Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Chauncey Tynes §



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009

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Man at the
centre of
Sir Lynden
Pindling
controversy
Says ‘it’s
time truth
was told’

THE former
PLP official
who sparked
off a major con-
troversy over
the Bahamas
drug era and
Sir Lynden Pin-
dling’s past said
yesterday: “I
have no
regrets.”

Chauncey
Tynes Sr., who
claimed his pilot son was killed
because of what he knew about
Sir Lynden and his links with drug
czar Joe Lehder, added: “It is
time the truth was told.”

Mr Tynes, 88, was the PLP’s
treasurer during the late 1960s
when the party was at its height.
He later took issue with Sir Lyn-
den over several matters and
resigned from his post in 1971.

He believes his son, Chauncey
Jr, was “disposed of” after tak-
ing off from Exuma for Nassau
with three other men — one a
Bahamian electrical engineer
called Donald Moree Sr, the oth-
ers believed to be Colombians —
in March, 1983.

The twin-engined plane never
reached Nassau and no trace of it
was ever found. Neither
Chauncey Jr nor Mr Moree have
been heard from since.

Chauncey Jr had told his father
repeatedly of cash consignments
he carried for Lehder from Exu-
ma to Nassau to be paid to Sir
Lynden and a senior police offi-
cer. On one occasion he even
brought a box of US banknotes
home, $50,000 in all, which he
said was destined for the police-
man.

He also flew Sir Lynden to
Norman’s Cay — Lehder’s
cocaine trans-shipment base —
on several occasions, as well as
to Grand Bahama for a secret
meeting with the drug lord, it was
claimed.

Since Mr Tynes’ claims were
published in last Monday’s Tri-
bune Insight section, other wit-
nesses have come forward to
claim that Sir Lynden went to
Norman’s Cay on several occa-
sions, not only to meet Lehder
but also to attend parties.

“T am glad that I spoke out,”
Mr Tynes told The Tribune,

SEE page six

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C R WALKER students check out the NCIS

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(Naval Criminal Investigative Service) forensic evidence bus

yesterday. The NCIS officers are in the Bahamas as part of the Tradewinds Exercise 2009.

Cruise passenger arrivals

The Tribune

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Proposed US
legislation is
‘bigger threat to
financial sector
than blacklisting’

Senator voices concern, hits
out at Ingraham administration

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

THE country's financial services sector will face a threat far
worse than the industry’s 2000 blacklisting if proposed “tax
haven” legislation is passed into law in the United States, Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald said.

The Opposition senator also accused the Ingraham admin-
istration of sticking "their heads in the sand" and not taking
a proactive approach to the looming problem.

Concern over the region's off-shore services sector began
to rise when American Senator Carl Levin first sponsored the
“Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act” in the US Senate. The Act was
defeated several times but appears to have gained some trac-

SEE page six

Man appears in court
charged with murder



@ By DENISE According to the par-
MAYCOCK ticulars, it is alleged that
Tribune Freeport on January 7, 2009, at
Reporter Hepburn Town, Eight
dmaycock@ Mile Rock, the accused,

being concerned with
others, intentionally
caused the death of Eri-
son Tanelus by means
of unlawful harm.

He was also charged

fea Bi with burglary and
SAUL Telly armed robbery.

tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Eight
Mile Rock resident
Samiko Rigby was
charged with murder in
the Eight Mile Rock
Magistrate’s Court on



up 30 per cent in January

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

To this end, beginning May 15, the Min-
istry of Tourism is embarking on a one-of-
a-kind all-inclusive experiment on Grand
Bahama. The new initiative will allow
potential visitors to pre-book a hotel room,
restaurants and tours — all before leaving
for their trip.

"What many people forget is from the
customer's perspective the cost to get any-
where is part of my vacation cost. We find
ourselves in the situation where people
are standing around talking about their
room rates as if that's all the customer is

considering. The customer has to think
about the cost to get here and guess what —
they want to minimise the cost to get to their desti-
nation so they can maximise their time enjoying
themselves.

SEE page six

CRUISE passengers arriving in Nassau
for the month of January, 2009 increased
by almost 30 per cent compared to the
same period last year, Minister of Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool- Wallace said yester-
day.

The Senator said this statistic repre-
sented a sign of the economic times, as
visitors are choosing a more economic, all-
inclusive sea vacation to the Bahamas over
the more expensive airfare and hotel com-
bination.

This makes it key for the Bahamas to maximise its
potential as a prime destination in the region by
offering more competitive all-inclusive vacations on
land and to lobby for lower airfares into the country.



Minister Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace

Christie’s failure to engage in Pindling debate
‘is inhibiting development of democracy’

Friday.

Rigby, a resident of Jones
Town, was arraigned before Mag-
istrate Gwen Claude at about
1.20pm following his arraignment
in Freeport on Friday morning
with other serious criminal
offences.

He was escorted to court under
heavy police guard in handcuffs
and shackles.

Rigby had escaped police cus-
tody on January 11 from Central
Police Station. He was appre-
hended by police on Wednesday.

Rigby was not required to enter
a plea to the murder charge.

It is alleged that on the same
date and place, Rigby unlawfully
entered the home of Erison
Tanelus with intent to commit a
felony.

It is also alleged that on the
same date and place, Rigby, being
concerned with others, while
armed with an offensive instru-
ment robbed Tanelus of $510
cash, and two LG cellular phones
valued at $698.

Rigby was not required to enter
pleas to the charges.

Bail was denied and he was

SEE page six

Howard K Stern, two of Anna
Nicole Smith’s doctors charged

CALIFORNIA’S Attorney General yester- I |
day called Howard K Stern the “principal se
enabler” in an alleged conspiracy to supply his
former girlfriend Anna Nicole Smith with thou-
sands of prescription drugs between 2004 and

her death in 2007.



m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PLP Leader Perry Christie’s
failure to engage in a debate
about Sir Lynden Pindling’s
legacy is inhibiting the develop-
ment of democracy, Dr Ian Stra-
chan has said.

The College of the Bahamas
English Department head main-
tains Mr Christie failed to
engage in honest debate when
responding to the controversial
Tribune Insight article by man-
aging editor John Marquis.

The article entitled “The trag-

ic young pilot who knew too
much”, told the story of the late
Chauncey Tynes Jr who went
missing in 1983 while piloting a
flight from Exuma to Nassau.
His father, Chauncey Tynes Sr,
told The Tribune he believed his
son was murdered because he
knew too much of the associa-
tion between Sir Lynden and
Colombian drug czar Carlos
“Joe” Lehder.

Mr Christie publicly con-
demned the story as “the vilest,
the most vicious, the most scur-
rilous, and the sickest piece of
garbage” he has ever read, and
slammed claims as “‘a tissue of

lies, fantasies and tall tales.”
Although the article sparked
impassioned discussions in the
press, on the airwaves and in
Parliament, Dr Strachan said the
nation has yet to hold a frank
conversation about events under
Pindling’s government and their
affect on political development.
Dr Strachan said: “I think the
conversation coming from the
opposite end is so shrill, so
angry, and condemnatory, and
also so grand-standing, and even
opportunistic, I don’t think it’s

SEE page six



Stern and two of Ms Smith’s doctors have
been charged by Los Angeles County prosecu-
tors with illegally providing the former Playboy
model with addictive prescription drugs.

These charges come two years after Ms Smith
died of an overdose in a hotel room in Florida.
Her death was ruled accidental.

Yesterday, California's Attorney General Jerry Brown told Amer-
ican media that Stern and the two doctors — Khristine Eroshevich and
Sandeep Kapoor — conspired to “repeatedly and excessively” provide
Ms Smith with drugs.

Prosecutors outlined 95 “overt acts” committed between 2004 and
2007.

Stern was last seen by members of the public in the Bahamas in
November 2008, having dinner at the Outback Steak House with Lar-
ry Birkhead who was holding his and Ms Smith’s daughter Dannielynn
in his arms.

Both Ms Smith and her son Daniel Smith, who died in a Doctors
Hospital room in 2006, are buried at Lake View Memorial.

Howard K Stern (AP)





NASSAU AND BAHAME:

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST ~

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Meeting over new fish market location

FREEPORT - Yesterday
marked the second in a
series of scheduled meet-
ings held between the
Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) and
local fish, conch and
seafood vendors in an effort
to obtain information and
gather views on the future
location of the new fish
market.

Local fish vendors turned
out in large numbers to
ensure that their voices
were heard.

Hannes Babak, chairman
of Port Group Limited
(PGL), along with commit-
tee members responsible
for the development of the
new fish market, announced
three possible locations for
the site. Based on discus-
sions with the fishermen,
the vast majority would like
to see the new fish market
situated in the downtown
area. The exact location will
be determined at a later
date.

Ian B A Rolle, president
of GBPA said, “It is critical
that we determine the best
location for the site to
ensure the long-term suc-
cess of the market, and the
positive impact that it will
have on the community.”

The project is set to com-
mMence construction in six
months.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
RR
PHONE: 322-2157

Harbour Bay East BAY St. tel.394-5767

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TEAM of scientists retraced the steps

of the original Exuma expedition

which led to the creation the first
national park in the Bahamas and returned
with new information proving the success of

protected natural areas.

The week-long trip allowed scientists to follow
the 1958 expedition which led to the creation of
the Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park and the
Bahamas National Trust (BNT) as the manage-
ment body for the National Park System of the
country.

The expedition was part of the Trust’s 50th
anniversary celebrations.

A diverse group of specialist scientists, BNT
park wardens and staff, Fisheries officers, coral
reef experts, botanists and scientists from the
Nature Conservancy, set out on the Coral Reef
II, a research vessel temporarily donated by the
Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, to analyse the sta-
tus of the park today.

Marine experts found the park is protecting
fish as there are more diverse communities of
fish in the park, larger populations and bigger
fish than in other areas of the Bahamas. And the
healthy fish populations are spilling out into the
surrounding areas.

Dr Dan Brumbaugh from the American Muse-
um of Natural History in New York, who led the
marine team, said: “Inside the park there are
three times as many fish than the surrounding
areas, but five times as much as the rest of the
Bahamas.”

And non-native invaders such as the lionfish,
which dominate reefs around New Providence,
are not as destructive within the intact ecosystem
of the park as in other areas of the Bahamas as
there are more predators to combat the lionfish,
Dr Brumbaugh said.

On land, the terrestrial team found native
plants and animals to be as abundant as they
were 50 years ago, and the pro-active removal of
non-native invasive species has been a success.

The only real damage to the environment has
been caused by the hutia, an endemic land mam-
mal which is eating its way through Little Wax
Cay, Warderick Wells and Shroud Cay.

Botanist Dr John Freid, leader of the team,
said the problem of controlling the hutia is one
the Trust will have to face.

“In Little Wax Cay they are eating themselves

Town Centre Mall hosts
Wii Fitness Challenge

out of house and home,” he
said.

“There is half the vegeta-
tion, there are large areas
with no vegetation at all, and
the hutia population is drop-
ping, probably reducing
because there is no food.”

In Warderick Wells the
diversity of plants is thinning,
and Dr Freid said there is
potential for hutia popula-
tions to drop as a result, and
he fears the hutia’s newest
home in Shroud Cay will be
similarly ravaged.

But where the hutia are absent, flora and fau-
na are thriving. And the Trust’s active removal of
invasive casuarina trees and scavella, or Hawai-
ian sea lettuce, has been a great success.

Dr Freid said: “The islands are absolutely
beautifully intact and nothing has been done to
them in terms of vegetation - you see exactly
what they saw 50 years ago — nice dune systems,
beautiful rocky shores.

“You look at it and it’s exactly the same.
Everything is growing exactly as it did.”

In these lush green islands Nature Conservan-
cy ornithologists spotted two Kirtland’s War-
blers, a small rare bird that is even more rarely
seen as the 1,400- strong bird population is
spread throughout the islands during the six
months they spend in the Bahamas.

Ancilleno Davis, conservation coordinator for
the Nature Conservancy, said the sighting will
now allow ornithologists to expand their limited
knowledge of the Kirtland’s Warblers and their
environment.

Following the Exuma expedition, the scientists
studied the land and seas of South Andros to find
an unique species of iguana thriving, and the seas
over-fished. This study will allow the BNT to
open a discussion with the local community
about the possible ways of protecting the area in
future.

Mr Davis said: “We had so many different sci-
entists with so many different qualifications and
specific abilities that we could get a very good
snapshot picture of what is going on in the Exu-
ma Land and Sea Park, so in that small amount
of information that we have we can be more
directed in future study efforts or managing
efforts.

“We were looking at the past, at what the park
was like, looking at the present, what the park is
like now, and the Andros project was looking at
the future.”

An exhibition celebrating 50 years of the
Bahamas National Trust is open to the public at
Central Bank on Shirley Street.

AN upcoming Wii Fitness
challenge will be a part of the
Town Centre Mall’s “Ultimate
Gamer’s Challenge 3” on Sat-
urday, March 28.

The event will also feature a
Madden 09 tournament.

To make this event more
than just a regular “sit down
behind the TV” scenario, the
Town Centre Mall teamed up
with Electrojack, who provid-
ed 26-inch television sets and
Wii consoles to go along with
the Playstations that were
already being provided for the
challenge.

The Wii Fit challenge will be

open for all ages and is expect-
ed to be just as big of a highlight
as the Madden 09 tournament.
There will also be sporting and
fitness clubs on hand to share
information about their club’s
activities, as well as giving all
those interested the opportuni-
ty to sign up or register to par-
ticipate in the various activities
and disciplines of these clubs.

The Ultimate Gamer’s and
Wii Fitness challenges will be
held at the Town Centre Mall
from 10am to 6pm and are
sponsored in part by Electro-
jack, Sports Locker and Island
Wholesale.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



CAC



Tyler Perry is
reportedly
seeking to buy
Bahamas island

MULTI-MILLIONAIRE :
producer, director and play-
wright Tyler Perry is reportedly ;
seeking to buy an island in the }
Bahamas. ;

People magazine has report- }
ed that Mr Perry intends to }
make the island a present to :
himself for his 40th birthday.

Reportedly, the idea came to }
the successful director, produc- }
er and actor of the Madea series
while visiting another private ;
island in the Exumas. He has }
not yet identified the island he }
wants to buy, but he’s said to }
be actively looking. ;

1,340 people
have heen
repatriated
this year

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter i
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net_

OVER 1,000 illegal migrants i
apprehended in the Bahamas :
have been returned to their }
countries of citizenship by the }
Department of Immigration this }
year. ;

Apprehension exercises }
throughout the Bahamas, includ-
ing recent operations in}
Eleuthera and New Providence, :}
have led to the repatriation of }
1,340 people in less than three }
months. :

Senior deputy director of the ;
Immigration Department Rod- }
erick Bowe said the numbers }
include 1,204 Haitian, 75 }
Jamaican, 28 Cuban and 13 }
Dominican Republic citizens.

Migrants who were appre- }
hended by teams of Immigration }
officers in the Family Islands ;
were sent to the Carmichael }
Road Detention Centre in Nas- }
sau before they were repatriated. }

Mr Bowe said: “Our appre- }
hension exercises will continue }
and we are in the process of }
arranging another deportation }
in a few days, so those persons
out there without work permits }
or legal status, we ask that their }
status becomes legal or they }
leave the country as soon as pos- }
sible.” ;



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingra-
ham, seated second left, is pic-
tured among Heads of Govern-
ment of the Caribbean Commu-
nity at the 20th Inter-Sessional
Meeting of CARICOM held in
Belize City, Belize, on Thursday,
March 12, 2009.

Pictured third and fourth left
respectively are CARICOM Sec-
retary General Edwin Carrington
and Dean Barrow, Prime Minis-
ter of Belize and Chairman of
CARICOM.

Photo Courtesy of the
CARICOM Secretariat

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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322-2157

‘No provision in law’ allowing NIB to
write off outstanding contributions

THERE is no provision in the law
that allows the National Insurance
Board to write off contributions that
have been outstanding for more than
ten, 20 years, or even 30 years, director
of NIB Algernon Cargill said in a press
release yesterday.

His statement was in response to a
Tribune article that suggested that mem-
bers of the business community are ina
state of “enormous consternation” over
the Board’s current and ongoing process
of updating its contribution records.

Mandated

Mr Cargill said that when NIB
encounters missing periods or payments
in a person’s contributions account they
are mandated by law to investigate and
resolve it.

“The National Insurance Board does
not have the right to discount a person-
*s entitlement and that’s exactly what
we would be doing if we were allowed to
write off arrears of contributions,” he
said.

“That means we either determine that
there were indeed no contributions

payable for the missing peri-
ods, or we determine that
the employer or self-
employed person actually
failed to pay contributions
for the periods.

“In the latter case, we
must pursue payment. We
have no other course of
action available to us under
the law.”

The NIB director said
that a few people seem to
be having a problem grasp-
ing this concept of perpetu-
al liability because it
appears to go against con-
ventional accounting prac-
tices or recommendations.

He said that in the case of social secu-
rity, the absence of a statute of limitation
on arrears of contributions has univer-
sally been a vital and necessary ingredi-
ent in ensuring the financial protection
of workers.

Further, NIB pays out in excess of
$150 million in claims annually, he said.

“To continue to do this and not chal-
lenge the NIB Fund, will require us to
continuously improve our collection effi-

Algernon Cargill



ciency and unfortunately
this means that employers
or self-employed persons
who have chosen to not pay
NIB contributions in the
past will be required to do
so now and to settle
arrears,” he said.

The NIB director said
that the Board is obligated
by the National Insurance
Act to ensure that all
employers have paid the
amount of contributions due
for each employee for each
a month, and that contribu-
tions submitted are accu-
rately posted or deposited
to the accounts of the
appropriate employees.

“Contributions represent one week
of a person’s work life. Social security —
in this case National Insurance — must
employ every tool at its disposal to
ensure that every week that a person
works is duly accounted for, because
one contribution can mean the differ-
ence between a sick, invalid or aged
worker qualifying for a benefit or being
disallowed.

BPSU wants minimum wage level in
private sector to match public service

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - THE
Bahamas Public Services
Union (BPSU) is asking gov-
ernment to increase the mini-
mum wage level in the private
sector to that of the public ser-
vice.

John Pinder, union presi-
dent, said yesterday:

“Shortly after the govern-
ment came to power in 2007,
the government lived up to its
obligation and increased min-
imum wage for the public ser-
vice.

“We have been asking the
private sector to follow suit,
however, around the time we
were expecting the govern-
ment to introduce minimum
wage to the private sector it
was at the same time we began
to experience an economic cri-
Sis.”

Mr Pinder said that the aver-
age salary in the public service
is $10,600 per annum or $5.20
per hour.

“T would still like to see the
minimum wage in this coun-
try come up to that of the pub-
lic service,” he said.

Mr Pinder said the BPSU is






further concerned about the
contractors on major projects
in the country being allowed to
bring in foreign workers to
avoid paying minimum wage.

“One of the things that con-
cerns us is when builders of
major projects ask for work
permits to bring in foreign
workers, mainly because they
don’t want to pay minimum
wage.

“They bring in these people
and pay them a smaller salary
than Bahamians. I believe that
when issuing work permits we
should ensure that all compa-
mies comply with the minimum
wage standard,” Mr Pinder
said.

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The BPSU president also
expressed concern about situ-
ations where work permits are
being granted for positions
that Bahamians are qualified
to hold.

“We have a number of
Bahamians who are qualified
for some jobs that are being
held by persons with work per-
mits. I believe we ought to
ensure that before issuing new
permits or renewing permits
that we find qualified Bahami-
ans to fill those jobs.

“In some areas we don’t
expect not to have any work
permits issued, but where
there are jobs that can be filled
by Bahamians, Bahamians
must be given an opportunity
to fill those jobs,” he said.



“We, therefore, have to ensure that
every eligible contribution is collected
and accounted for and when we are con-
fronted with situations that present a
conflict, particularly in cases where it
appears that NIB’s own record keeping
may not be current, we then have to
make a common-sense and practical
decision based on the contribution his-
tory of the employer and/or self
employed person.

Employee

“In every case, we make the decision
that benefits the employee and it is cer-
tainly not the intent to create any state
of ‘enormous consternation’,” he said.

Mr Cargill said a system was set up in
1972 where employees can verify that
their contributions are being paid to
NIB.

“The National Insurance Act always
provided employees the right to request
from their employers proof of contri-
butions, failing that, employees could
go in to any NIB local office, at any
time, to request an update on their con-
tribution accounts.

Mr. Eddie

Butler

your one and
only love,
Onya.

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand
Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the Purchaser’) now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provisions of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00

p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31% March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, 7" April, 2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-1530





PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Why Obama is in a hurry

WASHINGTON — “You’ve got to give it
all you can, that first year,” the president
told a senior adviser. “Doesn’t matter what
kind of majority you come in with. You’ve got
just one year when they treat you right.”

President Obama, however, did not utter
these words of wisdom to Rahm Emanuel
or David Axelrod last month. Lyndon John-
son said them to his aide Harry McPherson
nearly a half-century ago.

Fleeting power and fickle public opinion
are enduring challenges for presidents. This
reality contributes to the “strike-while-the-
iron-is-hot” mentality we witness with most
new presidents dealing with Congress — par-
ticularly those with large, friendly majorities
on the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue.
Lyndon Johnson understood this; and so does
Barack Obama.

The new president’s political capital is slow-
ly evaporating. And if the White House
accepts this view —and I believe it does — it
explains a lot about their early tactics. It’s
not hard to miss the administration’s bold
ambition in the recently enacted
stimulus/spending initiatives as well as the
president’s budget blueprint. Tom Bevan
called it “Obama’s need for speed,” writing in
Real Clear Politics last week. Bevan explored
what factors “may help explain why he
appears to be in such a rush to push through
an expansive, transformational agenda” and
wondered if a more sober, deliberative
method — like the one John F. Kennedy
took — might be a better approach.

Former Clinton aide and ABC News com-
mentator George Stephanopoulos raised sim-
ilar questions this past weekend. “Some in
Washington wonder if he is taking on too
much too fast.” His blog entry carries the
provocative title: “Obama’s Agenda: Circuit
Overload?”

Obama’s need to find the right balance
between accommodating the public’s desire
for “change” while not “overloading the cir-
cuits” poses one of the trickiest tactical chal-
lenges facing the new White House.

I may not agree with the substance of Oba-
ma’s policies. And even successfully enacting
them may not win public plaudits in the end.
But his chances for notching “accomplish-
ments” are better this year than next.

An interesting trend in public mood
inevitably seems to affect every president in
much the same way. James Stimson, a polit-
ical scientist at the University of North Car-
olina at Chapel Hill, suggests political moods
in America ebb and flow like ocean tides.
As soon as a new president gets elected, the

public mood gradually begins to shift against
him.

Using polling data, Stimson estimates the
American political mood between 1952 and
2004. He then analyzes changes in the mood
over that half-century. “One pattern emerges
fairly strongly,” Stimson writes. “Preferences
*zig’ upward (toward liberalism) when
Republicans control the White House and
*zag’ downward when Democrats are in
charge.” In other words, “mood becomes
more conservative under liberal governments,
more liberal under conservative regimes,”
Stimson asserts.

These trends give meaning to Obama’s
full-throttle approach — his opponents are
probably gaining ground right now. A couple
factors account for Stimson’s findings.

First, when voters want “change,” like last
November, they install a new president. They
project that desire for something different
on candidates and parties. Yet when cam-
paigning turns to governing, vague promises
of “change” become very specific. Real poli-
cies replace projections, producing outcomes
not everyone likes.

Second, time in general just takes its toll on
presidential popularity. Looking at graphs
of presidential approval ratings for every
president back to Eisenhower, with a few
exceptions (George W. Bush following 9/11 is
one), most presidents’ approval declines as
their terms progress.

Part of this has to do with the mobilization
of the “out-party,” according to James Gim-
pel, political science professor at the Uni-
versity of Maryland. “Usually after a loss,
the out-party goes back to work, gets on
offense, and eventually rebuilds a seriously
threatening movement,” Gimpel told me this
week.

Gimpel raises another reason why incum-
bent presidents (and parties) begin to lose
electoral altitude over time. “There is also a
tendency for people to pay closer attention to
negative than positive information. The in-
party’s mistakes eventually pile up to create
quite a stunning negative impression, where-
as the in-party’s accomplishments remain less
well noticed. A few negatives seem to out-
weigh many positives,” he said.

Put it all together, and it yields a pretty
simple tactical conclusion: Move fast.
Whether Obama follows Johnson’s one-year
rule or is lucky enough to gain a little more
time — the clock’s ticking. And the presi-
dent knows the bell tolls for his agenda.

(This article was written by Gary Andres -

c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).



Do not ban
harvesting of
sea turtles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish the follow-
ing letter to Minister of
Agriculture Larry
Cartwright.

Dear Minister,

I read with interest a let-
ter addressed to you
appearing in the Monday,
March 9th, edition of The
Tribune and relating to the
issue of the harvesting of
marine turtles in The
Bahamas.

Mr Minister, while I and
many Bahamians agree
with the general sentiments
of those who accept a social
responsibility for the pro-
tection of our natural envi-
ronment and its resources, I
cannot agree that banning
Bahamians from harvesting
sea turtles is either a
responsible, fair or well-
thought-out response to the
sad plight of sea turtle pop-
ulations around the world.

Perhaps I should begin
my argument by pointing
to two of the more success-
ful examples of natural
resource protection in our
region: the conch farm pro-
ject located at Providen-
ciales in the Turks and
Caicos, and the Cayman
Islands turtle farm. Both
of these commercial ven-
tures demonstrate the cor-
rect response to the pres-
sures exerted on important
marine resources by local
eating habits.

Faced with similar issues
as us, neither country has
responded by simply ban-
ning and delegitimising
established local culinary
traditions.

Rather, both have
approached the issue with a
view to making local cus-
toms and culture sustain-
able, rather than viewing
that local culture as the
problem itself.

In fact, in Cayman, Turtle
consumption is perhaps
higher than anywhere else
in the world, since they
now sustainably produce
the resource, rather than
simply banning its harvest-
ing.

In Turks and Caicos,
conch consumption far sur-
passes ours per capita and
locals even have the luxury
of eating baby conchs,
escargot-style, as this has
absolutely no negative
impact on wild breeding
stocks (farmed conchs
being far cheaper than har-
vested ones).

In The Bahamas, on the
other hand, the blanket and
off-the-cuff response of our

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia net



local intelligentsia has
always been to simply
impose a ban in an effort
to “correct” Bahamian cul-
ture (which they seem to
regard as having legitimacy
only insofar as it does not
inconvenience some higher
interest originating else-
where).

The problem to them is
not finding a way to make
established Bahamian cul-
ture sustainable. The prob-
lem is Bahamian culture
itself, which, with one
swipe of a ministerial pen
can be instantly crimi-
nalised with no important
casualties.

That an utter cultural
arrogance is the subtext of
these campaigns is evident
in the kind of legislation
they lobby for and typically
get.

In addition to banning
the harvesting of the wild
resource, they tend to ban
eating and possessing it,
utterly closing the door on
the development of a local
maricultural solution.
Instead of being given real
responsibility for making
their culture sustainable,
Bahamians must simply
start eating like they do in
Anglo-Saxon countries or
20 to jail!

The truth, of course, is
that far from being a prob-
lem, traditional Bahamian
culinary culture is a natural
and positive thing for
Bahamians and its contin-
ued marginalisation has
had tragic consequences.

Bahamians black, white
and mulatto all share a
common culinary history
that heavily emphasises
seafood and high protein,
low-fat harvested meats.
This has been on balance a
good nutritional feature
and made for generations
of healthy Bahamians. (My
90-year-old Long Island
Grandmother recently gave
me a bag of pigeons shot
by her elder cousin in
Deadman’s Cay).

What has been positive-
ly bad is the cultural push
into the alien and
unhealthy eating styles of
Eurocentric post-industrial
countries. Instead of out-
lawing our own foods, we
should be discouraging the
dairy products, processed

foods and steroid-pumped
cows that are all alien to
our culture and have result-
ed in the massive increase
in hypertension, diabetes,
heart disease and other
very modern maladies.

Further, it is now beyond
denial that a diet centred
on big, mass-bred mammals
and dairy products is not
only bad for the body but
horrible for the environ-
ment. The global encroach-
ing replacement of indige-
nous food culture by these
Eurocentric culinary
imports has resulted in a
world pumping out more
methane and imbibing
more cholesterol than it
can handle.

From filling the world
with flatulent cows to clear-
ing Brazilian and North
American natural forests,
post-industrial Eurocentric
eating habits have had
more negative impact on
our collective environment
than all other culinary cul-
tures combined. Yet the
contemptuous stigmatiza-
tion of what others choose
to eat (whether Bahamian
turtles, Japanese porpoises
or Peruvian guinea pigs)
has so often clothed itself
in the language of environ-
mentalism and moral supe-
riority that you could
almost miss the glaring
irony.

Mr Minister, Bahamian
culture is not the problem.
So rather than criminalis-
ing huge elements of it, we
should instead be making
them more sustainable. If
turtles are under pressure,
we should be putting our
resources into farming
them. Instead, some would
have us simply criminalise a
culinary tradition that is as
integral to us as snails are
to the French or generally
tasteless food to the Eng-
lish.

These other societies
tend to respond to the call
of sustainability by manag-
ing their food resources
better, rather than crimi-
nalising their traditional
diets. Likewise, we in The
Bahamas must never be
intimidated by self-right-
eous, but ultimately arro-
gant and ignorant people
who would encourage us to
throw our own culture
away rather than investing
in making it sustainable.

