Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

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BAHAMAS BIGGEST

Detention =
peports withheld

Immigration Director
tells press he found
no evidence to

back detainees’
claims of violence

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE FINDINGS of an inves-
tigation into living conditions at
the Detention Centre were fil-
tered to the press in a confer-
ence held by the Department of
Immigration yesterday.

Full reports submitted by psy-
chologist David Allen, Social
Services director Melanie Zon-
ical, Archdeacon James Pala-
cious, Royal Bahamas Defence
Force senior lieutenant Freder-
ick Brown and director of
Immigration Jack Thompson
were not provided to the
media.

Immigration officials also
denied The Tribune’s request to
tour the facility, although
Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette said the proposal will
be considered at “the next board
meeting.”

A tour of the detention centre
in Carmichael Road was carried
out by the fact-finding team of
professionals on Friday after
The Tribune published
detainees’ allegations of physical
abuse, sexual abuse, inadequate

SEE page eight

DMC) SM MOL OLUA SMS EU



DR MICHAEL DARVILLE takes his seat in the Senate for the first time yesterday after being sworn in.
Senator Darville fills the seat left vacant by the departure of Pleasant Bridgewater.

Newly relaxed US policies on travel
to Cuba raise concerns in Bahamas

@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

NEWLY relaxed travel poli-
cies to Cuba implemented by



US President Barack Obama
have raised concerns that this
country's tourism leaders have
been "dragging their feet" in
making the Bahamas a more
competitive destination than
emerging markets in the
region.

SEE page eight
Reports: Howard
K Stern ‘turns
himself in to police’

MEDIA REPORTS last
night alleged that Howard K
Stern would be turning himself
over to police in connection
with allegations he illegally
obtained prescription drugs for
the late Anna Nicole Smith.
Stern has reportedly denied any
wrongdoing.

SEE page eight

2:4. Desap Bart

Son of Chauncey























sie Me
The Tribune for
highlighting story

THE son of Chauncey
Tynes Jr, the pilot who went
missing on a flight from Exu-
ma to Nassau 26 years ago,
yesterday thanked The Tri-
bune for highlighting the story
of his father’s disappearance.

“It has done wonders for
me in answering a lot of ques-
tions,” Mr Kimo Tynes said
from Turks and Caicos, where
he works.

Mr Tynes, 28, was a baby
when his father disappeared.
“T never got to meet my dad,”
he said. “I have been asking
questions all the 28 years I
have been alive.”

The Tynes family has
always wondered why the
Bahamas government never
conducted an inquiry into the
mystery of Chauncey Jr’s final

SEE page eight

COF





Christie’s Tribune
tirade ‘at odds
with comments he
made 25 years ago’

Reaction to PLP leader’s
attack on Insight article

PLP leader Perry Christie’s his-
tory came back to haunt him yes-
terday after he had launched a
bitter attack on The Tribune’s
Insight article on Sir Lynden Pin-

dling.

For media veterans pointed out
that his tirade against The Tri-
bune’s managing editor John Mar-
quis and his interview with
Chauncey Tynes Sr was totally at
odds with what he said when he
was fired from Pindling’s Cabinet

25 years ago.

Then Mr Christie accused Pin-

dling of bringing the Bahamas’
integrity into question, adding:

Perry Christie

“For the better part of this year, the extent to which com-
mitment to service with integrity has been eroded in the
Bahamas has proven the cause for concern at every level of

our society.

“Indeed, it has gone beyond our national boundaries and
brought our nation’s integrity into question. I, too, have
been outspoken recently in my criticism of this decay.”

Mr Christie said in his statement of October 8, 1984:
“History will judge harshly those who stifle conscience and
good sense and permit loyalties other than those owed the
nation to dictate the course plotted for the nation they gov-

ern.

“No other virtue supersedes that of integrity in affairs of
government and those upon whom the people have called to
govern them are expected to serve no other masters than

SEE page eight



David Kelly dies age 76

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

DAVID Kelly, proprietor of
Kelly’s Home Centre, philan-
thropist and former Olympic rep-
resentative for the Bahamas, died
late Wednesday night in a New
York hospital.

With his family at his bedside,
Mr Kelly passed away at around
midnight at the New York Pres-
byterian Hospital. He would have
turned 77 on March 25.

A spokesperson for the family
told The Tribune that he did not
suffer at the end.

“Tt was peaceful, he died in his
sleep — he was still in a coma.”

Mr Kelly, with his wife Nancy,
and several members of Kelly’s
Home Centre, had travelled to
New York in February for their
annual purchasing trip for the
store. However, Mr Kelly, who
had a heart condition, developed
chest pains and went to the hos-
pital for a check-up. He under-
went a procedure at the hospital
on February 18, but afterwards
developed complications.

The family’s spokesperson said
his death this week was, however,

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NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



David Kelly

not the result of any new compli-
cations, but rather that he “grad-
ually” succumbed to his initial
condition.

Mr Kelly’s son Gregory was
the one to break the news to
members of executive staff and
friends at Kelly’s Home Centre
yesterday morning.

The store’s management then
shared the sad news with all of

SEE page eight

Wulff Road
Opposite Mackey Street
Tel: 393-0512, 393-8006,

OR 393-3513
Open Monday to Friday 7am - 4pm
Saturday 7am - 3pm



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

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Editorial/Letters. ...ccccccccccssscssseeseesssseeesseees P4
Bee eee eee eine pee secures eee eee P9,10,11

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

LOCAL NEWS

a -mem| The De

partment of

Immigration collects
342 million this year

Money primarily coming from
work permit, citizenship fees

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

MORE than $32 million has
been collected by the Depart-
ment of Immigration this year,
primarily from work permit
and citizenship fees, it was
announced yesterday.

And the department expects
it will reach its goal of drawing
more than $38 million in rev-
enue by the end of the fiscal
year on June 30, Director of
Immigration Jack Thompson
said.

“This makes us very proud
because the prime minister
has mentioned that revenue
is down,” he said.

“For us, our revenue is
doing extremely well.”

Mr Thompson attributes the
high revenue to the aggressive
approach taken by the depart-
ment’s team and a thorough
assessment of outstanding
funds over the last four years.

Unpaid funds identified in
an audit review found 70 New
Providence companies owe a
total of $834,718.74 to the
Immigration Department,

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while another 24 companies
in the capital are currently
being audited.

In Grand Bahama more
than $1 million in unpaid fees
is owed to the department.

Mr Thompson said: “The
department proposes to notify
all companies of this in writing
and we will give them a time
to settle the outstanding
accounts, or arrange a pay-
ment plan.

“But of course, we wish for
them to settle the outstanding
accounts.”

Much revenue is lost when a
letter from the Immigration
Department guaranteeing an
employer a work permit for
their employee upon condi-
tion of payment within 30 days
is used to hire foreign workers
before paying the government,
Mr Thompson said.

DIRECTOR OF IMMIGRATION Jack Thompson

“T think we need to look at
that,” he said. “I have strong-
ly advocated that we should
just issue an invoice as
opposed to a letter, and it may
just be the way to go.”

Enforcement is also vital to



ensure the payment of fees,
and Mr Thompson said
inspectorate teams could be
sent to building sites and areas
where foreign workers may be
employed to ensure permits
have been paid for.

Man drives himself to
hospital after being shot

A MAN drove himself to the hospital after
he was shot several times in the back in broad
daylight by someone he knows.

The 31-year-old man told police he was in
Farrington Road when the gunman approached
and shot him several times in the upper back at

around 2pm on Wednesday.

He drove his car to the Princess Margaret

ening.

Hospital, where he is now listed in serious con-
dition, however his injuries are not life threat-

Police are appealing for information from
the public to assist the investigation.
If you have any information in relation to this

incident call police on 322-4444, 911, or call

Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-8477.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 3



~ Woman claims Sir Lynden Pindling’s

biological mother was definitely Haitian

Three men
charged
with rape of
13-year-old

THREE men accused of
raping a 19-year-old woman
were arraigned in a Magis-

trate’s Court yesterday.

Anthony Sullivan, 24, of
Kenwood Street; Jumell Wal-

lace, 24, of Podeleo Street,

and Nekos Kemp, 25, of Mal-
were }
arraigned before Magistrate

colm Road west,

Susan Sylvester in Court 11,

Nassau Street, on the rape :

charge.

It is alleged that the three }
men committed the offence ;
on Sunday, March 1, 2009. :
The accused were not }
required to enter a plea to }
the rape charge. Sullivan and :
Wallace were each granted :
bail in the sum of $5,000. ;
Kemp, who according to the }
prosecution has a pending :

rape case before the courts,

was denied bail and remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison. }
The case has been adjourned

to August 13.

¢ A 38-year-old man }
accused of fraudulently :
obtaining nearly $11,000 was :
arraigned in a Magistrate’s :

Court yesterday.

Court dockets allege that
Jason Antonio Sands on ;
Wednesday, February 4, 2009 :

with the intent to defraud,

obtained from SaveCo Trad-
ing Company Limited at Tay- }

lor Street, Nassau Village,

two LG 52 LCD television }

sets valued at $5,120.

It is further alleged that on
Wednesday, January, 26, 2009 :
the accused, with the intent
to defraud, obtained from }
Bristol Cellars Group of }
Companies on East Street }
200 cartons of Rothmans blue }
cigarettes valued at $5,550. :
Sands, who was arraigned }
before Magistrate Susan }
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau ;
Street, pleaded not guilty to
the charges and was granted
bail in the sum of $10,000.
The case has been adjourned i

to August 13.

Handgun, live
ammunition
found after
car search

A HANDGUN and 15 :
rounds of live ammunition }
were found by Drug Enforce- ;
ment Unit officers when they
searched a car on Cable }

Beach on Wednesday.

Officers recovered the i
.Jmm handgun and ammuni- }
tion when they stopped and }
searched two men ina black }
Nissan Maxima as they drove }

through Sea Beach Estates,

off West Bay Street, at

around 4pm.

A 30-year-old man of Ida
Street and a 25-year-old man }
of Sunshine Park are in police
custody and are being ques-
tioned in connection with the }

discovery.

ie
Ut)
a as
PHONE: 322-2157

your
news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in
their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your
story.



THE dispute over Sir Lynden Pin-
dling’s birth continued yesterday
when a middle-aged woman from
East Street claimed his biological
mother was definitely Haitian.

The 55-year-old woman said a sis-
ter of Pindling’s nominal mother,
Viola Pindling (formerly Bain), told
her categorically that Viola was not

his real mother.

“IT knew Viola’s sister Sybil well
and she told me that Lynden was
born in Bain Town to a Haitian

woman.

“His father Arnold (a Jamaican)
left the mother with the child to
return to Jamaica, then came back
to Nassau later to join the police

force.

“He then took the child from the

Haitian mother.”

circulating for years.

Haitian woman and gave
it to Viola, whom he
married. I don’t know
whether Lynden went to
Jamaica for schooling or
what happened to his

The woman’s disclo-
sure came in the wake of
former senior police offi-
cer Errington Watkins’
claim that Pindling’s
mother was Jamaican.

She said this was not so
— but agreed with Mr
Watkins that Pindling
was born in Bain Town.

Speculation over whether Sir Lyn-
den was truly a Bahamian has been

Sir Lynden Pindling



years ago.

In last Monday’s con-
troversial Insight article,
former PLP treasurer
Chauncey Tynes Sr said
Pindling was born in
Jamaica and came to
Nassau as a boy.

The Tribune’s latest
source, who lives off East
Street, said neither Viola
Pindling nor her siblings
— Sybil, Drucilla and
Eugene — had children.

“They are all dead
now,
Eugene died within three
days of each other some

“But I think the truth should be
told about these things. Because he

and Sybil and

was prime minister, the nation has a
right to know where he came from.

“But the PLP always tried to cover
it up like they try to cover everything
else up.”

In 1973, Pindling responded to
speculation among politicians by pro-
ducing a birth certificate showing he
was born in Nassau.

However, his birth was registered
nearly 17 years after the event and
he refused to be drawn when a
reporter asked if he had sworn an
affidavit to support his application
for a passport.

His true origins are considered sig-
nificant among political observers

because of his Bahamianisation pro-

gramme and his anti-foreign rhetoric
during political campaigns.

PLP hopeful plans demonstration
outside of The Tribune next week

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN AN attempt to defend the
legacy of Sir Lynden Pindling
following a controversial arti-
cle published about the former
prime minister, activist and PLP
hopeful Paul Moss plans to
demonstrate outside The Tri-
bune next week.

Mr Moss said it is important
for supporters of Sir Lynden to
speak out, as the late former
prime minister is not alive to
defend his own name.

Memory

He echoed statements made
earlier this week by PLP leader
Perry Christie, saying that
because he was the father of
the nation, Sir Lynden's mem-
ory should be protected against
unfounded attacks.

"As a citizen I was just
offended by the managing edi-



Paul Moss

tor and I thought that since he
has freedom of expression to
write what he wrote, that I exer-
cise my freedom of expression,
freedom of movement, of
assembly — which are all funda-
mental freedoms guaranteed by
the constitution, Articles 15 to

" And to let it be known that
despite the opinion of Mr Mar-

quis of Bahamians and also of
Sir Lynden, I want it to be
known that I will stand up and
defend his legacy," Mr Moss
said yesterday.

Article

The demonstration — sched-
uled for Tuesday at 10am -— i
not planned to disparage the
character of The Tribune's man-
aging editor John Marquis, Mr
Moss said, but to allow those
affronted by the article to
express themselves in a public
forum.

He is not sure what the
turnout will be but stressed that
it would be a peaceful, non-vio-
lent demonstration.

"This demonstration is not
one to invite people to come
out there and disparage the
managing editor but to just
exercise the freedom of speech.
"One of the legacies of Sir Lyn-
den, is he has an anti-violence
stance. Sir Lynden was able to

Police in Abaco seek two
men for questioning

TWO men are wanted by Abaco police for
questioning in connection with string of crim-

inal offences.

Both should be considered armed and
extremely dangerous and should be

approached with caution.

Makines ‘Cell’ Francois, 18, of Treasure Cay,
Abaco and Peardale, Nassau is wanted for
questioning in connection with a kidnapping

and robbery case.

Christopher Livingstone Burnside, 42, of
Southside Road, Murphy Town, Abaco, is

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Francois is 5ft 7ins, has dark brown skin,

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    lead this nation, a nation of
    minority rule, to a nation of
    majority rule without the shed-
    ding of blood.

    "T believe that in spite of all
    that has transpired in the life of
    Sir Lynden, he is the father of
    this nation and that we ought to
    give him the respect, particu-
    larly in his death, that he
    deserves.

    "For me personally I know
    he was responsible, with a
    group of people, and ushered
    in a new and modern Bahamas.
    I think it is prudent for persons
    to stand up, particularly since

    AE

    he's not here to stand up for
    himself.

    Earlier this week, an explo-
    sive Insight article titled "The
    tragic young pilot who knew
    too much’, told the story of the
    late Chauncey Tynes Jr, who
    went missing in 1983 when
    piloting a flight from Exuma to
    Nassau.

    His father, Chauncey Tynes
    Sr, told The Tribune he believes
    his son was murdered because
    he knew too much of the asso-
    ciation between Sir Lynden and
    the Colombian drug czar Joe
    Lehder.

    PUP CR ee ey

    THAT NOW FAMOUS INTERVIEW

    SO WHAT do Tribune readers think about
    the Sir Lynden Pindling-Joe Lehder controversy?
    Don't miss Monday’s INSIGHT FEEDBACK,
    the biggest response ever to an Insight article.

    --
    wT
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    PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

    THE TRIBUNE





    The Tribune Limited

    NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
    Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

    LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

    SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

    (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

    Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
    Contributing Editor 1972-199]

    EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

    Publisher/Editor 1972-

    Published Daily Monday to Saturday

    Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
    Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

    WEBSITE
    www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

    Five leading PLPs see no evil

    EVERY picture, they say, is worth a thou-
    sand words. The one on the front of yester-
    day’s Nassau Guardian was worth ten thousand
    at least, probably more.

    It showed five senior members of the Pro-
    gressive Liberal Party, including its leader Per-
    ry Christie, sitting solemnly at a press confer-
    ence called to denounce The Tribune’s manag-
    ing editor John Marquis and the Insight article
    he wrote about the late Sir Lynden Pindling
    and his alleged links with the Colombian drug
    czar Joe Lehder.

    The looks on their faces were reminiscent of
    those of George Custer and his last remaining
    officers at the Battle of Little Big Horn. Boy, did
    they look grim.

    All were presumably there out of duty to
    bolster the fast-fading legacy of the late Sir
    Lynden, a man who brought shame and oppro-
    brium on the Bahamas by presiding over the
    drug-addled 1980s, when thousands of local
    lives were destroyed by the cocaine trade.

    All looked distinctly uncomfortable in their
    role. And all looked like they would far rather
    have been somewhere else.

    Mr Christie led the attack on The Tribune,
    calling the Insight article “garbage” and
    denouncing Mr Marquis in the most personal
    terms. Listening to him speak, one could truly
    believe that he was a lifelong supporter of Lyn-
    den Pindling, and an unshakeable proponent
    of his cause.

    Interesting, then, to note that when Mr
    Christie was fired from Pindling’s Cabinet in
    1984, he took the prime minister to task for
    leading the country into a steep decline.

    Both he and the current prime minister,
    Hubert Ingraham, were fired by Pindling at the
    very point where they were about to resign
    because they could no longer stomach the cor-
    ruption of his administration.

    So far from being a rock solid supporter of the
    late prime minister, Mr Christie — along with
    Mr Ingraham — was among his most dogged
    critics.

    Look down the line of glum-faced so-called
    ‘Pindlingites’ as they tried gallantly but vainly to
    hold Sir Lynden’s tattered image aloft and you
    see more examples of extreme disillusionment.

    Take Fred Mitchell, for instance, who burned
    a copy of the Bahamas constitution and sent
    the ashes to Pindling, declaring them to be sym-
    bolic of the destruction the then prime minister
    was causing in the Bahamas.

    In the picture, Mitchell looks deeply trou-
    bled and perplexed. Perhaps he was wondering
    what he was doing there in view of the fact that
    he had conducted a protracted campaign against
    Sir Lynden, even to the point of threatening to
    disclose secrets about his private life.

    Next to him sits Glenys Hanna-Martin, also
    looking distinctly uneasy about her part in this
    clumsily orchestrated charade. That’s no sur-
    prise because her father Arthur Hanna, now
    Governor General, resigned as deputy prime
    minister in 1984 because he saw it as “the only
    honourable course of action” and after the com-

    mission report advised Sir Lynden to do the
    same.

    Consider also the slightly embarrassed look of
    Dr Bernard Nottage. What was he doing there?
    One might well wonder, given the fact that he
    abandoned the PLP after failing to get the par-
    ty leadership in 1997 and spent most of his years
    in the political wilderness berating many of his
    former colleagues.

    It’s hard to believe that he is a committed
    fan of the ‘Father of the Nation’, especially as
    his ill-starred Coalition for Democratic Reform
    advocated a break from Pindling-style high-
    handedness.

    The fifth face of gloom belonged to Vincent
    Peet. His feelings about Sir Lynden are not
    known.

    So what, then, are we to make of this collec-
    tion of Pindling detractors?

    Were they there simply to shore up the rep-
    utation of the one figure that seems to unite
    the PLP nowadays? Are they coming to realise
    that, without the Pindling myth to cling to, they
    are a spent force whose useful life is long past?

    We fear so because the truth is that the so-
    called New PLP blew its opportunity for true
    reform between 2002 and 2007. The party
    showed itself to be just as hopeless as it had
    ever been — a disorganised group who had
    failed to keep faith with the people.

    Perry Christie, pleasant man though he is,
    proved an unmitigated calamity as prime min-
    ister, allowing a herd of headstrong ministers to
    run wild and cause havoc for his government
    during its entire term in office.

    The PLP now finds itself with a major prob-
    lem on its hands. It has to convince an increas-
    ingly smart electorate that Pindling was a good
    thing for this country when all of the evidence
    suggests otherwise.

    Sure, Pindling had his virtues. He did some
    positive things in his early years. But all his
    achievements were overshadowed by the
    immense damage caused during the 1980s, when
    the Bahamas almost went under because of the
    drug trade.

    If the PLP really wants to regain power, it has
    to turn its back on the idlers and deadbeats
    who have traditionally been an important part
    of its support structure and strive for better,
    nobler standards. It needs to put behind it the
    drug factions who have relied on it for suste-
    nance and support over many decades, and
    squash the attitude of entitlement in the party
    promoted by Pindling’s days in power.

    By trying to buttress the image of Sir Lynden
    Pindling when evidence of his wrong-doing
    mounts by the day, the PLP is merely confirm-
    ing what its fiercest critics know all too well: that
    despite the embarrassments of its past the par-
    ty is determined to drag Pindling’s soiled lega-
    cy into the future.

    What the party has failed to take into account
    is that the Bahamas is no longer a nation of
    impressionable dumbheads who are willing to
    be bamboozled by men in sharp suits and fancy
    watches.

    When is a
    hospital a
    hos pital?

    LETTERS

    EDITOR, The Tribune.

    The 2007 annual report of the
    Hospitals Board tabled in Par-
    lament last December raises
    some important public interest
    issues.

    One of those issues is
    whether the Hospitals Board
    has the ability to function as a
    regulator of private hospitals
    and clinics under the Hospital
    and Health Care Facilities Act,
    1998.

    For example, the Hospitals
    Board has a duty under the Act
    to investigate a complaint into
    the “management, diagnosis,
    and treatment” of a patient ina
    hospital or clinic licensed by the
    Hospitals Board.

    But it seems the Hospitals
    Board’s view is that it licenses
    the building and its facilities,
    and not the quality of health
    care services provided. The Act
    itself defines a hospital as “a
    building where beds are avail-
    able for the admission of per-
    sons requiring treatment for any
    sickness.”

    Experts say this description
    is not adequate. It does not
    require a central legal entity
    that is responsible and account-
    able for all medical services pro-
    vided under its roof. That struc-
    ture, according to advisers,
    would be in the best interest of
    the community for the obvious
    reasons of safety and ethics.
    There is a disconnect here
    which can adversely affect qual-
    ity assurance in medical treat-
    ment.

    Medical advisers to Bahamas
    Patient Advocacy see a hospital
    as an institution which accepts
    patients for medical treatment,
    within an organisation with a
    centralised authority responsi-
    ble for quality assurance in the
    delivery of healthcare services.

    It should be the medical ser-
    vices that are being licensed —
    not just the building — in order
    to properly reflect the modern
    concept of what a hospital is.
    The public needs a single source
    of accountability in healthcare
    facilities, and a licensing board
    to enforce it. On this basis, a
    “hospital”, together with its
    medical services, needs a regu-
    latory definition as a single
    (legal) entity.

    Under current law, private
    hospitals may function as a col-
    lection of independent physi-
    cians providing medical services,
    by having practicing privileges,
    in a building providing beds and
    nursing services, among other
    things. The patients would then
    be admitted as patients of the

    letters@tribunemedia net



    individual physician. Sections
    of the building may be leased
    or managed by different corpo-
    rate entities, providing other
    medical services.

    This structure diffuses author-
    ity and accountability. For
    instance, the Act requires that a
    healthcare facility should
    (among other things) provide
    sufficient numbers of qualified
    staff who can administer appro-
    priate care to the patients
    admitted.

    But if a hospital is a building
    with beds, without medical
    management authority, and
    medical services are provided
    by independent doctors, can
    “the hospital” exercise authori-
    ty to restrict admissions to only
    those patients that “hospital” is
    able to treat?

    Or can a private hospital
    make the appropriate medical
    staff available, if there is no
    overall authority that employs
    or manages medical profes-
    sionals at the hospital?

    BPA advisers say that a new
    institutional definition is
    required, making it clear that a
    hospital is a single interest enti-
    ty accountable for the medical
    services provided there. A hos-
    pital has to uphold its own inter-
    est beyond the interests of inde-
    pendent professionals and enti-
    ties within it. This would place
    the hospital in a proper posi-
    tion to oversee the safe delivery
    of healthcare services.

    A hospital also needs to have
    an internal quality management
    structure, which can immedi-
    ately respond to any concerns
    arising. To do this, a hospital
    needs to collect data on all
    patients admitted in order to
    know whether its operating
    units are doing a good job, and
    it needs sufficient qualified staff
    to enable it to respond.

    The interests of the patient,
    the doctors, and the hospital,
    must be one seamless and single
    interest, to improve patient out-
    comes. That is the purpose of
    a hospital.

    Usually a hospital has a Chief
    of Medical Staff, or Chief Med-
    ical Officer (CMO). The CMO
    has the authority to ensure the
    competency of the doctors prac-
    tising there.

    The CMO also has responsi-
    bility for the integrity of the
    hospital system. That integrity

    would include an effective
    “call” system, to ensure that all
    patients have medical care
    available 24/7, so no patient, in
    crisis, 1s left unattended.

    In public health care, a CMO
    would, or should, resign in the
    event of such a “systems fail-
    ure”.

    Should a private heath care
    facility, not also be held to a
    similar standard of account-
    ability?

    The licensing board of hos-
    pitals and clinics should require
    an independent audit of their
    health care services by an out-
    side review body. This external
    accreditation could also be used
    by a hospital to enhance its cre-
    dentials and image. The Hospi-
    tals Board could thus carry out
    its quality assurance- oversight
    function at no expense to the
    Board, or challenge to its limit-
    ed resources.

    But the 2007 report proposes
    changes to the Act that would
    seriously weaken the Hospitals
    Board as an oversight body.

    The Board wants the Gov-
    ernment to amend the Act to
    remove the provision for inves-
    tigation of complaints, elimi-
    nate the need to provide notifi-
    cations of deaths, and reduce
    penalties for failure to comply
    with licensing requirements.

    But at the same time, the
    Hospitals Board is also propos-
    ing a new and extensive set of
    hospital regulations. So, on the
    one hand, the Board says it
    wants to reduce its oversight
    responsibility, but on the other
    hand, it wants to increase regu-
    latory requirements?

    The BPA advocates that the
    Board’s oversight capacity be
    strengthened, and that the Hos-
    pital Board embrace its over-
    sight function of quality assur-
    ance, as per the petition on its
    website below.

    We urge our Parliamentari-
    ans to consider the Hospitals
    Board’s report in terms of the
    public interest in a safe system
    of health care, and oversight
    assurance of this.

    Good business sense should
    dictate that the more confidence
    the public has in our local insti-
    tutions — including statutory
    boards — the less likely we will
    be to spend our money abroad
    for medical care.

    Bahamas Patient

    Advocacy
    www.bahamaspatientadvocacy.org
    Nassau,

    March 6, 2009.

    US legislation to stop tax haven abuse

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    EDITOR, The Tribune.

    Ican recall the period not so long ago when all of
    the “big” countries of the world decided that not
    they, but other countries should be responsible for
    policing the tax laws of those “big” countries.

    At the time there was a very real fear that the
    effect of the position taken by those countries would
    lead to the collapse of this country’s second financial
    pillar - Financial Services.

    The Bahamas acted very quickly (and foolishly in
    some “educated” people’s minds) to “correct” what
    were viewed as deficiencies in its regulatory regime.

    Now there is major rumbling from our neighbour
    to the North that countries like The Bahamas, these
    so-called “tax havens”, need to be added to anoth-
    er list, despite all the efforts taken and being taken
    by countries like The Bahamas to co-operate and
    share information. Not to mention the myriad of
    bi-lateral and multi-lateral international agreements
    (drafted by the “big” countries) that this country is
    a party to and are complying with.

    The reality is that the steps taken by The Bahamas
    with respect to regulating financial services, in many
    instances is far superior, wide-ranging and better
    enforced than a lot of those “big” countries (can
    anyone say ENRON, CITIGROUP, Housing and
    mortgage crisis, Madoff?). Yet, we and other small
    states continue to take the blame for the ineffec-
    tiveness of these “big” countries, with all of the
    resources that they have, to police the financial
    transactions of their citizens.

    It seems to me that regardless of any and all of the
    efforts that this country takes as a responsible mem-
    ber of the international community, it will just nev-
    er be enough.

    Sometimes I get the feeling that the view from
    our “obvious Superiors” is that this country should
    not respect its own laws (which it is entitled to apply
    over the laws of any other country) and that only
    their laws are important or worth obeying.

    In my view, the move by the United States and
    other “big” countries is actually very shortsighted.
    Does anyone out there other than me see the unin-
    tended consequences of the US legislation to “stop
    tax haven abuse” to The Bahamas?

    Let’s think about it:

    (1) The “big” countries of the world decide that

    they will not only “walk lightly and carry a big stick”
    but now they will use that “big stick” to pound the
    economies of the “obviously banana republic-like”
    “tax-haven” countries into the ground (which they
    have a moral right to do because after all these are
    the places where their citizens are “hiding” their tax-
    able income and wealth, and for some unfathomable
    reason, they just can’t seem to stop them from doing
    SO);
    (2) So the economies of these tax havens are
    destroyed. The Bahamas is on the hit list, so of
    course, its second pillar comes crashing down. Many
    are left jobless as the few financial services providers
    that remain in the aftermath simply can’t absorb
    them all. The tourism sector in this climate of finan-
    cial uncertainty can’t absorb anyone either. What to
    do?

    (3) With the loss of income, the Government of
    The Bahamas can’t pay its bills and now has to pri-
    oritise where to spend its scarce resources. Many ser-
    vices are diminished, as there is simply not enough
    to go around. Somewhere in this mix is the obliga-
    tion the country has to maintain the OPBAT oper-
    ations with the US and Turks & Caicos, not to men-
    tion the regular patrols of its borders to stop not only
    the drug trafficker but the illegal immigrant... How
    the country will pay for these things, God only
    knows...

    Does anyone else see where I'm going with this?

    I certainly don't advocate illegal activity, but at
    some point common-sense (which everyone knows
    is not very common) needs to come into play. Could
    the problem in fact not be the “tax haven” but the
    failure of the regulators in the “big” countries to do
    their “important” jobs properly, if at all?

    In closing, I have two well-used and perhaps
    applicable adages to say to the “Big Fathers and
    Mothers” out there who continue to treat countries
    like ours as recalcitrant children: “Don’t cut off
    your nose to spite your face” and “Clean your own
    doorstep before you try to clean mine”. Enough
    said.

    I remain forever grateful, but wary and weary in
    Nassau.

    WEARY
    Nassau,
    March 4, 2009.



    THE TRIBUNE

    FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 5



    Plantation descendant accuses
    Clifton Heritage Authority of
    offering ‘slave’s work’ at park

    m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

    A DESCENDENT of slaves
    at the Whylly plantation in
    Clifton Pier claims to have
    been offered nothing more
    than slave’s work at the new
    Clifton Heritage National
    Park.

    But Vivian Whylly, 47, of
    Cable Beach, Nassau, is certi-
    fied in eco-tourism planning
    and tour guide training and has
    led scores of students and visi-
    tors on historical tours of the
    former plantation before it was
    declared a national park.

    O In brief :

    Gunman robs
    Yamacraw
    Convenience
    Store

    AN ARMED robber with a i
    Creole-Bahamian accent held }
    up an employee of the }
    Yamacraw Convenience Store }
    and stole cash from the shop }
    on Wednesday afternoon. ;

    It was broad daylight when }
    the gunman burst into the store ;
    in Yamacraw, southeast New }
    Providence, wielding a gun.

    He threatened the shop- }
    keeper with the weapon and }
    demanded cash before fleeing }
    the area heading east at around }
    3.45pm. The robber was wear- }
    ing blue jeans and a white T- :
    shirt at the time. ;

    He got away with an unde- }
    termined amount of cash. i

    Police are appealing for :
    information from the public to }
    assist ongoing investigations. }
    If you have any information :
    which may led to apprehension }
    of the gunman, call police on ;
    322-4444, 911, or call Crime }
    Stoppers anonymously on 328- ;

    PMH surgical
    clinics closed

    SURGICAL clinics at the }
    Princess Margaret Hospital will :
    be closed today, with the }
    exception of the antenatal clin-
    ic and Dr A Sawyer’s nephrol- }
    ogy clinic. Anyone who has an }
    appointment scheduled for :
    today should contact the clinic }
    on 322-2861 to resechdule. ;

    The hospital apologises for }
    any inconvenience caused.

    CORRECTION

    AN opinion piece on
    pages 10 and 11 of yester-
    day’s Tribune was mistak-
    enly published without attri-
    bution.

    The article was in fact the
    second in a series discussing
    the potential opportunities
    for the Bahamas in the
    emerging green economy,
    which will be running on
    Thursdays over the next two
    months.

    Colin Lightbourn, the
    author of the series, is a real
    estate business owner, devel-
    oper and past president of
    the Bahamas National Trust.

    To comment, discuss and
    submit ideas about these
    articles, visit: www.the-
    greenislands.com

    TON

    m@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
    Tribune Freeport
    Reporter
    dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

    POLICE are offering a
    reward for information con-
    cerning the whereabouts of
    GARRAN GIBSON.

    Asst Supt Clarence
    Reckley said police are hop-
    ing that the public can help
    them in locating the man, who
    is wanted for questioning in
    connection with several crim-
    inal matters on Grand
    Bahama.

    The man should be consid-
    ered armed and dangerous
    and should be approached
    with caution, he said.

    The police can be contacted
    by dialling: 911, 352-1919, 352-
    8224 or 351-9991.

    And the father-of-three
    maintains he was an integral
    part of the campaign to pre-
    serve the area and was knighted
    by the Sovereign Order of Saint
    John of Jerusalem because of
    his ancestry, historical knowl-
    edge and dedication to protect
    the former plantation.

    However he claims the
    Clifton Heritage Authority will
    now only offer him work
    cleaning toilets and weeding
    the gardens.

    Mr Whylly believes he has
    become embroiled in a political
    issue as he campaigned to
    establish the national park
    under the PLP government,
    but was overlooked when the
    Clifton Heritage Authority was
    set up under the FNM admin-
    istration in 2007.

    He said: “They are talking
    like their hands are tied but
    there are no tied hands, they
    are tying their own hands.

    “Politics are holding them
    up, but whether it is the PLP or
    FNM in power, I am a descen-
    dent of the slaves and I would
    enhance what they are doing.

    “In any other country a
    descendent of something like
    this would be looked at as
    something other than a prob-
    lem.”



    “In any other
    country a descen-
    dent of something
    like this would
    be looked at as
    something other
    than a problem.”



    Vivian Whylly

    Mr Whylly is keen to hon-
    our his legacy and share his
    intimate knowledge of the for-
    mer plantation by telling the
    ‘real story’ to visitors.

    He said: “The real story
    about the Whylly plantation is
    about William Whylly, a loyal-
    ist who came from America
    and stayed on the side of the
    British.

    “He was the first chief jus-
    tice and became the attorney
    general and an advocate of the
    slaves.”

    Through his research at the
    National Archives, Mr Whylly
    learned William Whylly
    bought the Clifton plantation
    in 1811 when slave trader
    James Moss, the previous own-
    er of the land, was forced to

    auction the site to pay a fine
    for his cruel treatment of
    slaves.

    William Whylly, a Methodist
    convert, was the first in the
    Bahamas to write a list of
    rules, regulations and entitle-
    ments for his slaves in 1815,
    including the right for slaves
    to own property, be baptised,
    and buried, Mr Whylly said.

    The plantation owner wrote
    to the British African Society
    in 1817 advocating the rights
    of slaves, and in 1821 became
    the first in the country to pro-
    duce a register of his slaves,
    Mr Whylly said.

    The register has allowed him
    to trace his heritage back to
    his great-great-great-grand-
    mother Esther Whylly.

    He said: “I need the Clifton
    Heritage Authority to realise
    there is a true story about the
    Whylly heritage, and there is a
    Bahamian descendent of the
    slaves who has the documents
    and is being overlooked.

    “This is what I am living to
    do and I would like to be able
    to tell this story, I want to
    bring it to life.”

    Clifton Heritage Authority
    chairman Senator Jacinta Hig-
    gs did not return calls before
    The Tribune went to press.



    VIVIAN WHYLLY with the 1820 list of slaves at the Whylly planta-
    tion including his great-great-great grandmother’s name, Esther

    Whylly.

    Miss Global Bahamas Pageant set to take off in May

    BY the end of May, one
    lucky young woman will make
    history as the first ever Miss
    Bahamas Global and head off to
    represent the country at an
    international pageant.

    The new talent focused
    pageant aims to give ladies
    between ages 17 and 26 a plat-
    form to display not just their
    physical beauty but also the
    ways in which they are positive
    role models, leaders and ambas-
    sadors for a worthy cause.

    According to pageant director
    Desiree Tynes-Moss, a priority
    for the organisers was to make
    sure the pageant would be fair-
    ly judged.

    “As a former model and
    pageant contestant, I’ve seen
    various sides of the industry and
    I want to sensitise the public of
    the positive aspects of
    pageantry,” said Mrs Tynes-
    Moss. “As the mother of a
    young daughter, I consider each
    of the contestants my own and
    would not want them in a posi-
    tion where they would not feel
    comfortable.

    “Overall, I think this pageant
    will be successful when we have
    a calibre of ladies who will rep-
    resent not only the country but
    represent what today’s young
    women should aspire to be like.
    Right now, we have a few girls
    who found out about our
    pageant but we are still accept-
    ing more contestants especially
    those from the Family Islands
    or those who may be living away
    and be back home in time for
    the event.”



    Mrs Tynes-Moss said the Miss
    Global Bahamas Organisation’s
    aim is to empower young ladies
    by providing real opportunities
    for them to excel through expo-
    sure.

    She noted that while there
    will be a scholarship and cash
    prize for the overall winner,
    self-appreciation is more impor-
    tant.

    “We seek to instill self confi-
    dence, good moral values,
    national pride, emphasis on per-
    sonal character and leadership,

    thus preparing young ladies
    today for the road ahead tomor-
    row,” said Mrs Tynes-Moss.
    “Like we say in our motto, we
    seek empowerment through
    pageantry, creating opportuni-
    ties and changing lives. For one
    young woman, when she wins
    this crown she will not be just
    another beauty queen but a liv-
    ing part of history.”

    More information on the
    Miss Global Bahamas Pageant
    can be found at www.missglob-
    albahamas.com.

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    PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    —————————————————————— SS
    Minister inspects construction of

    seating facilities at US Embassy



    MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Neko Grant (third from left) :
    discusses plans for the construction of seating facilities for clients of the Unit- :
    ed States Embassy in Nassau with Carlton King, right, contractor for the pro- :
    ject. Also pictured from left is Gordon Major, Director and Colin Higgs, Per- :

    manent Secretary.



    SEATING FACILITIES and an enclosed overhang are being constructed by the :
    Ministry of Public Works and Transport at the United States Embassy. :
    Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant visited the US Embassy to :
    inspect the ongoing project. Pictured from left are Gordon Major, director; :
    Colin Higgs, permanent secretary, Minister Grant and Carlton King, contractor :

    of CW King General Contractors and Developers.

    Did you know?
    One of the leading causes of death among children
    5-9 is CANCER.
    In the last 20 Years ASTHMA rates have increased
    over 400%. American Manufacturing Company
    has expanded into The Bahamas to educate
    ALL BAHAMIAN consumers.

    Come find out what is causing it!

    Place: The Cancer
    Society-Centreville (2 Doors Down from ZNS)
    Date: Friday, March 13, 2009
    Time: 6:30PM - Reserved Seating

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    “Business Minded Individuals and
    Stay At Home Moms are strongly
    encouraged to attend.”

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    Criminals’ use of guns
    increasing in Bahamas

    @ By ADRIAN GIBSON
    ajbahama@hotmail.com

    | HESE days, mania-
    cal criminals are
    increasingly using guns as
    their weapon of choice as
    they disrupt the serenity of
    our once tranquil islands,
    going on murderous ram-
    pages, robbing families of
    loved ones and callously
    committing heinous crimes
    with no regard for the law.

    The wave of gun violence
    that appears to be sweeping
    across the streets of New
    Providence week after week
    has left many residents terri-
    fied by the thought that this
    small island is becoming like
    the Wild West as we are con-
    stantly inundated with
    reports of the grisly carnage
    caused by gun violence or
    told about high-speed chases
    and dramatic gun battles
    between rival gangs or of
    emboldened outlaws engag-
    ing the police in gun fights.

    A few weeks ago, gunshots
    were fired from a car — in
    broad daylight — at police
    on West Bay Street. Three
    days before that, another
    group of hoodlums report-
    edly engaged police ina
    shootout in the Montagu dis-
    trict.

    Although there have been
    numerous other incidents
    this year, last weekend a
    shooting in a crowded night-
    club at Arawak Cay left one
    man dead.

    The growing trend of anti-
    social behaviour is rapidly
    leading to a state of social
    chaos, where boorish persons
    barbarously roam the streets
    like wild animals engaging in
    feral, homicidal behaviour to
    indulge their unabated anger.

    The senseless actions of
    uncivilised, dim-witted per-
    sons are rapidly casting the
    Bahamas in the image of a
    crime-ravaged hellhole on
    the brink of social implosion.
    There is no wonder why
    Bahamians — stricken by
    fear — have voluntarily cho-
    sen to live in virtual impris-
    onment, locked behind iron
    bars (windows), bolted doors



    “The senseless
    actions of
    uncivilised,
    dim-witted
    persons are
    rapidly casting
    the Bahamas in
    the image of a
    crime-ravaged
    hellthole on the
    brink of social
    implosion. ”



    and screens, and sheltered
    behind iron gates.

    In their state of paralysis,
    law-abiding Bahamians have
    become more distrustful and
    are swiftly arming them-
    selves with cutlasses, shot-
    guns, bats and other safety
    measures to ensure their
    security.

    Admittedly, I am a
    licensed gun owner and I
    support the right of Bahami-
    ans to legally bear arms, par-
    ticularly in instances such as
    hunting or self-defence.

    The Bahamas, a country
    with strict gun laws, has seen
    a proliferation of
    guns/ammunition on its
    streets that I’m told are eas-
    ily accessible and for hire to
    any deranged criminal.
    Undoubtedly, spiralling
    street warfare in this coun-
    try — particularly New Prov-

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    YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

    idence — is fuelled by the
    alarmingly high importa-
    tion/smuggling and circula-
    tion of illegal firearms (from
    assault rifles to handguns)
    primarily from the United
    States, that has given rise not
    only to the lawless behaviour
    that we now see but also toa
    ‘black market’ that profits on
    the trade of illegal weapons.

    Frankly, the easy avail-
    ability of handguns is dis-
    maying and a national issue



    NATIONAL SECURITY MINIS-
    TER Tommy Turnquest said
    that the illegal trade in small
    arms, light weapons and
    ammunition was creating an
    ‘illicit trafficking phenomenon’.

    that should be effectively
    addressed. The illegal
    firearms sale and smuggling
    operations within the archi-
    pelago have led to a number
    of killings of youngsters —
    most likely with drugs, mon-
    ey or women as the central
    figure of a dispute — and
    created a breeding ground
    for the criminal element
    (drug traffickers, gangs,
    migrant workers, terrorists,
    organised crime, etc) to
    access these dangerous
    weapons and cause mayhem.

    National Security Minis-
    ter Tommy Turnquest, in a
    speech to the CARICOM-
    US Partnership to Combat
    Illicit Trafficking in Arms
    Seminar, held in Nassau, said
    that the illegal trade in small
    arms, light weapons and
    ammunition was creating an
    “illicit trafficking phenome-
    non” as the illegal migrant
    and drug trade has created a
    single criminal enterprise.

    According to Mr Turn-
    quest:

    "Such criminal enterprises
    are engaging persons across
    national borders in much the
    same way that legitimate
    multi-national businesses do,
    bringing serious distortion to
    the concept of globalisation.

    "Whether arms in such
    enterprises are exchanged
    for money or for drugs, or
    are used to protect illicit
    shipments of persons or com-
    mit murders, assaults, rob-
    beries and other crimes; to
    intimidate and threaten and
    to enhance status, or other
    reasons, they contribute to
    the widespread availability
    of firearms in the region.”

    The Bahamas is extremely
    vulnerable to the trafficking
    of nearly all illicit items —
    including small arms and
    automatic weapons — pri-
    marily due to its central loca-
    tion between the air and sea
    routes of North and
    South/Central America as
    well as Europe.

    Sadly, it seems that our
    strict gun laws may only
    affect those law-abiding citi-
    zens, as thousands of hand-
    guns remain in circulation

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    and outlaws are constantly
    packing heat, while striking
    fear into the hearts of
    already caged-in residents. It
    is high-time we implement
    gun trade-in and buy-back
    programmes, similar to those
    adopted by cities such as
    Atlantic City, to encourage
    persons to fork over illegal
    firearms to the authorities.
    Furthermore, a conscientious
    effort must be made to curb
    the importation of other
    potentially lethal weapons
    such as low power air pistols,
    replica guns and paintball
    guns.

    Instead of pontificating
    about petty political matters,
    the church could have a huge
    impact in the fight against
    violent crime and the
    removal of guns from the
    streets.

    Indeed, there should be an
    amnesty period where unli-
    censed gun toters can feel
    protected if they take a gun
    to one of the many churches
    in our communities. Fur-
    thermore, in taking guns off
    the streets, we must launch a
    practical, effective campaign
    that incorporates the gov-
    ernment, the private sector
    and the public.

    There should not be a hint
    of the petty politics and
    political gimmicks portrayed
    by many self-serving politi-
    cians!

    In the Bahamas, we may
    soon need to establish an
    agency or department similar
    to the Alcohol, Tobacco and
    Firearms (ATF) agency in
    the US, whose sole purpose
    would be to gain intelligence
    and crackdown on the ille-
    gal weapons trade.

    These days, it is impera-
    tive that the police force con-
    tinue upgrading its arma-
    ments as I continue to see
    officers on the beat without
    bulletproof vests and carry-
    ing six-shooter revolvers that
    they hope would counter the
    sophisticated, high-powered
    weaponry of criminals that

    wear body armour and carry
    guns with magazines that
    hold 15 or more rounds.

    Police officers must be
    heavily deployed in those
    boroughs with the highest
    instances of crime and must
    strengthen their relationship
    with certain communities
    and thereby better their
    intelligence-gathering abili-
    ties.

    THE PHARMACY
    AT PMH AND THE
    EYE WARD

    I RECENTLY had an
    accident that led to me
    convalescing at Princess
    Margaret Hospital for sever-
    al days.

    I was able to witness first-
    hand the frustration of
    patients and others waiting
    at the hospital’s pharmacy
    for their medication.

    Although the hospital
    claims that the pharmacy is
    facing challenges — particu-
    larly in staffing — a number
    of the pharmacists on duty
    adopt a nonchalant, haughty
    attitude when dealing with
    patients.

    However, I must say thank
    you to a very accommodat-
    ing pharmacist — Daniel —
    who rendered impeccable
    service to myself and several
    others.

    Moreover, the eye ward
    at Princess Margaret Hospi-
    tal must be one of the most
    efficiently run wings of that
    institution.

    Although I had a room,
    when I was being encour-
    aged to “go private” or move
    to Doctors Hospital, I stayed
    because I had established a
    rapport with the nurses and
    also because of the
    concern and absolute pro-
    fessionalism that they had
    displayed.

    I left PMH with several
    more friends and I would
    especially like to thank nurs-
    es Ferguson, Sturrup, Hep-
    burn and Griffin — as well
    as my doctors and the sup-
    port staff — for the superb
    care and outstanding service
    that I received.

    Stanford case looms
    over Antigua elections

    @ ST. JOHN'S, Antigua

    ANTIGUAN VOTERS worried by the fallout from an alleged
    fraud scheme involving their richest man decide Thursday between
    the ruling party and the one that welcomed R. Allen Stanford to the
    Caribbean nation nearly two decades ago, according to Associated
    Press.

    Both main political parties have promised to strengthen Antigua's
    economy, which was hit hard after Caribbean regulators took over
    local banks controlled by the Texas financier.

    The billionaire is one of the island's most prominent citizens
    and its largest private employer. Hundreds of people work for his
    two restaurants, one newspaper, cricket grounds, a development
    company and a three-branch local bank as well as the headquarters
    of his Stanford International Bank.

    Prime Minister Baldwin Spencer, whose United Progressive
    Party is seeking to retain its majority of 17 parliamentary seats, has
    said his opponents sought to "literally give away Antigua and Bar-
    buda to Allen Stanford" when the financier brought his offshore
    bank here from Montserrat in 1990.

    Spencer's opponent, Lester Bird, a close Stanford ally, denies the
    claim - although his Antigua Labor Party was in power at the
    time.

    Lists

    There were long lines at polling places and at least 19 had yet to
    open more than three hours after voting was scheduled to start. The
    Electoral Commission blamed the delay on problems printing vot-
    er lists and said it was working to resolve the situation.

    Even the prime minister said he was unable to vote in the morn-
    ing because his polling station in had not yet opened. The Antigua
    Labor Party said it would seek to have polling hours extended.

    The ALP dominated island politics for 28 years before Spencer
    wrested control away in 2004.

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has accused
    Stanford and his top officers of an $8 billion fraud related to cer-
    tificates of deposits and other investments. An attorney for Stanford
    has denied the allegations made in civil court.

    The alleged scandal has Antigua worried about potential damage
    to its reputation and banking sector, and residents concerned
    about their economic future.

    Spencer says he fears Stanford might not be able to pay some 700
    workers. The Stanford Development Company, which provides
    maintenance, IT and other services to local Stanford companies, has
    already dismissed 94 employees.

    The Senate has voted to confiscate about 250 acres (100 hectares)
    of Stanford's property, including businesses that formed the basis
    of his empire.

    Both parties have pledged unemployment assistance, with the
    ALP promising to help impoverished families by canceling old
    power and property tax bills. The UPP also seeks privatization of
    key state entities, such as power and telecommunications.

    Roughly 52,000 of the island's 85,000 residents are registered vot-
    ers.



    THE TRIBUNE

    FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 7



    LOCAL NEWS



    Current global

    Crisis ‘demants
    deepening of regional
    collaboration’

    THE global economic
    crisis is a major test of
    the CARICOM Single
    Market and Economy
    and the region, Barba-
    dos Prime Minister
    David Thompson said.

    He said Caribbean
    countries need to deepen
    their collaboration and
    focus on regional com-
    mitments and partner-
    ships.

    Speaking at the Fifth
    Prime Ministerial Sub-
    Committee Meeting on
    the CARICOM Single
    Market and Economy
    (CSME) on Wednesday
    in Belize City, Belize,
    Mr Thompson noted that
    these are “challenging
    times” and warned that
    the effects of the global
    financial and economic
    downturn will not bypass
    the region.

    “...today we face the
    repercussions of an
    unparalleled global eco-
    nomic crisis centred in
    the developed world, but
    one which will not
    escape us. We must
    again rely on our region-
    al commitments and
    partnerships. This of
    course is one of the
    major tests of the Single
    Market and Economy.
    Let us determine to
    shore up the weaker
    links of our union, be it
    regulation and oversight
    of the financial sector or
    intra-regional trans-
    portation,” Mr Thomp-
    son said.

    Action

    He stressed the need
    for those attending the
    meeting to discuss cor-
    rective action and review
    timelines where neces-
    sary and also called for
    the completion of the
    Strategic Plan for the
    Single Economy in order
    to appropriately co-ordi-
    nate national efforts to
    accomplish objectives.

    “We have the occasion
    to look at the decisions
    we have taken prior to
    this juncture and to
    examine their effective-
    ness in light of the reces-
    sionary forces at work in
    the global economy. Our
    responsibility in this sub-
    committee is to steer this
    initiative to our destina-
    tion with purposefulness
    and for the betterment
    of all our people,” he
    said.

    The Barbadian prime
    minister, as the lead
    head of government with
    responsibility for the
    CSME, chaired the
    meeting. Bharrat Jagdeo
    and Drs Runaldo Vene-
    tiaan, presidents of
    Guyana and Suriname
    respectively; Dean Bar-
    row, prime minister of
    Belize and chair of the
    Conference of Heads of
    Government of CARI-
    COM; Roosevelt Skerrit,
    prime minister of
    Dominica; Bruce Gold-
    ing, prime minister of
    Jamaica; Tillman
    Thomas, prime minister
    of Grenada, and Dr
    Denzil Douglas, prime
    minister of St Kitts and
    Nevis, participated in
    the meeting. Saint Lucia
    and St Vincent and the
    Grenadines were also
    represented.

    Discussions at the
    meeting focused on the
    Single Market Imple-
    mentation Audit which
    would determine the lev-
    el of commitment of
    member states to the
    CSME, and contingent
    rights to be accorded
    persons who can now
    freely move and work
    within the region.

    Heads of government
    have approved nine cate-
    gories for free move-
    ment of skills — artists,
    musicians, university
    graduates, media work-
    ers, Sportspersons,
    teachers, nurses, holders
    of associate degrees and
    equivalent qualifica-
    tions, and artisans who
    have received a
    Caribbean Vocational
    Qualification (CVQ).

    ollege students ‘suffering
    effects of economic slump’

    @ By ELAN HUTCHINSON
    AND GREG SMITH

    AN INCREASING number of
    Bahamian students are questioning
    whether a college degree is still the way
    to go during this ongoing economic
    slump, an informal poll by The Tribune
    has shown.

    Many students at the College of the
    Bahamas said they have been directly
    hit by the recession and are suffering
    the consequences.

    Several students who talked to The
    Tribune said they are concerned that
    they will have to discontinue their stud-
    ies because they fear that all the energy
    and money they are spending on their
    education could be in vain if the job
    market does not recover in the near
    future.

    Others said that they may have to set-
    tle for a “mediocre profession” while
    they wait for the country’s economy to



    THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS: Many students there say they eae — alrpetly hit by

    the economic slump.

    make a comeback.

    Alexavia Dean, a 18-year-old student
    in her second semester of college, said
    her mother was recently laid off from
    Atlantis.

    Asked if her mother losing her job at

    the Paradise Island resort had affected
    her college career in any way, Ms Dean
    said: “I was ever struggling, I mean she
    found a next job, but I don’t know, this
    caused me to lose a little bit of hope, you
    know.”

    Like Ms Dean, a number of college
    students have found themselves strug-
    gling during these tough economic times
    and as a result they have since taken on
    the not-so-easy task of finding a job.

    While some students are close to
    despairing, others are still persistent in
    pursuing their career aspirations,
    although their ‘dream jobs’ may be in
    low demand at the moment.

    Thomas Barnett, a hospitality tourism
    management major, had much to say
    on the topic of the recession affecting his
    career choice. He said he will continue
    to pursue a career in tourism because it
    is his passion.

    Mr Barnett said he would even cut
    back on “partying” in an effort to save
    funds to help his parents pay tuition
    fees.

    For the tourism major, the recession
    has meant that he has become more
    responsible with money and more dili-
    gent in planning ahead for his future.

    Government is exploring
    alternative sources of energy

    @ By INDI
    MCLYMONT-LAFAYETTE
    for Panoscope, a series of
    Panos Caribbean

    THE Bahamas government is
    moving to put measures in place
    to help extremely vulnerable
    islands adjust to what one offi-
    cial called a possible “death sen-
    tence for small islands”.

    Phillip Weech, director of the
    Bahamas Environmental Science
    and Technology (BEST) Com-
    mission, said that the government
    is working on an energy policy,
    exploring alternative sources of
    energy as well as more sustain-
    able tourism options in a bid to
    prepare the more than 700 islands
    for the possible effects of climate
    change.

    “Bahamas has no national
    energy policy ... we have prepared
    it and are doing public consulta-
    tions to take it forward,” said Mr
    Weech, who was addressing a
    workshop put on by the UN Eco-
    nomic Commission on Latin
    America and the Caribbean
    (ECLAC) to discuss the feasibil-
    ity of doing a review on the eco-
    nomics of climate change in the
    Caribbean.



    “Adaptation is a priority for us
    but we have to do it in light of our
    circumstances. We have to diversify
    and to do so in renewable
    technology such as using wind
    energy and ocean thermal energy

    conversion.”



    Phillip Weech, director of Bahamas Environmental
    Science and Technology Commission

    The Caribbean is regarded as
    one of the regions that will be
    most affected by climate change
    and the resultant rising sea lev-
    els. According to Mr Weech,
    the Bahamas is one of the most
    vulnerable island countries in the
    region because of how flat it is.

    “We are not a high island coun-
    try like Jamaica or anywhere else
    — anywhere on the Bahamian
    islands is about 1.5m above sea-
    level. We are almost like pan-
    cakes,” he said.

    Mr Weech highlighted other
    vulnerabilities such as a high

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    dependence on imported energy
    and food as well as the increasing
    costs of these commodities. He
    said these are areas in which there
    will have to be significant change.

    “Adaptation is a priority for us
    but we have to do it in light of
    our circumstances,” said Mr
    Weech. “We have to diversify and
    to do so in renewable technology
    such as using wind energy and
    ocean thermal energy conver-
    sion.”

    “We have to look at our hotel
    sector — there is new technology
    on Paradise Island which allows

    you to dim lights and reduce elec-
    tricity use based on their occupa-
    tion level but most of our old
    hotels have nothing like this, so
    the hotels have to look at having
    energy efficient systems,” he said.
    “Energy assessments and audits:
    how much energy is used to keep
    someone in a hotel? How much
    energy is used in government
    departments? What about the use
    of transport — how much energy is
    used to move one person from
    point A to point B? We need to
    be a lot more energy efficient.”
    He added that the Bahamas is

    already doing the following to
    address climate change:

    ¢ establishing terrestrial and
    marine reserves as well as parks
    and protected areas across the
    Bahamas

    ¢ reducing emissions from land
    degradation and deforestation
    (REDD)

    ¢ fulfilling obligations to the
    United Nations Framework Con-
    vention on Climate Change
    (UNFCCC) through assessment
    reports

    * maintaining engagement
    with regional bodies including the
    Caribbean Community Climate
    Change Centre and the Alliance

    of Small Island Developing
    States.

    Mr Weech’s presentation was
    well received and the director of
    ECLAC’s Caribbean sub-region,
    Neil Pierre said that the feedback
    from the Bahamas workshop
    would feed into the feasibility
    studies being planned for the
    Caribbean.

    “Actions must be based on
    informed economic decision-mak-
    ing; the RECCC (Review of the
    Economics of Climate Change in
    the Caribbean) will give policy-
    makers this,” said Mr Pierre.
    “RECCC will arm policymakers
    with high quality information and
    informed analysis so that they can
    effectively play their part at an
    international level.”

    The RECCC study is expect-
    ed to be done over a two year
    period. The first phase (Septem-
    ber 2008 — March 2009) has
    already started with preliminary
    workshops on climate change in
    the Caribbean.

    “We hope that this project will
    arrive at some preliminary find-
    ings to inform Caribbean gov-
    ernment’s at the Copenhagen
    negotiations (December 2009),”
    said Mr Pierre

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    PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



    LOCAL NEWS



    Detention Centre| Pyqyjid Kelly dies age 76

    reports withheld ©

    FROM page one

    food and dirty living conditions.

    Director of Immigration Jack Thompson told the press he
    found no evidence to substantiate detainees’ claims of violence
    by centre supervisors, nor did he hear any allegations of guards
    inviting the detainees to do sexual favours for privileges.

    He said: “I know when people are detained they get bitter,
    they get angry, they say some things, especially when they are
    detained for too long, and they have fights between themselves.

    “There were no claims of beatings lodged with our committee,
    and I looked at these guys (who claimed to have been beaten)
    and saw no sign of beatings.

    “We heard nothing about sexual favours for privileges, and
    there was no suggestion of insufficient food.”

    The team found meals to be of reasonable quality and quan-
    tity, however recommendations to diversify the lunch menu to
    include fruit and salads will be adopted under the direction of a
    dietitian, Mr Thompson said.

    Detainees met the team in the presence of their supervisors,
    but the Immigration Department director maintains they spoke
    candidly about their experiences and were more concerned
    with their personal status than the state of the facility.

    Immigration is already working to implement recommenda-
    tions put forward by Dr Allen and Father Palacious to provide
    detainees with indoor games, televisions and more books in
    various languages, Mr Thompson said.

    New washing machines and dryers also will be provided, and
    mattresses, which Mr Thompson said have been vandalised by
    frustrated detainees, are being replaced, while grimy walls in the
    male and female dorms will be cleaned and repainted.

    Mr Thompson said: “Some of the detainees, because they
    become angry at times, they tend to destroy the mattresses and
    deface the walls, and we noticed that some of the mattresses were
    torn up and destroyed, and the walls could be painted and
    freshened up.”

    Dr Allen’s suggestion to allow detainees outside to play
    games and sports will however require more thoughtful con-
    sideration to prevent detainees from escaping, Mr Thompson
    said.

    And the psychologist’s recommendation to tear down the
    male dormitory recently ravaged by fire will take some time as
    it may be required for evidence.

    He added: “We are aware that these persons are not incar-
    cerated, they are not prisoners, so we are going to give them what
    we can.

    “Tt is not true that the detention centre is operated as a con-
    centration camp, it is not true that we have violated international
    protocols.

    “We take our responsibility seriously with respect to persons
    in our custody.

    “The detention centre is not yet what we want it to be, but it’s
    well on its way to being all that it could be, and we will contin-
    ue to spend public money to ensure that it is well kept and well
    managed.”

    Mr Thompson said the Immigration Department has been well
    aware of concerns at the Detention Centre since his directorate
    took office at the end of November.

    And the director maintains the fact-finding mission was not
    prompted by reports in The Tribune which drew the attention of
    Amnesty International, the American press and individuals
    around the world.

    Reports of conditions inside the facility are being reviewed by
    Minister of Immigration Branville McCartney, will be passed on
    to the Deputy Prime Minister and recommendations will then be
    considered by the Cabinet.

    Reports: Howard K Stern
    ‘turns himself in to police’

    FROM page one

    Smith, who made headlines in the Bahamas after the death
    of her son in Doctors Hospital and photos of her with then Cab-
    inet Minister Shane Gibson appeared in The Tribune, died in
    February, 2007, after being found unresponsive in a Florida
    hotel. She was 39.

