Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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LOW

BRIGHT AND

SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.89

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

PS
a
aE a

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

Man leat ater

Argument
at The Big

Yard leads
to murder

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

A MURDER inquiry has
been launched by police fol-
lowing the reckless shooting
of a 30-year-old man in an
Arawak Cay nightclub early
Monday morning.

Gentry McPhee, of Yellow
Elder Gardens, New Provi-
dence, became the thirteenth
murder victim of the year
when an argument between
men in The Big Yard escalat-
ed into violence.

Shots were fired in the club
between Arawak Cay and
Crystal Cay shortly after mid-
night, fatally injuring Mr
McPhee in the abdomen and
hands.

He was rushed to Princess
Margaret Hospital by ambu-
lance and died soon after
arrival.

Police are uncertain of the

SEE page eight

A PARTICIPANT is wrestled
to the ground during a demon-
stration for the Tradewinds Exer-
cise 2009 at the Coral Harbour
base yesterday.

US Coast Guardsmen provid-
ed instruction in compliant and
non-compliant boarding to
Defence Force members.

¢ SEE PAGE TWO

‘Water shortage’ sparks
anger from residents

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS of eastern New
Providence are fuming over
what they termed a water
"shortage" that has left some

The Taste

on

Tuesdays!!

Hays) i

1 fefeIeling)

ella medium,

age ohare

Valid only on



households incapacitated due to
a reduced water supply. Resi-
dents said the area is already
burdened with low pressure.
They say they have had very
low, to no water pressure for
the last two weekends.

The Water & Sewage Corpo-
ration (WSC) said the reduced
water pressure is due to
mechanical problems with the
Corporation's water barge, the
MT Titas, which supplies about
25 to 30 per cent of the captial's
water on a daily basis, according
to WSC.

Yesterday, State Minister for
the Environment Phenton Ney-
mour said this recent problem
with the barge, coupled with the
fact that water barging is not
financially viable for the corpo-
ration, will lead to its eventual
elimination. A date for this
phasing out has not been deter-
mined.

"The position that we're in
with the WSC at this time is crit-
ical in terms of water produc-

SEE page eight



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

SN TSA Ta
UEC
NACHT)
Centre detainees

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

AMNESTY Internation-
alis "concerned" for the
safety of detainees at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre and is urging the
international community to
flood government with
appeals on behalf of the
detainees, some of whom
claim to be victims of abuse
and inhumane treatment.

The agency also resumed
its call for independent
reviews of internal investi-
gations into these claims.

"A number of recent
media reports in the
Bahamas have indicated that
people being held at the

SEE page eight







Former minister
turned preacher
suffers stroke
in the pulpit

Kendal Nottage is
rushed to hospital

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN IMPASSIONED sermon by former PLP minister
turned born-again Christian preacher Kendal Nottage end-
ed abruptly when he suffered a stroke in the pulpit on Sun-

day.

The 68-year-old was rushed to Princess Margaret Hospital
by ambulance and his wife, former Supreme Court Justice
Rubie Nottage, hurried to his bedside.

A CAT scan revealed the preacher had suffered a slight
bleed to the right side of his brain and further tests showed

SEE page eight



Furore over Pindling
article in Tribune Insight

A MAJOR furore
broke out yesterday
over a hard-hitting 7ri-
bune Insight article
which attacked the
legacy of the late Sir
Lynden Pindling.

Political activist Paul
Moss described the
article as “repulsive”
and a “wholesale dese-
cration” of the former
prime minister’s char-
acter.

But former PLP backbencher
Edmund Moxey and others
gave the article wholehearted
support, saying: “Young
Bahamians need to know their
history.”





Sir Lynden Pindling

The article, headed
“The tragic young pilot
who knew too much”,
told the story of the
late Chauncey Tynes
Jr., who went missing
in 1983 while piloting a
flight from Exuma to
Nassau.

His father,
Chauncey Tynes Sr.,
believes his son was
murdered because he
knew too much of the associa-
tion between Sir Lynden and
the Colombian drug czar Joe
Lehder.

Chauncey Tynes Jr., who was

SEE page eight

Commonwealth
Day flag raising

MEMBERS OF the
Royal Bahamas
Police Force and the
Royal Bahamas
Defence Force hoist
the Commonwealth
flag at the Common-
wealth of the
Bahamas Flag Rais-
ing Ceremony in
commemoration of
the 60th Anniver-
sary of Common-
') wealth Day at the
| Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, East Hill
Street yesterday.

Kristaan HA Ingraham II/BIS





NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



US Coast Guard instructs Caribbean defence

forces on how to increase maritime

| S Coast Guardsmen
from the District 7,

Tactical Law Enforcement
Detachment provided instruction
in compliant and non-compliant
boarding to service members
from the Royal Bahamas, St Vin-
cent and Grenadines, St Kitts-
Nevis, Haiti, Trinidad-Tobago,
Belize, Barbados and the Domini-
can Republic Defence Forces at
the Coral Harbour base yester-
day.

PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff






































British American Financial

British American Financial “BAF” is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Bahamian entity BAB
Holdings Limited. BAF recently celebrated its second year as a 100% Bahamian owned entity
having been acquired by the Bahamian Group during February 2007.

Established in 1920, British American Financial provides a full range of insurance and
investment services, including life & health insurance, mortgages, financial and retirement
planning, annuities, mutual funds and pension plans. The Company has three offices in Nassau at
Independence Drive, Rosetta St. Palmdale, and Carmichael Rd. Also full service branches in
Freeport, Abaco, Exuma and a network of career agents throughout the Family Islands. The
Company directly employs more than 200 Bahamians.

British American Financial is not related or affiliated in any way whatsoever with any other
company with a similar name “British American’, whether in the Bahamas, the Caribbean region
or anywhere else.

In celebration of our second anniversary as a fully Bahamian Company, we are pleased to
announce our offering of free financial consultations, along with weekly financial seminars to our
clients and the public at our Independence Drive Headquarters every Friday until the end of April
2009. The Company extends a special invitation to members of the public who recently experienced
job losses and hardship as a result of the downturn in the economy.

Please direct any questions on this statement to Mr. I. Chester Cooper, President & CEO
via email: ccooper @babfinancial.com or Tel: 242-461-1003.

British
ty" American

FINANCIAL

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501

MORTGAGES ¢ MUTUAL FUNDS ¢ LIFE INSURANCE ¢ HEALTH INSURANCE
ANNUITIES & PENSION PLANS ¢ FINANCIAL PLANNING & INVESTMENTS

“In this day and age, terrorists
and drug runners are looking for
‘soft spots’ and I believe that by
working (together) we have an
excellent opportunity to impact
the evil forces aligned against us,”
said the US Chargé d’ Affaires to
the Dominican Republic Roland
Bullen, while explaining the
US/Dominican relations in an
interview during the exercise por-
tion.

“T always refer to the US Coast
Guard as the ‘911’ of the
Caribbean because whenever
there are problems, they’re
there.”

As one of the goals of the
Tradewinds Exercise 2009 is to
increase maritime security, the
compliant and non-compliant
boarding training will help to
ensure that partner nations are
able to execute the necessary
measures when called upon to
board a vessel, with the appro-
priate use of force, to prevent ille-
gal trafficking. At the Coral Har-
bour base, US Coast Guardsmen
began by instructing their part-
ner nation counterparts in the
proper way to approach a vessel
occupant in a non-aggressive
manner — slowly walking toward
the subject with their hands open,
palms facing the subject.

“When dealing with compliant
occupants of a vessel, it’s like
dealing with (peaceful) protest-
ers,” said US Coast Guard Chief
Petty Officer Matthew Rouse,
stationed out of Mayport, Florida.

Though not necessarily imme-
diately following instructions,
“the occupants are non-combat-
ant,” he said.

If the suspect vessel’s occupants
become aggressive and show
resistance to the service mem-



security

TAKE THAT! Service members learn some new skills.



bers, but are still not attacking
them, the students were shown
techniques such as pressure points
and handcuffing procedures to
detain the suspect.

“Non-compliant (occupants)
need a little bit more convincing
to cooperate,” said Able Seaman
Miska Clarke with the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.
“Whether it is talking more
harshly, getting more physical or
using deadly force to achieve the
goal of your boarding.”

Partner nation service mem-
bers were instructed in escalation
of force and how to properly eval-
uate when an occupant is non-
compliant and keep control of the
situation with the correct course
of action. “It’s very important for
the partner nations to learn these
skills because they will be con-
ducting these operations in the
future,” said Mr Rouse.

“There are a lot of people out
there up to no good and we want

Ferocious
fire ravages
Buy 4 Less

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to ensure that our partner
nations’ service members will
have the knowledge to deal with
those threats.”

Mr Rouse, who is based in
Miami, said he enjoys the oppor-
tunity to train other service mem-
bers and show them how the US
Coast Guard operates, as well as
build camaraderie that will bene-
fit all when having to cooperate in
real-world events.

“It’s a great chance for us to
share with them how we board
vessels and also shows them we’re
more than willing to support
them,” said Mr Rouse.

Nations participating in Exer-
cise Tradewinds 2009 include the
Bahamas, Barbados, Belize,
Dominica, Dominican Republic,
Guyana, Haiti, Honduras,
Jamaica, Nicaragua, St Kitts-
Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and
Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad-
Tobago, the United Kingdom and
the United States.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

FLAMES ravaged the Buy 4 Less store on Baillou Hill Road
south yesterday morning in what has been described as one of the

most ferocious fires of the year.

The blaze ignited shortly before 6am and Fire Services had
three fire engines on the scene eight minutes after receiving the

emergency call.

By the time they arrived, part of the upper building was already

fully ablaze.

That part of the building has been completely destroyed and the
rest of the building has been severely damaged by smoke and

water.

Fire Services maintain the blaze was one of the most significant
of the 25 fires they have fought this year so far.

The house fire that killed four-year-old Kentrell Rolle in Pride
Estates on Saturday is another of the most significant fires of 2009.

TROUBLE IN STORE: The fire caused extensive damage.

COB Union of Students to hold elections of officers

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE College of the Bahamas Union of Students will conduct its
annual elections of officers for the year 2009-2010 on Wednes-
day, March 25, and Thursday, March 26, between the hours of

9am and 9pm.

All eligible persons must hand in their nomination papers no lat-
er than March 12, 2009 at the Student Union Building.

Candidates must have no less than 20 signatures in support of
their nominations from persons in their respective schools, and in
the case of president, not less than 20 signatures from any school.

Nomination forms may be collected from the Student Union
Building located at the main campus on Thompson Boulevard.

Election polling stations will be set up at CHMI campus on
Thompson Boulevard, the Grosvenor campus on Shirley Street and
the Portia Smith Building on Thompson Boulevard.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

and charged

TWELVE persons were }
arrested and charged for drug }
related matters, four persons }
were charged for house break- }
ing, and 10 persons were :
charged for various minor i

offences in Grand Bahama.

Asst Supt Noel Curry said :
that a variety of stolen items }
were discovered and persons }
who have had a break-in and }
items stolen are asked tocome }
to Police Headquarters to iden-

tify their belongings.

¢ HAND GUN FOUND

A handgun was discovered :
on the beach at Smith’s Point }
by a concerned resident who }
was walking in the area on }

Thursday.

According to reports, the res- i
ident found a black and silver }
9mm handgun along with a }
magazine clip, which contained }
six live founds of ammunition, }
around 10am and contacted }

police.

The matter is under investi- :

gation by police.

¢ BURGLARY
AND ROBBERY

A resident of Frobisher Dri- :
ve was robbed of cash and oth- }
er items on Friday by a man }

who broke into his home.

The man told police that the }
incident occurred sometime }
around 12.50am. He said the }
culprit robbed him and his }
roommate of cash, two cellular }
telephones and $90 worth of }

GSM phone cards.

Police are continuing their ;

investigation into the matter.

and assault are

investigated

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia. net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama police are investi-
gating two serious matters,
including a cutlass attack
and an assault that occurred
in Freeport over the week-
end.

According to reports, a
27-year-old woman is in
hospital with injuries after
being attacked by another
woman with a cutlass in the
Garden Villas area on Fri-
day.

Asst Supt Noel Curry said
the victim, who is a resident
of Jervis Crescent, was
“chopped about the body.”

She was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where
she is presently detained in
the female surgical ward.

Investigations are contin-
uing in the matter.

A YOUNG man was also
assaulted in the Garden Vil-
las area on early Saturday
morning.

The attacker is believed
to be a man who is wanted

by police on Grand Bahama.

According to police, a 27-
year-old male resident of
Caravel Beach was taken to
hospital after being gun-
butted in the head during an
altercation with wanted sus-
pect Samiko Rigby.

Asst Supt Noel Curry said
the police received a report
from a concerned resident
who reported that a man
was being chased along
Adventurers Way around
2.30am on Saturday by
another man with a gun.

Police were dispatched to
the area to investigate.
After receiving additional

information, officers went to }

the Rand Memorial Hospi-
tal, where they interviewed
the victim.

Mr Curry said the suspect
was identified as Samiko
Rigby, who is wanted for
questioning in reference to
several other matters.

Rigby, a 26-year-old resi-
dent of Eight Mile Rock,
escaped police custody on
January 11 from the
Central Police Station at
Police Headquarters in
Freeport.

Although an all-points-
bulletin was issued for his
arrest, Rigby still remains at
large.

Rigby is about 5°11” tall
and weighs 185 pounds.

He is of dark complexion.

Anyone with information
concerning his whereabouts
is asked to contact the Cen-
tral Detective Unit at 350-
3107/ 8, 350-3106, 352-9774/
5; the duty officer at 919,
911, or the Crime Tipsters
Hotline at 352-1919.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE trial of a doctor accused of
negligence for allegedly failing to
properly diagnosis and treat a man
suffering from a life threatening
heart infection began in the
Supreme Court yesterday.

Christopher Rogers, the plaintiff
in the case, has taken legal action
against Dr Ian Kelly, a family
practitioner, for allegedly failing
to properly diagnosis and treat
him back in 2005.

Mr Rogers is represented by
lawyer Gail Lockhart-Charles,
while Dr Kelly is represented by
attorneys Steven Turnquest and
Michael Saunders.

The trial is being heard before
Senior Justice John Lyons.

Dr Andrew Selwyn, a cardiolo-
gist from Boston, was the first wit-
ness to take the stand yesterday.

Dr Selwyn was questioned
extensively regarding office notes
that Dr Kelly made regarding his
treatment of Mr Rogers and asked
to give his medical opinion.

According to Dr Kelly’s notes,

Mr Rogers’ initial visit for his ill-
ness was on October 7, 2005.

At that time, Mr Rogers was
examined by Dr Kelly after claim-
ing that he had been suffering
from a fever for a month. Dr Sel-
wyn noted that a haemotology
report stated that Mr Rogers’ ery-
throcyte sedimentation rate (ESR)
was “clearly abnormal and
markedly raised.”

Witness

The witness told the court that a
normal rate would be between 0
and 9 while Mr Rogers’ was at 57.
Dr Selwyn said that he saw this
an obvious reason for concern.

An ESR test is used to help
diagnosis conditions associated
with inflammation and infections.

Nearly two weeks after his ini-
tial visit, Mr Rogers reportedly
returned to Dr Kelly again, claim-
ing that he was not feeling well,
but according to Dr Kelly’s notes,
he was doing well, the court heard.

Dr Selwyn noted that accord-
ing to Dr Kelly’s notes, Mr Rogers

was given the drug Eloquin, a
broad spectrum antibiotic.

The witness said that between
Mr Rogers’ initial visit with Dr
Kelly and his second visit, no dif-
ferential diagnosis was carried out.
This, he said, should have been
done.

Mr Rogers was given the drug
Zenthromax on a subsequent vis-
it that month as his condition con-
tinued to deteriorate, although Dr
Kelly’s notes did not reflect the
same, the court heard.

On October 31, 2005, Mr
Rogers reportedly told Dr Kelly
that he had had an awful week-
end, but was reassured by Dr Kel-
ly to continue taking the antibi-
otics, the court heard.

Dr Selwyn said that Mr Rogers’
fever and weight loss were obvious
signs of an infection and that the
failure to reach a proper diagnosis
worsened the condition and
caused more damage.

The court also heard yesterday
that an infectious bacteria, which
ultimately led to endocarditis, an
infection in Mr Rogers’ heart
valve, had been found in three

The police in Abaco to make
crime reports available again

ASSISTANT Commissioner of Police
Hulan Hanna confirmed yesterday that
police in Abaco will again be making
their crime reports available to the local

media on that island.

Last week, the police in Abaco denied
the local press in Abaco the daily crime
report. This came after concerns were
raised about the effect of the publica-
tion of crime reports on the island’s sec-

ond home economy.

However, Mr Hanna said yesterday
that the issue, which was widely publi-
cised, has since been “sorted out.”

“Whatever the miscommunication or
misunderstanding was, that no longer
exists. That reporter no longer has that
issue to contend with because clearly we are working

with the media,” Mr Hanna said.

Abaconians last week were furious that the police
attempted to stop the press reporting on what they
termed a dramatic rise in crime on the island.

Supt Sean Neville-Smith allegedly told the local
newspaper that it can no longer carry crime reports
“because they reflect badly on the police.”

The publishers of The Abaconian, David and Kathy
Ralph, were displeased about the ban and asked their
readers to phone in their crime news.

Their readers were angry at what they saw as a
blatant attempt to keep important information away

from the public.

LOEW Mme lanarce



This attempt by the police to gag the
press follows a worrying upsurge in crime
in Abaco and growing disgruntlement
over the police force’s effectiveness there.

Residents are concerned that the
recent kidnapping of a foreign investor,
the mugging of a well-known local
woman, and a spate of boat thefts will
turn away yachtsmen and second-home
owners who form the backbone of the
island’s economy.

In the past, Abaco has been relatively
crime-free. But rising unemployment and
a sluggish economy have pushed up
theft.

Hardest hit have been visiting yachts,
some valued at $100,000 or more. On
more than one occasion, boats have arrived in Abaco

one day and been stolen the next. But the mugging of

on the island.

well-known resident Lily Sands, who is in her seven-
ties, has really brought home the changing crime scene

Ms Sands was accosted by two people with guns
who forced her into her own home in a normally qui-
et residential area of Marsh Harbour.

Then they locked her in a closet before stealing
money and other items.

A resident said: “Boats are disappearing like crazy.

”

omy

PLP chairman congratulates
Dr Darville on Senate appointment

PLP Chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin yesterday congratulated Grand
Bahama physician Dr Michael Darville on his appointment to the

Senate.

Stating that he is a “distinguished” son of Bahamian soil, Mrs Han-
na-Martin said that Dr Darville has contributed “significantly” to the
delivery of health care services, among other things, in the communi-

ty of Grand Bahama.

“His appointment to the Senate will enhance that body’s delibera-
tions and signifies the Progressive Liberal Party’s commitment to
bringing to the fore national voices that will articulate and help imple-
ment our vision for a new and exciting future for our Bahamas,” she

said in a brief press statement.

PLP leader Perry Christie on Sunday officially announced that Dr
Darville will fill the vacancy left in the Senate following the resignation

of Pleasant Bridgewater.

Dr Darville practices medicine in Freeport as a partner in the Grand

Bahama Family Medical Centre.

He holds an MBBS degree in medicine from the University of the
West Indies and a degree in engineering from the University of Wind-

sor in Canada.

National Energy Policy
consultation process initiated

GOVERNMENT has initiated
the consultation process for the
implementation of a National
Energy Policy which will have
BEC moving towards a more sus-
tainable mix of energy sources for
the public, State Minister for
Works Phenton Neymour said.

Mr Neymour also said that the
government is exploring funding
opportunities to advance energy
conservation at the residential lev-
el through an incandescent light-
bulb replacement programme.
This effort builds upon the Cus-
toms duty reductions introduced
in the last budget.

The state minister made this
statement last week during his
contribution to the mid-year bud-
get debate in the House of
Assembly.

He said that opportunities also
exist for energy efficiency
improvements in large industrial

motors as well as in residential
home construction.

“We have started the process
of looking at these options and
the opportunities through techni-
cal assistance of grant-funding to
fast-track its implementation,” Mr
Neymour said.

He said that his ministry has
what they believe is a firm foun-
dation for a National Energy Pol-
icy, which also addresses matters
of energy security, especially dur-
ing periods of fuel price volatility.

In order to advance the gov-
ernment’s National Energy Policy
and its proposed implementation
plan, Mr Neymour said input from
the various ministries and depart-
ments, agencies and corporations
of the government is being sought.

The BEST Commission of the
Ministry of the Environment is
now in the process of soliciting
that input.

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We have to get help up here. We must get Nassau’s
attention because this crime is going to kill the econ-

MZ

blood samples. Dr Selwyn said
that intravenous antibiotics could
have been administered to Mr
Rogers in sufficient dosages until
all signs of the infection had dis-
appeared.

Statement

The court heard that Mr
Rogers’ condition continued to
deteriorate, ultimately leading to

Trial of doctor accused of negligence underway

Twelve arrested :

heart failure on November 14,
2005. In his statement, Mr Rogers
claimed that Dr Kelly confirmed
to him that he was suffering from
heart failure and that he wanted
him to see someone later that
day.

Mr Rogers was subsequently
admitted to Doctors Hospital and
then later to a hospital in Cleve-
land, Ohio for heart surgery, the
court heard.

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yy Technical skill requirements
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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Clinton’s hard bargain on missile shield

WASHINGTON (AP) — If the Obama
administration intends to give up missile defence
in Europe as part of a security deal with Russia,
as its behind-the-scenes manoeuvring seems to
suggest, then Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton is driving a hard bargain.

On a trip to Europe and the Middle East
that ended Sunday, Clinton spoke positively of
the prospect of making Europe-based missile
defence an integral part of an overall USS.
defence strategy. Her message was that missile
defence has value and Washington won't give it
up easily.

The uncertain status of missile defence has
much to do with the administration's evolving
approach to Iran. Its nuclear programme and
missile-building efforts are the main reasons
usually cited to justify missile defences in
Europe. Clinton made it clear that the USS.
wants more than just a helping hand from Rus-
sia. The U.S. wants to see any such assistance
pay concrete dividends in the form of verifi-
able action by Tehran to halt its nuclear pro-
gramme and scale back missile development.
Until those results are achieved, or at least with-
in sight, the administration is likely to keep
missile defence as an option.

Talk of a bargain that would remove the
missile defence irritant from the U.S.-Russian
relationship has centred on a letter President
Barack Obama sent Russian President Dmitry
Medvedev in February. The note has been inter-
preted by some as a conciliatory gesture and a
possible first step toward linking missile defence
in Europe to Russia's assistance on Iran.

It is not clear how the Russians will respond,
and Clinton's talks with Russian Foreign Min-
ister Sergey Lavrov on Friday yielded no
answer. Missile defence was a favourite of the
Bush administration, but it never has been pop-
ular among Democrats. Obama's election was
widely seen as signaling a death knell for the
proposed European leg of the missile defence
system, which would be linked to an existing
network of interceptors in Alaska and Califor-
nia and radars elsewhere. Scaling back missile
defence ambitions also could produce some of
the big savings Obama seeks in a period of
tighter budgets.

What seems apparent at this point is that
the administration does not intend to bargain
away missile defence entirely in exchange for
Russian help with Tehran.

In Belgium, at a news conference following a
NATO meeting, Clinton said missile defence
was "a very important tool in our defensive
arsenal for the future." She later said she was
referring not just to Iran but more broadly to the

concept of deterring non-state adversaries such
as terrorist networks from seeking to acquire a
nuclear missile years or decades from now.

At another point during her trip, Clinton
said "Iran is the name we put to" those emerg-
ing and future threats, "but it is a kind of stand-
in for the range of threats we foresee." If the
present challenge of dissuading Iran from
acquiring nuclear weapons proved successful,
she seemed to suggest, then missile defence still
might be useful because other missile threats
might come up later.

What she avoided was offering a quid pro
quo. Clinton was careful not to assert that if
Russia were to accelerate pressure on Tehran to
back down, then the U.S. would scrap its plan to
put anti-missile interceptors in Poland and an
associated radar in the Czech Republic.

In fact she appeared to suggest that a missile
defence in Europe was a good idea even if Iran
no longer was a worry — although it would be
less urgent. Such talk may reflect doubt that
Iran will change course, although Clinton reaf-
firmed during the trip that the U.S. wants to
engage Iran in talks about its nuclear pro-
gramme and other topics. She told an Arab
diplomat at an international conference in Egypt
last Monday that she doubts the Iranians will
take up the American offer of a dialogue,
according to a senior USS. official who briefed
reporters on condition that he not be identi-
fied because the conversation was private.

Officially, the administration has not said
whether it intends to go ahead with the missile
defence sites in Poland and the Czech Republic.
It has stuck to the language that Obama used as
candidate, that missile defence must be proved
reliable and cost effective.

Poland's president said Sunday he believes
the U.S. will honour its agreement to build a
missile defence base in his country and that
scrapping the project to improve ties with Rus-
sia would be an unfriendly gesture toward
Poland. One possibility is that Washington and
Moscow could move toward agreement, with
NATO, to jointly reconfigure current U'S. plans
in a way that results in a coordinated system to
provide protection of the continent against a
range of missiles.

Russia says missile defence in Europe is
unnecessary and provocative. Moscow even has
threatened to deploy short-range missiles in its
westernmost region, bordering Poland, if the
U.S. goes ahead. But the rhetoric has since

(This article was written by Robert Burns,
Associated Press writer).

Disgusted with
our treatment
of animals

Bawa

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have lived in the Bahamas
for two years and am disgusted
at the way animals are treated
here.

The torture and barbaric
treatment of turtles are a dis-
grace to all Bahamians who
think they are decent folk.

Most Bahamians I am proud
to know, are decent easy going
folk, but they must rise up and
stop the cruel unnecessary
killing of turtles before the
whole world thinks all Bahami-
ans are barbaric and cruel folk.
For goodness sakes this is an
endangered species.

Every time a turtle is tortured
to death or ransomed, this is a
bloody stain that will crucify
your tourist industry one day.

The world has moved on and
it is high time the Bahamas

letters@tribunemedia net



live feed showing turtles being
tortured is placed on the inter-
net for the world to see what
Bahamians allow to happen?
Imagine the embarrassment the
Bahamian people and Govern-
ment will face world wide.

So please, pass this law and
make it have penalties for those
involved that are so harsh and
severe they will not even con-
template breaking it.

Make sure that this law is
enforced so harshly and fre-
quently that no one will cross
the line.

Teach your children to love
animals and realise that turtles
are a source of joy, swimming in
the sea that tourists will pay to

eigners have contacted you.
Perhaps these foreigners care
enough to want to make a dif-
ference to Bahamians’ lives and
do not want to see all Bahami-
ans branded as cruel, barbaric
folk.

Perhaps we care about the
livelihoods you derive from
tourism.

One day, maybe not so far
away, tourists will not come
here, as they don’t want to see
or hear about cruelty to turtles
and of course your other run-
ning sore, the Surrey horses.
Nor will they want to spend
money here to support a people
too weak and ineffectual to put
things right.

So please put this right. Yours
with the best of intentions for all
Bahamians.

JOHN LE SUEUR
Nassau,

caught up. see.

How long will it be before a

March, 2009.

You complain that only for-

Confident Mr Jones will not fall
for the trap being set for him

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It was a nice gesture by Mr Franklyn Wilson to
come to the aid of local media boss Mr Wendell
Jones. But let us look at the following scenarios.
It can be said that Jones communications (JCN)
has done quite well in his media empire in bring-
ing the news and other cultural entertaining pro-
grammes to the Bahamian public.

It can also be said that JCN has benefited from
just about all aspects of the local advertising pub-
lic including all political, independent and splin-
ter parties.

This was good for our country as well as main-
taining democracy.

Now on the other side of this scenario you
have the opposition Progressive Liberal Party
and its aspiring leader hopefuls, like the MP for
Fox Hill and others complaining about the biased
reporting and attacks against their party.

It can also be said that for some 40 years now
the PLP has been trying to replace the historic
“Nassau Herald” of the 1960s with a current
newspaper.

Prior to 1992 the reigning Progressive Liberal
Party government never wanted to free the air
waves because of its own ongoing political agen-
da. The Broadcasting Corporation of the
Bahamas was the official mouthpiece and news

media of the government. The Free National
Movement freed the air waves in 1992 granting
several private companies to operate indepen-
dent radio stations, including Mr Wendell Jones.

Despite Mr Jones’ shortcomings with his faulty
payment of taxes (National Insurance and utili-
ties) he has managed to build a competitive media
enterprise.

Now up steps the PLP top brass and millionaire
magnet Mr Franklyn Wilson who now wants to
take advantage of a opportunistic situation of
offering to help Mr Wendell Jones for — in my
opinion — the sole purpose of acquiring that
news media (JCN) for the propaganda use of the
PLP. We are with you Mr Jones and we know you
will not fall into the trap that is currently being set
for you. Stick to your guns and pay your taxes and
keep your news media (JCN) free and void of
political persuasion.

If, and should you fall for the so-called help that
is being offered to you by Mr Wilson, then you
find that later on your call letters which is cur-
rently JCN will for all intensive purposes will
become W-PLP.

BRIAN O
CLARKE
Nassau,
March 1, 2009.

Tired of the childish behaviour of some MPs in the House

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am sick and tired of the
childish misbehaviour of some
Members of Parliament in the
House of Assembly. It is truly
embarrassing to watch the Par-
liamentary Channel. In an era
where intolerance, rudeness and
violence are increasing, our
leaders need to be more civil
and respectful.

The behaviour and level of
"debate" is a poor example for
our young people.

There is total disregard for
the Speaker, and little under-
standing of the proper use of
"point of order.”

This has been a tradition in
Bahamian politics, but it is time
for politicians to realise that
there are now many educated
Bahamians who are not

impressed by playground argu-
ments in parliament.

These are supposed to be
professional people about the
people's business and they are
behaving like a bunch of thugs
on the bus going to prison.

CHARLES CAREY,
Harbour Island,
Bahamas,

March 3, 2009.



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 5



0 In brief |

The Bahamas
Humane Society
thanks Bain
Town community

THE Bahamas
Humane Society wishes
to thank the community
of Bain Town for their
participation in Febru-
ary’s “Who Let The Dogs
Out Free Spay and
Neuter programme.”

The programme visited
five primary schools in
the area and spoke with
1,960 students about how
to be a responsible ani-
mal owner and the
importance of neutering
and caring for their pets.

Every home was visited
in the area and animal
advice was given where
needed, unwanted ani-
mals were removed by
the Ministry of Agricul-
ture’s K-9 Control Unit
and 55 dogs were
neutered during this peri-
od by the Humane Soci-
ety.

The Bahamas Humane
Society would also like to
thank the persons who
gave donations towards
making this possible.

The programme will
next move to the Fort
Fincastle and Masons
Addition areas.

$5,000 donations
made on behalf of
the government

THE OAS Perma-
nent Representative of
the Bahamas Ambas-
sador C A Smith
donated $5,000 each to
the Inter-American
Drug Abuse Control
Commission and to the
Inter-American
Committee Against
Terrorism on behalf of
the Bahamas govern-
ment.

The cheque presenta-
tion took place at the
Organisation of Ameri-
can States (OAS), in
the Office of the Assis-
tant Secretary General,
Ambassador Albert
Ramdin.

Ambassador Smith
said he was grateful for
this opportunity and
thanked CICAD and
CICTE for being great
partners to the
Bahamian people in
providing training and
resources in the fight
against drugs, the traf-
ficking of small arms
and human trafficking,
which is becoming a
real problem in the
Bahamas.

With respect to ter-
rorism, Ambassador
Smith said that “it has

LOCAL NEWS

Out-of-work fisherman sells boat

to pay outstanding NI contributions
Man ordered to pay $700

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN OUT-OF-WORK fisherman
who was ordered to pay $700 in out-
standing National Insurance contribu-
tions sold his boat on Friday to avoid
jail.

Colin Fox, 53, a boat operator for a
35ft crawfishing vessel on Long Island,
has not earned a salary since the boat
engine broke down in October.

And although the engine was
repaired in January, adverse weather
conditions have kept the fisherman
from working since.

The boat operator said he has been
struggling to cover basic living costs,
including his diabetes medication, and
has not been in a position to pay $44
monthly to NIB.

He claims he received no warning
from the National Insurance Board

(NIB) of his outstanding contributions
until he was summoned to court two
weeks ago. Then, last Wednesday, he
appeared before the Long Island
administrator.

Mr Fox said he tried to explain his
predicament as he pleaded guilty to
the charge of failing to pay $700 to
NIB and was told he would have to
pay $300 to NIB by last Friday or be
jailed.

In a panic move to avoid prison, Mr
Fox sold his boat for half its retail val-
ue on Friday.

“T didn’t want to go in jail,” he said.
“So I sold it instead of going to Fox
Hill.”

Ms Fox, his wife and their 13-year-
old daughter, have been surviving on

his wife’s salary of under $100 a week
for the last six months, as he has been
unable to find alternative employment
in the current economic climate.

He said: “I am not working, I don’t
have a job, I don’t have anything. I
am struggling to put food on the table,
things are rough.”

The fishing industry has suffered
from rising gas prices, declining craw-
fish populations, a drop in the price
of crawfish and unusually windy
weather conditions this year, and Mr
Fox has little hope for improvement
before the crawfish season closes at
the end of the month.

He said this has been the worst sea-
son since he started professional craw-
fishing at the age of 18.

MP for Long Island and Minister of
Agriculture and Marine Resources
Larry Cartwright said many self-
employed fishermen are struggling to
pay NIB contributions, and he advises
them to make arrangements to pay
before they are summoned to court.

“It's part of government policy and
national insurance policy that persons
who are falling behind (on contribu-
tions) will be warned and after one or
two warnings they can be taken to
court,” Mr Cartwright said.

“There is little that can be done after
they have been fined in court as the
judge’s decision is final unless the per-
son appeals.”

Mr Cartwright said he is in talks with
the minister responsible for National
Insurance to represent the fishermen in
his constituency.

Mr Fox has now adjusted his contri-
butions to a more manageable $26 per
month.



BGR challenges govt
to act on independent |
review of gaming laws

THE Bahamas Gaming
Reform Committee announced
that it is working towards com-
missioning an independent
review of the country’s gambling
laws.

The committee said it wants
an outside expert to undertake
the review at no cost to the gov-
ernment.

Once completed, the commit-
tee said, it will use the review as
a basis to propose new legisla-
tion to the government.

Committee chairman Sidney
Strachan said: “The current con-
text for gaming laws is unten-
able and, in fact, discriminato-
ry. We are willing to do our part
to change the status quo, but
government must first show a
willingness to seriously entertain
recommendations.

“Again, we plan to ask the
government to formally begin
the reform process. We’ll then
submit a plan and formally com-
mit to shaping new legislation
and policies for adoption.”

BGR said it is encouraged by
the overall reaction to a recent
Rotary Club-sponsored poker
tournament for charity.

“By virtue of current arcane
gaming laws, the event was bor-
derline illegal. Despite this, the
government remained on the
sidelines. Once again, it has sig-
nalled that current laws are
emasculated because they are
transparently discriminatory,”
the BGR said.



PMT TA MTT as
WTC ET Clit
TRS UCR Te Te LGR

ATTORNEY Mrs Kelphene Cun-

According to the BGR, this is
a state of affairs that both humil-
iates and depreciates the
Bahamas on the world stage.
Present at the Rotary poker
game were members of the
BGR and Mark Johnson, presi-
dent of National Casino and
Bartending School, who was
responsible for oversight of the
event.

The NCBS currently trains
dealers and croupiers for the
local casino industry.

“The Rotary event demon-
strated the value of more mod-
ern gaming laws. It showed that
Bahamians are more than capa-
ble of operating casino-like
events and that the gaming
industry can benefit the
Bahamas far more that is cur-
rently the case if citizens are not
discriminated against. This is an
opportunity and the government
must act.”

BGR wants the government
to call for an independent review
without delay. The committee
has also initiated research on
modern methods and means of
protecting Bahamians from the
risks of impulsive gaming.

BGR claims that allowing
Bahamians to game could pro-
duce as much as $20 million in
additional annual revenue for
the government.

The committee said that rev-
enue of this magnitude could
support a host of important pub-
lic programmes and initiatives.





Edwards Twins eye
America’s Got Talent

TWIN brothers Antho-
ny and Eddie Edwards,
whose ‘Celebrities on
Stage’ show has featured
in Nassau for the last three
years, are to bid for mega-
stardom this summer...by
competing in America’s
Got Talent.

The twins, who can
impersonate 100 or more
singing stars with virtual-
ly flawless vocal mimicry,
are eager to show what
they can do in front of a
multi-million internation-
al television audience.

They hope their show,
which has been enthralling
theatre audiences for many
years now, will earn them
the kind of fame now
being enjoyed by the bril-
liant ventriloquist Terry
Fater, whose triumph in
America’s Got Talent
turned him into a Las
Vegas superstar.

“We are entering the
show because we need that
kind of exposure,” Antho-
ny told The Tribune.

“The response we get to
our shows is overwhelm-
ingly positive, but we need
to achieve the kind of
breakthrough that Ameri-
ca’s Got Talent can bring.”

The Edwards Twins have
been appearing at the
Rainforest Theatre, Crys-
tal Palace, four nights a
week since 2006.

They have proved a
great success with tourists
and locals and earned
plaudits from a Tribune
critic who has now been to

EM em Oram ae UO) | ate a te he ce MALTS

see them seven times.

On Sunday night, The
Edwards Twins gave a free
concert to Bahamians in
appreciation of the coun-
try’s willingness to host
their talents for three suc-
cessive Seasons.

“We wanted to give
something back - to say
thank you for having us,
because we now see Nas-
sau as our second home,”
Anthony told the audi-
ence.

The twins, from Las
Vegas, are now booked
into the Rainforest The-
atre until August, though
they will take time off to
appear in America’s Got
Talent during April and
May.

For their new season in

ningham, vice-president of the Industrial

Nassau, the twins have



repackaged their act, high-
lighting stars who have had
secondary billing in previ-
ous shows.

Retained, however, are
Anthony’s staggeringly
brilliant impersonations of
a succession of leading
male and female vocalists
and Eddie’s show-stopping
impression of Cher.

After Sunday’s show,
during which Anthony
again stunned the audience
with his impersonation of
Luciano Pavarotti, a mem-
ber of the audience said:

“Tf talent really is the
deciding factor on Ameri-
ca’s Got Talent, then these
guys will walk it. Frankly,
I’ve never seen any act
quite so riveting and amus-
ing.

“They are top class.”




Tribunal of the Bahamas, has become a
member of the Chartered Institute of
Arbitrators.

become a worldwide
problem” and “even
though we do not see

HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN KIA SUZUKI






: LS She has also completed post graduate be!
any evidence of it in studies with the University of London,
the Bahamas we recog- where she obtained a post graduate cer- =) ’ = =
nise that tourism is the tificate in equity and trust and a post ee ya [i I il 0 0 i $ >
deadlock of our finan- graduate diploma in commercial and cor- o = re
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areas oft target master of laws degree in international = —
: ; dispute resolution.

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CICTE.” oa aud te Deupies Bar ast Be Kelphene Cunningham J Vehicle Purchasing ed

On his behalf, Assis- = f st bd -<
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He highlighted the
great task being devel-
oped by CICTE and
CICAD and stated that
“the contribution not
only in terms of the
quantity, but symboli-
cally” is a way of show-
ing the commitment to
Caribbean issues, and
in this specific case, the
Bahamas.

This contribution
from the government
of the Bahamas coin-
cides with the begin-
ning of the Ninth Reg-
ular Session of the
CICTE.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





OOM rls
TEER:
TRE ps
STATI RTSUTEULTL

THE Cacique Awards
Scholarship Fund recently
received a $1,500 donation
from art lover Janet John-
son.

Ms Johnson, who is also
the director of communica-
tions in the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation,
donated $1,500 to the fund
after purchasing a duho carv-
ing from the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation.

She explained that the
duho (Lucayan ceremonial
stool) had great sentimental
value to her since there is a
family story behind its cre-
ation.

It began with lightning in a
hurricane, she said.

As Hurricane Floyd
passed through the Bahamas
in 1999, a Madeira tree in
her late father’s yard was
broken apart by a lightning
strike.

Her father, World War II





LOCAL NEWS

Call for the disparity
in wages between
men and women

to be addressed.

HYACINTH PRATT (left), permanent secretary in the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation, is pictured receiving the $1,500 cheque
from Ms Johnson and artist Antonius Roberts.

veteran Basil I Johnson,
saved the wood from the
tree. After he died in 2004, a
decision was made to create
a lasting and meaningful
symbol from the wood in his
honour.

Wood

The wood was given to
Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation, which engaged
artist Antonius Roberts to
craft the duho on a volun-
tary basis.

After the Ministry’s use of

the art piece for three years }
at various functions, includ- ;
ing Junkanoo Summer Festi- ;
val and the 12th Annual :
Cacique Awards, the duho }
is being added to Ms John- }

son’s private collection.

All the funds from its sale
have been posted to the }

Cacique Scholarship Fund,

which funds the education of }
deserving young Bahamians. :

The duho — the ceremoni-
al seat of the leader of the i
Lucayan people — is the }
symbol of the Cacique }

Awards.

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MAY 29, 2009
MAY 29, 2009

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WITH ALL REQUIRED INFORMATION ATTACHED
and returned ON OR BEFORE the deadline to the

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION

APPLICATION FORMS RECEIVED AFTER THE

DEADLINE

WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED

PLEASE VISIT OR CONTACT THE SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL
LOAN DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, FOR APPLICATION
FORMS AND/OR FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION.

APPLICATION FORMS CAN ALSO BE OBTAINED FROM OUR
WEBSITE AT www. bahamaseducation.com

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THE National Congress of
Trade Unions of the Bahamas
(NCTUB) is calling on the
government to review the
Employment Act to strength-
en the provision of equal pay
for equal work with particular
emphasis on the disparity in
wages between men and
women in the labour market.

The umbrella union, in con-
junction with the Caribbean
Congress of Labour, joined the
rest of the world in celebrating
International Women’s Day
on Sunday.

Every year, a political and
human rights theme, as desig-
nated by the United Nations to
create the social awareness of
the struggles of women world-
wide, is brought out and exam-
ined in a hopeful manner.

This year’s theme -
“Women and men unite to
end violence against women
and girls” — is a timely one, the
NCTUB said, “since we can
see the evidence of physical
abuse toward women and girls
almost on a daily basis glob-
ally.”

“The level of violence
against women and girls has
increased over the years and
women need to come together
as a united force to expose
those that are guilty of such
acts so that we can stomp out
the violence in our society. As
women organisations, it is our
duty to speak out on the injus-
tices and violence that are per-
petrated against females in our

w
co
—
o
ec
—_
—
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c
o
—_
ao
=
na

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham talks with Grand
Bahama Shipyard officials
and investors after having a
dock-side view of the Carnival
Miracle (pictured top left),
one of the boats currently on
dry-dock at the Shipyard. Mr
Ingraham was taken on a tour
of the docks following the
official commissioning of the
Shipyard's third dry dock on
Saturday, March 7.

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NCTUB in conjunction with Caribbean
Congress of Labour celebrates
International Women’s Day

society as well as on the glob-
al market,” Hellena
Cartwright, president of the
Women’s Association in the
Bahamas said in a press state-
ment.

“As we prepare ourselves
and our organisations to deal
with the challenges that we
now face within the Bahamas
and in the Caribbean region
due to the global recession, the
NCTUB wishes to remind
women that the struggle for
women’s rights is the struggle
for human rights.”

The NCTUB is calling on all
women to reflect on the gains,
strides, and achievements that
have been made by women
locally, regionally and inter-
nationally, despite the contin-
ued discrimination in the
workplace as well as domestic
and other violence that is per-
petrated against women, girls
and those who are still classi-
fied as the working poor.

The umbrella union said it
also wishes to remind women
of the importance of educa-
tion because it ensures that all
women and girls are able to
secure opportunities to broad-
en their knowledge and
increase their potential

Pictured from left are
Richard Fain, chairman and
CEO of Royal Caribbean
Cruises Ltd; Giora Israel,
senior vice- president of the
Carnival Corporation; Carl-










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for success.

‘While we have had tremen-
dous success stories with
women breaking the glass ceil-
ing, unfortunately the num-
bers are still too few. I would
like to take this opportunity
to congratulate those women
who have succeeded to the top
and encourage those who are
still standing as brave soldiers
in the struggle for fair play and
justice. We must continue to
fight for the equality that we so
rightly deserve,” the Women’s
Association and NCTUB said.

The NCTUB said it pledges
its support to all domestic
workers in their struggle for
legal and social recognition of
the value of all women’s work.
“Let us therefore join together
to realise the potential of gen-
der equality and eventually the
full empowerment of women
all over the world. On behalf
of the National Congress of
Trade Unions of the Bahamas
and the Women’s Association,
we take this opportunity to
wish all women in every island
of the Bahamas a very happy
Woman’s Day and be remind-
ed that the struggle goes on
until all men and all women
have become equals.”



PM tours Grand Bahama shipyard

Gustaf Rotkirch, chairman
and CEO of the Grand
Bahama Shipyard, Prime
Minister Ingraham and
Pineridge MP Kwasi Thomp-
son

PRIME MINISTER HUBERT
INGRAHAM is taken on a tour
of the Grand Bahama Ship-
yard's docks on Saturday,
March 7 following the official
commissioning of the Ship-
yard's third dry dock. Pictured
front from left are Pineridge MP
Kwasi Thompson, Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham, Carl-Gustaf
Rotkirch, chairman and CEO of
the Grand Bahama Shipyard
and Mrs Rotkirch.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 7





Charity campaign
role for music
and style guru

BAHAMIAN music
and style guru Gerry
DeVeaux is the creative
director for the new
“Fashion Targets Breast
Cancer” charity campaign.

Mr DeVeaux brought
together a few of his
friends, including super-
models Tyson Beckford
and Veronica Webb, and
Rolling Stones progeny
Jade Jagger and Leah
Wood, to pose for the UK
campaign to promote
awareness and raise funds
for breast cancer research.

He is also Ambassador
for Fashion Rocks for the
Princes Trust which bene-
fits HRH Prince Charles'
charity.

Mr DeVeaux is also the
creative director and a
judge for Britain's Next
Top Model, and has just
done a new BBC! series
with Sir Andrew Lloyd
Webber and the Oscars
with ITV and Sky TV.

Tyson Beckford is one
of the most successful
male models of all time
and is currently sharing his
top model tips as host of
Bravo TV's “Make Me A
Supermodel.”

Veronica Webb its one
of the original supermod-
els, she was the first model
of colour to be offered a
major cosmetics contract
as the face of Revlon.

Weather forecast
excellent for space
shuttle launch

m@ CAPE CANAVERAL,
Fla.

AFTER suffering
through a month’s delay,
NASA enjoyed a trou-
ble-free countdown for
space shuttle Discovery,
all set to blast off on a
space station construc-
tion mission Wednesday
night, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Launch director Mike
Leinbach said Monday
that the countdown was
going smoothly, and
forecasters put the odds
of good launching weath-
er at 90 percent. “The
team is anxious to go,”
he said.

Shuttle managers had
so little to discuss at
Monday morning’s
launch review at that
they wrapped up in
under an hour.

“That included a lot of
me pausing to make sure
no one had any ques-
tions,” said the chairman
of the mission manage-
ment team, Mike Moses.

Concern over some
shuttle valves led to
repeated meetings over
the past month, one last-
ing as long as 13 hours.
By Monday, there was
little more to say about
the valve issue.

One of the three
hydrogen gas valves
inside Endeavour’s
engine compartment
broke in November dur-
ing the last shuttle
launch. NASA ordered
extra testing to make
sure the valves that ulti-
mately ended up in Dis-
covery were safe to fly.

The valves control the
flow of hydrogen gas into
the external fuel tank for
proper pressurization.

Discovery and seven
astronauts will fly to the
international space sta-
tion, carrying up a $300
million framework that
includes two solar wings
and a radiator. It’s the
last set of solar wings for
the nearly completed
space station, and should
put the orbiting outpost
at full power.

One of the shuttle
crew, Koichi Wakata,
will become the first
Japanese to live aboard
the space station. He’
replace an American
astronaut, Sandra Mag-
nus, who has been up
there since November.

More than 200 Japan-
ese have descended on
NASA’s launching site to
watch the liftoff.

Redefining the Bahamas

@ Nassau Institute
Presentation to the
Bahamas National
Economic Forum

A THE risk of wast-
ing your precious

time, I would like to take a
minute or so to conduct a
thought experiment, with
apologies to Dr Charles Mur-
ray, the American political
scientist and historian who
first proposed this, albeit in
the American context:

As we know, government
spending has now put the
Bahamas in debt to the tune
of more than $3 billion, but
what else has this burden on
future generations accom-
plished? Let's find out.

Imagine for a moment that
the government as we know it
was reduced to its role out-
lined in the Constitution, and
other than defence, law and
order and maybe certain
infrastructure requirements,
the government was no longer
responsible for all the things
they take on.

To borrow from Dr Mur-
ray again, how would you
respond?

1. Would you be more or
less likely to volunteer at your
church? Yes or no?

2. Would you be more or
less likely to volunteer at a
food bank? Yes or no?

3. If you were a lawyer or
doctor, would you be more or
less likely to offer pro bono
services? Yes or no?

The list could go on, but I
think you see where this is
going.

As has turned out, most of
us answered yes.

The question we should
ask ourselves then, according
to Dr Murray is, why are
more of us not doing these
things already? He contends,
it's because we have bought
into the “soul killing logic”
that somebody else is doing
it for us.

Taxes

We vote the government
into office so we do not have
to be our neighbours keeper.
In other words, we pay taxes
for government to do it, so
why should we do any more.

Pushing the envelope a lit-
tle more, seldom people meet
that complaints are not
lodged against our bloated
government.

They say things like:

Duty rates are too high!
What does the government
do with all that money!

The educational system is a
mess!

The government can't even
fix the street lights!

Every government depart-
ment I visit the service is
lousy!

Whatever I want to do with
my business, I have to waste
hours getting a permit for this
or a permit for that!

I'm sure most of you have
uttered these words? Am I
right?

To be a little more specific
let's look at education for a
minute.

In 2001, The Nassau Insti-
tute wrote a few essays about
our educational system. At
that time, the country had
spent “over $480,000,000
(that's right, over four hun-
dred and eighty million dol-
lars since 1992— that's 9
years) on education. Even
though the public pays these
taxes, the actual student test
results from the government
run schools are considered
"confidential" and are never
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly, as any transparent gov-
ernment would do. It is a giv-
en, at least it is not denied by
the Ministry of Education, that
the mean grade is no higher
than a D, which in the real
world, is a failing grade.”

Yet somehow we do not
see the necessity to privatise
education, starting with
vouchers, where at least if a
parent is unhappy with one
school, he/she can transfer
his/her child to the school of
their choice.

I'm sure if you go through
the budgets of each govern-
ment department you would
find the country could do

away with one agency or
department after another.

I would argue that a major
step the government could
take to reform itself would be
to change its accounting pro-
cedure along the lines of real
business.

Each Ministry should have
a Balance Sheet and Income
Statement so they can see
what is necessary to sustain
their budgets. I bet we would
see an improvement with
expenditure.

Yes, I would admit that the
Bahamas is a more compli-
cated country than most of
our neighbours as we have
some 20 populated islands, so
we need an airport and port
on each one, etc.

But I also submit that is
more reason to create other
Freeport's as in Grand
Bahama, than proof that we
need ever larger government.
Present legal battles in
Freeport notwithstanding.

Debt

Now let's look at the
national debt. At the Nassau
Institute, we might be consid-
ered fiscal conservatives, but I
prefer to think it is better for
government to spend within
its means than burden future
generations, yet unborn, with
deficits and debt that we will
never repay in most of our
lifetimes.

What I find most disturb-
ing is successive governments
have committed to bringing
the debt and deficits under
control, yet year after year,
with the odd exception, the
deficits and debt increase.

Now I'm sure some of you
are thinking, these are extra-
ordinary times, so govern-
ments should throw fiscal cau-
tion to the wind and do what-
ever it takes to save us from
this market correction we call
a recession. Sorry, depression.

I would argue that this is
the time for the opposite
approach for our national
economic plan, but more on
that later.

Since 1991 the National
Debt of the Bahamas has
risen from $870 million to $3
billion, a staggering 244.8 per-
cent increase in 18 years.
That's what, a $118 million
increase each and every year.
Mind boggling.

All this and we have not
even considered the possibil-
ity of a bankrupt National
Insurance Board and the
additional taxes that will be
forced upon us to sustain that.

So what should the
Bahamas do in formulating a
national economic plan in
view of the oncoming train
wreck to our economy, if
indeed it turns out to be such?

In simple terms, we should
turn toward laissez-faire cap-
italism rather than more gov-
ernment planning, that so far
has set us on a path that is
clearly unsustainable.

The only national econom-
ic plan we should be setting
is for government to start to
downsize immediately by pri-
vatising or shutting down
whatever agency or depart-
ment they can.

I challenge anyone to name
10 government agencies,
departments or ministries, (of
the 173 services listed in the
phone book) that do their job
efficiently and effectively.

Surely we can close the
Hotel Corporation? No doubt
we can stop subsidising one
group while discriminating
against others.

How about selling Bahama-
sair, Water & Sewerage and
BEC? Do we need a price
control department when so
many people shop in Miami?
Oh, and don't forget ZNS
either.

I can tell by the hush that
has come over you that you
think I'm crazy, but I'll cite
one clear example where even
the half baked privatisation
of BaTelCo (now BTC), sev-
eral years back, was almost
worth what it cost at the time.



Just think of the entrepre-
neurs that came out of that
exercise. We have several cell
phone companies, a furniture
store and more.

Entrepreneurs now hiring
people, paying taxes and oth-
erwise contributing to eco-
nomic growth.

I sincerely believe the goal
of downsizing government is a
much more worthy national
economic plan than encour-
aging more failed government
planning.

After all, a government
does not an economy make.
An economy is the market
place of millions of individ-
ual transactions.

And I don't know about
you, but I trust myself to
make my personal decisions
rather than something or
someone called the govern-
ment.

Besides, Bahamians can ill
afford the taxation to come
in an effort to support the
leviathan we call the Bahamas
government, as it is presently
structured. And more gov-
ernment planning means
more costs to the taxpayer
and possibly to the economy.

Relevant

The unintended conse-
quences from government
planning agencies brings the
risk of them becoming The
Bahamas’ biggest growth
industry. You can bet they
would convince us that they
are even more relevant in



-govt'’s role in the economy

tough economic times, in an
attempt to justify even larger
budgets.

Far too often we let trans-
parency for government slide,
even as they pass laws every
day to make us more trans-
parent and keep us in “check”
as we Say.

In summary. Our national
economic plan should be to
return government to its con-
stitutionally stated purpose,
and accept the personal
responsibility so many of us
wish to hand over to all too
willing politicians, who might
have the best of intentions,
but for some reason they
make things worse.

In closing I'll remind you of
Fund's Law by the journalist
John Fund;

Government's will always
do the right thing, after
they've exhausted all other
possibilities.

Letisha Henderson/BIS

SIXTH GRADE STUDENTS and teachers of the Tarpum Bay Primary School in Eleuthera called on Gov-
ernor General Arthur Hanna at Government House on Wednesday March 4, 2009.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

Request For

Expressions Of Interest/

ualifications

{EOI-09-01: Janitorial Services
EOI:09-02: Pest Control & Exterminating Services}

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited is
presently seeking expressions of interest from qualified
suppliers for the provision of the following services: -

1) Janitorial Services

2) Pest Control & Exterminating Services

Interested parties are requested to complete the RFEI/RFQ
Package, which may be collected from the Receptionist
Desk of the FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas)
Super Support Centre, East West Highway, Nassau,
Bahamas or requested via email to:

sourcing&supplymanagement@firstcaribbeanbank.com
as of Friday, March 06, 2009.

Please reply to: Sourcing & Supply Management
FirstCaribbean International Bank

East West Highway
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Ms. I. Hamilton

The deadline for submission is Monday, March 16, 2009 at
1:00pm. Eastern Time. Completed Qualification Packages
may be mailed or couriered to the address above.

Packages received after this date and time will not be accepted.





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Furore over

Pindling article in

Tribune

FROM page one

Lehder’s chief pilot, told his par-
ents repeatedly that both Pin-
dling and a senior police officer
were “on the payroll” of
Lehder, who ran a secret
cocaine trans-shipment enter-
prise from Norman’s Cay in the
Exumas.

Mr Tynes Sr said in the article
that his son told him of frequent
cash consignments he was oblig-
ed to carry from Lehder for the
then prime minister and the
senior policeman.

He also revealed that he had
flown Pindling to Grand
Bahama for a secret meeting
with Lehder, with another pilot
flying the drug czar from Exuma
for the rendezvous.

Mr Moss, in attacking the article, said Bahami-
ans should stand up and stop this “slanderous”
form of journalism.

But older members of the PLP said it was
time that history was recorded by those who
experienced it first-hand.

One, who did not wish to be named, said:
“The article recorded what many senior mem-
bers of the party knew over many years. Now it’s
time for the truth to be told.”

Mr Moxey, 75, who was a PLP backbencher
during Pindling’s first administration in the late
1960s and early 1970s, said the article was need-
ed to show what really went on during the drug
era of the 1980s.

“Tt was a real eye-opener for many,” he told
The Tribune, “I respect Chauncey Tynes Sr for
telling the truth. I have known him for many
years and he was always an honest and decent
man.

“When I entered politics, I wanted to liberate
the people and let them fly. Pindling’s mission
was to keep them dumb and stupid all their
lives.”

Like other PLPs of the day, he said, he felt
that Pindling had betrayed the revolution.

“T think that Mr Tynes knows more than he is
saying. The drug era of the 1980s was the biggest
mistake ever, the biggest travesty that caused
everything to go astray.”

Mr Moxey, who is making his own DVD
about the Pindling era, said: “I feel that young



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Chauncey Tynes Jr



Insight

Bahamians need to know the
truth and Mr Tynes has done
the right thing in saying what
he did.”

Mr Moss, however, said: “It is
unfortunate that deceased per-
sons such as our esteemed
national hero Sir Lynden or his
estate cannot sue for defama-
tion of character, because the
assault on his legacy is nothing
short of repulsive.”

He continued: “What we have
here is the wholesale desecra-
tion of Sir Lynden’s legacy. I
wish to point out that Sir Lyn-
den was a great man and did a
great deal to usher in the new
Bahamas and educate the mass-
es. He is our hero, just like Mar-
tin Luther King, Nelson Man-
dela and Winston Churchill is
to the USA, South Africa and
the UK respectively. I stand to defend his lega-
cy.

“There should be a standards bureau for
media in this country that seek to profit by pass-
ing on lies and half-truths to the disadvantage of
others. Enough is enough and I wish that all
right-thinking Bahamians would stand up and
reject this slanderous kind of journalism.”

Yesterday, The Tribune received many calls
responding to the article, all of them positive.

A taxi-driver said: “This has made me see our
history differently. The PLPs and FNMs at the
taxi-ranks are fighting over this article today.”

The piece was written by The Tribune’s man-
aging editor, John Marquis, who said: “Mr Moss
is entitled to his illusions. However, with one
short press release, he has in my opinion
destroyed his credibility as a would-be parlia-
mentary candidate.

“The Bahamian people have become wiser
in recent years and they are no longer likely to
swallow self-serving prattle from the likes of
Moss, who knows nothing about Sir Lynden
Pindling or the drug era of the 1980s.

“Mr Chauncey Tynes Sr is regarded as an
extremely honourable man and I have no doubt
at all that everything he told me is true. His
information is also supported by several sources
within the old PLP.

“What the Bahamas needs is a standards
bureau to restrain those who try to manipulate
history for their own ends.”

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‘Water shortage’ sparks

anger from residents

FROM page one

tion, cost of production and the fact that we need
to eventually eliminate barging. The cost of barg-
ing has now exceeded the cost of reverse osmosis
(water production). Depending on the volume
that's being produced, we're now producing
reverse osmosis water in New Providence at a
lower cost than barging. And barging is impacted
severely by weather and mechanical breakdowns,
which we are now experiencing,” he told The
Tribune.

Although the vessel is still operating, the dam-
age caused a slower turnaround due to "a major
failure with its bow thruster." The damaged part
is being repaired in South Florida and should be
reinstalled by the end of the week, according to
WSC.

One angry Yamacraw resident, who asked to
remain anonymous, said his weekend chores were
brought to a standstill because of the lack of
water. "The water has been off, off and on, for the
past two weekends. I came home on Friday after
work and it was off. Saturday morning it came on
briefly and was off the rest of the day — Sunday
was the same thing, " the resident said.

"I can't clean, I can't shower — they cut the

water off at the most inopportune times. I wasn't
even aware that they (WSC) were having a prob-
lem until I asked a neighbour and he said he
heard it from someone else, that they were having
shortage because of a problem with their barge.”

WSC said public announcements about the sit-
uation have been broadcast on radio stations.
The corporation also said the low or no supply is
due to conservation efforts that ensure residents
have water during peak consumption hours like
the mornings and evenings. Officials anticipate
that these measures will be relaxed later this
week, once the Titas is fully operational and
water storage levels in the capital have been
raised.

"Barging has been a part of the WSC almost
from its inception but in this particular case we are
being affected by a mechanical breakdown in
The Titus, which is the sole ship that we have at
this particular time. And it's affecting its turn-
around time, its delivery. It's affecting our avail-
able storage and WSC at this time is doing its
best, within its operations, to maintain adequate
supply and pressure and is making operational
adjustments at this time,” Mr Neymour said.

Customers with low or no water for extended
periods are asked to contact WSC's customer
call centre at 302-5599.

Man dead after

nightclub shooting

FROM page one

circumstances leading to the
shooting, however two men
are being questioned in an
intensive murder investigation
and a third man is wanted for
questioning.

The nightclub shooting is
another sign of the country’s
desperate need to crackdown
on gun crime and hold a
firearms amnesty said politi-
cal activist Paul Moss.

Mr Moss has been fighting
to take guns off the streets
since he launched a campaign
in 1997, which, he claimed,
received no support from then
Commissioner of Police Paul
Farquharson, or Minister of
National Security Tommy
Turnquest.

As a result, gun toters will
not hand over their weapons
without the protection of an

amnesty, and guns still per-
vade the streets of Nassau, Mr
Moss said.

The government, the police
and private businesses all need

to get involved in the
war against gun crime, he
argued.

“If Parliament could have
weapons screening and these
people are honourable mem-
bers, so should the courts in
our country, and so should the
nightclubs,” Mr Moss said.

“I think that is something
we want to look at in con-
junction with trying to get
these guns off the streets.”

Shootings, such as the mur-
der of Mr McPhee on Mon-
day, not only represent a
needless loss of life, but spread
fear of crime in the communi-
ty, Mr Moss maintains.

“The fear of crime is often
worse than the crime itself,”
he said.

“Tt instills a fear of life, and
therefore people are not pre-
pared to risk going outside to
clubs for their own safety, so
the economy is suffering as
well.

“We have to look at it and
deal with it in a way that
involves many people, includ-
ing the private sector and ordi-
nary citizens.”

“They (the government)
ought to involve the private
sector in the reduction of
crime, but I think they are not
interested, really they think
they can do it by themselves,
which is folly.”

Another murder at a night-
club occurred on August 31,
when 23-year-old mechanic
Jason Jackson of Newbold
Street, Nassau, was fatally
stabbed outside Cocktails and
Dreams in Cable Beach when
an altercation inside the club
escalated in the car park.

Amnesty ‘concern’ for the safety
of Detention Centre detainees



FROM page one

country's immigration detention centre are
being ill-treated. Amnesty International is con-
cerned for their safety,” said a letter issued by
the group's International Secretariat. "The
detainees claimed that all those held at the

Former minister turned
DATE MRT tS
Stroke in the pulpit

FROM page one

his heart rate had slowed.

He was attended by neurologist Charles
Rahming and cardiologist Conville Brown.
He was fitted with a pacemaker and admit-
ted to the Intensive Care Unit where Mrs
Nottage said he is resting comfortably.

Mr Nottage’s brother Dr Bernard Not-
tage, PLP MP for Grants and Bain Town,
said his brother did not collapse, lose con-
sciousness or the ability to speak, and was
able to recognise family members at his side
on Sunday.

Although he has physical weakness in his
left arm, it appears Mr Nottage has not suf-
fered any brain damage.

Dr Nottage said: “This is a matter which
has to be monitored very closely because it
can change from hour to hour.

“Tt is at a very early stage at the moment
so the family is understandably concerned,
and the family will be concerned until we
have evidence that he is getting over it.”

Mr Nottage, of Sandford Drive, New
Providence, has never suffered a stroke
before and his brother said he had recently
been in good health.

The devoted Christian abandoned his 20-
year political career in 1992 when he lost
the St Agnes constituency seat to FNM can-
didate Charles “Chuck” Virgill.

Rather than returning to the politics that
consumed him as a colourful and contro-
versial politician, the former Cabinet min-
ister in Sir Lyden Pindling’s PLP adminis-
tration went from saving the nation to saving
souls.

Mr Nottage was ordained as a minister at
Bethel Baptist Church, “the mother church
of Baptists,” in Meeting Street in May 2003,
and has been active in the parish ever since.

Centre, including women and children, are
marched outside three times a day in order to
be counted by heavily armed guards who
pushed them with the butts of their guns. There
were also claims of severe problems with over-
crowding with some detainees forced to sleep
on concrete floors.

"The Bahamian authorities have publicly
denied the abuses, but said they would inves-
tigate. Amnesty International, however, is con-
cerned that any investigation would be con-
ducted internally without independent over-
sight,” said the letter which was sent to various
Cabinet ministers as well as the media.

Now the human rights watchdog group is
requesting concerned persons to ask govern-
ment for an immediate and thorough investi-
gation into these claims; independent moni-
toring of the centre by human rights groups;
proper medical treatment to injured detainees;
effective and fair refugee determination for
asylum seekers; and detention of asylum-seek-
ers as a last resort.

