Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION

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New claims over
Tynes’ fateful flight

Widow of engineer on
missing plane believes
husband was murdered
for drug trade knowledge



Stepfather is
charged over
virl’s fire death

Man appears in court accused
of manslaughter by aceon

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE stepfather of a four-year-
old girl who died tragically in a
house fire Saturday night was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court
yesterday on a charge of
manslaughter by negligence.

Lorenzo Payne, 22, of John-
stone Road, appeared before
Magistrate Ansella Williams in
Court One, Bank Lane yesterday a
afternoon on the manslaughter ts
charge. It is alleged that on Sat- 2
urday, March 7, Payne negligent- Ss

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ly caused the death of Kentrell
Rolle. The four-year-old girl was
consumed in a blaze that
destroyed her wooden home Sat- LQRENZO PAYNE outside of
urday night. She was reportedly ooyrt yesterday.
burned beyond recognition.

Police fire services officials said that they received reports of
a fire in a bushy area on the border of the southern portion of
the Pride Estates sub-division shortly after 7pm on Saturday.

m By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

carrying at the time of her husband
Donald’s disappearance and was
confined to bed for three months.
Today her son Donald Jr, 26, still
mourns the father he never saw —

THE widow of a Bahamian elec-

trical engineer who went missing on
the same flight as Chauncey Tynes Jr
26 years ago spoke out last night —
and said he was almost certainly
murdered for what he knew about
the drug trade.

A few days before he and Mr
Tynes vanished, two men appeared
on the doorstep of their Nassau
home and warned: “You better keep
your mouth shut. We don’t want
your wife to be a widow just yet.”

Mrs Ann Moree, 55, of Soldier
Road, almost lost the baby she was

and wonders what became of him
on that fateful day in the spring of
1983.

The final flight of pilot Chauncey
Tynes Jr., who worked for Colom-
bian drug czar Joe Lehder, was again
the centre of controversy yesterday
as arguments raged over his alleged
links with the late Prime Minister
Sir Lynden Pindling and a senior
Bahamian police officer.

SEE page 12

Anger on the airwaves over
Tribune’s Pindling article

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

OUTRAGE over The Tribune Insight article that attacked the lega-
cy of the late Sir Lynden Pindling spilled onto the airwaves yesterday,
with a former Cabinet minister among those expressing disgust.

But delighted readers deluged The Tribune with calls and e-mails of
congratulations as the article became the main talking point in Nassau.

Yesterday morning, taxi-drivers at Lynden Pindling International
Airport continued a full-scale argument started the day before, with PLP

SEE page eight

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STUDENTS of Woodcock Primary School hold aloft fingerprint
cards after officials from the US Embassy and armed forces visited
the school to give a demonstration of their work.

Tourism insiders hail Baha Mar
agreements with Chinese investors

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE announcement that devel-
opers of the Baha Mar project
signed two agreements with Chi-
nese investors was yesterday her-
alded by tourism insiders as the
"best news" this country has heard
in awhile.

An agreement with the China
State Construction Engineering
Corporation was signed recently
to construct the stalled multi-bil-
lion Baha Mar Resort on Cable
Beach. A Memorandum of Under-
standing regarding potential project
financing was also signed at the
same time with Export-Import
Bank of China, according to a

British
American

statement by President of Baha
Mar Resorts Don Robinson. How-
ever, he cautioned that many more
months of work and due diligence
is needed before final approval is
received to finance the develop-
ment.

Yesterday, former tourism min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe said the
positive news "quashes all the
doom and gloom" in the industry.
Noting that the Chinese are
"strategic" investors, he said the
agreements marked preparation
for the future when the global
recession ultimately turns around.

"T've always had faith in the pro-
ject and IJ think that is the best
news we've heard in the Bahamas

SEE page 12

Neighbours who tried to extinguish the fire told The Tribune that
the fire had already consumed the small wooden structure
before firefighters arrived at the scene. The tragedy is the first
fire-related casualty in New Providence this year.

Payne, who was represented by attorney Philip Hilton, was
not required to enter a plea to the manslaughter charge and was
granted bail in the sum of $10,000 with two sureties.

As a condition of his bail, Payne was ordered by the magis-
trate to report to the Carmichael Road Police Station every
Wednesday and Saturday before 6 pm. Payne is expected back
in court on Tuesday, March 17, which is when he will appear
before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane where

the matter has been transferred.

Christian Council
announces
agriculture plans

THE Bahamas Christian
Council yesterday announced a
revolutionary plan to capture 30
per cent of the country’s agricul-
tural industry.

The Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil (BCC) revealed its three-phase
National Initiative yesterday
which includes a five to seven
year plan to “capture” 30 per cent
of the food industry.

BCC president Rev Patrick
Paul presented the plan yester-
day during a press conference
when he said the Council will
move to sensitise the Church and
community of the “core values”
found in the Bahamas Constitu-
tion, the introduction of a Char-
acter Development Devotion-
al/Programme based on the “core
values of the Bahamas” and tap-
ping into the $500 million food
industry.

Rev Paul said that the Council
plans to facilitate the funding of
an agricultural-based company to
exploit the advancement in tech-
nology available to produce top
quality goods.

The Council hopes to do this

SEE page eight





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



US tourist
believed to
have drowned

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN AMERICAN tourist is
believed to have drowned
while diving off the coast of
south Cat Cay, near Bimini.

Seventy-three-year-old New
York resident Richard Merril
was pronounced dead by a
local doctor shortly after police
received reports that he had
drowned at about 3pm on
Monday.

An autopsy will be per-
formed to confirm the cause
of death.

North Bimini Police
Sergeant Gregory Lockhart
said Mr Merril was on a pri-
vately owned dive boat with
10 to 20 other divers explor-
ing the underwater world of
the Bimini island chain.

He is interviewing a num-
ber of witnesses in connection
with the incident.

SEE page eight

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Activist calls for support
for small businesses

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MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest speaks at
the Church of God of Prophecy’s 88th Annual Bahamas National
Convention on Monday evening.















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Local News alee Roe Cen
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Sports
BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

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USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

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m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

INVESTMENT in small
businesses could curb the
highest unemployment rates
in 15 years, political activist
and co-chair of Bahamians
Agitating fora Referendum
on the FTAA (BARF) Paul
Moss said yesterday.

Dubbing Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s stimulus
package an “illusion”, Mr
Moss claims the financial plan
does little more than stagnate
the economy.

A wiser move to boost the
country’s financial status and
create jobs for thousands of
Bahamians looking for work
during a global economic crisis
would be to support small
businesses, Mr Moss said at a
press conference yesterday.

Pressures

He also called for the gov-
ernment to reduce mortgage
rates and thereby relieve
financial pressures and allow
people more financial free-
dom to stimulate the econo-
my.
“The stimulus package is an
illusion,” he claimed.

“It is causing the economy
to be stagnant and stagnating
business. What the govern-
ment doesn’t understand is
that small businesses keep the
economy going, because small
businesses are responsible for
more than 90 per cent of the
employment of workers in this
country.

“What is the government
doing to ensure the small busi-
nesses keep their doors open?
What are they going to do
with respect to redundancies

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because of the funds small
businesses have to pay?
“We have to do it from a posi-
tion that allows businesses to
feel good and not have to lay
off staff.”

Of those who recently lost
their jobs in Grand Bahama,
48 per cent were laid off or
dismissed, while around 44 per
cent of the recently unem-
ployed in New Providence
were dismissed.

from 8.7 per cent in May 2008
to 12.1 per cent, according to
an interim survey conducted
by the Department of Statis-
tics last month.

This leaves a total of 16,315
people looking for work in



Unemployment figures are
at the highest they have been
in 15 years and show that
around half of people out of
work in Grand Bahama and
one-third of job seekers in
New Providence lost their jobs
in the last six months.

Survey

Unemployment among the
134,400-strong work force in
New Providence has risen

New Providence alone.
While in Grand Bahama the
number of people out of work
increased to 14.6 per cent,
meaning there are 4,195 peo-
ple looking for work ina
labour force of 28,820.

NUON TO

ABOVE: THE original Thierry Lamare water colour entitled
“Conch Shell and Peppers.” The artist donated the paint-
ing and a limited edition print to help raise funds at the
Inner Wheel Club of East Nassau’s Pink Ball. The gener-
al public is invited to bid in advance of the ball on the art-
work, which will be on display at Bahama Hand Prints.

LOCAL artist Thierry Lamare recently donated
an original water colour and limited edition print to
the Inner Wheel Club of East Nassau’s Pink Ball in
aid of breast and prostate cancer awareness and
prevention.

The artwork will be part of the silent auction at
the ball held on Saturday, March 14 at the British
Colonial Hilton.

The original painting titled “Conch Shell and
Peppers” depicts a simple still life scene which was
inspired by a garden of a Bahamian lady who lives in
Long Island.

The larger limited giclée entitled “Close to Shore”
captures a fisherman in a wooden skiff fishing near
the shoreline in a scene that harkens back to an age
when life was simpler.

Both illustrate the artist’s ability to capture every-
day Bahamian life and scenes with extraordinary
use of light.

The artist was compelled to donate his art to help
raise awareness for breast and prostate cancer.

“This is an important and good cause to support,”
said Mr Lamare.

“Cancer has affected everyone in some way and I
wanted to do what I could to show my support and
to help raise funds.

“The inspiration for my art comes from Bahami-
an people and their everyday activities, particularly
in the Family Islands, I feel it is important to give
back to that community.”

The public is invited to bid in advance of the Pink
Ball on both pieces of artwork. The art will be on dis-
play at Bahama Hand Prints located on Ernest
Street during regular business hours 8am — 4pm.
Monday — Friday and 10am — 2pm on Saturday.

The public is also invited to bid on a one-of-a-kind
quilt created by the members of the Stepping Stone
Quilters entitled “Aqua Bliss.”

The queen-sized quilt and matching European
pillow shams are comprised of a myriad of blue
hued shapes and designs of Bahama Hand Prints
original fabrics and is on display at the Maison
Décor Lyford Cay location. Bids will also be taken

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artwork to Heather Peterson, president of the Inner
Wheel Club of East Nassau. The original painting and
limited edition print will be part of the Pink Ball’s silent
auction to help raise funds for breast and prostate can-
cer. The general public is invited to bid in advance of
the ball on the artwork, which will be on display at
Bahama Hand Prints.

at the Parliament Street location during regular
business hours.

“We wanted to open the bidding on these extra-
ordinary pieces to a wider audience and bids have
already come in as many people wish to support
this important cause,” said Heather Peterson, pres-
ident of the Inner Wheel Club of East Nassau.

“We are very grateful to Mr Lamare and the
many other individual artists and local companies
that have donated generously to our silent auction
and raffle. “Our goal is to raise funds to assist the
Cancer Society with their ongoing cancer screen-
ings for breast and prostate cancer in the Family
Islands and with research. It is also our wish that the
Pink Ball will create an awareness of the impor-
tance of having mammograms and prostate screen-
ings. We especially hope that our effort will help
many detect breast and prostate cancer early which
ultimately saves lives.”

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HUNDREDS of persons
attempting to have their pre-
scriptions filled by the
Princess Margaret Hospital
pharmacy yesterday were
frustrated by extremely long
waiting times.

They are now demanding
answers from hospital offi-
cials as to what is being done
to rectify the ongoing prob-
lem.

PMH said in a statement
yesterday that its pharmacy is
faced with a number of chal-
lenges, particularly in staffing.

The hospital said that it
does not have sufficient phar-
macists to fill out-patient and
in-patient prescriptions, and
at the same time operate the
drop-off service and the new
the senior citizen/disabled
person service.

However, PMH denied that
the delays were caused by the
availability of medication or
the newly implemented phar-
macy GE Centricy software
system launched earlier this
year.

“(The delays relate to) a
significant deficit in the num-
ber of pharmacists on duty.
The role of the pharmacist is
to ensure accuracy of pre-
scriptions or refills at all
times,” the hospital said.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Security
guard heaten
and stabbed in
the hack

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A CITY Market security
guard was violently beaten
and stabbed in the back when
he tried to prevent three
young men from stealing from
the store.

Kernio Dulcio, 30,
approached the three men
when he saw them trying to
steal items from the Village
Road supermarket shortly
after 8pm on Monday.

But the men retaliated by
brutally beating the conscien-
tious officer and stabbing him
in the back.

Mr Dulcio was rushed to the
emergency room at Princess
Margaret Hospital where he
was treated for serious
injuries.

He was discharged early
yesterday morning.

He is employed by Execu-
tive Security Company and
has been a faithful employee
for some time, bosses said.

Police have two 16-year-old
boys in custody in connection
with the incident.

Anyone who may be able to
assist in the police investiga-
tion should call 919, 322-444,
or call Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-8477.

Two men face
unlawful
intercourse
charges

TWO men were brought
before the courts yesterday on
unlawful intercourse charges.

Paul Javin Thompson, of
Fire Trail Close, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Susan Sylvester in Court 11,
Nassau Street, charged with
having unlawful intercourse
with a person under the age of
14.

It is alleged that Thompson
had unlawful intercourse with
the underage girl sometime
during the month of August
2008.

Thompson was not required
to enter a plea to the charge
and was granted bail in the
sum of $5,000. The case has
been adjourned to August 20.

Henry Lewis Saunders, of
Kemp Road, was also
arraigned before Magistrate
Susan Sylvester in Court 11,
Nassau Street, charged, in a
separate incident, with having
unlawful intercourse with a
girl between 14 and 16 years
of age.

It is alleged that Saunders
had unlawful intercourse with
a 14-year-old girl on Saturday,
March 7, 2009.

Saunders was not required
to enter a plea to the charge
and was granted bail in the
sum of $5,000.

The case has been
adjourned to August 13.

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FOULKES SPEAKS AMID CONCERN OVER CHINESE INVOLVEMENT IN PROJECT

Govt plans to ‘maximise’ number
of Bahamian stadium workers

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT intends to
"maximise" the number of
Bahamian workers used in the
construction of the proposed
state-of-the-art national stadi-
um funded by the Chinese gov-
ernment, Minister of Labour
Dion Foulkes said yesterday.

This statement comes amid
growing concern that a large
number of Chinese workers will
enter the country once con-
struction on the highly-touted
stadium begins.

"We are going to try to max-
imise the amount of Bahamian
workers at the stadium and with
that gift comes the material and

Hf
ee.

Dion MOU Ces





“... we will
attempt to max-
imise the amount
of Bahamian par-
ticiaption in that
project.”



Dion Foulkes

also labour," said Mr Foulkes.

"That is part of the agreement
that was signed under the pre-
vious government.

“So that is an agreement that
we will honour, but we will
attempt to maximise the amount
of Bahamian participation in

Minister: govt will do everything it

that project.” In January, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham reaf-
firmed his administration's com-
mitment to starting construction
on the stadium sometime this
year — more than four years
after the deal was signed with
The People’s Republic of China
to fund the project.

In late October 2008 — a year
after the stadium was first
expected to be completed, the
government advised China to
start shipping their heavy con-
struction equipment to the
Bahamas.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune that month, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister said the size
of the multi-use stadium will be
"adapted for Bahamians” —

making it smaller than the initial
plan of a 30,000-seat venue.

The former PLP administra-
tion signed a deal in 2004 allow-
ing the Chinese government to
fund the construction of the sta-
dium, which would be valued at
$30 million upon completion.
The FNM assumed office in
2007 and there was reportedly
some delay in the progress of
the stadium due to time needed
by the Ministry of Works to
review the Chinese’ designs,
ensuring that they were up to
code.

The proposed stadium was
the subject of much political
furore, with the current admin-
istration blaming the delay on
PLP mismanagement.

can to help Bahamians during crisis

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE government will do everything in its power
to ease the financial burden placed on Bahamians
during these tumultuous economic times, said
Labour Minister Dion Foulkes yesterday.

These efforts by the government include peri-
odic reviews of, and possible adjustments to the
government's stimulus packages as the economic
climate dictates, said the Senator.

"What we plan to do is to review exactly what we
are doing in respect to our stimulus to ensure that we
are doing enough so that we can provide additional
jobs,” Mr Foulkes said to reporters outside of Cab-
inet yesterday.

"We will review the situation to ensure that we do
enough. We realise a lot of people are unemployed,
people are having difficulties paying their mort-
gages, their rent and meeting their bills. So the gov-
ernment will do everything in its power to ensure
that we ease the burden on all Bahamians.”

Mr Foulkes’ remarks came just days after the
latest unemployment figures — the highest in 15
years — were released by the Department of Sta-
tistics. According to those figures, the number of
people out of work in New Providence stands at
16,315, and in Grand Bahama at over 4,195 — equiv-
alent to a 12.1 and 14.6 per cent unemployment rate
respectively. The figures show that around half of all
people who are without work in Grand Bahama lost
their jobs in the last six months, with 48 per cent of
them reporting having been “laid-off or dismissed.”

In New Providence, one third were put on the

Armed robber



unemployment line during the same period, and of
these, 44 per cent were laid off or dismissed. Over-
all, in New Providence, unemployment among the
134,400-strong labour force rose from 8.7 per cent in
May 2008 to 12.1 per cent, based on the interim sur-
vey conducted last month.

Unemployment

While these numbers present a dismal reality,
Mr Foulkes said that considering the job market in
other countries, in particular the United States, the
unemployment situation could be much worse.

Any buffer Bahamians are experiencing from
the brunt of the American recession can be chalked
up to the stimulus packages the government put in
place, he added. "The unemployment rate increased
in New Providence to 12.1 per cent and in the Unit-
ed States over a corresponding period the unem-
ployment rate increased by almost 100 per cent. In
the Bahamas it increased by (about) 40 per cent, so
we must be doing some things right in respect to
our stimulus package,” he said.

An Unemployment Benefit Fund, which Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham announced during the
mid-year budget debate, is expected to be imple-
mented on July 1. In the interim, a training pro-
gramme for the unemployed is scheduled to be start-
ed shortly.

Officials have said the programme will have a
work component, allowing the out-of- work to
receive intern-like training while receiving a stipend.

Government has also launched environmental
clean-up campaigns and will start a number of cap-
ital works projects with the goal of creating jobs.

Police plea for help over alleged sex attack

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POLICE are asking persons
with any information pertaining
to an alleged sexual attack on a
primary school girl in January to
come forward.

Head of the Central Detective
Unit (CDU) Elsworth Moss said
yesterday that police have not
made any headway in identifying
the teenage assailants who are
alleged to have sexually attacked
a six-year-old girl.

Supt Moss said while the inves-
tigation into the alleged attack is
still continuing, police have met a
road block in their inquiries.

"We're not in a position to
charge anybody,” Supt Moss said
yesterday. "We're still hoping we
can get someone to come forward
in terms of identifying (the alleged
assailants).”

The attack reportedly occurred
on January 23, shortly after 3pm
on the primary school's premis-
es, however, it was not made pub-
lic until about two weeks later
after a concerned parent contact-
ed The Tribune.

It was reported that the girl was
lured behind the school by a
group of boys — between two to

terrorises staff




































AN ARMED robber terri-
fied the staff of the Fantasy
Café and Electronics on Bal-
four Avenue when he held
them at gunpoint as he stole
cash from the store on Mon-
day afternoon.

The gunman burst into the
store shortly before 1pm,
threatened the shop keeper
and security guard with a
deadly weapon and forced
them to the back of the store.

He then fled the store with
an undetermined amount of
cash in an unknown direc-
tion.

Police have described the
gunman as light-skinned,
medium-sized and around 6ft
tall.

Anyone who may be able
to assist the police in the
investigation should call 919,
322-4444 or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 324-
8477.

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four of them — wearing sec-
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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Crime news needs to be published

ABACONIANS, a vocal lot when aroused,
were more than angry when they learned that
their local police had gone hush-hush with crime
news.

Obviously alarmed by the rising crime in
the small, closely-knit island, a police superin-
tendent is said to have told the local newspaper
that his office will no longer issue crime reports
for publication. We don’t know if he thought
that by not publishing the crime it would mag-
ically disappear. However, his explanation was
that such publication would “reflect badly on the
police.”

What he didn’t understand was that the only
way that it would reflect badly on his officers
would be if they were seen not to be doing
their duty. Instead of silencing the press, they
should be using it to encourage residents to
join them in their fight against crime.

Once the legitimate press is silenced, the Sip-
Sip Express slides into motion and what it
churns out is often lethal to the well-being of a
small community. A thread of truth is quickly
turned into a horror movie filled with misin-
formation, exaggeration, and tall tails, enough to
make a community disappear behind locked
doors and barred windows. It is best for the
police to release the information, which will
contain the truth as far as it is known, and will
make residents feel secure to know that their
police officers are aware of what’s going on
and are on top of their job.

But silence and an announced attempt to
hide information is like pouring petrol onto
dying embers. That is when whatever the Sip-Sip
Express publishes by word of mouth is taken as
truth. “It must be true, or else the police would-
n’t try so hard to hide it,” is the thought process,
as one local adds his opinion and hands the sto-
ry on to his neighbour for another recycle and
more embellishment.

Abaconians are alarmed at the increase in
crime in their island. They are even more wor-
ried because they perceive their police officers
to be ineffective in face of the new threat. And,
instead of the officers calling headquarters in
Nassau for assistance, their announcement not
to release information was seen as the last straw.

Abaco is the one island that appears to be
holding its own during this economic recession.
Recently in the House of Assembly one of its
representatives, Mr Edison Key, attributed this
relative success to the number of second homes
established there, and owned by foreigners who
have been attracted to the island.

They have settled happily among the people
and spend many months of the year on an island
where they feel secure.

No wonder Abaconians are worried. Not only
do they live in physical fear for themselves, but
they also fear losing their livelihood should
crime frighten off their out-of-town neighbours.

The Tribune reported last Wednesday that
residents were particularly alarmed by the
attempted kidnapping of a would-be investor
during the Junkanoo parade last month.

According to the report the investor sought
police help after being released from the boot of
his own car by a thief who demanded that he
withdraw money from an ATM machine in
Marsh Harbour.

When the investor sought police help, the
report continues, the officer allegedly replied: “T
can’t help — I’m here to patrol the Junkanoo
parade.” This is the typical reply of a small
time cop, who has never heard of big town
crime.

Meanwhile, during this exchange the kid-
napper disappeared into the crowd of revellers.

He had earlier threatened the investor with a
machete as he forced him into the boot of his
car.

Whatever investment the foreigner had
planned in Abaco obviously ended then and
there.

Then there was the mugging in her home of
well known resident, Ms Lily Sands, who is in
her seventies. She was locked in a closet in her
home while thieves stole money and other per-
sonal items.

And then there is the theft of mega yachts —
some valued at more than $100,000 — that tie
up at Abaco’s marinas. It is reported that on
more than one occasion boats arrive in Abaco
one day and have been stolen the next.

“Boats are disappearing like crazy,” said one
resident. “We have to get help up here. We
must get Nassau’s attention because this crime
is going to kill the economy.”

At least they have caught the attention of
Assistant Police Commissioner Hulan Hanna
who announced yesterday that the police in
Abaco will continue to release crime reports.

It is now up to the police, supported by the
residents, to find the criminals and get them
behind bars in H M Prison, Fox Hill, Nassau.

This must be a joint effort between the police
and the community. For this to happen there
must be full disclosure of information, which will
result in mutual trust and cooperation.



How King
Hubert slowed
the country’s
momentum

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The anchor projects negoti-
ated and left, in place, at various
stages of commitment by
Christie’s Administration, could
have been, by now, producing
revenue sufficient to fund, with-
out having to borrow, the so-
called stimulus package the
FNM government has now pro-
posed.

If Ingraham had allowed the
PLP’s approved projects to con-
tinue without interruption, we
could have been home free and
would not have had to borrow
from the Chinese or anybody
else to see us through these tur-
bulent times; but king Hubert
couldn’t leave well enough
alone, so he stopped them and
changed them and adjusted
them and re-branded what was
left of them, so he could claim
ownership of them.

By doing what he did, it
slowed the country’s growth
momentum, and in the process
shattered investor confidence
in precisely the way the PLP
levied its charges which were
supported by the report given
by S&P.

Standard and Poor agreed
with the PLP’s assertions, when
they issued their report, which is
a matter of public record now,
on the state of affairs in the
country and the fact that the
FNM government was mostly
to blame for the economic
decline we are experiencing.

$150 million from the Chi-
nese, $200 million from a con-
sortium of banks, to be bor-
rowed, in an effort to stave off
bankrupting of the country,
which seems inevitable if we
continue down the road Ingra-
ham and Laing are dragging us.
We are eight months into this
fiscal period and eighteen
months away from the earliest
projection of any kind of relief
from this recession.

If the country’s revenue is
showing the kind of negative
traits, in this short a period,
where it has under performed to
the degree where it necessitated
us borrowing, so far, $350 mil-
lion, just think of our position in

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



eighteen months; even a child
can predict the precarious cir-
cumstances, with which we will
be faced, when that period
expires.

Revenue collected by the
Customs dept represents —
depending on whose point of
view is being given-about 80 per
cent of the country’s total
income.

Smarty-pants and his boss,
Hubert Ingraham, dismissed all
the top brass from customs and
then employed in excess of 100
trainees who are presently in
the classroom for the next six
months.

Who is minding the store, you
ask? Ask smarty-pants, Zhivar-
go Laing; I just hope, for the
country’s sake, that they are not
banking on collecting a whole
lot more customs duties any-
time soon, now that the top
brass was fired.

And then smarty pants and
his boss have plans, afoot, to
put the Officers on shifts, come
July this year; well there goes
the rest of the customs revenue.
The standard of living those
officers have got themselves use
too, over the years, with the
large amount of overtime they
are accustomed to earning, will,
for them, be a most difficult task
to try and make the kind of
adjustments necessary to cope.
Ingraham and Laing’s decisions
are all devoid of the human ele-
ment; they care very little, if any
at all, about the impact this
overtime stoppage will have on
these officers’ way of life.

The national debt, I predict,
will grow outrageously under
Ingraham in this term in office
as it did under him, during 1992-
2002. He took our national
debt, during that period, from a
low $970 million, inherited from
the PLP’s 25-year stint, to a
whopping $2.1 billion, at the
time he was kicked out of office
in 2002. The experts are pre-
dicting that, at the rate the

FNM is going presently, with
the borrowing of this $350 mil-
lion so far, the national debt
will spiral out of control well
before there is any relief from
our economic woes; thanks to
the FNM government’s bad
policies. The experts say, with
this borrowed amount, the
national debt is now essentially
at $3.22 billion and climbing. It
is, further, the view of the
experts that the IMF will defi-
nitely become concerned over
our borrowings, as the country’s
ability to repay and service this
debt will become more and
more cumbersome. There is a
likelihood of Ingraham having
to borrow another $100 million
to pay civil servants’ salaries,
etc, and that would immediate-
ly put the borrowed amount at
half a billion; well above the
debt-GDP ratio tolerance of 42
per cent; “a figure this nation
is poised to succeed by year’s
end” according to Mr Al Jar-
rett. With the $100 million bor-
rowed, the debt load might well
increase to 45.7 per cent, con-
tinued Mr Jarrett.

What can I say, we are in a
holy mess and both captain and
mate are sitting at the helm, but
neither of them knows what the
hell they are doing.

This being said, we are bound
to end up on the rocks of eco-
nomic disaster under this lame
brain government.

FORRESTER J CARROLL
Freeport,

Grand Bahama

March 2, 2009.

(Would Mr Carroll please
explain why former prime min-
ister Christie did not complete
his anchor projects so that they
could have been started during
his administration, instead of
leaving them in “various stages
of commitment” for the Ingra-
ham government to complete?
If Mr Carroll would look at the
number of years that some of
these were haggled over — with
at least one of them threatening
to pull out because of govern-
ment delays — Mr Christie’s
nae i was inexcusable.

You cannot go on deluding the public, Mr Carey

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Again, we sincerely apologise to our neigh-
bours for any inconvenience suffered, and we
assure everyone that a zero tolerance policy now
applies to any private functions booked at the
Retreat. This headache is now a thing of the past.

The quote by Eric Carey of the Bahamas
National Trust can go down in Bahamain history
as our equivalent to U.S President Bush’s ‘Mission
accomplished’ re the Iraq war, or perhaps
Britain’s Prime Minister Chamberlin’s ‘Peace in

the public. You must do the job you are being
handsomely paid for. I find it interesting that

neither Carey nor Gape consider this problem
serious enough to personally monitor the events.

Upon reading Mr Carey’s apology and his rec-
ommendations to ensure harmony in the area |
called the Trust, spoke to Ms Mills and asked
what I should do in the unlikely event of more
noise. She assured me there would be a respon-
sible person in the office at all times and that by
simply calling the Trust, I would be able to speak

to a responsible person on site.

I have been told and I believe it to be true that
the Bahamas National Trust does not have the
required licences and permits to host these parties
where liquor is served and music is played. If this
is true it is a serious oversight by the Trust and
adds even more weight to banning all parties.

Mr. Carey, I will not simply roll over and die.
Tam right, you are wrong. I can assure you I will
do whatever I legally can to ensure peace in my
environment, even if you don’t care.

our Time.’

By the stroke of Carey’s mighty pen he was
able to make the Bahamian people believe the
Bahamas National Trust was going to behave
itself. It would no longer be a blight on the com-
munity. This, of course, was nonsense.

On Saturday last yet another noisy party was
held at the Trust. I called Carey twice and got the
same old reply he would call the security guard.
The third call was not accepted, nor was I able to
get through to Lynne Gape.

The party continued until past one o’clock Sun-
day morning. Nassau,

Shame, shame. You cannot go on deluding March 9, 2009

Rejuvenating our tourism industry

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LEONARD SMITH

they would in fact reduce the
fees of its retail licencees by 50
per cent effective until February
2010. The question is, how is

NEW CONDOS

this move going to affect all of
us here on Grand Bahama?

How is this move going to
affect hoteliers, tour operators,
straw and seafood vendors?
How is this move going to affect
cabs and public bus drivers,
hotel and casino workers?

The GBPA is aware that the
majority of the people
employed on this Island are
directly or indirectly in the
tourism industry.

Would it not be practical then
that they also reduce the fees
by the same amount at the air-
port and harbour so as to restart
our failing tourism product for
the same period of time?

It has been announced that
the GBPA has indicated that

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





British ruling
blocks istand from
hanging two killers

A CARIBBEAN island :
has been blocked from hang- }
ing two brutal killers by a i
British ruling which reflects
the Bahamas’ own frustra-
tions over the death penalty.

Antigua’s prosecutors
have expressed despair over
an agreement with the
British government which
prevents them executing the
murderers of a Welsh honey- }
moon couple who were i
killed in their holiday chalet
last year.

Adlai Smith, Antigua’s
director of public prosecu-
tions, said: “It’s unfortunate,
it’s regrettable. These men
deserve the harshest penalty
the law can impose for this
horrendous crime. But we
have given our word and we
can’t go back on it.”

Antigua’s holiday trade
was badly hit after Ben and
Catherine Mullany were
murdered on what was sup-
posed to be an idyllic honey- }
moon trip. i

Hundreds of tourists can-
celled their bookings,
prompting Prime Minister
Baldwin Spencer to say the
island’s future was at risk.

Scotland Yard was called
in to investigate the crime.

But Britain agreed only if
the island promised not to
execute the killers if they

were found and convicted.

Antigua, a former British
colony that has been inde-
pendent since 1981, was
among Caribbean nations
that voted to inaugurate a
regional appeal court to
replace the Privy Council.

But the Antiguan constitu-
tion still states that the Privy
Council, which usually over-
turns death sentences, is the
final court of appeal.

Detectives from London
tracked down the killers
through mobile phones
stolen from the victims. :

Two local men, Avie How- }
el, 18, and Kaniel Martin, 21, }
were charged with murder
last August. The gun used to
kill the Mullanys has been
linked to three other mur-
ders. i
In the Bahamas, three pro- }
hanging marches were staged }
last year to call for the return }
of the death penalty. ;

Demonstrators expressed
anger at the rising murder
rate and demanded govern-
ment action.

However, the Privy Coun-
cil has ruled the mandatory
death penalty to be “uncon-
stitutional” and, in its rul-
ings, generally reflects the
UK’s opposition to capital
punishment.

The last man to hang in ;
Nassau was David Mitchell, a }
Haitian-Bahamian who ;
murdered a European cou-
ple in Abaco.

He went to the gallows in
January, 2000.

Group calls for Commission
of Inquiry into CLICO failure

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

THE FAILURE of CLI-
CO (Bahamas) should be
subject to a Commission of
Inquiry, according to the
activist group Bahamians
Agitating for a Referendum
on the FTAA (BARF).

BARF’s co-chairmen Paul
Moss and Fayne Thompson
yesterday called on the gov-
ernment to launch an official
inquiry to look into who is
responsible for the collapse
of CLICO (Bahamas) and
why it was allowed to crum-
ble when problems had been
identified as early as 2004.

The inquiry and an imme-
diate audit of insurance com-
panies to ensure their finan-
cial health would help pre-



® ' i bs a
FAYNE THOMPSON and Paul Moss are pictured in this file photo.

vent other companies from
crashing, Mr Moss said yes-
terday at a press conference.

BAREF is also calling on
policy holders to object to
the government’s decision to
liquidate the company, and
it maintains the decision was
a knee-jerk reaction at the
expense of 29,000 policy
holders and 170 employees.

Pageant demands may
prompt govt to seek
additional airport funding

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE government may seek
additional funding from the pri-
vate sector to temporarily spruce
up the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport to meet the needs
of the 2009 Miss Universe
pageant, Tourism and Aviation
Minister Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace said.

Speaking to reporters outside
of Cabinet yesterday morning,
Senator Vanderpool-Wallace said
his ministry may request more
money from the Nassau Paradise
Island Promotion Board to facili-
tate a swift facelift of the airport.

"We regularly call on our
friends in the private sector, Nas-
sau Paradise Island Promotion
Board in particular, when we
need any specific kind of short-
term work that needs to be done -
they have many times come
to our aid in terms of providing
that.

However, the ministry will also
continue to look for other sources
of funding for this project, he said.

Last week, Senator Vander-
pool-Wallace said the airport -
which is often described as an eye-
sore - will be getting some aes-
thetic and infrastructural improve-
ments in the months leading up to
the prestigious pageant.

“In terms of the kind of wel-
come we have in place, certainly
we have that in hand - what the
place looks like. We will have that
in hand, but there is no doubt that
the schedule that has already been
started with the redevelopment

Vincent Vanni alee

of the airport is going to continue
on the same pace,” Mr Vander-
pool- Wallace said recently.

“And to the degree that that is
going to interfere in any way,
shape or form, in terms of what
the airport looks like, we are
going to mask that as best we
can.”

The pageant, to be hosted at
Atlantis, Paradise Island, in late
August, will showcase the country
to millions of potential visitors - a
publicity boost that tourism offi-
cials said will provide invaluable
exposure.

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Mr Moss called on policy
holders to band together and
insist upon objectivity by
applying for the appointment
of a second liquidator at the
hearing on March 17.

CLICO (Bahamas) clients
should also insist that Minis-
ter of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing recuse him-
self from the matter as he is

instruments

presented
to St Annes

THE proceeds from the
Annual Epiphany Organ
Recital performed by organ-
ist Dr Sparkman Ferguson at
Christ Church Cathedral
resulted in the presentation of
musical instruments for
deserving St Annes High
School students.

Cynthia Wells, the school’s
principal, along with Karel
Coleby, music director at St
Annes High School, accepted
the instruments.

TAIL VES

a former director of Colina
Imperial and his former
employer may have an inter-
est in CLICO’s assets, Mr
Moss said.

“The inquiry should look
at the relationships of regu-
lators and the industry where
it is not uncommon for for-
mer government officials to
sit on the boards of insur-
ance companies or connected
companies, thereto bringing
their objectivity into ques-
tion on decisions made or
about to be made,” he said.

The governments of
Trinidad and Guyana have
shown more support for their
people by bailing out CLI-
CO to ensure policy holders
do not lose their investments,
Mr Moss said.

He added: “It is not suffi-
cient for them (the govern-
ment) to say they are not

“We are excited with the
quality of the instruments.
Fortunately for us, as a result
of the generosity of Dr Fer-
guson, we now have addition-
al instruments to afford our
students opportunities,” Mrs
Wells said.

The band programme at St
Annes, in addition to provid-

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‘nassau 688 1 be us " sport SNA Be

going to do this, that they
believe in the free markets,
etc.

“This is critical, and it
needs to be fixed.

“This is what we put them
there for.”

By not bailing out the
bank, the government will
end up paying out funds to
those who are forced to turn
to public funds when they
lose their life savings, BARF
said.

And the implications are
far reaching as thousands
more Bahamians who have
CLICO policies through
credit unions will also lose
out.

BARF warned policy hold-
ers to stop paying into CLI-
CO (Bahamas) policies, as
funds will be directed to
the liquidator to pay off
debts.

ST ANNES students
with some of the
instruments.

ing students with music skills,
teaches self-discipline, self-
respect, and respect for oth-
ers along with creative prob-
lem solving and physical, men-
tal and emotional growth
“Each year, we have to turn
away students from the band
because they cannot afford
instruments,” Mr Coleby said.



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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Visitors needs more cultural
experiences in the Bahamas

He TOWN, Abaco —
In 1976 the late Ameri-
can writer Alex Haley won a
Pulitzer prize for Roots, an histor-
ical novel said to have been based
on his family history, starting with
an African named Kunta Kinte
who was kidnapped into slavery.

The book was adapted into a
sensational TV mini-series that
played endlessly on ZNS whenev-
er election time rolled around.
And while it later transpired that
Haley's specific genealogical claims
did not pan out, in the end that
did not matter — they were gener-
ically true.

Although critics condemned the
book as fraudulent, Harvard pro-
fessor Henry Louis Gates Jr put it
this way: "Roots is a work of the
imagination rather than strict his-
torical scholarship. It was an
important event because it cap-
tured everyone's imagination."

Tough Call could produce a
similarly fanciful account that
would be just as accurate in its own
way — an idea that took shape this
past weekend while attending
Hope Town's Heritage Day.

This annual fair staged by the
local museum celebrates the set-
tlement's founding by a loyalist
widow named Wyannie Malone,
who came to Abaco some 10 years
before Kunta Kinte was supposed
to have arrived in America.

Little is known about Wyan-
nie's ancestors, although a massive
hardcover genealogy "bible" doc-

uments her descendants (includ-
ing me) in excruciating detail. But
Bahamian Peter Roberts, an
archivist at Georgia State Univer-
sity who specialises in these things,
provided a glimpse of the way
backward in a Heritage Day lec-
ture he presented in Hope Town
last Saturday.

For the past few years Prof
Roberts has been promoting the
Bahamas DNA Project, a genetic
database that tracks the roots of
those Bahamians who submit their
DNA for testing by a genealogy
lab. So far, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon,
Slavic, Berber, Abyssinian and
West African origins have been
identified for Bahamian partici-
pants.

One result shows that a direct
Bahamian descendant of Wyan-
nie Malone is a perfect DNA
match with an American Malone
who traces his genealogy to Vir-
ginia, with origins in Ireland.

This Malone's family history
says they came to America by way
of the Bahamas, but that an ances-
tor named Daniel was born in
Westmeath, Ireland in 1642 and
was “in the colonies” by 1665.

In other words, the Bahamian

US tourist believed
to have drowned

FROM page one

Cat Cay is a privately owned island about eight miles off
South Bimini on which the private Cat Cay Yacht Club and
Marina are located. However Mr Merril’s dive boat was not

docked at the marina.

Mr Jeff Dubel, spokesman for the US Embassy in Queen
Street, said he cannot comment on individual cases but that Mr
Merril’s family has been notified and an autopsy is being done
in accordance with Bahamian law.

Police investigations are continuing and anyone who may be
able to assist should call the police at 919 or 322-4444,

‘S) Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

CHARLES

FRANCIS DAVIS,

49

Of Kennedy Subdivision, off
Soldier Road will be held on
Thursday, March 12th, 9:45am
at St. Cecilia’s Roman Catholic
Church, 3rd Street, Coconut
Grove Avenue. Monsignor
Simeon Roberts will officiate.
Cremains will be interned in

St. Agnes Cemetery, Nassau Street.

He is survived by his sisters, Eloise Huyler, Maria Davis,

Bloneva Johnson, Shirley
Blake of Ontario, Canada;

Scavella and Pauline Tessie-
brothers, Maxwell S. Walkes

of Florida, Phillip A. Walkes, Blaise A. Taylor, James L.

Davis of Atlanta, Georgi

a, William “Tony” Davis of

Treasure Cay, Abaco, Walter “Tony” Davis of Fort Pierce,
Florida and Jim Davis; aunts, Dorothea Strachan, Julia

Thompson, Oletha Carroll

, Anna Brooks, Annie Archer,

Eloise Archer, Clarissa Neymour of Grand Bahama,
Maxine and Deanne Archer; uncles, Leonard “Skinny”
Archer, John “Femo” Neymour of Grand Bahama, Samuel
Archer of Abaco, Hilton Archer of Grand Bahama, Duke
Errol Strachan, Henry Books and Sylvester Ramsey;
nieces, Patrice Huyler, Glenell Scantlebury, Samantha
Walkes, Maresha Walkes, Phillipa McFarland, Gelenann

Long, Anastacia Walkes, C

ara Adderley, Tara Cartwright,

Janice Taylor, Daynette Blackwell of Austin, Texas, Wanda
McPhee of Springfield, Virginia, Alesia Baillou, Kisshnell

Davis, Bianca Maycock,

Denise and Genie Scavella,

Taneisha and Shevante Davis; nephews, David of New
York, Peco Jade Sands of Abaco, Kermit Smith of Raleigh,
North Carolina, Sean Walkes of Ontario, Canada, Tokey
and Maxwell Walkes of Miami, Florida, Elvis Walkes,
Blaise Taylor Jr., Craig Brown, Marvin and Michael
Johnson, Jude Scavella, Corey Davis, Orey Godet, Perez

Davis, Robert Maycock Jr.

and Steven Sealy; sisters-in-

law, Johnny Ruth Dukes of Miami, Florida, Janis Nicole
Taylor, Joanna Davis of Fort Pierce, Florida and Karen

Walkes of San Salvador;

other family and relatives

including, Millicent and Vincent Fernander of Miami,
Florida, Mrs. Carey of Malcolm Road, East, Eleanor Karen
Rolle and family, Stephen Ramsey and family, Sylvester
Ramsey and family, Robert and Theresa Moncur and
family, Florence, Vincent and Anton Brooks, Kevin Archer,

Lavern Archer, Gerard and

Stephen Archer, Geoffrey and

Catherine McPhee and family, Ernest and Marilyn
Cambridge and family, Adrian and Marcian Deveaux,
Kara, Kayna and Devon Dean, Anya Munnings, Nicole

Eve and the staff of Accid

ent and Emergency and Male

Medical Ward of The Princess Margaret Hospital;
numerous grand and great-grand nieces and nephews,
cousins, and other relatives too numerous to mention.





Malones may have originally left
the ‘auld sod' for Eleuthera, then
moved to Virginia and on to South
Carolina, before leaving from
Charleston in 1785 to settle in Aba-
co.

As an aside, Wyannie's husband,
Benjamin, fought for the British
in the War of Independence, and
their descendants were strict
protestants. So clearly, they were
not Irish patriots.

There were many non-Malones
present at the recent Heritage Day
celebrations, and Prof Roberts had
lots of interesting snippets of infor-
mation about some of them.

For example, genetic testing
shows that the Bahamian Lowe's
do not trace their lineage to the
British Isles as most of us would
suspect. Instead, they have a Por-
tuguese background and are prob-
ably related to Sephardic Jews who
were expelled from Iberia in the
15th century.

Since 2004 the Bahamas DNA
Project has tested hundreds of peo-
ple, most of them with an Abaco
or Key West background. But this
represents only about a third of
the 195 surnames found in the
Bahamas, and black Bahamian
families are grossly under-repre-
sented, Prof Roberts told an avid
audience in the Hope Town
library. And before you ask, no
trace of Lucayan ancestry has yet
been found — not even among
Long Islanders.

"The DNA results so far show
that we Bahamians are all closely
related and have a shared her-
itage," Prof Roberts said, adding
that: "If a black person marries
into a white family there will be
no visible trace of that after only
six generations — and vice versa."

The "Roots-like" suggestion
that the Malones may have arrived
on Eleuthera before settling on
Abaco was supported to a degree
by Florida archaeologist Bob Carr,
who also gave a talk at the Her-
itage Day event. Carr has been
investigating Bahamian sites since

at least 1986, when he helped con-
firm the discovery of Carleton,
Abaco's original loyalist settlement
located near present-day Treasure
Cay.

Re: the past several years
Carr has been digging up
Preachers Cave at North
Eleuthera, a geological feature
which he describes as "the Ply-
mouth Rock of the Bahamas", and
which contains Lucayan, European
and African cultural remains.

"The Eleutherean Adventur-
ers never came to the Bahamas,"
he told the Hope Town audience.
"They were the investors back in
London who were hoping to find
precious metals and valuable hard-
woods in the islands. About 70
people arrived on Eleuthera from
Bermuda in 1648, but we have nev-
er found the list of names. We do
know that within two years there
were 150 people living near
Preachers Cave, including free
blacks and some slaves."

After a 1656 slave conspiracy in
Bermuda led by a free black
named William Force, some of the
plotters were banished to the
Bahamas, which Carr referred to
as "the first Australia”.

Many white Bermudians were
also exiled to the Bahamas, and
DNA evidence has confirmed that
descendants of these first settlers
now live in nearby Spanish Wells.
Others ended up in Harbour
Island, Nassau, and possibly Aba-
co, Carr said.

Preachers Cave has been an
archaeological site since 1992 and
has yielded important information
about Bahamian history. It was
originally a Lucayan cemetary, and
among the five Indian burials that
have been found is one of a chief
or shaman, together with the bones
of a sacrificial victim who was
beheaded with hands and feet tied.
Charcoal found at the site has been
radiocarbon-dated to the 8th cen-
tury.

When the first Europeans set-
tlers were shipwrecked off
Eleuthera in 1648 they also used
the cave for shelter and for reli-
gious services, clearing away all
the Lucayan bones they could find,
according to Carr. "The legend of
the first church is true — the pulpit
rock is there with a notch for the

bible, along with two crude chairs
cut into the rock."

There are five Puritan graves
in the cave, including two bodies in
coffins, one of which was a very
old man who was likely to have
been a leader. Interestingly, one
of the skeletons was a dwarf and
DNA studies have confirmed the
existence of Laron Syndrome, a
growth hormone deficiency found
among Jews and Arabs. Several
inhabitants of Spanish Wells today
have this genetic syndrome and
the Preachers Cave dwarf was
probably their ancestor.

Bob Carr was Dade County's
first archaeologist and is renowned
as the discoverer of the Miami Cir-
cle on Brickell Point — an 800-
year-old Tequesta Indian ceremo-
nial site.

He is a co-founder and director
of the Miami-based Archaeological
and Historical Conservancy, which
handled the Preachers Cave dig,
and has worked with the Florida
Division of Historic Resources and
the US National Park Service.

One thing that came out of
Tough Call's Heritage Day visit to
Hope Town is that visitors need
more cultural experiences than
they are getting in the Bahamas.
Some of the wealthier family island
settlements like Hope Town, New
Plymouth, Spanish Wells and Rock
Sound have small museums run
by volunteers, but most Bahamian
communities pay scant attention
to heritage matters, and historic
preservation is not on their agenda.

Yet according to Carr, there is
much more interest in history and
heritage than in playing on the
beach: "In Florida, heritage is a
very important part of our tourism
sector that generates more money
from visitors."

Preachers Cave is the perfect
example of a heritage site that can
form part of a world class educa-
tional tour if properly preserved
and presented.

The 1836-vintage Hole-in-the
Wall lighthouse in South Abaco is
another good example.

And before going to Hope
Town I attended a town meeting at
Sandy Point where this very sub-
ject came up.

At the meeting, engineers from
American Bridge were discussing
more dredging at Disney's Cast-
away Cay just offshore. Formerly

known as Gorda Cay, this tiny
island within sight of the relatively
unprosperous village of Sandy
Point is a destination for three Dis-
ney cruise ships a week, each
loaded with 2300 passengers. The
improvements that are expected
to begin in May will allow the cay
to service larger ships bringing
4,000 passengers each. Yet none
of these visitors ever sets foot on
Abaco.

But just a short drive from
Sandy Point is the Abaco Nation-
al Park, a natural wonderland sur-
rounding a spectacular bluff that is
the site of the historic Hole-in-the-
Wall lighthouse.

At the town meeting,
Bernadette Hall of Abaco Friends
of the Environment announced a
project to clean up and restore the
lighthouse property.

Although functioning now on
solar power the lighthouse and its
associated Victorian-era buildings
are all in an embarrassing state of
disrepair and the entire stunning
site is littered with trash and rusting
relics.

Heritage tourism is officially
defined as “travelling to experi-
ence the places, artifacts, and activ-
ities that authentically represent
the stories and people of the past
and present."

And with more people than ever
seeking to combine their recre-
ational experiences with educa-
tional growth, heritage tourism can
be a powerful economic engine for
creating jobs and producing higher
tax revenues.

But as South Abaco's chief
councillor, Preston Roberts, told
me, "if we want to benefit from
the tourists that Disney brings we
have to go to them with a prod-
uct, and we don't have one yet."

Macaroni and cheese is fine as
far as it goes, but you can only eat
so much of it.

Heritage tourism involves a lot
more than that, and it can be so
much more fulfilling to those who
provide it — by protecting the
environmental and historical fea-
tures that form the basis for our
tourist economy.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

FROM page one

and FNM factions yelling at each
other outside the arrivals hall.

“The FNM are saying these sto-
ries should be told, the PLP are
saying the wrong-doing of the past
was justified,” one driver told The
Tribune as he witnessed the dis-
pute in full flow.

The talk-show Issues of the Day
on Love 97 FM was inundated
with calls from listeners expressing
disgust.

PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-
Gibson, who appeared as a guest,
told host Algernon Allen Sr that
the article disturbed her.

The article, headed ‘The tragic
young pilot who knew too much”,
told the story of the late Chauncey
Tynes Jr., who disappeared in 1983
while piloting a flight from Exuma
to Nassau.

The article, written by The Tri-
bune’s managing editor John Mar-
quis, stated that his father
Chauncey Tynes Sr believed his
son was murdered because he
knew too much of the association
between Sir Lynden, who is
revered as “The Father of the
Nation”, and the Colombian drug
cezat Joe Lehder.

“T believe the time has come for
us as Bahamians to really stand
against this kind of nonsense. Mr
Marquis has a right to his opinion
but he does not have a right to
abuse the privileges that the
Bahamian people have given to
him to reside in this country by
desecrating Sir Lynden’s legacy,”
said B J Moss.

“T believe that Sir Lynden has
made the greatest contribution to

Pindling
Bahamian society and to have a
foreigner come here and desecrate
his legacy and not let this man and
his family rest, I think every
Bahamian should be outraged,
FNM and PLP,” one irate caller
said.

Another caller said: “The best
thing for him to do is not let peo-
ple see his face and stay behind
those four walls and those masks
because you see they like to wear
masks and throw stones. He’s a
coward.”

However, one woman caller left
a voicemail for The Tribune’s
managing editor saying: “I love
you — you are a great man.” And
many more said it was time for
the truth to be told, praising the
article as another major contribu-
tion to Bahamian democracy. One
reader said: “Don’t be scared —
we all know what the article said is
true.”

A radio caller admonished
politicising the issue, saying that
the context of the story needed to
be understood.

“Tf you read the story in detail it
is still about a man who lost his
son who may still be grieving and
is looking for closure. The context
of the story needs to be under-
stood. The fact that the man had a
relationship with Sir Lynden Pin-
dling does not negate the fact that
he lost his only son and so we have
to be really careful when we turn
these things into a political foot-
ball,” the caller said.

The Insight article was also a
major topic of discussion on a pop-
ular Internet forum.

Did you know?

One of the leading causes of death among children
5-9 is CANCER.

In the last 20 Years ASTHMA rates have increased

over 400%. American Manufacturing Company

has expanded into The Bahamas to educate
ALL BAHAMIAN consumers.
Come find out what is causing it!
Place: The Cancer
Society-Centreville (2 Doors Down from ZNS)
Date: Friday, March 13, 2009
Time: 6:30PM — Reserved Seating

Call: Alex 328-7963 or 328-7964
“Business Minded Individuals and
Stay At Home Moms are strongly
encouraged to attend.”



Sir Lynden Pindling

One blogger asked why any-
one would take the words of a for-
eigner with an obvious disdain for
Bahamuans as truth while another
post stated that the article was
quite interesting.

Attorney and political activist
Paul Moss said yesterday: “Sir
Lynden is a great man. I respect
him for ensuring that the Bahamas
had majority rule and that there is
impartiality as well as freedom of
expression and freedom of move-
ment to allow a person like John
Marquis to write what he writes
and move about the way he moves
about.”

Mr Marquis, who has been
described by an online book



reviewer as “the most colourful,
controversial and courageous
newspaper editor in the
Caribbean,” remained unfazed by
the criticism but welcomed the
praise.

“Tn fact, a lot of fascinating new
information is now reaching me
from various quarters about the
drug era in the Bahamas as a
direct result of this article,” he
said.

“Our readers are delighted with
what we are doing, and are glad
that The Tribune is always ready
to get the truth out, which is what
newspapers are all about.

“Tt’s interesting that no-one in
the PLP has stepped forward to
deny any of the information in the
piece and that’s because every
word of it is true and they know it.
It came from an unimpeachable
source and is now in the process of
being backed up by several people
who were around at the time.

“As usual, the PLP’s supporters
are much more interested in con-
demning the messenger than
absorbing the message, and they
are pouring forth the usual racist,
anti-foreign rhetoric, as they
always do when they’re in a fury.