ANDREW ALLEN
Nassau,
March, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CLENIE JOSEPH
PIERRE of STJAMES ROAD, NASSAU BAHAMAS,
P.O.BOX SS-6582, intend to change my name to CLYNIE
JOSEPH PIERRE If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

in Loving Me

(Orion Feenetis

who departed his life
March 8th 1921 - March 13, 2008

Mory A leading retailer is seeking applications for the

position of

COMPANY MESSENGER

REQUIREMENTS

The successful candidate will be responsible for
assisting in the delivery and collection of all company
work, mail and any other tasks as per daily assignment
sheet.

NOTICE is hereby given that HENLEY BIRTHWICK
PERRY of WINTON HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX N-3702,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

RESPONSIBILITIES

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 6 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

¢ Basic Computer skills

¢ Valid Driver’s License - Ability to drive both
automatic and standard shift vehicles

¢ Current Police Certificate

¢ Experience in a similar position

¢ Ability to work well with others in a fast paced
retail environment

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LENLINE MITCHELL
of MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
MARCH 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

REMUNERATION

Althoten you left a void in our heart
your presence remain
with us.

We offer in return an excellent remuneration package,
inclusive of medical and life insurance.

Interested persons please forward your resume to:
The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Fax: (242) 322-6607

From your children, grandchildren
relatives and friends

Rest In Peace





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





m By TANEKA THOMPSON :

whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net m By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter

"I am vex and deeply dis- :
turbed with the proliferation of i
pseudo-intellectual right wing }
groups who are criticising our }

government and advocating } : irv into the clai f
only their narrow views of how pe hase ligt ares ei ncae ete

our government should oper-

our governing system is one of i
democracy and our government }
is one of majority rule for all of
our people, all the time, and not }

just a few.
"In these economic recessive

wing rhetoric only serves to
retard efforts to stimulate the

Inquiry launched into
home intrusion claim

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE Department of Immi-
gration has launched an

Bahamian single mother that

ate. One must remember that ; afmed Immigration officers

barged into her home terrify-
ing her and her child during
the night.

The Immigration Depart-

i ment maintains that every

sive : effort will be made to discover
times such nonsensical right }

the truth behind the allega-

! tions made by Violet Hanna,

‘Gross Domestic Happiness' of

our people. It is quite obvious }
these few think the Bahamas :

Bahamas and Canada sign Asset Sharing Agreement

obviously and selectively not }

operates in a vacuum and have

been aware of much published
events in the US. Perhaps the ;
‘right wingers’ should try run- }
ning for political seats with their :

platform instead of throwing : alt aes
i laundering and other criminal activities.

‘stink fish' from the sidelines. "

— Tertiary educated Bahamian, :
Nassau. :

? ecution and suppression of crime through
"I vex 'cause there are far too }
many liquor stores in New Prov- }
idence. In 2008, there were 208 }
new applications for liquor }
stores, 1,289 renewals, and so far }
in 2009 there are 48 new appli- :
cations. There are just too many i
liquor stores in New Providence. i
And why is nothing been done }
about the ones that are open all :
day on Sunday, which by the way }
have a sign on the door that says
i day.
"The authorities need to start ;
cracking down on these estab- ;
lishments that continually break i
the laws of our land. We as
Bahamians need to start attend- }
ing the Licensing Authority }
meetings which grant these }

“closed.”

licenses, and continually object to

liquor in New Providence."

- Don't need a drink, Nassau. = ecution of criminal offences. It also

marked February 23 show up

te the ; Al, of Price Street, Nassau Vil-
economy, create and maintain i lage
existing jobs and enlarge the } :

THE Bahamas and Canada this week

Allegation that Immigration officers
barged into house of single mother

Speaking at a press confer-
ence on Thursday, Director of
Immigration Jack Thompson
said an inquiry into Ms Han-
na’s complaint of the intrusion
which took place at around
4am on February 26 was
launched on Friday, March 6.

He said a panel of four
senior officials headed by the
Immigration Department’s
assistant director Dwight
Beneby held a second meet-
ing on the matter following a

visit to Ms Hanna’s home on
Monday.

“In light of the serious alle-
gations and accusations levied
by Ms Hanna I appointed a
panel of senior Immigration
officers to conduct an internal
hearing, or inquiry, into the
matter,” Mr Thompson said.

“Upon the conclusion of the
inquiry the findings will be for-
warded to myself for further
review.

“As this matter is under

active investigation the depart-
ment wishes to offer no fur-
ther comment, save that the
allegations are serious and no
effort will be spared to get to
the bottom of the matter.”

Ms Hanna told The Tribune
how she and her seven-year-
old daughter Amber were
frightened awake when they
heard violent banging at the
front and back doors, and the
mother-of-two was ordered to
let in armed men and women
in khaki uniforms who alleged-
ly failed to identify themselves
as officers from the Immigra-
tion Department.

As they shouted aggressive-
ly at the pair, Amber was so

petrified she began to cry and
vomit, Ms Hanna said.

Presuming the armed
intruders were from the Immi-
gration Department, Ms Han-
na said she offered to show
them her Bahamian passport
but they declined to see it.

She claims the officers used
a maul to break down her back
gate and damage her back
door, compromising the secu-
rity of her Nassau Village
home.

Ms Hanna said she and her
daughter have suffered from
post-traumatic stress since the
invasion, and both fell ill with
pneumonia, with Amber hav-
ing to be treated in hospital.

signed an Asset Sharing Agreement, for-
malising an arrangement to confiscate
the proceeds of drug trafficking, money

The aim of the agreement is to improve
the effectiveness of law enforcement in
both countries in the investigation, pros-

the tracing, freezing, seizure and forfeiture
or confiscation of assets related to crime
and the creation of a framework for shar-
ing the proceeds and disposition of such
assets.

Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette and High Commissioner for
Canada to the Bahamas Denis Kingsley
signed the agreement for the respective
governments during a ceremony at the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the Good-
man’s Bay Corporate Centre on Thurs-

“This agreement today with Canada is
symbolic of the excellent relationship that
exists between our two countries and we
look forward to continued collaboration
in these and other matters,” Mr Symon-
ette said.

In March 1990, both governments

a t ; entered into the Mutual Legal Assistance
the granting of any more licensed

in Criminal Matters Treaty. This treaty

: facilitates the gathering of evidence and
i intelligence in the investigation and pros-

sa : : i enhances the capabilities in the confisca-
I'm vexed with the delivery ;

of mail. Why does a letter post- }

tion of the proceeds of crime.
“Mutual legal assistance treaties are

: : ? concluded between two countries for the
in my post office box on March

5 or 6? Something needs to be }
addressed in this department." }

- Curious, Nassau.

"I'm vexed and upset over :
the cutting of trees on Eastern }
Road past the Winton turn off. }

I thought we were being appreciation for accountability
encouraged to plant trees. Some i 4g appears to be more con-
of these trees that were cut must i .

have been 10 to 20 years old. Is i Cerne eg Vi pom vag anlny

this being done by the newly } 7. . ee
hired people contracted to clean } erick: Men ipine said in the Sen

ides? es
up the roadsides? It doesn't i the mid-year budget debate on

make sense."

~ Disgusted, Nassau. obsessed with holding “power

"T vex that I have to pay $10 : over the people, as opposed to

for a real Bahamian lunch - peas ; respecting the power from the

and rice, chicken, macaroni and } people.”
the like - and the people have }

the nerve to give me dry rice. | } /teasury was their personal tuck

was so hot when Lopen my con- } Shop. They ran government



Patrick Hanna/BIS photo. -

DENIS Kingsley, High Commissioner for Canada to the Bahamas, left, and Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symonette, right, shake hands following the signing of an Asset Shar-
ing Agreement on Thursday, March 12, 2009 during a ceremony at the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs in the Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre.

purpose of gathering and exchanging
information in an effort to enforce crim-
inal laws and confiscate the ill-gotten
gains of criminal activity,” Mr Symonette
said.

He said that notwithstanding the excel-
lent cooperation that already exists
between the Bahamas and Canada with
regard to sharing such assets even in the
absence of a formal agreement, in 2001

the two governments commenced nego-
tiations on an Asset Sharing Agreement
to formalise the arrangement.

“Despite our limited resources, the
Bahamas government remains committed
to fighting the war against drugs and oth-
er criminal activities and prosecuting
those criminals that transcend interna-
tional borders,” Mr Symonette said.
“Cooperation between our governments

in joint criminal investigations such as
narcotics trafficking and money launder-
ing envisaged by the Mutual Legal Assis-
tance Treaty has been mutually beneficial
to both our governments.”

Pursuant to the 1988 United Nations
Convention Against the Illicit Traffic in
Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Sub-
stances, the government of the Bahamas
implemented the Proceeds of Crime Act
2000, where Sections 52 and 53 provide
for the establishment and administration
of the Confiscated Assets Fund.

“By utilising resources confiscated from
convicted criminals specifically in the fight
against crime and to assist in the preven-
tion of crime, we can increase our efforts
in terms of improved infrastructure and
increased man power,” Mr Symonette
said.

He added that although the Bahamas
recognises that confiscated assets are ben-
eficial to improving its international crime
fighting efforts through the improvement
of infrastructure, manpower and other
projects, confiscating the profits of crim-
inal activities is also important as a deter-
rent to further illicit activities.

“In this regard, we are also pursuing
negotiations with the United States to
formalise existing cooperation into an
Asset Sharing Agreement,” Mr Symon-
ette said.

High Commissioner Kingsley noted
that the Bahamas and Canada have
enjoyed a long-standing relationship that
can be improved through such agree-
ments.

McAlpine: ‘Opposition lacks appreciation for accountability’

THE OPPOSITION lacks

and prestige, Senator Rev Fred-

ate during his contribution to

i Thursday.

tainer and see all that rice with }
; store. They spent what they

not a stitch of gravy on it.

"How people expect you to ;
eat dry rice? They mussy want }
me to choke eh? I don't think I :
should have to tell the girl :
behind the counter, who already }
act like she doin' me a favour :

by taking up that stingy food."

? or the old PLP government,” he

i said. Ss

- Weak black man, Nassau. ;

¢ Are you vex?
Send your complaints to
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

? when the FNM came to office in
i 2007, they discovered that the
i former PLP government had
i spent money that was not

He accused the PLP of being

“They acted as if the Public

ministries like a mom and pop

liked, when they liked, however
they liked and it didn’t matter
what we, the people, liked. That
‘all-for-me-baby’ mentality just
never seemed to be broken,

“We had to move legislation
to approve money that had
already been spent by our pre-
decessors, even up to two years
prior to them leaving office. Let
me hasten to say that all gov-
ernments have been guilty of
this in the past, but old or new,
those opposite really hold the
record in regards to the financial
amounts and number of times
for which they gave no account-
ability or reasonable explana-
tion to the Bahamian people,”
he said.

Senator McAlpine said that
the mid-year budget exercise
gives the government an oppor-
tunity to account for the funds



and to ascertain whether or not
it is on target to meet the coun-
try’s fiscal budgetary obligations.

“If there are changes due to
circumstances or Cabinet deci-
sions then the government of
the day, or future, have a leg-
islative responsibility to inform
the people of the Bahamas as
to why, when and where funds
have been detoured from its
original intent. I heard someone
in the other place opposing the
government, describing this as
a useless exercise. Is that how
the Opposition really feels about
accounting to the Bahamian
people, as useless,” Senator
McAlpine said.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427






























BREA

“SS

PRE:

F ROM BONDA GES

Come! Join us this Sunday as we
come together and experience Deliverance, Healing

whether talking about the new

The Senator claimed that

(www.gtwesley.org)

7:00 a.m. Rev. Charles Sweetingr/Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Youth Choir/Dance Troupe Anniversary
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Franklyn Bethel



and Victory in the presence of God.

UNDAY, MARCH I5TH, 2009




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? accounted for.



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4&4 Soclety of The Free Methodist Church of
North merica

PasiorH. Mills WHERE GODIS ADORED AND FFERVONE IS AP FIRWED

Worship Tome: Lac. & 6pom. oe

Prayer Time: it! 30. i

inane ies sine min Mieinatiinias ines Wana dele ae cae ina: FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Prescling thas Bits a6 fs, So rear ee any ere Church School during Worship Service aes .

[Pastor A Mills * Prone: 393-0563 * Box N-aB22 | iain AIT Wi

Se MINISTRY
CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL en

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY
SUNDAY, MARCH 15TH, 2009

Tram. Speaker EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Bro. Gregory Bethel Assembly Of God
Eee ee aie rine Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville

Glory In Difficult Times
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m. ab ERROR (Cg eee ee ec
Ele ETE tie ER

ry Mating

Place: Twynam Heights

off Prince Charles Drive NE 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O,Box $3-3631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)



PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

"We are also starting some-
thing extraordinarily innovative,
you don't find it anywhere else in
the world. We're creating a prod-
uct called 'Club Grand Bahama’,
which is all-inclusive. We can
have an all-inclusive electroni-
cally nowadays — where the cus-
tomer stays one place, have their
meal some place else, goes on
tour some place else and pays
for it all in advance. So if the cus-
tomer wants to know what the
total cost of a vacation is, we are
going to do that. We don't know
how successful it's going to be,
but we're going to give it a shot,”
he told the Senate during his con-
tribution to the 2008/2009 mid-
year budget.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
added that for January, 2009 the
total number of visitor arrivals
to Nassau, Paradise Island and













OMe

EEPORT
11A East oral Road , Freeport G.B., Bahamas

Telephone: oa aretiis/ | (baz) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ° Fax: (249) 373-3005

Cruise passenger :

arrivals are up

the Family Islands were up.
However for the same period in

Grand Bahama, the total number

of visitors decreased.

However in terms of Grand }

Bahama's troubled tourism front,

the senator said he is confident :
that the island is poised to }
become one of the leading cruise }

ports in this part of the world.

"We might be able to make

an announcement in the not-too-
distant future, that will bring this
whole thing about," he said.

The senator also commented :
on the state of the current soft ;
tourism industry, stressing that }

the country has been through

downturns before and will :

rebound.

Robinson and Soldier Rede on NP, Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: {242} 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
















Minister Clarita
Elizabeth
Major-Thompson,
84

of Bacardi Road, will be held
on Sunday March 15th 2009
at 2:00pm at Good Sheperd
Church of God, Ida Street off
Robinson Road, Officiating
will be Bishop Sherwin
Smith assisted by Minister

Franklyn Rolle. Interment will follow in Woodlawn






Gardens, Solider Road.

Left to cherish her fond memories are: Daughters: Attorney
Stephanie Ann Wells, Jennifer Thompson, Earthel Smith,
Julie Thompson-Cooper and Brenda Thompson (pre-
deceased). Sons: Alfred Thompson, Jr. Jefferson, Stephen
and Rodney Fred Thompson (pre- deceased). Sister-In-
Law: Elcita Ferguson of Forbes Hill, Exuma. Grand
Daughters: Dr. Keysha Smith, Attorney Stephanie A.T.
Wells, Attorney Lillith Smith, Mikia Cooper, Rodina
Thompson-Armbrister, Kiera Johnson, Danielle, Altamese
and Mornette Thompson, Kayla Armbrister and Dedrie
Rolle. Great Grand Daughters: Antonesha Wells, Lakia
Jones, Claudia & Christa Rolle, Lavette Armbrister,
Shamara Armbrister, Rain Thompson, Jamie Francois and
Raven Wells. Daughters-In-Law: Gail, Myrna and
Esseymae Thompson. Neices: Dorothy Smith, Joycelyn
Ramsey, Sambrianna Walkine, Vandolyn Stubbs, Chrystal
Benson of Great Falls Montana and Michelle McDonald.
Grand Sons: Cleveland and Tennyson Wells Jr., Rodney
Thompson, Jr. Rev. Dwight Thompson of Oklahoma,
Kevin, Kino and Javano Thompson, Christopher Smith,




















Jamaal and Michael Cooper Jr. Sons-In-Laws:

Hon.

Tennyson R. Wells, Dr. Michael Cooper, Edward
Thompson. Grand Son-In-Laws: Liviticus and Omar













Armbrister. Great Grand
Armbrister. Nephews:

Florida, Willard Ferguson Jr.

Son: Jade and Shamaro

Whitfield, Freddie, Ishmael
Bradshaw Major and Rev.

Kenneth Major of Miami
of Freeport Grand Bahama.

Care Giver: Mrs. Sandra Augustin. A Host of Other
Relatives and Friends including: Bishop Sherwin Smith
& Church Family Good Shepherd Church of God, Officers
and Members Churches of God, Inc. Pastor Philemon
Wilson, Officers & Members Faith Temple Ministries,
Pastor Robert McPhee, Officers and Members Church of
God Cathedral, Coopers Terrace, Mrs. Dorothea Brown
and family, Mr. & Mrs Kirk Johnson & Family, Mr.
Earnest Brown, Mr. Darville Walkine and the Bacardi



Road Family.
Viewing will be held in the

Serenity Suite at Restview

Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and
Soldier Roads on Saturday from 10:00 am to 6:00pm and
at the church on Sunday from 12:30 pm until service time.

Securit

Abaco Markets

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Miomeey at Work

Possible new air charter to Freeport

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - As Grand
Bahama hotels continue to struggle
with “unacceptably” low occupancy
levels, Bahamas Hotel Association
president Robert Sands said that
news of a possible new air charter
service to Freeport is good news for
the island.

“There is a new charter that is
possibly coming to Grand Bahama
that will include a one stop going
onto possibly Cuba out of Italy —
that is good news,” he told reporters
on Friday.

“We also want to see how we can
ensure that one of the events of the
Miss Universe can take place here in
late August...to help (Grand
Bahama) move beyond the difficul-
ties you have been having in recent
times.”

Mr Sands, the newly elected
BHA president, met with hoteliers
and other stakeholders here on
Grand Bahama during a BHA
meeting held at the Sunrise Resort
and Marina.

He was concerned about the
occupancy levels on Grand Bahama,
particularly at the larger properties,
which have been experiencing very
low occupancies.

Also as the Isle of Capri moves to
close its casino operation at Our
Lucaya Resort, Mr Sands said that
the gaming presence is another area
of concern that must be addressed
on Grand Bahama.

“Tam aware that the Minister of
Tourism is very concerned about
the gaming presence in Grand
Bahama.

“Tam also aware that he has been
meeting with principles here in
Grand Bahama to see how we can
ensure that there is a gaming pres-
ence in Grand Bahama. I am aware
through meetings with the Grand
Bahama Port Authority that it is a
priority for them as well.

“T am not the spokesperson for
either of these entities, but it is not a
matter that is being left unattended.
It is being given focused attention by
the Minister to bring a reasonable
conclusion in the shortest possible
time,” he said.

Business

Mr Sands noted that “extremely
disappointing” occupancy levels at
the Westin and Sheraton Hotels at
the Our Lucaya property have
impacted business at the Isle of
Capri.

“So there is still a tremendous
amount of work that will have to be
done to raise the level of visitor
arrivals to this destination that will
be participating within the hotels,”
he added.

Mr Sands stressed that efforts
must be taken to create sufficient
demand for Grand Bahama so that
hotels can run at respectable occu-
pancies that will allow them to be
financially viable.

When asked about the impor-

tance of the reopening of Royal
Oasis, he said once sufficient
demand is created then it will cause
the need for it to be reopened.

“There will be compelling rea-
sons for the powers that be to push
for that to happen, but we must take
baby steps.

“We must really create the oppor-
tunity for Grand Bahama to now
begin to achieve occupancies that
are much higher than they are cur-
rently achieving, and thereby cause
for employment of persons in this
area, and also allow the investors of
those respective hotels to realise a
fair return on their investment in
their area.”

According to Mr Sands, the
BHA’s small member hotel prop-
erties are doing better, in terms of
occupancy, than the larger proper-
ties on Grand Bahama.

He noted that the Pelican Bay
Resort, the Best Western Castaways
Resort and the Wyndham Fortuna
Resort are performing reasonably
well.

“Two or three of the midsize
properties have found a business
niche that has allowed them to oper-
ate at respectable levels.

“Those hotels (mentioned above)
are doing reasonably well, but they
represent a small percentage of the
total number of available rooms in
Grand Bahama,” he said.

Mr Sand stated that the BHA is a
national association that addresses
the needs of member hoteliers as
well as allied members.

Grand Bahama has always played

a pivotal role in the organisation
over the years, but is now currently
experiencing levels of business that
are unprecedented, he said.

The association plans to address
four major issues of concern. The
first priority is airlift frequency and
cost to Grand Bahama.

Grand Bahama International Air-
port has one of the highest turn-
around and airfare costs for airlines
flying to Freeport.

The Ministry of Tourism is
presently seeking to reduce or elim-
inate airport taxes and fees to attract
new airlifts to the island.

Initiative

“The Minister of Tourism has put
a lot of this political equity behind
this singular initiative. He strongly
believes that reducing the cost of
airlift is paramount on his list of
things to accomplish. I think he is
having some results in this area,”
said Mr Sands.

Mr Sands said the second priori-
ty is marketing initiatives. The third
priority is agriculture related in
terms of cost of food supplies for
hoteliers, and the fourth is the issue
of work permits.

“Short-term work permits espe-
cially with brand properties is a con-
cern because we have multiple com-
panies that seem to be frustrated
with the timeliness in which some
of these things are awarded, and
that impacts on their business,” he
explained.

FROM page one

“Someone was wondering what I was getting
for the article, but I told them: ‘I don’t want
anything. There is nothing I want’.”

He said he had received several calls from
well-wishers since the article appeared.

Mr Tynes’ riveting disclosures created may-
hem in the PLP, which organised a press con-
ference on Thursday in an attempt to salvage
Sir Lynden’s legacy. Arguments over the arti-
cle have raged on radio talk shows all week.

PLP leader Perry Christie launched a bitter
attack on Mr Tynes and The Tribune’s man-
aging editor, John Marquis, calling the article
scurrilous “garbage” that was full of lies and
fairy-tales.

But The Tribune yesterday published a page
one story showing that Mr Christie’s views
seemed completely at odds with what he said
when he was fired from Pindling’s Cabinet
25 years ago.

Chauncey Tynes Sr

At the time, he and the present prime min-
ister, Hubert Ingraham, were dismissed after
they protested over corruption in the Pindling
government, particularly in relation to the
drug trade.

Activist Paul Moss is planning a demon-
stration outside The Tribune’s office next
Tuesday, when he hopes Pindling supporters
will show solidarity in protecting the former
prime minister’s name.

Mr Moss said it was important for the ex-
PM’s supporters to speak out “as he is not
alive to defend his own name.”

He said the purpose of the protest was not
to disparage Mr Marquis’s name, but to give
Bahamians a chance to express their opin-
ions.

If it goes ahead, the protest will be the
fourth placard demonstration to be held out-

side The Tribune in the last two years to
express fury over the managing editor’s arti-
cles.

In 2007, three demonstrations were staged
over Mr Marquis’s role in hastening the end of
the PLP government following the Anna
Nicole Smith controversy.

Some protesters called for his deportation.
One carried a placard branding him “‘a jour-
nalistic terrorist”.

Yesterday, phone calls and e-mails of sup-
port continued to pour into The Tribune over
the Tynes revelations.

Mr Marquis said: “The truth is often very
hard to swallow, especially for people in denial
like the PLP. However, Mr Tynes’ information
was crucial for the writing of Bahamian his-
tory.
a salute him for his courage, for his honesty
and his unshakeable integrity. Every other
right-thinking person in this country should be
doing the same.”

Proposed US legislation ‘bigger threat than blacklisting’

FROM page one

tion with an expected push from
co-sponser President Barack
Obama and emerging support
from a few European nations.
Recnently, US Treasury Sec-
retary Timothy Geithner told the
Senate Finance Committee in
Washington, DC, that the Amer-
ican government will build an
"ambitious" plan to crack down
on companies that use offshore
centres to avoid paying taxes.
At a joint session of the US
Congress nearly two weeks ago,
British Prime Minister Gordon
Brown urged world leaders to

"outlaw shadow banking systems
and offshore tax havens."

Mr Fitzgerald warned that this
represents an intense, multi-
pronged and multi-national attack
on the Bahamas’ financial ser-
vices industry.

"I am of the opinion that this is
the greatest threat now facing our
country and is far worse than the
crisis we faced during the black-
listing of 2000," Mr Fitzgerald
said in the Upper Chamber, dur-
ing his contribution to the mid-
year budget debate.

"At the core of the financial
services industry is private bank-
ing and if our private banking is
dismantled, the financial

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ALEXIO RENARDO
RUSSELL of Eastern Estates in the Eastern District of
the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intend to change my name
to ALEXIO RENARDO COOPER. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date

of publication of this notice.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 13 MARCH 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,658.91 | CHG -1.37 | %CHG -0.08 | YTD -53.45 | YTD % -3.12

FINDEX: CLOSE 813.75 | YTD -2.53% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Bahamas Property Fund

7.00
0.63
3.15

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
2.83 Colina Holdings
4.80
1.31
2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco

Foecol (S)

ISD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

7.00
0.63
3.15

2.83
6.59
1.43
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.

7.00
0.63
3.15

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.03
0.14
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

2.83
6.56
1.57
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

EPS $

FG CAPITAL
BROKERAG!

MARKETS
E & ADVISORY SERVICES

Div $
0.070
0.992
0.244

-0.877

0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

aapya
gaalZavoolsakoas
Don®Zonwol

aaa
a-0-

services
destroyed."

Despite mounting concern in
some sectors about the proposed
legislation, government has
remained relatively calm. Speak-
ing in the House of Assembly
recently, Education Minister Carl
Bethel tried to quash what he
called “hysteria” surrounding the
proposed Act, saying that recent
announcements by Mr Geithner
and Mr Brown do not foreshadow
an immediate threat to the coun-
try's off-shore centres.

Mr Fitzgerald chastised this
"wait and see" stance, outlining
that regional neighbours like the
Cayman Islands, Barbados, and
Antigua have already taken a
proactive approach.

"Barbados has been proactive
in taking a structured approach
to signing exchange of informa-
tion acts or treaties with individ-
ual nations apart from the US,

industry will

Perry Christie

FROM page one

actually helping us have a public conversation

about it.

“It’s hard to enter into that conversation, and
people like Perry Christie wield such influence the
debate is now about John Marquis and The Tri-
bune’s ongoing war against the Bahamian people,
which is feeding into xenophobia, race animosity,

and fear, and all sorts of things.”

Sir Lynden’s leadership practice of rooting out
those who challenged his leadership to build a

which is now the only nation with
which the Bahamas has an
exchange of information treaty.

"Antigua has retained the ser-
vices of one of the top law firms
in the US called Rubinstein &
Rubinstein LLP who have assist-
ed them in the formulation of
arguments to support and encour-
age co-operation between them-
selves and the other G-20 coun-
tries who have concerns about
the financial and regulatory
regimes of Antigua. The Society
of Trust and Estate Practitioners
of Great Britain (has) pointed out
that many of the financial regula-
tory regimes of the countries
attempting to attack offshore cen-
tres fall well behind international
standards."

Mr Fitzgerald questioned what
strategies the government had in
place to counter this possible
threat on the country's off-shore
sector.

Perry Christie



party of devoted supporters should also be discussed, Dr Strachan

said.

“The country is not as democratic as it could be and Pindling has a

lot to do with that,” he said.

“And Perry Christie and Hubert Ingraham haven’t done as much as
they ought to to deepen democracy and that has a lot to do with

working under Lynden Pindling.”

Rather than clinging to Sir Lynden’s legacy, the PLP should step out
of the former leader’s shadow and find a new message which speaks to
today’s Bahamians while taking an objective view of the late Sir Lyn-
den to move democracy forward, Dr Strachan said.

“T think the PLP is like many other parties in the Caribbean who con-
tinue to use these iconic leaders for political capital after they have

gone,” he added.

“But it’s a two edge sword because despite the good they did, there
is the evil they did, so they run a risk of continuing to hark back to that

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Daily Vol.
0.00 T%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
0.00 0.00 0.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv Last 12 Months
1.3664
2.8988
1.4432
3.3201
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0440 0.80
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volurne of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAY - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

legacy.”

Dr Strachan’s play, “Black Crabs Tragedy”, written in 1997, attempts
to demystify the image of Sir Lynden by discussing the best and worst
aspects of his leadership, and how it reflects the people who held him
in power.

FROM page one

S52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

FBB17
FBB22

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00

52wk-Low EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

4.540
0.000
0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

Man charged

vehicle.

During an earlier arraignment
in Freeport, Rigby appeared
before Magistrate Helen Jones on
several charges, including escape,
resisting arrest, possession of an
unlicensed firearm and ammuni-
tion, and assault with a deadly
weapon.

He was not required to enter a
plea to the charges, which were
adjourned for hearing to June 2.
He was represented by K Brian
Hanna.

remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison
until September 3, 2009, for a
preliminary inquiry into the mat-
ters.

After his arraignment in court,
the family of Tanelus became very
emotional outside the courtroom.

The mother of the victim and
other family members were crying
as police escorted Rigby to an
awaiting police van.

“We feed all of y’all and this is
what y’all did. I hope you rot in
jail,” shouted one woman pointing
at Rigby sitting inside the

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3041
2.9230
1.3828
3.3201
11.8789

100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

28-Feb-09
28-Feb-09
6-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund 0.06
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

3.64
4.40

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stook Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S11) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009



APT 3-G








GREAT. I'LL BE SPENDING THE 2
EVENING PICKING OLIVES OFF
THIS G/NORMOUS PIES

THAT'LL BE
$28.50, LADY.

