Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 105 No.91





CLASSIFIEDS |




CLASSIFIEDS TRADER

SA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com



THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

WSS

Tm SME
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Christie slams
Tribune article

PLP Leader says
Insight piece
on Sir Lynden
Pindling is ‘a
tissue of lies,
fantasies and
tall tales’

PLP Leader Perry Christie last
night condemned The Tribune’s
Insight article on Monday which
attacked the legacy of Sir Lyn-
den Pindling as “the vilest, the
most vicious, the most scurrilous,
and, frankly, the sickest piece of
garbage I have ever read.”

In a special press conference
held at PLP headquarters at
Gambier House in response to
the Insight article, the former
prime minister claimed that the
information in the article is “‘a tis-
sue of lies, fantasies and tall tales
unworthy of inclusion in any seri-
ous, self-respecting newspaper
such as The Tribune represents
itself to be.”

Mr Christie emphasised that
Sir Lynden is the “Father of the
Nation” — stating that while this
does not mean that he should be
given a “free pass”, his legacy,
which includes many tremendous
achievements for the modern
Bahamas, should be treated with
a certain sensibility.

The Insight article, titled ‘““The
tragic young pilot who knew too
much”, told the story of the late
Chauncey Tynes Jr, who went

SEE page 12

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DR MICHAEL DARVILLE, a Grand Bahama physician,
received his instruments of appointment from Governor

General Arthur Hanna at Government House yesterday.
He will be sworn in as the newest PLP Senator today.

Widow of man who went missing
on flight hopes to collect $350,000

m By JOHN MARQUIS Lior

Managing Editor

THE widow of Donald
Moree Sr, who went missing
ona flight with his pilot friend

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Chauncey Tynes Jr 26 years
ago, is now hoping to collect
more than $350,000 in a long-
delayed insurance pay-out.

Her case was taken up by
Nassau insurance expert
Clyde Treco after her plight
was outlined in yesterday’s
Tribune.

Mrs Ann Moree, 55, of Sol-
dier Road, was six months
pregnant when her 30-year-
old husband Donald vanished
on a flight from Exuma to
Nassau with Mr Tynes in
March, 1983.

Mr Tynes’ father, Chauncey
Sr., and Mrs Moree both
believe the men were killed
because of their inside knowl-
edge of the drug operation run
by Joe Lehder from Norman’s

SEE page 13

TT ME PAMMI OUTS RS RCL



naga TT
police officer claims
RAS a
PUENTE UT

THE mystery over Sir
Lynden Pindling’s true ori-
gins took a new turn yes-
terday when a retired
senior police officer

claimed the late prime min-
ister was born in Nassau of

a Jamaican mother.

He was then sent away
to Jamaica for his early
schooling and returned to
his Jamaican father’s home
in East Street when he was
about eight or nine years
old, it was alleged.

The claims came from
Errington Watkins, a senior
policeman in the 1960s who
says he had first-hand infor-
mation about East Street

SEE page 18



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Sex allegations
involving another
teacher at Eight Mile
Rock High School

Police are conducting
investigations into reports

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police
investigations are currently
underway into sex allegations
involving another teacher at
the Eight Mile Rock High
School.

Asst Supt Wellbourne Boo-
tle said police received reports
of the incident and are now
conducting investigations into
the matter.

These allegations have put
the school again in the spot-
light of a sexual scandal, this
time involving a female
teacher and a male student.

The Tribune attempted to
contact School Superinten-
dent Hezekiah Dean on



Wednesday afternoon, but
was told that he was ina
meeting at Eight Mile Rock
High

According to reports in a
local newspaper here in
Freeport, Mr Dean confirmed
that “the teacher involved was
taken out of the school for a
couple of days.”

In January, a male teacher
was accused of molesting two
former male students at the
Eight Mile Rock High.

The victims claim that the
alleged sexual abuse started
while they were in the seventh
grade and continued for a
period of eight years.

The teacher was sent to
New Providence and placed
on probation pending an
investigation by the Ministry
of Education. The teacher has
since resigned.

Letters from several
countries voice concern for
Detention Centre detainees

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE alleged plight of detainees housed at the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre has attracted the attention of persons
in several countries who have sent various government ministers
letters of concern for the immigrants.

The letters — copies of which were sent to The Tribune —
come from Germany, Canada and Spain.

The appeals implore government to allow independent agen-
cies to inspect the facility; to publish results of internal investi-
gations into the claims of abuse; to ensure that asylum seekers
and others at the Centre are not tortured; and that asylum

SEE page 18

Govt expected to present draft of
National Unemployment Benefit Scheme

@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT
officials are expected
to present a draft of
the proposed Nation-
al Unemployment
Benefit Scheme to members
of the labour, business, and
religious communities today
for their review before the leg-
islation is presented to Parlia-
ment later this month.

Ph: (242) 825-2576

East Street (South of Andros Avenue)
eral: jamaens Scoralvan.com



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



Hubert Ingraham

Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham will
meet with the relevant
stakeholders — both
in New Providence
and Grand Bahama —
on Monday and
7 Wednesday, respec-
tively, at two closed
meetings of the Tri-
partite Forum (TRI-
FOR).

The purpose of the special
meetings is to discuss and
receive input about the gov-
ernment’s plans to introduce

SEE page 18





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Ir | Minnis reveals

UR Ec SOUTH



plan to solve PMH pharmacy woes

POLICE have two men in
custody in connection with
the fatal shooting of Ricardo
Farrington on February 3.

The two men, aged 33 and
29, were apprehended by
police shortly before 3am
yesterday and are currently
being questioned in connec-
tion with the murder.

Mr Farrington, 37, a









m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

HEALTH Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said
he has a four-point plan to solve the myriad of
problems affecting the pharmacy at Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Hundreds of persons attempting to have

their prescriptions filled. Dr Minnis, who has
waited in line at PMH's pharmacy for two
hours to gain a first-hand glimpse of the prob-
lem, said Tuesday's chaos erupted because
three pharmacists called in sick to the already
short-staffed section.

He said a shortage of medication was not to
blame for the long waits this week.

However, he did acknowledge the merit of

Health Minister says he accepts the merit of public complaints

off in training and that would help to correct
the (staff) shortages that we experienced with-
in the Bahamas. To top it off, we are institut-
ing a programme so that those individuals,
the elderly especially, so that they can receive
their medication in the private sector rather
than coming to PMH,” he said.

The minister said he is preparing to meet
with pharmacists in the private sector so as








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prescriptions filled were frustrated by extreme-
ly long lines on Tuesday and were calling on
officials to fix the problem. Recently, The Tri-
bune visited the pharmacy and was told that
some patients wait as long as six hours to get

the public complaints.

"What they say is true, but that problem
will be resolved soon. We have an additional
five pharmacists that are coming and that still
is not sufficient. We also have 14 pharmacists

to implement the programme as soon as pos-

sible.

Dr Minnis also said that the College of the
Bahamas’ science department is presently
recruiting for the Fall semester.

Judge backs man in dispute with doctor

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A SUPREME Court judge has
ruled in favour of a man who
accused a local doctor of failing to
properly diagnose and treat a life
threatening heart infection in
2005.

Senior Justice John Lyons yes-

terday ruled in favour of the
plaintiff Christopher Rogers,
agreeing that the defendant Dr
Ian Kelly had been negligent as
alleged. Justice Lyons’ reasons
are expected to be outlined in a
written ruling to be handed down
later.

The trial began on Tuesday
when Mr Rogers — who is seeking

damages — and US cardiologist
Dr Andrew Selwyn took the
stand.

Rogers’ initially vistted Dr Kel-
ly, a family practitioner, on Octo-
ber 7, 2005, claiming that he had
been suffering from a fever for
more than a month.

The court was told that Mr
Rogers made several visits to Dr

Kelly in late 2005 as his condi-
tion worsened, but was never
properly diagnosed and was often
given broad spectrum antibiotics.
Dr Kelly’s office notes did not
reflect Rogers’ deteriorating con-
dition but rather suggested
improvement, the court also
heard.Testimony also suggested
that an infectious bacteria which
ultimately led to endocarditis, an
infection in Rogers’ heart valve,
had been found in three blood
samples taken from the plaintiff.
Rogers’ condition continued

to deteriorate until he ultimately
suffered heart failure on Novem-
ber 14, 2005. He was subsequent-
ly admitted to Doctors Hospital
and later to a hospital in Cleve-
land, Ohio for heart surgery, the
=i a a court heard. Rogers was repre-

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Wilchcombe: Insight article
was ‘dangerous journalism’

THE decision of Tribune Man-
aging Editor John Marquis to
repeat “unsubstantiated hearsay”
in an Insight article about Sir Lyn-
den Pindling and the drug trade
was “reckless and dangerous jour-
nalism” West End and Bimini MP
Obie Wilchombe said yesterday.

Mr Wilchcombe said that none
of the accusations levelled by
Chauncey Tynes Sr were aired dur-
ing the three Commissions of
Inquiry held in the Bahamas over
the last 20 years.

“At no time did Chauncey
Tynes Sr offer evidence at any
Commission of Inquiry. Nor has
this hearsay from Chauncey Tynes Sr ever been
the subject of police investigation,” said Mr
Wilchcombe.

He accused John Marquis of being “poi-
soned” by hate and said the Bahamas is “too
small a nation to have its space polluted with
divisive malice and hate.”

Birthplace

“What I can say without fear of contradiction
is that Sir Lynden was no murderer, no drug
dealer and never promoted violence as the Mar-
quis article hatefully suggests. Sir Lynden’s
birthplace is beyond debate. He was born in
the Bahamas and his mother was Viola Pin-
dling,” the MP said.

However, Mr Wilchcombe said he welcomes
the opportunity the article provides for dis-
cussing the contribution of Sir Lynden Pindling.

“Only God is perfect, but among leaders, Sir
Lynden stands as tall as they come, despite his
five-foot-seven inch frame. Destiny could have
chosen anyone, but it selected Sir Lynden to
lead the Bahamas into the era of independence.
In my view, it could not have chosen more wise-
I i?

t Mr Wilchcombe said missteps and mistakes
are inevitable among even the most brilliant
and experienced men and women, but when



WEST END AND BIMINI
MP Obie Wilchcombe
(left) spoke out over
Monday’s Tribune Insight
article (right).

the life and contribution
of Lynden Pindling are
weighed on the scales of
history, those scales will
tilt on Sir Lynden’s side
because he guided the
Bahamas through the
first perilous days of
independence and cre-
ated the foundation of
a modern society and
economy based on the values of a
democracy.

“When destiny called, Lynden
Pindling responded, bringing to
the task of nation-building every-
thing he possessed. He would be
the first to admit that nothing nor
everything went as he had hoped.
The fact that the Bahamas is
today a place where freedom of
speech, even of the kind
espoused by Mr Marquis, is
enjoyed is testimony to Sir Lyn-
den’s pursuit of the path of
democratic engagement of all
Bahamians,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe said that Sir Lynden truly
understood what was needed to build a modern
western state and quickly realised how the
tourism industry could benefit the Bahamian

eople.

“The PLP’s manifesto on which he cam-
paigned clearly demonstrates where his heart
lay. It lay with the people. He understood, very
well, that the future of our people lay in edu-
cation, good health, and jobs beyond the menial,
a solid economy and freedom of expression.
He understood that the challenge of geogra-
phy that scattered our people across so many
islands, posed special demands on political rep-



ee cme




AT

T

he stories b
Cc ehii
HAUNCEY Tyngg> ee WITH nt Hac
h 7 fi a aa

SI UNORT ERO LAG

resenta-
tion,” the MP said.

“He has gone and left another generation
to take the baton. We let down his legacy when
we throw our pain at the past and fight with
ghosts of our own making. None can dispute
that, in serving us, he did the best that he could
do.

“Those who knew him well would describe
him as a leader gifted with the common touch,
who had no greater joy than walking among
his people. He drew his inspiration from the
Bahamas and its people and in building this
nation, they drew theirs from him,” Mr Wilch-
combe said.

AND Lynpen PINDLING

ae pilot

Controversial article gets support from
former PLP chairmanship contender

A FORMER contender for
the PLP chairmanship yester-
day came out in support of The
Tribune’s controversial Insight
article about Sir Lynden Pin-
dling and the drug trade.

Mr Omar Archer said Sir
Lynden, as prime minister dur-
ing the 1980s drug era, had to
bear the brunt of responsibili-
ty for what went on in this
country.

And he said the cocaine
trade had destroyed an entire
generation of Bahamian men,
creating thousands of career
addicts, some of them dead
and others in prison.

“T think some are defending
Sir Lynden’s legacy to gain
political brownie points instead
of putting the country first,”
Mr Archer told The Tribune.

“But the cocaine trade was
responsible for a huge genera-
tional gap among Bahamian
men. I have a brother who was
a lifetime cocaine user. Many
others are either dead or in
prison.

“The women of that era who
refrained from drug use are
now in leadership roles in this
country. It destroyed a whole
generation of Bahamian men.”

Mr Archer said it was time
Bahamians faced up to the
“true facts”, acknowledge it
was wrong and find a way to
move forward.

“How are we going to stim-
ulate the minds of Bahamian
men? The drug trade now is
more violent than it was, and it
has created an attitude of enti-
tlement, with young men feel-
ing they should get money for
no work.”

Mr Archer said he found it
offensive that some people
were so ready to spring to Sir
Lynden’s defence without any
thought for the families of
cocaine victims.

“Even though I am not fully
aware of the activities of that
era, I am a student of history
and I call a spade a spade.

“Tt is a known fact that 70
per cent of the drugs entering
the north American market
was channelled through the
Bahamas.

“The question is: is it fair for
the then prime minister and
the commissioner of police to
shoulder the brunt of the
responsibility? That’s the ques-
tion that needs to be answered
and no-one is addressing that
question.”

Mr Archer’s comments came
as controversy continued to
rage over the Insight article
which recorded a former PLP
official’s belief that his pilot

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son was killed because he
knew too much about Pin-
dling’s connections with
Colombian drug czar Joe
Lehder.

Mr Chauncey Tynes Sr, PLP
treasurer in the late 1960s, told
Insight his son informed him
of regular cash consignments
he brought to Nassau for both
Pindling and a senior police
officer.

These were Lehder’s pay-
offs for their complicity in
facilitating his cocaine trans-
shipment operation in Nor-
man’s Cay in the Exumas.

Yesterday, The Tribune con-

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tinued to receive congratula-
tory calls from readers who
said it was time for Bahami-
ans to square up to the less
savoury parts of their history.

One, a Nassau businessman,
also supported Mr Tynes’
claim that Pindling was not a
Bahamian at all, but a
Jamaican who was brought to
the Bahamas as a boy.

“I knew the boat captain
who brought him here,” he
said, “I don’t know if he is still
living, but he was very vocal
about it even while Pindling
was at his height.

“He used to say he wished
he had dropped the little b.....d
overboard for all the trouble
he caused.”

The businessman also said
he knew a person still living in
Nassau who delivered cash, all
in US banknotes, from Joe
Lehder to the prime minister
every Monday morning.

Another reader said it would
be up to “our children” to
decide who should be revered
as part of Bahamian history.

“They will determine how
Sir Lynden is judged,” he
added.

“However, I really admire
your (The Tribune’s) courage
in writing these things and I
am delighted you are doing
what you are doing.”

1s a :
> ann
ee —_— dl




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CLL

IRS CTT LL

Ce UC
Ue

A 38-YEAR-OLD
woman is in police custody
in connection with the
murder of Gentry McPhee
who was shot dead in The
Big Yard nightclub early
on Monday morning.

The woman was appre-
hended just after 9pm on
Tuesday and is being ques-
tioned by police after two
men were arrested on
Monday in connection with
the incident.

Mr McPhee, 30, was
fatally shot shortly after
midnight while in The Big
Yard nightclub between
Arawak Cay and Crystal
Cay.

He was seriously injured
in his abdomen and hands
and was rushed to Princess
Margaret Hospital by
ambulance.

But the gunshot victim
died shortly after he
arrived at the hospital.

An intensive murder
investigation is underway.
Anyone who may be
able to assist police with
investigations should call

322-4444, 919, or call
Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-8477.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama a socialist? Not quite

OF ALL THE inane accusations about Pres-
ident Obama, the silliest has to be this: The
president is a socialist.

Obama’s plans are “one big down payment
on a new American socialist experiment,”
asserts House minority leader John Boehner.
He’s ”the world’s best salesman of socialism,”
says Republican Senator Jim DeMint.

“Lenin and Stalin would love this stuff,”
declares Mike Huckabee. Sean Hannity derides
his agenda as “socialism you can believe in.”
Obama is “a radical communist,” warns kooky
Alan Keyes.

“Epithets are substituting for thinking,”
observes Marc Landy, professor of political sci-
ence at Boston College.

Are they ever.

That has long been the case across vast realms
of conservative talk radio, of course. I recently
heard one of our local luminaries who regular-
ly accuses Obama of Marxism offering a similar
sort of indispensable insight on another critical
issue: Michelle Obama’s appearance during
her husband’s speech to Congress. The first
lady’s face resembled that of a camel, while her
body looked like the Liberty Bell wrapped in
purple, said WTKK’s Jay Severin, who, hilari-
ously, fancies himself a political polymath lead-
ing a rarefied radio discussion. (Severin imagines
any number of things about himself that are at
considerable variance with the truth).

So let’s examine the matter. One defining
aspect of socialism is state ownership, control, or
direction of the economy.

Think of Hugo Chavez nationalizing steel,
cement, power, and telecommunications firms in
Venezuela, and assuming control over foreign
oil projects.

Or of Francois Mitterrand nationalizing six of
France’s largest industrial conglomerates, plus
dozens of the country’s largest banks and invest-
ment houses, during his presidency.

By contrast, despite the excuse of a crisis,
Obama has resisted calls from both left and
right to temporarily nationalize teetering banks.
Sunilarly, if Obama were a socialist, crypto or
otherwise, he would surely be proposing gov-
ernment-run healthcare, rather than an expan-
sion that builds upon our current hybrid model.

Nor does his agenda compare to the democ-
ratic socialism of countries like Denmark or
Sweden, which have high taxation across a wide
swath of the population to fund a generous sys-
tem of social benefits.

“What Obama even in his wildest moments is

proposing is way short of that,” notes Landy.

What’s really causing conservative connip-
tions is that Obama wants to tax top earners
more and spend some of that revenue on ben-
efits — healthcare, education, tax cuts, etc. —
for others. His mortgage plan has drawn similar
ire.

But if he prevails, the two top income tax
rates — 36 and 39.6 per cent — would still be
well below those the country had for much of
the last six decades.

The top rates were 90 per cent or more from
the mid-1940s until the mid-1960s.

They remained above 65 per cent from the
mid-1960s until Ronald Reagan’s presidency,
when they were first cut to the 48 to 50 per
cent range and later to 28 per cent with a “bub-
ble” bracket that taxed some income at 33 per
cent.

Taxes rose under both George H.W. Bush
and Bill Clinton.

During Clinton’s presidency, the top rates
were set at 36 and 39.6 per cent. George W.
Bush’s tax cuts reduced those rates to 33 and 35
per cent.

When those tax cuts expire, Obama favours
letting the top rates revert to 36 and 39.6 per
cent.

That historical perspective gives the lie to
the notion that the president wants to impose an
unprecedented level of taxation. Add in his
other revenue-raisers, and he would clearly be
more progressive than Clinton, but well within
the tradition of FDR and LBJ.

It’s ambitious liberalism, without a doubt.
But socialism, with all that conjures up? Hard-
ly.

“For upper-income taxpayers, marginal tax
rates on ordinary income would return to Clin-
ton-era levels,” says Rosanne Altshuler, co-
director of the nonpartisan Tax Policy Centre.
“Taxes on capital gains would be lower or the
same as the top capital gains rate under Ronald
Reagan, while taxes on dividends would be sig-
nificantly lower than under Reagan.”

So why do Obama’s ideological opponents
persist in the socialist canard?

Simple: It’s far easier to gull people with
politically freighted terms than it is to argue
actual facts.

(This article was written by Scot Lehigh Globe

Staff
—c. 2009 The Boston Globe).



Eleuthera wild
horses legacy is a
lesson for us all

EDITOR, The Tribune

I read Mr Eugene Carey’s
letter in The Tribune this
morning, and I can understand
and feel his frustration, and
indeed as an organization, the
Bahamas Humane Society
shares this frustration with
him.

We were contacted some
months back about the horse
situation in Eleuthera, in fact,
you published an in depth arti-
cle about it.

These horses are the
descendants of horses left
behind when the Wood Prince
family left the farm they had
in Eleuthera.

The original horses broke
out of the fenced fields where
they were kept and gradually
became a wild herd.

The Bahamas Humane
Society sent our Executive
Director Stephen Turnquest
to visit Rock Sound and talk
to the farmers and hear their
concerns, he also visited their
farms and met with other con-
cerned persons in the com-
munity.

During this same visit he
drove around and tried to
identify a possible site for the
horses to be corralled, where
they could have sufficient
food, shade and water.

Upon Mr. Turnquest’s
return to Nassau from
Eleuthera, we held a meeting
at the Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety of knowledgeable horse
people shelter to discuss what
we could do to help with this
situation.

After meeting with the
horse community and seeing
first hand what the situation
was, the Bahamas Humane
Society sent a letter to the
Minister, and to the Director
of Agriculture.

The Bahamas Humane
Society also sent our Execu-
tive Director to visit Half

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



Moon Cay, with a prominent
and very knowledgeable
member of the Nassau horse
community.

The intention of this trip
was to see if the Half Moon
Cay would be a viable solu-
tion to this problem.

The Bahamas Humane
Society also has had many
lengthy phone conversations
with WSPA (World Society
of the Protection of Animals)
about the possibility of send-
ing a specialist to help us in
the capturing and relocation
of these horses.

We have also spent many
hours talking and negotiating
with landowners about secur-
ing a large enough tract of
land in the area of Rock
Sound with sufficient grasses,
shade and water to sustain
these horses.

There is still a group of very
interested persons trying to
sort out this daunting prob-
lem.

They are working on it as I
write.

The Bahamas Humane
Society is there to assist in any
way that we possibly can.

The option of relocating the
horses to Half Moon Cay is
fraught with complications:
Starting with the journey by
boat, coupled with how many
horses are already on that
island, combined with how
wild these horses actually are.

I have been told by one
lady, who is working very
closely with the horses that:
“What we need is the govern-
ment approval to work with
these animals and then per-
mission to bring in the spay-
vac, (a contraceptive vaccine)
and use it on the mares to

inhibit any more horses being
born to this herd.”

Perhaps a temporary solu-
tion would be to offer the
farmers fencing to protect
their crops while we sort
things out, and Government
can assist us in the manpower
needed to install these fences

We must not loose sight
that we must all work togeth-
er and find a solution to this
old and very vexing problem,
in doing so we will all finally
do what is right for these ani-
mals so carelessly and selfish-
ly abandoned years ago.

I would like to add, as a
footnote, and not a complaint,
for the record: the Bahamas
Humane Society made all the
above-mentioned trips and
phone calls at our own
expense.

We are prepared, as an
organization, to do everything
in our power to find a solu-
tion to this problem and assist
the Government in any way
we can.

However, this is a situation
that cannot be solved without
significant Government
involvement, and community
cooperation on the part of the
Eleuthera farmers.

This should also serve as a
lesson for us all that when
people pullout of this coun-
try, for whatever reason, they
should be made to “clean up
behind them”, and find solu-
tions for their animals and not
just abandon them.

KIM ARANHA
President, Bahamas
Humane Society.

Nassau,
March 9, 2009

We support the Bill to
protect sea turtles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We are Bahamians, with
the exception of two of us who
are permanent residents of
long standing with Bahamian
children.

We support the Bill to pro-
tect all Bahamian sea turtles

The Tomlinson
Scholarship

and would like to see it passed
into law as soon as possible.

Some of us have already
signed a petition.

However, in light of the
Minister of Agriculture and
Fisheries’ assertion that only a
small number of Bahamians
have publicly supported the
ban, we would be grateful if
you would place our names
on the record.

Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty

Nassau Office: Mike Light-
bourn, Athena Mabon,
Doretha Knowles, Cindi Scav-
ella, Sheska Sands (and Cecil
Sands), Pam Taylor, Spencer

White, Rudy Carroll, Heather
Peterson, Joel Moxey, Donna
Davis, Jane-Michelle Bethel,
Carman Massoni.

Tara Mabon (Environmen-
tal Studies major, York Uni-
versity, Toronto).

Abaco Office: Krista
Albury, Mailin Sands, Chris
Farrington, Lee Pinder,
Shirley Carroll (and Peter
Carroll).

Exuma Office: Dale and
Lisa Kemp

Eleuthera: Adam Boorman

Spanish Wells: Lonnie John-
son

Nassau,
March 9, 2009

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applications are now being accepted for academic scholarships
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



© In brief |CLICO crisis tops conference agenda

Police recover
ammunition
after chasing
three men

AMMUNITION recovered
by police is thought to have
been dropped by three men as
officers pursued them in the
Wilson Tract area on Tuesday
evening.

Mobile division officers on
patrol in the area said the
three men were acting suspi-
ciously and ran as they
approached.

When searching the area
where the men had been, the
officers found a plastic bag
containing four live rounds of
ammunition for an AK-47
assault rifle.

No arrests were made.

Police are appealing for
information from the public.
Anyone who may be able to
assist investigations should
call police on 322-4444, 919, or
call Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-8477.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham will discuss critical financial
issues affecting the Bahamas and
the region with heads of govern-
ment at a conference in Belize
today and tomorrow.

The liquidation of CLICO
(Bahamas), G20’s position on
“harmful” tax havens and the col-
lapse of the Stanford Bank of
Antigua top the agenda at the
20th inter-sessional meeting of
the Caribbean community
(CARICOM).

While CARICOM leaders are
slated to focus on the effects of
the current global economic crisis
on the region and possible miti-
gating action, the possibility of
an Economic Partnership Agree-
ment between Caribbean coun-
tries and Canada will also take
up time at the conference.

Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette, who is acting Prime
Minister in Mr Ingraham’s
absence, said discussion of CLI-
CO’s position will be a priority
for the Bahamas and several
Caribbean countries, as both
Guyana and Trinidad also have
an interest in the company.

Mr Symonette said: “It will be

discussed and

we want to

make sure the

policy holders

. and those that

have annuities

with CLICO

are covered.

We will make

sure there is as

foe little loss of

investment as

possible, although that is up to
the liquidators.”

The seizure of the Bank of
Antigua, which is owned by the
Stanford group and Sir Allen
Stanford, by Caribbean regula-
tors amid fraud regulations will
also require attention, Mr Symon-
ette said. The protectionist leg-
islative measures threatening tax
havens and the financial services
sector will be another primary
issue for CARICOM leaders.

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing, acting as Minis-
ter of Finance during Mr Ingra-
ham’s two-day absence, maintains
the Bahamas government is care-
fully monitoring moves in the
United States and other G20
nations intended to crack down
on “harmful” tax havens after an
expanded Stop Tax Haven Abuse
Bill was introduced in the US sen-
ate last week and British Prime



PLP Chairman swipes at Carl Bethel

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - PLP Chairman
Glenys Hanna-Martin is hitting
out at Education Minister Carl
Bethel, claiming that he attempt-
ed to push blame on the school
board for the non-payment of
workers at the West End Primary
School.

Mrs Hanna-Martin said West
End Primary, like several other
schools on Grand Bahama, is not
governed by a school board, but
falls under the direct responsibil-
ity of the Ministry of Education.

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Four persons
employed as jani-
tors and security
personnel at the

school have
‘ reportedly not
Glenys received their

salaries for more
than five weeks.
Mrs Hanna-Martin said the min-
istry’s failure to pay has caused
tremendous hardship for individ-
uals during these tough econom-
ic times. “I read with utter
amazement the comments attrib-
uted to the Minister of Education
Carl Bethel relative to the non-
payment of staff at the West End
Primary School wherein the min-
ister implies that the default in
the payment of staff is due to the
poor management of funding by
the school boards,” she said.

“T certainly hope the minister is
aware that West End Primary
School is not governed by a
school board and if he is so aware
he ought not to seek to mislead
our public by shafting responsi-
bility from himself to third par-
ties. If he is not so aware, then I
invite him to come out of the
comfort of his office and acquaint
himself with the facts relative to

Hanna-Martin

the operation of our Family
Island schools.”

Mrs Hanna-Martin said that
the public schools in West End,
Holmes Rock and the three
schools in East End come under
the direct jurisdiction of the Min-
istry of Education and do not
have school boards as suggested.
The PLP chairman said Minister
Bethel ought to ensure that staff
is duly remunerated for work per-
formed, particularly in times of
acute financial hardship.

The Tribune spoke with San-
dra Edgecombe, superintendent
of primary schools at the Min-
istry of Education on Grand
Bahama, about the situation.

She said that small schools,
such as West End Primary, are
not run by school boards.

Mrs Edgecombe said the mat-
ter concerning the non-payment
of employees at the school in
West End is currently being
addressed. Mrs Hanna-Martin
had previously suggested that oth-
er schools are also experiencing
similar difficulties, but Ms Edge-
combe said that she is not aware
of such problems at any of the
other primary schools in Grand
Bahama.

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Minister Gordon Brown has
repeated America’s call for a
global new deal to address the
issue. Mr Laing maintains the
government will remain actively
vigilant on the issue, as financial
services account for 15 per cent of
the country’s GDP, making it the
second most important sector of
the Bahamian economy.

CARICOM leaders will also
focus on the implementation of
the Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) signed with the
European Union (EU) and the
status of negotiations for a trade
and development agreement
between CARICOM and Cana-
da. Mr Symonette said: “The
EPA has been signed and now it

is a question of the technical arms
taking over.

“The CARICOM position with
regard to Canada will be dis-
cussed and we can see whether
or not that will be implemented.”

Prime Minister Ingraham left
Nassau yesterday and is due to
return following the close of the
conference tomorrow.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Two in court on marijuana charge

A 39-YEAR-OLD man of
Fox Hill and a 28-year-old
man of Pinewood Gardens
were arraigned in a Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday on a
Marijuana possession charge.

Carlos Lamm and Laticha
McKenzie appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in
Court 8, Bank Lane yester-
day, charged with possession
of marijuana with the intent
to supply.

It is alleged that the

accused on Monday, March
9, were found in possession
of a quantity of marijuana
which authorities believe they
intended to supply to another.

Court dockets further
allege that the accused were
found in possession of three
and a half pounds of marijua-
na.

Lamm and McKenzie both
pleaded not guilty to the
charge and were granted bail
in the sum of $10,000.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning

for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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Govt ‘must address Customs
and Immigration salaries’

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - President of
the Bahamas Public Services
Union John Pinder said gov-
ernment must address the
issue of salaries for Custom
and Immigration officers if it
intends to make them shift
workers.

He said the union has still
not received the government’s
counter-proposal on salaries
for employees of the Customs
and Immigration Depart-
ments.

“We are still awaiting the
government to come back to
the union with a counter-pro-
posal so we can address the
salaries of half of Immigration
and Customs.

“T heard them (the govern-
ment) throwing out the fact
that they are going to make
them shift workers. We cer-
tainly know that unless salaries
are properly addressed that
would not happen so smooth-
ly,” Mr Pinder said on Tues-
day in Grand Bahama.

The union president was in
Freeport to open an educa-
tional training seminar for
members at the Bahamas Pub-
lic Services Union Hall.

He told members that the
union will continue to push for
an amendment to the Indus-



“I heard them
(the government)
throwing out the
fact that they are
going to make
them shift
workers. We
certainly know
that unless salaries
are properly
addressed that
would not happen
so smoothly.”



John Pinder

trial Relations Act that gov-
erns the agency shop.

Mr Pinder told The Tribune
that he has requested to meet
with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham to discuss the matter
of salaries, as well as other
important issues of concern.

“There are situations where
persons have reached the max-
imum of their salary scale and
are not able to get promotion
but still receive above average
performance or better, and
they are entitled to receive
increments in the form of
lump sum payment and that is
not happening,” he said.

The issue of promotions is
also a major concern in the
public service, Mr Pinder said.

He noted that many civil
servants have completed their
training and educational
courses, but have not been
properly reclassified and pro-
moted accordingly.

“There are also those who
are entitled to tuition reim-
bursement and they are not
receiving those benefits,” he
said.

Mr Pinder claimed that the
promotional exercises at the
Immigration Department were
delayed because there were
challenges with verifying cer-
tain qualifications of some
officers.

However, he is now satisfied
that efforts are being made by



the government, which recent-
ly retired a number of senior
persons at the Immigration
Department.

“T believe it is safe to say
that those persons who are eli-
gible for promotion will fill the
number of positions that are
now available and we are sat-
isfied that efforts are being
made to fill all vacancies in
Immigration,” he said.

Mr Pinder said additional
manpower is required at both
Customs and Immigration to
ensure efficiency in those
departments.

He stressed that there is a
need for ongoing recruitment,
especially at the Department
of Immigration.

“The illegal immigration
problem is a very challenging
issue for the country right
now.

“There is continuous talk
about the situation and the
government spends hundreds
of thousands of dollars to
repatriate illegal immigrants.

“We think we need more
manpower to conduct appre-
hensions and to tighten our
borders from illegal sloops
sneaking through our borders.

“The government has to
seriously consider ways to
reduce the amount of illegal
immigrants that get through
and if more manpower is
required then we need to
address that,” Mr Pinder said.

Police constable accused of stabbing appears in court

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A POLICE Constable accused of stab-
bing a man in the shoulder during an alter-
cation early on Sunday morning was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Constable Joey Saunders, 19, of Windsor
Place, appeared before Magistrate Ansella
Williams in Court One, Bank Lane yester-
day morning, charged with causing grievous
harm and assault with a deadly weapon.

It is alleged that on Sunday, March 8,
Saunders unlawfully caused grievous harm

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that around 1.15am on Sunday, March 8,
Saunders unlawfully assaulted Rajeer Fer-
guson with a deadly weapon, namely a
motor vehicle. Thirteen witnesses are listed

on court dockets.

before 2am.











Robbin Whachell

TROPICAL
rs el

PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157



Sry
bo ana Tey Ss

Initial police reports stated that 22-year-
old Newbold was stabbed in the left shoul-
der early Sunday morning during an alter-
cation in the Carmichael Road area.

The incident reportedly occurred shortly

The victim was taken to hospital where
his condition is listed as critical. Police ini-

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tially reported that they were uncertain as
to the circumstances surrounding the inci-

Saunders, who is being represented by
attorney Romona Farquharson, pleaded

not guilty to both charges. Ms Farquharson

told the court that Saunders had been in
police custody since Sunday morning,
adding that she had not seen any docu-
ment from investigators requesting an
extension of time for his detainment.

Saunders was granted bail in the sum

" se

of the Groves.

THE Grand Bahama
Labyrinth hosted an event
where 40 visitors participated in
“A Walk of Love” in
honour of “the island and the
planet.”

Guests were invited to select
from a basket of meaningful
“love quotes” on which to
meditate during the walk, and

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to keep as a bookmark and for
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The many benches around
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

trworarey NIB defends

: is defending its decision to prose-
? cute employers and the self-

? employed for non-payment of tax-

dmaycock@tribunemedianet_ i eg pointing out that if it conducts

: “business-as-usual” the National

FREEPORT - Two women } [psurance Scheme will be chal-

: : lenged around 2032.
acy in the Freeport Magistrate’s ;

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

were charged with drug conspir-

Court on Wednesday.

Magistrate Debbye Ferguson.

ous drugs with intent to supply.

charged with breach of the Shop

zie and Dominick Newbold.

five defendants.

ber 8.

THE National Insurance Board

Self-employed Long Island fish-

? erman Colin Fox, 53, is one of

Karen Bowe, 22, of Fortune : many poor fishermen unable to

Hills, and Karen Moss, 26, of Wis- } pay National Insurance contribu-

teria Drive, Gambier Loop, ¢ tions because adverse weather con-

appeared in Court One before i ditions have kept him from work-

: ? ing this crawfish season.
The women pleaded not guilty }

to conspiracy to possess danger- } Jast week in order to pay $300 to

; NIB and avoid jail after pleading
Bowe and Moss were also } guilty to a charge of owing NIB
2 1 ? $700 before the Long Island mag-
License Act along with three oth- }

ers — Darren Pratt, Nola McKen- }

He was forced to sell his boat

istrate.
NIB, in a statement yesterday,

: said that in the case of fishermen
K Brian Hanna represented the ¢ and farmers in the Family Islands,
i NIB’s officers were very “sensitive

They all pleaded not guilty to ; in the discharge of their duties.”

the charge and were each granted }

$4,500 bail with two sureties. The i action against anyone — employer
matters were adjourned to Octo- } 6; self-employed person — the

i Board, through its Inspectors,

NIB said before beginning legal

makes a series of documented
attempts to secure compliance.
Cases are then only advanced
after a thorough investigation is
conducted and there is confirma-
tion that the persons were, indeed,
gainfully employed or have
employment activities.

Sensitive

NIB has Inspectors and/or man-
agers resident in the Family Islands
and these stewards understand the
local economies and use a sensi-
tive and commonsense approach
when recommending prosecution.

If a fisherman or farmer is
unemployed, or not gainfully
employed, and provides confirma-
tion of this to NIB, the required
adjustments are made and no fur-
ther action will be taken.

“Studies confirm that a signifi-
cant number of self-employed per-
sons do not pay contributions, and
a large number of employers are
paying late or not at all. This is a
serious state of affairs — one that

has the potential to adversely
impact the future of the National
Insurance Scheme. As we have
previously stated, the National
Insurance Scheme is solvent and
strong — however, there are spe-
cific recommendations that have
been made by the Board’s Actu-
ary,” NIB said.

While NIB said it considers
prosecution for non-compliance a
last resort, there has been an
increase in legal proceedings with-
in the last several months — largely
a result of NIB’s increased efforts
to ensure that contributions are
paid on time.

The increased charges primarily
include failure to pay contribu-

tions, and failure to produce
employment records as requested
by the board.

The board said that legal action
is commenced only when all efforts
to resolve the outstanding contri-
butions directly with the employer
have fallen off.

“In addition, action is only
brought when the Board’s Inspec-
tors confirm, through their local
intelligence, that there is employ-
ment activity,” the statement said.

NIB is increasing its review of
the contribution accounts of delin-
quent employers and self-
employed persons in order to
ensure compliance with the
National Insurance Act.

decision to prosecute for unpaid taxes

The Act, which was passed into
law in 1972, requires that all per-
sons gainfully employed in The
Bahamas must either pay contri-
butions into National Insurance or
have contributions paid on their
behalf.

NIB said that it has an obliga-
tion to ensure compliance with the
provisions of the legislation, so as
to ensure that no worker is without
this social protection.

“The Board takes very serious-
ly this duty, and its efforts in this
regard extend even to and on
behalf of those who would wilfully
and intentionally fail to comply,”
the board said.

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A KEEN cyclist who favours
two wheels over four and subse-
quently saves more than $5,000 a
year is calling on others to get on
their bikes.

Bike mechanic Douglas Fawkes
has been riding since childhood,
but decided to ditch his car in
favour of the traditional bicycle
ten years ago to the benefit of
both his wallet and his health.

The 53-year-old cycles around
2,500 miles a year, taking the bike
from his home in JFK Drive, New
Providence, to jobs across the
island, including Breezes in Cable
Beach where he services the
hotels bikes.

His blood pressure has dropped
from critical levels to a healthy
115/75 and his cholesterol levels
improved dramatically as a result
of cycling, he said.

He wants to encourage others
to take up the physically, finan-
cially and environmentally
healthy habit for their own good
and the good of the island as it
becomes increasingly choked by
bumper to bumper road traffic.

“Tt’s a way of saving money on
gas, on parking, on licence fees,
alleviating health problems, and
alleviating stress,” he said.

“Cars are multiplying like rab-
bits on this island and they are
causing people a lot of stress.

“Tam not anti-car, I am just
saying the car is being overused in
the Bahamas.

“T believe the government
should start cycling lessons in our
schools to teach students to ride
bicycles, and I would be happy to
teach them.

“And I would recommend any-
one who lives between one and
53-YEAR-OLD Douglas Fawkes pictured outside The Tribune. Mr Fawkes five miles from work tries cycling
cycles arund 2,500 miles a year and has saved more than $5,00 ayear. — to work.”

Top American economist to speak
about issues facing Bahamian economy

53-year-old man
saves thousands of
dollars by cycling

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LEADING American
aoe will address some of
the most pressing issues facing
the Bahamas in the face of the
global economic downturn at a
special meeting being held
tonight.

Michael LaFaive, of the
Mackinac Centre for Public Pol-
icy, will speak on the topic: "Eco-
nomic Diversification: Should
Mandates or Markets Rule?"

The event, which will begin at
6.30pm at the Nassau Yacht Club
on East Bay Street, is being host-
ed by local economic think-tank
The Nassau Institute.

Mr LaFaive is director of the
Mackinac Centre’s Morey Fiscal
Policy Initiative. The centre is a
20-year-old public policy
research institute, located in Mid-
land, Michigan, two hours north
of Detroit.

During his 15 years with the
Mackinac Centre, Mr LaFaive
has authored or co-authored
more than 100 essays and 10
major studies on fiscal policy
issues as diverse as trade liberal-
isation, government spending,
privatisation, cigarette taxes and
smuggling, as well as government
economic development initia-
tives.

He has conducted extensive
research on government eco-
nomic development pro-
grammes, including an empirical
analysis of his state’s premier
economic development pro-
gramme — the Michigan Eco-
nomic Growth Authority
(MEGA).

Along with this study, Mr
LaFaive authored a short history
of economic development in his
home state and he found that the
lessons of Michigan’s history may
be applicable elsewhere.

His newest project involves a
budget analysis of the Michigan
Economic Development Corpo-
ration, a quasi-public state
agency tasked with bringing new
jobs to Michigan and making
sure old ones remain.

His opinion on economic mat-
ters is widely sought; he averages
more than 125 interviews a year
in media outlets as diverse as the
Financial Times, The Baltimore
(Maryland) Sun and National

Public Radio.
Those interested in attending
can sign up at:

https://secure.lexi.net/nassau/mic
hael_lafaive_on_economic_diver
sification.php or call 328-6529.



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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

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CLICO, a credit union regula-
tor said.

Responding to media
reports, Nathaniel Adderley,
director of societies in the
Department of Co-operative
Development, assured the pub-
lic that no Bahamian credit
union had any investments on
the books of CLICO
(Bahamas) Limited at the date
of its collapse.

He pointed out that co-oper-
atives societies and credit

unions are prohibited by law
from investing in any financial
instruments other than those
outlined in Section 76 of The
Co-operatives Societies Act,
2005 which states that: “A soci-
ety may invest or deposit its
funds, (a) in any registered
society or bank approved by
the director of societies; (b) in
any securities issued or guar-
anteed by the government; (c)

in the shares or on the
security of any other institu-

2°2nd annual

THE Arawak Cay Fish
Fry is expected to be
bustling with activity this
weekend as the Antique
Auto Club of the Bahamas
takes locals and visitors on a
tour of the automotive
world of the past.

When the 22nd annual
Antique Car Show and
Steakout comes to town on
Saturday, March 14, cars
and trucks from the 1930s
to the 80s will be on display
along with some special
interest and customised
vehicles.

In addition to those
belonging to club members,
the organisers are looking
for antique and special
interest vehicles that belong
to other members of the
public. The club says
“antique vehicle” refers to
a car that is at least 20 years
old.

A separate section for
"project cars" is being
added this year, and will fea-
ture vehicles that are under
restoration but not yet com-
pleted.

Club secretary Murray
Forde said: “In recent years,
owners have stated that
their cars are not ready for

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tion with limited lability
approved by the director of
societies; or (d) in any other
manner permitted by the direc-
tor of societies.

Mr Adderley said credit
Unions remain one of the
safest areas of the financial sec-
tor as they are solely domestic
operations and funds are only
invested in the local economy.

“Credit union members and
depositors can rest assured that
their savings and deposits are



THE TRIBUNE



No co-operative credit unions

‘had any shares in CLICO’

not tied up on the books of
CLICO (Bahamas) Limited.
The sector regulator has not
uncovered any record repre-
senting deposits with the insur-
ance company and is confident
that deposits in credit unions
are safe and sound.

“The Bahamian public is
encouraged to continue patro-
nising co-operatives and credit
unions as the co-operative sec-
tor is stable, safe and sound,”
he said.

Elaine Forde/Tribune staff

THE ORIGINAL six members of the Antique Auto Club of the Bahamas 20 years later (taken in 2007) L-R:
Richard Chestnut, Lenny Brozozog, Don Aranha, Alonzo Rolle, Murray Forde and Charles Johnson.

showing or not good
enough, so this year we are
encouraging them to bring
them out so people can get
some idea of the work that
goes into restoration and
hopefully encourage them
to come back next year and
see the difference."

Many corporate sponsors
have again supported the

event with donations for tro-
phies, which will be awarded
in the seven judged classes
as well as the popular "Peo-
ples Choice" category, the
winners of which are deter-
mined by attendee votes.
Steak and chicken dinners
are again being sold and all
proceeds will benefit the
Bilney Lane Home for Chil-

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dren and the Every Child
Counts Learning Centre in
Abaco.

Other activities include a
raffle featuring several
prizes and an art contest for
children which was created
by club director Jim LaRoda
and introduced last year.
"The idea is for the child to
draw one of the cars on dis-
play on specially provided
forms." Mr LaRoda
explained. "Prizes will be
awarded to the winners the
following weekend, after
they have been judged by a
panel”.

The Antique Auto Club
of the Bahamas is a non-
profit organisation formed
in 1987 by six men (all of
whom are still members)
with a strong interest in old
cars. It now boasts a mem-
bership of almost 50.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

<

NASA postponed the launch
of space shuttle Discovery just }
hours before it was to head to

the international space station }
Wednesday because of a hydro- }
gen gas leak that could have }
been catastrophic at liftoff, :

according to Associated Press.
The leak was in a different :
part of the system that already }
has caused a vexing one-month }
delay. Shuttle managers were }
shooting for another launch }
attempt Thursday night pro-
vided they could fix the prob- }
lem quickly. ;
The gaseous hydrogen began
leaking just as the launch team }
was close to wrapping up the :
loading of Discovery’s external }
fuel tank for a late night liftoff. }
The seven astronauts had yet }
to board the spaceship. :
Discovery’s flight to the }
space station is already late }
because of concern about }
hydrogen gas valves in the }
ship’s engine compartment. }
NASA spokesman Allard Beu- }
tel said Wednesday’s small leak }
was in plumbing outside Dis- ;
covery, in the vicinity of the }
fuel tank and a hydrogen gas- }
venting line, and had nothing }
to do with the valves. But it still :
could have been dangerous at }
liftoff. i
“When you’re launching, you ;
have pyrotechnics going off,” :
said another NASA }
spokesman, Steve Roy. “You }
can’t have hydrogen leaking }
out in the vicinity of a launch ;
pad ... it’s possible it could }
explode.” ;
As NASA drained the exter- i
nal fuel tank and pondered its ;
next move, Mission Control }
notified the three astronauts }
aboard the space station that }
their visitors would not be }
arriving on time. Commander
Mike Fincke asked to be kept }
abreast of any developments.
NASA has until Monday to }
send Discovery to the space sta-
tion, otherwise the flight will }
have to be put off until April. }
That’s because a Russian Soyuz }
rocket is slated to blast off in }
two weeks, on a higher priority }
mission, with a fresh space sta- }
tion crew. :
Discovery’s liftoff originally }
was targeted for mid-February, }
but concern about the shuttle’s }
three hydrogen gas valves
resulted in four delays. i
Shuttle managers said they’re }
convinced after extensive test- }
ing that the valves are safe and ;
won’t break like one did during }
the last shuttle launch in }
November. The valves are part i
of the main propulsion system ;
and control the flow of hydro- }
gen gas into the fuel tank, in }
order to maintain proper tank }
pressure. i

Young artists
brush up
for Woodes

Murals painted
at former Straw
Market site

YOUNG artists’ colourful
visions have transformed
part of Woodes Rogers Walk
into an inspired experience
for Bahamians and visitors.

Students from the College
of the Bahamas, the Nation-
al Art and Craft Enrichment
Programme, D W Davis and
recent high school graduates
combined forces to paint
murals at the northern
boundary of the former
Straw Market site. As the
site awaits construction,
sheets of plywood were
placed around it to keep it
secure. However, the stu-
dents and the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation
formed a partnership to
beautify the area.

Timothy Nottage, director
of the art project, said the
creation of the murals aims
to do more than keep young-
sters occupied.

“This is more along the
lines of them investing in
themselves, in developing
their talents and investigat-
ing who they are as people,”
he said. “I just wanted a
medium and a platform for
them to show the country
what they are capable of.”

The murals depict cultur-
ally relevant scenes that
include the nation’s flora,
fauna and seascapes. The
majority of the ideas and
designs came directly from
the students. They individu-
ally conceptualised the
designs, which were all con-
nected in creative ways.

The artists hope their work
falls in line with the purpose
of art, which is to uplift the
human spirit, Mr Nottage
said.

“It adds an aesthetic
appeal to the waterfront
where the tourists have to
pass, rather than having an
eyesore,” he said.

“Imagine if we can do this
for all those dilapidated
buildings and all those eye-
sores that are downtown. We
can come up with a design
for them.”

Since the students have
been working on the project,
it has become an attraction
for visitors, who often stop
and take photographs. They
have asked the students lots
of questions about their
work, starting interesting
conversations.

Craig Culmer, an art edu-
cation student at COB, was
excited with the opportunity
to have people from around
the world see some of his art
work.

“It’s a privilege and it’s a
way of getting your name out
as a young, upcoming artist,”
he said.

Leonardo Dorsett had sim-
ilar thoughts. As a biochem-
istry student at COB, he
found himself on the project

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YOUNG ARTISTS beautify
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waterfront with murals.

through the National Art
and Craft Enrichment Pro-
gramme. He said he wants
the public to see the talent
of the young artists and take
note of them.

The Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation plans to engage
artists to complete murals
around the entire border of
the Straw Market site.





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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

eM i i

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165



THE TRIBUNE





Building a green

THE SOUTHERN ISLANDS



| HE further south one

travels from Nassau,
the more isolated and remote
the islands become. In fact,
once you leave the southern
end of the Great Bahama
Bank, the islands offer rela-
tively little to nothing in terms
of tourism and commerce.
Locals survive primarily off of
the land and sea and earn a
minimal income from local
consumption and modest busi-
ness arrangements with Nas-
sau.

Beyond Long Island is
another world, a blank canvas
where the people and settle-
ments are still authentic to a
traditional Bahamian culture
and way of life. There are
names like Delectable Bay,
Lovely Hill, Pirates Well and
True Blue; names that seem
pulled out of a timeless novel,
and destined for great triumph.
Here, one can explore rem-
nants of a more prosperous
era that has all but washed
away with the tides and van-
ished into the rolling hills.

Fortune Island (Cay) was
the original name given to
Long Cay in the
Crooked/Acklins archipelago.

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BOATS ON CROOKED ISLAND — The southern islands have each undergone independent ecological development

At the beginning of the 20th
century, it was home to more
than 3,000 inhabitants (+/- 15
today) and was one of the
leading shipping ports in the
western hemisphere. The first
post office in the Bahamas still
stands on Crooked Island, and
is now part of the restaurant at
the Pitts Town Point Landings
Resort.

Unlike the majority of our
other islands, which are con-
nected by the Great and Little
Bahama Banks, the southern
islands comprising of Inagua,
Mayaguana, Crooked Island
and Acklins each have under-
gone independent ecological
development. Possessing a
self-contained, one-of-kind
ecosystem means that each of
these islands is much more vul-
nerable to habitat loss and ulti-
mately the demise of fishery
stocks, the staple food prod-
uct of local communities. Yet
despite — or perhaps because

of — this fragile uniqueness, it is
here in the Southern Bahamas
where great potential exists to
meet the demand of the
emerging eco or nature
tourism market.

The World Tourism Organ-
isation and International Eco-
Tourism Society (www.eco-
tourism.com) say the follow-
ing about international
tourism:

© since the 1990s, ecotourism
has been growing 20 per cent —
34 per cent a year

¢ in 2004, ecotourism/nature
tourism was growing globally
three times faster than the
tourism industry as a whole

¢ sun-and-sand resort
tourism has now “matured as a
market” and its growth is pro-
jected to remain flat. In con-
trast, “experiential” tourism—
which encompasses eco-
tourism, nature, heritage, cul-
tural, and soft adventure

tourism, as well as sub-sectors
such as rural and community
tourism—is among the sectors
expected to grow most quick-
ly over the next two decades

¢ the United Nations Envi-
ronment Programme (UNEP)
and Conservation Interna-
tional have indicated that most
of tourism’s expansion is
occurring in and around the
world’s remaining natural
areas

¢ sustainable tourism could
grow to 25 per cent of the
world’s travel market within
six years

¢ analysts predict a growth
in eco-resorts and hotels, and a
boom in nature tourism — a
sector already growing at 20
per cent a year — and suggest
early converts to sustainable
tourism will make market
gains

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that international travellers are

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 11

economy in the Bahamas



Region Land Area (Square Miles) Stopover Visitors
Southern Bahamas ..................00005 OG) dau os ab bie basen oceans 25,319*
(Mayaguana, Crooked Is, Inagua, Acklins)

Leeward Islands .......... 0.000.000.0000 cee BAG. ofr ateieh aiden sa cee ees 427,183
(Montserrat, St Kitts and Nevis, Antigua,

Barbuda, Anguilla)

Windward Islands..........0.0.... 000000. ee OL dag peeeien aa. oat adeees od 560,796

(Grenada, St Lucia, Dominica, St Vincent
and the Grenadines)

Virgin Islands ......... 0.0.0... cee eee eee 194 Loc cee eee 1,051,428
(US and British)
French Antilles... 0.00.00... cc cece eee DO. aie ak ate iss te ees ee ee 1,310,107

(Martinique and Guadeloupe)

Netherland Antilles ....................0.. BOD. aera teach paat epee ge a 1,638,812
(Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao, Saba,

St Eustacius, St Marteen)

* This estimate covers Long Island, Cat Island, the Berry Islands
and Rum Cay (the real number is probably significantly lower)

Source: Caribbean Tourism Organisation 2007 Stopover Visitors

Ministry Of Tourism Statistics 2006

choosing environmentally
responsible destinations and
tour operators and are willing
to pay more money for this
type of experience. It isa
result of supply and demand:
the more natural resources
diminish globally, the more
money people are willing to
spend and the further they are
willing to travel in search of
“natural” experiences.

There are endless opportu-
nities for high-end eco/nature
tourism throughout the
Bahamas, however, the South-
ern Bahamas is unique in the
number of undeveloped
islands, the area's natural
wealth and diversity, the high
cost of traditional infrastruc-
ture and the potential to create
a destination brand that is larg-
er than most Caribbean coun-
tries.

To begin painting this blank
canvas, the government and
authoritative associations need

to provide the brush and paint.
Before any bold new plans can
be marketed to developers,
hoteliers, businesses and ulti-
mately the end consumer, a
recognisable brand needs to
be built. An eco/nature prod-
uct cannot be authentic if there
is no underlying platform
ensuring consistency. This can
be achieved through a process
of careful zoning, national
park expansion and the cre-
ation of a rating system to
ensure businesses are meeting
the criteria of an authentic
green product.

When Costa Rica first began
marketing itself as a natural
destination, resorts where
jumping onboard and using
the label "eco" on their prod-
uct. Soon, exit surveys showed
that many visitors were disap-
pointed with the product, as it
was not the eco/nature experi-
ence they had been expecting.
Authorities came up with a

rating system (www.turismo-
sostenible.com) which was
applied to hotels and resorts.
This not only helped potential
visitors choose their product,
but also encouraged proper-
ties to improve within the
guidelines of the countries’
brand (which is now their
identity).

Although such "green con-
cepts" are not yet mainstream,
they have been used in vari-
ous locations around the world
for many years and all indica-
tors show the market is grow-
ing faster than the traditional
sun, sand and sea product.
Where the Caribbean is con-
cerned, no country has taken
the lead in this market the way
Costa Rica has in Central
America. The opportunities
are here but we must have a
plan because timing is every-
thing where competition is a
factor. The blank canvas can
begin to take form.

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Perry Christie slams Tribune article

FROM page one

missing in 1983 while piloting a
flight from Exuma to Nassau.

His father, Chauncey Tynes
Sr, told The Tribune that he
believes his son was murdered
because he knew too much of
the association between Sir
Lynden and the Colombian
drug czar Joe Lehder.

Mr Christie, however, said:
“Like it or not, and no matter
what else one may think of him,
Lynden Pindling is the father
of this nation. That is not an
opinion, it is fact.”

“Now, does this mean that
Sir Lynden’s achievements are
so grand and great that he
should somehow get a free pass
and be rendered immune from
criticism for his failures and
shortcomings? Of course not.
But what it does mean is that
as ‘Father of the Nation’, as the
leader of the struggle for free-
dom in the Bahamas, as the
man who presided over the cre-
ation of the most prosperous
middle class in this region of
the world, as the man who led
the way in creating educational
opportunities for black Bahami-
ans, it means that Sir Lynden is

oA OASIS



revered and deeply respected
and remembered with fondness
and yes, even gratitude by
many, many thousands of
Bahamians.

“And because Sir Lynden,
even in death — indeed espe-
cially now in death — is so
regarded, it is important that
the sensibilities of those who

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remember him in the way that I
have just described be respect-
ed.”

Criticising a dead person is
one thing, the PLP leader said,
but “desecrating his memory is
quite another.”

“Making a case against him
is one thing, but using lies and
falsehoods and fables and doing
it in a nasty, low-down way is
quite another thing.

“John Marquis can write
what he likes — and I will
defend his right to write what
he likes because that is all a part
of the freedoms we fought for
— but as a writer, and even
more so as a guest in this coun-
try, someone who is here not
by entitlement but by a privi-
lege accorded him, he really
should know better than to
come into someone else’s home
and viciously assault the dignity
and sensibilities of those who
live here,” he said.

Addressing the Insight arti-
cle itself, Mr Christie said he is
convinced Mr Marquis does not
personally believe a single word
he wrote.

“It is shameful that he would
exploit an aging man who
understandably still grieves over
the loss of his son and who has
clearly tried to resolve the mys-
tery of his son’s disappearance
by filling in the holes with all
manner of speculation that has
absolutely no foundation in fact.

“Let me say, however, that I
have nothing but sympathy for
Mr Tynes’ loss and the restless-











ness for answers that continues
to exercise his imagination after
all these years. In reading Mr
Marquis’s article, however, it
should be clear to anyone of
even the slightest intellect that
Mr Tynes is dealing not in the
currency of facts but in fanta-
sy,” the former prime minister
said.

Mr Christie said that the sug-
gestion that Sir Lynden was
somehow involved in the disap-
pearance of Mr Tynes’ son is
not supported by even so much
as a shred of evidence.

“There is nothing whatsoev-
er to support it, as Mr Marquis
himself well knows. I can only
repeat how very sad it is too see
a good gentleman’s grief
exploited in the shameful way
that Mr Marquis has done.

“The rest of the Insight arti-
cle is as full of falsehood and
fantasy as the main line of the
narrative that I have just dealt
with. Indeed some of it, frankly,
is demonstrably false,” Mr
Christie said.

Giving an example of a false-
hood found in the article, the
PLP leader named the part of
the story that addresses the
original plan for the Black
Tuesday protest in 1965.

“Tt says that the plan called
for the Speaker of the House,
the late Bobby Symonette, to
be bodily thrown out of the
House of Assembly instead of
the mace and hour glass. Mr
Marquis, quoting Mr Tynes,
says that this plan was even

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debated at the Council level of
the PLP.

“Well, did Mr Marquis try
to corroborate that story by
speaking to any other members
of the Council at the time?
Isn’t that what journalists are
supposed to do?

“He could, for example, have
called the present Governor-
General Arthur D Hanna, or
Sir Arthur Foulkes, or Sir
Orville Turnquest, or Sir Clif-
ford Darling, or Maurice
Moore, or Paul Adderley, or
Warren Levarity, or any one of
the scores of others who are still
around and who were high-
ranking council members of the
PLP at the time and who could
quite easily confirm that the sto-
ry is complete nonsense; that
there was never any plan to
inflict violence upon anyone,
least of all Bobby Symonette,”
Mr Christie said.

The PLP leader said that the
historical record of exactly what
took place on Black Tuesday
demonstrates the great care that
was taken in the planning of the
whole protest to avoid violence
of any kind.

“T suspect, however, that Mr
Marquis did not bother to check
that particular story because if it
was revealed to be false — as
indeed it is from start to finish
— it would call into question
Mr Tynes’ credibility on every-
thing else he had to say. For Mr
Marquis and The Tribune, that
simply would not do. Far better
then to just go with the false-
hood and leave it at that.”

Mr Christie further said that
the part of the story about Sir
Lynden holding secret meetings
with Robert Mugabe in the late
1960s to learn “how to keep
power in an outwardly democ-
ratic framework” is absolute
nonsense.

“To begin with, in the late
60s, Mr Mugabe knew absolute-
ly nothing about ‘how to keep
power in an outwardly democ-
ratic society’ because he had no
power at all and Rhodesia (as
Zimbabwe was then known)
was anything but democratic. It
was instead a white minority
ruled, apartheid-ridden country
led by Ian Smith.

“Robert Mugabe therefore
could not have helped Pindling
on that score. Indeed he would
not even have been accessible
to Pindling because in the late
60s Mugabe was either in jail
as a political prisoner or in the
bush fighting a guerrilla war.

“Mr Mugabe did not, in fact,
come to power until the 1980s,
by which time Pindling would
have been in power for many
years already. These are sim-
ple, well-known historical facts,
so what in the world is John
Marquis talking about?” Mr

Christie asked.

The former prime minister
also said that the story con-
cerning Donald "Nine" Rolle
— “who again for Mr. Marquis
is now conveniently dead” — to
the effect that he was dis-
patched by Sir Lynden to assas-
sinate Mr Tynes is “too foolish
to be taken seriously, and yet
Mr Marquis retells this story as
if it is supported by facts. It is
supported by nothing whatso-
ever.”

“The only thing Mr Tynes
says is that Nine tried to hire
him as a taxi— from the airport
no less in broad daylight and in
plain sight — but that it was
Nine’s intention to do him in
on Pindling’s orders. Based on
what? Neither Mr Tynes nor Mr
Marquis offers any evidence,”
Mr Christie said.

The PLP leader said that the
allegations of bribes or involve-
ment with drugs was also not
supported by any evidence in
the article.

“The most despicable part
of the entire article, however,
centres on the old, tired, worn-
out and thoroughly false and
offensive story about Pindling
not being a Bahamian, that he
was either a Haitian or a
Jamaican, that he didn’t show
up in the Bahamas until he was
a youngster.

“This is a fable that has been
debunked so many times before
— including in Professor
Michael Craton’s definitive
biography of Sir Lynden — that
it is surprising that Mr Marquis
would try to bring it up again,
courtesy of Mr Tynes. Anyone
who reads what Mr Marquis
attributes to Mr Tynes is left to
wonder why in the world such
rantings would be thought wor-
thy of dissemination.

“This is all nonsense, as Mr
Marquis well knows,” Mr
Christie said.

“T will end as I began, by
roundly condemning Mr Mar-
quis and The Tribune for pub-
lishing an article that most
Bahamians would find, and
have found, to be offensive in
the extreme.

“Mr Marquis should be
ashamed of himself for retelling
the falsehoods and tall tales that
litter his article from beginning
to end.

“If his object was to sell
newspapers at the expense of
the truth, he has grandly suc-
ceeded but if he thought that
he could really turn the
Bahamian people away from
the respect they have for the
memory of the greatest
Bahamian of all times and the
Father of the Bahamian nation,
he has miserably failed.

“That memory will endure,”
he said.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Widow of man
who went
missing on flight
hopes to collect
$350,000
FROM page one

Mrs Moree was left to bring
up her son Donald Jr alone
after receiving a $157,000
basic life insurance pay-out
from Imperial Life.

However, she was unable to
collect a double indemnity
payment of $100,000 because
she had no proof her husband
died in an accident.

Now Mr Treco has taken up
her cause — and he confi-
dently predicted yesterday
that she would collect more
than $350,000 based on ten
per cent interest over 26 years.

“When she received the
original amount, she had to
pay $35,000 to her lawyer,”
Mr Treco said yesterday. “She
didn’t get the double indem-
nity payout because she had
no proof her husband had
died in an accident.

“However, he was ona
flight from Exuma and he has-
n’t been seen since. We can
therefore assume he died by
accident because murder is
regarded as an accident under
insurance law.”

Mr Treco is confident he
will secure Mrs Moree’s mon-
ey because of an Imperial Life
letter dated September, 1990,
confirming that the acciden-
tal death benefit was being
withheld pending formal
proof.

Six years later — 13 years
after Mr Moree went missing
— the company confirmed it
was unable to release the rest
of the money without a police
report confirming he died
accidentally.

Mr Treco said that the lapse
of time now made it “pretty
much open and shut” that the
money would have to be paid
with interest.

“In the circumstances, it can
be assumed the man died by
causes other than normal,”
said Mr Treco. “The family
have an assumed death cer-
tificate so I will assemble the
details and make the claim.

“The statute of limitations
doesn’t apply in this case
because the company
acknowledged the original
payment was made.”

Mr Treco said three lawyers
had been asked to handle the
case over the years, but noth-
ing had transpired. Now he
firmly believes Mrs Moree will
get due compensation for the
loss of her husband.

Last night, a delighted Mrs
Moree welcomed the news,
saying: “I’m hoping now that I
can retire.”

Her husband, a friend of
Chauncey Tynes Jr since his
schooldays, was warned just a
few days before his disap-
pearance that he had better
keep his mouth shut “or your
wife will become a widow.”
Two men had appeared on
their doorstep to issue the
death threat.

Mrs Moree also recalled
that an attempt had been
made on his life a few days
before when he was knocked
off his bicycle.

He had told friends he
planned to hand over to the
DEA a list of people involved
in Lehder’s drug racket.

On the list was Sir Lynden
Pindling, an official from the
United States and a Colom-
bian from Cartagena whose
name she could not recall.

“JT think he was trying to
extricate himself from the
drugs situation at the time of
his death,” she said. “All he
ever said to me was: ‘The less

79

you know the better’.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 13

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS
7 aaa ;



MINISTER of
Youth, Sports
and Culture
Desmond
Bannister
addresses
students at the
Uriah McPhee
primary school
during Common-
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celebrations

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THE Bahamas reaffirmed
its commitment to the princi-
ples of the Commonwealth
as it joined in observing
Commonwealth Day during
an official flag raising cere-
mony on Monday.

The 60th anniversary of
Commonwealth Day was
commemorated in the cere-
mony at the Foreign Affairs
building on East Hill Street.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna was among those
attending. Members of the
Diplomatic and Honorary
Consular Corps, senior gov-
ernment officials and mem-
bers of the Bahamas Nation-
al Children’s’ Choir under
the directorship of Patricia
Bazard were also in atten-
dance.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette in his
keynote address said that this
year’s celebration is espe-
cially significant because it
marks a major milestone in
the Commonwealth of
Nations.

On April 28, 1949, the
Commonwealth Heads of
Government issued the Lon-
don Declaration allowing
independent republics to
remain a part of the Com-
monwealth. Commonwealth
Day was subsequently cele-
brated on the second Mon-
day in March every year
since 1949. The Bahamas
joined the family of nations
upon Independence on July
10, 1973.

The Commonwealth is a
group of 53 nations that

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“We are keenly
aware of the
primary aim of the
Commonwealth
of Nations
to promote
understanding on
global issues, to
encourage interna-
tional cooperation
and to improve
the lives of its two
billion citizens.”



Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette

share common values and
goals such as the promotion
of democracy, human rights,
good governance, the rule of
law, individual liberty, free
trade and world peace.

“We are keenly aware of
the primary aim of the Com-
monwealth of Nations to pro-
mote understanding on glob-
al issues, to encourage inter-
national cooperation and to
improve the lives of its two
billion citizens,” Mr Symon-
ette said.

“Towards this end, the
Commonwealth has made
tremendous strides in the
promotion of democracy, fos-
tering of good governance; it
has encouraged and facilitat-
ed economic growth and
human development and
continues its efforts in the
areas of trade, education and
the environment.”

Referring to a “significant”
example of the organisation’s
sense of unity, Mr Symonette
said that the Commonwealth
Fund for Technical Coopera-
tion (CFTC) was established
to provide technical assis-
tance to member countries.

“Although contribution is
voluntary, most members,
including the Bahamas, con-
tribute financial resources, as
we, along with our Common-
wealth family of nations,
recognise that these
resources are aimed at the
mutual benefit of all mem-
bers.

“This is especially the case
for developing countries and
small island states that face
challenges in the areas of
human and _ financial
resources and technical and
technological capacity,” Mr
Symonette said.

“The Bahamas has and
continues to demonstrate its
commitment to the affairs of
the Commonwealth,” he said.

As an example, Mr Symon-
ette pointed to the 1985
CHOGM held in the
Bahamas at which the Com-
monwealth Accord on South
Africa was adopted and
played a pivotal role in the
dismantling of the apartheid
regime.

In contemplating this
year’s theme, “Serving a New
Generation”, and reflecting
on the past 60 years, Mr
Symonette said that it is espe-
cially important to consider
the enormous contributions
the Commonwealth has
made towards the develop-
ment of the youth.

“Tt is the effort which has
helped shaped those citizens
whom we now consider the
new generation,” he said.

“It also affords us the
opportunity to reaffirm our
resolve to address the many
global challenges facing us,
both as individuals and as a
country.”





THURSDAY, MARCH



TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

SAC Douglas Palacious jumps 6.94 to win.

A gallant Davis Cup

HE Bahamas

team turned in

another gallant

effort in the first
round of the American Zone II
Davis Cup tie in Paraguay over
the weekend.

Unfortunately, the effort was
not’t good enough to enable the
team to secure the victory.

The final result was a 4-1
decision that forced the
Bahamas to now host
Guatemala in a “must win” tie
in the second round at the
National Tennis Center over
the Independence holiday
weekend.

Both Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Associations president Wesley
Rolle and team captain John
Farrington alluded to the fact
that more consideration must
be given to the team’s prepara-
tion going into each tie.

The team of Devin Mullings,
Timothy Neilly, Bjorn Munroe
and Marvin Rolle was actually
scheduled to stay at least a week
in Paraguay getting acclimatized
to the conditions, but they end-
ed up only spending about two
days before the competition got
started.

Certainly not sufficient time,
considering the fact that the
players had to endure a long
journey to get to Paraguay.

Rolle indicated that they now
have to look at the possibility of
participating in a mini camp pri-
or to the tie.

Farrington suggested going
into the country where they
play a week earlier than they
normally do.

Perhaps an idea they should
consider is trying to play togeth-
er as a tearm on the circuit, espe-
cially with the current players
all basically residing in the Flori-

Felipé Major/Tribune staff
m SEE PAGE 17



STUBBS



OPINION

da area.

The latter might be a little
hard to accomplish considering
the fact that the players first
have to secure a berth into the
Satellite tournaments because
of the fact that none of them
are yet on the ATP tour.

But it would be good to see
any combination coming togeth-
er and playing s a team so that
they can keep hat unity togeth-
er before they try to wait until
tournament time to get it
together.

Over the years, the Bahamas
have suffered the same type of
fate in basketball where they
have assembled the team at the

12,

2009

INSIDE ¢ International sports news

i GSSSA Basketball

Lions roar to
win series 2-0

JUNIOR GIRLS

#] H.0 Nash Lions - 39
#2 T.A Thompson
Scorpions - 10

he Lions gave up

just 20 points over

the course of the

Championship
series and handily took home
another title for the school that
has become the unquestioned
powerhouse in junior girls’ bas-
ketball.

The Scorpions actually
responded early and trailed just
5-3 after the first three minutes
of gameplay, but a quick 14-0
run helped the Lions reaffirm
the dominance they established
in game one.

A Lakishna Munroe three
pointer capped the run and gave
the Lions a 17-3 advantage.

They led 21-7 at the half.

In game one, H.O Nash held
the Scorpions scoreless in the
second half, and in game two
they nearly accomplished a sim-
ilar feat, giving up just one field
goal and three points.

After the Scorpions top scor-
er, Shanae Armbrister was
ejected late in the first half, T.A
Thompson struggled to find any
semblance of an offensive flow.

Regine Curtis led all scorers
with 12 points, Munroe and
Randya Kemp each finished
with seven while Kaleshia Laing
added four.

Curtis said being apart of a
constantly dominant Lions
teams forces her and her team-
mates to grow each year.

“T think we had a good game
and good year,” she said,
“Nothing really changed from

last minute and tried to be suc-
cessful.

It just doesn't work out that
way.

Athletics realized that and
over the last couple of years,
they have pt together a train-
ing camp for their athletes to
attend prior to going to the
World Championships or the
Olympic Games.

We've seen the result of that
with the Golden Girls’ 4 x 100
metre relay team winning
medals at the two prestigious
international events.

Camp

he men's 4 x 400 relay
have also benefited
from the camp.

I'm a firm believer that where
there's unity, there's strength.
So unless we get our athletes
together to train as a team
before they head off to any of
the major international events,
we will continue to end up
falling short.

It's a blessing in disguise that
e get to host the second round
of the tie against Guatemala.
We can probably look at their
preparation for the tie when
they come to town and see if
we're doing anything different
from them.

But having already beaten
them in 2007, we know what
they are capable of doing it
again and so we have to ensure
that we make the necessary
adjustments at home to pull off
another victory and avoid being
relegated to zone III again.

We have a talented bunch of
young players in the system and
the BLTA is going to have to
find a way to not only maximize
their talent, but ensure that the



H.O Nash’s Randya Kemp pulls up for a jumpshot in the Lions’ 48-14 win
over the S.C McPherson Sharks at the D.W Davis Gymnasium. With the
win the Lions advanced to the championship round where they defeated

the T.A Thompson Scorpions.

last year to this, every year is
like the same for us but we just
try to get better each year.”
Munroe, the team’s sharp-
shooting forward said her team

effort

fans come out to watch the high
calibre of tennis right in our
backyard.

Last year when we hosted
Paraguay in July, the fan sup-
port was not what it used to be
when roger Smith, Mark
Knowles, Mark Merklein and
even John Farrington played.
There used to be standing room
only.

These players deserve our
support. Sure they're not at the
level of Smith, Knowles,
Merklein or Farrington, but
they are getting there.

And eventually they will pull
us back into zone one.

But it's going to take some
time and it's going to take the
support of the Bahamian peo-
ple, letting them know that we
are fully behind them, in order
for them to achieve that goal.

The team, from all indica-
tions, didn't have any fan sup-
port in Paraguay. So even when
the chips were down, they prob-
ably didn't hear any familiar
English-speaking voice cheer-
ing them on.

No wonder why it was such a
tough task for them in
Paraguay, which was reported-
ly hotter than it was in the
Bahamas.

Good thing their matches
were played in the evening,
rather than the day.

Playing on the red clay court
didn't help either. That was why
it was so important to get into
Paraguay in sufficient time to
get acclimatized.

But as Mullings said, the tie is
over and done with.

There's nothing that they can
do about it, but learn from the
mistakes that they made and
move on to the next tie.

So let's get ready for
Guatemala.

never suffers a letdown because
their coach, Pattie Johnson,
keeps them focused and
grounded.

“We just wanted to play hard



and come out here and do what
we needed to do because we
worked very very hard this sea-
son,” she said, “Sometimes we
get confident because we know
this was our biggest competi-
tion and we won easily once we
played hard.”

Paula Green led the Scorpi-
ons with five points.

Series tied 1-1

JUNIOR BOYS

#2 D.W Davis Pitbulls -
#1 T.A Thompson
Scorpions - 50

In a game where calls went
against the Scorpions for much
of the evening, with two starters
fouled out and another ejected,
the Pitbulls capitalized down
the stretch and forced a third
and deciding game in the cham-
pionship series.

The Pitbulls overcame a 10
point fourth quarter deficit with
a 19 point turnaround within
the game’s final five minutes.

The Scorpions led 48-38 on
an Angelo Lockhart basket,
with 5:05 remaining.

Shortly thereafter, Roosevelt
Whylly picked up his fifth foul,
joining Jermaine Sturrup, who
fouled out two plays earlier, and
Velnir Desir who was ejected
in the third quarter after he
traded elbows with Alvin St.
Fleur.

The Pitbulls’ full court press
took advantage of the Scorpi-
ons’ inexperienced bench and
forced a series of turnovers in

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009



TRIBUNE SPORTS



m@ By BOB BAUM
AP Sports Writer



PHOENIX (AP) — Now
that Dallas has pulled away
from the Phoenix Suns in the
race for the final playoff spot
in the Western Conference, the
Mavericks are setting their
sights higher.

Dallas, behind a 34-point per-
formance from Dirk Nowitzki,
beat Phoenix 122-117 on Tues-
day night to widen its lead over
the Suns to five games for the
eighth and final spot in the
West.

"Make no mistake, though,"
Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle
said. "We're trying to move up.
We're not just trying to hang in
this thing. We're trying to move
up the seeding.”

By opening a four-game road
trip with a victory, Dallas is just
a half-game behind Denver for
the seventh through fifth spots
in the conference.

Nowitzki scored 23 in the sec-
ond half to send Phoenix to its
fifth straight loss. The Suns’
Steve Nash said his team came
out flat in the second half,
something he couldn't explain
considering the importance of
the contest.

"Dirk played great. He was
unstoppable,” Nash said, "but
you know I felt like our output
in the second half wasn't nearly
up to where it could have been.
Our concentration, I felt, could
have improved a lot. I'm very
disappointed with the way we
played and competed in the sec-
ond half."

Jason Terry added 25 points
and Jose Barea 16 for Dallas,
which snapped a five-game road
losing streak. The Mavericks
play at Portland Wednesday
night.

"The first one is very big for
our confidence and now tomor-
row night we're going to face
another huge challenge,” Terry
said. "This was good because
now we can keep Phoenix in
our rearview and keep pushing
forward."

Nowitzki said it was impor-
tant for Dallas to win on the
road, something the Mavs had-
n't done since Feb. 2 at Orlan-
do.

"We know we can beat any-
body at home," he said, "but I
think the good teams and the
great teams find a way to win
big games on the road. That was
definitely a big game for us
tonight."

Shaquille O'Neal scored 21
on 9-of-10 shooting for Phoenix
to pass Elvin Hayes for sixth on
the NBA's career scoring list.
Nash had 23 points and 13
assists for the Suns. Matt Barnes
added 21 points.

"Tt was a tough loss and we're
really disappointed,” Phoenix
coach Alvin Gentry said, "but
we still have 18 games to play.
This was not the difference of us
being in the playoffs and not
being in the playoffs."

Dallas took final control with
a 10-2 run late in the fourth
quarter. Nowitzki made a pair
of outside jumpers to start the
spurt, then Jason Kidd sank two
3-pointers and it was 112-99
with 3:08 to play.

O'Neal got his 13th point of
the night with 1:34 left in the
first half to pass Hayes. With
27,322 points, O'Neal needs 88
to take over fifth place from
Moses Malone.

"Pretty good,” O'Neal said,
"but I'd like to have a win
tonight. All that stuff, it's cool,
but it's not really important. It's
all about winning.”

Jazz 112, Pacers 100

At Indianapolis, Mehmet
Okur scored 24 points and Utah
won its 12th straight. Paul Mill-
sap finished with 22 points and
nine rebounds, Ronnie Brewer
scored 18 points and Deron
Williams had 12 assists for the
Jazz, who moved closer to the
franchise record of 15 consecu-
tive victories.

Troy Murphy scored 23
points, tying a Pacers home
record with seven 3-pointers,
and grabbed 13 rebounds.

ye
(tlie

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Nowitzki scores 34 to lead
Mavs past Suns 122-117



DIRK NOWITZKI works into New Orleans Hornets forward James Posey in the first half of a game in New Orleans...

Cavaliers 87, Clippers 83

At Los Angeles, LeBron
James recorded his second
straight triple-double with 32
points, 13 rebounds and 11
assists, Mo Williams hit a go-
ahead 3-pointer with 6.6 sec-
onds to play, and Cleveland ral-

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lied from a 19-point, fourth-
quarter deficit.

Al Thornton and Zach Ran-
dolph each had 20 points for
the Clippers.

They used their 30th differ-
ent starting lineup, with center
Chris Kaman returning to
action after missing 48 games
because of plantar fascitis in his
left foot.

Spurs 100, Bobcats 86

At San Antonio, Tim Dun-
can had 18 points and 11
rebounds, and the Spurs
stopped Charlotte's franchise-
record winning streak at six.

Raja Bell and Emeka Okafor
each had 16 points for the Bob-
cats, who are a game behind
eighth-place Chicago in their
bid to make the playoffs for the
first time since joining the NBA
in 2004.

(AP Photo: Bill Haber)

Knicks 120, Bucks 112

At Milwaukee, Nate Robin-
son scored 10 of his 32 points in
the final five minutes, Larry
Hughes added a season-high 39,
and New York won on the road
for just the eighth time this sea-
son.

Charlie Villanueva scored 32
for the Bucks, who came into
Tuesday's game clinging to the
final playoff spot in the East
despite an injury-plagued sea-
son.

Thunder 99, Kings 98

At Sacramento, Calif., Jeff
Green and Russell Westbrook
each scored 24 points, and
Oklahoma City held on for its
fifth victory in six games.

Spencer Hawes had 20 points,
10 rebounds and five assists for
the Kings, and Francisco Garcia
made four 3-pointers and
scored 18.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 682/09
STORAGE TANK #11
CLEANING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236



NBA Today

@ By Associated Press
SCOREBOARD

Thursday, March 12

Los Angeles Lakers at San
Antonio (8pm EDT). The
Spurs bring a three-game
winning streak into the
matchup between the teams
with the best records in the
Western Conference. Los
Angeles, which beat San
Antonio in last year's con-
ference finals, expects to
have Lamar Odom back
after he was suspended for
Wednesday's game at Hous-
ton.

STARS

Tuesday

— Dirk Nowitzki, Maver-
icks, scored 23 of his 34
points in the second half and
grabbed 13 rebounds in Dal-
las' 122-117 victory over
Phoenix.

— Larry Hughes and Nate
Robinson, Knicks. Hughes
scored a season-high 39
points and Robinson had 10
of his 32 in the final five min-
utes of New York's 120-112
victory in Milwaukee.

— LeBron James, Cava-
liers, recorded his second
straight triple-double with 32
points, 13 rebounds and 11
assists as Cleveland rallied
from a 19-point deficit to
beat the Los Angeles Clip-
pers 87-83.

SUSPENDED

The NBA suspended Lak-
ers forward Lamar Odom
one game without pay Tues-
day for leaving the bench
area during an altercation.
NBA executive vice presi-
dent of operations Stu Jack-
son ruled Odom left the
"immediate vicinity" of the
bench after teammate Trevor
Ariza's hard foul on Port-
land's Rudy Fernandez with
2.2 seconds remaining in the
third quarter Monday
touched off a skirmish
between the teams. Odom
will miss the Lakers’ game in
Houston on Wednesday.