    In April that year, the Bahamas was again centre stage as her
    former boyfriend Larry Birkhead was granted custody of her
    daughter Dannielyn.

    FROM page one

    the employees.

    The Kelly’s spokesperson said
    that many people at the Home Cen-
    tre were taking his death very hard.

    “They were very fond of him. He
    was very loved and will be badly
    missed. Some staff members go as
    far back as 25 to 30 years with him,”
    the spokesperson said.

    Mr Kelly’s family, including his
    wife Nancy, his three sons, Andrew,
    Gregory and Scott, and his daugh-
    ters-in-law, Candy and Shelly, and
    others, are currently still in New
    York, but are expected to return to
    Nassau on Saturday.

    Kemp’s Funeral Home will han-
    dle the arrangements for the funeral
    service, but plans have not yet been
    finalised.

    The Kelly’s spokesperson said
    that the Home Centre will remain
    open and will only be closed on the
    day of his funeral.

    “(Closing the store now) would
    not be what he would have wanted.
    The best tribute to him would be to
    keep his beloved Kelly’s open as
    usual,” the spokesperson said.

    David Albert Charles Kelly was
    born on March 25, 1932, to C Ken-
    neth and Edna F Kelly. He was the
    youngest of three sons.

    His wife, Nancy Kelly, once told
    The Tribune that he was not born
    with the proverbial silver spoon in
    his mouth, but “more like a saw or
    hammer.”

    He attended Queen’s College
    until Form 3 when he left to go to
    McDonogh School, a military acad-
    emy in Maryland, together with his
    brothers Basil and Godfrey.

    He was graduated from there in
    1951. While at McDonogh, Mr Kel-
    ly attained the rank of Major, was
    president of his senior class and
    excelled in several sports, especially
    wrestling. In 1950, he was voted best
    wrestler in the State of Maryland.
    He and his brother Basil were both
    Maryland State Wrestling Champi-
    ons.

    Mr Kelly once said that winning
    the McDonogh’s “Babe Ruth
    Award” was one of his proudest
    moments.

    He was inducted into the
    McDonogh School Hall of Fame in
    1988.

    Tn 1951, at the age of 19, Mr Kel-
    ly returned to Nassau to work at
    Kelly’s Hardware Limited, located
    on Bay Street — now known as Kel-
    ly’s Home Centre at Marathon Mall.

    Mr Kelly’s father died in Decem-
    ber 1952, leaving him, his brother
    Basil and his mother Edna to take
    over operations and the expansion of
    the family business.

    His brother Godfrey, a graduate
    in Law from Cambridge Universi-
    ty, was admitted to the English and
    Bahamian Bars in 1953. Godfrey
    returned home to practice in the
    Bahamas. Both Basil and Godfrey
    Kelly were involved in Bahamian
    politics and both served in the House
    of Assembly and in ministerial posi-
    tions.

    In 1959, Mr Kelly met his future
    wife Nancy Booth. The couple mar-
    ried in 1963.

    David and Basil Kelly incorpo-
    rated Nassau Motors Company Lim-

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    ited in 1964 and moved the company
    to its present Shirley Street site, hav-
    ing moved Standard and Triumph
    cars out of the Kelly’s Hardware
    windows. Nassau Motor Company is
    one of the oldest car companies in
    the Bahamas. Mr Kelly was presi-
    dent of the company.

    Kelly’s Hardware became a mem-
    ber of the American Hardware
    cooperative, later known as ServiS-
    tar in 1973.

    Nancy Kelly joined her husband
    at the store full-time in 1978, helping
    to mould the new look of Kelly's
    Home Centre.

    Tt opened as the anchor for the
    Mall at Marathon just four days
    before Christmas in 1988.

    Since then, Kelly’s had undergone

    numerous changes and expansions,
    employing over 300 employees.

    Mr Kelly successfully managed
    the transition of Kelly’s from being a
    relatively small hardware store on
    Bay Street to a multi-million dollar
    home centre.

    In 1992, he received the Com-
    monwealth of the Bahamas Silver
    Jubilee Award in recognition of his
    outstanding contribution to national
    development in the field of business.

    Mr Kelly represented the
    Bahamas in two Olympics in Yatch-
    ing, in 1968 in Mexico and in 1972 in
    Germany in the Dragon Class.

    He was past Commodore of the
    Royal Nassau Sailing Club for the
    years 1969 and 1970 and was also a
    life-long member of the Nassau

    Yacht Club.

    Mr Kelly made numerous signifi-
    cant contributions to many charitable
    and civic organisations both person-
    ally and through Kelly’s Home Cen-
    tre, most notably to the College of
    the Bahamas, the Cancer Care Cen-
    tre, St Anne’s Church and the
    Bahamas National Trust.

    He is survived by his wife, Nancy
    Booth Kelly; three sons, Andrew
    Jordan Kelly, David Gregory Kelly
    and Reginald Scott Kelly; two
    daughters-in-law, Anne Boushelle
    Kelly and Candance Elizabeth Kel-
    ly; a brother, Godfrey Kenneth Kel-
    ly; five grandchildren, two sisters-in-
    law, Mrs Sonia Kelly and Mrs Paula
    Kelly, and many other relatives and
    friends.

    Newly relaxed US policies on travel
    to Cuba raise concerns in Bahamas

    FROM page one

    On Wednesday, President Obama
    signed into law a $410 billion spend-
    ing bill that will make it easier for
    residents of the United States to trav-
    el to Cuba and send money to fami-
    ly members on that island. The new
    measures will allow Cuban-Ameri-
    cans to travel legally to their home-
    land to visit relatives once a year and
    spend up to $179 a day. Previous
    restrictions on Cuban-Americans,
    imposed by former US President
    George Bush in 2004, limited travel
    to Cuba to once every three years
    with spending of no more than $50 a day.

    The new bill could also facilitate the sale of
    agricultural and pharmaceutical products to
    Cuba.

    One local observer saw this move as a pre-
    cursor to the inevitable opening up of Cuba,
    which some see as a threat to this country's num-
    ber one industry.

    Yesterday, former Minister of Tourism Obie
    Wilchcombe said the news should be a wake-up
    call to tourism stakeholders who he feels have
    been underestimating Cuba's potential threat
    to the Bahamas.

    "I think the problem that we're facing is, we
    knew it was bound to happen and we have
    dragged our feet in preparing ourselves for the
    new challenges. I spoke several years ago about
    emerging markets in the Caribbean and among
    those I listed (were) Turks & Caicos, the Domini-
    can Republic and Cuba.

    Despite severe travel and trade restrictions
    put on the communist island by the Unites States,
    Cuba's hotel occupancy rate has more than dou-
    bled since 1990. And despite a regional tourism
    downturn, Cuba's Tourism Minister Manuel

    FROM page one

    flight from Exuma, where he
    worked as chief pilot for the

    Obie Wilchcombe



    Marrero reported that the country's
    tourism industry grew sector 5.2 per
    cent in the first two months of 2009,
    compared to the same period in 2008.

    Back home, total visitor arrivals
    fell by 4.6 per cent in 2008 driven by
    a7.3 per cent decline in US stopover
    visits, Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
    ham said last month.

    These numbers should spur local
    tourism officials to invest in product
    and culture development, raising of
    industry standards, Mr Wilchombe
    said.

    Expanding the country's market
    share is also vital to capturing more of
    the visitor base. Statistics compiled by
    the Caribbean Tourism Organisation show that
    in 2006, Cuba and the Bahamas had a room
    inventory of 45,270 and 14,929, respectively.

    Mr Wilchcombe pegged the Bahamas’ cur-
    rent room inventory at about 12,000 due to sev-
    eral recent hotel closures. He argued that the
    country needed “at least 30,000 to be competi-
    tive."

    "Cuba has in place now more than 50,000
    hotel rooms, they have a product that is attractive
    if by nothing else but their personalities and also
    by their history. I said and I continue to argue
    that our job is not to be Cuba, but to be a better
    Bahamas. To be a better Bahamas means we
    should take all that we can and invest in the
    product.

    "Our challenge right now is not to panic, our
    challenge is to recognise that we have to create
    that thing that gives us the game-changer. That
    has to be centred around entertainment and cul-
    ture in general, and centred around our service
    that is one of excellence."

    Continued courting of the European, Cana-
    dian and Asian markets are also vital to enticing
    more visitors, he said.

    Son of Chauncey Tynes Jr thanks
    The Tribune for highlighting story

    Colombian drug czar Joe Lehder.

    On Monday, a Tribune Insight
    article revealed Chauncey Tynes
    Sr’s suspicions that his son was
    “disposed of” for knowing too
    much about Lehder’s dealings
    with the PLP government of the
    day, and especially Prime Minis-
    ter Lynden Pindling.

    Chauncey Jr told his father that
    he regularly flew cash consign-
    ments to Nassau from Lehder for
    Pindling and a senior police offi-
    cer. On one occasion, he brought
    a box into the family home con-
    taining $50,000 in US banknotes
    destined for a senior policeman.

    The Tynes family is baffled that
    Pindling’s government was able
    to “cover up” details of Chauncey
    Jr’s last flight and would still like
    closure on the case.

    Also lost on the flight was elec-
    trical engineer Donald Moree Sr.,
    whose wife Ann almost lost the
    baby she was carrying when she
    heard he had vanished.

    Like Chaucey Tynes Sr., Mrs
    Moree believes her husband died
    because he probably knew too
    much about the drugs trade,
    though he always told her “the
    less you know the better.”

    Meanwhile, readers yesterday
    continued to e-mail goodwill mes-
    sages to The Tribune for its bold
    exposure of the Chauncey Tynes
    story.

    One wrote: “Just a quick note
    to say you have my 100 per cent
    support in your ‘eye-catching’
    article. If you get that much pub-
    lic reaction from the article then it
    must be DAMN good and
    DAMN true...smile...keep up
    the good work!”

    Another said he had not heard
    a single bad word about the arti-
    cle among all his friends, who all
    agreed that Bahamian history
    must be told accurately.

    One reader wrote directly to
    The Tribune’s managing editor
    John Marquis, author of the con-

    troversial
    saying:

    “Mr Marquis, I hope that even
    now you are training several
    Bahamians who when you retire
    will be able to step up to the plate
    and carry on your bold, inves-
    tigative and, most importantly,
    fearless kind of journalism. God
    knows this country needs it bad-
    ly.”

    Others addressed the nature of
    the Pindling government and said
    it was close to being a dictator-
    ship.

    “What I would like to know is
    how so-called Right Honourable
    politicians can stand up and
    defend a legacy that is so obvi-
    ously flawed,” said one.

    Another added: “The Insight
    article confirmed what all intelli-
    gent Bahamians know to be true.
    The Pindling government was up
    to its ears in drug trafficking and
    made the country the mess it is
    today.”

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    Christie's Tribune tirade ‘at odds with
    comments he mate 25 years ago’

    FROM page one

    God or country.”

    His comments came at the height of the drug
    era when the international press was discussing
    openly Pindling’s alleged associations with the
    drug kingpin Joe Lehder.

    It was also the year of the commission of
    inquiry (1983-84) into drug trafficking when cer-
    tain members of Pindling’s government were
    roundly condemned for their association with
    drug dealers.

    Mr Christie and present Prime Minister Hubert
    Ingraham were both fired from the government at
    the time because of their growing disgruntlement
    with Pindling’s corruption and dictatorial atti-
    tudes.

    The present Governor General, Arthur Hanna,
    resigned at about the same time from his post as
    deputy prime minister. He said resignation was
    “the only honourable course of action” open to
    him because of his differences with Pindling.

    Senator Andrew ‘Dud’ Maynard and Cabinet
    ministers George Smith and Kendal Nottage also
    resigned after figuring prominently in evidence
    surfacing before the commission, which investi-
    gated corruption and pay-offs.

    Christie, Ingraham and Hanna were not tar-
    nished by the evidence.

    In his broadside on The Tribune and its man-

    aging editor, Mr Christie described the Insight
    article as “the vilest, the most vicious, the most
    scurrilous and, frankly, the sickest piece of
    garbage I have ever read.”

    He said while Sir Lynden should not get a “free
    pass” his legacy should be treated with a certain
    sensibility.

    But veteran media figures said yesterday that
    Christie’s outburst was completely at odds with
    what he said in 1984.

    “Everyone knows that Christie and Ingraham
    were fired by Pindling because they disapproved
    of his corrupt activities, especially in relation to
    the drug trade,” said one retired journalist.

    “So why is Christie now taking issue with what
    Mr Chauncey Tynes Sr said in the Insight article?
    It seems that he sees the issue as a last chance to
    save his leadership hopes in the PLP.”

    The article also came in for severe criticism in
    a radio talk show hosted by disbarred attorney
    Ortland Bodie Jr.

    Activist Paul Moss was particularly scathing
    towards the managing editor.

    Last night Mr Marquis said: “I’m a bit disap-
    pointed with Mr Christie. I thought he was above
    all that, especially as he should know perfectly
    well that everything Mr Tynes said was true.

    “As for Moss, he’s a political pipsqueak who, in
    my opinion, is of no account. I wouldn’t know him
    if I slipped on him.”



    TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 9

    SPORTS

    SAC still leading the way

    FROM page 11

    son, slowly making her way
    back from an injury prone year
    last season, topped the inter-
    mediate girls as she posted a
    time of 1.99. SAC's Shaunae
    Miller had to settle for second
    in 12.00 and Sarah Mackey of
    Nassau Christian Academy was
    third in 12.33.

    Both Johnson and Miller
    went under the qualifying time
    of 12.00 for Carifta, which will
    be held in St. Lucia over the
    Easter holiday weekend. How-
    ever, they will have to perform
    again at the Bahamas Associa-
    tion of Athletic Associations’
    final Carifta trials at the end of
    the month.

    The GSSSA's lone record
    yesterday came from Audley
    Carey of St. Augustine's Col-
    lege, who ran away with the
    intermediate boys 300 metres.
    He clocked 10 minutes and
    13.09 seconds, erasing the pre-
    vious mark of 10:30.02 that was
    set by Trevor Strachan in 2006.

    Marvin Minns of St. john's
    College got second in 11:06.60
    with George Zonicle of
    Queen's College taking the race
    in 11:13.58.

    The highlight of the day was
    the 100 final.

    SAC's Marcus Thompson
    took the title as the fastest boy
    in the BAISS this year with his
    victory in the senior boys divi-
    sion in 10.49. He easily won
    over a good field that featured
    Warren Fraser of Temple
    Christian in 10.62 in second and
    Aaron Wilmore of Queen's
    College in third with 10.91.

    SAC also claimed the
    female's title as V'Alonee
    Robinson cruised to victory in
    the senior girls’ century, stop-
    ping the clock in 11.74. Her
    nearest rival was Sparkyl Cash
    of Queen's College in 12.01.
    Dominique Morley of SAC got
    third in 12.34.

    Queen's College took con-
    trol of the intermediate divi-
    sion.

    Harold Carter clinched the
    boys’ crown as he sped to a
    time of 10.67. Devaughn Fraser
    of Temple Christian got second
    in 11.19 and Thompson of
    Westminister was third in 11.23.

    In the junior boys division,
    Andrae Stubbs of Charles W.
    Saunders avoided a clean
    sweep by the two powerhouses
    as he snatched the lead early
    and held off Gerrio Rahming
    of Queen's College. Stubbs won ia at cans :
    in 11.72 with Rahming timed NAS A. RUBINSON TRACK & FIE Ory DAIHATSU
    in 11.82. Dwight Campbell of repees Sh ait ae ee ee ee ee ee eee Me ee ee ey oe
    Jordan Prince William got third





    Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



    ST. ANDREWS Ashton Butler leads the way in the junior boys triple
    jump yesterday.

    in 12.11. RESULTS
    gene se pe an sweep in COMBINED TEAM SCORES

    ve Cemiry 1 mie Juntor SiS PLACE SCHOOL POINTS
    division behind the 1°2 punch 4 ‘saint Augustine's College 5 SAC 696
    of Makeya White (12.65) and g g
    Aalyiah Harris (12.85). Rikki 2 Queens College 14 Qc 562
    Barry of St. Anne's was thirdin 3 Saint Anne's 14 SAS 223.5
    12.87. 4 Saint Andrews School 13 SA 173 = — .

    _Kaiwan Culmer got the first 5 gaint John's College 6 SJC 1625 er. Window Van
    victory for SAC in the straight- _§ Temple Christian Schools TCS 145 MY \ & Panel V:
    Santain Boye division iy 1330. 7Nassau Christan Academy = «9 NCA 187 ) . “Tae
    over Dominic Knowles of 8 Jordan Prince William 12 PWH 84 : ;
    Queen's College (13.45). Erin 9 Westminster College WMC 48.5 , °* Automatic
    Smith of Charles W. Saunders 10 Aquinas College 10 AQ 40.5 == : Bi ; ti ae a transmission

    was third in 13.51.

    % 11 Charles W. Saunders CWS 40 : ae
    And Khadija Fraser got the . °
    parade started for Queen's Col- 12 Faith Temple Academy FTA 31 | ' = Air condition Ing
    lege when she took the bantam _‘_13 Kingsway Academy KA 30 a Mi ii « Power steeri ng
    girls’ race in 12.90. Jessica Stur- i> . :
    rup of St. Anne's was second — FEMALE TEAM SCORES - 1 BANTAM DIVISION ° ha cassette
    in 13.62 and Vinisa Beneby o ;
    St. John's was third in 13.68. PLAGE SEHOGE POIRTS Pp ayer
    SAC also got a sweep in the 1 Queens allege: 14 Qc 90 °3 cylinder 659cc
    senior girls’ 3000 as Huhnique 2 Saint Augustine $ College 5 SAC 66
    Rolle and Amber Weech — 3 Saint Andrews School 13 SA 28
    Le up _ oe 4 Saint Anne's 14 SAS 25
    olle was timed in 11:13.52 an
    Weech did 12:36.34. Temple en : ie eo cme -
    Christian's Kimberly Johnson rea Mins uitatn
    was third in 13:18.99, 7 Temple Christian Schools TCS 9
    If that wasn't enough, SAC 8 Nassau Christian Academy 9 NCA 6
    and QC basically dominated on —_Q Aquinas College 10 AQ 4
    Lt cgadailaprien 10 Faith Temple Academy FTA 2

    In events that they didn't

    win, St. Anne's, Aquinas Col-
    lege, St. Andrew's and St. MALE TEAM SCORES - 1 BANTAM DIVISION

    John's joined in the glory. PLACE SCHOOL POINTS
    The meet will wrap up today —_{ Queens College 14 ac 56
    starting at 9 am with the mar- 9 gaint Augustine's College 5 SAC 50 = ‘ a |
    Ae d00 regs 3 Charles W. Saunders cws 25 GY | * Standard transmission
    ‘ 4 Saint John's College 6 SJC 22 i e Air conditioning
    5 Saint Anne's 14 SAS 16
    6 Temple Christian Schools TCS Ti
    7 Nassau Christian Academy 9 NCA 10
    7 Aquinas College 10 AQ 10
    7 Saint Andrews School 13 SA 10
    10 Jordan Prince William 12 PWH 8
    11 Faith Temple Academy FTA 7
    FEMALE TEAM SCORES - 2 JUNIOR DIVISION
    PLACE SCHOOL POINTS
    1 Saint Augustine's College 5 SAC 97
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    3/11/2009 to 3/13/2009



    PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    TRIBUNE SPORTS



    SPORTS







    friends.

    Many would remember his last fight
    on October 4 when Ferguson was
    stopped 14 seconds in the first round
    by Seth Petruzelli. Excuse me. Fer-
    guson was quick to point out that
    he “slipped and fell.”

    Looking back at the fight, at
    the BankAtlantic Center in Sun-
    rise, Florida, which was his first
    loss in a sanctioned bout, Kimbo

    Slice admitted that he doesn’t

    want to put too much emphasis
    on it.

    “Every fighter has a fighter’s
    chance, so I’m not taking anything

    away from Seth,” he said. “Things
    happen in a fight. All it take is
    one punch to take you to a vic-
    tory. So I will leave it like that.”

    What was so disheartening for

    Kimbo Slice was the fact that

    Petruzelli was a fill in for the

    original fighter, Ken Shamrokc,

    who was deemed unfit after he
    sustained a nasty cut over his left
    eye in training.

    Yesterday on his arrival home,
    Ferguson stopped into The Tri-

    bune’s office with his parents,
    Clarence Ferguson and Rosemary
    Clarke, and a close friend, Nat ‘the
    Hit Man’ Gay from Miami, Florida.
    The 33-year-old Kimbo Slice was sort
    of surprised by the reception that he received
    because it seemed as if just about everybody in
    the office had either heard about him or seen him
    on the tubes.

    For Ferguson, who emerged from Miami, Flori-
    da where he resides as a street fighter to a big
    time showcase on the tubes, an actor, clothing
    designer or just an entertainer, the ball is in his
    court.

    “That gives me the opportunity to dedicate
    myself to whatever I want and to be successful at
    it,” Ferguson said. “So I will continue to fight.”

    His next fight is scheduled for June, but instead
    of performing in the MMA, he will actually venture
    into boxing. It’s his first appearance in that arena,
    but he haven’t gotten an opponent lined up as
    yet.

    But don’t count out the MMA just yet. Ferguson
    said he still has two of those fights on the drawing
    board this year.

    In the meantime, Ferguson said he’s just excited
    to be back home.

    “T’m just ready to settle in,” said Ferguson, who
    was a special guest at the Bahamian Idol show

    Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

    KEVIN
    aS ORs Ons
    FERGUSON

    ee
    Wins 4
    Losses 1

    SUI

    TS A
    Losses 1

    http:/Avww.kimboslice.org/

    THINKING ABOUT
    GETTING A TRUCK?

    TTS TEI
    aboutathiSnone:

    Get in it. Touch it. Feel it.

    YOU'LL FIND

    Uinls BSsu
    ULRIKE COU TE
    UinllSiri=

    is right in front of your face.

    = Fs 2 - ig

    MIXED MARTIAL ARTIST Kevin ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson

    @ By BRENT STUBBS
    Senior Sports Reporter ¢ bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

    WELCOME home Kevin ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson.

    After making his presence felt in the Mixed Martial Arts (MMA)
    and on the big screen as an entertainer in the United States, Fer-
    guson has returned home to spend some time with his family and

    last night and will be attending the funeral ser-
    vice of his cousin Bernadette Ann Ferguson Brown
    on Saturday.

    “So I have my passport straight so I can travel. I
    will be coming home frequently. I want to do a cou-
    ple fights over year. I plan to do at least four fights
    a year, so I would at last like to do one or two
    here.”

    Taken aback by the response he’s received so
    far, Ferguson said the Bahamian people have been
    very supportive of their athletes no matter where
    they are and what they are doing.

    “T want to do what I’m doing. I want to contin-
    ue being an entertainer, I want to continue fighting,
    continue to make my movies, continue to make
    commercials and continue to take care of my fam-
    ily and to make everybody proud,” he said.

    “God has seen fit to bless me. But I think there’s
    a greater calling on my life in the future. I just
    don’t know what it is. But until there, I’m here.”

    Ferguson, who grew up in the Step Street area in
    Fox Hill, said now that he had his passport, he
    will be in town as often as the Bahamian people
    will accept him.

    His father, businessman Clarence Ferguson said
    the Fox Hill community can’t wait for Kimbo Slice
    to come by.

    “They’re waiting for him,” he said.

    But while there are a lot of people who were
    eager to watch Kimbo Slice on the tube, his father
    said he gets goose bumps every time a show comes
    up.

    “IT move away from the TV and just try to peep
    in because you really don’t want to watch your
    son in action like that,” he said. “But I’m getting
    into it now.”

    His mother, Rosemary Clarke, a native from
    Exuma, has actually been in attendance to at one
    or two of his shows. She had a slightly different per-
    spective.

    “Watching it on TV is good, but when you have
    to go there and sit down and wait for all that
    action, it ain’t good,” she said. “I rather watch it on
    TV where I can shout and holler until I get hoarse.”

    But she noted that she’s been very proud of his
    accomplishment.

    Nat ‘the Hitman’ Gay, who also travelled from
    Miami, said Kimbo Slice had been an inspiration
    for him.

    “T love to see him fight. I love to see him go to
    war,” he said.

    This is Gay’s first appearance in the Bahamas
    and he noted that he’s enjoying himself.

    Now that he has his passport and he can travel as
    often as he sees fit, Kimbo Slice said the Bahami-
    an people will be seeing a lot more of him, not just
    on the big screen, but in person.



    (second from left) is shown above with his parents
    Clarence Ferguson and Rosemary Clarke (at left) and his close friend American Nat ‘the Hitman’ Gay (right) is
    in town to spend some time with his family.

    FROM page 11

    second half. Rashad Sturrup,
    the game's most valuable play-
    er, had a game high 28 points,
    including nine in the first quar-
    ter and 10 in the fourth quarter
    for CI Gibson. H Lewis had 19,
    Drew Rolle 14, Milano Hunter
    12 and Rashad Hunter and
    Dante Rolle both had seven.

    For TA Thompson, Basil
    Deveaux scored 18, Kenneth
    Pinder 17, Trevor Smith 12,
    Edmund Curtis 11 and Dereck
    Cox helped out with six.

    “We were short a man
    tonight and so we didn't have it.
    Four games in four nights, it's
    tough on these young guys,”
    said GHS coach Nigel Ingra-
    ham.

    But despite losing the game,
    Ingraham said he felt as if his
    Magicmen were the winners.

    “I'm so proud of them
    because I had about 12-13 guys
    who made 2.0 (grade point
    average), so we won,” Ingra-
    ham said.

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    DW Davis took advantage of



    some key fouls by TA Thomp-
    son down the stretch to seal the
    deal as they put a wrap on a
    successful year in which they
    won all four tournaments they
    competed in.

    “This is my third year at DW
    Davis and the guys I met there
    are now in grade nine. I sold
    the programme to them and
    they jumped on board. This
    year, we went to Andros and
    won, we won the Father Mar-
    cian, we went to Long Island
    and now we won this. Four
    straight. Thank the Lord,” said
    Mark Hanna, who was also
    named the coach of the year.

    DW Davis played with a lot
    of resilience coming back from
    a 21-11 first quarter deficit.
    Down 34-22 at the half, the Pit-
    bulls clawed their way back,
    trimming the margin to 47-43
    at the end of the third.

    It wasn't until the last three
    minutes of the fourth that they
    eventually took control of the
    game, going up 53-50 on a pair
    of free throws from William
    Ferguson, who was eventually
    named the MVP.

    Not done yet, the Scorpions
    managed to come back for a 54-

    Rattlers and Pithulls win titles

    54 tie with 1:41 to play, thanks
    to Roosevelt Whylly's consecu-
    tive driving fast break lay-ups.

    But after Alvin St. Fleur hit
    one of two free throws to open
    a slight 57-54 lead for DW
    Davis, TA Thompson suffered a
    big blow when their coach was
    tossed from the game by refer-
    ee Christian Wilmore with 59.9
    seconds left on the clock.

    The Pitbulls would convert
    three of the four free throws
    and they went up 60-54. But in
    the space of 15 seconds, they
    got two steals and scored on
    both possession with a lay-up
    from Prince Boodle and two
    charity shots from Ferguson to
    finally signal the end for the
    Scorpions.

    Ferguson, who came up big
    with 11 in the third quarter
    when the Pitbulls got back into
    the game, finished with a game
    high 25 points. St. Fleur had 14,
    Boodle 13 and Alcot Fox 10 in
    the win for DW Davis.

    Marvin Saunders paved the
    way for TA Thompson with 18.
    Angelo Lockhart had 14, Roo-
    sevelt Whylly and Vilner Desir
    both had eight and Kensiu
    Sylvester added five.







    ¢ The Bahamas Lawn
    Tennis Association will be
    sending a junior boys and
    junior girls team of players

    to the Dominican Republic

    to play in the North/Cen-
    tral American and
    Caribbean Zone Pre-Qual-
    ifying event for Boys and
    Girls 16 and under March
    23-28th, 2009.

    The Junior Davis Cup
    Team will be led by
    Johnathon Taylor, the cur-
    rent #1 in Junior Boys 18s
    and 16s in the Bahamas,
    Ondre Cargill and Kevin
    Major will round out the
    squad.

    The team will be
    coached by Giorgio Bal-
    dacci, a veteran coach who
    has travelled with many
    junior teams in the past.

    The Junior Fed Cup
    Team will be led by rising
    star Simone Pratt, who has
    been making waves with









    her performance in Central

    America this spring and is
    the top ranked junior girl
    in the COTEC ranking.

    Other members of the
    team are Gabrielle Moxey
    and Erin Strachan.

    Both teams are expected
    to compete well and chal-

    lenge for the right to repre-

    sent the region in a Quali-

    fying event this summer.
    Stephen Turnquest, Ist

    Vice President and Direc-

    tor of Junior Tennis for the

    BLTA who made the
    announcement said that he
    felt good about the juniors
    that will be representing
    the Bahamas and that it is
    these types of opportuni-
    ties that give the juniors a
    chance to measure their
    performances against the
    best in the region.

    And that these types of
    events go a long way in
    preparing our juniors for
    the future.

    ¢ Play in the masters
    softball league playoff
    rounds will continue this
    weekend at the Blue Hills
    Sporting Complex.

    In the opening day of the

    playoffs, the pennant win-

    ning Williams Construction

    Jets (12-2) scored a win
    over the Augusta St. Bulls
    (4-9), 18-0.

    Danny Subbs got the win

    while Paul Moss was
    tagged with the loss.

    Six Pack Abs (10-3) also
    scored an opening day win
    over Andeaus Brokers (6-
    7).

    Foster Dorsett was the
    winning pitcher in the Abs’
    12-10 win while Mike
    Isaacs was tagged with the
    loss.

    Other results from last

    weekend’s schedule includ-

    ed Alco Raiders over the
    Bamboo Shack Bulls, 8-1;
    while Micholette defeated
    Miller Lite 21-2; Six Pack
    Abs over the Andeaus
    Brokers, 12-2; and Alco
    Raiders over the Bulls 7-0.

    SATURDAY, 14TH
    MARCH 2009

    1pm Micholette Strokers
    vs. Miller Lite Royals

    3pm Williams Construc-
    tion Jets vs. Augusta St.
    Bulls

    SUNDAY, 15TH
    MARCH 2009

    1pm Miller Lite Royals
    vs. Micholette Strokers

    3pm Micholette Strokers
    vs. Williams Construction
    Jets

    Tay

    the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

    Rattlers and Pitbulls win titles

    @ By BRENT STUBBS
    Senior Sports Reporter
    bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

    OH how sweet it is to be
    champions.

    THE prestigious Hugh
    Campbell Basketball Tourna-
    ment title got away from the CI
    Gibson Rattlers. But there was
    no way that they were going to
    let the Government Secondary
    Schools Sports Association's
    senior boys crown slip away
    from them too.

    After losing the tournament
    title last month to the Taberna-
    cle Baptist Falcons from Grand
    Bahama, coach Kevin 'KJ'
    Johnson and his Rattlers
    regrouped and took their frus-
    tration out on the Magicmen to
    take the GSSSA title yesterday.

    They did it in convincing fash-
    ion from start to finish as they
    blew out the Cinderella Gov-
    ernment High Magicmen 96-70
    in the third and deciding game
    in their best-of-three champi-
    onship series yesterday at the
    Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

    “The Hugh Campbell is the
    pinnacle of high and low when
    it comes to basketball in high
    school in the country. Taberna-
    cle is an excellent ball club and
    they deserved to win. But GSS-
    SA is just as exciting to win.”

    The DW Davis Pitbulls and
    Johnson's coaching partner cel-
    ebrated as well as they pulled
    off a 67-58 win over the TA
    Thompson Scorpions, former-
    ly CC Sweeting Jr. in game
    three of their junior boys’ best-
    of-three finals.

    RATTLERS 96, MAGICMEN 70:

    CI Gibson rebounded after
    blowing game two and a chance
    to pull off a clean sweep. But
    what a difference a day makes.
    They didn't waste any time in
    turning the series back in their
    favour.

    “We had a hard breaking
    loss. Government High played
    an excellent game. We went
    over our game plan and we
    came ready to play,” Johnson
    summed up.

    Not enough the junkanoo
    music by Government High,
    whose fan support was greater
    in the stands, could derail CI
    Gibson from their mission.

    From start to finish, the Rat-
    tlers painfully took it to the
    Magicmen as they

    The Rattlers got a little care-
    less in the fourth quarter. But
    every time the Magic came up
    with a basket, they were able
    to regain their composure and
    managed to stay ahead of them.

    The Rattlers got a three-

    pointer with 1:51 left to open a
    decisive 92-65 lead.

    CI Gibson got a balanced
    scoring attack as they slowly
    built on their 23-17 first quarter
    lead to extend it to 41-20 and
    they never looked back in the

    SEE page 10

    SAC still leading the way

    @ By BRENT STUBBS
    Senior Sports Reporter
    bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

    IT will come down to a two-way battle for the
    top spot as the Bahamas Association of Inde-
    pendent Secondary Schools Sports Association's
    Inter-School Track and field Championships
    comes to a close today at the Thomas A. Robin-

    son Track and Field Stadium.

    The St. Augustine's College Big Red Machines
    are holding onto a 134-point advantage over the
    Queen's College Comets after the first two days
    of competition. They lead the 13-field competi-
    tion with a total of 696 points. Trailing with 562
    points. Sitting in third place is St. Anne's Blue-

    waves with 223.50.

    SAC's head coach William ‘Knucklehead’
    Johnson said the Big Red Machines are just
    rolling along as they try to remain undefeated in

    the championships.

    “We feel good about where we are and what
    we have been able to accomplish over the past
    two days,” Johnson said. “We had some points
    that got way from us, but overall we are quite

    pleased to still be out front.”

    Going into the final day of competition, SAC
    hold the lead in the junior, intermediate and
    senior girls divisions as well as the intermediate
    and senior boys. Queen's College are out front in
    the bantam girls and boys and intermediate boys.

    Jason Edwards, one of the Comets’ coaches,
    said Queen's College is right where they want to
    be - in striking distance of St. Augustine's Col-

    lege.

    “We just have to come out tomorrow and try to
    win everything that we compete in,” he project-
    ed. “We know it won't be easy because SAC is
    performing very well. But we feel confident that
    we can make up some ground.”

    Yesterday's event produced two Carifta qual-
    ifiers and just one GSSSA record.

    In the highlight of the day, Printassia John-

    SEE page 9



    SENIOR girls shot putt action.





    MEMBERS of the DW Davis Pitbulls celebrate their GSSSA champi-
    onship win over the TA Thompson Scorpions yesterday at the Kendal
    Isaacs Gymnasium.

    DOUBLE

    FILET O' FISH



    PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



    LOCAL NEWS



    Kevin ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson steps into The Tribune arena

    IN FIGHTING



    PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



    4 : At: making his presence felt in the Mixed Martial Arts
    ” (MMA) on the big screen in the United States, Kevin



    < ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson has returned home to spend some time
    with his family and friends.

    Yesterday on his arrival home, Ferguson stopped into The Tribune’s
    office with his parents, Clarence Ferguson and Rosemary Clarke, and a close
    friend, Nat ‘the Hit Man’ Gay from Miami, Florida.

    He was surprised by the reception he received because it seemed as if just
    about everybody in the office had either heard about him or seen him on the
    tubes.

    Ferguson, who grew up in the Step Street area in Fox Hill, said now
    that he had his passport, he will be in town as often as the Bahamian peo-
    ple will accept him.







    7) |)
    PtH ‘Va ¥

    STRUNG ARM TACTICS: Kimbo Slice with Tribune Business reporter Chester Robards.

    MAY THE FORCE BE WITH YOU: Kimbo Slice with Tribune staff member Jason
    Taylor and Tribune News Editor Paco Nunez.

    SHAKE ON IT:
    Kimbo Slice
    with Tribune
    staff member
    Dale Dean.

    DON’T MESS WITH KIMBO: Kimbo Slice with Tribune photographer Tim Clarke.













    Insurers
    face ‘serious

    issue’ of
    mounting
    RAQaE lI (ec

    Companies moving to
    deal with issue that has
    ‘everyone seriously
    concerned’, with
    greater urgency caused
    by impending new Act

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    Bahamian general insurance
    carriers are assessing how to
    deal with the “serious problem”
    of mounting accounts receiv-
    ables owed to them by brokers
    and agents, Tribune Business
    was told yesterday, with a solu-
    tion made more urgent by the
    stipulations in the new Domes-
    tic Insurance Act.

    Patrick Ward, Bahamas
    First’s group president and chief
    executive, said all Bahamas
    General Insurance Association
    (BGIA) carriers were “looking
    seriously” at how to combat the
    receivables situation, given that
    the new Act will “place the
    responsibility” on them to col-
    lect all premium revenues
    regardless of whether they are
    passed on by brokers and
    agents.

    Tribune Business had con-
    tacted Mr Ward and other
    industry executives after being
    told that one solution being pro-
    posed by some insurance carri-
    ers, who are the ones that
    underwrite each policyholder’s
    risk, was that the new Act and
    its regulations require brokers
    and agents to establish escrow
    accounts.

    Accounts

    These accounts would hold
    the premium income that bro-
    kers and agents needed to pass
    on to the underwriting carrier,
    once their commission - usually
    around 12-15 per cent - had
    been deducted.

    Using escrow accounts, so the
    theory went, would prevent any
    unscrupulous agents and bro-
    kers from using this premium
    income as working capital in
    their businesses, or for any oth-
    er purpose.

    Mr Ward, though, told Tri-
    bune Business that while there
    was “no official campaign” to
    adopt broker/agent escrow
    accounts or any other solution
    as a common position.

    “But I know there are peo-
    ple discussing different ways to
    deal with a serious problem,”
    Mr Ward told Tribune Business
    in reference to accounts receiv-
    ables.

    “Tt is something that I know
    all of the companies are looking
    at seriously. Pending the imple-
    mentation of the new Act, that
    will place the responsibility on
    us, the carrier, vis-a-vis the
    receipt of premiums, regardless
    of whether we received them
    from the broker or agent.”

    Acknowledging that “every-

    SEE page 6B

    The information contained is from a third
    party and The Tribune can not be held
    responsible for errors and/or omission,
    from the daily report.





    THE TRIBUNE

    usin

    FRIDAY,



    MARCH

    LB,

    2009

    SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

    FAMILY GUARDIAN

    INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



    Port chair mulls Tourism sector
    his resignation

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    The Grand Bahama Port
    Authority’s (GBPA) chairman
    yesterday confirmed to Tribune
    Business that he was consider-
    ing resigning from his post, and
    indicated a final decision would
    be taken once he met with man-
    agement next week.

    When contacted by this news-
    paper, Felix Stubbs, who is also
    general manager of IBM
    (Bahamas), said: “I’m thinking
    about it. I haven’t given in my
    resignation.”

    He initially said he would
    “prefer not” to discuss why he
    was thinking of resigning, but
    then added: “When I’m back,
    I’m going to sit down with man-
    agement and ask them to con-
    sider a couple of things.

    “Tf they’re not prepared to
    change certain things, I'll leave.
    It’s been brewing over time. I’m
    back on Sunday, and should be
    in office on Monday.”

    Speaking to Tribune Business
    from outside the Bahamas, Mr

    Stubbs added: “I think there’s a
    lot of opportunities missing at
    the Port Authority that have
    me concerned.”

    Tribune Business contacted
    Mr Stubbs after several sources
    suggested he was close to
    resigning the GBPA chairman-
    ship about one year after he
    took the post. This newspaper
    was told Mr Stubbs has offered
    to resign on several previous
    occasions, but each time the
    offer was either withdrawn or
    rejected.

    Unclear

    It was unclear precisely why
    he is mulling resignation, but a
    number of people said they had
    been expecting it, following
    Erik Christiansen’s resignation
    as Port Group Ltd chairman
    and his replacement by Hannes
    Babak.

    Some sources suggested that
    there was a feeling that the
    GBPA and Port Group Ltd
    chairmanships should be held
    jointly by one man, given that

    ‘must move away

    from model today’

    * Ex-minister says
    Bahamas must look to
    expand tax
    information treaty
    network and go out
    proactively seeking
    partners, in effort to
    obtain compensating

    economic benefits

    mw By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    The Bahamas will likely have
    to “move away from the existing
    model” for its international finan-
    cial services centre in the face of
    increasing US and G-20 pressure,
    a former finance minister has told
    Tribune Business, and seek reci-
    procal benefits from nations it
    signs tax information deals with.

    James Smith, minister of state
    for finance in the former Christie
    government, said the world’s
    major industrialised countries
    were likely “to just bulldoze”
    ahead with their professed drive
    to crack down on international
    financial centres such as the
    Bahamas, exploiting the global
    recession and credit crunch to jus-
    tify this.

    With the Bahamas already hav-
    ing signed a Tax Information
    Exchange Agreement (TIEA)
    with the US, Mr Smith suggested
    that this nation proactively seek
    other such partners, all the while
    looking to see what economic
    benefits it could get from these
    arrangements.

    Taxes

    He added that developed coun-
    tries were unlikely to recover
    much by way of unpaid taxes
    from clients of the Bahamian
    financial services industry, as the
    private wealth management sec-
    tor’s clients were largely compli-
    ant with their home country tax
    laws.

    The Organisation for Econom-
    ic Co-Operation and Develop-
    ment (OECD), the forum or
    ‘club’ most frequently used by the
    G-20 nations to lead the attack
    on international financial centres
    is already looking at creating a
    new ‘blacklist’ for nations that
    have entered less than 12 TIEAs
    with its members.

    SEE page 6B

    Pat |

    APU Stes TINT

    for a better life

    the two companies’ often over-
    lapped.

    However, it is thought that
    Mr Stubbs’ resignation would
    not sit well with the Govern-
    ment, especially if Mr Babak
    were to be approved by the
    GBPA Board to replace him.

    The Government is thought
    to like the split GBPA and Port
    Group Ltd chairs, given that it
    keeps the former’s regulato-
    ry/licensing functions away from
    the latter’s investment activi-
    ties.

    Meanwhile, several sources
    suggested that the end to British
    banker Roddie Fleming’s
    attempt to acquire the
    GBPA/Port Group Ltd stake
    held by Sir Jack Hayward’s fam-
    ily trust was likely to propel it to
    try and settle the almost two-
    and-a-half year ownership dis-
    pute with the late Edward St
    George’s estate.

    One source yesterday sug-
    gested the two sides were in
    talks in London to explore a

    SEE page 2B

    @ By CHESTER ROBARDS

    Business Reporter

    PRIVATE yacht and boat arrivals to the Bahamas
    declined by around 20 per cent year-over-year for
    2008 and into this year, a Ministry of Tourism offi-
    cial said yesterday, but just a few mega yachts have
    been able to buttress some Family Island marinas

    from the downturn.

    Earl Miller, general manager of vertical markets at
    the Ministry’s Fort Lauderdale office, said the eco-
    nomic downturn and last summer’s surging fuel
    costs were the crux of the decline.

    He said the Bahamas’ popular fishing tourna-

    to shrink 10%
    during 2009

    * Study suggests Bahamian industry's
    job total to contract by 7.5%

    * But provides brighter medium-term
    outlook over next decade for nation’s
    number one sector

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    The Bahamian tourism indus-
    try has been forecast to shrink
    by almost 10 per cent in terms
    of its total economic output for
    2009, a leading global tourism
    organisation has predicted, with
    the sector’s total job levels con-
    tracting by 7.5 per cent.

    Yet despite the gloomy short-
    term prognosis provided by the
    World Travel & Tourism Coun-
    cil’s (WTTC) 2009 forecast for
    the Bahamian tourism industry,
    it also offered hope for the

    Roasters SEE page 2B





    * Fewer vessels in
    Florida marinas imply
    decline for Bahamas
    * Valentine’s business
    down 10%, but mega
    yachts helping to
    buttress decline in

    ments will take a hit in the number of attendees

    compared to previous years.

    SEE page 4B

    NU Le

    smaller boat visitors

    FAMILY GUARDIAN

    INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

    SS

    [1 leave your children financially secure
    [7 provide a safety net for your loved ones
    C ensure a bright future for your fami

    aA all of the above





    PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    Summit organisers unveil
    alternative $1bn stimulus

    Urge government to reconsider multi-million roads project borrowing to focus on current account

    @ By CHESTER
    ROBARDS
    Business Reporter

    THE GOVERNMENT
    should reconsider borrowing
    money for road projects that
    the Bahamas does not need,
    and focus more on creating a

    feasible economic stimulus
    plan that buttresses this
    nation’s foreign exchange
    reserves, the organizers of last
    week’s National Economic
    Summit (NES) said yesterday.

    Lynden Nairn and Lester
    Cox said they held the Eco-
    nomic Summit in order to

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    “identify ways to positively
    impact the Bahamas’ current
    account balance in the imme-
    diate to medium term”.

    They said they have identi-
    fied preliminary ways that the
    Government and private sec-
    tor could use the current eco-
    nomic situation to improve the
    Bahamas’ current account bal-
    ance by $1 billion.

    “We believe that govern-
    ment spending should flow
    into areas that would have a
    genuine simulative effect,”
    said Mr Nairn.

    “Tt is not true that every dol-
    lar spent by Government, no
    matter how well intentioned,
    is stimulative.

    “Tn our context, government
    spending that has the effect of
    reducing the current account
    deficit is stimulative.”

    He said that $1 billion could
    be generated by the fisheries,
    energy, food production, and

    trade and manufacturing
    industries, while causing full
    employment, less reliance on
    tourism and an increase in
    entrepreneurial numbers.

    Mr Nairn said there had to
    be a vast improvement and
    upgrades to some of these sec-
    tors in order to achieve the
    goals set out by the summit.

    For example, Mr Nairn said
    there was a need in fisheries
    to focus more on marine secu-
    rity, in order to reduce poach-
    ing.

    Energy

    In the energy sector, he said
    public transportation improve-
    ments should be addressed
    and liquefied natural gas
    (LNG) should be approved.

    With regard to food pro-
    duction, Mr Nairn said abat-
    toirs needed to be expanded,
    and the Bahamas should pro-

    duce 100 per cent of its select
    fruits and vegetables needs.

    In the trade and manufac-
    turing sectors, greater
    exploitation of the Freeport
    Container Port and aggressive
    promotion of the Bahamas as
    a jurisdiction for light manu-
    facturing was required.

    “As we move into phase
    two of the NES, we expect
    further refinement of the
    above goals through conver-
    sations with the public and pri-
    vate sectors, as well as with
    members of the Government
    and Official Opposition,” said
    Mr Nairn.

    He added that the first steps
    the Government and nation
    would have to agree to would
    be the pursuit of billion dollar
    account improvement, and to
    agree that it will be achieved
    within three years.

    “We might not have anoth-
    er Opportunity in our life to

    effect the transformation we
    need. So less the world’s econ-
    omy improves and we return
    to the status quo, let us
    embrace this crisis now and
    convert it to the opportunity
    that it offers,” Mr Nairn said.

    He added that the draft
    report created out of discus-
    sion from the Economic Sum-
    mit is not intended to direct
    the Government, but to create
    a Clear strategy as to what the
    Bahamas has to do to weather
    the economic slump.

    “While we believe that rec-
    ommendations emanating
    from the NES should be
    adopted, their pursuit will not
    mean that we will not experi-
    ence pain.

    “Tt will mean, however, that
    we ameliorate the sting and
    set our country on the path to
    economic diversification and
    historical structural strength,”
    said Mr Nairn.

    Port chair mulls his resignation

    FROM page 1B

    possible settlement, although that could
    not be confirmed before press time last
    night.

    The disappearance of Mr Fleming and
    his partner, Geoffrey Richards, was pre-
    dicted by sources to push the Hayward fam-
    ily trust towards settlement, given that the
    British banker had been helping to pay its
    legal costs in the dispute.

    The St George estate has been able to
    finance its legal battle through the $41 mil-
    lion sale of Lady Henrietta St George’s 50
    per cent ICD Utilities stake to Emera, but
    both sides continue to bleed revenues on
    legal costs due to the fact that GBPA/Port
    Group Ltd dividends have not been forth-
    coming for some time.

    And while Mr Fleming may have disap-

    peared from the scene, Tribune Business
    can reveal that Hutchison Whampoa
    remains quietly in the wings, hoping to work
    out a deal where it can buy out both parties.

    It has previously made a combined $250
    million offer, and already owns a majority
    stake in the Freeport Container Port, plus a
    50 per cent interest and management rights
    in the Freeport Harbour Company, Grand
    Bahama Development Company, and
    Grand Bahama Airport Company.

    Dispute

    Effectively, the GBPA and Port Group
    Ltd - and the dispute between their owners
    - is back where it was when litigation began
    in November 2006, with Mr Babak in the
    chairmanship, despite the St George estate’s
    opposition. And a whole swathe of man-
    agement, in the shape of the likes of Carey

    Leonard and Albert Gray, has departed.

    Despite Justice Anita Allen ruling that
    the St George estate owns a 50 per cent
    stake in the GBPA and Port Group Ltd
    holding company, Intercontinental Diver-
    sified Corporation (IDC), it has been
    unable to change the Caymanian firm’s
    share register to get the shares put in its
    name.

    As a result, the Hayward family trust -
    which is appealing the 50 per cent ruling -
    has retained Board control at IDC. This, in
    turn, gives the Hayward family trust Board
    control of GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
    which enabled the latter to name Mr Babak
    chair despite the St George estate’s oppo-
    sition.

    Since returning to the Port Group Ltd
    chairmanship, Mr Babak has busied himself
    with trying to bring investment projects to
    fruition, and growing Freeport’s economy.

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    medium-term, with the indus-
    try forecast to achieve annu-
    alised real growth in its total
    output of 3.5 per cent in the
    decade up to 3.5 per cent.

    Still, for the present, which is
    what all Bahamians are con-
    cerned with, the WI'TC pro-
    jected that the tourism sector -
    the most important industry in
    this nation - was set to contract
    by 9.8 per cent in 2009, in terms
    of real gross domestic product
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    to $3.775 billion. As for direct
    tourism industry employment,
    the WTTC said the total num-
    ber of jobs provided by the
    Bahamian industry was set to
    fall by 7.5 per cent in 2009 to
    33,000 jobs.

    Jobs

    And the total number of jobs
    that are reliant upon the
    tourism industry is set to decline
    by 6.5 per cent to 95,000 in 2009,
    the WTTC study suggested,
    with the sector’s direct GDP
    contribution - the total value of
    all economic activity it produces
    - dropping by 11.2 per cent to
    $1.127 billion.

    Robert Sands, the Bahamas
    Hotel Association’s (BHA)
    president, said he had not seen
    the WITTC study when contact-
    ed by Tribune Business yester-
    day, and therefore did not know
    the factual basis on which it had
    based its projections.

    “The jury is still out as to
    what the contraction will be in
    2009,” he told this newspaper.
    “We probably won’t see any

    Box:

    ‘a’
    ca
    =
    Ke
    =

    growth in 2009, and maybe
    some contraction, but the level
    of contraction is unknown.”

    Mr Sands pointed out that
    while tourism arrivals may have
    been off by between 4-5 per
    cent in 2008, there was nothing
    yet to suggest this deterioration
    had increased in 2009.

    Rather than just raw arrivals
    numbers, Mr Sands said other
    factors were key determinants
    of the tourism industry’s per-
    formance, such as per capita vis-
    itor spend, the visitor mix and
    average daily room rates.

    On a brighter note, the
    WTTC said the “10-year trend”
    for the Bahamian tourism
    industry was positive, with
    direct industry employment
    increasing by an annualised rate
    of 2.5 per cent over the next 10
    years to reach 42,202 by 2019.

    The sector’s growth, in real
    GDP terms, was set to reach 3.4
    per cent on an annualised basis
    over the next 10 years, while
    total Bahamian employment -
    direct and indirect jobs -
    increasing at an annualised 2.5
    per cent rate to reach 121,000

    DA 69806

    c/o The Tribune
    P.O.Box N3207

    Tourism sector to shrink 10% during 2009

    jobs by 2019. Hlustrating the
    tourism sector’s importance to
    the Bahamian economy, the
    WTTC study said that it was set
    - directly and indirectly - to
    account for 50 per cent of GDP
    in 2009 to 51.7 per cent by 2019.

    In relative terms, the
    Bahamas is the world’s seventh
    most reliant nation on tourism
    as a percentage of GDP, and
    the sixth most reliant on the sec-
    tor as a source of jobs.

    It provides some 60.4 per cent
    of total jobs.

    In addition, visitor spending
    accounts for 60.7 per cent of the
    Bahamas’ total exports, mak-
    ing this nation the world’s
    eighth most reliant when it
    comes to exports.

    For 2009, the WTTC forecast
    that tourism would generate
    $3.775 billion of economic activ-
    ity.

    The industry was forecast to
    attract $1.239 billion in capital
    investment, representing 43.4
    per cent of such investment, and
    $146 million or 14 per cent of
    government spending.

    A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
    is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
    experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
    have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
    own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
    looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
    must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
    on behalf of companies clients.

    A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

    Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

    Nassau, Bahamas

    by March 14, 2009.





    THE TRIBUNE

    FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 3B



    INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL BUSINESS





    m BOSTON

    Nationalization of banks would be a "nightmare" that would fur-
    ther undermine confidence in the nation's financial system, Bank of
    America Chief Executive Officer Kenneth Lewis said Thursday,

    according to the Associated Press.

    Lewis said a full-scale government takeover in which sharehold-
    ers would be wiped out would "send shudders" through the invest-
    ment community and is not necessary to stabilize the country's

    banking system.

    "It would also give the false impression that all banks are insolvent
    and investors would immediately start betting on which banks
    would be next, possibly creating a self-fulfilling prophecy," Lewis told
    about 450 corporate leaders at a luncheon sponsored by Boston Col-
    lege's Chief Executives’ Club of Boston.

    He said government control of large banks would "politicize
    lending decisions" and damage the economy.

    Lewis, who has been criticized for large bonuses Merrill Lynch
    executives collected as the government was providing billions in
    bailout money, said he understands the outrage felt by taxpayers.
    Bank of America, based in Charlotte, N.C., acquired New York-

    based Merrill on Jan. 1.

    Lewis said because of the decline in its 2008 earnings, Bank of
    America paid no year-end bonuses to members of its executive

    management team.

    But he said extending such caps deeper into an organization
    could prompt non-executive associates to go to work for foreign

    banks.

    "Such a loss hurts our company and our shareholders,” Lewis said.
    While acknowledging that many banks "are under a lot of pres-
    sure," Lewis said the industry is not in “nearly as dire shape as

    some would have us believe."

    "As bad as our economy is right now, I am still optimistic about

    our long-term prospects," he said.

    "And I believe the financial services industry and the federal
    government are doing many of the right things to turn this cycle
    around and restore economic growth."

    Obama: Economic crisis
    ‘not as bad as we think'

    m@ By JIM KUHNHENN
    WASHINGTON

    Confronting misgivings, even
    in his own party, President
    Barack Obama mounted a stout
    defense of his blueprint to over-
    haul the economy Thursday,
    declaring the national crisis is
    "not as bad as we think” and
    his plans will speed recovery,
    according to the Associated
    Press.

    Challenged to provide
    encouragement as the nation's
    "confidence builder in chief,"
    Obama said Americans should-
    n't be whipsawed by bursts of
    either bad or good news and he
    was "highly optimistic” about
    the long term.

    The president's proposals for
    major health care, energy and
    education changes in the midst
    of economic hard times faced
    skepticism from both Democ-
    rats and Republicans on Capitol
    Hill, as senators questioned his
    budget outlook and the deficits
    it envisions in the middle of the
    next decade.

    But Obama, speaking to top
    executives of the Business
    Roundtable, expressed an opti-
    mistic vision and called for
    patience.

    Richard Parsons, chairman of
    beleaguered Citigroup Inc.,
    asked if Obama could offer
    some help in a national battle
    "between confidence and fear."

    "A smidgen of good news
    and suddenly everything is
    doing great. A little bit of bad
    news and ooohh , we're down
    on the dumps,” Obama said.
    "And Iam obviously an object
    of this constantly varying assess-
    ment. Iam the object in chief of
    this varying assessment.”

    "T don't think things are ever
    as good as they say, or ever as
    bad as they say,” Obama added.
    "Things two years ago were not
    as good as we thought because
    there were a lot of underlying
    weaknesses in the economy.
    They're not as bad as we think
    they are now."

    "And my long-term projec-
    tions are highly optimistic, if we
    take care of some of these long-
    term structural problems."

    But in Congress, Obama's
    budget plans were meeting
    resistance.

    Sen. Kent Conrad, the chair-
    man of the Budget Committee
    called the track of future deficits
    "unsustainable" and singled out
    Obama's proposal for adding
    $634 billion in health care
    spending over the next 10 years.

    "Some of us have a real pause
    about the notion of putting sub-
    stantially more money into the
    health care system when we've
    already got a bloated system,”
    said Conrad, D-N.D.

    Treasury Secretary Timothy
    Geithner, testifying before Con-
    rad's committee, also encoun-
    tered blunt questions about the
    administration's plans for
    shoring up the nation's banks.
    He reiterated the administra-
    tion's goal to lay out a private-
    public partnership to make up
    to $1 trillion in financing avail-
    able to help banks clear their
    books of toxic, mortgage-relat-
    ed assets that have led toa
    national credit freeze.

    Geithner hinted more mon-
    ey might be required beyond
    the existing $700 billion finan-



    cial rescue fund. "We certainly
    can start with the resources we
    have," he said.

    Meanwhile, House Speaker
    Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., played
    down talk that Democrats
    would consider a second eco-
    nomic stimulus bill.

    "I know that people have
    made suggestions that we
    should be ready to do some-
    thing, but I really would like to
    see this stimulus package play
    out,” Pelosi said. "It's just not
    something that, right now, is in
    the cards," she added later.

    The flurry of comments illus-
    trated the complicated moving
    parts confronting Washington
    as the economy continues to
    decline, credit remains clogged
    and a new president advances
    broad and expensive initiatives.
    The money set aside to address
    those needs so far has been
    staggering — $787 billion for
    an economic stimulus designed
    to save and create jobs, the $700
    billion approved by Congress
    for the financial rescue package
    and hundreds of billions more
    through programs from the
    Federal Reserve Bank.

    On top of that, Obama wants
    to overhaul health care, reduce
    greenhouse-gas pollution and
    undertake major changes in
    energy policy. He's projecting
    a federal deficit of $1.75 trillion
    this year, by far the largest in
    history, but says he can get it
    down to $533 billion by 2013.

    "Tam not choosing to address
    these additional challenges just
    because I feel like it, or because
    I'm a glutton for punishment,"
    Obama told the Business
    Roundtable, a group of top
    business executives. "I am doing
    so because they are fundamen-
    tal to our economic growth, and
    to ensuring that we don't have
    more crises like this in the
    future."

    Obama said his health and
    energy changes would build a
    foundation for lasting recovery,
    arguing that the current eco-
    nomic crisis was precipitated by
    an “illusion of prosperity." He
    told the business leaders he
    wants government to "right the
    ship" and then "let private

    ©
    PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA, left, greets Citigrou

    Nationalisation warning Pension reform ‘not made

    more urgent’ by CLICO

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    CLICO (Bahamas) col-
    lapse, and the investments
    made in its annuities by many
    company pension funds, has
    not made the work of the
    Government’s pension reform
    task force “more urgent”, a
    minister told Tribune Busi-
    ness yesterday.

    Zhivargo Laing said:
    “There’s nothing the private
    pension task force is consid-
    ering that has been made
    more urgent by the CLICO
    matter.”

    Tribune Business has been
    told that the pension reform
    task force has already met
    twice and received its man-
    date from the Government,
    something Mr Laing con-
    firmed.

    “The whole issue of regu-

    enterprise do its magic."

    Critics of Obama's budget,
    such as Sen. Judd Gregg, R-
    N.H., complained that the
    spending blueprint does not
    tackle the rising costs of Social
    Security and Medicare. Geithn-
    er said the administration
    intends to confront higher
    health care costs with broad
    changes that will lower
    Medicare spending.

    Geithner is at the center of
    Obama's economic policy,
    advocating for its budget pro-
    posals and tax policies, as well
    as the rescue program for the
    financial sector. He faced ques-
    tions on all those fronts before
    heading to London for talks Fri-
    day and Saturday with finance
    officials from the Group of 20
    nations.

    Obama's budget would raise
    taxes, starting in 2011, on indi-
    viduals earning more than
    $200,000 and on households
    earning more than $250,000.
    Geithner said the increases
    would kick in after the economy
    was expected to be in recovery.

    But he sidestepped a ques-
    tion by Sen. Mike Crapo, R-
    Idaho, about whether the
    administration would let the
    increases take effect if the econ-
    omy had not recovered in two
    years. "We have to watch how
    the economy evolves,” Geithn-
    er said.

    On Thursday, Wall Street
    extended its rally to a third day,
    and Conrad took note because
    the markets have not always
    responded well to Geithner's
    public utterances. "You've done
    a superb job," Conrad joked as
    the hearing came to a close
    shortly after noon. "Markets are
    up over 100."

    The Dow Jones industrials
    rose 239.66 points for the day
    on a string of hopeful news,
    apparently unconnected to Gei-
    thner.

    At the White House, the
    administration conferred with
    state officials about how the
    $787 billion in stimulus money
    will go out.

    Vice President Joe Biden
    opened the meeting by warn-
    ing state officials that if they

    Zhivargo Laing



    lating private pensions is
    something everyone knows
    has to be taken into consider-
    ation,” Mr Laing said.

    “It’s important considering
    what we want to do in the
    short and long-term, in terms
    of encouraging and protect-

    AP Photo/Charles Dharapak

    p chief executive officer Richard Parsons after speaking
    about the economy at a business roundtable discussion at a hotel in Washington, Thursday, March 12, 2009.

    misuse money from the stimulus
    package, they should not expect
    more help from the federal gov-
    ernment for a long time.

    "If we don't get this right,
    folks, this is the end of the abil-
    ity to convince Congress that
    anything should go to the
    states,” Biden said.