“But history is history and has
to be recorded. Of course they are
disturbed and embarrassed by
their history. I would be, too, if I
were a member of the PLP. But
the truth needs to be told and The
Tribune will go on telling it.”

Christian Council

FROM page one

by developing farmland in Andros and Abaco to produce fruits and veg-
etables while hoping to develop a possible third industry.

“The goal is to capture 30 per cent of the food industry ($150 million)
within five to seven years. Facilitating the mobilization of existing farmers
with the possibility of forming a Cooperative or Joint Venture to enhance
their overall performance. This can result in the creation of a second
stream of income for some and for others a third or fourth stream,” he said.

Rev Paul said that the Council believes that the programme can provide
a stream of full employment in the country.

“The Character Development programme can strengthen our employ-
ees in the workplace, family members in the home and assist in conflict
management and handling of domestic disputes, etc. Together we can once
again build a strong, healthy, productive, successful and prosperous

nation,” he said.

The Christian Council president said that the organization also hopes
to sensitize the public to the “noble virtues” that have brought the
Bahamas success, and are found in the preamble of the Bahamas Con-

stitution.

The Bahamas Christian Council will spearhead religious events, social
events and seminars and also develop other programmes to move this ini-

tiative forward.

Also, over the next 30 days, flyers and banners heralding the initiative

will be distributed and displayed.

A meeting was held during the month of February with more than 70
pastors from around New Providence to collectively present to them the

strategies for the national initiative.

“As a group the pastors were all enthused and supportive of the initiative
and what can be accomplished once we work together,” Rev Paul said.

The Bahamas Christian Council will also partner with groups, organi-
zations, government agencies, institutions, and other stockholders to
realise the National Initiative, he said.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Division winners
will get to pick
1st-round foes

NEW YORK (AP) — The NBA
Development League will have an
unusual format for the playoffs —
the division winners will get to pick
their first-round opponents.

Also, for the first time eight
teams will qualify for the postsea-
son, including the winners of the
three divisions along with the five
teams with the best regular-season
records, regardless of division.

The top-seeded division winner
will select its opponent first, with
the second and third ranked divi-
sion winners following in that
order. The fourth-seeded team will
play the remaining team.

"One of our fundamental goals at
the NBA D-League is to utilize our
unique position to explore new and
different ways to grow the game,"
league president Dan Reed said.
"We believe that these innovations
will provide our fans with com-
pelling matchups and action packed
games."

The first and second rounds of
the playoffs will be one game each,
while the finals will be a best-of-
three series. The playoffs will start
next month. The NBA Develop-
ment League has a team in Bis-

marck, N.D., the Wizards.

@ By The Associated Press
SCOREBOARD

Wednesday, March 11

Memphis at Minnesota (8 pm
EDT). A matchup of teams des-
perate for wins. The Grizzlies
have won just once in their last
11 games, while the Timber-
wolves have lost 10 in a row and
15 of their last 16.

STARS

Monday

— Dwyane Wade, Heat,
scored 48 points, including a
running 3-pointer as time
expired to lift Miami to a wild
130-127 double-overtime win
over Chicago.

— Joe Johnson, Hawks,
scored 30 points and Atlanta
beat New Orleans 89-79, ending
the Hornets’ season-best sev-
en-game winning streak.

— Richard Hamilton, Pistons,
led Detroit with 29 points and a
career-high 14 assists in a 98-94

win over Orlando.

— Brandon Roy, Trail Blaz-
ers, scored 27 points as Port-
land beat the Los Angeles Lak-
ers 111-94 for their 12th straight
win at the Rose Garden.

— Caron Butler, Timber-
wolves, had 27 points, 10
rebounds and six assists to lead
Minnesota to a 110-99 victory
over Washington.

M-V-3!

Miami's Dwyane Wade
scored 48 points, including a
running 3-pointer as time
expired to lift the Heat to a wild
130-127 double-overtime win
over the Chicago Bulls. Wade, a
top MVP candidate, also had
12 assists in 49 minutes, shot 15-
for-21 from the field and made
a 3-pointer at the end of the
first half, then again at the end
of regulation.

SCARY SIGHT
Portland forward Rudy Fer-
nandez was taken from the

VACANCY NOTICE

m

NBA Today



court on a stretcher with his
neck in a brace Monday night
after he was fouled hard by
Trevor Ariza in the fourth quar-
ter of Portland's 111-94 win
over the Los Angeles Lakers.
The rookie from Spain fell hard
on his elbow and his hip, and
remained prone under the bas-
ket for several minutes. X-rays
and a CT scan were negative,
but Fernandez was expected to
remain at the hospital overnight
with what the team called a
"soft tissue injury to his right
upper chest/side area."

SOMEONE HAD TO WIN

Caron Butler had 27 points,
10 rebounds and six assists to
lead Washington to a 110-99
victory over Minnesota on
Monday night in a matchup of
teams that had lost 14 straight

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER - EXECUTIVE

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Chief Financial Officer.

The job oversees all financial matters of BEC, inclusive of the activities of the Customer Services

Division.

The objectives of this function include, but are not limited to the following:

Financial Management, Accounting & Treasury

¢ Ensure and structure the Corporation’s financial policies, practices and internal controls so that
they are in accordance with the law, generally accepted accounting principles, contractual
commitments, the Corporation’s structure and protect the corporations assets;

* Manage BEC’s cash resources to ensure that funds are available to meet the ongoing and future
needs of BEC while minimizing the cost of capital;

¢ Ensure the timely preparation of all financial reports. These include complete financial statements
for presentation to the Board, preparation of budget reports for assisting management decision
making, and development of a yearly projected budget in consultation with other Division heads;

¢ Ensure that the divisions maintain a high standard of efficiency, control, and application of sound
accounting practices and principles along with the adequate trained qualified staff to achieve

these objectives;

¢ Coordinate to ensure that the workflow within the division and cross functionality with all
departments dependent upon the services of the division, are efficient and effective;

* Coordinate the annual budgeting process and present the completed budget for approval;

¢ Manage external relationships with local and international sources of funds;

¢ Ensure proper and cost effective insurance of BEC’s assets;

¢ Conduct Financial Analysis for the Corporation as requested;

Customer Services

* Ensure the accurate and timely meter reading and billing of all customer accounts in New
Providence and the billing of other Family Island Accounts.
¢ Ensure proper management of the revenue and collection recovery activities by effective
management of the Corporation’s Accounts Receivable.
« Ensure proper management of the business office services of cashiering and new services, queries
for customers, banking and accounting reconciliation, etc.
¢ Ensure that non-technical losses are kept to a minimum.

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounting/Finance with professional qualifications (e.g.,
ACCA, CPA) an MBA would be desired.

¢ A minimum of 15+ years of experience in financial accounting, at senior management level.

* Excellent verbal and written communication skills

¢ Excellent analytical and organizational skills

¢ Good customer relations skills

* Good time management skills

¢ Strong leadership skills

* Knowledge of finance, accounting, budgeting and cost control principles including General
Accepted Accounting Principles.

¢ Knowledge of automated financial and accounting reporting systems

¢ Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial reports, statements, and projections

* Extensive knowledge of project management and the ability to oversee a range of projects

simultaneously

* Strong human relations skills

* Knowledge of industrial relations
¢ Negotiation skills and techniques

Interested persons should apply by submitting a resume addressed to: The AGM-Human Resources
& Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau
Bahamas on or before: Wednesday, March 25, 2009.

combined.

The Wizards lost five in a row
and seven of their last eight
before the win, while the Tim-
berwolves have lost 10 in a row
and 15 of their last 16. Min-
nesota (18-45) is 1-12 since Al
Jefferson was lost for the season
with a torn ACL before the All-
Star break.

STANDINGS

Denver had a chance to tie
idle Utah atop the Northwest
Division after losing their grip
on first place 24 hours earlier
with a loss at Sacramento, but
lost for the eighth time in 11
games Monday night, this time
97-95 to the Houston Rockets.

The Nuggets were the No. 2
seed in the Western Conference
at the All-Star break but have
slipped all the way to seventh.

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STRONG IN DEFEAT

Ben Gordon scored a season-
high 43 points for Chicago,
including eight 3-pointers, but
the Bulls lost to Miami 130-127
in two overtimes Monday night
as Dwyane Wade hit a running
3-pointer at the buzzer.

Kobe Bryant had 26 points
for the Los Angeles Lakers,
who lost at Portland 111-94 and
haven't won at the Rose Gar-
den in their last seven tries, with
their last victory Feb. 23, 2005.

STEPPING IN

Detroit's Kwame Brown,
who has struggled since being
the No. 1 overall pick in the
2001 draft, had 10 points and
played 26 minutes of tough
defense against Dwight Howard
as the Pistons beat the Orlando
Magic 98-94 on Monday night.

He stepped up after Rasheed
Wallace left with a first-quar-
ter injury.

Blazers man down in win over Lakers

PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS Rudy Fernandez receives medical attention after he was fouled by Lakers’ Trevor Ariza in the third quarter of Monday’s game in Portland. The
Trail Blazers beat the Los Angeles Lakers 111-94 for their 12th straight win at the Rose Garden...

(AP Photo: Rick Bowmer)

SIDELINED

Atlanta's Marvin Williams,
who averages 14 points per
game, was held out with an
undisclosed lower back injury.
He was examined by Hawks
doctors Monday and will see
another doctor Tuesday. New
Orleans F Peja Stojakovic
missed his third straight game
with back spasms. Minnesota
guard Randy Foye had to be
carried to the locker room in
the fourth quarter of the Tim-
berwolves' 110-99 loss to Wash-
ington with a sprained right
ankle.

SPEAKING

"Right now, man, there ain't
nobody in the league playing
better than him."

— Miami's Jamario Moon on
teammate Dwyane Wade, who
made a running 3-pointer as
time expired and scored 48
points to lead the Heat to a 130-
127 victory over Chicago on
Monday night

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL SPORTS

Joss Big Red Machines going
for their 21st track title





Association of Independent Secondary Schools’ Inter-
School Track and Field Championships today at the
Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium, start-
ing at Yam:

Track Schedule

Junior Girls 75 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Junior Boys 80 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Intermediate Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Senior Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Intermediate Boys 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Senior Boys 110 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Junior Girls 1500 Meter Run Final

Junior Boys 1500 Meter Run Final

Bantam Girls 400 Meter Dash Prelimniaries
Bantam Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Junior Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries

Junor Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Intermediate Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Intermediate Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Senior Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries

Senior Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Bantam Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Bantam Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Junior Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Intermediate Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Intermediate Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Intermediate Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminiaries
Senior Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries

Senior Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Bantam Girls 1500 Meter Run Bantam Final
Bantam Boys 1500 Meter Run Final

Intermediate Girls 1500 Meter Run Final

Intermediate Boys ISO0O Meter Run Final
Junior Girls 75 Meter Hurdles Final

Junior Boys 80 Meter Hurdles Final
Intermediate Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Final
Senior Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Final
Intermediate Boys 100 Meter Hurdles Final

Senior Boys 110 Meter Hurdles Final
Senior Girls 1500 Meter Run Final
Senior Boys 1500 Meter Run Final
Bantam Girls 400 Meter Dash Final
Bantam Boys 400 Meter Dash Final
Junior Girls 400 Meter Dash Final
Junior Boys 400 Meter Dash Final
Intermediate Girls 400 Meter Dash Final
Intermediate Boys 400 Meter Dash Final
Senior Girls 400 Meter Dash Final
Senior Boys 400 Metre Dash Final

Field Schedule

Junior Boys High Jump 4'7" Final
Intermediate Girls Long Jump Final
Intermediate Boys Discus Throw 1.5k Final
Senior Girls Javelin Throw 6000gms Final
Senior Boys Shot Put 141bs Fina
Intermediate Boys Triple Jump Final
Bantam Girls High Jump 3'6" Final
Bantam Boys Long Jump Final

Junior Boys Javelin Throw 600gms Final
Intermediate Girls Shot Put 8lbs Final
Bantam Girls Javelin Throw Final
Junior Girls Discus Throw 1k Final
Senior Girls High Jump 4"4" Final
Senior Boys Long Jump Final



m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DON’T look now, but when
the Bahamas Association of
Independent Secondary Schools
(BAISS) kicks off its 21st Inter-
School Track and Field Cham-
pionships today, the St
Augustine’s College Big Red
Machines will be out to win
another title.

Winners of the past 20 titles
since the inception of the meet
in 1988, SAC head coach
William “Knucklehead” John-
son said the Big Red Machines
don’t intend to let up on their
stranglehold of the crown with-
out putting up a fight.

“We’re ready to go out and
defend. We’re going to compete
and try to win number 21,” said
Johnson, who intends to carry a
team of 122 athletes.

Over the years, SAC has
been challenged by a number
of schools and Johnson antici-
pates the same this time around.
But he admitted that they have
the quality athletes to maintain
their top position.

“We expect Queen’s College
to be very strong this year, as
well as St Anne’s,” Johnson
projected. “St Andrew’s, St
John’s and the other schools all
have some people who they can
rely on.”

SAC, according to Johnson,
has a well balanced team, but
he expects for the points to be
spread across the board in the
boys division, as opposed to the
girls.

V’Alonee Robinson is
expected to lead the Big Red
Machines’ charge as a versatile
sprinter/jumper with distance
runners Hughnique Rolle and
Deshana Burnside.

In the intermediate girls, look
for Shaunae Miller, who dou-
bles as a sprinter/hurdler.

And among the boys, there’s
Marcus Thompson and Byron
Ferguson in the javelin, who
have already qualified for the
javelin in the under-17 boys

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division for the Carifta Games
in St Lucia over the Easter hol-
iday weekend.

“We are going in there with
the confidence that we can do
it,” Johnson said. “Afterwards,
we hope to just walk away
knowing that we did our best.”

St Anne’s will have a 120-
member strong team.

“We’ve been practicing and
we will do our best,” said
Cleotha Collie, a member of the
Bluewaves’ coaching staff. “My
senior boys and junior girls look
pretty good.”

Pedrya Seymour, a sprinter,
will head the junior girls divi-
sion, while sprinters Derek

Wong and Dominic Collie and
middle distance runner Zhivar-
go Thompson will lead the way
for the senior boys.

Collie said their goal is to at
least finish in the top three
places.

St Andrew’s, known as a dark
horse in the competition, will
“compete as hard as we can,”
according to coach Peter Wil-
son, who noted that they lost
some key athletes who gradu-
ated last year.

This year they have added
senior boys’ hurdler Nejmi
Burnside, who should be in the
spotlight with intermediate girls’
sprinter Jessica Campbell and



bright young distance runner
Alice Heinel.

“T expect us to compete well
in the technical events like the
throws and the jumps,” said
Wilson. “But I think we will
struggle in the sprints and the
relays.”

Wilson said the competition
should be very keen this year
with Queen’s College expected
to be the real challengers for
SAC.

“T think that is going to be
good for the sport,” Wilson said.
“Over the years, the officials
have also done a good job of
running the meet, which also
makes it very exciting.”

Liverpool into quarters
with 4-0 win over Madrid

@ By ROB HARRIS
AP Sports Writer



LIVERPOOL, England
(AP) — Captain Steven Ger-
rard (celebrating) scored twice
as Liverpool stormed into the
quarterfinals of the Champi-
ons League with a 4-0 victory
over Real Madrid on Tuesday.

Protecting a 1-0 first-leg
lead, Fernando Torres paved
the way for a comfortable
night by finding the target
after 16 minutes before Ger-



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rard scored either side of the
break.

Andrea Dossena rounded
off the comprehensive victory
in the last minute.

It will renew manager Rafa
Benitez's hopes of repeating
the 2005 title triumph to
deflect attention from his
inability to end the club's 19-
year wait for an English title.

The scintillating display will
also raise Benitez's stock at
Madrid, where he served in
coaching roles for a decade.

Office of Research, Graduate Programmes

& International Relations
invites you to come engage in a dialogue on pivotal matters of national
importance at the inaugural Bahamian Perspectives:

CONVERSATIONS WITH SONS AND DAUGHTERS
OF THE SOIL LECTURE SERIES

When:
Where:
Topic:

Thursday March 12th at 6p.m.
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Topic: The Future of the Bahamian Economy
Speakers: Governor of The Central Bank of The Bahamas
Wendy Craigg
Chairman of Colina Financial Ltd.
James Smith
Chairman of Sunshine Group of Companies
Franklyn Wilson
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For more information contact:
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Graduate Programmes & International Relations
at 302-4392 or 302-4455.

Tel: 397-1700





THE TRIBUNE

Spo

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11,

PAGE 11





ts

2009





E 10 Big Red Machines going for 21st track title...




GOVERNMENT SECONDARY SCHOOLS SPORTS ASSOCIATION

hattlers shake up Magic

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Senior Boys

CI Gibson Rattlers - 68

GH S Magic - 60

After missing out on the
2009 Hugh Campbell title, the
Rattlers left nothing to chance
on their way to a sought after
GSSSA championship.

The Rattlers overcame a sev-
en point fourth quarter deficit
powered by Denirado Mott’s
23 points off the bench.

With Rashard Sturrup in foul
trouble Mott came in and
scored 11 in the fourth quar-
ter.

Drew Rolle finished with 14
points while Junior Denis
added six. Basil Deveaux led





the Magic with 19 points while
Kenneth Pratt added 14.

Senior Girls

C R Walker Knights - 40

Doris Johnson Mystic Mar-
lins - 22

The Mystic Marlins had no
answer for Malesha Peterson
as the Knights wing player took
charge early and established
the tone for her team’s seem-
ingly effortless game one win.

Peterson outscored the
Knights in the first half and led
her team with a game high 16
points.

Keedrah Hanna gave the
Knights their biggest lead of
the game on a turnaround
jumper which gave her team a
36-11 lead with 7:04 left to play.

Hanna finished with 11



BASKETBALL



points while Rickea Richard-
son added five. Jakia Brown

led the Mystic Marlins with 11
while Danielle Zonicle added
seven.

Junior Boys

T A Thompson

Scorpions - 58

DW Davis Pitbulls - 55

With a considerable size
advantage upfront, the Scorpi-
ons’ domination of the boards
proved to be the deciding fac-
tor in the opening game of the
series.

Scorpions center Mavin
Saunders finished with 15
points, 23 rebounds and three
blocks while frontcourt mate
Roosevelt Whylly added 10
points 13 rebounds and three
blocks.

Velnir Desir chipped in with
10 points while Angelo Lock-

hart added seven.

Alcott Fox led the Pitbulls
with 11 points while William
Ferguson finished with nine.

Junior Girls

HO Nash Lions - 56

T A Thompson

Scorpions -10

The vaunted Lions defense
exceeded even their lofty
expectations with a second half
shutout en route to a lopsided
game one win.

The Lions led 36-10 at half-
time and outscored the Scor-
pions 26-0 in the second half.

The Lions placed three play-
ers in double figures led by
Lakishna Munroe’s game high
15 points.

Regine Curtis added 14 and
Randya Kemp finished with 10.

Davis Cup team did their best, says captain









@ By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs @tribunemedia.net

ONE day after returning from South
America, Davis Cup team captain John
Farrington said the Bahamas’ team
performed as best as they could under
the circumstances in Paraguay over








the weekend.

The Bahamas lost 4-1 to Paraguay in
the first round of the American Zone
II Davis Cup and will now have to play
against Guatemala in the second round
over the Independence holiday week-
end at the National Tennis Center.

“Everybody played well. It’s always
difficult playing in South America, but
it wasn’t that the crowd was so bad,”
Farrington said. “We played well and
they played well, so it was a combina-














tion of both teams.”

Farrington admitted that the team’s
preparation in Paraguay could have
been a little better, had they arrived
when they were originally scheduled to







get there on Saturday.

Instead, the team didn’t arrive until
Tuesday morning and they didn’t have
sufficient time to get acclimatized
before the tie opened on Friday.

“Tt’s tough trying to do it all in one
week,” he said. “We had a meeting
before we left Paraguay and we agreed
that we need to get together at least the
week prior to the week before the tie.

“That way, we can do some more












training together as a team.”

Top seed Devin Mullings said it was
tough for the team, especially after los-






ing the pivotal doubles.

“Tt was tough. It was a tough one,”

said Mullings yesterday. “We felt that










if we could isolate (Paraguay’s top seed
Ramon) Delgado, we would have been

able to win,” he said.

“But they played well in the dou-
bles, a match that we thought that we
could win. They played well. The con-

cially hot.”

After evening the series at 1-1,
Mullings said if they had won the dou-
bles and he was able to take care of his
singles, they would have been in a dif-

dition was tough out there. It was espe-

OLYMPIAN Devin Mullings in action at the August ‘08 Beijing Olympic Games...

Paraguay.

ferent position.

“T played hard. I fought hard,” said
Mullings of his three-set loss to Del-
gado in the battle of the top seeds that
eventually clinched the tie for

“In my first match, even though I
didn’t play as well as I was capable of
playing, I knew once I wore the guy
down, I would have won. In the second
match, if I was able to win that tie
breaker, I think I could have won it.
But he saw the finish line and he deliv-
ered the knockout blow.”

Mullings said it was obvious that the
team needed a lot more time in
Paraguay to get adjusted to the condi-
tions there, but they didn’t have suffi-
cient time to do it.

“Not using it as an excuse, but I
think if we had gotten there much ear-
lier, marinated in the heat a little
longer, it could have made a differ-
ence. But it was tough,” he said.

“We fought hard. The guys all
played hard. But it was just tough.
We’re looking forward to playing
Guatemala at home. I think we can
definitely get that W in July and then
regroup for next year.”

As the Bahamas looks ahead to the
second round against Guatemala, Far-
rington said he is confident that they
will be in a better position to come out

on top.

The Bahamas last played Guatemala
in Guatemala in the final of the Zone
III in 2007 to be promoted back to

Zone II.

“J felt our chances were good down
there, but we needed to win at least
two singles and the doubles,” Farring-
ton said. “The pressure was on
Paraguay and they responded very well

to win.

“We just have to get ready to play

and the players have made a commit-
ment to play in a lot more tournaments

so that they can be match ready before
the next tie.”

As a young team, Mullings said they
can only get better with the experi-
ence that they gain during each match
and eventually they will make the

breakthrough to Zone One again.

FLYING HIGH — On March 5, principal/coach Norris Bain and the boys of the Tabernacle Falcons basketball team, paid a courtesy call on newly appoint-
ed president for Port Group Limited (PGL) and the Grand Bahama Port Authority Limited (GBPA) lan Rolle and PGL chairman Hannes Babak. Con-
gratulating the group on their recent victory at the annual Hugh Campbell basketball tournament, Rolle and Babak encouraged the young men to remain
focused on their education and to pursue excellence in all of their undertakings...

Blazers man
down in win
over Lakers...

See page 9



Golfer Rolle
falls short

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

GEORGETTE Rolle,
using the Sun Coast Ladies
Series as a tune-up for the
Ladies Professional Golf
Association’s Futures Tour,
fell short of qualifying for the
final at the Rio Pinar Coun-
try Club in Orlando, Florida.

Needing at least a 148 or
better to advance to the final
round today, Rolle shot a
combined total of 154 that
knocked her out of con-
tention yesterday.

She shot a 78 on Monday
and a 77 yesterday.

Speaking to The Tribune
from Orlando yesterday,
Rolle said her performance
wast that significant.

“Tm happy with my ball
striking on the second day
today, but my putting wasn’t
my best friend,” she admit-
ted. “So I know what I have
to work on for the next time.

“The first day, I was all
around the place, so I do
know what I have to work on
so that I can be ready when-
ever I start playing in the
Future Tour.”

Rolle, the 21-year-old
graduate of St Augustine’s
College who is now enrolled
as a grade student at the
Texas Southern University,
said she definitely gained
some valuable experience.

“T got to play with some
LPGA Future Tour players,
so I was able to learn some
things from them,” Rolle
said. “I was a little disap-
pointed in my performance.

“But I’m still trying to take
some good out of this whole
experience and not try to
make the same mistakes that
I made the next time around.
I just want to have a different
outlook on my game.”

The LGPA’s Futures Tour
start in two weeks, but Rolle
said she’s not sure yet, so she
will continue to practice on
her game.

She is one of two players
who are on the waiting list to
get in. At this point, she’s
number 12 on the alternate
list of players hoping to make
the final cut.

If she doesn’t make the
first tournament coming up
at the end of the month,
Rolle said she still has the
Sun Coast Tour to fall back
on where she can continue to
work on her game.

But she noted that she’s
optimistic that she will even-
tually get the break she needs
to make her presence felt on
the Futures Tour with a big
to earn a shot at qualifying
for the LPGA.

No Bahamian female
golfer has ever made the
Futures Tour or the LGPA
Tour.

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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Former Minister pays tribute to late Livingston B Johnson

GB Shipyard managing :

director ‘no longer
with the company’

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

Shipyard managing director Dave

restructuring its executive man-

learned.

Dalgleish has left the company.

of restructuring its executive man- }
agement team and Dalgleish’s }
departure was mutually agreed ;
upon,” he told The Tribune on
i in along time. I hope (the country)

Mr Dalgleish has been with }
company since 2002 and served in }
various Capacities at the shipyard.

Mr Rotkirch said he has led the
company through an unprece- }

Tuesday.

dented period of growth and devel-
opment.

“The Board and Shipyard are }
most grateful for his dedicated ser- :
vice and wish him the best in his
future endeavours,’ he said. ;

FORMER Exuma MP and Cabinet Min-

i ister George Smith yesterday extended his
i condolences to the family of the late Liv-

: ingston B Johnson.
dimaycock@tribunemeda.net_ | "When distin

“When distinguished Exuma-born Liv-

i ingston B Johnson passed away on Thursday,

FREEPORT — Grand Bahama March 5, the Bahamas lost a most valuable

ee ; ? son who, in addition to his outstanding con-
Dalgleish is no longer with the } tributions in the judiciary, played a pivotal

company, which is in the process of $ role in the development of the modern

. ? Bahamas,” Mr Smith said.
agement team, The Tribune has ;

Upon the Bahamas’ attainment of Inde-

i pendence in July 1973, Mr Johnson became
When contacted on Monday to : the new nation’s first ambassador to Wash-
confirm the news, Carl-Gustaf
Rotkirch, chairman and CEO of :

the shipyard, confirmed that Mr }

ington, DC, and for 10 years served not only
in that capacity, but at the same time as
ambassador to the United Nations and the

: : i country’s High Commissioner to Canada.
“The company is the in process }

“One important note is that he served

selflessly in those offices at a time which
would ordinarily have been perhaps the most
lucrative of his career at the Bahamas Bar.

“On the political landscape, in the early
years before majority rule, Mr Johnson allied
himself with the Progressive Liberal Party
along with others such as Paul Adderley,
Loftus Roker, Warren Laverity, Sir Arthur
Foulkes, Sir Orville Turnquest, and His
Excellency Arthur Hanna, adding much-
needed credibility to the still youthful organ-
isation,” Mr Smith said.

During the critical 1962 general elections,
when Bahamian women were allowed to
vote and when the PLP was expected to be
victorious, he was one of the two PLP can-
didates for Exuma, his running-mate being
the late Holland Smith, the former Cabinet
minister said.

“Although the PLP lost the election in
terms of the number of House of Assembly
seats captured, the party won the popular
vote, largely because it was demonstrated
that the party could produce men and
women of quality, who could eventually gov-
ern the Bahamas. LB was one of those men
of quality,” Mr Smith said.

In addition to his involvement in politics,
he not only served as a Magistrate, but pro-
vided free legal services for local institutions
such as Salem Baptist Church.

Mr Johnson was also known to sit on the
board of Bahamas Supermarkets, which
offered scholarships for Bahamians, and on
the board of the New Providence Develop-
ment Company.

“In the areas of the law, politics, diplo-
macy, the church, and family life, Livingston

was a man of unquestioned abilities and
integrity, and has left a rich example of noble
service which should today inspire and moti-
vate the new generation of Bahamians to
follow in those noble footsteps,” Mr Smith
said.

“Importantly, the community of Exuma,
where he was always held in such high
esteem, and where Exumians have long been
proud of the fact that it was the island of his
nativity, are today saddened by the fact that
he has gone to his reward, but are neverthe-
less happy to be able to claim him as one of
their own.

“T wish to offer my personal deep condo-
lences to his wife Charmaine and their chil-
dren at the passing of this great Bahamian,
and on behalf of the entire Exuma commu-
nity to extend heartfelt sympathy.”

FROM page one

uses this period to see what other
developments can come out of
this," said Mr Wilchcombe.
Tourism Minister Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace refrained from

i specific comment on the news until
? he had a chance to see the details

of the agreements.
He did say that his ministry
looks forward to any advancement



Tourism insiders hail Baha Mar
agreements with Chinese investors

in the hotel industry.

The proposed development will
span 1,000 acres on the Cable
Beach Strip and include a 100,000
square foot casino with more than
3,000 hotel rooms.

While details of the project are
still being discussed officials do not
expect much variation from the
original model, Mr Sands said.

It is unclear at this stage what, if
any alterations to Baha Mar's orig-
inal model the Chinese investors
may request.

"To the best of my knowledge
that has not been the pivotal part
of our discussions.

“Our discussions have simply
been to present to them a model
that we've spent years on devel-
oping, and to put in place the con-
struction agreement to that model
and secondly to work on a memo-
randum of understanding for
financing of the model that we had
developed over a number of
years," said Mr Sands.

The news of the agreements
comes a year after former financial
backer Harrah's Entertainment —
the world's largest resort and casi-
no operator — terminated its
agreement with Baha Mar and
about two and a half weeks before
a deadline for the developers to
meet certain agreed benchmarks
with the government.

Although the financing compo-
nent of the deal is not yet finalised,
yesterday Baha Mar's Senior Vice
President of Administration and
External Affairs Robert Sands said
the developers are "equally
encouraged by our current course
that we will continue to make baby
steps to get this project to fruition."

While no timeline for wrapping

up the negotiations has been set, :

significant progress on the ham-
mering out of details is expected by :

the end of this year.

Mr Sands also stressed that no i
changes have been made to the }
top tier of Baha Mar's hierarchy, as
a result of the Chinese investors }

coming on board.

"Nothing has changed. Our dis-
cussions with the Chinese do not }

sions with the Chinese speaks toa
construction agreement and a }
memorandum of understanding to }
finance and those were the two }
i wife that he was flying with his old

agreements we have reached.

"Baha Mar certainly is the vision
of Mr Sarkis Izmirilan, our CEO, }
and our chairman. And I think that }
will be the position going forward,"

he told The Tribune.

The newly inked agreements e
? involved in drugs, but he was aboard

also spawned concern that droves

of Chinese labourers would flock
to the capital once construction }
begins. But officials said they are
committed to ensuring a signifi-
cant number of Bahamians obtain }
? Chauncey, but my husband could

employment from the project.

"The only one thing that I can }
say is that Baha Mar is very con- }
scious of the need to maximise the ;
employment of Bahamians in all }
stages of the development. And
we will certainly work to promote }
all entrepreneurial opportunities :
for Bahamians as well," said Mr
Sands, adding that discussions on }
the levels of Chinese labour that }

are “very preliminary."

Mr Wilchcombe also weighed

ment of Chinese labour in the pro- }

omy.

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FROM page one

Tynes Jr told his father, Chauncey

Sr, that he frequently carried cash

consignments from Lehder to Pin-
dling and that a box he brought to
his parents’ home contained $50,000
in US banknotes for a senior police-
man.

But for Mrs Moree, the loss of
her husband was a major personal
blow, leaving her facing life as a sin-
gle parent — and embroiled in a dis-
pute over his life insurance policy.

“Because I was not able to offer
proof of his death, the pay-out of
$100,000 plus interest has never been

relate to ownership. Our discus- | made,” she told The Tribune. “I’m

still waiting for my money all these
years later.”

Donald Moree Sr’s doomed trip
to Exuma occurred after he told his

schoolfriend, Chauncey Tynes Jr.
Whenever she questioned him about
his activities, her husband replied:
“The less you know the better.”
Mrs Moree said: “T still don’t
know to this day whether he was

that plane with Chauncey and nei-
ther of them has been seen since.
“T was told by a girl who saw the
men board the plane in Exuma that
three Colombians were with

have been mistaken for a Colom-
bian and when I described him, she
confirmed he was one of them.”
The twin-engined plane never
completed its return trip to Nassau
and no trace of it was ever found.
Mr Tynes Sr is now convinced the
plane was diverted and his son “dis-
posed of” because of what he knew
about Lehder’s alleged drug pay-

will accompany the development : offs to Pindling and the police officer.

“It does seem strange that no
wreckage was ever found,” Mrs

in on this issue, saying the involve- | Moree added. “They (the Colom-

bians) obviously didn’t want them

ject is indicative of a global econ- } to be left behind. I understand

; Chauncey was about to appear in
: court. My belief is that they were

—. 9

ire

OLAY

LEFRSITY

New claims

murdered.

“T don’t know whether my hus-
band was working for Joe Lehder.
But he was friendly with Chauncey
and they went to school together.
When he vanished, I almost lost the
baby. My husband was only 30. My
son feels terrible that he never knew
his father.”

Mrs Moree then told of the two
mystery men — one of them very
tall and heavy — who turned up at
their home only two weeks before
her husband vanished.

“Tt was early one morning and I
overheard their conversation. One
told my husband he needed to keep
his mouth shut or else. They said
they didn’t want his wife to become
a widow just yet.

“They did not look Bahamian.
One was very tall and heavy. They
spoke with a kind of southern
accent.”

At the time, Mrs Moree was
working as a clerk at John S George.
“T faced hardship when my husband
went. He was an electrical engineer
with BEC. I am still working for a
living and have never remarried.”

As controversy raged over
Chauncey Tynes Sr’s disclosures, a
source told The Tribune of a police
stake-out at Nassau International
Airport in early 1983 when a parked
DC-3 aircraft had been found loaded
with cocaine.

Chauncey Tynes Jr was arrested
when he returned to the plane and
was later bailed to appear in court on
drug-related charges, the source said.

However, Tynes vanished before
the next hearing, raising speculation
that he might have fled from justice
— or been killed to stop him reveal-
ing incriminating information in
court.

His father believes the latter the-
ory to be true. And Mrs Moree
thinks Tynes Jr and her husband
may have been killed together.









THE TRIBUNE

usine

WEDNESDAY,

MARCH

a.



20 09

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

‘Major losses’ drive
closure of Cost
Right Abaco store

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ABACO
Markets yester- |
day confirmed
the closure of its
Cost-Right store
in Abaco with
the loss of 14
jobs, its presi-
dent telling Tri-
bune Business
that the outlet
had incurred
“significant loss-
es” within the
last two months as the BISX-
listed group attempted to sell it
as a going concern in a deal that
ultimately fell through.

Emphasising that the losses
were “significant” in the Abaco
context, but not in relation to
the wider Abaco Markets retail
group, as the store accounted
for “less than 5 per cent of total
turnover”, Gavin Watchorn said
closing was the only realistic
option given the cash drain
keeping it open was causing.

He added, though, that Aba-
co Markets overall was per-
forming well. “We did quite
well over Christmas,” Mr
Watchorn said. “We recorded
fairly strong sales growth. I
think you'll be very impressed
with the numbers produced
from the last quarter.”

Tribune Business under-
stands, although Mr Watchorn
declined to comment, that Aba-
co Markets’ fourth quarter
results for the fiscal year just
ended may have been enough
to pull full-year comparisons in
line with prior year, after being
behind for the first three quar-



* Closure to mean 14 job
losses, as deal with Keith
Evans’ group did not close
for sale as going concern

* Outlet a drag on overall
eroup, despite $1m
investment in fiscal 2009
and format changes, with
company to incur $300,000
one-time charge

* Abaco Markets’ overall
Christmas sales show ‘pretty
strong growth’, with Q4
figures said to have pulled
firm level with prior year
comparatives

ters.

Although Cost Right Abaco’s
operations had ceased as of 6pm
on Monday night, Mr Watchorn
said Abaco Markets was still
‘keeping the door open’ to
allow the group it was negotiat-
ing with previously to purchase
or lease the building in a pure
real estate transaction. If they
failed to come through, the
property would be placed on
the open market.

Abaco Markets had invested
heavily in attempting to turn
round Cost Right Abaco’s per-
formance, spending $1 million
on the store in fiscal 2009 alone,
and altering its format on sev-
eral occasions - going from
wholesale to the revamped Club
model, and finally reintroduc-
ing retail products.

Although these strategies had

SEE page 3B

Bahamas must ‘adapt’
to China’s demands on
Baha Mar development

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN companies and
workers, especially in the con-
struction sector, will likely have
to “adapt” to the extensive use
of Chinese labour and raw
materials in the $2.6 billion
build-out of Baha Mar’s Cable
Beach development, leading
executives said yesterday, given
that the project was “too impor-
tant to lose”.

Reacting to Monday’s late
night announcement that Baha
Mar had signed preliminary
agreements for the multi-billion
dollar project with two Chinese
state-owned entities, the presi-
dents of the Bahamas Chamber


























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

* Deal ‘too important to lose’
by getting hung up on Chinese
labour, raw material usage

* Project's potential go ahead
‘huge shot in the arm for
Bahamian economy’ at time
when most needed

* Baha Mar executive says
good progress on working out
details with Chinese entities
likely by year-end

of Commerce and Bahamian
Contractors Association (BCA)
both agreed that the project’s
timing - in the midst of a deep
recession - and significance for
the economy meant that this
nation may have to compromise
to meet Chinese requirements.

Dionisio D’Aguilar, the
Chamber’s head, said that if the
Baha Mar project was to move
forward it would be “a huge
shot in the arm for the Bahami-
an economy” at a time when it
was being buffeted almost daily
by bad economic news, with
‘doom and gloom’ all around.

“We've been talking about
this for months and years,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. “Something like this
would be good to tide us over as
we work through this reces-
sion/depression period.

“Baha Mar would be a huge
shot in the arm for the Bahami-
an economy if we can get this
up and running.”

The Cable Beach developer
announced on Monday night

SEE page 2B

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NASSAU OFFICE

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300k loss projection
behind store closure

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS

Business Reporter

ommonwealth

Building Supplies

(CBS) is prepar-

ing to shut down
its Freeport operation, which
the company projected would
lose $300,000 this year, its
general manager said yester-
day, with its Nassau head-
quarters set to hire some
employees displaced by the
shut-down.

Brent Burrows told Tri-
bune Business that the CBS
Freeport location had oper-
ated at a loss since its opening
in 2003, being kept afloat by
its parent in Nassau for all six

* Commonwealth Building Supplies says Nassau headquarters cannot afford to keep
subsidising Freeport outlet that has made loss in all of its six years in existence

* Installation projects dry up, with building firm hoping to take four of seven
impacted staff to Nassau, where it hired five more workers

years. However, he said if the
store were to remain open
with the economy in a down-
turn, it would eventually have
an adverse impact across the
board.

“Let’s say this was four
years ago when things were
booming. I might have been
able to have the extra cash to
say: ‘Let’s hang on in
Freeport for another year’,
but when things in Nassau are
slow as well, it becomes very
difficult,” said Mr Burrows.

$250k block plant makes
‘one-stop shop’ for BISX firm

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete’s pur-
chase of a $250,000 automated
block plant capable of churn-
ing out 6,000 concrete blocks
per day will boost its competi-
tive edge in the construction
industry supply market, its chief
executive said yesterday,
enabling the BISX-listed firm
to “offer contractors everything
from the foundation up to the
roof”.

* Freeport Concrete’s 2009
first quarter losses almost
treble to $220,000

* Company emphasises need
for more equity capital, as
vendors impose shorter
payment terms

Speaking after the company
saw its net loss for the fiscal

SEE page 6B

Make it a reality.

}

“Unfortunately, the big
thing we have to look at is the
overall health of the company
and I can’t jeopardise the
good jobs of my 65 employees
in Nassau to just keep sinking
money into Freeport.”

Mr Burrows said CBS’s
1,500 square foot Freeport
store had suffered on the
retail side for many years, but
brought in money through
contract work, especially win-
dow installations. When the
economy took a downturn

and the construction sector
began to decline, however,
CBS saw installation contracts
follow suit.

Mr Burrows said he sus-
pects that the ongoing legal
dispute over the Grand
Bahama Port Authority’s
(GBPA) ownership has also
caused Freeport’s economy
to experience further soften-
ing.

“T would venture to say that

SEE page 6B



Store ‘consigns’ quality 30% off

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

QUALITY used furniture up to 30 per cent less than the price of
a new item will be the order of the day when the Consignment Shop
opens, the store’s owner Thierry Boeuf, said yesterday.

“For 30 per cent off the price of a new item you can have a
good quality product, and I personally prefer a very good quality
table or couch in leather and so on second hand, than a new one of
poor quality,” he said.

The shop, which is currently only accepting the items it will
eventually sell, will act as a pawn shop of sorts, except those who
donate items are paid when the item is sold.

According to Mr Boeuf, the Consignment Store takes the hassle
out of getting rid of old furniture and sundry items.

“In the US this activity is one of the things that has been grow-

ing the past few years,” he said.
“Tf we sell this month we will pay SEE page 6B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Sa

@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

INVESTORS traded in eight
out of the 25 listed securities,
of which two advanced, two
declined and four remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET
A total of 40,945 shares
changed hands, representing a

slight decrease of 1,986 shares
or 4.6 per cent, versus the pre-
vious week's trading volume of
42,931 shares.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
led the volume last week with
16,550 shares trading, its stock
falling by $0.18 to end the week
at $6.59.

Focol Holdings (FCL) was
the top advancer last week with
7,000 shares trading, its stock

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

Weekly “oe Change
1.2868
1.4091
1.2642

+1.07
-1.45
-0,13

Weekly

“o Change

$46.07
$939.50

+3.76
-0.23

International Stock Market Indexes:

DJIA

S& P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

BAHA MAR, from 1B

that it had signed a construc-
tion agreement for the $2.6 bil-
lion project with China State
Construction, plus a separate
Memorandum of Understand-
ing (MoU) for the develop-
ment’s financing with the
Export-Import Bank of China.

However, while these were
“important steps forward” in
bringing Baha Mar’s vision for
Cable Beach to reality, the
developer said an actual con-
struction start was “contingent
on many more months of work
and due diligence before final
approval is received”.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s
senior vice-president for gov-
ernment and external affairs,
emphasised to Tribune Busi-

Weekly “o Change
-6.17
-7.03
-6.10
-5.22

6,626.94
683.38

1,293.85
7,173.10



ness yesterday that the resort
owner/developer “did not want
to overcreate the possibility that
this means Baha Mar is going to
start tomorrow”.

He added: “But this is an
achieved milestone that we’ve
been working on for many
months. These little victories
are all adding up to making this
project a reality.”

Mr Sands said both sides now
“have to flesh out the details” of
their partnership, having spent
months working on yesterday’s
preliminary agreements. He
hinted that substantial progress
towards doing this was likely to
be made by year-end 2009.

“We have months of work
ahead of us as we work out the
details in time. Possibly by the

price rising by $0.07 to end the
week at $5.07.

Abaco Markets (AML) share
price rose by $0.04 to $1.45 ona
volume of 6,379 shares.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) was the big declin-
er, its stock falling by $0.24 toa
new 52-week low of $2.16 on a
volume of 2,500 shares.

BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

Bank of the Bahamas (BOB)
released its financial results for
the six-month period ending
December 31, 2008. BOB
reported net income of $5 mil-
lion, representing a decrease of
$1.2 million or 20 per cent, com-
pared to $6.3 million in 2007.

Net interest income stood at
$14.8 million, up 5 per cent
from $14 million for the same 6-
month period in 2007. Net
income available to common
shareholders stood at $4.4 mil-
lion, compared to $5.7 million
in 2007.

Total assets and liabilities
stood at $748 million and $652
million respectively. BOB's
management said it was cau-
tiously comforted by the strong
financial results for the period,
and that the maintenance of
sound prudential standards will
continue to be its key focus in

end of this year we will be very
much further along in our rela-
tionship with these two enti-
ties,” he added. No timetable
had been set for concluding
negotiations.

Meanwhile, Mr D’Aguilar
said the Chinese never lent
money without stringent
terms/conditions attached,
meaning that they were likely
to want Baha Mar to be con-
structed with a large amount of
Chinese labour, raw materials
and products.

“At the end of the day, Cable
Beach needs revitalisation,” the
Chamber president said.
“There’s a lot of urgency to do
a deal, and boy do we need a
deal.

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all strategic initiatives during
the current economic upheaval.

Earnings per share declined
by 19 per cent to $0.29 versus
$0.36 in 2007.

FirstCaribbean International
Bank (CIB) released its audited
financial results for the year
ended October 31, 2008. For
fiscal 2008, CIB reported net
income of $84 million, repre-
senting a decrease of $26 mil-
lion or 24 per cent when com-
pared to the $109 million
achieved in fiscal 2007.

Net interest income of $155
million increased by $8 million
or 6 per cent, while operating
income of $16 million declined
by $16 million or 50 per cent.

Operating expenses were up
by $7 million or 13 per cent to
total $64 million.

CIB's management has indi-
cated that the performance was
commendable despite the chal-
lenges imposed by the weaken-
ing global business environ-
ment.

At October 31, 2008, CIB’s
total assets stood at $4.1 billion,
while total liabilities were $3.5
billion.

The bank's loan portfolio
increased by 5 per cent to total
$2.5 billion, while total deposits
decreased by $216 million or 5
per cent to total $3.5 billion as
at October 31, 2008.

Earnings per share also
declined falling by 24 per cent
to 69.8 cents.

lots of foreign labour or not,
Cable Beach needs revitalising.
I think everyone understands
from the outset that the Chi-
nese give money with strings
attached. Hopefully, it will
employ lots of Bahamians, but
everyone must recognise that.”

China had wanted to send
hundreds of workers to this
nation to construct the long-
proposed $30 million national
stadium. This has been a key
factor in delaying the construc-
tion start for that project, as suc-
cessive governments have wor-
ried over the Immigration and
‘jobs for Bahamians first’ impli-
cations.

Mr D’Aguilar emphasised
that, long-term, Cable Beach’s
revitalisation “will create
Bahamian jobs much as Atlantis
has done. It may not in the
short-term, because the Chinese
will bring specialist labour in.

“But they’re [Baha Mar] the
only game in town. In the long-
run, it’s good for the Bahamas
and I don’t want to hear noise
in the market about how we’re
not getting this and that job.
We’re at the stage where we
need the deal.”

He was backed by Bahami-
an Contractors Association
(BCA) president, Stephen
Wrinkle, who said companies
in the sector were going to have
to “adapt” to the realities of
working with the Chinese, and
be “proactive” in negotiating to
get work on the project.

“Hopefully, it’s going to
mean substantial work for us.
I’m sure we’re going to have to
negotiate our way into this

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 813.81 (-2.52%) YTD

BISX
SYMBOL PRICE
AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
FCL
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE

$1.45
$0.63
$7.00
$11.00
$9.58
$3.15
$13.95
$6.59
$2.83
$10.45
$1.51
$2.16
$7.76
$2.37
$0.30
$5.07
$1.00
$11.00
$5.50
$10.50
$10.00

$0.04

Tin igie nian teen Tag suite ie) al
S
ay
oO

SS
Wh
BS

ot
Q
~

FHFAFAAFFAFAAAFAFAAAAAAAS

Private Placement Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extending
the deadline of its private place-
ment offering. The preferred
shares will be paying a dividend
rate of prime + 1.75 per cent,
payable semi-annually.

Dividends Note:

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
has declared a dividend of $0.05
per share, payable on March
31, 2009, to all shareholders of
record date March 13, 2009.

one,” Mr Wrinkle explained.
“We have a language barrier to
begin with.

“We’re going to have to see
what percentage of the work is
taken on by Bahamian contrac-
tors and Bahamian workers in
general. It presents a unique set
of circumstances for the Gov-
ernment and industry, and pre-
sents an opportunity to negoti-
ate our way into participation
in the project.”

Village

Pointing out that Bahamians
were “in a global village now
and working with people from
all over the world”, Mr Wrinkle
suggested that the Government
introduce a programme to teach
Bahamians how to speak Man-
darin.

“This is what the Chinese do.
They export goods and services,
and certainly have ample labour
to send anywhere around the
world,” Mr Wrinkle said.

“This is going to be a new and
challenging experience for
Bahamian companies, because
the Chinese supply everything
required for everything they
become involved with. It’s going
to be a challenge to put our-
selves in the arena and partici-
pate in a significant way.”

Mr Wrinkle said the BCA
would seek a meeting with John
Pagano, head of Baha Mar
development, to obtain a bet-
ter understanding of how
Bahamian contractors could
participate.

While the heavy degree of
Chinese labour involvement

CLOSING CHANGE

VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE

379

6, -15.20%
0 -4.55%
0 8.38%
0 -6.78%
0
0
0

-5.99%
0.00%
-0.57%
-5.86%
0.00%
0.00%
-32.89%
-15.29%

16,550
442



AGM Notes:

Focol Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on
Thursday March 19, 2009, at
10.30am in the Boardroom at
its Corporate Office in
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) announced it
will be holding its Annual Gen-
eral Meeting on Thursday
March 19, 2009, at 6.30pm in
the Governor's Ballroom at
The British Colonial Hilton
Hotel.

was likely to spark criticism, the
BCA president added: “Every-
one has to back up and realise
we’re dealing with the situation
in hand.

“Youre going to have to
adapt. I don’t see any way
round it. It’s too big to lose, and
important project to land. We
desperately need the Baha Mar
project to uplift Nassau and
move the economy forward.

“Tfit doesn’t proceed with the
Chinese, we may be in jeopardy
of losing the whole project.
Cable Beach is in a very pre-
carious position right now.
We’ve to have a proactive
approach, not a reactive one.
This is the side of the coin
where we want to look at the
glass as being half full, not half-
empty. We want to get on this
train, rise it and make a posi-
tive contribution.”

Meanwhile, Mr D’ Aguilar
said the Government would be
“a lot more eager to bring this
project to fruition to stimulate
the economy” given the down-
turn and dearth of other invest-
ment projects on the table.

“Two years ago we weren’t
hungry for investment. We’re
much hungrier now,” the
Chamber president told Tri-
bune Business.

“Unemployment is up by 40
per cent, and 95 per cent of that
is contributed by the private
sector shedding jobs. As far as
Baha Mar is concerned, this is
great for them. It'll take two-
and-a-half years to get some-
thing in the ground, so they will
be in time to benefit from the
next upswing.”

Sea Turtles of

The Bahamas:
Insights from 30 years of study

Drs. Alan Bolten and Karen Bjorndal,
Archie Carr Centre for Sea Turtle Research,
University of Florida

Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2009
Time: 7pm

Place: The Retreat, Village Road

(parking at Queen’s College)

Admission: BNT Members Free

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Phone: 242-393-1317
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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 3B



aS 2 -
Infrastructure no bar to tourism diversity

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter



INFRASTRUCTURE is no longer a
hindrance to the diversification of the
Bahamian tourism industry, the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s
executive director believes, as “tech-
nology allows us to market ourselves
much more effectively”.

Philip Simon told Tribune Business
that, once diversified, tourism could
act as the gateway from which other
industries will be born.

He said that connecting small
Bahamian entrepreneurs to the wider
opportunities presented by tourism
would be the catalyst for future eco-
nomic growth.

“T base my whole
argument around the
fundamentals of eco-
nomics,” he said.
“There is supply and |
there is demand, for
goods and services,
and they are based on
advantages, whether
they be comparative or
competitive, and the
Bahamas has the com-
parative advantage of location.”

Diversification has become a sub-
ject of much debate, as the US reces-
sion’s impact bears down on the
Bahamian economy.

The Government has argued that
diversification, and the ultimate



replacement of tourism as this nation’s
premier industry by another sector,
was not feasible.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
has restated on several occasions that
the tourism industry has benefited the
Bahamas economically for decades,
and will continue to do so going for-
ward. However, his government advo-
cates shoring up the sector through
enhancing linkages with the manufac-
turing and retail industries, as outlined
in the government’s 2007 Manifesto.

Mr Simon said the Bahamas has
many “comparative advantages” to
levy as a neighbour to the US, but
these have not been effectively exploit-

“God has blessed us with being in a

unique proximity placement right on
the doorsteps of North America, posi-
tioned perfectly for access to the
Caribbean and South America,” he
said.

“The comparative advantage is also
tied into who we are as a people. What
we haven’t been able to do is effec-
tively diversify our number one indus-
try, and effectively diversify our num-
ber two industry to tie into our number
one industry.”

“So we have this comparative advan-
tage, and we have this unique people,
and we have so many stories to be told.

“The Bahamas is an archipelago with
a lot of diversity, and the stories are in
our backyard. The stories are in our
parents and grandparents, and we have

to be able to script that. We have to be
able to package experiences to be able
to sell within the tourism industry,
which is still the fastest growing indus-
try in the world.”

Mr Simon said the Bahamas needs to
tap into cultural and heritage tourism,
because they were the fastest growing
segments of the global tourism indus-
try.

“You name it, we have the opportu-
nity to provide it,” said Mr Simon. “We
have good infrastructure. One of the
things we may not have built up is our
competitive advantages to match those
in the region, but we have an innate
culture relative to who our people are
and, for the most part, we are friendly
people.”

IndiGo packages new phone deal

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter



BAHAMIAN telecommunications ser-
vices provider, IndiGo Networks, is moving
to further liberalize the market by offering
a new overseas calling bundle that uses
Voice-over Internet Protocol (VoIP) tech-
nology and will compete directly with the
Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s
(BTC) Vibe.

IndiGo’s marketing manager, Gillian
Slatter, said the package was a legal, reliable
alternative to Vonage and the instantly pop-
ular Magic Jack

“Vonage is out there but... you can get
something even better for less in the
Bahamas,” she said.

Ms Slatter said IndiGo’s package was
much cheaper than Vonage and offers much
more features.

She said that aside from other VoIP
devices being illegal, Indigo’s One Phone
offers calling to ten European destinations,
as well as a local number.