STREAKING

Utah's winning streak
reached a dozen and inched
closer to the longest in fran-
chise history with a 112-100
victory over the Indiana Pac-
ers on Tuesday.

The Jazz can match the
team record of 15 in a row,
set twice during the 1996-97
season, by sweeping road
games at Atlanta, Miami and
Orlando.

SAFELY HOME

Trail Blazers rookie Rudy
Fernandez was released from
a hospital Tuesday afternoon
after spending the night in
the hospital with a bruised
chest and injured right hip
after a hard foul by the Lak-
ers' Trevor Ariza that led to
a brief skirmish between the
teams Monday.

Fernandez was fouled on
a fast break during Portland's
111-94 victory. The Spaniard
was taken from the court on
a stretcher with his neck in
a brace. He was listed as
doubtful for Portland's game
against Dallas on Wednes-
day night.

SNAPPED

The longest winning streak
in Charlotte Bobcats' history
was snapped at six games
Tuesday with a 100-86 loss
to San Antonio. The Bobcats
are in position for the first
playoff berth in franchise his-
tory, sitting one game behind
eighth-place Chicago in the
East.

SETTING SUNS?

Phoenix fell farther back
in the playoff race with a 122-
117 home loss to Dallas on
Tuesday. The Suns have lost
five straight and fell five
games behind the Mavericks
for the eighth and final play-
off spot in the West with 18
games to play.

SPEAKING

"We haven't won a road
game it seems like in two
months. That's how it feels. I
think our last road win was in
Orlando (on February 2). We
know we can beat anybody
at home, but I think the good
teams and the great teams
find a way to win big games
on the road. That was defi-
nitely a big game for us
tonight."

— Dirk Nowitzki, who
scored 34 points as Dallas
beat Phoenix 122-117 to open
a five-game lead over the
Suns for the eighth and final
playoff spot in the Western
Conference



TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 17

m SSA Delete | PHOTO SPECIAL
Lions win

series 2 _ 0 21ST BAHAMAS ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT SECONDARY SCHOOL’S RACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS





FROM page 15

the fourth quarter.

William Ferguson capped a
12-0 run for the Pitbulls with a
lay-up that gave his team a 50-
48 advantage.

A pair of free throws by
Lockhart tied the game at 50
but the Scorpions failed to score
again over the final 3:04 of the
game.

Prince Boodle, led the Pit-
bulls with 16 points, Ferguson
added 13 and Alcot Fox fin-
ished with 11.

Roosevelt Whylly led all scor-
ers with 20 points while Mavin
Saunders finished with 15.

In a closely contested first
half, the game was tied at 14
after the first quarter and the
Scorpions led 25-23 at the half.

Their led grew to as much as
11 in the third quarter with
Whylly shouldering the offen-
sive load.

Ferguson did much of the
same for the Pitbulls in the
game’s final quarter, scoring
nine of his team’s 22 points.

US moves
up to 17th in

FIFA world SACLAUREN CHARLTON clears the bar.
kings

a
ZURICH (AP) — The Unit-
ed States moved up three spots
to 17th in the March FIFA
rankings, the highest the Amer-

icans have been on the list since
August 2007.
Following a 2-0 victory over

a
Mexico last month in a World
Cup qualifier at Columbus,
Ohio, the United States rose for
the fourth straight month. Mex-

ico Went up One spot to 23rd.
The next two World Cup
qualifiers for the Americans are

March 28 at No. 106 El Sal-
vador and April 1 against No.
75 Trinidad and Tobago at
Nashville, Tenn.

European champion Spain

remained first for the ninth con-
secutive month. The top seven
was unchanged, with Germany
second, followed by the Nether-
lands, World Cup champion
Italy, Brazil, Argentina and
Croatia. Russia moved up one
spot to eighth, England dropped

t inth d Port 1 climbed claiming yet another title. . . .
two pore Oth. ‘Turkey ai The St. Augustine’s College Big Red Machine sit atop

to 11th. the leaderboard on day one with 426.5 points, 126 points
ahead of the second placed Queen’s College Comets with

320.5 points.
eatt [4 ali The Big Red Machine leads three of the four contested

divisions, the Bantam, Intermediate and Junior Divisions,

Ow @ st Fi al d while the Comets hold a slim advantage in the Bantam divi-
sion.

The 122 member Big Red Machine is looking to continue

its dominance of the event, having captured every meet title
to host since the event’s inception in 1988. AQUNAS COLLEGE'S Ashlee Bain clears the bar during the high jump.
The meet continues today at the Thomas A. Robinson
MLS Cup Stadium, beginning at 9am.

NEW YORK (AP) — The
home of the expansion Seattle
Sounders will host this year's
MLS Cup on November 22.

Major League Soccer says the
Sounders have sold more than
20,000 season ticket packages
at Qwest Field. The franchise
starts play March 19.

The stadium will host a first-
round doubleheader of the
CONCACAF Gold Cup on
July 4. "The stadium was
designed with soccer in mind
and we believe the buzz sur-
rounding Sounders FC will add
to the electricity at our champi-
onship game," MLS commis-
sioner Don Garber said
Wednesday.



fter Day one of the 21st Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Secondary School’s rack
and Field Championships, the meet’s peren-
nial powerhouse appears well on its way to



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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Proposed draft of National

Letters from several |

countries voice
concern for Detention
Centre detainees

FROM page one

seekers are not returned to
their native land without a
fair refugee procedure.

Their pleas came after
human rights watchdog
group Amnesty Internation-
al appealed to concerned
members of the internation-
al community to write to gov-
ernment after allegations of
abuse and inhumane condi-
tions were published in The
Tribune.

"Tam deeply concerned at
these reports and respectful-
ly call on you to provide
appropriate medical treat-
ment to these detainees and
an immediate, thorough and
independent investigation
into these allegations, ensur-
ing that anyone found
responsible is brought to jus-
tice," a letter writer from
Canada said in a letter
addressed to Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette.

In a letter addressed to
Minister of State for Immi-
gration Branville McCartney,
one writer from Madrid said,
"Iam concerned about the
fate of asylum seekers, who
are arrested in the Detention
Centre. Reportedly they are
tortured and the detention
centre is crowded.

"Please publish the results
of the mentioned investiga-
tors and bring the (alleged)
torturers to justice, provide
that asylum seekers and oth-
er prisoners are not tortured,
provide that imprisonment is
only taken as (the) last facil-
ity to treat rejected asylum
seckers and illegal immi-
grants, and allow non-gov-
ernmental organisations to
inspect the prisons."

Meanwhile, some
detainees who sought to






















[>

bring attention to the condi-
tions at the Detention Centre
claim they are now being
denied visitors. They say this
is because they spoke out
about beatings and human
rights violations at the facili-
ty.
The detainees also claim
that they no longer have
access to newspapers, and
feel this is part of an effort to
prevent them from seeing
what has been written about
the Detention Centre in The
Tribune.

However, detainees said
there have been some
improvements at the centre
since going public with their
complaints. Officials report-
edly brought new mattresses,
washers and dryers to the
facility — but these items
have not been made avail-
able to the detainees.

There have also been
reports of food improve-
ments at the facility.

“By doing all this they are
admitting they were wrong
before,” according to one
detainee, who spoke to The
Tribune by phone yesterday.
His name has been withheld
to protect his identity. He
was referring to the initial
reports released by the
Department of Immigration
in which the claims of abuse
and poor conditions were
denied.

Last Monday week Direc-
tor of Immigration Jack
Thompson, Commodore of
the Defence Force Clifford
Scavella, accompanied by
representatives from the
department of social services,
the clergy, and psychologist
Dr David Allen toured the
holding facility.

Their findings have yet to
be made public.

FROM page one

the Scheme.

"We are consulting, under
the chairmanship of the prime
minister, with all of the labour
unions of the country through
their umbrella unions, and
the Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil to get their suggestions and
input with respect to the
national Unemployment Ben-
efit Scheme," Minister of
Labour, Senator Dion Foulkes
told The Tribune. "We hope
to get firm recommendations
from all of the groups before
we table the relevant legisla-
tion."

According to the senator,
any recommendations coming
out of the forum may alter the
proposals depending on if gov-
ernment and the stakeholders
come to a consensus. He
added that a draft of the pro-
posal would be circulated to
all of the relevant parties
today at a pre-meeting at the
Ministry of Labour.

Itoh mates



The legislation is expected
to be brought to Parliament
when the House of Assembly
resumes on March 25.

Heads of the National Con-
gress of Trade Unions, Trade
Union Congress, The
Bahamas Employers Confed-
eration will also attend the ses-
sions. The meeting in Nassau
will take place at the Police

Headquarters Conference
Centre on Monday, March 16,
at 3 pm, and in Freeport at
Our Lucaya Resort on
Wednesday, March 18, at 10
am.

With unemployment at its
highest in 15 years, both
islands have been hard hit
with a rise in job losses, exac-
erbated by the global eco-
nomic decline. New statistics
released last week show that
around half of all people who
are without work in Grand
Bahama lost their jobs in the
last six months, with 48 per
cent of these people report-
ing having been “laid-off or
dismissed.”

In New Providence, one
third had become jobless in
the same period - 44 per cent
were laid off or dismissed.
Overall, in New Providence,
unemployment among the
134,400-strong labour force
rose from 8.7 per cent in May
of last year to 12.1 per cent,
based on the interim survey
conducted last month.

Unemployment Benefit Scheme

This leaves a total of 16,315
people looking for a job on
this island alone and, in Grand
Bahama, the number of peo-
ple without work jumped to
14.6 per cent, equivalent to
4,195 job hunters in a labour
force of 28,820.

While speaking in Parlia-
ment during the 2008/2009
mid-year budget debate, Mr
Ingraham announced the
unemployment scheme would
be operational by July 1 to
provide eligible persons aid
for up to six and a half
months. Money will be trans-
ferred from an excess fund at
the National Insurance Board
for the programme.

In order to sustain the con-
tinuation of this scheme, gov-
ernment is proposing a new
fee that would require
employees and employers to
contribute about one per cent
of the insurable wage to gov-
ernment.

A tentative date of January
1, 2010 is being considered for
this new tax.

Retired senior police
officer claims Pindling was
born of a Jamaican mother

FROM page one

families of the time when Sir
Lynden was born.

He said Pindling’s father,
Arnold, had arrived in Nassau
from Jamaica as a police offi-
cer. He claimed Mr Pindling
fathered the future prime min-
ister with a Jamaican woman

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who left the Bahamas to
return home.

The boy was sent to Jamaica
for his early education and
returned to Nassau at the age
of eight or nine, he said.

Lynden Pindling was then
raised as the son of Arnold
Pindling and his Bahamian
wife, Viola Pindling, formerly
Bain. According to Mr
Watkins, Viola did not have a
biological child of her own.

He also supported claims
from other sources that Pin-
dling had to swear an affidavit
to formally register his birth
in 1947, when he was nearly
17 years old.

This was around the time
when he left Nassau to attend
law school in London.

“He was born in Nassau in
Hospital Lane,” said Mr
Watkins, who is now writing
a Series of articles recording
his memories of Nassau’s past.

Mr Watkins’ disclosures
came in the aftermath of Mon-
day’s controversial Tribune
Insight article, when former
PLP official Mr Chauncey

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Tynes Sr alleged that the
young Pindling had sworn a
false affidavit to support his
application for a passport.

In 1973, the then prime min-
ister held a press conference
in response to speculation
about his origins when he pro-
duced a birth certificate regis-
tered in Nassau. It was dated
1947 — 17 years after the
event.

He refused to be drawn
when a Tribune reporter asked
whether he had sworn an affi-
davit to support his applica-
tion.

Speculation about Sir Lyn-
den’s birth has swirled around
among East Street families for
decades, with some neighbours
claiming he was born of a
Haitian mother.

However, Mr Watkins
insists both Pindling’s parents
were Jamaican and that he
was, indeed, born in Nassau.

“Apart from that discrepan-
cy, the Insight article was very
good,” he said, “I have known
Chauncey Tynes and his fam-
ily for the best part of 70 years

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and they are truthful, honest
and upright people.

“Viola Pindling was not
Lynden Pindling’s biological
mother. She never had a child
in her life,” Mr Watkins
claimed.

Mr Watkins, a leading fig-
ure in the Abaco secessionist
movement in 1973, also
claimed that the Bahamas
would have gained indepen-
dence in 1970 had the UBP
won the 1967 general election.

He said the 1964 constitu-
tion, which introduced Cabi-
net-style government, was a
preparation for independence
because Britain was eager to
rid itself of its colonies at that
time.

He said he had opposed
independence at the time.
“Thirty-five years down the
line and we still can’t get the
flag straight,” he said.

He blamed corruption and
other societal ills on the break
from Britain.

“The police force is ina
mess because of indepen-
dence,” he added.

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THE TRIBUNE

Wanted man is

arrested by police

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - On Tuesday evening Grand
Bahama police finally apprehended wanted
suspect Shameko Rigby after posting a
reward for his capture and arrest.

Assistant Superintendent Wellborne Boo-
tle said as a result of the public’s assistance,
police arrested Rigby around 10pm in the
Hudson Estates area.

Mr Bootle said during his arrest a 9mm
pistol with four live rounds of ammunition
was found.

Federal money
to come for
Everglades work

m@ WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.

EVERGLADES restoration
will get a boost with the $410 bil-
lion spending package signed by
President Barack Obama, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The president signed the bill
on Wednesday, clearing the way
for nearly $200 million to be spent
largely on projects aimed at help-
ing heal the dying ecosystem.

The vast wetlands and marshes
have long suffered from
encroaching development and
agriculture that contributes fer-
tilizers and pollutants to the
ecosystem.

Efforts to restore more natural
water flow in the Everglades have
been ongoing for decades.

The not-for-profit Everglades
Foundation says federal money
in the spending bill will go toward
several projects, including Kissim-
mee River restoration, Tamiami
Trail work and reinforcing the
aging Herbert Hoover Dike
around Lake Okeechobee.

Rigby escaped police custody on January
11 from the Central Police Station, located at
the Police Headquarter Complex on the
Mall.

He is wanted in connection with several
offences, including assault of a young man in
the Garden Villas area on Saturday.

On Monday, police posted a reward for
the capture of Rigby and Garron Gibson,
who is also wanted for questioning by police.

ASP Bootle said Gibson, 30, remains at
large.

He said the police are appealing to the
public for its assistance in locating the sus-
pect.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 23



A Tg

Soldiers destroy
cocaine labs in
Venezuela



SOLDIERS PATROL a seized laboratory designed to process coca base into cocaine hydrochloride in a rural area
of Puerto Boyaca, in central Colombia, Friday, Feb. 13, 2009. Army officials said they destroyed the laboratory,

built to process as much as seven tons of cocaine per month.

m@ By CARLOS HERNANDEZ
CARACAS, Venezuela

Venezuela's National Guard destroyed an elaborate network
of clandestine cocaine-processing laboratories along the country's
border with Colombia on Tuesday as part of its anti-drug efforts,
according to the Associated Press.

National Guard troops armed with assault rifles secured the
area in the western state of Zulia before explosives were used to
demolish the labs located along the porous 1,400-mile (2,300-kilo-
meter) border that Venezuela shares with Colombia, the world's
largest cocaine producer.

Justice Minister Tareck El Aissami told the state-run Bolivarian
News Agency a day before the operation that troops seized 925 Ibs.
(420 kilos) of cocaine and coca paste, along with chemicals used to
produce cocaine, after discovering the labs.

Journalists were offered a rare look at the labs on Tuesday.

USS. officials say Venezuela is not doing enough to stem the
flow of illegal drugs, particularly cocaine, through its territory.

But President Hugo Chavez says his government is doing every-
thing it can to crack down on drug trafficking along the border.

The socialist leader has taken issue with a U.S. State Department
report issued last month that criticized his government for refusing
to cooperate with U.S. anti-drug efforts. The report said that drug
trafficking in Venezuela had increased fivefold since 2002.

Venezuela's cooperation with the U.S. on counter-drug efforts
ended in 2005, when Chavez suspended cooperation with the Drug
Enforcement Administration, accusing its agents of espionage.

Two DEA agents remain in Venezuela, but U.S. officials say their
work has been severely restricted.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
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good cause, campaigning
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area or have won an
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PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham views a school project by students of the Lewis Yard Primary School pri-
or to the demolition of the decades-old refinery stacks at Vopak Bahamas. Vopak managing director Thijs
Huizer (left) looks on.



if =" | /

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham was greeted by students of the Lewis Yard Primary School prior to the
demolition of the decades-old refinery stacks at Vopak Bahamas. Vopak managing director Thijs Huizer
(right) looks on. The demolition, which took place on Saturday, makes way for the expansion of the Vopak
facility on Grand Bahama. Lewis Yard is one of the communities directly adjacent to the Vopak facility, and
students of the primary school there constructed projects as part of a competition for the first and second
place chance to push the detonator in the historic demolition.

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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



China's show of force keeps Tibet quiet



AP Photo/Ashwini Bhatia

TIBETAN spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, foreground, arrives for a ceremony to mark the 50th anniversary of the
failed Tibetan uprising against Chinese rule that sent him into exile, in Dharmsala, India, Tuesday March 10, 2009.
China has launched a “brutal crackdown" in Tibet since protests shook the Himalayan region last year, the Dalai
Lama said Tuesday in a speech to mark the anniversary.

GN-832

GOVERNMENT

m@ By AUDRA ANG
YA'AN, China

Swarms of police and
stepped-up security checks in
Tibet and other parts of western
China apparently stifled any
large-scale protests to mark the
50th anniversary of a failed
Tibetan revolt against Chinese
tule, according to the Associated
Press.

In the Tibetan capital of
Lhasa — where the abortive
uprising began in 1959 and vio-
lent protests recurred last year
— riot and paramilitary police
patrolled the streets with auto-
matic rifles during Tuesday's
anniversary. Residents said
police were stationed through-
out the city. Tibetans in other
communities said police
checked hotel registrations and
asked Tibetans to show their
identity cards.

"Even though it seems rela-
tively quiet, we can feel that the
security is very tight now,” said
an employee at the Shannan
Yulong Holiday Hotel in
Tsedang, Tibet's third-largest
city. The employee, who
declined to give a name for fear
of government reprisal, said
police checked the hotel's reg-
istration records every day.

China's authoritarian gov-
ernment has sought in recent
weeks to head off trouble ahead
of the anniversary, increasing
an already heavy paramilitary
presence, locking down its
Tibetan areas, and barring for-
eigners to keep information
from seeping out of the region.

The Dalai Lama, the revered
leader of Tibetan Buddhists
who fled to exile as the 1959
uprising collapsed, said Tues-

day that the current crackdown
added to decades of repression
and misery for Tibetans, turning
their homeland into "hell on
earth."

"Even today, Tibetans in
Tibet live in constant fear, and
the Chinese authorities remain
constantly suspicious of them,”
the Dalai Lama said in an
anniversary speech from the
headquarters of his govern-
ment-in-exile across the
Himalayas in Dharmsala, India.

Chinese Foreign Ministry
spokesman Ma Zhaoxu called
the Dalai Lama's remarks "lies"
and accused him of spreading
rumors.

Messaging

Lhasa residents received
notice on their cell phones
Tuesday from carrier China
Mobile that voice and text mes-
saging services may face dis-
ruptions from March 10 to May
1 for "network improvements."
Similar measures were recently
taken in other Tibetan commu-
nities as the government sought
to unplug communications that
activists used to spread word of
the protests last year.

As part of the heightened
security, overseas Tibet support
groups reported that police
arrested at least four monks last
week in the heavily Tibetan
town of Aba, where security
forces opened fire on demon-
strators last year. The London-
based Free Tibet Campaign said
the detained monks were held
on suspicion of distributing fly-
ers that said others would to set
themselves on fire to commem-
orate the uprising.

In Washington, White House
press secretary Robert Gibbs
said the Obama administration
was concerned about the situa-
tion in Tibet.

"The United States respects
the territorial integrity of China
and considers Tibet to be part
of China. At the same time,
we're concerned about the
human rights situation in
Tibet," Gibbs told reporters
Tuesday.

Gibbs noted the State
Department's most recent
annual report on human rights
in China and concluded that last
year the Chinese government
had increased cultural and reli-
gious repression in Tibetan
areas.

Last year, an attempt by
monks in Lhasa to stage a
peaceful march drew swift
reprisal from police. It then set
off more protests that tapped
into Tibetan fears that their
identity, deeply rooted in their
religion, is being undermined
by Chinese rule, its religious
restrictions and the influx of
large numbers of Chinese
migrants.

Ethnic rioting erupted in
Lhasa on March 14 and anti-
government protests spread to
Tibetan communities in sur-
rounding provinces across a
quarter of China's territory —
the most widespread, sustained
revolt in Tibet since 1959.

Beijing has yet to give a full
accounting for deaths and
arrests.

The New York-based Human
Rights Watch said in a report
Monday that the official figures
on arrests and convictions sug-
gest that several hundred
remain in custody.

NOTICE
PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP’S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, hereby gives notice that in consequence of the owner’s
personal choice, application has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in respect of the ship “MAERSK
BARCELONA?” Official Number 731069 Gross Tonnage 33400, Register
Tonnage 12801 owned by Munia Mobiliegesellschaft mbH & Co. KG,
with its principal place of business at Tolzer Strasse 15, 82031 Grunwald,
Germany for permission to change her name to “BARCELONA?” registered
at the port of Nassau in the said new name as owned by Munia
Mobiliengesellschaft mbH & Co. KG.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, RO. Box N-4679, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
within seven days from the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 18th day of February, 2009.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs

NOTICE
PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP’S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, hereby gives notice that in consequence of the owner’s
personal choice, application has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in respect of the ship “SEMAKAU
SPIRIT” Official Number 732018 Gross Tonnage 52484, Register Tonnage
23308 owned by Semakau Producer AS, with its principal place of
business at Haakon VII’s Gate 10, RO. Box 1604, Vika 0119, Oslo,
Norway for permission to change her name to “SEMAKAU” registered
at the port of Nassau in the said new name as owned by Semakau
Producer AS.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, RO. Box N-4679, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
within seven days from the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 18th day of February, 2009.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs

NOTICE
PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP’S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, hereby gives notice that in consequence of the owner’s
personal choice, application has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in respect of the ship “TARJUN”
Official Number 8000473 Gross Tonnage 7602, Register Tonnage 3651
owned by Chantal Shipping Corporation, with its principal place of
business at 80 Broad Street, Monrovia, Liberia for permission to change
her name to “CAPRI CEMENT” registered at the port of Nassau in the
said new name as owned by Chantal Shipping Corporation.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, RO. Box N-4679, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
within seven days from the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 18th day of February, 2009.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs







A NOVICE TIBETAN monk stands near a banner with a portrait of Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, at the

Tsuglakhang temple in Dharmsala, India, Tuesday, March 10, 2009. China has overseen a "brutal crackdown" in
Tibet since protests shook the Himalayan region last year, part of decades of Chinese oppression that have dri-
ven Tibetan culture to the verge of extinction, the Dalai Lama said Tuesday in a speech to mark the 50th anniver-
sary of the failed uprising that sent him into exile. The banner in Tibetan reads, 'We the Tibetan people and gods
bless the Dalai Lama with long life for the benefit of the sentient beings."

Israel-Lebanon borders
stable despite attacks

@ By EDITH M. LEDERER
UNITED NATIONS

Southern Lebanon and northern Israel have
experienced their longest period of stability in
decades despite the worst violations of a 2006
cease-fire during the recent war in Gaza, the
U.N.'s special coordinator for Lebanon said
Tuesday, according to the Associated Press.

The cease-fire between Israel and Hezbollah
militants “continues to hold" but much remains
to be done to fully implement Security Coun-
cil resolution 1701 that ended their 34-day con-
flict, including disarming Hezbollah and all
other militias, Michael Williams told reporters
after a closed-door briefing to the U.N. Security
Council.

In a report to the council, Secretary-Gener-
al Ban Ki-moon condemned the firing of rock-
ets from southern Lebanon toward Israel dur-
ing the Gaza conflict in December and January
as “serious violations" of the 2006 cease-fire
resolution. The fact that Israel returned fire
without prior warning to U.N. peacekeepers in
southern Lebanon is also "a cause of serious
concern," he said.

Violations

Williams said "the past months have wit-
nessed the most serious violations by both par-
ties of their obligations under 1701 since it was
adopted."

"On the positive side, the resolution has con-
tinued to ensure a cessation of hostilities
between the parties and the longest period of
stability that south Lebanon has known in
decades," he said. "There is a stability on
Israel's northern border which it has not known
since the 1980s."

In other positive developments, Williams
said the internal political situation in Lebanon
in the run-up to June 7 general elections
"remains good."

He also cited the establishment of diplo-
matic relations between Lebanon and Syria,
and moves toward reconciliation in the Arab
world "which I think have an enormously pos-
itive effect on the situation on the ground in
Lebanon."

But Williams said "there are many other
issues in 1701 where very little progress has
been achieved."

The resolution reiterates a call for the dis-
arming of all militias in Lebanon, bans arms
transfers to any group except the Lebanese
armed forces, and urges the Lebanese govern-
ment to secure its borders to prevent arms
smuggling.

Cease-fire

It also calls for Israel and Lebanon to support
a permanent cease-fire and long-term solution
based on full respect for the U.N.-drawn Blue
Line along their border and security arrange-
ments to prevent the resumption of hostilities.

Williams said the national dialogue in
Lebanon under President Michel Suleiman
"has had enormously beneficial effect on the
country in enhancing national stability, but
where the question of the disarmament of
armed groups is making only slow process."

He expressed hope that the government
elected in June can move the issue forward.

"It's difficult to take the weapons out of pol-
itics. it needs to be done. it needs to be a
Lebanese-led process," Williams said,

He said there have been “some improve-
ments" on border control and management
following the establishment of Lebanon-Syria
diplomatic relations but he said Syria has not
yet appointed a representative to the joint bor-
der committee.

Syria also hasn't appointed an ambassador to
Lebanon, Williams said.

"That appointment, I'm sure, would be enor-
mously beneficial to stability in Lebanon."

He expressed hope that once a new Israeli
government is formed "very quick progress"
can be made in resolving the dispute over Gad-
jar, a border town in Lebanon, leading to a
withdrawal from the northern part of the village
and the deployment of Italian and Spanish
police.

"One looks forward to the day when
Lebanon is like most other states, and where
the government, the state itself, has a monop-
oly on the means of violence," Williams said.



THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 25



North Korea vows to protect itself amid US war games

lm By JAE-SOON CHANG
SEOUL, South Korea

North Korea vowed “every
necessary measure” Wednes-
day to defend itself against
what it calls U.S. threats,
claiming American military
exercises in South Korea are a
preparation to invade the
communist nation, according
to the Associated Press.

The statement by North
Korea's Foreign Ministry,
however, was far less harsh
than rhetoric issued by the
country's military in the run-

up to the annual war games
that started across the South
on Monday.

The military has threatened
South Korean passenger
planes and put its troops on
standby for war.

"The war maneuvers are
nuclear war exercises designed
to mount a pre-emptive
attack" on the North, the min-
istry said.

"Exposed to the potential
threat of the U.S. and its allied
forces, (the North) will take
every necessary measure to
protect its sovereignty."

It did not specify what the
measures would be.

North Korea has long
claimed that annual exercises
between the U.S. and the
South are rehearsals for an
invasion.

Seoul and Washington say
the drills are purely defensive.

On Monday, the North cut
off a military hot line with the
South citing the drills, caus-
ing a complete shutdown of
their border and stranding
hundreds of South Koreans
working in a joint industrial
zone in the North. Pyongyang



VACANCY FOR SENIOR SURVEYOR
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the post of Senior Surveyor,
Department of Lands and Surveys.

The requirements for the post are:
Must possess MRICS or the equivalent qualifications and must have at least eight (8)
years post qualifications experience as a surveyor;
Knowledge of GPS Technologies, including use in field data Collection campaigns as
well as knowledge in the use of electronic field equipment and the integration of
collected data in associated Autodesk surveying or land management software would
be an asset.

a and duties of the post:
oversees and directs the operations of survey teams to ensure work place safety and
the meeting of standards;
performs and monitors work such as the measurement of distances, angles and elevations;
conducts research and gathers data from existing survey plans of crown land to avoid
duplication of work;
serves Notice of Intention to adjacent land owners prior to conducting a survey;
inspects survey sites to verify accuracy of information compiled from existing survey
plan;
identifies, reconstructs and/or establishes boundary markers for linear, angular and
height measurements of crown land;
takes levels and benchmarks of properties in order to determine what is required to
bring it to building standard;
sketches in the Field Book the crown land surveyed to show linear, angular and elevation
measurements;
records physical details of the crown land such as buildings, walls, roads, vegetation,
trees, utility lines, swamps and lakes;
converts linear, angular and elevation measurements into meters or inches by mathematical
computations to determine size of crown land, accuracy of measurement and closure;
participates in projects such as the Land Use Policies and Administration Project to map
The Bahamas;
coordinates and oversees the installation of equipment and collection of equipment and
tools from the surveying site;
Teviews survey plans prepared by outside Land Surveyors for accuracy;
plots coordinates from survey plans prepared by outside Land Surveyors onto Department
of Lands and Survey maps for record purposes;
operate equipment such as theodolite, Topcon, tripod, plumbob, prism and level staff
to measure distances, angles and elevations;

The salary of the post is in the Scale of E10 $39,400 x 700 - $44,300 per annum (2006
Salary Scales) and will commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Serving officers should apply through their Heads of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill
Complex, Meeting Street. They should be returned, complete with qualifications and
documentary proof of relevant experience, to the Secretary, Public Service Commission,
Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, not later than 20 March, 2009.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

VACANCY FOR SURVEYOR
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the post of Surveyor, Scale
E12, Department of Lands and Surveys, Office of the Prime Minister.

The requirements for the post are:
applicants must be a member of the relevant Surveyor Division of the Royal Institute
of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS);
or
hold equivalent professional qualifications;
and
must have at least five years post qualification experience.
knowledge of GPS technologies including use in field data collection as well as knowledge
in the use of electronic field equipment and the integration of collected data in associate
autodesk surveying or land management software would be an asset.

oe and duties of the post:
assigns and monitors the work of staff and provides guidance and training;
measures and calculates distances between boundaries in order to prepare survey maps;
takes levels and benchmarks of properties in order to determine what is required to bring
it to building standard;
conducts surveys and placements of boundary markers in Government Subdivisions;
provides legal descriptions of properties for inclusion in conveyances;
researches land titles to verify ownership and other information;
drafts land surveys maps to scale;

The salary of the post is in the Scale of E12 - $36,400 x 700 - $41,300 per annum (2006
Salary Scales) and will commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Serving officers should apply through their Heads of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill
Complex, Meeting Street. They should be returned, complete with qualifications and
documentary proof of relevant experience, to the Secretary, Public Service Commission,
Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, not later than 20 March, 2009.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

reopened the border Tuesday,
but the hot line remains sus-
pended.

Tensions

Tensions on the divided
peninsula have also been run-
ning high amid fears that
Pyongyang might be trying to
test-fire a long-range missile
capable of reaching U.S. ter-
ritory.

The North claims what it is
trying to launch is a satellite as
part of its peaceful space pro-

against any one seeking to
shoot it down. In Washington,
U.S. national intelligence
director Dennis Blair said he
believes the North is trying to
launch a satellite, but said the
technology is no different
from that of a long-range mis-
sile and its success means the
communist nation is capable
of striking the mainland U.S.

"I tend to believe that the
North Koreans announced
that they would do a space
launch and that's what they
intend,” U.S. national intelli-
gence director Dennis Blair

said before a senate panel
Tuesday. "If a three stage
space launch vehicle works,
then that could reach not only
Alaska and Hawaii but part
of what the Hawaiians call the
mainland and what the
Alaskans call the lower forty-
eight," he said.

U.S., South Korean and
Japanese officials have warned
Pyongyang not to go ahead
with any launch — whether
it’s a satellite or a missile —
noting that missiles and satel-
lites are the same in principle
and differ only in payload.

gram, and vowed to retaliate

GN-831

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Public Service Commission

VACANCY FOR ESTATE MANAGEMENT OFFICER
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the post of Estate Management
Officer, Scale E12, Department of Lands and Surveys, Office of the Prime Minister.

The requirements for the post are:

applicants must be a member of the relevant Land Management Division of the Royal
Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS);

or
hold equivalent professional qualifications;

and

must have at least five years post qualification experience.
knowledge of project monitoring and qualitative evaluation would be an asset.

Responsibilities and duties of the post:

. conducts inspections of crown land. addresses queries or complaints;
gathers information and prepares applications for crown land for processing;
interviews applicants and advises on the application status and land availability;
prepares letters of approval of crown land granted to include terms and conditions;
conducts research to assist the Department. government agencies and the public in
identifying generation property, original owner and location of crown grants. leases or

survey plans;

conducts research and gathers information to be used by Surveyor General in courts
cases;
liaises with members of the public to provide information regarding crown land matters
and the location of crown grants;

The salary of the post is in the Scale of E12- $36,400 x 700 - $41,300 per annum (2006
Salary Scales) and will commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Serving officers should apply through their Heads of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Public Service Commission. Poinciana Hill
Complex, Meeting Street. They should be returned, complete with qualifications and
documentary proof of relevant experience, to the Secretary, Public Service Commission,
Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, not later than 20 March, 2009.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

VACANCY FOR ESTATE VALUATION OFFICER
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the post of Estate Valuation
Officer, Scale E12, Department of Lands and Surveys, Office of the Prime Minister.

The requirements for the post are:
applicants must be a member of the relevant Valuation Division of the Royal Institute
of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS);
or
hold equivalent professional qualifications;
and
must have at least five years post qualification experience and knowledge of aerial photos
and survey plans interpretation as well as projector monitoring and qualitative evaluation.

Responsibilities and Duties of the post:

. assesses properties for business rates, acquisitions and disposals;
assesses the impact of developments in terms of economic viability and environmental
impact;
writes reports on property for purposes such as rent reviews, investment potential, capital
valuations, marketability and building surveys;
drafts recommendations regarding the existing occupation of crown land, applications
for land, and requests to mine sand or dredge the sea bed;
guides land managers in the interpretation of land law and valuation techniques;
writes and proof reads descriptions of crown grants, crown leases and other legal
descriptions for lands to be acquired by the government for public purposes such as for
roads, subdivisions way-leaves;
liaises with other government agencies regarding the availability of land for projects by
the government, conducts research and recommends sites;
inspects, surveys and measures crown and government lands;
liaises with members of the public to provide information regarding crown land matters
and the location of crown grants;
reviews and actions correspondence and other communications related to land management
and valuation mapping;
prepares draft crown leases for review by the relevant Ministries/Departments.

The salary of the post is in the Scale of E12- $36,400 x 700 - $41,300 per annum (2006
Salary Scales) and will commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Serving officers should apply through their Heads of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill
Complex, Meeting Street. They should be returned, complete with qualifications and
documentary proof of relevant experience, to the Secretary, Public Service Commission,
Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, not later than 20 March, 2009.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION


















APRIL IS A ME, TOO! GOUNPS DO YOU REALLY
REMARKABLE a LIKE SHE'LL BE BELIEVE SHE
YOUNG WOMAN... K TRAVELING A LOT! QUIT THE CLA?
I HOPE IT P
WORKS OUT! oe oe. 3

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NO, BUT I'VE
WATCHEP TOO
MANY JAMES
BOND MOVIES!

[1 LOVE THESE
DOCUMENTARIES
ABOUT THE OLD

WESTERN PIONEERS

THOSE
POOR
DEVILS

NO RUSH HOUR TRAFFIC,
NO PHONE SOLICITORS

M7 UNCLE 1S
GETTING MARRIED
NEXT WEEK

TLL HAVE TO
WEARA TIE!



CALVIN & HOBBES

PLEASE LET MY BEANIE
COME TODAY! I PROMISE
T WONT EVER RE BAD
AGAIN! IT'LL DO WHATEVER

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE /
TLL NEVER ASK ANOTHER.
FAVOR IF TODAYS THE
PAY I GET MY BEANIE!



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

“DONT MAKE ME COME “I CAN'T MAKE YOU.
OUT THERE, DENNIS!” — YOURE THE 8058.”

3/Il

Difficulty Level we *%

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down





1 Easily passes on
(5,4)

Work of works (5)
Feeling of guilt about
introducing code (7)

2 Astrange lake in the
jungle described by

Kipling (6)

Hangs flags (6)

4 Cadger is source of

10 Parasites identified by a shame (8)
doctor on Lincoln's 5 Standard a number
back (6) considered average (6)
11 Soldier with papers in 6 Proof that someone has
order (6) settled (7)
12 Order a final course (5,3) 7 A ball game played on
15 Come again to gather board (9)
fruit (8) 11 He doesn’t have to be
18 Like a civet smart to fool the birds (9)
disturbed (6) 13 Perfect happiness is found
20 Be able to repeat a in a train (8) Aeros
vigorous dance (6) 14 Nut and date confection mM 4: Veudeviila
21 Seaside resort which is ridiculed (7) N (5,4)
complaint (7) 16 Key operators may strike = 8 Approximately (5)
22 Some of these bounce against it (6) Oo. 9 Stray from the
back, being 17 A problem for the bridge- > subject (7)
overweight (5) builder to emphasise (6) wo” 10 Loafing (6)
23 Common cash is 19 What one has to face 7 11. Command (6)

needful (9) when fencing (5) Kidnapped (8)

15 In the sky (8)
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 18 Injure (6)
Across: 1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, Across: 1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 20 Superficial
8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 appearance (6)
13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 21 Kind of

date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart.
Down: 1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3
Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6
Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda,
12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17
Crew.

18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21
Refrain.

Down: 1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit,
4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9
Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12
Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17
Urdu.

antelope (7)

Seeds used as
flavouring (5)
Backstage rest area
(5,4)



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.| WE'VE BATTLED LONG
ENOUGH, MARGO. CAN'T
WE CALL A TRUCE?

TM STAYING AT THE
PLAZA. HAVE DINNER
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Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer

Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer



























































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



































9/8/2|4 3/1/6|5/7 SN
3/5/1/7 2/6[9/4/8 9 (217 R721
7/6/4/9 5/8[3/2/1 9 7/3/8 BM2|1 (3 5
3 1 WM9 (7/58 9
8|7/5/6 4/2[1/9|3 32 TRO 3 Ma 7
4|9/3[1 8/5/7/6/2| feng 7; B13 BES
2/1/6[3 9/7/4/8/5| fy 2 p59 B23 4
5/4/7/8 1/9/2/3\6| Ps 4 BM3|7|1 ING 2
1|3\/8|2 6|4|5|7/9 31/5/44 i9l2 1
Difficulty Level #4 3/11 6/2/9/5 7/3/8/1/4 a3 (1/22 |7|1





Cathe ne: BY STEVE BECKER

In the Arms of Morpheus

South dealer,
Both sides vulnerable.

trouble is that | play brilliantly only
while I’m asleep, but badly while

NORTH I’m awake. I don’t understand why
@AQJ 109 this is so, but I am sure no one can
Â¥AQ10 hold a candle to my skills when I am
103 in the arms of Morpheus.
#1092 For example, last night I held the
WEST EAST East hand and my opponents got to
#K 83 $652 seven clubs. They should have
¥975 ¥KI432 known I would defeat them, but my
#7542 986 opponents never learn.
#863 &7 4 My partner led a heart. As any-
SOUTH one can plainly see, there is only one
a74 way for declarer to play such a hand.
Â¥86 He must take the ace and place all his
@AKQI hopes on the spade finesse. It would
AK QI5 be foolish to finesse the queen of
The bidding: hearts and then later have to finesse
South West North East in spades also. This would be run-
1 & Pass 24 Pass ning two risks instead of one.
Down 34 Pass 34 Pass So South, being a good player,
2 Consolidate (5) 4NT Pass 5 Pass went up with the ace — and on the
7& ace, I played the king!
3 Middle East Opening lead — five of hearts. You can’t really blame South for
country (6) Dear Mr. Becker: It will no doubt falling for this play. He naturally
4 Hold back in astonish you to learn that | am prob- thought the king was a singleton.
doubt (8) ably the greatest bridge player inthe Accordingly, after drawing trumps,
world! he led a heart and finessed the ten,
5 Horse-drawn I say this knowing full well that since there was no longer any reason
carriage (6) my name is unknown to you and the __ to take a chance on the spade finesse.
; bridge-playing public. It also is true But I took the ten with the jack to
STS ele that I have never won a world or defeat the slam, and I’m sure I would
world Ce) national championship. Neverthe- have won the rubber on the next deal
7 The actors’ entrance less, [ still think no one can equal my — except that just then my wife woke
(5,4) accomplishments at the bridge table. me and said it was time to get up and
il There is one thing seriously go to work.
" any eae wrong with my game, Foun The s Cordially yours, Ford E. Winx
audiences (3,6)
13 Devote (8) Tomorrow: Improving the odds.
14 Greeting on ©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
arrival (7)
16 Concealment (6)
17 Seem (6)
19 Eskimo house (5)



PAGE 28, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE









a

Win a family
vacation for 4 to
Orlando, Florida!

valued at

4000

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LOCAL NEWS

PICTURED are Dr Dahl, Manager, BTVI; Minister Carl Bethel; and Cleomie Wood, Acaemic Dean, BTVI.

BIVI walk-a-
thon hailed a
big success

Around 90 members of the
community came out early
Saturday morning in support
for technical and career edu-
cation to assist in raising funds
for students in need.

The enthusiastic walkers hit
the streets, the walk from
BTVI Old Trail Campus to
the foot of the Paradise Island
Bridge and back to campus
proved an exciting feat for all.

The first annual walk-a-thon
was a tremendous success with
over $8,000 in donations
raised through sponsorships
and registration fees.

Despite the economic down
turn the show of support by
sponsors was very encourag-
ing.

“It demonstrates that the
local community remains com-
mitted to raising funds to help
our students”, said Sean
Adderley, Public Relations

Officer at BTVI. “Attendance
for the walk-a-thon was great,
and the beautiful weather was
certainly welcomed by the
walkers,” added Mr. Adder-
ley.”

The winning walker was Mr.
Philip Moss, second place title
went to William Mackey and

-
Loren a fulen

Gallo

FAMILY



Donnell Forbes, took home
3rd place trophy. “It was
beautiful,” Ms Forbes noted
after crossing the finish line.
“T loved every single mile
of it.”
@ Persons interested in view-
ing pictures from the event
can go online at www.btvi.org.bs

¢
Eniest fajulee

Gallo

FAMILY

2008 WINERY OF THE YEAR

AVAILABLE AT ALL
ANT





THE TRIBUNE







oe



THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Insurer confirms
staff redundancies

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMAS-based health
insurer yesterday confirmed to
Tribune Business that it laid-
off four persons at the end of
February after efficiencies
resulting from “new systems”
made their posts redundant, a
move that reduced staffing lev-
els by 14 per cent. There is no
suggestion that Generali is in
financial difficulties

Tina Cambridge, Generali
Worldwide’s regional director
for the Bahamas, responding
to Tribune Business inquiries,
said the company’s Bahamian
operation had “been reorgan-
ised to take advantage of effi-
ciencies associated with new
and advanced system platforms
for both billing/enrollment and
claims administration”.

These systems, she explained,
were the same as those
employed by Generali’s Cay-
man-based operations, their
installation being an attempt to
“harmonise” the technology
platform used by the insurer
across the Caribbean.

Ms Cambridge said: “A result
of this investment in new sys-
tems is improved efficiencies,
and as such four jobs became
redundant at the end of Febru-
ary 2009.

Generali lays-off four
workers, some 14% of
staff, due to efficiency
gains from new systems

‘The redundancy of four
members in February amounted
to 14 per cent of our staff at
that time. All four of the per-
sons affected received redun-
dancy packages, which have
been accepted, and we have
been released by all from any
further liabilities.”

Ms Cambridge added: “Our
total employment complement
currently stands at 24 (filled and
open positions), and all employ-
ees are Bahamian. There are
no expatriates employed at our
local offices. We are pleased to
have achieved our goal of mak-
ing the Bahamas operation a
completely locally managed
environment.

“Tt is our firm intent that the
local staff complement will grow
in the future, in line with the
growth we expect for our port-
folio.”

Tribune Business had initial-
ly been told by multiple
informed sources that Gener-
ali’s Bahamian operation had
laid-off five to six persons,
amounting to 45 per cent of

SEE page 5B

‘Real impact of this recession’
only apparent from Q1 2009

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“THE real impact of this
recession” on the Government’s
finances will only become
apparent this quarter, a former
minister of state for finance has
told Tribune Business, as fiscal
conservatives expressed
increased concern over the
“frightening” level of national
debt.

James Smith, who served in
the 2002-2007 Christie govern-
ment as head of the Ministry of
Finance, said the peak tourism
season’s position on the calen-
dar meant that the Government
collected most of its revenues -
import duties, plus room and
departure taxes - during the first
three months of every year (the
third quarter of its financial
year).

This meant, he implied, that
the effects of the global eco-
nomic downturn on the public
finances would only become
truly apparent once the quar-
ter ended on March 31.

“The drop-off, the really
sharp drop-off [in government
revenues], will be possible this
quarter,” Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business.

“Most of the revenue we get
is a derived demand from visi-
tors coming in. If we don’t see
that uptick in tourism in the
most important quarter, which
is now, that’s when you’re going

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* Ex-minister says tourism
‘uptick’ and performance of
revenue during current three
months key to fiscal outcome
for 2008-2009 Budget

* Tribune calculations show
national debt at 45.7% of GDP
already, and could hit 50%
this year, even with $7bn GDP
* Fiscal hawks describe
national debt as ‘frightening’
and ‘out of control’

to see the real impact of this
recession on Us.

“Tt’s really the first quarter
of this year that will tell us how
deep this thing is.”

Unveiling the Government’s
mid-year Budget some two
weeks ago, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham pledged that
the Government would remain
within the $1.569 billion spend-
ing limits already approved by
Parliament for the 2008-2009
fiscal year, with a 7.6 per cent
drop below forecast in revenues
balanced by a $72.8 million sav-
ing on recurrent spending dur-
ing the first six months.

With recurrent spending
some $72.844 million below
forecasts for the half-year peri-
od July 1, 2008, to December

SEE page 4B

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Regulator: CLICO ‘totally ignored’ us

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) ‘com-
pletely ignored’ Bahamian reg-
ulators and behaved as if it did
not have to comply with their
demands, the company’s former
head supervisor told Tribune
Business yesterday, and said
that the current situation could
have been avoided if the new
Domestic Insurance Act had
been implemented.

Dr Roger Brown, the former
Registrar of Insurance, who
held the post until just over a
year ago, told this newspaper
that the difficulties he had in

* Ex-Registrar says insolvent insurer ‘paid no attention to us at all. They acted as though they didn’t have to’
* Major part of problem was Bahamian company run from Trinidad, and not forthcoming about US investments
* Denies tense relationship with Ministry of Finance, but says new Act would have prevented CLICO problems

regulating CLICO (Bahamas)
were compounded by the fact
that the company was effec-
tively run from Trinidad &
Tobago by its parent, CL Finan-
cial, and “there was no man-
agement in the Bahamas to
speak of”.

He acknowledged that the
Registrar of Insurance’s Office
probably made a mistake during
his stewardship, in not sitting
down to discuss the brewing
CLICO (Bahamas) situation

with the Cabinet minister
responsible for insurance regu-
lation, but denied assertion by
the former minister of state for
finance that the relationship
between their departments was
tense.

Dr Brown pointed out that
the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office only came under James
Smith and the Ministry of
Finance for one year, following
the 2006 Cabinet reshuffle. For
the prior four years, ministerial

responsibility had been vested
in Allyson Maynard-Gibson at
the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments.

“IT also believe that if the
Domestic Insurance Act had
been in place, the CLICO mat-
ter would not have developed,”
Dr Brown told Tribune Busi-
ness. “The Act would have giv-
en the Office of the Registrar of
Insurance some teeth; the abil-

SEE page 7B

Resort performing well despite fishing tourney uncertainty

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE BERTRAM Hatteras Fishing Tour-
nament, which lures numerous anglers and
enthusiasts to the Abaco Beach Resort
and Boat Harbour annually, could post-
pone this year, the resort’s general manag-
er, said yesterday, spelling a major eco-
nomic loss for the island.

Bob Kramm told Tribune Business, how-
ever, that his resort was doing well this
month for a traditionally slow season, with
90 - 95 boats moored in their Harbour. He
said one third of the resort’s room nights
come from the marina.

“We have such a blessed location here

that boaters like to base at Marsh Harbour,
at our place, and take day trips to the cays,”
he said.

“We have a lot more entertainment, so
that seems to be attracting the boats and
holding them longer.”

Mr Kramm said the resort hosts local
Bahamian talent, and holds full moon par-
ties and beach parties for their guests, with
Bahamian rake and scrape music and fare.

He was optimistic about the resort draw-
ing slightly less business than last year, and
is putting together domestic and foreign
tourism packages in the hope of attracting
more business.

“We’re gonna hope to meet last year’s
levels or maybe slightly below,” Mr Kramm

said.

“We're optimistic because there is a lot of
pent up demand in the US, and we get a lot
of repeat business here.”

He added that the resort will offer Sea
Camps this summer, and market itself more
as a family destination.

According to Mr Kramm, many Abaco
resorts have lowered rates to entice busi-
ness, but have had little success. He said
most resorts, whose business is driven by
their marinas, have to contend with eco-
nomic factors such as fuel costs and the
price of travel, which they have no control
over.

SEE page 3B

NIB ‘causing consternation’ in business community

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE National Insurance
Board’s (NIB) pursuit of unpaid
contributions dating from sev-
eral decades ago is “causing
enormous consternation in the
business community”, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president has told Tri-
bune Business, as he instead
urged it to focus on current
compliance.

Dionisio D’Aguilar said NIB
was placing the ‘burden of
proof’ on companies to show
they had paid contributions
going back, in some cases, to
the 1970s, even though busi-
nesses normally only kept
records going back seven to 10

Features:

* Chamber chief says ‘unfair’ to pursue companies for alleged
non-payment more than a decade ago, because they don’t

have records to back them up

* Warns insurable wage ceiling increase will increase

‘tax’ on businesses, employees

* Hotels concerned about rising costs from tip, gratuity

inclusion in insurable wage

years - in line with most inter-
national norms.

It was thus impossible, he
suggested, for businesses to
prove they had paid all NIB
contributions on behalf of
employees going back beyond
1999. For this reason he urged
the Board to focus on current
compliance, and unpaid contri-
butions going back one decade.

Mr D’Aguilar said he had
personal experience of this,
after his company, the Super-
wash laundromat chain, was
contacted by NIB and asked to
produce records proving it had
paid contributions on behalf of
a former employee between
1985-1990.

SEE page 4B

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The information contained is from a third
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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



A strong partnership exempt from trouble

What is an Exempted

Limited Partnership?

An exempted limited part-
nership (ELP) is a limited part-
nership comprised of general
partners who have unlimited
liability for the debts of the
partnership, and maintain
active management of the part-
nership, plus limited partners
who limit their liability to their
investment interests in the enti-

ty.

Responsibilities of General

and Limited Partners

The operation, financial and
legal obligations, and corpo-
rate maintenance are the
responsibilities of the general
partners of the ELP. It is they
who can also sue and be sued
in matters related to or affect-
ing the ELP. General partners
may also initiate the partner-
ship’s dissolution.

Dear Shareholders,

Limited partners may be
liable as general partners if
they transact with a third party
in the partnership’s name.

Legal Requirements for

the formation and

maintenance of ELPs

In the Bahamas, the
Exempted Limited Partnership
Act 1995, and the Exempted
Limited Partnership (Amend-
ment) Act, 1998 (referred col-
lectively as ‘the Act’), govern
the formation, operation, cor-
porate maintenance and legal-
ity of the ELP.

It is important to note that
the provisions of the Partner-
ship Limited Liability Act 1861
do not apply to ELPs.

ELPs must be registered
with the Registrar General in
accordance with the provisions
of Section 9 of the Act.

The ELP is required to have

by Tyrone Fitzgerald



at least one general partner,
who may be a local resident or
a company incorporated or
registered under Bahamian
companies’ legislation (an IBC
under the International Busi-
ness Companies Act 2000, as
amended, or a foreign regis-
tered company under the
Companies Act 1992).

ELPs are typically, though
not exclusively, used as corpo-
rate vehicles for investment
funds in the Bahamas. The
partnership may operate with-
in the Bahamas or abroad.

In order to form an ELP,
Section 9 of the Act requires

The economy in Grand Bahama continues to struggle and unfortunately our Ist quarter
results show a net loss of $220k compared to a net loss for the same period last year of

$74k.

Our overall sales in the 1st quarter ended November 30, 2008 are down 8.59% compared
to our 1st quarter sales last fiscal year ($3,425k compared to $3,746k). Sales in the con-
crete division for this 1st quarter are down almost 24% on the same period last fiscal year
( $691k compared to $907k) with the Home Centre's sales down 3.73% ($2,734k com-
pared to $2,840k). Our operating expenses are 10.41% less in this 1st quarter compared
to the same period last year ($886 compared to $989k)

The Home Centre has lost $97k for the quarter compared to a loss for the same period
last year of $77k and the concrete plant lost $123k this 1st quarter compared to a small
profit of $4k for the Ist quarter last year.

A key factor affecting our financial performance is that we need to raise additional capi-
tal to be able to purchase more inventory which will drive up sales at the Home Centre.
Despite the poor economic climate in Grand Bahama we see that there is still business
we could get; however, we are losing sales because we are constantly running out of
inventory due to the fact that our foreign vendors are not giving us the same level of cred-
it we enjoyed prior to the recession in the United States and our operating line of credit

at the bank is fully utilized.

We are actively pursuing ways to obtain capital as unfortunately without more capital we

will continue to struggle.

Ray Simpson
Chief Executive Officer

Feb 16, 2009

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Statement of Operations
Three months ended November 30, 2008 with comparative information for 2007

Outstanding shares =

4,708,354

{Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Sales
Cost of sales.
Gross profit

Payroll costs

Other operating costs
Rent expense
Advertising expanse

3 months andad
Nov 30,2008

3,425,090
2,646,810

3 months ended
Now 30.2007

3,746,889
2.722181
Pre 220 1,024,708
459,429
178,874
103,400

T2383

S22.213
21334
138,951

25.267

Utilities expense 95 344 871,785

Income{loss) before interest, taxes.

Gepreciation and amortisation
Depn and amort, expense
Net financing income expense)

Net income! {loss }

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
As at November 20, 2008

Assets

Cash
Accounts reenable, niet

Noy 30,2008
(Unaudned}

(107,720)

Bas, 940 S89. 560

25,7448
(P4007) (72,653)
(41,257) (36,155)

(73,864)

AUST 31 2008
(ade ted i

21,582
P16, 649

46,530
mo7,011

that information regarding the
name of the ELP; general
nature of the business; the peri-
od of duration; registered
office address; the full names
and addresses of the general
partners; and a declaration that
the ELP shall not undertake
business with the public in the
Bahamas (as defined by the
Act), be filed with the Regis-
trar General.

A Certificate of Registration
is issued to the ELP, upon
compliance with the provisions
regarding registration under
the Act.

The restriction on “under-
taking business with the public
in the Bahamas” is subject to
certain exceptions, particularly
in relation to business with
Bahamian IBCs and other
related businesses of an ancil-
lary nature.

Where the general partner
is a corporate entity, the Cer-
tificate of Incorporation and a
Certificate of Good Standing
must be filed with the Regis-
trar General.

The words ‘Limited Part-
nership’ or the letters ‘LP’
must be included in the ELP’s
name. Under Section 11 of the
Act, a register containing the
dates and contribution(s) of
each partner must be main-
tained by the general partner
at the registered office of the
ELP. The register is open to
public inspection.

Subject to Section 13 (2) of
the Act, legal proceedings by
or against an ELP may only be
instituted by or against any one
or more of the general part-
ners only, and no limited part-
ner shall be a party to or
named in such proceedings.

Under Section 13(2) of the
Act, “a limited partner may
bring an action on behalf of an
ELP if any one or more of the
general partners with authori-
ty to do so have, without good
cause, refused to institute such
proceedings”.

An ELP is required to file
with the Registrar General, on
or before January 31 every
year, after the year in which it
was registered, a return signed
by and on behalf of a general
partner, certifying that the
ELP has during the prior cal-
endar year complied with the
relevant provisions of the Act,
and there has been no breach
of the declaration given in
accordance with Section
91).

Registration of a partnership
under the ELP, originally
formed under the Partnership
Act 1890 or the Partnership
Limited Liability Act 1861, will
be governed by the Act from
the date of the Certificate of
Registration. This will not cre-
ate a new legal entity, affect
property previously acquired

by or on behalf of the ELP,
affect anything done prior to
such registration, or the rights,
powers, authorities, functions
or obligations of the ELP or
its partner, nor render defec-
tive any legal proceedings by
or against the ELP or any part-
ner or any person, before its
registration.

Fees and Filing Require-
ments

for ELPs

The registration fee for an
ELP is $850, and the ELP is
required to pay an annual fee
of $475 each year, except in
the year of its initial registra-
tion.

Notwithstanding the fact
that the ELP is exempt from
annual business licence fees,
stamp duty and other local
forms of taxation for a 50-year
period, it is required to file a
certificate each year, with pay-
ment of its annual fee, indicat-
ing that it is not doing business
with the public in the Bahamas
within the previous year. The
ELP is also required to file
notice of any changes in its reg-
istration statement.

Important Exemptions

for ELPs

Under Section 17, an ELP
registered under the Act or a
partner of such an ELP is
exempt from business licence
fees, income tax, capital gains
tax, or any other tax on income
or distributions accruing to -
or derived - from such part-
nership, or in connection with
any transaction to which the
ELP or partner is a party.

The Exchange Control Reg-
ulations Act does not apply to
an ELP registered under the
Act or to any transaction by a
partner.

However, it is important to
note that for the purposes of
exemption from local taxation,
a corporate general partner
that is deemed ‘Resident’ for
exchange control purposes in
the Bahamas, under the
Exchange Control Regula-
tions, will not be exempt from
annual business licence fees,
stamp duty and other forms of
local taxation.

ELPs are also exempt from
the payment of stamp duty for
all instruments relating to:

* Transfers of property to or
by an ELP

* Transactions in respect of
the interests of the ELP

* Transactions relating to the
business of an ELP

The partnership agreement
of an ELP, and all deeds and
other instruments relating to
transactions in respect of inter-
ests in an ELP, and other
transactions relating to the

business of an ELP are exempt
from registration under the
Registration of Records Act
1928 (as amended).

Exemptions granted under
Section 17 of the Act remain in
force for a period of 50 years
from the date shown on the
Certificate of Registration pur-
suant to Section 9(3) of the
Act.

The Importance of a

Partnership Agreement

for ELPs

While there is no legal
requirement for a partnership
agreement to govern the inter-
nal and external affairs of an
ELP, under the Act (as is typ-
ically required for most part-
nership arrangements), it is
highly advisable, as a matter
of good corporate practice and
to preserve and protect the
partners’ legal interests, for
persons to ensure that a part-
nership agreement is properly
drafted and implemented upon
formation.

Issues relating to expansion,
dissolution and buy-out
arrangements regarding a part-
nership should be agreed and
specifically discussed before
the occurrence of such events,
in order minimise problems
and challenges which may
occur later in the course of the
partnership.

Dissolution of an ELP

Section 7(6) of the Act stip-
ulates the circumstances upon
which an ELP shall not be ter-
minated or dissolved, unless a
contrary provision exists in the
partnership agreement.

These circumstances are:

Incapacity, death, bankrupt-
cy or dissolution of a limited
partner

A change in any of the part-
ners.

© 2005. Tyrone L. E.
Fitzgerald. All rights reserved.

NB: The information con-
tained in this article does not
constitute nor is it a substitute
for legal advice. Persons read-
ing this article and/or column,
generally, are encouraged to
seek the relevant legal advice
and assistance regarding issues
that may affect them and may
relate to the information pre-
sented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is
an attorney with Fitzgerald &
Fitzgerald. Should you have
any comments regarding this
article, you may contact Mr
Fitzgerald at Suite 212,
Lagoon Court Building, Olde
Towne Mall at Sandyport,
West Bay St., P. O. Box CB-
11173, Nassau, Bahamas or
at tyrone@tlefitzgerald-
group.com

Tel: 242.328.0264 * 242.328.0257 * 242.322.7371 » 242.325.6991

Fax: 242.325.6878 > www.premiertravelbahamas.com

=" Premier Travel is your one-stop

full-service travel agency.

Let us help you explore some great getaways!

imagine

being here...

1 438,555
106,280
70.839

Ine ntories
Inwentones of spare parts and supplies
Deposits and prepaid expenses

Toba! Gunent seats 2,408,505

Fixed auats 4794, 150

Total assnbs 6 B02 685 6 595 839

Liabilities. and Shareholders’ Equity

1,281,775
3,270,338
5,000)
176,260

1,847,481
3,035,007
5,000
183,887

Bank owerdrall

Accounts payable and accrued expenses
Warranty Provieian

Current portion of lang term debt

5 aa 983



Total current liabilities 5,080,345 |

Long term debi 13,057 oF 08

Shareholders’ equity
Share Capital
Contributed suepius
Apprasal excess
Retained aamings
Current @arnings

47a
5,774,858
1,439,887

(5,788,555)

(220,024)

47084
5.7 74,868
1,435 867

(5,736,559)

wu ‘ r J

Go on line to www.premiertravelbahamas.com or give us a call today!

Book your tickets on-line anywhere anytime and use your local credit card. Tickets are issued locally. ey

Total liabiities and shareholders’ equity 3 6,602 655 6585540





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 3B





Property tax could ‘kill the
goose that laid the golden egg’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE ABACO real estate
market is defying the econom-
ic downturn, which has pushed
second home prices down 10 to
15 per cent and caused proper-
ty sales on other islands to
plummet, some Abaco realtors
told Tribune Business yester-
day.

They remain concerned,
though, over what impact the
increase in real property taxes
could have on future sales.

An HG Christie real estate
Agent and appraiser, Dwayne
Wallas, said there was still a
large pool of buyers looking at
Abaco for second homes. He
said, though, that the market

Abaco real estate market defying downturn, but concerns abound over impact of tax ceiling’s removal

was not operating at the level it
was in 2006 and 2007.

“Sales are still happening, the
market is still moving,” he said.

“We're definitely seeing a lot
of interest right now because
people are realising that the
stock market is a very risky
place to put their money and
real estate, especially in Abaco
and the Bahamas generally, has
performed steadily over the
past decade or so.”

Mr Wallas said there had
been a steady decline in prop-
erty sales year-over-year since
2006, and he expects this year
will be much the same, espe-
cially with the looming real

property tax mecrease after the
removal of the $35,000 ceiling.

“Tf the Government doesn’t
watch what it is doing in terms
of messing with second home
owners and property tax and
all that, they very seriously
could risk killing the goose that
laid the golden egg,” said Mr
Wallas.

“Tf they raise the taxes on the
home owner, they are proba-
bly going to close up shop and
pull the tourism out of Abaco.”

He added that he understood
the Government’s need for
added revenue, but said the tax
increase would only serve as a
deterrent within the market.

Realtor expands operation

into south Eleuthera



A Bahamian real estate firm
has expanded its operations
into south Eleuthera.

Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty has appointed Rock
Sound businessman Chris Cates
as its area representative. His
appointment brings to seven
the number of Coldwell Banker
Lightbourn Realty sales asso-
ciates stationed throughout
Eleuthera.

“The presence of a resident
agent in the south will further
enhance our network driven
sales,” said company president
Mike Lightbourn.

"Buyers will have the com-
fort of knowing that Coldwell
Banker professionals, schooled
in the high standards set by the
premier global real estate
provider, can be found through-

out Eleuthera, including Har-
bour Island and Spanish Wells."

Mr Lightbourn said of Mr
Cates: "He is an experienced
businessman, hardworking and
has wonderful people skills. He
also has a long background in
real estate, and he is ideally
suited to the post.”

A native of Rock Sound, Mr
Cates was educated in the US
and received his Bachelor of
Arts degree in business admin-
istration from Florida South-
ern College in Lakeland, Flori-
da, and an M.B.A from Emory
University in Atlanta, Georgia.

He is the president elect of
the newly organised Rotary
Club of Eleuthera, which 1s
about to receive its charter
from Rotary International. He
also serves in his church as a

local preacher and superinten-
dent of the church Sunday
school.

Mr Cates operates a num-
ber of small businesses, includ-
ing The Lumber Shed, located
in Rock Sound.

He is the father of one child,
Alexander, and husband to
Monica Cates.

Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty has offices and sales rep-
resentatives in Nassau, Abaco,
Andros, Berry Islands, Bimini,
Eleuthera, Exuma and Long
Island.

The Coldwell Banker system
has about 3,800 residential real
estate offices and more than
120,000 sales associates in 41
countries and territories. It's
part of a huge global referral
system.

Scotiabank issues $25m small
business loans in two years

Scotiabank (Bahamas) small
business unit has seen some $25
million in loans, and 1,000 bor-
rowers, flow through it in just
under two years, its managing
director said.

Barry Malcolm, speaking as
the bank hosted the launch of
an initiative to assist small and
medium-sized businesses, said:
“Given our current climate, the
opportunity for small businesses
to access resources to evaluate,
understand and refine their busi-
ness models is invaluable.

“We launched the $10 million
SME Fund in 2006, and closely
followed this with the launch of
the Small Business Unit in 2007.
Signing this FINPYME agree-
ment in 2008 is another major

Resort
performing
well despite

fishing tourney
uncertainty

Abaco Beach Resort has kept
rates consistent with their cost.
Therefore, if costs went up,
rates went up.

“We’re doing a lot better
than most places, but we aren’t
where we were last year,” said
Mr Kramm.

He said the 2009 Bertram
Hatteras Shootout might have
been cancelled due to the cur-
rent economic climate ,or
because of the failed health of
one of the tournament’s chair-
men.

Mr Kramm added that many
more tournaments were once
headquartered at the Abaco
Beach Resort, but decided to
explore different destinations.
He said attendance for the fish-
ing events had reduced over the
past few years.

Real estate agent and
appraiser for HG Christie in
Abaco, Dwayne Wallas, said
visitor levels on the island are
high at the moment, and he and
Mr Kramm expect only a slight
decrease in arrivals this year.

“There were tons of tourists
in town last week. I think we
might have the same as last
year,” said Mr Wallas.

step in the bank’s 120-year his-
tory of supporting small and
medium enterprises throughout
the Caribbean.”

The FINPYME initiative has
been launched with the Inter-
American Investment Corpora-
tion (IC) and the College of
the Bahamas. It is a diagnostic
methodology developed by the
IIC to assist small and medium-
sized businesses, improve their
competitive skills and facilitate
their access to potential sources
of financing.

In December 2008, Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) signed a part-
nership agreement with IIC.
This will allow Scotiabank to
deepen its relationship with
small and medium-sized enter-

prises in the Bahamas. The FIN-
PYME programme addresses
the fundamental issues that
small businesses face on a day-
to-day basis, such as lacking
resources to have comprehen-
sive reviews done.

COB’s chairperson for the
School of Business, Remelda
Moxey, explained that the Col-
lege was partnering with IC and
obtaining faculty to assist in the
diagnostic review.

Michael Apel, IIC’s senior
trust fund and technical assis-
tance officer, said the pro-
gramme was not one to finance
small and medium enterprises,
but one to equip them with skills
to review resources and assess
financial situations themselves.

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According to Mr Wallas, a
lot of properties have been put
under contract this year, includ-
ing some $1 million dollar lots.
But other islands have not fared
so well, according to some of

his colleagues.

He said agents on Exuma
and Eleuthera have seen
markedly less business than
Abaco.

Mr Wallas said Abaco’s visi-

tor arrivals may not see a huge
decreasee this year either. “The
visitors we have coming to
Abaco come here because they
do not want to come to the big
resorts,” he said.

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

THIS MONTHS TOPIC: Ethics & Critical Care

SPEAKER:
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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
NIB ‘causing consternation’ in business community

FROM page 1B

“This is causing enormous
consternation in the business
community, the fact that NIB
is popping up with requests for
proof of payment from the
1970s, 1980s and 1990s,” the
Chamber president told Tri-
bune Business.

“For most jurisdictions,
you’re expected to keep docu-
ments for seven to 10 years. It’s
just completely ridiculous.
They’ve said Superwash did not
pay for some person back in the
1980s. I have no recorded proof,
and it’s absolutely impossible
for people to prove they’ve
paid.”

Instead, Mr D’Aguilar said:
“They should put the emphasis
on solving the problem of peo-
ple complying now. I think
Cargill [NIB director Algernon
Cargill] should focus on people
complying now, and going back
for 10 years. Focus on the cur-
rent decade and getting people
compliant.”

During a presentation to the

Rotary Club of West Nassau
last week, Mr Cargill attempted
to address business complaints
about NIB’s compliance drive,
how far back it was going in
challenging alleged non-pay-
ment, and the demands placed
on businesses to store records.

One Rotarian had told Mr
Cargill his business had been
contacted by the Board, claim-
ing it had not paid contributions
for a period of time many years
ago. The Board had also said
the business had missed a
month of contribution payments
more recently, but when chal-
lenged to produce evidence,
told the Rotarian businessman
he needed to produce his
records instead.

Mr Cargill said the NIB Act
required businesses and the self-
employed to keep their records
indefinitely, but the Board was
using common sense in applying
this.

It was pointed out to Mr
Cargill, though, that the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants (BICA) had rec-

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ommended that businesses only
keep records going back a max-
imum of 10 years.

However, on the question of
NIB chasing alleged non-pay-
ment from the distant past, Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness: “It’s irritating and time
consuming and annoying, and
businesses have to try and find
records from prior to 1999.

“T received a request for
information concerning an
employee from 1985-1990,
claiming they had no record of
contributions for this person
who was about to retire. The
only thing I could do is call up
the office manager from that
time and say: ‘Do you remem-
ber this person?’

“The accountants and bank
had no record. What is one to
do? But I knew Id paid because
when I gave NIB the numbers
of other employees at the time,
they could find them.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said NIB’s
compliance drive was “proof
they made silly errors” and
failed to rigorously enforce the
law during the 1970s, 1980s and
1990s. “Government is notori-
ous at not posting payments
that are received,” he added.

While praising NIB for mak-

ing a “valiant and admirable
effort” to collect all contribu-
tions allegedly owed to it, the
Chamber president added: “It’s
a bold policy and it’s going to
rile up people in the business
community. We have no prob-
lem with them trying to get
things going back 10 years.
Once they get past that window,
it’s unfair.”

The Chamber president also
called for NIB to set up a sys-
tem where employees could
verify whether their employer
was making the required con-
tributions on their behalf.

In last week’s presentation,
Mr Cargill said NIB has recom-
mended increasing the insur-
able wage ceiling by 50 per cent
- from $400 to $600 - as a way to
ensure its long-term sustain-
ability, given that the scheme
faced severe depletion by 2032
“if nothing happens”.

The proposed $200 increase
in the ceiling for the insurable
wage - the portion of employee
income on which NIB contri-
butions is calculated - was only
an initial step, the recommen-
dation being that it continue to
be raised in line with increases
in the average national wage.

Mr D’ Aguilar and others said

this, if it came to fruition, would
act as a further tax on both busi-
nesses and employees, and giv-
en the current economic down-
turn it was “absolutely the
wrong time to do it”.

“This represents a substan-
tial tax, not only on individuals
but the employer,” the Cham-
ber president said. “I know
what they’re doing, because the
NIB Fund has been predicted
to go bankrupt by 2032.

“T understand why they have
to adjust it. It would be good if
they could come back and say
how they’re going to make NIB
more efficient.”

That has been an ongoing
issue for NIB, whose adminis-
trative costs as a percentage of
total contributions have con-
stantly hovered at around the
20 per cent mark - a level con-
sidered far too high by institu-
tions such as the International
Monetary Fund (IMF).

“NIB is notoriously over-
staffed,” Mr D’ Aguilar added.
“Tt’s one area of government
that’s flush, so all the people
are making good salaries, but
efficiency and productivity are
not the focus.”

Meanwhile, another NIB pro-
posal, to include tips and gra-

tuities in the definition of ‘insur-
able wage’, has caused concern
in the hotel industry.

Mr Cargill said this would
end the “smaller benefits” being
received by hotel employees,
but the sector is likely to per-
ceive it as an additional tax and
inflationary wage pressure at a
time when it can least afford it,
due to the global economic sit-
uation and sector lay-offs.

Robert Sands, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s (BHA)
president, said the sector had
noted Mr Cargill’s comments
but was reacting cautiously until
it established whether this was
NIB’s and the Government’s
true position.

“We don’t know if that is a
definite position. We would
have difficulty with it,” Mr
Sands said. “We want to be sure
that is the position. It would
certainly be an expensive ven-
ture for us; that is correct.”

He added that the inclusion
of tips and gratuities in the
insurable wage definition could
not be viewed in isolation. Oth-
er considerations, Mr Sands
said, were how gratuities and
tips were calculated, and
whether benefits such as sick
and vacation pay were included.

‘Real impact of this recession’ only apparent from Q1 2009

31, 2008, Mr Ingraham said revenues for
the 2008-2009 Budget’s first half came in at
$626.5 million, down $51.6 million or 7.6
per cent below forecast.

However, Mr Ingraham said it was
“remarkable” that what the Government
was collecting was keeping pace with 2007-
2008 collection levels.

Yet Mr Smith downplayed the fact that
recurrent spending - which goes on its
fixed costs, such as wages and salaries -
had come in at $711.723 million, as
opposed to May Budget estimates of
$784.567 million.

The former minister said that, at this
stage of the fiscal year, he would “not put
much credence on that”, given how dra-
matically the fiscal position could change
within a matter of weeks.

“Nobody does a good job of controlling
spending, because most of it’s fixed,” Mr
Smith explained. “$70 million in a $1.5 bil-
lion budget; by the time the actual accounts
come up, that may be breaking up.”

Meanwhile, fiscal hawks have expressed
shock at the mounting level of national debt
which, according to data published by the
Government with its mid-term Budget
review, stood at $3.2 billion or 53 per cent of
gross domestic product (GDP) at year-end

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand
Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

1.0 The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser") now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provisions of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00

p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31: March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

2008 alone.

With GDP estimated at $6.032 billion,
the direct debt owed by the Government -
some $2.764 billion - was shown to be 46 per
cent of GDP. The debt owed by public cor-
porations and agencies, which the Govern-
ment has guaranteed, added another $436
million or asum equivalent to 7 per cent of
GDP to the total.

Both those percentages - the national
debt standing at 53 per cent of GDP, and
the Government’s direct debt of 46 per cent
of GDP - are well above the danger 40 per
cent threshold cited by the International
Monetary Fund (IMF) and other agencies.

Above this point, rating agencies may
take a slightly dimmer view of the Bahamas’
creditworthiness, and investors may demand
higher interest rate returns on the nation’s
sovereign bonds - a development that would
affect this nation’s debt servicing costs.

Even if Bahamian GDP has reached $7
billion, as the Government has suggested,
the national debt-to-GDP ratio still stands
at 45.7 per cent, based on its own 2008 fig-
ures. The direct charge on government lies
just below 40 per cent, at 39 per cent.

Given that the Prime Minister said the
GFS fiscal deficit will likely exceed 3 per
cent for the 2008-2009 Budget period, and

A Ministry of Marsh Harbour denepel Chapel

FO. Bae ABGoTbo, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahantas

that Bahamian GDP is estimated now to be
$7 billion, that means a fiscal deficit of at
least $210 million. And this deficit mea-
surement does not include debt principal
repayments, meaning the total deficit is
likely to be close to $300 million.

That is in addition to the existing $3.2
billion. Assuming a $3.5 billion total nation-
al debt, and $7 billion in GDP, that would
take the national debt-to-GDP ratio to
around 50 per cent.

Rick Lowe, a Nassau Institute executive
and noted fiscal hawk, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “The debt is frightening. It’s what
we’ve been saying over the last 15 years.
There’s always a reason to increase the
debt, but I’ve not seen our leaders justify
decreasing the debt or reducing spending.

“There’s just no way you can keep com-
pounding the problem with more debt. It’s
out of control. The Government’s size, bor-
rowing, it’s out of control. And unfortu-
nately, in the circumstances, it’s difficult to
get it back under control.

“Tt will not be long before we end up in
the position of Barbados or Jamaica.”

Mr Lowe urged the Government to
ensure it obtained a better return on its
spending in areas such as health and edu-
cation.

Sau eC

TEACHER POSITIONS

Primary Grades

&

Tunior and Senior Wt School

UR Ree Ty Teme TP a

ME os

eee Roy
Music, Compater Science, Physical Education, Biology, Science and Art

OA i Loge

Applicants mast be Born Again Christians and adhere to toe Statement of Faith of Mareh Harbour Gaoapel Chapel
Teachers must ago have af least a Bachelors Degres in Education or a Teacher's Certificate

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, 7" April, 2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-1530

and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the ahamnzs with work stabus,
Qualing persons are auked to contact Yor office
Telephone (242) 301-4171 830 AM. ~ 3:45 PM, or fan (242) B1-STTT
oe vesil oar website ~ wiewagapeschool cont ~ for jab or student applications

ae nn es pe ee ere es eee

PREIS CESS EEE

Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Pook Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values a6 well as a very high standard of education
and is approved by the Bahamas Ministry of Education,

We seek to train the mind, quide the person, and love the personality,
Otudy to show thysell approve unto Gol... 2 Timothy 215





THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 5B



Insurer confirms
staff redundancies

FROM page 1B

total staff. But Ms Cambridge
said these figures were inaccu-
rate.

This newspaper had also been
informed that the redundancies,
in part, were related to Generali
Worldwide outsourcing the pay-
ment of its medical claims to a
Canadian-based company,
Canadian Medical Network
(CMN).

Tribune Business was also
told that a Generali Worldwide
affilhate, Europ Assistance, had
a stake in CMN. The latter is
also used, this newspaper
understands, by Family
Guardian, which shares its non-
Bahamian dollar claims data
and portfolio with it.

Ms Cambridge did not direct-
ly answer Tribune Business’s
questions about the claims out-
sourcing and CMN, and
whether this was linked to the
redundancies.

She said that since the com-
pany’s new product launch in
early 2009, it had moved to
“maximise the synergies of
group entities operating within
the” Caribbean, with the aim
of improving coverage quality
and health outcomes for poli-
cyholders.

“With the full introduction of
these changes, providers and
members alike will be able to
track claims and reimburse-
ments, and verify benefits and
eligibility on line, providing effi-
ciencies which did not exist on
the previous system,’ Ms Cam-
bridge added.

Generali has recently come
under fire from the individual
health policyholders it inherited
when it acquired British Amer-
ican Financial’s health portfo-
lio in 2006. The company has
increased premiums by as much
as 100 per cent for elderly poli-
cyholders, with younger ones
experiencing 30 per cent
increases.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) OCEAN CAPITAL LIMITED is in dissolution under the provi-
sions of the International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on March 11, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by

the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

Ms Cambridge, though, said
the new rates had brought
premiums in line with each
customer’s perceived risk and
likely level of claims.

She added: “Our assessment
revealed that the block of indi-
vidual policies which we inher-
ited had been inappropriately
priced.

“The premiums were too
low for the level of benefits
offered, and they were also
too low given the ages of
many of the individuals
enrolled in that portfolio.

“Our options based on our
analysis were to sell the indi-
vidual portfolio or to cancel
the coverage. We realised,
however, that if we were sim-
ply to cancel the policies, it

would have left some individ-
uals without insurance cover
and for some, based on their
ages and health conditions, it
would have made it very diffi-
cult for them to find alterna-
tives.

“In order to provide an
appropriate solution, we have
moved to create an age-band-
ed premium structure, which
provides for a fairer and more
appropriate premium for each
risk presented.

That drew a withering
response from British Ameri-
can Financial’s president,
Chester Cooper, who accused
Generali of trying to blame
and ‘scapegoat’ it for the
response it had received from
policyholders.

LTS ag
MIR) rere Va BCL

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSSETTE JOSEPH of
KEY WEST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 12° day of MARCH, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

ISLAND SHIPPING LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 2nd day of March, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ANTONIQUE
MARIA DEVEAUX off Wulff Road, intend to change my
name from to NIYOKA MARIA CASSEUS. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that ALFRED MARVIN DAWKINS
of LEEWARD EAST, P.O.BOX SB-51218, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12" day of
MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.














KINGSWAY ACADEMY
ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway Academy will — be
holding Entrance Examinations
for students wishing to enter grades
2,3. and 6on MONDAY, APRIL6,
2009. Parents are asked to collect
Application Forms from __ the
Elementary School office before
the testing date from 8:30a.m. to
4:00p.m.

For further information contact

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the April 17, 2009 to send their names and ad-
dresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

the school at telephone numbers
324-5049, 324-2158, or 324-6269

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
March 12, 2009 of
SHAKIRA BURROWS ISLAND SHIPPING LIMITED
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

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PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





“My work at The Tribune is rewarding
and challenging. | enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.
[ am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY

PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune “ a





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 7B





BSI executive passes Series 7



FROM page 1B

ity to take action, and the abili-
ty to take action short of putting
a company into liquidation.

“In the existing Insurance
Act, there’s no in between. The
Minister can only put it into liq-
uidation. There’s no other mea-
sures.” The Domestic Insurance
Act, passed by Parliament in
2005 but yet to be implemented,
was designed to give regulators
the ability to appoint
receivers/managers for insur-
ance companies instead of
putting them straight into liq-
uidation.

‘The present Insurance Act
has no provision for that,” Dr
Brown said. This has been
recognised by the current gov-
ernment, minister of state for
finance, Zhivargo Laing, telling
Tribune Business that this pro-
vision was set to be reintro-
duced after dropping out of a
previous draft.

Meanwhile, Dr Brown, who is
now the Bahamas General
Insurance Association’s
(BGIA) co-ordinator, said
recalling the CLICO situation:
“A part of the problem with
CLICO was that the operation
of CLICO Bahamas came out
of Trinidad.

“There was no CLICO man-
agement in Nassau, so to speak.
They were operated out of
Trinidad. That was part of the
problem.”

When asked whether CLICO
(Bahamas) and its CL Finan-
cial ever responded to the reg-
ulatory concerns raised by Reg-
istrar of Insurance’s Office, Dr
Brown told Tribune Business:
“They paid no attention to us at
all. They acted as though they
didn’t have to. That is still a
serious problem.”

The former Registrar also
questioned how CLICO
(Bahamas) and its CLICO
Enterprises affiliate were able
to take Bahamian dollar-
denominated assets out of the
Bahamas, and invest them in
highly illiquid, speculative Flori-
da-based real estate develop-
ments.

Suggesting that the insurer
never received exchange con-
trol approval from the Central
Bank of the Bahamas, Dr
Brown said: “The first time we
saw that situation was when we
saw it in their audited financial
statements.”