    Added Obama: "If we see
    money being misspent, we're
    going to put a stop to it.”

    ing savings. There are many
    benefits, from an economic
    point of view, to increasing
    national savings. The commit-
    tee has been given their remit,
    and we look forward to hear-
    ing from them when they
    report.”

    Increased domestic savings,
    Mr Laing explained, increased
    the pool of funding to support
    Bahamians in retirement, and
    enabled them to take advan-
    tage of more economic oppor-
    tunities.

    He added that the Govern-
    ment had set the pension
    reform committee no report-
    ing deadline, “except to say
    we want them to do their
    work as expeditiously as pos-
    sible”.

    Among the issues the com-
    mittee will likely look at are
    whether to make private pen-
    sions mandatory and how,

    IN THE

    ESTATE

    plus regulating the pensions
    sector in terms of investment
    advisers and trustees.

    Meanwhile, Tribune Busi-
    ness understands that CLICO
    (Bahamas) liquidator, Craig
    A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, is looking
    at paying off the $400,000 loan
    owed to FirstCaribbean Inter-
    national Bank (Bahamas), fol-
    lowing receipt of the bank’s
    demand letter requesting
    immediate payment.

    The bank is understood to
    hold a mortgage over three
    CLICO (Bahamas) properties,
    making it a secured creditor
    and placing it at the top of the
    queue. Failure to pay would
    result in FirstCaribbean fore-
    closing on that real estate, thus
    depriving the creditors of any
    upside the liquidator might
    generate from selling that
    land.

    OF

    WILLIAM SAWYER late of
    Golden Gates #2 in the Southern
    District of the Island of New
    Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that all
    persons having any claim or demand against
    the said estate are required to send the same

    duly certified in writing to the undersigned
    on or before the 30" day of March, A.D.

    2009,

    after which date the Attorney

    by Deed of Power of Attorney will proceed to
    distribute the estate having regard only to the
    claims of which she shall have had notice.

    AND notice is hereby given that all
    persons indebted to the estate are required to
    make full settlement on or before the
    date hereinabove mentioned.

    Dated the 12" day of March, A.D. 2009

    CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
    Attorneys for the Executor
    9 Rusty Bethel Drive
    Nassau, Bahamas



    A leading retailer is seeking applications for the position of

    MANAGER ADMINISTRATION

    BASIC REQUIREMENTS

    SUMMARY OF DUTIES

    Minimum two years Management experience
    Excellent Oral and Written Communication Skills
    Proven organizational and planning capabilities
    Have a proven track record of meeting deadlines
    Must be proficient in Microsoft office software
    Strong Interpersonal skills and willingness to be a team player
    Must have strong leadership skills and be results oriented
    Posses integrity, excellent motivational skills and assertiveness

    Must be multifaceted and prepared to work flexible hours if necessary

    ¢ Overall responsibility for the administrative functions of the company
    ¢ Training and motivating team members
    Ensuring company policies and procedures are adhered to and implementing
    new policies as required.
    Control and monitor administrative budgets
    Responsible for the protection and maintenance of all company assets
    Analyze existing business and identify business development opportunities

    The successful candidate will become a part of a growing and progressive organization

    capable of facing challenges.

    Benefits include a comprehensive medical and life

    package and pension plan. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and

    experience.

    Interested persons may forward a copy of their resume, in confidence to:

    The Human Resources Manager
    P.O. Box N-623
    Nassau, Bahamas
    Fax: 322-6607





    PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    ZURICH BERN LIMITED

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)




































    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
    the 17th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
    Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    FARVAGNY SEAS LIMITED

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 3rd day of February 2009. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    JEVER CLIVER LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
    the 23rd day of February 2009. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    CLINTWOOD

    HOLDINGS LIMITED

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named

    Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
    the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
    Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    SOLLAWAY INDUSTRIES LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 3rd day of February 2009. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Boating arrivals
    down some 20%

    FROM page 1B

    Frank Herhold, executive
    firector of the Marine Indus-
    tries Association of South
    Florida (MIASF), told Tri-
    bune Business that the popular
    Bertram Hatteras fishing tour-
    nament had become a “vic-
    tim” of the economy.

    The tournament had tradi-
    tionally provided an econom-
    ic boost for Marsh Harbour,
    Abaco.

    He added that Fort Laud-
    erdale marinas had seen a
    sharp reduction in the amount
    of vessels moored at their
    slips, which he read as a bad
    sign for Bahamian marinas.

    “Our marinas at this time
    of year, for the first time, have
    some empty slip,s and if the
    boats are not coming here
    from the Northeast along the
    intercoastal waterway, they’re
    not going to make it over to
    the Bahamas,” he said.

    “Fort Lauderdale is the tra-
    ditional jumping off spot for
    some great cruising in
    Bahamian waters - we help
    each other in that respect.”

    Mr Herhold said, though,
    that the MIASF is involved in
    an outreach endeavour to
    encourage more visiting



    “There is a degree of concern.
    Americans are tightening their
    belts like never before. I think
    they are still using the boats,
    but they aren’t going great

    distances.”



    yachts, which could also mean
    more business for the
    Bahamas.

    He said fuel prices should
    no longer hinder boat travel,
    but the state of the economy
    might.

    “There is a degree of con-
    cern,” he said. “Americans are
    tightening their belts like nev-
    er before. I think they are still
    using the boats, but they aren’t
    going great distances.

    “So we’re looking at a
    reduction in the number of
    visiting yachts, which trans-
    lates into a reduction in visit-
    ing yachts for the Bahamas.”

    Some Bahamas-based
    resorts with marinas have

    Frank Herhold

    reported that they themselves
    have seen only slight reduc-
    tions in private vessel arrivals.

    Harper Sibley, general man-
    ager of Valentines Resort and
    Marina in Harbour Island,
    said his oepration had seen
    only a 10 per cent reduction in
    business compared to the
    same time last year.

    Operations

    He added that visitors who
    arrive on their private boats
    and yachts represent one-third
    of their room nights, a signifi-
    cant segment of the resort’s
    operations.

    Mr Sibley said repeat cus-

    tomers are keeping Valen-
    tine’s occupancy levels high,
    but the mega yachts keep
    coming and represent a sig-
    nificant portion of revenues
    for the resort.

    “It’s the smaller boats that
    don’t come as much - some of
    it is weather related,” Mr Sib-
    ley said.

    “It’s actually better than I
    thought it would be, but Har-
    bour Island is a world class
    destination so people want to
    keep coming here.”

    Mr Sibley said because of
    reduced fuel prices and the
    demand for the Harbour
    Island product, he anticipates
    a good summer for the resort.

    “Should be good as last
    year,” he said.

    Owner and Operator of
    Harbour Central Marina, Paul
    Neely, echoed similar senti-
    ments.

    He said just four yachts are
    giving his company a surpris-
    ingly good year, while other
    businesses owned by himself,
    including an oil company, are
    down about 50 per cent.

    Mr Neely said the larger
    yachts make up the revenue
    lag from the absence of many
    smaller vessels.

    “Dock slip rentals are up,”
    he said.

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    PHILIPPA VALLEY INC.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 8th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    NOVELESE SOUTH LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
    the 23rd day of September 2008. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    POMPERNICKEL

    ENTERPRISES LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 29th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that MERINE DOVALUS
    of BALFOUR AVENUE, P.O.BOX N-720, NASSAU,
    BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
    Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
    as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
    knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
    not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
    of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13" day of
    MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
    and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that MONIQUE ASTWOOD of 165
    KALANDAR ST.,#C-3, OPA LOCKA, FL.,U.S.A.,FL 33054
    is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
    Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
    Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
    registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
    send a written and signed statement of the facts within
    twenty-eight days from the 13° day of March, 2009 to the
    Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
    N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH MCINTOSH of
    PINEWOOD GARDENS, P.O.BOX N-720, NASSAU,
    BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
    Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
    as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
    knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
    not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
    of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13" day of
    MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
    and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE is hereby given that ETIENNE DALMOND of
    P.O. BOX AB-20334, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO,
    BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
    Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
    as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
    who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
    should not be granted, should send a written and
    signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
    from the 27 day of February, 2009 to the Minister
    responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
    N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    LEGAL NOTICE
    NOTICE

    BAROSSA LIMITED

    N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

    (a) BAROSSA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
    the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
    Companies Act 2000.

    (b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 27 th
    February 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
    and registered by the Registrar General.
    (c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mr. Michael Low of 1
    Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

    Dated this 13th day of January A. D. 2009

    Mr. Michael Low
    Liquidator



    PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    SSS SS Se
    Financial services ‘must move away from model today’ | Insurers face ‘serious issue’

    FROM page 1B

    Presently, the Bahamas has the
    solitary TIEA with the US, mean-
    ing it is at risk of running afoul of
    the OECD again.

    “Going forward, we’re going
    to have to, just short of yielding,
    move away from the existing
    model,” Mr Smith said of the
    Bahamas’ future in financial ser-
    vices.

    “T doubt they’ll [the OECD
    and G-20] find much to begin
    with, so we might as well enter
    TIEAs with 11 of these countries.
    It’s just a question of expanding
    the existing network. We have
    one TIEA already and should
    look at that, in the sense of having
    different provisions for TIEAs
    that could provide reciprocal ben-
    efits for us. There may be some-
    thing the European countries can
    give us in return.”

    In return for signing the TIEA
    with the US in 2001, Washington
    finally granted a tax break
    designed to help the Bahamian
    tourism industry. The convention
    tax benefit allows US business-
    men travelling to the Bahamas to
    attend conventions/conferences
    to deduct the costs incurred in
    doing so against their annual



    “I can see a move,
    in the residential
    business
    environment, to
    having a corporate
    tax environment —
    for businesses
    doing business
    here, resident

    businesses.”

    Michael Paton

    line with other nations, who had
    enjoyed the US convention tax
    benefit for years and obtained a
    competitive advantage over this
    nation when it came to the
    groups/convention tourism busi-
    ness.

    Mr Smith suggested that the
    Bahamas “ought to be looking
    for treaty partners, rather than
    have one come here looking to
    impose conditions on us”.

    The former minister’s com-
    ments back those of ex-Bahamas
    Financial Services Board (BFSB)
    chairman Michael Paton, who

    income tax returns.

    previously told Tribune Business
    This brought the Bahamas into

    that the Bahamas must “transi-



























    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    IN THE SUPREME COURT

    Equity Side

    IN THE MATTER OF a piece parcel or lot of land contained
    by measurements one and two hundred and ninety four
    hundredths (1.294) acres and situate on the northeastern side of
    the Queen’s Highway in the vicinity of Palestine Baptist
    Church in the settlement of Deadman’s Cay in the Island of
    Long Island, The Bahamas.

    AND

    IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Alvin S. Turnquest.

    AND
    IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act 1959
    NOTICE

    The Petitioner in this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple
    possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described and the
    Petitioner has made an application to the Supreme Court of the
    Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
    Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and
    the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in the
    Certificate of Title granted by the Court in accordance with the
    provisions of the said Act.

    Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office
    hours at:

    (1) The Registry of the Supreme Court.
    (2) The Administrators Office at Clarence Town, Long Island.
    (3) The Chambers of the undersigned.

    NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
    right to dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized
    in the Petition shall before the 30th day of April, A.D.,2009
    from the publication of the notice inclusive of the day of such
    publication file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of
    Nassau in the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve
    on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his or her
    claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
    therewith. The failure of any such person to file and serve a
    statement of his or her claim within the time fixed by the Notice
    aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

    Dated this 25th day of February, A.D., 2009

    PYFROM & CO,
    Chambers
    No.58, Shirley Street,
    Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.
    Attorneys for the Petitioner.

    tion” its financial services industry
    to a completely new business
    model within the next 10-15 years
    if it is to survive long-term.

    The future, he added, was like-
    ly to involve double tax treaties
    and a ‘corporate tax environment’
    for local companies. “I think
    we’re going to have to seriously
    consider tax transparency points,
    and how we re-position ourselves,
    and how we develop a strategic
    plan going forward,” Mr Paton
    had said.

    “T think we’re going to be tran-
    sitioning, if not to a TIEA envi-
    ronment, which is probably an
    easier solution, to a more sophis-
    ticated solution that would be a
    double tax treaty network. That
    would require us to have in place
    certain standards of taxation.

    “T can see a move, in the resi-
    dential business environment, to
    having a corporate tax environ-
    ment - for businesses doing busi-
    ness here, resident businesses.

    “Tt would probably make sense
    to transition to a corporate tax
    environment, which would have
    aspects of taxation that would be
    recognised by international stan-
    dards. On the back of that, we
    would be able to negotiate double
    tax treaties.

    “The trick is going to be to pro-
    tect non-resident, private bank-
    ing businesses from that tax.”

    The debate over the Bahamas’
    future in financial services is rag-
    ing as Liechtenstein yesterday
    bowed to outside pressure, agree-
    ing to adopt international stan-
    dards on cross-border tax coop-
    eration in an effort to shed its
    label as a ‘tax haven’.

    Mr Smith told Tribune Busi-
    ness that developed countries
    “want to remove the veil of con-
    fidentiality at any cost”, despite
    the fact that wealthy financial ser-
    vices clients required it to pro-
    tect themselves from kidnapping
    or serve extended families scat-
    tered across the globe.

    “There are so many reasons
    why you need confidentiality,”
    Mr Smith argued. “These guys
    are just bulldozing ahead. You'll
    just be seeing more and more of

    this.”

    He added, though, that the
    OECD’s own studies had “found
    the Bahamas had standards for
    transparency that exceeded some
    of the OECD countries”.

    Pressure on the Bahamian
    financial services industry con-
    tinues to come from various quar-
    ters. The US, in its recent drug
    control report, said this nation
    needed to “ensure that there is a
    public registry of the beneficial
    owners of all entities licensed in
    its offshore financial centre”.

    But John Delaney, attorney
    and managing partner at Higgs
    & Johnson, told Tribune Busi-
    ness there was “absolutely” no
    reason why such a public registry
    was necessary, given that benefi-
    cial ownership information for
    every Bahamas-incorporated enti-
    ty had to be kept at their respec-
    tive registered offices.

    This was required by both the
    Banks and Trust Companies
    (Regulation) Act 2000 and the
    Financial, Corporate and Service
    Providers Act 2000, and the infor-
    mation could be obtained from
    the registered agents via several
    routes, such as court orders, their
    respective regulators or “any duly
    authorised person”.

    “T can see no legitimate reason
    to require a public registry. Why
    should one need to have that
    information open to the public
    gaze,” asked Mr Delaney. “The
    US is calling for more that what
    several of their states have. There
    are no bearer shares in the
    Bahamas.”

    He suggested that the US
    report may have been based on
    misinformation and a lack of
    knowledge on what information
    sharing procedures there were in
    the Bahamas.

    Describing the ‘public registry’
    as “overblown”, Mr Delaney said:
    “The OECD is certainly pushing
    the obtaining of beneficial own-
    ership information. The Bahamas
    answered that by abolishing bear-
    er shares, and requiring registered
    agents to maintain private reg-
    istries that are open to public offi-
    cials and due legal processes.”

    NOTICE OF SALE

    Expocredit Corporation

    (‘the Company”) invites

    offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
    199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Maris Subdivision’,
    comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
    South of Burnt Ground in the [sland of Long Island
    one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
    Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
    bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
    and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.

    The Company makes no representations or warranties
    with respect to the state of the Property which is
    offered for sale “as is where 1s”.

    The Company will sell under power of sale in
    accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing

    & Law of Property Act.

    TERMS:

    Ten percent (10%) of the purchase

    price at the time of contract and the

    balance

    upon completion within

    Sixty (60) days of contract.

    This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
    reserves the right to reject any and all offers.

    Interested persons may

    submit written offers

    addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
    Partner, P- O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
    received no later than the close of business on the 30"

    day of March, 2009.

    ROYAL = FIDELITY

    Morey at Work

    BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
    THURSDAY, 12 MARCH 2009
    BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.28 | CHG 0.12 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -52.08 | YTD % -3.04
    FINDEX: CLOSE 813.80 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
    WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

    Securit y
    Abaco Markets
    Bahamas Property Fund
    Bank of Bahamas
    Benchmark
    Bahamas Waste
    Fidelity Bank
    Cable Bahamas
    Colina Holdings
    Commonwealth Bank ($1)
    Consclidated Water BDRs
    Doctor's Hospital

    1.39
    11.00
    7.00

    1.45
    11.00
    7.00
    0.63
    3.15
    1.95
    12.61
    2.83
    4.80
    1.31
    2.16
    6.02
    11.00
    10.45
    5.00
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50
    8.60
    10.00

    0.63
    3.15
    2.37
    13.95
    2.83
    6.59
    1.31
    2.16
    7.76
    11.00
    10.45
    5.07
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50

    Famguard

    Finco

    FirstCaribbean Bank
    Focol (S)

    Focol Class B Preference
    Freeport Concrete

    ICD Utilities

    J. S. Johnson 10.50
    Premier Real Estate 10.00

    Previous Close Today's Close

    Change Daily Vol.
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.12
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00

    1.45
    11.00
    7.00
    0.63
    3.15
    2.37
    13.95
    2.83
    6.59
    1.43
    2.16
    7.76
    11.00
    10.45
    5.07
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50
    10.50
    10.00

    EPS $

    Div $

    0.992
    0.244
    -0.877
    0.105
    0.055
    1.309
    0.118
    0.438
    0.111
    0.240
    0.598
    0.542
    0.794
    0.337
    0.000
    0.035
    0.407
    0.952
    0.180

    of mounting receivables

    FROM page 1B

    one’s very concerned” regarding accounts receivables, Mr Ward told
    Tribune Business that the new Domestic Insurance Act had several
    implications for Bahamas-based carriers in this area.

    With the onus on them to collect accounts receivables, a number
    of carriers were looking to upgrade their systems - and stipulate a
    shorter collection time in which brokers/agents had to pass on due
    premium income - to ensure “there’s a quicker handling of the
    processes involved”.

    In addition, Mr Ward told Tribune Business that there were sol-
    vency implications for carriers, given that the Registrar of Insur-
    ance’s Office might “discount” receivables balances beyond a cer-
    tain date under the new Act. As a result, insurance carriers were
    looking at “any issues that might arise” when the new Domestic
    Insurance Act comes into force. And this newspaper knows of at
    least one Bahamas-based carrier that is aggressively trimming the
    number of agents that write business for it in order to tackle its
    accounts receivables. It has also reduced the payment window for
    when premium income has to be remitted to it.

    Obtaining due premium income has been an ongoing problem
    among Bahamian general insurance carriers, with a small minori-
    ty of brokers and agents not passing this on.

    Tribune Business knows of several occasions where carriers
    have stopped doing business with certain brokers/agents because of
    this, and in some cases the premium receivable balances have built
    up into multi-million dollar sums.

    However, one Bahamas-based broker yesterday told Tribune
    Business that he would oppose the idea of escrow accounts for
    insurance intermediaries such as himself, arguing that carriers
    were effectively “trying to solve problems of their own making”.

    Bruce Ferguson, head of Professional Insurance Consultants,
    said: “I would certainly oppose any attempt to introduce escrow
    accounts. It was never considered necessary in the 15-plus years we
    were debating the new Act, and just because companies have run
    into problems of their own making, it doesn’t mean that we should
    have them now.”

    Other brokers and agents, spoken to by Tribune Business on con-
    dition of anonymity, told this newspaper that Bahamas-based car-
    riers needed to do better due diligence on brokers and agents they
    took on to write new business for them, and also improve their mon-
    itoring of accounts receivables.

    However, one senior insurance carrier executive, speaking to Tri-
    bune Business on condition of anonymity, told this newspaper
    that requiring brokers/agents to put funds into escrow would “be a
    step in the right direction, as it would alleviate some of the receiv-
    ables issue. It’s a real, real concern”.

    The industry source said Bahamian insurance laws and regula-
    tions, like most in the Caribbean, were focused heavily on the
    consumer and keeping premium prices cheap, almost to the “detri-
    ment of the product”.

    “The protection of the carrier; that should be the overriding
    concern, to ensure carriers are adequately capitalised and do not fail
    when there is a big event,” the source said.

    “The Bahamas needs to have an industry that can deal with the
    big event, and deal with it well, because the economic conse-
    quences of not dealing with it well could be disastrous.”

    PUBLIC NOTICE

    INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

    The Public is hereby advised that |, ALEXIO RENARDO
    RUSSEL of Eastern Estates in the Eastern District of
    the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The
    Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intend to change my name
    to ALEXIO RENARD COOPER. If there are any objections
    to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
    objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
    Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
    of publication of this notice.

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE

    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
    (No.45 of 2000)

    AITO INVESTMENTS LTD.

    In Voluntary liquidation

    “Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
    137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
    (No. 45 of 2000). AITO INVESTMENTS LTD. is in
    Dissolution.”

    The date of commencement of dissolution is the 17th
    day of February, 2009.

    Gustavo Federico Larriera Medivil
    Concepcion del Uruguay 1697
    Montevideo
    Uruguay
    Liquidator

    IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992
    AND

    IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST COUNSEL
    AND ATTORNEY
    BETWEEN

    OLGA & EDWARD ROSSI
    Complainants

    BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
    Securii Symbol Last Sale Daily Vol.
    Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17
    Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22
    Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series ©) + FBB13 100.00 0.00
    Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00
    Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
    Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
    7.92 8.42 14.60
    4.00 6.25 6.00
    0.35 0.40 0.35
    Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
    31.72 33.26 29.00
    0.00 0.00 0.00
    0.45 0.55 0.55
    BISX Listed Mutual Funds
    NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
    1.3664 0.95
    2.8988 -1.40
    1.4432 0.67
    3.3201 -1.94
    12.7397 0.96
    100.5606 0.56
    96.4070
    1.0000
    9.1005
    1.0440
    1.0364 0.33
    1.0452 0.76
    MARKET TERMS
    YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
    Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
    Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
    Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
    Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
    EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
    NAV - Net Asset Value
    N/M - Not Meaningful
    FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

    KENDALL KNOWLES
    Respondent

    S2wk-Hi_ 52wk-Low Interest

    1000.00 0.00

    0.00

    7%
    Prime + 1.75%
    T%
    Prime + 1.75%

    19 October 2017
    19 October 2022
    30 May 2013
    29 May 2015

    1000.00
    1000.00
    1000.00

    100.00

    Weekly Vol. EPS $
    -0.041
    0.000

    0.001

    Div $
    0.300
    0.480
    0.000

    S52wk-Low Symbol P/E
    14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
    6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

    0.20 RND Holdings

    NOTICE OF HEARING

    TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal shall
    hear the subject Complaint on Wednesday the 25th day
    of March, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the afternoon
    before Her Ladyship The Honourable Mrs. Justice
    Albury at 3rd Floor British American Building, George
    Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

    4.540
    0.000
    0.002

    0.000
    0.000
    0.000

    29.00 ABDAB
    0.00 Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
    0.40 RND Holdings
    S2wk-Low Div $ Yield %
    1.3041
    2.9230
    1.3828
    3.3201
    11.8789
    100.0000
    96.4070
    1.0000
    9.0950
    1.0000
    1.0000
    1.0000

    Fund Name
    Colina Bond Fund
    Colina MSI Preferred Fund
    Colina Money Market Fund
    Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
    Fidelity Prime Income Fund
    CFAL Global Bond Fund
    CFAL Global Equity Fund
    CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
    Fidelity International Investment Fund
    FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
    FG Financial Growth Fund
    FG Financial Diversified Fund

    28-Feb-09
    28-Feb-09
    6-Mar-09
    31-Jan-09
    28-Feb-09
    31-Dec-08
    31-Dec-08
    31-Dec-07
    31-Jan-09
    9-Feb-09
    9-Feb-09
    9-Feb-09

    -3.59
    0.00
    0.06
    0.80

    4.40
    Dated the 25th day of February, A.D., 2009

    BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
    52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
    52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
    Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
    Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
    Change - Change in closing price from day to day
    Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
    DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
    P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
    (S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
    (S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

    TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

    Bahamas Bar Association
    Elizabeth Avenue
    Nassau, The Bahamas





    THE TRIBUNE

    PAGE 7B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009



    APT 3-G

    IF WE'RE DINING \YOU LOOK BEAUTIFUL, | OON'T BE
    AT THE PLAZA, 1 ) MARGO, JUST LIKE | SILLY, DAD.
    SHOULD CHANGE.A_ YOUR MOTHER! PIM NOTHING

    ry

    JUDGE PARKER

    THERE WAS A

    LOT GOING ON

    AT THAT PARTY
    TONIGHT!
















    TL MEANT
    GABRIELLA.

    SHE'S VERY
    IMPRESSIVE! HOW
    COULP THE CIA






    ANP APRIL BOWER J

    SHOWING UP mape fil
    {T EVEN MORE
    INTERESTING!







    ate, Inc, Word rights reserved.



    wHAD AN ACCIDENT
    ON THE RUG!

    HELLO?
    THE ECHO FROM AN EMPTY
    REFRIGERATOR \«





    ©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.









    www.Blondie.com,



    BUT THIS IS

    T KNOW I SAI N,
    REicuLops.!

    EVERY BOY SHOUL?
    ws SOYOU HAVE HAVE A FET...
    TO STAY IN

    THE House! EVERYTHING



    Gac09 by King Featuras Syndicate, Inc, World rights “eservec.



    CALVIN & HOBBES

    HOY ae words af four Wits
    DP THe can whe make foom Lhe
    bebhers: show bere? In making a
    wise, asi Bel ber may Eee sal
    Ono only. Each oust montain

    " Chit ercavten ether ond thre iat
    words. In be af lee one nine-lelier weed
    Bio plurols.

    Toba TARGET
    CHened 27: rer sod 4): eecelent
    BE er Gen: . EH ihe Laster

    TESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

    ae babel bell lobe beech
    bekh Blah bleach chalet chit
    Cheal else dah enhi cleh
    hale Rall fale feal heal baich
    loth lathe beoeh loth beach
    Liaw Uleew walich
    WATCHABLE weak welch

    whealt: wlowl wheel wle

    THE LONGER YOU WAIT
    FOR THE MAIL, THE
    LESS THERE 1S IN IT.




    © 1989 Universal Press Syndicate



    Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
    several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
    9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
    3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
    level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
    Sunday

    edition!



    Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
    fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
    each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
    of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
    may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
    level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

















    Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

    Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer









































    ©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.























    ©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
    —/cO|0o
    O/O|;B/|N































    6/4 9 1]3]2/5 NE
    5|8 7 2|4/1/6 82/4 33/5/18
    216 3 5|7/819 5|7/8 9 BW9/8)2/7
    IN 1 16/7 8|/9 Ri7\4/9
    4 1/3 6 8/5/7/2 BMi2\s\9 RRs 3/09 RN
    5 8/1 2 7|9\3/4 S49 213 1 42
    3/2}/719 5 4/1/6/8 IOS 2 16 Rl2i6 1
    7/1|9}2 4 6/8/5|3 W218i M2 1/3/1814
    “DENNIS 1S TURNING S/X2 WHATA COINCIDENCE. “= ae =f 9/4 1fM2 17/3
    Sos My ULCER!” Difficulty Level *& %& %& 3/13 2/5/3|7 8 9/6/4/1 a
    ; % Difficulty Level * % *& % 3/13 6/8/1415 1 3}2/9/7 116|3 2M 3 [4/9 a



















    CRYPTIC PUZZLE

    Down

    Across






    + A Peas Ke: aL



    Bidding Quiz

    1 Acheater cheated? Turn 1 It's cold, but | would make : . : seta 4a :
    You are the dealer, neither side points do not fall into the opening
    a blind eye (7) it hot (5) I ble. Wh ld bid-with ; Sach
    5 Brush or 2 There's no holding a key vulnerable. What would you bid wit one- or two-notrump category. Suc

    brushwood (5)
    8 In this form, two sides are
    perfectly matched (9) 3
    9 Consumed but not all 4
    eaten (3) 5
    10 Right out of line (4)
    12 Star skater is



    man given some

    authority (3)

    Twice reduced by 50% (4)
    Come into service? (6)
    Forces one to hang about
    instead of going to

    work (8)



















    each of the following five hands?
    1. ®AQ7 ¥ 108 @ AIS & KQ963
    2. ®KQ7 ¥ K92 AQ83 & AJ5
    3. @ Q743 ¥ Q985 @ AQ6 & A7
    4. ®AQ108 ¥A7 © Ad? & 9865
    5. ®KQI9763 4 6 $8 & KQJ5

    kk *

    1. One notrump. This indicates 15

    hands are opened with one of suit,
    and the true nature of the hand is then
    shown at the next opportunity by
    jumping in notrump.

    3. One diamond. You have no
    legitimate suit with which to open
    the bidding, since the spades and
    hearts are too weak to mention, the

    upset (8) 6 Article is made to 17 points (many still play 16-18), diamonds are only three cards in
    14 Untidy little beasts (6) practical (9) balanced distribution (usually 4-3-3- length, and you cannot open one club
    15 He has an important job, 7 Small cask for fresh water 3, 4-4-3-2, or 5-3-3-2) and stoppers with a two-card suit. But since any








    on paper (6) — or sea water? (7) in at least three suits. Itis far betterto 14-point hand must be opened,
    17 Arrests about a thousand 11 Reckoned the date and open with one notrump than one something must be done, and one
    supporters (8) times are changed (9) club. diamond 1s the best choice. It has the
    18 Bill joins me at the 13 Don't forget about a There are several reasons why the merit of keeping the bidding low
    summit (4) person in society (8) notrump call is preferred. The pri- while allowing for the discovery of a
    21 Play one’s part out of 44° -maticial nensstan Lu Across Down mary one is that the opening notrump —_ major-sutt fit if it exists,
    character (3) escape (7) al 1 A fever (7) 1 Be equal to (5) bid immediately pinpoints the type 4. One elub. Here your best intro-
    22 Pul the stopper on soft 16 Ina Way my sortis hardly N 5 To chatter (5) 2 Be situated (3) of hand held in terms of both points ductory bid is one club. It serves to
    dnnks dapenses-(G) fair (6) > 8 Wearisome 3 Primitive (4) and distribution. As opposed to this, keep the bidding low and allows for
    ; routine (9) 4 Large caae for a one-club bid could be based on any you to bid one spade at your next
    24 Yet it may be quite a 19 One may slip and fall into ou ge cag ae : : ; ; :
    9 Useful hint (3) birds (6) type of distribution and a wide range turn if partner responds with a dia-
    young tree (5) it (5) > f hish-caed Hai d h
    20 It’s neckwear, we hear, for ~” 10 Pile (4) 5 Spacious and Oe ors . sae ea cline + ons
    25 Die woul ieee ge < ieee anare Additionally, a one-club opening 5. Four spades. This bid serves
    patente oe Lu oer epee) will present a rebid problem if part- two purposes simultaneously. It is an
    get it (7) 23 Enjoy spadework? (3) judging (8) 6 Consequence (9) ner responds with one diamond, one offensive effort that may easily suc-
    ; : : 14 A French 7 Atone for (7) heart or one spade, all of which ceed if partner has an ace. But, more
    Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution brandy (6) 11 Show good prospects would make an accurate rebid importantly, it has even greater value
    Aéross: 4 Fistien, 6 Faro lucré do: “sAerowss4 Ségabiéc® Passes 15 Lay waste (6) (5,4) impossible. The way to avoid such as a defensive bid. If partner has a
    Leading, 11 Out of spirits, 13 Notice, Slant, 10 Satiate, 11 Single-minded, 17 Supplier (8) 13 Believed to be (5,3) problems is to open one notrump at weak hand, the apponents are likely
    14 Aspire, 17 Extravagance, 20 13 Rating, 14 Astral, 17 18 To lash (4) 14 Abundant (7) the outset. . ; to make a game. However, because
    Enrages, 21 Inner, 22 Twin, 23 Marksmanship, 20 Sibling, 21 ’ 2, One diamond. Despite the clas- of the high level at which they would
    , , , , , 21 Be indebted 16 Intense : r een aey ae =
    Meanness. Gnome, 22 Sulk, 23 Leathery. for (3) enusneniee (6) sic notrump features of your hand, have to begin bidding, there is a good
    Down: 1 File, 2 Account, 3 Free of Down: 1 So-so, 2 Chariot, 3 ery ee : the proper opening is one diamond. chance they will miss their best con-
    charge, 4 Splash, 6 Alibi, 7 Register, 8 Antagonistic, 4 Lessen, 6 Award, 7 22 Advance indication 19 Devoutness (5) Hands containing 19 high-card — tract.
    Radio station, 12 Interest, 15 Incense, Steadily, 8 At first sight, 12 (9) 20 Stage ina . :
    16 Parsee, 18 Tarsi, 19 Arts. Premises, 15 Rhizome, 16 Haggle, 24 Of the sun (5) process (4) Tomorrow: Heads I win, tails you lose.
    18 Rebel, 19 Rely. 25 Fast (7) 23 Sorrowful (3) ©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.







    PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13th, 2009

    THE WEATHER REPORT

    THE TRIBUNE

    INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

    (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
    Marine FORECAST

    a

    il

    5-Day FORECAST



    TY rr Ny





















    F =: Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
    a Cr ~~" aa 7 - High = Low W High =Low W NASSAU Today: E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
    a th i 0| 1 |2 3 \4 [5 6 | 7/18 | gl10 Fic FIC Fic OFC Saturday: _E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
    ¥ i i a a Acapulco 90/32 68/20 s 88/31 73/22 S FREEPORT Today: E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
    = ~~ LOW | MODERATE J HIGH | V.HIGH J EXT. = Amsterdam 50/10 43/6 ¢ 56/13 45/7 ¢ Saturday: _E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
    et ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 46/7 32/0 r 41/5 28/-2¢ = ABACO ‘Today: E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
    High: 82° F/27°C i Nice with plenty of Clear and Warmer with plenty Mostly sunny and Sunny to partly Sunshine and patchy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 56/13 44/6 pc S713 44/6 pc Saturday: _E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
    . pei 61° rare ll sunshine. comfortable. of sunshine. humid. cloudy. clouds. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 67/9 53/11 c 66/18 54/12 s
    ; ° ° ° ° Bangkok 98/36 78/25 pc 90/32 74/23 pc
    i: @ hs ano 740 High: af High: 83" High: Bt" High: 80" Barbados 84/28 75/23 s 84/28 75/23 pc Pr
    TAMPA le High: 80 Low: 71 Low: 73 Low: 72 Low: 71 Low: 67 SS ESS Barcelona 66/18 53/11 pc yee TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
    os af Cece NSE aa —
    High: 82° F/27°C 03°-74° F Q0°-72° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low —_Hi.(ft.
    Low: 62° 5 i 5 - — - — — - - —— Beirut 70/21 55/12 sh 71/21 58/14 pe
    ow: 62° F/16°C ao F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 10:12am. 2.7 4:04am. -0.2 Belgrade AG/7 a5 +r 43/6 34/0 r
    a @ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:34pm. 3.0 4:12pm. -0.2 Berlin 47/8 34/1 sh 48/8 45/7 c
    a > CO Seusisy eer co ceam ay Bermuda a
    in | a 16pm. 29 4:52pm. -0. Bogota 65/18 43/6 t 70/21 43/6 r
    J ie Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday T132am. 04 5:32am. 01 Brussels 55/12 41/5 pe 57/13 43/6 pc
    | r ABACO Temperature, wn 5:33 p.m. 0.1 Budapest 49/9 36/2 sh 46/7 32/0 pc
    f , High:79° F/26° C PHU .easnac Stent acerca 75° F/24°C 0 aotam. 27 68am. 03 Buenos Aires 82/27 70/21 pe 88/31 57/13 t
    2 aa Reise 7c LOW ooeeeneen 67° F/19° C Y i44pm. 22 647pm. 02 Cairo 80/26 54/12 s 74/23 53/11 s
    . al ee Hoe 7 Normal high. .... 79° F/26° C TTT 95/35 73/22 s 94/34 72/22 s
    ” f Normal low 65° F/18° C Calgary 49/9 27/-2 c 36/2 23/-5 ¢
    ! a @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's WGN sence estece Mccsonccces 88° F/3° C SUN ay Ty ify Cancun 84/28 70/21 s 84/28 70/21 s
    F — High: 80° F/27°C i Last year's WOW: scseessutet cece ease: 68° F/20° C . : Caracas 79/26 66/18 pc 83/28 70/21 s
    Low: 68° F/20°C Precipitation a“ beeen oa a.m. Ln aoe p.m. Casablanca 80/26 58/14 s 79/26 55/12 s 68/50
    As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0.0.00 0.00" unsel....... ‘top.m. Moonset. .... 709 a.m. Copenhagen 44/6 39/3 ¢ 44/6 40/4 5
    FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Yearto dale... . Last New First Dublin 52/11 43/6 + 50/10 41/5 sh
    High: 82° F/28° C @ High: 78° F/26° C Normal year to date oo... 4.10" a 7 Frankfurt 5211 37/2 po 5713 37/2 po
    C 25 Low: 64° F/18° C AccuWeather Geneva 55/12 35/1 c 62/16 41/5 pe
    _ .com . Halifax 27/-2 10/-12 s 32/0 17/-8 pc
    fe a i. Forecasts and graphics provided by z Be Havana 84/28 63/17 s 81/27 64/17 pc Showers a
    % eee Miami
    % MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.18 Mar. 26 Apr. 2 Apr. 9 Helsinki 34/1 27/-2 po 36/2 28/-2 sf T-storms 82/68
    = 5 High: 82° F/27°C : ° : Hong Kong 72/22 57/13 ¢ 68/20 64/17 pce Rain Fronts
    High: 80° F/27° C OW: A Istanbul 48/8 39/3 ¢ S110 45/7 ¢ Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm Low: 64° F/18°C Jerusalem 68/20 52/11 65/18 44/6 sh Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationay
    4 : Johannesburg 74/23 53/11 s 74/23 56/13 s =
    a — @. S
    KEY WEST 2 Kingston 84/28 72/22 pc 84/28 76/24 pc z :
    High:78° F/26°C alia CAT ISLAND Lima 85/29 67/19 c 85/29 66/18 pc 10s 0s [Js] 10s_20s [805i] 40s
    Low: 69° F/21°C High: 78° F/26° C London 54/12 45/7 pc S512 41/5 +
    3 Low: 64° F/18°C Madrid 73/22 39/3 s 75/23 43/6 s
    @ ali Manila 91/32 75/23 s 93/33 76/24 pc
    r Mexico City 77/25 50/10 pe 72/22 47/8 pc A NM
    a Monterrey 63/17 48/8 c 66/18 52/11 sh eS rhe | i. 8 ean NM Ge FE
    wae GREATEXUMA i SAN SALVADOR Montreal ae 37/2 23/-5 s
    7 High: 81° F/27°C Hi h: 82° F/28°C Moscow 32/0 14/-10 pc 28/-2 10/-12 pe
    — Low: 66°F/19°C fe "64°F/18°C Munich 41/5 36/2 sh 45/7 37/2 c
    Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ieee al haaee 7 aia aa pe one ae pe
    highs and tonights's lows. d : al pe ‘i |
    g g = ‘a Low: 71° F/22°C 25 i Oslo 32/0 25/-3 sf 36/2 32/0 sn Never St Ol ir
    = —_ Paris 59/15 43/6 pc 61/16 45/7 pc i
    tli Prague 45/7 34/1 sh 44/6 31/0 c ell) GY; HC au QO us!
    LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 87/30 75/23 c 82/27 72/22 sh
    er rec fone sos a5 s BING. AST
    Low: 70° F/21°C Rome 5915 45/7 s 6116 45/7 s
    aa salindey aa Snir Tea Sink 4 MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 82/27 72/22 sh 82/27 73/22 s to Auto Insur ance,
    High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 83° F/28° C San Juan 97/36 72/22 s 93/33 73/22 pe ts Smart choice 1S
    FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC IC ee Low: 65° F/18° C ee — 7 s - ee c
    Albuquerque 46/7 35/1 t 54/12 35/1 t Indianapolis 46/7 27/-2 po 55/12 34/1 pe __ Philadelphia 43/6 32/0 pe 51/10 36/2 pe anag om a ol
    Anchorage 34/1 20/-6 pc 28/-2 17/8 pc Jacksonville 76/24 57/13 pc 78/25 58/14 pc Phoenix 78/25 5311 s 77/25 53/11 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 84/28 68/20 pe 83/28 68/20 s
    Atlanta 5241 425 6 S110 47/8 + Kansas City 44/6 26/-3 po 5341 344 pc Pittsburgh 44/6 26/-3 peo 52/11 30/-1 pe RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:84°F/29°c = -— ear — t — — t
    Atlantic City 40/4 26/-3 pc 48/8 30/-1 pc _Las Vegas 71/21 44/6 s 71/21 49/9 s Portland,OR 5442 415 po 488 415 1 High: 82° F/28° C Low: 64° F/18°C Sikh a a : a ; 7
    Baltimore 43/6 30/-1 ¢ 48/8 34/1 c Little Rock 42/5 36/2 + 47/8 38/3 + Raleigh-Durham 40/4 36/2 + 42/5 38/3 + Low: 66°F/19°C “an a — mone RAT . maT GAG .
    Boston 37/2 28/-2 s 47/8 31/0 s Los Angeles 68/20 50/10 s 68/20 52/11 pc __ St. Louis 44/6 29/-1 po 53/11 37/2 pe . om ae SaSUREEC SER SSOREEOTER
    Buffalo 36/2 24/-4 s 44/6 26/-3 s Louisville 48/8 344 c 54412 40/4 c Salt Lake City 46/7 28/-2 s 5110 31/0 pc ae P
    Charl SC 58/14 47/8 61/16 5442 sh Memphi 46 39/3 48/8 42 San Antoni 4 39/3 2/11 42. GREAT INAGUA Tokyo ee! ee
    AI eel A a ome ot St SE High: 84° F/29° C Toronto 34/1 23/-5 pc 45/7 3210 s (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
    Chicago 40/4 23/-5 pe 52/1 26/3 s Miami 82/27 68/20 pce 81/27 69/20 s San Diego 65/18 54/12 s 65/18 54/12 pc Low: 66° F/19°C Trinidad 84/28 72/22 t 94/28 71/21 t i.
    Cleveland 38/3 24/-4 5 50/10 27/-2 s Minneapolis 39/3 21/-6 pc 46/7 25/-3 s San Francisco 61/16 47/8 s 61/16 48/8 pc i Waren 47/8 38/3 c 46/7 36/2 sh j i Provider Grond Behe Abees [: i fy
    Dallas 42/5 35/1 + 50/10 40/4 + Nashville 446 38/3 c 52/11 44/6 + Seattle 5010 37/2 c © 467 -37/2 «+ Vienna AG? 37/2 sh so 426 oc | Ae ( vinere md
    Denver 42/5 22/-5 c¢ 53/11 27/-2 s New Orleans 70/21 58/14 ¢ 68/20 55/12 t Tallahassee 78/25 5412 pe 78/25 59/15 pc Warsaw 39/3 30/-1 c 43/6 32/0 5 i he) | iF i
    Detroit 37/2 2d/-4 po 52/11 30/-1 s New York 43/6 33/0 pe 49/9 38/3 pc ‘Tampa 82/27 62/16 pc 80/26 64/17 s ~ Winniped 96/3 19/-7 pc 35/1 20/-6 c \ we(40 SM Be (0) SSD00 TRG TAG) S004 |e (0) 0-062 | (20) STO
    Honolulu 73/22 6447 sh 77/25 68/20 sh Oklahoma City 42/5 344 ¢ 52/11 37/2 ¢ Tucson 71/21 47/8 s 72/22 46/7 $ — ae : : ——
    Houston 47/8 44/6 1 S110 44/6 + Orlando 82/27 6116 po 82/27 605 s Washington, DC 43/6 36/2 c 499 383 c Seen ee ee







  • Full Text

    PAGE 1

    n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net NEWLY relaxed travel policies to Cuba implemented by US President Barack Obama have raised concerns that this country's tourism leaders have been "dragging their feet" in making the Bahamas a more competitive destination than emerging markets in the region. N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Detention Centre reports withheld C M Y K C M Y K WEATHER SUNNY AND NICE HIGH 80F LOW 71F SEEBUSINESSFRONT Port chair mulls his resignation SEEPAGEELEVEN Rattlers and Pitbulls win n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net T HE FINDINGS of an investigation into living conditions at the Detention Centre were fil tered to the press in a confer ence held by the Department of Immigration yesterday. F ull reports submitted by psychologist David Allen, Social Services director Melanie Zonical, Archdeacon James Palacious, Royal Bahamas Defence Force senior lieutenant Freder ick Brown and director of Immigration Jack Thompson were not provided to the media. Immigration officials also denied The Tribune’s request to tour the facility , although Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette said the proposal will be considered at “the next board meeting.” A tour of the detention centre in Carmichael Road was carried out by the fact-finding team of professionals on Friday after The Tribune published detainees’ allegations of physical abuse, sexual abuse, inadequate Immigration Director tells press he found no evidence to back detainees’ claims of violence The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR D OUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com SEE page eight DR MICHAEL DARVILLE takes his seat in the Senate for the first time yesterday after being sworn in. Senator Darville fills the seat left vacant by the departure of Pleasant Bridgewater. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f DR MICHAELDARVILLETAKESSEATINSENATE Christie’s Tribune tirade ‘at odds with comments he made 25 years ago’ P LP leader Perry Christie’s his tory came back to haunt him yesterday after he had launched ab itter attack on T he Tribune’s I nsight article on Sir Lynden Pin dling. For media veterans pointed out t hat his tirade against T he Tri bune’s managing editor John Marquis and his interview with C hauncey Tynes Sr was totally at odds with what he said when he was fired from Pindling’s Cabinet 25 years ago. T hen Mr Christie accused Pindling of bringing the Bahamas’ integrity into question, adding: For the better part of this year, the extent to which com mitment to service with integrity has been eroded in the Bahamas has proven the cause for concern at every level ofo ur society. “Indeed, it has gone beyond our national boundaries and brought our nation’s integrity into question. I, too, haveb een outspoken recently in my criticism of this decay.” Mr Christie said in his statement of October 8, 1984: “History will judge harshly those who stifle conscience and good sense and permit loyalties other than those owed then ation to dictate the course plotted for the nation they govern. “No other virtue supersedes that of integrity in affairs of g overnment and those upon whom the people have called to govern them are expected to serve no other masters than Reaction to PLPleader’s attack on Insight article P erry Christie SEE page eight n By KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net DAVID Kelly, proprietor of Kelly’s Home Centre, philanthropist and former Olympic rep resentative for the Bahamas, died late Wednesday night in a New York hospital. With his family at his bedside, Mr Kelly passed away at around midnight at the New York Presbyterian Hospital. He would have turned 77 on March 25. A spokesperson for the family told The Tribune that he did not suffer at the end. “It was peaceful, he died in his sleep – he was still in a coma.” Mr Kelly, with his wife Nancy, and several members of Kelly’s Home Centre, had travelled to New York in February for their annual purchasing trip for the store. However, Mr Kelly, who had a heart condition, developed chest pains and went to the hospital for a check-up. He underwent a procedure at the hospital on February 18, but afterwards developed complications. The family’s spokesperson said his death this week was, however, not the result of any new compli cations, but rather that he “gradually” succumbed to his initial condition. Mr Kelly’s son Gregory was the one to break the news to members of executive staff and friends at Kelly’s Home Centre yesterday morning. The store’s management then shared the sad news with all of David Kelly dies age 76 David Kelly SEE page eight Newly relaxed US policies on travel to Cuba raise concerns in Bahamas SEE page eight THE son of Chauncey Tynes Jr, the pilot who went missing on a flight from Exuma to Nassau 26 years ago, yesterday thanked The Tri bune for highlighting the story of his father’s disappearance. “It has done wonders for me in answering a lot of questions,” Mr Kimo Tynes said from Turks and Caicos, where he works. Mr Tynes, 28, was a baby when his father disappeared. “I never got to meet my dad,” he said. “I have been asking questions all the 28 years I have been alive.” The Tynes family has always wondered why the Bahamas government never conducted an inquiry into the mystery of Chauncey Jr’s final Son of Chauncey Tynes Jr thanks The Tribune for highlighting story SEE page eight C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , M A R C H 1 3 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 3 . 5 6 $ 3 . 5 6 $ 3 . 6 0 T o u r i s m s e c t o r t o s h r i n k 1 0 % d u r i n g 2 0 0 9 I n s u r e r s f a c e s e r i o u s i s s u e o f m o u n t i n g r e c e i v a b l e s nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m a s w i l l l i k e l y h a v e t o m o v e a w a y f r o m t h e e x i s t i n g m o d e l f o r i t s i n t e r n a t i o n a l f i n a n c i a l s e r v i c e s c e n t r e i n t h e f a c e o f i n c r e a s i n g U S a n d G 2 0 p r e s s u r e , a f o r m e r f i n a n c e m i n i s t e r h a s t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s , a n d s e e k r e c i p r o c a l b e n e f i t s f r o m n a t i o n s i t s i g n s t a x i n f o r m a t i o n d e a l s w i t h . J a m e s S m i t h , m i n i s t e r o f s t a t e f o r f i n a n c e i n t h e f o r m e r C h r i s t i e g o v e r n m e n t , s a i d t h e w o r l d s m a j o r i n d u s t r i a l i s e d c o u n t r i e s w e r e l i k e l y t o j u s t b u l l d o z e a h e a d w i t h t h e i r p r o f e s s e d d r i v e t o c r a c k d o w n o n i n t e r n a t i o n a l f i n a n c i a l c e n t r e s s u c h a s t h e B a h a m a s , e x p l o i t i n g t h e g l o b a l r e c e s s i o n a n d c r e d i t c r u n c h t o j u s t i f y t h i s . W i t h t h e B a h a m a s a l r e a d y h a v i n g s i g n e d a T a x I n f o r m a t i o n E x c h a n g e A g r e e m e n t ( T I E A ) w i t h t h e U S , M r S m i t h s u g g e s t e d t h a t t h i s n a t i o n p r o a c t i v e l y s e e k o t h e r s u c h p a r t n e r s , a l l t h e w h i l e l o o k i n g t o s e e w h a t e c o n o m i c b e n e f i t s i t c o u l d g e t f r o m t h e s e a r r a n g e m e n t s .T a x e sH e a d d e d t h a t d e v e l o p e d c o u n t r i e s w e r e u n l i k e l y t o r e c o v e r m u c h b y w a y o f u n p a i d t a x e s f r o m c l i e n t s o f t h e B a h a m i a n f i n a n c i a l s e r v i c e s i n d u s t r y , a s t h e p r i v a t e w e a l t h m a n a g e m e n t s e c t o r s c l i e n t s w e r e l a r g e l y c o m p l i a n t w i t h t h e i r h o m e c o u n t r y t a x l a w s . T h e O r g a n i s a t i o n f o r E c o n o m i c C o O p e r a t i o n a n d D e v e l o p m e n t ( O E C D ) , t h e f o r u m o r c l u b m o s t f r e q u e n t l y u s e d b y t h e G 2 0 n a t i o n s t o l e a d t h e a t t a c k o n i n t e r n a t i o n a l f i n a n c i a l c e n t r e s i s a l r e a d y l o o k i n g a t c r e a t i n g a n e w b l a c k l i s t f o r n a t i o n s t h a t h a v e e n t e r e d l e s s t h a n 1 2 T I E A s w i t h i t s m e m b e r s . F i n a n c i a l s e r v i c e s m u s t m o v e a w a y f r o m m o d e l t o d a y * E x m i n i s t e r s a y s B a h a m a s m u s t l o o k t o e x p a n d t a x i n f o r m a t i o n t r e a t y n e t w o r k a n d g o o u t p r o a c t i v e l y s e e k i n g p a r t n e r s , i n e f f o r t t o o b t a i n c o m p e n s a t i n g e c o n o m i c b e n e f i t s J a m e s S m i t hS E E p a g e 6 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r B a h a m i a n g e n e r a l i n s u r a n c e c a r r i e r s a r e a s s e s s i n g h o w t o d e a l w i t h t h e s e r i o u s p r o b l e m o f m o u n t i n g a c c o u n t s r e c e i v a b l e s o w e d t o t h e m b y b r o k e r s a n d a g e n t s , T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s w a s t o l d y e s t e r d a y , w i t h a s o l u t i o n m a d e m o r e u r g e n t b y t h e s t i p u l a t i o n s i n t h e n e w D o m e s t i c I n s u r a n c e A c t . P a t r i c k W a r d , B a h a m a s F i r s t s g r o u p p r e s i d e n t a n d c h i e f e x e c u t i v e , s a i d a l l B a h a m a s G e n e r a l I n s u r a n c e A s s o c i a t i o n ( B G I A ) c a r r i e r s w e r e l o o k i n g s e r i o u s l y a t h o w t o c o m b a t t h e r e c e i v a b l e s s i t u a t i o n , g i v e n t h a t t h e n e w A c t w i l l p l a c e t h e r e s p o n s i b i l i t y o n t h e m t o c o l l e c t a l l p r e m i u m r e v e n u e s r e g a r d l e s s o f w h e t h e r t h e y a r e p a s s e d o n b y b r o k e r s a n d a g e n t s . T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s h a d c o n t a c t e d M r W a r d a n d o t h e r i n d u s t r y e x e c u t i v e s a f t e r b e i n g t o l d t h a t o n e s o l u t i o n b e i n g p r o p o s e d b y s o m e i n s u r a n c e c a r r i e r s , w h o a r e t h e o n e s t h a t u n d e r w r i t e e a c h p o l i c y h o l d e r s r i s k , w a s t h a t t h e n e w A c t a n d i t s r e g u l a t i o n s r e q u i r e b r o k e r s a n d a g e n t s t o e s t a b l i s h e s c r o w a c c o u n t s .A c c o u n t sT h e s e a c c o u n t s w o u l d h o l d t h e p r e m i u m i n c o m e t h a t b r o k e r s a n d a g e n t s n e e d e d t o p a s s o n t o t h e u n d e r w r i t i n g c a r r i e r , o n c e t h e i r c o m m i s s i o n u s u a l l y a r o u n d 1 2 1 5 p e r c e n t h a d b e e n d e d u c t e d . U s i n g e s c r o w a c c o u n t s , s o t h e t h e o r y w e n t , w o u l d p r e v e n t a n y u n s c r u p u l o u s a g e n t s a n d b r o k e r s f r o m u s i n g t h i s p r e m i u m i n c o m e a s w o r k i n g c a p i t a l i n t h e i r b u s i n e s s e s , o r f o r a n y o t h e r p u r p o s e . M r W a r d , t h o u g h , t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t w h i l e t h e r e w a s n o o f f i c i a l c a m p a i g n t o a d o p t b r o k e r / a g e n t e s c r o w a c c o u n t s o r a n y o t h e r s o l u t i o n a s a c o m m o n p o s i t i o n . B u t I k n o w t h e r e a r e p e o p l e d i s c u s s i n g d i f f e r e n t w a y s t o d e a l w i t h a s e r i o u s p r o b l e m , M r W a r d t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s i n r e f e r e n c e t o a c c o u n t s r e c e i v a b l e s . I t i s s o m e t h i n g t h a t I k n o w a l l o f t h e c o m p a n i e s a r e l o o k i n g a t s e r i o u s l y . P e n d i n g t h e i m p l e m e n t a t i o n o f t h e n e w A c t , t h a t w i l l p l a c e t h e r e s p o n s i b i l i t y o n u s , t h e c a r r i e r , v i s a v i s t h e r e c e i p t o f p r e m i u m s , r e g a r d l e s s o f w h e t h e r w e r e c e i v e d t h e m f r o m t h e b r o k e r o r a g e n t . A c k n o w l e d g i n g t h a t e v e r y C o m p a n i e s m o v i n g t o d e a l w i t h i s s u e t h a t h a s e v e r y o n e s e r i o u s l y c o n c e r n e d , w i t h g r e a t e r u r g e n c y c a u s e d b y i m p e n d i n g n e w A c tS E E p a g e 6 BnB y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r P R I V A T E y a c h t a n d b o a t a r r i v a l s t o t h e B a h a m a s d e c l i n e d b y a r o u n d 2 0 p e r c e n t y e a r o v e r y e a r f o r 2 0 0 8 a n d i n t o t h i s y e a r , a M i n i s t r y o f T o u r i s m o f f i c i a l s a i d y e s t e r d a y , b u t j u s t a f e w m e g a y a c h t s h a v e b e e n a b l e t o b u t t r e s s s o m e F a m i l y I s l a n d m a r i n a s f r o m t h e d o w n t u r n . E a r l M i l l e r , g e n e r a l m a n a g e r o f v e r t i c a l m a r k e t s a t t h e M i n i s t r y s F o r t L a u d e r d a l e o f f i c e , s a i d t h e e c o n o m i c d o w n t u r n a n d l a s t s u m m e r s s u r g i n g f u e l c o s t s w e r e t h e c r u x o f t h e d e c l i n e . H e s a i d t h e B a h a m a s p o p u l a r f i s h i n g t o u r n a m e n t s w i l l t a k e a h i t i n t h e n u m b e r o f a t t e n d e e s c o m p a r e d t o p r e v i o u s y e a r s . B o a t i n g a r r i v a l s d o w n s o m e 2 0 % * F e w e r v e s s e l s i n F l o r i d a m a r i n a s i m p l y d e c l i n e f o r B a h a m a s * V a l e n t i n e s b u s i n e s s d o w n 1 0 % , b u t m e g a y a c h t s h e l p i n g t o b u t t r e s s d e c l i n e i n s m a l l e r b o a t v i s i t o r sS E E p a g e 4 B * S t u d y s u g g e s t s B a h a m i a n i n d u s t r y s j o b t o t a l t o c o n t r a c t b y 7 . 5 % * B u t p r o v i d e s b r i g h t e r m e d i u m t e r m o u t l o o k o v e r n e x t d e c a d e f o r n a t i o n s n u m b e r o n e s e c t o rnB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m i a n t o u r i s m i n d u s t r y h a s b e e n f o r e c a s t t o s h r i n k b y a l m o s t 1 0 p e r c e n t i n t e r m s o f i t s t o t a l e c o n o m i c o u t p u t f o r 2 0 0 9 , a l e a d i n g g l o b a l t o u r i s m o r g a n i s a t i o n h a s p r e d i c t e d , w i t h t h e s e c t o r s t o t a l j o b l e v e l s c o n t r a c t i n g b y 7 . 5 p e r c e n t . Y e t d e s p i t e t h e g l o o m y s h o r t t e r m p r o g n o s i s p r o v i d e d b y t h e W o r l d T r a v e l & T o u r i s m C o u n c i l s ( W T T C ) 2 0 0 9 f o r e c a s t f o r t h e B a h a m i a n t o u r i s m i n d u s t r y , i t a l s o o f f e r e d h o p e f o r t h e S E E p a g e 2 B R o b e r t S a n d s nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e G r a n d B a h a m a P o r t A u t h o r i t y s ( G B P A ) c h a i r m a n y e s t e r d a y c o n f i r m e d t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t h e w a s c o n s i d e r i n g r e s i g n i n g f r o m h i s p o s t , a n d i n d i c a t e d a f i n a l d e c i s i o n w o u l d b e t a k e n o n c e h e m e t w i t h m a n a g e m e n t n e x t w e e k . W h e n c o n t a c t e d b y t h i s n e w s p a p e r , F e l i x S t u b b s , w h o i s a l s o g e n e r a l m a n a g e r o f I B M ( B a h a m a s ) , s a i d : I m t h i n k i n g a b o u t i t . I h a v e n t g i v e n i n m y r e s i g n a t i o n . H e i n i t i a l l y s a i d h e w o u l d p r e f e r n o t t o d i s c u s s w h y h e w a s t h i n k i n g o f r e s i g n i n g , b u t t h e n a d d e d : W h e n I m b a c k , I m g o i n g t o s i t d o w n w i t h m a n a g e m e n t a n d a s k t h e m t o c o n s i d e r a c o u p l e o f t h i n g s . I f t h e y r e n o t p r e p a r e d t o c h a n g e c e r t a i n t h i n g s , I l l l e a v e . I t s b e e n b r e w i n g o v e r t i m e . I m b a c k o n S u n d a y , a n d s h o u l d b e i n o f f i c e o n M o n d a y . S p e a k i n g t o T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s f r o m o u t s i d e t h e B a h a m a s , M r S t u b b s a d d e d : I t h i n k t h e r e s a l o t o f o p p o r t u n i t i e s m i s s i n g a t t h e P o r t A u t h o r i t y t h a t h a v e m e c o n c e r n e d . T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s c o n t a c t e d M r S t u b b s a f t e r s e v e r a l s o u r c e s s u g g e s t e d h e w a s c l o s e t o r e s i g n i n g t h e G B P A c h a i r m a n s h i p a b o u t o n e y e a r a f t e r h e t o o k t h e p o s t . T h i s n e w s p a p e r w a s t o l d M r S t u b b s h a s o f f e r e d t o r e s i g n o n s e v e r a l p r e v i o u s o c c a s i o n s , b u t e a c h t i m e t h e o f f e r w a s e i t h e r w i t h d r a w n o r r e j e c t e d .U U n n c c l l e e a a r rI t w a s u n c l e a r p r e c i s e l y w h y h e i s m u l l i n g r e s i g n a t i o n , b u t a n u m b e r o f p e o p l e s a i d t h e y h a d b e e n e x p e c t i n g i t , f o l l o w i n g E r i k C h r i s t i a n s e n s r e s i g n a t i o n a s P o r t G r o u p L t d c h a i r m a n a n d h i s r e p l a c e m e n t b y H a n n e s B a b a k . S o m e s o u r c e s s u g g e s t e d t h a t t h e r e w a s a f e e l i n g t h a t t h e G B P A a n d P o r t G r o u p L t d c h a i r m a n s h i p s s h o u l d b e h e l d j o i n t l y b y o n e m a n , g i v e n t h a t t h e t w o c o m p a n i e s o f t e n o v e r l a p p e d . H o w e v e r , i t i s t h o u g h t t h a t M r S t u b b s r e s i g n a t i o n w o u l d n o t s i t w e l l w i t h t h e G o v e r n m e n t , e s p e c i a l l y i f M r B a b a k w e r e t o b e a p p r o v e d b y t h e G B P A B o a r d t o r e p l a c e h i m . T h e G o v e r n m e n t i s t h o u g h t t o l i k e t h e s p l i t G B P A a n d P o r t G r o u p L t d c h a i r s , g i v e n t h a t i t k e e p s t h e f o r m e r s r e g u l a t o r y / l i c e n s i n g f u n c t i o n s a w a y f r o m t h e l a t t e r s i n v e s t m e n t a c t i v i t i e s . M e a n w h i l e , s e v e r a l s o u r c e s s u g g e s t e d t h a t t h e e n d t o B r i t i s h b a n k e r R o d d i e F l e m i n g s a t t e m p t t o a c q u i r e t h e G B P A / P o r t G r o u p L t d s t a k e h e l d b y S i r J a c k H a y w a r d s f a m i l y t r u s t w a s l i k e l y t o p r o p e l i t t o t r y a n d s e t t l e t h e a l m o s t t w o a n d a h a l f y e a r o w n e r s h i p d i s p u t e w i t h t h e l a t e E d w a r d S t G e o r g e s e s t a t e . O n e s o u r c e y e s t e r d a y s u g g e s t e d t h e t w o s i d e s w e r e i n t a l k s i n L o n d o n t o e x p l o r e a P o r t c h a i r m u l l s h i s r e s i g n a t i o n S E E p a g e 2 B B U S I N E S S BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E V olume: 105 No.92FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 S P O R T S MEDIA REPORTS last night alleged that Howard K Stern would be turning himself over to police in connection with allegations he illegally obtained prescription drugs for the late Anna Nicole Smith. Stern has reportedly denied any wrongdoing. Repor ts: Howard K Ster n ‘tur ns himself in to police’ SEE page eight