Ms Slatter said the service was much
more reliable than many other VoIP-based
systems, because calls were routed through
IndiGo’s network to the destination number
instead of many different Internet Service
Provider hubs.

“We’ve used the best technology out
there,” she said. “Whatever is most current
in order to bring the best to Bahamians,
without having to dig trenches and lay lines.
We can’t do that type of infrastructure. Our

infrastructure is different. We have used
what’s available with the most up-to-date
technology.”

It was recently announced that services
such as Vonage and Magic Jack were illegal
in the Bahamas, and that offenders found
with them could be fined, However, not
many people heeded the warning. In fact,
one store owner defiantly professed his
right to sell the popular Magic Jack.

Ms Slatter said IndiGo’s system offers
far better service at competitive prices. She
said that by the time Vonage customers
pay taxes and fees, their bills could be up to
$23.49, whereas IndiGo’s package is $19.95.

The company is accepting Vonage and
Vibe routers and waiving the set-up fee for
customers who switch to their system.

‘Major losses’ drive closure of Cost Right Abaco store

FROM page 1B

produced some initial success,
none paid dividends in the long-
term, and Mr Watchorn said:
“Our losses became too great
to fund when there was no
deadline for the transaction to
close.”

Abaco Markets is projecting
that it will take a one-time
$300,000 charge as a result of
the closure, mostly relating to
severance pay for the 14 staff.
Some four of those will stay on
for a month to wind down oper-
ations.

Mr Watchorn said Abaco
Markets had been negotiating
with the potential buyer group
since September 2008, having
previously initiated a process to
solicit interested parties.

Although he did not confirm
the identities of those involved
in the potential buying group,
Tribune Business had previ-
ously revealed that it involved
Keith Evans, brother of lead-
ing Bahamian wholesaler Gar-
land Evans.

Keith Evans, it is understood,
would have run the store’s oper-
ations had the purchase been
successful. Informed sources,
though, told Tribune Business
that the planned purchase ini-
tially hit trouble when a key
source of financial backing
pulled out. This forced mem-
bers of the group to look into
selling other assets to finance
the purchase, but they were
unable to raise the necessary
cash in the timeframe Abaco
Markets was seeking to avoid

closure.

“We had originally hoped for
the deal to complete by the end
of January, but then the dead-
line got pushed back, and then
it got pushed back again,” Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We realised it was not
going to happen in the time-
frame” Abaco Markets had
wanted.

“The store hasn’t made mon-
ey for years, and has been sub-
sidised heavily for the last cou-
ple of years by our other oper-
ations,” he added.

“We were faced with contin-
uing to invest money in some-
thing where we could not see
the light at the end of the tun-
nel. No businessman would take
on continuing losses in this envi-
ronment. Unfortunately, we had
to let people go.

“We invested $1 million in
the year ended on January 31,
2009, but the store couldn’t
meet its corporate restructur-
ing charge, so we were not get-
ting a return on the asset. It
wasn’t contributing to the cor-
porate overhead either. We had
a number of major inventory
losses down there, which did
not help the situation either.”

Mr Watchorn did not disclose
the scale of Cost Right Abaco’s
losses, with the group’s year-
end financials due to be
released shortly, but said: “For
January, February we record-
ed pretty significant losses down
there trying to facilitate a deal
to sell the business as a going
concern. We just can’t incur
those types of losses.

“We stuck with it for a couple
of months in a bid to get a trans-
action done, but we did not see
light at the end of the tunnel.
In this uncertain environment,
it’s too great a risk to continue
to invest in this facility, because
it could ultimately be detri-
mental to the others.”

Mr Watchorn added that the
transaction contemplated with
Mr Evans and his group “may
get resolved in some shape or
form in a couple of months
time”. He said Abaco Markets
had “given it a fair go” in trying
to conclude a deal for Cost
Right Abaco as a going con-
cern.

“We will not do anything with
the building for six to eight
weeks to give the group that we
were talking to an opportunity
to get their ducks lined up, and
then we will put it on the mar-
ket for sale or rent,” Mr
Watchorn said.

He added that Abaco Mar-
kets had tried numerous for-
mats and managers for Cost
Right Abaco, but lasting suc-
cess had proved elusive. All the
company’s other Solomon’s
SuperCentre and Cost Right
stores were profitable, and not
acting as a drain on company
resources.

“We have been very commit-
ted to doing what we can to
maintain a solid performing
location there,” says Craig
Symonette, chairman and chief
executive of Abaco Markets.

“Abaco Markets started in
Abaco, and this decision to
close is something we have

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struggled with for a long time,
trying so many different options
and investing a lot of money to
make it work. However, we are
just not getting enough support
to sustain the investment and
focus there. While we are very
disappointed to close Cost
Right Abaco, we are doing what
is best for the company as a
whole — particularly given the
current economic environment,
which will require the focus and
dedication of all our resources
to ensure that the great steps
we have made toward stability
are safeguarded.”

Group health plan coverage
for the laid-off employees will
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FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

Request For
ualifications

{EQI-09-01: Janitorial Services
EOI:09-02: Pest Control & Exterminating Services}

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited is
presently seeking expressions of interest from qualified
suppliers for the provision of the following services: -

1) Janitorial Services

2) Pest Control & Exterminating Services

Interested parties are requested to complete the RFEJ/RFQ
Package, which may be collected from the Receptionist
Desk of the FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas)
Super Support Centre, East West Highway, Nassau,
Bahamas or requested via email to:
sourcing&supplymanagement@firstcaribbeanbank.com

as of Friday, March 06, 2009.

Please reply to: Sourcing & Supply Management

FirstCaribbean International Bank
East West Highway

Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Ms. I. Hamilton

The deadline for submission is Monday, March 16, 2009 at
1:00pm. Eastern Time. Completed Qualification Packages
may be mailed or couriered to the address above.

Packages received after this date and time will not be accepted.





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



$250k block plant makes ‘one-stop shop’ for BISX firm

FROM page 1B

2009 first quarter almost treble
to $220,000, a 197 per cent
increase against the prior year’s
$74,000 loss, Raymond Simp-
son said the block plan addition
would enable its concrete plant
to generate revenue and cash
flow it did not have presently.

This, he explained, was key,
given that Freeport Concrete
was still plagued by the need to
raise additional capital and
equity to finance inventory pur-
chases for its Home Centre
retail format. Currently, Mr
Simpson said the outlet was los-
ing business because it was
unable to purchase enough
stock to meet customer
demand.

“We need more cash,” he
told Tribune Business yester-
day. “It’s as simple as that. If
we don’t get it, we will keep



running out of inventory in the
Home Centre. Without the
cash, we can’t get the inventory
we need.”

Freeport Concrete has long
been a candidate for a rights
issue, where new shares are
issued to existing ordinary
shareholders in proportion to
their existing holdings, so their
stakes are not diluted. C

Companies frequently do this
as a way to raise capital, but the
current economic environment
is likely to mean that any rights
issue is far from fully sub-
scribed, unless it is underwritten
by Freeport Concrete’s largest
shareholder, chairman Hannes
Babak, who has a 43 per cent
stake.

Emphasising the BISX-listed
firm’s ongoing need for working
capital, Mr Simpson wrote in
his first quarter note to share-
holders: “A key factor affect-

NOTICE





INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT




No. 45 of 2000



VISO INVEST S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, VISO INVEST S.A. is in dissolution.
The date of commencement of dissolution was the
4 day of March, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau,
Bahamas is the Liquidator of VISO INVEST S.A.













Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR






NOTICE OF SALE



Expocredit Corporation (‘the Company”) invites
offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Maris Subdivision’,
comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
South of Burnt Ground in the Island of Long Island
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.





The Company makes no representations or warranties
with respect to the state of the Property which is
offered for sale “as is where is”.










The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing








& Law of Property Act.

TERMS:

Ten percent (10%) of the purchase

price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.









This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
reserves the right to reject any and all offers.







Interested persons may submit written offers
addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
Partner, P, O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 30"







day of March, 2009.

ing our financial performance
is that we need to raise addi-
tional capital to be able to pur-
chase more inventory, which
will drive up sales at the Home
Centre.

“Despite the poor economic
climate in Grand Bahama, we
see that there is still business
we could get. However, we are
losing sales because we are con-
stantly running out of inventory
due to the fact that our foreign
vendors are not giving us the
same level of credit we enjoyed
prior to the recession in the US.
and our operating line of credit
at the bank is fully utilised.

“We are actively pursuing
ways to obtain capital as, unfor-
tunately, without more capital
we will continue to struggle.”

Mr Simpson said yesterday
that Freeport Concrete’s US-
based suppliers were looking to
do more business with firms
such as his, both in the Bahamas
and the wider Caribbean, since
they were seen as export mar-
kets that could compensate for
the dramatic slowdown in the
demand for construction mate-
rials and housewares in the US
- especially in Florida.

However, the credit crunch
meant that Freeport Concrete’s
suppliers were now under addi-
tional strain, unable to get the
credit lines they used to, and
under pressure from US finan-
cial institutions to collect their
accounts receivables.

Vendors

In turn, vendors were plac-
ing pressure on Freeport Con-
crete, placing the company on
30-45 day credit and payment
terms, as opposed to 60-90 days.

“Without new capital, we rely
on daily sales, but we can only
hit certain numbers with the
inventory we’ve got,” Mr Simp-
son said. “Equity capital is
exactly what we need. We can’t
grow the business any. We still
have an operating business, and
I can see us turning down busi-
ness because we don’t have the
inventory.”

He added that despite still
being in breach of key banking
covenants, Freeport Concrete
still had the support of its
lender, FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas), as it
was “still putting $1 million in

Store ‘consigns’

FROM page 1B

next month.”

Mr Boeuf said customers who
bring in furniture and other
items will be able to set up an
account that can be monitored
from a website that is currently
being developed. “We are
working on as big, sophisticated
website,” he said.

Furniture to be sold at the
Consignment Store will be held
under a contract between the
owner and the store, and will
be under 120 days of consign-
ment.

“We offer the possibility to
do 120 days of consignments,”
said Mr Boeuf. “We agree on
a price together, and will prob-
ably go with the price that the
person suggests most of the
time unless we see it is some-
thing very unrealistic.

“And we will, in the agree-
ment, from day one say if it is
not sold within a month there
will be a 10 per cent discount,

and then a further one and then
a third. After the fourth month
we will ask you to either take it
back or we will make a dona-
tion of it. That can be any char-
ity or person in need, but the
purpose is to sell and we cannot
keep things forever.”

Mr Boeuf anticipates taking
almost one month to fill the
store, and said he hopes to he
will be able to turn a profit fair-
ly quickly, as most models in
the US have enjoyed much suc-
cess.

“At the end of the year, in
any event, I will know if I have
succeeded or failed,” he said.

The store is only accepting
furniture that is in relatively top
condition. However, Mr Boeuf
said he hopes to start repairing
furniture so as to not have to
turn potential saleable items
away because of a nick or two.

“T plan to invite people who
have the knowledge of the
craft, and eventually we can
work with them to have things
that need some repair done, and

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

MIRINDA INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45
of 2000), MIRINDA INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in

dissolution.

CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS

INC. is

the Liquidator and can be contacted at 60 Market Square,
P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 9th day of April, 2009.

the bank a month”.

On a brighter note, Mr Simp-
son said four flat racks for the
automated block plant had
arrived on Grand Bahama yes-
terday, with the remaining eight
coming in several days time.
The plant will be operated by
Martin Foody, who was in
charge of the concrete block
plant that supplied Kerzner
International’s Phase II and
Phase III projects on Paradise
Island.

Concrete block production
was due to start by end-March
or early April, Mr Simpson said,
and the $250,000 purchase of
the plant from Florida Block
had been financed without dip-
ping into Freeport Concrete’s
resources. One of its US-based
vendors, which was a Florida
Block creditor, financed the
purchase for it, with the BISX-
listed firm paying its supplier
back with a percentage of each
block sale.

“The concrete quality is just
superb,” Mr Simpson said.
“Now, because we have the
Home Centre as well, we are
able to offer contractors every-
thing from the foundation up

to the roof. We’ve never had
that before. I Know this is what
we need to compete.”

In his 2009 first quarter mes-
sage to shareholders, Mr Simp-
son said: “Our overall sales in
the first quarter ended Novem-
ber 30, 2008, are down 8.59 per
cent compared to our first quar-
ter sales last fiscal year ($3.425
million compared to $3.746 mil-
lion).

“Sales in the concrete divi-
sion for this first quarter are
down almost 24 per cent on the
same period last fiscal year
($691,000 compared to
$907,000) with the Home Cen-
tre’s sales down 3.73 per cent
($2.734 million compared to
$2.84 million).

“Our operating expenses are
10.41 per cent less in this first
quarter compared to the same
period last year ($886,000 com-
pared to $989,000).

“The Home Centre has lost
$97,000 for the quarter com-
pared to a loss for the same
period last year of $77,000, and
the concrete plant lost $123,000
this first quarter compared toa
small profit of $4,000 for the
first quarter last year.”

quality 30% off

then for the owners to sell it
still, but we won’t start with
that,” he said.

The 5,000 square foot store,
located behind the Royal Palm
Hotel on Nassau and Bay
Streets, will apart from furni-
ture eventually sell clothing,
paintings and other sundry
items - except food and drink.

Mr Boeuf said the Consign-
ment Shop had been a dream

of his for 10 years, and has only
come to fruition in the past six
months. He said the store takes
the strain away for someone
who does not have the time to
sell old items, who has exhaust-
ed space in their houses due to
old items, or who does not want
to hold a garage sale.

“People coming into your
house is not always easy,” he
said.

$300k loss
projection
behind store
closure

FROM page 1B

is probably causing people who
want to invest some money to
rethink because, right now, who
knows who owns it?” he said.
“Contract work is non-exis-
tent.”

Seven CBS employees stand
to lose their jobs when the com-
pany closes its doors in
Freeport, but Mr Burrows said
it hoped to rehire four of the
employees for the Nassau store,
which recently took on another
five staff.

“How realistic it is for them
to relocate to Nassau? I don’t
know, but we'll have to wait and
see how that works,” he said.

Mr Burrows said CBS will try
to maintain the laid-off work-
ers’ health insurance benefits
until the end of the year.

He added that he personally
flew to Freeport in order to
explain to staff why the compa-
ny was downsizing and closing

its Freeport store. He said they
had “no reaction” to the news.

“T want to sit down with them
and go over some details to let
them know how we can help
them,” he said.

The Nassau store is holding
its ground despite the econom-
ic downturn through the com-
pletion of contracts it negotiat-
ed years before, but the retail
section is taking a hit.

“Retail in Nassau is slow.
We’re not as busy as we used to
be,” said Mr Burrows.

The company presently holds
contracts for the new UBS
building as well as another pro-
ject near the Harbour Bay
Shopping Plaza.

Mr Burrows said his sales and
marketing team frequented
Freeport in an effort to promote
the local CBS store, with no
luck.

“We made an effort and had
been beating on this thing for a
while,” he said.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

FG CAP

TTAL MARKETS
BROKEBAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 9 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.25 | CHG -0.11 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -52.11 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.81 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW. BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Fince
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol

FBB22
FBB13
1000.00 FBB15
52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

29.00 ABDAB
0.00 Bahamas Supermarkets (VOT QUOTED)
0.40 RND Holdings

0.00
0.45

Last Sale

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $

Change
0.00
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 T%

Prime + 1.75%

Daily Vol.

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00
100.00
100.00 0.00

Last Price Weekly Vol.

0.000

0.000
0.00 0.000

0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

S2wk-Low
1.3781
2.9230
1.3812
3.3201

11.8789
100.0000
96.4070

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000

1.0000 1.0410

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

4.10 4.10 31-Jan-09

Weekly Vol

EPS $-Acom

NAV - Net Ass:

N/M - Not Meaningful

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S11) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANGELLA PIERRE-JEROME of
HAWKSBILL, ABACO DRIVE #43, P.O.BOX F41422, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who Knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10th day of MARCH, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-
7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

intends to change my child’s name from

MACHELL SANDS to MACHELLE LYNDIANNA RAHMING. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JAMES FERGUSON
of PO. Box SP 66017, Nassau, Bahamas, intends to
change my name to JAMES TAYLOR. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.







JUDGE PARKER

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MY UNCLE IS
GETTING MARRIED / 4
NEXT WEEK

CALVIN & HOBBES

PLEASE LET MY BEANIE

COME TODAY! I PROMISE

T WONT EVER BE BAD

AGAIN! T'LL Do WHATEVER
You WANT /

“DON'T MAKE ME COME “I CAN'T MAKE YOU.

OUT THERE, DENNIS!”

E, TOOL SOUNPS
LIKE SHE'LL BE

TRAVELING A LOT!







Po vou reaucy \S
@ELIEVE SHE
QUIT THE CLAP

rv

TLL HAVE TO
WEAR A TIE!

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE /
T'LL NEVER ASK ANOTHER.
FAVOR IF TODANS THE
DAY T GET MY BEANIE /

Sunday

NO RUSH HOUR TRAFFIC,
NO PHONE SOLICITORS

NO, BUT I'VE
WATCHEP TOO
MANY JAMES







#2 BOND MOVIES!

THOSE
POOR
DEVILS







Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to















YOURE THES0SS:"





Difficulty Level * *%&



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across
1 Easily passes on 2
(5,4)
8 Work of works (5)
9 Feeling of guilt about 3
introducing code (7) 4
10 Parasites identified by a
doctor on Lincoln’s 5
back (6)
11 Soldier with papers in 6
order (6)
12 Order a final course (5,3) 7
15 Come again to gather
fruit (8) 11
18 Like a civet
disturbed (6) 13
20 Be able to repeat a
vigorous dance (6) 14
21 Seaside resort
complaint (7) 16
22 Some of these bounce
back, being 17
overweight (5)
23 Common cash is 19
needful (9)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses,
8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish,
13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm
date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart.
Down: 1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3
Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6
Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda,
12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17
Crew.



Down

A strange lake in the
jungle described by
Kipling (5)

Hangs flags (6)

Cadger is source of
shame (8)

Standard a number
considered average (6)
Proof that someone has
settled (7)

A ball game played on
board (9)

He doesn’t have to be
smart to fool the birds (9)
Perfect happiness is found
in a train (8)

Nut and date confection
which is ridiculed (7)
Key operators may strike
against it (6)

A problem for the bridge-
builder to emphasise (6)
What one has to face
when fencing (5)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer,
8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12
Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last,
18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21
Refrain.

Down: 1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit,
4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9
Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12
Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17
Urdu.









Across

1

10
11
12
15
18

Vaudeville

(5,4)
Approximately (5)
Stray from the
subject (7)
Loafing (6)
Command (6)
Kidnapped (8)

In the sky (8)
Injure (6)
Superficial
appearance (6)
Kind of

antelope (7)
Seeds used as
flavouring (5)
Backstage rest area
(5,4)

©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

APT 3-G
YOU SHOULD'VE

CALLED FIRST,
DAD. Z

Ey = |WITH MY

ANDO DAD LIVING
WITH US






WOULD YOU HAVE | I'M STAYING AT TH
SEEN ME IF LT HAD?] PLAZA. HAVE ZINN
WITH ME, MARGO.

YOU SHOLLD HAVE
BOUGHT A HOUSE

MOM

LOST ALL
OF OLR

PRIVACY

www kingleatures.com Z|

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

r Wo N
173 BEEN Y I CAN'T TAKE
Ba sf FA MOREL,

IN)
poe”




CHEER UC yf
HAGAR!

©2009 by King Featues Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.








fied ay
af ipl,

Boe Vien ve Vibe George.
acrid poreqr oie es, Terk
i "Fila be: gpd eee 1S eet
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Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum



of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty



level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.







Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer





















































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



















9/8]2]/4 3/1/6|5 7 NN 5
3/5/1|7 2/6l9/4 8| MBBS /2 7IN7/2/1 8
7161419 5i8l3i21| MA97(3 8RN2 11/315
817/516 4121119 3 a ag
4/9/3/1 8/5/7/6 2 ~ an - ERED
2/1/6/3 9/714/8 5 1/2 519 2139/4
5/4/7/8 1/9/2/3 6] WH5/4 W317 1 Mele
1/3/8/2 6/4/5!/7 9| WW3i1/5 4194 9/2 \1
Difficulty Level *& + 3/ll 6/2/9|5 7\/3/8/1 4 N3 [1 2 2\7\1 =

i 6



Down

11
13

14

17
19

Consolidate (5)
Middle East
country (6)

Hold back in
doubt (8)
Horse-drawn
carriage (6)

The fashionable
world (7)

The actors’ entrance
(5,4)

Ability to draw
audiences (3,6)
Devote (8)
Greeting on
arrival (7)
Concealment (6)
Seem (6)

Eskimo house (5)















A ay ea Fe: Pea



In the Arms of Morpheus

South dealer,
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
AQ] 109
VAQ10
#103
#1092
WEST EAST
@K83 #652
9975 VK J432
#7542 986
$863 &7 4
SOUTH
474
Â¥86
#AKQIJ
FAKQIS
The bidding:
South West North East
| & Pass 2% Pass
3¢ Pass 34 Pass
4NT Pass 5Â¥ Pass
7%

Opening lead — five of hearts.

Dear Mr. Becker: It will no doubt
astonish you to learn that I am prob-
ably the greatest bridge player in the
world!

I say this knowing full well that
my name is unknown to you and the
bridge-playing public. It also is true
that I have never won a world or
national championship. Neverthe-
less, I still think no one can equal my
accomplishments at the bridge table.

There is one thing seriously
wrong with my game, though. The

trouble is that | play brilliantly only
while I’m asleep, but badly while
I’m awake. I don’t understand why
this is so, but [ am sure no one can
hold a candle to my skills when I am
in the arms of Morpheus.

For example, last night I held the
East hand and my opponents got to
seven clubs. They should have
known I would defeat them, but my
opponents never learn.

My partner led a heart. As any-
one can plainly see, there is only one
way for declarer to play such a hand.
He must take the ace and place all his
hopes on the spade finesse. It would
be foolish to finesse the queen of
hearts and then later have to finesse
in spades also. This would be run-
ning two risks instead of one.

So South, being a good player,
went up with the ace — and on the
ace, I played the king!

You can’t really blame South for
falling for this play. He naturally
thought the king was a singleton.
Accordingly, after drawing trumps,
he led a heart and finessed the ten,
since there was no longer any reason
to take a chance on the spade finesse.

But I took the ten with the jack to
defeat the slam, and I’m sure I would
have won the rubber on the next deal
except that just then my wife woke
me and said it was time to get up and
go to work.

Cordially yours, Ford E. Winx

Tomorrow: Improving the odds.
€2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



eS



The Tribune




EXPERIENCE

HE BARN

m BY ALEX MISSICK ree How- ;
Tribune Features Reporter ever, the owner 0

the Red Carpet
. . I located it t
BAHAMIANS looking for a new place to dine, ecoued: °
may find a new hangout at The Barn - the perfect
place to experience something old with something

“Everything I get is mainly from local
vendors. Our lemonade comes from a
citrus concentrate that I get directly
from Abaco, the grits is Cat Island grits,
the nice thick yellow grits and I have to
go to the farmers market for that. Our
bread and pastries are always fresh. I try
and help persons who want to be entre-

area where it was
recently reopened
on Feburary 5.

new. The Barn offers = preneurs and who want to be in a busi-
a wide variety of ness of their own. People seem to appre-
The Barn Restaurant and Bar, located healthy breakfast ciate it and are responding well because

in the Red Carpet Inn off East Bat
Street (near the Harbour Bay Shopping
Centre) is a very personal but vibrant
eatery offering a ton a great food items
and specials. Manager, Kadren Carey
told Tribune Taste just why the resturant
is SO unique:

“This area used to be a barn section.
Where the Scotia Trust building is there
used to be a house and this section was a
back barn. Now the Red Carpet Inn is a
franchise out of the United States so that
is what the hotel is called. All of the hat
decorations, Raggedy Anne dolls and
boots were in a trunk that came right out
of the barn they tore down,” Mrs Carey
said.

Apparently, The Barn is not new to
the area and has been around for quite

and lunch alternatives to the average
everyday burger and fried food experi-
ence. However, their chicken salad is the
most popular item selling out every sin-
gle day.

“Everything here is made fresh
because I do not like over night food.
With the chicken salad, it is chicken
breast that we purchase, lightly seasoned
and boiled and we make it into a salad
consisting of mayonnaise, red onions,
yellow onions, sweet pepper and a house
blend of herbs and spices,” Mrs Carey
said.

Mrs Carey said with The Barn being
such a unique business, she uses small
local businesses so that they have a
chance to grow and distribute their prod-
ucts.

everyone who has wanted to help me has
been a small business,” Mrs Carey said.

The Barn in itself is an experience of
something old mixed with something
new and Mrs Carey said there are many
new things in the works for the restau-
rant.

“We are going to have our grand
opening on Easter Monday, and that Fri-
day we are going to have a poetry con-
test and even a three instrument contest,
but every month we want to have some-
thing planned. We also do different
sandwich specials everyday so that peo-
ple won’t get bored with the same dish-
es. Right now we are still in the first year
and we are still open in this economy so
we are planning new things for The



KADREN CAREY, Manager at the Barn restaurant, is dedicated to
treating her guests to a grand old time with specialty dishes to suit

Barn. what every pallete is looking for.

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

Dining on a budget
at Chez Willie

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

ALTHOUGH recent changes in the economy
have forced many people to cut back to the bare
essentials of living, one local restaurant is doing its
part to provide a fine dining experience at an
affordable rate.

Chez Willie Restaurant, located opposite Long
Wharf Beach, has created a new all you can eat
buffet which offers guests more options outside of
its ala cart menu.

Manager Cy Roberts explained: “We are a high
end restaurant, but we came up with the $30 buf-
fet to provide something affordable to local resi-
dents.”

The buffet has been meticulously designed to
offer a little something for all. Starting with the
choice of a mushroom or tossed salad, the buffet’s
main course provides a wide selection. Available
was the choice of baked chicken, sautéed pork
chops, barbecued spare or short ribs, as well as the
option of grouper salamander.

To accompany the main course is an all Bahami-
an cast of peas n rice, extremely cheesy maca-
roni, and steamed sweet potato, carrots, cauli-
flower, and broccoli.

With your choice of wine, juice, or water, it
does seem that Chez Willie has done its part in
providing you with a complete meal.

One thing that is most exceptional about the
restaurant is its refreshing water. With water
almost always being the least most significant
thing when it comes to fine dining, this unbottled
water unlike other places, has a sweet mist which
is for some better than any expensive wine.

In addition to a more than hearty main course,
the restaurant also provides the choice of short-
cake, chocolate, frosted cake, guava duff, cheese
cake, and a selection of tarts and pies.

The new buffet which runs Monday to Sunday
from 6.30pm to 10.30pm, will offer several diverse
menus everyday, so you are almost certain to dis-
cover something new when dining at Chez Willie. AND the pastries are cheese cake, coconut frosted

Remember that the dress code is casual, and chocolate cake, chocolate layered caked, and guava
making reservations is suggested. duff.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to
Box:

DA 69806
c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

‘a’
i
=
Ke
=



by March 14, 2009.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 9B



ENTERTAINMENT



The Tribune

























m@ By LLOYD ALLEN

Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

MANY music lovers would agree, that
wrapped in the experience of seeing a
favorite artist perform live, is an indescrib-
able feeling of total connection. Whether
it be with a verse, song, or simply with
that artist, music for most of us is some-
thing that can speak to our very soul,
wooing us into the submission of its
desire. To take that fantasy even fur- if
ther, having the chance to have an
intimate dialogue with that same
artist, is probably the ultimate con-

versation.

© \

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

JAH TOURHA, who has been in
the music game for some 16 years, is
ready to break the reggae sound bar-
riers in the country and become the
next big sensation when he takes the
stage with two major artists later this
month.

Although born and raised in the
Bahamas, Jah Tourha came from a
diverse background and like many
singers got his start in church.

“T started singing in the church,
choirs, competitions and things like
that because my mom has a church.
However, as I got older, I started to
venture out there and started to see
shows and live performances. They
intrigued me even more and as time
passed I wanted to get involved. I
entered the KFC competition around
the age of 12 or 13 and I even won
which encouraged me even more to
do music,” Jah Tourha said

Jah Tourha said although he has
many inspirations in his life, his father,
Nicholas Jacks, was the one who real-

Rita Marley.

sage.”

Well this is exactly what one young promoter is hoping
to accomplish, in her new event set to take place this Fri-
day at the Marley Resorts.

Conversations is a concept designed by Donisha Pren-
dergast of Sumething Fertile Productions (SFP).

This 23-year-old says outside of her ever evolving per-
sonality, the one constant which has remained is her com-
mitment to bringing together the African Diaspora.

Donisha who is also the granddaughter of reggae legend
Bob Marley, said the concept of SFP was first realised dur-
ing a trip to South Africa in 2007 with her grandmother

Attending the annual Africa Unite event in Johan-
nesburg, Donisha said after making a presentation at
a youth symposium on the issues of poverty, unity,

and the eradication of diseases, she realised that
she, like other members of her family, had a role
to play in helping to bridge the gap among blacks
around the world
She explained: “The young people would
say, we know nothing about you, the girls we
see on the TV are naked, and they don’t look
like you. They also know that the pictures of
poverty and misery that we see of them are not
all true either.

“These kids would come from parents who
would have gone through an apartheid, the kind
of stories that these kids had to tell are the kind

of stories that we need to hear in the west to really
put life into perspective.”

She said at that time, she was an acting major at
Howard University in Washington DC, but realised
that she was not where she needed to be, and soon

decided to switch her major to film production
and transferred to a Miami university to be clos-
er to the rest of her family, and to also persue
her passion of spreading the “one love mes-

“T now realise that the power is not in front of
the camera, the power is behind the camera.”

Donisha said with African people worldwide having
great stories of struggles, triumphs, and life experi-

ences, it is extremely important to have that information

available to all. She added that often the media does not
give an accurate view of Blacks and said Conversations is
her way of bringing together an already divided people.

The event which begins at 7pm this Friday, will give
audiences a chance to speak directly to some of their

favorite artist including Tanya Stephens, Tada, Philip
Michael and Sammy Star, and to learn of their experiences
as artists and as young persons committed to change. For
more information on this and other events at the Marley

Resort, visit www.marleyresort.com for further details.









Varies

A

ly gave him the tools to work with.

“He plays five different instruments
and has his own band. He started tak-
ing me around music at an early age.
He bought me drum sets, guitars, and
other instruments and encouraged me.
He took me to functions on cruise
ships when he played and seeing him
work really made me want to do it as
well,” Jah Tourha said.

Jah Tourha has a diverse musical
sound spanning from culture to reggae
to dancehall genres and said he draws
inspiration from such musical trail-
blazers as Sizzla, Capelton and Antho-
ny B.

“The sound I bring varies depend-
ing on the feelings and expressions I
am delivering in my message at the
time. You have to be well rounded
and versatile. If you are singing just
conscious music all the time it might
not appeal to a broader audience. At
times you have to sing songs that
appeal to other persons so sometimes
it enters the dancehall genre,” Jah
Tourha said.

As for his target audience, Jah
Tourha said he feels as an artist, one

should be able to reach people on all
levels, which is exactly what he wants
to do.

“Right now you have to be really
focused on the children because of the
things they are being exposed to. They
should be really receiving a positive
message in every song they listen to
on the radio. There should be some
form of inspiration, direction, and
upliftment for them. If a person really
wants to be an artist that has an
impression on the children of today,
that would be a plus for us in society,”
Jah Tourha said.

Jah Tourha currently has two sin-
gles “Intoxication” and “Your Name”
which he said he was inspired to write
for his wife, Ras Kita.

“She is my empress. It was written
for her. She has five beautiful children
for me. The song describes my rela-
tionship with her: ‘I’d like to know
your name girl. This is no time for us to
play no games girl. Dry your eyes, Oh
baby don’t you cry girl. Smile awhile,
Baby stay a while girl, a princess by
my side girl’” Jah Tourha said,

Jah Tourha’s manager, Brian “Supa

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

B’ Austin of Supa B Management, said
Jah Tourha is also slated to perform
with both Sizzla and Capelton at the
6th Annual Reggae All Stars Concert,
to be held on March 28 on Clifford
Park.

“As far as it relates to the DJ’s of the
Bahamas, we are really doing good in
the Bahamas, but if the DJ’s play the
music in the clubs and parties, the
Bahamian public has to like it because
it grows on you. We want them to
allow the music to grow on the
Bahamian people,” Mr Austin said.

Jah Tourha said he will continue to
express postive messages in his music.

“Rasta is always about a positive
message. No matter how it seems.
Music gets its power or meaning from
how it is being directed- the energy it is
being directed in. As much as people
think that children do not understand,
they absorb things like a sponge and
understand expressions very clearly.
Therefore, because music is a form of
expression and the way it is directed
with a certain type of energy, will
always be positive from my view point
in my music,” Jah Tourha said.

i sequence.

























D
a A
The

Watchmen

STARRING: Malin Akerman, Billy
i Crudup, Matthew Goode, Carla Gugino



Watchmen’s troubled journey

; from celebrated graphic novel

: (comic book to you and I) to big

i screen blockbuster has contained
i enough drama, twists and turns to
? merit a movie in itself.

Respected names such as Terry

i Gilliam, Paul Greengrass and Dar-
i ren Aronofsky have all at one

i time or another had their names

i connected to Alan Moore’s

“unfilmable” tale of heroes who

: are anything but super.

Then, once 300 director Zack

i Snyder finally had the film in the

i? can, a lawsuit emerged between

? 20th Century Fox and Warner

i Bros over alleged copyright

: infringement. Had the curse of the
i Watchmen reared its head again?

Well, no, as it happens. It’s here

i at last and, for the most part, it
? was worth the wait.

Watchmen is set in the US in an

i alternative 1985. Thanks to the tit-
i ular superheroes, America has

? won the Vietnam war and Nixon

i has been reelected for a third

i term.

But, save for the Cold War with

i the Russians, there are no battles

: left to fight, and masked vigilantes
i are declared illegal. The Watch-

; men retire and retreat into grim,

? unhappy lives. That is about to

i change, however, when one of

i them, cloth-masked hardman

i Rorschach, who is probing a mur-

i der, comes to believe his former

comrades are in danger.
Watchmen really gets off toa

vee with the kind of balletic vio-

: lence that Snyder made his own in

i 300. Then there is an incredible

i title sequence - which is worth the
i ticket money alone. We see an

i alternative history of the US from
? World War II up until the 1980s -
: a recognisable one, but skewed by
i the presence of superheros - good
i and bad - and their eventual fall

i from grace.

Then the film settles into a

: series of episodes, loosely held

i together by Rorscharch’s investi-
: gation, which reveal more about
: the individual Watchmen and

i their tortured pasts.

For perhaps two thirds of the

i way, Watchmen looks like being a
i hands down winner. There is a

: real air of melancholy that sur-

? rounds these flawed, in some cases
: monstrous, characters and their

i individual stories are intelligent

? and compelling.

But, as it heads for the climax,

the film lapses into more conven-
: tional territory - losing a lot of its
i momentum.

And, with a running time of

i over 160 minutes, that makes the
i good bits seem very far away.

Still, flawed brilliance is better

; than no brilliance, and there are
; enough inspired moments to make
: the Watchmen a must see.

Just don’t miss that opening title





PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

ALTHOUGH the Bahamas is known for its rich legendary
stories of pirates, princes, and even mystical creatures that
roamed our shores thousands of years ago, most of those skills
have been lost to technology. However, Vera Chase-Poitier
was ona mission to change all that and bring back the art of
storytelling.







got to work on implement-
ing one right away.

“T am interested in
Bahamian history, culture
and oral history- that can
be passed down from gen-
eration to generation, so
the Commonwealth Writ-
ers and convention were
born,” Mrs Poitier said.

on stage. Under the theme “Embracing Our Past
With The Future,” the aim was to let the junior
writers, who consisted of students from various
schools throughout the Bahamas, tell stories of those
historical Bahamians figures such as the Arawak
Indians.

“We did not have to do much practise with the
junior writers. They were awesome and just natural
in their roles. They performed the roles of people in
Bahamian history starting with the Arawak Indians,



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IF YOU’RE wondering
what’s happening in enter-
tainment locally, wonder no
more because Tribune Fea-
tures is bringing to you its top
five selection of events, which
are sure to provide some-
thing interesting for your fla-
vor.

' EXPRESS YOURSELF in
_. association with Sumthing
Fertile Productions is
pleased to bring to you
another level of artistic Expres-
sion featuring spoken word per-
formers and artist from Trinidad
and Haiti, along with a wide mix
of local entertainers. Picture
this, a lovely evening at the Mar-
ley Resorts, artistic expressions
on the walls, and a soft glow of
candlelight, all blended with
sounds of pure island beats.
Performances will include
CRAB, Club Superdeath and
Lyrically Blessed, just to name a
few. An open mic session will
take place from tonight at 8pm
to 9pm. There is a cover charge
of just 10 bucks. Tonight, all
roads lead to the Marley Resorts
where it will certainly be a beau-
tiful night to remember.

_) THIS WEEKEND, treat
== your special friend to a
night of entertainment,
smooth rhythms, and good
health. Join dozens at the Pink
Ball scheduled to be held at the
British Colonial Hilton, where
your support will assist the Can-
cer Society of the Bahamas in
delivering free breast and
prostate testing to many in the
family islands. At a cost of $150
per person, this event features
music by the Modern Vintage
band, cocktails and dinner, all
planned to take place on Satur-
day. Also planned that evening
is a silent auction, where guest
will have a chance to purchase
one of a kind Bahamian art or
gift items, as well as assorted
items including exclusive restau-
rant tickets, and hotel or island
getaways. For more information,
contact the Cancer Society for
details.

This Saturday the Antique
Auto Club of the Bahamas will
host its 22nd annual car show at
the Fish Fry. Running from noon
to 6pm, organisers are expect-
ing a minimum of 60 vehicles to
take part, some of which date
back from the early 30s and up
to the 80s. Also scheduled is a
chicken and steak-out at a cost
of $10, with proceeds going to
the Binley Lane home for chil-
dren and the Every Child Counts
Learning centre in Marsh Har-
bor. For more detail call
393.1892, or simply show up to
lend support to this community
event.



THE BAHAMAS Interna-
tional Literary Festival, the
Express Yourself move-
ment and The Ministry of
Tourism are hosting Street Fes-
tival on Sat,March 28, 2009
from 1pm to 6pm in Rawson
Square. Organisers are inviting
locals and visitors to show up in
support of this cultural extrava-
ganza, which will highlight local
artist, musicians, artist, and oth-
ers. The event will also offer
have a wide mix of vendors sell-
ing traditional dishes and treats.
This is a great family and group
event, so parents and youth
leaders, come out and enjoy this
one of a kind cultural show.



A ART ENTHUSIAST, stu-

+= dents, and others are invit-
ed to participate in a three
part project intended to
add a new dimension to an
emerging hot spot in the local art
scene. The Hub art center is
planning to use the public in cre-
ating a new face for its Bay
Street location, which is hoped
to bring a new look to the down-
town district. This Friday at 7pm,
interested persons are invited to
the Hub for a discussion on what
the new image will be.

With the general theme of
“Think Green Bahamas,” this
event is also intended to use
nature as part of its canvas for
this creative project. Organisers
are asking student participants
for a minimum one time dona-
tion of $50 donation, or a $20
donation for the session they
wish to attend. For more infor-
mation contact Margot Bethel at
322.4333 or visit www.thehub-
bahamas.org for more details.



+



Coming
into her
own

The Commonwealth Writers of the Bahamas, a
non profit group, was founded by Mrs Poitier along
with other writers such as Cynthia Ferguson-Fowler,
Elizabeth Munnings, Margaret Hepburn-McKay,
and Valarea Munnings-Miller in early 2004. This
group of esteemed writers wanted to provide more
venues for Bahamian writers to be heard. They were
also concerned that not enough persons were record-
ing the present for the future.

Mrs Poitier said as she had never heard of anyone
hosting a convention for writers in the country, she






SCENES FROM THE RED CROSS FAIR

oe Sr

a

Hundreds of Bahamians flocked to the Red Cross
Fair on Saturday to enjoy a day of fun all for a most
worthy-cause. Pictured above is Governor -General
Arthur Hanna being escorted through the fair
grounds by Gerald Sawyer Red Cross president.



In 2005, the association
experimented with the idea
of finding out the number

of persons in the Bahamas who were interested in
writing. They did this by implementing an annunal
writing competition throughout the country. The
National Short Story/Poetry competition is said to be
a success with students from the family islands par-
ticipating and many of them winning the competition.

At their first National Story Tellers Convention,
held on February 20 at the Wyndam Nassau Crystal
Palace Resort and Casino, the writers and those
who attended watched as the youngsters performed



a
ae



Black Beard, Queen Victoria, Sir Milo Butler, and Sir
Roland Symonette,” Mrs Poitier said.

Mrs Poitier said they saw the need to have the
convention with historical figures in mind to docu-
ment oral history.

“This will be an annual event because we have
realised that not many persons are interested in doc-
umenting our oral history. We had Ancient Man, a
musical story teller and the Region Bells from Cat
Island. We are preparing our students to be able to
document our history and also prepare them for the
future so that they will be the future story tellers of
the Bahamas,” Mrs Poitier said.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



~









es.

today.

FROM page 12

expression in college, she naturally incor-
porated a similar carriculum for her class-

Over the years, Mrs Bennett-Williams
has assisted hundreds of locals, helping
them to develop their abilities in art, while
learning of its importance in the world

Eventually obtaining a Masters in Art
Education, she has since moved on to
become an art professor and department
head at the College of The Bahamas.

Apart from her full time job, she has

career in art.

spent most of her free time at her home
based art centre for kids, which is now
going into its sixth year of operation.

Full Circle she said is a compilation of
works created at different phases of her
life, using new materials.

The exhibition, which showcases more
than 30 pieces, includes watercolor
abstracts, as well as stoneware and acrylic
designs, is a glimpse of a long and fruitful

With this being her newest project, Mrs
Bennett-Williams said in the future she
hopes to create bigger and more grand
pieces for all eyes to see.

“I’ve been doing
art from since I
was in junior high,
but at that time I
didn’t think I
wanted to study art,
back then I wanted
to be a physical
education teacher.”

























> Dining on a Donisha sae
Py budget at Prenieryast ////—s
g Chez Wille tuncnatnn’ iP
see page eight i)

See page nine

PICTURED are some
of the pieces on dis-
play at the Full Circle
exhibition by Sue
Bennet-Williams. Mrs.
Bennet-Williams is an
art professor and
department head at the
College of The
Bahamas and these are
works from her private
collection.





Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R New claims over Tynes’ fateful flight C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.90WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER BRIGHTAND SUNNY HIGH 80F LOW 69F F E A T U R E S SEE ‘THEARTS’ SECTION S P O R T S Coming into SEEPAGEELEVEN her own Davis Cup team ‘did their best’ The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY www.tribune242.com Try our Big Breakfast Sandwich BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E STUDENTS of Woodcock Primary School hold aloft fingerprint cards after officials from the USEmbassy and armed forces visited the school to give a demonstration of their work. Widow of engineer on missing plane believes husband was murdered for drug trade knowledge T R I B U N E E X C L U S I V E n By JOHN MARQUIS Managing Editor THE widow of a Bahamian elec t rical engineer who went missing on the same flight as Chauncey Tynes Jr2 6 years ago spoke out last night and said he was almost certainly m urdered for what he knew about the drug trade. A few days before he and Mr Tynes vanished, two men appeared on the doorstep of their Nassau h ome and warned: “You better keep your mouth shut. We don’t want y our wife to be a widow just yet.” Mrs Ann Moree, 55, of Soldier Road, almost lost the baby she was carrying at the time of her husband D onald’s disappearance and was confined to bed for three months. Today her son Donald Jr, 26, still mourns the father he never saw and wonders what became of him o n that fateful day in the spring of 1983. T he final flight of pilot Chauncey Tynes Jr., who worked for Colom b ian drug czar Joe Lehder, was again the centre of controversy yesterday as arguments raged over his alleged links with the late Prime Minister Sir Lynden Pindling and a senior Bahamian police officer. n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter OUTRAGEover TheTribune Insight article that attacked the legacy of the late Sir Lynden Pindling spilled onto the airwaves yesterday, with a former Cabinet minister among those expressing disgust. But delighted readers deluged The Tribune with calls and e-mails of congratulations as the article became the main talking point in Nassau. Yesterday morning, taxi-drivers at Lynden Pindling International Airport continued a full-scale argument started the day before, with PLP Anger on the airwaves over Tribune’s Pindling article SEE page eight SEE page 12 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f W OODC OCK PRIMAR Y HOS T SUSOFFICIALS Stepfather is charged over girl’s fire death n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE stepfather of a four-yearold girl who died tragically in a house fire Saturday night was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court y esterday on a charge of manslaughter by negligence. L orenzo Payne, 22, of John stone Road, appeared beforeM agistrate Ansella Williams in Court One, Bank Lane yesterday a fternoon on the manslaughter charge. It is alleged that on Saturday, March 7, Payne negligently caused the death of Kentrell Rolle. The four-year-old girl was c onsumed in a blaze that destroyed her wooden home Sat u rday night. She was reportedly burned beyond recognition. P olice fire services officials said that they received reports of a fire in a bushy area on the border of the southern portion of the Pride Estates sub-division shortly after 7pm on Saturday. Neighbours who tried to extinguish the fire told The Tribune that the fire had already consumed the small wooden structure b efore firefighters arrived at the scene. The tragedy is the first fire-related casualty in New Providence this year. P ayne, who was represented by attorney Philip Hilton, was not required to enter a plea to the manslaughter charge and was g ranted bail in the sum of $10,000 with two sureties. As a condition of his bail, Payne was ordered by the magistrate to report to the Carmichael Road Police Station every Wednesday and Saturday before 6 pm. Payne is expected back in court on Tuesday, March 17, which is when he will appearb efore Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane where the matter has been transferred. Man appears in court accused of manslaughter by negligence LORENZO PAYNE outside of court yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f THE Bahamas Christian Council yesterday announced a revolutionary plan to capture 30 per cent of the country’s agricultural industry. The Bahamas Christian Council (BCC National Initiative yesterday which includes a five to seven year plan to “capture” 30 per cent of the food industry. BCC president Rev Patrick Paul presented the plan yesterday during a press conference when he said the Council will move to sensitise the Church and community of the “core values” found in the Bahamas Constitution, the introduction of a Char acter Development Devotional/Programme based on the “core values of the Bahamas” and tapping into the $500 million food industry. Rev Paul said that the Council plans to facilitate the funding of an agricultural-based company to exploit the advancement in tech nology available to produce top quality goods. The Council hopes to do this n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net AN AMERICANtourist is believed to have drowned while diving off the coast of south Cat Cay, near Bimini. Seventy-three-year-old New York resident Richard Merril was pronounced dead by a local doctor shortly after police received reports that he had drowned at about 3pm on Monday. An autopsy will be performed to confirm the cause of death. North Bimini Police Sergeant Gregory Lockhart said Mr Merril was on a pri vately owned dive boat with 10 to 20 other divers exploring the underwater world of the Bimini island chain. He is interviewing a number of witnesses in connection with the incident. SEE page eight SEE page eight Christian Council announces agriculture plans US tourist believed to have drowned n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE announcement that developers of the Baha Mar project signed two agreements with Chinese investors was yesterday her alded by tourism insiders as the "best news" this country has heard in awhile. An agreement with the China State Construction Engineering Corporation was signed recently to construct the stalled multi-billion Baha Mar Resort on Cable Beach. A Memorandum of Under standing regarding potential project financing was also signed at the same time with Export-Import Bank of China, according to a statement by President of Baha Mar Resorts Don Robinson. However, he cautioned that many more months of work and due diligence is needed before final approval is received to finance the develop ment. Yesterday, former tourism minister Obie Wilchcombe said the positive news "quashes all the doom and gloom" in the industry. Noting that the Chinese are "strategic" investors, he said the agreements marked preparation for the future when the global recession ultimately turns around. "I've always had faith in the project and I think that is the best news we've heard in the Bahamas Tourism insiders hail Baha Mar agreements with Chinese investors SEE page 12

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN SECTION Local News................................P1,2,3,5,8,12 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Advt ........................................................P6,7 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION Business............................................P1,2,3,6 Advt.........................................................P4,5 Comics ........................................................ P7 Taste........................................................P8,9 Arts ...................................................... P10,12 W eather .....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net INVESTMENT in small businesses could curb the highest unemployment rates in 15 years, political activista nd co-chair of Bahamians Agitating for a Referendum on the FTAA (BARF Moss said yesterday. D ubbing Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s stimulus p ackage an “illusion”, Mr Moss claims the financial plan does little more than stagnatet he economy. A wiser move to boost the c ountry’s financial status and create jobs for thousands of Bahamians looking for workd uring a global economic crisis would be to support small businesses, Mr Moss said at ap ress conference yesterday. Pressures He also called for the government to reduce mortgager ates and thereby relieve financial pressures and allow p eople more financial freedom to stimulate the economy. The stimulus package is an illusion,” he claimed. “It is causing the economy to be stagnant and stagnating business. What the government doesn’t understand ist hat small businesses keep the economy going, because small b usinesses are responsible for more than 90 per cent of the employment of workers in thisc ountry. “What is the government d oing to ensure the small businesses keep their doors open? What are they going to dow ith respect to redundancies because of the funds small b usinesses have to pay? We have to do it from a position that allows businesses to feel good and not have to lay off staff.” U nemployment figures are a t the highest they have been in 15 years and show that around half of people out of work in Grand Bahama and one-third of job seekers in New Providence lost their jobsi n the last six months. Of those who recently lost t heir jobs in Grand Bahama, 4 8 per cent were laid off or dismissed, while around 44 per cent of the recently unemployed in New Providencew ere dismissed. Survey U nemployment among the 134,400-strong work force in N ew Providence has risen from 8.7 per cent in May 2008 t o 12.1 per cent, according to a n interim survey conducted by the Department of Statistics last month. This leaves a total of 16,315 p eople looking for work in N ew Providence alone. While in Grand Bahama the number of people out of work increased to 14.6 per cent, meaning there are 4,195 people looking for work in al abour force of 28,820. L OCAL artist Thierry Lamare recently donated an original water colour and limited edition print to t he Inner Wheel Club of East Nassau’s Pink Ball in aid of breast and prostate cancer awareness and prevention. The artwork will be part of the silent auction at the ball held on Saturday, March 14 at the British C olonial Hilton. The original painting titled “Conch Shell and P eppers” depicts a simple still life scene which was inspired by a garden of a Bahamian lady who lives in L ong Island. The larger limited gicle entitled “Close to Shore” captures a fisherman in a wooden skiff fishing near the shoreline in a scene that harkens back to an age when life was simpler. B oth illustrate the artist’s ability to capture everyday Bahamian life and scenes with extraordinary u se of light. The artist was compelled to donate his art to help r aise awareness for breast and prostate cancer. “This is an important and good cause to support,” said Mr Lamare. “Cancer has affected everyone in some way and I wanted to do what I could to show my support and t o help raise funds. “The inspiration for my art comes from Bahamia n people and their everyday activities, particularly in the Family Islands, I feel it is important to give b ack to that community.” The public is invited to bid in advance of the Pink B all on both pieces of artwork. The art will be on dis play at Bahama Hand Prints located on Ernest Street during regular business hours 8am – 4pm. Monday – Friday and 10am – 2pm on Saturday. T he public is also invited to bid on a one-of-a-kind quilt created by the members of the Stepping Stone Quilters entitled “Aqua Bliss.” The queen-sized quilt and matching European pillow shams are comprised of a myriad of blue hued shapes and designs of Bahama Hand Prints original fabrics and is on display at the Maison Dcor Lyford Cay location. Bids will also be taken at the Parliament Street location during regular business hours. “We wanted to open the bidding on these extraordinary pieces to a wider audience and bids have a lready come in as many people wish to support this important cause,” said Heather Peterson, president of the Inner Wheel Club of East Nassau. “We are very grateful to Mr Lamare and the many other individual artists and local companies that have donated generously to our silent auction and raffle. “Our goal is to raise funds to assist the Cancer Society with their ongoing cancer screenings for breast and prostate cancer in the Family Islands and with research. It is also our wish that the Pink Ball will create an awareness of the importance of having mammograms and prostate screenings. We especially hope that our effort will help many detect breast and prostate cancer early which ultimately saves lives.” MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest speaks at the Church of God of Prophecy’s 88th Annual Bahamas NationalC onvention on Monday evening. HUNDREDS of persons attempting to have their pre scriptions filled by the Princess Margaret Hospital pharmacy yesterday were frustrated by extremely long waiting times. They are now demanding answers from hospital offi cials as to what is being done to rectify the ongoing prob lem. PMH said in a statement yesterday that its pharmacy is faced with a number of chal lenges, particularly in staffing. The hospital said that it does not have sufficient phar macists to fill out-patient and in-patient prescriptions, and at the same time operate the drop-off service and the new the senior citizen/disabled person service. However, PMH denied that the delays were caused by the availability of medication or the newly implemented phar macy GE Centricy software system launched earlier this year. “(The delays relate to significant deficit in the num ber of pharmacists on duty. The role of the pharmacist is to ensure accuracy of pre scriptions or refills at all times,” the hospital said. Long waiting lines at PMH frustrate those waiting to have prescriptions filled T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f MINISTERSPEAKSATCONVENTION Activist calls for support for small businesses ABOVE: THE original Thierry Lamare water colour entitled “Conch Shell and Peppers.” The artist donated the painting and a limited edition print to help raise funds at theI nner Wheel Club of East Nassau’s Pink Ball. The general public is invited to bid in advance of the ball on the artwork, which will be on display at Bahama Hand Prints. (STANDING L-R ARTIST Thierry Lamare presents his artwork to Heather Peterson, president of the Inner W heel Club of East Nassau. The original painting and limited edition print will be part of the Pink Ball’s silenta uction to help raise funds for breast and prostate cancer. The general public is invited to bid in advance of t he ball on the artwork, which will be on display at Bahama Hand Prints. DONATEDARTWORKTOGOONSILENTAUCTION