The group also said over the years there
have been allegations that asylum seekers were
not granted access to “fair and effective"
refugee determination procedures, and claims
of poor conditions, beatings and overcrowding.

The plea — issued over the weekend —
comes after a series of articles published in
this newspaper chronicled several claims from
detainees, ranging from severe beatings by
guards, insufficient food, lack of toilet and
bathing facilities.

A statement by the Department of Immi-
gration, released the day after the claims first
broke, maintained that detainees are fed “three
times daily” and the “quantity of meals is
always adequate.”

Officials also denied, after swift internal
investigations into the claims, that any physical
abuse occurred at the site.

However, last Monday Immigration Direc-
tor Jack Thompson, and Defence Force Com-
modore Clifford Scavella, accompanied by rep-
resentatives from the department of social ser-
vices, the clergy, and psychologist Dr David
Allen toured the holding facility.

Reports were submitted to the Department
following this tour.

Yesterday, Mr Thompson who was out of
the country at the time, said he had reviewed
one report but would withhold any comment
on the contents until he was able to go over a
second document in the next few days. He
promised an update later this week.

Detainees claimed they saw minor improve-
ments after their claims went public, includ-
ing larger food portions.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



ai

Celtics without
9 players
for Miami

@ BASKETBALL
WALTHAM, Mass. :
Associated Press i



THE BOSTON Celtics’

biggest opponent right now is

the training room.

The Celtics will not dress
five players when they play at }
the Miami Heat on Wednes- :

day night.

Coach Doc Rivers on Mon- }
day ruled out Rajon Rondo :
and Glen "Big Baby’ Davis }
after both sprained their right }
ankles over the weekend. i
Rondo was hurt in Friday’s }
105-94 win over Cleveland
and Davis in Sunday’s 86-79 }

loss to Orlando.

They join superstar Kevin
Garnett, Brian Scalabrine and }
Tony Allen on the sidelines. }
Garnett has a sprained right }
knee and Allen has an injured
left thumb. Scalabrine has }

post-concussion syndrome.

Rivers said he expects Davis }
and Rondo to miss at least the }

next two games. After Miami,

Boston hosts Memphis on Fri-
day and plays at Milwaukee

on Sunday.

“Kevin will be out longer

than the Milwaukee game,”

Rivers said. “I’m pretty sure of i

that. I would say Kevin,

maybe at the end of the fol-

lowing week at the earliest.”

Rivers also said he’ll limit
the time for Paul Pierce and }
Ray Allen, who each played :

45 minutes on Sunday.

“Somebody else has to step }
up and the challenge for me is }
not doing what I did (Sunday) :
with Paul and Ray, that can’t }
happen,” Rivers said. “Obvi- }
ously, that was a different cir- 3
cumstance because the }
injuries happened during the }
game or right before the }
game. It’s tough to plan for }
but I still want to keep their }
minutes down, even in atime }
of crisis | want to keep their }
minutes down. We just have }

to find a way to win games.”

Rodriguez has
hip surgery

@ BASEBALL
TAMPA, Fla.

Associated Press

YANKEES third baseman i
Alex Rodriguez had arthro- ;
scopic surgery Monday to }
repair a torn labrum in his right }
hip, and his projected timetable
for recovery remained six to }

nine weeks.

Dr. Marc Philippon per-
formed the 1-hour, 20-minute
procedure at Vail Valley :

Surgery Center in Colorado.

“The surgery went exactly
as we planned,” Philippon said
during a conference call. “No

surprises.”

Other options considered :
were a more aggressive surgery }
that would have sidelined
Rodriguez up to four months }
and a conservative approach }
that would have included rest :

and treatment.

“There is no doubt in our }
minds that this was the best :
option,” Philippon said. “This :
was the best option for Alex }

and the Yankees.”

General manager Brian
Cashman expects the three- ;
time AL MVP back on the :

field “sometime in May.”

Rodriguez will need a more :
extensive operation after the :
season, and Philippon said :
Rodriguez will “absolutely” be i
ready for spring training in ;
2010. Rodriguez was expected }
to be released from the hospi- :
tal later Monday and to start :
his rehab. He was to perform :
range of motion drills and ride

a stationary bike.

“Alex is doing well,” Philip-
pon said. “Over the next few :
days, until Friday, we will work i
on his range of motion. Hope- }
fully by Friday or Sunday, we }
will starting working on his
muscle memory and adding }
range of motion that involves }
the rotation of a batter when :

he swings.”

Philippon said he found a }
small impingement and the lin- }
ing of a cyst that wasremoved }
last week. The labrum was :

repaired.

Toronto manager Cito Gas-
ton said the Yankees can over- }
come the loss of Rodriguez to }

start the regualar season.



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VE. Yang vets breakthrou

win at



Y.E. YANG, of South Korea, kisses the trophy after winning the
Honda Classic golf tournament in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Sun-
day, March 8, 2009. Yang shot a final round of 2-under 68 to win

with a score of 9-under par.

Nowitzki, Mavs head West
heeding to get on a roll

@ BASKETBALL
DALLAS
Associated Press

THE Dallas Mavericks are
heading West this week for a
conference tournament of
sorts.

The Mavs play their next
four games on the road
against Western Conference
foes — two against teams
ahead of them in the stand-
ings and two against teams
behind them.

Dallas goes into this stretch
holding the eighth and final
playoff spot. By the time Dirk
Nowitzki and the guys return
home, they could be all the
way up to the third or fourth
seed (and thinking about
home-court advantage in the
first round) or down to No. 9
(and thinking about the lot-
tery).

Considering how things
have gone this season, Now-
itzki said Monday he has no
idea what to expect.

“That’s I guess kind of the
fun part about it,” he said.
“These last 19 games, we’re
going to let it all hang out and
see where it takes us. That’s
the only way we can approach
it. ... It’s been weird, but, hey,
if you look at the other teams,
it’s not only us that’s been
struggling. If we’ve been up
and down and we’re still (2



Biante

1/2) games out of third, then
what does that say about the
whole rest of the conference?”

The Mavericks’ maddening
season went from a 2-7 start to
a 10-1 surge. New coach Rick
Carlisle scrapped the Prince-
ton-style motion offense he
was putting in and eventually
gave Jason Kidd total control
of the offense. Things were
going pretty well until a recent
stretch in which they were
crushed by a San Antonio
team missing Tim Duncan and
Manu Ginobili, then a week
later were crushed by an
Oklahoma City team missing
its two leading scorers,
prompting team owner Mark
Cuban to threaten everyone’s
roster spot.

GOLF
PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla.
Associated Press

Y.E. Yang said winning the Honda Classic is
more significant to him than beating Tiger Woods
three years ago.

His reward? Facing Woods again.

Staying alone in the lead the whole way Sunday,
Yang shot a 2-under 68 to finish one shot ahead of
John Rollins and pick up his first PGA Tour vic-
tory.

The Korean took command with three straight
birdies on the front side and wouldn’t fold, two-
putting from 50 feet on the finishing hole for a
winning par. With the win — his eighth worldwide
— he picked up a two-year exemption and a
check for $1,008,000, qualified for this week’s
CA Championship at Doral, plus earned an invi-
tation to next month’s Masters.

Woods will be at both venues.

“To be able to face Tiger again and again, it’s
an honor for me,” said Yang, who won the 2006
HSBC Champions in Shanghai, beating a field
headlined by Woods.

Yang played last year’s final round at PGA
National by himself, going off first and needing
only 1 hour, 53 minutes to finish.

He was there until the very end this time,
pumping his fists in the air, embracing his agent
and translator Michael Yim, and celebrating with
fans after closing out the victory. He finished at 9-
under 271.

“Pure emotion,” said Yang, who canceled plans
to fly to Puerto Rico to play there this week. “I
just felt all the fans were supporting me. I just
wanted to thank them.”

Rollins made birdie at the par-5 18th to get
within two, and Yang missed a 10-footer for par
on 17 to lose half his lead.

He held on, though: Yang cringed when his
third shot sailed off target at the finishing hole, but
coolly two-putted for the win.

“From 50 feet, it’s not easy to do that to win
your first golf tournament,” Rollins said. “My
hat’s off to him.”

Rollins (67) was alone in second and he, like

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise”

Honda Classic



JEFF Overton reacts after putting on the 16th
hole during the final round of the Honda Classic
golf tournament.

Yang, qualified for the CA Championship by
moving into the top 10 in the FedEx Cup stand-
ings. Ben Crane (68) was third after finishing 6
under and Jeff Klauk (71, with 17 pars and one
bogey) was alone in fourth, another shot back.

“T have no complaints,” Rollins said. “I did all
Ican do. Shot 3 under on championship Sunday
and came up short.”

He was one of the few guys who made a lasting
charge at Yang.

Robert Allenby started with two birdies in his
first three holes, but struggled from there and
finished 4 under, tied for fifth with Will MacKen-
zie (70), Fredrik Jacobson (70) and Scott Piercy
(65).

Just like last year, when he was in contention
during the Honda’s final round before chipping
onto a waterside pile of rocks and tossing his ball
into the drink, Mark Calcavecchia’s chances were
all wet again. The two-time Honda winner’s undo-
ing came at the 11th, when he hit into a greenside
hazard. He rolled up his right pant leg, hacked the
ball out of some muck and salvaged a bogey, but
got no closer and shot 73.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Rattlers honoured for Hugh Campbell performance

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THEY didn’t win the presti-
gious Hugh Campbell Basket-
ball Classic, but the CI Gibson
Rattlers senior boys basketball
team was recognised for its run-
ners-up position in the tourna-
ment held last month.

Speaking at the 60th Com-
monwealth Day assembly yes-
terday in the CI Gibson Gym-
nasium, Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister said the Rattlers’ sec-
ond place finish behind Grand
Bahama’s Tabernacle Acade-
my Falcons is a prime example
of what happens in the Com-
monwealth of Nations.

Also in attendance was Earl
Deveaux, the Minister of Envi-
ronment.

“There’s something about the
pride in belonging to some-
thing,” Bannister said. “You
take pride in being a Rattler and
you should let everybody know
that.”

When Bannister asked how
many people watched the Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic, the
gym went wild. When he asked
how many watched the Rattlers
play in the final, the students
cheered even louder.

On Commonwealth Day,
Bannister said it was so impor-
tant for all of us to learn the
importance of belonging to

something that we all can appre-
ciate.

Last year, Bannister said the
Bahamas sent a team to com-
pete in the Commonwealth
Youth Championships in India
where they participated in swim-
ming, track and field and tennis.

However, the Bahamas didn’t
participate in basketball.

Also last year, the Bahamas
travelled to St. Kitts to compete
in the Carifta Games. St. Kitts,
like India, are a part of the 53-
membership of the Common-
wealth.

Bannister said coach Kevin
‘KJ? Johnson and the members
of his Rattlers’ basketball team
should be commended for get-
ting into the final.

He compared the Common-
wealth nation to the Rattlers
basketball team.

“They performed so well in
so many areas,” said Bannister,
who left five important points
for CI Gibson to fashion them-
selves after in their quest to
remain not just a sporting pow-
er, but a highly respected edu-
cational institution.

1) COMMITMENT

“Your basketball team would
not have made the finals if they
didn’t come to practice, if they
didn’t do what coach KJ said
and if they didn’t follow the
rules,” Bannister said. “It took
commitment to do that.”

2) COMMUNICATE

“When the guard comes
down the court, you see him put
his hand up or you see him do
certain things and you see guys
go into position,” Bannister
said. “They might be talking at
that time, but they are commu-
nicating in a certain way.”

3) DEPENDABILITY

“On the basketball court, if
you are on a fast break and you
throw the ball down court, you
have to know that the center or
forward is going to catch it and
throw it in the rim,” Bannister
said.

4) DISCIPLINE

“Tf you don’t want to learn,
you get up and leave. I still see
friends you.”

5) WORKING TOGETHER

“No basketball team can suc-
ceed unless you work togeth-
er,” Bannister said. “The same
thing happens in your school.
You have to work together.”

Bannister’s message certainly
didn’t go on deaf ears.

“Tt was very encouraging to
hear him talk about our poten-
tial here and getting the most
out of our athletes,” said KJ
Johnson, whose Rattlers will be
trying to redeem themselves in
the GSSSA playoffs.

Rattlers’ starting point guard
Junior Dennis said as a senior,
he wanted to leave CI Gibson

Falcons pay courtesy call on the president and chairman of PGL

ON Thursday, 5th March 2009, Principal
and Coach Norris Bain along with the
Tabernacle Falcons boy’s basketball team,
paid a courtesy call on the newly appointed
President for Port Group Limited (PGL)
and The Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Limited (GBPA) Mr Tan Rolle and PGL
Chairman, Mr Hannes Babak.

Congratulating the group on their recent
victory at the annual Hugh Campbell Bas-
ketball Tournament, Mr Rolle and Mr
Babak encouraged the young men to
remain focused on their education and to
pursue excellence in all of their undertak-

ings.

Mr Rolle took the opportunity to share
with coach Bain and his students, how his
father instilled in him the importance of
education at a very early age. While Mr
Babak shared with the students, that their
education will allow them to travel the

school.

world and experience different cultures.

Mr Rolle also gave the group a synopsis
of GBPA’s plans for the education sector of
Grand Bahama, including the highest
achiever scholarship award that will be giv-
en to the top achieving student at each high

Principal and Head Coach of the Falcons

expressed his thanks for the opportunity to
meet with the newly appointed leaders of
the Port. ‘It is important that my students
hear the same morals and ideal that we
impart to them on a daily basis, being pre-
sented to them by the new President and

Chairman of the Port Authority,” said

Bain.

visit.

Mr Babak and Mr Rolle both presented
congratulatory gifts to each member of the
Falcons team and the group was treated to
refreshments prepared especially for their

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MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture (third from left) and Minister of Environment Earl Deveaux
pose with members of the Cl Gibson Rattlers Seior Boys basketball team at their Commonwealth day

assembly yesterday.

with the Hugh Campbell title
in Johnson’s hands.

But he noted that it was a dis-
appointing finish. He noted that
Bannister’s works were an
encouragement to them as they
try to put the defeat behind
them.

“Tt was a good inspiration,
telling us never to give up, keep
chasing our dream and no mat-
ter what your goal is in life, even
if you don’t make it to college,
you. can take up something like a
trade to keep you motivated,”
Dennis said.

“We were a little depressed
because we worked so hard to
win the championship. But we

didn’t win it. We fell short.”

The Rattlers also lost out in
the GSSSA track and field
championships last week, finish-
ing third behind the defending
champions CR Walker Knights
and the CV Bethel Stingrays.

Track coach Kenton Burrows
said Bannister’s comments were
not just an inspiration for the
basketball team, but also to
their track team.

“It was excellent, especially
making reference to the bas-
ketball team and their accom-
plishment,” Burrows said.
“When you put in the time and
effort, it will pay off in the end.”

Ryan Ingraham, a basketball

player who surpassed the qual-
ifying standard of 6-feet, 4-inch-
es in the under-17 boys high
jump when he cleared 6-4 1/2
at the GSSSA meet last week,
said he was pleased that Ban-
nister imparted the comments
to them.

And Katrina Seymour, who
got second in the 100 and won
both the 200 and 400 in the
intermediate girls division, said
she was very pleased with her
performance, despite the fact
that she was feeling sick.

As for Bannister’s comments,
Seymour said if there was any-
thing she learnt, it was about
“having pride in yourself.”

Phil Smith Primary Schools Basketball
Classic set to begin this weekend

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH so much emphasis
being placed on the high
schools, coach Kevin ‘KJ’ John-
son has decided to put some of
the spotlight on the primary
schools.

Starting this weekend and
running through March 20,
Johnson’s Providence Basket-
ball Club will host the first Phil
Smith Primary Schools Basket-
ball Classic at the CI Gibson
Gymnasium.

Already a total of 20 private
and 17 public schools have
signed up to participate in the
double elimination tournament
that will honour the top three
finishers.

“T feel that in order for us to
reach our full potential, we need
to start from the youth in the
primary schools,” Johnson said.
“T know that we have a lot of
talent down, but we just need
to recognise them.

“The coaches have been
doing a good job in getting

them prepared for the high
school, so this is a good way for
us to focus on what they are
doing.”

Entered from the private
schools are Temple Christian,
Teleos Christian, Queen’s Col-
lege, St. Francis/Joseph, St.
Thomas More, Nassau Christian
Academy, Galilee Academy, St.
John’s, St. Anne’s, Westminis-
ter, Jordan Prince William,
Mount Carmel, Xavier, Zion
Academy, Our Lady’s, Blair-
wood Academy, Freedom
Academy, St. Bede’s, Kingsway
and Church of God.

And from the government
schools, the teams entered are
Albury Sayles, CW Sawyer,
Carlton Francis, Carmichael,
Centreville, Cleveland Eneas,
Columbus, Naomi Blatch, Clar-
idge, Garvin Tynes, Palmdale,
Ridgeland, Sandilands, Stephen
Dillet, Uriah, Woodcock and
Yellow Elder Primary.

When asked about the inter-
est in the tournament, Johnson
said the numbers were right
around what he had anticipated.

“T wasn’t surprised because
youngsters like that love to play

basketball, so I wouldn’t be sur-
prised if some of the other
schools call to get in,” Johnson
said. “But it’s kind of late. They
will probably have to wait until
next year.”

The teams will be split up in
groups of nine in four different
pools. Similar to the Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic,
they will play each other.

They will then qualify to play
in the “sweet 16,” the elite eight,
final four and then the cham-
pionship game.

Trophies and medals will be
presented to the champions,
runners-up and third place fin-
ishers, the most valuable player
and the 10 All-Tournament
recipients.

The action will get started on
Saturday at 9 am and again on
Sunday at about 1 pm. Next
Monday and throughout the
week, the games will get started
at 3:30 pm.

“We want to encourage the
youngsters to work hard
because this is going to be an
exciting tournament for them
to participate in,” Johnson said.

Competition rises in New
Providence cycling event

ON Saturday, the New Proy-
idence Amateur Cycling Asso-
ciation continued with its road
race events and the excitement
as well as competition was hot.

There are now a few elite
junior cyclists who have joined
the ranks of the adults, thus
causing the race to be even
more competitive and this was
evident on Saturday past.

Thus we now see the level of
cycling races here in country/Nas-
sau have become very, very, very
competitive and along with the
juniors we have a group of senior
master cyclists who are showing
themselves to be contenders in
any of the road races.

Between the elite juniors,
elite seniors, the open women
and the elite men local rid-
ing/bicycle races are extremely
competitive.

On Saturday, cycling action
took place in western end/por-
tion of the island of New Prov-

42 miles road race
7 Laps

1st Lee Farmer
Time 1 hr 46mins .27sec

2nd Tracey Sweeting
Time 1 hr 48mins .16sec
3rd Rolf Fasth

Time 1 hr 48mins.17sec

Ath Jamie Nottage
Time 1 hr 48mins.59sec

5th Jay Major
Time 1 hr 50mins.32

6th Anthony Colebrook
Time ihr 50 mins 33sec

idence in the area of Jaws
Beach, Clifton Pier and South
Ocean, covering a 6 mile cir-
cuit.

The juniors started first cov-
ering two laps of this 6 miles
course. The juniors boys/girls
ranging from 10-14 years rode
like professional cyclists.

The pace was between 18-
21 miles per hour throughout
the race, but it all came to
down to a mass sprint out.

The conclusion saw Raheem
Colebrook winning the sprint
and the race, second was his
team-mate from Team War-
riors Justin Simmons, followed
by Antinece Simmons, Decoda
Johnson, Carlano Bain and
Abigail Minns.

The adults or the “Big Boys”
started shortly after and the
action continued with the top
elite local cyclists burning up
the street in western area of
New Providence.

7th Brad Henney
Time ihr 50 mins 33sec.99

8th Turbo

Time ihr 50 mins.35sec

9th Mark Davis
Time ihr 54 mins .33sec

10th Shawn Fox
11th Wayne Price
12th Edmund Butler
13th Tony Mackey

Tracey ‘Show-Time’ Sweet-
ing started the action break-
ing away for two laps, but was
brought back by the Pelton
group of cyclists. But shortly
after, Lee ‘the Jet’ Farmer
made his move to close the
gap.

The course was a huge
increase in speed within the
Pelton around 25-27 mph.

After chasing Farmer for a
few laps, Rolf Fasth and
Tracey Sweeting established a
gap on the remainder of
cyclists, which created a split in
the whole race.

Farmer went on to win the
race. Fasth and Sweeting end-
ed up in a sprint with Sweeting
edging out Rolf.

Here’s a look at the results
of the race:

New Providence Amateur
Cycling Association’s Stage
One Road Cycling Clash on
Saturday:

JUNIORS
Overall Results
2Laps 6mls_ route

ist Raheem Colebrook
2nd Justin Simmons
3rd Antinece Simmons
Ath Decoda Johnson
5th Carlano Bain

6th Abigail Minns

Jr Boys

Jr Girls

ist Raheem Colebrook
ist Antinece Simmons
2nd Justin Simmons
2nd Abagail Minns
3rd Decoda Johnson
Ath Carlano Bain

5th Abigail Minns





CN WEEE

7 |



m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH the championship
finals in the Government
Secondary School Sports
Association’s junior division
all set, each of the top seeds
advanced as expected, setting
the stage for a pair of highly
anticipated series.

JUNIOR GIRLS
#1 H.0 NASH LIONS - 48
#4 S.C MCPHERSON SHARKS - 14

¢ The division’s top seed led
wire to wire and added anoth-
er effortless win to their perfect
season thus far.

The Lions gave up just a sin-
gle field goal in the opening
half and led 21-5 at half-time.

H.O Nash opened the sec-
ond half connecting early and
often from beyond the arch as
the lead ballooned to as much
as 37.

The Sharks struggled to con-
sistently advance the ball
beyond half court in the face of
the Lions airtight trap which
forced a series of turnovers.

H.O Nash’s high powered
offense placed three players in
double figures.

Lakishna Munroe and
Randya Kemp led all scorers
with 15 points apiece while
Regine Neely added 10.

Jonethra Kelly scored all but
two of the Sharks’ points, fin-
ishing with 12.

#2 T.A THOMPSON SCORPIONS - 33
#3 A.F ADDERLEY TIGERS - 24

¢ The Scorpions overcame a
double figure deficit at half-
time with a concentrated fast-
break effort in a high scoring
second half.

The Tigers led 16-6 at inter-
mission but went scoreless over
the first seven minutes of the
second half as the Scorpions
raced out to easy baskets.

The Scorpions opened the
half on a 11-0 run capped by
Paula Green’s lay-up which
gave her team their first lead of
the game, 17-16 with 12:41
remaining.

Green also gave the Scorpi-
ons their largest lead of the
game, 29-20 with just under
five minutes remaining.

Green finished with 16
points, 12 of which came in the
in the second half, while
Shanae Armbrister and Jaynell

Top seeds ease to wins, Scorpions
place two teams in championships

Cox added six points apiece.

JUNIOR BOYS
#1 T.A THOMPSON SCORPIONS - 58
#4 LW YOUNG GOLDEN EAGLES - 26

¢ The Scorpions landed
their second team in the
championship final when the
junior boys breezed by the
fourth seeded Golden Eagles.

The Scorpions led 18-7
after the first quarter and the
route was on.

They continued to build
upon the advantage reaching
a 20 point lead on a lay-up
by Angelo Lockhart midway
through the third quarter.

T.A Thompson led 45-24
after the third quarter and
reached their largest lead of
the game on a lay-up by
Mavin Saunders late in the
fourth.

Saunders led all scorers
with 21 points, while Lock-
hart added 17.

Roosevelt Whylly and Jer-
maine Sturrup added seven
points apiece. =

#2 D.W DAVIS PITBULLS - 49
#3 A.F ADDERLEY TIGERS - 43

¢ The Tigers were on the
brink of disrupting the highly
anticipated 1-2 matchup
between the Pitbulls and Scor-
pions, but faltered down the
stretch in the fourth quarter
unable to keep pace with the
Pitbulls.

The Tigers opened the
game ona 7-0 run, led 13-4 at
the end of the first quarter
and 23-16 at the half.

The second half was a com-
plete turnaround with a full-
court trap which continuously
harassed the Tigers’ ballhan-
dlers and produced a series of
turnovers.

Alcott Fox gave the Pitbulls
their first lead of the game on
a three point play which gave
them a 31-30 advantage.

Fox scored with less than 20
seconds remaining in the
quarter to give his team a 36-
34 lead heading into the
fourth.

The Tigers never came
within four points in the final
quarter as the Pitbulls
outscored them 13-9.

Fox led all scorers with 19
points while Kenrico Lockhart
led the Tigers with 13.

Both championship series
will begin tomorrow at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

ru a = ag

H.O Nash’s Randya Kemp pulls up for a jumpshot in the Lions’ 48-14 win over the S.C McPherson Sharks
yesterday at the D.W Davis Gymnasium. With the win the Lions advanced to the championship round where
they will face the T.A Thompson Scorpions.

Lt McPherson Sharks players

Bahamas lose in Davis Cup tie

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas suffered a 4-1 loss to
Paraguay in the first round of the men’s
American Zone II Davis Cup tie and will
now have to host Guatemala in a must-win
situation in the second round in July.

Trailing 2-1 going into Sunday’s final day
of competition at the Yacht y Golf Club in
Paraguayo, Lambare, the Bahamas dropped
the two reverse singles to Paraguay to finish
with a 4-1 decision.

Paraguay wrapped up the tie as Ramon
Delgado knocked off Grand Bahamian
Devin Mullings 6-1, 7-6 (3), 6-1 in the battle
of the top seeds.

And in the final match between the num-
ber two seeds, Timothy Neilly was beaten 6-
4, 6-1 by Diego Galeano.

The Bahamas’ only victory came on Fri-
day’s first day when Mullings pulled off a 4-
6, 7-5, 4-1 retired win over Galeano. In the
first match, Delgado defeated Neilly 6-1,
6-4, 6-2.

And in the pivotal doubles that was
played on Saturday, Delgado and Galeano
teamed up for a 6-1, 6-0, 6-2 victory over
Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle.

Team captain John Farrington and the
players were en route from Paraguay yes-

terday to the United States where they
reside and were unavailable for comments.

But Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association’s
president Wesley Rolle said he felt the team
performed as best as they could under the
circumstances.

“T will be getting a report from John as
soon as he’s settled in,” Rolle said. “So we
have to wait to find out exactly what hap-
pened, especially in the doubles.

“We lost the doubles and that put us in a
hole. But we now have to regroup and get
ready for Guatemala.”

As a result of losing the tie, the Bahamas
will now host Guatemala in the second
round over the Independence holiday week-
end, July 10-12 at the National Tennis Cen-
ter.

Rolle said the association intended to
work on getting the players into a training
camp prior to the tie to make sure that they
were ready for the competition.

Additionally, Rolle said they could final-
ly see the inclusion of Jamaal Adderley,
who was not available to travel to Paraguay
because of his school commitments at the
University of South Florida.

With the tie being home, Rolle said the
association would also be looking at the
possibility of bringing veteran touring pro
Mark Knowles to play in the doubles.

As the host, Rolle said they would be
getting in touch with corporate Bahamas

———_- —— ——_—_——_—

Devin Mullings

to lend their financial support over the next
few months to ensure that the tie would be
another successful one here.

The Bahamas need to be successful in the
tie against Guatemala in order to avoid being
relegated to zone III next year. A win by
either team will keep them into zone II.

“We don’t want to be relegated to zone III
again. So we will do all we can to make sure
that we stay in zone I,” Rolle said. “It’s
going to be important for us to pull it off.”

The Bahamas has never played
Guatemala in Davis Cup history.



scramble for a loose ball dur-
ing the second half of the GSS-
SA Junior Girls Semifinals.

TENNIS

BOURNE/ATKINSON
RESULTS

THE finals of the Dr. Eric
Bourne-Ron Atkinson Open
Tennis Tournament was com-
pleted on Sunday at the Gym
Tennis Club.

* The following are the
results of the finals played:

Men’s open singles — Rob-
bie Isaacs def. Shaka Symon-
ette 6-3, 6-2.

Men’s 45 singles —Tony
Fisher def. Calvin Farquharson
Men’s 55 sinlges — Gabby
Sastre def. Tim Dames 6-1, 6-

2

Men’s 65 singles - Gabby
Sastre def. Ralph Barnet 6-0,
6-3.

Ladies’ singles — Paula
Whitfield def. Alicia Butler 6-
0, 6-1.

Men’s open doubles — Rob-
bie Isaacs/Jadrian turnquest
def. Keweku/Shaka Symonette
6-3, 5-7, 7-6.

Men’s 45 doubles — Mike
Isaacs/Don Cooke def. Terry
North/Mickey Williams 6-3, 6-
|

“Mixed doubles — Jody
Turnquest/Erin Strachan def.
Scott Alleyne/Dionne Butler.

P A



ALL

FREEDOM FARM
RESULTS

Here’s a look at the results
posted in the Freedom Farm
Baseball League over the
weekend at the park in
Yamacraw:

T-Ball Division

Coco Plums def. Sea
Grapes 7-1; Guineps def.
Dillies 11-1.

Coach Pitch

Bees def. Green Turtles 14-
7; Mosquitoes def. Wasps 9-2;
Boas def. Bees 8-5; Sand Flies
def. Green Turtles 16-4; Boas
def. Wasps 12-10; Barracudas
and Dolphins played to 6-6;
Turbots def. Red Snappers 5-
1; Octopus def. Eels 24-0;
Barracudas def. Eels 15-13.

11-12 Division

Wild Dogs def. Conchs 7-6;
Blue Marlins def. White
Crowns 14-0; Green Parrots
def. Conchs 7-0; Nassau
Groupers def. White Crowns
10-0; Wild Dogs def. Blue
Marlins 9-7.

13-15 Division

Silver Jacks def. Sharks 13-
4: Stingrays def. Raccoons
4-0; Potcakes def. Sharks 21-
6; Stingrays def. Owlz 4-3.

16-18 Division
Lucayans def. Tainos 13-3;
Arawaks def. Caribs 14-3.





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Gladstone Thurston/BIS

BENJAMIN PRATT, senior manager of the Andros Tourist Office, welcomes participants in the

People-to-People programme.

‘People-to-People’ programme
aids tourism in North Andros

m By GLADSTONE
THURSTON
Bahamas Information
Service

A VIBRANT “People-to-Peo-
ple” programme is sustaining
tourism in North Andros.

Sponsored by the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation, it connects
visitors with volunteer Bahamian
hosts throughout the islands.

The programme is designed to
give visitors a genuine taste of
Bahamian hospitality and culture
in an informal, personal way. Vis-
itors and Bahamians crammed the
Coconut Farms Resort in North
Andros on Friday to celebrate
People-to-People. North Andros
coconut craft designer Perky
Lightbourne, artist Ernest Pratt
and Bahamian preserves creator
Candice Turnquest were featured.

“People-to-People is essential
to us moving forward,” said Ben-
jamin Pratt, senior manager of the
Andros Tourist Office.

“Tt provides a human element to
what we want to do in terms of
building a tourism industry in
North Andros. The local people
are very enthusiastic about it,” he
said.

The global economic recession
has not impacted North Andros
as significantly as New Providence
and Grand Bahama, where hun-
dreds of workers lost their jobs.

“The interesting thing about

Coli

Andros is that for the type tourist
we have visiting us, they are almost
recession-proof,” said Mr Pratt.

“These are wealthy persons who
enjoy fly-fishing, scuba diving and
snorkelling. We receive thousands
of them every year. We do not see
any significant reduction in those
numbers.”

And, in an effort to attract more
domestic tourists, plans are under-
way to convert the regatta site at
Morgan’s Bluff into a welcome
centre and marketplace. From
there, artisans, farmers, fishermen
and other providers of goods and
services may ply their wares to
passengers arriving and leaving on
the nearby ferry service.

“Morgan’s Bluff would serve as
a centre at which customers and
providers of goods and services
would converge to do business,
making it a one-stop-shop,” said
Mr Pratt.

Deanne Gibson, assistant man-
ager of the People-to-People
department in the Ministry of
Tourism, thanked winter residents
for promoting the North Andros
destination. She encouraged them
to become official members of
People-to-People so they can share
with others the beauty of the
island. The programme can be
accessed through bahamas.com
and volunteers are featured on
YouTube. In New Providence,
there are up to ten requests each
day, she said.



“People-to-People experiences i
last a lifetime,” said Ms Gibson, }
whose parents helped found the :
programme. “They are visitors }

today, but friends for life.”

North Andros business woman

Daisy Bowleg immediately volun-
teered. “This is something I would
like to be a part of,” she said. “This
is great news for tourism here. I
believe that as we learn more
about People-to-People, more
North Androsians would sign up.”

Chief Councillor for the island
Brian Cleare said that “when it
comes to exhibiting true, quality
hospitality, Andros, in general, is
among the best. “People-to-People
is an excellent initiative. We wel-
come our fellow Bahamians into
our homes when they come over
for the various festivals, so wel-
coming guests from around the
world is no problem for us.”

Responding to the concerns of
guests, the North Andros District
Council will undertake a compre-
hensive clean-up of North Andros
beaches. As North Andros bor-
ders on a major shipping lane, rub-
bish from illegal dumping washes
up on the shores.

“That creates a huge problem
for us in terms of sustaining clean
beaches,” he said.

“Presently local government
does not have sufficient resources.
But we will do the best that we
can to maintain a clean, healthy
environment.”

nalmperial

To Our Valued Clients

Please note that all offices of
Colinalmperial in Nassau
will OPEN at 12.30pm on
Wednesday 11 March 2009
to allow for the company’s
Annual General Meeting &
Star Employee Awards

Breakfast.

We apologize for any
inconvenience caused.

Colinalmperial offers convenient Saturday payment
facilities at our Collins Avenue branch.
$:30am-12:30pm * Tel 356.8300



Search underway
for the next Miss
Teen Bahamas

THEODORE Elyett’s Miss Teen - ey
Bahamas — World Organisation is a
looking for its next teen beauty

queen.

Under the theme “Twilight Beau-
ties: Get In The Zone,” Theodore
Elyett Productions aims to present a
showcase of beauty, intelligence and

poise.

This year’s theme, the organisa-
tion said in a press release, will
encourage contestants to be the
epitome of “light in the midst of } 7

darkness.”

The pageant organisation said it
wants this concept to be the one the
teen delegates aspire to, so that
upon completing the rigorous two-
month programme they will be “a
shining example for other Bahami-

an teen females to emulate.”

All interested young ladies
between the ages of 14-18 are asked
to apply online at www.missteenba-
hamasworld.com and to attend the first pre-
pageant information session scheduled for
March 14 at the Wyndham Nassau Resort and

Crystal Palace Casino.

This session will provide applicants with
information on the pageant, allowing them to
begin preparations for the 2009 summer pro-
gramme which officially begins in June, the
organisation said. Application deadline is June

19, 2009.

Pageant president and national director
Theodore Sealy said: “With only four years
under our belt, our pageant organisation has
continuously shown progressive growth and
we expect our 2009 production to produce even



Bahama.

greater results. Since 2005, our
organisation has crowned ten teen
beauty queens, of that number six of
our teen ambassadors have brought
back international titles.

“This is a feat that no teen
pageant in the country has ever
accomplished, and we invite a new
group of teen delegates from
throughout the country to sign up
online to be a part of this exciting
teen summer programme.”

The programme, which officially
begins in June, provides contestants
with over two months of education-
al seminars, stage deportment train-
ing, question and answer technique
training, personal grooming, eti-
quette and speech seminars,
community service initiatives and
more.

This year, the organisation wel-
comes on board five Family Island
directors that will serve as scouts
who will provide the pageant with
Family Island delegates from Abaco,
Eleuthera, Harbor Island, Exuma and Grand

The 4th Annual Theodore Elyett’s Miss Teen
Bahamas pageant is slated for August 9, 2009 at
the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino.

The winner of the contest will walk away

with over $7,000 in cash and prizes.

World.

Theodore Elyett’s Miss Teen Bahamas -
World Organisation has been recently selected
as the new franchise holder for one of the
largest international teen pageants — Miss Teen

IIC and COB launch new
programme for businesses

THE Inter-American
Investment Corporation (IIC)
and the College of the
Bahamas together have
launched a new programme to
assist local businesses to access
financing.

The IIC and COB hosted a
cocktail reception to announce
the launch of the FINPYME
programme in the Bahamas.

FINPYME was developed
by the TIC to assist small and
medium-sized businesses to
improve their competitive
skills and facilitate their access
to potential sources of financ-
ing.
At the launch, Scotiabank
Bahamas’ managing director
Barry Malcolm said the pro-
gramme is timely and neces-
sary, especially in the tough
economic times that the coun-
try is currently facing

“Given our current climate,
the opportunity for small busi-
nesses to access resources to
evaluate, understand and
refine their business models is
invaluable,” Mr Malcolm said.

“We launched the $10 mil-
lion SME Fund in 2006 and
closely followed this with the
launch of the Small Business
Unit in 2007. Signing this FIN-
PYME agreement in 2008 is
another major step in the
bank’s 120 year-history of sup-
porting small and medium

a Ebi La

enterprises throughout the
Caribbean.”

Mr Malcolm said the Small
Business Unit has seen a cred-
it count of 1,000 and $25 mil-
lion has flowed through that
unit in just over two years.

Also on hand for the launch
was Richard Bernal, alternate
executive director for the
Caribbean.

Mr Bernal said in these
“interesting” economic times
the FINPYME programme is
urgent and critical, as it will
be assisting a sector which has
a major role to play in main-
taining the economies of those
countries which have imple-
mented the diagnostic tool.

COB’s chairperson for the
School of Business Remelda

yeah

OR Raa
ae el
SANDWICH

ey





Moxey explained that the Col-
lege is partnering with HC and
is obtaining faculty to assist in
the diagnostic review. To that
end, members of the COB fac-
ulty participated in training
sessions in Jamaica, making
them ready to conduct diag-
nostic reviews.

Michael Apel, IIC’s senior
trust fund and technical assis-
tance officer, was also on hand.

Mr Apel said that the pro-
gramme is not one to finance
small and medium enterpris-
es, but rather one to equip
them with skills to review
resources and assess financial
situations themselves.

FINPYME, a Spanish
acronym for Innovative
Financing for Small and Medi-
um Enterprises (SME), fea-
tures a mechanism for evalu-
ating the SMEs, which are
characteristically under-served
by the banking system because
their financial capacity is large-
ly unknown.

The programme’s diagnos-
tic reviews examine what fac-
tors positively or negatively
affect an establishment’s
capacity to create wealth and
employment and manage
them both efficiently.

In December 2008, Scotia-
bank Bahamas signed a part-
nership agreement with IIC.
This will allow Scotiabank to
deepen its relationship with
small and medium-sized enter-
prises in the Bahamas. The
FINPYME — programme
addresses the fundamental
issues that small businesses
face on a day-to-day basis such
as a lack of resources to have
comprehensive reviews done.

The IIC has executed the
FINPYME in six Central
American countries — Costa
Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala,
Honduras, Nicaragua and
Panama.

The programme has also
been implemented in the
Dominican Republic.









ywieyel
American
blasts

anal he
‘complete and
utter nonsense’

* Carrier accuses health
insurer of ‘scapegoating’ it
for customer relations
fallout associated with
premium increases on
health portfolio it acquired

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

British American Financial’s
president yesterday described as
“complete and utter nonsense”
assertions by Generali Worldwide
that his company’s “inappropriate
pricing” was responsible for the
more than 100 per cent increase
in premiums some of the latter’s
individual health policyholders
were now experiencing.

Chester Cooper implied that
Generali could not blame his
company for the major premium
rate increases it was now impos-
ing, a move that has provoked a
negative reaction from policy-
holders, because some two-and-a-
half to three years had passed
since it acquired British American
Financial’s health insurance port-
folio.

Mr Cooper, who is also British
American Financial’s president,
told Tribune Business that “any
assertion” by Generali and its
senior executives “that their rate
increases and their apparent client
relations issues have anything to
do with British American Finan-
cial is complete and utter non-
sense”.

He was responding to an article
published in Tribune Business on
Friday, March 6, in which Tina
Cambridge, Generali World-
wide’s regional director for the
Bahamas, had blamed “inappro-
priate pricing” by British Ameri-
can Financial for the major pre-
mium hikes experienced by indi-
vidual health policyholders it had
inherited from the latter.

Mr Cooper said he was
“frankly, puzzled” as to why
British American Financial’s
name was mentioned, “as the
issue discussed has absolutely
nothing whatsoever to do with
us”.

He accused Generali of
attempting to shift the blame for
the premium increases and sub-
sequent policyholder fallout on
to British American Financial,
using his company as a scapegoat
without justification, given that it
was only now adjusting rates.

Generali Worldwide acquired
British American Financial’s
health insurance book of busi-
ness, and the underwriting risk,
on January 1, 2006, taking over
management control from the
Bahamian-owned insurer in mid-
2006. Apart from the three years
that have elapsed between the
acquisition and current premium
increases, what is also likely to

SEE page 2B



THE TRIBUNE

1siness

TUESDAY,

MARCH 10, 2009

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net

Job application file April groundbreak

is ‘six inches thick’

B® Top construction firm boss unable to provide work for applicants, as

major private sector jobs coming to end with no replacements in sight

(i Albany ‘keeping our heads above water’ with 100 employed, as two
difficult years endured with overheads maintained

WF But 1980's worse for sector, with hope for Abaco project involving

$10m first phase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A leading Bahamian con-
struction firm’s managing direc-
tor yesterday told Tribune Busi-
ness that he had a “file six inch-
es thick” of job applications
from persons he was unable to
provide work for, as he praised
the Albany development for
“keeping our heads above
water” amid the current
“bleak” outlook for the sector.

Richard Wilson, of Cavalier
Construction, said that apart
from the $1.3 billion south-
western New Providence pro-
ject, which is backed by Lyford
Cay-based billionaire Joe Lewis
and golfers Tiger Woods and
Ernie Els, there were few new
construction projects on the
horizon to replace existing ones

Court rejects stay on
receivership end for marina

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Court of Appeal has
rejected an application to stay a
Supreme Court order that
removed a key 116-slip Freeport
marina and associated land
parcels from the receivership
affecting New Hope Holdings,
Tribune Business can reveal.

Appeal Justice Christopher
Blackman dismissed an applica-
tion by attorneys acting for Tom
Gonzalez’s T. G. Investments to
stay the January 27, 2009, order
by Justice Estelle Gray-Evans
that removed the Port Lucaya
Marina, related land assets and
another parcel of land from
receivership, returning them to
New Hope Marina Development.

Appeal Justice Blackman
declined to grant the appeal,
brought by T. G. Investments’
attorneys’, Anthony McKinney
and Arnold Forbes, on the
grounds that they and their client
had not complied with the Court
of Appeal’s rules in seeking leave
to appeal the initial ruling from
the Supreme Court.

Appeal Justice Blackman said
the “exception” argument offered
by Mr McKinney under the Court
of Appeal Act was not “applica-
ble in the circumstances of this
case”.

Asa result, he said: “The appli-
cation for leave for a stay of the
order of Justice Evans, dated Jan-
uary 27, 2009, is declined. It fol-
lows, therefore, that the appeal
itself is a nullity.”

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we’ve kept our overheads,” Mr
Wilson told Tribune Business.
“The Government said to try
and keep people employed, and
we’ve done that. It’s not been
good for the last two years.

“We’re very fortunate that
we've got Albany, and are mov-
ing ahead with Albany. That’s
keeping our heads above water
right now.

“All our other jobs are com-
ing to an end. Bayroc is due to
finish at Easter, and the British
Colonial Hilton renovation is
due to finish at the end of May.”

Mr Wilson said Cavalier was
currently employing 100 work-
ers at Albany, while another 20
were involved with the

Klonaris’ brothers $13 million

SEE page 3B

Tiger Woods

coming to an end.
“To be frank with you, for
the last 18 months to two years,

However, Tribune Business
understands that T. G. Invest-
ments’ main counsel, Maurice
Glinton, is now seeking to appeal
Justice Blackman’s decision to a
full, three-judge sitting of the
Court of Appeal.

This newspaper had previously
reported that Justice Evans had
altered the October 2, 2008, order
that appointed ex-PLP Senator
and MP, accountant Philip Gala-
nis, as the receiver for the assets
owned by Scandinavian investor
Preben Olsen and his New Hope
Holdings company. The receiver-
ship was initiated over a dispute
involving the repayment of loans

SEE page 6B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Make it a reality.



ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



for development’s
$10-$15m phase I

* The Balmoral president says pre-sales
completed for initial start, with title
insurance package set to produce 58%
saving on transaction legal fees

* Economic downturn likely added ‘one
year’ to existing five-six year business plan

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Nassau-based real estate development is planning to
break ground and start construction next month, after suc-
cessfully completing pre-sales for its $10-$15 million first
phase, with the developer having arranged a package deal to
significantly reduce closing and legal costs for buyers.

Jason Kinsale, president of The Balmoral development,
which when completed aims to have generated $100 mil-
lion in real estate sales, said yesterday that despite the slow-
ing Bahamian economy the April groundbreaking would
signal the start of an “aggressive” push to move the project
forward.

The first phase, which Mr Kinsale said would involve $10-
$15 million in investment, involves the construction of 28
town home units known as The Royale and putting in infra-
structure to ultimately support 75 single family lots.

SEE page 3B

$80,000 investment takes chef
from ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ to heaven

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter



A REAL-life Bahamian ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ survivor today opens the
doors to her very own Bistro, after a more than $80,000 outlay and an
extensive D.LY (do it yourself) venture to transform a former bank into
a cozy eatery.

Keshla Smith, 31, was once a chef under the tutelage of renowned
chef and recipient of 14 Michelin stars, Gordon Ramsey, whose shows
Ramsey’s Kitchen Nightmares and Hell’s Kitchen have given him inter-
national acclaim.

“Just the way you see him on TV, that’s just how he is,”
Ramsey.

Now, Ms Smith is set to demonstrate her own culinary prowess
with the opening of DK Clubhouse, a joint venture with her boyfriend.

According to Ms Smith, her fare can be described as a fusion of inter-
national cuisine served in a relaxing atmosphere, and which is designed
wholly by her and constructed by her boyfriend.

The $1,500 per month space in the Meldon Plaza, Mackey Street, was

SEE page 6B

she said of

Growth P Gre Fund

¢ Professional fund management

e Strong investment performance

PP
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
St. Michael: 246.435.1955

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e Professional administration

© Diversified portfolio

We can get you there!

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Tax reform may be ‘income-ing’

n my last contribution to
this series, I discussed a
sales tax and a value
added tax (VAT) as part
of my ongoing examination of
alternative tax systems. Today, I
continue with an assessment of

income tax. My final article in this
series will offer my thoughts on
the way forward for tax reform,
having explored the most widely-
adopted tax systems.

History of US
Income Tax

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When the Civil War erupted,
the US Congress passed the Rev-
enue Act of 1861 to help finance
the war. The Revenue Act
restored excise taxes and imposed
a tax on personal income. The
Federal income tax was levied at
3 per cent on all income higher
than $800 a year. This tax on per-
sonal income was a new direction
for a Federal tax system based
previously on excise taxes and
customs duties.

One year later (1862), amend-
ments were made to the tax law,
which created a two-tier system.
Income below $10,000 per annum
remained taxed at 3 per cent,
whereas income above that
threshold was taxed at 5 per cent.
Income tax was now ‘withheld at
the source’ (ie. by employers) and
a standard $600 deduction was
implemented, along with exemp-
tions for certain expenses.

The need for Federal revenue
declined sharply after the war,
and eventually income taxes were
repealed. By 1868, the main
source of US government rev-
enue was derived from liquor and
tobacco taxes. From 1868 to 1913,
almost 90 per cent of all revenue
was derived from various excise
taxes. In 1894, the Federal income
tax was reintroduced, and has
remained in effect since. Towards
the end of World War I, the mar-
ginal tax rate was around 67 per
cent. This coincided with the cre-
ation of offshore banking in the
Bahamas in the mid-1930s. In
1944, the top marginal tax rate
peaked at 94 per cent as the US
funded its participation in World
War II. Such high rates of taxa-
tion clearly create a huge disin-

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Income Tax

Income tax is a tax paid on the
taxable income of citizens for
each ‘tax year’. For example, in
the US, the tax year is the calen-
dar year and each taxpayer is
required to file tax returns by
April 15 of the following year.
The taxable income of a taxpayer
is ordinary income plus any addi-
tions (such as capital gains on the
sale of real estate or securities).
minus permitted deductions (mar-
riage deductions or interest costs
on the mortgage of the taxpay-
er’s principal residence).

An income tax regime is often
described as a progressive tax, to
the extent that those who earn
more... pay more. In 2007, the
richest 5 per cent of Americans
accounted for over half of feder-
al income taxes received. The top
1 per cent of income earners pay
25 per cent of total income taxes.
Forty per cent of Americans pay
no federal income tax at all,
although it is the government's
largest revenue source.

In countries with income taxes,
there are strict penalties for tax
evasion. However, courts have
generally ruled that taxpayers
have a legitimate right to seek
means to minimise their tax bur-
dens, within the parameters of

the law. Most tax minimisation
strategies seek to take advantage
of all available deductions and
deferrals. Some countries tax
their citizens on the basis of
worldwide income irrespective of
residency (for example, the US),
whereas other countries have lib-
eral exemptions for non-resident
citizens who live abroad (such as
the United Kingdom).

Policy

Tax rates may be progressive,
regressive or flat. A progressive
tax imposes taxes at different
rates based on one’s level of earn-
ings. For example, the first
$10,000 in earnings may be taxed
at 5 per cent, the next $10,000 at
10 per cent, and any more income
at 20 per cent. Alternatively, a
flat tax imposes the same taxa-
tion level on all earnings. A
regressive income tax may tax
income up to a certain amount,
such as taxing only the first
$90,000 earned.

Personal income tax is often
collected on a pay-as-you-earn
basis, with small corrections made
soon after the end of the tax year.
These corrections take one of two
forms: payments to the govern-
ment for taxpayers who have not
paid enough during the tax year;
and tax refunds from the govern-
ment for those who have over-
paid. Income tax systems will
often have deductions available
that lessen the total tax liability
through reducing total taxable
income. They may also allow loss-
es from one type of income to be
counted against another. For
example, a loss on the stock mar-

ket may be deducted against tax-
es paid on wages. Other tax sys-
tems may isolate the loss such
that business losses can only be
deducted against business taxes
by carrying forward the loss to
later tax years.

Criticisms

There are numerous criticisms
of an income tax system, such as
politicians being quick to increase
tax rates to generate more rev-
enues to throw at a problem, as
opposed to trying to find ways to
fix the problem in the first place.
Income tax rates are administra-
tively easy to change, and there is
virtually no lag time once a
change in tax rates has been
made. However, poorly created
and unfairly implemented income
tax systems can penalise work,
discourage saving and investment,
and hinder the competitiveness
of businesses.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas), a
wholly-owned subsidiary of Colo-
nial Group International, which
owns Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are those
of the author and doe not neces-
sarily represent those of Colonial
Group International or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any ques-
tions or comments to rlgib-
son@atlantichouse.com.bs

British American blasts Generali's ‘complete and utter nonsense’

FROM page 1B

have angered Mr Cooper and
British American Financial is that
Generali will have known exactly
what it was acquiring.

Tribune Business understands
that it conducted extensive due
diligence on the British Ameri-
can Financial health insurance
business prior to the acquisition,
sending a team from its head
office Europe to Nassau as part of
the assessment effort. This news-

paper understands that collec-
tively, inclusive of individual
health and group medical plan
policyholders, Generali World-
wide acquired some 15,000 poli-
cyholders from British American
Financial. Of these, some 2,000
were individual policyholders, the
rest being group plan participants.
“Almost three years later, this
attempt of Generali to attribute
blame to British American Finan-
cial, rather than focus on effec-
tive management of the funda-
mentals of their business itself, is

ye

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frankly astounding,” Mr Cooper
said yesterday.

“Stated directly, the assertions
made in the Tribune’ story is a
ridiculous and unfair ‘scapegoat-
ing attempt’ to use British Amer-
ican Financial as a means to
deflect attention from whatever
issue or query that may have been
raised by their customers.”

He added: “Although I cannot
comment on how Generali
derives its rates, I would say that
apart from claims experience
there are any number of factors
that play into determining the
annually renewable rates.

“Amongst them are claims
management, negotiation with
service providers, expense levels
of the company, cost of reinsur-
ance, actuarial reserves, admin-
istrative efficiencies, required
profit margin and social con-
science of the insurer.

“Obviously, British American
Financial has absolutely nothing
whatsoever to do with these busi-
ness practices or the pricing for-
mula of Generali.”

Mr Cooper also pointed out
that a key factor influencing how
medical/health insurers priced
their premiums, and designed
benefits packages, was the ever-
escalating costs of medical treat-
ment. These costs were increasing
annually at between 10-15 per
cent, meaning that medical infla-
tion was running at 30 per cent
over a three-year period.

Mr Cooper added that British
American Financial sold its health
insurance business to enable it to
concentrate on what it came to
view as its core life insurance and
financial services/investments
business. In her statement to Tri-
bune Business last week, Ms
Cambridge said: “Our assessment
revealed that the block of indi-
vidual policies which we inherited
had been inappropriately priced.

The premiums were too low
for the level of benefits offered,
and they were also too low given
the ages of many of the individu-
als enrolled in that portfolio.

“Our options based on our
analysis were to sell the individual
portfolio or to cancel the cover-
age,” Ms Cambridge told Tribune
Business. “We realised, howev-
er, that if we were simply to can-
cel the policies, it would have left
some individuals without insur-
ance cover and for some, based
on their ages and health condi-
tions, it would have made it very
difficult for them to find alterna-
tives. “In order to provide an
appropriate solution, we have
moved to create an age-banded
premium structure, which pro-
vides for a fairer and more appro-
priate premium for each risk pre-
sented.”

Ci

TO TEMPTATION



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS
Job application file is ‘six inches thick’

FROM page 1B

transformation of East Bay Street’s Moses
Plaza into Elizabeth on Bay. The latter,
though, was set to take places in sequences
of demolition and restoration.

He acknowledged that he had accumu-
lated “a huge file of people looking for
work”, which was “six inches thick with
names”, but Cavalier had been unable to
employ them because there simply were
not enough construction projects taking
place.

Bahamian contractors usually learned of
upcoming construction work from their
architect counterparts, but Mr Wilson said:
“The silence from them is deafening. It’s not
avery good situation. It is bleak right now.

“But Albany has weathered the storm
very well, and will be ahead of the curve in
a year’s time. We’re employing 100 Bahami-

ans right now just on Albany. That number
will increase as the scope of work increases.
We’re talking to them [the developers] on
increasing the scope some time in May, and
bringing on the amenities.”

However, on a more optimistic note, Mr
Wilson said he had “seen it worse” than
now in the Bahamian construction industry,
particularly in the 1980s, when it was “pret-
ty bad”.

He acknowledged that the construction
industry was cyclical, and one of those most
affected by external economic factors, espe-
cially those that impacted the US. The cur-
rent downturn, though, is global, meaning
that Bahamian contractors will not find
work coming from European investors to
pick up the slack.

“T honestly hope that by 2010, in 12
months time, we will be coming out of it,”
Mr Wilson said. “That’s what we’re seeing
right now. But the private sector has got

to have balls to do developments right
now.”

Elsewhere, Mr Wilson was hoping that
the boutique hotel/condo development
planned for Joe’s Cay in Abaco, which is
backed by Galaxy Group Holdings and sev-
eral private investors, would still go ahead.
Cavalier Construction would be the pro-
ject’s main contractor.

The project’s Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA) is currently being com-
pleted, and Mr Wilson said: “We’re still
looking at that and hoping to get a
favourable response from government.

“Tt’s basically a little boutique hotel and
condo project, with 19 Bahamian cottages
and a clubhouse. I would say the first phase
in construction terms is about $10 million,
but in this day and age it’s all done on pre-
sales and phasing.”

He added that there was still local oppo-
sition in Abaco to the development.

Heo

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April groundbreak for development’s $10-$15m phase |

FROM page 1B

And some two months after
the groundbreaking and con-
struction start, Mr Kinsale said
the developers planned to begin
work on 10 larger town home
units, known as The Grand,
which are slightly larger in size.
Several units in this section, he
added, were still on the market.

“We’ve done some initial
clearing of the roads and the
area where we will be building,”
Mr Kinsale told Tribune Busi-
ness. “April is really the offi-
cial groundbreaking with regard
to construction , getting the
infrastructure started and really
moving forward aggressively.”

He explained that the 28 units
in The Royale, consisting of
two-storey, 1,400 square feet
town homes with two bedrooms
and two-and-a half bathrooms,
had all been pre-sold.

“Without pre-sales in place,
we can’t build,” Mr Kinsale
said. “That was a condition set
by Royal Bank of Canada, so
we were able to pre-sale that
phase to get it going.”

The 10 units in The Grand
are slightly larger, at about
2,000 square feet on two storeys,
he added, with four bedrooms
and three bathrooms. “We still
have a couple of units left, but
they’ll be gone by the time
we’re ready to start construc-
tion,” Mr Kinsale added.

First phase construction on

The Royale was expected to be
completed within nine to 12
months, he said, and despite the
economic downturn buyers
were still coming. Mr Kinsale
added that all first phase sales
bar one had been to Bahamian
buyers.

To boost sales, and reduce
the transaction closing times,
when real estate demand was
potentially fickle, The Balmoral
had arranged a title insurance
package with Bahamian law
firm Lennox Paton, which acts
as the Bahamian representative
for US-based title insurer,
Chicago Title.

Through doing so, Mr Kin-
sale said a package had been
arranged where real estate pur-
chasers would pay a flat $3,000
fee for their legal fees and title
insurance combined.

With units in The Royale
starting at a $359,000 price
point, and those in The Grand
pitched at $559,000, Mr Kinsale
said this would produce consid-
erable savings for purchasers.

“On a $359,000 condo, if
you’re just looking at 2 per cent
of the purchase price as the
average legal fee on a tradi-
tional closing, that’s $7,180,” he
explained. The arrangement
with Lennox Paton, he
explained, would thus save buy-
ers at The Balmoral more than
$4,000 in legal fees and closing
costs, a 58 per cent reduction,
with title insurance thrown in.

“Once we start construction,
we plan to increase sales
prices,” Mr Kinsale told Tri-
bune Business. “There is
demand. Buyers are cautious
and asking more questions, like
do you have the financing in
place? Royal Bank of Canada is
providing the financing for the
construction and infrastructure.
We’re well-funded and that’s
giving people comfort.

“We have a pretty conserva-
tive business plan. I think every-
body’s affected by the econom-
ic slowdown, but we have a
pretty conservative plan that
does not require us to sell it out
in a year.

“We have a five to six-year
business plan. The downturn
has probably thrown an extra
year on it, realistically.”

The Balmoral will ultimate-
ly feature 200 town homes and
70 family lots when completed,
plus the associated clubhouse
and other amenities. Mr Kin-
sale added that there were sev-
eral factors that could impact it
positively, namely the fact that
New Providence did not suffer
from an oversupply of real
estate, and the possibilities a
lift-off for the $2.6 billion Baha
Mar project might produce.

And buyer demand was still
evident, with no downward
pressure on real estate prices
across the board. Mr Kinsale
pointed out that units in his last
real estate project, Hampton

Ridge, which was completed a
year-and-a-half ago, were sold
for around $250,000, but one
had just been re-sold for
$340,000, a 36 per cent increase.

“Everybody is feeling the
economic downturn, no doubt
about it,” he added. “The thing
we've been fortunate with is
that we have no direct compe-
tition. The indirect competition
is the economy, but we have a
strong foundation and the club-
house provides something tan-
gible, so people can see we’re
not a brochure.

“That’s helping us to get
through this pre-sales period.
We have our challenges like
everyone else, but we’re squeez-
ing through.”

Qualifications
Bachelor's degree in Sales, Marketing or related
subject; professional certifications
Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth
real estate promotions
Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power
Point, Microsoft Word, Excel and Asset Manager
Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership
and customer relations skills
Must have excellent written and verbal
communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to
work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be
a self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive
and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of The Director of HR & Training,
hr@bakersbayclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009



ek, h
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SECURITIES OFFICER - WINTERBOTHAM INTERNATIONAL SECURITIES

Winterbotham is seeking a professional to assume responsibility, reporting directly to the VP
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The candidate should be young, energetic, self motivated and be well educated, hold a
Series 7 and/or Canadian Securities qualification and preferably hold a degree in finance,
economics or business administration. Relevant post graduate studies and/or professional

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We offer excellent compensation, including financial incentives tied directly to performance
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before 11th March 2009.

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MANAGER ADMINISTRATION

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Excellent Oral and Written Communication Skills

Proven organizational and planning capabilities

Have a proven track record of meeting deadlines

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Strong Interpersonal skills and willingness to be a team player
Must have strong leadership skills and be results oriented
Posses integrity, excellent motivational skills and assertiveness

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iP
Time: 6:00 - 10:00 p.m. (Daily)
Location: Yellow Elder West

Date: March 16-27, 2009
Venue: Government High School

Application Form

P.0. Box:

Name:

Address: Email: SUMMARY OF DUTIES

¢ Overall responsibility for the administrative functions of the company
¢ Training and motivating team members
Ensuring company policies and procedures are adhered to and implementing
new policies as required.
Control and monitor administrative budgets
Responsible for the protection and maintenance of all company assets
Analyze existing business and identify business development opportunities

Tel: Fax:

Agerange: under15 16-2) 26-40 41-60 61-70 1 and over
The successful candidate will become a part of a growing and progressive organization
capable of facing challenges. Benefits include a comprehensive medical and life
package and pension plan. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and

experience.

Employment Status: Employed Government Private

Unemployed

Self-employed

Interested persons may forward a copy of their resume, in confidence to:

Have you completed Previous Training Courses byBAIC? Yes No
List: Date(s):

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 322-6607

ADMINISTRATIVE FEE: $100.00 [EXCLUDING MATERIALS]

behead a Pee ees

Contact: Sharae Collie/Pam Deveaux Tel: 322-3740-1 Fax: 322-21273/928-6542





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SSS ee ee eee
$80,000 investment takes chef from ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ to heaven

FROM page 1B

once the location for Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) and Western
Union. Ms Smith said it was now
the perfect place for her restau-

rant. “I did this for the people,”
she told Tribune Business.

Ms Smith, who is also execu-
tive chef at DK Clubhouse, has
created a unique breakfast and
lunch menu, with offerings such
as Smoked Salmon Benedict for





WASTE - ED








The Low Down Dirty Facts






DOLLARS AND SENSE






Throwing waste out on roads and in parks




breakfast and a house specialty
fish and chips dish for lunch. She
described this as a “secret family
recipe”, reminiscent of her days in
English kitchens. Dinner offer-
ings are to come next month.

Ms Smith has designed her
restaurant to be an affordable
lunch and breakfast spot, serving
fine dining-esque cuisine, with a
soft, muted burgundy and beige
interior to capture the flair of a
true French Bistro.

“T tell people: ‘Don’t come
here looking for cracked conch
and fried chicken.’ I refuse to do
what everybody else is doing ,and
I believe Bahamians need to
think outside of peas and rice,
steamed pork chops and steamed
chicken,” said Ms Smith.

When she returned to the
Bahamas from her studies and
apprenticeship in England in
1999, she worked as a head chef
for Doctors Hospital, and has

helped to design menus and lay-
outs for several restaurants,
including the Porch Cafe on
Blake Road and Curly Tails in
Marsh Harbour, Abaco.

Her new restaurant was just
the next step in her culinary
career.

“DK Clubhouse is actually me
acting out - you know how a child
acts out - it’s is me acting out,”
Ms Smith said. “I wanted to
attract the business class and I
wanted to attract families.”

However, her road to opening
day was not a smooth one, with
the looming recession causing
banks to shy away from loan
requests. She visited more than
five banks before finding the cap-
ital for DK Clubhouse.

“Tn this time, the banks are not
very friendly, so we had to basi-
cally use everything we had. If
this doesn’t work... it’s going to
work,” said Ms Smith.

She is confident that her busi-
ness, which employs 10 staff,
including delivery drivers, will be
competitive, as it was a rarity to
find similar offerings in New
Providence.

“T try to include foods from dif-
ferent parts of the world so every-
body can have something. It
offers a variety, and it’s generally
more on the health conscious side
- something quick, but nice,” Ms
Smith said. “I tried to find a way
for people to enjoy what I enjoy,
but be able to afford it.”

Ms Smith’s fare is prepared
from the best ingredients, includ-
ing indigenous seasonal fruits,
turkey and ham baked on site and
all dressings made from scratch.
“T try to use indigenous stuff
whenever they are in season,” she
said.

Ms Smith has also decided to
forego the automatic 15 per cent
gratuity imposed on customer

during lunch service in so many
Bahamian restaurants, for service
training and hospitality. Though it
may be included on the dinner
ticket.

“You shouldn’t force someone
to pay something that they might
not want to pay. I personally
think if you take out gratuities
you might get more,” she said.

Another unique offering from
such a small restaurant is the pri-
vate dining area. Ms Smith has
incorporated two private dining
areas into the design of DK Club-
house, which are offered for $250
to $300 for two hours. They
include a choice of four menus
that come with wine, soft drinks
and tea and coffee. The restau-
rant will also have free wireless
Internet access.

“I design (restaurants) based
on what my menu is, my clien-
tele and what character my clients
have,” said Ms Smith.

and other public places is dumb, dumb,
dumb! This practice amounts to throwing
money out of the car window. In 2007 it
is estimated that in excess of 2 million
dollars was spent on litter removal in New
Providence. This includes equipment and
staff time. The more you litter the more
money it cost you to keep The Bahamas
clean.

































A message from the Ministry of
Department of Environmental

Health Services

ex
yo.
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access fo the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRACI BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

Court rejects stay on receivership end for marina

FROM page 1B

worth $23-$24 million. A copy of the January
27, 2009, court order, which has been seen by
Tribune Business, stated that among the assets
removed from the receivership are “100 per
cent of the shares of Port Lucaya Marina
LTD, which owns the following properties
comprising Port Lucaya Marina”.