When asked whether he ever
brought the CLICO (Bahamas)
situation to ministerial atten-
tion, Dr Brown said it would

To: Clients of the late

David Bethel

Please contact the

Bahamas Bar Association
Office at telephone:
242-326-3276

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

A JUNIOR account officer at BSI
Overseas (Bahamas), Alec F. Rolle
(right), has passed the Series 7 Exam
after studying with the Securities
Training Institute (STI).

Michael Miller (left), STI’s

founder, said: “Mr Rolle has per-
formed exceptionally well, having dis-
tinguished himself by obtaining both
the Series 7 and the Series 6 qualifi-
cations after preparing with us.”

The Series 7 and the Series 6 qual-
ifying exams are administered by the
New York Stock Exchange, and the
National Association of Securities
Dealers (NASD) in the US.

Regulator: CLICO
‘totally ignored’ us

have been mentioned in his
office’s annual report.

But he added: “To actually
sit down and discuss it with the
Minister, I can’t recall us ever
doing that. It probably should
have been done, but it was not
done.

“Tt wasn’t as if the company
was in trouble. The local oper-
ations were going on alright, but
it was the exposure and heavy
concentration of assets in one
investment [the Florida real
estate project] we were con-
cerned about.

“It was an investment we
knew nothing about, and they
were not being forthcoming
with us about it. We were also
trying to ensure they brought
the company’s money back into
the Bahamas, and stop trying

to run it out of Trinidad. They
never did, and up to this point,
never did it.”

Dr Brown said the new
Domestic Insurance Act would
enable regulators to “step in
early and take the actions they
need to take. They need to have
the new Act and regulations in
place.

“Unfortunately, I believe that
by the time the new Act is intro-
duced, they’re going to need to
amend some parts of it because
it’s already outdated.”

Dr Brown said during his
time in Office he had been
pushing the Ministry of Finance
toimplement the new Domestic
Insurance Act, adding that the
tense suggested by Mr Smith
was never brought to his atten-
tion.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of JAMES ALEXANDER WALLACE late
of West Bay Street in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Island of The Commonwealth

of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of the
same certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the 21st day March A.D., 2009, and if required, prove
such debts or claims, or in default be excluded from
any distribution; after the above date the assets will
be distributed having regard only to the proved debts
or claims of which the Administrator shall have had Notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the aforementioned date.

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.,
Attorneys for the Administrator
Alvernia Court, 94 Dowdeswell Street
P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas

Office of Research, Graduate Programmes

& International Relations
invites you to come engage in a dialogue on pivotal matters of national
importance at the inaugural Bahamian Perspectives:

CONVERSATIONS WITH SONS AND DAUGHTERS
OF THE SOIL LECTURE SERIES

When:
Where:
Topic:

Thursday March 12th at 6p.m.
Grosvenor Close Campus, Shirley Street,
The Future of Healthcare in The Bahamas

Speakers: Minister of Health the Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis

Urologist Dr. Robin Roberts

When:
Where:
Topic:

Thursday, March 26th 6p.m.
Chapter One Bookstore, Thompson Boulevard
The Future of the Bahamian Economy

Speakers: Governor of The Central Bank of The Bahamas
Wendy Craigg
Chairman of Colina Financial Ltd.
James Smith
Chairman of Sunshine Group of Companies
Franklyn Wilson

Future lectures to address the topics Tourism & the Environment and
Competing Regional & International Perspectives.

For more information contact:

The Office of Research,

Graduate Programmes & International Relations

at 302-4392 or 302-4455.



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES -
A a”

ms ad er

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an
exciting career opportunity?

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AVAILABLE POSITIONS:

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descriptions, requirements and other available positions.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

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www irstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm GED THERES TOGETHER:

NOTICE

BARRY’S LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an Extraordinary General
Meeting of the Shareholders of BARRY’S LIMITED is hereby
called to be held at the Registered Office of the Company,
Shirley House, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau Bahamas on the 22nd
day of April, 2009 at 10:30 o’clock in the forenoon on that day.
The object and purpose of said meeting is to have
laid before the Shareholders of the Company the account of
the Liquidator, Dennis Barry Nottage, showing the manner in
which the winding up of the Company has been conducted,
the property of the Company distributed and the debts
and obligations of the Company discharged, and also to
hear any explanation that may be given by said Liquidator.
Dated the 11th day of March, A.D., 2009.

Dennis Barry Nottage
LIQUIDATOR

of
BARRY’S LIMITED


















[|

NOU e

To: Clients of the late

David Bethel

Please contact the
Bahamas Bar Association
(ffice at telephone:
242-326-3276

A leading retailer is seeking applications for the position of

MANAGER ADMINISTRATION

BASIC REQUIREMENTS

SUMMARY OF DUTIES

Minimum two years Management experience

Excellent Oral and Written Communication Skills

Proven organizational and planning capabilities

Have a proven track record of meeting deadlines

Must be proficient in Microsoft office software

Strong Interpersonal skills and willingness to be a team player
Must have strong leadership skills and be results oriented
Posses integrity, excellent motivational skills and assertiveness

Must be multifaceted and prepared to work flexible hours if necessary

¢ Overall responsibility for the administrative functions of the company
e Training and motivating team members
e Ensuring company policies and procedures are adhered to and implementing
new policies as required.
Control and monitor administrative budgets
Responsible for the protection and maintenance of all company assets
Analyze existing business and identify business development opportunities

The successful candidate will become a part of a growing and progressive organization

capable of facing challenges.

Benefits include a comprehensive medical and life

package and pension plan. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and

experience.

Interested persons may forward a copy of their resume, in confidence to:

The Human Resources Manager

P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 322-6607





THE TRIBUNE

m@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Four states — California,
South Carolina, Michigan and
Rhode Island — registered
unemployment rates above 10
percent in January, and the
national rate is expected to hit
double digits by year-end.

The US Labour Depart-
ment’s report on state unem-
ployment, released Wednes-
day, showed the increasing
damage inflicted on workers
and companies from a reces-
sion, now in its second year.
Some economists now predict
the US unemployment rate
will hit 10 percent by year-end,
and peak at 11 per cent or
higher by the middle of 2010.

In December, only Michigan
had a double-digit jobless rate.
One month later, four states
did and that doesn’t count
Puerto Rico, which saw its
unemployment rate actually
dip to 13 per cent in January,
from 13.5 per cent in Decem-
ber.

California’s unemployment
rate jumped to 10.1 per cent
in January, from 8.7 per cent m

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
syle Mara le ltd
on Mondays

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 9B

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Four US states in
unemployment
double-digits

December, as jobs have disap-
peared in the construction,
finance and retail industries.

Michigan’s jobless rate
jumped to 11.6 per cent in Jan-
uary, the highest in the coun-
try. The second-highest jobless
rate was South Carolina at 10.4
per cent. Rhode Island was
next at 10.3 per cent, which
marked an all-time high for the
state in federal records dating
to 1976. California rounded out
the top four.

Forty-nine states and the
District of Columbia registered
unemployment rate increases.
Louisiana was the only state
to record a monthly drop. Its
unemployment rate fell to 5.1
per cent in January from 5.5
per cent in December.

The US unemployment rate,
released last week, rose to 8.1
per cent in February, the high-
est in more than 25 years.

Employers are laying off
workers, holding hours down
and freezing or cutting pay as
the recession eats into sales
and profits.

Disappearing jobs and evap-
orating wealth from tanking
home values, 401(k)s and oth-
er investments have forced
consumers to retrench, driving
companies to shrink their work
forces. It’s a vicious cycle in
which all the economy’s prob-
lems feed on each other, wors-
ening the downward spiral.

And more layoffs are on the
way. National Semiconductor
Corp. said Wednesday it will
lay off 1,725 employees, more
than one-quarter of its work
force, after third-quarter prof-
its fell 71 per cent.

Industrial conglomerate
United Technologies Corp.,
which makes Otis elevators

and Sikorsky helicopters, said
Tuesday it will lay off 11,600
workers, or five per cent of its
work force. Dow Chemical Co.
on Monday said it would cut
3,500 jobs at chemical compa-
ny Rohm & Haas Co. as part
of its $15 billion buyout of the
company.

President Barack Obama
has urged Americans to be
patient, saying it will take time
for his economic revival and
job-creation programmes to
bear fruit.

Obama is counting on a mul-
tipronged assault to lift the
country out of recession: a
$787 billion stimulus package
of increased federal spending
and tax cuts, a revamped
bailout programme for trou-
bled banks and a $75 billion
effort to stem home foreclo-
sures,

Nationwide, the recession
has claimed a net total of 4.4
million jobs since December
2007, and has left 12.5 million
people searching for work —
more than the population of
Pennsylvania.

The state unemployment
report also showed that North
Carolina and Oregon — along
with South Carolina —
notched the biggest monthly
gains of 1.6 percentage-points
each.

North Carolina’s rate soared
to 9.7 per cent in January, from
8.1 per cent in December,
while Oregon jumped to 9.9
per cent, from 8.3 per cent.

Meanwhile, Georgia’s job-
less rate climbed to 8.6 per cent
in January, an all-time high on
federal records. On a brighter
note, Wyoming continued to
register the lowest unemploy-
ment rate — 3.7 per cent.

The Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers

(“BACCO”)

celebrates it’s

1 ().. Anniversary

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING (“AGM”)

NOTICE

& LUNCHEON MEETING

We invite you to join us as we
discuss issues relevant to our
profession zwell 2teErrniniy Ti

rofession as well as determining our

administration for 2009

Note: Only paid up members will be eligible to vote

Date: 27 March 2009

Venue: British Colonial Hilton

Time: 12:30 p.m. — 2:00 p.m.

Luncheon cost for Non-Member - $45.00

Contact details:

E-1 Tle | : infoiab acob ahamas sCOmM

Tel: 242-323-0871 or 323-0872

Fax: 247-575-6574

www. bacobahamas,com

“Committed to Compliance”





PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE






















































RENEWAL OF MASTER'S - NEW PROVIDENCE

LICENCE # WAMNIE

TH32 Nicholls Wenzel K.
P.O. Box N-254
Nassau, Bahamas

Plakaris Francis
P.O, CR-4545113
Nassau, Bahamas

Patton Robert
P.O. Box CR-54999
Nassau, Bahamas

Rolle Lynden G.
P.O”. Box SP-60993
Nassau, Bahamas
6EO4 Smith Jacob R.
P.O. Box CB-15417
Nassau, Bahamas

Smith Dennis
P.O. Box N-1500
Nassau, Bahamas

Stuart Alfred Jr
Nassau, Bahamas

Sweeting Michael
P.O. Box 4269
Nassau, Bahamas

Smith Ellis H
P.O. Box CR-5546
Nassau, Bahamas

Taylor Limas E.
P.O). Box N-7461
Nassau, Bahamas

Watkins Michael OG.
P.O). Box 6-37 12
Nassau, Bahamas

Williams Sidney A.
P.O. Box AP-59274
Nassau, Bahamas

Williams Yelverton
P.O. Box CR-54999
Nassau, Bahamas

Captain Anthony J. Allens
Port{Controller

NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID

GREEN TURTLE CAY WATER SUPPLY IMPROVEMENTS = PHASE 1

1, The Water & Sewerage Corporation invites bids from suitably qualified contractors for
the construction of Phase | of the Green Turtle Cay Water Supply Improvements. The
Scope of Works include the provision of all labour, equipment and other necessary
Ssérviogs required for the:-

A. UNDERWATER MAIN

a) Supply and Installation of approximately 15,000 linear feet of water
transmission mains, of which approximately 13,000 linear feet are
subaqueous 6-inch HDPE and 2,000 linear feet of 6-inch PVC, along with all
assonated valves and appurtenances,

PUMPING STATION ON GREEN TURTLE CAY

a) Construction of a Pumping Station and supply and installation of two 250 US
Gallon per Minute, 15 Horsepower Peerless (Sterling) pumps,

b) Supply installaten, and construction of piping, pump station faciliies/office
Building

Bids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehensive details fram the
Qualification Questionnaire out-lining:

a) Experience on similar projects
b) Personnel to be assigned (including their expenence on similar projects)
¢) Financial capacity to execute the works

The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evaluated for award of Contract

Bidding documents and drawings will be available on request beginning Wednesday
March 11, 2009, from the Engineering & Planning Department of the Water & Sewerage
Corporation for a nominal fee of $250.00 per set. The Pre-Bad Meeting is scheduled for
Tuesday March 24, 2009 at 10: a.m. atthe site

Completed documents must be returned to the address below, mo later than 4:00 p.m. an
Tuesday April 14, 009.

General Manager

Water & Sewerage Corporation
87 Thompson Blvd

P.O. Box N-3905

Nassau, Bahamas

Attn: Engineering & Planning Division

Telephone: (242) 302-5512
Facsimile: (242) 302-5838

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



SEC considers

reinstating its

rule to combat
short selling

mg By MARCY GORDON
AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Dramatic changes in the global
economy may merit restoring a
federal rule aimed at preventing
a massive plunge in a stock
price caused by a rush of short
sellers, the head of the Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission
said Wednesday.

SEC Chairman Mary
Schapiro said the agency “hope-
fully” will propose for public
comment next month reinstate-
ment of the so-called uptick
rule.

On another crisis-related
issue — an industry push to
scrap the accounting rule that
forces banks to value assets at
current prices — Schapiro said
the SEC wants revisions that
would continue to provide the
transparency investors need
without excessively hurting
banks.

The uptick rule, which the
SEC eliminated in 2007,
requires short sellers — those
who try to profit from a stock’s
decline by selling borrowed
shares — to sell at a price above
a stock’s most recent trading
price.

“The world has changed
rather dramatically in the past
year,” Schapiro told a House
Appropriations subcommittee.
“Hopefully we’ll get our pro-
posal out in April.”

The SEC could reinstate the
rule at some time after the pub-
lic comment period. The SEC
also will consider “other alter-
natives” related to short-sell-
ing, Schapiro said.

As the market has plunged,
pressure has been building from



‘The Tribune }

Real Estate )

some in Congress for the SEC
to reinstate the uptick rule,
which was established in 1938
during the Depression in the
wake of the 1929 market crash.

Short-sellers bet against a
stock. The practice, which is
legal and widely used on Wall
Street, involves borrowing a
company’s shares, selling them,
and then buying them when the
stock falls and returning them to
the lender. The short-seller
pockets the difference in price.

If a company stock was trad-
ing at $50 and a trader antici-
pated that it would decline, he
could borrow shares but could-
n't sell them until after the stock
traded higher, or “ticked up,”
to at least $50.01.

Schapiro said a multitude of
investors, both large financial
institutions and individuals,
have been pushing for the rule
to be restored.

Schapiro appeared before the
panel to make the case for the
agency’s budget request of $1.03
billion for the fiscal year starting
in October, an increase of nine
per cent from fiscal 2009.

She also was asked about the
push by the banking industry
and some lawmakers to scrap
the mark-to-market accounting
rule that forces banks to value
assets at current prices, as relief
for those institutions in the
financial crisis.

“T have a lot of sympathy for”
that view, Schapiro said, adding
that “it is not our intention that
these assets be written down to
zero ... or to fire-sale prices.”

Still, the SEC doesn’t advo-
cate suspending the rule.
Schapiro said it is “pushing” the
Financial Accounting Standards
Board to come up with new

guidance for companies that will
provide “a better application”
for determining what assets are
worth.

On the issue of short-selling,
proponents of restoring the
uptick rule say its elimination
helped fuel the volatility on
Wall Street amid the financial
crisis and the pounding of com-
pany stocks targeted by market
speculators.

Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass.,
chairman of the House Finan-
cial Services Committee, on
Tuesday said he was hopeful
the rule “will be restored with-
in a month.” Senate Banking
Committee Chairman Christo-
pher Dodd, D-Conn., agreed
that bringing back the rule was
necessary.

Rep. Gary Ackerman, D-
N.Y., has proposed legislation
that would order the SEC to
reinstate the rule.

The agency last fall adopted
measures aimed at imposing
protections against abusive
“naked” short-selling. That
occurs when sellers don’t even
borrow the shares before selling
them, and then look to cover
positions immediately after the
sale.

A test by the SEC in 2007,
removing the uptick rule for
one-third of the stocks in the
Russell 3000 index, found it
could be eliminated without
causing significant harm.

The analysis by the SEC pro-
vided “clear economic support
for our recommendation today
to remove all current short-sale
price test restrictions,” Erik Sir-
ri, the head of the SEC’s market
regulation division, said at a
public meeting of the commis-
sioners in June 2007.

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is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
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have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
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by March 14, 2009.



PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE





$410bn spending bill is
‘imperfect’, says Obama

DOUBLE
FILET O’ FISH



@ By PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Acknowledging it’s an “imper-
fect” bill, President Barack
Obama said he will accept a
$410 billion spending package
but insisted it must signal an
“end to the old way of doing
business.”

The massive measure fund-
ing federal agencies through the
fall contains nearly 8,000 pet
projects, known as “earmarks”
and denounced by critics as
pork.

Obama defended earmarks
when they’re “done right,”
allowing lawmakers to direct
money to worthy projects in
their districts — but added
they’ve been abused, and he’ll
work with Congress to curb
them.

“Tam signing an imperfect
omnibus bill because it’s neces-
sary for the ongoing functions of
government,” Obama declared.
“But I also view this as a depar-
ture point for more far-reaching
change.”

In a sign of his discomfort
with the bill, Obama did not
sign it in public. And he
declined to answer a shouted
reporters’ question about why.

Running for president, Oba-
ma denounced the pet projects
as wasteful and open to abuse
— and vowed to rein them in.

Explaining his decision, Oba-
ma said that future earmarks
must have a “legitimate and
worthy public purpose”, and the
any earmark for a private com-
pany should be subject to com-
petitive bidding rules. Plus he
said he’ll “work with Congress”
to eliminate any the adminis-
tration objects to.

But he acknowledged that
earmarks have bred “cynicism”,
and he declared, “This piece of
legislation must mark an end to
the old way of doing business.”

White House officials in

You are invited
to meet

Attila Keczer
Herend Porcelain’s

Master Painter

from Hungary
He will be demonstrating painting

& signing Herend China & Figurine

pieces



VICE President Joe Biden looks on as President Barack Obama speaks to
mayors from across the United States in the East Room of the White

House...

recent weeks have dismissed
criticism of the earmarks in the
bill, saying the legislation was
aremnant of last year and that
the president planned to turn
his attention to future spending
instead of looking backward.
White House spokesman
Robert Gibbs said Obama
wouldn’t be the first president
to sign legislation that he
viewed as less than ideal. Asked
whether Obama had second
thoughts about signing the bill,
Gibbs’ reply was curt: “No.”
Obama’s modest set of
reforms builds upon changes
initiated by Republicans in 2006
and strengthened by Democ-
rats two years ago. Most impor-
tantly, every earmark and its
sponsor must be made public.
In new steps — outlined in
concert with House Democrat-
ic leaders Wednesday morning
— the House Appropriations
Committee will submit every
earmark to the appropriate

(AP Photo: Ron Edmonds)

executive branch agency for a
review. And any earmark
designed to go to for-profit
companies would have to be
awarded through a competitive
bidding process.

But perhaps the most tangi-
ble change may be Obama’s
promise to resurrect the long-
defunct process by which the
president proposes to cut spend-
ing from bills that he has signed
into law.

Under this so-called rescis-
sions process, the White House
sends Congress a roster of cuts
for its consideration. Congress is
free to ignore the cuts, but both
Obama and senior members
like Appropriations Committee
Chairman David Obey, D-Wis.,
say they want to use it to clean
out bad earmarks that make it
through the process.

But Obama declined to
endorse a stronger process
advocated by Sen. John
McCain, R-Ariz., and others,

Get There. Together.

You have dreams. We hawe them too.

that would have required Con-
gress to vote on a presidential
recission earmark package.
Senior Democrats dislike the
idea even though many of them
backed it in the early-to-mid
1990s.

During his presidential cam-
paign, Obama promised to
force Congress to curb its pork-
barrel-spending ways. Yet the
bill sent from the Democratic-
controlled Congress to the
White House on Tuesday con-
tained 7,991 earmarks totaling
$5.5 billion, according to calcu-
lations by the Republican staff
of the House Appropriations
Committee.

The 1,132-page bill has an
extraordinary reach, wrapping
together nine spending bills to
fund the annual operating bud-
gets of every Cabinet depart-
ment except Defense, Home-
land Security and Veterans
Affairs.

Among the many earmarks
are $485,000 for a boarding
school for at-risk native students
in western Alaska and $1.2 mil-
lion for Helen Keller Interna-
tional so the nonprofit can pro-
vide eyeglasses to students with
poor vision.

Most of the government has
been running on a stopgap
funding bill set to expire at mid-
night Wednesday. Refusing to
sign the newly completed
spending bill would force Con-
gress to pass another bill to
keep the lights on come Thurs-
day or else shut down the mas-
sive federal government. That is
an unlikely possibility for a
president who has spent just
seven weeks in office.

The $410 billion bill includes
significant increases in food aid
for the poor, energy research
and other programs. It was sup-
posed to have been completed
last fall, but Democrats opted
against election-year battles
with Republicans and former
President George W. Bush.

Friday March 13th, 2009
10:30am - 1:00pm
3:30pm - 7:00pm

Saturday March 14th, 2009
10:30am - 1:30pm
3:30pm - 7:30pm

On March 16th, 2009
Oam - 1:00pm
3:30pm - 7:00pm

Internet & Telaghone Damnking

We each have our goals, things we want to achieve.
Al different tienes of cur lives, those aapiretions
may change and we may choose a different path.
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Th Ee Trib un e Thursday, March 12th, 2009

OWN ES
& RELIGION



; | The Tribune
aa f My Voice. My
ae d
\ eae
» \0
707.9

f
Your choice for the family



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009



TIN LOVING MEMORY





x

| ELORES PINDER

NOVEMBER 10, 1957 - MARCH 14, 2001

Crod saw WOU WEPE getting tired,
Ard a cure Was not te be,

Sir be pant his arms arcu you amd
W hisperedd, "Conve to hele"
With tearful eyes we watched you,

And saw “you pass AWAY
Although We iF wel Ai all dearly,
We could not make pou stay.
A Golden Heart stepped beating,
Hard working hanes at rest.
Crod broke our hearts to prove To Ls,

|

seni, -‘eopecsy “ets

He only takes the best

Precious memories will remain in the hearts of her
husband, Donnie Pinder; one daughter, Danielle; onc son
Donovan; one Grand-daughter; Tajanee’; Brothers and

Sisters and other family and friends.

SE SSS eae





IAN RONALDO THOMPSON
Sunrise - December Sth, 1969 Sunset - March 13th, 1999
Cherished Memories By
Wife-Renee & Doughter-Jennifer of Atlanta
Special Priewds Stephen Robinson &
fram Lewis PFaomily and Friends

FORGOTTEN? SEVERE
Friends may thiak we dove forpotter
whew af times (hey see we soniie
Little do ther know the heartache
thatonwe amile hides all the while.

Beantifel meaories are wonderful things
They fost Hl the longest day
Phey never wear ont
They wever get dost
and con wever be given ower,

fo some you may be forgerte ti
fo affiers a part of fhe post
Hut to thase whe loved and lost por
Four aewory will always fast,



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

FUNERAL SERVICE

for
William
«é Bill’

Cheney

of #79 Mt. Royal Ave. will be held
on Saturday 14th March 2009 at
10am at St. George’s Church Mt.
Rose Ave. officiating will be Fr.

Kingsley Knowles.

Left to cherish the memories of Bill are his sister, Elizabeth Loftus of
Kentucky; five children. Donald, Rochelle, Louis, Denise and William;
adopted daughter Iris Lowe: 7 Grand Children: Arthur Roker Jr. Dabria
Mcintosh. LaChelle Lightboum. Tatyana, Tyann, Tyniesha and Don
Cheney: Adopted Grand Daughters: Falesha Lowe & Chrishell Woodside:
2 Daughters-inlaw: Raquel and Bonita Cheney. 2 Sisters-in-law: Delores
Thompson and Eunice Greene.

Numerous Nieces & Nephews and a host of other relatives and friends
including: Eugenie Greene, Jennifer & Leslie Pyfrom, Ashanti Gardiner,
Rodney & Margaret Rolle, Paulette Dean, Mark Daniels, Staff at McDonalds
Palmdale. Jamie Butler, Kingsley Pinder, Julian Rolle, Clifford & Berthamae
Mcintosh, Ralph & Rose Brown, Odari Shan, Richard & Tracey Curry,
Nurse Sandra Rolle, Nicole Winder, Alyanna Henry, Jackie Hall, Anthony &
Keva McKinney, Allan Taylor, Lisa Thompson. Sonith Lockhart and Florinda
Baptiste.







THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

With S tucete

Anpeeciatian and
Catitude

Melvin A. Bonamy, Sr.
December 3, 1947
February 10, 2009

Resting in the everlasting
arms of Jesus |

We extend heartfelt thanks to those |
persons who either called, visited,
sent flowers, fruit baskets, food and
cards, orwhoinany way offered |
their time.
Your thoughtfulness has brought us
comfort.
We pray God’s ever flowing blessings
on you.
Mrs. Melvina Bonamy & |
Family



THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 3

Special Note of Thanks

Daniel Nairn

“They will know we are christians
by our house”

They Family of the late Daniel L. Narin wishes to
Express Our Most Profound Thanks to the whole
Bahamian Community who so willingly gave of their
lime, sentiments, service and hospitality during our
recent loss. Floral arrangements, donations of
food/drinks, telephone calls, verbal expressions of
adulation and sympathy are so deeply appreciated.

Special thanks to the following whose help made this
difficult time more bearable.

Father Glen Nixon and the entire staff of St. Francis
Xavier Cathedral, The Catholic Chanceroy Office
Andrew Curry and St. Francis Xavier Cathedral
Choirs, David Prudden, Denise Arthur-Adderly,
Doreen Campbell, Jacqueline Bain, Fairie Kraft,
Kathleen Dummett, Dr. Margot Braynen, Paulette
Rahming and the Statf of Bethel Brothers Morticians

May God’s Love and the practice of His
Charity continue to infuse
Everybody's Lives

The Nairn Family





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

1926-2009

We all love you dearly Mama.
However, we will all soon meet again,
However, until then you will always
Have a very special place in our hearts.

The family of the Late Muriel Elizabeth Cartwright wish
to express their sincere thanks and appreciation for all
who have offered words of comfort, sympathetic gestures,
prayers and who have been so thoughtful and caring
during our time of bereavement especially the Doctors,
Nurses and caregivers who cared for Muriel during her
illness. We greatly appreciate all that has been said and
done. May God richly bless you all.

Love her children, grandchildren family and friends.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

From Ihe Depth

Ow Shears
CITC meer

Ernest Chaiphas
McKenzie

would like to express their thanks and appreciation to
all of our relatives, friends and well-wishers who
surrounded us with their love and care during our period
of bereavement. We were deeply touched by the numerous
calls, visits, prayers and words of encouragement. We
could not have done it all alone without your help. Special
thanks to The Grand United Order of Odd Fellow:
President Cedric Smith and pastors and members of
Exuma District Churches; Superintendent Dr. Charles
W Saunders; pastors, ministers and the entire Bahamas
Baptist Union of Churches. Your acts of kindness and
generosity made our burden more bearable. We thank
you from the depth of our hearts. May you be blessed.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

* i
Pinder’s Funeral Home
‘Service Beyond Measure”
PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 « CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

Funeral Service for

ie

VIOLET
DOROTHEA
KNOWLES

of Prince Charles Drive, will
be held at Holy Cross
Anglican Church Highbury
we Park, Soldier Road on

at 11:00 am. Burial will be
-“7/ in Woodlawn Gardens
Soldier Road. Rev'd Fr.
Norman Lightbourne, assisted
by Cannon Neil Roach officiating.

She is survived by her husband: Eldridge Knowles;
children and spouses: Elizabeth & Raymond Bridges,
Perry Knowles, Christopher & Rachael Knowles, Peter &
Linda Knowles, Bryan & Paula Knowles, Donahue &
Mary Knowles, Saraan Knowles, Shayne & Sloan Knowles,
Patrick & Shelia Knowles, Kymberly & John Villachica;
grandchildren and spouses: Stewart & Cathy Bridges,
Corey Knowles, Lynette Knowles, Neil & Kim Knowles,
Michelle & Doddridge Davis, Adam & Candi Knowles,
Dane & Crystal Knowles, Duane & Kirsten Knowles,
Nicolette Elden, Cameron Knowles, Bryan Douglas
Knowles, Jr., Angel Knowles, Joshua Knowles, Shaw
Knowles, Raven Knowles, Parker Knowles, Cian Knowles,
Saylor Villachica; great grandchildren: Taylor and Dylan
Bridges, Megan and Tyler Knowles, Caowhen Davis,
Jonelle and Morgan Knowles, Khaiden and Skye Knowles,
Taran & Tanner Knowles and Alicia Elden; sisters: Mildred
Diah, Dr. Corolyn Hanna, Joan Mayson and pre-deceased
sisters Merle Brozogzog, Olive Wells and Maisie
Wilkinson; sisters-in-law: Verna Smith and Dorothy Deal;
adopted daughter: Jean Lotmore; adopted son: Fedner
Dorestal; adopted grandchildren: Yasmine and Jasmine
Burrows; caregivers: Mrs. Yvonne Wilson, Mrs. Adline
Griffiths and formerly Mrs. Paula Rolle; many other
relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects on Friday, March 13th,
2009 from 2:00pm until 7:00pm at Pinders Funeral Home
Palmdale Ave., Palmdale.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 5

THE LATE CHIEF PETTY OFFICER
CHARLES ANTHONY SMITH
JANUARY 3, 1961 TO NOVEMBER 11, 2008)

We the family of the late Chief Petty Officar Charles Anthony Smith pause to
remember his life. We extend our deepest and sincere appreciation to family,
fiends and colleagues who stood by us during his illness and during our time of
bereavement. Maybe you called, visiled our home, sent a floral arrangemend or
a wreath or attended the funeral. Your acts of kindness were truly a comfort to
US.
Our gratitude goes especially to Commodore Clifford Scavella, officers and
marines of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. Hon. 0.A.T. Tommy Turnquest,
Minister of National Security, Hon. Desmond Bannister Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Hon. Philio ‘Brave’ Davis, Rev Prince 0. Bodie, warrant officers and
members of Entry 13 Royal Bahamas Defence Force, Rev Michael Kelly,
Deacons Peter Rahming and Maxwell Johnson, members of Our Ladys Roman
Catholic Church and Hospitality Ministry. Supt Carolyn Bowe and officers of
Westem Division, Complaints and Corruption Branch, 'C' Squad 1984 Royal
Bahamas Police Force. Police Fire ServicesRred Watch, ACP Hulan Hanna,
Supt Kevin Rolle, Father Stephen Davies, A.M. Bailey Senior High School Class
of 1979. Bahamas immigration Dept, Her Majestys Prison, Bahamas Customs,
Defence Force Floaters and Cannons Softall Teams, The Pokers 2005 Softball
Championship Team, The Truckers, executives and players of the Bahamas
Goverment Deparimental Softball Association and Old Timers Softball
Association, Jason Moxey and family, Philip Johnson, Hon. Algernon Allen,
Jerome and Patrica Moxey and family, Gregory Higgs and family, Keith Moss and
Commando Security stall, the Greenslade farnily, Marietta A Smith and family,
Antrim and Eulamae Mckenzie and family, Lasie Roberts, Police Staff
Association, Rev Simeon Hall, the principals, teachers, students and parents of
Our Ladys Catholic Primary School and St Augustines College. Waller and
Sharon Capron, Donald and Linda Munnings, Reverend Floyd Jones and family.
Dr L. Barry Russell and staff, Dr Bimal Francis, Dr Gonville Brown, Nurse Celeste
Kingdorsett and Staff of the Bahamas Heart Centre. Or Kevin Moss, doctors and
nurses of Doctors Hospital, Demerittes Funeral Home and staff of Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery

SUSAN SMITH AND FAMILY





PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

diutler’s Wuneral Homes & Drematoriu

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

MR. SHERVIN
THOMAS “Tommy”
BURROWS, 57

of Nassau East North will be held }
on Saturday 14, March 2009 at 2:00 }
p.m. at Central Gospel Chapel, }
Christie and Dowdeswell Streets. :
Officiating will be Pastor Rex Major, }
assisted by Father Hugh Bartlett. :
Interment will follow in St. Anne’s }
Anglican Church Cemetery Fox Hill. ;

Left to cherish his memories are: his mother: Thelma “Tallie”
Burrows, one son: Jermal Burrows, two daughters: Tameka :

Forbes and Sheena Burrows, son-in-law; Anthony Forbes, three | mother Essie Ferguson, mother-in-law Vivien Moss, one

brothers; Reverend Timothy, Peter and Matthew Burrows, four : daughter; Tamicka Ferguson, adopted sons; Cordero Newton
sisters; Cassandra “Sandra” Cartwright, Maxine Rahming, Shirley :
Russell and Gail Bethel, six brothers-in-law; Llewellyn “Gus” }
Cartwright, Loran Rahming, Leslie Russell, Paul Bethel, Richard : *. foe Manica abl a F Want
Smith and John Pratt, five sisters-in-law; Zilpha and Edee Burrows, } ay ae : ad eae oe > i ae a ae an
Elease Smith, Sr. Felicitus Pratt O.S.A. and Gloria Pratt, nephews : and Tami Culmer, and Keva Wood, thirteen uncles and twenty-
and nieces; Shantel, Lowell and Caswell Burrows, Lieselle and }
Geno Edgecombe, Enrico and Carla Burrows, Miguel and Monica
Burrows, Meshalique and Ken Knowles, Dr. Shanique and Travante }
Cartwright, Nadia and Nikita Sumner, Larada and Jessica Rahming,
Riccihio Rahming, Julie Curry, Amaria Russell, Ashley, Gareth }

Bethel and Ari Burr Phyllis and Andre M n, ; . :
te ley Sharh et er Ra 6 ey S an rt & Backford II and the Mt. Carey Baptist Church family, Rev. Dr.
Douglas Duvall, Theron & Samantha Pratt, Alex & April Pratt,
Chris Pratt, Victor Wells, William Jr. & Linden and Sheryl }
Deleveaux, Trudy & Ian McKenzie, five uncles and ten aunts }
and a host of other relati and friends including Debbie, : : : ; ;
Mine nea (eons EChines a = elores, Paul, Brad. Monsignor Preston Moss and the St. Anselm’s Parish Family,
Mayumi, the morning crew and staff of Checkers Café, Mackey }
Street, Staff and Sunday evening crew of Starbucks, Harbour Bay }
staff at Kentucky Fried Chicken, Mackey Street, Antoinette :
Fernander and Family, Delvin and Judy Miller, Leroy and Ruth }
Sumner, John and Rosie Knowles, Diane Clarke Shabaz, The :

Jonnson and Cynch Patnily, bt. -Rexend DorecnMajorane omer Construction , the entire community of Fox Hill, and Zion Baptist,

: East and Shirley Streets, Church family and others too numerous

too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral Homes & 3
Crematorium, Ernest & York Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. :
until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 9:00a.m. until 12:00 noon }

ee until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until

service time.

MRS. CHERYL
LORRAINE MOSS, 48

of 21 Eastwood Estates will be held
on Saturday 14, March 2009 at 10:00
a.m. at Zion Baptist Church, East and
Shirley Streets. Officiating will be
Rev. T. G. Morrison assisted by Rev.
Warren Anderson and other
Associate Ministers, Deacons and
Evangelists. Interment will follow in
Mt. Carey Union Baptist Cemetery
Fox Hill.

Left to cherish her memories are: her husband Patrick Moss, her

and Edwin White Sr., grandson; Edwin White Jr., stepson; Ombra
Moss, stepdaughter; Pareece Moss, six brothers; Rodney Sr.,
Samuel II, Pedro, Gary, Dwayne and Jason Ferguson, seven

three aunts, five brothers-in-law, five sisters-in-law, eleven
adopted siblings including the Rose Street Boys, three grand
uncles and grand aunts, one godmother and one godchild,
nineteen nephews, twelve nieces, one grand nephew and seven
grand nieces, numerous cousins and a host of other relatives and
friends including Rev. Bertram Rolle and family, Rev. Dr. Enoch

Carrington Pinder and the St. Mark’s Baptist Church family, Rev.
Dr. J. Carl Rahming and the St. Paul’s Baptist Church family,
Rev. Dr. David Johnson and the Macedonia Baptist Church family,
Father Crosley Walkine and the St. Anne’s Parish family,

Rev. Joseph Knowles, Rev. Ivan Butler and the Kemp Road
Ministries family, Black Point Exuma family, Rose Street family,
Bahamas Development Bank, Central Bank of The Bahamas,
Galilee College, staff at Pulmonary & Critical Care Institute,
Rotary Club of East Nassau, staff of Princess Margaret Hospital’s
Private Medical Ward her caregivers, Mantina and Josey, Wrecker

to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral Homes &
Crematorium, Ernest & York Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 7

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

CHRISTOPHER
VISCOUNT STRACHAN,
40

of Joe Farrington Road, Sea Breeze Estates |
will be held on Saturday, March 14th, 11:00 |
a.m. at St. Agnes Anglican Church, Baillou |
Hill Road. Archdeacon I. Ranfurly Brown, |
assisted by Fr. Bernard Been and Deacon |
Neil Nairn will officiate. Interment will ;
follow in St. Agnes Cemetery, Nassau

Street.

He is survived by his parents, Perry Strachan
and Crystal Strachan; children, Crystal, Brittany, Christopher Jr., Kanaz, |
Shashanya, Stephan, Christique, Shonice, Christyn and Christyna; brothers, |
Jamal, Perry Jr. and Brian Strachan; sisters, Sophia Strachan-Christie, |
Lydia Thompson, Natasha Dames, Sonia Francis and Maria Strachan; |
grandmother, Vernell Brown; uncles, Gregory and Leonard Thompson, |
Selman and Hugh Strachan, Arnold, Craig, Cecil and Bradley Flowers and |
Raytheno Strachan; granduncle, Anzlo Strachan; aunts, Lynn and Lenor ;
Thompson, Deidre Strachan, Paula Newton, Hagah Strachan, Bernadette |
Pinder, Laurene Burrows, Sheila Hepburn, Stephanie Lightbourne, Val |
Strachan, Annamae Flowers, Linda Thompson, Shenique and Juliette |
Strachan; grand aunts, Leese Strachan, Sybil Reckley, Sheila Strachan, |
Gloria Strachan; nieces and nephews, Jalisa, Jarear, Jahir, Javin, Israel, |
Kavash, Kashan, Robyn, Tyler, Reagan, Tristain, Fayne II, Akwah, Autumn, |
Osha, Deontish, Denash, Doneice, Demar; cousins, Jarvis, Marquista, |
Cordero, Greer and Jessica Thompson, Lynden Braynen, Owen Hanna, |
Raytheno Strachan, Jill, Garrette and Derek Flowers Jr., Danielle Small, |
April Miller, Sherelle Strachan, Shevonne Miller, Monique Miller, Ian |
Strachan, Kadiah Strachan, Raymon, Rashad and Remise Newton, Arnold |
Jr., Ian, Damien, Jason, Andrew, Rickie, Ray, Cecil Jr. Flowers, Lavade |
and Kendric Darling, Kimchelle Dodge, Swithen Jr. and Shamuel Burrows, |
Ralph Hepburn, Donovan and Dwaine Dorsett, Sophia Bethel, Patrice, |
Lisa Greer, Sybil Lonice and Cecily Flowers and other cousins too numerous |
to mention; other relatives and friends, Lillian Bastian and family, Julia :
Evans of Miami, Florida, Lucille Roker and family of Texas, Jesse Knight |
and family of San Antonio, Texas, Cynthia Warren and family of New |
York, P. Anthony White and family, Petrona Johnson and family, Oreal |
Strachan and family, Lorraine Hepburn and family, the family of the late |
Psyche Smith, Anzlo Strachan and family, Leese Strachan and family, |
family of the late Cannon Dudley Strachan, family of the late Nathaniel ;
Strachan, family of the late Victoria Strachan, family of the late Birdie |
Strachan, Joyce Bain, Barbara Bullard, Shirley Cooper, Persis Adderley, |
Sister Annie Thompson, Camille Bullard, Mary Welch, Franklyn and |
Donnie Thompson, Gwen Moncur and family, the family of the late Ermath ;
Munroe, Burket Turnquest, Gloria Flowers and Debbie Strachan; special |
friends, Sonia Miriam Hamilton, Nash Evans, Wayne Saunders, Robert |
Smith, Daniel Scott, Winston and Harry Bunch, Jermaine Pratt, Vaughan |
Meadows, Denise Wallace, Orville Hanna, Maria Neely, Pearline Johnson, |
Claudette Russell, friends and neighbours of Joe Farrington Road, especially |
Marvalee Coakley, the Pratt family, the Wood family, the Turnquest family, |

friends of Zinna Street, Kennedy Subdivision especially the Smiths, the
Mollys, the Browns, and the Bains, Engineering staff of The Cove, Atlantis,
classmates of St. John's College and St. Agnes church family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday at the church
from 10am until service time.

CLAIR FRANCIS
ELLIS, 51

of Palm Terrace, Sunset Park will be held
on Saturday, March 14th, 10am at South
West Cathedral, Carmichael Road. Rev.
Donnie Storr, assisted by Rev. Roderick
Brown will officiate. Interment will follow
in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F.
Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish fond memories are her

mother, Mercianna Storr; five brothers,

Leroy Rolle, Cleveland Clarke, Glenroy Turtle,

Godfrey and Richard Ellis; seven sisters, Helen Brown, Pesserita Rolle,
Delores Bullard, Sheila Smith, Patricia Cooper, Francina Forbes and Betty
Ellis; one adopted sister, Judy Murphy; one aunt, Maude Pinder; four
sisters-in-law, Faye Brown, Laverne Turtle, Janette and Nancy Ellis; two
brothers-in-law, Ambrose Smith and Anthony Bullard; thirty-four nephews
including, Perry Brown, Mervin Lawrence, Raymond Fox, Derrington,
Sean, Stephen Sr. and Abby Brown, Patrick Brown and Vencil Balfour,
Dominic, Gregory and Obie Beneby, Kendal and Monty Williams, Quincy
Rolle, Trevor, Garvin and Glendin Turtle, Christopher; thirty-three nieces
including, Denise Darling, Bridgette Davis, Janet Rolle, Deatra Symonette,
Ecarscha Smith, Candice Beneby, Barbara Darville, Christine and Erica
Williams, Edna Brown, Prisca Forbes, Denavue and Theresa Brown, Helen
Morley, Cheryl Cash, Tarnell, Kendra, Vernika, Edahlia and Izaria Rolle,
Nitza, Trevia and Monique Turtle, Patricia and Indy Clarke; numerous
grand nieces and grand nephews, three godchildren, John Rolle Jr., Destiny
Nesbitt and Chelsea Stuart; numerous cousins including, Bishop Donnie
Storr, Viola Robert, Rosie Thompson, Eudane Stubbs, Lionel Pinder, Tyrone
Russell, Evamae Mott and Donna Deveaux; special friend, Montgomery
Lewis; other relatives and friends including, Marietta Miller, Cheryl and
John Rolle, Annette Major, Chris and Monique Basden, Jackie Rahming,
Gregory Beneby Sr., Debra Moxey-Rolle, Jeffrey Pratt, Philip Smith,
Debbie Nesbitt, Sheila Knowles and family, Bridgette Musgrove, Steven
Cole, Wendy Craigg and the staff of The Central Bank of the Bahamas,
Theophilus Russell and family, Anniemae Smith and family, Jannie Moxey
and family, Bert Sherman and family, the Sunset Park family and the entire
community of George Town, the Hermitage and Barreterre, Exuma, Dr.
Conville Brown, Dr. Patrick Cargill and the staff of Doctor's Hospital.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday at the church
from 9am until service time.





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 * Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393- 1352

Funeral Services For

VENLYN
ARMBRISTER, 76

resident of the Forest,
Exuma and formerly of
Mount Thompson, Exuma

at Salem Union Baptist

Rev. Dr. C. W. Saunders,
assisted by Rev. Cedric Smith and other Ministers.

Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish her memories are her three (3) sons,

brothers-in-law, Rev. Dr. Irvin Clarke, John, Bishop
Clarence Armbrister, Solomon Armbrister,

including, the Brice, Ferguson, Clarke, Collie,
Armbrister and Green families, Min. Althea Rolle,
Bishop Rudolph Bowe, Bishop Anthony Roker;

: and Francina Johnson, Philly and Sandra Thomas,
: Geneva Jones, Bradley Clarke, Lynden Curtis, Darrice
: Newbold, Benjamin Ferguson, Tori Glinton, Dorothy
‘ Laing, Rashad, Shazia, Shazett, Annie Lloyd and
: family, the Williams, Hunt, Taylor, Burrows, Bullard,
: Rolle, Bowe and Marshall families, Mr. and Mrs.
‘ Edward, Bobby Glinton, Ena Rolle and families,

: Annetta Flowers, management and staff of the Cove

will be held at 11:00 a.m. } and Reef, Atlantis, Paradise Island, Premier Importers,

Saturday, March 14th, 2009 : Bahamas Electricity Corporation in Exuma,
ae ; : Administrator's Office, Sam Gray Enterprises, Exuma,
Church. Officiating will be } The Bonanza in Freeport, Palestine Union Baptist
: Church, the entire community of Mt. Thompson and

tS. | the Forest Exuma.
Interment will follow in the Lakeview Memorial :

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar
: Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street

: on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. and at the

Franklin, Paul Jr., and Derrick Armbrister; three (3) } church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

daughters, Degra Williams, Sabrina and Paulette :
Armbrister; one (1) son-in-law, Vincent Williams :
Sr.; two (2) daughters-in-law, Nelda and Sharceen :
Annbrister; four (4) step-children, Helen, Leslie, :
Joey and Aloma; twenty three (23) grand children, :

Latia, Ethan, Laterco, Latishka, Latasa, Dario, : a resident of Bimini and formerly of Deep Creek,

Frandisha, Vincent Jr., Devardo, Devareo, Laquinton, : South Andros, will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday,

Kerry, Patrelle, Orrick, Shanee, Shareka, Shanique, ; March 14th, 2009 at the Chapel of Cedar Crest Funeral

Shavard, Swendell, Sharell, Wenty, Hansel, Portia ; Home, Robinson Road and First Street. Officiating

Ferguson and Audrus; 6 great grand children, two ; will be Rev. Leonard Miller. Interment will be made

(2) sisters, Leen Brice and Louise Gay, eleven (11) : - :
sisters-in-law, Marion Clarke, Althea Ferguson, Iona in the Southern Cemetery, Spikenard Road.
Roach, Priscilla, Shirley, Winnifred, Virginia, Claudia, ; Left to cherish his memories are his daughter, Louise

Peggy Armbrister, Lena Green, Dianna; six (6) : Rolle; 3 brothers, Samuel, Stanley and Bruce Rolle;

: 3 sisters, Ruth Rodgers, Lee Esther Bussell and

Livingstone Gay and Gregory Green: one (1) aunt, : ai Rolle and a host of other relatives and
Adeline Rolle; numerous nieces and nephews :

IVAN ALEXANDER
ROLLE, 74

: Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar
: Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street

. ‘ on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m., and on
UE OUS eee ere tae cone MO we Aue a Saturday from 10:00 a.m.until service time.

host of other relatives and friends including, Thora :





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager Euneral Home ( Crematorivan

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

JOHN EDWIN
ROLLE, 65

of #57 Whymper Lane,
Freeport and formerly of
Mangrove Cay, Andros will be
held on Saturday, March 14,
2009, at 11:00 a.m. at Bethel
Deliverance Centre, Eight Mile
Rock. Officiating will be Rev.
Dr. John N.T. Rolle, assisted
by Rev. Jonathan McMinns.
Interment will be made in the
Grand Bahama Memorial Park, Frobisher Drive.

Left with cherished memories are his eight sons: Lorenzo,
Elton, Matthew, Edwin III, Jason, Traves, Taven and
Trevor; two daughters: Christine and Bridgette; seven
grandchildren: Eldenika, Dalario, Brittney, Brianna,
Samantha, Shonta and Katavia; five sisters: Isalean Bowe,
Emily Howard, Deslean Cumberbatch, Rosalie Curtis and
Clora Williams; three brothers-in-law: Anthony
Cumberbatch, Benjamin Curtis and Kelsey Williams;
nephews: Paul and Keith Bowe, Anton, Edmund and
Chester Turner, Kelsie Williams Jr., Marcus Carey and
Tyrus Curtis; nieces: Suzette Grey, Yvette Ferguson,
Anishka Deveaux, Roquel, Nicola and Lashana Rolle,
Linda and Bridgette Bowe, Monique Rolle, Chelsey
Williams, Desdemona, Dowens, Diana and Denika Curtis
and Yuolanda Carey;John is survived by many family
friends Sylvanas Strachan who was like a twin brother,
Rev. Dr. John N.T. Rolle who is a spiritual advisor and
guardian angel and his family, Clement Pennerman, who
was a big brother to him, Eddie Clarke and the Clarke
family, The Rolle, Hepburn, Curtis, Adderley and Beckles
families, the entire community of Mangrove Cay, Andros
and Freeport, Grand Bahama including: Mr. Annie Cooper
and Bernd Bauer, the staff of Cemex and others too
numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager
Funeral Home and Crematorium Limited, Queens Highway,
Freeport on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. and at
the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 9

dock of Foes Muneral Dhape

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

DEATH NOTICE FOR

BISHOP HUBERT
GILBERT MOSS, 86

of Trinidad Ave., Elizabeth Estate and
formerly of Lovely Bay Acklins will be
held at Faith United Missionary Baptist
Church, Sunday March 15th 2009 at
2:00pm. Officiating will be The Rev.
Dr. William Thompson, assisted by
Ministers of the gospel. Interment will
follow in Lake View Memorial on John
F. Kennedy Drive.

He is survived by: Four Sons: Minister
Asa, Aron, Pastor Jacob and minister
Philip Moss, Six Daughters: Shirleymae
Martin, Acting Pastor Julie Farquharson,
Evangelist Loreen Johnson, Naomi Thurston, Katurah McKinney, Leah
Scavella ;One Brother: Deacon Joel Moss; Two Adopted sister: Minister
Sarah Ferguson and Hilda Sargeant; Sixty One (61) Grandchildren: Betty,
Lakeisha, Dorcas, Nelson, Rochelle, Naomi, Jerone, Rashad, Rotajh, Craig,
Tesma, Euline, and Asa Jr. Moss; Vincent Dorsette, Carla, Nickie, and
Wilka Deleaveaux; Michael, Nello, Shirleymae, Leroy, and Rev. Livingston
Edwards; Sheniqua Ferguson, Patrick, Corporal Sharico, Sargeant Kelsey,
Sargeant Christopher, Pamela, and Paulette Farquharson; Apostle Showalter
Johnson, Sherica Hamilton, Sheniska King, Gia Kemp, Marina and Faroone
Knowles; Timothy, Mario, David, Pledge, Burchnel and shantel Martin;
Patrice Williams, Charmine Mckenzie, Yolanda and Janario Mckinney;
Denise Rolle; Lacoya, Leonardo, and Lavard Scavella; Tanya Thompson,
Arthema Smith, Stanley, Patrick, and Earl Thurston; Shantel Forbes, and
Dr. Sambriann Curtis; Fifteen (15) Great Grandchildren: Six (6) Great,
Great Grandchildren: Four (4) Daughters-in-law: Marion, Zelma, Judy and
Rosemary Moss; Five (5) Son-in-law: Kendal Farquharson, Fredrick Johnson,
Glenville Scavella, Chief Inspector Samuel Mckenny and Gladstone
Thurston; Two (2) Sister-in-law: Leah and Emerline Moss; One (1) Brother-
in-law: Walter Knowles; Five (50) Granddaughters-in-law: Twelve (12)
Grandson-—in-law: Numerous nieces and nephew including: James, Rev.
Nathaniel, Glen, Stephen, Emroy, Jefferson, Worley, Justin, Wilfred and
Antoine Moss; Criscita, Jessiemae, Winifred, Susan and sharonna Moss;
Lucille and Roger Totte; Eunice Deveaux, Helen Miller, Clarabell Dawkins,
Felix Beneby, Deacon Cardinal Edwards and Family, Natalie Beneby and
family and Winston Knowles. Numerous other relatives and friends including:
Pastor Jeffery Woods and family; Donnie Barr and family; Elcima Johnson
and family; Gelena Moss and family; Huel Scavella and family; Rev.
Linkwood Ferguson and family, Philadelphia Baptist Church family, Divine
Deleverance Baptist Church family, The Bahama Islands Baptist Association,
Assistant Pastor Glaudine Virgil, Minister Vernice Bain and family, Shelia
Gibson, Elijah Beneby, Pastor Silvia Collie and family, Rev. Elias Ferguson,
Reginald Stevenson, Attorney Obediah Ferguson, Rev. Edmond Johnson
and family, Rev. Dr. Elkin Symonette and family, Margret Emmanuel,
Francis Jones, Joan Ferguson, Pastor Tueton Stubbs, Honorable Alfred
Gray, Estella and Premeletha Johnson and family, Maneria Rolle, Pastor
Betty Deveaux, Rev. Carol Rolle, Rev. Moses Cox and family, Remilia
Williams and family, Terrance Collie, Gwendolyn Sweeting, Minister
Stephen Ferguson Collie and Moss Families, the entire Acklins and Crooked
Island Communities. And a host of other relatives and friends too numerous
to mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT AT THE ROCK OF AGES
FUNERAL CHAPEL WULFF ROAD AND PINEDALE ON SATURDAY
FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. AND SUNDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM
1 PM UNTIL SERVICE TIME.





PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

AGG OSC? C cS
25
FUNERAL DIRECTORS |
“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition.”

7th Terrace, Collins Avenue * (242) 356-2187 *
P.O. Box GT-2679 * Nassau, Bahamas

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

MARIA THERESA
McPHEE

will be held at her residence #51 Maxwell
Lane off Farrington Road on Thursday,
March 12, 2009 at 7p.m.

FUNERAL SERVICE

MARIA THERESA
McPHEE, 72

of #51 Maxwell Lane will be held on Friday,
March 13, 2009 at 2pm at Kingdom Hall
of Jehovah's Witnesses, Theodora Lane.
Officiating will be Salathiel Cooper.
Interment will be made in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memories are husband: Eleston McPhee; five daughters:
Patricia Burns, Stephanie Dawkins, Sabrina Antor, Philippa Dixon and Nickia
McPhee; four sons: Glen Sr., Bernard, Edwin and Corporal 401 Mario Mcphee
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force; grandchildren: Lavaughn, Devont and
Antoine Burns, Lekita Chambers, Glen Jr. and Leshanda McPhee, Duran and
Terea Price and Bernique McPhee, Able Seaman Troy McPhee of the Royal
Bahamas Defense Force, Stacy Dean, Aniska Culmer, Matravia, Catavia,
Mario Jr. and Mateo McPhee, Harold Jr., Shannon and Jonathan Antor, and
Valdez Dixon Jr.; great grandchildren: Rayvaughn Burns, David Chambers,
Jaria Strachan, Tre’ and Hope McPhee, Karis Knowles and Ethan Culmer;
one sister: Mable Morgan; two brothers: Hosea Johnson and John Wallace;
sons-in-law: Alexander Burns, Donald Dawkins, Harold Antor Sr. and Valdez
Dixon Sr.; daughters-in-law: Lillian, Nellie and Calvese McPhee; grand
daughter-in-law: Tenier McPhee; grand sons-in-law: Randy Chambers and
Philip Culmer; step children: Larry, Jeffrey and Michelle McPhee; godchildren:
Terecita Ferguson and Sue Johnson; sisters-in-law: Geraldine Ferguson,
Muriel Ferguson, Dorothy Marshall, Lillian Saunders, Priscilla Forbes and
Margie Johnson; brothers-in-law: Charles and Richard McPhee; numerous
nieces, nephews and other relatives and friends including: Paulette, Brenda,
Christine, Vanessa, Donna, Barbara, Dennis, Richard and Reginald, the
Highland Park Congregation of the Jehovah's Witnesses, Patrice Glinton and
family, Carlton Demeritte, the Braynen family, Cecil Dorsett and family, Doris
Dean and family, Loretta Burns and family, Eloise Butler and family, Valarie
Williams and family, Dr. Eugene Gray and his team especially Dr. Bethel, Dr.
Locksley Munroe, Odette Nizel and family. the Dixon family, Lawrence
Ferguson and family, Salathiel Cooper and family, Frederick Brown and
family, Hilton Taylor and family, Charles Miller and family, Thelma Stubbs
and family, Beryl Brown and family, Inez Bowleg and family, Esther Curry
and family, Lillian Adderley and family, the Laing family, Tom Basden and
family and the Rock Crusher Community, the Pitt Road Community, Tri-star,
Family Guardian and Mosley Burnside Insurance, Lyford Cay beauty salon,
Team Deliverance, First Caribbean and Scotia Bank, Water and Sewerage,
Robin Hood, Atlantis, Ocean Club, Batelco and others certainly not forgotten
but too numerous to mention.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at Ferguson's Funeral
Directors, 7th Terrace Collins Avenue on Thursday from 10am to 5pm and at
the church on Friday from 1pm until service time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Hareweod Sinciair Higgs LPB.
Prestenl | Thang rector

BESSIEMAE
GREENE, 69

a resident of Marathon Estates and
formerly of Mangrove Cay, Andros
will be held on Saturday, 14 March,
2009 at 11:00 a.m. at Zion South Beach
Full Gospel Baptist Church, Zion's
Boulevard. Officiating will be Bishop
B. Wenith Davis, assisted by Other
Ministers of the Gospel and interment
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road. Services entrusted to
Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel,
Mount Royal Avenue and Kenwood
Street.

She leaves to treasure her memories are her Children: Reverend Tyrone
M. Greene, Joann Rolle, Stephanie Greene, Elvamae Johnson, Elvis
Greene, Jack Greene (Streamwood, Illinois), Jerome Greene (Warwick,
New York), Theola Edgecombe, Sharon Evans, Ivan Greene, also Alan,
Miguel and Michelle Greene; Twenty-four Grand children: Othello,
Lashan, Lakera, Latoya, Tiffany, Quinton, Kristin, Bridgette, Neville,
Ryan, Lesceia, Marcus, Oneal, Keisha, Brian, Julian, Shauntray, Joshua,
Garreth, Elvistina, Ivanique, Ashanti, Starasia, and Ivan, Jr.; Eleven
Great-Grand children: Oprah, Anphernique, Mercedes, Danero, Arvin,
Jr., Quintonique, Opal, Brittany, Demaro, Paris, and Odessa; Two Sons-
in Law: Gary Edgecombe and Troy Evans; Three Daughters-in-Law:
Linda Greene (Streamwood, Illinois), Dianne Greene (Warwick, New
York), and Karen Greene; Three Brothers: Carlington, Sylvanus, and
Harold Strachan; her Sisters: Leola Bullard, Francess Butler, and Margaret
Clyde, also Geraldine Johnson, Keta Bannister; One Uncle: Albert
Strachan; One Aunt: Ival Bain; Brothers-in-Law: Alexander Bullard,
Edison Butler, Keith Clyde, Reliston Greene, Otis Rolle, George Johnson,
and Samuel Wright; Sisters-in-Law: Maegrethel Strachan, Jacqueline
Strachan, Vivian Strachan, Gerelean Rolle, Jestina Johnson, Heterlyn
Wright, Maria Bowleg, Angela Neymour, and Beverly Greene, Thirty-
three nephews: including Reverend Nathan Strachan (Kansas); Thirty-
two Nieces, Three God-children: Sam, Valarie, Sherell, and Nabi;
special friends: Reverend Harry Davis, Vernal & Mavis Strachan and
Anetta Rolle, Rosa, Angie, Alice, Betty, Beryl, Kenu, Percy, Lawrence,
Chea, George Myers, Joann, Rhetta, Thessa, Freddie, Neka and numerous
other relatives and friends including Nurse Patrice Bowleg & Mangrove
Clinic, Nelson Ferguson, Godfrey and Anetta Rolle, Dr. Magnus, Dr.
Bullard, Dr. Rhema, Dr. McPhee and the staff of A & E Trauma facilities
at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Crows Nest staff of Holiday Inn,
Terrace Kitchen staff of Britannia Towers, Main kitchen staff of Cable
Beach Resorts, patrons of Bessie's Lunch Vending on Cable Beach, Beach
vendors of Paradise Island and Cable Beach, patrons of Bessie Greene's
Convenience Store, the communities of Grants & Peats at Mangrove
Cay, the community of Pyfrom Bend-Marathon Estates, Bishop B. Wenith
Davis and the Family of Zion South Beach Baptist Church, Reverend
Catherine Nairn and the Family of St. James Baptist Church, the family
of "In Christ" Ministries including Geraldine Johnson, Irene Sawyer,
Victoria Gibson, Althea Gaitor, Linda Woodside and Kermit Agaro.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday, March
13th, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday, from 9:30 a.m.
until service time at the church.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

DENIECE PATRICE

ROLLE, 41
affectionately called ''Neicy"

of Bimini Avenue, will be held on Saturday
1:00 p.m. at Glad Tidings Mission Baptist
Church, Balfour Avenue and Podoleo Street.
Rev. Jefferey Deleveaux will officiate and
interment will follow in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.

Precious memories are held by her mother,
Laura Taylor; sons, Danero and Jerome
Johnson, Vernaldo and Antwar Rolle;
grandson, Malik Johnson; sisters, Angela
Taylor, Mary Rolle, Linda Olds of St. Petersburg, Florida, Roberta Rolle,
Samantha Roberts, Karen and Yvette Johnson and Katrina Gibson; brothers,
Solomon Bowleg of Albany, New York, James Adderley and Dominique Rolle;
step sisters, Karen Butler, Lisa Scott, Lucy Mae Allen, Sadisca and Monique
Adderley and Alretha Forbes; step brothers, Marvin and Dwight Adderley;
nephews, Stephen Rolle, Omar Russell, Abdual Bowleg, Joshua Olds, Hendrick
Martin and Brendon Rolle; nieces, Eltoya Rolle, Maya-Angelou Carter Davis,
Aricka, Ingrid, Garnell and Crystal; aunts, Catherine Roxborough, Edna
Taylor-Michaels, Pauline and Anne-Marie Taylor, Mary Coakley and Emily
Rolle; uncles, Herbert Beneby, Leon Richards Jr. and James Taylor, Leon
Roxborough, Rudolph Stuart and Anthony (Bozo) Rolle; sister-in-law, Melinda
Bowleg of Albany, New York; brothers-in-law, Levon Olds of St. Petersburg,
Florida, Christopher Brown and Michael Roberts; grand nieces, Omesha,
Rodeasha and Taneasha; grand aunts, Merlene, Satella and Elizabeth DeCosta
of New York, Blanche Deveaux, Maser and Edna Sands, Florence Johnson
and Juliet Taylor; cousins, Patrick and Deon Stuart, John and Sherial Pierre,
Michael and Tabitha Culmer, Quincy and Eerie Stuart, Gregoire and Yvette
Montot Ricardo and Roger Taylor, Kevin and Sharan, Ryan and Monique,
Jon, Robert, Dawndrea and Jurich Taylor, Vernon and Jameca Johnson, Leonette
and Clinton Roxborough, Jodi and Ayana Brown, Laura and David Spence,
Kim, Rose, Tonya, Tracey and Mark Rolle, Christine Coakley, Angela, Renee
and Janice, Logan and Irene DeCosta, Rose and Portia and Helen Brown of
Freeport, Grand Bahama; other relatives and friends include, Erica Smith,
Bernice Robinson and family, Carlson Newton, Victoria (Vickie) Wood, Trivah
Johnson, Willeshia Sweeting, Erica Johnson, Alice Smith, the Fritz family,
the Newton family, Trevor Johnson and family, Johnson's Barber Shop, The
New Millennium Barber Shop, The Security Department of Wyndham Nassau
Resort, the Soldier Road Daycare Centre, City Market-South Beach, Glad
Tidings Mission Baptist Church family, All Saints Parish family, Tava Newton
and family, Velma Cox and family, Verline Bannister and family, Norma
Clarke and family, Shantell, Tasha, Cathy-Ann, Kendra Burrows and family,
Johnny DeCosta and family, Timothy and Alfred DeCosta, Judy, Margaret,
Freddie, Anthony, David, James, Andrew, Randy and Richard Rolle, Tracy
McDonald and family, Carol (Sunkie) and Cecile Bonamy, Shirlene Rolle and
family, the Pratt family, Flavia and Crew, Ola Colebrooke and family, Lily
Taylor and family, Vernencha Gibson and family, Jackie Gibson and family,
John Hall and family, Alexander Hall and family, Stephen (Peanut) Forbes,
Thomas Francis of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., Doreen Deleveaux and family, Miami
St. Crew, Market St. and Campari Crew, Jamal and Jason Satchel, Ramont
Knowles, Jermaine Rolle, Edward McGregor, Jason Rolle, Erica Smith,
Carolyn and family, Zerlene and Ruth and their families, the Nurses and
Doctors of the A&E of Princess Margaret Hospital.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL OF
MEMORIES, COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME,
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Friday from 10:30am - 6:30 p.m., on Saturday
from 10:00-11:30 a.m. and at the church from 12:00 noon to service time.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 11

for

CAPT. CYRIL
HOSEA
TURNQUEST, 87

Of Mortimer’s, Long Island will
be held Saturday March 14th ,
2009 at 10:30 am at Holy Family
Anglican Church in Mortimer’s.

| Officiating will be The Rev’d Fr.
Ernest Pratt and Rev’d Paulette
Cartwright. Interment will be in
the Church’s Cemetery,
Mortimer’s.

Left to cherish his memories are his Sons: Vivian, Elton, Cyril
Jr., Valance and Peter Turnquest; Daughters: Geraldine and
Althea Turnquest, Marjorie and Stephanie Cartwright, Sarah
Miller and Valerie McDonald, Elva Walkine, Doreen Turnquest,
Caroline Parris, Rose Edgecombe, Careese Dean, Romalee
Burrows, Jennifer Cartwright, Narine, Jocelyn, and Rosita
Turnquest; Sister: Myrtis Turnquest; Sons-in-law: John
Cartwright, Ashton Miller, Luther and Danny Cartwright, Colyn
McDonald, Reginald Walkine, and Luther Edgecombe;
Daughters-in-law: Martha, Eleanor, Sylvia, Geleta, and Maralyn
Turnquest; Grandchildren: Antoinette McKenzie, Hester, Ricky,
Lynn, Larry, Mario, Lucinda Miller, Julia Wells, Ashley
Cartwright, Bathsheba Fernander, Bonaventure and Uriah
Turnquest, Corrine Laing, Samantha Evans, Tristan Sands, Edith
Turnquest, Tamika Symonette, Nathan, Raquel and Elton Jr.
Turnquest, Verinique, Sherette, and Theodore Turnquest,
Charmine, Tamiko and Chauncey Miller, Stephen, LuKeisha
and LuKerah Cartwright, Barry, Lavado, Valencia and Mario
Turnquest, Cortney and Trent McDonald, Judy Davis, Suzette
Nairn, Paulette Crook, Hedy and Dion Walkine, Fred Paul,
Valerie Rolle, Carlton Paul, Glen and Cornell Knowles, Deal
Mortimer, Shantel Curry, Wayne and Tyrone Parris, Sandy
Smith, Jodel Roberts, Raquel, Obie, Peter Jr., Wadye and Domonic
Turnquest, Cassandra Smith, Jodell Roberts, Carl, Aston, Carline,
Carlisa Dean, Kaylee, Kaylynn and Indie Minnis, Kennis Johnson,
Nishka, Jamaal, Devonne and Danielle Cartwright, Rosanna and
Gregory Martinborough, Steven, Shannie, and Aleah Turnquest,
Shanell Knowles, Fhelton Cartwright, Trevon, Trenton and
Trenair Gray; Numerous Great Grandchildren, Nieces and
Nephews including: David and Vendolyn Dean, Delores,
Andrew, Margaret John, and Brenda Major, William Watson Jr.,
Frank, Agatha, Ernest, Basil, Bruce, Falcon Watson, Rudolph
and Naomi Pratt; Other Relatives and Friends including:
Catechist McFeild and Pearline Mortimer, Louie and Enid Carol,
John (John Smart) Cartwright, Mark and Kelsey Williams, Nadia
Hall, Rev. Paulette Cartwright and Family, Carlton and Monica
Cartwright, Essie, Lander and Drexel Turnquest, Coleen Adderley,
Olivia and Lockhart Turnquest, Harriet Dean, Peter Graham,
Kaiser Wilson, Predenza and Walkine Burrows, Iris Farquaharson
and Family, John and Eloise Knowles, Carlis and Sarah Milander
and the entire Mortimer’s and Long Island Communities.

Viewing will be held at the church from 6pm on Friday until
service time on Saturday.





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

a Kostsices Momoud
Fann Memorial Hoty

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rodd, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 »« Fax: (242) 340-8034

iy RVICE FOR

UNERAL SE

? Kenneth Major of Miami Florida, Willard Ferguson Jr.
| of Freeport Grand Bahama, Care Giver: Mrs. Sandra
: Augustin A Host of Other Relatives and Friends including:
| Bishop Sherwin Smith & Church Family Good Shepherd
Church of God, Officers and Members Churches of God,

f Bacardi Road will be held on | es ;
ow a bers a 7 Temple Ministries, Pastor Robert McPhee, Officers and
2:00pm at Good Sheperd
Church of God Ida Street off |
Robi Road Officiati ill :
b . Bishop ae ea te di Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and
Minister Franklyn Rolle}

Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens Soldier Road, | 2%4 at the church on Sunday from 12:30 until service

: time.

MINISTER CLARITA
ELIZABETH MAJOR
THOMPSON, 84

Left to cherish her fond memories are: Daughters: |

Attorney Stephanie Ann Wells, Jennifer Thompson, |
Earthel Smith, Julie Cooper and Brenda Thompson (pre-
deceased). Sons: Alfred Thompson, Jr. Jefferson, Stephen :
and Rodney Fred Thompson (pre- deceased) Sister-In- |
Law: Elcita Ferguson of Forbes Hill, Exuma Grand }
Daughters: Dr. Keysha Smith Attorney Stephanie A.T. |
Wells, Dr. Attorney Lillith Smith, Mikia Cooper, Rodina |
Armbrister, Kiera Johnson, Danielle, Altamese and |
Mornette Thompson, Kayla Armbrister and Dedrie; Great |
Grand Daughters: Antonesha Wells, Lakia Jones, Claudia :
& Christa Rolle, Lavette Armbrister, Shamara Armbrister, |
Rain Thompson, Jamie Francois and Raven Wells :
Daughters-In-Law: Gail, Myrna and Esseymae Thompson
Neices: Dorothy Smith, Sambrianna Walkine, Vandolyn
Stubbs, Chrystal Benson of Great Falls Montana and }
Michelle McDonald Grand Sons: Cleveland and Tennyson |
Wells Jr., Rodney Thompson, Jr. Rev. Dwight Thompson ;
ee : ena ae eee ee 2 brothers: Leonard and Alfred Bridgewater and Patrick
In-Laws: Hon. Tennyson R. Wells, Dr. Michael Cooper,
Edward Thompson Grand Son-In-Laws: Liviticus and :
Omar Armbrister Great Grand Son: Jade and Shamaro }
Armbrister Neices: Sambrianna Walkine, Vandolyn : L in earl A cearlaieedat
Stubbs, Chrystal Benson of Great Falls Montana Nephews: | Ae anion nee ear ncn? Ws reetnys ene zeny, teensy
Whitfield, Freddie, Ishmael Bradshaw Major and Rev. }

Inc. Pastor Philemon Wilson, Officers & Members Faith
Members Church of God.
Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview

Solider Roads on Saturday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

DEATH NOTICE

MS. ORELIA
FERGUSON, 65

of Miller’s Heights off
Carmichael Road and formerly
of Mt. Thompson Exuma died
at the Princess Margaret
Hospital on Monday March 9th
2009.

She is survived by her sons: Donavan Ferguson, Dwayne,
Dwight and David Ferguson daughters: Wilma Coin and
Lonease Ferguson sisters: Patsy Bridgewater, Ruth
Bridgewater, Theresa Bridgewater and Cynthia Fritz

Adderley grand parents: Estella Bridgewater numerous
nieces, nephews and other relatives and friends to
numerous to mention.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 13

and Crematouum Limiled

Ou Memorial Mortuary

EEPORT
11A East Coral pod eee G.B., Bahamas
Box F-4
Telephone: (4a) 373- tne7 (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 » Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

i A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY
? FROM 1:00 P.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

DANIEL
WILLIAMS, 87

OF #17 BERKLEY DRIVE,

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA |
AND FORMERLY OF WEST:
END, GRAND BAHAMA WILL |

BE HELD ON SATURDAY,

MARCH 14, 2009 AT 2:00 P.M. AT } |
THE KINGDOM HALL OF |

JEHOVAH’S WITNESSESS,
COMET ROAD, FREEPORT,

GRAND BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL BE BROTHER :

HERBERT MARSHALL.

Left to cherish his memories are his daughter: Coramae Thomas; |

2 sons-in-law: Dennis Thomas and Nathanial Brown; stepsons:
Dudrick, Ashley and Pedro Edwards; stepdaughters-in-law:

Brown, Bonita Pratt, Stephon Brown of California, Vernon, Owen
and Oscar Thomas, Elsa Bartlett, Alitha Lightbourne, Tanya and
Natalee Brown; great grandchildren: Bradley Jr., Brandon,

PERSONS WISHING TO

CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

FUNERAL SERVICE

EDNA LOUISE
KIKIVARAKIS, 88

OF #11 MAN-O-WAR CIRCLE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF NASSAU,
NEW PROVIDENCE WILL BE
HELD ON SATURDAY, MARCH
14, 2009 AT 10:00 A.M. AT ST.
JOHN’S NATIVE BAPTIST
CATHEDRAL, MEETING
STREET, NASSAU, NEW

: 7 PROVIDENCE. OFFICIATING WILL BE REV’D DR.
Berthaly, Carrol and Judy Edwards; grandchildren: Bradley :

MICHAEL SYMONETTE AND REV’D DR. HERVIS BAIN.

INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE LAKEVIEW
i MEMORIAL GARDENS, JOHN F. KENNEDY DRIVE,

: NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE.
Braadon and Lathario Brown, Tarico and Clarence Pratt Jr., Blake :

Bartlett Jr., Oscar Thomas Jr., Davon Lightbourne, Nathan Brown, } ate
Tajh Brown, Jason and Tikinba Pett - Toria Prati, Deajahnae | Left to cherish her memories are her five sons: Nick, Tony, Jeffrey,
Lightbourne, Ostia and Osteny Thomas and Blaante Bartlett; : / : -
Seto grandchildren: at Tario Jr. and Tamia Brown ang Ela, fifteen. grandclildren:
and Janae; special family and friends: Kenneth and Ann Williams :
and family, Veronica Johnson and family, Pastor Sheron Garvey :
and family, Millis Newton and Bone Fish Foley family, Nicolas }
Rolle, Harold and Mavis Rolle and family, Sherick and Ellie Ge Hk Anion. Aneclo-and Maint niedecand MeOH:
Smith and family, Irish Grant Floyd Dolly and family, Q. Deal : : a ae : P °
and family, Kitty Fishbacher, Hortence Roker and family, the |
Bowleg family, Jessica Maxis and family, Lilliame Brown and }
family, Raymond Anderson and family, Walter Forbes and family, }
Brother Herbert Marshall and family, Frederick Benson and family, }
Gracy Williams and family, Desiray, Cindy and family, Simeon } —: . :
eee and family, Pe Maxwell Dee and ual: Pastor } eivers race Els ancy dene Tusce lh
Steve Grant and family, Shervin and Madlyn Pinder and family, }

Susie Sawyer and a host of other relatives and friends. RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND

SIGN THE BOOK OF 3 CREMATORIUM LTD., ROBINSON AND SOLDIER ROADS,

CONDOLENCES, MAY DO SO IN THE “IRENIC SUITE”
OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND 2 FROM 9:00 A.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 }

Michael and Keith; four daughters-in-law: Joy, Deborah, Debra
Kathy Laster, Nicole Kiki-
varakis-McKenzie, Tamika Nelson, Karen, Sonia, Dominic,
Damien, Anthony, Kareem, Kim, Jeffrey, Veronique, Dorainey,
Scentique and Jarvis; fourteen great grandchildren: Kyhiel,
Anthony “Kylie”, Kiara, N’ya, Malique, Cloe, Leah, Toni, Aatifah,

Patsy, Dorothy, Judy, Bill, Lona, Minerva, Cynthia, Curtis Jr.,
Curtis, Margarette, Joan, Paulette, Carolyn, Jackie, Shayne,
William, Arthur, Justin, John, Shorie, Godfrey, Emily, Welma,
Edna, Caroline, Georgina and a host of other relatives and friends,
especially Mattie Tolliver, Annie Forbes and her devoted care

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “IRENIC SUITE” OF

NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00
AM TO 6:00PM. AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Tetsios Memoval Mortuary
and Crematouum Limiled

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rodd, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASS
Robinson and Soldier oe MGiscaE N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

OT UE SOUS ACS FOR

LYNN LYATTE
CLARKE, 46

WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY,

NAZARENCE, BAYSHORE ROAD,

FOLLOW IN THE HARBOUR WEST PUBLIC CEMETERY,

Johnett Davis; 2 grandchildren: Jamazio and Dianell; 6 sisters:

Minister Beulahmae Fowler, Araline Mackey, Leading Woman Marine

Doramae Clarke of R.B.D.F, Sherry, Darnell and Karen Clarke; 3

Crystal Mackey, Alvonett, Alicia, Alia, Alteshia, Elshadi and Kayneshia

Viola Hopkins; 1 grandaunt: Louise Colebrooke; adopted parents:

Kenneth and Shelia Hepburn; 2 sisters-in-law: Ruth and Rochell }
Clarke; 4 brothers-in-law: Bradley Fowler, Peter Mackey, Prince
Duncombe and Craig Nicholls; cousins: Prince Joseph, Dereck, Clifton }
Viverlaw and Elizabeth Hopkins, Nell Fowler, Cordiann Higgs, Christina }
Fowler, Berthram Taylor, Wilfred, Rovena, Marva and Anthon Fowler,

Melcine Dorsette, Diann Beneby, Ruthmae Romer, Pamela Russell,
Peter, James and Joshua Russell, Rev. Roston Simmons of Miami, Fla.,
Isodora Johnson, Vanrea Dameus, Cathrine Clarke, Kenneth Williams,
Sherly Clarke, Anntonett Rolle, Sharon and Autherine John, Estermae,

Louise and Rachel Clarke, Dedrie Adderley, Jannet Smith Prudence
Mackey, Idamae Williamsand a host of other relatives and friends ;
the entire management and staff at the Isle of Capri }

including:
especially the Food and Beverage department, Ishamell Williams,
Sharon, Patrice, Rochell, George, Kendal and Leroy Dorsett, Kevamae,

Florence, Ulahmae, Lana, Troy and Tyrone Beneby, Laurene and Junior }
Evans, Osley Russell, Vezel Gibson, John and Felix Saunders, Police
Sergeant 192 Steve Gibson, Otterine Jones, Elizabeth Fowler, Stella :
Nichols and family, Lauretta Dean, Rev. George Fowler, Pernetta
Russell, Laurea Lightbourne, Bridgette Fowler, Marlin and Nardia }

: Turner, Carnetta Martin, Ray Carroll, Carolyn Romer, Mary Davis,
i Carolyn Hepburn, J enneth Fowler, Marion Sturrup, Miriam Saunders,
i Ellen Bowleg, Andrea Bain, Desiree Roberts, Silvea Hanna, Gertrude
! Kelly, Mars Forbes, Samuel Evans, Pearl Simmons, Rev. Samuel
: Fowler, Ivy Ferguson, Rev. Kirk Curry and the Grace Church of the
OF DEADMAN’S REEF, GRAND } Nazarene family, Rev. Lewis Adderley and family, Bishop Godfrey
BAHAM AND FORMERLY OF } Williams and family, Rev. Carl Oliver and family, Rev. Reginald
SOUTH MASTIC POINT, ANDROS : Ferguson and family, Bishop Wilbert Rolle and family, Lyncee Murphy
! and family, Rev. Doris Tinker and family, Mariah Martin and family,
MARCH 14, 2008 AT 10:00 A.M. AT :

THE GRACE CHURCH OF THE }

Rashad Monroe and family, Martha Burrows and family, Lavardo Gray
and family, Damion Parker and family, Stephanie Rolle and family,

Wenzil Martin and family, Rev. Maude Romer and family, Mavis
HANNA HILL, EIGHT MILE ROCK, :
GRAND BAHAMA. OFFICIATING ; family, Rev. Lorenzo Harris and family and especially everyone life
WILL BE REV. KIRK. A. CURRY :
ASSISTED BY MINISTER RALPH HEPBURN. INTERMENT WILL
: Memorial Service for Lynn Lyatte Clarke will be held on Friday,
BARTLETT HILL, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA.
i Bayshore Road, Hanna Hill, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish her memories are her 2 daughters: Johnell Rolle and ;

Gaitor and family, Rev. Kenneth Fowler and family, Idel Reckley and

who she touched.

March 13, 2009 at 8:00 p.m. at the Grace Church of the Nazarene,

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE” OF

RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM
brothers: Eddison, Dave and Dwight Clarke; nieces: Anita Fowler, :
Rhonda Haven, Denice Tucker, Tamica Blyden, Precious, Petral and }

LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT

? THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM 8:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE
Clarke, Laverne Moxey, Louise Miller, Kenderea Neymour, Jessica }
and Shannie Clarke, Tabatha Duncombe, Albertha and Cathrine Clarke; }
nephews: Maquel, Eddison Michael, Jared, Omar, John and Dwight }
Clarke Jr., Prince Duncombe, Shapario Roberts, Shamari, Darren and
Richard Clarke; 4 aunts: Julia Fowler, Perneshia Taylor, Elouise and }

MRS. MILA CLARITA
BURROWS, 87

OF LEWIS YARD, GRAND
BAHAMA DIED AT HER
RESIDENCE ON FRIDAY,
MARCH 6, 2009.