PAGE 3

POLICE are asking persons with any information pertaining to an alleged sexual attack on a primary school girl in January to come forward. Head of the Central Detective U nit (CDU yesterday that police have not made any headway in identifying the teenage assailants who are alleged to have sexually attackeda six-year-old girl. Supt Moss said while the investigation into the alleged attack is still continuing, police have met a road block in their inquiries. "We're not in a position to charge anybody," Supt Moss said yesterday. "We're still hoping we can get someone to come forward in terms of identifying (the alleged assailants).” The attack reportedly occurred on January 23, shortly after 3pm on the primary school's premises, however, it was not made pub lic until about two weeks later after a concerned parent contacted The Tribune . It was reported that the girl was lured behind the school by a group of boys between two to four of them wearing secondary school uniforms. It is claimed that after someone found out about the attack, the group of boys jumped the school's back wall and escaped. The victim is doing well and has returned to school, The Tribune understands. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 3 T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242 2335 2335 Soft and durable Diversatex Soft and durable DiversatexTM TMcushion is fade and mildew cushion is fade and mildew resistant and is available in resistant and is available in blue, green or terracotta blue, green or terracotta x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsOutdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A CITY Market security guard was violently beaten and stabbed in the back when he tried to prevent threey oung men from stealing from the store. Kernio Dulcio, 30, approached the three men when he saw them trying to steal items from the Village Road supermarket shortly after 8pm on Monday. B ut the men retaliated by b rutally beating the conscient ious officer and stabbing him in the back. Mr Dulcio was rushed to the e mergency room at Princess M argaret Hospital where he was treated for serious i njuries. He was discharged early yesterday morning. He is employed by Executive Security Company and h as been a faithful employee for some time, bosses said. P olice have two 16-year-old boys in custody in connection with the incident. A nyone who may be able to assist in the police investiga-t ion should call 919, 322-444, o r call Crime Stoppers anonym ously on 328-8477. Security guard beaten and stabbed inthe back Two men face unlawful intercourse char ges In brief T WO men were brought before the courts yesterday on unlawful intercourse charges. Paul Javin Thompson, of F ire Trail Close, was arraigned before Magistrate S usan Sylvester in Court 11, N assau Street, charged with having unlawful intercourse with a person under the age of1 4. I t is alleged that Thompson had unlawful intercourse with the underage girl sometime during the month of August 2008. Thompson was not required to enter a plea to the charge a nd was granted bail in the sum of $5,000. The case has been adjourned to August 20. H enry Lewis Saunders, of Kemp Road, was also arraigned before MagistrateSusan Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau Street, charged, in a separate incident, with having unlawful intercourse with a girl between 14 and 16 yearsof age. It is alleged that Saunders had unlawful intercourse witha 14-year-old girl on Saturday, March 7, 2009. Saunders was not required to enter a plea to the charge and was granted bail in the sum of $5,000. The case has been adjourned to August 13. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE government will do everything in its power to ease the financial burden placed on Bahamians during these tumultuous economic times, said Labour Minister Dion Foulkes yesterday. These efforts by the government include periodic reviews of, and possible adjustments to the government's stimulus packages as the economic climate dictates, said the Senator. "What we plan to do is to review exactly what we are doing in respect to our stimulus to ensure that we are doing enough so that we can provide additional jobs," Mr Foulkes said to reporters outside of Cabinet yesterday. "We will review the situation to ensure that we do enough. We realise a lot of people are unemployed, people are having difficulties paying their mortgages, their rent and meeting their bills. So the gov ernment will do everything in its power to ensure that we ease the burden on all Bahamians.” M r Foulkes’ remarks came just days after the latest unemployment figures the highest in 15 years were released by the Department of Statistics. According to those figures, the number of people out of work in New Providence stands at 16,315, and in Grand Bahama at over 4,195 equiv alent to a 12.1 and 14.6 per cent unemployment rate respectively. The figures show that around half of all people who are without work in Grand Bahama lost t heir jobs in the last six months, with 48 per cent of them reporting having been “laid-off or dismissed.” In New Providence, one third were put on the unemployment line during the same period, and of these, 44 per cent were laid off or dismissed. Overall, in New Providence, unemployment among the 134,400-strong labour force rose from 8.7 per cent in May 2008 to 12.1 per cent, based on the interim survey conducted last month. U U n n e e m m p p l l o o y y m m e e n n t t While these numbers present a dismal reality, M r Foulkes said that considering the job market in other countries, in particular the United States, the unemployment situation could be much worse. Any buffer Bahamians are experiencing from the brunt of the American recession can be chalked up to the stimulus packages the government put in place, he added. "The unemployment rate increased in New Providence to 12.1 per cent and in the Unit ed States over a corresponding period the unem ployment rate increased by almost 100 per cent. In the Bahamas it increased by (about we must be doing some things right in respect to our stimulus package,” he said. An Unemployment Benefit Fund, which Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced during the mid-year budget debate, is expected to be imple mented on July 1. In the interim, a training programme for the unemployed is scheduled to be started shortly. Officials have said the programme will have a work component, allowing the out-ofwork to receive intern-like training while receiving a stipend. Government has also launched environmental clean-up campaigns and will start a number of cap ital works projects with the goal of creating jobs. n B y TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net G OVERNMENT intends to " maximise" the number of B ahamian workers used in the construction of the proposed state-of-the-art national stadium funded by the Chinese gove rnment, Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes said yesterday. This statement comes amid growing concern that a large number of Chinese workers wille nter the country once cons truction on the highly-touted s tadium begins. "We are going to try to maximise the amount of Bahamianw orkers at the stadium and with t hat gift comes the material and a lso labour," said Mr Foulkes. "That is part of the agreement that was signed under the pre-v ious government. So that is an agreement that we will honour, but we will attempt to maximise the amount o f Bahamian participation in that project.” In January, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham reaf-f irmed his administration's comm itment to starting construction on the stadium sometime this year more than four yearsa fter the deal was signed with T he People's Republic of China to fund the project. In late October 2008 a year a fter the stadium was first expected to be completed, the government advised China to start shipping their heavy cons truction equipment to the Bahamas. In an interview with The Trib une t hat month, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture D esmond Bannister said the size of the multi-use stadium will be "adapted for Bahamians" making it smaller than the initial plan of a 30,000-seat venue. The former PLP administration signed a deal in 2004 allowi ng the Chinese government to fund the construction of the stadium, which would be valued at $30 million upon completion. The FNM assumed office in 2007 and there was reportedly some delay in the progress of the stadium due to time needed b y the Ministry of Works to review the Chinese' designs, ensuring that they were up to code. T he proposed stadium was the subject of much political furore, with the current admini stration blaming the delay on PLP mismanagement. Govt plans to ‘maximise’ number of Bahamian stadium workers F OULKESSPEAKSAMIDCONCERNOVER C HINESEINVOLVEMENTINPROJECT Dion Foulkes Minister: govt will do everything it can to help Bahamians during crisis “... we will attempt to max-i mise the amount of Bahamian particiaption in that p roject.” Dion Foulkes AN ARMED robber terrified the staff of the Fantasy Caf and Electronics on Bal four Avenue when he held them at gunpoint as he stole cash from the store on Monday afternoon. The gunman burst into the store shortly before 1pm, threatened the shop keeper and security guard with a deadly weapon and forced them to the back of the store. He then fled the store with an undetermined amount of cash in an unknown direction. Police have described the gunman as light-skinned, medium-sized and around 6ft tall. Anyone who may be able to assist the police in the investigation should call 919, 322-4444 or call Crime Stop pers anonymously on 3248477. Armed robber terrorises staff Police plea for help over alleged sex attack

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. It has been announced that the GBPA has indicated that they would in fact reduce the fees of its retail licencees by 50 per cent effective until February 2010. The question is, how is this move going to affect all of us here on Grand Bahama? How is this move going to affect hoteliers, tour operators, straw and seafood vendors? How is this move going to affect cabs and public bus drivers, hotel and casino workers? The GBPA is aware that the majority of the people employed on this Island are directly or indirectly in the tourism industry. Would it not be practical then that they also reduce the fees by the same amount at the air port and harbour so as to restart our failing tourism product for the same period of time? ANTHONY “ZIPS” HANNA Cacique recipient (Tourism Nassau, March, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. The anchor projects negotiated and left, in place, at various stages of commitment by Christie’s Administration, could h ave been, by now, producing r evenue sufficient to fund, witho ut having to borrow, the socalled stimulus package the F NM government has now prop osed. If Ingraham had allowed the P LP’s approved projects to con t inue without interruption, we c ould have been home free and would not have had to borrow from the Chinese or anybodye lse to see us through these turb ulent times; but king Hubert c ouldn’t leave well enough alone, so he stopped them and changed them and adjustedt hem and re-branded what was left of them, so he could claim o wnership of them. By doing what he did, it s lowed the country’s growth momentum, and in the processs hattered investor confidence in precisely the way the PLP l evied its charges which were supported by the report given by S&P. S tandard and Poor agreed with the PLP’s assertions, when t hey issued their report, which is a matter of public record now, o n the state of affairs in the country and the fact that the F NM government was mostly to blame for the economic d ecline we are experiencing. $150 million from the Chi nese, $200 million from a con sortium of banks, to be borrowed, in an effort to stave off b ankrupting of the country, which seems inevitable if we c ontinue down the road Ingra ham and Laing are dragging us. We are eight months into this fiscal period and eighteen months away from the earliest projection of any kind of relief from this recession. I f the country’s revenue is showing the kind of negative t raits, in this short a period, where it has under performed to t he degree where it necessitated us borrowing, so far, $350 million, just think of our position in eighteen months; even a child can predict the precarious circumstances, with which we will be faced, when that period expires. Revenue collected by the C ustoms dept represents depending on whose point of view is being given-about 80 per cent of the country’s total income. S marty-pants and his boss, H ubert Ingraham, dismissed all t he top brass from customs and then employed in excess of 100 trainees who are presently int he classroom for the next six months. W ho is minding the store, you a sk? Ask smarty-pants, Zhivarg o Laing; I just hope, for the country’s sake, that they are not banking on collecting a whole l ot more customs duties any time soon, now that the top brass was fired. A nd then smarty pants and h is boss have plans, afoot, to put the Officers on shifts, come July this year; well there goest he rest of the customs revenue. The standard of living those officers have got themselves uset oo, over the years, with the large amount of overtime they are accustomed to earning, will, for them, be a most difficult task t o try and make the kind of adjustments necessary to cope. Ingraham and Laing’s decisions a re all devoid of the human ele ment; they care very little, if any at all, about the impact thiso vertime stoppage will have on t hese officers’ way of life. The national debt, I predict, will grow outrageously under Ingraham in this term in office as it did under him, during 19922002. He took our national debt, during that period, from a low $970 million, inherited from the PLP’s 25-year stint, to aw hopping $2.1 billion, at the time he was kicked out of office in 2002. The experts are predicting that, at the rate the FNM is going presently, with t he borrowing of this $350 million so far, the national debt will spiral out of control well before there is any relief from our economic woes; thanks to t he FNM government’s bad p olicies. The experts say, with t his borrowed amount, the national debt is now essentially a t $3.22 billion and climbing. It i s, further, the view of the experts that the IMF will defi-n itely become concerned over o ur borrowings, as the country’s a bility to repay and service this debt will become more and more cumbersome. There is al ikelihood of Ingraham having t o borrow another $100 million t o pay civil servants’ salaries, etc, and that would immediately put the borrowed amount ath alf a billion; well above the debt-GDP ratio tolerance of 42 p er cent; “a figure this nation is poised to succeed by year’s e nd” according to Mr Al Jarrett. With the $100 million bor-r owed, the debt load might well increase to 45.7 per cent, cont inued Mr Jarrett. What can I say, we are in a holy mess and both captain andm ate are sitting at the helm, but neither of them knows what the h ell they are doing. This being said, we are bound t o end up on the rocks of economic disaster under this lame b rain government. F ORRESTER J CARROLL Freeport, Grand Bahama March 2, 2009. (Would Mr Carroll please e xplain why former prime minister Christie did not complete h is anchor projects so that they could have been started during his administration, instead of leaving them in “various stages of commitment” for the Ingra ham government to complete? If Mr Carroll would look at then umber of years that some of these were haggled over with a t least one of them threatening to pull out because of governm ent delays Mr Christie’s foot-dragging was inexcusable. Ed). C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm ABACONIANS, a vocal lot when aroused, were more than angry when they learned that their local police had gone hush-hush with crime news. Obviously alarmed by the rising crime in the small, closely-knit island, a police superintendent is said to have told the local newspaper that his office will no longer issue crime reports for publication. We don’t know if he thought that by not publishing the crime it would magically disappear. However, his explanation was that such publication would “reflect badly on the police.” What he didn’t understand was that the only way that it would reflect badly on his officers would be if they were seen not to be doing their duty. Instead of silencing the press, they should be using it to encourage residents to join them in their fight against crime. Once the legitimate press is silenced, the SipSip Express slides into motion and what it churns out is often lethal to the well-being of a small community. A thread of truth is quickly turned into a horror movie filled with misin formation, exaggeration, and tall tails, enough to make a community disappear behind locked doors and barred windows. It is best for the police to release the information, which will contain the truth as far as it is known, and will make residents feel secure to know that their police officers are aware of what’s going on and are on top of their job. But silence and an announced attempt to hide information is like pouring petrol onto dying embers. That is when whatever the Sip-Sip Express publishes by word of mouth is taken as truth. “It must be true, or else the police would n’t try so hard to hide it,” is the thought process, as one local adds his opinion and hands the story on to his neighbour for another recycle and more embellishment. Abaconians are alarmed at the increase in crime in their island. They are even more worried because they perceive their police officers to be ineffective in face of the new threat. And, instead of the officers calling headquarters in Nassau for assistance, their announcement not to release information was seen as the last straw. Abaco is the one island that appears to be holding its own during this economic recession. Recently in the House of Assembly one of its representatives, Mr Edison Key, attributed this relative success to the number of second homes established there, and owned by foreigners who have been attracted to the island. They have settled happily among the people and spend many months of the year on an island where they feel secure. No wonder Abaconians are worried. Not only do they live in physical fear for themselves, but they also fear losing their livelihood should crime frighten off their out-of-town neighbours. The Tribune reported last Wednesday that residents were particularly alarmed by the attempted kidnapping of a would-be investor during the Junkanoo parade last month. According to the report the investor sought police help after being released from the boot of his own car by a thief who demanded that he withdraw money from an ATM machine in Marsh Harbour. When the investor sought police help, the report continues, the officer allegedly replied: “I can’t help I’m here to patrol the Junkanoo parade.” This is the typical reply of a small time cop, who has never heard of big town crime. Meanwhile, during this exchange the kid napper disappeared into the crowd of revellers. He had earlier threatened the investor with a machete as he forced him into the boot of his car. Whatever investment the foreigner had planned in Abaco obviously ended then and there. Then there was the mugging in her home of well known resident, Ms Lily Sands, who is in her seventies. She was locked in a closet in her home while thieves stole money and other per sonal items. And then there is the theft of mega yachts some valued at more than $100,000 that tie up at Abaco’s marinas. It is reported that on more than one occasion boats arrive in Abaco one day and have been stolen the next. “Boats are disappearing like crazy,” said one resident. “We have to get help up here. We must get Nassau’s attention because this crime is going to kill the economy.” At least they have caught the attention of Assistant Police Commissioner Hulan Hanna who announced yesterday that the police in Abaco will continue to release crime reports. It is now up to the police, supported by the residents, to find the criminals and get them behind bars in H M Prison, Fox Hill, Nassau. This must be a joint effort between the police and the community. For this to happen there must be full disclosure of information, which will result in mutual trust and cooperation. How King Hubert slowed the country’s momentum LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Crime news needs to be published )25$/( EDITOR, The Tribune. Again, we sincerely apologise to our neighbours for any inconvenience suffered, and we assure everyone that a zero tolerance policy now applies to any private functions booked at the Retreat. This headache is now a thing of the past. The quote by Eric Carey of the Bahamas National Trust can go down in Bahamain history as our equivalent to U.S President Bush’s ‘Mission accomplished’ re the Iraq war, or perhaps Britain’s Prime Minister Chamberlin’s ‘Peace in our Time.’ By the stroke of Carey’s mighty pen he was able to make the Bahamian people believe the Bahamas National Trust was going to behave itself. It would no longer be a blight on the com munity. This, of course, was nonsense. On Saturday last yet another noisy party was held at the Trust. I called Carey twice and got the same old reply he would call the security guard. The third call was not accepted, nor was I able to get through to Lynne Gape. The party continued until past one o’clock Sunday morning. Shame, shame. You cannot go on deluding the public. You must do the job you are being handsomely paid for. I find it interesting that neither Carey nor Gape consider this problem serious enough to personally monitor the events. Upon reading Mr Carey’s apology and his rec ommendations to ensure harmony in the area I called the Trust, spoke to Ms Mills and asked what I should do in the unlikely event of more noise. She assured me there would be a respon sible person in the office at all times and that by simply calling the Trust, I would be able to speak to a responsible person on site. I have been told and I believe it to be true that the Bahamas National Trust does not have the required licences and permits to host these parties where liquor is served and music is played. If this is true it is a serious oversight by the Trust and adds even more weight to banning all parties. Mr. Carey, I will not simply roll over and die. I am right, you are wrong. I can assure you I will do whatever I legally can to ensure peace in my environment, even if you don’t care. LEONARD SMITH Nassau, March 9, 2009 You cannot go on deluding the public, Mr Carey Rejuvenating our tourism industry

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n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE government may seek additional funding from the private sector to temporarily spruce up the Lynden Pindling International Airport to meet the needs of the 2009 Miss Universe pageant, Tourism and Aviation Minister Vincent VanderpoolWallace said. Speaking to reporters outside of Cabinet yesterday morning, Senator Vanderpool-Wallace said his ministry may request more money from the Nassau Paradise Island Promotion Board to facili tate a swift facelift of the airport. "We regularly call on our friends in the private sector, Nas sau Paradise Island Promotion Board in particular, when we need any specific kind of shortterm work that needs to be done they have many times come to our aid in terms of providing that. However, the ministry will also continue to look for other sources of funding for this project, he said. Last week, Senator Vanderpool-Wallace said the airport which is often described as an eyesore will be getting some aesthetic and infrastructural improvements in the months leading up to the prestigious pageant. “In terms of the kind of welcome we have in place, certainly we have that in hand what the place looks like. We will have that in hand, but there is no doubt that the schedule that has already been started with the redevelopment of the airport is going to continue o n the same pace,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said recently. “And to the degree that that is going to interfere in any way, shape or form, in terms of what the airport looks like, we are going to mask that as best we can.” The pageant, to be hosted at Atlantis, Paradise Island, in late August, will showcase the country to millions of potential visitors a publicity boost that tourism offi cials said will provide invaluable exposure. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 5 677 1111 nassau 688 1111 freeport www.indigonetworks.com say goodbye to Vonage and VibeBring your most recent bill when you switch & get FREE ’ Number Free Long Distance Number (US, Canada, UK 1 Month FREE Long Distance (plans include US, Canada, UK, Caribbean 1 Month FREE Local Calling (unlimited on-island calling FREE On-Net Calling (call other onephone customers for FREE FREE CLASS Features No set-up or service fees. Pay deposit only. Switch today & enjoy the Best Value for your money!switch for free! A CARIBBEAN island has been blocked from hanging two brutal killers by a British ruling which reflects the Bahamas’ own frustrations over the death penalty. A ntigua’s prosecutors h ave expressed despair over an agreement with the British government which prevents them executing the murderers of a Welsh honeym oon couple who were killed in their holiday chalet l ast year. Adlai Smith, Antigua’s director of public prosecutions, said: “It’s unfortunate, it’s regrettable. These mend eserve the harshest penalty t he law can impose for this h orrendous crime. But we h ave given our word and we c an’t go back on it.” Antigua’s holiday trade w as badly hit after Ben and Catherine Mullany were murdered on what was sup-p osed to be an idyllic honeymoon trip. Hundreds of tourists cancelled their bookings, prompting Prime Minister Baldwin Spencer to say the i sland’s future was at risk. S cotland Yard was called in to investigate the crime. But Britain agreed only ift he island promised not to execute the killers if theyw ere found and convicted. A ntigua, a former British c olony that has been independent since 1981, was among Caribbean nationst hat voted to inaugurate a regional appeal court to replace the Privy Council. B ut the Antiguan constitut ion still states that the Privy Council, which usually over turns death sentences, is the f inal court of appeal. Detectives from London tracked down the killerst hrough mobile phones stolen from the victims. Two local men, Avie How el, 18, and Kaniel Martin, 21, w ere charged with murder last August. The gun used to kill the Mullanys has been l inked to three other mur ders. In the Bahamas, three proh anging marches were staged l ast year to call for the return of the death penalty. Demonstrators expressed anger at the rising murder rate and demanded government action. H owever, the Privy Coun cil has ruled the mandatory death penalty to be “uncon-s titutional” and, in its rulings, generally reflects the UK’s opposition to capital punishment. The last man to hang in Nassau was David Mitchell, a Haitian-Bahamian who murdered a European couple in Abaco. He went to the gallows in January, 2000. T HEproceeds from the Annual Epiphany Organ Recital performed by organ i st Dr Sparkman Ferguson at Christ Church Cathedral resulted in the presentation ofm usical instruments for d eserving St Annes High School students. Cynthia Wells, the school’s p rincipal, along with Karel Coleby, music director at St Annes High School, acceptedt he instruments. “We are excited with the quality of the instruments.F ortunately for us, as a result of the generosity of Dr Fer guson, we now have addition a l instruments to afford our students opportunities,” Mrs Wells said. T he band programme at St A nnes, in addition to provid ing students with music skills, teaches self-discipline, self-r espect, and respect for others along with creative prob lem solving and physical, men t al and emotional growth “Each year, we have to turn away students from the bandb ecause they cannot afford i nstruments,” Mr Coleby said. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ t ribunemedia.net THE FAILURE of CLICO (Bahamas subject to a Commission of Inquiry, according to the a ctivist group Bahamians A gitating for a Referendum o n the FTAA (BARF B ARF’s co-chairmen Paul M oss and Fayne Thompson y esterday called on the gove rnment to launch an official i nquiry to look into who is r esponsible for the collapse of CLICO (Bahamas why it was allowed to crumble when problems had been identified as early as 2004. The inquiry and an imme diate audit of insurance com-p anies to ensure their financial health would help prev ent other companies from crashing, Mr Moss said yesterday at a press conference. BARF is also calling on policy holders to object to the government’s decision to liquidate the company, and i t maintains the decision was a knee-jerk reaction at the expense of 29,000 policy h olders and 170 employees. M r Moss called on policy holders to band together and insist upon objectivity by applying for the appointment of a second liquidator at the hearing on March 17. CLICO (Bahamas s hould also insist that Minist er of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing recuse hims elf from the matter as he is a former director of Colina Imperial and his former e mployer may have an intere st in CLICO’s assets, Mr M oss said. “The inquiry should look at the relationships of regulators and the industry where it is not uncommon for former government officials to sit on the boards of insura nce companies or connected companies, thereto bringing t heir objectivity into question on decisions made or about to be made,” he said. The governments of T rinidad and Guyana have shown more support for their people by bailing out CLIC O to ensure policy holders d o not lose their investments, M r Moss said. He added: “It is not suffic ient for them (the govern m ent) to say they are not going to do this, that they believe in the free markets, e tc. This is critical, and it n eeds to be fixed. “This is what we put them there for.” By not bailing out the bank, the government will end up paying out funds to those who are forced to turn t o public funds when they lose their life savings, BARF s aid. And the implications are far reaching as thousands more Bahamians who have C LICO policies through credit unions will also lose out. B ARF warned policy holde rs to stop paying into CLI C O (Bahamas funds will be directed to t he liquidator to pay off d ebts. Group calls for Commission of Inquiry into CLICOfailure Pageant demands may pr ompt govt to seek additional airport funding Musical instruments pr esented to St Annes STANNES students with some of the instruments. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace FAYNE THOMPSON and Paul Moss are pictured in this file photo. British ruling blocks island from hanging two killers In brief

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H O PE TOWN, Abaco In 1976 the late American writer Alex Haley won a Pulitzer prize for Roots , an histori cal novel said to have been based on his family history, starting with an African named Kunta Kinte who was kidnapped into slavery. The book was adapted into a s ensational TV mini-series that played endlessly on ZNS whenever election time rolled around. And while it later transpired that H aley's specific genealogical claims did not pan out, in the end that did not matter they were generically true. Although critics condemned the b ook as fraudulent, Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr put it this way: " Roots is a work of the imagination rather than strict hist orical scholarship. It was an important event because it captured everyone's imagination." Tough Call could produce a similarly fanciful account that would be just as accurate in its own way an idea that took shape thisp ast weekend while attending H ope Town's Heritage Day. This annual fair staged by the local museum celebrates the settlement's founding by a loyalist w idow named Wyannie Malone, who came to Abaco some 10 years before Kunta Kinte was supposed to have arrived in America. L ittle is known about Wyann ie's ancestors, although a massive hardcover genealogy "bible" documents her descendants (including me) in excruciating detail. But Bahamian Peter Roberts, an archivist at Georgia State University who specialises in these things, provided a glimpse of the way backward in a Heritage Day lecture he presented in Hope Town l ast Saturday. For the past few years Prof Roberts has been promoting the Bahamas DNA Project, a genetic database that tracks the roots of those Bahamians who submit their DNA for testing by a genealogy lab. So far, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Slavic, Berber, Abyssinian and W est African origins have been i dentified for Bahamian participants. O ne result shows that a direct B ahamian descendant of Wyannie Malone is a perfect DNAm atch with an American Malone who traces his genealogy to Virg inia, with origins in Ireland. This Malone's family history s ays they came to America by way of the Bahamas, but that an ances-t or named Daniel was born in W estmeath, Ireland in 1642 and was "in the colonies" by 1665. I n other words, the Bahamian Malones may have originally left the 'auld sod' for Eleuthera, then moved to Virginia and on to South Carolina, before leaving from Charleston in 1785 to settle in Abaco. As an aside, Wyannie's husband, Benjamin, fought for the British i n the War of Independence, and their descendants were strict protestants. So clearly, they were not Irish patriots. There were many non-Malones present at the recent Heritage Day celebrations, and Prof Roberts had lots of interesting snippets of information about some of them. F or example, genetic testing s hows that the Bahamian Lowe's do not trace their lineage to theB ritish Isles as most of us would s uspect. Instead, they have a Portuguese background and are prob-a bly related to Sephardic Jews who were expelled from Iberia in the 1 5th century. Since 2004 the Bahamas DNA P roject has tested hundreds of people, most of them with an Abacoo r Key West background. But this r epresents only about a third of the 195 surnames found in theB ahamas, and black Bahamian families are grossly under-repres ented, Prof Roberts told an avid audience in the Hope Town l ibrary. And before you ask, no trace of Lucayan ancestry has yet b een found not even among Long Islanders. "The DNA results so far show that we Bahamians are all closely related and have a shared her i tage," Prof Roberts said, adding that: "If a black person marries i nto a white family there will be no visible trace of that after only s ix generations and vice versa." The "Roots-like" suggestion that the Malones may have arrived on Eleuthera before settling on Abaco was supported to a degree b y Florida archaeologist Bob Carr, who also gave a talk at the Her i tage Day event. Carr has been investigating Bahamian sites since at least 1986, when he helped conf irm the discovery of Carleton, Abaco's original loyalist settlement located near present-day Treasure Cay. F or the past several years Carr has been digging up Preachers Cave at North E leuthera, a geological feature which he describes as "the Plymouth Rock of the Bahamas", and which contains Lucayan, European and African cultural remains. "The Eleutherean Adventurers never came to the Bahamas," he told the Hope Town audience. "They were the investors back in L ondon who were hoping to find precious metals and valuable hardwoods in the islands. About 70 people arrived on Eleuthera from Bermuda in 1648, but we have never found the list of names. We do know that within two years there were 150 people living near Preachers Cave, including free blacks and some slaves." A fter a 1656 slave conspiracy in Bermuda led by a free blackn amed William Force, some of the plotters were banished to the B ahamas, which Carr referred to as "the first Australia". Many white Bermudians were also exiled to the Bahamas, and DNA evidence has confirmed thatd escendants of these first settlers now live in nearby Spanish Wells.O thers ended up in Harbour Island, Nassau, and possibly Abac o, Carr said. Preachers Cave has been an archaeological site since 1992 and has yielded important information about Bahamian history. It was o riginally a Lucayan cemetary, and among the five Indian burials thath ave been found is one of a chief or shaman, together with the bones o f a sacrificial victim who was beheaded with hands and feet tied. Charcoal found at the site has been radiocarbon-dated to the 8th cen tury. W hen the first Europeans settlers were shipwrecked offE leuthera in 1648 they also used the cave for shelter and for reli g ious services, clearing away all the Lucayan bones they could find, according to Carr. "The legend of the first church is true the pulpit rock is there with a notch for the bible, along with two crude chairs c ut into the rock." There are five Puritan graves in the cave, including two bodies in coffins, one of which was a very old man who was likely to have been a leader. Interestingly, one of the skeletons was a dwarf and DNA studies have confirmed the existence of Laron Syndrome, a g rowth hormone deficiency found among Jews and Arabs. Several inhabitants of Spanish Wells today have this genetic syndrome and the Preachers Cave dwarf was probably their ancestor. Bob Carr was Dade County's first archaeologist and is renowned as the discoverer of the Miami Circ le on Brickell Point an 800year-old Tequesta Indian ceremonial site. He is a co-founder and director of the Miami-based Archaeological and Historical Conservancy, which handled the Preachers Cave dig, and has worked with the Florida Division of Historic Resources and the US National Park Service. O ne thing that came out of Tough Call's Heritage Day visit to H ope Town is that visitors need more cultural experiences than t hey are getting in the Bahamas. Some of the wealthier family island settlements like Hope Town, New Plymouth, Spanish Wells and Rock Sound have small museums runb y volunteers, but most Bahamian communities pay scant attentiont o heritage matters, and historic preservation is not on their agenda. Y et according to Carr, there is much more interest in history and heritage than in playing on the beach: "In Florida, heritage is a very important part of our tourism s ector that generates more money from visitors." P reachers Cave is the perfect example of a heritage site that can f orm part of a world class educa tional tour if properly preserved and presented. The 1836-vintage Hole-in-the Wall lighthouse in South Abaco is a nother good example. And before going to Hope T own I attended a town meeting at Sandy Point where this very sub j ect came up. At the meeting, engineers from American Bridge were discussing more dredging at Disney's Cast away Cay just offshore. Formerly known as Gorda Cay, this tiny i sland within sight of the relatively unprosperous village of Sandy Point is a destination for three Disney cruise ships a week, each loaded with 2300 passengers. The improvements that are expected to begin in May will allow the cay to service larger ships bringing 4,000 passengers each. Yet none o f these visitors ever sets foot on Abaco. But just a short drive from Sandy Point is the Abaco National Park, a natural wonderland surrounding a spectacular bluff that is the site of the historic Hole-in-theWall lighthouse. At the town meeting, B ernadette Hall of Abaco Friends of the Environment announced a project to clean up and restore the lighthouse property. Although functioning now on solar power the lighthouse and its associated Victorian-era buildings are all in an embarrassing state of disrepair and the entire stunning site is littered with trash and rustingr elics. Heritage tourism is officially d efined as “travelling to experience the places, artifacts, and activi ties that authentically represent the stories and people of the past and present." And with more people than ever seeking to combine their recre-a tional experiences with educational growth, heritage tourism canb e a powerful economic engine for creating jobs and producing higher t ax revenues. But as South Abaco's chief councillor, Preston Roberts, told me, "if we want to benefit from the tourists that Disney brings we h ave to go to them with a product, and we don't have one yet." M acaroni and cheese is fine as far as it goes, but you can only eat s o much of it. Heritage tourism involves a lot more than that, and it can be so much more fulfilling to those who provide it by protecting the e nvironmental and historical features that form the basis for ourt ourist economy. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 2QHRIWKHOHDGLQJFDXVHVRIGHDWKDPRQJFKLOGUHQ &$1&(5
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Division winners will get to pick 1st-round foes C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 9 n By The Associated Press SCOREBOARD Wednesday, March 11 Memphis at Minnesota (8 pm EDT). A matchup of teams des perate for wins. The Grizzlies have won just once in their last 11 games, while the Timberwolves have lost 10 in a row and 15 of their last 16. STARS Monday Dwyane Wade, Heat, scored 48 points, including a running 3-pointer as time expired to lift Miami to a wild 130-127 double-overtime wino ver Chicago. Joe Johnson, Hawks, scored 30 points and Atlantabeat New Orleans 89-79, ending the Hornets' season-best sev en-game winning streak. Richard Hamilton, Pistons, led Detroit with 29 points and ac areer-high 14 assists in a 98-94 win over Orlando. Brandon Roy, Trail Blazers, scored 27 points as Portland beat the Los Angeles Lakers 111-94 for their 12th straight win at the Rose Garden. Caron Butler, Timberw olves, had 27 points, 10 rebounds and six assists to lead Minnesota to a 110-99 victory over Washington. M-V-3! Miami's Dwyane Wade scored 48 points, including a running 3-pointer as time expired to lift the Heat to a wild 130-127 double-overtime win over the Chicago Bulls. Wade, a top MVP candidate, also had 12 assists in 49 minutes, shot 15for-21 from the field and madea 3-pointer at the end of the first half, then again at the end of regulation. SCARY SIGHT Portland forward Rudy Fernandez was taken from the court on a stretcher with his neck in a brace Monday night after he was fouled hard by Trevor Ariza in the fourth quarter of Portland's 111-94 win over the Los Angeles Lakers. The rookie from Spain fell hard on his elbow and his hip, and remained prone under the basket for several minutes. X-rays and a CT scan were negative, but Fernandez was expected to remain at the hospital overnight with what the team called a "soft tissue injury to his right upper chest/side area." SOMEONE HAD TO WIN Caron Butler had 27 points, 10 rebounds and six assists to lead Washington to a 110-99 victory over Minnesota on Monday night in a matchup of teams that had lost 14 straight combined. The Wizards lost five in a row and seven of their last eight before the win, while the Timberwolves have lost 10 in a row and 15 of their last 16. Minnesota (18-45 Jefferson was lost for the season with a torn ACL before the AllStar break. STANDINGS Denver had a chance to tie idle Utah atop the Northwest Division after losing their grip on first place 24 hours earlier with a loss at Sacramento, but lost for the eighth time in 11 games Monday night, this time 97-95 to the Houston Rockets. The Nuggets were the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference at the All-Star break but have slipped all the way to seventh. STRONG IN DEFEAT Ben Gordon scored a seasonhigh 43 points for Chicago, including eight 3-pointers, but the Bulls lost to Miami 130-127 in two overtimes Monday night a s Dwyane Wade hit a running 3 -pointer at the buzzer. Kobe Bryant had 26 points for the Los Angeles Lakers, who lost at Portland 111-94 and haven't won at the Rose Gar den in their last seven tries, with their last victory Feb. 23, 2005. STEPPING IN Detroit's Kwame Brown, who has struggled since being the No. 1 overall pick in the 2001 draft, had 10 points and played 26 minutes of tough defense against Dwight Howard as the Pistons beat the Orlando Magic 98-94 on Monday night. He stepped up after Rasheed Wallace left with a first-quarter injury. SIDELINED Atlanta's Marvin Williams, who averages 14 points per game, was held out with an undisclosed lower back injury. He was examined by Hawks d octors Monday and will see a nother doctor Tuesday. New Orleans F Peja Stojakovic missed his third straight game with back spasms. Minnesota guard Randy Foye had to be carried to the locker room in the fourth quarter of the Timberwolves' 110-99 loss to Washington with a sprained right ankle. SPEAKING "Right now, man, there ain't nobody in the league playing better than him." Miami's Jamario Moon on teammate Dwyane Wade, who made a running 3-pointer as time expired and scored 48 points to lead the Heat to a 130127 victory over Chicago on Monday night NBAToday NEW YORK (AP Development League will have an unusual format for the playoffs the division winners will get to pick their first-round opponents. Also, for the first time eight teams will qualify for the postseason, including the winners of the three divisions along with the five teams with the best regular-season records, regardless of division. The top-seeded division winner will select its opponent first, with the second and third ranked division winners following in that order. The fourth-seeded team will play the remaining team. "One of our fundamental goals at the NBA D-League is to utilize our unique position to explore new and different ways to grow the game," league president Dan Reed said. "We believe that these innovations will provide our fans with compelling matchups and action packed games." The first and second rounds of the playoffs will be one game each, while the finals will be a best-ofthree series. The playoffs will start next month. The NBA Development League has a team in Bismarck, N.D., the Wizards. PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS Rudy Fernandez receives medical attention after he was fouled by Lakers’ Trevor Ariza in the third quarter of Monday’s game in Portland. The Trail Blazers beat the Los Angeles Lakers 111-94 for their 12th straight win at the Rose Garden... (AP Photo: Rick Bowmer Blazers man down in win over Lakers

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS THIS is the schedule for day one of the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools’ InterS chool Track and Field Championships today at the T homas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium, starting at 9am: Track Schedule J unior Girls 75 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries J unior Boys 80 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries I ntermediate Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries S enior Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries I ntermediate Boys 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries S enior Boys 110 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries J unior Girls 1500 Meter Run Final J unior Boys 1500 Meter Run Final B antam Girls 400 Meter Dash Prelimniaries Bantam Boys 400 Meter Dash PreliminariesJ unior Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries J unor Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries Intermediate Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries Intermediate Boys 400 Meter Dash PreliminariesS enior Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries Senior Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries Bantam Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries Bantam Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries J unior Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries Intermediate Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries Intermediate Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries I ntermediate Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminiaries Senior Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries Senior Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries B antam Girls 1500 Meter Run Bantam Final B antam Boys 1500 Meter Run Final Intermediate Girls 1500 Meter Run Final I ntermediate Boys I50O Meter Run Final J unior Girls 75 Meter Hurdles Final J unior Boys 80 Meter Hurdles Final I ntermediate Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Final S enior Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Final I ntermediate Boys 100 Meter Hurdles Final S enior Boys 110 Meter Hurdles Final S enior Girls 1500 Meter Run Final S enior Boys 1500 Meter Run Final B antam Girls 400 Meter Dash Final B antam Boys 400 Meter Dash Final J unior Girls 400 Meter Dash Final Junior Boys 400 Meter Dash Final I ntermediate Girls 400 Meter Dash Final I ntermediate Boys 400 Meter Dash Final Senior Girls 400 Meter Dash Final Senior Boys 400 Metre Dash Final F ield Schedule J unior Boys High Jump 4'7" Final Intermediate Girls Long Jump Final Inter mediate Boys Discus Thr o w 1.5k Final S enior Girls Javelin Thr o w 6000gms Final Senior Boys Shot Put 141bs Final Inter mediate Boys T r iple Jump Final B antam Girls High Jump 3'6" Final Bantam Boys Long Jump Final Junior Boys Javelin Throw 600gms Final I ntermediate Girls Shot Put 8lbs Final Bantam Girls Javelin Throw Final Junior Girls Discus Thr o w 1k Final S enior Girls High Jump 4"4" Final S enior Boys Long Jump Final BAISS Track Schedule n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DON’T look now, but when the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools (BAISS School Track and Field Championships today, the St Augustine’s College Big Red Machines will be out to win another title. Winners of the past 20 titles since the inception of the meet in 1988, SAC head coach William “Knucklehead” Johnson said the Big Red Machines don’t intend to let up on their stranglehold of the crown without putting up a fight. “We’re ready to go out and defend. We’re going to compete and try to win number 21,” said Johnson, who intends to carry a team of 122 athletes. Over the years, SAC has been challenged by a number of schools and Johnson anticipates the same this time around. But he admitted that they have the quality athletes to maintain their top position. “We expect Queen’s College to be very strong this year, as well as St Anne’s,” Johnson projected. “St Andrew’s, St J ohn’s and the other schools all have some people who they can r ely on.” SAC, according to Johnson, has a well balanced team, but he expects for the points to be spread across the board in theb oys division, as opposed to the g irls. V’Alonee Robinson is expected to lead the Big Red Machines’ charge as a versatile sprinter/jumper with distance runners Hughnique Rolle and Deshana Burnside. In the intermediate girls, look for Shaunae Miller, who doubles as a sprinter/hurdler. And among the boys, there’s Marcus Thompson and Byron Ferguson in the javelin, who have already qualified for the javelin in the under-17 boys division for the Carifta Games in St Lucia over the Easter hol iday weekend. “We are going in there with the confidence that we can do it,” Johnson said. “Afterwards, we hope to just walk away knowing that we did our best.” St Anne’s will have a 120member strong team. “We’ve been practicing and we will do our best,” said Cleotha Collie, a member of the Bluewaves’ coaching staff. “My senior boys and junior girls look pretty good.” Pedrya Seymour, a sprinter, will head the junior girls division, while sprinters Derek Wong and Dominic Collie and middle distance runner Zhivar go Thompson will lead the way for the senior boys. Collie said their goal is to at least finish in the top three places. St Andrew’s, known as a dark horse in the competition, will “compete as hard as we can,” according to coach Peter Wil son, who noted that they lost some key athletes who graduated last year. This year they have added senior boys’ hurdler Nejmi Burnside, who should be in the spotlight with intermediate girls’ sprinter Jessica Campbell and bright young distance runner Alice Heinel. “I expect us to compete well in the technical events like the throws and the jumps,” said Wilson. “But I think we will struggle in the sprints and the relays.” Wilson said the competition should be very keen this year with Queen’s College expected to be the real challengers for SAC. “I think that is going to be good for the sport,” Wilson said. “Over the years, the officials have also done a good job of running the meet, which also makes it very exciting.” Big Red Machines going for their 21st track title V’ALONEE ROBINSON is expected to lead the Big Red Machines’ charge as a versatile sprinter/jumper... n By ROB HARRIS A P Sports Writer LIVERPOOL, England (AP rard (celebrating scored twice as Liverpool stormed into the quarterfinals of the Champi ons League with a 4-0 victory over Real Madrid on Tuesday. Protecting a 1-0 first-leg lead, Fernando Torres paved the way for a comfortable night by finding the target after 16 minutes before Gerrard scored either side of the break. Andrea Dossena rounded off the comprehensive victory in the last minute. It will renew manager Rafa B enitez's hopes of repeating the 2005 title triumph to deflect attention from his inability to end the club's 19year wait for an English title. The scintillating display will also raise Benitez's stock at Madrid, where he served in coaching roles for a decade. Liverpool into quarters with 4-0 win o v er Madr id

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 1 0 Big Red Machines going for 21st track title... Blazers man down in win over Lakers... See page 9

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS THIS is the schedule for day one of the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools’ InterS chool Track and Field Championships today at the T homas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium, starting at 9am: Track Schedule J unior Girls 75 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries J unior Boys 80 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries I ntermediate Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries S enior Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries I ntermediate Boys 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries S enior Boys 110 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries J unior Girls 1500 Meter Run Final J unior Boys 1500 Meter Run Final B antam Girls 400 Meter Dash Prelimniaries Bantam Boys 400 Meter Dash PreliminariesJ unior Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries J unor Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries Intermediate Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries Intermediate Boys 400 Meter Dash PreliminariesS enior Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries Senior Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries Bantam Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries Bantam Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries J unior Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries Intermediate Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries Intermediate Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries I ntermediate Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminiaries Senior Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries Senior Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries B antam Girls 1500 Meter Run Bantam Final B antam Boys 1500 Meter Run Final Intermediate Girls 1500 Meter Run Final I ntermediate Boys I50O Meter Run Final J unior Girls 75 Meter Hurdles Final J unior Boys 80 Meter Hurdles Final I ntermediate Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Final S enior Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Final I ntermediate Boys 100 Meter Hurdles Final S enior Boys 110 Meter Hurdles Final S enior Girls 1500 Meter Run Final S enior Boys 1500 Meter Run Final B antam Girls 400 Meter Dash Final B antam Boys 400 Meter Dash Final J unior Girls 400 Meter Dash Final Junior Boys 400 Meter Dash Final I ntermediate Girls 400 Meter Dash Final I ntermediate Boys 400 Meter Dash Final Senior Girls 400 Meter Dash Final Senior Boys 400 Metre Dash Final F ield Schedule J unior Boys High Jump 4'7" Final Intermediate Girls Long Jump Final Inter mediate Boys Discus Thr o w 1.5k Final S enior Girls Javelin Thr o w 6000gms Final Senior Boys Shot Put 141bs Final Inter mediate Boys T r iple Jump Final B antam Girls High Jump 3'6" Final Bantam Boys Long Jump Final Junior Boys Javelin Throw 600gms Final I ntermediate Girls Shot Put 8lbs Final Bantam Girls Javelin Throw Final Junior Girls Discus Thr o w 1k Final S enior Girls High Jump 4"4" Final S enior Boys Long Jump Final BAISS Track Schedule n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DON’T look now, but when the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools (BAISS School Track and Field Championships today, the St Augustine’s College Big Red Machines will be out to win another title. Winners of the past 20 titles since the inception of the meet in 1988, SAC head coach William “Knucklehead” Johnson said the Big Red Machines don’t intend to let up on their stranglehold of the crown without putting up a fight. “We’re ready to go out and defend. We’re going to compete and try to win number 21,” said Johnson, who intends to carry a team of 122 athletes. Over the years, SAC has been challenged by a number of schools and Johnson anticipates the same this time around. But he admitted that they have the quality athletes to maintain their top position. “We expect Queen’s College to be very strong this year, as well as St Anne’s,” Johnson projected. “St Andrew’s, St J ohn’s and the other schools all have some people who they can r ely on.” SAC, according to Johnson, has a well balanced team, but he expects for the points to be spread across the board in theb oys division, as opposed to the g irls. V’Alonee Robinson is expected to lead the Big Red Machines’ charge as a versatile sprinter/jumper with distance runners Hughnique Rolle and Deshana Burnside. In the intermediate girls, look for Shaunae Miller, who doubles as a sprinter/hurdler. And among the boys, there’s Marcus Thompson and Byron Ferguson in the javelin, who have already qualified for the javelin in the under-17 boys division for the Carifta Games in St Lucia over the Easter hol iday weekend. “We are going in there with the confidence that we can do it,” Johnson said. “Afterwards, we hope to just walk away knowing that we did our best.” St Anne’s will have a 120member strong team. “We’ve been practicing and we will do our best,” said Cleotha Collie, a member of the Bluewaves’ coaching staff. “My senior boys and junior girls look pretty good.” Pedrya Seymour, a sprinter, will head the junior girls division, while sprinters Derek Wong and Dominic Collie and middle distance runner Zhivar go Thompson will lead the way for the senior boys. Collie said their goal is to at least finish in the top three places. St Andrew’s, known as a dark horse in the competition, will “compete as hard as we can,” according to coach Peter Wil son, who noted that they lost some key athletes who graduated last year. This year they have added senior boys’ hurdler Nejmi Burnside, who should be in the spotlight with intermediate girls’ sprinter Jessica Campbell and bright young distance runner Alice Heinel. “I expect us to compete well in the technical events like the throws and the jumps,” said Wilson. “But I think we will struggle in the sprints and the relays.” Wilson said the competition should be very keen this year with Queen’s College expected to be the real challengers for SAC. “I think that is going to be good for the sport,” Wilson said. “Over the years, the officials have also done a good job of running the meet, which also makes it very exciting.” Big Red Machines going for their 21st track title V’ALONEE ROBINSON is expected to lead the Big Red Machines’ charge as a versatile sprinter/jumper... n By ROB HARRIS A P Sports Writer LIVERPOOL, England (AP rard (celebrating scored twice as Liverpool stormed into the quarterfinals of the Champi ons League with a 4-0 victory over Real Madrid on Tuesday. Protecting a 1-0 first-leg lead, Fernando Torres paved the way for a comfortable night by finding the target after 16 minutes before Gerrard scored either side of the break. Andrea Dossena rounded off the comprehensive victory in the last minute. It will renew manager Rafa B enitez's hopes of repeating the 2005 title triumph to deflect attention from his inability to end the club's 19year wait for an English title. The scintillating display will also raise Benitez's stock at Madrid, where he served in coaching roles for a decade. Liverpool into quarters with 4-0 win o v er Madr id

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n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net Senior Boys C I Gibson Rattlers 68 G H S Magic 60 After missing out on the 2009 Hugh Campbell title, the Rattlers left nothing to chance o n their way to a sought after GSSSA championship. The Rattlers overcame a seven point fourth quarter deficit powered by Denirado Mott’s 23 points off the bench. With Rashard Sturrup in foul t rouble Mott came in and scored 11 in the fourth quarter. Drew Rolle finished with 14 points while Junior Denis added six. Basil Deveaux led the Magic with 19 points while Kenneth Pratt added 14. Senior Girls C R Walker Knights 40 Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins 22 T he Mystic Marlins had no answer for Malesha Peterson as the Knights wing player took charge early and established the tone for her team’s seemingly effortless game one win. Peterson outscored the K nights in the first half and led her team with a game high 16 points. K eedrah Hanna gave the Knights their biggest lead of the game on a turnaround jumper which gave her team a 36-11 lead with 7:04 left to play. Hanna finished with 11 points while Rickea Richardson added five. Jakia Brown led the Mystic Marlins with 11 while Danielle Zonicle added seven. J unior Boys T A Thompson Scorpions 58D W Davis Pitbulls 55 With a considerable size advantage upfront, the Scorpions’ domination of the boards proved to be the deciding factor in the opening game of the series. S corpions center Mavin Saunders finished with 15 points, 23 rebounds and threeb locks while frontcourt mate Roosevelt Whylly added 10 points 13 rebounds and three blocks. Velnir Desir chipped in with 10 points while Angelo Lockhart added seven. Alcott Fox led the Pitbulls with 11 points while William Ferguson finished with nine. Junior Girls H O Nash Lions 56 T A Thompson Scorpions -10 The vaunted Lions defense exceeded even their lofty expectations with a second half shutout en route to a lopsided game one win. T he Lions led 36-10 at halftime and outscored the Scorpions 26-0 in the second half. T he Lions placed three players in double figures led by Lakishna Munroe’s game high 15 points. Regine Curtis added 14 and Randya Kemp finished with 10. Da vis Cup team did their best, says captain C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 1 0 Big Red Machines going for 21st track title... Blazers man down in win over Lakers... See page 9 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net G EORGETTE Rolle, u sing the Sun Coast Ladies S eries as a tune-up for the Ladies Professional Golf A ssociation’s Futures Tour, f ell short of qualifying for the f inal at the Rio Pinar Count ry Club in Orlando, Florida. N eeding at least a 148 or b etter to advance to the final r ound today, Rolle shot a c ombined total of 154 that knocked her out of con-t ention yesterday. She shot a 78 on Monday a nd a 77 yesterday. S peaking to The Tribune from Orlando yesterday, Rolle said her performancew asn’t that significant. I’m happy with my ball s triking on the second day today, but my putting wasn’t my best friend,” she admit-t ed. “So I know what I have t o work on for the next time. “The first day, I was all around the place, so I dok now what I have to work on so that I can be ready whenever I start playing in theF uture Tour.” R olle, the 21-year-old graduate of St Augustine’sC ollege who is now enrolled a s a grade student at the Texas Southern University, said she definitely gaineds ome valuable experience. “I got to play with some L PGA Future Tour players, s o I was able to learn some things from them,” Rolle said. “I was a little disappointed in my performance. “But I’m still trying to take some good out of this wholee xperience and not try to m ake the same mistakes that I made the next time around.I just want to have a different outlook on my game.” The LGPA’s Futures Tour s tart in two weeks, but Rolle said she’s not sure yet, so shew ill continue to practice on her game. She is one of two players w ho are on the waiting list to get in. At this point, she’s number 12 on the alternate list of players hoping to make the final cut. If she doesn’t make the first tournament coming up at the end of the month, Rolle said she still has the Sun Coast Tour to fall back on where she can continue to work on her game. But she noted that she’s optimistic that she will eventually get the break she needs to make her presence felt on the Futures Tour with a big to earn a shot at qualifying for the LPGA. No Bahamian female golfer has ever made the Futures Tour or the LGPA Tour. Golfer Rolle falls short n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net ONE day after returning from South America, Davis Cup team captain John Farrington said the Bahamas’ team performed as best as they could under the circumstances in Paraguay over the weekend. The Bahamas lost 4-1 to Paraguay in the first round of the American Zone II Davis Cup and will now have to play against Guatemala in the second round over the Independence holiday weekend at the National Tennis Center. “Everybody played well. It’s always difficult playing in South America, but it wasn’t that the crowd was so bad,” Farrington said. “We played well and they played well, so it was a combination of both teams.” Farrington admitted that the team’s preparation in Paraguay could have been a little better, had they arrived when they were originally scheduled to get there on Saturday. Instead, the team didn’t arrive until Tuesday morning and they didn’t have sufficient time to get acclimatized before the tie opened on Friday. “It’s tough trying to do it all in one week,” he said. “We had a meeting before we left Paraguay and we agreed that we need to get together at least the week prior to the week before the tie. “That way, we can do some more training together as a team.” Top seed Devin Mullings said it was tough for the team, especially after losing the pivotal doubles. “It was tough. It was a tough one,” said Mullings yesterday. “We felt that if we could isolate (Paraguay’s top seed Ramon) Delgado, we would have been able to win,” he said. “But they played well in the dou bles, a match that we thought that we could win. They played well. The condition was tough out there. It was espe cially hot.” After evening the series at 1-1, Mullings said if they had won the doubles and he was able to take care of his singles, they would have been in a different position. “I played hard. I fought hard,” said Mullings of his three-set loss to Delgado in the battle of the top seeds that eventually clinched the tie for Paraguay. “In my first match, even though I didn’t play as well as I was capable ofp laying, I knew once I wore the guy down, I would have won. In the second match, if I was able to win that tie breaker, I think I could have won it. But he saw the finish line and he delivered the knockout blow.” Mullings said it was obvious that the t eam needed a lot more time in Paraguay to get adjusted to the conditions there, but they didn’t have sufficient time to do it. “Not using it as an excuse, but I think if we had gotten there much earlier, marinated in the heat a littlel onger, it could have made a difference. But it was tough,” he said. “We fought hard. The guys all played hard. But it was just tough. We’re looking forward to playing Guatemala at home. I think we can definitely get that W in July and then regroup for next year.” As the Bahamas looks ahead to the second round against Guatemala, Far rington said he is confident that they will be in a better position to come out on top. The Bahamas last played Guatemala in Guatemala in the final of the Zone III in 2007 to be promoted back to Zone II. “I felt our chances were good down there, but we needed to win at least two singles and the doubles,” Farrington said. “The pressure was on Paraguay and they responded very well to win. “We just have to get ready to play and the players have made a commitment to play in a lot more tournaments so that they can be match ready before the next tie.” As a young team, Mullings said they can only get better with the experience that they gain during each match and eventually they will make the breakthrough to Zone One again. OLYMPIAN Devin Mullings in action at the August Beijing Olympic Games... FLYING HIGH O n March 5, principal/coach Norris Bain and the boys of the Tabernacle Falcons basketball team, paid a courtesy call on newly appoint ed president for Port Group Limited (PGLGBPA gratulating the group on their recent victory at the annual Hugh Campbell basketball tournament, Rolle and Babak encouraged the young men to remain focused on their education and to pursue excellence in all of their undertakings... T aber nacle Falcons’ courtesy call on Babak Rattlers shake up Magic GOVERNMENT SECONDARY SCHOOLS SPORTS ASSOCIATION B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L