These properties include a 14,506 square
foot parcel of land, situated in Block 3, Unit 2,
of the Bell Channel Subdivision in Freeport;
an 813 square foot parcel of land on Lot 13,
Block 3, Unit 2, of the Bell Channel Subdivi-
sion and a portion of Tract ‘O’, Unit 3 in the
same subdivision; a 6,051 square foot land
tract comprising a portion of the same Tract
‘O’; and a 10.6 acre parcel of land comprising
a portion of the seabed in the Bell Channel
Subdivision. In addition, a separate parcel of
land, consisting of 6.19 acres, and also in the
Bell Channel Bay Subdivision, was also
removed from the receivership by order of
the Supreme Court.

Justice Evans, in her order, also directed
Mr Galanis “to release and deliver over to
New Hope Marina Development Ltd all of
the licences, permits, certificates, deeds, agree-
ments, records, bank accounts, negotiable
instruments, documents, correspondence and
papers relating to Port Lucaya Marina Com-

pany Ltd, doing business as Port Lucaya Mari-
na” and the related land assets.

Port Lucaya Marina’s removal from the
receivership came after attorneys acting New
Hope Marina Development Ltd and AP
Holdings Ltd petitioned the Supreme Court.

The two companies were represented by
Robert Adams and Dwayne Fernander of
Graham, Thompson & Co, and it is under-
stood they were successfully able to argue
that the Port Lucaya Marina and related land
parcels were outside the New Hope Holdings
ownership structure. Messrs Adams and Fer-
nander represented the two companies again
before Appeal Justice Blackman.

However, the Port Lucaya Marina’s con-
tinued removal does not end Mr Galanis’s
receivership over other New Hope Holdings’
assets. These include the Grand Bahama
Yacht Club Marina and Grand Bahama Yacht
Club, plus multiple parcels of land owned in
freehold by New Hope Holdings that are
mainly situated in the Lucayan Marina and
Bell Channel areas. Another 10 parcels of
land that have been leased to New Hope
Holdings were also covered by the original
receivership order.

Tribune Business previously exclusively
revealed that Mr Olsen's main financial
backer, T.G. Investments, had been seeking a
court-appointed receiver for the New Hope

aL

Well-established Wholesaler
saleperson (females are

proven record

encouraged
apply) for the snack food division. Individual
must have experience in sales with emphasis
on large food stores. Only individuals with a
of being able to work
unsupervised and achieve results will be

properties, alleging that Mr Olsen had default-
ed on repaying loans worth $23-$24 million.

T.G. Investments had obtained a Mareva
Injunction to freeze the assets of Mr Olsen and
New Hope Holdings.

They are alleging T.G. Investments lent
$23-$24 million, secured by two promissory
notes, to Mr Olsen and New Hope Holdings to
finance the acquisition of the Port Lucaya
Marina and associated properties, but this has
not been repaid. They are also claiming the
company financed other obligations of New
Hope Holdings.

Yet this newspaper understands that Mr
Olsen’s and New Hope’s attorneys are vigor-
ously contesting the default allegations and the
receivership.

They are alleging that responsibility for any
loan repayment default lies squarely with Mr
Gonzalez. They are claiming he failed to live
up to several obligations, one of which was to
provide New Hope Holdings with $12 mil-
lion in working capital - over and above the
initial purchase price - to fund its operations.

This, Mr Olsen and New Hope’s attorneys
are alleging, never happened, and without
that capital New Hope ended up defaulting.
Essentially, the core allegation in their argu-
ments rests on the claim that any responsi-
bility for the loan default lies with Mr Gon-
zalez himself.

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 of the International

requires a
to

considered. Must be able to drive standard
shift vehicle and be in possession of current
valid driver’s license. Individuals with their
own transportation will receive favorable

consideration. Company offers good benefits.

Submit applications
NaS

Ken

P.O.Box N-7124
Nassau, Bahamas

Le ee

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 9 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.25 | CHG -0.11 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -52.11 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.81 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

1.39
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.43
2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00

1.45
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.59
1.50
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Fince

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS $
0.070

Change Daily Vol. Div $
1.45
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.59
1.40
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.895
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50

10.00 0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S52wk-Hi S2wk-Low

1000.00

Securit
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Symbol
FBB17
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change
0.00

Daily Vol. Interest
7%

Prime + 1.75%
T%

100.00
100.00
100.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

FG CAPITAL
BEOKEBAG!

MARKE
—E ee SERVICES
es

Cah!

Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), NOTICE is
hereby given that RIVERWOODS INVESTMENT
COMPANY LTD. is in dissolution and the date of
commencement of the dissolution is March 6, 2009

Lorna Kemp and Margaret Tatem-Gilbert

LIQUIDATORS

c/o EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

1 Bay Street

2nd Floor, Centre of Commerce

P.O. Box SS-6289

Nassau, The Bahamas

We

Maker's Hap

Baker’s Bay

GOLF & OCEAN CLUB

As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians

TS

â„¢ Ts

on our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to
apply for the position of:

Golf Course Construction

Assistant Manager

Attributes to include:

5 — 8 years experience in Golf Course Construction and
Management at leading Golf Club.

Knowledge of all phases of Golf course design and
construction activities including vertical golf construction
(club houses, maintenance facilities irrigation pump stations)
Turf Management Degree.

A thorough understanding of all phases of maintenance and
repair to courses, practice range and equipment.

Extensive experience working with city planners, engineers,

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

architects, and contractors.
Knowledgeable in all phases of construction contracts

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015 related to golf projects.

Detail oriented, a skilled planner, ability to prioritize with
excellent communication skills.

Computer literate.

Willing to live on an out island.

Ability to work on own initiative is important.

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
0.00 0.00 0.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387
2.8988
1.4428
3.3201
12.6816
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0401 4.01
1.0330 3.30
1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
ASk $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany‘s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

4.540
0.000
0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3781
2.9230
1.3812
3.3201
11.8789

100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

30-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
27-Feb-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need
apply.

-13.33
4.01
3.30
4.10

Applications can be submitted to:

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Director, Human Resources and Training
P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or sbowe@bakersbayclub.com

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
('S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





J

el

velatte /

N

UDGE PARKER











\

THINK APRIL
MOVED BACK
HERE?

WHY BO YOU Ll /

BLONDIE

WHAD'YA THINK OF MY PRESENTATION |

jersal Press Syndicate

©1989 Unive

“How COME YOU NEVER TIP MoM WHEN SHE
SERVES DINNER?”



















THIS MORNING, BOSS?

¢, Inc. World Rights reserved

SOMEDAY I
HOPE To BE IN
THE OLYMPICS



Across



1 Old fashioned pop is her 1
best composition (7)

4 Hazard of drivers and 2
divers (5)

7 Doesn't neglect 3

established practices (4)

8 Does turn dead

miserable (8) 5
10 Summarised and

withdrawn (10) 6
12 Scandinavian article in

plate (6) 9
13 Reformed ladies show the

highest standards (6) 11
15 Subscribe and accept the

risk (10) 12
18 A fruit that won't give a

fixed delivery time? (4,4) 14
19 Stump or catch 16

perhaps (4)
20 Wordy form of gift (5) 17

21 Run into some of the
defence (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10
Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14
Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19
Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24
Glider pilot.

Down: 2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5
Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8
Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal,
17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui.

SHE SAID
Tt WAS
TO HAVE
DINNER
WITH MEL

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down



4 Cracked up, oddly enough















HER! SHE
HAP A THING
FOR YOU FROM
DAY ONES P

TOMORROW'S ANOTHER DAY, SON...
T KNOW YOU DID THE VERY BEST













I’? BE LYING IF I
SAIP THE FEELING
WASN‘T MUTUALS



BLAST /...DID MY

BEANIE COME



Sunday

















Difficulty Level * *&

Thus America produced a
composer (5)

Regular lay preachers take
it (8)

Slit at the front (6)





(6,4)

Ordered, as whisky may
be (4)

Observes the intrusion and
is furious (7)

Now it’s gift time

(7,3)

| can head this way for the
ranch (8)

Made to feel small?

(7)

An old fool (6)

Well-known skating









figure (5)

One of them acted as
cox or acted as
cocks (4)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10
Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14
Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19
Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In
the offing.

Down: 2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5
Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8
Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15
Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21
Calf.











Across

1
4
7
8
10
12
13

15

Ship’s master (7)
Exhausted (3,2)
Swerve (4)
Unwavering
supporter (8)
Become thinner (4,6)
Conference with
enemy (6)
Temporary
madness (6)
After much delay
(2,4,4)

Of necessity (8)
Ardent
enthusiasm (4)
Harsh (5)
Forbear (7)

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

©2009 Conceplis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.







L HAVEN'T WORKED sINcE
MN COMPANY DOWNSIZED

YOUR WIFE HAS HIREP
ME TO TEACH YOU
MY GOOP MAN

RRALE

o id

DO YOU.\K\S5 WOULD BE
WANT? & NICE,MARGO.

IL FEEL YOUR
PAIN, MAN




ANNERS,

td
oP Q

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.



for res 8, i I ST
aera ab bot aed es Ee
fecal bn le Pcie 8 pee
warner Od icles, Bee ine at
bait Lao Placa ba panes Gill ab
ATSC OT eee eee ban dg
dh er Fads bed oe Sie
be oy ue
vin Ly sy
hl AA Ses or eee IH
KEES § mere, 2 et capi
indeed Gs 5 ides Peo fee ad
So Cla Si ame sce PA Moma haa,
ia oe aaa Pa

Phere ECET6T Bap
ed 9 ged cg nae [2M es Bee
eA SE,



BUT T'LL SETTLE FOR
“COME ON IN, BAD,”

. World rights reserved.

©2009 by North America Syndi

T UAVEN'T PLAVED SINCE
THE MARKET DOWNSIZED
MN RETIREMENT SAVINGS



WHERE Do
WE a sie

res Syndicate, Ine.

‘©2008 by King Featu

Leer o

I s
SEL)

ii
eens



ms In:
ork.

2 Capt Lage ol basis













Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer












































Down

11

12
14
16
17

To quibble (5)
Urgency (8)
Blockhead (6)

Very much in fashion
(3,3,4)

Principal role in

play (4)

In particular (7)
Fondness for sugary
foods (5,5)

Behind closed doors
(2,6)

Thrive (7)

Agree (6)

Claw (5)

Language of
Pakistan (4)

























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





8]3]2]9 6]/5/4|7/ 1 TN UN
7/5/6]1 3/4]2/8/9| MRI 5 Bio 8S
1/9/4/7 2/8/5i3l6| MMi 4(3)2 Biw2 i7)9 8
9/1[5[4 7/213/618 a SEALE
6l2/7/13 811191415 near coe
3/4/8115 9/611)2|7 NG 211/319 69
4'7/9/l8 51/3(611/2| M1 32 18M 6
2lel3ie 119171514| Ww2 113.6 MR7 (9/4 8
3/10 5(6/1/2 4/7/8\9/3| MMBN2|1/3 Bi [5

































A ay ea ye: Pac

North dealer,
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
@J83
VI 1072
@#AKI8
&A 5
WEST EAST
#AQ62 49754
Â¥85 963
4762 #054
$0193 #K 1062
SOUTH
#K 10
VAKQ94
#1093
#874
The bidding:
North East South West
1¢ Pass 1¥ Pass
29 Pass 4Â¥

Opening lead — queen of clubs.

Some deals contain built-in traps
that may lure declarer to an unneces-
sary defeat. For this reason, declarer
should carefully examine all his
assets before committing himself to a
particular line of play.

Take this case where South got to
four hearts and West led the queen of
clubs. Declarer won with the ace,
cashed the ace of diamonds, drew
two rounds of trumps ending in his
hand, then led the ten of diamonds
and let it nde. East won with the

Declarer Has a Blind Spot








queen, cashed the king of clubs and
shifted to a spade, and West’s A-Q of
spades put the contract down one.

South bemoaned his bad luck in
finding the queen of diamonds and
both missing spade honors offside.
However, with proper play, the con-
tract was a virtual certainty from the
outset. The fault lay in South’s
becoming overly enamored of
dummy’s diamonds and the potential
spade discard it afforded. Had he
instead looked at the hand as a
whole, he would have realized that
his spade holding was actually an
asset rather than a liability.

The correct approach is to draw
trumps ending in dummy and lead a
spade toward the K-10. After East
follows low, South can either finesse
the ten or play the king, depending
on where he thinks the ace is located.

As it happens, both spade honors
are offside, so declarer cannot avoid
losmg two spade tricks. Neverthe-
less, the contract is assured.

For example, suppose West wins
the ten of spades with the queen and
shifts to a diamond. Declarer puts up
the ace and plays a second spade to
the king and ace, establishing
dummy’s jack. Whatever West
returns, South cannot be stopped
from discarding a diamond on the
jack of spades, and he winds up los-
ing only two spades and a club.

Tomorrow: In the arms of Morpheus.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a eV



The Tribune



©





ith



SEASONAL
EFFECTS ON
DRY SKIN.

mâ„¢ By SARAH BEEK

SIMILAR to the seasons, }
skin goes through its own fluc- }
tuations. Combine nature's }
weather cycle with air condi- }
tioning and forced air heating }
devices, and you have skin
that's constantly under }
assault. :

Cold winds and low tem- }
peratures can dry out skin, }
depriving it of balanced levels :
of oils, contributing to dry- }
ness, sensitivity, and prema- }
ture aging. i

Prolonged exposure to the
sun causes water to evaporate
from skin, which is why skin }
that has recently been burned }
or tanned requires more mois- }
turisation than unexposed }
areas. Forced air heating also }
dries out skin: warm, dry air }
acts like a sponge, soaking up }
moisture from everything it }
touches. ;

To help skin stay healthy :
with the seasons, speak with }
your professional skin thera- }
pist about modifying your skin }
care regimen accordingly. }
Chances are just a few prod- }
uct updates (for example, :
going from a moisturiser toa }
more emollient cream) can }
keep skin healthy year-round. }

DRY SKIN AND SENSITIVITY
While there are many trig- }
gers to skin sensitisation, one :
of the biggest consequences }
of dry skin is an increase in }
sensitivity. Dry skin is a pre- }
cursor to sensitised skin ;
because when skin is dry, it's :
depleted of its natural protec- }
tive lipid barrier. This lowers }
skin's defenses against envi- }
ronmental assaults that can }
cause a sensitised reaction in }
skin, such as itching and red- :
ness. :
For proper treatment of a }
dry and sensitised skin condi- :
tion, speak to a professional }
skin therapist. i

° Sarah Beek is a skin care ther- :
apist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit :
her and her team of skin and :
body therapists at One Sandy- }
port Plaza (the same building as :
Bally’s Gym). For more informa- :
tion visit www.dermal-clinic.com 3
or call 327.6788 i

Box:

‘a’
i
=
Ke
=



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

LIFE for most 5-year-
olds, most likely involves

learning the personalities

of his or her teacher and
friends at kindergarten,
conquering the potty,
and living as carefree as
they please.

On the tip of my

However for
one young boy,
life has been any-
thing but care-
free, in fact for
young Palmer
Cleare Jr (PJ), his
biggest challenge
on any given day
is to simply say
his name.

Palmer is one
of dozens of chil-
dren who suffer
from stammering,
a condition that
has many medical

and psychological professionals baffled.

Stammering is generally defined as a speech dis-
order in which sounds, syllables, or words are
repeated or prolonged, disrupting the normal flow
of speech. These speech disruptions may be accom-
panied by struggling behaviors, such as rapid eye
blinks or tremors of the lips, or in some instances
even barking. Stammering can make it difficult to
communicate with other people, which often affects
a person’s quality of life and social well-being.

PJ’s father, Palmer Cleare Sr, feels his son was
not born a stammer, and said somewhere along the
way PJ must have watched people possibly on tele-

vision.

He said at first the mimicking was amusing, but
later became a trait in little PJ’s regular speech.
“He did it so often, that one day my mother was

talking to him and he was actually stammering. She
asked when did he start stammering, and I hadn’t
even known that it had developed to that point.”

Mr Cleare explained soon after that episode, he
decided to take his son to a doctor, but was told to
ignore the stammers and to not interrupt his son’s
speaking as he had started doing in response to the
stammering.

Although this advice seemed an awkward solu-
tion to the problem, Mr Cleare said he followed
through with it.

He said after his son began preschool, he soon
started to complain of his classmates making fun of
the way he spoke, an indication situation was more
serious than it appeared.

PJ’s father said that apart from the stammering,
his son was still learning to properly pronounce
words which added an extra challenge to him.

Mr Cleare said after trying various methods of
correcting his son’s stammering with minimal suc-
cess, he eventually decided to take his son toa
speech specialist whose assistance he said has had a
profound impact on PJ’s speaking skills.

Speech and language pathologist Jennifer Alex-
1ou of the Speech Clinic, a facility which deals with
childhood speech disorders and occupational thera-
py, explained that the reason who people stammer
can be related to several factors.

Apart from stammering occurring more often in
boys than in girls, Mrs Alexiou said genealogy, lan-
guage delay, and learnt behavior may also affect
one’s ability to speak fluently.

Whatever the cause, she explained that the reality
of a stammer’s life involves daily anxiety and uncer-

tainty in clearly relaying their thoughts to others.

“There is a lot of anxiety associated with that, it
can affect you socially, emotionally, and with your
profession.

“So it can really have a detrimental affect on a
lot of people.”

Mrs Alexiou explained although there is little
hope for improvement for an adult suffering from
stammering, early intervention has proven effective
in reducing the occurrence in many children who go
on to become fluent adults.

She said in recent years, there has been the intro-
duction of a device known as a Delayed Auditory
Feedback (DAF) machine.

The machine which embraces the effects of choral
speaking is inserted into a stammer’s ear similarly
to a hearing aid, and echoes each word spoken
which has proven tremendously effective in improv-
ing speech impediments. She explained that for
many, fluency is naturally achieved when speaking
in unison like when reciting a pledge, song, or other
message within a group.

“Tt doesn’t work for long periods of time, you can
wear it if you’re going into a meeting where you
would need to speak fluently.”

While many DAFs are considered a last option
for most adult stammers, it remains only a tempo-
rary fix. With stammering being identified in chil-
dren as young as 2, and with it being a minimally
researched and investigated issue locally, she sug-
gest the responsibility is on the parents to be watch-
ful of any of its symptoms, and to seek assistance
swiftly for their children if the occurrence of speech
difficulties persist.



SENSEI D’Arcy Rahming gives students a quick lesson in defeating
an opponent.

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

DA 69806
c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.





The art of jujitsu

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE Japanese form of mar-
tial art known as Jujitsu, is a
collective form which incorpo-
rates both armed and unarmed
methods of self defense.

Originating from the Samu-
rai warriors of Feudal Japan,
the technique allows its user to
manipulate his opponents ener-
gy against him rather than sim-
ply deflecting it.

Also Known as the Art of
Softness, Jujitsu has over the
years evolved throughout the
world as something more than a
fighting skill, according to one
local instructor, the skill of Jujit-
su is an activity which brings to
calm a person’s holistic being.

Instructor and owner of the
Martial Arts Academy D’Arcy
Rahming, who has served as a
martial arts sensei for the past
23 years, has taught dozens of
local students various forms of
martial arts.

From the classical arts which
use the sword, to modern forms
of Judo, Jujitsu and Kick Box-
ing, Mr Rahming continues to
pass on his skills.

Mr Rahming said: “T think its
important for persons to
embrace martial arts because it

not only increases a persons
ability to protect him or herself,
but is also a means of discover-
ing your strengths and weak-
nesses, which works on three
levels, the mind, body, and emo-
tional state.”

At his facility, Mr Rahming
explained that his approach is to
first determine the personality
of an individual, and to then
help them develop in areas
where they are lacking.

He said what he has noticed
is that his mature students tend
to prefer his Jujitsu classes,
while the younger more agile
students, seeking to learn a
sport, float toward the Judo
classes, and the working pro-
fessionals prefer kick boxing.

Mr Rahming said that what
people should understand
about martial arts is that each
form is like a food: “different
people have different taste for
different things.”

Be warned though, Mr Rah-
ming explained because the
martial arts industry is unregu-
lated, there are many who
operate as a ‘sensei’ but may
not have the proper training.

“The secret is to find a good
teacher who has good creden-
tials, and make sure that what
you see is what you want.”

He explained some of those
good credentials could include

international certification from
agencies like the International
Judo Federation, or for the
instructor to have studied under
a sensei with international
notoriety.

Apart from finding the right
sensei, Mr Rahming said many
remain skeptical on enrolling
in a martial art class because of
the presumed rigorous activi-
ty.

“Tt’s not intense to the point
where you would be harmed or
so badly shaken that you would
not learn it, however the idea
behind the martial arts is that it
is a Science to teach an ordi-
nary person how to improve
him or herself.”

Mr Rahming said the image
in many Japanese karate
movies where a martial artist
is able to break a two or three
inch piece of wood with their
bare hands, is only a confidence
builder and really doesn’t
require much skill.

“Tt takes a lot of confidence
to think that you can break it
without being harmed, but you
willsee even small children to
adults doing that.”

Available for private lessons
, Mr Rahming is one sensei who
stands out among others, giv-
ing many the strength to pro-
tect themselves while staying
in shape.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 9B



a Ne





ec
Companion

planning

“Corn loves
Beans”. There’s a
more promising
prospect. It has
been known since
the early days of
history that some
plants do not do
well in each oth-
er’s proximity
while others seem
to form a symbio-
sis and - to use
that business
catchword of the
moment — become
synergistic.

With corn and
beans the symbio-
sis is obvious:
beans help fix nitrogen into the soil for the corn
and the corn provides stalks for the beans to
climb on and produce sturdier plants. With other
pairings the reason for beneficial interaction is less
obvious but nevertheless proven over the years.

Herbs are aromatic and many act as insect
repellents. Mexican oregano can be rubbed onto
the skin in the absence of your favourite com-
mercial repellent. Thyme is almost universal as a
beneficial companion planting. There are pair-
ings, however, that seem to set each other back,
with tomatoes and beans being the prime exam-
ple.

My thoughts went to companion plantings dur-
ing the past autumn when my rose bushes did
not look as sprightly as they should have done. I
have for years planted parsley around the base of
my roses but when I transplanted them last April
into the garden of my new home it was

the wrong time of year to plant parsley suc-
cessfully. When autumn came I sowed seeds
around the rose bushes and now all is well in
Eden. The parsley benefits from the richly
mulched soil that roses are grown in and the ros-
es now have shiny leaves and healthy flowers.

Here’s a partial list of the beneficial pairings of
vegetables and herbs commonly grown in The
Bahamas:

WHILE a schoolteacher
for 43 years | became
used to messages like
“Natasha loves Pedro”
written in books, on
sheets at the end of an
essay, on random pieces
of paper left on my table,
or even carved into the
lid of a desk. So Natasha
loves Pedro. In the flow
of human relationships
Natasha has very little
chance of going through
life with Pedro as her
helpmeet. Art is long;
teenage love is short.

BARBERSHOP

BEANS — Corn, cucumber, eggplant, marigold, nas-
turtium, oregano, sweet potato, rosemary.

BEETS - Onions.

BROCCOLI - Cucumber, mint, nasturtium, onions.
CABBAGE - Celery, garlic, mint, nasturtium, onions,
tomato.

CARROTS - Chives, garden peas, radish, rosemary,
sage.

CAULIFLOWER - Dill, garlic, mint, nasturtium, onions.
CELERY - Beans, cabbage, chives, garlic, nasturtium.
CORN - Beans, cucumber, garden peas, sweet pota-
to, pumpkin, squash, watermelon.

CUCUMBER - Corn, oregano, radish.

EGGPLANT - Coriander, marigold, sweet potato.
GARDEN PEAS - Chives, mint, turnips.

LETTUCE - Carrots, chives, garlic, radish.

LIMA BEANS - Marigold.

ONION - Beets, carrots, sweet potato.

SWEET POTATO - Beans, corn, coriander, eggplant,
nasturtium, onions.

PUMPKIN - Beans.

RADISH - Cucumber, lettuce, nasturtium, squash.
SQUASH - Borage, corn, marigold, mint, nasturtium,
oregano, radish, tomato.

SWEET PEPPER — Nasturtium.

SWEET POTATO - Beans, corn, eggplant, onion,
summer savory.

TOMATO - Basil, cabbage, celery, coriander, dill,
marigold, mint, parsley, sage, squash.

TURNIPS — Garden peas.

WATERMELON - Corn.

This list is far from exhaustive but gives a guide
to the most popular vegetable and herb compan-
ion plantings. And remember that thyme could
have been paired with just about all of the above.

In case you were interested, the thing between
Natasha and Pedro never did work out.

ej. hardy@coralwave.com



Pas LOVES PARSLEY... One example of the rae ielettoneins yaa herbs, vegetables and
flowering plants.



Homosexuality, p olitics and ethics

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE recent allegation circulated in the local
media that a former member of parliament may
have been arrested in Cuba on charges of sexual
misconduct with a male child, remains a hot top-
ic throughout many circles, and has a group of
men questioning the importance of integrity in the
political arena.

This week, Tribune Features visited Tonto’s
Barber Shop on Abundant Life Road, where its
owner Tonto, began by saying if the claims against
the former member of parliament were untrue,
then some statement should have been released to
the public to dispel the rumor.

The 33-year-old proprietor said: “Yeah I
believe it’s possible, and if it’s not true then the
MP should close the story and make a public
statement.” Tonto feels because the situation was
reported and never addressed by the former MP
or refuted by anyone else, foreigners looking at
the issue could very likely question ethics in
Bahamian society, especially when combined
with the recent allegations of extortion from a for-
mer senator.

One patron who requested to remain anony-
mous, said all of these allegations were simply an
attack against a certain political party, and said
flat out that any MP or citizen has the right to
sleep with who so ever they desired.

“Tt’s all tabloid information, your personal life
with who you sleep with or want to go to bed
with is your business, you don’t need nobody dic-
tating to you.”

The man claimed because the Cuban govern-
ment has not named any individual or acknowl-
edged the arrest, he views the entire incident as
nothing other than a ploy to malign his party’s
integrity with “malicious scandal.”

One barber who goes by the alias of ‘American
Boy,’ feels because the information first came
from a particular tabloid, there is without doubt
some truth to the matter.

“Tf the Punch said it, it gatta be 60 to 70 per cent
true, and I think it makes us look like some
freaks.”

The 21-year-old father of one, said after moving
back home after years of residing in the US, he is
now questioning whether he made the right deci-
sion. While acknowledging that the US does have
its share of shortcomings, the Bahamas should
not follow the same path because “we are a Chris-
tian nation with praying

people.”

He said with many Bahamians today going
against tradition and morality, the rise in crime and
increased economic hardship may be “God’s way
of telling us we need to go back to the basics.”

A regular customer at Tonto’s, 23-year-old
accountant Don Williams, said with all the nega-
tive publicity on the Bahamas in recent news, he
questions if there is anything good to say about the
Bahamas from a foreigner’s point of view.

Don explained: “Other than the Super Bowl
commercial, do we have any good news interna-
tionally.”

Don feels whether something happens over-
seas or at home, if it’s a question of a political
personality’s integrity, morality, or illicit behavior,
there should always be some investigation as well
as some personal onus to the situation, especially

“It’s all tabloid
information, your
personal life with who
you sleep with or want
to go to bed with is your
business, you don’t need
nobody dictating to you.”



if they are guilty.

Taking the discussion even further, Don said the
issue of homosexuality in Bahamian politics and
society has now taken on a new identity. He said
although all people should be free to decide on
whatever lifestyle they

desire, the blatant exhibition of alternative
lifestyle in various clubs, hotels, and other public
places will in the future have a negative impact on
Bahamian life as we know it.

With an increased number of churches report-
ing a decline in membership, and an obvious void
of good role models in many sectors of society,
there is also concern for the nation’s youth and
overall well-being.

As this talk of morality and homosexuality con-
tinues, we ask that you write to us and tell us
what you think.

Write to lallen@tribunemedia.net.

¢ Next week, we will feature a new barber shop to
discuss the issue of sweethearting and the prevalence
of bastard children in Bahamian society.



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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





SOCIAL SER-
VICES Minister
Loretta Butler-

Turner gave an
address at the
church service
for ‘Women
and Men Unit-
ed To End Vio-
lence Against
Women And
Girls.’



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

INTERNATIONAL Women’s
Day which was celebrated over the
course of March 2 to 8, is a time
used by women throughout the
globe to bring to the forefront issues
which remain an obstacle to the
advancement of women as equal
contributors in all levels of society.

The day which was first recog-
nised by American Clara Zetkin in
1911, was started to validate women
during the early years of the indus-

The week-long event brings
to the forefront issues still
plaguing women

trialisation era, in the areas of poli-
tics, economics, and in their social
advancements.

Recognised locally with a wom-
en’s issues workshop held at the
Police Conference centre on Satur-
day, representatives from various
non-profit and government organi-
sations, as well as public supporters
showed up to learn more of what
could be done to further liberate

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

women in the community.

Under the theme of “Women and
Men United To End Violence
Against Women And Girls,” the
event culminated with a church ser-
vice on Sunday at the St Matthews
Anglican Church, where Social Ser-
vices Minister Loretta Butler-Turn-
er gave an address.

Women like Dame Doris Johnson
who paved the way for women in
Bahamian politics, and Mable Walk-
er who aggigated for better salaries
in the teaching profession have giv-
en today’s Bahamian women a
strong foundation to continue in the
fight for equality and growth.



Licks aint violence, they just show love: Ask Rihanna

@ By IAN BETHELL-
BENETT

AFTER Rihanna's boyfriend
beat her, she went back to him.
But that's not the amazing part
of the story. Perhaps the most
amazing part of the entire thing
is that people support her deci-
sion to go back. More than a
generation after Naipaul's char-
acter in Miguel Street keeps the
cricket bat well-oiled for her hus-
band to beat her with it, women
are still going back to the men
who slap them around.

Where does machismo end
and enabling machismo begin?
When the case broke the young
rapper in question said that he
was seeking council from his
family and his pastor. Perhaps
he suddenly thought that he
might have a problem. How
long, though, will his counselling
session last? How long will it
be before his need to dominate
arises again? Obviously the fam-
ilies of the performers in ques-
tion agree with their decisions
to reconcile. But this then brings
us to the general point. Vio-

lence against women is common.
And many women are often the
ones who most promote violent
behaviour in their men. One
would have thought that this
kind of behaviour started when
couples were old and married,
but these days, the more knowl-
edge we have shows us that it in
fact starts far earlier than that.
On campus the other day at
the University of Puerto Rico,
as a part of the celebration of
International Woman's
Day/Week, one of the organisa-
tions had a talk about violence
among young couples. The talk
was given by a member of the
Department for Women's
Affairs, Or the Procuradora de
Las Mujeres (in Spanish). The
organisers put the event togeth-
er because of a need among
young women on campus for
this service. Counsellors see
many young women every term
that suffer from violence in their
relationships with their
boyfriends. Amazingly, not one
student went. Notwithstanding
the girls who seek out help indi-
vidually, the activity was a flop.

What this seems to say is that
while violence on the whole is a
public ‘thing’, domestic violence
or violence against women is a
private matter and should never
be brought into the public
sphere. Violence is, however,
violence and there is no code of
silence around it.

Unfortunately, Rihanna's
return to her abusive rapper
man, is not only about her, it
speaks volumes about what our
young people are seeing and
doing. Worse, the artist has
made a statement, a very public
statement, that will have long-
lasting and wide reaching reper-
cussions: 'I love him, even if he
beats me and we can make this
work’.

Many young girls, already in
odd mental and emotional
spaces, see this and figure that if
their man beats them, at least-
like Rihanna-he's showing me
some kind of attention, and he
says he loves me. Alas, the road
to hell is paved with so many
mistaken cases of love. Love is
not about blows. Our parents
often gave us the rod as parents

to try to bring us up properly,
to form us into people they
would be proud of. Yes, some
parents were a little 'slap-hap-
py’, but there is a difference
between a parent punishing a
child for rude behaviour and a
partner ‘punishing’ another part-
ner for ‘misbehaviour’. This dis-
tinction is, however, lost on
many young women. ‘He only
beat me cause he love me and he
was 'vex' cause I didn't show
him enough attention’. But
nothing exists in splendid isola-
tion. Peer pressure also encour-
ages young women to stay in or
even seek out abusive relation-
ships with the desirable young
man, even though everyone
Knows ‘he like to beat his
woman’. Actually, that usually
makes him more desirable. 'He
know how to deal with woman’.
So, where does machismo end
and enabling machismo begin?

Obviously a woman in her
right mind will not go looking
for licks, but somehow she
allows it to happen. This is obvi-
ously an oversimplification. But,
again, nothing exists in isolation.

Violence and especially violence
against women is related to the
reality that we are living today.
In other Caribbean countries
like Belize and Guyana they are
capturing data that shows that
violence against women is ris-
ing as the economic crisis wors-
ens. In Puerto Rico, the rates of
murder and suicide have gone
through the roof. UNCTAD-
or the UN's agency on trade,
also examines the relationship
between violence and unem-
ployment. The male-empower-
ing organisation PROMUNDO
has just released a report that
deals with the correlation
between forced unemployment
and violence. These sources
clearly elucidate the link
between high male unemploy-
ment and the increase in domes-
tic violence. It must be true as
well that the Bahamian organi-
sations and newspapers are
working on presenting such
facts. Violence is not only about
blows or licks, but also about
mental abuse as well as sexual
abuse. But we have already
gone through this. What is sad

is that Popular Culture/media
garners more attention than
reports from the UN or the Min-
istry of Health or Youth.

Going back to Naipaul's
Miguel Street, men had to be
silent, respected, feared, and
their abuse of women was often
publicly condoned. What was
not condoned was women talk-
ing about it. One of the charac-
ters in the book, a woman out of
place in Miguel Street because
of her class/colour, lives there
with a man who the reader finds
out later is her boyfriend, having
left her husband for him. The
man in question lays so many
blows on her that she attempts
to explain away, apologise for,
and even condone until eventu-
ally she leaves. Love, Love,
Love alone can't even make up
for the blows he puts on her.
She eventually returns to her
‘real’ life. What is amazing
again, is that she kept offering
excuses for his violence, his
behaviour. Where was her self-
esteem?

PART 2 NEXT WEEK

Quiet desperation at work

As I meet employees from different
companies, I am beginning to see a par-
ticular commonality in corporate and
business cultures. Thoreau captured
what I witness in this simple quotation,
“The mass of men lead lives of quiet
desperation.”

When I speak to employees there is a
majority that feels a sense of entrap-
ment. They need a job, especially during
difficult economic times, but they feel
underutilised and helpless about find-
ing the work that brings them joy or
excitement. They feel invisible and
unable or unwilling to do anything about
it and others feel overtly victimised.

Thear many stories but one particular
example stands out. There is a supervi-
sor, Joe, who was asked to meet with his
team to share information about a
change in his department. He was reluc-
tant to schedule a meeting because
whenever he holds a meeting, his man-
ager reacts negatively if she is not invit-
ed and attacks the staff if she is invited.

Inviting her would not be a challenge
if employees were comfortable being
authentic in her presence, so on one
hand, Joe should hold meetings but he
would rather not experience the mental
and emotional anguish of being raked
over the coals so meetings are avoided at
all costs. As a result, there is stagna-
tion, ill informed employees, a lack of
trust and a huge need to preserve self



within his department.

In other cases of quiet desperation,
employees wait and wait until an exec-
utive or manager recognises their poten-
tial. There aren't enough leaders who
take interest in mentoring so employees
end up stuck doing the same thing over
and over unless the manager has too
much work. Employees are not
stretched. Instead, they are left to their
own devices to develop themselves. The
trouble with this model is that employees
can't possibly know what they don't
know.

There are employees who long to be
developed, who are given feedback that
is either not constructive or does not
add any particular value. Comments
like, “Oh you are doing a great job” or
“we have plans for you.” Most times
these non-specific, statements are vague
by design, they keep your hopes alive
enough so that you will hang on to the
appearance of a promise of a bright
future. When the waiting goes on and

on, some employees get tired of the lack
of specificity and leave, others sit back
and patiently experience the inter-
minable wait, hoping they will be recog-
nised for their achievements.

Tunderstand fully that companies can-
not make promises of promotions or
transfers and this is reasonable, but com-
mitments can be made to employees for
developmental opportunities. Devel-
oping employees is a proven retention
strategy. Even if you don't have the
training budget, mentoring or stretch
projects can be used to provide employ-
ees with new opportunities to grow.

At other times, stagnation may occur
when less talented, more political, spin
savvy co-workers continuously attempt
to “show up” other employees, using
their relationships with executives and
powerbrokers to manipulate informa-
tion about you and anyone else they
view as a competitor. They may not be
as competent as you but they are blessed
with the gift of “gab” and can talk their
way into the jobs they desire.

As an employees you experience qui-
et desperation because you feel power-
less for one reason or another. You
believe you are immobilised because
you believe you should wait until your
turn comes (seniority), or it could be
that you are waiting for someone to
notice your positive contribution to the
bottom line.

Powerlessness is a state of mind.
When you think you are powerless, your
mind is playing a trick on you, causing
you to believe that you are forced to

accept your lot at the office and watch
your coworkers get what they want.
Some scholars link it to pessimism
because pessimists view circumstances as
though they don't have a choice.

YOU DO HAVE A CHOICE

The first step in digging yourself out of
your perceived predicament is to realise
that you always have a choice. You
have a choice about which company you
work for, your department, whether or
not you move to a new job and if you
decide to move, what is the best timing.
When I meet people who believe there
is no choice, most times I find that they
don't have a personally developed blue-
print for their career or personal devel-
opment.

I have viewed many types of career
development plans. Some employees
plan to move up the hierarchy within
the company they work for and others
are open to moving within an industry.
There are employees who are not inter-
ested in a promotion because they don't
want anyone reporting to them or
because they are about to retire. Other
employees want a job that is familiar
because they are preparing to change
career paths or even open their own
company.

There are even business owners who
feel trapped by their business. They
become tired of the routine and start to
resent having people who are depen-
dent on them for a salary because they
want to be free.

BREAK OUT OF YOUR TRANCE:
REINVENT YOURSELF

Start by identifying what it is that you
want to do and then create a plan to
achieve your goals. Always recognise
that you have a choice and don't buy
into the deception that you have no pos-
sibilities. If you get creative, no matter
your age or educational background you
can find something that you can do. Then
there is the question of risk. Should you
risk making the change? How will it
impact you and your family? Should you
jeopardise guaranteed income?

Even when you think you don't have a
choice, you are making a choice to go
with the flow. Why not take control of
your career? When you start perceiving
choices, you feel less trapped, more alive,
and less affected by apparent stagnation
or immobility.

I have witnessed profound transfor-
mations within employees who create a
plan. When you have a plan, you are not
afraid of losing your job and you have
more confidence because of your focus.
Even if you don't have an entire plan
documented you can be re-invigorated
by potential, hope and most important-
ly the possibility of freedom brought
about by taking small steps toward your
personal goals.

¢ Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul
an HR Consulting and Leadership Develop-
ment company. If you are interested in assis-
tance with planning your career you can con-

Obesity in pets

BECAUSE I am considered
to be a health fitness junky and
practise good eating habits all
year long, I can only wish the
same for my clients and their
owners as well. So I spend a good
part of my day at the clinic talk-
ing with pet owners about how to
improve the quality of their lives
as well as of their pets with
regard to fitness.

One subject that seems to be
especially difficult for many pet
owners is that of weight control
mainly because they often have a
problem controlling their own
weight. Today, I will talk about
obesity and the causes of weight
gain in pets and how extra body
fat can adversely affect their well
being. Obesity is an excess of
body fat that impairs health or
normal body function. This con-
dition is considered the most
common and important nutri-
tional disorder of dogs and is esti-
mated to affect about 25 per cent
of pet dogs seen by veterinari-
ans.

A lot of pet owners often ask



me, “What is my ideal weight for
my potcake?” I try to stay away
from actual numbers of pounds
but rather tell clients to do the
“Rib Test”. This test involves
simply feeling for your pet’s rib
bones along the side of his chest
wall. If you can easily feel the
rib bones as you move your hand
backward then your dog/cat is

likely to be at good body weight.
If on the other hand you have to
press in fairly hard to feel the
ribs then your pet s likely to be
carrying a few extra pounds. Of
course, if you can ever see rib
lines then your pet is too thin.

Fat tissue is remarkably effi-
cient at storing energy. When
the number of calories taken in
(food) exceeds the calories
expended, these extra calories
are stored as body fat. This is
easily the most common cause
of obesity in our pets. Simply
put we often feed our pets too
much. Does that remind us
about the amount of food that
we eat? Yes, we pet owners also
eat too much, hence the weight
gain.

Of course there are some
medical reasons for excessive
weight gain. Simply spaying or
neutering you pet will increase
the likelihood of weight gain.
(This is not a reason to avoid
spaying or neutering your dog
because the weight gain is quite
preventable.) Some endocrine

problems, such as low thyroid
gland function, and excessive
adrenal gland function can be
associated with unexpected
weight gain.

Some may argue that a little
extra weight is not a health risk
for pets, but the facts just don’t
support that position. There are
many health problems that are
associated with obese pets. Take
for instance, arthritis. Joint pain
can affect any dog or cat, but in
the overweight pet, the arthritis
will be aggravated by the extra
pounds the joints have to sup-
port. In addition, the heavy ani-
mal will tend to be less active
and have poor muscle tone,
which is important for healthy
joint function. Obese pets have
higher risks for developing dis-
eases of the pancreas (including
diabetes), liver, lungs, and gastro
intestinal tract. Increased high
blood pressure, anesthetic and
surgical risks, and possible
reduced resistance to infection
are additional concerns with
overweight pets.

If you think your dog is over-
weight after doing the Rib Test,
your veterinarian should be able
to give you some good ideas on
how to take off some of the extra
weight. Sometimes, a complete
physical exam is recommended
with blood and urine tests to rule

tact her at www.orgsoul.com.

out underlying problems. If all
the tests are normal, a safe
weight control plan can be devel-
oped. The corner stone of your
pet’s weight loss program will
be reduced calorie intake with
increased calorie utilisation-or
the eat less, exercise more rule.
Your veterinarian will recom-
mend some excellent low fat/low
calorie diet options that can
make the difference between
success and failure. Feed only
the amount your vet recom-
mends each day. Resist from
offering your pet treats from the
table or in the form of dog bis-
cuits. Try to make exercise a reg-
ular part of your pet’s daily rou-
tine. The good part about a dai-
ly walk with your dog is that you
both benefit. Most weight con-
trol programs take approxi-
mately 4-8 months to reach their
goal. As a veterinarian, I see
many medical problems that
require complex and expensive
testing and treatment. Obesity
on the other hand is simple to
diagnose and in most cases sim-
ple and inexpensive to treat. I
whole heartedly believe that if
we were to keep our bodies and
our pets at a trim lean weight, we
will quite possibly improve the
quality and quantity of life not
only for our pets, but ourselves
as well.

READY, SET,
WEAVE

FROM page 12

i ferent way. I do not see it as
? I used to and now I see it as
? art,” Mrs Neely said.

? Mrs Neely said she is
? grateful to the all the young
? women that came out and
? supported her as models at
? the show (Tia, Florine, Eisha,
? Alicia, Lydia, Kissy, Aman-
? da, Thea, and her male mod-
: el Kareem). Mrs Neely said
? she would encourage anyone
i who wants to get into cos-
? metology, to go into it lov-
: ing it.

i “With me I would like to
? soar to higher heights and
? my husband is my biggest
? fan. In order for you to per-
: fect anything, you must grow
? to love it in order for it to
i become natural. The more
? hands on you are in your
? work, the better you will
: become. Cosmetology is an
? excellent field to go into
? because it is art as well as a
? ministry because different
? people are in you chair dai-
? ly,” Mrs Neely said.








ils

THE WEATHER REPO

5-Day FORECAST

TUESDAY, MARCH 10TH, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST






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Charleston, SC 75/23 5713 pe 81/27 52/11 pe Memphis 78/25 47/8 t 53/11 36/2 46 San Antonio 81/27 66/18 pce 74/23 48/8 t High: 84° F/29°C Taal 42/5 33/0 F 45/7 19/-7 E “pill solemn ee
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: : : Low: 65° F/18°C Trinidad 88/31 74/23 t 76/24 72/22 sh . a
Cleveland 56/13 40/4 1 50/10 23/-5 pc Minneapolis 32/0 5/15 sn 6/-14 O17 pe San Francisco 60/15 43/6 s 59/15 45/7 pc eee 35/1 23/-5 s 39/3 29/-1 pc : p it
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Honolulu 79/26 68/20 c 80/26 67/19 s Oklahoma City 73/22 31/0 pc 44/6 31/0 ¢ Tucson 71/21 47/8 s 76/24 49/9 s << 7 — seeeeeese
Houston 83/28 64/17 po 76/24 49/9 t Orlando B4/28 57/13 s 84/28 59/15 s Washington,DC 51/10 47/8 r 65/18 39/3 sh The ee








@ By ALEX MISSICK The event was
Tribune Features Reporter put on by the
TT Bahamian Cosme-
AIR stylist Sharron felogstend Bate
ber Association

Sweeting-Neely of Fab- and sponsored by

THE TRIBUNE

ulous Ronnie Beauty

Salon was thrilled to
present her stunning work at
the Advanced Inspiration
2009 hair show held on
March 1 at the Wyndham

Nassau resort and casino.

Bijoux Beauty ele-
ments. There were
AO hair stylists
from major salons
around the island
showcasing their
talents in the dif-
ferent hair style
techniques.

Mrs Neely’s
business is located on Antigua Street in Elizabeth Estates,
initially she just wanted to enter the competition for the
exposure and experience.

“We had a showcase and a competition. The cosmetol-
ogy association wanted us to showcase what our salons
would normally offer. I put my everything in the competi-
tion because it did not come easy,” Mrs Neely said.

In order to prepare herself for the event, Mrs Neely said
she chose to go abroad just to take a look at different tech-
niques she may have missed.

“T went away to a friend of mine who is a cosmetologist.
Knowing I was going into a competition with people who
have been in the business 40 plus years, you would always
have to try and put yourself out there. It was a big sacrifice
and I felt it was worth it. I studied certain styles to see
what I would think the judges would look for,” Mrs Neely
said.

There were three categories: weaving, braids and fanta-
sy. Mrs Neely was the winner in the weaving competition
and took home an $800 prize along with bragging rights
for her winning piece.

Mrs Neely said although she loves styling hair, it was not
something she grew up thinking about.

“T grew up doing hair but grew up never really wanting
to venture into cosmetology. I really wanted to be a nurse.
T had a job and wanted to do something on the side and I
started to work at home doing braids and I grew to love
it,” Mrs Neely said.

Mrs Neely said she left her job as a waitress to pursue
cosmetology and loves every minute of it.

“My passion now is hair. I find myself venturing into dif-
ferent styles and avenues of the hair business in a totally dif-

SEE page 10

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

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Full Text

PAGE 1

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net RESIDENTS of eastern New Providence are fuming over what they termed a water "shortage" that has left some households incapacitated due to a reduced water supply. Resi dents said the area is already burdened with low pressure. They say they have had very low, to no water pressure for the last two weekends. The Water & Sewage Corporation (WSC water pressure is due to mechanical problems with the Corporation's water barge, the MT Titas, which supplies about 25 to 30 per cent of the captial's water on a daily basis, according to WSC. Yesterday, State Minister for the Environment Phenton Ney mour said this recent problem with the barge, coupled with the fact that water barging is not financially viable for the corporation, will lead to its eventual elimination. A date for this phasing out has not been determined. "The position that we're in with the WSC at this time is critical in terms of water produc N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Man dead after nightclub shooting C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.89TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER BRIGHTAND SUNNY HIGH 82F LOW 70F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Ready, set, weave SEEPAGEELEVEN GSSSA basketball n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A MURDER inquiry has been launched by police following the reckless shootingo f a 30-year-old man in an Arawak Cay nightclub early Monday morning. G entry McPhee, of Yellow Elder Gardens, New Providence, became the thirteenth murder victim of the year when an argument between men in The Big Yard escalated into violence. Shots were fired in the club between Arawak Cay and Crystal Cay shortly after mid night, fatally injuring Mr McPhee in the abdomen and hands. He was rushed to Princess Margaret Hospital by ambulance and died soon after arrival. Police are uncertain of the Argument at The BigY ard leads to murder The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net AN IMPASSIONED sermon by former PLP minister turned born-again Christian preacher Kendal Nottage end ed abruptly when he suffered a stroke in the pulpit on Sun day. The 68-year-old was rushed to Princess Margaret Hospital by ambulance and his wife, former Supreme Court Justice Rubie Nottage, hurried to his bedside. A CAT scan revealed the preacher had suffered a slight bleed to the right side of his brain and further tests showed Former minister turned preacher suffers stroke in the pulpit SEE page eight K endal Notta g e is rushed to hospital TRADEWINDS EXER CISE DEMONS TRA TION A PARTICIPANT is wrestled to the ground during a demon stration for the Tradewinds Exercise 2009 at the Coral Harbour base yesterday. US Coast Guardsmen provid ed instruction in compliant and non-compliant boarding to Defence Force members. SEEPAGETWO Tim Clarke /Tribune staff SEE page eight A MAJOR furore broke out yesterday over a hard-hitting Tribune Insight article which attacked the legacy of the late Sir Lynden Pindling. Political activist Paul Moss described the article as “repulsive” and a “wholesale dese cration” of the former prime minister’s char acter. But former PLP backbencher Edmund Moxey and others gave the article wholehearted support, saying: “Young Bahamians need to know their history.” The article, headed “The tragic young pilot who knew too much”, told the story of the late Chauncey Tynes Jr., who went missing in 1983 while piloting a flight from Exuma to Nassau. Hisfather, Chauncey Tynes Sr., believes his son was murdered because he knew too much of the associa tion between Sir Lynden and the Colombian drug czar Joe Lehder. Chauncey Tynes Jr., who was SEE page eight Furore over Pindling article in T ribune Insight Sir Lynden Pindling ater shortage’ sparks anger from residents n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net AMNESTY Internation al is "concerned" for the safety of detainees at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre and is urging the international community to flood government with appeals on behalf of the detainees, some of whom claim to be victims of abuse and inhumane treatment. The agency also resumed its call for independent reviews of internal investigations into these claims. "A number of recent media reports in the Bahamas have indicated that people being held at the SEE page eight Amnesty ‘concern’ for the safety of Detention Centre detainees SEE page eight MEMBERS OF the Royal Bahamas Police Force and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force hoist the Commonwealth flag at the Commonwealth of the Bahamas Flag Rais ing Ceremony in commemoration of the 60th Anniversary of Commonwealth Day at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, East Hill Street yesterday. Commonwealth Day flag raising K r i s t a a n H A I n g r a h a m I I / B I S

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U S Coast Guardsmen from the District 7, Tactical Law Enforcement Detachment provided instructioni n compliant and non-compliant boarding to service members from the Royal Bahamas, St Vincent and Grenadines, St KittsN evis, Haiti, Trinidad-Tobago, B elize, Barbados and the Dominican Republic Defence Forces at the Coral Harbour base yesterday. “In this day and age, terrorists a nd drug runners are looking for ‘soft spots’ and I believe that by working (together excellent opportunity to impact t he evil forces aligned against us,” s aid the US Charg d’Affaires to the Dominican Republic Roland Bullen, while explaining the US/Dominican relations in an i nterview during the exercise portion. “I always refer to the US Coast Guard as the ’ of the C aribbean because whenever there are problems, they’re there.” As one of the goals of the Tradewinds Exercise 2009 is to i ncrease maritime security, the compliant and non-compliant boarding training will help to ensure that partner nations are a ble to execute the necessary measures when called upon to board a vessel, with the appropriate use of force, to prevent illegal trafficking. At the Coral Harbour base, US Coast Guardsmen began by instructing their partner nation counterparts in the proper way to approach a vessel occupant in a non-aggressive manner slowly walking toward the subject with their hands open, palms facing the subject. When dealing with compliant occupants of a vessel, it’s liked ealing with (peaceful ers,” said US Coast Guard Chief P etty Officer Matthew Rouse, stationed out of Mayport, Florida. Though not necessarily immediately following instructions, “the occupants are non-combat-a nt,” he said. If the suspect vessel’s occupants b ecome aggressive and show resistance to the service members, but are still not attacking them, the students were shownt echniques such as pressure points and handcuffing procedures to detain the suspect. “Non-compliant (occupants n eed a little bit more convincing t o cooperate,” said Able Seaman Miska Clarke with the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. Whether it is talking more harshly, getting more physical or u sing deadly force to achieve the goal of your boarding.” Partner nation service members were instructed in escalation of force and how to properly eval-u ate when an occupant is noncompliant and keep control of thes ituation with the correct course of action. “It’s very important for t he partner nations to learn these skills because they will be con ducting these operations in the future,” said Mr Rouse. “There are a lot of people out t here up to no good and we want to ensure that our partner nations’ service members willh ave the knowledge to deal with those threats.” Mr Rouse, who is based in Miami, said he enjoys the opport unity to train other service memb ers and show them how the US Coast Guard operates, as well as build camaraderie that will benef it all when having to cooperate in real-world events. It’s a great chance for us to share with them how we board vessels and also shows them we’re more than willing to support them,” said Mr Rouse. N ations participating in Exercise Tradewinds 2009 include theB ahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Dominican Republic, G uyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, St KittsNevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and Grenadines, Suriname, TrinidadTobago, the United Kingdom andt he United States. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE FLAMES ravaged the Buy 4 Less store on Baillou Hill Road south yesterday morning in what has been described as one of the most ferocious fires of the year. The blaze ignited shortly before 6am and Fire Services had three fire engines on the scene eight minutes after receiving the emergency call. By the time they arrived, part of the upper building was already fully ablaze. That part of the building has been completely destroyed and the rest of the building has been severely damaged by smoke and water. Fire Services maintain the blaze was one of the most significant of the 25 fires they have fought this year so far. The house fire that killed four-year-old Kentrell Rolle in Pride Estates on Saturday is another of the most significant fires of 2009. THE College of the Bahamas Union of Students will conduct its annual elections of officers for the year 2009-2010 on Wednesday, March 25, and Thursday, March 26, between the hours of 9am and 9pm. All eligible persons must hand in their nomination papers no later than March 12, 2009 at the Student Union Building. Candidates must have no less than 20 signatures in support of their nominations from persons in their respective schools, and in the case of president, not less than 20 signatures from any school. Nomination forms may be collected from the Student Union Building located at the main campus on Thompson Boulevard. Election polling stations will be set up at CHMI campus on Thompson Boulevard, the Grosvenor campus on Shirley Street and the Portia Smith Building on Thompson Boulevard. www.babnancial.com 242-461-1000 Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501 B ritish American Financial British American Financial BAFsawholly-ownedsubsidiaryoftheBahamianentityBAB HoldingsLimited.BAFrecentlycelebrateditssecondyearasa100%Bahamianownedentity havingbeenacquiredbytheBahamianGroupduringFebruary2007. Established in 1920, British American Financial providesafullrangeofinsuranceand investment services, including life & health insurance, mortgages, nancial and retirement planning, annuities,mutual funds and pension plans. The Company has three ofces in Nassau at IndependenceDrive,RosettaSt.Palmdale,andCarmichaelRd.Alsofullservicebranchesin Freeport, Abaco, Exuma and a network of career agents throughout the Family Islands. The Company directly employs more than 200 Bahamians. British American Financial is not related or afliated in any way whatsoever with any other companywithasimilarnamBritishAmerican,whetherintheBahamas,theCaribbeanregion or anywhere else. IncelebrationofoursecondanniversaryasafullyBahamianCompany,wearepleasedto announce our offering of free nancial consultations, along with weekly nancial seminars to our clients and the public at our Independence Drive Headquarters every Friday until the end of April 2009.TheCompanyextendsaspecialinvitationtomembersofthepublicwhorecentlyexperienced joblossesandhardshipasaresultofthedownturnintheeconomy. PleasedirectanyquestionsonthisstatementtoMr.I.ChesterCooper,President&CEO via email: ccooper@babnancial.com or Tel: 242-461-1003. TRADEWINDS EXERCISE 2009 P HOTOS: Tim Clarke / Tribune staff ATCORALHARBOURBASE USCoast Guard instructs Caribbean defence forces on how to increase maritime security TAKE THAT! Service members learn some new skills. P HYSICAL APPROACH: S ervice members take part in Exercise Tradewinds 2009. Ferocious fire ravages Buy 4 Less store COB Union of Students to hold elections of of ficers F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f TROUBLE IN STORE: The fire caused extensive damage. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE trial of a doctor accused of negligence for allegedly failing to properly diagnosis and treat a man s uffering from a life threatening heart infection began in the Supreme Court yesterday. Christopher Rogers, the plaintiff in the case, has taken legal action against Dr Ian Kelly, a family practitioner, for allegedly failing to properly diagnosis and treat him back in 2005. M r Rogers is represented by lawyer Gail Lockhart-Charles, while Dr Kelly is represented by attorneys Steven Turnquest and Michael Saunders. The trial is being heard before Senior Justice John Lyons. Dr Andrew Selwyn, a cardiologist from Boston, was the first witn ess to take the stand yesterday. Dr Selwyn was questioned extensively regarding office notes that Dr Kelly made regarding his treatment of Mr Rogers and asked to give his medical opinion. According to Dr Kelly’s notes, Mr Rogers’ initial visit for his illness was on October 7, 2005. At that time, Mr Rogers was examined by Dr Kelly after claiming that he had been suffering from a fever for a month. Dr Selwyn noted that a haemotology r eport stated that Mr Rogers’ erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR was “clearly abnormal and markedly raised.” Witness The witness told the court that a normal rate would be between 0 and 9 while Mr Rogers’ was at 57. Dr Selwyn said that he saw this an obvious reason for concern. An ESR test is used to help diagnosis conditions associated with inflammation and infections. Nearly two weeks after his initial visit, Mr Rogers reportedly returned to Dr Kelly again, claiming that he was not feeling well, but according to Dr Kelly’s notes, he was doing well, the court heard. Dr Selwyn noted that according to Dr Kelly’s notes, Mr Rogers was given the drug Eloquin, a broad spectrum antibiotic. The witness said that between Mr Rogers’ initial visit with Dr Kelly and his second visit, no differential diagnosis was carried out. This, he said, should have been d one. Mr Rogers was given the drug Zenthromax on a subsequent visit that month as his condition continued to deteriorate, although Dr Kelly’s notes did not reflect the same, the court heard. On October 31, 2005, Mr Rogers reportedly told Dr Kelly t hat he had had an awful weekend, but was reassured by Dr Kelly to continue taking the antibiotics, the court heard. Dr Selwyn said that Mr Rogers’ fever and weight loss were obvious signs of an infection and that the failure to reach a proper diagnosis worsened the condition and c aused more damage. The court also heard yesterday that an infectious bacteria, which ultimately led to endocarditis, an infection in Mr Rogers’ heart valve, had been found in three blood samples. Dr Selwyn said that intravenous antibiotics could have been administered to Mr Rogers in sufficient dosages until all signs of the infection had disappeared. Statement The court heard that Mr Rogers’ condition continued to deteriorate, ultimately leading to heart failure on November 14, 2005. In his statement, Mr Rogers claimed that Dr Kelly confirmed to him that he was suffering from heart failure and that he wanted him to see someone later that day. M r Rogers was subsequently admitted to Doctors Hospital and then later to a hospital in Cleveland, Ohio for heart surgery, the court heard. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 3 TWELVE persons were arrested and charged for drug related matters, four persons were charged for house breaking, and 10 persons were charged for various minor o ffences in Grand Bahama. Asst Supt Noel Curry said that a variety of stolen items were discovered and persons who have had a break-in and items stolen are asked to come to Police Headquarters to identify their belongings. HAND GUN FOUND A handgun was discovered on the beach at Smith’s Pointby a concerned resident who was walking in the area on Thursday. According to reports, the resident found a black and silver 9mm handgun along with a m agazine clip, which contained six live founds of ammunition, around 10am and contacted police. The matter is under investigation by police. BURGLARY A ND ROBBERY A resident of Frobisher Driv e was robbed of cash and other items on Friday by a man who broke into his home. The man told police that the incident occurred sometime around 12.50am. He said the culprit robbed him and hisr oommate of cash, two cellular telephones and $90 worth of G SM phone cards. Police are continuing their investigation into the matter. Twelve arrested and charged In brief PLP Chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin yesterday congratulated Grand Bahama physician Dr Michael Darville on his appointment to the Senate. S tating that he is a “distinguished” son of Bahamian soil, Mrs Hanna-Martin said that Dr Darville has contributed “significantly” to the delivery of health care services, among other things, in the community of Grand Bahama. “His appointment to the Senate will enhance that body’s deliberations and signifies the Progressive Liberal Party’s commitment to bringing to the fore national voices that will articulate and help imple ment our vision for a new and exciting future for our Bahamas,” she said in a brief press statement. P LP leader Perry Christie on Sunday officially announced that Dr Darville will fill the vacancy left in the Senate following the resignation of Pleasant Bridgewater. Dr Darville practices medicine in Freeport as a partner in the Grand Bahama Family Medical Centre. He holds an MBBS degree in medicine from the University of the West Indies and a degree in engineering from the University of Wind sor in Canada. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORTGrand Bahama police are investi gating two serious matters, including a cutlass attackand an assault that occurred in Freeport over the weekend. According to reports, a 27-year-old woman is in hospital with injuries after being attacked by another woman with a cutlass in the Garden Villas area on Fri day. Asst Supt Noel Curry said the victim, who is a residentof Jervis Crescent, was “chopped about the body.” She was taken to Rand Memorial Hospital, where she is presently detained in the female surgical ward. Investigations are contin uing in the matter. A YOUNG man was also assaulted in the Garden Vil las area on early Saturday morning. The attacker is believed to be a man who is wanted by police on Grand Bahama. According to police, a 27year-old male resident of Caravel Beach was taken to hospital after being gunbutted in the head during an altercation with wanted sus pect Samiko Rigby. Asst Supt Noel Curry said the police received a report from a concerned residentwho reported that a man was being chased along Adventurers Way around 2.30am on Saturday by another man with a gun. Police were dispatched to the area to investigate. After receiving additional information, officers went to the Rand Memorial Hospi tal, where they interviewed the victim. Mr Curry said the suspect was identified as Samiko Rigby, who is wanted for questioning in reference to several other matters. Rigby, a 26-year-old resi dent of Eight Mile Rock, escaped police custody on January 11 from the Central Police Station at Police Headquarters in Freeport. Although an all-pointsbulletin was issued for his arrest, Rigby still remains at large. Rigby is about 5” tall and weighs 185 pounds. He is of dark complexion. Anyone with information concerning his whereabouts is asked to contact the Central Detective Unit at 3503107/ 8, 350-3106, 352-9774/ 5; the duty officer at 919, 911, or the Crime Tipsters Hotline at 352-1919. Cutlass attack and assault are investigated ASSISTANT Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna confirmed yesterday that police in Abaco will again be making their crime reports available to the local media on that island. Last week, the police in Abaco denied the local press in Abaco the daily crime report. This came after concerns were r aised about the effect of the publication of crime reports on the island’s second home economy. However, Mr Hanna said yesterday that the issue, which was widely publicised, has since been “sorted out.” “Whatever the miscommunication or misunderstanding was, that no longer exists. That reporter no longer has that issue to contend with because clearly we are working with the media,” Mr Hanna said. Abaconians last week were furious that the police attempted to stop the press reporting on what they termed a dramatic rise in crime on the island. Supt Sean Neville-Smith allegedly told the local newspaper that it can no longer carry crime reports “because they reflect badly on the police.” The publishers of The Abaconian, David and Kathy Ralph, were displeased about the ban and asked their readers to phone in their crime news. Their readers were angry at what they saw as a blatant attempt to keep important information away from the public. This attempt by the police to gag the press follows a worrying upsurge in crime in Abaco and growing disgruntlement over the police force’s effectiveness there. Residents are concerned that the recent kidnapping of a foreign investor, the mugging of a well-known local woman, and a spate of boat thefts will t urn away yachtsmen and second-home owners who form the backbone of the island’s economy. In the past, Abaco has been relatively crime-free. But rising unemployment and a sluggish economy have pushed up theft. Hardest hit have been visiting yachts, some valued at $100,000 or more. On more than one occasion, boats have arrived in Abaco one day and been stolen the next. But the mugging of well-known resident Lily Sands, who is in her seven ties, has really brought home the changing crime scene on the island. Ms Sands was accosted by two people with guns who forced her into her own home in a normally qui et residential area of Marsh Harbour. Then they locked her in a closet before stealing money and other items. A resident said: “Boats are disappearing like crazy. We have to get help up here. We must get Nassau’s attention because this crime is going to kill the econ omy.” Trial of doctor accused of negligence underway The police in Abaco to make crime reports available again National Ener gy Policy consultation pr ocess initiated PLP chairman congratulates Dr Darville on Senate appointment GOVERNMENT has initiated the consultation process for the implementation of a National Energy Policy which will have BEC moving towards a more sustainable mix of energy sources for the public, State Minister for Works Phenton Neymour said. Mr Neymour also said that the government is exploring funding opportunities to advance energy conservation at the residential level through an incandescent lightbulb replacement programme. This effort builds upon the Customs duty reductions introduced in the last budget. The state minister made this statement last week during his contribution to the mid-year bud get debate in the House of Assembly. He said that opportunities also exist for energy efficiency improvements in large industrial motors as well as in residential home construction. “We have started the process of looking at these options and the opportunities through technical assistance of grant-funding to fast-track its implementation,” Mr Neymour said. He said that his ministry has what they believe is a firm foundation for a National Energy Pol icy, which also addresses matters of energy security, especially during periods of fuel price volatility. In order to advance the government’s National Energy Policy and its proposed implementation plan, Mr Neymour said input from the various ministries and departments, agencies and corporations of the government is being sought. The BEST Commission of the Ministry of the Environment is now in the process of soliciting that input. Hulan Hanna