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    n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net MORE than $32 million has b een collected by the Departm ent of Immigration this year, p rimarily from work permit a nd citizenship fees, it was a nnounced yesterday. A nd the department expects it will reach its goal of drawing more than $38 million in revenue by the end of the fiscal year on June 30, Director of Immigration Jack Thompson said. This makes us very proud because the prime minister has mentioned that revenue i s down,” he said. For us, our revenue is d oing extremely well.” Mr Thompson attributes the h igh revenue to the aggressive a pproach taken by the department’s team and a thorough assessment of outstanding funds over the last four years. Unpaid funds identified in an audit review found 70 New Providence companies owe a t otal of $834,718.74 to the I mmigration Department, w hile another 24 companies i n the capital are currently b eing audited. I n Grand Bahama more than $1 million in unpaid fees is owed to the department. M r Thompson said: “The department proposes to notify all companies of this in writing and we will give them a time t o settle the outstanding accounts, or arrange a payment plan. But of course, we wish for t hem to settle the outstanding a ccounts.” Much revenue is lost when a l etter from the Immigration D epartment guaranteeing an employer a work permit for their employee upon condi tion of payment within 30 days is used to hire foreign workers before paying the government, Mr Thompson said. I think we need to look at t hat,” he said. “I have strong l y advocated that we should just issue an invoice aso pposed to a letter, and it may j ust be the way to go.” Enforcement is also vital to e nsure the payment of fees, a nd Mr Thompson said i nspectorate teams could be sent to building sites and areasw here foreign workers may be e mployed to ensure permits have been paid for. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX M AIN/SPORTS SECTION L ocal News..........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,12 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 B USINESS SECTION B usiness.........................................P1,2,3,4,6 Advt............................................................P5 Comics........................................................P7W eather.......................................................P8 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES U SA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES The Department of Immigration collects $32 million this year A MAN drove himself to the hospital after he was shot several times in the back in broadd aylight by someone he knows. T he 31-year-old man told police he was in Farrington Road when the gunman approached and shot him several times in the upper back ata round 2pm on Wednesday. He drove his car to the Princess Margaret Hospital, where he is now listed in serious con dition, however his injuries are not life threat e ning. P olice are appealing for information from the public to assist the investigation. If you have any information in relation to this i ncident call police on 322-4444, 911, or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-8477. Man drives himself to hospital after being shot Money primarily coming from work permit, citizenship fees DIRECTOR OF IMMIGRATION Jack Thompson

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    C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 3 n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net IN ANattempt to defend the legacy of Sir Lynden Pindling following a controversial article published about the former prime minister, activist and PLP hopeful Paul Moss plans to d emonstrate outside T he Trib une n ext week. Mr Moss said it is important f or supporters of Sir Lynden to s peak out, as the late former prime minister is not alive to defend his own name. Memory He echoed statements made earlier this week by PLP leaderP erry Christie, saying that because he was the father of the nation, Sir Lynden's mem-o ry should be protected against u nfounded attacks. "As a citizen I was just offended by the managing editor and I thought that since he has freedom of expression to write what he wrote, that I exer c ise my freedom of expression, freedom of movement, of assembly – which are all funda m ental freedoms guaranteed by the constitution, Articles 15 to 27. "And to let it be known that d espite the opinion of Mr Marquis of Bahamians and also of Sir Lynden, I want it to be known that I will stand up and d efend his legacy," Mr Moss s aid yesterday. Article The demonstration – sched uled for Tuesday at 10am – is not planned to disparage the character of The Tribune's man aging editor John Marquis, Mr Moss said, but to allow those affronted by the article to express themselves in a public forum. H e is not sure what the turnout will be but stressed that it would be a peaceful, non-vio l ent demonstration. "This demonstration is not one to invite people to come out there and disparage them anaging editor but to just e xercise the freedom of speech. "One of the legacies of Sir Lynden, is he has an anti-violence stance. Sir Lynden was able to lead this nation, a nation of minority rule, to a nation of majority rule without the shedd ing of blood. " I believe that in spite of all that has transpired in the life of S ir Lynden, he is the father of t his nation and that we ought to g ive him the respect, particularly in his death, that he deserves. "For me personally I know he was responsible, with a group of people, and ushered in a new and modern Bahamas.I think it is prudent for persons to stand up, particularly since he's not here to stand up for himself. Earlier this week, an explos ive Insight article titled 'The t ragic young pilot who knew too much', told the story of the l ate Chauncey Tynes Jr, who w ent missing in 1983 when p iloting a flight from Exuma to Nassau. His father, Chauncey Tynes Sr, told The Tribune he believes his son was murdered because he knew too much of the asso ciation between Sir Lynden and t he Colombian drug czar Joe Lehder. THREE men accused of raping a 19-year-old womanw ere arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Anthony Sullivan, 24, of Kenwood Street; Jumell Wallace, 24, of Podeleo Street, and Nekos Kemp, 25, of Malcolm Road west, werea rraigned before Magistrate Susan Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau Street, on the rape charge. It is alleged that the three men committed the offence o n Sunday, March 1, 2009. T he accused were not r equired to enter a plea to t he rape charge. Sullivan and Wallace were each granted bail in the sum of $5,000.K emp, who according to the prosecution has a pending rape case before the courts, w as denied bail and remande d to Her Majesty’s Prison. T he case has been adjourned to August 13. A 38-year-old man accused of fraudulentlyo btaining nearly $11,000 was arraigned in a Magistrate’s C ourt yesterday. Court dockets allege that Jason Antonio Sands on Wednesday, February 4, 2009 w ith the intent to defraud, o btained from SaveCo Trading Company Limited at Tay lor Street, Nassau Village, t wo LG 52 LCD television sets valued at $5,120. It is further alleged that on W ednesday, January, 26, 2009 t he accused, with the intent to defraud, obtained from Bristol Cellars Group ofC ompanies on East Street 200 cartons of Rothmans blue cigarettes valued at $5,550. S ands, who was arraigned before Magistrate Susan Sylvester in Court 11, NassauS treet, pleaded not guilty to t he charges and was granted bail in the sum of $10,000. The case has been adjourned t o August 13. TWO men are wanted by Abaco police for questioning in connection with string of crim inal offences. B oth should be considered armed and extremely dangerous and should be approached with caution. Makines ‘Cell’ Francois, 18, of Treasure Cay, Abaco and Peardale, Nassau is wanted for questioning in connection with a kidnapping and robbery case. Christopher Livingstone Burnside, 42, of Southside Road, Murphy Town, Abaco, is wanted for questioning in connection with shop breaking and stealing allegations. Francois is 5ft 7ins, has dark brown skin, w eighs around 130lbs, and has short hair. Burnside is 5ft 3ins, has dark brown skin, long dreadlocks, weighs 105lbs and has a scar on the left side of his face. If you have any information concerning these men contact Abaco police immediately on 242367-2560, 242-367-3437, or 911. Or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 3288477. A HANDGUN and 15 rounds of live ammunitionw ere found by Drug Enforce ment Unit officers when they searched a car on CableB each on Wednesday. Officers recovered the .9mm handgun and ammunit ion when they stopped and searched two men in a black Nissan Maxima as they drove through Sea Beach Estates, off West Bay Street, at around 4pm. A 30-year-old man of Ida Street and a 25-year-old manof Sunshine Park are in police custody and are being questioned in connection with the discovery. INSIGHT WHAT YOURE SAYING ABOUT THAT N O W F AMOUS INTER VIEW SO WHA T do T r ibune readers think about t he Sir L ynden Pindling-Joe Lehder controversy? D on’ t miss Monday’ s INSIGHT FEEDBACK, the biggest response ever to an Insight article. THE dispute over Sir Lynden Pindling’s birth continued yesterday w hen a middle-aged woman from E ast Street claimed his biological m other was definitely Haitian. T he 55-year-old woman said a sister of Pindling’s nominal mother, Viola Pindling (formerly Bain her categorically that Viola was not his real mother. “I knew Viola’s sister Sybil well and she told me that Lynden was born in Bain Town to a Haitian woman. His father Arnold (a Jamaican left the mother with the child to return to Jamaica, then came backt o Nassau later to join the police force. “He then took the child from the Haitian woman and gave it to Viola, whom he m arried. I don’t know w hether Lynden went to J amaica for schooling or w hat happened to his Haitian mother.” The woman’s disclosure came in the wake of former senior police officer Errington Watkins’ claim that Pindling’s mother was Jamaican. She said this was not so but agreed with Mr Watkins that Pindling was born in Bain Town. S peculation over whether Sir Lynden was truly a Bahamian has been circulating for years. In last Monday’s controversial Insight article, f ormer PLP treasurer C hauncey Tynes Sr said P indling was born in J amaica and came to Nassau as a boy. The Tribune’s latest source, who lives off East Street, said neither Viola Pindling nor her siblings Sybil, Drucilla and Eugene had children. “They are all dead n ow, and Sybil and Eugene died within three days of each other some y ears ago. “But I think the truth should be told about these things. Because he was prime minister, the nation has a right to know where he came from. But the PLP always tried to cover i t up like they try to cover everything e lse up.” I n 1973, Pindling responded to speculation among politicians by producing a birth certificate showing he was born in Nassau. However, his birth was registered nearly 17 years after the event and he refused to be drawn when a reporter asked if he had sworn an affidavit to support his applicationf or a passport. His true origins are considered significant among political observersb ecause of his Bahamianisation programme and his anti-foreign rhetoric during political campaigns. Three men charged with rape of 19-year-old Handgun, live ammunition found aftercar search In brief Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 3221986 and shar e your stor y. Woman claims Sir Lynden Pindling’s biological mother was definitely Haitian PLP hopeful plans demonstration outside of The Tribune next week Sir Lynden Pindling P olice in Abaco seek two men for questioning Paul Moss

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    EDITOR, The Tribune. The 2007 annual report of the Hospitals Board tabled in Parliament last December raises some important public interest issues. One of those issues is whether the Hospitals Board has the ability to function as a regulator of private hospitals and clinics under the Hospital and Health Care Facilities Act,1 998. For example, the Hospitals Board has a duty under the Act to investigate a complaint into the “management, diagnosis, and treatment” of a patient in a hospital or clinic licensed by the Hospitals Board. But it seems the Hospitals Board’s view is that it licenses the building and its facilities, and not the quality of health care services provided. The Act i tself defines a hospital as “a building where beds are available for the admission of persons requiring treatment for any sickness.” Experts say this description is not adequate. It does not require a central legal entity that is responsible and account able for all medical services pro vided under its roof. That structure, according to advisers, would be in the best interest of the community for the obvious reasons of safety and ethics. There is a disconnect here which can adversely affect qual ity assurance in medical treat m ent. Medical advisers to Bahamas Patient Advocacy see a hospital as an institution which accepts patients for medical treatment, within an organisation with a centralised authority responsible for quality assurance in the delivery of healthcare services. It should be the medical ser vices that are being licensed not just the building in order to properly reflect the modern concept of what a hospital is. The public needs a single source of accountability in healthcare facilities, and a licensing board to enforce it. On this basis, a hospital”, together with its medical services, needs a regulatory definition as a single (legal Under current law, private hospitals may function as a collection of independent physicians providing medical services, by having practicing privileges, in a building providing beds and nursing services, among other things. The patients would then be admitted as patients of the individual physician. Sections of the building may be leased or managed by different corpo-r ate entities, providing other medical services. This structure diffuses authority and accountability. For instance, the Act requires that a healthcare facility should (among other things sufficient numbers of qualified staff who can administer appro priate care to the patients admitted. But if a hospital is a building with beds, without medical m anagement authority, and m edical services are provided b y independent doctors, can “the hospital” exercise authority to restrict admissions to only those patients that “hospital” is able to treat? Or can a private hospital make the appropriate medical staff available, if there is no overall authority that employs or manages medical profess ionals at the hospital? BPA advisers say that a new institutional definition is required, making it clear that a hospital is a single interest entity accountable for the medical services provided there. A hospital has to uphold its own inter est beyond the interests of independent professionals and enti ties within it. This would place the hospital in a proper posi tion to oversee the safe delivery of healthcare services. A hospital also needs to have an internal quality management structure, which can immediately respond to any concerns arising. To do this, a hospital needs to collect data on all patients admitted in order to know whether its operating units are doing a good job, and it needs sufficient qualified staff to enable it to respond. The interests of the patient, the doctors, and the hospital, must be one seamless and single interest, to improve patient out comes. That is the purpose ofa hospital. Usually a hospital has a Chief of Medical Staff, or Chief Medical Officer (CMO has the authority to ensure the competency of the doctors practising there. The CMO also has responsibility for the integrity of the hospital system. That integrity would include an effective “call” system, to ensure that all patients have medical care available 24/7, so no patient, in crisis, is left unattended. In public health care, a CMO would, or should, resign in the event of such a “systems failure”. Should a private heath care facility, not also be held to a similar standard of accountability? The licensing board of hospitals and clinics should require an independent audit of their health care services by an outside review body. This external accreditation could also be used by a hospital to enhance its credentials and image. The Hospitals Board could thus carry out its quality assuranceoversight function at no expense to the Board, or challenge to its limit ed resources. But the 2007 report proposes changes to the Act that would seriously weaken the Hospitals Board as an oversight body. The Board wants the Government to amend the Act to remove the provision for investigation of complaints, elimi nate the need to provide notifications of deaths, and reduce penalties for failure to complyw ith licensing requirements. But at the same time, the Hospitals Board is also propos ing a new and extensive set of hospital regulations. So, on the one hand, the Board says it wants to reduce its oversightr esponsibility, but on the other h and, it wants to increase regu latory requirements? The BPA advocates that the Board’s oversight capacity be strengthened, and that the Hospital Board embrace its oversight function of quality assurance, as per the petition on its website below. We urge our Parliamentari ans to consider the Hospitals Board’s report in terms of the public interest in a safe system of health care, and oversight assurance of this. Good business sense should dictate that the more confidence the public has in our local institutions including statutory boards the less likely we will be to spend our money abroad for medical care. Bahamas Patient Advocacy www.bahamaspatientadvocacy.org Nassau, March 6, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm EVERY picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. The one on the front of yesterd ay’s N assau Guardian w as worth ten thousand at least, probably more. I t showed five senior members of the Prog ressive Liberal Party, including its leader Perr y Christie, sitting solemnly at a press confer ence called to denounce The Tribune’s managi ng editor John Marquis and the Insight article he wrote about the late Sir Lynden Pindling a nd his alleged links with the Colombian drug czar Joe Lehder. T he looks on their faces were reminiscent of those of George Custer and his last remaining o fficers at the Battle of Little Big Horn. Boy, did they look grim. All were presumably there out of duty to bolster the fast-fading legacy of the late Sir Lynden, a man who brought shame and oppro-b rium on the Bahamas by presiding over the drug-addled 1980s, when thousands of locall ives were destroyed by the cocaine trade. All looked distinctly uncomfortable in their role. And all looked like they would far rather have been somewhere else. Mr Christie led the attack on The Tribune , c alling the Insight article “garbage” and denouncing Mr Marquis in the most personalt erms. Listening to him speak, one could truly believe that he was a lifelong supporter of Lynd en Pindling, and an unshakeable proponent of his cause. Interesting, then, to note that when Mr Christie was fired from Pindling’s Cabinet in 1984, he took the prime minister to task for l eading the country into a steep decline. Both he and the current prime minister, H ubert Ingraham, were fired by Pindling at the very point where they were about to resign b ecause they could no longer stomach the cor ruption of his administration. So far from being a rock solid supporter of the late prime minister, Mr Christie along withMr Ingraham was among his most dogged c ritics. Look down the line of glum-faced so-called Pindlingites’ as they tried gallantly but vainly to hold Sir Lynden’s tattered image aloft and you s ee more examples of extreme disillusionment. Take Fred Mitchell, for instance, who burned a copy of the Bahamas constitution and sent the ashes to Pindling, declaring them to be symbolic of the destruction the then prime minister w as causing in the Bahamas. In the picture, Mitchell looks deeply troub led and perplexed. Perhaps he was wondering what he was doing there in view of the fact that h e had conducted a protracted campaign against Sir Lynden, even to the point of threatening to disclose secrets about his private life. N ext to him sits Glenys Hanna-Martin, also looking distinctly uneasy about her part in this c lumsily orchestrated charade. That’s no surprise because her father Arthur Hanna, now G overnor General, resigned as deputy prime minister in 1984 because he saw it as “the only honourable course of action” and after the commission report advised Sir Lynden to do the same. C onsider also the slightly embarrassed look of Dr Bernard Nottage. What was he doing there? O ne might well wonder, given the fact that he a bandoned the PLP after failing to get the part y leadership in 1997 and spent most of his years in the political wilderness berating many of his f ormer colleagues. It’s hard to believe that he is a committed f an of the ‘Father of the Nation’, especially as his ill-starred Coalition for Democratic Reforma dvocated a break from Pindling-style highhandedness. T he fifth face of gloom belonged to Vincent Peet. His feelings about Sir Lynden are not known. So what, then, are we to make of this collection of Pindling detractors? W ere they there simply to shore up the reputation of the one figure that seems to unitet he PLP nowadays? Are they coming to realise that, without the Pindling myth to cling to, they are a spent force whose useful life is long past? We fear so because the truth is that the socalled New PLP blew its opportunity for true r eform between 2002 and 2007. The party showed itself to be just as hopeless as it hade ver been a disorganised group who had failed to keep faith with the people. P erry Christie, pleasant man though he is, proved an unmitigated calamity as prime minister, allowing a herd of headstrong ministers to run wild and cause havoc for his government during its entire term in office. T he PLP now finds itself with a major problem on its hands. It has to convince an increas-i ngly smart electorate that Pindling was a good thing for this country when all of the evidence s uggests otherwise. Sure, Pindling had his virtues. He did some positive things in his early years. But all his achievements were overshadowed by the immense damage caused during the 1980s, when t he Bahamas almost went under because of the drug trade. I f the PLP really wants to regain power, it has to turn its back on the idlers and deadbeats w ho have traditionally been an important part of its support structure and strive for better, nobler standards. It needs to put behind it the drug factions who have relied on it for sustenance and support over many decades, and s quash the attitude of entitlement in the party promoted by Pindling’s days in power. B y trying to buttress the image of Sir Lynden Pindling when evidence of his wrong-doing m ounts by the day, the PLP is merely confirming what its fiercest critics know all too well: that despite the embarrassments of its past the par-t y is determined to drag Pindling’s soiled lega cy into the future. W hat the party has failed to take into account is that the Bahamas is no longer a nation of i mpressionable dumbheads who are willing to be bamboozled by men in sharp suits and fancy watches. When is a hospital a hospital? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Five leading PLPs see no evil EDITOR, The Tribune. I can recall the period not so long ago when all of the “big” countries of the world decided that not they, but other countries should be responsible for policing the tax laws of those “big” countries. At the time there was a very real fear that the effect of the position taken by those countries would lead to the collapse of this country’s second financial pillar Financial Services. The Bahamas acted very quickly (and foolishly in some “educated” people’s minds) to “correct” what were viewed as deficiencies in its regulatory regime. Now there is major rumbling from our neighbour to the North that countries like The Bahamas, these so-called “tax havens”, need to be added to anoth er list, despite all the efforts taken and being taken by countries like The Bahamas to co-operate and share information. Not to mention the myriad of bi-lateral and multi-lateral international agreements (drafted by the “big” countries a party to and are complying with. The reality is that the steps taken by The Bahamas with respect to regulating financial services, in many instances is far superior, wide-ranging and better enforced than a lot of those “big” countries (can anyone say ENRON, CITIGROUP, Housing and mortgage crisis, Madoff?). Yet, we and other small states continue to take the blame for the ineffec tiveness of these “big” countries, with all of the resources that they have, to police the financial transactions of their citizens. It seems to me that regardless of any and all of the efforts that this country takes as a responsible member of the international community, it will just never be enough. Sometimes I get the feeling that the view from our “obvious Superiors” is that this country should not respect its own laws (which it is entitled to apply over the laws of any other country) and that only their laws are important or worth obeying. In my view, the move by the United States and other “big” countries is actually very shortsighted. Does anyone out there other than me see the unintended consequences of the US legislation to “stop tax haven abuse” to The Bahamas? Let’s think about it: (1 they will not only “walk lightly and carry a big stick” but now they will use that “big stick” to pound the economies of the “obviously banana republic-like” “tax-haven” countries into the ground (which they have a moral right to do because after all these are the places where their citizens are “hiding” their taxable income and wealth, and for some unfathomable reason, they just can’t seem to stop them from doing so); (2 destroyed. The Bahamas is on the hit list, so of course, its second pillar comes crashing down. Many are left jobless as the few financial services providers that remain in the aftermath simply can’t absorb them all. The tourism sector in this climate of finan cial uncertainty can’t absorb anyone either. What to do? (3 The Bahamas can’t pay its bills and now has to prioritise where to spend its scarce resources. Many services are diminished, as there is simply not enough to go around. Somewhere in this mix is the obligation the country has to maintain the OPBAT operations with the US and Turks & Caicos, not to mention the regular patrols of its borders to stop not only the drug trafficker but the illegal immigrant...How the country will pay for these things, God only knows... Does anyone else see where I'm going with this? I certainly don't advocate illegal activity, but at some point common-sense (which everyone knows is not very common) needs to come into play. Could the problem in fact not be the “tax haven” but the failure of the regulators in the “big” countries to do their “important” jobs properly, if at all? In closing, I have two well-used and perhaps applicable adages to say to the “Big Fathers and Mothers” out there who continue to treat countries like ours as recalcitrant children: “Don’t cut off your nose to spite your face” and “Clean your own doorstep before you try to clean mine”. Enough said. I remain forever grateful, but wary and weary in Nassau. WEARY Nassau, March 4, 2009. US legislation to stop tax haven abuse

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    n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A DESCENDENT of slaves at the Whylly plantation in C lifton Pier claims to have been offered nothing more than slave’s work at the new Clifton Heritage National Park. But Vivian Whylly, 47, of Cable Beach, Nassau, is certi-f ied in eco-tourism planning and tour guide training and has led scores of students and visitors on historical tours of thef ormer plantation before it was declared a national park. A nd the father-of-three maintains he was an integral part of the campaign to preserve the area and was knighted by the Sovereign Order of Saint J ohn of Jerusalem because of h is ancestry, historical knowle dge and dedication to protect the former plantation. However he claims the Clifton Heritage Authority will now only offer him workc leaning toilets and weeding t he gardens. Mr Whylly believes he has become embroiled in a political issue as he campaigned to establish the national parku nder the PLP government, but was overlooked when the Clifton Heritage Authority was s et up under the FNM admini stration in 2007. He said: “They are talking like their hands are tied but there are no tied hands, they are tying their own hands. “Politics are holding them u p, but whether it is the PLP or FNM in power, I am a descen dent of the slaves and I would enhance what they are doing. “In any other country a descendent of something like t his would be looked at as s omething other than a problem.” Mr Whylly is keen to honour his legacy and share his intimate knowledge of the for-m er plantation by telling the real story’ to visitors. He said: “The real story about the Whylly plantation is a bout William Whylly, a loyalist who came from Americaa nd stayed on the side of the B ritish. He was the first chief justice and became the attorney general and an advocate of the s laves.” Through his research at the National Archives, Mr Whyllyl earned William Whylly b ought the Clifton plantation in 1811 when slave trader James Moss, the previous owner of the land, was forced to a uction the site to pay a fine for his cruel treatment of slaves. William Whylly, a Methodist convert, was the first in the B ahamas to write a list of r ules, regulations and entitlem ents for his slaves in 1815, including the right for slaves to own property, be baptised, and buried, Mr Whylly said. The plantation owner wrote t o the British African Society i n 1817 advocating the rights of slaves, and in 1821 became the first in the country to produce a register of his slaves, Mr Whylly said. T he register has allowed him to trace his heritage back to his great-great-great-grandm other Esther Whylly. H e said: “I need the Clifton Heritage Authority to realise there is a true story about the Whylly heritage, and there is a Bahamian descendent of the slaves who has the documentsa nd is being overlooked. “This is what I am living to do and I would like to be able to tell this story, I want to bring it to life.” Clifton Heritage Authority c hairman Senator Jacinta Higg s did not return calls before The Tribune went to press. BY the end of May, one lucky young woman will make h istory as the first ever Miss Bahamas Global and head off to represent the country at ani nternational pageant. T he new talent focused pageant aims to give ladies between ages 17 and 26 a plat-f orm to display not just their physical beauty but also the ways in which they are positive r ole models, leaders and ambas sadors for a worthy cause. According to pageant director Desiree Tynes-Moss, a priority f or the organisers was to make sure the pageant would be fair ly judged. As a former model and pageant contestant, I’ve seen various sides of the industry andI want to sensitise the public of the positive aspects of pageantry,” said Mrs Tynes-M oss. “As the mother of a young daughter, I consider each of the contestants my own and would not want them in a posi-t ion where they would not feel comfortable. “Overall, I think this pageant will be successful when we havea calibre of ladies who will represent not only the country but represent what today’s young women should aspire to be like. Right now, we have a few girls who found out about our pageant but we are still accept ing more contestants especially those from the Family Islands or those who may be living away and be back home in time for the event.” Mrs Tynes-Moss said the Miss Global Bahamas Organisation’s a im is to empower young ladies by providing real opportunities for them to excel through expo-s ure. S he noted that while there will be a scholarship and cash prize for the overall winner,s elf-appreciation is more important. “We seek to instill self confid ence, good moral values, national pride, emphasis on per sonal character and leadership, thus preparing young ladies today for the road ahead tomorr ow,” said Mrs Tynes-Moss. “Like we say in our motto, we seek empowerment throughp ageantry, creating opportunit ies and changing lives. For one young woman, when she wins this crown she will not be justa nother beauty queen but a living part of history.” More information on the M iss Global Bahamas Pageant can be found at www.missglob albahamas.com. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 5 Plantation descendant accuses Clifton Heritage Authority of offering ‘slave’s work’ at park VIVIAN WHYLLY with the 1820 list of slaves at the Whylly plantation including his great-great-great grandmother’s name, Esther Whylly. Gunman r obs Yamacraw Convenience Store PMH sur gical clinics closed CORRECTION In brief AN ARMED robber with a C reole-Bahamian accent held u p an employee of the Yamacraw Convenience Store and stole cash from the shop on Wednesday afternoon. It was broad daylight when the gunman burst into the storei n Yamacraw, southeast New Providence, wielding a gun. He threatened the shopkeeper with the weapon and d emanded cash before fleeing the area heading east at around 3.45pm. The robber was wear-i ng blue jeans and a white Tshirt at the time. He got away with an unde t ermined amount of cash. Police are appealing for information from the public to assist ongoing investigations.I f you have any information which may led to apprehension of the gunman, call police on 3 22-4444, 911, or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 3288477. n BY DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net POLICE are offering a reward for information concerning the whereabouts of GARRAN GIBSON. Asst Supt Clarence Reckley said police are hop ing that the public can help them in locating the man, whois wanted for questioning in connection with several criminal matters on Grand Bahama. The man should be consid ered armed and dangerous and should be approached with caution, he said. The police can be contacted by dialling: 911, 352-1919, 3528224 or 351-9991. WANTED Miss Global Bahamas Pageant set to take off in May SURGICAL clinics at the Princess Margaret Hospital will be closed today, with the exception of the antenatal clin-i c and Dr A Sawyer’s nephrolo gy clinic. Anyone who has an appointment scheduled for today should contact the clinic on 322-2861 to resechdule. The hospital apologises for any inconvenience caused. AN opinion piece on pages 10 and 11 of yesterday’s Tribune was mistak enly published without attribution. The article was in fact the second in a series discussing the potential opportunities for the Bahamas in the emerging green economy, which will be running on Thursdays over the next two months. Colin Lightbourn, the author of the series, is a real estate business owner, developer and past president of the Bahamas National Trust. To comment, discuss and submit ideas about these articles, visit: www.the greenislands.com “In any other country a descendent of something like this would be looked at as something other than a problem.” Vivian Whylly

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    n By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com T H ESE days, maniac al criminals are increasingly using guns as their weapon of choice as they disrupt the serenity of our once tranquil islands, going on murderous rampages, robbing families of l oved ones and callously c ommitting heinous crimes w ith no regard for the law. The wave of gun violence that appears to be sweeping across the streets of New Providence week after week has left many residents terrified by the thought that this s mall island is becoming like t he Wild West as we are con stantly inundated withr eports of the grisly carnage caused by gun violence or t old about high-speed chases and dramatic gun battles between rival gangs or of e mboldened outlaws engaging the police in gun fights. A few weeks ago, gunshots were fired from a car in broad daylight at police on West Bay Street. Three days before that, anotherg roup of hoodlums reportedly engaged police in a s hootout in the Montagu dist rict. Although there have been n umerous other incidents this year, last weekend a s hooting in a crowded nightclub at Arawak Cay left one man dead. T he growing trend of antisocial behaviour is rapidlyl eading to a state of social c haos, where boorish persons barbarously roam the streets like wild animals engaging in feral, homicidal behaviour toi ndulge their unabated anger. The senseless actions of uncivilised, dim-witted per s ons are rapidly casting the Bahamas in the image of a crime-ravaged hellhole on the brink of social implosion.T here is no wonder why B ahamians stricken by fear have voluntarily chosen to live in virtual impris onment, locked behind iron bars (windows and screens, and sheltered behind iron gates. In their state of paralysis, law-abiding Bahamians have become more distrustful and are swiftly arming themselves with cutlasses, shotguns, bats and other safety measures to ensure their security. Admittedly, I am a licensed gun owner and I support the right of Bahamians to legally bear arms, par ticularly in instances such as hunting or self-defence. The Bahamas, a country with strict gun laws, has seena proliferation of guns/ammunition on its streets that I’m told are easily accessible and for hire to any deranged criminal. Undoubtedly, spiralling street warfare in this coun try particularly New Prov i dence is fuelled by the a larmingly high importation/smuggling and circulation of illegal firearms (from assault rifles to handguns) primarily from the United S tates, that has given rise not o nly to the lawless behaviour that we now see but also to a ‘black market’ that profits ont he trade of illegal weapons. Frankly, the easy availability of handguns is dis maying and a national issue that should be effectively a ddressed. The illegal f irearms sale and smuggling operations within the archi-p elago have led to a number o f killings of youngsters most likely with drugs, money or women as the central figure of a dispute andc reated a breeding ground for the criminal element (drug traffickers, gangs, migrant workers, terrorists, organised crime, etc) to access these dangerous weapons and cause mayhem. N ational Security Minist er Tommy Turnquest, in a s peech to the CARICOMUS Partnership to Combat Illicit Trafficking in ArmsS eminar, held in Nassau, said that the illegal trade in small arms, light weapons and ammunition was creating an “illicit trafficking phenomenon” as the illegal migrant and drug trade has created a single criminal enterprise. According to Mr Turnquest: "Such criminal enterprises are engaging persons across national borders in much the same way that legitimate multi-national businesses do, bringing serious distortion to the concept of globalisation. "Whether arms in such enterprises are exchanged for money or for drugs, or are used to protect illicit shipments of persons or com mit murders, assaults, robberies and other crimes; to intimidate and threaten and to enhance status, or other reasons, they contribute to the widespread availability of firearms in the region.” The Bahamas is extremely vulnerable to the trafficking of nearly all illicit items including small arms and automatic weapons pri marily due to its central location between the air and sea routes of North and South/Central America as well as Europe. Sadly, it seems that our strict gun laws may only affect those law-abiding citi zens, as thousands of hand guns remain in circulation a nd outlaws are constantly p acking heat, while striking fear into the hearts of already caged-in residents. It is high-time we implement gun trade-in and buy-back p rogrammes, similar to those a dopted by cities such as Atlantic City, to encourage persons to fork over illegalf irearms to the authorities. Furthermore, a conscientious effort must be made to curb the importation of other p otentially lethal weapons such as low power air pistols, replica guns and paintball g uns. I nstead of pontificating a bout petty political matters, the church could have a hugei mpact in the fight against v iolent crime and the removal of guns from the streets. Indeed, there should be an amnesty period where unlicensed gun toters can feel protected if they take a gun t o one of the many churches i n our communities. Furthermore, in taking guns off t he streets, we must launch a p ractical, effective campaign t hat incorporates the government, the private sector and the public. There should not be a hint of the petty politics and political gimmicks portrayed by many self-serving politi c ians! In the Bahamas, we may soon need to establish an agency or department similart o the Alcohol, Tobacco and F irearms (ATF the US, whose sole purposew ould be to gain intelligence a nd crackdown on the ille gal weapons trade. These days, it is impera tive that the police force con t inue upgrading its armaments as I continue to see officers on the beat without bulletproof vests and carry ing six-shooter revolvers that they hope would counter the sophisticated, high-powered w eaponry of criminals that wear body armour and carry guns with magazines that hold 15 or more rounds. Police officers must be heavily deployed in those boroughs with the highest i nstances of crime and must s trengthen their relationship w ith certain communities and thereby better their intelligence-gathering abilities. THE PHARMACY A T PMH AND THE E YE WARD I RECENTLYhad an accident that led to me convalescing at Princess Margaret Hospital for severa l days. I was able to witness firsthand the frustration ofp atients and others waiting at the hospital’s pharmacy for their medication. Although the hospital c laims that the pharmacy is facing challenges particularly in staffing a number o f the pharmacists on duty a dopt a nonchalant, haughty a ttitude when dealing with patients. H owever, I must say thank y ou to a very accommodating pharmacist Daniel who rendered impeccable service to myself and several others. M oreover, the eye ward at Princess Margaret Hospi-t al must be one of the most e fficiently run wings of that institution. Although I had a room, when I was being encour a ged to “go private” or move to Doctors Hospital, I stayed because I had established a rapport with the nurses and also because of the concern and absolute pro fessionalism that they had d isplayed. I left PMH with several more friends and I would especially like to thank nurses Ferguson, Sturrup, Hep burn and Griffin as well as my doctors and the sup port staff for the superb c are and outstanding service t hat I received. C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 'LG\RXNQRZ"2QHRIWKHOHDGLQJFDXVHVRIGHDWKDPRQJFKLOGUHQ &$1&(5
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    C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 7 n bn n t b"b br"r tn tn btf T HE global economic crisis is a major test of the CARICOM Single Market and Economy and the region, Barbados Prime Minister David Thompson said. He said Caribbean countries need to deepen their collaboration and focus on regional commitments and partnerships. Speaking at the Fifth P rime Ministerial SubC ommittee Meeting on the CARICOM Single M arket and Economy ( CSME) on Wednesday in Belize City, Belize, M r Thompson noted that t hese are “challenging t imes” and warned that the effects of the global financial and economicd ownturn will not bypass the region. “today we face the repercussions of an u nparalleled global economic crisis centred in the developed world, but o ne which will not e scape us. We must a gain rely on our regional commitments andp artnerships. This of c ourse is one of the major tests of the Single Market and Economy.Let us determine to shore up the weaker links of our union, be it regulation and oversight o f the financial sector or i ntra-regional transportation,” Mr Thomps on said. Action He stressed the need f or those attending the meeting to discuss corrective action and reviewt imelines where neces sary and also called for the completion of the Strategic Plan for theS ingle Economy in order t o appropriately co-ordi nate national efforts to accomplish objectives. We have the occasion to look at the decisions we have taken prior to this juncture and toe xamine their effectiven ess in light of the recessionary forces at work in the global economy. Our responsibility in this subcommittee is to steer this initiative to our destination with purposefulness and for the betterment of all our people,” he said. The Barbadian prime minister, as the lead head of government with responsibility for the CSME, chaired the meeting. Bharrat Jagdeo and Drs Runaldo Vene tiaan, presidents of Guyana and Suriname respectively; Dean Barrow, prime minister of Belize and chair of the Conference of Heads of Government of CARI COM; Roosevelt Skerrit, prime minister of Dominica; Bruce Golding, prime minister of Jamaica; Tillman Thomas, prime minister of Grenada, and Dr Denzil Douglas, prime minister of St Kitts and Nevis, participated in the meeting. Saint Lucia and St Vincent and the Grenadines were also represented. Discussions at the meeting focused on the Single Market Implementation Audit which would determine the lev-el of commitment of member states to the CSME, and contingent rights to be accorded persons who can now freely move and work within the region. Heads of government have approved nine categories for free movement of skills – artists, musicians, university graduates, media work ers, sportspersons, teachers, nurses, holders of associate degrees and equivalent qualifications, and artisans who have received a Caribbean Vocational Qualification (CVQ n ByELAN HUTCHINSON AND GREG SMITH A N INCREASING number of B ahamian students are questioning w hether a college degree is still the way to go during this ongoing economic slump, an informal poll by The Tribune has shown. Many students at the College of the Bahamas said they have been directly hit by the recession and are suffering the consequences. S everal students who talked to T he T ribune s aid they are concerned that they will have to discontinue their studies because they fear that all the energy and money they are spending on their e ducation could be in vain if the job market does not recover in the near future. O thers said that they may have to sett le for a “mediocre profession” while t hey wait for the country’s economy to m ake a comeback. A lexavia Dean, a 18-year-old student in her second semester of college, said h er mother was recently laid off from A tlantis. A sked if her mother losing her job at t he Paradise Island resort had affected h er college career in any way, Ms Dean said: “I was ever struggling, I mean she f ound a next job, but I don’t know, this c aused me to lose a little bit of hope, you k now.” Like Ms Dean, a number of college students have found themselves struggling during these tough economic times and as a result they have since taken on t he not-so-easy task of finding a job. W hile some students are close to d espairing, others are still persistent in pursuing their career aspirations, although their ‘dream jobs’ may be in low demand at the moment. Thomas Barnett, a hospitality tourism management major, had much to sayo n the topic of the recession affecting his career choice. He said he will continue to pursue a career in tourism because iti s his passion. Mr Barnett said he would even cut back on “partying” in an effort to save funds to help his parents pay tuition f ees. For the tourism major, the recession has meant that he has become more r esponsible with money and more dilig ent in planning ahead for his future. n B y INDI MCLYMONT-LAFAYETTE for Panoscope, a series of Panos Caribbean THE Bahamas government is moving to put measures in placet o help extremely vulnerable islands adjust to what one official called a possible “death sentence for small islands”. Phillip Weech, director of the Bahamas Environmental Science and Technology (BEST mission, said that the government is working on an energy policy, exploring alternative sources of energy as well as more sustain able tourism options in a bid to prepare the more than 700 islands for the possible effects of climate change. “Bahamas has no national energy policy ... we have prepared it and are doing public consulta tions to take it forward,” said Mr Weech, who was addressing a workshop put on by the UN Economic Commission on Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC ity of doing a review on the economics of climate change in the Caribbean. The Caribbean is regarded as one of the regions that will be most affected by climate change and the resultant rising sea lev els.According to Mr Weech, the Bahamas is one of the most vulnerable island countries in the region because of how flat it is. “We are not a high island coun try like Jamaica or anywhere else anywhere on the Bahamian islands is about 1.5m above sealevel. We are almost like pancakes,” he said. Mr Weech highlighted other vulnerabilities such as a high dependence on imported energy and food as well as the increasing costs of these commodities. He said these are areas in which there will have to be significant change. “Adaptation is a priority for us but we have to do it in light of our circumstances,” said Mr Weech. “We have to diversify and to do so in renewable technology such as using wind energy and ocean thermal energy conver sion.” “We have to look at our hotel sector – there is new technology on Paradise Island which allows you to dim lights and reduce elec tricity use based on their occupation level but most of our old hotels have nothing like this, so the hotels have to look at having energy efficient systems,” he said. “Energy assessments and audits: how much energy is used to keep someone in a hotel? How much energy is used in government departments? What about the use of transport – how much energy is used to move one person from point A to point B? We need to be a lot more energy efficient.” He added that the Bahamas is already doing the following to address climate change: establishing terrestrial and marine reserves as well as parks and protected areas across the Bahamas reducing emissions from land degradation and deforestation (REDD fulfilling obligations to the United Nations Framework Con vention on Climate Change (UNFCCC reports maintaining engagement with regional bodies including the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre and the Alliance of Small Island Developing States. Mr Weech’s presentation was well received and the director of ECLAC’s Caribbean sub-region, Neil Pierre said that the feedback from the Bahamas workshop would feed into the feasibility studies being planned for the Caribbean. “Actions must be based on informed economic decision-making; the RECCC (Review of the Economics of Climate Change in the Caribbean) will give policymakers this,” said Mr Pierre. “RECCC will arm policymakers with high quality information and informed analysis so that they can effectively play their part at an international level.” The RECCC study is expect ed to be done over a two year period. The first phase (Septem ber 2008 – March 2009) has already started with preliminary workshops on climate change in the Caribbean. “We hope that this project will arrive at some preliminary find ings to inform Caribbean government’s at the Copenhagen negotiations (December 2009 said Mr Pierre College students ‘suffering effects of economic slump’ C urrent global c risis ‘demands deepening of regionalc ollaboration’ Government is exploring alternative sources of energy T HECOLLEGEOFTHEBAHAMAS: M any students there say they have been directly hit by the economic slump. A A d d a a p p t t a a t t i i o o n n i i s s a a p p r r i i o o r r i i t t y y f f o o r r u u s s b b u u t t w w e e h h a a v v e e t t o o d d o o i i t t i i n n l l i i g g h h t t o o f f o o u u r r c c i i r r c c u u m m s s t t a a n n c c e e s s . . W W e e h h a a v v e e t t o o d d i i v v e e r r s s i i f f y y a a n n d d t t o o d d o o s s o o i i n n r r e e n n e e w w a a b b l l e e t t e e c c h h n n o o l l o o g g y y s s u u c c h h a a s s u u s s i i n n g g w w i i n n d d e e n n e e r r g g y y a a n n d d o o c c e e a a n n t t h h e e r r m m a a l l e e n n e e r r g g y y c c o o n n v v e e r r s s i i o o n n . . Phillip Weech, director of Bahamas Environmental S cience and T ec hnolog y Commission

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    C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE food and dirty living conditions. Director of Immigration Jack Thompson told the press he f ound no evidence to substantiate detainees’ claims of violence b y centre supervisors, nor did he hear any allegations of guards inviting the detainees to do sexual favours for privileges. He said: “I know when people are detained they get bitter, they get angry, they say some things, especially when they are detained for too long, and they have fights between themselves. “There were no claims of beatings lodged with our committee, a nd I looked at these guys (who claimed to have been beaten a nd saw no sign of beatings. “We heard nothing about sexual favours for privileges, and there was no suggestion of insufficient food.” The team found meals to be of reasonable quality and quantity, however recommendations to diversify the lunch menu to include fruit and salads will be adopted under the direction of a dietitian, Mr Thompson said. D etainees met the team in the presence of their supervisors, but the Immigration Department director maintains they spoke candidly about their experiences and were more concerned with their personal status than the state of the facility. Immigration is already working to implement recommendations put forward by Dr Allen and Father Palacious to provide detainees with indoor games, televisions and more books in various languages, Mr Thompson said. New washing machines and dryers also will be provided, and m attresses, which Mr Thompson said have been vandalised by frustrated detainees, are being replaced, while grimy walls in the m ale and female dorms will be cleaned and repainted. Mr Thompson said: “Some of the detainees, because they become angry at times, they tend to destroy the mattresses and deface the walls, and we noticed that some of the mattresses were torn up and destroyed, and the walls could be painted and f reshened up.” D r Allen’s suggestion to allow detainees outside to play g ames and sports will however require more thoughtful consideration to prevent detainees from escaping, Mr Thompson said. A nd the psychologist’s recommendation to tear down the male dormitory recently ravaged by fire will take some time asi t may be required for evidence. H e added: “We are aware that these persons are not incarc erated, they are not prisoners, so we are going to give them what w e can. “It is not true that the detention centre is operated as a conc entration camp, it is not true that we have violated international protocols. “We take our responsibility seriously with respect to persons i n our custody. “The detention centre is not yet what we want it to be, but it’s well on its way to being all that it could be, and we will continue to spend public money to ensure that it is well kept and well m anaged.” Mr Thompson said the Immigration Department has been well aware of concerns at the Detention Centre since his directoratet ook office at the end of November. And the director maintains the fact-finding mission was not prompted by reports in The Tribune which drew the attention of Amnesty International, the American press and individualsa round the world. Reports of conditions inside the facility are being reviewed by Minister of Immigration Branville McCartney, will be passed on to the Deputy Prime Minister and recommendations will then be considered by the Cabinet. the employees. The Kelly’s spokesperson said that many people at the Home Centre were taking his death very hard. “They were very fond of him. He was very loved and will be badly missed. Some staff members go as far back as 25 to 30 years with him,” the spokesperson said. Mr Kelly’s family, including his wife Nancy, his three sons, Andrew, Gregory and Scott, and his daughters-in-law, Candy and Shelly, and others, are currently still in New York, but are expected to return to Nassau on Saturday. Kemp’s Funeral Home will handle the arrangements for the funeral service, but plans have not yet been finalised. The Kelly’s spokesperson said that the Home Centre will remain open and will only be closed on the day of his funeral. “(Closing the store now not be what he would have wanted. The best tribute to him would be to keep his beloved Kelly’s open as usual,” the spokesperson said. David Albert Charles Kelly was born on March 25, 1932, to C Kenneth and Edna F Kelly. He was the youngest of three sons. His wife, Nancy Kelly, once told The Tribune that he was not born with the proverbial silver spoon in his mouth, but “more like a saw or hammer.” He attended Queen’s College until Form 3 when he left to go to McDonogh School, a military acad emy in Maryland, together with his brothers Basil and Godfrey. He was graduated from there in 1951. While at McDonogh, Mr Kel ly attained the rank of Major, was president of his senior class and excelled in several sports, especially wrestling. In 1950, he was voted best wrestler in the State of Maryland. He and his brother Basil were both Maryland State Wrestling Champions. Mr Kelly once said that winning the McDonogh’s “Babe Ruth Award” was one of his proudest moments. He was inducted into the McDonogh School Hall of Fame in 1988. In 1951, at the age of 19, Mr Kelly returned to Nassau to work at Kelly’s Hardware Limited, located on Bay Street now known as Kel ly’s Home Centre at Marathon Mall. Mr Kelly’s father died in December 1952, leaving him, his brother Basil and his mother Edna to take over operations and the expansion of the family business. His brother Godfrey, a graduate in Law from Cambridge Universi ty, was admitted to the English and Bahamian Bars in 1953. Godfrey returned home to practice in the Bahamas. Both Basil and Godfrey Kelly were involved in Bahamian politics and both served in the House of Assembly and in ministerial positions. In 1959, Mr Kelly met his future wife Nancy Booth. The couple mar ried in 1963. David and Basil Kelly incorpo rated Nassau Motors Company Lim ited in 1964 and moved the company to its present Shirley Street site, having moved Standard and Triumph cars out of the Kelly’s Hardware windows. Nassau Motor Company is one of the oldest car companies in the Bahamas. Mr Kelly was president of the company. Kelly’s Hardware became a member of the American Hardware cooperative, later known as ServiStar in 1973. Nancy Kelly joined her husband at the store full-time in 1978, helping to mould the new look of Kelly's Home Centre. It opened as the anchor for the Mall at Marathon just four days before Christmas in 1988. Since then, Kelly’s had undergone numerous changes and expansions, employing over 300 employees. Mr Kelly successfully managed the transition of Kelly’s from being a relatively small hardware store on Bay Street to a multi-million dollar home centre. In 1992, he received the Commonwealth of the Bahamas Silver Jubilee Award in recognition of his outstanding contribution to national development in the field of business. Mr Kelly represented the Bahamas in two Olympics in Yatching, in 1968 in Mexico and in 1972 in Germany in the Dragon Class. He was past Commodore of the Royal Nassau Sailing Club for the years 1969 and 1970 and was also a life-long member of the Nassau Yacht Club. Mr Kelly made numerous significant contributions to many charitable and civic organisations both personally and through Kelly’s Home Centre, most notably to the College of the Bahamas, the Cancer Care Centre, St Anne’s Church and the Bahamas National Trust. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Booth Kelly; three sons, Andrew Jordan Kelly, David Gregory Kelly and Reginald Scott Kelly; two daughters-in-law, Anne Boushelle Kelly and Candance Elizabeth Kelly; a brother, Godfrey Kenneth Kelly; five grandchildren, two sisters-inlaw, Mrs Sonia Kelly and Mrs Paula Kelly, and many other relatives and friends. David Kelly dies age 76 FROM page one flight from Exuma, where he worked as chief pilot for the C olombian drug czar Joe Lehder. On Monday, a Tribune Insight article revealed Chauncey Tynes Sr’s suspicions that his son was “disposed of” for knowing too much about Lehder’s dealings with the PLP government of the day, and especially Prime Minister Lynden Pindling. Chauncey Jr told his father that he regularly flew cash consignments to Nassau from Lehder for Pindling and a senior police officer. On one occasion, he brought a box into the family home containing $50,000 in US banknotes destined for a senior policeman. The Tynes family is baffled that Pindling’s government was able to “cover up” details of Chauncey Jr’s last flight and would still like closure on the case. Also lost on the flight was elec trical engineer Donald Moree Sr., whose wife Ann almost lost the baby she was carrying when she heard he had vanished. Like Chaucey Tynes Sr., Mrs Moree believes her husband died because he probably knew too much about the drugs trade, though he always told her “the less you know the better.” Meanwhile, readers yesterday continued to e-mail goodwill mes sages to The Tribune for its bold exposure of the Chauncey Tynes story. O ne wrote: “Just a quick note to say you have my 100 per cent support in your ‘eye-catching’ article. If you get that much public reaction from the article then it must be DAMN good and DAMN truesmilekeep up the good work!” Another said he had not heard a single bad word about the article among all his friends, who all agreed that Bahamian history must be told accurately. One reader wrote directly to The Tribune’s managing editor John Marquis, author of the con troversial Insight article, saying: “Mr Marquis, I hope that even now you are training several Bahamians who when you retire will be able to step up to the plate and carry on your bold, investigative and, most importantly, fearless kind of journalism. God knows this country needs it badly.” O thers addressed the nature of the Pindling government and said it was close to being a dictatorship. “What I would like to know is how so-called Right Honourable politicians can stand up and defend a legacy that is so obvi ously flawed,” said one. Another added: “The Insight article confirmed what all intelli gent Bahamians know to be true. The Pindling government was up to its ears in drug trafficking and made the country the mess it is today.” God or country.” His comments came at the height of the drug era when the international press was discussing openly Pindling’s alleged associations with the drug kingpin Joe Lehder. It was also the year of the commission of inquiry (1983-84 tain members of Pindling’s government were roundly condemned for their association with drug dealers. Mr Christie and present Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham were both fired from the government at the time because of their growing disgruntlement with Pindling’s corruption and dictatorial atti tudes. The present Governor General, Arthur Hanna, resigned at about the same time from his post as deputy prime minister. He said resignation was “the only honourable course of action” open to him because of his differences with Pindling. Senator Andrew ‘Dud’ Maynard and Cabinet ministers George Smith and Kendal Nottage also resigned after figuring prominently in evidence surfacing before the commission, which investigated corruption and pay-offs. Christie, Ingraham and Hanna were not tarnished by the evidence. In his broadside on The Tribune and its managing editor, Mr Christie described the Insight article as “the vilest, the most vicious, the most scurrilous and, frankly, the sickest piece of garbage I have ever read.” He said while Sir Lynden should not get a “free pass” his legacy should be treated with a certain sensibility. But veteran media figures said yesterday that Christie’s outburst was completely at odds with what he said in 1984. “Everyone knows that Christie and Ingraham were fired by Pindling because they disapproved of his corrupt activities, especially in relation to the drug trade,” said one retired journalist. “So why is Christie now taking issue with what Mr Chauncey Tynes Sr said in the Insight article? It seems that he sees the issue as a last chance to save his leadership hopes in the PLP.” The article also came in for severe criticism in a radio talk show hosted by disbarred attorney Ortland Bodie Jr. Activist Paul Moss was particularly scathing towards the managing editor. Last night Mr Marquis said: “I’m a bit disappointed with Mr Christie. I thought he was above all that, especially as he should know perfectly well that everything Mr Tynes said was true. “As for Moss, he’s a political pipsqueak who, in my opinion, is of no account. I wouldn’t know him if I slipped on him.” Christie’s Tribune tirade ‘at odds with comments he made 25 years ago’ FROM page one On Wednesday, President Obama s igned into law a $410 billion spending bill that will make it easier for r esidents of the United States to travel to Cuba and send money to family members on that island. The new m easures will allow Cuban-Americans to travel legally to their homel and to visit relatives once a year and spend up to $179 a day. Previous restrictions on Cuban-Americans,i mposed by former US President George Bush in 2004, limited travel t o Cuba to once every three years with spending of no more than $50 a day. T he new bill could also facilitate the sale of agricultural and pharmaceutical products to Cuba. O ne local observer saw this move as a precursor to the inevitable opening up of Cuba, w hich some see as a threat to this country's number one industry. Yesterday, former Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe said the news should be a wake-up call to tourism stakeholders who he feels haveb een underestimating Cuba's potential threat to the Bahamas. "I think the problem that we're facing is, we k new it was bound to happen and we have dragged our feet in preparing ourselves for the new challenges. I spoke several years ago about emerging markets in the Caribbean and amongt hose I listed (were c an Republic and Cuba. Despite severe travel and trade restrictions put on the communist island by the Unites States,C uba's hotel occupancy rate has more than dou bled since 1990. And despite a regional tourism downturn, Cuba's Tourism Minister Manuel Marrero reported that the country's tourism industry grew sector 5.2 per c ent in the first two months of 2009, compared to the same period in 2008. B ack home, total visitor arrivals fell by 4.6 per cent in 2008 driven by a 7.3 per cent decline in US stopover v isits, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said last month. T hese numbers should spur local tourism officials to invest in product a nd culture development, raising of industry standards, Mr Wilchombe said. E xpanding the country's market share is also vital to capturing more of t he visitor base. Statistics compiled by the Caribbean Tourism Organisation show that in 2006, Cuba and the Bahamas had a roomi nventory of 45,270 and 14,929, respectively. Mr Wilchcombe pegged the Bahamas' curr ent room inventory at about 12,000 due to several recent hotel closures. He argued that the country needed "at least 30,000 to be competit ive." "Cuba has in place now more than 50,000 hotel rooms, they have a product that is attractive if by nothing else but their personalities and alsob y their history. I said and I continue to argue t hat our job is not to be Cuba, but to be a better Bahamas. To be a better Bahamas means we should take all that we can and invest in thep roduct. "Our challenge right now is not to panic, our challenge is to recognise that we have to create that thing that gives us the game-changer. Thath as to be centred around entertainment and culture in general, and centred around our service that is one of excellence." Continued courting of the European, Canad ian and Asian markets are also vital to enticing more visitors, he said. Newly relaxed US policies on travel to Cuba raise concerns in Bahamas FROM page one Obie Wilchcombe FROM page one Son of Chauncey Tynes Jr thanks The Tribune for highlighting story Detention Centre reports withheld F ROM page one S mith, who made headlines in the Bahamas after the death o f her son in Doctors Hospital and photos of her with then Cab inet Minister Shane Gibson appeared in The Tribune, died in February, 2007, after being found unresponsive in a Floridah otel. She was 39. In April that year, the Bahamas was again centre stage as her former boyfriend Larry Birkhead was granted custody of herd aughter Dannielyn. Reports: Howard K Stern ‘turns himself in to police’ FROM page one