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in a long time. I hope (the country uses this period to see what other developments can come out of this," said Mr Wilchcombe. T ourism Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace refrained from specific comment on the news until he had a chance to see the details of the agreements. He did say that his ministry looks forward to any advancement in the hotel industry. T he proposed development will span 1,000 acres on the Cable Beach Strip and include a 100,000 square foot casino with more than 3 ,000 hotel rooms. While details of the project are still being discussed officials do not expect much variation from the original model, Mr Sands said. I t is unclear at this stage what, if a ny alterations to Baha Mar's original model the Chinese investors m ay request. "To the best of my knowledge t hat has not been the pivotal part o f our discussions. Our discussions have simply b een to present to them a model that we've spent years on develo ping, and to put in place the construction agreement to that model a nd secondly to work on a memorandum of understanding forf inancing of the model that we had developed over a number of y ears," said Mr Sands. The news of the agreements comes a year after former financialb acker Harrah's Entertainment the world's largest resort and casi n o operator terminated its agreement with Baha Mar and a bout two and a half weeks before a deadline for the developers to m eet certain agreed benchmarks with the government. Although the financing component of the deal is not yet finalised, yesterday Baha Mar's Senior Vice P resident of Administration and External Affairs Robert Sands said t he developers are "equally encouraged by our current course t hat we will continue to make baby steps to get this project to fruition." While no timeline for wrapping up the negotiations has been set, s ignificant progress on the hammering out of details is expected by the end of this year. Mr Sands also stressed that no c hanges have been made to the top tier of Baha Mar's hierarchy, as a result of the Chinese investors coming on board. "Nothing has changed. Our disc ussions with the Chinese do not r elate to ownership. Our discussions with the Chinese speaks to a c onstruction agreement and a memorandum of understanding tof inance and those were the two a greements we have reached. " Baha Mar certainly is the vision o f Mr Sarkis Izmirilan, our CEO, and our chairman. And I think that w ill be the position going forward," he told The Tribune. T he newly inked agreements also spawned concern that droveso f Chinese labourers would flock to the capital once construction b egins. But officials said they are committed to ensuring a significant number of Bahamians obtaine mployment from the project. "The only one thing that I can s ay is that Baha Mar is very conscious of the need to maximise the e mployment of Bahamians in all stages of the development. And w e will certainly work to promote all entrepreneurial opportunities for Bahamians as well," said Mr Sands, adding that discussions on the levels of Chinese labour that w ill accompany the development are "very preliminary." M r Wilchcombe also weighed in on this issue, saying the involvem ent of Chinese labour in the pro ject is indicative of a global econ omy. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Mini Famous Bowl $2.75 Tynes Jr told his father, Chauncey Sr, that he frequently carried cash c onsignments from Lehder to Pindling and that a box he brought to his parents’ home contained $50,000 in US banknotes for a senior policem an. But for Mrs Moree, the loss of her husband was a major personal blow, leaving her facing life as a single parent and embroiled in a dis-p ute over his life insurance policy. “Because I was not able to offer proof of his death, the pay-out of $100,000 plus interest has never been made,” she told The Tribune . “I’m s till waiting for my money all these years later.” D onald Moree Sr’s doomed trip to Exuma occurred after he told his w ife that he was flying with his old schoolfriend, Chauncey Tynes Jr. Whenever she questioned him about his activities, her husband replied: “The less you know the better.” M rs Moree said: “I still don’t know to this day whether he wasi nvolved in drugs, but he was aboard that plane with Chauncey and neit her of them has been seen since. “I was told by a girl who saw the men board the plane in Exuma that three Colombians were with Chauncey, but my husband could h ave been mistaken for a Colom bian and when I described him, she c onfirmed he was one of them.” The twin-engined plane never completed its return trip to Nassau and no trace of it was ever found. Mr Tynes Sr is now convinced the p lane was diverted and his son “disposed of” because of what he knew a bout Lehder’s alleged drug payoffs to Pindling and the police officer. It does seem strange that no wreckage was ever found,” Mrs Moree added. “They (the Colombians) obviously didn’t want them to be left behind. I understand C hauncey was about to appear in court. My belief is that they were murdered. I don’t know whether my husband was working for Joe Lehder. But he was friendly with Chauncey and they went to school together. W hen he vanished, I almost lost the baby. My husband was only 30. My son feels terrible that he never knew his father.” Mrs Moree then told of the two m ystery men one of them very tall and heavy who turned up at their home only two weeks before her husband vanished. “It was early one morning and I o verheard their conversation. One told my husband he needed to keep h is mouth shut or else. They said they didn’t want his wife to become a widow just yet. “They did not look Bahamian. One was very tall and heavy. Theys poke with a kind of southern accent.” A t the time, Mrs Moree was working as a clerk at John S George. I faced hardship when my husband went. He was an electrical engineer with BEC. I am still working for a living and have never remarried.” As controversy raged over C hauncey Tynes Sr’s disclosures, a source told The Tribune of a police s take-out at Nassau International Airport in early 1983 when a parked DC-3 aircraft had been found loaded with cocaine. Chauncey Tynes Jr was arrested w hen he returned to the plane and was later bailed to appear in court on d rug-related charges, the source said. However, Tynes vanished before t he next hearing, raising speculation that he might have fled from justice or been killed to stop him revealing incriminating information in court. H is father believes the latter theory to be true. And Mrs Moree t hinks Tynes Jr and her husband may have been killed together. F ORMER Exuma MP and Cabinet Minister George Smith yesterday extended his condolences to the family of the late Livingston B Johnson. When distinguished Exuma-born Livingston B Johnson passed away on Thursday, March 5, the Bahamas lost a most valuable son who, in addition to his outstanding cont ributions in the judiciary, played a pivotal role in the development of the modern Bahamas,” Mr Smith said. Upon the Bahamas’ attainment of Independence in July 1973, Mr Johnson became the new nation’s first ambassador to Washington, DC, and for 10 years served not only in that capacity, but at the same time as ambassador to the United Nations and the c ountry’s High Commissioner to Canada. “One important note is that he served s elflessly in those offices at a time which would ordinarily have been perhaps the most lucrative of his career at the Bahamas Bar. “On the political landscape, in the early y ears before majority rule, Mr Johnson allied himself with the Progressive Liberal Party along with others such as Paul Adderley, Loftus Roker, Warren Laverity, Sir Arthur F oulkes, Sir Orville Turnquest, and His Excellency Arthur Hanna, adding muchneeded credibility to the still youthful organisation,” Mr Smith said. During the critical 1962 general elections, when Bahamian women were allowed to vote and when the PLP was expected to be victorious, he was one of the two PLP candidates for Exuma, his running-mate being t he late Holland Smith, the former Cabinet minister said. Although the PLP lost the election in terms of the number of House of Assembly seats captured, the party won the popular vote, largely because it was demonstrated t hat the party could produce men and women of quality, who could eventually govern the Bahamas. L B was one of those men of quality,” Mr Smith said. I n addition to his involvement in politics, he not only served as a Magistrate, but provided free legal services for local institutions such as Salem Baptist Church. Mr Johnson was also known to sit on the board of Bahamas Supermarkets, which offered scholarships for Bahamians, and on the board of the New Providence Development Company. In the areas of the law, politics, diplomacy, the church, and family life, Livingston w as a man of unquestioned abilities and integrity, and has left a rich example of noble service which should today inspire and motivate the new generation of Bahamians to f ollow in those noble footsteps,” Mr Smith said. “Importantly, the community of Exuma, where he was always held in such high e steem, and where Exumians have long been proud of the fact that it was the island of his nativity, are today saddened by the fact that he has gone to his reward, but are nevertheless happy to be able to claim him as one of their own. “I wish to offer my personal deep condolences to his wife Charmaine and their children at the passing of this great Bahamian, a nd on behalf of the entire Exuma community to extend heartfelt sympathy.” Former Minister pays tribute to late Livingston B Johnson n B y DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Grand Bahama S hipyard managing director Dave Dalgleish is no longer with the company, which is in the process of restructuring its executive mana gement team, The Tribune has l earned. When contacted on Monday to confirm the news, Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch, chairman and CEO of t he shipyard, confirmed that Mr Dalgleish has left the company. “The company is the in process of restructuring its executive mana gement team and Dalgleish’s d eparture was mutually agreed upon,” he told The Tribune on Tuesday. Mr Dalgleish has been with c ompany since 2002 and served in various capacities at the shipyard. Mr Rotkirch said he has led the company through an unpreced ented period of growth and develo pment. “The Board and Shipyard are most grateful for his dedicated service and wish him the best in his f uture endeavours,’ he said. GBShipyard managing d irector ‘no longer with the company’ New claims FROM page one F ROM page one Tourism insiders hail Baha Mar agreements with Chinese investors

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor ABACO Markets yesterday confirmed the closure of its Cost-Right store in Abaco with the loss of 14 jobs, its president telling Tribune Business that the outlet had incurred “significant losses” within the last two months as the BISXlisted group attempted to sell it as a going concern in a deal that ultimately fell through. Emphasising that the losses w ere “significant” in the Abaco c ontext, but not in relation to t he wider Abaco Markets retail group, as the store accounted for “less than 5 per cent of total turnover”, Gavin Watchorn said closing was the only realistic option given the cash drain keeping it open was causing. He added, though, that Abaco Markets overall was performing well. “We did quite well over Christmas,” Mr Watchorn said. “We recorded fairly strong sales growth. I think you’ll be very impressed with the numbers produced from the last quarter.” Tribune Business understands, although Mr Watchorn declined to comment, that Abaco Markets’ fourth quarter results for the fiscal year just ended may have been enoughto pull full-year comparisons in line with prior year, after being behind for the first three quar ters. Although Cost Right Abaco’s operations had ceased as of 6pm on Monday night, Mr Watchorn said Abaco Markets was still ‘keeping the door open’ to allow the group it was negotiating with previously to purchase or lease the building in a pure real estate transaction. If they failed to come through, the property would be placed on the open market. Abaco Markets had invested heavily in attempting to turn round Cost Right Abaco’s performance, spending $1 million on the store in fiscal 2009 alone, and altering its format on several occasions going from wholesale to the revamped Club model, and finally reintroduc ing retail products. Although these strategies had n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN companies and workers, especially in the con struction sector, will likely have to “adapt” to the extensive use of Chinese labour and raw materials in the $2.6 billion build-out of Baha Mar’s Cable Beach development, leading executives said yesterday, given that the project was “too important to lose”. Reacting to Monday’s late night announcement that Baha Mar had signed preliminary agreements for the multi-billion dollar project with two Chinese state-owned entities, the presidents of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Bahamian Contractors Association (BCA both agreed that the project’s timing in the midst of a deep recession and significance for the economy meant that this nation may have to compromise to meet Chinese requirements. Dionisio D’Aguilar, the Chamber’s head, said that if the Baha Mar project was to move forward it would be “a huge shot in the arm for the Bahamian economy” at a time when it was being buffeted almost daily by bad economic news, with ‘doom and gloom’ all around. “We’ve been talking about this for months and years,” Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune Business. “Something like this would be good to tide us over as we work through this recession/depression period. “Baha Mar would be a huge shot in the arm for the Bahamian economy if we can get this up and running.” The Cable Beach developer announced on Monday night C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.56 $3.56 $3.36 Bahamas must ‘adapt’ to China’s demands on Baha Mar de velopment * Deal ‘too important to lose’ by getting hung up on Chinese labour, raw material usage* Project’s potential go ahead ‘huge shot in the arm for Bahamian economy’ at time when most needed * Baha Mar executive says good progress on working out details with Chinese entities likely by year-end SEE page 2B S EE page 3B ‘Major losses’ drive closure of Cost Right Abaco store * Closure to mean 14 job losses, as deal with Keith Evans’ group did not close for sale as going concern * Outlet a drag on overall group, despite $1m investment in fiscal 2009 and format changes, with company to incur $300,000 one-time charge * Abaco Markets’ overall Christmas sales show ‘pretty strong growth’, with Q4 figures said to have pulled firm level with prior year comparatives $300k loss projection behind store closure Watchorn n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter C ommonwealth Building Supplies (CBS ing to shut down its Freeport operation, which the company projected would lose $300,000 this year, its general manager said yesterday, with its Nassau headquarters set to hire some employees displaced by the shut-down. Brent Burrows told Tribune Business that the CBS Freeport location had oper ated at a loss since its openingi n 2003, being kept afloat by i ts parent in Nassau for all six years. However, he said if the store were to remain open with the economy in a downturn, it would eventually have an adverse impact across the board. “Let’s say this was four years ago when things were booming. I might have been able to have the extra cash to say: ‘Let’s hang on in Freeport for another year’, but when things in Nassau are slow as well, it becomes very difficult,” said Mr Burrows. “Unfortunately, the big thing we have to look at is the overall health of the company and I can’t jeopardise the good jobs of my 65 employees in Nassau to just keep sinking money into Freeport.” Mr Burrows said CBS’s 1,500 square foot Freeport store had suffered on the retail side for many years, but brought in money through contract work, especially window installations. When the economy took a downturn and the construction sector began to decline, however, CBS saw installation contracts follow suit. Mr Burrows said he suspects that the ongoing legal dispute over the Grand Bahama Port Authority’s (GBPA caused Freeport’s economy to experience further softening. “I would venture to say that * Commonwealth Building Supplies says Nassau headquarters cannot afford to keep subsidising Freeport outlet that has made loss in all of its six years in existence * Installation projects dry up, with building firm hoping to take four of seven impacted staff to Nassau, where it hired five more workers SEE page 6B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FREEPORT Concrete’s pur chase of a $250,000 automated block plant capable of churning out 6,000 concrete blocks per day will boost its competitive edge in the construction industry supply market, its chief executive said yesterday, enabling the BISX-listed firm to “offer contractors everything from the foundation up to the roof”. Speaking after the company saw its net loss for the fiscal $250k block plant makes ‘one-stop shop’ for BISX firm * Freeport Concrete’s 2009 first quarter losses almost treble to $220,000 * Company emphasises need for more equity capital, as vendors impose shorter payment terms SEE page 6B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter QUALITY used furniture up to 30 per cent less than the price of a new item will be the order of the day when the Consignment Shop opens, the store’s owner Thierry Boeuf, said yesterday. “For 30 per cent off the price of a new item you can have a good quality product, and I personally prefer a very good quality table or couch in leather and so on second hand, than a new one of poor quality,” he said. The shop, which is currently only accepting the items it will eventually sell, will act as a pawn shop of sorts, except those who donate items are paid when the item is sold. According to Mr Boeuf, the Consignment Store takes the hassle out of getting rid of old furniture and sundry items. “In the US this activity is one of the things that has been growing the past few years,” he said. “If we sell this month we will pay Store ‘consigns’ quality 30% off SEE page 6B

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that it had signed a construction agreement for the $2.6 billion project with China StateC onstruction, plus a separate Memorandum of Understand ing (MoU ment’s financing with the Export-Import Bank of China. However, while these were “important steps forward” in bringing Baha Mar’s vision for Cable Beach to reality, the developer said an actual construction start was “contingenton many more months of work and due diligence before final approval is received”. Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president for government and external affairs, emphasised to Tribune Business yesterday that the resort owner/developer “did not want to overcreate the possibility that this means Baha Mar is going to start tomorrow”. He added: “But this is an achieved milestone that we’ve been working on for many months. These little victories are all adding up to making this project a reality.” Mr Sands said both sides now “have to flesh out the details” of their partnership, having spent months working on yesterday’s preliminary agreements. He hinted that substantial progress towards doing this was likely to be made by year-end 2009. “We have months of work ahead of us as we work out the details in time. Possibly by the end of this year we will be very much further along in our relationship with these two entities,” he added. No timetable had been set for concluding negotiations. Meanwhile, Mr D’Aguilar said the Chinese never lent money without stringent terms/conditions attached, meaning that they were likely to want Baha Mar to be con structed with a large amount of Chinese labour, raw materials and products. “At the end of the day, Cable Beach needs revitalisation,” the Chamber president said. “There’s a lot of urgency to doa deal, and boy do we need a deal. “Whether it involves using lots of foreign labour or not, Cable Beach needs revitalising.I think everyone understands from the outset that the Chinese give money with strings attached. Hopefully, it will employ lots of Bahamians, but everyone must recognise that.” China had wanted to send hundreds of workers to this nation to construct the longproposed $30 million national stadium. This has been a key factor in delaying the construction start for that project, as suc cessive governments have wor ried over the Immigration and ‘jobs for Bahamians first’ implications. Mr D’Aguilar emphasised that, long-term, Cable Beach’s revitalisation “will create Bahamian jobs much as Atlantis has done. It may not in the short-term, because the Chinese will bring specialist labour in. “But they’re [Baha Mar] the only game in town. In the longrun, it’s good for the Bahamas and I don’t want to hear noise in the market about how we’re not getting this and that job. We’re at the stage where we need the deal.” He was backed by Bahamian Contractors Association (BCA Wrinkle, who said companies in the sector were going to have to “adapt” to the realities of working with the Chinese, and be “proactive” in negotiating to get work on the project. “Hopefully, it’s going to mean substantial work for us. I’m sure we’re going to have to negotiate our way into this one,” Mr Wrinkle explained. “We have a language barrier to begin with. “We’re going to have to see what percentage of the work is taken on by Bahamian contrac tors and Bahamian workers in general. It presents a unique set of circumstances for the Government and industry, and presents an opportunity to negotiate our way into participation in the project.” V illage Pointing out that Bahamians were “in a global village now and working with people from all over the world”, Mr Wrinkle suggested that the Government introduce a programme to teach Bahamians how to speak Mandarin. “This is what the Chinese do. They export goods and services, and certainly have ample labour to send anywhere around the world,” Mr Wrinkle said. “This is going to be a new and challenging experience for Bahamian companies, because the Chinese supply everything required for everything they become involved with. It’s going to be a challenge to put ourselves in the arena and partici pate in a significant way.” Mr Wrinkle said the BCA would seek a meeting with John Pagano, head of Baha Mar development, to obtain a better understanding of how Bahamian contractors could participate. While the heavy degree of Chinese labour involvement was likely to spark criticism, the BCA president added: “Everyone has to back up and realise we’re dealing with the situation in hand. “You’re going to have to adapt. I don’t see any way round it. It’s too big to lose, and important project to land. We desperately need the Baha Mar project to uplift Nassau and move the economy forward. “If it doesn’t proceed with the Chinese, we may be in jeopardy of losing the whole project. Cable Beach is in a very pre carious position right now. We’ve to have a proactive approach, not a reactive one. This is the side of the coin where we want to look at the glass as being half full, not halfempty. We want to get on this train, rise it and make a posi tive contribution.” Meanwhile, Mr D’Aguilar said the Government would be “a lot more eager to bring this project to fruition to stimulate the economy” given the downturn and dearth of other investment projects on the table. “Two years ago we weren’t hungry for investment. We’re much hungrier now,” the Chamber president told Tribune Business. “Unemployment is up by 40 per cent, and 95 per cent of that is contributed by the private sector shedding jobs. As far as Baha Mar is concerned, this is great for them. It’ll take twoand-a-half years to get something in the ground, so they will be in time to benefit from the next upswing.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 Time: 7pm Place:e Retreat, Village Road (parking at Queens College) Admission: BNT Members Free General Public $2P u b l i c E d u c a t i o n M e e t i n gDrs. Alan Bolten and Kar en Bjorndal, Archie Carr Centre for Sea Turtle Research, University of FloridaSea Turtles of The Bahamas:Insights from 30 years of studyPhone: 242-393-1317 Email: bnt@bnt.bs n By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets INVESTORS traded in eight out of the 25 listed securities, of which two advanced, twod eclined and four remained unchanged. EQUITY MARKET A total of 40,945 shares changed hands, representing a slight decrease of 1,986 shares o r 4.6 per cent, versus the previous week's trading volume of 42,931 shares. Commonwealth Bank (CBL l ed the volume last week with 16,550 shares trading, its stock falling by $0.18 to end the week at $6.59. F ocol Holdings (FCL w as the top advancer last week with 7,000 shares trading, its stock price rising by $0.07 to end the w eek at $5.07. Abaco Markets (AML share price rose by $0.04 to $1.45 on a volume of 6,379 shares. D octors Hospital Health Systems (DHS was the big decliner, its stock falling by $0.24 to a new 52-week low of $2.16 on a v olume of 2,500 shares. BOND MARKET No notes traded in the B ahamian market last week. COMPANY NEWS Earnings Releases: Bank of the Bahamas (BOB r eleased its financial results for the six-month period ending December 31, 2008. BOB reported net income of $5 million, representing a decrease of $1.2 million or 20 per cent, compared to $6.3 million in 2007. Net interest income stood at $14.8 million, up 5 per centf rom $14 million for the same 6month period in 2007. Net i ncome available to common shareholders stood at $4.4 million, compared to $5.7 million in 2007. T otal assets and liabilities stood at $748 million and $652 m illion respectively. BOB's management said it was cau-t iously comforted by the strong financial results for the period, a nd that the maintenance of sound prudential standards will c ontinue to be its key focus in all strategic initiatives during t he current economic upheaval. Earnings per share declined by 19 per cent to $0.29 versus $0.36 in 2007. F irstCaribbean International Bank (CIB released its audited financial results for the year ended October 31, 2008. For f iscal 2008, CIB reported net income of $84 million, representing a decrease of $26 million or 24 per cent when comp ared to the $109 million achieved in fiscal 2007. Net interest income of $155 million increased by $8 million or 6 per cent, while operatingi ncome of $16 million declined by $16 million or 50 per cent. Operating expenses were up by $7 million or 13 per cent to total $64 million. CIB's management has indicated that the performance was commendable despite the challenges imposed by the weaken-i ng global business environment. A t October 31, 2008, CIB’s total assets stood at $4.1billion, while total liabilities were $3.5 billion. T he bank's loan portfolio increased by 5 per cent to total $ 2.5 billion, while total deposits decreased by $216 million or 5p er cent to total $3.5 billion as at October 31, 2008. E arnings per share also declined falling by 24 per cent t o 69.8 cents. Private Placement Offerings: F OCOL Holdings (FCL announced it will be extending t he deadline of its private placement offering. The preferreds hares will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable semi-annually. D ividends Note: Commonwealth Bank (CBL h as declared a dividend of $0.05 per share, payable on March 31, 2009, to all shareholders of record date March 13, 2009. AGM Notes: F ocol Holdings (FCL announced it will be holding its A nnual General Meeting on Thursday March 19, 2009, at1 0.30am in the Boardroom at its Corporate Office in Freeport, Grand Bahama. Finance Corporation of the B ahamas (FIN a nnounced it will be holding its Annual Gen-e ral Meeting on Thursday March 19, 2009, at 6.30pm in the Governor's Ballroom at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel. T T h h e e B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n S S t t o o c c k k M M a a r r k k e e t t FINDEX 813.81(-2.52% BISX CLOSINGCHANGEVOLUMEYTD PRICE S YMBOLPRICECHANGE AML$1.45 $0.046,379-15.20% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% B OB$7.00 $-0-8.38% B PF$11.00 $-0-6.78% B SL$9.58 $-0-5.99% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$13.95$-0-0.57% CBL$6.59 $-0.18 16,550-5.86% CHL$2.83 $-4420.00% CIB$10.45 $-00.00% CWCB$1.51$-0.220-32.89% DHS$2.16 $-0.242,500-15.29% FAM$7.76 $-0-0.51% FBB$2.37$-00.00% FCC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$5.07 $0.077,000-1.93% FCLB$1.00$-1,350-7.33% F IN$11.00$-010.31% ICD$5.50 $-5,000-10.28% JSJ$10.50 $-1,724-5.41% PRE$10.00 $-00.00% International Markets FOREX Rates Weekly %Change CAD$ 1.2868+1.07 GBP 1.4091-1.45 E UR 1 .2642-0.13 Commodities Weekly %Change Crude Oil $46.07+3.76 Gold $939.50-0.23 International Stock Market Indexes: Weekly %Change DJIA 6,626.94-6.17 S & P 500 6 83.38-7.03 NASDAQ 1,293.85-6.10 Nikkei 7,173.10-5.22 ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP BAHA MAR, from 1B

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produced some initial success, none paid dividends in the longterm, and Mr Watchorn said: “Our losses became too greatto fund when there was no deadline for the transaction to close.” Abaco Markets is projecting that it will take a one-time $300,000 charge as a result of the closure, mostly relating to severance pay for the 14 staff. Some four of those will stay onf or a month to wind down operations. Mr Watchorn said Abaco Markets had been negotiating with the potential buyer group since September 2008, having previously initiated a process tos olicit interested parties. Although he did not confirm the identities of those involvedin the potential buying group, Tribune Business had previously revealed that it involved Keith Evans, brother of lead-i ng Bahamian wholesaler Garland Evans. Keith Evans, it is understood, would have run the store’s oper ations had the purchase been successful. Informed sources, though, told Tribune Business that the planned purchase initially hit trouble when a key source of financial backing pulled out. This forced mem-bers of the group to look into selling other assets to finance the purchase, but they were unable to raise the necessary cash in the timeframe Abaco Markets was seeking to avoid closure. “We had originally hoped for the deal to complete by the end of January, but then the deadline got pushed back, and then it got pushed back again,” Mr Watchorn told Tribune Business. ‘We realised it was not going to happen in the time frame” Abaco Markets had wanted. “The store hasn’t made mon ey for years, and has been subsidised heavily for the last couple of years by our other operations,” he added. “We were faced with contin uing to invest money in something where we could not see the light at the end of the tun nel. No businessman would take on continuing losses in this envi ronment. Unfortunately, we had to let people go. “We invested $1 million in the year ended on January 31, 2009, but the store couldn’t meet its corporate restructuring charge, so we were not get ting a return on the asset. It wasn’t contributing to the corporate overhead either. We hada number of major inventory losses down there, which did not help the situation either.” Mr Watchorn did not disclose the scale of Cost Right Abaco’s losses, with the group’s yearend financials due to be released shortly, but said: “For January, February we recorded pretty significant losses down there trying to facilitate a deal to sell the business as a going concern. We just can’t incur those types of losses. “We stuck with it for a couple of months in a bid to get a transaction done, but we did not see light at the end of the tunnel.In this uncertain environment, it’s too great a risk to continue to invest in this facility, because it could ultimately be detri mental to the others.” Mr Watchorn added that the transaction contemplated with Mr Evans and his group “may get resolved in some shape or form in a couple of months time”. He said Abaco Markets had “given it a fair go” in trying to conclude a deal for Cost Right Abaco as a going concern. “We will not do anything with the building for six to eight weeks to give the group that we were talking to an opportunity to get their ducks lined up, and then we will put it on the market for sale or rent,” Mr Watchorn said. He added that Abaco Markets had tried numerous for mats and managers for Cost Right Abaco, but lasting success had proved elusive. All the company’s other Solomon’s SuperCentre and Cost Right stores were profitable, and not acting as a drain on company resources. “We have been very committed to doing what we can to maintain a solid performing location there,” says Craig Symonette, chairman and chief executive of Abaco Markets. “Abaco Markets started in Abaco, and this decision to close is something we have struggled with for a long time, trying so many different options and investing a lot of money to make it work. However, we are just not getting enough support to sustain the investment and focus there. While we are very disappointed to close Cost Right Abaco, we are doing what is best for the company as a whole – particularly given the current economic environment, which will require the focus and dedication of all our resources to ensure that the great steps we have made toward stability are safeguarded.” Group health plan coverage for the laid-off employees will be continued for six months. n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter INFRASTRUCTURE is no longer a hindrance to the diversification of the Bahamian tourism industry, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s executive director believes, as “technology allows us to market ourselves much more effectively”. Philip Simon told Tribune Business that, once diversified, tourism could act as the gateway from which other industries will be born. He said that connecting small Bahamian entrepreneurs to the wider opportunities presented by tourism would be the catalyst for future economic growth. “I base my whole argument around the fundamentals of economics,” he said. “There is supply and there is demand, for goods and services, and they are based on advantages, whether they be comparative or competitive, and the Bahamas has the comparative advantage of location.” Diversification has become a subject of much debate, as the US recession’s impact bears down on the Bahamian economy. The Government has argued that diversification, and the ultimate replacement of tourism as this nation’s premier industry by another sector, was not feasible. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has restated on several occasions that the tourism industry has benefited the Bahamas economically for decades, and will continue to do so going forward. However, his government advocates shoring up the sector through enhancing linkages with the manufacturing and retail industries, as outlined in the government’s 2007 Manifesto. Mr Simon said the Bahamas has many “comparative advantages” to levy as a neighbour to the US, but these have not been effectively exploited. “God has blessed us with being in a unique proximity placement right on the doorsteps of North America, positioned perfectly for access to the Caribbean and South America,” he said. “The comparative advantage is also tied into who we are as a people. What we haven’t been able to do is effectively diversify our number one industry, and effectively diversify our number two industry to tie into our number one industry.” “So we have this comparative advantage, and we have this unique people, and we have so many stories to be told. “The Bahamas is an archipelago with a lot of diversity, and the stories are in our backyard. The stories are in our parents and grandparents, and we have to be able to script that. We have to be able to package experiences to be able to sell within the tourism industry, which is still the fastest growing industry in the world.” Mr Simon said the Bahamas needs to tap into cultural and heritage tourism, because they were the fastest growing segments of the global tourism industry. “You name it, we have the opportunity to provide it,” said Mr Simon. “We have good infrastructure. One of the things we may not have built up is our competitive advantages to match those in the region, but we have an innate culture relative to who our people are and, for the most part, we are friendly people.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 3B Infrastructure no bar to tourism diversity P hilip Simon n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter BAHAMIAN telecommunications services provider, IndiGo Networks, is moving to further liberalize the market by offering a new overseas calling bundle that uses Voice-over Internet Protocol (VoIP nology and will compete directly with the Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s (BTC IndiGo’s marketing manager, Gillian Slatter, said the package was a legal, reliable alternative to Vonage and the instantly popular Magic Jack “Vonage is out there but... you can get something even better for less in the Bahamas,” she said. Ms Slatter said IndiGo’s package was much cheaper than Vonage and offers much more features. She said that aside from other VoIP devices being illegal, Indigo’s One Phone offers calling to ten European destinations, as well as a local number. Ms Slatter said the service was much more reliable than many other VoIP-based systems, because calls were routed through IndiGo’s network to the destination number instead of many different Internet Service Provider hubs. “We’ve used the best technology out there,” she said. “Whatever is most current i n order to bring the best to Bahamians, w ithout having to dig trenches and lay lines. W e can’t do that type of infrastructure. Our infrastructure is different. We have used what’s available with the most up-to-date technology.” It was recently announced that services such as Vonage and Magic Jack were illegal in the Bahamas, and that offenders found with them could be fined, However, not many people heeded the warning. In fact, one store owner defiantly professed his right to sell the popular Magic Jack. Ms Slatter said IndiGo’s system offers far better service at competitive prices. She said that by the time Vonage customers pay taxes and fees, their bills could be up to $23.49, whereas IndiGo’s package is $19.95. T he company is accepting Vonage and V ibe routers and waiving the set-up fee for c ustomers who switch to their system. IndiGo packages new phone deal ‘Major losses’ drive closure of Cost Right Abaco store FROM page 1B

PAGE 16

next month.” Mr Boeuf said customers who bring in furniture and other items will be able to set up an account that can be monitored from a website that is currently being developed. “We are working on as big, sophisticated website,” he said. Furniture to be sold at the Consignment Store will be heldu nder a contract between the o wner and the store, and will be under 120 days of consignment. “We offer the possibility to do 120 days of consignments,” said Mr Boeuf. “We agree ona price together, and will proba bly go with the price that the person suggests most of the time unless we see it is some thing very unrealistic. “And we will, in the agreement, from day one say if it is not sold within a month there will be a 10 per cent discount, and then a further one and then a third. After the fourth month we will ask you to either take it back or we will make a donation of it. That can be any charity or person in need, but the purpose is to sell and we cannot keep things forever.” Mr Boeuf anticipates taking almost one month to fill the store, and said he hopes to he will be able to turn a profit fairly quickly, as most models in the US have enjoyed much success. At the end of the year, in a ny event, I will know if I have succeeded or failed,” he said. The store is only accepting furniture that is in relatively top condition. However, Mr Boeuf said he hopes to start repairing furniture so as to not have tot urn potential saleable items away because of a nick or two. “I plan to invite people who have the knowledge of the craft, and eventually we can work with them to have things that need some repair done, and then for the owners to sell it still, but we won’t start with that,” he said. The 5,000 square foot store, located behind the Royal Palm Hotel on Nassau and Bay Streets, will apart from furniture eventually sell clothing, paintings and other sundry items except food and drink. Mr Boeuf said the Consign ment Shop had been a dream of his for 10 years, and has only come to fruition in the past six months. He said the store takes the strain away for someone who does not have the time to sell old items, who has exhausted space in their houses due to old items, or who does not want to hold a garage sale. “People coming into your house is not always easy,” he said. 2009 first quarter almost treble to $220,000, a 197 per cent increase against the prior year’s $74,000 loss, Raymond Simpson said the block plan addition would enable its concrete plantto generate revenue and cash flow it did not have presently. This, he explained, was key, given that Freeport Concrete w as still plagued by the need to r aise additional capital and e quity to finance inventory purchases for its Home Centreretail format. Currently, Mr Simpson said the outlet was losing business because it was unable to purchase enough stock to meet customer demand. “We need more cash,” he told Tribune Business yesterday. “It’s as simple as that. If we don’t get it, we will keep running out of inventory in the Home Centre. Without the cash, we can’t get the inventory we need.” Freeport Concrete has long been a candidate for a rights issue, where new shares are issued to existing ordinary shareholders in proportion to their existing holdings, so their stakes are not diluted. C Companies frequently do this as a way to raise capital, but the current economic environment is likely to mean that any rights issue is far from fully subscribed, unless it is underwritten by Freeport Concrete’s largest shareholder, chairman Hannes Babak, who has a 43 per cent stake. Emphasising the BISX-listed firm’s ongoing need for working capital, Mr Simpson wrote in his first quarter note to shareholders: “A key factor affecting our financial performance is that we need to raise additional capital to be able to purchase more inventory, which will drive up sales at the Home Centre. “Despite the poor economic climate in Grand Bahama, we see that there is still business we could get. However, we are losing sales because we are constantly running out of inventory due to the fact that our foreign vendors are not giving us the same level of credit we enjoyed prior to the recession in the US. and our operating line of credit at the bank is fully utilised. “We are actively pursuing ways to obtain capital as, unfortunately, without more capital we will continue to struggle.” Mr Simpson said yesterday that Freeport Concrete’s USbased suppliers were looking to do more business with firms such as his, both in the Bahamas and the wider Caribbean, since they were seen as export markets that could compensate for the dramatic slowdown in the demand for construction materials and housewares in the US especially in Florida. However, the credit crunch meant that Freeport Concrete’s suppliers were now under additional strain, unable to get the credit lines they used to, and under pressure from US financial institutions to collect their accounts receivables. Vendors In turn, vendors were placing pressure on Freeport Concrete, placing the company on 30-45 day credit and payment terms, as opposed to 60-90 days. “Without new capital, we rely on daily sales, but we can only hit certain numbers with the inventory we’ve got,” Mr Simpson said. “Equity capital is exactly what we need. We can’t grow the business any. We still have an operating business, and I can see us turning down business because we don’t have the inventory.” He added that despite still being in breach of key banking covenants, Freeport Concrete still had the support of its lender, FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas was “still putting $1 million in the bank a month”. On a brighter note, Mr Simpson said four flat racks for the automated block plant had arrived on Grand Bahama yesterday, with the remaining eight coming in several days time. The plant will be operated by Martin Foody, who was in charge of the concrete block plant that supplied Kerzner International’s Phase II and Phase III projects on Paradise Island. Concrete block production was due to start by end-March or early April, Mr Simpson said, and the $250,000 purchase of the plant from Florida Block had been financed without dipping into Freeport Concrete’s resources. One of its US-based vendors, which was a Florida Block creditor, financed the purchase for it, with the BISXlisted firm paying its supplier back with a percentage of each block sale. “The concrete quality is just superb,” Mr Simpson said. “Now, because we have the Home Centre as well, we are able to offer contractors everything from the foundation up to the roof. We’ve never had that before. I know this is what we need to compete.” In his 2009 first quarter message to shareholders, Mr Simpson said: “Our overall sales in the first quarter ended November 30, 2008, are down 8.59 per cent compared to our first quarter sales last fiscal year ($3.425 million compared to $3.746 million). “Sales in the concrete division for this first quarter are down almost 24 per cent on the same period last fiscal year ($691,000 compared to $907,000) with the Home Centre’s sales down 3.73 per cent ($2.734 million compared to $2.84 million). “Our operating expenses are 10.41 per cent less in this first quarter compared to the same period last year ($886,000 compared to $989,000). “The Home Centre has lost $97,000 for the quarter compared to a loss for the same period last year of $77,000, and the concrete plant lost $123,000 this first quarter compared to a small profit of $4,000 for the first quarter last year.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.596.590.000.4380.05015.00.76% 5 .001.43Consolidated Water BDRs1.501.40-0.100.1110.05212.63.71% 3 .002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8 .106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 1 4.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.8950.40011.73.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1 .000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44281.3812Colina Money Market Fund1.44280.634.45 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525F INDEX: CLOSE 813.81 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSMONDAY, 9 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.25 | CHG -0.11 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -52.11 | YTD % -3.04BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 27-Feb-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 127,&(2)6$/( ( [SRFUHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQ&RPSDQ\f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t/DZRI3URSHUW\$FW 7(506 7HQSHUFHQWRIWKHSXUFKDVH SULFHDWWKHWLPHRIFRQWUDFWDQGWKH EDODQFHXSRQFRPSOHWLRQZLWKLQ 6L[W\GD\VRIFRQWUDFW 7KLVVDOHLVVXEMHFWWRDUHVHUYHSULFH7KH&RPSDQ\ UHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\DQGDOORIIHUV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVPD\VXEPLWZULWWHQRIIHUV DGGUHVVHGWR([SRFUHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQFR0DQDJLQJ 3DUWQHU32%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDVWREH UHFHLYHGQRODWHUWKDQWKHFORVHRIEXVLQHVVRQWKHWKGD\RI0DUFK 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW 0$&+(//(5/($15$+0,1* RI *KDQD&LUFOH(OL]DEHWK(VWDWHVLQWKH(DVWHUQ'LVWULFWRIWKH,VODQGRI1HZ 3URYLGHQFHRQHRIWKH,VODQGVRIWKH&RPPRQZHDOWKRI7KH%DKDPDV LQWHQGVWRFKDQJHFKLOGQDPHIURP '$5521,6(1$7+$6,$ 0$&+(//6$1'6 WR 0$&+(//(/<1',$11$5$+0,1* ,IWKHUHDUH DQ\REMHFWLRQVWRWKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ZULWHVXFK REMHFWLRQVWRWKH &KLHI3DVVSRUW2IFHU31DVVDX%DKDPDV QRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\fGD\VDIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH \ f \ S 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW -$0(6)(5*8621 RI3%R[631DVVDX%DKDPDVLQWHQGVWR FKDQJHQDPHWR -$0(67$
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m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 7B Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 10 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER H AGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on ( 5,4) 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 21 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the j ungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of shame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be smart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 1 213 14 151617 1 819 20 21 22 23 1234567 8 9 10 11 1 213 14 151617 1 819 20 21 22 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 10 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on (5,4 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 1 0 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 21 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the jungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of shame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be smart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 1 213 14 151617 1 819 20 21 2 2 23 1234567 8 9 10 11 1 213 14 151617 1 819 20 21 2 2 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 10 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 2 0 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 2 2 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area ( 5,4) Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 1 1 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 1 7 Seem (6 1 9 Eskimo house (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BU N E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on (5,4 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather f ruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a v igorous dance (6 21 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the jungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of shame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 1 1 He doesn’t have to be smart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 1 4 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 1 0 11 1213 1 4 1 51617 1819 20 21 22 23 1234567 8 9 1 0 11 1213 1 4 1 51617 1819 20 21 22 23Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 1 0 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 1 2 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on ( 5,4) 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 2 1 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the j ungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of s hame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be s mart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 14 151617 1 819 20 21 2 2 23 1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 14 151617 1 819 20 21 2 2 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 1 0 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial a ppearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 1 6 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on ( 5,4) 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 1 8 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 2 1 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the j ungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of s hame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be s mart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. D own:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 1 213 14 151617 1 819 20 21 2 2 23 1234567 8 9 10 11 1 213 14 151617 1 819 20 21 2 2 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 10 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on (5,4 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 21 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the jungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of shame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be smart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 14 151617 1819 20 21 22 23 1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 14 151617 1819 20 21 22 23 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 10 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on (5,4 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 21 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the jungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of shame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be smart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 9 1 0 1 1 1 213 14 1 51617 1819 20 21 22 23 1 234567 8 9 1 0 1 1 1 213 14 1 51617 1819 20 21 22 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 10 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on (5,4 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 21 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the jungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of shame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be smart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 14 151617 1819 20 21 22 23 1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 14 151617 1819 20 21 22 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 10 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on (5,4 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 21 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the jungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of shame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be smart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 14 151617 1819 20 21 22 23 1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 14 151617 1819 20 21 22 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 10 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on (5,4 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 21 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the jungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of shame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be smart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 14 151617 1819 20 21 22 23 1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 14 151617 1819 20 21 22 23T ribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u c e s s h Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 10 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on (5,4 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 21 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the jungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of shame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be smart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 9 1 0 11 1 213 14 1 51617 1 819 20 21 22 23 1 234567 8 9 1 0 11 1 213 14 1 51617 1 819 20 21 22 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y S TEVE BEC KER Across 1 Vaudeville (5,4 8 Approximately (5 9 Stray from the subject (7 10 Loafing (6 11 Command (6 12 Kidnapped (8 15 In the sky (8 18 Injure (6 20 Superficial appearance (6 21 Kind of antelope (7 22 Seeds used as flavouring (5 23 Backstage rest area (5,4 Down 2 Consolidate (5 3 Middle East country (6 4 Hold back in doubt (8 5 Horse-drawn carriage (6 6 The fashionable world (7 7 The actors’entrance (5,4 11 Ability to draw audiences (3,6 13 Devote (8 14 Greeting on arrival (7 16 Concealment (6 17 Seem (6 19 Eskimo house (5 rbr J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Easily passes on (5,4 8 Work of works (5 9 Feeling of guilt about introducing code (7 10 Parasites identified by a doctor on Lincoln’s back (6 11 Soldier with papers in order (6 12 Order a final course (5,3 15 Come again to gather fruit (8 18 Like a civet disturbed (6 20 Be able to repeat a vigorous dance (6 21 Seaside resort complaint (7 22 Some of these bounce back, being overweight (5 23 Common cash is needful (9 Down 2 Astrange lake in the jungle described by Kipling (5 3 Hangs flags (6 4 Cadger is source of shame (8 5 Standard a number considered average (6 6 Proof that someone has settled (7 7 Aball game played on board (9 11 He doesn’t have to be smart to fool the birds (9 13 Perfect happiness is found in a train (8 14 Nut and date confection which is ridiculed (7 16 Key operators may strike against it (6 17 Aproblem for the bridgebuilder to emphasise (6 19 What one has to face when fencing (5 Across:1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses, 8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish, 13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart. Down:1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3 Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6 Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda, 12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17 Crew. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer, 8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12 Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last, 18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21 Refrain. Down:1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit, 4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9 Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12 Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17 Urdu. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 1 4 151617 1819 20 21 22 23 1234567 8 9 10 11 1213 1 4 151617 1819 20 21 22 23 T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R

PAGE 18

The Barn Restaurant and Bar, located in the Red Carpet Inn off East BatS treet (near the Harbour Bay Shopping C entre) is a very personal but vibrant eatery offering a ton a great food items and specials. Manager, Kadren Carey told Tribune Taste just why the resturant is so unique: “This area used to be a barn section. Where the Scotia Trust building is there used to be a house and this section was a back barn. Now the Red Carpet Inn is a franchise out of the United States so that is what the hotel is called. All of the hat decorations, Raggedy Anne dolls and boots were in a trunk that came right out of the barn they tore down,” Mrs Carey said. Apparently, The Barn is not new to the area and has been around for quite sometime. However, the owner of the Red Carpet Inn relocated it to the courtyard area where it was recently reopened on Feburary 5. The Barn offers a wide variety of healthy breakfast and lunch alternatives to the average everyday burger and fried food experi ence. However, their chicken salad is the most popular item selling out every sin gle day. “Everything here is made fresh because I do not like over night food. With the chicken salad, it is chicken breast that we purchase, lightly seasoned and boiled and we make it into a salad consisting of mayonnaise, red onions, yellow onions, sweet pepper and a house blend of herbs and spices,” Mrs Carey said. Mrs Carey said with The Barn being such a unique business, she uses small local businesses so that they have a chance to grow and distribute their products. “Everything I get is mainly from local vendors. Our lemonade comes from a citrus concentrate that I get directly from Abaco, the grits is Cat Island grits, the nice thick yellow grits and I have to go to the farmers market for that. Our bread and pastries are always fresh. I try and help persons who want to be entre preneurs and who want to be in a busi ness of their own. People seem to appreciate it and are responding well because everyone who has wanted to help me has been a small business,” Mrs Carey said. The Barn in itself is an experience of something old mixed with something new and Mrs Carey said there are many new things in the works for the restaurant. “We are going to have our grand opening on Easter Monday, and that Friday we are going to have a poetry con test and even a three instrument contest, but every month we want to have some thing planned. We also do different sandwich specials everyday so that people won’t get bored with the same dishes. Right now we are still in the first year and we are still open in this economy so we are planning new things for The Barn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h e T r i b u n e n BY ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter BAHAMIANS looking for a new place to dine, may find a new hangout at The Bar n the per fect place to experience something old with something new. Dining on a budget at Chez Willie KADREN CAREY, Manager at the Barn restaurant, is dedicated to treating her guests to a grand old time with specialty dishes to suit what every pallete is looking for. n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net ALTHOUGH recent changes in the economy have forced many people to cut back to the bare essentials of living, one local restaurant is doing its part to provide a fine dining experience at an affordable rate. Chez Willie Restaurant, located opposite Long Wharf Beach, has created a new all you can eat buffet which offers guests more options outside of its la cart menu. Manager Cy Roberts explained: “We are a high end restaurant, but we came up with the $30 buf fet to provide something affordable to local residents.” The buffet has been meticulously designed to offer a little something for all. Starting with the choice of a mushroom or tossed salad, the buffet’s main course provides a wide selection. Available was the choice of baked chicken, sauted pork chops, barbecued spare or short ribs, as well as the option of grouper salamander. To accompany the main course is an all Bahamian cast of peas n rice, extremely cheesy maca roni, and steamed sweet potato, carrots, cauliflower, and broccoli. With your choice of wine, juice, or water, it does seem that Chez Willie has done its part in providing you with a complete meal. One thing that is most exceptional about the restaurant is its refreshing water. With water almost always being the least most significant thing when it comes to fine dining, this unbottled water unlike other places, has a sweet mist which is for some better than any expensive wine. In addition to a more than hearty main course, the restaurant also provides the choice of short cake, chocolate, frosted cake, guava duff, cheese cake, and a selection of tarts and pies. The new buffet which runs Monday to Sunday from 6.30pm to 10.30pm, will offer several diverse menus everyday, so you are almost certain to dis cover something new when dining at Chez Willie. Remember that the dress code is casual, and making reservations is suggested. T HEBARN EXPERIENCE AND the pastries are cheese cake, coconut frosted chocolate cake, chocolate layered caked, and guava duff.