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I have lived in the Bahamas for two years and am disgusted at the way animals are treated here. The torture and barbaric treatment of turtles are a disgrace to all Bahamians who think they are decent folk. Most Bahamians I am proud to know, are decent easy going folk, but they must rise up and stop the cruel unnecessary killing of turtles before the whole world thinks all Bahamians are barbaric and cruel folk. For goodness sakes this is an endangered species. Every time a turtle is tortured to death or ransomed, this is a bloody stain that will crucify your tourist industry one day. The world has moved on and it is high time the Bahamas caught up. How long will it be before a live feed showing turtles being tortured is placed on the internet for the world to see what Bahamians allow to happen? Imagine the embarrassment the Bahamian people and Government will face world wide. So please, pass this law and make it have penalties for those involved that are so harsh and severe they will not even contemplate breaking it. Make sure that this law is e nforced so harshly and frequently that no one will cross t he line. Teach your children to love a nimals and realise that turtles are a source of joy, swimming in the sea that tourists will pay to see. You complain that only foreigners have contacted you. Perhaps these foreigners care enough to want to make a difference to Bahamians’ lives and do not want to see all Bahamians branded as cruel, barbaric folk. Perhaps we care about the livelihoods you derive from tourism. One day, maybe not so far away, tourists will not come here, as they don’t want to see or hear about cruelty to turtles and of course your other running sore, the Surrey horses. Nor will they want to spend money here to support a people too weak and ineffectual to put things right. So please put this right. Yours with the best of intentions for all Bahamians. JOHN LE SUEUR Nassau, March, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON (AP administration intends to give up missile defencei n Europe as part of a security deal with Russia, as its behind-the-scenes manoeuvring seems tos uggest, then Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is driving a hard bargain. O n a trip to Europe and the Middle East that ended Sunday, Clinton spoke positively of the prospect of making Europe-based missile defence an integral part of an overall U.S. defence strategy. Her message was that missiled efence has value and Washington won't give it up easily. T he uncertain status of missile defence has much to do with the administration's evolving a pproach to Iran. Its nuclear programme and missile-building efforts are the main reasons usually cited to justify missile defences in Europe. Clinton made it clear that the U.S. wants more than just a helping hand from Russ ia. The U.S. wants to see any such assistance pay concrete dividends in the form of verifi a ble action by Tehran to halt its nuclear programme and scale back missile development. U ntil those results are achieved, or at least within sight, the administration is likely to keep missile defence as an option. Talk of a bargain that would remove the missile defence irritant from the U.S.-Russian r elationship has centred on a letter President Barack Obama sent Russian President DmitryM edvedev in February. The note has been interpreted by some as a conciliatory gesture and a p ossible first step toward linking missile defence in Europe to Russia's assistance on Iran. It is not clear how the Russians will respond, and Clinton's talks with Russian Foreign Min ister Sergey Lavrov on Friday yielded no a nswer. Missile defence was a favourite of the Bush administration, but it never has been pop u lar among Democrats. Obama's election was widely seen as signaling a death knell for the p roposed European leg of the missile defence system, which would be linked to an existing network of interceptors in Alaska and Califor nia and radars elsewhere. Scaling back missile defence ambitions also could produce some of the big savings Obama seeks in a period of tighter budgets. W hat seems apparent at this point is that the administration does not intend to bargain away missile defence entirely in exchange for Russian help with Tehran. In Belgium, at a news conference following a N ATO meeting, Clinton said missile defence was "a very important tool in our defensive arsenal for the future." She later said she was referring not just to Iran but more broadly to the concept of deterring non-state adversaries such as terrorist networks from seeking to acquire an uclear missile years or decades from now. At another point during her trip, Clinton s aid "Iran is the name we put to" those emerging and future threats, "but it is a kind of standi n for the range of threats we foresee." If the present challenge of dissuading Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons proved successful, she seemed to suggest, then missile defence still might be useful because other missile threatsm ight come up later. What she avoided was offering a quid pro q uo. Clinton was careful not to assert that if Russia were to accelerate pressure on Tehran to b ack down, then the U.S. would scrap its plan to put anti-missile interceptors in Poland and an associated radar in the Czech Republic. In fact she appeared to suggest that a missile defence in Europe was a good idea even if Iran n o longer was a worry although it would be less urgent. Such talk may reflect doubt thatI ran will change course, although Clinton reaffirmed during the trip that the U.S. wants to e ngage Iran in talks about its nuclear programme and other topics. She told an Arab diplomat at an international conference in Egypt last Monday that she doubts the Iranians will take up the American offer of a dialogue, a ccording to a senior U.S. official who briefed reporters on condition that he not be identi f ied because the conversation was private. Officially, the administration has not said w hether it intends to go ahead with the missile defence sites in Poland and the Czech Republic. It has stuck to the language that Obama used as candidate, that missile defence must be proved reliable and cost effective. P oland's president said Sunday he believes the U.S. will honour its agreement to build am issile defence base in his country and that scrapping the project to improve ties with Russ ia would be an unfriendly gesture toward Poland. One possibility is that Washington and Moscow could move toward agreement, with NATO, to jointly reconfigure current U.S. plans in a way that results in a coordinated system to provide protection of the continent against a range of missiles. R ussia says missile defence in Europe is unnecessary and provocative. Moscow even has threatened to deploy short-range missiles in its westernmost region, bordering Poland, if the U.S. goes ahead. But the rhetoric has sincec ooled. (This article was written by Robert Burns, Associated Press writer). Disgusted with our treatment of animals LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Clinton’s hard bargain on missile shield EDITOR, The Tribune. It was a nice gesture by Mr Franklyn Wilson to come to the aid of local media boss Mr Wendell Jones. But let us look at the following scenarios. It can be said that Jones communications (JCN has done quite well in his media empire in bringing the news and other cultural entertaining programmes to the Bahamian public. It can also be said that JCN has benefited from just about all aspects of the local advertising public including all political, independent and splin ter parties. This was good for our country as well as maintaining democracy. Now on the other side of this scenario you have the opposition Progressive Liberal Party and its aspiring leader hopefuls, like the MP for Fox Hill and others complaining about the biased reporting and attacks against their party. It can also be said that for some 40 years now the PLP has been trying to replace the historic Nassau Herald” of the 1960s with a current n ewspaper. Prior to 1992 the reigning Progressive Liberal Party government never wanted to free the air waves because of its own ongoing political agenda. The Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas was the official mouthpiece and news media of the government. The Free National Movement freed the air waves in 1992 granting several private companies to operate indepen dent radio stations, including Mr Wendell Jones. Despite Mr Jones’ shortcomings with his faulty payment of taxes (National Insurance and utili ties) he has managed to build a competitive media enterprise. Now up steps the PLP top brass and millionaire magnet Mr Franklyn Wilson who now wants to take advantage of a opportunistic situation of offering to help Mr Wendell Jones for in my opinion the sole purpose of acquiring that news media (JCN PLP. We are with you Mr Jones and we know you will not fall into the trap that is currently being set for you. Stick to your guns and pay your taxes and keep your news media (JCN political persuasion. If, and should you fall for the so-called help that is being offered to you by Mr Wilson, then you find that later on your call letters which is cur-r ently JCN will for all intensive purposes will b ecome W-PLP. BRIAN O CLARKE Nassau, March 1, 2009. Confident Mr Jones will not fall for the trap being set for him EDITOR, The Tribune. I am sick and tired of the childish misbehaviour of some Members of Parliament in the House of Assembly. It is truly embarrassing to watch the Parliamentary Channel. In an era where intolerance, rudeness and violence are increasing, our leaders need to be more civil and respectful. The behaviour and level of "debate" is a poor example for our young people. There is total disregard for the Speaker, and little under standing of the proper use of "point of order." This has been a tradition in Bahamian politics, but it is time for politicians to realise that there are now many educated Bahamians who are not impressed by playground argu ments in parliament. These are supposed to be professional people about the people's business and they are behaving like a bunch of thugs on the bus going to prison. CHARLES CAREY , Harbour Island, Bahamas, March 3, 2009. Tired of the childish behaviour of some MPs in the House

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 5 '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* )$67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A N OUT-OF-WORK fisherman w ho was ordered to pay $700 in outstanding National Insurance contributions sold his boat on Friday to avoid jail. Colin Fox, 53, a boat operator for a 35ft crawfishing vessel on Long Island, has not earned a salary since the boat engine broke down in October. A nd although the engine was r epaired in January, adverse weather conditions have kept the fisherman from working since. T he boat operator said he has been struggling to cover basic living costs, including his diabetes medication, and has not been in a position to pay $44 m onthly to NIB. He claims he received no warning f rom the National Insurance Board (NIB until he was summoned to court twow eeks ago. Then, last Wednesday, he appeared before the Long Island administrator. Mr Fox said he tried to explain his predicament as he pleaded guilty to the charge of failing to pay $700 toN IB and was told he would have to pay $300 to NIB by last Friday or be jailed. In a panic move to avoid prison, Mr F ox sold his boat for half its retail value on Friday. “I didn’t want to go in jail,” he said. So I sold it instead of going to Fox H ill.” M s Fox, his wife and their 13-yearold daughter, have been surviving on his wife’s salary of under $100 a week for the last six months, as he has beenu nable to find alternative employment in the current economic climate. He said: “I am not working, I don’t have a job, I don’t have anything. I am struggling to put food on the table, things are rough.” T he fishing industry has suffered from rising gas prices, declining crawfish populations, a drop in the price of crawfish and unusually windy w eather conditions this year, and Mr Fox has little hope for improvement before the crawfish season closes at t he end of the month. H e said this has been the worst seas on since he started professional crawfishing at the age of 18. MP for Long Island and Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry Cartwright said many selfemployed fishermen are struggling to p ay NIB contributions, and he advises t hem to make arrangements to pay before they are summoned to court. “It's part of government policy and national insurance policy that persons who are falling behind (on contributions) will be warned and after one or two warnings they can be taken to c ourt,” Mr Cartwright said. “There is little that can be done after they have been fined in court as the judge’s decision is final unless the person appeals.” Mr Cartwright said he is in talks with t he minister responsible for National I nsurance to represent the fishermen in h is constituency. M r Fox has now adjusted his contrib utions to a more manageable $26 per m onth. THE Bahamas Gaming Reform Committee announced that it is working towards com missioning an independent review of the country’s gambling laws. The committee said it wants an outside expert to undertake the review at no cost to the government. Once completed, the committee said, it will use the review asa basis to propose new legislation to the government. Committee chairman Sidney Strachan said: “The current context for gaming laws is untenable and, in fact, discriminatory. We are willing to do our part to change the status quo, but government must first show a willingness to seriously entertain recommendations. “Again, we plan to ask the government to formally begin the reform process. We’ll then submit a plan and formally com mit to shaping new legislation and policies for adoption.” BGR said it is encouraged by the overall reaction to a recent Rotary Club-sponsored poker tournament for charity. “By virtue of current arcane gaming laws, the event was bor derline illegal. Despite this, the government remained on the sidelines. Once again, it has signalled that current laws are emasculated because they are transparently discriminatory,” the BGR said. According to the BGR, this is a state of affairs that both humiliates and depreciates the Bahamas on the world stage. Present at the Rotary poker game were members of the BGR and Mark Johnson, president of National Casino and Bartending School, who was responsible for oversight of the event. The NCBS currently trains dealers and croupiers for the local casino industry. “The Rotary event demon strated the value of more modern gaming laws. It showed that Bahamians are more than capable of operating casino-like events and that the gaming industry can benefit the Bahamas far more that is cur rently the case if citizens are not discriminated against. This is an opportunity and the government must act.” BGR wants the government to call for an independent review without delay. The committee has also initiated research on modern methods and means of protecting Bahamians from the risks of impulsive gaming. BGR claims that allowing Bahamians to game could pro duce as much as $20 million in additional annual revenue for the government. The committee said that rev enue of this magnitude could support a host of important pub lic programmes and initiatives. THE Bahamas Humane Society wishes to thank the community of Bain Town for their participation in February’s “Who Let The Dogs O ut Free Spay and N euter programme.” T he programme visited five primary schools in the area and spoke with 1,960 students about how to be a responsible anim al owner and the i mportance of neutering a nd caring for their pets. E very home was visited i n the area and animal advice was given where needed, unwanted animals were removed by the Ministry of Agricult ure’s K-9 Control Unit and 55 dogs were n eutered during this period by the Humane Society. T he Bahamas Humane Society would also like to t hank the persons who gave donations towards making this possible. T he programme will next move to the Fort F incastle and Masons Addition areas. T HE OAS Perma n ent Representative of the Bahamas Ambas sador C A Smith d onated $5,000 each to the Inter-American Drug Abuse ControlC ommission and to the I nter-American Committee Against Terrorism on behalf of the Bahamas govern m ent. The cheque presentation took place at theO rganisation of Ameri can States (OAS the Office of the Assis tant Secretary General, A mbassador Albert R amdin. Ambassador Smith said he was grateful for this opportunity and thanked CICAD and CICTE for being great p artners to the B ahamian people in p roviding training and resources in the fight against drugs, the trafficking of small arms and human trafficking, which is becoming a real problem in the Bahamas. With respect to terrorism, Ambassador Smith said that “it has become a worldwide problem” and “even though we do not see any evidence of it in the Bahamas we recog nise that tourism is the deadlock of our financial services and if there is, because we are a soft target, we recognise, we need the support of CICTE.” On his behalf, Assistant Secretary General, Ambassador Ramdin, thanked Ambassador Smith for the financial contribution made on behalf of the government. He highlighted the great task being devel oped by CICTE and CICAD and stated that “the contribution not only in terms of the quantity, but symbolically” is a way of show ing the commitment to Caribbean issues, and in this specific case, the Bahamas. This contribution from the government of the Bahamas coincides with the begin ning of the Ninth Reg ular Session of the CICTE. The Bahamas Humane Society thanks Bain Town community $5,000 donations made on behalf of the gover nment In brief Out-of-work fisherman sells boat to pay outstanding NI contributions Man ordered to pay $700 Edwards Twins eye America’s Got Talent TWIN brothers Anthony and Eddie Edwards, whose ‘Celebrities on S tage’ show has featured i n Nassau for the last three years, are to bid for megas tardom this summer...by c ompeting in America’s G ot Talent. The twins, who can impersonate 100 or more singing stars with virtually flawless vocal mimicry, are eager to show whatt hey can do in front of a m ulti-million international television audience. They hope their show, w hich has been enthralling t heatre audiences for many years now, will earn them the kind of fame now being enjoyed by the bril l iant ventriloquist Terry Fater, whose triumph in America’s Got Talentt urned him into a Las Vegas superstar. “We are entering the show because we need thatk ind of exposure,” Antho n y told T he Tribune . “The response we get to our shows is overwhelm-i ngly positive, but we need to achieve the kind of breakthrough that Ameri ca’s Got Talent can bring.” The Edwards Twins have been appearing at the Rainforest Theatre, Crystal Palace, four nights a week since 2006. They have proved a great success with tourists and locals and earned plaudits from a Tribune critic who has now been to see them seven times. On Sunday night, The Edwards Twins gave a free concert to Bahamians in appreciation of the coun try’s willingness to host t heir talents for three succ essive seasons. We wanted to give something back to say thank you for having us,b ecause we now see Nas sau as our second home,” Anthony told the audience. The twins, from Las Vegas, are now booked into the Rainforest The atre until August, though they will take time off to appear in America’s Got Talent during April and May. For their new season in Nassau, the twins have repackaged their act, highlighting stars who have had secondary billing in previ ous shows. Retained, however, are Anthony’s staggeringlyb rilliant impersonations of a succession of leading m ale and female vocalists and Eddie’s show-stopping impression of Cher. A fter Sunday’s show, during which Anthony again stunned the audience with his impersonation of Luciano Pavarotti, a member of the audience said: “If talent really is the deciding factor on America’s Got Talent, then these guys will walk it. Frankly, I’ve never seen any act quite so riveting and amusing. “They are top class.” A IMING FOR TV AUDIENCE: T he Edwards Twins BGR challenges govt to act on independent r eview of gaming laws ATTORNEY Mrs Kelphene Cunningham, vice-president of the Industrial Tribunal of the Bahamas, has become a member of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators. She has also completed post graduate studies with the University of London, where she obtained a post graduate certificate in equity and trust and a post graduate diploma in commercial and cor porate law. She is in the process of completing a master of laws degree in international dispute resolution. Mrs Cunningham is a member of Gray’s Inn and the Bahamas Bar Asso ciation. Attorney becomes member of Chartered Institute of Arbitrators Mrs Kelphene Cunningham

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THE Cacique Awards Scholarship Fund recently received a $1,500 donationf rom art lover Janet Johnson. Ms Johnson, who is also the director of communications in the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, donated $1,500 to the fund after purchasing a duho carving from the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation. She explained that the duho (Lucayan ceremonial stool) had great sentimental v alue to her since there is a f amily story behind its creation. I t began with lightning in a h urricane, she said. As Hurricane Floyd passed through the Bahamas in 1999, a Madeira tree in her late father’s yard was b roken apart by a lightning strike. Her father, World War II veteran Basil I Johnson, saved the wood from thet ree. After he died in 2004, a d ecision was made to create a lasting and meaningful s ymbol from the wood in his honour. Wood The wood was given to M inistry of Tourism and Aviation, which engaged artist Antonius Roberts toc raft the duho on a voluntary basis. A fter the Ministry’s use of the art piece for three years at various functions, includ-i ng Junkanoo Summer Festiv al and the 12th Annual Cacique Awards, the duho i s being added to Ms Johnson’s private collection. All the funds from its sale h ave been posted to the Cacique Scholarship Fund, w hich funds the education of deserving young Bahamians. The duho – the ceremonia l seat of the leader of the Lucayan people – is the s ymbol of the Cacique Awards. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 6&+2/$56+,3t('8&$7,21$//2$1 ',9,6,210,1,675<('8&$7,21,03257$17,&( $33/,&$7,21)2506$5( 12:$9$,/$%/(6&+2/$56+,3/2$1<3( '($'/,1( $//%$+$0$6(5,7&+2/$56+,3 1 $7,21$/(5,7&+2/$56+,3 1$7,21$/$&$'(0,&&+2/$56+,3 1$7,21$/(&+1,&$/&+2/$56+,3 1$7,21$/*5$17( '8&$7,21*8$5$17((/2$1)81'*5$00( *(5$&((6($5&+&(175(&+2/$56+,3 ),1$1&,$/&20081,7<$'9$1&('(&+1,&$/ 75867&+2/$56+,3 1$7,21$/$:$5'%856$5<$ 7($&+(5('8&$7,21*5$17$$SSOLFDWLRQIRUPVPXVWEHSURSHUO\FRPSOHWHG :,7+$//(48,5(',1)250$7,21$77$&+(' DQGUHWXUQHG’%()25( WKHGHDGOLQHWRWKH $SSOLFDWLRQIRUPVUHFHLYHGDIWHUWKH GHDGOLQH ZLOOQRWEHDFFHSWHG ZZZEDKDPDVHGXFDWLRQFRP T HE National Congress of T rade Unions of the Bahamas (NCTUB government to review the Employment Act to strengthen the provision of equal pay for equal work with particulare mphasis on the disparity in wages between men and women in the labour market. T he umbrella union, in conjunction with the Caribbean C ongress of Labour, joined the rest of the world in celebrating International Women’s Dayo n Sunday. Every year, a political and h uman rights theme, as designated by the United Nations to create the social awareness oft he struggles of women worldwide, is brought out and exami ned in a hopeful manner. This year’s theme – “Women and men unite toe nd violence against women and girls” – is a timely one, the NCTUB said, “since we can see the evidence of physical abuse toward women and girlsa lmost on a daily basis globally.” “The level of violence a gainst women and girls has increased over the years and women need to come togethera s a united force to expose those that are guilty of such a cts so that we can stomp out the violence in our society. As women organisations, it is ourd uty to speak out on the injus tices and violence that are per petrated against females in our s ociety as well as on the globalmarket,”Hellena Cartwright, president of theW omen’s Association in the Bahamas said in a press statem ent. As we prepare ourselves and our organisations to deal with the challenges that we n ow face within the Bahamas and in the Caribbean regiond ue to the global recession, the NCTUB wishes to remind w omen that the struggle for women’s rights is the struggle for human rights.” T he NCTUB is calling on all women to reflect on the gains, s trides, and achievements that have been made by women locally, regionally and inter-n ationally, despite the continued discrimination in the workplace as well as domestic and other violence that is perpetrated against women, girlsa nd those who are still classified as the working poor. The umbrella union said it also wishes to remind women of the importance of educa-t ion because it ensures that all women and girls are able to secure opportunities to broad-e n their knowledge and increase their potential f or success. ‘While we have had tremendous success stories withw omen breaking the glass ceiling, unfortunately the numb ers are still too few. I would l ike to take this opportunity to congratulate those women who have succeeded to the top a nd encourage those who are still standing as brave soldiersi n the struggle for fair play and justice. We must continue to f ight for the equality that we so rightly deserve,” the Women’s Association and NCTUB said. T he NCTUB said it pledges its support to all domestic w orkers in their struggle for legal and social recognition of the value of all women’s work. Let us therefore join together to realise the potential of gen der equality and eventually the full empowerment of women all over the world. On behalfo f the National Congress of Trade Unions of the Bahamas and the Women’s Association, we take this opportunity to wish all women in every islando f the Bahamas a very happy Woman’s Day and be reminded that the struggle goes onu ntil all men and all women have become equals.” Call for the disparity in wages between men and women to be addressed HYACINTH PRATT (left T ourism and Aviation, is pictured receiving the $1,500 cheque from Ms Johnson and artist Antonius Roberts. Art lover donates $1,500 to the Cacique Awards Scholarship Fund NCTUB in conjunction with Caribbean Congress of Labour celebrates International Women’s Day PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham talks with Grand Bahama Shipyard officials and investors after having a dock-side view of the Carnival Miracle (pictured top left one of the boats currently on dry-dock at the Shipyard. Mr Ingraham was taken on a tour of the docks following the official commissioning of the Shipyard's third dry dock on Saturday, March 7. Pictured from left are Richard Fain, chairman and CEO of Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd; Giora Israel, senior vicepresident of the Carnival Corporation; CarlGustaf Rotkirch, chairman and CEO of the Grand Bahama Shipyard, Prime Minister Ingraham and Pineridge MP Kwasi Thompson PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM is taken on a tour of the Grand Bahama Shipyard's docks on Saturday, March 7 following the official commissioning of the Shipyard's third dry dock. Pictured front from left are Pineridge MP Kwasi Thompson, Prime Minister Ingraham, Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch, chairman and CEO of the Grand Bahama Shipyard and Mrs Rotkirch. S h a r o n T u r n e r / B I S PM tours Grand Bahama shipyard

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n Nassau Institute Presentation to the Bahamas National E conomic Forum A T THE risk of wasting your precious time, I would like to take a minute or so to conduct a thought experiment, with apologies to Dr Charles Murr ay, the American political s cientist and historian who f irst proposed this, albeit in the American context: As we know, government s pending has now put the Bahamas in debt to the tune of more than $3 billion, but what else has this burden on f uture generations accomplished? Let's find out. Imagine for a moment that t he government as we know it w as reduced to its role out l ined in the Constitution, and o ther than defence, law and o rder and maybe certain i nfrastructure requirements, the government was no longer responsible for all the things they take on. To borrow from Dr Murray again, how would you respond? 1 . Would you be more or l ess likely to volunteer at your church? Yes or no? 2 . Would you be more or l ess likely to volunteer at a f ood bank? Yes or no? 3. If you were a lawyer or doctor, would you be more orl ess likely to offer pro bono s ervices? Yes or no? The list could go on, but I t hink you see where this is g oing. As has turned out, most of us answered yes. The question we should a sk ourselves then, according to Dr Murray is, why are more of us not doing theset hings already? He contends, it's because we have bought into the “soul killing logic” that somebody else is doingi t for us. T axes We vote the government i nto office so we do not have t o be our neighbours keeper. In other words, we pay taxes for government to do it, so why should we do any more. Pushing the envelope a lit tle more, seldom people meet that complaints are not lodged against our bloated government. They say things like: Duty rates are too high! What does the governmentdo with all that money! The educational system is a mess! The government can't even fix the street lights! Every government depart ment I visit the service is lousy! Whatever I want to do with my business, I have to waste hours getting a permit for this or a permit for that! I'm sure most of you have uttered these words? Am I right? To be a little more specific let's look at education for a minute. In 2001, The Nassau Insti tute wrote a few essays about our educational system. At that time, the country had spent “over $480,000,000 (that's right, over four hundred and eighty million dol lars since 1992 that's 9 years) on education. Even though the public pays these taxes, the actual student test results from the government run schools are considered "confidential" and are never tabled in the House of Assem bly, as any transparent gov ernment would do. It is a given, at least it is not denied by the Ministry of Education, that the mean grade is no higher than a D, which in the real world, is a failing grade.” Yet somehow we do not see the necessity to privatise education, starting with vouchers, where at least if a parent is unhappy with one school, he/she can transfer his/her child to the school of their choice. I'm sure if you go through the budgets of each government department you would find the country could do a way with one agency or d epartment after another. I would argue that a major step the government couldt ake to reform itself would be to change its accounting proc edure along the lines of real b usiness. E ach Ministry should have a Balance Sheet and Income S tatement so they can see w hat is necessary to sustain their budgets. I bet we would see an improvement with expenditure. Yes, I would admit that the Bahamas is a more compli c ated country than most of o ur neighbours as we have some 20 populated islands, so we need an airport and porto n each one, etc. But I also submit that is more reason to create other Freeport's as in Grand Bahama, than proof that we need ever larger government. Present legal battles in F reeport notwithstanding. Debt Now let's look at the national debt. At the Nassau Institute, we might be considered fiscal conservatives, but Ip refer to think it is better for government to spend within i ts means than burden future generations, yet unborn, with deficits and debt that we willn ever repay in most of our lifetimes. What I find most disturb ing is successive governments h ave committed to bringing t he debt and deficits under control, yet year after year,w ith the odd exception, the d eficits and debt increase. Now I'm sure some of you are thinking, these are extraordinary times, so govern m ents should throw fiscal cau tion to the wind and do whatever it takes to save us from this market correction we calla recession. Sorry, depression. I would argue that this is the time for the opposite approach for our national economic plan, but more on that later. Since 1991 the National Debt of the Bahamas has risen from $870 million to $3 billion, a staggering 244.8 per cent increase in 18 years. That's what, a $118 million increase each and every year. Mind boggling. All this and we have not even considered the possibil ity of a bankrupt National Insurance Board and the additional taxes that will be forced upon us to sustain that. So what should the Bahamas do in formulating a national economic plan in view of the oncoming train wreck to our economy, if indeed it turns out to be such? In simple terms, we should turn toward laissez-faire capitalism rather than more government planning, that so far has set us on a path that is clearly unsustainable. The only national economic plan we should be setting is for government to start to downsize immediately by pri vatising or shutting down whatever agency or department they can. I challenge anyone to name 10 government agencies, departments or ministries, (of the 173 services listed in the phone book) that do their job efficiently and effectively. Surely we can close the Hotel Corporation? No doubt we can stop subsidising one group while discriminating against others. How about selling Bahama sair, Water & Sewerage and BEC? Do we need a price control department when so many people shop in Miami? Oh, and don't forget ZNS either. I can tell by the hush that has come over you that you think I'm crazy, but I'll cite one clear example where even the half baked privatisation of BaTelCo (now BTC eral years back, was almost worth what it cost at the time. J ust think of the entrepren eurs that came out of that e xercise. We have several cell phone companies, a furnitures tore and more. Entrepreneurs now hiring p eople, paying taxes and othe rwise contributing to econ omic growth. I sincerely believe the goal o f downsizing government is a m uch more worthy national economic plan than encouraging more failed government planning. After all, a government does not an economy make. A n economy is the market p lace of millions of individual transactions. And I don't know about you, but I trust myself to make my personal decisions rather than something or s omeone called the governm ent. B esides, Bahamians can ill afford the taxation to come in an effort to support the leviathan we call the Bahamas government, as it is presently s tructured. And more gove rnment planning means more costs to the taxpayer and possibly to the economy. Relevant T he unintended conseq uences from government p lanning agencies brings the risk of them becoming The Bahamas' biggest growth industry. You can bet theyw ould convince us that they a re even more relevant in tough economic times, in an attempt to justify even larger budgets. Far too often we let transp arency for government slide, e ven as they pass laws every d ay to make us more transparent and keep us in “check” as we say. In summary. Our national economic plan should be to r eturn government to its cons titutionally stated purpose, and accept the personal responsibility so many of usw ish to hand over to all too willing politicians, who might have the best of intentions, but for some reason they m ake things worse. In closing I'll remind you of Fund's Law by the journalist J ohn Fund; G overnment's will always d o the right thing, after t hey've exhausted all other possibilities. C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 7 Redefining the Bahamas govt’s role in the economy Y OUR S AY S IXTH GRADE STUDENTS a nd teachers of the Tarpum Bay Primary School in Eleuthera called on Gov ernor General Arthur Hanna at Government House on Wednesday March 4, 2009. STUDENTSVISITTHEGOVERNORGENERAL L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S In brief B AHAMIAN music and style guru Gerry DeVeaux is the creative director for the new “Fashion Targets Breast Cancer” charity campaign. Mr DeVeaux brought t ogether a few of his friends, including supermodels Tyson Beckford and Veronica Webb, and Rolling Stones progeny Jade Jagger and Leah Wood, to pose for the UK campaign to promote awareness and raise funds f or breast cancer research. H e is also Ambassador f or Fashion Rocks for the P rinces Trust which benef its HRH Prince Charles' c harity. Mr DeVeaux is also the creative director and a judge for Britain's Next Top Model, and has just done a new BBC1 series with Sir Andrew Lloyd W ebber and the Oscars with ITV and Sky TV. Tyson Beckford is one o f the most successful m ale models of all time a nd is currently sharing his top model tips as host of Bravo TV's “Make Me AS upermodel.” Veronica Webb is one of the original supermodels, she was the first model of colour to be offered a major cosmetics contract as the face of Revlon. Charity campaign role for music and style guru Weather forecast excellent for space shuttle launch n CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. AFTERsuffering through a month’s delay,N ASA enjoyed a troub le-free countdown for space shuttle Discovery, all set to blast off on as pace station construction mission Wednesday night, according to Asso c iated Press. L aunch director Mike Leinbach said Monday that the countdown wasg oing smoothly, and forecasters put the odds of good launching weath e r at 90 percent. “The team is anxious to go,”he said. Shuttle managers had s o little to discuss at Monday morning’s launch review at that they wrapped up in under an hour. “That included a lot of me pausing to make sure no one had any questions,” said the chairman of the mission manage ment team, Mike Moses. Concern over some shuttle valves led to repeated meetings over the past month, one lasting as long as 13 hours. By Monday, there was little more to say about the valve issue. One of the three hydrogen gas valves inside Endeavour’s engine compartment broke in November dur-ing the last shuttle launch. NASA ordered extra testing to make sure the valves that ulti mately ended up in Discovery were safe to fly. The valves control the flow of hydrogen gas intothe external fuel tank for proper pressurization. Discovery and seven astronauts will fly to the international space station, carrying up a $300 million framework that includes two solar wings and a radiator. It’s the last set of solar wings for the nearly completed space station, and shouldput the orbiting outpost at full power. One of the shuttle crew, Koichi Wakata, will become the first Japanese to live aboard the space station. He’ll replace an American astronaut, Sandra Mag nus, who has been up there since November. More than 200 Japanese have descended on NASA’s launching site to watch the liftoff.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE circumstances leading to the s hooting, however two men a re being questioned in an intensive murder investigation a nd a third man is wanted for questioning. The nightclub shooting is a nother sign of the country’s desperate need to crackdown o n gun crime and hold a firearms amnesty said political activist Paul Moss. M r Moss has been fighting to take guns off the streets since he launched a campaign in 1997, which, he claimed, received no support from thenC ommissioner of Police Paul Farquharson, or Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest. As a result, gun toters will n ot hand over their weapons without the protection of an a mnesty, and guns still pervade the streets of Nassau, Mr Moss said. T he government, the police and private businesses all need to get involved in the w ar against gun crime, he argued. “If Parliament could have weapons screening and these people are honourable mem b ers, so should the courts in our country, and so should the nightclubs,” Mr Moss said. I think that is something we want to look at in conj unction with trying to get these guns off the streets.” Shootings, such as the mur d er of Mr McPhee on Mon day, not only represent a needless loss of life, but spread fear of crime in the communi ty, Mr Moss maintains. The fear of crime is often worse than the crime itself,” he said. It instills a fear of life, and therefore people are not prepared to risk going outside toc lubs for their own safety, so the economy is suffering as well. We have to look at it and deal with it in a way that involves many people, including the private sector and ordinary citizens.” They (the government ought to involve the private sector in the reduction ofc rime, but I think they are not interested, really they think t hey can do it by themselves, which is folly.” Another murder at a night c lub occurred on August 31, when 23-year-old mechanic Jason Jackson of Newbold Street, Nassau, was fatally stabbed outside Cocktails andD reams in Cable Beach when an altercation inside the club escalated in the car park. tion, cost of production and the fact that we need to eventually eliminate barging. The cost of barging has now exceeded the cost of reverse osmosis (water production that's being produced, we're now producing reverse osmosis water in New Providence at a lower cost than barging. And barging is impacted severely by weather and mechanical breakdowns, which we are now experiencing," he told The Tribune. Although the vessel is still operating, the damage caused a slower turnaround due to "a major failure with its bow thruster." The damaged part is being repaired in South Florida and should be reinstalled by the end of the week, according to WSC. One angry Yamacraw resident, who asked to remain anonymous, said his weekend chores were b rought to a standstill because of the lack of water. "The water has been off, off and on, for the past two weekends. I came home on Friday after work and it was off. Saturday morning it came on briefly and was off the rest of the day Sunday was the same thing, " the resident said. "I can't clean, I can't shower they cut the water off at the most inopportune times. I wasn't even aware that they (WSC lem until I asked a neighbour and he said he heard it from someone else, that they were having shortage because of a problem with their barge." WSC said public announcements about the situation have been broadcast on radio stations. The corporation also said the low or no supply is due to conservation efforts that ensure residents have water during peak consumption hours like the mornings and evenings. Officials anticipate that these measures will be relaxed later this week, once the Titas is fully operational and water storage levels in the capital have been raised. "Barging has been a part of the WSC almost from its inception but in this particular case we are being affected by a mechanical breakdown in The Titus, which is the sole ship that we have at this particular time. And it's affecting its turnaround time, its delivery. It's affecting our available storage and WSC at this time is doing its b est, within its operations, to maintain adequate s upply and pressure and is making operational a djustments at this time,” Mr Neymour said. Customers with low or no water for extended periods are asked to contact WSC's customer call centre at 302-5599. country's immigration detention centre are being ill-treated. Amnesty International is concerned for their safety," said a letter issued by the group's International Secretariat. "The detainees claimed that all those held at the C entre, including women and children, are marched outside three times a day in order tobe counted by heavily armed guards who pushed them with the butts of their guns. There were also claims of severe problems with overcrowding with some detainees forced to sleep on concrete floors. "The Bahamian authorities have publicly denied the abuses, but said they would investigate. Amnesty International, however, is concerned that any investigation would be conducted internally without independent oversight," said the letter which was sent to various Cabinet ministers as well as the media. Now the human rights watchdog group is requesting concerned persons to ask government for an immediate and thorough investigation into these claims; independent monitoring of the centre by human rights groups; proper medical treatment to injured detainees; effective and fair refugee determination for asylum seekers; and detention of asylum-seekers as a last resort. The group also said over the years there have been allegations that asylum seekers were not granted access to "fair and effective" refugee determination procedures, and claims of poor conditions, beatings and overcrowding. The plea issued over the weekend comes after a series of articles published in this newspaper chronicled several claims from detainees, ranging from severe beatings by guards, insufficient food, lack of toilet and bathing facilities. A statement by the Department of Immigration, released the day after the claims first broke, maintained that detainees are fed “three times daily” and the “quantity of meals is always adequate.” Officials also denied, after swift internal investigations into the claims, that any physical abuse occurred at the site. However, last Monday Immigration Director Jack Thompson, and Defence Force Com modore Clifford Scavella, accompanied by rep resentatives from the department of social services, the clergy, and psychologist Dr David Allen toured the holding facility. Reports were submitted to the Department following this tour. Yesterday, Mr Thompson who was out of the country at the time, said he had reviewed one report but would withhold any comment on the contents until he was able to go over a second document in the next few days. He promised an update later this week. Detainees claimed they saw minor improve ments after their claims went public, including larger food portions. Lehder’s chief pilot, told his parents repeatedly that both Pindling and a senior police officer were “on the payroll” of Lehder, who ran a secret cocaine trans-shipment enterprise from Norman’s Cay in the Exumas. Mr Tynes Sr said in the article that his son told him of frequent cash consignments he was obliged to carry from Lehder for the then prime minister and the senior policeman. He also revealed that he had flown Pindling to Grand Bahama for a secret meeting with Lehder, with another pilot flying the drug czar from Exuma for the rendezvous. Mr Moss, in attacking the article, said Bahamians should stand up and stop this “slanderous” form of journalism. But older members of the PLP said it was time that history was recorded by those who experienced it first-hand. One, who did not wish to be named, said: “The article recorded what many senior members of the party knew over many years. Now it’s time for the truth to be told.” Mr Moxey, 75, who was a PLP backbencher during Pindling’s first administration in the late 1960s and early 1970s, said the article was needed to show what really went on during the drugera of the 1980s. “It was a real eye-opener for many,” he told The Tribune , “I respect Chauncey Tynes Sr for telling the truth. I have known him for many years and he was always an honest and decent man. “When I entered politics, I wanted to liberate the people and let them fly. Pindling’s mission was to keep them dumb and stupid all their lives.” Like other PLPs of the day, he said, he felt that Pindling had betrayed the revolution. think that Mr Tynes knows more than he is saying. The drug era of the 1980s was the biggest mistake ever, the biggest travesty that causede verything to go astray.” M r Moxey, who is making his own DVD about the Pindling era, said: “I feel that young Bahamians need to know the truth and Mr Tynes has done the right thing in saying what he did.” Mr Moss, however, said: “It is unfortunate that deceased persons such as our esteemed national hero Sir Lynden or his estate cannot sue for defamation of character, because the assault on his legacy is nothing short of repulsive.” He continued: “What we have here is the wholesale desecrat ion of Sir Lynden’s legacy. I w ish to point out that Sir Lynden was a great man and did a great deal to usher in the new Bahamas and educate the masses. He is our hero, just like Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela and Winston Churchill is to the USA, South Africa and the UK respectively. I stand to defend his legacy. “There should be a standards bureau for media in this country that seek to profit by pass ing on lies and half-truths to the disadvantage of others. Enough is enough and I wish that all right-thinking Bahamians would stand up and reject this slanderous kind of journalism.” Yesterday, The Tribune received many calls responding to the article, all of them positive. A taxi-driver said: “This has made me see our history differently. The PLPs and FNMs at the taxi-ranks are fighting over this article today.” The piece was written by The Tribune’s managing editor, John Marquis, who said: “Mr Moss is entitled to his illusions. However, with one short press release, he has in my opinion destroyed his credibility as a would-be parlia mentary candidate. “The Bahamian people have become wiser in recent years and they are no longer likely to swallow self-serving prattle from the likes of Moss, who knows nothing about Sir Lynden Pindling or the drug era of the 1980s. “Mr Chauncey Tynes Sr is regarded as an extremely honourable man and I have no doubt at all that everything he told me is true. His information is also supported by several sources within the old PLP. “What the Bahamas needs is a standards bureau to restrain those who try to manipulate history for their own ends.” Furore over Pindling article in Tribune Insight F ROM page one Chauncey Tynes Jr ater shortage’ sparks anger from residents F ROM page one Man dead after nightc lub shooting F ROM page one his heart rate had slowed. He was attended by neurologist Charles Rahming and cardiologist Conville Brown. He was fitted with a pacemaker and admitted to the Intensive Care Unit where Mrs Nottage said he is resting comfortably. Mr Nottage’s brother Dr Bernard Nottage, PLP MP for Grants and Bain Town, said his brother did not collapse, lose con sciousness or the ability to speak, and was able to recognise family members at his side on Sunday. Although he has physical weakness in his left arm, it appears Mr Nottage has not suf fered any brain damage. Dr Nottage said: “This is a matter which has to be monitored very closely because it can change from hour to hour. “It is at a very early stage at the moment so the family is understandably concerned, and the family will be concerned until we have evidence that he is getting over it.” Mr Nottage, of Sandford Drive, New Providence, has never suffered a stroke before and his brother said he had recently been in good health. The devoted Christian abandoned his 20year political career in 1992 when he lost the St Agnes constituency seat to FNM candidate Charles “Chuck” Virgill. Rather than returning to the politics that consumed him as a colourful and controversial politician, the former Cabinet minister in Sir Lyden Pindling’s PLP administration went from saving the nation to saving souls. Mr Nottage was ordained as a minister at Bethel Baptist Church, “the mother church of Baptists,” in Meeting Street in May 2003, and has been active in the parish ever since. Amnesty ‘concer n’ for the safety of Detention Centr e detainees FROM page one For mer minister tur ned preacher suffers stroke in the pulpit FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 9 n BASEBALL TAMPA, Fla. Associated Press YANKEES third baseman Alex Rodriguez had arthroscopic surgery Monday to repair a torn labrum in his right hip, and his projected timetable for recovery remained six to nine weeks. Dr. Marc Philippon performed the 1-hour, 20-minute procedure at Vail Valley Surgery Center in Colorado. “The surgery went exactly as we planned,” Philippon said during a conference call. “No surprises.” Other options considered were a more aggressive surgery that would have sidelined Rodriguez up to four months and a conservative approach that would have included rest and treatment. “There is no doubt in our minds that this was the best option,” Philippon said. “This was the best option for Alex and the Yankees.” General manager Brian Cashman expects the threetime AL MVP back on the field “sometime in May.” Rodriguez will need a more extensive operation after the season, and Philippon said Rodriguez will “absolutely” be ready for spring training in 2010. Rodriguez was expected to be released from the hospital later Monday and to start his rehab. He was to perform range of motion drills and ride a stationary bike. “Alex is doing well,” Philippon said. “Over the next few days, until Friday, we will work on his range of motion. Hope fully by Friday or Sunday, we will starting working on his muscle memory and adding range of motion that involves the rotation of a batter whenhe swings.” Philippon said he found a small impingement and the lining of a cyst that was removed last week. The labrum was repaired. Toronto manager Cito Gaston said the Yankees can over come the loss of Rodriguez to start the regualar season. n BASKETBALL WALTHAM, Mass. Associated Press THE BOSTONCeltics’ biggest opponent right now is the training room. The Celtics will not dress five players when they play at the Miami Heat on Wednesday night. Coach Doc Rivers on Monday ruled out Rajon Rondo and Glen ’Big Baby’ Davis after both sprained their righta nkles over the weekend. Rondo was hurt in Friday’s 105-94 win over Cleveland and Davis in Sunday’s 86-79 loss to Orlando. They join superstar Kevin Garnett, Brian Scalabrine and Tony Allen on the sidelines. Garnett has a sprained right knee and Allen has an injured left thumb. Scalabrine hasp ost-concussion syndrome. Rivers said he expects Davis a nd Rondo to miss at least the next two games. After Miami, B oston hosts Memphis on Friday and plays at Milwaukee on Sunday. “Kevin will be out longer than the Milwaukee game,” Rivers said. “I’m pretty sure of t hat. I would say Kevin, maybe at the end of the fol lowing week at the earliest.” Rivers also said he’ll limit the time for Paul Pierce and Ray Allen, who each played 45 minutes on Sunday. “Somebody else has to step up and the challenge for me is not doing what I did (Sunday with Paul and Ray, that can’t happen,” Rivers said. “Obviously, that was a different cir cumstance because the injuries happened during thegame or right before the game. It’s tough to plan for but I still want to keep their minutes down, even in a timeof crisis I want to keep their minutes down. We just have to find a way to win games.” SPORTS IN BRIEF Celtics without 5 players for Miami Rodriguez has hip sur gery n BASKETBALL DALLAS Associated Press THE Dallas Mavericks are heading West this week for a conference tournament of sorts. The Mavs play their next four games on the road against Western Conference foes two against teams ahead of them in the standings and two against teams behind them. Dallas goes into this stretch holding the eighth and final playoff spot. By the time Dirk Nowitzki and the guys return home, they could be all the way up to the third or fourth seed (and thinking about home-court advantage in the first round) or down to No. 9 (and thinking about the lottery). Considering how things have gone this season, Nowitzki said Monday he has no idea what to expect. “That’s I guess kind of the fun part about it,” he said. “These last 19 games, we’re going to let it all hang out and see where it takes us. That’s the only way we can approach it. ... It’s been weird, but, hey, if you look at the other teams, it’s not only us that’s been struggling. If we’ve been up and down and we’re still (2 1/2) games out of third, then what does that say about the whole rest of the conference?” The Mavericks’ maddening season went from a 2-7 start to a 10-1 surge. New coach Rick Carlisle scrapped the Prince ton-style motion offense he was putting in and eventually gave Jason Kidd total control of the offense. Things were going pretty well until a recent stretch in which they were crushed by a San Antonio team missing Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili, then a week later were crushed by an Oklahoma City team missing its two leading scorers, prompting team owner Mark Cuban to threaten everyone’s roster spot. Nowitzki, Mavs head W est needing to get on a roll n GOLF PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. Associated Press Y.E. Yang said winning the Honda Classic is more significant to him than beating Tiger Woods three years ago. His reward? Facing Woods again. Staying alone in the lead the whole way Sunday, Yang shot a 2-under 68 to finish one shot ahead of John Rollins and pick up his first PGA Tour victory. The Korean took command with three straight birdies on the front side and wouldn’t fold, twoputting from 50 feet on the finishing hole for a winning par. With the win his eighth worldwide he picked up a two-year exemption and a check for $1,008,000, qualified for this week’s CA Championship at Doral, plus earned an invi tation to next month’s Masters. Woods will be at both venues. “To be able to face Tiger again and again, it’s an honor for me,” said Yang, who won the 2006 HSBC Champions in Shanghai, beating a field headlined by Woods. Yang played last year’s final round at PGA National by himself, going off first and needing only 1 hour, 53 minutes to finish. He was there until the very end this time, pumping his fists in the air, embracing his agent and translator Michael Yim, and celebrating with fans after closing out the victory. He finished at 9under 271. “Pure emotion,” said Yang, who canceled plans to fly to Puerto Rico to play there this week. “I just felt all the fans were supporting me. I just wanted to thank them.” Rollins made birdie at the par-5 18th to get within two, and Yang missed a 10-footer for par on 17 to lose half his lead. He held on, though: Yang cringed when his third shot sailed off target at the finishing hole, but coolly two-putted for the win. “From 50 feet, it’s not easy to do that to win your first golf tournament,” Rollins said. “My hat’s off to him.” Rollins (67 Yang, qualified for the CA Championship by moving into the top 10 in the FedEx Cup stand ings. Ben Crane (68 under and Jeff Klauk (71, with 17 pars and one bogey) was alone in fourth, another shot back. “I have no complaints,” Rollins said. “I did all I can do. Shot 3 under on championship Sunday and came up short.” He was one of the few guys who made a lasting charge at Yang. Robert Allenby started with two birdies in his first three holes, but struggled from there and finished 4 under, tied for fifth with Will MacKenzie (7070 (65 Just like last year, when he was in contention during the Honda’s final round before chipping onto a waterside pile of rocks and tossing his ball into the drink, Mark Calcavecchia’s chances were all wet again. The two-time Honda winner’s undoing came at the 11th, when he hit into a greenside hazard. He rolled up his right pant leg, hacked the ball out of some muck and salvaged a bogey, but got no closer and shot 73. Y.E. Yang gets breakthrough win at Honda Classic JAMES Oh chips onto the eighth green during the Honda Classic golf tournament in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla, Friday, March 6, 2009. J P a t C a r t e r / A P P h o t o s Y.E. YANG, of South Korea, kisses the trophy after winning the Honda Classic golf tournament in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Sunday, March 8, 2009. Yang shot a final round of 2-under 68 to win with a score of 9-under par. J EFF O verton reacts after putting on the 16th hole during the final round of the Honda Classic golf tournament. Dirk Nowitzki

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THEY didn’t win the prestigious Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic, but the CI Gibson Rattlers senior boys basketball team was recognised for its runners-up position in the tournament held last month. Speaking at the 60th Comm onwealth Day assembly yest erday in the CI Gibson Gymnasium, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister said the Rattlers’ second place finish behind Grand Bahama’s Tabernacle Academy Falcons is a prime example of what happens in the Commonwealth of Nations. Also in attendance was Earl Deveaux, the Minister of Environment. “There’s something about the p ride in belonging to something,” Bannister said. “You take pride in being a Rattler and you should let everybody know that.” When Bannister asked how many people watched the Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic, the gym went wild. When he asked how many watched the Rattlers play in the final, the students cheered even louder. On Commonwealth Day, Bannister said it was so important for all of us to learn the importance of belonging to something that we all can appreciate. Last year, Bannister said the Bahamas sent a team to compete in the Commonwealth Youth Championships in India where they participated in swimming, track and field and tennis. However, the Bahamas didn’t participate in basketball. Also last year, the Bahamas travelled to St. Kitts to compete in the Carifta Games. St. Kitts, like India, are a part of the 53membership of the Commonwealth. Bannister said coach Kevin ‘KJ’ Johnson and the members of his Rattlers’ basketball team should be commended for getting into the final. He compared the Commonwealth nation to the Rattlers basketball team. “They performed so well in so many areas,” said Bannister, who left five important points for CI Gibson to fashion themselves after in their quest to r emain not just a sporting power, but a highly respected educational institution. 1) COMMITMENT “Your basketball team would not have made the finals if they didn’t come to practice, if they didn’t do what coach KJ said a nd if they didn’t follow the r ules,” Bannister said. “It took c ommitment to do that.” 2) COMMUNICATE “When the guard comes down the court, you see him put his hand up or you see him do certain things and you see guys go into position,” Bannister said. “They might be talking at that time, but they are communicating in a certain way.” 3) DEPENDABILITY “On the basketball court, if you are on a fast break and you throw the ball down court, you have to know that the center or forward is going to catch it and throw it in the rim,” Bannister said. 4) DISCIPLINE “If you don’t want to learn, you get up and leave. I still see friends you.” 5) WORKING TOGETHER “No basketball team can succeed unless you work together,” Bannister said. “The same thing happens in your school. You have to work together.” Bannister’s message certainly didn’t go on deaf ears. “It was very encouraging to hear him talk about our potential here and getting the most out of our athletes,” said KJ Johnson, whose Rattlers will be trying to redeem themselves in the GSSSA playoffs. Rattlers’ starting point guard Junior Dennis said as a senior, he wanted to leave CI Gibson with the Hugh Campbell title in Johnson’s hands. But he noted that it was a disappointing finish. He noted that Bannister’s works were an encouragement to them as they try to put the defeat behind them. “It was a good inspiration, telling us never to give up, keep chasing our dream and no matter what your goal is in life, even if you don’t make it to college, you can take up something like a trade to keep you motivated,” Dennis said. We were a little depressed b ecause we worked so hard to w in the championship. But we didn’t win it. We fell short.” The Rattlers also lost out in the GSSSA track and field championships last week, finishing third behind the defending champions CR Walker Knights and the CV Bethel Stingrays. Track coach Kenton Burrows said Bannister’s comments were not just an inspiration for the basketball team, but also to their track team. “It was excellent, especially making reference to the basketball team and their accomplishment,” Burrows said. When you put in the time and e ffort, it will pay off in the end.” R yan Ingraham, a basketball player who surpassed the qualifying standard of 6-feet, 4-inches in the under-17 boys high jump when he cleared 6-4 1/2 at the GSSSA meet last week, said he was pleased that Bannister imparted the comments to them. And Katrina Seymour, who got second in the 100 and won both the 200 and 400 in the intermediate girls division, said she was very pleased with her performance, despite the fact that she was feeling sick. As for Bannister’s comments, S eymour said if there was anyt hing she learnt, it was about having pride in yourself.” Rattlers honoured for Hugh Campbell performance n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WITH so much emphasis being placed on the high schools, coach Kevin ‘KJ’ Johnson has decided to put some of the spotlight on the primary schools. Starting this weekend and running through March 20, Johnson’s Providence Basket ball Club will host the first Phil Smith Primary Schools Basketball Classic at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. Already a total of 20 private and 17 public schools have signed up to participate in the double elimination tournament that will honour the top three finishers. “I feel that in order for us to reach our full potential, we need to start from the youth in the primary schools,” Johnson said. “I know that we have a lot of talent down, but we just need to recognise them. “The coaches have been doing a good job in getting them prepared for the high school, so this is a good way for us to focus on what they are doing.” Entered from the private schools are Temple Christian,T eleos Christian, Queen’s Col lege, St. Francis/Joseph, St. Thomas More, Nassau Christian Academy, Galilee Academy, St. John’s, St. Anne’s, Westminister, Jordan Prince William, Mount Carmel, Xavier, ZionA cademy, Our Lady’s, Blairwood Academy, Freedom Academy, St. Bede’s, Kingsway and Church of God. And from the government schools, the teams entered are Albury Sayles, CW Sawyer, Carlton Francis, Carmichael, Centreville, Cleveland Eneas, Columbus, Naomi Blatch, Claridge, Garvin Tynes, Palmdale, Ridgeland, Sandilands, Stephen Dillet, Uriah, Woodcock and Yellow Elder Primary. When asked about the inter est in the tournament, Johnson said the numbers were right around what he had anticipated. “I wasn’t surprised because youngsters like that love to play basketball, so I wouldn’t be surprised if some of the other schools call to get in,” Johnson said. “But it’s kind of late. They will probably have to wait until next year.” T he teams will be split up in groups of nine in four different pools. Similar to the Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic, they will play each other. They will then qualify to play in the “sweet 16,” the elite eight,f inal four and then the championship game. Trophies and medals will be presented to the champions, runners-up and third place fin ishers, the most valuable player and the 10 All-Tournament recipients. The action will get started on Saturday at 9 am and again on Sunday at about 1 pm. Next Monday and throughout the week, the games will get started at 3:30 pm. “We want to encourage the youngsters to work hard because this is going to be an exciting tournament for them to participate in,” Johnson said. ONSaturday, the New Providence Amateur Cycling Asso ciation continued with its road race events and the excitement as well as competition was hot. There are now a few elite junior cyclists who have joined the ranks of the adults, thus causing the race to be even more competitive and this was evident on Saturday past. Thus we now see the level of cycling races here in country/Nas sau have become very, very, very competitive and along with the juniors we have a group of senior master cyclists who are showing themselves to be contenders in any of the road races. Between the elite juniors, elite seniors, the open women and the elite men local riding/bicycle races are extremely competitive. On Saturday, cycling action took place in western end/portion of the island of New Prov idence in the area of Jaws Beach, Clifton Pier and South Ocean, covering a 6 mile circuit. The juniors started first covering two laps of this 6 miles course. The juniors boys/girls ranging from 10-14 years rode like professional cyclists. The pace was between 1821 miles per hour throughout the race, but it all came to down to a mass sprint out. The conclusion saw Raheem Colebrook winning the sprint and the race, second was his team-mate from Team Warriors Justin Simmons, followed by Antinece Simmons, Decoda Johnson, Carlano Bain and Abigail Minns. The adults or the “Big Boys” started shortly after and the action continued with the top elite local cyclists burning up the street in western area of New Providence. Tracey ‘Show-Time’ Sweeting started the action break ing away for two laps, but was brought back by the Pelton group of cyclists. But shortly after, Lee ‘the Jet’ Farmer made his move to close the gap. The course was a huge increase in speed within the Pelton around 25-27 mph. After chasing Farmer for a few laps, Rolf Fasth and Tracey Sweeting established a gap on the remainder of cyclists, which created a split in the whole race. Farmer went on to win the race. Fasth and Sweeting end ed up in a sprint with Sweeting edging out Rolf. Here’s a look at the results of the race: New Providence Amateur Cycling Association’s Stage One Road Cycling Clash on Saturday: OVERALL RESULTS 42 miles road race 7 Laps 1st Lee Farmer Time 1 hr 46mins .27sec 2nd Tracey Sweeting Time 1 hr 48mins .16sec 3rd Rolf Fasth Time 1 hr 48mins.17sec 4th Jamie Nottage Time 1 hr 48mins.59sec 5th Jay Major Time 1 hr 50mins.32 6th Anthony Colebrook Time 1hr 50 mins 33sec 7th Brad Henney Time 1hr 50 mins 33sec.99 8th Turbo Time 1hr 50 mins.35sec 9th Mark Davis Time 1hr 54 mins .33sec 10th Shawn Fox 11th Wayne Price 12th Edmund Butler 13th Tony Mackey JUNIORS Overall Results 2 Laps 6 mls route 1st Raheem Colebrook 2nd Justin Simmons 3rd Antinece Simmons 4th Decoda Johnson 5th Carlano Bain 6th Abigail Minns Jr Boys Jr Girls 1st Raheem Colebrook 1st Antinece Simmons 2nd Justin Simmons 2nd Abagail Minns 3rd Decoda Johnson 4th Carlano Bain 5th Abigail Minns Competition rises in New Providence cycling event Phil Smith Primary Schools Basketball Classic set to begin this weekend MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture (third from left pose with members of the CI Gibson Rattlers Seior Boys basketball team at their Commonwealth daya ssembly yesterday. O NThursday, 5th March 2009, Principal and Coach Norris Bain along with theT abernacle Falcons boy’s basketball team, paid a courtesy call on the newly appointed President for Port Group Limited (PGLa nd The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited (GBPA Chairman, Mr Hannes Babak. C ongratulating the group on their recent victory at the annual Hugh Campbell Bask etball Tournament, Mr Rolle and Mr B abak encouraged the young men to remain focused on their education and to pursue excellence in all of their undertak-i ngs. Mr Rolle took the opportunity to share with coach Bain and his students, how hisf ather instilled in him the importance of education at a very early age. While Mr Babak shared with the students, that theire ducation will allow them to travel the w orld and experience different cultures. Mr Rolle also gave the group a synopsis o f GBPA’s plans for the education sector of Grand Bahama, including the highest achiever scholarship award that will be giv-e n to the top achieving student at each high school. Principal and Head Coach of the Falcons e xpressed his thanks for the opportunity to meet with the newly appointed leaders of t he Port. ‘It is important that my students h ear the same morals and ideal that we impart to them on a daily basis, being presented to them by the new President andC hairman of the Port Authority,” said Bain. Mr Babak and Mr Rolle both presented c ongratulatory gifts to each member of the Falcons team and the group was treated to refreshments prepared especially for theirv isit. Falcons pay courtesy call on the president and chairman of PGL

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H.O Nash’s Randya Kemp pulls up for a jumpshot in the Lions’ 48-14 win over the S.C McPherson Sharks yesterday at the D.W Davis Gymnasium. With the win the Lions advanced to the championship round where they will face the T.A Thompson Scorpions. C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE International sports news TENNIS B OURNE/ATKINSON RESULTS T HE finals of the Dr. Eric Bourne-Ron Atkinson Open Tennis Tournament was comp leted on Sunday at the Gym Tennis Club. The following are the r esults of the finals played: Men’s open singles – Robb ie Isaacs def. Shaka Symone tte 6-3, 6-2. Men’s 45 singles –Tony Fisher def. Calvin Farquharson 6 -3, 6-2. Men’s 55 sinlges – Gabby S astre def. Tim Dames 6-1, 62. Men’s 65 singles – Gabby S astre def. Ralph Barnet 6-0, 6-3. L adies’ singles – Paula Whitfield def. Alicia Butler 60, 6-1. M en’s open doubles – Robbie Isaacs/Jadrian turnquest def. Keweku/Shaka Symonette6 -3, 5-7, 7-6. Men’s 45 doubles – Mike I saacs/Don Cooke def. Terry N orth/Mickey Williams 6-3, 61. Mixed doubles – Jody Turnquest/Erin Strachan def. Scott Alleyne/Dionne Butler. BASEBALL FREEDOM FARM RESULTS Here’s a look at the results posted in the Freedom FarmB aseball League over the w eekend at the park in Yamacraw: T-Ball Division Coco Plums def. Sea Grapes7-1; Guineps def. Dillies 11-1. Coach Pitch B ees def. Green Turtles 147; Mosquitoes def. Wasps 9-2; Boas def. Bees 8-5; Sand Fliesd ef. Green Turtles 16-4; Boas def. Wasps 12-10; Barracudas a nd Dolphins played to 6-6; Turbots def. Red Snappers 51; Octopus def. Eels 24-0; Barracudas def. Eels 15-13. 11-12 Division Wild Dogs def. Conchs 7-6; Blue Marlins def. White Crowns 14-0; Green Parrots def. Conchs 7-0; Nassau Groupers def. White Crowns 10-0; Wild Dogs def. Blue Marlins 9-7. 13-15 Division Silver Jacks def. Sharks 134; Stingrays def. Raccoons 4-0; Potcakes def. Sharks 216; Stingrays def. Owlz 4-3. 16-18 Division Lucayans def. Tainos 13-3; Arawaks def. Caribs 14-3. BRIEFS sports n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas suffered a 4-1 loss to Paraguay in the first round of the men’s American Zone II Davis Cup tie and will now have to host Guatemala in a must-win situation in the second round in July. Trailing 2-1 going into Sunday’s final day of competition at the Yacht y Golf Club in Paraguayo, Lambare, the Bahamas dropped the two reverse singles to Paraguay to finish with a 4-1 decision. Paraguay wrapped up the tie as Ramon Delgado knocked off Grand Bahamian Devin Mullings 6-1, 7-6 (3 of the top seeds. And in the final match between the number two seeds, Timothy Neilly was beaten 64, 6-1 by Diego Galeano. The Bahamas’ only victory came on Friday’s first day when Mullings pulled off a 46, 7-5, 4-1 retired win over Galeano. In the first match, Delgado defeated Neilly 6-1, 6-4, 6-2. And in the pivotal doubles that was played on Saturday, Delgado and Galeano teamed up for a 6-1, 6-0, 6-2 victory over Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle. Team captain John Farrington and the players were en route from Paraguay yes terday to the United States where they reside and were unavailable for comments. But Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association’s president Wesley Rolle said he felt the team performed as best as they could under the circumstances. “I will be getting a report from John as soon as he’s settled in,” Rolle said. “So we have to wait to find out exactly what happened, especially in the doubles. “We lost the doubles and that put us in a hole. But we now have to regroup and get ready for Guatemala.” As a result of losing the tie, the Bahamas will now host Guatemala in the second round over the Independence holiday week end, July 10-12 at the National Tennis Center. Rolle said the association intended to work on getting the players into a training camp prior to the tie to make sure that they were ready for the competition. Additionally, Rolle said they could finally see the inclusion of Jamaal Adderley, who was not available to travel to Paraguay because of his school commitments at the University of South Florida. With the tie being home, Rolle said the association would also be looking at the possibility of bringing veteran touring pro Mark Knowles to play in the doubles. As the host, Rolle said they would be getting in touch with corporate Bahamas to lend their financial support over the next few months to ensure that the tie would be another successful one here. The Bahamas need to be successful in the tie against Guatemala in order to avoid being relegated to zone III next year. A win by either team will keep them into zone II. “We don’t want to be relegated to zone III again. So we will do all we can to make sure that we stay in zone II,” Rolle said. “It’s going to be important for us to pull it off.” The Bahamas has never played Guatemala in Davis Cup history. Bahamas lose in Davis Cup tie Devin Mullings GSSSA finals all set H.O NashLions and S.C McPherson Sharks players scramble for a loose ball during the second half of the GSS SA Junior Girls Semifinals. Top seeds ease to wins, Scorpions place two teams in championships n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net WITH the championship finals in the Government S econdary School Sports A ssociation’s junior division all set, each of the top seeds a dvanced as expected, setting t he stage for a pair of highly anticipated series. JUNIOR GIRLS # 1 H.O NASH LIONS – 48 # 4 S.C MCPHERSON SHARKS – 14 The division’s top seed led w ire to wire and added another effortless win to their perfect s eason thus far. T he Lions gave up just a sin g le field goal in the opening half and led 21-5 at half-time. H .O Nash opened the sec ond half connecting early and often from beyond the arch ast he lead ballooned to as much as 37. The Sharks struggled to cons istently advance the ball beyond half court in the face of the Lions airtight trap which f orced a series of turnovers. H .O Nash’s high powered offense placed three players in double figures. L akishna Munroe and Randya Kemp led all scorers with 15 points apiece whileR egine Neely added 10. Jonethra Kelly scored all but two of the Sharks’ points, fin-i shing with 12. #2 T .A THOMPSON SCORPIONS – 33 #3 A .F ADDERLEY TIGERS – 24 The Scorpions overcame a double figure deficit at halft ime with a concentrated fastbreak effort in a high scoring second half. The Tigers led 16-6 at inter mission but went scoreless over the first seven minutes of the second half as the Scorpions raced out to easy baskets. The Scorpions opened the half on a 11-0 run capped by Paula Green’s lay-up which gave her team their first lead of the game, 17-16 with 12:41 remaining. Green also gave the Scorpions their largest lead of the game, 29-20 with just under five minutes remaining. Green finished with 16 points, 12 of which came in the in the second half, while Shanae Armbrister and Jaynell C ox added six points apiece. JUNIOR BOYS #1 T.A THOMPSON SCORPIONS – 58 #4 L.W YOUNG GOLDEN EAGLES – 26 The Scorpions landed t heir second team in the championship final when the j unior boys breezed by the f ourth seeded Golden Eagles. The Scorpions led 18-7 a fter the first quarter and the r oute was on. They continued to build u pon the advantage reaching a 20 point lead on a lay-up by Angelo Lockhart midway through the third quarter. T .A Thompson led 45-24 after the third quarter and reached their largest lead oft he game on a lay-up by M avin Saunders late in the fourth. S aunders led all scorers with 21 points, while Lockhart added 17. Roosevelt Whylly and Jer m aine Sturrup added seven points apiece. # 2 D.W DAVIS PITBULLS – 49 #3 A.F ADDERLEY TIGERS – 43 The Tigers were on the b rink of disrupting the highly a nticipated 1-2 matchup between the Pitbulls and Scorpions, but faltered down thes tretch in the fourth quarter unable to keep pace with the Pitbulls. T he Tigers opened the game on a 7-0 run, led 13-4 at the end of the first quartera nd 23-16 at the half. The second half was a com plete turnaround with a fullcourt trap which continuously harassed the Tigers’ ballhandlers and produced a series of turnovers. Alcott Fox gave the Pitbulls their first lead of the game on a three point play which gave them a 31-30 advantage. Fox scored with less than 20 seconds remaining in the quarter to give his team a 3634 lead heading into the fourth. The Tigers never came within four points in the final quarter as the Pitbulls outscored them 13-9. Fox led all scorers with 19 points while Kenrico Lockhart led the Tigers with 13. Both championship series will begin tomorrow at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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T HE Inter-American I nvestment Corporation (IIC and the College of theB ahamas together have l aunched a new programme to assist local businesses to access financing. The IIC and COB hosted a c ocktail reception to announce the launch of the FINPYME programme in the Bahamas. FINPYME was developed by the IIC to assist small and medium-sized businesses to improve their competitive s kills and facilitate their access t o potential sources of financing. At the launch, Scotiabank Bahamas’ managing director Barry Malcolm said the pro gramme is timely and necessary, especially in the tough economic times that the country is currently facing “Given our current climate, the opportunity for small busi nesses to access resources to evaluate, understand and refine their business models is invaluable,” Mr Malcolm said. “We launched the $10 mil lion SME Fund in 2006 and closely followed this with the launch of the Small Business Unit in 2007. Signing this FIN PYME agreement in 2008 is another major step in the bank’s 120 year-history of sup porting small and medium enterprises throughout the Caribbean.” Mr Malcolm said the Small Business Unit has seen a credit count of 1,000 and $25 million has flowed through that unit in just over two years. Also on hand for the launch was Richard Bernal, alternate executive director for the Caribbean. Mr Bernal said in these “interesting” economic times the FINPYME programme is urgent and critical, as it will be assisting a sector which has a major role to play in maintaining the economies of those countries which have imple mented the diagnostic tool. COB’s chairperson for the School of Business Remelda Moxey explained that the College is partnering with IIC and is obtaining faculty to assist in the diagnostic review. To that end, members of the COB faculty participated in training sessions in Jamaica, making them ready to conduct diagnostic reviews. Michael Apel, IIC’s senior trust fund and technical assistance officer, was also on hand. Mr Apel said that the pro gramme is not one to finance small and medium enterprises, but rather one to equip them with skills to review resources and assess financial situations themselves. FINPYME, a Spanish acronym for Innovative Financing for Small and Medium Enterprises (SME tures a mechanism for evaluating the SMEs, which are characteristically under-served by the banking system because their financial capacity is large ly unknown. The programme’s diagnostic reviews examine what fac tors positively or negatively affect an establishment’s capacity to create wealth and employment and manage them both efficiently. In December 2008, Scotiabank Bahamas signed a part nership agreement with IIC. This will allow Scotiabank to deepen its relationship with small and medium-sized enterprises in the Bahamas. The FINPYME programme addresses the fundamental issues that small businesses face on a day-to-day basis such as a lack of resources to have comprehensive reviews done. The IIC has executed the FINPYME in six Central American countries – Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. The programme has also been implemented in the Dominican Republic. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THEODORE Elyett’s Miss Teen Bahamas – World Organisation is l ooking for its next teen beauty queen. Under the theme “Twilight Beauties: Get In The Zone,” Theodore Elyett Productions aims to present a showcase of beauty, intelligence and poise. This year’s theme, the organisation said in a press release, will e ncourage contestants to be the e pitome of “light in the midst of d arkness.” T he pageant organisation said it w ants this concept to be the one the t een delegates aspire to, so that upon completing the rigorous twom onth programme they will be “a shining example for other Bahamian teen females to emulate.” A ll interested young ladies between the ages of 14-18 are asked t o apply online at www.missteenbahamasworld.com and to attend the first prepageant information session scheduled forM arch 14 at the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino. T his session will provide applicants with information on the pageant, allowing them to begin preparations for the 2009 summer prog ramme which officially begins in June, the organisation said. Application deadline is June 1 9, 2009. Pageant president and national director Theodore Sealy said: “With only four years u nder our belt, our pageant organisation has continuously shown progressive growth and we expect our 2009 production to produce even greater results. Since 2005, our organisation has crowned ten teen b eauty queens, of that number six of our teen ambassadors have brought back international titles. “This is a feat that no teen pageant in the country has ever accomplished, and we invite a new group of teen delegates from throughout the country to sign up online to be a part of this exciting t een summer programme.” T he programme, which officially b egins in June, provides contestants w ith over two months of educationa l seminars, stage deportment traini ng, question and answer technique training, personal grooming, etiq uette and speech seminars, community service initiatives and more. T his year, the organisation welcomes on board five Family Island d irectors that will serve as scouts who will provide the pageant with Family Island delegates from Abaco,E leuthera, Harbor Island, Exuma and Grand Bahama. T he 4th Annual Theodore Elyett’s Miss Teen Bahamas pageant is slated for August 9, 2009 at the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal P alace Casino. The winner of the contest will walk away w ith over $7,000 in cash and prizes. Theodore Elyett’s Miss Teen Bahamas World Organisation has been recently selected a s the new franchise holder for one of the largest international teen pageants – Miss Teen World. Search underway for the next Miss Teen Bahamas IIC and COB launch new pr ogramme for businesses n By GLADSTONE THURSTON Bahamas Information Service A VIBRANT “People-to-People” programme is sustaining t ourism in North Andros. Sponsored by the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, it connects visitors with volunteer Bahamian hosts throughout the islands. The programme is designed to give visitors a genuine taste of Bahamian hospitality and culture in an informal, personal way. Visi tors and Bahamians crammed the Coconut Farms Resort in North Andros on Friday to celebrate People-to-People. North Andros coconut craft designer Perky Lightbourne, artist Ernest Pratt and Bahamian preserves creator Candice Turnquest were featured. “People-to-People is essential t o us moving forward,” said Ben jamin Pratt, senior manager of the Andros Tourist Office. “It provides a human element to what we want to do in terms of building a tourism industry in North Andros. The local people are very enthusiastic about it,” he said. T he global economic recession has not impacted North Andros as significantly as New Providenceand Grand Bahama, where hun dreds of workers lost their jobs. “The interesting thing about Andros is that for the type tourist we have visiting us, they are almost recession-proof,” said Mr Pratt. “These are wealthy persons who enjoy fly-fishing, scuba diving and snorkelling. We receive thousands of them every year. We do not see any significant reduction in those n umbers.” And, in an effort to attract more domestic tourists, plans are underway to convert the regatta site at Morgan’s Bluff into a welcome centre and marketplace. From there, artisans, farmers, fishermen and other providers of goods and services may ply their wares to p assengers arriving and leaving on the nearby ferry service. “Morgan’s Bluff would serve as a centre at which customers and providers of goods and services would converge to do business, making it a one-stop-shop,” said Mr Pratt. Deanne Gibson, assistant mana ger of the People-to-People department in the Ministry of Tourism, thanked winter residents for promoting the North Andros destination. She encouraged them to become official members of People-to-People so they can share with others the beauty of the island. The programme can be accessed through bahamas.com and volunteers are featured on YouTube. In New Providence, there are up to ten requests each day, she said. “People-to-People experiences last a lifetime,” said Ms Gibson, whose parents helped found the programme. “They are visitors today, but friends for life.” North Andros business woman Daisy Bowleg immediately volunteered. “This is something I would l ike to be a part of,” she said. “This is great news for tourism here. I believe that as we learn more about People-to-People, more North Androsians would sign up.” Chief Councillor for the island Brian Cleare said that “when it comes to exhibiting true, quality hospitality, Andros, in general, is a mong the best. “People-to-People is an excellent initiative. We welcome our fellow Bahamians into our homes when they come over for the various festivals, so welcoming guests from around the world is no problem for us.” Responding to the concerns of guests, the North Andros District C ouncil will undertake a comprehensive clean-up of North Andros beaches. As North Andros bor ders on a major shipping lane, rubbish from illegal dumping washes up on the shores. “That creates a huge problem for us in terms of sustaining clean beaches,” he said. “Presently local government does not have sufficient resources. But we will do the best that we can to maintain a clean, healthy environment.” G l a d s t o n e T h u r s t o n / B I S ‘People-to-People’ programme aids tourism in North Andros BENJAMIN PRATT , senior manager of the Andros Tourist Office, welcomes participants in the P eople-to-People programme.

