Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{T\

Pim flowin’ it

81F
71F

BRIGHT AND
SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.88

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

HIGH
LOW



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Tragic pilot
Te

COMA
SS STA St et

rour-year'- Olt
gin dies



eisai.



Dr Michael
Darville
fills PLP

Senate seat

Physician replaces
Pleasant Bridgewater

Home destroyed
near Pride Estates

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A FOUR-year-old girl died
tragically in a blaze that
engulfed her wooden home
near Pride Estates sub-divi-
sion on Saturday night.

Police say they received
reports of a fire in a bushy
area on the border of the
southern portion of the Pride
Estates sub-division shortly
after 7pm.

Neighbours who tried to
extinguish the fire told The
Tribune yesterday that the
blaze had already consumed
the small wooden structure
before firefighters arrived at
the scene.

Police reported that, after
firefighters extinguished the
blaze, they discovered the
remains of a child on the floor
of the north-western section
of the burnt-out structure.

The remains, believed to
be those of the four-year-old
girl who was at home at the
time, had been burned

beyond recognition.

Neighbours who expressed
shock and dismay over the
incident claimed the child was
in her stepfather’s care at the
time, and was alone in the
house when the blaze erupted.

They told The Tribune that
the stepfather had gone to a
shop nearby only to return
and find the house engulfed
in flames. Some claimed the
child had been locked in the
house.

A neighbour who tried to
extinguish the blaze told The
Tribune: "When I reach on
the scene I meet the house
engulfed in flames. Me and
the other fellas them we try
out the fire.

“By the time we got the fire
team and the fire people reach
we find out that there was a
little youth inside who perish
in the fire.

"Everybody here really sor-
ry about it, it’s one of them
accidents in life that nobody

SEE page 11

Stel: 394-1378

Wepre oa Aer Cid Geeta |

Offer Good Until:
March 14th

Re ae Cpe

Wee ate ca

——
Sea

Junior

Stop in TODAY and LOOK for the
BOSS Target for MORE great DEALS!





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

FIREFIGHTERS show the area where the Bad of the four-year-

old girl was found.

PM vows that
govt will reduce
unemployment

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham has
vowed that the Free National
Movement government will
reduce the unemployment
rate from double digits again
as it has done previously in
the Bahamas.

At the opening of the new
$60 million dry dock at Grand
Bahama Shipyard on Satur-
day, Mr Ingraham gave his

SEE page 11

Quiznos



‘to shrink for
first time since
World War I

m By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE World Bank report-
ed yesterday that the global
economy will shrink in 2009
for the first time since World
War II, confirming earlier esti-
mates raised by officials at the
International Monetary Fund.

Noting the significance of
the announcement, Minister
of State for Finance Zhivar-
go Laing said the Bahamas

SEE page 11

BIG GREAKE

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

OVER a month after Pleas-
ant Bridgewater resigned
from the Senate, PLP leader
Perry Christie yesterday offi-
cially announced that physi-
cian Dr Michael Ronald
Darville of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, will fill the vacancy
left in the upper chamber.

This move ends weeks of
speculation about which
Grand Bahama resident
would join the parliamentary
ranks of the PLP.

In welcoming Dr Darville,
Mr Christie in a press state-
ment said: “I am delighted
that Dr Darville has accept-
ed my call for front-line ser-
vice in the national legislature
under the banner of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party.

“He is an individual of ster-
ling character and outstand-



TWO WORKERS prepare rm fae a number of broken glass panels at

Sunburst Paint on Harrold Road.

ing accomplishment, most
notably in the fields of medi-
cine and business in Grand
Bahama. He steps to the fore
at a time in our country’s life -
including, most especially, the
life of Grand Bahama - when
individuals of intelligence,
proven ability, and social com-
passion are required more
than ever before — Dr Darville
is such an individual.”

Mr Christie yesterday
advised Governor General
Arthur Hanna to appoint Dr
Darville.

Dr Darville practises medi-
cine in Freeport as a partner
in the Grand Bahama Family
Medical Centre.

He holds an MBBS degree
in medicine from the Univer-
sity of the West Indies and a
degree in engineering from
the University of Windsor in

SEE page 11



o> Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Former minister’s business
and home are broken into

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Trade Minister Leslie Miller had his business broken into
over the weekend by burglars who sought to use this distraction as a
means to gain entry into his home.

On Friday night, Sunburst Paint on Harrold Road had three of its
large window panes broken by an unknown assailant sometime after
11pm.

On the surveillance video the male assailant is seen wielding a ham-
mer as he smashes window after window and then - without explana-
tion - flees the area.

Mr Miller, who was asleep at his home at the time, rushed to the paint

SEE page 11

SHU

a.

Te

-9

cus *

pelll8a

92.99

uheese wart | your — -

~ PRICES MAY VARY





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Government aims to reduce

bureaucracy of doing business

FREEPORT —- The FNM
government will seek to “under-
take major reforms of govern-
mental processes and proce-
dures” to reduce the bureau-
cracy of doing business with the
government, said Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham stated that the
Bahamas is a very bureaucratic
country that is still very much
tied to its colonial past.

“We have not reviewed and
looked at all the things we
would require to be done for
the conduct of business for the
government,” he said on Satur-
day in Grand Bahama.

“One of the things that we
seek to do is to undertake major
reforms of governmental
processes and procedures so
that people can do business with
the government without having
to spend an inordinate amount
of time and money to have very
simple and straightforward
things undertaken.”

Mr Ingraham was speaking
at the official opening of the
third dry dock at Grand
Bahama Shipyard.

He said they are going to
seek to use the facility as an
example of how government
can cause the processes of gov-



“One of the things
that we seek to do
is to undertake
major reforms of
governmental
processes and
procedures so that
people can do
business with the
government without
having to spend an
inordinate amount
of time and money
to have very simple
and straightforward
things undertaken.”



Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham

ernment to be speeded up.
“One of the things that I nev-
er tire of telling my colleagues is
that we are in a global environ-
ment and we seek to provide
international services from The
Bahamas; that is the basis of the



Bahamian economy — the pro-
vision of services. We are not
manufacturers, we are not pro-
ducers.

“We are in the business of
providing services whether that
is in tourism, or as in the case
today, services in terms of ship
care, maintenance and repair.

“And if you are in that busi-
ness and you do not have suffi-


























For every

cient local business, as we do
not, to be able to provide
employment and business
opportunities for the society,
then you have to be able to
attract it from outside the coun-
try,” Mr Ingraham said.

He pointed out that the ship-
yard requires equipment, parts,
services and labour from out-
side the country for its enter-
prise.

Mr Ingraham noted that all
of the ships that chose to come
the shipyard in the Bahamas are
foreign-owned and require
equipment, services, goods and
parts and labour not available in
the Bahamas.

“The company that builds a
ship in Germany that provides a
warranty for the engine or oth-
er parts on the ship has to cause
that part to be fixed or repaired
when something goes wrong.

Manufacturer

“Tt is not a question of dri-
ving down the street and say-
ing, ‘I can find Jack Jones who
is a mechanic to fix the engine
for me today.’ Someone from
the manufacturer will need to
come in and repair the part and
do so in the shortest possible
time.

“Tf a ship breaks down in Fort
Lauderdale, Florida, it has been
known for a 747 to be chartered
from Europe to come with all
the parts, equipment and per-
sonnel to cause it to be fixed,
fixed in a short period of time
and without a lot of undue
bureaucracy and paperwork,”
said Mr Ingraham.

The GB Shipyard began its
operation in the Bahamas in
1999 and began training in 2000.

Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch, chair-
man and CEO, commended the
Bahamas government for its
tremendous support.

He reported that the shipyard
had grown over the years from
an enterprise with a few million
in revenue and under 100
employees to a full-scale facili-
ty earning revenues of over
$130 million and an average
number of permanent and tem-
porary employees of over 800.

Mr Rotkirch said the facility
is the biggest ship repair facility
in the region, with three floating
docks. The third dry dock was
acquired in 2008 from France
at an investment of $60 million.

He said the commissioning of
the new dock represents anoth-
er milestone for the shipyard.

Mr Ingraham said the gov-
ernment is very appreciative of
the owners of Royal Caribbean
and Carnival for investment in
the shipyard in the Bahamas.

Carnival and Royal
Caribbean are the major owners
and operators of cruise ships
and it is primarily their ships
that come here to be repaired
and refurbished.

"And so we do have the
opportunity on a continuing
basis to demonstrate to them
that we are appreciative of their
investment in The Bahamas and
that we are going take full
advantage of it.

"On behalf of the Govern-
ment of The Bahamas and res-
idents of Grand Bahama I wish
to say thank you.

“T trus you are continuing to
feel comfortable with us, and
the extent to which there are
things we need to work on we
would be happy to do so," said
Mr Ingraham.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Sports

BUSINESS SECTION
Business

INSIGHT SECTION

Plea OO eo oO ambalic
See ea ne eee ee ere P4

P12,13,14,15




blood




donation














3 lives can
be saved

Date:
Time:

Help save
Fic)

Give blood.

March 14, 20
11:00 — 4:00

Venue: Scotiabank Cable Beach Branch

Counselling offered by Dr. David Allen

Giveaways & prizes

Refreshments
Kiddie Corner

Financial Consultation

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



Murphyville, 2nd House right from Sears Road,
Telephone 322-8493

Anger over

letter informing of
end to duty-free
concessions

mBy PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

LOCAL light industry

i businesses are furious that

? the Ministry of Finance

: issued a mass letter over the
? weekend informing them

? that their duty-free conces-

: sions are set to finish by the

end of June.

Noting the enormous
efforts that other countries
around the world are taking

to ensure that local busi-
: nesses continue to thrive, a
: local store owner told The

Tribune yesterday that it

i seems as if the Bahamas
? government is working

“backwards”.
The ministry letter, signed

by Mark Edgar for the
; Financial Secretary, states:

“We bring to your attention

the provisions of item 8(4)

of Part B of the fourth

i schedule of the Tariff Act,

? which limits the aggregate

i period for duty-free conces-
i sions to five years from the
i first date of your approval.

“Applicants who received
exemption during the fiscal

i period July 1, 2003, to June
? 30, 2004, should note that
? their concessionary period
} will end June 30, 2009. All

other applicants after June

: 30, 2004, should note their
? five-year period from this
: date,” the letter reads.

A local businessman who
owns and operates a down-

town store said he would be
? forced to lay off staff if the

? government goes through

? with its plans to remove

? duty-free concessions.

Claiming that he is strug-

i gling as it is to simply “make
? it by”, the owner - who did

i not wish to be named - said

i he expected businesses

i throughout Nassau to start

: laying off staff shortly as a

? result of this letter.

“How do they expect you

i to survive? All over the

? world, other countries are

? making it easier for people

? to keep their business or

i their homes. So why are we
? going the reverse? How can

I afford to pay more now?

? Food prices are high, gas is

: going back up, if this tax

? goes through - because basi-
: cally it’s a tax - ’'m going to
i have to lay off a few people.

“T mean, I hate to do it,

: but business is business.

? And I tell you one thing, a

i lot of people are not going

i to be pleased with this. A lot

of these small companies
are going to have to cut

back and that’s only going
: to make a bad situation
? much worse,” he said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

Striking Red Pillbox hat, with tulle facial veil and large
tulle bow at the back of the hat.
Suits Church, Weddings and Teas

Rn a

area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

* Trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia, used under licence.

TE
EVERY DAY

VALUE |

‘ALL DAY, EVERY DAY.

REGULAR
FOOTLONGS *â„¢ $ T

SPOCY (THLLAM - THA
VEGGIE DELITE
TURRET BREAST & BLACK FOREST HA
BLT - COLD COT COMA
WEATEMLL WA) MARA
GWEN PUISTED CHIC MEN BREAST
ITALIAN ELT - TORREY BREAST
HLACK FOREST HAM

ODA 2009

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!
AT PARTICIPATING STORES





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 3



© nbriey The PLP wants unemployment

assistance available by April 1

Man in
hospital
after being
stabbed

A YOUNG man is in
critical condition in hospi-
tal after being stabbed
early yesterday.

Police reported that
shortly before 2am on
Sunday, a fight broke out
in the area of Carmichael
and Blue Hill Roads. A
22-year-old man was
stabbed in his left shoul-
der.

The victim was taken to
hospital for treatment.
Police are uncertain about
the circumstances and
have launched an investi-
gation.

¢ A 26-year-old man
was taken into custody on
Friday following the
seizure of a handgun and
two live rounds of ammu-
nition.

Police on patrol in
Carmichael Road around
noon stopped and
searched the driver of a
burgundy Nissan Sentra.

Officers found a 9mm

handgun in the front pock-

et of the driver’s trousers.

¢ Police seized 13 live
rounds of ammunition on
Saturday while on patrol
in Collins Avenue.

Officers from Southern
police station saw two
men acting suspiciously
near Eighth Terrace
around noon on Saturday.

The men fled when
approached. Police
searched the area and dis-
covered a ziploc bag con-
taining 13 live rounds of
ammunition for a .380
handgun.

No arrests were made

and investigations are con- }

tinuing.

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP is urging the gov-
ernment to make its
announced unemployment
assistance available to
Bahamians by as early as
April 1.

The Department of Statis-
tics revealed on Friday that
the latest unemployment fig-

ures are at a 15-year high, with
12.1 per cent of the workforce
in Nassau, and 14.6 per cent in
Grand Bahama without jobs.

Figures

In a press statement, PLP
chairman Glenys Hanna-Mar-
tin called these figures “stag-
gering and very worrisome in
their implications.”

“We support in full the gov-

ernment’s declared intention
to bring about relief by way
of unemployment assistance.

“While the prime minister
has indicated that this relief
will soon become available,
we urge the government to
ensure that it can be accessed
as early as April 1, or earlier, if
possible,” she said.

So as to minimise the suf-
fering and financial hardship
of unemployed Bahamians in

Minister willing to convene TRIFOR session

LABOUR and Maritime Affairs Min-
ister Dion Foulkes said yesterday that he is
willing to convene a special session of TRI-
FOR to discuss issues relating to the dis-
placement of former CLICO employees.

"I would be happy to convene a session
of TRIFOR to discuss this issue. I will
speak with Mr John Pinder about it and we
will come up with a convenient date," Mr
Foulkes told The Tribune yesterday.

Mr Foulkes, who played a leading role
in the establishment of The Tripartite
forum in 2000, said his ministry intends to
ensure that the rights of the former CLI-

CO employees are protected.

John Pinder, president of the National
Congress of Trade Unions, called on Mr Foulkes
to convene a special session of TRIFOR and appoint
a select committee to investigate the CLICO matter



DIM MeL Cs

icy liabilities.

"with the view to submitting recommen-
dations to amend the provisions of the
Employment Act to ensure that events
like this never occur in the Bahamas
again.

"Despite the many calls of the NCTUB
for the government to enact legislation to
better protect worker's rights, we are again
faced with a situation where workers are
being made redundant and not receiving
their legal entitlements as prescribed by
the Statute Laws of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas and subsequently many fam-
ilies could be negatively impacted. This is
unacceptable," Mr Pinder stated in the
release.

CLICO reportedly has just over 29,000 policy-
holders, over 170 staff and over $100 million in pol-























the immediate interim, Mrs
Hanna-Martin said “persons
out of work ought to be able
to access without hassle or
delay, the maximum assis-
tance available through the
agencies of the government.”

Details

“We would also ask the gov-
ernment to release to the pub-
lic as soon as it is available all
of the pertinent details rele-
vant to this unemployment
benefit scheme,” she
said.

The numbers revealed by
the Department of Statistics’
acting director Kalsie Dorsett
on Friday show that over
20,000 people are looking for
employment in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama.

Around half of all people
who are without work in

Grand Bahama lost their jobs
in the last six months, with 48
per cent of these people
reporting having been “laid-
off or dismissed,” the Depart-
ment’s report said.

In New Providence, one
third had become jobless in
the same period and, of these,
44 per cent were laid off or
dismissed.

Overall, in New Providence,
unemployment among the
134,400-strong labour force
rose from 8.7 per cent in May
last year to 12.1 per cent,
based on the interim survey
conducted last month by the
Department of Statistics.

In Grand Bahama, the
number of people without
work increased to 14.6 per
cent.

This leaves a total of 16,315
people without work in New
Providence and 4,195 in
Grand Bahama.

M I D W AY HOME IMPROVEMENTS

“Where Our Quality & Experience Shine!”

Specializing in:

Roofing, Home Maintenance, Painting & Varnishing,
Pressure & Mildew Cleaning, Roof Painting, Water

Se

Proofing, Plumbing, Window Cleaning, Drywall
Installation, Replace Rotten Woodwork,

Laminate Floor, Tiling, Repair

Cracks to Concrete Walls

LEROY TUCKER - Proprietor
Tel: 242-324-2153 ¢ Cell 432-3561 ¢ P.O. Box SP -60315

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Moet Thomoocs Rretoaanoy & Cuno Ever, on Tun Jon & Fem!

Masealy"s

Oly PRorsiowaL, Creme Sos Caps & UPoLeToey CA Ses,

* Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marhic Cleaning %&

Resirii Spsculet.

+ Prochen (Cleaning Spanos noms. Dapap 2. bhariy
Sul, bactere Civeaasz, Watermarks and Stains trom
& apcieig f& Famitare, 1a2 rit them to like acw

atk Trectios of replacement 2061.

* Carpet, Sofa's, Lowessns. Chairs. Caining Chairs, Cars,

Doan, Groen. Ties, Marte & Soe

* Pemaan, Worl d& Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist

Bache Polishieg. Reworaion & Cane
* Woed Floor Resteralion

Suited Stent Tech Profesional Cotracior

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN OO FF RIGHTY

re eC eer ee Toe cc © EI, OF
* pa sored eet

A A oe

PROCHEM SYSTEM fan)

Six Shot,
wounded in
Miami-Date
County

MIAMI GARDENS,
Fla.


































1 pc 5 Drawer Chest

Queen 8 Pc Set

Financing Available Through
King 8 Pe Se

Commonwealth Bank

Solid Wood

fini bel
ERECTOR OF “Deo"

POLICE are investi-
gating a shooting in
Miami Gardens that left
six wounded, according
to Associated Press.

The shooting hap-
pened early Sunday
near a party in the small
city, located northwest
of Miami’s downtown.

All six, including
some teenagers, were
airlifted to an area hos-
pital and are being
treated with non-life
threatening injuries.

This is the third mass
shooting in Miami-Dade
in as many months.

In February, four peo-
ple were wounded after
getting caught ina
spray of fire in a North
Miami complex.

In January, seven
were wounded and two
were killed in a shoot-
ing that happened ata
street gambling game in
Liberty City.

/
' +
i)
et



Easter Baskets
& Crafts

» Bunnies trom $2.99
» Colourful Baskets from $1.99

» Basket Bags 10 for $7.50
» Plastic Eqgs & Lots of Grass

» Easter Lillies and Callalillies
» Lovely Potted Orchids

+)

a eo sE%

ee ieaes ere

Che Mall-at-*Lanat hewn
BOX OFFDCE OPENS AT id-00 AN PAILY

Paap ek en:

fusca cv WA Yen ran nf
aro [os io
THER PERRYS MERGES TOUaL__| ete [0 [HA | fs [Ra

Sapna + Loon [em as
IWTERMATIOMAL =| tet 20 | A | een | 0 [sre |
frac [a ut a
rear [wn [eas [as [ua |

ane ee eee
pete raat |e ea
es [an P| | a0 [0
oemonnseorTaeuAN—c | Wi [wa [RA [wa [eo hss

Fit pita) Le E*

Eee eri Pe a Tan

Home Fabrics

ee RR ee Ome Pe eC ee Mol) gett Aae

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAA Tas
Be Me re ay
322-2157

rena ev [a [Wa | wo [oe |
[FRibwrTHETSTH | 1:05 | a5 | WIA | ets | a0 | 10:35

[nes sot woraar [ww [390 [ WA | 5 was 0s

Providing technology that works. fer [sa

@wicronet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

FINK PAMTHER i

nis 4 00 6 do

380-FLIX

56 MADEIRA STREET, PALMDALE

WAR DELL acer TOSHIBA 242.328.3040 « WWW.MIGRONET.BS

lemane





PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A solution to global warming?

IN A MEETING held at Breezes in Cable
Beach to discuss the Review of the Economic
Climate Change in the Caribbean, the Bahamas
was again warned that as one of the world’s
most vulnerable nations it must urgently address
the potentially irreversible effects of climate
change. If nothing is done these islands could
eventually become uninhabitable.

Mr Philip Weech, director of the Bahamas
Environment Science and Technology (BEST)
Commission, department of meteorology direc-
tor Arthur Rolle, and director of the Econom-
ic Commission for the Caribbean, Neil Pierre,
pointed to the undeniable effects of global
warming already being felt in this country’s
low-lying islands.

“Immediate action must be taken to address
climate change and the longer the action is
delayed the greater the costs in the future,” Mr
Pierre warned. “If we delay by a decade or two
we will have a situation that climate change
becomes unavoidable or irreversible and we
will reach a point of no return.”

This is not the first time that the Bahamas
has been warned. At the beginning of 2007 it
was told that some of its islands could be sub-
merged by 2030. Last year it was informed that
its carbon dioxide emissions per capita exceed-
ed those of the industrialised countries.

If all countries were to emit carbon dioxide at
levels similar to the Bahamas, the world would
exceed its current CO2 output by more than
200 per cent, said the United Nations in its
2007/2008 Human Development report.

This report seems alarmingly fanciful, but
anyone driving in the bumper-to-bumper traffic
of our busy streets, particularly in the morn-
ings and evenings — would find it believable.

Mr Eric Crowch, who with his wife Mar-
garet, came to the Bahamas in 1958 as the assis-
tant manager, then manager of the McAlpine
company, returns with his wife tomorrow to
their retirement home in South Wales after
their sixth visit since leaving the Bahamas in
March, 2003. Mr Crowch is keenly interested in
the global warming problem and the various
scientific solutions being suggested for its reduc-
tion. An article in the weekend edition of USA
Today caught his eye. It described the research
being done by scientists to recycle carbon diox-
ide (CO2) and turn it back into gasoline and
other transportation fuels — jet fuel, diesel fuel,
methanol, propane, butane.

He believes that this is the solution to the

Quality Auto Sales

PRE-OWNED
FUER le

For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

NOW
IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
»,, 06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN

world’s problems. By comparison, he consid-
ers the development of windmills impractical,
and turning farmland into a multi-billion ethanol
industry to reduce the US’s need on foreign
oil, a threat to the food supply.

He believes that the answer is the recycling of
carbon dioxide coupled with nuclear generated
electricity.

France, he points out, leads the world in the
generation of electricity from nuclear plants,
starting in 1950 under General Charles de
Gaulle, increasing during the oil shocks of the
1970s, and continuing to the present, despite
the accidents of Three Mile Island and Cher-
nobyl.

France, a country without oil, natural gas
and little coal, produces 77 per cent of its elec-
tricity from its nuclear plants.

There is no way to stop China’s industrial
growth, which has seen the almost weekly open-
ing of coal-fired plants, or the industries of India
or South America.

“As the underdeveloped world continues to
develop,” said Mr Crowch, “it will continue to
add CO2 to the atmosphere. There is no way to
stop their development, nor should we even
try. Therefore, a way has to be found to mitigate
the damage that their growth will contribute
to global warming.”

He believes there are enough good scientif-
ic brains now following the right path that a
solution will be found. Instead of trying to stop
the unstoppable, he believes all efforts should
now be made to trap the carbon dioxide that
these countries will inevitably produce and recy-
cle it into liquid fuel or return it to the earth
from where it came.

Researchers say they have tested their tech-
nologies in the lab and are about to unveil their
prototypes, which, if successful, could “lead to
commercial roll outs in as little as two years.”

“Tf successful,” reported USAToday, “such
initiatives could reduce dependence on carbon
spewing, petroleum-based products, as well as
renewable fuels such as corn ethanol that com-
pete with food supplies.”

It is not easy technology, but Mr Crowch
thinks that it has so many possibilities that this
is the route that scientists will take and con-
centrate on until the difficulties are overcome.

Meanwhile, Bahamians will have to find solu-
tions to reduce their own carbon emissions —
they cannot wait for someone else to do it for
them.





Support bill
to protect
sea turtles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Our Minister of Agriculture
and Marine resources, Larry
Cartwright, told us today that
there were lots of letters in from
foreigners supporting the total
ban on the harvesting of turtles,
but very few Bahamians have
voiced a positive opinion, or any
opinion at all for that matter,
as there were only two protests.

He indicated that Parliament
wanted to hear from more
BAHAMIANS supporting this
Bill. If you are a Bahamian,
please help us.

Attached, we have prepared
a letter that, if you wish, you
can download and sign and date
and send to Minister
Cartwright.

You can equally write your
own letter of support.

THE IMPORTANT THING
IS TO WRITE IN SUPPORT!

Please, this law that was pro-
posed some time ago to protect
turtles from mindless slaughter
has NOT been passed YET and
is NOT law, so turtles can still
legally be tortured and killed.

Minister Cartwright's fax
number is: 322 1767

Minister Cartwright’s email
address is:
larrycartwright@bahamas.gov.bs

Minister Cartwright's P.O.
Box No. is: N 3028

Please this is no joke, unless
we band together and write let-
ters of support IT WILL NOT
GET PASSED, and turtle pie
will stay on the menu, and the



LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



taunting and teasing, the hack-
ing and torture of turtles will
continue. You can help make it
stop.

Please forward this to every
Bahamian you know and ask
them to keep forwarding until
we have covered the country
and the Minister has received
the letters he requires to make
it become law.

If you are not a Bahamian
but have Bahamian friends and
family please urge them to write
a letter of support.

Thank you for your help and
support in this.

KIM ARANHA

(Co-chairman of the
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conserva-
tion Group)

Following is the text of the
letter that the Bahamas Sea
Turtle Conservation Group sug-
gests should be sent to Agricul-
ture Minister Larry Cartwright
to save the endangered turtles.

Mr. Minister,

I am writing to you to
declare that I support the total
ban of Turtle harvesting in the
islands of the Bahamas with
utmost sincerity.

As a Bahamian, I see these
turtles being killed as a major

loss to our nation, and our peo-
ple.

We, as a nation, need to dras-
tically reconstruct the ways in
which we look at the ocean, and
the mystical creatures, who
inhabit the unknown depths.

Rather than taking these
creatures for granted, we must
refrain from slaughtering them,
and begin protecting them.

If we kill off a resource as
valuable to our nation, ecosys-
tem, and tourism as marine life:
Specifically Turtles, we take
away from ourselves the oppor-
tunity to help in the re-growth
of the Turtle population.

We, as a people, are convey-
ing interest in the conservation
of Turtles, and our interest
needs to be matched by the
Government.

Once upon a time, spotting
the graceful, and timid appari-
tion of a Turtle on the surface of
the ocean was an everyday
occurrence, but as time passes
by, spotting these gentile giants
has become a rare, and magi-
cal thing.

We as a Nation are dragging
our feet in this situation, and
need to join the rest of the
world in conserving the
unknown world, beneath the
surface of the sea.

I support the passing of the
bill to protect ALL BAHAMI-
AN SEA TURTLES and
would like to see it put into
effect as soon as possible.

Sincerely,

JOHN DOE

Wild horses are destroying
crops at South Eleuthera farm

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me space in your
paper to vent my annoyance to
a situation that has cause much
stress and financial loss to me as
the owner of a farm in South
Eleuthera.

In recent years there has been
a herd of wild horses roaming
around causing much destruc-
tion to crops at my farm.

At one point they were a dan-
ger to air traffic into the Rock
Sound International airport as
they would find their way on to
the runway which places a dan-
ger to airplanes landing.

However there has been a
fence erected around the air-
port property thus these ani-
mals no longer pose a problem
to the airport.

These animals find them-

NEW CONDOS

Resario West
St. Albans Dr. New 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath,
3 Storey Townhouses. Gated Property.
Modern Kitchens & Well Appointed Interiors
$239,000 with only 5% deposit required.
Bank Financing Available
325-1325 454-2098 or 422-4489

selves on my farm several times
a week they have destroyed
what I estimate to be around
12000 dollars in crops the lat-
est incident occurred last night
which resulted in damage to the
irrigation system as well the loss
of about two acres of corn.

Arrangements had been
made in the past to have a Mr
Cartwright who is associated
with the Half-moon Cay devel-
opment to come in and capture
the animals and transport them
to that island to be used as part
of the attractions offered when
the visitors stop there on cruis-
es.
However this did not take
place because some of the local
winter residents and others
were concerned about the treat-
ment of the animals once they
had been captured.

Thus the situation still
remains.

The animals are roaming the
area freely causing a major
annoyance to myself and oth-
ers.

Iam sure they even pose dan-
ger to persons on the highway
as they cross the road in the
cover of darkness.

I have contacted several
agencies of the government
which include The Office of the
Prime Minister, The Depart-
ment of Agriculture, The

Department of Environmental
Health, The Agriculture Office
of South Eleuthera and The
Administrator for South
Eleuthera and nothing has been
done.

I have even contacted the
Bahamas Humane Society and
nothing done.

Tam at a point where if noth-
ing is done I am going to have
to cease from farming com-
pletely.

It has become completely
impossible to produce a suc-
cessful crop because of these
animals.

I feel like there is a serious
problem here as Bahamians we
are encouraged to farm, but
when we try things like this
makes it difficult to be success-
ful and no one seems to be con-
cerned with getting this prob-
lem solved.

I am asking those that have
the responsibility to please
come up with a plan to elimi-
nate this problem.

Thank you for publishing this
letter in your paper I hope that
this brings some light and
answers to this situation.

EUGENE CAREY
Tarpum Bay,
Eleuthera,
Bahamas.

March 3, 2009.

VILLAGE ROAD NEAR SHIRLEY STREET
Call Us at 394-0323/5 or 394-1377

NOW SELLING

Used Japanese Motor Scooters.
Direct from Japan.
Yamaha Jog, Honda Dio - 50cc/100cc

oF ‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA

‘02 SUZUKI XL-7

" Like New " never in an accident.
Drop in at Odessa Garden and
see our supply of Royal Readers
(Reproduction)
Grades 11, 111 and V.
Our stock of these books
always sell out.





Starting from $950.00

‘05 TOYOTA COROLLA
sales (2)
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA Sdr
» QUALITY22:

‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK







PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Abaco student wins Last remaining chimney stacks at

at Knights Spelling former BORCO plant demolished
Bee in Florida

YELENA Per-
saud from St
Francis de Sales
School in Marsh
Harbour, Abaco
took top honours
in the Grades 7
and 8 Division in
the Knights of
Columbus Annu-
al Spelling Bee
Competition in
Kissimmee, Flori-
da over the
weekend.

The young Per-
saud was runner-
up to Maya Fran-
cis in the recent
42nd Annual
Catholic Arch-
diocese Spelling
Bee Competition
in Nassau.

Maya, from
Xavier Lower
School in Nassau,
was unsuccessful
in her division in
the Florida com-
petition.

The two con-
testants, accom-
panied by a par-
ent and coach
and representa-
tives from the
Catholic Board of Educa-
tion and the Knights of
Columbus, were sponsored
by Knights of Columbus
Councils in the Bahamas
District.

District grand knight Gre-

Florida.



YELENA PERSAUD, from
St Francis de Sales
School in Marsh Har-
bour, Abaco, seen sec-
ond from the right, and
Kim Francis, right, pose
with grand knight of
Council 10415 Ken Kelly
at the recent 42nd Annu-
al Catholic Archdiocese
Spelling Bee Competition
in New Providence. Mr
Kelly, together with faith-
ful navigator John Davis,
accompanied the stu-
dents to Kissimmee,

Photo: Grechis
Public Relations,
Grand Bahama

competition.

Bahamas

dents

one-day

state of Florida.

in her division.

cis,” said Mr Christie.

gory Christie in }
congratulating the :
two entrants said }
that they contin- :
ued the outstand- ;
ing performances :
turned in by stu- }
dents from the :
Bahamas at this }

“Our knights :
throughout the
are }
please to have :
assisted these stu- i
in their :
opportunity to
compete in this }
event ;
among their peers }
from around the }

“We've had pre-
vious winners and ;
runners-up at this :
event and we’re }
extremely proud }
that our first ever
entrant from Aba- }
co was able to}
return this year as }
champion speller :

“T join with the :
Knights of Colum- }
bus from Councils ;
10415 and 11755 }
in New Providence, 10647 in }
Grand Bahama, and 12692 :
in North Eleuthera in cele- }
brating this accomplishment
with Miss Persaud, and the }
stellar efforts of Miss Fran- }

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 40-year land-
mark came down on Saturday
when the last remaining chimney
stacks at the former BORCO
plant were demolished, ending an
era of the oil refining industry and
signalling the beginning of a world-
class petroleum transshipment hub
on Grand Bahama.

Many turned out for the implo-
sion, which took place around
3.24pm when the first of three con-
crete stacks fell some 350 feet to
the ground in 13 seconds.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and students at nearby Lewis
Yard Primary School pushed the
button to detonate over 200
pounds of explosives arranged by
Cleveland Wrecking Company
and Dykon Explosives.

Before each blast, a loud siren
sounded to signal one minute to
count down. The second stack
came down at 3.42pm and the
third stack fell at 3.54 pm.

Guests

Invited guests and residents in
the nearby communities of Pin-
der’s Point, Lewis Yard, Hunters,
Mack Town and Seaco Town were
transported by bus to a designated
site some 1,000 feet away to wit-
ness the historic event.

Bleacher seating provided was
filled to capacity. Many persons
brought along their children, cam-
eras and hand-held video
recorders.

The dismantling of the refinery
began last year when the three
smaller steel stacks were demol-
ished.

T J Huizer, managing director at
Vopak Terminal Bahamas, said

ASSOCIATE DEGREE a oSna |

BUSINESS

BANRUNGS & FINANCE

“imam Be te po me

40 COUNTING MANAGEMENT

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

.2- BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
HUMAN RESOURCE MAMAGEMENT
JINT'L BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

. SUPERVISORY MAN AGEMENT

a
~~
—

| Call 324-7T7TO for registration and program details. ee
SUCCESS TRAINING COLLEGE, BERNARD RD, NASSAU.

Maximum Security
& Patrol Services

Supervisory
Training Program

Left to right sitting down: Valerie Sands, Estella Johnson, Maxine Anderson, Byron Rodgers,
Chairman & CEO Catherine Mcphee, Charmine Thompson & Donna Adderley.

Left to right standing: Charles Caroll, Bernadette Turnquest, Donald Saunders, Philip Felix,

Naomi Moss, Sandra Johnson, Chris Fawkes & Gaynell Stubbs.

On March 1st, 2009 - Supervisors and Management of Maximum Security & Patrol
Services Ltd had undergone an intense 3 weekend Training program. Each year, Officers
and Supervisors are encouraged to go back into the classroom to be re-trained on new
developments in the security arena to help broaden their perspective in knowing how to
properly exercise and assume responsibility for the client’s assets and personnel.

Officers were very receptive, supportive and thankful for such a program. Mr Chris Fawks,
Manager of Maximum Security stressed the importance of how Officers see themselves
in the roles they must emulate on a daily basis to ensure that our clients are the recipient
of a successful business continuity.

Mr Byron Rodgers, Chairman and CEO, applauded the efforts of each of the graduating
Supervisors and was also very encouraged to witness the successful fruition of such a lengthy
intense program. He is very proud of his officers.





WATCHING ONE of the chimney
stacks fall.

the falling of the taller concrete
stack units symbolises the end of
what once was the old BORCO
refinery.

“The old BORCO refinery was
probably one of the most impor-
tant companies to come to Grand
Bahama and help drive develop-
ment of industry on the island, and
the chimney stacks were a symbol
of that development and could be
seen from miles away,” he said.

Although the stacks provided
bearing and direction to people
from the air, sea, and land, Mr
Huizer said they were very old
and not being used.

“As you know, the refinery was
closed down in 1985 - over 20
years ago - and since then BOR-
CO has basically been a company

in decline going from several sig-
nificant downsizing operations,
and investment in people and
infrastructure was limited to bare
minimum.

“The shareholders of First
Reserve and Vopak recognised
the potential and made a signifi-
cant investment to acquire what
was a Starving company and turn it
around,” said Huizer.

The companies bought the
BORCO plant last April, begin-
ning major refurbishment to
restore the existing 19-million bar-
rel oil facility.

The removal of the stacks has
freed up space for construction of
new tanks that will increase the
current storage capacity to 22 mil-
lion barrels by October.

Expansion

Vopak is also in the process of
beginning a major expansion pro-
ject estimated between $250 to
$300 million called the Greenfield
Expansion Project, which involves
construction of a new oil storage
facility on acres of undeveloped
land near BORCO.

Mr Huizer believes that Grand
Bahama is an ideal location to
become a world-class logistic hub.

“Today symbolises the turning
of the page 1n our history and for-
tune of our county and company.
I firmly believe we are a diamond
in the rough. Our location here in
Grand Bahama is at the crossroad
of many trade flows around the
world.

“We are investing significant
money to transform the old BOR-
CO and become one of the largest
petroleum transshipment hubs in
the world, said Mr Huizer.

He noted that Vopak has

tremendous impact on the global
flow of oil and petroleum, indi-
cating that the nation of Puerto
Rico depends on fuel that is stored
at the terminal in Freeport.

“Three quarters of the popula-
tion of that whole nation depend
on fuel that is supplied from these
parts. If we do not do our job
properly the people of the country
will be without electricity and light.

“The fuel used by the Grand
Bahama Power Company is also
stored in our tanks so we have a
big impact here as well.”

Comparing Saturday’s event to
that of the mythical Phoenix, Mr
Huizer said the BORCO plant will
emerge more glorious than ever.

Vopak is also building a strong
professional team in Freeport, he
said.

However, he revealed that the
company also needed to bring in a
number of expatriates and four
contractors on temporary basis to
meet its goals.

He explained that the skills and
knowledge brought by the expa-
triates are being transferred to its
professional staff, which is also
being sent off for training at its
terminal overseas in the Vopak
network.

Mr Huizer said Freeport’s econ-
omy is also benefiting because
expatriates and foreign contrac-
tors are costly and the money for
work permits, housing, food, etc,
goes back into the community.

“The knowledge and skills they
bring are indispensable for our
progress, and, in fact, not having
them available is costing us signif-
icant revenue. But we also see
these expatriate positions as an
essential part of the investment
we are making in our own
Bahamian staff,” he said.

Minister: cancer one of most dreaded
and prolific illnesses in the Bahamas

m By MATT MAURA

One measure is the availability of cancer-care

Bahamas Information Services

HEALTH Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said that
cancer has become “one of the most dreaded and
prolific illnesses” in the Bahamas — the burden of
which extends far beyond the cancer victim or sur-
vivor to families and friends.

Addressing the opening session of the third annu-
al Caribbean Association of Oncology and Hema-
tology Conference, Dr Minnis said World Health
Organisation officials predict a 50 per cent
rise in cancers by 2020 due largely to lifestyle
factors.

Cancer rates in developing countries are pro-
gressively approaching those in industrialised nations
due largely to an increase in the average age of pop-
ulations, the control of other diseases and the
increase in the use of tobacco products, he noted.

Dr Minnis said cancer, with its high prevalence
and mortality rate, continues to rank among the
world’s deadliest and most costly diseases. “It is no
secret that heart disease and cancer are the leading
causes of death in The Bahamas,” he added.

The minister told delegates that the Ministry of
Health, in conjunction with the Department of Pub-
lic Health and the Public Hospitals Authority, has
implemented a number of strategies designed to
help stem the increase in cancers in The Bahamas.

services at the state-owned Princess Margaret Hos-
pital that consist of therapeutic modalities for inpa-
tient and outpatient care.

Other services include diagnostic imaging, surgery,
cytology, hematology, pathology, surveillance, pedi-
atric, oncology, gynaecological oncology, pharmacy
and counselling.

Dr Minnis said healthcare officials also commis-
sioned a state-of-the-art Oncology Centre on Janu-
ary 15, 2009, that is equipped with modern tech-
nology and which will offer the “best quality care” to
cancer patients.

“Bridging the gap from patient to cure must be
done through effective patient education, devoting
resources to delivering quality, safe, cost-effective,
socially responsible and compassionate healthcare
services in a caring environment (that) puts patients
first,” Dr Minnis said.

“The physicians and our entire disciplinary team
work together with patients and their families to
ascertain what the best course of treatment and/or
action,” Dr. Minnis added.

The Ministry of Health has also implemented a
Healthy Lifestyles Programme that is geared towards
raising public awareness to the importance of healthy
living, and has launched an initiative geared towards
preventative healthcare as opposed to curative
healthcare.

sale

Sale Begins March 2nd, 2009



Marathon Mall ¢ 393-4155 ¢ Mon-Fri 10am-8pm e Sat 10am-9pm
All major credit cards accepted. Sorry no debit cards accepted.



THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



BNT’s bird
monitoring
workshop

THE Bahamas National Trust hosted partici-
pants from 18 West Indian islands and two
Caribbean rim countries at the Retreat Garden
and New Providence National Parks in the week
of February 19 —- 23. The participants were
attending the Society for the Conservation and
Study of Caribbean Birds (SCSCB) five-day bird
monitoring training workshop.

The participants included executive directors of
non-government organisations in charge of pro-
tected areas; ornithologists and conservation biol-
ogists employed by governments and non-gov-
ernment organisations; protected area wardens,
and volunteers.

Interest

All shared a common interest in learning mon-
itoring methodologies and how to use the results
from monitoring to more effectively conserve
and manage migratory and resident bird species.

“We were very excited at this training oppor-
tunity for BNT wardens”, said Lynn Gape, deputy
executive director of the Trust.

Participating for the Trust were Randolph Bur-
rows and Apollo Butler (New Providence), Hen-
ry Nixon (Inagua), Prescott Gay (Grand Bahama)
and David Knowles (Abaco).

Also participating for the Bahamas was Leno
Davis of the Nature Conservancy

The eight facilitators for the workshop includ-
ed Floyd Hayes, professor at PacificCollege, Cal-
ifornia; Frank Rivera-Milan of the US Fish and
Wildlife Service, Washington, DC; Geoff Welch
of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds,
UK; Jeff Gerbracht of Cornell Laboratory of
Ornithology, New York; John Alexander, exec-
utive director of the Klamath Bird Observatory,
Oregon; Arne Lesterhuis of Wetlands Interna-
tional, Buenos Aires; Ann Haynes-Sutton, mon-
itoring coordinator of SCSCB, Jamaica, and Lisa
Sorenson, president of SCSCB, Boston).

The workshop included a complete introduc-
tion to designing, implementing, analysing and
reporting basic bird monitoring programmes in
the region. With the assistance of the team of
facilitators and other experts in the field, SCSCB
is developing simple standard protocols for mon-
itoring landbirds, wetland birds, seabirds and
shorebirds and their habitats.

Governor General
atliresses issues
of the elderly

GOVERNOR General
Arthur Hanna addressed
the concerns of older per-
sons in the Bahamian com-
munity while speaking to
the National Council of
Older Persons at a lun-
cheon and variety show
held at Montague Gardens
last weekend.

He commended the “old-
er persons” for remaining
active in the community
despite the limitations of
the aging process.

He recognised the recent
change in leadership within
the Council and congratu- 7
lated Mary Sweetnum and 7



Patrick Gomez on their
new posts as co-chairper-
sons of the Council.

The Governor General
said the new leadership
offers opportunities for
international exchange in
talent and culture, for both
old and young as presented
in the variety show at the
luncheon.

Talent

He said that the overall
assumption that older per-
sons are decrepit and
unaware of the current
times is false and should
not be applied to those
who have contributed time,
effort and talent to the
development of the coun-
try.

The Governor General
also commented on the
rush of people to register
their elderly parents into
Sandlilands Geriatric
Ward because they cannot
find time to look after
them.

He told the audience that
most people are reluctant
to leave their homes to
enter an institutionalised
facility, so the government
responded by building
homes to care for the
elderly in areas close to
where they lived.

The Governor General
said it is for this reason
that every settlement in
the Family Islands has a
post office, even if it is
only for two people living
in that settlement.

ae
US)

Uae ta
PHONE: 322-2157



pa

Monday to Saturday 10am to 5pm _ «¢ Charlotte Street « P.O. Box N-4845, Nassau, Bahamas
242-322-4862 ¢ email: sales@coinrealm.com

WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS at Harrold and Wil-
son Pond National Park.

These were presented and tested during field
sessions at the workshop. The participants com-
mitted to share their experiences and train others
in their islands.

To facilitate this process, all the materials from
the workshop will be made available online, and
a manual “Caribbean Birdwatch - How to design
and implement a bird monitoring programme in
the Caribbean” will be produced.

At the end of the workshop participants and
presenters agreed that the initiative had been an
overwhelming success and pledged to continue to
work to promote its objectives.

“We were very pleased with the enthusiasm
and skills exhibited by all the participants,” said
Dr Sorenson, president of the SCSCB.

“Partnering with the BNT to host the workshop
made things easy to organise as their wardens,
staff and volunteers were very helpful in assisting
with logistics.

“We were very impressed with the work that
has been done at Harrold and Wilson’s Pond
National Park, which is an important bird
area, and was one of the sites we selected for
our morning monitoring exercises,” Dr Soren-
son said.

The workshop was the main output of a project
called “Long-term Bird Monitoring in the
Caribbean — Why, What, Where and How?”
which is being funded by the Organisation of
American States (OAS) through the Western
Hemisphere Migratory Species Initiative (WHM-
SI).

The goal of this project is to establish a
Caribbean partnership to promote migratory bird
monitoring as a means to improve science-based
conservation planning and adaptive management
of birds in the region.

vv’
Cut. a ae
——*

cc yee ia

a
wes

tS

—_



&

CHECK OUT THIS GREAT DEAL!

PAUL it Fy
merece tse

ALT

‘Honda Accord «Honda Civic ‘Honda CRV «Nissan Cefiro «Nissan Sunny
‘Mitsubishi Galant «Toyota Avalon «Toyota Camry «Toyota Corolla
‘Toyota Lexus «Toyota Noah «Toyota Rav-4 «Toyota Regius «Toyota Windom

and many more to choose from

2005/06 30 SEATER
$24,900.00

AVAILABLE
FOR SHORT TERM LEASE

pp)
(242) 341-2249

FAX: (242) 361-1136
Visit our Website: www.autohl.com



IT’S NICE TO HAVE A CHOICE...

_<@ © we've gotit

<2

— Custom

COMPUTERS LIMITED

4 Stores at Cable Beach & East Bay St.»
242.396.1101 © 242.396.1100

www. CLstomcomputers.bs
solutions(@customvcomputers.bs

NOW IN TWO LOCATIONS!

Half-Price SALE

on all ttems on display

DAYS
ONLY

Friday 13th March
SPEC h me eDCaN

* www.coinrealm.net





PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





‘Tax haven’ jurisdictions —
sitting ducks and scapegoats

a .
f
= “= ele

WORLD VIEW

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

IT IS a classic case of
“passing the buck”, but
Caribbean jurisdictions that
offer offshore financial ser-
vices will be the victims of
lax regulation by the OECD
countries — the UK and US
in particular.

Britain’s Prime Minister,
Gordon Brown, and the US
Senate and Congress have
both now shown their inten-
tion to close down offshore
financial services which they
call “tax havens.”

Speaking on March 4th to
the US Congress Brown
asked: “'But how much safer
would everybody's savings
be if the whole world finally
came together to outlaw
shadow banking systems and
outlaw offshore tax havens?”
Implicit in what he said is
that so-called “tax havens”
are a threat to people’s sav-
ings even though it is poor



banking and investment
practices and inefficient reg-
ulation in the US and UK in
particular that led to the pre-
sent global financial crisis.

So, Mr Brown has passed
the buck and has fingered
jurisdictions that offer off-
shore financial services as
the culprits.

Equally, as I predicted
some weeks ago, the “Stop
the Tax Havens Abuse Act”
introduced in the US Senate
two years ago by then Sena-
tor Barack Obama and Sen-
ator Carl Levin, was rein-
troduced in the US Congress
the day before Brown made
his statement.

I had hoped that the rein-
troduced Act would have
removed the names of coun-
tries that were listed as “tax
havens.” No such luck. Not
only did the Act retain all
the countries, it added three
new very onerous sections
for liability. The intention is
clear — if banks and other
financial institutions in these
jurisdictions are going to
continue to operate, they
will do so only at great



“It is a curious kind of
international democracy that
allows rules and punishment to be
created by a few — and imposed
on the many — simply because
the few have the power to do so.”



Fai

@ SIR Ronald Sanders

expense. Few will be able to
afford the additional costs
of compliance.

The Caribbean jurisdic-
tions named in the US Act
are: Anguilla, Antigua and
Barbuda, Bahamas, Barba-
dos, Belize, Bermuda,
British Virgin Islands, Cay-
man Islands, Dominica,
Grenada, St Kitts-Nevis, St
Lucia, St Vincent & The
Grenadines and Turks and
Caicos.

When Jamaica, Trinidad
and Tobago and Guyana
begin their international
financial services for which
they have all legislated, they
can expect to join the list.

It seems irrelevant to the
US Congress that some of
these countries have Tax
Information Exchange
Agreements (TIEAS) with
the United States under
which the US can request —
and are obliged to receive
information — concerning tax
inquiries. To my certain
knowledge Antigua and Bar-
buda, Barbados and the
British Virgin Islands have
such agreements. Others
may also have.

But, if the US Act is

AW WUUUOWS

OPEN CALL FOR A YOUTH MIX TALENT

Dance Judge
on the T.V. Show

America’s Best Dance Crew

March 11-13,2009,
Wednesday - Friday 3PM - 9PM
March 14, 2009,
Saturday 12PM - 9PM

NATIONAL CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

For More Information Contact 393-2884
Dance (Hip-Hop, Folk, Praise-Gospel, Performing Arts) Voice (Rap, RMB & Folk)

Ages 6-21yrs & College Students
Audition Registration Fee- $5.00 Per Person

Harbour Bay
HALF IS

50.% OFF

The other half
Is 15.% OFF

Ask about Our
Gift with
Purchase



Seve

Is cutting the store in half

ies
|
>



Susan Walsh/AP

BRITISH PRIME MINISTER Gordon Brown addresses a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in
Washington , Wednesday, March 4, 2009. Vice President Joe Biden and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of

Calif. applaud at rear.

passed in its present form, it
seems that TIEA is not
enough and the US Treasury
Secretary will be given
extreme powers to act
against jurisdictions that he
deems to have “ineffective
information exchange prac-
tices.”

Jurisdictions

The G20 countries — none
of which are jurisdictions
considered as “tax havens”
— will meet in London on
April 2nd and on their agen-
da is the matter of “tax
havens.” The discussion and
its conclusions will take
place without the benefit of
any of the affected jurisdic-
tions at the table. Among
the missing “tax havens” will
be all those I have named
earlier from the Caribbean
plus Switzerland, Luxem-
bourg, Singapore, Malta,
Cyprus, Panama, Hong
Kong and a few others in
Europe and the Pacific.

It is a curious kind of
international democracy that
allows rules and punishment
to be created by a few —
and imposed on the many —
simply because the few have
the power to do so.

It is even worse that the
few are yet to admit that it is
lax supervision and regula-
tion in their own jurisdic-
tions that has caused the
present global financial cri-
sis. They are also yet to
demonstrate that they are
taking effective action with-
in their own systems to cor-
rect and improve their defi-
ciencies.

In his speech to the US

Extra 10% off for

Privilege Cards &

Corporate Partners



Congress, Brown said, “Let
us agree in our G20 summit
in London in April rules and
standards for proper
accountability, transparen-
cy, and reward that will
mean an end to the excesses
and will apply to every bank,
everywhere, all the time.”

No one would quarrel
with that position. Indeed,
in light of two events in the
Caribbean - surrounding
CLICO in Trinidad and
Tobago and holdings of R
Allen Stanford —- there
would be few who would not
agree wholeheartedly with
the need to tighten up rules
for banks. But, Mr Brown
did not mention regulation
which is sorely in need of
improvement in Britain and
the US. Instead, he focused
on “outlawing” tax havens.

During the week all this
was taking place, along with
three other persons, I was
asked by a publication in
Washington, Inter-American
Dialogue, whether the civil
complaint by the US Secu-
rities and Exchange Com-
mission against Stanford
“shows a need for stricter
regulation of financial ser-
vices companies in the
Caribbean? The following
was my published reply:

“The matter of the SEC
prosecuting a civil suit for
alleged fraud against R
Allen Stanford points to the
absolute need for stricter
regulation not only in
Antigua and Barbuda but
also in the United States.
Court documents about this
matter claim that the alleged
fraud relates to the sale of
products by the Stanford
International Bank (SIB) in
Antigua and by the Stanford
Financial Group in Houston.
The regulators in both juris-
dictions are, therefore, cul-
pable.

“While the smallness of
its resources does not
absolve the Antigua regula-
tors of responsibility, the
vastness of the resources
available to the US regula-
tors condemns their failure

to recognise the danger sig-
nals in the operations at a
much earlier stage. The
Stanford allegation should
not be used to stain
Caribbean regulators while
ignoring the fact that defi-
ciencies also existed in the
US system.

“No Caribbean jurisdic-
tion should wish to remain
in the business of hosting
companies that offer finan-
cial services without strong,
relevant and appropriate leg-
islation and supervision that
protects the interests of cus-
tomers. In this regard, inde-
pendent statutory bodies
that are free of political
interference and are over-
seen by bipartisan commit-
tees drawn from the legisla-
ture should be established
to raise their credibility and
give confidence to domestic
and international clients”.

Regulation

My point was that the
alleged Stanford fraud
occurred as much in the US
as it did in Antigua and Bar-
buda. So, while there is a
need for stricter and fearless
regulation of financial ser-
vices in the Caribbean, there
is also such a need in the US.

Unfortunately, while the
G20 meets in April to make
their pronouncement, the so-
called “tax haven” countries
have made no attempt to
meet to devise an appropri-
ate response.

The countries of the
Caribbean Community and
Common market (CARI-
COM) have no excuse for
not doing so, and if there
any among them who feel
that they are capable of
stopping this juggernaut
alone, they should think
again. Caribbean countries
should act on this now and
together or see their off-
shore financial services with-
er.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 9



‘Govt committed’ to bolstering

national security initiatives

Patrick Hanna/BIS

MINISTER OF HEALTH Hubert Minnis cuts the ceremonial ribbon at the
re-commissioning ceremony of an ambulance presented to the Min-
istry of Health in Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera on Sunday, March 1. Looking on
is nursing officer for South Eleuthera Whelma Dorsett.

Residents of South
Eleuthera to embark on
CPR training programme

@ By LLONELLA GILBERT



TARPUM BAY, Eleuthera — Minister of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis applauded the residents of South Eleuthera for planning
to embark on a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and }

first aid training programme.

Speaking at the recent South Eleuthera re-commissioning of }
an ambulance, Dr Minnis emphasised the importance for all }
Bahamians to know how to perform first aid or CPR in order }
to stabilise individuals who have suffered an illness or are }

injured in a motor vehicle accident.

“I think that is a great and excellent idea for you to embark }
upon because if the community of South Eleuthera is truly CPR }
trained, imagine the message you would send out to not only :
the Bahamas, but to the rest of the world and the message you :

would send out to tourists,” Dr Minnis said.

“Before individuals visit a particular country or island, two
things play an important role - health and crime. If they are con- i
vinced that each and every one of you understands and could :

perform CPR, then you would be better than any hospital.”

“I would hope that other communities in our Bahamas }
would follow suit because you are truly leading us into a new }

direction of healthcare,” Dr Minnis said.

“You are truly preparing this community for the future and
I will learn from you today and ensure that the Bahamas is pre- :

pared for the future in following suit.”

He also promised that the residents would receive help from
the government as they embark on their training programmes :
and plans to educate students and each other about healthy liv- ;

ing and illness prevention.

Dr Minnis commended the local and winter residents along }
with corporate sponsors who under the guidance of the South ;
Eleuthera Emergency Partners (SEEP) organisation, raised :
funds to refurbish the five-year-old ambulance and purchase a }

fire truck for use in the community.

SEEP was established after a group of local citizens came
together to discuss ways to increase the support given to the fire j

and medical services on the island.

m@ By MATT MAURA

THE government of the
Bahamas remains fully com-
mitted to participating in crime-
fighting cooperative initiatives
designed to enhance national
and regional security, Minister
of National Security Tommy
Turnquest told regional law
enforcement officials on
Wednesday.

Addressing the opening ses-
sion of the 25th Tradewinds
conference, Mr Turnquest said
Operation Tradewinds has not
only enhanced the collective
capacity of regional forces to
counter transnational and secu-
rity threats both at the national
and regional levels, but has also
facilitated the standardisation
of the region’s approach to the
security issues it faces such as
illicit gun and drug trafficking,
illegal human smuggling and
other transnational crimes.

The National Security Min-
ister said there are a number of
factors that contribute to
transnational crimes within
small-island states in the region.
Two of those, he noted, are the
region’s location between Cen-
tral and South America which is
the source of “significant illicit
transnational activities”, and its
location between North Amer-
ica and Europe which are the
targets of much of those illicit
activities.

Mr Turnquest added that oth-
er contributors to ongoing
transnational crimes include the
fact that regional countries are,
for the most part, island and
archipelagic states that all have
porous sea and land borders,
and have limited financial and
human resources and assets to
counter transnational crime.

It is therefore necessary that
regional countries continue to
cooperate in initiatives such as
Operation Tradewinds and oth-
er conferences at the regional
and hemispheric levels that deal
with those threats as the relate
to transnational crime and ter-
rorism, he noted.

“Drugs and arms trafficking,
illegal immigration, migrant
smuggling, trafficking in per-

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for provision of General Insurance
Services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:

on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 690/09

ABOVE: DELEGATES from the 16
countries participating in the
Tradewinds 2009 Conference on
Wednesday March 4, 2009. Par-
ticipating countries include Bar-
bados, Belize, Dominica, Domini-
can Republic, Grenada, Guyana,
Haiti, Jamaica, St Kitts and Nevis,
St Lucia, St Vincent and the
Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad
and Tobago, United Kingdom,
United States of America and
host country the Bahamas.

sons and vulnerability to inter-
national terrorism, head a dis-
turbing list of the challenges fac-
ing regional countries with
regards to crime and criminali-
ty,” Mr Turnquest said.

“The Bahamas can attest to
this. For decades now it has
been contending with the illicit
transit of drugs and significant
illegal immigration. These two
illicit activities have created a
platform for the other illegal
activity we are experiencing,
particularly the illicit traffick-
ing in small arms,” Mr Turn-
quest added.

Mr Turnquest said the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas has
undertaken a number of “deci-
sive and ongoing initiatives” to
counter transnational crime by
“systematically making its law
enforcement presence felt
throughout the archipelago.”

He told delegates from 16



ABOVE: Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest addresses dele-
gates attending Tradewinds 2009
which opened Wednesday, March 4,
2009 in New Providence at the Wyn-



countries participating in
Tradewinds 2009 that the Roy-
al Bahamas Defence Force
Base at Inagua has been
strengthened to facilitate cov-
erage of the southern Bahamas,
while a new base has been
established at Grand Bahama
to cover the northern Bahamas.

“At great cost to our nation-
al accounts, we are progressing
with the acquisition of addi-
tional craft for our Defence
Force and will soon take deliv-
ery of two new aircraft for
transport and surveillance,” Mr
Turnquest said.

Break away from the ordinary

dham Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino.

“Our assets base has also
been further strengthened by
the donation of four Interceptor
Vessels donated under the
Enduring Friendship Pro-
gramme, for which we express
our sincere appreciation to the
United States of America.”

Mr Turnquest said the focus
of Tradewinds 2009 — maritime
interdiction — is “critical and
timely” and is in line with the
government of the Bahamas’
determination that “every effort
should be made to prevent a
significant upsurge in drug traf-
ficking in the Caribbean.”

and discover how to experience
life to the fullest. The Isuzu
D-MAX is the ultimate
multi-purpose pick-up truck
which enables you to drive
through tough roads and load
a variety of cargoes. It is
Specially designed to be
powerful, stylish and highly
functional. The Isuzu 1-MAX
iS one tough vehicle that

& will never let you down!

All Risks General Insurance
(a) Commercial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents); and
(b) Computers, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment

Tender No. 691/09
Motor Insurance - Commercial & Private Vehicles

Tender No. 692/09
Accident Insurance - Money & Burglary

Tender No. 693/09
Liability Insurance - Personal & Public

Tender No. 694/09
Professional Indemnity
[Officers, Directors, Professional Staff, Engineers,
Accountants, Attorneys]

Tender No. 695/09

Marine Insurance le f a ai

das eC e
oe ee ed aa a chee ih

Wulff Road, FO, Box WH 9123, Nassau. The Bahamas © Fax: 323.4667

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163





PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS





























nothing like
cotton candy.



Thousands flock to

RED CROSS

HOUSANDS
of Bahamians
flocked to the
gardens of
Government House on Sat-
urday to attend the 67th
annual Red Cross Fair — the
major fundraising event for
the Bahamas Red Cross
Society.
The co-chairpersons of

this annual fair, Pauline



Felipe
Allen-Dean and Brendon i

Watson, along with the Major/

fair’s committee members, j

once again organised a Tri bu ne staff
fun-filled family event.



GOING up a slide.

y
Medical Association of the
Bahamas i. me 24 |

37 Annual Conference 2009

Formal Opening Night Session I:

A FREE PUBLIC LECTURE



2009 Spectra5/CERATO

KIA MOTORS _—



The Power to Surprise”

Presenter
Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter pc, Mp, MBA, FACR, FACRO,
FAAMA

pbirector-General and CEO of the McGill University Health Cente
Councillor Privy Council of Canada
Montreal, Canada.

Wednesday, March, 11 2009, 6:30 PM
British Colonial Hilton Hotel

in Affordable Compact Wagons

MAB Conference: March 11" — 13"

The Spectras/CERATO has a sporty attitude with ita aport-
tuned suspension, strut tower bar, and fully independent
Buapension. It can seat up ta five occupants. It is powered by a
1.6-litear four-cylinder that ia mated to a standard four-speed
automatic traneamlasion. Alr Gonditlon, PWR Windows, PWR
Door Locks, CD Radio, Two 4-Door Sedan Models including the
5-BDoor Modal.

Sessions II-IV Thursday 12°: 8:30pm — 7:00pm

Sessions V-VIII Friday 13": 8:30am — 7:00pm ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED On co hacurwcalT sank

MOMAE ALT BARK
Thompson Bhd, « Oakes Field
#289 Will Rood
PO. Bax Med @th 242.326.6377" 242.326.0305 SUA
b (a2) ead? 22] FOS ®. sanpindcoralwave.com BAGKERS & AGENTS LTR



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Dr Michael Darville

fills PLP Senate sal
FROM page one

Canada.

Dr Darville, 48, is married
to Susie Darville. The couple :
have two sons together. He is }
not to be confused with Dr }
Michael Darville, who is :
employed at Doctors Hospital :

in New Providence.
Ms Bridgewater, who was

charged with abetment to ;
extort and conspiracy to extort :
$25 million from Hollywood
actor John Travolta, officially :
resigned from the Senate on

January 24.

She said she tendered her
resignation so as to fully dedi- }
cate her resources and energies
to fight the charges brought }

against her.

At the time, Mr Christie said

he regretted the turn of events,

but understood her course of :

action.

Initially, the PLP leader said
he intended to announce a :
replacement within two weeks }
of Ms Bridgewater’s stepping

down.

The former prime minister i
confirmed that he always }
intended for another Grand }
Bahama resident to take the }
seat. He said he had received :
about six recommendations for i

the post.

Former minister's
husiness anid home.
are broken into

FROM page one

store to find out for himself
what had happened.
Fortunately, Mr Miller said,
he had noticed earlier that ee
that someone had ae
with a door at his home and
reported the matter to police.

Thinking back on this event ;
as he was travelling to Harrold }
Road, Mr Miller phoned police
at Elizabeth Estates station and }
asked them to drive by his :
home as he felt the break-in at }
his store was a distraction to }

get him out of the house.
This hunch, Mr Miller said,

paid off as he discovered upon
returning to his Winton Estates }
home that his bedroom door }
had been prised ajar andsome
$500 was stolen from his night-

stand.

to search the place.

The former Blue Hills MP
said he has since upgraded the }
“in and around” his }

security
home.

excellent job.”

Four-year-old
girl dies in blaze
FROM page one

could have seen,"
said.

Mounds of charcoal, a
small burnt-out stove anda :
portable propane burner ;

were all that was left at the
scene yesterday as local fire-
fighters revisited the scene
with arson investigators
from the US Marine Corps.
The tragedy is the first
fire-related casualty in New
Providence this year.

Mr Miller said the burglars i
must have been frightened :
away by police as it was obvi- }
ous from the way things were }
thrown about his home that }
they did not have a lot of time :

“TI want to thank the police }
for their quick and excellent }
response to this incident,” Mr
Miller said. “I just want to say }
thank you on behalf of my fam- }
ily and myself. They did an }

the man

PM vows that govt will
‘reduce unemployment

FROM page one

assurance to Bahamians, par-
ticularly in Grand Bahama,
where the unemployment rate
has jumped to 14.6.

“We are surrounded by bad
news from time to time, and
you heard yesterday that the
unemployment rate in Grand
Bahama is now nearly what it
was in 1992 when I came to
office for the first time.

“And so I want to assure
Grand Bahama that we have
been there before, we did it
before, and we will do it
again,” said the prime minis-
ter.

Mr Ingraham promised that
the FNM government will
cause the Grand Bahama
economy to be restored in as
short a time as possible.

He stressed that the ship-
yard facility is one of several
major investments on the
island that continue to pro-
vide significant benefit to the
Freeport economy.

The prime minister com-
mended Royal Caribbean and
Carnival Corporation for their
investment in the shipyard.

“Tam very pleased that the
owners of Royal Caribbean
and the owners of Carnival
decided to take a chance ona
substantial investment in our
country, and especially at a
time when there were options
available to go elsewhere,” Mr
Ingraham said.

The new dry dock, which
was acquired from France, is
the third for the shipyard. It is
one of the largest in the world,
spanning some 310 metres in
length and 54 metres in width.
It can accommodate vessels
weighing up to 55,000 tonnes.

The Grand Bahama Port
Authority owns a 20 per cent
stake in the shipyard, which
opened in January, 1999.

Mr Ingraham recalled how
the late Port Authority chair-
man Edward St George was
a major proponent for the
facility.

“The only regret I have this

morning is that Edward St
George...is not here this
morning. He pushed very hard
for this facility and for the port
to begin to realise its original
purpose which was to attract
facilities such as this, such as
Hutchison’s container facili-
ty, such as Bradford Marine
and the harbour in Freeport.”

Mr Ingraham noted that the
shipyard is the only invest-
ment in the Bahamas where
there are more non-Bahami-
ans employed than Bahami-
ans.

Despite this, he stated that
the large expatriate workforce
has benefited the economy of
Grand Bahama and the
Bahamas.

“We have never dreamt of
such a thing and so many have
not overcome that fear yet,
but I think even the doubters
are now beginning to come to
terms with the reality that it is
the most beneficial for the
economy of Grand Bahama
and for the economy of the
Bahamas because not only has

Global economy ‘to
shrink for first time
since World War II’

FROM page one

did not need to reassess its pro-
jections for 2009 as it was already
operating on the prospect of a
global downturn for “sometime
now”.

According to the New York
Times, until now even the most
pessimistic of forecasters had pre-
dicted that the global economy
would report “a tiny expansion”.

In countries such as China,
however, even a modest growth
rate of five per cent would be
classified as a “disastrous slow-
down”, given the enormous pres-
sure there to create jobs for its
rural population.

As a lending institution that
provides financial and technical
assistance to developing countries
for roads, schools, and other
infrastructural projects, the World
Bank’s Global Economic
Prospects for 2009 said that world
trade volumes are projected to
contract 2.1 per cent in 2009, with
developing countries set to see a
“big drop” in their exports.

“Tighter credit conditions and
increased uncertainty are expect-
ed to see investment growth in
both developing and high-income
countries slow in 2009 - actually
falling 1.3 per cent in developed
countries and rising by only 3.5
per cent in developing countries
versus 13 per cent in 2007,” the
report read.

According to Uri Dadush,
director of the World Bank’s
Development Prospects Group,
“policy-makers in developing
countries should monitor their
banking sectors carefully and be
prepared to enlist external sup-
port to shore up currencies and
banking systems.

“Given the expected decline in
global trade, both developed and
developing countries need to



Zhivargo Laing

resist the temptation to resort to
protectionism, which would only
prolong and deepen the crisis,”
he said.

The report, released on Sun-
day, warned that the financial dis-
ruptions are all but certain to
overwhelm the ability of institu-
tions like itself and the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF) to
provide a buffer. Therefore it
highlighted the need for wealthy
governments to create a “vulner-
ability fund” and set aside a frac-
tion of what they spend on stim-
ulating their own economies for
assisting others.

Mr Laing pointed out, howev-
er, that the Bahamas is a not one
of the 185 countries receiving reg-
ular assistance from the World
Bank and as such would not be
hurt by its current limitations to
provide funding.

The last programme for which
the Bahamas received World
Bank assistance was the Technical
and Vocational Training Project
in 1988.

At a value of $10 million, this
project was approved two years
before the New Providence Island
Water Supply and Sewerage

$ SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE ¢

RM FRAME

WINDOWS

Rehabilitation Project, another
$10 million investment by the
World Bank.

“The point that the World
Bank is making is that many of
the least developed countries that
rely on their support will see a
shrinkage,” Mr Laing added.

“But we are not under any
IMF programme or World Bank
programmes at this time,” he
said.

On Friday, an interim Labour
Force Survey conducted by the
Department of Statistics revealed
that the unemployment rate for
both New Providence and Grand
Bahama reached double-digit fig-
ures - 12.1 per cent for New Prov-
idence and 14.6 per cent for
Grand Bahama.

Prime Minister and Minister of
Finance Hubert Ingraham
explained the need for the interim
survey in his statement to Parlia-
ment on the government’s
2008/2009 mid-year budget, point-
ing out that “the usual tracking of
unemployment rates on an annu-
al basis will not assist in better
informing our interventions to
address job losses.”

However, the prime minister
has since assured the country that
the government is doing all it can
to turn these unemployment
numbers around.

this facility lived up to what it
said it would do, it continues
to provide additional training
for Bahamians and additional
skills being had by many as a
result of transfer of skills that
is taking place as a result of
persons who come in from
time to time,” he said.

With the current downturn
in tourism, Prime Minister
Ingraham stressed that the
shipyard is an industry that
adds to the diversification of
the Bahamian economy.

He said it is a booming busi-
ness because cruise ships still
continue to move many pas-
sengers and cruise lines con-
tinue to build more ships that
require ship care, repairs and
maintenance.

“We here in the Bahamas
are fully cognizant of another

reality and that is this ship-
yard is mobile. It can be
picked up and taken away any
day.

“The first dock took over
nine months to come here
and...so having had these
docks towed to the Bahamas
we simply want to keep them
here in the Bahamas and we
want to keep them in a way
to maximise benefit for our
people and our economy.”

Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch, chair-
man and CEO of Grand
Bahama Shipyard, said the
shipyard services 70 per
cent of cruise ships in the
region. Mr Richard Fair,
chairman and CEO of Royal
Caribbean, said the shipyard
has recorded its milestone
with nine ships at the facility
at one time.







ln Loki ’ Memor










he late

"MRS ANNIE B. RALSTON |

Sunrise: October 16th, 1939
Sunset: March Sth, 2004

Dear Nein,











|
Grace was in all your steps ‘
and your generosity abound..

We can

never be separated as God has left me y

with memories to held and lowe that

doesn't pass away.





Whatever [im

doing and wherever go, my thoughts

are lai vs Ww ith VOU,





[miss vou dearly

“Youth fades; lave droaps; the leaves
of friendship fall. A Mother's secret
hope outlives them all”







‘Your loving daughter Kyla'











& nee 2009

Arawals Cay, » saat urday March 14 from Noon until 6:00 PM

All owners af vehicles 20) years ald and other
Special Interest vehicles are invited to pairticrpanie.

Registration Fee only $35.00)

5b pprizes for Peaple aC boice We inners

Ra file prizes

Nassau's Leading Manufacturer of Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Doors

MARCH MADNESS
$$$ $ALE $$$

HUGE DISCOUNTS ON ALL ORDERS
PLACED DURING THE MONTH OF MARCH

ee rik

Call for your FREE quote or

Come visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau,

TEL: 1-242-325-6633
FAX: 1-242-325-6638

SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE

-
-
$
$
-
$
-
-
-
-
$
$



Art Contest for Children
Surprive Entertaiament!!
Lote of Fun for the Whale Family

Steak & Chicken Dinners $10 each

(Tickets available from any Club Member)

{ Ingperandzes drys
The Antique Auto Club of The Bahamas
Proceeds in aid of The Bilney Lane Home for Children,
Nassau and Every Child Counts Learning Centre, Abaco

For dnformation, including Registration, pleave contact:

328-1576
564-6728
395-1892
455-6106

Peter Armstrong
Richard Blake
Murray Forde

or Jim LaRoda





PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



Manchester United to face
Everton in FA Cup semifinal

m LONDON

Everton rallied to beat Middlesbrough 2-1 on
Sunday and set up an FA Cup semifinal at Wembley
with Manchester United, while Arsenal outclassed
lower tier Burnley 3-0 to reach the last eight, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

David Wheater’s 44th minute header for Boro
had surprised American goalkeeper Tim Howard
and threatened an upset at Goodison Park. But
Everton rallied with two headed goals in seven min-
utes by Marouane Fellaini and Louis Saha.

Sunday’s other game was in the previous round,
with Arsenal beating League Championship club
Burnley 3-0 on strikes by Carlos Vela, Eduardo da
Silva and Emmanuel Eboue at the Emirates Stadi-
um.

Held up by postponements and replays, Arsenal
now faces Hull in a quarterfinal and the winner will
meet Chelsea in the semifinals. Both semifinals will
be at Wembley over the weekend of April 18-19.