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    C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 9 B.A.I.S.S. 2009 TRACK & FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS THOMAS A. ROBINSON TRACK & FIELD STADIUM RESULTS COMBINED TEAM SCORES PLACE SCHOOLPOINTS 1 Saint Augustine's College 5 SAC 696 2 Queens College 11QC562 3 Saint Anne's 14 SAS223.5 4 Saint Andrews School13 SA 173 5 Saint John's College 6 SJC 162.5 6 Temple Christian Schools TCS 145 7 Nassau Christian Academy 9NCA 137 8 Jordan Prince William 12 PWH 84 9 Westminster CollegeWMC 48.5 10 Aquinas College10 AQ 40.5 11 Charles W. Saunders CWS 40 12 Faith Temple AcademyFTA 31 13 Kingsway AcademyKA 30 FEMALE TEAM SCORES 1 BANTAM DIVISION PLACE SCHOOLPOINTS 1 Queens College 11 QC 90 2 Saint Augustine's College 5 SAC 66 3 Saint Andrews School 13 SA 28 4 Saint Anne's 14 SAS 25 5 Saint John's College 6 SJC 22 6 Jordan Prince William 12 PWH 18 7 Temple Christian Schools TCS 9 8 Nassau Christian Academy 9 NCA 6 9 Aquinas College 10 AQ 4 10 Faith Temple Academy FTA 2 MALE TEAM SCORES 1 BANTAM DIVISION PLACE SCHOOLPOINTS 1 Queens College11 QC 56 2 Saint Augustine's College 5SAC 50 3 Charles W. Saunders CWS 25 4 Saint John's College6 SJC 22 5 Saint Anne's 14 SAS 16 6 Temple Christian SchoolsTCS 11 7 Nassau Christian Academy 9 NCA 10 7 Aquinas College 10 AQ 10 7 Saint Andrews School13 SA 10 10 Jordan Prince William12 PWH 8 11 Faith Temple Academy FTA 7 FEMALE TEAM SCORES 2 JUNIOR DIVISION PLACE SCHOOLPOINTS 1 Saint Augustine's College 5 SAC 97 2 Queens College 11 QC 51 3 Saint Anne's 14 SAS 39 4 Saint Andrews School13 SA 27 5 Kingsway Academy KA 14 6 Aquinas College 10 AQ 11 7 Saint John's College 6 SJC 9 7 Jordan Prince William 12 PWH 9 9 Temple Christian Schools TCS 7 10 Nassau Christian Academy 9 NCA 5 11 Charles W. Saunders CWS 1 3/11/2009 to 3/13/2009 son, slowly making her way back from an injury prone year last season, topped the intermediate girls as she posted at ime of 1.99. SAC's Shaunae M iller had to settle for second in 12.00 and Sarah Mackey of Nassau Christian Academy was third in 12.33. Both Johnson and Miller went under the qualifying timeo f 12.00 for Carifta, which will b e held in St. Lucia over the Easter holiday weekend. However, they will have to perform again at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations' f inal Carifta trials at the end of the month. T he GSSSA's lone record yesterday came from Audley Carey of St. Augustine's College, who ran away with the intermediate boys 300 metres. He clocked 10 minutes and 1 3.09 seconds, erasing the prev ious mark of 10:30.02 that was s et by Trevor Strachan in 2006. M arvin Minns of St. john's College got second in 11:06.60 w ith George Zonicle of Queen's College taking the race in 11:13.58. T he highlight of the day was the 100 final. SAC's Marcus Thompson took the title as the fastest boy in the BAISS this year with his victory in the senior boys division in 10.49. He easily wono ver a good field that featured Warren Fraser of Temple Christian in 10.62 in second and Aaron Wilmore of Queen's College in third with 10.91. S AC also claimed the f emale's title as V'Alonee R obinson cruised to victory in the senior girls' century, stop ping the clock in 11.74. Her n earest rival was Sparkyl Cash of Queen's College in 12.01. D ominique Morley of SAC got third in 12.34. Q ueen's College took control of the intermediate division. H arold Carter clinched the boys' crown as he sped to a time of 10.67. Devaughn Frasero f Temple Christian got second i n 11.19 and Thompson of Westminister was third in 11.23. In the junior boys division, A ndrae Stubbs of Charles W. Saunders avoided a clean sweep by the two powerhousesa s he snatched the lead early and held off Gerrio Rahming of Queen's College. Stubbs won in 11.72 with Rahming timed i n 11.82. Dwight Campbell of Jordan Prince William got thirdin 12.11. SAC got the only sweep in the century in the junior girls division behind the 1-2 punchof Makeya White (12.65 Aalyiah Harris (12.85 Barry of St. Anne's was third in1 2.87. Kaiwan Culmer got the first victory for SAC in the straight away race when he won the bantam boys division in 13.20 over Dominic Knowles of Queen's College (13.45 Smith of Charles W. Saunderswas third in 13.51. And Khadija Fraser got the parade started for Queen's College when she took the bantam girls' race in 12.90. Jessica Stur rup of St. Anne's was second in 13.62 and Vinisa Beneby of St. John's was third in 13.68. SAC also got a sweep in the senior girls' 3000 as Huhnique Rolle and Amber Weech tagged up for the top two spots. Rolle was timed in 11:13.52 and Weech did 12:36.34. Temple Christian's Kimberly Johnson was third in 13:18.99. If that wasn't enough, SAC and QC basically dominated on the field as well. In events that they didn't win, St. Anne's, Aquinas Col lege, St. Andrew's and St. John's joined in the glory. The meet will wrap up today starting at 9 am with the marquee final events in the 200 and the 4 x 400 relays. SACstill leading the way FROM page 11 Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. ST. ANDREWS Ashton Butler leads the way in the junior boys triple j ump yesterday. SAC Leads the way winning the second heat of the senoir boys 4x100meters yesterday. S T. ANNES b lue Waves won the first heat of the senior boys 4x100meters. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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    M any would remember his last fight o n October 4 when Ferguson was stopped 14 seconds in the first round by Seth Petruzelli. Excuse me. Ferguson was quick to point out that he “slipped and fell.” Looking back at the fight, at t he BankAtlantic Center in Sunr ise, Florida, which was his first l oss in a sanctioned bout, Kimbo S lice admitted that he doesn’t w ant to put too much emphasis o n it. Every fighter has a fighter’s chance, so I’m not taking anything a way from Seth,” he said. “Things h appen in a fight. All it take is one punch to take you to a vict ory. So I will leave it like that.” What was so disheartening for Kimbo Slice was the fact that Petruzelli was a fill in for the original fighter, Ken Shamrokc, w ho was deemed unfit after he sustained a nasty cut over his left e ye in training. Y esterday on his arrival home, Ferguson stopped into The Tribune’s office with his parents, Clarence Ferguson and Rosemary C larke, and a close friend, Nat ‘the H it Man’ Gay from Miami, Florida. The 33-year-old Kimbo Slice was sort o f surprised by the reception that he received because it seemed as if just about everybody in t he office had either heard about him or seen him on the tubes. For Ferguson, who emerged from Miami, Flori da where he resides as a street fighter to a big t ime showcase on the tubes, an actor, clothing designer or just an entertainer, the ball is in his court. “That gives me the opportunity to dedicate m yself to whatever I want and to be successful at it,” Ferguson said. “So I will continue to fight.” His next fight is scheduled for June, but instead o f performing in the MMA, he will actually venture into boxing. It’s his first appearance in that arena, but he haven’t gotten an opponent lined up asy et. B ut don’t count out the MMA just yet. Ferguson said he still has two of those fights on the drawing board this year. I n the meantime, Ferguson said he’s just excited to be back home. “I’m just ready to settle in,” said Ferguson, who was a special guest at the Bahamian Idol show l ast night and will be attending the funeral serv ice of his cousin Bernadette Ann Ferguson Brown on Saturday. “So I have my passport straight so I can travel. I will be coming home frequently. I want to do a couple fights over year. I plan to do at least four fightsa year, so I would at last like to do one or two h ere.” T aken aback by the response he’s received so f ar, Ferguson said the Bahamian people have been v ery supportive of their athletes no matter where t hey are and what they are doing. I want to do what I’m doing. I want to continu e being an entertainer, I want to continue fighting, continue to make my movies, continue to make c ommercials and continue to take care of my fam i ly and to make everybody proud,” he said. “God has seen fit to bless me. But I think there’s a greater calling on my life in the future. I just don’t know what it is. But until there, I’m here.” Ferguson, who grew up in the Step Street area in Fox Hill, said now that he had his passport, he will be in town as often as the Bahamian people w ill accept him. His father, businessman Clarence Ferguson said t he Fox Hill community can’t wait for Kimbo Slice t o come by. “They’re waiting for him,” he said. But while there are a lot of people who were eager to watch Kimbo Slice on the tube, his father s aid he gets goose bumps every time a show comes u p. “I move away from the TV and just try to peep i n because you really don’t want to watch your son in action like that,” he said. “But I’m getting i nto it now.” His mother, Rosemary Clarke, a native from Exuma, has actually been in attendance to at one or two of his shows. She had a slightly different per-s pective. “Watching it on TV is good, but when you have to go there and sit down and wait for all that action, it ain’t good,” she said. “I rather watch it on T V where I can shout and holler until I get hoarse.” But she noted that she’s been very proud of his accomplishment. N at ‘the Hitman’ Gay, who also travelled from Miami, said Kimbo Slice had been an inspiration for him. I love to see him fight. I love to see him go to w ar,” he said. This is Gay’s first appearance in the Bahamas and he noted that he’s enjoying himself. N ow that he has his passport and he can travel as often as he sees fit, Kimbo Slice said the Bahami an people will be seeing a lot more of him, not just on the big screen, but in person. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net W ELCOME home Kevin ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson. After making his presence felt in the Mixed Martial Arts (MMA and on the big screen as an entertainer in the United States, Ferguson has returned home to spend some time with his family and friends. C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Kimbo Slice back home MIXED MARTIAL ARTIST Kevin ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson (second from left Clarence Ferguson and Rosemary Clarke (at leftright in town to spend some time with his family. second half. Rashad Sturrup, the game's most valuable player, had a game high 28 points, including nine in the first quarter and 10 in the fourth quarter for CI Gibson. H Lewis had 19, Drew Rolle 14, Milano Hunter 12 and Rashad Hunter and Dante Rolle both had seven. For TA Thompson, Basil Deveaux scored 18, Kenneth Pinder 17, Trevor Smith 12, Edmund Curtis 11 and Dereck Cox helped out with six. “We were short a man tonight and so we didn't have it. Four games in four nights, it's tough on these young guys,” said GHS coach Nigel Ingraham. But despite losing the game, Ingraham said he felt as if his Magicmen were the winners. “I'm so proud of them because I had about 12-13 guys who made 2.0 (grade point average), so we won,” Ingra ham said. PITBULLS 67, SCORPIONS 58: DW Davis took advantage of some key fouls by TA Thompson down the stretch to seal the deal as they put a wrap on a successful year in which they won all four tournaments they competed in. “This is my third year at DW Davis and the guys I met there are now in grade nine. I sold the programme to them and they jumped on board. This year, we went to Andros and won, we won the Father Mar cian, we went to Long Island and now we won this. Four straight. Thank the Lord,” said Mark Hanna, who was also named the coach of the year. DW Davis played with a lot of resilience coming back from a 21-11 first quarter deficit. Down 34-22 at the half, the Pit bulls clawed their way back, trimming the margin to 47-43 at the end of the third. It wasn't until the last three minutes of the fourth that they eventually took control of the game, going up 53-50 on a pair of free throws from William Ferguson, who was eventually named the MVP. Not done yet, the Scorpions managed to come back for a 5454 tie with 1:41 to play, thanks to Roosevelt Whylly's consecutive driving fast break lay-ups. But after Alvin St. Fleur hit one of two free throws to open a slight 57-54 lead for DW Davis, TA Thompson suffered a big blow when their coach was tossed from the game by refer ee Christian Wilmore with 59.9 seconds left on the clock. The Pitbulls would convert three of the four free throws and they went up 60-54. But in the space of 15 seconds, they got two steals and scored on both possession with a lay-up from Prince Boodle and two charity shots from Ferguson to finally signal the end for the Scorpions. Ferguson, who came up big with 11 in the third quarter when the Pitbulls got back into the game, finished with a game high 25 points. St. Fleur had 14, Boodle 13 and Alcot Fox 10 in the win for DW Davis. Marvin Saunders paved the way for TA Thompson with 18. Angelo Lockhart had 14, Roo sevelt Whylly and Vilner Desir both had eight and Kensiu Sylvester added five. FROM page 11 Rattlers and Pitbulls win titles K EVIN KIMBO SLICE’ FERGUSON MMA RECORD Wins 4 L osses 1 STREET FIGHTS: Wins 7 L osses 1 http://www.kimboslice.org/ T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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    n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net OH how sweet it is to be champions. T HE prestigious Hugh Campbell Basketball Tournament title got away from the CI G ibson Rattlers. But there was no way that they were going to let the Government Secondary Schools Sports Association's s enior boys crown slip away from them too. After losing the tournament t itle last month to the Taberna cle Baptist Falcons from Grand Bahama, coach Kevin 'KJ'J ohnson and his Rattlers regrouped and took their frus tration out on the Magicmen to take the GSSSA title yesterday. T hey did it in convincing fash ion from start to finish as they blew out the Cinderella Government High Magicmen 96-70 in the third and deciding game in their best-of-three championship series yesterday at theK endal Isaacs Gymnasium. “The Hugh Campbell is the pinnacle of high and low when it comes to basketball in high school in the country. Taberna cle is an excellent ball club and they deserved to win. But GSSSA is just as exciting to win.” T he DW Davis Pitbulls and J ohnson's coaching partner celebrated as well as they pulled off a 67-58 win over the TAT hompson Scorpions, formerly CC Sweeting Jr. in game three of their junior boys' besto f-three finals. R ATTLERS 96, MAGICMEN 70: CI Gibson rebounded after b lowing game two and a chance t o pull off a clean sweep. But what a difference a day makes. They didn't waste any time int urning the series back in their favour. “We had a hard breaking l oss. Government High played an excellent game. We went over our game plan and we came ready to play,” Johnsons ummed up. Not enough the junkanoo music by Government High,w hose fan support was greater in the stands, could derail CI Gibson from their mission. From start to finish, the Ratt lers painfully took it to the Magicmen as they The Rattlers got a little carel ess in the fourth quarter. But every time the Magic came up with a basket, they were able to regain their composure and managed to stay ahead of them. The Rattlers got a threepointer with 1:51 left to open a decisive 92-65 lead. CI Gibson got a balanced s coring attack as they slowly built on their 23-17 first quarter lead to extend it to 41-20 and they never looked back in the n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net IT will come down to a two-way battle for the top spot as the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools Sports Association's Inter-School Track and field Championships comes to a close today at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. The St. Augustine's College Big Red Machines are holding onto a 134-point advantage over the Queen's College Comets after the first two days of competition. They lead the 13-field competition with a total of 696 points. Trailing with 562 points. Sitting in third place is St. Anne's Blue waves with 223.50. SAC's head coach William 'Knucklehead' Johnson said the Big Red Machines are just rolling along as they try to remain undefeated in the championships. “We feel good about where we are and what we have been able to accomplish over the past two days,” Johnson said. “We had some points that got way from us, but overall we are quite pleased to still be out front.” Going into the final day of competition, SAC hold the lead in the junior, intermediate and senior girls divisions as well as the intermediate and senior boys. Queen's College are out front in the bantam girls and boys and intermediate boys. Jason Edwards, one of the Comets' coaches, said Queen's College is right where they want to be in striking distance of St. Augustine's Col lege. “We just have to come out tomorrow and try to win everything that we compete in,” he project ed. “We know it won't be easy because SAC is performing very well. But we feel confident that we can make up some ground.” Yesterday's event produced two Carifta qualifiers and just one GSSSA record. In the highlight of the day, Printassia John C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 INSIDE Local sports news T ENNIS The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association will be s ending a junior boys and j unior girls team of players to the Dominican Republic to play in the North/Central American andC aribbean Zone Pre-Quali fying event for Boys and G irls 16 and under March 2 3-28th, 2009. T he Junior Davis Cup T eam will be led by Johnathon Taylor, the cur r ent #1 in Junior Boys 18s a nd 16s in the Bahamas, O ndre Cargill and Kevin M ajor will round out the squad. The team will be coached by Giorgio Bald acci, a veteran coach who h as travelled with many j unior teams in the past. The Junior Fed Cup Team will be led by rising star Simone Pratt, who has been making waves with her performance in Central America this spring and is the top ranked junior girl i n the COTEC ranking. O ther members of the team are Gabrielle Moxey and Erin Strachan. Both teams are expected to compete well and challenge for the right to repre-s ent the region in a Qualifying event this summer. Stephen Turnquest, 1st V ice President and Direc t or of Junior Tennis for the BLTA who made the a nnouncement said that he f elt good about the juniors that will be representing the Bahamas and that it is t hese types of opportunities that give the juniors a chance to measure their performances against the best in the region. And that these types of e vents go a long way in p reparing our juniors for the future. MASTERS SOFTBALL Play in the masters softball league playoff rounds will continue this weekend at the Blue Hills Sporting Complex. In the opening day of the playoffs, the pennant win ning Williams Construction Jets (12-2 over the Augusta St. Bulls (4-9 Danny Subbs got the win while Paul Moss was tagged with the loss. Six Pack Abs (10-3 scored an opening day win over Andeaus Brokers (67). Foster Dorsett was the winning pitcher in the Abs’ 12-10 win while Mike Isaacs was tagged with the loss. Other results from last weekend’s schedule includ-ed Alco Raiders over the Bamboo Shack Bulls, 8-1; while Micholette defeated Miller Lite 21-2; Six Pack Abs over the Andeaus Brokers, 12-2; and Alco Raiders over the Bulls 7-0. SATURDAY, 14TH MAR CH 2009 1pm Micholette Strokers vs. Miller Lite Royals 3pm Williams Construction Jets vs. Augusta St. Bulls SUND A Y , 15TH MAR CH 2009 1pm Miller Lite Royals vs. Micholette Strokers 3pm Micholette Strokers vs. Williams Construction Jets sports BRIEFS SACstill leading the way MEMBERS of the DW Davis Pitbulls celebrate their GSSSA championship win over the TA Thompson Scorpions yesterday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. MEMBERS of the CI Gibson Rattlers’ senior boys basketball team celebrated after winning the GSSSA title in three games over the Government High Magicmen yesterday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. SENIOR girls shot putt action. SEE page 9 SEE page 10 Rattlers and Pitbulls win titles

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    C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A f ter making his presence felt in the Mixed Martial Arts (MMA ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson has returned home to spend some time w ith his family and friends. Yesterday on his arrival home, Ferguson stopped into The Tribune’s o ffice with his parents, Clarence Ferguson and Rosemary Clarke, and a close friend, Nat ‘the Hit Man’ Gay from Miami, Florida. He was surprised by the reception he received because it seemed as if just a bout everybody in the office had either heard about him or seen him on the tubes. F erguson, who grew up in the Step Street area in Fox Hill, said now that he had his passport, he will be in town as often as the Bahamian people will accept him. INFIGHTING FORM PHOTOS: Tim Clarke /Tribune staff Kevin ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson steps into The Tribune arena T ERRIFIC TRIO: K imbo Slice is flanked by Tribune staff reporters Taneka Thompson (left TALKING TOUGH: Kimbo Slice with Tribune staff reporter Natario McKenzie. SHOULDER TO SHOULDER: Kimbo Slice with Tribune staff member Laura Roberts. SEESPORT, PAGE 10, FOR FULLSTORYANDMORE PICTURES ABOVE STRONGARMTACTICS: Kimbo Slice with Tribune Business reporter Chester Robards. LEFT MAYTHEFORCEBEWITHYOU: Kimbo Slice with Tribune staff member Jason Taylor and Tribune News Editor Paco Nunez. DON’T MESS WITH KIMBO: Kimbo Slice with Tribune photographer Tim Clarke. SHAKE ON IT: Kimbo Slice with Tribune staff member Dale Dean.

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    C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.56 $3.56 $3.60 for a better lifeLIFE INSURANCE SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com call us today at 396-1355 A SUBSIDIARY OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating secure future leave your children nancially secure provide a safety net for your loved ones ensure a bright future for your familyall of the above Tourism sector to shrink 10% during 2009 Insurers face ‘serious issue’ of mounting receivables n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas will likely have to “move away from the existing model” for its international finan cial services centre in the face of increasing US and G-20 pressure, a former finance minister has told Tribune Business, and seek reci procal benefits from nations it signs tax information deals with. James Smith, minister of state for finance in the former Christie government, said the world’s major industrialised countries were likely “to just bulldoze” ahead with their professed drive to crack down on international financial centres such as the Bahamas, exploiting the global recession and credit crunch to justify this. With the Bahamas already hav ing signed a Tax Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA with the US, Mr Smith suggested that this nation proactively seek other such partners, all the while looking to see what economic benefits it could get from these arrangements. T T a a x x e e s s He added that developed coun tries were unlikely to recover much by way of unpaid taxes from clients of the Bahamian financial services industry, as the private wealth management sector’s clients were largely compli ant with their home country tax laws. The Organisation for Econom ic Co-Operation and Development (OECD ‘club’ most frequently used by the G-20 nations to lead the attack on international financial centres is already looking at creating a new ‘blacklist’ for nations that have entered less than 12 TIEAs with its members. Financial services ‘must move away from model today’ * Ex-minister says Bahamas must look to expand tax information treaty network and go out proactively seeking partners, in effort to obtain compensating economic benefits James Smith SEE page 6B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Bahamian general insurance carriers are assessing how to deal with the “serious problem” of mounting accounts receiv ables owed to them by brokers and agents, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with a solu tion made more urgent by the stipulations in the new Domestic Insurance Act. Patrick Ward, Bahamas First’s group president and chief executive, said all Bahamas General Insurance Association (BGIA seriously” at how to combat the receivables situation, given that the new Act will “place the responsibility” on them to collect all premium revenues regardless of whether they are passed on by brokers and agents. Tribune Business had con tacted Mr Ward and other industry executives after being told that one solution being pro posed by some insurance carriers, who are the ones that underwrite each policyholder’sr isk, was that the new Act and its regulations require brokers and agents to establish escrow accounts. A A c c c c o o u u n n t t s s T hese accounts would hold t he premium income that brokers and agents needed to pass on to the underwriting carrier, once their commission usually around 12-15 per cent had been deducted. Using escrow accounts, so the theory went, would prevent any unscrupulous agents and brokers from using this premium income as working capital in their businesses, or for any oth er purpose. Mr Ward, though, told Tribune Business that while there was “no official campaign” to adopt broker/agent escrow accounts or any other solution as a common position. “But I know there are people discussing different ways to deal with a serious problem,” Mr Ward told Tribune Business in reference to accounts receiv ables. “It is something that I know all of the companies are looking at seriously. Pending the implementation of the new Act, that will place the responsibility on us, the carrier, vis-a-vis the receipt of premiums, regardless of whether we received them from the broker or agent.” Acknowledging that “everyCompanies moving to deal with issue that has ‘everyone seriously concerned’, with greater urgency caused by impending new Act SEE page 6B n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter P RIVATE yacht and boat arrivals to the Bahamas declined by around 20 per cent year-over-year for 2008 and into this year, a Ministry of Tourism offi-c ial said yesterday, but just a few mega yachts have been able to buttress some Family Island marinas from the downturn. Earl Miller, general manager of vertical markets at the Ministry’s Fort Lauderdale office, said the eco n omic downturn and last summer’s surging fuel costs were the crux of the decline. He said the Bahamas’ popular fishing tourna m ents will take a hit in the number of attendees compared to previous years. Boating arrivals down some 20% * Fewer vessels in Florida marinas imply decline for Bahamas * Valentine’s business down 10%, but mega yachts helping to buttress decline in smaller boat visitors SEE page 4B * Study suggests Bahamian industry’s job total to contract by 7.5%* But provides brighter medium-term outlook over next decade for nation’s number one sector n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamian tourism indus try has been forecast to shrink by almost 10 per cent in terms of its total economic output for 2009, a leading global tourism organisation has predicted, with the sector’s total job levels contracting by 7.5 per cent. Yet despite the gloomy shortterm prognosis provided by the World Travel & Tourism Council’s (WTTC the Bahamian tourism industry, it also offered hope for the SEE page 2B Robert Sands n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Grand Bahama Port Authority’s (GBPA yesterday confirmed to Tribune Business that he was considering resigning from his post, and indicated a final decision would be taken once he met with management next week. When contacted by this newsp aper, Felix Stubbs, who is also g eneral manager of IBM ( Bahamas), said: “I’m thinking about it. I haven’t given in my resignation.” He initially said he would “prefer not” to discuss why he was thinking of resigning, but then added: “When I’m back, I’m going to sit down with management and ask them to consider a couple of things. “If they’re not prepared to change certain things, I’ll leave. It’s been brewing over time. I’m back on Sunday, and should bei n office on Monday.” Speaking to Tribune Business from outside the Bahamas, Mr Stubbs added: “I think there’s a lot of opportunities missing at the Port Authority that have me concerned.” Tribune Business contacted Mr Stubbs after several sources suggested he was close to resigning the GBPA chairmanship about one year after he took the post. This newspaper was told Mr Stubbs has offered to resign on several previous occasions, but each time the offer was either withdrawn or rejected. U U n n c c l l e e a a r r It was unclear precisely why he is mulling resignation, but a number of people said they had been expecting it, following Erik Christiansen’s resignation as Port Group Ltd chairman and his replacement by Hannes Babak. Some sources suggested that there was a feeling that the GBPA and Port Group Ltd chairmanships should be held jointly by one man, given that the two companies’ often overlapped. However, it is thought that Mr Stubbs’ resignation would not sit well with the Government, especially if Mr Babak were to be approved by the GBPA Board to replace him. The Government is thought to like the split GBPA and Port Group Ltd chairs, given that it keeps the former’s regulatory/licensing functions away from the latter’s investment activities. Meanwhile, several sources suggested that the end to British banker Roddie Fleming’s attempt to acquire the GBPA/Port Group Ltd stake held by Sir Jack Hayward’s family trust was likely to propel it to try and settle the almost twoand-a-half year ownership dis pute with the late Edward St George’s estate. One source yesterday sug gested the two sides were in talks in London to explore a Port chair mulls his resignation SEE page 2B

    PAGE 14

    medium-term, with the industry forecast to achieve annu a lised real growth in its total output of 3.5 per cent in the decade up to 3.5 per cent. Still, for the present, which is what all Bahamians are concerned with, the WTTC projected that the tourism sector the most important industry in this nation was set to contract by 9.8 per cent in 2009, in terms of real gross domestic product (GDP to $3.775 billion. As for direct tourism industry employment, the WTTC said the total numb er of jobs provided by the Bahamian industry was set to fall by 7.5 per cent in 2009 to 33,000 jobs. J J o o b b s s And the total number of jobs that are reliant upon the tourism industry is set to decline by 6.5 per cent to 95,000 in 2009, the WTTC study suggested, with the sector’s direct GDP contribution the total value of all economic activity it produces dropping by 11.2 per cent to $1.127 billion. Robert Sands, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA president, said he had not seen the WTTC study when contact ed by Tribune Business yester day, and therefore did not know the factual basis on which it had based its projections. “The jury is still out as to what the contraction will be in 2009,” he told this newspaper. “We probably won’t see any growth in 2009, and maybe some contraction, but the level of contraction is unknown.” M r Sands pointed out that while tourism arrivals may have been off by between 4-5 per cent in 2008, there was nothing yet to suggest this deterioration had increased in 2009. Rather than just raw arrivals numbers, Mr Sands said other factors were key determinants of the tourism industry’s performance, such as per capita visitor spend, the visitor mix and average daily room rates. On a brighter note, the WTTC said the -year trend” for the Bahamian tourism industry was positive, with direct industry employment increasing by an annualised rate of 2.5 per cent over the next 10 years to reach 42,202 by 2019. The sector’s growth, in real GDP terms, was set to reach 3.4 per cent on an annualised basis over the next 10 years, while total Bahamian employment direct and indirect jobs increasing at an annualised 2.5 per cent rate to reach 121,000 jobs by 2019. Illustrating the tourism sector’s importance to the Bahamian economy, the WTTC study said that it was set directly and indirectly to account for 50 per cent of GDP in 2009 to 51.7 per cent by 2019. In relative terms, the Bahamas is the world’s seventh m ost reliant nation on tourism as a percentage of GDP, and the sixth most reliant on the sector as a source of jobs. It provides some 60.4 per cent of total jobs. In addition, visitor spending accounts for 60.7 per cent of the Bahamas’ total exports, making this nation the world’s eighth most reliant when it comes to exports. For 2009, the WTTC forecast that tourism would generate $3.775 billion of economic activity. The industry was forecast to attract $1.239 billion in capital investment, representing 43.4 per cent of such investment, and $146 million or 14 per cent of government spending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ourism sector to shrink 10% during 2009 FROM page 1B possible settlement, although that could not be confirmed before press time last night. The disappearance of Mr Fleming and his partner, Geoffrey Richards, was predicted by sources to push the Hayward family trust towards settlement, given that the British banker had been helping to pay its legal costs in the dispute. The St George estate has been able to finance its legal battle through the $41 million sale of Lady Henrietta St George’s 50 per cent ICD Utilities stake to Emera, but both sides continue to bleed revenues on legal costs due to the fact that GBPA/Port Group Ltd dividends have not been forth coming for some time. And while Mr Fleming may have disap peared from the scene, Tribune Business can reveal that Hutchison Whampoa remains quietly in the wings, hoping to work out a deal where it can buy out both parties. It has previously made a combined $250 million offer, and already owns a majority stake in the Freeport Container Port, plus a 50 per cent interest and management rights in the Freeport Harbour Company, Grand Bahama Development Company, and Grand Bahama Airport Company. D D i i s s p p u u t t e e Effectively, the GBPA and Port Group Ltd and the dispute between their owners is back where it was when litigation began in November 2006, with Mr Babak in the chairmanship, despite the St George estate’s opposition. And a whole swathe of man agement, in the shape of the likes of Carey Leonard and Albert Gray, has departed. Despite Justice Anita Allen ruling that the St George estate owns a 50 per cent stake in the GBPA and Port Group Ltd holding company, Intercontinental Diversified Corporation (IDC unable to change the Caymanian firm’s share register to get the shares put in its name. As a result, the Hayward family trust which is appealing the 50 per cent ruling has retained Board control at IDC. This, in turn, gives the Hayward family trust Board control of GBPA and Port Group Ltd, which enabled the latter to name Mr Babak chair despite the St George estate’s opposition. Since returning to the Port Group Ltd chairmanship, Mr Babak has busied himself with trying to bring investment projects to fruition, and growing Freeport’s economy. Port chair mulls his resignation n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE GOVERNMENT should reconsider borrowing money for road projects thatt he Bahamas does not need, and focus more on creating a feasible economic stimulus plan that buttresses thisn ation’s foreign exchange reserves, the organizers of last week’s National Economic Summit (NES Lynden Nairn and Lester Cox said they held the Eco-n omic Summit in order to “identify ways to positively impact the Bahamas’ current a ccount balance in the immediate to medium term”. They said they have identified preliminary ways that the Government and private sec-t or could use the current econ omic situation to improve the B ahamas’ current account bala nce by $1 billion. We believe that government spending should flow into areas that would have a genuine simulative effect,” said Mr Nairn. “It is not true that every dollar spent by Government, no matter how well intentioned, is stimulative. “In our context, government spending that has the effect of reducing the current account deficit is stimulative.” He said that $1 billion could be generated by the fisheries, energy, food production, and trade and manufacturing industries, while causing full e mployment, less reliance on tourism and an increase in entrepreneurial numbers. Mr Nairn said there had to be a vast improvement andu pgrades to some of these sect ors in order to achieve the g oals set out by the summit. F or example, Mr Nairn said t here was a need in fisheries to focus more on marine security, in order to reduce poaching. E E n n e e r r g g y y In the energy sector, he said public transportation improvements should be addressed and liquefied natural gas (LNG With regard to food production, Mr Nairn said abattoirs needed to be expanded, and the Bahamas should produce 100 per cent of its select fruits and vegetables needs. I n the trade and manufacturing sectors, greater exploitation of the Freeport Container Port and aggressive promotion of the Bahamas asa jurisdiction for light manuf acturing was required. As we move into phase t wo of the NES, we expect f urther refinement of the above goals through conversations with the public and private sectors, as well as with members of the Government and Official Opposition,” said Mr Nairn. He added that the first steps the Government and nation would have to agree to would be the pursuit of billion dollar account improvement, and to agree that it will be achieved within three years. “We might not have another opportunity in our life to effect the transformation we need. So less the world’s econo my improves and we return to the status quo, let us embrace this crisis now and convert it to the opportunity that it offers,” Mr Nairn said. H e added that the draft r eport created out of discuss ion from the Economic Summ it is not intended to direct t he Government, but to create a clear strategy as to what the Bahamas has to do to weather the economic slump. “While we believe that recommendations emanating from the NES should be adopted, their pursuit will not mean that we will not experience pain. “It will mean, however, that we ameliorate the sting and set our country on the path to economic diversification and historical structural strength,” said Mr Nairn. Summit organisers unveil alternative $1bn stimulus Urge government to reconsider multi-million roads project borrowing to focus on current account F ROM page 1B Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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    n By JIM KUHNHENN WASHINGTON Confronting misgivings, even in his own party, President Barack Obama mounted a stout defense of his blueprint to overhaul the economy Thursday, declaring the national crisis is "not as bad as we think" andhis plans will speed recovery, according to the Associated Press . Challenged to provide encouragement as the nation's "confidence builder in chief," Obama said Americans shouldn't be whipsawed by bursts of either bad or good news and he was "highly optimistic" about the long term. The president's proposals for major health care, energy and education changes in the midst of economic hard times faced skepticism from both Democrats and Republicans on CapitolHill, as senators questioned his budget outlook and the deficits it envisions in the middle of thenext decade. But Obama, speaking to top executives of the Business Roundtable, expressed an optimistic vision and called for patience. Richard Parsons, chairman of beleaguered Citigroup Inc., asked if Obama could offer some help in a national battle "between confidence and fear." "A smidgen of good news and suddenly everything is doing great. A little bit of bad news and ooohh , we're down on the dumps," Obama said. "And I am obviously an object of this constantly varying assess ment. I am the object in chief of this varying assessment." "I don't think things are ever as good as they say, or ever as bad as they say," Obama added. "Things two years ago were not as good as we thought because there were a lot of underlying weaknesses in the economy. They're not as bad as we think they are now." "And my long-term projec tions are highly optimistic, if we take care of some of these longterm structural problems." But in Congress, Obama's budget plans were meeting resistance. Sen. Kent Conrad, the chairman of the Budget Committee called the track of future deficits "unsustainable" and singled out Obama's proposal for adding $634 billion in health care spending over the next 10 years. "Some of us have a real pause about the notion of putting sub stantially more money into the health care system when we've already got a bloated system," said Conrad, D-N.D. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, testifying before Conrad's committee, also encountered blunt questions about the administration's plans for shoring up the nation's banks. He reiterated the administra tion's goal to lay out a privatepublic partnership to make up to $1 trillion in financing available to help banks clear their books of toxic, mortgage-relat ed assets that have led to a national credit freeze. Geithner hinted more mon ey might be required beyond the existing $700 billion finan cial rescue fund. "We certainly can start with the resources we have," he said. Meanwhile, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., played down talk that Democrats would consider a second economic stimulus bill. "I know that people have made suggestions that we should be ready to do something, but I really would like to see this stimulus package play out," Pelosi said. "It's just not something that, right now, is in the cards," she added later. The flurry of comments illus trated the complicated moving parts confronting Washington as the economy continues to decline, credit remains clogged and a new president advances broad and expensive initiatives. The money set aside to address those needs so far has been staggering $787 billion for an economic stimulus designed to save and create jobs, the $700 billion approved by Congress for the financial rescue package and hundreds of billions more through programs from the Federal Reserve Bank. On top of that, Obama wants to overhaul health care, reduce greenhouse-gas pollution and undertake major changes in energy policy. He's projectinga federal deficit of $1.75 trillion this year, by far the largest in history, but says he can get it down to $533 billion by 2013. "I am not choosing to address these additional challenges just because I feel like it, or because I'm a glutton for punishment," Obama told the Business Roundtable, a group of top business executives. "I am doing so because they are fundamen tal to our economic growth, and to ensuring that we don't have more crises like this in the future." Obama said his health and energy changes would build a foundation for lasting recovery, arguing that the current economic crisis was precipitated by an "illusion of prosperity." He told the business leaders he wants government to "right the ship" and then "let private enterprise do its magic." Critics of Obama's budget, such as Sen. Judd Gregg, RN.H., complained that the spending blueprint does not tackle the rising costs of Social Security and Medicare. Geithner said the administration intends to confront higher health care costs with broad changes that will lower Medicare spending. Geithner is at the center of Obama's economic policy, advocating for its budget pro posals and tax policies, as well as the rescue program for the financial sector. He faced questions on all those fronts before heading to London for talks Friday and Saturday with finance officials from the Group of 20 nations. Obama's budget would raise taxes, starting in 2011, on individuals earning more than $200,000 and on households earning more than $250,000. Geithner said the increases would kick in after the economy was expected to be in recovery. But he sidestepped a ques tion by Sen. Mike Crapo, RIdaho, about whether the administration would let the increases take effect if the economy had not recovered in two years. "We have to watch how the economy evolves," Geithn er said. On Thursday, Wall Street extended its rally to a third day, and Conrad took note because the markets have not always responded well to Geithner's public utterances. "You've done a superb job," Conrad joked as the hearing came to a close shortly after noon. "Markets are up over 100." The Dow Jones industrials rose 239.66 points for the day on a string of hopeful news, apparently unconnected to Geithner. At the White House, the administration conferred with state officials about how the $787 billion in stimulus money will go out. Vice President Joe Biden opened the meeting by warning state officials that if they misuse money from the stimulus package, they should not expect more help from the federal gov ernment for a long time. "If we don't get this right, folks, this is the end of the abil ity to convince Congress that anything should go to the states," Biden said. Added Obama: "If we see money being misspent, we're going to put a stop to it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t&2 $WWRUQH\VIRUWKH([HFXWRU 5XVW\%HWKHO'ULYH 1DVVDX%DKDPDV Obama: Economic crisis 'not as bad as we think' PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA, left, greets Citigroup chief executive officer Richard Parsons after speaking about the economy at a business roundtable discussion at a hotel in Washington, Thursday, March 12, 2009. A P P h o t o / C h a r l e s D h a r a p a k n BOSTON Nationalization of banks would be a "nightmare" that would further undermine confidence in the nation's financial system, Bank of America Chief Executive Officer Kenneth Lewis said Thursday, a ccording to the Associated Press . L ewis said a full-scale government takeover in which shareholders would be wiped out would "send shudders" through the investment community and is not necessary to stabilize the country's banking system. " It would also give the false impression that all banks are insolvent and investors would immediately start betting on which banks would be next, possibly creating a self-fulfilling prophecy," Lewis told about 450 corporate leaders at a luncheon sponsored by Boston Coll ege's Chief Executives' Club of Boston. He said government control of large banks would "politicize lending decisions" and damage the economy. Lewis, who has been criticized for large bonuses Merrill Lynch executives collected as the government was providing billions inb ailout money, said he understands the outrage felt by taxpayers. Bank of America, based in Charlotte, N.C., acquired New Yorkbased Merrill on Jan. 1. Lewis said because of the decline in its 2008 earnings, Bank of A merica paid no year-end bonuses to members of its executive management team. But he said extending such caps deeper into an organization could prompt non-executive associates to go to work for foreign banks. " Such a loss hurts our company and our shareholders," Lewis said. While acknowledging that many banks "are under a lot of pressure," Lewis said the industry is not in "nearly as dire shape as some would have us believe." " As bad as our economy is right now, I am still optimistic about our long-term prospects," he said. "And I believe the financial services industry and the federal government are doing many of the right things to turn this cycle a round and restore economic growth." Nationalisation warning n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor CLICO (Bahamas lapse, and the investments made in its annuities by many company pension funds, has not made the work of theG overnment’s pension reform t ask force “more urgent”, a minister told Tribune Business yesterday. Zhivargo Laing said: There’s nothing the private pension task force is considering that has been made m ore urgent by the CLICO m atter.” Tribune Business has been told that the pension reform task force has already met t wice and received its mandate from the Government, something Mr Laing confirmed. “The whole issue of regulating private pensions is s omething everyone knows h as to be taken into considera tion,” Mr Laing said. It’s important considering what we want to do in the s hort and long-term, in terms of encouraging and protecti ng savings. There are many benefits, from an economic point of view, to increasing national savings. The committee has been given their remit, and we look forward to hearing from them when they report.” Increased domestic savings, Mr Laing explained, increased the pool of funding to support Bahamians in retirement, and enabled them to take advantage of more economic opportunities. He added that the Government had set the pension r eform committee no reporti ng deadline, “except to say we want them to do their work as expeditiously as possible”. Among the issues the committee will likely look at are whether to make private pensions mandatory and how, p lus regulating the pensions sector in terms of investment advisers and trustees. Meanwhile, Tribune Business understands that CLICO (Bahamas A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, is looking a t paying off the $400,000 loan owed to FirstCaribbean Inter-n ational Bank (Bahamas lowing receipt of the bank’s d emand letter requesting i mmediate payment. T he bank is understood to h old a mortgage over three CLICO (Bahamas m aking it a secured creditor and placing it at the top of the q ueue. Failure to pay would result in FirstCaribbean foreclosing on that real estate, thus d epriving the creditors of any upside the liquidator might g enerate from selling that land. Pension reform ‘not made more urgent’ by CLICO Zhivargo Laing

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f 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI6HSWHPEHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-DQXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $ UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI-DQXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Boating arrivals down some 20% F rank Herhold, executive firector of the Marine Industries Association of South Florida (MIASF Tribune Business that the popular Bertram Hatteras fishing tour-n ament had become a “victim” of the economy. The tournament had tradit ionally provided an economic boost for Marsh Harbour, A baco. He added that Fort Lauderdale marinas had seen as harp reduction in the amount of vessels moored at their slips, which he read as a bad sign for Bahamian marinas. “Our marinas at this time o f year, for the first time, have some empty slip,s and if the boats are not coming here from the Northeast along the intercoastal waterway, they’ren ot going to make it over to the Bahamas,” he said. “Fort Lauderdale is the tra d itional jumping off spot for some great cruising in B ahamian waters we help each other in that respect.” Mr Herhold said, though, t hat the MIASF is involved in an outreach endeavour to e ncourage more visiting yachts, which could also mean more business for the Bahamas. H e said fuel prices should no longer hinder boat travel, but the state of the economym ight. “There is a degree of conc ern,” he said. “Americans are tightening their belts like never before. I think they are stillu sing the boats, but they aren’t going great distances. “So we’re looking at a reduction in the number of visiting yachts, which trans-l ates into a reduction in visiting yachts for the Bahamas.” S ome Bahamas-based resorts with marinas have reported that they themselves have seen only slight reductions in private vessel arrivals. H arper Sibley, general manager of Valentines Resort and Marina in Harbour Island,s aid his oepration had seen only a 10 per cent reduction in b usiness compared to the same time last year. O O p p e e r r a a t t i i o o n n s s He added that visitors who arrive on their private boats and yachts represent one-thirdo f their room nights, a significant segment of the resort’so perations. Mr Sibley said repeat customers are keeping Valentine’s occupancy levels high, but the mega yachts keepc oming and represent a significant portion of revenues for the resort. “It’s the smaller boats that don’t come as much some of it is weather related,” Mr Sib-l ey said. “It’s actually better than I thought it would be, but Har-b our Island is a world class destination so people want to k eep coming here.” Mr Sibley said because of reduced fuel prices and thed emand for the Harbour Island product, he anticipates a good summer for the resort. “Should be good as last year,” he said. O wner and Operator of Harbour Central Marina, Paul Neely, echoed similar senti-m ents. He said just four yachts are g iving his company a surprisingly good year, while other businesses owned by himself,i ncluding an oil company, are down about 50 per cent. M r Neely said the larger yachts make up the revenue lag from the absence of manys maller vessels. “Dock slip rentals are up,” he said. FROM page 1B “There is a degree of concern. Americans are tightening their belts like never before. I think t hey are still using the boats, but they aren’t going great distances.” Frank Herhold

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    Presently, the Bahamas has the s olitary TIEA with the US, meaning it is at risk of running afoul of the OECD again. “Going forward, we’re going to have to, just short of yielding,m ove away from the existing model,” Mr Smith said of the Bahamas’ future in financial services. I doubt they’ll [the OECD and G-20] find much to begin with, so we might as well enter TIEAs with 11 of these countries. It’s just a question of expandingt he existing network. We have one TIEA already and should look at that, in the sense of having different provisions for TIEAs t hat could provide reciprocal benefits for us. There may be something the European countries can give us in return.” In return for signing the TIEA w ith the US in 2001, Washington finally granted a tax break designed to help the Bahamian tourism industry. The convention t ax benefit allows US businessmen travelling to the Bahamas to attend conventions/conferences to deduct the costs incurred in doing so against their annuali ncome tax returns. T his brought the Bahamas into l ine with other nations, who had enjoyed the US convention tax benefit for years and obtained a competitive advantage over this n ation when it came to the g roups/convention tourism business. Mr Smith suggested that the Bahamas “ought to be looking f or treaty partners, rather than have one come here looking to impose conditions on us”. The former minister’s comm ents back those of ex-Bahamas F inancial Services Board (BFSB chairman Michael Paton, who previously told Tribune Businesst hat the Bahamas must “transition” its financial services industry t o a completely new business model within the next 10-15 years if it is to survive long-term. The future, he added, was likely to involve double tax treaties a nd a ‘corporate tax environment’ for local companies. “I think we’re going to have to seriously consider tax transparency points,a nd how we re-position ourselves, and how we develop a strategic plan going forward,” Mr Paton had said. “I think we’re going to be trans itioning, if not to a TIEA environment, which is probably an easier solution, to a more sophisticated solution that would be ad ouble tax treaty network. That would require us to have in place certain standards of taxation. “I can see a move, in the residential business environment, to h aving a corporate tax environment for businesses doing business here, resident businesses. “It would probably make sense t o transition to a corporate tax environment, which would have aspects of taxation that would be recognised by international standards. On the back of that, we w ould be able to negotiate double tax treaties. “The trick is going to be to protect non-resident, private banking businesses from that tax.” T he debate over the Bahamas’ future in financial services is raging as Liechtenstein yesterday bowed to outside pressure, agreeing to adopt international stan-d ards on cross-border tax cooperation in an effort to shed itsl abel as a ‘tax haven’. Mr Smith told Tribune Busin ess t hat developed countries “want to remove the veil of confidentiality at any cost”, despite the fact that wealthy financial ser-v ices clients required it to prot ect themselves from kidnapping or serve extended families scattered across the globe. “There are so many reasons w hy you need confidentiality,” Mr Smith argued. “These guys are just bulldozing ahead. You’ll just be seeing more and more of this.” H e added, though, that the OECD’s own studies had “found the Bahamas had standards for transparency that exceeded some of the OECD countries”. P ressure on the Bahamian financial services industry continues to come from various quarters. The US, in its recent drugc ontrol report, said this nation needed to “ensure that there is a public registry of the beneficial owners of all entities licensed in its offshore financial centre”. B ut John Delaney, attorney and managing partner at Higgs & Johnson, told Tribune Business there was “absolutely” nor eason why such a public registry was necessary, given that beneficial ownership information for every Bahamas-incorporated entity had to be kept at their respect ive registered offices. This was required by both the Banks and Trust Companies (RegulationF inancial, Corporate and Service Providers Act 2000, and the information could be obtained from the registered agents via several routes, such as court orders, their r espective regulators or “any duly authorised person”. “I can see no legitimate reason to require a public registry. Why should one need to have that i nformation open to the public gaze,” asked Mr Delaney. “The US is calling for more that what several of their states have. There are no bearer shares in theB ahamas.” He suggested that the US r eport may have been based on misinformation and a lack of k nowledge on what information sharing procedures there were in the Bahamas. Describing the ‘public registry’ a s “overblown”, Mr Delaney said: The OECD is certainly pushing the obtaining of beneficial ownership information. The Bahamas answered that by abolishing beare r shares, and requiring registered agents to maintain private reg istries that are open to public officials and due legal processes.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.596.590.001,0000.4380.05015.00.76% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs1.311.430.120.1110.05212.93.64% 3.002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.7940.40013.23.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.002,0220.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44321.3828Colina Money Market Fund1.44320.674.37 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.739711.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 6-Mar-09 31-Jan-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 813.80 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 12 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.28 | CHG 0.12 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -52.08 | YTD % -3.04BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases 1 27,&(2)6$/( ([SRFUHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQ&RPSDQ\f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t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t&2 &KDPEHUV HHW 1DVVDX $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHU fKHHJLVWU\RIWKHXSUHPH&RXUW $GPLQLVWUDWRUVIFHDW&ODUHQFHRZQ/RQJ,VODQG f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page 1B Financial services ‘must move away from model today’ I can see a move, i n the residential b usiness e nvironment, to having a corporate t ax environment – f or businesses d oing business here, resident businesses M ichael Paton one’s very concerned” regarding accounts receivables, Mr Ward told Tribune Business that the new Domestic Insurance Act had several implications for Bahamas-based carriers in this area. With the onus on them to collect accounts receivables, a number of carriers were looking to upgrade their systems and stipulate a shorter collection time in which brokers/agents had to pass on due premium income to ensure “there’s a quicker handling of the processes involved”. In addition, Mr Ward told Tribune Business that there were solvency implications for carriers, given that the Registrar of Insurance’s Office might “discount” receivables balances beyond a certain date under the new Act. As a result, insurance carriers were looking at “any issues that might arise” when the new Domestic Insurance Act comes into force. And this newspaper knows of at least one Bahamas-based carrier that is aggressively trimming the number of agents that write business for it in order to tackle its accounts receivables. It has also reduced the payment window for when premium income has to be remitted to it. Obtaining due premium income has been an ongoing problem among Bahamian general insurance carriers, with a small minority of brokers and agents not passing this on. Tribune Business knows of several occasions where carriers have stopped doing business with certain brokers/agents because of this, and in some cases the premium receivable balances have built up into multi-million dollar sums. However, one Bahamas-based broker yesterday told Tribune Business that he would oppose the idea of escrow accounts for insurance intermediaries such as himself, arguing that carriers were effectively “trying to solve problems of their own making”. Bruce Ferguson, head of Professional Insurance Consultants, said: “I would certainly oppose any attempt to introduce escrow accounts. It was never considered necessary in the 15-plus years we were debating the new Act, and just because companies have run into problems of their own making, it doesn’t mean that we should have them now.” Other brokers and agents, spoken to by Tribune Business on condition of anonymity, told this newspaper that Bahamas-based car riers needed to do better due diligence on brokers and agents they took on to write new business for them, and also improve their monitoring of accounts receivables. However, one senior insurance carrier executive, speaking to Tribune Business on condition of anonymity, told this newspaper that requiring brokers/agents to put funds into escrow would “be a step in the right direction, as it would alleviate some of the receivables issue. It’s a real, real concern”. The industry source said Bahamian insurance laws and regulations, like most in the Caribbean, were focused heavily on the consumer and keeping premium prices cheap, almost to the “detriment of the product”. “The protection of the carrier; that should be the overriding concern, to ensure carriers are adequately capitalised and do not fail when there is a big event,” the source said. “The Bahamas needs to have an industry that can deal with the big event, and deal with it well, because the economic conse quences of not dealing with it well could be disastrous.” Insurers face ‘serious issue’ of mounting receivables F ROM page 1B

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    APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER Of the sun (5 25 Fast (7 Down 1 Be equal to (5 2 Be situated (3 3 Primitive (4 4 Large cage for birds (6 5 Spacious and splendid (8 6 Consequence (9 7 Atone for (7 11 Show good prospects (5,4 13 Believed to be (5,3 14 Abundant (7 16 Intense repugnance (6 19 Devoutness (5 20 Stage in a p rocess (4 23 Sorrowful (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Acheater cheated? Turn a blind eye (7 5 Brush or b rushwood (5 8 In this form, two sides are perfectly matched (9 9 Consumed but not all e aten (3 1 0 Right out of line (4 12 Star skater is upset (8 14 Untidy little beasts (6 1 5 He has an important job, on paper (6 17 Arrests about a thousand supporters (8 18 Bill joins me at the s ummit (4 21 Play one’s part out of character (3 22 Put the stopper on soft d rinks dispenser (9 24 Yet it may be quite a y oung tree (5 25 One would have to go back in time to get it (7 Down 1 It’s cold, but I would make i t hot (5 2 There’s no holding a key m an given some authority (3 3 Twice reduced by 50% (4 4 Come into service? (6 5 Forces one to hang about instead of going to work (8 6 Article is made p ractical (9 7 Small cask for fresh water or sea water? (7 11 Reckoned the date and times are changed (9 1 3 Don’t forget about a person in society (8 14 Unofficial news of an escape (7 1 6 In a way my sort is hardly fair (6 1 9 One may slip and fall into it (5 20 It’s neckwear, we hear, for the dandy (4 2 3 Enjoy spadework? (3 Across:1 Flatfish, 5 Fair, 9 Lucre, 10 Leading, 11 Out of spirits, 13 Notice, 14 Aspire, 17 Extravagance, 20 Enrages, 21 Inner, 22 Twin, 23 M eanness. Down:1 File, 2 Account, 3 Free of charge, 4 Splash, 6 Alibi, 7 Register, 8 Radio station, 12 Interest, 15 Incense, 16 Parsee, 18 Tarsi, 19 Arts. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sociable, 5 Pass, 9 Slant, 10 Satiate, 11 Single-minded, 13 Rating, 14 Astral, 17 Marksmanship, 20 Sibling, 21 G nome, 22 Sulk, 23 Leathery. Down:1 So-so, 2 Chariot, 3 Antagonistic, 4 Lessen, 6 Award, 7 Steadily, 8 At first sight, 12 Premises, 15 Rhizome, 16 Haggle, 1 8 Rebel, 19 Rely. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 89 101112 1 3 1415 16 1 71819 20 212223 2 425 1 234567 89 101112 1 3 1415 16 1 71819 20 212223 2 425Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Afever (7 5 To chatter (5 8 Wearisome routine (9 9 Useful hint (3 10 Pile (4 12 Standards for judging (8 14 AFrench brandy (6 15 Lay waste (6 17 Supplier (8 18 To lash (4 21 Be indebted for (3 22 Advance indication (9 24 Of the sun (5 25 Fast (7 Down 1 Be equal to (5 2 Be situated (3 3 Primitive (4 4 Large cage for birds (6 5 Spacious and splendid (8 6 Consequence (9 7 Atone for (7 11 Show good prospects (5,4 13 Believed to be (5,3 14 Abundant (7 16 Intense repugnance (6 19 Devoutness (5 20 Stage in a process (4 23 Sorrowful (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Acheater cheated? Turn a blind eye (7 5 Brush or brushwood (5 8 In this form, two sides are perfectly matched (9 9 Consumed but not all eaten (3 10 Right out of line (4 12 Star skater is upset (8 14 Untidy little beasts (6 15 He has an important job, on paper (6 17 Arrests about a thousand supporters (8 18 Bill joins me at the summit (4 21 Play one’s part out of character (3 22 Put the stopper on soft drinks dispenser (9 24 Yet it may be quite a young tree (5 25 One would have to go back in time to get it (7 Down 1 It’s cold, but I would make it hot (5 2 There’s no holding a key man given some authority (3 3 Twice reduced by 50% (4 4 Come into service? (6 5 Forces one to hang about instead of going to work (8 6 Article is made practical (9 7 Small cask for fresh water or sea water? (7 11 Reckoned the date and times are changed (9 13 Don’t forget about a person in society (8 14 Unofficial news of an escape (7 16 In a way my sort is hardly fair (6 19 One may slip and fall into it (5 20 It’s neckwear, we hear, for the dandy (4 23 Enjoy spadework? (3 Across:1 Flatfish, 5 Fair, 9 Lucre, 10 Leading, 11 Out of spirits, 13 Notice, 14 Aspire, 17 Extravagance, 20 Enrages, 21 Inner, 22 Twin, 23 Meanness. Down:1 File, 2 Account, 3 Free of charge, 4 Splash, 6 Alibi, 7 Register, 8 Radio station, 12 Interest, 15 Incense, 16 Parsee, 18 Tarsi, 19 Arts. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sociable, 5 Pass, 9 Slant, 10 Satiate, 11 Single-minded, 13 Rating, 14 Astral, 17 Marksmanship, 20 Sibling, 21 Gnome, 22 Sulk, 23 Leathery. Down:1 So-so, 2 Chariot, 3 Antagonistic, 4 Lessen, 6 Award, 7 Steadily, 8 At first sight, 12 Premises, 15 Rhizome, 16 Haggle, 18 Rebel, 19 Rely. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 89 101112 13 1415 16 171819 20 212223 2425 1234567 89 101112 13 1415 16 171819 20 212223 2425 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Afever (7 5 To chatter (5 8 Wearisome routine (9 9 Useful hint (3 10 Pile (4 12 Standards for judging (8 14 AFrench brandy (6 15 Lay waste (6 17 Supplier (8 18 To lash (4 21 Be indebted for (3 22 Advance indication (9 24 Of the sun (5 25 Fast (7 Down 1 Be equal to (5 2 Be situated (3 3 Primitive (4 4 Large cage for birds (6 5 Spacious and splendid (8 6 Consequence (9 7 Atone for (7 11 Show good prospects (5,4 13 Believed to be (5,3 14 Abundant (7 16 Intense repugnance (6 19 Devoutness (5 20 Stage in a process (4 23 Sorrowful (3 fbrf J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Acheater cheated? Turn a blind eye (7 5 Brush or brushwood (5 8 In this form, two sides are perfectly matched (9 9 Consumed but not all eaten (3 10 Right out of line (4 12 Star skater is upset (8 14 Untidy little beasts (6 15 He has an important job, on paper (6 17 Arrests about a thousand supporters (8 18 Bill joins me at the summit (4 21 Play one’s part out of character (3 22 Put the stopper on soft drinks dispenser (9 24 Yet it may be quite a young tree (5 25 One would have to go back in time to get it (7 Down 1 It’s cold, but I would make it hot (5 2 There’s no holding a key man given some authority (3 3 Twice reduced by 50% (4 4 Come into service? (6 5 Forces one to hang about instead of going to work (8 6 Article is made practical (9 7 Small cask for fresh water or sea water? (7 11 Reckoned the date and times are changed (9 13 Don’t forget about a person in society (8 14 Unofficial news of an escape (7 16 In a way my sort is hardly fair (6 19 One may slip and fall into it (5 20 It’s neckwear, we hear, for the dandy (4 23 Enjoy spadework? (3 Across:1 Flatfish, 5 Fair, 9 Lucre, 10 Leading, 11 Out of spirits, 13 Notice, 14 Aspire, 17 Extravagance, 20 Enrages, 21 Inner, 22 Twin, 23 Meanness. Down:1 File, 2 Account, 3 Free of charge, 4 Splash, 6 Alibi, 7 Register, 8 Radio station, 12 Interest, 15 Incense, 16 Parsee, 18 Tarsi, 19 Arts. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sociable, 5 Pass, 9 Slant, 10 Satiate, 11 Single-minded, 13 Rating, 14 Astral, 17 Marksmanship, 20 Sibling, 21 Gnome, 22 Sulk, 23 Leathery. Down:1 So-so, 2 Chariot, 3 Antagonistic, 4 Lessen, 6 Award, 7 Steadily, 8 At first sight, 12 Premises, 15 Rhizome, 16 Haggle, 18 Rebel, 19 Rely. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 9 101112 1 3 1415 16 171819 20 212223 2425 1 234567 8 9 101112 1 3 1415 16 171819 20 212223 2425 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Afever (7 5 To chatter (5 8 Wearisome routine (9 9 Useful hint (3 10 Pile (4 12 Standards for judging (8 14 AFrench brandy (6 15 Lay waste (6 17 Supplier (8 18 To lash (4 21 Be indebted for (3 22 Advance indication (9 24 Of the sun (5 25 Fast (7 Down 1 Be equal to (5 2 Be situated (3 3 Primitive (4 4 Large cage for birds (6 5 Spacious and splendid (8 6 Consequence (9 7 Atone for (7 11 Show good prospects (5,4 13 Believed to be (5,3 14 Abundant (7 16 Intense repugnance (6 19 Devoutness (5 20 Stage in a process (4 23 Sorrowful (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Acheater cheated? Turn a blind eye (7 5 Brush or brushwood (5 8 In this form, two sides are perfectly matched (9 9 Consumed but not all eaten (3 10 Right out of line (4 12 Star skater is upset (8 14 Untidy little beasts (6 15 He has an important job, on paper (6 17 Arrests about a thousand supporters (8 18 Bill joins me at the summit (4 21 Play one’s part out of character (3 22 Put the stopper on soft drinks dispenser (9 24 Yet it may be quite a young tree (5 25 One would have to go back in time to get it (7 Down 1 It’s cold, but I would make it hot (5 2 There’s no holding a key man given some authority (3 3 Twice reduced by 50% (4 4 Come into service? (6 5 Forces one to hang about instead of going to work (8 6 Article is made practical (9 7 Small cask for fresh water or sea water? (7 11 Reckoned the date and times are changed (9 13 Don’t forget about a person in society (8 14 Unofficial news of an escape (7 16 In a way my sort is hardly fair (6 19 One may slip and fall into it (5 20 It’s neckwear, we hear, for the dandy (4 23 Enjoy spadework? (3 Across:1 Flatfish, 5 Fair, 9 Lucre, 10 Leading, 11 Out of spirits, 13 Notice, 14 Aspire, 17 Extravagance, 20 Enrages, 21 Inner, 22 Twin, 23 Meanness. Down:1 File, 2 Account, 3 Free of charge, 4 Splash, 6 Alibi, 7 Register, 8 Radio station, 12 Interest, 15 Incense, 16 Parsee, 18 Tarsi, 19 Arts. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sociable, 5 Pass, 9 Slant, 10 Satiate, 11 Single-minded, 13 Rating, 14 Astral, 17 Marksmanship, 20 Sibling, 21 Gnome, 22 Sulk, 23 Leathery. Down:1 So-so, 2 Chariot, 3 Antagonistic, 4 Lessen, 6 Award, 7 Steadily, 8 At first sight, 12 Premises, 15 Rhizome, 16 Haggle, 18 Rebel, 19 Rely. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 89 101112 13 1415 16 171819 20 212223 2425 1234567 89 101112 13 1415 16 171819 20 212223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Afever (7 5 To chatter (5 8 Wearisome routine (9 9 Useful hint (3 10 Pile (4 12 Standards for judging (8 14 AFrench brandy (6 15 Lay waste (6 17 Supplier (8 18 To lash (4 21 Be indebted for (3 22 Advance indication (9 24 Of the sun (5 25 Fast (7 Down 1 Be equal to (5 2 Be situated (3 3 Primitive (4 4 Large cage for birds (6 5 Spacious and splendid (8 6 Consequence (9 7 Atone for (7 11 Show good prospects (5,4 13 Believed to be (5,3 14 Abundant (7 16 Intense repugnance (6 19 Devoutness (5 20 Stage in a process (4 23 Sorrowful (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Acheater cheated? Turn a blind eye (7 5 Brush or brushwood (5 8 In this form, two sides are perfectly matched (9 9 Consumed but not all eaten (3 10 Right out of line (4 12 Star skater is upset (8 14 Untidy little beasts (6 15 He has an important job, on paper (6 17 Arrests about a thousand supporters (8 18 Bill joins me at the summit (4 21 Play one’s part out of character (3 22 Put the stopper on soft drinks dispenser (9 24 Yet it may be quite a young tree (5 25 One would have to go back in time to get it (7 Down 1 It’s cold, but I would make it hot (5 2 There’s no holding a key man given some authority (3 3 Twice reduced by 50% (4 4 Come into service? (6 5 Forces one to hang about instead of going to work (8 6 Article is made practical (9 7 Small cask for fresh water or sea water? (7 11 Reckoned the date and times are changed (9 13 Don’t forget about a person in society (8 14 Unofficial news of an escape (7 16 In a way my sort is hardly fair (6 19 One may slip and fall into it (5 20 It’s neckwear, we hear, for the dandy (4 23 Enjoy spadework? (3 Across:1 Flatfish, 5 Fair, 9 Lucre, 10 Leading, 11 Out of spirits, 13 Notice, 14 Aspire, 17 Extravagance, 20 Enrages, 21 Inner, 22 Twin, 23 Meanness. Down:1 File, 2 Account, 3 Free of charge, 4 Splash, 6 Alibi, 7 Register, 8 Radio station, 12 Interest, 15 Incense, 16 Parsee, 18 Tarsi, 19 Arts. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sociable, 5 Pass, 9 Slant, 10 Satiate, 11 Single-minded, 13 Rating, 14 Astral, 17 Marksmanship, 20 Sibling, 21 Gnome, 22 Sulk, 23 Leathery. Down:1 So-so, 2 Chariot, 3 Antagonistic, 4 Lessen, 6 Award, 7 Steadily, 8 At first sight, 12 Premises, 15 Rhizome, 16 Haggle, 18 Rebel, 19 Rely. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 89 101112 13 1415 16 171819 20 212223 2425 1234567 89 101112 13 1415 16 171819 20 212223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Afever (7 5 To chatter (5 8 Wearisome routine (9 9 Useful hint (3 10 Pile (4 12 Standards for judging (8 14 AFrench brandy (6 15 Lay waste (6 17 Supplier (8 18 To lash (4 21 Be indebted for (3 22 Advance indication (9 24 Of the sun (5 25 Fast (7 Down 1 Be equal to (5 2 Be situated (3 3 Primitive (4 4 Large cage for birds (6 5 Spacious and splendid (8 6 Consequence (9 7 Atone for (7 11 Show good prospects (5,4 13 Believed to be (5,3 14 Abundant (7 16 Intense repugnance (6 19 Devoutness (5 20 Stage in a process (4 23 Sorrowful (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Acheater cheated? Turn a blind eye (7 5 Brush or brushwood (5 8 In this form, two sides are perfectly matched (9 9 Consumed but not all eaten (3 10 Right out of line (4 12 Star skater is upset (8 14 Untidy little beasts (6 15 He has an important job, on paper (6 17 Arrests about a thousand supporters (8 18 Bill joins me at the summit (4 21 Play one’s part out of character (3 22 Put the stopper on soft drinks dispenser (9 24 Yet it may be quite a young tree (5 25 One would have to go back in time to get it (7 Down 1 It’s cold, but I would make it hot (5 2 There’s no holding a key man given some authority (3 3 Twice reduced by 50% (4 4 Come into service? (6 5 Forces one to hang about instead of going to work (8 6 Article is made practical (9 7 Small cask for fresh water or sea water? (7 11 Reckoned the date and times are changed (9 13 Don’t forget about a person in society (8 14 Unofficial news of an escape (7 16 In a way my sort is hardly fair (6 19 One may slip and fall into it (5 20 It’s neckwear, we hear, for the dandy (4 23 Enjoy spadework? (3 Across:1 Flatfish, 5 Fair, 9 Lucre, 10 Leading, 11 Out of spirits, 13 Notice, 14 Aspire, 17 Extravagance, 20 Enrages, 21 Inner, 22 Twin, 23 Meanness. Down:1 File, 2 Account, 3 Free of charge, 4 Splash, 6 Alibi, 7 Register, 8 Radio station, 12 Interest, 15 Incense, 16 Parsee, 18 Tarsi, 19 Arts. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sociable, 5 Pass, 9 Slant, 10 Satiate, 11 Single-minded, 13 Rating, 14 Astral, 17 Marksmanship, 20 Sibling, 21 Gnome, 22 Sulk, 23 Leathery. Down:1 So-so, 2 Chariot, 3 Antagonistic, 4 Lessen, 6 Award, 7 Steadily, 8 At first sight, 12 Premises, 15 Rhizome, 16 Haggle, 18 Rebel, 19 Rely. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 89 101112 13 1415 16 171819 20 212223 2425 1234567 89 101112 13 1415 16 171819 20 212223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u Across 1 Afever (7 5 To chatter (5 8 Wearisome routine (9 9 Useful hint (3 10 Pile (4 12 Standards for judging (8 14 AFrench brandy (6 15 Lay waste (6 17 Supplier (8 18 To lash (4 21 Be indebted for (3 22 Advance indication (9 24 Of the sun (5 25 Fast (7 Down 1 Be equal to (5 2 Be situated (3 3 Primitive (4 4 Large cage for birds (6 5 Spacious and splendid (8 6 Consequence (9 7 Atone for (7 11 Show good prospects (5,4 13 Believed to be (5,3 14 Abundant (7 16 Intense repugnance (6 19 Devoutness (5 20 Stage in a process (4 23 Sorrowful (3 fbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Acheater cheated? Turn a blind eye (7 5 Brush or brushwood (5 8 In this form, two sides are perfectly matched (9 9 Consumed but not all eaten (3 10 Right out of line (4 12 Star skater is upset (8 14 Untidy little beasts (6 15 He has an important job, on paper (6 17 Arrests about a thousand supporters (8 18 Bill joins me at the summit (4 21 Play one’s part out of character (3 22 Put the stopper on soft drinks dispenser (9 24 Yet it may be quite a young tree (5 25 One would have to go back in time to get it (7 Down 1 It’s cold, but I would make it hot (5 2 There’s no holding a key man given some authority (3 3 Twice reduced by 50% (4 4 Come into service? (6 5 Forces one to hang about instead of going to work (8 6 Article is made practical (9 7 Small cask for fresh water or sea water? (7 11 Reckoned the date and times are changed (9 13 Don’t forget about a person in society (8 14 Unofficial news of an escape (7 16 In a way my sort is hardly fair (6 19 One may slip and fall into it (5 20 It’s neckwear, we hear, for the dandy (4 23 Enjoy spadework? (3 Across:1 Flatfish, 5 Fair, 9 Lucre, 10 Leading, 11 Out of spirits, 13 Notice, 14 Aspire, 17 Extravagance, 20 Enrages, 21 Inner, 22 Twin, 23 Meanness. Down:1 File, 2 Account, 3 Free of charge, 4 Splash, 6 Alibi, 7 Register, 8 Radio station, 12 Interest, 15 Incense, 16 Parsee, 18 Tarsi, 19 Arts. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sociable, 5 Pass, 9 Slant, 10 Satiate, 11 Single-minded, 13 Rating, 14 Astral, 17 Marksmanship, 20 Sibling, 21 Gnome, 22 Sulk, 23 Leathery. Down:1 So-so, 2 Chariot, 3 Antagonistic, 4 Lessen, 6 Award, 7 Steadily, 8 At first sight, 12 Premises, 15 Rhizome, 16 Haggle, 18 Rebel, 19 Rely. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 89 101112 13 1 415 1 6 1 71819 20 212223 2425 1 234567 89 101112 13 1 415 1 6 1 71819 20 212223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a BY STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Afever (7 5 To chatter (5 8 Wearisome routine (9 9 Useful hint (3 10 Pile (4 12 Standards for judging (8 14 AFrench brandy (6 15 Lay waste (6 17 Supplier (8 18 To lash (4 21 Be indebted for (3 22 Advance indication (9 24 Of the sun (5 25 Fast (7 Down 1 Be equal to (5 2 Be situated (3 3 Primitive (4 4 Large cage for birds (6 5 Spacious and splendid (8 6 Consequence (9 7 Atone for (7 11 Show good prospects (5,4 13 Believed to be (5,3 14 Abundant (7 16 Intense repugnance (6 19 Devoutness (5 20 Stage in a process (4 23 Sorrowful (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Acheater cheated? Turn a blind eye (7 5 Brush or brushwood (5 8 In this form, two sides are perfectly matched (9 9 Consumed but not all eaten (3 10 Right out of line (4 12 Star skater is upset (8 14 Untidy little beasts (6 15 He has an important job, on paper (6 17 Arrests about a thousand supporters (8 18 Bill joins me at the summit (4 21 Play one’s part out of character (3 22 Put the stopper on soft drinks dispenser (9 24 Yet it may be quite a young tree (5 25 One would have to go back in time to get it (7 Down 1 It’s cold, but I would make it hot (5 2 There’s no holding a key man given some authority (3 3 Twice reduced by 50% (4 4 Come into service? (6 5 Forces one to hang about instead of going to work (8 6 Article is made practical (9 7 Small cask for fresh water or sea water? (7 11 Reckoned the date and times are changed (9 13 Don’t forget about a person in society (8 14 Unofficial news of an escape (7 16 In a way my sort is hardly fair (6 19 One may slip and fall into it (5 20 It’s neckwear, we hear, for the dandy (4 23 Enjoy spadework? (3 Across:1 Flatfish, 5 Fair, 9 Lucre, 10 Leading, 11 Out of spirits, 13 Notice, 14 Aspire, 17 Extravagance, 20 Enrages, 21 Inner, 22 Twin, 23 Meanness. Down:1 File, 2 Account, 3 Free of charge, 4 Splash, 6 Alibi, 7 Register, 8 Radio station, 12 Interest, 15 Incense, 16 Parsee, 18 Tarsi, 19 Arts. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Sociable, 5 Pass, 9 Slant, 10 Satiate, 11 Single-minded, 13 Rating, 14 Astral, 17 Marksmanship, 20 Sibling, 21 Gnome, 22 Sulk, 23 Leathery. Down:1 So-so, 2 Chariot, 3 Antagonistic, 4 Lessen, 6 Award, 7 Steadily, 8 At first sight, 12 Premises, 15 Rhizome, 16 Haggle, 18 Rebel, 19 Rely. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1234567 89 101112 13 1 415 16 171819 20 212223 2425 1234567 89 101112 13 1 415 16 171819 20 212223 2425 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R PAGE 7B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE tt r e g a