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A leading Bahamian construction firm’s managing director yesterday told Tribune Business that he had a “file six inches thick” of job applications from persons he was unable to provide work for, as he praised the Albany development for “keeping our heads above water” amid the current “bleak” outlook for the sector. R ichard Wilson, of Cavalier Construction, said that apart from the $1.3 billion southwestern New Providence pro ject, which is backed by Lyford Cay-based billionaire Joe Lewisa nd golfers Tiger Woods and Ernie Els, there were few new construction projects on the horizon to replace existing ones coming to an end. “To be frank with you, for the last 18 months to two years, w e’ve kept our overheads,” Mr Wilson told Tribune Business. “The Government said to try and keep people employed, and we’ve done that. It’s not been good for the last two years. “We’re very fortunate that we’ve got Albany, and are moving ahead with Albany. That’s keeping our heads above water right now. “All our other jobs are com ing to an end. Bayroc is due tof inish at Easter, and the British Colonial Hilton renovation is due to finish at the end of May.” Mr Wilson said Cavalier was currently employing 100 workers at Albany, while another 20 were involved with the Klonaris’ brothers $13 million T op construction firm boss unable to provide work for applicants, as m ajor private sector jobs coming to end with no replacements in sight Albany ‘keeping our heads above water’ with 100 employed, as two difficult years endured with overheads maintained But 1980’s worse for sector, with hope for Abaco project involving $10m first phase n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Court of Appeal has rejected an application to stay a S upreme Court order that removed a key 116-slip Freeport marina and associated land parcels from the receivership affecting New Hope Holdings, Tribune Business can reveal. Appeal Justice Christopher Blackman dismissed an applica tion by attorneys acting for Tom G onzalez’s T. G. Investments to stay the January 27, 2009, order b y Justice Estelle Gray-Evans that removed the Port Lucaya Marina, related land assets and another parcel of land from receivership, returning them toN ew Hope Marina Development. Appeal Justice Blackman d eclined to grant the appeal, brought by T. G. Investments’ attorneys’, Anthony McKinney and Arnold Forbes, on the grounds that they and their client had not complied with the Court of Appeal’s rules in seeking leave to appeal the initial ruling from the Supreme Court. Appeal Justice Blackman said the “exception” argument offered by Mr McKinney under the Court of Appeal Act was not “applica ble in the circumstances of this case”. As a result, he said: “The application for leave for a stay of the order of Justice Evans, dated Jan uary 27, 2009, is declined. It follows, therefore, that the appeal itself is a nullity.” However, Tribune Business u nderstands that T. G. Investments’ main counsel, Maurice G linton, is now seeking to appeal Justice Blackman’s decision to a full, three-judge sitting of the Court of Appeal. This newspaper had previously reported that Justice Evans had altered the October 2, 2008, order t hat appointed ex-PLP Senator and MP, accountant Philip Gala n is, as the receiver for the assets owned by Scandinavian investor Preben Olsen and his New Hope Holdings company. The receiver ship was initiated over a dispute involving the repayment of loans n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor B ritish American Financial’s president yesterday described as complete and utter nonsense” assertions by Generali Worldwide t hat his company’s “inappropriate pricing” was responsible for them ore than 100 per cent increase i n premiums some of the latter’s individual health policyholdersw ere now experiencing. Chester Cooper implied that G enerali could not blame his company for the major premium r ate increases it was now impos ing, a move that has provoked a n egative reaction from policyholders, because some two-and-ahalf to three years had passed since it acquired British American Financial’s health insurance port f olio. Mr Cooper, who is also British A merican Financial’s president, told Tribune Business that “any a ssertion” by Generali and its senior executives “that their rate increases and their apparent client relations issues have anything to do with British American Finan c ial is complete and utter nonsense”. H e was responding to an article published in Tribune Business on F riday, March 6, in which Tina Cambridge, Generali World wide’s regional director for the Bahamas, had blamed “inappropriate pricing” by British Ameri c an Financial for the major pre mium hikes experienced by indiv idual health policyholders it had inherited from the latter. M r Cooper said he was “frankly, puzzled” as to why British American Financial’s name was mentioned, “as the issue discussed has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do withus”. He accused Generali of attempting to shift the blame for the premium increases and sub sequent policyholder fallout on to British American Financial, using his company as a scapegoat without justification, given that it was only now adjusting rates. Generali Worldwide acquired British American Financial’s health insurance book of business, and the underwriting risk, on January 1, 2006, taking over management control from the Bahamian-owned insurer in mid2006. Apart from the three years that have elapsed between the acquisition and current premium increases, what is also likely to C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.56 $3.56 $3.36 #!( nnrnn)'&#)&&#"( .(#+"#)'(+($$&# -'%)& &f -&##!#&$## +'+# !"!(##(f)&' rbntffn! !b April groundbreak for development’s $10-$15m phase I British American blasts Generali’s ‘complete and utter nonsense’ Cour t r ejects stay on r eceivership end for marina * Carrier accuses health insurer of ‘scapegoating’ it for customer relations fallout associated with premium increases on health portfolio it acquired SEE page 2B SEE page 6B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Nassau-based real estate development is planning to break ground and start construction next month, after successfully completing pre-sales for its $10-$15 million first phase, with the developer having arranged a package deal to significantly reduce closing and legal costs for buyers. Jason Kinsale, president of The Balmoral development, which when completed aims to have generated $100 million in real estate sales, said yesterday that despite the slowing Bahamian economy the April groundbreaking would signal the start of an “aggressive” push to move the project forward. T he first phase, which Mr Kinsale said would involve $10$15 million in investment, involves the construction of 28 town home units known as The Royale and putting in infrastructure to ultimately support 75 single family lots. * The Balmoral president says pre-sales completed for initial start, with title insurance package set to produce 58% saving on transaction legal fees * Economic downturn likely added ‘one year’ to existing five-six year business plan SEE page 3B n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter A REAL-life Bahamian ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ survivor today opens the d oors to her very own Bistro, after a more than $80,000 outlay and an extensive D.I.Y (do it yourselfa cozy eatery. Keshla Smith, 31, was once a chef under the tutelage of renowned chef and recipient of 14 Michelin stars, Gordon Ramsey, whose shows R amsey’s Kitchen Nightmares a nd H ell’s Kitchen h ave given him inter national acclaim. Just the way you see him on TV, that’s just how he is,” she said of Ramsey. N ow, Ms Smith is set to demonstrate her own culinary prowess with the opening of DK Clubhouse, a joint venture with her boyfriend. According to Ms Smith, her fare can be described as a fusion of international cuisine served in a relaxing atmosphere, and which is designed wholly by her and constructed by her boyfriend. The $1,500 per month space in the Meldon Plaza, Mackey Street, was $80,000 investment takes chef from ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ to heaven SEE page 6B Tiger Woods Job application file is ‘six inches thick’ SEE page 3B

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have angered Mr Cooper and British American Financial is that Generali will have known exactly what it was acquiring. T ribune Business understands that it conducted extensive due d iligence on the British Ameri can Financial health insurance b usiness prior to the acquisition, sending a team from its head office Europe to Nassau as part of the assessment effort. This newspaper understands that collectively, inclusive of individual health and group medical plan policyholders, Generali World w ide acquired some 15,000 policyholders from British American F inancial. Of these, some 2,000 were individual policyholders, the r est being group plan participants. “Almost three years later, this attempt of Generali to attribute blame to British American Financial, rather than focus on effec tive management of the fundamentals of their business itself, is frankly astounding,” Mr Cooper said yesterday. “Stated directly, the assertions made in the Tribune' story is a r idiculous and unfair ‘scapegoating attempt' to use British Ameri can Financial as a means to deflect attention from whatever i ssue or query that may have been raised by their customers.” He added: “Although I cannot comment on how Generali derives its rates, I would say that apart from claims experience there are any number of factors that play into determining the annually renewable rates. Amongst them are claims management, negotiation with service providers, expense levels of the company, cost of reinsurance, actuarial reserves, admin istrative efficiencies, required profit margin and social con science of the insurer. “Obviously, British American F inancial has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with these business practices or the pricing formula of Generali.” Mr Cooper also pointed out that a key factor influencing how medical/health insurers priced their premiums, and designed benefits packages, was the everescalating costs of medical treatment. These costs were increasing annually at between 10-15 per cent, meaning that medical infla tion was running at 30 per cent over a three-year period. Mr Cooper added that British American Financial sold its health insurance business to enable it to concentrate on what it came to view as its core life insurance and financial services/investments business. In her statement to Tri bune Business last week, Ms Cambridge said: “Our assessment revealed that the block of individual policies which we inherited had been inappropriately priced. The premiums were too low for the level of benefits offered, and they were also too low given the ages of many of the individu als enrolled in that portfolio. “Our options based on our analysis were to sell the individual portfolio or to cancel the cover age,” Ms Cambridge told Tribune Business. “We realised, howev er, that if we were simply to cancel the policies, it would have left some individuals without insur ance cover and for some, based on their ages and health conditions, it would have made it very difficult for them to find alterna tives. “In order to provide an appropriate solution, we have moved to create an age-banded premium structure, which provides for a fairer and more appro priate premium for each risk presented.” I n my last contribution to this series, I discussed a sales tax and a value a dded tax (VAT o f my ongoing examination of alternative tax systems. Today, I continue with an assessment of income tax. My final article in this series will offer my thoughts on the way forward for tax reform,h aving explored the most widelya dopted tax systems. H H i i s s t t o o r r y y o o f f U U S S I I n n c c o o m m e e T T a a x x When the Civil War erupted, t he US Congress passed the Revenue Act of 1861 to help finance t he war. The Revenue Act restored excise taxes and imposed a tax on personal income. The Federal income tax was levied at 3 per cent on all income higher than $800 a year. This tax on personal income was a new direction for a Federal tax system based previously on excise taxes and customs duties. O ne year later (1862 ments were made to the tax law, which created a two-tier system. Income below $10,000 per annum remained taxed at 3 per cent, w hereas income above that threshold was taxed at 5 per cent. Income tax was now ‘withheld at the source’ (ie. by employers a standard $600 deduction was i mplemented, along with exemptions for certain expenses. T he need for Federal revenue declined sharply after the war, and eventually income taxes were repealed. By 1868, the main source of US government reve nue was derived from liquor and tobacco taxes. From 1868 to 1913, almost 90 per cent of all revenue was derived from various exciset axes. In 1894, the Federal income t ax was reintroduced, and has remained in effect since. Towards t he end of World War I, the marg inal tax rate was around 67 per c ent. This coincided with the crea tion of offshore banking in the Bahamas in the mid-1930s. In 1944, the top marginal tax rate p eaked at 94 per cent as the US f unded its participation in World W ar II. Such high rates of taxat ion clearly create a huge disincentive to work and make investments. I I n n c c o o m m e e T T a a x x Income tax is a tax paid on the taxable income of citizens for e ach ‘tax year’. For example, in t he US, the tax year is the calendar year and each taxpayer is required to file tax returns by April 15 of the following year. T he taxable income of a taxpayer i s ordinary income plus any additions (such as capital gains on the sale of real estate or securities). minus permitted deductions (marriage deductions or interest costs o n the mortgage of the taxpaye r’s principal residence). An income tax regime is often described as a progressive tax, to the extent that those who earn more pay more. In 2007, ther ichest 5 per cent of Americans accounted for over half of federal income taxes received. The top 1 per cent of income earners pay 2 5 per cent of total income taxes. Forty per cent of Americans payn o federal income tax at all, a lthough it is the government's largest revenue source. In countries with income taxes, there are strict penalties for tax evasion. However, courts have generally ruled that taxpayers have a legitimate right to seek means to minimise their tax burd ens, within the parameters of the law. Most tax minimisation s trategies seek to take advantage of all available deductions and d eferrals. Some countries tax their citizens on the basis of worldwide income irrespective of residency (for example, the US whereas other countries have liberal exemptions for non-resident citizens who live abroad (such as the United Kingdom). P P o o l l i i c c y y Tax rates may be progressive, regressive or flat. A progressive tax imposes taxes at different rates based on one’s level of earni ngs. For example, the first $10,000 in earnings may be taxed at 5 per cent, the next $10,000 at 10 per cent, and any more income at 20 per cent. Alternatively, a f lat tax imposes the same taxation level on all earnings. A r egressive income tax may tax income up to a certain amount, such as taxing only the first $90,000 earned. Personal income tax is often c ollected on a pay-as-you-earn basis, with small corrections made soon after the end of the tax year. These corrections take one of twof orms: payments to the governm ent for taxpayers who have not paid enough during the tax year; a nd tax refunds from the governm ent for those who have overp aid. Income tax systems will o ften have deductions available that lessen the total tax liability through reducing total taxable i ncome. They may also allow losse s from one type of income to be c ounted against another. For e xample, a loss on the stock market may be deducted against taxes paid on wages. Other tax systems may isolate the loss such t hat business losses can only be deducted against business taxes by carrying forward the loss to later tax years. C C r r i i t t i i c c i i s s m m s s There are numerous criticisms of an income tax system, such as politicians being quick to increase tax rates to generate more revenues to throw at a problem, as opposed to trying to find ways to fix the problem in the first place. I ncome tax rates are administrat ively easy to change, and there is v irtually no lag time once a c hange in tax rates has been made. However, poorly created and unfairly implemented income tax systems can penalise work, discourage saving and investment, and hinder the competitiveness of businesses. Until next week NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Financial Analyst, is vicepresident pensions, Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas wholly-owned subsidiary of Colonial Group International, which o wns Atlantic Medical Insurance a nd is a major shareholder of Security & General Insurance Company in the Bahamas. T he views expressed are those o f the author and doe not necessarily represent those of Colonial Group International or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated com-p anies. Please direct any questions or comments to rlgibs on@atlantichouse.com.bs C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE (03/2<0(17,7<
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And some two months after the groundbreaking and construction start, Mr Kinsale said the developers planned to begin work on 10 larger town home units, known as The Grand, which are slightly larger in size. Several units in this section, he added, were still on the market. “We’ve done some initial clearing of the roads and thearea where we will be building,” Mr Kinsale told Tribune Business. “April is really the official groundbreaking with regard to construction , getting the infrastructure started and really moving forward aggressively.” He explained that the 28 units in The Royale, consisting of two-storey, 1,400 square feet town homes with two bedrooms and two-and-a half bathrooms,had all been pre-sold. “Without pre-sales in place, we can’t build,” Mr Kinsale said. “That was a condition setby Royal Bank of Canada, so we were able to pre-sale that phase to get it going.” The 10 units in The Grand are slightly larger, at about 2,000 square feet on two storeys, he added, with four bedrooms and three bathrooms. “We still have a couple of units left, but they’ll be gone by the time we’re ready to start construc tion,” Mr Kinsale added. First phase construction on The Royale was expected to be completed within nine to 12 months, he said, and despite the economic downturn buyers were still coming. Mr Kinsale added that all first phase sales bar one had been to Bahamian buyers. To boost sales, and reduce the transaction closing times, when real estate demand was potentially fickle, The Balmoral had arranged a title insurance package with Bahamian law firm Lennox Paton, which acts as the Bahamian representative for US-based title insurer, Chicago Title. Through doing so, Mr Kin sale said a package had been arranged where real estate purchasers would pay a flat $3,000 fee for their legal fees and title insurance combined. With units in The Royale starting at a $359,000 price point, and those in The Grand pitched at $559,000, Mr Kinsale said this would produce considerable savings for purchasers. “On a $359,000 condo, if you’re just looking at 2 per cent of the purchase price as the average legal fee on a traditional closing, that’s $7,180,” he explained. The arrangementw ith Lennox Paton, he explained, would thus save buyers at The Balmoral more than $4,000 in legal fees and closing costs, a 58 per cent reduction, with title insurance thrown in. “Once we start construction, we plan to increase sales prices,” Mr Kinsale told Tribune Business. “There is demand. Buyers are cautious and asking more questions, like do you have the financing in place? Royal Bank of Canada is providing the financing for the construction and infrastructure. We’re well-funded and that’s giving people comfort. “We have a pretty conservative business plan. I think everybody’s affected by the economic slowdown, but we have a pretty conservative plan that does not require us to sell it out in a year. “We have a five to six-year business plan. The downturn has probably thrown an extra year on it, realistically.” The Balmoral will ultimately feature 200 town homes and 70 family lots when completed, plus the associated clubhouse and other amenities. Mr Kin sale added that there were several factors that could impact it positively, namely the fact that New Providence did not suffer from an oversupply of real estate, and the possibilities a lift-off for the $2.6 billion Baha Mar project might produce. A nd buyer demand was still evident, with no downward pressure on real estate prices across the board. Mr Kinsale pointed out that units in his last real estate project, Hampton Ridge, which was completed a year-and-a-half ago, were sold for around $250,000, but one had just been re-sold for $340,000, a 36 per cent increase. “Everybody is feeling the economic downturn, no doubt about it,” he added. “The thing we’ve been fortunate with is that we have no direct compe tition. The indirect competition is the economy, but we have a strong foundation and the clubhouse provides something tangible, so people can see we’re not a brochure. “That’s helping us to get through this pre-sales period. We have our challenges like everyone else, but we’re squeezing through.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 3B (03/2<0(17,7<
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once the location for Fidelity Bank (Bahamas Union. Ms Smith said it was now the perfect place for her restaurant. “I did this for the people,” s he told Tribune Business. Ms Smith, who is also executive chef at DK Clubhouse, has created a unique breakfast and lunch menu, with offerings such as Smoked Salmon Benedict for breakfast and a house specialty f ish and chips dish for lunch. She described this as a “secret family recipe”, reminiscent of her days in English kitchens. Dinner offerings are to come next month. Ms Smith has designed her restaurant to be an affordable lunch and breakfast spot, serving fine dining-esque cuisine, with a s oft, muted burgundy and beige interior to capture the flair of a true French Bistro. “I tell people: ‘Don’t come here looking for cracked conch and fried chicken.’ I refuse to do what everybody else is doing ,andI believe Bahamians need to think outside of peas and rice, s teamed pork chops and steamed chicken,” said Ms Smith. When she returned to the Bahamas from her studies and apprenticeship in England in 1999, she worked as a head chef for Doctors Hospital, and has helped to design menus and layo uts for several restaurants, including the Porch Cafe on Blake Road and Curly Tails in Marsh Harbour, Abaco. Her new restaurant was just the next step in her culinary career. “DK Clubhouse is actually me acting out you know how a child a cts out it’s is me acting out,” Ms Smith said. “I wanted to attract the business class and I wanted to attract families.” However, her road to opening day was not a smooth one, with the looming recession causing banks to shy away from loan requests. She visited more than f ive banks before finding the capital for DK Clubhouse. “In this time, the banks are not very friendly, so we had to basically use everything we had. If this doesn’t work... it’s going to work,” said Ms Smith. She is confident that her busin ess, which employs 10 staff, including delivery drivers, will be competitive, as it was a rarity to find similar offerings in New Providence. “I try to include foods from different parts of the world so everybody can have something. It offers a variety, and it’s generally m ore on the health conscious side something quick, but nice,” Ms Smith said. “I tried to find a way for people to enjoy what I enjoy, but be able to afford it.” Ms Smith’s fare is prepared from the best ingredients, including indigenous seasonal fruits, turkey and ham baked on site and a ll dressings made from scratch. “I try to use indigenous stuff whenever they are in season,” she said. Ms Smith has also decided to forego the automatic 15 per cent gratuity imposed on customer during lunch service in so many B ahamian restaurants, for service training and hospitality. Though it may be included on the dinner ticket. “You shouldn’t force someone to pay something that they might not want to pay. I personally think if you take out gratuities you might get more,” she said. A nother unique offering from such a small restaurant is the private dining area. Ms Smith has incorporated two private dining areas into the design of DK Clubhouse, which are offered for $250 to $300 for two hours. They include a choice of four menus that come with wine, soft drinks a nd tea and coffee. The restaurant will also have free wireless Internet access. “I design (restaurants on what my menu is, my clientele and what character my clients have,” said Ms Smith. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7 .904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.596.590.000.4380.05015.00.76% 5 .001.43Consolidated Water BDRs1.501.40-0.100.1110.05212.63.71% 3.002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.8950.40011.73.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44281.3812Colina Money Market Fund1.44280.634.45 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 813.81 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSM ONDAY, 9 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.25 | CHG -0.11 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -52.11 | YTD % -3.04BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 27-Feb-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 7KH/RZ'RZQ'LUW\)DFWV $ PHVVDJHIURPWKHLQLVWU\RI 'HSDUWPHQWRI(QYLURQPHQWDO + HDOWKHUYLFHV +(/3 :$17(' Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following items: %XLOGLQJVWUXFWXUHH[WHULRUHQYHORSHH[WHULRUFDQRSLHVDQG UHODWHGVXEWUDGHSDFNDJHV *HQHUDO5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU*HQHUDO&RQWUDFWLQJVHUYLFHVIRU WKHRYHUDOOSURMHFWDQG &RQVWUXFWLRQ0DQDJHPHQW)HHIRUWHQGHULQJWKHEDODQFHRI VXEWUDGHDQGVXSSOLHUZRUNSDFNDJHVDWDODWHUGDWH The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (i.e. mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are notincluded in this Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230 General Contractor in 2009. The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci Brisby to receive access to the NAD online data room or data room located at the NAD Project office. TENDERC-230 General Contract, Stage 1Contact: TRACI BRISBYContract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project Ph: (24224217 P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs $WWULEXWHVWRLQFOXGH FRQVWUXFWLRQDFWLYLWLHVLQFOXGLQJYHUWLFDOJROIFRQVWUXFWLRQ FOXEKRXVHVPDLQWHQDQFHIDFLOLWLHVLUULJDWLRQSXPSVWDWLRQVf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t&($1&/8%$VSDUWRIRXUFRPPLWPHQWWRHPSOR\%DKDPLDQV RQRXUSURMHFWZHDUHVHHNLQJTXDOLHG%DKDPLDQVWR DSSO\IRUWKHSRVLWLRQRI*ROI&RXUVH&RQVWUXFWLRQ $VVLVWDQWDQDJHU worth $23-$24 million. A copy of the January 2 7, 2009, court order, which has been seen by Tribune Business, stated that among the assets removed from the receivership are per cent of the shares of Port Lucaya Marina LTD, which owns the following properties c omprising Port Lucaya Marina”. T hese properties include a 14,506 square f oot parcel of land, situated in Block 3, Unit 2, o f the Bell Channel Subdivision in Freeport; an 813 square foot parcel of land on Lot 13, B lock 3, Unit 2, of the Bell Channel Subdivision and a portion of Tract ‘O’, Unit 3 in the s ame subdivision; a 6,051 square foot land tract comprising a portion of the same Tract O’; and a 10.6 acre parcel of land comprising a portion of the seabed in the Bell Channel S ubdivision. In addition, a separate parcel of l and, consisting of 6.19 acres, and also in the Bell Channel Bay Subdivision, was also r emoved from the receivership by order of the Supreme Court. J ustice Evans, in her order, also directed Mr Galanis “to release and deliver over toN ew Hope Marina Development Ltd all of the licences, permits, certificates, deeds, agreem ents, records, bank accounts, negotiable instruments, documents, correspondence and papers relating to Port Lucaya Marina Com pany Ltd, doing business as Port Lucaya Marina” and the related land assets. Port Lucaya Marina’s removal from the r eceivership came after attorneys acting New Hope Marina Development Ltd and AP Holdings Ltd petitioned the Supreme Court. The two companies were represented by Robert Adams and Dwayne Fernander of G raham, Thompson & Co, and it is unders tood they were successfully able to argue t hat the Port Lucaya Marina and related land p arcels were outside the New Hope Holdings ownership structure. Messrs Adams and Fern ander represented the two companies again before Appeal Justice Blackman. H owever, the Port Lucaya Marina’s continued removal does not end Mr Galanis’sr eceivership over other New Hope Holdings’ a ssets. These include the Grand Bahama Y acht Club Marina and Grand Bahama Yacht C lub, plus multiple parcels of land owned in freehold by New Hope Holdings that are m ainly situated in the Lucayan Marina and Bell Channel areas. Another 10 parcels of l and that have been leased to New Hope Holdings were also covered by the originalr eceivership order. Tribune Business previously exclusively r evealed that Mr Olsen's main financial backer, T.G. Investments, had been seeking a court-appointed receiver for the New Hope properties, alleging that Mr Olsen had defaulted on repaying loans worth $23-$24 million. T.G. Investments had obtained a Mareva I njunction to freeze the assets of Mr Olsen and New Hope Holdings. They are alleging T.G. Investments lent $23-$24 million, secured by two promissory notes, to Mr Olsen and New Hope Holdings to f inance the acquisition of the Port Lucaya M arina and associated properties, but this has n ot been repaid. They are also claiming the c ompany financed other obligations of New Hope Holdings. Y et this newspaper understands that Mr Olsen’s and New Hope’s attorneys are vigoro usly contesting the default allegations and the receivership. T hey are alleging that responsibility for any l oan repayment default lies squarely with Mr G onzalez. They are claiming he failed to live u p to several obligations, one of which was to provide New Hope Holdings with $12 mill ion in working capital over and above the initial purchase price to fund its operations. T his, Mr Olsen and New Hope’s attorneys are alleging, never happened, and withoutt hat capital New Hope ended up defaulting. Essentially, the core allegation in their argum ents rests on the claim that any responsi bility for the loan default lies with Mr Gon zalez himself. Court rejects stay on receivership end for marina F ROM page 1B $80,000 investment takes chef from ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ to heaven F ROM page 1B

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m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 7B Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER H AGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and d ivers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 13 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a fixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5) 21 Run into some of the defence (7 D own 1 Thus America produced a composer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time (7,3 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 14 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 1 23456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead m iserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 13 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a fixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a composer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time (7,3 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 14 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 7 8 9 10 1 1 1213 14 1 516 17 1819 2021 123456 7 8 9 10 1 1 1213 14 1 516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. A cross 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in p late (6 13 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a fixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a composer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough ( 6,4) 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time (7,3 1 1 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 14 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1 516 1 7 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1 516 1 7 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 1 3 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a f ixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a c omposer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time ( 7,3) 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 1 4 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 1 1 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 1 1 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 1 2 Conference with enemy (6 1 3 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 1 2 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 1 3 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a f ixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a c omposer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time ( 7,3) 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 1 4 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 1 1 1213 14 1 516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 1 1 1213 14 1 516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 13 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a fixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a composer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time (7,3 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 14 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 13 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a fixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a composer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time (7,3 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 14 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 13 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a fixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a composer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time (7,3 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 14 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 13 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a fixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a composer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time (7,3 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 14 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 13 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a fixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a composer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time (7,3 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 14 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021T ribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u c e s s h Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 13 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a fixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a composer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time (7,3 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 14 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 1 1 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 1 1 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y S TEVE BEC KER Across 1 Ship’s master (7 4 Exhausted (3,2 7 Swerve (4 8 Unwavering supporter (8 10 Become thinner (4,6 12 Conference with enemy (6 13 Temporary madness (6 15 After much delay (2,4,4 18 Of necessity (8 19 Ardent enthusiasm (4 20 Harsh (5 21 Forbear (7 Down 1 To quibble (5 2 Urgency (8 3 Blockhead (6 4 Very much in fashion (3,3,4 5 Principal role in play (4 6 In particular (7 9 Fondness for sugary foods (5,5 11 Behind closed doors (2,6 12 Thrive (7 14 Agree (6 16 Claw (5 17 Language of Pakistan (4 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Old fashioned pop is her best composition (7 4 Hazard of drivers and divers (5 7 Doesn’t neglect established practices (4 8 Does turn dead miserable (8 10 Summarised and withdrawn (10 12 Scandinavian article in plate (6 13 Reformed ladies show the highest standards (6 15 Subscribe and accept the risk (10 18 Afruit that won’t give a fixed delivery time? (4,4 19 Stump or catch perhaps (4 20 Wordy form of gift (5 21 Run into some of the defence (7 Down 1 Thus America produced a composer (5 2 Regular lay preachers take it (8 3 Slit at the front (6 4 Cracked up, oddly enough (6,4 5 Ordered, as whisky may be (4 6 Observes the intrusion and is furious (7 9 Now it’s gift time (7,3 11 I can head this way for the ranch (8 12 Made to feel small? (7 14 An old fool (6 16 Well-known skating figure (5 17 One of them acted as cox or acted as cocks (4 Across:1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10 Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14 Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19 Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24 Glider pilot. Down:2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5 Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8 Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal, 17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10 Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14 Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19 Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In the offing. Down:2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5 Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8 Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15 Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21 Calf. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 123456 7 8 9 10 11 1 213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 7 8 9 10 11 1 213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 57F/14C Low: 61F/16C Low: 62F/17C Low: 67 F/19C Low: 64F/17C Low: 68F/20C Low: 70 F/21C Low: 62F/17C High: 84F/26C High: 80F/27C High: 80 F/27C High: 81F/27C High: 82F/27C High: 78 F/26 High: 82F/28C Low: 64F/18C High: 80 F/27C Low: 64 F/18 High: 81 F/27CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 61F/16C High: 83F/28C Low: 69 F/21C High: 81F/27C Low: 61 F/16C High: 79F/26C Low: 64 F/18C High: 82F/28C Low: 66F/19C High: 86 F/30C Low: 63F/17C High: 81 F/27C Low: 63 F/17C High: 83F/28C Low: 65F/18C High: 84F/29C Low: 65 F/18C High: 84F/29C High: 79F/26CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 10TH, 2009, PAGE 11BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Bright and sunny. A moonlit sky.Sunny.Mostly sunny. Partly sunny, breezy and pleasant. High: 82 Low: 70 High: 80 High: 80 High: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny. High: 84 Low: 69 Low: 71 Low: 71 AccuWeather RealFeel 85F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 70F 81-69F 79-71F 78-73F 88-79F Low: 73 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 79F/26C Low .................................................... 68F/20C Normal high ...................................... 79F/26C Normal low ........................................ 65F/18C Last year's high .................................. 75F/24C Last year's low .................................. 69F/21C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.98"Normal year to date ......................................3.94" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Full Last New First Mar . 10 Mar . 18 Mar . 26 Apr . 2 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:24 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:17 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 7:07 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 6:53 a.m. Today W ednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 8:04 a.m.3.01:43 a.m.-0.4 8:23 p.m.3.02:08 p.m.-0.3 8:49 a.m.2.92:32 a.m.-0.4 9:08 p.m.3.12:50 p.m.-0.3 9:31 a.m.2.83:19 a.m.-0.4 9:52 p.m. 3.13:31 p.m.-0.3 10:12 a.m. 2.74:04 a.m.-0.2 10:34 p.m. 3.0 4:12 p.m.-0.2 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 90/3269/20s88/3172/22s Amsterdam47/836/2r47/837/2pc Ankara, Turkey52/1132/0pc46/731/0c Athens61/1644/6s59/1549/9pc Auckland67/1958/14c64/1759/15sh Bangkok93/3377/25pc95/3579/26pc Barbados84/2874/23pc85/2974/23sh Barcelona60/1549/9s59/1548/8pc Beijing50/1030/-1pc54/1237/2pc Beirut65/1860/15pc68/2060/15c Belgrade43/637/2pc47/834/1sh Berlin41/532/0sh42/534/1c Bermuda 66/1862/16c67/1963/17s Bogota65/1848/8t67/1945/7t Brussels45/734/1r50/1041/5pc Budapest48/836/2sh45/733/0rBuenos Aires 79/2666/18pc79/2664/17pc Cairo72/2258/14s77/2557/13pc Calcutta 96/3578/25c98/3674/23pc Calgar y-1/-18-13/-25pc21/-64/-15pc Cancun84/2868/20s85/2968/20pc Caracas77/2562/16s83/2868/20pcCasablanca 74/23 58/14 c 76/2459/15s Copenhagen 41/536/2pc43/640/4pc Dublin48/845/7pc52/1143/6shFrankfurt 43/6 36/2r46/737/2pc Geneva41/537/2r46/733/0c Halifax37/224/-4s37/232/0cHavana 84/28 61/16 s84/2860/15s Helsinki34/130/-1sn34/128/-2sf Hong Kong 73/2263/17pc75/2364/17pc Islamabad80/2648/8s85/2954/12s Istanbul50/1038/3r50/1044/6cJerusalem 58/1443/6pc64/1750/10pc Johannesburg 74/23 54/12t74/2355/12t Kingston 82/27 72/22s84/2875/23s Lima83/2869/20c84/2867/19c London 52/11 37/2 sh55/1245/7pc Madrid68/2037/2s68/2040/4s Manila90/3273/22pc88/3175/23s Mexico City79/2650/10s74/2347/8pc Monterrey93/3366/18pc84/2859/15pcMontreal 39/332/0pc43/618/-7sh Moscow 36/230/-1sn34/130/-1sf Munich39/335/1sn36/230/-1sn Nairobi91/3258/14s89/3160/15s New Delhi88/3159/15pc82/2759/15s Oslo 34/123/-5c32/028/-2pc Paris 48/836/2r54/1241/5pc Prague39/337/2sh41/532/0c Rio de Janeiro83/2874/23c85/2974/23pc Riyadh86/3057/13s81/2759/15s Rome55/1245/7s57/1337/2pc St. Thomas 81/27 73/22pc83/2871/21s San Juan84/2864/17pc94/3468/20s San Salvador93/3368/20s91/3272/22s Santiago88/3154/12s86/3055/12s Santo Domingo82/2766/18pc85/2966/18pc Sao Paulo78/2566/18r78/2567/19t Seoul 50/1025/-3s48/830/-1pc Stockholm34/130/-1sn34/128/-2c Sydney73/2263/17pc72/2261/16pc T aipei 73/22 61/16pc75/2363/17pc Tokyo60/1547/8pc56/1342/5pc Toronto42/533/0r45/719/-7c Trinidad88/3174/23t76/2472/22sh Vancouver35/123/-5s39/329/-1pcVienna 45/7 41/5sh44/633/0sh Warsaw38/333/0sn39/328/-2sf Winnipeg1/-17-11/-23sn1/-17-6/-21c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayWednesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 63/1736/2s64/1738/3s Anchorage33/025/-3sn35/124/-4sn Atlanta 80/26 55/12pc71/2144/6t Atlantic City44/640/4r61/1635/1sh Baltimore50/1042/5r68/2038/3shBoston 41/5 34/1pc47/831/0r Buffalo42/540/4r44/624/-4c Charleston, SC75/2357/13pc81/2752/11pc Chicago52/1127/-2t33/013/-10pcCleveland 56/13 40/4r50/1023/-5pc Dallas81/2748/8t49/941/5r Denver36/216/-8pc39/317/-8pc Detroit51/1033/0r38/321/-6pc Honolulu79/2668/20c80/2667/19sHouston 83/28 64/17 pc76/2449/9t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayWednesday T odayWednesday T odayWednesday Indianapolis 68/2038/3t47/821/-6pc Jacksonville82/2754/12s81/2755/12s Kansas City 52/11 20/-6t36/215/-9s Las Vegas66/1841/5s70/2147/8pc Little Rock76/2446/7t47/836/2rLos Angeles 65/18 48/8s68/2048/8pc Louisville75/2345/7t54/1229/-1pc Memphis78/2547/8t53/1136/2r Miami82/2764/17s82/2767/19s Minneapolis 32/0 5/-15sn6/-140/-17pc Nashville77/2548/8pc55/1234/1c New Orleans80/2664/17pc80/2657/13c New York42/538/3r52/1137/2r Oklahoma City73/2231/0pc44/631/0c Orlando 84/28 57/13 s84/2859/15s Philadelphia47/842/5r58/1439/3sh Phoenix74/2351/10s77/2554/12s Pittsburgh58/1445/7r57/1325/-3pc Portland, OR47/828/-2pc50/1032/0s Raleigh-Durham 67/1955/12pc78/2545/7pc St. Louis68/2031/0t40/422/-5pcSalt Lake City 42/523/-5c44/626/-3pc San Antonio 81/27 66/18 pc74/2348/8t San Diego64/1751/10s64/1752/11pc San Francisco60/1543/6s59/1545/7pcSeattle 42/526/-3pc45/730/-1pc T allahassee 82/2747/8s82/2752/11pc Tampa80/2661/16s80/2662/16s Tucson71/2147/8s76/2449/9s Washington, DC51/1047/8r65/1839/3sh UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuWeather.com

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However for one young boy, life has been anything but carefree, in fact for young Palmer Cleare Jr (PJ biggest challenge on any given day is to simply say his name. Palmer is one of dozens of children who suffer from stammering, a condition that has many medical and psychological professionals baffled. Stammering is generally defined as a speech disorder in which sounds, syllables, or words are repeated or prolonged, disrupting the normal flow of speech. These speech disruptions may be accompanied by struggling behaviors, such as rapid eye blinks or tremors of the lips, or in some instances even barking. Stammering can make it difficult to communicate with other people, which often affectsa person’s quality of life and social well-being. PJ’s father, Palmer Cleare Sr, feels his son was not born a stammer, and said somewhere along the way PJ must have watched people possibly on television. He said at first the mimicking was amusing, but later became a trait in little PJ’s regular speech. “He did it so often, that one day my mother was talking to him and he was actually stammering. She asked when did he start stammering, and I hadn’t even known that it had developed to that point.” Mr Cleare explained soon after that episode, he decided to take his son to a doctor, but was told to ignore the stammers and to not interrupt his son’s speaking as he had started doing in response to the stammering. Although this advice seemed an awkward solution to the problem, Mr Cleare said he followed through with it. He said after his son began preschool, he soon started to complain of his classmates making fun of the way he spoke, an indication situation was more serious than it appeared. PJ’s father said that apart from the stammering, his son was still learning to properly pronounce words which added an extra challenge to him. Mr Cleare said after trying various methods of correcting his son’s stammering with minimal success, he eventually decided to take his son to a speech specialist whose assistance he said has had a profound impact on PJ’s speaking skills. Speech and language pathologist Jennifer Alexiou of the Speech Clinic, a facility which deals with childhood speech disorders and occupational therapy, explained that the reason who people stammer can be related to several factors. Apart from stammering occurring more often in boys than in girls, Mrs Alexiou said genealogy, language delay, and learnt behavior may also affect one’s ability to speak fluently. Whatever the cause, she explained that the reality of a stammer’s life involves daily anxiety and uncertainty in clearly relaying their thoughts to others. “There is a lot of anxiety associated with that, it can affect you socially, emotionally, and with your profession. “So it can really have a detrimental affect on a lot of people.” Mrs Alexiou explained although there is little hope for improvement for an adult suffering from stammering, early intervention has proven effective in reducing the occurrence in many children who go on to become fluent adults. She said in recent years, there has been the introduction of a device known as a Delayed Auditory Feedback (DAF The machine which embraces the effects of choral speaking is inserted into a stammer’s ear similarly to a hearing aid, and echoes each word spoken which has proven tremendously effective in improving speech impediments. She explained that for many, fluency is naturally achieved when speaking in unison like when reciting a pledge, song, or other message within a group. “It doesn’t work for long periods of time, you can wear it if you’re going into a meeting where you would need to speak fluently.” While many DAFs are considered a last option for most adult stammers, it remains only a temporary fix. With stammering being identified in children as young as 2, and with it being a minimally researched and investigated issue locally, she suggest the responsibility is on the parents to be watchful of any of its symptoms, and to seek assistance swiftly for their children if the occurrence of speech difficulties persist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health BODYANDMIND T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e n n B y SARAH BEEK SIMILAR to the seasons, skin goes through its own fluctuations. Combine nature's weather cycle with air conditioning and forced air heating devices, and you have skin that's constantly under assault. Cold winds and low temperatures can dry out skin, depriving it of balanced levels of oils, contributing to dryness, sensitivity, and premature aging. Prolonged exposure to the sun causes water to evaporate from skin, which is why skin that has recently been burned or tanned requires more mois turisation than unexposed areas. Forced air heating also dries out skin: warm, dry air acts like a sponge, soaking up moisture from everything it touches. To help skin stay healthy with the seasons, speak with your professional skin therapist about modifying your skin care regimen accordingly. Chances are just a few prod u ct updates (for example, g oing from a moisturiser to a more emollient cream) can keep skin healthy year-round. D RY SKIN AND SENSITIVITY While there are many trig gers to skin sensitisation, one of the biggest consequences of dry skin is an increase in sensitivity. Dry skin is a precursor to sensitised skin because when skin is dry, it'sd epleted of its natural protective lipid barrier. This lowers skin's defenses against envi ronmental assaults that can cause a sensitised reaction in skin, such as itching and redness. F or proper treatment of a dry and sensitised skin condi tion, speak to a professional skin therapist. Sarah Beek is a skin care therapist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her and her team of skin and body therapists at One Sandyport Plaza (the same building as Bally’s Gym). For more informa tion visit www.dermal-clinic.com or call 327.6788 SEASONAL EFFECTS ON DRY SKIN skin c are n By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Staff Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net LIFEfor most 5-yearolds, most likely involves lear ning the personalities of his or her teacher and friends at kindergarten, conquering the potty, a nd living as car efree as they please. On the tip of my tongue n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Staff Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THE Japanese form of martial art known as Jujitsu, is a collective form which incorporates both armed and unarmed methods of self defense. Originating from the Samurai warriors of Feudal Japan, the technique allows its user to manipulate his opponents energy against him rather than sim ply deflecting it. Also known as the Art of Softness, Jujitsu has over the years evolved throughout the world as something more than a fighting skill, according to one local instructor, the skill of Jujit su is an activity which brings to calm a person’s holistic being. Instructor and owner of the Martial Arts Academy D’Arcy Rahming, who has served as a martial arts sensei for the past 23 years, has taught dozens of local students various forms of martial arts. From the classical arts which use the sword, to modern forms of Judo, Jujitsu and Kick Box ing, Mr Rahming continues to pass on his skills. Mr Rahming said: “I think its important for persons to embrace martial arts because it not only increases a persons ability to protect him or herself, but is also a means of discover ing your strengths and weaknesses, which works on three levels, the mind, body, and emotional state.” At his facility, Mr Rahming explained that his approach is to first determine the personality of an individual, and to then help them develop in areas where they are lacking. He said what he has noticed is that his mature students tend to prefer his Jujitsu classes, while the younger more agile students, seeking to learn a sport, float toward the Judo classes, and the working professionals prefer kick boxing. Mr Rahming said that what people should understand about martial arts is that each form is like a food: “different people have different taste for different things.” Be warned though, Mr Rah ming explained because the martial arts industry is unregulated, there are many who operate as a ‘sensei’ but may not have the proper training. “The secret is to find a good teacher who has good credentials, and make sure that what you see is what you want.” He explained some of those good credentials could include international certification from agencies like the International Judo Federation, or for the instructor to have studied under a sensei with international notoriety. Apart from finding the right sensei, Mr Rahming said many remain skeptical on enrolling in a martial art class because of the presumed rigorous activity. “It’s not intense to the point where you would be harmed or so badly shaken that you would not learn it, however the idea behind the martial arts is that it is a science to teach an ordinary person how to improve him or herself.” Mr Rahming said the image in many Japanese karate movies where a martial artist is able to break a two or three inch piece of wood with their bare hands, is only a confidence builder and really doesn’t require much skill. “It takes a lot of confidence to think that you can break it without being harmed, but you will see even small children to adults doing that.” Available for private lessons , Mr Rahming is one sensei who stands out among others, giving many the strength to pro tect themselves while staying in shape. The art of jujitsu SENSEI D’Arcy Rahming gives students a quick lesson in defeating an opponent.

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“Corn loves Beans”. There’s a more promising prospect. It has been known since the early days of history that some plants do not do well in each other’s proximity while others seem to form a symbiosis and to use that business catchword of the moment – become synergistic. With corn and beans the symbiosis is obvious: beans help fix nitrogen into the soil for the corn and the corn provides stalks for the beans to climb on and produce sturdier plants. With other pairings the reason for beneficial interaction is less obvious but nevertheless proven over the years. Herbs are aromatic and many act as insect repellents. Mexican oregano can be rubbed onto the skin in the absence of your favourite commercial repellent. Thyme is almost universal as a beneficial companion planting. There are pairings, however, that seem to set each other back, with tomatoes and beans being the prime example. My thoughts went to companion plantings during the past autumn when my rose bushes did not look as sprightly as they should have done. I have for years planted parsley around the base of my roses but when I transplanted them last April into the garden of my new home it was the wrong time of year to plant parsley successfully. When autumn came I sowed seeds around the rose bushes and now all is well in Eden. The parsley benefits from the richly mulched soil that roses are grown in and the ros es now have shiny leaves and healthy flowers. Here’s a partial list of the beneficial pairings of vegetables and herbs commonly grown in The Bahamas: B EANS – Corn, cucumber, eggplant, marigold, nasturtium, oregano, sweet potato, rosemary. B EETS – Onions. B ROCCOLI – Cucumber, mint, nasturtium, onions. CABBAGE – Celery, garlic, mint, nasturtium, onions, tomato. CARROTS – Chives, garden peas, radish, rosemary, sage. CAULIFLOWER – D ill, garlic, mint, nasturtium, onions. C ELERY – Beans, cabbage, chives, garlic, nasturtium. CORN – Beans, cucumber, garden peas, sweet potato, pumpkin, squash, watermelon. CUCUMBER – Corn, oregano, radish. EGGPLANT – Coriander, marigold, sweet potato. GARDEN PEAS – Chives, mint, turnips. L ETTUCE – Carrots, chives, garlic, radish. LIMA BEANS – Marigold. O NION – B eets, carrots, sweet potato. SWEET POTATO – Beans, corn, coriander, eggplant, nasturtium, onions. PUMPKIN – Beans. RADISH – Cucumber, lettuce, nasturtium, squash. SQUASH – Borage, corn, marigold, mint, nasturtium, oregano, radish, tomato. S WEET PEPPER – Nasturtium. SWEET POTATO – Beans, corn, eggplant, onion, summer savory. TOMATO – Basil, cabbage, celery, coriander, dill, marigold, mint, parsley, sage, squash. T URNIPS – Garden peas. W ATERMELON – Corn. This list is far from exhaustive but gives a guide t o the most popular vegetable and herb companion plantings. And remember that thyme could have been paired with just about all of the above. In case you were interested, the thing between Natasha and Pedro never did work out. j. hardy@coralwave.com By GARDENER JACK C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 9B WHILE a schoolteacher for 43 years I became used to messages like “Natasha loves Pedro” written in books, on sheets at the end of an essay, on random pieces of paper left on my table, or even carved into the lid of a desk. So Natasha loves Pedro. In the flow of human relationships Natasha has very little chance of going through l ife with Pedro as her helpmeet. Art is long; teenage love is short. Companion planning GREEN SCENE ROSE LOVES PARSLEY ... One example of the symbiotic relationships between herbs, vegetables and flowering plants. Homosexuality, politics and ethics BARBERSHOP n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net THE recent allegation circulated in the local media that a former member of parliament may have been arrested in Cuba on charges of sexual misconduct with a male child, remains a hot top ic throughout many circles, and has a group of men questioning the importance of integrity in the political arena. This week, Tribune Features visited Tonto’s Barber Shop on Abundant Life Road, where its owner Tonto, began by saying if the claims against the former member of parliament were untrue, then some statement should have been released to the public to dispel the rumor. The 33-year-old proprietor said: “Yeah I believe it’s possible, and if it’s not true then the MP should close the story and make a public statement.” Tonto feels because the situation was reported and never addressed by the former MP or refuted by anyone else, foreigners looking at the issue could very likely question ethics in Bahamian society, especially when combined with the recent allegations of extortion from a for mer senator. One patron who requested to remain anony mous, said all of these allegations were simply an attack against a certain political party, and said flat out that any MP or citizen has the right to sleep with who so ever they desired. “It’s all tabloid information, your personal life with who you sleep with or want to go to bed with is your business, you don’t need nobody dic tating to you.” The man claimed because the Cuban govern ment has not named any individual or acknowledged the arrest, he views the entire incident as nothing other than a ploy to malign his party’s integrity with “malicious scandal.” One barber who goes by the alias of ‘American Boy,’ feels because the information first came from a particular tabloid, there is without doubt some truth to the matter. “If the Punch said it, it gatta be 60 to 70 per cent true, and I think it makes us look like some freaks.” The 21-year-old father of one, said after moving back home after years of residing in the US, he is now questioning whether he made the right decision. While acknowledging that the US does have its share of shortcomings, the Bahamas should not follow the same path because “we are a Christian nation with praying people.” He said with many Bahamians today going against tradition and morality, the rise in crime and increased economic hardship may be “God’s way of telling us we need to go back to the basics.” A regular customer at Tonto’s, 23-year-old accountant Don Williams, said with all the nega tive publicity on the Bahamas in recent news, he questions if there is anything good to say about the Bahamas from a foreigner’s point of view. Don explained: “Other than the Super Bowl commercial, do we have any good news internationally.” Don feels whether something happens overseas or at home, if it’s a question of a political personality’s integrity, morality, or illicit behavior, there should always be some investigation as well as some personal onus to the situation, especially if they are guilty. Taking the discussion even further, Don said the issue of homosexuality in Bahamian politics and society has now taken on a new identity. He said although all people should be free to decide on whatever lifestyle they desire, the blatant exhibition of alternative lifestyle in various clubs, hotels, and other public places will in the future have a negative impact on Bahamian life as we know it. With an increased number of churches reporting a decline in membership, and an obvious void of good role models in many sectors of society, there is also concern for the nation’s youth and overall well-being. As this talk of morality and homosexuality continues, we ask that you write to us and tell us what you think. Write to lallen@tribunemedia.net. Next week, we will feature a new barber shop to discuss the issue of sweethearting and the prevalence of bastard children in Bahamian society. “It’s all tabloid information, your personal life with who you sleep with or want to go to bed with is your business, you don’t need nobody dictating to you.”