I’M GORRY I
DIPN'T GET A
CHANCE TO SAY
GOOPNIGHT TO
APRIL!



PARTY PIZZA
FOR MAGEE,



©2009 by North America Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved.

SFRAINK BOLLE




SHE'S OFF
TO SPAIN iN
THE MORNING!
YOU'LL SEE
HER AGAIN:

was
WHEN? WHY DON'T WE
ALL HAVE DINNER HERE
WHEN SHE RETURNS?

MARVIN

YOUR FATHER
HAS STARTED
TO GRow



HE THINKS IT
MAIKES HIM LOOK Like
SEAN CONNERY

AFTERNOON,
LADIES To THInk HE
LOOKS LiKE A

MR. B., YO TOILET BOWL

IN THAT CASE, MR. B.,
I GUESS ULL SAVE MY

VE GOTTA





















LOOK LIKE YOU
DON'T HAVE
A CARE IN
THE WORLD

SEEMS TO BE |.
JUST RIGHT AT |=
THE MOMENT,

I'M HOME. I DIDNT GET
MY PROPELLER BEANIE
TOON, DIDI?

we 6
reek

“EVERY BIRTHDAY PUTS HIM ONE YEAR CLOSER

10 LEAVING HOME.”



Across
1 Uninspired
footman (10)
6 Count in German (4)
10 Mature, or mature toa
point (5)
11 With us details can
produce weariness (9)
12 Taking someone on and
winning (8)
13 Moral principle held by the
thick-skinned (5)
15 Refreshed as sleep
passes away (7)
17 An inch out perhaps, but
maintaining
contact (2,5)
19 Agirl after a bit of



butter for her 1
kneecap (7)
21 Nota straight 1
musician? (7)
22 Perform aerobatics in an 1
advertising display (5)
24 In the main perhaps he’s 2
all at sea (8)
27 Make sure as sure can 2
be (9)
28 Not an all-American name
for a girl (5) 2
29 Girl right at all
times (4) 2
30 Have one nightcap too
many? (5,5) 2











Across: 1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8
Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk,
14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18
Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder,
25 Younger.

Down: 1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4
Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7














14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20
Beau, 23 Dig.











AS A MATTER OF
FACT, You DID!



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down

1

2

3

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember,

START LOCKING

NEWS FOR LATER THAT FRONT

-penvese: udu pom “our “areoIpUAg suNjeay Bury Ac BOUT)

HAHA! IT TOOK WEEKS
AND WEEKS OF WAITING,
BUT AT LONG LAST {T'S
HERE? NoW 1 FINALLY,
FINALLY GET TO PUT TON!

“SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED.
BATTERIES NOT INCLUDED. ”



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



























3/14

Difficulty Level %& %&

Leave the car where one
can take a stroll (4)

One kept — in
suspense? (9)

lan’s confused with love
for a girl (5)

A king with supporters
stages a recovery (7)

A ship, for example, with
first-rate missile (7)
Being coarse on the golf
course (5)

Is it instrumental in
warning Paris pedestrians?
(6,4)

Governed, having been
shown the way (8)

Main part of a book taken
by travellers (3,7)
Distressed Royalist living
the life of a hermit (8)
Taking bullets from an old

ree eel

Across

Exhausted after a day’s
shopping? (5)
Found on stage (4)

13 Pitch forward
suddenly (5)

15 Even-tempered (7)

17 Account for (7)

19 Urban fortress (7)

Across: 1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 21 Raining heavily (7)

gun | dismantled (9) Ww
Not a sunny greeting? _I 1 Dispenser of
(3,4) N medicines (10)
Cafe and inn combine N 6B 4
somehow to make a) eee (4)
money (7) o. 10 Maintain (5)
Dad’s brother Sam is in 11 Ad-lib (9)
the U.S. (5) a 12 Portray in words (8)
LL

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 22 Provoke aversion
Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 in (5)

Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22

Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. 24 Common sense (8)
Down: 1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 27 Not guilty

judgment (9)
Construct (5)

Long hard journey (4)
Cave-dweller (10)

Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7

Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 28
14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 29
Step, 23 Sad. 30

©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

peels Wed) Met fe



DO You HAVE ANY THING
YOU'D LIKE TO PONATE TO
OUR CHARITY ORIVE



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

uT HE



HASN'T

Bi
FINIGHED BREAKFAST
YET

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Loere must

Lar aos Logie
wend af 2 Pharos

inkjel prumber).
TODAYS TARGET













CV guia works of
four letters of Der! can
Fea naake from the
heirs. ahi lee? Tin
Ggkur a WOOT, Baul

be wh eh
ont Taine letter ward Wo
plies, oF wee fornia
Bm uo “87, mo moored
with Initial ropials ond
nen wars with 2 hyphen

penmbbed. ‘The Lert

Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer



i Ny pes
a

TESTEROAY'S SOLUTION
hen Genk bund buoder
bint bond Bone bomnd
horker Teun wer

letter may be usedomee | brine dent deal
aeiky. Faas nat eonmtain dine diner dint door
Loe oeuloe leller aml a 5

dtane: nhred Index
inert inter inde inten
ot, woned mec ext
Gitte Tek: note noted
ment en Fein rele
rem renl cont rub
rodent tend tenor tem

i Hinder TINTRR ROK

pernethe| fe iikjet in

Line loge lice lner
tom. toxin trend tone

Cee 1, very pooeel 21h,
Bee en 2 lor mre),
aotubion Mood

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer









































































Down

1

@

aon a &

14
16
18
20
21

25
26

International

treaty (4)
Consequently (2, 1,6)
Ridicule by

imitation (5)

Style of cooking (7)
Highest in rank (7)
Superior (5)
Extremely uncertain
(5-3-2)

Disintegrate (8)
Ribes rubrum (3,7)
The butterfly bush (8)
Strong dislike (9)
Shallow port boat (7)
Interval of

delay (4,3)
Resentment (5)
Unmentionable (5)
Not in operation (4)

















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

3|9/8]1 7\/2/5|/4/6| PSE SAN
2\6|7/9 4/5/8/1/3| M2 /1/4 M4 8/7 9/3
1154/6 8/3/2l7/9| (N8|7\9 Bas 417 8/5
413/915 6 1}7l21\8] M2 RMS 2 1 M7 1

ao 86/2/11 4/2

6/211/7 3/8/9 15/4 SD EEL.
7/8\5)2 9/4/6/3)1 M1 2901 7/6 9/8
8/4/6/3 2/7[1/9/5 2/9 R78 903 |1
5/7/1318 1/9/4/6/2| M7 /8\9/2/6 No 38/3

vid 9/1|2]4 sj6/3iai7| MÂ¥3/4i6/1)2 is 7/2































Heads | Win, Tails You Lose

South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
4K J763
Â¥6
4753
AKI?

WEST EAST
o— 4Q 104
Â¥Q87542 VK I93
#KQI6 #1082
854 #Q 109

SOUTH

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VA 10

@A94

$763
The bidding:
South West North East
14 Pass 34 Pass
4

Opening lead — king of diamonds.

The ideal goal in bridge is to
establish a “heads I win, tails you
lose” position.

Consider this deal played by
Bruce Bell, New Zealand star. He got
to four spades and ordinarily would
have made the contract easily. How-
ever, since East happened to have all
three missing spades and the guarded
queen of clubs as well, it might seem
that the contract was doomed. But
Bell made his game anyway, and,

what’s more, there was nothing the
defenders could do to stop him.

West led the king of diamonds,
which Bell ducked. If West had now
shifted to a club, declarer, after learn-
ing of the 3-0 trump division, could
have avoided a second diamond loser
by establishing dummy’s fourth club.

But West led another diamond at
trick two, taken by the ace, and when
Bell next cashed the ace of trumps,
he learned that East had a trump trick
coming. It looked as though the con-
tract would now depend on winning
a club finesse, but Bell found a way
to make 10 tricks without the finesse.

At trick four, he played the ace of
hearts and continued by ruffing a
heart in dummy, He then exited with
a diamond, won by West with the
jack.

West could do no better than
return a club, taken with the ace. Bell
then played the K-x of trumps, sad-
dling East with the lead and render-
ing him helpless. East had to return a
club or yield a ruff-and-discard,
either of which gave South the con-
tract.

The endplay developed by Bell
was typical of the “heads I win, tails
you lose” position. No matter how
East-West defended, Bell had a
countermeasure available that would
get him home safely.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc,



THE TRIBUNE

S
i

SATURDAY, MARCH 14,

PAGE 9





2009



po

Scotiabank
sponsors
Lightning
track club...
See page 10



SAC victorious!

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

on’t look now,

but the St

Augustine’s

College Big

Red Machines
added the 21st championship
title to the history books of the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations’ Track and
Field Championships.

But this year, the Queen’s
College Comets made a gallant
effort, falling short by just 164
points as they continued to
close the gap in the point stand-
ings.

At the end of the three-day
meet yesterday at the Thomas
A Robinson Track and Field
Stadium, which saw 11 records
established, the Big Red
Machines celebrated their vic-
tory lap with a total of 1,282
points.

They were eventually joined
by the Comets with 1,118.

No other school came close
as the St Anne’s Bluewaves
took third place with 448.

SAC’s head coach William
“Knucklehead” Johnson said
they knew it was going to be
tough, but they are just happy
that they were able to prevail
once again.

“They put together a good
team,” said Johnson of Queen’s
College. “They had a lot of new
athletes in a lot of categories,
sO we expected it.”

Johnson, however, said his
Big Red Machines were just
simply too strong across the
board and that made the differ-
ence.

He said “hard work” was the
key to their success. “The kids
wanted it more. There was a lot
of talk about what QC is going
to do and who they had. But
we stayed focused on the prize
and we did what we had to do.”

But credit the entire coaching
staff, including twin sisters
Dianne Woodside, who
returned to team up with Dawn
Johnson, Tito Moss, Norma
Miller, John Todd and all of the
other people who assisted in the
various areas.

As they tasted the thrill of
victory for another year, John-
son said they are coming back
next year “bigger and stronger”
to go for their 22nd crown.

If Queen’s College has any-
thing to do with it, they’re going
to regroup and try to pull off
the upset.

“We didn’t perform as well
as we could have,” said Comet’s
coach Gary Markham. “We had
athletes not getting into the

TASS
final point
standings

HERBP’S a look at the
final point standings from
the Bahamas Association
of Independent Secondary
Schools’ 21st Track and
Field Championships that
wrapped up yesterday at

the Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium:
St Augustine’s College:
1,282
Queen’s College: 1,118
St Anne’s: 448
St Andrew’s: 355.50
St John’s College: 309
Temple Christian: 282.50
Nassau Christian
Academy: 278
Jordan Prince
William: 192
Aquinas College: 153.50
Charles W Saunders: 119
Kingsway Academy: 67
Faith Temple
Academy: 66
Westminister
College: 62.50



Queen’s College Comets close behind for
second in record breaking track meet



a = ol

COUGARS bantam 4x100m team edge out SAC for the win...

finals because they were ill and
we had some bad exchanges
that hurt us in the relays.

“But we’re very happy. We’re
closing the gap. That is our
biggest aim. But we have to
admit that SAC has got some
phenomenal and talented ath-
letes. But only one school is
going to do it. They deserve to
win, but we will be on their
heels again next year.”

On the record front, four of
SAC’s athletes and two 4 x 400
relay teams inked their names
in the record books, while QC
had one individual athlete and
three relay teams.

Temple Christian Suns had
one of the records, thanks to
Laquardo Newbold’s winning
time of 17 minutes and 54.22
seconds in the senior boys’ 5,000
which erased the previous mark

of 17:58.87 by Justin Miller in
2007.

Perhaps one of the most
impressive performances came
on the field where SAC’s bas-
ketball standout Jabari Wilmott
cleared 6-feet, 8 1/4-inches to
shatter the old mark of 6-6 that
was posted by fellow SAC stu-
dent Horace Pierre in 2000.

Wilmott’s mark also exceed-
ed the qualifying mark of 6-4
for the Carifta Games in St
Lucia over the Easter holiday
weekend. It was the second
time this season that Wilmott
has achieved the feat.

“T just went out there to do
my best. My goal was to jump 6-
6,” Wilmott said. “But when I
came to 6-10, my legs started
to get tired. So I was very
pleased with the performance.”

This would be the second

= = = —



SAC Big Red Machines’ Jabari Wilmott
jumped into the record books, break-
ing the meet record in the high jump

yesterday.

(Photos by Tim Clarke/ Tribune staff



COMETS hold off Big Red Machines in the junior girls 4x100m finals yesterday...

Carifta appearance for Wilmott,
who noted that his goal this
year is to win a medal.

SAC’s Kenya Culmer domi-
nated in the senior girls triple
jump. She soared 36-5 to
remove the old mark of 34-11
3/4 by Eunae Wright in 2007.

The only other record on the
field came from Devinn
Cartwright of Queen’s College
in the intermediate girls high
jump. She did 5-5 1/4 to surpass
the record of 5-3 3/4 by Janice
Ezegbunam of SAC in 1998.

Back on the track, individual
track records also came from
Shaunae Miller in the interme-
diate girls’ 300 hurdles in 43.93
to replace the previous time of
44.05 by SAC’s Tess Mullings
in 2006. Devinn Cartwright also
went under the record in 44.02
for second.

And Deshana Burnside led a
1-2 finish for SAC in the senior
girls’ 800, running 1:06.35 to
beat out team-mate Hughnique
Rolle (2:26.25). In the process,
Burnside replaced Romona
Nicholls’ 2005 time of 2:22.27.

Queen’s College bantam girls

4x 1 relay team of Zaria Gib-
son, Khadija Fraser, Vanaillan
Walker and Kennadi Carbin
ran 53.46 to shatter an old QC
mark of 54.36 set in 2006.

QC’s junior girls team of
Rachel Knowles, Shelby
Carbin, Shanae Sands and Talia
Thompson ran 4:14.56 in the 4x
4 to knock off SAC’s 2005 time
of 4:14.80.

In the intermediate girls’ 4 x
1, QC’s team of Willicia Hart,
Devinn Cartwright, Mona Lisa
Taylor and Printassia Johnson
ran 48.87 to replace the previ-
ous time of 48.95 that was also
held by QC.

SAC’s intermediate girls’
team of Rashante Colebrooke,
Kryshell Rolle, Ashley Johnson
and Shaunae Miller ran so fast
in winning the 4 x 4 relay in
3:59.70 that they not only broke
the record of 4:00.59 by SAC,
but they also lapped one of the
teams.

And their senior girls’ 4 x 4
team of Kenya Culmer, Hugh-
nique Rolle, V’Alonee Robin-
son and Deshana Burnside did
the same thing when they ran

4:02.16 to replace SAC’s old
time of 4:03.42. However, their
time was slower than the inter-
mediate girls.

Robinson completed a sweep
of the senior girls’ sprints, win-
ning the 200 in 24.64. Marcus
Thompson duplicated the feat
in the senior boys division in
the 200 in 21.48.

“T felt pretty good about the
race. I felt I could get a better
start, but overall I was pleased
about it,” Thompson stated.
“This is the first year that I won
in BAISS, so ’m happy.”

Thompson, 17, said he’s even
more excited over the fact that
he got to compete against Tem-
ple Christian’s Warren Fraser,
who was second in 21.68, just
as he was in the 100.

Fraser’s sister Khadija Fraser,
however, was unbeaten in the
bantam girls’ sprints, adding the
200 (26.97) title to her 100
crown.

Danielle Gibson of Aquinas
won the junior girls’ 200 (26.26)
and Shaunae Miller took the
intermediate girls half-lapper in
25.06.



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Defence, police, prison officers take
art in physical fitness programme

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THEY moaned and they
groaned. But one by one each
participant went through the
vigorous training session yes-
terday morning at the Royal
Bahamas Defense Force
(RBDF) base.

Maybe because they were
being closely watched, none of
the 13 competitors passed up
on the routine as physical train-
ing instructor Raymond
“Brave” Sawyer shouted out
the instructions from the side-
line.

Sawyer, a 29-year veteran on
the force, is hosting a 16-week
training course on the base in
what they call the “pit”. The
course, however, is not just
designed for the RBDF.

For the first time, members
of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, Her Majesty’s Prisons,
Fox Hill and one or two mem-
bers of the community have
come together to participate in
the training course.

Already through the 10th
week, the course is designed for
two sessions each day where
the participants go through vig-
orous training and are engaged
in classroom lessons.

At the end of the course,
Sawyer said the participants are
expected to be certified to
“teach as instructors” to any
sporting body outside of the
Defense Force.

Additionally, the participants
will be so fit that by the time
they are finished, they would
have ended up running a half
marathon. Right now, they
have already ran up to nine
miles.

“We never offered it outside
of the base before, but I real-
ized that all of these agencies
need a physical fitness pro-
gramme,” Sawyer said.

“So I think if we can get at
least one person in each of the
military branches in a position
to teach the same type of phys-
ical fitness that we go through
here at the base, their law
enforcement agencies will be
better off physically.”





MILITARY officers in pain as they go through an exercise during the

training programme at the RBDF base yesterday...

In 2003, Sawyer offered the
first such course to the RBDF
and they eventually had four
successful graduates. This time
around, with a much bigger
class to work with, Sawyer is
hoping to at least double and
even succeed in passing out all
of the participants.

Terico Sweeting, a police offi-
cer attached at the Training
College, said he came in from
the initial week and it has been
a tough 10 weeks.

“I did not expect this,”
Sweeting stated. “Coming from
the training base at the college
I did not expect this. I thought
that I would have been in
superb conditioning.

“But it was only when I came
here that I discovered that I
really wasn’t. So it has been
really rough on me. But I’ve
made a vast improvement since
I came here and I think it’s
obvious in the eyes of the
instructor.”

Looking at the entire training

programme, Sawyer said the
most difficult aspect he has had
to endure was “the physical
training with the push ups and
the rope climb.”

“That was the most difficult
part for me,” he said.

When he returns to the force,
Sweeting said he intends to
impart all of the knowledge that
he gained to help make the
RBPF a more vibrant and fit
military department.

Foster Ferguson, a corporate
at Her Majesty’s Prison, has
also been in the programme
since its inception. He too has
considered it to be a challenge.

“So far, it’s been well round-
ed and we’ve learnt a lot as far
as the physical fitness and your
health awareness is concern,”
he said. “I think that the pro-
gramme will be very good to
carry back to the prison to help
us with a programme to assist
our staff.”

Getting his body to a physical
level where he learns how to

DEFENSE, police and prison officers do an exercise routine yesterday at the RBDF base...

Scotiabank sponsors Lightning track club

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER joining the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associ-
ations (BAAA) five years ago,
the Silver Lightning Track and
Field Club has finally secured
a sponsor.

Scotiabank has come to the
aid of the club — made up of the
majority of the “grassroots” ath-
letes in the BAAA — headed by
Rupert Gardiner.

On Thursday at the Thomas
A Robinson Track and Field
Stadium, Rekett Griffin, acting
senior manager for marketing
and products, presented a
cheque of an undisclosed
amount to Gardiner, who dou-
bles as the club president/head
coach.

Griffin said when Gardiner
approached her predecessor
Greg Burrows in connection
with sponsoring his track club,
they couldn’t turn him down
because of their commitment
to the young people of the
Bahamas.

“We sponsored the 2008
BAAA Olympic Trials and so
we figured that this will be a





MILITARY officers undergo a training exercise...

“climb rope,” Sweeting said he
has enjoyed going through a
balanced routine of exercise
activities.

And there are a couple of
women participating as well.

Leading woman Margaret
Taylor, of the RBDF, said she
was always interested in the
physical training, but she had
a “challenging, yet rewarding”
experience so far.

When asked what the hardest
aspect of the training was, Tay-
lor quickly pointed out that it
was the “push-ups because of a

nageing shoulder injury.”

“But I didn’t allow it to stop
me.”

If there was anything that she
didn’t have any problem with at
all, it was the run. “But it was
challenging because I didn’t
expect the intensity of what we
had to go through.”

And bodybuilder Jay Dar-
ling, a member of the RBDF,
said the course would help him
to be much more defined as he
competes for the Mr Bahamas
title again this year.

“When I came in, I didn’t

me _

PHYSICAL fitness instructor Raymond “Brave’

REKELL GRIFFIN (presenting cheque), Scotiabank’s acting senior manager for marketing and products, presents a cheque to coach Rupert Gardiner
as they are now the official sponsors of his Silver Lightning Track and Field Club. Also shown are members and executives of the club...
(Photo: Derek Smith)

way for us to continue in that
role, helping our young people
to develop their skills in the
area of athletics,” she said.
Gardiner said because of the

fact that he caters mainly to
children that come from single
parent homes, it’s a step in the
right direction for them to get
the support from Scotiabank.

“To have Scotiabank come
to our aid, it says a whole lot,”
Gardiner said.

“As a national coach, for
years I’ve seen athletes who

can’t afford a decent uniform
just to compete in, so this is a
great help.”

Look for the Silver Lightning
to come out shining when they



J

expect to be doing so much.
I’ve already lost 20 pounds,”
he said.

“Tm leveling off at 189 and it
seems as if I’m staying at that
weight, which is pretty good
because it’s where I need to be
as a middleweight.”

For Sawyer, it would make
his tenure complete at the
RBDF as he intends to retire
at the end of the course and
look at whatever opportunity
is available for him as a physical
education instructor major at
the College of the Bahamas.



” Sawyer shows participants how to do their exercise...

host their track and field meet
on Saturday, May 2 at the TAR
Stadium, starting at 9 am for
the youth and the open segment
at 1 pm.

“We are looking for some
ereat things to happen because
we have some underprivileged
kids in our club, but they are
all eager to compete,” Gardiner
said.

Five years ago, when he
returned home, Gardiner said
he saw the need to launch the
club. Initially, they only had 20
athletes, but they have blos-
somed and now have more than
60.

“We already have kids who
made national teams and we are
looking for some more to make
the Carifta team this year,” Gar-
diner said. “Our top sprinter
Antonique Strachan won the
under-17 girls 100m and 200m
at the GSSSA meet last week.
She’s one of our prospects.”

While the majority of the ath-
letes are relatively young, Gar-
diner said Scotiabank’s spon-
sorship will go a long way in
assisting them in their future
endeavors, including getting
into college, either here at the
College of the Bahamas, or in
the US.



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

thescene

by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP











NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA

Match made in

4 ENTREPRENEUR and former
banker Gary Christie escorts his
daughter Gari Fenrica up the aisle
on Saturday, February 21 at Christ
Church Cathedral, George Street.
The ceremony was performed by
Rev Dean Patrick Adderley and the
following reception was held at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort on Cable
Beach.

The menu included Bimini white
conch chowder, an array of baby
field greens with raspberry basil
dressing as appetizers; the entrée
included a rack of lamb and a
French Atlantic salmon filet in a dill
cream sauce, red-skinned potatoes,
and grilled tomatoes, asparagus
and glazed carrots; desert was a
pina colada caramel flan served
with coffee and tea.

2 MOTHER of the bride Cleopatra F
Christie, former Magistrate and
corporate manager with Scotia-
bank, is escorted by her son Gavin
Christie, real estate agent with C A
Christie.

3 THE groom’s mother La-Roma
Hunt- Seifert, office manager at the
Public Treasury Department, is
escorted by her husband Corporal
Dudley Seifert.

Mrs Hunt- Seifert’s dress was
designed by her and was made by
Lynn Curry.

4 ATTORNEY Willie Moss of
Freeport, Grand Bahama; Hubert L
Prescod, chief financial officer for
aL PE Political Media Buying Specialists,
aiiebl se wie and his wife Joan Prescod, an
fal eel ell accountant.

5 BANKER Kim Foster, director of
projects and country relationship
manager for Scotiabank; attorney
Gilbert A Ward, owner of Valdy
Administration in the British Colo-
nial Centre of Commerce; Minna
Israel, former managing director of
Scotiabank Bahamas and presently
managing director of RBTT Bank of
Jamaica.

6 AFAMILY AFFAIR — Dr Sandra
Dean Patterson, head of the Crisis
Centre; Roni Patterson, Natasha
Patterson and Gerrard Patterson.

7 (I-r) VINCENT Pratt, bank officer;
Bjorn Hunt; Khaalis Rolle, best man
and managing director of Bahamas
Fast Ferries; Phillip Rahming, the
groom and building engineer;
Shane Deveaux, contractor, Jamiko
Sands, engineer; Gavin Christie,
real estate agent.

8 (I-r) NADIA Taylor, maid of hon-
our in the wedding and a lawyer
with Higgs and Johnson; Orese
Darville, flower girl; Dr Keisha Pat-
terson, bridesmaid; Defence Force
Officer Lavonya Seifert, bridesmaid;
Stacey Smith, council attorney;
Christie Cash, trust officer at
Cititrust; Rojarra Armbrister, stu-
dent in Canada; Danielle Hanek,
officer of Ministry of Agriculture
and Fisheries.

9 CLEOPATRA Strachan, an educa-
tor, along with Harry Kemp, man-
aging director of Telepoint.

10 CLEOPATRA Rolle, an auditor
in the Auditor General’s Office, with
her husband Marco Rolle, under-
secretary in the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs and a law student at the
Eugene Dupuch Law School.

41 MR and Mrs Philip Osbourne-
Rahming leaving Christ Church
Cathedral to enjoy the rest of their
lives together.





Full Text
WEATHER

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Chauncey Tynes §



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009

|

: :
Ni Ma

[oe

| 7
| | "4
ee oe ae |

| nave no regrets

Man at the
centre of
Sir Lynden
Pindling
controversy
Says ‘it’s
time truth
was told’

THE former
PLP official
who sparked
off a major con-
troversy over
the Bahamas
drug era and
Sir Lynden Pin-
dling’s past said
yesterday: “I
have no
regrets.”

Chauncey
Tynes Sr., who
claimed his pilot son was killed
because of what he knew about
Sir Lynden and his links with drug
czar Joe Lehder, added: “It is
time the truth was told.”

Mr Tynes, 88, was the PLP’s
treasurer during the late 1960s
when the party was at its height.
He later took issue with Sir Lyn-
den over several matters and
resigned from his post in 1971.

He believes his son, Chauncey
Jr, was “disposed of” after tak-
ing off from Exuma for Nassau
with three other men — one a
Bahamian electrical engineer
called Donald Moree Sr, the oth-
ers believed to be Colombians —
in March, 1983.

The twin-engined plane never
reached Nassau and no trace of it
was ever found. Neither
Chauncey Jr nor Mr Moree have
been heard from since.

Chauncey Jr had told his father
repeatedly of cash consignments
he carried for Lehder from Exu-
ma to Nassau to be paid to Sir
Lynden and a senior police offi-
cer. On one occasion he even
brought a box of US banknotes
home, $50,000 in all, which he
said was destined for the police-
man.

He also flew Sir Lynden to
Norman’s Cay — Lehder’s
cocaine trans-shipment base —
on several occasions, as well as
to Grand Bahama for a secret
meeting with the drug lord, it was
claimed.

Since Mr Tynes’ claims were
published in last Monday’s Tri-
bune Insight section, other wit-
nesses have come forward to
claim that Sir Lynden went to
Norman’s Cay on several occa-
sions, not only to meet Lehder
but also to attend parties.

“T am glad that I spoke out,”
Mr Tynes told The Tribune,

SEE page six

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C R WALKER students check out the NCIS

‘



(Naval Criminal Investigative Service) forensic evidence bus

yesterday. The NCIS officers are in the Bahamas as part of the Tradewinds Exercise 2009.

Cruise passenger arrivals

The Tribune

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Proposed US
legislation is
‘bigger threat to
financial sector
than blacklisting’

Senator voices concern, hits
out at Ingraham administration

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

THE country's financial services sector will face a threat far
worse than the industry’s 2000 blacklisting if proposed “tax
haven” legislation is passed into law in the United States, Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald said.

The Opposition senator also accused the Ingraham admin-
istration of sticking "their heads in the sand" and not taking
a proactive approach to the looming problem.

Concern over the region's off-shore services sector began
to rise when American Senator Carl Levin first sponsored the
“Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act” in the US Senate. The Act was
defeated several times but appears to have gained some trac-

SEE page six

Man appears in court
charged with murder



@ By DENISE According to the par-
MAYCOCK ticulars, it is alleged that
Tribune Freeport on January 7, 2009, at
Reporter Hepburn Town, Eight
dmaycock@ Mile Rock, the accused,

being concerned with
others, intentionally
caused the death of Eri-
son Tanelus by means
of unlawful harm.

He was also charged

fea Bi with burglary and
SAUL Telly armed robbery.

tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Eight
Mile Rock resident
Samiko Rigby was
charged with murder in
the Eight Mile Rock
Magistrate’s Court on



up 30 per cent in January

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

To this end, beginning May 15, the Min-
istry of Tourism is embarking on a one-of-
a-kind all-inclusive experiment on Grand
Bahama. The new initiative will allow
potential visitors to pre-book a hotel room,
restaurants and tours — all before leaving
for their trip.

"What many people forget is from the
customer's perspective the cost to get any-
where is part of my vacation cost. We find
ourselves in the situation where people
are standing around talking about their
room rates as if that's all the customer is

considering. The customer has to think
about the cost to get here and guess what —
they want to minimise the cost to get to their desti-
nation so they can maximise their time enjoying
themselves.