    PAGE 19

    ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 61F/16C Low: 62F/16C Low: 68F/20C C Low: 68F/20 Low: 69F/21C Low: 64 F/18C Low: 64F/18C High: 82F/27C High: 82F/27C High: 80 F/27C High: 82F/28C High: 82F/27C High: 78 F/26 High: 80F/27C Low: 62F/17C High: 79 F/26C Low: 62 F/17 High: 81 F/27CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 66F/19C High: 82F/28C Low: 66 F/19C High: 81F/27C Low: 64 F/18C High: 78F/26C Low: 64 F/18C High: 82F/28C Low: 64F/18C High: 84 F/29C Low: 70F/21C High: 80 F/27C Low: 65 F/18C High: 83F/28C Low: 66F/19C High: 84F/29C Low: 71 F/22C High: 82F/28C High: 78F/26CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13TH, 2009 THE TRIBUNETHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Nice with plenty of sunshine. Clear and comfortable. Warmer with plenty of sunshine. Mostly sunny and humid. Sunny to partly cloudy. High: 80 Low: 71 High: 84 High: 83 High: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Sunshine and patchy clouds. High: 80 Low: 73 Low: 72 Low: 71 AccuWeather RealFeel 84F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 71F 86-78F 93-74F 90-72F 88-67F Low: 67 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 75F/24C Low .................................................... 67F/19C Normal high ...................................... 79F/26C Normal low ........................................ 65F/18C Last year's high .................................. 88F/31C Last year's low .................................. 68F/20C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.98"Normal year to date ......................................4.10" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Last New First Full Mar . 18 Mar . 26 Apr . 2 Apr . 9 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:21 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:18 p.m. Moonrise . . . 10:04 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 8:38 a.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 10:12 a.m.2.74:04 a.m.-0.2 10:34 p.m.3.04:12 p.m.-0.2 10:52 a.m.2.54:48 a.m.-0.1 11:16 p.m.2.94:52 p.m.-0.1 11:32 a.m.2.45:32 a.m.0.1 ----5:33 p.m.0.1 12:01 a.m. 2.76:18 a.m.0.3 12:14 p.m. 2.2 6:17 p.m.0.2 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 90/3268/20s88/3173/22s Amsterdam50/1043/6c56/1345/7c Ankara, Turkey46/732/0r41/528/-2c Athens56/1344/6pc57/1344/6pc Auckland67/1953/11c66/1854/12s Bangkok98/3678/25pc90/3274/23pc Barbados84/2875/23s84/2875/23pc Barcelona66/1853/11pc68/2054/12s Beijing39/323/-5s54/1234/1pc Beirut70/2155/12sh71/2158/14pc Belgrade46/735/1r43/631/0r Berlin47/834/1sh48/845/7c Bermuda 70/2165/18sh71/2164/17pc Bogota65/1843/6t70/2143/6r Brussels55/1241/5pc57/1343/6pc Budapest49/936/2sh46/732/0pcBuenos Aires 82/2770/21pc88/3157/13t Cairo80/2654/12s74/2353/11s Calcutta 95/3573/22s94/3472/22s Calgar y49/927/-2c36/223/-5c Cancun84/2870/21s84/2870/21s Caracas79/2666/18pc83/2870/21sCasablanca 80/26 58/14 s 79/2655/12s Copenhagen 44/639/3c44/640/4r Dublin52/1143/6r50/1041/5shFrankfurt 52/11 37/2pc57/1337/2pc Geneva55/1235/1c62/1641/5pc Halifax27/-210/-12s32/017/-8pcHavana 84/28 63/17 s81/2764/17pc Helsinki34/127/-2pc36/228/-2sf Hong Kong 72/2257/13c68/2064/17pc Islamabad87/3059/15pc86/3060/15s Istanbul48/839/3c51/1045/7cJerusalem 68/2052/11r65/1844/6sh Johannesburg 74/23 53/11s74/2356/13s Kingston 84/28 72/22pc84/2876/24pc Lima85/2967/19c85/2966/18pc London 54/12 45/7 pc55/1241/5r Madrid73/2239/3s75/2343/6s Manila91/3275/23s93/3376/24pc Mexico City77/2550/10pc72/2247/8pc Monterrey63/1748/8c66/1852/11shMontreal 27/-219/-7s37/223/-5s Moscow 32/014/-10pc28/-210/-12pc Munich41/536/2sh45/737/2c Nairobi90/3257/13pc90/3258/14pc New Delhi84/2859/15pc84/2859/15s Oslo 32/025/-3sf36/232/0sn Paris 59/1543/6pc61/1645/7pc Prague45/734/1sh44/631/0c Rio de Janeiro87/3075/23c82/2772/22sh Riyadh86/3059/15s87/3063/17s Rome59/1545/7s61/1645/7s St. Thomas 82/27 72/22sh82/2773/22s San Juan97/3672/22s93/3373/22pc San Salvador93/3368/20s90/3272/22c Santiago88/3154/12s91/3257/13s Santo Domingo84/2868/20pc83/2868/20s Sao Paulo82/2765/18t81/2762/16t Seoul 41/528/-2c43/632/0c Stockholm37/232/0pc39/334/1pc Sydney79/2664/17t82/2766/18t T aipei 69/20 59/15sh68/2062/16c Tokyo55/1246/7r56/1347/8r Toronto34/123/-5pc45/732/0s Trinidad84/2872/22t84/2871/21t Vancouver47/838/3c46/736/2shVienna 46/7 37/2sh51/1042/5pc Warsaw39/330/-1c43/632/0s Winnipeg26/-319/-7pc35/120/-6c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodaySaturdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 8-15 Knots1-3 Feet7-10 Miles74F Saturday:E at 8-15 Knots1-3 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:E at 8-15 Knots1-3 Feet7-10 Miles74F Saturday:E at 8-15 Knots1-3 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:E at 8-15 Knots1-3 Feet7-10 Miles74F Saturday:E at 8-15 Knots1-3 Feet7-10 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 46/735/1t54/1235/1t Anchorage34/120/-6pc28/-217/-8pc Atlanta 52/11 42/5r51/1047/8r Atlantic City40/426/-3pc48/830/-1pc Baltimore43/630/-1c48/834/1cBoston 37/2 28/-2s47/831/0s Buffalo36/224/-4s44/626/-3s Charleston, SC58/1447/8c61/1654/12sh Chicago40/423/-5pc52/1126/-3sCleveland 38/3 24/-4s50/1027/-2s Dallas42/535/1r50/1040/4r Denver42/522/-5c53/1127/-2s Detroit37/224/-4pc52/1130/-1s Honolulu73/2264/17sh77/2568/20shHouston 47/8 44/6 r51/1044/6r HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySaturday T odaySaturday T odaySaturday Indianapolis 46/727/-2pc55/1234/1pc Jacksonville76/2457/13pc78/2558/14pc Kansas City 44/6 26/-3pc53/1134/1pc Las Vegas71/2144/6s71/2149/9s Little Rock42/536/2r47/838/3rLos Angeles 68/20 50/10s68/2052/11pc Louisville48/834/1c54/1240/4c Memphis46/739/3r48/842/5r Miami82/2768/20pc81/2769/20s Minneapolis 39/3 21/-6pc46/725/-3s Nashville44/638/3c52/1144/6r New Orleans70/2158/14c68/2055/12t New York43/633/0pc49/938/3pc Oklahoma City42/534/1c52/1137/2c Orlando 82/27 61/16 pc82/2760/15s Philadelphia43/632/0pc51/1036/2pc Phoenix78/2553/11s77/2553/11s Pittsburgh44/626/-3pc52/1130/-1pc Portland, OR54/1241/5pc48/841/5r Raleigh-Durham 40/436/2r42/538/3r St. Louis44/629/-1pc53/1137/2pcSalt Lake City 46/728/-2s51/1031/0pc San Antonio 45/7 39/3 r52/1142/5r San Diego65/1854/12s65/1854/12pc San Francisco61/1647/8s61/1648/8pcSeattle 50/1037/2c46/737/2r T allahassee 78/2554/12pc78/2559/15pc Tampa82/2762/16pc80/2664/17s Tucson71/2147/8s72/2246/7s Washington, DC43/636/2c49/938/3c UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms RainFlurries Snow Ice AccuWeather.com


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    Pim flowin’ it

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    71F

    SUNNY

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    Volume: 105 No.92

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    The Tribune

    =USA TODAY.

    BAHAMAS EDITION

    www.tribune242.com

    FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    AN cS
    EAN
    Me Sto

    BAHAMAS BIGGEST

    Detention =
    peports withheld

    Immigration Director
    tells press he found
    no evidence to

    back detainees’
    claims of violence

    m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

    THE FINDINGS of an inves-
    tigation into living conditions at
    the Detention Centre were fil-
    tered to the press in a confer-
    ence held by the Department of
    Immigration yesterday.

    Full reports submitted by psy-
    chologist David Allen, Social
    Services director Melanie Zon-
    ical, Archdeacon James Pala-
    cious, Royal Bahamas Defence
    Force senior lieutenant Freder-
    ick Brown and director of
    Immigration Jack Thompson
    were not provided to the
    media.

    Immigration officials also
    denied The Tribune’s request to
    tour the facility, although
    Deputy Prime Minister Brent
    Symonette said the proposal will
    be considered at “the next board
    meeting.”

    A tour of the detention centre
    in Carmichael Road was carried
    out by the fact-finding team of
    professionals on Friday after
    The Tribune published
    detainees’ allegations of physical
    abuse, sexual abuse, inadequate

    SEE page eight

    DMC) SM MOL OLUA SMS EU



    DR MICHAEL DARVILLE takes his seat in the Senate for the first time yesterday after being sworn in.
    Senator Darville fills the seat left vacant by the departure of Pleasant Bridgewater.

    Newly relaxed US policies on travel
    to Cuba raise concerns in Bahamas

    @ By TANEKA
    THOMPSON
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    tthompson@tribunemedia.net

    NEWLY relaxed travel poli-
    cies to Cuba implemented by



    US President Barack Obama
    have raised concerns that this
    country's tourism leaders have
    been "dragging their feet" in
    making the Bahamas a more
    competitive destination than
    emerging markets in the
    region.

    SEE page eight
    Reports: Howard
    K Stern ‘turns
    himself in to police’

    MEDIA REPORTS last
    night alleged that Howard K
    Stern would be turning himself
    over to police in connection
    with allegations he illegally
    obtained prescription drugs for
    the late Anna Nicole Smith.
    Stern has reportedly denied any
    wrongdoing.

    SEE page eight

    2:4. Desap Bart

    Son of Chauncey























    sie Me
    The Tribune for
    highlighting story

    THE son of Chauncey
    Tynes Jr, the pilot who went
    missing on a flight from Exu-
    ma to Nassau 26 years ago,
    yesterday thanked The Tri-
    bune for highlighting the story
    of his father’s disappearance.

    “It has done wonders for
    me in answering a lot of ques-
    tions,” Mr Kimo Tynes said
    from Turks and Caicos, where
    he works.

    Mr Tynes, 28, was a baby
    when his father disappeared.
    “T never got to meet my dad,”
    he said. “I have been asking
    questions all the 28 years I
    have been alive.”

    The Tynes family has
    always wondered why the
    Bahamas government never
    conducted an inquiry into the
    mystery of Chauncey Jr’s final

    SEE page eight

    COF





    Christie’s Tribune
    tirade ‘at odds
    with comments he
    made 25 years ago’

    Reaction to PLP leader’s
    attack on Insight article

    PLP leader Perry Christie’s his-
    tory came back to haunt him yes-
    terday after he had launched a
    bitter attack on The Tribune’s
    Insight article on Sir Lynden Pin-

    dling.

    For media veterans pointed out
    that his tirade against The Tri-
    bune’s managing editor John Mar-
    quis and his interview with
    Chauncey Tynes Sr was totally at
    odds with what he said when he
    was fired from Pindling’s Cabinet

    25 years ago.

    Then Mr Christie accused Pin-

    dling of bringing the Bahamas’
    integrity into question, adding:

    Perry Christie

    “For the better part of this year, the extent to which com-
    mitment to service with integrity has been eroded in the
    Bahamas has proven the cause for concern at every level of

    our society.

    “Indeed, it has gone beyond our national boundaries and
    brought our nation’s integrity into question. I, too, have
    been outspoken recently in my criticism of this decay.”

    Mr Christie said in his statement of October 8, 1984:
    “History will judge harshly those who stifle conscience and
    good sense and permit loyalties other than those owed the
    nation to dictate the course plotted for the nation they gov-

    ern.

    “No other virtue supersedes that of integrity in affairs of
    government and those upon whom the people have called to
    govern them are expected to serve no other masters than

    SEE page eight



    David Kelly dies age 76

    @ By KARIN HERIG
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    kherig@tribunemedia.net

    DAVID Kelly, proprietor of
    Kelly’s Home Centre, philan-
    thropist and former Olympic rep-
    resentative for the Bahamas, died
    late Wednesday night in a New
    York hospital.

    With his family at his bedside,
    Mr Kelly passed away at around
    midnight at the New York Pres-
    byterian Hospital. He would have
    turned 77 on March 25.

    A spokesperson for the family
    told The Tribune that he did not
    suffer at the end.

    “Tt was peaceful, he died in his
    sleep — he was still in a coma.”

    Mr Kelly, with his wife Nancy,
    and several members of Kelly’s
    Home Centre, had travelled to
    New York in February for their
    annual purchasing trip for the
    store. However, Mr Kelly, who
    had a heart condition, developed
    chest pains and went to the hos-
    pital for a check-up. He under-
    went a procedure at the hospital
    on February 18, but afterwards
    developed complications.

    The family’s spokesperson said
    his death this week was, however,

    ONADO

    “For 50 years Coronado Paint has been

    the choice of painting professionals,
    providing paints with lasting performance
    and consistant quality.”





    NASSAU AND BAHAME

    ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



    David Kelly

    not the result of any new compli-
    cations, but rather that he “grad-
    ually” succumbed to his initial
    condition.

    Mr Kelly’s son Gregory was
    the one to break the news to
    members of executive staff and
    friends at Kelly’s Home Centre
    yesterday morning.

    The store’s management then
    shared the sad news with all of

    SEE page eight

    Wulff Road
    Opposite Mackey Street
    Tel: 393-0512, 393-8006,

    OR 393-3513
    Open Monday to Friday 7am - 4pm
    Saturday 7am - 3pm
    PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE







    MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

    Local N@WS ......ccccccsecessssees PipZeoeoroeie oul

    Editorial/Letters. ...ccccccccccssscssseeseesssseeesseees P4
    Bee eee eee eine pee secures eee eee P9,10,11

    CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

    USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

    LOCAL NEWS

    a -mem| The De

    partment of

    Immigration collects
    342 million this year

    Money primarily coming from
    work permit, citizenship fees

    m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

    MORE than $32 million has
    been collected by the Depart-
    ment of Immigration this year,
    primarily from work permit
    and citizenship fees, it was
    announced yesterday.

    And the department expects
    it will reach its goal of drawing
    more than $38 million in rev-
    enue by the end of the fiscal
    year on June 30, Director of
    Immigration Jack Thompson
    said.

    “This makes us very proud
    because the prime minister
    has mentioned that revenue
    is down,” he said.

    “For us, our revenue is
    doing extremely well.”

    Mr Thompson attributes the
    high revenue to the aggressive
    approach taken by the depart-
    ment’s team and a thorough
    assessment of outstanding
    funds over the last four years.

    Unpaid funds identified in
    an audit review found 70 New
    Providence companies owe a
    total of $834,718.74 to the
    Immigration Department,

    eee) ee Bie
    Fertilizer, Fungicide,
    Ie AAO Tes

    ete rte
    322-2157



    Do you long for lO ng?

    NEW BEAUTIFUL LENGTHS

    COLLECTION

    a

    t

    while another 24 companies
    in the capital are currently
    being audited.

    In Grand Bahama more
    than $1 million in unpaid fees
    is owed to the department.

    Mr Thompson said: “The
    department proposes to notify
    all companies of this in writing
    and we will give them a time
    to settle the outstanding
    accounts, or arrange a pay-
    ment plan.

    “But of course, we wish for
    them to settle the outstanding
    accounts.”

    Much revenue is lost when a
    letter from the Immigration
    Department guaranteeing an
    employer a work permit for
    their employee upon condi-
    tion of payment within 30 days
    is used to hire foreign workers
    before paying the government,
    Mr Thompson said.

    DIRECTOR OF IMMIGRATION Jack Thompson

    “T think we need to look at
    that,” he said. “I have strong-
    ly advocated that we should
    just issue an invoice as
    opposed to a letter, and it may
    just be the way to go.”

    Enforcement is also vital to



    ensure the payment of fees,
    and Mr Thompson said
    inspectorate teams could be
    sent to building sites and areas
    where foreign workers may be
    employed to ensure permits
    have been paid for.

    Man drives himself to
    hospital after being shot

    A MAN drove himself to the hospital after
    he was shot several times in the back in broad
    daylight by someone he knows.

    The 31-year-old man told police he was in
    Farrington Road when the gunman approached
    and shot him several times in the upper back at

    around 2pm on Wednesday.

    He drove his car to the Princess Margaret

    ening.

    Hospital, where he is now listed in serious con-
    dition, however his injuries are not life threat-

    Police are appealing for information from
    the public to assist the investigation.
    If you have any information in relation to this

    incident call police on 322-4444, 911, or call

    Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-8477.

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    THE TRIBUNE

    FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 3



    ~ Woman claims Sir Lynden Pindling’s

    biological mother was definitely Haitian

    Three men
    charged
    with rape of
    13-year-old

    THREE men accused of
    raping a 19-year-old woman
    were arraigned in a Magis-

    trate’s Court yesterday.

    Anthony Sullivan, 24, of
    Kenwood Street; Jumell Wal-

    lace, 24, of Podeleo Street,

    and Nekos Kemp, 25, of Mal-
    were }
    arraigned before Magistrate

    colm Road west,

    Susan Sylvester in Court 11,

    Nassau Street, on the rape :

    charge.

    It is alleged that the three }
    men committed the offence ;
    on Sunday, March 1, 2009. :
    The accused were not }
    required to enter a plea to }
    the rape charge. Sullivan and :
    Wallace were each granted :
    bail in the sum of $5,000. ;
    Kemp, who according to the }
    prosecution has a pending :

    rape case before the courts,

    was denied bail and remand-
    ed to Her Majesty’s Prison. }
    The case has been adjourned

    to August 13.

    ¢ A 38-year-old man }
    accused of fraudulently :
    obtaining nearly $11,000 was :
    arraigned in a Magistrate’s :

    Court yesterday.

    Court dockets allege that
    Jason Antonio Sands on ;
    Wednesday, February 4, 2009 :

    with the intent to defraud,

    obtained from SaveCo Trad-
    ing Company Limited at Tay- }

    lor Street, Nassau Village,

    two LG 52 LCD television }

    sets valued at $5,120.

    It is further alleged that on
    Wednesday, January, 26, 2009 :
    the accused, with the intent
    to defraud, obtained from }
    Bristol Cellars Group of }
    Companies on East Street }
    200 cartons of Rothmans blue }
    cigarettes valued at $5,550. :
    Sands, who was arraigned }
    before Magistrate Susan }
    Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau ;
    Street, pleaded not guilty to
    the charges and was granted
    bail in the sum of $10,000.
    The case has been adjourned i

    to August 13.

    Handgun, live
    ammunition
    found after
    car search

    A HANDGUN and 15 :
    rounds of live ammunition }
    were found by Drug Enforce- ;
    ment Unit officers when they
    searched a car on Cable }

    Beach on Wednesday.

    Officers recovered the i
    .Jmm handgun and ammuni- }
    tion when they stopped and }
    searched two men ina black }
    Nissan Maxima as they drove }

    through Sea Beach Estates,

    off West Bay Street, at

    around 4pm.

    A 30-year-old man of Ida
    Street and a 25-year-old man }
    of Sunshine Park are in police
    custody and are being ques-
    tioned in connection with the }

    discovery.

    ie
    Ut)
    a as
    PHONE: 322-2157

    your
    news

    The Tribune wants to
    hear from people who
    are making news in
    their neighbourhoods.
    Perhaps you are raising
    funds for a good cause,
    campaigning for
    improvements in the
    area or have won an
    award.

    If so, call us on 322-
    1986 and share your
    story.



    THE dispute over Sir Lynden Pin-
    dling’s birth continued yesterday
    when a middle-aged woman from
    East Street claimed his biological
    mother was definitely Haitian.

    The 55-year-old woman said a sis-
    ter of Pindling’s nominal mother,
    Viola Pindling (formerly Bain), told
    her categorically that Viola was not

    his real mother.

    “IT knew Viola’s sister Sybil well
    and she told me that Lynden was
    born in Bain Town to a Haitian

    woman.

    “His father Arnold (a Jamaican)
    left the mother with the child to
    return to Jamaica, then came back
    to Nassau later to join the police

    force.

    “He then took the child from the

    Haitian mother.”

    circulating for years.

    Haitian woman and gave
    it to Viola, whom he
    married. I don’t know
    whether Lynden went to
    Jamaica for schooling or
    what happened to his

    The woman’s disclo-
    sure came in the wake of
    former senior police offi-
    cer Errington Watkins’
    claim that Pindling’s
    mother was Jamaican.

    She said this was not so
    — but agreed with Mr
    Watkins that Pindling
    was born in Bain Town.

    Speculation over whether Sir Lyn-
    den was truly a Bahamian has been

    Sir Lynden Pindling



    years ago.

    In last Monday’s con-
    troversial Insight article,
    former PLP treasurer
    Chauncey Tynes Sr said
    Pindling was born in
    Jamaica and came to
    Nassau as a boy.

    The Tribune’s latest
    source, who lives off East
    Street, said neither Viola
    Pindling nor her siblings
    — Sybil, Drucilla and
    Eugene — had children.

    “They are all dead
    now,
    Eugene died within three
    days of each other some

    “But I think the truth should be
    told about these things. Because he

    and Sybil and

    was prime minister, the nation has a
    right to know where he came from.

    “But the PLP always tried to cover
    it up like they try to cover everything
    else up.”

    In 1973, Pindling responded to
    speculation among politicians by pro-
    ducing a birth certificate showing he
    was born in Nassau.

    However, his birth was registered
    nearly 17 years after the event and
    he refused to be drawn when a
    reporter asked if he had sworn an
    affidavit to support his application
    for a passport.

    His true origins are considered sig-
    nificant among political observers

    because of his Bahamianisation pro-

    gramme and his anti-foreign rhetoric
    during political campaigns.

    PLP hopeful plans demonstration
    outside of The Tribune next week

    @ By TANEKA THOMPSON
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    tthompson@tribunemedia.net

    IN AN attempt to defend the
    legacy of Sir Lynden Pindling
    following a controversial arti-
    cle published about the former
    prime minister, activist and PLP
    hopeful Paul Moss plans to
    demonstrate outside The Tri-
    bune next week.

    Mr Moss said it is important
    for supporters of Sir Lynden to
    speak out, as the late former
    prime minister is not alive to
    defend his own name.

    Memory

    He echoed statements made
    earlier this week by PLP leader
    Perry Christie, saying that
    because he was the father of
    the nation, Sir Lynden's mem-
    ory should be protected against
    unfounded attacks.

    "As a citizen I was just
    offended by the managing edi-



    Paul Moss

    tor and I thought that since he
    has freedom of expression to
    write what he wrote, that I exer-
    cise my freedom of expression,
    freedom of movement, of
    assembly — which are all funda-
    mental freedoms guaranteed by
    the constitution, Articles 15 to

    " And to let it be known that
    despite the opinion of Mr Mar-

    quis of Bahamians and also of
    Sir Lynden, I want it to be
    known that I will stand up and
    defend his legacy," Mr Moss
    said yesterday.

    Article

    The demonstration — sched-
    uled for Tuesday at 10am -— i
    not planned to disparage the
    character of The Tribune's man-
    aging editor John Marquis, Mr
    Moss said, but to allow those
    affronted by the article to
    express themselves in a public
    forum.

    He is not sure what the
    turnout will be but stressed that
    it would be a peaceful, non-vio-
    lent demonstration.

    "This demonstration is not
    one to invite people to come
    out there and disparage the
    managing editor but to just
    exercise the freedom of speech.
    "One of the legacies of Sir Lyn-
    den, is he has an anti-violence
    stance. Sir Lynden was able to

    Police in Abaco seek two
    men for questioning

    TWO men are wanted by Abaco police for
    questioning in connection with string of crim-

    inal offences.

    Both should be considered armed and
    extremely dangerous and should be

    approached with caution.

    Makines ‘Cell’ Francois, 18, of Treasure Cay,
    Abaco and Peardale, Nassau is wanted for
    questioning in connection with a kidnapping

    and robbery case.

    Christopher Livingstone Burnside, 42, of
    Southside Road, Murphy Town, Abaco, is

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    lead this nation, a nation of
    minority rule, to a nation of
    majority rule without the shed-
    ding of blood.

    "T believe that in spite of all
    that has transpired in the life of
    Sir Lynden, he is the father of
    this nation and that we ought to
    give him the respect, particu-
    larly in his death, that he
    deserves.

    "For me personally I know
    he was responsible, with a
    group of people, and ushered
    in a new and modern Bahamas.
    I think it is prudent for persons
    to stand up, particularly since

    AE

    he's not here to stand up for
    himself.

    Earlier this week, an explo-
    sive Insight article titled "The
    tragic young pilot who knew
    too much’, told the story of the
    late Chauncey Tynes Jr, who
    went missing in 1983 when
    piloting a flight from Exuma to
    Nassau.

    His father, Chauncey Tynes
    Sr, told The Tribune he believes
    his son was murdered because
    he knew too much of the asso-
    ciation between Sir Lynden and
    the Colombian drug czar Joe
    Lehder.

    PUP CR ee ey

    THAT NOW FAMOUS INTERVIEW

    SO WHAT do Tribune readers think about
    the Sir Lynden Pindling-Joe Lehder controversy?
    Don't miss Monday’s INSIGHT FEEDBACK,
    the biggest response ever to an Insight article.

    --
    wT
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    380-FLIX
    PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

    THE TRIBUNE





    The Tribune Limited

    NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
    Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

    LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

    SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

    (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

    Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
    Contributing Editor 1972-199]

    EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

    Publisher/Editor 1972-

    Published Daily Monday to Saturday

    Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
    Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

    WEBSITE
    www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

    Five leading PLPs see no evil

    EVERY picture, they say, is worth a thou-
    sand words. The one on the front of yester-
    day’s Nassau Guardian was worth ten thousand
    at least, probably more.

    It showed five senior members of the Pro-
    gressive Liberal Party, including its leader Per-
    ry Christie, sitting solemnly at a press confer-
    ence called to denounce The Tribune’s manag-
    ing editor John Marquis and the Insight article
    he wrote about the late Sir Lynden Pindling
    and his alleged links with the Colombian drug
    czar Joe Lehder.

    The looks on their faces were reminiscent of
    those of George Custer and his last remaining
    officers at the Battle of Little Big Horn. Boy, did
    they look grim.

    All were presumably there out of duty to
    bolster the fast-fading legacy of the late Sir
    Lynden, a man who brought shame and oppro-
    brium on the Bahamas by presiding over the
    drug-addled 1980s, when thousands of local
    lives were destroyed by the cocaine trade.

    All looked distinctly uncomfortable in their
    role. And all looked like they would far rather
    have been somewhere else.

    Mr Christie led the attack on The Tribune,
    calling the Insight article “garbage” and
    denouncing Mr Marquis in the most personal
    terms. Listening to him speak, one could truly
    believe that he was a lifelong supporter of Lyn-
    den Pindling, and an unshakeable proponent
    of his cause.

    Interesting, then, to note that when Mr
    Christie was fired from Pindling’s Cabinet in
    1984, he took the prime minister to task for
    leading the country into a steep decline.

    Both he and the current prime minister,
    Hubert Ingraham, were fired by Pindling at the
    very point where they were about to resign
    because they could no longer stomach the cor-
    ruption of his administration.

    So far from being a rock solid supporter of the
    late prime minister, Mr Christie — along with
    Mr Ingraham — was among his most dogged
    critics.

    Look down the line of glum-faced so-called
    ‘Pindlingites’ as they tried gallantly but vainly to
    hold Sir Lynden’s tattered image aloft and you
    see more examples of extreme disillusionment.

    Take Fred Mitchell, for instance, who burned
    a copy of the Bahamas constitution and sent
    the ashes to Pindling, declaring them to be sym-
    bolic of the destruction the then prime minister
    was causing in the Bahamas.

    In the picture, Mitchell looks deeply trou-
    bled and perplexed. Perhaps he was wondering
    what he was doing there in view of the fact that
    he had conducted a protracted campaign against
    Sir Lynden, even to the point of threatening to
    disclose secrets about his private life.

    Next to him sits Glenys Hanna-Martin, also
    looking distinctly uneasy about her part in this
    clumsily orchestrated charade. That’s no sur-
    prise because her father Arthur Hanna, now
    Governor General, resigned as deputy prime
    minister in 1984 because he saw it as “the only
    honourable course of action” and after the com-

    mission report advised Sir Lynden to do the
    same.

    Consider also the slightly embarrassed look of
    Dr Bernard Nottage. What was he doing there?
    One might well wonder, given the fact that he
    abandoned the PLP after failing to get the par-
    ty leadership in 1997 and spent most of his years
    in the political wilderness berating many of his
    former colleagues.

    It’s hard to believe that he is a committed
    fan of the ‘Father of the Nation’, especially as
    his ill-starred Coalition for Democratic Reform
    advocated a break from Pindling-style high-
    handedness.

    The fifth face of gloom belonged to Vincent
    Peet. His feelings about Sir Lynden are not
    known.

    So what, then, are we to make of this collec-
    tion of Pindling detractors?

    Were they there simply to shore up the rep-
    utation of the one figure that seems to unite
    the PLP nowadays? Are they coming to realise
    that, without the Pindling myth to cling to, they
    are a spent force whose useful life is long past?

    We fear so because the truth is that the so-
    called New PLP blew its opportunity for true
    reform between 2002 and 2007. The party
    showed itself to be just as hopeless as it had
    ever been — a disorganised group who had
    failed to keep faith with the people.

    Perry Christie, pleasant man though he is,
    proved an unmitigated calamity as prime min-
    ister, allowing a herd of headstrong ministers to
    run wild and cause havoc for his government
    during its entire term in office.

    The PLP now finds itself with a major prob-
    lem on its hands. It has to convince an increas-
    ingly smart electorate that Pindling was a good
    thing for this country when all of the evidence
    suggests otherwise.

    Sure, Pindling had his virtues. He did some
    positive things in his early years. But all his
    achievements were overshadowed by the
    immense damage caused during the 1980s, when
    the Bahamas almost went under because of the
    drug trade.

    If the PLP really wants to regain power, it has
    to turn its back on the idlers and deadbeats
    who have traditionally been an important part
    of its support structure and strive for better,
    nobler standards. It needs to put behind it the
    drug factions who have relied on it for suste-
    nance and support over many decades, and
    squash the attitude of entitlement in the party
    promoted by Pindling’s days in power.

    By trying to buttress the image of Sir Lynden
    Pindling when evidence of his wrong-doing
    mounts by the day, the PLP is merely confirm-
    ing what its fiercest critics know all too well: that
    despite the embarrassments of its past the par-
    ty is determined to drag Pindling’s soiled lega-
    cy into the future.

    What the party has failed to take into account
    is that the Bahamas is no longer a nation of
    impressionable dumbheads who are willing to
    be bamboozled by men in sharp suits and fancy
    watches.

    When is a
    hospital a
    hos pital?

    LETTERS

    EDITOR, The Tribune.

    The 2007 annual report of the
    Hospitals Board tabled in Par-
    lament last December raises
    some important public interest
    issues.

    One of those issues is
    whether the Hospitals Board
    has the ability to function as a
    regulator of private hospitals
    and clinics under the Hospital
    and Health Care Facilities Act,
    1998.

    For example, the Hospitals
    Board has a duty under the Act
    to investigate a complaint into
    the “management, diagnosis,
    and treatment” of a patient ina
    hospital or clinic licensed by the
    Hospitals Board.

    But it seems the Hospitals
    Board’s view is that it licenses
    the building and its facilities,
    and not the quality of health
    care services provided. The Act
    itself defines a hospital as “a
    building where beds are avail-
    able for the admission of per-
    sons requiring treatment for any
    sickness.”

    Experts say this description
    is not adequate. It does not
    require a central legal entity
    that is responsible and account-
    able for all medical services pro-
    vided under its roof. That struc-
    ture, according to advisers,
    would be in the best interest of
    the community for the obvious
    reasons of safety and ethics.
    There is a disconnect here
    which can adversely affect qual-
    ity assurance in medical treat-
    ment.

    Medical advisers to Bahamas
    Patient Advocacy see a hospital
    as an institution which accepts
    patients for medical treatment,
    within an organisation with a
    centralised authority responsi-
    ble for quality assurance in the
    delivery of healthcare services.

    It should be the medical ser-
    vices that are being licensed —
    not just the building — in order
    to properly reflect the modern
    concept of what a hospital is.
    The public needs a single source
    of accountability in healthcare
    facilities, and a licensing board
    to enforce it. On this basis, a
    “hospital”, together with its
    medical services, needs a regu-
    latory definition as a single
    (legal) entity.

    Under current law, private
    hospitals may function as a col-
    lection of independent physi-
    cians providing medical services,
    by having practicing privileges,
    in a building providing beds and
    nursing services, among other
    things. The patients would then
    be admitted as patients of the

    letters@tribunemedia net



    individual physician. Sections
    of the building may be leased
    or managed by different corpo-
    rate entities, providing other
    medical services.

    This structure diffuses author-
    ity and accountability. For
    instance, the Act requires that a
    healthcare facility should
    (among other things) provide
    sufficient numbers of qualified
    staff who can administer appro-
    priate care to the patients
    admitted.

    But if a hospital is a building
    with beds, without medical
    management authority, and
    medical services are provided
    by independent doctors, can
    “the hospital” exercise authori-
    ty to restrict admissions to only
    those patients that “hospital” is
    able to treat?

    Or can a private hospital
    make the appropriate medical
    staff available, if there is no
    overall authority that employs
    or manages medical profes-
    sionals at the hospital?

    BPA advisers say that a new
    institutional definition is
    required, making it clear that a
    hospital is a single interest enti-
    ty accountable for the medical
    services provided there. A hos-
    pital has to uphold its own inter-
    est beyond the interests of inde-
    pendent professionals and enti-
    ties within it. This would place
    the hospital in a proper posi-
    tion to oversee the safe delivery
    of healthcare services.

    A hospital also needs to have
    an internal quality management
    structure, which can immedi-
    ately respond to any concerns
    arising. To do this, a hospital
    needs to collect data on all
    patients admitted in order to
    know whether its operating
    units are doing a good job, and
    it needs sufficient qualified staff
    to enable it to respond.

    The interests of the patient,
    the doctors, and the hospital,
    must be one seamless and single
    interest, to improve patient out-
    comes. That is the purpose of
    a hospital.

    Usually a hospital has a Chief
    of Medical Staff, or Chief Med-
    ical Officer (CMO). The CMO
    has the authority to ensure the
    competency of the doctors prac-
    tising there.

    The CMO also has responsi-
    bility for the integrity of the
    hospital system. That integrity

    would include an effective
    “call” system, to ensure that all
    patients have medical care
    available 24/7, so no patient, in
    crisis, 1s left unattended.

    In public health care, a CMO
    would, or should, resign in the
    event of such a “systems fail-
    ure”.

    Should a private heath care
    facility, not also be held to a
    similar standard of account-
    ability?

    The licensing board of hos-
    pitals and clinics should require
    an independent audit of their
    health care services by an out-
    side review body. This external
    accreditation could also be used
    by a hospital to enhance its cre-
    dentials and image. The Hospi-
    tals Board could thus carry out
    its quality assurance- oversight
    function at no expense to the
    Board, or challenge to its limit-
    ed resources.

    But the 2007 report proposes
    changes to the Act that would
    seriously weaken the Hospitals
    Board as an oversight body.

    The Board wants the Gov-
    ernment to amend the Act to
    remove the provision for inves-
    tigation of complaints, elimi-
    nate the need to provide notifi-
    cations of deaths, and reduce
    penalties for failure to comply
    with licensing requirements.

    But at the same time, the
    Hospitals Board is also propos-
    ing a new and extensive set of
    hospital regulations. So, on the
    one hand, the Board says it
    wants to reduce its oversight
    responsibility, but on the other
    hand, it wants to increase regu-
    latory requirements?

    The BPA advocates that the
    Board’s oversight capacity be
    strengthened, and that the Hos-
    pital Board embrace its over-
    sight function of quality assur-
    ance, as per the petition on its
    website below.

    We urge our Parliamentari-
    ans to consider the Hospitals
    Board’s report in terms of the
    public interest in a safe system
    of health care, and oversight
    assurance of this.

    Good business sense should
    dictate that the more confidence
    the public has in our local insti-
    tutions — including statutory
    boards — the less likely we will
    be to spend our money abroad
    for medical care.

    Bahamas Patient

    Advocacy
    www.bahamaspatientadvocacy.org
    Nassau,

    March 6, 2009.

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    EDITOR, The Tribune.

    Ican recall the period not so long ago when all of
    the “big” countries of the world decided that not
    they, but other countries should be responsible for
    policing the tax laws of those “big” countries.

    At the time there was a very real fear that the
    effect of the position taken by those countries would
    lead to the collapse of this country’s second financial
    pillar - Financial Services.

    The Bahamas acted very quickly (and foolishly in
    some “educated” people’s minds) to “correct” what
    were viewed as deficiencies in its regulatory regime.

    Now there is major rumbling from our neighbour
    to the North that countries like The Bahamas, these
    so-called “tax havens”, need to be added to anoth-
    er list, despite all the efforts taken and being taken
    by countries like The Bahamas to co-operate and
    share information. Not to mention the myriad of
    bi-lateral and multi-lateral international agreements
    (drafted by the “big” countries) that this country is
    a party to and are complying with.

    The reality is that the steps taken by The Bahamas
    with respect to regulating financial services, in many
    instances is far superior, wide-ranging and better
    enforced than a lot of those “big” countries (can
    anyone say ENRON, CITIGROUP, Housing and
    mortgage crisis, Madoff?). Yet, we and other small
    states continue to take the blame for the ineffec-
    tiveness of these “big” countries, with all of the
    resources that they have, to police the financial
    transactions of their citizens.

    It seems to me that regardless of any and all of the
    efforts that this country takes as a responsible mem-
    ber of the international community, it will just nev-
    er be enough.

    Sometimes I get the feeling that the view from
    our “obvious Superiors” is that this country should
    not respect its own laws (which it is entitled to apply
    over the laws of any other country) and that only
    their laws are important or worth obeying.

    In my view, the move by the United States and
    other “big” countries is actually very shortsighted.
    Does anyone out there other than me see the unin-
    tended consequences of the US legislation to “stop
    tax haven abuse” to The Bahamas?

    Let’s think about it:

    (1) The “big” countries of the world decide that

    they will not only “walk lightly and carry a big stick”
    but now they will use that “big stick” to pound the
    economies of the “obviously banana republic-like”
    “tax-haven” countries into the ground (which they
    have a moral right to do because after all these are
    the places where their citizens are “hiding” their tax-
    able income and wealth, and for some unfathomable
    reason, they just can’t seem to stop them from doing
    SO);
    (2) So the economies of these tax havens are
    destroyed. The Bahamas is on the hit list, so of
    course, its second pillar comes crashing down. Many
    are left jobless as the few financial services providers
    that remain in the aftermath simply can’t absorb
    them all. The tourism sector in this climate of finan-
    cial uncertainty can’t absorb anyone either. What to
    do?

    (3) With the loss of income, the Government of
    The Bahamas can’t pay its bills and now has to pri-
    oritise where to spend its scarce resources. Many ser-
    vices are diminished, as there is simply not enough
    to go around. Somewhere in this mix is the obliga-
    tion the country has to maintain the OPBAT oper-
    ations with the US and Turks & Caicos, not to men-
    tion the regular patrols of its borders to stop not only
    the drug trafficker but the illegal immigrant... How
    the country will pay for these things, God only
    knows...

    Does anyone else see where I'm going with this?

    I certainly don't advocate illegal activity, but at
    some point common-sense (which everyone knows
    is not very common) needs to come into play. Could
    the problem in fact not be the “tax haven” but the
    failure of the regulators in the “big” countries to do
    their “important” jobs properly, if at all?

    In closing, I have two well-used and perhaps
    applicable adages to say to the “Big Fathers and
    Mothers” out there who continue to treat countries
    like ours as recalcitrant children: “Don’t cut off
    your nose to spite your face” and “Clean your own
    doorstep before you try to clean mine”. Enough
    said.

    I remain forever grateful, but wary and weary in
    Nassau.

    WEARY
    Nassau,
    March 4, 2009.
    THE TRIBUNE

    FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 5



    Plantation descendant accuses
    Clifton Heritage Authority of
    offering ‘slave’s work’ at park

    m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
    Tribune Staff Reporter
    mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

    A DESCENDENT of slaves
    at the Whylly plantation in
    Clifton Pier claims to have
    been offered nothing more
    than slave’s work at the new
    Clifton Heritage National
    Park.

    But Vivian Whylly, 47, of
    Cable Beach, Nassau, is certi-
    fied in eco-tourism planning
    and tour guide training and has
    led scores of students and visi-
    tors on historical tours of the
    former plantation before it was
    declared a national park.

    O In brief :

    Gunman robs
    Yamacraw
    Convenience
    Store

    AN ARMED robber with a i
    Creole-Bahamian accent held }
    up an employee of the }
    Yamacraw Convenience Store }
    and stole cash from the shop }
    on Wednesday afternoon. ;

    It was broad daylight when }
    the gunman burst into the store ;
    in Yamacraw, southeast New }
    Providence, wielding a gun.

    He threatened the shop- }
    keeper with the weapon and }
    demanded cash before fleeing }
    the area heading east at around }
    3.45pm. The robber was wear- }
    ing blue jeans and a white T- :
    shirt at the time. ;

    He got away with an unde- }
    termined amount of cash. i

    Police are appealing for :
    information from the public to }
    assist ongoing investigations. }
    If you have any information :
    which may led to apprehension }
    of the gunman, call police on ;
    322-4444, 911, or call Crime }
    Stoppers anonymously on 328- ;

    PMH surgical
    clinics closed

    SURGICAL clinics at the }
    Princess Margaret Hospital will :
    be closed today, with the }
    exception of the antenatal clin-
    ic and Dr A Sawyer’s nephrol- }
    ogy clinic. Anyone who has an }
    appointment scheduled for :
    today should contact the clinic }
    on 322-2861 to resechdule. ;

    The hospital apologises for }
    any inconvenience caused.

    CORRECTION

    AN opinion piece on
    pages 10 and 11 of yester-
    day’s Tribune was mistak-
    enly published without attri-
    bution.

    The article was in fact the
    second in a series discussing
    the potential opportunities
    for the Bahamas in the
    emerging green economy,
    which will be running on
    Thursdays over the next two
    months.

    Colin Lightbourn, the
    author of the series, is a real
    estate business owner, devel-
    oper and past president of
    the Bahamas National Trust.

    To comment, discuss and
    submit ideas about these
    articles, visit: www.the-
    greenislands.com

    TON

    m@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
    Tribune Freeport
    Reporter
    dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

    POLICE are offering a
    reward for information con-
    cerning the whereabouts of
    GARRAN GIBSON.

    Asst Supt Clarence
    Reckley said police are hop-
    ing that the public can help
    them in locating the man, who
    is wanted for questioning in
    connection with several crim-
    inal matters on Grand
    Bahama.

    The man should be consid-
    ered armed and dangerous
    and should be approached
    with caution, he said.

    The police can be contacted
    by dialling: 911, 352-1919, 352-
    8224 or 351-9991.

    And the father-of-three
    maintains he was an integral
    part of the campaign to pre-
    serve the area and was knighted
    by the Sovereign Order of Saint
    John of Jerusalem because of
    his ancestry, historical knowl-
    edge and dedication to protect
    the former plantation.

    However he claims the
    Clifton Heritage Authority will
    now only offer him work
    cleaning toilets and weeding
    the gardens.

    Mr Whylly believes he has
    become embroiled in a political
    issue as he campaigned to
    establish the national park
    under the PLP government,
    but was overlooked when the
    Clifton Heritage Authority was
    set up under the FNM admin-
    istration in 2007.

    He said: “They are talking
    like their hands are tied but
    there are no tied hands, they
    are tying their own hands.

    “Politics are holding them
    up, but whether it is the PLP or
    FNM in power, I am a descen-
    dent of the slaves and I would
    enhance what they are doing.

    “In any other country a
    descendent of something like
    this would be looked at as
    something other than a prob-
    lem.”



    “In any other
    country a descen-
    dent of something
    like this would
    be looked at as
    something other
    than a problem.”



    Vivian Whylly

    Mr Whylly is keen to hon-
    our his legacy and share his
    intimate knowledge of the for-
    mer plantation by telling the
    ‘real story’ to visitors.

    He said: “The real story
    about the Whylly plantation is
    about William Whylly, a loyal-
    ist who came from America
    and stayed on the side of the
    British.

    “He was the first chief jus-
    tice and became the attorney
    general and an advocate of the
    slaves.”

    Through his research at the
    National Archives, Mr Whylly
    learned William Whylly
    bought the Clifton plantation
    in 1811 when slave trader
    James Moss, the previous own-
    er of the land, was forced to

    auction the site to pay a fine
    for his cruel treatment of
    slaves.

    William Whylly, a Methodist
    convert, was the first in the
    Bahamas to write a list of
    rules, regulations and entitle-
    ments for his slaves in 1815,
    including the right for slaves
    to own property, be baptised,
    and buried, Mr Whylly said.

    The plantation owner wrote
    to the British African Society
    in 1817 advocating the rights
    of slaves, and in 1821 became
    the first in the country to pro-
    duce a register of his slaves,
    Mr Whylly said.

    The register has allowed him
    to trace his heritage back to
    his great-great-great-grand-
    mother Esther Whylly.

    He said: “I need the Clifton
    Heritage Authority to realise
    there is a true story about the
    Whylly heritage, and there is a
    Bahamian descendent of the
    slaves who has the documents
    and is being overlooked.

    “This is what I am living to
    do and I would like to be able
    to tell this story, I want to
    bring it to life.”

    Clifton Heritage Authority
    chairman Senator Jacinta Hig-
    gs did not return calls before
    The Tribune went to press.



    VIVIAN WHYLLY with the 1820 list of slaves at the Whylly planta-
    tion including his great-great-great grandmother’s name, Esther

    Whylly.

    Miss Global Bahamas Pageant set to take off in May

    BY the end of May, one
    lucky young woman will make
    history as the first ever Miss
    Bahamas Global and head off to
    represent the country at an
    international pageant.

    The new talent focused
    pageant aims to give ladies
    between ages 17 and 26 a plat-
    form to display not just their
    physical beauty but also the
    ways in which they are positive
    role models, leaders and ambas-
    sadors for a worthy cause.

    According to pageant director
    Desiree Tynes-Moss, a priority
    for the organisers was to make
    sure the pageant would be fair-
    ly judged.

    “As a former model and
    pageant contestant, I’ve seen
    various sides of the industry and
    I want to sensitise the public of
    the positive aspects of
    pageantry,” said Mrs Tynes-
    Moss. “As the mother of a
    young daughter, I consider each
    of the contestants my own and
    would not want them in a posi-
    tion where they would not feel
    comfortable.

    “Overall, I think this pageant
    will be successful when we have
    a calibre of ladies who will rep-
    resent not only the country but
    represent what today’s young
    women should aspire to be like.
    Right now, we have a few girls
    who found out about our
    pageant but we are still accept-
    ing more contestants especially
    those from the Family Islands
    or those who may be living away
    and be back home in time for
    the event.”



    Mrs Tynes-Moss said the Miss
    Global Bahamas Organisation’s
    aim is to empower young ladies
    by providing real opportunities
    for them to excel through expo-
    sure.

    She noted that while there
    will be a scholarship and cash
    prize for the overall winner,
    self-appreciation is more impor-
    tant.

    “We seek to instill self confi-
    dence, good moral values,
    national pride, emphasis on per-
    sonal character and leadership,

    thus preparing young ladies
    today for the road ahead tomor-
    row,” said Mrs Tynes-Moss.
    “Like we say in our motto, we
    seek empowerment through
    pageantry, creating opportuni-
    ties and changing lives. For one
    young woman, when she wins
    this crown she will not be just
    another beauty queen but a liv-
    ing part of history.”

    More information on the
    Miss Global Bahamas Pageant
    can be found at www.missglob-
    albahamas.com.

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    PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    —————————————————————— SS
    Minister inspects construction of

    seating facilities at US Embassy



    MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Neko Grant (third from left) :
    discusses plans for the construction of seating facilities for clients of the Unit- :
    ed States Embassy in Nassau with Carlton King, right, contractor for the pro- :
    ject. Also pictured from left is Gordon Major, Director and Colin Higgs, Per- :

    manent Secretary.



    SEATING FACILITIES and an enclosed overhang are being constructed by the :
    Ministry of Public Works and Transport at the United States Embassy. :
    Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant visited the US Embassy to :
    inspect the ongoing project. Pictured from left are Gordon Major, director; :
    Colin Higgs, permanent secretary, Minister Grant and Carlton King, contractor :

    of CW King General Contractors and Developers.

    Did you know?
    One of the leading causes of death among children
    5-9 is CANCER.
    In the last 20 Years ASTHMA rates have increased
    over 400%. American Manufacturing Company
    has expanded into The Bahamas to educate
    ALL BAHAMIAN consumers.

    Come find out what is causing it!

    Place: The Cancer
    Society-Centreville (2 Doors Down from ZNS)
    Date: Friday, March 13, 2009
    Time: 6:30PM - Reserved Seating

    Call: Alex 328-7963 or 328-7964
    “Business Minded Individuals and
    Stay At Home Moms are strongly
    encouraged to attend.”

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    Criminals’ use of guns
    increasing in Bahamas

    @ By ADRIAN GIBSON
    ajbahama@hotmail.com

    | HESE days, mania-
    cal criminals are
    increasingly using guns as
    their weapon of choice as
    they disrupt the serenity of
    our once tranquil islands,
    going on murderous ram-
    pages, robbing families of
    loved ones and callously
    committing heinous crimes
    with no regard for the law.

    The wave of gun violence
    that appears to be sweeping
    across the streets of New
    Providence week after week
    has left many residents terri-
    fied by the thought that this
    small island is becoming like
    the Wild West as we are con-
    stantly inundated with
    reports of the grisly carnage
    caused by gun violence or
    told about high-speed chases
    and dramatic gun battles
    between rival gangs or of
    emboldened outlaws engag-
    ing the police in gun fights.

    A few weeks ago, gunshots
    were fired from a car — in
    broad daylight — at police
    on West Bay Street. Three
    days before that, another
    group of hoodlums report-
    edly engaged police ina
    shootout in the Montagu dis-
    trict.

    Although there have been
    numerous other incidents
    this year, last weekend a
    shooting in a crowded night-
    club at Arawak Cay left one
    man dead.

    The growing trend of anti-
    social behaviour is rapidly
    leading to a state of social
    chaos, where boorish persons
    barbarously roam the streets
    like wild animals engaging in
    feral, homicidal behaviour to
    indulge their unabated anger.

    The senseless actions of
    uncivilised, dim-witted per-
    sons are rapidly casting the
    Bahamas in the image of a
    crime-ravaged hellhole on
    the brink of social implosion.
    There is no wonder why
    Bahamians — stricken by
    fear — have voluntarily cho-
    sen to live in virtual impris-
    onment, locked behind iron
    bars (windows), bolted doors



    “The senseless
    actions of
    uncivilised,
    dim-witted
    persons are
    rapidly casting
    the Bahamas in
    the image of a
    crime-ravaged
    hellthole on the
    brink of social
    implosion. ”



    and screens, and sheltered
    behind iron gates.

    In their state of paralysis,
    law-abiding Bahamians have
    become more distrustful and
    are swiftly arming them-
    selves with cutlasses, shot-
    guns, bats and other safety
    measures to ensure their
    security.

    Admittedly, I am a
    licensed gun owner and I
    support the right of Bahami-
    ans to legally bear arms, par-
    ticularly in instances such as
    hunting or self-defence.

    The Bahamas, a country
    with strict gun laws, has seen
    a proliferation of
    guns/ammunition on its
    streets that I’m told are eas-
    ily accessible and for hire to
    any deranged criminal.
    Undoubtedly, spiralling
    street warfare in this coun-
    try — particularly New Prov-

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    YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

    idence — is fuelled by the
    alarmingly high importa-
    tion/smuggling and circula-
    tion of illegal firearms (from
    assault rifles to handguns)
    primarily from the United
    States, that has given rise not
    only to the lawless behaviour
    that we now see but also toa
    ‘black market’ that profits on
    the trade of illegal weapons.

    Frankly, the easy avail-
    ability of handguns is dis-
    maying and a national issue



    NATIONAL SECURITY MINIS-
    TER Tommy Turnquest said
    that the illegal trade in small
    arms, light weapons and
    ammunition was creating an
    ‘illicit trafficking phenomenon’.

    that should be effectively
    addressed. The illegal
    firearms sale and smuggling
    operations within the archi-
    pelago have led to a number
    of killings of youngsters —
    most likely with drugs, mon-
    ey or women as the central
    figure of a dispute — and
    created a breeding ground
    for the criminal element
    (drug traffickers, gangs,
    migrant workers, terrorists,
    organised crime, etc) to
    access these dangerous
    weapons and cause mayhem.

    National Security Minis-
    ter Tommy Turnquest, in a
    speech to the CARICOM-
    US Partnership to Combat
    Illicit Trafficking in Arms
    Seminar, held in Nassau, said
    that the illegal trade in small
    arms, light weapons and
    ammunition was creating an
    “illicit trafficking phenome-
    non” as the illegal migrant
    and drug trade has created a
    single criminal enterprise.

    According to Mr Turn-
    quest:

    "Such criminal enterprises
    are engaging persons across
    national borders in much the
    same way that legitimate
    multi-national businesses do,
    bringing serious distortion to
    the concept of globalisation.

    "Whether arms in such
    enterprises are exchanged
    for money or for drugs, or
    are used to protect illicit
    shipments of persons or com-
    mit murders, assaults, rob-
    beries and other crimes; to
    intimidate and threaten and
    to enhance status, or other
    reasons, they contribute to
    the widespread availability
    of firearms in the region.”

    The Bahamas is extremely
    vulnerable to the trafficking
    of nearly all illicit items —
    including small arms and
    automatic weapons — pri-
    marily due to its central loca-
    tion between the air and sea
    routes of North and
    South/Central America as
    well as Europe.