She is survived by her daughters:
Millicent Higgs and Pauline Lewis;
sister: Maude Swann; numerous
grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A
LATER DATE.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 15

and Crematouum Limited

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

FUNERAL SE

i Davis, Marcus Garvey,Rayann Pinder, Robyn, Sharise, Dwayne, Denado,
i Mel, Queenie Hanna & Family, Sonia Palacious & family, Virgil
i Bowleg, Granville Johnson, Alfred Pennerman, Harvard Cooper &
i family, Les Fountain & family, Childern of Columbus House for Boys
i & Girls, Hanna family, Menas Vardoulis & family, Yvonne Cartwright,

OF #65 EAST CORAL ROAD, Ophalia, Backkus, Martha, Charlie Bullard, Charlie Bootle, Bishop

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA }
AND FORMERLY OF ST. MARY’S, }

JAMAICA WILL BE HELD ON ; ‘amily, Elim Baptist Church, Higher Anointed Church, G.B Family

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 AT : Worship Center, Aniskha Parker & family, Keisha, Victory Way
ST. JOHN’S }
JUBILEE CATHEDRAL, SETTLER’S
WAY, FREEPORT, GRAND:
BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL BE
BISHOP GODFREY WILLIAMS :
ASSISTED BY REV. K. BRIAN SANDS. INTERMENT WILL }
FOLLOW IN THE GRAND BAHAMA MEMORIAL PARK,

JOSEPH EZEKIEL
BAILEY, 65

12:00 NOON AT

Randy and Jon Bailey and Brohdny Ricketts; daughters: Nicole Turner, :
Dorothy Bailey, Nadia Samuda, Krista Bailey, Carla West and Shantel :
Grant; grandchildren: Bailey Watson, Andrew and Michael Fair;
Abigale and Joshua Samuda, Natlie and Renae Bailey, Taylor and : :
Tatyana Turner, Lavar, Ashley and Bussy Bailey and Emmanuel West; ep ae et UN
sister: Veda Bailey; brothers: Frank, Francis, Norman “Ben” and :
Wendel Bailey; aunt: Turla Moore; mother-in-law: Lorraine :
Pennerman; father-in-law: Christopher Thompson; daughters in-law: |
Nicole Bailey and Mandielyn Rickettes; sons-in-law: Delton Turner ;
and Eurland West; sisters-in-law: Joletta Bailey, Roslyn Sands, Virginia :
Jones, Maria Thompson, Shirley Smith, Flerica Pierre, Dellerese Frazier, :
Katy Thompson, Sandra Ferguson, Philena Pierre, Sherilyn Antonio, ;
Margarette Bailey, Sonia Carroll, Ellen Thompson and Antionette :
Thompson; brothers-in-law: Whitney Thompson, Joseph Thompson, ;
Kim Thompson, Christopher Thompson, Christopher Pierre, Ray Carroll, :
William Smith and Robert Sands; aunts-in-law: Edris Johnson, Myrtis :
Saunders, Maria Saunders and Beatice Williams; nieces: Jessica ;
Blossom, Carlene, Maureen and Nicole Bailey, Elanie Porter, Marvaree, :
Nardia, Arnette, Paula, Jennifer, Diana and Latoya Bailey, Sonia ;
Oneisha Sandra; nephews: Clive, Marcus and Mark Bailey, Leroy :
Jennings, Alrick Jennings, Peter Bailey, David Douglas Donnevan, :
Thor, Trevor and Hugh Bailey, Philp Taylor and Sean Jamal Greene; :
grandnieces: Jenice and Niesha Kerryann Bailey, Melissa and Sha ;
Jennings and Jasmine and Nya Bailey, Shanta Sophia and Tiffany ;
Porter; grandnephew: Omar, Emmanuel, Samuel, and Luke Bailey ;
and Chris Lawrence; cousins: Oswald, Silas, Timothy, Isacara, Joseph, }
Besty, Ina, Val and Marge Moore and a host of other relatives and }
friends including: Hubert & Kelly Russell and family, Frank Outten ;
& family, Michael Darville & family, Paul Darville, Junior Bain &

: Earl and Duke Johnson; numerous grandchildren, nieces, nephews and

family, Jim White, Artis Neely & family, Ron, Mario Donato, Brian : 4 host of other relatives and friends.

Roberts, Arnette Ferguson, Samantha Bastian, Brother Mac, Chantell

i FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A
i LATER.

Claudia, Kimberly, Shelly, Queenie Bain & family, Mama Jane, Robert :

Albury, Ina Stuart, Lucita Johnson, Lionel Wilchombe, Glenera Johnson,
Garnel Johnson, Nicara, Terrance, Prince, Lionel Jr, Ashanique, Kenrick,

* =~
NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

RVICE FOR

Godfrey Williams & family, Pastor Willard Strachan & family, Pastor
Reginald Bastian & family, Min. Winifred Pratt, St. John Jubilee Church

Christian Center, Bishop James & Dr. Johnniemae Swinson, Staff of
Pier 1, Xanadu Beach Hotel, Jennifer & family, Teka, Tara, Anjulie,
Enea, Dawnique,Kendesia, Rudena, Shante, Brian, Juliana, Evangelist
Beulahmae Fowler, Pastor Marge Lefluer & family, Edith Gardiner &
family, Jane Sweeting, Grand Bahama Airport Company, Paul Marshall,
Mr. Quant, Julita Ingraham Department of Social Services, N.I.B,
Nurses & Doctors at the Rand Memorial & Princess Margaret Hospital,

SECTION #2, FROBISHER DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA. ; Pastor Bernard & Isadora Walkins & family.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Christina Bailey; sons: Mark, VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “PERPETUAL SUITE” OF

RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM
LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT

SERVICE TIME.

MR. CLIFFORD
LEONARD
JOHNSON, 76

OF #6 SETTLER’S WAY,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF HATCHET
BAY, ELEUTHERA DIED AT THE
RAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL ON
SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Margurita
Johnson; sons: Derek, Kevin, Clayton,
Dwayne, Dexter and Desmond Johnson;
daughters: Juliette Foster and Angela Woodside; sisters: Shirley Gibson,
Julie Pennerman, Sandra Johnson, Myrna Gaitor and Jane Lord; brothers:





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009



mt Coomaheeinn Zomited’ | \ FAST SUN

FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: (242) 373-3005

DEATH NOTICE FOR

Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 304-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 340-8034

MR. PATRICK DORN
“NON”
JOHNSON, 49

OF #15 MAN-O-WAR CIRCLE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA DIED AT
THE PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL
ON MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

He is survived by his wife: Myrtle Cartwright;
father: Stanley Johnson; sons: Tristan and
Tavaris Johnson; daughters: Alisa, Raven and
Asaunde Johnson; stepchildren: Fabian,
Virgill, Antonio, Parrish and Colette; sisters:
Ivy Stuart, Drusilla Butterfield and Stanleka
Taylor; brothers: Warren, Reunie, Andrew
and Calvin Johnson and a host of other relatives
and friends.

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS WILL
BE ANNOUNCED AT A LATER DATE.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



willy

@ RISE MORTUARY

—=,-$ SS ===

“A New Commitment To Service’

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

REGINALD
THEODORE
STRACHAN, 72

of Malcolm Road will be held on
Saturday at 2 p.m. at St. Margaret’s
Anglican Church, Kemp Road.
Officiating will be Rev. Fr. Joseph
Mycklewhyte and Rev. Angela
Palacious. Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

He is survived by his wife: Betty

Veronica; 1 daughter: Monique Neely; two sons: Neil and Reginald
Strachan; mother: Daisybell Strachan; 5 grandchildren: Achaz
Neely, Cato, Kale, Cai, and Kezia Strachan; 2 brothers: Lester and
Lionel Strachan; 1 daughter-in-law: Shawna Strachan; | son-in-
law: Wencil Neely; 2 brothers-in-law: Roderick Innis and Granville
Cleare; 5 sisters-in-law: Remilda Strachan, Dorothy Symonette,
Alice Innis, Dency Moss and Mable Strachan; 1 aunt: Winnifred
Dames; | uncle: Dudley Cooper; numerous nieces and nephews
especially, Ruel, Stephen, Rachelle and Andrew Strachan, Brian
Cleare, Dr. Patti Symonette, Sharon Hepburn, Shenna and Shanice
Innis, Ingrid Smiles, Sean Innis, Sterling, Keith, Sheldon and Gary
Symonette, Natasha Williams, Alvin Moss, Fredrick Moss Jr.,
Cheryl Haven, Gennean Cleare, Marie and Deborah Moss;
Dominique and Riochelle Strachan and Devaughn Pinder other
relatives and friends including: Gurth Knowles, Nathaniel Cooper,
Ruby Ann Cooper-Darling, Oswald Marshall, Beryl Miller, Beverley
Woodside, Brenda Marshall, Rev. Charles Lewis, Evangelist Gloria
Dawkins, Shirley Rolle, James Lewis, Rev. Irene Coakley, Fanny
Pletka, John Cooper, Primrose Chase, Rev. R. E. Cooper Jr., Bertha
Rousseau, Carmella Colonneaux, Heather Humes, Wendy Dames,
Richard Dames, Marilyn Darville, Pauline Winder, Cleomi Saunders,
Noel Rahming, James Thompson, Leonard Leadon, Paulette
Lockhart, Clayton and Karen King, Joseph Hall, Ross Cartwright,
Charles Taylor, Charles Adderley, Peter Joseph, James Dean and
Raphael Sanon, Leslie Ryan.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta
Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and again from
10 a.m. to noon and at the Church from 1 p.m. on Saturday until
service time.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 ¢ Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Evergreen Mortuary

EXCELLENT IN THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE

For all of your Funeral Service Needs,
We will be pleased to serve you with bono.
Tel: 242-394-749
Fax: 242-704 7900
24hrs: 242-341-4009
or 322.) 242
(el 565-9758

DEM ALEE &. PENN L.F.Gamke.

Mackey Street South
MANAGING FUNERAL DIRECTOR

VERONIA
AUGUSTIN, 65

of Strachan's Alley off Kemp :

Road and formerly Port-de-Paix,

Haiti will be held on Saturday, :
March 14, 2009 at St. Margaret }
Anglican Church, Kemp Road at !
11:00 a.m. Officiating will be

Rev'd Joseph L. Myclewhyte,

assisted iby other ministers. Interment will follow in !

Woodlawn Garden, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish fond memories are her husband, Ulrick
Agenor; Children: Berry and Prince of Miami, Lilian of !

Haiti,
Grandchildren: John, Babenka, Milisha of Haiti, Kevin,
Claudesha, Deiontae, Newry, Devontae, Steven, Darryo,

Darryell, Antonio, Benjamin, Rodline, D.J. Dontar, Besty :

and Branden of Miami; Brothers: Montalien, Aguste,

Raymond, Dieucel, Felistin of Miami; Adopted Brothers:
Tony Major, Achouwel, Vincent, Marcel; Sisters: Refelia :

of Miami, Bregetha of Haiti; Adopted Sisters: Jacqueline,

Melony, Molonie, Phillippa, Odet Tassy; Aunts: Man-Ceko
and Sacia of Haiti; Uncle: Eledor of Haiti; God-parents: }
Carline Bain and Lenousa Civilma. Adopted Children: :

Marie-Natha, Felicia, Sauver, Allian, Frank, Sherene,
Mercilia, Raymond, Jasmine, Anoude, Tabby, Peter, Sheda,
Micheline, Nabath, Samantha, Maptisa, Jimmy, Marieta,

Gassy, Gelandne; Son-in-law: Addly Cadet; Daughter-in- !
law: Carline Joseph; Sisters-in-law: Carline Joseph, Saret, }
Janine, Carolina; Brothers-in-law including: Prophet, Eliaso; :

Numerous nieces and nephews including: Bohnomme,

Bernitha, Eliasen, Philip, Robert, Shelia, Solivia, Gloria,
Esland, Sowel, Joseph, Madianie, Mary; Other relatives :
and friends including: Lequaz, Man Blac, Marriela Joseph :

and family, The Major family of Strachan’'s Alley, Claudine,

Claude, Sonie, Lucie and Betty; Eighteen :

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 17

Tasha, Tavia, Paul Major, Derelien, Cassy and family, Dwain
and family, Tifrere, Hilda and family, Vandette, Raquel,
Jerry, Andicka, Anika, Margo and Family, Bassy, Josue,
Telson, Woslet and family, Wesner, Tiwono, Michel, Jean
Robert, The Saunders family, The Morley family, The
Francophone Church family, Ebenezer and Bethel Seventh-
day Adventist Church family, The Orion Academy School
family, George & family, Samon & family, Juliet, Janet &
family, Anton and family, Cetelen, Borlot and family, Denise,
Cilvertha, Mitis and family, Harold and family, Luke,
Raynold, Silvana & family and the entire family of Strachan's
Alley and Kemp Road community.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at Evergreen
Mortuary on Friday from 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. and again
on Saturday from 11:00 a.m. until service time.

SELONDIEU
JOSEPH, 60

of Fox Hill and formerly of Haiti
will be held on Saturday, March 7,
2009 at St. Bedes Catholic Church
at 3:00 p.m. Officiating will be
Father Roland Vilfort. Interment
will follow in Fox Hill Cemetery.

Left to cherish fond memories are his children: Walnert,
Helenne, Onondieur, Antoinise and Wednent Joseph;
Brothers: Cirema Joseph and Ajas Rolmy; Sisters: Adelicia,
Melira and Ophanie, Chante’ and Inel Joseph; His special
friend, Francilia Polucape; Uncle: Junette, Verly, Telson,
Francu, Enritha, Jason, Mac and Santara Joseph; Aunts:
Dieula, Serveir, Salizia, Estephen and Jumeir St. Louis and
Jean Clouide; Cousins: Antoinier Poiucope, Anseigno
Benjamen, Amezida Gustarhe, Beme Rismond, Luc Chery,
Elissaint Prophete, Verdieu and Jane Prophete, Termutis
Delva, Frandy Joseph and Jason Joseph, Robedye and Valeri
Joseph, Valsilia Pierre, Quira Molson Joseph, Nuposine
Phophete, Mecus Joseph, Sefoca Joseph, Mac Joseph,
Macola Grutave, Ketia Grutave, Melia Riomonche, Ethel
Riomonche, Claudia Pierre, Tilasry Guitave, Christepho,
Zozana Cuillocune, Louzette Chery, Cramide Chery; A host
of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at Evergreen
Mortuary, Mackey Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. - 6:00
p.m. and again at the church from 2:00 p.m. until service.





PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

BArmerittie’s SHuneral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 « TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Eldridge James Johnson, 70

Gardens, Soldier Road.

Tina and Hope Lightbourne, Thalia Campbell, Judy Miller, Sauleene,
Monique, Michelle, Adapha and Tominica Beach, Carol Thomas,

Joyce Bain and family, Shirley Cooper and family, Jennie Welch

family, Jennie Benson and family, Ruthmae Neely and family,

. family, Brenda Ingraham and family, Barbara Smith and family,
i Gloria Sweeting and family, Madeline Wilson and family, Harriett

. ? Davis and family, Dale Davis and family, Ancil Davis and family,
. se = eee ge ae nig i Larry Davis and family, Charles Scott and family, Wendy Kemp
Ti js Baptist Church. East & Shirle : and family, Paulette Davis and family, Ingrid Bartlett and family,
Streets pa Sun day at 2:30 ear : Carolyn Azikiwie and family, Hazel Taylor and family, Herbert Scott

Orblerabing ll Be Ese Seymour and family, Dr. Gertrude Holder and family, Leon
Morrison, assisted by Rev. Ulrick : Hutch Adanily Bete jak d family. Michael Joh
Smith & Rev. Anthony Sampson. ; Hutchinson and family, Betty Johnson and family, Michael Johnson

Interment follows. in. Woodlawn Sands, Kendal, Derek, Brian and Richard Sands, Eva, Diana and

: Thomas Greenslade, Nurse Sylvia Davis, Dorothy Colby, Edward

. . . | Brown, Merril Mackey, Daniel Ferguson and family, Rev. Osborne
Cherishet pie ic Rees Held by: i Rolle and family, The Hon. Orville T. Tommy) Turnquest M.P. and
The love of his life:Lady Ella; His ; : : :

. . : ! family, Audrey Fernander and family, Myrthlyn Jones and family,
loving children: Byron, Sheldon and : :

. Ba ae i Bernard Hanna and family, Alex Hanna and family, Rudolph and
Indira Johnson-Wright; Daughter- : Daisy Valerina Willi a tanails. Harn Wi
in-law: Jasmine Johnson: Son-in- ; Daisy Hanson, Valerina Williamson and family, Harrison Hanna

law: Christopher Wright; Three : ©. : ; ; : ; :
Grandchildren: Shelethia and Abner J einuicid KrisDira Wright; | Sidney Bain and family, Dr. Nicolas Fox and family, Katrina Miller
Adopted Brother: Eldridge Davis; Five Sisters: Mizpah Lightbourne and family, Maria Poitier and family, Glen Bodie and family, Alanaire
(Predeceased), Macushla Beach, Naomi Brown, Addison Francis } Jones and family, BTC Retiree Assoc., The Staff of Glowell Motel,
and Sonia Charlow; Two adopted Sisters: Clara Evans and Subleeka The staff of BIC, David and Bridgett James and family, Preston
Johnson; Four Brothers-in-law: Sidney Jones, Glanville Bethel, } Gibson and family, Betty Moses and family, Anatasha Clyde and
Cerzales Dennis and Carl Charlow; Four Sisters-in-law: Marilyn } family, Allisa Lockhart and family, Jacqueline Bain and family,

Kerr, Gloria Lightbourn, Andrea Bethel and Sandra Dennis; Three

Aunts: Gladys Johnson (Mama), Julia Davis and Edith Johnson; | : : : : i : :
Twenty Six Nephews: Dr. Jerome, Bradley, Timothy, Brent and } Rev. Rosalita Davis and family, Ernestine Poitier and family, Tamicho

Maurice Lightbourne, Anthony, Ricardo, Mark, Tyrone, David, Paul R t Tab le family. H Howavick and fini Men
and Samuel Beach, Durell, Brockholst, and Garrett Brown, Raleigh, } ee: df Se Py Pe AG d es S verre df ay Lavi ane
Demetrius and Melchoir Francis, Tyrone Smith, Ricardo Smith, } Paces he a oe a M et ee amy: Ae
Theoder and fain Charon, Pei oc vesn er Rolle and family, Rev. Reginald Williams and family, Maudeline

: Pinder and family, Nora Pinder and family, Dorothy Allen and

Pamela Akie-Grimple, Deborah Ward, Shanla Brown-Cleare and family, Mervin, Peter and Roy Jones and family, Beryl Bonamy,
Vanessa Brown, Dawn Francis, Uchi Pinder, Deidre Young, Pinnicue } Maude Hamilton and family, Minerva Puler and family, Peter JOHES
Johnson, Lynda and Ellen Smith, Chevette Williamson, Carlette : and family, Austin Cole and family, Richard Johnson and family,
Major, Nicoya and Shatara Grant, Sileigha Jones and Rachelle Noble } ee a rhe and ce ae = eee
(Predeceased; Forty one Grand Nephews. Thirty five Grand Nieces. : Pe t .s he aie oe ia f Kear y: a "al es Sas
Numerous relatives and friends including: Persis Adderley and rae “a eo a i fohage an ata 4 a "Sh . Shen ae 4
family, Sister Annie Thompsom, Barbara, Jalna and Camille Bullard, | AY SEY. Pastl SOMNSON ane lamlys ixey. olenna owe an

i family, Revs. Leon and Venera Johnson, Rev and Mrs. Norris

. . ? McDonald, Rev. Anthony Sampson, Rev. Ulrick and Bonnie Smith
and family, Donald Thompson and family, Franklyn Thompson and } a : : ? : ;
family, Anita Thompson a family, Keith OIRO aid family, and family, Mins Veronica Smith and family, Ricardo Knowles and
Clement Johnson and family, Earl Johnson and family, Kenneth family, Rev. Wilton Strachan and family, Evang. Beth Stewart and
Johsnon and family, Ual Johnson and family, Rodney Johnson and ; f@mily, Zion Seniors Ministry, Carl Russell and family, Harley
family, Joy Johnson and family, Rosa Johnson and family, Janet } Simms and family, Dwayne and Daphne Williams, Pedro and Marlene
Johnson and family, Jolton Johnson and family, Patricia Morton and_} Bain and family, Josephine Parker and family, Thelma Darling and

; : i family, Eloise Jones and family, Thelma Pennennan and family,

‘ . i Kendall and Joan Humes, the Staff of Chalks Ocean Airways

George Parks and family, John Johnson and family, Godfrey Johnson i .~. ; el : ys;
and family, Florinda Stuart and family, Marie Johnson and family, } ee oe and the entire Zion Baptist Church family,
Sandra Johnson and family, Leonard McDonald Johnson and family, : ee Nae eee

Maria Thompson and family, Sylvia Bodie and family, Anthony } Friend faetane ‘cap itte's F lH
Naim and family, Joseph Young and family, Monica Kemp and | saarket Street, from 10-6:00 p.m.on Saturday é& on Sunday from
family esi Carles: Mose ane tantly, amnesia. hompson end: ¢ 10-12:30 p.m. & at the church from I :30 p.m. until service time.

and family, Harold Scott and family, Ernest Scott and family, Sybil

and family, Bernard and Yorick Evans, Rosalie Minus, Reginald

and family, Carolyn Hanna and family, Thezel Wright and family,

Gloria Hanna and family, Zion's Usher Board, Zion's Christian
Education Ministry, Dr. Charles Osazuwa, Jackie Smith and family,

and Natasha Allen and family, Rev.Elva Russell and family, The





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 19

Hemeritie’s Funeral

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Elvie Bochard-Moise, 67

a resident of Fire Trail Road, & formerly of
Haiti, will be held at Mount Pleasant Green

Baptist Church, Quakoo & East Streets, on :
i Itell, Rashad, Leroy, Kiesha, Quanlisha, Tianna, Rollie, L.J., Alex, Kim,

Webster, Warren, Tenario, Garvin, ; other relatives & friends including:
i Melonie, Pam Bethel, Carolyn Johnson, Ms. Simmons, Rose Minnis, Mary

Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev.
Dr. Wesley L. Thompson, Pastor Lawrence
Papou-Loutt & Pastor Kevin Pierre, assisted

by other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment |
follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK

Drive.

Cherished and indelible memories will forever
? Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 9:00

i a.m. until service time.
Sylvanie Beauchard, Martha Jack, Arnold

! Mitchell Ricardo D'Haiti-McKenzie, 41

be by her husband: Jean Moise; six children:
Jocelyne Beauchard; Marie- Edline Lubine,

Bochard and Duquene Moise; Adopted son:
James Joseph; Grandchildren: Berline Lubine,Judette Jules, Lokirdeline Jules,
Gayo Jules, Jhon Carey-Jules, Peggie Beauchard, Ronaldo Lubine, Avinson
Beauchard, Ronaldo Lubine, Avison Beauchard, Tyesha Culmer, Julisa Jules
& Arrest Beauchard; Daughter-in-law: Andrea Bochard; Sons-in-law: Bertus
Lubine, Henry Petitifrere & Auxilieu Jules; sisters: Lamercie Beauchard,
Marie Beauchard, Jeune Vierge Louis, Melanie Louis; brothers: Renan

Bochard, Pharbius Bochard, Dieubon Louis, Jean Bochard, Roland Bochard,

Florian Bochard; mother-in-law: Anna Baptist; Aunts: Tagras Bochard, Mrs,
Ratino, Mrs. Charles; Uncle: Borome Almorise; nieces: Annette, Paulette,
Anette, Roseanette, Cindy; nephews: Stephen, Olbry, Mike, Norman, Renald,
Junior & Wilkenson; Sisters-in-law: Rosana, Rosalia, Aurina, Antonette,
Marielle, Annalia Moise; brothers-in-law: Raymond and Jean Rony Moise;
Cousins: Vervi, Germaine, Ester, Jahnee, Iyannah, Elijh, Kamoi, Elirose,
Sandy, Magda, Jenny, Joward, Emila, Damelia, Brena, Mimous, Elyse, Ebony,
Mimine, Rosanette, Rosemarie, Telicia, Andieula, Amanda, Tineg, Simon,
Augustin, Auxius, Gerlad, Patrick, Pastor Kevin Pierre, Tyoken; Other relatives
and friends including: Iranie Pierre, Marcelilia, Mildor, Larose Pierre, Kirin
Pierre, Adule St. Jean, Idejea and Family, Mizou, Pierette, Dante, Schaffer,
Duery, Mr. Don Grissom, Wyndham Casino Marketing Dept., Mr. & Mrs.
Dean & Family, Alicia, Duery, Tanya, Meredith, Sopnovia, Shaniqua, Erica,
Kizzie, Toya, Janeille, Judith, Marina, Karen, Wyndham Banquet Crew,

Church.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market

Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00
a.m. until service time.

Alexander Hanna, 15

~~ a resident of Milton Street, will be held at }

Church of God of Prophecy, Englerston, East
Street & Prophecy Way, on Saturday at 10:00
a.m. Officiating will be Minister Timothy
Johnson & Other Ministers. Interment follows
in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard
Roads.

Left to cherish his memories are his mother:
Sandy Hanna; father: Alexander Wright;

Hanna; grandparents: Linda & Rollie Hanna,
Bursil & Rosenell Wright; great grand mother:

. Doreen Ingraham; aunts: Felicia, Althea, Portia, Alma, Stephanie, Shanell,
i Stacy, Sherryann & Kenra Hanna, Marie Fowler, Cherry Ann, Terry Ann,
i Debra, Mable & Kenya Wright; uncles: Rollie, Tonny, Raymond & Kevin
i Hanna, James, Isaac & Sidney Wright; grand aunts: Lavaughn Young, Mable,
? Naomi & Martha Hanna; granduncles: Kingsley, Gernice, Kiplin, Gordon,

Elseworth, Larry & Buddy Ray; cousins: Lastina, Ivan, Jimmy, Calvin, Rico,

March, The School for the Physically Disable, Social Services Department
& Calivar Construction Company.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market

a resident of Thompson Lane, will be held at
Foresight Baptist Church, Taylor Street, Nassau
Village, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Officiating
will be Rev. Dr. Charles Culmer, assisted by
Elder Kendal Mackey. Interment follows in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Precious memories will always linger in the
hearts of his mother, Creola McKenzie; father,
| Joseph D'Haiti, Step Father, Eugene Miller;
stepmother, Maxine D'Haiti; 1 daughter:
Brinique; 3 sons: Mitchelle, Tiano and Alton
D'Haiti; grandfather: Clifton McKenzie; sisters:
Michelle D'Haiti and Woman Marine Owenta

i Pennerman' brothers: Marvin D'Haiti, Jerald Lotmore, Benjamin Seymour,
: Javon, Dwayne and Kevin D'Haiti; nieces: Natasha Knowles, Sheena,
i Shantiqua, Lakeisha D'Haiti, Saharia, Maquella, Michelle; & Latariea;
? nephews: Marvin, Mervin, Dwayne Jr., Kevin Jr. D'Haiti, Jamine, Jamal,
: : .. + Giovanni, Lavardo Lotmore & Jordan; grand niece: Brianna Knowles; sisters-
Cuskco Sei Community, Fao Papo Late & amly-Ebaezr Hepis| ag Natasha Dat Chott Lotmeve ants: Maran, Wis Eas

i Leisha, Irene, Nancy & Sue McKenzie, Janet Storr, Janette Miller, Lavada
i Sands, Helen Knowles; uncles: Alfred, Lionel & Arthur McKenzie & Ronald
? Bell; grand uncle: Harcourt McKenzie; grand aunt: Camie Rolle; cousins:
i Rose Forbes, Antionette & Shavonne Bell, Don Miller, Keilia Williams,
i Samantha, Samaijah, Stanley Jr & Stanzil Forbes, Doris Newton, Joyclyn,
i June & Barbara; special friend: Bridgette Stuart; numerous friends including:
? Carne & family, Maudrean & Jenniemae Stuart & family, George Whitfield,
i Edith Boyd & family, Orlando Rudon & family, Tamika Fowler & family,
: Thomas & family, Carla Henderson & family, Thompson Lane family, Nicola
i Stuart & family, Lynette & family, Chester Hanna, Marvin, Paul Gray &

family, Thompson family, Donna Campbell, Gail Frazier, R.H. Curry &

i family, Julian & family, Barrette Smith, Dwayne Saunders & family, Ryan
i Ward & family, Mario Williams & family, Kim & Willie Moss & family,
? Sharon, Geo, Keisha & Gigi Butler, Rev. Dr. Charles Culmer, Rev. Iris Culmer
i & the Foresight Baptist Baptist Church family, Vernita Gibson & family,
? Colyn Gibson & family, Nancy Lewis & family, Ricardo Williams & family,
i Strachan Corner family, Clethus Dean, Christine Curtis & family, the Carter
? family, The Rt. Hon. Perry Christie, Hon. Alfred Sears & family, Mr. Ian
i Cargill & family, Chester McKenzie & family, Gibbs Corner family, Vera &
i family (Jamaica), Nurse Adderley & family & Dr. Orlando & family.
brothers: Cleo, Otis, Jordon & Kevenique

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
i Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 9:00
* a.m. until service time.





PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aemeritte’s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Pedro Andrew "Dutchie" Nesbitt, 43

a resident of Grant Street, Fox Hill, will
be held at St. Anselm's Roman Catholic
Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill, on
Friday at 3:00 p.m. Officiating will be i
Fr. Noel Clarke, Msgr. Preston Moss &
Deacon Raymond Forbes. Interment
follows in Fox Hill Cemetery, Fox Hill
Road. Left with treasured and precious
memories of this rare gem will always }
linger in the hearts of his loving, }
dedicated, and caring mother: Rebecca }

Nesbitt; five (5) brothers: John Davis,
Anthony "Bee" Taylor Sr., Gregory Sr.,
Ricardo Sr., and Roscoe Nesbitt Sr.; two

Woodside; four (4) uncles: Edward "Sox" Kerr of Freeport Grand Bahama,
Leonard "Mikey" and family, Alfred Kerr and family and Bobba Hilton;
seven (7) aunts: Brenda Kerr, Theresa Hilton of Savannah Sound Eleuthera,
Joyce Roberts, Mizpah Rolle, Olive Neely, Mavis Hutchinson, and Sandra
Kerr; Godmother: Lulamae Greaves; two (2) sister-in-Iaws: Janet Davis
,Oris Cooper of George Town Exuma; eighteen (18) nieces: Natasha
McPhee and family, Simone Mcintosh, Janiska Davis, Antandra, Antdreika

Rigby and family, Nicole Smith and family, Natika Brown and family,
Claudette & Vandette Brown, Shonelle Woodside; Shantell Kerr and
family; thirteen (13) nephews: Brian and Jason Davis, Leroy and family,

Roscoe, Ricardo Nesbitt, Jr.,Curtis Walkes, Eric Kerr, Donald and Kevin
Brown; nineteen (19) grandnieces and nephews; ten (10) Godchildren;
other relatives and friends including: Raymond Farquharson, Patricia
Newry, Kennedy Frazier and family, Linda Mott, June Mars, Craig Miller,
Peggy Styles, Rev. Dr. J. Carl Rahming and family and St. Paul's Baptist

Rose Street Boys, Philip Smith, the families of Mable and Hortense

Fox Hill Constituency, Senator Jacintha Higgs, Samuel Gray and family,
the Step and Grant Streets family and the Fox Hill Congos family, the
staff of Princess Margaret Hospital Male Medical 2, Monsignor Preston
Moss and the St. Anselm's Catholic Church family, and many family and
friends to numerous too mention. Friends may pay their last respects at
Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m: on Thursday
& on Friday from 9-1 :00 p.m. & at the church from 2:00 p.m. until
service time.

A Memorial service will be held on Thursday evening at 76:30 p.m. at

Rev. Dr. Carl J. Rahming.

Mother Eloise Johnson Stubbs, 65

by Pastor Derick Maycock. Interment
follows in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.

Cherishing her memories arc her children:
One (1) son: Marvin Johnson; Eight (8)
daughters: Sheila Rolle, Zellamae,
Priscilla & Rochelle Johnson, Debra
Moss, Shena Smith, Wendy Ferguson &
Sharlene Ryan; One (1) Adopted
daughter: Kerah Deveaux; Seven (7)
step-daughters: Alfreda Fox, Genevieve
Burrows, Ella Anderson, Monique
Maycock, Gwendolyn Joseph, Kimberley

? Stubbs, & Inishka Lloyd; Two (2) Step-sons: Keithwood & Genius Stubbs
i? Jr.; Fourteen (14) Grandchildren: Renard Poitier, Aniska Adderley, Erika
i & Tahnee Wright, Ahrachelle & Arreo Ferguson Jr., Khrishena, Christopher
(2) sisters Kathy Nesbitt and Hilda ; Jr, Christian, & Shanae Smith, Garranique Ryan, Donovan Moss, Bernique
i Rolle & Pedrico Johnson; Five (5) Great Grandchildren: Elvardo
? Thompson, Mellisha Andrews, Marco Nottage, Tivonya Davis & Dante
? Seymour; Six (6) Sisters: Elder Queenie Rose, Cleomie Collie, Maria
? Williamson, Delro Williamson, Clothilda Williamson, Joyce Higgins;
? Four (4) Brothers: Elder King Williamson, Enos Bain of Bellglade Florida,
? Evangeles Williamson, Clarence Williamson; Four (4) Sons-in-law:
i Bernard Rolle, Deno Moss, Christopher Smith Sr., & Arreo Ferguson;
and Robyn Taylor, Shakera, Rikela, Dorell, and Donell Nesbitt, Nickia ; Five (5) Step-sons-in-Iaw: Pastor Derick Maycock, Pastor Burton Fox,
i Asher Anderson, Corporal Collin Burrows, & Sirdonne Lloyd; Two (2)
? Grandaunts: Daisy Willamson & Marietha Deveaux; Numerous Nieces
: including: Minister Mitterlean Gordon, Margaret McPhee, Deacon Ruthmae
Norrison and Anthony Taylor Jr., Alexis Collie and family, Gregory, }

Sargent, Minister Bettyann Ferguson, Minister Geneieve Bullard, Albertha,

i Janice & Elaine of Bellglade Florida, Stacey Grant, Deegenera Jones-
i Dixon, Delicia Miller, Nyoshe Williamson, Michelle & Catherina Johnson,
? Judy Strachan, Janet Russell, Ernestine Johnson, Juliamae Roberts, Juetta
? Johnson, Maria Williams, Barbara, Claudine & Melinda Sweeting,
? Lahomma Johnson, Floretta Williamson, lvarene Murphy, Sharon, Sheila
Church Family, Cora Davis and family, the Fox Hill Community, Larry
Wilmott, Nassa Mackey, Val Roberts and family, Ishmael Clark, The } Numerous Nephews including: Bishop Trevor Williamson, Antone, Pastor
i Arlington, Anthony & Vincentie Williamson, Dexter Brown, Nelson,
Hutchinson, Rum Cay Crew, Marco, The Hon. Fred Mitchell, MP for the } Anthony, Kennedy, Daniel & Reno Johnson, Anthony Sweeting, Greg
? Bain of Bellglade Florida, Windson & Victor Collie, Jeffrey Charlton,
? Deno, Jonathan, & Pastor Bernard Walkine, Samuel, Vincent & Bryan
i? Gaitor, Ual Johnson, Martin Nixon; Eight (8) Sisters-in-law: Hattie Bain
i of Bellglade Florida, Maxine Williamson, Gretel Sweeting, Gwendolyn
? Johnson, Lavetta Johnson, Sylvia Gaitor, Hazel Bain, Zelita Ferguson.Other
i Relative & Friends: Bishop Elkin & Inez Symonette & Family, Co-Pastor
? Sharon Williamson, Minister Bettyann & Samantha Williamson, Carena
? Symonette, May Williamson, Florey Bain, Alvin Gardiner, Minister
i Marietta Moss, Solomon Miller, Ozel & Viola Miller & Family, Elton,
? Felton, Berkley Williamson, Pastor Leonardo & Michelle Jones,
St. Paul's Baptist Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill. Officiating will be ! Chanderlear Forbes, Nieknell, Rodnique, Precious, Rodney, Kathrina,
i Dejenaba Brice, Ministers Reginald & Santoya Edgecombe, Jackie
? Johnson, Yvonne Taylor, Richard Boodle, Wenthworth Musgrove, Latoya
i Payne, Bethlehem Holiness Faith Mission Family, Chipman, Rolle, Hanna,
? Johnson, Williamson, Cox, Miller, & Cooper Families, Dialysis Unit,
? PMH and a host of other relatives and friends.

& Monica Gaitor, Buelah Whyms, Vivian Laing, Renet & Rhonda Johnson;

a resident of Woodlawn Garden Road & formerly of Pinefield, Acklins, Pnends may pay then last respects at Dementie's Funeral Home, Market

will be held at Trinity Full Gospel Baptist Church, Marshall Road, on } ai he ene [rorn LOU aad cantil Gere ibe tne
Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will be Bishop Trevor Williamson, assisted } Scones :

Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on Sunday from 10-12:00 noon





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 21

Hemeritte’s Funeral

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Bernadette Ann Ferguson Brown, 47

& formerly of Fox Hill, will be held at St.
Road, on Saturday at 3:00 p.m. Officiating
will be Monsignor Preston A. Moss, Fr.
Noel Clarke & Deacon Raymond Forbes.

Church, Fox Hill.

Bernie's life will always be treasured and }
will linger in the hearts of her husband,
Warren Brown, daughters, Wardissa and }
Warnika Brown; sisters, Cora Mackey, }
Eileen Bain, Marita Ferguson, Theresa :

Ferguson Knott and Carriemae Knowles;

brothers, Clarence II, Kervin and Garth Ferguson; aunts, Berylmae Wright, |
Maria Ferguson of Manhattan, New York, and Auntie Tip Cox from Miami, }

Florida; uncles, Daniel Ferguson of Manhattan, New York; sisters-in-law,

Verdell and Sharon Ferguson, Marsha Brown, Betty Hanna and Eltaena
Whymns; brothers-in-law, Philip Bain, George Knott, James Whymns, Bernard
Hanna; aunts-in-Iaw, Salomie and Pearl Munroe, Myrtis Brown, Mable }
Colebrooke, Mildred Kelly, Elizabeth (Bets) Sands; uncles-in-law, Stafford :
and George Munroe; nephews and nieces, Dwight & Senator The Honorable }
Dr. Jacinta Higgs, Stephen, Bonita, and Leon Mackey, Eddie, Lillian and }
Ryan Flowers, Don and Tamara Ferguson, Ricardo and Alexandrea Taylor, }
Dominique Adderley, Daniel Ferguson, Criselle and James King, Attorney

Chaunece, Cherise, Clarence IIT Kevin (Kimbo Slice), Renae, Devin and & Talia Williams, Omara Williams & Tracey & Theodore Dorsette, Shirland

Kemuel Collymore, Terran, Kervin II, and Kervinique Ferguson; grand Willi ou Jr., Christian Williams, Ricardo Hynds, Reno & Camille Hynd Ss

y’ : ; aie zt pen Ee ? Portia Smith, Patric & Aretha Gardner, Cpl. Juan Meadows, Cpl. Jermaine
nephews and nieces, Valane, Stephanita, Sabrea, Stephen Jr., Cecilia, Dwight | Murphy: Curtis Gray, Owen & Latoya Gray. Christoff, Shenika, Denise &
Jr., Crystal, Nigia, Ellea, Michaela, Leonard, Ryiesha, Edvardo, Keshante, ? Dina Williams, Khalvaran Edgecombe, Sharrad & Christopher Cartwright,

? Andrea Darceuil, Javan, Kaleb & Precious Burrows, Reginald Williams Jr.,
? Raquel & Michael Williams: 13 Great Grandchildren: Tania, Taylor, Philia,

; : : : : i Javanno, Javez, Tenisha., Terell Jr., Mareno, Juan Jr., Jermaine Jr., Dania.
Sophia Smith, Avian Darville, Jyles (Aston) Butler, Sabrea Mackey, Clinton } aves e 2 aye ; ie : ; ;
C.J. Sands; cousins, Fred & Florence, Katrina, Elsie, Manette, Joe & Judy, | Daniel, Javan Jr; 3 Son-in-Iaws: Richard Coleby, Bishop Michael Patton &

Magaretia, Iedenek 6 Teotha, Albert & Ruby, Nigel & Sophia, Margaret, Brothers: Thomas, Franklyn & Glen Williams: 2 Sisters: Felicia Vincent &

? Lucille Lewis: 1 Brother-in-law: Christopher Lewis: 5 Sisters-inlaw: Loletha

efmise edie. LBS. Dace Vanndae Mena Nadia ec es ? Hanchell, Rosemary, Dorothy & Albertha Williams and Elva Missick: 2
Lit : } : ie Lowe : > 88), } Aunts: Vernetta Williams & Esther Henfield: 1 Uncle: Albert Williams: 19
ulamas, Laveme, Joy, Tony, Sonia, Marilyn, Predencka, Ann, Barry Richard, ? Nieces: Katherine, Alvera, Winseley, Fiona & Shantell King, Janet Hanna,

Charlie Brown, The Moss family, John & Laverne Pople & family, the Eunice Young, Karen Thompson, Monique Wallace, Deidree Williams, Denis

Edwards family, Michael & Joy Smith & Family, Winton & Renee Bain & i ‘ : : ; ' ;
family, Mrs. Sands & family, Stephanie, Dale, Avon, Jenn, Michelle Butler Alexandria & Samantha Gibson; 17 Nephews: Charles, Lou, Llewelyn Spanky
? : : 3 ? Hanchell, Vernon & Vincent Bullard, Kevin Brooks, Hubert, Dennis, Thomas,

& family, Wendy Clarke, Katie Clarke & family, Shirley Johnson, Vandamae as
Albury, Arthur Clarke & family, Barbara, Patricia, Claudine and Tyrone Miller Reno, Tedford, Teko, Tino & Tarico, Glen Williams Jr., Mario Lewis and Van
y Le : ° y ? Gibson. Numerous Grand Nieces and Nephews: Other Relatives and Friends

i including: Thelma Shakespeare & Family, Janice Grant, Linda Wildgoose,
? Shandira Ferguson and the entire Missick Family, Jude Martin, Dina Munnings,

: : . .1’ £ Janice Strapp, the Delancy Family, Kimsley Ferguson & Family, Marie, the
Gloria Gray-Wallace, Mrs. Sylvia Rolle, Mrs. Carey & Family, Eleanor Smith . ‘
& Family, Stephanie Neely, Ms. Williams. Delores Greene & Family, Kim | Staff at Columbus Primary School, The National Insurance Board, the Staff

Dawkins, Samuel Pinder & Family, Patrick Gibson & Family, [Yfrs. Romer é : : : : rs ae ie
‘ : : i Nesbitt, neighbours & friends in the Pinewood and Miami Street Communities,
and the Staff of Human Resources Unit at B.T.V.I, The entire B.T.V.1. Family, ¢ poy Rains Family: the loving members of Messials Baptist Chusch and

i the Prayer Band.

Thomas Moore, Staff of Ernst & Young, Staff of Sandilands Rehabilitation end eae D eer 1H Mark:
Center, the Fox Hill Community, the Current Island Community, Bahamas } ren Cae ae abl i panne fact ee ia -
Cricket Association, the 1979 Class of Aquinas College, and a host of other Bi Nage teca a Cheney Senn alee eae
friends too numerous to mention; special thanks are extended to Monsignor ? “" :

Alice Ferguson of Miami, Florida, Erica and Darcine Brown, Phillandra Bain,

Erin, Ethan, Tianna, Ricardo Jr, Dantae, Melantae, Danae, Tyler, Kemron,
Kemry, James Jr., Kevin Jr., Kevin, Keviena., Kevlar, Kassandra., Kiara,
Reggie Jr, Reginae, Raejay, and Re'Naja; godchildren, Wandessa Charlton,

Deborah, Cedric, Anthony & Peggy, Martha, Betty, Dorrie, Ted, Fredericka,
Rudy, Jeffrey, Alpheus & Etoy, Leslie & Jackie, Miriam, Raymond, Leonard,

Joanne Rolle, Halcy Dorsett and Freddy Ferguson; other relatives and friends:

& Family, Val & Deidre Thompson, Thomas Davis Sr. Family Reunion Clan,
Linda Ford, Mrs. Wood, Mildred Kelly & Family, Mrs. Taylor, Mrs. Rolle,
Cynthia Thompson, Dawn Collie, Patsy Strachan, Gloria Munnings & Family,

Richard Lucy, Joan Fagundes & Staff of M & E Limited (Caterpillar),
Principal, Staff and Students of Kingsway Academy, Aquinas College, & St.

i Preston Moss, Father Noel Clarke, Deacon Raymond Forbes, Ricardo
? Demeritte, St. Anselm's Senior Chou, the entire St. Anselm's Church Family,
? Kingsway Academy Choir, Dr. Iva Dahl & the staff of B.T.V.I., The Princess
a resident of Trinidad Ave., Elizabeth Estates
? Community.

Anselm's Roman Catholic Church, Bernard

? Friends ray pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
? Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from 9-1 :00 p.m. & at
i the church from 2:00 p.m. until service time.

Interment follows in St. Anselm's Catholic i

Margaret and Doctors Hospitals Emergency Staff, The Elizabeth Estates

Susan Elizabeth Williams, 68

> a resident of Jumbey Street, Pinewood
| Gardens, and formerly of Grand Turks,
|} Turks & Caicos Island, will be held at
Messiah Baptist Church, Palm Beach Street,

| on Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating will
be Bishop William Rahming, assisted by
Evangelist Vanda Miller. Interment follows

in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.

Left to cherished fond memories are: 5
sons: Shirland 'Solo', Wellington ‘Jake’,
Harrison 'Harry' & Reginald 'Reggie'
| Williams & Quintin Taylor: 5 daughters:
Mary 'May' Coleby, Valderine 'Val' &
Keturah Williams, Leah 'Lee' Patton and
Jacqueline Burrows: Grandchildren: Tito

Derek Burrows: 2 Daughters-in-law: Patricia Williams, Kendra Taylor: 3

LaFleur, Barbara., Sherise, Glendina & Glenda Williams, Christine Lewis,

at the Princess Margaret Hospital/Eye Ward, Shanice Taylor & Family, Mr.





PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Hemeritie’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Neville Arlington (Tom) Major, 48

Cremation follows.

Precious memories will always :

linger in the hearts of his Mother }

Etoil Maxine Darville; one son, :
Jameko Major; one grandson, Jameko Major Jr.; four sisters, }
Flora Woodside, Joan Barry, Sonia Yankey and Audrey Major; :
10 brothers, Louis, Henry, Anthony, Phillip, Lawrence, :
Charles, Finley Jr., Joseph, Leroy and George Major; Eight :
slsters-in-law, Denise, Rochelle, Shirley, Ina, Stephanie, :
Coleen, Judy, Lavern and Mary Major; three brothers-in-law, |
Jason Woodside, AllIson Barry and Robery Yankey; three :
aunts, Angela Robinson of North Carolina, Audrey Darville :
and Carol Harrison; two uncles, Donald Darvllle and Clarence
Harrison; three grand aunts, Joyce Darville, Leoni Cartwright :
and Bulah Darville; two grand uncles Addington and :
Livingston Darville numerous neices and nephews including, :
Tonya and Craig Stanley of Texas, Keno and Valerie Simmons }
of Baltimore Maryland, Jurymchieo Cleare of Ft. Lauderdale :
F., Merill Major, Mario and Tamara Major, Jushikii Woodside :
of Baltimore Maryland, AI'Diko and Al'lanisha Barry, Arsenio :
Woodside, Akeemo Cambridge, Akeel and Ryan Yankey, :
Anthonique Thiquia and Rashea Major and Taneil Major; :
numerous grand neices and nephews, other relatives and }
friends including, Lisa Bonaby, Elaine Whymns, Arnette }
Campbell, Cyprianna Saunders, John and Glinton Major :
Terrence Jr, and Terron Bonaby, Raynell and Ramia :
Colebrooke, Abraham Brunashe, Cicely Rabass, Naomi :
Symonette and family, Kathline Warren and family, Angela :
Achara and family, the Bowleg family, the Williamson family, :
Eugene and Olive Butler, Paula Rolle and family, the :
Cartwright family, the Darville family, George Delpek, the }
Missick family, the Gardiner family, the Bonaby family, the :
Moss family, The First Holiness Church of God family, the :
Saunders family, the Brown family, the Glinton family, the :
Major family, the Doctors and nurses of Male Surgical #2 at :
: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral :

The Princess Margaret Hospital.

: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
: Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

a resident of Strachan Blvd.,
Soldier Road, will be held at First :
Holiness Church of God, Holiness }
Way, Bamboo Town, on Saturday :
at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating will be |
Bishop Edward Missick, assisted :
by Pastor Gregory Collie. }

Joel John McKinney, 52

a resident of Hospital Lane, will
be held at Grants Town Seventh-
day Adventist Church, Wellington
Street, on Sunday at 11 :00 a.m.
Officiating will be Pastor Andrew
Burrows. Interment follows in
Southern Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads.
Left to cherish his memories are
his wife: Arlene McKinney; 1
daughter: Shavonne McKinney;
1 son: Javonne Joel; 1 step son:
Tamiko Williams; 1 grandson: Pedro Colterell Jr.; 7 brothers:
Pastor Simeon Hepburn, Pastor David Anderson, George
Rolle, Richard Newbold, James, Johnny & Carlo; 2 sisters:
Augusta of Freeport, Grand Bahama & Sarah of Nashville
Tenn.; brothers-in-law: Leonard Breynan, Larry, Marvin,
Gregory McDonald, Bartholomew Bastian, George Roberts
& Neil Benjamin; sisters-in-law: Sandra Bastian, Paulette
Adderley, Adriana Roberts, Judy Benjaminan & Isadora
Hepburn; | aunt: Espserlcaner Rolle of Exuma; nephews:
Derek Bastian, Charles, Deon Stuart, Joey, George, David
Roberts, Omarr Martin, Leonardo Braynen, Peter, Denario
Ferguson, David, Michael Turnquest, Javon McKinney,
Tamiko Williams, Omarr McDonald, Neil Benjamin, Simeon
B. Hepburn; nieces: Charlene Stuart-Kelly of Eleuthera,
Michelle Evans, Sheryl Stuart, Crystal Martin of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Cheryl Gittens of Barbados, Kenyetta Blyden,
Petra McDonald, Daynell Turnquest, & Shawnya Murray of
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Shantel Ferguson & Maranay
Saunders; other relatives & friends including: Linda Moss
& family, Betty Taylor, Jerome Pinder & family, Shirlymae
Smith & family, Rose Key & family, Estermae & family,
Augustamae Samuel, Ivy Smith, Sherry, Jackie, Kim Pinder,
Ricky Patageo, Tamika Newbold, Olga Hinzey, Mama Joyce
Brown, Rev. David Anderson & family of USA, Pastor
Tyrone & family of USA & June Lewis & family, the Lewis
Street & Hospital Lane family.

Sunday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

EULAH MAE
FRANCIS, 77

OF THOMPSON COURT, OAKES
FIELD WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, MARCH 7TH, 3:00 P.M.

AT ST. MATTHEW'S ANGLICAN
CHURCH, EAST SHIRLEY STREET.
ARCHBISHOP DREXEL GOMEZ

foem ASSISTED BY FR. JAMES
fae) MOULTRIE, FR. DON HAYNES
ey AND ARCHDEACON JAMES
PALACIOUS WILL OFFICIATE.
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE CHURCH'S CEMETERY.

She is survived by two grandchildren: Shannon and Shennique Davis;
Sister-in-Law: Mrs. Maria Francis; Nieces: Angela & Lorenzo Gibson
(Kwasi & Laurel) Denise Francis (Andre Hayne) Elaine & Raymond
Collie (Raynell) Mrs. Ethel Rolle, Patrica and Freddy Mackey, Carmen
Ingraham, Faye & Jeffrey Swaby; Nephews: Dr. Rudolph & Mary
Francis, Omari & Dr. Shani Francis-Smith, Tellis & Doris Ingraham,
Nigel & Ann Ingraham, Larry & Patrice Ingraham, Chef Don &
Michelle Ingraham, Howard Ingraham. RELATIVES: Mr. & Mrs.
William Lightbourne & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Francis & Family,
Basil Francis & Family, Ms. Dorothy Davis, Mr. Wendell Francis &
Family, Mrs. Thelma Ford & Family, Archbishop Drexel & Mrs.
Gomez & Family, Myrtle Gomez, Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Gomez &
Family, Dr. Perry & Mrs. Gomez, Mr. & Mrs. Roger Gomez & Family,
Anita & Antonia Roberts, Miss Veronica Gomez, Leonie McCartney,
Ophelia Fox, Naomi Gomez, Bloneva Rahming, Peggy Francis, Mr.
& Mrs. Rodney Heastie & Family, Ms. Brenda Heastie, Miss Annette
Heastie & Family, Mrs. Carolyn Heastie & Family, Ms. Karen Jervis
& Family, Mrs. Pauline Bastian & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Tyrone Heastie
& Family; Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Rodgers & Family, Ms. Coralee Heastie,
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Heastie & Family, The Stuart Family, The Pople
Family, The Woods Family, The Braynen Family, The Gomez Family
& The Francis Family; SPECIAL FRIENDS: Mr. Lowell- Mortimer,
Mrs. Yvonne Bethel, Sir Orville & Lady Turnquest, Sir Cyril & Lady
Fountain, Dr. & Mrs. Austin Davis, Ms. Alicia & Lewis White &
Family, Mr. Samuel Spence, Mr. & Mrs. Nathaniel Levarity & Family,
Dr. David Barnett, Ms. Constance Mackey & Family, Mrs. Christine
Rolle, The Mortimer Family, Mr. & Mrs. Edward Williams, Mrs.
Sonia Dames, Mrs. Stella Nicholls, Ms. Pat Bowe, Mrs. Dorothy
Ferguson-Horton, Mrs. Constance Lunn, Mrs. Maxine Eldon & Family,
Mrs. Trudy Miller, Mrs. Geneva Thurston, Mr. George & Satella Cox,
Mrs. Orry Sands, Mrs. Margaret Claridge, Ms. Cynthia Donaldson,
Ms. Olga Reid, Mrs. Lovely Forbes, Mr. Ivan Conliffe, Sandra Mackey,
Juliette Barnett, Claudette Allens, The Pedal Pushers - Corrine Fountain,
Mavis Adderley, Edith Powell, Beryl Campbell, Grace Wallace, Louise
Gibson, Patricia Treco, Roberta Sands, Inez Saunders, Hyacinth
Saunders, Clara Gibson, Dawn Arnold, Ehurd Cunningham, Shirley
Francis. The Altar Guild & St. Mathews Church Family, Archdeacon
James & Angela Palacious, Fr. James & Mrs. Moultrie PHD., Fr. Don
Haynes.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECTS AT BETHEL
BROTHERS MORTICIANS, #44 NASSAU STREET ON FRIDAY
FROM 10:00 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. AND ON SATURDAY FROM
10:00 A.M. TO 12:30 PM. AND AT THE CHURCH FROM 1:30
P.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 23

diatler’s Huneral Home

& Qrenatortiun

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Funeral Announcement For

MRS. CARMEN
TURNER
BODIE, 82

of 5th Street, Coconut
Grove and formerly of
Tea Bay, Cat Island will
be held on Saturday at
11:00 a.m. at Christ the
King Anglican Church,
Ridgeland Park.
Officiating will be Rev'd Rodney Burrows, assisted
by other members of the clergy. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

She is survived by Three (3) Daughters:
Esthermae Bodie, Annamae Farquharson and
Sandra Bodie-Smith; Two (2) Sons: Terrance and
Vernon Bodie of Fresh Creek, Andros; Three (3)
Brothers: Cedric, Leland and Eric Turner; Eight
(8) Grandchildren: Shannon Nicole Johnson,
Tanya and Leo Farquharson Jr., Tyrone Kellman
Sr., Tremaine Bodie, Thalia Bodie, Deandra Smith
and Chevette Russell; Seven (7)
Greatgrandchildren; Two (2) Daughters-in-
Law: Jane and Renae Bodie; Two (2) Sons-in-
Law: Force Chief Petty Officer Hubert Smith and
Leo Farquharson Sr.; Eight (8) Sisters-in-Law;
Mildred, Leoni and Agnes Turner of Miami,
Florida, Anita, Ulean, Dotlyn, Grenelda and Ethel
Bodie; Three (3) Brothers-in-Law: Carlton,
Harold and Israel Bodie; Numerous Nieces and
Nephews and a host of other relatives and friends
too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’
Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Blue Hill Road
& Oxford Avenue on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until
service time at the church.





THURSDAY

March 12, 2009

Pg 23 The Tribune



RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
STORIES
NN ID,
CHURCH
EVENTS





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

diutler’s Muneral Homes & Drematorim

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

MS. ELEANOR
MAE BUTLER, 64

=) | of New York and formerly of |

ie | Mason’s Addition will be held }

"| on Saturday, March 7th, 2009 |

~ | at 9:00 a.m. at Zion Baptist :

Church, East and Shirley :

Streets. Officiating will be |

y} Pastor T.G. Morrison, assisted |

by Rev. Anthony Sampson. }

Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier }

Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her son: Echendu

Sisters: Sister Mary Johnson and Mrs. Sheila Ferguson
of Freeport, Grand Bahama; Three (3) Sisters-in-law:

including Caregivers at Metropolitan Hospital, New

Margaret Hospital, Pastor George Kelly, Officers and
members of Metropolitan Baptist Church, Rev. Betty

to mention.

; church on Saturday from 8:00 a.m. until service.

MRS. VALERIE
RENIA
KNOWLES, 31

of Baldwin Avenue will be
} held on Saturday, March 7th,
| 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at New
Destiny Baptist Cathedral,
) Blue Hill Road. Officiating
will be Bishop Delton D.
Fernander, assisted by other

| ministers of Religion. Interment will follow in

. ee Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
Nwanodi; Daughter-in-Law: Yuka Shimizu Nwanodi; }

Six (6) Sisters: Sylvia Demeritte-Forbes, Kathleen |
Demeritte, Dorothy Dames, Marjorie Johnson, Joan }
Butler and Rosetta Johnson; Two (2) Brothers: Charles :
Butler of California and Tellis Butler; Two (2) Adopted }

Left to cherish her memories are her husband: Samuel
Knowles Jr.; Parents: Russell and Sylvia Davis; Five
(5) Stepchildren: Ntieado, Juerissa, Theodore, Samdon

: and Samgie Knowles; One (1) Sister: Sonia Grant;
: One (1) Brother: Edwin Evans; Grandmother:

a | Nathalie Butler; Grandfather: Thomas Moss; Two
Virginia, Coralee and Thelma Butler; Four (4) |

Brothers-in-Law: Charlie Forbes, Leonard Dames, |
Maxwell Johnson and Clement Johnson; Two (2) :
Aunts; Alice Rosmond Tucker and Clara Gibson of |
Miami, Florida; Numerous Nieces, Nephews and :
Cousins and a host of other relatives and friends |

(2) Nieces: Racquel Renia Russell Davis and Jasmine
Grant; One (1) Nephew: Brandon Grant; Father-in-
Law: Samuel Knowles; Mother-in-Law: Lucinda
Knowles; Seven (7) Sisters-in-Law: Kathleen, Diane,
Marion, Lucille, Beatrice, Albertha and Paulamae;
Three (3) Brothers-in-Law: Ruel Grant, Livingston

: and Phillip Knowles; Nine (9) Aunts; Eighteen (18)
York, The Physiotherapy Department of Princess ! uncles; Godchildren: Tahje, Francis, Xavier, K.K.,
: Hakeem and Javan; Numerous Cousins, Grandaunts,

L i Granduncles and a host of other relatives and friends
of New York, Pastor T.G. Morrison and the family of |

Zion Baptist Church and many others too numerous |
: Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral

a : ' Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral :

Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on |
Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the |

too numerous to mention.

Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the
church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until service.





PG 24 @ Thursday, March 12, 2009



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS past Sunday, thousands of
devout Church of God of Prophecy
(CGP) members gathered in body and
spirit for their 88th annual Bahamas

National Convention.

In an elaborate display of song and dance, sever-
al local church choirs and interpretive groups per-
formed at the main East Street tabernacle. Also in
attendance were numerous international affiliates
from Canada, the United States, Jamaica, and sev-
eral other countries.

On Monday, National Overseer Bishop Dr
Elgarnet B Rahming made his official convention
address, where he urged CGP members to not
focus on the past of the church, but rather its des-
tiny.

“Let us therefore awake, celebrate, but be sensi-
tive to the vision of God, and to the moving of the
spirit of God. For we are a people of destiny, and
our destiny is in God.”

Dr Rahming expressed his desire to see those
who call themselves Christian operate in the full-
ness of true Christian living, which starts by walk-
ing away from earthly pleasures.

“The flesh may be humanly smart, the flesh may

RELIGION

be humanly strong, the flesh may be humanly
skilled, gifted and talented.

“But I can tell you that devoid of spiritual empow-
erment from on high, devoid of the supernatural
infusion and intervention of the Holy Ghost, all that
flesh has to offer in the service of God will falter,
will fail, and will not please God.”

Dr Rahming said the time is now for those that
slumber to awake, which will only come from a spiri-
tual relationship with the father. Otherwise, he said:
“The flames and fire of revival fail to burn, unity of
the believer is impaired, and the manifestation of
the power of God in salvation, in restoration, in
healing, and in deliverance is limited.”

Even for the unsaved, Dr Rahming contends that
their spiritual death is but a sleep, but adds that
restoration and awakening can only come when one

The Tribune



Bianitcemonee ne
Prophecy celebrated It'S == i

STOICA STlIr UES
National Convention with
thousands of members
attending the event.

surrenders all to God.

Speaking to the issue of economic turmoil in the
local and international arena, Dr Rahming explained
that like the seasons, these rough times too shall
pass.

He referred to Genesis 8:22: “As long as the earth
remains, there will be springtime and harvest, cold
and heat, winter and summer, day and night.”

“Yes we have been in a recession before and we
came out okay, and yes recessions don’t last
always... The God who brought us out in the past, is
the God who is bringing us out now.”

Despite the few suicides, the hundred of job losses,
and other changes happening because of these diffi-
cult times, Dr Rahming said God allows nothing to

SEE page 29



The Tribune

Teachin

i

our kids

TO

RELIGION

@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

WHEN teaching children
about the importance of
prayer and how to pray,
parents should take care to
preserve their kids’ childlike
faith. Parents especially
should avoid making prayer
seem too complicated, or
give the impression that
egy. TM CMOM Colao MoM al (Ue
al, or merely a church or
Folie lelK AM ke) AU S
really just talking, worship-
ping, and fellowshipping
NL Secu M Tela es



Thursday, March 12, 2009 ® PG 25

Pastor at New Life Ministries, Reverend
Antonio Beckford, who specialises in parent/child
intervention, said he believes that prayer is a very
important component that parents should teach
their children.

“Prayer itself is the primary way we communi-
cate with God. The family that prays and really
communicates with God has the better half of two
things. The first is that it affords them a sense of
unity and togetherness in the house because they
are focusing on a common purpose. On the other
hand, prayer gives each individual in the family an
avenue that they can use to be able to foster a
relationship with God,” Mr Beckford said.

When children understand the importance of
prayer they will be more likely to share all their
feelings with the Lord, and come to Him with con-
fidence. Children need to understand that they
can talk to God about anything, no matter how
big, or how small the problem.

“Mothers and fathers are not going to be able to
be with their children all the time. So if a child has
an issue at school, college, or anywhere away from
their home, then they can be able to request the
presence of God in that particular issue,”
Reverend Beckford said.

Many parents are so consumed with the
demands of their careers and other pressing issues
that they forget the importance of teaching the
child how to reverence God. Reverend Beckford
said that many parents in today’s society, particu-
larly in the current economic climate, have stum-
bled in this responsibility.

“A lot of parents now a days may not focus on
praying or be pushing the importance of prayer in
their children’s lives because many of them espe-
cially those who grew up in the 1970’s and the
present felt that their grandparents and parents
forced them to pray. Those parents then feel as
though they do not want to force their children to
pray and would rather let the child foster their
own relationship with God on their own terms
and time. However, some children have their own
minds. Their parents may be showing them the
importance of prayer and teaching them how to
pray, but the child may decide to fall to the peer
pressure and not pray as they see their friends
may consult witchcraft, horoscopes and so forth,”
Rev Beckford said.

Erica Musgrove, a mother of three, said she
believes prayer is essential for children to learn
from an early age.

“T tell my children everyday that prayer changes
things. I still believe in the word that says “Train
up a child in the way he should go, so that as they
get old they shall not depart from it’. I do believe
that my kids will make mistakes but when they
make their mistakes they are going to come back
into the way that I taught them. Parents should
not wait until children get 10, 11, or 12 to teach
them how to pray. I started my kids off from the
age of 1 when they started saying words. Through
teaching kids how to pray they learn how to not
rely on friends or give into peer pressure but take
everything to God,” Mrs Musgrove said.

One of the biggest obstacles to prayer is time.
Many parents have a hard time finding time to
pray. It is important for children to hear their par-
ents and family members pray. It is important for
them to hear their parents pray for them. When
parents model prayer, children begin to see that
talking to God is something they can do.

“We are not living a life for the here and now.
We are building a generation. You want to be able
to say that your great grand children have a foun-
dation of prayer or reliance of God. Some 50
years from now what kind of relationship will
your grand children have with God because of the
choices we made today in prayer,” Reverend
Beckford said.



PG 26 ® Thursday, March 12, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

(SY MEDITATION

The Feeding

WHAT kind of God do we have that
orchestrates this kind of evening out-
door picnic that can feed five thousand?
Many of them had been cured of sick-
ness

Matthew tells us in Chapter 14. They
were so elated, they may not have
noticed that they were hungry.

The disciples are no doubt hungry
themselves, and so they realise that the
crowd is hungry too. They come and
make representation with a very practi-
cal suggestion. It keeps the responsibili-
ty away from them and places it on the
people who can go into the surrounding
villages and buy food for themselves.

The Lord has a better idea. He
decides to let the disciples become more
intimately involved. This is ministry at
its best. We see the need, we come to

Jesus with what we have, and Jesus
meets the needs of numbers beyond
measure. Jesus prays, blesses and breaks
the loaves for the disciples to distribute.

REV. ANGELA
+ PALACIOUS

How could they or we miss the point
that the deserted place does not dictate
the supply? The desert has hidden
resources. The crowd has resources to

contribute. We are all in this together.
The time, the place, nor the ‘magnitude
of the multitude’ determines how God’s
love will operate.

This is their manna in the wilderness
and, instead of quail, this time it is fish.
The table is set before them as it were,
with enough food to satisfy, and some
astounded but obedient servants to
serve it. That was quite a number to feed
and pick up after. Ifit can be this good in

It’s not over !

AS A nation, we’re experiencing
some challenges; financial, marital,
health, spiritual, etc; but let me assure
you that these challenges will work out
for your good, as long as you just hold
on and don’t give up. The enemy and
this world’s system would celebrate the
fact that you’ve thrown in the towel
and quit. Years ago, there was a secular
song that said “Winners never quit, and
quitters never win.”

Despite your present circumstances,
the enemy knows that you are a winner;
because you’ve been created in the
expressed image of your heavenly
Father (Yahweh).

The Bahamas is dear to God’s heart;
as a nation, it is time for us to give God
our undivided attention. Now, we know
that if the truth be told the vast majori-
ty of us have looked and are yet look-
ing to the lost politicians and powerless
religious leaders for answers and deliv-
erance from the troubled / difficult
times that we’re facing personally and
nationally. The veil and excuses for the
deterioration of this beautiful Bahamas
and the welfare of its people, that our
leaders are hiding behind is this;
“America and the world are in a reces-
sion, that’s why we’re going through
what we’re experiencing” and to this, I
say nonsense.

At the end of the day when the dusk
is cleared, it will be a proven fact that
America’s present so-called recession is
the result of greed and corruption
among those who were trusted to be




PASTOR
ALLEN

people of integrity. Likewise, the
Bahamas is facing the same fate as a
result of greed and corruption. It does-
n’t matter how the politicians (FNM &
PLP) try to dress up and cover the acts
of missed-management, corruption and
greed. The Clico insurance saga is just
the beginning of that which is to come.
Both present and former administra-
tions have done a good job in swinging
the grassroots through the use of the
government owned radio and television
stations, and other compromising print
media to advance their twisted cause;
but God’s justice will always prevail.

If there was ever a time that the true
meaning of the slogan “It’s Better in
the Bahamas” has been revealed to me
that time is now. The Clico saga is but
a drop in the bucket as it relates to the
level of corruption that runs through-
out the length and breadth of this coun-
try. Personally, I will never listen to;
much less believe a word that comes
out of the politician’s mouth. Had this
Clico drama happened in America, I
can assure you that at the end of the
day somebody would be going to jail;
but then again, It’s Better in the
Bahamas! Sad but true, many

the wilderness what must it be like on
fertile ground, in the Promised Land or
at the heavenly banquet?

If you are in the crowd at the moment,
eat and be satisfied with what God pro-
vides for you. If your situation is desper-
ate, then some servants should be near
with some supplies. If you are a disciple,
then your part is to be with the people
for as long as it takes for them to hear
what Jesus is trying to say. Be practical
even as you are concerned with spiritual
needs.

Drive your message home with hands-
on ministry. All who are leaders, clergy
or lay people, are to be involved in bless-
ing those in need. Accept the offerings
of those willing to give and then share
them around equally. Do not be over-
whelmed by the numbers in the wilder-
ness, or the seemingly limited resources.
Be satisfied with the bare essentials, fol-
low God’s lead, assess the nature of the
wilderness, reject any thought of separa-
tion from Christ for any reason, and
then get on with feeding as many thou-
sands that need to be strengthened in
body, mind and spirit. As you feast on
the love with which they are being fed,
you too will find yourself truly satisfied.

Bahamians will someday learn that this
slogan doesn’t apply just to tourism; but
to the contrary, this is a haven where
corrupt practices and greed seem to be
the order of the day.

The old folks had a saying “that time,
is longer than rope.” God has a way of
exposing dirt and corruption; the
politicians can say and do all that’s
within their power to hide and try to
justify their dirty actions, but as we
know whatever is done in the dark; will
be brought into the light. Let’s talk
briefly about Clico, as well as the bank-
ing - financial industry; where in many
cases we’ve got politicians or their hand
picked persons serving and sitting on
the

boards of these companies in various
capacities. These sorts of practises and
behaviours are the breeding ground for
corruption and unethical acts; think
about.

It’s a little worse than having the rat
watching over and protecting the
cheese. In the Clico scenario, who do
the customers / clients complain too
and get justice from? They can’t go to
the police, because they (the police)
despite all the rhetoric; are subjected to
the government / political leaders.

There is something called job-securi-
ty and if that police officer wants to
secure his job, when the order comes
down to “end that investigation or have
the case become sine-die” such order
has to be carried out. What is most dis-
turbing about the level of corruption
and greed among our leaders is that the
church is in no position to confront,
challenge and drive out this spirit;
because many of the country’s leading
clergymen have already compromised
their integrity one way or another.

“Be satisfied with the
bare essentials, fol-
low God’s lead, assess
the nature of the
wilderness, reject any
thought of separation
from Christ for any
reason, and then get
on with feeding as
many thousands that
need to be strength-
ened in body, mind
and spirit.”

Many of them are busy seeking fame
and fortune, writing their books, con-
structing mega sanctuaries to host their
money making conferences and getting
on the Word Network and TBN. Asa
result the enemy has his agents (known
and unknown) that are effectively exe-
cuting his plans. Today the very gate of
HELL has been unleashed against the
Bahamas and the compromising reli-
gious leaders are in no position to
rebuke or bind; even a used / worn-out
demon.

There are lots of talks within the
churches about the kingdom of God.
Today we’ve got kingdom bread, king-
dom water, kingdom junkanoo groups,
kingdom shops, etc;

but yet we lack the true manifesta-
tion of God’s kingdom in the Bahamas.
Despite all the deep revelations being
put forth about the kingdom, here’s the
simplicity of God’s kingdom.
Rom.14:17. For the kingdom of God is
not meat and drink; but righteousness,
and peach and joy in the Holy Ghost.

If there were twenty church leaders
in this country that were willing to put
their ministry, their titles and die-out to
self and collectively seek the face of
Father Yahweh on the behalf of this
nation, God’s righteousness would pre-
vail. If God’s righteous judgment was a
apart of the Bahamian culture the Clico
matter and the other games that are
being run on the Bahamian people;
would be called into an open account
and if need be an external agency
would conduct these investigations.

¢ For questions, comments contact us via
E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.225-3850 or 441-2021



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, March 12, 2009 ® PG 27

Men of Mark

Baptist

FOLLOWING the arrival of Rev
Joseph Burton and Rev Kilner and
Mrs Pearson in 1833, the English
Baptists grew alongside the large num-
bers of pre-existing native Baptists.

Several other English missionaries
arrived during the 1830s to supplement
Burton's ministry but none were as
long lived and influential as Rev Henry
Capern, who arrived with his wife in
1840. The Caperns made their mark
serving through thick and thin for six-
teen years.

Capern spent a great deal of time
training a native ministry. He was con-
vinced that the work needed to be
done by these men, with only one
white missionary as superintendent.
When he first arrived, he found
Baptists contaminated with the beliefs
of other groups that baptism washed
away sins and that taking the Lord's
Supper was a way for a dying sinner to
get to heaven. He vigorously taught
Biblical truth to combat these ideas
and to improve the moral life of the
people, and was successful in both.

During the cholera epidemic which
raged from October, 1852, to January
29,1853, Capern helped to set up and
carry on house-to-house visitation,
teaching sanitation as prevention and
discovering and treating those who
were ill. Prior to the programe, which
started on November 18, 639 persons
had died. The number of cases discov-
ered by the visitors was 1817, but due
to their care, only 87 of these died.
Bethel and Zion together lost about 90

RELIGIONTODAY



| ae
\ Se Sym
\ LAWLOR

members in the epidemic. A hurricane
on November 21,1853, destroyed
crops and many ships.

Mrs Capern had to leave for
England before the very hot weather
of 1856 in order to survive, and was
told by her doctor that she could never
return. Although his health was also
failing, Mr Capern stayed to orient Mr
and Mrs Davey, who arrived in
February, 1856, to replace him. Capern
left for England in May, 1857 and he
died in Belvedere, Kent, on April 12,
1883, just two weeks after his very dear
friend, Rev Thomas Rumer, had
passed away - Rumer was replaced by
Rev David C Lightbourne..

Two more Baptist missionaries, who
made their mark, were Rev William
Littlewood and his wife who arrived in
1841 and Rev William Knight Rycroft
who arrived in 1843. Both served in the
southern islands: Rycroft attempted a
mission to Haiti and Dominica but was
not successful there so he had to return
to Turks, where the Littlewoods had
been stationed. The Littlewoods
moved to Inagua in 1855 and Mrs
Littlewood died suddenly on June 13,

1856, and evidently was buried on
Inagua. Mr Littlewood had discovered
in 1843 that he had diabetes, and he
had trouble with that disease for the
rest of his life. He married again in a
year or two. The Rev Rycroft died on
Turks Island on June 22, 1865 and his
wife shortly before that.

By 1861, Edward Bean Underhill of
the English Baptist Society, reported
that missionary churches had been
formed on eighteen islands, containing
2656 members, divided into three dis-
tricts, under the superintendence of
the Revds J Davey, W Littlewood, and
WK Rycroft.

Davey was very interested in estab-
lishing libraries on all the family
islands under his care and was able to
do so on some of them, as well as in
Zion Baptist Church in Nassau. He
transformed Zion chapel from a barn-
like structure to one of the prettiest
buildings in town, with a columned
portico in front and the interior
remodeled with galleries on three
sides making the total capacity 800.
The galleries would hold 300 people.
The church was reopened on August
27, 1865.

In the 1874 report on the BMS work
in the West Indies, comments on the
churches on the Bahamas family
islands were made. Sixteen islands had
churches under the BMS. "The com-
munities are only occasionally visited
by missionaries. Their regular reli-
gious instruction, their discipline and
the administration of ordinances of



the Gospel, are the work of a body of
native pastors raised up on spot. The
number of members falls scarcely
short of 3,500 and the proportion of
the entire population attached to the
mission is about one-third. With two
or three exceptions, their places of
worship, though often of a very hum-
ble character, have been erected by
themselves, and their gifts suffice for
the wants of their pastors, who watch
over them.

The Daveys retired in June, 1878,
because of Mrs Davey's ill health. The
Littlewoods also retired in 1879
because of their ill health. They lived
in Nassau for a number of years and
then moved to Harbour Island. Mr
Littlewood died on May 14, 1890, leav-
ing his wife, who had been blind for a
long time. On the morning of his death,
Littlewood had visited the cemetery
where two months before he had laid
his brother-in-law, to direct the enclo-
sure of that and places for himself and
his wife. He got up that night, lay back
down complaining of "short breath"
and died. He was buried the next day,
services being conducted by Rev R
Whittleton and Rev EE Newton.

It is ironic that these men of mark
bravely supported by their wives
should contribute so much to bring the
Kingdom of God to the Bahamas but
suffer personal ill health and death.

e (Next Time: Part 21 - Anglican History
during the 19th Century)



ULTRA-ORTHODOX
Jewish men gather at
a yeshiva, a rabbinical
seminary, during
Purim celebrations in
Jerusalem,
Wednesday, March
11, 2009. The festival
of Purim commemo-
rates the rescue of
Jews from genocide
in ancient Persia.
Many revelers will
often consume alco-
hol to intoxication.

Sebastian Scheiner/AP Photo



PG 28 ® Thursday, March 12, 2009

RELI

ION

The Tribune



Got personality?

THE HAND me down view, in
which the majority of persons, in par-
ticular, the younger generations, per-
ceive personality today, makes it
become really just a false confidence.
You see, it’s easier in their opinion, to
get through life being imitators,
rather than initiators. It’s quite dis-
couraging to see persons you’re famil-
iar with, just wither away, in a life so
immersed in fantasy and delusion,
that they no longer know how to shut
it off. It used to be that they could go
in, and come out of their trance, but
now, there's really no security or cer-
tainty.

Their lives have gone from courage
to cardboard, with no base in which
to stand strong.

We are meant to be God's image
and we should live our lives in obedi-
ence to his word. If we are to shape
our personalities after any person to
ever walk on the earth's soil, it should
certainly be our Lord and Saviour
Jesus Christ, and not our friends.

Matthew 7:24-27, explains what a
false confidence looks like in God's
opinion.

"Therefore everyone who hears



| TONL.

these words of mine and puts them
into practise is like a wise man who
built his house on the rock. The rain
came down, the streams rose, and the
winds blew and beat against that
house; yet it did not fall, because it
had it's foundation on the rock. But
everyone who hears these words of
mine and does not put them into
practise, is like a foolish man who
built his house on sand.

“The rain came down, the streams
rose, and the winds blew and beat
against that house, and it fell down
with a great crash." (N.I.V)

The Oxford dictionary's first defi-
nition of personality, describes it as,
the combination of characteristics or
qualities that form an individual's
distinctive character. This being what
it is, would then mean, every individ-
ual possesses a personality. However,
no individual has the same personali-

ty, all the time, and let's be honest,
most of us like to feel comfortable
right? And we tend to find comfort in
what we deem as normal, so if some-
one has a contrasting personality to
that normality, we become troubled.
However, we have to decide whether
we will remain in our little worlds, or
we'll grow and realise, that there will
come a time, when our current one
sided "personalities", will need more
than just an oil change, but rather an
extreme makeover, and this may hap-
pen more than once. In fact I'm sure
it will. The way we were in primary
school, became uncool when we
entered high school, and the way we
were in high school became pathetic
when we went to college, and I won't
even talk about bringing those col-
lege habits into the job market.

In the Bible it states: "All things are
permissible, but not all things are ben-
eficial", so while a one-sided reckless
personality, filled with a lifestyle of
debauchery may be fun to some, does
it really advance that person in a posi-
tive way? No, it does not. Does a one-
sided stubborn life, of keeping to one's
self and not allowing others in,

advance that person in a positive way?
No, it does not.

But, a life centered around God's
word, having this strong foundation,
will always advance a person and ulti-
mately advance those around them, in
a number of beneficial ways.

That's why ‘personality’ for what it
really is, is so wonderful, as it allows
for a variety of experiences, and
though not all will be good ones, those
that are not will bring with them an
opportunity for positive growth to take
place. It's great to live in a world where
persons, if they so choose, can be the
beautiful and unique vessels God
made them to be.

Timplore all who have read this arti-
cle, to take a meticulous look at your
life and make those changes that are
vitally important in order for you to
grow both spiritually and mentally.
Strive to live a pure, meaningful and
purposeful existence, for God's glory,
and the edification of others.

In closing, may God continue to
bless you all throughout your journey.

One of my mottos in life is "Always
take time to cry really hard, and then
laugh really loud".

RELIGION BRIEFS

DISPUTE OVER POSSESSION OF

TORAHS HEADED TO SECULAR COURT

m LOS ANGELES

not complied with the court’s order that he return
the scrolls within 30 days. Instead, he appealed the
decision to a higher court in Jerusalem.

That prompted Rita Pauker’s attorney to ask a
Superior Court judge to confirm the Los Angeles

religious court’s ruling.

A LEGAL battle between the widow of a San

Muslims who were either arrested locally or held for
federal authorities.

ETHNIC CATHOLIC PARISHES

IN CLEVELAND FEAR CLOSURE

Fernando Valley rabbi and his former assistant will
go before a secular judge after the assistant flouted a
religious court’s ruling that he relinquish a set of
Torahs.

Rita Pauker’s lawyer argues in the lawsuit sched-
uled to go before a Los Angeles Superior Court
judge next month that her late husband never meant
for Rabbi Samuel Ohana to keep the four Torahs
when he lent Ohana the parchment scrolls in 1998.

“T'll fight to the end,” said Pauker, who wants to
give to Torahs to her husband’s nephews, two of
whom are Orthodox rabbis. “I want them to go
where they belong.”

Ohana, 73, said Rabbi Norman Pauker gave him
the Torahs — which contain the first five books of
the Bible — after Pauker’s own synagogue closed.
He said the Torahs had been sitting in Pauker’s
garage and that he was surprised when Rita Pauker
began asking for the scrolls.

“When a person donates a ... Torah to a syna-
gogue, it belongs to the synagogue,” Ohana said.

Rita Pauker has been seeking the return of the
Torahs since her husband died in 2002. She insists
that a handwritten agreement between her husband
and Ohana proves that the Torahs had been lent for
just two years.

Last year, the two parties agreed to observe the
ruling of a Los Angeles-based religious court, which
ruled in Pauker’s favor in January. But Ohana has

JAIL RULES ON HEAD COVERINGS
MODIFIED TO ACCOMMODATE RELIGION

m PORTLAND, Maine

MAINBP’S courts and the Cumberland County Jail
are modifying their rules regarding head coverings
in order to accommodate the practices of Muslims
and people of other faiths.

Under the new policy, defendants, inmates and
visitors will no longer be required to remove scarves
or other head coverings that are required by reli-
gious custom.

That obligation has come into conflict with securi-
ty concerns and cultural standards that prevail in
many of the nation’s courts and prisons.

With the growth of the nation’s Muslim communi-
ties, pressure to allow head coverings has increased.
Some other states and the federal justice system
have already modified their rules.

Hats have historically been forbidden inside the
Cumberland County Jail, where inmates are issued
pants and shirts of yellow, orange or blue depending
on the security risk they present. To address con-
cerns about security, the jail has contracted with a
vendor to provide head coverings that meet jail
security standards, Sheriff Mark Dion said.

Since 2005, the jail has detained 538 declared

m@ CLEVELAND

AS THE Cleveland Catholic Diocese prepares
to announce which parishes must close or merge,
those at most risk may be the 51 nationality
parishes that cater to specific ethnic groups such
as Polish-Americans and Irish-Americans.