SEE page six

CRUISE passengers arriving in Nassau
for the month of January, 2009 increased
by almost 30 per cent compared to the
same period last year, Minister of Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool- Wallace said yester-
day.

The Senator said this statistic repre-
sented a sign of the economic times, as
visitors are choosing a more economic, all-
inclusive sea vacation to the Bahamas over
the more expensive airfare and hotel com-
bination.

This makes it key for the Bahamas to maximise its
potential as a prime destination in the region by
offering more competitive all-inclusive vacations on
land and to lobby for lower airfares into the country.



Minister Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace

Christie’s failure to engage in Pindling debate
‘is inhibiting development of democracy’

Friday.

Rigby, a resident of Jones
Town, was arraigned before Mag-
istrate Gwen Claude at about
1.20pm following his arraignment
in Freeport on Friday morning
with other serious criminal
offences.

He was escorted to court under
heavy police guard in handcuffs
and shackles.

Rigby had escaped police cus-
tody on January 11 from Central
Police Station. He was appre-
hended by police on Wednesday.

Rigby was not required to enter
a plea to the murder charge.

It is alleged that on the same
date and place, Rigby unlawfully
entered the home of Erison
Tanelus with intent to commit a
felony.

It is also alleged that on the
same date and place, Rigby, being
concerned with others, while
armed with an offensive instru-
ment robbed Tanelus of $510
cash, and two LG cellular phones
valued at $698.

Rigby was not required to enter
pleas to the charges.

Bail was denied and he was

SEE page six

Howard K Stern, two of Anna
Nicole Smith’s doctors charged

CALIFORNIA’S Attorney General yester- I |
day called Howard K Stern the “principal se
enabler” in an alleged conspiracy to supply his
former girlfriend Anna Nicole Smith with thou-
sands of prescription drugs between 2004 and

her death in 2007.



m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PLP Leader Perry Christie’s
failure to engage in a debate
about Sir Lynden Pindling’s
legacy is inhibiting the develop-
ment of democracy, Dr Ian Stra-
chan has said.

The College of the Bahamas
English Department head main-
tains Mr Christie failed to
engage in honest debate when
responding to the controversial
Tribune Insight article by man-
aging editor John Marquis.

The article entitled “The trag-

ic young pilot who knew too
much”, told the story of the late
Chauncey Tynes Jr who went
missing in 1983 while piloting a
flight from Exuma to Nassau.
His father, Chauncey Tynes Sr,
told The Tribune he believed his
son was murdered because he
knew too much of the associa-
tion between Sir Lynden and
Colombian drug czar Carlos
“Joe” Lehder.

Mr Christie publicly con-
demned the story as “the vilest,
the most vicious, the most scur-
rilous, and the sickest piece of
garbage” he has ever read, and
slammed claims as “‘a tissue of

lies, fantasies and tall tales.”
Although the article sparked
impassioned discussions in the
press, on the airwaves and in
Parliament, Dr Strachan said the
nation has yet to hold a frank
conversation about events under
Pindling’s government and their
affect on political development.
Dr Strachan said: “I think the
conversation coming from the
opposite end is so shrill, so
angry, and condemnatory, and
also so grand-standing, and even
opportunistic, I don’t think it’s

SEE page six



Stern and two of Ms Smith’s doctors have
been charged by Los Angeles County prosecu-
tors with illegally providing the former Playboy
model with addictive prescription drugs.

These charges come two years after Ms Smith
died of an overdose in a hotel room in Florida.
Her death was ruled accidental.

Yesterday, California's Attorney General Jerry Brown told Amer-
ican media that Stern and the two doctors — Khristine Eroshevich and
Sandeep Kapoor — conspired to “repeatedly and excessively” provide
Ms Smith with drugs.

Prosecutors outlined 95 “overt acts” committed between 2004 and
2007.

Stern was last seen by members of the public in the Bahamas in
November 2008, having dinner at the Outback Steak House with Lar-
ry Birkhead who was holding his and Ms Smith’s daughter Dannielynn
in his arms.

Both Ms Smith and her son Daniel Smith, who died in a Doctors
Hospital room in 2006, are buried at Lake View Memorial.

Howard K Stern (AP)





NASSAU AND BAHAME:

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST ~

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Meeting over new fish market location

FREEPORT - Yesterday
marked the second in a
series of scheduled meet-
ings held between the
Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) and
local fish, conch and
seafood vendors in an effort
to obtain information and
gather views on the future
location of the new fish
market.

Local fish vendors turned
out in large numbers to
ensure that their voices
were heard.

Hannes Babak, chairman
of Port Group Limited
(PGL), along with commit-
tee members responsible
for the development of the
new fish market, announced
three possible locations for
the site. Based on discus-
sions with the fishermen,
the vast majority would like
to see the new fish market
situated in the downtown
area. The exact location will
be determined at a later
date.

Ian B A Rolle, president
of GBPA said, “It is critical
that we determine the best
location for the site to
ensure the long-term suc-
cess of the market, and the
positive impact that it will
have on the community.”

The project is set to com-
mMence construction in six
months.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
RR
PHONE: 322-2157

Harbour Bay East BAY St. tel.394-5767

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TEAM of scientists retraced the steps

of the original Exuma expedition

which led to the creation the first
national park in the Bahamas and returned
with new information proving the success of

protected natural areas.

The week-long trip allowed scientists to follow
the 1958 expedition which led to the creation of
the Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park and the
Bahamas National Trust (BNT) as the manage-
ment body for the National Park System of the
country.

The expedition was part of the Trust’s 50th
anniversary celebrations.

A diverse group of specialist scientists, BNT
park wardens and staff, Fisheries officers, coral
reef experts, botanists and scientists from the
Nature Conservancy, set out on the Coral Reef
II, a research vessel temporarily donated by the
Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, to analyse the sta-
tus of the park today.

Marine experts found the park is protecting
fish as there are more diverse communities of
fish in the park, larger populations and bigger
fish than in other areas of the Bahamas. And the
healthy fish populations are spilling out into the
surrounding areas.

Dr Dan Brumbaugh from the American Muse-
um of Natural History in New York, who led the
marine team, said: “Inside the park there are
three times as many fish than the surrounding
areas, but five times as much as the rest of the
Bahamas.”

And non-native invaders such as the lionfish,
which dominate reefs around New Providence,
are not as destructive within the intact ecosystem
of the park as in other areas of the Bahamas as
there are more predators to combat the lionfish,
Dr Brumbaugh said.

On land, the terrestrial team found native
plants and animals to be as abundant as they
were 50 years ago, and the pro-active removal of
non-native invasive species has been a success.

The only real damage to the environment has
been caused by the hutia, an endemic land mam-
mal which is eating its way through Little Wax
Cay, Warderick Wells and Shroud Cay.

Botanist Dr John Freid, leader of the team,
said the problem of controlling the hutia is one
the Trust will have to face.

“In Little Wax Cay they are eating themselves

Town Centre Mall hosts
Wii Fitness Challenge

out of house and home,” he
said.

“There is half the vegeta-
tion, there are large areas
with no vegetation at all, and
the hutia population is drop-
ping, probably reducing
because there is no food.”

In Warderick Wells the
diversity of plants is thinning,
and Dr Freid said there is
potential for hutia popula-
tions to drop as a result, and
he fears the hutia’s newest
home in Shroud Cay will be
similarly ravaged.

But where the hutia are absent, flora and fau-
na are thriving. And the Trust’s active removal of
invasive casuarina trees and scavella, or Hawai-
ian sea lettuce, has been a great success.

Dr Freid said: “The islands are absolutely
beautifully intact and nothing has been done to
them in terms of vegetation - you see exactly
what they saw 50 years ago — nice dune systems,
beautiful rocky shores.

“You look at it and it’s exactly the same.
Everything is growing exactly as it did.”

In these lush green islands Nature Conservan-
cy ornithologists spotted two Kirtland’s War-
blers, a small rare bird that is even more rarely
seen as the 1,400- strong bird population is
spread throughout the islands during the six
months they spend in the Bahamas.

Ancilleno Davis, conservation coordinator for
the Nature Conservancy, said the sighting will
now allow ornithologists to expand their limited
knowledge of the Kirtland’s Warblers and their
environment.

Following the Exuma expedition, the scientists
studied the land and seas of South Andros to find
an unique species of iguana thriving, and the seas
over-fished. This study will allow the BNT to
open a discussion with the local community
about the possible ways of protecting the area in
future.

Mr Davis said: “We had so many different sci-
entists with so many different qualifications and
specific abilities that we could get a very good
snapshot picture of what is going on in the Exu-
ma Land and Sea Park, so in that small amount
of information that we have we can be more
directed in future study efforts or managing
efforts.

“We were looking at the past, at what the park
was like, looking at the present, what the park is
like now, and the Andros project was looking at
the future.”

An exhibition celebrating 50 years of the
Bahamas National Trust is open to the public at
Central Bank on Shirley Street.

AN upcoming Wii Fitness
challenge will be a part of the
Town Centre Mall’s “Ultimate
Gamer’s Challenge 3” on Sat-
urday, March 28.

The event will also feature a
Madden 09 tournament.

To make this event more
than just a regular “sit down
behind the TV” scenario, the
Town Centre Mall teamed up
with Electrojack, who provid-
ed 26-inch television sets and
Wii consoles to go along with
the Playstations that were
already being provided for the
challenge.

The Wii Fit challenge will be

open for all ages and is expect-
ed to be just as big of a highlight
as the Madden 09 tournament.
There will also be sporting and
fitness clubs on hand to share
information about their club’s
activities, as well as giving all
those interested the opportuni-
ty to sign up or register to par-
ticipate in the various activities
and disciplines of these clubs.

The Ultimate Gamer’s and
Wii Fitness challenges will be
held at the Town Centre Mall
from 10am to 6pm and are
sponsored in part by Electro-
jack, Sports Locker and Island
Wholesale.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



CAC



Tyler Perry is
reportedly
seeking to buy
Bahamas island

MULTI-MILLIONAIRE :
producer, director and play-
wright Tyler Perry is reportedly ;
seeking to buy an island in the }
Bahamas. ;

People magazine has report- }
ed that Mr Perry intends to }
make the island a present to :
himself for his 40th birthday.

Reportedly, the idea came to }
the successful director, produc- }
er and actor of the Madea series
while visiting another private ;
island in the Exumas. He has }
not yet identified the island he }
wants to buy, but he’s said to }
be actively looking. ;

1,340 people
have heen
repatriated
this year

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter i
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net_

OVER 1,000 illegal migrants i
apprehended in the Bahamas :
have been returned to their }
countries of citizenship by the }
Department of Immigration this }
year. ;

Apprehension exercises }
throughout the Bahamas, includ-
ing recent operations in}
Eleuthera and New Providence, :}
have led to the repatriation of }
1,340 people in less than three }
months. :

Senior deputy director of the ;
Immigration Department Rod- }
erick Bowe said the numbers }
include 1,204 Haitian, 75 }
Jamaican, 28 Cuban and 13 }
Dominican Republic citizens.

Migrants who were appre- }
hended by teams of Immigration }
officers in the Family Islands ;
were sent to the Carmichael }
Road Detention Centre in Nas- }
sau before they were repatriated. }

Mr Bowe said: “Our appre- }
hension exercises will continue }
and we are in the process of }
arranging another deportation }
in a few days, so those persons
out there without work permits }
or legal status, we ask that their }
status becomes legal or they }
leave the country as soon as pos- }
sible.” ;



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingra-
ham, seated second left, is pic-
tured among Heads of Govern-
ment of the Caribbean Commu-
nity at the 20th Inter-Sessional
Meeting of CARICOM held in
Belize City, Belize, on Thursday,
March 12, 2009.

Pictured third and fourth left
respectively are CARICOM Sec-
retary General Edwin Carrington
and Dean Barrow, Prime Minis-
ter of Belize and Chairman of
CARICOM.

Photo Courtesy of the
CARICOM Secretariat

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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322-2157

‘No provision in law’ allowing NIB to
write off outstanding contributions

THERE is no provision in the law
that allows the National Insurance
Board to write off contributions that
have been outstanding for more than
ten, 20 years, or even 30 years, director
of NIB Algernon Cargill said in a press
release yesterday.

His statement was in response to a
Tribune article that suggested that mem-
bers of the business community are ina
state of “enormous consternation” over
the Board’s current and ongoing process
of updating its contribution records.

Mandated

Mr Cargill said that when NIB
encounters missing periods or payments
in a person’s contributions account they
are mandated by law to investigate and
resolve it.

“The National Insurance Board does
not have the right to discount a person-
*s entitlement and that’s exactly what
we would be doing if we were allowed to
write off arrears of contributions,” he
said.

“That means we either determine that
there were indeed no contributions

payable for the missing peri-
ods, or we determine that
the employer or self-
employed person actually
failed to pay contributions
for the periods.

“In the latter case, we
must pursue payment. We
have no other course of
action available to us under
the law.”

The NIB director said
that a few people seem to
be having a problem grasp-
ing this concept of perpetu-
al liability because it
appears to go against con-
ventional accounting prac-
tices or recommendations.

He said that in the case of social secu-
rity, the absence of a statute of limitation
on arrears of contributions has univer-
sally been a vital and necessary ingredi-
ent in ensuring the financial protection
of workers.

Further, NIB pays out in excess of
$150 million in claims annually, he said.

“To continue to do this and not chal-
lenge the NIB Fund, will require us to
continuously improve our collection effi-

Algernon Cargill



ciency and unfortunately
this means that employers
or self-employed persons
who have chosen to not pay
NIB contributions in the
past will be required to do
so now and to settle
arrears,” he said.

The NIB director said
that the Board is obligated
by the National Insurance
Act to ensure that all
employers have paid the
amount of contributions due
for each employee for each
a month, and that contribu-
tions submitted are accu-
rately posted or deposited
to the accounts of the
appropriate employees.

“Contributions represent one week
of a person’s work life. Social security —
in this case National Insurance — must
employ every tool at its disposal to
ensure that every week that a person
works is duly accounted for, because
one contribution can mean the differ-
ence between a sick, invalid or aged
worker qualifying for a benefit or being
disallowed.

BPSU wants minimum wage level in
private sector to match public service

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - THE
Bahamas Public Services
Union (BPSU) is asking gov-
ernment to increase the mini-
mum wage level in the private
sector to that of the public ser-
vice.

John Pinder, union presi-
dent, said yesterday:

“Shortly after the govern-
ment came to power in 2007,
the government lived up to its
obligation and increased min-
imum wage for the public ser-
vice.

“We have been asking the
private sector to follow suit,
however, around the time we
were expecting the govern-
ment to introduce minimum
wage to the private sector it
was at the same time we began
to experience an economic cri-
Sis.”

Mr Pinder said that the aver-
age salary in the public service
is $10,600 per annum or $5.20
per hour.

“T would still like to see the
minimum wage in this coun-
try come up to that of the pub-
lic service,” he said.

Mr Pinder said the BPSU is






further concerned about the
contractors on major projects
in the country being allowed to
bring in foreign workers to
avoid paying minimum wage.

“One of the things that con-
cerns us is when builders of
major projects ask for work
permits to bring in foreign
workers, mainly because they
don’t want to pay minimum
wage.

“They bring in these people
and pay them a smaller salary
than Bahamians. I believe that
when issuing work permits we
should ensure that all compa-
mies comply with the minimum
wage standard,” Mr Pinder
said.

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The BPSU president also
expressed concern about situ-
ations where work permits are
being granted for positions
that Bahamians are qualified
to hold.

“We have a number of
Bahamians who are qualified
for some jobs that are being
held by persons with work per-
mits. I believe we ought to
ensure that before issuing new
permits or renewing permits
that we find qualified Bahami-
ans to fill those jobs.

“In some areas we don’t
expect not to have any work
permits issued, but where
there are jobs that can be filled
by Bahamians, Bahamians
must be given an opportunity
to fill those jobs,” he said.



“We, therefore, have to ensure that
every eligible contribution is collected
and accounted for and when we are con-
fronted with situations that present a
conflict, particularly in cases where it
appears that NIB’s own record keeping
may not be current, we then have to
make a common-sense and practical
decision based on the contribution his-
tory of the employer and/or self
employed person.

Employee

“In every case, we make the decision
that benefits the employee and it is cer-
tainly not the intent to create any state
of ‘enormous consternation’,” he said.

Mr Cargill said a system was set up in
1972 where employees can verify that
their contributions are being paid to
NIB.

“The National Insurance Act always
provided employees the right to request
from their employers proof of contri-
butions, failing that, employees could
go in to any NIB local office, at any
time, to request an update on their con-
tribution accounts.

Mr. Eddie

Butler

your one and
only love,
Onya.

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand
Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the Purchaser’) now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provisions of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00

p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31% March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, 7" April, 2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-1530


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Why Obama is in a hurry

WASHINGTON — “You’ve got to give it
all you can, that first year,” the president
told a senior adviser. “Doesn’t matter what
kind of majority you come in with. You’ve got
just one year when they treat you right.”

President Obama, however, did not utter
these words of wisdom to Rahm Emanuel
or David Axelrod last month. Lyndon John-
son said them to his aide Harry McPherson
nearly a half-century ago.

Fleeting power and fickle public opinion
are enduring challenges for presidents. This
reality contributes to the “strike-while-the-
iron-is-hot” mentality we witness with most
new presidents dealing with Congress — par-
ticularly those with large, friendly majorities
on the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue.
Lyndon Johnson understood this; and so does
Barack Obama.

The new president’s political capital is slow-
ly evaporating. And if the White House
accepts this view —and I believe it does — it
explains a lot about their early tactics. It’s
not hard to miss the administration’s bold
ambition in the recently enacted
stimulus/spending initiatives as well as the
president’s budget blueprint. Tom Bevan
called it “Obama’s need for speed,” writing in
Real Clear Politics last week. Bevan explored
what factors “may help explain why he
appears to be in such a rush to push through
an expansive, transformational agenda” and
wondered if a more sober, deliberative
method — like the one John F. Kennedy
took — might be a better approach.

Former Clinton aide and ABC News com-
mentator George Stephanopoulos raised sim-
ilar questions this past weekend. “Some in
Washington wonder if he is taking on too
much too fast.” His blog entry carries the
provocative title: “Obama’s Agenda: Circuit
Overload?”

Obama’s need to find the right balance
between accommodating the public’s desire
for “change” while not “overloading the cir-
cuits” poses one of the trickiest tactical chal-
lenges facing the new White House.

I may not agree with the substance of Oba-
ma’s policies. And even successfully enacting
them may not win public plaudits in the end.
But his chances for notching “accomplish-
ments” are better this year than next.

An interesting trend in public mood
inevitably seems to affect every president in
much the same way. James Stimson, a polit-
ical scientist at the University of North Car-
olina at Chapel Hill, suggests political moods
in America ebb and flow like ocean tides.
As soon as a new president gets elected, the

public mood gradually begins to shift against
him.

Using polling data, Stimson estimates the
American political mood between 1952 and
2004. He then analyzes changes in the mood
over that half-century. “One pattern emerges
fairly strongly,” Stimson writes. “Preferences
*zig’ upward (toward liberalism) when
Republicans control the White House and
*zag’ downward when Democrats are in
charge.” In other words, “mood becomes
more conservative under liberal governments,
more liberal under conservative regimes,”
Stimson asserts.

These trends give meaning to Obama’s
full-throttle approach — his opponents are
probably gaining ground right now. A couple
factors account for Stimson’s findings.

First, when voters want “change,” like last
November, they install a new president. They
project that desire for something different
on candidates and parties. Yet when cam-
paigning turns to governing, vague promises
of “change” become very specific. Real poli-
cies replace projections, producing outcomes
not everyone likes.

Second, time in general just takes its toll on
presidential popularity. Looking at graphs
of presidential approval ratings for every
president back to Eisenhower, with a few
exceptions (George W. Bush following 9/11 is
one), most presidents’ approval declines as
their terms progress.

Part of this has to do with the mobilization
of the “out-party,” according to James Gim-
pel, political science professor at the Uni-
versity of Maryland. “Usually after a loss,
the out-party goes back to work, gets on
offense, and eventually rebuilds a seriously
threatening movement,” Gimpel told me this
week.

Gimpel raises another reason why incum-
bent presidents (and parties) begin to lose
electoral altitude over time. “There is also a
tendency for people to pay closer attention to
negative than positive information. The in-
party’s mistakes eventually pile up to create
quite a stunning negative impression, where-
as the in-party’s accomplishments remain less
well noticed. A few negatives seem to out-
weigh many positives,” he said.

Put it all together, and it yields a pretty
simple tactical conclusion: Move fast.
Whether Obama follows Johnson’s one-year
rule or is lucky enough to gain a little more
time — the clock’s ticking. And the presi-
dent knows the bell tolls for his agenda.

(This article was written by Gary Andres -

c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).



Do not ban
harvesting of
sea turtles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish the follow-
ing letter to Minister of
Agriculture Larry
Cartwright.

Dear Minister,

I read with interest a let-
ter addressed to you
appearing in the Monday,
March 9th, edition of The
Tribune and relating to the
issue of the harvesting of
marine turtles in The
Bahamas.

Mr Minister, while I and
many Bahamians agree
with the general sentiments
of those who accept a social
responsibility for the pro-
tection of our natural envi-
ronment and its resources, I
cannot agree that banning
Bahamians from harvesting
sea turtles is either a
responsible, fair or well-
thought-out response to the
sad plight of sea turtle pop-
ulations around the world.

Perhaps I should begin
my argument by pointing
to two of the more success-
ful examples of natural
resource protection in our
region: the conch farm pro-
ject located at Providen-
ciales in the Turks and
Caicos, and the Cayman
Islands turtle farm. Both
of these commercial ven-
tures demonstrate the cor-
rect response to the pres-
sures exerted on important
marine resources by local
eating habits.

Faced with similar issues
as us, neither country has
responded by simply ban-
ning and delegitimising
established local culinary
traditions.

Rather, both have
approached the issue with a
view to making local cus-
toms and culture sustain-
able, rather than viewing
that local culture as the
problem itself.

In fact, in Cayman, Turtle
consumption is perhaps
higher than anywhere else
in the world, since they
now sustainably produce
the resource, rather than
simply banning its harvest-
ing.

In Turks and Caicos,
conch consumption far sur-
passes ours per capita and
locals even have the luxury
of eating baby conchs,
escargot-style, as this has
absolutely no negative
impact on wild breeding
stocks (farmed conchs
being far cheaper than har-
vested ones).

In The Bahamas, on the
other hand, the blanket and
off-the-cuff response of our

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia net



local intelligentsia has
always been to simply
impose a ban in an effort
to “correct” Bahamian cul-
ture (which they seem to
regard as having legitimacy
only insofar as it does not
inconvenience some higher
interest originating else-
where).

The problem to them is
not finding a way to make
established Bahamian cul-
ture sustainable. The prob-
lem is Bahamian culture
itself, which, with one
swipe of a ministerial pen
can be instantly crimi-
nalised with no important
casualties.

That an utter cultural
arrogance is the subtext of
these campaigns is evident
in the kind of legislation
they lobby for and typically
get.

In addition to banning
the harvesting of the wild
resource, they tend to ban
eating and possessing it,
utterly closing the door on
the development of a local
maricultural solution.
Instead of being given real
responsibility for making
their culture sustainable,
Bahamians must simply
start eating like they do in
Anglo-Saxon countries or
20 to jail!

The truth, of course, is
that far from being a prob-
lem, traditional Bahamian
culinary culture is a natural
and positive thing for
Bahamians and its contin-
ued marginalisation has
had tragic consequences.

Bahamians black, white
and mulatto all share a
common culinary history
that heavily emphasises
seafood and high protein,
low-fat harvested meats.
This has been on balance a
good nutritional feature
and made for generations
of healthy Bahamians. (My
90-year-old Long Island
Grandmother recently gave
me a bag of pigeons shot
by her elder cousin in
Deadman’s Cay).

What has been positive-
ly bad is the cultural push
into the alien and
unhealthy eating styles of
Eurocentric post-industrial
countries. Instead of out-
lawing our own foods, we
should be discouraging the
dairy products, processed

foods and steroid-pumped
cows that are all alien to
our culture and have result-
ed in the massive increase
in hypertension, diabetes,
heart disease and other
very modern maladies.

Further, it is now beyond
denial that a diet centred
on big, mass-bred mammals
and dairy products is not
only bad for the body but
horrible for the environ-
ment. The global encroach-
ing replacement of indige-
nous food culture by these
Eurocentric culinary
imports has resulted in a
world pumping out more
methane and imbibing
more cholesterol than it
can handle.

From filling the world
with flatulent cows to clear-
ing Brazilian and North
American natural forests,
post-industrial Eurocentric
eating habits have had
more negative impact on
our collective environment
than all other culinary cul-
tures combined. Yet the
contemptuous stigmatiza-
tion of what others choose
to eat (whether Bahamian
turtles, Japanese porpoises
or Peruvian guinea pigs)
has so often clothed itself
in the language of environ-
mentalism and moral supe-
riority that you could
almost miss the glaring
irony.

Mr Minister, Bahamian
culture is not the problem.
So rather than criminalis-
ing huge elements of it, we
should instead be making
them more sustainable. If
turtles are under pressure,
we should be putting our
resources into farming
them. Instead, some would
have us simply criminalise a
culinary tradition that is as
integral to us as snails are
to the French or generally
tasteless food to the Eng-
lish.

These other societies
tend to respond to the call
of sustainability by manag-
ing their food resources
better, rather than crimi-
nalising their traditional
diets. Likewise, we in The
Bahamas must never be
intimidated by self-right-
eous, but ultimately arro-
gant and ignorant people
who would encourage us to
throw our own culture
away rather than investing
in making it sustainable.

ANDREW ALLEN
Nassau,
March, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CLENIE JOSEPH
PIERRE of STJAMES ROAD, NASSAU BAHAMAS,
P.O.BOX SS-6582, intend to change my name to CLYNIE
JOSEPH PIERRE If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

in Loving Me

(Orion Feenetis

who departed his life
March 8th 1921 - March 13, 2008

Mory A leading retailer is seeking applications for the

position of

COMPANY MESSENGER

REQUIREMENTS

The successful candidate will be responsible for
assisting in the delivery and collection of all company
work, mail and any other tasks as per daily assignment
sheet.

NOTICE is hereby given that HENLEY BIRTHWICK
PERRY of WINTON HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX N-3702,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

RESPONSIBILITIES

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 6 day of March, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

¢ Basic Computer skills

¢ Valid Driver’s License - Ability to drive both
automatic and standard shift vehicles

¢ Current Police Certificate

¢ Experience in a similar position

¢ Ability to work well with others in a fast paced
retail environment

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LENLINE MITCHELL
of MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
MARCH 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

REMUNERATION

Althoten you left a void in our heart
your presence remain
with us.

We offer in return an excellent remuneration package,
inclusive of medical and life insurance.

Interested persons please forward your resume to:
The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Fax: (242) 322-6607

From your children, grandchildren
relatives and friends

Rest In Peace


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





m By TANEKA THOMPSON :

whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net m By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter

"I am vex and deeply dis- :
turbed with the proliferation of i
pseudo-intellectual right wing }
groups who are criticising our }

government and advocating } : irv into the clai f
only their narrow views of how pe hase ligt ares ei ncae ete

our government should oper-

our governing system is one of i
democracy and our government }
is one of majority rule for all of
our people, all the time, and not }

just a few.
"In these economic recessive

wing rhetoric only serves to
retard efforts to stimulate the

Inquiry launched into
home intrusion claim

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE Department of Immi-
gration has launched an

Bahamian single mother that

ate. One must remember that ; afmed Immigration officers

barged into her home terrify-
ing her and her child during
the night.

The Immigration Depart-

i ment maintains that every

sive : effort will be made to discover
times such nonsensical right }

the truth behind the allega-

! tions made by Violet Hanna,

‘Gross Domestic Happiness' of

our people. It is quite obvious }
these few think the Bahamas :

Bahamas and Canada sign Asset Sharing Agreement

obviously and selectively not }

operates in a vacuum and have

been aware of much published
events in the US. Perhaps the ;
‘right wingers’ should try run- }
ning for political seats with their :

platform instead of throwing : alt aes
i laundering and other criminal activities.

‘stink fish' from the sidelines. "

— Tertiary educated Bahamian, :
Nassau. :

? ecution and suppression of crime through
"I vex 'cause there are far too }
many liquor stores in New Prov- }
idence. In 2008, there were 208 }
new applications for liquor }
stores, 1,289 renewals, and so far }
in 2009 there are 48 new appli- :
cations. There are just too many i
liquor stores in New Providence. i
And why is nothing been done }
about the ones that are open all :
day on Sunday, which by the way }
have a sign on the door that says
i day.
"The authorities need to start ;
cracking down on these estab- ;
lishments that continually break i
the laws of our land. We as
Bahamians need to start attend- }
ing the Licensing Authority }
meetings which grant these }

“closed.”

licenses, and continually object to

liquor in New Providence."

- Don't need a drink, Nassau. = ecution of criminal offences. It also

marked February 23 show up

te the ; Al, of Price Street, Nassau Vil-
economy, create and maintain i lage
existing jobs and enlarge the } :

THE Bahamas and Canada this week

Allegation that Immigration officers
barged into house of single mother

Speaking at a press confer-
ence on Thursday, Director of
Immigration Jack Thompson
said an inquiry into Ms Han-
na’s complaint of the intrusion
which took place at around
4am on February 26 was
launched on Friday, March 6.