    Sadly, it seems that our
    strict gun laws may only
    affect those law-abiding citi-
    zens, as thousands of hand-
    guns remain in circulation

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    and outlaws are constantly
    packing heat, while striking
    fear into the hearts of
    already caged-in residents. It
    is high-time we implement
    gun trade-in and buy-back
    programmes, similar to those
    adopted by cities such as
    Atlantic City, to encourage
    persons to fork over illegal
    firearms to the authorities.
    Furthermore, a conscientious
    effort must be made to curb
    the importation of other
    potentially lethal weapons
    such as low power air pistols,
    replica guns and paintball
    guns.

    Instead of pontificating
    about petty political matters,
    the church could have a huge
    impact in the fight against
    violent crime and the
    removal of guns from the
    streets.

    Indeed, there should be an
    amnesty period where unli-
    censed gun toters can feel
    protected if they take a gun
    to one of the many churches
    in our communities. Fur-
    thermore, in taking guns off
    the streets, we must launch a
    practical, effective campaign
    that incorporates the gov-
    ernment, the private sector
    and the public.

    There should not be a hint
    of the petty politics and
    political gimmicks portrayed
    by many self-serving politi-
    cians!

    In the Bahamas, we may
    soon need to establish an
    agency or department similar
    to the Alcohol, Tobacco and
    Firearms (ATF) agency in
    the US, whose sole purpose
    would be to gain intelligence
    and crackdown on the ille-
    gal weapons trade.

    These days, it is impera-
    tive that the police force con-
    tinue upgrading its arma-
    ments as I continue to see
    officers on the beat without
    bulletproof vests and carry-
    ing six-shooter revolvers that
    they hope would counter the
    sophisticated, high-powered
    weaponry of criminals that

    wear body armour and carry
    guns with magazines that
    hold 15 or more rounds.

    Police officers must be
    heavily deployed in those
    boroughs with the highest
    instances of crime and must
    strengthen their relationship
    with certain communities
    and thereby better their
    intelligence-gathering abili-
    ties.

    THE PHARMACY
    AT PMH AND THE
    EYE WARD

    I RECENTLY had an
    accident that led to me
    convalescing at Princess
    Margaret Hospital for sever-
    al days.

    I was able to witness first-
    hand the frustration of
    patients and others waiting
    at the hospital’s pharmacy
    for their medication.

    Although the hospital
    claims that the pharmacy is
    facing challenges — particu-
    larly in staffing — a number
    of the pharmacists on duty
    adopt a nonchalant, haughty
    attitude when dealing with
    patients.

    However, I must say thank
    you to a very accommodat-
    ing pharmacist — Daniel —
    who rendered impeccable
    service to myself and several
    others.

    Moreover, the eye ward
    at Princess Margaret Hospi-
    tal must be one of the most
    efficiently run wings of that
    institution.

    Although I had a room,
    when I was being encour-
    aged to “go private” or move
    to Doctors Hospital, I stayed
    because I had established a
    rapport with the nurses and
    also because of the
    concern and absolute pro-
    fessionalism that they had
    displayed.

    I left PMH with several
    more friends and I would
    especially like to thank nurs-
    es Ferguson, Sturrup, Hep-
    burn and Griffin — as well
    as my doctors and the sup-
    port staff — for the superb
    care and outstanding service
    that I received.

    Stanford case looms
    over Antigua elections

    @ ST. JOHN'S, Antigua

    ANTIGUAN VOTERS worried by the fallout from an alleged
    fraud scheme involving their richest man decide Thursday between
    the ruling party and the one that welcomed R. Allen Stanford to the
    Caribbean nation nearly two decades ago, according to Associated
    Press.

    Both main political parties have promised to strengthen Antigua's
    economy, which was hit hard after Caribbean regulators took over
    local banks controlled by the Texas financier.

    The billionaire is one of the island's most prominent citizens
    and its largest private employer. Hundreds of people work for his
    two restaurants, one newspaper, cricket grounds, a development
    company and a three-branch local bank as well as the headquarters
    of his Stanford International Bank.

    Prime Minister Baldwin Spencer, whose United Progressive
    Party is seeking to retain its majority of 17 parliamentary seats, has
    said his opponents sought to "literally give away Antigua and Bar-
    buda to Allen Stanford" when the financier brought his offshore
    bank here from Montserrat in 1990.

    Spencer's opponent, Lester Bird, a close Stanford ally, denies the
    claim - although his Antigua Labor Party was in power at the
    time.

    Lists

    There were long lines at polling places and at least 19 had yet to
    open more than three hours after voting was scheduled to start. The
    Electoral Commission blamed the delay on problems printing vot-
    er lists and said it was working to resolve the situation.

    Even the prime minister said he was unable to vote in the morn-
    ing because his polling station in had not yet opened. The Antigua
    Labor Party said it would seek to have polling hours extended.

    The ALP dominated island politics for 28 years before Spencer
    wrested control away in 2004.

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has accused
    Stanford and his top officers of an $8 billion fraud related to cer-
    tificates of deposits and other investments. An attorney for Stanford
    has denied the allegations made in civil court.

    The alleged scandal has Antigua worried about potential damage
    to its reputation and banking sector, and residents concerned
    about their economic future.

    Spencer says he fears Stanford might not be able to pay some 700
    workers. The Stanford Development Company, which provides
    maintenance, IT and other services to local Stanford companies, has
    already dismissed 94 employees.

    The Senate has voted to confiscate about 250 acres (100 hectares)
    of Stanford's property, including businesses that formed the basis
    of his empire.

    Both parties have pledged unemployment assistance, with the
    ALP promising to help impoverished families by canceling old
    power and property tax bills. The UPP also seeks privatization of
    key state entities, such as power and telecommunications.

    Roughly 52,000 of the island's 85,000 residents are registered vot-
    ers.
    THE TRIBUNE

    FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 7



    LOCAL NEWS



    Current global

    Crisis ‘demants
    deepening of regional
    collaboration’

    THE global economic
    crisis is a major test of
    the CARICOM Single
    Market and Economy
    and the region, Barba-
    dos Prime Minister
    David Thompson said.

    He said Caribbean
    countries need to deepen
    their collaboration and
    focus on regional com-
    mitments and partner-
    ships.

    Speaking at the Fifth
    Prime Ministerial Sub-
    Committee Meeting on
    the CARICOM Single
    Market and Economy
    (CSME) on Wednesday
    in Belize City, Belize,
    Mr Thompson noted that
    these are “challenging
    times” and warned that
    the effects of the global
    financial and economic
    downturn will not bypass
    the region.

    “...today we face the
    repercussions of an
    unparalleled global eco-
    nomic crisis centred in
    the developed world, but
    one which will not
    escape us. We must
    again rely on our region-
    al commitments and
    partnerships. This of
    course is one of the
    major tests of the Single
    Market and Economy.
    Let us determine to
    shore up the weaker
    links of our union, be it
    regulation and oversight
    of the financial sector or
    intra-regional trans-
    portation,” Mr Thomp-
    son said.

    Action

    He stressed the need
    for those attending the
    meeting to discuss cor-
    rective action and review
    timelines where neces-
    sary and also called for
    the completion of the
    Strategic Plan for the
    Single Economy in order
    to appropriately co-ordi-
    nate national efforts to
    accomplish objectives.

    “We have the occasion
    to look at the decisions
    we have taken prior to
    this juncture and to
    examine their effective-
    ness in light of the reces-
    sionary forces at work in
    the global economy. Our
    responsibility in this sub-
    committee is to steer this
    initiative to our destina-
    tion with purposefulness
    and for the betterment
    of all our people,” he
    said.

    The Barbadian prime
    minister, as the lead
    head of government with
    responsibility for the
    CSME, chaired the
    meeting. Bharrat Jagdeo
    and Drs Runaldo Vene-
    tiaan, presidents of
    Guyana and Suriname
    respectively; Dean Bar-
    row, prime minister of
    Belize and chair of the
    Conference of Heads of
    Government of CARI-
    COM; Roosevelt Skerrit,
    prime minister of
    Dominica; Bruce Gold-
    ing, prime minister of
    Jamaica; Tillman
    Thomas, prime minister
    of Grenada, and Dr
    Denzil Douglas, prime
    minister of St Kitts and
    Nevis, participated in
    the meeting. Saint Lucia
    and St Vincent and the
    Grenadines were also
    represented.

    Discussions at the
    meeting focused on the
    Single Market Imple-
    mentation Audit which
    would determine the lev-
    el of commitment of
    member states to the
    CSME, and contingent
    rights to be accorded
    persons who can now
    freely move and work
    within the region.

    Heads of government
    have approved nine cate-
    gories for free move-
    ment of skills — artists,
    musicians, university
    graduates, media work-
    ers, Sportspersons,
    teachers, nurses, holders
    of associate degrees and
    equivalent qualifica-
    tions, and artisans who
    have received a
    Caribbean Vocational
    Qualification (CVQ).

    ollege students ‘suffering
    effects of economic slump’

    @ By ELAN HUTCHINSON
    AND GREG SMITH

    AN INCREASING number of
    Bahamian students are questioning
    whether a college degree is still the way
    to go during this ongoing economic
    slump, an informal poll by The Tribune
    has shown.

    Many students at the College of the
    Bahamas said they have been directly
    hit by the recession and are suffering
    the consequences.

    Several students who talked to The
    Tribune said they are concerned that
    they will have to discontinue their stud-
    ies because they fear that all the energy
    and money they are spending on their
    education could be in vain if the job
    market does not recover in the near
    future.

    Others said that they may have to set-
    tle for a “mediocre profession” while
    they wait for the country’s economy to



    THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS: Many students there say they eae — alrpetly hit by

    the economic slump.

    make a comeback.

    Alexavia Dean, a 18-year-old student
    in her second semester of college, said
    her mother was recently laid off from
    Atlantis.

    Asked if her mother losing her job at

    the Paradise Island resort had affected
    her college career in any way, Ms Dean
    said: “I was ever struggling, I mean she
    found a next job, but I don’t know, this
    caused me to lose a little bit of hope, you
    know.”

    Like Ms Dean, a number of college
    students have found themselves strug-
    gling during these tough economic times
    and as a result they have since taken on
    the not-so-easy task of finding a job.

    While some students are close to
    despairing, others are still persistent in
    pursuing their career aspirations,
    although their ‘dream jobs’ may be in
    low demand at the moment.

    Thomas Barnett, a hospitality tourism
    management major, had much to say
    on the topic of the recession affecting his
    career choice. He said he will continue
    to pursue a career in tourism because it
    is his passion.

    Mr Barnett said he would even cut
    back on “partying” in an effort to save
    funds to help his parents pay tuition
    fees.

    For the tourism major, the recession
    has meant that he has become more
    responsible with money and more dili-
    gent in planning ahead for his future.

    Government is exploring
    alternative sources of energy

    @ By INDI
    MCLYMONT-LAFAYETTE
    for Panoscope, a series of
    Panos Caribbean

    THE Bahamas government is
    moving to put measures in place
    to help extremely vulnerable
    islands adjust to what one offi-
    cial called a possible “death sen-
    tence for small islands”.

    Phillip Weech, director of the
    Bahamas Environmental Science
    and Technology (BEST) Com-
    mission, said that the government
    is working on an energy policy,
    exploring alternative sources of
    energy as well as more sustain-
    able tourism options in a bid to
    prepare the more than 700 islands
    for the possible effects of climate
    change.

    “Bahamas has no national
    energy policy ... we have prepared
    it and are doing public consulta-
    tions to take it forward,” said Mr
    Weech, who was addressing a
    workshop put on by the UN Eco-
    nomic Commission on Latin
    America and the Caribbean
    (ECLAC) to discuss the feasibil-
    ity of doing a review on the eco-
    nomics of climate change in the
    Caribbean.



    “Adaptation is a priority for us
    but we have to do it in light of our
    circumstances. We have to diversify
    and to do so in renewable
    technology such as using wind
    energy and ocean thermal energy

    conversion.”



    Phillip Weech, director of Bahamas Environmental
    Science and Technology Commission

    The Caribbean is regarded as
    one of the regions that will be
    most affected by climate change
    and the resultant rising sea lev-
    els. According to Mr Weech,
    the Bahamas is one of the most
    vulnerable island countries in the
    region because of how flat it is.

    “We are not a high island coun-
    try like Jamaica or anywhere else
    — anywhere on the Bahamian
    islands is about 1.5m above sea-
    level. We are almost like pan-
    cakes,” he said.

    Mr Weech highlighted other
    vulnerabilities such as a high

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    dependence on imported energy
    and food as well as the increasing
    costs of these commodities. He
    said these are areas in which there
    will have to be significant change.

    “Adaptation is a priority for us
    but we have to do it in light of
    our circumstances,” said Mr
    Weech. “We have to diversify and
    to do so in renewable technology
    such as using wind energy and
    ocean thermal energy conver-
    sion.”

    “We have to look at our hotel
    sector — there is new technology
    on Paradise Island which allows

    you to dim lights and reduce elec-
    tricity use based on their occupa-
    tion level but most of our old
    hotels have nothing like this, so
    the hotels have to look at having
    energy efficient systems,” he said.
    “Energy assessments and audits:
    how much energy is used to keep
    someone in a hotel? How much
    energy is used in government
    departments? What about the use
    of transport — how much energy is
    used to move one person from
    point A to point B? We need to
    be a lot more energy efficient.”
    He added that the Bahamas is

    already doing the following to
    address climate change:

    ¢ establishing terrestrial and
    marine reserves as well as parks
    and protected areas across the
    Bahamas

    ¢ reducing emissions from land
    degradation and deforestation
    (REDD)

    ¢ fulfilling obligations to the
    United Nations Framework Con-
    vention on Climate Change
    (UNFCCC) through assessment
    reports

    * maintaining engagement
    with regional bodies including the
    Caribbean Community Climate
    Change Centre and the Alliance

    of Small Island Developing
    States.

    Mr Weech’s presentation was
    well received and the director of
    ECLAC’s Caribbean sub-region,
    Neil Pierre said that the feedback
    from the Bahamas workshop
    would feed into the feasibility
    studies being planned for the
    Caribbean.

    “Actions must be based on
    informed economic decision-mak-
    ing; the RECCC (Review of the
    Economics of Climate Change in
    the Caribbean) will give policy-
    makers this,” said Mr Pierre.
    “RECCC will arm policymakers
    with high quality information and
    informed analysis so that they can
    effectively play their part at an
    international level.”

    The RECCC study is expect-
    ed to be done over a two year
    period. The first phase (Septem-
    ber 2008 — March 2009) has
    already started with preliminary
    workshops on climate change in
    the Caribbean.

    “We hope that this project will
    arrive at some preliminary find-
    ings to inform Caribbean gov-
    ernment’s at the Copenhagen
    negotiations (December 2009),”
    said Mr Pierre

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    PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



    LOCAL NEWS



    Detention Centre| Pyqyjid Kelly dies age 76

    reports withheld ©

    FROM page one

    food and dirty living conditions.

    Director of Immigration Jack Thompson told the press he
    found no evidence to substantiate detainees’ claims of violence
    by centre supervisors, nor did he hear any allegations of guards
    inviting the detainees to do sexual favours for privileges.

    He said: “I know when people are detained they get bitter,
    they get angry, they say some things, especially when they are
    detained for too long, and they have fights between themselves.

    “There were no claims of beatings lodged with our committee,
    and I looked at these guys (who claimed to have been beaten)
    and saw no sign of beatings.

    “We heard nothing about sexual favours for privileges, and
    there was no suggestion of insufficient food.”

    The team found meals to be of reasonable quality and quan-
    tity, however recommendations to diversify the lunch menu to
    include fruit and salads will be adopted under the direction of a
    dietitian, Mr Thompson said.

    Detainees met the team in the presence of their supervisors,
    but the Immigration Department director maintains they spoke
    candidly about their experiences and were more concerned
    with their personal status than the state of the facility.

    Immigration is already working to implement recommenda-
    tions put forward by Dr Allen and Father Palacious to provide
    detainees with indoor games, televisions and more books in
    various languages, Mr Thompson said.

    New washing machines and dryers also will be provided, and
    mattresses, which Mr Thompson said have been vandalised by
    frustrated detainees, are being replaced, while grimy walls in the
    male and female dorms will be cleaned and repainted.

    Mr Thompson said: “Some of the detainees, because they
    become angry at times, they tend to destroy the mattresses and
    deface the walls, and we noticed that some of the mattresses were
    torn up and destroyed, and the walls could be painted and
    freshened up.”

    Dr Allen’s suggestion to allow detainees outside to play
    games and sports will however require more thoughtful con-
    sideration to prevent detainees from escaping, Mr Thompson
    said.

    And the psychologist’s recommendation to tear down the
    male dormitory recently ravaged by fire will take some time as
    it may be required for evidence.

    He added: “We are aware that these persons are not incar-
    cerated, they are not prisoners, so we are going to give them what
    we can.

    “Tt is not true that the detention centre is operated as a con-
    centration camp, it is not true that we have violated international
    protocols.

    “We take our responsibility seriously with respect to persons
    in our custody.

    “The detention centre is not yet what we want it to be, but it’s
    well on its way to being all that it could be, and we will contin-
    ue to spend public money to ensure that it is well kept and well
    managed.”

    Mr Thompson said the Immigration Department has been well
    aware of concerns at the Detention Centre since his directorate
    took office at the end of November.

    And the director maintains the fact-finding mission was not
    prompted by reports in The Tribune which drew the attention of
    Amnesty International, the American press and individuals
    around the world.

    Reports of conditions inside the facility are being reviewed by
    Minister of Immigration Branville McCartney, will be passed on
    to the Deputy Prime Minister and recommendations will then be
    considered by the Cabinet.

    Reports: Howard K Stern
    ‘turns himself in to police’

    FROM page one

    Smith, who made headlines in the Bahamas after the death
    of her son in Doctors Hospital and photos of her with then Cab-
    inet Minister Shane Gibson appeared in The Tribune, died in
    February, 2007, after being found unresponsive in a Florida
    hotel. She was 39.

    In April that year, the Bahamas was again centre stage as her
    former boyfriend Larry Birkhead was granted custody of her
    daughter Dannielyn.

    FROM page one

    the employees.

    The Kelly’s spokesperson said
    that many people at the Home Cen-
    tre were taking his death very hard.

    “They were very fond of him. He
    was very loved and will be badly
    missed. Some staff members go as
    far back as 25 to 30 years with him,”
    the spokesperson said.

    Mr Kelly’s family, including his
    wife Nancy, his three sons, Andrew,
    Gregory and Scott, and his daugh-
    ters-in-law, Candy and Shelly, and
    others, are currently still in New
    York, but are expected to return to
    Nassau on Saturday.

    Kemp’s Funeral Home will han-
    dle the arrangements for the funeral
    service, but plans have not yet been
    finalised.

    The Kelly’s spokesperson said
    that the Home Centre will remain
    open and will only be closed on the
    day of his funeral.

    “(Closing the store now) would
    not be what he would have wanted.
    The best tribute to him would be to
    keep his beloved Kelly’s open as
    usual,” the spokesperson said.

    David Albert Charles Kelly was
    born on March 25, 1932, to C Ken-
    neth and Edna F Kelly. He was the
    youngest of three sons.

    His wife, Nancy Kelly, once told
    The Tribune that he was not born
    with the proverbial silver spoon in
    his mouth, but “more like a saw or
    hammer.”

    He attended Queen’s College
    until Form 3 when he left to go to
    McDonogh School, a military acad-
    emy in Maryland, together with his
    brothers Basil and Godfrey.

    He was graduated from there in
    1951. While at McDonogh, Mr Kel-
    ly attained the rank of Major, was
    president of his senior class and
    excelled in several sports, especially
    wrestling. In 1950, he was voted best
    wrestler in the State of Maryland.
    He and his brother Basil were both
    Maryland State Wrestling Champi-
    ons.

    Mr Kelly once said that winning
    the McDonogh’s “Babe Ruth
    Award” was one of his proudest
    moments.

    He was inducted into the
    McDonogh School Hall of Fame in
    1988.

    Tn 1951, at the age of 19, Mr Kel-
    ly returned to Nassau to work at
    Kelly’s Hardware Limited, located
    on Bay Street — now known as Kel-
    ly’s Home Centre at Marathon Mall.

    Mr Kelly’s father died in Decem-
    ber 1952, leaving him, his brother
    Basil and his mother Edna to take
    over operations and the expansion of
    the family business.

    His brother Godfrey, a graduate
    in Law from Cambridge Universi-
    ty, was admitted to the English and
    Bahamian Bars in 1953. Godfrey
    returned home to practice in the
    Bahamas. Both Basil and Godfrey
    Kelly were involved in Bahamian
    politics and both served in the House
    of Assembly and in ministerial posi-
    tions.

    In 1959, Mr Kelly met his future
    wife Nancy Booth. The couple mar-
    ried in 1963.

    David and Basil Kelly incorpo-
    rated Nassau Motors Company Lim-

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    ited in 1964 and moved the company
    to its present Shirley Street site, hav-
    ing moved Standard and Triumph
    cars out of the Kelly’s Hardware
    windows. Nassau Motor Company is
    one of the oldest car companies in
    the Bahamas. Mr Kelly was presi-
    dent of the company.

    Kelly’s Hardware became a mem-
    ber of the American Hardware
    cooperative, later known as ServiS-
    tar in 1973.

    Nancy Kelly joined her husband
    at the store full-time in 1978, helping
    to mould the new look of Kelly's
    Home Centre.

    Tt opened as the anchor for the
    Mall at Marathon just four days
    before Christmas in 1988.

    Since then, Kelly’s had undergone

    numerous changes and expansions,
    employing over 300 employees.

    Mr Kelly successfully managed
    the transition of Kelly’s from being a
    relatively small hardware store on
    Bay Street to a multi-million dollar
    home centre.

    In 1992, he received the Com-
    monwealth of the Bahamas Silver
    Jubilee Award in recognition of his
    outstanding contribution to national
    development in the field of business.

    Mr Kelly represented the
    Bahamas in two Olympics in Yatch-
    ing, in 1968 in Mexico and in 1972 in
    Germany in the Dragon Class.

    He was past Commodore of the
    Royal Nassau Sailing Club for the
    years 1969 and 1970 and was also a
    life-long member of the Nassau

    Yacht Club.

    Mr Kelly made numerous signifi-
    cant contributions to many charitable
    and civic organisations both person-
    ally and through Kelly’s Home Cen-
    tre, most notably to the College of
    the Bahamas, the Cancer Care Cen-
    tre, St Anne’s Church and the
    Bahamas National Trust.

    He is survived by his wife, Nancy
    Booth Kelly; three sons, Andrew
    Jordan Kelly, David Gregory Kelly
    and Reginald Scott Kelly; two
    daughters-in-law, Anne Boushelle
    Kelly and Candance Elizabeth Kel-
    ly; a brother, Godfrey Kenneth Kel-
    ly; five grandchildren, two sisters-in-
    law, Mrs Sonia Kelly and Mrs Paula
    Kelly, and many other relatives and
    friends.

    Newly relaxed US policies on travel
    to Cuba raise concerns in Bahamas

    FROM page one

    On Wednesday, President Obama
    signed into law a $410 billion spend-
    ing bill that will make it easier for
    residents of the United States to trav-
    el to Cuba and send money to fami-
    ly members on that island. The new
    measures will allow Cuban-Ameri-
    cans to travel legally to their home-
    land to visit relatives once a year and
    spend up to $179 a day. Previous
    restrictions on Cuban-Americans,
    imposed by former US President
    George Bush in 2004, limited travel
    to Cuba to once every three years
    with spending of no more than $50 a day.

    The new bill could also facilitate the sale of
    agricultural and pharmaceutical products to
    Cuba.

    One local observer saw this move as a pre-
    cursor to the inevitable opening up of Cuba,
    which some see as a threat to this country's num-
    ber one industry.

    Yesterday, former Minister of Tourism Obie
    Wilchcombe said the news should be a wake-up
    call to tourism stakeholders who he feels have
    been underestimating Cuba's potential threat
    to the Bahamas.

    "I think the problem that we're facing is, we
    knew it was bound to happen and we have
    dragged our feet in preparing ourselves for the
    new challenges. I spoke several years ago about
    emerging markets in the Caribbean and among
    those I listed (were) Turks & Caicos, the Domini-
    can Republic and Cuba.

    Despite severe travel and trade restrictions
    put on the communist island by the Unites States,
    Cuba's hotel occupancy rate has more than dou-
    bled since 1990. And despite a regional tourism
    downturn, Cuba's Tourism Minister Manuel

    FROM page one

    flight from Exuma, where he
    worked as chief pilot for the

    Obie Wilchcombe



    Marrero reported that the country's
    tourism industry grew sector 5.2 per
    cent in the first two months of 2009,
    compared to the same period in 2008.

    Back home, total visitor arrivals
    fell by 4.6 per cent in 2008 driven by
    a7.3 per cent decline in US stopover
    visits, Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
    ham said last month.

    These numbers should spur local
    tourism officials to invest in product
    and culture development, raising of
    industry standards, Mr Wilchombe
    said.

    Expanding the country's market
    share is also vital to capturing more of
    the visitor base. Statistics compiled by
    the Caribbean Tourism Organisation show that
    in 2006, Cuba and the Bahamas had a room
    inventory of 45,270 and 14,929, respectively.

    Mr Wilchcombe pegged the Bahamas’ cur-
    rent room inventory at about 12,000 due to sev-
    eral recent hotel closures. He argued that the
    country needed “at least 30,000 to be competi-
    tive."

    "Cuba has in place now more than 50,000
    hotel rooms, they have a product that is attractive
    if by nothing else but their personalities and also
    by their history. I said and I continue to argue
    that our job is not to be Cuba, but to be a better
    Bahamas. To be a better Bahamas means we
    should take all that we can and invest in the
    product.

    "Our challenge right now is not to panic, our
    challenge is to recognise that we have to create
    that thing that gives us the game-changer. That
    has to be centred around entertainment and cul-
    ture in general, and centred around our service
    that is one of excellence."

    Continued courting of the European, Cana-
    dian and Asian markets are also vital to enticing
    more visitors, he said.

    Son of Chauncey Tynes Jr thanks
    The Tribune for highlighting story

    Colombian drug czar Joe Lehder.

    On Monday, a Tribune Insight
    article revealed Chauncey Tynes
    Sr’s suspicions that his son was
    “disposed of” for knowing too
    much about Lehder’s dealings
    with the PLP government of the
    day, and especially Prime Minis-
    ter Lynden Pindling.

    Chauncey Jr told his father that
    he regularly flew cash consign-
    ments to Nassau from Lehder for
    Pindling and a senior police offi-
    cer. On one occasion, he brought
    a box into the family home con-
    taining $50,000 in US banknotes
    destined for a senior policeman.

    The Tynes family is baffled that
    Pindling’s government was able
    to “cover up” details of Chauncey
    Jr’s last flight and would still like
    closure on the case.

    Also lost on the flight was elec-
    trical engineer Donald Moree Sr.,
    whose wife Ann almost lost the
    baby she was carrying when she
    heard he had vanished.

    Like Chaucey Tynes Sr., Mrs
    Moree believes her husband died
    because he probably knew too
    much about the drugs trade,
    though he always told her “the
    less you know the better.”

    Meanwhile, readers yesterday
    continued to e-mail goodwill mes-
    sages to The Tribune for its bold
    exposure of the Chauncey Tynes
    story.

    One wrote: “Just a quick note
    to say you have my 100 per cent
    support in your ‘eye-catching’
    article. If you get that much pub-
    lic reaction from the article then it
    must be DAMN good and
    DAMN true...smile...keep up
    the good work!”

    Another said he had not heard
    a single bad word about the arti-
    cle among all his friends, who all
    agreed that Bahamian history
    must be told accurately.

    One reader wrote directly to
    The Tribune’s managing editor
    John Marquis, author of the con-

    troversial
    saying:

    “Mr Marquis, I hope that even
    now you are training several
    Bahamians who when you retire
    will be able to step up to the plate
    and carry on your bold, inves-
    tigative and, most importantly,
    fearless kind of journalism. God
    knows this country needs it bad-
    ly.”

    Others addressed the nature of
    the Pindling government and said
    it was close to being a dictator-
    ship.

    “What I would like to know is
    how so-called Right Honourable
    politicians can stand up and
    defend a legacy that is so obvi-
    ously flawed,” said one.

    Another added: “The Insight
    article confirmed what all intelli-
    gent Bahamians know to be true.
    The Pindling government was up
    to its ears in drug trafficking and
    made the country the mess it is
    today.”

    Insight article,

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    Christie's Tribune tirade ‘at odds with
    comments he mate 25 years ago’

    FROM page one

    God or country.”

    His comments came at the height of the drug
    era when the international press was discussing
    openly Pindling’s alleged associations with the
    drug kingpin Joe Lehder.

    It was also the year of the commission of
    inquiry (1983-84) into drug trafficking when cer-
    tain members of Pindling’s government were
    roundly condemned for their association with
    drug dealers.

    Mr Christie and present Prime Minister Hubert
    Ingraham were both fired from the government at
    the time because of their growing disgruntlement
    with Pindling’s corruption and dictatorial atti-
    tudes.

    The present Governor General, Arthur Hanna,
    resigned at about the same time from his post as
    deputy prime minister. He said resignation was
    “the only honourable course of action” open to
    him because of his differences with Pindling.

    Senator Andrew ‘Dud’ Maynard and Cabinet
    ministers George Smith and Kendal Nottage also
    resigned after figuring prominently in evidence
    surfacing before the commission, which investi-
    gated corruption and pay-offs.

    Christie, Ingraham and Hanna were not tar-
    nished by the evidence.

    In his broadside on The Tribune and its man-

    aging editor, Mr Christie described the Insight
    article as “the vilest, the most vicious, the most
    scurrilous and, frankly, the sickest piece of
    garbage I have ever read.”

    He said while Sir Lynden should not get a “free
    pass” his legacy should be treated with a certain
    sensibility.

    But veteran media figures said yesterday that
    Christie’s outburst was completely at odds with
    what he said in 1984.

    “Everyone knows that Christie and Ingraham
    were fired by Pindling because they disapproved
    of his corrupt activities, especially in relation to
    the drug trade,” said one retired journalist.

    “So why is Christie now taking issue with what
    Mr Chauncey Tynes Sr said in the Insight article?
    It seems that he sees the issue as a last chance to
    save his leadership hopes in the PLP.”

    The article also came in for severe criticism in
    a radio talk show hosted by disbarred attorney
    Ortland Bodie Jr.

    Activist Paul Moss was particularly scathing
    towards the managing editor.

    Last night Mr Marquis said: “I’m a bit disap-
    pointed with Mr Christie. I thought he was above
    all that, especially as he should know perfectly
    well that everything Mr Tynes said was true.

    “As for Moss, he’s a political pipsqueak who, in
    my opinion, is of no account. I wouldn’t know him
    if I slipped on him.”
    TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 9

    SPORTS

    SAC still leading the way

    FROM page 11

    son, slowly making her way
    back from an injury prone year
    last season, topped the inter-
    mediate girls as she posted a
    time of 1.99. SAC's Shaunae
    Miller had to settle for second
    in 12.00 and Sarah Mackey of
    Nassau Christian Academy was
    third in 12.33.

    Both Johnson and Miller
    went under the qualifying time
    of 12.00 for Carifta, which will
    be held in St. Lucia over the
    Easter holiday weekend. How-
    ever, they will have to perform
    again at the Bahamas Associa-
    tion of Athletic Associations’
    final Carifta trials at the end of
    the month.

    The GSSSA's lone record
    yesterday came from Audley
    Carey of St. Augustine's Col-
    lege, who ran away with the
    intermediate boys 300 metres.
    He clocked 10 minutes and
    13.09 seconds, erasing the pre-
    vious mark of 10:30.02 that was
    set by Trevor Strachan in 2006.

    Marvin Minns of St. john's
    College got second in 11:06.60
    with George Zonicle of
    Queen's College taking the race
    in 11:13.58.

    The highlight of the day was
    the 100 final.

    SAC's Marcus Thompson
    took the title as the fastest boy
    in the BAISS this year with his
    victory in the senior boys divi-
    sion in 10.49. He easily won
    over a good field that featured
    Warren Fraser of Temple
    Christian in 10.62 in second and
    Aaron Wilmore of Queen's
    College in third with 10.91.

    SAC also claimed the
    female's title as V'Alonee
    Robinson cruised to victory in
    the senior girls’ century, stop-
    ping the clock in 11.74. Her
    nearest rival was Sparkyl Cash
    of Queen's College in 12.01.
    Dominique Morley of SAC got
    third in 12.34.

    Queen's College took con-
    trol of the intermediate divi-
    sion.

    Harold Carter clinched the
    boys’ crown as he sped to a
    time of 10.67. Devaughn Fraser
    of Temple Christian got second
    in 11.19 and Thompson of
    Westminister was third in 11.23.

    In the junior boys division,
    Andrae Stubbs of Charles W.
    Saunders avoided a clean
    sweep by the two powerhouses
    as he snatched the lead early
    and held off Gerrio Rahming
    of Queen's College. Stubbs won ia at cans :
    in 11.72 with Rahming timed NAS A. RUBINSON TRACK & FIE Ory DAIHATSU
    in 11.82. Dwight Campbell of repees Sh ait ae ee ee ee ee ee eee Me ee ee ey oe
    Jordan Prince William got third





    Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



    ST. ANDREWS Ashton Butler leads the way in the junior boys triple
    jump yesterday.

    in 12.11. RESULTS
    gene se pe an sweep in COMBINED TEAM SCORES

    ve Cemiry 1 mie Juntor SiS PLACE SCHOOL POINTS
    division behind the 1°2 punch 4 ‘saint Augustine's College 5 SAC 696
    of Makeya White (12.65) and g g
    Aalyiah Harris (12.85). Rikki 2 Queens College 14 Qc 562
    Barry of St. Anne's was thirdin 3 Saint Anne's 14 SAS 223.5
    12.87. 4 Saint Andrews School 13 SA 173 = — .

    _Kaiwan Culmer got the first 5 gaint John's College 6 SJC 1625 er. Window Van
    victory for SAC in the straight- _§ Temple Christian Schools TCS 145 MY \ & Panel V:
    Santain Boye division iy 1330. 7Nassau Christan Academy = «9 NCA 187 ) . “Tae
    over Dominic Knowles of 8 Jordan Prince William 12 PWH 84 : ;
    Queen's College (13.45). Erin 9 Westminster College WMC 48.5 , °* Automatic
    Smith of Charles W. Saunders 10 Aquinas College 10 AQ 40.5 == : Bi ; ti ae a transmission

    was third in 13.51.

    % 11 Charles W. Saunders CWS 40 : ae
    And Khadija Fraser got the . °
    parade started for Queen's Col- 12 Faith Temple Academy FTA 31 | ' = Air condition Ing
    lege when she took the bantam _‘_13 Kingsway Academy KA 30 a Mi ii « Power steeri ng
    girls’ race in 12.90. Jessica Stur- i> . :
    rup of St. Anne's was second — FEMALE TEAM SCORES - 1 BANTAM DIVISION ° ha cassette
    in 13.62 and Vinisa Beneby o ;
    St. John's was third in 13.68. PLAGE SEHOGE POIRTS Pp ayer
    SAC also got a sweep in the 1 Queens allege: 14 Qc 90 °3 cylinder 659cc
    senior girls’ 3000 as Huhnique 2 Saint Augustine $ College 5 SAC 66
    Rolle and Amber Weech — 3 Saint Andrews School 13 SA 28
    Le up _ oe 4 Saint Anne's 14 SAS 25
    olle was timed in 11:13.52 an
    Weech did 12:36.34. Temple en : ie eo cme -
    Christian's Kimberly Johnson rea Mins uitatn
    was third in 13:18.99, 7 Temple Christian Schools TCS 9
    If that wasn't enough, SAC 8 Nassau Christian Academy 9 NCA 6
    and QC basically dominated on —_Q Aquinas College 10 AQ 4
    Lt cgadailaprien 10 Faith Temple Academy FTA 2

    In events that they didn't

    win, St. Anne's, Aquinas Col-
    lege, St. Andrew's and St. MALE TEAM SCORES - 1 BANTAM DIVISION

    John's joined in the glory. PLACE SCHOOL POINTS
    The meet will wrap up today —_{ Queens College 14 ac 56
    starting at 9 am with the mar- 9 gaint Augustine's College 5 SAC 50 = ‘ a |
    Ae d00 regs 3 Charles W. Saunders cws 25 GY | * Standard transmission
    ‘ 4 Saint John's College 6 SJC 22 i e Air conditioning
    5 Saint Anne's 14 SAS 16
    6 Temple Christian Schools TCS Ti
    7 Nassau Christian Academy 9 NCA 10
    7 Aquinas College 10 AQ 10
    7 Saint Andrews School 13 SA 10
    10 Jordan Prince William 12 PWH 8
    11 Faith Temple Academy FTA 7
    FEMALE TEAM SCORES - 2 JUNIOR DIVISION
    PLACE SCHOOL POINTS
    1 Saint Augustine's College 5 SAC 97
    oie eras i ee : 2 year/24,000-mile factory warranty.
    siete enecasteteticed 4 Saint Andrews School 13 SA 27
    : 5 Kingsway Academy KA 14
    Roi people who ate making 6 Aquinas College 10 AQ 11

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    3/11/2009 to 3/13/2009
    PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    TRIBUNE SPORTS



    SPORTS







    friends.

    Many would remember his last fight
    on October 4 when Ferguson was
    stopped 14 seconds in the first round
    by Seth Petruzelli. Excuse me. Fer-
    guson was quick to point out that
    he “slipped and fell.”

    Looking back at the fight, at
    the BankAtlantic Center in Sun-
    rise, Florida, which was his first
    loss in a sanctioned bout, Kimbo

    Slice admitted that he doesn’t

    want to put too much emphasis
    on it.

    “Every fighter has a fighter’s
    chance, so I’m not taking anything

    away from Seth,” he said. “Things
    happen in a fight. All it take is
    one punch to take you to a vic-
    tory. So I will leave it like that.”

    What was so disheartening for

    Kimbo Slice was the fact that

    Petruzelli was a fill in for the

    original fighter, Ken Shamrokc,

    who was deemed unfit after he
    sustained a nasty cut over his left
    eye in training.

    Yesterday on his arrival home,
    Ferguson stopped into The Tri-

    bune’s office with his parents,
    Clarence Ferguson and Rosemary
    Clarke, and a close friend, Nat ‘the
    Hit Man’ Gay from Miami, Florida.
    The 33-year-old Kimbo Slice was sort
    of surprised by the reception that he received
    because it seemed as if just about everybody in
    the office had either heard about him or seen him
    on the tubes.

    For Ferguson, who emerged from Miami, Flori-
    da where he resides as a street fighter to a big
    time showcase on the tubes, an actor, clothing
    designer or just an entertainer, the ball is in his
    court.

    “That gives me the opportunity to dedicate
    myself to whatever I want and to be successful at
    it,” Ferguson said. “So I will continue to fight.”

    His next fight is scheduled for June, but instead
    of performing in the MMA, he will actually venture
    into boxing. It’s his first appearance in that arena,
    but he haven’t gotten an opponent lined up as
    yet.

    But don’t count out the MMA just yet. Ferguson
    said he still has two of those fights on the drawing
    board this year.

    In the meantime, Ferguson said he’s just excited
    to be back home.

    “T’m just ready to settle in,” said Ferguson, who
    was a special guest at the Bahamian Idol show

    Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

    KEVIN
    aS ORs Ons
    FERGUSON

    ee
    Wins 4
    Losses 1

    SUI

    TS A
    Losses 1

    http:/Avww.kimboslice.org/

    THINKING ABOUT
    GETTING A TRUCK?

    TTS TEI
    aboutathiSnone:

    Get in it. Touch it. Feel it.

    YOU'LL FIND

    Uinls BSsu
    ULRIKE COU TE
    UinllSiri=

    is right in front of your face.

    = Fs 2 - ig

    MIXED MARTIAL ARTIST Kevin ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson

    @ By BRENT STUBBS
    Senior Sports Reporter ¢ bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

    WELCOME home Kevin ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson.

    After making his presence felt in the Mixed Martial Arts (MMA)
    and on the big screen as an entertainer in the United States, Fer-
    guson has returned home to spend some time with his family and

    last night and will be attending the funeral ser-
    vice of his cousin Bernadette Ann Ferguson Brown
    on Saturday.

    “So I have my passport straight so I can travel. I
    will be coming home frequently. I want to do a cou-
    ple fights over year. I plan to do at least four fights
    a year, so I would at last like to do one or two
    here.”

    Taken aback by the response he’s received so
    far, Ferguson said the Bahamian people have been
    very supportive of their athletes no matter where
    they are and what they are doing.

    “T want to do what I’m doing. I want to contin-
    ue being an entertainer, I want to continue fighting,
    continue to make my movies, continue to make
    commercials and continue to take care of my fam-
    ily and to make everybody proud,” he said.

    “God has seen fit to bless me. But I think there’s
    a greater calling on my life in the future. I just
    don’t know what it is. But until there, I’m here.”

    Ferguson, who grew up in the Step Street area in
    Fox Hill, said now that he had his passport, he
    will be in town as often as the Bahamian people
    will accept him.

    His father, businessman Clarence Ferguson said
    the Fox Hill community can’t wait for Kimbo Slice
    to come by.

    “They’re waiting for him,” he said.

    But while there are a lot of people who were
    eager to watch Kimbo Slice on the tube, his father
    said he gets goose bumps every time a show comes
    up.

    “IT move away from the TV and just try to peep
    in because you really don’t want to watch your
    son in action like that,” he said. “But I’m getting
    into it now.”

    His mother, Rosemary Clarke, a native from
    Exuma, has actually been in attendance to at one
    or two of his shows. She had a slightly different per-
    spective.

    “Watching it on TV is good, but when you have
    to go there and sit down and wait for all that
    action, it ain’t good,” she said. “I rather watch it on
    TV where I can shout and holler until I get hoarse.”

    But she noted that she’s been very proud of his
    accomplishment.

    Nat ‘the Hitman’ Gay, who also travelled from
    Miami, said Kimbo Slice had been an inspiration
    for him.

    “T love to see him fight. I love to see him go to
    war,” he said.

    This is Gay’s first appearance in the Bahamas
    and he noted that he’s enjoying himself.

    Now that he has his passport and he can travel as
    often as he sees fit, Kimbo Slice said the Bahami-
    an people will be seeing a lot more of him, not just
    on the big screen, but in person.



    (second from left) is shown above with his parents
    Clarence Ferguson and Rosemary Clarke (at left) and his close friend American Nat ‘the Hitman’ Gay (right) is
    in town to spend some time with his family.

    FROM page 11

    second half. Rashad Sturrup,
    the game's most valuable play-
    er, had a game high 28 points,
    including nine in the first quar-
    ter and 10 in the fourth quarter
    for CI Gibson. H Lewis had 19,
    Drew Rolle 14, Milano Hunter
    12 and Rashad Hunter and
    Dante Rolle both had seven.

    For TA Thompson, Basil
    Deveaux scored 18, Kenneth
    Pinder 17, Trevor Smith 12,
    Edmund Curtis 11 and Dereck
    Cox helped out with six.

    “We were short a man
    tonight and so we didn't have it.
    Four games in four nights, it's
    tough on these young guys,”
    said GHS coach Nigel Ingra-
    ham.

    But despite losing the game,
    Ingraham said he felt as if his
    Magicmen were the winners.

    “I'm so proud of them
    because I had about 12-13 guys
    who made 2.0 (grade point
    average), so we won,” Ingra-
    ham said.

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    DW Davis took advantage of



    some key fouls by TA Thomp-
    son down the stretch to seal the
    deal as they put a wrap on a
    successful year in which they
    won all four tournaments they
    competed in.

    “This is my third year at DW
    Davis and the guys I met there
    are now in grade nine. I sold
    the programme to them and
    they jumped on board. This
    year, we went to Andros and
    won, we won the Father Mar-
    cian, we went to Long Island
    and now we won this. Four
    straight. Thank the Lord,” said
    Mark Hanna, who was also
    named the coach of the year.

    DW Davis played with a lot
    of resilience coming back from
    a 21-11 first quarter deficit.
    Down 34-22 at the half, the Pit-
    bulls clawed their way back,
    trimming the margin to 47-43
    at the end of the third.

    It wasn't until the last three
    minutes of the fourth that they
    eventually took control of the
    game, going up 53-50 on a pair
    of free throws from William
    Ferguson, who was eventually
    named the MVP.

    Not done yet, the Scorpions
    managed to come back for a 54-

    Rattlers and Pithulls win titles

    54 tie with 1:41 to play, thanks
    to Roosevelt Whylly's consecu-
    tive driving fast break lay-ups.

    But after Alvin St. Fleur hit
    one of two free throws to open
    a slight 57-54 lead for DW
    Davis, TA Thompson suffered a
    big blow when their coach was
    tossed from the game by refer-
    ee Christian Wilmore with 59.9
    seconds left on the clock.

    The Pitbulls would convert
    three of the four free throws
    and they went up 60-54. But in
    the space of 15 seconds, they
    got two steals and scored on
    both possession with a lay-up
    from Prince Boodle and two
    charity shots from Ferguson to
    finally signal the end for the
    Scorpions.

    Ferguson, who came up big
    with 11 in the third quarter
    when the Pitbulls got back into
    the game, finished with a game
    high 25 points. St. Fleur had 14,
    Boodle 13 and Alcot Fox 10 in
    the win for DW Davis.

    Marvin Saunders paved the
    way for TA Thompson with 18.
    Angelo Lockhart had 14, Roo-
    sevelt Whylly and Vilner Desir
    both had eight and Kensiu
    Sylvester added five.




    ¢ The Bahamas Lawn
    Tennis Association will be
    sending a junior boys and
    junior girls team of players

    to the Dominican Republic

    to play in the North/Cen-
    tral American and
    Caribbean Zone Pre-Qual-
    ifying event for Boys and
    Girls 16 and under March
    23-28th, 2009.

    The Junior Davis Cup
    Team will be led by
    Johnathon Taylor, the cur-
    rent #1 in Junior Boys 18s
    and 16s in the Bahamas,
    Ondre Cargill and Kevin
    Major will round out the
    squad.

    The team will be
    coached by Giorgio Bal-
    dacci, a veteran coach who
    has travelled with many
    junior teams in the past.

    The Junior Fed Cup
    Team will be led by rising
    star Simone Pratt, who has
    been making waves with









    her performance in Central

    America this spring and is
    the top ranked junior girl
    in the COTEC ranking.

    Other members of the
    team are Gabrielle Moxey
    and Erin Strachan.

    Both teams are expected
    to compete well and chal-

    lenge for the right to repre-

    sent the region in a Quali-

    fying event this summer.
    Stephen Turnquest, Ist

    Vice President and Direc-

    tor of Junior Tennis for the

    BLTA who made the
    announcement said that he
    felt good about the juniors
    that will be representing
    the Bahamas and that it is
    these types of opportuni-
    ties that give the juniors a
    chance to measure their
    performances against the
    best in the region.

    And that these types of
    events go a long way in
    preparing our juniors for
    the future.

    ¢ Play in the masters
    softball league playoff
    rounds will continue this
    weekend at the Blue Hills
    Sporting Complex.

    In the opening day of the

    playoffs, the pennant win-

    ning Williams Construction

    Jets (12-2) scored a win
    over the Augusta St. Bulls
    (4-9), 18-0.

    Danny Subbs got the win

    while Paul Moss was
    tagged with the loss.

    Six Pack Abs (10-3) also
    scored an opening day win
    over Andeaus Brokers (6-
    7).

    Foster Dorsett was the
    winning pitcher in the Abs’
    12-10 win while Mike
    Isaacs was tagged with the
    loss.

    Other results from last

    weekend’s schedule includ-

    ed Alco Raiders over the
    Bamboo Shack Bulls, 8-1;
    while Micholette defeated
    Miller Lite 21-2; Six Pack
    Abs over the Andeaus
    Brokers, 12-2; and Alco
    Raiders over the Bulls 7-0.

    SATURDAY, 14TH
    MARCH 2009

    1pm Micholette Strokers
    vs. Miller Lite Royals

    3pm Williams Construc-
    tion Jets vs. Augusta St.
    Bulls

    SUNDAY, 15TH
    MARCH 2009

    1pm Miller Lite Royals
    vs. Micholette Strokers

    3pm Micholette Strokers
    vs. Williams Construction
    Jets

    Tay

    the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

    Rattlers and Pitbulls win titles

    @ By BRENT STUBBS
    Senior Sports Reporter
    bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

    OH how sweet it is to be
    champions.

    THE prestigious Hugh
    Campbell Basketball Tourna-
    ment title got away from the CI
    Gibson Rattlers. But there was
    no way that they were going to
    let the Government Secondary
    Schools Sports Association's
    senior boys crown slip away
    from them too.

    After losing the tournament
    title last month to the Taberna-
    cle Baptist Falcons from Grand
    Bahama, coach Kevin 'KJ'
    Johnson and his Rattlers
    regrouped and took their frus-
    tration out on the Magicmen to
    take the GSSSA title yesterday.

    They did it in convincing fash-
    ion from start to finish as they
    blew out the Cinderella Gov-
    ernment High Magicmen 96-70
    in the third and deciding game
    in their best-of-three champi-
    onship series yesterday at the
    Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

    “The Hugh Campbell is the
    pinnacle of high and low when
    it comes to basketball in high
    school in the country. Taberna-
    cle is an excellent ball club and
    they deserved to win. But GSS-
    SA is just as exciting to win.”

    The DW Davis Pitbulls and
    Johnson's coaching partner cel-
    ebrated as well as they pulled
    off a 67-58 win over the TA
    Thompson Scorpions, former-
    ly CC Sweeting Jr. in game
    three of their junior boys’ best-
    of-three finals.

    RATTLERS 96, MAGICMEN 70:

    CI Gibson rebounded after
    blowing game two and a chance
    to pull off a clean sweep. But
    what a difference a day makes.
    They didn't waste any time in
    turning the series back in their
    favour.

    “We had a hard breaking
    loss. Government High played
    an excellent game. We went
    over our game plan and we
    came ready to play,” Johnson
    summed up.

    Not enough the junkanoo
    music by Government High,
    whose fan support was greater
    in the stands, could derail CI
    Gibson from their mission.

    From start to finish, the Rat-
    tlers painfully took it to the
    Magicmen as they

    The Rattlers got a little care-
    less in the fourth quarter. But
    every time the Magic came up
    with a basket, they were able
    to regain their composure and
    managed to stay ahead of them.

    The Rattlers got a three-

    pointer with 1:51 left to open a
    decisive 92-65 lead.

    CI Gibson got a balanced
    scoring attack as they slowly
    built on their 23-17 first quarter
    lead to extend it to 41-20 and
    they never looked back in the

    SEE page 10

    SAC still leading the way

    @ By BRENT STUBBS
    Senior Sports Reporter
    bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

    IT will come down to a two-way battle for the
    top spot as the Bahamas Association of Inde-
    pendent Secondary Schools Sports Association's
    Inter-School Track and field Championships
    comes to a close today at the Thomas A. Robin-

    son Track and Field Stadium.

    The St. Augustine's College Big Red Machines
    are holding onto a 134-point advantage over the
    Queen's College Comets after the first two days
    of competition. They lead the 13-field competi-
    tion with a total of 696 points. Trailing with 562
    points. Sitting in third place is St. Anne's Blue-

    waves with 223.50.

    SAC's head coach William ‘Knucklehead’
    Johnson said the Big Red Machines are just
    rolling along as they try to remain undefeated in

    the championships.

    “We feel good about where we are and what
    we have been able to accomplish over the past
    two days,” Johnson said. “We had some points
    that got way from us, but overall we are quite

    pleased to still be out front.”

    Going into the final day of competition, SAC
    hold the lead in the junior, intermediate and
    senior girls divisions as well as the intermediate
    and senior boys. Queen's College are out front in
    the bantam girls and boys and intermediate boys.

    Jason Edwards, one of the Comets’ coaches,
    said Queen's College is right where they want to
    be - in striking distance of St. Augustine's Col-

    lege.

    “We just have to come out tomorrow and try to
    win everything that we compete in,” he project-
    ed. “We know it won't be easy because SAC is
    performing very well. But we feel confident that
    we can make up some ground.”

    Yesterday's event produced two Carifta qual-
    ifiers and just one GSSSA record.

    In the highlight of the day, Printassia John-

    SEE page 9



    SENIOR girls shot putt action.





    MEMBERS of the DW Davis Pitbulls celebrate their GSSSA champi-
    onship win over the TA Thompson Scorpions yesterday at the Kendal
    Isaacs Gymnasium.

    DOUBLE

    FILET O' FISH
    PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



    LOCAL NEWS



    Kevin ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson steps into The Tribune arena

    IN FIGHTING



    PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



    4 : At: making his presence felt in the Mixed Martial Arts
    ” (MMA) on the big screen in the United States, Kevin



    < ‘Kimbo Slice’ Ferguson has returned home to spend some time
    with his family and friends.

    Yesterday on his arrival home, Ferguson stopped into The Tribune’s
    office with his parents, Clarence Ferguson and Rosemary Clarke, and a close
    friend, Nat ‘the Hit Man’ Gay from Miami, Florida.

    He was surprised by the reception he received because it seemed as if just
    about everybody in the office had either heard about him or seen him on the
    tubes.

    Ferguson, who grew up in the Step Street area in Fox Hill, said now
    that he had his passport, he will be in town as often as the Bahamian peo-
    ple will accept him.







    7) |)
    PtH ‘Va ¥

    STRUNG ARM TACTICS: Kimbo Slice with Tribune Business reporter Chester Robards.

    MAY THE FORCE BE WITH YOU: Kimbo Slice with Tribune staff member Jason
    Taylor and Tribune News Editor Paco Nunez.

    SHAKE ON IT:
    Kimbo Slice
    with Tribune
    staff member
    Dale Dean.

    DON’T MESS WITH KIMBO: Kimbo Slice with Tribune photographer Tim Clarke.










    Insurers
    face ‘serious

    issue’ of
    mounting
    RAQaE lI (ec

    Companies moving to
    deal with issue that has
    ‘everyone seriously
    concerned’, with
    greater urgency caused
    by impending new Act

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    Bahamian general insurance
    carriers are assessing how to
    deal with the “serious problem”
    of mounting accounts receiv-
    ables owed to them by brokers
    and agents, Tribune Business
    was told yesterday, with a solu-
    tion made more urgent by the
    stipulations in the new Domes-
    tic Insurance Act.

    Patrick Ward, Bahamas
    First’s group president and chief
    executive, said all Bahamas
    General Insurance Association
    (BGIA) carriers were “looking
    seriously” at how to combat the
    receivables situation, given that
    the new Act will “place the
    responsibility” on them to col-
    lect all premium revenues
    regardless of whether they are
    passed on by brokers and
    agents.

    Tribune Business had con-
    tacted Mr Ward and other
    industry executives after being
    told that one solution being pro-
    posed by some insurance carri-
    ers, who are the ones that
    underwrite each policyholder’s
    risk, was that the new Act and
    its regulations require brokers
    and agents to establish escrow
    accounts.

    Accounts

    These accounts would hold
    the premium income that bro-
    kers and agents needed to pass
    on to the underwriting carrier,
    once their commission - usually
    around 12-15 per cent - had
    been deducted.

    Using escrow accounts, so the
    theory went, would prevent any
    unscrupulous agents and bro-
    kers from using this premium
    income as working capital in
    their businesses, or for any oth-
    er purpose.

    Mr Ward, though, told Tri-
    bune Business that while there
    was “no official campaign” to
    adopt broker/agent escrow
    accounts or any other solution
    as a common position.

    “But I know there are peo-
    ple discussing different ways to
    deal with a serious problem,”
    Mr Ward told Tribune Business
    in reference to accounts receiv-
    ables.

    “Tt is something that I know
    all of the companies are looking
    at seriously. Pending the imple-
    mentation of the new Act, that
    will place the responsibility on
    us, the carrier, vis-a-vis the
    receipt of premiums, regardless
    of whether we received them
    from the broker or agent.”

    Acknowledging that “every-

    SEE page 6B

    The information contained is from a third
    party and The Tribune can not be held
    responsible for errors and/or omission,
    from the daily report.





    THE TRIBUNE

    usin

    FRIDAY,



    MARCH

    LB,

    2009

    SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

    FAMILY GUARDIAN

    INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



    Port chair mulls Tourism sector
    his resignation

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    The Grand Bahama Port
    Authority’s (GBPA) chairman
    yesterday confirmed to Tribune
    Business that he was consider-
    ing resigning from his post, and
    indicated a final decision would
    be taken once he met with man-
    agement next week.

    When contacted by this news-
    paper, Felix Stubbs, who is also
    general manager of IBM
    (Bahamas), said: “I’m thinking
    about it. I haven’t given in my
    resignation.”

    He initially said he would
    “prefer not” to discuss why he
    was thinking of resigning, but
    then added: “When I’m back,
    I’m going to sit down with man-
    agement and ask them to con-
    sider a couple of things.

    “Tf they’re not prepared to
    change certain things, I'll leave.
    It’s been brewing over time. I’m
    back on Sunday, and should be
    in office on Monday.”

    Speaking to Tribune Business
    from outside the Bahamas, Mr

    Stubbs added: “I think there’s a
    lot of opportunities missing at
    the Port Authority that have
    me concerned.”

    Tribune Business contacted
    Mr Stubbs after several sources
    suggested he was close to
    resigning the GBPA chairman-
    ship about one year after he
    took the post. This newspaper
    was told Mr Stubbs has offered
    to resign on several previous
    occasions, but each time the
    offer was either withdrawn or
    rejected.

    Unclear

    It was unclear precisely why
    he is mulling resignation, but a
    number of people said they had
    been expecting it, following
    Erik Christiansen’s resignation
    as Port Group Ltd chairman
    and his replacement by Hannes
    Babak.

    Some sources suggested that
    there was a feeling that the
    GBPA and Port Group Ltd
    chairmanships should be held
    jointly by one man, given that

    ‘must move away

    from model today’

    * Ex-minister says
    Bahamas must look to
    expand tax
    information treaty
    network and go out
    proactively seeking
    partners, in effort to
    obtain compensating

    economic benefits

    mw By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    The Bahamas will likely have
    to “move away from the existing
    model” for its international finan-
    cial services centre in the face of
    increasing US and G-20 pressure,
    a former finance minister has told
    Tribune Business, and seek reci-
    procal benefits from nations it
    signs tax information deals with.

    James Smith, minister of state
    for finance in the former Christie
    government, said the world’s
    major industrialised countries
    were likely “to just bulldoze”
    ahead with their professed drive
    to crack down on international
    financial centres such as the
    Bahamas, exploiting the global
    recession and credit crunch to jus-
    tify this.

    With the Bahamas already hav-
    ing signed a Tax Information
    Exchange Agreement (TIEA)
    with the US, Mr Smith suggested
    that this nation proactively seek
    other such partners, all the while
    looking to see what economic
    benefits it could get from these
    arrangements.

    Taxes

    He added that developed coun-
    tries were unlikely to recover
    much by way of unpaid taxes
    from clients of the Bahamian
    financial services industry, as the
    private wealth management sec-
    tor’s clients were largely compli-
    ant with their home country tax
    laws.

    The Organisation for Econom-
    ic Co-Operation and Develop-
    ment (OECD), the forum or
    ‘club’ most frequently used by the
    G-20 nations to lead the attack
    on international financial centres
    is already looking at creating a
    new ‘blacklist’ for nations that
    have entered less than 12 TIEAs
    with its members.

    SEE page 6B

    Pat |

    APU Stes TINT

    for a better life

    the two companies’ often over-
    lapped.

    However, it is thought that
    Mr Stubbs’ resignation would
    not sit well with the Govern-
    ment, especially if Mr Babak
    were to be approved by the
    GBPA Board to replace him.

    The Government is thought
    to like the split GBPA and Port
    Group Ltd chairs, given that it
    keeps the former’s regulato-
    ry/licensing functions away from
    the latter’s investment activi-
    ties.

    Meanwhile, several sources
    suggested that the end to British
    banker Roddie Fleming’s
    attempt to acquire the
    GBPA/Port Group Ltd stake
    held by Sir Jack Hayward’s fam-
    ily trust was likely to propel it to
    try and settle the almost two-
    and-a-half year ownership dis-
    pute with the late Edward St
    George’s estate.

    One source yesterday sug-
    gested the two sides were in
    talks in London to explore a

    SEE page 2B

    @ By CHESTER ROBARDS

    Business Reporter

    PRIVATE yacht and boat arrivals to the Bahamas
    declined by around 20 per cent year-over-year for
    2008 and into this year, a Ministry of Tourism offi-
    cial said yesterday, but just a few mega yachts have
    been able to buttress some Family Island marinas

    from the downturn.

    Earl Miller, general manager of vertical markets at
    the Ministry’s Fort Lauderdale office, said the eco-
    nomic downturn and last summer’s surging fuel
    costs were the crux of the decline.

    He said the Bahamas’ popular fishing tourna-

    to shrink 10%
    during 2009

    * Study suggests Bahamian industry's
    job total to contract by 7.5%

    * But provides brighter medium-term
    outlook over next decade for nation’s
    number one sector

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    The Bahamian tourism indus-
    try has been forecast to shrink
    by almost 10 per cent in terms
    of its total economic output for
    2009, a leading global tourism
    organisation has predicted, with
    the sector’s total job levels con-
    tracting by 7.5 per cent.

    Yet despite the gloomy short-
    term prognosis provided by the
    World Travel & Tourism Coun-
    cil’s (WTTC) 2009 forecast for
    the Bahamian tourism industry,
    it also offered hope for the

    Roasters SEE page 2B





    * Fewer vessels in
    Florida marinas imply
    decline for Bahamas
    * Valentine’s business
    down 10%, but mega
    yachts helping to
    buttress decline in

    ments will take a hit in the number of attendees

    compared to previous years.