Manchester United, which has a record 11 FA
Cup titles, won 4-0 at Fulham on Saturday to reach
a record 26th cup semifinal. Arsenal, a 10-time cup
winner, can match that mark by beating Hull. Ever-
ton, which has won the cup five times, is in its 24th
semifinal.



ROME - Filippo Inzaghi scored all three goals in
AC Milan’s 3-0 win over Atalanta with the club
also sure it has David Beckham for the rest of the
Serie A season.

On loan to Milan, Beckham reached an agreement
Saturday to return to the Los Angeles Galaxy on
July 1, more than three months later than planned.

Paul Thomas/AP Photo

On Sunday, he had a central role as a playmaker,
directing Inzaghi and fellow striker Alexandre Pato.

Inzaghi put Milan in front seven minutes in, dou-
bled the lead in the 71st and then scored again three
minutes later.

Milan solidified its third-place position in the
standings with 51 points. Inter Milan leads with 63
points and Juventus is second with 56. Serie A scor-
ing leader Marco Di Vaio also found the net three
times as Bologna beat Sampdoria 3-0.



FRANKFURT -— Bayer Leverkusen drew 1-1 with
10-man VfL Bochum to continue its struggles in
Germany’s Bundesliga.

Although Leverkusen beat Bayern Munich 4-2
in the German Cup, it has now failed to win at home
in five straight league matches and the draw leaves
Leverkusen with 37 points, five points behind fifth
place and the final UEFA Cup spot.



GLASGOW, Scotland - Kyle Lafferty scored
twice as Rangers charged into the semifinal of the
Scottish Cup with a 5-1 victory over Hamilton.

A day after St. Mirren upset Celtic 1-0 in another
quarterfinal, Rangers were wary of losing especial-
ly after a surprise 1-0 loss to Inverness in the Premier
League on Wednesday.

Although Hamilton’s Rocco Quinn replied after
Steven Whittaker had given Rangers a 15th minute
lead, the home side was up 3-1 by halftime thanks to
Lafferty’s first strike and a penalty by Aaron Niguez.

Hamilton lost three players through injury in the
first half and was down to 10 men early in the second
and Rangers added two more through Steven Davies
and Lafferty.



EVERTON'S Leon Osman, right, vies with Middlesbrough's Gary O'Neil during their quarter final FA Cup soc-
cer match at Goodison Park Stadium, Liverpool, England, Sunday, March 8, 2009.

2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT

7 Passanger XLT, Leather Interior



The Zap





aul Thomas/AP Photo

EVERTON’ $ Louis Sie 2nd right, heads to score a goal past Middlesbrough keeper Bradley Jones, num-
ber 22, during their quarter final FA Cup soccer match at Goodison Park Stadium, Liverpool, England.

Paul Thomas/AP Photo

EVERTON'S Marouane Fellaini, bottom left, reacts after scoring a goal with teammate Leon Osman, top,dur-
ing their quarter final FA Cup soccer match against Middlesbrough at Goodison Park Stadium, Liverpool, Eng-
land, Sunday, March 8, 2009.

Davis Cun nie-cee

FROM page 15

retired win over Galeano.
Team captain John Farrington, in an inter-
view going into Sunday’s match, noted that it’s






































was $42,073.00
NOW $33,800.00

2008 FORD SPORT TRAC
LIMITED - Leather Interior

was $46,186.00
NOW $37,300.00 ,

Save BIG Right Now!

me |

ie ae oan

aug,

a ee
=—//

|
= _ —-

2008 FORD EDGE SEL

was $41,670.00
NOW $35,400.00

was $42,116.00
NOW $35,800.00

NOW THAT'S REALLY A

| |(SDeal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

s |
rT Eel C2)

intense heat in Paraguay.

If the team lose the tie, the Bahamas will
get to host Guatemala in the second round
over the weekend of July 10-12 at te National
Tennis Center in a bid to avoid being relegat-
ed to zone ITI next year.

If the team end up winning the tie, the
Bahamas will have to go back on the road to
the Dominican Republic the same weekend
with a bid to play for further advancement to
Zone One.

The Dominican Republic blanked
Guatemala 5-0 in their frst round match-up
this weekend.

In Saturday’s pivotal doubles, the Bahamas’
team of Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle did-
n’t have a chance against Delgado and
Galeano.

Paraguay won the match 6-1, 6-0, 6-2 as the
Bahamas fell behind 2-1.

The win came on the heels of the split
between the two countries in the opening sin-
gles on Friday. Delgado knocked off Neilly 6-
1, 6-4, 6-2 in the first match. Then Mullings
pulled the Bahamas even with a 4-6, 7-5, 4-1

EW ae of]

AE els
In Just One Day!

Our DuraBath SSP Bathtubs & Wall Systems
are custom made to cover worn-out bathtubs

and out-of-date wall tiles...

No Mess. No Stress.

RE*BATH BAHAMAS

(Manufacturer's Lifetime Warranty).

Telephone
(242) 393-8501

“Authorized Dealer”

Visit our Showroom & Office Located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street
OFM Cater ae mer Moe HE A eo

been a difficult tie so far.

“With Delgado playing at home, he played
well” Farringto said. “To me, Timmy didn’t
play badly. He could have been a little more
consistent.

“But Delgado was forcing the play a lot. So
Timmy had to do a lot more just to stay in the
match.”

Farrington said Mullings had hs hands full
with Galeano.

“The kid was good. He kept a lot of balls in
play. Devin made him work for every point,”
Farrington stressed. “Devin made him play a
lot of balls and he ended up retiring.

“Devin made him work hard, forcing him
around the court. He was a lot more patient.
But the guy just couldn’t keep up with Devin.”

As for the doubles, Farrington aid Munroe
and Rolle didn’t stand a chance..

“The other team played extremely well. We
got behind the eight ball early. We got broke
early and we just couldn’t get the momentum
back,”

Farrington said. “They gained al ot more
confidence as the match went on.”

Commonwealth
Bank Giants
ready to
defend title

FROM page 15

hand, said if the regular season
was any indication, the post-sea-
son will be just as competitive.

“Based on the level of com-
petition, I was very surprised
that we only lost three games,”
Thompson said. “But on any
given night, especially with the
teams involved, you really have
to bring your A game.

“Tf you don’t bring your A
game, you could be prepared
to watch the rest of the season.”

While Commonwealth Bank
have to concentrate on the Y-
Care’s first, Thompson said the
road to the championship still
have to come through the
Giants.

“We have basically the same
make-up as last year, with one
or two additions that we feel
will help us down the stretch,”
he said. “But we are just trying
to get o the next level.”



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS

5 e
2009 JOYCE MINUS BASKETBALL CLASSIC



have no mercy on
sorry Ebenezer

Temple Fellowship didn't
have any mercy on welcom-
ing Ebenezer men into the
Baptist Sports Council's 2009
Joyce Minus Basketball Clas-
sic.

On Saturday at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, Tem-
ple Fellowship blasted
Ebenezer 54-13 to improve
their front-running record to
3-0 in the men's president divi-
sion.

Clayton Cooper and Jason
Tucker both had nine in the
win. Samuel Brown had seven
in the loss.

In the men's vice president
division, New Bethlehem
stayed unbeaten to top their
standings at 2-0 as they hand-
ed last year's runners-up
Evangelistic Center a 46-29
rout.

Other games in the men's
division saw Christian Taber-
nacle make their debut a suc-
cessful one with a 24-19 deci-
sion over Church of the
Nazarene and BIBA lost a
double header, 36-35 to Lat-
ter-Day Saints and 39-27 to
City of Praise.

In the 19-and-under divi-
sion, Latter-Day Saints
pushed their unblemished
record to 3-0 with a 46-34 rout
over Macedonia; Macedonia
held off Mercy Seat 37-36;
Golden Gates def. Miracle
Working Church of God 29-25
and Temple Fellowship got by
Golden Gates team one 41-
35.

Undefeated

And in the 15-and-under
division, Golden Gates
remained undefeated as they
shocked Macedonia 18-16;
Latter-Day Saints team two
stunned First Baptist 28-22;
Miracle Working Church of
God nipped Latter-Day 22-21
and Temple Fellowship won
30-22 over Faith United.

Here's a summary of some
of the games played:

Latter-Day Saints 36, BIBA
35: Reno Moss scored the
game's winning basket, finish-
ing with six, along with Tero
Lloyd to lead the Saints as
they marched past BIBA men.

Enricay Rolle had a game
high 12 in a losing effort.

City of Praise 39, BIBA 27:
Jermaine Humes scored a
game high 13 to pace City of
Praise men to victory. Roje
Chisholm had nine in the loss.

Macedonia 37, Mercy Seat
36: Prince Pinder netted the
game winning basket as he fin-
ished with nine, but Patrick
Brice led the attack for Mace-
donia's 19-and-under with a
game high 13. Wayde Higgs
had 11 in the loss.

Golden Gates No.2 29, Mir-
acle Working Church of God
25: Samuel Johnson had a
game high 14 to lift Golden
Gates No.2 to their season
opening 19-and-under victo-
ry. Omar Deveaux had nine
in the loss.

Latter-Day Saints No.2 28,
Golden Gates 22: Darren
Smith had a game high 13 in

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Frontrunners improve their
record with 54-13 thrashing

SEER

¢ Here’s a look at the team standings after this
weekend's results were posted:

Teams W
Men's President
Temple Fellowship
First Baptist

City of Praise
Latter-Day Saints
Ebenezer

BIBA

Pilgrim

Men's Vice President
New Bethlehem
Golden Gates
Christian Tabernacle
Bahamas Harvest
Evangelistic Center
Calvary Bible

Church of the Nazarene
19-And-Under
Latter-Day Saints
Faith United

First Baptist
Macedonia

Golden Gates

Golden Gates No.2
Temple Fellowship
Miracle Working COG
Mercy Seat
15-And-Under
Golden Gates
Latter-Day No.2
Temple Fellowship
First Baptist
Macedonia

Faith United

Miracle Working COG
Latter-Day

Zion South Beach

Latter-Day's second team's
big debut victory. Leon Saun-
ders had seven in the loss.
Golden Gates 18, Macedo-
nia 16: Randy Williams
canned the game's winning
basket and led Golden Gates’
15-and-under with six in the

=—O 7-4 op Doo ==0

Ones pH OSB Sp oo

L Pet.

1,000
1,000
500
900
.000
.000
.000

1,000
1,000
1,000
900
900
.000
.000

aN tH OOO ow-H+ + OO

1,000
1,000
666
500
500
900
900
833
.000

1,000
1,000
666
500
900
500
833
833
.000

Ropar + H+ Mwo- Oe wnat HtNM HK Of



win. Geno Bullard had a game
high seven in the loss.

¢ The league will be back in
action on Saturday with
another host of games at Bail-
lou Hills, starting at 10 am on
the two courts.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 682/09
STORAGE TANK #11
CLEANING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236



gal) Minister gives update
aCe AIT on National Stadium

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

THERE’S been quite a bit of
speculations as to what is hap-
pening with the construction of
the National Stadium at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre
by the Chinese government.

Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister laid
those speculations to rest when
he made his contribution on the
2009 Mid Year budget in the
House of Assembly last week.

“T am pleased to confirm pub-
licly today, Sir, that on 28th Jan-
uary of this year, 17 containers
of construction equipment for the
new stadium were shipped from
China, and should be here within
a matter of days,” he said.

“T am also pleased to say, Sir,
that the advance group of twenty
Chinese technical workers will
arrive here on 20th March to
begin preliminary works.”

Bannister, the Member of Par-
liament for Carmichael, said this
should lay to rest all concerns
about whether or not the FNM
government can build the nation-
al stadium.

In the meantime, Bannister
advised that the government now
has title documents to the land
upon which the Grand Bahama
Sports Complex sits.

“All 80 acres of it,” he
emphased.

In keeping with their manifesto
commitment to complete the
Grand Bahama Sports Complex,
Bannister said the first phase of
the new softball stadium has been
completed.

“Grand Bahama now has a
beautiful softball field, which is
the best that I have seen in the
Bahamas,” he said. “The new
grass practice track has been com-
pleted, so that our athletes can
train without the danger of stress
injuries that often accompany
asphalt or rubberized surfaces.”

And he assured the members
that the government has agreed
to resurface the track in Grand
Bahama with a Mondo rubber-
ized surface, which will be one of
the best in this part of the world.

“We expect that this track will
be completed in time for the
Bahamas to host the Caribbean

1 ee

aaa

a

BRAEE CONTAOL

STYLE,
en ee ee



Mi Advance group of Chinese technical
workers to arrive here on March 20

HM Containers of construction gear
expected to arrive soon

Desmond Een Cln



and Central American Age
Group Championships in
Freeport this summer,” Bannister
said.

During his contribution, Ban-
nister also advised members that
his Ministry is currently working
on a number of initiatives, includ-
ing the finalization of proposed
amendments to the National
Sports Policy in conjunction with
Sporting leaders.

“What is important as we move
ahead, Sir, is that we provide the
fullest opportunity to our young
people from traditionally disad-
vantaged community and our
family islanders to participate at
the highest levels of competition,”
he stressed.

“They have to know that sports
opens the door to opportunity,
and that there is much to be
learnt from the traditions of
excellence of the past.”

Talking about the past, Ban-
nister said he has mandated that
the National Hall of Fame
become a fixture in the annual
calendar of his minitry’s National
Sports Development Programme.

“Such a decision, Sir, is based
on the fact that the Ministry has a
duty to ensure that the young ath-
letes and coaches of the Bahamas
gain a better appreciation of the
athletes and coaches of yester-
year who sacrificed so much of

[ r

alt oF

fa

*
ioe g
“ ' tne

Cit * Fagan
aaa
‘ee

= om

STA A Pi
errs

aa

their lives to put the Bahamas on
the world map of sporting excel-
lence,” he said.

“Through this process, Mr.
Speaker, my Ministry seeks to
acquaint our young Bahamians
with the difficult circumstances
that many of our legendary sport-
ing heroes had to overcome on
their road to glory so that they
may fully appreciate the truth in
the well known adage that it mat-
ters not where one starts in life,
but rather where one ends, having
regard to making smart choices
and understanding that each of
us are born with God given gifts
and that our destiny is defined by
how well we use those gifts.”

He said his iministry
introdeuced an annual Hall of
Fame Calendar, designed to cre-
ate a year round awareness of
those sporting giants who paved
the way for the successes of the
present generation of our world
class athletes.

While the first edition was
essentially concentrated upon the
Class of 2008 of this country's
national Hall of Fame, Bannister
said it, therefore, pained him to
observe the unfounded criticism
of the 2008 Hall of Fame Calen-
dar by a former champion ath-
lete himself, the Honourable
Member for Exuma.

“Mr. Speaker, when I was
appointed as a Minister, I deter-
mined that I would give service to
the Bahamian people, not just
F.N.M.'s,” he said. “You will
note, Mr. Speaker, that the leader
of opposition business (Bernard
Nottage) was enshrined in the
Hall of Fame this year, and is Mr.
February in the calendar.

“And in 2009, the government
plans to induct the first field event
medalist, who just happens to be
the leader of the opposition (Per-
ry Christie). But sports does not
revolve around politics, Sir. We
are determined to honour all
deserving Bahamians.”

SB TOYOTA moving forward
2) cornu &

i ee ee ee ee ee | —s

an

ie

BULLTED OVER THE TRADITCLOWAL CORDLLA,
Po el ee ee

WITH & BETTER

ere Creme mat URE OUR me tee lee lia

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew's Cha
Open Mon to Fri Sam - 5:30pm
Sat fam - 12neon

tel: 397-1700

E-mail: execmotoriabatelnet.bs
Parti and service guaranteed



Avellabla in Grand Beta at Quality Aeto Sales (Freeporl] © Queens Hay, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don Mactey dived, 367-2808



PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS





NAIA INDOOR TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIP

Miller celebrates triple victory

P|
|
*

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

AT last year’s Olympic Games in Bei-
jing, China, Ramon Miller made his debut
on the Bahamas senior national team as the
“rookie” as he helped the men win the sil-
ver medal in the 4 x 400 metre relay.

This year, Miller has served notice that
he intends to play a more vital role on the
national team when they head to the IAAF
World Championships in Berlin, Germany
in August.

Over the weekend, Miller posted a triple
victory in the NAIA indoor track and field
championships in a pace of three hours to
earn the Male Track Athlete of the Meet as
he contributed to Dickinson State Univer-
sity’s second place finish in the point stand-
ings.

The senior, who graduated from CR
Walker, closed out his indoor season by
winning the 200 and 400 metres as well as
anchored Dickinson State to its second
consecutive title in the 4 x 400 relay.

In a brief interview from the Dickinson

Miller stated: “It was alright to go out with
three national championships.”

It was the third straight 400 title on the
two-lap race on the indoor track for Miller,
who clocked 46.98 seconds (just off his
championship record of 46.95), well ahead
of his Blue Hawks’ team-mate Sean Pick-
stock, who ran 47.83 for second.

Miler had the fastest qualifying time of
47.95 with Pickstock sitting in second with
48.36.

In the 200, Miller was just .08 seconds
shy of erasing the NAIA meet record when
he stopped the clock at 20.97 for another
victory for DSU.

His nearest rival King College’s sopho-
more Kemar Hyman, who trailed in 21.48.

Miller led all qualifiers in the prelimi-
naries in 21.32. Pickstock was ninth in 21.87
and Forbes was tied for 10th in 21.92, but
neither of the latter two advanced.

Before he was done, Miller teamed up
on the anchor leg with Allan Ayala (lead
off), Pickstock (second) and Ian Smith
(third) to turn in a winning time of 3:13.17
in the 4x 4 relay final.

Smith was inserted in the line-up to

Ingraham, who had to sit out after he
strained his hamstring on Friday.

DSU’s coach Pete Stanton had nothing
but praise for Miller.

“It was a dominating performance by
Ramon,” he said.

“It was one of those special perfor-
mances to watch in every event. He con-
tinues to shine and run so well and compete
so hard. He’s been fun to watch.”

Stanton also got to watch three other
Bahamians perform for DSU.

In the men’s 60 final, sophomore Jamal
‘Snickers’ Forbes, back after an injury
plaque season last year, ended up second in
6.81, while team-mate Michael Sands was
sixth in 6.91.

Johnnie Nabors, a senior from Union
(Kentucky) won in 6.80.

Forbes had the third fastest qualifying
time out of the semifinal in 6.78, while
Sands was sixth in 6.84. Ingraham was tenth
in 6.99 as he suffered his injury.

And in the preliminary rounds, Sands
had the second fastest time of 6.80, fol-
lowed by Ingraham in 6.85 and Forbes in
6.86.

from McKendree State.

Clarke, a senior sprinter and another
CR Walker graduate, had to settle for third
in the women’s 60 in 7.56.

The race was won by Wayland Baptist’s
sophomore Kimberly Smith in 7.37.
Shantrell Jenkins, a senior at Voorhees,
was second in 7.56.

In the preliminaries, Clarke had the third
fastest time of 7.66. Her semifinal time was
not available.

Clarke, however, played second fiddle to
Smith in the 200. Smith won the race in
24.34 with Clarke not too far behind in
24.41.

And in the 4 x 400 relay, Clarke
anchored McKendree to second in the final
in 3:49.73. Oklahoma Baptist won the race
in 3:47.35. Clarke and McKendree had the
fourth fastest qualifying time of 3:54.22.

Sasha Joyce, a team-mate of Clarke, ran
9.50 for fourth place in the fifth of six heats
in the women’s 60 hurdles.

That placed her 25th overall in a field of
33 and she failed to make the cut of the top
12 to advance.

Both Clarke and Joyce helped Wayland

Ramon Miller

Also at the meet was Lanece Clarke



replace another Bahamian, senior John Baptist to clinch the team title.

lm BASKETBALL

Press on Saturday after his performances,

NATIONAL JUNIOR COLLEGE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION: NATIONAL INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS



Olympian Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson
leads the way for Bahamians!

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

OLYMPIAN Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson led
the way for a number of Bahamians compet-
ing at the National Junior College Athletic
Association’s National Indoor Championships
over the weekend.

The former Jordan Prince William Falcons’
standout who won the World Junior Cham-
pionships’ 200 metre title was second in the 55
metres at the Texas Tech University in Lub-
bock, Texas.

The Southwest Missouri sophomore ran
6.80 seconds to follow behind Florissant
Valle’s freshman Santana Lowery’s record
breaking performance of 6.70.

Ferguson (6.85) also trailed Lowery (6.80)
in the preliminaries.

In the 200, Ferguson got second in 23.69.
The race was won by Lowery in 23.46. Lowery
had the best qualifying time of 23.75 with Fer-
guson behind her in 23.79.

Krystal Bodie, a sophomore as well at
Southwest Missouri, was also third in the
women’s 55 hurdles. She ran 7.97. Natasha
Ruddock of Essex Community College won in
7.66 with April Williams of Barton County
Community College was second in 7.72.

Ferguson and Bodie helped Southwest Mis-
souri to an eighth place finish in the point
standings with 40.

The other member of the Bahamian con-
nection at Southwest Missouri, Jamal Wilson,
failed to secure a mark in the men’s high jump.

Cory Holman, a sophomore from Rend
Lake, won the title with a best leap of 6-feet,
11 3/4-inches.

Despite not getting any points from Wil-
son, Southwest Missouri was tied for 11th in
the standings with 16 points.

Demetrius Pinder, a sophomore at Essex

Sheniqua ‘Q’ ioe

Community College, was second in the men’s
400 in 46.89. Renny Quow, a freshman from
South Plains, won the title in 46.45.

In the preliminaries, Pinder ran 46.35 to
trail Quow, who did 47.20.

Essex Community College was 18th overall
in the standings with 11.

Deandra Knowles, a freshman competing
for South Plains, ran 58.08 for 10th overall in
the preliminaries of the women’s 400. But she
didn’t make the cut of eight for the final.

South Plains was the women’s national
champions with 139.50. They also took the
men’s crown with 163.

Another freshman, Shelleyeka Rolle of Bar-
ton County Community College, was third in

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

Lt EXTRA, ENTRA,

Krystal Bodie



the women’s 600 final in 1:34.15. Shakeeri
Cole, a freshman from South Plains won in
1:32.65 with Andrea Sutherland of Barton
County Community College second in 1:32.87.

Rolle posted the fastest qualifying time of
1:37.61.

And in the 800, Rolle had to settle for fifth
place in 2:23.82. Cole again took the victory in
2:21.57. Claudette Hetmeyer, a sophomore
from Bronx Community College, was ahead of
Rolle in 2:23.27 in fourth.

Rolle had the third fastest qualifying time of
2:24.06. Cole led the way in 2:23.68, followed
by Hetmeyer in 2:25.32.

Barton County Community College ended
up in second place in the standings with 83.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

EXTRA,

Large Shipment
of
Used Cars

New Shipments Arrived

ui , Lowawe
aa

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Inaurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

CALL 322-1722

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165



AS WN
UKE

TMD

With the high school basketball season nearing conclusion,
one series of champions will be decided this week to culmi-
nate an exciting year thus far.

The Government Schools Sports Association will begin
their playoff rounds today at a pair of separate locations for
the semifinals.

Seniors will face off at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium while
Juniors will meet at the D.W. Davis Gymnasium beginning at
4pm.

Today’s eight semifinal games will be sudden death elimi-
nation while the best of three finals in each division will begin
tomorrow at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Senior Boys

G.H.S Magic (GHS) 12-2

C.I Gibson Rattlers (CIG) 10-4
C.C Sweeting Cobras (CCS) 10-4
C.V Bethel Stingrays (CVB) 9-5

Semifinal Matchups
1. GHS vs. 4. CVB
2. CIG vs. 3. CCS

In a stark contrast with the 2007-08 season, this division is
wide open with no clear front runner like last year’s undefeat-
ed C.R Walker Knights, infact, both last years champions’ the
Knights, and runners’ up, the Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins,
failed to qualify for the postseason.

The Magic went from bottom feeders to pennant winners
in just a single season but fell short in the Hugh Campbell
tournament where they were eliminated by the Cobras.

The Rattlers come into the playoffs on the heels of a crush-
ing loss on the national stage in the Hugh Campbell final.

As the only returning playoff team from a year ago, C.I
Gibson will look to salvage a season with a league title.

The Cobras have been another surprise after a disappoint-
ing 2007-08 season but had become a top title contender this
year, claiming the third seed and advancing to the pool finals
of the Hugh Campbell tournament.

The Stingrays advanced to the postseason on the final day
of regular season play when the beat the Knights to claim the
final playoff spot.

Junior Boys

D.W Davis Pitbulls (DWD) 11-1

T.A Thompson Cobras (TAT) 11-1
A.F Adderley Tigers (AFA) 8-4

L.W Young Golden Eagles (LWY) 5-7

Semifinal Matchups
1. DWD vs. 4. LWY
2. TAT vs. 3. AFA

The Pibulls won every possible tournament before them
this season, most notably the Father Marcian Peters’ tourna-
ment where they edged out the Cobras in the finals.

The teams ‘split the regular season series.

The Tigers pose the biggest threat to the top seeds with the
size of Kenrico Lockhart upfront and an athletic backcourt.

Senior Girls

C.R Walker Knights (CRW) 12-0

C.V Bethel Stingrays (CVB) 8-4

C.I Gibson Rattlers (CIG) 6-6

Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins (DDJ) 6-6

Semifinal Matchups
1. CRW vs. 4. DDJ
2. CVB vs. 3. CIG

The Knights returned much of last year’s squad including
top scorer Malesha Peterson.

Peterson led the Knights to an undefeated regular season
but fell short in the finals of the Father Marcian Peters tour-
nament.

Junior Girls

H.O. Nash Lions (HON) 12-0
T.A Thompson Cobras (TAT) 9-3
A.F Adderley Tigers (AFA) 8-4
S.C McPherson Sharks (SCM) 6-6

Semifinal Matchups
1. HON vs. 4. SCM
2. TAT vs. 3. AFA

The Lions steamrolled through the competiton and seem to
be a lock to add another championship title to Pattie John-
son’s resume.

H.O. Nash went through the regular season virtually
untested and claimed the Father Marcian Peters title for their
division.

With a talented lineup led by Kaleisha Laing, Leshea
Grant, Randya Kemp and Lakishna Munroe, the Lions are

the clear favorites to repeat as champions.





THE TRIBUNE

sp
Davis Cup knife-erlge

Commonwealth
Bank Giants
reatly to
defend title

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Commonwealth Bank
Giants are ready to defend their
title in the New Providence Bas-
ketball Association.

Head coach Perry Thompson
said from year-to-year, they
have had to deal with different
teams and different challenges,
but they have been able to pre-
vail.

“This year, we have the
Wreckers with a very big front
court, but I think one of the key
things for us will be controlling
the game and minimizing the
turnovers,” Thompson pointed
out.

BASKETBALL
NPBA PLAYOFFS

THE New Providence Basket-
ball Association will open its first
round best-of-three playoffs
tonight at the CI Gibson Gymna-
sium.

¢ Here’s a look at the fixtures
on tap for the week:

Tonight’s schedule

7 pm Commonwealth Bank vs
Y-Care Wreckers.

8 pm Johnson's Truckling
Jumpers vs Sunshine Auto Ruff
Ryders.

Wednesday’s schedule

7 pm Electro Telecom Cybots
vs Coke Explorers.

8 pm Police Crimestoppers vs
Foxies’ Pros.

Friday’s schedule

7 pm Sunshine Auto Ruff
Ryders vs Johnson’s Trucking
Jumpers.

8 pm Y-Care’s Destroyers vs
Commonwealth Bank Giants.

Saturday’s schedule

7 pm Foxies’ Pros vs Police
Crimestoppers.

8 pm Electro Telecom Cybots
vs Coke Explorers.

“We would probably like to
run a little more against the
Wreckers. I think that would be
an advantage for us because of
their size. But we’re going to
be up for the challenge.”

That challenge will come
tonight when Thompson and his
the Giants face Y-Care’s,
coached by Donnie Culmer, in
game one of the best-of-three
series at 7 pm.

“Tt’s going to be a dog fight.
Once I’m at first mast, it will be
a dog fight,” Culmer said. “And
I feel whoever come out of this
series will win the champi-
onship.

“The other side doesn’t have
anybody on it. So I’m not really
concerned about them.”

Culmer, who added Emeka
Watson to their frontcourt line-
up, said he expect that the series
will go down to the wire. While
he would like to wrap it up in
two straight, he said he could
live with it going the distance.

Thompson, on the other

SEE page 12

PAGE 15



r

MONDAY, MARCH 9,

Bahamas in
critical position
on final day of
tie in Paraguay

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas was in a crit-
ical position yesterday as the
final day of the first round of
the American Zone IT Davis
Cup tie wrapped up in
Paraguay.

Playing at the Yacht y Golf
Club in Paraguayo, Lambare,
Grand Bahamian Olympian
Devin Mullings needed to win
his reverse five set singles
match against Ramon Delga-
do in the battle of the top
seeds.

The Bahamas was trailing
2-1 going into the match.

The final match was to have
showcased the two number
two seeds, Grand Bahamian
Timothy Neilly against Diego
Galeano.

But up to presstime, the
results were not available.

The matches were plyed in
the evening because of the

SEE page 12

ts

2009

DEVIN MULLINGS
(above) who
needs to win his
reverse five set
singles match
against Ramon
Delgado in the
battle of the top
seeds.

RESULTS SO FAR

¢ Here’s a look at the results posted so far by the Bahamas at
the first round of the American Zone II Davis Cup tie in

Paraguay over the weekend:
Friday’s Opening Singles
Ramon Delgado (Paraguay)

6-1, 6-4. 6-2.

def. Timothy Neilly (Bahamas)

Devin Mullings (Bahamas) def. Diego Galeano (Paraguay)

4-6, 7-5, 4-1 (retired).
Saturday’s Doubles

Ramon Delgado/Diego Galeano (Paraguay) def. Bjorn
Munroe/Marvin Rolle (Bahamas) 6-1, 6-0, 6-2.

Sunday’s Reverse Singles

Devin Mullings (Bahamas vs Ramon Delgado (Paraguay) not

completed up to presstime.

Timothy Neilly (Bahamas) vs Diego Galeano (Paraguay)

scheduled to follow.

Odessa

Garden

Murphyville, 2nd House right from Sears Road. |
Telephone 322-8493

Vintage Moral Dress Smocked ood made in England.
Pretty and Perfect for Springtime and Easter. Size 3/4.
See our Selection of Hand-smocked diresses in oonl pastel

| colours for Easter and Tea Parties for your Littl Ladies!

Muda aul
STA eM iat
mela

Online

egistration

c

buttonsformalwear.com

BUTTONS

a Bridal & Formal Wear



NDHAM NASSAU RESORT

ABLE BEACH







ae a es

SR Le)

...A Tender 100% North Pacific Cod Fillet
topped with Zesty Tartar Sauce,
Cheddar Cheese and Crisp Lettuce
all wrapped in a Warm Tortilla.





PAGE 16, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS







THE TSAVOUSSIS BROTHERS are ‘Wrapping and Rolling Out’ the next big thing in the quick serve restaurant
industry...the ‘Fish Go Wrap!’ From left: Wendy’s president, Chris Tsavoussis; vice-president Terry Tsavous-
sis, director of operations Randy Sands.

Tsavoussis brothers
make history with
fabulous fish wrap

THE Bahamas is the first market to intro-
duce the “fish go wrap” at the Wendy’s restau-
rants.

The brainchild of Wendy’s Bahamas presi-
dent Chris Tsavoussis, this menu item features
a fresh, hand-cut cod fillet and is topped with
shredded cheddar cheese, lettuce anda
zesty tartar sauce, all wrapped in a warm, soft
tortilla.

“Timing couldn’t be better,” said Chris
Tsavoussis. “I had been toying with this idea for
quite a while and I’m thrilled that Wendy’s
has agreed to allow The Bahamas to be the

very first market in the world to roll out the
‘fish go wrap.’”

Described as a “tasty spin-off” from the exist-
ing Wendy’s ‘chicken go wrap,’ the ‘fish go
wrap’ substitutes North Pacific Cod to deliver
the perfect, palate pleasing snack .

Vice-president Terry Tsavoussis and director
of operations Randy Sands hit the Wendy’s
kitchen to personally whip up and test the new
wrap prior to its launch.

The International Wendy’s Community will
have their sights set on The Bahamas as ‘Fish
Go Wrap’ makes its historic debut.

Teachers pair up for Wednesday night space shot

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

TWO SCIENCE teachers who
have spent the past five years
under NASA’s tutelage are about
to graduate with high-flying hon-
ors, according to Associated Press.

The space shuttle flight
Wednesday night of Joseph Aca-
ba and Richard Arnold II will
mark the first time two one-time

teachers have rocketed into space
together. And during the two-
week construction mission to the
international space station, both
will attempt multiple spacewalks
— the most dangerous job in
orbit.

The flight on shuttle Discovery
was delayed a month because of
concerns about hydrogen gas
valves in the engine compartment.

After extra tests, NASA deemed
the spacecraft safe to fly.

Discovery’s astronauts arrived
at the launching site Sunday after-
noon, four hours ahead of the
start of the countdown, and
thanked everyone who helped
resolve the valve issue.

The teachers and their five
crewmates — the usual assort-
ment of military pilots and rocket

, Es
Pee esd
ee

- 7 4
Pot Sal dal
: . ee

all a ee eel

oO
20 Yo All Power Sprayers
OFF and Rollers!

of

Wagnere Paint Crew
Power Sprayer

ae

Wagnere
QuickTouch
Power Roller

PLU

ask about MORE

in-house specials!
All Sales Final

Painting The Bahamas!
188 Wulff Road
Open Mon-Fri 7:30am-4:30pm Sat 8:00am-3:00pm
Tel: 323-3973 or 325-3976 Fax: 322-3937

Web: www.buildersmalibahamas.com Email: infoG@buildersmalibahamas.com



SS

Odessa

Murphyville, 2nd House right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493
oe

Gorgeous Black and Torqacise Hat.
Keauliful, simple and elegant; appropriate for
Summer very ary, Great for Chorch, Teas, Croises and

Horse Races.
a

TWO mi WAY
SOLUTIONS

We Keep you in touch

Authorized Distributor For:

HVT

Professional
Two-Way Radios

TMé600
Mobile/Base

TCV0O
Handheld



scientists — will deliver and install
a final set of solar wings for the
space station. With just over a
year remaining until the orbiting
complex is completed, the frame-
work holding the solar wings is
the last major American-made
building block left to fly.

This flight comes a year and a
half after the last teacher-astro-
naut, Barbara Morgan, went into
space after a two-decade wait.
Morgan was the backup in the
mid-1980s for schoolteacher
Christa McAuliffe, who was killed
when space shuttle Challenger
exploded after takeoff.

Acaba was a freshman at the
University of California at Santa
Barbara when McAuliffe died on
Jan. 28, 1986. Arnold was fresh
out of college and living in Wash-
ington, and his wife-to-be was a
student-teacher.

“It definitely had an impact
when you look at the sacrifices
that she (McAuliffe) made and
the importance that NASA put
on it,” Acaba said. When it came
time for him to step up, “it really
made you feel like you were doing
something worthwhile.”

Two-Way Radios
as low as

$396.00
PROGRAMMED

We offer sales, service and accessories

for all makes and models

TC6é10
Waterproof/
Shockproof

TR8O
Repeater

#41 Mackey Street & Palmdale Ave,

Mon-Fri, 8:30am - 4:30pm
Tel: 394-5025
sales@two-waysolutions,com





THE TRIBUNE

OU



ine

MONDAY,



MARCH 9,

SS

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life







Construction
industry
unemployment

VEN OER I Ce
18-20 per cent



m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Unemployment in the
Bahamian construction indus-
try could be running as high as
18-20 per cent, the Bahamian
Contractors Association’s
(BCA) president has told Tri-
bune Business, with few pro-
jects coming on stream to
replace jobs that are finished
by companies.

Responding to the Depart-
ment of Statistics’ interim
Labour Force Survey, which
showed that construction
industry employment had fall-
en by a further 9 per cent
between May 2008 and Febru-
ary 2009, Stephen Wrinkle
said that figure tallied with the
sector’s own estimates.

With sector unemployment
running at about 9 per cent,
according to previous con-
struction industry workforce
assessments, Mr Wrinkle said
the estimate of a further 9 per
cent increase was in line with
estimated.

“That’s an additional 9 per
cent,” he said of the Depart-
ment’s findings. “We reckon
we’re at about 20 per cent
unemployment in the field.
From what we’re hearing from
our members, that’s not far
off. We were at 8-9 per cent
unemployment, and if you add
another 9 per cent that takes
us to 18 per cent, so it’s not far
off.

“That’s pretty much what
the industry is telling us —
between 18-20 per cent. It’s a
substantial number when you
start to add it up. It’s in the
hundreds, if not thousands.”

While Bahamian contrac-
tors did their best to keep key
personnel, and the most pro-
ductive employees, on payroll
even during down times, Mr
Wrinkle questioned whether

SEE page 6B

The information soar or a third |
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omissi soos
from the daily report,



CLICO collapse CLICO regulation

causes Act delay



Zhivargo Laing

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Implementation of the Domes-
tic Insurance Act and its accom-
panying regulations is set to be
further delayed after new amend-
ments were suggested to enhance
the Registrar’s “ability to regu-
late the sector”, with some
changes prompted by CLICO
(Bahamas) collapse into provi-
sional liquidation.

The proposed changes come
after Tribune Business obtained
evidence that CLICO (Bahamas)
and its subsidiaries breached this
nation’s exchange control laws
and regulations, with both the
current and a former Central
Bank governor telling this news-
paper that any Bahamian-resi-

Wi Minister says Domestic Insurance Act held up
after insurer's failure prompts further suggested
amendments to enhance ‘Registrar's ability to

regulate the industry’

wi Further evidence shows CLICO Bahamas and
Bahamian affiliate violated exchange control laws

and regulations

Wi Sizeable number of CLICO's 141 Bahamian staff
to be formally laif-off this week

gy Minister acknowledges episode shows need for
enhanced cross-border supervision in Caribbean

dent company — such as the insur-
er and its CLICO Enterprises Ltd
affiliate — needed to obtain regu-
latory permission for any over-
seas loans and investments that
were made in their name (see
other story on Page 1B).

Tribune Business has also
learned that a sizeable number
of CLICO (Bahamas) 141
Bahamian-based staff are likely
to be made redundant this week,
with the liquidator likely to this
week complete the financial pack-
age for buyers interested in
acquiring the insolvent compa-
ny’s life and health insurance
portfolio.

Among those most likely to be
made redundant will be CLICO
(Bahamas) 90-strong agent force,
who previously operated on a

Pioneers aiming to
fill ‘missing middle’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

An awards programme that
could provide Bahamian entre-
preneurs with up to $100,000 in
grant funding is “hoping to get a
lot more” than the 40-50 appli-
cations received from this nation
prior to today’s close, its country
representative explaining that the
initiative aimed to fill “the missing
middle” in the national econom-
ic structure.

Abigail Noble, country repre-
sentative for Pioneers of Pros-
perity, said the initiative was tar-
geted at small and medium-sized
enterprises across the Bahamas
and the Caribbean, in a bid to fill
the gap between micro and large
businesses, and inspire, invest in
and empower the next genera-
tion of entrepreneurs.

Describing the focus on small
and medium-sized enterprises as
“immensely important, Ms Noble
explained: “Look at the devel-
oped, industrialized countries. A
large percentage of their gross
domestic product (GDP) comes
from small and medium-sized
enterprises. That’s not the case
in small island and developing
countries. It’s the missing mid-
dle.”

Ms Noble described as a “lega-

M_ REXCLUSIVE

Ocean Club Residences & Marina

If you enjoy the privacy of poolside sunbathing, playing a leisure game of
tennis or golf, soaking up the warm island breeze or look to experience a
meght filled with entertainment, tt is all within your grasp as an owner of
this Ocean Club Residences & Marina condominium. This thoughtfully dec-
orated 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath ground floor home with an oversized patio, 1s
located on the breathtaking Nassau Harbour. Ownership benefits include
access to the on-site marina, pools, gym facilities, private beaches and all
the amenities of Atlantis at your doorstep. Some grand features of the home
include a gourmet kitchen, tiled floors and walk in closets. Exclusively of-
fered by Mario Carey Realty at $2,495,000.00. Web Listing #8287. MCR
also offers a number of units and dock spaces for sale and for rent.

NAN

MARIO CAREY REALTY

Tel: 242-677-TALK (8255) | Fax: 242-677-8256 | Cell: 242-357-7013
mario@mariocareyrealty.com | www.mariocareyrealty.com



cy of colonialism” the fact that
there were very few companies
of a size between micro enter-
prises and large firms in nations
such as the Bahamas. “Very
rarely does that gap get bridged —
small companies growing into
large and medium-sized enter-
prises,” Ms Noble said. “These
are the ones that employ more
people, create more disposable
income, enable people to invest
more in education and health-

SEE page 6B

medical emergencies
don't study economics

commission basis, and have
already been sent home to await
further instructions. It is also
unclear how many of its 51
administrative and underwriting
staff will be retained by the lig-
uidator, Baker Tilly Gomez
accountant and partner, Craig A.
‘Tony’ Gomez.

When contacted by Tribune
Business, Mr Gomez did not
directly confirm whether many
CLICO (Bahamas) staff would
be formally let go this week.
However, he added: “Clearly,
business has ceased, and to fund
staff payroll, you need business.”

Mr Gomez said he and his liq-
uidation team (he is only the pro-
visional liquidator) had enjoyed

SEE page 7B

hindered by ‘non-
cosy’ relationship

* Ex-minister says relationship between Ministry
of Finance, Registrar of Insurance's Office was
tense, with insurer's problems never brought to
his attention

* Says exchange controls breached, as Bahamas
resident companies need prior permission to
lend investment monies overseas in their name

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

REGULATION of CLICO (Bahamas) during the key 2004-
2007 period may have been hampered by the tense relation-
ship that existed between the Ministry of Finance and Registrar
of Insurance’s Office, Tribune Business has been told, as a for-
mer minister confirmed the company had not operated “in
accordance with Bahamian laws and regulations”.

James Smith, Minister of State for Finance under the 2002-2007
Christie administration, said CLICO (Bahamas) financial posi-
tion, and its increasing exposure to highly risky, speculative
Florida-based real estate investments, which at 2007 year-end
accounted for almost 59 per cent of its assets — a highly unusual
concentration of risk — was never brought to his attention when
he was minister.

“No, not while I was there. I don’t recall anything,” Mr Smith
told Tribune Business when questioned on whether these matters
came across his desk.

He then indicated this may have been due to the troubled rela-
tionship the Ministry of Finance then had with the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office, explaining that the latter had wanted the
freedom to operate as a relatively autonomous, standalone reg-
ulator, and resented what it perceived as his ministry’s “inter-
ference”.

SEE page 4B



Chamber chief ‘shocked’ at rate of jobless increase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s presi-
dent is “shocked” that the national unemploy-
ment rate has risen so rapidly within the past six
months, pointing out that in percentage terms it
was almost a 40 per cent increase.

Commenting on the Department of Statistics’
interim labour force survey, which showed that
the unemployment rate on New Providence had
increased from 8.7 per cent to 12.1 per cent
between May 2008 to early 2009, Dionisio
D’ Aguilar said the data showed both the Bahami-
an economy’s vulnerability and the “urgent need”
for the Government to initiate its planned capital



works stimulus. “That’s an almost 40 per cent
increase in the rate of unemployment,” Mr
D’Aguilar said, commenting on the 3.5 per cent rise
in New Providence. “I’m surprised that it’s that sig-
nificant. I’m a little shocked that it’s as significant
as it is in terms of percentage.

“This recession/depression is only getting start-
ed. We don’t know where the bottom island how
long it’s going to go on for. I’m shocked that the
rate of unemployment has increased as precipi-
tously as it has.

“It has been demonstrated that our economy is
increasingly fragile. That’s why the recession, when
it us, has been as devastating as it has been.”

SEE page 5B

—_
ColinalImperial.

.. they don't know the word “recession” either. That's why you
need to maintain your insurance coverage with Colinalmperial
even when the economy is weak — to make sure hard times don't

get harder just because you fall ill or fall down on your luck.
Stay confident. Stay connected,

confidence for life

FIRST AID

www..colinaimperial.com





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





WANTED

Bimini Sands Resort & Marina is

seeking a mason, skilled in steel
bending.

The best candidate must have
high volume experience and the
best candidate must have training
experience and ability to motivate
other associates.

Salary will reflect experience and
skill set.

Please contact our office at (242)
347-3500 or (242) 347-3501 (fax)

©



@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE BAHAMAS should
place trade experts in its estab-
lished worldwide embassy and
consulate network in a bid to
forge new import/export
opportunities, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s
executive director has urged,
although he acknowledged
that this would be costly.

Philip Simon, speaking at
the National Economic Sum-
mit at Ebenezer’s Loyola Hall,
told Tribune Business that the
Bahamas would greatly bene-
fit from trade ambassadors
who were a specialist on trade
opportunities.

“Consulates should have a
trade ambassador in every
consulate around the world;
someone who is a specialist

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
CERTIFICATION & CERTIFICATE PROGRAMMES

| i
Continuing Education Units Now Available |

Course Commencement Dates
28" March - 2009

Whar is hour career goal?







S44 44,

PROMOTION

QUALITY SERVICE
INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION
SALARY INCREASE

CAREER CHANGE! ENHANCEMENT

The Professional Development Department com help

you achieve your carver coal! A wide array of courses and

programmes leading io cenificate, cenification and licensure are

offered. You can become a pioneer in secing performance standards

in Vou of gakomion. We have secumed partnerships with leading

Talon Al InSstiiliors bo help jo aepom plist yor cancer peals

You can alain your professional development credentials at The Callege of The Bahamas. Success is at your finger tips
Calle teh Cleo the cone or propre fe help yon cccommlish parr cnreer poate, ..









VY ¥

i i

Bookstore grounds

Certiied Professional Managers Programme (CPM), James Madizon Unversity, Hameanburg, via

Cortified Associio Manager, James Macon Unavormty, Harrisonburg. VA

Certified Computer Operator Microeact Office Specialisi- MOLE)

a Resource Manager (Cert. HAM), National Management Assocation of Amernca, Dayton
. Chia

Certificate in Law- Parokegal (Pa), The Inatitube of Legal Eeacutmes, Bactord, England

Gentilicate For The Office Assistant (OA), The Inatituie Of Lagal Executives, Bedford, England

Certified Public Accountant, (CFA), Becker Review, Qakorock Terrace, Chicaga, IL

Cortified Professional Secretary Programme (OPS. Association of Aden. Prodessionals, Wexondna, VA,

Accounting For Noc-Financial Managers

Company Law. The Institute of Legal Executives. Bedford, England

Employment Law, The Inst@ute of Legal Executives, Bedford, England

Ethics and Prafessianal Reapeesibility

Josneyman Plumbing License (JPL)

Legal Writing & Research

Project Management Practitianer PMPri

Singles Phase Eksctrical License PEL}

VWiréing & Aeseansh Sails

Ne entrance exam required. Tuition Payment is due per teri
For additional information, telephone us at (242) 325-5714 of (242) 328-0005

Foes May He Fok By Cosh, Creda Com or Bank Cenilied Cheque To: The College of The Bahanas, Hines Chllce
CEES Reserved The Right To Change Tutti, Peee, Course Content, Coure Scheel: And Course Miers

The 2"¢ Annual Book Festival |
“read Green to Live Green...
Towards a Better Environment!”

Featuring Jeannie Thompson, lan Strachan, Marion

Bethel, Obediah Smith, Anku, Nicolette Bethel and more!

Cotton Candy!
Rotis!
Face Painting!

Conch Fritters!
Books!

Arts + crafts!

rere Lele
March 14, 2009
12-5pm
Chapter One

Jazz Music!

eee ee eae (eee) eel)
Schoo! of English Studies, Libraries
& Instructional Media Services and

eee meee sie ternal

The College of The Bahamas.

Thompson
Boulevard

on the economy, a specialist
on trade opportunities, to sell
the Bahamas in addition to
other diplomatic and political
things that consulates do.

It may have been men-
tioned in the manifest of the
governing party,” he said.

However, the former

























i ital

ta
me Ly

crm

i

(The Tribune)__
al Estate

rl F
MA aT):

GS Tel: 502 2356 tam
| for ad rates hw

Ambassador to CARICOM,
Leonard Archer, said govern-
ment might not consider rati-
fying such a position because
of the high costs involved.
“Trade Ambassadors are
expensive,” he said. “The
additional expense of putting
a qualified trade ambas-

Ses

ee ee eee
te ls I a

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

je Public is hereby aavised tha

RALD of No

9 Gleniston Gardens in the Western District of the Island of New Providence,

one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

intends to

change my child’s name from NATHANIEL WILLIAM FRANCIS HEY to
NATHANIEL WILLIAM FRANCIS FITZGERALD. If there are any objections
0 this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirt
30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

Chamber executive: We need
network of trade ambassadors

sador/trade officer in the mis-
sion would not be cost effec-
tive.”

Mr Archer said, though,
that the Bahamas and many
Caribbean countries have
gravely understaffed missions
abroad, and suffer handi-
capped relations with partner
countries worldwide because
of it. “Someone ought to be
able to sit in the public ses-
sion of that (foreign) commit-
tee from beginning to end so
they can be constantly sending
reports back to Nassau saying
this is what is being said, this is
what is being said by whom
and this is what you should
do,” he continued.

Manifesto

The FNM government, in
its 2007 Manifesto, promised
to continue the acquisition of
residential properties overseas
“for the accommodation of
Bahamas Foreign Service
Officers and Bahamas Diplo-
matic and Consular Offices.”

It was suggested during the
National Economic Summit
that CARICOM nations con-
sider joint ownership of con-
sular offices abroad to miti-
gate costs and increase
staffing. However, Mr Archer
said the idea had been mulled
over and tried, but some coun-
tries were not confident that
their concerns would be
uppermost in the minds of
nations that they shared con-
sular accommodations with.

The FNM Government also
said in Manifesto 2007 that it
would review the operations
of “diplomatic and consular
offices to ensure adequate
funding and appropriate staff
levels”.

This, Mr Archer restated,
was paramount in assuring
that all aspects of the
Bahamas and other Caribbean
nations foreign interests are
duly looked after.

Vacation in Paradise.

Only $69"

per person double OCcuUpanty.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only.

Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
+ Complimentary continental breakfast datly
+ Junior Suites with King-size or two double beds
+ Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,

coffee maker, hatr dryer

- Kids 15 and under, jree

¢ Pool with swim-up bar

Limited-time offer! Reserve today /
Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.



THE TRIBUNE

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE BAHAMAS Cham-
ber of Commerce is not doing
all it “could and should be
doing,” its executive director
has acknowledged, but denied
claims it was an organisation
that was not friendly to small
businesses.

Philip Simon, speaking at
the National Economic Sum-
mit, said the Chamber had
rebuilt its membership
through small and medium-
sized businesses, and entre-
preneurs, after it was put
under pressure through the
creation of other private sec-
tor groups. “The presidents
of the Chamber of Commerce
up until the late 1990s all
looked very much the same -
rich, mercantile, involved in
the real estate sector, retail
sector and white - and that has

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



“There is much
more the
Bahamas
Chamber of
Commerce could
and should be
doing.”

Philip Stmon

changed tremendously,” Mr
Simon said.

“T have seen no semblance
of it since ’'ve been involved
with the Chamber since 2004.”

He added that when organ-
isations such as the Quality
Council and Nassau Tourism
and Development Board
(NTDB) broke off from the
Chamber, they took a sub-
stantial number of members
with them, along much of its
influence.

“When they evolved, par-
ticularly the NTDB with Nor-
man Solomon and Diane
Philips leading that charge
from a committee level within
the Chamber, to an actual
organisation that felt as
though it needed its own iden-
tity along Bay Street to focus
on Bay Street’s needs, it took
all of those member persons
who would have been classi-



fied as being the ‘Bay Street
Boys’ within the Chamber of
Commerce’s influence. [As a
result], the organisation
almost died,” said Mr Simon.

He said that out of the
Chamber’s now less than 500
members, 72 per cent are
small businesses, with 47 per
cent of those having an
employee base of 10 persons
or less. Mr Simon said that
contrary to what new small
business groups say, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce is a small business
Chamber of Commerce.

He added that the creation
of more small business groups
could be counterproductive in
the long run, as they all vie
for the limited resources of
the nation’s private sector. He
said, however, it was ulti-
mately each company’s deci-
sion as to which association
they endorse.

“There is much more the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce could and should be
doing,” Mr Simon said.

“We have a resource chal-
lenge just like most other com-
panies and businesses. We
depend on our membership
to make things happen. The
Chamber of Commerce is in
not that building on Collins
Avenue, it is that membership
pool and we are as strong as



LAID -OFF WORKERS







Enroll ina (ours
Recemionist
Kiang eT ere

Marketing ‘Sales
MS Word /Excel
iickEooks
Ofte Procedures



SUNNY ISLES CHAPTER®

stk Annual Educational Conference

Steurt_o Fousiness
Entrepreneurship training
Marketing research
Baiemess Plans
Funditig Search
Bisnis Advice
Accouming Sundcet

Legon: wee umarkbornquestconsubting.com

MARK A TURNQUEST & COLTD
(242) 326-6748 / (242) 427-3640







Thursday, March 19", 2009 - 8:30am. to100p.m, EEE

Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas

Iehrasteed Lagcatcs of
Adpemijtrative Frodeniipeali®

GAIN CREDITABILITY & SUCCESS » BUILD A CAREER

PATH » BECOME INSPIRED & INVIGORATED

Delton Ellis

Anthony Fergueon

Yolanda K.J. Rolle

Theme: “Building a Pathway to Success”

CONFERENCE INCLUDES:

our members are.”

He said current Chamber
president Dionisio D’ Aguilar,
who is set to vacate the posi-
tion this summer, has been
extremely vocal on the issues
facing small and medium-sized

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 3B

Chamber challenged
on small firm relevance

businesses, and the Chamber
was more interested in collab-
orating with other small busi-
ness groups rather than com-
peting for membership.
“He’s (Mr D’Aguilar) been
very aggressive about the

amount of money these insti-
tutions make that leave the
country, and the fact that they
have not been as open to
offering venture capital,” said
Mr Simon.

CONFERENCE TOPICS

A Cartificabs of Participation

Re: Certification points tor CPSICAP holders
Conlerance Keepeales

Contisantal Brakes

“PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS”

> Fisifles, prites and surpemes!!

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

All Administrative Professionals including
Administrative Assistants, Executive Secrataries, Office
Managers, Clerks, Receptionists, Other Administrative

support stat

“MANAGING YOUR FINANCES IN A
RECESSION”

REMARKS
REGISTRATION OPTIONS:
U General Regisbrathom S75-00) pop.

U) Late Legtstrathos (after March 164, 20g) 805-44) pop.

FOR MORE INFORMATION SONTACT:

Shanta Kerr
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
110 Thompson Blvd.
Tal. (242) 302-8816

Marsha Saunders
Si. Margaret's Rectory
Parkgate Road
Tal. (242) 393-6929











































entages

INVESTMENT RISK MANAGER
in a major international Venture Fund in Nassau







We are looking to strengthen our team in Mass,

If you have

* A sound degree in a life sciemee related field, such a5 pharmacology, biology,
nutritional scicnees or medicine and/or sound business background in nutrition
or food and beverage products
Post graduate qualifications andor an MBA or equivalent
Hands-on analytical and research experience, preferably in a Venture Capital of
Private Equity environment
Experience in accounting, valuation and risk management for Venture Capital
Passion for a healthy lifestyle and the right food
Excellent oral and written communications skilkk in English (ather langguages Hi
plush
Bahamian Citizenship, you want to live and work in an
environment right here in Nassau, with frequent travels abroad

intemational

We are

The world’s foremost Wenture Fund in Health, Wellness and Nutrition, The Partnership
invests in the life sciences field and is particularly interested in identifying nutritional
products, dietary supplements, medical foods and mnovative approaches to prevent
chronic cliseases.

We offer

A job which will involve search and analysis of companies in the area of health, wellness
and nutrition and preparation of investment decisions by investment committes. A
competitive salary package commensurate with the experience and qualifications will be
offered.

If you are attracted by this unique opportunity, or have questions, please contact VC
Americas SoA... P.O Box WN-7532, Nassau or PAX: 327-006 or EMAIL:
hr.nassauia@linventages.com for the attention of HUMAN RESOLRCES —Ref: IRM Nas,

The deadline for applications ts 20-March-2009,

IAAP® SUNNY ISLES CHAPTER®

5" Annual Educational Conference (1/2 Day)
Thursday, March 19", 2009 - 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas
“BUILDING A PATHWAY TO SUCCESS”

REGISTRATION:

JTAAPS SUNNY ISLES CHAPTER: 5" ANNUAL EDUCATIONAL OONFERENCE, MARCH 194, 2009

Mailing Address:
Phoae Contact(s)

CPS/CAP Holder? LU Yee L Mo

Would you like to become an LAAP member? 0 Yes 0 No

AAP Member? UO Yes 1 No

METHOD OF PAYMENT

aCash o Cheque
Moke cheque payeble toc “Sumny Isles Chapter, AAP"
Deliver completed registration form, with full payment
to:
® Shanta Kerr

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

110 Thompson Bhd.

Tel (242) 302-8816

REGISTRATION: $75.00 per person
(Includes Continental Breakfast)

CANCELLAT CY: There will be NO REPUNDS
for cancellations received aller Friday, March 12", 2004. A
$25.10 adinintetrative fee will be charged. There will be

NO REFUNDS for rezistrants mod in atlendance.
WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

All Adcninistrative Professionals including:
Administrative Assistants, Executive Secretaries, Office
Managers, Clerks, Receptionists, and Other
Administrative support staff

> Marsha Saunders
St. Mangaret’s Rectory
Parkgate Road
Tel (242) 399-t929

International Association of Administrative Professionals®

The Intemational Association of ndminsvative Professionals (AAP IB & a non-gerit profesional association with approsimately 40,000 members and
aflbates and neaty G00 Chapters woriteade.

[AAF defines administretwe professionals es indices wha ane resporsble for ed minesraGve tasks and co-ordination ef information in support af an
oFice-refeted eiecoment end who ere dedicated! to furthering their personal end profesional gerwih in their chosen professon

[AP works in partnerstip with englowert to promote professional excellence.

The LAA? Plieson 6 fo enhance the success of caneer-rinded achninisirative profess oneis by providing oppariunities for geawth through education,
community bulicing and leadership dewelopment



PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USNS ee
CLICO regulation hindered by 'non-cosy' relationship

FROM page 1B

“The Registrar’s Office has
always been a bit of a sore thumb
in the public service area,” Mr
Smith explained. “It was always
peopled by people not from the
public service. The relationship
between that office and the Min-
istry of Finance was not a cosy
one. They felt we were interfer-
ing.”
te suggested that through hav-
ing the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office staffed by personnel who,
largely, had not come up through
the civil service, the Bahamian
insurance regulator was unaware
—and not alert to — the time when
it needed to notify the Ministry of
Finance about CLICO
(Bahamas) regulatory issues.

Mr Smith said the Registrar
would have reported directly to









the then-Financial Secretary to
the Treasury, Ruth Millar. “The
Financial Secretary was very well-
versed in the rules and knew
exactly what to do if something
was wrong,” he added.

The fact that neither Mr Smith
nor, it would appear, Mrs Millar
knew of the CLICO (Bahamas)
situation indicates that at the cru-
cial time — when the company was
both making and expanding its
investment and asset concentra-
tion in the Florida real estate pro-
ject — key figures in the govern-
ment hierarchy were ‘in the dark’
about the issues that would ulti-
mately lead to the insurer’s insol-
vency and collapse.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, in his address to the House
of Assembly on CLICO

(Bahamas) collapse, indicated
that the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office was keenly aware of the
problem, having met with the

company on the issue since 2004.

In 2007, it went so far as to
demand that CLICO (Bahamas)
repatriate the $53 million invest-
ed in inter-company loan bal-
ances, but this request was never
met by the company.

Indeed, throughout the “non-
cosy” relationship between the
Ministry of Finance and insur-
ance regulator, CLICO
(Bahamas) increased these loans
from $37.092 million in 2004 to
$53.761 million in 2005, then to
$68.302 million in 2006 and, final-
ly, $57.010 million in 2007. That
latter figure represented some 59
per cent of its total assets.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith said that
while enhanced cross-border
supervision may have helped pre-
vent CLICO (Bahamas) collapse,
the real problem was the fact that
the insurer appeared to have
breached some key Bahamian
laws and regulations.

NOTICE

The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:
























* WILLIAM KNOWLES
* BERYL EDGECOMBE
* CHARLES MUNNSINGS
* ADRIAN MILLER

* ANTHONY WELLS

* MAKITA DEPRADINE
* FREDRICKA JIMENES
* CYRIL WOODSIDE

* TIFFANY ADDERLEY
* MELISSA GRANT
* WAYNE MILLER

*GCOODWIN BUTLER
* BRIAN DEVEAUX

(EVERYTHING LINCOLN)
* CHERYL WELLS

* JASON ALLEN

* GLENDAMAE BAIN








* TIMOTHY CLARKE
* GARTH SAWYER

*KRYSTAL LORD

*MARCO ARMBRISTER

All rentals must be paid and items removed no later than March 26th, 2009

stor-it-all

Soldier Road













sfOFf-IT-

all

(by Lowe’s Wholesale),
Telephone: 393-0964

The Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers

(“BACO”)

celebrates it’s

1 ().. Anniversary

NOTICE

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING (“AGM”)
& LUNCHEON MEETING

We invite you to join us as we
discuss issues relevant to our
profession as well as determining our

administration for 2009

Note: Only paid up members will be eligible to vote

Date: ?7 March 2009

Venue: British Colonial Hilton
Time: 12:30 pam. — 2:00 p.m.

Luncheon cost for Non-Member - $45.00

Contact details:

E-mail: info@bacobahamas,com
Tel.: 247-323-0871 or 325-087?

Fax: 242-325-6574

www, bacobahamas,.com

“Committed to Compliance”

Chief among these were the
exchange control system, with
both Mr Smith and his current
successor as Central Bank of the
Bahamas governor, Wendy
Craigg, pointing out that
Bahamas-resident companies,
including those considered resi-
dent for exchange control pur-
poses, needed the regulator’s pri-
or approval if loans and invest-
ments made overseas were in
their names.

In other words, they needed
permission to invest Bahamian
dollar assets they took in over-
seas in a foreign currency, regard-
less of whether money physically
left the Bahamas or not.

This situation also raises ques-
tions over whether the Registrar
of Insurance’s Office ever dis-
cussed the CLICO (Bahamas) sit-
uation with the Central Bank,
especially whether the company
was receiving exchange control.

Both the Central Bank governor
and Registrar of Insurance attend
the monthly meetings of the
Group of Financial Services Reg-
ulators (GFSR), which discuss
common regulatory issues.

“What’s coming out is that the
[CLICO] operations in the
Bahamas were not in accordance
with Bahamian laws and regula-
tions,” Mr Smith said. “It’s one
thing to have a regulatory failure,
meaning the regulators did not
do something they should have
done. But from what I’ve read, it
seems the company, as a resident
company in the Bahamas, was
making loans and investments
abroad without the prior permis-
sion of exchange control.

“It’s very hard to regulate that
activity, because they’ve done
that under the radar of the regu-
lator. Having said that, with the
increasing cross-border trade in
services between us and the rest

NOTICE OF SALE

Expocredit Corporation (‘the Company”) invites
offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Mans Subdivision’,
comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
South of Burnt Ground in the [sland of Long Island
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.

The Company makes no representations or warranties
with respect to the state of the Property which is
offered for sale “as is where is”.

The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing

& Law of Property Act.

TERMS:

Ten percent (10%) of the purchase

price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
reserves the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers
addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
Partner, P. O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 30°

day of March, 2009.

of the Caribbean, I think that will
encourage greater co-operation
between regulators in the
Caribbean.”

Craig A ‘Tony’ Gomez, CLI-
CO (Bahamas) liquidator, is cur-
rently having to wade through a
maze of related party transactions
and inter-company book trans-
fers to build up a complete pic-
ture of the company’s financial
position.

Mr Smith said it was likely that
CLICO (Bahamas) and its
Trinidadian parent, CL Financial,
had transferred assets between
entities in the group, and used
the former’s Turks and Caicos
branch as a way to move US dol-
lar assets into the US.

The former minister and Cen-
tral Bank governor said CLICO
(Bahamas) would have needed
exchange control permission to
repatriate dividends and profits
from the US real estate venture
back into the Bahamas, and also
would have required the Regis-
trar of Insurance’s approval for
material changes on its balance
sheet.

“There seems to be no regula-
tor in the Bahamas that gave per-
mission for it,” Mr Smith added
of CLICO (Bahamas) actions.
“On the surface, I don’t think it’s
fair to blame a system failure,
because the system was not
designed to deal with what
appears to be a blatant attempt to
disguise transactions.”

Evidence to support the
exchange control breaches claim
comes from the 2007 audited
financial statements of CLICO
Enterprises, the wholly-owned
CLICO (Bahamas) subsidiary
that received the $57 million
advances from the parent. Like
CLICO (Bahamas), CLICO
Enterprises is a Bahamian-regis-
tered company, sharing the same
registered office as its parent.

The 2007 accounts list both the
Florida real estate development,
Wellington Preserve, and anoth-
er asset — a Haiti-based bakery
called Shabisco — as 100 per cent
owned by CLICO Enterprises.
The chairman’s report accompa-
nying the financials lists Welling-
ton Preserve as CLICO Enter-
prises “most significant invest-
ment in 2007”, and details that
“funding from” the Bahamian
company will replace loans from
CL Financial once the develop-
ment starts to generate positive
cash flow. This clearly suggests
that overseas loans and invest-
ments are being made in the
name of a Bahamian company.



p.m,



GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICH

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand
Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

1.0 The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser’) now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provision of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the
subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31% March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those

Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Thursday, 2" April, 2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-1530









THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 5B



Chamber chief ‘shocked" at rate of jobless increase

FROM page 1B

Acknowledging that time con-
straints had restricted its interim
survey to New Providence and
Grand Bahama, the Department
of Statistics nevertheless had been
able to survey a sample of 2,500
households for the interim data
produced in February 2009.

For New Providence, the total
projected unemployment rate
rose from 8.7 per cent in May
2008 to 12.1 per cent in February
2009, an increase likely to have
been driven largely by the more
than 1,500 hotel lay-offs. These
job cuts, together with the
increasing effects of the down-
turn, have impacted other sec-
tors, especially industries such as
retail and construction.

For Grand Bahama, the
Department of Statistics said the
unemployment rate had increased
from a 9 per cent total in May
2008 to 14.6 per cent in February
2009, an increase of 5.6 per cent
or more than 50 per cent in per-
centage terms.

These latest unemployment
rates were described as the high-
est experienced by both islands
in the past 15 years, since the
recession of the early 1990s. The
Department of Statistics said the
number of persons unemployed
on New Providence had risen by
4,540 or 38 per cent, while for
Grand Bahama the equivalent
was a 55 per cent rise or 1,500
persons.

These data mean that just over
one in 10 Bahamians who are
actively looking for work are now
not able to find it. On Grand
Bahama, the February 2009 sur-
vey showed that that 17.7 per cent
of women were unemployed, with
the rate slightly lower for men at
11.7 per cent. Conversely, for
New Providence, the unemploy-
ment rate was only 11.9 per cent
for women, yet 12.4 per cent for
men.

“The Government has to get
these infrastructure programmes
up and running as quickly as pos-
sible,” Mr D’ Aguilar told Tribune
Business. “The planning, the
design, the scope of works, those
phases take a lot of time.

“Clearly, the Bahamian econ-
omy does not have any time. Peo-
ple are losing their jobs at a phe-
nomenal rate. The percentage of
the workforce that is unemployed
is up 40 per cent in six months.”

The Chamber president added:
“Money spent during a recession

typically generates a 38 per cent
greater return that money spent
during a boom. These displaced
people need to be found jobs. The
quickest way to do that is to start
some of these infrastructure pro-
jects, and get them going.

“Governments don’t know how
to speed up in a crisis. This is
clearly what they need to do.
What that number shows you is
that there is an urgency to expe-
dite what projects are out there,
and see what others might come
along.

“There’s a sense of urgency to
get things going. Unemployment
is rising at a precipitous rate.”

The increased unemployment
rate will come as no surprise to
anyone, with the Government,
business community and Bahami-
ans across this nation braced for
such a rise, given the severity of
the economic downturn impacting
the US, which acts as this coun-
try’s major tourism and inward
investment source.

Not surprisingly, the Depart-
ment of Statistics survey found
that out of the total 16,315 per-
sons unemployed in New Provi-
dence, more than one-third (33
per cent) had lost their jobs with-
in the last six months. Out of this
total, some 44 per cent had either
been laid-off or dismissed.

On Grand Bahama, almost 50
per cent of those unemployed had
lost their jobs within the past six
months. Of these, some 48 per
cent had been paid-off or dis-
missed. The employed labour
force also experienced a decline,
shrinking by 5 per cent on New
Providence and 9.2 per cent on
Grand Bahama.

Philip Simon, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s execu-
tive director, said that while the
general expectation had been that
the unemployment rate would
rise into “double digits”, the feel-
ing had been that it would not go
much above 12 per cent.

“But it [an even higher unem-
ployment rate] could be reality,
quite honestly, because I don’t
think we’ve hit the bottom of the
barrel yet,” he explained, “and
there may be more lay-offs to
come.

“At the same time, it’s impor-
tant to encourage businesses to
be prudent but also have a social
responsibility, and as best as pos-
sible not to take advantage of the
situation.”

Mr Simon urged Bahamian
businesses and entrepreneurs not
to become obsessed by the ‘doom
and gloom’, and to raise their

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (A) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Quelantra Company Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 18th day of February, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (A) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Thatchberri Company Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 16th day of February, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

ThesBahamas *NationaL*!lrust

invites

you*to

ae I

het a cles i
a ey

|

heads and examine future objec-
tives. “There has to be, even in
the midst of this recession, there
has to be a drive and creativity
in the establishment of new busi-
nesses,” he explained.

“Just look at when we go
through a hurricane. Old trees
are blown away, but there is
always new growth, and there are
some businesses that are thriving
right now. You have to be in tune
with your consumers, new ways of
getting to them, and attach a ser-
vice to your product. You’ve got
to hustle.”

The Chamber executive urged
Bahamians to keep the unem-
ployment figures, and their

increase, in perspective. “We all
accept the fact that we are in the
midst of a recession, and this is
one of the indicators manifesting
itself,” he said.

“What we have to do as best
as possible is to micro-manage
our lives, not just from a business
perspective, but the community
we live in is so inter-linked and
interdependent on one another.
What happens on Paradise Island
affects me in South Beach, what
happens in Lyford Cay affects me
in Fox Hill.

“We have a social responsibil-
ity intertwined with economic
responsibility to truly be our
brother’s keeper. We can’t disas-

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF MOHAMMED
BIN RASHID BIN ABDULLAH AL
FANNAH AL ARAIMI late of House
2651 Way No. 1949 Plot No. 80
Eastern Madinat, Qaboos, Sultanate
of Oman, deceased.













NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned
on or before the 25th day of March, 2009,
after which date the Administrators will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard
only to the claims of which they shall then
















have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.









HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators
Chambers
P.O. Box N-3247
Ocean Centre
Montagu Foreshore
East Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas














we

Waker’s Dap

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

Sous Chef

Key Responsibilities

* Required to skillfully prepare international cuisine.
* Assist in ordering food supplies and kitchen equipment as

needed,

* Will be required to oversee majority of cooking and methods

of food preparation.

¢ Along with the Executive Chef, instruct kitchen employees

in the finer points of cooking.

* Assist in planning meals; making of menus, and assigning

prices.

* Assist in butchering and/or prepares meats and poultry for

cooking.

Qualifications

* High School diploma or equivalent

* Culinary degree from approved school or completion of an
approved apprentice program is preferred
5 to 10 years in different supervisory positions in the
kitchens including sous chef and/or chef d’ cuisine position.
Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred.
Highly skilled cooking ability in all areas of kitchen including
the ability to prepare various ethnic cuisines.

¢ Experience working in multiple operations preferred.

* Aminimum of two years international experience an asset.

* Experience in opening a property a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work
in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a
self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career,
submit your resume to the attention of the Director of HR &
Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613.

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009

Teri an
Parcel a ae)

sociate ourselves from the lay-
offs. The outlook has to be one of
positioning ourselves for progress
and success coming out of this
recession. That’s a tough pill to
swallow when we’re going
through what we’re going through










COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

in the short-term, but we have to
have that perspective in mind.
What are you doing a year from
now? What would I like to do,
and how do I position myself to
achieve that?”

2008

CLE/QUI/360

Common Law and Equity Division






IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles
Act Chapter 393 Statute Law of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas











AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land situate in the Subdivision
known as Englerston in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
being that lot bounded on the NORTH by a
public road known as Balfour Avenue and
running thereon One Hundred feet and Fourty-
Seven hundredths (100.47) on the EAST by
land said to be of Elgin Wright and running
thereon Fifty-Two feet and Seventy-Three
hundredths (52.73) on the SOUTH by land
said to be of Emmanuel Larrimore and running
thereon Ninety-Nine feet and Sixty-Two
hundredths (99.62) and on the WEST by a
public road known as St. Charles Vincent
Street and running thereon Fourty-Six feet and
Thirty-Two hundredths (46.32).

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of MARY

STUBBS.

NOTICE OF PETITION

Take notice that by Petition filed in the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas on the 6" day of March, A.D., 2008
MARY STUBBS of the Subdivision known as
Englerston in the Southern District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas (hereinafter “the
Petitioner’) claims to be the owner in fee simple in
possession of the above captioned piece parcel or lot
of land and has made application to the Supreme Court
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959, to have her title to
the said piece parcel or lot of land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in
a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

The Registry of The Supreme Court, Ansbacher
House, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

The Chambers of Cedric L. Parker & Co. No.
9 Rusty Bethel Drive, Nassau, Bahamas.