He said a panel of four
senior officials headed by the
Immigration Department’s
assistant director Dwight
Beneby held a second meet-
ing on the matter following a

visit to Ms Hanna’s home on
Monday.

“In light of the serious alle-
gations and accusations levied
by Ms Hanna I appointed a
panel of senior Immigration
officers to conduct an internal
hearing, or inquiry, into the
matter,” Mr Thompson said.

“Upon the conclusion of the
inquiry the findings will be for-
warded to myself for further
review.

“As this matter is under

active investigation the depart-
ment wishes to offer no fur-
ther comment, save that the
allegations are serious and no
effort will be spared to get to
the bottom of the matter.”

Ms Hanna told The Tribune
how she and her seven-year-
old daughter Amber were
frightened awake when they
heard violent banging at the
front and back doors, and the
mother-of-two was ordered to
let in armed men and women
in khaki uniforms who alleged-
ly failed to identify themselves
as officers from the Immigra-
tion Department.

As they shouted aggressive-
ly at the pair, Amber was so

petrified she began to cry and
vomit, Ms Hanna said.

Presuming the armed
intruders were from the Immi-
gration Department, Ms Han-
na said she offered to show
them her Bahamian passport
but they declined to see it.

She claims the officers used
a maul to break down her back
gate and damage her back
door, compromising the secu-
rity of her Nassau Village
home.

Ms Hanna said she and her
daughter have suffered from
post-traumatic stress since the
invasion, and both fell ill with
pneumonia, with Amber hav-
ing to be treated in hospital.

signed an Asset Sharing Agreement, for-
malising an arrangement to confiscate
the proceeds of drug trafficking, money

The aim of the agreement is to improve
the effectiveness of law enforcement in
both countries in the investigation, pros-

the tracing, freezing, seizure and forfeiture
or confiscation of assets related to crime
and the creation of a framework for shar-
ing the proceeds and disposition of such
assets.

Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette and High Commissioner for
Canada to the Bahamas Denis Kingsley
signed the agreement for the respective
governments during a ceremony at the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the Good-
man’s Bay Corporate Centre on Thurs-

“This agreement today with Canada is
symbolic of the excellent relationship that
exists between our two countries and we
look forward to continued collaboration
in these and other matters,” Mr Symon-
ette said.

In March 1990, both governments

a t ; entered into the Mutual Legal Assistance
the granting of any more licensed

in Criminal Matters Treaty. This treaty

: facilitates the gathering of evidence and
i intelligence in the investigation and pros-

sa : : i enhances the capabilities in the confisca-
I'm vexed with the delivery ;

of mail. Why does a letter post- }

tion of the proceeds of crime.
“Mutual legal assistance treaties are

: : ? concluded between two countries for the
in my post office box on March

5 or 6? Something needs to be }
addressed in this department." }

- Curious, Nassau.

"I'm vexed and upset over :
the cutting of trees on Eastern }
Road past the Winton turn off. }

I thought we were being appreciation for accountability
encouraged to plant trees. Some i 4g appears to be more con-
of these trees that were cut must i .

have been 10 to 20 years old. Is i Cerne eg Vi pom vag anlny

this being done by the newly } 7. . ee
hired people contracted to clean } erick: Men ipine said in the Sen

ides? es
up the roadsides? It doesn't i the mid-year budget debate on

make sense."

~ Disgusted, Nassau. obsessed with holding “power

"T vex that I have to pay $10 : over the people, as opposed to

for a real Bahamian lunch - peas ; respecting the power from the

and rice, chicken, macaroni and } people.”
the like - and the people have }

the nerve to give me dry rice. | } /teasury was their personal tuck

was so hot when Lopen my con- } Shop. They ran government



Patrick Hanna/BIS photo. -

DENIS Kingsley, High Commissioner for Canada to the Bahamas, left, and Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symonette, right, shake hands following the signing of an Asset Shar-
ing Agreement on Thursday, March 12, 2009 during a ceremony at the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs in the Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre.

purpose of gathering and exchanging
information in an effort to enforce crim-
inal laws and confiscate the ill-gotten
gains of criminal activity,” Mr Symonette
said.

He said that notwithstanding the excel-
lent cooperation that already exists
between the Bahamas and Canada with
regard to sharing such assets even in the
absence of a formal agreement, in 2001

the two governments commenced nego-
tiations on an Asset Sharing Agreement
to formalise the arrangement.

“Despite our limited resources, the
Bahamas government remains committed
to fighting the war against drugs and oth-
er criminal activities and prosecuting
those criminals that transcend interna-
tional borders,” Mr Symonette said.
“Cooperation between our governments

in joint criminal investigations such as
narcotics trafficking and money launder-
ing envisaged by the Mutual Legal Assis-
tance Treaty has been mutually beneficial
to both our governments.”

Pursuant to the 1988 United Nations
Convention Against the Illicit Traffic in
Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Sub-
stances, the government of the Bahamas
implemented the Proceeds of Crime Act
2000, where Sections 52 and 53 provide
for the establishment and administration
of the Confiscated Assets Fund.

“By utilising resources confiscated from
convicted criminals specifically in the fight
against crime and to assist in the preven-
tion of crime, we can increase our efforts
in terms of improved infrastructure and
increased man power,” Mr Symonette
said.

He added that although the Bahamas
recognises that confiscated assets are ben-
eficial to improving its international crime
fighting efforts through the improvement
of infrastructure, manpower and other
projects, confiscating the profits of crim-
inal activities is also important as a deter-
rent to further illicit activities.

“In this regard, we are also pursuing
negotiations with the United States to
formalise existing cooperation into an
Asset Sharing Agreement,” Mr Symon-
ette said.

High Commissioner Kingsley noted
that the Bahamas and Canada have
enjoyed a long-standing relationship that
can be improved through such agree-
ments.

McAlpine: ‘Opposition lacks appreciation for accountability’

THE OPPOSITION lacks

and prestige, Senator Rev Fred-

ate during his contribution to

i Thursday.

tainer and see all that rice with }
; store. They spent what they

not a stitch of gravy on it.

"How people expect you to ;
eat dry rice? They mussy want }
me to choke eh? I don't think I :
should have to tell the girl :
behind the counter, who already }
act like she doin' me a favour :

by taking up that stingy food."

? or the old PLP government,” he

i said. Ss

- Weak black man, Nassau. ;

¢ Are you vex?
Send your complaints to
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

? when the FNM came to office in
i 2007, they discovered that the
i former PLP government had
i spent money that was not

He accused the PLP of being

“They acted as if the Public

ministries like a mom and pop

liked, when they liked, however
they liked and it didn’t matter
what we, the people, liked. That
‘all-for-me-baby’ mentality just
never seemed to be broken,

“We had to move legislation
to approve money that had
already been spent by our pre-
decessors, even up to two years
prior to them leaving office. Let
me hasten to say that all gov-
ernments have been guilty of
this in the past, but old or new,
those opposite really hold the
record in regards to the financial
amounts and number of times
for which they gave no account-
ability or reasonable explana-
tion to the Bahamian people,”
he said.

Senator McAlpine said that
the mid-year budget exercise
gives the government an oppor-
tunity to account for the funds



and to ascertain whether or not
it is on target to meet the coun-
try’s fiscal budgetary obligations.

“If there are changes due to
circumstances or Cabinet deci-
sions then the government of
the day, or future, have a leg-
islative responsibility to inform
the people of the Bahamas as
to why, when and where funds
have been detoured from its
original intent. I heard someone
in the other place opposing the
government, describing this as
a useless exercise. Is that how
the Opposition really feels about
accounting to the Bahamian
people, as useless,” Senator
McAlpine said.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427






























BREA

“SS

PRE:

F ROM BONDA GES

Come! Join us this Sunday as we
come together and experience Deliverance, Healing

whether talking about the new

The Senator claimed that

(www.gtwesley.org)

7:00 a.m. Rev. Charles Sweetingr/Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Youth Choir/Dance Troupe Anniversary
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Franklyn Bethel



and Victory in the presence of God.

UNDAY, MARCH I5TH, 2009




OPPORTUNITIES FOR






pt a Ee ad
SUNDAY SERVICES

? accounted for.



An Service

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)
BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL
‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching iiam4& 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
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Wad, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

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Prayer Time: it! 30. i

inane ies sine min Mieinatiinias ines Wana dele ae cae ina: FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Prescling thas Bits a6 fs, So rear ee any ere Church School during Worship Service aes .

[Pastor A Mills * Prone: 393-0563 * Box N-aB22 | iain AIT Wi

Se MINISTRY
CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL en

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY
SUNDAY, MARCH 15TH, 2009

Tram. Speaker EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Bro. Gregory Bethel Assembly Of God
Eee ee aie rine Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville

Glory In Difficult Times
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m. ab ERROR (Cg eee ee ec
Ele ETE tie ER

ry Mating

Place: Twynam Heights

off Prince Charles Drive NE 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O,Box $3-3631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)
PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

"We are also starting some-
thing extraordinarily innovative,
you don't find it anywhere else in
the world. We're creating a prod-
uct called 'Club Grand Bahama’,
which is all-inclusive. We can
have an all-inclusive electroni-
cally nowadays — where the cus-
tomer stays one place, have their
meal some place else, goes on
tour some place else and pays
for it all in advance. So if the cus-
tomer wants to know what the
total cost of a vacation is, we are
going to do that. We don't know
how successful it's going to be,
but we're going to give it a shot,”
he told the Senate during his con-
tribution to the 2008/2009 mid-
year budget.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
added that for January, 2009 the
total number of visitor arrivals
to Nassau, Paradise Island and













OMe

EEPORT
11A East oral Road , Freeport G.B., Bahamas

Telephone: oa aretiis/ | (baz) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ° Fax: (249) 373-3005

Cruise passenger :

arrivals are up

the Family Islands were up.
However for the same period in

Grand Bahama, the total number

of visitors decreased.

However in terms of Grand }

Bahama's troubled tourism front,

the senator said he is confident :
that the island is poised to }
become one of the leading cruise }

ports in this part of the world.

"We might be able to make

an announcement in the not-too-
distant future, that will bring this
whole thing about," he said.

The senator also commented :
on the state of the current soft ;
tourism industry, stressing that }

the country has been through

downturns before and will :

rebound.

Robinson and Soldier Rede on NP, Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: {242} 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
















Minister Clarita
Elizabeth
Major-Thompson,
84

of Bacardi Road, will be held
on Sunday March 15th 2009
at 2:00pm at Good Sheperd
Church of God, Ida Street off
Robinson Road, Officiating
will be Bishop Sherwin
Smith assisted by Minister

Franklyn Rolle. Interment will follow in Woodlawn






Gardens, Solider Road.

Left to cherish her fond memories are: Daughters: Attorney
Stephanie Ann Wells, Jennifer Thompson, Earthel Smith,
Julie Thompson-Cooper and Brenda Thompson (pre-
deceased). Sons: Alfred Thompson, Jr. Jefferson, Stephen
and Rodney Fred Thompson (pre- deceased). Sister-In-
Law: Elcita Ferguson of Forbes Hill, Exuma. Grand
Daughters: Dr. Keysha Smith, Attorney Stephanie A.T.
Wells, Attorney Lillith Smith, Mikia Cooper, Rodina
Thompson-Armbrister, Kiera Johnson, Danielle, Altamese
and Mornette Thompson, Kayla Armbrister and Dedrie
Rolle. Great Grand Daughters: Antonesha Wells, Lakia
Jones, Claudia & Christa Rolle, Lavette Armbrister,
Shamara Armbrister, Rain Thompson, Jamie Francois and
Raven Wells. Daughters-In-Law: Gail, Myrna and
Esseymae Thompson. Neices: Dorothy Smith, Joycelyn
Ramsey, Sambrianna Walkine, Vandolyn Stubbs, Chrystal
Benson of Great Falls Montana and Michelle McDonald.
Grand Sons: Cleveland and Tennyson Wells Jr., Rodney
Thompson, Jr. Rev. Dwight Thompson of Oklahoma,
Kevin, Kino and Javano Thompson, Christopher Smith,




















Jamaal and Michael Cooper Jr. Sons-In-Laws:

Hon.

Tennyson R. Wells, Dr. Michael Cooper, Edward
Thompson. Grand Son-In-Laws: Liviticus and Omar













Armbrister. Great Grand
Armbrister. Nephews:

Florida, Willard Ferguson Jr.

Son: Jade and Shamaro

Whitfield, Freddie, Ishmael
Bradshaw Major and Rev.

Kenneth Major of Miami
of Freeport Grand Bahama.

Care Giver: Mrs. Sandra Augustin. A Host of Other
Relatives and Friends including: Bishop Sherwin Smith
& Church Family Good Shepherd Church of God, Officers
and Members Churches of God, Inc. Pastor Philemon
Wilson, Officers & Members Faith Temple Ministries,
Pastor Robert McPhee, Officers and Members Church of
God Cathedral, Coopers Terrace, Mrs. Dorothea Brown
and family, Mr. & Mrs Kirk Johnson & Family, Mr.
Earnest Brown, Mr. Darville Walkine and the Bacardi



Road Family.
Viewing will be held in the

Serenity Suite at Restview

Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and
Soldier Roads on Saturday from 10:00 am to 6:00pm and
at the church on Sunday from 12:30 pm until service time.

Securit

Abaco Markets

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Miomeey at Work

Possible new air charter to Freeport

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - As Grand
Bahama hotels continue to struggle
with “unacceptably” low occupancy
levels, Bahamas Hotel Association
president Robert Sands said that
news of a possible new air charter
service to Freeport is good news for
the island.

“There is a new charter that is
possibly coming to Grand Bahama
that will include a one stop going
onto possibly Cuba out of Italy —
that is good news,” he told reporters
on Friday.

“We also want to see how we can
ensure that one of the events of the
Miss Universe can take place here in
late August...to help (Grand
Bahama) move beyond the difficul-
ties you have been having in recent
times.”

Mr Sands, the newly elected
BHA president, met with hoteliers
and other stakeholders here on
Grand Bahama during a BHA
meeting held at the Sunrise Resort
and Marina.

He was concerned about the
occupancy levels on Grand Bahama,
particularly at the larger properties,
which have been experiencing very
low occupancies.

Also as the Isle of Capri moves to
close its casino operation at Our
Lucaya Resort, Mr Sands said that
the gaming presence is another area
of concern that must be addressed
on Grand Bahama.

“Tam aware that the Minister of
Tourism is very concerned about
the gaming presence in Grand
Bahama.

“Tam also aware that he has been
meeting with principles here in
Grand Bahama to see how we can
ensure that there is a gaming pres-
ence in Grand Bahama. I am aware
through meetings with the Grand
Bahama Port Authority that it is a
priority for them as well.

“T am not the spokesperson for
either of these entities, but it is not a
matter that is being left unattended.
It is being given focused attention by
the Minister to bring a reasonable
conclusion in the shortest possible
time,” he said.

Business

Mr Sands noted that “extremely
disappointing” occupancy levels at
the Westin and Sheraton Hotels at
the Our Lucaya property have
impacted business at the Isle of
Capri.

“So there is still a tremendous
amount of work that will have to be
done to raise the level of visitor
arrivals to this destination that will
be participating within the hotels,”
he added.

Mr Sands stressed that efforts
must be taken to create sufficient
demand for Grand Bahama so that
hotels can run at respectable occu-
pancies that will allow them to be
financially viable.

When asked about the impor-

tance of the reopening of Royal
Oasis, he said once sufficient
demand is created then it will cause
the need for it to be reopened.

“There will be compelling rea-
sons for the powers that be to push
for that to happen, but we must take
baby steps.

“We must really create the oppor-
tunity for Grand Bahama to now
begin to achieve occupancies that
are much higher than they are cur-
rently achieving, and thereby cause
for employment of persons in this
area, and also allow the investors of
those respective hotels to realise a
fair return on their investment in
their area.”

According to Mr Sands, the
BHA’s small member hotel prop-
erties are doing better, in terms of
occupancy, than the larger proper-
ties on Grand Bahama.

He noted that the Pelican Bay
Resort, the Best Western Castaways
Resort and the Wyndham Fortuna
Resort are performing reasonably
well.

“Two or three of the midsize
properties have found a business
niche that has allowed them to oper-
ate at respectable levels.

“Those hotels (mentioned above)
are doing reasonably well, but they
represent a small percentage of the
total number of available rooms in
Grand Bahama,” he said.

Mr Sand stated that the BHA is a
national association that addresses
the needs of member hoteliers as
well as allied members.

Grand Bahama has always played

a pivotal role in the organisation
over the years, but is now currently
experiencing levels of business that
are unprecedented, he said.

The association plans to address
four major issues of concern. The
first priority is airlift frequency and
cost to Grand Bahama.

Grand Bahama International Air-
port has one of the highest turn-
around and airfare costs for airlines
flying to Freeport.

The Ministry of Tourism is
presently seeking to reduce or elim-
inate airport taxes and fees to attract
new airlifts to the island.

Initiative

“The Minister of Tourism has put
a lot of this political equity behind
this singular initiative. He strongly
believes that reducing the cost of
airlift is paramount on his list of
things to accomplish. I think he is
having some results in this area,”
said Mr Sands.

Mr Sands said the second priori-
ty is marketing initiatives. The third
priority is agriculture related in
terms of cost of food supplies for
hoteliers, and the fourth is the issue
of work permits.

“Short-term work permits espe-
cially with brand properties is a con-
cern because we have multiple com-
panies that seem to be frustrated
with the timeliness in which some
of these things are awarded, and
that impacts on their business,” he
explained.

FROM page one

“Someone was wondering what I was getting
for the article, but I told them: ‘I don’t want
anything. There is nothing I want’.”

He said he had received several calls from
well-wishers since the article appeared.

Mr Tynes’ riveting disclosures created may-
hem in the PLP, which organised a press con-
ference on Thursday in an attempt to salvage
Sir Lynden’s legacy. Arguments over the arti-
cle have raged on radio talk shows all week.

PLP leader Perry Christie launched a bitter
attack on Mr Tynes and The Tribune’s man-
aging editor, John Marquis, calling the article
scurrilous “garbage” that was full of lies and
fairy-tales.

But The Tribune yesterday published a page
one story showing that Mr Christie’s views
seemed completely at odds with what he said
when he was fired from Pindling’s Cabinet
25 years ago.

Chauncey Tynes Sr

At the time, he and the present prime min-
ister, Hubert Ingraham, were dismissed after
they protested over corruption in the Pindling
government, particularly in relation to the
drug trade.

Activist Paul Moss is planning a demon-
stration outside The Tribune’s office next
Tuesday, when he hopes Pindling supporters
will show solidarity in protecting the former
prime minister’s name.

Mr Moss said it was important for the ex-
PM’s supporters to speak out “as he is not
alive to defend his own name.”

He said the purpose of the protest was not
to disparage Mr Marquis’s name, but to give
Bahamians a chance to express their opin-
ions.

If it goes ahead, the protest will be the
fourth placard demonstration to be held out-

side The Tribune in the last two years to
express fury over the managing editor’s arti-
cles.

In 2007, three demonstrations were staged
over Mr Marquis’s role in hastening the end of
the PLP government following the Anna
Nicole Smith controversy.

Some protesters called for his deportation.
One carried a placard branding him “‘a jour-
nalistic terrorist”.

Yesterday, phone calls and e-mails of sup-
port continued to pour into The Tribune over
the Tynes revelations.

Mr Marquis said: “The truth is often very
hard to swallow, especially for people in denial
like the PLP. However, Mr Tynes’ information
was crucial for the writing of Bahamian his-
tory.
a salute him for his courage, for his honesty
and his unshakeable integrity. Every other
right-thinking person in this country should be
doing the same.”

Proposed US legislation ‘bigger threat than blacklisting’

FROM page one

tion with an expected push from
co-sponser President Barack
Obama and emerging support
from a few European nations.
Recnently, US Treasury Sec-
retary Timothy Geithner told the
Senate Finance Committee in
Washington, DC, that the Amer-
ican government will build an
"ambitious" plan to crack down
on companies that use offshore
centres to avoid paying taxes.
At a joint session of the US
Congress nearly two weeks ago,
British Prime Minister Gordon
Brown urged world leaders to

"outlaw shadow banking systems
and offshore tax havens."

Mr Fitzgerald warned that this
represents an intense, multi-
pronged and multi-national attack
on the Bahamas’ financial ser-
vices industry.

"I am of the opinion that this is
the greatest threat now facing our
country and is far worse than the
crisis we faced during the black-
listing of 2000," Mr Fitzgerald
said in the Upper Chamber, dur-
ing his contribution to the mid-
year budget debate.

"At the core of the financial
services industry is private bank-
ing and if our private banking is
dismantled, the financial

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ALEXIO RENARDO
RUSSELL of Eastern Estates in the Eastern District of
the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intend to change my name
to ALEXIO RENARDO COOPER. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date

of publication of this notice.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 13 MARCH 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,658.91 | CHG -1.37 | %CHG -0.08 | YTD -53.45 | YTD % -3.12

FINDEX: CLOSE 813.75 | YTD -2.53% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Bahamas Property Fund

7.00
0.63
3.15

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
2.83 Colina Holdings
4.80
1.31
2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco

Foecol (S)

ISD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

7.00
0.63
3.15

2.83
6.59
1.43
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.

7.00
0.63
3.15

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.03
0.14
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

2.83
6.56
1.57
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

EPS $

FG CAPITAL
BROKERAG!

MARKETS
E & ADVISORY SERVICES

Div $
0.070
0.992
0.244

-0.877

0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

aapya
gaalZavoolsakoas
Don®Zonwol

aaa
a-0-

services
destroyed."

Despite mounting concern in
some sectors about the proposed
legislation, government has
remained relatively calm. Speak-
ing in the House of Assembly
recently, Education Minister Carl
Bethel tried to quash what he
called “hysteria” surrounding the
proposed Act, saying that recent
announcements by Mr Geithner
and Mr Brown do not foreshadow
an immediate threat to the coun-
try's off-shore centres.

Mr Fitzgerald chastised this
"wait and see" stance, outlining
that regional neighbours like the
Cayman Islands, Barbados, and
Antigua have already taken a
proactive approach.

"Barbados has been proactive
in taking a structured approach
to signing exchange of informa-
tion acts or treaties with individ-
ual nations apart from the US,

industry will

Perry Christie

FROM page one

actually helping us have a public conversation

about it.

“It’s hard to enter into that conversation, and
people like Perry Christie wield such influence the
debate is now about John Marquis and The Tri-
bune’s ongoing war against the Bahamian people,
which is feeding into xenophobia, race animosity,

and fear, and all sorts of things.”

Sir Lynden’s leadership practice of rooting out
those who challenged his leadership to build a

which is now the only nation with
which the Bahamas has an
exchange of information treaty.

"Antigua has retained the ser-
vices of one of the top law firms
in the US called Rubinstein &
Rubinstein LLP who have assist-
ed them in the formulation of
arguments to support and encour-
age co-operation between them-
selves and the other G-20 coun-
tries who have concerns about
the financial and regulatory
regimes of Antigua. The Society
of Trust and Estate Practitioners
of Great Britain (has) pointed out
that many of the financial regula-
tory regimes of the countries
attempting to attack offshore cen-
tres fall well behind international
standards."

Mr Fitzgerald questioned what
strategies the government had in
place to counter this possible
threat on the country's off-shore
sector.

Perry Christie



party of devoted supporters should also be discussed, Dr Strachan

said.

“The country is not as democratic as it could be and Pindling has a

lot to do with that,” he said.

“And Perry Christie and Hubert Ingraham haven’t done as much as
they ought to to deepen democracy and that has a lot to do with

working under Lynden Pindling.”

Rather than clinging to Sir Lynden’s legacy, the PLP should step out
of the former leader’s shadow and find a new message which speaks to
today’s Bahamians while taking an objective view of the late Sir Lyn-
den to move democracy forward, Dr Strachan said.

“T think the PLP is like many other parties in the Caribbean who con-
tinue to use these iconic leaders for political capital after they have

gone,” he added.

“But it’s a two edge sword because despite the good they did, there
is the evil they did, so they run a risk of continuing to hark back to that

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Daily Vol.
0.00 T%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
0.00 0.00 0.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv Last 12 Months
1.3664
2.8988
1.4432
3.3201
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0440 0.80
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volurne of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAY - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

legacy.”

Dr Strachan’s play, “Black Crabs Tragedy”, written in 1997, attempts
to demystify the image of Sir Lynden by discussing the best and worst
aspects of his leadership, and how it reflects the people who held him
in power.

FROM page one

S52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

FBB17
FBB22

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00

52wk-Low EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

4.540
0.000
0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

Man charged

vehicle.

During an earlier arraignment
in Freeport, Rigby appeared
before Magistrate Helen Jones on
several charges, including escape,
resisting arrest, possession of an
unlicensed firearm and ammuni-
tion, and assault with a deadly
weapon.

He was not required to enter a
plea to the charges, which were
adjourned for hearing to June 2.
He was represented by K Brian
Hanna.

remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison
until September 3, 2009, for a
preliminary inquiry into the mat-
ters.

After his arraignment in court,
the family of Tanelus became very
emotional outside the courtroom.

The mother of the victim and
other family members were crying
as police escorted Rigby to an
awaiting police van.

“We feed all of y’all and this is
what y’all did. I hope you rot in
jail,” shouted one woman pointing
at Rigby sitting inside the

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3041
2.9230
1.3828
3.3201
11.8789

100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

28-Feb-09
28-Feb-09
6-Mar-09
31-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund 0.06
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

3.64
4.40

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stook Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S11) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009



APT 3-G








GREAT. I'LL BE SPENDING THE 2
EVENING PICKING OLIVES OFF
THIS G/NORMOUS PIES

THAT'LL BE
$28.50, LADY.

I’M GORRY I
DIPN'T GET A
CHANCE TO SAY
GOOPNIGHT TO
APRIL!



PARTY PIZZA
FOR MAGEE,



©2009 by North America Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved.

SFRAINK BOLLE




SHE'S OFF
TO SPAIN iN
THE MORNING!
YOU'LL SEE
HER AGAIN:

was
WHEN? WHY DON'T WE
ALL HAVE DINNER HERE
WHEN SHE RETURNS?

MARVIN

YOUR FATHER
HAS STARTED
TO GRow



HE THINKS IT
MAIKES HIM LOOK Like
SEAN CONNERY

AFTERNOON,
LADIES To THInk HE
LOOKS LiKE A

MR. B., YO TOILET BOWL

IN THAT CASE, MR. B.,
I GUESS ULL SAVE MY

VE GOTTA





















LOOK LIKE YOU
DON'T HAVE
A CARE IN
THE WORLD

SEEMS TO BE |.
JUST RIGHT AT |=
THE MOMENT,

I'M HOME. I DIDNT GET
MY PROPELLER BEANIE
TOON, DIDI?

we 6
reek

“EVERY BIRTHDAY PUTS HIM ONE YEAR CLOSER

10 LEAVING HOME.”



Across
1 Uninspired
footman (10)
6 Count in German (4)
10 Mature, or mature toa
point (5)
11 With us details can
produce weariness (9)
12 Taking someone on and
winning (8)
13 Moral principle held by the
thick-skinned (5)
15 Refreshed as sleep
passes away (7)
17 An inch out perhaps, but
maintaining
contact (2,5)
19 Agirl after a bit of



butter for her 1
kneecap (7)
21 Nota straight 1
musician? (7)
22 Perform aerobatics in an 1
advertising display (5)
24 In the main perhaps he’s 2
all at sea (8)
27 Make sure as sure can 2
be (9)
28 Not an all-American name
for a girl (5) 2
29 Girl right at all
times (4) 2
30 Have one nightcap too
many? (5,5) 2











Across: 1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8
Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk,
14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18
Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder,
25 Younger.

Down: 1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4
Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7














14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20
Beau, 23 Dig.











AS A MATTER OF
FACT, You DID!



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down

1

2

3

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember,

START LOCKING

NEWS FOR LATER THAT FRONT

-penvese: udu pom “our “areoIpUAg suNjeay Bury Ac BOUT)

HAHA! IT TOOK WEEKS
AND WEEKS OF WAITING,
BUT AT LONG LAST {T'S
HERE? NoW 1 FINALLY,
FINALLY GET TO PUT TON!

“SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED.
BATTERIES NOT INCLUDED. ”



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



























3/14

Difficulty Level %& %&

Leave the car where one
can take a stroll (4)

One kept — in
suspense? (9)

lan’s confused with love
for a girl (5)

A king with supporters
stages a recovery (7)

A ship, for example, with
first-rate missile (7)
Being coarse on the golf
course (5)

Is it instrumental in
warning Paris pedestrians?
(6,4)

Governed, having been
shown the way (8)

Main part of a book taken
by travellers (3,7)
Distressed Royalist living
the life of a hermit (8)
Taking bullets from an old

ree eel

Across

Exhausted after a day’s
shopping? (5)
Found on stage (4)

13 Pitch forward
suddenly (5)

15 Even-tempered (7)

17 Account for (7)

19 Urban fortress (7)

Across: 1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 21 Raining heavily (7)

gun | dismantled (9) Ww
Not a sunny greeting? _I 1 Dispenser of
(3,4) N medicines (10)
Cafe and inn combine N 6B 4
somehow to make a) eee (4)
money (7) o. 10 Maintain (5)
Dad’s brother Sam is in 11 Ad-lib (9)
the U.S. (5) a 12 Portray in words (8)
LL

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 22 Provoke aversion
Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 in (5)

Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22

Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. 24 Common sense (8)
Down: 1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 27 Not guilty

judgment (9)
Construct (5)

Long hard journey (4)
Cave-dweller (10)

Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7

Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 28
14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 29
Step, 23 Sad. 30

©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

peels Wed) Met fe



DO You HAVE ANY THING
YOU'D LIKE TO PONATE TO
OUR CHARITY ORIVE



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

uT HE



HASN'T

Bi
FINIGHED BREAKFAST
YET

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Loere must

Lar aos Logie
wend af 2 Pharos

inkjel prumber).
TODAYS TARGET













CV guia works of
four letters of Der! can
Fea naake from the
heirs. ahi lee? Tin
Ggkur a WOOT, Baul

be wh eh
ont Taine letter ward Wo
plies, oF wee fornia
Bm uo “87, mo moored
with Initial ropials ond
nen wars with 2 hyphen

penmbbed. ‘The Lert

Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer



i Ny pes
a

TESTEROAY'S SOLUTION
hen Genk bund buoder
bint bond Bone bomnd
horker Teun wer

letter may be usedomee | brine dent deal
aeiky. Faas nat eonmtain dine diner dint door
Loe oeuloe leller aml a 5

dtane: nhred Index
inert inter inde inten
ot, woned mec ext
Gitte Tek: note noted
ment en Fein rele
rem renl cont rub
rodent tend tenor tem

i Hinder TINTRR ROK

pernethe| fe iikjet in

Line loge lice lner
tom. toxin trend tone

Cee 1, very pooeel 21h,
Bee en 2 lor mre),
aotubion Mood

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer









































































Down

1

@

aon a &

14
16
18
20
21

25
26

International

treaty (4)
Consequently (2, 1,6)
Ridicule by

imitation (5)

Style of cooking (7)
Highest in rank (7)
Superior (5)
Extremely uncertain
(5-3-2)

Disintegrate (8)
Ribes rubrum (3,7)
The butterfly bush (8)
Strong dislike (9)
Shallow port boat (7)
Interval of

delay (4,3)
Resentment (5)
Unmentionable (5)
Not in operation (4)

















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

3|9/8]1 7\/2/5|/4/6| PSE SAN
2\6|7/9 4/5/8/1/3| M2 /1/4 M4 8/7 9/3
1154/6 8/3/2l7/9| (N8|7\9 Bas 417 8/5
413/915 6 1}7l21\8] M2 RMS 2 1 M7 1

ao 86/2/11 4/2

6/211/7 3/8/9 15/4 SD EEL.
7/8\5)2 9/4/6/3)1 M1 2901 7/6 9/8
8/4/6/3 2/7[1/9/5 2/9 R78 903 |1
5/7/1318 1/9/4/6/2| M7 /8\9/2/6 No 38/3

vid 9/1|2]4 sj6/3iai7| MÂ¥3/4i6/1)2 is 7/2































Heads | Win, Tails You Lose

South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
4K J763
Â¥6
4753
AKI?

WEST EAST
o— 4Q 104
Â¥Q87542 VK I93
#KQI6 #1082
854 #Q 109

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VA 10

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$763
The bidding:
South West North East
14 Pass 34 Pass
4

Opening lead — king of diamonds.

The ideal goal in bridge is to
establish a “heads I win, tails you
lose” position.

Consider this deal played by
Bruce Bell, New Zealand star. He got
to four spades and ordinarily would
have made the contract easily. How-
ever, since East happened to have all
three missing spades and the guarded
queen of clubs as well, it might seem
that the contract was doomed. But
Bell made his game anyway, and,

what’s more, there was nothing the
defenders could do to stop him.

West led the king of diamonds,
which Bell ducked. If West had now
shifted to a club, declarer, after learn-
ing of the 3-0 trump division, could
have avoided a second diamond loser
by establishing dummy’s fourth club.

But West led another diamond at
trick two, taken by the ace, and when
Bell next cashed the ace of trumps,
he learned that East had a trump trick
coming. It looked as though the con-
tract would now depend on winning
a club finesse, but Bell found a way
to make 10 tricks without the finesse.

At trick four, he played the ace of
hearts and continued by ruffing a
heart in dummy, He then exited with
a diamond, won by West with the
jack.

West could do no better than
return a club, taken with the ace. Bell
then played the K-x of trumps, sad-
dling East with the lead and render-
ing him helpless. East had to return a
club or yield a ruff-and-discard,
either of which gave South the con-
tract.

The endplay developed by Bell
was typical of the “heads I win, tails
you lose” position. No matter how
East-West defended, Bell had a
countermeasure available that would
get him home safely.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc,
THE TRIBUNE

S
i

SATURDAY, MARCH 14,

PAGE 9





2009



po

Scotiabank
sponsors
Lightning
track club...
See page 10



SAC victorious!

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

on’t look now,

but the St

Augustine’s

College Big

Red Machines
added the 21st championship
title to the history books of the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations’ Track and
Field Championships.

But this year, the Queen’s
College Comets made a gallant
effort, falling short by just 164
points as they continued to
close the gap in the point stand-
ings.

At the end of the three-day
meet yesterday at the Thomas
A Robinson Track and Field
Stadium, which saw 11 records
established, the Big Red
Machines celebrated their vic-
tory lap with a total of 1,282
points.

They were eventually joined
by the Comets with 1,118.

No other school came close
as the St Anne’s Bluewaves
took third place with 448.

SAC’s head coach William
“Knucklehead” Johnson said
they knew it was going to be
tough, but they are just happy
that they were able to prevail
once again.

“They put together a good
team,” said Johnson of Queen’s
College. “They had a lot of new
athletes in a lot of categories,
sO we expected it.”

Johnson, however, said his
Big Red Machines were just
simply too strong across the
board and that made the differ-
ence.

He said “hard work” was the
key to their success. “The kids
wanted it more. There was a lot
of talk about what QC is going
to do and who they had. But
we stayed focused on the prize
and we did what we had to do.”

But credit the entire coaching
staff, including twin sisters
Dianne Woodside, who
returned to team up with Dawn
Johnson, Tito Moss, Norma
Miller, John Todd and all of the
other people who assisted in the
various areas.

As they tasted the thrill of
victory for another year, John-
son said they are coming back
next year “bigger and stronger”
to go for their 22nd crown.

If Queen’s College has any-
thing to do with it, they’re going
to regroup and try to pull off
the upset.

“We didn’t perform as well
as we could have,” said Comet’s
coach Gary Markham. “We had
athletes not getting into the

TASS
final point
standings

HERBP’S a look at the
final point standings from
the Bahamas Association
of Independent Secondary
Schools’ 21st Track and
Field Championships that
wrapped up yesterday at

the Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium:
St Augustine’s College:
1,282
Queen’s College: 1,118
St Anne’s: 448
St Andrew’s: 355.50
St John’s College: 309
Temple Christian: 282.50
Nassau Christian
Academy: 278
Jordan Prince
William: 192
Aquinas College: 153.50
Charles W Saunders: 119
Kingsway Academy: 67
Faith Temple
Academy: 66
Westminister
College: 62.50



Queen’s College Comets close behind for
second in record breaking track meet



a = ol

COUGARS bantam 4x100m team edge out SAC for the win...

finals because they were ill and
we had some bad exchanges
that hurt us in the relays.

“But we’re very happy. We’re
closing the gap. That is our
biggest aim. But we have to
admit that SAC has got some
phenomenal and talented ath-
letes. But only one school is
going to do it. They deserve to
win, but we will be on their
heels again next year.”

On the record front, four of
SAC’s athletes and two 4 x 400
relay teams inked their names
in the record books, while QC
had one individual athlete and
three relay teams.

Temple Christian Suns had
one of the records, thanks to
Laquardo Newbold’s winning
time of 17 minutes and 54.22
seconds in the senior boys’ 5,000
which erased the previous mark

of 17:58.87 by Justin Miller in
2007.

Perhaps one of the most
impressive performances came
on the field where SAC’s bas-
ketball standout Jabari Wilmott
cleared 6-feet, 8 1/4-inches to
shatter the old mark of 6-6 that
was posted by fellow SAC stu-
dent Horace Pierre in 2000.

Wilmott’s mark also exceed-
ed the qualifying mark of 6-4
for the Carifta Games in St
Lucia over the Easter holiday
weekend. It was the second
time this season that Wilmott
has achieved the feat.

“T just went out there to do
my best. My goal was to jump 6-
6,” Wilmott said. “But when I
came to 6-10, my legs started
to get tired. So I was very
pleased with the performance.”

This would be the second

= = = —



SAC Big Red Machines’ Jabari Wilmott
jumped into the record books, break-
ing the meet record in the high jump

yesterday.

(Photos by Tim Clarke/ Tribune staff



COMETS hold off Big Red Machines in the junior girls 4x100m finals yesterday...

Carifta appearance for Wilmott,
who noted that his goal this
year is to win a medal.

SAC’s Kenya Culmer domi-
nated in the senior girls triple
jump. She soared 36-5 to
remove the old mark of 34-11
3/4 by Eunae Wright in 2007.

The only other record on the
field came from Devinn
Cartwright of Queen’s College
in the intermediate girls high
jump. She did 5-5 1/4 to surpass
the record of 5-3 3/4 by Janice
Ezegbunam of SAC in 1998.

Back on the track, individual
track records also came from
Shaunae Miller in the interme-
diate girls’ 300 hurdles in 43.93
to replace the previous time of
44.05 by SAC’s Tess Mullings
in 2006. Devinn Cartwright also
went under the record in 44.02
for second.

And Deshana Burnside led a
1-2 finish for SAC in the senior
girls’ 800, running 1:06.35 to
beat out team-mate Hughnique
Rolle (2:26.25). In the process,
Burnside replaced Romona
Nicholls’ 2005 time of 2:22.27.

Queen’s College bantam girls

4x 1 relay team of Zaria Gib-
son, Khadija Fraser, Vanaillan
Walker and Kennadi Carbin
ran 53.46 to shatter an old QC
mark of 54.36 set in 2006.

QC’s junior girls team of
Rachel Knowles, Shelby
Carbin, Shanae Sands and Talia
Thompson ran 4:14.56 in the 4x
4 to knock off SAC’s 2005 time
of 4:14.80.

In the intermediate girls’ 4 x
1, QC’s team of Willicia Hart,
Devinn Cartwright, Mona Lisa
Taylor and Printassia Johnson
ran 48.87 to replace the previ-
ous time of 48.95 that was also
held by QC.

SAC’s intermediate girls’
team of Rashante Colebrooke,
Kryshell Rolle, Ashley Johnson
and Shaunae Miller ran so fast
in winning the 4 x 4 relay in
3:59.70 that they not only broke
the record of 4:00.59 by SAC,
but they also lapped one of the
teams.

And their senior girls’ 4 x 4
team of Kenya Culmer, Hugh-
nique Rolle, V’Alonee Robin-
son and Deshana Burnside did
the same thing when they ran

4:02.16 to replace SAC’s old
time of 4:03.42. However, their
time was slower than the inter-
mediate girls.

Robinson completed a sweep
of the senior girls’ sprints, win-
ning the 200 in 24.64. Marcus
Thompson duplicated the feat
in the senior boys division in
the 200 in 21.48.

“T felt pretty good about the
race. I felt I could get a better
start, but overall I was pleased
about it,” Thompson stated.
“This is the first year that I won
in BAISS, so ’m happy.”

Thompson, 17, said he’s even
more excited over the fact that
he got to compete against Tem-
ple Christian’s Warren Fraser,
who was second in 21.68, just
as he was in the 100.

Fraser’s sister Khadija Fraser,
however, was unbeaten in the
bantam girls’ sprints, adding the
200 (26.97) title to her 100
crown.

Danielle Gibson of Aquinas
won the junior girls’ 200 (26.26)
and Shaunae Miller took the
intermediate girls half-lapper in
25.06.
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Defence, police, prison officers take
art in physical fitness programme

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THEY moaned and they
groaned. But one by one each
participant went through the
vigorous training session yes-
terday morning at the Royal
Bahamas Defense Force
(RBDF) base.

Maybe because they were
being closely watched, none of
the 13 competitors passed up
on the routine as physical train-
ing instructor Raymond
“Brave” Sawyer shouted out
the instructions from the side-
line.

Sawyer, a 29-year veteran on
the force, is hosting a 16-week
training course on the base in
what they call the “pit”. The
course, however, is not just
designed for the RBDF.

For the first time, members
of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, Her Majesty’s Prisons,
Fox Hill and one or two mem-
bers of the community have
come together to participate in
the training course.

Already through the 10th
week, the course is designed for
two sessions each day where
the participants go through vig-
orous training and are engaged
in classroom lessons.

At the end of the course,
Sawyer said the participants are
expected to be certified to
“teach as instructors” to any
sporting body outside of the
Defense Force.

Additionally, the participants
will be so fit that by the time
they are finished, they would
have ended up running a half
marathon. Right now, they
have already ran up to nine
miles.

“We never offered it outside
of the base before, but I real-
ized that all of these agencies
need a physical fitness pro-
gramme,” Sawyer said.

“So I think if we can get at
least one person in each of the
military branches in a position
to teach the same type of phys-
ical fitness that we go through
here at the base, their law
enforcement agencies will be
better off physically.”





MILITARY officers in pain as they go through an exercise during the

training programme at the RBDF base yesterday...

In 2003, Sawyer offered the
first such course to the RBDF
and they eventually had four
successful graduates. This time
around, with a much bigger
class to work with, Sawyer is
hoping to at least double and
even succeed in passing out all
of the participants.

Terico Sweeting, a police offi-
cer attached at the Training
College, said he came in from
the initial week and it has been
a tough 10 weeks.

“I did not expect this,”
Sweeting stated. “Coming from
the training base at the college
I did not expect this. I thought
that I would have been in
superb conditioning.

“But it was only when I came
here that I discovered that I
really wasn’t. So it has been
really rough on me. But I’ve
made a vast improvement since
I came here and I think it’s
obvious in the eyes of the
instructor.”

Looking at the entire training

programme, Sawyer said the
most difficult aspect he has had
to endure was “the physical
training with the push ups and
the rope climb.”

“That was the most difficult
part for me,” he said.

When he returns to the force,
Sweeting said he intends to
impart all of the knowledge that
he gained to help make the
RBPF a more vibrant and fit
military department.

Foster Ferguson, a corporate
at Her Majesty’s Prison, has
also been in the programme
since its inception. He too has
considered it to be a challenge.

“So far, it’s been well round-
ed and we’ve learnt a lot as far
as the physical fitness and your
health awareness is concern,”
he said. “I think that the pro-
gramme will be very good to
carry back to the prison to help
us with a programme to assist
our staff.”

Getting his body to a physical
level where he learns how to

DEFENSE, police and prison officers do an exercise routine yesterday at the RBDF base...

Scotiabank sponsors Lightning track club

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER joining the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associ-
ations (BAAA) five years ago,
the Silver Lightning Track and
Field Club has finally secured
a sponsor.

Scotiabank has come to the
aid of the club — made up of the
majority of the “grassroots” ath-
letes in the BAAA — headed by
Rupert Gardiner.

On Thursday at the Thomas
A Robinson Track and Field
Stadium, Rekett Griffin, acting
senior manager for marketing
and products, presented a
cheque of an undisclosed
amount to Gardiner, who dou-
bles as the club president/head
coach.

Griffin said when Gardiner
approached her predecessor
Greg Burrows in connection
with sponsoring his track club,
they couldn’t turn him down
because of their commitment
to the young people of the
Bahamas.

“We sponsored the 2008
BAAA Olympic Trials and so
we figured that this will be a





MILITARY officers undergo a training exercise...

“climb rope,” Sweeting said he
has enjoyed going through a
balanced routine of exercise
activities.

And there are a couple of
women participating as well.

Leading woman Margaret
Taylor, of the RBDF, said she
was always interested in the
physical training, but she had
a “challenging, yet rewarding”
experience so far.

When asked what the hardest
aspect of the training was, Tay-
lor quickly pointed out that it
was the “push-ups because of a

nageing shoulder injury.”

“But I didn’t allow it to stop
me.”

If there was anything that she
didn’t have any problem with at
all, it was the run. “But it was
challenging because I didn’t
expect the intensity of what we
had to go through.”

And bodybuilder Jay Dar-
ling, a member of the RBDF,
said the course would help him
to be much more defined as he
competes for the Mr Bahamas
title again this year.

“When I came in, I didn’t

me _

PHYSICAL fitness instructor Raymond “Brave’

REKELL GRIFFIN (presenting cheque), Scotiabank’s acting senior manager for marketing and products, presents a cheque to coach Rupert Gardiner
as they are now the official sponsors of his Silver Lightning Track and Field Club. Also shown are members and executives of the club...
(Photo: Derek Smith)

way for us to continue in that
role, helping our young people
to develop their skills in the
area of athletics,” she said.
Gardiner said because of the

fact that he caters mainly to
children that come from single
parent homes, it’s a step in the
right direction for them to get
the support from Scotiabank.

“To have Scotiabank come
to our aid, it says a whole lot,”
Gardiner said.

“As a national coach, for
years I’ve seen athletes who

can’t afford a decent uniform
just to compete in, so this is a
great help.”

Look for the Silver Lightning
to come out shining when they



J

expect to be doing so much.
I’ve already lost 20 pounds,”
he said.

“Tm leveling off at 189 and it
seems as if I’m staying at that
weight, which is pretty good
because it’s where I need to be
as a middleweight.”

For Sawyer, it would make
his tenure complete at the
RBDF as he intends to retire
at the end of the course and
look at whatever opportunity
is available for him as a physical
education instructor major at
the College of the Bahamas.



” Sawyer shows participants how to do their exercise...

host their track and field meet
on Saturday, May 2 at the TAR
Stadium, starting at 9 am for
the youth and the open segment
at 1 pm.

“We are looking for some
ereat things to happen because
we have some underprivileged
kids in our club, but they are
all eager to compete,” Gardiner
said.

Five years ago, when he
returned home, Gardiner said
he saw the need to launch the
club. Initially, they only had 20
athletes, but they have blos-
somed and now have more than
60.

“We already have kids who
made national teams and we are
looking for some more to make
the Carifta team this year,” Gar-
diner said. “Our top sprinter
Antonique Strachan won the
under-17 girls 100m and 200m
at the GSSSA meet last week.
She’s one of our prospects.”

While the majority of the ath-
letes are relatively young, Gar-
diner said Scotiabank’s spon-
sorship will go a long way in
assisting them in their future
endeavors, including getting
into college, either here at the
College of the Bahamas, or in
the US.
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

thescene

by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP











NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA

Match made in

4 ENTREPRENEUR and former
banker Gary Christie escorts his
daughter Gari Fenrica up the aisle
on Saturday, February 21 at Christ
Church Cathedral, George Street.
The ceremony was performed by
Rev Dean Patrick Adderley and the
following reception was held at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort on Cable
Beach.

The menu included Bimini white
conch chowder, an array of baby
field greens with raspberry basil
dressing as appetizers; the entrée
included a rack of lamb and a
French Atlantic salmon filet in a dill
cream sauce, red-skinned potatoes,
and grilled tomatoes, asparagus
and glazed carrots; desert was a
pina colada caramel flan served
with coffee and tea.

2 MOTHER of the bride Cleopatra F
Christie, former Magistrate and
corporate manager with Scotia-
bank, is escorted by her son Gavin
Christie, real estate agent with C A
Christie.

3 THE groom’s mother La-Roma
Hunt- Seifert, office manager at the
Public Treasury Department, is
escorted by her husband Corporal
Dudley Seifert.

Mrs Hunt- Seifert’s dress was
designed by her and was made by
Lynn Curry.

4 ATTORNEY Willie Moss of
Freeport, Grand Bahama; Hubert L
Prescod, chief financial officer for
aL PE Political Media Buying Specialists,
aiiebl se wie and his wife Joan Prescod, an
fal eel ell accountant.

5 BANKER Kim Foster, director of
projects and country relationship
manager for Scotiabank; attorney
Gilbert A Ward, owner of Valdy
Administration in the British Colo-
nial Centre of Commerce; Minna
Israel, former managing director of
Scotiabank Bahamas and presently
managing director of RBTT Bank of
Jamaica.

6 AFAMILY AFFAIR — Dr Sandra
Dean Patterson, head of the Crisis
Centre; Roni Patterson, Natasha
Patterson and Gerrard Patterson.

7 (I-r) VINCENT Pratt, bank officer;
Bjorn Hunt; Khaalis Rolle, best man
and managing director of Bahamas
Fast Ferries; Phillip Rahming, the
groom and building engineer;
Shane Deveaux, contractor, Jamiko
Sands, engineer; Gavin Christie,
real estate agent.

8 (I-r) NADIA Taylor, maid of hon-
our in the wedding and a lawyer
with Higgs and Johnson; Orese
Darville, flower girl; Dr Keisha Pat-
terson, bridesmaid; Defence Force
Officer Lavonya Seifert, bridesmaid;
Stacey Smith, council attorney;
Christie Cash, trust officer at
Cititrust; Rojarra Armbrister, stu-
dent in Canada; Danielle Hanek,
officer of Ministry of Agriculture
and Fisheries.

9 CLEOPATRA Strachan, an educa-
tor, along with Harry Kemp, man-
aging director of Telepoint.

10 CLEOPATRA Rolle, an auditor
in the Auditor General’s Office, with
her husband Marco Rolle, under-
secretary in the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs and a law student at the
Eugene Dupuch Law School.

41 MR and Mrs Philip Osbourne-
Rahming leaving Christ Church
Cathedral to enjoy the rest of their
lives together.






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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.93SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND WARM HIGH 84F LOW 73F THE former PLP official who sparked off a major cont roversy over the Bahamas d rug era and Sir Lynden Pindling’s past said yesterday: “I have nor egrets.” Chauncey T ynes Sr., who claimed his pilot son was killed because of what he knew about Sir Lynden and his links with drug czar Joe Lehder, added: “It is time the truth was told.” Mr Tynes, 88, was the PLP’s treasurer during the late 1960s when the party was at its height. He later took issue with Sir Lynden over several matters and resigned from his post in 1971. He believes his son, Chauncey Jr, was “disposed of” after taking off from Exuma for Nassau with three other men one a Bahamian electrical engineer called Donald Moree Sr, the oth ers believed to be Colombians in March, 1983. The twin-engined plane never reached Nassau and no trace of it was ever found. Neither Chauncey Jr nor Mr Moree have been heard from since. Chauncey Jr had told his father repeatedly of cash consignments he carried for Lehder from Exuma to Nassau to be paid to Sir Lynden and a senior police officer. On one occasion he even brought a box of US banknotes home, $50,000 in all, which he said was destined for the policeman. He also flew Sir Lynden to Norman’s Cay Lehder’s cocaine trans-shipment base on several occasions, as well as to Grand Bahama for a secret meeting with the drug lord, it was claimed. Since Mr Tynes’ claims were published in last Monday’s Tribune Insight section, other wit nesses have come forward to claim that Sir Lynden went to Norman’s Cay on several occasions, not only to meet Lehder but also to attend parties. “I am glad that I spoke out,” Mr Tynes told The Tribune , Man at the centre of Sir Lynden Pindling contr o v er sy sa ys ‘it’s time truth was told’ The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com Chauncey Tynes Sr: I have no r egr ets Pr oposed US legislation is ‘bigger threat to financial sector than blacklisting’ n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net T HE country's financial services sector will face a threat far worse than the industry’s 2000 blacklisting if proposed “tax h aven” legislation is passed into law in the United States, Sen ator Jerome Fitzgerald said. T he Opposition senator also accused the Ingraham admin istration of sticking "their heads in the sand" and not taking a proactive approach to the looming problem. Concern over the region's off-shore services sector began to rise when American Senator Carl Levin first sponsored the Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act” in the US Senate. The Act was defeated several times but appears to have gained some tracSenator voices concern, hits out at Ingraham administration Chauncey Tynes Sr C R WALKER students check out the NCIS (Naval Criminal Investigative Service yesterday. The NCIS officers are in the Bahamas as part of the Tradewinds Exercise 2009. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f FORENSIC EVIDENCE BUS MAKES STOP FOR STUDENTS SEE page six SEE page six n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@ tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Eight Mile Rock resident Samiko Rigby was charged with murder in the Eight Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court on Friday. Rigby, a resident of Jones Town, was arraigned before Magistrate Gwen Claude at about 1.20pm following his arraignment in Freeport on Friday morning with other serious criminal offences. He was escorted to court under heavy police guard in handcuffs and shackles. Rigby had escaped police custody on January 11 from Central Police Station. He was appre hended by police on Wednesday. Rigby was not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. According to the particulars, it is alleged that on January 7, 2009, atH epburn Town, Eight Mile Rock, the accused, b eing concerned with others, intentionally c aused the death of Eri son Tanelus by means of unlawful harm. He was also charged with burglary and armed robbery. It is alleged that on the same date and place, Rigby unlawfully entered the home of Erison Tanelus with intent to commit a felony. It is also alleged that on the same date and place, Rigby, being concerned with others, while armed with an offensive instrument robbed Tanelus of $510 cash, and two LG cellular phones valued at $698. Rigby was not required to enter pleas to the charges. Bail was denied and he was Man appears in court charged with murder Samiko Rigby SEE page six n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net CRUISE passengers arriving in Nassau for the month of January, 2009 increased by almost 30 per cent compared to the same period last year, Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said yesterday. The Senator said this statistic represented a sign of the economic times, as visitors are choosing a more economic, allinclusive sea vacation to the Bahamas over the more expensive airfare and hotel com bination. This makes it key for the Bahamas to maximise its potential as a prime destination in the region by offering more competitive all-inclusive vacations on land and to lobby for lower airfares into the country. To this end, beginning May 15, the Min istry of Tourism is embarking on a one-ofa-kind all-inclusive experiment on Grand Bahama. The new initiative will allow potential visitors to pre-book a hotel room, restaurants and tours all before leaving for their trip. "What many people forget is from the customer's perspective the cost to get anywhere is part of my vacation cost. We find ourselves in the situation where people are standing around talking about their room rates as if that's all the customer is considering. The customer has to think about the cost to get here and guess what they want to minimise the cost to get to their desti nation so they can maximise their time enjoying themselves. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net PLP Leader Perry Christie’s failure to engage in a debate about Sir Lynden Pindling’s legacy is inhibiting the develop ment of democracy, Dr Ian Stra chan has said. The College of the Bahamas English Department head main tains Mr Christie failed to engage in honest debate when responding to the controversial Tribune Insight article by managing editor John Marquis. The article entitled “The trag ic young pilot who knew too much”, told the story of the late Chauncey Tynes Jr who went missing in 1983 while piloting a flight from Exuma to Nassau. His father, Chauncey Tynes Sr, told The Tribune he believed his son was murdered because he knew too much of the association between Sir Lynden and Colombian drug czar Carlos “Joe” Lehder. Mr Christie publicly condemned the story as “the vilest, the most vicious, the most scur rilous, and the sickest piece of garbage” he has ever read, and slammed claims as “a tissue of lies, fantasies and tall tales.” Although the article sparked impassioned discussions in the press, on the airwaves and in Parliament, Dr Strachan said the nation has yet to hold a frank conversation about events under Pindling’s government and their affect on political development. Dr Strachan said: “I think the conversation coming from the opposite end is so shrill, so angry, and condemnatory, and also so grand-standing, and even opportunistic, I don’t think it’s CALIFORNIA’S Attorney General yester day called Howard K Stern the “principal enabler” in an alleged conspiracy to supply his former girlfriend Anna Nicole Smith with thou sands of prescription drugs between 2004 and her death in 2007. Stern and two of Ms Smith’s doctors have been charged by Los Angeles County prosecutors with illegally providing the former Playboy model with addictive prescription drugs. These charges come two years after Ms Smith died of an overdose in a hotel room in Florida. Her death was ruled accidental. Yesterday, California's Attorney General Jerry Brown told Amer ican media that Stern and the two doctors Khristine Eroshevich and Sandeep Kapoor conspired to “repeatedly and excessively” provide Ms Smith with drugs. Prosecutors outlined 95 “overt acts” committed between 2004 and 2007. Stern was last seen by members of the public in the Bahamas in November 2008, having dinner at the Outback Steak House with Larry Birkhead who was holding his and Ms Smith’s daughter Dannielynn in his arms. Both Ms Smith and her son Daniel Smith, who died in a Doctors Hospital room in 2006, are buried at Lake View Memorial. Howard K Stern (AP Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace Howard K Stern, two of Anna Nicole Smith’s doctors charged Cruise passenger arrivals up 30 per cent in January SEE page six Christie’ s failure to engage in Pindling debate ‘is inhibiting development of democracy’ SEE page six