    SEE page 4B

    NU Le

    smaller boat visitors

    FAMILY GUARDIAN

    INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

    SS

    [1 leave your children financially secure
    [7 provide a safety net for your loved ones
    C ensure a bright future for your fami

    aA all of the above


    PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    Summit organisers unveil
    alternative $1bn stimulus

    Urge government to reconsider multi-million roads project borrowing to focus on current account

    @ By CHESTER
    ROBARDS
    Business Reporter

    THE GOVERNMENT
    should reconsider borrowing
    money for road projects that
    the Bahamas does not need,
    and focus more on creating a

    feasible economic stimulus
    plan that buttresses this
    nation’s foreign exchange
    reserves, the organizers of last
    week’s National Economic
    Summit (NES) said yesterday.

    Lynden Nairn and Lester
    Cox said they held the Eco-
    nomic Summit in order to

    Share your news

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    “identify ways to positively
    impact the Bahamas’ current
    account balance in the imme-
    diate to medium term”.

    They said they have identi-
    fied preliminary ways that the
    Government and private sec-
    tor could use the current eco-
    nomic situation to improve the
    Bahamas’ current account bal-
    ance by $1 billion.

    “We believe that govern-
    ment spending should flow
    into areas that would have a
    genuine simulative effect,”
    said Mr Nairn.

    “Tt is not true that every dol-
    lar spent by Government, no
    matter how well intentioned,
    is stimulative.

    “Tn our context, government
    spending that has the effect of
    reducing the current account
    deficit is stimulative.”

    He said that $1 billion could
    be generated by the fisheries,
    energy, food production, and

    trade and manufacturing
    industries, while causing full
    employment, less reliance on
    tourism and an increase in
    entrepreneurial numbers.

    Mr Nairn said there had to
    be a vast improvement and
    upgrades to some of these sec-
    tors in order to achieve the
    goals set out by the summit.

    For example, Mr Nairn said
    there was a need in fisheries
    to focus more on marine secu-
    rity, in order to reduce poach-
    ing.

    Energy

    In the energy sector, he said
    public transportation improve-
    ments should be addressed
    and liquefied natural gas
    (LNG) should be approved.

    With regard to food pro-
    duction, Mr Nairn said abat-
    toirs needed to be expanded,
    and the Bahamas should pro-

    duce 100 per cent of its select
    fruits and vegetables needs.

    In the trade and manufac-
    turing sectors, greater
    exploitation of the Freeport
    Container Port and aggressive
    promotion of the Bahamas as
    a jurisdiction for light manu-
    facturing was required.

    “As we move into phase
    two of the NES, we expect
    further refinement of the
    above goals through conver-
    sations with the public and pri-
    vate sectors, as well as with
    members of the Government
    and Official Opposition,” said
    Mr Nairn.

    He added that the first steps
    the Government and nation
    would have to agree to would
    be the pursuit of billion dollar
    account improvement, and to
    agree that it will be achieved
    within three years.

    “We might not have anoth-
    er Opportunity in our life to

    effect the transformation we
    need. So less the world’s econ-
    omy improves and we return
    to the status quo, let us
    embrace this crisis now and
    convert it to the opportunity
    that it offers,” Mr Nairn said.

    He added that the draft
    report created out of discus-
    sion from the Economic Sum-
    mit is not intended to direct
    the Government, but to create
    a Clear strategy as to what the
    Bahamas has to do to weather
    the economic slump.

    “While we believe that rec-
    ommendations emanating
    from the NES should be
    adopted, their pursuit will not
    mean that we will not experi-
    ence pain.

    “Tt will mean, however, that
    we ameliorate the sting and
    set our country on the path to
    economic diversification and
    historical structural strength,”
    said Mr Nairn.

    Port chair mulls his resignation

    FROM page 1B

    possible settlement, although that could
    not be confirmed before press time last
    night.

    The disappearance of Mr Fleming and
    his partner, Geoffrey Richards, was pre-
    dicted by sources to push the Hayward fam-
    ily trust towards settlement, given that the
    British banker had been helping to pay its
    legal costs in the dispute.

    The St George estate has been able to
    finance its legal battle through the $41 mil-
    lion sale of Lady Henrietta St George’s 50
    per cent ICD Utilities stake to Emera, but
    both sides continue to bleed revenues on
    legal costs due to the fact that GBPA/Port
    Group Ltd dividends have not been forth-
    coming for some time.

    And while Mr Fleming may have disap-

    peared from the scene, Tribune Business
    can reveal that Hutchison Whampoa
    remains quietly in the wings, hoping to work
    out a deal where it can buy out both parties.

    It has previously made a combined $250
    million offer, and already owns a majority
    stake in the Freeport Container Port, plus a
    50 per cent interest and management rights
    in the Freeport Harbour Company, Grand
    Bahama Development Company, and
    Grand Bahama Airport Company.

    Dispute

    Effectively, the GBPA and Port Group
    Ltd - and the dispute between their owners
    - is back where it was when litigation began
    in November 2006, with Mr Babak in the
    chairmanship, despite the St George estate’s
    opposition. And a whole swathe of man-
    agement, in the shape of the likes of Carey

    Leonard and Albert Gray, has departed.

    Despite Justice Anita Allen ruling that
    the St George estate owns a 50 per cent
    stake in the GBPA and Port Group Ltd
    holding company, Intercontinental Diver-
    sified Corporation (IDC), it has been
    unable to change the Caymanian firm’s
    share register to get the shares put in its
    name.

    As a result, the Hayward family trust -
    which is appealing the 50 per cent ruling -
    has retained Board control at IDC. This, in
    turn, gives the Hayward family trust Board
    control of GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
    which enabled the latter to name Mr Babak
    chair despite the St George estate’s oppo-
    sition.

    Since returning to the Port Group Ltd
    chairmanship, Mr Babak has busied himself
    with trying to bring investment projects to
    fruition, and growing Freeport’s economy.

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    FROM page 1B

    medium-term, with the indus-
    try forecast to achieve annu-
    alised real growth in its total
    output of 3.5 per cent in the
    decade up to 3.5 per cent.

    Still, for the present, which is
    what all Bahamians are con-
    cerned with, the WI'TC pro-
    jected that the tourism sector -
    the most important industry in
    this nation - was set to contract
    by 9.8 per cent in 2009, in terms
    of real gross domestic product
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    to $3.775 billion. As for direct
    tourism industry employment,
    the WTTC said the total num-
    ber of jobs provided by the
    Bahamian industry was set to
    fall by 7.5 per cent in 2009 to
    33,000 jobs.

    Jobs

    And the total number of jobs
    that are reliant upon the
    tourism industry is set to decline
    by 6.5 per cent to 95,000 in 2009,
    the WTTC study suggested,
    with the sector’s direct GDP
    contribution - the total value of
    all economic activity it produces
    - dropping by 11.2 per cent to
    $1.127 billion.

    Robert Sands, the Bahamas
    Hotel Association’s (BHA)
    president, said he had not seen
    the WITTC study when contact-
    ed by Tribune Business yester-
    day, and therefore did not know
    the factual basis on which it had
    based its projections.

    “The jury is still out as to
    what the contraction will be in
    2009,” he told this newspaper.
    “We probably won’t see any

    Box:

    ‘a’
    ca
    =
    Ke
    =

    growth in 2009, and maybe
    some contraction, but the level
    of contraction is unknown.”

    Mr Sands pointed out that
    while tourism arrivals may have
    been off by between 4-5 per
    cent in 2008, there was nothing
    yet to suggest this deterioration
    had increased in 2009.

    Rather than just raw arrivals
    numbers, Mr Sands said other
    factors were key determinants
    of the tourism industry’s per-
    formance, such as per capita vis-
    itor spend, the visitor mix and
    average daily room rates.

    On a brighter note, the
    WTTC said the “10-year trend”
    for the Bahamian tourism
    industry was positive, with
    direct industry employment
    increasing by an annualised rate
    of 2.5 per cent over the next 10
    years to reach 42,202 by 2019.

    The sector’s growth, in real
    GDP terms, was set to reach 3.4
    per cent on an annualised basis
    over the next 10 years, while
    total Bahamian employment -
    direct and indirect jobs -
    increasing at an annualised 2.5
    per cent rate to reach 121,000

    DA 69806

    c/o The Tribune
    P.O.Box N3207

    Tourism sector to shrink 10% during 2009

    jobs by 2019. Hlustrating the
    tourism sector’s importance to
    the Bahamian economy, the
    WTTC study said that it was set
    - directly and indirectly - to
    account for 50 per cent of GDP
    in 2009 to 51.7 per cent by 2019.

    In relative terms, the
    Bahamas is the world’s seventh
    most reliant nation on tourism
    as a percentage of GDP, and
    the sixth most reliant on the sec-
    tor as a source of jobs.

    It provides some 60.4 per cent
    of total jobs.

    In addition, visitor spending
    accounts for 60.7 per cent of the
    Bahamas’ total exports, mak-
    ing this nation the world’s
    eighth most reliant when it
    comes to exports.

    For 2009, the WTTC forecast
    that tourism would generate
    $3.775 billion of economic activ-
    ity.

    The industry was forecast to
    attract $1.239 billion in capital
    investment, representing 43.4
    per cent of such investment, and
    $146 million or 14 per cent of
    government spending.

    A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
    is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
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    own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
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    on behalf of companies clients.

    A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

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    by March 14, 2009.


    THE TRIBUNE

    FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009, PAGE 3B



    INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL BUSINESS





    m BOSTON

    Nationalization of banks would be a "nightmare" that would fur-
    ther undermine confidence in the nation's financial system, Bank of
    America Chief Executive Officer Kenneth Lewis said Thursday,

    according to the Associated Press.

    Lewis said a full-scale government takeover in which sharehold-
    ers would be wiped out would "send shudders" through the invest-
    ment community and is not necessary to stabilize the country's

    banking system.

    "It would also give the false impression that all banks are insolvent
    and investors would immediately start betting on which banks
    would be next, possibly creating a self-fulfilling prophecy," Lewis told
    about 450 corporate leaders at a luncheon sponsored by Boston Col-
    lege's Chief Executives’ Club of Boston.

    He said government control of large banks would "politicize
    lending decisions" and damage the economy.

    Lewis, who has been criticized for large bonuses Merrill Lynch
    executives collected as the government was providing billions in
    bailout money, said he understands the outrage felt by taxpayers.
    Bank of America, based in Charlotte, N.C., acquired New York-

    based Merrill on Jan. 1.

    Lewis said because of the decline in its 2008 earnings, Bank of
    America paid no year-end bonuses to members of its executive

    management team.

    But he said extending such caps deeper into an organization
    could prompt non-executive associates to go to work for foreign

    banks.

    "Such a loss hurts our company and our shareholders,” Lewis said.
    While acknowledging that many banks "are under a lot of pres-
    sure," Lewis said the industry is not in “nearly as dire shape as

    some would have us believe."

    "As bad as our economy is right now, I am still optimistic about

    our long-term prospects," he said.

    "And I believe the financial services industry and the federal
    government are doing many of the right things to turn this cycle
    around and restore economic growth."

    Obama: Economic crisis
    ‘not as bad as we think'

    m@ By JIM KUHNHENN
    WASHINGTON

    Confronting misgivings, even
    in his own party, President
    Barack Obama mounted a stout
    defense of his blueprint to over-
    haul the economy Thursday,
    declaring the national crisis is
    "not as bad as we think” and
    his plans will speed recovery,
    according to the Associated
    Press.

    Challenged to provide
    encouragement as the nation's
    "confidence builder in chief,"
    Obama said Americans should-
    n't be whipsawed by bursts of
    either bad or good news and he
    was "highly optimistic” about
    the long term.

    The president's proposals for
    major health care, energy and
    education changes in the midst
    of economic hard times faced
    skepticism from both Democ-
    rats and Republicans on Capitol
    Hill, as senators questioned his
    budget outlook and the deficits
    it envisions in the middle of the
    next decade.

    But Obama, speaking to top
    executives of the Business
    Roundtable, expressed an opti-
    mistic vision and called for
    patience.

    Richard Parsons, chairman of
    beleaguered Citigroup Inc.,
    asked if Obama could offer
    some help in a national battle
    "between confidence and fear."

    "A smidgen of good news
    and suddenly everything is
    doing great. A little bit of bad
    news and ooohh , we're down
    on the dumps,” Obama said.
    "And Iam obviously an object
    of this constantly varying assess-
    ment. Iam the object in chief of
    this varying assessment.”

    "T don't think things are ever
    as good as they say, or ever as
    bad as they say,” Obama added.
    "Things two years ago were not
    as good as we thought because
    there were a lot of underlying
    weaknesses in the economy.
    They're not as bad as we think
    they are now."

    "And my long-term projec-
    tions are highly optimistic, if we
    take care of some of these long-
    term structural problems."

    But in Congress, Obama's
    budget plans were meeting
    resistance.

    Sen. Kent Conrad, the chair-
    man of the Budget Committee
    called the track of future deficits
    "unsustainable" and singled out
    Obama's proposal for adding
    $634 billion in health care
    spending over the next 10 years.

    "Some of us have a real pause
    about the notion of putting sub-
    stantially more money into the
    health care system when we've
    already got a bloated system,”
    said Conrad, D-N.D.

    Treasury Secretary Timothy
    Geithner, testifying before Con-
    rad's committee, also encoun-
    tered blunt questions about the
    administration's plans for
    shoring up the nation's banks.
    He reiterated the administra-
    tion's goal to lay out a private-
    public partnership to make up
    to $1 trillion in financing avail-
    able to help banks clear their
    books of toxic, mortgage-relat-
    ed assets that have led toa
    national credit freeze.

    Geithner hinted more mon-
    ey might be required beyond
    the existing $700 billion finan-



    cial rescue fund. "We certainly
    can start with the resources we
    have," he said.

    Meanwhile, House Speaker
    Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., played
    down talk that Democrats
    would consider a second eco-
    nomic stimulus bill.

    "I know that people have
    made suggestions that we
    should be ready to do some-
    thing, but I really would like to
    see this stimulus package play
    out,” Pelosi said. "It's just not
    something that, right now, is in
    the cards," she added later.

    The flurry of comments illus-
    trated the complicated moving
    parts confronting Washington
    as the economy continues to
    decline, credit remains clogged
    and a new president advances
    broad and expensive initiatives.
    The money set aside to address
    those needs so far has been
    staggering — $787 billion for
    an economic stimulus designed
    to save and create jobs, the $700
    billion approved by Congress
    for the financial rescue package
    and hundreds of billions more
    through programs from the
    Federal Reserve Bank.

    On top of that, Obama wants
    to overhaul health care, reduce
    greenhouse-gas pollution and
    undertake major changes in
    energy policy. He's projecting
    a federal deficit of $1.75 trillion
    this year, by far the largest in
    history, but says he can get it
    down to $533 billion by 2013.

    "Tam not choosing to address
    these additional challenges just
    because I feel like it, or because
    I'm a glutton for punishment,"
    Obama told the Business
    Roundtable, a group of top
    business executives. "I am doing
    so because they are fundamen-
    tal to our economic growth, and
    to ensuring that we don't have
    more crises like this in the
    future."

    Obama said his health and
    energy changes would build a
    foundation for lasting recovery,
    arguing that the current eco-
    nomic crisis was precipitated by
    an “illusion of prosperity." He
    told the business leaders he
    wants government to "right the
    ship" and then "let private

    ©
    PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA, left, greets Citigrou

    Nationalisation warning Pension reform ‘not made

    more urgent’ by CLICO

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    CLICO (Bahamas) col-
    lapse, and the investments
    made in its annuities by many
    company pension funds, has
    not made the work of the
    Government’s pension reform
    task force “more urgent”, a
    minister told Tribune Busi-
    ness yesterday.

    Zhivargo Laing said:
    “There’s nothing the private
    pension task force is consid-
    ering that has been made
    more urgent by the CLICO
    matter.”

    Tribune Business has been
    told that the pension reform
    task force has already met
    twice and received its man-
    date from the Government,
    something Mr Laing con-
    firmed.

    “The whole issue of regu-

    enterprise do its magic."

    Critics of Obama's budget,
    such as Sen. Judd Gregg, R-
    N.H., complained that the
    spending blueprint does not
    tackle the rising costs of Social
    Security and Medicare. Geithn-
    er said the administration
    intends to confront higher
    health care costs with broad
    changes that will lower
    Medicare spending.

    Geithner is at the center of
    Obama's economic policy,
    advocating for its budget pro-
    posals and tax policies, as well
    as the rescue program for the
    financial sector. He faced ques-
    tions on all those fronts before
    heading to London for talks Fri-
    day and Saturday with finance
    officials from the Group of 20
    nations.

    Obama's budget would raise
    taxes, starting in 2011, on indi-
    viduals earning more than
    $200,000 and on households
    earning more than $250,000.
    Geithner said the increases
    would kick in after the economy
    was expected to be in recovery.

    But he sidestepped a ques-
    tion by Sen. Mike Crapo, R-
    Idaho, about whether the
    administration would let the
    increases take effect if the econ-
    omy had not recovered in two
    years. "We have to watch how
    the economy evolves,” Geithn-
    er said.

    On Thursday, Wall Street
    extended its rally to a third day,
    and Conrad took note because
    the markets have not always
    responded well to Geithner's
    public utterances. "You've done
    a superb job," Conrad joked as
    the hearing came to a close
    shortly after noon. "Markets are
    up over 100."

    The Dow Jones industrials
    rose 239.66 points for the day
    on a string of hopeful news,
    apparently unconnected to Gei-
    thner.

    At the White House, the
    administration conferred with
    state officials about how the
    $787 billion in stimulus money
    will go out.

    Vice President Joe Biden
    opened the meeting by warn-
    ing state officials that if they

    Zhivargo Laing



    lating private pensions is
    something everyone knows
    has to be taken into consider-
    ation,” Mr Laing said.

    “It’s important considering
    what we want to do in the
    short and long-term, in terms
    of encouraging and protect-

    AP Photo/Charles Dharapak

    p chief executive officer Richard Parsons after speaking
    about the economy at a business roundtable discussion at a hotel in Washington, Thursday, March 12, 2009.

    misuse money from the stimulus
    package, they should not expect
    more help from the federal gov-
    ernment for a long time.

    "If we don't get this right,
    folks, this is the end of the abil-
    ity to convince Congress that
    anything should go to the
    states,” Biden said.

    Added Obama: "If we see
    money being misspent, we're
    going to put a stop to it.”

    ing savings. There are many
    benefits, from an economic
    point of view, to increasing
    national savings. The commit-
    tee has been given their remit,
    and we look forward to hear-
    ing from them when they
    report.”

    Increased domestic savings,
    Mr Laing explained, increased
    the pool of funding to support
    Bahamians in retirement, and
    enabled them to take advan-
    tage of more economic oppor-
    tunities.

    He added that the Govern-
    ment had set the pension
    reform committee no report-
    ing deadline, “except to say
    we want them to do their
    work as expeditiously as pos-
    sible”.

    Among the issues the com-
    mittee will likely look at are
    whether to make private pen-
    sions mandatory and how,

    IN THE

    ESTATE

    plus regulating the pensions
    sector in terms of investment
    advisers and trustees.

    Meanwhile, Tribune Busi-
    ness understands that CLICO
    (Bahamas) liquidator, Craig
    A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, is looking
    at paying off the $400,000 loan
    owed to FirstCaribbean Inter-
    national Bank (Bahamas), fol-
    lowing receipt of the bank’s
    demand letter requesting
    immediate payment.

    The bank is understood to
    hold a mortgage over three
    CLICO (Bahamas) properties,
    making it a secured creditor
    and placing it at the top of the
    queue. Failure to pay would
    result in FirstCaribbean fore-
    closing on that real estate, thus
    depriving the creditors of any
    upside the liquidator might
    generate from selling that
    land.

    OF

    WILLIAM SAWYER late of
    Golden Gates #2 in the Southern
    District of the Island of New
    Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that all
    persons having any claim or demand against
    the said estate are required to send the same

    duly certified in writing to the undersigned
    on or before the 30" day of March, A.D.

    2009,

    after which date the Attorney

    by Deed of Power of Attorney will proceed to
    distribute the estate having regard only to the
    claims of which she shall have had notice.

    AND notice is hereby given that all
    persons indebted to the estate are required to
    make full settlement on or before the
    date hereinabove mentioned.

    Dated the 12" day of March, A.D. 2009

    CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
    Attorneys for the Executor
    9 Rusty Bethel Drive
    Nassau, Bahamas



    A leading retailer is seeking applications for the position of

    MANAGER ADMINISTRATION

    BASIC REQUIREMENTS

    SUMMARY OF DUTIES

    Minimum two years Management experience
    Excellent Oral and Written Communication Skills
    Proven organizational and planning capabilities
    Have a proven track record of meeting deadlines
    Must be proficient in Microsoft office software
    Strong Interpersonal skills and willingness to be a team player
    Must have strong leadership skills and be results oriented
    Posses integrity, excellent motivational skills and assertiveness

    Must be multifaceted and prepared to work flexible hours if necessary

    ¢ Overall responsibility for the administrative functions of the company
    ¢ Training and motivating team members
    Ensuring company policies and procedures are adhered to and implementing
    new policies as required.
    Control and monitor administrative budgets
    Responsible for the protection and maintenance of all company assets
    Analyze existing business and identify business development opportunities

    The successful candidate will become a part of a growing and progressive organization

    capable of facing challenges.

    Benefits include a comprehensive medical and life

    package and pension plan. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and

    experience.

    Interested persons may forward a copy of their resume, in confidence to:

    The Human Resources Manager
    P.O. Box N-623
    Nassau, Bahamas
    Fax: 322-6607


    PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE





    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    ZURICH BERN LIMITED

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)




































    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
    the 17th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
    Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    FARVAGNY SEAS LIMITED

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 3rd day of February 2009. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    JEVER CLIVER LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
    the 23rd day of February 2009. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    CLINTWOOD

    HOLDINGS LIMITED

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named

    Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
    the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
    Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    SOLLAWAY INDUSTRIES LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 3rd day of February 2009. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Boating arrivals
    down some 20%

    FROM page 1B

    Frank Herhold, executive
    firector of the Marine Indus-
    tries Association of South
    Florida (MIASF), told Tri-
    bune Business that the popular
    Bertram Hatteras fishing tour-
    nament had become a “vic-
    tim” of the economy.

    The tournament had tradi-
    tionally provided an econom-
    ic boost for Marsh Harbour,
    Abaco.

    He added that Fort Laud-
    erdale marinas had seen a
    sharp reduction in the amount
    of vessels moored at their
    slips, which he read as a bad
    sign for Bahamian marinas.

    “Our marinas at this time
    of year, for the first time, have
    some empty slip,s and if the
    boats are not coming here
    from the Northeast along the
    intercoastal waterway, they’re
    not going to make it over to
    the Bahamas,” he said.

    “Fort Lauderdale is the tra-
    ditional jumping off spot for
    some great cruising in
    Bahamian waters - we help
    each other in that respect.”

    Mr Herhold said, though,
    that the MIASF is involved in
    an outreach endeavour to
    encourage more visiting



    “There is a degree of concern.
    Americans are tightening their
    belts like never before. I think
    they are still using the boats,
    but they aren’t going great

    distances.”



    yachts, which could also mean
    more business for the
    Bahamas.

    He said fuel prices should
    no longer hinder boat travel,
    but the state of the economy
    might.

    “There is a degree of con-
    cern,” he said. “Americans are
    tightening their belts like nev-
    er before. I think they are still
    using the boats, but they aren’t
    going great distances.

    “So we’re looking at a
    reduction in the number of
    visiting yachts, which trans-
    lates into a reduction in visit-
    ing yachts for the Bahamas.”

    Some Bahamas-based
    resorts with marinas have

    Frank Herhold

    reported that they themselves
    have seen only slight reduc-
    tions in private vessel arrivals.

    Harper Sibley, general man-
    ager of Valentines Resort and
    Marina in Harbour Island,
    said his oepration had seen
    only a 10 per cent reduction in
    business compared to the
    same time last year.

    Operations

    He added that visitors who
    arrive on their private boats
    and yachts represent one-third
    of their room nights, a signifi-
    cant segment of the resort’s
    operations.

    Mr Sibley said repeat cus-

    tomers are keeping Valen-
    tine’s occupancy levels high,
    but the mega yachts keep
    coming and represent a sig-
    nificant portion of revenues
    for the resort.

    “It’s the smaller boats that
    don’t come as much - some of
    it is weather related,” Mr Sib-
    ley said.

    “It’s actually better than I
    thought it would be, but Har-
    bour Island is a world class
    destination so people want to
    keep coming here.”

    Mr Sibley said because of
    reduced fuel prices and the
    demand for the Harbour
    Island product, he anticipates
    a good summer for the resort.

    “Should be good as last
    year,” he said.

    Owner and Operator of
    Harbour Central Marina, Paul
    Neely, echoed similar senti-
    ments.

    He said just four yachts are
    giving his company a surpris-
    ingly good year, while other
    businesses owned by himself,
    including an oil company, are
    down about 50 per cent.

    Mr Neely said the larger
    yachts make up the revenue
    lag from the absence of many
    smaller vessels.

    “Dock slip rentals are up,”
    he said.

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    PHILIPPA VALLEY INC.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 8th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    NOVELESE SOUTH LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
    the 23rd day of September 2008. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE
    POMPERNICKEL

    ENTERPRISES LTD.

    (In Voluntary Liquidation)

    Notice is hereby given that the above-named
    Company is in dissolution, which commenced
    on the 29th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
    is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

    Bahamas.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that MERINE DOVALUS
    of BALFOUR AVENUE, P.O.BOX N-720, NASSAU,
    BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
    Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
    as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
    knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
    not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
    of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13" day of
    MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
    and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that MONIQUE ASTWOOD of 165
    KALANDAR ST.,#C-3, OPA LOCKA, FL.,U.S.A.,FL 33054
    is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
    Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
    Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
    registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
    send a written and signed statement of the facts within
    twenty-eight days from the 13° day of March, 2009 to the
    Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
    N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH MCINTOSH of
    PINEWOOD GARDENS, P.O.BOX N-720, NASSAU,
    BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
    Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
    as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
    knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
    not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
    of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13" day of
    MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
    and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE is hereby given that ETIENNE DALMOND of
    P.O. BOX AB-20334, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO,
    BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
    Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
    as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
    who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
    should not be granted, should send a written and
    signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
    from the 27 day of February, 2009 to the Minister
    responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
    N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    LEGAL NOTICE
    NOTICE

    BAROSSA LIMITED

    N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

    (a) BAROSSA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
    the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
    Companies Act 2000.

    (b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 27 th
    February 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
    and registered by the Registrar General.
    (c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mr. Michael Low of 1
    Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

    Dated this 13th day of January A. D. 2009

    Mr. Michael Low
    Liquidator
    PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009

    THE TRIBUNE



    SSS SS Se
    Financial services ‘must move away from model today’ | Insurers face ‘serious issue’

    FROM page 1B

    Presently, the Bahamas has the
    solitary TIEA with the US, mean-
    ing it is at risk of running afoul of
    the OECD again.

    “Going forward, we’re going
    to have to, just short of yielding,
    move away from the existing
    model,” Mr Smith said of the
    Bahamas’ future in financial ser-
    vices.

    “T doubt they’ll [the OECD
    and G-20] find much to begin
    with, so we might as well enter
    TIEAs with 11 of these countries.
    It’s just a question of expanding
    the existing network. We have
    one TIEA already and should
    look at that, in the sense of having
    different provisions for TIEAs
    that could provide reciprocal ben-
    efits for us. There may be some-
    thing the European countries can
    give us in return.”

    In return for signing the TIEA
    with the US in 2001, Washington
    finally granted a tax break
    designed to help the Bahamian
    tourism industry. The convention
    tax benefit allows US business-
    men travelling to the Bahamas to
    attend conventions/conferences
    to deduct the costs incurred in
    doing so against their annual



    “I can see a move,
    in the residential
    business
    environment, to
    having a corporate
    tax environment —
    for businesses
    doing business
    here, resident

    businesses.”

    Michael Paton

    line with other nations, who had
    enjoyed the US convention tax
    benefit for years and obtained a
    competitive advantage over this
    nation when it came to the
    groups/convention tourism busi-
    ness.

    Mr Smith suggested that the
    Bahamas “ought to be looking
    for treaty partners, rather than
    have one come here looking to
    impose conditions on us”.

    The former minister’s com-
    ments back those of ex-Bahamas
    Financial Services Board (BFSB)
    chairman Michael Paton, who

    income tax returns.

    previously told Tribune Business
    This brought the Bahamas into

    that the Bahamas must “transi-



























    COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
    IN THE SUPREME COURT

    Equity Side

    IN THE MATTER OF a piece parcel or lot of land contained
    by measurements one and two hundred and ninety four
    hundredths (1.294) acres and situate on the northeastern side of
    the Queen’s Highway in the vicinity of Palestine Baptist
    Church in the settlement of Deadman’s Cay in the Island of
    Long Island, The Bahamas.

    AND

    IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Alvin S. Turnquest.

    AND
    IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act 1959
    NOTICE

    The Petitioner in this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple
    possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described and the
    Petitioner has made an application to the Supreme Court of the
    Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
    Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and
    the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in the
    Certificate of Title granted by the Court in accordance with the
    provisions of the said Act.

    Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office
    hours at:

    (1) The Registry of the Supreme Court.
    (2) The Administrators Office at Clarence Town, Long Island.
    (3) The Chambers of the undersigned.

    NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
    right to dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized
    in the Petition shall before the 30th day of April, A.D.,2009
    from the publication of the notice inclusive of the day of such
    publication file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of
    Nassau in the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve
    on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his or her
    claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
    therewith. The failure of any such person to file and serve a
    statement of his or her claim within the time fixed by the Notice
    aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

    Dated this 25th day of February, A.D., 2009

    PYFROM & CO,
    Chambers
    No.58, Shirley Street,
    Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.
    Attorneys for the Petitioner.

    tion” its financial services industry
    to a completely new business
    model within the next 10-15 years
    if it is to survive long-term.

    The future, he added, was like-
    ly to involve double tax treaties
    and a ‘corporate tax environment’
    for local companies. “I think
    we’re going to have to seriously
    consider tax transparency points,
    and how we re-position ourselves,
    and how we develop a strategic
    plan going forward,” Mr Paton
    had said.

    “T think we’re going to be tran-
    sitioning, if not to a TIEA envi-
    ronment, which is probably an
    easier solution, to a more sophis-
    ticated solution that would be a
    double tax treaty network. That
    would require us to have in place
    certain standards of taxation.

    “T can see a move, in the resi-
    dential business environment, to
    having a corporate tax environ-
    ment - for businesses doing busi-
    ness here, resident businesses.

    “Tt would probably make sense
    to transition to a corporate tax
    environment, which would have
    aspects of taxation that would be
    recognised by international stan-
    dards. On the back of that, we
    would be able to negotiate double
    tax treaties.

    “The trick is going to be to pro-
    tect non-resident, private bank-
    ing businesses from that tax.”

    The debate over the Bahamas’
    future in financial services is rag-
    ing as Liechtenstein yesterday
    bowed to outside pressure, agree-
    ing to adopt international stan-
    dards on cross-border tax coop-
    eration in an effort to shed its
    label as a ‘tax haven’.

    Mr Smith told Tribune Busi-
    ness that developed countries
    “want to remove the veil of con-
    fidentiality at any cost”, despite
    the fact that wealthy financial ser-
    vices clients required it to pro-
    tect themselves from kidnapping
    or serve extended families scat-
    tered across the globe.

    “There are so many reasons
    why you need confidentiality,”
    Mr Smith argued. “These guys
    are just bulldozing ahead. You'll
    just be seeing more and more of

    this.”

    He added, though, that the
    OECD’s own studies had “found
    the Bahamas had standards for
    transparency that exceeded some
    of the OECD countries”.

    Pressure on the Bahamian
    financial services industry con-
    tinues to come from various quar-
    ters. The US, in its recent drug
    control report, said this nation
    needed to “ensure that there is a
    public registry of the beneficial
    owners of all entities licensed in
    its offshore financial centre”.

    But John Delaney, attorney
    and managing partner at Higgs
    & Johnson, told Tribune Busi-
    ness there was “absolutely” no
    reason why such a public registry
    was necessary, given that benefi-
    cial ownership information for
    every Bahamas-incorporated enti-
    ty had to be kept at their respec-
    tive registered offices.

    This was required by both the
    Banks and Trust Companies
    (Regulation) Act 2000 and the
    Financial, Corporate and Service
    Providers Act 2000, and the infor-
    mation could be obtained from
    the registered agents via several
    routes, such as court orders, their
    respective regulators or “any duly
    authorised person”.

    “T can see no legitimate reason
    to require a public registry. Why
    should one need to have that
    information open to the public
    gaze,” asked Mr Delaney. “The
    US is calling for more that what
    several of their states have. There
    are no bearer shares in the
    Bahamas.”

    He suggested that the US
    report may have been based on
    misinformation and a lack of
    knowledge on what information
    sharing procedures there were in
    the Bahamas.

    Describing the ‘public registry’
    as “overblown”, Mr Delaney said:
    “The OECD is certainly pushing
    the obtaining of beneficial own-
    ership information. The Bahamas
    answered that by abolishing bear-
    er shares, and requiring registered
    agents to maintain private reg-
    istries that are open to public offi-
    cials and due legal processes.”

    NOTICE OF SALE

    Expocredit Corporation

    (‘the Company”) invites

    offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
    199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Maris Subdivision’,
    comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
    South of Burnt Ground in the [sland of Long Island
    one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
    Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
    bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
    and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.

    The Company makes no representations or warranties
    with respect to the state of the Property which is
    offered for sale “as is where 1s”.

    The Company will sell under power of sale in
    accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing

    & Law of Property Act.

    TERMS:

    Ten percent (10%) of the purchase

    price at the time of contract and the

    balance

    upon completion within

    Sixty (60) days of contract.

    This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
    reserves the right to reject any and all offers.

    Interested persons may

    submit written offers

    addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
    Partner, P- O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
    received no later than the close of business on the 30"

    day of March, 2009.

    ROYAL = FIDELITY

    Morey at Work

    BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
    THURSDAY, 12 MARCH 2009
    BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.28 | CHG 0.12 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -52.08 | YTD % -3.04
    FINDEX: CLOSE 813.80 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
    WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

    Securit y
    Abaco Markets
    Bahamas Property Fund
    Bank of Bahamas
    Benchmark
    Bahamas Waste
    Fidelity Bank
    Cable Bahamas
    Colina Holdings
    Commonwealth Bank ($1)
    Consclidated Water BDRs
    Doctor's Hospital

    1.39
    11.00
    7.00

    1.45
    11.00
    7.00
    0.63
    3.15
    1.95
    12.61
    2.83
    4.80
    1.31
    2.16
    6.02
    11.00
    10.45
    5.00
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50
    8.60
    10.00

    0.63
    3.15
    2.37
    13.95
    2.83
    6.59
    1.31
    2.16
    7.76
    11.00
    10.45
    5.07
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50

    Famguard

    Finco

    FirstCaribbean Bank
    Focol (S)

    Focol Class B Preference
    Freeport Concrete

    ICD Utilities

    J. S. Johnson 10.50
    Premier Real Estate 10.00

    Previous Close Today's Close

    Change Daily Vol.
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.12
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00
    0.00

    1.45
    11.00
    7.00
    0.63
    3.15
    2.37
    13.95
    2.83
    6.59
    1.43
    2.16
    7.76
    11.00
    10.45
    5.07
    1.00
    0.30
    5.50
    10.50
    10.00

    EPS $

    Div $

    0.992
    0.244
    -0.877
    0.105
    0.055
    1.309
    0.118
    0.438
    0.111
    0.240
    0.598
    0.542
    0.794
    0.337
    0.000
    0.035
    0.407
    0.952
    0.180

    of mounting receivables

    FROM page 1B

    one’s very concerned” regarding accounts receivables, Mr Ward told
    Tribune Business that the new Domestic Insurance Act had several
    implications for Bahamas-based carriers in this area.

    With the onus on them to collect accounts receivables, a number
    of carriers were looking to upgrade their systems - and stipulate a
    shorter collection time in which brokers/agents had to pass on due
    premium income - to ensure “there’s a quicker handling of the
    processes involved”.

    In addition, Mr Ward told Tribune Business that there were sol-
    vency implications for carriers, given that the Registrar of Insur-
    ance’s Office might “discount” receivables balances beyond a cer-
    tain date under the new Act. As a result, insurance carriers were
    looking at “any issues that might arise” when the new Domestic
    Insurance Act comes into force. And this newspaper knows of at
    least one Bahamas-based carrier that is aggressively trimming the
    number of agents that write business for it in order to tackle its
    accounts receivables. It has also reduced the payment window for
    when premium income has to be remitted to it.

    Obtaining due premium income has been an ongoing problem
    among Bahamian general insurance carriers, with a small minori-
    ty of brokers and agents not passing this on.

    Tribune Business knows of several occasions where carriers
    have stopped doing business with certain brokers/agents because of
    this, and in some cases the premium receivable balances have built
    up into multi-million dollar sums.

    However, one Bahamas-based broker yesterday told Tribune
    Business that he would oppose the idea of escrow accounts for
    insurance intermediaries such as himself, arguing that carriers
    were effectively “trying to solve problems of their own making”.

    Bruce Ferguson, head of Professional Insurance Consultants,
    said: “I would certainly oppose any attempt to introduce escrow
    accounts. It was never considered necessary in the 15-plus years we
    were debating the new Act, and just because companies have run
    into problems of their own making, it doesn’t mean that we should
    have them now.”

    Other brokers and agents, spoken to by Tribune Business on con-
    dition of anonymity, told this newspaper that Bahamas-based car-
    riers needed to do better due diligence on brokers and agents they
    took on to write new business for them, and also improve their mon-
    itoring of accounts receivables.

    However, one senior insurance carrier executive, speaking to Tri-
    bune Business on condition of anonymity, told this newspaper
    that requiring brokers/agents to put funds into escrow would “be a
    step in the right direction, as it would alleviate some of the receiv-
    ables issue. It’s a real, real concern”.

    The industry source said Bahamian insurance laws and regula-
    tions, like most in the Caribbean, were focused heavily on the
    consumer and keeping premium prices cheap, almost to the “detri-
    ment of the product”.

    “The protection of the carrier; that should be the overriding
    concern, to ensure carriers are adequately capitalised and do not fail
    when there is a big event,” the source said.

    “The Bahamas needs to have an industry that can deal with the
    big event, and deal with it well, because the economic conse-
    quences of not dealing with it well could be disastrous.”

    PUBLIC NOTICE

    INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

    The Public is hereby advised that |, ALEXIO RENARDO
    RUSSEL of Eastern Estates in the Eastern District of
    the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The
    Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intend to change my name
    to ALEXIO RENARD COOPER. If there are any objections
    to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
    objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
    Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
    of publication of this notice.

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE

    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
    (No.45 of 2000)

    AITO INVESTMENTS LTD.

    In Voluntary liquidation

    “Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
    137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
    (No. 45 of 2000). AITO INVESTMENTS LTD. is in
    Dissolution.”

    The date of commencement of dissolution is the 17th
    day of February, 2009.

    Gustavo Federico Larriera Medivil
    Concepcion del Uruguay 1697
    Montevideo
    Uruguay
    Liquidator

    IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992
    AND

    IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST COUNSEL
    AND ATTORNEY
    BETWEEN

    OLGA & EDWARD ROSSI
    Complainants

    BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
    Securii Symbol Last Sale Daily Vol.
    Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17
    Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22
    Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series ©) + FBB13 100.00 0.00
    Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00
    Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
    Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
    7.92 8.42 14.60
    4.00 6.25 6.00
    0.35 0.40 0.35
    Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
    31.72 33.26 29.00
    0.00 0.00 0.00
    0.45 0.55 0.55
    BISX Listed Mutual Funds
    NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
    1.3664 0.95
    2.8988 -1.40
    1.4432 0.67
    3.3201 -1.94
    12.7397 0.96
    100.5606 0.56
    96.4070
    1.0000
    9.1005
    1.0440
    1.0364 0.33
    1.0452 0.76
    MARKET TERMS
    YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
    Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
    Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
    Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
    Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
    EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
    NAV - Net Asset Value
    N/M - Not Meaningful
    FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

    KENDALL KNOWLES
    Respondent

    S2wk-Hi_ 52wk-Low Interest

    1000.00 0.00

    0.00

    7%
    Prime + 1.75%
    T%
    Prime + 1.75%

    19 October 2017
    19 October 2022
    30 May 2013
    29 May 2015

    1000.00
    1000.00
    1000.00

    100.00

    Weekly Vol. EPS $
    -0.041
    0.000

    0.001

    Div $
    0.300
    0.480
    0.000

    S52wk-Low Symbol P/E
    14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
    6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

    0.20 RND Holdings

    NOTICE OF HEARING

    TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal shall
    hear the subject Complaint on Wednesday the 25th day
    of March, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the afternoon
    before Her Ladyship The Honourable Mrs. Justice
    Albury at 3rd Floor British American Building, George
    Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

    4.540
    0.000
    0.002

    0.000
    0.000
    0.000

    29.00 ABDAB
    0.00 Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
    0.40 RND Holdings
    S2wk-Low Div $ Yield %
    1.3041
    2.9230
    1.3828
    3.3201
    11.8789
    100.0000
    96.4070
    1.0000
    9.0950
    1.0000
    1.0000
    1.0000

    Fund Name
    Colina Bond Fund
    Colina MSI Preferred Fund
    Colina Money Market Fund
    Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
    Fidelity Prime Income Fund
    CFAL Global Bond Fund
    CFAL Global Equity Fund
    CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
    Fidelity International Investment Fund
    FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
    FG Financial Growth Fund
    FG Financial Diversified Fund

    28-Feb-09
    28-Feb-09
    6-Mar-09
    31-Jan-09
    28-Feb-09
    31-Dec-08
    31-Dec-08
    31-Dec-07
    31-Jan-09
    9-Feb-09
    9-Feb-09
    9-Feb-09

    -3.59
    0.00
    0.06
    0.80

    4.40
    Dated the 25th day of February, A.D., 2009

    BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
    52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
    52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
    Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
    Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
    Change - Change in closing price from day to day
    Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
    DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
    P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
    (S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
    (S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

    TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

    Bahamas Bar Association
    Elizabeth Avenue
    Nassau, The Bahamas


    THE TRIBUNE

    PAGE 7B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2009



    APT 3-G

    IF WE'RE DINING \YOU LOOK BEAUTIFUL, | OON'T BE
    AT THE PLAZA, 1 ) MARGO, JUST LIKE | SILLY, DAD.
    SHOULD CHANGE.A_ YOUR MOTHER! PIM NOTHING

    ry

    JUDGE PARKER

    THERE WAS A

    LOT GOING ON

    AT THAT PARTY
    TONIGHT!
















    TL MEANT
    GABRIELLA.

    SHE'S VERY
    IMPRESSIVE! HOW
    COULP THE CIA






    ANP APRIL BOWER J

    SHOWING UP mape fil
    {T EVEN MORE
    INTERESTING!







    ate, Inc, Word rights reserved.



    wHAD AN ACCIDENT
    ON THE RUG!

    HELLO?
    THE ECHO FROM AN EMPTY
    REFRIGERATOR \«





    ©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.









    www.Blondie.com,



    BUT THIS IS

    T KNOW I SAI N,
    REicuLops.!

    EVERY BOY SHOUL?
    ws SOYOU HAVE HAVE A FET...
    TO STAY IN

    THE House! EVERYTHING



    Gac09 by King Featuras Syndicate, Inc, World rights “eservec.



    CALVIN & HOBBES

    HOY ae words af four Wits
    DP THe can whe make foom Lhe
    bebhers: show bere? In making a
    wise, asi Bel ber may Eee sal
    Ono only. Each oust montain

    " Chit ercavten ether ond thre iat
    words. In be af lee one nine-lelier weed
    Bio plurols.

    Toba TARGET
    CHened 27: rer sod 4): eecelent
    BE er Gen: . EH ihe Laster

    TESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

    ae babel bell lobe beech
    bekh Blah bleach chalet chit
    Cheal else dah enhi cleh
    hale Rall fale feal heal baich
    loth lathe beoeh loth beach
    Liaw Uleew walich
    WATCHABLE weak welch

    whealt: wlowl wheel wle

    THE LONGER YOU WAIT
    FOR THE MAIL, THE
    LESS THERE 1S IN IT.




    © 1989 Universal Press Syndicate



    Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
    several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
    9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
    3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
    level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
    Sunday

    edition!



    Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
    fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
    each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
    of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
    may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
    level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

















    Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

    Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer









































    ©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.























    ©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
    —/cO|0o
    O/O|;B/|N































    6/4 9 1]3]2/5 NE
    5|8 7 2|4/1/6 82/4 33/5/18
    216 3 5|7/819 5|7/8 9 BW9/8)2/7
    IN 1 16/7 8|/9 Ri7\4/9
    4 1/3 6 8/5/7/2 BMi2\s\9 RRs 3/09 RN
    5 8/1 2 7|9\3/4 S49 213 1 42
    3/2}/719 5 4/1/6/8 IOS 2 16 Rl2i6 1
    7/1|9}2 4 6/8/5|3 W218i M2 1/3/1814
    “DENNIS 1S TURNING S/X2 WHATA COINCIDENCE. “= ae =f 9/4 1fM2 17/3
    Sos My ULCER!” Difficulty Level *& %& %& 3/13 2/5/3|7 8 9/6/4/1 a
    ; % Difficulty Level * % *& % 3/13 6/8/1415 1 3}2/9/7 116|3 2M 3 [4/9 a



















    CRYPTIC PUZZLE

    Down

    Across






    + A Peas Ke: aL



    Bidding Quiz

    1 Acheater cheated? Turn 1 It's cold, but | would make : . : seta 4a :
    You are the dealer, neither side points do not fall into the opening
    a blind eye (7) it hot (5) I ble. Wh ld bid-with ; Sach
    5 Brush or 2 There's no holding a key vulnerable. What would you bid wit one- or two-notrump category. Suc

    brushwood (5)
    8 In this form, two sides are
    perfectly matched (9) 3
    9 Consumed but not all 4
    eaten (3) 5
    10 Right out of line (4)
    12 Star skater is



    man given some

    authority (3)

    Twice reduced by 50% (4)
    Come into service? (6)
    Forces one to hang about
    instead of going to

    work (8)



















    each of the following five hands?
    1. ®AQ7 ¥ 108 @ AIS & KQ963
    2. ®KQ7 ¥ K92 AQ83 & AJ5
    3. @ Q743 ¥ Q985 @ AQ6 & A7
    4. ®AQ108 ¥A7 © Ad? & 9865
    5. ®KQI9763 4 6 $8 & KQJ5

    kk *

    1. One notrump. This indicates 15

    hands are opened with one of suit,
    and the true nature of the hand is then
    shown at the next opportunity by
    jumping in notrump.

    3. One diamond. You have no
    legitimate suit with which to open
    the bidding, since the spades and
    hearts are too weak to mention, the

    upset (8) 6 Article is made to 17 points (many still play 16-18), diamonds are only three cards in
    14 Untidy little beasts (6) practical (9) balanced distribution (usually 4-3-3- length, and you cannot open one club
    15 He has an important job, 7 Small cask for fresh water 3, 4-4-3-2, or 5-3-3-2) and stoppers with a two-card suit. But since any








    on paper (6) — or sea water? (7) in at least three suits. Itis far betterto 14-point hand must be opened,
    17 Arrests about a thousand 11 Reckoned the date and open with one notrump than one something must be done, and one
    supporters (8) times are changed (9) club. diamond 1s the best choice. It has the
    18 Bill joins me at the 13 Don't forget about a There are several reasons why the merit of keeping the bidding low
    summit (4) person in society (8) notrump call is preferred. The pri- while allowing for the discovery of a
    21 Play one’s part out of 44° -maticial nensstan Lu Across Down mary one is that the opening notrump —_ major-sutt fit if it exists,
    character (3) escape (7) al 1 A fever (7) 1 Be equal to (5) bid immediately pinpoints the type 4. One elub. Here your best intro-
    22 Pul the stopper on soft 16 Ina Way my sortis hardly N 5 To chatter (5) 2 Be situated (3) of hand held in terms of both points ductory bid is one club. It serves to
    dnnks dapenses-(G) fair (6) > 8 Wearisome 3 Primitive (4) and distribution. As opposed to this, keep the bidding low and allows for
    ; routine (9) 4 Large caae for a one-club bid could be based on any you to bid one spade at your next
    24 Yet it may be quite a 19 One may slip and fall into ou ge cag ae : : ; ; :
    9 Useful hint (3) birds (6) type of distribution and a wide range turn if partner responds with a dia-
    young tree (5) it (5) > f hish-caed Hai d h
    20 It’s neckwear, we hear, for ~” 10 Pile (4) 5 Spacious and Oe ors . sae ea cline + ons
    25 Die woul ieee ge < ieee anare Additionally, a one-club opening 5. Four spades. This bid serves
    patente oe Lu oer epee) will present a rebid problem if part- two purposes simultaneously. It is an
    get it (7) 23 Enjoy spadework? (3) judging (8) 6 Consequence (9) ner responds with one diamond, one offensive effort that may easily suc-
    ; : : 14 A French 7 Atone for (7) heart or one spade, all of which ceed if partner has an ace. But, more
    Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution brandy (6) 11 Show good prospects would make an accurate rebid importantly, it has even greater value
    Aéross: 4 Fistien, 6 Faro lucré do: “sAerowss4 Ségabiéc® Passes 15 Lay waste (6) (5,4) impossible. The way to avoid such as a defensive bid. If partner has a
    Leading, 11 Out of spirits, 13 Notice, Slant, 10 Satiate, 11 Single-minded, 17 Supplier (8) 13 Believed to be (5,3) problems is to open one notrump at weak hand, the apponents are likely
    14 Aspire, 17 Extravagance, 20 13 Rating, 14 Astral, 17 18 To lash (4) 14 Abundant (7) the outset. . ; to make a game. However, because
    Enrages, 21 Inner, 22 Twin, 23 Marksmanship, 20 Sibling, 21 ’ 2, One diamond. Despite the clas- of the high level at which they would
    , , , , , 21 Be indebted 16 Intense : r een aey ae =
    Meanness. Gnome, 22 Sulk, 23 Leathery. for (3) enusneniee (6) sic notrump features of your hand, have to begin bidding, there is a good
    Down: 1 File, 2 Account, 3 Free of Down: 1 So-so, 2 Chariot, 3 ery ee : the proper opening is one diamond. chance they will miss their best con-
    charge, 4 Splash, 6 Alibi, 7 Register, 8 Antagonistic, 4 Lessen, 6 Award, 7 22 Advance indication 19 Devoutness (5) Hands containing 19 high-card — tract.
    Radio station, 12 Interest, 15 Incense, Steadily, 8 At first sight, 12 (9) 20 Stage ina . :
    16 Parsee, 18 Tarsi, 19 Arts. Premises, 15 Rhizome, 16 Haggle, 24 Of the sun (5) process (4) Tomorrow: Heads I win, tails you lose.
    18 Rebel, 19 Rely. 25 Fast (7) 23 Sorrowful (3) ©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.




    PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MARCH 13th, 2009

    THE WEATHER REPORT

    THE TRIBUNE

    INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

    (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
    Marine FORECAST

    a

    il

    5-Day FORECAST



    TY rr Ny





















    F =: Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
    a Cr ~~" aa 7 - High = Low W High =Low W NASSAU Today: E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
    a th i 0| 1 |2 3 \4 [5 6 | 7/18 | gl10 Fic FIC Fic OFC Saturday: _E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
    ¥ i i a a Acapulco 90/32 68/20 s 88/31 73/22 S FREEPORT Today: E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
    = ~~ LOW | MODERATE J HIGH | V.HIGH J EXT. = Amsterdam 50/10 43/6 ¢ 56/13 45/7 ¢ Saturday: _E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
    et ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 46/7 32/0 r 41/5 28/-2¢ = ABACO ‘Today: E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
    High: 82° F/27°C i Nice with plenty of Clear and Warmer with plenty Mostly sunny and Sunny to partly Sunshine and patchy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 56/13 44/6 pc S713 44/6 pc Saturday: _E at 8-15 Knots 1-3 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
    . pei 61° rare ll sunshine. comfortable. of sunshine. humid. cloudy. clouds. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 67/9 53/11 c 66/18 54/12 s
    ; ° ° ° ° Bangkok 98/36 78/25 pc 90/32 74/23 pc
    i: @ hs ano 740 High: af High: 83" High: Bt" High: 80" Barbados 84/28 75/23 s 84/28 75/23 pc Pr
    TAMPA le High: 80 Low: 71 Low: 73 Low: 72 Low: 71 Low: 67 SS ESS Barcelona 66/18 53/11 pc yee TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
    os af Cece NSE aa —
    High: 82° F/27°C 03°-74° F Q0°-72° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low —_Hi.(ft.
    Low: 62° 5 i 5 - — - — — - - —— Beirut 70/21 55/12 sh 71/21 58/14 pe
    ow: 62° F/16°C ao F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 10:12am. 2.7 4:04am. -0.2 Belgrade AG/7 a5 +r 43/6 34/0 r
    a @ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:34pm. 3.0 4:12pm. -0.2 Berlin 47/8 34/1 sh 48/8 45/7 c
    a > CO Seusisy eer co ceam ay Bermuda a
    in | a 16pm. 29 4:52pm. -0. Bogota 65/18 43/6 t 70/21 43/6 r
    J ie Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday T132am. 04 5:32am. 01 Brussels 55/12 41/5 pe 57/13 43/6 pc
    | r ABACO Temperature, wn 5:33 p.m. 0.1 Budapest 49/9 36/2 sh 46/7 32/0 pc
    f , High:79° F/26° C PHU .easnac Stent acerca 75° F/24°C 0 aotam. 27 68am. 03 Buenos Aires 82/27 70/21 pe 88/31 57/13 t
    2 aa Reise 7c LOW ooeeeneen 67° F/19° C Y i44pm. 22 647pm. 02 Cairo 80/26 54/12 s 74/23 53/11 s
    . al ee Hoe 7 Normal high. .... 79° F/26° C TTT 95/35 73/22 s 94/34 72/22 s
    ” f Normal low 65° F/18° C Calgary 49/9 27/-2 c 36/2 23/-5 ¢
    ! a @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's WGN sence estece Mccsonccces 88° F/3° C SUN ay Ty ify Cancun 84/28 70/21 s 84/28 70/21 s
    F — High: 80° F/27°C i Last year's WOW: scseessutet cece ease: 68° F/20° C . : Caracas 79/26 66/18 pc 83/28 70/21 s
    Low: 68° F/20°C Precipitation a“ beeen oa a.m. Ln aoe p.m. Casablanca 80/26 58/14 s 79/26 55/12 s 68/50
    As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0.0.00 0.00" unsel....... ‘top.m. Moonset. .... 709 a.m. Copenhagen 44/6 39/3 ¢ 44/6 40/4 5
    FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Yearto dale... . Last New First Dublin 52/11 43/6 + 50/10 41/5 sh
    High: 82° F/28° C @ High: 78° F/26° C Normal year to date oo... 4.10" a 7 Frankfurt 5211 37/2 po 5713 37/2 po
    C 25 Low: 64° F/18° C AccuWeather Geneva 55/12 35/1 c 62/16 41/5 pe
    _ .com . Halifax 27/-2 10/-12 s 32/0 17/-8 pc
    fe a i. Forecasts and graphics provided by z Be Havana 84/28 63/17 s 81/27 64/17 pc Showers a
    % eee Miami
    % MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.18 Mar. 26 Apr. 2 Apr. 9 Helsinki 34/1 27/-2 po 36/2 28/-2 sf T-storms 82/68
    = 5 High: 82° F/27°C : ° : Hong Kong 72/22 57/13 ¢ 68/20 64/17 pce Rain Fronts
    High: 80° F/27° C OW: A Istanbul 48/8 39/3 ¢ S110 45/7 ¢ Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm Low: 64° F/18°C Jerusalem 68/20 52/11 65/18 44/6 sh Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationay
    4 : Johannesburg 74/23 53/11 s 74/23 56/13 s =
    a — @. S
    KEY WEST 2 Kingston 84/28 72/22 pc 84/28 76/24 pc z :
    High:78° F/26°C alia CAT ISLAND Lima 85/29 67/19 c 85/29 66/18 pc 10s 0s [Js] 10s_20s [805i] 40s
    Low: 69° F/21°C High: 78° F/26° C London 54/12 45/7 pc S512 41/5 +
    3 Low: 64° F/18°C Madrid 73/22 39/3 s 75/23 43/6 s
    @ ali Manila 91/32 75/23 s 93/33 76/24 pc
    r Mexico City 77/25 50/10 pe 72/22 47/8 pc A NM
    a Monterrey 63/17 48/8 c 66/18 52/11 sh eS rhe | i. 8 ean NM Ge FE
    wae GREATEXUMA i SAN SALVADOR Montreal ae 37/2 23/-5 s
    7 High: 81° F/27°C Hi h: 82° F/28°C Moscow 32/0 14/-10 pc 28/-2 10/-12 pe
    — Low: 66°F/19°C fe "64°F/18°C Munich 41/5 36/2 sh 45/7 37/2 c
    Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ieee al haaee 7 aia aa pe one ae pe
    highs and tonights's lows. d : al pe ‘i |
    g g = ‘a Low: 71° F/22°C 25 i Oslo 32/0 25/-3 sf 36/2 32/0 sn Never St Ol ir
    = —_ Paris 59/15 43/6 pc 61/16 45/7 pc i
    tli Prague 45/7 34/1 sh 44/6 31/0 c ell) GY; HC au QO us!
    LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 87/30 75/23 c 82/27 72/22 sh
    er rec fone sos a5 s BING. AST
    Low: 70° F/21°C Rome 5915 45/7 s 6116 45/7 s
    aa salindey aa Snir Tea Sink 4 MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 82/27 72/22 sh 82/27 73/22 s to Auto Insur ance,
    High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 83° F/28° C San Juan 97/36 72/22 s 93/33 73/22 pe ts Smart choice 1S
    FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC IC ee Low: 65° F/18° C ee — 7 s - ee c
    Albuquerque 46/7 35/1 t 54/12 35/1 t Indianapolis 46/7 27/-2 po 55/12 34/1 pe __ Philadelphia 43/6 32/0 pe 51/10 36/2 pe anag om a ol
    Anchorage 34/1 20/-6 pc 28/-2 17/8 pc Jacksonville 76/24 57/13 pc 78/25 58/14 pc Phoenix 78/25 5311 s 77/25 53/11 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 84/28 68/20 pe 83/28 68/20 s
    Atlanta 5241 425 6 S110 47/8 + Kansas City 44/6 26/-3 po 5341 344 pc Pittsburgh 44/6 26/-3 peo 52/11 30/-1 pe RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:84°F/29°c = -— ear — t — — t
    Atlantic City 40/4 26/-3 pc 48/8 30/-1 pc _Las Vegas 71/21 44/6 s 71/21 49/9 s Portland,OR 5442 415 po 488 415 1 High: 82° F/28° C Low: 64° F/18°C Sikh a a : a ; 7
    Baltimore 43/6 30/-1 ¢ 48/8 34/1 c Little Rock 42/5 36/2 + 47/8 38/3 + Raleigh-Durham 40/4 36/2 + 42/5 38/3 + Low: 66°F/19°C “an a — mone RAT . maT GAG .
    Boston 37/2 28/-2 s 47/8 31/0 s Los Angeles 68/20 50/10 s 68/20 52/11 pc __ St. Louis 44/6 29/-1 po 53/11 37/2 pe . om ae SaSUREEC SER SSOREEOTER
    Buffalo 36/2 24/-4 s 44/6 26/-3 s Louisville 48/8 344 c 54412 40/4 c Salt Lake City 46/7 28/-2 s 5110 31/0 pc ae P
    Charl SC 58/14 47/8 61/16 5442 sh Memphi 46 39/3 48/8 42 San Antoni 4 39/3 2/11 42. GREAT INAGUA Tokyo ee! ee
    AI eel A a ome ot St SE High: 84° F/29° C Toronto 34/1 23/-5 pc 45/7 3210 s (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
    Chicago 40/4 23/-5 pe 52/1 26/3 s Miami 82/27 68/20 pce 81/27 69/20 s San Diego 65/18 54/12 s 65/18 54/12 pc Low: 66° F/19°C Trinidad 84/28 72/22 t 94/28 71/21 t i.
    Cleveland 38/3 24/-4 5 50/10 27/-2 s Minneapolis 39/3 21/-6 pc 46/7 25/-3 s San Francisco 61/16 47/8 s 61/16 48/8 pc i Waren 47/8 38/3 c 46/7 36/2 sh j i Provider Grond Behe Abees [: i fy
    Dallas 42/5 35/1 + 50/10 40/4 + Nashville 446 38/3 c 52/11 44/6 + Seattle 5010 37/2 c © 467 -37/2 «+ Vienna AG? 37/2 sh so 426 oc | Ae ( vinere md
    Denver 42/5 22/-5 c¢ 53/11 27/-2 s New Orleans 70/21 58/14 ¢ 68/20 55/12 t Tallahassee 78/25 5412 pe 78/25 59/15 pc Warsaw 39/3 30/-1 c 43/6 32/0 5 i he) | iF i
    Detroit 37/2 2d/-4 po 52/11 30/-1 s New York 43/6 33/0 pe 49/9 38/3 pc ‘Tampa 82/27 62/16 pc 80/26 64/17 s ~ Winniped 96/3 19/-7 pc 35/1 20/-6 c \ we(40 SM Be (0) SSD00 TRG TAG) S004 |e (0) 0-062 | (20) STO
    Honolulu 73/22 6447 sh 77/25 68/20 sh Oklahoma City 42/5 344 ¢ 52/11 37/2 ¢ Tucson 71/21 47/8 s 72/22 46/7 $ — ae : : ——
    Houston 47/8 44/6 1 S110 44/6 + Orlando 82/27 6116 po 82/27 605 s Washington, DC 43/6 36/2 c 499 383 c Seen ee ee