Some of the historically large nationality parish-
es in Cleveland have shrunk as members moved to
the suburbs. The faithful at St. Casimir, one of the
last vestiges of an old Polish neighborhood, are on
edge. The church, founded in 1892, still offers a
Polish Mass but is no longer surrounded by the
ethnic culture that built it. On a recent Sunday, no
more than 50 joined in song and prayer at a Mass
inside the church. “I was baptized here, I was mar-
ried here, and I want to be buried from here,” said
Tina Girod, 53.

Bishop Richard Lennon said closing some
churches is necessary so that others can thrive. He
intends to share decision with parish priests on
Saturday. Up to 50 parishes, mostly in urban
areas, could close or be merged within the diocese
because of declining numbers of parishioners and
priests, reflecting consolidation also seen else-
where in the United States.

For much of the diocese’s history, ethnic church-
es thrived. New immigrants often built grand
structures.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, March 12, 2009 ® PG 29

Taking the Bahamas back

@ By PROPHETESS MATTIE
NOTTAGE
Mattie Nottage Ministries
International

SOME government leaders and
politicians are continuing to utter sweet
nothings while exacting the poor, hold-
ing riches to themselves until another
election. They own some of the bar
rooms and gambling houses right in our
communities, passing laws to suit them-
selves. Alcohol is still one of the leading
causes of death in our country and it is
amazing, the number of barrooms that
are “popping up” on almost every cor-
ner.

The spirit of greed and filthy lucre has
also crept its way into the corridors of
the church. The focus has now become
“glitz and glamour.’ It is a race for power
and prestige and has now become a
trade/fashion show with Sunday morn-
ing services now becoming a circus
where the focus is on displaying fancy
hats, leather bags, brand name clothing,
seven piece designer suits, and alligator
shoes more than it is about miracles,
signs and wonders. Sermons are struc-
tured, regimented and timed, almost
leaving no room for God to speak.

It is so sad, it seems like the rich are
getting richer and the poor continue to
suffer. Week after week there are peo-
ple who are hurting, losing their jobs
and homes and are on the verge of giv-
ing up in our land. Many are feeling
anxious, frustrated, depressed and have
become suicidal. Many are sick and
dying and in need of deliverance. We as
a people must wake up. God is calling
us back to prayer.

This is the hour for the return of the
glory of God. In order for the glory of
God to return, there must be a shift in
the hearts and minds of the people. In 2
Chronicles 7:14, God declares: “If my
people who are called by my name
would humble themselves and pray and
seek my face and turn from their wicked
ways, I will hear them from heaven, I
will forgive their sin and heal their
land.” God is calling His people to shift.

There has been a demonic insurgence
of immorality, sexual lust and perver-
sion. This evil spirit has intensified its
powers through mediums such as: the
Internet, television shows, the influx of
negative music and wicked men and
seducers working witchcraft. This must
end!

We are at epidemic proportions as it
relates to HIV/AIDS and other sexually
transmitted diseases. This foul spirit of
perversion has given rise to the spirit of
fornication, adultery, rape, incest,
sodomy, bestiality, homosexuality and
lesbianism. This is not the will of God
for His people. This too must stop! Men
and women are stepping out to their
marriages to enjoy a brief moment
pleasure that may bring them a lifetime
of pain. (2 Timothy 3:1-5)

Many pillows are wet night after night
as women, children and even some men
weep in silence. Marriages are being
torn apart by a vicious lying spirit called
the “sweetheart.” This is a syndrome.
This too must stop!

I declare to every young lady, if you
are “sweethearting,” someone else’s
husband, you are a foolish woman. You
should be ashamed of yourself and
should seek to increase the value on
your life by first, finding God, then allow

Tt 1h bh
bay



Him to bring you your very own hus-
band.

To the men, you should always
remember and never forget that no-one
“pot cakes.” A “pot cake” by defini-
tion is a homeless, stray with no sense
of direction or purpose. You have not
been called as a purposeless nomad,
but you have been called to lead and
God is calling you to be the prophet,
priest and king of your home. (Malachi
4:6) “I shall turn the hearts of the
fathers back to their children, and the
heart of the children back to their
fathers.” In this hour, God wants to
restore the home.

There are many children that are
hurting. Many go to school hungry and
angry because of these broken, dys-
functional homes; hence, the escalation
of violence in our schools and on our
streets. We speak the peace of God
upon our school teachers and most of
all, upon each student who is experi-
encing crises in their families. Those of
you who are practicing homosexuality
and lesbianism, please turn your life
around. This was never God’s divine
will for your life. He wants to deliver
you. Remember, “there is a way that
seemeth right unto a man but the end
thereof are the ways of death.”
Proverbs 14:12

It is time to awake people of God.
We must re-visit our foundation. Yes,
the economy does not look good and it
seems as if inflation is everywhere. But
no, God is everywhere (omnipresent).
He is simply looking for a people to dis-
play His glory through. Do not be
moved by what you see. Turn back to
God with a pure heart. Let us all cry
out to Him. (Psalms 118:5) It is not His

Cw

PART 2

will that any should perish (2 Peter 3:9),
but that we should all come into the
knowledge of the truth.

“And you shall know the truth and
the truth shall make you free.” (John
8:32). Jesus loves you. Give Him your
life today. This is a call for national
repentance. From Bay Street to
Baintown, from the pulpit to the pew,
parents and children, the rich and the
poor and even those who are not sure.
For some of you it may be time to
rededicate yourself to Him.

Let us pray!

Father God, in the name of Jesus I
break every generational curse from
over the hearts and minds of your peo-
ple. I decree and declare that every
stronghold of the enemy be broken from
over this nation and the lives of individ-
uals. I bind the strongman of murder,
violence and rage from over this nation
and release the spirit of peace over our
streets. I come against every spirit of
fear, anxiety and worry. I cancel every
plan and strategy of the enemy that will
seek to destroy the lives of the people of
this nation by suicides, drugs, promiscu-
ity and violent acts. I call this nation
back to God. I call this nation back to
prayer. I pray that as God, Himself con-
tinues to shake the economic system and
governments of the nations, that the
people of the Bahamas would humble
themselves and go back to serving the
One True and Living God. I pray this
prayer in the mighty name of Jesus.
Amen!

May this word be received in the spir-
it in which it was spoken to me by the
Father (Shalom).

Living in the spirit

FROM page 23

take place without reason, and in his
address encouraged all to remain hope-
ful that change is on the way.

Looking toward the future growth of
the body, Dr Rahming revealed plans
to introduce a new Social Outreach
ministry at the end of the convention.

With so many throughout the coun-
try in great need of social, economic,
spiritual and emotion support, the
bishop said this move is timely in
addressing these concerns, and will
help to perpetuate CGPs commitment
in fulfilling its mandate of standing in
the gap for all, while delivering the
word to the masses.

With 100 years of growth and strug-
gle in its past, Dr Rahming feels confi-
dent that the church is sufficiently pre-
pared to deal with the many challenges
that face Christians and others today.



PG 30 @ Thursday, March 12, 2009



RELIGION

Dave Martin/AP Photo

JERRY LAWSON, lead pastor at Daystar Church in Good Hope, Ala., discusses his “Great Sex: God's Way'' sermon series in
this photograph taken Wednesday, March 4, 2009. Some people in the rural community are offended by the church's discus-
sion of sex and the billboards it used to promote the sermons.

‘Sex-y sermons cause
stir in rural Alabama

m@ GOOD HOPE, Ala.
Associated Press

IT’S ONE thing for a church in a big
city like Dallas or Atlanta to tackle the
ticklish topic of sex. It blends in with the
urban scene.

It’s another thing when a small-town
congregation puts up billboards with the
phrase “Great sex: God’s way” on rural
highways to promote a sermon series.
You can’t even legally buy beer in
Cullman County, and a preacher is talk-
ing about S-E-X on Sunday morning?

Daystar Church, whose congregation
has grown dramatically under pastor
Jerry Lawson, has run up against the
sensibilities of a conservative north
Alabama community with a monthlong
focus on sex.

Sex just isn’t an appropriate topic for
church, some say, and others are upset
over the church’s signs, which advertise
the sermon series and accompanying
Web site.

“It’s really stirred up the people
here,” said Good Hope town clerk
Joann Jones.

Evangelist Roland Belew, a self-

described fundamentalist and former
trucker who now preaches at a truck
stop, said the whole idea goes against
the teaching of New Testament apostles.

“Paul said preach the Gospel,” said
Belew. “Talking about sex ain’t gonna
get nobody to heaven.”

The controversy is a bit ironic con-
sidering the church’s overall point is
about as straight-laced as they come:
That God intends for sex to be enjoyed
solely within a heterosexual marriage,
and that anything else — adultery,
pornography, homosexuality, even
“sexual arousal” outside of marriage —
is sin.

Churches have been talking about
sex and sexual purity more often. In
November, the Rev. Ed Young of the
Fellowship Church based in Dallas
drew nationwide attention by challeng-
ing married couples to have sex for
seven straight days in the name of
strengthening marriages.

But an expert who tracks evangelical
Christianity, Larry Eskridge, said few
are addressing the subject as directly as
Daystar. “It sounds like an example of
one of those church-growth, market-

savvy campaigns going out to an area
where you wouldn’t normally see it,”
said Eskridge, associate director of the
Institute for the Study of American
Evangelicals at Wheaton College in
Illionis. “I could see where in that par-
ticular setting, that could raise some
eyebrows.”

City Hall has gotten a few complaints
about the church’s sexy signs from a
handful of people like Belew, 71, who
preaches in a trailer off Interstate 65.

Even the 22-year-old mayor, Corey
Harbison, worries that the “great sex”
message will force parents to talk about
the birds and the bees with inquisitive
young children before either is ready.

“T understand what they’re trying to
do. I get it,” said Harbison. “(But)
some people just aren’t ready for that.
Good Hope is just a good old, country
town.”

Lawson, the pastor at the center of
the debate, said the purpose of his ser-
mons and the billboards was to get
Christian parents talking to their kids
about sex before they learn too much
immorality from TV or playground
buddies.

The Tribune

| GAS

PALM SUNDAY MARCH

¢ GREATER Love Ministries

i International is calling on local dance
i troupes
: denominations to join them in a pub-
i lic display of praise worship and
: dance.

and worshippers of all

In a press release, the church is

asking for participants for their Palm
i Sunday parade and festival sched-
: uled for April 5 from 2.15 pm to 6.30

pm.
“We intensify our call to you. Acts

: 15:16-17 states...” After this I will

: return, and will build again the taber-
: nacle of David, which is fallen down;
? and I will build again the ruins there-
i of, and I will set it up:

that the residue of men might seek

after the Lord...”

The mobile float parade is sched-

i ule to leave the RM Bailey Park, at

: 2pm for Prayer and Intercession over
? the nation, ending in a foot dance

: parade on Bay Street and a Praise,

i Worship and Dance fest in Rawson

: Square.

“ We kindly ask for your dance

: group to accompany us in a properly
? decorated vehicle with banners bear-
? ing the Church and/or Dance

: Ministry’s name, flags and any form

? of parade or pageantry gadgets to

: make this a festive occasion.”

In addition, due to the increased

? numbers of participants, and the need
i for more musical trucks, organisiers

? are requesting donations to defray the
i cost of additional music trucks and

i: DJs.

Persons interested in being part of

the event are asked to confirm their
} attendance by March 20.

For further information call (242)

i 394-0734.

We WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

@ Did you recently give birth
to the newest little angel on
earth? Have you and your
beloved recently tied the knot?
Is your church planning a spe-
cial event? Tribune Religion
wants to hear from you!

We want to know about the
special things going on in your
life, so go ahead and send in
your wedding photographs,
birth announcements and
church activities schedule to be
posted in upcoming Tribune
Religion sections.

This service is free. Send all
information, including (especial-
ly) photographs, to features@tri-
bunemedia.net. Information can
be hand delivered to The
Tribune at Shirley and Deveaux
Streets or call the Religion sec-
tion @ 502.2368.



The Tribune

30

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE Anglican community is
hosting its 36th Annual
Men’‘s Conference (AMC),
which is expected to draw
an interesting mix of speak-
ers and events over the next

few days.

The event which began yesterday
will run until March 22 and will bring
speakers like recently enthroned
Diocesan Bishop Laish Boyd (2),
Colonial Pension Service Vice
President Larry Gibson (3), Acting
Police Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade (4), and Rector of the All
Saints Parish Reverend Sebastian
Campbell (1).

AMC President Kurt Wallace
explained: “This year we are looking
forward to the conference and the
speakers who will share and encour-
age the men of our diocese to continue
to live in faith.

(CA MORAL POEM

RELIGION

“We are all aware of what's taking
place in the world today, the economic
emergency, oil prices on the rise, food
prices are up, health care seems to be
a burden to all, escalating crime, and
our spiritual man seem discouraged.”

Mr Wallace said it is his hope that
this year’s speakers can encourage
attendants of the conference in some
way, if only to influence a greater
sense of reality and positive living.

AMC chairman Kevin Ryan,
stressed that The Anglican Church
Men conference is open to all men of
the diocese, and is particularly calling
for fathers and husbands to take part
in the event.

The conference which will be held at
St. Gregory’s Anglican Church on
Carmichael Road, has a minimum reg-
istration fee of $50 which will cover
conference materials, lunch and a
reception. It is important to note that
The West Central Archdeaconry is
hosting the conference and looks for-
ward to a great time in workshops, dia-
logue and fellowshipping with men
from across the diocese. For more
information, contact you church's
ACM President.

nnual Men's
onterence





Thursday, March 12, 2009 ® PG 31

3

By NAKOYA DEANE



VVhoredom

It is 2009 and it is time to call it
what it is, not SWEETHEART-
ING:

WHOREDOM!

It has been an infectious plague for
generations:
WHOREDOM!

Many homes have been wrecked
and families destroyed by it:
WHOREDOM!

It is the root cause of all our family
ills:
WHOREDOM!

The festering sore on many mar-
riages:
WHOREDOM!

It is what is eating away at the very
moral fabric of our society:
WHOREDOM!

The root of all our social decay:
WHOREDOM!

It is accepted or ignored:



WHOREDOM!

No one to address it or can't:
WHOREDOM!

The reason we have absentee
fathers and depressed, overworked
mothers:

WHOREDOM!

The reason so many of our young
men are angry and violent:
WHOREDOM!

The reason so many of our young
women are confused about what
love is:

WHOREDOM!

It is the reason many of our chil-
dren's basic needs are not met:
WHOREDOM!

If you are with a man only for
what he can do for you, it is not
only prostitution...

IT'S WHOREDOM!

If the married man in your bed is
not your husband...

IT'S WHOREDOM!

If the married woman with you on
vacation is not your wife...

IT'S WHOREDOM!

If the married man buying you
sexy underwear, paying for your
hair, your nails, and all your other
bills, is not your husband...

IT'S WHOREDOM!

If the married woman buying your
clothes, cooking your food, and
messaging your back is not your
wife...

IT'S WHOREDOM!

It is time to expose it! Confront it!
Stand up to it! Fight against it!
THIS WHOREDOM!

It is time for the decent,
respectable society to say with one
disgusted thunderous voice and a
scorned nose, “IT IS A DIS-
GRACE!”

And not with loud silence embrace
it...

THIS WHOREDOM!

WIVES, ARISE AND SHINE
FOR YOUR LIGHT HAS
COME AND THE GLORY OF
THE LORD IS RISEN ON
THEE!

The time to retreat and surrender,
to hold down your head in shame
and disgrace as if you did some-
thing wrong, is LONG GONE!

It is time to STAND UP and
FIGHT! Open your mouths and
SCREAM!

SHOUT!

ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!

You spirit of WHOREDOM! You
have gone too far, but no further!
Go back to hell and get out of my
house!

It is 2009 and I am taking back
what is mine!

You will not have my husband, my
joy, or my peace of mind!
ENOUGH!!!

Not my life, those belong to me!
So you spirit of WHOREDOM,
get under my feet!

IN JESUS' NAME

AMEN! And AMEN!



PG 32 © Thursday, March 12, 2009



IT WAS an historic visit to Harbour
Island for the Church of God of
Prophecy last month when a group of
12 members visited the island following
the 11th Caribbean Leadership
Conference held at SuperClubs Breezes
in Nassau. The trip was organisied by
Bishop Franklin Ferguson, who served
as Conference Coordinator. Making up
the group was: General Overseer,
Bishop Randall Howard and his wife -
Bess, National Overseer, Bishop
Elgarnet Rahming and his wife —
Jacqueline, District Overseer for
Harbour Island, Bishop Ghaly Swann
and his wife — Angela, District Overseer
for New Providence, Bishop Rudolph
Bowe and his wife — Veronica, National
Overseer for Trinidad and Tobago,
Bishop Maurice Jones and his wife —
Maureena and _ Bishop Franklin
Ferguson and his wife — Rovena.

Upon arrival at Harbour Island, the
group was greeted by Pastor Curtlin
Johnson and members of the church
who had organised a grand welcome
including a band, banners and golf carts
arrayed with church flags. The welcom-
ing party included the island’s adminis-
trator and island councillor.

Presentations were made to the wife
of the General Overseer and wife of the
National Overseer and then the group
drove to the local church, where they
held a brief informal service.

Bishop Ghaly Swann, District
Overseer, gave brief remarks expressing
his thanks to Bishop Franklin for choos-
ing Harbour Island. He said how over-
whelmed he was to have the leadership
of the church visiting Harbour Island all

at one time. He noted that this was
indeed a historic moment. He lead in
the singing of ‘For You I Am Praying?
followed by a concert prayer.

Bishop Elgarnet Rahming, National
Overseer, gave remarks pointing out
that Harbour Island was a quaint island
with a great history and friendly people.
He commended Associate Pastor
Johnson for the grand welcome and
went on to say that some 98 years ago
the General Overseer, A J Tomlinson
visited Ragged Island, Long Island and
Exuma and now the 5th General
Overseer had come to Harbour Island.

Bishop Howard expressed his appre-
ciation to the Lord and those who made
it possible for him to visit Harbour
Island. He extended special thanks to
the Pastors and the members of
Harbour Island for the work that they
are doing and prayed God’s blessings
upon them.

Bishop Rudolph Bowe who served as
District Overseer for Harbour Island in
the earlier years gave brief remarks and
closing prayer.

From here the group stopped at a few
of the elderly members’ homes as they
sat on their porches waving and then
toured the island. This tour ended at the
Beretta’s Restaurant where a scrump-
tious native lunch was_ prepared.
Following lunch, there was a nature
walk to the beautiful pink sand beach
and the group stopped at the home of
Pastor Curtlin Johnson and Mrs
Johnson who were celebrating their
wedding anniversary.

(Submitted by Rovena Ferguson)

RELIGION

The Tribune

A GROUP of 12
members visited
Harbour Island after
the 11th Caribbean
Leadership
Conference. They
were greeted by
Pastor Curtlin
Johnson and mem-
bers of the church
who had organised a
grand welcome
including a band,
banners and golf
carts arrayed with
church flags.





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{\

Pim blowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

SUNNY

SOF
71F

AND NIGE

Volume: 105 No.91





CLASSIFIEDS |




CLASSIFIEDS TRADER

SA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com



THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

WSS

Tm SME
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Christie slams
Tribune article

PLP Leader says
Insight piece
on Sir Lynden
Pindling is ‘a
tissue of lies,
fantasies and
tall tales’

PLP Leader Perry Christie last
night condemned The Tribune’s
Insight article on Monday which
attacked the legacy of Sir Lyn-
den Pindling as “the vilest, the
most vicious, the most scurrilous,
and, frankly, the sickest piece of
garbage I have ever read.”

In a special press conference
held at PLP headquarters at
Gambier House in response to
the Insight article, the former
prime minister claimed that the
information in the article is “‘a tis-
sue of lies, fantasies and tall tales
unworthy of inclusion in any seri-
ous, self-respecting newspaper
such as The Tribune represents
itself to be.”

Mr Christie emphasised that
Sir Lynden is the “Father of the
Nation” — stating that while this
does not mean that he should be
given a “free pass”, his legacy,
which includes many tremendous
achievements for the modern
Bahamas, should be treated with
a certain sensibility.

The Insight article, titled ‘““The
tragic young pilot who knew too
much”, told the story of the late
Chauncey Tynes Jr, who went

SEE page 12

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DR MICHAEL DARVILLE, a Grand Bahama physician,
received his instruments of appointment from Governor

General Arthur Hanna at Government House yesterday.
He will be sworn in as the newest PLP Senator today.

Widow of man who went missing
on flight hopes to collect $350,000

m By JOHN MARQUIS Lior

Managing Editor

THE widow of Donald
Moree Sr, who went missing
ona flight with his pilot friend

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Chauncey Tynes Jr 26 years
ago, is now hoping to collect
more than $350,000 in a long-
delayed insurance pay-out.

Her case was taken up by
Nassau insurance expert
Clyde Treco after her plight
was outlined in yesterday’s
Tribune.

Mrs Ann Moree, 55, of Sol-
dier Road, was six months
pregnant when her 30-year-
old husband Donald vanished
on a flight from Exuma to
Nassau with Mr Tynes in
March, 1983.

Mr Tynes’ father, Chauncey
Sr., and Mrs Moree both
believe the men were killed
because of their inside knowl-
edge of the drug operation run
by Joe Lehder from Norman’s

SEE page 13

TT ME PAMMI OUTS RS RCL



naga TT
police officer claims
RAS a
PUENTE UT

THE mystery over Sir
Lynden Pindling’s true ori-
gins took a new turn yes-
terday when a retired
senior police officer

claimed the late prime min-
ister was born in Nassau of

a Jamaican mother.

He was then sent away
to Jamaica for his early
schooling and returned to
his Jamaican father’s home
in East Street when he was
about eight or nine years
old, it was alleged.

The claims came from
Errington Watkins, a senior
policeman in the 1960s who
says he had first-hand infor-
mation about East Street

SEE page 18



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Sex allegations
involving another
teacher at Eight Mile
Rock High School

Police are conducting
investigations into reports

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police
investigations are currently
underway into sex allegations
involving another teacher at
the Eight Mile Rock High
School.

Asst Supt Wellbourne Boo-
tle said police received reports
of the incident and are now
conducting investigations into
the matter.

These allegations have put
the school again in the spot-
light of a sexual scandal, this
time involving a female
teacher and a male student.

The Tribune attempted to
contact School Superinten-
dent Hezekiah Dean on



Wednesday afternoon, but
was told that he was ina
meeting at Eight Mile Rock
High

According to reports in a
local newspaper here in
Freeport, Mr Dean confirmed
that “the teacher involved was
taken out of the school for a
couple of days.”

In January, a male teacher
was accused of molesting two
former male students at the
Eight Mile Rock High.

The victims claim that the
alleged sexual abuse started
while they were in the seventh
grade and continued for a
period of eight years.

The teacher was sent to
New Providence and placed
on probation pending an
investigation by the Ministry
of Education. The teacher has
since resigned.

Letters from several
countries voice concern for
Detention Centre detainees

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE alleged plight of detainees housed at the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre has attracted the attention of persons
in several countries who have sent various government ministers
letters of concern for the immigrants.

The letters — copies of which were sent to The Tribune —
come from Germany, Canada and Spain.

The appeals implore government to allow independent agen-
cies to inspect the facility; to publish results of internal investi-
gations into the claims of abuse; to ensure that asylum seekers
and others at the Centre are not tortured; and that asylum

SEE page 18

Govt expected to present draft of
National Unemployment Benefit Scheme

@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT
officials are expected
to present a draft of
the proposed Nation-
al Unemployment
Benefit Scheme to members
of the labour, business, and
religious communities today
for their review before the leg-
islation is presented to Parlia-
ment later this month.

Ph: (242) 825-2576

East Street (South of Andros Avenue)
eral: jamaens Scoralvan.com



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



Hubert Ingraham

Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham will
meet with the relevant
stakeholders — both
in New Providence
and Grand Bahama —
on Monday and
7 Wednesday, respec-
tively, at two closed
meetings of the Tri-
partite Forum (TRI-
FOR).

The purpose of the special
meetings is to discuss and
receive input about the gov-
ernment’s plans to introduce

SEE page 18


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Ir | Minnis reveals

UR Ec SOUTH



plan to solve PMH pharmacy woes

POLICE have two men in
custody in connection with
the fatal shooting of Ricardo
Farrington on February 3.

The two men, aged 33 and
29, were apprehended by
police shortly before 3am
yesterday and are currently
being questioned in connec-
tion with the murder.

Mr Farrington, 37, a









m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

HEALTH Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said
he has a four-point plan to solve the myriad of
problems affecting the pharmacy at Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Hundreds of persons attempting to have

their prescriptions filled. Dr Minnis, who has
waited in line at PMH's pharmacy for two
hours to gain a first-hand glimpse of the prob-
lem, said Tuesday's chaos erupted because
three pharmacists called in sick to the already
short-staffed section.

He said a shortage of medication was not to
blame for the long waits this week.

However, he did acknowledge the merit of

Health Minister says he accepts the merit of public complaints

off in training and that would help to correct
the (staff) shortages that we experienced with-
in the Bahamas. To top it off, we are institut-
ing a programme so that those individuals,
the elderly especially, so that they can receive
their medication in the private sector rather
than coming to PMH,” he said.

The minister said he is preparing to meet
with pharmacists in the private sector so as








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prescriptions filled were frustrated by extreme-
ly long lines on Tuesday and were calling on
officials to fix the problem. Recently, The Tri-
bune visited the pharmacy and was told that
some patients wait as long as six hours to get

the public complaints.

"What they say is true, but that problem
will be resolved soon. We have an additional
five pharmacists that are coming and that still
is not sufficient. We also have 14 pharmacists

to implement the programme as soon as pos-

sible.

Dr Minnis also said that the College of the
Bahamas’ science department is presently
recruiting for the Fall semester.

Judge backs man in dispute with doctor

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A SUPREME Court judge has
ruled in favour of a man who
accused a local doctor of failing to
properly diagnose and treat a life
threatening heart infection in
2005.

Senior Justice John Lyons yes-

terday ruled in favour of the
plaintiff Christopher Rogers,
agreeing that the defendant Dr
Ian Kelly had been negligent as
alleged. Justice Lyons’ reasons
are expected to be outlined in a
written ruling to be handed down
later.

The trial began on Tuesday
when Mr Rogers — who is seeking

damages — and US cardiologist
Dr Andrew Selwyn took the
stand.

Rogers’ initially vistted Dr Kel-
ly, a family practitioner, on Octo-
ber 7, 2005, claiming that he had
been suffering from a fever for
more than a month.

The court was told that Mr
Rogers made several visits to Dr

Kelly in late 2005 as his condi-
tion worsened, but was never
properly diagnosed and was often
given broad spectrum antibiotics.
Dr Kelly’s office notes did not
reflect Rogers’ deteriorating con-
dition but rather suggested
improvement, the court also
heard.Testimony also suggested
that an infectious bacteria which
ultimately led to endocarditis, an
infection in Rogers’ heart valve,
had been found in three blood
samples taken from the plaintiff.
Rogers’ condition continued

to deteriorate until he ultimately
suffered heart failure on Novem-
ber 14, 2005. He was subsequent-
ly admitted to Doctors Hospital
and later to a hospital in Cleve-
land, Ohio for heart surgery, the
=i a a court heard. Rogers was repre-

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Wilchcombe: Insight article
was ‘dangerous journalism’

THE decision of Tribune Man-
aging Editor John Marquis to
repeat “unsubstantiated hearsay”
in an Insight article about Sir Lyn-
den Pindling and the drug trade
was “reckless and dangerous jour-
nalism” West End and Bimini MP
Obie Wilchombe said yesterday.

Mr Wilchcombe said that none
of the accusations levelled by
Chauncey Tynes Sr were aired dur-
ing the three Commissions of
Inquiry held in the Bahamas over
the last 20 years.

“At no time did Chauncey
Tynes Sr offer evidence at any
Commission of Inquiry. Nor has
this hearsay from Chauncey Tynes Sr ever been
the subject of police investigation,” said Mr
Wilchcombe.

He accused John Marquis of being “poi-
soned” by hate and said the Bahamas is “too
small a nation to have its space polluted with
divisive malice and hate.”

Birthplace

“What I can say without fear of contradiction
is that Sir Lynden was no murderer, no drug
dealer and never promoted violence as the Mar-
quis article hatefully suggests. Sir Lynden’s
birthplace is beyond debate. He was born in
the Bahamas and his mother was Viola Pin-
dling,” the MP said.

However, Mr Wilchcombe said he welcomes
the opportunity the article provides for dis-
cussing the contribution of Sir Lynden Pindling.

“Only God is perfect, but among leaders, Sir
Lynden stands as tall as they come, despite his
five-foot-seven inch frame. Destiny could have
chosen anyone, but it selected Sir Lynden to
lead the Bahamas into the era of independence.
In my view, it could not have chosen more wise-
I i?

t Mr Wilchcombe said missteps and mistakes
are inevitable among even the most brilliant
and experienced men and women, but when



WEST END AND BIMINI
MP Obie Wilchcombe
(left) spoke out over
Monday’s Tribune Insight
article (right).

the life and contribution
of Lynden Pindling are
weighed on the scales of
history, those scales will
tilt on Sir Lynden’s side
because he guided the
Bahamas through the
first perilous days of
independence and cre-
ated the foundation of
a modern society and
economy based on the values of a
democracy.

“When destiny called, Lynden
Pindling responded, bringing to
the task of nation-building every-
thing he possessed. He would be
the first to admit that nothing nor
everything went as he had hoped.
The fact that the Bahamas is
today a place where freedom of
speech, even of the kind
espoused by Mr Marquis, is
enjoyed is testimony to Sir Lyn-
den’s pursuit of the path of
democratic engagement of all
Bahamians,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe said that Sir Lynden truly
understood what was needed to build a modern
western state and quickly realised how the
tourism industry could benefit the Bahamian

eople.

“The PLP’s manifesto on which he cam-
paigned clearly demonstrates where his heart
lay. It lay with the people. He understood, very
well, that the future of our people lay in edu-
cation, good health, and jobs beyond the menial,
a solid economy and freedom of expression.
He understood that the challenge of geogra-
phy that scattered our people across so many
islands, posed special demands on political rep-



ee cme




AT

T

he stories b
Cc ehii
HAUNCEY Tyngg> ee WITH nt Hac
h 7 fi a aa

SI UNORT ERO LAG

resenta-
tion,” the MP said.

“He has gone and left another generation
to take the baton. We let down his legacy when
we throw our pain at the past and fight with
ghosts of our own making. None can dispute
that, in serving us, he did the best that he could
do.

“Those who knew him well would describe
him as a leader gifted with the common touch,
who had no greater joy than walking among
his people. He drew his inspiration from the
Bahamas and its people and in building this
nation, they drew theirs from him,” Mr Wilch-
combe said.

AND Lynpen PINDLING

ae pilot

Controversial article gets support from
former PLP chairmanship contender

A FORMER contender for
the PLP chairmanship yester-
day came out in support of The
Tribune’s controversial Insight
article about Sir Lynden Pin-
dling and the drug trade.

Mr Omar Archer said Sir
Lynden, as prime minister dur-
ing the 1980s drug era, had to
bear the brunt of responsibili-
ty for what went on in this
country.

And he said the cocaine
trade had destroyed an entire
generation of Bahamian men,
creating thousands of career
addicts, some of them dead
and others in prison.

“T think some are defending
Sir Lynden’s legacy to gain
political brownie points instead
of putting the country first,”
Mr Archer told The Tribune.

“But the cocaine trade was
responsible for a huge genera-
tional gap among Bahamian
men. I have a brother who was
a lifetime cocaine user. Many
others are either dead or in
prison.

“The women of that era who
refrained from drug use are
now in leadership roles in this
country. It destroyed a whole
generation of Bahamian men.”

Mr Archer said it was time
Bahamians faced up to the
“true facts”, acknowledge it
was wrong and find a way to
move forward.

“How are we going to stim-
ulate the minds of Bahamian
men? The drug trade now is
more violent than it was, and it
has created an attitude of enti-
tlement, with young men feel-
ing they should get money for
no work.”

Mr Archer said he found it
offensive that some people
were so ready to spring to Sir
Lynden’s defence without any
thought for the families of
cocaine victims.

“Even though I am not fully
aware of the activities of that
era, I am a student of history
and I call a spade a spade.

“Tt is a known fact that 70
per cent of the drugs entering
the north American market
was channelled through the
Bahamas.

“The question is: is it fair for
the then prime minister and
the commissioner of police to
shoulder the brunt of the
responsibility? That’s the ques-
tion that needs to be answered
and no-one is addressing that
question.”

Mr Archer’s comments came
as controversy continued to
rage over the Insight article
which recorded a former PLP
official’s belief that his pilot

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son was killed because he
knew too much about Pin-
dling’s connections with
Colombian drug czar Joe
Lehder.

Mr Chauncey Tynes Sr, PLP
treasurer in the late 1960s, told
Insight his son informed him
of regular cash consignments
he brought to Nassau for both
Pindling and a senior police
officer.

These were Lehder’s pay-
offs for their complicity in
facilitating his cocaine trans-
shipment operation in Nor-
man’s Cay in the Exumas.

Yesterday, The Tribune con-

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tinued to receive congratula-
tory calls from readers who
said it was time for Bahami-
ans to square up to the less
savoury parts of their history.

One, a Nassau businessman,
also supported Mr Tynes’
claim that Pindling was not a
Bahamian at all, but a
Jamaican who was brought to
the Bahamas as a boy.

“I knew the boat captain
who brought him here,” he
said, “I don’t know if he is still
living, but he was very vocal
about it even while Pindling
was at his height.

“He used to say he wished
he had dropped the little b.....d
overboard for all the trouble
he caused.”

The businessman also said
he knew a person still living in
Nassau who delivered cash, all
in US banknotes, from Joe
Lehder to the prime minister
every Monday morning.

Another reader said it would
be up to “our children” to
decide who should be revered
as part of Bahamian history.

“They will determine how
Sir Lynden is judged,” he
added.

“However, I really admire
your (The Tribune’s) courage
in writing these things and I
am delighted you are doing
what you are doing.”

1s a :
> ann
ee —_— dl




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CLL

IRS CTT LL

Ce UC
Ue

A 38-YEAR-OLD
woman is in police custody
in connection with the
murder of Gentry McPhee
who was shot dead in The
Big Yard nightclub early
on Monday morning.

The woman was appre-
hended just after 9pm on
Tuesday and is being ques-
tioned by police after two
men were arrested on
Monday in connection with
the incident.

Mr McPhee, 30, was
fatally shot shortly after
midnight while in The Big
Yard nightclub between
Arawak Cay and Crystal
Cay.

He was seriously injured
in his abdomen and hands
and was rushed to Princess
Margaret Hospital by
ambulance.

But the gunshot victim
died shortly after he
arrived at the hospital.

An intensive murder
investigation is underway.
Anyone who may be
able to assist police with
investigations should call

322-4444, 919, or call
Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-8477.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
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WEBSITE
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Obama a socialist? Not quite

OF ALL THE inane accusations about Pres-
ident Obama, the silliest has to be this: The
president is a socialist.

Obama’s plans are “one big down payment
on a new American socialist experiment,”
asserts House minority leader John Boehner.
He’s ”the world’s best salesman of socialism,”
says Republican Senator Jim DeMint.

“Lenin and Stalin would love this stuff,”
declares Mike Huckabee. Sean Hannity derides
his agenda as “socialism you can believe in.”
Obama is “a radical communist,” warns kooky
Alan Keyes.

“Epithets are substituting for thinking,”
observes Marc Landy, professor of political sci-
ence at Boston College.

Are they ever.

That has long been the case across vast realms
of conservative talk radio, of course. I recently
heard one of our local luminaries who regular-
ly accuses Obama of Marxism offering a similar
sort of indispensable insight on another critical
issue: Michelle Obama’s appearance during
her husband’s speech to Congress. The first
lady’s face resembled that of a camel, while her
body looked like the Liberty Bell wrapped in
purple, said WTKK’s Jay Severin, who, hilari-
ously, fancies himself a political polymath lead-
ing a rarefied radio discussion. (Severin imagines
any number of things about himself that are at
considerable variance with the truth).

So let’s examine the matter. One defining
aspect of socialism is state ownership, control, or
direction of the economy.

Think of Hugo Chavez nationalizing steel,
cement, power, and telecommunications firms in
Venezuela, and assuming control over foreign
oil projects.

Or of Francois Mitterrand nationalizing six of
France’s largest industrial conglomerates, plus
dozens of the country’s largest banks and invest-
ment houses, during his presidency.

By contrast, despite the excuse of a crisis,
Obama has resisted calls from both left and
right to temporarily nationalize teetering banks.
Sunilarly, if Obama were a socialist, crypto or
otherwise, he would surely be proposing gov-
ernment-run healthcare, rather than an expan-
sion that builds upon our current hybrid model.

Nor does his agenda compare to the democ-
ratic socialism of countries like Denmark or
Sweden, which have high taxation across a wide
swath of the population to fund a generous sys-
tem of social benefits.

“What Obama even in his wildest moments is

proposing is way short of that,” notes Landy.

What’s really causing conservative connip-
tions is that Obama wants to tax top earners
more and spend some of that revenue on ben-
efits — healthcare, education, tax cuts, etc. —
for others. His mortgage plan has drawn similar
ire.

But if he prevails, the two top income tax
rates — 36 and 39.6 per cent — would still be
well below those the country had for much of
the last six decades.

The top rates were 90 per cent or more from
the mid-1940s until the mid-1960s.

They remained above 65 per cent from the
mid-1960s until Ronald Reagan’s presidency,
when they were first cut to the 48 to 50 per
cent range and later to 28 per cent with a “bub-
ble” bracket that taxed some income at 33 per
cent.

Taxes rose under both George H.W. Bush
and Bill Clinton.

During Clinton’s presidency, the top rates
were set at 36 and 39.6 per cent. George W.
Bush’s tax cuts reduced those rates to 33 and 35
per cent.

When those tax cuts expire, Obama favours
letting the top rates revert to 36 and 39.6 per
cent.

That historical perspective gives the lie to
the notion that the president wants to impose an
unprecedented level of taxation. Add in his
other revenue-raisers, and he would clearly be
more progressive than Clinton, but well within
the tradition of FDR and LBJ.

It’s ambitious liberalism, without a doubt.
But socialism, with all that conjures up? Hard-
ly.

“For upper-income taxpayers, marginal tax
rates on ordinary income would return to Clin-
ton-era levels,” says Rosanne Altshuler, co-
director of the nonpartisan Tax Policy Centre.
“Taxes on capital gains would be lower or the
same as the top capital gains rate under Ronald
Reagan, while taxes on dividends would be sig-
nificantly lower than under Reagan.”

So why do Obama’s ideological opponents
persist in the socialist canard?

Simple: It’s far easier to gull people with
politically freighted terms than it is to argue
actual facts.

(This article was written by Scot Lehigh Globe

Staff
—c. 2009 The Boston Globe).



Eleuthera wild
horses legacy is a
lesson for us all

EDITOR, The Tribune

I read Mr Eugene Carey’s
letter in The Tribune this
morning, and I can understand
and feel his frustration, and
indeed as an organization, the
Bahamas Humane Society
shares this frustration with
him.

We were contacted some
months back about the horse
situation in Eleuthera, in fact,
you published an in depth arti-
cle about it.

These horses are the
descendants of horses left
behind when the Wood Prince
family left the farm they had
in Eleuthera.

The original horses broke
out of the fenced fields where
they were kept and gradually
became a wild herd.

The Bahamas Humane
Society sent our Executive
Director Stephen Turnquest
to visit Rock Sound and talk
to the farmers and hear their
concerns, he also visited their
farms and met with other con-
cerned persons in the com-
munity.

During this same visit he
drove around and tried to
identify a possible site for the
horses to be corralled, where
they could have sufficient
food, shade and water.

Upon Mr. Turnquest’s
return to Nassau from
Eleuthera, we held a meeting
at the Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety of knowledgeable horse
people shelter to discuss what
we could do to help with this
situation.

After meeting with the
horse community and seeing
first hand what the situation
was, the Bahamas Humane
Society sent a letter to the
Minister, and to the Director
of Agriculture.

The Bahamas Humane
Society also sent our Execu-
tive Director to visit Half

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



Moon Cay, with a prominent
and very knowledgeable
member of the Nassau horse
community.

The intention of this trip
was to see if the Half Moon
Cay would be a viable solu-
tion to this problem.

The Bahamas Humane
Society also has had many
lengthy phone conversations
with WSPA (World Society
of the Protection of Animals)
about the possibility of send-
ing a specialist to help us in
the capturing and relocation
of these horses.

We have also spent many
hours talking and negotiating
with landowners about secur-
ing a large enough tract of
land in the area of Rock
Sound with sufficient grasses,
shade and water to sustain
these horses.

There is still a group of very
interested persons trying to
sort out this daunting prob-
lem.

They are working on it as I
write.

The Bahamas Humane
Society is there to assist in any
way that we possibly can.

The option of relocating the
horses to Half Moon Cay is
fraught with complications:
Starting with the journey by
boat, coupled with how many
horses are already on that
island, combined with how
wild these horses actually are.

I have been told by one
lady, who is working very
closely with the horses that:
“What we need is the govern-
ment approval to work with
these animals and then per-
mission to bring in the spay-
vac, (a contraceptive vaccine)
and use it on the mares to

inhibit any more horses being
born to this herd.”

Perhaps a temporary solu-
tion would be to offer the
farmers fencing to protect
their crops while we sort
things out, and Government
can assist us in the manpower
needed to install these fences

We must not loose sight
that we must all work togeth-
er and find a solution to this
old and very vexing problem,
in doing so we will all finally
do what is right for these ani-
mals so carelessly and selfish-
ly abandoned years ago.

I would like to add, as a
footnote, and not a complaint,
for the record: the Bahamas
Humane Society made all the
above-mentioned trips and
phone calls at our own
expense.

We are prepared, as an
organization, to do everything
in our power to find a solu-
tion to this problem and assist
the Government in any way
we can.

However, this is a situation
that cannot be solved without
significant Government
involvement, and community
cooperation on the part of the
Eleuthera farmers.

This should also serve as a
lesson for us all that when
people pullout of this coun-
try, for whatever reason, they
should be made to “clean up
behind them”, and find solu-
tions for their animals and not
just abandon them.

KIM ARANHA
President, Bahamas
Humane Society.

Nassau,
March 9, 2009

We support the Bill to
protect sea turtles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We are Bahamians, with
the exception of two of us who
are permanent residents of
long standing with Bahamian
children.

We support the Bill to pro-
tect all Bahamian sea turtles

The Tomlinson
Scholarship

and would like to see it passed
into law as soon as possible.

Some of us have already
signed a petition.

However, in light of the
Minister of Agriculture and
Fisheries’ assertion that only a
small number of Bahamians
have publicly supported the
ban, we would be grateful if
you would place our names
on the record.

Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty

Nassau Office: Mike Light-
bourn, Athena Mabon,
Doretha Knowles, Cindi Scav-
ella, Sheska Sands (and Cecil
Sands), Pam Taylor, Spencer

White, Rudy Carroll, Heather
Peterson, Joel Moxey, Donna
Davis, Jane-Michelle Bethel,
Carman Massoni.

Tara Mabon (Environmen-
tal Studies major, York Uni-
versity, Toronto).

Abaco Office: Krista
Albury, Mailin Sands, Chris
Farrington, Lee Pinder,
Shirley Carroll (and Peter
Carroll).

Exuma Office: Dale and
Lisa Kemp

Eleuthera: Adam Boorman

Spanish Wells: Lonnie John-
son

Nassau,
March 9, 2009

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applications are now being accepted for academic scholarships
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at colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



© In brief |CLICO crisis tops conference agenda

Police recover
ammunition
after chasing
three men

AMMUNITION recovered
by police is thought to have
been dropped by three men as
officers pursued them in the
Wilson Tract area on Tuesday
evening.

Mobile division officers on
patrol in the area said the
three men were acting suspi-
ciously and ran as they
approached.

When searching the area
where the men had been, the
officers found a plastic bag
containing four live rounds of
ammunition for an AK-47
assault rifle.

No arrests were made.

Police are appealing for
information from the public.
Anyone who may be able to
assist investigations should
call police on 322-4444, 919, or
call Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-8477.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham will discuss critical financial
issues affecting the Bahamas and
the region with heads of govern-
ment at a conference in Belize
today and tomorrow.

The liquidation of CLICO
(Bahamas), G20’s position on
“harmful” tax havens and the col-
lapse of the Stanford Bank of
Antigua top the agenda at the
20th inter-sessional meeting of
the Caribbean community
(CARICOM).

While CARICOM leaders are
slated to focus on the effects of
the current global economic crisis
on the region and possible miti-
gating action, the possibility of
an Economic Partnership Agree-
ment between Caribbean coun-
tries and Canada will also take
up time at the conference.

Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette, who is acting Prime
Minister in Mr Ingraham’s
absence, said discussion of CLI-
CO’s position will be a priority
for the Bahamas and several
Caribbean countries, as both
Guyana and Trinidad also have
an interest in the company.

Mr Symonette said: “It will be

discussed and

we want to

make sure the

policy holders

. and those that

have annuities

with CLICO

are covered.

We will make

sure there is as

foe little loss of

investment as

possible, although that is up to
the liquidators.”

The seizure of the Bank of
Antigua, which is owned by the
Stanford group and Sir Allen
Stanford, by Caribbean regula-
tors amid fraud regulations will
also require attention, Mr Symon-
ette said. The protectionist leg-
islative measures threatening tax
havens and the financial services
sector will be another primary
issue for CARICOM leaders.

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing, acting as Minis-
ter of Finance during Mr Ingra-
ham’s two-day absence, maintains
the Bahamas government is care-
fully monitoring moves in the
United States and other G20
nations intended to crack down
on “harmful” tax havens after an
expanded Stop Tax Haven Abuse
Bill was introduced in the US sen-
ate last week and British Prime



PLP Chairman swipes at Carl Bethel

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - PLP Chairman
Glenys Hanna-Martin is hitting
out at Education Minister Carl
Bethel, claiming that he attempt-
ed to push blame on the school
board for the non-payment of
workers at the West End Primary
School.

Mrs Hanna-Martin said West
End Primary, like several other
schools on Grand Bahama, is not
governed by a school board, but
falls under the direct responsibil-
ity of the Ministry of Education.

SHRUIC ISIC

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PHONE: 327-6464

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(des)

Four persons
employed as jani-
tors and security
personnel at the

school have
‘ reportedly not
Glenys received their

salaries for more
than five weeks.
Mrs Hanna-Martin said the min-
istry’s failure to pay has caused
tremendous hardship for individ-
uals during these tough econom-
ic times. “I read with utter
amazement the comments attrib-
uted to the Minister of Education
Carl Bethel relative to the non-
payment of staff at the West End
Primary School wherein the min-
ister implies that the default in
the payment of staff is due to the
poor management of funding by
the school boards,” she said.

“T certainly hope the minister is
aware that West End Primary
School is not governed by a
school board and if he is so aware
he ought not to seek to mislead
our public by shafting responsi-
bility from himself to third par-
ties. If he is not so aware, then I
invite him to come out of the
comfort of his office and acquaint
himself with the facts relative to

Hanna-Martin

the operation of our Family
Island schools.”

Mrs Hanna-Martin said that
the public schools in West End,
Holmes Rock and the three
schools in East End come under
the direct jurisdiction of the Min-
istry of Education and do not
have school boards as suggested.
The PLP chairman said Minister
Bethel ought to ensure that staff
is duly remunerated for work per-
formed, particularly in times of
acute financial hardship.

The Tribune spoke with San-
dra Edgecombe, superintendent
of primary schools at the Min-
istry of Education on Grand
Bahama, about the situation.

She said that small schools,
such as West End Primary, are
not run by school boards.

Mrs Edgecombe said the mat-
ter concerning the non-payment
of employees at the school in
West End is currently being
addressed. Mrs Hanna-Martin
had previously suggested that oth-
er schools are also experiencing
similar difficulties, but Ms Edge-
combe said that she is not aware
of such problems at any of the
other primary schools in Grand
Bahama.

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Minister Gordon Brown has
repeated America’s call for a
global new deal to address the
issue. Mr Laing maintains the
government will remain actively
vigilant on the issue, as financial
services account for 15 per cent of
the country’s GDP, making it the
second most important sector of
the Bahamian economy.

CARICOM leaders will also
focus on the implementation of
the Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) signed with the
European Union (EU) and the
status of negotiations for a trade
and development agreement
between CARICOM and Cana-
da. Mr Symonette said: “The
EPA has been signed and now it

is a question of the technical arms
taking over.

“The CARICOM position with
regard to Canada will be dis-
cussed and we can see whether
or not that will be implemented.”

Prime Minister Ingraham left
Nassau yesterday and is due to
return following the close of the
conference tomorrow.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Two in court on marijuana charge

A 39-YEAR-OLD man of
Fox Hill and a 28-year-old
man of Pinewood Gardens
were arraigned in a Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday on a
Marijuana possession charge.

Carlos Lamm and Laticha
McKenzie appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in
Court 8, Bank Lane yester-
day, charged with possession
of marijuana with the intent
to supply.

It is alleged that the

accused on Monday, March
9, were found in possession
of a quantity of marijuana
which authorities believe they
intended to supply to another.

Court dockets further
allege that the accused were
found in possession of three
and a half pounds of marijua-
na.

Lamm and McKenzie both
pleaded not guilty to the
charge and were granted bail
in the sum of $10,000.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning

for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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Govt ‘must address Customs
and Immigration salaries’

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - President of
the Bahamas Public Services
Union John Pinder said gov-
ernment must address the
issue of salaries for Custom
and Immigration officers if it
intends to make them shift
workers.

He said the union has still
not received the government’s
counter-proposal on salaries
for employees of the Customs
and Immigration Depart-
ments.

“We are still awaiting the
government to come back to
the union with a counter-pro-
posal so we can address the
salaries of half of Immigration
and Customs.

“T heard them (the govern-
ment) throwing out the fact
that they are going to make
them shift workers. We cer-
tainly know that unless salaries
are properly addressed that
would not happen so smooth-
ly,” Mr Pinder said on Tues-
day in Grand Bahama.

The union president was in
Freeport to open an educa-
tional training seminar for
members at the Bahamas Pub-
lic Services Union Hall.

He told members that the
union will continue to push for
an amendment to the Indus-



“I heard them
(the government)
throwing out the
fact that they are
going to make
them shift
workers. We
certainly know
that unless salaries
are properly
addressed that
would not happen
so smoothly.”



John Pinder

trial Relations Act that gov-
erns the agency shop.

Mr Pinder told The Tribune
that he has requested to meet
with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham to discuss the matter
of salaries, as well as other
important issues of concern.

“There are situations where
persons have reached the max-
imum of their salary scale and
are not able to get promotion
but still receive above average
performance or better, and
they are entitled to receive
increments in the form of
lump sum payment and that is
not happening,” he said.

The issue of promotions is
also a major concern in the
public service, Mr Pinder said.

He noted that many civil
servants have completed their
training and educational
courses, but have not been
properly reclassified and pro-
moted accordingly.

“There are also those who
are entitled to tuition reim-
bursement and they are not
receiving those benefits,” he
said.

Mr Pinder claimed that the
promotional exercises at the
Immigration Department were
delayed because there were
challenges with verifying cer-
tain qualifications of some
officers.

However, he is now satisfied
that efforts are being made by



the government, which recent-
ly retired a number of senior
persons at the Immigration
Department.

“T believe it is safe to say
that those persons who are eli-
gible for promotion will fill the
number of positions that are
now available and we are sat-
isfied that efforts are being
made to fill all vacancies in
Immigration,” he said.

Mr Pinder said additional
manpower is required at both
Customs and Immigration to
ensure efficiency in those
departments.

He stressed that there is a
need for ongoing recruitment,
especially at the Department
of Immigration.

“The illegal immigration
problem is a very challenging
issue for the country right
now.

“There is continuous talk
about the situation and the
government spends hundreds
of thousands of dollars to
repatriate illegal immigrants.

“We think we need more
manpower to conduct appre-
hensions and to tighten our
borders from illegal sloops
sneaking through our borders.

“The government has to
seriously consider ways to
reduce the amount of illegal
immigrants that get through
and if more manpower is
required then we need to
address that,” Mr Pinder said.

Police constable accused of stabbing appears in court

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A POLICE Constable accused of stab-
bing a man in the shoulder during an alter-
cation early on Sunday morning was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Constable Joey Saunders, 19, of Windsor
Place, appeared before Magistrate Ansella
Williams in Court One, Bank Lane yester-
day morning, charged with causing grievous
harm and assault with a deadly weapon.

It is alleged that on Sunday, March 8,
Saunders unlawfully caused grievous harm

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to Randell Newbold. It is further alleged
that around 1.15am on Sunday, March 8,
Saunders unlawfully assaulted Rajeer Fer-
guson with a deadly weapon, namely a
motor vehicle. Thirteen witnesses are listed

on court dockets.

before 2am.











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PHONE: 322-2157



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Initial police reports stated that 22-year-
old Newbold was stabbed in the left shoul-
der early Sunday morning during an alter-
cation in the Carmichael Road area.

The incident reportedly occurred shortly

The victim was taken to hospital where
his condition is listed as critical. Police ini-

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tially reported that they were uncertain as
to the circumstances surrounding the inci-

Saunders, who is being represented by
attorney Romona Farquharson, pleaded

not guilty to both charges. Ms Farquharson

told the court that Saunders had been in
police custody since Sunday morning,
adding that she had not seen any docu-
ment from investigators requesting an
extension of time for his detainment.

Saunders was granted bail in the sum

" se

of the Groves.

THE Grand Bahama
Labyrinth hosted an event
where 40 visitors participated in
“A Walk of Love” in
honour of “the island and the
planet.”

Guests were invited to select
from a basket of meaningful
“love quotes” on which to
meditate during the walk, and

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to keep as a bookmark and for
later reflection.

The many benches around
the labyrinth provided com-
fortable seating in the natural
garden setting. The beauty of
the surroundings was enhanced
by twinkling “fairy lights” in
the trees, tiki torches and cit-
ronella candles.












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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

trworarey NIB defends

: is defending its decision to prose-
? cute employers and the self-

? employed for non-payment of tax-

dmaycock@tribunemedianet_ i eg pointing out that if it conducts

: “business-as-usual” the National

FREEPORT - Two women } [psurance Scheme will be chal-

: : lenged around 2032.
acy in the Freeport Magistrate’s ;

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

were charged with drug conspir-

Court on Wednesday.

Magistrate Debbye Ferguson.

ous drugs with intent to supply.

charged with breach of the Shop

zie and Dominick Newbold.

five defendants.

ber 8.

THE National Insurance Board

Self-employed Long Island fish-

? erman Colin Fox, 53, is one of

Karen Bowe, 22, of Fortune : many poor fishermen unable to

Hills, and Karen Moss, 26, of Wis- } pay National Insurance contribu-

teria Drive, Gambier Loop, ¢ tions because adverse weather con-

appeared in Court One before i ditions have kept him from work-

: ? ing this crawfish season.
The women pleaded not guilty }

to conspiracy to possess danger- } Jast week in order to pay $300 to

; NIB and avoid jail after pleading
Bowe and Moss were also } guilty to a charge of owing NIB
2 1 ? $700 before the Long Island mag-
License Act along with three oth- }

ers — Darren Pratt, Nola McKen- }

He was forced to sell his boat

istrate.
NIB, in a statement yesterday,

: said that in the case of fishermen
K Brian Hanna represented the ¢ and farmers in the Family Islands,
i NIB’s officers were very “sensitive

They all pleaded not guilty to ; in the discharge of their duties.”

the charge and were each granted }

$4,500 bail with two sureties. The i action against anyone — employer
matters were adjourned to Octo- } 6; self-employed person — the

i Board, through its Inspectors,

NIB said before beginning legal

makes a series of documented
attempts to secure compliance.
Cases are then only advanced
after a thorough investigation is
conducted and there is confirma-
tion that the persons were, indeed,
gainfully employed or have
employment activities.

Sensitive

NIB has Inspectors and/or man-
agers resident in the Family Islands
and these stewards understand the
local economies and use a sensi-
tive and commonsense approach
when recommending prosecution.

If a fisherman or farmer is
unemployed, or not gainfully
employed, and provides confirma-
tion of this to NIB, the required
adjustments are made and no fur-
ther action will be taken.

“Studies confirm that a signifi-
cant number of self-employed per-
sons do not pay contributions, and
a large number of employers are
paying late or not at all. This is a
serious state of affairs — one that

has the potential to adversely
impact the future of the National
Insurance Scheme. As we have
previously stated, the National
Insurance Scheme is solvent and
strong — however, there are spe-
cific recommendations that have
been made by the Board’s Actu-
ary,” NIB said.

While NIB said it considers
prosecution for non-compliance a
last resort, there has been an
increase in legal proceedings with-
in the last several months — largely
a result of NIB’s increased efforts
to ensure that contributions are
paid on time.

The increased charges primarily
include failure to pay contribu-

tions, and failure to produce
employment records as requested
by the board.

The board said that legal action
is commenced only when all efforts
to resolve the outstanding contri-
butions directly with the employer
have fallen off.

“In addition, action is only
brought when the Board’s Inspec-
tors confirm, through their local
intelligence, that there is employ-
ment activity,” the statement said.

NIB is increasing its review of
the contribution accounts of delin-
quent employers and self-
employed persons in order to
ensure compliance with the
National Insurance Act.

decision to prosecute for unpaid taxes

The Act, which was passed into
law in 1972, requires that all per-
sons gainfully employed in The
Bahamas must either pay contri-
butions into National Insurance or
have contributions paid on their
behalf.

NIB said that it has an obliga-
tion to ensure compliance with the
provisions of the legislation, so as
to ensure that no worker is without
this social protection.

“The Board takes very serious-
ly this duty, and its efforts in this
regard extend even to and on
behalf of those who would wilfully
and intentionally fail to comply,”
the board said.

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A KEEN cyclist who favours
two wheels over four and subse-
quently saves more than $5,000 a
year is calling on others to get on
their bikes.

Bike mechanic Douglas Fawkes
has been riding since childhood,
but decided to ditch his car in
favour of the traditional bicycle
ten years ago to the benefit of
both his wallet and his health.

The 53-year-old cycles around
2,500 miles a year, taking the bike
from his home in JFK Drive, New
Providence, to jobs across the
island, including Breezes in Cable
Beach where he services the
hotels bikes.

His blood pressure has dropped
from critical levels to a healthy
115/75 and his cholesterol levels
improved dramatically as a result
of cycling, he said.

He wants to encourage others
to take up the physically, finan-
cially and environmentally
healthy habit for their own good
and the good of the island as it
becomes increasingly choked by
bumper to bumper road traffic.

“Tt’s a way of saving money on
gas, on parking, on licence fees,
alleviating health problems, and
alleviating stress,” he said.

“Cars are multiplying like rab-
bits on this island and they are
causing people a lot of stress.

“Tam not anti-car, I am just
saying the car is being overused in
the Bahamas.

“T believe the government
should start cycling lessons in our
schools to teach students to ride
bicycles, and I would be happy to
teach them.

“And I would recommend any-
one who lives between one and
53-YEAR-OLD Douglas Fawkes pictured outside The Tribune. Mr Fawkes five miles from work tries cycling
cycles arund 2,500 miles a year and has saved more than $5,00 ayear. — to work.”

Top American economist to speak
about issues facing Bahamian economy

53-year-old man
saves thousands of
dollars by cycling

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LEADING American
aoe will address some of
the most pressing issues facing
the Bahamas in the face of the
global economic downturn at a
special meeting being held
tonight.

Michael LaFaive, of the
Mackinac Centre for Public Pol-
icy, will speak on the topic: "Eco-
nomic Diversification: Should
Mandates or Markets Rule?"

The event, which will begin at
6.30pm at the Nassau Yacht Club
on East Bay Street, is being host-
ed by local economic think-tank
The Nassau Institute.

Mr LaFaive is director of the
Mackinac Centre’s Morey Fiscal
Policy Initiative. The centre is a
20-year-old public policy
research institute, located in Mid-
land, Michigan, two hours north
of Detroit.

During his 15 years with the
Mackinac Centre, Mr LaFaive
has authored or co-authored
more than 100 essays and 10
major studies on fiscal policy
issues as diverse as trade liberal-
isation, government spending,
privatisation, cigarette taxes and
smuggling, as well as government
economic development initia-
tives.

He has conducted extensive
research on government eco-
nomic development pro-
grammes, including an empirical
analysis of his state’s premier
economic development pro-
gramme — the Michigan Eco-
nomic Growth Authority
(MEGA).

Along with this study, Mr
LaFaive authored a short history
of economic development in his
home state and he found that the
lessons of Michigan’s history may
be applicable elsewhere.

His newest project involves a
budget analysis of the Michigan
Economic Development Corpo-
ration, a quasi-public state
agency tasked with bringing new
jobs to Michigan and making
sure old ones remain.

His opinion on economic mat-
ters is widely sought; he averages
more than 125 interviews a year
in media outlets as diverse as the
Financial Times, The Baltimore
(Maryland) Sun and National

Public Radio.
Those interested in attending
can sign up at:

https://secure.lexi.net/nassau/mic
hael_lafaive_on_economic_diver
sification.php or call 328-6529.



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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

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, immediately



CLICO, a credit union regula-
tor said.

Responding to media
reports, Nathaniel Adderley,
director of societies in the
Department of Co-operative
Development, assured the pub-
lic that no Bahamian credit
union had any investments on
the books of CLICO
(Bahamas) Limited at the date
of its collapse.

He pointed out that co-oper-
atives societies and credit

unions are prohibited by law
from investing in any financial
instruments other than those
outlined in Section 76 of The
Co-operatives Societies Act,
2005 which states that: “A soci-
ety may invest or deposit its
funds, (a) in any registered
society or bank approved by
the director of societies; (b) in
any securities issued or guar-
anteed by the government; (c)

in the shares or on the
security of any other institu-

2°2nd annual

THE Arawak Cay Fish
Fry is expected to be
bustling with activity this
weekend as the Antique
Auto Club of the Bahamas
takes locals and visitors on a
tour of the automotive
world of the past.

When the 22nd annual
Antique Car Show and
Steakout comes to town on
Saturday, March 14, cars
and trucks from the 1930s
to the 80s will be on display
along with some special
interest and customised
vehicles.

In addition to those
belonging to club members,
the organisers are looking
for antique and special
interest vehicles that belong
to other members of the
public. The club says
“antique vehicle” refers to
a car that is at least 20 years
old.

A separate section for
"project cars" is being
added this year, and will fea-
ture vehicles that are under
restoration but not yet com-
pleted.

Club secretary Murray
Forde said: “In recent years,
owners have stated that
their cars are not ready for

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tion with limited lability
approved by the director of
societies; or (d) in any other
manner permitted by the direc-
tor of societies.

Mr Adderley said credit
Unions remain one of the
safest areas of the financial sec-
tor as they are solely domestic
operations and funds are only
invested in the local economy.

“Credit union members and
depositors can rest assured that
their savings and deposits are



THE TRIBUNE



No co-operative credit unions

‘had any shares in CLICO’

not tied up on the books of
CLICO (Bahamas) Limited.
The sector regulator has not
uncovered any record repre-
senting deposits with the insur-
ance company and is confident
that deposits in credit unions
are safe and sound.

“The Bahamian public is
encouraged to continue patro-
nising co-operatives and credit
unions as the co-operative sec-
tor is stable, safe and sound,”
he said.

Elaine Forde/Tribune staff

THE ORIGINAL six members of the Antique Auto Club of the Bahamas 20 years later (taken in 2007) L-R:
Richard Chestnut, Lenny Brozozog, Don Aranha, Alonzo Rolle, Murray Forde and Charles Johnson.

showing or not good
enough, so this year we are
encouraging them to bring
them out so people can get
some idea of the work that
goes into restoration and
hopefully encourage them
to come back next year and
see the difference."

Many corporate sponsors
have again supported the

event with donations for tro-
phies, which will be awarded
in the seven judged classes
as well as the popular "Peo-
ples Choice" category, the
winners of which are deter-
mined by attendee votes.
Steak and chicken dinners
are again being sold and all
proceeds will benefit the
Bilney Lane Home for Chil-

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dren and the Every Child
Counts Learning Centre in
Abaco.

Other activities include a
raffle featuring several
prizes and an art contest for
children which was created
by club director Jim LaRoda
and introduced last year.
"The idea is for the child to
draw one of the cars on dis-
play on specially provided
forms." Mr LaRoda
explained. "Prizes will be
awarded to the winners the
following weekend, after
they have been judged by a
panel”.

The Antique Auto Club
of the Bahamas is a non-
profit organisation formed
in 1987 by six men (all of
whom are still members)
with a strong interest in old
cars. It now boasts a mem-
bership of almost 50.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

<

NASA postponed the launch
of space shuttle Discovery just }
hours before it was to head to

the international space station }
Wednesday because of a hydro- }
gen gas leak that could have }
been catastrophic at liftoff, :

according to Associated Press.
The leak was in a different :
part of the system that already }
has caused a vexing one-month }
delay. Shuttle managers were }
shooting for another launch }
attempt Thursday night pro-
vided they could fix the prob- }
lem quickly. ;
The gaseous hydrogen began
leaking just as the launch team }
was close to wrapping up the :
loading of Discovery’s external }
fuel tank for a late night liftoff. }
The seven astronauts had yet }
to board the spaceship. :
Discovery’s flight to the }
space station is already late }
because of concern about }
hydrogen gas valves in the }
ship’s engine compartment. }
NASA spokesman Allard Beu- }
tel said Wednesday’s small leak }
was in plumbing outside Dis- ;
covery, in the vicinity of the }
fuel tank and a hydrogen gas- }
venting line, and had nothing }
to do with the valves. But it still :
could have been dangerous at }
liftoff. i
“When you’re launching, you ;
have pyrotechnics going off,” :
said another NASA }
spokesman, Steve Roy. “You }
can’t have hydrogen leaking }
out in the vicinity of a launch ;
pad ... it’s possible it could }
explode.” ;
As NASA drained the exter- i
nal fuel tank and pondered its ;
next move, Mission Control }
notified the three astronauts }
aboard the space station that }
their visitors would not be }
arriving on time. Commander
Mike Fincke asked to be kept }
abreast of any developments.
NASA has until Monday to }
send Discovery to the space sta-
tion, otherwise the flight will }
have to be put off until April. }
That’s because a Russian Soyuz }
rocket is slated to blast off in }
two weeks, on a higher priority }
mission, with a fresh space sta- }
tion crew. :
Discovery’s liftoff originally }
was targeted for mid-February, }
but concern about the shuttle’s }
three hydrogen gas valves
resulted in four delays. i
Shuttle managers said they’re }
convinced after extensive test- }
ing that the valves are safe and ;
won’t break like one did during }
the last shuttle launch in }
November. The valves are part i
of the main propulsion system ;
and control the flow of hydro- }
gen gas into the fuel tank, in }
order to maintain proper tank }
pressure. i

Young artists
brush up
for Woodes

Murals painted
at former Straw
Market site

YOUNG artists’ colourful
visions have transformed
part of Woodes Rogers Walk
into an inspired experience
for Bahamians and visitors.

Students from the College
of the Bahamas, the Nation-
al Art and Craft Enrichment
Programme, D W Davis and
recent high school graduates
combined forces to paint
murals at the northern
boundary of the former
Straw Market site. As the
site awaits construction,
sheets of plywood were
placed around it to keep it
secure. However, the stu-
dents and the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation
formed a partnership to
beautify the area.

Timothy Nottage, director
of the art project, said the
creation of the murals aims
to do more than keep young-
sters occupied.

“This is more along the
lines of them investing in
themselves, in developing
their talents and investigat-
ing who they are as people,”
he said. “I just wanted a
medium and a platform for
them to show the country
what they are capable of.”

The murals depict cultur-
ally relevant scenes that
include the nation’s flora,
fauna and seascapes. The
majority of the ideas and
designs came directly from
the students. They individu-
ally conceptualised the
designs, which were all con-
nected in creative ways.

The artists hope their work
falls in line with the purpose
of art, which is to uplift the
human spirit, Mr Nottage
said.

“It adds an aesthetic
appeal to the waterfront
where the tourists have to
pass, rather than having an
eyesore,” he said.

“Imagine if we can do this
for all those dilapidated
buildings and all those eye-
sores that are downtown. We
can come up with a design
for them.”

Since the students have
been working on the project,
it has become an attraction
for visitors, who often stop
and take photographs. They
have asked the students lots
of questions about their
work, starting interesting
conversations.

Craig Culmer, an art edu-
cation student at COB, was
excited with the opportunity
to have people from around
the world see some of his art
work.

“It’s a privilege and it’s a
way of getting your name out
as a young, upcoming artist,”
he said.

Leonardo Dorsett had sim-
ilar thoughts. As a biochem-
istry student at COB, he
found himself on the project

Sale Begins March 2nd, 2009

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YOUNG ARTISTS beautify
downtown Nassau's
waterfront with murals.

through the National Art
and Craft Enrichment Pro-
gramme. He said he wants
the public to see the talent
of the young artists and take
note of them.

The Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation plans to engage
artists to complete murals
around the entire border of
the Straw Market site.





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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

eM i i

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165



THE TRIBUNE





Building a green

THE SOUTHERN ISLANDS



| HE further south one

travels from Nassau,
the more isolated and remote
the islands become. In fact,
once you leave the southern
end of the Great Bahama
Bank, the islands offer rela-
tively little to nothing in terms
of tourism and commerce.
Locals survive primarily off of
the land and sea and earn a
minimal income from local
consumption and modest busi-
ness arrangements with Nas-
sau.

Beyond Long Island is
another world, a blank canvas
where the people and settle-
ments are still authentic to a
traditional Bahamian culture
and way of life. There are
names like Delectable Bay,
Lovely Hill, Pirates Well and
True Blue; names that seem
pulled out of a timeless novel,
and destined for great triumph.
Here, one can explore rem-
nants of a more prosperous
era that has all but washed
away with the tides and van-
ished into the rolling hills.

Fortune Island (Cay) was
the original name given to
Long Cay in the
Crooked/Acklins archipelago.

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BOATS ON CROOKED ISLAND — The southern islands have each undergone independent ecological development

At the beginning of the 20th
century, it was home to more
than 3,000 inhabitants (+/- 15
today) and was one of the
leading shipping ports in the
western hemisphere. The first
post office in the Bahamas still
stands on Crooked Island, and
is now part of the restaurant at
the Pitts Town Point Landings
Resort.

Unlike the majority of our
other islands, which are con-
nected by the Great and Little
Bahama Banks, the southern
islands comprising of Inagua,
Mayaguana, Crooked Island
and Acklins each have under-
gone independent ecological
development. Possessing a
self-contained, one-of-kind
ecosystem means that each of
these islands is much more vul-
nerable to habitat loss and ulti-
mately the demise of fishery
stocks, the staple food prod-
uct of local communities. Yet
despite — or perhaps because

of — this fragile uniqueness, it is
here in the Southern Bahamas
where great potential exists to
meet the demand of the
emerging eco or nature
tourism market.

The World Tourism Organ-
isation and International Eco-
Tourism Society (www.eco-
tourism.com) say the follow-
ing about international
tourism:

© since the 1990s, ecotourism
has been growing 20 per cent —
34 per cent a year

¢ in 2004, ecotourism/nature
tourism was growing globally
three times faster than the
tourism industry as a whole

¢ sun-and-sand resort
tourism has now “matured as a
market” and its growth is pro-
jected to remain flat. In con-
trast, “experiential” tourism—
which encompasses eco-
tourism, nature, heritage, cul-
tural, and soft adventure

tourism, as well as sub-sectors
such as rural and community
tourism—is among the sectors
expected to grow most quick-
ly over the next two decades

¢ the United Nations Envi-
ronment Programme (UNEP)
and Conservation Interna-
tional have indicated that most
of tourism’s expansion is
occurring in and around the
world’s remaining natural
areas

¢ sustainable tourism could
grow to 25 per cent of the
world’s travel market within
six years

¢ analysts predict a growth
in eco-resorts and hotels, and a
boom in nature tourism — a
sector already growing at 20
per cent a year — and suggest
early converts to sustainable
tourism will make market
gains

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 11

economy in the Bahamas



Region Land Area (Square Miles) Stopover Visitors
Southern Bahamas ..................00005 OG) dau os ab bie basen oceans 25,319*
(Mayaguana, Crooked Is, Inagua, Acklins)

Leeward Islands .......... 0.000.000.0000 cee BAG. ofr ateieh aiden sa cee ees 427,183
(Montserrat, St Kitts and Nevis, Antigua,

Barbuda, Anguilla)

Windward Islands..........0.0.... 000000. ee OL dag peeeien aa. oat adeees od 560,796

(Grenada, St Lucia, Dominica, St Vincent
and the Grenadines)

Virgin Islands ......... 0.0.0... cee eee eee 194 Loc cee eee 1,051,428
(US and British)
French Antilles... 0.00.00... cc cece eee DO. aie ak ate iss te ees ee ee 1,310,107

(Martinique and Guadeloupe)

Netherland Antilles ....................0.. BOD. aera teach paat epee ge a 1,638,812
(Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao, Saba,

St Eustacius, St Marteen)

* This estimate covers Long Island, Cat Island, the Berry Islands
and Rum Cay (the real number is probably significantly lower)

Source: Caribbean Tourism Organisation 2007 Stopover Visitors

Ministry Of Tourism Statistics 2006

choosing environmentally
responsible destinations and
tour operators and are willing
to pay more money for this
type of experience. It isa
result of supply and demand:
the more natural resources
diminish globally, the more
money people are willing to
spend and the further they are
willing to travel in search of
“natural” experiences.

There are endless opportu-
nities for high-end eco/nature
tourism throughout the
Bahamas, however, the South-
ern Bahamas is unique in the
number of undeveloped
islands, the area's natural
wealth and diversity, the high
cost of traditional infrastruc-
ture and the potential to create
a destination brand that is larg-
er than most Caribbean coun-
tries.

To begin painting this blank
canvas, the government and
authoritative associations need

to provide the brush and paint.
Before any bold new plans can
be marketed to developers,
hoteliers, businesses and ulti-
mately the end consumer, a
recognisable brand needs to
be built. An eco/nature prod-
uct cannot be authentic if there
is no underlying platform
ensuring consistency. This can
be achieved through a process
of careful zoning, national
park expansion and the cre-
ation of a rating system to
ensure businesses are meeting
the criteria of an authentic
green product.

When Costa Rica first began
marketing itself as a natural
destination, resorts where
jumping onboard and using
the label "eco" on their prod-
uct. Soon, exit surveys showed
that many visitors were disap-
pointed with the product, as it
was not the eco/nature experi-
ence they had been expecting.
Authorities came up with a

rating system (www.turismo-
sostenible.com) which was
applied to hotels and resorts.
This not only helped potential
visitors choose their product,
but also encouraged proper-
ties to improve within the
guidelines of the countries’
brand (which is now their
identity).

Although such "green con-
cepts" are not yet mainstream,
they have been used in vari-
ous locations around the world
for many years and all indica-
tors show the market is grow-
ing faster than the traditional
sun, sand and sea product.
Where the Caribbean is con-
cerned, no country has taken
the lead in this market the way
Costa Rica has in Central
America. The opportunities
are here but we must have a
plan because timing is every-
thing where competition is a
factor. The blank canvas can
begin to take form.

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Perry Christie slams Tribune article

FROM page one

missing in 1983 while piloting a
flight from Exuma to Nassau.

His father, Chauncey Tynes
Sr, told The Tribune that he
believes his son was murdered
because he knew too much of
the association between Sir
Lynden and the Colombian
drug czar Joe Lehder.

Mr Christie, however, said:
“Like it or not, and no matter
what else one may think of him,
Lynden Pindling is the father
of this nation. That is not an
opinion, it is fact.”

“Now, does this mean that
Sir Lynden’s achievements are
so grand and great that he
should somehow get a free pass
and be rendered immune from
criticism for his failures and
shortcomings? Of course not.
But what it does mean is that
as ‘Father of the Nation’, as the
leader of the struggle for free-
dom in the Bahamas, as the
man who presided over the cre-
ation of the most prosperous
middle class in this region of
the world, as the man who led
the way in creating educational
opportunities for black Bahami-
ans, it means that Sir Lynden is

oA OASIS



revered and deeply respected
and remembered with fondness
and yes, even gratitude by
many, many thousands of
Bahamians.

“And because Sir Lynden,
even in death — indeed espe-
cially now in death — is so
regarded, it is important that
the sensibilities of those who

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remember him in the way that I
have just described be respect-
ed.”

Criticising a dead person is
one thing, the PLP leader said,
but “desecrating his memory is
quite another.”

“Making a case against him
is one thing, but using lies and
falsehoods and fables and doing
it in a nasty, low-down way is
quite another thing.

“John Marquis can write
what he likes — and I will
defend his right to write what
he likes because that is all a part
of the freedoms we fought for
— but as a writer, and even
more so as a guest in this coun-
try, someone who is here not
by entitlement but by a privi-
lege accorded him, he really
should know better than to
come into someone else’s home
and viciously assault the dignity
and sensibilities of those who
live here,” he said.

Addressing the Insight arti-
cle itself, Mr Christie said he is
convinced Mr Marquis does not
personally believe a single word
he wrote.

“It is shameful that he would
exploit an aging man who
understandably still grieves over
the loss of his son and who has
clearly tried to resolve the mys-
tery of his son’s disappearance
by filling in the holes with all
manner of speculation that has
absolutely no foundation in fact.

“Let me say, however, that I
have nothing but sympathy for
Mr Tynes’ loss and the restless-











ness for answers that continues
to exercise his imagination after
all these years. In reading Mr
Marquis’s article, however, it
should be clear to anyone of
even the slightest intellect that
Mr Tynes is dealing not in the
currency of facts but in fanta-
sy,” the former prime minister
said.

Mr Christie said that the sug-
gestion that Sir Lynden was
somehow involved in the disap-
pearance of Mr Tynes’ son is
not supported by even so much
as a shred of evidence.

“There is nothing whatsoev-
er to support it, as Mr Marquis
himself well knows. I can only
repeat how very sad it is too see
a good gentleman’s grief
exploited in the shameful way
that Mr Marquis has done.

“The rest of the Insight arti-
cle is as full of falsehood and
fantasy as the main line of the
narrative that I have just dealt
with. Indeed some of it, frankly,
is demonstrably false,” Mr
Christie said.

Giving an example of a false-
hood found in the article, the
PLP leader named the part of
the story that addresses the
original plan for the Black
Tuesday protest in 1965.

“Tt says that the plan called
for the Speaker of the House,
the late Bobby Symonette, to
be bodily thrown out of the
House of Assembly instead of
the mace and hour glass. Mr
Marquis, quoting Mr Tynes,
says that this plan was even

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debated at the Council level of
the PLP.

“Well, did Mr Marquis try
to corroborate that story by
speaking to any other members
of the Council at the time?
Isn’t that what journalists are
supposed to do?

“He could, for example, have
called the present Governor-
General Arthur D Hanna, or
Sir Arthur Foulkes, or Sir
Orville Turnquest, or Sir Clif-
ford Darling, or Maurice
Moore, or Paul Adderley, or
Warren Levarity, or any one of
the scores of others who are still
around and who were high-
ranking council members of the
PLP at the time and who could
quite easily confirm that the sto-
ry is complete nonsense; that
there was never any plan to
inflict violence upon anyone,
least of all Bobby Symonette,”
Mr Christie said.

The PLP leader said that the
historical record of exactly what
took place on Black Tuesday
demonstrates the great care that
was taken in the planning of the
whole protest to avoid violence
of any kind.

“T suspect, however, that Mr
Marquis did not bother to check
that particular story because if it
was revealed to be false — as
indeed it is from start to finish
— it would call into question
Mr Tynes’ credibility on every-
thing else he had to say. For Mr
Marquis and The Tribune, that
simply would not do. Far better
then to just go with the false-
hood and leave it at that.”

Mr Christie further said that
the part of the story about Sir
Lynden holding secret meetings
with Robert Mugabe in the late
1960s to learn “how to keep
power in an outwardly democ-
ratic framework” is absolute
nonsense.

“To begin with, in the late
60s, Mr Mugabe knew absolute-
ly nothing about ‘how to keep
power in an outwardly democ-
ratic society’ because he had no
power at all and Rhodesia (as
Zimbabwe was then known)
was anything but democratic. It
was instead a white minority
ruled, apartheid-ridden country
led by Ian Smith.

“Robert Mugabe therefore
could not have helped Pindling
on that score. Indeed he would
not even have been accessible
to Pindling because in the late
60s Mugabe was either in jail
as a political prisoner or in the
bush fighting a guerrilla war.

“Mr Mugabe did not, in fact,
come to power until the 1980s,
by which time Pindling would
have been in power for many
years already. These are sim-
ple, well-known historical facts,
so what in the world is John
Marquis talking about?” Mr

Christie asked.

The former prime minister
also said that the story con-
cerning Donald "Nine" Rolle
— “who again for Mr. Marquis
is now conveniently dead” — to
the effect that he was dis-
patched by Sir Lynden to assas-
sinate Mr Tynes is “too foolish
to be taken seriously, and yet
Mr Marquis retells this story as
if it is supported by facts. It is
supported by nothing whatso-
ever.”

“The only thing Mr Tynes
says is that Nine tried to hire
him as a taxi— from the airport
no less in broad daylight and in
plain sight — but that it was
Nine’s intention to do him in
on Pindling’s orders. Based on
what? Neither Mr Tynes nor Mr
Marquis offers any evidence,”
Mr Christie said.

The PLP leader said that the
allegations of bribes or involve-
ment with drugs was also not
supported by any evidence in
the article.

“The most despicable part
of the entire article, however,
centres on the old, tired, worn-
out and thoroughly false and
offensive story about Pindling
not being a Bahamian, that he
was either a Haitian or a
Jamaican, that he didn’t show
up in the Bahamas until he was
a youngster.

“This is a fable that has been
debunked so many times before
— including in Professor
Michael Craton’s definitive
biography of Sir Lynden — that
it is surprising that Mr Marquis
would try to bring it up again,
courtesy of Mr Tynes. Anyone
who reads what Mr Marquis
attributes to Mr Tynes is left to
wonder why in the world such
rantings would be thought wor-
thy of dissemination.

“This is all nonsense, as Mr
Marquis well knows,” Mr
Christie said.

“T will end as I began, by
roundly condemning Mr Mar-
quis and The Tribune for pub-
lishing an article that most
Bahamians would find, and
have found, to be offensive in
the extreme.

“Mr Marquis should be
ashamed of himself for retelling
the falsehoods and tall tales that
litter his article from beginning
to end.

“If his object was to sell
newspapers at the expense of
the truth, he has grandly suc-
ceeded but if he thought that
he could really turn the
Bahamian people away from
the respect they have for the
memory of the greatest
Bahamian of all times and the
Father of the Bahamian nation,
he has miserably failed.