Take notice that any person having dower or right of
dower or any adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition must on or before the expiry of Thirty
(30) days following final publication of this Notice
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
and the undersigned a Statement of his Claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith together with a plan of the area claimed and
an abstract of title to the said area claimed by him.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of his Claim on or before the Thirtieth (30) day
following final publication of this notice will operate

as a bar to such claim.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Chambers
Neil’s Court
No. 9 Rusty Bethel Drive,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

@ Maillis Farm, Adelaide Road

Cost-

on Saturday,14 March,
Dress-Cuban or Smart Casual
$150pp

2009 @ lpm

2Do you want to make up a table?

Call 393 1317 and ask for Rosita

bntmembershi p@bnt.os





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

es
Pioneers aiming to fill ‘missing middle’ | Construction sector



FROM page 1B

care, and create a higher standard
of living.

“Tt’s a virtuous cycle of feeding
the economy, so it grows more
and diversifies. In some ways
tourism, because it’s dependent
on external customers and financ-
ing, can be extremely fragile. But
if you invest in small and medi-
um-sized enterprises, you develop
an economy that is more diversi-
fied, robust and deeper.”

The Pioneers of Prosperity ini-

tiative is now in its third year,
having been launched in — and
extended through — Africa, with
awards ceremonies and presen-
tations held in nations such as
Rwanda and Kenya. It has now
been launched in the Bahamas
and Caribbean, and later this year
will expand into Central America,
backed by the John Templeton
Foundation, Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB), 7
(Seven) and the OTF (On the
Frontier) Group. The latter is a
competitive strategies consulting

Legal Notice

NOTI

CE

EMI OVERSEAS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution

, which commenced on

firm. Pioneers for Prosperity will
likely award between 10 to 15
grants to small and medium-sized
enterprises from across the
Bahamas and the Caribbean. The
grants will range in size from
$5,000 to $100,000, but only one
company will be awarded the lat-
ter sum. All companies need
equity and financing, and grant
money represents one of the best
and least onerous forms of financ-
ing for Bahamian firms. Pioneers
of Prosperity has held several
information and recruitment ses-
sions in the Bahamas, and Ms
Noble said the response had been
overwhelmingly positive, with
entrepreneurs telling her that they
had never seen such an initiative
targeted at small and medium-
sized enterprises before.

To date, Pioneers for Prosper-
ity had received between 200-250
applications from across the
Bahamas and the Caribbean, but
was expecting a last-minute influx
before today’s close to take that
to somewhere between 500-1,000

Ms Noble said: “The last count
I’ve seen has been somewhere in
the order of 40-50 persons. We’re
hoping to get a lot more.”

She explained that when it
came to deciding on grant recipi-
ents, Pioneers of Prosperity was
looking for “the four bottom
lines”. These were investing in
understanding their customer and
customer service; investing in
themselves via profitability;
investing in their staff through
training, benefits and premium
wages; and investing in their com-
munities.

“We're looking for companies
seeking to create prosperity in all
senses,” Ms Noble explained.
And she advised Bahamian firms
and entrepreneurs: “Don’t put
your head in the sand. Now is the
time to be thinking about starting
a business if you don’t have one.

“Tf you do have one, now is the
time to think about investing to
get ahead of the curve. The cur-
rent economic environment is a
challenge, but it should be viewed

unemployment may
have struck 18-20%

FROM page 1B

the Department of Statistics survey accounted for construction

industry personnel who were temporarily laid-off between jobs —

meaning until the next construction project came along.
The BCA president pointed out that very few new construc-

tion projects had so far emerged to replace jobs that contractors
had completed last year. He added that once the 2009-2010 Bud-
get was finalised, the Government was likely to release to tender

contracts for various public works projects, a process that the

BCA was urging be transparent and include all contractors capa-

ble and qualified for doing the work.

Expressing hope that Baha Mar may be able to conclude a
deal with the Chinese that would allow the $2.6 billion Cable
Beach project to proceed, Mr Wrinkle said any public sector

works would help the construction industry “immensely”, given

the short supply of private jobs.

“This is a time when the Government has got to step up to the

plate and get these works going,” Mr Wrinkle said. “All that

money is Bahamian, and is far more valuable than a foreign pro-
ject because it all stays here. Hopefully, it all goes smoothly and

we all get a piece of it.”

the 20th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



re DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DR. MEYER RASSIN
FOUNDATION
SCHOLARSHIPS



The Dectors Hospital Dr, Meyer
Aiessin Foundation & pleased to
announce thal applications are now
being accepted for scholarships &
financial assestance for students
Pursuing Healthcare careers.

Applicants must be Gahamian
citimans & return to the Bahamas
Upon completion of their shucties

Applications are available on our
website al ww. doctorsioasp.com,
Only ceeniléted appicalians with
required documentation submitted
Would be considerad.,

Deedine for submesion of
competed application forme & al
Supparting documentation &

March 31, 4008

The Doctors Hospital

Dr. Meyer Rassin Foundation

P.0.Bex N08 * Nassau, ALP, The Bahamas

www. doctorshosp.com/foundation



ROYAL = FIDEL

Paoeey at Wowk

applications. From the Bahamas,

ITY GY

as an opportunity.”

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000

ZUNI INVEST S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, ZUNI INVEST S.A. is in dissolution. The date of
commencement of dissolution was the 4th day of March,
2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator

of ZUNI INVEST S.A.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Ea

Well-established Wholesaler
saleperson (females
apply) for the snack food division. Individual
must have experience in sales with emphasis
on large food stores. Only individuals with a
proven record of being able to work
unsupervised and achieve results will be
considered, Must be able to drive standard
shill vehicle and be in possession of current
valid driver's license. Individuals with their
own transportation will receive favorable

requires a

are encouraged i

consideration. Company offers good benefits.
Submit applications to:
Sales
P.O.Box N-7124
Nassau, Bahamas



EG CAPITAL cS
BROKERAGE &

MARKE
EB & ADVISORY SERVICES

cr A LL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 6 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.36 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -52.00 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.86 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
WVWVWV.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

1.39
11.00
7.00

1.45
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.43
2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.59
1.43
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close

11.00

13.95

11.00
10.45

10.50
10.00

EPS $
0.070
0.992
0.244

-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309

Change Daily Vol. Div $

1.45

7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37

0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.895
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

2.83
6.59
1.50
2.16
7.76

5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50

SoS OO Oe emcee
29029000909900000
666666N556665666566

oo
Q
6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low

1000.00

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Last Sale

100.00
100.00
100.00

Interest
T% 19 October 2017
0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
0.00 T% 30 May 2013
0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

S52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

8.42
6.25
0.40

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol.

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

29.00 ABDAB
0.00 Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
0.40 RND Holdings

31.72
0.00
0.45

33.26

0.00
0.55

4.540
0.000
0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

29.00
0.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

S2wk-Low
1.3781
2.9230
1.3812
3.3201

11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000

NA Vv
1.4387
2.8988
1.4428
3.3201

12.6816
100.5606
96.4070

1.0000
9.1005
1.0401
1.0330
1.0410

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
1.0000

YTD%

0.35
-1.40
0.63
-1.94
0.50
0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.06
4.01
3.30
4.10

Last 12 Months Div $ Yield _%
30-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
27-Feb-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

4.10 31-Jan-09

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Last Price
Weekly Vol. -
EPS $ - A company’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

- Last traded over-the-counter price

Trading volume of the prior week



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

ANTEX TRADING LTD.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the
Dissolution of ANTEX TRADING LTD. has been completed,
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register. The date of comple-
tion of the dissolution was the 2nd of March, 2008.

Sa OE ccc eal oe >
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD,
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CGA Holdings Limited

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CGA Holdings Limited is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act
2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
5 March 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is David Becker of
c/o Seaboard Corporation, 9000 West 67th Street, Suite
300, Merriam, Kansas 66203-3700 U.S.A.

Dated the 5th day of March, 2009.

H & J Corporate Services Ltd.

Registered Agent
for the above-named Company

we

Baker's Dap

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

Assistant Marketing Manager

Key Requirements

¢ Ademonstrated track record of sales to high net
worth clients

* Extensive experience maintaining strong long term
customer relationships with significant add-on/repeat
business

* Astrong existing network with high net worth clients in
the U.S.A. , Europe and The Bahamas

* Ability to develop and implement marketing
campaigns to high net worth clients

Qualifications

* Bachelor's degree in Sales, Marketing or related
subject; professional certifications
Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth
real estate promotions
Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power
Point, Microsoft Word, Excel and Asset Manager
Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership
and customer relations skills
Must have excellent written and verbal
communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to
work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be
a self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive
and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of The Director of HR & Training,

hr@bakersbayclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 7B





CLICO collapse causes Act delay

FROM page 1B

“a good and productive week”
when it came to determining CLI-
CO (Bahamas) actual financial
position. At least four companies
— British American Financial,
Colinalmperial Insurance Com-
pany, Family Guardian and
Atlantic Medical -— have con-
firmed their interest in acquiring
CLICO (Bahamas) life and
health insurance portfolio.
Whether they will actually pur-
sue this interest, and translate it
into a formal offer to the liquida-
tor, will depend on the portfolio’s
quality and the financial infor-
mation supplied by Mr Gomez.
“It'll be out to those persons
early [this] week who have
expressed an interest,” the liq-
uidator told Tribune Business,
saying the process had taken
slightly longer because he wanted
to verify the accuracy of the infor-
mation provided. CLICO
(Bahamas) has some 17,297 life
insurance policyholders, paying
an annual combined premium of
$5.1 million, and 11,230 health
insurance policyholders, paying

annual premiums of $3.2 million.
In total, the Bahamas accounted
for 23,191 of the company’s
29,017 insurance and annuity
clients, and some $44 million of its
$100 million in liabilities.

Asked when a creditors’ meet-
ing would be held, Mr Gomez
said he was “awaiting the hearing
of the full application” to place
CLICO (Bahamas) into full liq-
uidation. That petition is due to
be heard before Supreme Court
Justice Cheryl Albury on
Wednesday, March 18.

Meanwhile, Zhivargo Laing,
minister of state for finance,
pledged that the Government
would move “expeditiously” to
bring the Domestic Insurance Act
— passed by Parliament more than
three years ago — into effect, but
first needed to assess and intro-
duce amendments suggested “in
light of these events”.

He explained that there had
“been some suggestions by the
Registrar of Insurance that there
may be some amendments to the
Act that would strengthen its abil-
ity to regulate the insurance sec-
tor”.

Although he was not in office

WHY PAY MORE?

ak Trip Airfare $69 x gi S|

Nassau — Mangrove Cay
Nassau — Congo Town
Nassau — San Andros
Nassau — Fresh Creek

For ticket sabes and travel information contact
Partormance Air af 362-1608 | d62- 2302.

Wa, Perormance-aircom



or

Lictiiaa ff ACHP PLA-Tat

when contacted by Tribune Busi-
ness, and could not recall many of
the specific proposals, Mr Laing
said: “In the legislation, both the
existing one and the new Act, we
don’t have the ability to do judi-
cial management. Instead of lig-
uidation, the courts could order a
management team to take con-
trol of the company, as a step
before liquidation.”

The minister added that had
Tribune Business contacted him a
week ago, he would have said that
the regulations to accompany the
Domestic Insurance Act — the
missing piece, which would give it
enforcement teeth — would have
been tabled in Parliament within
the next few weeks.

That was the piece missing
from the puzzle to bring the leg-
islation into effect. When asked
about a new Domestic Insurance
Act timetable, Mr Laing replied:
“There is no question that we will
seek to get to it expeditiously,
that’s for sure.”

On CLICO (Bahamas) col-
lapse, he added: “What it does
point to is something that has
been observed already, which we
ourselves had seen prior to this
event. There have to be upgrades
to the insurance regulatory
regime, inclusive of legislation,
the resources of the Office of the
Registrar of Insurance, and the
capacity of the Registrar to
respond quickly when necessary
and react in a graduated fashion
that allows it to better exert con-
trol over how much is done by an
operation. We clearly have to
move in that direction, and clear-
ly we are.”

Mr Laing, though, indicated
that the main responsibility for
CLICO (Bahamas) being placed
into liquidation lay with its
Trinidad parent, CL Financial. It
is understood that CL Financial
representatives dominated CLI-
CO (Bahamas) Board.

In particular, the minister said
the Bahamas-based insurer failed
to obtain the required ‘no objec-
tion’ approval from the Registrar
of Insurance for its overweight
exposure to related party loans
and US-based real estate invest-
ments, despite having an obliga-
tion to do so. “It really is for an
operation to comply with the law,
because it protects them and their
clients,” Mr Laing said. “What
increased supervision does is that
it allows you to do these kinds of
robust inspections to determine
these things early.” Otherwise,
Bahamian regulators would be
responding to events after they

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

ADVERTISEMENT
VACANCY

MANAGER | (HUMAN RESOURCES)

had had happened and only
revealed in a company’s audited
financial statements.

Mr Laing also acknowledged
that CLICO (Bahamas) troubles,
and that of its Trinidadian par-
ent, CL Financial, had strength-
ened the case for improved con-
solidated supervision and cross-
border regulation of pan-
Caribbean financial entities.

CLICO (Bahamas) was a per-
fect example of a financial ser-
vices provider straddling multi-
ple jurisdictions. CL Financial
owned the Bahamian company,
and its affiliates, through a Bar-
bados-based holding company,
and CLICO (Bahamas) also had
branch operations in the Turks
& Caicos Islands and Belize.

“T think you could argue that,”
Mr Laing acknowledged, when
Tribune Business asked him
whether CLICO (Bahamas) col-
lapse had strengthened the case
for enhanced cross-border regu-
latory co-operation and supervi-
sion within the Caribbean.

“T think it could have benefited
from tighter co-operation
between regulators from across
the region, that’s for sure.”

The CLICO (Bahamas) case
has raised concerns about the
ability of Bahamian regulators to
oversee/supervise the overseas
branches of Bahamas-resident
financial services providers, espe-
cially given that much of the $73.6
million advanced to US real
estate investments — the exposure
that eventually sunk the company
— came via US dollar annuities
placed in the Turks & Caicos.

The move by Bahamian
authorities to place CLICO
(Bahamas) into liquidation also
has CARICOM-related political
implications, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham having revealed
last week that Guyana’s president
had called him several times to
express concern about the fact 53
per cent of CLICO (Guyana’s)
assets were tied up in the Bahami-
an liquidation.

Improved co-operation may be
on the way, though. “I think the
CARICOM grouping may have
some discussions along these lines
at some point,” Mr Laing said.
“That would be the right facility
for achieving co-operation. I’m
sure that, arising out of this, that
platform will make some sugges-
tions along those lines.”

The Registrar of Insurance, the

minister added, was last week
attending an inter-CARICOM
regulatory meeting in Belize. But
Mr Laing emphasized that
improved cross-border supervi-
sion of financial institutions with-

in the Caribbean depended on
the willingness of individual
nations and regulators to share
information, and to do so while
still complying with their coun-
try’s own laws.

Ww

Maker's Bap

Baker’s Bay
GOLF & OCEAN CLUB

As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians
on our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to

apply for the position of:

Golf Course Construction
Assistant Manager

Attributes to include:

* 5-8 years experience in Golf Course Construction and
Management at leading Golf Club.

* Knowledge of all phases of Golf course design and
construction activities including vertical golf construction
(club houses, maintenance facilities irrigation pump stations)

Turf Management Degree.

Athorough understanding of all phases of maintenance and
repair to courses, practice range and equipment.
Extensive experience working with city planners, engineers,

architects, and contractors.

Knowledgeable in all phases of construction contracts

related to golf projects.

Detail oriented, a skilled planner, ability to prioritize with

excellent communication skills.

Computer literate.

Willing to live on an out island.

Ability to work on own initiative is important.

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need

apply.

Applications can be submitted to:

Director, Human Resources and Training
P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or sbowe@bakersbayclub.com

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009



THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

TENDER

MAKING AND/OR SUPPLYING UNIFORMS
FOR SECURITY OFFICERS, SCREENERS
AND FIREFIGHTERS

1. Bids are invited for a one year contract to manufacture uniforms for the Security
Officers, Screeners and Firefighters of the Airport Authority. The details for security

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified
persons for the post of Manager | (Human Resources), Corporate Office, Public
Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

* Bachelors Degree in Business Administration, Management, Public
Administration, Human Resources, Psychology, or equivalent;

Five (5) years experience in Human Resources;
Knowledge of HR practices and related laws;

Excellent communication skills (oral and written) analytical and
conceptualized thinking skills; computer skills; negotiation and conflict
resolution skills;

* Ability to organize and prioritize multiple work assignments ;

The Manager 1, (Human Resources) Corporate Office will report to the
Deputy Director/Operations, Human Resources, Corporate Office.

JOB SUMMARY

The Manager 1, (Human Resources), Corporate Office is responsible for
coordinating all matters relating to the Employee Assistance Program (EAP)
for the Corporate Office, Institutions and Agencies. Also, the processing of
Human Resources matters forwarded to Corporate Office from the Institutions
and Agencies.

DUTIES:

1. Liaises with Institutions/Agencies, Corporate Office and Provider of
Services for all Employee Assistance Program (EAP) referrals:
Coordinates appointments and reports for all EAP referrals;
Prepares monthly management reports on EAP and Human
Resources Activities;

Processes assigned HR duties, i.e., selection and recruitment:
Ensures compliance with policies and procedures;

Develops and designs systems and surveys to ensure a proactive
approach to HR Management;

7. Participates on various ad hoc committees;

The post of Manager 1 (Human Resources) is in Scale HAAS1
($38,150 x 700 - $44,450).

Letter of application and curricula vitae should be submitted to the
Director of Human Resources, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals
Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or P.O. Box N-8200 Nassau,
Bahamas no later than 16th March, 2009.



and firefighters are as follows:

Trousers (Male and Female)
Trousers (Male)-Dickies
Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(M/F)
Female Caps

Rain Coats

Shoulders Patches

Ties

Sweaters

Cap Badges

Dress Uniform Jackets
Trousers K-9 Unit

Shirts*

Senior Officers Shirts*
Shoes*

Belts*

Trousers (Male and Female)-Dickies
Skirts

Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(Dickies)M/F
Male Peak Caps

Shoulders Bars

Belts (Male and Female)
Windbreakers

Shoes (Male and Female)

Safety Boots

Golf Shirts — K-9 Unit

Pants*

Boots*

Dress Pants Senior Officers*
Overalls*

Base Ball Caps*

(*Items are for Fire Fighters)

Collection of the Bid Specifications and viewing of the samples of the uniforms may
be done at the Security Office (located in the former Police Station at Lynden Pindling
International Airport) between the hours of 9:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m., Monday thru Friday
up to March 10, 2009.

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes addressed to the undersigned and the
envelope must specify “BID FOR UNIFORMS”. The Airport Authority reserves the
right to reject any envelope not properly addressed and/or not specifying “BID FOR
UNIFORMS”. Faxed bids will NOT be considered.

The Authority reserves the right to reject any and all bids without stating any
reason (s).

Bids should be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday March 31, 2009. Bids
received after the deadline will not be considered.

There will be a public opening of bids at 10:00 a.m. on Friday April 3, 2009. Interested
bidders may attend, and bring copies of the business licenses.

Acting General Manager
The Airport Authority
Lynden Pindling International Airport
P. O. Box AP59222
Nassau, Bahamas



MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

be







The stories behind the news

aG al 1



CHAUNCEY TYNES’ ASSOCIATIONS WITH JOE LEHDER AND LYNDEN PINDLING

The tragic young pilot
who Knew too much

@ By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

PILOT Chauncey Tynes knew a
lot about Joe Lehder, the Colom-
bian drug czar whose cocaine traf-
ficking activities in the 1980s had
such a profound and damaging
effect on the Bahamas and its peo-

le.
: He also knew plenty about the
movements of the then Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling, includ-
ing a hush-hush night flight to
Grand Bahama when Pindling and
Lehder met in secret.

When Tynes brought a boxful
of US banknotes back to the fam-
ily home off Mackey Street and
told his father — a respected PLP
official — that the $50,000 “gift”
from Lehder was destined for a
high-ranking police officer, he was
roundly berated.

“Don’t drag me into this kind of
stuff,” said Chauncey Sr., who was
treasurer of the PLP in the late
1960s, when the party came to
power.

Chauncey Jr assured his father
that he never got involved in drug
flights and that all he ever carried
for Lehder was money, usually
neatly wrapped US banknotes
which — we can now safely
assume — were used to pay off
crooks in the PLP and the civil
service.

But his dubious associations
were to be his undoing. For
Chauncey Jr., the association with
Lehder and Pindling eventually
brought tragedy.

Having been privy to various
clandestine transactions — he
always insisted that Pindling and a
senior police officer were on
Lehder’s payroll, receiving regular
consignments of cash — he “went
missing” on a flight from George
Town, Exuma, to Nassau in 1983.

Parents

His parents, who both still live
in their humble home in a close-
knit Bahamian community, nev-
er saw him again. He was 37 at
the time, a father-of-two cut down
in his prime.

“He knew too much,” his father
told INSIGHT, glancing up at the
photograph of Chauncey Jr which
still graces his sitting room wall.

“When he vanished, the family
was affected badly, but we sur-
vived. He was working as chief
pilot for Lehder, but of course
when he took the job we thought
that Lehder was a genuine
investor. It was only later that we
discovered the truth. But my belief
is that Pindling was responsible
for his death. Not directly, but
that’s the way it seems to me.”

In 1981, Chauncey Jr flew Pin-
dling to Freeport during the night
hours for a meeting with Joe
Lehder, who was by then running
a lucrative drugs trans-shipment
operation from his “headquarters”
at Norman’s Cay.

At 4am, while it was still dark,
he transported the prime minister
back to Nassau. It was one of
many missions he flew for Lehder.

CEP Cciclt pecple vittuelly cuy

’ New Car 4
Show [=
» MallatMarathon }
a, March 27 & 28
2008

a0



PILOT CHAUNCEY TYNES who ‘went missing’ on a flight from George

Town, Exuma, to Nassau in 1983.

Usually, boxes of banknotes were
involved, including the one he
brought home from the drug czar’s
HQ destined for a police officer
whose name would surprise you.
“He told me who was getting the
money,” said Mr Tynes, “He took
cash from Lehder to Pindling’s
home on a frequent basis. It was
always in small boxes, and I imag-
ine it was in US banknotes.”

At the 1984 public inquiry into
drug trafficking, Pindling denied
ever meeting Lehder. But
Chauncey Jr was in no doubt that
the pair met, and that Pindling and
the senior police officer were vir-
tually at the drug czar’s beck and
call.

“T warned him to stay away
from all that,” his father revealed.
“But he didn’t.”

Having failed to take that
fatherly advice, young Chauncey
paid the price. He “disappeared”
on a flight from Exuma to Nassau
in 1983, having apparently taken
off in the company of three
Colombians.

It is now believed the plane was
diverted and that pilot Tynes was
“disposed of” because he knew
far too much about the criminal
connections between Lehder and
certain members of the PLP gov-
ernment, including Pindling.

From that fateful day 26 years
ago, nothing has been heard of
the promising young man who
found himself caught up in the
wrong company. All that remains
of him are the memories and his
father’s plainly stated accusations
against those he blames for his
death.

The story of Chauncey Tynes
Jr and his mysterious loss is just

ema tale)

one of many to emerge from that
shameful period in Bahamian his-
tory. He was one of several young
men who lost their lives because
they became embroiled in the
Colombian cocaine trade through
the islands.

The police officer who was
accused of being beneficiary of
that $50,000 pay-off was a career
policeman who spent more than
four decades in the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

His involvement with Pindling
in turning a blind eye to Lehder’s
trafficking enterprise was outlined
to me, without equivocation, by a
man who is rated by those who
know him as an unchallengeably
honourable man.

Chauncey Tynes Sr., 88, a for-
mer taxi-driver and insurance offi-
cial, is known by all as a straight-
forward and scrupulously honest
character.

Bribe

He is one of the few senior PLP
figures who did not profit from
the party’s rise, and admits to hav-
ing turned down a $600,000 bribe
from a UBP “agent” who wanted
him to stop campaigning against
his party in the islands in 1968.

“T knew so many of the
islanders well and they were all
ready to vote any way I voted,”
he said, “The UBP wanted me
back in Nassau where I could do
no harm because they thought I
was a dangerous man. An agent
offered me $600,000 to go away,
but I wouldn’t take it. I said I did-
n’t want their money.”

As PLP treasurer in the late

Lietaey

)

CHAUNCEY TYNES SR

1960s, when the party was at the
height of its power, he bridled at
corrupt practices and took issue
with Pindling over alleged irregu-
lar use of party funds.

After he quit his post in 1971, he
was subjected to more than 25
years of victimisation by Pindling
and sincerely believes that a PLP
“hatchet man” called ‘Nine’ Rolle
— now dead — was given the job
of “getting rid of me” while he
was driving a taxi at Nassau Inter-
national Airport.

“Rolle was waiting for a taxi at
the arrivals area,” said Mr Tynes,
“but he let several taxis go because
he wanted to ride in my taxi. I
have no doubt that he wanted to
get rid of me. He was known to be
a violent hatchet man of Pin-
dling’s.”

Mr Tynes said Pindling came to
dislike him because he was fre-
quently critical of the prime min-
ister’s judgment. “People were not
allowed to tell him he was wrong,”
he said, “I was too upfront.”

But he has no regrets.

“T have never done a single
thing wrong,” he told me, “TI can
look any man in the eye and I can
sleep easy at nights. That to me
means everything.”

Today, Mr Tynes struggles at
his modest home, where he has
lived for 50 years, to look after his
invalid wife. He could have been a
very rich man living in great com-
fort had he fallen to temptation.

But he is obviously at ease with
himself, having resisted the blan-
dishments of an era when Bahami-
an morality evaporated and an
entire generation was left tainted
by drugs.

“Party colleagues asked me why

* Jengine 2.7L 4 cyl
options: 4.0L Vé

mtg tener
Ree ee ee’

air conditioning



COLOMBIAN drug czar Joe Lehder

I didn’t take the $600,000 anyway,
and then continue campaigning
against the UBP, but I was having
none of that,” he said.

It is because Mr Tynes was an
outspoken critic of corruption at
the time, and risked everything to
do the right thing, that he emerges
today as a beacon of honour in a
society which Pindling brutally and
ruthlessly undermined.

Today, Mr Tynes believes his
son was killed by evil men who
felt he had seen too much of the
nefarious transactions taking place
between Lehder and some leading
PLP figures of the day.

Chauncey Tynes Jr went miss-
ing some months after flying Pin-
dling to Grand Bahama for that
secret meeting. The arrangement
was that he was to carry the prime
minister to Freeport while anoth-
er pilot transported Lehder from
Norman’s Cay. No-one knows
what transpired between the two
men during the night hours, but
you can be sure it had more to do
with the welfare of Lynden Pin-
dling than the welfare of the peo-
ple.

The fate of Chauncey Tynes Jr
was sealed some months later.

“When my son disappeared
during that flight from Exuma to
Nassau, I asked his girlfriend
whether anyone else had been
aboard with him when he left Exu-
ma,” said Mr Tynes.

“She said three men went with
him, and she believed they were
Colombians. I can’t imagine that
the plane crashed because it was a
very reliable twin-engined aircraft
and my son was known as a very
good pilot.

“There is a chance it was shot

down because it was known at the
time that the Americans were
shooting down small drug planes.
But I think the plane was diverted
and he was killed because he knew
too much.”

Whenever Mr Tynes challenged
his son about his flying activities,
Chauncey Jr always insisted he
never carried drugs — “only mon-
ey.”

“T once saw him with a box full
of US banknotes which he said
were for (giving the name of a
senior police officer). I was told
the sum was $50,000. He also said
both Pindling and (the officer)
were on Lehder’s payroll. He told
me he made frequent deliveries
to Pindling’s home. My son was
Lehder’s paymaster.

“After the plane vanished, the
government said there had been a
search of the entire area, but that
nothing had been found. Also,
there was no record of any plane
having landed anywhere. I thought
at first it had been diverted to
Colombia, then I thought maybe it
was shot down. Today, I think
someone ordered that he should
die because he had too much
information.”

Mr Tynes admits that when
Lehder first appeared on the
scene, the PLP was convinced that
he was a bona fide land developer.
It was only later that people
became aware of Lehder’s
“takeover” of Norman’s Cay,
where he lived a hedonistic life on
the fruits of the drug trade.

Lehder, in fact, more or less
declared the cay a “nation within a
nation” — an idyllic hideout from

SEE page two

CG) TOYOTA moving forward
Land Cruiser Prado 4 X 4

Ted Pe Me Cag
See R ee

ae)

PU heey)
Beeler Tse}

Tell bape dal bet rt factory bias

_ EXECUTIVE |

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

ce ie

Po ee EA) mest ta abe yo Merce ee eae tee Tera
Cai sil Mori to Fri Sam - §: Bali si|
ears)

Te: 397-1700

eet ae TL DNTa (eM ccc td | De
| Parts asd service guaranteed

r
cs

eb le a Ro tg TTA et cme ees bs |





PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

i
Tragic young pilot who knew too much

FROM page one

which he could conduct his illicit
trans-shipment operation. He was
so sure that he had the prime min-
ister and law enforcement agen-
cies “in his pocket” that he went
about his business in a brazen,
carefree fashion, even to the
extent of having his hoodlums car-
rying guns around Nassau.

Planes flew cocaine into Nor-
man’s Cay from Colombia. There
it was redistributed to different
parts of the United States. Lehder
set up home at one end of the cay
and viewed operations from win-
dows which offered panoramic
views of his entire domain.

It is now widely believed that
he did this with the full knowl-
edge and active co-operation of
Pindling, who received handsome
pay-offs for his help.

Mr Tynes also told me that,
during his days as PLP treasurer,
he was sent to the United States
to pick up election campaign mon-
ey from a man called Mike
McLaney.

Mr Tynes was not aware of
McLaney’s status at the time, but
it later became clear that he was a
gangster who was bankrolling the
PLP’s 1968 election campaign in
return for a possible casino
licence.

Mr Tynes brought back a suit-
case full of banknotes and handed
it over to PLP Cabinet minister
Carlton Francis.

“Carl gave me $3,000 for my
trip,” said Mr Tynes, “I later
realised the money in the case was
to finance the 1968 campaign.
McLaney was a mobster, but I
didn’t know that at the time. I
thought I was doing right.

“However, I found out the
truth about Pindling at that elec-
tion, and that damaged my spirit
towards him. Until then I had
always liked him.”

As party treasurer, Mr Tynes’
job was to hand out allocations
of cash to PLP candidates. The
rate was $3,000 each for New
Providence constituencies and
$6,000 each for Out Island seats.

His suspicions about Pindling
grew when the prime minister
signed for one $6,000 allocation
to fight his own Andros seat, then
allegedly asked for another $6,000
for which he didn’t want to sign.

“T refused to give it to him
because he refused to sign for it,”
he told me, “He was not prepared
to sign for it. He was trying to fid-
dle the party funds. I wanted to
play it straight and until this very
day I still have a clear conscience.
Tam happy that I never took any-
thing. I don’t have to hide from
anybody.”





















1. The Water & Sewerage Corporation invites bids from suitably qualified contractors for
the construction of Phase | of the Green Turtle Cay Water Supply Improvements. The
Scope of Works include the provision of all labour, equipment and other necessary

Mr Tynes’ revelations come
against a background of disclo-
sure now underway among age-
ing PLP figures who feel the
record must be set straight before
they die. What emerges is a fright-
ening picture of a would-be dicta-
tor who, had he been given his
head, would have led the
Bahamas into Third World dere-
liction.

Mr Tynes recalled that Pindling
held secret meetings in Africa dur-
ing the late 1960s with Robert
Mugabe and others with a view
to learning how to keep power in
an outwardly democratic frame-
work.

A document called The One-
Man Manifesto, drafted by an
African nationalist, recommended
as a strategy that national lead-
ers should stuff government
departments with party support-
ers. It also promoted the notion of
the maximum leader.

Whatever transpired during his
African visit, there is no doubt
among PLP veterans that Pindling
returned with a “Mugabe com-
plex”, a strong belief in the dicta-
torial excesses which have led
Zimbabwe to its present parlous
state.

There is also no doubt, accord-
ing to senior political figures, that
Pindling became so seduced by
power that he was
unable to distinguish
between the country
and himself.

From another
tyrant, Frangois ‘Papa
Doc” Duvalier of
Haiti, Pindling
gleaned a destructive
philosophy relating to
education.

Papa Doc believed
that an educated pop-
ulace was inimical to
his own interests.
Thus, it was always to
a leader’s benefit, in
his eyes, to keep the
people poorly
informed. Today’s
grim statistics from
Bahamian classrooms
—with D for Dunce the national
exam average — are probably a
direct by-product of Pindling’s
dumbing-down process.

The overloading of government
departments with party supporters
was, of course, a tactic embraced
by Pindling with unbridled enthu-
siasm. His policies had adverse
effects in many areas, leading to
feelings of entitlement among the
lazy and incompetent, and ren-
dering companies like Bahama-
sair financially inefficient, to say

NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID

GREEN TURTLE CAY WATER SUPPLY IMPROVEMENTS — PHASE 1

services required for the:-




A. UNDERWATER MAIN







a) Supply and Installation of approximately 15,000 linear feet of water
transmission mains, of which approximately 13,000 linear feet are
subaqueous 6-inch HDPE and 2,000 linear feet of 6-inch PVC, along with all

associated valves and appurtenances.

PUMPING STATION ON GREEN TURTLE CAY

a) Construction of a Pumping Station and supply and installation of two 250 US
Gallon per Minute, 15 Horsepower Peerless (Sterling) pumps,
b) Supply installation, and construction of piping, pump station facilities/office

Building.

Bids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehensive details from the

Qualification Questionnaire out-lining:

a) Experience on similar projects

b) Personnel to be assigned (including their experience on similar projects)

c) Financial capacity to execute the works

The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evaluated for award of Contract.

Bidding documents and drawings will be available on request beginning Wednesday
March 11, 2009, from the Engineering & Planning Department of the Water & Sewerage
Corporation for a nominal fee of $250.00 per set. The Pre-Bid Meeting is scheduled for

Tuesday March 24, 2009 at 10: a.m. at the site.

Completed documents must be returned to the address below, no later than 4:00 p.m. on
Tuesday April 14, 009.

General Manager

Water & Sewerage Corporation

87 Thompson Blvd.
P.O. Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

Attn: Engineering & Planning Division

Telephone: (242) 302-5512
Facsimile: (242) 302-5538

Frangois ‘Papa Doc Duvalier



the least.

In Mr Tynes’ view, had Pindling
been allowed to pursue his dicta-
torial ambitions to the limit, the
Bahamas would have become
another Zimbabwe, a Third
World ruin full of starving peo-
ple, broken institutions and ram-
pant disease.

His view is shared by others
who believe that only The
Bahamas’ location off the end of
the Florida peninsula prevented
a full-scale descent into disorder
and eventual bankruptcy.

Another former leading PLP
figure told INSIGHT that it
became clear within months of
the 1967 election that Pindling
had no national plan and that he
was not interested in any devel-
opment unless it was a direct vote-
winner.

“As a keen young politician, I
drafted a set of proposals in my
own particular field and presented
it to the prime minister because I
felt they would be good for the
nation,” he told INSIGHT.

“But he told me that my pro-
posals would not win a single vote
and that he was not interested,”
said the source.

“Tt made me realise there and
then that Pindling had no vision
for the Bahamas and that his real
interest lay only in retaining pow-
er.”

As disclosures
about Pindling and
his motives flow
into INSIGHT
from more and
more inside
sources, it becomes
clear just how per-
sonally responsible
he was for what the
Bahamas became
during the drug-
ravaged 1980s.

It also becomes
clear that some of
his tactics were too
extreme even for
the PLP’s own
council.

When the parlia-
mentary mace was
tossed by Pindling from the House
of Assembly window in 1965, fol-
lowed by the hour-glass, it was a
watered-down version of his orig-
inal intentions, according to inside
sources.

Mr Tynes said the first plan was
actually to throw the Speaker of
the House, Bobby Symonette,
bodily out of parliament because
of his dismissive attitudes, though
his recollections do not accord
with those of some other senior
PLP figures.



Mr Tynes’ version of events
emphasises the party’s aversion
to Symonette for imposing time
limits on speeches, monitored by
the hour-glass on the Speaker’s
bench.

Symonette, he claimed, was
also unpopular for proposing that
parliamentary sessions between
elections should be stretched to
21 years, effectively blocking the
move towards major-
ity rule. It was
regarded by the PLP
as an unacceptable
strategy to prolong
the UBP’s reign.

“But when the
proposal to throw
him bodily out of the
Assembly was put
before the PLP coun-
cil, it was voted
down,” said Mr
Tynes.

The tossing of the
mace, with Milo But-
ler following through
with the hour-glass,
was a compromise,
but it had the
required effect by
signalling the PLP’s intention to
overturn the status quo, he added.

Other senior figures dispute that
the move to heave Symonette out
of the House was ever seriously
considered. But there is no doubt
that emotions were running high
as the PLP became increasingly
disgruntled at UBP high-handed-
ness and the prospect of spending
five or ten more years in opposi-
tion.

From this distance in time, it’s
interesting to consider what might
have happened had widespread
speculation about Pindling’s ori-
gins been known to the electorate.

The PLP’s relentless anti-for-
eign stance, its racist rhetoric, its
ruthless campaign of victimisation
against expatriates were all based
on the assumption that Pindling
himself was a true-born, full-
blooded Bahamian.

In fact, according to Mr Tynes
and other former senior PLP fig-
ures, Pindling was born to a
Jamaican father, Arnold Pindling,
a policeman, and an unknown
woman who was probably Hait-
jan.

Far from being a born Bahami-
an, he first saw light of day in
Jamaica, arriving in Nassau by
boat as a small boy, they say. His
nominal mother, Viola Pindling,
nee Bain, never gave birth to any
child, according to PLP insiders.

Thus, the entire thrust of PLP
policy from its earliest days in
power was critically weakened by
the widely-held belief in his own
party that the leader’s Bahamian
credentials were bogus.

Some now feel that the whis-
perings about Pindling’s origins
were an attempt to smear him and
that he was a true product of his
East Street home. In Mr Tynes’
eyes, however, discussion about
Pindling’s “foreignness” was well-
founded.

Party leaders, even when they
grew sickened by Pindling’s dic-
tatorial ways after the 1968 elec-
tion, kept the lid on the prime min-
ister’s alleged secret because they
feared it would scupper the black
cause and drop the country back
into the hands of the UBP, he said.

They even kept quiet about an
affidavit Pindling allegedly swore
in 1947, as he was about to set off
for law school in London, declar-
ing that he was Bahamian-born,
even though he wasn’t, added Mr
Tynes.

But during one angry exchange

RMA ceece aac



in Cabinet, circa 1968, a senior col-
league allegedly told Pindling: “So
you, a damned Jamaican, are try-
ing to tell us what to do.”

It was one of the many furious
exchanges which were soon to lead
to a party split and a 20-year stand-
off between the PLP and the
FNM, a party formed largely by
anti-Pindling rebels.

Had the rebel faction’s leader,
Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield, become
prime minister
instead of Pindling,
it’s near certain that
the Bahamas would
have taken a differ-
ent course, said Mr

Tynes.
He has no doubt
that Whitfield

would have made a
better prime minis-
ter, and that the
drug era, and the
age of corruption,
would not have
happened under his
! watch.

“Wallace-Whit-
field was much
more radical than Pindling,” said
Mr Tynes, “And he was much
more straightforward. He would
cut you down to your face, where-
as Pindling would cut you from
behind. Pindling was more con-
servative and a smooth operator,
but Cecil was more to be trusted.”

According to some political vet-
erans, Pindling successfully
defended his origins during a 1973
press conference in which he pro-
duced a birth certificate which
appeared to reinforce his Bahami-
an credentials.

However, his birth was regis-
tered in Nassau on February 25,
1947, a month short of his 17th
birthday. It named Viola Pindling
(formerly Bain) as his mother.

While his supporters were hap-
py with the prime minister’s expla-
nation, outsiders were less con-
vinced — especially when Pindling
refused to say whether affidavits of
birth were produced at the time
of registration.

Pindling said he was not pre-
pared to go beyond the matter of
the certificate and said it was “low
and dirty” of an opposition MP
(Michael Lightbourn) to cast
aspersions on his parents, espe-
cially his mother.

For the sceptics, though, Pin-
dling’s performance generated
more questions than answers. To
them, the fact that his birth was
registered nearly 17 years after the
event was powerful evidence in
itself. His refusal to say whether an
affidavit was sworn to support his
claim that he was born in Nassau
was also seen as a virtual admis-
sion that he had something to hide.

Thus, for PLP officials like Mr
Tynes Pindling was a fraud who
was protected from exposure even
by his fiercest critics within his
own party because their first con-
cern was to jettison the UBP and
fulfil their own political ambitions.

“Whatever his origins, Pindling
was viewed by prominent PLP fig-
ures as the leader most likely to
get rid of the UBP, and that was
regarded as the priority at the
time,” he said.

According to Mr Tynes, any
publicly expressed doubt over Pin-
dling’s birth either before or after
the 1967 general election would
have done untold damage to the
black movement’s image.

Hence, Pindling was given clear-
ance to pursue what turned out to
be an extremely destructive agen-
da for a quarter of a century.

For my part, I believe Mr
Tynes’ version of Pindling’s ori-
gins for two reasons. Firstly, I see
Mr Tynes himself as an extremely
honest character. Secondly, I recall
all too vividly a series of telephone
calls I received shortly after my
return to Nassau in 1999.

These calls came from an old
man living in East Street whose
name I recall but am not disclos-
ing. He told me unequivocally that
Lynden Pindling was not a
Bahamian and that he first
appeared at his East Street home
as a grown boy.

He said: “He was brought in
from outside by his father. We
always thought he was really part-
Haitian. I lived close by the Pin-
dling home and know what I say is
true.”

The old man asked me more
than once to visit his home so that
we could discuss the matter fur-
ther. It is one of my greatest pro-
fessional regrets that I didn’t take
up the offer, mainly because I was
so busy at the time trying to get to
grips with my new job at The Tri-
bune. When his calls ceased, I
assumed he had passed on.

However, Mr Tynes’ opinions
— backed up by the recollections
of a former PLP parliamentarian
— add another crucial piece to the
puzzle which, when completed,
will record the whole modern
political history of the Bahamas.

If the young pilot Chauncey
Tynes Jr’s information was true —
and there are few intelligent
Bahamians who would bet against
it — then Pindling, a foreigner
with a slick line in patter, was
growing fat off a drug king’s pay-
offs while those who brought him
to power continued to live dirt
poor in over-the-hill shacks.

As the PLP struggles with its
leadership woes, and tries to find a
way forward, it would do well to
consider whether the Pindling
legacy is really worth clinging on
to in light of Mr Tynes’ disclo-
sures.

At the last election, Pindling’s
name was hauled from its hangar
at every opportunity to lend cre-
dence to the party cause. Perry
Christie’s government even
renamed the international airport
after a man whose real worth is
now under serious review.

According to Pindling critics
within the wider PLP movement,
Mr Christie would be well-advised
to set aside his illusions about
“The Father of the Nation” and
begin the task of building firmer
foundations for the cause.

For Mr Tynes himself, there is
no doubt that Pindling is unde-
serving of the kudos accorded him.
“He should not be called Father of
the Nation because he was a for-
eigner who was being paid off by a
drug lord,” he said.

The fate of Chauncey Tynes Jr
is something all should bear in
mind when they consider the Pin-
dling legacy. He died at the height
of an appalling era for which many
people still living should feel
deeply ashamed.

His father still looks at pictures
of his son and wonders how his
beloved Bahamas could ever have
reached such a low that promis-
ing young people could be
whisked away, never to be seen
again, by wicked people whose
greed almost brought this nation
to its knees.

¢ What do you think?
Fax 328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net

Sea Turtles of

The Bahamas:
Insights from 30 years of study

Drs. Alan Bolten and Karen Bjorndal,
Archie Carr Centre for Sea Turtle Research,
University of Florida

Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Time: 7pm
Place: The Retreat, Village Road

Admission: BNT Members Free

General Public $2

a =

(parking at Queen’s College) gif?

Na

Phone: 242-393-1317
Email: bnt@bnt.bs





THE TRIBUNE

INSIGHT

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 3C



H

FEEDBACK



Re: No joke for Jo King (Funny names)

MANY years ago I heard
that a Mr and Mrs Kinnell
had thoughtlessly called
their daughter Jennifer!

And the following is also
reported:

Churchill, inspecting a
troop of soldiers: "And what
is your name?"

Soldier: "Ball, sir!”

Churchill: "How very sin-
gular!"

No evidence to support
the veracity of either story,
but they do bring a smile to
a Monday morning!

Regards,

Insight reader

YOU will, of course, have
heard of the famous law firm
Sue, Grabbitt and Run,
whose many exploits were
recorded in the magazine
Private Eye.

AB

I ONCE heard of a very
religious family called Abel
who named a son Canaan.

Jean Ross

HERE are a few beauties
for your collection (all true)

GILES CLOTWORTHY,
a British National Trust offi-
cial

HECTOR McSPORRAN,
a Scottish sportswriter

DELWYN SWINGE-
WOOD, a public relations
executive

ALISTAIR McALLIS-
TER, a man I met some
years ago

MAJOR GENERAL SIR
EVELYN FANSHAWE,
late president of the British
Spotted Horse Society

V. RAY STRANGE (he
always insisted on using the
V) who worked as a legal
executive in the North of
England

HARRY CHEST, who
didn’t have a hair on his
body, apparently.

JIM RIDDLE, a West
Country farmer who hated
being called ‘Jimmy’ for
obvious reasons.

SARAH LILLICRAP, a
British TV anchor.

However, I can’t think of a
single Bahamian name worth
recording. Surely there’s a
Rockan Rolle out there
somewhere.

Observer

A TRADITIONAL Lon-
don grocer called Wright
objected when two Chinese
stores opened in competition
nearby, both bearing the
name Wong.

He put a notice in his win-
dow saying ‘Two Wongs
don’t make a Wright!’ in an
attempt to hold on to his
customers.

Today, of course, he would
fall foul of the Race Rela-
tions Act.

GSP (Expat)

I ONCE knew an accoun-
tant called Fidler. In spite of
his name, he was noted for

honesty and integrity.
J Robinson

YOUR reference to an
undertaker called Phil
Graves reminds me of a
petrol station owner I knew
in Somerset called Arthur
Gallan. His name caused
much amusement for miles
around.

B Hatton (Visitor)

I WENT to college in
New York with two lovely
young women named
BRITTISH MISER and
BARRIER CAVE.
How's that for unusual?
J Reid

I USED to work with a
woman called Doris Morris
and went to school witha
girl called Anne McCann
(her nickname was Can-
Can).

Amber

I KNEW a lady called Frie-
da Crisp (though her first
name was pronounced
Freeda rather than Fry-da,
so the joke was spoilt a lit-
tle, but not enough to stop
us laughing, I’m ashamed
to say)

Jean, Cable Beach

A MAN I knew called
Sidebottom insisted on pro-
nouncing it Siddybottoom.
He used to become quite
indignant if you insisted on
pronouncing it the way it
looks.

JL

ME laff til me cry, mon!
Here are some nicknames:

HARKER
FAVOR HOG
RAFFY
SHABBY

KY

BIG BARRA
LIL BARRA,
SUKIE
SQUINTY
UNCA LABBY
LONDON
DODY.
Regards,

Glen More

AT college, I met an
unfortunate fellow named
Boris Orpington (known as
B.O. for short) But he didn’t
smell. Not that I recall any-
way.

Jim, Nassau

THERE’S an Australian
newspaperman called Harry
Potter. Can you imagine
what he’s been through over
the last few years?

Aussie

AN English humorist
called Stephen Pile (founder
of the Not Terribly Good at
Anything Society, or some-
thing of the kind) always
referred to himself in print
as Stephen Pile(s).

I suppose he had taken the

It's Electric!

Geoffrey Jones has you covered when it comes to
electrical supplies & accessories. Great service
at competitive prices. Come in today!

#14 single wire (500’ roll)..............$49.50 NET

N142 NM Cable (250’ roll)

4” Square box (50)

4” Single Gang Ring (50)

F40D/CW 4’ Bulb (30)

1/2” PVC Pipe (100Lts)
1/2” PVC Adapters (100)
1/2” Locknuts (100)

CxS @ NY

net

©2009 CreativeRelations

$74.25 NET
$55.80 NET
$39.60 NET
$53.10 NET
$64.95 NET
$25.92 NET



Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
Tel: 322-2188/9

Email: GeoffJones@comcast.net



decision, after years of long

suffering, to get in first with

the joke before anyone else

did. Funny writer, though.
G Minard (Visitor)

WHEN I worked in insur-
ance many years ago, a very
unpopular boss called Wal-
ter Pratt was known as Wot-
ta Pratt behind his back.

The Grove (West)

I ONCE knew a sports
columnist called Basil V
Easterbrook whose name
was frequently taken to refer
to a minor league soccer
match.

Granville

MISCELLANEOUS

MR MARQUIS: If you
haven't left Nassau as yet, I
think that your last
INSIGHT article should be
about the joke we call the
National Insurance
Board. Could you believe
what was written about
Wendall Jones owing NIB
$430,000? I've heard years
ago that he owed NIB but
what was revealed is not
only staggering but ridicu-
lous.

He should not be enjoying
the fruits of having a busi-
ness, his licence should be
revoked for five years as
well as paying the interest
and the original sum that is
owed. In this time when our
country is going through an
economical crisis, ALL
efforts should be made to
collect all outstanding debt
owed to the Government.

I think that every business
or individual who owes NIB

contributions should not
only go to jail, they should
lose their licence for a peri-
od of five years and be held
up for public shame by hav-
ing their names, faces,
amount owed and business
name published in a BIG ad
by NIB for all to see.

You are getting out of this
mess, I wish that I had that
same option. Right now the
Bahamas is not a place
where I want to continue to
live.

Marie

Box:

WANTED

10%0FF

for

BUILT TO LAST!

REFRIGERATORS - top mount 19 ct

$1,37000

REFRIGERATORS - bottom mount 19 cf from $ 1,9400°

REFRIGERATORS - side by side 26 cf

AE taeda eer

from $2,2100°
Te YA ad

UPRIGHT FREEZERS -20 cf and up

MANUAL DEFROST.................
UGE ca eur)
PV er CURL ea

ee | from $ 1,315°°

from $ 19500
from $79Q00

TAYEOR INDUSTRIES

SHIRLEY STREET ¢ TEL: 322-8941 * OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30am-4:30pm ¢ SAT 8:00am-12 noon

eee lei
a ee eure

Closets
Pantries

Call us at:

FREE consutration: 377-8795/325-8850
WE ARE LOCATED IN THE AIRPORT INDUSTRIAL PARK



A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

DA 69806
c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.



DEPENDABLE PRODUCTS
REFRIGERATORS - bottom mount 22 ef PTs
REFRIGERATORS - french door 25 cf $3,40000
ae ea CUO SECT ae WRC
ae CUE Onna CMO R TI $3,09000
FUMES SIC ORTON Mie MCS MMIC Y At bau
FOOD DISPOSERS from $24500
GAS RANGES - 30” white, black, S.Steel TUL YAS
ELECTRIC RANGES - 30” white from $89090
BUILT-IN GAS OVENS-24” white, blk, S.Steel...from $ 1,107°°
GAS COOK TOPS - 30” white, bisque from $760°°
ELECTRIC COOK TOPS - 30” white OM Ed hag
WASHERS ES A ae
DA 0a Sa Cae Ree)
DRYERS - gas. from $86Q0°

Visit our web site at www.taylor-industries.com







APT 3-G

GARY’S STILL WORKING HERE,BUT | YOU SHOULD
HONESTLY JOE, WHEN HE TALKS PAY ATTENTION,
ABOUT THE COMPUTER SYSTEM, TOMMIE.




















WE MEN LOVE TO) ARE YOU GIVING 4
TALK ABOUT ME DATING ADVICE,
DOCTOR ?_.

MAY I TAKE
YOU TO DINNER
WHEN YOU GET A

WHY PO YOU THINK ZT
MOVED BACK HERE,
YOUR HONOR?








1 BACK FROM
SPAINF

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.



A COUPLE

DAYS! IT'S
DUST A QUICK
TRir! ‘
FAT LOT OF GOOD IT
BLONDIE DID TO WEAR A BIB









THIS NEW CHAIR WILL
LULL YOU TO SLEEP
WITH ITS MAGIC

0 RATHER YOU DION'T...ONCE
PEOPLE SIT IN THIS
CHAIR, THEY CAN'T
BE PULLED OUT OF
IT WITH A MOVING

a

HOW SOON
CAN IT BE
DELIVERED?

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.



wwiw.Blondie.com

HAGAR STORMED My’ mOEMY BAK ==
FATHER'S CASTLE ANP PROBLEMS)
Po YovKNOW EVERVES?Y ie CARRIED Me AWAY ! =
HOME? , vee = BEGINNING J mg’ Ie Ce.
E yi

$ :
4 WN
\

~
RX

World rights reserved. Peres



C t

RS &





re

©2009 by King Features
Be

3-7



Clee scl oo han “lew, Sar Peet
‘eee et DU pout Bl Se
































y Rade ae Ba es Peay ec: Eee
ARE YOU ie H
KIDDING? I |] I'M NEVER GOING aa" ery Cogpearten der ret ir

te ace ee eh ee eee.
ee, Be ek reaped ope

ey oer is eee eee ey
pee we ce 5 ie ks ed BE
Fea Ah ES, ops Fe
BOS ees eee ete er
inet . eh be er Pe
a eS
aicHhipS Dada" s ee er per
pee we es ee ee ay
ee et ee i
Ler eb is oe ee Pr |
wet feb fie hws cain, Ea ee eet
a le ag eel

©1989 Universal Press Syndicate





cae fa se!
Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with Pham MLL tail final rales BT ary
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to oe ee a ee geo el |
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each We Fal? eee! fob bin EL’
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty Tiel la.

level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

















Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer



















































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





























6/7 2[4/3/1| Bi
3/1 5/6/9/8| (MBN2 |1/7 Bis 94/7
23) E)
819 4/7512) BS cme OmET o
5/8 113/419) Werit 4219 m1 1213
7\2 3/8|1/6) jee l1 is 4 5 IR
416 9/5/2/7| IN3)2/1 Ri 3 214/15
9
“BUT YOUTOLD ME NOT TOWALK ON {T,$0, [= — oA Be eee
E. UFF IN To THE BALL.” ifficulty Level 7 4/311 & 2 |
$ » Ger e Difficulty Level * *& 3/07 115 7/2/83 fo [3 [8/7 M2 9 ’



Cabo sn: Rc)

A Delicate Situation

a

CRYPTIC PUZZLE
| i i i
Hie

Across Down
1 Funny story about oriental 1 Switch choices ; ;
seafood (6) occasionally (2,9,9) haan de. eee een
ions i i 2 Quality that needs :; : aoe : ;
4 Reductions in capital ma (8) Pt | ieee Mee Pall ete 4 NORTH Superficially, it may seem that this
on : Taare g1072 lan wl sce dvi fn
: eee, & 2 plan will succeed if declarer finds a
a Tee Bile Stak aie 2 Eve wildly Se VÂ¥A9543 3-3 division of the missing diamonds
5 Family ties for the mother's Tf ; 3
10 es (6) au eaane wal boy? i: 7) Ne Wes eee IS yee 62 with East holding the king. But even
OP: elves with Tne tie @ Cable roma Buraneen || || || || || | | )] | #AQI if the diamonds are divided this way,
gets heated (8) sentra (4) WEST EAST more than ordinary care is required
12 Double act no longer 7 Make straight for this (6) PT tT tT tT Tey ty ty @KI954 4Q8 for South to get home safely.
seen (4) Tins ptornunatehy dpeet 6 Pe | | | | || || z || ¥Q108 ¥K76 Suppose South crosses to dummy
13 Big portion of Norwegian highly-apresti foreign a 393 #K 108 with a club at trick four and leads a
trout (5) a 6) Pood pail | ey] | [ $83 #107542 diamond to the queen. Having gotten
14 Well-established 27 J i
hes | (i Bowes Wonca a | | || | | | | zi | | SOUTH over this hurdle, he then cashes the
usiness (4) We Toleie aenowe er #A63 ace. All would be well if East rou-
17 Early news from a rare resistance: (6) erase) eas 4 V2 tinely followed low, but if East
book sale (5,7) See ce al | || | | | | | | | @AQ754 alertly deposits the king of diamonds
20 It gives an impression of stupidity (5) &K 96 under the ace, declarer will not be
permanence (9,3) 18 B es Tee eat rele ee Po) The bidding: able to establish the suit without los-
23 Some steak or grouse cali aes (8) South West North East ing the lead to West’s jack.
perhaps (4) Sora eaeeine a ees _ Ww Across Down 1¢ Pass 1¥ Pass To circumvent this possibility,
24 Boards a coach (5) ae a star? (8) _I 1 Across 1 Break (8) 1 NT Pass 2NT Pass after the diamond finesse wins South
25 Water thoroughly (4) sii at the Hast: N 1 Understand fully (6) 2 Exhaustive (8) 3 NT should re-enter dummy with a club
28 Is it won by the fastest . : ee os N 4 Close Opening lead — five of spades. and lead another diamond. If East
guns in the West? (4,4) os ioe bate ie Raho We examination (8) . Leave pune) There are times when declarer follows low, the ace is played, and
o0| Kariya call tor eourane te) ferns anger wnone ou 9 Handsome young 5 Simultaneous but must exercise great care to keep a _ East is then given the king. Alterna-
at -Nesatve walexeeen ta a a ibe ( : . > man (6) unrelated (12) particular opponent out of the lead. _ tively, if East puts up the king on the
change? Absurd (8) Insite he 0”) 10 Pettily 6 Advocate strongly (4) An example of the delicate handling — second diamond lead, South lets him
Saige eat SER generous (4) x bothersome (8) 7 Stupidity (6) that might be required is provided by hold the trick; when the suit later
: : , 27 Vehicle to move before Lui 12 Brisk steady pace (4) et ST Ee, today’s deal. divides evenly, the contract is made.
pernape() ery 13 Highly skilled (5) BS Semsoleoris Declarer ducked the first two As long as declarer handlcs his
: : : 14 Mark left by food (6) spade leads and won the third as East diamonds with tender, loving, care,
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution wound (4) 11 Important scientific discarded a low club. With only six West cannot gain the lead. Even if
; . 17 Principal assistant advance (12) sure tricks in view, South had to find —_ East plays the king on the first dia-
se 1 eet 2 Slums ce Malye: * seneass 1 Wieng. 2 Tianicre eet (5-4,3) 15 Excessive (5 three more and decided that the dia- mond lead from dummy, South can
rappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 20 Remaining xcessive (5) : : ie :
ie ‘ mond suit offered the best chance. counter by allowing the king to win,
Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, Ived (4.2.33 16 Secret store (5) : ees : :
Kitchen, 24. Given awa : : unresolved (4,2,3,3) However, the diamonds had to be and again nine tricks come rolling
‘ Yy, 23 Obi, 24 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 23 Alcove (4) 18 Idler (8) i :
Dresser. 25 Tenor. Paragon, 25 Dated. ye ewe ich sel developed without allowing West to home.
Down: 1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, Down: 1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 25 To caution (4) y excited (8) €2009 King Features Syndicate Inc,
4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 28 Compassionate (8) 21 Hostility (6)
12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 : 22 Origin (6)
: ae 29 Elephant driver (6)
Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, | Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 30 Surreptitious (8) 26 To grind (4)
22 Vie. Avoid, 22 Mar. a a 6) 27 Vague (4)















i imsormre ( Bright and sunny. Clear and moonlit. Mostly sunny. Bright and sunny. Mostly sunny. a The HE Aeron hentai a ll
, ow: 56°F/13°C © . : : : :
@ pa High: 82° High: 80° High: 82° High: 82°
. ee f High: 81° Low: 71° Low: 70° Low: 69° Low: 69° Low: 71° see EE
TAMPA Ls AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 80° F/27°C > High __Ht.(ft.) Low __Ht.(ft.
Low: 59° F/15°C ae r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 7:15am. 29 12:49am. -0.3
@ “ - elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 7:35pm. 29 1:23pm. -0.2
i j 8:04am. 30 1:43am. -0.4
CT Testy sogpm. 30 2:08pm. 03
5 ae Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesdayo:29 am. 09 232?am. 04
i , ABACO Temperate aoe 9:08 p. 3.1 2:50pm. -0.3
, : ati ° VOM, ease ca tae gots eeaceosacocen etc ceeme ts ° 2 : : :
, ON ig: 80°F eee TS Tasty Sen —2e— San Oy
re A Low: 64° F/18°C Normal high... [op 6 eee
; : Normal low 65° F/18° C
a _ eS @ WEST PALM BEACH i} Last year's High ...cccc:scssseuseestee gor rs2c | INTIMA TIMT(II
4 ll High: 82° F/28°C —_ Last year's lOW oes 73° F/23° C
7 i Low: 64° F/18°C oe Precipitation _ i aes es a.m. Lay ee
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......ccccccccceeeneeeee 0.00" unsel....... ‘1op.m. Moonset. .... “10 a.m.
i FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Yearto date... eStats, SO
High: 81°F/27°C @ High: 79° F/26° C Normal year to date oo... 3.88" ee . s
Low: 66° F/19°C Low: 63° F/17°C eo 2
~ AccuWeather.com > & a
Be @ ii. Forecasts and graphics provided by th: oa F
my MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.10 Mar.18 Mar.26 = Apr. 2
High: 82° F/28° C High: 82° F/28° C
— Low: 66°F/19°C NASSAU igh: 82° F/28"
Low: 71° F/22°C
’ * @
KEY WEST ee CATISLAND
High: 78° F/26°C High: 79° F/26° C
Low: 68° F/20°C = Low: 60° F/16°C
ee
a 2
= GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
~ Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | ,
highs and tonights's lows. \ a High: 85° F/29° C
¢ p Low: 65° F/18°C
LONGISLAND
Low: 63° F/A17°C
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday i MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 83° F/28° C
Fic FIC FC FC FC FIC Fic FIC FC FIC Fic FC me Low: 63° F/17° C
Albuquerque 65/18 38/3 pe 65/18 36/2 pc Indianapolis 57/13 49/9 pe 64/17 40/4 t Philadelphia 54/12 40/4 pc 47/8 42/5 +
Anchorage 31/0 22/-5 sn 33/0 23/-5 sn Jacksonville 81/27 54/12 s 82/27 56/13 s Phoenix 75/23 52/11 s 76/24 51/10 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 76/24 56/12 po 81/27 56/12 po Kansas City 60/15 48/8 t 56/13 20/-6 t Pittsburgh 50/10 37/2 pe 55/12 48/8 + RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:84°F/za"c
Atlantic City 59/15 310 po 47/8 40/4 1 Las Vegas 6719 44/6 po 67/19 41/5 s Portland,OR 46/7 29/1 c 47/8 28/-2 pc High: 83° F/28° C Low: 65° F/18°C
Baltimore 64/17 39/3 pe 49/9 43/6 © Little Rock 73/22 61/16 t 80/26 50/10 t Raleigh-Durham 80/26 50/10 pc 64/17 55/12 c Low: 60°F/16°C i
Boston 37/2 27/-2 sn 41/5 341 pe Los Angeles 65/18 48/8 s 67/19 48/8 s St. Louis 6417 53/41 pe 71/21 341 ¢t .
Buffalo 40/4 29/-1 c 41/5 37/2 + Louisville 67/19 5713 pe 74/23 47/8 t Salt Lake City 40/4 24/-4 sn 37/2 20/6 c GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 80/26 57/13 s 80/26 57/13 pc Memphis 76/24 62/16 t 80/26 49/9 t San Antonio 83/28 66/18 pc 85/29 63/17 c High: 83° F/28° C
Chicago 47/8 39/3 pe 510 23/5 t Miami 82/27 64/17 s 82/27 66/18 s San Diego 6146 51410 pe 62/16 51/10 s Low. 64°FAB°C
Cleveland 42/5 36/2 pe 54/12 44/6 1 Minneapolis 42/5 28/-2 pc 33/0 5/-15 sn San Francisco 57/13 42/5 pe 60/15 42/5 s .
Dallas 81/27 65/18 t 80/26 51/10 t Nashville 71/21 58/14 t 77/25 51/10 c Seattle 38/3 25/-3 sf 42/5 26/-3 pc
Denver 60/15 23/-5 pc 38/3 16/-8 pc New Orleans 79/26 6417 pe 79/26 64/17 s Tallahassee 81/27 49/9 pe 80/26 53/11 s _
Detroit 46/77 354 pe 510 36/2 © New York 45/7 35 46 42/5 38/3 4+ Tampa 80/26 60/15 s 80/26 61/16 s —
Honolulu 78/25 67/19 pce 79/26 68/20 pc Oklahoma City 75/23 56/13 t 73/22 36/2 pc Tucson 71/21 48/8 pe 71/21 45/7 s ate
Houston 81/27 68/20 pce 83/28 62/16 pc Orlando 84/28 57/13 s 84/28 57/13 $s Washington, DC 69/20 42/5 pc 49/9 45/7 +

THE TRIBUNE







o|1|2

LOW

3|4|5

MODERATE

=| | &














hm ORLANDO
































ae CNY

6|7

HIGH

iin



\. HIGH



Te, SLT TELUT Es




vv
8| ao
EXT.








ii







MARINE FORECAST



MONDAY, MARCH Stu, 2009, PAGE 7C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F





Showers

T-storms



Houston) C
7 MILD)

Atlanta’
76/55

New York

Detroit "45/35

Miami
82/64

Rain Fronts

[3,4 Plumes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and res a2 2

Pk] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. a)

[y=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
10s | -0s [l0si) 10s | 20s [BOSi) 40s









Never start your
t us!

Today Tuesday

High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C
Acapulco 87/30 70/21 s 87/30 69/20 s
Amsterdam 42/5 40/4 c 44/6 36/2 r
Ankara, Turkey 5442 36/2 c 55/12 29/-1 15
Athens 63/17 47/8 s 63/17 44/6 s
Auckland 65/18 55/12 sh 67/19 58/14 c
Bangkok 95/35 79/26 pc 93/33 77/25 pc
Barbados 84/28 74/23 s 84/28 74/23 pc
Barcelona 57/13 44/6 sh 58/14 49/9 pc
Beijing 55/12 25/-3 s 52/11 30/-1 pe
Beirut 65/18 54/12 sh 65/18 60/15 pc
Belgrade 53/11 36/2 + 43/6 37/2 ¢
Berlin 38/3 32/0 sn 41/5 37/2 sh
Bermuda 73/22 62/16 pc 68/20 59/15 pc
Bogota 66/18 48/8 +r 65/18 48/8 t
Brussels 43/6 37/2 ¢ 43/6 33/0 r
Budapest 52/11 32/0 sh 45/7 34/1 ¢
Buenos Aires 75/23 68/20 pc 78/25 68/20 pc
Cairo 73/22 50/10 s 72/22 58/14 s
Calcutta 93/33 73/22 s 96/35 78/25 c
Calgary -6/-21 -20/-28 sn 4/-15 -9/-22 pc
Cancun 84/28 63/17 s 86/30 64/17 s
Caracas 83/28 66/18 pc 84/28 67/19 pc
Casablanca 64/17 52/11 pc 74/23 58/14 c
Copenhagen 42/5 = 38/3 c 44/6 37/2 ¢
Dublin 45/7 41/5 sh 48/8 45/7 pc
Frankfurt 42/5 36/2 r 44/6 37/2 r
Geneva 38/3 35/1 sf 38/3 37/2 sn
Halifax 35/1 18/-7 ¢ 37/2 21/6 s
Havana 85/29 61/16 s 85/29 60/15 s
Helsinki 32/0 28/-2 sn 30/-1 23/-5 sn
Hong Kong 72/22 63/17 pc 73/22 64/17 pc
Islamabad 75/23 50/10 pc 80/26 48/8 s
Istanbul 55/12 44/6 sh 50/10 38/3 r
Jerusalem 60/15 44/6 s 58/14 43/6 sh
Johannesburg 76/24 54/12 t 74/23 54/12 t
Kingston 82/27 74/23 pc 84/28 75/23 s
Lima 85/29 70/21 c 83/28 69/20 c
London 48/8 41/5 pc 5010 39/3 r
Madrid 64/17 34/1 pc 68/20 36/2 s
Manila 91/32 75/23 s 87/30 75/23 s
Mexico City 77/25 = 46/7 s 75/23 46/7 s
Monterrey 85/29 62/16 s 96/35 58/14 pc
Montreal 32/0 25/-3 sn 41/5 28/-2 pe
Moscow 33/0 33/0 sn 36/2 31/0 c
Munich 31/0 28/-2 sn 35/1 32/0 sn
Nairobi 91/32 56/13 s 91/382 58/14 s
New Delhi 88/31 59/15 pc 93/33 59/15 s
Oslo 34/1 26/-3 sn 33/0 25/-3 sf
Paris 48/8 43/6 sh 53/11 36/2 +
Prague 39/3 34/1 sn 40/4 34/1 +
Rio de Janeiro 85/29 74/23 pc 83/28 74/23 c
Riyadh 88/31 59/15 s 86/30 57/13 s
Rome 61/16 37/2 pc 55/12 43/6 s
St. Thomas 81/27 71/21 s 81/27 73/22 pc
San Juan 81/27 65/18 c 90/32 64/17 t
San Salvador 92/33 72/22 s 91/382 71/21 s
Santiago 90/32 55/12 pc 88/31 54/12 s
Santo Domingo 83/28 66/18 pc 82/27 66/18 pc
Sao Paulo 81/27 67/19 t 78/25 66/18 Fr
Seoul 54/12 25/-3 s 50/10 25/-3 s
Stockholm 36/2 30/-1 sn 34/1 28/-2 sf
Sydney 73/22 63/17 pc 73/22 63/17 s
Taipei 68/20 59/15 sh 73/22 61/16 pc
Tokyo 5412 48/8 c 59/15 46/7 pc
Toronto 40/4 26/-3 pc 42/5 33/0 r
Trinidad 86/30 76/24 r 79/26 74/23 +
Vancouver 38/3 23/-5 sf 38/3 26/-3 pc
Vienna 44/6 33/0 c 45/7 41/5 r
Warsaw 40/4 30/-1 SUP Se)
Winnipeg 24/-4 O/-17 sn 5/-15 -11/-23 sn

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

eneame witho

es to Auto Insurance,
‘the smart choice is
ice Management.

ache you can trust.








a iti




eS

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

rf
; (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Hew Preiane its peice Albay Euthera | Eun
_ Tee DAD) SUT Wes (H0) 390350 DAE CEA GAT-ADM | Te (D4) S32-284D | Tez (240) 33-2904



Full Text
{T\

Pim flowin’ it

81F
71F

BRIGHT AND
SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.88

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

HIGH
LOW



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Tragic pilot
Te

COMA
SS STA St et

rour-year'- Olt
gin dies



eisai.



Dr Michael
Darville
fills PLP

Senate seat

Physician replaces
Pleasant Bridgewater

Home destroyed
near Pride Estates

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A FOUR-year-old girl died
tragically in a blaze that
engulfed her wooden home
near Pride Estates sub-divi-
sion on Saturday night.

Police say they received
reports of a fire in a bushy
area on the border of the
southern portion of the Pride
Estates sub-division shortly
after 7pm.

Neighbours who tried to
extinguish the fire told The
Tribune yesterday that the
blaze had already consumed
the small wooden structure
before firefighters arrived at
the scene.

Police reported that, after
firefighters extinguished the
blaze, they discovered the
remains of a child on the floor
of the north-western section
of the burnt-out structure.

The remains, believed to
be those of the four-year-old
girl who was at home at the
time, had been burned

beyond recognition.

Neighbours who expressed
shock and dismay over the
incident claimed the child was
in her stepfather’s care at the
time, and was alone in the
house when the blaze erupted.

They told The Tribune that
the stepfather had gone to a
shop nearby only to return
and find the house engulfed
in flames. Some claimed the
child had been locked in the
house.

A neighbour who tried to
extinguish the blaze told The
Tribune: "When I reach on
the scene I meet the house
engulfed in flames. Me and
the other fellas them we try
out the fire.

“By the time we got the fire
team and the fire people reach
we find out that there was a
little youth inside who perish
in the fire.

"Everybody here really sor-
ry about it, it’s one of them
accidents in life that nobody

SEE page 11

Stel: 394-1378

Wepre oa Aer Cid Geeta |

Offer Good Until:
March 14th

Re ae Cpe

Wee ate ca

——
Sea

Junior

Stop in TODAY and LOOK for the
BOSS Target for MORE great DEALS!





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

FIREFIGHTERS show the area where the Bad of the four-year-

old girl was found.

PM vows that
govt will reduce
unemployment

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham has
vowed that the Free National
Movement government will
reduce the unemployment
rate from double digits again
as it has done previously in
the Bahamas.

At the opening of the new
$60 million dry dock at Grand
Bahama Shipyard on Satur-
day, Mr Ingraham gave his

SEE page 11

Quiznos



‘to shrink for
first time since
World War I

m By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE World Bank report-
ed yesterday that the global
economy will shrink in 2009
for the first time since World
War II, confirming earlier esti-
mates raised by officials at the
International Monetary Fund.

Noting the significance of
the announcement, Minister
of State for Finance Zhivar-
go Laing said the Bahamas

SEE page 11

BIG GREAKE

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

OVER a month after Pleas-
ant Bridgewater resigned
from the Senate, PLP leader
Perry Christie yesterday offi-
cially announced that physi-
cian Dr Michael Ronald
Darville of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, will fill the vacancy
left in the upper chamber.

This move ends weeks of
speculation about which
Grand Bahama resident
would join the parliamentary
ranks of the PLP.