PAGE 19

Well this is exactly what one young promoter is hoping to accomplish, in her new event set to take place this Friday at the Marley Resorts. Conversations is a concept designed by Donisha Prendergast of Sumething Fertile Productions (SFP This 23-year-old says outside of her ever evolving personality, the one constant which has remained is her commitment to bringing together the African Diaspora. Donisha who is also the granddaughter of reggae legend Bob Marley, said the concept of SFP was first realised during a trip to South Africa in 2007 with her grandmother Rita Marley. Attending the annual Africa Unite event in Johannesburg, Donisha said after making a presentation at a youth symposium on the issues of poverty, unity, and the eradication of diseases, she realised that she, like other members of her family, had a role to play in helping to bridge the gap among blacks around the world She explained: “The young people would say, we know nothing about you, the girls we see on the TV are naked, and they don’t look like you. They also know that the pictures of poverty and misery that we see of them are not all true either. “These kids would come from parents who would have gone through an apartheid, the kind of stories that these kids had to tell are the kind of stories that we need to hear in the west to really put life into perspective.” She said at that time, she was an acting major at Howard University in Washington DC, but realised that she was not where she needed to be, and soon decided to switch her major to film production and transferred to a Miami university to be closer to the rest of her family, and to also persue her passion of spreading the “one love message.” “I now realise that the power is not in front of the camera, the power is behind the camera.” Donisha said with African people worldwide having great stories of struggles, triumphs, and life experiences, it is extremely important to have that information available to all. She added that often the media does not give an accurate view of Blacks and said C onversations is her way of bringing together an already divided people. The event which begins at 7pm this Friday, will give audiences a chance to speak directly to some of their favorite artist including Tanya Stephens, Tada, Philip Michael and Sammy Star, and to learn of their experiences as artists and as young persons committed to change. For more information on this and other events at the Marley Resort, visit www.marleyresort.com for further details. n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net MANY music lovers would agree, that wrapped in the experience of seeing a favorite ar tist perform live, is an indescribable feeling of total connection. Whether it be with a verse, song, or simply with that ar tist, music for most of us is something that can speak to our very soul, wooing us into the submission of its desire. To take that fantasy even further, having the chance to have an intimate dialogue with that same artist, is probably the ultimate conversation. C M Y K C M Y K ENTERTAINMENT THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 9B T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter JAH TOURHA, who has been in the music game for some 16 years, is ready to break the reggae sound bar riers in the country and become the next big sensation when he takes the stage with two major artists later this month. Although born and raised in the Bahamas, Jah Tourha came from a diverse background and like many singers got his start in church. “I started singing in the church, choirs, competitions and things like that because my mom has a church. However, as I got older, I started to venture out there and started to see shows and live performances. They intrigued me even more and as time passed I wanted to get involved. I entered the KFC competition around the age of 12 or 13 and I even won which encouraged me even more to do music,” Jah Tourha said Jah Tourha said although he has many inspirations in his life, his father, Nicholas Jacks, was the one who real ly gave him the tools to work with. “He plays five different instruments and has his own band. He started taking me around music at an early age. He bought me drum sets, guitars, and other instruments and encouraged me. He took me to functions on cruise ships when he played and seeing him work really made me want to do it as well,” Jah Tourha said. Jah Tourha has a diverse musical sound spanning from culture to reggae to dancehall genres and said he draws inspiration from such musical trailblazers as Sizzla, Capelton and Antho ny B. “The sound I bring varies depending on the feelings and expressions I am delivering in my message at the time. You have to be well rounded and versatile. If you are singing just conscious music all the time it might not appeal to a broader audience. At times you have to sing songs that appeal to other persons so sometimes it enters the dancehall genre,” Jah Tourha said. As for his target audience, Jah Tourha said he feels as an artist, one should be able to reach people on all levels, which is exactly what he wants to do. “Right now you have to be really focused on the children because of the things they are being exposed to. They should be really receiving a positive message in every song they listen to on the radio. There should be some form of inspiration, direction, and upliftment for them. If a person really wants to be an artist that has an impression on the children of today, that would be a plus for us in society,” Jah Tourha said. Jah Tourha currently has two singles “Intoxication” and “Your Name” which he said he was inspired to write for his wife, Ras Kita. “She is my empress. It was written for her. She has five beautiful children for me. The song describes my relationship with her: ‘I’d like to know your name girl. This is no time for us to play no games girl. Dry your eyes, Oh baby don’t you cry girl. Smile awhile, Baby stay a while girl, a princess by my side girl’” Jah Tourha said, Jah Tourha’s manager, Brian ‘Supa B’ Austin of Supa B Management, said Jah Tourha is also slated to perform with both Sizzla and Capelton at the 6th Annual Reggae All Stars Concert, to be held on March 28 on Clifford Park. “As far as it relates to the DJ’s of the Bahamas, we are really doing good in the Bahamas, but if the DJ’s play the music in the clubs and parties, the Bahamian public has to like it because it grows on you. We want them to allow the music to grow on the Bahamian people,” Mr Austin said. Jah Tourha said he will continue to express postive messages in his music. “Rasta is always about a positive message. No matter how it seems. Music gets its power or meaning from how it is being directedthe energy it is being directed in. As much as people think that children do not understand, they absorb things like a sponge and understand expressions very clearly. Therefore, because music is a form of expression and the way it is directed with a certain type of energy, will always be positive from my view point in my music,” Jah Tourha said. artist INER VIEW movie REVIEW BY JASON DONALD The Watchmen j a h t o u r h a STARRING: Malin Akerman, Billy Crudup, Matthew Goode, Carla Gugino Watchmen ’s troubled journey from celebrated graphic novel (comic book to you and I screen blockbuster has contained enough drama, twists and turns to merit a movie in itself. R espected names such as Terry G illiam, Paul Greengrass and Dar r en Aronofsky have all at one time or another had their names connected to Alan Moore’s “unfilmable” tale of heroes who are anything but super. Then, once 300 director Zack Snyder finally had the film in the can, a lawsuit emerged between 20th Century Fox and Warner Bros over alleged copyright infringement. Had the curse of the Watchmen reared its head again? Well, no, as it happens. It’s here at last and, for the most part, it was worth the wait. Watchmen is set in the US in an alternative 1985. Thanks to the titular superheroes, America has won the Vietnam war and Nixon has been reelected for a third term. But, save for the Cold War with the Russians, there are no battles left to fight, and masked vigilantes are declared illegal. The Watchmen retire and retreat into grim, unhappy lives. That is about to change, however, when one of them, cloth-masked hardman Rorschach, who is probing a mur der, comes to believe his former comrades are in danger. Watchmen really gets off to a flyer, with the kind of balletic violence that Snyder made his own in 300. Then there is an incredible title sequence which is worth the ticket money alone. We see an alternative history of the US from World War II up until the 1980s a recognisable one, but skewed by the presence of superheros good and bad and their eventual fall from grace. Then the film settles into a series of episodes, loosely held together by Rorscharch’s investigation, which reveal more about the individual Watchmen and their tortured pasts. For perhaps two thirds of the way, Watchmen looks like being a hands down winner. There is a real air of melancholy that sur rounds these flawed, in some cases monstrous, characters and their individual stories are intelligent and compelling. But, as it heads for the climax, the film lapses into more conventional territory losing a lot of its momentum. And, with a running time of over 160 minutes, that makes the good bits seem very far away. Still, flawed brilliance is better than no brilliance, and there are enough inspired moments to make the Watchmen a must see. Just don’t miss that opening title sequence. C O n V ersations F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 20

The Commonwealth Writers of the Bahamas, a non profit group, was founded by Mrs Poitier along with other writers such as Cynthia Ferguson-Fowler, Elizabeth Munnings, Margaret Hepburn-McKay, and Valarea Munnings-Miller in early 2004. This group of esteemed writers wanted to provide more venues for Bahamian writers to be heard. They were also concerned that not enough persons were recording the present for the future. Mrs Poitier said as she had never heard of anyone hosting a convention for writers in the country, she got to work on implementing one right away. “I am interested in Bahamian history, culture and oral historythat can be passed down from generation to generation, so the Commonwealth Writers and convention were born,” Mrs Poitier said. I n 2005, the association e xperimented with the idea of finding out the number of persons in the Bahamas who were interested in writing. They did this by implementing an annunal writing competition throughout the country. The National Short Story/Poetry competition is said to bea success with students from the family islands participating and many of them winning the competition. At their first National Story Tellers Convention, held on February 20 at the Wyndam Nassau Crystal Palace Resort and Casino, the writers and those who attended watched as the youngsters performed on stage. Under the theme “Embracing Our Past With The Future,” the aim was to let the junior writers, who consisted of students from various schools throughout the Bahamas, tell stories of those historical Bahamians figures such as the Arawak Indians. “We did not have to do much practise with the junior writers. They were awesome and just naturalin their roles. They performed the roles of people in Bahamian history starting with the Arawak Indians, B lack Beard, Queen Victoria, Sir Milo Butler, and Sir R oland Symonette,” Mrs Poitier said. Mrs Poitier said they saw the need to have the convention with historical figures in mind to document oral history. “This will be an annual event because we have realised that not many persons are interested in documenting our oral history. We had Ancient Man, a musical story teller and the Region Bells from Cat Island. We are preparing our students to be able to document our history and also prepare them for the future so that they will be the future story tellers of the Bahamas,” Mrs Poitier said. C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE t expression in college, she naturally incor porated a similar carriculum for her classes. Over the years, Mrs Bennett-Williams has assisted hundreds of locals, helping them to develop their abilities in art, while learning of its importance in the world today. Eventually obtaining a Masters in Art Education, she has since moved on to become an art professor and department head at the College of The Bahamas. Apart from her full time job, she has spent most of her free time at her home based art centre for kids, which is now going into its sixth year of operation. Full Circle she said is a compilation of works created at different phases of her life, using new materials. The exhibition, which showcases more than 30 pieces, includes watercolor abstracts, as well as stoneware and acrylic designs, is a glimpse of a long and fruitful career in art. With this being her newest project, Mrs Bennett-Williams said in the future she hopes to create bigger and more grand pieces for all eyes to see. n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net IF YOU’RE wondering what’s happening in entertainment locally, wonder no more because Tribune Features is bringing to you its top five selection of events, which are sure to provide some-t hing interesting for your flavor. EXPRESS YOURSELF in association with Sumthing Fertile Productions isp leased to bring to you another level of artistic Expression featuring spoken word per-f ormers and artist from Trinidad and Haiti, along with a wide mix o f local entertainers. Picture this, a lovely evening at the Marley Resorts, artistic expressionson the walls, and a soft glow of candlelight, all blended with sounds of pure island beats. Performances will include CRAB, Club Superdeath andL yrically Blessed, just to name a few. An open mic session willt ake place from tonight at 8pm to 9pm. There is a cover charge of just 10 bucks. Tonight, all roads lead to the Marley Resorts where it will certainly be a beautiful night to remember. THIS WEEKEND, treat your special friend to a night of entertainment, s mooth rhythms, and good health. Join dozens at the Pink Ball scheduled to be held at the British Colonial Hilton, where your support will assist the Can cer Society of the Bahamas in delivering free breast and prostate testing to many in the family islands. At a cost of $150 per person, this event features m usic by the Modern Vintage band, cocktails and dinner, all planned to take place on Satur-d ay. Also planned that evening is a silent auction, where guest will have a chance to purchase one of a kind Bahamian art or gift items, as well as assorted items including exclusive restaurant tickets, and hotel or island getaways. For more information, contact the Cancer Society for details. T his Saturday the Antique Auto Club of the Bahamas willhost its 22nd annual car show at the Fish Fry. Running from noon to 6pm, organisers are expecting a minimum of 60 vehicles tot ake part, some of which date back from the early 30s and up to the 80s. Also scheduled is a chicken and steak-out at a cost of $10, with proceeds going to the Binley Lane home for chil dren and the Every Child Counts Learning centre in Marsh Harbor. For more detail call 393.1892, or simply show up to lend support to this community event. THE BAHAMAS International Literary Festival, the Express Yourself move ment and The Ministry of Tourism are hosting Street Festival on Sat,March 28, 2009 from 1pm to 6pm in Rawson Square. Organisers are inviting locals and visitors to show up in support of this cultural extravaganza, which will highlight local artist, musicians, artist, and others. The event will also offer have a wide mix of vendors selling traditional dishes and treats. This is a great family and group event, so parents and youth leaders, come out and enjoy this one of a kind cultural show. ART ENTHUSIAST, students, and others are invited to participate in a three part project intended to add a new dimension to an emerging hot spot in the local art scene. The Hub art center is planning to use the public in creating a new face for its Bay Street location, which is hopedto bring a new look to the downtown district. This Friday at 7pm, interested persons are invited to the Hub for a discussion on what the new image will be. With the general theme of “Think Green Bahamas,” this event is also intended to use nature as part of its canvas for this creative project. Organisers are asking student participants for a minimum one time donation of $50 donation, or a $20 donation for the session they wish to attend. For more infor mation contact Margot Bethel at 322.4333 or visit www.thehubbahamas.org for more details. Things TO DO 1 2 4 3 n By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter A LTHOUGH the Bahamas is known for its rich legendary stories of pirates, princes, and even mystical creatures that roamed our shores thousands of years ago, most of those skills h ave been lost to technology. However, Vera Chase-Poitier was on a mission to change all that and bring back the art of storytelling. It’s story time S CENES FROM THE RED CROSS FAIR Felip Major /Tribune staff FROM page 12 Coming into her own “I’ve been doing art from since I was in junior high, but at that time I didn’t think I wanted to study art, back then I wanted to be a physical education teacher.” SUE BENNETT-WILLIAMS Hundreds of Bahamians flocked to the Red Cross Fair on Saturday to enjoy a day of fun all for a most worthy-cause. Pictured above is Governor -General Arthur Hanna being escorted through the fair grounds by Gerald Sawyer Red Cross president.

PAGE 21

C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E Dining on a budget at Chez Willie See page eight WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 Donisha Prendergast presents ‘Conversations’ See page nine THE Full Circle art exhibition at Popop Studio, is giving one experienced artist a chance to display her diverse sense of artistry, while exposing her audience to a taste of several art forms, all under one roof. Sue Bennett-Williams, originally from the US says although she appreciates the freedom in expressing herself through art, it was not her first choice as a career. “I’ve been doing art from since I was in junior high, but at that time I didn’t think I want ed to study art, back then I wanted to be a physical education teacher.” However all that changed when she first began college, where she quickly realised that art was really her only option. Growing up in a home with a father who was in the Navy, she became used to traveling and moving around from state to state, and exposed to dozens of art museums and displays. After her father retired, Mrs Bennett-Williams explained that her family moved to Florida where they organised a sailing camp. Every summer, she and her father along with a group of campers would journey from South Florida to the Abacos. Mrs Bennett-Williams who was also a captain on her father’s boat said from her first trip to these shores, she fall in love with the Bahamas, which eventually became her home. She said even throughout her college life, she assisted her father in his annual trips to the Bahamas. Recognising an obvious need at that time for a more diversified art programme in the public school system, Mrs Bennett-Williams applied for a teaching job at the Ministry of Education. With her sights set on working at a public school in Green Turtle Cay, Mrs Bennett-Williams said she was placed at a local primary school where she was told her skills were most needed. After working as a grade one teacher n B y LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net SEE page 10 COMINGINTOHEROWN PICTURED are some o f the pieces on display at the Full Circle exhibition by SueB ennet-Williams. Mrs. Bennet-Williams is an art professor and department head at the College of The Bahamas and these are works from her private collection.


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New claims over
Tynes’ fateful flight

Widow of engineer on
missing plane believes
husband was murdered
for drug trade knowledge



Stepfather is
charged over
virl’s fire death

Man appears in court accused
of manslaughter by aceon

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE stepfather of a four-year-
old girl who died tragically in a
house fire Saturday night was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court
yesterday on a charge of
manslaughter by negligence.

Lorenzo Payne, 22, of John-
stone Road, appeared before
Magistrate Ansella Williams in
Court One, Bank Lane yesterday a
afternoon on the manslaughter ts
charge. It is alleged that on Sat- 2
urday, March 7, Payne negligent- Ss

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ly caused the death of Kentrell
Rolle. The four-year-old girl was
consumed in a blaze that
destroyed her wooden home Sat- LQRENZO PAYNE outside of
urday night. She was reportedly ooyrt yesterday.
burned beyond recognition.

Police fire services officials said that they received reports of
a fire in a bushy area on the border of the southern portion of
the Pride Estates sub-division shortly after 7pm on Saturday.

m By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

carrying at the time of her husband
Donald’s disappearance and was
confined to bed for three months.
Today her son Donald Jr, 26, still
mourns the father he never saw —

THE widow of a Bahamian elec-

trical engineer who went missing on
the same flight as Chauncey Tynes Jr
26 years ago spoke out last night —
and said he was almost certainly
murdered for what he knew about
the drug trade.

A few days before he and Mr
Tynes vanished, two men appeared
on the doorstep of their Nassau
home and warned: “You better keep
your mouth shut. We don’t want
your wife to be a widow just yet.”

Mrs Ann Moree, 55, of Soldier
Road, almost lost the baby she was

and wonders what became of him
on that fateful day in the spring of
1983.

The final flight of pilot Chauncey
Tynes Jr., who worked for Colom-
bian drug czar Joe Lehder, was again
the centre of controversy yesterday
as arguments raged over his alleged
links with the late Prime Minister
Sir Lynden Pindling and a senior
Bahamian police officer.

SEE page 12

Anger on the airwaves over
Tribune’s Pindling article

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

OUTRAGE over The Tribune Insight article that attacked the lega-
cy of the late Sir Lynden Pindling spilled onto the airwaves yesterday,
with a former Cabinet minister among those expressing disgust.

But delighted readers deluged The Tribune with calls and e-mails of
congratulations as the article became the main talking point in Nassau.

Yesterday morning, taxi-drivers at Lynden Pindling International
Airport continued a full-scale argument started the day before, with PLP

SEE page eight

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STUDENTS of Woodcock Primary School hold aloft fingerprint
cards after officials from the US Embassy and armed forces visited
the school to give a demonstration of their work.

Tourism insiders hail Baha Mar
agreements with Chinese investors

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE announcement that devel-
opers of the Baha Mar project
signed two agreements with Chi-
nese investors was yesterday her-
alded by tourism insiders as the
"best news" this country has heard
in awhile.

An agreement with the China
State Construction Engineering
Corporation was signed recently
to construct the stalled multi-bil-
lion Baha Mar Resort on Cable
Beach. A Memorandum of Under-
standing regarding potential project
financing was also signed at the
same time with Export-Import
Bank of China, according to a

British
American

statement by President of Baha
Mar Resorts Don Robinson. How-
ever, he cautioned that many more
months of work and due diligence
is needed before final approval is
received to finance the develop-
ment.

Yesterday, former tourism min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe said the
positive news "quashes all the
doom and gloom" in the industry.
Noting that the Chinese are
"strategic" investors, he said the
agreements marked preparation
for the future when the global
recession ultimately turns around.

"T've always had faith in the pro-
ject and IJ think that is the best
news we've heard in the Bahamas

SEE page 12

Neighbours who tried to extinguish the fire told The Tribune that
the fire had already consumed the small wooden structure
before firefighters arrived at the scene. The tragedy is the first
fire-related casualty in New Providence this year.

Payne, who was represented by attorney Philip Hilton, was
not required to enter a plea to the manslaughter charge and was
granted bail in the sum of $10,000 with two sureties.

As a condition of his bail, Payne was ordered by the magis-
trate to report to the Carmichael Road Police Station every
Wednesday and Saturday before 6 pm. Payne is expected back
in court on Tuesday, March 17, which is when he will appear
before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane where

the matter has been transferred.

Christian Council
announces
agriculture plans

THE Bahamas Christian
Council yesterday announced a
revolutionary plan to capture 30
per cent of the country’s agricul-
tural industry.

The Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil (BCC) revealed its three-phase
National Initiative yesterday
which includes a five to seven
year plan to “capture” 30 per cent
of the food industry.

BCC president Rev Patrick
Paul presented the plan yester-
day during a press conference
when he said the Council will
move to sensitise the Church and
community of the “core values”
found in the Bahamas Constitu-
tion, the introduction of a Char-
acter Development Devotion-
al/Programme based on the “core
values of the Bahamas” and tap-
ping into the $500 million food
industry.

Rev Paul said that the Council
plans to facilitate the funding of
an agricultural-based company to
exploit the advancement in tech-
nology available to produce top
quality goods.

The Council hopes to do this

SEE page eight





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



US tourist
believed to
have drowned

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN AMERICAN tourist is
believed to have drowned
while diving off the coast of
south Cat Cay, near Bimini.

Seventy-three-year-old New
York resident Richard Merril
was pronounced dead by a
local doctor shortly after police
received reports that he had
drowned at about 3pm on
Monday.

An autopsy will be per-
formed to confirm the cause
of death.

North Bimini Police
Sergeant Gregory Lockhart
said Mr Merril was on a pri-
vately owned dive boat with
10 to 20 other divers explor-
ing the underwater world of
the Bimini island chain.

He is interviewing a num-
ber of witnesses in connection
with the incident.

SEE page eight

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Activist calls for support
for small businesses

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MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest speaks at
the Church of God of Prophecy’s 88th Annual Bahamas National
Convention on Monday evening.















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Local News alee Roe Cen
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Sports
BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

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m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

INVESTMENT in small
businesses could curb the
highest unemployment rates
in 15 years, political activist
and co-chair of Bahamians
Agitating fora Referendum
on the FTAA (BARF) Paul
Moss said yesterday.

Dubbing Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s stimulus
package an “illusion”, Mr
Moss claims the financial plan
does little more than stagnate
the economy.

A wiser move to boost the
country’s financial status and
create jobs for thousands of
Bahamians looking for work
during a global economic crisis
would be to support small
businesses, Mr Moss said at a
press conference yesterday.

Pressures

He also called for the gov-
ernment to reduce mortgage
rates and thereby relieve
financial pressures and allow
people more financial free-
dom to stimulate the econo-
my.
“The stimulus package is an
illusion,” he claimed.

“It is causing the economy
to be stagnant and stagnating
business. What the govern-
ment doesn’t understand is
that small businesses keep the
economy going, because small
businesses are responsible for
more than 90 per cent of the
employment of workers in this
country.

“What is the government
doing to ensure the small busi-
nesses keep their doors open?
What are they going to do
with respect to redundancies

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because of the funds small
businesses have to pay?
“We have to do it from a posi-
tion that allows businesses to
feel good and not have to lay
off staff.”

Of those who recently lost
their jobs in Grand Bahama,
48 per cent were laid off or
dismissed, while around 44 per
cent of the recently unem-
ployed in New Providence
were dismissed.

from 8.7 per cent in May 2008
to 12.1 per cent, according to
an interim survey conducted
by the Department of Statis-
tics last month.

This leaves a total of 16,315
people looking for work in



Unemployment figures are
at the highest they have been
in 15 years and show that
around half of people out of
work in Grand Bahama and
one-third of job seekers in
New Providence lost their jobs
in the last six months.

Survey

Unemployment among the
134,400-strong work force in
New Providence has risen

New Providence alone.
While in Grand Bahama the
number of people out of work
increased to 14.6 per cent,
meaning there are 4,195 peo-
ple looking for work ina
labour force of 28,820.

NUON TO

ABOVE: THE original Thierry Lamare water colour entitled
“Conch Shell and Peppers.” The artist donated the paint-
ing and a limited edition print to help raise funds at the
Inner Wheel Club of East Nassau’s Pink Ball. The gener-
al public is invited to bid in advance of the ball on the art-
work, which will be on display at Bahama Hand Prints.

LOCAL artist Thierry Lamare recently donated
an original water colour and limited edition print to
the Inner Wheel Club of East Nassau’s Pink Ball in
aid of breast and prostate cancer awareness and
prevention.

The artwork will be part of the silent auction at
the ball held on Saturday, March 14 at the British
Colonial Hilton.

The original painting titled “Conch Shell and
Peppers” depicts a simple still life scene which was
inspired by a garden of a Bahamian lady who lives in
Long Island.

The larger limited giclée entitled “Close to Shore”
captures a fisherman in a wooden skiff fishing near
the shoreline in a scene that harkens back to an age
when life was simpler.

Both illustrate the artist’s ability to capture every-
day Bahamian life and scenes with extraordinary
use of light.

The artist was compelled to donate his art to help
raise awareness for breast and prostate cancer.

“This is an important and good cause to support,”
said Mr Lamare.

“Cancer has affected everyone in some way and I
wanted to do what I could to show my support and
to help raise funds.

“The inspiration for my art comes from Bahami-
an people and their everyday activities, particularly
in the Family Islands, I feel it is important to give
back to that community.”

The public is invited to bid in advance of the Pink
Ball on both pieces of artwork. The art will be on dis-
play at Bahama Hand Prints located on Ernest
Street during regular business hours 8am — 4pm.
Monday — Friday and 10am — 2pm on Saturday.

The public is also invited to bid on a one-of-a-kind
quilt created by the members of the Stepping Stone
Quilters entitled “Aqua Bliss.”

The queen-sized quilt and matching European
pillow shams are comprised of a myriad of blue
hued shapes and designs of Bahama Hand Prints
original fabrics and is on display at the Maison
Décor Lyford Cay location. Bids will also be taken

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artwork to Heather Peterson, president of the Inner
Wheel Club of East Nassau. The original painting and
limited edition print will be part of the Pink Ball’s silent
auction to help raise funds for breast and prostate can-
cer. The general public is invited to bid in advance of
the ball on the artwork, which will be on display at
Bahama Hand Prints.

at the Parliament Street location during regular
business hours.

“We wanted to open the bidding on these extra-
ordinary pieces to a wider audience and bids have
already come in as many people wish to support
this important cause,” said Heather Peterson, pres-
ident of the Inner Wheel Club of East Nassau.

“We are very grateful to Mr Lamare and the
many other individual artists and local companies
that have donated generously to our silent auction
and raffle. “Our goal is to raise funds to assist the
Cancer Society with their ongoing cancer screen-
ings for breast and prostate cancer in the Family
Islands and with research. It is also our wish that the
Pink Ball will create an awareness of the impor-
tance of having mammograms and prostate screen-
ings. We especially hope that our effort will help
many detect breast and prostate cancer early which
ultimately saves lives.”

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HUNDREDS of persons
attempting to have their pre-
scriptions filled by the
Princess Margaret Hospital
pharmacy yesterday were
frustrated by extremely long
waiting times.

They are now demanding
answers from hospital offi-
cials as to what is being done
to rectify the ongoing prob-
lem.

PMH said in a statement
yesterday that its pharmacy is
faced with a number of chal-
lenges, particularly in staffing.

The hospital said that it
does not have sufficient phar-
macists to fill out-patient and
in-patient prescriptions, and
at the same time operate the
drop-off service and the new
the senior citizen/disabled
person service.

However, PMH denied that
the delays were caused by the
availability of medication or
the newly implemented phar-
macy GE Centricy software
system launched earlier this
year.

“(The delays relate to) a
significant deficit in the num-
ber of pharmacists on duty.
The role of the pharmacist is
to ensure accuracy of pre-
scriptions or refills at all
times,” the hospital said.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Security
guard heaten
and stabbed in
the hack

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A CITY Market security
guard was violently beaten
and stabbed in the back when
he tried to prevent three
young men from stealing from
the store.

Kernio Dulcio, 30,
approached the three men
when he saw them trying to
steal items from the Village
Road supermarket shortly
after 8pm on Monday.

But the men retaliated by
brutally beating the conscien-
tious officer and stabbing him
in the back.

Mr Dulcio was rushed to the
emergency room at Princess
Margaret Hospital where he
was treated for serious
injuries.

He was discharged early
yesterday morning.

He is employed by Execu-
tive Security Company and
has been a faithful employee
for some time, bosses said.

Police have two 16-year-old
boys in custody in connection
with the incident.

Anyone who may be able to
assist in the police investiga-
tion should call 919, 322-444,
or call Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-8477.

Two men face
unlawful
intercourse
charges

TWO men were brought
before the courts yesterday on
unlawful intercourse charges.

Paul Javin Thompson, of
Fire Trail Close, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Susan Sylvester in Court 11,
Nassau Street, charged with
having unlawful intercourse
with a person under the age of
14.

It is alleged that Thompson
had unlawful intercourse with
the underage girl sometime
during the month of August
2008.

Thompson was not required
to enter a plea to the charge
and was granted bail in the
sum of $5,000. The case has
been adjourned to August 20.

Henry Lewis Saunders, of
Kemp Road, was also
arraigned before Magistrate
Susan Sylvester in Court 11,
Nassau Street, charged, in a
separate incident, with having
unlawful intercourse with a
girl between 14 and 16 years
of age.

It is alleged that Saunders
had unlawful intercourse with
a 14-year-old girl on Saturday,
March 7, 2009.

Saunders was not required
to enter a plea to the charge
and was granted bail in the
sum of $5,000.

The case has been
adjourned to August 13.

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FOULKES SPEAKS AMID CONCERN OVER CHINESE INVOLVEMENT IN PROJECT

Govt plans to ‘maximise’ number
of Bahamian stadium workers

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT intends to
"maximise" the number of
Bahamian workers used in the
construction of the proposed
state-of-the-art national stadi-
um funded by the Chinese gov-
ernment, Minister of Labour
Dion Foulkes said yesterday.

This statement comes amid
growing concern that a large
number of Chinese workers will
enter the country once con-
struction on the highly-touted
stadium begins.

"We are going to try to max-
imise the amount of Bahamian
workers at the stadium and with
that gift comes the material and

Hf
ee.

Dion MOU Ces





“... we will
attempt to max-
imise the amount
of Bahamian par-
ticiaption in that
project.”



Dion Foulkes

also labour," said Mr Foulkes.

"That is part of the agreement
that was signed under the pre-
vious government.

“So that is an agreement that
we will honour, but we will
attempt to maximise the amount
of Bahamian participation in

Minister: govt will do everything it

that project.” In January, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham reaf-
firmed his administration's com-
mitment to starting construction
on the stadium sometime this
year — more than four years
after the deal was signed with
The People’s Republic of China
to fund the project.

In late October 2008 — a year
after the stadium was first
expected to be completed, the
government advised China to
start shipping their heavy con-
struction equipment to the
Bahamas.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune that month, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister said the size
of the multi-use stadium will be
"adapted for Bahamians” —

making it smaller than the initial
plan of a 30,000-seat venue.

The former PLP administra-
tion signed a deal in 2004 allow-
ing the Chinese government to
fund the construction of the sta-
dium, which would be valued at
$30 million upon completion.
The FNM assumed office in
2007 and there was reportedly
some delay in the progress of
the stadium due to time needed
by the Ministry of Works to
review the Chinese’ designs,
ensuring that they were up to
code.

The proposed stadium was
the subject of much political
furore, with the current admin-
istration blaming the delay on
PLP mismanagement.

can to help Bahamians during crisis

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE government will do everything in its power
to ease the financial burden placed on Bahamians
during these tumultuous economic times, said
Labour Minister Dion Foulkes yesterday.

These efforts by the government include peri-
odic reviews of, and possible adjustments to the
government's stimulus packages as the economic
climate dictates, said the Senator.

"What we plan to do is to review exactly what we
are doing in respect to our stimulus to ensure that we
are doing enough so that we can provide additional
jobs,” Mr Foulkes said to reporters outside of Cab-
inet yesterday.

"We will review the situation to ensure that we do
enough. We realise a lot of people are unemployed,
people are having difficulties paying their mort-
gages, their rent and meeting their bills. So the gov-
ernment will do everything in its power to ensure
that we ease the burden on all Bahamians.”

Mr Foulkes’ remarks came just days after the
latest unemployment figures — the highest in 15
years — were released by the Department of Sta-
tistics. According to those figures, the number of
people out of work in New Providence stands at
16,315, and in Grand Bahama at over 4,195 — equiv-
alent to a 12.1 and 14.6 per cent unemployment rate
respectively. The figures show that around half of all
people who are without work in Grand Bahama lost
their jobs in the last six months, with 48 per cent of
them reporting having been “laid-off or dismissed.”

In New Providence, one third were put on the

Armed robber



unemployment line during the same period, and of
these, 44 per cent were laid off or dismissed. Over-
all, in New Providence, unemployment among the
134,400-strong labour force rose from 8.7 per cent in
May 2008 to 12.1 per cent, based on the interim sur-
vey conducted last month.

Unemployment

While these numbers present a dismal reality,
Mr Foulkes said that considering the job market in
other countries, in particular the United States, the
unemployment situation could be much worse.

Any buffer Bahamians are experiencing from
the brunt of the American recession can be chalked
up to the stimulus packages the government put in
place, he added. "The unemployment rate increased
in New Providence to 12.1 per cent and in the Unit-
ed States over a corresponding period the unem-
ployment rate increased by almost 100 per cent. In
the Bahamas it increased by (about) 40 per cent, so
we must be doing some things right in respect to
our stimulus package,” he said.

An Unemployment Benefit Fund, which Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham announced during the
mid-year budget debate, is expected to be imple-
mented on July 1. In the interim, a training pro-
gramme for the unemployed is scheduled to be start-
ed shortly.

Officials have said the programme will have a
work component, allowing the out-of- work to
receive intern-like training while receiving a stipend.

Government has also launched environmental
clean-up campaigns and will start a number of cap-
ital works projects with the goal of creating jobs.

Police plea for help over alleged sex attack

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POLICE are asking persons
with any information pertaining
to an alleged sexual attack on a
primary school girl in January to
come forward.

Head of the Central Detective
Unit (CDU) Elsworth Moss said
yesterday that police have not
made any headway in identifying
the teenage assailants who are
alleged to have sexually attacked
a six-year-old girl.

Supt Moss said while the inves-
tigation into the alleged attack is
still continuing, police have met a
road block in their inquiries.

"We're not in a position to
charge anybody,” Supt Moss said
yesterday. "We're still hoping we
can get someone to come forward
in terms of identifying (the alleged
assailants).”

The attack reportedly occurred
on January 23, shortly after 3pm
on the primary school's premis-
es, however, it was not made pub-
lic until about two weeks later
after a concerned parent contact-
ed The Tribune.

It was reported that the girl was
lured behind the school by a
group of boys — between two to

terrorises staff




































AN ARMED robber terri-
fied the staff of the Fantasy
Café and Electronics on Bal-
four Avenue when he held
them at gunpoint as he stole
cash from the store on Mon-
day afternoon.

The gunman burst into the
store shortly before 1pm,
threatened the shop keeper
and security guard with a
deadly weapon and forced
them to the back of the store.

He then fled the store with
an undetermined amount of
cash in an unknown direc-
tion.

Police have described the
gunman as light-skinned,
medium-sized and around 6ft
tall.

Anyone who may be able
to assist the police in the
investigation should call 919,
322-4444 or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 324-
8477.

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four of them — wearing sec-
ondary school uniforms. It is
claimed that after someone found
out about the attack, the group
of boys jumped the school's back
wall and escaped.

The victim is doing well and
has returned to school, The Tri-
bune understands.

Rosetta Street

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 « Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Crime news needs to be published

ABACONIANS, a vocal lot when aroused,
were more than angry when they learned that
their local police had gone hush-hush with crime
news.

Obviously alarmed by the rising crime in
the small, closely-knit island, a police superin-
tendent is said to have told the local newspaper
that his office will no longer issue crime reports
for publication. We don’t know if he thought
that by not publishing the crime it would mag-
ically disappear. However, his explanation was
that such publication would “reflect badly on the
police.”

What he didn’t understand was that the only
way that it would reflect badly on his officers
would be if they were seen not to be doing
their duty. Instead of silencing the press, they
should be using it to encourage residents to
join them in their fight against crime.

Once the legitimate press is silenced, the Sip-
Sip Express slides into motion and what it
churns out is often lethal to the well-being of a
small community. A thread of truth is quickly
turned into a horror movie filled with misin-
formation, exaggeration, and tall tails, enough to
make a community disappear behind locked
doors and barred windows. It is best for the
police to release the information, which will
contain the truth as far as it is known, and will
make residents feel secure to know that their
police officers are aware of what’s going on
and are on top of their job.

But silence and an announced attempt to
hide information is like pouring petrol onto
dying embers. That is when whatever the Sip-Sip
Express publishes by word of mouth is taken as
truth. “It must be true, or else the police would-
n’t try so hard to hide it,” is the thought process,
as one local adds his opinion and hands the sto-
ry on to his neighbour for another recycle and
more embellishment.

Abaconians are alarmed at the increase in
crime in their island. They are even more wor-
ried because they perceive their police officers
to be ineffective in face of the new threat. And,
instead of the officers calling headquarters in
Nassau for assistance, their announcement not
to release information was seen as the last straw.

Abaco is the one island that appears to be
holding its own during this economic recession.
Recently in the House of Assembly one of its
representatives, Mr Edison Key, attributed this
relative success to the number of second homes
established there, and owned by foreigners who
have been attracted to the island.

They have settled happily among the people
and spend many months of the year on an island
where they feel secure.

No wonder Abaconians are worried. Not only
do they live in physical fear for themselves, but
they also fear losing their livelihood should
crime frighten off their out-of-town neighbours.

The Tribune reported last Wednesday that
residents were particularly alarmed by the
attempted kidnapping of a would-be investor
during the Junkanoo parade last month.

According to the report the investor sought
police help after being released from the boot of
his own car by a thief who demanded that he
withdraw money from an ATM machine in
Marsh Harbour.

When the investor sought police help, the
report continues, the officer allegedly replied: “T
can’t help — I’m here to patrol the Junkanoo
parade.” This is the typical reply of a small
time cop, who has never heard of big town
crime.

Meanwhile, during this exchange the kid-
napper disappeared into the crowd of revellers.

He had earlier threatened the investor with a
machete as he forced him into the boot of his
car.

Whatever investment the foreigner had
planned in Abaco obviously ended then and
there.

Then there was the mugging in her home of
well known resident, Ms Lily Sands, who is in
her seventies. She was locked in a closet in her
home while thieves stole money and other per-
sonal items.

And then there is the theft of mega yachts —
some valued at more than $100,000 — that tie
up at Abaco’s marinas. It is reported that on
more than one occasion boats arrive in Abaco
one day and have been stolen the next.

“Boats are disappearing like crazy,” said one
resident. “We have to get help up here. We
must get Nassau’s attention because this crime
is going to kill the economy.”

At least they have caught the attention of
Assistant Police Commissioner Hulan Hanna
who announced yesterday that the police in
Abaco will continue to release crime reports.

It is now up to the police, supported by the
residents, to find the criminals and get them
behind bars in H M Prison, Fox Hill, Nassau.

This must be a joint effort between the police
and the community. For this to happen there
must be full disclosure of information, which will
result in mutual trust and cooperation.



How King
Hubert slowed
the country’s
momentum

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The anchor projects negoti-
ated and left, in place, at various
stages of commitment by
Christie’s Administration, could
have been, by now, producing
revenue sufficient to fund, with-
out having to borrow, the so-
called stimulus package the
FNM government has now pro-
posed.

If Ingraham had allowed the
PLP’s approved projects to con-
tinue without interruption, we
could have been home free and
would not have had to borrow
from the Chinese or anybody
else to see us through these tur-
bulent times; but king Hubert
couldn’t leave well enough
alone, so he stopped them and
changed them and adjusted
them and re-branded what was
left of them, so he could claim
ownership of them.

By doing what he did, it
slowed the country’s growth
momentum, and in the process
shattered investor confidence
in precisely the way the PLP
levied its charges which were
supported by the report given
by S&P.

Standard and Poor agreed
with the PLP’s assertions, when
they issued their report, which is
a matter of public record now,
on the state of affairs in the
country and the fact that the
FNM government was mostly
to blame for the economic
decline we are experiencing.

$150 million from the Chi-
nese, $200 million from a con-
sortium of banks, to be bor-
rowed, in an effort to stave off
bankrupting of the country,
which seems inevitable if we
continue down the road Ingra-
ham and Laing are dragging us.
We are eight months into this
fiscal period and eighteen
months away from the earliest
projection of any kind of relief
from this recession.

If the country’s revenue is
showing the kind of negative
traits, in this short a period,
where it has under performed to
the degree where it necessitated
us borrowing, so far, $350 mil-
lion, just think of our position in

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



eighteen months; even a child
can predict the precarious cir-
cumstances, with which we will
be faced, when that period
expires.

Revenue collected by the
Customs dept represents —
depending on whose point of
view is being given-about 80 per
cent of the country’s total
income.

Smarty-pants and his boss,
Hubert Ingraham, dismissed all
the top brass from customs and
then employed in excess of 100
trainees who are presently in
the classroom for the next six
months.

Who is minding the store, you
ask? Ask smarty-pants, Zhivar-
go Laing; I just hope, for the
country’s sake, that they are not
banking on collecting a whole
lot more customs duties any-
time soon, now that the top
brass was fired.

And then smarty pants and
his boss have plans, afoot, to
put the Officers on shifts, come
July this year; well there goes
the rest of the customs revenue.
The standard of living those
officers have got themselves use
too, over the years, with the
large amount of overtime they
are accustomed to earning, will,
for them, be a most difficult task
to try and make the kind of
adjustments necessary to cope.
Ingraham and Laing’s decisions
are all devoid of the human ele-
ment; they care very little, if any
at all, about the impact this
overtime stoppage will have on
these officers’ way of life.

The national debt, I predict,
will grow outrageously under
Ingraham in this term in office
as it did under him, during 1992-
2002. He took our national
debt, during that period, from a
low $970 million, inherited from
the PLP’s 25-year stint, to a
whopping $2.1 billion, at the
time he was kicked out of office
in 2002. The experts are pre-
dicting that, at the rate the

FNM is going presently, with
the borrowing of this $350 mil-
lion so far, the national debt
will spiral out of control well
before there is any relief from
our economic woes; thanks to
the FNM government’s bad
policies. The experts say, with
this borrowed amount, the
national debt is now essentially
at $3.22 billion and climbing. It
is, further, the view of the
experts that the IMF will defi-
nitely become concerned over
our borrowings, as the country’s
ability to repay and service this
debt will become more and
more cumbersome. There is a
likelihood of Ingraham having
to borrow another $100 million
to pay civil servants’ salaries,
etc, and that would immediate-
ly put the borrowed amount at
half a billion; well above the
debt-GDP ratio tolerance of 42
per cent; “a figure this nation
is poised to succeed by year’s
end” according to Mr Al Jar-
rett. With the $100 million bor-
rowed, the debt load might well
increase to 45.7 per cent, con-
tinued Mr Jarrett.

What can I say, we are in a
holy mess and both captain and
mate are sitting at the helm, but
neither of them knows what the
hell they are doing.

This being said, we are bound
to end up on the rocks of eco-
nomic disaster under this lame
brain government.

FORRESTER J CARROLL
Freeport,

Grand Bahama

March 2, 2009.

(Would Mr Carroll please
explain why former prime min-
ister Christie did not complete
his anchor projects so that they
could have been started during
his administration, instead of
leaving them in “various stages
of commitment” for the Ingra-
ham government to complete?
If Mr Carroll would look at the
number of years that some of
these were haggled over — with
at least one of them threatening
to pull out because of govern-
ment delays — Mr Christie’s
nae i was inexcusable.

You cannot go on deluding the public, Mr Carey

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Again, we sincerely apologise to our neigh-
bours for any inconvenience suffered, and we
assure everyone that a zero tolerance policy now
applies to any private functions booked at the
Retreat. This headache is now a thing of the past.

The quote by Eric Carey of the Bahamas
National Trust can go down in Bahamain history
as our equivalent to U.S President Bush’s ‘Mission
accomplished’ re the Iraq war, or perhaps
Britain’s Prime Minister Chamberlin’s ‘Peace in

the public. You must do the job you are being
handsomely paid for. I find it interesting that

neither Carey nor Gape consider this problem
serious enough to personally monitor the events.

Upon reading Mr Carey’s apology and his rec-
ommendations to ensure harmony in the area |
called the Trust, spoke to Ms Mills and asked
what I should do in the unlikely event of more
noise. She assured me there would be a respon-
sible person in the office at all times and that by
simply calling the Trust, I would be able to speak

to a responsible person on site.

I have been told and I believe it to be true that
the Bahamas National Trust does not have the
required licences and permits to host these parties
where liquor is served and music is played. If this
is true it is a serious oversight by the Trust and
adds even more weight to banning all parties.

Mr. Carey, I will not simply roll over and die.
Tam right, you are wrong. I can assure you I will
do whatever I legally can to ensure peace in my
environment, even if you don’t care.

our Time.’

By the stroke of Carey’s mighty pen he was
able to make the Bahamian people believe the
Bahamas National Trust was going to behave
itself. It would no longer be a blight on the com-
munity. This, of course, was nonsense.

On Saturday last yet another noisy party was
held at the Trust. I called Carey twice and got the
same old reply he would call the security guard.
The third call was not accepted, nor was I able to
get through to Lynne Gape.

The party continued until past one o’clock Sun-
day morning. Nassau,

Shame, shame. You cannot go on deluding March 9, 2009

Rejuvenating our tourism industry

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LEONARD SMITH

they would in fact reduce the
fees of its retail licencees by 50
per cent effective until February
2010. The question is, how is

NEW CONDOS

this move going to affect all of
us here on Grand Bahama?

How is this move going to
affect hoteliers, tour operators,
straw and seafood vendors?
How is this move going to affect
cabs and public bus drivers,
hotel and casino workers?

The GBPA is aware that the
majority of the people
employed on this Island are
directly or indirectly in the
tourism industry.

Would it not be practical then
that they also reduce the fees
by the same amount at the air-
port and harbour so as to restart
our failing tourism product for
the same period of time?

It has been announced that
the GBPA has indicated that

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





British ruling
blocks istand from
hanging two killers

A CARIBBEAN island :
has been blocked from hang- }
ing two brutal killers by a i
British ruling which reflects
the Bahamas’ own frustra-
tions over the death penalty.

Antigua’s prosecutors
have expressed despair over
an agreement with the
British government which
prevents them executing the
murderers of a Welsh honey- }
moon couple who were i
killed in their holiday chalet
last year.

Adlai Smith, Antigua’s
director of public prosecu-
tions, said: “It’s unfortunate,
it’s regrettable. These men
deserve the harshest penalty
the law can impose for this
horrendous crime. But we
have given our word and we
can’t go back on it.”

Antigua’s holiday trade
was badly hit after Ben and
Catherine Mullany were
murdered on what was sup-
posed to be an idyllic honey- }
moon trip. i

Hundreds of tourists can-
celled their bookings,
prompting Prime Minister
Baldwin Spencer to say the
island’s future was at risk.

Scotland Yard was called
in to investigate the crime.

But Britain agreed only if
the island promised not to
execute the killers if they

were found and convicted.

Antigua, a former British
colony that has been inde-
pendent since 1981, was
among Caribbean nations
that voted to inaugurate a
regional appeal court to
replace the Privy Council.

But the Antiguan constitu-
tion still states that the Privy
Council, which usually over-
turns death sentences, is the
final court of appeal.

Detectives from London
tracked down the killers
through mobile phones
stolen from the victims. :

Two local men, Avie How- }
el, 18, and Kaniel Martin, 21, }
were charged with murder
last August. The gun used to
kill the Mullanys has been
linked to three other mur-
ders. i
In the Bahamas, three pro- }
hanging marches were staged }
last year to call for the return }
of the death penalty. ;

Demonstrators expressed
anger at the rising murder
rate and demanded govern-
ment action.

However, the Privy Coun-
cil has ruled the mandatory
death penalty to be “uncon-
stitutional” and, in its rul-
ings, generally reflects the
UK’s opposition to capital
punishment.

The last man to hang in ;
Nassau was David Mitchell, a }
Haitian-Bahamian who ;
murdered a European cou-
ple in Abaco.

He went to the gallows in
January, 2000.

Group calls for Commission
of Inquiry into CLICO failure

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

THE FAILURE of CLI-
CO (Bahamas) should be
subject to a Commission of
Inquiry, according to the
activist group Bahamians
Agitating for a Referendum
on the FTAA (BARF).

BARF’s co-chairmen Paul
Moss and Fayne Thompson
yesterday called on the gov-
ernment to launch an official
inquiry to look into who is
responsible for the collapse
of CLICO (Bahamas) and
why it was allowed to crum-
ble when problems had been
identified as early as 2004.

The inquiry and an imme-
diate audit of insurance com-
panies to ensure their finan-
cial health would help pre-



® ' i bs a
FAYNE THOMPSON and Paul Moss are pictured in this file photo.

vent other companies from
crashing, Mr Moss said yes-
terday at a press conference.

BAREF is also calling on
policy holders to object to
the government’s decision to
liquidate the company, and
it maintains the decision was
a knee-jerk reaction at the
expense of 29,000 policy
holders and 170 employees.

Pageant demands may
prompt govt to seek
additional airport funding

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE government may seek
additional funding from the pri-
vate sector to temporarily spruce
up the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport to meet the needs
of the 2009 Miss Universe
pageant, Tourism and Aviation
Minister Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace said.

Speaking to reporters outside
of Cabinet yesterday morning,
Senator Vanderpool-Wallace said
his ministry may request more
money from the Nassau Paradise
Island Promotion Board to facili-
tate a swift facelift of the airport.

"We regularly call on our
friends in the private sector, Nas-
sau Paradise Island Promotion
Board in particular, when we
need any specific kind of short-
term work that needs to be done -
they have many times come
to our aid in terms of providing
that.

However, the ministry will also
continue to look for other sources
of funding for this project, he said.

Last week, Senator Vander-
pool-Wallace said the airport -
which is often described as an eye-
sore - will be getting some aes-
thetic and infrastructural improve-
ments in the months leading up to
the prestigious pageant.

“In terms of the kind of wel-
come we have in place, certainly
we have that in hand - what the
place looks like. We will have that
in hand, but there is no doubt that
the schedule that has already been
started with the redevelopment

Vincent Vanni alee

of the airport is going to continue
on the same pace,” Mr Vander-
pool- Wallace said recently.

“And to the degree that that is
going to interfere in any way,
shape or form, in terms of what
the airport looks like, we are
going to mask that as best we
can.”

The pageant, to be hosted at
Atlantis, Paradise Island, in late
August, will showcase the country
to millions of potential visitors - a
publicity boost that tourism offi-
cials said will provide invaluable
exposure.

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f=



Mr Moss called on policy
holders to band together and
insist upon objectivity by
applying for the appointment
of a second liquidator at the
hearing on March 17.

CLICO (Bahamas) clients
should also insist that Minis-
ter of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing recuse him-
self from the matter as he is

instruments

presented
to St Annes

THE proceeds from the
Annual Epiphany Organ
Recital performed by organ-
ist Dr Sparkman Ferguson at
Christ Church Cathedral
resulted in the presentation of
musical instruments for
deserving St Annes High
School students.

Cynthia Wells, the school’s
principal, along with Karel
Coleby, music director at St
Annes High School, accepted
the instruments.

TAIL VES

a former director of Colina
Imperial and his former
employer may have an inter-
est in CLICO’s assets, Mr
Moss said.

“The inquiry should look
at the relationships of regu-
lators and the industry where
it is not uncommon for for-
mer government officials to
sit on the boards of insur-
ance companies or connected
companies, thereto bringing
their objectivity into ques-
tion on decisions made or
about to be made,” he said.

The governments of
Trinidad and Guyana have
shown more support for their
people by bailing out CLI-
CO to ensure policy holders
do not lose their investments,
Mr Moss said.

He added: “It is not suffi-
cient for them (the govern-
ment) to say they are not

“We are excited with the
quality of the instruments.
Fortunately for us, as a result
of the generosity of Dr Fer-
guson, we now have addition-
al instruments to afford our
students opportunities,” Mrs
Wells said.

The band programme at St
Annes, in addition to provid-

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‘nassau 688 1 be us " sport SNA Be

going to do this, that they
believe in the free markets,
etc.

“This is critical, and it
needs to be fixed.

“This is what we put them
there for.”

By not bailing out the
bank, the government will
end up paying out funds to
those who are forced to turn
to public funds when they
lose their life savings, BARF
said.

And the implications are
far reaching as thousands
more Bahamians who have
CLICO policies through
credit unions will also lose
out.

BARF warned policy hold-
ers to stop paying into CLI-
CO (Bahamas) policies, as
funds will be directed to
the liquidator to pay off
debts.

ST ANNES students
with some of the
instruments.

ing students with music skills,
teaches self-discipline, self-
respect, and respect for oth-
ers along with creative prob-
lem solving and physical, men-
tal and emotional growth
“Each year, we have to turn
away students from the band
because they cannot afford
instruments,” Mr Coleby said.



switch for free!



—— onephone

IndiGO

N

T WO R K §
PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Visitors needs more cultural
experiences in the Bahamas

He TOWN, Abaco —
In 1976 the late Ameri-
can writer Alex Haley won a
Pulitzer prize for Roots, an histor-
ical novel said to have been based
on his family history, starting with
an African named Kunta Kinte
who was kidnapped into slavery.

The book was adapted into a
sensational TV mini-series that
played endlessly on ZNS whenev-
er election time rolled around.
And while it later transpired that
Haley's specific genealogical claims
did not pan out, in the end that
did not matter — they were gener-
ically true.

Although critics condemned the
book as fraudulent, Harvard pro-
fessor Henry Louis Gates Jr put it
this way: "Roots is a work of the
imagination rather than strict his-
torical scholarship. It was an
important event because it cap-
tured everyone's imagination."

Tough Call could produce a
similarly fanciful account that
would be just as accurate in its own
way — an idea that took shape this
past weekend while attending
Hope Town's Heritage Day.

This annual fair staged by the
local museum celebrates the set-
tlement's founding by a loyalist
widow named Wyannie Malone,
who came to Abaco some 10 years
before Kunta Kinte was supposed
to have arrived in America.

Little is known about Wyan-
nie's ancestors, although a massive
hardcover genealogy "bible" doc-

uments her descendants (includ-
ing me) in excruciating detail. But
Bahamian Peter Roberts, an
archivist at Georgia State Univer-
sity who specialises in these things,
provided a glimpse of the way
backward in a Heritage Day lec-
ture he presented in Hope Town
last Saturday.

For the past few years Prof
Roberts has been promoting the
Bahamas DNA Project, a genetic
database that tracks the roots of
those Bahamians who submit their
DNA for testing by a genealogy
lab. So far, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon,
Slavic, Berber, Abyssinian and
West African origins have been
identified for Bahamian partici-
pants.

One result shows that a direct
Bahamian descendant of Wyan-
nie Malone is a perfect DNA
match with an American Malone
who traces his genealogy to Vir-
ginia, with origins in Ireland.

This Malone's family history
says they came to America by way
of the Bahamas, but that an ances-
tor named Daniel was born in
Westmeath, Ireland in 1642 and
was “in the colonies” by 1665.

In other words, the Bahamian

US tourist believed
to have drowned

FROM page one

Cat Cay is a privately owned island about eight miles off
South Bimini on which the private Cat Cay Yacht Club and
Marina are located. However Mr Merril’s dive boat was not

docked at the marina.

Mr Jeff Dubel, spokesman for the US Embassy in Queen
Street, said he cannot comment on individual cases but that Mr
Merril’s family has been notified and an autopsy is being done
in accordance with Bahamian law.

Police investigations are continuing and anyone who may be
able to assist should call the police at 919 or 322-4444,

‘S) Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

CHARLES

FRANCIS DAVIS,

49

Of Kennedy Subdivision, off
Soldier Road will be held on
Thursday, March 12th, 9:45am
at St. Cecilia’s Roman Catholic
Church, 3rd Street, Coconut
Grove Avenue. Monsignor
Simeon Roberts will officiate.
Cremains will be interned in

St. Agnes Cemetery, Nassau Street.

He is survived by his sisters, Eloise Huyler, Maria Davis,

Bloneva Johnson, Shirley
Blake of Ontario, Canada;

Scavella and Pauline Tessie-
brothers, Maxwell S. Walkes

of Florida, Phillip A. Walkes, Blaise A. Taylor, James L.

Davis of Atlanta, Georgi

a, William “Tony” Davis of

Treasure Cay, Abaco, Walter “Tony” Davis of Fort Pierce,
Florida and Jim Davis; aunts, Dorothea Strachan, Julia

Thompson, Oletha Carroll

, Anna Brooks, Annie Archer,

Eloise Archer, Clarissa Neymour of Grand Bahama,
Maxine and Deanne Archer; uncles, Leonard “Skinny”
Archer, John “Femo” Neymour of Grand Bahama, Samuel
Archer of Abaco, Hilton Archer of Grand Bahama, Duke
Errol Strachan, Henry Books and Sylvester Ramsey;
nieces, Patrice Huyler, Glenell Scantlebury, Samantha
Walkes, Maresha Walkes, Phillipa McFarland, Gelenann

Long, Anastacia Walkes, C

ara Adderley, Tara Cartwright,

Janice Taylor, Daynette Blackwell of Austin, Texas, Wanda
McPhee of Springfield, Virginia, Alesia Baillou, Kisshnell

Davis, Bianca Maycock,

Denise and Genie Scavella,

Taneisha and Shevante Davis; nephews, David of New
York, Peco Jade Sands of Abaco, Kermit Smith of Raleigh,
North Carolina, Sean Walkes of Ontario, Canada, Tokey
and Maxwell Walkes of Miami, Florida, Elvis Walkes,
Blaise Taylor Jr., Craig Brown, Marvin and Michael
Johnson, Jude Scavella, Corey Davis, Orey Godet, Perez

Davis, Robert Maycock Jr.

and Steven Sealy; sisters-in-

law, Johnny Ruth Dukes of Miami, Florida, Janis Nicole
Taylor, Joanna Davis of Fort Pierce, Florida and Karen

Walkes of San Salvador;

other family and relatives

including, Millicent and Vincent Fernander of Miami,
Florida, Mrs. Carey of Malcolm Road, East, Eleanor Karen
Rolle and family, Stephen Ramsey and family, Sylvester
Ramsey and family, Robert and Theresa Moncur and
family, Florence, Vincent and Anton Brooks, Kevin Archer,

Lavern Archer, Gerard and

Stephen Archer, Geoffrey and

Catherine McPhee and family, Ernest and Marilyn
Cambridge and family, Adrian and Marcian Deveaux,
Kara, Kayna and Devon Dean, Anya Munnings, Nicole

Eve and the staff of Accid

ent and Emergency and Male

Medical Ward of The Princess Margaret Hospital;
numerous grand and great-grand nieces and nephews,
cousins, and other relatives too numerous to mention.