“That memory will endure,”
he said.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Widow of man
who went
missing on flight
hopes to collect
$350,000
FROM page one

Mrs Moree was left to bring
up her son Donald Jr alone
after receiving a $157,000
basic life insurance pay-out
from Imperial Life.

However, she was unable to
collect a double indemnity
payment of $100,000 because
she had no proof her husband
died in an accident.

Now Mr Treco has taken up
her cause — and he confi-
dently predicted yesterday
that she would collect more
than $350,000 based on ten
per cent interest over 26 years.

“When she received the
original amount, she had to
pay $35,000 to her lawyer,”
Mr Treco said yesterday. “She
didn’t get the double indem-
nity payout because she had
no proof her husband had
died in an accident.

“However, he was ona
flight from Exuma and he has-
n’t been seen since. We can
therefore assume he died by
accident because murder is
regarded as an accident under
insurance law.”

Mr Treco is confident he
will secure Mrs Moree’s mon-
ey because of an Imperial Life
letter dated September, 1990,
confirming that the acciden-
tal death benefit was being
withheld pending formal
proof.

Six years later — 13 years
after Mr Moree went missing
— the company confirmed it
was unable to release the rest
of the money without a police
report confirming he died
accidentally.

Mr Treco said that the lapse
of time now made it “pretty
much open and shut” that the
money would have to be paid
with interest.

“In the circumstances, it can
be assumed the man died by
causes other than normal,”
said Mr Treco. “The family
have an assumed death cer-
tificate so I will assemble the
details and make the claim.

“The statute of limitations
doesn’t apply in this case
because the company
acknowledged the original
payment was made.”

Mr Treco said three lawyers
had been asked to handle the
case over the years, but noth-
ing had transpired. Now he
firmly believes Mrs Moree will
get due compensation for the
loss of her husband.

Last night, a delighted Mrs
Moree welcomed the news,
saying: “I’m hoping now that I
can retire.”

Her husband, a friend of
Chauncey Tynes Jr since his
schooldays, was warned just a
few days before his disap-
pearance that he had better
keep his mouth shut “or your
wife will become a widow.”
Two men had appeared on
their doorstep to issue the
death threat.

Mrs Moree also recalled
that an attempt had been
made on his life a few days
before when he was knocked
off his bicycle.

He had told friends he
planned to hand over to the
DEA a list of people involved
in Lehder’s drug racket.

On the list was Sir Lynden
Pindling, an official from the
United States and a Colom-
bian from Cartagena whose
name she could not recall.

“JT think he was trying to
extricate himself from the
drugs situation at the time of
his death,” she said. “All he
ever said to me was: ‘The less

79

you know the better’.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 13

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS
7 aaa ;



MINISTER of
Youth, Sports
and Culture
Desmond
Bannister
addresses
students at the
Uriah McPhee
primary school
during Common-
wealth Day
celebrations

graham II/BIS f

Kristaan H A In



MEMBERS of the Diplomatic and Consular Corps at the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas Flag Raising Ceremony in commemoration of
the 60th anniversary of Commonwealth Day at the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, East Hill Street on Monday, March 9.

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Bahamas reaffirms commitment
to Commonwealth principles

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THE Bahamas reaffirmed
its commitment to the princi-
ples of the Commonwealth
as it joined in observing
Commonwealth Day during
an official flag raising cere-
mony on Monday.

The 60th anniversary of
Commonwealth Day was
commemorated in the cere-
mony at the Foreign Affairs
building on East Hill Street.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna was among those
attending. Members of the
Diplomatic and Honorary
Consular Corps, senior gov-
ernment officials and mem-
bers of the Bahamas Nation-
al Children’s’ Choir under
the directorship of Patricia
Bazard were also in atten-
dance.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette in his
keynote address said that this
year’s celebration is espe-
cially significant because it
marks a major milestone in
the Commonwealth of
Nations.

On April 28, 1949, the
Commonwealth Heads of
Government issued the Lon-
don Declaration allowing
independent republics to
remain a part of the Com-
monwealth. Commonwealth
Day was subsequently cele-
brated on the second Mon-
day in March every year
since 1949. The Bahamas
joined the family of nations
upon Independence on July
10, 1973.

The Commonwealth is a
group of 53 nations that

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“We are keenly
aware of the
primary aim of the
Commonwealth
of Nations
to promote
understanding on
global issues, to
encourage interna-
tional cooperation
and to improve
the lives of its two
billion citizens.”



Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette

share common values and
goals such as the promotion
of democracy, human rights,
good governance, the rule of
law, individual liberty, free
trade and world peace.

“We are keenly aware of
the primary aim of the Com-
monwealth of Nations to pro-
mote understanding on glob-
al issues, to encourage inter-
national cooperation and to
improve the lives of its two
billion citizens,” Mr Symon-
ette said.

“Towards this end, the
Commonwealth has made
tremendous strides in the
promotion of democracy, fos-
tering of good governance; it
has encouraged and facilitat-
ed economic growth and
human development and
continues its efforts in the
areas of trade, education and
the environment.”

Referring to a “significant”
example of the organisation’s
sense of unity, Mr Symonette
said that the Commonwealth
Fund for Technical Coopera-
tion (CFTC) was established
to provide technical assis-
tance to member countries.

“Although contribution is
voluntary, most members,
including the Bahamas, con-
tribute financial resources, as
we, along with our Common-
wealth family of nations,
recognise that these
resources are aimed at the
mutual benefit of all mem-
bers.

“This is especially the case
for developing countries and
small island states that face
challenges in the areas of
human and _ financial
resources and technical and
technological capacity,” Mr
Symonette said.

“The Bahamas has and
continues to demonstrate its
commitment to the affairs of
the Commonwealth,” he said.

As an example, Mr Symon-
ette pointed to the 1985
CHOGM held in the
Bahamas at which the Com-
monwealth Accord on South
Africa was adopted and
played a pivotal role in the
dismantling of the apartheid
regime.

In contemplating this
year’s theme, “Serving a New
Generation”, and reflecting
on the past 60 years, Mr
Symonette said that it is espe-
cially important to consider
the enormous contributions
the Commonwealth has
made towards the develop-
ment of the youth.

“Tt is the effort which has
helped shaped those citizens
whom we now consider the
new generation,” he said.

“It also affords us the
opportunity to reaffirm our
resolve to address the many
global challenges facing us,
both as individuals and as a
country.”


THURSDAY, MARCH



TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

SAC Douglas Palacious jumps 6.94 to win.

A gallant Davis Cup

HE Bahamas

team turned in

another gallant

effort in the first
round of the American Zone II
Davis Cup tie in Paraguay over
the weekend.

Unfortunately, the effort was
not’t good enough to enable the
team to secure the victory.

The final result was a 4-1
decision that forced the
Bahamas to now host
Guatemala in a “must win” tie
in the second round at the
National Tennis Center over
the Independence holiday
weekend.

Both Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Associations president Wesley
Rolle and team captain John
Farrington alluded to the fact
that more consideration must
be given to the team’s prepara-
tion going into each tie.

The team of Devin Mullings,
Timothy Neilly, Bjorn Munroe
and Marvin Rolle was actually
scheduled to stay at least a week
in Paraguay getting acclimatized
to the conditions, but they end-
ed up only spending about two
days before the competition got
started.

Certainly not sufficient time,
considering the fact that the
players had to endure a long
journey to get to Paraguay.

Rolle indicated that they now
have to look at the possibility of
participating in a mini camp pri-
or to the tie.

Farrington suggested going
into the country where they
play a week earlier than they
normally do.

Perhaps an idea they should
consider is trying to play togeth-
er as a tearm on the circuit, espe-
cially with the current players
all basically residing in the Flori-

Felipé Major/Tribune staff
m SEE PAGE 17



STUBBS



OPINION

da area.

The latter might be a little
hard to accomplish considering
the fact that the players first
have to secure a berth into the
Satellite tournaments because
of the fact that none of them
are yet on the ATP tour.

But it would be good to see
any combination coming togeth-
er and playing s a team so that
they can keep hat unity togeth-
er before they try to wait until
tournament time to get it
together.

Over the years, the Bahamas
have suffered the same type of
fate in basketball where they
have assembled the team at the

12,

2009

INSIDE ¢ International sports news

i GSSSA Basketball

Lions roar to
win series 2-0

JUNIOR GIRLS

#] H.0 Nash Lions - 39
#2 T.A Thompson
Scorpions - 10

he Lions gave up

just 20 points over

the course of the

Championship
series and handily took home
another title for the school that
has become the unquestioned
powerhouse in junior girls’ bas-
ketball.

The Scorpions actually
responded early and trailed just
5-3 after the first three minutes
of gameplay, but a quick 14-0
run helped the Lions reaffirm
the dominance they established
in game one.

A Lakishna Munroe three
pointer capped the run and gave
the Lions a 17-3 advantage.

They led 21-7 at the half.

In game one, H.O Nash held
the Scorpions scoreless in the
second half, and in game two
they nearly accomplished a sim-
ilar feat, giving up just one field
goal and three points.

After the Scorpions top scor-
er, Shanae Armbrister was
ejected late in the first half, T.A
Thompson struggled to find any
semblance of an offensive flow.

Regine Curtis led all scorers
with 12 points, Munroe and
Randya Kemp each finished
with seven while Kaleshia Laing
added four.

Curtis said being apart of a
constantly dominant Lions
teams forces her and her team-
mates to grow each year.

“T think we had a good game
and good year,” she said,
“Nothing really changed from

last minute and tried to be suc-
cessful.

It just doesn't work out that
way.

Athletics realized that and
over the last couple of years,
they have pt together a train-
ing camp for their athletes to
attend prior to going to the
World Championships or the
Olympic Games.

We've seen the result of that
with the Golden Girls’ 4 x 100
metre relay team winning
medals at the two prestigious
international events.

Camp

he men's 4 x 400 relay
have also benefited
from the camp.

I'm a firm believer that where
there's unity, there's strength.
So unless we get our athletes
together to train as a team
before they head off to any of
the major international events,
we will continue to end up
falling short.

It's a blessing in disguise that
e get to host the second round
of the tie against Guatemala.
We can probably look at their
preparation for the tie when
they come to town and see if
we're doing anything different
from them.

But having already beaten
them in 2007, we know what
they are capable of doing it
again and so we have to ensure
that we make the necessary
adjustments at home to pull off
another victory and avoid being
relegated to zone III again.

We have a talented bunch of
young players in the system and
the BLTA is going to have to
find a way to not only maximize
their talent, but ensure that the



H.O Nash’s Randya Kemp pulls up for a jumpshot in the Lions’ 48-14 win
over the S.C McPherson Sharks at the D.W Davis Gymnasium. With the
win the Lions advanced to the championship round where they defeated

the T.A Thompson Scorpions.

last year to this, every year is
like the same for us but we just
try to get better each year.”
Munroe, the team’s sharp-
shooting forward said her team

effort

fans come out to watch the high
calibre of tennis right in our
backyard.

Last year when we hosted
Paraguay in July, the fan sup-
port was not what it used to be
when roger Smith, Mark
Knowles, Mark Merklein and
even John Farrington played.
There used to be standing room
only.

These players deserve our
support. Sure they're not at the
level of Smith, Knowles,
Merklein or Farrington, but
they are getting there.

And eventually they will pull
us back into zone one.

But it's going to take some
time and it's going to take the
support of the Bahamian peo-
ple, letting them know that we
are fully behind them, in order
for them to achieve that goal.

The team, from all indica-
tions, didn't have any fan sup-
port in Paraguay. So even when
the chips were down, they prob-
ably didn't hear any familiar
English-speaking voice cheer-
ing them on.

No wonder why it was such a
tough task for them in
Paraguay, which was reported-
ly hotter than it was in the
Bahamas.

Good thing their matches
were played in the evening,
rather than the day.

Playing on the red clay court
didn't help either. That was why
it was so important to get into
Paraguay in sufficient time to
get acclimatized.

But as Mullings said, the tie is
over and done with.

There's nothing that they can
do about it, but learn from the
mistakes that they made and
move on to the next tie.

So let's get ready for
Guatemala.

never suffers a letdown because
their coach, Pattie Johnson,
keeps them focused and
grounded.

“We just wanted to play hard



and come out here and do what
we needed to do because we
worked very very hard this sea-
son,” she said, “Sometimes we
get confident because we know
this was our biggest competi-
tion and we won easily once we
played hard.”

Paula Green led the Scorpi-
ons with five points.

Series tied 1-1

JUNIOR BOYS

#2 D.W Davis Pitbulls -
#1 T.A Thompson
Scorpions - 50

In a game where calls went
against the Scorpions for much
of the evening, with two starters
fouled out and another ejected,
the Pitbulls capitalized down
the stretch and forced a third
and deciding game in the cham-
pionship series.

The Pitbulls overcame a 10
point fourth quarter deficit with
a 19 point turnaround within
the game’s final five minutes.

The Scorpions led 48-38 on
an Angelo Lockhart basket,
with 5:05 remaining.

Shortly thereafter, Roosevelt
Whylly picked up his fifth foul,
joining Jermaine Sturrup, who
fouled out two plays earlier, and
Velnir Desir who was ejected
in the third quarter after he
traded elbows with Alvin St.
Fleur.

The Pitbulls’ full court press
took advantage of the Scorpi-
ons’ inexperienced bench and
forced a series of turnovers in

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009



TRIBUNE SPORTS



m@ By BOB BAUM
AP Sports Writer



PHOENIX (AP) — Now
that Dallas has pulled away
from the Phoenix Suns in the
race for the final playoff spot
in the Western Conference, the
Mavericks are setting their
sights higher.

Dallas, behind a 34-point per-
formance from Dirk Nowitzki,
beat Phoenix 122-117 on Tues-
day night to widen its lead over
the Suns to five games for the
eighth and final spot in the
West.

"Make no mistake, though,"
Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle
said. "We're trying to move up.
We're not just trying to hang in
this thing. We're trying to move
up the seeding.”

By opening a four-game road
trip with a victory, Dallas is just
a half-game behind Denver for
the seventh through fifth spots
in the conference.

Nowitzki scored 23 in the sec-
ond half to send Phoenix to its
fifth straight loss. The Suns’
Steve Nash said his team came
out flat in the second half,
something he couldn't explain
considering the importance of
the contest.

"Dirk played great. He was
unstoppable,” Nash said, "but
you know I felt like our output
in the second half wasn't nearly
up to where it could have been.
Our concentration, I felt, could
have improved a lot. I'm very
disappointed with the way we
played and competed in the sec-
ond half."

Jason Terry added 25 points
and Jose Barea 16 for Dallas,
which snapped a five-game road
losing streak. The Mavericks
play at Portland Wednesday
night.

"The first one is very big for
our confidence and now tomor-
row night we're going to face
another huge challenge,” Terry
said. "This was good because
now we can keep Phoenix in
our rearview and keep pushing
forward."

Nowitzki said it was impor-
tant for Dallas to win on the
road, something the Mavs had-
n't done since Feb. 2 at Orlan-
do.

"We know we can beat any-
body at home," he said, "but I
think the good teams and the
great teams find a way to win
big games on the road. That was
definitely a big game for us
tonight."

Shaquille O'Neal scored 21
on 9-of-10 shooting for Phoenix
to pass Elvin Hayes for sixth on
the NBA's career scoring list.
Nash had 23 points and 13
assists for the Suns. Matt Barnes
added 21 points.

"Tt was a tough loss and we're
really disappointed,” Phoenix
coach Alvin Gentry said, "but
we still have 18 games to play.
This was not the difference of us
being in the playoffs and not
being in the playoffs."

Dallas took final control with
a 10-2 run late in the fourth
quarter. Nowitzki made a pair
of outside jumpers to start the
spurt, then Jason Kidd sank two
3-pointers and it was 112-99
with 3:08 to play.

O'Neal got his 13th point of
the night with 1:34 left in the
first half to pass Hayes. With
27,322 points, O'Neal needs 88
to take over fifth place from
Moses Malone.

"Pretty good,” O'Neal said,
"but I'd like to have a win
tonight. All that stuff, it's cool,
but it's not really important. It's
all about winning.”

Jazz 112, Pacers 100

At Indianapolis, Mehmet
Okur scored 24 points and Utah
won its 12th straight. Paul Mill-
sap finished with 22 points and
nine rebounds, Ronnie Brewer
scored 18 points and Deron
Williams had 12 assists for the
Jazz, who moved closer to the
franchise record of 15 consecu-
tive victories.

Troy Murphy scored 23
points, tying a Pacers home
record with seven 3-pointers,
and grabbed 13 rebounds.

ye
(tlie

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Nowitzki scores 34 to lead
Mavs past Suns 122-117



DIRK NOWITZKI works into New Orleans Hornets forward James Posey in the first half of a game in New Orleans...

Cavaliers 87, Clippers 83

At Los Angeles, LeBron
James recorded his second
straight triple-double with 32
points, 13 rebounds and 11
assists, Mo Williams hit a go-
ahead 3-pointer with 6.6 sec-
onds to play, and Cleveland ral-

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lied from a 19-point, fourth-
quarter deficit.

Al Thornton and Zach Ran-
dolph each had 20 points for
the Clippers.

They used their 30th differ-
ent starting lineup, with center
Chris Kaman returning to
action after missing 48 games
because of plantar fascitis in his
left foot.

Spurs 100, Bobcats 86

At San Antonio, Tim Dun-
can had 18 points and 11
rebounds, and the Spurs
stopped Charlotte's franchise-
record winning streak at six.

Raja Bell and Emeka Okafor
each had 16 points for the Bob-
cats, who are a game behind
eighth-place Chicago in their
bid to make the playoffs for the
first time since joining the NBA
in 2004.

(AP Photo: Bill Haber)

Knicks 120, Bucks 112

At Milwaukee, Nate Robin-
son scored 10 of his 32 points in
the final five minutes, Larry
Hughes added a season-high 39,
and New York won on the road
for just the eighth time this sea-
son.

Charlie Villanueva scored 32
for the Bucks, who came into
Tuesday's game clinging to the
final playoff spot in the East
despite an injury-plagued sea-
son.

Thunder 99, Kings 98

At Sacramento, Calif., Jeff
Green and Russell Westbrook
each scored 24 points, and
Oklahoma City held on for its
fifth victory in six games.

Spencer Hawes had 20 points,
10 rebounds and five assists for
the Kings, and Francisco Garcia
made four 3-pointers and
scored 18.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 682/09
STORAGE TANK #11
CLEANING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236



NBA Today

@ By Associated Press
SCOREBOARD

Thursday, March 12

Los Angeles Lakers at San
Antonio (8pm EDT). The
Spurs bring a three-game
winning streak into the
matchup between the teams
with the best records in the
Western Conference. Los
Angeles, which beat San
Antonio in last year's con-
ference finals, expects to
have Lamar Odom back
after he was suspended for
Wednesday's game at Hous-
ton.

STARS

Tuesday

— Dirk Nowitzki, Maver-
icks, scored 23 of his 34
points in the second half and
grabbed 13 rebounds in Dal-
las' 122-117 victory over
Phoenix.

— Larry Hughes and Nate
Robinson, Knicks. Hughes
scored a season-high 39
points and Robinson had 10
of his 32 in the final five min-
utes of New York's 120-112
victory in Milwaukee.

— LeBron James, Cava-
liers, recorded his second
straight triple-double with 32
points, 13 rebounds and 11
assists as Cleveland rallied
from a 19-point deficit to
beat the Los Angeles Clip-
pers 87-83.

SUSPENDED

The NBA suspended Lak-
ers forward Lamar Odom
one game without pay Tues-
day for leaving the bench
area during an altercation.
NBA executive vice presi-
dent of operations Stu Jack-
son ruled Odom left the
"immediate vicinity" of the
bench after teammate Trevor
Ariza's hard foul on Port-
land's Rudy Fernandez with
2.2 seconds remaining in the
third quarter Monday
touched off a skirmish
between the teams. Odom
will miss the Lakers’ game in
Houston on Wednesday.

STREAKING

Utah's winning streak
reached a dozen and inched
closer to the longest in fran-
chise history with a 112-100
victory over the Indiana Pac-
ers on Tuesday.

The Jazz can match the
team record of 15 in a row,
set twice during the 1996-97
season, by sweeping road
games at Atlanta, Miami and
Orlando.

SAFELY HOME

Trail Blazers rookie Rudy
Fernandez was released from
a hospital Tuesday afternoon
after spending the night in
the hospital with a bruised
chest and injured right hip
after a hard foul by the Lak-
ers' Trevor Ariza that led to
a brief skirmish between the
teams Monday.

Fernandez was fouled on
a fast break during Portland's
111-94 victory. The Spaniard
was taken from the court on
a stretcher with his neck in
a brace. He was listed as
doubtful for Portland's game
against Dallas on Wednes-
day night.

SNAPPED

The longest winning streak
in Charlotte Bobcats' history
was snapped at six games
Tuesday with a 100-86 loss
to San Antonio. The Bobcats
are in position for the first
playoff berth in franchise his-
tory, sitting one game behind
eighth-place Chicago in the
East.

SETTING SUNS?

Phoenix fell farther back
in the playoff race with a 122-
117 home loss to Dallas on
Tuesday. The Suns have lost
five straight and fell five
games behind the Mavericks
for the eighth and final play-
off spot in the West with 18
games to play.

SPEAKING

"We haven't won a road
game it seems like in two
months. That's how it feels. I
think our last road win was in
Orlando (on February 2). We
know we can beat anybody
at home, but I think the good
teams and the great teams
find a way to win big games
on the road. That was defi-
nitely a big game for us
tonight."

— Dirk Nowitzki, who
scored 34 points as Dallas
beat Phoenix 122-117 to open
a five-game lead over the
Suns for the eighth and final
playoff spot in the Western
Conference
TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 17

m SSA Delete | PHOTO SPECIAL
Lions win

series 2 _ 0 21ST BAHAMAS ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT SECONDARY SCHOOL’S RACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS





FROM page 15

the fourth quarter.

William Ferguson capped a
12-0 run for the Pitbulls with a
lay-up that gave his team a 50-
48 advantage.

A pair of free throws by
Lockhart tied the game at 50
but the Scorpions failed to score
again over the final 3:04 of the
game.

Prince Boodle, led the Pit-
bulls with 16 points, Ferguson
added 13 and Alcot Fox fin-
ished with 11.

Roosevelt Whylly led all scor-
ers with 20 points while Mavin
Saunders finished with 15.

In a closely contested first
half, the game was tied at 14
after the first quarter and the
Scorpions led 25-23 at the half.

Their led grew to as much as
11 in the third quarter with
Whylly shouldering the offen-
sive load.

Ferguson did much of the
same for the Pitbulls in the
game’s final quarter, scoring
nine of his team’s 22 points.

US moves
up to 17th in

FIFA world SACLAUREN CHARLTON clears the bar.
kings

a
ZURICH (AP) — The Unit-
ed States moved up three spots
to 17th in the March FIFA
rankings, the highest the Amer-

icans have been on the list since
August 2007.
Following a 2-0 victory over

a
Mexico last month in a World
Cup qualifier at Columbus,
Ohio, the United States rose for
the fourth straight month. Mex-

ico Went up One spot to 23rd.
The next two World Cup
qualifiers for the Americans are

March 28 at No. 106 El Sal-
vador and April 1 against No.
75 Trinidad and Tobago at
Nashville, Tenn.

European champion Spain

remained first for the ninth con-
secutive month. The top seven
was unchanged, with Germany
second, followed by the Nether-
lands, World Cup champion
Italy, Brazil, Argentina and
Croatia. Russia moved up one
spot to eighth, England dropped

t inth d Port 1 climbed claiming yet another title. . . .
two pore Oth. ‘Turkey ai The St. Augustine’s College Big Red Machine sit atop

to 11th. the leaderboard on day one with 426.5 points, 126 points
ahead of the second placed Queen’s College Comets with

320.5 points.
eatt [4 ali The Big Red Machine leads three of the four contested

divisions, the Bantam, Intermediate and Junior Divisions,

Ow @ st Fi al d while the Comets hold a slim advantage in the Bantam divi-
sion.

The 122 member Big Red Machine is looking to continue

its dominance of the event, having captured every meet title
to host since the event’s inception in 1988. AQUNAS COLLEGE'S Ashlee Bain clears the bar during the high jump.
The meet continues today at the Thomas A. Robinson
MLS Cup Stadium, beginning at 9am.

NEW YORK (AP) — The
home of the expansion Seattle
Sounders will host this year's
MLS Cup on November 22.

Major League Soccer says the
Sounders have sold more than
20,000 season ticket packages
at Qwest Field. The franchise
starts play March 19.

The stadium will host a first-
round doubleheader of the
CONCACAF Gold Cup on
July 4. "The stadium was
designed with soccer in mind
and we believe the buzz sur-
rounding Sounders FC will add
to the electricity at our champi-
onship game," MLS commis-
sioner Don Garber said
Wednesday.



fter Day one of the 21st Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Secondary School’s rack
and Field Championships, the meet’s peren-
nial powerhouse appears well on its way to



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award. If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your story.


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Proposed draft of National

Letters from several |

countries voice
concern for Detention
Centre detainees

FROM page one

seekers are not returned to
their native land without a
fair refugee procedure.

Their pleas came after
human rights watchdog
group Amnesty Internation-
al appealed to concerned
members of the internation-
al community to write to gov-
ernment after allegations of
abuse and inhumane condi-
tions were published in The
Tribune.

"Tam deeply concerned at
these reports and respectful-
ly call on you to provide
appropriate medical treat-
ment to these detainees and
an immediate, thorough and
independent investigation
into these allegations, ensur-
ing that anyone found
responsible is brought to jus-
tice," a letter writer from
Canada said in a letter
addressed to Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette.

In a letter addressed to
Minister of State for Immi-
gration Branville McCartney,
one writer from Madrid said,
"Iam concerned about the
fate of asylum seekers, who
are arrested in the Detention
Centre. Reportedly they are
tortured and the detention
centre is crowded.

"Please publish the results
of the mentioned investiga-
tors and bring the (alleged)
torturers to justice, provide
that asylum seekers and oth-
er prisoners are not tortured,
provide that imprisonment is
only taken as (the) last facil-
ity to treat rejected asylum
seckers and illegal immi-
grants, and allow non-gov-
ernmental organisations to
inspect the prisons."

Meanwhile, some
detainees who sought to






















[>

bring attention to the condi-
tions at the Detention Centre
claim they are now being
denied visitors. They say this
is because they spoke out
about beatings and human
rights violations at the facili-
ty.
The detainees also claim
that they no longer have
access to newspapers, and
feel this is part of an effort to
prevent them from seeing
what has been written about
the Detention Centre in The
Tribune.

However, detainees said
there have been some
improvements at the centre
since going public with their
complaints. Officials report-
edly brought new mattresses,
washers and dryers to the
facility — but these items
have not been made avail-
able to the detainees.

There have also been
reports of food improve-
ments at the facility.

“By doing all this they are
admitting they were wrong
before,” according to one
detainee, who spoke to The
Tribune by phone yesterday.
His name has been withheld
to protect his identity. He
was referring to the initial
reports released by the
Department of Immigration
in which the claims of abuse
and poor conditions were
denied.

Last Monday week Direc-
tor of Immigration Jack
Thompson, Commodore of
the Defence Force Clifford
Scavella, accompanied by
representatives from the
department of social services,
the clergy, and psychologist
Dr David Allen toured the
holding facility.

Their findings have yet to
be made public.

FROM page one

the Scheme.

"We are consulting, under
the chairmanship of the prime
minister, with all of the labour
unions of the country through
their umbrella unions, and
the Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil to get their suggestions and
input with respect to the
national Unemployment Ben-
efit Scheme," Minister of
Labour, Senator Dion Foulkes
told The Tribune. "We hope
to get firm recommendations
from all of the groups before
we table the relevant legisla-
tion."

According to the senator,
any recommendations coming
out of the forum may alter the
proposals depending on if gov-
ernment and the stakeholders
come to a consensus. He
added that a draft of the pro-
posal would be circulated to
all of the relevant parties
today at a pre-meeting at the
Ministry of Labour.

Itoh mates



The legislation is expected
to be brought to Parliament
when the House of Assembly
resumes on March 25.

Heads of the National Con-
gress of Trade Unions, Trade
Union Congress, The
Bahamas Employers Confed-
eration will also attend the ses-
sions. The meeting in Nassau
will take place at the Police

Headquarters Conference
Centre on Monday, March 16,
at 3 pm, and in Freeport at
Our Lucaya Resort on
Wednesday, March 18, at 10
am.

With unemployment at its
highest in 15 years, both
islands have been hard hit
with a rise in job losses, exac-
erbated by the global eco-
nomic decline. New statistics
released last week show that
around half of all people who
are without work in Grand
Bahama lost their jobs in the
last six months, with 48 per
cent of these people report-
ing having been “laid-off or
dismissed.”

In New Providence, one
third had become jobless in
the same period - 44 per cent
were laid off or dismissed.
Overall, in New Providence,
unemployment among the
134,400-strong labour force
rose from 8.7 per cent in May
of last year to 12.1 per cent,
based on the interim survey
conducted last month.

Unemployment Benefit Scheme

This leaves a total of 16,315
people looking for a job on
this island alone and, in Grand
Bahama, the number of peo-
ple without work jumped to
14.6 per cent, equivalent to
4,195 job hunters in a labour
force of 28,820.

While speaking in Parlia-
ment during the 2008/2009
mid-year budget debate, Mr
Ingraham announced the
unemployment scheme would
be operational by July 1 to
provide eligible persons aid
for up to six and a half
months. Money will be trans-
ferred from an excess fund at
the National Insurance Board
for the programme.

In order to sustain the con-
tinuation of this scheme, gov-
ernment is proposing a new
fee that would require
employees and employers to
contribute about one per cent
of the insurable wage to gov-
ernment.

A tentative date of January
1, 2010 is being considered for
this new tax.

Retired senior police
officer claims Pindling was
born of a Jamaican mother

FROM page one

families of the time when Sir
Lynden was born.

He said Pindling’s father,
Arnold, had arrived in Nassau
from Jamaica as a police offi-
cer. He claimed Mr Pindling
fathered the future prime min-
ister with a Jamaican woman

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who left the Bahamas to
return home.

The boy was sent to Jamaica
for his early education and
returned to Nassau at the age
of eight or nine, he said.

Lynden Pindling was then
raised as the son of Arnold
Pindling and his Bahamian
wife, Viola Pindling, formerly
Bain. According to Mr
Watkins, Viola did not have a
biological child of her own.

He also supported claims
from other sources that Pin-
dling had to swear an affidavit
to formally register his birth
in 1947, when he was nearly
17 years old.

This was around the time
when he left Nassau to attend
law school in London.

“He was born in Nassau in
Hospital Lane,” said Mr
Watkins, who is now writing
a Series of articles recording
his memories of Nassau’s past.

Mr Watkins’ disclosures
came in the aftermath of Mon-
day’s controversial Tribune
Insight article, when former
PLP official Mr Chauncey

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Tynes Sr alleged that the
young Pindling had sworn a
false affidavit to support his
application for a passport.

In 1973, the then prime min-
ister held a press conference
in response to speculation
about his origins when he pro-
duced a birth certificate regis-
tered in Nassau. It was dated
1947 — 17 years after the
event.

He refused to be drawn
when a Tribune reporter asked
whether he had sworn an affi-
davit to support his applica-
tion.

Speculation about Sir Lyn-
den’s birth has swirled around
among East Street families for
decades, with some neighbours
claiming he was born of a
Haitian mother.

However, Mr Watkins
insists both Pindling’s parents
were Jamaican and that he
was, indeed, born in Nassau.

“Apart from that discrepan-
cy, the Insight article was very
good,” he said, “I have known
Chauncey Tynes and his fam-
ily for the best part of 70 years

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and they are truthful, honest
and upright people.

“Viola Pindling was not
Lynden Pindling’s biological
mother. She never had a child
in her life,” Mr Watkins
claimed.

Mr Watkins, a leading fig-
ure in the Abaco secessionist
movement in 1973, also
claimed that the Bahamas
would have gained indepen-
dence in 1970 had the UBP
won the 1967 general election.

He said the 1964 constitu-
tion, which introduced Cabi-
net-style government, was a
preparation for independence
because Britain was eager to
rid itself of its colonies at that
time.

He said he had opposed
independence at the time.
“Thirty-five years down the
line and we still can’t get the
flag straight,” he said.

He blamed corruption and
other societal ills on the break
from Britain.

“The police force is ina
mess because of indepen-
dence,” he added.

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THE TRIBUNE

Wanted man is

arrested by police

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - On Tuesday evening Grand
Bahama police finally apprehended wanted
suspect Shameko Rigby after posting a
reward for his capture and arrest.

Assistant Superintendent Wellborne Boo-
tle said as a result of the public’s assistance,
police arrested Rigby around 10pm in the
Hudson Estates area.

Mr Bootle said during his arrest a 9mm
pistol with four live rounds of ammunition
was found.

Federal money
to come for
Everglades work

m@ WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.

EVERGLADES restoration
will get a boost with the $410 bil-
lion spending package signed by
President Barack Obama, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The president signed the bill
on Wednesday, clearing the way
for nearly $200 million to be spent
largely on projects aimed at help-
ing heal the dying ecosystem.

The vast wetlands and marshes
have long suffered from
encroaching development and
agriculture that contributes fer-
tilizers and pollutants to the
ecosystem.

Efforts to restore more natural
water flow in the Everglades have
been ongoing for decades.

The not-for-profit Everglades
Foundation says federal money
in the spending bill will go toward
several projects, including Kissim-
mee River restoration, Tamiami
Trail work and reinforcing the
aging Herbert Hoover Dike
around Lake Okeechobee.

Rigby escaped police custody on January
11 from the Central Police Station, located at
the Police Headquarter Complex on the
Mall.

He is wanted in connection with several
offences, including assault of a young man in
the Garden Villas area on Saturday.

On Monday, police posted a reward for
the capture of Rigby and Garron Gibson,
who is also wanted for questioning by police.

ASP Bootle said Gibson, 30, remains at
large.

He said the police are appealing to the
public for its assistance in locating the sus-
pect.

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THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 23



A Tg

Soldiers destroy
cocaine labs in
Venezuela



SOLDIERS PATROL a seized laboratory designed to process coca base into cocaine hydrochloride in a rural area
of Puerto Boyaca, in central Colombia, Friday, Feb. 13, 2009. Army officials said they destroyed the laboratory,

built to process as much as seven tons of cocaine per month.

m@ By CARLOS HERNANDEZ
CARACAS, Venezuela

Venezuela's National Guard destroyed an elaborate network
of clandestine cocaine-processing laboratories along the country's
border with Colombia on Tuesday as part of its anti-drug efforts,
according to the Associated Press.

National Guard troops armed with assault rifles secured the
area in the western state of Zulia before explosives were used to
demolish the labs located along the porous 1,400-mile (2,300-kilo-
meter) border that Venezuela shares with Colombia, the world's
largest cocaine producer.

Justice Minister Tareck El Aissami told the state-run Bolivarian
News Agency a day before the operation that troops seized 925 Ibs.
(420 kilos) of cocaine and coca paste, along with chemicals used to
produce cocaine, after discovering the labs.

Journalists were offered a rare look at the labs on Tuesday.

USS. officials say Venezuela is not doing enough to stem the
flow of illegal drugs, particularly cocaine, through its territory.

But President Hugo Chavez says his government is doing every-
thing it can to crack down on drug trafficking along the border.

The socialist leader has taken issue with a U.S. State Department
report issued last month that criticized his government for refusing
to cooperate with U.S. anti-drug efforts. The report said that drug
trafficking in Venezuela had increased fivefold since 2002.

Venezuela's cooperation with the U.S. on counter-drug efforts
ended in 2005, when Chavez suspended cooperation with the Drug
Enforcement Administration, accusing its agents of espionage.

Two DEA agents remain in Venezuela, but U.S. officials say their
work has been severely restricted.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

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PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham views a school project by students of the Lewis Yard Primary School pri-
or to the demolition of the decades-old refinery stacks at Vopak Bahamas. Vopak managing director Thijs
Huizer (left) looks on.



if =" | /

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham was greeted by students of the Lewis Yard Primary School prior to the
demolition of the decades-old refinery stacks at Vopak Bahamas. Vopak managing director Thijs Huizer
(right) looks on. The demolition, which took place on Saturday, makes way for the expansion of the Vopak
facility on Grand Bahama. Lewis Yard is one of the communities directly adjacent to the Vopak facility, and
students of the primary school there constructed projects as part of a competition for the first and second
place chance to push the detonator in the historic demolition.

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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



China's show of force keeps Tibet quiet



AP Photo/Ashwini Bhatia

TIBETAN spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, foreground, arrives for a ceremony to mark the 50th anniversary of the
failed Tibetan uprising against Chinese rule that sent him into exile, in Dharmsala, India, Tuesday March 10, 2009.
China has launched a “brutal crackdown" in Tibet since protests shook the Himalayan region last year, the Dalai
Lama said Tuesday in a speech to mark the anniversary.

GN-832

GOVERNMENT

m@ By AUDRA ANG
YA'AN, China

Swarms of police and
stepped-up security checks in
Tibet and other parts of western
China apparently stifled any
large-scale protests to mark the
50th anniversary of a failed
Tibetan revolt against Chinese
tule, according to the Associated
Press.

In the Tibetan capital of
Lhasa — where the abortive
uprising began in 1959 and vio-
lent protests recurred last year
— riot and paramilitary police
patrolled the streets with auto-
matic rifles during Tuesday's
anniversary. Residents said
police were stationed through-
out the city. Tibetans in other
communities said police
checked hotel registrations and
asked Tibetans to show their
identity cards.

"Even though it seems rela-
tively quiet, we can feel that the
security is very tight now,” said
an employee at the Shannan
Yulong Holiday Hotel in
Tsedang, Tibet's third-largest
city. The employee, who
declined to give a name for fear
of government reprisal, said
police checked the hotel's reg-
istration records every day.

China's authoritarian gov-
ernment has sought in recent
weeks to head off trouble ahead
of the anniversary, increasing
an already heavy paramilitary
presence, locking down its
Tibetan areas, and barring for-
eigners to keep information
from seeping out of the region.

The Dalai Lama, the revered
leader of Tibetan Buddhists
who fled to exile as the 1959
uprising collapsed, said Tues-

day that the current crackdown
added to decades of repression
and misery for Tibetans, turning
their homeland into "hell on
earth."

"Even today, Tibetans in
Tibet live in constant fear, and
the Chinese authorities remain
constantly suspicious of them,”
the Dalai Lama said in an
anniversary speech from the
headquarters of his govern-
ment-in-exile across the
Himalayas in Dharmsala, India.

Chinese Foreign Ministry
spokesman Ma Zhaoxu called
the Dalai Lama's remarks "lies"
and accused him of spreading
rumors.

Messaging

Lhasa residents received
notice on their cell phones
Tuesday from carrier China
Mobile that voice and text mes-
saging services may face dis-
ruptions from March 10 to May
1 for "network improvements."
Similar measures were recently
taken in other Tibetan commu-
nities as the government sought
to unplug communications that
activists used to spread word of
the protests last year.

As part of the heightened
security, overseas Tibet support
groups reported that police
arrested at least four monks last
week in the heavily Tibetan
town of Aba, where security
forces opened fire on demon-
strators last year. The London-
based Free Tibet Campaign said
the detained monks were held
on suspicion of distributing fly-
ers that said others would to set
themselves on fire to commem-
orate the uprising.

In Washington, White House
press secretary Robert Gibbs
said the Obama administration
was concerned about the situa-
tion in Tibet.

"The United States respects
the territorial integrity of China
and considers Tibet to be part
of China. At the same time,
we're concerned about the
human rights situation in
Tibet," Gibbs told reporters
Tuesday.

Gibbs noted the State
Department's most recent
annual report on human rights
in China and concluded that last
year the Chinese government
had increased cultural and reli-
gious repression in Tibetan
areas.

Last year, an attempt by
monks in Lhasa to stage a
peaceful march drew swift
reprisal from police. It then set
off more protests that tapped
into Tibetan fears that their
identity, deeply rooted in their
religion, is being undermined
by Chinese rule, its religious
restrictions and the influx of
large numbers of Chinese
migrants.

Ethnic rioting erupted in
Lhasa on March 14 and anti-
government protests spread to
Tibetan communities in sur-
rounding provinces across a
quarter of China's territory —
the most widespread, sustained
revolt in Tibet since 1959.

Beijing has yet to give a full
accounting for deaths and
arrests.

The New York-based Human
Rights Watch said in a report
Monday that the official figures
on arrests and convictions sug-
gest that several hundred
remain in custody.

NOTICE
PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP’S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, hereby gives notice that in consequence of the owner’s
personal choice, application has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in respect of the ship “MAERSK
BARCELONA?” Official Number 731069 Gross Tonnage 33400, Register
Tonnage 12801 owned by Munia Mobiliegesellschaft mbH & Co. KG,
with its principal place of business at Tolzer Strasse 15, 82031 Grunwald,
Germany for permission to change her name to “BARCELONA?” registered
at the port of Nassau in the said new name as owned by Munia
Mobiliengesellschaft mbH & Co. KG.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, RO. Box N-4679, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
within seven days from the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 18th day of February, 2009.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs

NOTICE
PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP’S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, hereby gives notice that in consequence of the owner’s
personal choice, application has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in respect of the ship “SEMAKAU
SPIRIT” Official Number 732018 Gross Tonnage 52484, Register Tonnage
23308 owned by Semakau Producer AS, with its principal place of
business at Haakon VII’s Gate 10, RO. Box 1604, Vika 0119, Oslo,
Norway for permission to change her name to “SEMAKAU” registered
at the port of Nassau in the said new name as owned by Semakau
Producer AS.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, RO. Box N-4679, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
within seven days from the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 18th day of February, 2009.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs

NOTICE
PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP’S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, hereby gives notice that in consequence of the owner’s
personal choice, application has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in respect of the ship “TARJUN”
Official Number 8000473 Gross Tonnage 7602, Register Tonnage 3651
owned by Chantal Shipping Corporation, with its principal place of
business at 80 Broad Street, Monrovia, Liberia for permission to change
her name to “CAPRI CEMENT” registered at the port of Nassau in the
said new name as owned by Chantal Shipping Corporation.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, RO. Box N-4679, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
within seven days from the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 18th day of February, 2009.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs







A NOVICE TIBETAN monk stands near a banner with a portrait of Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, at the

Tsuglakhang temple in Dharmsala, India, Tuesday, March 10, 2009. China has overseen a "brutal crackdown" in
Tibet since protests shook the Himalayan region last year, part of decades of Chinese oppression that have dri-
ven Tibetan culture to the verge of extinction, the Dalai Lama said Tuesday in a speech to mark the 50th anniver-
sary of the failed uprising that sent him into exile. The banner in Tibetan reads, 'We the Tibetan people and gods
bless the Dalai Lama with long life for the benefit of the sentient beings."

Israel-Lebanon borders
stable despite attacks

@ By EDITH M. LEDERER
UNITED NATIONS

Southern Lebanon and northern Israel have
experienced their longest period of stability in
decades despite the worst violations of a 2006
cease-fire during the recent war in Gaza, the
U.N.'s special coordinator for Lebanon said
Tuesday, according to the Associated Press.

The cease-fire between Israel and Hezbollah
militants “continues to hold" but much remains
to be done to fully implement Security Coun-
cil resolution 1701 that ended their 34-day con-
flict, including disarming Hezbollah and all
other militias, Michael Williams told reporters
after a closed-door briefing to the U.N. Security
Council.

In a report to the council, Secretary-Gener-
al Ban Ki-moon condemned the firing of rock-
ets from southern Lebanon toward Israel dur-
ing the Gaza conflict in December and January
as “serious violations" of the 2006 cease-fire
resolution. The fact that Israel returned fire
without prior warning to U.N. peacekeepers in
southern Lebanon is also "a cause of serious
concern," he said.

Violations

Williams said "the past months have wit-
nessed the most serious violations by both par-
ties of their obligations under 1701 since it was
adopted."

"On the positive side, the resolution has con-
tinued to ensure a cessation of hostilities
between the parties and the longest period of
stability that south Lebanon has known in
decades," he said. "There is a stability on
Israel's northern border which it has not known
since the 1980s."

In other positive developments, Williams
said the internal political situation in Lebanon
in the run-up to June 7 general elections
"remains good."

He also cited the establishment of diplo-
matic relations between Lebanon and Syria,
and moves toward reconciliation in the Arab
world "which I think have an enormously pos-
itive effect on the situation on the ground in
Lebanon."

But Williams said "there are many other
issues in 1701 where very little progress has
been achieved."

The resolution reiterates a call for the dis-
arming of all militias in Lebanon, bans arms
transfers to any group except the Lebanese
armed forces, and urges the Lebanese govern-
ment to secure its borders to prevent arms
smuggling.

Cease-fire

It also calls for Israel and Lebanon to support
a permanent cease-fire and long-term solution
based on full respect for the U.N.-drawn Blue
Line along their border and security arrange-
ments to prevent the resumption of hostilities.

Williams said the national dialogue in
Lebanon under President Michel Suleiman
"has had enormously beneficial effect on the
country in enhancing national stability, but
where the question of the disarmament of
armed groups is making only slow process."

He expressed hope that the government
elected in June can move the issue forward.

"It's difficult to take the weapons out of pol-
itics. it needs to be done. it needs to be a
Lebanese-led process," Williams said,

He said there have been “some improve-
ments" on border control and management
following the establishment of Lebanon-Syria
diplomatic relations but he said Syria has not
yet appointed a representative to the joint bor-
der committee.

Syria also hasn't appointed an ambassador to
Lebanon, Williams said.

"That appointment, I'm sure, would be enor-
mously beneficial to stability in Lebanon."

He expressed hope that once a new Israeli
government is formed "very quick progress"
can be made in resolving the dispute over Gad-
jar, a border town in Lebanon, leading to a
withdrawal from the northern part of the village
and the deployment of Italian and Spanish
police.

"One looks forward to the day when
Lebanon is like most other states, and where
the government, the state itself, has a monop-
oly on the means of violence," Williams said.
THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 25



North Korea vows to protect itself amid US war games

lm By JAE-SOON CHANG
SEOUL, South Korea

North Korea vowed “every
necessary measure” Wednes-
day to defend itself against
what it calls U.S. threats,
claiming American military
exercises in South Korea are a
preparation to invade the
communist nation, according
to the Associated Press.

The statement by North
Korea's Foreign Ministry,
however, was far less harsh
than rhetoric issued by the
country's military in the run-

up to the annual war games
that started across the South
on Monday.

The military has threatened
South Korean passenger
planes and put its troops on
standby for war.

"The war maneuvers are
nuclear war exercises designed
to mount a pre-emptive
attack" on the North, the min-
istry said.

"Exposed to the potential
threat of the U.S. and its allied
forces, (the North) will take
every necessary measure to
protect its sovereignty."

It did not specify what the
measures would be.

North Korea has long
claimed that annual exercises
between the U.S. and the
South are rehearsals for an
invasion.

Seoul and Washington say
the drills are purely defensive.

On Monday, the North cut
off a military hot line with the
South citing the drills, caus-
ing a complete shutdown of
their border and stranding
hundreds of South Koreans
working in a joint industrial
zone in the North. Pyongyang



VACANCY FOR SENIOR SURVEYOR
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the post of Senior Surveyor,
Department of Lands and Surveys.

The requirements for the post are:
Must possess MRICS or the equivalent qualifications and must have at least eight (8)
years post qualifications experience as a surveyor;
Knowledge of GPS Technologies, including use in field data Collection campaigns as
well as knowledge in the use of electronic field equipment and the integration of
collected data in associated Autodesk surveying or land management software would
be an asset.

a and duties of the post:
oversees and directs the operations of survey teams to ensure work place safety and
the meeting of standards;
performs and monitors work such as the measurement of distances, angles and elevations;
conducts research and gathers data from existing survey plans of crown land to avoid
duplication of work;
serves Notice of Intention to adjacent land owners prior to conducting a survey;
inspects survey sites to verify accuracy of information compiled from existing survey
plan;
identifies, reconstructs and/or establishes boundary markers for linear, angular and
height measurements of crown land;
takes levels and benchmarks of properties in order to determine what is required to
bring it to building standard;
sketches in the Field Book the crown land surveyed to show linear, angular and elevation
measurements;
records physical details of the crown land such as buildings, walls, roads, vegetation,
trees, utility lines, swamps and lakes;
converts linear, angular and elevation measurements into meters or inches by mathematical
computations to determine size of crown land, accuracy of measurement and closure;
participates in projects such as the Land Use Policies and Administration Project to map
The Bahamas;
coordinates and oversees the installation of equipment and collection of equipment and
tools from the surveying site;
Teviews survey plans prepared by outside Land Surveyors for accuracy;
plots coordinates from survey plans prepared by outside Land Surveyors onto Department
of Lands and Survey maps for record purposes;
operate equipment such as theodolite, Topcon, tripod, plumbob, prism and level staff
to measure distances, angles and elevations;

The salary of the post is in the Scale of E10 $39,400 x 700 - $44,300 per annum (2006
Salary Scales) and will commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Serving officers should apply through their Heads of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill
Complex, Meeting Street. They should be returned, complete with qualifications and
documentary proof of relevant experience, to the Secretary, Public Service Commission,
Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, not later than 20 March, 2009.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

VACANCY FOR SURVEYOR
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the post of Surveyor, Scale
E12, Department of Lands and Surveys, Office of the Prime Minister.

The requirements for the post are:
applicants must be a member of the relevant Surveyor Division of the Royal Institute
of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS);
or
hold equivalent professional qualifications;
and
must have at least five years post qualification experience.
knowledge of GPS technologies including use in field data collection as well as knowledge
in the use of electronic field equipment and the integration of collected data in associate
autodesk surveying or land management software would be an asset.

oe and duties of the post:
assigns and monitors the work of staff and provides guidance and training;
measures and calculates distances between boundaries in order to prepare survey maps;
takes levels and benchmarks of properties in order to determine what is required to bring
it to building standard;
conducts surveys and placements of boundary markers in Government Subdivisions;
provides legal descriptions of properties for inclusion in conveyances;
researches land titles to verify ownership and other information;
drafts land surveys maps to scale;

The salary of the post is in the Scale of E12 - $36,400 x 700 - $41,300 per annum (2006
Salary Scales) and will commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Serving officers should apply through their Heads of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill
Complex, Meeting Street. They should be returned, complete with qualifications and
documentary proof of relevant experience, to the Secretary, Public Service Commission,
Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, not later than 20 March, 2009.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

reopened the border Tuesday,
but the hot line remains sus-
pended.

Tensions

Tensions on the divided
peninsula have also been run-
ning high amid fears that
Pyongyang might be trying to
test-fire a long-range missile
capable of reaching U.S. ter-
ritory.

The North claims what it is
trying to launch is a satellite as
part of its peaceful space pro-

against any one seeking to
shoot it down. In Washington,
U.S. national intelligence
director Dennis Blair said he
believes the North is trying to
launch a satellite, but said the
technology is no different
from that of a long-range mis-
sile and its success means the
communist nation is capable
of striking the mainland U.S.

"I tend to believe that the
North Koreans announced
that they would do a space
launch and that's what they
intend,” U.S. national intelli-
gence director Dennis Blair

said before a senate panel
Tuesday. "If a three stage
space launch vehicle works,
then that could reach not only
Alaska and Hawaii but part
of what the Hawaiians call the
mainland and what the
Alaskans call the lower forty-
eight," he said.

U.S., South Korean and
Japanese officials have warned
Pyongyang not to go ahead
with any launch — whether
it’s a satellite or a missile —
noting that missiles and satel-
lites are the same in principle
and differ only in payload.

gram, and vowed to retaliate

GN-831

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Public Service Commission

VACANCY FOR ESTATE MANAGEMENT OFFICER
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the post of Estate Management
Officer, Scale E12, Department of Lands and Surveys, Office of the Prime Minister.

The requirements for the post are:

applicants must be a member of the relevant Land Management Division of the Royal
Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS);

or
hold equivalent professional qualifications;

and

must have at least five years post qualification experience.
knowledge of project monitoring and qualitative evaluation would be an asset.

Responsibilities and duties of the post:

. conducts inspections of crown land. addresses queries or complaints;
gathers information and prepares applications for crown land for processing;
interviews applicants and advises on the application status and land availability;
prepares letters of approval of crown land granted to include terms and conditions;
conducts research to assist the Department. government agencies and the public in
identifying generation property, original owner and location of crown grants. leases or

survey plans;

conducts research and gathers information to be used by Surveyor General in courts
cases;
liaises with members of the public to provide information regarding crown land matters
and the location of crown grants;

The salary of the post is in the Scale of E12- $36,400 x 700 - $41,300 per annum (2006
Salary Scales) and will commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Serving officers should apply through their Heads of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Public Service Commission. Poinciana Hill
Complex, Meeting Street. They should be returned, complete with qualifications and
documentary proof of relevant experience, to the Secretary, Public Service Commission,
Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, not later than 20 March, 2009.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

VACANCY FOR ESTATE VALUATION OFFICER
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the post of Estate Valuation
Officer, Scale E12, Department of Lands and Surveys, Office of the Prime Minister.

The requirements for the post are:
applicants must be a member of the relevant Valuation Division of the Royal Institute
of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS);
or
hold equivalent professional qualifications;
and
must have at least five years post qualification experience and knowledge of aerial photos
and survey plans interpretation as well as projector monitoring and qualitative evaluation.

Responsibilities and Duties of the post:

. assesses properties for business rates, acquisitions and disposals;
assesses the impact of developments in terms of economic viability and environmental
impact;
writes reports on property for purposes such as rent reviews, investment potential, capital
valuations, marketability and building surveys;
drafts recommendations regarding the existing occupation of crown land, applications
for land, and requests to mine sand or dredge the sea bed;
guides land managers in the interpretation of land law and valuation techniques;
writes and proof reads descriptions of crown grants, crown leases and other legal
descriptions for lands to be acquired by the government for public purposes such as for
roads, subdivisions way-leaves;
liaises with other government agencies regarding the availability of land for projects by
the government, conducts research and recommends sites;
inspects, surveys and measures crown and government lands;
liaises with members of the public to provide information regarding crown land matters
and the location of crown grants;
reviews and actions correspondence and other communications related to land management
and valuation mapping;
prepares draft crown leases for review by the relevant Ministries/Departments.

The salary of the post is in the Scale of E12- $36,400 x 700 - $41,300 per annum (2006
Salary Scales) and will commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Serving officers should apply through their Heads of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill
Complex, Meeting Street. They should be returned, complete with qualifications and
documentary proof of relevant experience, to the Secretary, Public Service Commission,
Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, not later than 20 March, 2009.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION















APRIL IS A ME, TOO! GOUNPS DO YOU REALLY
REMARKABLE a LIKE SHE'LL BE BELIEVE SHE
YOUNG WOMAN... K TRAVELING A LOT! QUIT THE CLA?
I HOPE IT P
WORKS OUT! oe oe. 3

jj : I q ry
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NO, BUT I'VE
WATCHEP TOO
MANY JAMES
BOND MOVIES!

[1 LOVE THESE
DOCUMENTARIES
ABOUT THE OLD

WESTERN PIONEERS

THOSE
POOR
DEVILS

NO RUSH HOUR TRAFFIC,
NO PHONE SOLICITORS

M7 UNCLE 1S
GETTING MARRIED
NEXT WEEK

TLL HAVE TO
WEARA TIE!



CALVIN & HOBBES

PLEASE LET MY BEANIE
COME TODAY! I PROMISE
T WONT EVER RE BAD
AGAIN! IT'LL DO WHATEVER

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE /
TLL NEVER ASK ANOTHER.
FAVOR IF TODAYS THE
PAY I GET MY BEANIE!



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

=
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3
4
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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

“DONT MAKE ME COME “I CAN'T MAKE YOU.
OUT THERE, DENNIS!” — YOURE THE 8058.”

3/Il

Difficulty Level we *%

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down





1 Easily passes on
(5,4)

Work of works (5)
Feeling of guilt about
introducing code (7)

2 Astrange lake in the
jungle described by

Kipling (6)

Hangs flags (6)

4 Cadger is source of

10 Parasites identified by a shame (8)
doctor on Lincoln's 5 Standard a number
back (6) considered average (6)
11 Soldier with papers in 6 Proof that someone has
order (6) settled (7)
12 Order a final course (5,3) 7 A ball game played on
15 Come again to gather board (9)
fruit (8) 11 He doesn’t have to be
18 Like a civet smart to fool the birds (9)
disturbed (6) 13 Perfect happiness is found
20 Be able to repeat a in a train (8) Aeros
vigorous dance (6) 14 Nut and date confection mM 4: Veudeviila
21 Seaside resort which is ridiculed (7) N (5,4)
complaint (7) 16 Key operators may strike = 8 Approximately (5)
22 Some of these bounce against it (6) Oo. 9 Stray from the
back, being 17 A problem for the bridge- > subject (7)
overweight (5) builder to emphasise (6) wo” 10 Loafing (6)
23 Common cash is 19 What one has to face 7 11. Command (6)

needful (9) when fencing (5) Kidnapped (8)

15 In the sky (8)
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 18 Injure (6)
Across: 1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, Across: 1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 20 Superficial
8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 appearance (6)
13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 21 Kind of

date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart.
Down: 1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3
Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6
Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda,
12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17
Crew.

18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21
Refrain.

Down: 1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit,
4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9
Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12
Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17
Urdu.

antelope (7)

Seeds used as
flavouring (5)
Backstage rest area
(5,4)



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YOU SHOULD'VE ) WOULD YOU HAVE
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.| WE'VE BATTLED LONG
ENOUGH, MARGO. CAN'T
WE CALL A TRUCE?

TM STAYING AT THE
PLAZA. HAVE DINNER
WITH ME, MARGO.

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Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer

Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer



























































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



































9/8/2|4 3/1/6|5/7 SN
3/5/1/7 2/6[9/4/8 9 (217 R721
7/6/4/9 5/8[3/2/1 9 7/3/8 BM2|1 (3 5
3 1 WM9 (7/58 9
8|7/5/6 4/2[1/9|3 32 TRO 3 Ma 7
4|9/3[1 8/5/7/6/2| feng 7; B13 BES
2/1/6[3 9/7/4/8/5| fy 2 p59 B23 4
5/4/7/8 1/9/2/3\6| Ps 4 BM3|7|1 ING 2
1|3\/8|2 6|4|5|7/9 31/5/44 i9l2 1
Difficulty Level #4 3/11 6/2/9/5 7/3/8/1/4 a3 (1/22 |7|1





Cathe ne: BY STEVE BECKER

In the Arms of Morpheus

South dealer,
Both sides vulnerable.

trouble is that | play brilliantly only
while I’m asleep, but badly while

NORTH I’m awake. I don’t understand why
@AQJ 109 this is so, but I am sure no one can
Â¥AQ10 hold a candle to my skills when I am
103 in the arms of Morpheus.
#1092 For example, last night I held the
WEST EAST East hand and my opponents got to
#K 83 $652 seven clubs. They should have
¥975 ¥KI432 known I would defeat them, but my
#7542 986 opponents never learn.
#863 &7 4 My partner led a heart. As any-
SOUTH one can plainly see, there is only one
a74 way for declarer to play such a hand.
Â¥86 He must take the ace and place all his
@AKQI hopes on the spade finesse. It would
AK QI5 be foolish to finesse the queen of
The bidding: hearts and then later have to finesse
South West North East in spades also. This would be run-
1 & Pass 24 Pass ning two risks instead of one.
Down 34 Pass 34 Pass So South, being a good player,
2 Consolidate (5) 4NT Pass 5 Pass went up with the ace — and on the
7& ace, I played the king!
3 Middle East Opening lead — five of hearts. You can’t really blame South for
country (6) Dear Mr. Becker: It will no doubt falling for this play. He naturally
4 Hold back in astonish you to learn that | am prob- thought the king was a singleton.
doubt (8) ably the greatest bridge player inthe Accordingly, after drawing trumps,
world! he led a heart and finessed the ten,
5 Horse-drawn I say this knowing full well that since there was no longer any reason
carriage (6) my name is unknown to you and the __ to take a chance on the spade finesse.
; bridge-playing public. It also is true But I took the ten with the jack to
STS ele that I have never won a world or defeat the slam, and I’m sure I would
world Ce) national championship. Neverthe- have won the rubber on the next deal
7 The actors’ entrance less, [ still think no one can equal my — except that just then my wife woke
(5,4) accomplishments at the bridge table. me and said it was time to get up and
il There is one thing seriously go to work.
" any eae wrong with my game, Foun The s Cordially yours, Ford E. Winx
audiences (3,6)
13 Devote (8) Tomorrow: Improving the odds.
14 Greeting on ©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
arrival (7)
16 Concealment (6)
17 Seem (6)
19 Eskimo house (5)
PAGE 28, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE









a

Win a family
vacation for 4 to
Orlando, Florida!

valued at

4000

Prize includes airfare and hotel
accommodations valued at
*3,000 plus ‘1,000 to spend.

wT

jet

Le ) A

ian

u aed | all :

Purchase TWO Jumbo Pull-Ups :
training pants plus ONE Pull-Ups ‘\

elYela Mae LM A scMOlce ReMi eee) me

your original store receipt(s). Answer the —

skill question. Deposit receipt(s) and completed
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or drop off to The d’Albenas Agency, Palmdale.
Contest ends April 6, 2009.

Win a family vacation for 4 to Orlando from

® Registered trademark of Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Employees of The d‘Albenas Agency and Media Enterprises or thelr immediate familles are not eligible to enter the contest.
To enter, attach store receipt(s) for
ONE Huggies Supreme and ONE
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Snug&Dry and ONE Huggies wipes,
answer the skill question, attach
receipt(s) to your completed entry
and drop into the entry box at
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Contest ends April 6, 2009.
Employees of The d’Albenas Agency and Media Enterprises, and
their immediate families, are not eligible to enter.

Vacation to Orlando with Huggies P_!I_-U_s

Name:
Address:

Telephone:

CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE FAIR
& BLOOD DRIVE

Date: March 14, 20
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Venue: Scotiabank Cable Beach Branch

Counselling offered by Dr. David Allen
Giveaways & prizes

Refreshments

Kiddie Corner

Financial Consultation

* Trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia, used under licence.



LOCAL NEWS

PICTURED are Dr Dahl, Manager, BTVI; Minister Carl Bethel; and Cleomie Wood, Acaemic Dean, BTVI.

BIVI walk-a-
thon hailed a
big success

Around 90 members of the
community came out early
Saturday morning in support
for technical and career edu-
cation to assist in raising funds
for students in need.

The enthusiastic walkers hit
the streets, the walk from
BTVI Old Trail Campus to
the foot of the Paradise Island
Bridge and back to campus
proved an exciting feat for all.

The first annual walk-a-thon
was a tremendous success with
over $8,000 in donations
raised through sponsorships
and registration fees.

Despite the economic down
turn the show of support by
sponsors was very encourag-
ing.

“It demonstrates that the
local community remains com-
mitted to raising funds to help
our students”, said Sean
Adderley, Public Relations

Officer at BTVI. “Attendance
for the walk-a-thon was great,
and the beautiful weather was
certainly welcomed by the
walkers,” added Mr. Adder-
ley.”

The winning walker was Mr.
Philip Moss, second place title
went to William Mackey and

-
Loren a fulen

Gallo

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Donnell Forbes, took home
3rd place trophy. “It was
beautiful,” Ms Forbes noted
after crossing the finish line.
“T loved every single mile
of it.”
@ Persons interested in view-
ing pictures from the event
can go online at www.btvi.org.bs

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THE TRIBUNE







oe



THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Insurer confirms
staff redundancies

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMAS-based health
insurer yesterday confirmed to
Tribune Business that it laid-
off four persons at the end of
February after efficiencies
resulting from “new systems”
made their posts redundant, a
move that reduced staffing lev-
els by 14 per cent. There is no
suggestion that Generali is in
financial difficulties

Tina Cambridge, Generali
Worldwide’s regional director
for the Bahamas, responding
to Tribune Business inquiries,
said the company’s Bahamian
operation had “been reorgan-
ised to take advantage of effi-
ciencies associated with new
and advanced system platforms
for both billing/enrollment and
claims administration”.

These systems, she explained,
were the same as those
employed by Generali’s Cay-
man-based operations, their
installation being an attempt to
“harmonise” the technology
platform used by the insurer
across the Caribbean.

Ms Cambridge said: “A result
of this investment in new sys-
tems is improved efficiencies,
and as such four jobs became
redundant at the end of Febru-
ary 2009.

Generali lays-off four
workers, some 14% of
staff, due to efficiency
gains from new systems

‘The redundancy of four
members in February amounted
to 14 per cent of our staff at
that time. All four of the per-
sons affected received redun-
dancy packages, which have
been accepted, and we have
been released by all from any
further liabilities.”

Ms Cambridge added: “Our
total employment complement
currently stands at 24 (filled and
open positions), and all employ-
ees are Bahamian. There are
no expatriates employed at our
local offices. We are pleased to
have achieved our goal of mak-
ing the Bahamas operation a
completely locally managed
environment.

“Tt is our firm intent that the
local staff complement will grow
in the future, in line with the
growth we expect for our port-
folio.”

Tribune Business had initial-
ly been told by multiple
informed sources that Gener-
ali’s Bahamian operation had
laid-off five to six persons,
amounting to 45 per cent of

SEE page 5B

‘Real impact of this recession’
only apparent from Q1 2009

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“THE real impact of this
recession” on the Government’s
finances will only become
apparent this quarter, a former
minister of state for finance has
told Tribune Business, as fiscal
conservatives expressed
increased concern over the
“frightening” level of national
debt.

James Smith, who served in
the 2002-2007 Christie govern-
ment as head of the Ministry of
Finance, said the peak tourism
season’s position on the calen-
dar meant that the Government
collected most of its revenues -
import duties, plus room and
departure taxes - during the first
three months of every year (the
third quarter of its financial
year).

This meant, he implied, that
the effects of the global eco-
nomic downturn on the public
finances would only become
truly apparent once the quar-
ter ended on March 31.

“The drop-off, the really
sharp drop-off [in government
revenues], will be possible this
quarter,” Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business.

“Most of the revenue we get
is a derived demand from visi-
tors coming in. If we don’t see
that uptick in tourism in the
most important quarter, which
is now, that’s when you’re going

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* Ex-minister says tourism
‘uptick’ and performance of
revenue during current three
months key to fiscal outcome
for 2008-2009 Budget

* Tribune calculations show
national debt at 45.7% of GDP
already, and could hit 50%
this year, even with $7bn GDP
* Fiscal hawks describe
national debt as ‘frightening’
and ‘out of control’

to see the real impact of this
recession on Us.

“Tt’s really the first quarter
of this year that will tell us how
deep this thing is.”

Unveiling the Government’s
mid-year Budget some two
weeks ago, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham pledged that
the Government would remain
within the $1.569 billion spend-
ing limits already approved by
Parliament for the 2008-2009
fiscal year, with a 7.6 per cent
drop below forecast in revenues
balanced by a $72.8 million sav-
ing on recurrent spending dur-
ing the first six months.

With recurrent spending
some $72.844 million below
forecasts for the half-year peri-
od July 1, 2008, to December

SEE page 4B

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Regulator: CLICO ‘totally ignored’ us

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) ‘com-
pletely ignored’ Bahamian reg-
ulators and behaved as if it did
not have to comply with their
demands, the company’s former
head supervisor told Tribune
Business yesterday, and said
that the current situation could
have been avoided if the new
Domestic Insurance Act had
been implemented.

Dr Roger Brown, the former
Registrar of Insurance, who
held the post until just over a
year ago, told this newspaper
that the difficulties he had in

* Ex-Registrar says insolvent insurer ‘paid no attention to us at all. They acted as though they didn’t have to’
* Major part of problem was Bahamian company run from Trinidad, and not forthcoming about US investments
* Denies tense relationship with Ministry of Finance, but says new Act would have prevented CLICO problems

regulating CLICO (Bahamas)
were compounded by the fact
that the company was effec-
tively run from Trinidad &
Tobago by its parent, CL Finan-
cial, and “there was no man-
agement in the Bahamas to
speak of”.

He acknowledged that the
Registrar of Insurance’s Office
probably made a mistake during
his stewardship, in not sitting
down to discuss the brewing
CLICO (Bahamas) situation

with the Cabinet minister
responsible for insurance regu-
lation, but denied assertion by
the former minister of state for
finance that the relationship
between their departments was
tense.

Dr Brown pointed out that
the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office only came under James
Smith and the Ministry of
Finance for one year, following
the 2006 Cabinet reshuffle. For
the prior four years, ministerial

responsibility had been vested
in Allyson Maynard-Gibson at
the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments.

“IT also believe that if the
Domestic Insurance Act had
been in place, the CLICO mat-
ter would not have developed,”
Dr Brown told Tribune Busi-
ness. “The Act would have giv-
en the Office of the Registrar of
Insurance some teeth; the abil-

SEE page 7B

Resort performing well despite fishing tourney uncertainty

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE BERTRAM Hatteras Fishing Tour-
nament, which lures numerous anglers and
enthusiasts to the Abaco Beach Resort
and Boat Harbour annually, could post-
pone this year, the resort’s general manag-
er, said yesterday, spelling a major eco-
nomic loss for the island.

Bob Kramm told Tribune Business, how-
ever, that his resort was doing well this
month for a traditionally slow season, with
90 - 95 boats moored in their Harbour. He
said one third of the resort’s room nights
come from the marina.

“We have such a blessed location here

that boaters like to base at Marsh Harbour,
at our place, and take day trips to the cays,”
he said.

“We have a lot more entertainment, so
that seems to be attracting the boats and
holding them longer.”

Mr Kramm said the resort hosts local
Bahamian talent, and holds full moon par-
ties and beach parties for their guests, with
Bahamian rake and scrape music and fare.

He was optimistic about the resort draw-
ing slightly less business than last year, and
is putting together domestic and foreign
tourism packages in the hope of attracting
more business.

“We’re gonna hope to meet last year’s
levels or maybe slightly below,” Mr Kramm

said.

“We're optimistic because there is a lot of
pent up demand in the US, and we get a lot
of repeat business here.”

He added that the resort will offer Sea
Camps this summer, and market itself more
as a family destination.

According to Mr Kramm, many Abaco
resorts have lowered rates to entice busi-
ness, but have had little success. He said
most resorts, whose business is driven by
their marinas, have to contend with eco-
nomic factors such as fuel costs and the
price of travel, which they have no control
over.

SEE page 3B

NIB ‘causing consternation’ in business community

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE National Insurance
Board’s (NIB) pursuit of unpaid
contributions dating from sev-
eral decades ago is “causing
enormous consternation in the
business community”, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president has told Tri-
bune Business, as he instead
urged it to focus on current
compliance.

Dionisio D’Aguilar said NIB
was placing the ‘burden of
proof’ on companies to show
they had paid contributions
going back, in some cases, to
the 1970s, even though busi-
nesses normally only kept
records going back seven to 10

Features:

* Chamber chief says ‘unfair’ to pursue companies for alleged
non-payment more than a decade ago, because they don’t

have records to back them up

* Warns insurable wage ceiling increase will increase

‘tax’ on businesses, employees

* Hotels concerned about rising costs from tip, gratuity

inclusion in insurable wage

years - in line with most inter-
national norms.

It was thus impossible, he
suggested, for businesses to
prove they had paid all NIB
contributions on behalf of
employees going back beyond
1999. For this reason he urged
the Board to focus on current
compliance, and unpaid contri-
butions going back one decade.

Mr D’Aguilar said he had
personal experience of this,
after his company, the Super-
wash laundromat chain, was
contacted by NIB and asked to
produce records proving it had
paid contributions on behalf of
a former employee between
1985-1990.

SEE page 4B

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The information contained is from a third
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from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



A strong partnership exempt from trouble

What is an Exempted

Limited Partnership?

An exempted limited part-
nership (ELP) is a limited part-
nership comprised of general
partners who have unlimited
liability for the debts of the
partnership, and maintain
active management of the part-
nership, plus limited partners
who limit their liability to their
investment interests in the enti-

ty.

Responsibilities of General

and Limited Partners

The operation, financial and
legal obligations, and corpo-
rate maintenance are the
responsibilities of the general
partners of the ELP. It is they
who can also sue and be sued
in matters related to or affect-
ing the ELP. General partners
may also initiate the partner-
ship’s dissolution.

Dear Shareholders,

Limited partners may be
liable as general partners if
they transact with a third party
in the partnership’s name.

Legal Requirements for

the formation and

maintenance of ELPs

In the Bahamas, the
Exempted Limited Partnership
Act 1995, and the Exempted
Limited Partnership (Amend-
ment) Act, 1998 (referred col-
lectively as ‘the Act’), govern
the formation, operation, cor-
porate maintenance and legal-
ity of the ELP.

It is important to note that
the provisions of the Partner-
ship Limited Liability Act 1861
do not apply to ELPs.

ELPs must be registered
with the Registrar General in
accordance with the provisions
of Section 9 of the Act.

The ELP is required to have

by Tyrone Fitzgerald



at least one general partner,
who may be a local resident or
a company incorporated or
registered under Bahamian
companies’ legislation (an IBC
under the International Busi-
ness Companies Act 2000, as
amended, or a foreign regis-
tered company under the
Companies Act 1992).

ELPs are typically, though
not exclusively, used as corpo-
rate vehicles for investment
funds in the Bahamas. The
partnership may operate with-
in the Bahamas or abroad.

In order to form an ELP,
Section 9 of the Act requires

The economy in Grand Bahama continues to struggle and unfortunately our Ist quarter
results show a net loss of $220k compared to a net loss for the same period last year of

$74k.

Our overall sales in the 1st quarter ended November 30, 2008 are down 8.59% compared
to our 1st quarter sales last fiscal year ($3,425k compared to $3,746k). Sales in the con-
crete division for this 1st quarter are down almost 24% on the same period last fiscal year
( $691k compared to $907k) with the Home Centre's sales down 3.73% ($2,734k com-
pared to $2,840k). Our operating expenses are 10.41% less in this 1st quarter compared
to the same period last year ($886 compared to $989k)

The Home Centre has lost $97k for the quarter compared to a loss for the same period
last year of $77k and the concrete plant lost $123k this 1st quarter compared to a small
profit of $4k for the Ist quarter last year.

A key factor affecting our financial performance is that we need to raise additional capi-
tal to be able to purchase more inventory which will drive up sales at the Home Centre.
Despite the poor economic climate in Grand Bahama we see that there is still business
we could get; however, we are losing sales because we are constantly running out of
inventory due to the fact that our foreign vendors are not giving us the same level of cred-
it we enjoyed prior to the recession in the United States and our operating line of credit

at the bank is fully utilized.

We are actively pursuing ways to obtain capital as unfortunately without more capital we

will continue to struggle.

Ray Simpson
Chief Executive Officer

Feb 16, 2009

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Statement of Operations
Three months ended November 30, 2008 with comparative information for 2007

Outstanding shares =

4,708,354

{Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Sales
Cost of sales.
Gross profit

Payroll costs

Other operating costs
Rent expense
Advertising expanse

3 months andad
Nov 30,2008

3,425,090
2,646,810

3 months ended
Now 30.2007

3,746,889
2.722181
Pre 220 1,024,708
459,429
178,874
103,400

T2383

S22.213
21334
138,951

25.267

Utilities expense 95 344 871,785

Income{loss) before interest, taxes.

Gepreciation and amortisation
Depn and amort, expense
Net financing income expense)

Net income! {loss }

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
As at November 20, 2008

Assets

Cash
Accounts reenable, niet

Noy 30,2008
(Unaudned}

(107,720)

Bas, 940 S89. 560

25,7448
(P4007) (72,653)
(41,257) (36,155)

(73,864)

AUST 31 2008
(ade ted i

21,582
P16, 649

46,530
mo7,011

that information regarding the
name of the ELP; general
nature of the business; the peri-
od of duration; registered
office address; the full names
and addresses of the general
partners; and a declaration that
the ELP shall not undertake
business with the public in the
Bahamas (as defined by the
Act), be filed with the Regis-
trar General.

A Certificate of Registration
is issued to the ELP, upon
compliance with the provisions
regarding registration under
the Act.

The restriction on “under-
taking business with the public
in the Bahamas” is subject to
certain exceptions, particularly
in relation to business with
Bahamian IBCs and other
related businesses of an ancil-
lary nature.

Where the general partner
is a corporate entity, the Cer-
tificate of Incorporation and a
Certificate of Good Standing
must be filed with the Regis-
trar General.

The words ‘Limited Part-
nership’ or the letters ‘LP’
must be included in the ELP’s
name. Under Section 11 of the
Act, a register containing the
dates and contribution(s) of
each partner must be main-
tained by the general partner
at the registered office of the
ELP. The register is open to
public inspection.

Subject to Section 13 (2) of
the Act, legal proceedings by
or against an ELP may only be
instituted by or against any one
or more of the general part-
ners only, and no limited part-
ner shall be a party to or
named in such proceedings.

Under Section 13(2) of the
Act, “a limited partner may
bring an action on behalf of an
ELP if any one or more of the
general partners with authori-
ty to do so have, without good
cause, refused to institute such
proceedings”.

An ELP is required to file
with the Registrar General, on
or before January 31 every
year, after the year in which it
was registered, a return signed
by and on behalf of a general
partner, certifying that the
ELP has during the prior cal-
endar year complied with the
relevant provisions of the Act,
and there has been no breach
of the declaration given in
accordance with Section
91).

Registration of a partnership
under the ELP, originally
formed under the Partnership
Act 1890 or the Partnership
Limited Liability Act 1861, will
be governed by the Act from
the date of the Certificate of
Registration. This will not cre-
ate a new legal entity, affect
property previously acquired

by or on behalf of the ELP,
affect anything done prior to
such registration, or the rights,
powers, authorities, functions
or obligations of the ELP or
its partner, nor render defec-
tive any legal proceedings by
or against the ELP or any part-
ner or any person, before its
registration.

Fees and Filing Require-
ments

for ELPs

The registration fee for an
ELP is $850, and the ELP is
required to pay an annual fee
of $475 each year, except in
the year of its initial registra-
tion.

Notwithstanding the fact
that the ELP is exempt from
annual business licence fees,
stamp duty and other local
forms of taxation for a 50-year
period, it is required to file a
certificate each year, with pay-
ment of its annual fee, indicat-
ing that it is not doing business
with the public in the Bahamas
within the previous year. The
ELP is also required to file
notice of any changes in its reg-
istration statement.

Important Exemptions

for ELPs

Under Section 17, an ELP
registered under the Act or a
partner of such an ELP is
exempt from business licence
fees, income tax, capital gains
tax, or any other tax on income
or distributions accruing to -
or derived - from such part-
nership, or in connection with
any transaction to which the
ELP or partner is a party.

The Exchange Control Reg-
ulations Act does not apply to
an ELP registered under the
Act or to any transaction by a
partner.

However, it is important to
note that for the purposes of
exemption from local taxation,
a corporate general partner
that is deemed ‘Resident’ for
exchange control purposes in
the Bahamas, under the
Exchange Control Regula-
tions, will not be exempt from
annual business licence fees,
stamp duty and other forms of
local taxation.

ELPs are also exempt from
the payment of stamp duty for
all instruments relating to:

* Transfers of property to or
by an ELP

* Transactions in respect of
the interests of the ELP

* Transactions relating to the
business of an ELP

The partnership agreement
of an ELP, and all deeds and
other instruments relating to
transactions in respect of inter-
ests in an ELP, and other
transactions relating to the

business of an ELP are exempt
from registration under the
Registration of Records Act
1928 (as amended).

Exemptions granted under
Section 17 of the Act remain in
force for a period of 50 years
from the date shown on the
Certificate of Registration pur-
suant to Section 9(3) of the
Act.

The Importance of a

Partnership Agreement

for ELPs

While there is no legal
requirement for a partnership
agreement to govern the inter-
nal and external affairs of an
ELP, under the Act (as is typ-
ically required for most part-
nership arrangements), it is
highly advisable, as a matter
of good corporate practice and
to preserve and protect the
partners’ legal interests, for
persons to ensure that a part-
nership agreement is properly
drafted and implemented upon
formation.

Issues relating to expansion,
dissolution and buy-out
arrangements regarding a part-
nership should be agreed and
specifically discussed before
the occurrence of such events,
in order minimise problems
and challenges which may
occur later in the course of the
partnership.

Dissolution of an ELP

Section 7(6) of the Act stip-
ulates the circumstances upon
which an ELP shall not be ter-
minated or dissolved, unless a
contrary provision exists in the
partnership agreement.

These circumstances are:

Incapacity, death, bankrupt-
cy or dissolution of a limited
partner

A change in any of the part-
ners.

© 2005. Tyrone L. E.
Fitzgerald. All rights reserved.

NB: The information con-
tained in this article does not
constitute nor is it a substitute
for legal advice. Persons read-
ing this article and/or column,
generally, are encouraged to
seek the relevant legal advice
and assistance regarding issues
that may affect them and may
relate to the information pre-
sented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is
an attorney with Fitzgerald &
Fitzgerald. Should you have
any comments regarding this
article, you may contact Mr
Fitzgerald at Suite 212,
Lagoon Court Building, Olde
Towne Mall at Sandyport,
West Bay St., P. O. Box CB-
11173, Nassau, Bahamas or
at tyrone@tlefitzgerald-
group.com

Tel: 242.328.0264 * 242.328.0257 * 242.322.7371 » 242.325.6991

Fax: 242.325.6878 > www.premiertravelbahamas.com

=" Premier Travel is your one-stop

full-service travel agency.

Let us help you explore some great getaways!

imagine

being here...

1 438,555
106,280
70.839

Ine ntories
Inwentones of spare parts and supplies
Deposits and prepaid expenses

Toba! Gunent seats 2,408,505

Fixed auats 4794, 150

Total assnbs 6 B02 685 6 595 839

Liabilities. and Shareholders’ Equity

1,281,775
3,270,338
5,000)
176,260

1,847,481
3,035,007
5,000
183,887

Bank owerdrall

Accounts payable and accrued expenses
Warranty Provieian

Current portion of lang term debt

5 aa 983



Total current liabilities 5,080,345 |

Long term debi 13,057 oF 08

Shareholders’ equity
Share Capital
Contributed suepius
Apprasal excess
Retained aamings
Current @arnings

47a
5,774,858
1,439,887

(5,788,555)

(220,024)

47084
5.7 74,868
1,435 867

(5,736,559)

wu ‘ r J

Go on line to www.premiertravelbahamas.com or give us a call today!

Book your tickets on-line anywhere anytime and use your local credit card. Tickets are issued locally. ey

Total liabiities and shareholders’ equity 3 6,602 655 6585540


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 3B





Property tax could ‘kill the
goose that laid the golden egg’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE ABACO real estate
market is defying the econom-
ic downturn, which has pushed
second home prices down 10 to
15 per cent and caused proper-
ty sales on other islands to
plummet, some Abaco realtors
told Tribune Business yester-
day.

They remain concerned,
though, over what impact the
increase in real property taxes
could have on future sales.