In welcoming Dr Darville,
Mr Christie in a press state-
ment said: “I am delighted
that Dr Darville has accept-
ed my call for front-line ser-
vice in the national legislature
under the banner of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party.

“He is an individual of ster-
ling character and outstand-



TWO WORKERS prepare rm fae a number of broken glass panels at

Sunburst Paint on Harrold Road.

ing accomplishment, most
notably in the fields of medi-
cine and business in Grand
Bahama. He steps to the fore
at a time in our country’s life -
including, most especially, the
life of Grand Bahama - when
individuals of intelligence,
proven ability, and social com-
passion are required more
than ever before — Dr Darville
is such an individual.”

Mr Christie yesterday
advised Governor General
Arthur Hanna to appoint Dr
Darville.

Dr Darville practises medi-
cine in Freeport as a partner
in the Grand Bahama Family
Medical Centre.

He holds an MBBS degree
in medicine from the Univer-
sity of the West Indies and a
degree in engineering from
the University of Windsor in

SEE page 11



o> Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Former minister’s business
and home are broken into

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Trade Minister Leslie Miller had his business broken into
over the weekend by burglars who sought to use this distraction as a
means to gain entry into his home.

On Friday night, Sunburst Paint on Harrold Road had three of its
large window panes broken by an unknown assailant sometime after
11pm.

On the surveillance video the male assailant is seen wielding a ham-
mer as he smashes window after window and then - without explana-
tion - flees the area.

Mr Miller, who was asleep at his home at the time, rushed to the paint

SEE page 11

SHU

a.

Te

-9

cus *

pelll8a

92.99

uheese wart | your — -

~ PRICES MAY VARY





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Government aims to reduce

bureaucracy of doing business

FREEPORT —- The FNM
government will seek to “under-
take major reforms of govern-
mental processes and proce-
dures” to reduce the bureau-
cracy of doing business with the
government, said Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham stated that the
Bahamas is a very bureaucratic
country that is still very much
tied to its colonial past.

“We have not reviewed and
looked at all the things we
would require to be done for
the conduct of business for the
government,” he said on Satur-
day in Grand Bahama.

“One of the things that we
seek to do is to undertake major
reforms of governmental
processes and procedures so
that people can do business with
the government without having
to spend an inordinate amount
of time and money to have very
simple and straightforward
things undertaken.”

Mr Ingraham was speaking
at the official opening of the
third dry dock at Grand
Bahama Shipyard.

He said they are going to
seek to use the facility as an
example of how government
can cause the processes of gov-



“One of the things
that we seek to do
is to undertake
major reforms of
governmental
processes and
procedures so that
people can do
business with the
government without
having to spend an
inordinate amount
of time and money
to have very simple
and straightforward
things undertaken.”



Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham

ernment to be speeded up.
“One of the things that I nev-
er tire of telling my colleagues is
that we are in a global environ-
ment and we seek to provide
international services from The
Bahamas; that is the basis of the



Bahamian economy — the pro-
vision of services. We are not
manufacturers, we are not pro-
ducers.

“We are in the business of
providing services whether that
is in tourism, or as in the case
today, services in terms of ship
care, maintenance and repair.

“And if you are in that busi-
ness and you do not have suffi-


























For every

cient local business, as we do
not, to be able to provide
employment and business
opportunities for the society,
then you have to be able to
attract it from outside the coun-
try,” Mr Ingraham said.

He pointed out that the ship-
yard requires equipment, parts,
services and labour from out-
side the country for its enter-
prise.

Mr Ingraham noted that all
of the ships that chose to come
the shipyard in the Bahamas are
foreign-owned and require
equipment, services, goods and
parts and labour not available in
the Bahamas.

“The company that builds a
ship in Germany that provides a
warranty for the engine or oth-
er parts on the ship has to cause
that part to be fixed or repaired
when something goes wrong.

Manufacturer

“Tt is not a question of dri-
ving down the street and say-
ing, ‘I can find Jack Jones who
is a mechanic to fix the engine
for me today.’ Someone from
the manufacturer will need to
come in and repair the part and
do so in the shortest possible
time.

“Tf a ship breaks down in Fort
Lauderdale, Florida, it has been
known for a 747 to be chartered
from Europe to come with all
the parts, equipment and per-
sonnel to cause it to be fixed,
fixed in a short period of time
and without a lot of undue
bureaucracy and paperwork,”
said Mr Ingraham.

The GB Shipyard began its
operation in the Bahamas in
1999 and began training in 2000.

Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch, chair-
man and CEO, commended the
Bahamas government for its
tremendous support.

He reported that the shipyard
had grown over the years from
an enterprise with a few million
in revenue and under 100
employees to a full-scale facili-
ty earning revenues of over
$130 million and an average
number of permanent and tem-
porary employees of over 800.

Mr Rotkirch said the facility
is the biggest ship repair facility
in the region, with three floating
docks. The third dry dock was
acquired in 2008 from France
at an investment of $60 million.

He said the commissioning of
the new dock represents anoth-
er milestone for the shipyard.

Mr Ingraham said the gov-
ernment is very appreciative of
the owners of Royal Caribbean
and Carnival for investment in
the shipyard in the Bahamas.

Carnival and Royal
Caribbean are the major owners
and operators of cruise ships
and it is primarily their ships
that come here to be repaired
and refurbished.

"And so we do have the
opportunity on a continuing
basis to demonstrate to them
that we are appreciative of their
investment in The Bahamas and
that we are going take full
advantage of it.

"On behalf of the Govern-
ment of The Bahamas and res-
idents of Grand Bahama I wish
to say thank you.

“T trus you are continuing to
feel comfortable with us, and
the extent to which there are
things we need to work on we
would be happy to do so," said
Mr Ingraham.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Sports

BUSINESS SECTION
Business

INSIGHT SECTION

Plea OO eo oO ambalic
See ea ne eee ee ere P4

P12,13,14,15




blood




donation














3 lives can
be saved

Date:
Time:

Help save
Fic)

Give blood.

March 14, 20
11:00 — 4:00

Venue: Scotiabank Cable Beach Branch

Counselling offered by Dr. David Allen

Giveaways & prizes

Refreshments
Kiddie Corner

Financial Consultation

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



Murphyville, 2nd House right from Sears Road,
Telephone 322-8493

Anger over

letter informing of
end to duty-free
concessions

mBy PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

LOCAL light industry

i businesses are furious that

? the Ministry of Finance

: issued a mass letter over the
? weekend informing them

? that their duty-free conces-

: sions are set to finish by the

end of June.

Noting the enormous
efforts that other countries
around the world are taking

to ensure that local busi-
: nesses continue to thrive, a
: local store owner told The

Tribune yesterday that it

i seems as if the Bahamas
? government is working

“backwards”.
The ministry letter, signed

by Mark Edgar for the
; Financial Secretary, states:

“We bring to your attention

the provisions of item 8(4)

of Part B of the fourth

i schedule of the Tariff Act,

? which limits the aggregate

i period for duty-free conces-
i sions to five years from the
i first date of your approval.

“Applicants who received
exemption during the fiscal

i period July 1, 2003, to June
? 30, 2004, should note that
? their concessionary period
} will end June 30, 2009. All

other applicants after June

: 30, 2004, should note their
? five-year period from this
: date,” the letter reads.

A local businessman who
owns and operates a down-

town store said he would be
? forced to lay off staff if the

? government goes through

? with its plans to remove

? duty-free concessions.

Claiming that he is strug-

i gling as it is to simply “make
? it by”, the owner - who did

i not wish to be named - said

i he expected businesses

i throughout Nassau to start

: laying off staff shortly as a

? result of this letter.

“How do they expect you

i to survive? All over the

? world, other countries are

? making it easier for people

? to keep their business or

i their homes. So why are we
? going the reverse? How can

I afford to pay more now?

? Food prices are high, gas is

: going back up, if this tax

? goes through - because basi-
: cally it’s a tax - ’'m going to
i have to lay off a few people.

“T mean, I hate to do it,

: but business is business.

? And I tell you one thing, a

i lot of people are not going

i to be pleased with this. A lot

of these small companies
are going to have to cut

back and that’s only going
: to make a bad situation
? much worse,” he said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

Striking Red Pillbox hat, with tulle facial veil and large
tulle bow at the back of the hat.
Suits Church, Weddings and Teas

Rn a

area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

* Trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia, used under licence.

TE
EVERY DAY

VALUE |

‘ALL DAY, EVERY DAY.

REGULAR
FOOTLONGS *â„¢ $ T

SPOCY (THLLAM - THA
VEGGIE DELITE
TURRET BREAST & BLACK FOREST HA
BLT - COLD COT COMA
WEATEMLL WA) MARA
GWEN PUISTED CHIC MEN BREAST
ITALIAN ELT - TORREY BREAST
HLACK FOREST HAM

ODA 2009

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!
AT PARTICIPATING STORES


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 3



© nbriey The PLP wants unemployment

assistance available by April 1

Man in
hospital
after being
stabbed

A YOUNG man is in
critical condition in hospi-
tal after being stabbed
early yesterday.

Police reported that
shortly before 2am on
Sunday, a fight broke out
in the area of Carmichael
and Blue Hill Roads. A
22-year-old man was
stabbed in his left shoul-
der.

The victim was taken to
hospital for treatment.
Police are uncertain about
the circumstances and
have launched an investi-
gation.

¢ A 26-year-old man
was taken into custody on
Friday following the
seizure of a handgun and
two live rounds of ammu-
nition.

Police on patrol in
Carmichael Road around
noon stopped and
searched the driver of a
burgundy Nissan Sentra.

Officers found a 9mm

handgun in the front pock-

et of the driver’s trousers.

¢ Police seized 13 live
rounds of ammunition on
Saturday while on patrol
in Collins Avenue.

Officers from Southern
police station saw two
men acting suspiciously
near Eighth Terrace
around noon on Saturday.

The men fled when
approached. Police
searched the area and dis-
covered a ziploc bag con-
taining 13 live rounds of
ammunition for a .380
handgun.

No arrests were made

and investigations are con- }

tinuing.

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP is urging the gov-
ernment to make its
announced unemployment
assistance available to
Bahamians by as early as
April 1.

The Department of Statis-
tics revealed on Friday that
the latest unemployment fig-

ures are at a 15-year high, with
12.1 per cent of the workforce
in Nassau, and 14.6 per cent in
Grand Bahama without jobs.

Figures

In a press statement, PLP
chairman Glenys Hanna-Mar-
tin called these figures “stag-
gering and very worrisome in
their implications.”

“We support in full the gov-

ernment’s declared intention
to bring about relief by way
of unemployment assistance.

“While the prime minister
has indicated that this relief
will soon become available,
we urge the government to
ensure that it can be accessed
as early as April 1, or earlier, if
possible,” she said.

So as to minimise the suf-
fering and financial hardship
of unemployed Bahamians in

Minister willing to convene TRIFOR session

LABOUR and Maritime Affairs Min-
ister Dion Foulkes said yesterday that he is
willing to convene a special session of TRI-
FOR to discuss issues relating to the dis-
placement of former CLICO employees.

"I would be happy to convene a session
of TRIFOR to discuss this issue. I will
speak with Mr John Pinder about it and we
will come up with a convenient date," Mr
Foulkes told The Tribune yesterday.

Mr Foulkes, who played a leading role
in the establishment of The Tripartite
forum in 2000, said his ministry intends to
ensure that the rights of the former CLI-

CO employees are protected.

John Pinder, president of the National
Congress of Trade Unions, called on Mr Foulkes
to convene a special session of TRIFOR and appoint
a select committee to investigate the CLICO matter



DIM MeL Cs

icy liabilities.

"with the view to submitting recommen-
dations to amend the provisions of the
Employment Act to ensure that events
like this never occur in the Bahamas
again.

"Despite the many calls of the NCTUB
for the government to enact legislation to
better protect worker's rights, we are again
faced with a situation where workers are
being made redundant and not receiving
their legal entitlements as prescribed by
the Statute Laws of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas and subsequently many fam-
ilies could be negatively impacted. This is
unacceptable," Mr Pinder stated in the
release.

CLICO reportedly has just over 29,000 policy-
holders, over 170 staff and over $100 million in pol-























the immediate interim, Mrs
Hanna-Martin said “persons
out of work ought to be able
to access without hassle or
delay, the maximum assis-
tance available through the
agencies of the government.”

Details

“We would also ask the gov-
ernment to release to the pub-
lic as soon as it is available all
of the pertinent details rele-
vant to this unemployment
benefit scheme,” she
said.

The numbers revealed by
the Department of Statistics’
acting director Kalsie Dorsett
on Friday show that over
20,000 people are looking for
employment in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama.

Around half of all people
who are without work in

Grand Bahama lost their jobs
in the last six months, with 48
per cent of these people
reporting having been “laid-
off or dismissed,” the Depart-
ment’s report said.

In New Providence, one
third had become jobless in
the same period and, of these,
44 per cent were laid off or
dismissed.

Overall, in New Providence,
unemployment among the
134,400-strong labour force
rose from 8.7 per cent in May
last year to 12.1 per cent,
based on the interim survey
conducted last month by the
Department of Statistics.

In Grand Bahama, the
number of people without
work increased to 14.6 per
cent.

This leaves a total of 16,315
people without work in New
Providence and 4,195 in
Grand Bahama.

M I D W AY HOME IMPROVEMENTS

“Where Our Quality & Experience Shine!”

Specializing in:

Roofing, Home Maintenance, Painting & Varnishing,
Pressure & Mildew Cleaning, Roof Painting, Water

Se

Proofing, Plumbing, Window Cleaning, Drywall
Installation, Replace Rotten Woodwork,

Laminate Floor, Tiling, Repair

Cracks to Concrete Walls

LEROY TUCKER - Proprietor
Tel: 242-324-2153 ¢ Cell 432-3561 ¢ P.O. Box SP -60315

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Moet Thomoocs Rretoaanoy & Cuno Ever, on Tun Jon & Fem!

Masealy"s

Oly PRorsiowaL, Creme Sos Caps & UPoLeToey CA Ses,

* Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marhic Cleaning %&

Resirii Spsculet.

+ Prochen (Cleaning Spanos noms. Dapap 2. bhariy
Sul, bactere Civeaasz, Watermarks and Stains trom
& apcieig f& Famitare, 1a2 rit them to like acw

atk Trectios of replacement 2061.

* Carpet, Sofa's, Lowessns. Chairs. Caining Chairs, Cars,

Doan, Groen. Ties, Marte & Soe

* Pemaan, Worl d& Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist

Bache Polishieg. Reworaion & Cane
* Woed Floor Resteralion

Suited Stent Tech Profesional Cotracior

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN OO FF RIGHTY

re eC eer ee Toe cc © EI, OF
* pa sored eet

A A oe

PROCHEM SYSTEM fan)

Six Shot,
wounded in
Miami-Date
County

MIAMI GARDENS,
Fla.


































1 pc 5 Drawer Chest

Queen 8 Pc Set

Financing Available Through
King 8 Pe Se

Commonwealth Bank

Solid Wood

fini bel
ERECTOR OF “Deo"

POLICE are investi-
gating a shooting in
Miami Gardens that left
six wounded, according
to Associated Press.

The shooting hap-
pened early Sunday
near a party in the small
city, located northwest
of Miami’s downtown.

All six, including
some teenagers, were
airlifted to an area hos-
pital and are being
treated with non-life
threatening injuries.

This is the third mass
shooting in Miami-Dade
in as many months.

In February, four peo-
ple were wounded after
getting caught ina
spray of fire in a North
Miami complex.

In January, seven
were wounded and two
were killed in a shoot-
ing that happened ata
street gambling game in
Liberty City.

/
' +
i)
et



Easter Baskets
& Crafts

» Bunnies trom $2.99
» Colourful Baskets from $1.99

» Basket Bags 10 for $7.50
» Plastic Eqgs & Lots of Grass

» Easter Lillies and Callalillies
» Lovely Potted Orchids

+)

a eo sE%

ee ieaes ere

Che Mall-at-*Lanat hewn
BOX OFFDCE OPENS AT id-00 AN PAILY

Paap ek en:

fusca cv WA Yen ran nf
aro [os io
THER PERRYS MERGES TOUaL__| ete [0 [HA | fs [Ra

Sapna + Loon [em as
IWTERMATIOMAL =| tet 20 | A | een | 0 [sre |
frac [a ut a
rear [wn [eas [as [ua |

ane ee eee
pete raat |e ea
es [an P| | a0 [0
oemonnseorTaeuAN—c | Wi [wa [RA [wa [eo hss

Fit pita) Le E*

Eee eri Pe a Tan

Home Fabrics

ee RR ee Ome Pe eC ee Mol) gett Aae

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAA Tas
Be Me re ay
322-2157

rena ev [a [Wa | wo [oe |
[FRibwrTHETSTH | 1:05 | a5 | WIA | ets | a0 | 10:35

[nes sot woraar [ww [390 [ WA | 5 was 0s

Providing technology that works. fer [sa

@wicronet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

FINK PAMTHER i

nis 4 00 6 do

380-FLIX

56 MADEIRA STREET, PALMDALE

WAR DELL acer TOSHIBA 242.328.3040 « WWW.MIGRONET.BS

lemane


PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A solution to global warming?

IN A MEETING held at Breezes in Cable
Beach to discuss the Review of the Economic
Climate Change in the Caribbean, the Bahamas
was again warned that as one of the world’s
most vulnerable nations it must urgently address
the potentially irreversible effects of climate
change. If nothing is done these islands could
eventually become uninhabitable.

Mr Philip Weech, director of the Bahamas
Environment Science and Technology (BEST)
Commission, department of meteorology direc-
tor Arthur Rolle, and director of the Econom-
ic Commission for the Caribbean, Neil Pierre,
pointed to the undeniable effects of global
warming already being felt in this country’s
low-lying islands.

“Immediate action must be taken to address
climate change and the longer the action is
delayed the greater the costs in the future,” Mr
Pierre warned. “If we delay by a decade or two
we will have a situation that climate change
becomes unavoidable or irreversible and we
will reach a point of no return.”

This is not the first time that the Bahamas
has been warned. At the beginning of 2007 it
was told that some of its islands could be sub-
merged by 2030. Last year it was informed that
its carbon dioxide emissions per capita exceed-
ed those of the industrialised countries.

If all countries were to emit carbon dioxide at
levels similar to the Bahamas, the world would
exceed its current CO2 output by more than
200 per cent, said the United Nations in its
2007/2008 Human Development report.

This report seems alarmingly fanciful, but
anyone driving in the bumper-to-bumper traffic
of our busy streets, particularly in the morn-
ings and evenings — would find it believable.

Mr Eric Crowch, who with his wife Mar-
garet, came to the Bahamas in 1958 as the assis-
tant manager, then manager of the McAlpine
company, returns with his wife tomorrow to
their retirement home in South Wales after
their sixth visit since leaving the Bahamas in
March, 2003. Mr Crowch is keenly interested in
the global warming problem and the various
scientific solutions being suggested for its reduc-
tion. An article in the weekend edition of USA
Today caught his eye. It described the research
being done by scientists to recycle carbon diox-
ide (CO2) and turn it back into gasoline and
other transportation fuels — jet fuel, diesel fuel,
methanol, propane, butane.

He believes that this is the solution to the

Quality Auto Sales

PRE-OWNED
FUER le

For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

NOW
IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
»,, 06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN

world’s problems. By comparison, he consid-
ers the development of windmills impractical,
and turning farmland into a multi-billion ethanol
industry to reduce the US’s need on foreign
oil, a threat to the food supply.

He believes that the answer is the recycling of
carbon dioxide coupled with nuclear generated
electricity.

France, he points out, leads the world in the
generation of electricity from nuclear plants,
starting in 1950 under General Charles de
Gaulle, increasing during the oil shocks of the
1970s, and continuing to the present, despite
the accidents of Three Mile Island and Cher-
nobyl.

France, a country without oil, natural gas
and little coal, produces 77 per cent of its elec-
tricity from its nuclear plants.

There is no way to stop China’s industrial
growth, which has seen the almost weekly open-
ing of coal-fired plants, or the industries of India
or South America.

“As the underdeveloped world continues to
develop,” said Mr Crowch, “it will continue to
add CO2 to the atmosphere. There is no way to
stop their development, nor should we even
try. Therefore, a way has to be found to mitigate
the damage that their growth will contribute
to global warming.”

He believes there are enough good scientif-
ic brains now following the right path that a
solution will be found. Instead of trying to stop
the unstoppable, he believes all efforts should
now be made to trap the carbon dioxide that
these countries will inevitably produce and recy-
cle it into liquid fuel or return it to the earth
from where it came.

Researchers say they have tested their tech-
nologies in the lab and are about to unveil their
prototypes, which, if successful, could “lead to
commercial roll outs in as little as two years.”

“Tf successful,” reported USAToday, “such
initiatives could reduce dependence on carbon
spewing, petroleum-based products, as well as
renewable fuels such as corn ethanol that com-
pete with food supplies.”

It is not easy technology, but Mr Crowch
thinks that it has so many possibilities that this
is the route that scientists will take and con-
centrate on until the difficulties are overcome.

Meanwhile, Bahamians will have to find solu-
tions to reduce their own carbon emissions —
they cannot wait for someone else to do it for
them.





Support bill
to protect
sea turtles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Our Minister of Agriculture
and Marine resources, Larry
Cartwright, told us today that
there were lots of letters in from
foreigners supporting the total
ban on the harvesting of turtles,
but very few Bahamians have
voiced a positive opinion, or any
opinion at all for that matter,
as there were only two protests.

He indicated that Parliament
wanted to hear from more
BAHAMIANS supporting this
Bill. If you are a Bahamian,
please help us.

Attached, we have prepared
a letter that, if you wish, you
can download and sign and date
and send to Minister
Cartwright.

You can equally write your
own letter of support.

THE IMPORTANT THING
IS TO WRITE IN SUPPORT!

Please, this law that was pro-
posed some time ago to protect
turtles from mindless slaughter
has NOT been passed YET and
is NOT law, so turtles can still
legally be tortured and killed.

Minister Cartwright's fax
number is: 322 1767

Minister Cartwright’s email
address is:
larrycartwright@bahamas.gov.bs

Minister Cartwright's P.O.
Box No. is: N 3028

Please this is no joke, unless
we band together and write let-
ters of support IT WILL NOT
GET PASSED, and turtle pie
will stay on the menu, and the



LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



taunting and teasing, the hack-
ing and torture of turtles will
continue. You can help make it
stop.

Please forward this to every
Bahamian you know and ask
them to keep forwarding until
we have covered the country
and the Minister has received
the letters he requires to make
it become law.

If you are not a Bahamian
but have Bahamian friends and
family please urge them to write
a letter of support.

Thank you for your help and
support in this.

KIM ARANHA

(Co-chairman of the
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conserva-
tion Group)

Following is the text of the
letter that the Bahamas Sea
Turtle Conservation Group sug-
gests should be sent to Agricul-
ture Minister Larry Cartwright
to save the endangered turtles.

Mr. Minister,

I am writing to you to
declare that I support the total
ban of Turtle harvesting in the
islands of the Bahamas with
utmost sincerity.

As a Bahamian, I see these
turtles being killed as a major

loss to our nation, and our peo-
ple.

We, as a nation, need to dras-
tically reconstruct the ways in
which we look at the ocean, and
the mystical creatures, who
inhabit the unknown depths.

Rather than taking these
creatures for granted, we must
refrain from slaughtering them,
and begin protecting them.

If we kill off a resource as
valuable to our nation, ecosys-
tem, and tourism as marine life:
Specifically Turtles, we take
away from ourselves the oppor-
tunity to help in the re-growth
of the Turtle population.

We, as a people, are convey-
ing interest in the conservation
of Turtles, and our interest
needs to be matched by the
Government.

Once upon a time, spotting
the graceful, and timid appari-
tion of a Turtle on the surface of
the ocean was an everyday
occurrence, but as time passes
by, spotting these gentile giants
has become a rare, and magi-
cal thing.

We as a Nation are dragging
our feet in this situation, and
need to join the rest of the
world in conserving the
unknown world, beneath the
surface of the sea.

I support the passing of the
bill to protect ALL BAHAMI-
AN SEA TURTLES and
would like to see it put into
effect as soon as possible.

Sincerely,

JOHN DOE

Wild horses are destroying
crops at South Eleuthera farm

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me space in your
paper to vent my annoyance to
a situation that has cause much
stress and financial loss to me as
the owner of a farm in South
Eleuthera.

In recent years there has been
a herd of wild horses roaming
around causing much destruc-
tion to crops at my farm.

At one point they were a dan-
ger to air traffic into the Rock
Sound International airport as
they would find their way on to
the runway which places a dan-
ger to airplanes landing.

However there has been a
fence erected around the air-
port property thus these ani-
mals no longer pose a problem
to the airport.

These animals find them-

NEW CONDOS

Resario West
St. Albans Dr. New 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath,
3 Storey Townhouses. Gated Property.
Modern Kitchens & Well Appointed Interiors
$239,000 with only 5% deposit required.
Bank Financing Available
325-1325 454-2098 or 422-4489

selves on my farm several times
a week they have destroyed
what I estimate to be around
12000 dollars in crops the lat-
est incident occurred last night
which resulted in damage to the
irrigation system as well the loss
of about two acres of corn.

Arrangements had been
made in the past to have a Mr
Cartwright who is associated
with the Half-moon Cay devel-
opment to come in and capture
the animals and transport them
to that island to be used as part
of the attractions offered when
the visitors stop there on cruis-
es.
However this did not take
place because some of the local
winter residents and others
were concerned about the treat-
ment of the animals once they
had been captured.

Thus the situation still
remains.

The animals are roaming the
area freely causing a major
annoyance to myself and oth-
ers.

Iam sure they even pose dan-
ger to persons on the highway
as they cross the road in the
cover of darkness.

I have contacted several
agencies of the government
which include The Office of the
Prime Minister, The Depart-
ment of Agriculture, The

Department of Environmental
Health, The Agriculture Office
of South Eleuthera and The
Administrator for South
Eleuthera and nothing has been
done.

I have even contacted the
Bahamas Humane Society and
nothing done.

Tam at a point where if noth-
ing is done I am going to have
to cease from farming com-
pletely.

It has become completely
impossible to produce a suc-
cessful crop because of these
animals.

I feel like there is a serious
problem here as Bahamians we
are encouraged to farm, but
when we try things like this
makes it difficult to be success-
ful and no one seems to be con-
cerned with getting this prob-
lem solved.

I am asking those that have
the responsibility to please
come up with a plan to elimi-
nate this problem.

Thank you for publishing this
letter in your paper I hope that
this brings some light and
answers to this situation.

EUGENE CAREY
Tarpum Bay,
Eleuthera,
Bahamas.

March 3, 2009.

VILLAGE ROAD NEAR SHIRLEY STREET
Call Us at 394-0323/5 or 394-1377

NOW SELLING

Used Japanese Motor Scooters.
Direct from Japan.
Yamaha Jog, Honda Dio - 50cc/100cc

oF ‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA

‘02 SUZUKI XL-7

" Like New " never in an accident.
Drop in at Odessa Garden and
see our supply of Royal Readers
(Reproduction)
Grades 11, 111 and V.
Our stock of these books
always sell out.





Starting from $950.00

‘05 TOYOTA COROLLA
sales (2)
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA Sdr
» QUALITY22:

‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK




PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Abaco student wins Last remaining chimney stacks at

at Knights Spelling former BORCO plant demolished
Bee in Florida

YELENA Per-
saud from St
Francis de Sales
School in Marsh
Harbour, Abaco
took top honours
in the Grades 7
and 8 Division in
the Knights of
Columbus Annu-
al Spelling Bee
Competition in
Kissimmee, Flori-
da over the
weekend.

The young Per-
saud was runner-
up to Maya Fran-
cis in the recent
42nd Annual
Catholic Arch-
diocese Spelling
Bee Competition
in Nassau.

Maya, from
Xavier Lower
School in Nassau,
was unsuccessful
in her division in
the Florida com-
petition.

The two con-
testants, accom-
panied by a par-
ent and coach
and representa-
tives from the
Catholic Board of Educa-
tion and the Knights of
Columbus, were sponsored
by Knights of Columbus
Councils in the Bahamas
District.

District grand knight Gre-

Florida.



YELENA PERSAUD, from
St Francis de Sales
School in Marsh Har-
bour, Abaco, seen sec-
ond from the right, and
Kim Francis, right, pose
with grand knight of
Council 10415 Ken Kelly
at the recent 42nd Annu-
al Catholic Archdiocese
Spelling Bee Competition
in New Providence. Mr
Kelly, together with faith-
ful navigator John Davis,
accompanied the stu-
dents to Kissimmee,

Photo: Grechis
Public Relations,
Grand Bahama

competition.

Bahamas

dents

one-day

state of Florida.

in her division.

cis,” said Mr Christie.

gory Christie in }
congratulating the :
two entrants said }
that they contin- :
ued the outstand- ;
ing performances :
turned in by stu- }
dents from the :
Bahamas at this }

“Our knights :
throughout the
are }
please to have :
assisted these stu- i
in their :
opportunity to
compete in this }
event ;
among their peers }
from around the }

“We've had pre-
vious winners and ;
runners-up at this :
event and we’re }
extremely proud }
that our first ever
entrant from Aba- }
co was able to}
return this year as }
champion speller :

“T join with the :
Knights of Colum- }
bus from Councils ;
10415 and 11755 }
in New Providence, 10647 in }
Grand Bahama, and 12692 :
in North Eleuthera in cele- }
brating this accomplishment
with Miss Persaud, and the }
stellar efforts of Miss Fran- }

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 40-year land-
mark came down on Saturday
when the last remaining chimney
stacks at the former BORCO
plant were demolished, ending an
era of the oil refining industry and
signalling the beginning of a world-
class petroleum transshipment hub
on Grand Bahama.

Many turned out for the implo-
sion, which took place around
3.24pm when the first of three con-
crete stacks fell some 350 feet to
the ground in 13 seconds.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and students at nearby Lewis
Yard Primary School pushed the
button to detonate over 200
pounds of explosives arranged by
Cleveland Wrecking Company
and Dykon Explosives.

Before each blast, a loud siren
sounded to signal one minute to
count down. The second stack
came down at 3.42pm and the
third stack fell at 3.54 pm.

Guests

Invited guests and residents in
the nearby communities of Pin-
der’s Point, Lewis Yard, Hunters,
Mack Town and Seaco Town were
transported by bus to a designated
site some 1,000 feet away to wit-
ness the historic event.

Bleacher seating provided was
filled to capacity. Many persons
brought along their children, cam-
eras and hand-held video
recorders.

The dismantling of the refinery
began last year when the three
smaller steel stacks were demol-
ished.

T J Huizer, managing director at
Vopak Terminal Bahamas, said

ASSOCIATE DEGREE a oSna |

BUSINESS

BANRUNGS & FINANCE

“imam Be te po me

40 COUNTING MANAGEMENT

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

.2- BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
HUMAN RESOURCE MAMAGEMENT
JINT'L BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

. SUPERVISORY MAN AGEMENT

a
~~
—

| Call 324-7T7TO for registration and program details. ee
SUCCESS TRAINING COLLEGE, BERNARD RD, NASSAU.

Maximum Security
& Patrol Services

Supervisory
Training Program

Left to right sitting down: Valerie Sands, Estella Johnson, Maxine Anderson, Byron Rodgers,
Chairman & CEO Catherine Mcphee, Charmine Thompson & Donna Adderley.

Left to right standing: Charles Caroll, Bernadette Turnquest, Donald Saunders, Philip Felix,

Naomi Moss, Sandra Johnson, Chris Fawkes & Gaynell Stubbs.

On March 1st, 2009 - Supervisors and Management of Maximum Security & Patrol
Services Ltd had undergone an intense 3 weekend Training program. Each year, Officers
and Supervisors are encouraged to go back into the classroom to be re-trained on new
developments in the security arena to help broaden their perspective in knowing how to
properly exercise and assume responsibility for the client’s assets and personnel.

Officers were very receptive, supportive and thankful for such a program. Mr Chris Fawks,
Manager of Maximum Security stressed the importance of how Officers see themselves
in the roles they must emulate on a daily basis to ensure that our clients are the recipient
of a successful business continuity.

Mr Byron Rodgers, Chairman and CEO, applauded the efforts of each of the graduating
Supervisors and was also very encouraged to witness the successful fruition of such a lengthy
intense program. He is very proud of his officers.





WATCHING ONE of the chimney
stacks fall.

the falling of the taller concrete
stack units symbolises the end of
what once was the old BORCO
refinery.

“The old BORCO refinery was
probably one of the most impor-
tant companies to come to Grand
Bahama and help drive develop-
ment of industry on the island, and
the chimney stacks were a symbol
of that development and could be
seen from miles away,” he said.

Although the stacks provided
bearing and direction to people
from the air, sea, and land, Mr
Huizer said they were very old
and not being used.

“As you know, the refinery was
closed down in 1985 - over 20
years ago - and since then BOR-
CO has basically been a company

in decline going from several sig-
nificant downsizing operations,
and investment in people and
infrastructure was limited to bare
minimum.

“The shareholders of First
Reserve and Vopak recognised
the potential and made a signifi-
cant investment to acquire what
was a Starving company and turn it
around,” said Huizer.

The companies bought the
BORCO plant last April, begin-
ning major refurbishment to
restore the existing 19-million bar-
rel oil facility.

The removal of the stacks has
freed up space for construction of
new tanks that will increase the
current storage capacity to 22 mil-
lion barrels by October.

Expansion

Vopak is also in the process of
beginning a major expansion pro-
ject estimated between $250 to
$300 million called the Greenfield
Expansion Project, which involves
construction of a new oil storage
facility on acres of undeveloped
land near BORCO.

Mr Huizer believes that Grand
Bahama is an ideal location to
become a world-class logistic hub.

“Today symbolises the turning
of the page 1n our history and for-
tune of our county and company.
I firmly believe we are a diamond
in the rough. Our location here in
Grand Bahama is at the crossroad
of many trade flows around the
world.

“We are investing significant
money to transform the old BOR-
CO and become one of the largest
petroleum transshipment hubs in
the world, said Mr Huizer.

He noted that Vopak has

tremendous impact on the global
flow of oil and petroleum, indi-
cating that the nation of Puerto
Rico depends on fuel that is stored
at the terminal in Freeport.

“Three quarters of the popula-
tion of that whole nation depend
on fuel that is supplied from these
parts. If we do not do our job
properly the people of the country
will be without electricity and light.

“The fuel used by the Grand
Bahama Power Company is also
stored in our tanks so we have a
big impact here as well.”

Comparing Saturday’s event to
that of the mythical Phoenix, Mr
Huizer said the BORCO plant will
emerge more glorious than ever.

Vopak is also building a strong
professional team in Freeport, he
said.

However, he revealed that the
company also needed to bring in a
number of expatriates and four
contractors on temporary basis to
meet its goals.

He explained that the skills and
knowledge brought by the expa-
triates are being transferred to its
professional staff, which is also
being sent off for training at its
terminal overseas in the Vopak
network.

Mr Huizer said Freeport’s econ-
omy is also benefiting because
expatriates and foreign contrac-
tors are costly and the money for
work permits, housing, food, etc,
goes back into the community.

“The knowledge and skills they
bring are indispensable for our
progress, and, in fact, not having
them available is costing us signif-
icant revenue. But we also see
these expatriate positions as an
essential part of the investment
we are making in our own
Bahamian staff,” he said.

Minister: cancer one of most dreaded
and prolific illnesses in the Bahamas

m By MATT MAURA

One measure is the availability of cancer-care

Bahamas Information Services

HEALTH Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said that
cancer has become “one of the most dreaded and
prolific illnesses” in the Bahamas — the burden of
which extends far beyond the cancer victim or sur-
vivor to families and friends.

Addressing the opening session of the third annu-
al Caribbean Association of Oncology and Hema-
tology Conference, Dr Minnis said World Health
Organisation officials predict a 50 per cent
rise in cancers by 2020 due largely to lifestyle
factors.

Cancer rates in developing countries are pro-
gressively approaching those in industrialised nations
due largely to an increase in the average age of pop-
ulations, the control of other diseases and the
increase in the use of tobacco products, he noted.

Dr Minnis said cancer, with its high prevalence
and mortality rate, continues to rank among the
world’s deadliest and most costly diseases. “It is no
secret that heart disease and cancer are the leading
causes of death in The Bahamas,” he added.

The minister told delegates that the Ministry of
Health, in conjunction with the Department of Pub-
lic Health and the Public Hospitals Authority, has
implemented a number of strategies designed to
help stem the increase in cancers in The Bahamas.

services at the state-owned Princess Margaret Hos-
pital that consist of therapeutic modalities for inpa-
tient and outpatient care.

Other services include diagnostic imaging, surgery,
cytology, hematology, pathology, surveillance, pedi-
atric, oncology, gynaecological oncology, pharmacy
and counselling.

Dr Minnis said healthcare officials also commis-
sioned a state-of-the-art Oncology Centre on Janu-
ary 15, 2009, that is equipped with modern tech-
nology and which will offer the “best quality care” to
cancer patients.

“Bridging the gap from patient to cure must be
done through effective patient education, devoting
resources to delivering quality, safe, cost-effective,
socially responsible and compassionate healthcare
services in a caring environment (that) puts patients
first,” Dr Minnis said.

“The physicians and our entire disciplinary team
work together with patients and their families to
ascertain what the best course of treatment and/or
action,” Dr. Minnis added.

The Ministry of Health has also implemented a
Healthy Lifestyles Programme that is geared towards
raising public awareness to the importance of healthy
living, and has launched an initiative geared towards
preventative healthcare as opposed to curative
healthcare.

sale

Sale Begins March 2nd, 2009



Marathon Mall ¢ 393-4155 ¢ Mon-Fri 10am-8pm e Sat 10am-9pm
All major credit cards accepted. Sorry no debit cards accepted.
THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



BNT’s bird
monitoring
workshop

THE Bahamas National Trust hosted partici-
pants from 18 West Indian islands and two
Caribbean rim countries at the Retreat Garden
and New Providence National Parks in the week
of February 19 —- 23. The participants were
attending the Society for the Conservation and
Study of Caribbean Birds (SCSCB) five-day bird
monitoring training workshop.

The participants included executive directors of
non-government organisations in charge of pro-
tected areas; ornithologists and conservation biol-
ogists employed by governments and non-gov-
ernment organisations; protected area wardens,
and volunteers.

Interest

All shared a common interest in learning mon-
itoring methodologies and how to use the results
from monitoring to more effectively conserve
and manage migratory and resident bird species.

“We were very excited at this training oppor-
tunity for BNT wardens”, said Lynn Gape, deputy
executive director of the Trust.

Participating for the Trust were Randolph Bur-
rows and Apollo Butler (New Providence), Hen-
ry Nixon (Inagua), Prescott Gay (Grand Bahama)
and David Knowles (Abaco).

Also participating for the Bahamas was Leno
Davis of the Nature Conservancy

The eight facilitators for the workshop includ-
ed Floyd Hayes, professor at PacificCollege, Cal-
ifornia; Frank Rivera-Milan of the US Fish and
Wildlife Service, Washington, DC; Geoff Welch
of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds,
UK; Jeff Gerbracht of Cornell Laboratory of
Ornithology, New York; John Alexander, exec-
utive director of the Klamath Bird Observatory,
Oregon; Arne Lesterhuis of Wetlands Interna-
tional, Buenos Aires; Ann Haynes-Sutton, mon-
itoring coordinator of SCSCB, Jamaica, and Lisa
Sorenson, president of SCSCB, Boston).

The workshop included a complete introduc-
tion to designing, implementing, analysing and
reporting basic bird monitoring programmes in
the region. With the assistance of the team of
facilitators and other experts in the field, SCSCB
is developing simple standard protocols for mon-
itoring landbirds, wetland birds, seabirds and
shorebirds and their habitats.

Governor General
atliresses issues
of the elderly

GOVERNOR General
Arthur Hanna addressed
the concerns of older per-
sons in the Bahamian com-
munity while speaking to
the National Council of
Older Persons at a lun-
cheon and variety show
held at Montague Gardens
last weekend.

He commended the “old-
er persons” for remaining
active in the community
despite the limitations of
the aging process.

He recognised the recent
change in leadership within
the Council and congratu- 7
lated Mary Sweetnum and 7



Patrick Gomez on their
new posts as co-chairper-
sons of the Council.

The Governor General
said the new leadership
offers opportunities for
international exchange in
talent and culture, for both
old and young as presented
in the variety show at the
luncheon.

Talent

He said that the overall
assumption that older per-
sons are decrepit and
unaware of the current
times is false and should
not be applied to those
who have contributed time,
effort and talent to the
development of the coun-
try.

The Governor General
also commented on the
rush of people to register
their elderly parents into
Sandlilands Geriatric
Ward because they cannot
find time to look after
them.

He told the audience that
most people are reluctant
to leave their homes to
enter an institutionalised
facility, so the government
responded by building
homes to care for the
elderly in areas close to
where they lived.

The Governor General
said it is for this reason
that every settlement in
the Family Islands has a
post office, even if it is
only for two people living
in that settlement.

ae
US)

Uae ta
PHONE: 322-2157



pa

Monday to Saturday 10am to 5pm _ «¢ Charlotte Street « P.O. Box N-4845, Nassau, Bahamas
242-322-4862 ¢ email: sales@coinrealm.com

WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS at Harrold and Wil-
son Pond National Park.

These were presented and tested during field
sessions at the workshop. The participants com-
mitted to share their experiences and train others
in their islands.

To facilitate this process, all the materials from
the workshop will be made available online, and
a manual “Caribbean Birdwatch - How to design
and implement a bird monitoring programme in
the Caribbean” will be produced.

At the end of the workshop participants and
presenters agreed that the initiative had been an
overwhelming success and pledged to continue to
work to promote its objectives.

“We were very pleased with the enthusiasm
and skills exhibited by all the participants,” said
Dr Sorenson, president of the SCSCB.

“Partnering with the BNT to host the workshop
made things easy to organise as their wardens,
staff and volunteers were very helpful in assisting
with logistics.

“We were very impressed with the work that
has been done at Harrold and Wilson’s Pond
National Park, which is an important bird
area, and was one of the sites we selected for
our morning monitoring exercises,” Dr Soren-
son said.

The workshop was the main output of a project
called “Long-term Bird Monitoring in the
Caribbean — Why, What, Where and How?”
which is being funded by the Organisation of
American States (OAS) through the Western
Hemisphere Migratory Species Initiative (WHM-
SI).

The goal of this project is to establish a
Caribbean partnership to promote migratory bird
monitoring as a means to improve science-based
conservation planning and adaptive management
of birds in the region.

vv’
Cut. a ae
——*

cc yee ia

a
wes

tS

—_



&

CHECK OUT THIS GREAT DEAL!

PAUL it Fy
merece tse

ALT

‘Honda Accord «Honda Civic ‘Honda CRV «Nissan Cefiro «Nissan Sunny
‘Mitsubishi Galant «Toyota Avalon «Toyota Camry «Toyota Corolla
‘Toyota Lexus «Toyota Noah «Toyota Rav-4 «Toyota Regius «Toyota Windom

and many more to choose from

2005/06 30 SEATER
$24,900.00

AVAILABLE
FOR SHORT TERM LEASE

pp)
(242) 341-2249

FAX: (242) 361-1136
Visit our Website: www.autohl.com



IT’S NICE TO HAVE A CHOICE...

_<@ © we've gotit

<2

— Custom

COMPUTERS LIMITED

4 Stores at Cable Beach & East Bay St.»
242.396.1101 © 242.396.1100

www. CLstomcomputers.bs
solutions(@customvcomputers.bs

NOW IN TWO LOCATIONS!

Half-Price SALE

on all ttems on display

DAYS
ONLY

Friday 13th March
SPEC h me eDCaN

* www.coinrealm.net


PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





‘Tax haven’ jurisdictions —
sitting ducks and scapegoats

a .
f
= “= ele

WORLD VIEW

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

IT IS a classic case of
“passing the buck”, but
Caribbean jurisdictions that
offer offshore financial ser-
vices will be the victims of
lax regulation by the OECD
countries — the UK and US
in particular.

Britain’s Prime Minister,
Gordon Brown, and the US
Senate and Congress have
both now shown their inten-
tion to close down offshore
financial services which they
call “tax havens.”

Speaking on March 4th to
the US Congress Brown
asked: “'But how much safer
would everybody's savings
be if the whole world finally
came together to outlaw
shadow banking systems and
outlaw offshore tax havens?”
Implicit in what he said is
that so-called “tax havens”
are a threat to people’s sav-
ings even though it is poor



banking and investment
practices and inefficient reg-
ulation in the US and UK in
particular that led to the pre-
sent global financial crisis.

So, Mr Brown has passed
the buck and has fingered
jurisdictions that offer off-
shore financial services as
the culprits.

Equally, as I predicted
some weeks ago, the “Stop
the Tax Havens Abuse Act”
introduced in the US Senate
two years ago by then Sena-
tor Barack Obama and Sen-
ator Carl Levin, was rein-
troduced in the US Congress
the day before Brown made
his statement.

I had hoped that the rein-
troduced Act would have
removed the names of coun-
tries that were listed as “tax
havens.” No such luck. Not
only did the Act retain all
the countries, it added three
new very onerous sections
for liability. The intention is
clear — if banks and other
financial institutions in these
jurisdictions are going to
continue to operate, they
will do so only at great



“It is a curious kind of
international democracy that
allows rules and punishment to be
created by a few — and imposed
on the many — simply because
the few have the power to do so.”



Fai

@ SIR Ronald Sanders

expense. Few will be able to
afford the additional costs
of compliance.

The Caribbean jurisdic-
tions named in the US Act
are: Anguilla, Antigua and
Barbuda, Bahamas, Barba-
dos, Belize, Bermuda,
British Virgin Islands, Cay-
man Islands, Dominica,
Grenada, St Kitts-Nevis, St
Lucia, St Vincent & The
Grenadines and Turks and
Caicos.

When Jamaica, Trinidad
and Tobago and Guyana
begin their international
financial services for which
they have all legislated, they
can expect to join the list.

It seems irrelevant to the
US Congress that some of
these countries have Tax
Information Exchange
Agreements (TIEAS) with
the United States under
which the US can request —
and are obliged to receive
information — concerning tax
inquiries. To my certain
knowledge Antigua and Bar-
buda, Barbados and the
British Virgin Islands have
such agreements. Others
may also have.

But, if the US Act is

AW WUUUOWS

OPEN CALL FOR A YOUTH MIX TALENT

Dance Judge
on the T.V. Show

America’s Best Dance Crew

March 11-13,2009,
Wednesday - Friday 3PM - 9PM
March 14, 2009,
Saturday 12PM - 9PM

NATIONAL CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

For More Information Contact 393-2884
Dance (Hip-Hop, Folk, Praise-Gospel, Performing Arts) Voice (Rap, RMB & Folk)

Ages 6-21yrs & College Students
Audition Registration Fee- $5.00 Per Person

Harbour Bay
HALF IS

50.% OFF

The other half
Is 15.% OFF

Ask about Our
Gift with
Purchase



Seve

Is cutting the store in half

ies
|
>



Susan Walsh/AP

BRITISH PRIME MINISTER Gordon Brown addresses a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in
Washington , Wednesday, March 4, 2009. Vice President Joe Biden and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of

Calif. applaud at rear.

passed in its present form, it
seems that TIEA is not
enough and the US Treasury
Secretary will be given
extreme powers to act
against jurisdictions that he
deems to have “ineffective
information exchange prac-
tices.”

Jurisdictions

The G20 countries — none
of which are jurisdictions
considered as “tax havens”
— will meet in London on
April 2nd and on their agen-
da is the matter of “tax
havens.” The discussion and
its conclusions will take
place without the benefit of
any of the affected jurisdic-
tions at the table. Among
the missing “tax havens” will
be all those I have named
earlier from the Caribbean
plus Switzerland, Luxem-
bourg, Singapore, Malta,
Cyprus, Panama, Hong
Kong and a few others in
Europe and the Pacific.

It is a curious kind of
international democracy that
allows rules and punishment
to be created by a few —
and imposed on the many —
simply because the few have
the power to do so.

It is even worse that the
few are yet to admit that it is
lax supervision and regula-
tion in their own jurisdic-
tions that has caused the
present global financial cri-
sis. They are also yet to
demonstrate that they are
taking effective action with-
in their own systems to cor-
rect and improve their defi-
ciencies.

In his speech to the US

Extra 10% off for

Privilege Cards &

Corporate Partners



Congress, Brown said, “Let
us agree in our G20 summit
in London in April rules and
standards for proper
accountability, transparen-
cy, and reward that will
mean an end to the excesses
and will apply to every bank,
everywhere, all the time.”

No one would quarrel
with that position. Indeed,
in light of two events in the
Caribbean - surrounding
CLICO in Trinidad and
Tobago and holdings of R
Allen Stanford —- there
would be few who would not
agree wholeheartedly with
the need to tighten up rules
for banks. But, Mr Brown
did not mention regulation
which is sorely in need of
improvement in Britain and
the US. Instead, he focused
on “outlawing” tax havens.

During the week all this
was taking place, along with
three other persons, I was
asked by a publication in
Washington, Inter-American
Dialogue, whether the civil
complaint by the US Secu-
rities and Exchange Com-
mission against Stanford
“shows a need for stricter
regulation of financial ser-
vices companies in the
Caribbean? The following
was my published reply:

“The matter of the SEC
prosecuting a civil suit for
alleged fraud against R
Allen Stanford points to the
absolute need for stricter
regulation not only in
Antigua and Barbuda but
also in the United States.
Court documents about this
matter claim that the alleged
fraud relates to the sale of
products by the Stanford
International Bank (SIB) in
Antigua and by the Stanford
Financial Group in Houston.
The regulators in both juris-
dictions are, therefore, cul-
pable.

“While the smallness of
its resources does not
absolve the Antigua regula-
tors of responsibility, the
vastness of the resources
available to the US regula-
tors condemns their failure

to recognise the danger sig-
nals in the operations at a
much earlier stage. The
Stanford allegation should
not be used to stain
Caribbean regulators while
ignoring the fact that defi-
ciencies also existed in the
US system.

“No Caribbean jurisdic-
tion should wish to remain
in the business of hosting
companies that offer finan-
cial services without strong,
relevant and appropriate leg-
islation and supervision that
protects the interests of cus-
tomers. In this regard, inde-
pendent statutory bodies
that are free of political
interference and are over-
seen by bipartisan commit-
tees drawn from the legisla-
ture should be established
to raise their credibility and
give confidence to domestic
and international clients”.

Regulation

My point was that the
alleged Stanford fraud
occurred as much in the US
as it did in Antigua and Bar-
buda. So, while there is a
need for stricter and fearless
regulation of financial ser-
vices in the Caribbean, there
is also such a need in the US.

Unfortunately, while the
G20 meets in April to make
their pronouncement, the so-
called “tax haven” countries
have made no attempt to
meet to devise an appropri-
ate response.

The countries of the
Caribbean Community and
Common market (CARI-
COM) have no excuse for
not doing so, and if there
any among them who feel
that they are capable of
stopping this juggernaut
alone, they should think
again. Caribbean countries
should act on this now and
together or see their off-
shore financial services with-
er.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 9



‘Govt committed’ to bolstering

national security initiatives

Patrick Hanna/BIS

MINISTER OF HEALTH Hubert Minnis cuts the ceremonial ribbon at the
re-commissioning ceremony of an ambulance presented to the Min-
istry of Health in Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera on Sunday, March 1. Looking on
is nursing officer for South Eleuthera Whelma Dorsett.

Residents of South
Eleuthera to embark on
CPR training programme

@ By LLONELLA GILBERT



TARPUM BAY, Eleuthera — Minister of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis applauded the residents of South Eleuthera for planning
to embark on a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and }

first aid training programme.

Speaking at the recent South Eleuthera re-commissioning of }
an ambulance, Dr Minnis emphasised the importance for all }
Bahamians to know how to perform first aid or CPR in order }
to stabilise individuals who have suffered an illness or are }

injured in a motor vehicle accident.

“I think that is a great and excellent idea for you to embark }
upon because if the community of South Eleuthera is truly CPR }
trained, imagine the message you would send out to not only :
the Bahamas, but to the rest of the world and the message you :

would send out to tourists,” Dr Minnis said.

“Before individuals visit a particular country or island, two
things play an important role - health and crime. If they are con- i
vinced that each and every one of you understands and could :

perform CPR, then you would be better than any hospital.”

“I would hope that other communities in our Bahamas }
would follow suit because you are truly leading us into a new }

direction of healthcare,” Dr Minnis said.

“You are truly preparing this community for the future and
I will learn from you today and ensure that the Bahamas is pre- :

pared for the future in following suit.”

He also promised that the residents would receive help from
the government as they embark on their training programmes :
and plans to educate students and each other about healthy liv- ;

ing and illness prevention.

Dr Minnis commended the local and winter residents along }
with corporate sponsors who under the guidance of the South ;
Eleuthera Emergency Partners (SEEP) organisation, raised :
funds to refurbish the five-year-old ambulance and purchase a }

fire truck for use in the community.

SEEP was established after a group of local citizens came
together to discuss ways to increase the support given to the fire j

and medical services on the island.

m@ By MATT MAURA

THE government of the
Bahamas remains fully com-
mitted to participating in crime-
fighting cooperative initiatives
designed to enhance national
and regional security, Minister
of National Security Tommy
Turnquest told regional law
enforcement officials on
Wednesday.

Addressing the opening ses-
sion of the 25th Tradewinds
conference, Mr Turnquest said
Operation Tradewinds has not
only enhanced the collective
capacity of regional forces to
counter transnational and secu-
rity threats both at the national
and regional levels, but has also
facilitated the standardisation
of the region’s approach to the
security issues it faces such as
illicit gun and drug trafficking,
illegal human smuggling and
other transnational crimes.

The National Security Min-
ister said there are a number of
factors that contribute to
transnational crimes within
small-island states in the region.
Two of those, he noted, are the
region’s location between Cen-
tral and South America which is
the source of “significant illicit
transnational activities”, and its
location between North Amer-
ica and Europe which are the
targets of much of those illicit
activities.

Mr Turnquest added that oth-
er contributors to ongoing
transnational crimes include the
fact that regional countries are,
for the most part, island and
archipelagic states that all have
porous sea and land borders,
and have limited financial and
human resources and assets to
counter transnational crime.

It is therefore necessary that
regional countries continue to
cooperate in initiatives such as
Operation Tradewinds and oth-
er conferences at the regional
and hemispheric levels that deal
with those threats as the relate
to transnational crime and ter-
rorism, he noted.

“Drugs and arms trafficking,
illegal immigration, migrant
smuggling, trafficking in per-

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for provision of General Insurance
Services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:

on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 690/09

ABOVE: DELEGATES from the 16
countries participating in the
Tradewinds 2009 Conference on
Wednesday March 4, 2009. Par-
ticipating countries include Bar-
bados, Belize, Dominica, Domini-
can Republic, Grenada, Guyana,
Haiti, Jamaica, St Kitts and Nevis,
St Lucia, St Vincent and the
Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad
and Tobago, United Kingdom,
United States of America and
host country the Bahamas.

sons and vulnerability to inter-
national terrorism, head a dis-
turbing list of the challenges fac-
ing regional countries with
regards to crime and criminali-
ty,” Mr Turnquest said.

“The Bahamas can attest to
this. For decades now it has
been contending with the illicit
transit of drugs and significant
illegal immigration. These two
illicit activities have created a
platform for the other illegal
activity we are experiencing,
particularly the illicit traffick-
ing in small arms,” Mr Turn-
quest added.

Mr Turnquest said the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas has
undertaken a number of “deci-
sive and ongoing initiatives” to
counter transnational crime by
“systematically making its law
enforcement presence felt
throughout the archipelago.”

He told delegates from 16



ABOVE: Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest addresses dele-
gates attending Tradewinds 2009
which opened Wednesday, March 4,
2009 in New Providence at the Wyn-



countries participating in
Tradewinds 2009 that the Roy-
al Bahamas Defence Force
Base at Inagua has been
strengthened to facilitate cov-
erage of the southern Bahamas,
while a new base has been
established at Grand Bahama
to cover the northern Bahamas.

“At great cost to our nation-
al accounts, we are progressing
with the acquisition of addi-
tional craft for our Defence
Force and will soon take deliv-
ery of two new aircraft for
transport and surveillance,” Mr
Turnquest said.

Break away from the ordinary

dham Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino.

“Our assets base has also
been further strengthened by
the donation of four Interceptor
Vessels donated under the
Enduring Friendship Pro-
gramme, for which we express
our sincere appreciation to the
United States of America.”

Mr Turnquest said the focus
of Tradewinds 2009 — maritime
interdiction — is “critical and
timely” and is in line with the
government of the Bahamas’
determination that “every effort
should be made to prevent a
significant upsurge in drug traf-
ficking in the Caribbean.”

and discover how to experience
life to the fullest. The Isuzu
D-MAX is the ultimate
multi-purpose pick-up truck
which enables you to drive
through tough roads and load
a variety of cargoes. It is
Specially designed to be
powerful, stylish and highly
functional. The Isuzu 1-MAX
iS one tough vehicle that

& will never let you down!

All Risks General Insurance
(a) Commercial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents); and
(b) Computers, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment

Tender No. 691/09
Motor Insurance - Commercial & Private Vehicles

Tender No. 692/09
Accident Insurance - Money & Burglary

Tender No. 693/09
Liability Insurance - Personal & Public

Tender No. 694/09
Professional Indemnity
[Officers, Directors, Professional Staff, Engineers,
Accountants, Attorneys]

Tender No. 695/09

Marine Insurance le f a ai

das eC e
oe ee ed aa a chee ih

Wulff Road, FO, Box WH 9123, Nassau. The Bahamas © Fax: 323.4667

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163


PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS





























nothing like
cotton candy.



Thousands flock to

RED CROSS

HOUSANDS
of Bahamians
flocked to the
gardens of
Government House on Sat-
urday to attend the 67th
annual Red Cross Fair — the
major fundraising event for
the Bahamas Red Cross
Society.
The co-chairpersons of

this annual fair, Pauline



Felipe
Allen-Dean and Brendon i

Watson, along with the Major/

fair’s committee members, j

once again organised a Tri bu ne staff
fun-filled family event.



GOING up a slide.

y
Medical Association of the
Bahamas i. me 24 |

37 Annual Conference 2009

Formal Opening Night Session I:

A FREE PUBLIC LECTURE



2009 Spectra5/CERATO

KIA MOTORS _—



The Power to Surprise”

Presenter
Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter pc, Mp, MBA, FACR, FACRO,
FAAMA

pbirector-General and CEO of the McGill University Health Cente
Councillor Privy Council of Canada
Montreal, Canada.

Wednesday, March, 11 2009, 6:30 PM
British Colonial Hilton Hotel

in Affordable Compact Wagons

MAB Conference: March 11" — 13"

The Spectras/CERATO has a sporty attitude with ita aport-
tuned suspension, strut tower bar, and fully independent
Buapension. It can seat up ta five occupants. It is powered by a
1.6-litear four-cylinder that ia mated to a standard four-speed
automatic traneamlasion. Alr Gonditlon, PWR Windows, PWR
Door Locks, CD Radio, Two 4-Door Sedan Models including the
5-BDoor Modal.

Sessions II-IV Thursday 12°: 8:30pm — 7:00pm

Sessions V-VIII Friday 13": 8:30am — 7:00pm ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED On co hacurwcalT sank

MOMAE ALT BARK
Thompson Bhd, « Oakes Field
#289 Will Rood
PO. Bax Med @th 242.326.6377" 242.326.0305 SUA
b (a2) ead? 22] FOS ®. sanpindcoralwave.com BAGKERS & AGENTS LTR
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Dr Michael Darville

fills PLP Senate sal
FROM page one

Canada.

Dr Darville, 48, is married
to Susie Darville. The couple :
have two sons together. He is }
not to be confused with Dr }
Michael Darville, who is :
employed at Doctors Hospital :

in New Providence.
Ms Bridgewater, who was

charged with abetment to ;
extort and conspiracy to extort :
$25 million from Hollywood
actor John Travolta, officially :
resigned from the Senate on

January 24.

She said she tendered her
resignation so as to fully dedi- }
cate her resources and energies
to fight the charges brought }

against her.

At the time, Mr Christie said

he regretted the turn of events,

but understood her course of :

action.

Initially, the PLP leader said
he intended to announce a :
replacement within two weeks }
of Ms Bridgewater’s stepping

down.

The former prime minister i
confirmed that he always }
intended for another Grand }
Bahama resident to take the }
seat. He said he had received :
about six recommendations for i

the post.

Former minister's
husiness anid home.
are broken into

FROM page one

store to find out for himself
what had happened.
Fortunately, Mr Miller said,
he had noticed earlier that ee
that someone had ae
with a door at his home and
reported the matter to police.

Thinking back on this event ;
as he was travelling to Harrold }
Road, Mr Miller phoned police
at Elizabeth Estates station and }
asked them to drive by his :
home as he felt the break-in at }
his store was a distraction to }

get him out of the house.
This hunch, Mr Miller said,

paid off as he discovered upon
returning to his Winton Estates }
home that his bedroom door }
had been prised ajar andsome
$500 was stolen from his night-

stand.

to search the place.

The former Blue Hills MP
said he has since upgraded the }
“in and around” his }

security
home.

excellent job.”

Four-year-old
girl dies in blaze
FROM page one

could have seen,"
said.

Mounds of charcoal, a
small burnt-out stove anda :
portable propane burner ;

were all that was left at the
scene yesterday as local fire-
fighters revisited the scene
with arson investigators
from the US Marine Corps.
The tragedy is the first
fire-related casualty in New
Providence this year.

Mr Miller said the burglars i
must have been frightened :
away by police as it was obvi- }
ous from the way things were }
thrown about his home that }
they did not have a lot of time :

“TI want to thank the police }
for their quick and excellent }
response to this incident,” Mr
Miller said. “I just want to say }
thank you on behalf of my fam- }
ily and myself. They did an }

the man

PM vows that govt will
‘reduce unemployment

FROM page one

assurance to Bahamians, par-
ticularly in Grand Bahama,
where the unemployment rate
has jumped to 14.6.

“We are surrounded by bad
news from time to time, and
you heard yesterday that the
unemployment rate in Grand
Bahama is now nearly what it
was in 1992 when I came to
office for the first time.

“And so I want to assure
Grand Bahama that we have
been there before, we did it
before, and we will do it
again,” said the prime minis-
ter.

Mr Ingraham promised that
the FNM government will
cause the Grand Bahama
economy to be restored in as
short a time as possible.

He stressed that the ship-
yard facility is one of several
major investments on the
island that continue to pro-
vide significant benefit to the
Freeport economy.

The prime minister com-
mended Royal Caribbean and
Carnival Corporation for their
investment in the shipyard.

“Tam very pleased that the
owners of Royal Caribbean
and the owners of Carnival
decided to take a chance ona
substantial investment in our
country, and especially at a
time when there were options
available to go elsewhere,” Mr
Ingraham said.

The new dry dock, which
was acquired from France, is
the third for the shipyard. It is
one of the largest in the world,
spanning some 310 metres in
length and 54 metres in width.
It can accommodate vessels
weighing up to 55,000 tonnes.

The Grand Bahama Port
Authority owns a 20 per cent
stake in the shipyard, which
opened in January, 1999.

Mr Ingraham recalled how
the late Port Authority chair-
man Edward St George was
a major proponent for the
facility.

“The only regret I have this

morning is that Edward St
George...is not here this
morning. He pushed very hard
for this facility and for the port
to begin to realise its original
purpose which was to attract
facilities such as this, such as
Hutchison’s container facili-
ty, such as Bradford Marine
and the harbour in Freeport.”

Mr Ingraham noted that the
shipyard is the only invest-
ment in the Bahamas where
there are more non-Bahami-
ans employed than Bahami-
ans.

Despite this, he stated that
the large expatriate workforce
has benefited the economy of
Grand Bahama and the
Bahamas.

“We have never dreamt of
such a thing and so many have
not overcome that fear yet,
but I think even the doubters
are now beginning to come to
terms with the reality that it is
the most beneficial for the
economy of Grand Bahama
and for the economy of the
Bahamas because not only has

Global economy ‘to
shrink for first time
since World War II’

FROM page one

did not need to reassess its pro-
jections for 2009 as it was already
operating on the prospect of a
global downturn for “sometime
now”.

According to the New York
Times, until now even the most
pessimistic of forecasters had pre-
dicted that the global economy
would report “a tiny expansion”.

In countries such as China,
however, even a modest growth
rate of five per cent would be
classified as a “disastrous slow-
down”, given the enormous pres-
sure there to create jobs for its
rural population.

As a lending institution that
provides financial and technical
assistance to developing countries
for roads, schools, and other
infrastructural projects, the World
Bank’s Global Economic
Prospects for 2009 said that world
trade volumes are projected to
contract 2.1 per cent in 2009, with
developing countries set to see a
“big drop” in their exports.

“Tighter credit conditions and
increased uncertainty are expect-
ed to see investment growth in
both developing and high-income
countries slow in 2009 - actually
falling 1.3 per cent in developed
countries and rising by only 3.5
per cent in developing countries
versus 13 per cent in 2007,” the
report read.

According to Uri Dadush,
director of the World Bank’s
Development Prospects Group,
“policy-makers in developing
countries should monitor their
banking sectors carefully and be
prepared to enlist external sup-
port to shore up currencies and
banking systems.

“Given the expected decline in
global trade, both developed and
developing countries need to



Zhivargo Laing

resist the temptation to resort to
protectionism, which would only
prolong and deepen the crisis,”
he said.

The report, released on Sun-
day, warned that the financial dis-
ruptions are all but certain to
overwhelm the ability of institu-
tions like itself and the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF) to
provide a buffer. Therefore it
highlighted the need for wealthy
governments to create a “vulner-
ability fund” and set aside a frac-
tion of what they spend on stim-
ulating their own economies for
assisting others.

Mr Laing pointed out, howev-
er, that the Bahamas is a not one
of the 185 countries receiving reg-
ular assistance from the World
Bank and as such would not be
hurt by its current limitations to
provide funding.

The last programme for which
the Bahamas received World
Bank assistance was the Technical
and Vocational Training Project
in 1988.

At a value of $10 million, this
project was approved two years
before the New Providence Island
Water Supply and Sewerage

$ SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE ¢

RM FRAME

WINDOWS

Rehabilitation Project, another
$10 million investment by the
World Bank.

“The point that the World
Bank is making is that many of
the least developed countries that
rely on their support will see a
shrinkage,” Mr Laing added.

“But we are not under any
IMF programme or World Bank
programmes at this time,” he
said.

On Friday, an interim Labour
Force Survey conducted by the
Department of Statistics revealed
that the unemployment rate for
both New Providence and Grand
Bahama reached double-digit fig-
ures - 12.1 per cent for New Prov-
idence and 14.6 per cent for
Grand Bahama.

Prime Minister and Minister of
Finance Hubert Ingraham
explained the need for the interim
survey in his statement to Parlia-
ment on the government’s
2008/2009 mid-year budget, point-
ing out that “the usual tracking of
unemployment rates on an annu-
al basis will not assist in better
informing our interventions to
address job losses.”

However, the prime minister
has since assured the country that
the government is doing all it can
to turn these unemployment
numbers around.

this facility lived up to what it
said it would do, it continues
to provide additional training
for Bahamians and additional
skills being had by many as a
result of transfer of skills that
is taking place as a result of
persons who come in from
time to time,” he said.

With the current downturn
in tourism, Prime Minister
Ingraham stressed that the
shipyard is an industry that
adds to the diversification of
the Bahamian economy.

He said it is a booming busi-
ness because cruise ships still
continue to move many pas-
sengers and cruise lines con-
tinue to build more ships that
require ship care, repairs and
maintenance.

“We here in the Bahamas
are fully cognizant of another

reality and that is this ship-
yard is mobile. It can be
picked up and taken away any
day.

“The first dock took over
nine months to come here
and...so having had these
docks towed to the Bahamas
we simply want to keep them
here in the Bahamas and we
want to keep them in a way
to maximise benefit for our
people and our economy.”

Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch, chair-
man and CEO of Grand
Bahama Shipyard, said the
shipyard services 70 per
cent of cruise ships in the
region. Mr Richard Fair,
chairman and CEO of Royal
Caribbean, said the shipyard
has recorded its milestone
with nine ships at the facility
at one time.







ln Loki ’ Memor










he late

"MRS ANNIE B. RALSTON |

Sunrise: October 16th, 1939
Sunset: March Sth, 2004

Dear Nein,











|
Grace was in all your steps ‘
and your generosity abound..

We can

never be separated as God has left me y

with memories to held and lowe that

doesn't pass away.





Whatever [im

doing and wherever go, my thoughts

are lai vs Ww ith VOU,





[miss vou dearly

“Youth fades; lave droaps; the leaves
of friendship fall. A Mother's secret
hope outlives them all”







‘Your loving daughter Kyla'











& nee 2009

Arawals Cay, » saat urday March 14 from Noon until 6:00 PM

All owners af vehicles 20) years ald and other
Special Interest vehicles are invited to pairticrpanie.

Registration Fee only $35.00)

5b pprizes for Peaple aC boice We inners

Ra file prizes

Nassau's Leading Manufacturer of Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Doors

MARCH MADNESS
$$$ $ALE $$$

HUGE DISCOUNTS ON ALL ORDERS
PLACED DURING THE MONTH OF MARCH

ee rik

Call for your FREE quote or

Come visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau,

TEL: 1-242-325-6633
FAX: 1-242-325-6638

SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE

-
-
$
$
-
$
-
-
-
-
$
$



Art Contest for Children
Surprive Entertaiament!!
Lote of Fun for the Whale Family

Steak & Chicken Dinners $10 each

(Tickets available from any Club Member)

{ Ingperandzes drys
The Antique Auto Club of The Bahamas
Proceeds in aid of The Bilney Lane Home for Children,
Nassau and Every Child Counts Learning Centre, Abaco

For dnformation, including Registration, pleave contact:

328-1576
564-6728
395-1892
455-6106

Peter Armstrong
Richard Blake
Murray Forde

or Jim LaRoda


PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



Manchester United to face
Everton in FA Cup semifinal

m LONDON

Everton rallied to beat Middlesbrough 2-1 on
Sunday and set up an FA Cup semifinal at Wembley
with Manchester United, while Arsenal outclassed
lower tier Burnley 3-0 to reach the last eight, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

David Wheater’s 44th minute header for Boro
had surprised American goalkeeper Tim Howard
and threatened an upset at Goodison Park. But
Everton rallied with two headed goals in seven min-
utes by Marouane Fellaini and Louis Saha.

Sunday’s other game was in the previous round,
with Arsenal beating League Championship club
Burnley 3-0 on strikes by Carlos Vela, Eduardo da
Silva and Emmanuel Eboue at the Emirates Stadi-
um.

Held up by postponements and replays, Arsenal
now faces Hull in a quarterfinal and the winner will
meet Chelsea in the semifinals. Both semifinals will
be at Wembley over the weekend of April 18-19.

Manchester United, which has a record 11 FA
Cup titles, won 4-0 at Fulham on Saturday to reach
a record 26th cup semifinal. Arsenal, a 10-time cup
winner, can match that mark by beating Hull. Ever-
ton, which has won the cup five times, is in its 24th
semifinal.



ROME - Filippo Inzaghi scored all three goals in
AC Milan’s 3-0 win over Atalanta with the club
also sure it has David Beckham for the rest of the
Serie A season.

On loan to Milan, Beckham reached an agreement
Saturday to return to the Los Angeles Galaxy on
July 1, more than three months later than planned.

Paul Thomas/AP Photo

On Sunday, he had a central role as a playmaker,
directing Inzaghi and fellow striker Alexandre Pato.

Inzaghi put Milan in front seven minutes in, dou-
bled the lead in the 71st and then scored again three
minutes later.

Milan solidified its third-place position in the
standings with 51 points. Inter Milan leads with 63
points and Juventus is second with 56. Serie A scor-
ing leader Marco Di Vaio also found the net three
times as Bologna beat Sampdoria 3-0.



FRANKFURT -— Bayer Leverkusen drew 1-1 with
10-man VfL Bochum to continue its struggles in
Germany’s Bundesliga.

Although Leverkusen beat Bayern Munich 4-2
in the German Cup, it has now failed to win at home
in five straight league matches and the draw leaves
Leverkusen with 37 points, five points behind fifth
place and the final UEFA Cup spot.



GLASGOW, Scotland - Kyle Lafferty scored
twice as Rangers charged into the semifinal of the
Scottish Cup with a 5-1 victory over Hamilton.

A day after St. Mirren upset Celtic 1-0 in another
quarterfinal, Rangers were wary of losing especial-
ly after a surprise 1-0 loss to Inverness in the Premier
League on Wednesday.

Although Hamilton’s Rocco Quinn replied after
Steven Whittaker had given Rangers a 15th minute
lead, the home side was up 3-1 by halftime thanks to
Lafferty’s first strike and a penalty by Aaron Niguez.

Hamilton lost three players through injury in the
first half and was down to 10 men early in the second
and Rangers added two more through Steven Davies
and Lafferty.



EVERTON'S Leon Osman, right, vies with Middlesbrough's Gary O'Neil during their quarter final FA Cup soc-
cer match at Goodison Park Stadium, Liverpool, England, Sunday, March 8, 2009.

2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT

7 Passanger XLT, Leather Interior



The Zap





aul Thomas/AP Photo

EVERTON’ $ Louis Sie 2nd right, heads to score a goal past Middlesbrough keeper Bradley Jones, num-
ber 22, during their quarter final FA Cup soccer match at Goodison Park Stadium, Liverpool, England.

Paul Thomas/AP Photo

EVERTON'S Marouane Fellaini, bottom left, reacts after scoring a goal with teammate Leon Osman, top,dur-
ing their quarter final FA Cup soccer match against Middlesbrough at Goodison Park Stadium, Liverpool, Eng-
land, Sunday, March 8, 2009.