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The week-long trip allowed scientists to follow the 1958 expedition which led to the creation oft he Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park and the B ahamas National Trust (BNT ment body for the National Park System of the country. The expedition was part of the Trust’s 50th anniversary celebrations. A diverse group of specialist scientists, BNT p ark wardens and staff, Fisheries officers, coral r eef experts, botanists and scientists from the Nature Conservancy, set out on the Coral Reef II, a research vessel temporarily donated by the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, to analyse the status of the park today. M arine experts found the park is protecting fish as there are more diverse communities of f ish in the park, larger populations and bigger f ish than in other areas of the Bahamas. And the healthy fish populations are spilling out into the surrounding areas. D r Dan Brumbaugh from the American Muse um of Natural History in New York, who led the m arine team, said: “Inside the park there are t hree times as many fish than the surrounding a reas, but five times as much as the rest of the Bahamas.” And non-native invaders such as the lionfish, w hich dominate reefs around New Providence, are not as destructive within the intact ecosystemo f the park as in other areas of the Bahamas as t here are more predators to combat the lionfish, D r Brumbaugh said. On land, the terrestrial team found native plants and animals to be as abundant as they w ere 50 years ago, and the pro-active removal of non-native invasive species has been a success. The only real damage to the environment has b een caused by the hutia, an endemic land mamm al which is eating its way through Little Wax Cay, Warderick Wells and Shroud Cay. Botanist Dr John Freid, leader of the team, said the problem of controlling the hutia is one the Trust will have to face. “In Little Wax Cay they are eating themselves o ut of house and home,” he said. “There is half the vegetation, there are large areas with no vegetation at all, and the hutia population is dropp ing, probably reducing b ecause there is no food.” In Warderick Wells the diversity of plants is thinning, and Dr Freid said there is potential for hutia popula-t ions to drop as a result, and h e fears the hutia’s newest h ome in Shroud Cay will be similarly ravaged. But where the hutia are absent, flora and fauna are thriving. And the Trust’s active removal of invasive casuarina trees and scavella, or Hawai-i an sea lettuce, has been a great success. D r Freid said: “The islands are absolutely b eautifully intact and nothing has been done to them in terms of vegetation you see exactly what they saw 50 years ago – nice dune systems, beautiful rocky shores. “You look at it and it’s exactly the same. E verything is growing exactly as it did.” I n these lush green islands Nature Conservancy ornithologists spotted two Kirtland’s Warblers, a small rare bird that is even more rarely seen as the 1,400strong bird population is s pread throughout the islands during the six m onths they spend in the Bahamas. Ancilleno Davis, conservation coordinator for the Nature Conservancy, said the sighting willn ow allow ornithologists to expand their limited knowledge of the Kirtland’s Warblers and theire nvironment. F ollowing the Exuma expedition, the scientists studied the land and seas of South Andros to find an unique species of iguana thriving, and the seas over-fished. This study will allow the BNT to open a discussion with the local community about the possible ways of protecting the area in future. M r Davis said: “We had so many different scientists with so many different qualifications and specific abilities that we could get a very good snapshot picture of what is going on in the Exuma Land and Sea Park, so in that small amount of information that we have we can be more d irected in future study efforts or managing e fforts. “We were looking at the past, at what the park was like, looking at the present, what the park isl ike now, and the Andros project was looking at the future.” An exhibition celebrating 50 years of the B ahamas National Trust is open to the public at C entral Bank on Shirley Street. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE AN upcoming Wii Fitness challenge will be a part of the Town Centre Mall’s “Ultimate Gamer’s Challenge 3” on Saturday, March 28. The event will also feature a Madden 09 tournament. To make this event more than just a regular “sit down behind the TV” scenario, the Town Centre Mall teamed up with Electrojack, who provid ed 26-inch television sets and Wii consoles to go along with the Playstations that were already being provided for the challenge. The Wii Fit challenge will be open for all ages and is expect ed to be just as big of a highlight as the Madden 09 tournament. There will also be sporting and fitness clubs on hand to share information about their club’s activities, as well as giving all those interested the opportuni ty to sign up or register to participate in the various activities and disciplines of these clubs. The Ultimate Gamer’s and Wii Fitness challenges will be held at the Town Centre Mall from 10am to 6pm and are sponsored in part by Electro jack, Sports Locker and Island Wholesale. T own Centr e Mall hosts W ii Fitness Challenge F REEPORT – Yesterday marked the second in a series of scheduled meetings held between theG rand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA local fish, conch ands eafood vendors in an effort to obtain information and gather views on the future location of the new fishm arket. Local fish vendors turned out in large numbers to ensure that their voices w ere heard. Hannes Babak, chairman of Port Group Limited ( PGL), along with committ ee members responsible f or the development of the new fish market, announced three possible locations for the site. Based on discus sions with the fishermen, the vast majority would like to see the new fish market situated in the downtown area. The exact location will be determined at a later date. Ian B A Rolle, president of GBPA said, “It is critical that we determine the best location for the site to ensure the long-term suc cess of the market, and the positive impact that it will have on the community.” The project is set to commence construction in six months. Meeting over new fish market location n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A TEAM of scientists retraced the steps of the original Exuma expeditionw hich led to the creation the first national park in the Bahamas and returned with new information proving the success of p rotected natural areas. N O WT H E N 50 th BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST ANNIVERSARY EXPEDITION

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune FreeportR eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT THE B ahamas Public Services Union (BPSU ernment to increase the minimum wage level in the privates ector to that of the public ser vice. John Pinder, union presid ent, said yesterday: “Shortly after the govern ment came to power in 2007, the government lived up to itso bligation and increased min imum wage for the public service. “We have been asking the p rivate sector to follow suit, however, around the time we were expecting the govern m ent to introduce minimum wage to the private sector it was at the same time we began to experience an economic cri-s is.” Mr Pinder said that the average salary in the public service is $10,600 per annum or $5.20p er hour. “I would still like to see the minimum wage in this coun try come up to that of the public service,” he said. Mr Pinder said the BPSU is further concerned about the contractors on major projects in the country being allowed to bring in foreign workers toa void paying minimum wage. “One of the things that concerns us is when builders of major projects ask for workp ermits to bring in foreign workers, mainly because they don’t want to pay minimum wage. They bring in these people and pay them a smaller salary than Bahamians. I believe thatw hen issuing work permits we should ensure that all companies comply with the minimum wage standard,” Mr Pinder said. T he BPSU president also expressed concern about situ ations where work permits are b eing granted for positions that Bahamians are qualified to hold. “We have a number of B ahamians who are qualified for some jobs that are being held by persons with work permits. I believe we ought toe nsure that before issuing new permits or renewing permits that we find qualified Bahami a ns to fill those jobs. “In some areas we don’t expect not to have any work permits issued, but wheret here are jobs that can be filled by Bahamians, Bahamians must be given an opportunity to fill those jobs,” he said. T HERE is no provision in the law that allows the National Insurance Board to write off contributions that have been outstanding for more than ten, 20 years, or even 30 years, director of NIB Algernon Cargill said in a press release yesterday. His statement was in response to a Tribune article that suggested that members of the business community are in a s tate of “enormous consternation” over the Board’s current and ongoing process of updating its contribution records. Mandated Mr Cargill said that when NIB encounters missing periods or payments in a person’s contributions account they are mandated by law to investigate and resolve it. The National Insurance Board does not have the right to discount a person- ’s entitlement and that’s exactly what we would be doing if we were allowed to write off arrears of contributions,” hes aid. “That means we either determine that there were indeed no contributions p ayable for the missing periods, or we determine that the employer or selfemployed person actually failed to pay contributions for the periods. “In the latter case, we m ust pursue payment. We have no other course of action available to us under the law.” The NIB director said that a few people seem to be having a problem grasp-i ng this concept of perpetual liability because it appears to go against conventional accounting practices or recommendations. He said that in the case of social security, the absence of a statute of limitation on arrears of contributions has universally been a vital and necessary ingredient in ensuring the financial protection of workers. Further, NIB pays out in excess of $ 150 million in claims annually, he said. “To continue to do this and not chal lenge the NIB Fund, will require us to continuously improve our collection effic iency and unfortunately this means that employersor self-employed persons who have chosen to not pay NIB contributions in the past will be required to do so now and to settlea rrears,” he said. The NIB director said that the Board is obligated by the National Insurance Act to ensure that all employers have paid the amount of contributions duef or each employee for each month, and that contributions submitted are accurately posted or deposited to the accounts of the appropriate employees. “Contributions represent one week of a person’s work life. Social security – in this case National Insurance – must employ every tool at its disposal to ensure that every week that a person works is duly accounted for, becauseo ne contribution can mean the difference between a sick, invalid or aged worker qualifying for a benefit or being disallowed. We, therefore, have to ensure that every eligible contribution is collected and accounted for and when we are confronted with situations that present a conflict, particularly in cases where it appears that NIB’s own record keeping may not be current, we then have tom ake a common-sense and practical decision based on the contribution history of the employer and/or self employed person. E mployee “In every case, we make the decision that benefits the employee and it is certainly not the intent to create any stateo f ‘enormous consternation’,” he said. Mr Cargill said a system was set up in 1972 where employees can verify that their contributions are being paid to NIB. The National Insurance Act always provided employees the right to request from their employers proof of contributions, failing that, employees could go in to any NIB local office, at any time, to request an update on their contribution accounts. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009, PAGE 3 MULTI-MILLIONAIRE p roducer, director and playwright Tyler Perry is reportedly seeking to buy an island in the Bahamas. People magazine has reported that Mr Perry intends to make the island a present to himself for his 40th birthday. Reportedly, the idea came to the successful director, produce r and actor of the Madea series while visiting another private island in the Exumas. He has n ot yet identified the island he wants to buy, but he’s said to be actively looking. PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham, seated second left, is pictured among Heads of Government of the Caribbean Commu nity at the 20th Inter-Sessional Meeting of CARICOM held in Belize City, Belize, on Thursday, March 12, 2009. Pictured third and fourth left respectively are CARICOM Sec retary General Edwin Carrington and Dean Barrow, Prime Minister of Belize and Chairman of CARICOM. Photo Courtesy of the CARICOM Secretariat n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net OVER 1,000 illegal migrants apprehended in the Bahamas have been returned to theirc ountries of citizenship by the Department of Immigration this year. A pprehension exercises throughout the Bahamas, includ ing recent operations inE leuthera and New Providence, have led to the repatriation of 1,340 people in less than threem onths. Senior deputy director of the Immigration Department Rod erick Bowe said the numbers include 1,204 Haitian, 75 Jamaican, 28 Cuban and 13 Dominican Republic citizens. Migrants who were apprehended by teams of Immigration officers in the Family Islands were sent to the Carmichael Road Detention Centre in Nas sau before they were repatriated. Mr Bowe said: “Our appre hension exercises will continue and we are in the process of arranging another deportation in a few days, so those persons out there without work permits or legal status, we ask that their status becomes legal or they leave the country as soon as pos sible.” In brief T yler Perry is reportedly seeking to buy Bahamas island 1,340 people have been repatriated this year Tyler Perry (AP PM ATTENDSHEADSOFGOVERNMENTMEETING ‘No provision in law’ allowing NIB to write off outstanding contributions BPSU wants minimum wage level in private sector to match public service Algernon Cargill John Pinder

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EDITOR, The Tribune. P lease publish the followi ng letter to Minister of Agriculture Larry Cartwright. Dear Minister, I read with interest a lett er addressed to you appearing in the Monday, M arch 9th, edition of The T ribune and relating to the issue of the harvesting of m arine turtles in The Bahamas. Mr Minister, while I and many Bahamians agree w ith the general sentiments of those who accept a social r esponsibility for the protection of our natural environment and its resources, Ic annot agree that banning Bahamians from harvesting sea turtles is either a responsible, fair or wellthought-out response to thes ad plight of sea turtle populations around the world. Perhaps I should begin m y argument by pointing to two of the more success-f ul examples of natural resource protection in our r egion: the conch farm pro ject located at Providen ciales in the Turks and C aicos, and the Cayman Islands turtle farm. Both o f these commercial ventures demonstrate the cor rect response to the pres s ures exerted on important marine resources by local eating habits. Faced with similar issues as us, neither country hasr esponded by simply ban ning and delegitimising established local culinary traditions. Rather, both have a pproached the issue with a view to making local cus toms and culture sustaina ble, rather than viewing that local culture as the p roblem itself. In fact, in Cayman, Turtle consumption is perhapsh igher than anywhere else in the world, since they n ow sustainably produce the resource, rather than simply banning its harvesting. In Turks and Caicos, conch consumption far sur passes ours per capita and locals even have the luxury of eating baby conchs, escargot-style, as this has absolutely no negative impact on wild breeding stocks (farmed conchs being far cheaper than harvested ones). In The Bahamas, on the other hand, the blanket and off-the-cuff response of our local intelligentsia has always been to simplyi mpose a ban in an effort to “correct” Bahamian cult ure (which they seem to regard as having legitimacy only insofar as it does noti nconvenience some higher interest originating elsew here). The problem to them is not finding a way to makee stablished Bahamian culture sustainable. The problem is Bahamian culturei tself, which, with one swipe of a ministerial pen c an be instantly criminalised with no important casualties. T hat an utter cultural arrogance is the subtext of t hese campaigns is evident in the kind of legislation they lobby for and typicallyg et. In addition to banning the harvesting of the wildr esource, they tend to ban eating and possessing it, utterly closing the door on the development of a local maricultural solution.I nstead of being given real responsibility for making their culture sustainable,B ahamians must simply start eating like they do in A nglo-Saxon countries or go to jail! The truth, of course, is t hat far from being a problem, traditional Bahamian culinary culture is a natural and positive thing for Bahamians and its contin u ed marginalisation has had tragic consequences. Bahamians black, white and mulatto all share a common culinary historyt hat heavily emphasises seafood and high protein, low-fat harvested meats. This has been on balance a good nutritional feature and made for generations o f healthy Bahamians. (My 90-year-old Long Island Grandmother recently gave me a bag of pigeons shot by her elder cousin in Deadman’s Cay). What has been positive ly bad is the cultural push into the alien and unhealthy eating styles of Eurocentric post-industrial countries. Instead of outlawing our own foods, we should be discouraging the dairy products, processed foods and steroid-pumped c ows that are all alien to o ur culture and have resulted in the massive increase in hypertension, diabetes,h eart disease and other very modern maladies. Further, it is now beyond d enial that a diet centred on big, mass-bred mammals a nd dairy products is not o nly bad for the body but horrible for the environm ent. The global encroaching replacement of indigenous food culture by these Eurocentric culinary i mports has resulted in a world pumping out more m ethane and imbibing more cholesterol than it can handle. F rom filling the world with flatulent cows to clearing Brazilian and North American natural forests, post-industrial Eurocentrice ating habits have had more negative impact on our collective environmentt han all other culinary cultures combined. Yet thec ontemptuous stigmatiza tion of what others choose t o eat (whether Bahamian turtles, Japanese porpoises or Peruvian guinea pigs)h as so often clothed itself in the language of environ m entalism and moral superiority that you could almost miss the glaringi rony. Mr Minister, Bahamian culture is not the problem. So rather than criminalising huge elements of it, wes hould instead be making them more sustainable. If turtles are under pressure, we should be putting our resources into farmingt hem. Instead, some would have us simply criminalise a culinary tradition that is asi ntegral to us as snails are to the French or generally t asteless food to the Eng lish. These other societies t end to respond to the call of sustainability by managi ng their food resources better, rather than criminalising their traditional diets. Likewise, we in The Bahamas must never be intimidated by self-right eous, but ultimately arrogant and ignorant people who would encourage us to throw our own culture away rather than investing in making it sustainable. ANDREW ALLEN Nassau, March, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON “You’ve got to give it all you can, that first year,” the president told a senior adviser. “Doesn’t matter what kind of majority you come in with. You’ve got just one year when they treat you right.” President Obama, however, did not utter these words of wisdom to Rahm Emanuel or David Axelrod last month. Lyndon Johnson said them to his aide Harry McPherson nearly a half-century ago. Fleeting power and fickle public opinion are enduring challenges for presidents. This reality contributes to the “strike-while-theiron-is-hot” mentality we witness with most new presidents dealing with Congress particularly those with large, friendly majorities on the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue. Lyndon Johnson understood this; and so does Barack Obama. The new president’s political capital is slowly evaporating. And if the White House accepts this view and I believe it does it explains a lot about their early tactics. It’s not hard to miss the administration’s bold ambition in the recently enacted stimulus/spending initiatives as well as the president’s budget blueprint. Tom Bevan called it “Obama’s need for speed,” writing in Real Clear Politics last week. Bevan explored what factors “may help explain why he appears to be in such a rush to push through an expansive, transformational agenda” and wondered if a more sober, deliberative method like the one John F. Kennedy took might be a better approach. Former Clinton aide and ABC News commentator George Stephanopoulos raised similar questions this past weekend. “Some in Washington wonder if he is taking on too much too fast.” His blog entry carries the provocative title: “Obama’s Agenda: Circuit Overload?” Obama’s need to find the right balance between accommodating the public’s desire for “change” while not “overloading the circuits” poses one of the trickiest tactical chal-l enges facing the new White House. I may not agree with the substance of Obama’s policies. And even successfully enacting them may not win public plaudits in the end. But his chances for notching “accomplishments” are better this year than next. An interesting trend in public mood inevitably seems to affect every president in much the same way. James Stimson, a polit ical scientist at the University of North Car olina at Chapel Hill, suggests political moods in America ebb and flow like ocean tides. As soon as a new president gets elected, the public mood gradually begins to shift against him. Using polling data, Stimson estimates the American political mood between 1952 and 2004. He then analyzes changes in the mood over that half-century. “One pattern emerges fairly strongly,” Stimson writes. “Preferences ’zig’ upward (toward liberalism Republicans control the White House and ’zag’ downward when Democrats are in charge.” In other words, “mood becomes more conservative under liberal governments, more liberal under conservative regimes,” Stimson asserts. These trends give meaning to Obama’s full-throttle approach his opponents are probably gaining ground right now. A couple factors account for Stimson’s findings. First, when voters want “change,” like last November, they install a new president. They project that desire for something different on candidates and parties. Yet when cam paigning turns to governing, vague promises of “change” become very specific. Real policies replace projections, producing outcomes not everyone likes. Second, time in general just takes its toll on presidential popularity. Looking at graphs of presidential approval ratings for every president back to Eisenhower, with a few exceptions (George W. Bush following 9/11 is one), most presidents’ approval declines as their terms progress. Part of this has to do with the mobilization of the “out-party,” according to James Gimpel, political science professor at the University of Maryland. “Usually after a loss, the out-party goes back to work, gets on offense, and eventually rebuilds a seriously threatening movement,” Gimpel told me this week. Gimpel raises another reason why incumbent presidents (and parties electoral altitude over time. “There is also a tendency for people to pay closer attention to negative than positive information. The in-p arty’s mistakes eventually pile up to create quite a stunning negative impression, whereas the in-party’s accomplishments remain less well noticed. A few negatives seem to outweigh many positives,” he said. Put it all together, and it yields a pretty simple tactical conclusion: Move fast. Whether Obama follows Johnson’s one-year rule or is lucky enough to gain a little more time the clock’s ticking. And the presi dent knows the bell tolls for his agenda. (This article was written by Gary Andres c.2009 Hearst Newspapers). Do not ban harvesting of sea turtles LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Why Obama is in a hur ry 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW +(1/(<%,57+:,&. 3(55
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THE OPPOSITION lacks appreciation for accountabilitya nd appears to be more concerned with pomp, pageantry and prestige, Senator Rev Frederick McAlpine said in the Sen a te during his contribution to the mid-year budget debate on Thursday. He accused the PLP of being obsessed with holding “power over the people, as opposed to respecting the power from the people.” “They acted as if the Public Treasury was their personal tuck shop. They ran government ministries like a mom and pop store. They spent what they liked, when they liked, however they liked and it didn’t matter what we, the people, liked. That ‘all-for-me-baby’ mentality just never seemed to be broken, whether talking about the new or the old PLP government,” he said. The Senator claimed that when the FNM came to office in 2007, they discovered that the former PLP government had spent money that was not accounted for. “We had to move legislation to approve money that hada lready been spent by our predecessors, even up to two years prior to them leaving office. Let me hasten to say that all gov e rnments have been guilty of this in the past, but old or new, those opposite really hold the record in regards to the financial amounts and number of times for which they gave no accountability or reasonable explanation to the Bahamian people,” he said. Senator McAlpine said that the mid-year budget exercise gives the government an opportunity to account for the funds and to ascertain whether or not it is on target to meet the coun t ry’s fiscal budgetary obligations. “If there are changes due to circumstances or Cabinet decisions then the government oft he day, or future, have a leg islative responsibility to inform the people of the Bahamas as to why, when and where funds have been detoured from its original intent. I heard someone in the other place opposing the government, describing this as a useless exercise. Is that how the Opposition really feels about accounting to the Bahamian people, as useless,” Senator McAlpine said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009, PAGE 5 n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net "I am vex and deeply disturbed with the proliferation of pseudo-intellectual right wing groups who are criticising our g overnment and advocating only their narrow views of how our government should opera te. One must remember that our governing system is one of democracy and our governmenti s one of majority rule for all of our people, all the time, and not just a few. " In these economic recessive times such nonsensical right wing rhetoric only serves to retard efforts to stimulate the economy, create and maintaine xisting jobs and enlarge the ' Gross Domestic Happiness' of our people. It is quite obvious these few think the Bahamas operates in a vacuum and have o bviously and selectively not b een aware of much published events in the US. Perhaps the 'right wingers' should try running for political seats with their platform instead of throwing' stink fish' from the sidelines." Tertiary educated Bahamian, Nassau. " I vex 'cause there are far too many liquor stores in New Prov idence. In 2008, there were 208 new applications for liquor stores, 1,289 renewals, and so far i n 2009 there are 48 new applications. There are just too many liquor stores in New Providence. And why is nothing been done about the ones that are open alld ay on Sunday, which by the way have a sign on the door that says “closed.” "The authorities need to start cracking down on these estab lishments that continually break the laws of our land. We as Bahamians need to start attend i ng the Licensing Authority meetings which grant these licenses, and continually object to the granting of any more licensedl iquor in New Providence." Don't need a drink, Nassau. " I'm vexed with the delivery of mail. Why does a letter post marked February 23 show up in my post office box on March 5 or 6? Something needs to be addressed in this department." Curious, Nassau. "I'm vexed and upset over the cutting of trees on Eastern Road past the Winton turn off.I thought we were being encouraged to plant trees. Some of these trees that were cut must have been 10 to 20 years old. Is this being done by the newly hired people contracted to clean u p the roadsides? It doesn't make sense." Disgusted, Nassau. "I vex that I have to pay $10 for a real Bahamian lunch peas and rice, chicken, macaroni and the like and the people have the nerve to give me dry rice. I was so hot when I open my container and see all that rice with not a stitch of gravy on it. "How people expect you to eat dry rice? They mussy want me to choke eh? I don't think I should have to tell the girl behind the counter, who already act like she doin' me a favourby taking up that stingy food." Weak black man, Nassau. Are you vex? Send your complaints to whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net Why you VEX? n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE Department of Immigration has launched an inquiry into the claim of a Bahamian single mother that armed Immigration officers barged into her home terrifyi ng her and her child during the night. The Immigration Departm ent maintains that every effort will be made to discover the truth behind the allegat ions made by Violet Hanna, 4 1, of Price Street, Nassau Vill age. Speaking at a press conference on Thursday, Director of Immigration Jack Thompson said an inquiry into Ms Hanna’s complaint of the intrusion which took place at around 4am on February 26 was launched on Friday, March 6. He said a panel of four senior officials headed by the I mmigration Department’s a ssistant director Dwight Beneby held a second meeti ng on the matter following a visit to Ms Hanna’s home on Monday. “In light of the serious allegations and accusations levied by Ms Hanna I appointed a panel of senior Immigration officers to conduct an internal hearing, or inquiry, into the matter,” Mr Thompson said. “Upon the conclusion of the i nquiry the findings will be forw arded to myself for further review. As this matter is under a ctive investigation the department wishes to offer no further comment, save that the allegations are serious and no effort will be spared to get to the bottom of the matter.” M s Hanna told T he Tribune how she and her seven-yearold daughter Amber were frightened awake when they heard violent banging at the front and back doors, and them other-of-two was ordered to let in armed men and women in khaki uniforms who allegedly failed to identify themselves a s officers from the Immigration Department. As they shouted aggressivel y at the pair, Amber was so p etrified she began to cry and vomit, Ms Hanna said. Presuming the armed intruders were from the Immigration Department, Ms Hanna said she offered to showt hem her Bahamian passport but they declined to see it. She claims the officers used a maul to break down her back gate and damage her back door, compromising the secu-r ity of her Nassau Village home. Ms Hanna said she and her daughter have suffered from p ost-traumatic stress since the invasion, and both fell ill with pneumonia, with Amber havi ng to be treated in hospital. Inquiry launched into home intrusion claim Allegation that Immigration officers barged into house of single mother McAlpine: ‘Opposition lacks appreciation for accountability’ THE Bahamas and Canada this week s igned an Asset Sharing Agreement, formalising an arrangement to confiscate the proceeds of drug trafficking, money laundering and other criminal activities. The aim of the agreement is to improve the effectiveness of law enforcement in both countries in the investigation, pros e cution and suppression of crime through the tracing, freezing, seizure and forfeiture or confiscation of assets related to crime and the creation of a framework for sharing the proceeds and disposition of such a ssets. M inister of Foreign Affairs Brent S ymonette and High Commissioner for Canada to the Bahamas Denis Kingsley signed the agreement for the respectiveg overnments during a ceremony at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the Good-m an’s Bay Corporate Centre on Thursday. This agreement today with Canada is symbolic of the excellent relationship that exists between our two countries and we l ook forward to continued collaboration in these and other matters,” Mr Symonette said. I n March 1990, both governments e ntered into the Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Treaty. This treaty facilitates the gathering of evidence andi ntelligence in the investigation and pros ecution of criminal offences. It also enhances the capabilities in the confisca t ion of the proceeds of crime. “Mutual legal assistance treaties are concluded between two countries for the purpose of gathering and exchanging i nformation in an effort to enforce crimi nal laws and confiscate the ill-gotten gains of criminal activity,” Mr Symonette said. H e said that notwithstanding the excel l ent cooperation that already exists between the Bahamas and Canada with regard to sharing such assets even in thea bsence of a formal agreement, in 2001 the two governments commenced negot iations on an Asset Sharing Agreement t o formalise the arrangement. “Despite our limited resources, the Bahamas government remains committedt o fighting the war against drugs and oth e r criminal activities and prosecuting those criminals that transcend international borders,” Mr Symonette said. Cooperation between our governments in joint criminal investigations such as n arcotics trafficking and money laundering envisaged by the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty has been mutually beneficial to both our governments.” Pursuant to the 1988 United Nations Convention Against the Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Sub s tances, the government of the Bahamas implemented the Proceeds of Crime Act 2000, where Sections 52 and 53 provide for the establishment and administration of the Confiscated Assets Fund. By utilising resources confiscated from c onvicted criminals specifically in the fight a gainst crime and to assist in the prevention of crime, we can increase our efforts in terms of improved infrastructure andi ncreased man power,” Mr Symonette said. H e added that although the Bahamas recognises that confiscated assets are ben e ficial to improving its international crime fighting efforts through the improvement of infrastructure, manpower and other p rojects, confiscating the profits of crim inal activities is also important as a deterrent to further illicit activities. In this regard, we are also pursuing n egotiations with the United States to formalise existing cooperation into an Asset Sharing Agreement,” Mr Symon-e tte said. High Commissioner Kingsley noted that the Bahamas and Canada havee njoyed a long-standing relationship that can be improved through such agree ments. Bahamas and Canada sign Asset Sharing Agreement DENIS Kingsley, High Commissioner for Canada to the Bahamas, left, and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette, right, shake hands following the signing of an Asset Shar ing Agreement on Thursday, March 12, 2009 during a ceremony at the Ministry of For e ign Affairs in the Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S p h o t o