An HG Christie real estate
Agent and appraiser, Dwayne
Wallas, said there was still a
large pool of buyers looking at
Abaco for second homes. He
said, though, that the market

Abaco real estate market defying downturn, but concerns abound over impact of tax ceiling’s removal

was not operating at the level it
was in 2006 and 2007.

“Sales are still happening, the
market is still moving,” he said.

“We're definitely seeing a lot
of interest right now because
people are realising that the
stock market is a very risky
place to put their money and
real estate, especially in Abaco
and the Bahamas generally, has
performed steadily over the
past decade or so.”

Mr Wallas said there had
been a steady decline in prop-
erty sales year-over-year since
2006, and he expects this year
will be much the same, espe-
cially with the looming real

property tax mecrease after the
removal of the $35,000 ceiling.

“Tf the Government doesn’t
watch what it is doing in terms
of messing with second home
owners and property tax and
all that, they very seriously
could risk killing the goose that
laid the golden egg,” said Mr
Wallas.

“Tf they raise the taxes on the
home owner, they are proba-
bly going to close up shop and
pull the tourism out of Abaco.”

He added that he understood
the Government’s need for
added revenue, but said the tax
increase would only serve as a
deterrent within the market.

Realtor expands operation

into south Eleuthera



A Bahamian real estate firm
has expanded its operations
into south Eleuthera.

Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty has appointed Rock
Sound businessman Chris Cates
as its area representative. His
appointment brings to seven
the number of Coldwell Banker
Lightbourn Realty sales asso-
ciates stationed throughout
Eleuthera.

“The presence of a resident
agent in the south will further
enhance our network driven
sales,” said company president
Mike Lightbourn.

"Buyers will have the com-
fort of knowing that Coldwell
Banker professionals, schooled
in the high standards set by the
premier global real estate
provider, can be found through-

out Eleuthera, including Har-
bour Island and Spanish Wells."

Mr Lightbourn said of Mr
Cates: "He is an experienced
businessman, hardworking and
has wonderful people skills. He
also has a long background in
real estate, and he is ideally
suited to the post.”

A native of Rock Sound, Mr
Cates was educated in the US
and received his Bachelor of
Arts degree in business admin-
istration from Florida South-
ern College in Lakeland, Flori-
da, and an M.B.A from Emory
University in Atlanta, Georgia.

He is the president elect of
the newly organised Rotary
Club of Eleuthera, which 1s
about to receive its charter
from Rotary International. He
also serves in his church as a

local preacher and superinten-
dent of the church Sunday
school.

Mr Cates operates a num-
ber of small businesses, includ-
ing The Lumber Shed, located
in Rock Sound.

He is the father of one child,
Alexander, and husband to
Monica Cates.

Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty has offices and sales rep-
resentatives in Nassau, Abaco,
Andros, Berry Islands, Bimini,
Eleuthera, Exuma and Long
Island.

The Coldwell Banker system
has about 3,800 residential real
estate offices and more than
120,000 sales associates in 41
countries and territories. It's
part of a huge global referral
system.

Scotiabank issues $25m small
business loans in two years

Scotiabank (Bahamas) small
business unit has seen some $25
million in loans, and 1,000 bor-
rowers, flow through it in just
under two years, its managing
director said.

Barry Malcolm, speaking as
the bank hosted the launch of
an initiative to assist small and
medium-sized businesses, said:
“Given our current climate, the
opportunity for small businesses
to access resources to evaluate,
understand and refine their busi-
ness models is invaluable.

“We launched the $10 million
SME Fund in 2006, and closely
followed this with the launch of
the Small Business Unit in 2007.
Signing this FINPYME agree-
ment in 2008 is another major

Resort
performing
well despite

fishing tourney
uncertainty

Abaco Beach Resort has kept
rates consistent with their cost.
Therefore, if costs went up,
rates went up.

“We’re doing a lot better
than most places, but we aren’t
where we were last year,” said
Mr Kramm.

He said the 2009 Bertram
Hatteras Shootout might have
been cancelled due to the cur-
rent economic climate ,or
because of the failed health of
one of the tournament’s chair-
men.

Mr Kramm added that many
more tournaments were once
headquartered at the Abaco
Beach Resort, but decided to
explore different destinations.
He said attendance for the fish-
ing events had reduced over the
past few years.

Real estate agent and
appraiser for HG Christie in
Abaco, Dwayne Wallas, said
visitor levels on the island are
high at the moment, and he and
Mr Kramm expect only a slight
decrease in arrivals this year.

“There were tons of tourists
in town last week. I think we
might have the same as last
year,” said Mr Wallas.

step in the bank’s 120-year his-
tory of supporting small and
medium enterprises throughout
the Caribbean.”

The FINPYME initiative has
been launched with the Inter-
American Investment Corpora-
tion (IC) and the College of
the Bahamas. It is a diagnostic
methodology developed by the
IIC to assist small and medium-
sized businesses, improve their
competitive skills and facilitate
their access to potential sources
of financing.

In December 2008, Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) signed a part-
nership agreement with IIC.
This will allow Scotiabank to
deepen its relationship with
small and medium-sized enter-

prises in the Bahamas. The FIN-
PYME programme addresses
the fundamental issues that
small businesses face on a day-
to-day basis, such as lacking
resources to have comprehen-
sive reviews done.

COB’s chairperson for the
School of Business, Remelda
Moxey, explained that the Col-
lege was partnering with IC and
obtaining faculty to assist in the
diagnostic review.

Michael Apel, IIC’s senior
trust fund and technical assis-
tance officer, said the pro-
gramme was not one to finance
small and medium enterprises,
but one to equip them with skills
to review resources and assess
financial situations themselves.

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According to Mr Wallas, a
lot of properties have been put
under contract this year, includ-
ing some $1 million dollar lots.
But other islands have not fared
so well, according to some of

his colleagues.

He said agents on Exuma
and Eleuthera have seen
markedly less business than
Abaco.

Mr Wallas said Abaco’s visi-

tor arrivals may not see a huge
decreasee this year either. “The
visitors we have coming to
Abaco come here because they
do not want to come to the big
resorts,” he said.

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

THIS MONTHS TOPIC: Ethics & Critical Care

SPEAKER:
Dr. N’ tari Darville

Internal Medicine

Purpose:

To educate the public about

the important health issues,

presented by distinguished
physicians.

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RSVP ¢ Seating is Limited ¢ 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

LECTURE SERIES

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Dr. N’tari Darville

Nutrition
Ronnell ‘Sandy’ Sands

Total Joint Replacement
Dr. Dane Bowe

Uninary Incontinence
Dr. Robin Roberts

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
NIB ‘causing consternation’ in business community

FROM page 1B

“This is causing enormous
consternation in the business
community, the fact that NIB
is popping up with requests for
proof of payment from the
1970s, 1980s and 1990s,” the
Chamber president told Tri-
bune Business.

“For most jurisdictions,
you’re expected to keep docu-
ments for seven to 10 years. It’s
just completely ridiculous.
They’ve said Superwash did not
pay for some person back in the
1980s. I have no recorded proof,
and it’s absolutely impossible
for people to prove they’ve
paid.”

Instead, Mr D’Aguilar said:
“They should put the emphasis
on solving the problem of peo-
ple complying now. I think
Cargill [NIB director Algernon
Cargill] should focus on people
complying now, and going back
for 10 years. Focus on the cur-
rent decade and getting people
compliant.”

During a presentation to the

Rotary Club of West Nassau
last week, Mr Cargill attempted
to address business complaints
about NIB’s compliance drive,
how far back it was going in
challenging alleged non-pay-
ment, and the demands placed
on businesses to store records.

One Rotarian had told Mr
Cargill his business had been
contacted by the Board, claim-
ing it had not paid contributions
for a period of time many years
ago. The Board had also said
the business had missed a
month of contribution payments
more recently, but when chal-
lenged to produce evidence,
told the Rotarian businessman
he needed to produce his
records instead.

Mr Cargill said the NIB Act
required businesses and the self-
employed to keep their records
indefinitely, but the Board was
using common sense in applying
this.

It was pointed out to Mr
Cargill, though, that the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants (BICA) had rec-

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ommended that businesses only
keep records going back a max-
imum of 10 years.

However, on the question of
NIB chasing alleged non-pay-
ment from the distant past, Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness: “It’s irritating and time
consuming and annoying, and
businesses have to try and find
records from prior to 1999.

“T received a request for
information concerning an
employee from 1985-1990,
claiming they had no record of
contributions for this person
who was about to retire. The
only thing I could do is call up
the office manager from that
time and say: ‘Do you remem-
ber this person?’

“The accountants and bank
had no record. What is one to
do? But I knew Id paid because
when I gave NIB the numbers
of other employees at the time,
they could find them.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said NIB’s
compliance drive was “proof
they made silly errors” and
failed to rigorously enforce the
law during the 1970s, 1980s and
1990s. “Government is notori-
ous at not posting payments
that are received,” he added.

While praising NIB for mak-

ing a “valiant and admirable
effort” to collect all contribu-
tions allegedly owed to it, the
Chamber president added: “It’s
a bold policy and it’s going to
rile up people in the business
community. We have no prob-
lem with them trying to get
things going back 10 years.
Once they get past that window,
it’s unfair.”

The Chamber president also
called for NIB to set up a sys-
tem where employees could
verify whether their employer
was making the required con-
tributions on their behalf.

In last week’s presentation,
Mr Cargill said NIB has recom-
mended increasing the insur-
able wage ceiling by 50 per cent
- from $400 to $600 - as a way to
ensure its long-term sustain-
ability, given that the scheme
faced severe depletion by 2032
“if nothing happens”.

The proposed $200 increase
in the ceiling for the insurable
wage - the portion of employee
income on which NIB contri-
butions is calculated - was only
an initial step, the recommen-
dation being that it continue to
be raised in line with increases
in the average national wage.

Mr D’ Aguilar and others said

this, if it came to fruition, would
act as a further tax on both busi-
nesses and employees, and giv-
en the current economic down-
turn it was “absolutely the
wrong time to do it”.

“This represents a substan-
tial tax, not only on individuals
but the employer,” the Cham-
ber president said. “I know
what they’re doing, because the
NIB Fund has been predicted
to go bankrupt by 2032.

“T understand why they have
to adjust it. It would be good if
they could come back and say
how they’re going to make NIB
more efficient.”

That has been an ongoing
issue for NIB, whose adminis-
trative costs as a percentage of
total contributions have con-
stantly hovered at around the
20 per cent mark - a level con-
sidered far too high by institu-
tions such as the International
Monetary Fund (IMF).

“NIB is notoriously over-
staffed,” Mr D’ Aguilar added.
“Tt’s one area of government
that’s flush, so all the people
are making good salaries, but
efficiency and productivity are
not the focus.”

Meanwhile, another NIB pro-
posal, to include tips and gra-

tuities in the definition of ‘insur-
able wage’, has caused concern
in the hotel industry.

Mr Cargill said this would
end the “smaller benefits” being
received by hotel employees,
but the sector is likely to per-
ceive it as an additional tax and
inflationary wage pressure at a
time when it can least afford it,
due to the global economic sit-
uation and sector lay-offs.

Robert Sands, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s (BHA)
president, said the sector had
noted Mr Cargill’s comments
but was reacting cautiously until
it established whether this was
NIB’s and the Government’s
true position.

“We don’t know if that is a
definite position. We would
have difficulty with it,” Mr
Sands said. “We want to be sure
that is the position. It would
certainly be an expensive ven-
ture for us; that is correct.”

He added that the inclusion
of tips and gratuities in the
insurable wage definition could
not be viewed in isolation. Oth-
er considerations, Mr Sands
said, were how gratuities and
tips were calculated, and
whether benefits such as sick
and vacation pay were included.

‘Real impact of this recession’ only apparent from Q1 2009

31, 2008, Mr Ingraham said revenues for
the 2008-2009 Budget’s first half came in at
$626.5 million, down $51.6 million or 7.6
per cent below forecast.

However, Mr Ingraham said it was
“remarkable” that what the Government
was collecting was keeping pace with 2007-
2008 collection levels.

Yet Mr Smith downplayed the fact that
recurrent spending - which goes on its
fixed costs, such as wages and salaries -
had come in at $711.723 million, as
opposed to May Budget estimates of
$784.567 million.

The former minister said that, at this
stage of the fiscal year, he would “not put
much credence on that”, given how dra-
matically the fiscal position could change
within a matter of weeks.

“Nobody does a good job of controlling
spending, because most of it’s fixed,” Mr
Smith explained. “$70 million in a $1.5 bil-
lion budget; by the time the actual accounts
come up, that may be breaking up.”

Meanwhile, fiscal hawks have expressed
shock at the mounting level of national debt
which, according to data published by the
Government with its mid-term Budget
review, stood at $3.2 billion or 53 per cent of
gross domestic product (GDP) at year-end

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand
Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

1.0 The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser") now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provisions of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00

p.m.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the

subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31: March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

2008 alone.

With GDP estimated at $6.032 billion,
the direct debt owed by the Government -
some $2.764 billion - was shown to be 46 per
cent of GDP. The debt owed by public cor-
porations and agencies, which the Govern-
ment has guaranteed, added another $436
million or asum equivalent to 7 per cent of
GDP to the total.

Both those percentages - the national
debt standing at 53 per cent of GDP, and
the Government’s direct debt of 46 per cent
of GDP - are well above the danger 40 per
cent threshold cited by the International
Monetary Fund (IMF) and other agencies.

Above this point, rating agencies may
take a slightly dimmer view of the Bahamas’
creditworthiness, and investors may demand
higher interest rate returns on the nation’s
sovereign bonds - a development that would
affect this nation’s debt servicing costs.

Even if Bahamian GDP has reached $7
billion, as the Government has suggested,
the national debt-to-GDP ratio still stands
at 45.7 per cent, based on its own 2008 fig-
ures. The direct charge on government lies
just below 40 per cent, at 39 per cent.

Given that the Prime Minister said the
GFS fiscal deficit will likely exceed 3 per
cent for the 2008-2009 Budget period, and

A Ministry of Marsh Harbour denepel Chapel

FO. Bae ABGoTbo, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahantas

that Bahamian GDP is estimated now to be
$7 billion, that means a fiscal deficit of at
least $210 million. And this deficit mea-
surement does not include debt principal
repayments, meaning the total deficit is
likely to be close to $300 million.

That is in addition to the existing $3.2
billion. Assuming a $3.5 billion total nation-
al debt, and $7 billion in GDP, that would
take the national debt-to-GDP ratio to
around 50 per cent.

Rick Lowe, a Nassau Institute executive
and noted fiscal hawk, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “The debt is frightening. It’s what
we’ve been saying over the last 15 years.
There’s always a reason to increase the
debt, but I’ve not seen our leaders justify
decreasing the debt or reducing spending.

“There’s just no way you can keep com-
pounding the problem with more debt. It’s
out of control. The Government’s size, bor-
rowing, it’s out of control. And unfortu-
nately, in the circumstances, it’s difficult to
get it back under control.

“Tt will not be long before we end up in
the position of Barbados or Jamaica.”

Mr Lowe urged the Government to
ensure it obtained a better return on its
spending in areas such as health and edu-
cation.

Sau eC

TEACHER POSITIONS

Primary Grades

&

Tunior and Senior Wt School

UR Ree Ty Teme TP a

ME os

eee Roy
Music, Compater Science, Physical Education, Biology, Science and Art

OA i Loge

Applicants mast be Born Again Christians and adhere to toe Statement of Faith of Mareh Harbour Gaoapel Chapel
Teachers must ago have af least a Bachelors Degres in Education or a Teacher's Certificate

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, 7" April, 2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-1530

and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the ahamnzs with work stabus,
Qualing persons are auked to contact Yor office
Telephone (242) 301-4171 830 AM. ~ 3:45 PM, or fan (242) B1-STTT
oe vesil oar website ~ wiewagapeschool cont ~ for jab or student applications

ae nn es pe ee ere es eee

PREIS CESS EEE

Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Pook Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values a6 well as a very high standard of education
and is approved by the Bahamas Ministry of Education,

We seek to train the mind, quide the person, and love the personality,
Otudy to show thysell approve unto Gol... 2 Timothy 215


THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 5B



Insurer confirms
staff redundancies

FROM page 1B

total staff. But Ms Cambridge
said these figures were inaccu-
rate.

This newspaper had also been
informed that the redundancies,
in part, were related to Generali
Worldwide outsourcing the pay-
ment of its medical claims to a
Canadian-based company,
Canadian Medical Network
(CMN).

Tribune Business was also
told that a Generali Worldwide
affilhate, Europ Assistance, had
a stake in CMN. The latter is
also used, this newspaper
understands, by Family
Guardian, which shares its non-
Bahamian dollar claims data
and portfolio with it.

Ms Cambridge did not direct-
ly answer Tribune Business’s
questions about the claims out-
sourcing and CMN, and
whether this was linked to the
redundancies.

She said that since the com-
pany’s new product launch in
early 2009, it had moved to
“maximise the synergies of
group entities operating within
the” Caribbean, with the aim
of improving coverage quality
and health outcomes for poli-
cyholders.

“With the full introduction of
these changes, providers and
members alike will be able to
track claims and reimburse-
ments, and verify benefits and
eligibility on line, providing effi-
ciencies which did not exist on
the previous system,’ Ms Cam-
bridge added.

Generali has recently come
under fire from the individual
health policyholders it inherited
when it acquired British Amer-
ican Financial’s health portfo-
lio in 2006. The company has
increased premiums by as much
as 100 per cent for elderly poli-
cyholders, with younger ones
experiencing 30 per cent
increases.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) OCEAN CAPITAL LIMITED is in dissolution under the provi-
sions of the International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on March 11, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by

the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

Ms Cambridge, though, said
the new rates had brought
premiums in line with each
customer’s perceived risk and
likely level of claims.

She added: “Our assessment
revealed that the block of indi-
vidual policies which we inher-
ited had been inappropriately
priced.

“The premiums were too
low for the level of benefits
offered, and they were also
too low given the ages of
many of the individuals
enrolled in that portfolio.

“Our options based on our
analysis were to sell the indi-
vidual portfolio or to cancel
the coverage. We realised,
however, that if we were sim-
ply to cancel the policies, it

would have left some individ-
uals without insurance cover
and for some, based on their
ages and health conditions, it
would have made it very diffi-
cult for them to find alterna-
tives.

“In order to provide an
appropriate solution, we have
moved to create an age-band-
ed premium structure, which
provides for a fairer and more
appropriate premium for each
risk presented.

That drew a withering
response from British Ameri-
can Financial’s president,
Chester Cooper, who accused
Generali of trying to blame
and ‘scapegoat’ it for the
response it had received from
policyholders.

LTS ag
MIR) rere Va BCL

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSSETTE JOSEPH of
KEY WEST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 12° day of MARCH, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

ISLAND SHIPPING LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 2nd day of March, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ANTONIQUE
MARIA DEVEAUX off Wulff Road, intend to change my
name from to NIYOKA MARIA CASSEUS. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that ALFRED MARVIN DAWKINS
of LEEWARD EAST, P.O.BOX SB-51218, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12" day of
MARCH, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.














KINGSWAY ACADEMY
ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway Academy will — be
holding Entrance Examinations
for students wishing to enter grades
2,3. and 6on MONDAY, APRIL6,
2009. Parents are asked to collect
Application Forms from __ the
Elementary School office before
the testing date from 8:30a.m. to
4:00p.m.

For further information contact

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the April 17, 2009 to send their names and ad-
dresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

the school at telephone numbers
324-5049, 324-2158, or 324-6269

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
March 12, 2009 of
SHAKIRA BURROWS ISLAND SHIPPING LIMITED
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

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PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





“My work at The Tribune is rewarding
and challenging. | enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.
[ am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY

PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune “ a


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 7B





BSI executive passes Series 7



FROM page 1B

ity to take action, and the abili-
ty to take action short of putting
a company into liquidation.

“In the existing Insurance
Act, there’s no in between. The
Minister can only put it into liq-
uidation. There’s no other mea-
sures.” The Domestic Insurance
Act, passed by Parliament in
2005 but yet to be implemented,
was designed to give regulators
the ability to appoint
receivers/managers for insur-
ance companies instead of
putting them straight into liq-
uidation.

‘The present Insurance Act
has no provision for that,” Dr
Brown said. This has been
recognised by the current gov-
ernment, minister of state for
finance, Zhivargo Laing, telling
Tribune Business that this pro-
vision was set to be reintro-
duced after dropping out of a
previous draft.

Meanwhile, Dr Brown, who is
now the Bahamas General
Insurance Association’s
(BGIA) co-ordinator, said
recalling the CLICO situation:
“A part of the problem with
CLICO was that the operation
of CLICO Bahamas came out
of Trinidad.

“There was no CLICO man-
agement in Nassau, so to speak.
They were operated out of
Trinidad. That was part of the
problem.”

When asked whether CLICO
(Bahamas) and its CL Finan-
cial ever responded to the reg-
ulatory concerns raised by Reg-
istrar of Insurance’s Office, Dr
Brown told Tribune Business:
“They paid no attention to us at
all. They acted as though they
didn’t have to. That is still a
serious problem.”

The former Registrar also
questioned how CLICO
(Bahamas) and its CLICO
Enterprises affiliate were able
to take Bahamian dollar-
denominated assets out of the
Bahamas, and invest them in
highly illiquid, speculative Flori-
da-based real estate develop-
ments.

Suggesting that the insurer
never received exchange con-
trol approval from the Central
Bank of the Bahamas, Dr
Brown said: “The first time we
saw that situation was when we
saw it in their audited financial
statements.”

When asked whether he ever
brought the CLICO (Bahamas)
situation to ministerial atten-
tion, Dr Brown said it would

To: Clients of the late

David Bethel

Please contact the

Bahamas Bar Association
Office at telephone:
242-326-3276

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

A JUNIOR account officer at BSI
Overseas (Bahamas), Alec F. Rolle
(right), has passed the Series 7 Exam
after studying with the Securities
Training Institute (STI).

Michael Miller (left), STI’s

founder, said: “Mr Rolle has per-
formed exceptionally well, having dis-
tinguished himself by obtaining both
the Series 7 and the Series 6 qualifi-
cations after preparing with us.”

The Series 7 and the Series 6 qual-
ifying exams are administered by the
New York Stock Exchange, and the
National Association of Securities
Dealers (NASD) in the US.

Regulator: CLICO
‘totally ignored’ us

have been mentioned in his
office’s annual report.

But he added: “To actually
sit down and discuss it with the
Minister, I can’t recall us ever
doing that. It probably should
have been done, but it was not
done.

“Tt wasn’t as if the company
was in trouble. The local oper-
ations were going on alright, but
it was the exposure and heavy
concentration of assets in one
investment [the Florida real
estate project] we were con-
cerned about.

“It was an investment we
knew nothing about, and they
were not being forthcoming
with us about it. We were also
trying to ensure they brought
the company’s money back into
the Bahamas, and stop trying

to run it out of Trinidad. They
never did, and up to this point,
never did it.”

Dr Brown said the new
Domestic Insurance Act would
enable regulators to “step in
early and take the actions they
need to take. They need to have
the new Act and regulations in
place.

“Unfortunately, I believe that
by the time the new Act is intro-
duced, they’re going to need to
amend some parts of it because
it’s already outdated.”

Dr Brown said during his
time in Office he had been
pushing the Ministry of Finance
toimplement the new Domestic
Insurance Act, adding that the
tense suggested by Mr Smith
was never brought to his atten-
tion.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of JAMES ALEXANDER WALLACE late
of West Bay Street in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Island of The Commonwealth

of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of the
same certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the 21st day March A.D., 2009, and if required, prove
such debts or claims, or in default be excluded from
any distribution; after the above date the assets will
be distributed having regard only to the proved debts
or claims of which the Administrator shall have had Notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the aforementioned date.

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.,
Attorneys for the Administrator
Alvernia Court, 94 Dowdeswell Street
P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas

Office of Research, Graduate Programmes

& International Relations
invites you to come engage in a dialogue on pivotal matters of national
importance at the inaugural Bahamian Perspectives:

CONVERSATIONS WITH SONS AND DAUGHTERS
OF THE SOIL LECTURE SERIES

When:
Where:
Topic:

Thursday March 12th at 6p.m.
Grosvenor Close Campus, Shirley Street,
The Future of Healthcare in The Bahamas

Speakers: Minister of Health the Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis

Urologist Dr. Robin Roberts

When:
Where:
Topic:

Thursday, March 26th 6p.m.
Chapter One Bookstore, Thompson Boulevard
The Future of the Bahamian Economy

Speakers: Governor of The Central Bank of The Bahamas
Wendy Craigg
Chairman of Colina Financial Ltd.
James Smith
Chairman of Sunshine Group of Companies
Franklyn Wilson

Future lectures to address the topics Tourism & the Environment and
Competing Regional & International Perspectives.

For more information contact:

The Office of Research,

Graduate Programmes & International Relations

at 302-4392 or 302-4455.



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES -
A a”

ms ad er

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an
exciting career opportunity?

Find what you're looking for with FirstCaribbean Careers.
AVAILABLE POSITIONS:

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Director- Product Management (Mortgages & Consumer Loans)
Director —Client Insights & Database Marketing

Senior Analyst-Management Information.

Visit firstcariobeanbank.com/careers.htm for job
descriptions, requirements and other available positions.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

www irstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm GED THERES TOGETHER:

NOTICE

BARRY’S LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an Extraordinary General
Meeting of the Shareholders of BARRY’S LIMITED is hereby
called to be held at the Registered Office of the Company,
Shirley House, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau Bahamas on the 22nd
day of April, 2009 at 10:30 o’clock in the forenoon on that day.
The object and purpose of said meeting is to have
laid before the Shareholders of the Company the account of
the Liquidator, Dennis Barry Nottage, showing the manner in
which the winding up of the Company has been conducted,
the property of the Company distributed and the debts
and obligations of the Company discharged, and also to
hear any explanation that may be given by said Liquidator.
Dated the 11th day of March, A.D., 2009.

Dennis Barry Nottage
LIQUIDATOR

of
BARRY’S LIMITED


















[|

NOU e

To: Clients of the late

David Bethel

Please contact the
Bahamas Bar Association
(ffice at telephone:
242-326-3276

A leading retailer is seeking applications for the position of

MANAGER ADMINISTRATION

BASIC REQUIREMENTS

SUMMARY OF DUTIES

Minimum two years Management experience

Excellent Oral and Written Communication Skills

Proven organizational and planning capabilities

Have a proven track record of meeting deadlines

Must be proficient in Microsoft office software

Strong Interpersonal skills and willingness to be a team player
Must have strong leadership skills and be results oriented
Posses integrity, excellent motivational skills and assertiveness

Must be multifaceted and prepared to work flexible hours if necessary

¢ Overall responsibility for the administrative functions of the company
e Training and motivating team members
e Ensuring company policies and procedures are adhered to and implementing
new policies as required.
Control and monitor administrative budgets
Responsible for the protection and maintenance of all company assets
Analyze existing business and identify business development opportunities

The successful candidate will become a part of a growing and progressive organization

capable of facing challenges.

Benefits include a comprehensive medical and life

package and pension plan. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and

experience.

Interested persons may forward a copy of their resume, in confidence to:

The Human Resources Manager

P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 322-6607


THE TRIBUNE

m@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Four states — California,
South Carolina, Michigan and
Rhode Island — registered
unemployment rates above 10
percent in January, and the
national rate is expected to hit
double digits by year-end.

The US Labour Depart-
ment’s report on state unem-
ployment, released Wednes-
day, showed the increasing
damage inflicted on workers
and companies from a reces-
sion, now in its second year.
Some economists now predict
the US unemployment rate
will hit 10 percent by year-end,
and peak at 11 per cent or
higher by the middle of 2010.

In December, only Michigan
had a double-digit jobless rate.
One month later, four states
did and that doesn’t count
Puerto Rico, which saw its
unemployment rate actually
dip to 13 per cent in January,
from 13.5 per cent in Decem-
ber.

California’s unemployment
rate jumped to 10.1 per cent
in January, from 8.7 per cent m

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
syle Mara le ltd
on Mondays

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 9B

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Four US states in
unemployment
double-digits

December, as jobs have disap-
peared in the construction,
finance and retail industries.

Michigan’s jobless rate
jumped to 11.6 per cent in Jan-
uary, the highest in the coun-
try. The second-highest jobless
rate was South Carolina at 10.4
per cent. Rhode Island was
next at 10.3 per cent, which
marked an all-time high for the
state in federal records dating
to 1976. California rounded out
the top four.

Forty-nine states and the
District of Columbia registered
unemployment rate increases.
Louisiana was the only state
to record a monthly drop. Its
unemployment rate fell to 5.1
per cent in January from 5.5
per cent in December.

The US unemployment rate,
released last week, rose to 8.1
per cent in February, the high-
est in more than 25 years.

Employers are laying off
workers, holding hours down
and freezing or cutting pay as
the recession eats into sales
and profits.

Disappearing jobs and evap-
orating wealth from tanking
home values, 401(k)s and oth-
er investments have forced
consumers to retrench, driving
companies to shrink their work
forces. It’s a vicious cycle in
which all the economy’s prob-
lems feed on each other, wors-
ening the downward spiral.

And more layoffs are on the
way. National Semiconductor
Corp. said Wednesday it will
lay off 1,725 employees, more
than one-quarter of its work
force, after third-quarter prof-
its fell 71 per cent.

Industrial conglomerate
United Technologies Corp.,
which makes Otis elevators

and Sikorsky helicopters, said
Tuesday it will lay off 11,600
workers, or five per cent of its
work force. Dow Chemical Co.
on Monday said it would cut
3,500 jobs at chemical compa-
ny Rohm & Haas Co. as part
of its $15 billion buyout of the
company.

President Barack Obama
has urged Americans to be
patient, saying it will take time
for his economic revival and
job-creation programmes to
bear fruit.

Obama is counting on a mul-
tipronged assault to lift the
country out of recession: a
$787 billion stimulus package
of increased federal spending
and tax cuts, a revamped
bailout programme for trou-
bled banks and a $75 billion
effort to stem home foreclo-
sures,

Nationwide, the recession
has claimed a net total of 4.4
million jobs since December
2007, and has left 12.5 million
people searching for work —
more than the population of
Pennsylvania.

The state unemployment
report also showed that North
Carolina and Oregon — along
with South Carolina —
notched the biggest monthly
gains of 1.6 percentage-points
each.

North Carolina’s rate soared
to 9.7 per cent in January, from
8.1 per cent in December,
while Oregon jumped to 9.9
per cent, from 8.3 per cent.

Meanwhile, Georgia’s job-
less rate climbed to 8.6 per cent
in January, an all-time high on
federal records. On a brighter
note, Wyoming continued to
register the lowest unemploy-
ment rate — 3.7 per cent.

The Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers

(“BACCO”)

celebrates it’s

1 ().. Anniversary

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING (“AGM”)

NOTICE

& LUNCHEON MEETING

We invite you to join us as we
discuss issues relevant to our
profession zwell 2teErrniniy Ti

rofession as well as determining our

administration for 2009

Note: Only paid up members will be eligible to vote

Date: 27 March 2009

Venue: British Colonial Hilton

Time: 12:30 p.m. — 2:00 p.m.

Luncheon cost for Non-Member - $45.00

Contact details:

E-1 Tle | : infoiab acob ahamas sCOmM

Tel: 242-323-0871 or 323-0872

Fax: 247-575-6574

www. bacobahamas,com

“Committed to Compliance”


PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE






















































RENEWAL OF MASTER'S - NEW PROVIDENCE

LICENCE # WAMNIE

TH32 Nicholls Wenzel K.
P.O. Box N-254
Nassau, Bahamas

Plakaris Francis
P.O, CR-4545113
Nassau, Bahamas

Patton Robert
P.O. Box CR-54999
Nassau, Bahamas

Rolle Lynden G.
P.O”. Box SP-60993
Nassau, Bahamas
6EO4 Smith Jacob R.
P.O. Box CB-15417
Nassau, Bahamas

Smith Dennis
P.O. Box N-1500
Nassau, Bahamas

Stuart Alfred Jr
Nassau, Bahamas

Sweeting Michael
P.O. Box 4269
Nassau, Bahamas

Smith Ellis H
P.O. Box CR-5546
Nassau, Bahamas

Taylor Limas E.
P.O). Box N-7461
Nassau, Bahamas

Watkins Michael OG.
P.O). Box 6-37 12
Nassau, Bahamas

Williams Sidney A.
P.O. Box AP-59274
Nassau, Bahamas

Williams Yelverton
P.O. Box CR-54999
Nassau, Bahamas

Captain Anthony J. Allens
Port{Controller

NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID

GREEN TURTLE CAY WATER SUPPLY IMPROVEMENTS = PHASE 1

1, The Water & Sewerage Corporation invites bids from suitably qualified contractors for
the construction of Phase | of the Green Turtle Cay Water Supply Improvements. The
Scope of Works include the provision of all labour, equipment and other necessary
Ssérviogs required for the:-

A. UNDERWATER MAIN

a) Supply and Installation of approximately 15,000 linear feet of water
transmission mains, of which approximately 13,000 linear feet are
subaqueous 6-inch HDPE and 2,000 linear feet of 6-inch PVC, along with all
assonated valves and appurtenances,

PUMPING STATION ON GREEN TURTLE CAY

a) Construction of a Pumping Station and supply and installation of two 250 US
Gallon per Minute, 15 Horsepower Peerless (Sterling) pumps,

b) Supply installaten, and construction of piping, pump station faciliies/office
Building

Bids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehensive details fram the
Qualification Questionnaire out-lining:

a) Experience on similar projects
b) Personnel to be assigned (including their expenence on similar projects)
¢) Financial capacity to execute the works

The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evaluated for award of Contract

Bidding documents and drawings will be available on request beginning Wednesday
March 11, 2009, from the Engineering & Planning Department of the Water & Sewerage
Corporation for a nominal fee of $250.00 per set. The Pre-Bad Meeting is scheduled for
Tuesday March 24, 2009 at 10: a.m. atthe site

Completed documents must be returned to the address below, mo later than 4:00 p.m. an
Tuesday April 14, 009.

General Manager

Water & Sewerage Corporation
87 Thompson Blvd

P.O. Box N-3905

Nassau, Bahamas

Attn: Engineering & Planning Division

Telephone: (242) 302-5512
Facsimile: (242) 302-5838

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



SEC considers

reinstating its

rule to combat
short selling

mg By MARCY GORDON
AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Dramatic changes in the global
economy may merit restoring a
federal rule aimed at preventing
a massive plunge in a stock
price caused by a rush of short
sellers, the head of the Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission
said Wednesday.

SEC Chairman Mary
Schapiro said the agency “hope-
fully” will propose for public
comment next month reinstate-
ment of the so-called uptick
rule.

On another crisis-related
issue — an industry push to
scrap the accounting rule that
forces banks to value assets at
current prices — Schapiro said
the SEC wants revisions that
would continue to provide the
transparency investors need
without excessively hurting
banks.

The uptick rule, which the
SEC eliminated in 2007,
requires short sellers — those
who try to profit from a stock’s
decline by selling borrowed
shares — to sell at a price above
a stock’s most recent trading
price.

“The world has changed
rather dramatically in the past
year,” Schapiro told a House
Appropriations subcommittee.
“Hopefully we’ll get our pro-
posal out in April.”

The SEC could reinstate the
rule at some time after the pub-
lic comment period. The SEC
also will consider “other alter-
natives” related to short-sell-
ing, Schapiro said.

As the market has plunged,
pressure has been building from



‘The Tribune }

Real Estate )

some in Congress for the SEC
to reinstate the uptick rule,
which was established in 1938
during the Depression in the
wake of the 1929 market crash.

Short-sellers bet against a
stock. The practice, which is
legal and widely used on Wall
Street, involves borrowing a
company’s shares, selling them,
and then buying them when the
stock falls and returning them to
the lender. The short-seller
pockets the difference in price.

If a company stock was trad-
ing at $50 and a trader antici-
pated that it would decline, he
could borrow shares but could-
n't sell them until after the stock
traded higher, or “ticked up,”
to at least $50.01.

Schapiro said a multitude of
investors, both large financial
institutions and individuals,
have been pushing for the rule
to be restored.

Schapiro appeared before the
panel to make the case for the
agency’s budget request of $1.03
billion for the fiscal year starting
in October, an increase of nine
per cent from fiscal 2009.

She also was asked about the
push by the banking industry
and some lawmakers to scrap
the mark-to-market accounting
rule that forces banks to value
assets at current prices, as relief
for those institutions in the
financial crisis.

“T have a lot of sympathy for”
that view, Schapiro said, adding
that “it is not our intention that
these assets be written down to
zero ... or to fire-sale prices.”

Still, the SEC doesn’t advo-
cate suspending the rule.
Schapiro said it is “pushing” the
Financial Accounting Standards
Board to come up with new

guidance for companies that will
provide “a better application”
for determining what assets are
worth.

On the issue of short-selling,
proponents of restoring the
uptick rule say its elimination
helped fuel the volatility on
Wall Street amid the financial
crisis and the pounding of com-
pany stocks targeted by market
speculators.

Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass.,
chairman of the House Finan-
cial Services Committee, on
Tuesday said he was hopeful
the rule “will be restored with-
in a month.” Senate Banking
Committee Chairman Christo-
pher Dodd, D-Conn., agreed
that bringing back the rule was
necessary.

Rep. Gary Ackerman, D-
N.Y., has proposed legislation
that would order the SEC to
reinstate the rule.

The agency last fall adopted
measures aimed at imposing
protections against abusive
“naked” short-selling. That
occurs when sellers don’t even
borrow the shares before selling
them, and then look to cover
positions immediately after the
sale.

A test by the SEC in 2007,
removing the uptick rule for
one-third of the stocks in the
Russell 3000 index, found it
could be eliminated without
causing significant harm.

The analysis by the SEC pro-
vided “clear economic support
for our recommendation today
to remove all current short-sale
price test restrictions,” Erik Sir-
ri, the head of the SEC’s market
regulation division, said at a
public meeting of the commis-
sioners in June 2007.

ene OCCT Cae eC eg ce Dn le

wll A rehensel F ig Buyers Are!



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DA 69806

c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
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Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.
PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE





$410bn spending bill is
‘imperfect’, says Obama

DOUBLE
FILET O’ FISH



@ By PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Acknowledging it’s an “imper-
fect” bill, President Barack
Obama said he will accept a
$410 billion spending package
but insisted it must signal an
“end to the old way of doing
business.”

The massive measure fund-
ing federal agencies through the
fall contains nearly 8,000 pet
projects, known as “earmarks”
and denounced by critics as
pork.

Obama defended earmarks
when they’re “done right,”
allowing lawmakers to direct
money to worthy projects in
their districts — but added
they’ve been abused, and he’ll
work with Congress to curb
them.

“Tam signing an imperfect
omnibus bill because it’s neces-
sary for the ongoing functions of
government,” Obama declared.
“But I also view this as a depar-
ture point for more far-reaching
change.”

In a sign of his discomfort
with the bill, Obama did not
sign it in public. And he
declined to answer a shouted
reporters’ question about why.

Running for president, Oba-
ma denounced the pet projects
as wasteful and open to abuse
— and vowed to rein them in.

Explaining his decision, Oba-
ma said that future earmarks
must have a “legitimate and
worthy public purpose”, and the
any earmark for a private com-
pany should be subject to com-
petitive bidding rules. Plus he
said he’ll “work with Congress”
to eliminate any the adminis-
tration objects to.

But he acknowledged that
earmarks have bred “cynicism”,
and he declared, “This piece of
legislation must mark an end to
the old way of doing business.”

White House officials in

You are invited
to meet

Attila Keczer
Herend Porcelain’s

Master Painter

from Hungary
He will be demonstrating painting

& signing Herend China & Figurine

pieces



VICE President Joe Biden looks on as President Barack Obama speaks to
mayors from across the United States in the East Room of the White

House...

recent weeks have dismissed
criticism of the earmarks in the
bill, saying the legislation was
aremnant of last year and that
the president planned to turn
his attention to future spending
instead of looking backward.
White House spokesman
Robert Gibbs said Obama
wouldn’t be the first president
to sign legislation that he
viewed as less than ideal. Asked
whether Obama had second
thoughts about signing the bill,
Gibbs’ reply was curt: “No.”
Obama’s modest set of
reforms builds upon changes
initiated by Republicans in 2006
and strengthened by Democ-
rats two years ago. Most impor-
tantly, every earmark and its
sponsor must be made public.
In new steps — outlined in
concert with House Democrat-
ic leaders Wednesday morning
— the House Appropriations
Committee will submit every
earmark to the appropriate

(AP Photo: Ron Edmonds)

executive branch agency for a
review. And any earmark
designed to go to for-profit
companies would have to be
awarded through a competitive
bidding process.

But perhaps the most tangi-
ble change may be Obama’s
promise to resurrect the long-
defunct process by which the
president proposes to cut spend-
ing from bills that he has signed
into law.

Under this so-called rescis-
sions process, the White House
sends Congress a roster of cuts
for its consideration. Congress is
free to ignore the cuts, but both
Obama and senior members
like Appropriations Committee
Chairman David Obey, D-Wis.,
say they want to use it to clean
out bad earmarks that make it
through the process.

But Obama declined to
endorse a stronger process
advocated by Sen. John
McCain, R-Ariz., and others,

Get There. Together.

You have dreams. We hawe them too.

that would have required Con-
gress to vote on a presidential
recission earmark package.
Senior Democrats dislike the
idea even though many of them
backed it in the early-to-mid
1990s.

During his presidential cam-
paign, Obama promised to
force Congress to curb its pork-
barrel-spending ways. Yet the
bill sent from the Democratic-
controlled Congress to the
White House on Tuesday con-
tained 7,991 earmarks totaling
$5.5 billion, according to calcu-
lations by the Republican staff
of the House Appropriations
Committee.

The 1,132-page bill has an
extraordinary reach, wrapping
together nine spending bills to
fund the annual operating bud-
gets of every Cabinet depart-
ment except Defense, Home-
land Security and Veterans
Affairs.

Among the many earmarks
are $485,000 for a boarding
school for at-risk native students
in western Alaska and $1.2 mil-
lion for Helen Keller Interna-
tional so the nonprofit can pro-
vide eyeglasses to students with
poor vision.

Most of the government has
been running on a stopgap
funding bill set to expire at mid-
night Wednesday. Refusing to
sign the newly completed
spending bill would force Con-
gress to pass another bill to
keep the lights on come Thurs-
day or else shut down the mas-
sive federal government. That is
an unlikely possibility for a
president who has spent just
seven weeks in office.

The $410 billion bill includes
significant increases in food aid
for the poor, energy research
and other programs. It was sup-
posed to have been completed
last fall, but Democrats opted
against election-year battles
with Republicans and former
President George W. Bush.

Friday March 13th, 2009
10:30am - 1:00pm
3:30pm - 7:00pm

Saturday March 14th, 2009
10:30am - 1:30pm
3:30pm - 7:30pm

On March 16th, 2009
Oam - 1:00pm
3:30pm - 7:00pm

Internet & Telaghone Damnking

We each have our goals, things we want to achieve.
Al different tienes of cur lives, those aapiretions
may change and we may choose a different path.
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Th Ee Trib un e Thursday, March 12th, 2009

OWN ES
& RELIGION



; | The Tribune
aa f My Voice. My
ae d
\ eae
» \0
707.9

f
Your choice for the family
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009



TIN LOVING MEMORY





x

| ELORES PINDER

NOVEMBER 10, 1957 - MARCH 14, 2001

Crod saw WOU WEPE getting tired,
Ard a cure Was not te be,

Sir be pant his arms arcu you amd
W hisperedd, "Conve to hele"
With tearful eyes we watched you,

And saw “you pass AWAY
Although We iF wel Ai all dearly,
We could not make pou stay.
A Golden Heart stepped beating,
Hard working hanes at rest.
Crod broke our hearts to prove To Ls,

|

seni, -‘eopecsy “ets

He only takes the best

Precious memories will remain in the hearts of her
husband, Donnie Pinder; one daughter, Danielle; onc son
Donovan; one Grand-daughter; Tajanee’; Brothers and

Sisters and other family and friends.

SE SSS eae





IAN RONALDO THOMPSON
Sunrise - December Sth, 1969 Sunset - March 13th, 1999
Cherished Memories By
Wife-Renee & Doughter-Jennifer of Atlanta
Special Priewds Stephen Robinson &
fram Lewis PFaomily and Friends

FORGOTTEN? SEVERE
Friends may thiak we dove forpotter
whew af times (hey see we soniie
Little do ther know the heartache
thatonwe amile hides all the while.

Beantifel meaories are wonderful things
They fost Hl the longest day
Phey never wear ont
They wever get dost
and con wever be given ower,

fo some you may be forgerte ti
fo affiers a part of fhe post
Hut to thase whe loved and lost por
Four aewory will always fast,



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

FUNERAL SERVICE

for
William
«é Bill’

Cheney

of #79 Mt. Royal Ave. will be held
on Saturday 14th March 2009 at
10am at St. George’s Church Mt.
Rose Ave. officiating will be Fr.

Kingsley Knowles.

Left to cherish the memories of Bill are his sister, Elizabeth Loftus of
Kentucky; five children. Donald, Rochelle, Louis, Denise and William;
adopted daughter Iris Lowe: 7 Grand Children: Arthur Roker Jr. Dabria
Mcintosh. LaChelle Lightboum. Tatyana, Tyann, Tyniesha and Don
Cheney: Adopted Grand Daughters: Falesha Lowe & Chrishell Woodside:
2 Daughters-inlaw: Raquel and Bonita Cheney. 2 Sisters-in-law: Delores
Thompson and Eunice Greene.

Numerous Nieces & Nephews and a host of other relatives and friends
including: Eugenie Greene, Jennifer & Leslie Pyfrom, Ashanti Gardiner,
Rodney & Margaret Rolle, Paulette Dean, Mark Daniels, Staff at McDonalds
Palmdale. Jamie Butler, Kingsley Pinder, Julian Rolle, Clifford & Berthamae
Mcintosh, Ralph & Rose Brown, Odari Shan, Richard & Tracey Curry,
Nurse Sandra Rolle, Nicole Winder, Alyanna Henry, Jackie Hall, Anthony &
Keva McKinney, Allan Taylor, Lisa Thompson. Sonith Lockhart and Florinda
Baptiste.




THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

With S tucete

Anpeeciatian and
Catitude

Melvin A. Bonamy, Sr.
December 3, 1947
February 10, 2009

Resting in the everlasting
arms of Jesus |

We extend heartfelt thanks to those |
persons who either called, visited,
sent flowers, fruit baskets, food and
cards, orwhoinany way offered |
their time.
Your thoughtfulness has brought us
comfort.
We pray God’s ever flowing blessings
on you.
Mrs. Melvina Bonamy & |
Family



THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 3

Special Note of Thanks

Daniel Nairn

“They will know we are christians
by our house”

They Family of the late Daniel L. Narin wishes to
Express Our Most Profound Thanks to the whole
Bahamian Community who so willingly gave of their
lime, sentiments, service and hospitality during our
recent loss. Floral arrangements, donations of
food/drinks, telephone calls, verbal expressions of
adulation and sympathy are so deeply appreciated.

Special thanks to the following whose help made this
difficult time more bearable.

Father Glen Nixon and the entire staff of St. Francis
Xavier Cathedral, The Catholic Chanceroy Office
Andrew Curry and St. Francis Xavier Cathedral
Choirs, David Prudden, Denise Arthur-Adderly,
Doreen Campbell, Jacqueline Bain, Fairie Kraft,
Kathleen Dummett, Dr. Margot Braynen, Paulette
Rahming and the Statf of Bethel Brothers Morticians

May God’s Love and the practice of His
Charity continue to infuse
Everybody's Lives

The Nairn Family


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

1926-2009

We all love you dearly Mama.
However, we will all soon meet again,
However, until then you will always
Have a very special place in our hearts.

The family of the Late Muriel Elizabeth Cartwright wish
to express their sincere thanks and appreciation for all
who have offered words of comfort, sympathetic gestures,
prayers and who have been so thoughtful and caring
during our time of bereavement especially the Doctors,
Nurses and caregivers who cared for Muriel during her
illness. We greatly appreciate all that has been said and
done. May God richly bless you all.

Love her children, grandchildren family and friends.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

From Ihe Depth

Ow Shears
CITC meer

Ernest Chaiphas
McKenzie

would like to express their thanks and appreciation to
all of our relatives, friends and well-wishers who
surrounded us with their love and care during our period
of bereavement. We were deeply touched by the numerous
calls, visits, prayers and words of encouragement. We
could not have done it all alone without your help. Special
thanks to The Grand United Order of Odd Fellow:
President Cedric Smith and pastors and members of
Exuma District Churches; Superintendent Dr. Charles
W Saunders; pastors, ministers and the entire Bahamas
Baptist Union of Churches. Your acts of kindness and
generosity made our burden more bearable. We thank
you from the depth of our hearts. May you be blessed.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

* i
Pinder’s Funeral Home
‘Service Beyond Measure”
PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 « CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

Funeral Service for

ie

VIOLET
DOROTHEA
KNOWLES

of Prince Charles Drive, will
be held at Holy Cross
Anglican Church Highbury
we Park, Soldier Road on

at 11:00 am. Burial will be
-“7/ in Woodlawn Gardens
Soldier Road. Rev'd Fr.
Norman Lightbourne, assisted
by Cannon Neil Roach officiating.

She is survived by her husband: Eldridge Knowles;
children and spouses: Elizabeth & Raymond Bridges,
Perry Knowles, Christopher & Rachael Knowles, Peter &
Linda Knowles, Bryan & Paula Knowles, Donahue &
Mary Knowles, Saraan Knowles, Shayne & Sloan Knowles,
Patrick & Shelia Knowles, Kymberly & John Villachica;
grandchildren and spouses: Stewart & Cathy Bridges,
Corey Knowles, Lynette Knowles, Neil & Kim Knowles,
Michelle & Doddridge Davis, Adam & Candi Knowles,
Dane & Crystal Knowles, Duane & Kirsten Knowles,
Nicolette Elden, Cameron Knowles, Bryan Douglas
Knowles, Jr., Angel Knowles, Joshua Knowles, Shaw
Knowles, Raven Knowles, Parker Knowles, Cian Knowles,
Saylor Villachica; great grandchildren: Taylor and Dylan
Bridges, Megan and Tyler Knowles, Caowhen Davis,
Jonelle and Morgan Knowles, Khaiden and Skye Knowles,
Taran & Tanner Knowles and Alicia Elden; sisters: Mildred
Diah, Dr. Corolyn Hanna, Joan Mayson and pre-deceased
sisters Merle Brozogzog, Olive Wells and Maisie
Wilkinson; sisters-in-law: Verna Smith and Dorothy Deal;
adopted daughter: Jean Lotmore; adopted son: Fedner
Dorestal; adopted grandchildren: Yasmine and Jasmine
Burrows; caregivers: Mrs. Yvonne Wilson, Mrs. Adline
Griffiths and formerly Mrs. Paula Rolle; many other
relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects on Friday, March 13th,
2009 from 2:00pm until 7:00pm at Pinders Funeral Home
Palmdale Ave., Palmdale.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 5

THE LATE CHIEF PETTY OFFICER
CHARLES ANTHONY SMITH
JANUARY 3, 1961 TO NOVEMBER 11, 2008)

We the family of the late Chief Petty Officar Charles Anthony Smith pause to
remember his life. We extend our deepest and sincere appreciation to family,
fiends and colleagues who stood by us during his illness and during our time of
bereavement. Maybe you called, visiled our home, sent a floral arrangemend or
a wreath or attended the funeral. Your acts of kindness were truly a comfort to
US.
Our gratitude goes especially to Commodore Clifford Scavella, officers and
marines of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. Hon. 0.A.T. Tommy Turnquest,
Minister of National Security, Hon. Desmond Bannister Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Hon. Philio ‘Brave’ Davis, Rev Prince 0. Bodie, warrant officers and
members of Entry 13 Royal Bahamas Defence Force, Rev Michael Kelly,
Deacons Peter Rahming and Maxwell Johnson, members of Our Ladys Roman
Catholic Church and Hospitality Ministry. Supt Carolyn Bowe and officers of
Westem Division, Complaints and Corruption Branch, 'C' Squad 1984 Royal
Bahamas Police Force. Police Fire ServicesRred Watch, ACP Hulan Hanna,
Supt Kevin Rolle, Father Stephen Davies, A.M. Bailey Senior High School Class
of 1979. Bahamas immigration Dept, Her Majestys Prison, Bahamas Customs,
Defence Force Floaters and Cannons Softall Teams, The Pokers 2005 Softball
Championship Team, The Truckers, executives and players of the Bahamas
Goverment Deparimental Softball Association and Old Timers Softball
Association, Jason Moxey and family, Philip Johnson, Hon. Algernon Allen,
Jerome and Patrica Moxey and family, Gregory Higgs and family, Keith Moss and
Commando Security stall, the Greenslade farnily, Marietta A Smith and family,
Antrim and Eulamae Mckenzie and family, Lasie Roberts, Police Staff
Association, Rev Simeon Hall, the principals, teachers, students and parents of
Our Ladys Catholic Primary School and St Augustines College. Waller and
Sharon Capron, Donald and Linda Munnings, Reverend Floyd Jones and family.
Dr L. Barry Russell and staff, Dr Bimal Francis, Dr Gonville Brown, Nurse Celeste
Kingdorsett and Staff of the Bahamas Heart Centre. Or Kevin Moss, doctors and
nurses of Doctors Hospital, Demerittes Funeral Home and staff of Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery

SUSAN SMITH AND FAMILY


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

diutler’s Wuneral Homes & Drematoriu

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

MR. SHERVIN
THOMAS “Tommy”
BURROWS, 57

of Nassau East North will be held }
on Saturday 14, March 2009 at 2:00 }
p.m. at Central Gospel Chapel, }
Christie and Dowdeswell Streets. :
Officiating will be Pastor Rex Major, }
assisted by Father Hugh Bartlett. :
Interment will follow in St. Anne’s }
Anglican Church Cemetery Fox Hill. ;

Left to cherish his memories are: his mother: Thelma “Tallie”
Burrows, one son: Jermal Burrows, two daughters: Tameka :

Forbes and Sheena Burrows, son-in-law; Anthony Forbes, three | mother Essie Ferguson, mother-in-law Vivien Moss, one

brothers; Reverend Timothy, Peter and Matthew Burrows, four : daughter; Tamicka Ferguson, adopted sons; Cordero Newton
sisters; Cassandra “Sandra” Cartwright, Maxine Rahming, Shirley :
Russell and Gail Bethel, six brothers-in-law; Llewellyn “Gus” }
Cartwright, Loran Rahming, Leslie Russell, Paul Bethel, Richard : *. foe Manica abl a F Want
Smith and John Pratt, five sisters-in-law; Zilpha and Edee Burrows, } ay ae : ad eae oe > i ae a ae an
Elease Smith, Sr. Felicitus Pratt O.S.A. and Gloria Pratt, nephews : and Tami Culmer, and Keva Wood, thirteen uncles and twenty-
and nieces; Shantel, Lowell and Caswell Burrows, Lieselle and }
Geno Edgecombe, Enrico and Carla Burrows, Miguel and Monica
Burrows, Meshalique and Ken Knowles, Dr. Shanique and Travante }
Cartwright, Nadia and Nikita Sumner, Larada and Jessica Rahming,
Riccihio Rahming, Julie Curry, Amaria Russell, Ashley, Gareth }

Bethel and Ari Burr Phyllis and Andre M n, ; . :
te ley Sharh et er Ra 6 ey S an rt & Backford II and the Mt. Carey Baptist Church family, Rev. Dr.
Douglas Duvall, Theron & Samantha Pratt, Alex & April Pratt,
Chris Pratt, Victor Wells, William Jr. & Linden and Sheryl }
Deleveaux, Trudy & Ian McKenzie, five uncles and ten aunts }
and a host of other relati and friends including Debbie, : : : ; ;
Mine nea (eons EChines a = elores, Paul, Brad. Monsignor Preston Moss and the St. Anselm’s Parish Family,
Mayumi, the morning crew and staff of Checkers Café, Mackey }
Street, Staff and Sunday evening crew of Starbucks, Harbour Bay }
staff at Kentucky Fried Chicken, Mackey Street, Antoinette :
Fernander and Family, Delvin and Judy Miller, Leroy and Ruth }
Sumner, John and Rosie Knowles, Diane Clarke Shabaz, The :

Jonnson and Cynch Patnily, bt. -Rexend DorecnMajorane omer Construction , the entire community of Fox Hill, and Zion Baptist,

: East and Shirley Streets, Church family and others too numerous

too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral Homes & 3
Crematorium, Ernest & York Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. :
until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 9:00a.m. until 12:00 noon }

ee until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until

service time.

MRS. CHERYL
LORRAINE MOSS, 48

of 21 Eastwood Estates will be held
on Saturday 14, March 2009 at 10:00
a.m. at Zion Baptist Church, East and
Shirley Streets. Officiating will be
Rev. T. G. Morrison assisted by Rev.
Warren Anderson and other
Associate Ministers, Deacons and
Evangelists. Interment will follow in
Mt. Carey Union Baptist Cemetery
Fox Hill.

Left to cherish her memories are: her husband Patrick Moss, her

and Edwin White Sr., grandson; Edwin White Jr., stepson; Ombra
Moss, stepdaughter; Pareece Moss, six brothers; Rodney Sr.,
Samuel II, Pedro, Gary, Dwayne and Jason Ferguson, seven

three aunts, five brothers-in-law, five sisters-in-law, eleven
adopted siblings including the Rose Street Boys, three grand
uncles and grand aunts, one godmother and one godchild,
nineteen nephews, twelve nieces, one grand nephew and seven
grand nieces, numerous cousins and a host of other relatives and
friends including Rev. Bertram Rolle and family, Rev. Dr. Enoch

Carrington Pinder and the St. Mark’s Baptist Church family, Rev.
Dr. J. Carl Rahming and the St. Paul’s Baptist Church family,
Rev. Dr. David Johnson and the Macedonia Baptist Church family,
Father Crosley Walkine and the St. Anne’s Parish family,

Rev. Joseph Knowles, Rev. Ivan Butler and the Kemp Road
Ministries family, Black Point Exuma family, Rose Street family,
Bahamas Development Bank, Central Bank of The Bahamas,
Galilee College, staff at Pulmonary & Critical Care Institute,
Rotary Club of East Nassau, staff of Princess Margaret Hospital’s
Private Medical Ward her caregivers, Mantina and Josey, Wrecker

to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral Homes &
Crematorium, Ernest & York Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 7

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

CHRISTOPHER
VISCOUNT STRACHAN,
40

of Joe Farrington Road, Sea Breeze Estates |
will be held on Saturday, March 14th, 11:00 |
a.m. at St. Agnes Anglican Church, Baillou |
Hill Road. Archdeacon I. Ranfurly Brown, |
assisted by Fr. Bernard Been and Deacon |
Neil Nairn will officiate. Interment will ;
follow in St. Agnes Cemetery, Nassau

Street.

He is survived by his parents, Perry Strachan
and Crystal Strachan; children, Crystal, Brittany, Christopher Jr., Kanaz, |
Shashanya, Stephan, Christique, Shonice, Christyn and Christyna; brothers, |
Jamal, Perry Jr. and Brian Strachan; sisters, Sophia Strachan-Christie, |
Lydia Thompson, Natasha Dames, Sonia Francis and Maria Strachan; |
grandmother, Vernell Brown; uncles, Gregory and Leonard Thompson, |
Selman and Hugh Strachan, Arnold, Craig, Cecil and Bradley Flowers and |
Raytheno Strachan; granduncle, Anzlo Strachan; aunts, Lynn and Lenor ;
Thompson, Deidre Strachan, Paula Newton, Hagah Strachan, Bernadette |
Pinder, Laurene Burrows, Sheila Hepburn, Stephanie Lightbourne, Val |
Strachan, Annamae Flowers, Linda Thompson, Shenique and Juliette |
Strachan; grand aunts, Leese Strachan, Sybil Reckley, Sheila Strachan, |
Gloria Strachan; nieces and nephews, Jalisa, Jarear, Jahir, Javin, Israel, |
Kavash, Kashan, Robyn, Tyler, Reagan, Tristain, Fayne II, Akwah, Autumn, |
Osha, Deontish, Denash, Doneice, Demar; cousins, Jarvis, Marquista, |
Cordero, Greer and Jessica Thompson, Lynden Braynen, Owen Hanna, |
Raytheno Strachan, Jill, Garrette and Derek Flowers Jr., Danielle Small, |
April Miller, Sherelle Strachan, Shevonne Miller, Monique Miller, Ian |
Strachan, Kadiah Strachan, Raymon, Rashad and Remise Newton, Arnold |
Jr., Ian, Damien, Jason, Andrew, Rickie, Ray, Cecil Jr. Flowers, Lavade |
and Kendric Darling, Kimchelle Dodge, Swithen Jr. and Shamuel Burrows, |
Ralph Hepburn, Donovan and Dwaine Dorsett, Sophia Bethel, Patrice, |
Lisa Greer, Sybil Lonice and Cecily Flowers and other cousins too numerous |
to mention; other relatives and friends, Lillian Bastian and family, Julia :
Evans of Miami, Florida, Lucille Roker and family of Texas, Jesse Knight |
and family of San Antonio, Texas, Cynthia Warren and family of New |
York, P. Anthony White and family, Petrona Johnson and family, Oreal |
Strachan and family, Lorraine Hepburn and family, the family of the late |
Psyche Smith, Anzlo Strachan and family, Leese Strachan and family, |
family of the late Cannon Dudley Strachan, family of the late Nathaniel ;
Strachan, family of the late Victoria Strachan, family of the late Birdie |
Strachan, Joyce Bain, Barbara Bullard, Shirley Cooper, Persis Adderley, |
Sister Annie Thompson, Camille Bullard, Mary Welch, Franklyn and |
Donnie Thompson, Gwen Moncur and family, the family of the late Ermath ;
Munroe, Burket Turnquest, Gloria Flowers and Debbie Strachan; special |
friends, Sonia Miriam Hamilton, Nash Evans, Wayne Saunders, Robert |
Smith, Daniel Scott, Winston and Harry Bunch, Jermaine Pratt, Vaughan |
Meadows, Denise Wallace, Orville Hanna, Maria Neely, Pearline Johnson, |
Claudette Russell, friends and neighbours of Joe Farrington Road, especially |
Marvalee Coakley, the Pratt family, the Wood family, the Turnquest family, |

friends of Zinna Street, Kennedy Subdivision especially the Smiths, the
Mollys, the Browns, and the Bains, Engineering staff of The Cove, Atlantis,
classmates of St. John's College and St. Agnes church family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday at the church
from 10am until service time.

CLAIR FRANCIS
ELLIS, 51

of Palm Terrace, Sunset Park will be held
on Saturday, March 14th, 10am at South
West Cathedral, Carmichael Road. Rev.
Donnie Storr, assisted by Rev. Roderick
Brown will officiate. Interment will follow
in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F.
Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish fond memories are her

mother, Mercianna Storr; five brothers,

Leroy Rolle, Cleveland Clarke, Glenroy Turtle,

Godfrey and Richard Ellis; seven sisters, Helen Brown, Pesserita Rolle,
Delores Bullard, Sheila Smith, Patricia Cooper, Francina Forbes and Betty
Ellis; one adopted sister, Judy Murphy; one aunt, Maude Pinder; four
sisters-in-law, Faye Brown, Laverne Turtle, Janette and Nancy Ellis; two
brothers-in-law, Ambrose Smith and Anthony Bullard; thirty-four nephews
including, Perry Brown, Mervin Lawrence, Raymond Fox, Derrington,
Sean, Stephen Sr. and Abby Brown, Patrick Brown and Vencil Balfour,
Dominic, Gregory and Obie Beneby, Kendal and Monty Williams, Quincy
Rolle, Trevor, Garvin and Glendin Turtle, Christopher; thirty-three nieces
including, Denise Darling, Bridgette Davis, Janet Rolle, Deatra Symonette,
Ecarscha Smith, Candice Beneby, Barbara Darville, Christine and Erica
Williams, Edna Brown, Prisca Forbes, Denavue and Theresa Brown, Helen
Morley, Cheryl Cash, Tarnell, Kendra, Vernika, Edahlia and Izaria Rolle,
Nitza, Trevia and Monique Turtle, Patricia and Indy Clarke; numerous
grand nieces and grand nephews, three godchildren, John Rolle Jr., Destiny
Nesbitt and Chelsea Stuart; numerous cousins including, Bishop Donnie
Storr, Viola Robert, Rosie Thompson, Eudane Stubbs, Lionel Pinder, Tyrone
Russell, Evamae Mott and Donna Deveaux; special friend, Montgomery
Lewis; other relatives and friends including, Marietta Miller, Cheryl and
John Rolle, Annette Major, Chris and Monique Basden, Jackie Rahming,
Gregory Beneby Sr., Debra Moxey-Rolle, Jeffrey Pratt, Philip Smith,
Debbie Nesbitt, Sheila Knowles and family, Bridgette Musgrove, Steven
Cole, Wendy Craigg and the staff of The Central Bank of the Bahamas,
Theophilus Russell and family, Anniemae Smith and family, Jannie Moxey
and family, Bert Sherman and family, the Sunset Park family and the entire
community of George Town, the Hermitage and Barreterre, Exuma, Dr.
Conville Brown, Dr. Patrick Cargill and the staff of Doctor's Hospital.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday at the church
from 9am until service time.


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 * Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393- 1352

Funeral Services For

VENLYN
ARMBRISTER, 76

resident of the Forest,
Exuma and formerly of
Mount Thompson, Exuma

at Salem Union Baptist

Rev. Dr. C. W. Saunders,
assisted by Rev. Cedric Smith and other Ministers.

Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish her memories are her three (3) sons,

brothers-in-law, Rev. Dr. Irvin Clarke, John, Bishop
Clarence Armbrister, Solomon Armbrister,

including, the Brice, Ferguson, Clarke, Collie,
Armbrister and Green families, Min. Althea Rolle,
Bishop Rudolph Bowe, Bishop Anthony Roker;

: and Francina Johnson, Philly and Sandra Thomas,
: Geneva Jones, Bradley Clarke, Lynden Curtis, Darrice
: Newbold, Benjamin Ferguson, Tori Glinton, Dorothy
‘ Laing, Rashad, Shazia, Shazett, Annie Lloyd and
: family, the Williams, Hunt, Taylor, Burrows, Bullard,
: Rolle, Bowe and Marshall families, Mr. and Mrs.
‘ Edward, Bobby Glinton, Ena Rolle and families,

: Annetta Flowers, management and staff of the Cove

will be held at 11:00 a.m. } and Reef, Atlantis, Paradise Island, Premier Importers,

Saturday, March 14th, 2009 : Bahamas Electricity Corporation in Exuma,
ae ; : Administrator's Office, Sam Gray Enterprises, Exuma,
Church. Officiating will be } The Bonanza in Freeport, Palestine Union Baptist
: Church, the entire community of Mt. Thompson and

tS. | the Forest Exuma.
Interment will follow in the Lakeview Memorial :

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar
: Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street

: on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. and at the

Franklin, Paul Jr., and Derrick Armbrister; three (3) } church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

daughters, Degra Williams, Sabrina and Paulette :
Armbrister; one (1) son-in-law, Vincent Williams :
Sr.; two (2) daughters-in-law, Nelda and Sharceen :
Annbrister; four (4) step-children, Helen, Leslie, :
Joey and Aloma; twenty three (23) grand children, :

Latia, Ethan, Laterco, Latishka, Latasa, Dario, : a resident of Bimini and formerly of Deep Creek,

Frandisha, Vincent Jr., Devardo, Devareo, Laquinton, : South Andros, will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday,

Kerry, Patrelle, Orrick, Shanee, Shareka, Shanique, ; March 14th, 2009 at the Chapel of Cedar Crest Funeral

Shavard, Swendell, Sharell, Wenty, Hansel, Portia ; Home, Robinson Road and First Street. Officiating

Ferguson and Audrus; 6 great grand children, two ; will be Rev. Leonard Miller. Interment will be made

(2) sisters, Leen Brice and Louise Gay, eleven (11) : - :
sisters-in-law, Marion Clarke, Althea Ferguson, Iona in the Southern Cemetery, Spikenard Road.
Roach, Priscilla, Shirley, Winnifred, Virginia, Claudia, ; Left to cherish his memories are his daughter, Louise

Peggy Armbrister, Lena Green, Dianna; six (6) : Rolle; 3 brothers, Samuel, Stanley and Bruce Rolle;

: 3 sisters, Ruth Rodgers, Lee Esther Bussell and

Livingstone Gay and Gregory Green: one (1) aunt, : ai Rolle and a host of other relatives and
Adeline Rolle; numerous nieces and nephews :

IVAN ALEXANDER
ROLLE, 74

: Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar
: Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street

. ‘ on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m., and on
UE OUS eee ere tae cone MO we Aue a Saturday from 10:00 a.m.until service time.

host of other relatives and friends including, Thora :


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager Euneral Home ( Crematorivan

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

JOHN EDWIN
ROLLE, 65

of #57 Whymper Lane,
Freeport and formerly of
Mangrove Cay, Andros will be
held on Saturday, March 14,
2009, at 11:00 a.m. at Bethel
Deliverance Centre, Eight Mile
Rock. Officiating will be Rev.
Dr. John N.T. Rolle, assisted
by Rev. Jonathan McMinns.
Interment will be made in the
Grand Bahama Memorial Park, Frobisher Drive.

Left with cherished memories are his eight sons: Lorenzo,
Elton, Matthew, Edwin III, Jason, Traves, Taven and
Trevor; two daughters: Christine and Bridgette; seven
grandchildren: Eldenika, Dalario, Brittney, Brianna,
Samantha, Shonta and Katavia; five sisters: Isalean Bowe,
Emily Howard, Deslean Cumberbatch, Rosalie Curtis and
Clora Williams; three brothers-in-law: Anthony
Cumberbatch, Benjamin Curtis and Kelsey Williams;
nephews: Paul and Keith Bowe, Anton, Edmund and
Chester Turner, Kelsie Williams Jr., Marcus Carey and
Tyrus Curtis; nieces: Suzette Grey, Yvette Ferguson,
Anishka Deveaux, Roquel, Nicola and Lashana Rolle,
Linda and Bridgette Bowe, Monique Rolle, Chelsey
Williams, Desdemona, Dowens, Diana and Denika Curtis
and Yuolanda Carey;John is survived by many family
friends Sylvanas Strachan who was like a twin brother,
Rev. Dr. John N.T. Rolle who is a spiritual advisor and
guardian angel and his family, Clement Pennerman, who
was a big brother to him, Eddie Clarke and the Clarke
family, The Rolle, Hepburn, Curtis, Adderley and Beckles
families, the entire community of Mangrove Cay, Andros
and Freeport, Grand Bahama including: Mr. Annie Cooper
and Bernd Bauer, the staff of Cemex and others too
numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager
Funeral Home and Crematorium Limited, Queens Highway,
Freeport on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. and at
the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 9

dock of Foes Muneral Dhape

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

DEATH NOTICE FOR

BISHOP HUBERT
GILBERT MOSS, 86

of Trinidad Ave., Elizabeth Estate and
formerly of Lovely Bay Acklins will be
held at Faith United Missionary Baptist
Church, Sunday March 15th 2009 at
2:00pm. Officiating will be The Rev.
Dr. William Thompson, assisted by
Ministers of the gospel. Interment will
follow in Lake View Memorial on John
F. Kennedy Drive.

He is survived by: Four Sons: Minister
Asa, Aron, Pastor Jacob and minister
Philip Moss, Six Daughters: Shirleymae
Martin, Acting Pastor Julie Farquharson,
Evangelist Loreen Johnson, Naomi Thurston, Katurah McKinney, Leah
Scavella ;One Brother: Deacon Joel Moss; Two Adopted sister: Minister
Sarah Ferguson and Hilda Sargeant; Sixty One (61) Grandchildren: Betty,
Lakeisha, Dorcas, Nelson, Rochelle, Naomi, Jerone, Rashad, Rotajh, Craig,
Tesma, Euline, and Asa Jr. Moss; Vincent Dorsette, Carla, Nickie, and
Wilka Deleaveaux; Michael, Nello, Shirleymae, Leroy, and Rev. Livingston
Edwards; Sheniqua Ferguson, Patrick, Corporal Sharico, Sargeant Kelsey,
Sargeant Christopher, Pamela, and Paulette Farquharson; Apostle Showalter
Johnson, Sherica Hamilton, Sheniska King, Gia Kemp, Marina and Faroone
Knowles; Timothy, Mario, David, Pledge, Burchnel and shantel Martin;
Patrice Williams, Charmine Mckenzie, Yolanda and Janario Mckinney;
Denise Rolle; Lacoya, Leonardo, and Lavard Scavella; Tanya Thompson,
Arthema Smith, Stanley, Patrick, and Earl Thurston; Shantel Forbes, and
Dr. Sambriann Curtis; Fifteen (15) Great Grandchildren: Six (6) Great,
Great Grandchildren: Four (4) Daughters-in-law: Marion, Zelma, Judy and
Rosemary Moss; Five (5) Son-in-law: Kendal Farquharson, Fredrick Johnson,
Glenville Scavella, Chief Inspector Samuel Mckenny and Gladstone
Thurston; Two (2) Sister-in-law: Leah and Emerline Moss; One (1) Brother-
in-law: Walter Knowles; Five (50) Granddaughters-in-law: Twelve (12)
Grandson-—in-law: Numerous nieces and nephew including: James, Rev.
Nathaniel, Glen, Stephen, Emroy, Jefferson, Worley, Justin, Wilfred and
Antoine Moss; Criscita, Jessiemae, Winifred, Susan and sharonna Moss;
Lucille and Roger Totte; Eunice Deveaux, Helen Miller, Clarabell Dawkins,
Felix Beneby, Deacon Cardinal Edwards and Family, Natalie Beneby and
family and Winston Knowles. Numerous other relatives and friends including:
Pastor Jeffery Woods and family; Donnie Barr and family; Elcima Johnson
and family; Gelena Moss and family; Huel Scavella and family; Rev.
Linkwood Ferguson and family, Philadelphia Baptist Church family, Divine
Deleverance Baptist Church family, The Bahama Islands Baptist Association,
Assistant Pastor Glaudine Virgil, Minister Vernice Bain and family, Shelia
Gibson, Elijah Beneby, Pastor Silvia Collie and family, Rev. Elias Ferguson,
Reginald Stevenson, Attorney Obediah Ferguson, Rev. Edmond Johnson
and family, Rev. Dr. Elkin Symonette and family, Margret Emmanuel,
Francis Jones, Joan Ferguson, Pastor Tueton Stubbs, Honorable Alfred
Gray, Estella and Premeletha Johnson and family, Maneria Rolle, Pastor
Betty Deveaux, Rev. Carol Rolle, Rev. Moses Cox and family, Remilia
Williams and family, Terrance Collie, Gwendolyn Sweeting, Minister
Stephen Ferguson Collie and Moss Families, the entire Acklins and Crooked
Island Communities. And a host of other relatives and friends too numerous
to mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT AT THE ROCK OF AGES
FUNERAL CHAPEL WULFF ROAD AND PINEDALE ON SATURDAY
FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. AND SUNDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM
1 PM UNTIL SERVICE TIME.


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

AGG OSC? C cS
25
FUNERAL DIRECTORS |
“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition.”

7th Terrace, Collins Avenue * (242) 356-2187 *
P.O. Box GT-2679 * Nassau, Bahamas

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

MARIA THERESA
McPHEE

will be held at her residence #51 Maxwell
Lane off Farrington Road on Thursday,
March 12, 2009 at 7p.m.

FUNERAL SERVICE

MARIA THERESA
McPHEE, 72

of #51 Maxwell Lane will be held on Friday,
March 13, 2009 at 2pm at Kingdom Hall
of Jehovah's Witnesses, Theodora Lane.
Officiating will be Salathiel Cooper.
Interment will be made in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memories are husband: Eleston McPhee; five daughters:
Patricia Burns, Stephanie Dawkins, Sabrina Antor, Philippa Dixon and Nickia
McPhee; four sons: Glen Sr., Bernard, Edwin and Corporal 401 Mario Mcphee
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force; grandchildren: Lavaughn, Devont and
Antoine Burns, Lekita Chambers, Glen Jr. and Leshanda McPhee, Duran and
Terea Price and Bernique McPhee, Able Seaman Troy McPhee of the Royal
Bahamas Defense Force, Stacy Dean, Aniska Culmer, Matravia, Catavia,
Mario Jr. and Mateo McPhee, Harold Jr., Shannon and Jonathan Antor, and
Valdez Dixon Jr.; great grandchildren: Rayvaughn Burns, David Chambers,
Jaria Strachan, Tre’ and Hope McPhee, Karis Knowles and Ethan Culmer;
one sister: Mable Morgan; two brothers: Hosea Johnson and John Wallace;
sons-in-law: Alexander Burns, Donald Dawkins, Harold Antor Sr. and Valdez
Dixon Sr.; daughters-in-law: Lillian, Nellie and Calvese McPhee; grand
daughter-in-law: Tenier McPhee; grand sons-in-law: Randy Chambers and
Philip Culmer; step children: Larry, Jeffrey and Michelle McPhee; godchildren:
Terecita Ferguson and Sue Johnson; sisters-in-law: Geraldine Ferguson,
Muriel Ferguson, Dorothy Marshall, Lillian Saunders, Priscilla Forbes and
Margie Johnson; brothers-in-law: Charles and Richard McPhee; numerous
nieces, nephews and other relatives and friends including: Paulette, Brenda,
Christine, Vanessa, Donna, Barbara, Dennis, Richard and Reginald, the
Highland Park Congregation of the Jehovah's Witnesses, Patrice Glinton and
family, Carlton Demeritte, the Braynen family, Cecil Dorsett and family, Doris
Dean and family, Loretta Burns and family, Eloise Butler and family, Valarie
Williams and family, Dr. Eugene Gray and his team especially Dr. Bethel, Dr.
Locksley Munroe, Odette Nizel and family. the Dixon family, Lawrence
Ferguson and family, Salathiel Cooper and family, Frederick Brown and
family, Hilton Taylor and family, Charles Miller and family, Thelma Stubbs
and family, Beryl Brown and family, Inez Bowleg and family, Esther Curry
and family, Lillian Adderley and family, the Laing family, Tom Basden and
family and the Rock Crusher Community, the Pitt Road Community, Tri-star,
Family Guardian and Mosley Burnside Insurance, Lyford Cay beauty salon,
Team Deliverance, First Caribbean and Scotia Bank, Water and Sewerage,
Robin Hood, Atlantis, Ocean Club, Batelco and others certainly not forgotten
but too numerous to mention.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at Ferguson's Funeral
Directors, 7th Terrace Collins Avenue on Thursday from 10am to 5pm and at
the church on Friday from 1pm until service time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Hareweod Sinciair Higgs LPB.
Prestenl | Thang rector

BESSIEMAE
GREENE, 69

a resident of Marathon Estates and
formerly of Mangrove Cay, Andros
will be held on Saturday, 14 March,
2009 at 11:00 a.m. at Zion South Beach
Full Gospel Baptist Church, Zion's
Boulevard. Officiating will be Bishop
B. Wenith Davis, assisted by Other
Ministers of the Gospel and interment
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road. Services entrusted to
Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel,
Mount Royal Avenue and Kenwood
Street.

She leaves to treasure her memories are her Children: Reverend Tyrone
M. Greene, Joann Rolle, Stephanie Greene, Elvamae Johnson, Elvis
Greene, Jack Greene (Streamwood, Illinois), Jerome Greene (Warwick,
New York), Theola Edgecombe, Sharon Evans, Ivan Greene, also Alan,
Miguel and Michelle Greene; Twenty-four Grand children: Othello,
Lashan, Lakera, Latoya, Tiffany, Quinton, Kristin, Bridgette, Neville,
Ryan, Lesceia, Marcus, Oneal, Keisha, Brian, Julian, Shauntray, Joshua,
Garreth, Elvistina, Ivanique, Ashanti, Starasia, and Ivan, Jr.; Eleven
Great-Grand children: Oprah, Anphernique, Mercedes, Danero, Arvin,
Jr., Quintonique, Opal, Brittany, Demaro, Paris, and Odessa; Two Sons-
in Law: Gary Edgecombe and Troy Evans; Three Daughters-in-Law:
Linda Greene (Streamwood, Illinois), Dianne Greene (Warwick, New
York), and Karen Greene; Three Brothers: Carlington, Sylvanus, and
Harold Strachan; her Sisters: Leola Bullard, Francess Butler, and Margaret
Clyde, also Geraldine Johnson, Keta Bannister; One Uncle: Albert
Strachan; One Aunt: Ival Bain; Brothers-in-Law: Alexander Bullard,
Edison Butler, Keith Clyde, Reliston Greene, Otis Rolle, George Johnson,
and Samuel Wright; Sisters-in-Law: Maegrethel Strachan, Jacqueline
Strachan, Vivian Strachan, Gerelean Rolle, Jestina Johnson, Heterlyn
Wright, Maria Bowleg, Angela Neymour, and Beverly Greene, Thirty-
three nephews: including Reverend Nathan Strachan (Kansas); Thirty-
two Nieces, Three God-children: Sam, Valarie, Sherell, and Nabi;
special friends: Reverend Harry Davis, Vernal & Mavis Strachan and
Anetta Rolle, Rosa, Angie, Alice, Betty, Beryl, Kenu, Percy, Lawrence,
Chea, George Myers, Joann, Rhetta, Thessa, Freddie, Neka and numerous
other relatives and friends including Nurse Patrice Bowleg & Mangrove
Clinic, Nelson Ferguson, Godfrey and Anetta Rolle, Dr. Magnus, Dr.
Bullard, Dr. Rhema, Dr. McPhee and the staff of A & E Trauma facilities
at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Crows Nest staff of Holiday Inn,
Terrace Kitchen staff of Britannia Towers, Main kitchen staff of Cable
Beach Resorts, patrons of Bessie's Lunch Vending on Cable Beach, Beach
vendors of Paradise Island and Cable Beach, patrons of Bessie Greene's
Convenience Store, the communities of Grants & Peats at Mangrove
Cay, the community of Pyfrom Bend-Marathon Estates, Bishop B. Wenith
Davis and the Family of Zion South Beach Baptist Church, Reverend
Catherine Nairn and the Family of St. James Baptist Church, the family
of "In Christ" Ministries including Geraldine Johnson, Irene Sawyer,
Victoria Gibson, Althea Gaitor, Linda Woodside and Kermit Agaro.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday, March
13th, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday, from 9:30 a.m.
until service time at the church.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

DENIECE PATRICE

ROLLE, 41
affectionately called ''Neicy"

of Bimini Avenue, will be held on Saturday
1:00 p.m. at Glad Tidings Mission Baptist
Church, Balfour Avenue and Podoleo Street.
Rev. Jefferey Deleveaux will officiate and
interment will follow in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.