Davis Cun nie-cee

FROM page 15

retired win over Galeano.
Team captain John Farrington, in an inter-
view going into Sunday’s match, noted that it’s






































was $42,073.00
NOW $33,800.00

2008 FORD SPORT TRAC
LIMITED - Leather Interior

was $46,186.00
NOW $37,300.00 ,

Save BIG Right Now!

me |

ie ae oan

aug,

a ee
=—//

|
= _ —-

2008 FORD EDGE SEL

was $41,670.00
NOW $35,400.00

was $42,116.00
NOW $35,800.00

NOW THAT'S REALLY A

| |(SDeal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

s |
rT Eel C2)

intense heat in Paraguay.

If the team lose the tie, the Bahamas will
get to host Guatemala in the second round
over the weekend of July 10-12 at te National
Tennis Center in a bid to avoid being relegat-
ed to zone ITI next year.

If the team end up winning the tie, the
Bahamas will have to go back on the road to
the Dominican Republic the same weekend
with a bid to play for further advancement to
Zone One.

The Dominican Republic blanked
Guatemala 5-0 in their frst round match-up
this weekend.

In Saturday’s pivotal doubles, the Bahamas’
team of Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle did-
n’t have a chance against Delgado and
Galeano.

Paraguay won the match 6-1, 6-0, 6-2 as the
Bahamas fell behind 2-1.

The win came on the heels of the split
between the two countries in the opening sin-
gles on Friday. Delgado knocked off Neilly 6-
1, 6-4, 6-2 in the first match. Then Mullings
pulled the Bahamas even with a 4-6, 7-5, 4-1

EW ae of]

AE els
In Just One Day!

Our DuraBath SSP Bathtubs & Wall Systems
are custom made to cover worn-out bathtubs

and out-of-date wall tiles...

No Mess. No Stress.

RE*BATH BAHAMAS

(Manufacturer's Lifetime Warranty).

Telephone
(242) 393-8501

“Authorized Dealer”

Visit our Showroom & Office Located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street
OFM Cater ae mer Moe HE A eo

been a difficult tie so far.

“With Delgado playing at home, he played
well” Farringto said. “To me, Timmy didn’t
play badly. He could have been a little more
consistent.

“But Delgado was forcing the play a lot. So
Timmy had to do a lot more just to stay in the
match.”

Farrington said Mullings had hs hands full
with Galeano.

“The kid was good. He kept a lot of balls in
play. Devin made him work for every point,”
Farrington stressed. “Devin made him play a
lot of balls and he ended up retiring.

“Devin made him work hard, forcing him
around the court. He was a lot more patient.
But the guy just couldn’t keep up with Devin.”

As for the doubles, Farrington aid Munroe
and Rolle didn’t stand a chance..

“The other team played extremely well. We
got behind the eight ball early. We got broke
early and we just couldn’t get the momentum
back,”

Farrington said. “They gained al ot more
confidence as the match went on.”

Commonwealth
Bank Giants
ready to
defend title

FROM page 15

hand, said if the regular season
was any indication, the post-sea-
son will be just as competitive.

“Based on the level of com-
petition, I was very surprised
that we only lost three games,”
Thompson said. “But on any
given night, especially with the
teams involved, you really have
to bring your A game.

“Tf you don’t bring your A
game, you could be prepared
to watch the rest of the season.”

While Commonwealth Bank
have to concentrate on the Y-
Care’s first, Thompson said the
road to the championship still
have to come through the
Giants.

“We have basically the same
make-up as last year, with one
or two additions that we feel
will help us down the stretch,”
he said. “But we are just trying
to get o the next level.”
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS

5 e
2009 JOYCE MINUS BASKETBALL CLASSIC



have no mercy on
sorry Ebenezer

Temple Fellowship didn't
have any mercy on welcom-
ing Ebenezer men into the
Baptist Sports Council's 2009
Joyce Minus Basketball Clas-
sic.

On Saturday at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, Tem-
ple Fellowship blasted
Ebenezer 54-13 to improve
their front-running record to
3-0 in the men's president divi-
sion.

Clayton Cooper and Jason
Tucker both had nine in the
win. Samuel Brown had seven
in the loss.

In the men's vice president
division, New Bethlehem
stayed unbeaten to top their
standings at 2-0 as they hand-
ed last year's runners-up
Evangelistic Center a 46-29
rout.

Other games in the men's
division saw Christian Taber-
nacle make their debut a suc-
cessful one with a 24-19 deci-
sion over Church of the
Nazarene and BIBA lost a
double header, 36-35 to Lat-
ter-Day Saints and 39-27 to
City of Praise.

In the 19-and-under divi-
sion, Latter-Day Saints
pushed their unblemished
record to 3-0 with a 46-34 rout
over Macedonia; Macedonia
held off Mercy Seat 37-36;
Golden Gates def. Miracle
Working Church of God 29-25
and Temple Fellowship got by
Golden Gates team one 41-
35.

Undefeated

And in the 15-and-under
division, Golden Gates
remained undefeated as they
shocked Macedonia 18-16;
Latter-Day Saints team two
stunned First Baptist 28-22;
Miracle Working Church of
God nipped Latter-Day 22-21
and Temple Fellowship won
30-22 over Faith United.

Here's a summary of some
of the games played:

Latter-Day Saints 36, BIBA
35: Reno Moss scored the
game's winning basket, finish-
ing with six, along with Tero
Lloyd to lead the Saints as
they marched past BIBA men.

Enricay Rolle had a game
high 12 in a losing effort.

City of Praise 39, BIBA 27:
Jermaine Humes scored a
game high 13 to pace City of
Praise men to victory. Roje
Chisholm had nine in the loss.

Macedonia 37, Mercy Seat
36: Prince Pinder netted the
game winning basket as he fin-
ished with nine, but Patrick
Brice led the attack for Mace-
donia's 19-and-under with a
game high 13. Wayde Higgs
had 11 in the loss.

Golden Gates No.2 29, Mir-
acle Working Church of God
25: Samuel Johnson had a
game high 14 to lift Golden
Gates No.2 to their season
opening 19-and-under victo-
ry. Omar Deveaux had nine
in the loss.

Latter-Day Saints No.2 28,
Golden Gates 22: Darren
Smith had a game high 13 in

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Frontrunners improve their
record with 54-13 thrashing

SEER

¢ Here’s a look at the team standings after this
weekend's results were posted:

Teams W
Men's President
Temple Fellowship
First Baptist

City of Praise
Latter-Day Saints
Ebenezer

BIBA

Pilgrim

Men's Vice President
New Bethlehem
Golden Gates
Christian Tabernacle
Bahamas Harvest
Evangelistic Center
Calvary Bible

Church of the Nazarene
19-And-Under
Latter-Day Saints
Faith United

First Baptist
Macedonia

Golden Gates

Golden Gates No.2
Temple Fellowship
Miracle Working COG
Mercy Seat
15-And-Under
Golden Gates
Latter-Day No.2
Temple Fellowship
First Baptist
Macedonia

Faith United

Miracle Working COG
Latter-Day

Zion South Beach

Latter-Day's second team's
big debut victory. Leon Saun-
ders had seven in the loss.
Golden Gates 18, Macedo-
nia 16: Randy Williams
canned the game's winning
basket and led Golden Gates’
15-and-under with six in the

=—O 7-4 op Doo ==0

Ones pH OSB Sp oo

L Pet.

1,000
1,000
500
900
.000
.000
.000

1,000
1,000
1,000
900
900
.000
.000

aN tH OOO ow-H+ + OO

1,000
1,000
666
500
500
900
900
833
.000

1,000
1,000
666
500
900
500
833
833
.000

Ropar + H+ Mwo- Oe wnat HtNM HK Of



win. Geno Bullard had a game
high seven in the loss.

¢ The league will be back in
action on Saturday with
another host of games at Bail-
lou Hills, starting at 10 am on
the two courts.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 682/09
STORAGE TANK #11
CLEANING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236



gal) Minister gives update
aCe AIT on National Stadium

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

THERE’S been quite a bit of
speculations as to what is hap-
pening with the construction of
the National Stadium at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre
by the Chinese government.

Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister laid
those speculations to rest when
he made his contribution on the
2009 Mid Year budget in the
House of Assembly last week.

“T am pleased to confirm pub-
licly today, Sir, that on 28th Jan-
uary of this year, 17 containers
of construction equipment for the
new stadium were shipped from
China, and should be here within
a matter of days,” he said.

“T am also pleased to say, Sir,
that the advance group of twenty
Chinese technical workers will
arrive here on 20th March to
begin preliminary works.”

Bannister, the Member of Par-
liament for Carmichael, said this
should lay to rest all concerns
about whether or not the FNM
government can build the nation-
al stadium.

In the meantime, Bannister
advised that the government now
has title documents to the land
upon which the Grand Bahama
Sports Complex sits.

“All 80 acres of it,” he
emphased.

In keeping with their manifesto
commitment to complete the
Grand Bahama Sports Complex,
Bannister said the first phase of
the new softball stadium has been
completed.

“Grand Bahama now has a
beautiful softball field, which is
the best that I have seen in the
Bahamas,” he said. “The new
grass practice track has been com-
pleted, so that our athletes can
train without the danger of stress
injuries that often accompany
asphalt or rubberized surfaces.”

And he assured the members
that the government has agreed
to resurface the track in Grand
Bahama with a Mondo rubber-
ized surface, which will be one of
the best in this part of the world.

“We expect that this track will
be completed in time for the
Bahamas to host the Caribbean

1 ee

aaa

a

BRAEE CONTAOL

STYLE,
en ee ee



Mi Advance group of Chinese technical
workers to arrive here on March 20

HM Containers of construction gear
expected to arrive soon

Desmond Een Cln



and Central American Age
Group Championships in
Freeport this summer,” Bannister
said.

During his contribution, Ban-
nister also advised members that
his Ministry is currently working
on a number of initiatives, includ-
ing the finalization of proposed
amendments to the National
Sports Policy in conjunction with
Sporting leaders.

“What is important as we move
ahead, Sir, is that we provide the
fullest opportunity to our young
people from traditionally disad-
vantaged community and our
family islanders to participate at
the highest levels of competition,”
he stressed.

“They have to know that sports
opens the door to opportunity,
and that there is much to be
learnt from the traditions of
excellence of the past.”

Talking about the past, Ban-
nister said he has mandated that
the National Hall of Fame
become a fixture in the annual
calendar of his minitry’s National
Sports Development Programme.

“Such a decision, Sir, is based
on the fact that the Ministry has a
duty to ensure that the young ath-
letes and coaches of the Bahamas
gain a better appreciation of the
athletes and coaches of yester-
year who sacrificed so much of

[ r

alt oF

fa

*
ioe g
“ ' tne

Cit * Fagan
aaa
‘ee

= om

STA A Pi
errs

aa

their lives to put the Bahamas on
the world map of sporting excel-
lence,” he said.

“Through this process, Mr.
Speaker, my Ministry seeks to
acquaint our young Bahamians
with the difficult circumstances
that many of our legendary sport-
ing heroes had to overcome on
their road to glory so that they
may fully appreciate the truth in
the well known adage that it mat-
ters not where one starts in life,
but rather where one ends, having
regard to making smart choices
and understanding that each of
us are born with God given gifts
and that our destiny is defined by
how well we use those gifts.”

He said his iministry
introdeuced an annual Hall of
Fame Calendar, designed to cre-
ate a year round awareness of
those sporting giants who paved
the way for the successes of the
present generation of our world
class athletes.

While the first edition was
essentially concentrated upon the
Class of 2008 of this country's
national Hall of Fame, Bannister
said it, therefore, pained him to
observe the unfounded criticism
of the 2008 Hall of Fame Calen-
dar by a former champion ath-
lete himself, the Honourable
Member for Exuma.

“Mr. Speaker, when I was
appointed as a Minister, I deter-
mined that I would give service to
the Bahamian people, not just
F.N.M.'s,” he said. “You will
note, Mr. Speaker, that the leader
of opposition business (Bernard
Nottage) was enshrined in the
Hall of Fame this year, and is Mr.
February in the calendar.

“And in 2009, the government
plans to induct the first field event
medalist, who just happens to be
the leader of the opposition (Per-
ry Christie). But sports does not
revolve around politics, Sir. We
are determined to honour all
deserving Bahamians.”

SB TOYOTA moving forward
2) cornu &

i ee ee ee ee ee | —s

an

ie

BULLTED OVER THE TRADITCLOWAL CORDLLA,
Po el ee ee

WITH & BETTER

ere Creme mat URE OUR me tee lee lia

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew's Cha
Open Mon to Fri Sam - 5:30pm
Sat fam - 12neon

tel: 397-1700

E-mail: execmotoriabatelnet.bs
Parti and service guaranteed



Avellabla in Grand Beta at Quality Aeto Sales (Freeporl] © Queens Hay, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don Mactey dived, 367-2808
PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS





NAIA INDOOR TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIP

Miller celebrates triple victory

P|
|
*

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

AT last year’s Olympic Games in Bei-
jing, China, Ramon Miller made his debut
on the Bahamas senior national team as the
“rookie” as he helped the men win the sil-
ver medal in the 4 x 400 metre relay.

This year, Miller has served notice that
he intends to play a more vital role on the
national team when they head to the IAAF
World Championships in Berlin, Germany
in August.

Over the weekend, Miller posted a triple
victory in the NAIA indoor track and field
championships in a pace of three hours to
earn the Male Track Athlete of the Meet as
he contributed to Dickinson State Univer-
sity’s second place finish in the point stand-
ings.

The senior, who graduated from CR
Walker, closed out his indoor season by
winning the 200 and 400 metres as well as
anchored Dickinson State to its second
consecutive title in the 4 x 400 relay.

In a brief interview from the Dickinson

Miller stated: “It was alright to go out with
three national championships.”

It was the third straight 400 title on the
two-lap race on the indoor track for Miller,
who clocked 46.98 seconds (just off his
championship record of 46.95), well ahead
of his Blue Hawks’ team-mate Sean Pick-
stock, who ran 47.83 for second.

Miler had the fastest qualifying time of
47.95 with Pickstock sitting in second with
48.36.

In the 200, Miller was just .08 seconds
shy of erasing the NAIA meet record when
he stopped the clock at 20.97 for another
victory for DSU.

His nearest rival King College’s sopho-
more Kemar Hyman, who trailed in 21.48.

Miller led all qualifiers in the prelimi-
naries in 21.32. Pickstock was ninth in 21.87
and Forbes was tied for 10th in 21.92, but
neither of the latter two advanced.

Before he was done, Miller teamed up
on the anchor leg with Allan Ayala (lead
off), Pickstock (second) and Ian Smith
(third) to turn in a winning time of 3:13.17
in the 4x 4 relay final.

Smith was inserted in the line-up to

Ingraham, who had to sit out after he
strained his hamstring on Friday.

DSU’s coach Pete Stanton had nothing
but praise for Miller.

“It was a dominating performance by
Ramon,” he said.

“It was one of those special perfor-
mances to watch in every event. He con-
tinues to shine and run so well and compete
so hard. He’s been fun to watch.”

Stanton also got to watch three other
Bahamians perform for DSU.

In the men’s 60 final, sophomore Jamal
‘Snickers’ Forbes, back after an injury
plaque season last year, ended up second in
6.81, while team-mate Michael Sands was
sixth in 6.91.

Johnnie Nabors, a senior from Union
(Kentucky) won in 6.80.

Forbes had the third fastest qualifying
time out of the semifinal in 6.78, while
Sands was sixth in 6.84. Ingraham was tenth
in 6.99 as he suffered his injury.

And in the preliminary rounds, Sands
had the second fastest time of 6.80, fol-
lowed by Ingraham in 6.85 and Forbes in
6.86.

from McKendree State.

Clarke, a senior sprinter and another
CR Walker graduate, had to settle for third
in the women’s 60 in 7.56.

The race was won by Wayland Baptist’s
sophomore Kimberly Smith in 7.37.
Shantrell Jenkins, a senior at Voorhees,
was second in 7.56.

In the preliminaries, Clarke had the third
fastest time of 7.66. Her semifinal time was
not available.

Clarke, however, played second fiddle to
Smith in the 200. Smith won the race in
24.34 with Clarke not too far behind in
24.41.

And in the 4 x 400 relay, Clarke
anchored McKendree to second in the final
in 3:49.73. Oklahoma Baptist won the race
in 3:47.35. Clarke and McKendree had the
fourth fastest qualifying time of 3:54.22.

Sasha Joyce, a team-mate of Clarke, ran
9.50 for fourth place in the fifth of six heats
in the women’s 60 hurdles.

That placed her 25th overall in a field of
33 and she failed to make the cut of the top
12 to advance.

Both Clarke and Joyce helped Wayland

Ramon Miller

Also at the meet was Lanece Clarke



replace another Bahamian, senior John Baptist to clinch the team title.

lm BASKETBALL

Press on Saturday after his performances,

NATIONAL JUNIOR COLLEGE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION: NATIONAL INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS



Olympian Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson
leads the way for Bahamians!

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

OLYMPIAN Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson led
the way for a number of Bahamians compet-
ing at the National Junior College Athletic
Association’s National Indoor Championships
over the weekend.

The former Jordan Prince William Falcons’
standout who won the World Junior Cham-
pionships’ 200 metre title was second in the 55
metres at the Texas Tech University in Lub-
bock, Texas.

The Southwest Missouri sophomore ran
6.80 seconds to follow behind Florissant
Valle’s freshman Santana Lowery’s record
breaking performance of 6.70.

Ferguson (6.85) also trailed Lowery (6.80)
in the preliminaries.

In the 200, Ferguson got second in 23.69.
The race was won by Lowery in 23.46. Lowery
had the best qualifying time of 23.75 with Fer-
guson behind her in 23.79.

Krystal Bodie, a sophomore as well at
Southwest Missouri, was also third in the
women’s 55 hurdles. She ran 7.97. Natasha
Ruddock of Essex Community College won in
7.66 with April Williams of Barton County
Community College was second in 7.72.

Ferguson and Bodie helped Southwest Mis-
souri to an eighth place finish in the point
standings with 40.

The other member of the Bahamian con-
nection at Southwest Missouri, Jamal Wilson,
failed to secure a mark in the men’s high jump.

Cory Holman, a sophomore from Rend
Lake, won the title with a best leap of 6-feet,
11 3/4-inches.

Despite not getting any points from Wil-
son, Southwest Missouri was tied for 11th in
the standings with 16 points.

Demetrius Pinder, a sophomore at Essex

Sheniqua ‘Q’ ioe

Community College, was second in the men’s
400 in 46.89. Renny Quow, a freshman from
South Plains, won the title in 46.45.

In the preliminaries, Pinder ran 46.35 to
trail Quow, who did 47.20.

Essex Community College was 18th overall
in the standings with 11.

Deandra Knowles, a freshman competing
for South Plains, ran 58.08 for 10th overall in
the preliminaries of the women’s 400. But she
didn’t make the cut of eight for the final.

South Plains was the women’s national
champions with 139.50. They also took the
men’s crown with 163.

Another freshman, Shelleyeka Rolle of Bar-
ton County Community College, was third in

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

Lt EXTRA, ENTRA,

Krystal Bodie



the women’s 600 final in 1:34.15. Shakeeri
Cole, a freshman from South Plains won in
1:32.65 with Andrea Sutherland of Barton
County Community College second in 1:32.87.

Rolle posted the fastest qualifying time of
1:37.61.

And in the 800, Rolle had to settle for fifth
place in 2:23.82. Cole again took the victory in
2:21.57. Claudette Hetmeyer, a sophomore
from Bronx Community College, was ahead of
Rolle in 2:23.27 in fourth.

Rolle had the third fastest qualifying time of
2:24.06. Cole led the way in 2:23.68, followed
by Hetmeyer in 2:25.32.

Barton County Community College ended
up in second place in the standings with 83.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

EXTRA,

Large Shipment
of
Used Cars

New Shipments Arrived

ui , Lowawe
aa

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Inaurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

CALL 322-1722

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165



AS WN
UKE

TMD

With the high school basketball season nearing conclusion,
one series of champions will be decided this week to culmi-
nate an exciting year thus far.

The Government Schools Sports Association will begin
their playoff rounds today at a pair of separate locations for
the semifinals.

Seniors will face off at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium while
Juniors will meet at the D.W. Davis Gymnasium beginning at
4pm.

Today’s eight semifinal games will be sudden death elimi-
nation while the best of three finals in each division will begin
tomorrow at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Senior Boys

G.H.S Magic (GHS) 12-2

C.I Gibson Rattlers (CIG) 10-4
C.C Sweeting Cobras (CCS) 10-4
C.V Bethel Stingrays (CVB) 9-5

Semifinal Matchups
1. GHS vs. 4. CVB
2. CIG vs. 3. CCS

In a stark contrast with the 2007-08 season, this division is
wide open with no clear front runner like last year’s undefeat-
ed C.R Walker Knights, infact, both last years champions’ the
Knights, and runners’ up, the Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins,
failed to qualify for the postseason.

The Magic went from bottom feeders to pennant winners
in just a single season but fell short in the Hugh Campbell
tournament where they were eliminated by the Cobras.

The Rattlers come into the playoffs on the heels of a crush-
ing loss on the national stage in the Hugh Campbell final.

As the only returning playoff team from a year ago, C.I
Gibson will look to salvage a season with a league title.

The Cobras have been another surprise after a disappoint-
ing 2007-08 season but had become a top title contender this
year, claiming the third seed and advancing to the pool finals
of the Hugh Campbell tournament.

The Stingrays advanced to the postseason on the final day
of regular season play when the beat the Knights to claim the
final playoff spot.

Junior Boys

D.W Davis Pitbulls (DWD) 11-1

T.A Thompson Cobras (TAT) 11-1
A.F Adderley Tigers (AFA) 8-4

L.W Young Golden Eagles (LWY) 5-7

Semifinal Matchups
1. DWD vs. 4. LWY
2. TAT vs. 3. AFA

The Pibulls won every possible tournament before them
this season, most notably the Father Marcian Peters’ tourna-
ment where they edged out the Cobras in the finals.

The teams ‘split the regular season series.

The Tigers pose the biggest threat to the top seeds with the
size of Kenrico Lockhart upfront and an athletic backcourt.

Senior Girls

C.R Walker Knights (CRW) 12-0

C.V Bethel Stingrays (CVB) 8-4

C.I Gibson Rattlers (CIG) 6-6

Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins (DDJ) 6-6

Semifinal Matchups
1. CRW vs. 4. DDJ
2. CVB vs. 3. CIG

The Knights returned much of last year’s squad including
top scorer Malesha Peterson.

Peterson led the Knights to an undefeated regular season
but fell short in the finals of the Father Marcian Peters tour-
nament.

Junior Girls

H.O. Nash Lions (HON) 12-0
T.A Thompson Cobras (TAT) 9-3
A.F Adderley Tigers (AFA) 8-4
S.C McPherson Sharks (SCM) 6-6

Semifinal Matchups
1. HON vs. 4. SCM
2. TAT vs. 3. AFA

The Lions steamrolled through the competiton and seem to
be a lock to add another championship title to Pattie John-
son’s resume.

H.O. Nash went through the regular season virtually
untested and claimed the Father Marcian Peters title for their
division.

With a talented lineup led by Kaleisha Laing, Leshea
Grant, Randya Kemp and Lakishna Munroe, the Lions are

the clear favorites to repeat as champions.


THE TRIBUNE

sp
Davis Cup knife-erlge

Commonwealth
Bank Giants
reatly to
defend title

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Commonwealth Bank
Giants are ready to defend their
title in the New Providence Bas-
ketball Association.

Head coach Perry Thompson
said from year-to-year, they
have had to deal with different
teams and different challenges,
but they have been able to pre-
vail.

“This year, we have the
Wreckers with a very big front
court, but I think one of the key
things for us will be controlling
the game and minimizing the
turnovers,” Thompson pointed
out.

BASKETBALL
NPBA PLAYOFFS

THE New Providence Basket-
ball Association will open its first
round best-of-three playoffs
tonight at the CI Gibson Gymna-
sium.

¢ Here’s a look at the fixtures
on tap for the week:

Tonight’s schedule

7 pm Commonwealth Bank vs
Y-Care Wreckers.

8 pm Johnson's Truckling
Jumpers vs Sunshine Auto Ruff
Ryders.

Wednesday’s schedule

7 pm Electro Telecom Cybots
vs Coke Explorers.

8 pm Police Crimestoppers vs
Foxies’ Pros.

Friday’s schedule

7 pm Sunshine Auto Ruff
Ryders vs Johnson’s Trucking
Jumpers.

8 pm Y-Care’s Destroyers vs
Commonwealth Bank Giants.

Saturday’s schedule

7 pm Foxies’ Pros vs Police
Crimestoppers.

8 pm Electro Telecom Cybots
vs Coke Explorers.

“We would probably like to
run a little more against the
Wreckers. I think that would be
an advantage for us because of
their size. But we’re going to
be up for the challenge.”

That challenge will come
tonight when Thompson and his
the Giants face Y-Care’s,
coached by Donnie Culmer, in
game one of the best-of-three
series at 7 pm.

“Tt’s going to be a dog fight.
Once I’m at first mast, it will be
a dog fight,” Culmer said. “And
I feel whoever come out of this
series will win the champi-
onship.

“The other side doesn’t have
anybody on it. So I’m not really
concerned about them.”

Culmer, who added Emeka
Watson to their frontcourt line-
up, said he expect that the series
will go down to the wire. While
he would like to wrap it up in
two straight, he said he could
live with it going the distance.

Thompson, on the other

SEE page 12

PAGE 15



r

MONDAY, MARCH 9,

Bahamas in
critical position
on final day of
tie in Paraguay

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas was in a crit-
ical position yesterday as the
final day of the first round of
the American Zone IT Davis
Cup tie wrapped up in
Paraguay.

Playing at the Yacht y Golf
Club in Paraguayo, Lambare,
Grand Bahamian Olympian
Devin Mullings needed to win
his reverse five set singles
match against Ramon Delga-
do in the battle of the top
seeds.

The Bahamas was trailing
2-1 going into the match.

The final match was to have
showcased the two number
two seeds, Grand Bahamian
Timothy Neilly against Diego
Galeano.

But up to presstime, the
results were not available.

The matches were plyed in
the evening because of the

SEE page 12

ts

2009

DEVIN MULLINGS
(above) who
needs to win his
reverse five set
singles match
against Ramon
Delgado in the
battle of the top
seeds.

RESULTS SO FAR

¢ Here’s a look at the results posted so far by the Bahamas at
the first round of the American Zone II Davis Cup tie in

Paraguay over the weekend:
Friday’s Opening Singles
Ramon Delgado (Paraguay)

6-1, 6-4. 6-2.

def. Timothy Neilly (Bahamas)

Devin Mullings (Bahamas) def. Diego Galeano (Paraguay)

4-6, 7-5, 4-1 (retired).
Saturday’s Doubles

Ramon Delgado/Diego Galeano (Paraguay) def. Bjorn
Munroe/Marvin Rolle (Bahamas) 6-1, 6-0, 6-2.

Sunday’s Reverse Singles

Devin Mullings (Bahamas vs Ramon Delgado (Paraguay) not

completed up to presstime.

Timothy Neilly (Bahamas) vs Diego Galeano (Paraguay)

scheduled to follow.

Odessa

Garden

Murphyville, 2nd House right from Sears Road. |
Telephone 322-8493

Vintage Moral Dress Smocked ood made in England.
Pretty and Perfect for Springtime and Easter. Size 3/4.
See our Selection of Hand-smocked diresses in oonl pastel

| colours for Easter and Tea Parties for your Littl Ladies!

Muda aul
STA eM iat
mela

Online

egistration

c

buttonsformalwear.com

BUTTONS

a Bridal & Formal Wear



NDHAM NASSAU RESORT

ABLE BEACH







ae a es

SR Le)

...A Tender 100% North Pacific Cod Fillet
topped with Zesty Tartar Sauce,
Cheddar Cheese and Crisp Lettuce
all wrapped in a Warm Tortilla.


PAGE 16, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS







THE TSAVOUSSIS BROTHERS are ‘Wrapping and Rolling Out’ the next big thing in the quick serve restaurant
industry...the ‘Fish Go Wrap!’ From left: Wendy’s president, Chris Tsavoussis; vice-president Terry Tsavous-
sis, director of operations Randy Sands.

Tsavoussis brothers
make history with
fabulous fish wrap

THE Bahamas is the first market to intro-
duce the “fish go wrap” at the Wendy’s restau-
rants.

The brainchild of Wendy’s Bahamas presi-
dent Chris Tsavoussis, this menu item features
a fresh, hand-cut cod fillet and is topped with
shredded cheddar cheese, lettuce anda
zesty tartar sauce, all wrapped in a warm, soft
tortilla.

“Timing couldn’t be better,” said Chris
Tsavoussis. “I had been toying with this idea for
quite a while and I’m thrilled that Wendy’s
has agreed to allow The Bahamas to be the

very first market in the world to roll out the
‘fish go wrap.’”

Described as a “tasty spin-off” from the exist-
ing Wendy’s ‘chicken go wrap,’ the ‘fish go
wrap’ substitutes North Pacific Cod to deliver
the perfect, palate pleasing snack .

Vice-president Terry Tsavoussis and director
of operations Randy Sands hit the Wendy’s
kitchen to personally whip up and test the new
wrap prior to its launch.

The International Wendy’s Community will
have their sights set on The Bahamas as ‘Fish
Go Wrap’ makes its historic debut.

Teachers pair up for Wednesday night space shot

m CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

TWO SCIENCE teachers who
have spent the past five years
under NASA’s tutelage are about
to graduate with high-flying hon-
ors, according to Associated Press.

The space shuttle flight
Wednesday night of Joseph Aca-
ba and Richard Arnold II will
mark the first time two one-time

teachers have rocketed into space
together. And during the two-
week construction mission to the
international space station, both
will attempt multiple spacewalks
— the most dangerous job in
orbit.

The flight on shuttle Discovery
was delayed a month because of
concerns about hydrogen gas
valves in the engine compartment.

After extra tests, NASA deemed
the spacecraft safe to fly.

Discovery’s astronauts arrived
at the launching site Sunday after-
noon, four hours ahead of the
start of the countdown, and
thanked everyone who helped
resolve the valve issue.

The teachers and their five
crewmates — the usual assort-
ment of military pilots and rocket

, Es
Pee esd
ee

- 7 4
Pot Sal dal
: . ee

all a ee eel

oO
20 Yo All Power Sprayers
OFF and Rollers!

of

Wagnere Paint Crew
Power Sprayer

ae

Wagnere
QuickTouch
Power Roller

PLU

ask about MORE

in-house specials!
All Sales Final

Painting The Bahamas!
188 Wulff Road
Open Mon-Fri 7:30am-4:30pm Sat 8:00am-3:00pm
Tel: 323-3973 or 325-3976 Fax: 322-3937

Web: www.buildersmalibahamas.com Email: infoG@buildersmalibahamas.com



SS

Odessa

Murphyville, 2nd House right from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493
oe

Gorgeous Black and Torqacise Hat.
Keauliful, simple and elegant; appropriate for
Summer very ary, Great for Chorch, Teas, Croises and

Horse Races.
a

TWO mi WAY
SOLUTIONS

We Keep you in touch

Authorized Distributor For:

HVT

Professional
Two-Way Radios

TMé600
Mobile/Base

TCV0O
Handheld



scientists — will deliver and install
a final set of solar wings for the
space station. With just over a
year remaining until the orbiting
complex is completed, the frame-
work holding the solar wings is
the last major American-made
building block left to fly.

This flight comes a year and a
half after the last teacher-astro-
naut, Barbara Morgan, went into
space after a two-decade wait.
Morgan was the backup in the
mid-1980s for schoolteacher
Christa McAuliffe, who was killed
when space shuttle Challenger
exploded after takeoff.

Acaba was a freshman at the
University of California at Santa
Barbara when McAuliffe died on
Jan. 28, 1986. Arnold was fresh
out of college and living in Wash-
ington, and his wife-to-be was a
student-teacher.

“It definitely had an impact
when you look at the sacrifices
that she (McAuliffe) made and
the importance that NASA put
on it,” Acaba said. When it came
time for him to step up, “it really
made you feel like you were doing
something worthwhile.”

Two-Way Radios
as low as

$396.00
PROGRAMMED

We offer sales, service and accessories

for all makes and models

TC6é10
Waterproof/
Shockproof

TR8O
Repeater

#41 Mackey Street & Palmdale Ave,

Mon-Fri, 8:30am - 4:30pm
Tel: 394-5025
sales@two-waysolutions,com


THE TRIBUNE

OU



ine

MONDAY,



MARCH 9,

SS

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life







Construction
industry
unemployment

VEN OER I Ce
18-20 per cent



m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Unemployment in the
Bahamian construction indus-
try could be running as high as
18-20 per cent, the Bahamian
Contractors Association’s
(BCA) president has told Tri-
bune Business, with few pro-
jects coming on stream to
replace jobs that are finished
by companies.

Responding to the Depart-
ment of Statistics’ interim
Labour Force Survey, which
showed that construction
industry employment had fall-
en by a further 9 per cent
between May 2008 and Febru-
ary 2009, Stephen Wrinkle
said that figure tallied with the
sector’s own estimates.

With sector unemployment
running at about 9 per cent,
according to previous con-
struction industry workforce
assessments, Mr Wrinkle said
the estimate of a further 9 per
cent increase was in line with
estimated.

“That’s an additional 9 per
cent,” he said of the Depart-
ment’s findings. “We reckon
we’re at about 20 per cent
unemployment in the field.
From what we’re hearing from
our members, that’s not far
off. We were at 8-9 per cent
unemployment, and if you add
another 9 per cent that takes
us to 18 per cent, so it’s not far
off.

“That’s pretty much what
the industry is telling us —
between 18-20 per cent. It’s a
substantial number when you
start to add it up. It’s in the
hundreds, if not thousands.”

While Bahamian contrac-
tors did their best to keep key
personnel, and the most pro-
ductive employees, on payroll
even during down times, Mr
Wrinkle questioned whether

SEE page 6B

The information soar or a third |
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omissi soos
from the daily report,



CLICO collapse CLICO regulation

causes Act delay



Zhivargo Laing

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Implementation of the Domes-
tic Insurance Act and its accom-
panying regulations is set to be
further delayed after new amend-
ments were suggested to enhance
the Registrar’s “ability to regu-
late the sector”, with some
changes prompted by CLICO
(Bahamas) collapse into provi-
sional liquidation.

The proposed changes come
after Tribune Business obtained
evidence that CLICO (Bahamas)
and its subsidiaries breached this
nation’s exchange control laws
and regulations, with both the
current and a former Central
Bank governor telling this news-
paper that any Bahamian-resi-

Wi Minister says Domestic Insurance Act held up
after insurer's failure prompts further suggested
amendments to enhance ‘Registrar's ability to

regulate the industry’

wi Further evidence shows CLICO Bahamas and
Bahamian affiliate violated exchange control laws

and regulations

Wi Sizeable number of CLICO's 141 Bahamian staff
to be formally laif-off this week

gy Minister acknowledges episode shows need for
enhanced cross-border supervision in Caribbean

dent company — such as the insur-
er and its CLICO Enterprises Ltd
affiliate — needed to obtain regu-
latory permission for any over-
seas loans and investments that
were made in their name (see
other story on Page 1B).

Tribune Business has also
learned that a sizeable number
of CLICO (Bahamas) 141
Bahamian-based staff are likely
to be made redundant this week,
with the liquidator likely to this
week complete the financial pack-
age for buyers interested in
acquiring the insolvent compa-
ny’s life and health insurance
portfolio.

Among those most likely to be
made redundant will be CLICO
(Bahamas) 90-strong agent force,
who previously operated on a

Pioneers aiming to
fill ‘missing middle’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

An awards programme that
could provide Bahamian entre-
preneurs with up to $100,000 in
grant funding is “hoping to get a
lot more” than the 40-50 appli-
cations received from this nation
prior to today’s close, its country
representative explaining that the
initiative aimed to fill “the missing
middle” in the national econom-
ic structure.

Abigail Noble, country repre-
sentative for Pioneers of Pros-
perity, said the initiative was tar-
geted at small and medium-sized
enterprises across the Bahamas
and the Caribbean, in a bid to fill
the gap between micro and large
businesses, and inspire, invest in
and empower the next genera-
tion of entrepreneurs.

Describing the focus on small
and medium-sized enterprises as
“immensely important, Ms Noble
explained: “Look at the devel-
oped, industrialized countries. A
large percentage of their gross
domestic product (GDP) comes
from small and medium-sized
enterprises. That’s not the case
in small island and developing
countries. It’s the missing mid-
dle.”

Ms Noble described as a “lega-

M_ REXCLUSIVE

Ocean Club Residences & Marina

If you enjoy the privacy of poolside sunbathing, playing a leisure game of
tennis or golf, soaking up the warm island breeze or look to experience a
meght filled with entertainment, tt is all within your grasp as an owner of
this Ocean Club Residences & Marina condominium. This thoughtfully dec-
orated 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath ground floor home with an oversized patio, 1s
located on the breathtaking Nassau Harbour. Ownership benefits include
access to the on-site marina, pools, gym facilities, private beaches and all
the amenities of Atlantis at your doorstep. Some grand features of the home
include a gourmet kitchen, tiled floors and walk in closets. Exclusively of-
fered by Mario Carey Realty at $2,495,000.00. Web Listing #8287. MCR
also offers a number of units and dock spaces for sale and for rent.

NAN

MARIO CAREY REALTY

Tel: 242-677-TALK (8255) | Fax: 242-677-8256 | Cell: 242-357-7013
mario@mariocareyrealty.com | www.mariocareyrealty.com



cy of colonialism” the fact that
there were very few companies
of a size between micro enter-
prises and large firms in nations
such as the Bahamas. “Very
rarely does that gap get bridged —
small companies growing into
large and medium-sized enter-
prises,” Ms Noble said. “These
are the ones that employ more
people, create more disposable
income, enable people to invest
more in education and health-

SEE page 6B

medical emergencies
don't study economics

commission basis, and have
already been sent home to await
further instructions. It is also
unclear how many of its 51
administrative and underwriting
staff will be retained by the lig-
uidator, Baker Tilly Gomez
accountant and partner, Craig A.
‘Tony’ Gomez.

When contacted by Tribune
Business, Mr Gomez did not
directly confirm whether many
CLICO (Bahamas) staff would
be formally let go this week.
However, he added: “Clearly,
business has ceased, and to fund
staff payroll, you need business.”

Mr Gomez said he and his liq-
uidation team (he is only the pro-
visional liquidator) had enjoyed

SEE page 7B

hindered by ‘non-
cosy’ relationship

* Ex-minister says relationship between Ministry
of Finance, Registrar of Insurance's Office was
tense, with insurer's problems never brought to
his attention

* Says exchange controls breached, as Bahamas
resident companies need prior permission to
lend investment monies overseas in their name

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

REGULATION of CLICO (Bahamas) during the key 2004-
2007 period may have been hampered by the tense relation-
ship that existed between the Ministry of Finance and Registrar
of Insurance’s Office, Tribune Business has been told, as a for-
mer minister confirmed the company had not operated “in
accordance with Bahamian laws and regulations”.

James Smith, Minister of State for Finance under the 2002-2007
Christie administration, said CLICO (Bahamas) financial posi-
tion, and its increasing exposure to highly risky, speculative
Florida-based real estate investments, which at 2007 year-end
accounted for almost 59 per cent of its assets — a highly unusual
concentration of risk — was never brought to his attention when
he was minister.

“No, not while I was there. I don’t recall anything,” Mr Smith
told Tribune Business when questioned on whether these matters
came across his desk.

He then indicated this may have been due to the troubled rela-
tionship the Ministry of Finance then had with the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office, explaining that the latter had wanted the
freedom to operate as a relatively autonomous, standalone reg-
ulator, and resented what it perceived as his ministry’s “inter-
ference”.

SEE page 4B



Chamber chief ‘shocked’ at rate of jobless increase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s presi-
dent is “shocked” that the national unemploy-
ment rate has risen so rapidly within the past six
months, pointing out that in percentage terms it
was almost a 40 per cent increase.

Commenting on the Department of Statistics’
interim labour force survey, which showed that
the unemployment rate on New Providence had
increased from 8.7 per cent to 12.1 per cent
between May 2008 to early 2009, Dionisio
D’ Aguilar said the data showed both the Bahami-
an economy’s vulnerability and the “urgent need”
for the Government to initiate its planned capital



works stimulus. “That’s an almost 40 per cent
increase in the rate of unemployment,” Mr
D’Aguilar said, commenting on the 3.5 per cent rise
in New Providence. “I’m surprised that it’s that sig-
nificant. I’m a little shocked that it’s as significant
as it is in terms of percentage.

“This recession/depression is only getting start-
ed. We don’t know where the bottom island how
long it’s going to go on for. I’m shocked that the
rate of unemployment has increased as precipi-
tously as it has.

“It has been demonstrated that our economy is
increasingly fragile. That’s why the recession, when
it us, has been as devastating as it has been.”

SEE page 5B

—_
ColinalImperial.

.. they don't know the word “recession” either. That's why you
need to maintain your insurance coverage with Colinalmperial
even when the economy is weak — to make sure hard times don't

get harder just because you fall ill or fall down on your luck.
Stay confident. Stay connected,

confidence for life

FIRST AID

www..colinaimperial.com


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





WANTED

Bimini Sands Resort & Marina is

seeking a mason, skilled in steel
bending.

The best candidate must have
high volume experience and the
best candidate must have training
experience and ability to motivate
other associates.

Salary will reflect experience and
skill set.

Please contact our office at (242)
347-3500 or (242) 347-3501 (fax)

©



@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE BAHAMAS should
place trade experts in its estab-
lished worldwide embassy and
consulate network in a bid to
forge new import/export
opportunities, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s
executive director has urged,
although he acknowledged
that this would be costly.

Philip Simon, speaking at
the National Economic Sum-
mit at Ebenezer’s Loyola Hall,
told Tribune Business that the
Bahamas would greatly bene-
fit from trade ambassadors
who were a specialist on trade
opportunities.

“Consulates should have a
trade ambassador in every
consulate around the world;
someone who is a specialist

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
CERTIFICATION & CERTIFICATE PROGRAMMES

| i
Continuing Education Units Now Available |

Course Commencement Dates
28" March - 2009

Whar is hour career goal?







S44 44,

PROMOTION

QUALITY SERVICE
INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION
SALARY INCREASE

CAREER CHANGE! ENHANCEMENT

The Professional Development Department com help

you achieve your carver coal! A wide array of courses and

programmes leading io cenificate, cenification and licensure are

offered. You can become a pioneer in secing performance standards

in Vou of gakomion. We have secumed partnerships with leading

Talon Al InSstiiliors bo help jo aepom plist yor cancer peals

You can alain your professional development credentials at The Callege of The Bahamas. Success is at your finger tips
Calle teh Cleo the cone or propre fe help yon cccommlish parr cnreer poate, ..









VY ¥

i i

Bookstore grounds

Certiied Professional Managers Programme (CPM), James Madizon Unversity, Hameanburg, via

Cortified Associio Manager, James Macon Unavormty, Harrisonburg. VA

Certified Computer Operator Microeact Office Specialisi- MOLE)

a Resource Manager (Cert. HAM), National Management Assocation of Amernca, Dayton
. Chia

Certificate in Law- Parokegal (Pa), The Inatitube of Legal Eeacutmes, Bactord, England

Gentilicate For The Office Assistant (OA), The Inatituie Of Lagal Executives, Bedford, England

Certified Public Accountant, (CFA), Becker Review, Qakorock Terrace, Chicaga, IL

Cortified Professional Secretary Programme (OPS. Association of Aden. Prodessionals, Wexondna, VA,

Accounting For Noc-Financial Managers

Company Law. The Institute of Legal Executives. Bedford, England

Employment Law, The Inst@ute of Legal Executives, Bedford, England

Ethics and Prafessianal Reapeesibility

Josneyman Plumbing License (JPL)

Legal Writing & Research

Project Management Practitianer PMPri

Singles Phase Eksctrical License PEL}

VWiréing & Aeseansh Sails

Ne entrance exam required. Tuition Payment is due per teri
For additional information, telephone us at (242) 325-5714 of (242) 328-0005

Foes May He Fok By Cosh, Creda Com or Bank Cenilied Cheque To: The College of The Bahanas, Hines Chllce
CEES Reserved The Right To Change Tutti, Peee, Course Content, Coure Scheel: And Course Miers

The 2"¢ Annual Book Festival |
“read Green to Live Green...
Towards a Better Environment!”

Featuring Jeannie Thompson, lan Strachan, Marion

Bethel, Obediah Smith, Anku, Nicolette Bethel and more!

Cotton Candy!
Rotis!
Face Painting!

Conch Fritters!
Books!

Arts + crafts!

rere Lele
March 14, 2009
12-5pm
Chapter One

Jazz Music!

eee ee eae (eee) eel)
Schoo! of English Studies, Libraries
& Instructional Media Services and

eee meee sie ternal

The College of The Bahamas.

Thompson
Boulevard

on the economy, a specialist
on trade opportunities, to sell
the Bahamas in addition to
other diplomatic and political
things that consulates do.

It may have been men-
tioned in the manifest of the
governing party,” he said.

However, the former

























i ital

ta
me Ly

crm

i

(The Tribune)__
al Estate

rl F
MA aT):

GS Tel: 502 2356 tam
| for ad rates hw

Ambassador to CARICOM,
Leonard Archer, said govern-
ment might not consider rati-
fying such a position because
of the high costs involved.
“Trade Ambassadors are
expensive,” he said. “The
additional expense of putting
a qualified trade ambas-

Ses

ee ee eee
te ls I a

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

je Public is hereby aavised tha

RALD of No

9 Gleniston Gardens in the Western District of the Island of New Providence,

one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

intends to

change my child’s name from NATHANIEL WILLIAM FRANCIS HEY to
NATHANIEL WILLIAM FRANCIS FITZGERALD. If there are any objections
0 this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirt
30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

Chamber executive: We need
network of trade ambassadors

sador/trade officer in the mis-
sion would not be cost effec-
tive.”

Mr Archer said, though,
that the Bahamas and many
Caribbean countries have
gravely understaffed missions
abroad, and suffer handi-
capped relations with partner
countries worldwide because
of it. “Someone ought to be
able to sit in the public ses-
sion of that (foreign) commit-
tee from beginning to end so
they can be constantly sending
reports back to Nassau saying
this is what is being said, this is
what is being said by whom
and this is what you should
do,” he continued.

Manifesto

The FNM government, in
its 2007 Manifesto, promised
to continue the acquisition of
residential properties overseas
“for the accommodation of
Bahamas Foreign Service
Officers and Bahamas Diplo-
matic and Consular Offices.”

It was suggested during the
National Economic Summit
that CARICOM nations con-
sider joint ownership of con-
sular offices abroad to miti-
gate costs and increase
staffing. However, Mr Archer
said the idea had been mulled
over and tried, but some coun-
tries were not confident that
their concerns would be
uppermost in the minds of
nations that they shared con-
sular accommodations with.

The FNM Government also
said in Manifesto 2007 that it
would review the operations
of “diplomatic and consular
offices to ensure adequate
funding and appropriate staff
levels”.

This, Mr Archer restated,
was paramount in assuring
that all aspects of the
Bahamas and other Caribbean
nations foreign interests are
duly looked after.

Vacation in Paradise.

Only $69"

per person double OCcuUpanty.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only.

Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
+ Complimentary continental breakfast datly
+ Junior Suites with King-size or two double beds
+ Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,

coffee maker, hatr dryer

- Kids 15 and under, jree

¢ Pool with swim-up bar

Limited-time offer! Reserve today /
Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.
THE TRIBUNE

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE BAHAMAS Cham-
ber of Commerce is not doing
all it “could and should be
doing,” its executive director
has acknowledged, but denied
claims it was an organisation
that was not friendly to small
businesses.

Philip Simon, speaking at
the National Economic Sum-
mit, said the Chamber had
rebuilt its membership
through small and medium-
sized businesses, and entre-
preneurs, after it was put
under pressure through the
creation of other private sec-
tor groups. “The presidents
of the Chamber of Commerce
up until the late 1990s all
looked very much the same -
rich, mercantile, involved in
the real estate sector, retail
sector and white - and that has

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



“There is much
more the
Bahamas
Chamber of
Commerce could
and should be
doing.”

Philip Stmon

changed tremendously,” Mr
Simon said.

“T have seen no semblance
of it since ’'ve been involved
with the Chamber since 2004.”

He added that when organ-
isations such as the Quality
Council and Nassau Tourism
and Development Board
(NTDB) broke off from the
Chamber, they took a sub-
stantial number of members
with them, along much of its
influence.

“When they evolved, par-
ticularly the NTDB with Nor-
man Solomon and Diane
Philips leading that charge
from a committee level within
the Chamber, to an actual
organisation that felt as
though it needed its own iden-
tity along Bay Street to focus
on Bay Street’s needs, it took
all of those member persons
who would have been classi-



fied as being the ‘Bay Street
Boys’ within the Chamber of
Commerce’s influence. [As a
result], the organisation
almost died,” said Mr Simon.

He said that out of the
Chamber’s now less than 500
members, 72 per cent are
small businesses, with 47 per
cent of those having an
employee base of 10 persons
or less. Mr Simon said that
contrary to what new small
business groups say, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce is a small business
Chamber of Commerce.

He added that the creation
of more small business groups
could be counterproductive in
the long run, as they all vie
for the limited resources of
the nation’s private sector. He
said, however, it was ulti-
mately each company’s deci-
sion as to which association
they endorse.

“There is much more the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce could and should be
doing,” Mr Simon said.

“We have a resource chal-
lenge just like most other com-
panies and businesses. We
depend on our membership
to make things happen. The
Chamber of Commerce is in
not that building on Collins
Avenue, it is that membership
pool and we are as strong as



LAID -OFF WORKERS







Enroll ina (ours
Recemionist
Kiang eT ere

Marketing ‘Sales
MS Word /Excel
iickEooks
Ofte Procedures



SUNNY ISLES CHAPTER®

stk Annual Educational Conference

Steurt_o Fousiness
Entrepreneurship training
Marketing research
Baiemess Plans
Funditig Search
Bisnis Advice
Accouming Sundcet

Legon: wee umarkbornquestconsubting.com

MARK A TURNQUEST & COLTD
(242) 326-6748 / (242) 427-3640







Thursday, March 19", 2009 - 8:30am. to100p.m, EEE

Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas

Iehrasteed Lagcatcs of
Adpemijtrative Frodeniipeali®

GAIN CREDITABILITY & SUCCESS » BUILD A CAREER

PATH » BECOME INSPIRED & INVIGORATED

Delton Ellis

Anthony Fergueon

Yolanda K.J. Rolle

Theme: “Building a Pathway to Success”

CONFERENCE INCLUDES:

our members are.”

He said current Chamber
president Dionisio D’ Aguilar,
who is set to vacate the posi-
tion this summer, has been
extremely vocal on the issues
facing small and medium-sized

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 3B

Chamber challenged
on small firm relevance

businesses, and the Chamber
was more interested in collab-
orating with other small busi-
ness groups rather than com-
peting for membership.
“He’s (Mr D’Aguilar) been
very aggressive about the

amount of money these insti-
tutions make that leave the
country, and the fact that they
have not been as open to
offering venture capital,” said
Mr Simon.

CONFERENCE TOPICS

A Cartificabs of Participation

Re: Certification points tor CPSICAP holders
Conlerance Keepeales

Contisantal Brakes

“PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS”

> Fisifles, prites and surpemes!!

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

All Administrative Professionals including
Administrative Assistants, Executive Secrataries, Office
Managers, Clerks, Receptionists, Other Administrative

support stat

“MANAGING YOUR FINANCES IN A
RECESSION”

REMARKS
REGISTRATION OPTIONS:
U General Regisbrathom S75-00) pop.

U) Late Legtstrathos (after March 164, 20g) 805-44) pop.

FOR MORE INFORMATION SONTACT:

Shanta Kerr
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
110 Thompson Blvd.
Tal. (242) 302-8816

Marsha Saunders
Si. Margaret's Rectory
Parkgate Road
Tal. (242) 393-6929











































entages

INVESTMENT RISK MANAGER
in a major international Venture Fund in Nassau







We are looking to strengthen our team in Mass,

If you have

* A sound degree in a life sciemee related field, such a5 pharmacology, biology,
nutritional scicnees or medicine and/or sound business background in nutrition
or food and beverage products
Post graduate qualifications andor an MBA or equivalent
Hands-on analytical and research experience, preferably in a Venture Capital of
Private Equity environment
Experience in accounting, valuation and risk management for Venture Capital
Passion for a healthy lifestyle and the right food
Excellent oral and written communications skilkk in English (ather langguages Hi
plush
Bahamian Citizenship, you want to live and work in an
environment right here in Nassau, with frequent travels abroad

intemational

We are

The world’s foremost Wenture Fund in Health, Wellness and Nutrition, The Partnership
invests in the life sciences field and is particularly interested in identifying nutritional
products, dietary supplements, medical foods and mnovative approaches to prevent
chronic cliseases.

We offer

A job which will involve search and analysis of companies in the area of health, wellness
and nutrition and preparation of investment decisions by investment committes. A
competitive salary package commensurate with the experience and qualifications will be
offered.

If you are attracted by this unique opportunity, or have questions, please contact VC
Americas SoA... P.O Box WN-7532, Nassau or PAX: 327-006 or EMAIL:
hr.nassauia@linventages.com for the attention of HUMAN RESOLRCES —Ref: IRM Nas,

The deadline for applications ts 20-March-2009,

IAAP® SUNNY ISLES CHAPTER®

5" Annual Educational Conference (1/2 Day)
Thursday, March 19", 2009 - 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas
“BUILDING A PATHWAY TO SUCCESS”

REGISTRATION:

JTAAPS SUNNY ISLES CHAPTER: 5" ANNUAL EDUCATIONAL OONFERENCE, MARCH 194, 2009

Mailing Address:
Phoae Contact(s)

CPS/CAP Holder? LU Yee L Mo

Would you like to become an LAAP member? 0 Yes 0 No

AAP Member? UO Yes 1 No

METHOD OF PAYMENT

aCash o Cheque
Moke cheque payeble toc “Sumny Isles Chapter, AAP"
Deliver completed registration form, with full payment
to:
® Shanta Kerr

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

110 Thompson Bhd.

Tel (242) 302-8816

REGISTRATION: $75.00 per person
(Includes Continental Breakfast)

CANCELLAT CY: There will be NO REPUNDS
for cancellations received aller Friday, March 12", 2004. A
$25.10 adinintetrative fee will be charged. There will be

NO REFUNDS for rezistrants mod in atlendance.
WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

All Adcninistrative Professionals including:
Administrative Assistants, Executive Secretaries, Office
Managers, Clerks, Receptionists, and Other
Administrative support staff

> Marsha Saunders
St. Mangaret’s Rectory
Parkgate Road
Tel (242) 399-t929

International Association of Administrative Professionals®

The Intemational Association of ndminsvative Professionals (AAP IB & a non-gerit profesional association with approsimately 40,000 members and
aflbates and neaty G00 Chapters woriteade.

[AAF defines administretwe professionals es indices wha ane resporsble for ed minesraGve tasks and co-ordination ef information in support af an
oFice-refeted eiecoment end who ere dedicated! to furthering their personal end profesional gerwih in their chosen professon

[AP works in partnerstip with englowert to promote professional excellence.

The LAA? Plieson 6 fo enhance the success of caneer-rinded achninisirative profess oneis by providing oppariunities for geawth through education,
community bulicing and leadership dewelopment
PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USNS ee
CLICO regulation hindered by 'non-cosy' relationship

FROM page 1B

“The Registrar’s Office has
always been a bit of a sore thumb
in the public service area,” Mr
Smith explained. “It was always
peopled by people not from the
public service. The relationship
between that office and the Min-
istry of Finance was not a cosy
one. They felt we were interfer-
ing.”
te suggested that through hav-
ing the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office staffed by personnel who,
largely, had not come up through
the civil service, the Bahamian
insurance regulator was unaware
—and not alert to — the time when
it needed to notify the Ministry of
Finance about CLICO
(Bahamas) regulatory issues.

Mr Smith said the Registrar
would have reported directly to









the then-Financial Secretary to
the Treasury, Ruth Millar. “The
Financial Secretary was very well-
versed in the rules and knew
exactly what to do if something
was wrong,” he added.

The fact that neither Mr Smith
nor, it would appear, Mrs Millar
knew of the CLICO (Bahamas)
situation indicates that at the cru-
cial time — when the company was
both making and expanding its
investment and asset concentra-
tion in the Florida real estate pro-
ject — key figures in the govern-
ment hierarchy were ‘in the dark’
about the issues that would ulti-
mately lead to the insurer’s insol-
vency and collapse.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, in his address to the House
of Assembly on CLICO

(Bahamas) collapse, indicated
that the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office was keenly aware of the
problem, having met with the

company on the issue since 2004.

In 2007, it went so far as to
demand that CLICO (Bahamas)
repatriate the $53 million invest-
ed in inter-company loan bal-
ances, but this request was never
met by the company.

Indeed, throughout the “non-
cosy” relationship between the
Ministry of Finance and insur-
ance regulator, CLICO
(Bahamas) increased these loans
from $37.092 million in 2004 to
$53.761 million in 2005, then to
$68.302 million in 2006 and, final-
ly, $57.010 million in 2007. That
latter figure represented some 59
per cent of its total assets.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith said that
while enhanced cross-border
supervision may have helped pre-
vent CLICO (Bahamas) collapse,
the real problem was the fact that
the insurer appeared to have
breached some key Bahamian
laws and regulations.

NOTICE

The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:
























* WILLIAM KNOWLES
* BERYL EDGECOMBE
* CHARLES MUNNSINGS
* ADRIAN MILLER

* ANTHONY WELLS

* MAKITA DEPRADINE
* FREDRICKA JIMENES
* CYRIL WOODSIDE

* TIFFANY ADDERLEY
* MELISSA GRANT
* WAYNE MILLER

*GCOODWIN BUTLER
* BRIAN DEVEAUX

(EVERYTHING LINCOLN)
* CHERYL WELLS

* JASON ALLEN

* GLENDAMAE BAIN








* TIMOTHY CLARKE
* GARTH SAWYER

*KRYSTAL LORD

*MARCO ARMBRISTER

All rentals must be paid and items removed no later than March 26th, 2009

stor-it-all

Soldier Road













sfOFf-IT-

all

(by Lowe’s Wholesale),
Telephone: 393-0964

The Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers

(“BACO”)

celebrates it’s

1 ().. Anniversary

NOTICE

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING (“AGM”)
& LUNCHEON MEETING

We invite you to join us as we
discuss issues relevant to our
profession as well as determining our

administration for 2009

Note: Only paid up members will be eligible to vote

Date: ?7 March 2009

Venue: British Colonial Hilton
Time: 12:30 pam. — 2:00 p.m.

Luncheon cost for Non-Member - $45.00

Contact details:

E-mail: info@bacobahamas,com
Tel.: 247-323-0871 or 325-087?

Fax: 242-325-6574

www, bacobahamas,.com

“Committed to Compliance”

Chief among these were the
exchange control system, with
both Mr Smith and his current
successor as Central Bank of the
Bahamas governor, Wendy
Craigg, pointing out that
Bahamas-resident companies,
including those considered resi-
dent for exchange control pur-
poses, needed the regulator’s pri-
or approval if loans and invest-
ments made overseas were in
their names.

In other words, they needed
permission to invest Bahamian
dollar assets they took in over-
seas in a foreign currency, regard-
less of whether money physically
left the Bahamas or not.

This situation also raises ques-
tions over whether the Registrar
of Insurance’s Office ever dis-
cussed the CLICO (Bahamas) sit-
uation with the Central Bank,
especially whether the company
was receiving exchange control.

Both the Central Bank governor
and Registrar of Insurance attend
the monthly meetings of the
Group of Financial Services Reg-
ulators (GFSR), which discuss
common regulatory issues.

“What’s coming out is that the
[CLICO] operations in the
Bahamas were not in accordance
with Bahamian laws and regula-
tions,” Mr Smith said. “It’s one
thing to have a regulatory failure,
meaning the regulators did not
do something they should have
done. But from what I’ve read, it
seems the company, as a resident
company in the Bahamas, was
making loans and investments
abroad without the prior permis-
sion of exchange control.

“It’s very hard to regulate that
activity, because they’ve done
that under the radar of the regu-
lator. Having said that, with the
increasing cross-border trade in
services between us and the rest

NOTICE OF SALE

Expocredit Corporation (‘the Company”) invites
offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Mans Subdivision’,
comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
South of Burnt Ground in the [sland of Long Island
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.

The Company makes no representations or warranties
with respect to the state of the Property which is
offered for sale “as is where is”.

The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing

& Law of Property Act.

TERMS:

Ten percent (10%) of the purchase

price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
reserves the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers
addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
Partner, P. O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 30°

day of March, 2009.

of the Caribbean, I think that will
encourage greater co-operation
between regulators in the
Caribbean.”

Craig A ‘Tony’ Gomez, CLI-
CO (Bahamas) liquidator, is cur-
rently having to wade through a
maze of related party transactions
and inter-company book trans-
fers to build up a complete pic-
ture of the company’s financial
position.

Mr Smith said it was likely that
CLICO (Bahamas) and its
Trinidadian parent, CL Financial,
had transferred assets between
entities in the group, and used
the former’s Turks and Caicos
branch as a way to move US dol-
lar assets into the US.

The former minister and Cen-
tral Bank governor said CLICO
(Bahamas) would have needed
exchange control permission to
repatriate dividends and profits
from the US real estate venture
back into the Bahamas, and also
would have required the Regis-
trar of Insurance’s approval for
material changes on its balance
sheet.

“There seems to be no regula-
tor in the Bahamas that gave per-
mission for it,” Mr Smith added
of CLICO (Bahamas) actions.
“On the surface, I don’t think it’s
fair to blame a system failure,
because the system was not
designed to deal with what
appears to be a blatant attempt to
disguise transactions.”

Evidence to support the
exchange control breaches claim
comes from the 2007 audited
financial statements of CLICO
Enterprises, the wholly-owned
CLICO (Bahamas) subsidiary
that received the $57 million
advances from the parent. Like
CLICO (Bahamas), CLICO
Enterprises is a Bahamian-regis-
tered company, sharing the same
registered office as its parent.

The 2007 accounts list both the
Florida real estate development,
Wellington Preserve, and anoth-
er asset — a Haiti-based bakery
called Shabisco — as 100 per cent
owned by CLICO Enterprises.
The chairman’s report accompa-
nying the financials lists Welling-
ton Preserve as CLICO Enter-
prises “most significant invest-
ment in 2007”, and details that
“funding from” the Bahamian
company will replace loans from
CL Financial once the develop-
ment starts to generate positive
cash flow. This clearly suggests
that overseas loans and invest-
ments are being made in the
name of a Bahamian company.



p.m,



GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICH

Tender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New
Providence and the Family Islands including Grand
Bahama for the years 2009 - 2013

1.0 The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the “Purchaser’) now invites
sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from
schools in accordance with the provision of the Education Act. Bid
forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of
Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the
subject bided on.

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address
below, on or before Tuesday, 31% March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those

Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m.
on Thursday, 2" April, 2009 at the address below:

The Chairman, Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre

Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-1530






THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 5B



Chamber chief ‘shocked" at rate of jobless increase

FROM page 1B

Acknowledging that time con-
straints had restricted its interim
survey to New Providence and
Grand Bahama, the Department
of Statistics nevertheless had been
able to survey a sample of 2,500
households for the interim data
produced in February 2009.

For New Providence, the total
projected unemployment rate
rose from 8.7 per cent in May
2008 to 12.1 per cent in February
2009, an increase likely to have
been driven largely by the more
than 1,500 hotel lay-offs. These
job cuts, together with the
increasing effects of the down-
turn, have impacted other sec-
tors, especially industries such as
retail and construction.

For Grand Bahama, the
Department of Statistics said the
unemployment rate had increased
from a 9 per cent total in May
2008 to 14.6 per cent in February
2009, an increase of 5.6 per cent
or more than 50 per cent in per-
centage terms.

These latest unemployment
rates were described as the high-
est experienced by both islands
in the past 15 years, since the
recession of the early 1990s. The
Department of Statistics said the
number of persons unemployed
on New Providence had risen by
4,540 or 38 per cent, while for
Grand Bahama the equivalent
was a 55 per cent rise or 1,500
persons.

These data mean that just over
one in 10 Bahamians who are
actively looking for work are now
not able to find it. On Grand
Bahama, the February 2009 sur-
vey showed that that 17.7 per cent
of women were unemployed, with
the rate slightly lower for men at
11.7 per cent. Conversely, for
New Providence, the unemploy-
ment rate was only 11.9 per cent
for women, yet 12.4 per cent for
men.

“The Government has to get
these infrastructure programmes
up and running as quickly as pos-
sible,” Mr D’ Aguilar told Tribune
Business. “The planning, the
design, the scope of works, those
phases take a lot of time.

“Clearly, the Bahamian econ-
omy does not have any time. Peo-
ple are losing their jobs at a phe-
nomenal rate. The percentage of
the workforce that is unemployed
is up 40 per cent in six months.”

The Chamber president added:
“Money spent during a recession

typically generates a 38 per cent
greater return that money spent
during a boom. These displaced
people need to be found jobs. The
quickest way to do that is to start
some of these infrastructure pro-
jects, and get them going.

“Governments don’t know how
to speed up in a crisis. This is
clearly what they need to do.
What that number shows you is
that there is an urgency to expe-
dite what projects are out there,
and see what others might come
along.

“There’s a sense of urgency to
get things going. Unemployment
is rising at a precipitous rate.”

The increased unemployment
rate will come as no surprise to
anyone, with the Government,
business community and Bahami-
ans across this nation braced for
such a rise, given the severity of
the economic downturn impacting
the US, which acts as this coun-
try’s major tourism and inward
investment source.

Not surprisingly, the Depart-
ment of Statistics survey found
that out of the total 16,315 per-
sons unemployed in New Provi-
dence, more than one-third (33
per cent) had lost their jobs with-
in the last six months. Out of this
total, some 44 per cent had either
been laid-off or dismissed.

On Grand Bahama, almost 50
per cent of those unemployed had
lost their jobs within the past six
months. Of these, some 48 per
cent had been paid-off or dis-
missed. The employed labour
force also experienced a decline,
shrinking by 5 per cent on New
Providence and 9.2 per cent on
Grand Bahama.

Philip Simon, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s execu-
tive director, said that while the
general expectation had been that
the unemployment rate would
rise into “double digits”, the feel-
ing had been that it would not go
much above 12 per cent.

“But it [an even higher unem-
ployment rate] could be reality,
quite honestly, because I don’t
think we’ve hit the bottom of the
barrel yet,” he explained, “and
there may be more lay-offs to
come.

“At the same time, it’s impor-
tant to encourage businesses to
be prudent but also have a social
responsibility, and as best as pos-
sible not to take advantage of the
situation.”

Mr Simon urged Bahamian
businesses and entrepreneurs not
to become obsessed by the ‘doom
and gloom’, and to raise their

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (A) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Quelantra Company Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 18th day of February, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (A) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Thatchberri Company Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 16th day of February, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

ThesBahamas *NationaL*!lrust

invites

you*to

ae I

het a cles i
a ey

|

heads and examine future objec-
tives. “There has to be, even in
the midst of this recession, there
has to be a drive and creativity
in the establishment of new busi-
nesses,” he explained.

“Just look at when we go
through a hurricane. Old trees
are blown away, but there is
always new growth, and there are
some businesses that are thriving
right now. You have to be in tune
with your consumers, new ways of
getting to them, and attach a ser-
vice to your product. You’ve got
to hustle.”

The Chamber executive urged
Bahamians to keep the unem-
ployment figures, and their

increase, in perspective. “We all
accept the fact that we are in the
midst of a recession, and this is
one of the indicators manifesting
itself,” he said.

“What we have to do as best
as possible is to micro-manage
our lives, not just from a business
perspective, but the community
we live in is so inter-linked and
interdependent on one another.
What happens on Paradise Island
affects me in South Beach, what
happens in Lyford Cay affects me
in Fox Hill.

“We have a social responsibil-
ity intertwined with economic
responsibility to truly be our
brother’s keeper. We can’t disas-

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF MOHAMMED
BIN RASHID BIN ABDULLAH AL
FANNAH AL ARAIMI late of House
2651 Way No. 1949 Plot No. 80
Eastern Madinat, Qaboos, Sultanate
of Oman, deceased.













NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned
on or before the 25th day of March, 2009,
after which date the Administrators will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard
only to the claims of which they shall then
















have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.









HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators
Chambers
P.O. Box N-3247
Ocean Centre
Montagu Foreshore
East Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas














we

Waker’s Dap

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

Sous Chef

Key Responsibilities

* Required to skillfully prepare international cuisine.
* Assist in ordering food supplies and kitchen equipment as

needed,

* Will be required to oversee majority of cooking and methods

of food preparation.

¢ Along with the Executive Chef, instruct kitchen employees

in the finer points of cooking.

* Assist in planning meals; making of menus, and assigning

prices.

* Assist in butchering and/or prepares meats and poultry for

cooking.

Qualifications

* High School diploma or equivalent

* Culinary degree from approved school or completion of an
approved apprentice program is preferred
5 to 10 years in different supervisory positions in the
kitchens including sous chef and/or chef d’ cuisine position.
Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred.
Highly skilled cooking ability in all areas of kitchen including
the ability to prepare various ethnic cuisines.

¢ Experience working in multiple operations preferred.

* Aminimum of two years international experience an asset.

* Experience in opening a property a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work
in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a
self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career,
submit your resume to the attention of the Director of HR &
Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613.

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009

Teri an
Parcel a ae)

sociate ourselves from the lay-
offs. The outlook has to be one of
positioning ourselves for progress
and success coming out of this
recession. That’s a tough pill to
swallow when we’re going
through what we’re going through










COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

in the short-term, but we have to
have that perspective in mind.
What are you doing a year from
now? What would I like to do,
and how do I position myself to
achieve that?”

2008

CLE/QUI/360

Common Law and Equity Division






IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles
Act Chapter 393 Statute Law of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas











AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel or lot of land situate in the Subdivision
known as Englerston in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
being that lot bounded on the NORTH by a
public road known as Balfour Avenue and
running thereon One Hundred feet and Fourty-
Seven hundredths (100.47) on the EAST by
land said to be of Elgin Wright and running
thereon Fifty-Two feet and Seventy-Three
hundredths (52.73) on the SOUTH by land
said to be of Emmanuel Larrimore and running
thereon Ninety-Nine feet and Sixty-Two
hundredths (99.62) and on the WEST by a
public road known as St. Charles Vincent
Street and running thereon Fourty-Six feet and
Thirty-Two hundredths (46.32).

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of MARY

STUBBS.

NOTICE OF PETITION

Take notice that by Petition filed in the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas on the 6" day of March, A.D., 2008
MARY STUBBS of the Subdivision known as
Englerston in the Southern District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas (hereinafter “the
Petitioner’) claims to be the owner in fee simple in
possession of the above captioned piece parcel or lot
of land and has made application to the Supreme Court
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959, to have her title to
the said piece parcel or lot of land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in
a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

The Registry of The Supreme Court, Ansbacher
House, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

The Chambers of Cedric L. Parker & Co. No.
9 Rusty Bethel Drive, Nassau, Bahamas.

Take notice that any person having dower or right of
dower or any adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition must on or before the expiry of Thirty
(30) days following final publication of this Notice
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
and the undersigned a Statement of his Claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith together with a plan of the area claimed and
an abstract of title to the said area claimed by him.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of his Claim on or before the Thirtieth (30) day
following final publication of this notice will operate

as a bar to such claim.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Chambers
Neil’s Court
No. 9 Rusty Bethel Drive,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

@ Maillis Farm, Adelaide Road

Cost-

on Saturday,14 March,
Dress-Cuban or Smart Casual
$150pp

2009 @ lpm

2Do you want to make up a table?

Call 393 1317 and ask for Rosita

bntmembershi p@bnt.os


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

es
Pioneers aiming to fill ‘missing middle’ | Construction sector



FROM page 1B

care, and create a higher standard
of living.

“Tt’s a virtuous cycle of feeding
the economy, so it grows more
and diversifies. In some ways
tourism, because it’s dependent
on external customers and financ-
ing, can be extremely fragile. But
if you invest in small and medi-
um-sized enterprises, you develop
an economy that is more diversi-
fied, robust and deeper.”

The Pioneers of Prosperity ini-

tiative is now in its third year,
having been launched in — and
extended through — Africa, with
awards ceremonies and presen-
tations held in nations such as
Rwanda and Kenya. It has now
been launched in the Bahamas
and Caribbean, and later this year
will expand into Central America,
backed by the John Templeton
Foundation, Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB), 7
(Seven) and the OTF (On the
Frontier) Group. The latter is a
competitive strategies consulting

Legal Notice

NOTI

CE

EMI OVERSEAS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution

, which commenced on

firm. Pioneers for Prosperity will
likely award between 10 to 15
grants to small and medium-sized
enterprises from across the
Bahamas and the Caribbean. The
grants will range in size from
$5,000 to $100,000, but only one
company will be awarded the lat-
ter sum. All companies need
equity and financing, and grant
money represents one of the best
and least onerous forms of financ-
ing for Bahamian firms. Pioneers
of Prosperity has held several
information and recruitment ses-
sions in the Bahamas, and Ms
Noble said the response had been
overwhelmingly positive, with
entrepreneurs telling her that they
had never seen such an initiative
targeted at small and medium-
sized enterprises before.

To date, Pioneers for Prosper-
ity had received between 200-250
applications from across the
Bahamas and the Caribbean, but
was expecting a last-minute influx
before today’s close to take that
to somewhere between 500-1,000

Ms Noble said: “The last count
I’ve seen has been somewhere in
the order of 40-50 persons. We’re
hoping to get a lot more.”

She explained that when it
came to deciding on grant recipi-
ents, Pioneers of Prosperity was
looking for “the four bottom
lines”. These were investing in
understanding their customer and
customer service; investing in
themselves via profitability;
investing in their staff through
training, benefits and premium
wages; and investing in their com-
munities.