PAGE 21

C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net INTERNATIONAL Women’s Day which was celebrated over the course of March 2 to 8, is a time used by women throughout theg lobe to bring to the forefront issues which remain an obstacle to the advancement of women as equal contributors in all levels of society. The day which was first recogn ised by American Clara Zetkin in 1911, was started to validate women during the early years of the industrialisation era, in the areas of politics, economics, and in their sociala dvancements. R ecognised locally with a women’s issues workshop held at the Police Conference centre on Saturday, representatives from various non-profit and government organi-s ations, as well as public supporters showed up to learn more of what could be done to further liberate women in the community. Under the theme of “Women and M en United To End Violence A gainst Women And Girls,” the event culminated with a church service on Sunday at the St Matthews Anglican Church, where Social Services Minister Loretta Butler-Turn-e r gave an address. W omen like Dame Doris Johnson who paved the way for women in Bahamian politics, and Mable Walker who aggigated for better salaries in the teaching profession have giv-e n today’s Bahamian women a strong foundation to continue in the fight for equality and growth. ferent way. I do not see it as I used to and now I see it as art,” Mrs Neely said. Mrs Neely said she is grateful to the all the young women that came out and supported her as models at the show (Tia, Florine, Eisha, Alicia, Lydia, Kissy, Amanda, Thea, and her male mod el Kareem). Mrs Neely said she would encourage anyone who wants to get into cosmetology, to go into it loving it. “With me I would like to soar to higher heights and my husband is my biggest fan. In order for you to per fect anything, you must grow to love it in order for it to become natural. The more hands on you are in your work, the better you will become. Cosmetology is an excellent field to go into because it is art as well as a ministry because different people are in you chair daily,” Mrs Neely said. n By IAN BETHELLBENETT AFTERRihanna's boyfriend beat her, she went back to him. But that's not the amazing part of the story. Perhaps the most amazing part of the entire thing is that people support her decision to go back. More than a generation after Naipaul's character in Miguel Street keeps the cricket bat well-oiled for her husband to beat her with it, womenare still going back to the men who slap them around. Where does machismo end and enabling machismo begin? When the case broke the young rapper in question said that he was seeking council from his family and his pastor. Perhaps he suddenly thought that he might have a problem. How long, though, will his counselling session last? How long will itbe before his need to dominate arises again? Obviously the fam ilies of the performers in question agree with their decisions to reconcile. But this then bringsus to the general point. Violence against women is common. And many women are often the ones who most promote violent behaviour in their men. One would have thought that this kind of behaviour started when couples were old and married, but these days, the more knowledge we have shows us that it in fact starts far earlier than that. On campus the other day at the University of Puerto Rico, as a part of the celebration of International Woman's Day/Week, one of the organisations had a talk about violence among young couples. The talk was given by a member of the Department for Women's Affairs, Or the Procuradora de Las Mujeres (in Spanish organisers put the event together because of a need among young women on campus for this service. Counsellors see many young women every term that suffer from violence in their relationships with their boyfriends. Amazingly, not ones tudent went. Notwithstanding the girls who seek out help individually, the activity was a flop. What this seems to say is that while violence on the whole is a public 'thing', domestic violence or violence against women is a private matter and should never be brought into the public sphere. Violence is, however, violence and there is no code of silence around it. Unfortunately, Rihanna's return to her abusive rapper man, is not only about her, it speaks volumes about what our young people are seeing and doing. Worse, the artist has made a statement, a very public statement, that will have longlasting and wide reaching repercussions: 'I love him, even if he beats me and we can make this work'. Many young girls, already in odd mental and emotional spaces, see this and figure that if their man beats them, at leastlike Rihanna-he's showing me some kind of attention, and he says he loves me. Alas, the road to hell is paved with so manym istaken cases of love. Love is not about blows. Our parents often gave us the rod as parents to try to bring us up properly, to form us into people they would be proud of. Yes, some parents were a little 'slap-happy', but there is a difference between a parent punishing a child for rude behaviour and a partner 'punishing' another partner for 'misbehaviour'. This distinction is, however, lost on many young women. 'He only beat me cause he love me and he was 'vex' cause I didn't show him enough attention'. But nothing exists in splendid isolation. Peer pressure also encourages young women to stay in or even seek out abusive relationships with the desirable young man, even though everyone knows 'he like to beat his woman'. Actually, that usually makes him more desirable. 'He know how to deal with woman'. So, where does machismo end and enabling machismo begin? Obviously a woman in her right mind will not go looking for licks, but somehow shea llows it to happen. This is obviously an oversimplification. But, again, nothing exists in isolation. Violence and especially violence against women is related to the reality that we are living today. In other Caribbean countries like Belize and Guyana they are capturing data that shows that violence against women is rising as the economic crisis worsens. In Puerto Rico, the rates of murder and suicide have gone through the roof. UNCTADor the UN's agency on trade, also examines the relationship between violence and unemployment. The male-empowering organisation PROMUNDO has just released a report that deals with the correlation between forced unemployment and violence. These sources clearly elucidate the link between high male unemployment and the increase in domestic violence. It must be true as well that the Bahamian organisations and newspapers are working on presenting such facts. Violence is not only about blows or licks, but also aboutm ental abuse as well as sexual abuse. But we have already gone through this. What is sad is that Popular Culture/media garners more attention than reports from the UN or the Ministry of Health or Youth. Going back to Naipaul's Miguel Street , men had to be silent, respected, feared, and their abuse of women was often publicly condoned. What was not condoned was women talking about it. One of the characters in the book, a woman out of place in Miguel Street because of her class/colour, lives there with a man who the reader finds out later is her boyfriend, having left her husband for him. The man in question lays so many blows on her that she attempts to explain away, apologise for, and even condone until eventually she leaves. Love, Love, Love alone can't even make up for the blows he puts on her. She eventually returns to her 'real' life. What is amazing again, is that she kept offering excuses for his violence, his behaviour. Where was her self-e steem? PART 2 NEXT WEEK Licks aint violence, they just show love: Ask Rihanna SOCIAL SERV ICES M inister L oretta ButlerTurner gave an address at the church servicef or ‘Women a nd Men United To End Violence Against Women And Girls.’ BECAUSEI am considered to be a health fitness junky and practise good eating habits all year long, I can only wish the same for my clients and their owners as well. So I spend a good part of my day at the clinic talk ing with pet owners about how to improve the quality of their lives as well as of their pets with regard to fitness. One subject that seems to be especially difficult for many pet owners is that of weight control mainly because they often have a problem controlling their own weight. Today, I will talk about obesity and the causes of weight gain in pets and how extra body fat can adversely affect their well being. Obesity is an excess of body fat that impairs health or normal body function. This con dition is considered the most common and important nutritional disorder of dogs and is estimated to affect about 25 per cent of pet dogs seen by veterinarians. A lot of pet owners often ask me, “What is my ideal weight for my potcake?” I try to stay away from actual numbers of pounds but rather tell clients to do the “Rib Test”. This test involves simply feeling for your pet’s rib bones along the side of his chest wall. If you can easily feel the rib bones as you move your hand backward then your dog/cat is likely to be at good body weight. If on the other hand you have to press in fairly hard to feel the ribs then your pet s likely to be carrying a few extra pounds. Of course, if you can ever see rib lines then your pet is too thin. Fat tissue is remarkably efficient at storing energy. When the number of calories taken in (food expended, these extra calories are stored as body fat. This is easily the most common cause of obesity in our pets. Simply put we often feed our pets too much. Does that remind us about the amount of food that we eat? Yes, we pet owners also eat too much, hence the weight gain. Of course there are some medical reasons for excessive weight gain. Simply spaying or neutering you pet will increase the likelihood of weight gain. (This is not a reason to avoid spaying or neutering your dog because the weight gain is quite preventable.) Some endocrine problems, such as low thyroid gland function, and excessive adrenal gland function can be associated with unexpected weight gain. Some may argue that a little extra weight is not a health risk for pets, but the facts just don’t support that position. There are many health problems that are associated with obese pets. Take for instance, arthritis. Joint pain can affect any dog or cat, but in the overweight pet, the arthritis will be aggravated by the extra pounds the joints have to support. In addition, the heavy animal will tend to be less active and have poor muscle tone, which is important for healthy joint function. Obese pets have higher risks for developing diseases of the pancreas (including diabetes), liver, lungs, and gastro intestinal tract. Increased high blood pressure, anesthetic and surgical risks, and possible reduced resistance to infection are additional concerns with overweight pets. If you think your dog is overweight after doing the Rib Test, your veterinarian should be able to give you some good ideas on how to take off some of the extra weight. Sometimes, a complete physical exam is recommended with blood and urine tests to rule out underlying problems. If all the tests are normal, a safe weight control plan can be developed. The corner stone of your pet’s weight loss program will be reduced calorie intake with increased calorie utilisation-or the eat less, exercise more rule. Your veterinarian will recom mend some excellent low fat/low calorie diet options that can make the difference between success and failure. Feed only the amount your vet recommends each day. Resist from offering your pet treats from the table or in the form of dog biscuits. Try to make exercise a reg ular part of your pet’s daily routine. The good part about a daily walk with your dog is that you both benefit. Most weight control programs take approximately 4-8 months to reach their goal. As a veterinarian, I see many medical problems that require complex and expensive testing and treatment. Obesity on the other hand is simple to diagnose and in most cases simple and inexpensive to treat. I whole heartedly believe that if we were to keep our bodies and our pets at a trim lean weight, we will quite possibly improve the quality and quantity of life not only for our pets, but ourselves as well. Obesity in pets By DR BASIL SANDS READ Y , SET , WEAVE FROM page 12 As I meet employees from different companies, I am beginning to see a particular commonality in corporate and business cultures. Thoreau captured what I witness in this simple quotation, “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.” When I speak to employees there is a majority that feels a sense of entrap ment. They need a job, especially during difficult economic times, but they feel underutilised and helpless about finding the work that brings them joy or excitement. They feel invisible and unable or unwilling to do anything about it and others feel overtly victimised. I hear many stories but one particular example stands out. There is a supervi sor, Joe, who was asked to meet with his team to share information about a change in his department. He was reluc tant to schedule a meeting because whenever he holds a meeting, his manager reacts negatively if she is not invited and attacks the staff if she is invited. Inviting her would not be a challenge if employees were comfortable being authentic in her presence, so on one hand, Joe should hold meetings but he would rather not experience the mental and emotional anguish of being raked over the coals so meetings are avoided at all costs. As a result, there is stagnation, ill informed employees, a lack of trust and a huge need to preserve self within his department. In other cases of quiet desperation, employees wait and wait until an executive or manager recognises their potential. There aren't enough leaders who take interest in mentoring so employees end up stuck doing the same thing over and over unless the manager has too much work. Employees are not stretched. Instead, they are left to their own devices to develop themselves. The trouble with this model is that employees can't possibly know what they don't know. There are employees who long to be developed, who are given feedback that is either not constructive or does not add any particular value. Comments like, “Oh you are doing a great job” or “we have plans for you.” Most times these non-specific, statements are vague by design, they keep your hopes alive enough so that you will hang on to the appearance of a promise of a bright future. When the waiting goes on and on, some employees get tired of the lack of specificity and leave, others sit back and patiently experience the inter m inable wait, hoping they will be recogn ised for their achievements. I understand fully that companies cannot make promises of promotions or transfers and this is reasonable, but commitments can be made to employees for developmental opportunities. Developing employees is a proven retentions trategy. Even if you don't have the training budget, mentoring or stretch projects can be used to provide employees with new opportunities to grow. At other times, stagnation may occur when less talented, more political, spin savvy co-workers continuously attempt to “show up” other employees, using their relationships with executives and powerbrokers to manipulate information about you and anyone else they view as a competitor. They may not be as competent as you but they are blessed with the gift of “gab” and can talk their way into the jobs they desire. As an employees you experience qui et desperation because you feel powerless for one reason or another. You believe you are immobilised because you believe you should wait until your turn comes (seniority that you are waiting for someone to notice your positive contribution to the bottom line. Powerlessness is a state of mind. When you think you are powerless, your mind is playing a trick on you, causing you to believe that you are forced to accept your lot at the office and watch your coworkers get what they want. Some scholars link it to pessimismb ecause pessimists view circumstances as t hough they don't have a choice. Y OU DO HAVE A CHOICE The first step in digging yourself out of your perceived predicament is to realise that you always have a choice. You have a choice about which company you work for, your department, whether or not you move to a new job and if youd ecide to move, what is the best timing. W hen I meet people who believe there is no choice, most times I find that they don't have a personally developed blueprint for their career or personal development. I have viewed many types of career d evelopment plans. Some employees p lan to move up the hierarchy within the company they work for and others are open to moving within an industry. There are employees who are not inter ested in a promotion because they don't want anyone reporting to them or because they are about to retire. Other employees want a job that is familiar because they are preparing to change career paths or even open their own company. There are even business owners who feel trapped by their business. They become tired of the routine and start to resent having people who are dependent on them for a salary because they want to be free. BREAK OUT OF YOUR TRANCE: R EINVENT YOURSELF Start by identifying what it is that you want to do and then create a plan to achieve your goals. Always recognise t hat you have a choice and don't buy i nto the deception that you have no poss ibilities. If you get creative, no matter y our age or educational background you c an find something that you can do. Then there is the question of risk. Should you risk making the change? How will it impact you and your family? Should you jeopardise guaranteed income? Even when you think you don't have a choice, you are making a choice to go with the flow. Why not take control of your career? When you start perceiving choices, you feel less trapped, more alive, and less affected by apparent stagnation or immobility. I have witnessed profound transfor mations within employees who create a plan. When you have a plan, you are not afraid of losing your job and you have more confidence because of your focus. Even if you don't have an entire plan documented you can be re-invigorated by potential, hope and most important ly the possibility of freedom brought about by taking small steps toward your personal goals. Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul an HR Consulting and Leadership Development company. If you are interested in assistance with planning your career you can contact her at www.orgsoul.com . By YVETTE BETHEL Quiet desperation at work T he week-long event brings t o the forefront issues still p laguing women INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

PAGE 22

The event was put on by the Bahamian Cosmetologist and Barber Association and sponsored by Bijoux Beauty ele ments. There were 40 hair stylists from major salons around the island showcasing their talents in the different hair style techniques. Mrs Neely’s business is located on Antigua Street in Elizabeth Estates, initially she just wanted to enter the competition for the exposure and experience. “We had a showcase and a competition. The cosmetology association wanted us to showcase what our salons would normally offer. I put my everything in the competi tion because it did not come easy,” Mrs Neely said. In order to prepare herself for the event, Mrs Neely said she chose to go abroad just to take a look at different techniques she may have missed. “I went away to a friend of mine who is a cosmetologist. Knowing I was going into a competition with people who have been in the business 40 plus years, you would always have to try and put yourself out there. It was a big sacrifice and I felt it was worth it. I studied certain styles to see what I would think the judges would look for,” Mrs Neely said. There were three categories: weaving, braids and fanta sy. Mrs Neely was the winner in the weaving competition and took home an $800 prize along with bragging rights for her winning piece. Mrs Neely said although she loves styling hair, it was not something she grew up thinking about. “I grew up doing hair but grew up never really wanting to venture into cosmetology. I really wanted to be a nurse. I had a job and wanted to do something on the side and I started to work at home doing braids and I grew to love it,” Mrs Neely said. Mrs Neely said she left her job as a waitress to pursue cosmetology and loves every minute of it. “My passion now is hair. I find myself venturing into different styles and avenues of the hair business in a totally difC M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009 n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter H AIR sty list Shar r on Sw ee ting-N eely of Fabulous Ronnie Beauty Salon w as thrilled to present her stunning work at the Advanced Inspiration 2009 hair show held on March 1 at the Wyndham N assau r esor t and casino. EADY , ET , EA VE SEE page 10 PARTICIPANTES of the 2009 a dvanced inspiration hair show competed to show off thier skills to international hair company Bijoux hair elements for year long bragging rights and prizes. R W S !




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BAHAMAS EDITION

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TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

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BAHAMAS BIGGEST

Man leat ater

Argument
at The Big

Yard leads
to murder

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

A MURDER inquiry has
been launched by police fol-
lowing the reckless shooting
of a 30-year-old man in an
Arawak Cay nightclub early
Monday morning.

Gentry McPhee, of Yellow
Elder Gardens, New Provi-
dence, became the thirteenth
murder victim of the year
when an argument between
men in The Big Yard escalat-
ed into violence.

Shots were fired in the club
between Arawak Cay and
Crystal Cay shortly after mid-
night, fatally injuring Mr
McPhee in the abdomen and
hands.

He was rushed to Princess
Margaret Hospital by ambu-
lance and died soon after
arrival.

Police are uncertain of the

SEE page eight

A PARTICIPANT is wrestled
to the ground during a demon-
stration for the Tradewinds Exer-
cise 2009 at the Coral Harbour
base yesterday.

US Coast Guardsmen provid-
ed instruction in compliant and
non-compliant boarding to
Defence Force members.

¢ SEE PAGE TWO

‘Water shortage’ sparks
anger from residents

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS of eastern New
Providence are fuming over
what they termed a water
"shortage" that has left some

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households incapacitated due to
a reduced water supply. Resi-
dents said the area is already
burdened with low pressure.
They say they have had very
low, to no water pressure for
the last two weekends.

The Water & Sewage Corpo-
ration (WSC) said the reduced
water pressure is due to
mechanical problems with the
Corporation's water barge, the
MT Titas, which supplies about
25 to 30 per cent of the captial's
water on a daily basis, according
to WSC.

Yesterday, State Minister for
the Environment Phenton Ney-
mour said this recent problem
with the barge, coupled with the
fact that water barging is not
financially viable for the corpo-
ration, will lead to its eventual
elimination. A date for this
phasing out has not been deter-
mined.

"The position that we're in
with the WSC at this time is crit-
ical in terms of water produc-

SEE page eight



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

SN TSA Ta
UEC
NACHT)
Centre detainees

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

AMNESTY Internation-
alis "concerned" for the
safety of detainees at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre and is urging the
international community to
flood government with
appeals on behalf of the
detainees, some of whom
claim to be victims of abuse
and inhumane treatment.

The agency also resumed
its call for independent
reviews of internal investi-
gations into these claims.

"A number of recent
media reports in the
Bahamas have indicated that
people being held at the

SEE page eight







Former minister
turned preacher
suffers stroke
in the pulpit

Kendal Nottage is
rushed to hospital

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN IMPASSIONED sermon by former PLP minister
turned born-again Christian preacher Kendal Nottage end-
ed abruptly when he suffered a stroke in the pulpit on Sun-

day.

The 68-year-old was rushed to Princess Margaret Hospital
by ambulance and his wife, former Supreme Court Justice
Rubie Nottage, hurried to his bedside.

A CAT scan revealed the preacher had suffered a slight
bleed to the right side of his brain and further tests showed

SEE page eight



Furore over Pindling
article in Tribune Insight

A MAJOR furore
broke out yesterday
over a hard-hitting 7ri-
bune Insight article
which attacked the
legacy of the late Sir
Lynden Pindling.

Political activist Paul
Moss described the
article as “repulsive”
and a “wholesale dese-
cration” of the former
prime minister’s char-
acter.

But former PLP backbencher
Edmund Moxey and others
gave the article wholehearted
support, saying: “Young
Bahamians need to know their
history.”





Sir Lynden Pindling

The article, headed
“The tragic young pilot
who knew too much”,
told the story of the
late Chauncey Tynes
Jr., who went missing
in 1983 while piloting a
flight from Exuma to
Nassau.

His father,
Chauncey Tynes Sr.,
believes his son was
murdered because he
knew too much of the associa-
tion between Sir Lynden and
the Colombian drug czar Joe
Lehder.

Chauncey Tynes Jr., who was

SEE page eight

Commonwealth
Day flag raising

MEMBERS OF the
Royal Bahamas
Police Force and the
Royal Bahamas
Defence Force hoist
the Commonwealth
flag at the Common-
wealth of the
Bahamas Flag Rais-
ing Ceremony in
commemoration of
the 60th Anniver-
sary of Common-
') wealth Day at the
| Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, East Hill
Street yesterday.

Kristaan HA Ingraham II/BIS





NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



US Coast Guard instructs Caribbean defence

forces on how to increase maritime

| S Coast Guardsmen
from the District 7,

Tactical Law Enforcement
Detachment provided instruction
in compliant and non-compliant
boarding to service members
from the Royal Bahamas, St Vin-
cent and Grenadines, St Kitts-
Nevis, Haiti, Trinidad-Tobago,
Belize, Barbados and the Domini-
can Republic Defence Forces at
the Coral Harbour base yester-
day.

PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff






































British American Financial

British American Financial “BAF” is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Bahamian entity BAB
Holdings Limited. BAF recently celebrated its second year as a 100% Bahamian owned entity
having been acquired by the Bahamian Group during February 2007.

Established in 1920, British American Financial provides a full range of insurance and
investment services, including life & health insurance, mortgages, financial and retirement
planning, annuities, mutual funds and pension plans. The Company has three offices in Nassau at
Independence Drive, Rosetta St. Palmdale, and Carmichael Rd. Also full service branches in
Freeport, Abaco, Exuma and a network of career agents throughout the Family Islands. The
Company directly employs more than 200 Bahamians.

British American Financial is not related or affiliated in any way whatsoever with any other
company with a similar name “British American’, whether in the Bahamas, the Caribbean region
or anywhere else.

In celebration of our second anniversary as a fully Bahamian Company, we are pleased to
announce our offering of free financial consultations, along with weekly financial seminars to our
clients and the public at our Independence Drive Headquarters every Friday until the end of April
2009. The Company extends a special invitation to members of the public who recently experienced
job losses and hardship as a result of the downturn in the economy.

Please direct any questions on this statement to Mr. I. Chester Cooper, President & CEO
via email: ccooper @babfinancial.com or Tel: 242-461-1003.

British
ty" American

FINANCIAL

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501

MORTGAGES ¢ MUTUAL FUNDS ¢ LIFE INSURANCE ¢ HEALTH INSURANCE
ANNUITIES & PENSION PLANS ¢ FINANCIAL PLANNING & INVESTMENTS

“In this day and age, terrorists
and drug runners are looking for
‘soft spots’ and I believe that by
working (together) we have an
excellent opportunity to impact
the evil forces aligned against us,”
said the US Chargé d’ Affaires to
the Dominican Republic Roland
Bullen, while explaining the
US/Dominican relations in an
interview during the exercise por-
tion.

“T always refer to the US Coast
Guard as the ‘911’ of the
Caribbean because whenever
there are problems, they’re
there.”

As one of the goals of the
Tradewinds Exercise 2009 is to
increase maritime security, the
compliant and non-compliant
boarding training will help to
ensure that partner nations are
able to execute the necessary
measures when called upon to
board a vessel, with the appro-
priate use of force, to prevent ille-
gal trafficking. At the Coral Har-
bour base, US Coast Guardsmen
began by instructing their part-
ner nation counterparts in the
proper way to approach a vessel
occupant in a non-aggressive
manner — slowly walking toward
the subject with their hands open,
palms facing the subject.

“When dealing with compliant
occupants of a vessel, it’s like
dealing with (peaceful) protest-
ers,” said US Coast Guard Chief
Petty Officer Matthew Rouse,
stationed out of Mayport, Florida.

Though not necessarily imme-
diately following instructions,
“the occupants are non-combat-
ant,” he said.

If the suspect vessel’s occupants
become aggressive and show
resistance to the service mem-



security

TAKE THAT! Service members learn some new skills.



bers, but are still not attacking
them, the students were shown
techniques such as pressure points
and handcuffing procedures to
detain the suspect.

“Non-compliant (occupants)
need a little bit more convincing
to cooperate,” said Able Seaman
Miska Clarke with the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.
“Whether it is talking more
harshly, getting more physical or
using deadly force to achieve the
goal of your boarding.”

Partner nation service mem-
bers were instructed in escalation
of force and how to properly eval-
uate when an occupant is non-
compliant and keep control of the
situation with the correct course
of action. “It’s very important for
the partner nations to learn these
skills because they will be con-
ducting these operations in the
future,” said Mr Rouse.

“There are a lot of people out
there up to no good and we want

Ferocious
fire ravages
Buy 4 Less

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to ensure that our partner
nations’ service members will
have the knowledge to deal with
those threats.”

Mr Rouse, who is based in
Miami, said he enjoys the oppor-
tunity to train other service mem-
bers and show them how the US
Coast Guard operates, as well as
build camaraderie that will bene-
fit all when having to cooperate in
real-world events.

“It’s a great chance for us to
share with them how we board
vessels and also shows them we’re
more than willing to support
them,” said Mr Rouse.

Nations participating in Exer-
cise Tradewinds 2009 include the
Bahamas, Barbados, Belize,
Dominica, Dominican Republic,
Guyana, Haiti, Honduras,
Jamaica, Nicaragua, St Kitts-
Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and
Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad-
Tobago, the United Kingdom and
the United States.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

FLAMES ravaged the Buy 4 Less store on Baillou Hill Road
south yesterday morning in what has been described as one of the

most ferocious fires of the year.

The blaze ignited shortly before 6am and Fire Services had
three fire engines on the scene eight minutes after receiving the

emergency call.

By the time they arrived, part of the upper building was already

fully ablaze.

That part of the building has been completely destroyed and the
rest of the building has been severely damaged by smoke and

water.

Fire Services maintain the blaze was one of the most significant
of the 25 fires they have fought this year so far.

The house fire that killed four-year-old Kentrell Rolle in Pride
Estates on Saturday is another of the most significant fires of 2009.

TROUBLE IN STORE: The fire caused extensive damage.

COB Union of Students to hold elections of officers

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE College of the Bahamas Union of Students will conduct its
annual elections of officers for the year 2009-2010 on Wednes-
day, March 25, and Thursday, March 26, between the hours of

9am and 9pm.

All eligible persons must hand in their nomination papers no lat-
er than March 12, 2009 at the Student Union Building.

Candidates must have no less than 20 signatures in support of
their nominations from persons in their respective schools, and in
the case of president, not less than 20 signatures from any school.

Nomination forms may be collected from the Student Union
Building located at the main campus on Thompson Boulevard.

Election polling stations will be set up at CHMI campus on
Thompson Boulevard, the Grosvenor campus on Shirley Street and
the Portia Smith Building on Thompson Boulevard.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

and charged

TWELVE persons were }
arrested and charged for drug }
related matters, four persons }
were charged for house break- }
ing, and 10 persons were :
charged for various minor i

offences in Grand Bahama.

Asst Supt Noel Curry said :
that a variety of stolen items }
were discovered and persons }
who have had a break-in and }
items stolen are asked tocome }
to Police Headquarters to iden-

tify their belongings.

¢ HAND GUN FOUND

A handgun was discovered :
on the beach at Smith’s Point }
by a concerned resident who }
was walking in the area on }

Thursday.

According to reports, the res- i
ident found a black and silver }
9mm handgun along with a }
magazine clip, which contained }
six live founds of ammunition, }
around 10am and contacted }

police.

The matter is under investi- :

gation by police.

¢ BURGLARY
AND ROBBERY

A resident of Frobisher Dri- :
ve was robbed of cash and oth- }
er items on Friday by a man }

who broke into his home.

The man told police that the }
incident occurred sometime }
around 12.50am. He said the }
culprit robbed him and his }
roommate of cash, two cellular }
telephones and $90 worth of }

GSM phone cards.

Police are continuing their ;

investigation into the matter.

and assault are

investigated

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia. net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama police are investi-
gating two serious matters,
including a cutlass attack
and an assault that occurred
in Freeport over the week-
end.

According to reports, a
27-year-old woman is in
hospital with injuries after
being attacked by another
woman with a cutlass in the
Garden Villas area on Fri-
day.

Asst Supt Noel Curry said
the victim, who is a resident
of Jervis Crescent, was
“chopped about the body.”

She was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where
she is presently detained in
the female surgical ward.

Investigations are contin-
uing in the matter.

A YOUNG man was also
assaulted in the Garden Vil-
las area on early Saturday
morning.

The attacker is believed
to be a man who is wanted

by police on Grand Bahama.

According to police, a 27-
year-old male resident of
Caravel Beach was taken to
hospital after being gun-
butted in the head during an
altercation with wanted sus-
pect Samiko Rigby.

Asst Supt Noel Curry said
the police received a report
from a concerned resident
who reported that a man
was being chased along
Adventurers Way around
2.30am on Saturday by
another man with a gun.

Police were dispatched to
the area to investigate.
After receiving additional

information, officers went to }

the Rand Memorial Hospi-
tal, where they interviewed
the victim.

Mr Curry said the suspect
was identified as Samiko
Rigby, who is wanted for
questioning in reference to
several other matters.

Rigby, a 26-year-old resi-
dent of Eight Mile Rock,
escaped police custody on
January 11 from the
Central Police Station at
Police Headquarters in
Freeport.

Although an all-points-
bulletin was issued for his
arrest, Rigby still remains at
large.

Rigby is about 5°11” tall
and weighs 185 pounds.

He is of dark complexion.

Anyone with information
concerning his whereabouts
is asked to contact the Cen-
tral Detective Unit at 350-
3107/ 8, 350-3106, 352-9774/
5; the duty officer at 919,
911, or the Crime Tipsters
Hotline at 352-1919.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE trial of a doctor accused of
negligence for allegedly failing to
properly diagnosis and treat a man
suffering from a life threatening
heart infection began in the
Supreme Court yesterday.

Christopher Rogers, the plaintiff
in the case, has taken legal action
against Dr Ian Kelly, a family
practitioner, for allegedly failing
to properly diagnosis and treat
him back in 2005.

Mr Rogers is represented by
lawyer Gail Lockhart-Charles,
while Dr Kelly is represented by
attorneys Steven Turnquest and
Michael Saunders.

The trial is being heard before
Senior Justice John Lyons.

Dr Andrew Selwyn, a cardiolo-
gist from Boston, was the first wit-
ness to take the stand yesterday.

Dr Selwyn was questioned
extensively regarding office notes
that Dr Kelly made regarding his
treatment of Mr Rogers and asked
to give his medical opinion.

According to Dr Kelly’s notes,

Mr Rogers’ initial visit for his ill-
ness was on October 7, 2005.

At that time, Mr Rogers was
examined by Dr Kelly after claim-
ing that he had been suffering
from a fever for a month. Dr Sel-
wyn noted that a haemotology
report stated that Mr Rogers’ ery-
throcyte sedimentation rate (ESR)
was “clearly abnormal and
markedly raised.”

Witness

The witness told the court that a
normal rate would be between 0
and 9 while Mr Rogers’ was at 57.
Dr Selwyn said that he saw this
an obvious reason for concern.

An ESR test is used to help
diagnosis conditions associated
with inflammation and infections.

Nearly two weeks after his ini-
tial visit, Mr Rogers reportedly
returned to Dr Kelly again, claim-
ing that he was not feeling well,
but according to Dr Kelly’s notes,
he was doing well, the court heard.

Dr Selwyn noted that accord-
ing to Dr Kelly’s notes, Mr Rogers

was given the drug Eloquin, a
broad spectrum antibiotic.

The witness said that between
Mr Rogers’ initial visit with Dr
Kelly and his second visit, no dif-
ferential diagnosis was carried out.
This, he said, should have been
done.

Mr Rogers was given the drug
Zenthromax on a subsequent vis-
it that month as his condition con-
tinued to deteriorate, although Dr
Kelly’s notes did not reflect the
same, the court heard.

On October 31, 2005, Mr
Rogers reportedly told Dr Kelly
that he had had an awful week-
end, but was reassured by Dr Kel-
ly to continue taking the antibi-
otics, the court heard.

Dr Selwyn said that Mr Rogers’
fever and weight loss were obvious
signs of an infection and that the
failure to reach a proper diagnosis
worsened the condition and
caused more damage.

The court also heard yesterday
that an infectious bacteria, which
ultimately led to endocarditis, an
infection in Mr Rogers’ heart
valve, had been found in three

The police in Abaco to make
crime reports available again

ASSISTANT Commissioner of Police
Hulan Hanna confirmed yesterday that
police in Abaco will again be making
their crime reports available to the local

media on that island.

Last week, the police in Abaco denied
the local press in Abaco the daily crime
report. This came after concerns were
raised about the effect of the publica-
tion of crime reports on the island’s sec-

ond home economy.

However, Mr Hanna said yesterday
that the issue, which was widely publi-
cised, has since been “sorted out.”

“Whatever the miscommunication or
misunderstanding was, that no longer
exists. That reporter no longer has that
issue to contend with because clearly we are working

with the media,” Mr Hanna said.

Abaconians last week were furious that the police
attempted to stop the press reporting on what they
termed a dramatic rise in crime on the island.

Supt Sean Neville-Smith allegedly told the local
newspaper that it can no longer carry crime reports
“because they reflect badly on the police.”

The publishers of The Abaconian, David and Kathy
Ralph, were displeased about the ban and asked their
readers to phone in their crime news.

Their readers were angry at what they saw as a
blatant attempt to keep important information away

from the public.

LOEW Mme lanarce



This attempt by the police to gag the
press follows a worrying upsurge in crime
in Abaco and growing disgruntlement
over the police force’s effectiveness there.

Residents are concerned that the
recent kidnapping of a foreign investor,
the mugging of a well-known local
woman, and a spate of boat thefts will
turn away yachtsmen and second-home
owners who form the backbone of the
island’s economy.

In the past, Abaco has been relatively
crime-free. But rising unemployment and
a sluggish economy have pushed up
theft.

Hardest hit have been visiting yachts,
some valued at $100,000 or more. On
more than one occasion, boats have arrived in Abaco

one day and been stolen the next. But the mugging of

on the island.

well-known resident Lily Sands, who is in her seven-
ties, has really brought home the changing crime scene

Ms Sands was accosted by two people with guns
who forced her into her own home in a normally qui-
et residential area of Marsh Harbour.

Then they locked her in a closet before stealing
money and other items.

A resident said: “Boats are disappearing like crazy.

”

omy

PLP chairman congratulates
Dr Darville on Senate appointment

PLP Chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin yesterday congratulated Grand
Bahama physician Dr Michael Darville on his appointment to the

Senate.

Stating that he is a “distinguished” son of Bahamian soil, Mrs Han-
na-Martin said that Dr Darville has contributed “significantly” to the
delivery of health care services, among other things, in the communi-

ty of Grand Bahama.

“His appointment to the Senate will enhance that body’s delibera-
tions and signifies the Progressive Liberal Party’s commitment to
bringing to the fore national voices that will articulate and help imple-
ment our vision for a new and exciting future for our Bahamas,” she

said in a brief press statement.

PLP leader Perry Christie on Sunday officially announced that Dr
Darville will fill the vacancy left in the Senate following the resignation

of Pleasant Bridgewater.

Dr Darville practices medicine in Freeport as a partner in the Grand

Bahama Family Medical Centre.

He holds an MBBS degree in medicine from the University of the
West Indies and a degree in engineering from the University of Wind-

sor in Canada.

National Energy Policy
consultation process initiated

GOVERNMENT has initiated
the consultation process for the
implementation of a National
Energy Policy which will have
BEC moving towards a more sus-
tainable mix of energy sources for
the public, State Minister for
Works Phenton Neymour said.

Mr Neymour also said that the
government is exploring funding
opportunities to advance energy
conservation at the residential lev-
el through an incandescent light-
bulb replacement programme.
This effort builds upon the Cus-
toms duty reductions introduced
in the last budget.

The state minister made this
statement last week during his
contribution to the mid-year bud-
get debate in the House of
Assembly.

He said that opportunities also
exist for energy efficiency
improvements in large industrial

motors as well as in residential
home construction.

“We have started the process
of looking at these options and
the opportunities through techni-
cal assistance of grant-funding to
fast-track its implementation,” Mr
Neymour said.

He said that his ministry has
what they believe is a firm foun-
dation for a National Energy Pol-
icy, which also addresses matters
of energy security, especially dur-
ing periods of fuel price volatility.

In order to advance the gov-
ernment’s National Energy Policy
and its proposed implementation
plan, Mr Neymour said input from
the various ministries and depart-
ments, agencies and corporations
of the government is being sought.

The BEST Commission of the
Ministry of the Environment is
now in the process of soliciting
that input.

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MZ

blood samples. Dr Selwyn said
that intravenous antibiotics could
have been administered to Mr
Rogers in sufficient dosages until
all signs of the infection had dis-
appeared.

Statement

The court heard that Mr
Rogers’ condition continued to
deteriorate, ultimately leading to

Trial of doctor accused of negligence underway

Twelve arrested :

heart failure on November 14,
2005. In his statement, Mr Rogers
claimed that Dr Kelly confirmed
to him that he was suffering from
heart failure and that he wanted
him to see someone later that
day.

Mr Rogers was subsequently
admitted to Doctors Hospital and
then later to a hospital in Cleve-
land, Ohio for heart surgery, the
court heard.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Clinton’s hard bargain on missile shield

WASHINGTON (AP) — If the Obama
administration intends to give up missile defence
in Europe as part of a security deal with Russia,
as its behind-the-scenes manoeuvring seems to
suggest, then Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton is driving a hard bargain.

On a trip to Europe and the Middle East
that ended Sunday, Clinton spoke positively of
the prospect of making Europe-based missile
defence an integral part of an overall USS.
defence strategy. Her message was that missile
defence has value and Washington won't give it
up easily.

The uncertain status of missile defence has
much to do with the administration's evolving
approach to Iran. Its nuclear programme and
missile-building efforts are the main reasons
usually cited to justify missile defences in
Europe. Clinton made it clear that the USS.
wants more than just a helping hand from Rus-
sia. The U.S. wants to see any such assistance
pay concrete dividends in the form of verifi-
able action by Tehran to halt its nuclear pro-
gramme and scale back missile development.
Until those results are achieved, or at least with-
in sight, the administration is likely to keep
missile defence as an option.

Talk of a bargain that would remove the
missile defence irritant from the U.S.-Russian
relationship has centred on a letter President
Barack Obama sent Russian President Dmitry
Medvedev in February. The note has been inter-
preted by some as a conciliatory gesture and a
possible first step toward linking missile defence
in Europe to Russia's assistance on Iran.

It is not clear how the Russians will respond,
and Clinton's talks with Russian Foreign Min-
ister Sergey Lavrov on Friday yielded no
answer. Missile defence was a favourite of the
Bush administration, but it never has been pop-
ular among Democrats. Obama's election was
widely seen as signaling a death knell for the
proposed European leg of the missile defence
system, which would be linked to an existing
network of interceptors in Alaska and Califor-
nia and radars elsewhere. Scaling back missile
defence ambitions also could produce some of
the big savings Obama seeks in a period of
tighter budgets.

What seems apparent at this point is that
the administration does not intend to bargain
away missile defence entirely in exchange for
Russian help with Tehran.

In Belgium, at a news conference following a
NATO meeting, Clinton said missile defence
was "a very important tool in our defensive
arsenal for the future." She later said she was
referring not just to Iran but more broadly to the

concept of deterring non-state adversaries such
as terrorist networks from seeking to acquire a
nuclear missile years or decades from now.

At another point during her trip, Clinton
said "Iran is the name we put to" those emerg-
ing and future threats, "but it is a kind of stand-
in for the range of threats we foresee." If the
present challenge of dissuading Iran from
acquiring nuclear weapons proved successful,
she seemed to suggest, then missile defence still
might be useful because other missile threats
might come up later.

What she avoided was offering a quid pro
quo. Clinton was careful not to assert that if
Russia were to accelerate pressure on Tehran to
back down, then the U.S. would scrap its plan to
put anti-missile interceptors in Poland and an
associated radar in the Czech Republic.

In fact she appeared to suggest that a missile
defence in Europe was a good idea even if Iran
no longer was a worry — although it would be
less urgent. Such talk may reflect doubt that
Iran will change course, although Clinton reaf-
firmed during the trip that the U.S. wants to
engage Iran in talks about its nuclear pro-
gramme and other topics. She told an Arab
diplomat at an international conference in Egypt
last Monday that she doubts the Iranians will
take up the American offer of a dialogue,
according to a senior USS. official who briefed
reporters on condition that he not be identi-
fied because the conversation was private.

Officially, the administration has not said
whether it intends to go ahead with the missile
defence sites in Poland and the Czech Republic.
It has stuck to the language that Obama used as
candidate, that missile defence must be proved
reliable and cost effective.

Poland's president said Sunday he believes
the U.S. will honour its agreement to build a
missile defence base in his country and that
scrapping the project to improve ties with Rus-
sia would be an unfriendly gesture toward
Poland. One possibility is that Washington and
Moscow could move toward agreement, with
NATO, to jointly reconfigure current U'S. plans
in a way that results in a coordinated system to
provide protection of the continent against a
range of missiles.

Russia says missile defence in Europe is
unnecessary and provocative. Moscow even has
threatened to deploy short-range missiles in its
westernmost region, bordering Poland, if the
U.S. goes ahead. But the rhetoric has since

(This article was written by Robert Burns,
Associated Press writer).

Disgusted with
our treatment
of animals

Bawa

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have lived in the Bahamas
for two years and am disgusted
at the way animals are treated
here.

The torture and barbaric
treatment of turtles are a dis-
grace to all Bahamians who
think they are decent folk.

Most Bahamians I am proud
to know, are decent easy going
folk, but they must rise up and
stop the cruel unnecessary
killing of turtles before the
whole world thinks all Bahami-
ans are barbaric and cruel folk.
For goodness sakes this is an
endangered species.

Every time a turtle is tortured
to death or ransomed, this is a
bloody stain that will crucify
your tourist industry one day.

The world has moved on and
it is high time the Bahamas

letters@tribunemedia net



live feed showing turtles being
tortured is placed on the inter-
net for the world to see what
Bahamians allow to happen?
Imagine the embarrassment the
Bahamian people and Govern-
ment will face world wide.

So please, pass this law and
make it have penalties for those
involved that are so harsh and
severe they will not even con-
template breaking it.

Make sure that this law is
enforced so harshly and fre-
quently that no one will cross
the line.

Teach your children to love
animals and realise that turtles
are a source of joy, swimming in
the sea that tourists will pay to

eigners have contacted you.
Perhaps these foreigners care
enough to want to make a dif-
ference to Bahamians’ lives and
do not want to see all Bahami-
ans branded as cruel, barbaric
folk.

Perhaps we care about the
livelihoods you derive from
tourism.

One day, maybe not so far
away, tourists will not come
here, as they don’t want to see
or hear about cruelty to turtles
and of course your other run-
ning sore, the Surrey horses.
Nor will they want to spend
money here to support a people
too weak and ineffectual to put
things right.

So please put this right. Yours
with the best of intentions for all
Bahamians.

JOHN LE SUEUR
Nassau,

caught up. see.

How long will it be before a

March, 2009.

You complain that only for-

Confident Mr Jones will not fall
for the trap being set for him

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It was a nice gesture by Mr Franklyn Wilson to
come to the aid of local media boss Mr Wendell
Jones. But let us look at the following scenarios.
It can be said that Jones communications (JCN)
has done quite well in his media empire in bring-
ing the news and other cultural entertaining pro-
grammes to the Bahamian public.

It can also be said that JCN has benefited from
just about all aspects of the local advertising pub-
lic including all political, independent and splin-
ter parties.

This was good for our country as well as main-
taining democracy.

Now on the other side of this scenario you
have the opposition Progressive Liberal Party
and its aspiring leader hopefuls, like the MP for
Fox Hill and others complaining about the biased
reporting and attacks against their party.

It can also be said that for some 40 years now
the PLP has been trying to replace the historic
“Nassau Herald” of the 1960s with a current
newspaper.

Prior to 1992 the reigning Progressive Liberal
Party government never wanted to free the air
waves because of its own ongoing political agen-
da. The Broadcasting Corporation of the
Bahamas was the official mouthpiece and news

media of the government. The Free National
Movement freed the air waves in 1992 granting
several private companies to operate indepen-
dent radio stations, including Mr Wendell Jones.

Despite Mr Jones’ shortcomings with his faulty
payment of taxes (National Insurance and utili-
ties) he has managed to build a competitive media
enterprise.

Now up steps the PLP top brass and millionaire
magnet Mr Franklyn Wilson who now wants to
take advantage of a opportunistic situation of
offering to help Mr Wendell Jones for — in my
opinion — the sole purpose of acquiring that
news media (JCN) for the propaganda use of the
PLP. We are with you Mr Jones and we know you
will not fall into the trap that is currently being set
for you. Stick to your guns and pay your taxes and
keep your news media (JCN) free and void of
political persuasion.

If, and should you fall for the so-called help that
is being offered to you by Mr Wilson, then you
find that later on your call letters which is cur-
rently JCN will for all intensive purposes will
become W-PLP.

BRIAN O
CLARKE
Nassau,
March 1, 2009.

Tired of the childish behaviour of some MPs in the House

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am sick and tired of the
childish misbehaviour of some
Members of Parliament in the
House of Assembly. It is truly
embarrassing to watch the Par-
liamentary Channel. In an era
where intolerance, rudeness and
violence are increasing, our
leaders need to be more civil
and respectful.

The behaviour and level of
"debate" is a poor example for
our young people.

There is total disregard for
the Speaker, and little under-
standing of the proper use of
"point of order.”

This has been a tradition in
Bahamian politics, but it is time
for politicians to realise that
there are now many educated
Bahamians who are not

impressed by playground argu-
ments in parliament.

These are supposed to be
professional people about the
people's business and they are
behaving like a bunch of thugs
on the bus going to prison.

CHARLES CAREY,
Harbour Island,
Bahamas,

March 3, 2009.



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 5



0 In brief |

The Bahamas
Humane Society
thanks Bain
Town community

THE Bahamas
Humane Society wishes
to thank the community
of Bain Town for their
participation in Febru-
ary’s “Who Let The Dogs
Out Free Spay and
Neuter programme.”

The programme visited
five primary schools in
the area and spoke with
1,960 students about how
to be a responsible ani-
mal owner and the
importance of neutering
and caring for their pets.

Every home was visited
in the area and animal
advice was given where
needed, unwanted ani-
mals were removed by
the Ministry of Agricul-
ture’s K-9 Control Unit
and 55 dogs were
neutered during this peri-
od by the Humane Soci-
ety.

The Bahamas Humane
Society would also like to
thank the persons who
gave donations towards
making this possible.

The programme will
next move to the Fort
Fincastle and Masons
Addition areas.

$5,000 donations
made on behalf of
the government

THE OAS Perma-
nent Representative of
the Bahamas Ambas-
sador C A Smith
donated $5,000 each to
the Inter-American
Drug Abuse Control
Commission and to the
Inter-American
Committee Against
Terrorism on behalf of
the Bahamas govern-
ment.

The cheque presenta-
tion took place at the
Organisation of Ameri-
can States (OAS), in
the Office of the Assis-
tant Secretary General,
Ambassador Albert
Ramdin.

Ambassador Smith
said he was grateful for
this opportunity and
thanked CICAD and
CICTE for being great
partners to the
Bahamian people in
providing training and
resources in the fight
against drugs, the traf-
ficking of small arms
and human trafficking,
which is becoming a
real problem in the
Bahamas.

With respect to ter-
rorism, Ambassador
Smith said that “it has

LOCAL NEWS

Out-of-work fisherman sells boat

to pay outstanding NI contributions
Man ordered to pay $700

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN OUT-OF-WORK fisherman
who was ordered to pay $700 in out-
standing National Insurance contribu-
tions sold his boat on Friday to avoid
jail.

Colin Fox, 53, a boat operator for a
35ft crawfishing vessel on Long Island,
has not earned a salary since the boat
engine broke down in October.

And although the engine was
repaired in January, adverse weather
conditions have kept the fisherman
from working since.

The boat operator said he has been
struggling to cover basic living costs,
including his diabetes medication, and
has not been in a position to pay $44
monthly to NIB.

He claims he received no warning
from the National Insurance Board

(NIB) of his outstanding contributions
until he was summoned to court two
weeks ago. Then, last Wednesday, he
appeared before the Long Island
administrator.

Mr Fox said he tried to explain his
predicament as he pleaded guilty to
the charge of failing to pay $700 to
NIB and was told he would have to
pay $300 to NIB by last Friday or be
jailed.

In a panic move to avoid prison, Mr
Fox sold his boat for half its retail val-
ue on Friday.

“T didn’t want to go in jail,” he said.
“So I sold it instead of going to Fox
Hill.”

Ms Fox, his wife and their 13-year-
old daughter, have been surviving on

his wife’s salary of under $100 a week
for the last six months, as he has been
unable to find alternative employment
in the current economic climate.

He said: “I am not working, I don’t
have a job, I don’t have anything. I
am struggling to put food on the table,
things are rough.”

The fishing industry has suffered
from rising gas prices, declining craw-
fish populations, a drop in the price
of crawfish and unusually windy
weather conditions this year, and Mr
Fox has little hope for improvement
before the crawfish season closes at
the end of the month.

He said this has been the worst sea-
son since he started professional craw-
fishing at the age of 18.

MP for Long Island and Minister of
Agriculture and Marine Resources
Larry Cartwright said many self-
employed fishermen are struggling to
pay NIB contributions, and he advises
them to make arrangements to pay
before they are summoned to court.

“It's part of government policy and
national insurance policy that persons
who are falling behind (on contribu-
tions) will be warned and after one or
two warnings they can be taken to
court,” Mr Cartwright said.

“There is little that can be done after
they have been fined in court as the
judge’s decision is final unless the per-
son appeals.”

Mr Cartwright said he is in talks with
the minister responsible for National
Insurance to represent the fishermen in
his constituency.

Mr Fox has now adjusted his contri-
butions to a more manageable $26 per
month.



BGR challenges govt
to act on independent |
review of gaming laws

THE Bahamas Gaming
Reform Committee announced
that it is working towards com-
missioning an independent
review of the country’s gambling
laws.

The committee said it wants
an outside expert to undertake
the review at no cost to the gov-
ernment.

Once completed, the commit-
tee said, it will use the review as
a basis to propose new legisla-
tion to the government.

Committee chairman Sidney
Strachan said: “The current con-
text for gaming laws is unten-
able and, in fact, discriminato-
ry. We are willing to do our part
to change the status quo, but
government must first show a
willingness to seriously entertain
recommendations.

“Again, we plan to ask the
government to formally begin
the reform process. We’ll then
submit a plan and formally com-
mit to shaping new legislation
and policies for adoption.”

BGR said it is encouraged by
the overall reaction to a recent
Rotary Club-sponsored poker
tournament for charity.

“By virtue of current arcane
gaming laws, the event was bor-
derline illegal. Despite this, the
government remained on the
sidelines. Once again, it has sig-
nalled that current laws are
emasculated because they are
transparently discriminatory,”
the BGR said.



PMT TA MTT as
WTC ET Clit
TRS UCR Te Te LGR

ATTORNEY Mrs Kelphene Cun-

According to the BGR, this is
a state of affairs that both humil-
iates and depreciates the
Bahamas on the world stage.
Present at the Rotary poker
game were members of the
BGR and Mark Johnson, presi-
dent of National Casino and
Bartending School, who was
responsible for oversight of the
event.

The NCBS currently trains
dealers and croupiers for the
local casino industry.

“The Rotary event demon-
strated the value of more mod-
ern gaming laws. It showed that
Bahamians are more than capa-
ble of operating casino-like
events and that the gaming
industry can benefit the
Bahamas far more that is cur-
rently the case if citizens are not
discriminated against. This is an
opportunity and the government
must act.”

BGR wants the government
to call for an independent review
without delay. The committee
has also initiated research on
modern methods and means of
protecting Bahamians from the
risks of impulsive gaming.

BGR claims that allowing
Bahamians to game could pro-
duce as much as $20 million in
additional annual revenue for
the government.

The committee said that rev-
enue of this magnitude could
support a host of important pub-
lic programmes and initiatives.





Edwards Twins eye
America’s Got Talent

TWIN brothers Antho-
ny and Eddie Edwards,
whose ‘Celebrities on
Stage’ show has featured
in Nassau for the last three
years, are to bid for mega-
stardom this summer...by
competing in America’s
Got Talent.

The twins, who can
impersonate 100 or more
singing stars with virtual-
ly flawless vocal mimicry,
are eager to show what
they can do in front of a
multi-million internation-
al television audience.

They hope their show,
which has been enthralling
theatre audiences for many
years now, will earn them
the kind of fame now
being enjoyed by the bril-
liant ventriloquist Terry
Fater, whose triumph in
America’s Got Talent
turned him into a Las
Vegas superstar.

“We are entering the
show because we need that
kind of exposure,” Antho-
ny told The Tribune.

“The response we get to
our shows is overwhelm-
ingly positive, but we need
to achieve the kind of
breakthrough that Ameri-
ca’s Got Talent can bring.”

The Edwards Twins have
been appearing at the
Rainforest Theatre, Crys-
tal Palace, four nights a
week since 2006.

They have proved a
great success with tourists
and locals and earned
plaudits from a Tribune
critic who has now been to

EM em Oram ae UO) | ate a te he ce MALTS

see them seven times.

On Sunday night, The
Edwards Twins gave a free
concert to Bahamians in
appreciation of the coun-
try’s willingness to host
their talents for three suc-
cessive Seasons.

“We wanted to give
something back - to say
thank you for having us,
because we now see Nas-
sau as our second home,”
Anthony told the audi-
ence.

The twins, from Las
Vegas, are now booked
into the Rainforest The-
atre until August, though
they will take time off to
appear in America’s Got
Talent during April and
May.

For their new season in

ningham, vice-president of the Industrial

Nassau, the twins have



repackaged their act, high-
lighting stars who have had
secondary billing in previ-
ous shows.

Retained, however, are
Anthony’s staggeringly
brilliant impersonations of
a succession of leading
male and female vocalists
and Eddie’s show-stopping
impression of Cher.

After Sunday’s show,
during which Anthony
again stunned the audience
with his impersonation of
Luciano Pavarotti, a mem-
ber of the audience said:

“Tf talent really is the
deciding factor on Ameri-
ca’s Got Talent, then these
guys will walk it. Frankly,
I’ve never seen any act
quite so riveting and amus-
ing.

“They are top class.”




Tribunal of the Bahamas, has become a
member of the Chartered Institute of
Arbitrators.

become a worldwide
problem” and “even
though we do not see

HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN KIA SUZUKI






: LS She has also completed post graduate be!
any evidence of it in studies with the University of London,
the Bahamas we recog- where she obtained a post graduate cer- =) ’ = =
nise that tourism is the tificate in equity and trust and a post ee ya [i I il 0 0 i $ >
deadlock of our finan- graduate diploma in commercial and cor- o = re
ial servi nd if porate law.
bate we She is in the process of completing a — re Ow ned Depa rim e nt =
areas oft target master of laws degree in international = —
: ; dispute resolution.

ihe sapoencr need Mts Cunningham is a member of = Your Fast Lane to ps
CICTE.” oa aud te Deupies Bar ast Be Kelphene Cunningham J Vehicle Purchasing ed

On his behalf, Assis- = f st bd -<
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Ambassador Ramdin, La aa Wee dil L —
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He highlighted the
great task being devel-
oped by CICTE and
CICAD and stated that
“the contribution not
only in terms of the
quantity, but symboli-
cally” is a way of show-
ing the commitment to
Caribbean issues, and
in this specific case, the
Bahamas.

This contribution
from the government
of the Bahamas coin-
cides with the begin-
ning of the Ninth Reg-
ular Session of the
CICTE.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





OOM rls
TEER:
TRE ps
STATI RTSUTEULTL

THE Cacique Awards
Scholarship Fund recently
received a $1,500 donation
from art lover Janet John-
son.

Ms Johnson, who is also
the director of communica-
tions in the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation,
donated $1,500 to the fund
after purchasing a duho carv-
ing from the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation.

She explained that the
duho (Lucayan ceremonial
stool) had great sentimental
value to her since there is a
family story behind its cre-
ation.

It began with lightning in a
hurricane, she said.

As Hurricane Floyd
passed through the Bahamas
in 1999, a Madeira tree in
her late father’s yard was
broken apart by a lightning
strike.

Her father, World War II





LOCAL NEWS

Call for the disparity
in wages between
men and women

to be addressed.

HYACINTH PRATT (left), permanent secretary in the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation, is pictured receiving the $1,500 cheque
from Ms Johnson and artist Antonius Roberts.

veteran Basil I Johnson,
saved the wood from the
tree. After he died in 2004, a
decision was made to create
a lasting and meaningful
symbol from the wood in his
honour.

Wood

The wood was given to
Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation, which engaged
artist Antonius Roberts to
craft the duho on a volun-
tary basis.

After the Ministry’s use of

the art piece for three years }
at various functions, includ- ;
ing Junkanoo Summer Festi- ;
val and the 12th Annual :
Cacique Awards, the duho }
is being added to Ms John- }

son’s private collection.

All the funds from its sale
have been posted to the }

Cacique Scholarship Fund,

which funds the education of }
deserving young Bahamians. :

The duho — the ceremoni-
al seat of the leader of the i
Lucayan people — is the }
symbol of the Cacique }

Awards.

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN

DIVISION

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

IMPORTANT NOTICE

2009 APPLICATION FORMS ARE
NOW AVAILABLE

SCHOLARSHIP /LOAN TYPE

ALL BAHAMAS MERIT SCHOLARSHIP
NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP
NATIONAL ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIP
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GERACE RESEARCH CENTRE SCHOLARSHIP

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APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008
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APRIL 30, 2008
APRIL 30, 2008

MAY 29, 2008
MAY 29, 2009
MAY 29, 2009

Application forms must be properly completed,

WITH ALL REQUIRED INFORMATION ATTACHED
and returned ON OR BEFORE the deadline to the

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION

APPLICATION FORMS RECEIVED AFTER THE

DEADLINE

WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED

PLEASE VISIT OR CONTACT THE SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL
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THE National Congress of
Trade Unions of the Bahamas
(NCTUB) is calling on the
government to review the
Employment Act to strength-
en the provision of equal pay
for equal work with particular
emphasis on the disparity in
wages between men and
women in the labour market.

The umbrella union, in con-
junction with the Caribbean
Congress of Labour, joined the
rest of the world in celebrating
International Women’s Day
on Sunday.

Every year, a political and
human rights theme, as desig-
nated by the United Nations to
create the social awareness of
the struggles of women world-
wide, is brought out and exam-
ined in a hopeful manner.

This year’s theme -
“Women and men unite to
end violence against women
and girls” — is a timely one, the
NCTUB said, “since we can
see the evidence of physical
abuse toward women and girls
almost on a daily basis glob-
ally.”

“The level of violence
against women and girls has
increased over the years and
women need to come together
as a united force to expose
those that are guilty of such
acts so that we can stomp out
the violence in our society. As
women organisations, it is our
duty to speak out on the injus-
tices and violence that are per-
petrated against females in our

w
co
—
o
ec
—_
—
—_
c
o
—_
ao
=
na

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham talks with Grand
Bahama Shipyard officials
and investors after having a
dock-side view of the Carnival
Miracle (pictured top left),
one of the boats currently on
dry-dock at the Shipyard. Mr
Ingraham was taken on a tour
of the docks following the
official commissioning of the
Shipyard's third dry dock on
Saturday, March 7.

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NCTUB in conjunction with Caribbean
Congress of Labour celebrates
International Women’s Day

society as well as on the glob-
al market,” Hellena
Cartwright, president of the
Women’s Association in the
Bahamas said in a press state-
ment.

“As we prepare ourselves
and our organisations to deal
with the challenges that we
now face within the Bahamas
and in the Caribbean region
due to the global recession, the
NCTUB wishes to remind
women that the struggle for
women’s rights is the struggle
for human rights.”

The NCTUB is calling on all
women to reflect on the gains,
strides, and achievements that
have been made by women
locally, regionally and inter-
nationally, despite the contin-
ued discrimination in the
workplace as well as domestic
and other violence that is per-
petrated against women, girls
and those who are still classi-
fied as the working poor.

The umbrella union said it
also wishes to remind women
of the importance of educa-
tion because it ensures that all
women and girls are able to
secure opportunities to broad-
en their knowledge and
increase their potential

Pictured from left are
Richard Fain, chairman and
CEO of Royal Caribbean
Cruises Ltd; Giora Israel,
senior vice- president of the
Carnival Corporation; Carl-










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for success.

‘While we have had tremen-
dous success stories with
women breaking the glass ceil-
ing, unfortunately the num-
bers are still too few. I would
like to take this opportunity
to congratulate those women
who have succeeded to the top
and encourage those who are
still standing as brave soldiers
in the struggle for fair play and
justice. We must continue to
fight for the equality that we so
rightly deserve,” the Women’s
Association and NCTUB said.

The NCTUB said it pledges
its support to all domestic
workers in their struggle for
legal and social recognition of
the value of all women’s work.
“Let us therefore join together
to realise the potential of gen-
der equality and eventually the
full empowerment of women
all over the world. On behalf
of the National Congress of
Trade Unions of the Bahamas
and the Women’s Association,
we take this opportunity to
wish all women in every island
of the Bahamas a very happy
Woman’s Day and be remind-
ed that the struggle goes on
until all men and all women
have become equals.”



PM tours Grand Bahama shipyard

Gustaf Rotkirch, chairman
and CEO of the Grand
Bahama Shipyard, Prime
Minister Ingraham and
Pineridge MP Kwasi Thomp-
son

PRIME MINISTER HUBERT
INGRAHAM is taken on a tour
of the Grand Bahama Ship-
yard's docks on Saturday,
March 7 following the official
commissioning of the Ship-
yard's third dry dock. Pictured
front from left are Pineridge MP
Kwasi Thompson, Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham, Carl-Gustaf
Rotkirch, chairman and CEO of
the Grand Bahama Shipyard
and Mrs Rotkirch.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 7





Charity campaign
role for music
and style guru

BAHAMIAN music
and style guru Gerry
DeVeaux is the creative
director for the new
“Fashion Targets Breast
Cancer” charity campaign.

Mr DeVeaux brought
together a few of his
friends, including super-
models Tyson Beckford
and Veronica Webb, and
Rolling Stones progeny
Jade Jagger and Leah
Wood, to pose for the UK
campaign to promote
awareness and raise funds
for breast cancer research.

He is also Ambassador
for Fashion Rocks for the
Princes Trust which bene-
fits HRH Prince Charles'
charity.

Mr DeVeaux is also the
creative director and a
judge for Britain's Next
Top Model, and has just
done a new BBC! series
with Sir Andrew Lloyd
Webber and the Oscars
with ITV and Sky TV.

Tyson Beckford is one
of the most successful
male models of all time
and is currently sharing his
top model tips as host of
Bravo TV's “Make Me A
Supermodel.”

Veronica Webb its one
of the original supermod-
els, she was the first model
of colour to be offered a
major cosmetics contract
as the face of Revlon.

Weather forecast
excellent for space
shuttle launch

m@ CAPE CANAVERAL,
Fla.

AFTER suffering
through a month’s delay,
NASA enjoyed a trou-
ble-free countdown for
space shuttle Discovery,
all set to blast off on a
space station construc-
tion mission Wednesday
night, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Launch director Mike
Leinbach said Monday
that the countdown was
going smoothly, and
forecasters put the odds
of good launching weath-
er at 90 percent. “The
team is anxious to go,”
he said.

Shuttle managers had
so little to discuss at
Monday morning’s
launch review at that
they wrapped up in
under an hour.

“That included a lot of
me pausing to make sure
no one had any ques-
tions,” said the chairman
of the mission manage-
ment team, Mike Moses.

Concern over some
shuttle valves led to
repeated meetings over
the past month, one last-
ing as long as 13 hours.
By Monday, there was
little more to say about
the valve issue.

One of the three
hydrogen gas valves
inside Endeavour’s
engine compartment
broke in November dur-
ing the last shuttle
launch. NASA ordered
extra testing to make
sure the valves that ulti-
mately ended up in Dis-
covery were safe to fly.

The valves control the
flow of hydrogen gas into
the external fuel tank for
proper pressurization.

Discovery and seven
astronauts will fly to the
international space sta-
tion, carrying up a $300
million framework that
includes two solar wings
and a radiator. It’s the
last set of solar wings for
the nearly completed
space station, and should
put the orbiting outpost
at full power.

One of the shuttle
crew, Koichi Wakata,
will become the first
Japanese to live aboard
the space station. He’
replace an American
astronaut, Sandra Mag-
nus, who has been up
there since November.

More than 200 Japan-
ese have descended on
NASA’s launching site to
watch the liftoff.

Redefining the Bahamas

@ Nassau Institute
Presentation to the
Bahamas National
Economic Forum

A THE risk of wast-
ing your precious

time, I would like to take a
minute or so to conduct a
thought experiment, with
apologies to Dr Charles Mur-
ray, the American political
scientist and historian who
first proposed this, albeit in
the American context:

As we know, government
spending has now put the
Bahamas in debt to the tune
of more than $3 billion, but
what else has this burden on
future generations accom-
plished? Let's find out.

Imagine for a moment that
the government as we know it
was reduced to its role out-
lined in the Constitution, and
other than defence, law and
order and maybe certain
infrastructure requirements,
the government was no longer
responsible for all the things
they take on.

To borrow from Dr Mur-
ray again, how would you
respond?

1. Would you be more or
less likely to volunteer at your
church? Yes or no?

2. Would you be more or
less likely to volunteer at a
food bank? Yes or no?

3. If you were a lawyer or
doctor, would you be more or
less likely to offer pro bono
services? Yes or no?

The list could go on, but I
think you see where this is
going.

As has turned out, most of
us answered yes.

The question we should
ask ourselves then, according
to Dr Murray is, why are
more of us not doing these
things already? He contends,
it's because we have bought
into the “soul killing logic”
that somebody else is doing
it for us.

Taxes

We vote the government
into office so we do not have
to be our neighbours keeper.
In other words, we pay taxes
for government to do it, so
why should we do any more.

Pushing the envelope a lit-
tle more, seldom people meet
that complaints are not
lodged against our bloated
government.

They say things like:

Duty rates are too high!
What does the government
do with all that money!

The educational system is a
mess!

The government can't even
fix the street lights!

Every government depart-
ment I visit the service is
lousy!

Whatever I want to do with
my business, I have to waste
hours getting a permit for this
or a permit for that!

I'm sure most of you have
uttered these words? Am I
right?

To be a little more specific
let's look at education for a
minute.

In 2001, The Nassau Insti-
tute wrote a few essays about
our educational system. At
that time, the country had
spent “over $480,000,000
(that's right, over four hun-
dred and eighty million dol-
lars since 1992— that's 9
years) on education. Even
though the public pays these
taxes, the actual student test
results from the government
run schools are considered
"confidential" and are never
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly, as any transparent gov-
ernment would do. It is a giv-
en, at least it is not denied by
the Ministry of Education, that
the mean grade is no higher
than a D, which in the real
world, is a failing grade.”

Yet somehow we do not
see the necessity to privatise
education, starting with
vouchers, where at least if a
parent is unhappy with one
school, he/she can transfer
his/her child to the school of
their choice.

I'm sure if you go through
the budgets of each govern-
ment department you would
find the country could do

away with one agency or
department after another.

I would argue that a major
step the government could
take to reform itself would be
to change its accounting pro-
cedure along the lines of real
business.

Each Ministry should have
a Balance Sheet and Income
Statement so they can see
what is necessary to sustain
their budgets. I bet we would
see an improvement with
expenditure.

Yes, I would admit that the
Bahamas is a more compli-
cated country than most of
our neighbours as we have
some 20 populated islands, so
we need an airport and port
on each one, etc.

But I also submit that is
more reason to create other
Freeport's as in Grand
Bahama, than proof that we
need ever larger government.
Present legal battles in
Freeport notwithstanding.

Debt

Now let's look at the
national debt. At the Nassau
Institute, we might be consid-
ered fiscal conservatives, but I
prefer to think it is better for
government to spend within
its means than burden future
generations, yet unborn, with
deficits and debt that we will
never repay in most of our
lifetimes.

What I find most disturb-
ing is successive governments
have committed to bringing
the debt and deficits under
control, yet year after year,
with the odd exception, the
deficits and debt increase.

Now I'm sure some of you
are thinking, these are extra-
ordinary times, so govern-
ments should throw fiscal cau-
tion to the wind and do what-
ever it takes to save us from
this market correction we call
a recession. Sorry, depression.

I would argue that this is
the time for the opposite
approach for our national
economic plan, but more on
that later.

Since 1991 the National
Debt of the Bahamas has
risen from $870 million to $3
billion, a staggering 244.8 per-
cent increase in 18 years.
That's what, a $118 million
increase each and every year.
Mind boggling.

All this and we have not
even considered the possibil-
ity of a bankrupt National
Insurance Board and the
additional taxes that will be
forced upon us to sustain that.

So what should the
Bahamas do in formulating a
national economic plan in
view of the oncoming train
wreck to our economy, if
indeed it turns out to be such?

In simple terms, we should
turn toward laissez-faire cap-
italism rather than more gov-
ernment planning, that so far
has set us on a path that is
clearly unsustainable.

The only national econom-
ic plan we should be setting
is for government to start to
downsize immediately by pri-
vatising or shutting down
whatever agency or depart-
ment they can.

I challenge anyone to name
10 government agencies,
departments or ministries, (of
the 173 services listed in the
phone book) that do their job
efficiently and effectively.

Surely we can close the
Hotel Corporation? No doubt
we can stop subsidising one
group while discriminating
against others.

How about selling Bahama-
sair, Water & Sewerage and
BEC? Do we need a price
control department when so
many people shop in Miami?
Oh, and don't forget ZNS
either.

I can tell by the hush that
has come over you that you
think I'm crazy, but I'll cite
one clear example where even
the half baked privatisation
of BaTelCo (now BTC), sev-
eral years back, was almost
worth what it cost at the time.



Just think of the entrepre-
neurs that came out of that
exercise. We have several cell
phone companies, a furniture
store and more.

Entrepreneurs now hiring
people, paying taxes and oth-
erwise contributing to eco-
nomic growth.

I sincerely believe the goal
of downsizing government is a
much more worthy national
economic plan than encour-
aging more failed government
planning.

After all, a government
does not an economy make.
An economy is the market
place of millions of individ-
ual transactions.

And I don't know about
you, but I trust myself to
make my personal decisions
rather than something or
someone called the govern-
ment.

Besides, Bahamians can ill
afford the taxation to come
in an effort to support the
leviathan we call the Bahamas
government, as it is presently
structured. And more gov-
ernment planning means
more costs to the taxpayer
and possibly to the economy.

Relevant

The unintended conse-
quences from government
planning agencies brings the
risk of them becoming The
Bahamas’ biggest growth
industry. You can bet they
would convince us that they
are even more relevant in



-govt'’s role in the economy

tough economic times, in an
attempt to justify even larger
budgets.

Far too often we let trans-
parency for government slide,
even as they pass laws every
day to make us more trans-
parent and keep us in “check”
as we Say.

In summary. Our national
economic plan should be to
return government to its con-
stitutionally stated purpose,
and accept the personal
responsibility so many of us
wish to hand over to all too
willing politicians, who might
have the best of intentions,
but for some reason they
make things worse.

In closing I'll remind you of
Fund's Law by the journalist
John Fund;

Government's will always
do the right thing, after
they've exhausted all other
possibilities.

Letisha Henderson/BIS

SIXTH GRADE STUDENTS and teachers of the Tarpum Bay Primary School in Eleuthera called on Gov-
ernor General Arthur Hanna at Government House on Wednesday March 4, 2009.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

Request For

Expressions Of Interest/

ualifications

{EOI-09-01: Janitorial Services
EOI:09-02: Pest Control & Exterminating Services}

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited is
presently seeking expressions of interest from qualified
suppliers for the provision of the following services: -

1) Janitorial Services

2) Pest Control & Exterminating Services

Interested parties are requested to complete the RFEI/RFQ
Package, which may be collected from the Receptionist
Desk of the FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas)
Super Support Centre, East West Highway, Nassau,
Bahamas or requested via email to:

sourcing&supplymanagement@firstcaribbeanbank.com
as of Friday, March 06, 2009.

Please reply to: Sourcing & Supply Management
FirstCaribbean International Bank

East West Highway
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Ms. I. Hamilton

The deadline for submission is Monday, March 16, 2009 at
1:00pm. Eastern Time. Completed Qualification Packages
may be mailed or couriered to the address above.

Packages received after this date and time will not be accepted.


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Furore over

Pindling article in

Tribune

FROM page one

Lehder’s chief pilot, told his par-
ents repeatedly that both Pin-
dling and a senior police officer
were “on the payroll” of
Lehder, who ran a secret
cocaine trans-shipment enter-
prise from Norman’s Cay in the
Exumas.

Mr Tynes Sr said in the article
that his son told him of frequent
cash consignments he was oblig-
ed to carry from Lehder for the
then prime minister and the
senior policeman.

He also revealed that he had
flown Pindling to Grand
Bahama for a secret meeting
with Lehder, with another pilot
flying the drug czar from Exuma
for the rendezvous.

Mr Moss, in attacking the article, said Bahami-
ans should stand up and stop this “slanderous”
form of journalism.

But older members of the PLP said it was
time that history was recorded by those who
experienced it first-hand.

One, who did not wish to be named, said:
“The article recorded what many senior mem-
bers of the party knew over many years. Now it’s
time for the truth to be told.”

Mr Moxey, 75, who was a PLP backbencher
during Pindling’s first administration in the late
1960s and early 1970s, said the article was need-
ed to show what really went on during the drug
era of the 1980s.

“Tt was a real eye-opener for many,” he told
The Tribune, “I respect Chauncey Tynes Sr for
telling the truth. I have known him for many
years and he was always an honest and decent
man.

“When I entered politics, I wanted to liberate
the people and let them fly. Pindling’s mission
was to keep them dumb and stupid all their
lives.”

Like other PLPs of the day, he said, he felt
that Pindling had betrayed the revolution.

“T think that Mr Tynes knows more than he is
saying. The drug era of the 1980s was the biggest
mistake ever, the biggest travesty that caused
everything to go astray.”