Malones may have originally left
the ‘auld sod' for Eleuthera, then
moved to Virginia and on to South
Carolina, before leaving from
Charleston in 1785 to settle in Aba-
co.

As an aside, Wyannie's husband,
Benjamin, fought for the British
in the War of Independence, and
their descendants were strict
protestants. So clearly, they were
not Irish patriots.

There were many non-Malones
present at the recent Heritage Day
celebrations, and Prof Roberts had
lots of interesting snippets of infor-
mation about some of them.

For example, genetic testing
shows that the Bahamian Lowe's
do not trace their lineage to the
British Isles as most of us would
suspect. Instead, they have a Por-
tuguese background and are prob-
ably related to Sephardic Jews who
were expelled from Iberia in the
15th century.

Since 2004 the Bahamas DNA
Project has tested hundreds of peo-
ple, most of them with an Abaco
or Key West background. But this
represents only about a third of
the 195 surnames found in the
Bahamas, and black Bahamian
families are grossly under-repre-
sented, Prof Roberts told an avid
audience in the Hope Town
library. And before you ask, no
trace of Lucayan ancestry has yet
been found — not even among
Long Islanders.

"The DNA results so far show
that we Bahamians are all closely
related and have a shared her-
itage," Prof Roberts said, adding
that: "If a black person marries
into a white family there will be
no visible trace of that after only
six generations — and vice versa."

The "Roots-like" suggestion
that the Malones may have arrived
on Eleuthera before settling on
Abaco was supported to a degree
by Florida archaeologist Bob Carr,
who also gave a talk at the Her-
itage Day event. Carr has been
investigating Bahamian sites since

at least 1986, when he helped con-
firm the discovery of Carleton,
Abaco's original loyalist settlement
located near present-day Treasure
Cay.

Re: the past several years
Carr has been digging up
Preachers Cave at North
Eleuthera, a geological feature
which he describes as "the Ply-
mouth Rock of the Bahamas", and
which contains Lucayan, European
and African cultural remains.

"The Eleutherean Adventur-
ers never came to the Bahamas,"
he told the Hope Town audience.
"They were the investors back in
London who were hoping to find
precious metals and valuable hard-
woods in the islands. About 70
people arrived on Eleuthera from
Bermuda in 1648, but we have nev-
er found the list of names. We do
know that within two years there
were 150 people living near
Preachers Cave, including free
blacks and some slaves."

After a 1656 slave conspiracy in
Bermuda led by a free black
named William Force, some of the
plotters were banished to the
Bahamas, which Carr referred to
as "the first Australia”.

Many white Bermudians were
also exiled to the Bahamas, and
DNA evidence has confirmed that
descendants of these first settlers
now live in nearby Spanish Wells.
Others ended up in Harbour
Island, Nassau, and possibly Aba-
co, Carr said.

Preachers Cave has been an
archaeological site since 1992 and
has yielded important information
about Bahamian history. It was
originally a Lucayan cemetary, and
among the five Indian burials that
have been found is one of a chief
or shaman, together with the bones
of a sacrificial victim who was
beheaded with hands and feet tied.
Charcoal found at the site has been
radiocarbon-dated to the 8th cen-
tury.

When the first Europeans set-
tlers were shipwrecked off
Eleuthera in 1648 they also used
the cave for shelter and for reli-
gious services, clearing away all
the Lucayan bones they could find,
according to Carr. "The legend of
the first church is true — the pulpit
rock is there with a notch for the

bible, along with two crude chairs
cut into the rock."

There are five Puritan graves
in the cave, including two bodies in
coffins, one of which was a very
old man who was likely to have
been a leader. Interestingly, one
of the skeletons was a dwarf and
DNA studies have confirmed the
existence of Laron Syndrome, a
growth hormone deficiency found
among Jews and Arabs. Several
inhabitants of Spanish Wells today
have this genetic syndrome and
the Preachers Cave dwarf was
probably their ancestor.

Bob Carr was Dade County's
first archaeologist and is renowned
as the discoverer of the Miami Cir-
cle on Brickell Point — an 800-
year-old Tequesta Indian ceremo-
nial site.

He is a co-founder and director
of the Miami-based Archaeological
and Historical Conservancy, which
handled the Preachers Cave dig,
and has worked with the Florida
Division of Historic Resources and
the US National Park Service.

One thing that came out of
Tough Call's Heritage Day visit to
Hope Town is that visitors need
more cultural experiences than
they are getting in the Bahamas.
Some of the wealthier family island
settlements like Hope Town, New
Plymouth, Spanish Wells and Rock
Sound have small museums run
by volunteers, but most Bahamian
communities pay scant attention
to heritage matters, and historic
preservation is not on their agenda.

Yet according to Carr, there is
much more interest in history and
heritage than in playing on the
beach: "In Florida, heritage is a
very important part of our tourism
sector that generates more money
from visitors."

Preachers Cave is the perfect
example of a heritage site that can
form part of a world class educa-
tional tour if properly preserved
and presented.

The 1836-vintage Hole-in-the
Wall lighthouse in South Abaco is
another good example.

And before going to Hope
Town I attended a town meeting at
Sandy Point where this very sub-
ject came up.

At the meeting, engineers from
American Bridge were discussing
more dredging at Disney's Cast-
away Cay just offshore. Formerly

known as Gorda Cay, this tiny
island within sight of the relatively
unprosperous village of Sandy
Point is a destination for three Dis-
ney cruise ships a week, each
loaded with 2300 passengers. The
improvements that are expected
to begin in May will allow the cay
to service larger ships bringing
4,000 passengers each. Yet none
of these visitors ever sets foot on
Abaco.

But just a short drive from
Sandy Point is the Abaco Nation-
al Park, a natural wonderland sur-
rounding a spectacular bluff that is
the site of the historic Hole-in-the-
Wall lighthouse.

At the town meeting,
Bernadette Hall of Abaco Friends
of the Environment announced a
project to clean up and restore the
lighthouse property.

Although functioning now on
solar power the lighthouse and its
associated Victorian-era buildings
are all in an embarrassing state of
disrepair and the entire stunning
site is littered with trash and rusting
relics.

Heritage tourism is officially
defined as “travelling to experi-
ence the places, artifacts, and activ-
ities that authentically represent
the stories and people of the past
and present."

And with more people than ever
seeking to combine their recre-
ational experiences with educa-
tional growth, heritage tourism can
be a powerful economic engine for
creating jobs and producing higher
tax revenues.

But as South Abaco's chief
councillor, Preston Roberts, told
me, "if we want to benefit from
the tourists that Disney brings we
have to go to them with a prod-
uct, and we don't have one yet."

Macaroni and cheese is fine as
far as it goes, but you can only eat
so much of it.

Heritage tourism involves a lot
more than that, and it can be so
much more fulfilling to those who
provide it — by protecting the
environmental and historical fea-
tures that form the basis for our
tourist economy.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

FROM page one

and FNM factions yelling at each
other outside the arrivals hall.

“The FNM are saying these sto-
ries should be told, the PLP are
saying the wrong-doing of the past
was justified,” one driver told The
Tribune as he witnessed the dis-
pute in full flow.

The talk-show Issues of the Day
on Love 97 FM was inundated
with calls from listeners expressing
disgust.

PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-
Gibson, who appeared as a guest,
told host Algernon Allen Sr that
the article disturbed her.

The article, headed ‘The tragic
young pilot who knew too much”,
told the story of the late Chauncey
Tynes Jr., who disappeared in 1983
while piloting a flight from Exuma
to Nassau.

The article, written by The Tri-
bune’s managing editor John Mar-
quis, stated that his father
Chauncey Tynes Sr believed his
son was murdered because he
knew too much of the association
between Sir Lynden, who is
revered as “The Father of the
Nation”, and the Colombian drug
cezat Joe Lehder.

“T believe the time has come for
us as Bahamians to really stand
against this kind of nonsense. Mr
Marquis has a right to his opinion
but he does not have a right to
abuse the privileges that the
Bahamian people have given to
him to reside in this country by
desecrating Sir Lynden’s legacy,”
said B J Moss.

“T believe that Sir Lynden has
made the greatest contribution to

Pindling
Bahamian society and to have a
foreigner come here and desecrate
his legacy and not let this man and
his family rest, I think every
Bahamian should be outraged,
FNM and PLP,” one irate caller
said.

Another caller said: “The best
thing for him to do is not let peo-
ple see his face and stay behind
those four walls and those masks
because you see they like to wear
masks and throw stones. He’s a
coward.”

However, one woman caller left
a voicemail for The Tribune’s
managing editor saying: “I love
you — you are a great man.” And
many more said it was time for
the truth to be told, praising the
article as another major contribu-
tion to Bahamian democracy. One
reader said: “Don’t be scared —
we all know what the article said is
true.”

A radio caller admonished
politicising the issue, saying that
the context of the story needed to
be understood.

“Tf you read the story in detail it
is still about a man who lost his
son who may still be grieving and
is looking for closure. The context
of the story needs to be under-
stood. The fact that the man had a
relationship with Sir Lynden Pin-
dling does not negate the fact that
he lost his only son and so we have
to be really careful when we turn
these things into a political foot-
ball,” the caller said.

The Insight article was also a
major topic of discussion on a pop-
ular Internet forum.

Did you know?

One of the leading causes of death among children
5-9 is CANCER.

In the last 20 Years ASTHMA rates have increased

over 400%. American Manufacturing Company

has expanded into The Bahamas to educate
ALL BAHAMIAN consumers.
Come find out what is causing it!
Place: The Cancer
Society-Centreville (2 Doors Down from ZNS)
Date: Friday, March 13, 2009
Time: 6:30PM — Reserved Seating

Call: Alex 328-7963 or 328-7964
“Business Minded Individuals and
Stay At Home Moms are strongly
encouraged to attend.”



Sir Lynden Pindling

One blogger asked why any-
one would take the words of a for-
eigner with an obvious disdain for
Bahamuans as truth while another
post stated that the article was
quite interesting.

Attorney and political activist
Paul Moss said yesterday: “Sir
Lynden is a great man. I respect
him for ensuring that the Bahamas
had majority rule and that there is
impartiality as well as freedom of
expression and freedom of move-
ment to allow a person like John
Marquis to write what he writes
and move about the way he moves
about.”

Mr Marquis, who has been
described by an online book



reviewer as “the most colourful,
controversial and courageous
newspaper editor in the
Caribbean,” remained unfazed by
the criticism but welcomed the
praise.

“Tn fact, a lot of fascinating new
information is now reaching me
from various quarters about the
drug era in the Bahamas as a
direct result of this article,” he
said.

“Our readers are delighted with
what we are doing, and are glad
that The Tribune is always ready
to get the truth out, which is what
newspapers are all about.

“Tt’s interesting that no-one in
the PLP has stepped forward to
deny any of the information in the
piece and that’s because every
word of it is true and they know it.
It came from an unimpeachable
source and is now in the process of
being backed up by several people
who were around at the time.

“As usual, the PLP’s supporters
are much more interested in con-
demning the messenger than
absorbing the message, and they
are pouring forth the usual racist,
anti-foreign rhetoric, as they
always do when they’re in a fury.

“But history is history and has
to be recorded. Of course they are
disturbed and embarrassed by
their history. I would be, too, if I
were a member of the PLP. But
the truth needs to be told and The
Tribune will go on telling it.”

Christian Council

FROM page one

by developing farmland in Andros and Abaco to produce fruits and veg-
etables while hoping to develop a possible third industry.

“The goal is to capture 30 per cent of the food industry ($150 million)
within five to seven years. Facilitating the mobilization of existing farmers
with the possibility of forming a Cooperative or Joint Venture to enhance
their overall performance. This can result in the creation of a second
stream of income for some and for others a third or fourth stream,” he said.

Rev Paul said that the Council believes that the programme can provide
a stream of full employment in the country.

“The Character Development programme can strengthen our employ-
ees in the workplace, family members in the home and assist in conflict
management and handling of domestic disputes, etc. Together we can once
again build a strong, healthy, productive, successful and prosperous

nation,” he said.

The Christian Council president said that the organization also hopes
to sensitize the public to the “noble virtues” that have brought the
Bahamas success, and are found in the preamble of the Bahamas Con-

stitution.

The Bahamas Christian Council will spearhead religious events, social
events and seminars and also develop other programmes to move this ini-

tiative forward.

Also, over the next 30 days, flyers and banners heralding the initiative

will be distributed and displayed.

A meeting was held during the month of February with more than 70
pastors from around New Providence to collectively present to them the

strategies for the national initiative.

“As a group the pastors were all enthused and supportive of the initiative
and what can be accomplished once we work together,” Rev Paul said.

The Bahamas Christian Council will also partner with groups, organi-
zations, government agencies, institutions, and other stockholders to
realise the National Initiative, he said.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Division winners
will get to pick
1st-round foes

NEW YORK (AP) — The NBA
Development League will have an
unusual format for the playoffs —
the division winners will get to pick
their first-round opponents.

Also, for the first time eight
teams will qualify for the postsea-
son, including the winners of the
three divisions along with the five
teams with the best regular-season
records, regardless of division.

The top-seeded division winner
will select its opponent first, with
the second and third ranked divi-
sion winners following in that
order. The fourth-seeded team will
play the remaining team.

"One of our fundamental goals at
the NBA D-League is to utilize our
unique position to explore new and
different ways to grow the game,"
league president Dan Reed said.
"We believe that these innovations
will provide our fans with com-
pelling matchups and action packed
games."

The first and second rounds of
the playoffs will be one game each,
while the finals will be a best-of-
three series. The playoffs will start
next month. The NBA Develop-
ment League has a team in Bis-

marck, N.D., the Wizards.

@ By The Associated Press
SCOREBOARD

Wednesday, March 11

Memphis at Minnesota (8 pm
EDT). A matchup of teams des-
perate for wins. The Grizzlies
have won just once in their last
11 games, while the Timber-
wolves have lost 10 in a row and
15 of their last 16.

STARS

Monday

— Dwyane Wade, Heat,
scored 48 points, including a
running 3-pointer as time
expired to lift Miami to a wild
130-127 double-overtime win
over Chicago.

— Joe Johnson, Hawks,
scored 30 points and Atlanta
beat New Orleans 89-79, ending
the Hornets’ season-best sev-
en-game winning streak.

— Richard Hamilton, Pistons,
led Detroit with 29 points and a
career-high 14 assists in a 98-94

win over Orlando.

— Brandon Roy, Trail Blaz-
ers, scored 27 points as Port-
land beat the Los Angeles Lak-
ers 111-94 for their 12th straight
win at the Rose Garden.

— Caron Butler, Timber-
wolves, had 27 points, 10
rebounds and six assists to lead
Minnesota to a 110-99 victory
over Washington.

M-V-3!

Miami's Dwyane Wade
scored 48 points, including a
running 3-pointer as time
expired to lift the Heat to a wild
130-127 double-overtime win
over the Chicago Bulls. Wade, a
top MVP candidate, also had
12 assists in 49 minutes, shot 15-
for-21 from the field and made
a 3-pointer at the end of the
first half, then again at the end
of regulation.

SCARY SIGHT
Portland forward Rudy Fer-
nandez was taken from the

VACANCY NOTICE

m

NBA Today



court on a stretcher with his
neck in a brace Monday night
after he was fouled hard by
Trevor Ariza in the fourth quar-
ter of Portland's 111-94 win
over the Los Angeles Lakers.
The rookie from Spain fell hard
on his elbow and his hip, and
remained prone under the bas-
ket for several minutes. X-rays
and a CT scan were negative,
but Fernandez was expected to
remain at the hospital overnight
with what the team called a
"soft tissue injury to his right
upper chest/side area."

SOMEONE HAD TO WIN

Caron Butler had 27 points,
10 rebounds and six assists to
lead Washington to a 110-99
victory over Minnesota on
Monday night in a matchup of
teams that had lost 14 straight

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER - EXECUTIVE

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Chief Financial Officer.

The job oversees all financial matters of BEC, inclusive of the activities of the Customer Services

Division.

The objectives of this function include, but are not limited to the following:

Financial Management, Accounting & Treasury

¢ Ensure and structure the Corporation’s financial policies, practices and internal controls so that
they are in accordance with the law, generally accepted accounting principles, contractual
commitments, the Corporation’s structure and protect the corporations assets;

* Manage BEC’s cash resources to ensure that funds are available to meet the ongoing and future
needs of BEC while minimizing the cost of capital;

¢ Ensure the timely preparation of all financial reports. These include complete financial statements
for presentation to the Board, preparation of budget reports for assisting management decision
making, and development of a yearly projected budget in consultation with other Division heads;

¢ Ensure that the divisions maintain a high standard of efficiency, control, and application of sound
accounting practices and principles along with the adequate trained qualified staff to achieve

these objectives;

¢ Coordinate to ensure that the workflow within the division and cross functionality with all
departments dependent upon the services of the division, are efficient and effective;

* Coordinate the annual budgeting process and present the completed budget for approval;

¢ Manage external relationships with local and international sources of funds;

¢ Ensure proper and cost effective insurance of BEC’s assets;

¢ Conduct Financial Analysis for the Corporation as requested;

Customer Services

* Ensure the accurate and timely meter reading and billing of all customer accounts in New
Providence and the billing of other Family Island Accounts.
¢ Ensure proper management of the revenue and collection recovery activities by effective
management of the Corporation’s Accounts Receivable.
« Ensure proper management of the business office services of cashiering and new services, queries
for customers, banking and accounting reconciliation, etc.
¢ Ensure that non-technical losses are kept to a minimum.

Job requirements include:

¢ A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounting/Finance with professional qualifications (e.g.,
ACCA, CPA) an MBA would be desired.

¢ A minimum of 15+ years of experience in financial accounting, at senior management level.

* Excellent verbal and written communication skills

¢ Excellent analytical and organizational skills

¢ Good customer relations skills

* Good time management skills

¢ Strong leadership skills

* Knowledge of finance, accounting, budgeting and cost control principles including General
Accepted Accounting Principles.

¢ Knowledge of automated financial and accounting reporting systems

¢ Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial reports, statements, and projections

* Extensive knowledge of project management and the ability to oversee a range of projects

simultaneously

* Strong human relations skills

* Knowledge of industrial relations
¢ Negotiation skills and techniques

Interested persons should apply by submitting a resume addressed to: The AGM-Human Resources
& Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau
Bahamas on or before: Wednesday, March 25, 2009.

combined.

The Wizards lost five in a row
and seven of their last eight
before the win, while the Tim-
berwolves have lost 10 in a row
and 15 of their last 16. Min-
nesota (18-45) is 1-12 since Al
Jefferson was lost for the season
with a torn ACL before the All-
Star break.

STANDINGS

Denver had a chance to tie
idle Utah atop the Northwest
Division after losing their grip
on first place 24 hours earlier
with a loss at Sacramento, but
lost for the eighth time in 11
games Monday night, this time
97-95 to the Houston Rockets.

The Nuggets were the No. 2
seed in the Western Conference
at the All-Star break but have
slipped all the way to seventh.

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STRONG IN DEFEAT

Ben Gordon scored a season-
high 43 points for Chicago,
including eight 3-pointers, but
the Bulls lost to Miami 130-127
in two overtimes Monday night
as Dwyane Wade hit a running
3-pointer at the buzzer.

Kobe Bryant had 26 points
for the Los Angeles Lakers,
who lost at Portland 111-94 and
haven't won at the Rose Gar-
den in their last seven tries, with
their last victory Feb. 23, 2005.

STEPPING IN

Detroit's Kwame Brown,
who has struggled since being
the No. 1 overall pick in the
2001 draft, had 10 points and
played 26 minutes of tough
defense against Dwight Howard
as the Pistons beat the Orlando
Magic 98-94 on Monday night.

He stepped up after Rasheed
Wallace left with a first-quar-
ter injury.

Blazers man down in win over Lakers

PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS Rudy Fernandez receives medical attention after he was fouled by Lakers’ Trevor Ariza in the third quarter of Monday’s game in Portland. The
Trail Blazers beat the Los Angeles Lakers 111-94 for their 12th straight win at the Rose Garden...

(AP Photo: Rick Bowmer)

SIDELINED

Atlanta's Marvin Williams,
who averages 14 points per
game, was held out with an
undisclosed lower back injury.
He was examined by Hawks
doctors Monday and will see
another doctor Tuesday. New
Orleans F Peja Stojakovic
missed his third straight game
with back spasms. Minnesota
guard Randy Foye had to be
carried to the locker room in
the fourth quarter of the Tim-
berwolves' 110-99 loss to Wash-
ington with a sprained right
ankle.

SPEAKING

"Right now, man, there ain't
nobody in the league playing
better than him."

— Miami's Jamario Moon on
teammate Dwyane Wade, who
made a running 3-pointer as
time expired and scored 48
points to lead the Heat to a 130-
127 victory over Chicago on
Monday night

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL SPORTS

Joss Big Red Machines going
for their 21st track title





Association of Independent Secondary Schools’ Inter-
School Track and Field Championships today at the
Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium, start-
ing at Yam:

Track Schedule

Junior Girls 75 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Junior Boys 80 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Intermediate Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Senior Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Intermediate Boys 100 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Senior Boys 110 Meter Hurdles Preliminaries
Junior Girls 1500 Meter Run Final

Junior Boys 1500 Meter Run Final

Bantam Girls 400 Meter Dash Prelimniaries
Bantam Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Junior Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries

Junor Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Intermediate Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Intermediate Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Senior Girls 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries

Senior Boys 400 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Bantam Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Bantam Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Junior Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Intermediate Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Intermediate Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Intermediate Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminiaries
Senior Girls 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries

Senior Boys 100 Meter Dash Preliminaries
Bantam Girls 1500 Meter Run Bantam Final
Bantam Boys 1500 Meter Run Final

Intermediate Girls 1500 Meter Run Final

Intermediate Boys ISO0O Meter Run Final
Junior Girls 75 Meter Hurdles Final

Junior Boys 80 Meter Hurdles Final
Intermediate Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Final
Senior Girls 100 Meter Hurdles Final
Intermediate Boys 100 Meter Hurdles Final

Senior Boys 110 Meter Hurdles Final
Senior Girls 1500 Meter Run Final
Senior Boys 1500 Meter Run Final
Bantam Girls 400 Meter Dash Final
Bantam Boys 400 Meter Dash Final
Junior Girls 400 Meter Dash Final
Junior Boys 400 Meter Dash Final
Intermediate Girls 400 Meter Dash Final
Intermediate Boys 400 Meter Dash Final
Senior Girls 400 Meter Dash Final
Senior Boys 400 Metre Dash Final

Field Schedule

Junior Boys High Jump 4'7" Final
Intermediate Girls Long Jump Final
Intermediate Boys Discus Throw 1.5k Final
Senior Girls Javelin Throw 6000gms Final
Senior Boys Shot Put 141bs Fina
Intermediate Boys Triple Jump Final
Bantam Girls High Jump 3'6" Final
Bantam Boys Long Jump Final

Junior Boys Javelin Throw 600gms Final
Intermediate Girls Shot Put 8lbs Final
Bantam Girls Javelin Throw Final
Junior Girls Discus Throw 1k Final
Senior Girls High Jump 4"4" Final
Senior Boys Long Jump Final



m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DON’T look now, but when
the Bahamas Association of
Independent Secondary Schools
(BAISS) kicks off its 21st Inter-
School Track and Field Cham-
pionships today, the St
Augustine’s College Big Red
Machines will be out to win
another title.

Winners of the past 20 titles
since the inception of the meet
in 1988, SAC head coach
William “Knucklehead” John-
son said the Big Red Machines
don’t intend to let up on their
stranglehold of the crown with-
out putting up a fight.

“We’re ready to go out and
defend. We’re going to compete
and try to win number 21,” said
Johnson, who intends to carry a
team of 122 athletes.

Over the years, SAC has
been challenged by a number
of schools and Johnson antici-
pates the same this time around.
But he admitted that they have
the quality athletes to maintain
their top position.

“We expect Queen’s College
to be very strong this year, as
well as St Anne’s,” Johnson
projected. “St Andrew’s, St
John’s and the other schools all
have some people who they can
rely on.”

SAC, according to Johnson,
has a well balanced team, but
he expects for the points to be
spread across the board in the
boys division, as opposed to the
girls.

V’Alonee Robinson is
expected to lead the Big Red
Machines’ charge as a versatile
sprinter/jumper with distance
runners Hughnique Rolle and
Deshana Burnside.

In the intermediate girls, look
for Shaunae Miller, who dou-
bles as a sprinter/hurdler.

And among the boys, there’s
Marcus Thompson and Byron
Ferguson in the javelin, who
have already qualified for the
javelin in the under-17 boys

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division for the Carifta Games
in St Lucia over the Easter hol-
iday weekend.

“We are going in there with
the confidence that we can do
it,” Johnson said. “Afterwards,
we hope to just walk away
knowing that we did our best.”

St Anne’s will have a 120-
member strong team.

“We’ve been practicing and
we will do our best,” said
Cleotha Collie, a member of the
Bluewaves’ coaching staff. “My
senior boys and junior girls look
pretty good.”

Pedrya Seymour, a sprinter,
will head the junior girls divi-
sion, while sprinters Derek

Wong and Dominic Collie and
middle distance runner Zhivar-
go Thompson will lead the way
for the senior boys.

Collie said their goal is to at
least finish in the top three
places.

St Andrew’s, known as a dark
horse in the competition, will
“compete as hard as we can,”
according to coach Peter Wil-
son, who noted that they lost
some key athletes who gradu-
ated last year.

This year they have added
senior boys’ hurdler Nejmi
Burnside, who should be in the
spotlight with intermediate girls’
sprinter Jessica Campbell and



bright young distance runner
Alice Heinel.

“T expect us to compete well
in the technical events like the
throws and the jumps,” said
Wilson. “But I think we will
struggle in the sprints and the
relays.”

Wilson said the competition
should be very keen this year
with Queen’s College expected
to be the real challengers for
SAC.

“T think that is going to be
good for the sport,” Wilson said.
“Over the years, the officials
have also done a good job of
running the meet, which also
makes it very exciting.”

Liverpool into quarters
with 4-0 win over Madrid

@ By ROB HARRIS
AP Sports Writer



LIVERPOOL, England
(AP) — Captain Steven Ger-
rard (celebrating) scored twice
as Liverpool stormed into the
quarterfinals of the Champi-
ons League with a 4-0 victory
over Real Madrid on Tuesday.

Protecting a 1-0 first-leg
lead, Fernando Torres paved
the way for a comfortable
night by finding the target
after 16 minutes before Ger-



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rard scored either side of the
break.

Andrea Dossena rounded
off the comprehensive victory
in the last minute.

It will renew manager Rafa
Benitez's hopes of repeating
the 2005 title triumph to
deflect attention from his
inability to end the club's 19-
year wait for an English title.

The scintillating display will
also raise Benitez's stock at
Madrid, where he served in
coaching roles for a decade.

Office of Research, Graduate Programmes

& International Relations
invites you to come engage in a dialogue on pivotal matters of national
importance at the inaugural Bahamian Perspectives:

CONVERSATIONS WITH SONS AND DAUGHTERS
OF THE SOIL LECTURE SERIES

When:
Where:
Topic:

Thursday March 12th at 6p.m.
Grosvenor Close Campus, Shirley Street,
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Topic: The Future of the Bahamian Economy
Speakers: Governor of The Central Bank of The Bahamas
Wendy Craigg
Chairman of Colina Financial Ltd.
James Smith
Chairman of Sunshine Group of Companies
Franklyn Wilson
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Competing Regional & International Perspectives.

For more information contact:
The Office of Research,
Graduate Programmes & International Relations
at 302-4392 or 302-4455.

Tel: 397-1700


THE TRIBUNE

Spo

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11,

PAGE 11





ts

2009





E 10 Big Red Machines going for 21st track title...




GOVERNMENT SECONDARY SCHOOLS SPORTS ASSOCIATION

hattlers shake up Magic

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Senior Boys

CI Gibson Rattlers - 68

GH S Magic - 60

After missing out on the
2009 Hugh Campbell title, the
Rattlers left nothing to chance
on their way to a sought after
GSSSA championship.

The Rattlers overcame a sev-
en point fourth quarter deficit
powered by Denirado Mott’s
23 points off the bench.

With Rashard Sturrup in foul
trouble Mott came in and
scored 11 in the fourth quar-
ter.

Drew Rolle finished with 14
points while Junior Denis
added six. Basil Deveaux led





the Magic with 19 points while
Kenneth Pratt added 14.

Senior Girls

C R Walker Knights - 40

Doris Johnson Mystic Mar-
lins - 22

The Mystic Marlins had no
answer for Malesha Peterson
as the Knights wing player took
charge early and established
the tone for her team’s seem-
ingly effortless game one win.

Peterson outscored the
Knights in the first half and led
her team with a game high 16
points.

Keedrah Hanna gave the
Knights their biggest lead of
the game on a turnaround
jumper which gave her team a
36-11 lead with 7:04 left to play.

Hanna finished with 11



BASKETBALL



points while Rickea Richard-
son added five. Jakia Brown

led the Mystic Marlins with 11
while Danielle Zonicle added
seven.

Junior Boys

T A Thompson

Scorpions - 58

DW Davis Pitbulls - 55

With a considerable size
advantage upfront, the Scorpi-
ons’ domination of the boards
proved to be the deciding fac-
tor in the opening game of the
series.

Scorpions center Mavin
Saunders finished with 15
points, 23 rebounds and three
blocks while frontcourt mate
Roosevelt Whylly added 10
points 13 rebounds and three
blocks.

Velnir Desir chipped in with
10 points while Angelo Lock-

hart added seven.

Alcott Fox led the Pitbulls
with 11 points while William
Ferguson finished with nine.

Junior Girls

HO Nash Lions - 56

T A Thompson

Scorpions -10

The vaunted Lions defense
exceeded even their lofty
expectations with a second half
shutout en route to a lopsided
game one win.

The Lions led 36-10 at half-
time and outscored the Scor-
pions 26-0 in the second half.

The Lions placed three play-
ers in double figures led by
Lakishna Munroe’s game high
15 points.

Regine Curtis added 14 and
Randya Kemp finished with 10.

Davis Cup team did their best, says captain









@ By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs @tribunemedia.net

ONE day after returning from South
America, Davis Cup team captain John
Farrington said the Bahamas’ team
performed as best as they could under
the circumstances in Paraguay over








the weekend.

The Bahamas lost 4-1 to Paraguay in
the first round of the American Zone
II Davis Cup and will now have to play
against Guatemala in the second round
over the Independence holiday week-
end at the National Tennis Center.

“Everybody played well. It’s always
difficult playing in South America, but
it wasn’t that the crowd was so bad,”
Farrington said. “We played well and
they played well, so it was a combina-














tion of both teams.”

Farrington admitted that the team’s
preparation in Paraguay could have
been a little better, had they arrived
when they were originally scheduled to







get there on Saturday.

Instead, the team didn’t arrive until
Tuesday morning and they didn’t have
sufficient time to get acclimatized
before the tie opened on Friday.

“Tt’s tough trying to do it all in one
week,” he said. “We had a meeting
before we left Paraguay and we agreed
that we need to get together at least the
week prior to the week before the tie.

“That way, we can do some more












training together as a team.”

Top seed Devin Mullings said it was
tough for the team, especially after los-






ing the pivotal doubles.

“Tt was tough. It was a tough one,”

said Mullings yesterday. “We felt that










if we could isolate (Paraguay’s top seed
Ramon) Delgado, we would have been

able to win,” he said.

“But they played well in the dou-
bles, a match that we thought that we
could win. They played well. The con-

cially hot.”

After evening the series at 1-1,
Mullings said if they had won the dou-
bles and he was able to take care of his
singles, they would have been in a dif-

dition was tough out there. It was espe-

OLYMPIAN Devin Mullings in action at the August ‘08 Beijing Olympic Games...

Paraguay.

ferent position.

“T played hard. I fought hard,” said
Mullings of his three-set loss to Del-
gado in the battle of the top seeds that
eventually clinched the tie for

“In my first match, even though I
didn’t play as well as I was capable of
playing, I knew once I wore the guy
down, I would have won. In the second
match, if I was able to win that tie
breaker, I think I could have won it.
But he saw the finish line and he deliv-
ered the knockout blow.”

Mullings said it was obvious that the
team needed a lot more time in
Paraguay to get adjusted to the condi-
tions there, but they didn’t have suffi-
cient time to do it.

“Not using it as an excuse, but I
think if we had gotten there much ear-
lier, marinated in the heat a little
longer, it could have made a differ-
ence. But it was tough,” he said.

“We fought hard. The guys all
played hard. But it was just tough.
We’re looking forward to playing
Guatemala at home. I think we can
definitely get that W in July and then
regroup for next year.”

As the Bahamas looks ahead to the
second round against Guatemala, Far-
rington said he is confident that they
will be in a better position to come out

on top.

The Bahamas last played Guatemala
in Guatemala in the final of the Zone
III in 2007 to be promoted back to

Zone II.

“J felt our chances were good down
there, but we needed to win at least
two singles and the doubles,” Farring-
ton said. “The pressure was on
Paraguay and they responded very well

to win.

“We just have to get ready to play

and the players have made a commit-
ment to play in a lot more tournaments

so that they can be match ready before
the next tie.”

As a young team, Mullings said they
can only get better with the experi-
ence that they gain during each match
and eventually they will make the

breakthrough to Zone One again.

FLYING HIGH — On March 5, principal/coach Norris Bain and the boys of the Tabernacle Falcons basketball team, paid a courtesy call on newly appoint-
ed president for Port Group Limited (PGL) and the Grand Bahama Port Authority Limited (GBPA) lan Rolle and PGL chairman Hannes Babak. Con-
gratulating the group on their recent victory at the annual Hugh Campbell basketball tournament, Rolle and Babak encouraged the young men to remain
focused on their education and to pursue excellence in all of their undertakings...

Blazers man
down in win
over Lakers...

See page 9



Golfer Rolle
falls short

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

GEORGETTE Rolle,
using the Sun Coast Ladies
Series as a tune-up for the
Ladies Professional Golf
Association’s Futures Tour,
fell short of qualifying for the
final at the Rio Pinar Coun-
try Club in Orlando, Florida.

Needing at least a 148 or
better to advance to the final
round today, Rolle shot a
combined total of 154 that
knocked her out of con-
tention yesterday.

She shot a 78 on Monday
and a 77 yesterday.

Speaking to The Tribune
from Orlando yesterday,
Rolle said her performance
wast that significant.

“Tm happy with my ball
striking on the second day
today, but my putting wasn’t
my best friend,” she admit-
ted. “So I know what I have
to work on for the next time.

“The first day, I was all
around the place, so I do
know what I have to work on
so that I can be ready when-
ever I start playing in the
Future Tour.”

Rolle, the 21-year-old
graduate of St Augustine’s
College who is now enrolled
as a grade student at the
Texas Southern University,
said she definitely gained
some valuable experience.

“T got to play with some
LPGA Future Tour players,
so I was able to learn some
things from them,” Rolle
said. “I was a little disap-
pointed in my performance.

“But I’m still trying to take
some good out of this whole
experience and not try to
make the same mistakes that
I made the next time around.
I just want to have a different
outlook on my game.”

The LGPA’s Futures Tour
start in two weeks, but Rolle
said she’s not sure yet, so she
will continue to practice on
her game.

She is one of two players
who are on the waiting list to
get in. At this point, she’s
number 12 on the alternate
list of players hoping to make
the final cut.

If she doesn’t make the
first tournament coming up
at the end of the month,
Rolle said she still has the
Sun Coast Tour to fall back
on where she can continue to
work on her game.

But she noted that she’s
optimistic that she will even-
tually get the break she needs
to make her presence felt on
the Futures Tour with a big
to earn a shot at qualifying
for the LPGA.

No Bahamian female
golfer has ever made the
Futures Tour or the LGPA
Tour.

ais
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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Former Minister pays tribute to late Livingston B Johnson

GB Shipyard managing :

director ‘no longer
with the company’

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

Shipyard managing director Dave

restructuring its executive man-

learned.

Dalgleish has left the company.

of restructuring its executive man- }
agement team and Dalgleish’s }
departure was mutually agreed ;
upon,” he told The Tribune on
i in along time. I hope (the country)

Mr Dalgleish has been with }
company since 2002 and served in }
various Capacities at the shipyard.

Mr Rotkirch said he has led the
company through an unprece- }

Tuesday.

dented period of growth and devel-
opment.

“The Board and Shipyard are }
most grateful for his dedicated ser- :
vice and wish him the best in his
future endeavours,’ he said. ;

FORMER Exuma MP and Cabinet Min-

i ister George Smith yesterday extended his
i condolences to the family of the late Liv-

: ingston B Johnson.
dimaycock@tribunemeda.net_ | "When distin

“When distinguished Exuma-born Liv-

i ingston B Johnson passed away on Thursday,

FREEPORT — Grand Bahama March 5, the Bahamas lost a most valuable

ee ; ? son who, in addition to his outstanding con-
Dalgleish is no longer with the } tributions in the judiciary, played a pivotal

company, which is in the process of $ role in the development of the modern

. ? Bahamas,” Mr Smith said.
agement team, The Tribune has ;

Upon the Bahamas’ attainment of Inde-

i pendence in July 1973, Mr Johnson became
When contacted on Monday to : the new nation’s first ambassador to Wash-
confirm the news, Carl-Gustaf
Rotkirch, chairman and CEO of :

the shipyard, confirmed that Mr }

ington, DC, and for 10 years served not only
in that capacity, but at the same time as
ambassador to the United Nations and the

: : i country’s High Commissioner to Canada.
“The company is the in process }

“One important note is that he served

selflessly in those offices at a time which
would ordinarily have been perhaps the most
lucrative of his career at the Bahamas Bar.

“On the political landscape, in the early
years before majority rule, Mr Johnson allied
himself with the Progressive Liberal Party
along with others such as Paul Adderley,
Loftus Roker, Warren Laverity, Sir Arthur
Foulkes, Sir Orville Turnquest, and His
Excellency Arthur Hanna, adding much-
needed credibility to the still youthful organ-
isation,” Mr Smith said.

During the critical 1962 general elections,
when Bahamian women were allowed to
vote and when the PLP was expected to be
victorious, he was one of the two PLP can-
didates for Exuma, his running-mate being
the late Holland Smith, the former Cabinet
minister said.

“Although the PLP lost the election in
terms of the number of House of Assembly
seats captured, the party won the popular
vote, largely because it was demonstrated
that the party could produce men and
women of quality, who could eventually gov-
ern the Bahamas. LB was one of those men
of quality,” Mr Smith said.

In addition to his involvement in politics,
he not only served as a Magistrate, but pro-
vided free legal services for local institutions
such as Salem Baptist Church.

Mr Johnson was also known to sit on the
board of Bahamas Supermarkets, which
offered scholarships for Bahamians, and on
the board of the New Providence Develop-
ment Company.

“In the areas of the law, politics, diplo-
macy, the church, and family life, Livingston

was a man of unquestioned abilities and
integrity, and has left a rich example of noble
service which should today inspire and moti-
vate the new generation of Bahamians to
follow in those noble footsteps,” Mr Smith
said.

“Importantly, the community of Exuma,
where he was always held in such high
esteem, and where Exumians have long been
proud of the fact that it was the island of his
nativity, are today saddened by the fact that
he has gone to his reward, but are neverthe-
less happy to be able to claim him as one of
their own.

“T wish to offer my personal deep condo-
lences to his wife Charmaine and their chil-
dren at the passing of this great Bahamian,
and on behalf of the entire Exuma commu-
nity to extend heartfelt sympathy.”

FROM page one

uses this period to see what other
developments can come out of
this," said Mr Wilchcombe.
Tourism Minister Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace refrained from

i specific comment on the news until
? he had a chance to see the details

of the agreements.
He did say that his ministry
looks forward to any advancement



Tourism insiders hail Baha Mar
agreements with Chinese investors

in the hotel industry.

The proposed development will
span 1,000 acres on the Cable
Beach Strip and include a 100,000
square foot casino with more than
3,000 hotel rooms.

While details of the project are
still being discussed officials do not
expect much variation from the
original model, Mr Sands said.

It is unclear at this stage what, if
any alterations to Baha Mar's orig-
inal model the Chinese investors
may request.

"To the best of my knowledge
that has not been the pivotal part
of our discussions.

“Our discussions have simply
been to present to them a model
that we've spent years on devel-
oping, and to put in place the con-
struction agreement to that model
and secondly to work on a memo-
randum of understanding for
financing of the model that we had
developed over a number of
years," said Mr Sands.

The news of the agreements
comes a year after former financial
backer Harrah's Entertainment —
the world's largest resort and casi-
no operator — terminated its
agreement with Baha Mar and
about two and a half weeks before
a deadline for the developers to
meet certain agreed benchmarks
with the government.

Although the financing compo-
nent of the deal is not yet finalised,
yesterday Baha Mar's Senior Vice
President of Administration and
External Affairs Robert Sands said
the developers are "equally
encouraged by our current course
that we will continue to make baby
steps to get this project to fruition."

While no timeline for wrapping

up the negotiations has been set, :

significant progress on the ham-
mering out of details is expected by :

the end of this year.

Mr Sands also stressed that no i
changes have been made to the }
top tier of Baha Mar's hierarchy, as
a result of the Chinese investors }

coming on board.

"Nothing has changed. Our dis-
cussions with the Chinese do not }

sions with the Chinese speaks toa
construction agreement and a }
memorandum of understanding to }
finance and those were the two }
i wife that he was flying with his old

agreements we have reached.

"Baha Mar certainly is the vision
of Mr Sarkis Izmirilan, our CEO, }
and our chairman. And I think that }
will be the position going forward,"

he told The Tribune.

The newly inked agreements e
? involved in drugs, but he was aboard

also spawned concern that droves

of Chinese labourers would flock
to the capital once construction }
begins. But officials said they are
committed to ensuring a signifi-
cant number of Bahamians obtain }
? Chauncey, but my husband could

employment from the project.

"The only one thing that I can }
say is that Baha Mar is very con- }
scious of the need to maximise the ;
employment of Bahamians in all }
stages of the development. And
we will certainly work to promote }
all entrepreneurial opportunities :
for Bahamians as well," said Mr
Sands, adding that discussions on }
the levels of Chinese labour that }

are “very preliminary."

Mr Wilchcombe also weighed

ment of Chinese labour in the pro- }

omy.

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FROM page one

Tynes Jr told his father, Chauncey

Sr, that he frequently carried cash

consignments from Lehder to Pin-
dling and that a box he brought to
his parents’ home contained $50,000
in US banknotes for a senior police-
man.

But for Mrs Moree, the loss of
her husband was a major personal
blow, leaving her facing life as a sin-
gle parent — and embroiled in a dis-
pute over his life insurance policy.

“Because I was not able to offer
proof of his death, the pay-out of
$100,000 plus interest has never been

relate to ownership. Our discus- | made,” she told The Tribune. “I’m

still waiting for my money all these
years later.”

Donald Moree Sr’s doomed trip
to Exuma occurred after he told his

schoolfriend, Chauncey Tynes Jr.
Whenever she questioned him about
his activities, her husband replied:
“The less you know the better.”
Mrs Moree said: “T still don’t
know to this day whether he was

that plane with Chauncey and nei-
ther of them has been seen since.
“T was told by a girl who saw the
men board the plane in Exuma that
three Colombians were with

have been mistaken for a Colom-
bian and when I described him, she
confirmed he was one of them.”
The twin-engined plane never
completed its return trip to Nassau
and no trace of it was ever found.
Mr Tynes Sr is now convinced the
plane was diverted and his son “dis-
posed of” because of what he knew
about Lehder’s alleged drug pay-

will accompany the development : offs to Pindling and the police officer.

“It does seem strange that no
wreckage was ever found,” Mrs

in on this issue, saying the involve- | Moree added. “They (the Colom-

bians) obviously didn’t want them

ject is indicative of a global econ- } to be left behind. I understand

; Chauncey was about to appear in
: court. My belief is that they were

—. 9

ire

OLAY

LEFRSITY

New claims

murdered.

“T don’t know whether my hus-
band was working for Joe Lehder.
But he was friendly with Chauncey
and they went to school together.
When he vanished, I almost lost the
baby. My husband was only 30. My
son feels terrible that he never knew
his father.”

Mrs Moree then told of the two
mystery men — one of them very
tall and heavy — who turned up at
their home only two weeks before
her husband vanished.

“Tt was early one morning and I
overheard their conversation. One
told my husband he needed to keep
his mouth shut or else. They said
they didn’t want his wife to become
a widow just yet.

“They did not look Bahamian.
One was very tall and heavy. They
spoke with a kind of southern
accent.”

At the time, Mrs Moree was
working as a clerk at John S George.
“T faced hardship when my husband
went. He was an electrical engineer
with BEC. I am still working for a
living and have never remarried.”

As controversy raged over
Chauncey Tynes Sr’s disclosures, a
source told The Tribune of a police
stake-out at Nassau International
Airport in early 1983 when a parked
DC-3 aircraft had been found loaded
with cocaine.

Chauncey Tynes Jr was arrested
when he returned to the plane and
was later bailed to appear in court on
drug-related charges, the source said.

However, Tynes vanished before
the next hearing, raising speculation
that he might have fled from justice
— or been killed to stop him reveal-
ing incriminating information in
court.

His father believes the latter the-
ory to be true. And Mrs Moree
thinks Tynes Jr and her husband
may have been killed together.






THE TRIBUNE

usine

WEDNESDAY,

MARCH

a.



20 09

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

‘Major losses’ drive
closure of Cost
Right Abaco store

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ABACO
Markets yester- |
day confirmed
the closure of its
Cost-Right store
in Abaco with
the loss of 14
jobs, its presi-
dent telling Tri-
bune Business
that the outlet
had incurred
“significant loss-
es” within the
last two months as the BISX-
listed group attempted to sell it
as a going concern in a deal that
ultimately fell through.

Emphasising that the losses
were “significant” in the Abaco
context, but not in relation to
the wider Abaco Markets retail
group, as the store accounted
for “less than 5 per cent of total
turnover”, Gavin Watchorn said
closing was the only realistic
option given the cash drain
keeping it open was causing.

He added, though, that Aba-
co Markets overall was per-
forming well. “We did quite
well over Christmas,” Mr
Watchorn said. “We recorded
fairly strong sales growth. I
think you'll be very impressed
with the numbers produced
from the last quarter.”

Tribune Business under-
stands, although Mr Watchorn
declined to comment, that Aba-
co Markets’ fourth quarter
results for the fiscal year just
ended may have been enough
to pull full-year comparisons in
line with prior year, after being
behind for the first three quar-



* Closure to mean 14 job
losses, as deal with Keith
Evans’ group did not close
for sale as going concern

* Outlet a drag on overall
eroup, despite $1m
investment in fiscal 2009
and format changes, with
company to incur $300,000
one-time charge

* Abaco Markets’ overall
Christmas sales show ‘pretty
strong growth’, with Q4
figures said to have pulled
firm level with prior year
comparatives

ters.

Although Cost Right Abaco’s
operations had ceased as of 6pm
on Monday night, Mr Watchorn
said Abaco Markets was still
‘keeping the door open’ to
allow the group it was negotiat-
ing with previously to purchase
or lease the building in a pure
real estate transaction. If they
failed to come through, the
property would be placed on
the open market.

Abaco Markets had invested
heavily in attempting to turn
round Cost Right Abaco’s per-
formance, spending $1 million
on the store in fiscal 2009 alone,
and altering its format on sev-
eral occasions - going from
wholesale to the revamped Club
model, and finally reintroduc-
ing retail products.

Although these strategies had

SEE page 3B

Bahamas must ‘adapt’
to China’s demands on
Baha Mar development

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN companies and
workers, especially in the con-
struction sector, will likely have
to “adapt” to the extensive use
of Chinese labour and raw
materials in the $2.6 billion
build-out of Baha Mar’s Cable
Beach development, leading
executives said yesterday, given
that the project was “too impor-
tant to lose”.

Reacting to Monday’s late
night announcement that Baha
Mar had signed preliminary
agreements for the multi-billion
dollar project with two Chinese
state-owned entities, the presi-
dents of the Bahamas Chamber


























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

* Deal ‘too important to lose’
by getting hung up on Chinese
labour, raw material usage

* Project's potential go ahead
‘huge shot in the arm for
Bahamian economy’ at time
when most needed

* Baha Mar executive says
good progress on working out
details with Chinese entities
likely by year-end

of Commerce and Bahamian
Contractors Association (BCA)
both agreed that the project’s
timing - in the midst of a deep
recession - and significance for
the economy meant that this
nation may have to compromise
to meet Chinese requirements.

Dionisio D’Aguilar, the
Chamber’s head, said that if the
Baha Mar project was to move
forward it would be “a huge
shot in the arm for the Bahami-
an economy” at a time when it
was being buffeted almost daily
by bad economic news, with
‘doom and gloom’ all around.

“We've been talking about
this for months and years,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. “Something like this
would be good to tide us over as
we work through this reces-
sion/depression period.

“Baha Mar would be a huge
shot in the arm for the Bahami-
an economy if we can get this
up and running.”

The Cable Beach developer
announced on Monday night

SEE page 2B

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300k loss projection
behind store closure

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS

Business Reporter

ommonwealth

Building Supplies

(CBS) is prepar-

ing to shut down
its Freeport operation, which
the company projected would
lose $300,000 this year, its
general manager said yester-
day, with its Nassau head-
quarters set to hire some
employees displaced by the
shut-down.

Brent Burrows told Tri-
bune Business that the CBS
Freeport location had oper-
ated at a loss since its opening
in 2003, being kept afloat by
its parent in Nassau for all six

* Commonwealth Building Supplies says Nassau headquarters cannot afford to keep
subsidising Freeport outlet that has made loss in all of its six years in existence

* Installation projects dry up, with building firm hoping to take four of seven
impacted staff to Nassau, where it hired five more workers

years. However, he said if the
store were to remain open
with the economy in a down-
turn, it would eventually have
an adverse impact across the
board.

“Let’s say this was four
years ago when things were
booming. I might have been
able to have the extra cash to
say: ‘Let’s hang on in
Freeport for another year’,
but when things in Nassau are
slow as well, it becomes very
difficult,” said Mr Burrows.

$250k block plant makes
‘one-stop shop’ for BISX firm

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete’s pur-
chase of a $250,000 automated
block plant capable of churn-
ing out 6,000 concrete blocks
per day will boost its competi-
tive edge in the construction
industry supply market, its chief
executive said yesterday,
enabling the BISX-listed firm
to “offer contractors everything
from the foundation up to the
roof”.

* Freeport Concrete’s 2009
first quarter losses almost
treble to $220,000

* Company emphasises need
for more equity capital, as
vendors impose shorter
payment terms

Speaking after the company
saw its net loss for the fiscal

SEE page 6B

Make it a reality.

}

“Unfortunately, the big
thing we have to look at is the
overall health of the company
and I can’t jeopardise the
good jobs of my 65 employees
in Nassau to just keep sinking
money into Freeport.”

Mr Burrows said CBS’s
1,500 square foot Freeport
store had suffered on the
retail side for many years, but
brought in money through
contract work, especially win-
dow installations. When the
economy took a downturn

and the construction sector
began to decline, however,
CBS saw installation contracts
follow suit.

Mr Burrows said he sus-
pects that the ongoing legal
dispute over the Grand
Bahama Port Authority’s
(GBPA) ownership has also
caused Freeport’s economy
to experience further soften-
ing.

“T would venture to say that

SEE page 6B



Store ‘consigns’ quality 30% off

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

QUALITY used furniture up to 30 per cent less than the price of
a new item will be the order of the day when the Consignment Shop
opens, the store’s owner Thierry Boeuf, said yesterday.

“For 30 per cent off the price of a new item you can have a
good quality product, and I personally prefer a very good quality
table or couch in leather and so on second hand, than a new one of
poor quality,” he said.

The shop, which is currently only accepting the items it will
eventually sell, will act as a pawn shop of sorts, except those who
donate items are paid when the item is sold.

According to Mr Boeuf, the Consignment Store takes the hassle
out of getting rid of old furniture and sundry items.

“In the US this activity is one of the things that has been grow-

ing the past few years,” he said.
“Tf we sell this month we will pay SEE page 6B

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THE TRIBUNE





Sa

@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

INVESTORS traded in eight
out of the 25 listed securities,
of which two advanced, two
declined and four remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET
A total of 40,945 shares
changed hands, representing a

slight decrease of 1,986 shares
or 4.6 per cent, versus the pre-
vious week's trading volume of
42,931 shares.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
led the volume last week with
16,550 shares trading, its stock
falling by $0.18 to end the week
at $6.59.

Focol Holdings (FCL) was
the top advancer last week with
7,000 shares trading, its stock

International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

Weekly “oe Change
1.2868
1.4091
1.2642

+1.07
-1.45
-0,13

Weekly

“o Change

$46.07
$939.50

+3.76
-0.23

International Stock Market Indexes:

DJIA

S& P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

BAHA MAR, from 1B

that it had signed a construc-
tion agreement for the $2.6 bil-
lion project with China State
Construction, plus a separate
Memorandum of Understand-
ing (MoU) for the develop-
ment’s financing with the
Export-Import Bank of China.