“We're looking for companies
seeking to create prosperity in all
senses,” Ms Noble explained.
And she advised Bahamian firms
and entrepreneurs: “Don’t put
your head in the sand. Now is the
time to be thinking about starting
a business if you don’t have one.

“Tf you do have one, now is the
time to think about investing to
get ahead of the curve. The cur-
rent economic environment is a
challenge, but it should be viewed

unemployment may
have struck 18-20%

FROM page 1B

the Department of Statistics survey accounted for construction

industry personnel who were temporarily laid-off between jobs —

meaning until the next construction project came along.
The BCA president pointed out that very few new construc-

tion projects had so far emerged to replace jobs that contractors
had completed last year. He added that once the 2009-2010 Bud-
get was finalised, the Government was likely to release to tender

contracts for various public works projects, a process that the

BCA was urging be transparent and include all contractors capa-

ble and qualified for doing the work.

Expressing hope that Baha Mar may be able to conclude a
deal with the Chinese that would allow the $2.6 billion Cable
Beach project to proceed, Mr Wrinkle said any public sector

works would help the construction industry “immensely”, given

the short supply of private jobs.

“This is a time when the Government has got to step up to the

plate and get these works going,” Mr Wrinkle said. “All that

money is Bahamian, and is far more valuable than a foreign pro-
ject because it all stays here. Hopefully, it all goes smoothly and

we all get a piece of it.”

the 20th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



re DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DR. MEYER RASSIN
FOUNDATION
SCHOLARSHIPS



The Dectors Hospital Dr, Meyer
Aiessin Foundation & pleased to
announce thal applications are now
being accepted for scholarships &
financial assestance for students
Pursuing Healthcare careers.

Applicants must be Gahamian
citimans & return to the Bahamas
Upon completion of their shucties

Applications are available on our
website al ww. doctorsioasp.com,
Only ceeniléted appicalians with
required documentation submitted
Would be considerad.,

Deedine for submesion of
competed application forme & al
Supparting documentation &

March 31, 4008

The Doctors Hospital

Dr. Meyer Rassin Foundation

P.0.Bex N08 * Nassau, ALP, The Bahamas

www. doctorshosp.com/foundation



ROYAL = FIDEL

Paoeey at Wowk

applications. From the Bahamas,

ITY GY

as an opportunity.”

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000

ZUNI INVEST S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, ZUNI INVEST S.A. is in dissolution. The date of
commencement of dissolution was the 4th day of March,
2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator

of ZUNI INVEST S.A.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

Ea

Well-established Wholesaler
saleperson (females
apply) for the snack food division. Individual
must have experience in sales with emphasis
on large food stores. Only individuals with a
proven record of being able to work
unsupervised and achieve results will be
considered, Must be able to drive standard
shill vehicle and be in possession of current
valid driver's license. Individuals with their
own transportation will receive favorable

requires a

are encouraged i

consideration. Company offers good benefits.
Submit applications to:
Sales
P.O.Box N-7124
Nassau, Bahamas



EG CAPITAL cS
BROKERAGE &

MARKE
EB & ADVISORY SERVICES

cr A LL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 6 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.36 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -52.00 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.86 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
WVWVWV.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

1.39
11.00
7.00

1.45
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.43
2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.59
1.43
2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close

11.00

13.95

11.00
10.45

10.50
10.00

EPS $
0.070
0.992
0.244

-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309

Change Daily Vol. Div $

1.45

7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37

0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.895
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

2.83
6.59
1.50
2.16
7.76

5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50

SoS OO Oe emcee
29029000909900000
666666N556665666566

oo
Q
6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low

1000.00

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Last Sale

100.00
100.00
100.00

Interest
T% 19 October 2017
0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
0.00 T% 30 May 2013
0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

S52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

8.42
6.25
0.40

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Weekly Vol.

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

29.00 ABDAB
0.00 Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
0.40 RND Holdings

31.72
0.00
0.45

33.26

0.00
0.55

4.540
0.000
0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

29.00
0.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

S2wk-Low
1.3781
2.9230
1.3812
3.3201

11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000

NA Vv
1.4387
2.8988
1.4428
3.3201

12.6816
100.5606
96.4070

1.0000
9.1005
1.0401
1.0330
1.0410

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
1.0000

YTD%

0.35
-1.40
0.63
-1.94
0.50
0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.06
4.01
3.30
4.10

Last 12 Months Div $ Yield _%
30-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
27-Feb-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

4.10 31-Jan-09

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Last Price
Weekly Vol. -
EPS $ - A company’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

- Last traded over-the-counter price

Trading volume of the prior week



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

ANTEX TRADING LTD.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the
Dissolution of ANTEX TRADING LTD. has been completed,
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register. The date of comple-
tion of the dissolution was the 2nd of March, 2008.

Sa OE ccc eal oe >
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD,
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CGA Holdings Limited

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CGA Holdings Limited is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act
2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
5 March 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is David Becker of
c/o Seaboard Corporation, 9000 West 67th Street, Suite
300, Merriam, Kansas 66203-3700 U.S.A.

Dated the 5th day of March, 2009.

H & J Corporate Services Ltd.

Registered Agent
for the above-named Company

we

Baker's Dap

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

Assistant Marketing Manager

Key Requirements

¢ Ademonstrated track record of sales to high net
worth clients

* Extensive experience maintaining strong long term
customer relationships with significant add-on/repeat
business

* Astrong existing network with high net worth clients in
the U.S.A. , Europe and The Bahamas

* Ability to develop and implement marketing
campaigns to high net worth clients

Qualifications

* Bachelor's degree in Sales, Marketing or related
subject; professional certifications
Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth
real estate promotions
Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power
Point, Microsoft Word, Excel and Asset Manager
Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership
and customer relations skills
Must have excellent written and verbal
communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to
work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be
a self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive
and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of The Director of HR & Training,

hr@bakersbayclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 7B





CLICO collapse causes Act delay

FROM page 1B

“a good and productive week”
when it came to determining CLI-
CO (Bahamas) actual financial
position. At least four companies
— British American Financial,
Colinalmperial Insurance Com-
pany, Family Guardian and
Atlantic Medical -— have con-
firmed their interest in acquiring
CLICO (Bahamas) life and
health insurance portfolio.
Whether they will actually pur-
sue this interest, and translate it
into a formal offer to the liquida-
tor, will depend on the portfolio’s
quality and the financial infor-
mation supplied by Mr Gomez.
“It'll be out to those persons
early [this] week who have
expressed an interest,” the liq-
uidator told Tribune Business,
saying the process had taken
slightly longer because he wanted
to verify the accuracy of the infor-
mation provided. CLICO
(Bahamas) has some 17,297 life
insurance policyholders, paying
an annual combined premium of
$5.1 million, and 11,230 health
insurance policyholders, paying

annual premiums of $3.2 million.
In total, the Bahamas accounted
for 23,191 of the company’s
29,017 insurance and annuity
clients, and some $44 million of its
$100 million in liabilities.

Asked when a creditors’ meet-
ing would be held, Mr Gomez
said he was “awaiting the hearing
of the full application” to place
CLICO (Bahamas) into full liq-
uidation. That petition is due to
be heard before Supreme Court
Justice Cheryl Albury on
Wednesday, March 18.

Meanwhile, Zhivargo Laing,
minister of state for finance,
pledged that the Government
would move “expeditiously” to
bring the Domestic Insurance Act
— passed by Parliament more than
three years ago — into effect, but
first needed to assess and intro-
duce amendments suggested “in
light of these events”.

He explained that there had
“been some suggestions by the
Registrar of Insurance that there
may be some amendments to the
Act that would strengthen its abil-
ity to regulate the insurance sec-
tor”.

Although he was not in office

WHY PAY MORE?

ak Trip Airfare $69 x gi S|

Nassau — Mangrove Cay
Nassau — Congo Town
Nassau — San Andros
Nassau — Fresh Creek

For ticket sabes and travel information contact
Partormance Air af 362-1608 | d62- 2302.

Wa, Perormance-aircom



or

Lictiiaa ff ACHP PLA-Tat

when contacted by Tribune Busi-
ness, and could not recall many of
the specific proposals, Mr Laing
said: “In the legislation, both the
existing one and the new Act, we
don’t have the ability to do judi-
cial management. Instead of lig-
uidation, the courts could order a
management team to take con-
trol of the company, as a step
before liquidation.”

The minister added that had
Tribune Business contacted him a
week ago, he would have said that
the regulations to accompany the
Domestic Insurance Act — the
missing piece, which would give it
enforcement teeth — would have
been tabled in Parliament within
the next few weeks.

That was the piece missing
from the puzzle to bring the leg-
islation into effect. When asked
about a new Domestic Insurance
Act timetable, Mr Laing replied:
“There is no question that we will
seek to get to it expeditiously,
that’s for sure.”

On CLICO (Bahamas) col-
lapse, he added: “What it does
point to is something that has
been observed already, which we
ourselves had seen prior to this
event. There have to be upgrades
to the insurance regulatory
regime, inclusive of legislation,
the resources of the Office of the
Registrar of Insurance, and the
capacity of the Registrar to
respond quickly when necessary
and react in a graduated fashion
that allows it to better exert con-
trol over how much is done by an
operation. We clearly have to
move in that direction, and clear-
ly we are.”

Mr Laing, though, indicated
that the main responsibility for
CLICO (Bahamas) being placed
into liquidation lay with its
Trinidad parent, CL Financial. It
is understood that CL Financial
representatives dominated CLI-
CO (Bahamas) Board.

In particular, the minister said
the Bahamas-based insurer failed
to obtain the required ‘no objec-
tion’ approval from the Registrar
of Insurance for its overweight
exposure to related party loans
and US-based real estate invest-
ments, despite having an obliga-
tion to do so. “It really is for an
operation to comply with the law,
because it protects them and their
clients,” Mr Laing said. “What
increased supervision does is that
it allows you to do these kinds of
robust inspections to determine
these things early.” Otherwise,
Bahamian regulators would be
responding to events after they

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

ADVERTISEMENT
VACANCY

MANAGER | (HUMAN RESOURCES)

had had happened and only
revealed in a company’s audited
financial statements.

Mr Laing also acknowledged
that CLICO (Bahamas) troubles,
and that of its Trinidadian par-
ent, CL Financial, had strength-
ened the case for improved con-
solidated supervision and cross-
border regulation of pan-
Caribbean financial entities.

CLICO (Bahamas) was a per-
fect example of a financial ser-
vices provider straddling multi-
ple jurisdictions. CL Financial
owned the Bahamian company,
and its affiliates, through a Bar-
bados-based holding company,
and CLICO (Bahamas) also had
branch operations in the Turks
& Caicos Islands and Belize.

“T think you could argue that,”
Mr Laing acknowledged, when
Tribune Business asked him
whether CLICO (Bahamas) col-
lapse had strengthened the case
for enhanced cross-border regu-
latory co-operation and supervi-
sion within the Caribbean.

“T think it could have benefited
from tighter co-operation
between regulators from across
the region, that’s for sure.”

The CLICO (Bahamas) case
has raised concerns about the
ability of Bahamian regulators to
oversee/supervise the overseas
branches of Bahamas-resident
financial services providers, espe-
cially given that much of the $73.6
million advanced to US real
estate investments — the exposure
that eventually sunk the company
— came via US dollar annuities
placed in the Turks & Caicos.

The move by Bahamian
authorities to place CLICO
(Bahamas) into liquidation also
has CARICOM-related political
implications, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham having revealed
last week that Guyana’s president
had called him several times to
express concern about the fact 53
per cent of CLICO (Guyana’s)
assets were tied up in the Bahami-
an liquidation.

Improved co-operation may be
on the way, though. “I think the
CARICOM grouping may have
some discussions along these lines
at some point,” Mr Laing said.
“That would be the right facility
for achieving co-operation. I’m
sure that, arising out of this, that
platform will make some sugges-
tions along those lines.”

The Registrar of Insurance, the

minister added, was last week
attending an inter-CARICOM
regulatory meeting in Belize. But
Mr Laing emphasized that
improved cross-border supervi-
sion of financial institutions with-

in the Caribbean depended on
the willingness of individual
nations and regulators to share
information, and to do so while
still complying with their coun-
try’s own laws.

Ww

Maker's Bap

Baker’s Bay
GOLF & OCEAN CLUB

As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians
on our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to

apply for the position of:

Golf Course Construction
Assistant Manager

Attributes to include:

* 5-8 years experience in Golf Course Construction and
Management at leading Golf Club.

* Knowledge of all phases of Golf course design and
construction activities including vertical golf construction
(club houses, maintenance facilities irrigation pump stations)

Turf Management Degree.

Athorough understanding of all phases of maintenance and
repair to courses, practice range and equipment.
Extensive experience working with city planners, engineers,

architects, and contractors.

Knowledgeable in all phases of construction contracts

related to golf projects.

Detail oriented, a skilled planner, ability to prioritize with

excellent communication skills.

Computer literate.

Willing to live on an out island.

Ability to work on own initiative is important.

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need

apply.

Applications can be submitted to:

Director, Human Resources and Training
P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or sbowe@bakersbayclub.com

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009



THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

TENDER

MAKING AND/OR SUPPLYING UNIFORMS
FOR SECURITY OFFICERS, SCREENERS
AND FIREFIGHTERS

1. Bids are invited for a one year contract to manufacture uniforms for the Security
Officers, Screeners and Firefighters of the Airport Authority. The details for security

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified
persons for the post of Manager | (Human Resources), Corporate Office, Public
Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

* Bachelors Degree in Business Administration, Management, Public
Administration, Human Resources, Psychology, or equivalent;

Five (5) years experience in Human Resources;
Knowledge of HR practices and related laws;

Excellent communication skills (oral and written) analytical and
conceptualized thinking skills; computer skills; negotiation and conflict
resolution skills;

* Ability to organize and prioritize multiple work assignments ;

The Manager 1, (Human Resources) Corporate Office will report to the
Deputy Director/Operations, Human Resources, Corporate Office.

JOB SUMMARY

The Manager 1, (Human Resources), Corporate Office is responsible for
coordinating all matters relating to the Employee Assistance Program (EAP)
for the Corporate Office, Institutions and Agencies. Also, the processing of
Human Resources matters forwarded to Corporate Office from the Institutions
and Agencies.

DUTIES:

1. Liaises with Institutions/Agencies, Corporate Office and Provider of
Services for all Employee Assistance Program (EAP) referrals:
Coordinates appointments and reports for all EAP referrals;
Prepares monthly management reports on EAP and Human
Resources Activities;

Processes assigned HR duties, i.e., selection and recruitment:
Ensures compliance with policies and procedures;

Develops and designs systems and surveys to ensure a proactive
approach to HR Management;

7. Participates on various ad hoc committees;

The post of Manager 1 (Human Resources) is in Scale HAAS1
($38,150 x 700 - $44,450).

Letter of application and curricula vitae should be submitted to the
Director of Human Resources, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals
Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or P.O. Box N-8200 Nassau,
Bahamas no later than 16th March, 2009.



and firefighters are as follows:

Trousers (Male and Female)
Trousers (Male)-Dickies
Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(M/F)
Female Caps

Rain Coats

Shoulders Patches

Ties

Sweaters

Cap Badges

Dress Uniform Jackets
Trousers K-9 Unit

Shirts*

Senior Officers Shirts*
Shoes*

Belts*

Trousers (Male and Female)-Dickies
Skirts

Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(Dickies)M/F
Male Peak Caps

Shoulders Bars

Belts (Male and Female)
Windbreakers

Shoes (Male and Female)

Safety Boots

Golf Shirts — K-9 Unit

Pants*

Boots*

Dress Pants Senior Officers*
Overalls*

Base Ball Caps*

(*Items are for Fire Fighters)

Collection of the Bid Specifications and viewing of the samples of the uniforms may
be done at the Security Office (located in the former Police Station at Lynden Pindling
International Airport) between the hours of 9:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m., Monday thru Friday
up to March 10, 2009.

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes addressed to the undersigned and the
envelope must specify “BID FOR UNIFORMS”. The Airport Authority reserves the
right to reject any envelope not properly addressed and/or not specifying “BID FOR
UNIFORMS”. Faxed bids will NOT be considered.

The Authority reserves the right to reject any and all bids without stating any
reason (s).

Bids should be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday March 31, 2009. Bids
received after the deadline will not be considered.

There will be a public opening of bids at 10:00 a.m. on Friday April 3, 2009. Interested
bidders may attend, and bring copies of the business licenses.

Acting General Manager
The Airport Authority
Lynden Pindling International Airport
P. O. Box AP59222
Nassau, Bahamas
MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

be







The stories behind the news

aG al 1



CHAUNCEY TYNES’ ASSOCIATIONS WITH JOE LEHDER AND LYNDEN PINDLING

The tragic young pilot
who Knew too much

@ By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

PILOT Chauncey Tynes knew a
lot about Joe Lehder, the Colom-
bian drug czar whose cocaine traf-
ficking activities in the 1980s had
such a profound and damaging
effect on the Bahamas and its peo-

le.
: He also knew plenty about the
movements of the then Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling, includ-
ing a hush-hush night flight to
Grand Bahama when Pindling and
Lehder met in secret.

When Tynes brought a boxful
of US banknotes back to the fam-
ily home off Mackey Street and
told his father — a respected PLP
official — that the $50,000 “gift”
from Lehder was destined for a
high-ranking police officer, he was
roundly berated.

“Don’t drag me into this kind of
stuff,” said Chauncey Sr., who was
treasurer of the PLP in the late
1960s, when the party came to
power.

Chauncey Jr assured his father
that he never got involved in drug
flights and that all he ever carried
for Lehder was money, usually
neatly wrapped US banknotes
which — we can now safely
assume — were used to pay off
crooks in the PLP and the civil
service.

But his dubious associations
were to be his undoing. For
Chauncey Jr., the association with
Lehder and Pindling eventually
brought tragedy.

Having been privy to various
clandestine transactions — he
always insisted that Pindling and a
senior police officer were on
Lehder’s payroll, receiving regular
consignments of cash — he “went
missing” on a flight from George
Town, Exuma, to Nassau in 1983.

Parents

His parents, who both still live
in their humble home in a close-
knit Bahamian community, nev-
er saw him again. He was 37 at
the time, a father-of-two cut down
in his prime.

“He knew too much,” his father
told INSIGHT, glancing up at the
photograph of Chauncey Jr which
still graces his sitting room wall.

“When he vanished, the family
was affected badly, but we sur-
vived. He was working as chief
pilot for Lehder, but of course
when he took the job we thought
that Lehder was a genuine
investor. It was only later that we
discovered the truth. But my belief
is that Pindling was responsible
for his death. Not directly, but
that’s the way it seems to me.”

In 1981, Chauncey Jr flew Pin-
dling to Freeport during the night
hours for a meeting with Joe
Lehder, who was by then running
a lucrative drugs trans-shipment
operation from his “headquarters”
at Norman’s Cay.

At 4am, while it was still dark,
he transported the prime minister
back to Nassau. It was one of
many missions he flew for Lehder.

CEP Cciclt pecple vittuelly cuy

’ New Car 4
Show [=
» MallatMarathon }
a, March 27 & 28
2008

a0



PILOT CHAUNCEY TYNES who ‘went missing’ on a flight from George

Town, Exuma, to Nassau in 1983.

Usually, boxes of banknotes were
involved, including the one he
brought home from the drug czar’s
HQ destined for a police officer
whose name would surprise you.
“He told me who was getting the
money,” said Mr Tynes, “He took
cash from Lehder to Pindling’s
home on a frequent basis. It was
always in small boxes, and I imag-
ine it was in US banknotes.”

At the 1984 public inquiry into
drug trafficking, Pindling denied
ever meeting Lehder. But
Chauncey Jr was in no doubt that
the pair met, and that Pindling and
the senior police officer were vir-
tually at the drug czar’s beck and
call.

“T warned him to stay away
from all that,” his father revealed.
“But he didn’t.”

Having failed to take that
fatherly advice, young Chauncey
paid the price. He “disappeared”
on a flight from Exuma to Nassau
in 1983, having apparently taken
off in the company of three
Colombians.

It is now believed the plane was
diverted and that pilot Tynes was
“disposed of” because he knew
far too much about the criminal
connections between Lehder and
certain members of the PLP gov-
ernment, including Pindling.

From that fateful day 26 years
ago, nothing has been heard of
the promising young man who
found himself caught up in the
wrong company. All that remains
of him are the memories and his
father’s plainly stated accusations
against those he blames for his
death.

The story of Chauncey Tynes
Jr and his mysterious loss is just

ema tale)

one of many to emerge from that
shameful period in Bahamian his-
tory. He was one of several young
men who lost their lives because
they became embroiled in the
Colombian cocaine trade through
the islands.

The police officer who was
accused of being beneficiary of
that $50,000 pay-off was a career
policeman who spent more than
four decades in the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

His involvement with Pindling
in turning a blind eye to Lehder’s
trafficking enterprise was outlined
to me, without equivocation, by a
man who is rated by those who
know him as an unchallengeably
honourable man.

Chauncey Tynes Sr., 88, a for-
mer taxi-driver and insurance offi-
cial, is known by all as a straight-
forward and scrupulously honest
character.

Bribe

He is one of the few senior PLP
figures who did not profit from
the party’s rise, and admits to hav-
ing turned down a $600,000 bribe
from a UBP “agent” who wanted
him to stop campaigning against
his party in the islands in 1968.

“T knew so many of the
islanders well and they were all
ready to vote any way I voted,”
he said, “The UBP wanted me
back in Nassau where I could do
no harm because they thought I
was a dangerous man. An agent
offered me $600,000 to go away,
but I wouldn’t take it. I said I did-
n’t want their money.”

As PLP treasurer in the late

Lietaey

)

CHAUNCEY TYNES SR

1960s, when the party was at the
height of its power, he bridled at
corrupt practices and took issue
with Pindling over alleged irregu-
lar use of party funds.

After he quit his post in 1971, he
was subjected to more than 25
years of victimisation by Pindling
and sincerely believes that a PLP
“hatchet man” called ‘Nine’ Rolle
— now dead — was given the job
of “getting rid of me” while he
was driving a taxi at Nassau Inter-
national Airport.

“Rolle was waiting for a taxi at
the arrivals area,” said Mr Tynes,
“but he let several taxis go because
he wanted to ride in my taxi. I
have no doubt that he wanted to
get rid of me. He was known to be
a violent hatchet man of Pin-
dling’s.”

Mr Tynes said Pindling came to
dislike him because he was fre-
quently critical of the prime min-
ister’s judgment. “People were not
allowed to tell him he was wrong,”
he said, “I was too upfront.”

But he has no regrets.

“T have never done a single
thing wrong,” he told me, “TI can
look any man in the eye and I can
sleep easy at nights. That to me
means everything.”

Today, Mr Tynes struggles at
his modest home, where he has
lived for 50 years, to look after his
invalid wife. He could have been a
very rich man living in great com-
fort had he fallen to temptation.

But he is obviously at ease with
himself, having resisted the blan-
dishments of an era when Bahami-
an morality evaporated and an
entire generation was left tainted
by drugs.

“Party colleagues asked me why

* Jengine 2.7L 4 cyl
options: 4.0L Vé

mtg tener
Ree ee ee’

air conditioning



COLOMBIAN drug czar Joe Lehder

I didn’t take the $600,000 anyway,
and then continue campaigning
against the UBP, but I was having
none of that,” he said.

It is because Mr Tynes was an
outspoken critic of corruption at
the time, and risked everything to
do the right thing, that he emerges
today as a beacon of honour in a
society which Pindling brutally and
ruthlessly undermined.

Today, Mr Tynes believes his
son was killed by evil men who
felt he had seen too much of the
nefarious transactions taking place
between Lehder and some leading
PLP figures of the day.

Chauncey Tynes Jr went miss-
ing some months after flying Pin-
dling to Grand Bahama for that
secret meeting. The arrangement
was that he was to carry the prime
minister to Freeport while anoth-
er pilot transported Lehder from
Norman’s Cay. No-one knows
what transpired between the two
men during the night hours, but
you can be sure it had more to do
with the welfare of Lynden Pin-
dling than the welfare of the peo-
ple.

The fate of Chauncey Tynes Jr
was sealed some months later.

“When my son disappeared
during that flight from Exuma to
Nassau, I asked his girlfriend
whether anyone else had been
aboard with him when he left Exu-
ma,” said Mr Tynes.

“She said three men went with
him, and she believed they were
Colombians. I can’t imagine that
the plane crashed because it was a
very reliable twin-engined aircraft
and my son was known as a very
good pilot.

“There is a chance it was shot

down because it was known at the
time that the Americans were
shooting down small drug planes.
But I think the plane was diverted
and he was killed because he knew
too much.”

Whenever Mr Tynes challenged
his son about his flying activities,
Chauncey Jr always insisted he
never carried drugs — “only mon-
ey.”

“T once saw him with a box full
of US banknotes which he said
were for (giving the name of a
senior police officer). I was told
the sum was $50,000. He also said
both Pindling and (the officer)
were on Lehder’s payroll. He told
me he made frequent deliveries
to Pindling’s home. My son was
Lehder’s paymaster.

“After the plane vanished, the
government said there had been a
search of the entire area, but that
nothing had been found. Also,
there was no record of any plane
having landed anywhere. I thought
at first it had been diverted to
Colombia, then I thought maybe it
was shot down. Today, I think
someone ordered that he should
die because he had too much
information.”

Mr Tynes admits that when
Lehder first appeared on the
scene, the PLP was convinced that
he was a bona fide land developer.
It was only later that people
became aware of Lehder’s
“takeover” of Norman’s Cay,
where he lived a hedonistic life on
the fruits of the drug trade.

Lehder, in fact, more or less
declared the cay a “nation within a
nation” — an idyllic hideout from

SEE page two

CG) TOYOTA moving forward
Land Cruiser Prado 4 X 4

Ted Pe Me Cag
See R ee

ae)

PU heey)
Beeler Tse}

Tell bape dal bet rt factory bias

_ EXECUTIVE |

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

ce ie

Po ee EA) mest ta abe yo Merce ee eae tee Tera
Cai sil Mori to Fri Sam - §: Bali si|
ears)

Te: 397-1700

eet ae TL DNTa (eM ccc td | De
| Parts asd service guaranteed

r
cs

eb le a Ro tg TTA et cme ees bs |


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

i
Tragic young pilot who knew too much

FROM page one

which he could conduct his illicit
trans-shipment operation. He was
so sure that he had the prime min-
ister and law enforcement agen-
cies “in his pocket” that he went
about his business in a brazen,
carefree fashion, even to the
extent of having his hoodlums car-
rying guns around Nassau.

Planes flew cocaine into Nor-
man’s Cay from Colombia. There
it was redistributed to different
parts of the United States. Lehder
set up home at one end of the cay
and viewed operations from win-
dows which offered panoramic
views of his entire domain.

It is now widely believed that
he did this with the full knowl-
edge and active co-operation of
Pindling, who received handsome
pay-offs for his help.

Mr Tynes also told me that,
during his days as PLP treasurer,
he was sent to the United States
to pick up election campaign mon-
ey from a man called Mike
McLaney.

Mr Tynes was not aware of
McLaney’s status at the time, but
it later became clear that he was a
gangster who was bankrolling the
PLP’s 1968 election campaign in
return for a possible casino
licence.

Mr Tynes brought back a suit-
case full of banknotes and handed
it over to PLP Cabinet minister
Carlton Francis.

“Carl gave me $3,000 for my
trip,” said Mr Tynes, “I later
realised the money in the case was
to finance the 1968 campaign.
McLaney was a mobster, but I
didn’t know that at the time. I
thought I was doing right.

“However, I found out the
truth about Pindling at that elec-
tion, and that damaged my spirit
towards him. Until then I had
always liked him.”

As party treasurer, Mr Tynes’
job was to hand out allocations
of cash to PLP candidates. The
rate was $3,000 each for New
Providence constituencies and
$6,000 each for Out Island seats.

His suspicions about Pindling
grew when the prime minister
signed for one $6,000 allocation
to fight his own Andros seat, then
allegedly asked for another $6,000
for which he didn’t want to sign.

“T refused to give it to him
because he refused to sign for it,”
he told me, “He was not prepared
to sign for it. He was trying to fid-
dle the party funds. I wanted to
play it straight and until this very
day I still have a clear conscience.
Tam happy that I never took any-
thing. I don’t have to hide from
anybody.”





















1. The Water & Sewerage Corporation invites bids from suitably qualified contractors for
the construction of Phase | of the Green Turtle Cay Water Supply Improvements. The
Scope of Works include the provision of all labour, equipment and other necessary

Mr Tynes’ revelations come
against a background of disclo-
sure now underway among age-
ing PLP figures who feel the
record must be set straight before
they die. What emerges is a fright-
ening picture of a would-be dicta-
tor who, had he been given his
head, would have led the
Bahamas into Third World dere-
liction.

Mr Tynes recalled that Pindling
held secret meetings in Africa dur-
ing the late 1960s with Robert
Mugabe and others with a view
to learning how to keep power in
an outwardly democratic frame-
work.

A document called The One-
Man Manifesto, drafted by an
African nationalist, recommended
as a strategy that national lead-
ers should stuff government
departments with party support-
ers. It also promoted the notion of
the maximum leader.

Whatever transpired during his
African visit, there is no doubt
among PLP veterans that Pindling
returned with a “Mugabe com-
plex”, a strong belief in the dicta-
torial excesses which have led
Zimbabwe to its present parlous
state.

There is also no doubt, accord-
ing to senior political figures, that
Pindling became so seduced by
power that he was
unable to distinguish
between the country
and himself.

From another
tyrant, Frangois ‘Papa
Doc” Duvalier of
Haiti, Pindling
gleaned a destructive
philosophy relating to
education.

Papa Doc believed
that an educated pop-
ulace was inimical to
his own interests.
Thus, it was always to
a leader’s benefit, in
his eyes, to keep the
people poorly
informed. Today’s
grim statistics from
Bahamian classrooms
—with D for Dunce the national
exam average — are probably a
direct by-product of Pindling’s
dumbing-down process.

The overloading of government
departments with party supporters
was, of course, a tactic embraced
by Pindling with unbridled enthu-
siasm. His policies had adverse
effects in many areas, leading to
feelings of entitlement among the
lazy and incompetent, and ren-
dering companies like Bahama-
sair financially inefficient, to say

NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID

GREEN TURTLE CAY WATER SUPPLY IMPROVEMENTS — PHASE 1

services required for the:-




A. UNDERWATER MAIN







a) Supply and Installation of approximately 15,000 linear feet of water
transmission mains, of which approximately 13,000 linear feet are
subaqueous 6-inch HDPE and 2,000 linear feet of 6-inch PVC, along with all

associated valves and appurtenances.

PUMPING STATION ON GREEN TURTLE CAY

a) Construction of a Pumping Station and supply and installation of two 250 US
Gallon per Minute, 15 Horsepower Peerless (Sterling) pumps,
b) Supply installation, and construction of piping, pump station facilities/office

Building.

Bids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehensive details from the

Qualification Questionnaire out-lining:

a) Experience on similar projects

b) Personnel to be assigned (including their experience on similar projects)

c) Financial capacity to execute the works

The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evaluated for award of Contract.

Bidding documents and drawings will be available on request beginning Wednesday
March 11, 2009, from the Engineering & Planning Department of the Water & Sewerage
Corporation for a nominal fee of $250.00 per set. The Pre-Bid Meeting is scheduled for

Tuesday March 24, 2009 at 10: a.m. at the site.

Completed documents must be returned to the address below, no later than 4:00 p.m. on
Tuesday April 14, 009.

General Manager

Water & Sewerage Corporation

87 Thompson Blvd.
P.O. Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

Attn: Engineering & Planning Division

Telephone: (242) 302-5512
Facsimile: (242) 302-5538

Frangois ‘Papa Doc Duvalier



the least.

In Mr Tynes’ view, had Pindling
been allowed to pursue his dicta-
torial ambitions to the limit, the
Bahamas would have become
another Zimbabwe, a Third
World ruin full of starving peo-
ple, broken institutions and ram-
pant disease.

His view is shared by others
who believe that only The
Bahamas’ location off the end of
the Florida peninsula prevented
a full-scale descent into disorder
and eventual bankruptcy.

Another former leading PLP
figure told INSIGHT that it
became clear within months of
the 1967 election that Pindling
had no national plan and that he
was not interested in any devel-
opment unless it was a direct vote-
winner.

“As a keen young politician, I
drafted a set of proposals in my
own particular field and presented
it to the prime minister because I
felt they would be good for the
nation,” he told INSIGHT.

“But he told me that my pro-
posals would not win a single vote
and that he was not interested,”
said the source.

“Tt made me realise there and
then that Pindling had no vision
for the Bahamas and that his real
interest lay only in retaining pow-
er.”

As disclosures
about Pindling and
his motives flow
into INSIGHT
from more and
more inside
sources, it becomes
clear just how per-
sonally responsible
he was for what the
Bahamas became
during the drug-
ravaged 1980s.

It also becomes
clear that some of
his tactics were too
extreme even for
the PLP’s own
council.

When the parlia-
mentary mace was
tossed by Pindling from the House
of Assembly window in 1965, fol-
lowed by the hour-glass, it was a
watered-down version of his orig-
inal intentions, according to inside
sources.

Mr Tynes said the first plan was
actually to throw the Speaker of
the House, Bobby Symonette,
bodily out of parliament because
of his dismissive attitudes, though
his recollections do not accord
with those of some other senior
PLP figures.



Mr Tynes’ version of events
emphasises the party’s aversion
to Symonette for imposing time
limits on speeches, monitored by
the hour-glass on the Speaker’s
bench.

Symonette, he claimed, was
also unpopular for proposing that
parliamentary sessions between
elections should be stretched to
21 years, effectively blocking the
move towards major-
ity rule. It was
regarded by the PLP
as an unacceptable
strategy to prolong
the UBP’s reign.

“But when the
proposal to throw
him bodily out of the
Assembly was put
before the PLP coun-
cil, it was voted
down,” said Mr
Tynes.

The tossing of the
mace, with Milo But-
ler following through
with the hour-glass,
was a compromise,
but it had the
required effect by
signalling the PLP’s intention to
overturn the status quo, he added.

Other senior figures dispute that
the move to heave Symonette out
of the House was ever seriously
considered. But there is no doubt
that emotions were running high
as the PLP became increasingly
disgruntled at UBP high-handed-
ness and the prospect of spending
five or ten more years in opposi-
tion.

From this distance in time, it’s
interesting to consider what might
have happened had widespread
speculation about Pindling’s ori-
gins been known to the electorate.

The PLP’s relentless anti-for-
eign stance, its racist rhetoric, its
ruthless campaign of victimisation
against expatriates were all based
on the assumption that Pindling
himself was a true-born, full-
blooded Bahamian.

In fact, according to Mr Tynes
and other former senior PLP fig-
ures, Pindling was born to a
Jamaican father, Arnold Pindling,
a policeman, and an unknown
woman who was probably Hait-
jan.

Far from being a born Bahami-
an, he first saw light of day in
Jamaica, arriving in Nassau by
boat as a small boy, they say. His
nominal mother, Viola Pindling,
nee Bain, never gave birth to any
child, according to PLP insiders.

Thus, the entire thrust of PLP
policy from its earliest days in
power was critically weakened by
the widely-held belief in his own
party that the leader’s Bahamian
credentials were bogus.

Some now feel that the whis-
perings about Pindling’s origins
were an attempt to smear him and
that he was a true product of his
East Street home. In Mr Tynes’
eyes, however, discussion about
Pindling’s “foreignness” was well-
founded.

Party leaders, even when they
grew sickened by Pindling’s dic-
tatorial ways after the 1968 elec-
tion, kept the lid on the prime min-
ister’s alleged secret because they
feared it would scupper the black
cause and drop the country back
into the hands of the UBP, he said.

They even kept quiet about an
affidavit Pindling allegedly swore
in 1947, as he was about to set off
for law school in London, declar-
ing that he was Bahamian-born,
even though he wasn’t, added Mr
Tynes.

But during one angry exchange

RMA ceece aac



in Cabinet, circa 1968, a senior col-
league allegedly told Pindling: “So
you, a damned Jamaican, are try-
ing to tell us what to do.”

It was one of the many furious
exchanges which were soon to lead
to a party split and a 20-year stand-
off between the PLP and the
FNM, a party formed largely by
anti-Pindling rebels.

Had the rebel faction’s leader,
Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield, become
prime minister
instead of Pindling,
it’s near certain that
the Bahamas would
have taken a differ-
ent course, said Mr

Tynes.
He has no doubt
that Whitfield

would have made a
better prime minis-
ter, and that the
drug era, and the
age of corruption,
would not have
happened under his
! watch.

“Wallace-Whit-
field was much
more radical than Pindling,” said
Mr Tynes, “And he was much
more straightforward. He would
cut you down to your face, where-
as Pindling would cut you from
behind. Pindling was more con-
servative and a smooth operator,
but Cecil was more to be trusted.”

According to some political vet-
erans, Pindling successfully
defended his origins during a 1973
press conference in which he pro-
duced a birth certificate which
appeared to reinforce his Bahami-
an credentials.

However, his birth was regis-
tered in Nassau on February 25,
1947, a month short of his 17th
birthday. It named Viola Pindling
(formerly Bain) as his mother.

While his supporters were hap-
py with the prime minister’s expla-
nation, outsiders were less con-
vinced — especially when Pindling
refused to say whether affidavits of
birth were produced at the time
of registration.

Pindling said he was not pre-
pared to go beyond the matter of
the certificate and said it was “low
and dirty” of an opposition MP
(Michael Lightbourn) to cast
aspersions on his parents, espe-
cially his mother.

For the sceptics, though, Pin-
dling’s performance generated
more questions than answers. To
them, the fact that his birth was
registered nearly 17 years after the
event was powerful evidence in
itself. His refusal to say whether an
affidavit was sworn to support his
claim that he was born in Nassau
was also seen as a virtual admis-
sion that he had something to hide.

Thus, for PLP officials like Mr
Tynes Pindling was a fraud who
was protected from exposure even
by his fiercest critics within his
own party because their first con-
cern was to jettison the UBP and
fulfil their own political ambitions.

“Whatever his origins, Pindling
was viewed by prominent PLP fig-
ures as the leader most likely to
get rid of the UBP, and that was
regarded as the priority at the
time,” he said.

According to Mr Tynes, any
publicly expressed doubt over Pin-
dling’s birth either before or after
the 1967 general election would
have done untold damage to the
black movement’s image.

Hence, Pindling was given clear-
ance to pursue what turned out to
be an extremely destructive agen-
da for a quarter of a century.

For my part, I believe Mr
Tynes’ version of Pindling’s ori-
gins for two reasons. Firstly, I see
Mr Tynes himself as an extremely
honest character. Secondly, I recall
all too vividly a series of telephone
calls I received shortly after my
return to Nassau in 1999.

These calls came from an old
man living in East Street whose
name I recall but am not disclos-
ing. He told me unequivocally that
Lynden Pindling was not a
Bahamian and that he first
appeared at his East Street home
as a grown boy.

He said: “He was brought in
from outside by his father. We
always thought he was really part-
Haitian. I lived close by the Pin-
dling home and know what I say is
true.”

The old man asked me more
than once to visit his home so that
we could discuss the matter fur-
ther. It is one of my greatest pro-
fessional regrets that I didn’t take
up the offer, mainly because I was
so busy at the time trying to get to
grips with my new job at The Tri-
bune. When his calls ceased, I
assumed he had passed on.

However, Mr Tynes’ opinions
— backed up by the recollections
of a former PLP parliamentarian
— add another crucial piece to the
puzzle which, when completed,
will record the whole modern
political history of the Bahamas.

If the young pilot Chauncey
Tynes Jr’s information was true —
and there are few intelligent
Bahamians who would bet against
it — then Pindling, a foreigner
with a slick line in patter, was
growing fat off a drug king’s pay-
offs while those who brought him
to power continued to live dirt
poor in over-the-hill shacks.

As the PLP struggles with its
leadership woes, and tries to find a
way forward, it would do well to
consider whether the Pindling
legacy is really worth clinging on
to in light of Mr Tynes’ disclo-
sures.

At the last election, Pindling’s
name was hauled from its hangar
at every opportunity to lend cre-
dence to the party cause. Perry
Christie’s government even
renamed the international airport
after a man whose real worth is
now under serious review.

According to Pindling critics
within the wider PLP movement,
Mr Christie would be well-advised
to set aside his illusions about
“The Father of the Nation” and
begin the task of building firmer
foundations for the cause.

For Mr Tynes himself, there is
no doubt that Pindling is unde-
serving of the kudos accorded him.
“He should not be called Father of
the Nation because he was a for-
eigner who was being paid off by a
drug lord,” he said.

The fate of Chauncey Tynes Jr
is something all should bear in
mind when they consider the Pin-
dling legacy. He died at the height
of an appalling era for which many
people still living should feel
deeply ashamed.

His father still looks at pictures
of his son and wonders how his
beloved Bahamas could ever have
reached such a low that promis-
ing young people could be
whisked away, never to be seen
again, by wicked people whose
greed almost brought this nation
to its knees.

¢ What do you think?
Fax 328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net

Sea Turtles of

The Bahamas:
Insights from 30 years of study

Drs. Alan Bolten and Karen Bjorndal,
Archie Carr Centre for Sea Turtle Research,
University of Florida

Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Time: 7pm
Place: The Retreat, Village Road

Admission: BNT Members Free

General Public $2

a =

(parking at Queen’s College) gif?

Na

Phone: 242-393-1317
Email: bnt@bnt.bs


THE TRIBUNE

INSIGHT

MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 3C



H

FEEDBACK



Re: No joke for Jo King (Funny names)

MANY years ago I heard
that a Mr and Mrs Kinnell
had thoughtlessly called
their daughter Jennifer!

And the following is also
reported:

Churchill, inspecting a
troop of soldiers: "And what
is your name?"

Soldier: "Ball, sir!”

Churchill: "How very sin-
gular!"

No evidence to support
the veracity of either story,
but they do bring a smile to
a Monday morning!

Regards,

Insight reader

YOU will, of course, have
heard of the famous law firm
Sue, Grabbitt and Run,
whose many exploits were
recorded in the magazine
Private Eye.

AB

I ONCE heard of a very
religious family called Abel
who named a son Canaan.

Jean Ross

HERE are a few beauties
for your collection (all true)

GILES CLOTWORTHY,
a British National Trust offi-
cial

HECTOR McSPORRAN,
a Scottish sportswriter

DELWYN SWINGE-
WOOD, a public relations
executive

ALISTAIR McALLIS-
TER, a man I met some
years ago

MAJOR GENERAL SIR
EVELYN FANSHAWE,
late president of the British
Spotted Horse Society

V. RAY STRANGE (he
always insisted on using the
V) who worked as a legal
executive in the North of
England

HARRY CHEST, who
didn’t have a hair on his
body, apparently.

JIM RIDDLE, a West
Country farmer who hated
being called ‘Jimmy’ for
obvious reasons.

SARAH LILLICRAP, a
British TV anchor.

However, I can’t think of a
single Bahamian name worth
recording. Surely there’s a
Rockan Rolle out there
somewhere.

Observer

A TRADITIONAL Lon-
don grocer called Wright
objected when two Chinese
stores opened in competition
nearby, both bearing the
name Wong.

He put a notice in his win-
dow saying ‘Two Wongs
don’t make a Wright!’ in an
attempt to hold on to his
customers.

Today, of course, he would
fall foul of the Race Rela-
tions Act.

GSP (Expat)

I ONCE knew an accoun-
tant called Fidler. In spite of
his name, he was noted for

honesty and integrity.
J Robinson

YOUR reference to an
undertaker called Phil
Graves reminds me of a
petrol station owner I knew
in Somerset called Arthur
Gallan. His name caused
much amusement for miles
around.

B Hatton (Visitor)

I WENT to college in
New York with two lovely
young women named
BRITTISH MISER and
BARRIER CAVE.
How's that for unusual?
J Reid

I USED to work with a
woman called Doris Morris
and went to school witha
girl called Anne McCann
(her nickname was Can-
Can).

Amber

I KNEW a lady called Frie-
da Crisp (though her first
name was pronounced
Freeda rather than Fry-da,
so the joke was spoilt a lit-
tle, but not enough to stop
us laughing, I’m ashamed
to say)

Jean, Cable Beach

A MAN I knew called
Sidebottom insisted on pro-
nouncing it Siddybottoom.
He used to become quite
indignant if you insisted on
pronouncing it the way it
looks.

JL

ME laff til me cry, mon!
Here are some nicknames:

HARKER
FAVOR HOG
RAFFY
SHABBY

KY

BIG BARRA
LIL BARRA,
SUKIE
SQUINTY
UNCA LABBY
LONDON
DODY.
Regards,

Glen More

AT college, I met an
unfortunate fellow named
Boris Orpington (known as
B.O. for short) But he didn’t
smell. Not that I recall any-
way.

Jim, Nassau

THERE’S an Australian
newspaperman called Harry
Potter. Can you imagine
what he’s been through over
the last few years?

Aussie

AN English humorist
called Stephen Pile (founder
of the Not Terribly Good at
Anything Society, or some-
thing of the kind) always
referred to himself in print
as Stephen Pile(s).

I suppose he had taken the

It's Electric!

Geoffrey Jones has you covered when it comes to
electrical supplies & accessories. Great service
at competitive prices. Come in today!

#14 single wire (500’ roll)..............$49.50 NET

N142 NM Cable (250’ roll)

4” Square box (50)

4” Single Gang Ring (50)

F40D/CW 4’ Bulb (30)

1/2” PVC Pipe (100Lts)
1/2” PVC Adapters (100)
1/2” Locknuts (100)

CxS @ NY

net

©2009 CreativeRelations

$74.25 NET
$55.80 NET
$39.60 NET
$53.10 NET
$64.95 NET
$25.92 NET



Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
Tel: 322-2188/9

Email: GeoffJones@comcast.net



decision, after years of long

suffering, to get in first with

the joke before anyone else

did. Funny writer, though.
G Minard (Visitor)

WHEN I worked in insur-
ance many years ago, a very
unpopular boss called Wal-
ter Pratt was known as Wot-
ta Pratt behind his back.

The Grove (West)

I ONCE knew a sports
columnist called Basil V
Easterbrook whose name
was frequently taken to refer
to a minor league soccer
match.

Granville

MISCELLANEOUS

MR MARQUIS: If you
haven't left Nassau as yet, I
think that your last
INSIGHT article should be
about the joke we call the
National Insurance
Board. Could you believe
what was written about
Wendall Jones owing NIB
$430,000? I've heard years
ago that he owed NIB but
what was revealed is not
only staggering but ridicu-
lous.

He should not be enjoying
the fruits of having a busi-
ness, his licence should be
revoked for five years as
well as paying the interest
and the original sum that is
owed. In this time when our
country is going through an
economical crisis, ALL
efforts should be made to
collect all outstanding debt
owed to the Government.

I think that every business
or individual who owes NIB

contributions should not
only go to jail, they should
lose their licence for a peri-
od of five years and be held
up for public shame by hav-
ing their names, faces,
amount owed and business
name published in a BIG ad
by NIB for all to see.

You are getting out of this
mess, I wish that I had that
same option. Right now the
Bahamas is not a place
where I want to continue to
live.

Marie

Box:

WANTED

10%0FF

for

BUILT TO LAST!

REFRIGERATORS - top mount 19 ct

$1,37000

REFRIGERATORS - bottom mount 19 cf from $ 1,9400°

REFRIGERATORS - side by side 26 cf

AE taeda eer

from $2,2100°
Te YA ad

UPRIGHT FREEZERS -20 cf and up

MANUAL DEFROST.................
UGE ca eur)
PV er CURL ea

ee | from $ 1,315°°

from $ 19500
from $79Q00

TAYEOR INDUSTRIES

SHIRLEY STREET ¢ TEL: 322-8941 * OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30am-4:30pm ¢ SAT 8:00am-12 noon

eee lei
a ee eure

Closets
Pantries

Call us at:

FREE consutration: 377-8795/325-8850
WE ARE LOCATED IN THE AIRPORT INDUSTRIAL PARK



A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

DA 69806
c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.



DEPENDABLE PRODUCTS
REFRIGERATORS - bottom mount 22 ef PTs
REFRIGERATORS - french door 25 cf $3,40000
ae ea CUO SECT ae WRC
ae CUE Onna CMO R TI $3,09000
FUMES SIC ORTON Mie MCS MMIC Y At bau
FOOD DISPOSERS from $24500
GAS RANGES - 30” white, black, S.Steel TUL YAS
ELECTRIC RANGES - 30” white from $89090
BUILT-IN GAS OVENS-24” white, blk, S.Steel...from $ 1,107°°
GAS COOK TOPS - 30” white, bisque from $760°°
ELECTRIC COOK TOPS - 30” white OM Ed hag
WASHERS ES A ae
DA 0a Sa Cae Ree)
DRYERS - gas. from $86Q0°

Visit our web site at www.taylor-industries.com




APT 3-G

GARY’S STILL WORKING HERE,BUT | YOU SHOULD
HONESTLY JOE, WHEN HE TALKS PAY ATTENTION,
ABOUT THE COMPUTER SYSTEM, TOMMIE.




















WE MEN LOVE TO) ARE YOU GIVING 4
TALK ABOUT ME DATING ADVICE,
DOCTOR ?_.

MAY I TAKE
YOU TO DINNER
WHEN YOU GET A

WHY PO YOU THINK ZT
MOVED BACK HERE,
YOUR HONOR?








1 BACK FROM
SPAINF

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.



A COUPLE

DAYS! IT'S
DUST A QUICK
TRir! ‘
FAT LOT OF GOOD IT
BLONDIE DID TO WEAR A BIB









THIS NEW CHAIR WILL
LULL YOU TO SLEEP
WITH ITS MAGIC

0 RATHER YOU DION'T...ONCE
PEOPLE SIT IN THIS
CHAIR, THEY CAN'T
BE PULLED OUT OF
IT WITH A MOVING

a

HOW SOON
CAN IT BE
DELIVERED?

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.



wwiw.Blondie.com

HAGAR STORMED My’ mOEMY BAK ==
FATHER'S CASTLE ANP PROBLEMS)
Po YovKNOW EVERVES?Y ie CARRIED Me AWAY ! =
HOME? , vee = BEGINNING J mg’ Ie Ce.
E yi

$ :
4 WN
\

~
RX

World rights reserved. Peres



C t

RS &





re

©2009 by King Features
Be

3-7



Clee scl oo han “lew, Sar Peet
‘eee et DU pout Bl Se
































y Rade ae Ba es Peay ec: Eee
ARE YOU ie H
KIDDING? I |] I'M NEVER GOING aa" ery Cogpearten der ret ir

te ace ee eh ee eee.
ee, Be ek reaped ope

ey oer is eee eee ey
pee we ce 5 ie ks ed BE
Fea Ah ES, ops Fe
BOS ees eee ete er
inet . eh be er Pe
a eS
aicHhipS Dada" s ee er per
pee we es ee ee ay
ee et ee i
Ler eb is oe ee Pr |
wet feb fie hws cain, Ea ee eet
a le ag eel

©1989 Universal Press Syndicate





cae fa se!
Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with Pham MLL tail final rales BT ary
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to oe ee a ee geo el |
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each We Fal? eee! fob bin EL’
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty Tiel la.

level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

















Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer



















































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





























6/7 2[4/3/1| Bi
3/1 5/6/9/8| (MBN2 |1/7 Bis 94/7
23) E)
819 4/7512) BS cme OmET o
5/8 113/419) Werit 4219 m1 1213
7\2 3/8|1/6) jee l1 is 4 5 IR
416 9/5/2/7| IN3)2/1 Ri 3 214/15
9
“BUT YOUTOLD ME NOT TOWALK ON {T,$0, [= — oA Be eee
E. UFF IN To THE BALL.” ifficulty Level 7 4/311 & 2 |
$ » Ger e Difficulty Level * *& 3/07 115 7/2/83 fo [3 [8/7 M2 9 ’



Cabo sn: Rc)

A Delicate Situation

a

CRYPTIC PUZZLE
| i i i
Hie

Across Down
1 Funny story about oriental 1 Switch choices ; ;
seafood (6) occasionally (2,9,9) haan de. eee een
ions i i 2 Quality that needs :; : aoe : ;
4 Reductions in capital ma (8) Pt | ieee Mee Pall ete 4 NORTH Superficially, it may seem that this
on : Taare g1072 lan wl sce dvi fn
: eee, & 2 plan will succeed if declarer finds a
a Tee Bile Stak aie 2 Eve wildly Se VÂ¥A9543 3-3 division of the missing diamonds
5 Family ties for the mother's Tf ; 3
10 es (6) au eaane wal boy? i: 7) Ne Wes eee IS yee 62 with East holding the king. But even
OP: elves with Tne tie @ Cable roma Buraneen || || || || || | | )] | #AQI if the diamonds are divided this way,
gets heated (8) sentra (4) WEST EAST more than ordinary care is required
12 Double act no longer 7 Make straight for this (6) PT tT tT tT Tey ty ty @KI954 4Q8 for South to get home safely.
seen (4) Tins ptornunatehy dpeet 6 Pe | | | | || || z || ¥Q108 ¥K76 Suppose South crosses to dummy
13 Big portion of Norwegian highly-apresti foreign a 393 #K 108 with a club at trick four and leads a
trout (5) a 6) Pood pail | ey] | [ $83 #107542 diamond to the queen. Having gotten
14 Well-established 27 J i
hes | (i Bowes Wonca a | | || | | | | zi | | SOUTH over this hurdle, he then cashes the
usiness (4) We Toleie aenowe er #A63 ace. All would be well if East rou-
17 Early news from a rare resistance: (6) erase) eas 4 V2 tinely followed low, but if East
book sale (5,7) See ce al | || | | | | | | | @AQ754 alertly deposits the king of diamonds
20 It gives an impression of stupidity (5) &K 96 under the ace, declarer will not be
permanence (9,3) 18 B es Tee eat rele ee Po) The bidding: able to establish the suit without los-
23 Some steak or grouse cali aes (8) South West North East ing the lead to West’s jack.
perhaps (4) Sora eaeeine a ees _ Ww Across Down 1¢ Pass 1¥ Pass To circumvent this possibility,
24 Boards a coach (5) ae a star? (8) _I 1 Across 1 Break (8) 1 NT Pass 2NT Pass after the diamond finesse wins South
25 Water thoroughly (4) sii at the Hast: N 1 Understand fully (6) 2 Exhaustive (8) 3 NT should re-enter dummy with a club
28 Is it won by the fastest . : ee os N 4 Close Opening lead — five of spades. and lead another diamond. If East
guns in the West? (4,4) os ioe bate ie Raho We examination (8) . Leave pune) There are times when declarer follows low, the ace is played, and
o0| Kariya call tor eourane te) ferns anger wnone ou 9 Handsome young 5 Simultaneous but must exercise great care to keep a _ East is then given the king. Alterna-
at -Nesatve walexeeen ta a a ibe ( : . > man (6) unrelated (12) particular opponent out of the lead. _ tively, if East puts up the king on the
change? Absurd (8) Insite he 0”) 10 Pettily 6 Advocate strongly (4) An example of the delicate handling — second diamond lead, South lets him
Saige eat SER generous (4) x bothersome (8) 7 Stupidity (6) that might be required is provided by hold the trick; when the suit later
: : , 27 Vehicle to move before Lui 12 Brisk steady pace (4) et ST Ee, today’s deal. divides evenly, the contract is made.
pernape() ery 13 Highly skilled (5) BS Semsoleoris Declarer ducked the first two As long as declarer handlcs his
: : : 14 Mark left by food (6) spade leads and won the third as East diamonds with tender, loving, care,
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution wound (4) 11 Important scientific discarded a low club. With only six West cannot gain the lead. Even if
; . 17 Principal assistant advance (12) sure tricks in view, South had to find —_ East plays the king on the first dia-
se 1 eet 2 Slums ce Malye: * seneass 1 Wieng. 2 Tianicre eet (5-4,3) 15 Excessive (5 three more and decided that the dia- mond lead from dummy, South can
rappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 20 Remaining xcessive (5) : : ie :
ie ‘ mond suit offered the best chance. counter by allowing the king to win,
Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, Ived (4.2.33 16 Secret store (5) : ees : :
Kitchen, 24. Given awa : : unresolved (4,2,3,3) However, the diamonds had to be and again nine tricks come rolling
‘ Yy, 23 Obi, 24 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 23 Alcove (4) 18 Idler (8) i :
Dresser. 25 Tenor. Paragon, 25 Dated. ye ewe ich sel developed without allowing West to home.
Down: 1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, Down: 1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 25 To caution (4) y excited (8) €2009 King Features Syndicate Inc,
4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 28 Compassionate (8) 21 Hostility (6)
12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 : 22 Origin (6)
: ae 29 Elephant driver (6)
Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, | Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 30 Surreptitious (8) 26 To grind (4)
22 Vie. Avoid, 22 Mar. a a 6) 27 Vague (4)












i imsormre ( Bright and sunny. Clear and moonlit. Mostly sunny. Bright and sunny. Mostly sunny. a The HE Aeron hentai a ll
, ow: 56°F/13°C © . : : : :
@ pa High: 82° High: 80° High: 82° High: 82°
. ee f High: 81° Low: 71° Low: 70° Low: 69° Low: 69° Low: 71° see EE
TAMPA Ls AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 80° F/27°C > High __Ht.(ft.) Low __Ht.(ft.
Low: 59° F/15°C ae r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 7:15am. 29 12:49am. -0.3
@ “ - elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 7:35pm. 29 1:23pm. -0.2
i j 8:04am. 30 1:43am. -0.4
CT Testy sogpm. 30 2:08pm. 03
5 ae Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesdayo:29 am. 09 232?am. 04
i , ABACO Temperate aoe 9:08 p. 3.1 2:50pm. -0.3
, : ati ° VOM, ease ca tae gots eeaceosacocen etc ceeme ts ° 2 : : :
, ON ig: 80°F eee TS Tasty Sen —2e— San Oy
re A Low: 64° F/18°C Normal high... [op 6 eee
; : Normal low 65° F/18° C
a _ eS @ WEST PALM BEACH i} Last year's High ...cccc:scssseuseestee gor rs2c | INTIMA TIMT(II
4 ll High: 82° F/28°C —_ Last year's lOW oes 73° F/23° C
7 i Low: 64° F/18°C oe Precipitation _ i aes es a.m. Lay ee
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......ccccccccceeeneeeee 0.00" unsel....... ‘1op.m. Moonset. .... “10 a.m.
i FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Yearto date... eStats, SO
High: 81°F/27°C @ High: 79° F/26° C Normal year to date oo... 3.88" ee . s
Low: 66° F/19°C Low: 63° F/17°C eo 2
~ AccuWeather.com > & a
Be @ ii. Forecasts and graphics provided by th: oa F
my MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.10 Mar.18 Mar.26 = Apr. 2
High: 82° F/28° C High: 82° F/28° C
— Low: 66°F/19°C NASSAU igh: 82° F/28"
Low: 71° F/22°C
’ * @
KEY WEST ee CATISLAND
High: 78° F/26°C High: 79° F/26° C
Low: 68° F/20°C = Low: 60° F/16°C
ee
a 2
= GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
~ Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | ,
highs and tonights's lows. \ a High: 85° F/29° C
¢ p Low: 65° F/18°C
LONGISLAND
Low: 63° F/A17°C
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday i MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 83° F/28° C
Fic FIC FC FC FC FIC Fic FIC FC FIC Fic FC me Low: 63° F/17° C
Albuquerque 65/18 38/3 pe 65/18 36/2 pc Indianapolis 57/13 49/9 pe 64/17 40/4 t Philadelphia 54/12 40/4 pc 47/8 42/5 +
Anchorage 31/0 22/-5 sn 33/0 23/-5 sn Jacksonville 81/27 54/12 s 82/27 56/13 s Phoenix 75/23 52/11 s 76/24 51/10 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 76/24 56/12 po 81/27 56/12 po Kansas City 60/15 48/8 t 56/13 20/-6 t Pittsburgh 50/10 37/2 pe 55/12 48/8 + RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:84°F/za"c
Atlantic City 59/15 310 po 47/8 40/4 1 Las Vegas 6719 44/6 po 67/19 41/5 s Portland,OR 46/7 29/1 c 47/8 28/-2 pc High: 83° F/28° C Low: 65° F/18°C
Baltimore 64/17 39/3 pe 49/9 43/6 © Little Rock 73/22 61/16 t 80/26 50/10 t Raleigh-Durham 80/26 50/10 pc 64/17 55/12 c Low: 60°F/16°C i
Boston 37/2 27/-2 sn 41/5 341 pe Los Angeles 65/18 48/8 s 67/19 48/8 s St. Louis 6417 53/41 pe 71/21 341 ¢t .
Buffalo 40/4 29/-1 c 41/5 37/2 + Louisville 67/19 5713 pe 74/23 47/8 t Salt Lake City 40/4 24/-4 sn 37/2 20/6 c GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 80/26 57/13 s 80/26 57/13 pc Memphis 76/24 62/16 t 80/26 49/9 t San Antonio 83/28 66/18 pc 85/29 63/17 c High: 83° F/28° C
Chicago 47/8 39/3 pe 510 23/5 t Miami 82/27 64/17 s 82/27 66/18 s San Diego 6146 51410 pe 62/16 51/10 s Low. 64°FAB°C
Cleveland 42/5 36/2 pe 54/12 44/6 1 Minneapolis 42/5 28/-2 pc 33/0 5/-15 sn San Francisco 57/13 42/5 pe 60/15 42/5 s .
Dallas 81/27 65/18 t 80/26 51/10 t Nashville 71/21 58/14 t 77/25 51/10 c Seattle 38/3 25/-3 sf 42/5 26/-3 pc
Denver 60/15 23/-5 pc 38/3 16/-8 pc New Orleans 79/26 6417 pe 79/26 64/17 s Tallahassee 81/27 49/9 pe 80/26 53/11 s _
Detroit 46/77 354 pe 510 36/2 © New York 45/7 35 46 42/5 38/3 4+ Tampa 80/26 60/15 s 80/26 61/16 s —
Honolulu 78/25 67/19 pce 79/26 68/20 pc Oklahoma City 75/23 56/13 t 73/22 36/2 pc Tucson 71/21 48/8 pe 71/21 45/7 s ate
Houston 81/27 68/20 pce 83/28 62/16 pc Orlando 84/28 57/13 s 84/28 57/13 $s Washington, DC 69/20 42/5 pc 49/9 45/7 +

THE TRIBUNE







o|1|2

LOW

3|4|5

MODERATE

=| | &














hm ORLANDO
































ae CNY

6|7

HIGH

iin



\. HIGH



Te, SLT TELUT Es




vv
8| ao
EXT.








ii







MARINE FORECAST



MONDAY, MARCH Stu, 2009, PAGE 7C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F





Showers

T-storms



Houston) C
7 MILD)

Atlanta’
76/55

New York

Detroit "45/35

Miami
82/64

Rain Fronts

[3,4 Plumes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and res a2 2

Pk] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. a)

[y=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
10s | -0s [l0si) 10s | 20s [BOSi) 40s









Never start your
t us!