Mr Moxey, who is making his own DVD
about the Pindling era, said: “I feel that young



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Insight

Bahamians need to know the
truth and Mr Tynes has done
the right thing in saying what
he did.”

Mr Moss, however, said: “It is
unfortunate that deceased per-
sons such as our esteemed
national hero Sir Lynden or his
estate cannot sue for defama-
tion of character, because the
assault on his legacy is nothing
short of repulsive.”

He continued: “What we have
here is the wholesale desecra-
tion of Sir Lynden’s legacy. I
wish to point out that Sir Lyn-
den was a great man and did a
great deal to usher in the new
Bahamas and educate the mass-
es. He is our hero, just like Mar-
tin Luther King, Nelson Man-
dela and Winston Churchill is
to the USA, South Africa and
the UK respectively. I stand to defend his lega-
cy.

“There should be a standards bureau for
media in this country that seek to profit by pass-
ing on lies and half-truths to the disadvantage of
others. Enough is enough and I wish that all
right-thinking Bahamians would stand up and
reject this slanderous kind of journalism.”

Yesterday, The Tribune received many calls
responding to the article, all of them positive.

A taxi-driver said: “This has made me see our
history differently. The PLPs and FNMs at the
taxi-ranks are fighting over this article today.”

The piece was written by The Tribune’s man-
aging editor, John Marquis, who said: “Mr Moss
is entitled to his illusions. However, with one
short press release, he has in my opinion
destroyed his credibility as a would-be parlia-
mentary candidate.

“The Bahamian people have become wiser
in recent years and they are no longer likely to
swallow self-serving prattle from the likes of
Moss, who knows nothing about Sir Lynden
Pindling or the drug era of the 1980s.

“Mr Chauncey Tynes Sr is regarded as an
extremely honourable man and I have no doubt
at all that everything he told me is true. His
information is also supported by several sources
within the old PLP.

“What the Bahamas needs is a standards
bureau to restrain those who try to manipulate
history for their own ends.”

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‘Water shortage’ sparks

anger from residents

FROM page one

tion, cost of production and the fact that we need
to eventually eliminate barging. The cost of barg-
ing has now exceeded the cost of reverse osmosis
(water production). Depending on the volume
that's being produced, we're now producing
reverse osmosis water in New Providence at a
lower cost than barging. And barging is impacted
severely by weather and mechanical breakdowns,
which we are now experiencing,” he told The
Tribune.

Although the vessel is still operating, the dam-
age caused a slower turnaround due to "a major
failure with its bow thruster." The damaged part
is being repaired in South Florida and should be
reinstalled by the end of the week, according to
WSC.

One angry Yamacraw resident, who asked to
remain anonymous, said his weekend chores were
brought to a standstill because of the lack of
water. "The water has been off, off and on, for the
past two weekends. I came home on Friday after
work and it was off. Saturday morning it came on
briefly and was off the rest of the day — Sunday
was the same thing, " the resident said.

"I can't clean, I can't shower — they cut the

water off at the most inopportune times. I wasn't
even aware that they (WSC) were having a prob-
lem until I asked a neighbour and he said he
heard it from someone else, that they were having
shortage because of a problem with their barge.”

WSC said public announcements about the sit-
uation have been broadcast on radio stations.
The corporation also said the low or no supply is
due to conservation efforts that ensure residents
have water during peak consumption hours like
the mornings and evenings. Officials anticipate
that these measures will be relaxed later this
week, once the Titas is fully operational and
water storage levels in the capital have been
raised.

"Barging has been a part of the WSC almost
from its inception but in this particular case we are
being affected by a mechanical breakdown in
The Titus, which is the sole ship that we have at
this particular time. And it's affecting its turn-
around time, its delivery. It's affecting our avail-
able storage and WSC at this time is doing its
best, within its operations, to maintain adequate
supply and pressure and is making operational
adjustments at this time,” Mr Neymour said.

Customers with low or no water for extended
periods are asked to contact WSC's customer
call centre at 302-5599.

Man dead after

nightclub shooting

FROM page one

circumstances leading to the
shooting, however two men
are being questioned in an
intensive murder investigation
and a third man is wanted for
questioning.

The nightclub shooting is
another sign of the country’s
desperate need to crackdown
on gun crime and hold a
firearms amnesty said politi-
cal activist Paul Moss.

Mr Moss has been fighting
to take guns off the streets
since he launched a campaign
in 1997, which, he claimed,
received no support from then
Commissioner of Police Paul
Farquharson, or Minister of
National Security Tommy
Turnquest.

As a result, gun toters will
not hand over their weapons
without the protection of an

amnesty, and guns still per-
vade the streets of Nassau, Mr
Moss said.

The government, the police
and private businesses all need

to get involved in the
war against gun crime, he
argued.

“If Parliament could have
weapons screening and these
people are honourable mem-
bers, so should the courts in
our country, and so should the
nightclubs,” Mr Moss said.

“I think that is something
we want to look at in con-
junction with trying to get
these guns off the streets.”

Shootings, such as the mur-
der of Mr McPhee on Mon-
day, not only represent a
needless loss of life, but spread
fear of crime in the communi-
ty, Mr Moss maintains.

“The fear of crime is often
worse than the crime itself,”
he said.

“Tt instills a fear of life, and
therefore people are not pre-
pared to risk going outside to
clubs for their own safety, so
the economy is suffering as
well.

“We have to look at it and
deal with it in a way that
involves many people, includ-
ing the private sector and ordi-
nary citizens.”

“They (the government)
ought to involve the private
sector in the reduction of
crime, but I think they are not
interested, really they think
they can do it by themselves,
which is folly.”

Another murder at a night-
club occurred on August 31,
when 23-year-old mechanic
Jason Jackson of Newbold
Street, Nassau, was fatally
stabbed outside Cocktails and
Dreams in Cable Beach when
an altercation inside the club
escalated in the car park.

Amnesty ‘concern’ for the safety
of Detention Centre detainees



FROM page one

country's immigration detention centre are
being ill-treated. Amnesty International is con-
cerned for their safety,” said a letter issued by
the group's International Secretariat. "The
detainees claimed that all those held at the

Former minister turned
DATE MRT tS
Stroke in the pulpit

FROM page one

his heart rate had slowed.

He was attended by neurologist Charles
Rahming and cardiologist Conville Brown.
He was fitted with a pacemaker and admit-
ted to the Intensive Care Unit where Mrs
Nottage said he is resting comfortably.

Mr Nottage’s brother Dr Bernard Not-
tage, PLP MP for Grants and Bain Town,
said his brother did not collapse, lose con-
sciousness or the ability to speak, and was
able to recognise family members at his side
on Sunday.

Although he has physical weakness in his
left arm, it appears Mr Nottage has not suf-
fered any brain damage.

Dr Nottage said: “This is a matter which
has to be monitored very closely because it
can change from hour to hour.

“Tt is at a very early stage at the moment
so the family is understandably concerned,
and the family will be concerned until we
have evidence that he is getting over it.”

Mr Nottage, of Sandford Drive, New
Providence, has never suffered a stroke
before and his brother said he had recently
been in good health.

The devoted Christian abandoned his 20-
year political career in 1992 when he lost
the St Agnes constituency seat to FNM can-
didate Charles “Chuck” Virgill.

Rather than returning to the politics that
consumed him as a colourful and contro-
versial politician, the former Cabinet min-
ister in Sir Lyden Pindling’s PLP adminis-
tration went from saving the nation to saving
souls.

Mr Nottage was ordained as a minister at
Bethel Baptist Church, “the mother church
of Baptists,” in Meeting Street in May 2003,
and has been active in the parish ever since.

Centre, including women and children, are
marched outside three times a day in order to
be counted by heavily armed guards who
pushed them with the butts of their guns. There
were also claims of severe problems with over-
crowding with some detainees forced to sleep
on concrete floors.

"The Bahamian authorities have publicly
denied the abuses, but said they would inves-
tigate. Amnesty International, however, is con-
cerned that any investigation would be con-
ducted internally without independent over-
sight,” said the letter which was sent to various
Cabinet ministers as well as the media.

Now the human rights watchdog group is
requesting concerned persons to ask govern-
ment for an immediate and thorough investi-
gation into these claims; independent moni-
toring of the centre by human rights groups;
proper medical treatment to injured detainees;
effective and fair refugee determination for
asylum seekers; and detention of asylum-seek-
ers as a last resort.

The group also said over the years there
have been allegations that asylum seekers were
not granted access to “fair and effective"
refugee determination procedures, and claims
of poor conditions, beatings and overcrowding.

The plea — issued over the weekend —
comes after a series of articles published in
this newspaper chronicled several claims from
detainees, ranging from severe beatings by
guards, insufficient food, lack of toilet and
bathing facilities.

A statement by the Department of Immi-
gration, released the day after the claims first
broke, maintained that detainees are fed “three
times daily” and the “quantity of meals is
always adequate.”

Officials also denied, after swift internal
investigations into the claims, that any physical
abuse occurred at the site.

However, last Monday Immigration Direc-
tor Jack Thompson, and Defence Force Com-
modore Clifford Scavella, accompanied by rep-
resentatives from the department of social ser-
vices, the clergy, and psychologist Dr David
Allen toured the holding facility.

Reports were submitted to the Department
following this tour.

Yesterday, Mr Thompson who was out of
the country at the time, said he had reviewed
one report but would withhold any comment
on the contents until he was able to go over a
second document in the next few days. He
promised an update later this week.

Detainees claimed they saw minor improve-
ments after their claims went public, includ-
ing larger food portions.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



ai

Celtics without
9 players
for Miami

@ BASKETBALL
WALTHAM, Mass. :
Associated Press i



THE BOSTON Celtics’

biggest opponent right now is

the training room.

The Celtics will not dress
five players when they play at }
the Miami Heat on Wednes- :

day night.

Coach Doc Rivers on Mon- }
day ruled out Rajon Rondo :
and Glen "Big Baby’ Davis }
after both sprained their right }
ankles over the weekend. i
Rondo was hurt in Friday’s }
105-94 win over Cleveland
and Davis in Sunday’s 86-79 }

loss to Orlando.

They join superstar Kevin
Garnett, Brian Scalabrine and }
Tony Allen on the sidelines. }
Garnett has a sprained right }
knee and Allen has an injured
left thumb. Scalabrine has }

post-concussion syndrome.

Rivers said he expects Davis }
and Rondo to miss at least the }

next two games. After Miami,

Boston hosts Memphis on Fri-
day and plays at Milwaukee

on Sunday.

“Kevin will be out longer

than the Milwaukee game,”

Rivers said. “I’m pretty sure of i

that. I would say Kevin,

maybe at the end of the fol-

lowing week at the earliest.”

Rivers also said he’ll limit
the time for Paul Pierce and }
Ray Allen, who each played :

45 minutes on Sunday.

“Somebody else has to step }
up and the challenge for me is }
not doing what I did (Sunday) :
with Paul and Ray, that can’t }
happen,” Rivers said. “Obvi- }
ously, that was a different cir- 3
cumstance because the }
injuries happened during the }
game or right before the }
game. It’s tough to plan for }
but I still want to keep their }
minutes down, even in atime }
of crisis | want to keep their }
minutes down. We just have }

to find a way to win games.”

Rodriguez has
hip surgery

@ BASEBALL
TAMPA, Fla.

Associated Press

YANKEES third baseman i
Alex Rodriguez had arthro- ;
scopic surgery Monday to }
repair a torn labrum in his right }
hip, and his projected timetable
for recovery remained six to }

nine weeks.

Dr. Marc Philippon per-
formed the 1-hour, 20-minute
procedure at Vail Valley :

Surgery Center in Colorado.

“The surgery went exactly
as we planned,” Philippon said
during a conference call. “No

surprises.”

Other options considered :
were a more aggressive surgery }
that would have sidelined
Rodriguez up to four months }
and a conservative approach }
that would have included rest :

and treatment.

“There is no doubt in our }
minds that this was the best :
option,” Philippon said. “This :
was the best option for Alex }

and the Yankees.”

General manager Brian
Cashman expects the three- ;
time AL MVP back on the :

field “sometime in May.”

Rodriguez will need a more :
extensive operation after the :
season, and Philippon said :
Rodriguez will “absolutely” be i
ready for spring training in ;
2010. Rodriguez was expected }
to be released from the hospi- :
tal later Monday and to start :
his rehab. He was to perform :
range of motion drills and ride

a stationary bike.

“Alex is doing well,” Philip-
pon said. “Over the next few :
days, until Friday, we will work i
on his range of motion. Hope- }
fully by Friday or Sunday, we }
will starting working on his
muscle memory and adding }
range of motion that involves }
the rotation of a batter when :

he swings.”

Philippon said he found a }
small impingement and the lin- }
ing of a cyst that wasremoved }
last week. The labrum was :

repaired.

Toronto manager Cito Gas-
ton said the Yankees can over- }
come the loss of Rodriguez to }

start the regualar season.



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JAMES Oh eines ae iis eighth ee monn ae Rene ere oO) cern in aaa Beach AE Fla, Friday, March 6, 2009.

VE. Yang vets breakthrou

win at



Y.E. YANG, of South Korea, kisses the trophy after winning the
Honda Classic golf tournament in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Sun-
day, March 8, 2009. Yang shot a final round of 2-under 68 to win

with a score of 9-under par.

Nowitzki, Mavs head West
heeding to get on a roll

@ BASKETBALL
DALLAS
Associated Press

THE Dallas Mavericks are
heading West this week for a
conference tournament of
sorts.

The Mavs play their next
four games on the road
against Western Conference
foes — two against teams
ahead of them in the stand-
ings and two against teams
behind them.

Dallas goes into this stretch
holding the eighth and final
playoff spot. By the time Dirk
Nowitzki and the guys return
home, they could be all the
way up to the third or fourth
seed (and thinking about
home-court advantage in the
first round) or down to No. 9
(and thinking about the lot-
tery).

Considering how things
have gone this season, Now-
itzki said Monday he has no
idea what to expect.

“That’s I guess kind of the
fun part about it,” he said.
“These last 19 games, we’re
going to let it all hang out and
see where it takes us. That’s
the only way we can approach
it. ... It’s been weird, but, hey,
if you look at the other teams,
it’s not only us that’s been
struggling. If we’ve been up
and down and we’re still (2



Biante

1/2) games out of third, then
what does that say about the
whole rest of the conference?”

The Mavericks’ maddening
season went from a 2-7 start to
a 10-1 surge. New coach Rick
Carlisle scrapped the Prince-
ton-style motion offense he
was putting in and eventually
gave Jason Kidd total control
of the offense. Things were
going pretty well until a recent
stretch in which they were
crushed by a San Antonio
team missing Tim Duncan and
Manu Ginobili, then a week
later were crushed by an
Oklahoma City team missing
its two leading scorers,
prompting team owner Mark
Cuban to threaten everyone’s
roster spot.

GOLF
PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla.
Associated Press

Y.E. Yang said winning the Honda Classic is
more significant to him than beating Tiger Woods
three years ago.

His reward? Facing Woods again.

Staying alone in the lead the whole way Sunday,
Yang shot a 2-under 68 to finish one shot ahead of
John Rollins and pick up his first PGA Tour vic-
tory.

The Korean took command with three straight
birdies on the front side and wouldn’t fold, two-
putting from 50 feet on the finishing hole for a
winning par. With the win — his eighth worldwide
— he picked up a two-year exemption and a
check for $1,008,000, qualified for this week’s
CA Championship at Doral, plus earned an invi-
tation to next month’s Masters.

Woods will be at both venues.

“To be able to face Tiger again and again, it’s
an honor for me,” said Yang, who won the 2006
HSBC Champions in Shanghai, beating a field
headlined by Woods.

Yang played last year’s final round at PGA
National by himself, going off first and needing
only 1 hour, 53 minutes to finish.

He was there until the very end this time,
pumping his fists in the air, embracing his agent
and translator Michael Yim, and celebrating with
fans after closing out the victory. He finished at 9-
under 271.

“Pure emotion,” said Yang, who canceled plans
to fly to Puerto Rico to play there this week. “I
just felt all the fans were supporting me. I just
wanted to thank them.”

Rollins made birdie at the par-5 18th to get
within two, and Yang missed a 10-footer for par
on 17 to lose half his lead.

He held on, though: Yang cringed when his
third shot sailed off target at the finishing hole, but
coolly two-putted for the win.

“From 50 feet, it’s not easy to do that to win
your first golf tournament,” Rollins said. “My
hat’s off to him.”

Rollins (67) was alone in second and he, like

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JEFF Overton reacts after putting on the 16th
hole during the final round of the Honda Classic
golf tournament.

Yang, qualified for the CA Championship by
moving into the top 10 in the FedEx Cup stand-
ings. Ben Crane (68) was third after finishing 6
under and Jeff Klauk (71, with 17 pars and one
bogey) was alone in fourth, another shot back.

“T have no complaints,” Rollins said. “I did all
Ican do. Shot 3 under on championship Sunday
and came up short.”

He was one of the few guys who made a lasting
charge at Yang.

Robert Allenby started with two birdies in his
first three holes, but struggled from there and
finished 4 under, tied for fifth with Will MacKen-
zie (70), Fredrik Jacobson (70) and Scott Piercy
(65).

Just like last year, when he was in contention
during the Honda’s final round before chipping
onto a waterside pile of rocks and tossing his ball
into the drink, Mark Calcavecchia’s chances were
all wet again. The two-time Honda winner’s undo-
ing came at the 11th, when he hit into a greenside
hazard. He rolled up his right pant leg, hacked the
ball out of some muck and salvaged a bogey, but
got no closer and shot 73.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Rattlers honoured for Hugh Campbell performance

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THEY didn’t win the presti-
gious Hugh Campbell Basket-
ball Classic, but the CI Gibson
Rattlers senior boys basketball
team was recognised for its run-
ners-up position in the tourna-
ment held last month.

Speaking at the 60th Com-
monwealth Day assembly yes-
terday in the CI Gibson Gym-
nasium, Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister said the Rattlers’ sec-
ond place finish behind Grand
Bahama’s Tabernacle Acade-
my Falcons is a prime example
of what happens in the Com-
monwealth of Nations.

Also in attendance was Earl
Deveaux, the Minister of Envi-
ronment.

“There’s something about the
pride in belonging to some-
thing,” Bannister said. “You
take pride in being a Rattler and
you should let everybody know
that.”

When Bannister asked how
many people watched the Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic, the
gym went wild. When he asked
how many watched the Rattlers
play in the final, the students
cheered even louder.

On Commonwealth Day,
Bannister said it was so impor-
tant for all of us to learn the
importance of belonging to

something that we all can appre-
ciate.

Last year, Bannister said the
Bahamas sent a team to com-
pete in the Commonwealth
Youth Championships in India
where they participated in swim-
ming, track and field and tennis.

However, the Bahamas didn’t
participate in basketball.

Also last year, the Bahamas
travelled to St. Kitts to compete
in the Carifta Games. St. Kitts,
like India, are a part of the 53-
membership of the Common-
wealth.

Bannister said coach Kevin
‘KJ? Johnson and the members
of his Rattlers’ basketball team
should be commended for get-
ting into the final.

He compared the Common-
wealth nation to the Rattlers
basketball team.

“They performed so well in
so many areas,” said Bannister,
who left five important points
for CI Gibson to fashion them-
selves after in their quest to
remain not just a sporting pow-
er, but a highly respected edu-
cational institution.

1) COMMITMENT

“Your basketball team would
not have made the finals if they
didn’t come to practice, if they
didn’t do what coach KJ said
and if they didn’t follow the
rules,” Bannister said. “It took
commitment to do that.”

2) COMMUNICATE

“When the guard comes
down the court, you see him put
his hand up or you see him do
certain things and you see guys
go into position,” Bannister
said. “They might be talking at
that time, but they are commu-
nicating in a certain way.”

3) DEPENDABILITY

“On the basketball court, if
you are on a fast break and you
throw the ball down court, you
have to know that the center or
forward is going to catch it and
throw it in the rim,” Bannister
said.

4) DISCIPLINE

“Tf you don’t want to learn,
you get up and leave. I still see
friends you.”

5) WORKING TOGETHER

“No basketball team can suc-
ceed unless you work togeth-
er,” Bannister said. “The same
thing happens in your school.
You have to work together.”

Bannister’s message certainly
didn’t go on deaf ears.

“Tt was very encouraging to
hear him talk about our poten-
tial here and getting the most
out of our athletes,” said KJ
Johnson, whose Rattlers will be
trying to redeem themselves in
the GSSSA playoffs.

Rattlers’ starting point guard
Junior Dennis said as a senior,
he wanted to leave CI Gibson

Falcons pay courtesy call on the president and chairman of PGL

ON Thursday, 5th March 2009, Principal
and Coach Norris Bain along with the
Tabernacle Falcons boy’s basketball team,
paid a courtesy call on the newly appointed
President for Port Group Limited (PGL)
and The Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Limited (GBPA) Mr Tan Rolle and PGL
Chairman, Mr Hannes Babak.

Congratulating the group on their recent
victory at the annual Hugh Campbell Bas-
ketball Tournament, Mr Rolle and Mr
Babak encouraged the young men to
remain focused on their education and to
pursue excellence in all of their undertak-

ings.

Mr Rolle took the opportunity to share
with coach Bain and his students, how his
father instilled in him the importance of
education at a very early age. While Mr
Babak shared with the students, that their
education will allow them to travel the

school.

world and experience different cultures.

Mr Rolle also gave the group a synopsis
of GBPA’s plans for the education sector of
Grand Bahama, including the highest
achiever scholarship award that will be giv-
en to the top achieving student at each high

Principal and Head Coach of the Falcons

expressed his thanks for the opportunity to
meet with the newly appointed leaders of
the Port. ‘It is important that my students
hear the same morals and ideal that we
impart to them on a daily basis, being pre-
sented to them by the new President and

Chairman of the Port Authority,” said

Bain.

visit.

Mr Babak and Mr Rolle both presented
congratulatory gifts to each member of the
Falcons team and the group was treated to
refreshments prepared especially for their

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MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture (third from left) and Minister of Environment Earl Deveaux
pose with members of the Cl Gibson Rattlers Seior Boys basketball team at their Commonwealth day

assembly yesterday.

with the Hugh Campbell title
in Johnson’s hands.

But he noted that it was a dis-
appointing finish. He noted that
Bannister’s works were an
encouragement to them as they
try to put the defeat behind
them.

“Tt was a good inspiration,
telling us never to give up, keep
chasing our dream and no mat-
ter what your goal is in life, even
if you don’t make it to college,
you. can take up something like a
trade to keep you motivated,”
Dennis said.

“We were a little depressed
because we worked so hard to
win the championship. But we

didn’t win it. We fell short.”

The Rattlers also lost out in
the GSSSA track and field
championships last week, finish-
ing third behind the defending
champions CR Walker Knights
and the CV Bethel Stingrays.

Track coach Kenton Burrows
said Bannister’s comments were
not just an inspiration for the
basketball team, but also to
their track team.

“It was excellent, especially
making reference to the bas-
ketball team and their accom-
plishment,” Burrows said.
“When you put in the time and
effort, it will pay off in the end.”

Ryan Ingraham, a basketball

player who surpassed the qual-
ifying standard of 6-feet, 4-inch-
es in the under-17 boys high
jump when he cleared 6-4 1/2
at the GSSSA meet last week,
said he was pleased that Ban-
nister imparted the comments
to them.

And Katrina Seymour, who
got second in the 100 and won
both the 200 and 400 in the
intermediate girls division, said
she was very pleased with her
performance, despite the fact
that she was feeling sick.

As for Bannister’s comments,
Seymour said if there was any-
thing she learnt, it was about
“having pride in yourself.”

Phil Smith Primary Schools Basketball
Classic set to begin this weekend

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH so much emphasis
being placed on the high
schools, coach Kevin ‘KJ’ John-
son has decided to put some of
the spotlight on the primary
schools.

Starting this weekend and
running through March 20,
Johnson’s Providence Basket-
ball Club will host the first Phil
Smith Primary Schools Basket-
ball Classic at the CI Gibson
Gymnasium.

Already a total of 20 private
and 17 public schools have
signed up to participate in the
double elimination tournament
that will honour the top three
finishers.

“T feel that in order for us to
reach our full potential, we need
to start from the youth in the
primary schools,” Johnson said.
“T know that we have a lot of
talent down, but we just need
to recognise them.

“The coaches have been
doing a good job in getting

them prepared for the high
school, so this is a good way for
us to focus on what they are
doing.”

Entered from the private
schools are Temple Christian,
Teleos Christian, Queen’s Col-
lege, St. Francis/Joseph, St.
Thomas More, Nassau Christian
Academy, Galilee Academy, St.
John’s, St. Anne’s, Westminis-
ter, Jordan Prince William,
Mount Carmel, Xavier, Zion
Academy, Our Lady’s, Blair-
wood Academy, Freedom
Academy, St. Bede’s, Kingsway
and Church of God.

And from the government
schools, the teams entered are
Albury Sayles, CW Sawyer,
Carlton Francis, Carmichael,
Centreville, Cleveland Eneas,
Columbus, Naomi Blatch, Clar-
idge, Garvin Tynes, Palmdale,
Ridgeland, Sandilands, Stephen
Dillet, Uriah, Woodcock and
Yellow Elder Primary.

When asked about the inter-
est in the tournament, Johnson
said the numbers were right
around what he had anticipated.

“T wasn’t surprised because
youngsters like that love to play

basketball, so I wouldn’t be sur-
prised if some of the other
schools call to get in,” Johnson
said. “But it’s kind of late. They
will probably have to wait until
next year.”

The teams will be split up in
groups of nine in four different
pools. Similar to the Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic,
they will play each other.

They will then qualify to play
in the “sweet 16,” the elite eight,
final four and then the cham-
pionship game.

Trophies and medals will be
presented to the champions,
runners-up and third place fin-
ishers, the most valuable player
and the 10 All-Tournament
recipients.

The action will get started on
Saturday at 9 am and again on
Sunday at about 1 pm. Next
Monday and throughout the
week, the games will get started
at 3:30 pm.

“We want to encourage the
youngsters to work hard
because this is going to be an
exciting tournament for them
to participate in,” Johnson said.

Competition rises in New
Providence cycling event

ON Saturday, the New Proy-
idence Amateur Cycling Asso-
ciation continued with its road
race events and the excitement
as well as competition was hot.

There are now a few elite
junior cyclists who have joined
the ranks of the adults, thus
causing the race to be even
more competitive and this was
evident on Saturday past.

Thus we now see the level of
cycling races here in country/Nas-
sau have become very, very, very
competitive and along with the
juniors we have a group of senior
master cyclists who are showing
themselves to be contenders in
any of the road races.

Between the elite juniors,
elite seniors, the open women
and the elite men local rid-
ing/bicycle races are extremely
competitive.

On Saturday, cycling action
took place in western end/por-
tion of the island of New Prov-

42 miles road race
7 Laps

1st Lee Farmer
Time 1 hr 46mins .27sec

2nd Tracey Sweeting
Time 1 hr 48mins .16sec
3rd Rolf Fasth

Time 1 hr 48mins.17sec

Ath Jamie Nottage
Time 1 hr 48mins.59sec

5th Jay Major
Time 1 hr 50mins.32

6th Anthony Colebrook
Time ihr 50 mins 33sec

idence in the area of Jaws
Beach, Clifton Pier and South
Ocean, covering a 6 mile cir-
cuit.

The juniors started first cov-
ering two laps of this 6 miles
course. The juniors boys/girls
ranging from 10-14 years rode
like professional cyclists.

The pace was between 18-
21 miles per hour throughout
the race, but it all came to
down to a mass sprint out.

The conclusion saw Raheem
Colebrook winning the sprint
and the race, second was his
team-mate from Team War-
riors Justin Simmons, followed
by Antinece Simmons, Decoda
Johnson, Carlano Bain and
Abigail Minns.

The adults or the “Big Boys”
started shortly after and the
action continued with the top
elite local cyclists burning up
the street in western area of
New Providence.

7th Brad Henney
Time ihr 50 mins 33sec.99

8th Turbo

Time ihr 50 mins.35sec

9th Mark Davis
Time ihr 54 mins .33sec

10th Shawn Fox
11th Wayne Price
12th Edmund Butler
13th Tony Mackey

Tracey ‘Show-Time’ Sweet-
ing started the action break-
ing away for two laps, but was
brought back by the Pelton
group of cyclists. But shortly
after, Lee ‘the Jet’ Farmer
made his move to close the
gap.

The course was a huge
increase in speed within the
Pelton around 25-27 mph.

After chasing Farmer for a
few laps, Rolf Fasth and
Tracey Sweeting established a
gap on the remainder of
cyclists, which created a split in
the whole race.

Farmer went on to win the
race. Fasth and Sweeting end-
ed up in a sprint with Sweeting
edging out Rolf.

Here’s a look at the results
of the race:

New Providence Amateur
Cycling Association’s Stage
One Road Cycling Clash on
Saturday:

JUNIORS
Overall Results
2Laps 6mls_ route

ist Raheem Colebrook
2nd Justin Simmons
3rd Antinece Simmons
Ath Decoda Johnson
5th Carlano Bain

6th Abigail Minns

Jr Boys

Jr Girls

ist Raheem Colebrook
ist Antinece Simmons
2nd Justin Simmons
2nd Abagail Minns
3rd Decoda Johnson
Ath Carlano Bain

5th Abigail Minns


CN WEEE

7 |



m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH the championship
finals in the Government
Secondary School Sports
Association’s junior division
all set, each of the top seeds
advanced as expected, setting
the stage for a pair of highly
anticipated series.

JUNIOR GIRLS
#1 H.0 NASH LIONS - 48
#4 S.C MCPHERSON SHARKS - 14

¢ The division’s top seed led
wire to wire and added anoth-
er effortless win to their perfect
season thus far.

The Lions gave up just a sin-
gle field goal in the opening
half and led 21-5 at half-time.

H.O Nash opened the sec-
ond half connecting early and
often from beyond the arch as
the lead ballooned to as much
as 37.

The Sharks struggled to con-
sistently advance the ball
beyond half court in the face of
the Lions airtight trap which
forced a series of turnovers.

H.O Nash’s high powered
offense placed three players in
double figures.

Lakishna Munroe and
Randya Kemp led all scorers
with 15 points apiece while
Regine Neely added 10.

Jonethra Kelly scored all but
two of the Sharks’ points, fin-
ishing with 12.

#2 T.A THOMPSON SCORPIONS - 33
#3 A.F ADDERLEY TIGERS - 24

¢ The Scorpions overcame a
double figure deficit at half-
time with a concentrated fast-
break effort in a high scoring
second half.

The Tigers led 16-6 at inter-
mission but went scoreless over
the first seven minutes of the
second half as the Scorpions
raced out to easy baskets.

The Scorpions opened the
half on a 11-0 run capped by
Paula Green’s lay-up which
gave her team their first lead of
the game, 17-16 with 12:41
remaining.

Green also gave the Scorpi-
ons their largest lead of the
game, 29-20 with just under
five minutes remaining.

Green finished with 16
points, 12 of which came in the
in the second half, while
Shanae Armbrister and Jaynell

Top seeds ease to wins, Scorpions
place two teams in championships

Cox added six points apiece.

JUNIOR BOYS
#1 T.A THOMPSON SCORPIONS - 58
#4 LW YOUNG GOLDEN EAGLES - 26

¢ The Scorpions landed
their second team in the
championship final when the
junior boys breezed by the
fourth seeded Golden Eagles.

The Scorpions led 18-7
after the first quarter and the
route was on.

They continued to build
upon the advantage reaching
a 20 point lead on a lay-up
by Angelo Lockhart midway
through the third quarter.

T.A Thompson led 45-24
after the third quarter and
reached their largest lead of
the game on a lay-up by
Mavin Saunders late in the
fourth.

Saunders led all scorers
with 21 points, while Lock-
hart added 17.

Roosevelt Whylly and Jer-
maine Sturrup added seven
points apiece. =

#2 D.W DAVIS PITBULLS - 49
#3 A.F ADDERLEY TIGERS - 43

¢ The Tigers were on the
brink of disrupting the highly
anticipated 1-2 matchup
between the Pitbulls and Scor-
pions, but faltered down the
stretch in the fourth quarter
unable to keep pace with the
Pitbulls.

The Tigers opened the
game ona 7-0 run, led 13-4 at
the end of the first quarter
and 23-16 at the half.

The second half was a com-
plete turnaround with a full-
court trap which continuously
harassed the Tigers’ ballhan-
dlers and produced a series of
turnovers.

Alcott Fox gave the Pitbulls
their first lead of the game on
a three point play which gave
them a 31-30 advantage.

Fox scored with less than 20
seconds remaining in the
quarter to give his team a 36-
34 lead heading into the
fourth.

The Tigers never came
within four points in the final
quarter as the Pitbulls
outscored them 13-9.

Fox led all scorers with 19
points while Kenrico Lockhart
led the Tigers with 13.

Both championship series
will begin tomorrow at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

ru a = ag

H.O Nash’s Randya Kemp pulls up for a jumpshot in the Lions’ 48-14 win over the S.C McPherson Sharks
yesterday at the D.W Davis Gymnasium. With the win the Lions advanced to the championship round where
they will face the T.A Thompson Scorpions.

Lt McPherson Sharks players

Bahamas lose in Davis Cup tie

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas suffered a 4-1 loss to
Paraguay in the first round of the men’s
American Zone II Davis Cup tie and will
now have to host Guatemala in a must-win
situation in the second round in July.

Trailing 2-1 going into Sunday’s final day
of competition at the Yacht y Golf Club in
Paraguayo, Lambare, the Bahamas dropped
the two reverse singles to Paraguay to finish
with a 4-1 decision.

Paraguay wrapped up the tie as Ramon
Delgado knocked off Grand Bahamian
Devin Mullings 6-1, 7-6 (3), 6-1 in the battle
of the top seeds.

And in the final match between the num-
ber two seeds, Timothy Neilly was beaten 6-
4, 6-1 by Diego Galeano.

The Bahamas’ only victory came on Fri-
day’s first day when Mullings pulled off a 4-
6, 7-5, 4-1 retired win over Galeano. In the
first match, Delgado defeated Neilly 6-1,
6-4, 6-2.

And in the pivotal doubles that was
played on Saturday, Delgado and Galeano
teamed up for a 6-1, 6-0, 6-2 victory over
Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle.

Team captain John Farrington and the
players were en route from Paraguay yes-

terday to the United States where they
reside and were unavailable for comments.

But Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association’s
president Wesley Rolle said he felt the team
performed as best as they could under the
circumstances.

“T will be getting a report from John as
soon as he’s settled in,” Rolle said. “So we
have to wait to find out exactly what hap-
pened, especially in the doubles.

“We lost the doubles and that put us in a
hole. But we now have to regroup and get
ready for Guatemala.”

As a result of losing the tie, the Bahamas
will now host Guatemala in the second
round over the Independence holiday week-
end, July 10-12 at the National Tennis Cen-
ter.

Rolle said the association intended to
work on getting the players into a training
camp prior to the tie to make sure that they
were ready for the competition.

Additionally, Rolle said they could final-
ly see the inclusion of Jamaal Adderley,
who was not available to travel to Paraguay
because of his school commitments at the
University of South Florida.

With the tie being home, Rolle said the
association would also be looking at the
possibility of bringing veteran touring pro
Mark Knowles to play in the doubles.

As the host, Rolle said they would be
getting in touch with corporate Bahamas

———_- —— ——_—_——_—

Devin Mullings

to lend their financial support over the next
few months to ensure that the tie would be
another successful one here.

The Bahamas need to be successful in the
tie against Guatemala in order to avoid being
relegated to zone III next year. A win by
either team will keep them into zone II.

“We don’t want to be relegated to zone III
again. So we will do all we can to make sure
that we stay in zone I,” Rolle said. “It’s
going to be important for us to pull it off.”

The Bahamas has never played
Guatemala in Davis Cup history.



scramble for a loose ball dur-
ing the second half of the GSS-
SA Junior Girls Semifinals.

TENNIS

BOURNE/ATKINSON
RESULTS

THE finals of the Dr. Eric
Bourne-Ron Atkinson Open
Tennis Tournament was com-
pleted on Sunday at the Gym
Tennis Club.

* The following are the
results of the finals played:

Men’s open singles — Rob-
bie Isaacs def. Shaka Symon-
ette 6-3, 6-2.

Men’s 45 singles —Tony
Fisher def. Calvin Farquharson
Men’s 55 sinlges — Gabby
Sastre def. Tim Dames 6-1, 6-

2

Men’s 65 singles - Gabby
Sastre def. Ralph Barnet 6-0,
6-3.

Ladies’ singles — Paula
Whitfield def. Alicia Butler 6-
0, 6-1.

Men’s open doubles — Rob-
bie Isaacs/Jadrian turnquest
def. Keweku/Shaka Symonette
6-3, 5-7, 7-6.

Men’s 45 doubles — Mike
Isaacs/Don Cooke def. Terry
North/Mickey Williams 6-3, 6-
|

“Mixed doubles — Jody
Turnquest/Erin Strachan def.
Scott Alleyne/Dionne Butler.

P A



ALL

FREEDOM FARM
RESULTS

Here’s a look at the results
posted in the Freedom Farm
Baseball League over the
weekend at the park in
Yamacraw:

T-Ball Division

Coco Plums def. Sea
Grapes 7-1; Guineps def.
Dillies 11-1.

Coach Pitch

Bees def. Green Turtles 14-
7; Mosquitoes def. Wasps 9-2;
Boas def. Bees 8-5; Sand Flies
def. Green Turtles 16-4; Boas
def. Wasps 12-10; Barracudas
and Dolphins played to 6-6;
Turbots def. Red Snappers 5-
1; Octopus def. Eels 24-0;
Barracudas def. Eels 15-13.

11-12 Division

Wild Dogs def. Conchs 7-6;
Blue Marlins def. White
Crowns 14-0; Green Parrots
def. Conchs 7-0; Nassau
Groupers def. White Crowns
10-0; Wild Dogs def. Blue
Marlins 9-7.

13-15 Division

Silver Jacks def. Sharks 13-
4: Stingrays def. Raccoons
4-0; Potcakes def. Sharks 21-
6; Stingrays def. Owlz 4-3.

16-18 Division
Lucayans def. Tainos 13-3;
Arawaks def. Caribs 14-3.


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Gladstone Thurston/BIS

BENJAMIN PRATT, senior manager of the Andros Tourist Office, welcomes participants in the

People-to-People programme.

‘People-to-People’ programme
aids tourism in North Andros

m By GLADSTONE
THURSTON
Bahamas Information
Service

A VIBRANT “People-to-Peo-
ple” programme is sustaining
tourism in North Andros.

Sponsored by the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation, it connects
visitors with volunteer Bahamian
hosts throughout the islands.

The programme is designed to
give visitors a genuine taste of
Bahamian hospitality and culture
in an informal, personal way. Vis-
itors and Bahamians crammed the
Coconut Farms Resort in North
Andros on Friday to celebrate
People-to-People. North Andros
coconut craft designer Perky
Lightbourne, artist Ernest Pratt
and Bahamian preserves creator
Candice Turnquest were featured.

“People-to-People is essential
to us moving forward,” said Ben-
jamin Pratt, senior manager of the
Andros Tourist Office.

“Tt provides a human element to
what we want to do in terms of
building a tourism industry in
North Andros. The local people
are very enthusiastic about it,” he
said.

The global economic recession
has not impacted North Andros
as significantly as New Providence
and Grand Bahama, where hun-
dreds of workers lost their jobs.

“The interesting thing about

Coli

Andros is that for the type tourist
we have visiting us, they are almost
recession-proof,” said Mr Pratt.

“These are wealthy persons who
enjoy fly-fishing, scuba diving and
snorkelling. We receive thousands
of them every year. We do not see
any significant reduction in those
numbers.”

And, in an effort to attract more
domestic tourists, plans are under-
way to convert the regatta site at
Morgan’s Bluff into a welcome
centre and marketplace. From
there, artisans, farmers, fishermen
and other providers of goods and
services may ply their wares to
passengers arriving and leaving on
the nearby ferry service.

“Morgan’s Bluff would serve as
a centre at which customers and
providers of goods and services
would converge to do business,
making it a one-stop-shop,” said
Mr Pratt.

Deanne Gibson, assistant man-
ager of the People-to-People
department in the Ministry of
Tourism, thanked winter residents
for promoting the North Andros
destination. She encouraged them
to become official members of
People-to-People so they can share
with others the beauty of the
island. The programme can be
accessed through bahamas.com
and volunteers are featured on
YouTube. In New Providence,
there are up to ten requests each
day, she said.



“People-to-People experiences i
last a lifetime,” said Ms Gibson, }
whose parents helped found the :
programme. “They are visitors }

today, but friends for life.”

North Andros business woman

Daisy Bowleg immediately volun-
teered. “This is something I would
like to be a part of,” she said. “This
is great news for tourism here. I
believe that as we learn more
about People-to-People, more
North Androsians would sign up.”

Chief Councillor for the island
Brian Cleare said that “when it
comes to exhibiting true, quality
hospitality, Andros, in general, is
among the best. “People-to-People
is an excellent initiative. We wel-
come our fellow Bahamians into
our homes when they come over
for the various festivals, so wel-
coming guests from around the
world is no problem for us.”

Responding to the concerns of
guests, the North Andros District
Council will undertake a compre-
hensive clean-up of North Andros
beaches. As North Andros bor-
ders on a major shipping lane, rub-
bish from illegal dumping washes
up on the shores.

“That creates a huge problem
for us in terms of sustaining clean
beaches,” he said.

“Presently local government
does not have sufficient resources.
But we will do the best that we
can to maintain a clean, healthy
environment.”

nalmperial

To Our Valued Clients

Please note that all offices of
Colinalmperial in Nassau
will OPEN at 12.30pm on
Wednesday 11 March 2009
to allow for the company’s
Annual General Meeting &
Star Employee Awards

Breakfast.

We apologize for any
inconvenience caused.

Colinalmperial offers convenient Saturday payment
facilities at our Collins Avenue branch.
$:30am-12:30pm * Tel 356.8300



Search underway
for the next Miss
Teen Bahamas

THEODORE Elyett’s Miss Teen - ey
Bahamas — World Organisation is a
looking for its next teen beauty

queen.

Under the theme “Twilight Beau-
ties: Get In The Zone,” Theodore
Elyett Productions aims to present a
showcase of beauty, intelligence and

poise.

This year’s theme, the organisa-
tion said in a press release, will
encourage contestants to be the
epitome of “light in the midst of } 7

darkness.”

The pageant organisation said it
wants this concept to be the one the
teen delegates aspire to, so that
upon completing the rigorous two-
month programme they will be “a
shining example for other Bahami-

an teen females to emulate.”

All interested young ladies
between the ages of 14-18 are asked
to apply online at www.missteenba-
hamasworld.com and to attend the first pre-
pageant information session scheduled for
March 14 at the Wyndham Nassau Resort and

Crystal Palace Casino.

This session will provide applicants with
information on the pageant, allowing them to
begin preparations for the 2009 summer pro-
gramme which officially begins in June, the
organisation said. Application deadline is June

19, 2009.

Pageant president and national director
Theodore Sealy said: “With only four years
under our belt, our pageant organisation has
continuously shown progressive growth and
we expect our 2009 production to produce even



Bahama.

greater results. Since 2005, our
organisation has crowned ten teen
beauty queens, of that number six of
our teen ambassadors have brought
back international titles.

“This is a feat that no teen
pageant in the country has ever
accomplished, and we invite a new
group of teen delegates from
throughout the country to sign up
online to be a part of this exciting
teen summer programme.”

The programme, which officially
begins in June, provides contestants
with over two months of education-
al seminars, stage deportment train-
ing, question and answer technique
training, personal grooming, eti-
quette and speech seminars,
community service initiatives and
more.

This year, the organisation wel-
comes on board five Family Island
directors that will serve as scouts
who will provide the pageant with
Family Island delegates from Abaco,
Eleuthera, Harbor Island, Exuma and Grand

The 4th Annual Theodore Elyett’s Miss Teen
Bahamas pageant is slated for August 9, 2009 at
the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino.

The winner of the contest will walk away

with over $7,000 in cash and prizes.

World.

Theodore Elyett’s Miss Teen Bahamas -
World Organisation has been recently selected
as the new franchise holder for one of the
largest international teen pageants — Miss Teen

IIC and COB launch new
programme for businesses

THE Inter-American
Investment Corporation (IIC)
and the College of the
Bahamas together have
launched a new programme to
assist local businesses to access
financing.

The IIC and COB hosted a
cocktail reception to announce
the launch of the FINPYME
programme in the Bahamas.

FINPYME was developed
by the TIC to assist small and
medium-sized businesses to
improve their competitive
skills and facilitate their access
to potential sources of financ-
ing.
At the launch, Scotiabank
Bahamas’ managing director
Barry Malcolm said the pro-
gramme is timely and neces-
sary, especially in the tough
economic times that the coun-
try is currently facing

“Given our current climate,
the opportunity for small busi-
nesses to access resources to
evaluate, understand and
refine their business models is
invaluable,” Mr Malcolm said.

“We launched the $10 mil-
lion SME Fund in 2006 and
closely followed this with the
launch of the Small Business
Unit in 2007. Signing this FIN-
PYME agreement in 2008 is
another major step in the
bank’s 120 year-history of sup-
porting small and medium

a Ebi La

enterprises throughout the
Caribbean.”

Mr Malcolm said the Small
Business Unit has seen a cred-
it count of 1,000 and $25 mil-
lion has flowed through that
unit in just over two years.

Also on hand for the launch
was Richard Bernal, alternate
executive director for the
Caribbean.

Mr Bernal said in these
“interesting” economic times
the FINPYME programme is
urgent and critical, as it will
be assisting a sector which has
a major role to play in main-
taining the economies of those
countries which have imple-
mented the diagnostic tool.

COB’s chairperson for the
School of Business Remelda

yeah

OR Raa
ae el
SANDWICH

ey





Moxey explained that the Col-
lege is partnering with HC and
is obtaining faculty to assist in
the diagnostic review. To that
end, members of the COB fac-
ulty participated in training
sessions in Jamaica, making
them ready to conduct diag-
nostic reviews.

Michael Apel, IIC’s senior
trust fund and technical assis-
tance officer, was also on hand.

Mr Apel said that the pro-
gramme is not one to finance
small and medium enterpris-
es, but rather one to equip
them with skills to review
resources and assess financial
situations themselves.

FINPYME, a Spanish
acronym for Innovative
Financing for Small and Medi-
um Enterprises (SME), fea-
tures a mechanism for evalu-
ating the SMEs, which are
characteristically under-served
by the banking system because
their financial capacity is large-
ly unknown.

The programme’s diagnos-
tic reviews examine what fac-
tors positively or negatively
affect an establishment’s
capacity to create wealth and
employment and manage
them both efficiently.

In December 2008, Scotia-
bank Bahamas signed a part-
nership agreement with IIC.
This will allow Scotiabank to
deepen its relationship with
small and medium-sized enter-
prises in the Bahamas. The
FINPYME — programme
addresses the fundamental
issues that small businesses
face on a day-to-day basis such
as a lack of resources to have
comprehensive reviews done.

The IIC has executed the
FINPYME in six Central
American countries — Costa
Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala,
Honduras, Nicaragua and
Panama.

The programme has also
been implemented in the
Dominican Republic.






ywieyel
American
blasts

anal he
‘complete and
utter nonsense’

* Carrier accuses health
insurer of ‘scapegoating’ it
for customer relations
fallout associated with
premium increases on
health portfolio it acquired

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

British American Financial’s
president yesterday described as
“complete and utter nonsense”
assertions by Generali Worldwide
that his company’s “inappropriate
pricing” was responsible for the
more than 100 per cent increase
in premiums some of the latter’s
individual health policyholders
were now experiencing.

Chester Cooper implied that
Generali could not blame his
company for the major premium
rate increases it was now impos-
ing, a move that has provoked a
negative reaction from policy-
holders, because some two-and-a-
half to three years had passed
since it acquired British American
Financial’s health insurance port-
folio.

Mr Cooper, who is also British
American Financial’s president,
told Tribune Business that “any
assertion” by Generali and its
senior executives “that their rate
increases and their apparent client
relations issues have anything to
do with British American Finan-
cial is complete and utter non-
sense”.

He was responding to an article
published in Tribune Business on
Friday, March 6, in which Tina
Cambridge, Generali World-
wide’s regional director for the
Bahamas, had blamed “inappro-
priate pricing” by British Ameri-
can Financial for the major pre-
mium hikes experienced by indi-
vidual health policyholders it had
inherited from the latter.

Mr Cooper said he was
“frankly, puzzled” as to why
British American Financial’s
name was mentioned, “as the
issue discussed has absolutely
nothing whatsoever to do with
us”.

He accused Generali of
attempting to shift the blame for
the premium increases and sub-
sequent policyholder fallout on
to British American Financial,
using his company as a scapegoat
without justification, given that it
was only now adjusting rates.

Generali Worldwide acquired
British American Financial’s
health insurance book of busi-
ness, and the underwriting risk,
on January 1, 2006, taking over
management control from the
Bahamian-owned insurer in mid-
2006. Apart from the three years
that have elapsed between the
acquisition and current premium
increases, what is also likely to

SEE page 2B



THE TRIBUNE

1siness

TUESDAY,

MARCH 10, 2009

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net

Job application file April groundbreak

is ‘six inches thick’

B® Top construction firm boss unable to provide work for applicants, as

major private sector jobs coming to end with no replacements in sight

(i Albany ‘keeping our heads above water’ with 100 employed, as two
difficult years endured with overheads maintained

WF But 1980's worse for sector, with hope for Abaco project involving

$10m first phase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A leading Bahamian con-
struction firm’s managing direc-
tor yesterday told Tribune Busi-
ness that he had a “file six inch-
es thick” of job applications
from persons he was unable to
provide work for, as he praised
the Albany development for
“keeping our heads above
water” amid the current
“bleak” outlook for the sector.

Richard Wilson, of Cavalier
Construction, said that apart
from the $1.3 billion south-
western New Providence pro-
ject, which is backed by Lyford
Cay-based billionaire Joe Lewis
and golfers Tiger Woods and
Ernie Els, there were few new
construction projects on the
horizon to replace existing ones

Court rejects stay on
receivership end for marina

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Court of Appeal has
rejected an application to stay a
Supreme Court order that
removed a key 116-slip Freeport
marina and associated land
parcels from the receivership
affecting New Hope Holdings,
Tribune Business can reveal.

Appeal Justice Christopher
Blackman dismissed an applica-
tion by attorneys acting for Tom
Gonzalez’s T. G. Investments to
stay the January 27, 2009, order
by Justice Estelle Gray-Evans
that removed the Port Lucaya
Marina, related land assets and
another parcel of land from
receivership, returning them to
New Hope Marina Development.

Appeal Justice Blackman
declined to grant the appeal,
brought by T. G. Investments’
attorneys’, Anthony McKinney
and Arnold Forbes, on the
grounds that they and their client
had not complied with the Court
of Appeal’s rules in seeking leave
to appeal the initial ruling from
the Supreme Court.

Appeal Justice Blackman said
the “exception” argument offered
by Mr McKinney under the Court
of Appeal Act was not “applica-
ble in the circumstances of this
case”.

Asa result, he said: “The appli-
cation for leave for a stay of the
order of Justice Evans, dated Jan-
uary 27, 2009, is declined. It fol-
lows, therefore, that the appeal
itself is a nullity.”

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we’ve kept our overheads,” Mr
Wilson told Tribune Business.
“The Government said to try
and keep people employed, and
we’ve done that. It’s not been
good for the last two years.

“We’re very fortunate that
we've got Albany, and are mov-
ing ahead with Albany. That’s
keeping our heads above water
right now.

“All our other jobs are com-
ing to an end. Bayroc is due to
finish at Easter, and the British
Colonial Hilton renovation is
due to finish at the end of May.”

Mr Wilson said Cavalier was
currently employing 100 work-
ers at Albany, while another 20
were involved with the

Klonaris’ brothers $13 million

SEE page 3B

Tiger Woods

coming to an end.
“To be frank with you, for
the last 18 months to two years,

However, Tribune Business
understands that T. G. Invest-
ments’ main counsel, Maurice
Glinton, is now seeking to appeal
Justice Blackman’s decision to a
full, three-judge sitting of the
Court of Appeal.

This newspaper had previously
reported that Justice Evans had
altered the October 2, 2008, order
that appointed ex-PLP Senator
and MP, accountant Philip Gala-
nis, as the receiver for the assets
owned by Scandinavian investor
Preben Olsen and his New Hope
Holdings company. The receiver-
ship was initiated over a dispute
involving the repayment of loans

SEE page 6B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Make it a reality.



ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



for development’s
$10-$15m phase I

* The Balmoral president says pre-sales
completed for initial start, with title
insurance package set to produce 58%
saving on transaction legal fees

* Economic downturn likely added ‘one
year’ to existing five-six year business plan

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Nassau-based real estate development is planning to
break ground and start construction next month, after suc-
cessfully completing pre-sales for its $10-$15 million first
phase, with the developer having arranged a package deal to
significantly reduce closing and legal costs for buyers.

Jason Kinsale, president of The Balmoral development,
which when completed aims to have generated $100 mil-
lion in real estate sales, said yesterday that despite the slow-
ing Bahamian economy the April groundbreaking would
signal the start of an “aggressive” push to move the project
forward.

The first phase, which Mr Kinsale said would involve $10-
$15 million in investment, involves the construction of 28
town home units known as The Royale and putting in infra-
structure to ultimately support 75 single family lots.

SEE page 3B

$80,000 investment takes chef
from ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ to heaven

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter



A REAL-life Bahamian ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ survivor today opens the
doors to her very own Bistro, after a more than $80,000 outlay and an
extensive D.LY (do it yourself) venture to transform a former bank into
a cozy eatery.

Keshla Smith, 31, was once a chef under the tutelage of renowned
chef and recipient of 14 Michelin stars, Gordon Ramsey, whose shows
Ramsey’s Kitchen Nightmares and Hell’s Kitchen have given him inter-
national acclaim.

“Just the way you see him on TV, that’s just how he is,”
Ramsey.

Now, Ms Smith is set to demonstrate her own culinary prowess
with the opening of DK Clubhouse, a joint venture with her boyfriend.

According to Ms Smith, her fare can be described as a fusion of inter-
national cuisine served in a relaxing atmosphere, and which is designed
wholly by her and constructed by her boyfriend.

The $1,500 per month space in the Meldon Plaza, Mackey Street, was

SEE page 6B

she said of

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Tax reform may be ‘income-ing’

n my last contribution to
this series, I discussed a
sales tax and a value
added tax (VAT) as part
of my ongoing examination of
alternative tax systems. Today, I
continue with an assessment of

income tax. My final article in this
series will offer my thoughts on
the way forward for tax reform,
having explored the most widely-
adopted tax systems.

History of US
Income Tax

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When the Civil War erupted,
the US Congress passed the Rev-
enue Act of 1861 to help finance
the war. The Revenue Act
restored excise taxes and imposed
a tax on personal income. The
Federal income tax was levied at
3 per cent on all income higher
than $800 a year. This tax on per-
sonal income was a new direction
for a Federal tax system based
previously on excise taxes and
customs duties.

One year later (1862), amend-
ments were made to the tax law,
which created a two-tier system.
Income below $10,000 per annum
remained taxed at 3 per cent,
whereas income above that
threshold was taxed at 5 per cent.
Income tax was now ‘withheld at
the source’ (ie. by employers) and
a standard $600 deduction was
implemented, along with exemp-
tions for certain expenses.

The need for Federal revenue
declined sharply after the war,
and eventually income taxes were
repealed. By 1868, the main
source of US government rev-
enue was derived from liquor and
tobacco taxes. From 1868 to 1913,
almost 90 per cent of all revenue
was derived from various excise
taxes. In 1894, the Federal income
tax was reintroduced, and has
remained in effect since. Towards
the end of World War I, the mar-
ginal tax rate was around 67 per
cent. This coincided with the cre-
ation of offshore banking in the
Bahamas in the mid-1930s. In
1944, the top marginal tax rate
peaked at 94 per cent as the US
funded its participation in World
War II. Such high rates of taxa-
tion clearly create a huge disin-

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world’s leading financial institutions in the
Caribbean, Through our Business Area Wealth Management International we look
after wealthy private dents by providing them with comprehensive, value
enhancing services. Our client advisors combine strong personal relationships with
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Income Tax

Income tax is a tax paid on the
taxable income of citizens for
each ‘tax year’. For example, in
the US, the tax year is the calen-
dar year and each taxpayer is
required to file tax returns by
April 15 of the following year.
The taxable income of a taxpayer
is ordinary income plus any addi-
tions (such as capital gains on the
sale of real estate or securities).
minus permitted deductions (mar-
riage deductions or interest costs
on the mortgage of the taxpay-
er’s principal residence).

An income tax regime is often
described as a progressive tax, to
the extent that those who earn
more... pay more. In 2007, the
richest 5 per cent of Americans
accounted for over half of feder-
al income taxes received. The top
1 per cent of income earners pay
25 per cent of total income taxes.
Forty per cent of Americans pay
no federal income tax at all,
although it is the government's
largest revenue source.

In countries with income taxes,
there are strict penalties for tax
evasion. However, courts have
generally ruled that taxpayers
have a legitimate right to seek
means to minimise their tax bur-
dens, within the parameters of

the law. Most tax minimisation
strategies seek to take advantage
of all available deductions and
deferrals. Some countries tax
their citizens on the basis of
worldwide income irrespective of
residency (for example, the US),
whereas other countries have lib-
eral exemptions for non-resident
citizens who live abroad (such as
the United Kingdom).

Policy

Tax rates may be progressive,
regressive or flat. A progressive
tax imposes taxes at different
rates based on one’s level of earn-
ings. For example, the first
$10,000 in earnings may be taxed
at 5 per cent, the next $10,000 at
10 per cent, and any more income
at 20 per cent. Alternatively, a
flat tax imposes the same taxa-
tion level on all earnings. A
regressive income tax may tax
income up to a certain amount,
such as taxing only the first
$90,000 earned.

Personal income tax is often
collected on a pay-as-you-earn
basis, with small corrections made
soon after the end of the tax year.
These corrections take one of two
forms: payments to the govern-
ment for taxpayers who have not
paid enough during the tax year;
and tax refunds from the govern-
ment for those who have over-
paid. Income tax systems will
often have deductions available
that lessen the total tax liability
through reducing total taxable
income. They may also allow loss-
es from one type of income to be
counted against another. For
example, a loss on the stock mar-

ket may be deducted against tax-
es paid on wages. Other tax sys-
tems may isolate the loss such
that business losses can only be
deducted against business taxes
by carrying forward the loss to
later tax years.

Criticisms

There are numerous criticisms
of an income tax system, such as
politicians being quick to increase
tax rates to generate more rev-
enues to throw at a problem, as
opposed to trying to find ways to
fix the problem in the first place.
Income tax rates are administra-
tively easy to change, and there is
virtually no lag time once a
change in tax rates has been
made. However, poorly created
and unfairly implemented income
tax systems can penalise work,
discourage saving and investment,
and hinder the competitiveness
of businesses.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas), a
wholly-owned subsidiary of Colo-
nial Group International, which
owns Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are those
of the author and doe not neces-
sarily represent those of Colonial
Group International or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any ques-
tions or comments to rlgib-
son@atlantichouse.com.bs

British American blasts Generali's ‘complete and utter nonsense’

FROM page 1B

have angered Mr Cooper and
British American Financial is that
Generali will have known exactly
what it was acquiring.

Tribune Business understands
that it conducted extensive due
diligence on the British Ameri-
can Financial health insurance
business prior to the acquisition,
sending a team from its head
office Europe to Nassau as part of
the assessment effort. This news-

paper understands that collec-
tively, inclusive of individual
health and group medical plan
policyholders, Generali World-
wide acquired some 15,000 poli-
cyholders from British American
Financial. Of these, some 2,000
were individual policyholders, the
rest being group plan participants.
“Almost three years later, this
attempt of Generali to attribute
blame to British American Finan-
cial, rather than focus on effec-
tive management of the funda-
mentals of their business itself, is

ye

Makers Dap

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

Sous Chef

Key Responsibilities

* Required to skillfully prepare international cuisine.
* Assist in ordering food supplies and kitchen equipment as

needed.

¢ Will be required to oversee majority of cooking and methods

of food preparation.

* Along with the Executive Chef, instruct kitchen employees

in the finer points of cooking.

¢ Assist in planning meals; making of menus, and assigning

prices.

¢ Assist in butchering and/or prepares meats and poultry for

cooking.

Qualifications

* High School diploma or equivalent

* Culinary degree from approved school or completion of an
approved apprentice program is preferred
5 to 10 years in different supervisory positions in the
kitchens including sous chef and/or chef d’ cuisine position.
Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred.
Highly skilled cooking ability in all areas of kitchen including
the ability to prepare various ethnic cuisines.

* Experience working in multiple operations preferred.

* Aminimum of two years international experience an asset.

* Experience in opening a property a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work
in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a
self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and méet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career,
submit your resume to the attention of the Director of HR &
Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613.

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009

F -g NUT

frankly astounding,” Mr Cooper
said yesterday.

“Stated directly, the assertions
made in the Tribune’ story is a
ridiculous and unfair ‘scapegoat-
ing attempt’ to use British Amer-
ican Financial as a means to
deflect attention from whatever
issue or query that may have been
raised by their customers.”

He added: “Although I cannot
comment on how Generali
derives its rates, I would say that
apart from claims experience
there are any number of factors
that play into determining the
annually renewable rates.

“Amongst them are claims
management, negotiation with
service providers, expense levels
of the company, cost of reinsur-
ance, actuarial reserves, admin-
istrative efficiencies, required
profit margin and social con-
science of the insurer.

“Obviously, British American
Financial has absolutely nothing
whatsoever to do with these busi-
ness practices or the pricing for-
mula of Generali.”

Mr Cooper also pointed out
that a key factor influencing how
medical/health insurers priced
their premiums, and designed
benefits packages, was the ever-
escalating costs of medical treat-
ment. These costs were increasing
annually at between 10-15 per
cent, meaning that medical infla-
tion was running at 30 per cent
over a three-year period.

Mr Cooper added that British
American Financial sold its health
insurance business to enable it to
concentrate on what it came to
view as its core life insurance and
financial services/investments
business. In her statement to Tri-
bune Business last week, Ms
Cambridge said: “Our assessment
revealed that the block of indi-
vidual policies which we inherited
had been inappropriately priced.

The premiums were too low
for the level of benefits offered,
and they were also too low given
the ages of many of the individu-
als enrolled in that portfolio.

“Our options based on our
analysis were to sell the individual
portfolio or to cancel the cover-
age,” Ms Cambridge told Tribune
Business. “We realised, howev-
er, that if we were simply to can-
cel the policies, it would have left
some individuals without insur-
ance cover and for some, based
on their ages and health condi-
tions, it would have made it very
difficult for them to find alterna-
tives. “In order to provide an
appropriate solution, we have
moved to create an age-banded
premium structure, which pro-
vides for a fairer and more appro-
priate premium for each risk pre-
sented.”

Ci

TO TEMPTATION
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS
Job application file is ‘six inches thick’

FROM page 1B

transformation of East Bay Street’s Moses
Plaza into Elizabeth on Bay. The latter,
though, was set to take places in sequences
of demolition and restoration.

He acknowledged that he had accumu-
lated “a huge file of people looking for
work”, which was “six inches thick with
names”, but Cavalier had been unable to
employ them because there simply were
not enough construction projects taking
place.

Bahamian contractors usually learned of
upcoming construction work from their
architect counterparts, but Mr Wilson said:
“The silence from them is deafening. It’s not
avery good situation. It is bleak right now.

“But Albany has weathered the storm
very well, and will be ahead of the curve in
a year’s time. We’re employing 100 Bahami-

ans right now just on Albany. That number
will increase as the scope of work increases.
We’re talking to them [the developers] on
increasing the scope some time in May, and
bringing on the amenities.”

However, on a more optimistic note, Mr
Wilson said he had “seen it worse” than
now in the Bahamian construction industry,
particularly in the 1980s, when it was “pret-
ty bad”.

He acknowledged that the construction
industry was cyclical, and one of those most
affected by external economic factors, espe-
cially those that impacted the US. The cur-
rent downturn, though, is global, meaning
that Bahamian contractors will not find
work coming from European investors to
pick up the slack.

“T honestly hope that by 2010, in 12
months time, we will be coming out of it,”
Mr Wilson said. “That’s what we’re seeing
right now. But the private sector has got

to have balls to do developments right
now.”

Elsewhere, Mr Wilson was hoping that
the boutique hotel/condo development
planned for Joe’s Cay in Abaco, which is
backed by Galaxy Group Holdings and sev-
eral private investors, would still go ahead.
Cavalier Construction would be the pro-
ject’s main contractor.

The project’s Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA) is currently being com-
pleted, and Mr Wilson said: “We’re still
looking at that and hoping to get a
favourable response from government.

“Tt’s basically a little boutique hotel and
condo project, with 19 Bahamian cottages
and a clubhouse. I would say the first phase
in construction terms is about $10 million,
but in this day and age it’s all done on pre-
sales and phasing.”

He added that there was still local oppo-
sition in Abaco to the development.

Heo

Waker's Dap

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following position

currently available.

Assistant Marketing Manager

Key Requirements

¢ Ademonstrated track record of sales to high net

worth clients

* Extensive experience maintaining strong long term
customer relationships with significant add-on/repeat

business

¢ Astrong existing network with high net worth clients in

the U.S.A. , Europe and The Bahamas
* Ability to develop and implement marketing
campaigns to high net worth clients

April groundbreak for development’s $10-$15m phase |

FROM page 1B

And some two months after
the groundbreaking and con-
struction start, Mr Kinsale said
the developers planned to begin
work on 10 larger town home
units, known as The Grand,
which are slightly larger in size.
Several units in this section, he
added, were still on the market.