However, while these were
“important steps forward” in
bringing Baha Mar’s vision for
Cable Beach to reality, the
developer said an actual con-
struction start was “contingent
on many more months of work
and due diligence before final
approval is received”.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s
senior vice-president for gov-
ernment and external affairs,
emphasised to Tribune Busi-

Weekly “o Change
-6.17
-7.03
-6.10
-5.22

6,626.94
683.38

1,293.85
7,173.10



ness yesterday that the resort
owner/developer “did not want
to overcreate the possibility that
this means Baha Mar is going to
start tomorrow”.

He added: “But this is an
achieved milestone that we’ve
been working on for many
months. These little victories
are all adding up to making this
project a reality.”

Mr Sands said both sides now
“have to flesh out the details” of
their partnership, having spent
months working on yesterday’s
preliminary agreements. He
hinted that substantial progress
towards doing this was likely to
be made by year-end 2009.

“We have months of work
ahead of us as we work out the
details in time. Possibly by the

price rising by $0.07 to end the
week at $5.07.

Abaco Markets (AML) share
price rose by $0.04 to $1.45 ona
volume of 6,379 shares.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) was the big declin-
er, its stock falling by $0.24 toa
new 52-week low of $2.16 on a
volume of 2,500 shares.

BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

Bank of the Bahamas (BOB)
released its financial results for
the six-month period ending
December 31, 2008. BOB
reported net income of $5 mil-
lion, representing a decrease of
$1.2 million or 20 per cent, com-
pared to $6.3 million in 2007.

Net interest income stood at
$14.8 million, up 5 per cent
from $14 million for the same 6-
month period in 2007. Net
income available to common
shareholders stood at $4.4 mil-
lion, compared to $5.7 million
in 2007.

Total assets and liabilities
stood at $748 million and $652
million respectively. BOB's
management said it was cau-
tiously comforted by the strong
financial results for the period,
and that the maintenance of
sound prudential standards will
continue to be its key focus in

end of this year we will be very
much further along in our rela-
tionship with these two enti-
ties,” he added. No timetable
had been set for concluding
negotiations.

Meanwhile, Mr D’Aguilar
said the Chinese never lent
money without stringent
terms/conditions attached,
meaning that they were likely
to want Baha Mar to be con-
structed with a large amount of
Chinese labour, raw materials
and products.

“At the end of the day, Cable
Beach needs revitalisation,” the
Chamber president said.
“There’s a lot of urgency to do
a deal, and boy do we need a
deal.

“Whether it involves using

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all strategic initiatives during
the current economic upheaval.

Earnings per share declined
by 19 per cent to $0.29 versus
$0.36 in 2007.

FirstCaribbean International
Bank (CIB) released its audited
financial results for the year
ended October 31, 2008. For
fiscal 2008, CIB reported net
income of $84 million, repre-
senting a decrease of $26 mil-
lion or 24 per cent when com-
pared to the $109 million
achieved in fiscal 2007.

Net interest income of $155
million increased by $8 million
or 6 per cent, while operating
income of $16 million declined
by $16 million or 50 per cent.

Operating expenses were up
by $7 million or 13 per cent to
total $64 million.

CIB's management has indi-
cated that the performance was
commendable despite the chal-
lenges imposed by the weaken-
ing global business environ-
ment.

At October 31, 2008, CIB’s
total assets stood at $4.1 billion,
while total liabilities were $3.5
billion.

The bank's loan portfolio
increased by 5 per cent to total
$2.5 billion, while total deposits
decreased by $216 million or 5
per cent to total $3.5 billion as
at October 31, 2008.

Earnings per share also
declined falling by 24 per cent
to 69.8 cents.

lots of foreign labour or not,
Cable Beach needs revitalising.
I think everyone understands
from the outset that the Chi-
nese give money with strings
attached. Hopefully, it will
employ lots of Bahamians, but
everyone must recognise that.”

China had wanted to send
hundreds of workers to this
nation to construct the long-
proposed $30 million national
stadium. This has been a key
factor in delaying the construc-
tion start for that project, as suc-
cessive governments have wor-
ried over the Immigration and
‘jobs for Bahamians first’ impli-
cations.

Mr D’Aguilar emphasised
that, long-term, Cable Beach’s
revitalisation “will create
Bahamian jobs much as Atlantis
has done. It may not in the
short-term, because the Chinese
will bring specialist labour in.

“But they’re [Baha Mar] the
only game in town. In the long-
run, it’s good for the Bahamas
and I don’t want to hear noise
in the market about how we’re
not getting this and that job.
We’re at the stage where we
need the deal.”

He was backed by Bahami-
an Contractors Association
(BCA) president, Stephen
Wrinkle, who said companies
in the sector were going to have
to “adapt” to the realities of
working with the Chinese, and
be “proactive” in negotiating to
get work on the project.

“Hopefully, it’s going to
mean substantial work for us.
I’m sure we’re going to have to
negotiate our way into this

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 813.81 (-2.52%) YTD

BISX
SYMBOL PRICE
AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
FCL
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE

$1.45
$0.63
$7.00
$11.00
$9.58
$3.15
$13.95
$6.59
$2.83
$10.45
$1.51
$2.16
$7.76
$2.37
$0.30
$5.07
$1.00
$11.00
$5.50
$10.50
$10.00

$0.04

Tin igie nian teen Tag suite ie) al
S
ay
oO

SS
Wh
BS

ot
Q
~

FHFAFAAFFAFAAAFAFAAAAAAAS

Private Placement Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extending
the deadline of its private place-
ment offering. The preferred
shares will be paying a dividend
rate of prime + 1.75 per cent,
payable semi-annually.

Dividends Note:

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
has declared a dividend of $0.05
per share, payable on March
31, 2009, to all shareholders of
record date March 13, 2009.

one,” Mr Wrinkle explained.
“We have a language barrier to
begin with.

“We’re going to have to see
what percentage of the work is
taken on by Bahamian contrac-
tors and Bahamian workers in
general. It presents a unique set
of circumstances for the Gov-
ernment and industry, and pre-
sents an opportunity to negoti-
ate our way into participation
in the project.”

Village

Pointing out that Bahamians
were “in a global village now
and working with people from
all over the world”, Mr Wrinkle
suggested that the Government
introduce a programme to teach
Bahamians how to speak Man-
darin.

“This is what the Chinese do.
They export goods and services,
and certainly have ample labour
to send anywhere around the
world,” Mr Wrinkle said.

“This is going to be a new and
challenging experience for
Bahamian companies, because
the Chinese supply everything
required for everything they
become involved with. It’s going
to be a challenge to put our-
selves in the arena and partici-
pate in a significant way.”

Mr Wrinkle said the BCA
would seek a meeting with John
Pagano, head of Baha Mar
development, to obtain a bet-
ter understanding of how
Bahamian contractors could
participate.

While the heavy degree of
Chinese labour involvement

CLOSING CHANGE

VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE

379

6, -15.20%
0 -4.55%
0 8.38%
0 -6.78%
0
0
0

-5.99%
0.00%
-0.57%
-5.86%
0.00%
0.00%
-32.89%
-15.29%

16,550
442



AGM Notes:

Focol Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on
Thursday March 19, 2009, at
10.30am in the Boardroom at
its Corporate Office in
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) announced it
will be holding its Annual Gen-
eral Meeting on Thursday
March 19, 2009, at 6.30pm in
the Governor's Ballroom at
The British Colonial Hilton
Hotel.

was likely to spark criticism, the
BCA president added: “Every-
one has to back up and realise
we’re dealing with the situation
in hand.

“Youre going to have to
adapt. I don’t see any way
round it. It’s too big to lose, and
important project to land. We
desperately need the Baha Mar
project to uplift Nassau and
move the economy forward.

“Tfit doesn’t proceed with the
Chinese, we may be in jeopardy
of losing the whole project.
Cable Beach is in a very pre-
carious position right now.
We’ve to have a proactive
approach, not a reactive one.
This is the side of the coin
where we want to look at the
glass as being half full, not half-
empty. We want to get on this
train, rise it and make a posi-
tive contribution.”

Meanwhile, Mr D’ Aguilar
said the Government would be
“a lot more eager to bring this
project to fruition to stimulate
the economy” given the down-
turn and dearth of other invest-
ment projects on the table.

“Two years ago we weren’t
hungry for investment. We’re
much hungrier now,” the
Chamber president told Tri-
bune Business.

“Unemployment is up by 40
per cent, and 95 per cent of that
is contributed by the private
sector shedding jobs. As far as
Baha Mar is concerned, this is
great for them. It'll take two-
and-a-half years to get some-
thing in the ground, so they will
be in time to benefit from the
next upswing.”

Sea Turtles of

The Bahamas:
Insights from 30 years of study

Drs. Alan Bolten and Karen Bjorndal,
Archie Carr Centre for Sea Turtle Research,
University of Florida

Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2009
Time: 7pm

Place: The Retreat, Village Road

(parking at Queen’s College)

Admission: BNT Members Free

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General Public $2

Phone: 242-393-1317
Email: bnt@bnt.bs


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 3B



aS 2 -
Infrastructure no bar to tourism diversity

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter



INFRASTRUCTURE is no longer a
hindrance to the diversification of the
Bahamian tourism industry, the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s
executive director believes, as “tech-
nology allows us to market ourselves
much more effectively”.

Philip Simon told Tribune Business
that, once diversified, tourism could
act as the gateway from which other
industries will be born.

He said that connecting small
Bahamian entrepreneurs to the wider
opportunities presented by tourism
would be the catalyst for future eco-
nomic growth.

“T base my whole
argument around the
fundamentals of eco-
nomics,” he said.
“There is supply and |
there is demand, for
goods and services,
and they are based on
advantages, whether
they be comparative or
competitive, and the
Bahamas has the com-
parative advantage of location.”

Diversification has become a sub-
ject of much debate, as the US reces-
sion’s impact bears down on the
Bahamian economy.

The Government has argued that
diversification, and the ultimate



replacement of tourism as this nation’s
premier industry by another sector,
was not feasible.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
has restated on several occasions that
the tourism industry has benefited the
Bahamas economically for decades,
and will continue to do so going for-
ward. However, his government advo-
cates shoring up the sector through
enhancing linkages with the manufac-
turing and retail industries, as outlined
in the government’s 2007 Manifesto.

Mr Simon said the Bahamas has
many “comparative advantages” to
levy as a neighbour to the US, but
these have not been effectively exploit-

“God has blessed us with being in a

unique proximity placement right on
the doorsteps of North America, posi-
tioned perfectly for access to the
Caribbean and South America,” he
said.

“The comparative advantage is also
tied into who we are as a people. What
we haven’t been able to do is effec-
tively diversify our number one indus-
try, and effectively diversify our num-
ber two industry to tie into our number
one industry.”

“So we have this comparative advan-
tage, and we have this unique people,
and we have so many stories to be told.

“The Bahamas is an archipelago with
a lot of diversity, and the stories are in
our backyard. The stories are in our
parents and grandparents, and we have

to be able to script that. We have to be
able to package experiences to be able
to sell within the tourism industry,
which is still the fastest growing indus-
try in the world.”

Mr Simon said the Bahamas needs to
tap into cultural and heritage tourism,
because they were the fastest growing
segments of the global tourism indus-
try.

“You name it, we have the opportu-
nity to provide it,” said Mr Simon. “We
have good infrastructure. One of the
things we may not have built up is our
competitive advantages to match those
in the region, but we have an innate
culture relative to who our people are
and, for the most part, we are friendly
people.”

IndiGo packages new phone deal

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter



BAHAMIAN telecommunications ser-
vices provider, IndiGo Networks, is moving
to further liberalize the market by offering
a new overseas calling bundle that uses
Voice-over Internet Protocol (VoIP) tech-
nology and will compete directly with the
Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s
(BTC) Vibe.

IndiGo’s marketing manager, Gillian
Slatter, said the package was a legal, reliable
alternative to Vonage and the instantly pop-
ular Magic Jack

“Vonage is out there but... you can get
something even better for less in the
Bahamas,” she said.

Ms Slatter said IndiGo’s package was
much cheaper than Vonage and offers much
more features.

She said that aside from other VoIP
devices being illegal, Indigo’s One Phone
offers calling to ten European destinations,
as well as a local number.

Ms Slatter said the service was much
more reliable than many other VoIP-based
systems, because calls were routed through
IndiGo’s network to the destination number
instead of many different Internet Service
Provider hubs.

“We’ve used the best technology out
there,” she said. “Whatever is most current
in order to bring the best to Bahamians,
without having to dig trenches and lay lines.
We can’t do that type of infrastructure. Our

infrastructure is different. We have used
what’s available with the most up-to-date
technology.”

It was recently announced that services
such as Vonage and Magic Jack were illegal
in the Bahamas, and that offenders found
with them could be fined, However, not
many people heeded the warning. In fact,
one store owner defiantly professed his
right to sell the popular Magic Jack.

Ms Slatter said IndiGo’s system offers
far better service at competitive prices. She
said that by the time Vonage customers
pay taxes and fees, their bills could be up to
$23.49, whereas IndiGo’s package is $19.95.

The company is accepting Vonage and
Vibe routers and waiving the set-up fee for
customers who switch to their system.

‘Major losses’ drive closure of Cost Right Abaco store

FROM page 1B

produced some initial success,
none paid dividends in the long-
term, and Mr Watchorn said:
“Our losses became too great
to fund when there was no
deadline for the transaction to
close.”

Abaco Markets is projecting
that it will take a one-time
$300,000 charge as a result of
the closure, mostly relating to
severance pay for the 14 staff.
Some four of those will stay on
for a month to wind down oper-
ations.

Mr Watchorn said Abaco
Markets had been negotiating
with the potential buyer group
since September 2008, having
previously initiated a process to
solicit interested parties.

Although he did not confirm
the identities of those involved
in the potential buying group,
Tribune Business had previ-
ously revealed that it involved
Keith Evans, brother of lead-
ing Bahamian wholesaler Gar-
land Evans.

Keith Evans, it is understood,
would have run the store’s oper-
ations had the purchase been
successful. Informed sources,
though, told Tribune Business
that the planned purchase ini-
tially hit trouble when a key
source of financial backing
pulled out. This forced mem-
bers of the group to look into
selling other assets to finance
the purchase, but they were
unable to raise the necessary
cash in the timeframe Abaco
Markets was seeking to avoid

closure.

“We had originally hoped for
the deal to complete by the end
of January, but then the dead-
line got pushed back, and then
it got pushed back again,” Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We realised it was not
going to happen in the time-
frame” Abaco Markets had
wanted.

“The store hasn’t made mon-
ey for years, and has been sub-
sidised heavily for the last cou-
ple of years by our other oper-
ations,” he added.

“We were faced with contin-
uing to invest money in some-
thing where we could not see
the light at the end of the tun-
nel. No businessman would take
on continuing losses in this envi-
ronment. Unfortunately, we had
to let people go.

“We invested $1 million in
the year ended on January 31,
2009, but the store couldn’t
meet its corporate restructur-
ing charge, so we were not get-
ting a return on the asset. It
wasn’t contributing to the cor-
porate overhead either. We had
a number of major inventory
losses down there, which did
not help the situation either.”

Mr Watchorn did not disclose
the scale of Cost Right Abaco’s
losses, with the group’s year-
end financials due to be
released shortly, but said: “For
January, February we record-
ed pretty significant losses down
there trying to facilitate a deal
to sell the business as a going
concern. We just can’t incur
those types of losses.

“We stuck with it for a couple
of months in a bid to get a trans-
action done, but we did not see
light at the end of the tunnel.
In this uncertain environment,
it’s too great a risk to continue
to invest in this facility, because
it could ultimately be detri-
mental to the others.”

Mr Watchorn added that the
transaction contemplated with
Mr Evans and his group “may
get resolved in some shape or
form in a couple of months
time”. He said Abaco Markets
had “given it a fair go” in trying
to conclude a deal for Cost
Right Abaco as a going con-
cern.

“We will not do anything with
the building for six to eight
weeks to give the group that we
were talking to an opportunity
to get their ducks lined up, and
then we will put it on the mar-
ket for sale or rent,” Mr
Watchorn said.

He added that Abaco Mar-
kets had tried numerous for-
mats and managers for Cost
Right Abaco, but lasting suc-
cess had proved elusive. All the
company’s other Solomon’s
SuperCentre and Cost Right
stores were profitable, and not
acting as a drain on company
resources.

“We have been very commit-
ted to doing what we can to
maintain a solid performing
location there,” says Craig
Symonette, chairman and chief
executive of Abaco Markets.

“Abaco Markets started in
Abaco, and this decision to
close is something we have

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struggled with for a long time,
trying so many different options
and investing a lot of money to
make it work. However, we are
just not getting enough support
to sustain the investment and
focus there. While we are very
disappointed to close Cost
Right Abaco, we are doing what
is best for the company as a
whole — particularly given the
current economic environment,
which will require the focus and
dedication of all our resources
to ensure that the great steps
we have made toward stability
are safeguarded.”

Group health plan coverage
for the laid-off employees will
be continued for six months.

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FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

Request For
ualifications

{EQI-09-01: Janitorial Services
EOI:09-02: Pest Control & Exterminating Services}

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited is
presently seeking expressions of interest from qualified
suppliers for the provision of the following services: -

1) Janitorial Services

2) Pest Control & Exterminating Services

Interested parties are requested to complete the RFEJ/RFQ
Package, which may be collected from the Receptionist
Desk of the FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas)
Super Support Centre, East West Highway, Nassau,
Bahamas or requested via email to:
sourcing&supplymanagement@firstcaribbeanbank.com

as of Friday, March 06, 2009.

Please reply to: Sourcing & Supply Management

FirstCaribbean International Bank
East West Highway

Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Ms. I. Hamilton

The deadline for submission is Monday, March 16, 2009 at
1:00pm. Eastern Time. Completed Qualification Packages
may be mailed or couriered to the address above.

Packages received after this date and time will not be accepted.


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



$250k block plant makes ‘one-stop shop’ for BISX firm

FROM page 1B

2009 first quarter almost treble
to $220,000, a 197 per cent
increase against the prior year’s
$74,000 loss, Raymond Simp-
son said the block plan addition
would enable its concrete plant
to generate revenue and cash
flow it did not have presently.

This, he explained, was key,
given that Freeport Concrete
was still plagued by the need to
raise additional capital and
equity to finance inventory pur-
chases for its Home Centre
retail format. Currently, Mr
Simpson said the outlet was los-
ing business because it was
unable to purchase enough
stock to meet customer
demand.

“We need more cash,” he
told Tribune Business yester-
day. “It’s as simple as that. If
we don’t get it, we will keep



running out of inventory in the
Home Centre. Without the
cash, we can’t get the inventory
we need.”

Freeport Concrete has long
been a candidate for a rights
issue, where new shares are
issued to existing ordinary
shareholders in proportion to
their existing holdings, so their
stakes are not diluted. C

Companies frequently do this
as a way to raise capital, but the
current economic environment
is likely to mean that any rights
issue is far from fully sub-
scribed, unless it is underwritten
by Freeport Concrete’s largest
shareholder, chairman Hannes
Babak, who has a 43 per cent
stake.

Emphasising the BISX-listed
firm’s ongoing need for working
capital, Mr Simpson wrote in
his first quarter note to share-
holders: “A key factor affect-

NOTICE





INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT




No. 45 of 2000



VISO INVEST S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, VISO INVEST S.A. is in dissolution.
The date of commencement of dissolution was the
4 day of March, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau,
Bahamas is the Liquidator of VISO INVEST S.A.













Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR






NOTICE OF SALE



Expocredit Corporation (‘the Company”) invites
offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Maris Subdivision’,
comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
South of Burnt Ground in the Island of Long Island
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.





The Company makes no representations or warranties
with respect to the state of the Property which is
offered for sale “as is where is”.










The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing








& Law of Property Act.

TERMS:

Ten percent (10%) of the purchase

price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.









This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
reserves the right to reject any and all offers.







Interested persons may submit written offers
addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
Partner, P, O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 30"







day of March, 2009.

ing our financial performance
is that we need to raise addi-
tional capital to be able to pur-
chase more inventory, which
will drive up sales at the Home
Centre.

“Despite the poor economic
climate in Grand Bahama, we
see that there is still business
we could get. However, we are
losing sales because we are con-
stantly running out of inventory
due to the fact that our foreign
vendors are not giving us the
same level of credit we enjoyed
prior to the recession in the US.
and our operating line of credit
at the bank is fully utilised.

“We are actively pursuing
ways to obtain capital as, unfor-
tunately, without more capital
we will continue to struggle.”

Mr Simpson said yesterday
that Freeport Concrete’s US-
based suppliers were looking to
do more business with firms
such as his, both in the Bahamas
and the wider Caribbean, since
they were seen as export mar-
kets that could compensate for
the dramatic slowdown in the
demand for construction mate-
rials and housewares in the US
- especially in Florida.

However, the credit crunch
meant that Freeport Concrete’s
suppliers were now under addi-
tional strain, unable to get the
credit lines they used to, and
under pressure from US finan-
cial institutions to collect their
accounts receivables.

Vendors

In turn, vendors were plac-
ing pressure on Freeport Con-
crete, placing the company on
30-45 day credit and payment
terms, as opposed to 60-90 days.

“Without new capital, we rely
on daily sales, but we can only
hit certain numbers with the
inventory we’ve got,” Mr Simp-
son said. “Equity capital is
exactly what we need. We can’t
grow the business any. We still
have an operating business, and
I can see us turning down busi-
ness because we don’t have the
inventory.”

He added that despite still
being in breach of key banking
covenants, Freeport Concrete
still had the support of its
lender, FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas), as it
was “still putting $1 million in

Store ‘consigns’

FROM page 1B

next month.”

Mr Boeuf said customers who
bring in furniture and other
items will be able to set up an
account that can be monitored
from a website that is currently
being developed. “We are
working on as big, sophisticated
website,” he said.

Furniture to be sold at the
Consignment Store will be held
under a contract between the
owner and the store, and will
be under 120 days of consign-
ment.

“We offer the possibility to
do 120 days of consignments,”
said Mr Boeuf. “We agree on
a price together, and will prob-
ably go with the price that the
person suggests most of the
time unless we see it is some-
thing very unrealistic.

“And we will, in the agree-
ment, from day one say if it is
not sold within a month there
will be a 10 per cent discount,

and then a further one and then
a third. After the fourth month
we will ask you to either take it
back or we will make a dona-
tion of it. That can be any char-
ity or person in need, but the
purpose is to sell and we cannot
keep things forever.”

Mr Boeuf anticipates taking
almost one month to fill the
store, and said he hopes to he
will be able to turn a profit fair-
ly quickly, as most models in
the US have enjoyed much suc-
cess.

“At the end of the year, in
any event, I will know if I have
succeeded or failed,” he said.

The store is only accepting
furniture that is in relatively top
condition. However, Mr Boeuf
said he hopes to start repairing
furniture so as to not have to
turn potential saleable items
away because of a nick or two.

“T plan to invite people who
have the knowledge of the
craft, and eventually we can
work with them to have things
that need some repair done, and

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

MIRINDA INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45
of 2000), MIRINDA INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in

dissolution.

CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS

INC. is

the Liquidator and can be contacted at 60 Market Square,
P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 9th day of April, 2009.

the bank a month”.

On a brighter note, Mr Simp-
son said four flat racks for the
automated block plant had
arrived on Grand Bahama yes-
terday, with the remaining eight
coming in several days time.
The plant will be operated by
Martin Foody, who was in
charge of the concrete block
plant that supplied Kerzner
International’s Phase II and
Phase III projects on Paradise
Island.

Concrete block production
was due to start by end-March
or early April, Mr Simpson said,
and the $250,000 purchase of
the plant from Florida Block
had been financed without dip-
ping into Freeport Concrete’s
resources. One of its US-based
vendors, which was a Florida
Block creditor, financed the
purchase for it, with the BISX-
listed firm paying its supplier
back with a percentage of each
block sale.

“The concrete quality is just
superb,” Mr Simpson said.
“Now, because we have the
Home Centre as well, we are
able to offer contractors every-
thing from the foundation up

to the roof. We’ve never had
that before. I Know this is what
we need to compete.”

In his 2009 first quarter mes-
sage to shareholders, Mr Simp-
son said: “Our overall sales in
the first quarter ended Novem-
ber 30, 2008, are down 8.59 per
cent compared to our first quar-
ter sales last fiscal year ($3.425
million compared to $3.746 mil-
lion).

“Sales in the concrete divi-
sion for this first quarter are
down almost 24 per cent on the
same period last fiscal year
($691,000 compared to
$907,000) with the Home Cen-
tre’s sales down 3.73 per cent
($2.734 million compared to
$2.84 million).

“Our operating expenses are
10.41 per cent less in this first
quarter compared to the same
period last year ($886,000 com-
pared to $989,000).

“The Home Centre has lost
$97,000 for the quarter com-
pared to a loss for the same
period last year of $77,000, and
the concrete plant lost $123,000
this first quarter compared toa
small profit of $4,000 for the
first quarter last year.”

quality 30% off

then for the owners to sell it
still, but we won’t start with
that,” he said.

The 5,000 square foot store,
located behind the Royal Palm
Hotel on Nassau and Bay
Streets, will apart from furni-
ture eventually sell clothing,
paintings and other sundry
items - except food and drink.

Mr Boeuf said the Consign-
ment Shop had been a dream

of his for 10 years, and has only
come to fruition in the past six
months. He said the store takes
the strain away for someone
who does not have the time to
sell old items, who has exhaust-
ed space in their houses due to
old items, or who does not want
to hold a garage sale.

“People coming into your
house is not always easy,” he
said.

$300k loss
projection
behind store
closure

FROM page 1B

is probably causing people who
want to invest some money to
rethink because, right now, who
knows who owns it?” he said.
“Contract work is non-exis-
tent.”

Seven CBS employees stand
to lose their jobs when the com-
pany closes its doors in
Freeport, but Mr Burrows said
it hoped to rehire four of the
employees for the Nassau store,
which recently took on another
five staff.

“How realistic it is for them
to relocate to Nassau? I don’t
know, but we'll have to wait and
see how that works,” he said.

Mr Burrows said CBS will try
to maintain the laid-off work-
ers’ health insurance benefits
until the end of the year.

He added that he personally
flew to Freeport in order to
explain to staff why the compa-
ny was downsizing and closing

its Freeport store. He said they
had “no reaction” to the news.

“T want to sit down with them
and go over some details to let
them know how we can help
them,” he said.

The Nassau store is holding
its ground despite the econom-
ic downturn through the com-
pletion of contracts it negotiat-
ed years before, but the retail
section is taking a hit.

“Retail in Nassau is slow.
We’re not as busy as we used to
be,” said Mr Burrows.

The company presently holds
contracts for the new UBS
building as well as another pro-
ject near the Harbour Bay
Shopping Plaza.

Mr Burrows said his sales and
marketing team frequented
Freeport in an effort to promote
the local CBS store, with no
luck.

“We made an effort and had
been beating on this thing for a
while,” he said.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

FG CAP

TTAL MARKETS
BROKEBAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 9 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.25 | CHG -0.11 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -52.11 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.81 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW. BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Fince
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol

FBB22
FBB13
1000.00 FBB15
52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

29.00 ABDAB
0.00 Bahamas Supermarkets (VOT QUOTED)
0.40 RND Holdings

0.00
0.45

Last Sale

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $

Change
0.00
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 T%

Prime + 1.75%

Daily Vol.

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00
100.00
100.00 0.00

Last Price Weekly Vol.

0.000

0.000
0.00 0.000

0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

S2wk-Low
1.3781
2.9230
1.3812
3.3201

11.8789
100.0000
96.4070

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000

1.0000 1.0410

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

4.10 4.10 31-Jan-09

Weekly Vol

EPS $-Acom

NAV - Net Ass:

N/M - Not Meaningful

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S11) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANGELLA PIERRE-JEROME of
HAWKSBILL, ABACO DRIVE #43, P.O.BOX F41422, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who Knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10th day of MARCH, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-
7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

intends to change my child’s name from

MACHELL SANDS to MACHELLE LYNDIANNA RAHMING. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JAMES FERGUSON
of PO. Box SP 66017, Nassau, Bahamas, intends to
change my name to JAMES TAYLOR. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.




JUDGE PARKER

APRIL IGA
REMARKABLE
YOUNG WOMAN..-
tI HOFE IT
WORKS OUT!








1 LOVE THESE
DOCUMENTARIES
ABOUT THE OLD

WESTERN PIONEERS

MY UNCLE IS
GETTING MARRIED / 4
NEXT WEEK

CALVIN & HOBBES

PLEASE LET MY BEANIE

COME TODAY! I PROMISE

T WONT EVER BE BAD

AGAIN! T'LL Do WHATEVER
You WANT /

“DON'T MAKE ME COME “I CAN'T MAKE YOU.

OUT THERE, DENNIS!”

E, TOOL SOUNPS
LIKE SHE'LL BE

TRAVELING A LOT!







Po vou reaucy \S
@ELIEVE SHE
QUIT THE CLAP

rv

TLL HAVE TO
WEAR A TIE!

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE /
T'LL NEVER ASK ANOTHER.
FAVOR IF TODANS THE
DAY T GET MY BEANIE /

Sunday

NO RUSH HOUR TRAFFIC,
NO PHONE SOLICITORS

NO, BUT I'VE
WATCHEP TOO
MANY JAMES







#2 BOND MOVIES!

THOSE
POOR
DEVILS







Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to















YOURE THES0SS:"





Difficulty Level * *%&



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across
1 Easily passes on 2
(5,4)
8 Work of works (5)
9 Feeling of guilt about 3
introducing code (7) 4
10 Parasites identified by a
doctor on Lincoln’s 5
back (6)
11 Soldier with papers in 6
order (6)
12 Order a final course (5,3) 7
15 Come again to gather
fruit (8) 11
18 Like a civet
disturbed (6) 13
20 Be able to repeat a
vigorous dance (6) 14
21 Seaside resort
complaint (7) 16
22 Some of these bounce
back, being 17
overweight (5)
23 Common cash is 19
needful (9)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Sherbet, 4 Bends, 7 Uses,
8 Desolate, 10 Abstracted, 12 Danish,
13 Ideals, 15 Underwrite, 18 Firm
date, 19 Snag, 20 Dowry, 21 Rampart.
Down: 1 Sousa, 2 Evensong, 3
Trench, 4 Broken down, 5 Neat, 6
Seethes, 9 Present day, 11 Hacienda,
12 Dwarfed, 14 Jester, 16 Eight, 17
Crew.



Down

A strange lake in the
jungle described by
Kipling (5)

Hangs flags (6)

Cadger is source of
shame (8)

Standard a number
considered average (6)
Proof that someone has
settled (7)

A ball game played on
board (9)

He doesn’t have to be
smart to fool the birds (9)
Perfect happiness is found
in a train (8)

Nut and date confection
which is ridiculed (7)
Key operators may strike
against it (6)

A problem for the bridge-
builder to emphasise (6)
What one has to face
when fencing (5)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Captain, 4 All in, 7 Veer,
8 Stalwart, 10 Lose weight, 12
Parley, 13 Frenzy, 15 At long last,
18 Perforce, 19 Zeal, 20 Rough, 21
Refrain.

Down: 1 Cavil, 2 Pressure, 3 Nitwit,
4 All the rage, 5 Lead, 6 Notably, 9
Sweet tooth, 11 In camera, 12
Prosper, 14 Concur, 16 Talon, 17
Urdu.









Across

1

10
11
12
15
18

Vaudeville

(5,4)
Approximately (5)
Stray from the
subject (7)
Loafing (6)
Command (6)
Kidnapped (8)

In the sky (8)
Injure (6)
Superficial
appearance (6)
Kind of

antelope (7)
Seeds used as
flavouring (5)
Backstage rest area
(5,4)

©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

APT 3-G
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Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum



of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty



level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.







Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer





















































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



















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i 6



Down

11
13

14

17
19

Consolidate (5)
Middle East
country (6)

Hold back in
doubt (8)
Horse-drawn
carriage (6)

The fashionable
world (7)

The actors’ entrance
(5,4)

Ability to draw
audiences (3,6)
Devote (8)
Greeting on
arrival (7)
Concealment (6)
Seem (6)

Eskimo house (5)















A ay ea Fe: Pea



In the Arms of Morpheus

South dealer,
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
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VAQ10
#103
#1092
WEST EAST
@K83 #652
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FAKQIS
The bidding:
South West North East
| & Pass 2% Pass
3¢ Pass 34 Pass
4NT Pass 5Â¥ Pass
7%

Opening lead — five of hearts.

Dear Mr. Becker: It will no doubt
astonish you to learn that I am prob-
ably the greatest bridge player in the
world!

I say this knowing full well that
my name is unknown to you and the
bridge-playing public. It also is true
that I have never won a world or
national championship. Neverthe-
less, I still think no one can equal my
accomplishments at the bridge table.

There is one thing seriously
wrong with my game, though. The

trouble is that | play brilliantly only
while I’m asleep, but badly while
I’m awake. I don’t understand why
this is so, but [ am sure no one can
hold a candle to my skills when I am
in the arms of Morpheus.

For example, last night I held the
East hand and my opponents got to
seven clubs. They should have
known I would defeat them, but my
opponents never learn.

My partner led a heart. As any-
one can plainly see, there is only one
way for declarer to play such a hand.
He must take the ace and place all his
hopes on the spade finesse. It would
be foolish to finesse the queen of
hearts and then later have to finesse
in spades also. This would be run-
ning two risks instead of one.

So South, being a good player,
went up with the ace — and on the
ace, I played the king!

You can’t really blame South for
falling for this play. He naturally
thought the king was a singleton.
Accordingly, after drawing trumps,
he led a heart and finessed the ten,
since there was no longer any reason
to take a chance on the spade finesse.

But I took the ten with the jack to
defeat the slam, and I’m sure I would
have won the rubber on the next deal
except that just then my wife woke
me and said it was time to get up and
go to work.

Cordially yours, Ford E. Winx

Tomorrow: Improving the odds.
€2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



eS



The Tribune




EXPERIENCE

HE BARN

m BY ALEX MISSICK ree How- ;
Tribune Features Reporter ever, the owner 0

the Red Carpet
. . I located it t
BAHAMIANS looking for a new place to dine, ecoued: °
may find a new hangout at The Barn - the perfect
place to experience something old with something

“Everything I get is mainly from local
vendors. Our lemonade comes from a
citrus concentrate that I get directly
from Abaco, the grits is Cat Island grits,
the nice thick yellow grits and I have to
go to the farmers market for that. Our
bread and pastries are always fresh. I try
and help persons who want to be entre-

area where it was
recently reopened
on Feburary 5.

new. The Barn offers = preneurs and who want to be in a busi-
a wide variety of ness of their own. People seem to appre-
The Barn Restaurant and Bar, located healthy breakfast ciate it and are responding well because

in the Red Carpet Inn off East Bat
Street (near the Harbour Bay Shopping
Centre) is a very personal but vibrant
eatery offering a ton a great food items
and specials. Manager, Kadren Carey
told Tribune Taste just why the resturant
is SO unique:

“This area used to be a barn section.
Where the Scotia Trust building is there
used to be a house and this section was a
back barn. Now the Red Carpet Inn is a
franchise out of the United States so that
is what the hotel is called. All of the hat
decorations, Raggedy Anne dolls and
boots were in a trunk that came right out
of the barn they tore down,” Mrs Carey
said.

Apparently, The Barn is not new to
the area and has been around for quite

and lunch alternatives to the average
everyday burger and fried food experi-
ence. However, their chicken salad is the
most popular item selling out every sin-
gle day.

“Everything here is made fresh
because I do not like over night food.
With the chicken salad, it is chicken
breast that we purchase, lightly seasoned
and boiled and we make it into a salad
consisting of mayonnaise, red onions,
yellow onions, sweet pepper and a house
blend of herbs and spices,” Mrs Carey
said.

Mrs Carey said with The Barn being
such a unique business, she uses small
local businesses so that they have a
chance to grow and distribute their prod-
ucts.

everyone who has wanted to help me has
been a small business,” Mrs Carey said.

The Barn in itself is an experience of
something old mixed with something
new and Mrs Carey said there are many
new things in the works for the restau-
rant.

“We are going to have our grand
opening on Easter Monday, and that Fri-
day we are going to have a poetry con-
test and even a three instrument contest,
but every month we want to have some-
thing planned. We also do different
sandwich specials everyday so that peo-
ple won’t get bored with the same dish-
es. Right now we are still in the first year
and we are still open in this economy so
we are planning new things for The



KADREN CAREY, Manager at the Barn restaurant, is dedicated to
treating her guests to a grand old time with specialty dishes to suit

Barn. what every pallete is looking for.

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

Dining on a budget
at Chez Willie

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

ALTHOUGH recent changes in the economy
have forced many people to cut back to the bare
essentials of living, one local restaurant is doing its
part to provide a fine dining experience at an
affordable rate.

Chez Willie Restaurant, located opposite Long
Wharf Beach, has created a new all you can eat
buffet which offers guests more options outside of
its ala cart menu.

Manager Cy Roberts explained: “We are a high
end restaurant, but we came up with the $30 buf-
fet to provide something affordable to local resi-
dents.”

The buffet has been meticulously designed to
offer a little something for all. Starting with the
choice of a mushroom or tossed salad, the buffet’s
main course provides a wide selection. Available
was the choice of baked chicken, sautéed pork
chops, barbecued spare or short ribs, as well as the
option of grouper salamander.

To accompany the main course is an all Bahami-
an cast of peas n rice, extremely cheesy maca-
roni, and steamed sweet potato, carrots, cauli-
flower, and broccoli.

With your choice of wine, juice, or water, it
does seem that Chez Willie has done its part in
providing you with a complete meal.

One thing that is most exceptional about the
restaurant is its refreshing water. With water
almost always being the least most significant
thing when it comes to fine dining, this unbottled
water unlike other places, has a sweet mist which
is for some better than any expensive wine.

In addition to a more than hearty main course,
the restaurant also provides the choice of short-
cake, chocolate, frosted cake, guava duff, cheese
cake, and a selection of tarts and pies.

The new buffet which runs Monday to Sunday
from 6.30pm to 10.30pm, will offer several diverse
menus everyday, so you are almost certain to dis-
cover something new when dining at Chez Willie. AND the pastries are cheese cake, coconut frosted

Remember that the dress code is casual, and chocolate cake, chocolate layered caked, and guava
making reservations is suggested. duff.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to
Box:

DA 69806
c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

‘a’
i
=
Ke
=



by March 14, 2009.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009, PAGE 9B



ENTERTAINMENT



The Tribune

























m@ By LLOYD ALLEN

Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

MANY music lovers would agree, that
wrapped in the experience of seeing a
favorite artist perform live, is an indescrib-
able feeling of total connection. Whether
it be with a verse, song, or simply with
that artist, music for most of us is some-
thing that can speak to our very soul,
wooing us into the submission of its
desire. To take that fantasy even fur- if
ther, having the chance to have an
intimate dialogue with that same
artist, is probably the ultimate con-

versation.

© \

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

JAH TOURHA, who has been in
the music game for some 16 years, is
ready to break the reggae sound bar-
riers in the country and become the
next big sensation when he takes the
stage with two major artists later this
month.

Although born and raised in the
Bahamas, Jah Tourha came from a
diverse background and like many
singers got his start in church.

“T started singing in the church,
choirs, competitions and things like
that because my mom has a church.
However, as I got older, I started to
venture out there and started to see
shows and live performances. They
intrigued me even more and as time
passed I wanted to get involved. I
entered the KFC competition around
the age of 12 or 13 and I even won
which encouraged me even more to
do music,” Jah Tourha said

Jah Tourha said although he has
many inspirations in his life, his father,
Nicholas Jacks, was the one who real-

Rita Marley.

sage.”

Well this is exactly what one young promoter is hoping
to accomplish, in her new event set to take place this Fri-
day at the Marley Resorts.

Conversations is a concept designed by Donisha Pren-
dergast of Sumething Fertile Productions (SFP).

This 23-year-old says outside of her ever evolving per-
sonality, the one constant which has remained is her com-
mitment to bringing together the African Diaspora.

Donisha who is also the granddaughter of reggae legend
Bob Marley, said the concept of SFP was first realised dur-
ing a trip to South Africa in 2007 with her grandmother

Attending the annual Africa Unite event in Johan-
nesburg, Donisha said after making a presentation at
a youth symposium on the issues of poverty, unity,

and the eradication of diseases, she realised that
she, like other members of her family, had a role
to play in helping to bridge the gap among blacks
around the world
She explained: “The young people would
say, we know nothing about you, the girls we
see on the TV are naked, and they don’t look
like you. They also know that the pictures of
poverty and misery that we see of them are not
all true either.

“These kids would come from parents who
would have gone through an apartheid, the kind
of stories that these kids had to tell are the kind

of stories that we need to hear in the west to really
put life into perspective.”

She said at that time, she was an acting major at
Howard University in Washington DC, but realised
that she was not where she needed to be, and soon

decided to switch her major to film production
and transferred to a Miami university to be clos-
er to the rest of her family, and to also persue
her passion of spreading the “one love mes-

“T now realise that the power is not in front of
the camera, the power is behind the camera.”

Donisha said with African people worldwide having
great stories of struggles, triumphs, and life experi-

ences, it is extremely important to have that information

available to all. She added that often the media does not
give an accurate view of Blacks and said Conversations is
her way of bringing together an already divided people.

The event which begins at 7pm this Friday, will give
audiences a chance to speak directly to some of their

favorite artist including Tanya Stephens, Tada, Philip
Michael and Sammy Star, and to learn of their experiences
as artists and as young persons committed to change. For
more information on this and other events at the Marley

Resort, visit www.marleyresort.com for further details.









Varies

A

ly gave him the tools to work with.

“He plays five different instruments
and has his own band. He started tak-
ing me around music at an early age.
He bought me drum sets, guitars, and
other instruments and encouraged me.
He took me to functions on cruise
ships when he played and seeing him
work really made me want to do it as
well,” Jah Tourha said.

Jah Tourha has a diverse musical
sound spanning from culture to reggae
to dancehall genres and said he draws
inspiration from such musical trail-
blazers as Sizzla, Capelton and Antho-
ny B.

“The sound I bring varies depend-
ing on the feelings and expressions I
am delivering in my message at the
time. You have to be well rounded
and versatile. If you are singing just
conscious music all the time it might
not appeal to a broader audience. At
times you have to sing songs that
appeal to other persons so sometimes
it enters the dancehall genre,” Jah
Tourha said.

As for his target audience, Jah
Tourha said he feels as an artist, one

should be able to reach people on all
levels, which is exactly what he wants
to do.

“Right now you have to be really
focused on the children because of the
things they are being exposed to. They
should be really receiving a positive
message in every song they listen to
on the radio. There should be some
form of inspiration, direction, and
upliftment for them. If a person really
wants to be an artist that has an
impression on the children of today,
that would be a plus for us in society,”
Jah Tourha said.

Jah Tourha currently has two sin-
gles “Intoxication” and “Your Name”
which he said he was inspired to write
for his wife, Ras Kita.

“She is my empress. It was written
for her. She has five beautiful children
for me. The song describes my rela-
tionship with her: ‘I’d like to know
your name girl. This is no time for us to
play no games girl. Dry your eyes, Oh
baby don’t you cry girl. Smile awhile,
Baby stay a while girl, a princess by
my side girl’” Jah Tourha said,

Jah Tourha’s manager, Brian “Supa

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

B’ Austin of Supa B Management, said
Jah Tourha is also slated to perform
with both Sizzla and Capelton at the
6th Annual Reggae All Stars Concert,
to be held on March 28 on Clifford
Park.

“As far as it relates to the DJ’s of the
Bahamas, we are really doing good in
the Bahamas, but if the DJ’s play the
music in the clubs and parties, the
Bahamian public has to like it because
it grows on you. We want them to
allow the music to grow on the
Bahamian people,” Mr Austin said.

Jah Tourha said he will continue to
express postive messages in his music.

“Rasta is always about a positive
message. No matter how it seems.
Music gets its power or meaning from
how it is being directed- the energy it is
being directed in. As much as people
think that children do not understand,
they absorb things like a sponge and
understand expressions very clearly.
Therefore, because music is a form of
expression and the way it is directed
with a certain type of energy, will
always be positive from my view point
in my music,” Jah Tourha said.

i sequence.

























D
a A
The

Watchmen

STARRING: Malin Akerman, Billy
i Crudup, Matthew Goode, Carla Gugino



Watchmen’s troubled journey

; from celebrated graphic novel

: (comic book to you and I) to big

i screen blockbuster has contained
i enough drama, twists and turns to
? merit a movie in itself.

Respected names such as Terry

i Gilliam, Paul Greengrass and Dar-
i ren Aronofsky have all at one

i time or another had their names

i connected to Alan Moore’s

“unfilmable” tale of heroes who

: are anything but super.

Then, once 300 director Zack

i Snyder finally had the film in the

i? can, a lawsuit emerged between

? 20th Century Fox and Warner

i Bros over alleged copyright

: infringement. Had the curse of the
i Watchmen reared its head again?

Well, no, as it happens. It’s here

i at last and, for the most part, it
? was worth the wait.

Watchmen is set in the US in an

i alternative 1985. Thanks to the tit-
i ular superheroes, America has

? won the Vietnam war and Nixon

i has been reelected for a third

i term.

But, save for the Cold War with

i the Russians, there are no battles

: left to fight, and masked vigilantes
i are declared illegal. The Watch-

; men retire and retreat into grim,

? unhappy lives. That is about to

i change, however, when one of

i them, cloth-masked hardman

i Rorschach, who is probing a mur-

i der, comes to believe his former

comrades are in danger.
Watchmen really gets off toa

vee with the kind of balletic vio-

: lence that Snyder made his own in

i 300. Then there is an incredible

i title sequence - which is worth the
i ticket money alone. We see an

i alternative history of the US from
? World War II up until the 1980s -
: a recognisable one, but skewed by
i the presence of superheros - good
i and bad - and their eventual fall

i from grace.

Then the film settles into a

: series of episodes, loosely held

i together by Rorscharch’s investi-
: gation, which reveal more about
: the individual Watchmen and

i their tortured pasts.

For perhaps two thirds of the

i way, Watchmen looks like being a
i hands down winner. There is a

: real air of melancholy that sur-

? rounds these flawed, in some cases
: monstrous, characters and their

i individual stories are intelligent

? and compelling.

But, as it heads for the climax,

the film lapses into more conven-
: tional territory - losing a lot of its
i momentum.

And, with a running time of

i over 160 minutes, that makes the
i good bits seem very far away.

Still, flawed brilliance is better

; than no brilliance, and there are
; enough inspired moments to make
: the Watchmen a must see.

Just don’t miss that opening title


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

ALTHOUGH the Bahamas is known for its rich legendary
stories of pirates, princes, and even mystical creatures that
roamed our shores thousands of years ago, most of those skills
have been lost to technology. However, Vera Chase-Poitier
was ona mission to change all that and bring back the art of
storytelling.







got to work on implement-
ing one right away.

“T am interested in
Bahamian history, culture
and oral history- that can
be passed down from gen-
eration to generation, so
the Commonwealth Writ-
ers and convention were
born,” Mrs Poitier said.

on stage. Under the theme “Embracing Our Past
With The Future,” the aim was to let the junior
writers, who consisted of students from various
schools throughout the Bahamas, tell stories of those
historical Bahamians figures such as the Arawak
Indians.

“We did not have to do much practise with the
junior writers. They were awesome and just natural
in their roles. They performed the roles of people in
Bahamian history starting with the Arawak Indians,



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IF YOU’RE wondering
what’s happening in enter-
tainment locally, wonder no
more because Tribune Fea-
tures is bringing to you its top
five selection of events, which
are sure to provide some-
thing interesting for your fla-
vor.

' EXPRESS YOURSELF in
_. association with Sumthing
Fertile Productions is
pleased to bring to you
another level of artistic Expres-
sion featuring spoken word per-
formers and artist from Trinidad
and Haiti, along with a wide mix
of local entertainers. Picture
this, a lovely evening at the Mar-
ley Resorts, artistic expressions
on the walls, and a soft glow of
candlelight, all blended with
sounds of pure island beats.
Performances will include
CRAB, Club Superdeath and
Lyrically Blessed, just to name a
few. An open mic session will
take place from tonight at 8pm
to 9pm. There is a cover charge
of just 10 bucks. Tonight, all
roads lead to the Marley Resorts
where it will certainly be a beau-
tiful night to remember.

_) THIS WEEKEND, treat
== your special friend to a
night of entertainment,
smooth rhythms, and good
health. Join dozens at the Pink
Ball scheduled to be held at the
British Colonial Hilton, where
your support will assist the Can-
cer Society of the Bahamas in
delivering free breast and
prostate testing to many in the
family islands. At a cost of $150
per person, this event features
music by the Modern Vintage
band, cocktails and dinner, all
planned to take place on Satur-
day. Also planned that evening
is a silent auction, where guest
will have a chance to purchase
one of a kind Bahamian art or
gift items, as well as assorted
items including exclusive restau-
rant tickets, and hotel or island
getaways. For more information,
contact the Cancer Society for
details.

This Saturday the Antique
Auto Club of the Bahamas will
host its 22nd annual car show at
the Fish Fry. Running from noon
to 6pm, organisers are expect-
ing a minimum of 60 vehicles to
take part, some of which date
back from the early 30s and up
to the 80s. Also scheduled is a
chicken and steak-out at a cost
of $10, with proceeds going to
the Binley Lane home for chil-
dren and the Every Child Counts
Learning centre in Marsh Har-
bor. For more detail call
393.1892, or simply show up to
lend support to this community
event.



THE BAHAMAS Interna-
tional Literary Festival, the
Express Yourself move-
ment and The Ministry of
Tourism are hosting Street Fes-
tival on Sat,March 28, 2009
from 1pm to 6pm in Rawson
Square. Organisers are inviting
locals and visitors to show up in
support of this cultural extrava-
ganza, which will highlight local
artist, musicians, artist, and oth-
ers. The event will also offer
have a wide mix of vendors sell-
ing traditional dishes and treats.
This is a great family and group
event, so parents and youth
leaders, come out and enjoy this
one of a kind cultural show.



A ART ENTHUSIAST, stu-

+= dents, and others are invit-
ed to participate in a three
part project intended to
add a new dimension to an
emerging hot spot in the local art
scene. The Hub art center is
planning to use the public in cre-
ating a new face for its Bay
Street location, which is hoped
to bring a new look to the down-
town district. This Friday at 7pm,
interested persons are invited to
the Hub for a discussion on what
the new image will be.

With the general theme of
“Think Green Bahamas,” this
event is also intended to use
nature as part of its canvas for
this creative project. Organisers
are asking student participants
for a minimum one time dona-
tion of $50 donation, or a $20
donation for the session they
wish to attend. For more infor-
mation contact Margot Bethel at
322.4333 or visit www.thehub-
bahamas.org for more details.



+



Coming
into her
own

The Commonwealth Writers of the Bahamas, a
non profit group, was founded by Mrs Poitier along
with other writers such as Cynthia Ferguson-Fowler,
Elizabeth Munnings, Margaret Hepburn-McKay,
and Valarea Munnings-Miller in early 2004. This
group of esteemed writers wanted to provide more
venues for Bahamian writers to be heard. They were
also concerned that not enough persons were record-
ing the present for the future.

Mrs Poitier said as she had never heard of anyone
hosting a convention for writers in the country, she






SCENES FROM THE RED CROSS FAIR

oe Sr

a

Hundreds of Bahamians flocked to the Red Cross
Fair on Saturday to enjoy a day of fun all for a most
worthy-cause. Pictured above is Governor -General
Arthur Hanna being escorted through the fair
grounds by Gerald Sawyer Red Cross president.



In 2005, the association
experimented with the idea
of finding out the number

of persons in the Bahamas who were interested in
writing. They did this by implementing an annunal
writing competition throughout the country. The
National Short Story/Poetry competition is said to be
a success with students from the family islands par-
ticipating and many of them winning the competition.

At their first National Story Tellers Convention,
held on February 20 at the Wyndam Nassau Crystal
Palace Resort and Casino, the writers and those
who attended watched as the youngsters performed



a
ae



Black Beard, Queen Victoria, Sir Milo Butler, and Sir
Roland Symonette,” Mrs Poitier said.

Mrs Poitier said they saw the need to have the
convention with historical figures in mind to docu-
ment oral history.

“This will be an annual event because we have
realised that not many persons are interested in doc-
umenting our oral history. We had Ancient Man, a
musical story teller and the Region Bells from Cat
Island. We are preparing our students to be able to
document our history and also prepare them for the
future so that they will be the future story tellers of
the Bahamas,” Mrs Poitier said.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



~









es.

today.

FROM page 12

expression in college, she naturally incor-
porated a similar carriculum for her class-

Over the years, Mrs Bennett-Williams
has assisted hundreds of locals, helping
them to develop their abilities in art, while
learning of its importance in the world

Eventually obtaining a Masters in Art
Education, she has since moved on to
become an art professor and department
head at the College of The Bahamas.

Apart from her full time job, she has

career in art.

spent most of her free time at her home
based art centre for kids, which is now
going into its sixth year of operation.

Full Circle she said is a compilation of
works created at different phases of her
life, using new materials.

The exhibition, which showcases more
than 30 pieces, includes watercolor
abstracts, as well as stoneware and acrylic
designs, is a glimpse of a long and fruitful

With this being her newest project, Mrs
Bennett-Williams said in the future she
hopes to create bigger and more grand
pieces for all eyes to see.

“I’ve been doing
art from since I
was in junior high,
but at that time I
didn’t think I
wanted to study art,
back then I wanted
to be a physical
education teacher.”






















> Dining on a Donisha sae
Py budget at Prenieryast ////—s
g Chez Wille tuncnatnn’ iP
see page eight i)

See page nine

PICTURED are some
of the pieces on dis-
play at the Full Circle
exhibition by Sue
Bennet-Williams. Mrs.
Bennet-Williams is an
art professor and
department head at the
College of The
Bahamas and these are
works from her private
collection.







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