Today Tuesday

High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C
Acapulco 87/30 70/21 s 87/30 69/20 s
Amsterdam 42/5 40/4 c 44/6 36/2 r
Ankara, Turkey 5442 36/2 c 55/12 29/-1 15
Athens 63/17 47/8 s 63/17 44/6 s
Auckland 65/18 55/12 sh 67/19 58/14 c
Bangkok 95/35 79/26 pc 93/33 77/25 pc
Barbados 84/28 74/23 s 84/28 74/23 pc
Barcelona 57/13 44/6 sh 58/14 49/9 pc
Beijing 55/12 25/-3 s 52/11 30/-1 pe
Beirut 65/18 54/12 sh 65/18 60/15 pc
Belgrade 53/11 36/2 + 43/6 37/2 ¢
Berlin 38/3 32/0 sn 41/5 37/2 sh
Bermuda 73/22 62/16 pc 68/20 59/15 pc
Bogota 66/18 48/8 +r 65/18 48/8 t
Brussels 43/6 37/2 ¢ 43/6 33/0 r
Budapest 52/11 32/0 sh 45/7 34/1 ¢
Buenos Aires 75/23 68/20 pc 78/25 68/20 pc
Cairo 73/22 50/10 s 72/22 58/14 s
Calcutta 93/33 73/22 s 96/35 78/25 c
Calgary -6/-21 -20/-28 sn 4/-15 -9/-22 pc
Cancun 84/28 63/17 s 86/30 64/17 s
Caracas 83/28 66/18 pc 84/28 67/19 pc
Casablanca 64/17 52/11 pc 74/23 58/14 c
Copenhagen 42/5 = 38/3 c 44/6 37/2 ¢
Dublin 45/7 41/5 sh 48/8 45/7 pc
Frankfurt 42/5 36/2 r 44/6 37/2 r
Geneva 38/3 35/1 sf 38/3 37/2 sn
Halifax 35/1 18/-7 ¢ 37/2 21/6 s
Havana 85/29 61/16 s 85/29 60/15 s
Helsinki 32/0 28/-2 sn 30/-1 23/-5 sn
Hong Kong 72/22 63/17 pc 73/22 64/17 pc
Islamabad 75/23 50/10 pc 80/26 48/8 s
Istanbul 55/12 44/6 sh 50/10 38/3 r
Jerusalem 60/15 44/6 s 58/14 43/6 sh
Johannesburg 76/24 54/12 t 74/23 54/12 t
Kingston 82/27 74/23 pc 84/28 75/23 s
Lima 85/29 70/21 c 83/28 69/20 c
London 48/8 41/5 pc 5010 39/3 r
Madrid 64/17 34/1 pc 68/20 36/2 s
Manila 91/32 75/23 s 87/30 75/23 s
Mexico City 77/25 = 46/7 s 75/23 46/7 s
Monterrey 85/29 62/16 s 96/35 58/14 pc
Montreal 32/0 25/-3 sn 41/5 28/-2 pe
Moscow 33/0 33/0 sn 36/2 31/0 c
Munich 31/0 28/-2 sn 35/1 32/0 sn
Nairobi 91/32 56/13 s 91/382 58/14 s
New Delhi 88/31 59/15 pc 93/33 59/15 s
Oslo 34/1 26/-3 sn 33/0 25/-3 sf
Paris 48/8 43/6 sh 53/11 36/2 +
Prague 39/3 34/1 sn 40/4 34/1 +
Rio de Janeiro 85/29 74/23 pc 83/28 74/23 c
Riyadh 88/31 59/15 s 86/30 57/13 s
Rome 61/16 37/2 pc 55/12 43/6 s
St. Thomas 81/27 71/21 s 81/27 73/22 pc
San Juan 81/27 65/18 c 90/32 64/17 t
San Salvador 92/33 72/22 s 91/382 71/21 s
Santiago 90/32 55/12 pc 88/31 54/12 s
Santo Domingo 83/28 66/18 pc 82/27 66/18 pc
Sao Paulo 81/27 67/19 t 78/25 66/18 Fr
Seoul 54/12 25/-3 s 50/10 25/-3 s
Stockholm 36/2 30/-1 sn 34/1 28/-2 sf
Sydney 73/22 63/17 pc 73/22 63/17 s
Taipei 68/20 59/15 sh 73/22 61/16 pc
Tokyo 5412 48/8 c 59/15 46/7 pc
Toronto 40/4 26/-3 pc 42/5 33/0 r
Trinidad 86/30 76/24 r 79/26 74/23 +
Vancouver 38/3 23/-5 sf 38/3 26/-3 pc
Vienna 44/6 33/0 c 45/7 41/5 r
Warsaw 40/4 30/-1 SUP Se)
Winnipeg 24/-4 O/-17 sn 5/-15 -11/-23 sn

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

eneame witho

es to Auto Insurance,
‘the smart choice is
ice Management.

ache you can trust.








a iti




eS

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

rf
; (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Hew Preiane its peice Albay Euthera | Eun
_ Tee DAD) SUT Wes (H0) 390350 DAE CEA GAT-ADM | Te (D4) S32-284D | Tez (240) 33-2904






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Four-year-old girl dies in blaze C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.88MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER BRIGHTAND SUNNY HIGH 81F LOW 71F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S Tragic pilot who knew too much SEEPAGEFIFTEEN Davis Cup knife-edge n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A FOUR-year-old girl died t ragically in a blaze that e ngulfed her wooden home near Pride Estates sub-division on Saturday night. Police say they received reports of a fire in a bushy area on the border of the southern portion of the Pride Estates sub-division shortly after 7pm. Neighbours who tried to extinguish the fire told The Tribune yesterday that the blaze had already consumed the small wooden structure before firefighters arrived at the scene. Police reported that, after firefighters extinguished the blaze, they discovered the remains of a child on the floor of the north-western section of the burnt-out structure. The remains, believed to be those of the four-year-old girl who was at home at the time, had been burned beyond recognition. Neighbours who expressed shock and dismay over thei ncident claimed the child was i n her stepfather’s care at the time, and was alone in the house when the blaze erupted. T hey told T he Tribune t hat t he stepfather had gone to a shop nearby only to return and find the house engulfed in flames. Some claimed the child had been locked in the house. A neighbour who tried to extinguish the blaze told The Tribune : "When I reach on the scene I meet the house engulfed in flames. Me and the other fellas them we try out the fire. “By the time we got the fire team and the fire people reach we find out that there was a little youth inside who perish in the fire. "Everybody here really sorry about it, it’s one of them accidents in life that nobody Home destroyed near Pride Estates The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate SEE page 11 FIREFIGHTERS show the area where the body of the four-yearold girl was found. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net OVER a month after Pleas ant Bridgewater resigned from the Senate, PLP leader Perry Christie yesterday offi cially announced that physician Dr Michael Ronald Darville of Freeport, Grand Bahama, will fill the vacancy left in the upper chamber. This move ends weeks of speculation about which Grand Bahama resident would join the parliamentary ranks of the PLP. In welcoming Dr Darville, Mr Christie in a press state ment said: “I am delighted that Dr Darville has accept ed my call for front-line service in the national legislature under the banner of the Progressive Liberal Party. “He is an individual of sterling character and outstanding accomplishment, most notably in the fields of medi c ine and business in Grand Bahama. He steps to the fore at a time in our country’s life including, most especially, the life of Grand Bahama when individuals of intelligence, proven ability, and social compassion are required more than ever before – Dr Darvillei s such an individual.” Mr Christie yesterday advised Governor General Arthur Hanna to appoint Dr Darville. Dr Darville practises medicine in Freeport as a partner in the Grand Bahama Family Medical Centre. He holds an MBBS degree in medicine from the Univer sity of the West Indies and a degree in engineering from the University of Windsor in Dr Michael Darville fills PLP Senate seat Physician replaces Pleasant Br idgewater SEE page 11 TWO WORKERS prepare to replace a number of broken glass panels at Sunburst Paint on Harrold Road. n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FORMER Trade Minister Leslie Miller had his business broken into over the weekend by burglars who sought to use this distraction as a means to gain entry into his home. On Friday night, Sunburst Paint on Harrold Road had three of its large window panes broken by an unknown assailant sometime after 11pm. On the surveillance video the male assailant is seen wielding a hammer as he smashes window after window and then without explana tion flees the area. Mr Miller, who was asleep at his home at the time, rushed to the paint Former minister’ s business and home are broken into F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 11 n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Prime Min ister Hubert Ingraham has vowed that the Free National Movement government will reduce the unemployment rate from double digits again as it has done previously in the Bahamas. At the opening of the new $60 million dry dock at Grand Bahama Shipyard on Saturday, Mr Ingraham gave his PM vows that govt will reduce unemployment SEE page 11 n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE World Bank reported yesterday that the global economy will shrink in 2009 for the first time since World War II, confirming earlier estimates raised by officials at the International Monetary Fund. Noting the significance of the announcement, Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing said the Bahamas Global economy ‘to shrink for first time since World War II’ SEE page 11

PAGE 2

FREEPORT – The FNM government will seek to “undertake major reforms of governmental processes and procedures” to reduce the bureau-c racy of doing business with the g overnment, said Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham. Mr Ingraham stated that the Bahamas is a very bureaucratic country that is still very much tied to its colonial past. We have not reviewed and l ooked at all the things we would require to be done for the conduct of business for the government,” he said on Saturday in Grand Bahama. “One of the things that we seek to do is to undertake major r eforms of governmental p rocesses and procedures so that people can do business with the government without havingt o spend an inordinate amount of time and money to have very simple and straightforward t hings undertaken.” M r Ingraham was speaking at the official opening of the third dry dock at Grand B ahama Shipyard. He said they are going to seek to use the facility as ane xample of how government c an cause the processes of gove rnment to be speeded up. “One of the things that I never tire of telling my colleagues is that we are in a global environm ent and we seek to provide i nternational services from The Bahamas; that is the basis of the Bahamian economy – the prov ision of services. We are not manufacturers, we are not prod ucers. We are in the business of p roviding services whether that i s in tourism, or as in the case today, services in terms of ship care, maintenance and repair. “And if you are in that business and you do not have sufficient local business, as we do not, to be able to provide employment and business opportunities for the society, then you have to be able toa ttract it from outside the count ry,” Mr Ingraham said. He pointed out that the shipyard requires equipment, parts, services and labour from outside the country for its enterprise. M r Ingraham noted that all o f the ships that chose to come the shipyard in the Bahamas are foreign-owned and require equipment, services, goods and parts and labour not available in the Bahamas. “The company that builds a s hip in Germany that provides a w arranty for the engine or other parts on the ship has to cause that part to be fixed or repairedw hen something goes wrong. Manufacturer “It is not a question of driv ing down the street and say ing, ‘I can find Jack Jones who is a mechanic to fix the enginef or me today.’ Someone from t he manufacturer will need to come in and repair the part and do so in the shortest possible time. “If a ship breaks down in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, it has beenk nown for a 747 to be chartered from Europe to come with all the parts, equipment and personnel to cause it to be fixed, fixed in a short period of time and without a lot of undue b ureaucracy and paperwork,” s aid Mr Ingraham. The GB Shipyard began its operation in the Bahamas in1 999 and began training in 2000. Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch, chairman and CEO, commended the Bahamas government for its tremendous support. He reported that the shipyard h ad grown over the years from a n enterprise with a few million in revenue and under 100 employees to a full-scale facility earning revenues of over $130 million and an average number of permanent and tem-p orary employees of over 800. M r Rotkirch said the facility is the biggest ship repair facility in the region, with three floating docks. The third dry dock was acquired in 2008 from France at an investment of $60 million. He said the commissioning of t he new dock represents anothe r milestone for the shipyard. Mr Ingraham said the government is very appreciative oft he owners of Royal Caribbean and Carnival for investment in the shipyard in the Bahamas. C arnival and Royal C aribbean are the major owners and operators of cruise ships and it is primarily their ships t hat come here to be repaired and refurbished. "And so we do have the o pportunity on a continuing b asis to demonstrate to them that we are appreciative of their investment in The Bahamas and t hat we are going take full advantage of it. "On behalf of the Governm ent of The Bahamas and residents of Grand Bahama I wish to say thank you. “I trus you are continuing to feel comfortable with us, and the extent to which there are things we need to work on we w ould be happy to do so," said Mr Ingraham. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPOR T S SECTION L ocal News .............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,16 E ditorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports........................................P12,13,14,15 BUSINESS SECTION Business................................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 INSIGHT SECTION Insight...................................................P1,2,3 Advts.....................................................P4,5,8 Comics........................................................P6 Weather.......................................................P7 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES REAL EST ATE GUIDE 24 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@ t ribunemedia.net LOCAL light industry businesses are furious that the Ministry of Finance issued a mass letter over the weekend informing them that their duty-free concess ions are set to finish by the end of June. Noting the enormous efforts that other countries around the world are taking to ensure that local businesses continue to thrive, a local store owner told The Tribune yesterday that it s eems as if the Bahamas g overnment is working backwards”. T he ministry letter, signed b y Mark Edgar for the F inancial Secretary, states: “We bring to your attention the provisions of item 8(4 of Part B of the fourth schedule of the Tariff Act, which limits the aggregate period for duty-free concess ions to five years from the first date of your approval. “Applicants who received e xemption during the fiscal p eriod July 1, 2003, to June 3 0, 2004, should note that their concessionary periodw ill end June 30, 2009. All o ther applicants after June 30, 2004, should note their five-year period from this date,” the letter reads. A local businessman who owns and operates a down town store said he would bef orced to lay off staff if the g overnment goes through with its plans to removed uty-free concessions. C laiming that he is strug gling as it is to simply “make it by”, the owner who did not wish to be named saidh e expected businesses throughout Nassau to start laying off staff shortly as a result of this letter. “How do they expect you to survive? All over the world, other countries arem aking it easier for people t o keep their business or their homes. So why are we going the reverse? How canI afford to pay more now? F ood prices are high, gas is going back up, if this tax goes through because basically it’s a tax I’m going to have to lay off a few people. “I mean, I hate to do it, but business is business. A nd I tell you one thing, a lot of people are not going to be pleased with this. A lot of these small companies are going to have to cut back and that’s only going to make a bad situation much worse,” he said. Government aims to reduce bureaucracy of doing business Anger over letter informing of end to duty-free concessions O O n n e e o o f f t t h h e e t t h h i i n n g g s s t t h h a a t t w w e e s s e e e e k k t t o o d d o o i i s s t t o o u u n n d d e e r r t t a a k k e e m m a a j j o o r r r r e e f f o o r r m m s s o o f f g g o o v v e e r r n n m m e e n n t t a a l l p p r r o o c c e e s s s s e e s s a a n n d d p p r r o o c c e e d d u u r r e e s s s s o o t t h h a a t t p p e e o o p p l l e e c c a a n n d d o o b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s w w i i t t h h t t h h e e g g o o v v e e r r n n m m e e n n t t w w i i t t h h o o u u t t h h a a v v i i n n g g t t o o s s p p e e n n d d a a n n i i n n o o r r d d i i n n a a t t e e a a m m o o u u n n t t o o f f t t i i m m e e a a n n d d m m o o n n e e y y t t o o h h a a v v e e v v e e r r y y s s i i m m p p l l e e a a n n d d s s t t r r a a i i g g h h t t f f o o r r w w a a r r d d t t h h i i n n g g s s u u n n d d e e r r t t a a k k e e n n . . Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 3

n By KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net THE PLP is urging the gove rnmenttomakeits announced unemployment assistanceavailableto Bahamians by as early as April 1. The Department of Statist ics revealed on Friday that t he latest unemployment figures are at a 15-year high, with 12.1 per cent of the workforce in Nassau, and 14.6 per cent in Grand Bahama without jobs. Figures In a press statement, PLP chairman Glenys Hanna-Mart in called these figures “stagg ering and very worrisome in t heir implications.” “We support in full the government’s declared intention to bring about relief by way of unemployment assistance. “While the prime minister h as indicated that this relief w ill soon become available, w e urge the government to ensure that it can be accessed as early as April 1, or earlier, if possible,” she said. So as to minimise the suffering and financial hardship of unemployed Bahamians in the immediate interim, Mrs Hanna-Martin said “persons out of work ought to be able to access without hassle or d elay, the maximum assist ance available through the a gencies of the government.” Details We would also ask the gove rnment to release to the public as soon as it is available all of the pertinent details relevant to this unemployment b enefitscheme,”she s aid. T he numbers revealed by t he Department of Statistics’ a cting director Kalsie Dorsett o n Friday show that over 20,000 people are looking for employment in New Provi-d ence and Grand Bahama. Around half of all people w ho are without work in Grand Bahama lost their jobs in the last six months, with 48 per cent of these people reporting having been “laido ff or dismissed,” the Departm ent’s report said. I n New Providence, one third had become jobless in the same period and, of these, 44 per cent were laid off or dismissed. Overall, in New Providence, unemployment among the 1 34,400-strong labour force r ose from 8.7 per cent in May l ast year to 12.1 per cent, based on the interim survey conducted last month by the Department of Statistics. I n Grand Bahama, the number of people without work increased to 14.6 per c ent. T his leaves a total of 16,315 p eople without work in New Providence and 4,195 inG rand Bahama. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,440 $3,440 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,600 $3,600Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza W ong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 ( 242)326 2335 2 335F inancing Available Through C ommonwealth Bank P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e A YOUNG man is in critical condition in hospital after being stabbed early yesterday. Police reported that shortly before 2am on Sunday, a fight broke out in the area of Carmichael and Blue Hill Roads. A 22-year-old man was stabbed in his left shoulder. T he victim was taken to hospital for treatment. Police are uncertain about the circumstances and h ave launched an investig ation. A 26-year-old man w as taken into custody on F riday following the seizure of a handgun andt wo live rounds of ammu n ition. Police on patrol in C armichael Road around noon stopped and searched the driver of a b urgundy Nissan Sentra. Officers found a 9mm h andgun in the front pocket of the driver’s trousers. Police seized 13 live rounds of ammunition on S aturday while on patrol in Collins Avenue. O fficers from Southern police station saw two men acting suspiciously n ear Eighth Terrace around noon on Saturday. T he men fled when a pproached. Police searched the area and discovered a ziploc bag containing 13 live rounds ofa mmunition for a .380 handgun. No arrests were made a nd investigations are continuing. LABOUR and Maritime Affairs Minister Dion Foulkes said yesterday that he is willing to convene a special session of TRIFOR to discuss issues relating to the displacement of former CLICO employees. "I would be happy to convene a session of TRIFOR to discuss this issue. I will speak with Mr John Pinder about it and we will come up with a convenient date," Mr Foulkes told The Tribune yesterday. Mr Foulkes, who played a leading role in the establishment of The Tripartite forum in 2000, said his ministry intends to ensure that the rights of the former CLI CO employees are protected. John Pinder, president of the National Congress of Trade Unions, called on Mr Foulkes to convene a special session of TRIFOR and appointa select committee to investigate the CLICO matter "with the view to submitting recommendations to amend the provisions of the Employment Act to ensure that events like this never occur in the Bahamas again. "Despite the many calls of the NCTUB for the government to enact legislation to better protect worker's rights, we are again faced with a situation where workers are being made redundant and not receiving their legal entitlements as prescribed by the Statute Laws of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and subsequently many families could be negatively impacted. This is unacceptable," Mr Pinder stated in the release. CLICO reportedly has just over 29,000 policyholders, over 170 staff and over $100 million in policy liabilities. Man in hospital after being stabbed In brief The PLP wants unemployment assistance available by April 1 Dion Foulkes Minister willing to convene TRIFOR session n M IAMI GARDENS, Fla. P OLICEare investig ating a shooting in Miami Gardens that left six wounded, according to Associated Press. The shooting happened early Sunday near a party in the small city, located northwestof Miami’s downtown. All six, including some teenagers, were airlifted to an area hos pital and are being treated with non-life threatening injuries. This is the third mass shooting in Miami-Dade in as many months. In February, four people were wounded after getting caught in a spray of fire in a North Miami complex. In January, seven were wounded and two were killed in a shooting that happened at a street gambling game in Liberty City. Six shot, wounded in Miami-Dade County

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. Please allow me space in your paper to vent my annoyance toa situation that has cause much stress and financial loss to me as the owner of a farm in South Eleuthera. In recent years there has been a herd of wild horses roaming around causing much destruc tion to crops at my farm. At one point they were a danger to air traffic into the Rock Sound International airport as they would find their way on to the runway which places a danger to airplanes landing. However there has been a fence erected around the air port property thus these ani mals no longer pose a problem to the airport. These animals find themselves on my farm several times a week they have destroyed what I estimate to be around 12000 dollars in crops the latest incident occurred last night which resulted in damage to the irrigation system as well the loss of about two acres of corn. Arrangements had been made in the past to have a Mr Cartwright who is associated with the Half-moon Cay development to come in and capture the animals and transport them to that island to be used as part of the attractions offered when the visitors stop there on cruises. However this did not take place because some of the local winter residents and others were concerned about the treatment of the animals once they had been captured. Thus the situation still remains. The animals are roaming the area freely causing a major annoyance to myself and oth ers. I am sure they even pose danger to persons on the highway as they cross the road in the cover of darkness. I have contacted several agencies of the government which include The Office of the Prime Minister, The Depart ment of Agriculture, The Department of Environmental Health, The Agriculture Office of South Eleuthera and The Administrator for South Eleuthera and nothing has been done. I have even contacted the Bahamas Humane Society and nothing done. I am at a point where if noth ing is done I am going to have to cease from farming completely. It has become completely impossible to produce a successful crop because of these animals. I feel like there is a serious problem here as Bahamians we are encouraged to farm, but when we try things like this makes it difficult to be successful and no one seems to be concerned with getting this problem solved. I am asking those that have the responsibility to please come up with a plan to eliminate this problem. Thank you for publishing this letter in your paper I hope that this brings some light and answers to this situation. EUGENE CAREY Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, Bahamas. March 3, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Our Minister of Agriculture and Marine resources, Larry C artwright, told us today that there were lots of letters in from foreigners supporting the total ban on the harvesting of turtles, but very few Bahamians have voiced a positive opinion, or any opinion at all for that matter, as there were only two protests. He indicated that Parliament w anted to hear from more BAHAMIANS supporting this Bill. If you are a Bahamian, please help us. Attached, we have prepared a letter that, if you wish, you can download and sign and date and send to Minister Cartwright. You can equally write your own letter of support. THE IMPORTANT THING IS TO WRITE IN SUPPORT! Please, this law that was proposed some time ago to protect turtles from mindless slaughter has NOT been passed YET andi s NOT law, so turtles can still legally be tortured and killed. Minister Cartwright's fax number is: 322 1767 Minister Cartwright’s email address is: larrycartwright@bahamas.gov.bs Minister Cartwright's P.O. Box No. is: N 3028 Please this is no joke, unless we band together and write letters of support IT WILL NOT G ET PASSED, and turtle pie will stay on the menu, and the taunting and teasing, the hacking and torture of turtles will continue. You can help make it stop. Please forward this to every Bahamian you know and ask them to keep forwarding until we have covered the country and the Minister has received the letters he requires to make it become law. If you are not a Bahamian but have Bahamian friends and family please urge them to write a letter of support. Thank you for your help and support in this. KIM ARANHA (Co-chairman of the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group) Following is the text of the l etter that the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group suggests should be sent to Agriculture Minister Larry Cartwright to save the endangered turtles. Mr. Minister, I am writing to you to declare that I support the total ban of Turtle harvesting in the islands of the Bahamas with utmost sincerity. As a Bahamian, I see these turtles being killed as a major loss to our nation, and our people. We, as a nation, need to drastically reconstruct the ways in which we look at the ocean, and the mystical creatures, who inhabit the unknown depths. Rather than taking these creatures for granted, we must refrain from slaughtering them, and begin protecting them. If we kill off a resource as valuable to our nation, ecosystem, and tourism as marine life: Specifically Turtles, we take away from ourselves the opportunity to help in the re-growth of the Turtle population. We, as a people, are conveying interest in the conservation of Turtles, and our interest needs to be matched by the Government. Once upon a time, spotting the graceful, and timid apparition of a Turtle on the surface of the ocean was an everyday occurrence, but as time passes by, spotting these gentile giants has become a rare, and magical thing. We as a Nation are dragging our feet in this situation, and need to join the rest of the world in conserving the unknown world, beneath the surface of the sea. I support the passing of the bill to protect ALL BAHAMI AN SEA TURTLES and would like to see it put into effect as soon as possible. Sincerely, JOHN DOE C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm I N A MEETING held at Breezes in Cable B each to discuss the Review of the Economic C limate Change in the Caribbean, the Bahamas was again warned that as one of the world’s m ost vulnerable nations it must urgently address the potentially irreversible effects of climate c hange. If nothing is done these islands could eventually become uninhabitable. M r Philip Weech, director of the Bahamas Environment Science and Technology (BEST C ommission, department of meteorology direc tor Arthur Rolle, and director of the Economic Commission for the Caribbean, Neil Pierre, pointed to the undeniable effects of global warming already being felt in this country’s l ow-lying islands. “Immediate action must be taken to address c limate change and the longer the action is delayed the greater the costs in the future,” Mr P ierre warned. “If we delay by a decade or two we will have a situation that climate change becomes unavoidable or irreversible and we will reach a point of no return.” This is not the first time that the Bahamas h as been warned. At the beginning of 2007 it was told that some of its islands could be subm erged by 2030. Last year it was informed that its carbon dioxide emissions per capita exceede d those of the industrialised countries. If all countries were to emit carbon dioxide at levels similar to the Bahamas, the world would exceed its current CO2 output by more than200 per cent, said the United Nations in its 2 007/2008 Human Development report. This report seems alarmingly fanciful, but a nyone driving in the bumper-to-bumper traffic of our busy streets, particularly in the morni ngs and evenings would find it believable. Mr Eric Crowch, who with his wife Margaret, came to the Bahamas in 1958 as the assis tant manager, then manager of the McAlpine company, returns with his wife tomorrow to t heir retirement home in South Wales after their sixth visit since leaving the Bahamas inM arch, 2003. Mr Crowch is keenly interested in the global warming problem and the various s cientific solutions being suggested for its reduction. An article in the weekend edition of USA Today caught his eye. It described the research being done by scientists to recycle carbon diox ide (CO2 o ther transportation fuels jet fuel, diesel fuel, methanol, propane, butane. He believes that this is the solution to the w orld’s problems. By comparison, he conside rs the development of windmills impractical, a nd turning farmland into a multi-billion ethanol industry to reduce the US’s need on foreign o il, a threat to the food supply. He believes that the answer is the recycling of c arbon dioxide coupled with nuclear generated electricity. F rance, he points out, leads the world in the generation of electricity from nuclear plants, s tarting in 1950 under General Charles de Gaulle, increasing during the oil shocks of the 1970s, and continuing to the present, despite the accidents of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. F rance, a country without oil, natural gas and little coal, produces 77 per cent of its elect ricity from its nuclear plants. There is no way to stop China’s industrial g rowth, which has seen the almost weekly open ing of coal-fired plants, or the industries of India or South America. “As the underdeveloped world continues to develop,” said Mr Crowch, “it will continue to a dd CO2 to the atmosphere. There is no way to stop their development, nor should we even t ry. Therefore, a way has to be found to mitigate the damage that their growth will contribute t o global warming.” He believes there are enough good scientif ic brains now following the right path that a solution will be found. Instead of trying to stop the unstoppable, he believes all efforts should n ow be made to trap the carbon dioxide that these countries will inevitably produce and recy c le it into liquid fuel or return it to the earth from where it came. R esearchers say they have tested their tech nologies in the lab and are about to unveil their prototypes, which, if successful, could “lead to commercial roll outs in as little as two years.” “If successful,” reported USAToday, “such i nitiatives could reduce dependence on carbon spewing, petroleum-based products, as well asr enewable fuels such as corn ethanol that compete with food supplies.” I t is not easy technology, but Mr Crowch thinks that it has so many possibilities that this is the route that scientists will take and concentrate on until the difficulties are overcome. Meanwhile, Bahamians will have to find solut ions to reduce their own carbon emissions they cannot wait for someone else to do it for them. Support bill to protect sea turtles LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net A solution to global warming? )25$/( Wild horses are destroying crops at South Eleuthera farm

PAGE 5

n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A 40-year landmark came down on Saturday when the last remaining chimney stacks at the former BORCO p lant were demolished, ending an era of the oil refining industry and signalling the beginning of a worldclass petroleum transshipment hub on Grand Bahama. Many turned out for the implosion, which took place around 3.24pm when the first of three concrete stacks fell some 350 feet to t he ground in 13 seconds. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and students at nearby Lewis Yard Primary School pushed the button to detonate over 200 pounds of explosives arranged by Cleveland Wrecking Company and Dykon Explosives. Before each blast, a loud siren s ounded to signal one minute to count down. The second stack came down at 3.42pm and the third stack fell at 3.54 pm. Guests Invited guests and residents in the nearby communities of Pinder’s Point, Lewis Yard, Hunters, Mack Town and Seaco Town were transported by bus to a designated site some 1,000 feet away to wit ness the historic event. Bleacher seating provided was filled to capacity. Many persons brought along their children, cameras and hand-held video recorders. The dismantling of the refinery began last year when the three smaller steel stacks were demolished. T J Huizer, managing director at Vopak Terminal Bahamas, said the falling of the taller concrete stack units symbolises the end of what once was the old BORCO refinery. The old BORCO refinery was probably one of the most import ant companies to come to Grand Bahama and help drive development of industry on the island, and the chimney stacks were a symbol of that development and could be seen from miles away,” he said. Although the stacks provided b earing and direction to people from the air, sea, and land, Mr H uizer said they were very old and not being used. “As you know, the refinery was closed down in 1985 over 20 years ago and since then BORCO has basically been a company i n decline going from several significant downsizing operations, and investment in people and infrastructure was limited to bare minimum. “The shareholders of First Reserve and Vopak recognised the potential and made a significant investment to acquire what w as a starving company and turn it around,” said Huizer. The companies bought the BORCO plant last April, beginning major refurbishment to restore the existing 19-million barrel oil facility. The removal of the stacks has freed up space for construction of new tanks that will increase the current storage capacity to 22 million barrels by October. Expansion Vopak is also in the process of beginning a major expansion project estimated between $250 to $300 million called the Greenfield Expansion Project, which involves construction of a new oil storage facility on acres of undeveloped land near BORCO. Mr Huizer believes that Grand Bahama is an ideal location to become a world-class logistic hub. “Today symbolises the turning of the page in our history and fortune of our county and company. I firmly believe we are a diamond in the rough. Our location here in Grand Bahama is at the crossroad of many trade flows around the world. “We are investing significant money to transform the old BORCO and become one of the largest petroleum transshipment hubs in the world, said Mr Huizer. He noted that Vopak has t remendous impact on the global flow of oil and petroleum, indicating that the nation of Puerto Rico depends on fuel that is stored at the terminal in Freeport. “Three quarters of the population of that whole nation depend on fuel that is supplied from these parts. If we do not do our job p roperly the people of the country will be without electricity and light. “The fuel used by the Grand Bahama Power Company is also stored in our tanks so we have a big impact here as well.” Comparing Saturday’s event to that of the mythical Phoenix, Mr Huizer said the BORCO plant will emerge more glorious than ever. Vopak is also building a strong professional team in Freeport, he said. However, he revealed that the company also needed to bring in a number of expatriates and four contractors on temporary basis to meet its goals. He explained that the skills and knowledge brought by the expatriates are being transferred to its professional staff, which is also being sent off for training at its terminal overseas in the Vopak network. Mr Huizer said Freeport’s economy is also benefiting because expatriates and foreign contractors are costly and the money for work permits, housing, food, etc, goes back into the community. “The knowledge and skills they bring are indispensable for our progress, and, in fact, not having them available is costing us significant revenue. But we also see these expatriate positions as an essential part of the investment we are making in our own Bahamian staff,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By MATT MAURA Bahamas Information Services HEALTH Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said that cancer has become “one of the most dreaded and prolific illnesses” in the Bahamas – the burden of which extends far beyond the cancer victim or sur vivor to families and friends. Addressing the opening session of the third annu al Caribbean Association of Oncology and Hematology Conference, Dr Minnis said World Health Organisation officials predict a 50 per cent rise in cancers by 2020 due largely to lifestyle factors. Cancer rates in developing countries are pro gressively approaching those in industrialised nations due largely to an increase in the average age of pop ulations, the control of other diseases and the increase in the use of tobacco products, he noted. Dr Minnis said cancer, with its high prevalence and mortality rate, continues to rank among the world’s deadliest and most costly diseases. “It is no secret that heart disease and cancer are the leading causes of death in The Bahamas,” he added. The minister told delegates that the Ministry of Health, in conjunction with the Department of Public Health and the Public Hospitals Authority, has implemented a number of strategies designed to help stem the increase in cancers in The Bahamas. One measure is the availability of cancer-care services at the state-owned Princess Margaret Hos pital that consist of therapeutic modalities for inpa tient and outpatient care. Other services include diagnostic imaging, surgery, cytology, hematology, pathology, surveillance, pedi atric, oncology, gynaecological oncology, pharmacy and counselling. Dr Minnis said healthcare officials also commissioned a state-of-the-art Oncology Centre on Janu ary 15, 2009, that is equipped with modern technology and which will offer the “best quality care” to cancer patients. “Bridging the gap from patient to cure must be done through effective patient education, devoting resources to delivering quality, safe, cost-effective, socially responsible and compassionate healthcare services in a caring environment (that first,” Dr Minnis said. “The physicians and our entire disciplinary team work together with patients and their families to ascertain what the best course of treatment and/or action,” Dr. Minnis added. The Ministry of Health has also implemented a Healthy Lifestyles Programme that is geared towards raising public awareness to the importance of healthy living, and has launched an initiative geared towards preventative healthcare as opposed to curative healthcare. Y ELENA Pers aud from St Francis de Sales School in Marsh Harbour, Abaco took top honours in the Grades 7 and 8 Division in the Knights of Columbus Annual Spelling Bee Competition in Kissimmee, Florida over the weekend. The young Persaud was runneru p to Maya Franc is in the recent 42nd Annual C atholic Archd iocese Spelling B ee Competition in Nassau. M aya, from X avier Lower School in Nassau, was unsuccessful in her division in the Florida competition. The two cont estants, accomp anied by a pare nt and coach a nd representat ives from the C atholic Board of Education and the Knights of Columbus, were sponsored by Knights of Columbus Councils in the Bahamas District. District grand knight Greg ory Christie in c ongratulating the two entrants said that they continued the outstanding performances turned in by students from the Bahamas at this competition. “Our knights throughout the Bahamas are please to have assisted these students in their opportunity to c ompete in this o ne-day event among their peers f rom around the s tate of Florida. We’ve had previous winners andr unners-up at this e vent and we’re extremely proud that our first ever entrant from Abaco was able to return this year as champion speller i n her division. I join with the K nights of Columb us from Councils 1 0415 and 11755 i n New Providence, 10647 in Grand Bahama, and 12692 in North Eleuthera in cele brating this accomplishment with Miss Persaud, and the stellar efforts of Miss Fran cis,” said Mr Christie. Minister: cancer one of most dreaded and prolific illnesses in the Bahamas Last remaining chimney stacks at former BORCO plant demolished Abaco student wins at Knights Spelling Bee in Florida YELENA PERSAUD , from St Francis de Sales School in Marsh Harbour, Abaco, seen second from the right, and Kim Francis, right, pose with grand knight of Council 10415 Ken Kelly at the recent 42nd Annual Catholic Archdiocese Spelling Bee Competition in New Providence. Mr Kelly, together with faithful navigator John Davis, accompanied the students to Kissimmee, Florida. P hoto: G rechis P ublic Relations, Grand Bahama W ATCHING ONE o f the chimney s tacks fall.

PAGE 6

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 7 Friday13th March F r i d a y 1 3 t h M a r c h Saturday 14th March S a t u r d a y 1 4 t h M a r c h 2 2DAYS D AY S ONLY ON L YHalf-PriceSALEonallitemsondisplayMondaytoSaturday 10am to 5pm Charlotte Street P. O. Box N-4845, Nassau, Bahamas 242-322-4862email:sales@coinrealm.com www.coinrealm.net T HE Bahamas National Trust hosted participants from 18 West Indian islands and two Caribbean rim countries at the Retreat Garden and New Providence National Parks in the week of February 19 – 23. The participants were attending the Society for the Conservation and Study of Caribbean Birds (SCSCBm onitoring training workshop. The participants included executive directors of non-government organisations in charge of protected areas; ornithologists and conservation biologists employed by governments and non-government organisations; protected area wardens, and volunteers. Interest All shared a common interest in learning monitoring methodologies and how to use the resultsf rom monitoring to more effectively conserve a nd manage migratory and resident bird species. “We were very excited at this training opportunity for BNT wardens”, said Lynn Gape, deputy executive director of the Trust. Participating for the Trust were Randolph Burr ows and Apollo Butler (New Providence ry Nixon (InaguaGrand Bahama and David Knowles (Abaco Also participating for the Bahamas was Leno Davis of the Nature Conservancy The eight facilitators for the workshop include d Floyd Hayes, professor at PacificCollege, Cali fornia; Frank Rivera-Miln of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC; Geoff Welch of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds,U K; Jeff Gerbracht of Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, New York; John Alexander, exec-u tive director of the Klamath Bird Observatory, O regon; Arne Lesterhuis of Wetlands Internat ional, Buenos Aires; Ann Haynes-Sutton, monitoring coordinator of SCSCB, Jamaica, and Lisa Sorenson, president of SCSCB, Boston). T he workshop included a complete introduction to designing, implementing, analysing and reporting basic bird monitoring programmes int he region. With the assistance of the team of f acilitators and other experts in the field, SCSCB is developing simple standard protocols for monitoring landbirds, wetland birds, seabirds and s horebirds and their habitats. These were presented and tested during field sessions at the workshop. The participants committed to share their experiences and train others in their islands. To facilitate this process, all the materials from the workshop will be made available online, anda manual “Caribbean Birdwatch How to design a nd implement a bird monitoring programme in the Caribbean” will be produced. At the end of the workshop participants and presenters agreed that the initiative had been ano verwhelming success and pledged to continue to w ork to promote its objectives. We were very pleased with the enthusiasm and skills exhibited by all the participants,” said D r Sorenson, president of the SCSCB. “Partnering with the BNT to host the workshop made things easy to organise as their wardens, s taff and volunteers were very helpful in assisting w ith logistics. “We were very impressed with the work that has been done at Harrold and Wilson’s Pond N ational Park, which is an important bird area, and was one of the sites we selected for our morning monitoring exercises,” Dr Soren-s on said. T he workshop was the main output of a project called “Long-term Bird Monitoring in the Caribbean – Why, What, Where and How?” which is being funded by the Organisation of American States (OAS Hemisphere Migratory Species Initiative (WHM-S I). The goal of this project is to establish a Caribbean partnership to promote migratory bird monitoring as a means to improve science-based conservation planning and adaptive management of birds in the region. GOVERNOR General Arthur Hanna addressedt he concerns of older persons in the Bahamian com munity while speaking to the National Council of Older Persons at a luncheon and variety show held at Montague Gardensl ast weekend. H e commended the “older persons” for remaining active in the community despite the limitations of the aging process. He recognised the recent change in leadership within the Council and congratulated Mary Sweetnum and Patrick Gomez on their new posts as co-chairpersons of the Council. The Governor General said the new leadership offers opportunities for international exchange in talent and culture, for both old and young as presented in the variety show at the luncheon. T alent He said that the overall assumption that older persons are decrepit and unaware of the current times is false and should not be applied to those who have contributed time, effort and talent to the development of the country. The Governor General also commented on the rush of people to register their elderly parents into Sandlilands Geriatric Ward because they cannot find time to look after them. He told the audience that most people are reluctant to leave their homes to enter an institutionalised facility, so the government responded by building homes to care for the elderly in areas close to where they lived. The Governor General said it is for this reason that every settlement in the Family Islands has a post office, even if it is only for two people living in that settlement. Governor General addresses issues of the elderly WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS at Harrold and Wilson Pond National Park. BNT’s bird monitoring workshop

PAGE 7

n B y SIR RONALD S ANDERS (The writer is a C onsultant and former Caribbean diplomat) IT IS a classic case of passing the buck”, but Caribbean jurisdictions that offer offshore financial serv ices will be the victims of l ax regulation by the OECD c ountries – the UK and US in particular. B ritain’s Prime Minister, G ordon Brown, and the US Senate and Congress have both now shown their intention to close down offshore financial services which they call “tax havens.” Speaking on March 4th to t he US Congress Brown a sked: “'But how much safer would everybody's savings b e if the whole world finally c ame together to outlaw s hadow banking systems and outlaw offshore tax havens?” Implicit in what he said is that so-called “tax havens” are a threat to people’s savings even though it is poor b anking and investment practices and inefficient regulation in the US and UK inp articular that led to the present global financial crisis. So, Mr Brown has passed the buck and has fingered j urisdictions that offer offshore financial services as t he culprits. Equally, as I predicted s ome weeks ago, the “Stop the Tax Havens Abuse Act” i ntroduced in the US Senate t wo years ago by then Senat or Barack Obama and Sena tor Carl Levin, was reintroduced in the US Congress the day before Brown made his statement. I had hoped that the reintroduced Act would have removed the names of count ries that were listed as “tax havens.” No such luck. Not only did the Act retain all t he countries, it added three n ew very onerous sections f or liability. The intention is clear – if banks and otherf inancial institutions in these j urisdictions are going to continue to operate, they will do so only at great expense. Few will be able to afford the additional costs o f compliance. T he Caribbean jurisdictions named in the US Act a re: Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbad os, Belize, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, G renada, St Kitts-Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent & The G renadines and Turks and Caicos. When Jamaica, Trinidad a nd Tobago and Guyana begin their international f inancial services for which they have all legislated, they can expect to join the list. I t seems irrelevant to the US Congress that some of these countries have Tax Information Exchange Agreements (TIEAst he United States under which the US can request – and are obliged to receivei nformation – concerning tax inquiries. To my certain knowledge Antigua and Bar buda, Barbados and the B ritish Virgin Islands have s uch agreements. Others may also have. But, if the US Act is passed in its present form, it seems that TIEA is not enough and the US TreasuryS ecretary will be given e xtreme powers to act against jurisdictions that he deems to have “ineffectivei nformation exchange prac tices.” Jurisdictions T he G20 countries – none of which are jurisdictions considered as “tax havens” will meet in London on A pril 2nd and on their agenda is the matter of “tax havens.” The discussion and its conclusions will take place without the benefit of any of the affected jurisdictions at the table. Among the missing “tax havens” will be all those I have named earlier from the Caribbean plus Switzerland, Luxem bourg, Singapore, Malta, Cyprus, Panama, Hong Kong and a few others in Europe and the Pacific. It is a curious kind of international democracy that allows rules and punishment to be created by a few and imposed on the many simply because the few have the power to do so. It is even worse that the few are yet to admit that it is lax supervision and regulation in their own jurisdic tions that has caused the present global financial crisis. They are also yet to demonstrate that they are taking effective action with in their own systems to cor rect and improve their defi ciencies. In his speech to the US Congress, Brown said, “Let us agree in our G20 summit in London in April rules ands tandards for proper a ccountability, transparen cy, and reward that will mean an end to the excessesa nd will apply to every bank, everywhere, all the time.” No one would quarrel with that position. Indeed,i n light of two events in the Caribbean – surrounding CLICO in Trinidad and Tobago and holdings of RA llen Stanford – there would be few who would not agree wholeheartedly with t he need to tighten up rules f or banks. But, Mr Brown did not mention regulation which is sorely in need of improvement in Britain and the US. Instead, he focused on “outlawing” tax havens. During the week all this was taking place, along with three other persons, I was asked by a publication in Washington, Inter-American Dialogue, whether the civil complaint by the US Securities and Exchange Com mission against Stanford “shows a need for stricter regulation of financial services companies in the Caribbean? The following was my published reply: “The matter of the SEC prosecuting a civil suit for alleged fraud against R Allen Stanford points to the absolute need for stricter regulation not only in Antigua and Barbuda but also in the United States. Court documents about this matter claim that the alleged fraud relates to the sale of products by the Stanford International Bank (SIB Antigua and by the Stanford Financial Group in Houston. The regulators in both juris dictions are, therefore, culpable. “While the smallness of its resources does not absolve the Antigua regulators of responsibility, the vastness of the resources available to the US regulators condemns their failure to recognise the danger sig nals in the operations at a much earlier stage. TheS tanford allegation should n ot be used to stain Caribbean regulators while ignoring the fact that defi c iencies also existed in the US system. “No Caribbean jurisdiction should wish to remaini n the business of hosting companies that offer finan cial services without strong, relevant and appropriate leg i slation and supervision that protects the interests of customers. In this regard, indep endent statutory bodies t hat are free of political interference and are overseen by bipartisan committees drawn from the legislature should be established to raise their credibility and give confidence to domestic and international clients”. Regulation My point was that the alleged Stanford fraud occurred as much in the US as it did in Antigua and Barbuda. So, while there is a need for stricter and fearless regulation of financial ser vices in the Caribbean, there is also such a need in the US. Unfortunately, while the G20 meets in April to make their pronouncement, the socalled “tax haven” countries have made no attempt to meet to devise an appropriate response. The countries of the Caribbean Community and Common market (CARI COM) have no excuse for not doing so, and if there any among them who feel that they are capable of stopping this juggernaut alone, they should think again. Caribbean countries should act on this now and together or see their off shore financial services wither. Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ax haven’ jurisdictions – sitting ducks and scapegoats WORLDVIEW n SIRRonald Sanders BRITISH PRIME MINISTER Gordon Brown addresses a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington , Wednesday, March 4, 2009. Vice President Joe Biden and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ofC alif. applaud at rear. S u s a n W a l s h / A P I I t t i i s s a a c c u u r r i i o o u u s s k k i i n n d d o o f f i i n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l d d e e m m o o c c r r a a c c y y t t h h a a t t a a l l l l o o w w s s r r u u l l e e s s a a n n d d p p u u n n i i s s h h m m e e n n t t t t o o b b e e c c r r e e a a t t e e d d b b y y a a f f e e w w a a n n d d i i m m p p o o s s e e d d o o n n t t h h e e m m a a n n y y s s i i m m p p l l y y b b e e c c a a u u s s e e t t h h e e f f e e w w h h a a v v e e t t h h e e p p o o w w e e r r t t o o d d o o s s o o . . Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 8

sons and vulnerability to intern ational terrorism, head a disturbing list of the challenges facing regional countries with r egards to crime and criminalit y,” Mr Turnquest said. The Bahamas can attest to this. For decades now it has b een contending with the illicit transit of drugs and significant illegal immigration. These twoi llicit activities have created a p latform for the other illegal activity we are experiencing, p articularly the illicit trafficking in small arms,” Mr Turnquest added. Mr Turnquest said the gov e rnment of the Bahamas has undertaken a number of “decisive and ongoing initiatives” to c ounter transnational crime by “systematically making its law enforcement presence feltt hroughout the archipelago.” H e told delegates from 16 c ountries participating in Tradewinds 2009 that the Roy al Bahamas Defence Force B ase at Inagua has been strengthened to facilitate cov erage of the southern Bahamas, w hile a new base has been established at Grand Bahama to cover the northern Bahamas. At great cost to our nationa l accounts, we are progressing with the acquisition of additional craft for our DefenceF orce and will soon take deliv ery of two new aircraft for transport and surveillance,” Mr Turnquest said. Our assets base has also been further strengthened by the donation of four InterceptorV essels donated under the Enduring Friendship Pro gramme, for which we express o ur sincere appreciation to the United States of America.” Mr Turnquest said the focus o f Tradewinds 2009 – maritime i nterdiction – is “critical and timely” and is in line with the government of the Bahamas’d etermination that “every effort should be made to prevent a significant upsurge in drug traf ficking in the Caribbean.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 9 TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor provision of General Insurance Services described below.Biddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQIFH%OXH+LOOt7XFNHURDGV Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 7HQGHUVDUHWREHDGGUHVVHGWR Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. 6XEPLVVLRQVVKRXOGEHPDUNHGDVIROORZV Tender No. 690/09 $OOLVNV*HQHUDO,QVXUDQFH (acial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents (bs, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment Tender No. 691/09 0RWRU,QVXUDQFH&RPPHUFLDOtULYDWHHKLFOHV Tender No. 692/09 $FFLGHQW,QVXUDQFHRQH\t%XUJODU\ Tender No. 693/09 /LDELOLW\,QVXUHUVRQDOtXEOLF Tender No. 694/09 Professional Indemnity >2IFHU'LUHFWRU3URIHVVLRQDO6WDII(QJLQHHU Accountants, Attorneys] t Tender No. 695/09 Marine Insurance 7KH&RUSRUDWLRQUHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRDFFHSWRUUHMHFWDQ\RUDOOSURSRVDOV )RUDOOLQTXLULHVUHJDUGLQJWKHWHQGHUVtVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163 n By MATT MAURA THE government of the Bahamas remains fully com-m itted to participating in crimef ighting cooperative initiatives designed to enhance national and regional security, Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest told regional lawe nforcement officials on Wednesday. A ddressing the opening session of the 25th Tradewinds conference, Mr Turnquest said Operation Tradewinds has not only enhanced the collectivec apacity of regional forces to counter transnational and security threats both at the national and regional levels, but has also facilitated the standardisation of the region’s approach to thes ecurity issues it faces such as illicit gun and drug trafficking, illegal human smuggling ando ther transnational crimes. T he National Security Minister said there are a number of factors that contribute to transnational crimes within s mall-island states in the region. Two of those, he noted, are the r egion’s location between Central and South America which is the source of “significant illicit transnational activities”, and its location between North Ameri ca and Europe which are the targets of much of those illicit a ctivities. M r Turnquest added that oth er contributors to ongoing t ransnational crimes include the fact that regional countries are,f or the most part, island and a rchipelagic states that all have porous sea and land borders, a nd have limited financial and human resources and assets to c ounter transnational crime. It is therefore necessary that regional countries continue to cooperate in initiatives such as O peration Tradewinds and oth er conferences at the regional and hemispheric levels that deal with those threats as the relate t o transnational crime and ter rorism, he noted. Drugs and arms trafficking, i llegal immigration, migrant smuggling, trafficking in per n By LLONELLA GILBERT T ARPUM BAY, Eleuthera – Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis applauded the residents of South Eleuthera for planningto embark on a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR first aid training programme. Speaking at the recent South Eleuthera re-commissioning of an ambulance, Dr Minnis emphasised the importance for all Bahamians to know how to perform first aid or CPR in order t o stabilise individuals who have suffered an illness or are i njured in a motor vehicle accident. I think that is a great and excellent idea for you to embark u pon because if the community of South Eleuthera is truly CPR t rained, imagine the message you would send out to not only t he Bahamas, but to the rest of the world and the message you would send out to tourists,” Dr Minnis said. “Before individuals visit a particular country or island, two things play an important role health and crime. If they are convinced that each and every one of you understands and could perform CPR, then you would be better than any hospital.” “I would hope that other communities in our Bahamas w ould follow suit because you are truly leading us into a new direction of healthcare,” Dr Minnis said. “You are truly preparing this community for the future and I will learn from you today and ensure that the Bahamas is prepared for the future in following suit.” H e also promised that the residents would receive help from the government as they embark on their training programmes and plans to educate students and each other about healthy liv i ng and illness prevention. Dr Minnis commended the local and winter residents along with corporate sponsors who under the guidance of the South Eleuthera Emergency Partners (SEEPf unds to refurbish the five-year-old ambulance and purchase a f ire truck for use in the community. SEEP was established after a group of local citizens came together to discuss ways to increase the support given to the fire and medical services on the island. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S M INISTER OF HEALTH H ubert Minnis cuts the ceremonial ribbon at the re-commissioning ceremony of an ambulance presented to the Ministry of Health in Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera on Sunday, March 1. Looking on is nursing officer for South Eleuthera Whelma Dorsett. Residents of South Eleuthera to embark on CPR training programme ‘Govt committed’ to bolstering national security initiatives ABOVE: Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest addresses delegates attending Tradewinds 2009 which opened Wednesday, March 4, 2009 in New Providence at the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino. ABOVE: DELEGATES from the 16 countries participating in the T radewinds 2009 Conference on W ednesday March 4, 2009. Participating countries include Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidada nd Tobago, United Kingdom, United States of America and host country the Bahamas. Patrick Hanna /BIS

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 0HGLFDO$VVRFLDWLRQRI %DKDPDV )RUPDOSHQLQJLJKWHVVLRQ,$ )5((%/,&/(&785(HGLFDO&DUHLV([SHQVLYH ,VXDOLW\&DUHIRU$OO 5HDOLVWLF"3UHVHQWHU +RQU$UWKXURUWHU )$$0$'LUHFWRU*HQHUDODQG&(2RIWKHF*LOOQLYHUVLW\+HDOWK&HQWHU&RXQFLOORUULY\&RXQFLORI&DQDGD 0RQWUHDO&DQDGD:HGQHVGD\WK%ULWLVK&RORQLDO+LOWRQ+RWHO0$%&RQIHUHQFHDUFKWKWK*(77,1*,7,*+7,1+($/7+&$5( 7KHLJKWUHDWPHQWLJKWLPHLJKWXWFRPHVtWKHLJKWULFH6HVVLRQV,,,97KXUVGD\WK 6HVVLRQV9WK T HOUSANDS of Bahamians flocked to the gardens of Government House on Saturday to attend the 67th annual Red Cross Fair – the major fundraising event for the Bahamas Red Cross Society. The co-chairpersons of this annual fair, Pauline Allen-Dean and Brendon Watson, along with the fair’s committee members, once again organised a fun-filled family event. REDCROSS FAIR Thousands flock to THE OMEGA PSI PHI FRATERNITY holds down the greasy pit at the Red Cross fair. P HOTOS: Felip Major / Tribune staff LOOK WHAT I’VE GOT! A child shows off a new toy. THE GOVERNOR GENERAL walks and talks to vendors. G OING u p a slide. A TIME for the family. T HERE’S nothing like cotton candy.

PAGE 10

assurance to Bahamians, particularly in Grand Bahama, where the unemployment rate has jumped to 14.6. We are surrounded by bad n ews from time to time, and you heard yesterday that the unemployment rate in Grand Bahama is now nearly what it was in 1992 when I came to o ffice for the first time. “And so I want to assure Grand Bahama that we have b een there before, we did it b efore, and we will do it a gain,” said the prime minist er. M r Ingraham promised that t he FNM government will cause the Grand Bahama economy to be restored in as short a time as possible. He stressed that the shipyard facility is one of several major investments on the i sland that continue to prov ide significant benefit to the Freeport economy. T he prime minister comm ended Royal Caribbean and Carnival Corporation for their investment in the shipyard. “I am very pleased that the owners of Royal Caribbean and the owners of Carnival decided to take a chance on a s ubstantial investment in our c ountry, and especially at a time when there were options available to go elsewhere,” Mr Ingraham said. The new dry dock, which w as acquired from France, is t he third for the shipyard. It is one of the largest in the world, s panning some 310 metres in l ength and 54 metres in width. I t can accommodate vessels weighing up to 55,000 tonnes. T he Grand Bahama Port A uthority owns a 20 per cent stake in the shipyard, which o pened in January, 1999. Mr Ingraham recalled how the late Port Authority chair-m an Edward St George was a major proponent for the f acility. “The only regret I have this m orning is that Edward St G eorgeis not here this morning. He pushed very hard for this facility and for the port to begin to realise its original purpose which was to attract facilities such as this, such as Hutchison’s container facilit y, such as Bradford Marine a nd the harbour in Freeport.” Mr Ingraham noted that the shipyard is the only investment in the Bahamas where there are more non-Bahamia ns employed than Bahamia ns. Despite this, he stated that t he large expatriate workforce h as benefited the economy of G rand Bahama and the Bahamas. We have never dreamt of s uch a thing and so many have not overcome that fear yet, b ut I think even the doubters are now beginning to come to terms with the reality that it ist he most beneficial for the economy of Grand Bahama a nd for the economy of the Bahamas because not only has t his facility lived up to what it s aid it would do, it continues to provide additional training for Bahamians and additional skills being had by many as a result of transfer of skills that is taking place as a result of persons who come in from t ime to time,” he said. W ith the current downturn in tourism, Prime Minister Ingraham stressed that the shipyard is an industry that adds to the diversification of t he Bahamian economy. H e said it is a booming business because cruise ships still c ontinue to move many pass engers and cruise lines cont inue to build more ships that require ship care, repairs andm aintenance. We here in the Bahamas are fully cognizant of another r eality and that is this shipy ard is mobile. It can be picked up and taken away any day. “The first dock took over nine months to come here andso having had these docks towed to the Bahamas w e simply want to keep them h ere in the Bahamas and we want to keep them in a way to maximise benefit for our people and our economy.” Carl-Gustaf Rotkirch, chairm an and CEO of Grand B ahama Shipyard, said the shipyard services 70 per c ent of cruise ships in the r egion. Mr Richard Fair, c hairman and CEO of Royal Caribbean, said the shipyardh as recorded its milestone w ith nine ships at the facility at one time. did not need to reassess its projections for 2009 as it was already operating on the prospect of a global downturn for “sometime now”. A ccording to the N ew York Times , until now even the most pessimistic of forecasters had predicted that the global economy would report “a tiny expansion”. In countries such as China, however, even a modest growth rate of five per cent would be classified as a “disastrous slow d own”, given the enormous pres sure there to create jobs for its rural population. As a lending institution that provides financial and technical assistance to developing countries for roads, schools, and other infrastructural projects, the World Bank’s Global Economic P rospects for 2009 said that world trade volumes are projected to contract 2.1 per cent in 2009, with developing countries set to see a “big drop” in their exports. “Tighter credit conditions and increased uncertainty are expected to see investment growth in both developing and high-income countries slow in 2009 actually falling 1.3 per cent in developed countries and rising by only 3.5 per cent in developing countries versus 13 per cent in 2007,” the report read. According to Uri Dadush, director of the World Bank’s Development Prospects Group, “policy-makers in developing countries should monitor their banking sectors carefully and be prepared to enlist external support to shore up currencies and banking systems. “Given the expected decline in global trade, both developed and developing countries need to resist the temptation to resort to protectionism, which would only prolong and deepen the crisis,” he said. The report, released on Sunday, warned that the financial dis ruptions are all but certain to overwhelm the ability of institutions like itself and the International Monetary Fund (IMF provide a buffer. Therefore it highlighted the need for wealthy governments to create a “vulnerability fund” and set aside a frac tion of what they spend on stim ulating their own economies for assisting others. Mr Laing pointed out, however, that the Bahamas is a not one of the 185 countries receiving regular assistance from the World Bank and as such would not be hurt by its current limitations to provide funding. The last programme for which the Bahamas received World Bank assistance was the Technical and Vocational Training Project in 1988. At a value of $10 million, this project was approved two years before the New Providence Island Water Supply and Sewerage Rehabilitation Project, another $10 million investment by the World Bank. “The point that the World B ank is making is that many of the least developed countries that rely on their support will see a shrinkage,” Mr Laing added. “But we are not under any IMF programme or World Bank programmes at this time,” he said. On Friday, an interim Labour F orce Survey conducted by the Department of Statistics revealed that the unemployment rate for both New Providence and Grand Bahama reached double-digit fig ures 12.1 per cent for New Providence and 14.6 per cent for Grand Bahama. Prime Minister and Minister of F inance Hubert Ingraham explained the need for the interim survey in his statement to Parliament on the government’s 2008/2009 mid-year budget, point ing out that “the usual tracking of unemployment rates on an annu al basis will not assist in better informing our interventions to a ddress job losses.” However, the prime minister h as since assured the country that the government is doing all it can to turn these unemployment numbers around. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 11 C anada. Dr Darville, 48, is married to Susie Darville. The couple have two sons together. He is not to be confused with Dr Michael Darville, who is employed at Doctors Hospital in New Providence. Ms Bridgewater, who was c harged with abetment to extort and conspiracy to extort $25 million from Hollywood actor John Travolta, officially resigned from the Senate on January 24. She said she tendered her resignation so as to fully dedicate her resources and energiest o fight the charges brought against her. At the time, Mr Christie said he regretted the turn of events, but understood her course of action. Initially, the PLP leader said he intended to announce a replacement within two weekso f Ms Bridgewater’s stepping down. The former prime minister confirmed that he always intended for another Grand Bahama resident to take the seat. He said he had received about six recommendations for t he post. s tore to find out for himself what had happened. F ortunately, Mr Miller said, he had noticed earlier that day that someone had tampered with a door at his home and reported the matter to police. Thinking back on this event as he was travelling to Harrold Road, Mr Miller phoned policeat Elizabeth Estates station and asked them to drive by his home as he felt the break-in at his store was a distraction to get him out of the house. This hunch, Mr Miller said, paid off as he discovered upon returning to his Winton Estates home that his bedroom door had been prised ajar and some $ 500 was stolen from his night stand. Mr Miller said the burglars must have been frightened away by police as it was obvious from the way things were thrown about his home that they did not have a lot of timeto search the place. T he former Blue Hills MP said he has since upgraded the security “in and around” his home. “I want to thank the police for their quick and excellent response to this incident,” Mr Miller said. “I just want to say thank you on behalf of my fami ly and myself. They did an excellent job.” could have seen," the man said. Mounds of charcoal, a small burnt-out stove and a portable propane burner were all that was left at the scene yesterday as local firefighters revisited the scene with arson investigators from the US Marine Corps. The tragedy is the first fire-related casualty in New Providence this year. FROM page one Four-year-old girl dies in blaze FROM page one Former minister’s business and home are broken into Dr Michael Darville fills PLP Senate seat FROM page one PM vows that govt will reduce unemployment FROM page one Global economy ‘to shrink for first time since World War II’ Z hivargo Laing FROM page one

PAGE 11

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n LONDON Everton rallied to beat Middlesbrough 2-1 on Sunday and set up an FA Cup semifinal at Wembley with Manchester United, while Arsenal outclassed l ower tier Burnley 3-0 to reach the last eight, a ccording to the Associated Press . David Wheater’s 44th minute header for Boro had surprised American goalkeeper Tim Howard and threatened an upset at Goodison Park. But Everton rallied with two headed goals in seven minutes by Marouane Fellaini and Louis Saha. Sunday’s other game was in the previous round, with Arsenal beating League Championship club B urnley 3-0 on strikes by Carlos Vela, Eduardo da Silva and Emmanuel Eboue at the Emirates Stadium. Held up by postponements and replays, Arsenal now faces Hull in a quarterfinal and the winner will meet Chelsea in the semifinals. Both semifinals will be at Wembley over the weekend of April 18-19. Manchester United, which has a record 11 FA Cup titles, won 4-0 at Fulham on Saturday to reach a record 26th cup semifinal. Arsenal, a 10-time cup winner, can match that mark by beating Hull. Everton, which has won the cup five times, is in its 24th semifinal. R OME Filippo Inzaghi scored all three goals in A C Milan’s 3-0 win over Atalanta with the club also sure it has David Beckham for the rest of the S erie A season. On loan to Milan, Beckham reached an agreement S aturday to return to the Los Angeles Galaxy on July 1, more than three months later than planned. On Sunday, he had a central role as a playmaker, directing Inzaghi and fellow striker Alexandre Pato. I nzaghi put Milan in front seven minutes in, doub led the lead in the 71st and then scored again three minutes later. Milan solidified its third-place position in the standings with 51 points. Inter Milan leads with 63 p oints and Juventus is second with 56. Serie A scoring leader Marco Di Vaio also found the net three times as Bologna beat Sampdoria 3-0. F RANKFURT Bayer Leverkusen drew 1-1 with 1 0-man VfL Bochum to continue its struggles in Germany’s Bundesliga. Although Leverkusen beat Bayern Munich 4-2 in the German Cup, it has now failed to win at home i n five straight league matches and the draw leaves Leverkusen with 37 points, five points behind fifth place and the final UEFA Cup spot. G LASGOW, Scotland Kyle Lafferty scored t wice as Rangers charged into the semifinal of the Scottish Cup with a 5-1 victory over Hamilton. A day after St. Mirren upset Celtic 1-0 in another quarterfinal, Rangers were wary of losing especiall y after a surprise 1-0 loss to Inverness in the Premier League on Wednesday. Although Hamilton’s Rocco Quinn replied after S teven Whittaker had given Rangers a 15th minute lead, the home side was up 3-1 by halftime thanks to Lafferty’s first strike and a penalty by Aaron Niguez. Hamilton lost three players through injury in the first half and was down to 10 men early in the seconda nd Rangers added two more through Steven Davies and Lafferty. EVERTON'S Louis Saha, 2nd right, heads to score a goal past Middlesbrough keeper Bradley Jones, number 22, during their quarter final FA Cup soccer match at Goodison Park Stadium, Liverpool, England. EUROPEANSOCCER P a u l T h o m a s / A P P h o t o P a u l T h o m a s / A P P h o t o Manchester United to face Everton in FA Cup semifinal EVERTON'S Leon Osman, right, vies with Middlesbrough's Gary O'Neil during their quarter final FA Cup soccer match at Goodison Park Stadium, Liverpool, England, Sunday, March 8, 2009. P a u l T h o m a s / A P P h o t o EVERTON'S Marouane Fellaini, bottom left, reacts after scoring a goal with teammate Leon Osman, top,during their quarter final FA Cup soccer match against Middlesbrough at Goodison Park Stadium, Liverpool, Eng land, Sunday, March 8, 2009. hand, said if the regular season was any indication, the post-season will be just as competitive. “Based on the level of com petition, I was very surprised that we only lost three games,” Thompson said. “But on any given night, especially with the teams involved, you really have to bring your A game. “If you don’t bring your A game, you could be prepared to watch the rest of the season.” While Commonwealth Bank have to concentrate on the YCare’s first, Thompson said the road to the championship still have to come through the Giants. “We have basically the same make-up as last year, with one or two additions that we feel will help us down the stretch,” he said. “But we are just trying to get o the next level.” FROM page 15 Commonwealth Bank Giants ready to defend title intense heat in Paraguay. If the team lose the tie, the Bahamas will get to host Guatemala in the second round over the weekend of July 10-12 at te National Tennis Center in a bid to avoid being relegated to zone III next year. If the team end up winning the tie, the Bahamas will have to go back on the road to the Dominican Republic the same weekend with a bid to play for further advancement to Zone One. The Dominican Republic blanked Guatemala 5-0 in their frst round match-up this weekend. In Saturday’s pivotal doubles, the Bahamas’ team of Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle didn’t have a chance against Delgado and Galeano. Paraguay won the match 6-1, 6-0, 6-2 as the Bahamas fell behind 2-1. The win came on the heels of the split between the two countries in the opening singles on Friday. Delgado knocked off Neilly 61, 6-4, 6-2 in the first match. Then Mullings pulled the Bahamas even with a 4-6, 7-5, 4-1 r etired win over Galeano. Team captain John Farrington, in an interview going into Sunday’s match, noted that it’s been a difficult tie so far. “With Delgado playing at home, he played w ell” Farringto said. “To me, Timmy didn’t play badly. He could have been a little more consistent. “But Delgado was forcing the play a lot. So Timmy had to do a lot more just to stay in the match.” Farrington said Mullings had hs hands full with Galeano. “The kid was good. He kept a lot of balls in play. Devin made him work for every point,” Farrington stressed. “Devin made him play a lot of balls and he ended up retiring. “Devin made him work hard, forcing him around the court. He was a lot more patient. But the guy just couldn’t keep up with Devin.” As for the doubles, Farrington aid Munroe and Rolle didn’t stand a chance.. “The other team played extremely well. We got behind the eight ball early. We got broke early and we just couldn’t get the momentum back,” Farrington said. “They gained al ot more confidence as the match went on.” Davis Cup knife-edge FROM page 15

PAGE 12

Temple Fellowship didn't have any mercy on welcom-i ng Ebenezer men into the Baptist Sports Council's 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Clas-sic. O n Saturday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex, Temp le Fellowship blasted E benezer 54-13 to improve t heir front-running record to 3 -0 in the men's president division. Clayton Cooper and Jason T ucker both had nine in the w in. Samuel Brown had seven in the loss. In the men's vice president division, New Bethlehem s tayed unbeaten to top their standings at 2-0 as they handed last year's runners-up E vangelistic Center a 46-29 rout. O ther games in the men's division saw Christian Tabernacle make their debut a succ essful one with a 24-19 decision over Church of the Nazarene and BIBA lost a double header, 36-35 to Lat t er-Day Saints and 39-27 to City of Praise. In the 19-and-under divi sion, Latter-Day Saints pushed their unblemishedr ecord to 3-0 with a 46-34 rout over Macedonia; Macedonia held off Mercy Seat 37-36; Golden Gates def. Miracle Working Church of God 29-25 and Temple Fellowship got by Golden Gates team one 4135. U U n n d d e e f f e e a a t t e e d d And in the 15-and-under division, Golden Gates remained undefeated as they shocked Macedonia 18-16; Latter-Day Saints team twos tunned First Baptist 28-22; Miracle Working Church of God nipped Latter-Day 22-21 and Temple Fellowship won 30-22 over Faith United. Here's a summary of some of the games played: L atter-Day Saints 36, BIBA 35: Reno Moss scored the game's winning basket, finishing with six, along with Tero Lloyd to lead the Saints as they marched past BIBA men. Enricay Rolle had a game high 12 in a losing effort. City of Praise 39, BIBA 27: Jermaine Humes scored a game high 13 to pace City of Praise men to victory. Roje Chisholm had nine in the loss. Macedonia 37, Mercy Seat 36: Prince Pinder netted the game winning basket as he finished with nine, but Patrick Brice led the attack for Mace donia's 19-and-under with a game high 13. Wayde Higgs had 11 in the loss. Golden Gates No.2 29, Mir acle Working Church of God 25: Samuel Johnson had a game high 14 to lift Golden Gates No.2 to their season opening 19-and-under victo ry. Omar Deveaux had nine in the loss. Latter-Day Saints No.2 28, Golden Gates 22: Darren Smith had a game high 13 in L atter-Day's second team's big debut victory. Leon Saun ders had seven in the loss. Golden Gates 18, Macedo nia 16: Randy Williams c anned the game's winning basket and led Golden Gates' 15-and-under with six in the w in. Geno Bullard had a game high seven in the loss. The league will be back in action on Saturday witha nother host of games at Baillou Hills, starting at 10 am on the two courts. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 13 TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor the services described belowBiddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ2IFH Blue Hill & Tucker Roads Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 Tendersaretobeaddressedto: Mr. Kevin Basden General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: onorbefore26thMarch,2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. Submissions should be marked as follows: Tender No. 682/09 6725$*(7$1. &/($1,1*(59,&(6 &/,)721,(5:(5$7,21 TheCorporationreservestherighttoaccept or reject any or all proposals. For all inquiries regarding the tenders DQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236 Here’s a look at the team standings after this weekend’s results were posted: TeamsWLPct.GB Men's President Temple Fellowship301,000First Baptist101,0001 City of Praise11.50011/2 L atter-Day Saints11.50011/2 E benezer01.0002 BIBA03.0003 Pilgrim00.0003 Men's Vice President New Bethlehem201,000Golden Gates101,000_ Christian Tabernacle101,000_ Bahamas Harvest11.5001 Evangelistic Center11.5001 Calvary Bible02.0001 Church of the Nazarene11.0001 19-And-Under Latter-Day Saints301,000Faith United101,0001F irst Baptist21.6661 M acedonia 2 2.50011/2 Golden Gates11.50011/2 Golden Gates No.211.50011/2 Temple Fellowship 1 1 .500 11/2 Miracle Working COG12.3332 Mercy Seat03.0003 15-And-Under Golden Gates201,000Latter-Day No.2 1 0 1,000 _ Temple Fellowship 21.6661/2 First Baptist22.5001 Macedonia 1 1 .500 1 Faith United 1 1 .500 1 Miracle Working COG 1 2.33311/2 Latter-Day12.33311/2 Zion South Beach02.0002 2009 JOYCE MINUS BASKETBALL CLASSIC Temple Fellowship have no mercy on sorry Ebenezer Frontrunners improve their record with 54-13 thrashing STANDINGS Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THERE’S been quite a bit of speculations as to what is happening with the construction of t he National Stadium at the Q ueen Elizabeth Sports Centre by the Chinese government. Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister laidt hose speculations to rest when he made his contribution on the 2009 Mid Year budget in the House of Assembly last week. I am pleased to confirm publ icly today, Sir, that on 28th January of this year, 17 containers of construction equipment for the new stadium were shipped fromC hina, and should be here within a matter of days,” he said. “I am also pleased to say, Sir, that the advance group of twenty C hinese technical workers will a rrive here on 20th March to begin preliminary works.” Bannister, the Member of Parl iament for Carmichael, said this should lay to rest all concerns a bout whether or not the FNM government can build the nation al stadium. In the meantime, Bannister advised that the government nowh as title documents to the land upon which the Grand BahamaS ports Complex sits. “All 80 acres of it,” he e mphased. In keeping with their manifesto commitment to complete the Grand Bahama Sports Complex, Bannister said the first phase oft he new softball stadium has been completed. Grand Bahama now has a beautiful softball field, which is t he best that I have seen in the Bahamas,” he said. “The new grass practice track has been completed, so that our athletes can train without the danger of stress i njuries that often accompany asphalt or rubberized surfaces.” A nd he assured the members that the government has agreedt o resurface the track in Grand Bahama with a Mondo rubberi zed surface, which will be one of the best in this part of the world. “We expect that this track will be completed in time for the Bahamas to host the Caribbean and Central American Age G roup Championships in Freeport this summer,” Bannister s aid. During his contribution, Bannister also advised members that his Ministry is currently working on a number of initiatives, includ-i ng the finalization of proposed amendments to the NationalS ports Policy in conjunction with Sporting leaders. What is important as we move ahead, Sir, is that we provide the fullest opportunity to our young people from traditionally disadvantaged community and ourf amily islanders to participate at the highest levels of competition,”h e stressed. “They have to know that sports o pens the door to opportunity, and that there is much to be learnt from the traditions of excellence of the past.” Talking about the past, Bann ister said he has mandated that the National Hall of Fameb ecome a fixture in the annual calendar of his minitry’s National S ports Development Programme. “Such a decision, Sir, is based on the fact that the Ministry has a duty to ensure that the young ath letes and coaches of the Bahamas gain a better appreciation of the athletes and coaches of yestery ear who sacrificed so much of their lives to put the Bahamas on the world map of sporting excellence,” he said. “Through this process, Mr. Speaker, my Ministry seeks to acquaint our young Bahamians with the difficult circumstances t hat many of our legendary sporting heroes had to overcome on their road to glory so that they may fully appreciate the truth in the well known adage that it matters not where one starts in life, but rather where one ends, having regard to making smart choices and understanding that each of u s are born with God given gifts and that our destiny is defined by how well we use those gifts.” H e said his iministry introdeuced an annual Hall of F ame Calendar, designed to create a year round awareness of those sporting giants who paved the way for the successes of thep resent generation of our world c lass athletes. While the first edition was essentially concentrated upon the Class of 2008 of this country's n ational Hall of Fame, Bannister said it, therefore, pained him to observe the unfounded criticism of the 2008 Hall of Fame Calen-d ar by a former champion athl ete himself, the Honourable Member for Exuma. Mr. Speaker, when I was appointed as a Minister, I determ ined that I would give service to the Bahamian people, not just F.N.M.'s,” he said. “You will note, Mr. Speaker, that the leader of opposition business (Bernard N ottage) was enshrined in the Hall of Fame this year, and is Mr. F ebruary in the calendar. “And in 2009, the government p lans to induct the first field event medalist, who just happens to be the leader of the opposition (Perry Christie). But sports does not revolve around politics, Sir. We a re determined to honour all deserving Bahamians.” Minister gives update on National Stadium Advance group of Chinese technical workers to arrive here on March 20 Containers of construction gear expected to arrive soon D esmond Bannister

PAGE 13

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor the services described belowBiddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ2IFH Blue Hill & Tucker Roads Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 Tendersaretobeaddressedto: Mr. Kevin Basden General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: onorbefore26thMarch,2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. Submissions should be marked as follows: Tender No. 688/09 %866,1*(59,&(6 &/,)721,(5:(5$7,21 The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals. For all inquiries regarding the tenders DQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW 0U$QWKRQ\)RUEHV at telephone 302-1165 n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net A T last year’s Olympic Games in Beijing, China, Ramon Miller made his debut on the Bahamas senior national team as the “rookie” as he helped the men win the silver medal in the 4 x 400 metre relay. T his year, Miller has served notice that he intends to play a more vital role on the national team when they head to the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany i n August. Over the weekend, Miller posted a triple victory in the NAIA indoor track and field championships in a pace of three hours to earn the Male Track Athlete of the Meet ash e contributed to Dickinson State University’s second place finish in the point standings. The senior, who graduated from CR W alker, closed out his indoor season by winning the 200 and 400 metres as well as anchored Dickinson State to its second consecutive title in the 4 x 400 relay. In a brief interview from the Dickinson P ress on Saturday after his performances, Miller stated: “It was alright to go out with t hree national championships.” I t was the third straight 400 title on the two-lap race on the indoor track for Miller, who clocked 46.98 seconds (just off his championship record of 46.95), well aheado f his Blue Hawks’ team-mate Sean Pickstock, who ran 47.83 for second. Miler had the fastest qualifying time of 47.95 with Pickstock sitting in second with 4 8.36. I n the 200, Miller was just .08 seconds shy of erasing the NAIA meet record when he stopped the clock at 20.97 for another victory for DSU. H is nearest rival King College’s sophomore Kemar Hyman, who trailed in 21.48. Miller led all qualifiers in the preliminaries in 21.32. Pickstock was ninth in 21.87 a nd Forbes was tied for 10th in 21.92, but n either of the latter two advanced. Before he was done, Miller teamed up on the anchor leg with Allan Ayala (lead off), Pickstock (second) and Ian Smith( third) to turn in a winning time of 3:13.17 in the 4 x 4 relay final. Smith was inserted in the line-up to replace another Bahamian, senior John Ingraham, who had to sit out after he s trained his hamstring on Friday. D SU’s coach Pete Stanton had nothing but praise for Miller. “It was a dominating performance by Ramon,” he said. It was one of those special performances to watch in every event. He continues to shine and run so well and compete so hard. He’s been fun to watch.” S tanton also got to watch three other B ahamians perform for DSU. In the men’s 60 final, sophomore Jamal ‘Snickers’ Forbes, back after an injury plaque season last year, ended up second in6 .81, while team-mate Michael Sands was sixth in 6.91. Johnnie Nabors, a senior from Union (Kentucky F orbes had the third fastest qualifying t ime out of the semifinal in 6.78, while Sands was sixth in 6.84. Ingraham was tenth in 6.99 as he suffered his injury. And in the preliminary rounds, Sands h ad the second fastest time of 6.80, followed by Ingraham in 6.85 and Forbes in 6.86. Also at the meet was Lanece Clarke from McKendree State. C larke, a senior sprinter and another C R Walker graduate, had to settle for third in the women’s 60 in 7.56. The race was won by Wayland Baptist’s sophomore Kimberly Smith in 7.37.S hantrell Jenkins, a senior at Voorhees, was second in 7.56. In the preliminaries, Clarke had the third fastest time of 7.66. Her semifinal time was n ot available. C larke, however, played second fiddle to Smith in the 200. Smith won the race in 24.34 with Clarke not too far behind in 24.41. A nd in the 4 x 400 relay, Clarke anchored McKendree to second in the final in 3:49.73. Oklahoma Baptist won the race in 3:47.35. Clarke and McKendree had the f ourth fastest qualifying time of 3:54.22. S asha Joyce, a team-mate of Clarke, ran 9.50 for fourth place in the fifth of six heats in the women’s 60 hurdles. That placed her 25th overall in a field of 3 3 and she failed to make the cut of the top 12 to advance. Both Clarke and Joyce helped Wayland Baptist to clinch the team title. Miller celebrates triple victory N AIAINDOORTRACKANDFIELD CHAMPIONSHIP n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net O LYMPIAN Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson led the way for a number of Bahamians competi ng at the National Junior College Athletic Association’s National Indoor Championships over the weekend. The former Jordan Prince William Falcons’ standout who won the World Junior Cham p ionships’ 200 metre title was second in the 55 metres at the Texas Tech University in Lubb ock, Texas. The Southwest Missouri sophomore ran 6 .80 seconds to follow behind Florissant Valle’s freshman Santana Lowery’s record b reaking performance of 6.70. Ferguson (6.856.80 in the preliminaries. In the 200, Ferguson got second in 23.69. The race was won by Lowery in 23.46. Lowery h ad the best qualifying time of 23.75 with Fer guson behind her in 23.79. K rystal Bodie, a sophomore as well at Southwest Missouri, was also third in the w omen’s 55 hurdles. She ran 7.97. Natasha Ruddock of Essex Community College won in 7.66 with April Williams of Barton County Community College was second in 7.72. Ferguson and Bodie helped Southwest Mis s ouri to an eighth place finish in the point standings with 40. T he other member of the Bahamian con nection at Southwest Missouri, Jamal Wilson,f ailed to secure a mark in the men’s high jump. Cory Holman, a sophomore from Rend Lake, won the title with a best leap of 6-feet, 1 1 3/4-inches. Despite not getting any points from Wils on, Southwest Missouri was tied for 11th in the standings with 16 points. D emetrius Pinder, a sophomore at Essex C ommunity College, was second in the men’s 400 in 46.89. Renny Quow, a freshman from South Plains, won the title in 46.45. In the preliminaries, Pinder ran 46.35 to trail Quow, who did 47.20. Essex Community College was 18th overall in the standings with 11. D eandra Knowles, a freshman competing for South Plains, ran 58.08 for 10th overall in t he preliminaries of the women’s 400. But she didn’t make the cut of eight for the final. S outh Plains was the women’s national champions with 139.50. They also took the men’s crown with 163. Another freshman, Shelleyeka Rolle of Barton County Community College, was third in t he women’s 600 final in 1:34.15. Shakeeri Cole, a freshman from South Plains won in 1:32.65 with Andrea Sutherland of Barton County Community College second in 1:32.87. Rolle posted the fastest qualifying time of 1:37.61. And in the 800, Rolle had to settle for fifth p lace in 2:23.82. Cole again took the victory in 2:21.57. Claudette Hetmeyer, a sophomore f rom Bronx Community College, was ahead of Rolle in 2:23.27 in fourth. R olle had the third fastest qualifying time of 2:24.06. Cole led the way in 2:23.68, followed by Hetmeyer in 2:25.32. Barton County Community College ended up in second place in the standings with 83. NATIONALJUNIORCOLLEGE ATHLETICASSOCIATION: NATIONAL INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS With the high school basketball season nearing conclusion, one series of champions will be decided this week to culminate an exciting year thus far. The Government Schools Sports Association will begin their playoff rounds today at a pair of separate locations for the semifinals. Seniors will face off at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium while Juniors will meet at the D.W. Davis Gymnasium beginning at 4pm. Today’s eight semifinal games will be sudden death elimination while the best of three finals in each division will begin tomorrow at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Senior Boy s G.H.S Magic (GHS C.I Gibson Rattlers (CIG C.C Sweeting Cobras (CCS C.V Bethel Stingrays (CVB Semifinal Matchups 1. GHS vs.4. CVB 2. CIG vs. 3. CCS In a stark contrast with the 2007-08 season, this division is wide open with no clear front runner like last year’s undefeat ed C.R Walker Knights, infact, both last years champions’ the Knights, and runners’ up, the Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins,f ailed to qualify for the postseason. The Magic went from bottom feeders to pennant winners in just a single season but fell short in the Hugh Campbell tournament where they were eliminated by the Cobras. The Rattlers come into the playoffs on the heels of a crushing loss on the national stage in the Hugh Campbell final. As the only returning playoff team from a year ago, C.I Gibson will look to salvage a season with a league title. The Cobras have been another surprise after a disappointing 2007-08 season but had become a top title contender this year, claiming the third seed and advancing to the pool finals of the Hugh Campbell tournament. The Stingrays advanced to the postseason on the final day of regular season play when the beat the Knights to claim the final playoff spot. Junior Boys D.W Davis Pitbulls (DWD T.A Thompson Cobras (TAT A.F Adderley Tigers (AFA L.W Young Golden Eagles (LWY Semifinal Matchups 1. DWD vs. 4. LWY 2. TAT vs. 3. AFA The Pibulls won every possible tournament before them this season, most notably the Father Marcian Peters’ tournament where they edged out the Cobras in the finals. The teams ‘split the regular season series. The Tigers pose the biggest threat to the top seeds with the size of Kenrico Lockhart upfront and an athletic backcourt. Senior Girls C.R Walker Knights (CRW C.V Bethel Stingrays (CVB C.I Gibson Rattlers (CIG Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins (DDJ Semifinal Matchups 1. CRW vs. 4. DDJ 2. CVB vs. 3. CIG The Knights returned much of last year’s squad including top scorer Malesha Peterson. Peterson led the Knights to an undefeated regular season but fell short in the finals of the Father Marcian Peters tournament. Junior Girls H.O. Nash Lions (HON T.A Thompson Cobras (TAT A.F Adderley Tigers (AFA S.C McPherson Sharks (SCM Semifinal Matchups 1. HON vs. 4. SCM 2. TAT vs. 3. AFA The Lions steamrolled through the competiton and seem to be a lock to add another championship title to Pattie Johnson’s resume. H.O. Nash went through the regular season virtually untested and claimed the Father Marcian Peters title for their division. With a talented lineup led by Kaleisha Laing, Leshea Grant, Randya Kemp and Lakishna Munroe, the Lions are the clear favorites to repeat as champions. Ramon Miller GSS A playoff rounds to begin today n BASKETBALL Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson Krystal Bodie Olympian Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson leads the way for Bahamians!