“We’ve done some initial
clearing of the roads and the
area where we will be building,”
Mr Kinsale told Tribune Busi-
ness. “April is really the offi-
cial groundbreaking with regard
to construction , getting the
infrastructure started and really
moving forward aggressively.”

He explained that the 28 units
in The Royale, consisting of
two-storey, 1,400 square feet
town homes with two bedrooms
and two-and-a half bathrooms,
had all been pre-sold.

“Without pre-sales in place,
we can’t build,” Mr Kinsale
said. “That was a condition set
by Royal Bank of Canada, so
we were able to pre-sale that
phase to get it going.”

The 10 units in The Grand
are slightly larger, at about
2,000 square feet on two storeys,
he added, with four bedrooms
and three bathrooms. “We still
have a couple of units left, but
they’ll be gone by the time
we’re ready to start construc-
tion,” Mr Kinsale added.

First phase construction on

The Royale was expected to be
completed within nine to 12
months, he said, and despite the
economic downturn buyers
were still coming. Mr Kinsale
added that all first phase sales
bar one had been to Bahamian
buyers.

To boost sales, and reduce
the transaction closing times,
when real estate demand was
potentially fickle, The Balmoral
had arranged a title insurance
package with Bahamian law
firm Lennox Paton, which acts
as the Bahamian representative
for US-based title insurer,
Chicago Title.

Through doing so, Mr Kin-
sale said a package had been
arranged where real estate pur-
chasers would pay a flat $3,000
fee for their legal fees and title
insurance combined.

With units in The Royale
starting at a $359,000 price
point, and those in The Grand
pitched at $559,000, Mr Kinsale
said this would produce consid-
erable savings for purchasers.

“On a $359,000 condo, if
you’re just looking at 2 per cent
of the purchase price as the
average legal fee on a tradi-
tional closing, that’s $7,180,” he
explained. The arrangement
with Lennox Paton, he
explained, would thus save buy-
ers at The Balmoral more than
$4,000 in legal fees and closing
costs, a 58 per cent reduction,
with title insurance thrown in.

“Once we start construction,
we plan to increase sales
prices,” Mr Kinsale told Tri-
bune Business. “There is
demand. Buyers are cautious
and asking more questions, like
do you have the financing in
place? Royal Bank of Canada is
providing the financing for the
construction and infrastructure.
We’re well-funded and that’s
giving people comfort.

“We have a pretty conserva-
tive business plan. I think every-
body’s affected by the econom-
ic slowdown, but we have a
pretty conservative plan that
does not require us to sell it out
in a year.

“We have a five to six-year
business plan. The downturn
has probably thrown an extra
year on it, realistically.”

The Balmoral will ultimate-
ly feature 200 town homes and
70 family lots when completed,
plus the associated clubhouse
and other amenities. Mr Kin-
sale added that there were sev-
eral factors that could impact it
positively, namely the fact that
New Providence did not suffer
from an oversupply of real
estate, and the possibilities a
lift-off for the $2.6 billion Baha
Mar project might produce.

And buyer demand was still
evident, with no downward
pressure on real estate prices
across the board. Mr Kinsale
pointed out that units in his last
real estate project, Hampton

Ridge, which was completed a
year-and-a-half ago, were sold
for around $250,000, but one
had just been re-sold for
$340,000, a 36 per cent increase.

“Everybody is feeling the
economic downturn, no doubt
about it,” he added. “The thing
we've been fortunate with is
that we have no direct compe-
tition. The indirect competition
is the economy, but we have a
strong foundation and the club-
house provides something tan-
gible, so people can see we’re
not a brochure.

“That’s helping us to get
through this pre-sales period.
We have our challenges like
everyone else, but we’re squeez-
ing through.”

Qualifications
Bachelor's degree in Sales, Marketing or related
subject; professional certifications
Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth
real estate promotions
Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power
Point, Microsoft Word, Excel and Asset Manager
Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership
and customer relations skills
Must have excellent written and verbal
communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to
work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be
a self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive
and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of The Director of HR & Training,
hr@bakersbayclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009



ek, h
Sara,

at
are
=.

SECURITIES OFFICER - WINTERBOTHAM INTERNATIONAL SECURITIES

Winterbotham is seeking a professional to assume responsibility, reporting directly to the VP
Winterbotham International Securities, for the broker/dealer business.

The candidate should be young, energetic, self motivated and be well educated, hold a
Series 7 and/or Canadian Securities qualification and preferably hold a degree in finance,
economics or business administration. Relevant post graduate studies and/or professional

qualifications will also be beneficial. In depth knowledge of financial and capital markets
is a must. It is vital that the candidate have hands on trading (FX, Equities and Bonds)
and securities back office experience (maintaining records of transactions, recording of
dividends, stock splits, interest, corporate actions, duties as related to the administration
of securities, portfolio valuations and reporting), and be able to demonstrate that he/she
has successfully generated revenue producing business in the past. Fluency in Spanish/
Tenet Portuguese will also be an advantage.

Winterbotham is in an exciting period of evolution as it adapts to developments in the
international financial services industry, and the opportunity offers tremendous scope to an
innovative and entrepreneurial self starter. Some travel at short notice will be required.

Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation (BAIC;

Presents
Its
HANDICRAFT ‘STRAW’ TRAINING PROGRAM

We offer excellent compensation, including financial incentives tied directly to performance
and a group health scheme.

Candidates should send a detailed CV together with a covering letter describing why
you think you are qualified for the job, directly to the Chairman, The Winterbotham Trust
Company Limited, P.O. Box N-3026, Nassau or by email to chairman@vip-wtb.com on or
before 11th March 2009.

A leading retailer is seeking applications for the position of

MANAGER ADMINISTRATION

BASIC REQUIREMENTS

Minimum two years Management experience

Excellent Oral and Written Communication Skills

Proven organizational and planning capabilities

Have a proven track record of meeting deadlines

Must be proficient in Microsoft office software

Strong Interpersonal skills and willingness to be a team player
Must have strong leadership skills and be results oriented
Posses integrity, excellent motivational skills and assertiveness

Must be multifaceted and prepared to work flexible hours if necessary

iP
Time: 6:00 - 10:00 p.m. (Daily)
Location: Yellow Elder West

Date: March 16-27, 2009
Venue: Government High School

Application Form

P.0. Box:

Name:

Address: Email: SUMMARY OF DUTIES

¢ Overall responsibility for the administrative functions of the company
¢ Training and motivating team members
Ensuring company policies and procedures are adhered to and implementing
new policies as required.
Control and monitor administrative budgets
Responsible for the protection and maintenance of all company assets
Analyze existing business and identify business development opportunities

Tel: Fax:

Agerange: under15 16-2) 26-40 41-60 61-70 1 and over
The successful candidate will become a part of a growing and progressive organization
capable of facing challenges. Benefits include a comprehensive medical and life
package and pension plan. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and

experience.

Employment Status: Employed Government Private

Unemployed

Self-employed

Interested persons may forward a copy of their resume, in confidence to:

Have you completed Previous Training Courses byBAIC? Yes No
List: Date(s):

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 322-6607

ADMINISTRATIVE FEE: $100.00 [EXCLUDING MATERIALS]

behead a Pee ees

Contact: Sharae Collie/Pam Deveaux Tel: 322-3740-1 Fax: 322-21273/928-6542


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SSS ee ee eee
$80,000 investment takes chef from ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ to heaven

FROM page 1B

once the location for Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) and Western
Union. Ms Smith said it was now
the perfect place for her restau-

rant. “I did this for the people,”
she told Tribune Business.

Ms Smith, who is also execu-
tive chef at DK Clubhouse, has
created a unique breakfast and
lunch menu, with offerings such
as Smoked Salmon Benedict for





WASTE - ED








The Low Down Dirty Facts






DOLLARS AND SENSE






Throwing waste out on roads and in parks




breakfast and a house specialty
fish and chips dish for lunch. She
described this as a “secret family
recipe”, reminiscent of her days in
English kitchens. Dinner offer-
ings are to come next month.

Ms Smith has designed her
restaurant to be an affordable
lunch and breakfast spot, serving
fine dining-esque cuisine, with a
soft, muted burgundy and beige
interior to capture the flair of a
true French Bistro.

“T tell people: ‘Don’t come
here looking for cracked conch
and fried chicken.’ I refuse to do
what everybody else is doing ,and
I believe Bahamians need to
think outside of peas and rice,
steamed pork chops and steamed
chicken,” said Ms Smith.

When she returned to the
Bahamas from her studies and
apprenticeship in England in
1999, she worked as a head chef
for Doctors Hospital, and has

helped to design menus and lay-
outs for several restaurants,
including the Porch Cafe on
Blake Road and Curly Tails in
Marsh Harbour, Abaco.

Her new restaurant was just
the next step in her culinary
career.

“DK Clubhouse is actually me
acting out - you know how a child
acts out - it’s is me acting out,”
Ms Smith said. “I wanted to
attract the business class and I
wanted to attract families.”

However, her road to opening
day was not a smooth one, with
the looming recession causing
banks to shy away from loan
requests. She visited more than
five banks before finding the cap-
ital for DK Clubhouse.

“Tn this time, the banks are not
very friendly, so we had to basi-
cally use everything we had. If
this doesn’t work... it’s going to
work,” said Ms Smith.

She is confident that her busi-
ness, which employs 10 staff,
including delivery drivers, will be
competitive, as it was a rarity to
find similar offerings in New
Providence.

“T try to include foods from dif-
ferent parts of the world so every-
body can have something. It
offers a variety, and it’s generally
more on the health conscious side
- something quick, but nice,” Ms
Smith said. “I tried to find a way
for people to enjoy what I enjoy,
but be able to afford it.”

Ms Smith’s fare is prepared
from the best ingredients, includ-
ing indigenous seasonal fruits,
turkey and ham baked on site and
all dressings made from scratch.
“T try to use indigenous stuff
whenever they are in season,” she
said.

Ms Smith has also decided to
forego the automatic 15 per cent
gratuity imposed on customer

during lunch service in so many
Bahamian restaurants, for service
training and hospitality. Though it
may be included on the dinner
ticket.

“You shouldn’t force someone
to pay something that they might
not want to pay. I personally
think if you take out gratuities
you might get more,” she said.

Another unique offering from
such a small restaurant is the pri-
vate dining area. Ms Smith has
incorporated two private dining
areas into the design of DK Club-
house, which are offered for $250
to $300 for two hours. They
include a choice of four menus
that come with wine, soft drinks
and tea and coffee. The restau-
rant will also have free wireless
Internet access.

“I design (restaurants) based
on what my menu is, my clien-
tele and what character my clients
have,” said Ms Smith.

and other public places is dumb, dumb,
dumb! This practice amounts to throwing
money out of the car window. In 2007 it
is estimated that in excess of 2 million
dollars was spent on litter removal in New
Providence. This includes equipment and
staff time. The more you litter the more
money it cost you to keep The Bahamas
clean.

































A message from the Ministry of
Department of Environmental

Health Services

ex
yo.
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

TENDER

C-230 General Contract, Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company seeks qualified General
Contractors to provide General Contracting and Construction
Management Services for the C-230 General Contract, Stage
1 Terminal Expansion Project. The scope of work includes the
construction of Terminal C and Pier C comprising 247,000 sq. ft of
new building space. Specifically the Tender includes the following
items:

* Building structure, exterior envelope, exterior canopies and
related subtrade packages;

* General Requirements for General Contracting services for
the overall project; and

* Construction Management Fee for tendering the balance of
subtrade and supplier work packages at a later date.

The balance of subtrade, vendor and supplier packages (ie.
mechanical, electrical, finishes, etc.) are not included in this
Tender but are expected to be tendered by the successful C-230
General Contractor in 2009.

The C-230 General Contract, Stage 1 Terminal Expansion Project
Tender Documents will be available for pick up or online viewing
after 3:00pm, Thursday March 5th, 2009. Please contact Traci
Brisby to receive access fo the NAD online data room or data room
located at the NAD Project office.

Contact: TRACI BRISBY

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 | Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

Court rejects stay on receivership end for marina

FROM page 1B

worth $23-$24 million. A copy of the January
27, 2009, court order, which has been seen by
Tribune Business, stated that among the assets
removed from the receivership are “100 per
cent of the shares of Port Lucaya Marina
LTD, which owns the following properties
comprising Port Lucaya Marina”.

These properties include a 14,506 square
foot parcel of land, situated in Block 3, Unit 2,
of the Bell Channel Subdivision in Freeport;
an 813 square foot parcel of land on Lot 13,
Block 3, Unit 2, of the Bell Channel Subdivi-
sion and a portion of Tract ‘O’, Unit 3 in the
same subdivision; a 6,051 square foot land
tract comprising a portion of the same Tract
‘O’; and a 10.6 acre parcel of land comprising
a portion of the seabed in the Bell Channel
Subdivision. In addition, a separate parcel of
land, consisting of 6.19 acres, and also in the
Bell Channel Bay Subdivision, was also
removed from the receivership by order of
the Supreme Court.

Justice Evans, in her order, also directed
Mr Galanis “to release and deliver over to
New Hope Marina Development Ltd all of
the licences, permits, certificates, deeds, agree-
ments, records, bank accounts, negotiable
instruments, documents, correspondence and
papers relating to Port Lucaya Marina Com-

pany Ltd, doing business as Port Lucaya Mari-
na” and the related land assets.

Port Lucaya Marina’s removal from the
receivership came after attorneys acting New
Hope Marina Development Ltd and AP
Holdings Ltd petitioned the Supreme Court.

The two companies were represented by
Robert Adams and Dwayne Fernander of
Graham, Thompson & Co, and it is under-
stood they were successfully able to argue
that the Port Lucaya Marina and related land
parcels were outside the New Hope Holdings
ownership structure. Messrs Adams and Fer-
nander represented the two companies again
before Appeal Justice Blackman.

However, the Port Lucaya Marina’s con-
tinued removal does not end Mr Galanis’s
receivership over other New Hope Holdings’
assets. These include the Grand Bahama
Yacht Club Marina and Grand Bahama Yacht
Club, plus multiple parcels of land owned in
freehold by New Hope Holdings that are
mainly situated in the Lucayan Marina and
Bell Channel areas. Another 10 parcels of
land that have been leased to New Hope
Holdings were also covered by the original
receivership order.

Tribune Business previously exclusively
revealed that Mr Olsen's main financial
backer, T.G. Investments, had been seeking a
court-appointed receiver for the New Hope

aL

Well-established Wholesaler
saleperson (females are

proven record

encouraged
apply) for the snack food division. Individual
must have experience in sales with emphasis
on large food stores. Only individuals with a
of being able to work
unsupervised and achieve results will be

properties, alleging that Mr Olsen had default-
ed on repaying loans worth $23-$24 million.

T.G. Investments had obtained a Mareva
Injunction to freeze the assets of Mr Olsen and
New Hope Holdings.

They are alleging T.G. Investments lent
$23-$24 million, secured by two promissory
notes, to Mr Olsen and New Hope Holdings to
finance the acquisition of the Port Lucaya
Marina and associated properties, but this has
not been repaid. They are also claiming the
company financed other obligations of New
Hope Holdings.

Yet this newspaper understands that Mr
Olsen’s and New Hope’s attorneys are vigor-
ously contesting the default allegations and the
receivership.

They are alleging that responsibility for any
loan repayment default lies squarely with Mr
Gonzalez. They are claiming he failed to live
up to several obligations, one of which was to
provide New Hope Holdings with $12 mil-
lion in working capital - over and above the
initial purchase price - to fund its operations.

This, Mr Olsen and New Hope’s attorneys
are alleging, never happened, and without
that capital New Hope ended up defaulting.
Essentially, the core allegation in their argu-
ments rests on the claim that any responsi-
bility for the loan default lies with Mr Gon-
zalez himself.

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 of the International

requires a
to

considered. Must be able to drive standard
shift vehicle and be in possession of current
valid driver’s license. Individuals with their
own transportation will receive favorable

consideration. Company offers good benefits.

Submit applications
NaS

Ken

P.O.Box N-7124
Nassau, Bahamas

Le ee

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 9 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.25 | CHG -0.11 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -52.11 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.81 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

1.39
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.43
2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00

1.45
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.59
1.50
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Fince

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS $
0.070

Change Daily Vol. Div $
1.45
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.59
1.40
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.895
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50

10.00 0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S52wk-Hi S2wk-Low

1000.00

Securit
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Symbol
FBB17
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change
0.00

Daily Vol. Interest
7%

Prime + 1.75%
T%

100.00
100.00
100.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

FG CAPITAL
BEOKEBAG!

MARKE
—E ee SERVICES
es

Cah!

Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), NOTICE is
hereby given that RIVERWOODS INVESTMENT
COMPANY LTD. is in dissolution and the date of
commencement of the dissolution is March 6, 2009

Lorna Kemp and Margaret Tatem-Gilbert

LIQUIDATORS

c/o EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

1 Bay Street

2nd Floor, Centre of Commerce

P.O. Box SS-6289

Nassau, The Bahamas

We

Maker's Hap

Baker’s Bay

GOLF & OCEAN CLUB

As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians

TS

â„¢ Ts

on our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to
apply for the position of:

Golf Course Construction

Assistant Manager

Attributes to include:

5 — 8 years experience in Golf Course Construction and
Management at leading Golf Club.

Knowledge of all phases of Golf course design and
construction activities including vertical golf construction
(club houses, maintenance facilities irrigation pump stations)
Turf Management Degree.

A thorough understanding of all phases of maintenance and
repair to courses, practice range and equipment.

Extensive experience working with city planners, engineers,

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

architects, and contractors.
Knowledgeable in all phases of construction contracts

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015 related to golf projects.

Detail oriented, a skilled planner, ability to prioritize with
excellent communication skills.

Computer literate.

Willing to live on an out island.

Ability to work on own initiative is important.

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
0.00 0.00 0.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387
2.8988
1.4428
3.3201
12.6816
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0401 4.01
1.0330 3.30
1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
ASk $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany‘s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

4.540
0.000
0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3781
2.9230
1.3812
3.3201
11.8789

100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

30-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
27-Feb-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need
apply.

-13.33
4.01
3.30
4.10

Applications can be submitted to:

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Director, Human Resources and Training
P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or sbowe@bakersbayclub.com

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
('S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


J

el

velatte /

N

UDGE PARKER











\

THINK APRIL
MOVED BACK
HERE?

WHY BO YOU Ll /

BLONDIE

WHAD'YA THINK OF MY PRESENTATION |

jersal Press Syndicate

©1989 Unive

“How COME YOU NEVER TIP MoM WHEN SHE
SERVES DINNER?”



















THIS MORNING, BOSS?

¢, Inc. World Rights reserved

SOMEDAY I
HOPE To BE IN
THE OLYMPICS



Across



1 Old fashioned pop is her 1
best composition (7)

4 Hazard of drivers and 2
divers (5)

7 Doesn't neglect 3

established practices (4)

8 Does turn dead

miserable (8) 5
10 Summarised and

withdrawn (10) 6
12 Scandinavian article in

plate (6) 9
13 Reformed ladies show the

highest standards (6) 11
15 Subscribe and accept the

risk (10) 12
18 A fruit that won't give a

fixed delivery time? (4,4) 14
19 Stump or catch 16

perhaps (4)
20 Wordy form of gift (5) 17

21 Run into some of the
defence (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Appropriate, 9 Execute, 10
Limbo, 11 Used, 12 Keystone, 14
Enigma, 16 Artful, 18 Felonies, 19
Span, 22 Right, 23 Outcome, 24
Glider pilot.

Down: 2 Piece, 3 Rout, 4 Prefer, 5
Illusory, 6 Time off, 7 Reduced fare, 8
Moneylender, 13 Emanated, 15 Illegal,
17 Detour, 20 Photo, 21 Etui.

SHE SAID
Tt WAS
TO HAVE
DINNER
WITH MEL

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down



4 Cracked up, oddly enough















HER! SHE
HAP A THING
FOR YOU FROM
DAY ONES P

TOMORROW'S ANOTHER DAY, SON...
T KNOW YOU DID THE VERY BEST













I’? BE LYING IF I
SAIP THE FEELING
WASN‘T MUTUALS



BLAST /...DID MY

BEANIE COME



Sunday

















Difficulty Level * *&

Thus America produced a
composer (5)

Regular lay preachers take
it (8)

Slit at the front (6)





(6,4)

Ordered, as whisky may
be (4)

Observes the intrusion and
is furious (7)

Now it’s gift time

(7,3)

| can head this way for the
ranch (8)

Made to feel small?

(7)

An old fool (6)

Well-known skating









figure (5)

One of them acted as
cox or acted as
cocks (4)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Ad infinitum, 9 Officer, 10
Torch, 11 Gory, 12 Malinger, 14
Angler, 16 Rustic, 18 Travesty, 19
Glum, 22 Nadir, 23 Deadpan, 24 In
the offing.

Down: 2 Defer, 3 Nick, 4 Inroad, 5
Intrigue, 6 Upright, 7 Long-lasting, 8
Shortcoming, 13 Research, 15
Gladden, 17 Studio, 20 Lupin, 21
Calf.











Across

1
4
7
8
10
12
13

15

Ship’s master (7)
Exhausted (3,2)
Swerve (4)
Unwavering
supporter (8)
Become thinner (4,6)
Conference with
enemy (6)
Temporary
madness (6)
After much delay
(2,4,4)

Of necessity (8)
Ardent
enthusiasm (4)
Harsh (5)
Forbear (7)

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

©2009 Conceplis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.







L HAVEN'T WORKED sINcE
MN COMPANY DOWNSIZED

YOUR WIFE HAS HIREP
ME TO TEACH YOU
MY GOOP MAN

RRALE

o id

DO YOU.\K\S5 WOULD BE
WANT? & NICE,MARGO.

IL FEEL YOUR
PAIN, MAN




ANNERS,

td
oP Q

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.



for res 8, i I ST
aera ab bot aed es Ee
fecal bn le Pcie 8 pee
warner Od icles, Bee ine at
bait Lao Placa ba panes Gill ab
ATSC OT eee eee ban dg
dh er Fads bed oe Sie
be oy ue
vin Ly sy
hl AA Ses or eee IH
KEES § mere, 2 et capi
indeed Gs 5 ides Peo fee ad
So Cla Si ame sce PA Moma haa,
ia oe aaa Pa

Phere ECET6T Bap
ed 9 ged cg nae [2M es Bee
eA SE,



BUT T'LL SETTLE FOR
“COME ON IN, BAD,”

. World rights reserved.

©2009 by North America Syndi

T UAVEN'T PLAVED SINCE
THE MARKET DOWNSIZED
MN RETIREMENT SAVINGS



WHERE Do
WE a sie

res Syndicate, Ine.

‘©2008 by King Featu

Leer o

I s
SEL)

ii
eens



ms In:
ork.

2 Capt Lage ol basis













Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer












































Down

11

12
14
16
17

To quibble (5)
Urgency (8)
Blockhead (6)

Very much in fashion
(3,3,4)

Principal role in

play (4)

In particular (7)
Fondness for sugary
foods (5,5)

Behind closed doors
(2,6)

Thrive (7)

Agree (6)

Claw (5)

Language of
Pakistan (4)

























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





8]3]2]9 6]/5/4|7/ 1 TN UN
7/5/6]1 3/4]2/8/9| MRI 5 Bio 8S
1/9/4/7 2/8/5i3l6| MMi 4(3)2 Biw2 i7)9 8
9/1[5[4 7/213/618 a SEALE
6l2/7/13 811191415 near coe
3/4/8115 9/611)2|7 NG 211/319 69
4'7/9/l8 51/3(611/2| M1 32 18M 6
2lel3ie 119171514| Ww2 113.6 MR7 (9/4 8
3/10 5(6/1/2 4/7/8\9/3| MMBN2|1/3 Bi [5

































A ay ea ye: Pac

North dealer,
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
@J83
VI 1072
@#AKI8
&A 5
WEST EAST
#AQ62 49754
Â¥85 963
4762 #054
$0193 #K 1062
SOUTH
#K 10
VAKQ94
#1093
#874
The bidding:
North East South West
1¢ Pass 1¥ Pass
29 Pass 4Â¥

Opening lead — queen of clubs.

Some deals contain built-in traps
that may lure declarer to an unneces-
sary defeat. For this reason, declarer
should carefully examine all his
assets before committing himself to a
particular line of play.

Take this case where South got to
four hearts and West led the queen of
clubs. Declarer won with the ace,
cashed the ace of diamonds, drew
two rounds of trumps ending in his
hand, then led the ten of diamonds
and let it nde. East won with the

Declarer Has a Blind Spot








queen, cashed the king of clubs and
shifted to a spade, and West’s A-Q of
spades put the contract down one.

South bemoaned his bad luck in
finding the queen of diamonds and
both missing spade honors offside.
However, with proper play, the con-
tract was a virtual certainty from the
outset. The fault lay in South’s
becoming overly enamored of
dummy’s diamonds and the potential
spade discard it afforded. Had he
instead looked at the hand as a
whole, he would have realized that
his spade holding was actually an
asset rather than a liability.

The correct approach is to draw
trumps ending in dummy and lead a
spade toward the K-10. After East
follows low, South can either finesse
the ten or play the king, depending
on where he thinks the ace is located.

As it happens, both spade honors
are offside, so declarer cannot avoid
losmg two spade tricks. Neverthe-
less, the contract is assured.

For example, suppose West wins
the ten of spades with the queen and
shifts to a diamond. Declarer puts up
the ace and plays a second spade to
the king and ace, establishing
dummy’s jack. Whatever West
returns, South cannot be stopped
from discarding a diamond on the
jack of spades, and he winds up los-
ing only two spades and a club.

Tomorrow: In the arms of Morpheus.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a eV



The Tribune



©





ith



SEASONAL
EFFECTS ON
DRY SKIN.

mâ„¢ By SARAH BEEK

SIMILAR to the seasons, }
skin goes through its own fluc- }
tuations. Combine nature's }
weather cycle with air condi- }
tioning and forced air heating }
devices, and you have skin
that's constantly under }
assault. :

Cold winds and low tem- }
peratures can dry out skin, }
depriving it of balanced levels :
of oils, contributing to dry- }
ness, sensitivity, and prema- }
ture aging. i

Prolonged exposure to the
sun causes water to evaporate
from skin, which is why skin }
that has recently been burned }
or tanned requires more mois- }
turisation than unexposed }
areas. Forced air heating also }
dries out skin: warm, dry air }
acts like a sponge, soaking up }
moisture from everything it }
touches. ;

To help skin stay healthy :
with the seasons, speak with }
your professional skin thera- }
pist about modifying your skin }
care regimen accordingly. }
Chances are just a few prod- }
uct updates (for example, :
going from a moisturiser toa }
more emollient cream) can }
keep skin healthy year-round. }

DRY SKIN AND SENSITIVITY
While there are many trig- }
gers to skin sensitisation, one :
of the biggest consequences }
of dry skin is an increase in }
sensitivity. Dry skin is a pre- }
cursor to sensitised skin ;
because when skin is dry, it's :
depleted of its natural protec- }
tive lipid barrier. This lowers }
skin's defenses against envi- }
ronmental assaults that can }
cause a sensitised reaction in }
skin, such as itching and red- :
ness. :
For proper treatment of a }
dry and sensitised skin condi- :
tion, speak to a professional }
skin therapist. i

° Sarah Beek is a skin care ther- :
apist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit :
her and her team of skin and :
body therapists at One Sandy- }
port Plaza (the same building as :
Bally’s Gym). For more informa- :
tion visit www.dermal-clinic.com 3
or call 327.6788 i

Box:

‘a’
i
=
Ke
=



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

LIFE for most 5-year-
olds, most likely involves

learning the personalities

of his or her teacher and
friends at kindergarten,
conquering the potty,
and living as carefree as
they please.

On the tip of my

However for
one young boy,
life has been any-
thing but care-
free, in fact for
young Palmer
Cleare Jr (PJ), his
biggest challenge
on any given day
is to simply say
his name.

Palmer is one
of dozens of chil-
dren who suffer
from stammering,
a condition that
has many medical

and psychological professionals baffled.

Stammering is generally defined as a speech dis-
order in which sounds, syllables, or words are
repeated or prolonged, disrupting the normal flow
of speech. These speech disruptions may be accom-
panied by struggling behaviors, such as rapid eye
blinks or tremors of the lips, or in some instances
even barking. Stammering can make it difficult to
communicate with other people, which often affects
a person’s quality of life and social well-being.

PJ’s father, Palmer Cleare Sr, feels his son was
not born a stammer, and said somewhere along the
way PJ must have watched people possibly on tele-

vision.

He said at first the mimicking was amusing, but
later became a trait in little PJ’s regular speech.
“He did it so often, that one day my mother was

talking to him and he was actually stammering. She
asked when did he start stammering, and I hadn’t
even known that it had developed to that point.”

Mr Cleare explained soon after that episode, he
decided to take his son to a doctor, but was told to
ignore the stammers and to not interrupt his son’s
speaking as he had started doing in response to the
stammering.

Although this advice seemed an awkward solu-
tion to the problem, Mr Cleare said he followed
through with it.

He said after his son began preschool, he soon
started to complain of his classmates making fun of
the way he spoke, an indication situation was more
serious than it appeared.

PJ’s father said that apart from the stammering,
his son was still learning to properly pronounce
words which added an extra challenge to him.

Mr Cleare said after trying various methods of
correcting his son’s stammering with minimal suc-
cess, he eventually decided to take his son toa
speech specialist whose assistance he said has had a
profound impact on PJ’s speaking skills.

Speech and language pathologist Jennifer Alex-
1ou of the Speech Clinic, a facility which deals with
childhood speech disorders and occupational thera-
py, explained that the reason who people stammer
can be related to several factors.

Apart from stammering occurring more often in
boys than in girls, Mrs Alexiou said genealogy, lan-
guage delay, and learnt behavior may also affect
one’s ability to speak fluently.

Whatever the cause, she explained that the reality
of a stammer’s life involves daily anxiety and uncer-

tainty in clearly relaying their thoughts to others.

“There is a lot of anxiety associated with that, it
can affect you socially, emotionally, and with your
profession.

“So it can really have a detrimental affect on a
lot of people.”

Mrs Alexiou explained although there is little
hope for improvement for an adult suffering from
stammering, early intervention has proven effective
in reducing the occurrence in many children who go
on to become fluent adults.

She said in recent years, there has been the intro-
duction of a device known as a Delayed Auditory
Feedback (DAF) machine.

The machine which embraces the effects of choral
speaking is inserted into a stammer’s ear similarly
to a hearing aid, and echoes each word spoken
which has proven tremendously effective in improv-
ing speech impediments. She explained that for
many, fluency is naturally achieved when speaking
in unison like when reciting a pledge, song, or other
message within a group.

“Tt doesn’t work for long periods of time, you can
wear it if you’re going into a meeting where you
would need to speak fluently.”

While many DAFs are considered a last option
for most adult stammers, it remains only a tempo-
rary fix. With stammering being identified in chil-
dren as young as 2, and with it being a minimally
researched and investigated issue locally, she sug-
gest the responsibility is on the parents to be watch-
ful of any of its symptoms, and to seek assistance
swiftly for their children if the occurrence of speech
difficulties persist.



SENSEI D’Arcy Rahming gives students a quick lesson in defeating
an opponent.

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

DA 69806
c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.





The art of jujitsu

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE Japanese form of mar-
tial art known as Jujitsu, is a
collective form which incorpo-
rates both armed and unarmed
methods of self defense.

Originating from the Samu-
rai warriors of Feudal Japan,
the technique allows its user to
manipulate his opponents ener-
gy against him rather than sim-
ply deflecting it.

Also Known as the Art of
Softness, Jujitsu has over the
years evolved throughout the
world as something more than a
fighting skill, according to one
local instructor, the skill of Jujit-
su is an activity which brings to
calm a person’s holistic being.

Instructor and owner of the
Martial Arts Academy D’Arcy
Rahming, who has served as a
martial arts sensei for the past
23 years, has taught dozens of
local students various forms of
martial arts.

From the classical arts which
use the sword, to modern forms
of Judo, Jujitsu and Kick Box-
ing, Mr Rahming continues to
pass on his skills.

Mr Rahming said: “T think its
important for persons to
embrace martial arts because it

not only increases a persons
ability to protect him or herself,
but is also a means of discover-
ing your strengths and weak-
nesses, which works on three
levels, the mind, body, and emo-
tional state.”

At his facility, Mr Rahming
explained that his approach is to
first determine the personality
of an individual, and to then
help them develop in areas
where they are lacking.

He said what he has noticed
is that his mature students tend
to prefer his Jujitsu classes,
while the younger more agile
students, seeking to learn a
sport, float toward the Judo
classes, and the working pro-
fessionals prefer kick boxing.

Mr Rahming said that what
people should understand
about martial arts is that each
form is like a food: “different
people have different taste for
different things.”

Be warned though, Mr Rah-
ming explained because the
martial arts industry is unregu-
lated, there are many who
operate as a ‘sensei’ but may
not have the proper training.

“The secret is to find a good
teacher who has good creden-
tials, and make sure that what
you see is what you want.”

He explained some of those
good credentials could include

international certification from
agencies like the International
Judo Federation, or for the
instructor to have studied under
a sensei with international
notoriety.

Apart from finding the right
sensei, Mr Rahming said many
remain skeptical on enrolling
in a martial art class because of
the presumed rigorous activi-
ty.

“Tt’s not intense to the point
where you would be harmed or
so badly shaken that you would
not learn it, however the idea
behind the martial arts is that it
is a Science to teach an ordi-
nary person how to improve
him or herself.”

Mr Rahming said the image
in many Japanese karate
movies where a martial artist
is able to break a two or three
inch piece of wood with their
bare hands, is only a confidence
builder and really doesn’t
require much skill.

“Tt takes a lot of confidence
to think that you can break it
without being harmed, but you
willsee even small children to
adults doing that.”

Available for private lessons
, Mr Rahming is one sensei who
stands out among others, giv-
ing many the strength to pro-
tect themselves while staying
in shape.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009, PAGE 9B



a Ne





ec
Companion

planning

“Corn loves
Beans”. There’s a
more promising
prospect. It has
been known since
the early days of
history that some
plants do not do
well in each oth-
er’s proximity
while others seem
to form a symbio-
sis and - to use
that business
catchword of the
moment — become
synergistic.

With corn and
beans the symbio-
sis is obvious:
beans help fix nitrogen into the soil for the corn
and the corn provides stalks for the beans to
climb on and produce sturdier plants. With other
pairings the reason for beneficial interaction is less
obvious but nevertheless proven over the years.

Herbs are aromatic and many act as insect
repellents. Mexican oregano can be rubbed onto
the skin in the absence of your favourite com-
mercial repellent. Thyme is almost universal as a
beneficial companion planting. There are pair-
ings, however, that seem to set each other back,
with tomatoes and beans being the prime exam-
ple.

My thoughts went to companion plantings dur-
ing the past autumn when my rose bushes did
not look as sprightly as they should have done. I
have for years planted parsley around the base of
my roses but when I transplanted them last April
into the garden of my new home it was

the wrong time of year to plant parsley suc-
cessfully. When autumn came I sowed seeds
around the rose bushes and now all is well in
Eden. The parsley benefits from the richly
mulched soil that roses are grown in and the ros-
es now have shiny leaves and healthy flowers.

Here’s a partial list of the beneficial pairings of
vegetables and herbs commonly grown in The
Bahamas:

WHILE a schoolteacher
for 43 years | became
used to messages like
“Natasha loves Pedro”
written in books, on
sheets at the end of an
essay, on random pieces
of paper left on my table,
or even carved into the
lid of a desk. So Natasha
loves Pedro. In the flow
of human relationships
Natasha has very little
chance of going through
life with Pedro as her
helpmeet. Art is long;
teenage love is short.

BARBERSHOP

BEANS — Corn, cucumber, eggplant, marigold, nas-
turtium, oregano, sweet potato, rosemary.

BEETS - Onions.

BROCCOLI - Cucumber, mint, nasturtium, onions.
CABBAGE - Celery, garlic, mint, nasturtium, onions,
tomato.

CARROTS - Chives, garden peas, radish, rosemary,
sage.

CAULIFLOWER - Dill, garlic, mint, nasturtium, onions.
CELERY - Beans, cabbage, chives, garlic, nasturtium.
CORN - Beans, cucumber, garden peas, sweet pota-
to, pumpkin, squash, watermelon.

CUCUMBER - Corn, oregano, radish.

EGGPLANT - Coriander, marigold, sweet potato.
GARDEN PEAS - Chives, mint, turnips.

LETTUCE - Carrots, chives, garlic, radish.

LIMA BEANS - Marigold.

ONION - Beets, carrots, sweet potato.

SWEET POTATO - Beans, corn, coriander, eggplant,
nasturtium, onions.

PUMPKIN - Beans.

RADISH - Cucumber, lettuce, nasturtium, squash.
SQUASH - Borage, corn, marigold, mint, nasturtium,
oregano, radish, tomato.

SWEET PEPPER — Nasturtium.

SWEET POTATO - Beans, corn, eggplant, onion,
summer savory.

TOMATO - Basil, cabbage, celery, coriander, dill,
marigold, mint, parsley, sage, squash.

TURNIPS — Garden peas.

WATERMELON - Corn.

This list is far from exhaustive but gives a guide
to the most popular vegetable and herb compan-
ion plantings. And remember that thyme could
have been paired with just about all of the above.

In case you were interested, the thing between
Natasha and Pedro never did work out.

ej. hardy@coralwave.com



Pas LOVES PARSLEY... One example of the rae ielettoneins yaa herbs, vegetables and
flowering plants.



Homosexuality, p olitics and ethics

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE recent allegation circulated in the local
media that a former member of parliament may
have been arrested in Cuba on charges of sexual
misconduct with a male child, remains a hot top-
ic throughout many circles, and has a group of
men questioning the importance of integrity in the
political arena.

This week, Tribune Features visited Tonto’s
Barber Shop on Abundant Life Road, where its
owner Tonto, began by saying if the claims against
the former member of parliament were untrue,
then some statement should have been released to
the public to dispel the rumor.

The 33-year-old proprietor said: “Yeah I
believe it’s possible, and if it’s not true then the
MP should close the story and make a public
statement.” Tonto feels because the situation was
reported and never addressed by the former MP
or refuted by anyone else, foreigners looking at
the issue could very likely question ethics in
Bahamian society, especially when combined
with the recent allegations of extortion from a for-
mer senator.

One patron who requested to remain anony-
mous, said all of these allegations were simply an
attack against a certain political party, and said
flat out that any MP or citizen has the right to
sleep with who so ever they desired.

“Tt’s all tabloid information, your personal life
with who you sleep with or want to go to bed
with is your business, you don’t need nobody dic-
tating to you.”

The man claimed because the Cuban govern-
ment has not named any individual or acknowl-
edged the arrest, he views the entire incident as
nothing other than a ploy to malign his party’s
integrity with “malicious scandal.”

One barber who goes by the alias of ‘American
Boy,’ feels because the information first came
from a particular tabloid, there is without doubt
some truth to the matter.

“Tf the Punch said it, it gatta be 60 to 70 per cent
true, and I think it makes us look like some
freaks.”

The 21-year-old father of one, said after moving
back home after years of residing in the US, he is
now questioning whether he made the right deci-
sion. While acknowledging that the US does have
its share of shortcomings, the Bahamas should
not follow the same path because “we are a Chris-
tian nation with praying

people.”

He said with many Bahamians today going
against tradition and morality, the rise in crime and
increased economic hardship may be “God’s way
of telling us we need to go back to the basics.”

A regular customer at Tonto’s, 23-year-old
accountant Don Williams, said with all the nega-
tive publicity on the Bahamas in recent news, he
questions if there is anything good to say about the
Bahamas from a foreigner’s point of view.

Don explained: “Other than the Super Bowl
commercial, do we have any good news interna-
tionally.”

Don feels whether something happens over-
seas or at home, if it’s a question of a political
personality’s integrity, morality, or illicit behavior,
there should always be some investigation as well
as some personal onus to the situation, especially

“It’s all tabloid
information, your
personal life with who
you sleep with or want
to go to bed with is your
business, you don’t need
nobody dictating to you.”



if they are guilty.

Taking the discussion even further, Don said the
issue of homosexuality in Bahamian politics and
society has now taken on a new identity. He said
although all people should be free to decide on
whatever lifestyle they

desire, the blatant exhibition of alternative
lifestyle in various clubs, hotels, and other public
places will in the future have a negative impact on
Bahamian life as we know it.

With an increased number of churches report-
ing a decline in membership, and an obvious void
of good role models in many sectors of society,
there is also concern for the nation’s youth and
overall well-being.

As this talk of morality and homosexuality con-
tinues, we ask that you write to us and tell us
what you think.

Write to lallen@tribunemedia.net.

¢ Next week, we will feature a new barber shop to
discuss the issue of sweethearting and the prevalence
of bastard children in Bahamian society.



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———
OP
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





SOCIAL SER-
VICES Minister
Loretta Butler-

Turner gave an
address at the
church service
for ‘Women
and Men Unit-
ed To End Vio-
lence Against
Women And
Girls.’



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

INTERNATIONAL Women’s
Day which was celebrated over the
course of March 2 to 8, is a time
used by women throughout the
globe to bring to the forefront issues
which remain an obstacle to the
advancement of women as equal
contributors in all levels of society.

The day which was first recog-
nised by American Clara Zetkin in
1911, was started to validate women
during the early years of the indus-

The week-long event brings
to the forefront issues still
plaguing women

trialisation era, in the areas of poli-
tics, economics, and in their social
advancements.

Recognised locally with a wom-
en’s issues workshop held at the
Police Conference centre on Satur-
day, representatives from various
non-profit and government organi-
sations, as well as public supporters
showed up to learn more of what
could be done to further liberate

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

women in the community.

Under the theme of “Women and
Men United To End Violence
Against Women And Girls,” the
event culminated with a church ser-
vice on Sunday at the St Matthews
Anglican Church, where Social Ser-
vices Minister Loretta Butler-Turn-
er gave an address.

Women like Dame Doris Johnson
who paved the way for women in
Bahamian politics, and Mable Walk-
er who aggigated for better salaries
in the teaching profession have giv-
en today’s Bahamian women a
strong foundation to continue in the
fight for equality and growth.



Licks aint violence, they just show love: Ask Rihanna

@ By IAN BETHELL-
BENETT

AFTER Rihanna's boyfriend
beat her, she went back to him.
But that's not the amazing part
of the story. Perhaps the most
amazing part of the entire thing
is that people support her deci-
sion to go back. More than a
generation after Naipaul's char-
acter in Miguel Street keeps the
cricket bat well-oiled for her hus-
band to beat her with it, women
are still going back to the men
who slap them around.

Where does machismo end
and enabling machismo begin?
When the case broke the young
rapper in question said that he
was seeking council from his
family and his pastor. Perhaps
he suddenly thought that he
might have a problem. How
long, though, will his counselling
session last? How long will it
be before his need to dominate
arises again? Obviously the fam-
ilies of the performers in ques-
tion agree with their decisions
to reconcile. But this then brings
us to the general point. Vio-

lence against women is common.
And many women are often the
ones who most promote violent
behaviour in their men. One
would have thought that this
kind of behaviour started when
couples were old and married,
but these days, the more knowl-
edge we have shows us that it in
fact starts far earlier than that.
On campus the other day at
the University of Puerto Rico,
as a part of the celebration of
International Woman's
Day/Week, one of the organisa-
tions had a talk about violence
among young couples. The talk
was given by a member of the
Department for Women's
Affairs, Or the Procuradora de
Las Mujeres (in Spanish). The
organisers put the event togeth-
er because of a need among
young women on campus for
this service. Counsellors see
many young women every term
that suffer from violence in their
relationships with their
boyfriends. Amazingly, not one
student went. Notwithstanding
the girls who seek out help indi-
vidually, the activity was a flop.

What this seems to say is that
while violence on the whole is a
public ‘thing’, domestic violence
or violence against women is a
private matter and should never
be brought into the public
sphere. Violence is, however,
violence and there is no code of
silence around it.

Unfortunately, Rihanna's
return to her abusive rapper
man, is not only about her, it
speaks volumes about what our
young people are seeing and
doing. Worse, the artist has
made a statement, a very public
statement, that will have long-
lasting and wide reaching reper-
cussions: 'I love him, even if he
beats me and we can make this
work’.

Many young girls, already in
odd mental and emotional
spaces, see this and figure that if
their man beats them, at least-
like Rihanna-he's showing me
some kind of attention, and he
says he loves me. Alas, the road
to hell is paved with so many
mistaken cases of love. Love is
not about blows. Our parents
often gave us the rod as parents

to try to bring us up properly,
to form us into people they
would be proud of. Yes, some
parents were a little 'slap-hap-
py’, but there is a difference
between a parent punishing a
child for rude behaviour and a
partner ‘punishing’ another part-
ner for ‘misbehaviour’. This dis-
tinction is, however, lost on
many young women. ‘He only
beat me cause he love me and he
was 'vex' cause I didn't show
him enough attention’. But
nothing exists in splendid isola-
tion. Peer pressure also encour-
ages young women to stay in or
even seek out abusive relation-
ships with the desirable young
man, even though everyone
Knows ‘he like to beat his
woman’. Actually, that usually
makes him more desirable. 'He
know how to deal with woman’.
So, where does machismo end
and enabling machismo begin?

Obviously a woman in her
right mind will not go looking
for licks, but somehow she
allows it to happen. This is obvi-
ously an oversimplification. But,
again, nothing exists in isolation.

Violence and especially violence
against women is related to the
reality that we are living today.
In other Caribbean countries
like Belize and Guyana they are
capturing data that shows that
violence against women is ris-
ing as the economic crisis wors-
ens. In Puerto Rico, the rates of
murder and suicide have gone
through the roof. UNCTAD-
or the UN's agency on trade,
also examines the relationship
between violence and unem-
ployment. The male-empower-
ing organisation PROMUNDO
has just released a report that
deals with the correlation
between forced unemployment
and violence. These sources
clearly elucidate the link
between high male unemploy-
ment and the increase in domes-
tic violence. It must be true as
well that the Bahamian organi-
sations and newspapers are
working on presenting such
facts. Violence is not only about
blows or licks, but also about
mental abuse as well as sexual
abuse. But we have already
gone through this. What is sad

is that Popular Culture/media
garners more attention than
reports from the UN or the Min-
istry of Health or Youth.

Going back to Naipaul's
Miguel Street, men had to be
silent, respected, feared, and
their abuse of women was often
publicly condoned. What was
not condoned was women talk-
ing about it. One of the charac-
ters in the book, a woman out of
place in Miguel Street because
of her class/colour, lives there
with a man who the reader finds
out later is her boyfriend, having
left her husband for him. The
man in question lays so many
blows on her that she attempts
to explain away, apologise for,
and even condone until eventu-
ally she leaves. Love, Love,
Love alone can't even make up
for the blows he puts on her.
She eventually returns to her
‘real’ life. What is amazing
again, is that she kept offering
excuses for his violence, his
behaviour. Where was her self-
esteem?

PART 2 NEXT WEEK

Quiet desperation at work

As I meet employees from different
companies, I am beginning to see a par-
ticular commonality in corporate and
business cultures. Thoreau captured
what I witness in this simple quotation,
“The mass of men lead lives of quiet
desperation.”

When I speak to employees there is a
majority that feels a sense of entrap-
ment. They need a job, especially during
difficult economic times, but they feel
underutilised and helpless about find-
ing the work that brings them joy or
excitement. They feel invisible and
unable or unwilling to do anything about
it and others feel overtly victimised.

Thear many stories but one particular
example stands out. There is a supervi-
sor, Joe, who was asked to meet with his
team to share information about a
change in his department. He was reluc-
tant to schedule a meeting because
whenever he holds a meeting, his man-
ager reacts negatively if she is not invit-
ed and attacks the staff if she is invited.

Inviting her would not be a challenge
if employees were comfortable being
authentic in her presence, so on one
hand, Joe should hold meetings but he
would rather not experience the mental
and emotional anguish of being raked
over the coals so meetings are avoided at
all costs. As a result, there is stagna-
tion, ill informed employees, a lack of
trust and a huge need to preserve self



within his department.

In other cases of quiet desperation,
employees wait and wait until an exec-
utive or manager recognises their poten-
tial. There aren't enough leaders who
take interest in mentoring so employees
end up stuck doing the same thing over
and over unless the manager has too
much work. Employees are not
stretched. Instead, they are left to their
own devices to develop themselves. The
trouble with this model is that employees
can't possibly know what they don't
know.

There are employees who long to be
developed, who are given feedback that
is either not constructive or does not
add any particular value. Comments
like, “Oh you are doing a great job” or
“we have plans for you.” Most times
these non-specific, statements are vague
by design, they keep your hopes alive
enough so that you will hang on to the
appearance of a promise of a bright
future. When the waiting goes on and

on, some employees get tired of the lack
of specificity and leave, others sit back
and patiently experience the inter-
minable wait, hoping they will be recog-
nised for their achievements.

Tunderstand fully that companies can-
not make promises of promotions or
transfers and this is reasonable, but com-
mitments can be made to employees for
developmental opportunities. Devel-
oping employees is a proven retention
strategy. Even if you don't have the
training budget, mentoring or stretch
projects can be used to provide employ-
ees with new opportunities to grow.

At other times, stagnation may occur
when less talented, more political, spin
savvy co-workers continuously attempt
to “show up” other employees, using
their relationships with executives and
powerbrokers to manipulate informa-
tion about you and anyone else they
view as a competitor. They may not be
as competent as you but they are blessed
with the gift of “gab” and can talk their
way into the jobs they desire.

As an employees you experience qui-
et desperation because you feel power-
less for one reason or another. You
believe you are immobilised because
you believe you should wait until your
turn comes (seniority), or it could be
that you are waiting for someone to
notice your positive contribution to the
bottom line.

Powerlessness is a state of mind.
When you think you are powerless, your
mind is playing a trick on you, causing
you to believe that you are forced to

accept your lot at the office and watch
your coworkers get what they want.
Some scholars link it to pessimism
because pessimists view circumstances as
though they don't have a choice.

YOU DO HAVE A CHOICE

The first step in digging yourself out of
your perceived predicament is to realise
that you always have a choice. You
have a choice about which company you
work for, your department, whether or
not you move to a new job and if you
decide to move, what is the best timing.
When I meet people who believe there
is no choice, most times I find that they
don't have a personally developed blue-
print for their career or personal devel-
opment.

I have viewed many types of career
development plans. Some employees
plan to move up the hierarchy within
the company they work for and others
are open to moving within an industry.
There are employees who are not inter-
ested in a promotion because they don't
want anyone reporting to them or
because they are about to retire. Other
employees want a job that is familiar
because they are preparing to change
career paths or even open their own
company.

There are even business owners who
feel trapped by their business. They
become tired of the routine and start to
resent having people who are depen-
dent on them for a salary because they
want to be free.

BREAK OUT OF YOUR TRANCE:
REINVENT YOURSELF

Start by identifying what it is that you
want to do and then create a plan to
achieve your goals. Always recognise
that you have a choice and don't buy
into the deception that you have no pos-
sibilities. If you get creative, no matter
your age or educational background you
can find something that you can do. Then
there is the question of risk. Should you
risk making the change? How will it
impact you and your family? Should you
jeopardise guaranteed income?

Even when you think you don't have a
choice, you are making a choice to go
with the flow. Why not take control of
your career? When you start perceiving
choices, you feel less trapped, more alive,
and less affected by apparent stagnation
or immobility.

I have witnessed profound transfor-
mations within employees who create a
plan. When you have a plan, you are not
afraid of losing your job and you have
more confidence because of your focus.
Even if you don't have an entire plan
documented you can be re-invigorated
by potential, hope and most important-
ly the possibility of freedom brought
about by taking small steps toward your
personal goals.

¢ Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul
an HR Consulting and Leadership Develop-
ment company. If you are interested in assis-
tance with planning your career you can con-

Obesity in pets

BECAUSE I am considered
to be a health fitness junky and
practise good eating habits all
year long, I can only wish the
same for my clients and their
owners as well. So I spend a good
part of my day at the clinic talk-
ing with pet owners about how to
improve the quality of their lives
as well as of their pets with
regard to fitness.

One subject that seems to be
especially difficult for many pet
owners is that of weight control
mainly because they often have a
problem controlling their own
weight. Today, I will talk about
obesity and the causes of weight
gain in pets and how extra body
fat can adversely affect their well
being. Obesity is an excess of
body fat that impairs health or
normal body function. This con-
dition is considered the most
common and important nutri-
tional disorder of dogs and is esti-
mated to affect about 25 per cent
of pet dogs seen by veterinari-
ans.

A lot of pet owners often ask



me, “What is my ideal weight for
my potcake?” I try to stay away
from actual numbers of pounds
but rather tell clients to do the
“Rib Test”. This test involves
simply feeling for your pet’s rib
bones along the side of his chest
wall. If you can easily feel the
rib bones as you move your hand
backward then your dog/cat is

likely to be at good body weight.
If on the other hand you have to
press in fairly hard to feel the
ribs then your pet s likely to be
carrying a few extra pounds. Of
course, if you can ever see rib
lines then your pet is too thin.

Fat tissue is remarkably effi-
cient at storing energy. When
the number of calories taken in
(food) exceeds the calories
expended, these extra calories
are stored as body fat. This is
easily the most common cause
of obesity in our pets. Simply
put we often feed our pets too
much. Does that remind us
about the amount of food that
we eat? Yes, we pet owners also
eat too much, hence the weight
gain.

Of course there are some
medical reasons for excessive
weight gain. Simply spaying or
neutering you pet will increase
the likelihood of weight gain.
(This is not a reason to avoid
spaying or neutering your dog
because the weight gain is quite
preventable.) Some endocrine

problems, such as low thyroid
gland function, and excessive
adrenal gland function can be
associated with unexpected
weight gain.

Some may argue that a little
extra weight is not a health risk
for pets, but the facts just don’t
support that position. There are
many health problems that are
associated with obese pets. Take
for instance, arthritis. Joint pain
can affect any dog or cat, but in
the overweight pet, the arthritis
will be aggravated by the extra
pounds the joints have to sup-
port. In addition, the heavy ani-
mal will tend to be less active
and have poor muscle tone,
which is important for healthy
joint function. Obese pets have
higher risks for developing dis-
eases of the pancreas (including
diabetes), liver, lungs, and gastro
intestinal tract. Increased high
blood pressure, anesthetic and
surgical risks, and possible
reduced resistance to infection
are additional concerns with
overweight pets.

If you think your dog is over-
weight after doing the Rib Test,
your veterinarian should be able
to give you some good ideas on
how to take off some of the extra
weight. Sometimes, a complete
physical exam is recommended
with blood and urine tests to rule

tact her at www.orgsoul.com.

out underlying problems. If all
the tests are normal, a safe
weight control plan can be devel-
oped. The corner stone of your
pet’s weight loss program will
be reduced calorie intake with
increased calorie utilisation-or
the eat less, exercise more rule.
Your veterinarian will recom-
mend some excellent low fat/low
calorie diet options that can
make the difference between
success and failure. Feed only
the amount your vet recom-
mends each day. Resist from
offering your pet treats from the
table or in the form of dog bis-
cuits. Try to make exercise a reg-
ular part of your pet’s daily rou-
tine. The good part about a dai-
ly walk with your dog is that you
both benefit. Most weight con-
trol programs take approxi-
mately 4-8 months to reach their
goal. As a veterinarian, I see
many medical problems that
require complex and expensive
testing and treatment. Obesity
on the other hand is simple to
diagnose and in most cases sim-
ple and inexpensive to treat. I
whole heartedly believe that if
we were to keep our bodies and
our pets at a trim lean weight, we
will quite possibly improve the
quality and quantity of life not
only for our pets, but ourselves
as well.

READY, SET,
WEAVE

FROM page 12

i ferent way. I do not see it as
? I used to and now I see it as
? art,” Mrs Neely said.

? Mrs Neely said she is
? grateful to the all the young
? women that came out and
? supported her as models at
? the show (Tia, Florine, Eisha,
? Alicia, Lydia, Kissy, Aman-
? da, Thea, and her male mod-
: el Kareem). Mrs Neely said
? she would encourage anyone
i who wants to get into cos-
? metology, to go into it lov-
: ing it.

i “With me I would like to
? soar to higher heights and
? my husband is my biggest
? fan. In order for you to per-
: fect anything, you must grow
? to love it in order for it to
i become natural. The more
? hands on you are in your
? work, the better you will
: become. Cosmetology is an
? excellent field to go into
? because it is art as well as a
? ministry because different
? people are in you chair dai-
? ly,” Mrs Neely said.





ils

THE WEATHER REPO

5-Day FORECAST

TUESDAY, MARCH 10TH, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST






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a ~— i — ie Low | MODERATE | HicH | \. HIGH Amsterdam 47/8 36/2 1 47/8 37/2 pc Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet __10-20 Miles 74° F
ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 52/11 32/0 pe 4677 31/0 c= ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
High: 84° F/26°C AR , Bright and sunny. A moonlit sky. Sunny. Mostly sunny. Partly sunny, breezy Partly sunny. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 61/16 44/6 s S915 49/9 pc Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Fa ake FAA°C ~ © and pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 67/19 58/14 c 64/17 59/15 sh
: oy" la Hi h: 80° Hi h: 80° Hi h: 80° Hi h: 84° Bangkok 93/383 77/25 pc 95/35 79/26 pc
L- @ ° ° g ° g ° g ° g ° Barbados 84/28 74/23 pc 85/29 74/23 sh
TAMPA ls High: 82 Low: 70 Low: 69 Low: 71 Low: 71 Low: 73 ES) Barcelona 60/15 49/9 s 5015 48/8 po PI) VA ee 1)
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Low: 61° F/16°C 3 r. The at AccuWeather RealFeel aE an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 8:04 a.m. 3.0 1:43 a.m. -0.4 Belgrad 43/6 37/2 47/8 34/1 sh
e Q Fa - elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 8:23pm. 3.0 2:08pm. -0.3 an e 41/5 32/0 = 42/5 34/1 ;
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CT ae WednesdayS@@am. 20° 22am. 04 Bermuda 66/18 62/16 c 6719 63/17 s
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) ae Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday 31am. 28 3:19am. 04 Brussels 45/7 34/1 50/10 41/5 pe
' ~~ ABACO Temperature 9:52pm. 3.1 3:31pm. -0.3 Budapest 48/8 36/2 sh 45/7 =. 33/0 r
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C - ow: 64° F/1 Normal high .... 79° F/26°G EE TE alcutta 96/35 78/25 c 98/36 74/23 pc
; i Normal low . 65° F/18° C Calgary -1/-18 -13/-25 pe 21/-6 4/-15 pc
A, ad ; @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's WGN senctetes feces Meson 75° F/2d° C SUN ay Ty ify Cancun 84/28 68/20 s 95/29 68/20 pc
4 at High: 80° F/27°C Pies Last year's low pigcipey lc seoesrieee estas ae 69° F/21° C ; Caracas 77/25 62/16 s 83/28 68/20 pc
‘eae Low: 62°F/17°C oe Precipitation /_ ree ie am. Lay ae p.m. Casablanca 74/23 58/14 c 76/24 59/15 s
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i FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date . Full Last New First Dublin 48/8 45/7 pc 52/11 43/6 sh :
High: 81°F/27°C @ High: 79° F/26° C Normal year to date 0... cece 3.94" aa a Frankfurt 43/6 36/2 r 46/7 37/2 pe
Low: 67°F/19°C Low: 62° F/17°C Geneva 41/5 37/2 + 46/7 33/0 c
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a @ Forecasts and graphics provided by Eile 3 Havana 84/28 61/16 s 84/28 60/15 s
‘ny MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar. 10 Mar. 18 Mar.26 Apr.2 Helsinki 34/1 30/-1 sn 34/1 28/-2 sf Showers Miamni
High: 82° F/27°C 3 Hong Kong 73/22 63/17 pc 75/23 64/17 pc T-storms 82/64
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High: 82° F/28° C Low: 64° F/18°C Istanbul 50/10 38/3 r 50/10 44/6 c Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
Low: 70° F/21°C Jerusalem 58/14 43/6 pe 64/17 50/10 pc Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. WAT) fienflnlln
OW: Johannesburg 74/23 54/12 t 74/23 55/12 t me Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary engunllt-
KEY WEST eX - Kingston 82/27 72/22 s 84/28 75/23 s
High: 78° F/26°C CAT ISLAND Lima 83/28 69/20 « 84/28 67/19 ¢ Os (03) 10s 20s (B05) 40s
Low: 68° F/20°C High: 79° F/26” C London 52/11 37/2 sh 55/12 45/7 pc
3 Low: 61° F/16°C Madrid 68/20 37/2 s 68/20 40/4 s
@ = Manila 90/32 73/22 pc 88/31 75/23 s
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Low: 69° F/21° C fe -64°F/18°C Munich 39/3 35/1 sn 36/2 30/-1 sn
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS ee Nairobi 91/32 58/14 s 89/31 60/15 s
i i ' High: 84° F/29° C New Delhi 88/31 59/15 pc 82/27 59/15 s
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Today an ra waite aie ene MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 81/27 73/22 pe 83/28 71/21 s ies to Auto Insurance.
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 83° F/28° C San Juan 84/28 64/17 pc 94/34 68/20 s the smart choice is
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Albuquerque 63/17 36/2 s 647 38/3 s Indianapolis 68/20 38/3 t 47/8 21/-6 pc Philadelphia 47/8 42/5 1 58/14 39/3 sh antiago s s M navemen
Anchorage 33/0 25/-3 sn 35/1 24/-4 sn Jacksonville 82/27 54/12 $s 81/27 55/12 s Phoenix 74/23 51/10 $s 77/25 5412 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 82/27 66/18 pe 85/29 66/18 pc , Oo le oan trust.
Atlanta 80/26 55/12 po 71/21 44/6 t Kansas City 52/11 20/6 t 36/2 15/-9 s Pittsburgh 58/14 45/77 + S713. 25/3 pe RAGGEDISLAND — High:86°F/s0°c = _ a — r one ee t : aD ¥
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Boston 41/5 34/1 pe 478 310 © Los Angeles 65/18 48/8 s 68/20 48/8 pc St. Louis 68/20 31/0 t 40/4 22/-5 pe ° om ae “ORES Ss SESMES Ta Se ,
Buffalo 42/5 40/4 1 44/6 24/-4 ¢ Louisville 75/23 45/7 54/12 29/-1 pe Salt Lake City 42/5 23/-5 c 44/6 26/-3 pc GREATINAGUA Tala 60/15 47/8 c 56/13 42/5 = INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Charleston, SC 75/23 5713 pe 81/27 52/11 pe Memphis 78/25 47/8 t 53/11 36/2 46 San Antonio 81/27 66/18 pce 74/23 48/8 t High: 84° F/29°C Taal 42/5 33/0 F 45/7 19/-7 E “pill solemn ee
Chicago 521 27/-2 t 33/0 13/-10 pc Miami 82/27 64/17 s 82/27 67H9 ss San Diego 64417 5110 s 64/17 52/11 pc papel tee a J (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
: : : Low: 65° F/18°C Trinidad 88/31 74/23 t 76/24 72/22 sh . a
Cleveland 56/13 40/4 1 50/10 23/-5 pc Minneapolis 32/0 5/15 sn 6/-14 O17 pe San Francisco 60/15 43/6 s 59/15 45/7 pc eee 35/1 23/-5 s 39/3 29/-1 pc : p it
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Detroit S110 330 1 38/8 21-6 pe —_New York 42/5 38/3 + 521 37/2 r — Tampa 80/26 6116 s 80/26 62/16 s a Winnipeg 4/47 -14/-23 sn WAT -B/-21 Tet) SD Tes (OND) SSPSG00 | (OAT) MSPAIOY |W (240) S3D-DERT | Tet (D8) SU- TONE
Honolulu 79/26 68/20 c 80/26 67/19 s Oklahoma City 73/22 31/0 pc 44/6 31/0 ¢ Tucson 71/21 47/8 s 76/24 49/9 s << 7 — seeeeeese
Houston 83/28 64/17 po 76/24 49/9 t Orlando B4/28 57/13 s 84/28 59/15 s Washington,DC 51/10 47/8 r 65/18 39/3 sh The ee





@ By ALEX MISSICK The event was
Tribune Features Reporter put on by the
TT Bahamian Cosme-
AIR stylist Sharron felogstend Bate
ber Association

Sweeting-Neely of Fab- and sponsored by

THE TRIBUNE

ulous Ronnie Beauty

Salon was thrilled to
present her stunning work at
the Advanced Inspiration
2009 hair show held on
March 1 at the Wyndham

Nassau resort and casino.

Bijoux Beauty ele-
ments. There were
AO hair stylists
from major salons
around the island
showcasing their
talents in the dif-
ferent hair style
techniques.

Mrs Neely’s
business is located on Antigua Street in Elizabeth Estates,
initially she just wanted to enter the competition for the
exposure and experience.

“We had a showcase and a competition. The cosmetol-
ogy association wanted us to showcase what our salons
would normally offer. I put my everything in the competi-
tion because it did not come easy,” Mrs Neely said.

In order to prepare herself for the event, Mrs Neely said
she chose to go abroad just to take a look at different tech-
niques she may have missed.

“T went away to a friend of mine who is a cosmetologist.
Knowing I was going into a competition with people who
have been in the business 40 plus years, you would always
have to try and put yourself out there. It was a big sacrifice
and I felt it was worth it. I studied certain styles to see
what I would think the judges would look for,” Mrs Neely
said.

There were three categories: weaving, braids and fanta-
sy. Mrs Neely was the winner in the weaving competition
and took home an $800 prize along with bragging rights
for her winning piece.

Mrs Neely said although she loves styling hair, it was not
something she grew up thinking about.

“T grew up doing hair but grew up never really wanting
to venture into cosmetology. I really wanted to be a nurse.
T had a job and wanted to do something on the side and I
started to work at home doing braids and I grew to love
it,” Mrs Neely said.

Mrs Neely said she left her job as a waitress to pursue
cosmetology and loves every minute of it.

“My passion now is hair. I find myself venturing into dif-
ferent styles and avenues of the hair business in a totally dif-

SEE page 10

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2009

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