Precious memories are held by her mother,
Laura Taylor; sons, Danero and Jerome
Johnson, Vernaldo and Antwar Rolle;
grandson, Malik Johnson; sisters, Angela
Taylor, Mary Rolle, Linda Olds of St. Petersburg, Florida, Roberta Rolle,
Samantha Roberts, Karen and Yvette Johnson and Katrina Gibson; brothers,
Solomon Bowleg of Albany, New York, James Adderley and Dominique Rolle;
step sisters, Karen Butler, Lisa Scott, Lucy Mae Allen, Sadisca and Monique
Adderley and Alretha Forbes; step brothers, Marvin and Dwight Adderley;
nephews, Stephen Rolle, Omar Russell, Abdual Bowleg, Joshua Olds, Hendrick
Martin and Brendon Rolle; nieces, Eltoya Rolle, Maya-Angelou Carter Davis,
Aricka, Ingrid, Garnell and Crystal; aunts, Catherine Roxborough, Edna
Taylor-Michaels, Pauline and Anne-Marie Taylor, Mary Coakley and Emily
Rolle; uncles, Herbert Beneby, Leon Richards Jr. and James Taylor, Leon
Roxborough, Rudolph Stuart and Anthony (Bozo) Rolle; sister-in-law, Melinda
Bowleg of Albany, New York; brothers-in-law, Levon Olds of St. Petersburg,
Florida, Christopher Brown and Michael Roberts; grand nieces, Omesha,
Rodeasha and Taneasha; grand aunts, Merlene, Satella and Elizabeth DeCosta
of New York, Blanche Deveaux, Maser and Edna Sands, Florence Johnson
and Juliet Taylor; cousins, Patrick and Deon Stuart, John and Sherial Pierre,
Michael and Tabitha Culmer, Quincy and Eerie Stuart, Gregoire and Yvette
Montot Ricardo and Roger Taylor, Kevin and Sharan, Ryan and Monique,
Jon, Robert, Dawndrea and Jurich Taylor, Vernon and Jameca Johnson, Leonette
and Clinton Roxborough, Jodi and Ayana Brown, Laura and David Spence,
Kim, Rose, Tonya, Tracey and Mark Rolle, Christine Coakley, Angela, Renee
and Janice, Logan and Irene DeCosta, Rose and Portia and Helen Brown of
Freeport, Grand Bahama; other relatives and friends include, Erica Smith,
Bernice Robinson and family, Carlson Newton, Victoria (Vickie) Wood, Trivah
Johnson, Willeshia Sweeting, Erica Johnson, Alice Smith, the Fritz family,
the Newton family, Trevor Johnson and family, Johnson's Barber Shop, The
New Millennium Barber Shop, The Security Department of Wyndham Nassau
Resort, the Soldier Road Daycare Centre, City Market-South Beach, Glad
Tidings Mission Baptist Church family, All Saints Parish family, Tava Newton
and family, Velma Cox and family, Verline Bannister and family, Norma
Clarke and family, Shantell, Tasha, Cathy-Ann, Kendra Burrows and family,
Johnny DeCosta and family, Timothy and Alfred DeCosta, Judy, Margaret,
Freddie, Anthony, David, James, Andrew, Randy and Richard Rolle, Tracy
McDonald and family, Carol (Sunkie) and Cecile Bonamy, Shirlene Rolle and
family, the Pratt family, Flavia and Crew, Ola Colebrooke and family, Lily
Taylor and family, Vernencha Gibson and family, Jackie Gibson and family,
John Hall and family, Alexander Hall and family, Stephen (Peanut) Forbes,
Thomas Francis of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., Doreen Deleveaux and family, Miami
St. Crew, Market St. and Campari Crew, Jamal and Jason Satchel, Ramont
Knowles, Jermaine Rolle, Edward McGregor, Jason Rolle, Erica Smith,
Carolyn and family, Zerlene and Ruth and their families, the Nurses and
Doctors of the A&E of Princess Margaret Hospital.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL OF
MEMORIES, COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME,
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Friday from 10:30am - 6:30 p.m., on Saturday
from 10:00-11:30 a.m. and at the church from 12:00 noon to service time.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 11

for

CAPT. CYRIL
HOSEA
TURNQUEST, 87

Of Mortimer’s, Long Island will
be held Saturday March 14th ,
2009 at 10:30 am at Holy Family
Anglican Church in Mortimer’s.

| Officiating will be The Rev’d Fr.
Ernest Pratt and Rev’d Paulette
Cartwright. Interment will be in
the Church’s Cemetery,
Mortimer’s.

Left to cherish his memories are his Sons: Vivian, Elton, Cyril
Jr., Valance and Peter Turnquest; Daughters: Geraldine and
Althea Turnquest, Marjorie and Stephanie Cartwright, Sarah
Miller and Valerie McDonald, Elva Walkine, Doreen Turnquest,
Caroline Parris, Rose Edgecombe, Careese Dean, Romalee
Burrows, Jennifer Cartwright, Narine, Jocelyn, and Rosita
Turnquest; Sister: Myrtis Turnquest; Sons-in-law: John
Cartwright, Ashton Miller, Luther and Danny Cartwright, Colyn
McDonald, Reginald Walkine, and Luther Edgecombe;
Daughters-in-law: Martha, Eleanor, Sylvia, Geleta, and Maralyn
Turnquest; Grandchildren: Antoinette McKenzie, Hester, Ricky,
Lynn, Larry, Mario, Lucinda Miller, Julia Wells, Ashley
Cartwright, Bathsheba Fernander, Bonaventure and Uriah
Turnquest, Corrine Laing, Samantha Evans, Tristan Sands, Edith
Turnquest, Tamika Symonette, Nathan, Raquel and Elton Jr.
Turnquest, Verinique, Sherette, and Theodore Turnquest,
Charmine, Tamiko and Chauncey Miller, Stephen, LuKeisha
and LuKerah Cartwright, Barry, Lavado, Valencia and Mario
Turnquest, Cortney and Trent McDonald, Judy Davis, Suzette
Nairn, Paulette Crook, Hedy and Dion Walkine, Fred Paul,
Valerie Rolle, Carlton Paul, Glen and Cornell Knowles, Deal
Mortimer, Shantel Curry, Wayne and Tyrone Parris, Sandy
Smith, Jodel Roberts, Raquel, Obie, Peter Jr., Wadye and Domonic
Turnquest, Cassandra Smith, Jodell Roberts, Carl, Aston, Carline,
Carlisa Dean, Kaylee, Kaylynn and Indie Minnis, Kennis Johnson,
Nishka, Jamaal, Devonne and Danielle Cartwright, Rosanna and
Gregory Martinborough, Steven, Shannie, and Aleah Turnquest,
Shanell Knowles, Fhelton Cartwright, Trevon, Trenton and
Trenair Gray; Numerous Great Grandchildren, Nieces and
Nephews including: David and Vendolyn Dean, Delores,
Andrew, Margaret John, and Brenda Major, William Watson Jr.,
Frank, Agatha, Ernest, Basil, Bruce, Falcon Watson, Rudolph
and Naomi Pratt; Other Relatives and Friends including:
Catechist McFeild and Pearline Mortimer, Louie and Enid Carol,
John (John Smart) Cartwright, Mark and Kelsey Williams, Nadia
Hall, Rev. Paulette Cartwright and Family, Carlton and Monica
Cartwright, Essie, Lander and Drexel Turnquest, Coleen Adderley,
Olivia and Lockhart Turnquest, Harriet Dean, Peter Graham,
Kaiser Wilson, Predenza and Walkine Burrows, Iris Farquaharson
and Family, John and Eloise Knowles, Carlis and Sarah Milander
and the entire Mortimer’s and Long Island Communities.

Viewing will be held at the church from 6pm on Friday until
service time on Saturday.


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

a Kostsices Momoud
Fann Memorial Hoty

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rodd, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 »« Fax: (242) 340-8034

iy RVICE FOR

UNERAL SE

? Kenneth Major of Miami Florida, Willard Ferguson Jr.
| of Freeport Grand Bahama, Care Giver: Mrs. Sandra
: Augustin A Host of Other Relatives and Friends including:
| Bishop Sherwin Smith & Church Family Good Shepherd
Church of God, Officers and Members Churches of God,

f Bacardi Road will be held on | es ;
ow a bers a 7 Temple Ministries, Pastor Robert McPhee, Officers and
2:00pm at Good Sheperd
Church of God Ida Street off |
Robi Road Officiati ill :
b . Bishop ae ea te di Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and
Minister Franklyn Rolle}

Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens Soldier Road, | 2%4 at the church on Sunday from 12:30 until service

: time.

MINISTER CLARITA
ELIZABETH MAJOR
THOMPSON, 84

Left to cherish her fond memories are: Daughters: |

Attorney Stephanie Ann Wells, Jennifer Thompson, |
Earthel Smith, Julie Cooper and Brenda Thompson (pre-
deceased). Sons: Alfred Thompson, Jr. Jefferson, Stephen :
and Rodney Fred Thompson (pre- deceased) Sister-In- |
Law: Elcita Ferguson of Forbes Hill, Exuma Grand }
Daughters: Dr. Keysha Smith Attorney Stephanie A.T. |
Wells, Dr. Attorney Lillith Smith, Mikia Cooper, Rodina |
Armbrister, Kiera Johnson, Danielle, Altamese and |
Mornette Thompson, Kayla Armbrister and Dedrie; Great |
Grand Daughters: Antonesha Wells, Lakia Jones, Claudia :
& Christa Rolle, Lavette Armbrister, Shamara Armbrister, |
Rain Thompson, Jamie Francois and Raven Wells :
Daughters-In-Law: Gail, Myrna and Esseymae Thompson
Neices: Dorothy Smith, Sambrianna Walkine, Vandolyn
Stubbs, Chrystal Benson of Great Falls Montana and }
Michelle McDonald Grand Sons: Cleveland and Tennyson |
Wells Jr., Rodney Thompson, Jr. Rev. Dwight Thompson ;
ee : ena ae eee ee 2 brothers: Leonard and Alfred Bridgewater and Patrick
In-Laws: Hon. Tennyson R. Wells, Dr. Michael Cooper,
Edward Thompson Grand Son-In-Laws: Liviticus and :
Omar Armbrister Great Grand Son: Jade and Shamaro }
Armbrister Neices: Sambrianna Walkine, Vandolyn : L in earl A cearlaieedat
Stubbs, Chrystal Benson of Great Falls Montana Nephews: | Ae anion nee ear ncn? Ws reetnys ene zeny, teensy
Whitfield, Freddie, Ishmael Bradshaw Major and Rev. }

Inc. Pastor Philemon Wilson, Officers & Members Faith
Members Church of God.
Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview

Solider Roads on Saturday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

DEATH NOTICE

MS. ORELIA
FERGUSON, 65

of Miller’s Heights off
Carmichael Road and formerly
of Mt. Thompson Exuma died
at the Princess Margaret
Hospital on Monday March 9th
2009.

She is survived by her sons: Donavan Ferguson, Dwayne,
Dwight and David Ferguson daughters: Wilma Coin and
Lonease Ferguson sisters: Patsy Bridgewater, Ruth
Bridgewater, Theresa Bridgewater and Cynthia Fritz

Adderley grand parents: Estella Bridgewater numerous
nieces, nephews and other relatives and friends to
numerous to mention.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 13

and Crematouum Limiled

Ou Memorial Mortuary

EEPORT
11A East Coral pod eee G.B., Bahamas
Box F-4
Telephone: (4a) 373- tne7 (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 » Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

i A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY
? FROM 1:00 P.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

DANIEL
WILLIAMS, 87

OF #17 BERKLEY DRIVE,

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA |
AND FORMERLY OF WEST:
END, GRAND BAHAMA WILL |

BE HELD ON SATURDAY,

MARCH 14, 2009 AT 2:00 P.M. AT } |
THE KINGDOM HALL OF |

JEHOVAH’S WITNESSESS,
COMET ROAD, FREEPORT,

GRAND BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL BE BROTHER :

HERBERT MARSHALL.

Left to cherish his memories are his daughter: Coramae Thomas; |

2 sons-in-law: Dennis Thomas and Nathanial Brown; stepsons:
Dudrick, Ashley and Pedro Edwards; stepdaughters-in-law:

Brown, Bonita Pratt, Stephon Brown of California, Vernon, Owen
and Oscar Thomas, Elsa Bartlett, Alitha Lightbourne, Tanya and
Natalee Brown; great grandchildren: Bradley Jr., Brandon,

PERSONS WISHING TO

CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

FUNERAL SERVICE

EDNA LOUISE
KIKIVARAKIS, 88

OF #11 MAN-O-WAR CIRCLE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF NASSAU,
NEW PROVIDENCE WILL BE
HELD ON SATURDAY, MARCH
14, 2009 AT 10:00 A.M. AT ST.
JOHN’S NATIVE BAPTIST
CATHEDRAL, MEETING
STREET, NASSAU, NEW

: 7 PROVIDENCE. OFFICIATING WILL BE REV’D DR.
Berthaly, Carrol and Judy Edwards; grandchildren: Bradley :

MICHAEL SYMONETTE AND REV’D DR. HERVIS BAIN.

INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE LAKEVIEW
i MEMORIAL GARDENS, JOHN F. KENNEDY DRIVE,

: NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE.
Braadon and Lathario Brown, Tarico and Clarence Pratt Jr., Blake :

Bartlett Jr., Oscar Thomas Jr., Davon Lightbourne, Nathan Brown, } ate
Tajh Brown, Jason and Tikinba Pett - Toria Prati, Deajahnae | Left to cherish her memories are her five sons: Nick, Tony, Jeffrey,
Lightbourne, Ostia and Osteny Thomas and Blaante Bartlett; : / : -
Seto grandchildren: at Tario Jr. and Tamia Brown ang Ela, fifteen. grandclildren:
and Janae; special family and friends: Kenneth and Ann Williams :
and family, Veronica Johnson and family, Pastor Sheron Garvey :
and family, Millis Newton and Bone Fish Foley family, Nicolas }
Rolle, Harold and Mavis Rolle and family, Sherick and Ellie Ge Hk Anion. Aneclo-and Maint niedecand MeOH:
Smith and family, Irish Grant Floyd Dolly and family, Q. Deal : : a ae : P °
and family, Kitty Fishbacher, Hortence Roker and family, the |
Bowleg family, Jessica Maxis and family, Lilliame Brown and }
family, Raymond Anderson and family, Walter Forbes and family, }
Brother Herbert Marshall and family, Frederick Benson and family, }
Gracy Williams and family, Desiray, Cindy and family, Simeon } —: . :
eee and family, Pe Maxwell Dee and ual: Pastor } eivers race Els ancy dene Tusce lh
Steve Grant and family, Shervin and Madlyn Pinder and family, }

Susie Sawyer and a host of other relatives and friends. RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND

SIGN THE BOOK OF 3 CREMATORIUM LTD., ROBINSON AND SOLDIER ROADS,

CONDOLENCES, MAY DO SO IN THE “IRENIC SUITE”
OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND 2 FROM 9:00 A.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 }

Michael and Keith; four daughters-in-law: Joy, Deborah, Debra
Kathy Laster, Nicole Kiki-
varakis-McKenzie, Tamika Nelson, Karen, Sonia, Dominic,
Damien, Anthony, Kareem, Kim, Jeffrey, Veronique, Dorainey,
Scentique and Jarvis; fourteen great grandchildren: Kyhiel,
Anthony “Kylie”, Kiara, N’ya, Malique, Cloe, Leah, Toni, Aatifah,

Patsy, Dorothy, Judy, Bill, Lona, Minerva, Cynthia, Curtis Jr.,
Curtis, Margarette, Joan, Paulette, Carolyn, Jackie, Shayne,
William, Arthur, Justin, John, Shorie, Godfrey, Emily, Welma,
Edna, Caroline, Georgina and a host of other relatives and friends,
especially Mattie Tolliver, Annie Forbes and her devoted care

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “IRENIC SUITE” OF

NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00
AM TO 6:00PM. AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Tetsios Memoval Mortuary
and Crematouum Limiled

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rodd, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASS
Robinson and Soldier oe MGiscaE N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

OT UE SOUS ACS FOR

LYNN LYATTE
CLARKE, 46

WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY,

NAZARENCE, BAYSHORE ROAD,

FOLLOW IN THE HARBOUR WEST PUBLIC CEMETERY,

Johnett Davis; 2 grandchildren: Jamazio and Dianell; 6 sisters:

Minister Beulahmae Fowler, Araline Mackey, Leading Woman Marine

Doramae Clarke of R.B.D.F, Sherry, Darnell and Karen Clarke; 3

Crystal Mackey, Alvonett, Alicia, Alia, Alteshia, Elshadi and Kayneshia

Viola Hopkins; 1 grandaunt: Louise Colebrooke; adopted parents:

Kenneth and Shelia Hepburn; 2 sisters-in-law: Ruth and Rochell }
Clarke; 4 brothers-in-law: Bradley Fowler, Peter Mackey, Prince
Duncombe and Craig Nicholls; cousins: Prince Joseph, Dereck, Clifton }
Viverlaw and Elizabeth Hopkins, Nell Fowler, Cordiann Higgs, Christina }
Fowler, Berthram Taylor, Wilfred, Rovena, Marva and Anthon Fowler,

Melcine Dorsette, Diann Beneby, Ruthmae Romer, Pamela Russell,
Peter, James and Joshua Russell, Rev. Roston Simmons of Miami, Fla.,
Isodora Johnson, Vanrea Dameus, Cathrine Clarke, Kenneth Williams,
Sherly Clarke, Anntonett Rolle, Sharon and Autherine John, Estermae,

Louise and Rachel Clarke, Dedrie Adderley, Jannet Smith Prudence
Mackey, Idamae Williamsand a host of other relatives and friends ;
the entire management and staff at the Isle of Capri }

including:
especially the Food and Beverage department, Ishamell Williams,
Sharon, Patrice, Rochell, George, Kendal and Leroy Dorsett, Kevamae,

Florence, Ulahmae, Lana, Troy and Tyrone Beneby, Laurene and Junior }
Evans, Osley Russell, Vezel Gibson, John and Felix Saunders, Police
Sergeant 192 Steve Gibson, Otterine Jones, Elizabeth Fowler, Stella :
Nichols and family, Lauretta Dean, Rev. George Fowler, Pernetta
Russell, Laurea Lightbourne, Bridgette Fowler, Marlin and Nardia }

: Turner, Carnetta Martin, Ray Carroll, Carolyn Romer, Mary Davis,
i Carolyn Hepburn, J enneth Fowler, Marion Sturrup, Miriam Saunders,
i Ellen Bowleg, Andrea Bain, Desiree Roberts, Silvea Hanna, Gertrude
! Kelly, Mars Forbes, Samuel Evans, Pearl Simmons, Rev. Samuel
: Fowler, Ivy Ferguson, Rev. Kirk Curry and the Grace Church of the
OF DEADMAN’S REEF, GRAND } Nazarene family, Rev. Lewis Adderley and family, Bishop Godfrey
BAHAM AND FORMERLY OF } Williams and family, Rev. Carl Oliver and family, Rev. Reginald
SOUTH MASTIC POINT, ANDROS : Ferguson and family, Bishop Wilbert Rolle and family, Lyncee Murphy
! and family, Rev. Doris Tinker and family, Mariah Martin and family,
MARCH 14, 2008 AT 10:00 A.M. AT :

THE GRACE CHURCH OF THE }

Rashad Monroe and family, Martha Burrows and family, Lavardo Gray
and family, Damion Parker and family, Stephanie Rolle and family,

Wenzil Martin and family, Rev. Maude Romer and family, Mavis
HANNA HILL, EIGHT MILE ROCK, :
GRAND BAHAMA. OFFICIATING ; family, Rev. Lorenzo Harris and family and especially everyone life
WILL BE REV. KIRK. A. CURRY :
ASSISTED BY MINISTER RALPH HEPBURN. INTERMENT WILL
: Memorial Service for Lynn Lyatte Clarke will be held on Friday,
BARTLETT HILL, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA.
i Bayshore Road, Hanna Hill, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish her memories are her 2 daughters: Johnell Rolle and ;

Gaitor and family, Rev. Kenneth Fowler and family, Idel Reckley and

who she touched.

March 13, 2009 at 8:00 p.m. at the Grace Church of the Nazarene,

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE” OF

RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM
brothers: Eddison, Dave and Dwight Clarke; nieces: Anita Fowler, :
Rhonda Haven, Denice Tucker, Tamica Blyden, Precious, Petral and }

LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT

? THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM 8:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE
Clarke, Laverne Moxey, Louise Miller, Kenderea Neymour, Jessica }
and Shannie Clarke, Tabatha Duncombe, Albertha and Cathrine Clarke; }
nephews: Maquel, Eddison Michael, Jared, Omar, John and Dwight }
Clarke Jr., Prince Duncombe, Shapario Roberts, Shamari, Darren and
Richard Clarke; 4 aunts: Julia Fowler, Perneshia Taylor, Elouise and }

MRS. MILA CLARITA
BURROWS, 87

OF LEWIS YARD, GRAND
BAHAMA DIED AT HER
RESIDENCE ON FRIDAY,
MARCH 6, 2009.

She is survived by her daughters:
Millicent Higgs and Pauline Lewis;
sister: Maude Swann; numerous
grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A
LATER DATE.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 15

and Crematouum Limited

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

FUNERAL SE

i Davis, Marcus Garvey,Rayann Pinder, Robyn, Sharise, Dwayne, Denado,
i Mel, Queenie Hanna & Family, Sonia Palacious & family, Virgil
i Bowleg, Granville Johnson, Alfred Pennerman, Harvard Cooper &
i family, Les Fountain & family, Childern of Columbus House for Boys
i & Girls, Hanna family, Menas Vardoulis & family, Yvonne Cartwright,

OF #65 EAST CORAL ROAD, Ophalia, Backkus, Martha, Charlie Bullard, Charlie Bootle, Bishop

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA }
AND FORMERLY OF ST. MARY’S, }

JAMAICA WILL BE HELD ON ; ‘amily, Elim Baptist Church, Higher Anointed Church, G.B Family

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2009 AT : Worship Center, Aniskha Parker & family, Keisha, Victory Way
ST. JOHN’S }
JUBILEE CATHEDRAL, SETTLER’S
WAY, FREEPORT, GRAND:
BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL BE
BISHOP GODFREY WILLIAMS :
ASSISTED BY REV. K. BRIAN SANDS. INTERMENT WILL }
FOLLOW IN THE GRAND BAHAMA MEMORIAL PARK,

JOSEPH EZEKIEL
BAILEY, 65

12:00 NOON AT

Randy and Jon Bailey and Brohdny Ricketts; daughters: Nicole Turner, :
Dorothy Bailey, Nadia Samuda, Krista Bailey, Carla West and Shantel :
Grant; grandchildren: Bailey Watson, Andrew and Michael Fair;
Abigale and Joshua Samuda, Natlie and Renae Bailey, Taylor and : :
Tatyana Turner, Lavar, Ashley and Bussy Bailey and Emmanuel West; ep ae et UN
sister: Veda Bailey; brothers: Frank, Francis, Norman “Ben” and :
Wendel Bailey; aunt: Turla Moore; mother-in-law: Lorraine :
Pennerman; father-in-law: Christopher Thompson; daughters in-law: |
Nicole Bailey and Mandielyn Rickettes; sons-in-law: Delton Turner ;
and Eurland West; sisters-in-law: Joletta Bailey, Roslyn Sands, Virginia :
Jones, Maria Thompson, Shirley Smith, Flerica Pierre, Dellerese Frazier, :
Katy Thompson, Sandra Ferguson, Philena Pierre, Sherilyn Antonio, ;
Margarette Bailey, Sonia Carroll, Ellen Thompson and Antionette :
Thompson; brothers-in-law: Whitney Thompson, Joseph Thompson, ;
Kim Thompson, Christopher Thompson, Christopher Pierre, Ray Carroll, :
William Smith and Robert Sands; aunts-in-law: Edris Johnson, Myrtis :
Saunders, Maria Saunders and Beatice Williams; nieces: Jessica ;
Blossom, Carlene, Maureen and Nicole Bailey, Elanie Porter, Marvaree, :
Nardia, Arnette, Paula, Jennifer, Diana and Latoya Bailey, Sonia ;
Oneisha Sandra; nephews: Clive, Marcus and Mark Bailey, Leroy :
Jennings, Alrick Jennings, Peter Bailey, David Douglas Donnevan, :
Thor, Trevor and Hugh Bailey, Philp Taylor and Sean Jamal Greene; :
grandnieces: Jenice and Niesha Kerryann Bailey, Melissa and Sha ;
Jennings and Jasmine and Nya Bailey, Shanta Sophia and Tiffany ;
Porter; grandnephew: Omar, Emmanuel, Samuel, and Luke Bailey ;
and Chris Lawrence; cousins: Oswald, Silas, Timothy, Isacara, Joseph, }
Besty, Ina, Val and Marge Moore and a host of other relatives and }
friends including: Hubert & Kelly Russell and family, Frank Outten ;
& family, Michael Darville & family, Paul Darville, Junior Bain &

: Earl and Duke Johnson; numerous grandchildren, nieces, nephews and

family, Jim White, Artis Neely & family, Ron, Mario Donato, Brian : 4 host of other relatives and friends.

Roberts, Arnette Ferguson, Samantha Bastian, Brother Mac, Chantell

i FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A
i LATER.

Claudia, Kimberly, Shelly, Queenie Bain & family, Mama Jane, Robert :

Albury, Ina Stuart, Lucita Johnson, Lionel Wilchombe, Glenera Johnson,
Garnel Johnson, Nicara, Terrance, Prince, Lionel Jr, Ashanique, Kenrick,

* =~
NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

RVICE FOR

Godfrey Williams & family, Pastor Willard Strachan & family, Pastor
Reginald Bastian & family, Min. Winifred Pratt, St. John Jubilee Church

Christian Center, Bishop James & Dr. Johnniemae Swinson, Staff of
Pier 1, Xanadu Beach Hotel, Jennifer & family, Teka, Tara, Anjulie,
Enea, Dawnique,Kendesia, Rudena, Shante, Brian, Juliana, Evangelist
Beulahmae Fowler, Pastor Marge Lefluer & family, Edith Gardiner &
family, Jane Sweeting, Grand Bahama Airport Company, Paul Marshall,
Mr. Quant, Julita Ingraham Department of Social Services, N.I.B,
Nurses & Doctors at the Rand Memorial & Princess Margaret Hospital,

SECTION #2, FROBISHER DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA. ; Pastor Bernard & Isadora Walkins & family.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Christina Bailey; sons: Mark, VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “PERPETUAL SUITE” OF

RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM
LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT

SERVICE TIME.

MR. CLIFFORD
LEONARD
JOHNSON, 76

OF #6 SETTLER’S WAY,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF HATCHET
BAY, ELEUTHERA DIED AT THE
RAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL ON
SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Margurita
Johnson; sons: Derek, Kevin, Clayton,
Dwayne, Dexter and Desmond Johnson;
daughters: Juliette Foster and Angela Woodside; sisters: Shirley Gibson,
Julie Pennerman, Sandra Johnson, Myrna Gaitor and Jane Lord; brothers:


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009



mt Coomaheeinn Zomited’ | \ FAST SUN

FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: (242) 373-3005

DEATH NOTICE FOR

Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 304-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 340-8034

MR. PATRICK DORN
“NON”
JOHNSON, 49

OF #15 MAN-O-WAR CIRCLE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA DIED AT
THE PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL
ON MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

He is survived by his wife: Myrtle Cartwright;
father: Stanley Johnson; sons: Tristan and
Tavaris Johnson; daughters: Alisa, Raven and
Asaunde Johnson; stepchildren: Fabian,
Virgill, Antonio, Parrish and Colette; sisters:
Ivy Stuart, Drusilla Butterfield and Stanleka
Taylor; brothers: Warren, Reunie, Andrew
and Calvin Johnson and a host of other relatives
and friends.

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS WILL
BE ANNOUNCED AT A LATER DATE.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



willy

@ RISE MORTUARY

—=,-$ SS ===

“A New Commitment To Service’

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

REGINALD
THEODORE
STRACHAN, 72

of Malcolm Road will be held on
Saturday at 2 p.m. at St. Margaret’s
Anglican Church, Kemp Road.
Officiating will be Rev. Fr. Joseph
Mycklewhyte and Rev. Angela
Palacious. Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

He is survived by his wife: Betty

Veronica; 1 daughter: Monique Neely; two sons: Neil and Reginald
Strachan; mother: Daisybell Strachan; 5 grandchildren: Achaz
Neely, Cato, Kale, Cai, and Kezia Strachan; 2 brothers: Lester and
Lionel Strachan; 1 daughter-in-law: Shawna Strachan; | son-in-
law: Wencil Neely; 2 brothers-in-law: Roderick Innis and Granville
Cleare; 5 sisters-in-law: Remilda Strachan, Dorothy Symonette,
Alice Innis, Dency Moss and Mable Strachan; 1 aunt: Winnifred
Dames; | uncle: Dudley Cooper; numerous nieces and nephews
especially, Ruel, Stephen, Rachelle and Andrew Strachan, Brian
Cleare, Dr. Patti Symonette, Sharon Hepburn, Shenna and Shanice
Innis, Ingrid Smiles, Sean Innis, Sterling, Keith, Sheldon and Gary
Symonette, Natasha Williams, Alvin Moss, Fredrick Moss Jr.,
Cheryl Haven, Gennean Cleare, Marie and Deborah Moss;
Dominique and Riochelle Strachan and Devaughn Pinder other
relatives and friends including: Gurth Knowles, Nathaniel Cooper,
Ruby Ann Cooper-Darling, Oswald Marshall, Beryl Miller, Beverley
Woodside, Brenda Marshall, Rev. Charles Lewis, Evangelist Gloria
Dawkins, Shirley Rolle, James Lewis, Rev. Irene Coakley, Fanny
Pletka, John Cooper, Primrose Chase, Rev. R. E. Cooper Jr., Bertha
Rousseau, Carmella Colonneaux, Heather Humes, Wendy Dames,
Richard Dames, Marilyn Darville, Pauline Winder, Cleomi Saunders,
Noel Rahming, James Thompson, Leonard Leadon, Paulette
Lockhart, Clayton and Karen King, Joseph Hall, Ross Cartwright,
Charles Taylor, Charles Adderley, Peter Joseph, James Dean and
Raphael Sanon, Leslie Ryan.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta
Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and again from
10 a.m. to noon and at the Church from 1 p.m. on Saturday until
service time.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 ¢ Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117
THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Evergreen Mortuary

EXCELLENT IN THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE

For all of your Funeral Service Needs,
We will be pleased to serve you with bono.
Tel: 242-394-749
Fax: 242-704 7900
24hrs: 242-341-4009
or 322.) 242
(el 565-9758

DEM ALEE &. PENN L.F.Gamke.

Mackey Street South
MANAGING FUNERAL DIRECTOR

VERONIA
AUGUSTIN, 65

of Strachan's Alley off Kemp :

Road and formerly Port-de-Paix,

Haiti will be held on Saturday, :
March 14, 2009 at St. Margaret }
Anglican Church, Kemp Road at !
11:00 a.m. Officiating will be

Rev'd Joseph L. Myclewhyte,

assisted iby other ministers. Interment will follow in !

Woodlawn Garden, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish fond memories are her husband, Ulrick
Agenor; Children: Berry and Prince of Miami, Lilian of !

Haiti,
Grandchildren: John, Babenka, Milisha of Haiti, Kevin,
Claudesha, Deiontae, Newry, Devontae, Steven, Darryo,

Darryell, Antonio, Benjamin, Rodline, D.J. Dontar, Besty :

and Branden of Miami; Brothers: Montalien, Aguste,

Raymond, Dieucel, Felistin of Miami; Adopted Brothers:
Tony Major, Achouwel, Vincent, Marcel; Sisters: Refelia :

of Miami, Bregetha of Haiti; Adopted Sisters: Jacqueline,

Melony, Molonie, Phillippa, Odet Tassy; Aunts: Man-Ceko
and Sacia of Haiti; Uncle: Eledor of Haiti; God-parents: }
Carline Bain and Lenousa Civilma. Adopted Children: :

Marie-Natha, Felicia, Sauver, Allian, Frank, Sherene,
Mercilia, Raymond, Jasmine, Anoude, Tabby, Peter, Sheda,
Micheline, Nabath, Samantha, Maptisa, Jimmy, Marieta,

Gassy, Gelandne; Son-in-law: Addly Cadet; Daughter-in- !
law: Carline Joseph; Sisters-in-law: Carline Joseph, Saret, }
Janine, Carolina; Brothers-in-law including: Prophet, Eliaso; :

Numerous nieces and nephews including: Bohnomme,

Bernitha, Eliasen, Philip, Robert, Shelia, Solivia, Gloria,
Esland, Sowel, Joseph, Madianie, Mary; Other relatives :
and friends including: Lequaz, Man Blac, Marriela Joseph :

and family, The Major family of Strachan’'s Alley, Claudine,

Claude, Sonie, Lucie and Betty; Eighteen :

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 17

Tasha, Tavia, Paul Major, Derelien, Cassy and family, Dwain
and family, Tifrere, Hilda and family, Vandette, Raquel,
Jerry, Andicka, Anika, Margo and Family, Bassy, Josue,
Telson, Woslet and family, Wesner, Tiwono, Michel, Jean
Robert, The Saunders family, The Morley family, The
Francophone Church family, Ebenezer and Bethel Seventh-
day Adventist Church family, The Orion Academy School
family, George & family, Samon & family, Juliet, Janet &
family, Anton and family, Cetelen, Borlot and family, Denise,
Cilvertha, Mitis and family, Harold and family, Luke,
Raynold, Silvana & family and the entire family of Strachan's
Alley and Kemp Road community.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at Evergreen
Mortuary on Friday from 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. and again
on Saturday from 11:00 a.m. until service time.

SELONDIEU
JOSEPH, 60

of Fox Hill and formerly of Haiti
will be held on Saturday, March 7,
2009 at St. Bedes Catholic Church
at 3:00 p.m. Officiating will be
Father Roland Vilfort. Interment
will follow in Fox Hill Cemetery.

Left to cherish fond memories are his children: Walnert,
Helenne, Onondieur, Antoinise and Wednent Joseph;
Brothers: Cirema Joseph and Ajas Rolmy; Sisters: Adelicia,
Melira and Ophanie, Chante’ and Inel Joseph; His special
friend, Francilia Polucape; Uncle: Junette, Verly, Telson,
Francu, Enritha, Jason, Mac and Santara Joseph; Aunts:
Dieula, Serveir, Salizia, Estephen and Jumeir St. Louis and
Jean Clouide; Cousins: Antoinier Poiucope, Anseigno
Benjamen, Amezida Gustarhe, Beme Rismond, Luc Chery,
Elissaint Prophete, Verdieu and Jane Prophete, Termutis
Delva, Frandy Joseph and Jason Joseph, Robedye and Valeri
Joseph, Valsilia Pierre, Quira Molson Joseph, Nuposine
Phophete, Mecus Joseph, Sefoca Joseph, Mac Joseph,
Macola Grutave, Ketia Grutave, Melia Riomonche, Ethel
Riomonche, Claudia Pierre, Tilasry Guitave, Christepho,
Zozana Cuillocune, Louzette Chery, Cramide Chery; A host
of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at Evergreen
Mortuary, Mackey Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. - 6:00
p.m. and again at the church from 2:00 p.m. until service.


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

BArmerittie’s SHuneral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 « TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Eldridge James Johnson, 70

Gardens, Soldier Road.

Tina and Hope Lightbourne, Thalia Campbell, Judy Miller, Sauleene,
Monique, Michelle, Adapha and Tominica Beach, Carol Thomas,

Joyce Bain and family, Shirley Cooper and family, Jennie Welch

family, Jennie Benson and family, Ruthmae Neely and family,

. family, Brenda Ingraham and family, Barbara Smith and family,
i Gloria Sweeting and family, Madeline Wilson and family, Harriett

. ? Davis and family, Dale Davis and family, Ancil Davis and family,
. se = eee ge ae nig i Larry Davis and family, Charles Scott and family, Wendy Kemp
Ti js Baptist Church. East & Shirle : and family, Paulette Davis and family, Ingrid Bartlett and family,
Streets pa Sun day at 2:30 ear : Carolyn Azikiwie and family, Hazel Taylor and family, Herbert Scott

Orblerabing ll Be Ese Seymour and family, Dr. Gertrude Holder and family, Leon
Morrison, assisted by Rev. Ulrick : Hutch Adanily Bete jak d family. Michael Joh
Smith & Rev. Anthony Sampson. ; Hutchinson and family, Betty Johnson and family, Michael Johnson

Interment follows. in. Woodlawn Sands, Kendal, Derek, Brian and Richard Sands, Eva, Diana and

: Thomas Greenslade, Nurse Sylvia Davis, Dorothy Colby, Edward

. . . | Brown, Merril Mackey, Daniel Ferguson and family, Rev. Osborne
Cherishet pie ic Rees Held by: i Rolle and family, The Hon. Orville T. Tommy) Turnquest M.P. and
The love of his life:Lady Ella; His ; : : :

. . : ! family, Audrey Fernander and family, Myrthlyn Jones and family,
loving children: Byron, Sheldon and : :

. Ba ae i Bernard Hanna and family, Alex Hanna and family, Rudolph and
Indira Johnson-Wright; Daughter- : Daisy Valerina Willi a tanails. Harn Wi
in-law: Jasmine Johnson: Son-in- ; Daisy Hanson, Valerina Williamson and family, Harrison Hanna

law: Christopher Wright; Three : ©. : ; ; : ; :
Grandchildren: Shelethia and Abner J einuicid KrisDira Wright; | Sidney Bain and family, Dr. Nicolas Fox and family, Katrina Miller
Adopted Brother: Eldridge Davis; Five Sisters: Mizpah Lightbourne and family, Maria Poitier and family, Glen Bodie and family, Alanaire
(Predeceased), Macushla Beach, Naomi Brown, Addison Francis } Jones and family, BTC Retiree Assoc., The Staff of Glowell Motel,
and Sonia Charlow; Two adopted Sisters: Clara Evans and Subleeka The staff of BIC, David and Bridgett James and family, Preston
Johnson; Four Brothers-in-law: Sidney Jones, Glanville Bethel, } Gibson and family, Betty Moses and family, Anatasha Clyde and
Cerzales Dennis and Carl Charlow; Four Sisters-in-law: Marilyn } family, Allisa Lockhart and family, Jacqueline Bain and family,

Kerr, Gloria Lightbourn, Andrea Bethel and Sandra Dennis; Three

Aunts: Gladys Johnson (Mama), Julia Davis and Edith Johnson; | : : : : i : :
Twenty Six Nephews: Dr. Jerome, Bradley, Timothy, Brent and } Rev. Rosalita Davis and family, Ernestine Poitier and family, Tamicho

Maurice Lightbourne, Anthony, Ricardo, Mark, Tyrone, David, Paul R t Tab le family. H Howavick and fini Men
and Samuel Beach, Durell, Brockholst, and Garrett Brown, Raleigh, } ee: df Se Py Pe AG d es S verre df ay Lavi ane
Demetrius and Melchoir Francis, Tyrone Smith, Ricardo Smith, } Paces he a oe a M et ee amy: Ae
Theoder and fain Charon, Pei oc vesn er Rolle and family, Rev. Reginald Williams and family, Maudeline

: Pinder and family, Nora Pinder and family, Dorothy Allen and

Pamela Akie-Grimple, Deborah Ward, Shanla Brown-Cleare and family, Mervin, Peter and Roy Jones and family, Beryl Bonamy,
Vanessa Brown, Dawn Francis, Uchi Pinder, Deidre Young, Pinnicue } Maude Hamilton and family, Minerva Puler and family, Peter JOHES
Johnson, Lynda and Ellen Smith, Chevette Williamson, Carlette : and family, Austin Cole and family, Richard Johnson and family,
Major, Nicoya and Shatara Grant, Sileigha Jones and Rachelle Noble } ee a rhe and ce ae = eee
(Predeceased; Forty one Grand Nephews. Thirty five Grand Nieces. : Pe t .s he aie oe ia f Kear y: a "al es Sas
Numerous relatives and friends including: Persis Adderley and rae “a eo a i fohage an ata 4 a "Sh . Shen ae 4
family, Sister Annie Thompsom, Barbara, Jalna and Camille Bullard, | AY SEY. Pastl SOMNSON ane lamlys ixey. olenna owe an

i family, Revs. Leon and Venera Johnson, Rev and Mrs. Norris

. . ? McDonald, Rev. Anthony Sampson, Rev. Ulrick and Bonnie Smith
and family, Donald Thompson and family, Franklyn Thompson and } a : : ? : ;
family, Anita Thompson a family, Keith OIRO aid family, and family, Mins Veronica Smith and family, Ricardo Knowles and
Clement Johnson and family, Earl Johnson and family, Kenneth family, Rev. Wilton Strachan and family, Evang. Beth Stewart and
Johsnon and family, Ual Johnson and family, Rodney Johnson and ; f@mily, Zion Seniors Ministry, Carl Russell and family, Harley
family, Joy Johnson and family, Rosa Johnson and family, Janet } Simms and family, Dwayne and Daphne Williams, Pedro and Marlene
Johnson and family, Jolton Johnson and family, Patricia Morton and_} Bain and family, Josephine Parker and family, Thelma Darling and

; : i family, Eloise Jones and family, Thelma Pennennan and family,

‘ . i Kendall and Joan Humes, the Staff of Chalks Ocean Airways

George Parks and family, John Johnson and family, Godfrey Johnson i .~. ; el : ys;
and family, Florinda Stuart and family, Marie Johnson and family, } ee oe and the entire Zion Baptist Church family,
Sandra Johnson and family, Leonard McDonald Johnson and family, : ee Nae eee

Maria Thompson and family, Sylvia Bodie and family, Anthony } Friend faetane ‘cap itte's F lH
Naim and family, Joseph Young and family, Monica Kemp and | saarket Street, from 10-6:00 p.m.on Saturday é& on Sunday from
family esi Carles: Mose ane tantly, amnesia. hompson end: ¢ 10-12:30 p.m. & at the church from I :30 p.m. until service time.

and family, Harold Scott and family, Ernest Scott and family, Sybil

and family, Bernard and Yorick Evans, Rosalie Minus, Reginald

and family, Carolyn Hanna and family, Thezel Wright and family,

Gloria Hanna and family, Zion's Usher Board, Zion's Christian
Education Ministry, Dr. Charles Osazuwa, Jackie Smith and family,

and Natasha Allen and family, Rev.Elva Russell and family, The


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 19

Hemeritie’s Funeral

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Elvie Bochard-Moise, 67

a resident of Fire Trail Road, & formerly of
Haiti, will be held at Mount Pleasant Green

Baptist Church, Quakoo & East Streets, on :
i Itell, Rashad, Leroy, Kiesha, Quanlisha, Tianna, Rollie, L.J., Alex, Kim,

Webster, Warren, Tenario, Garvin, ; other relatives & friends including:
i Melonie, Pam Bethel, Carolyn Johnson, Ms. Simmons, Rose Minnis, Mary

Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev.
Dr. Wesley L. Thompson, Pastor Lawrence
Papou-Loutt & Pastor Kevin Pierre, assisted

by other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment |
follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK

Drive.

Cherished and indelible memories will forever
? Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 9:00

i a.m. until service time.
Sylvanie Beauchard, Martha Jack, Arnold

! Mitchell Ricardo D'Haiti-McKenzie, 41

be by her husband: Jean Moise; six children:
Jocelyne Beauchard; Marie- Edline Lubine,

Bochard and Duquene Moise; Adopted son:
James Joseph; Grandchildren: Berline Lubine,Judette Jules, Lokirdeline Jules,
Gayo Jules, Jhon Carey-Jules, Peggie Beauchard, Ronaldo Lubine, Avinson
Beauchard, Ronaldo Lubine, Avison Beauchard, Tyesha Culmer, Julisa Jules
& Arrest Beauchard; Daughter-in-law: Andrea Bochard; Sons-in-law: Bertus
Lubine, Henry Petitifrere & Auxilieu Jules; sisters: Lamercie Beauchard,
Marie Beauchard, Jeune Vierge Louis, Melanie Louis; brothers: Renan

Bochard, Pharbius Bochard, Dieubon Louis, Jean Bochard, Roland Bochard,

Florian Bochard; mother-in-law: Anna Baptist; Aunts: Tagras Bochard, Mrs,
Ratino, Mrs. Charles; Uncle: Borome Almorise; nieces: Annette, Paulette,
Anette, Roseanette, Cindy; nephews: Stephen, Olbry, Mike, Norman, Renald,
Junior & Wilkenson; Sisters-in-law: Rosana, Rosalia, Aurina, Antonette,
Marielle, Annalia Moise; brothers-in-law: Raymond and Jean Rony Moise;
Cousins: Vervi, Germaine, Ester, Jahnee, Iyannah, Elijh, Kamoi, Elirose,
Sandy, Magda, Jenny, Joward, Emila, Damelia, Brena, Mimous, Elyse, Ebony,
Mimine, Rosanette, Rosemarie, Telicia, Andieula, Amanda, Tineg, Simon,
Augustin, Auxius, Gerlad, Patrick, Pastor Kevin Pierre, Tyoken; Other relatives
and friends including: Iranie Pierre, Marcelilia, Mildor, Larose Pierre, Kirin
Pierre, Adule St. Jean, Idejea and Family, Mizou, Pierette, Dante, Schaffer,
Duery, Mr. Don Grissom, Wyndham Casino Marketing Dept., Mr. & Mrs.
Dean & Family, Alicia, Duery, Tanya, Meredith, Sopnovia, Shaniqua, Erica,
Kizzie, Toya, Janeille, Judith, Marina, Karen, Wyndham Banquet Crew,

Church.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market

Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00
a.m. until service time.

Alexander Hanna, 15

~~ a resident of Milton Street, will be held at }

Church of God of Prophecy, Englerston, East
Street & Prophecy Way, on Saturday at 10:00
a.m. Officiating will be Minister Timothy
Johnson & Other Ministers. Interment follows
in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard
Roads.

Left to cherish his memories are his mother:
Sandy Hanna; father: Alexander Wright;

Hanna; grandparents: Linda & Rollie Hanna,
Bursil & Rosenell Wright; great grand mother:

. Doreen Ingraham; aunts: Felicia, Althea, Portia, Alma, Stephanie, Shanell,
i Stacy, Sherryann & Kenra Hanna, Marie Fowler, Cherry Ann, Terry Ann,
i Debra, Mable & Kenya Wright; uncles: Rollie, Tonny, Raymond & Kevin
i Hanna, James, Isaac & Sidney Wright; grand aunts: Lavaughn Young, Mable,
? Naomi & Martha Hanna; granduncles: Kingsley, Gernice, Kiplin, Gordon,

Elseworth, Larry & Buddy Ray; cousins: Lastina, Ivan, Jimmy, Calvin, Rico,

March, The School for the Physically Disable, Social Services Department
& Calivar Construction Company.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market

a resident of Thompson Lane, will be held at
Foresight Baptist Church, Taylor Street, Nassau
Village, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Officiating
will be Rev. Dr. Charles Culmer, assisted by
Elder Kendal Mackey. Interment follows in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Precious memories will always linger in the
hearts of his mother, Creola McKenzie; father,
| Joseph D'Haiti, Step Father, Eugene Miller;
stepmother, Maxine D'Haiti; 1 daughter:
Brinique; 3 sons: Mitchelle, Tiano and Alton
D'Haiti; grandfather: Clifton McKenzie; sisters:
Michelle D'Haiti and Woman Marine Owenta

i Pennerman' brothers: Marvin D'Haiti, Jerald Lotmore, Benjamin Seymour,
: Javon, Dwayne and Kevin D'Haiti; nieces: Natasha Knowles, Sheena,
i Shantiqua, Lakeisha D'Haiti, Saharia, Maquella, Michelle; & Latariea;
? nephews: Marvin, Mervin, Dwayne Jr., Kevin Jr. D'Haiti, Jamine, Jamal,
: : .. + Giovanni, Lavardo Lotmore & Jordan; grand niece: Brianna Knowles; sisters-
Cuskco Sei Community, Fao Papo Late & amly-Ebaezr Hepis| ag Natasha Dat Chott Lotmeve ants: Maran, Wis Eas

i Leisha, Irene, Nancy & Sue McKenzie, Janet Storr, Janette Miller, Lavada
i Sands, Helen Knowles; uncles: Alfred, Lionel & Arthur McKenzie & Ronald
? Bell; grand uncle: Harcourt McKenzie; grand aunt: Camie Rolle; cousins:
i Rose Forbes, Antionette & Shavonne Bell, Don Miller, Keilia Williams,
i Samantha, Samaijah, Stanley Jr & Stanzil Forbes, Doris Newton, Joyclyn,
i June & Barbara; special friend: Bridgette Stuart; numerous friends including:
? Carne & family, Maudrean & Jenniemae Stuart & family, George Whitfield,
i Edith Boyd & family, Orlando Rudon & family, Tamika Fowler & family,
: Thomas & family, Carla Henderson & family, Thompson Lane family, Nicola
i Stuart & family, Lynette & family, Chester Hanna, Marvin, Paul Gray &

family, Thompson family, Donna Campbell, Gail Frazier, R.H. Curry &

i family, Julian & family, Barrette Smith, Dwayne Saunders & family, Ryan
i Ward & family, Mario Williams & family, Kim & Willie Moss & family,
? Sharon, Geo, Keisha & Gigi Butler, Rev. Dr. Charles Culmer, Rev. Iris Culmer
i & the Foresight Baptist Baptist Church family, Vernita Gibson & family,
? Colyn Gibson & family, Nancy Lewis & family, Ricardo Williams & family,
i Strachan Corner family, Clethus Dean, Christine Curtis & family, the Carter
? family, The Rt. Hon. Perry Christie, Hon. Alfred Sears & family, Mr. Ian
i Cargill & family, Chester McKenzie & family, Gibbs Corner family, Vera &
i family (Jamaica), Nurse Adderley & family & Dr. Orlando & family.
brothers: Cleo, Otis, Jordon & Kevenique

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
i Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 9:00
* a.m. until service time.


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aemeritte’s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Pedro Andrew "Dutchie" Nesbitt, 43

a resident of Grant Street, Fox Hill, will
be held at St. Anselm's Roman Catholic
Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill, on
Friday at 3:00 p.m. Officiating will be i
Fr. Noel Clarke, Msgr. Preston Moss &
Deacon Raymond Forbes. Interment
follows in Fox Hill Cemetery, Fox Hill
Road. Left with treasured and precious
memories of this rare gem will always }
linger in the hearts of his loving, }
dedicated, and caring mother: Rebecca }

Nesbitt; five (5) brothers: John Davis,
Anthony "Bee" Taylor Sr., Gregory Sr.,
Ricardo Sr., and Roscoe Nesbitt Sr.; two

Woodside; four (4) uncles: Edward "Sox" Kerr of Freeport Grand Bahama,
Leonard "Mikey" and family, Alfred Kerr and family and Bobba Hilton;
seven (7) aunts: Brenda Kerr, Theresa Hilton of Savannah Sound Eleuthera,
Joyce Roberts, Mizpah Rolle, Olive Neely, Mavis Hutchinson, and Sandra
Kerr; Godmother: Lulamae Greaves; two (2) sister-in-Iaws: Janet Davis
,Oris Cooper of George Town Exuma; eighteen (18) nieces: Natasha
McPhee and family, Simone Mcintosh, Janiska Davis, Antandra, Antdreika

Rigby and family, Nicole Smith and family, Natika Brown and family,
Claudette & Vandette Brown, Shonelle Woodside; Shantell Kerr and
family; thirteen (13) nephews: Brian and Jason Davis, Leroy and family,

Roscoe, Ricardo Nesbitt, Jr.,Curtis Walkes, Eric Kerr, Donald and Kevin
Brown; nineteen (19) grandnieces and nephews; ten (10) Godchildren;
other relatives and friends including: Raymond Farquharson, Patricia
Newry, Kennedy Frazier and family, Linda Mott, June Mars, Craig Miller,
Peggy Styles, Rev. Dr. J. Carl Rahming and family and St. Paul's Baptist

Rose Street Boys, Philip Smith, the families of Mable and Hortense

Fox Hill Constituency, Senator Jacintha Higgs, Samuel Gray and family,
the Step and Grant Streets family and the Fox Hill Congos family, the
staff of Princess Margaret Hospital Male Medical 2, Monsignor Preston
Moss and the St. Anselm's Catholic Church family, and many family and
friends to numerous too mention. Friends may pay their last respects at
Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m: on Thursday
& on Friday from 9-1 :00 p.m. & at the church from 2:00 p.m. until
service time.

A Memorial service will be held on Thursday evening at 76:30 p.m. at

Rev. Dr. Carl J. Rahming.

Mother Eloise Johnson Stubbs, 65

by Pastor Derick Maycock. Interment
follows in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.

Cherishing her memories arc her children:
One (1) son: Marvin Johnson; Eight (8)
daughters: Sheila Rolle, Zellamae,
Priscilla & Rochelle Johnson, Debra
Moss, Shena Smith, Wendy Ferguson &
Sharlene Ryan; One (1) Adopted
daughter: Kerah Deveaux; Seven (7)
step-daughters: Alfreda Fox, Genevieve
Burrows, Ella Anderson, Monique
Maycock, Gwendolyn Joseph, Kimberley

? Stubbs, & Inishka Lloyd; Two (2) Step-sons: Keithwood & Genius Stubbs
i? Jr.; Fourteen (14) Grandchildren: Renard Poitier, Aniska Adderley, Erika
i & Tahnee Wright, Ahrachelle & Arreo Ferguson Jr., Khrishena, Christopher
(2) sisters Kathy Nesbitt and Hilda ; Jr, Christian, & Shanae Smith, Garranique Ryan, Donovan Moss, Bernique
i Rolle & Pedrico Johnson; Five (5) Great Grandchildren: Elvardo
? Thompson, Mellisha Andrews, Marco Nottage, Tivonya Davis & Dante
? Seymour; Six (6) Sisters: Elder Queenie Rose, Cleomie Collie, Maria
? Williamson, Delro Williamson, Clothilda Williamson, Joyce Higgins;
? Four (4) Brothers: Elder King Williamson, Enos Bain of Bellglade Florida,
? Evangeles Williamson, Clarence Williamson; Four (4) Sons-in-law:
i Bernard Rolle, Deno Moss, Christopher Smith Sr., & Arreo Ferguson;
and Robyn Taylor, Shakera, Rikela, Dorell, and Donell Nesbitt, Nickia ; Five (5) Step-sons-in-Iaw: Pastor Derick Maycock, Pastor Burton Fox,
i Asher Anderson, Corporal Collin Burrows, & Sirdonne Lloyd; Two (2)
? Grandaunts: Daisy Willamson & Marietha Deveaux; Numerous Nieces
: including: Minister Mitterlean Gordon, Margaret McPhee, Deacon Ruthmae
Norrison and Anthony Taylor Jr., Alexis Collie and family, Gregory, }

Sargent, Minister Bettyann Ferguson, Minister Geneieve Bullard, Albertha,

i Janice & Elaine of Bellglade Florida, Stacey Grant, Deegenera Jones-
i Dixon, Delicia Miller, Nyoshe Williamson, Michelle & Catherina Johnson,
? Judy Strachan, Janet Russell, Ernestine Johnson, Juliamae Roberts, Juetta
? Johnson, Maria Williams, Barbara, Claudine & Melinda Sweeting,
? Lahomma Johnson, Floretta Williamson, lvarene Murphy, Sharon, Sheila
Church Family, Cora Davis and family, the Fox Hill Community, Larry
Wilmott, Nassa Mackey, Val Roberts and family, Ishmael Clark, The } Numerous Nephews including: Bishop Trevor Williamson, Antone, Pastor
i Arlington, Anthony & Vincentie Williamson, Dexter Brown, Nelson,
Hutchinson, Rum Cay Crew, Marco, The Hon. Fred Mitchell, MP for the } Anthony, Kennedy, Daniel & Reno Johnson, Anthony Sweeting, Greg
? Bain of Bellglade Florida, Windson & Victor Collie, Jeffrey Charlton,
? Deno, Jonathan, & Pastor Bernard Walkine, Samuel, Vincent & Bryan
i? Gaitor, Ual Johnson, Martin Nixon; Eight (8) Sisters-in-law: Hattie Bain
i of Bellglade Florida, Maxine Williamson, Gretel Sweeting, Gwendolyn
? Johnson, Lavetta Johnson, Sylvia Gaitor, Hazel Bain, Zelita Ferguson.Other
i Relative & Friends: Bishop Elkin & Inez Symonette & Family, Co-Pastor
? Sharon Williamson, Minister Bettyann & Samantha Williamson, Carena
? Symonette, May Williamson, Florey Bain, Alvin Gardiner, Minister
i Marietta Moss, Solomon Miller, Ozel & Viola Miller & Family, Elton,
? Felton, Berkley Williamson, Pastor Leonardo & Michelle Jones,
St. Paul's Baptist Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill. Officiating will be ! Chanderlear Forbes, Nieknell, Rodnique, Precious, Rodney, Kathrina,
i Dejenaba Brice, Ministers Reginald & Santoya Edgecombe, Jackie
? Johnson, Yvonne Taylor, Richard Boodle, Wenthworth Musgrove, Latoya
i Payne, Bethlehem Holiness Faith Mission Family, Chipman, Rolle, Hanna,
? Johnson, Williamson, Cox, Miller, & Cooper Families, Dialysis Unit,
? PMH and a host of other relatives and friends.

& Monica Gaitor, Buelah Whyms, Vivian Laing, Renet & Rhonda Johnson;

a resident of Woodlawn Garden Road & formerly of Pinefield, Acklins, Pnends may pay then last respects at Dementie's Funeral Home, Market

will be held at Trinity Full Gospel Baptist Church, Marshall Road, on } ai he ene [rorn LOU aad cantil Gere ibe tne
Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will be Bishop Trevor Williamson, assisted } Scones :

Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on Sunday from 10-12:00 noon


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009, PAGE 21

Hemeritte’s Funeral

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Bernadette Ann Ferguson Brown, 47

& formerly of Fox Hill, will be held at St.
Road, on Saturday at 3:00 p.m. Officiating
will be Monsignor Preston A. Moss, Fr.
Noel Clarke & Deacon Raymond Forbes.

Church, Fox Hill.

Bernie's life will always be treasured and }
will linger in the hearts of her husband,
Warren Brown, daughters, Wardissa and }
Warnika Brown; sisters, Cora Mackey, }
Eileen Bain, Marita Ferguson, Theresa :

Ferguson Knott and Carriemae Knowles;

brothers, Clarence II, Kervin and Garth Ferguson; aunts, Berylmae Wright, |
Maria Ferguson of Manhattan, New York, and Auntie Tip Cox from Miami, }

Florida; uncles, Daniel Ferguson of Manhattan, New York; sisters-in-law,

Verdell and Sharon Ferguson, Marsha Brown, Betty Hanna and Eltaena
Whymns; brothers-in-law, Philip Bain, George Knott, James Whymns, Bernard
Hanna; aunts-in-Iaw, Salomie and Pearl Munroe, Myrtis Brown, Mable }
Colebrooke, Mildred Kelly, Elizabeth (Bets) Sands; uncles-in-law, Stafford :
and George Munroe; nephews and nieces, Dwight & Senator The Honorable }
Dr. Jacinta Higgs, Stephen, Bonita, and Leon Mackey, Eddie, Lillian and }
Ryan Flowers, Don and Tamara Ferguson, Ricardo and Alexandrea Taylor, }
Dominique Adderley, Daniel Ferguson, Criselle and James King, Attorney

Chaunece, Cherise, Clarence IIT Kevin (Kimbo Slice), Renae, Devin and & Talia Williams, Omara Williams & Tracey & Theodore Dorsette, Shirland

Kemuel Collymore, Terran, Kervin II, and Kervinique Ferguson; grand Willi ou Jr., Christian Williams, Ricardo Hynds, Reno & Camille Hynd Ss

y’ : ; aie zt pen Ee ? Portia Smith, Patric & Aretha Gardner, Cpl. Juan Meadows, Cpl. Jermaine
nephews and nieces, Valane, Stephanita, Sabrea, Stephen Jr., Cecilia, Dwight | Murphy: Curtis Gray, Owen & Latoya Gray. Christoff, Shenika, Denise &
Jr., Crystal, Nigia, Ellea, Michaela, Leonard, Ryiesha, Edvardo, Keshante, ? Dina Williams, Khalvaran Edgecombe, Sharrad & Christopher Cartwright,

? Andrea Darceuil, Javan, Kaleb & Precious Burrows, Reginald Williams Jr.,
? Raquel & Michael Williams: 13 Great Grandchildren: Tania, Taylor, Philia,

; : : : : i Javanno, Javez, Tenisha., Terell Jr., Mareno, Juan Jr., Jermaine Jr., Dania.
Sophia Smith, Avian Darville, Jyles (Aston) Butler, Sabrea Mackey, Clinton } aves e 2 aye ; ie : ; ;
C.J. Sands; cousins, Fred & Florence, Katrina, Elsie, Manette, Joe & Judy, | Daniel, Javan Jr; 3 Son-in-Iaws: Richard Coleby, Bishop Michael Patton &

Magaretia, Iedenek 6 Teotha, Albert & Ruby, Nigel & Sophia, Margaret, Brothers: Thomas, Franklyn & Glen Williams: 2 Sisters: Felicia Vincent &

? Lucille Lewis: 1 Brother-in-law: Christopher Lewis: 5 Sisters-inlaw: Loletha

efmise edie. LBS. Dace Vanndae Mena Nadia ec es ? Hanchell, Rosemary, Dorothy & Albertha Williams and Elva Missick: 2
Lit : } : ie Lowe : > 88), } Aunts: Vernetta Williams & Esther Henfield: 1 Uncle: Albert Williams: 19
ulamas, Laveme, Joy, Tony, Sonia, Marilyn, Predencka, Ann, Barry Richard, ? Nieces: Katherine, Alvera, Winseley, Fiona & Shantell King, Janet Hanna,

Charlie Brown, The Moss family, John & Laverne Pople & family, the Eunice Young, Karen Thompson, Monique Wallace, Deidree Williams, Denis

Edwards family, Michael & Joy Smith & Family, Winton & Renee Bain & i ‘ : : ; ' ;
family, Mrs. Sands & family, Stephanie, Dale, Avon, Jenn, Michelle Butler Alexandria & Samantha Gibson; 17 Nephews: Charles, Lou, Llewelyn Spanky
? : : 3 ? Hanchell, Vernon & Vincent Bullard, Kevin Brooks, Hubert, Dennis, Thomas,

& family, Wendy Clarke, Katie Clarke & family, Shirley Johnson, Vandamae as
Albury, Arthur Clarke & family, Barbara, Patricia, Claudine and Tyrone Miller Reno, Tedford, Teko, Tino & Tarico, Glen Williams Jr., Mario Lewis and Van
y Le : ° y ? Gibson. Numerous Grand Nieces and Nephews: Other Relatives and Friends

i including: Thelma Shakespeare & Family, Janice Grant, Linda Wildgoose,
? Shandira Ferguson and the entire Missick Family, Jude Martin, Dina Munnings,

: : . .1’ £ Janice Strapp, the Delancy Family, Kimsley Ferguson & Family, Marie, the
Gloria Gray-Wallace, Mrs. Sylvia Rolle, Mrs. Carey & Family, Eleanor Smith . ‘
& Family, Stephanie Neely, Ms. Williams. Delores Greene & Family, Kim | Staff at Columbus Primary School, The National Insurance Board, the Staff

Dawkins, Samuel Pinder & Family, Patrick Gibson & Family, [Yfrs. Romer é : : : : rs ae ie
‘ : : i Nesbitt, neighbours & friends in the Pinewood and Miami Street Communities,
and the Staff of Human Resources Unit at B.T.V.I, The entire B.T.V.1. Family, ¢ poy Rains Family: the loving members of Messials Baptist Chusch and

i the Prayer Band.

Thomas Moore, Staff of Ernst & Young, Staff of Sandilands Rehabilitation end eae D eer 1H Mark:
Center, the Fox Hill Community, the Current Island Community, Bahamas } ren Cae ae abl i panne fact ee ia -
Cricket Association, the 1979 Class of Aquinas College, and a host of other Bi Nage teca a Cheney Senn alee eae
friends too numerous to mention; special thanks are extended to Monsignor ? “" :

Alice Ferguson of Miami, Florida, Erica and Darcine Brown, Phillandra Bain,

Erin, Ethan, Tianna, Ricardo Jr, Dantae, Melantae, Danae, Tyler, Kemron,
Kemry, James Jr., Kevin Jr., Kevin, Keviena., Kevlar, Kassandra., Kiara,
Reggie Jr, Reginae, Raejay, and Re'Naja; godchildren, Wandessa Charlton,

Deborah, Cedric, Anthony & Peggy, Martha, Betty, Dorrie, Ted, Fredericka,
Rudy, Jeffrey, Alpheus & Etoy, Leslie & Jackie, Miriam, Raymond, Leonard,

Joanne Rolle, Halcy Dorsett and Freddy Ferguson; other relatives and friends:

& Family, Val & Deidre Thompson, Thomas Davis Sr. Family Reunion Clan,
Linda Ford, Mrs. Wood, Mildred Kelly & Family, Mrs. Taylor, Mrs. Rolle,
Cynthia Thompson, Dawn Collie, Patsy Strachan, Gloria Munnings & Family,

Richard Lucy, Joan Fagundes & Staff of M & E Limited (Caterpillar),
Principal, Staff and Students of Kingsway Academy, Aquinas College, & St.

i Preston Moss, Father Noel Clarke, Deacon Raymond Forbes, Ricardo
? Demeritte, St. Anselm's Senior Chou, the entire St. Anselm's Church Family,
? Kingsway Academy Choir, Dr. Iva Dahl & the staff of B.T.V.I., The Princess
a resident of Trinidad Ave., Elizabeth Estates
? Community.

Anselm's Roman Catholic Church, Bernard

? Friends ray pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
? Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from 9-1 :00 p.m. & at
i the church from 2:00 p.m. until service time.

Interment follows in St. Anselm's Catholic i

Margaret and Doctors Hospitals Emergency Staff, The Elizabeth Estates

Susan Elizabeth Williams, 68

> a resident of Jumbey Street, Pinewood
| Gardens, and formerly of Grand Turks,
|} Turks & Caicos Island, will be held at
Messiah Baptist Church, Palm Beach Street,

| on Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating will
be Bishop William Rahming, assisted by
Evangelist Vanda Miller. Interment follows

in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.

Left to cherished fond memories are: 5
sons: Shirland 'Solo', Wellington ‘Jake’,
Harrison 'Harry' & Reginald 'Reggie'
| Williams & Quintin Taylor: 5 daughters:
Mary 'May' Coleby, Valderine 'Val' &
Keturah Williams, Leah 'Lee' Patton and
Jacqueline Burrows: Grandchildren: Tito

Derek Burrows: 2 Daughters-in-law: Patricia Williams, Kendra Taylor: 3

LaFleur, Barbara., Sherise, Glendina & Glenda Williams, Christine Lewis,

at the Princess Margaret Hospital/Eye Ward, Shanice Taylor & Family, Mr.


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Hemeritie’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Neville Arlington (Tom) Major, 48

Cremation follows.

Precious memories will always :

linger in the hearts of his Mother }

Etoil Maxine Darville; one son, :
Jameko Major; one grandson, Jameko Major Jr.; four sisters, }
Flora Woodside, Joan Barry, Sonia Yankey and Audrey Major; :
10 brothers, Louis, Henry, Anthony, Phillip, Lawrence, :
Charles, Finley Jr., Joseph, Leroy and George Major; Eight :
slsters-in-law, Denise, Rochelle, Shirley, Ina, Stephanie, :
Coleen, Judy, Lavern and Mary Major; three brothers-in-law, |
Jason Woodside, AllIson Barry and Robery Yankey; three :
aunts, Angela Robinson of North Carolina, Audrey Darville :
and Carol Harrison; two uncles, Donald Darvllle and Clarence
Harrison; three grand aunts, Joyce Darville, Leoni Cartwright :
and Bulah Darville; two grand uncles Addington and :
Livingston Darville numerous neices and nephews including, :
Tonya and Craig Stanley of Texas, Keno and Valerie Simmons }
of Baltimore Maryland, Jurymchieo Cleare of Ft. Lauderdale :
F., Merill Major, Mario and Tamara Major, Jushikii Woodside :
of Baltimore Maryland, AI'Diko and Al'lanisha Barry, Arsenio :
Woodside, Akeemo Cambridge, Akeel and Ryan Yankey, :
Anthonique Thiquia and Rashea Major and Taneil Major; :
numerous grand neices and nephews, other relatives and }
friends including, Lisa Bonaby, Elaine Whymns, Arnette }
Campbell, Cyprianna Saunders, John and Glinton Major :
Terrence Jr, and Terron Bonaby, Raynell and Ramia :
Colebrooke, Abraham Brunashe, Cicely Rabass, Naomi :
Symonette and family, Kathline Warren and family, Angela :
Achara and family, the Bowleg family, the Williamson family, :
Eugene and Olive Butler, Paula Rolle and family, the :
Cartwright family, the Darville family, George Delpek, the }
Missick family, the Gardiner family, the Bonaby family, the :
Moss family, The First Holiness Church of God family, the :
Saunders family, the Brown family, the Glinton family, the :
Major family, the Doctors and nurses of Male Surgical #2 at :
: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral :

The Princess Margaret Hospital.

: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
: Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

a resident of Strachan Blvd.,
Soldier Road, will be held at First :
Holiness Church of God, Holiness }
Way, Bamboo Town, on Saturday :
at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating will be |
Bishop Edward Missick, assisted :
by Pastor Gregory Collie. }

Joel John McKinney, 52

a resident of Hospital Lane, will
be held at Grants Town Seventh-
day Adventist Church, Wellington
Street, on Sunday at 11 :00 a.m.
Officiating will be Pastor Andrew
Burrows. Interment follows in
Southern Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads.
Left to cherish his memories are
his wife: Arlene McKinney; 1
daughter: Shavonne McKinney;
1 son: Javonne Joel; 1 step son:
Tamiko Williams; 1 grandson: Pedro Colterell Jr.; 7 brothers:
Pastor Simeon Hepburn, Pastor David Anderson, George
Rolle, Richard Newbold, James, Johnny & Carlo; 2 sisters:
Augusta of Freeport, Grand Bahama & Sarah of Nashville
Tenn.; brothers-in-law: Leonard Breynan, Larry, Marvin,
Gregory McDonald, Bartholomew Bastian, George Roberts
& Neil Benjamin; sisters-in-law: Sandra Bastian, Paulette
Adderley, Adriana Roberts, Judy Benjaminan & Isadora
Hepburn; | aunt: Espserlcaner Rolle of Exuma; nephews:
Derek Bastian, Charles, Deon Stuart, Joey, George, David
Roberts, Omarr Martin, Leonardo Braynen, Peter, Denario
Ferguson, David, Michael Turnquest, Javon McKinney,
Tamiko Williams, Omarr McDonald, Neil Benjamin, Simeon
B. Hepburn; nieces: Charlene Stuart-Kelly of Eleuthera,
Michelle Evans, Sheryl Stuart, Crystal Martin of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Cheryl Gittens of Barbados, Kenyetta Blyden,
Petra McDonald, Daynell Turnquest, & Shawnya Murray of
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Shantel Ferguson & Maranay
Saunders; other relatives & friends including: Linda Moss
& family, Betty Taylor, Jerome Pinder & family, Shirlymae
Smith & family, Rose Key & family, Estermae & family,
Augustamae Samuel, Ivy Smith, Sherry, Jackie, Kim Pinder,
Ricky Patageo, Tamika Newbold, Olga Hinzey, Mama Joyce
Brown, Rev. David Anderson & family of USA, Pastor
Tyrone & family of USA & June Lewis & family, the Lewis
Street & Hospital Lane family.

Sunday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

EULAH MAE
FRANCIS, 77

OF THOMPSON COURT, OAKES
FIELD WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, MARCH 7TH, 3:00 P.M.

AT ST. MATTHEW'S ANGLICAN
CHURCH, EAST SHIRLEY STREET.
ARCHBISHOP DREXEL GOMEZ

foem ASSISTED BY FR. JAMES
fae) MOULTRIE, FR. DON HAYNES
ey AND ARCHDEACON JAMES
PALACIOUS WILL OFFICIATE.
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE CHURCH'S CEMETERY.

She is survived by two grandchildren: Shannon and Shennique Davis;
Sister-in-Law: Mrs. Maria Francis; Nieces: Angela & Lorenzo Gibson
(Kwasi & Laurel) Denise Francis (Andre Hayne) Elaine & Raymond
Collie (Raynell) Mrs. Ethel Rolle, Patrica and Freddy Mackey, Carmen
Ingraham, Faye & Jeffrey Swaby; Nephews: Dr. Rudolph & Mary
Francis, Omari & Dr. Shani Francis-Smith, Tellis & Doris Ingraham,
Nigel & Ann Ingraham, Larry & Patrice Ingraham, Chef Don &
Michelle Ingraham, Howard Ingraham. RELATIVES: Mr. & Mrs.
William Lightbourne & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Francis & Family,
Basil Francis & Family, Ms. Dorothy Davis, Mr. Wendell Francis &
Family, Mrs. Thelma Ford & Family, Archbishop Drexel & Mrs.
Gomez & Family, Myrtle Gomez, Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Gomez &
Family, Dr. Perry & Mrs. Gomez, Mr. & Mrs. Roger Gomez & Family,
Anita & Antonia Roberts, Miss Veronica Gomez, Leonie McCartney,
Ophelia Fox, Naomi Gomez, Bloneva Rahming, Peggy Francis, Mr.
& Mrs. Rodney Heastie & Family, Ms. Brenda Heastie, Miss Annette
Heastie & Family, Mrs. Carolyn Heastie & Family, Ms. Karen Jervis
& Family, Mrs. Pauline Bastian & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Tyrone Heastie
& Family; Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Rodgers & Family, Ms. Coralee Heastie,
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Heastie & Family, The Stuart Family, The Pople
Family, The Woods Family, The Braynen Family, The Gomez Family
& The Francis Family; SPECIAL FRIENDS: Mr. Lowell- Mortimer,
Mrs. Yvonne Bethel, Sir Orville & Lady Turnquest, Sir Cyril & Lady
Fountain, Dr. & Mrs. Austin Davis, Ms. Alicia & Lewis White &
Family, Mr. Samuel Spence, Mr. & Mrs. Nathaniel Levarity & Family,
Dr. David Barnett, Ms. Constance Mackey & Family, Mrs. Christine
Rolle, The Mortimer Family, Mr. & Mrs. Edward Williams, Mrs.
Sonia Dames, Mrs. Stella Nicholls, Ms. Pat Bowe, Mrs. Dorothy
Ferguson-Horton, Mrs. Constance Lunn, Mrs. Maxine Eldon & Family,
Mrs. Trudy Miller, Mrs. Geneva Thurston, Mr. George & Satella Cox,
Mrs. Orry Sands, Mrs. Margaret Claridge, Ms. Cynthia Donaldson,
Ms. Olga Reid, Mrs. Lovely Forbes, Mr. Ivan Conliffe, Sandra Mackey,
Juliette Barnett, Claudette Allens, The Pedal Pushers - Corrine Fountain,
Mavis Adderley, Edith Powell, Beryl Campbell, Grace Wallace, Louise
Gibson, Patricia Treco, Roberta Sands, Inez Saunders, Hyacinth
Saunders, Clara Gibson, Dawn Arnold, Ehurd Cunningham, Shirley
Francis. The Altar Guild & St. Mathews Church Family, Archdeacon
James & Angela Palacious, Fr. James & Mrs. Moultrie PHD., Fr. Don
Haynes.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECTS AT BETHEL
BROTHERS MORTICIANS, #44 NASSAU STREET ON FRIDAY
FROM 10:00 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. AND ON SATURDAY FROM
10:00 A.M. TO 12:30 PM. AND AT THE CHURCH FROM 1:30
P.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 23

diatler’s Huneral Home

& Qrenatortiun

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Funeral Announcement For

MRS. CARMEN
TURNER
BODIE, 82

of 5th Street, Coconut
Grove and formerly of
Tea Bay, Cat Island will
be held on Saturday at
11:00 a.m. at Christ the
King Anglican Church,
Ridgeland Park.
Officiating will be Rev'd Rodney Burrows, assisted
by other members of the clergy. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

She is survived by Three (3) Daughters:
Esthermae Bodie, Annamae Farquharson and
Sandra Bodie-Smith; Two (2) Sons: Terrance and
Vernon Bodie of Fresh Creek, Andros; Three (3)
Brothers: Cedric, Leland and Eric Turner; Eight
(8) Grandchildren: Shannon Nicole Johnson,
Tanya and Leo Farquharson Jr., Tyrone Kellman
Sr., Tremaine Bodie, Thalia Bodie, Deandra Smith
and Chevette Russell; Seven (7)
Greatgrandchildren; Two (2) Daughters-in-
Law: Jane and Renae Bodie; Two (2) Sons-in-
Law: Force Chief Petty Officer Hubert Smith and
Leo Farquharson Sr.; Eight (8) Sisters-in-Law;
Mildred, Leoni and Agnes Turner of Miami,
Florida, Anita, Ulean, Dotlyn, Grenelda and Ethel
Bodie; Three (3) Brothers-in-Law: Carlton,
Harold and Israel Bodie; Numerous Nieces and
Nephews and a host of other relatives and friends
too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’
Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Blue Hill Road
& Oxford Avenue on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until
service time at the church.


THURSDAY

March 12, 2009

Pg 23 The Tribune



RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
STORIES
NN ID,
CHURCH
EVENTS


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

diutler’s Muneral Homes & Drematorim

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

MS. ELEANOR
MAE BUTLER, 64

=) | of New York and formerly of |

ie | Mason’s Addition will be held }

"| on Saturday, March 7th, 2009 |

~ | at 9:00 a.m. at Zion Baptist :

Church, East and Shirley :

Streets. Officiating will be |

y} Pastor T.G. Morrison, assisted |

by Rev. Anthony Sampson. }

Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier }

Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her son: Echendu

Sisters: Sister Mary Johnson and Mrs. Sheila Ferguson
of Freeport, Grand Bahama; Three (3) Sisters-in-law:

including Caregivers at Metropolitan Hospital, New

Margaret Hospital, Pastor George Kelly, Officers and
members of Metropolitan Baptist Church, Rev. Betty

to mention.

; church on Saturday from 8:00 a.m. until service.

MRS. VALERIE
RENIA
KNOWLES, 31

of Baldwin Avenue will be
} held on Saturday, March 7th,
| 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at New
Destiny Baptist Cathedral,
) Blue Hill Road. Officiating
will be Bishop Delton D.
Fernander, assisted by other

| ministers of Religion. Interment will follow in

. ee Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
Nwanodi; Daughter-in-Law: Yuka Shimizu Nwanodi; }

Six (6) Sisters: Sylvia Demeritte-Forbes, Kathleen |
Demeritte, Dorothy Dames, Marjorie Johnson, Joan }
Butler and Rosetta Johnson; Two (2) Brothers: Charles :
Butler of California and Tellis Butler; Two (2) Adopted }

Left to cherish her memories are her husband: Samuel
Knowles Jr.; Parents: Russell and Sylvia Davis; Five
(5) Stepchildren: Ntieado, Juerissa, Theodore, Samdon

: and Samgie Knowles; One (1) Sister: Sonia Grant;
: One (1) Brother: Edwin Evans; Grandmother:

a | Nathalie Butler; Grandfather: Thomas Moss; Two
Virginia, Coralee and Thelma Butler; Four (4) |

Brothers-in-Law: Charlie Forbes, Leonard Dames, |
Maxwell Johnson and Clement Johnson; Two (2) :
Aunts; Alice Rosmond Tucker and Clara Gibson of |
Miami, Florida; Numerous Nieces, Nephews and :
Cousins and a host of other relatives and friends |

(2) Nieces: Racquel Renia Russell Davis and Jasmine
Grant; One (1) Nephew: Brandon Grant; Father-in-
Law: Samuel Knowles; Mother-in-Law: Lucinda
Knowles; Seven (7) Sisters-in-Law: Kathleen, Diane,
Marion, Lucille, Beatrice, Albertha and Paulamae;
Three (3) Brothers-in-Law: Ruel Grant, Livingston

: and Phillip Knowles; Nine (9) Aunts; Eighteen (18)
York, The Physiotherapy Department of Princess ! uncles; Godchildren: Tahje, Francis, Xavier, K.K.,
: Hakeem and Javan; Numerous Cousins, Grandaunts,

L i Granduncles and a host of other relatives and friends
of New York, Pastor T.G. Morrison and the family of |

Zion Baptist Church and many others too numerous |
: Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral

a : ' Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral :

Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on |
Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the |

too numerous to mention.

Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the
church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until service.


PG 24 @ Thursday, March 12, 2009



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS past Sunday, thousands of
devout Church of God of Prophecy
(CGP) members gathered in body and
spirit for their 88th annual Bahamas

National Convention.

In an elaborate display of song and dance, sever-
al local church choirs and interpretive groups per-
formed at the main East Street tabernacle. Also in
attendance were numerous international affiliates
from Canada, the United States, Jamaica, and sev-
eral other countries.

On Monday, National Overseer Bishop Dr
Elgarnet B Rahming made his official convention
address, where he urged CGP members to not
focus on the past of the church, but rather its des-
tiny.

“Let us therefore awake, celebrate, but be sensi-
tive to the vision of God, and to the moving of the
spirit of God. For we are a people of destiny, and
our destiny is in God.”

Dr Rahming expressed his desire to see those
who call themselves Christian operate in the full-
ness of true Christian living, which starts by walk-
ing away from earthly pleasures.

“The flesh may be humanly smart, the flesh may

RELIGION

be humanly strong, the flesh may be humanly
skilled, gifted and talented.

“But I can tell you that devoid of spiritual empow-
erment from on high, devoid of the supernatural
infusion and intervention of the Holy Ghost, all that
flesh has to offer in the service of God will falter,
will fail, and will not please God.”

Dr Rahming said the time is now for those that
slumber to awake, which will only come from a spiri-
tual relationship with the father. Otherwise, he said:
“The flames and fire of revival fail to burn, unity of
the believer is impaired, and the manifestation of
the power of God in salvation, in restoration, in
healing, and in deliverance is limited.”

Even for the unsaved, Dr Rahming contends that
their spiritual death is but a sleep, but adds that
restoration and awakening can only come when one

The Tribune



Bianitcemonee ne
Prophecy celebrated It'S == i

STOICA STlIr UES
National Convention with
thousands of members
attending the event.

surrenders all to God.

Speaking to the issue of economic turmoil in the
local and international arena, Dr Rahming explained
that like the seasons, these rough times too shall
pass.

He referred to Genesis 8:22: “As long as the earth
remains, there will be springtime and harvest, cold
and heat, winter and summer, day and night.”

“Yes we have been in a recession before and we
came out okay, and yes recessions don’t last
always... The God who brought us out in the past, is
the God who is bringing us out now.”

Despite the few suicides, the hundred of job losses,
and other changes happening because of these diffi-
cult times, Dr Rahming said God allows nothing to

SEE page 29
The Tribune<