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tion with an expected push from co-sponser President Barack Obama and emerging support from a few European nations. R ecnently, US Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner told the S enate Finance Committee in Washington, DC, that the Ameri can government will build an "ambitious" plan to crack down on companies that use offshore centres to avoid paying taxes. At a joint session of the US Congress nearly two weeks ago, British Prime Minister GordonB rown urged world leaders to " outlaw shadow banking systems and offshore tax havens." M r Fitzgerald warned that this represents an intense, multip ronged and multi-national attack on the Bahamas' financial services industry. "I am of the opinion that this is the greatest threat now facing our country and is far worse than the crisis we faced during the black listing of 2000," Mr Fitzgerald said in the Upper Chamber, dur i ng his contribution to the midyear budget debate. "At the core of the financial services industry is private bank ing and if our private banking is dismantled, the financial s ervices industry will be destroyed." D espite mounting concern in some sectors about the proposed l egislation, government has remained relatively calm. Speaking in the House of Assembly recently, Education Minister Carl Bethel tried to quash what he called "hysteria" surrounding the proposed Act, saying that recent announcements by Mr Geithner and Mr Brown do not foreshadow a n immediate threat to the country's off-shore centres. Mr Fitzgerald chastised this "wait and see" stance, outlining that regional neighbours like the Cayman Islands, Barbados, and Antigua have already taken ap roactive approach. "Barbados has been proactive i n taking a structured approach to signing exchange of informat ion acts or treaties with individ ual nations apart from the US, w hich is now the only nation with which the Bahamas has an e xchange of information treaty. "Antigua has retained the serv ices of one of the top law firms in the US called Rubinstein & Rubinstein LLP who have assisted them in the formulation of arguments to support and encour age co-operation between themselves and the other G-20 coun tries who have concerns about the financial and regulatory r egimes of Antigua. The Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners of Great Britain (has that many of the financial regula tory regimes of the countries attempting to attack offshore centres fall well behind internationals tandards." Mr Fitzgerald questioned what s trategies the government had in place to counter this possible t hreat on the country's off-shore sector. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.004500.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72%3 .142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7 .904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.596.56-0.0310,5360.4380.05015.00.76% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs1.431.570.140.1110.05214.13.31% 3.002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.7940.40013.23.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44321.3828Colina Money Market Fund1.44320.674.37 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739711.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 813.75 | YTD -2.53% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSFRIDAY, 13 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,658.91 | CHG -1.37 | %CHG -0.08 | YTD -53.45 | YTD % -3.12BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 6-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW $/(;,25(1$5'2 5866(// RI(DVWHUQ(VWDWHVLQWKH(DVWHUQ'LVWULFWRI WKH,VODQGRI1HZ3URYLGHQFHRQHRIWKH,VODQGVRI7KH &RPPRQZHDOWKRI7KH%DKDPDVLQWHQGWRFKDQJHQDPH WR $/(;,25(1$5'2&223(5 ,IWKHUHDUHDQ\REMHFWLRQV WRWKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ZULWHVXFK REMHFWLRQVWRWKH&KLHI3DVVSRUW2IFHU3 1DVVDX%DKDPDVQRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\GD\VDIWHUWKHGDWH RISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH “Someone was wondering what I was getting f or the article, but I told them: ‘I don’t want anything. There is nothing I want’.” H e said he had received several calls from well-wishers since the article appeared. M r Tynes’ riveting disclosures created mayhem in the PLP, which organised a press conference on Thursday in an attempt to salvage Sir Lynden’s legacy. Arguments over the article have raged on radio talk shows all week. PLP leader Perry Christie launched a bitter attack on Mr Tynes and The Tribune’s man a ging editor, John Marquis, calling the article scurrilous “garbage” that was full of lies and f airy-tales. But The Tribune yesterday published a page o ne story showing that Mr Christie’s views seemed completely at odds with what he said when he was fired from Pindling’s Cabinet 25 years ago. A t the time, he and the present prime mini ster, Hubert Ingraham, were dismissed after they protested over corruption in the Pindling government, particularly in relation to the drug trade. A ctivist Paul Moss is planning a demonstration outside The Tribune’s office next T uesday, when he hopes Pindling supporters will show solidarity in protecting the former p rime minister’s name. Mr Moss said it was important for the exPM’s supporters to speak out “as he is not alive to defend his own name.” He said the purpose of the protest was not t o disparage Mr Marquis’s name, but to give Bahamians a chance to express their opin i ons. If it goes ahead, the protest will be the f ourth placard demonstration to be held outs ide T he Tribune i n the last two years to express fury over the managing editor’s arti c les. In 2007, three demonstrations were staged o ver Mr Marquis’s role in hastening the end of the PLP government following the Anna N icole Smith controversy. Some protesters called for his deportation. One carried a placard branding him “a journalistic terrorist”. Yesterday, phone calls and e-mails of sup p ort continued to pour into T he Tribune o ver the Tynes revelations. M r Marquis said: “The truth is often very hard to swallow, especially for people in denial like the PLP. However, Mr Tynes’ information was crucial for the writing of Bahamian history. I salute him for his courage, for his honesty and his unshakeable integrity. Every otherr ight-thinking person in this country should be doing the same.” "We are also starting something extraordinarily innovative, you don't find it anywhere else in the world. We're creating a product called 'Club Grand Bahama', w hich is all-inclusive. We can have an all-inclusive electronically nowadays where the customer stays one place, have their meal some place else, goes on tour some place else and pays for it all in advance. So if the customer wants to know what the total cost of a vacation is, we are g oing to do that. We don't know how successful it's going to be, but we're going to give it a shot," he told the Senate during his contribution to the 2008/2009 midyear budget. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace added that for January, 2009 the total number of visitor arrivals t o Nassau, Paradise Island and the Family Islands were up. However for the same period in Grand Bahama, the total number o f visitors decreased. However in terms of Grand Bahama's troubled tourism front, the senator said he is confident that the island is poised tob ecome one of the leading cruise ports in this part of the world. "We might be able to make an announcement in the not-tood istant future, that will bring this whole thing about," he said. The senator also commented on the state of the current soft tourism industry, stressing thatt he country has been through downturns before and will rebound. actually helping us have a public conversation about it. “It’s hard to enter into that conversation, and people like Perry Christie wield such influence the debate is now about John Marquis and The Tribune s ongoing war against the Bahamian people, which is feeding into xenophobia, race animosity, and fear, and all sorts of things.” Sir Lynden’s leadership practice of rooting out those who challenged his leadership to build a party of devoted supporters should also be discussed, Dr Strachan said. “The country is not as democratic as it could be and Pindling has a lot to do with that,” he said. “And Perry Christie and Hubert Ingraham haven’t done as much as they ought to to deepen democracy and that has a lot to do with working under Lynden Pindling.” Rather than clinging to Sir Lynden’s legacy, the PLP should step out of the former leader’s shadow and find a new message which speaks to today’s Bahamians while taking an objective view of the late Sir Lyn den to move democracy forward, Dr Strachan said. “I think the PLP is like many other parties in the Caribbean who continue to use these iconic leaders for political capital after they have gone,” he added. “But it’s a two edge sword because despite the good they did, there is the evil they did, so they run a risk of continuing to hark back to that legacy.” Dr Strachan’s play, “Black Crabs Tragedy”, written in 1997, attempts to demystify the image of Sir Lynden by discussing the best and worst aspects of his leadership, and how it reflects the people who held him in power. remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison until September 3, 2009, for a preliminary inquiry into the matters. After his arraignment in court, the family of Tanelus became very emotional outside the courtroom. The mother of the victim and other family members were crying as police escorted Rigby to an awaiting police van. “We feed all of y’all and this is what y’all did. I hope you rot in jail,” shouted one woman pointing at Rigby sitting inside the vehicle. During an earlier arraignment in Freeport, Rigby appeared before Magistrate Helen Jones on several charges, including escape, resisting arrest, possession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition, and assault with a deadly weapon. He was not required to enter a plea to the charges, which were adjourned for hearing to June 2. He was represented by K Brian Hanna. n By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – As Grand B ahama hotels continue to struggle with “unacceptably” low occupancy levels, Bahamas Hotel Association president Robert Sands said that news of a possible new air charter service to Freeport is good news for the island. “There is a new charter that is possibly coming to Grand Bahama t hat will include a one stop going onto possibly Cuba out of Italy that is good news,” he told reporters on Friday. “We also want to see how we can ensure that one of the events of the Miss Universe can take place here in late Augustto help (Grand Bahama) move beyond the difficult ies you have been having in recent times.” Mr Sands, the newly elected BHA president, met with hoteliers and other stakeholders here on Grand Bahama during a BHA meeting held at the Sunrise Resort and Marina. He was concerned about the o ccupancy levels on Grand Bahama, particularly at the larger properties, which have been experiencing very low occupancies. A lso as the Isle of Capri moves to close its casino operation at OurL ucaya Resort, Mr Sands said that the gaming presence is another area o f concern that must be addressed on Grand Bahama. “I am aware that the Minister of Tourism is very concerned about the gaming presence in Grand B ahama. “I am also aware that he has been meeting with principles here in Grand Bahama to see how we can e nsure that there is a gaming presence in Grand Bahama. I am aware through meetings with the Grand Bahama Port Authority that it is a priority for them as well. I am not the spokesperson for either of these entities, but it is not a matter that is being left unattended. It is being given focused attention by t he Minister to bring a reasonable conclusion in the shortest possible time,” he said. Business Mr Sands noted that “extremely disappointing” occupancy levels at the Westin and Sheraton Hotels att he Our Lucaya property have impacted business at the Isle of Capri. “So there is still a tremendous a mount of work that will have to be done to raise the level of visitor arrivals to this destination that will be participating within the hotels,” he added. M r Sands stressed that efforts must be taken to create sufficient demand for Grand Bahama so thath otels can run at respectable occupancies that will allow them to be financially viable. W hen asked about the importance of the reopening of Royal Oasis, he said once sufficient demand is created then it will cause t he need for it to be reopened. “There will be compelling reasons for the powers that be to push for that to happen, but we must take b aby steps. “We must really create the opportunity for Grand Bahama to now begin to achieve occupancies that are much higher than they are cur-r ently achieving, and thereby cause for employment of persons in this area, and also allow the investors of those respective hotels to realise a f air return on their investment in their area.” According to Mr Sands, the BHA’s small member hotel properties are doing better, in terms ofo ccupancy, than the larger properties on Grand Bahama. He noted that the Pelican Bay Resort, the Best Western Castaways R esort and the Wyndham Fortuna Resort are performing reasonably well. “Two or three of the midsize properties have found a businessn iche that has allowed them to operate at respectable levels. “Those hotels (mentioned above are doing reasonably well, but they r epresent a small percentage of the total number of available rooms in Grand Bahama,” he said. M r Sand stated that the BHA is a national association that addresses the needs of member hoteliers as well as allied members. Grand Bahama has always played a pivotal role in the organisation over the years, but is now currently experiencing levels of business that a re unprecedented, he said. The association plans to address four major issues of concern. The first priority is airlift frequency and c ost to Grand Bahama. Grand Bahama International Airport has one of the highest turnaround and airfare costs for airlines flying to Freeport. T he Ministry of Tourism is presently seeking to reduce or eliminate airport taxes and fees to attract new airlifts to the island. Initiative “The Minister of Tourism has put a lot of this political equity behind this singular initiative. He strongly believes that reducing the cost of airlift is paramount on his list of things to accomplish. I think he ish aving some results in this area,” said Mr Sands. Mr Sands said the second priority is marketing initiatives. The third p riority is agriculture related in terms of cost of food supplies for hoteliers, and the fourth is the issue of work permits. “Short-term work permits espec ially with brand properties is a concern because we have multiple companies that seem to be frustratedw ith the timeliness in which some of these things are awarded, and that impacts on their business,” hee xplained. Possible new air charter to Freeport FROM page one Chauncey Tynes Sr F ROM page one Cruise passenger arrivals are up Proposed USlegislation ‘bigger threat than blacklisting’ FROM page one Man charged FROM page one Perry Christie Perry Christie FROM page one

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APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN T IGER H AGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired f ootman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can p roduce weariness (9 1 2 Taking someone on and w inning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep p asses away (7 1 7 An inch out perhaps, but m aintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her k neecap (7 2 1 Not a straight m usician? (7 2 2 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 2 7 Make sure as sure can b e (9 2 8 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 3 0 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in w arning Paris pedestrians? ( 6,4) 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 1 6 Distressed Royalist living t he life of a hermit (8 1 8 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 2 1 Cafe and inn combine s omehow to make m oney (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s s hopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 A cross:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 I sosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. D own:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 E nlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionA cross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 T readmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. D own:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 A viary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1 213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1 213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930T ribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 1 4 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 1 4 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a BY STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Dispenser of medicines (10 6 Brusque (4 10 Maintain (5 11 Ad-lib (9 12 Portray in words (8 13 Pitch forward suddenly (5 15 Even-tempered (7 17 Account for (7 19 Urban fortress (7 21 Raining heavily (7 22 Provoke aversion in (5 24 Common sense (8 27 Not guilty judgment (9 28 Construct (5 29 Long hard journey (4 30 Cave-dweller (10 Down 1 International treaty (4 2 Consequently (2,1,6 3 Ridicule by imitation (5 4 Style of cooking (7 5 Highest in rank (7 7 Superior (5 8 Extremely uncertain (5-3-2 9 Disintegrate (8 14 Ribes rubrum (3,7 16 The butterfly bush (8 18 Strong dislike (9 20 Shallow port boat (7 21 Interval of delay (4,3 23 Resentment (5 25 Unmentionable (5 26 Not in operation (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Uninspired footman (10 6 Count in German (4 10 Mature, or mature to a point (5 11 With us details can produce weariness (9 12 Taking someone on and winning (8 13 Moral principle held by the thick-skinned (5 15 Refreshed as sleep passes away (7 17 An inch out perhaps, but maintaining contact (2,5 19 Agirl after a bit of butter for her kneecap (7 21 Not a straight musician? (7 22 Perform aerobatics in an advertising display (5 24 In the main perhaps he’s all at sea (8 27 Make sure as sure can be (9 28 Not an all-American name for a girl (5 29 Girl right at all times (4 30 Have one nightcap too many? (5,5 Down 1 Leave the car where one can take a stroll (4 2 One kept in suspense? (9 3 Ian’s confused with love for a girl (5 4 Aking with supporters stages a recovery (7 5 Aship, for example, with first-rate missile (7 7 Being coarse on the golf course (5 8 Is it instrumental in warning Paris pedestrians? (6,4 9 Governed, having been shown the way (8 14 Main part of a book taken by travellers (3,7 16 Distressed Royalist living the life of a hermit (8 18 Taking bullets from an old gun I dismantled (9 20 Not a sunny greeting? (3,4 21 Cafe and inn combine somehow to make money (7 23 Dad’s brother Sam is in the U.S. (5 25 Exhausted after a day’s shopping? (5 26 Found on stage (4 Across:1 Condone, 5 Scrub, 8 Isosceles, 9 Ate, 10 Lien, 12 Asterisk, 14 Litter, 15 Editor, 17 Armrests, 18 Acme, 21 Act, 22 Bartender, 24 Elder, 25 Younger. Down:1 Chill, 2 NCO, 3 Once, 4 Enlist, 5 Suspends, 6 Realistic, 7 Breaker, 11 Estimated, 13 Remember, 14 Leakage, 16 Stormy, 19 Error, 20 Beau, 23 Dig. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Malaria, 5 Prate, 8 Treadmill, 9 Tip, 10 Heap, 12 Criteria, 14 Cognac, 15 Savage, 17 Purveyor, 18 Whip, 21 Owe, 22 Foretaste, 24 Solar, 25 Rapidly. Down:1 Match, 2 Lie, 3 Rude, 4 Aviary, 5 Palatial, 6 Aftermath, 7 Expiate, 11 Augur well, 13 Taken for, 14 Copious, 16 Horror, 19 Piety, 20 Step, 23 Sad. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 12345678 9 1011 1213 1 4 1 5161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 1 4 1 5161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE tt r e g a

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C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 P AGE 10 Officers take part in physical fitness programme... n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net D on’t look now, b ut the St A ugustine’s College BigR ed Machines added the 21st championship title to the history books of the B ahamas Association of Athletic Associations’ Track and Field Championships. B ut this year, the Queen’s College Comets made a gallant effort, falling short by just 164 points as they continued to close the gap in the point standings. At the end of the three-day meet yesterday at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium, which saw 11 records established, the Big Red Machines celebrated their victory lap with a total of 1,282 points. They were eventually joined by the Comets with 1,118. No other school came close as the St Anne’s Bluewaves took third place with 448. SAC’s head coach William “Knucklehead” Johnson said they knew it was going to be tough, but they are just happy that they were able to prevail once again. “They put together a good team,” said Johnson of Queen’s College. “They had a lot of newa thletes in a lot of categories, s o we expected it.” Johnson, however, said his B ig Red Machines were just s imply too strong across the board and that made the differe nce. H e said “hard work” was the k ey to their success. “The kids w anted it more. There was a lot o f talk about what QC is going t o do and who they had. But w e stayed focused on the prize a nd we did what we had to do.” B ut credit the entire coaching s taff, including twin sisters Dianne Woodside, who returned to team up with Dawn J ohnson, Tito Moss, Norma Miller, John Todd and all of the o ther people who assisted in the various areas. As they tasted the thrill of victory for another year, Johnson said they are coming back next year “bigger and stronger” to go for their 22nd crown. If Queen’s College has any thing to do with it, they’re going to regroup and try to pull off the upset. “We didn’t perform as well as we could have,” said Comet’s coach Gary Markham. “We had athletes not getting into the finals because they were ill and we had some bad exchanges that hurt us in the relays. “But we’re very happy. We’re closing the gap. That is our biggest aim. But we have to admit that SAC has got some phenomenal and talented athletes. But only one school is going to do it. They deserve to win, but we will be on their heels again next year.” On the record front, four of SAC’s athletes and two 4 x 400 relay teams inked their names in the record books, while QC had one individual athlete and three relay teams. Temple Christian Suns had one of the records, thanks to Laquardo Newbold’s winning time of 17 minutes and 54.22 seconds in the senior boys’ 5,000 which erased the previous mark of 17:58.87 by Justin Miller in 2007. Perhaps one of the most impressive performances came on the field where SAC’s basketball standout Jabari Wilmott cleared 6-feet, 8 1/4-inches to shatter the old mark of 6-6 that was posted by fellow SAC student Horace Pierre in 2000. Wilmott’s mark also exceeded the qualifying mark of 6-4 for the Carifta Games in St Lucia over the Easter holiday weekend. It was the second time this season that Wilmott has achieved the feat. “I just went out there to do my best. My goal was to jump 66,” Wilmott said. “But when I came to 6-10, my legs started to get tired. So I was very pleased with the performance.” This would be the second Carifta appearance for Wilmott, who noted that his goal this year is to win a medal. SAC’s Kenya Culmer dominated in the senior girls triple jump. She soared 36-5 to remove the old mark of 34-11 3/4 by Eunae Wright in 2007. The only other record on the field came from Devinn Cartwright of Queen’s College in the intermediate girls high jump. She did 5-5 1/4 to surpass the record of 5-3 3/4 by Janice Ezegbunam of SAC in 1998. Back on the track, individual track records also came from Shaunae Miller in the interme diate girls’ 300 hurdles in 43.93 to replace the previous time of 44.05 by SAC’s Tess Mullings in 2006. Devinn Cartwright also went under the record in 44.02 for second. And Deshana Burnside led a 1-2 finish for SAC in the senior girls’ 800, running 1:06.35 to beat out team-mate Hughnique Rolle (2:26.25 Burnside replaced Romona Nicholls’ 2005 time of 2:22.27. Queen’s College bantam girls 4 x 1 relay team of Zaria Gibson, Khadija Fraser, Vanaillan Walker and Kennadi Carbin ran 53.46 to shatter an old QC mark of 54.36 set in 2006. QC’s junior girls team of Rachel Knowles, Shelby Carbin, Shanae Sands and Talia Thompson ran 4:14.56 in the 4 x 4 to knock off SAC’s 2005 time of 4:14.80. In the intermediate girls’ 4 x 1, QC’s team of Willicia Hart, Devinn Cartwright, Mona Lisa Taylor and Printassia Johnson ran 48.87 to replace the previous time of 48.95 that was also held by QC. SAC’s intermediate girls’ team of Rashante Colebrooke, Kryshell Rolle, Ashley Johnson and Shaunae Miller ran so fast in winning the 4 x 4 relay in 3:59.70 that they not only broke the record of 4:00.59 by SAC, but they also lapped one of the teams. And their senior girls’ 4 x 4 team of Kenya Culmer, Hugh nique Rolle, V’Alonee Robinson and Deshana Burnside did the same thing when they ran 4:02.16 to replace SAC’s old time of 4:03.42. However, their time was slower than the inter mediate girls. Robinson completed a sweep of the senior girls’ sprints, winning the 200 in 24.64. Marcus Thompson duplicated the feat in the senior boys division in the 200 in 21.48. “I felt pretty good about the race. I felt I could get a better start, but overall I was pleased about it,” Thompson stated. “This is the first year that I won in BAISS, so I’m happy.” Thompson, 17, said he’s even more excited over the fact that he got to compete against Temple Christian’s Warren Fraser, who was second in 21.68, just as he was in the 100. Fraser’s sister Khadija Fraser, however, was unbeaten in the bantam girls’ sprints, adding the 200 (26.97 crown. Danielle Gibson of Aquinas won the junior girls’ 200 (26.26 and Shaunae Miller took the intermediate girls half-lapper in 25.06. SAC victorious! S cotiabank s ponsors Lightning track club... See page 10 Queen’s College Comets close behind for second in record breaking track meet SAC Big Red Machines’ Jabari Wilmott jumped into the record books, breaking the meet record in the high jump yesterday... (Photos by Tim Clarke/ Tribune staff ) COUGARS bantam 4x100m team edge out SAC for the win... COMETS hold off Big Red Machines in the junior girls 4x100m finals yesterday... HERE’S a look at the final point standings from the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools’ 21st Track and Field Championships that wrapped up yesterday at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium: St Augustine’s College: 1,282 Queen’s College: 1,118 St Anne’s: 448 St Andrew’s: 355.50 St John’s College: 309 Temple Christian: 282.50 Nassau Christian Academy: 278 Jordan Prince William: 192 Aquinas College: 153.50 Charles W Saunders: 119 Kingsway Academy: 67 Faith Temple Academy: 66 Westminister College: 62.50 BAISS final point standings

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THEY moaned and they groaned. But one by one each participant went through the vigorous training session yesterday morning at the Royal Bahamas Defense Force (RBDF Maybe because they were being closely watched, none of the 13 competitors passed up on the routine as physical training instructor Raymond “Brave” Sawyer shouted out the instructions from the sideline. Sawyer, a 29-year veteran on the force, is hosting a 16-week training course on the base in what they call the “pit”. The course, however, is not just designed for the RBDF. For the first time, members of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Her Majesty’s Prisons, Fox Hill and one or two members of the community have come together to participate in the training course. Already through the 10th week, the course is designed for two sessions each day where t he participants go through vigorous training and are engaged in classroom lessons. A t the end of the course, Sawyer said the participants are expected to be certified to “teach as instructors” to any sporting body outside of the Defense Force. Additionally, the participants will be so fit that by the time they are finished, they would have ended up running a half marathon. Right now, they have already ran up to nine miles. “We never offered it outside of the base before, but I real ized that all of these agencies need a physical fitness programme,” Sawyer said. “So I think if we can get at least one person in each of the military branches in a position to teach the same type of physical fitness that we go through here at the base, their law enforcement agencies will be better off physically.” In 2003, Sawyer offered the f irst such course to the RBDF and they eventually had four successful graduates. This timea round, with a much bigger class to work with, Sawyer is hoping to at least double and even succeed in passing out all of the participants. Terico Sweeting, a police officer attached at the Training College, said he came in from the initial week and it has beena tough 10 weeks. “I did not expect this,” Sweeting stated. “Coming fromt he training base at the college I did not expect this. I thought that I would have been ins uperb conditioning. “But it was only when I came here that I discovered that I really wasn’t. So it has been really rough on me. But I’ve made a vast improvement sinceI came here and I think it’s obvious in the eyes of the instructor.” Looking at the entire training programme, Sawyer said the m ost difficult aspect he has had to endure was “the physical training with the push ups andt he rope climb.” “That was the most difficult part for me,” he said. When he returns to the force, Sweeting said he intends to impart all of the knowledge that he gained to help make the RBPF a more vibrant and fit military department. Foster Ferguson, a corporate at Her Majesty’s Prison, has also been in the programmes ince its inception. He too has considered it to be a challenge. “So far, it’s been well round e d and we’ve learnt a lot as far as the physical fitness and your health awareness is concern,” he said. “I think that the programme will be very good to carry back to the prison to help us with a programme to assist our staff.” Getting his body to a physical level where he learns how to “climb rope,” Sweeting said he has enjoyed going through a b alanced routine of exercise activities. And there are a couple of w omen participating as well. Leading woman Margaret Taylor, of the RBDF, said she was always interested in the physical training, but she had a “challenging, yet rewarding” experience so far. When asked what the hardest aspect of the training was, Tay lor quickly pointed out that it was the “push-ups because of a nagging shoulder injury.” “But I didn’t allow it to stop m e.” If there was anything that she didn’t have any problem with at a ll, it was the run. “But it was challenging because I didn’t expect the intensity of what we had to go through.” And bodybuilder Jay Darling, a member of the RBDF, said the course would help him to be much more defined as he competes for the Mr Bahamas title again this year. “When I came in, I didn’t expect to be doing so much. I’ve already lost 20 pounds,” h e said. “I’m leveling off at 189 and it seems as if I’m staying at that w eight, which is pretty good because it’s where I need to be as a middleweight.” For Sawyer, it would make his tenure complete at the RBDF as he intends to retire at the end of the course and look at whatever opportunity is available for him as a physical education instructor major at the College of the Bahamas. Defence, police, prison officers take part in physical fitness programme C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS DEFENSE , police and prison officers take part in rope climbing... DEFENSE , police and prison officers do an exercise routine yesterday at the RBDF base... PHYSICAL fitness instructor Raymond “Brave” Sawyer shows participants how to do their exercise... n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER joining the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA the Silver Lightning Track and Field Club has finally secured a sponsor. Scotiabank has come to the aid of the club – made up of the majority of the “grassroots” athletes in the BAAA – headed by Rupert Gardiner. On Thursday at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium, Rekett Griffin, acting senior manager for marketing and products, presented a cheque of an undisclosed amount to Gardiner, who doubles as the club president/head coach. Griffin said when Gardiner approached her predecessor Greg Burrows in connection with sponsoring his track club, they couldn’t turn him down because of their commitment to the young people of the Bahamas. “We sponsored the 2008 BAAA Olympic Trials and so we figured that this will be a way for us to continue in that role, helping our young people to develop their skills in the area of athletics,” she said. Gardiner said because of the fact that he caters mainly to children that come from single parent homes, it’s a step in the right direction for them to get the support from Scotiabank. “To have Scotiabank come to our aid, it says a whole lot,” Gardiner said. “As a national coach, for years I’ve seen athletes who can’t afford a decent uniform just to compete in, so this is a great help.” Look for the Silver Lightning to come out shining when they host their track and field meet on Saturday, May 2 at the TAR Stadium, starting at 9 am for the youth and the open segment at 1 pm. “We are looking for some great things to happen because we have some underprivileged kids in our club, but they are all eager to compete,” Gardiner said. Five years ago, when he returned home, Gardiner said he saw the need to launch the club. Initially, they only had 20 athletes, but they have blossomed and now have more than 60. “We already have kids who made national teams and we are looking for some more to make the Carifta team this year,” Gardiner said. “Our top sprinter Antonique Strachan won the under-17 girls 100m and 200m at the GSSSA meet last week. She’s one of our prospects.” While the majority of the ath letes are relatively young, Gardiner said Scotiabank’s sponsorship will go a long way in assisting them in their future endeavors, including getting into college, either here at the College of the Bahamas, or in the US. Scotiabank sponsors Lightning track club REKELL GRIFFIN (presenting cheque as they are now the official sponsors of his Silver Lightning Track and Field Club. Also shown are members and executives of the club... (Photo: Derek Smith MILITARY officers in pain as they go through an exercise during the training programme at the RBDF base yesterday... MILITARY officers undergo a training exercise...

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE the scene N ASSAU E VENTS C APTURED O N C AMERA by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP 1 ENTREPRENEUR and former banker Gary Christie escorts his daughter Gari Fenrica up the aisleo n Saturday, February 21 at Christ Church Cathedral, George Street. The ceremony was performed byR ev Dean Patrick Adderley and the following reception was held at the W yndham Nassau Resort on Cable Beach. The menu included Bimini whitec onch chowder, an array of baby field greens with raspberry basil dressing as appetizers; the entrei ncluded a rack of lamb and a French Atlantic salmon filet in a dill c ream sauce, red-skinned potatoes, and grilled tomatoes, asparagus and glazed carrots; desert was ap ina colada caramel flan served with coffee and tea. 2 MOTHER of the bride Cleopatra F Christie, former Magistrate and c orporate manager with Scotiabank, is escorted by her son Gavin C hristie, real estate agent with C A Christie. 3 T HE groom’s mother La-Roma H untSeifert, office manager at the Public Treasury Department, is escorted by her husband CorporalD udley Seifert. Mrs HuntSeifert’s dress was d esigned by her and was made by Lynn Curry. 4 A TTORNEY Willie Moss of Freeport, Grand Bahama; Hubert L P rescod, chief financial officer for Political Media Buying Specialists, and his wife Joan Prescod, an accountant. 5 B ANKER Kim Foster, director of projects and country relationship m anager for Scotiabank; attorney Gilbert A Ward, owner of Valdy Administration in the British Colonial Centre of Commerce; Minna Israel, former managing director ofS cotiabank Bahamas and presently managing director of RBTT Bank of Jamaica. 6 A FAMILY AFFAIR – Dr Sandra Dean Patterson, head of the Crisis Centre; Roni Patterson, NatashaP atterson and Gerrard Patterson. 7 ( l-r) VINCENT Pratt, bank officer; Bjorn Hunt; Khaalis Rolle, best man and managing director of Bahamas Fast Ferries; Phillip Rahming, the groom and building engineer; Shane Deveaux, contractor; Jamiko Sands, engineer; Gavin Christie, real estate agent. 8 (l-r our in the wedding and a lawyer with Higgs and Johnson; Orese Darville, flower girl; Dr Keisha Patterson, bridesmaid; Defence Force Officer Lavonya Seifert, bridesmaid; Stacey Smith, council attorney; Christie Cash, trust officer at Cititrust; Rojarra Armbrister, stu dent in Canada; Danielle Hanek, officer of Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. 9 CLEOPATRA Strachan, an educator, along with Harry Kemp, managing director of Telepoint. 10 CLEOPATRA Rolle, an auditor in the Auditor General’s Office, with her husband Marco Rolle, undersecretary in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and a law student at the Eugene Dupuch Law School. 11 MR and Mrs Philip OsbourneRahming leaving Christ Church Cathedral to enjoy the rest of their lives together. Match made in HEAVEN 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 11 6




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