PAGE 14

C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 I NSIDE European soccer latest SPORTS IN BRIEF n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Commonwealth Bank Giants are ready to defend their title in the New Providence Basketball Association. Head coach Perry Thompson said from year-to-year, they have had to deal with different teams and different challenges, but they have been able to prevail. “This year, we have the Wreckers with a very big front court, but I think one of the key things for us will be controlling the game and minimizing the turnovers,” Thompson pointed out. “We would probably like to r un a little more against the W reckers. I think that would be an advantage for us because of their size. But we’re going to be up for the challenge.” That challenge will come tonight when Thompson and his the Giants face Y-Care’s, coached by Donnie Culmer, in game one of the best-of-three series at 7 pm. “It’s going to be a dog fight. Once I’m at first mast, it will be a dog fight,” Culmer said. “And I feel whoever come out of this series will win the championship. “The other side doesn’t have anybody on it. So I’m not really concerned about them.” Culmer, who added Emeka Watson to their frontcourt lineup, said he expect that the series will go down to the wire. While he would like to wrap it up in two straight, he said he could live with it going the distance. Thompson, on the other B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L N N P P B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S T HE New Providence Basketball Association will open its firstr ound best-of-three playoffs tonight at the CI Gibson Gymna s ium. Here’s a look at the fixtures on tap for the week: Tonight’s schedule 7 pm Commonwealth Bank vs Y -Care Wreckers. 8 pm Johnson’s Truckling J umpers vs Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders. W ednesday’s schedule 7 pm Electro Telecom Cybots vs Coke Explorers. 8 pm Police Crimestoppers vs Foxies’ Pros. Friday’s schedule 7 pm Sunshine Auto Ruff R yders vs Johnson’s Trucking Jumpers. 8 pm Y-Care’s Destroyers vs Commonwealth Bank Giants. Saturday’s schedule 7 pm Foxies’ Pros vs Police Crimestoppers. 8 pm Electro Telecom Cybots vs Coke Explorers. Commonwealth Bank Giants ready to defend title Here’s a look at the results posted so far by the Bahamas at t he first round of the American Zone II Davis Cup tie in Paraguay over the weekend: F riday’s Opening Singles Ramon Delgado (ParaguayBahamas 6-1, 6-4. 6-2. Devin Mullings (BahamasParaguay 4-6, 7-5, 4-1 (retired S aturday’s Doubles Ramon Delgado/Diego Galeano (Paraguay M unroe/Marvin Rolle (Bahamas Sunday’s Reverse Singles Devin Mullings (Bahamas vs Ramon Delgado (Paraguay) not c ompleted up to presstime. Timothy Neilly (BahamasParaguay scheduled to follow. RESULTSSOFAR DEVIN MULLINGS (above needs to win his reverse five set singles match against Ramon Delgado in the battle of the top seeds. SEE page 12 Davis Cup knife-edge n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas was in a critical position yesterday as the final day of the first round oft he American Zone II Davis Cup tie wrapped up in Paraguay. P laying at the Yacht y Golf Club in Paraguayo, Lambare, G rand Bahamian Olympian Devin Mullings needed to win his reverse five set singlesm atch against Ramon Delgado in the battle of the top s eeds. The Bahamas was trailing 2-1 going into the match. The final match was to have showcased the two number two seeds, Grand BahamianT imothy Neilly against Diego Galeano. But up to presstime, the r esults were not available. The matches were plyed in t he evening because of the SEE page 12 Bahamas in critical position on final day of tie in Paraguay NEEDINGTOWIN

PAGE 15

n CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. TWO SCIENCE teachers who have spent the past five yearsu nder NASA’s tutelage are about to graduate with high-flying honors, according to Associated Press. The space shuttle flight Wednesday night of Joseph Acaba and Richard Arnold II will mark the first time two one-time teachers have rocketed into space together. And during the twoweek construction mission to the international space station, both will attempt multiple spacewalks the most dangerous job in orbit. The flight on shuttle Discovery was delayed a month because of concerns about hydrogen gas valves in the engine compartment. After extra tests, NASA deemed the spacecraft safe to fly. Discovery’s astronauts arrived at the launching site Sunday afternoon, four hours ahead of the start of the countdown, and thanked everyone who helped resolve the valve issue. The teachers and their five crewmates the usual assort ment of military pilots and rocket scientists will deliver and installa final set of solar wings for the s pace station. With just over a year remaining until the orbiting complex is completed, the framework holding the solar wings is the last major American-made building block left to fly. This flight comes a year and a half after the last teacher-astronaut, Barbara Morgan, went into s pace after a two-decade wait. Morgan was the backup in the mid-1980s for schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe, who was killed when space shuttle Challenger exploded after takeoff. Acaba was a freshman at the University of California at Santa Barbara when McAuliffe died on Jan. 28, 1986. Arnold was fresh out of college and living in Washington, and his wife-to-be was a student-teacher. “It definitely had an impact when you look at the sacrifices that she (McAuliffe the importance that NASA put on it,” Acaba said. When it came time for him to step up, “it really made you feel like you were doing something worthwhile.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T HE Bahamas is the first market to introd uce the “fish go wrap” at the Wendy’s restaur ants. T he brainchild of Wendy’s Bahamas president Chris Tsavoussis, this menu item featuresa fresh, hand-cut cod fillet and is topped with shredded cheddar cheese, lettuce and a zesty tartar sauce, all wrapped in a warm, soft tortilla. “Timing couldn’t be better,” said Chris Tsavoussis. “I had been toying with this idea for q uite a while and I’m thrilled that Wendy’s h as agreed to allow The Bahamas to be the v ery first market in the world to roll out the fish go wrap.’” D escribed as a “tasty spin-off” from the existi ng Wendy’s ‘chicken go wrap,’ the ‘fish go wrap substitutes North Pacific Cod to deliver the perfect, palate pleasing snack . Vice-president Terry Tsavoussis and director of operations Randy Sands hit the Wendy’s kitchen to personally whip up and test the new wrap prior to its launch. The International Wendy’s Community will h ave their sights set on The Bahamas as ‘Fish G o Wrap’ makes its historic debut. THE TSAVOUSSIS BROTHERS are ‘Wrapping and Rolling Out’ the next big thing in the quick serve restaurant industrythe ‘Fish Go Wrap!’ From left: Wendy’s president, Chris Tsavoussis; vice-president Terry Tsavoussis, director of operations Randy Sands. Tsavoussis brothers make history with fabulous fish wrap Teachers pair up for Wednesday night space shot

PAGE 16

n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor An awards programme that could provide Bahamian entrepreneurs with up to $100,000 in g rant funding is “hoping to get a lot more” than the 40-50 appli c ations received from this nation prior to today’s close, its country r epresentative explaining that the initiative aimed to fill “the missing middle” in the national economic structure. Abigail Noble, country representative for Pioneers of Prosperity, said the initiative was tar-g eted at small and medium-sized enterprises across the Bahamas and the Caribbean, in a bid to fill the gap between micro and large businesses, and inspire, invest in and empower the next genera tion of entrepreneurs. Describing the focus on small and medium-sized enterprises as “immensely important, Ms Noble explained: “Look at the devel oped, industrialized countries. A large percentage of their gross domestic product (GDP from small and medium-sized enterprises. That’s not the case in small island and developing countries. It’s the missing middle.” Ms Noble described as a “lega cy of colonialism” the fact that there were very few companies of a size between micro enterp rises and large firms in nations such as the Bahamas. “Very r arely does that gap get bridged – small companies growing into large and medium-sized enter prises,” Ms Noble said. “These are the ones that employ more people, create more disposable income, enable people to invest more in education and healthC M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.56 $3.56 $3.36 3*/ )%*3.# +,$0*!+**'-$ -/).#$)"+'$)"' $-/, "( *! . ))$-*,"*'!-*&$)"/+.# 1,(, 4 *,'**&.* 2+ ,$ ) )$"#.!$''1$.# ). ,.$)( ).$.$-'1$.#$)3*/,",-+*1) ,*! .#$-)'/-$ -,$)($$/(#$-.#*/"#.!/''3 *,. t",*/)!'**,#*( 1$.#*0 ,-$4 +.$*$'**).# .#.&$)"/*/,) ,-#$+) !$.-$'/ .*.# *)-$. +**'-"3(!$'$.$ -+,$0. '' .# )$.$ -*!.$-3*/,**,-. +*( ! ./, -*!.# #*( $)'/ "*/,( .&$.# ).$' !'**,-1'&$)'*.-'/-$0 '3*! ! , '.3$-.$)" '-**!! ,-)/( ,*!/)$.--+ -!*,-' !*,, ). n n t t f f r r t t f f n n b b b b n n r r f f n n t t n nr r b b n n r r bntn n n b b t t n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor I mplementation of the Domestic Insurance Act and its accompanying regulations is set to be further delayed after new amend ments were suggested to enhancet he Registrar’s “ability to regulate the sector”, with some c hanges prompted by CLICO (Bahamas s ional liquidation. The proposed changes come after Tribune Business obtained evidence that CLICO (Bahamas and its subsidiaries breached this n ation’s exchange control laws and regulations, with both the c urrent and a former Central Bank governor telling this newsp aper that any Bahamian-resident company – such as the insurer and its CLICO Enterprises Ltd affiliate – needed to obtain regulatory permission for any over s eas loans and investments that were made in their name (see o ther story on Page 1B). Tribune Business has also l earned that a sizeable number of CLICO (Bahamas Bahamian-based staff are likely to be made redundant this week, with the liquidator likely to this w eek complete the financial package for buyers interested in a cquiring the insolvent compa ny’s life and health insurance p ortfolio. Among those most likely to be made redundant will be CLICO (Bahamas who previously operated on a commission basis, and have already been sent home to await further instructions. It is also unclear how many of its 51a dministrative and underwriting staff will be retained by the liq-u idator, Baker Tilly Gomez accountant and partner, Craig A. Tony’ Gomez. When contacted by Tribune Business, Mr Gomez did not directly confirm whether many CLICO (Bahamas b e formally let go this week. However, he added: “Clearly, b usiness has ceased, and to fund staff payroll, you need business.” M r Gomez said he and his liquidation team (he is only the pro visional liquidator) had enjoyed CLICO collapse causes Act delay Minister says Domestic Insurance Act held up after insurer's failure prompts further suggested amendments to enhance 'Registrar's ability to regulate the industry' Further evidence shows CLICO Bahamas and Bahamian affiliate violated exchange control laws and regulations Sizeable number of CLICO's 141 Bahamian staff to be formally laif-off this week Minister acknowledges episode shows need for enhanced cross-border supervision in Caribbean Zhivargo Laing CLICO regulation hindered by ‘noncosy’ relationship SEE page 7B Construction i ndustry unemployment may have struck 18-20 per cent n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Unemployment in the Bahamian construction industry could be running as high as 18-20 per cent, the Bahamian Contractors Association’s (BCA bune Business, with few projects coming on stream to replace jobs that are finished by companies. Responding to the Department of Statistics’ interim Labour Force Survey, which showed that construction industry employment had fallen by a further 9 per cent between May 2008 and Febru-a ry 2009, Stephen Wrinkle said that figure tallied with the s ector’s own estimates. With sector unemployment r unning at about 9 per cent, according to previous construction industry workforce assessments, Mr Wrinkle said the estimate of a further 9 perc ent increase was in line with e stimated. “That’s an additional 9 per cent,” he said of the Department’s findings. “We reckon we’re at about 20 per cent unemployment in the field. From what we’re hearing from our members, that’s not far off. We were at 8-9 per cent unemployment, and if you add another 9 per cent that takes us to 18 per cent, so it’s not far off. “That’s pretty much what the industry is telling us – between 18-20 per cent. It’s a substantial number when you start to add it up. It’s in the hundreds, if not thousands.” While Bahamian contractors did their best to keep key personnel, and the most pro ductive employees, on payroll even during down times, Mr Wrinkle questioned whether SEE page 6B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president is “shocked” that the national unemployment rate has risen so rapidly within the past six months, pointing out that in percentage terms it w as almost a 40 per cent increase. Commenting on the Department of Statistics’ i nterim labour force survey, which showed that the unemployment rate on New Providence had i ncreased from 8.7 per cent to 12.1 per cent between May 2008 to early 2009, Dionisio D’Aguilar said the data showed both the Bahamian economy’s vulnerability and the “urgent need” for the Government to initiate its planned capital w orks stimulus. “That’s an almost 40 per cent increase in the rate of unemployment,” Mr D ’Aguilar said, commenting on the 3.5 per cent rise in New Providence. “I’m surprised that it’s that significant. I’m a little shocked that it’s as significant as it is in terms of percentage. “This recession/depression is only getting starte d. We don’t know where the bottom island how long it’s going to go on for. I’m shocked that ther ate of unemployment has increased as precipitously as it has. “It has been demonstrated that our economy is increasingly fragile. That’s why the recession, when it us, has been as devastating as it has been.” Chamber chief 'shocked' at rate of jobless incr ease SEE page 5B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor REGULATIONof CLICO (Bahamas 2 007 period may have been hampered by the tense relationship that existed between the Ministry of Finance and Registrar of Insurance’s Office, Tribune Business has been told, as a former minister confirmed the company had not operated “in accordance with Bahamian laws and regulations”. J ames Smith, Minister of State for Finance under the 2002-2007 Christie administration, said CLICO (Bahamast ion, and its increasing exposure to highly risky, speculative Florida-based real estate investments, which at 2007 year-end a ccounted for almost 59 per cent of its assets – a highly unusual concentration of risk – was never brought to his attention when h e was minister. “No, not while I was there. I don’t recall anything,” Mr Smith told Tribune Business when questioned on whether these matters came across his desk. He then indicated this may have been due to the troubled rela t ionship the Ministry of Finance then had with the Registrar of Insurance’s Office, explaining that the latter had wanted the f reedom to operate as a relatively autonomous, standalone reg ulator, and resented what it perceived as his ministry’s “inter-f erence”. * Ex-minister says relationship between Ministry o f Finance, Registrar of Insurance's Office was t ense, with insurer's problems never brought to his attention * Says exchange controls breached, as Bahamas resident companies need prior permission to lend investment monies overseas in their name SEE page 4B Pioneers aiming to fill 'missing middle' SEE page 6B

PAGE 17

n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter T HE BAHAMAS should place trade experts in its established worldwide embassy and consulate network in a bid to forge new import/exporto pportunities, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s executive director has urged, although he acknowledged that this would be costly. Philip Simon, speaking at t he National Economic Summit at Ebenezer’s Loyola Hall, told Tribune Business that theB ahamas would greatly benefit from trade ambassadors w ho were a specialist on trade opportunities. “Consulates should have a t rade ambassador in every consulate around the world; someone who is a specialist o n the economy, a specialist o n trade opportunities, to sell t he Bahamas in addition to other diplomatic and political things that consulates do. It mayhave been mentioned in the manifest of theg overning party,” he said. However, the former A mbassador to CARICOM, L eonard Archer, said governm ent might not consider ratifying such a position because of the high costs involved. “Trade Ambassadors are expensive,” he said. “Thea dditional expense of putting a qualified trade ambass ador/trade officer in the miss ion would not be cost effect ive.” Mr Archer said, though, that the Bahamas and many Caribbean countries have gravely understaffed missionsa broad, and suffer handicapped relations with partner countries worldwide because of it. “Someone ought to be able to sit in the public ses-s ion of that (foreign t ee from beginning to end so they can be constantly sending reports back to Nassau sayingt his is what is being said, this is what is being said by whom a nd this is what you should do,” he continued. M M a a n n i i f f e e s s t t o o T he FNM government, in its 2007 Manifesto, promised to continue the acquisition ofr esidential properties overseas “for the accommodation of B ahamas Foreign Service Officers and Bahamas Diplomatic and Consular Offices.” I t was suggested during the National Economic Summit t hat CARICOM nations consider joint ownership of consular offices abroad to miti-g ate costs and increase staffing. However, Mr Archer said the idea had been mulled over and tried, but some countries were not confident that their concerns would be u ppermost in the minds of nations that they shared cons ular accommodations with. The FNM Government also said in Manifesto 2007 that itw ould review the operations of “diplomatic and consular offices to ensure adequate funding and appropriate staff levels”. T his, Mr Archer restated, was paramount in assuring that all aspects of the Bahamas and other Caribbean nations foreign interests ared uly looked after. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW '25,&(721<$),7=*(5$/' RI *OHQLVWRQ*DUGHQVLQWKH:HVWHUQ'LVWULFWRIWKH,VODQGRI1HZ3URYLGHQFH RQHRIWKH,VODQGVRIWKH&RPPRQZHDOWKRI7KH%DKDPDVLQWHQGVWR FKDQJHFKLOGQDPHIURP 1$7+$1,(/:,//,$0)5$1&,6+(< WR 1 $7+$1,(/:,//,$0)5$1&,6),7=*(5$/' , WKHUHDUHDQ\REMHFWLRQV WRWKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ZULWHVXFKREMHFWLRQVWRWKH &KLHI3DVVSRUW2IFHU31DVVDX%DKDPDVQRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\ fGD\VDIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM Chamber executive: We need network of trade ambassadors

PAGE 18

n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE BAHAMAS Chamber of Commerce is not doing all it “could and should be doing,” its executive directorh as acknowledged, but denied claims it was an organisation that was not friendly to small businesses. P hilip Simon, speaking at the National Economic Summit, said the Chamber hadr ebuilt its membership through small and mediums ized businesses, and entrepreneurs, after it was put under pressure through thec reation of other private sector groups. “The presidents o f the Chamber of Commerce up until the late 1990s all looked very much the same -r ich, mercantile, involved in the real estate sector, retail s ector and white and that has changed tremendously,” Mr Simon said. I have seen no semblance of it since I’ve been involved w ith the Chamber since 2004.” He added that when organisations such as the QualityC ouncil and Nassau Tourism and Development Board ( NTDB) broke off from the Chamber, they took a substantial number of membersw ith them, along much of its influence. When they evolved, particularly the NTDB with Norman Solomon and DianeP hilips leading that charge from a committee level within the Chamber, to an actual organisation that felt as though it needed its own iden-t ity along Bay Street to focus on Bay Street’s needs, it took all of those member personsw ho would have been classified as beingthe ‘Bay Street B oys’ within the Chamber of Commerce’s influence. [As a result], the organisation almost died,” said Mr Simon. He said that out of the C hamber’s now less than 500 members, 72 per cent are small businesses, with 47 per cent of those having ane mployee base of 10 persons or less. Mr Simon said that c ontrary to what new small business groups say, the Bahamas Chamber of Com-m erce is a small business Chamber of Commerce. H e added that the creation of more small business groups could be counterproductive int he long run, as they all vie for the limited resources of the nation’s private sector. Hes aid, however, it was ulti mately each company’s deci s ion as to which association they endorse. “There is much more the B ahamas Chamber of Commerce could and should be d oing,” Mr Simon said. “We have a resource challenge just like most other com p anies and businesses. We depend on our membership t o make things happen. The Chamber of Commerce is in not that building on CollinsA venue, it is that membership pool and we are as strong as our members are.” H e said current Chamber president Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is set to vacate the position this summer, has been extremely vocal on the issuesf acing small and medium-sized businesses, and the Chamber w as more interested in collaborating with other small business groups rather than competing for membership. “He’s (Mr D’Aguilar v ery aggressive about the amount of money these instit utions make that leave the country, and the fact that they have not been as open to offering venture capital,” said Mr Simon. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 3B Chamber challenged on small firm relevance Share your news The Tribune wants to hear f rom people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per h aps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d . If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. There is much more the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce could a nd should be doing.” Philip Simon

PAGE 19

“The Registrar’s Office has always been a bit of a sore thumb in the public service area,” Mr S mith explained. “It was always p eopled by people not from the public service. The relationship between that office and the Mini stry of Finance was not a cosy o ne. They felt we were interfering.” He suggested that through having the Registrar of Insurance’sO ffice staffed by personnel who, largely, had not come up through the civil service, the Bahamian insurance regulator was unaware and not alert to – the time when i t needed to notify the Ministry of Finance about CLICO (Bahamas Mr Smith said the Registrar w ould have reported directly to the then-Financial Secretary to the Treasury, Ruth Millar. “The Financial Secretary was very wellversed in the rules and knew exactly what to do if something was wrong,” he added. The fact that neither Mr Smith n or, it would appear, Mrs Millar knew of the CLICO (Bahamas situation indicates that at the crucial time – when the company was both making and expanding its investment and asset concentration in the Florida real estate project – key figures in the government hierarchy were ‘in the dark’ a bout the issues that would ultimately lead to the insurer’s insolvency and collapse. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, in his address to the House of Assembly on CLICO (Bahamas that the Registrar of Insurance’s Office was keenly aware of the p roblem, having met with the company on the issue since 2004. In 2007, it went so far as to demand that CLICO (Bahamas repatriate the $53 million invested in inter-company loan balances, but this request was never met by the company. I ndeed, throughout the “noncosy” relationship between the Ministry of Finance and insurance regulator, CLICO (Bahamas from $37.092 million in 2004 to $53.761 million in 2005, then to $68.302 million in 2006 and, finally, $57.010 million in 2007. That l atter figure represented some 59 per cent of its total assets. Meanwhile, Mr Smith said that while enhanced cross-border supervision may have helped prevent CLICO (Bahamas the real problem was the fact that the insurer appeared to have breached some key Bahamian l aws and regulations. Chief among these were the exchange control system, with both Mr Smith and his current successor as Central Bank of the Bahamas governor, Wendy Craigg, pointing out that Bahamas-resident companies, i ncluding those considered resident for exchange control purposes, needed the regulator’s prior approval if loans and investments made overseas were in their names. In other words, they needed permission to invest Bahamian dollar assets they took in overs eas in a foreign currency, regardless of whether money physically left the Bahamas or not. This situation also raises questions over whether the Registrar of Insurance’s Office ever discussed the CLICO (Bahamas uation with the Central Bank, especially whether the company w as receiving exchange control. Both the Central Bank governor and Registrar of Insurance attend the monthly meetings of the Group of Financial Services Regulators (GFSR common regulatory issues. “What’s coming out is that the [ CLICO] operations in the Bahamas were not in accordance with Bahamian laws and regulations,” Mr Smith said. “It’s one thing to have a regulatory failure, meaning the regulators did not do something they should have done. But from what I’ve read, it seems the company, as a resident c ompany in the Bahamas, was making loans and investments abroad without the prior permission of exchange control. “It’s very hard to regulate that activity, because they’ve done that under the radar of the regulator. Having said that, with the increasing cross-border trade in s ervices between us and the rest of the Caribbean, I think that will encourage greater co-operation between regulators in the Caribbean.” Craig A ‘Tony’ Gomez, CLICO (Bahamas rently having to wade through a m aze of related party transactions and inter-company book transfers to build up a complete picture of the company’s financial position. Mr Smith said it was likely that CLICO (Bahamas Trinidadian parent, CL Financial, had transferred assets between e ntities in the group, and used the former’s Turks and Caicos branch as a way to move US dollar assets into the US. The former minister and Central Bank governor said CLICO (Bahamas exchange control permission to repatriate dividends and profits f rom the US real estate venture back into the Bahamas, and also would have required the Registrar of Insurance’s approval for material changes on its balance sheet. “There seems to be no regulator in the Bahamas that gave permission for it,” Mr Smith added o f CLICO (Bahamas On the surface, I don’t think it’s fair to blame a system failure,b ecause the system was not designed to deal with what a ppears to be a blatant attempt to disguise transactions.” Evidence to support the exchange control breaches claim comes from the 2007 auditedf inancial statements of CLICO Enterprises, the wholly-ownedC LICO (Bahamas that received the $57 million a dvances from the parent. Like CLICO (Bahamas Enterprises is a Bahamian-registered company, sharing the same registered office as its parent. T he 2007 accounts list both the Florida real estate development,W ellington Preserve, and another asset – a Haiti-based bakery c alled Shabisco – as 100 per cent owned by CLICO Enterprises. The chairman’s report accompa nying the financials lists Welling ton Preserve as CLICO Enter p rises “most significant investment in 2007”, and details that funding from” the Bahamian company will replace loans from C L Financial once the develop ment starts to generate positive cash flow. This clearly suggests that overseas loans and invest ments are being made in the name of a Bahamian company. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE GOVERNMENT NOTICE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION N N O O T T I I C C E ETender for Bussing/Transportation of children in New Providence and the Family Islands including Grand Bahama for the years 2009 2013 1.0The Ministry of Education (hereafter call the Purchaser) now invites sealed bids, from persons to provide transportation to and from schools in accordance with the provision of the Education Act. Bid forms can be collected from the Ministry of Education and the office of Family Island Administrators between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 2.0Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicate in a sealed envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject bided on. 3.0Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the address below, on or before Tuesday, 31st March, 2009 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened. 4.0Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, 2nd April, 2009 at the address below: The Chairman, Tenders Board Ministry of Finance Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre Cable Beach P.O. Box N-3017 Nassau, The Bahamas Tel: ( 242)327-1530 1 27,&(2)6$/( ( [SRFUHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQ&RPSDQ\f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t /DZRI3URSHUW\$FW 7(506 7HQSHUFHQWRIWKHSXUFKDVH S ULFHDWWKHWLPHRIFRQWUDFWDQGWKH E DODQFHXSRQFRPSOHWLRQZLWKLQ 6L[W\GD\VRIFRQWUDFW 7KLVVDOHLVVXEMHFWWRDUHVHUYHSULFH7KH&RPSDQ\ UHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\DQGDOORIIHUV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVPD\VXEPLWZULWWHQRIIHUV DGGUHVVHGWR([SRFUHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQFR0DQDJLQJ3 DUWQHU32%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDVWREH UHFHLYHGQRODWHUWKDQWKHFORVHRIEXVLQHVVRQWKHWKG D\RI0DUFK CLICO regulation hindered by 'non-cosy' relationship F ROM page 1B

PAGE 20

Acknowledging that time constraints had restricted its interim survey to New Providence and Grand Bahama, the Department of Statistics nevertheless had been able to survey a sample of 2,500 h ouseholds for the interim data produced in February 2009. For New Providence, the total projected unemployment rate rose from 8.7 per cent in May2 008 to 12.1 per cent in February 2009, an increase likely to have been driven largely by the more than 1,500 hotel lay-offs. These j ob cuts, together with the increasing effects of the downturn, have impacted other sectors, especially industries such as retail and construction. For Grand Bahama, the Department of Statistics said the unemployment rate had increased from a 9 per cent total in May 2 008 to 14.6 per cent in February 2009, an increase of 5.6 per cent or more than 50 per cent in percentage terms. These latest unemployment rates were described as the highest experienced by both islands in the past 15 years, since the r ecession of the early 1990s. The Department of Statistics said the n umber of persons unemployed o n New Providence had risen by 4 ,540 or 38 per cent, while for Grand Bahama the equivalent was a 55 per cent rise or 1,500 p ersons. T hese data mean that just over o ne in 10 Bahamians who are actively looking for work are now n ot able to find it. On Grand Bahama, the February 2009 surv ey showed that that 17.7 per cent of women were unemployed, with the rate slightly lower for men at 11.7 per cent. Conversely, forN ew Providence, the unemploym ent rate was only 11.9 per cent for women, yet 12.4 per cent for m en. “The Government has to get t hese infrastructure programmes up and running as quickly as possible,” Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune Business. “The planning, the design, the scope of works, those p hases take a lot of time. “Clearly, the Bahamian econ o my does not have any time. People are losing their jobs at a phe n omenal rate. The percentage of the workforce that is unemployed i s up 40 per cent in six months.” The Chamber president added: “Money spent during a recession typically generates a 38 per cent greater return that money spent during a boom. These displaced p eople need to be found jobs. The quickest way to do that is to start some of these infrastructure projects, and get them going. Governments don’t know how t o speed up in a crisis. This is clearly what they need to do. What that number shows you is that there is an urgency to exped ite what projects are out there, and see what others might come along. “There’s a sense of urgency to g et things going. Unemployment is rising at a precipitous rate.” The increased unemployment rate will come as no surprise to anyone, with the Government, b usiness community and Bahamians across this nation braced for such a rise, given the severity of the economic downturn impacting t he US, which acts as this country’s major tourism and inward investment source. Not surprisingly, the Department of Statistics survey found that out of the total 16,315 persons unemployed in New Providence, more than one-third (33 per cent) had lost their jobs withi n the last six months. Out of this total, some 44 per cent had either been laid-off or dismissed. On Grand Bahama, almost 50 p er cent of those unemployed had lost their jobs within the past sixm onths. Of these, some 48 per cent had been paid-off or dism issed.The employed labour force also experienced a decline, shrinking by 5 per cent on New Providence and 9.2 per cent on Grand Bahama. P hilip Simon, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s execu-t ive director, said that while the general expectation had been that t he unemployment rate would rise into “double digits”, the feeli ng had been that it would not go much above 12 per cent. “But it [an even higher unemployment rate] could be reality, quite honestly, because I don’t t hink we’ve hit the bottom of the barrel yet,” he explained, “and t here may be more lay-offs to come. At the same time, it’s important to encourage businesses to be prudent but also have a social responsibility, and as best as pos sible not to take advantage of thes ituation.” Mr Simon urged Bahamian b usinesses and entrepreneurs not to become obsessed by the ‘doom a nd gloom’, and to raise their heads and examine future objectives. “There has to be, even in the midst of this recession, there h as to be a drive and creativity in the establishment of new businesses,” he explained. “Just look at when we go t hrough a hurricane. Old trees a re blown away, but there is always new growth, and there are some businesses that are thriving right now. You have to be in tune w ith your consumers, new ways of getting to them, and attach a service to your product. You’ve got to hustle.” T he Chamber executive urged Bahamians to keep the unemployment figures, and their increase, in perspective. “We all accept the fact that we are in the midst of a recession, and this is o ne of the indicators manifesting itself,” he said. “What we have to do as best as possible is to micro-manage o ur lives, not just from a business p erspective, but the community we live in is so inter-linked and interdependent on one another. What happens on Paradise Island a ffects me in South Beach, what happens in Lyford Cay affects me in Fox Hill. “We have a social responsibili ty intertwined with economic responsibility to truly be our brother’s keeper. We can’t disassociate ourselves from the layoffs. The outlook has to be one of positioning ourselves for progress a nd success coming out of this recession. That’s a tough pill to swallow when we’re going through what we’re going through in the short-term, but we have to have that perspective in mind. What are you doing a year from n ow? What would I like to do, and how do I position myself to achieve that?” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 5B (03/2<0(17,7<
PAGE 21

care, and create a higher standard o f living. “It’s a virtuous cycle of feeding the economy, so it grows moreand diversifies. In some ways t ourism, because it’s dependent o n external customers and financing, can be extremely fragile. But if you invest in small and medium-sized enterprises, you developa n economy that is more diversified, robust and deeper.” The Pioneers of Prosperity initiative is now in its third year, h aving been launched in – and extended through – Africa, with awards ceremonies and presentations held in nations such as Rwanda and Kenya.It has nowb een launched in the Bahamas and Caribbean, and later this year will expand into Central America, backed by the John Templeton F oundation, Inter-American Development Bank (IDB (Seven) and the OTF (On the Frontier) Group. The latter is a competitive strategies consulting firm. Pioneers for Prosperity will l ikely award between 10 to 15 grants to small and medium-sized enterprises from across the Bahamas and the Caribbean. The grants will range in size from$ 5,000 to $100,000, but only one company will be awarded the latter sum. All companies need equity and financing, and grant m oney represents one of the best and least onerous forms of financing for Bahamian firms. Pioneers of Prosperity has held several information and recruitment ses-s ions in the Bahamas, and Ms Noble said the response had been overwhelmingly positive, with entrepreneurs telling her that they h ad never seen such an initiative targeted at small and mediumsized enterprises before. To date, Pioneers for Prosperity had received between 200-250a pplications from across the Bahamas and the Caribbean, but was expecting a last-minute influx before today’s close to take that t o somewhere between 500-1,000 applications. From the Bahamas, Ms Noble said: “The last count I ’ve seen has been somewhere in the order of 40-50 persons. We’re hoping to get a lot more.” She explained that when it came to deciding on grant recipi-e nts, Pioneers of Prosperity was looking for “the four bottom lines”. These were investing in understanding their customer and c ustomer service; investing in themselves via profitability; investing in their staff through training, benefits and premium wages; and investing in their com-m unities. “We’re looking for companies seeking to create prosperity in all senses,” Ms Noble explained. A nd she advised Bahamian firms and entrepreneurs: “Don’t put your head in the sand. Now is the time to be thinking about starting a business if you don’t have one. If you do have one, now is the time to think about investing to get ahead of the curve. The current economic environment is a c hallenge, but it should be viewed as an opportunity.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.596.590.003,0500.4380.05015.00.76% 5.001.43Consolidated Water BDRs1.431.500.070.1110.05213.53.47% 3.002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.8950.40011.73.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44281.3812Colina Money Market Fund1.44280.634.45 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S131-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 27-Feb-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 813.86 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSFRIDAY, 6 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.36 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -52.00 | YTD % -3.04BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases (03/2<0(17,7<
PAGE 22

“a good and productive week” w hen it came to determining CLICO (Bahamas position. At least four companies British American Financial, C olinaImperial Insurance Company, Family Guardian and Atlantic Medical – have confirmed their interest in acquiring CLICO (Bahamash ealth insurance portfolio. Whether they will actually pur-sue this interest, and translate it into a formal offer to the liquidat or, will depend on the portfolio’s quality and the financial information supplied by Mr Gomez. “It’ll be out to those persons early [this] week who havee xpressed an interest,” the liquidator told Tribune Business, saying the process had taken slightly longer because he wanted t o verify the accuracy of the information provided. CLICO (Bahamas insurance policyholders, paying an annual combined premium of $ 5.1 million, and 11,230 health insurance policyholders, paying annual premiums of $3.2 million. In total, the Bahamas accounted for 23,191 of the company’s 2 9,017 insurance and annuity c lients, and some $44 million of its $100 million in liabilities. Asked when a creditors’ meeting would be held, Mr Gomez s aid he was “awaiting the hearing of the full application” to place CLICO (Bahamas uidation. That petition is due to b e heard before Supreme Court J ustice Cheryl Albury on Wednesday, March 18. Meanwhile, Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, p ledged that the Government would move “expeditiously” to bring the Domestic Insurance Act passed by Parliament more than t hree years ago – into effect, but f irst needed to assess and introduce amendments suggested “in light of these events”. He explained that there had been some suggestions by the Registrar of Insurance that there may be some amendments to the Act that would strengthen its abili ty to regulate the insurance sector”. Although he was not in office when contacted by Tribune Business, and could not recall many of the specific proposals, Mr Laing s aid: “In the legislation, both the e xisting one and the new Act, we don’t have the ability to do judicial management. Instead of liquidation, the courts could order a m anagement team to take control of the company, as a step before liquidation.” The minister added that had T ribune Business contacted him a w eek ago, he would have said that the regulations to accompany the Domestic Insurance Act – the missing piece, which would give it e nforcement teeth – would have been tabled in Parliament within the next few weeks. That was the piece missing f rom the puzzle to bring the legi slation into effect. When asked about a new Domestic Insurance Act timetable, Mr Laing replied: “There is no question that we will s eek to get to it expeditiously, that’s for sure.” On CLICO (Bahamas lapse, he added: “What it does p oint to is something that has been observed already, which we ourselves had seen prior to this event. There have to be upgrades to the insurance regulatory regime, inclusive of legislation, the resources of the Office of the Registrar of Insurance, and thec apacity of the Registrar to respond quickly when necessarya nd react in a graduated fashion that allows it to better exert cont rol over how much is done by an operation. We clearly have to move in that direction, and clearly we are.” Mr Laing, though, indicated t hat the main responsibility for CLICO (Bahamasi nto liquidation lay with its Trinidad parent, CL Financial. It i s understood that CL Financial representatives dominated CLICO (Bahamas In particular, the minister said the Bahamas-based insurer failed t o obtain the required ‘no objection’ approval from the Registrar o f Insurance for its overweight exposure to related party loans a nd US-based real estate investments, despite having an obliga tion to do so. “It really is for an operation to comply with the law, because it protects them and their c lients,” Mr Laing said. “What increased supervision does is that i t allows you to do these kinds of robust inspections to determine t hese things early.” Otherwise, Bahamian regulators would be responding to events after they had had happened and only revealed in a company’s audited financial statements. M r Laing also acknowledged t hat CLICO (Bahamas and that of its Trinidadian parent, CL Financial, had strengthened the case for improved cons olidated supervision and crossborder regulation of panCaribbean financial entities. CLICO (Bahamas f ect example of a financial serv ices provider straddling multiple jurisdictions. CL Financial owned the Bahamian company, and its affiliates, through a Barb ados-based holding company, and CLICO (Bahamas branch operations in the Turks & Caicos Islands and Belize. I think you could argue that,” M r Laing acknowledged, when Tribune Business asked him whether CLICO (Bahamas lapse had strengthened the case f or enhanced cross-border regulatory co-operation and supervision within the Caribbean. “I think it could have benefited f rom tighter co-operation between regulators from across the region, that’s for sure.” The CLICO (Bahamas has raised concerns about the ability of Bahamian regulators to oversee/supervise the overseas branches of Bahamas-residentf inancial services providers, especially given that much of the $73.6m illion advanced to US real estate investments – the exposure t hat eventually sunk the company came via US dollar annuities placed in the Turks & Caicos. The move by Bahamian authorities to place CLICO( Bahamas) into liquidation also has CARICOM-related politicali mplications, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham having revealed l ast week that Guyana’s president had called him several times to express concern about the fact 53 per cent of CLICO (Guyana’s assets were tied up in the Bahami a n liquidation. Improved co-operation may be o n the way, though. “I think the CARICOM grouping may have s ome discussions along these lines at some point,” Mr Laing said. “That would be the right facility for achieving co-operation. I’m sure that, arising out of this, that p latform will make some suggestions along those lines.” T he Registrar of Insurance, the minister added, was last week attending an inter-CARICOM regulatory meeting in Belize. But M r Laing emphasized that i mproved cross-border supervision of financial institutions within the Caribbean depended on the willingness of individual nations and regulators to share i nformation, and to do so while s till complying with their country’s own laws. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 7B $WWULEXWHVWRLQFOXGH \HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQ*ROI&RXUVH&RQVWUXFWLRQDQG 0DQDJHPHQWDWOHDGLQJ*ROI&OXE .QRZOHGJHRIDOOSKDVHVRI*ROIFRXUVHGHVLJQDQG FRQVWUXFWLRQDFWLYLWLHVLQFOXGLQJYHUWLFDOJROIFRQVWUXFWLRQ FOXEKRXVHVPDLQWHQDQFHIDFLOLWLHVLUULJDWLRQSXPSVWDWLRQVf 7XUIDQDJHPHQW'HJUHH $ WKRURXJKXQGHUVWDQGLQJRIDOOSKDVHVRIPDLQWHQDQFHDQG UHSDLUWRFRXUVHVSUDFWLFHUDQJHDQGHTXLSPHQW ([WHQVLYHH[SHULHQFHZRUNLQJZLWKFLW\SODQQHUVHQJLQHHUV DUFKLWHFWVDQGFRQWUDFWRUV .QRZOHGJHDEOHLQDOOSKDVHVRIFRQVWUXFWLRQFRQWUDFWV UHODWHGWRJROISURMHFWV 'HWDLORULHQWHGDVNLOOHGSODQQHUDELOLW\WRSULRULWL]HZLWK H[FHOOHQWFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV &RPSXWHUOLWHUDWH :LOOLQJWROLYHRQDQRXWLVODQG $ELOLW\WRZRUNRQRZQLQLWLDWLYHLVLPSRUWDQW 6DODU\DQGEHQHWVZLOOEHEDVHGRQH[SHULHQFHDQGZLOO LQFOXGHKHDOWKEHQHWVQO\TXDOLHGDSSOLFDQWVQHHGD SSO\ $ SSOLFDWLRQVFDQEHVXEPLWWHGWR 'LUHFWRU+XPDQHVRXUFHVDQGUDLQLQJ 3 0DUVK+DUERXU$EDFR 2 U VERZH#EDNHUVED\FOXEFRP 'HDGOLQHIRU$SSOLFDWLRQUHVXPHLVDUFKWK%DNHUV%D\*2/)t&($1&/8%$VSDUWRIRXUFRPPLWPHQWWRHPSOR\%DKDPLDQV RQRXUSURMHFWZHDUHVHHNLQJTXDOLHG%DKDPLDQVWRD SSO\IRUWKHSRVLWLRQRI*ROI&RXUVH&RQVWUXFWLRQ $ VVLVWDQWDQDJHU CLICO collapse causes Act delay F ROM page 1B

PAGE 23

INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 The stories behind the news n By JOHN MARQUIS Managing Editor PILOT Chauncey Tynes knew a lot about Joe Lehder, the Colombian drug czar whose cocaine trafficking activities in the 1980s had s uch a profound and damaging effect on the Bahamas and its people. He also knew plenty about the movements of the then Prime Minister Lynden Pindling, including a hush-hush night flight to Grand Bahama when Pindling and Lehder met in secret. W hen Tynes brought a boxful of US banknotes back to the family home off Mackey Street and told his father a respected PLP official that the $50,000 “gift” from Lehder was destined for a high-ranking police officer, he was roundly berated. “Don’t drag me into this kind of stuff,” said Chauncey Sr., who was treasurer of the PLP in the late 1960s, when the party came to power. Chauncey Jr assured his father that he never got involved in drug flights and that all he ever carried for Lehder was money, usually neatly wrapped US banknotes which we can now safely assume were used to pay off crooks in the PLP and the civil service. But his dubious associations were to be his undoing. For Chauncey Jr., the association with Lehder and Pindling eventually brought tragedy. Having been privy to various clandestine transactions he always insisted that Pindling and a senior police officer were on Lehder’s payroll, receiving regular consignments of cash he “went missing” on a flight from George Town, Exuma, to Nassau in 1983. Parents His parents, who both still live in their humble home in a closeknit Bahamian community, nev er saw him again. He was 37 at the time, a father-of-two cut down in his prime. “He knew too much,” his father told INSIGHT, glancing up at the photograph of Chauncey Jr which still graces his sitting room wall. “When he vanished, the family was affected badly, but we sur vived. He was working as chief pilot for Lehder, but of course when he took the job we thought that Lehder was a genuine investor. It was only later that we discovered the truth. But my belief is that Pindling was responsible for his death. Not directly, but that’s the way it seems to me.” In 1981, Chauncey Jr flew Pindling to Freeport during the night hours for a meeting with Joe Lehder, who was by then running a lucrative drugs trans-shipment operation from his “headquarters” at Norman’s Cay. At 4am, while it was still dark, he transported the prime minister back to Nassau. It was one of many missions he flew for Lehder. Usually, boxes of banknotes were involved, including the one he brought home from the drug czar’s HQ destined for a police officer whose name would surprise you. “He told me who was getting the money,” said Mr Tynes, “He took cash from Lehder to Pindling’s home on a frequent basis. It was always in small boxes, and I imag ine it was in US banknotes.” At the 1984 public inquiry into drug trafficking, Pindling denied ever meeting Lehder. But Chauncey Jr was in no doubt that the pair met, and that Pindling and the senior police officer were vir tually at the drug czar’s beck and call. “I warned him to stay away from all that,” his father revealed. “But he didn’t.” Having failed to take that fatherly advice, young Chauncey paid the price. He “disappeared” on a flight from Exuma to Nassau in 1983, having apparently taken off in the company of three Colombians. It is now believed the plane was diverted and that pilot Tynes was “disposed of” because he knew far too much about the criminal connections between Lehder and certain members of the PLP government, including Pindling. From that fateful day 26 years ago, nothing has been heard of the promising young man who found himself caught up in the wrong company. All that remains of him are the memories and his father’s plainly stated accusations against those he blames for his death. The story of Chauncey Tynes Jr and his mysterious loss is just one of many to emerge from that shameful period in Bahamian history. He was one of several young men who lost their lives because they became embroiled in the Colombian cocaine trade through the islands. The police officer who was accused of being beneficiary of that $50,000 pay-off was a career policeman who spent more than four decades in the Royal Bahamas Police Force. His involvement with Pindling in turning a blind eye to Lehder’s trafficking enterprise was outlined to me, without equivocation, by a man who is rated by those who know him as an unchallengeably honourable man. Chauncey Tynes Sr., 88, a former taxi-driver and insurance official, is known by all as a straightforward and scrupulously honest character. Bribe He is one of the few senior PLP figures who did not profit from the party’s rise, and admits to having turned down a $600,000 bribe from a UBP “agent” who wanted him to stop campaigning against his party in the islands in 1968. “I knew so many of the islanders well and they were all ready to vote any way I voted,” he said, “The UBP wanted me back in Nassau where I could do no harm because they thought I was a dangerous man. An agent offered me $600,000 to go away, but I wouldn’t take it. I said I didn’t want their money.” As PLP treasurer in the late 1960s, when the party was at the height of its power, he bridled at corrupt practices and took issue with Pindling over alleged irregular use of party funds. After he quit his post in 1971, he was subjected to more than 25 years of victimisation by Pindling and sincerely believes that a PLP “hatchet man” called ‘Nine’ Rolle now dead was given the job of “getting rid of me” while he was driving a taxi at Nassau Inter national Airport. “Rolle was waiting for a taxi at the arrivals area,” said Mr Tynes, “but he let several taxis go because he wanted to ride in my taxi. I have no doubt that he wanted to get rid of me. He was known to be a violent hatchet man of Pindling’s.” Mr Tynes said Pindling came to dislike him because he was frequently critical of the prime min ister’s judgment. “People were not allowed to tell him he was wrong,” he said, “I was too upfront.” But he has no regrets. “I have never done a single thing wrong,” he told me, “I can look any man in the eye and I can sleep easy at nights. That to me means everything.” Today, Mr Tynes struggles at his modest home, where he has lived for 50 years, to look after his invalid wife. He could have been a very rich man living in great comfort had he fallen to temptation. But he is obviously at ease with himself, having resisted the blandishments of an era when Bahami an morality evaporated and an entire generation was left tainted by drugs. “Party colleagues asked me why I didn’t take the $600,000 anyway, and then continue campaigning against the UBP, but I was having none of that,” he said. It is because Mr Tynes was an outspoken critic of corruption at the time, and risked everything to do the right thing, that he emerges today as a beacon of honour in a society which Pindling brutally and ruthlessly undermined. Today, Mr Tynes believes his son was killed by evil men who felt he had seen too much of the nefarious transactions taking place between Lehder and some leading PLP figures of the day. Chauncey Tynes Jr went missing some months after flying Pindling to Grand Bahama for that secret meeting. The arrangement was that he was to carry the prime minister to Freeport while anoth er pilot transported Lehder from Norman’s Cay. No-one knows what transpired between the two men during the night hours, but you can be sure it had more to do with the welfare of Lynden Pindling than the welfare of the people. The fate of Chauncey Tynes Jr was sealed some months later. “When my son disappeared during that flight from Exuma to Nassau, I asked his girlfriend whether anyone else had been aboard with him when he left Exuma,” said Mr Tynes. “She said three men went with him, and she believed they were Colombians. I can’t imagine that the plane crashed because it was a very reliable twin-engined aircraft and my son was known as a very good pilot. “There is a chance it was shot down because it was known at the time that the Americans were shooting down small drug planes. But I think the plane was diverted and he was killed because he knew too much.” Whenever Mr Tynes challenged his son about his flying activities, Chauncey Jr always insisted he never carried drugs “only money.” “I once saw him with a box full of US banknotes which he said were for (giving the name of a senior police officer). I was told the sum was $50,000. He also said both Pindling and (the officer were on Lehder’s payroll. He told me he made frequent deliveries to Pindling’s home. My son was Lehder’s paymaster. “After the plane vanished, the government said there had been a search of the entire area, but that nothing had been found. Also, there was no record of any plane having landed anywhere. I thought at first it had been diverted to Colombia, then I thought maybe it was shot down. Today, I think someone ordered that he should die because he had too much information.” Mr Tynes admits that when Lehder first appeared on the scene, the PLP was convinced that he was a bona fide land developer. It was only later that people became aware of Lehder’s “takeover” of Norman’s Cay, where he lived a hedonistic life on the fruits of the drug trade. Lehder, in fact, more or less declared the cay a “nation within a nation” an idyllic hideout from The tragic young pilot who knew too much PILOT CHAUNCEY TYNES who ‘went missing’ on a flight from George Town, Exuma, to Nassau in 1983. COLOMBIAN drug czar Joe Lehder S IR LYNDEN PINDLING CHAUNCEY TYNES SR SEE page two C HAUNCEY T YNES ASSOCIATIONSWITH J OE L EHDERAND L YNDEN P INDLING

PAGE 24

which he could conduct his illicit trans-shipment operation. He was so sure that he had the prime minister and law enforcement agenc ies “in his pocket” that he went about his business in a brazen, carefree fashion, even to the extent of having his hoodlums carrying guns around Nassau. Planes flew cocaine into Norman’s Cay from Colombia. There it was redistributed to different parts of the United States. Lehder s et up home at one end of the cay and viewed operations from windows which offered panoramic views of his entire domain. It is now widely believed that he did this with the full knowledge and active co-operation of Pindling, who received handsome pay-offs for his help. M r Tynes also told me that, during his days as PLP treasurer, he was sent to the United States to pick up election campaign money from a man called Mike McLaney. Mr Tynes was not aware of McLaney’s status at the time, but it later became clear that he was a g angster who was bankrolling the PLP’s 1968 election campaign in return for a possible casino licence. Mr Tynes brought back a suitcase full of banknotes and handed it over to PLP Cabinet minister Carlton Francis. Carl gave me $3,000 for my trip,” said Mr Tynes, “I later r ealised the money in the case was to finance the 1968 campaign. McLaney was a mobster, but I didn’t know that at the time. I thought I was doing right. “However, I found out the truth about Pindling at that elec t ion, and that damaged my spirit towards him. Until then I had a lways liked him.” As party treasurer, Mr Tynes’ job was to hand out allocations of cash to PLP candidates. The rate was $3,000 each for New Providence constituencies and $6,000 each for Out Island seats. H is suspicions about Pindling grew when the prime minister s igned for one $6,000 allocation to fight his own Andros seat, then allegedly asked for another $6,000 for which he didn’t want to sign. “I refused to give it to him because he refused to sign for it,”he told me, “He was not prepared to sign for it. He was trying to fiddle the party funds. I wanted to play it straight and until this very day I still have a clear conscience.I am happy that I never took anything. I don’t have to hide from anybody.” Mr Tynes’ revelations come against a background of disclosure now underway among ageing PLP figures who feel the r ecord must be set straight before they die. What emerges is a frightening picture of a would-be dictator who, had he been given his head, would have led the Bahamas into Third World dereliction. Mr Tynes recalled that Pindling held secret meetings in Africa duri ng the late 1960s with Robert Mugabe and others with a view to learning how to keep power inan outwardly democratic framework. A document called The OneMan Manifesto, drafted by an African nationalist, recommended as a strategy that national leade rs should stuff government departments with party supporters. It also promoted the notion of the maximum leader. Whatever transpired during his African visit, there is no doubt among PLP veterans that Pindling returned with a “Mugabe complex”, a strong belief in the dictat orial excesses which have led Zimbabwe to its present parlous state. There is also no doubt, according to senior political figures, that Pindling became so seduced by power that he was unable to distinguishb etween the country and himself. F rom another tyrant, Franois ‘Papa Doc” Duvalier of Haiti, Pindling gleaned a destructive philosophy relating to education. P apa Doc believed that an educated popu lace was inimical to his own interests. Thus, it was always to a leader’s benefit, in his eyes, to keep the people poorly informed. Today’sg rim statistics from Bahamian classrooms with D for Dunce the national exam average are probably a direct by-product of Pindling’s dumbing-down process. The overloading of government departments with party supporters was, of course, a tactic embraced by Pindling with unbridled enthusiasm. His policies had adverse effects in many areas, leading to feelings of entitlement among the lazy and incompetent, and rendering companies like Bahamasair financially inefficient, to say the least. In Mr Tynes’ view, had Pindling been allowed to pursue his dictatorial ambitions to the limit, the B ahamas would have become another Zimbabwe, a Third World ruin full of starving people, broken institutions and rampant disease. His view is shared by others who believe that only The Bahamas’ location off the end of the Florida peninsula prevented a full-scale descent into disorder and eventual bankruptcy. Another former leading PLP figure told INSIGHTthat it became clear within months of the 1967 election that Pindling had no national plan and that he was not interested in any development unless it was a direct votew inner. “As a keen young politician, I drafted a set of proposals in my own particular field and presented it to the prime minister because I felt they would be good for the nation,” he told INSIGHT. “But he told me that my proposals would not win a single vote a nd that he was not interested,” said the source. “It made me realise there and then that Pindling had no vision for the Bahamas and that his real interest lay only in retaining power.” As disclosures a bout Pindling and his motives flow i nto INSIGHT from more and more inside sources, it becomes clear just how personally responsible he was for what theB ahamas became during the drugr avaged 1980s. It also becomes clear that some of his tactics were too extreme even for the PLP’s own council. W hen the parliamentary mace was t ossed by Pindling from the House of Assembly window in 1965, followed by the hour-glass, it was a watered-down version of his original intentions, according to inside sources. Mr Tynes said the first plan was actually to throw the Speaker of the House, Bobby Symonette, bodily out of parliament because of his dismissive attitudes, though his recollections do not accord with those of some other senior PLP figures. Mr Tynes’ version of events emphasises the party’s aversion to Symonette for imposing time limits on speeches, monitored by t he hour-glass on the Speaker’s bench. Symonette, he claimed, was also unpopular for proposing that parliamentary sessions between elections should be stretched to 21 years, effectively blocking the move towards majority rule. It was r egarded by the PLP as an unacceptable strategy to prolong the UBP’s reign. “But when the proposal to throw him bodily out of the Assembly was put before the PLP counc il, it was voted down,” said Mr Tynes. The tossing of the mace, with Milo Butler following through with the hour-glass, was a compromise, but it had the r equired effect by signalling the PLP’s intention to overturn the status quo, he added. Other senior figures dispute that the move to heave Symonette out of the House was ever seriously considered. But there is no doubt that emotions were running higha s the PLP became increasingly disgruntled at UBP high-handedn ess and the prospect of spending five or ten more years in opposition. From this distance in time, it’s interesting to consider what might have happened had widespread speculation about Pindling’s ori g ins been known to the electorate. The PLP’s relentless anti-fore ign stance, its racist rhetoric, its ruthless campaign of victimisation against expatriates were all based on the assumption that Pindling himself was a true-born, fullblooded Bahamian. In fact, according to Mr Tynes a nd other former senior PLP figures, Pindling was born to a J amaican father, Arnold Pindling, a policeman, and an unknown woman who was probably Haitian. Far from being a born Bahami an, he first saw light of day in Jamaica, arriving in Nassau by boat as a small boy, they say. His nominal mother, Viola Pindling, nee Bain, never gave birth to any child, according to PLP insiders. Thus, the entire thrust of PLP policy from its earliest days in power was critically weakened by the widely-held belief in his own party that the leader’s Bahamian credentials were bogus. Some now feel that the whis perings about Pindling’s origins were an attempt to smear him and that he was a true product of his East Street home. In Mr Tynes’ eyes, however, discussion about Pindling’s “foreignness” was wellfounded. P arty leaders, even when they grew sickened by Pindling’s dict atorial ways after the 1968 elec tion, kept the lid on the prime min ister’s alleged secret because they feared it would scupper the black cause and drop the country back into the hands of the UBP, he said. They even kept quiet about an affidavit Pindling allegedly swore in 1947, as he was about to set off for law school in London, declaring that he was Bahamian-born, even though he wasn’t, added Mr Tynes. But during one angry exchange in Cabinet, circa 1968, a senior colleague allegedly told Pindling: “So you, a damned Jamaican, are trying to tell us what to do.” I t was one of the many furious exchanges which were soon to lead to a party split and a 20-year standoff between the PLP and the FNM, a party formed largely by anti-Pindling rebels. Had the rebel faction’s leader, Cecil WallaceWhitfield, become p rime minister instead of Pindling, it’s near certain that the Bahamas would have taken a different course, said Mr Tynes. He has no doubt that Whitfield w ould have made a better prime minister, and that the drug era, and the age of corruption, would not have happened under his watch. “Wallace-Whitf ield was much more radical than Pindling,” said Mr Tynes, “And he was much more straightforward. He would cut you down to your face, whereas Pindling would cut you from behind. Pindling was more conservative and a smooth operator,b ut Cecil was more to be trusted.” According to some political vete rans, Pindling successfully defended his origins during a 1973 press conference in which he produced a birth certificate which appeared to reinforce his Bahamian credentials. However, his birth was regis t ered in Nassau on February 25, 1947, a month short of his 17th b irthday. It named Viola Pindling (formerly Bain While his supporters were happy with the prime minister’s explanation, outsiders were less convinced especially when Pindling refused to say whether affidavits ofb irth were produced at the time of registration. P indling said he was not prepared to go beyond the matter of the certificate and said it was “low and dirty” of an opposition MP (Michael Lightbourn aspersions on his parents, espe cially his mother. For the sceptics, though, Pindling’s performance generated more questions than answers. To them, the fact that his birth was registered nearly 17 years after the event was powerful evidence in itself. His refusal to say whether an affidavit was sworn to support his claim that he was born in Nassau was also seen as a virtual admis sion that he had something to hide. Thus, for PLP officials like Mr Tynes Pindling was a fraud who was protected from exposure even by his fiercest critics within his own party because their first concern was to jettison the UBP and fulfil their own political ambitions. Whatever his origins, Pindling was viewed by prominent PLP figu res as the leader most likely to get rid of the UBP, and that was regarded as the priority at the time,” he said. According to Mr Tynes, any publicly expressed doubt over Pindling’s birth either before or after the 1967 general election would have done untold damage to the black movement’s image. Hence, Pindling was given clearance to pursue what turned out to be an extremely destructive agen da for a quarter of a century. For my part, I believe Mr Tynes’ version of Pindling’s origins for two reasons. Firstly, I see Mr Tynes himself as an extremely h onest character. Secondly, I recall all too vividly a series of telephone calls I received shortly after my return to Nassau in 1999. These calls came from an old man living in East Street whose name I recall but am not disclosing. He told me unequivocally that Lynden Pindling was not a B ahamian and that he first appeared at his East Street home as a grown boy. He said: “He was brought in from outside by his father. We always thought he was really partHaitian. I lived close by the Pindling home and know what I say is true.” T he old man asked me more than once to visit his home so that we could discuss the matter further. It is one of my greatest professional regrets that I didn’t take up the offer, mainly because I was so busy at the time trying to get to grips with my new job at The Tribune . When his calls ceased, I a ssumed he had passed on. However, Mr Tynes’ opinions backed up by the recollections of a former PLP parliamentarian add another crucial piece to the puzzle which, when completed, will record the whole modern political history of the Bahamas. I f the young pilot Chauncey Tynes Jr’s information was true – a nd there are few intelligent Bahamians who would bet against it then Pindling, a foreigner with a slick line in patter, was growing fat off a drug king’s payoffs while those who brought him to power continued to live dirtp oor in over-the-hill shacks. As the PLP struggles with its l eadership woes, and tries to find a way forward, it would do well to consider whether the Pindling legacy is really worth clinging on to in light of Mr Tynes’ disclosures. At the last election, Pindling’s n ame was hauled from its hangar at every opportunity to lend cred ence to the party cause. Perry Christie’s government even renamed the international airport after a man whose real worth is now under serious review. According to Pindling critics within the wider PLP movement, Mr Christie would be well-advised to set aside his illusions about “The Father of the Nation” and begin the task of building firmer foundations for the cause. For Mr Tynes himself, there is no doubt that Pindling is unde serving of the kudos accorded him. “He should not be called Father of the Nation because he was a for eigner who was being paid off by a drug lord,” he said. The fate of Chauncey Tynes Jr is something all should bear in mind when they consider the Pindling legacy. He died at the height of an appalling era for which many people still living should feel d eeply ashamed. His father still looks at pictures o f his son and wonders how his beloved Bahamas could ever have reached such a low that promis ing young people could be whisked away, never to be seen again, by wicked people whose greed almost brought this nation to its knees. What do you think? Fax 328-2398 or e-mail jmarquis@tribunemedia.net C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 Time: 7pm Place:e Retreat, Village Road (parking at Queens College) Admission: BNT Members Free General Public $2P u b l i c E d u c a t i o n M e e t i n gDrs. Alan Bolten and Kar en Bjorndal, Archie Carr Centre for Sea Turtle Research, University of FloridaSea Turtles of The Bahamas:Insights from 30 years of studyPhone: 242-393-1317 Email: bnt@bnt.bs NOTICEINVITATION TO BIDGREEN TURTLE CAY WATER SUPPLY IMPROVEMENTS – PHASE 11.The Water & Sewerage Corporation invites bids from suitably qualified contractors for the construction of Phase I of the Green Turtle Cay Water Supply Improvements. The Scope of Works include the provision of all labour, equipment and other necessary services required for the:A.UNDERWATER MAIN a)Supply and Installation of approximately 15,000 linear feet of water transmission mains, of which approximately 13,000 linear feet are subaqueous 6-inch HDPE and 2,000 linear feet of 6-inch PVC, along with all associated valves and appurtenances. B.PUMPING STATION ON GREEN TURTLE CAY a)Construction of a Pumping Station and supply and installation of two 250 US Gallon per Minute, 15 Horsepower Peerless (Sterling b)Supply installation, and construction of piping, pump station facilities/office Building. 2.Bids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehensive details from the Qualification Questionnaire out-lining : a)Experience on similar projects b)Personnel to be assigned (including their experience on similar projects c)Financial capacity to execute the works The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evaluated for award of Contract. 3.Bidding documents and drawings will be available on request beginning Wednesday March 11, 2009, from the Engineering & Planning Department of the Water & Sewerage Corporation for a nominal fee of $2 5 0.00 per set. The Pre-Bid Meeting is scheduled for Tuesday March 24, 2009 at 10: a.m. at the site. 4.Completed documents must be returned to the address below, no later than 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday April 14, 009. General Manager Water & Sewerage Corporation 87 Thompson Blvd. P. O. Box N-3905 Nassau, Bahamas Attn: Engineering & Planning Division Telephone:(242 Facsimile: (242 FROM page one Tragic young pilot who knew too much Franois ‘Papa Doc Duvalier Cecil Wallace-Whitfield

PAGE 25

MANYyears ago Iheard that a Mr and Mrs Kinnell had thoughtlessly called their daughter Jennifer! And the following is also reported: Churchill, inspecting a troop of soldiers: "And whati s your name?" Soldier: "Ball, sir!" Churchill: "How very singular!" N o evidence to support the veracity of either story, but they do bring a smile to a Monday morning! Regards, I nsight reader YOU will, of course, have h eard of the famous law firm Sue, Grabbitt and Run, w hose many exploits were recorded in the magazine Private Eye. A B I ONCE heard of a very religious family called Abel who named a son Canaan. J ean Ross H EREare a few beauties for your collection (all true G ILES CLOTWORTHY , a British National Trust official H ECTOR McSPORRAN , a Scottish sportswriter D ELWYN SWINGEW OOD , a public relations executive ALISTAIR McALLISTER , a man I met some y ears ago MAJOR GENERAL SIR EVELYN FANSHAWE, l ate president of the British Spotted Horse Society V. RAY STRANGE (he always insisted on using theV ) who worked as a legal e xecutive in the North of England HARRY CHEST , who d idn’t have a hair on his body, apparently. JIM RIDDLE, a West Country farmer who hatedb eing called ‘Jimmy’ for o bvious reasons. SARAH LILLICRAP , a British TV anchor. H owever, I can’t think of a single Bahamian name worth recording. Surely there’s a Rockan Rolle out there somewhere. Observer A TRADITIONAL London grocer called Wright objected when two Chinese stores opened in competition nearby, both bearing the name Wong. He put a notice in his window saying ‘Two Wongs don’t make a Wright!’ in an attempt to hold on to his customers. Today, of course, he would fall foul of the Race Relations Act. GSP (Expat I ONCE knew an accoun tant called Fidler. In spite of his name, he was noted for honesty and integrity. J Robinson YOUR reference to an undertaker called Phil Graves reminds me of a petrol station owner I knew in Somerset called ArthurG allan. His name caused much amusement for miles around. B Hatton (Visitor I WENTto college in NewYork with two lovely y oung women named BRITTISH MISER and B ARRIER CAVE. How's that for unusual? J Reid I USEDto work with a w oman called Doris Morris and went to school with a girl called Anne McCann ( her nickname was CanCan). A mber I KNEW a lady called Fried a Crisp (though her first name was pronounced F reeda rather than Fry-da, so the joke was spoilt a litt le, but not enough to stop us laughing, I’m ashamed to say) J ean, Cable Beach A MAN I knew called S idebottom insisted on pro nouncing it Siddybottoom. He used to become quite indignant if you insisted onp ronouncing it the way it looks. JL MElaff til me cry, mon! Here are some nicknames: H ARKER F AVOR HOG RAFFY SHABBYK Y BIG BARRA LIL BARRA, SUKIES QUINTY U NCA LABBY LONDON DODY.R egards, Glen More AT college, I met an unfortunate fellow named Boris Orpington (known as B.O. for short) But he didn’t smell. Not that I recall anyway. Jim, Nassau THERE’S an Australian newspaperman called Harry Potter. Can you imagine what he’s been through over the last few years? Aussie AN English humorist called Stephen Pile (founder of the Not Terribly Good at Anything Society, or something of the kind) always referred to himself in print as Stephen Pile(s I suppose he had taken the decision, after years of long suffering, to get in first with the joke before anyone else did. Funny writer, though. G Minard (Visitor WHEN I worked in insurance many years ago, a veryu npopular boss called Walter Pratt was known as Wotta Pratt behind his back. The Grove (West I ONCE knew a sports columnist called Basil V E asterbrook whose name was frequently taken to refer t o a minor league soccer match. Granville MISCELLANEOUS MR MARQUIS: If you haven't left Nassau as yet, I t hink that your last INSIGHTarticle should be a bout the joke we call the National Insurance Board.Could you believew hat was written about Wendall Jones owing NIB $ 430,000?I've heard years ago that he owed NIB but w hat was revealed is not only staggering but ridiculous. H e should not be enjoying the fruits of having a busi-n ess, his licence should be r evoked for five years as well as paying the interest and the original sum that is owed.In this time when ourc ountry is going through an economical crisis, ALL efforts should be made toc ollect all outstanding debt owed to the Government. I think that every business or individual who owes NIB contributions should not only go to jail, they should lose their licence for a period of five years and be held up for public shame by having their names, faces, amount owed and business name published in a BIG adb y NIB for all to see. You are getting out of this mess, I wish that I had that same option.Right now the B ahamas is not a place where I want to continue to live. M arie C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009, PAGE 3C : $ 1 7 ( '6DOHV&DUHHU $PXOWLIDFHWWHGFRPPXQLFDWLRQVFRQVXOWLQJFRPSDQ\WKDW LVFXUUHQWO\XQGHUJRLQJPDUNHWH[SDQVLRQZLVKHVWRHPSOR\ H[SHULHQFHGFRPPLVVLRQVDOHVH[HFXWLYH7KHLGHDOSHUVRQZRXOG KDYHPLQLPXPRIWKUHH\HDUVLQFRPPLVVLRQVDOHVKDYHWKHLU RZQSULYDWHYHKLFOHDQGWUDFNUHFRUGDVWRSSHUIRUPHU:DUH ORRNLQJIRUH[FHOOHQWFRPPXQLFDWRUVWKDWDUHGULYHQ&DQGLGDWHV PXVWKDYHFRPSXWHUVNLOOVDQGEHDEOHSUHSDUHSXEOLFSUHVHQWDWLRQVR QEHKDOIRIFRPSDQLHVFOLHQWV $GHJUHHLQPDUNHWLQJRUEXVLQHVVLVSUHIHUUHGEXWQRWDPXVW 3HUVRQVLQWHUHVWHGVKRXOGVXEPLW&9DQGUHIHUHQFHOHWWHUVWR %R['$ FRKHULEXQH 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV E\DU Email: 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t It’sElectric! FEEDBACK INSIGHT Re: No joke for Jo King (Funny names

PAGE 26

APT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN w o bills I stuck on a tree (6 10 Cop involved with the trial g ets heated (8 12 Double act no longer seen (4 1 3 Big portion of Norwegian trout (5 14 Well-established b usiness (4 17 Early news from a rare book sale (5,7 20 It gives an impression of permanence (9,3 23 Some steak or grouse perhaps (4 2 4 Boards a coach (5 25 Water thoroughly (4 28 Is it won by the fastest guns in the West? (4,4 29 Many a call for courage (6 30 Negative poles seen to change? Absurd (8 3 1 Turn meant to amuse, perhaps (6 Down 1 Switch choices occasionally (2,3,3 2 Quality that needs raising? (8 3 Live wildly in sin (4 5 Family ties for the mothers b oy? (5,7 6 Cable from a European centre (4 7 Make straight for this (6 8 I’m unfortunately upset by highly spiced foreign food (6 1 1 Bows? Nonsense! (12 15 Tolerate a show of resistance (5 16 Work of monumental stupidity (5 1 8 By which railways earn e xtra money? (8 19 It gives us illumination like a star? (8 21 Get the boat in somehow (6 2 2 Amoney changer who had a farm (6 26 At liberty to be generous (4 27 Vehicle to move before take-off (4 Across:1 Liszt, 4 Stumble, 8 Cam, 9 Trappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 Kitchen, 21 Given away, 23 Obi, 24 Dresser, 25 Tenor. Down:1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, 4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, 12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, 22 Vie. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Wrong, 4 Frantic, 8 Set, 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 Paragon, 25 Dated. Down:1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 Avoid, 22 Mar. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 2345678 9 10 1 1 1 21314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3 031 1 2345678 9 10 1 1 1 21314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3 031T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Across 1 Understand fully (6 4 Close examination (8 9 Handsome young man (6 1 0 Pettily b othersome (8 12 Brisk steady pace (4 13 Highly skilled (5 14 Mark left by wound (4 17 Principal assistant (5-4,3 20 Remaining unresolved (4,2,3,3 23 Alcove (4 24 Ardent enthusiast (5 25 To caution (4 28 Compassionate (8 29 Elephant driver (6 30 Surreptitious (8 31 Occult (6 Down 1 Break (8 2 Exhaustive (8 3 Leave out (4 5 Simultaneous but unrelated (12 6 Advocate strongly (4 7 Stupidity (6 8 Semi-solid milk food (6 11 Important scientific advance (12 15 Excessive (5 16 Secret store (5 18 Idler (8 19 Wildly excited (8 21 Hostility (6 22 Origin (6 26 To grind (4 27 Vague (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Funny story about oriental s eafood (6 4 Reductions in capital growth (8 9 Two bills I stuck on a tree (6 10 Cop involved with the trial g ets heated (8 12 Double act no longer seen (4 13 Big portion of Norwegian trout (5 14 Well-established business (4 17 Early news from a rare book sale (5,7 20 It gives an impression of p ermanence (9,3 23 Some steak or grouse perhaps (4 2 4 Boards a coach (5 2 5 Water thoroughly (4 28 Is it won by the fastest guns in the West? (4,4 2 9 Many a call for courage (6 30 Negative poles seen to change? Absurd (8 31 Turn meant to amuse, perhaps (6 Down 1 Switch choices occasionally (2,3,3 2 Quality that needs r aising? (8 3 Live wildly in sin (4 5 Family ties for the mothers boy? (5,7 6 Cable from a European c entre (4 7 Make straight for this (6 8 I’m unfortunately upset by highly spiced foreign food (6 1 1 Bows? Nonsense! (12 15 Tolerate a show of r esistance (5 16 Work of monumental stupidity (5 18 By which railways earn extra money? (8 19 It gives us illumination l ike a star? (8 21 Get the boat in somehow (6 22 Amoney changer who had a farm (6 2 6 At liberty to be generous (4 27 Vehicle to move before take-off (4 Across:1 Liszt, 4 Stumble, 8 Cam, 9 Trappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 Kitchen, 21 Given away, 23 Obi, 24 Dresser, 25 Tenor. Down:1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, 4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, 12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, 22 Vie. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Wrong, 4 Frantic, 8 Set, 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 Paragon, 25 Dated. Down:1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 Avoid, 22 Mar. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2 122 2 32425 2 627 2 829 3 031 12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2 122 2 32425 2 627 2 829 3 031T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Across 1 Understand fully (6 4 Close examination (8 9 Handsome young man (6 10 Pettily bothersome (8 12 Brisk steady pace (4 13 Highly skilled (5 14 Mark left by wound (4 1 7 Principal assistant ( 5-4,3) 20 Remaining unresolved (4,2,3,3 23 Alcove (4 24 Ardent enthusiast (5 2 5 To caution (4 28 Compassionate (8 29 Elephant driver (6 30 Surreptitious (8 3 1 Occult (6 Down 1 Break (8 2 Exhaustive (8 3 Leave out (4 5 Simultaneous but unrelated (12 6 Advocate strongly (4 7 Stupidity (6 8 Semi-solid milk food (6 11 Important scientific advance (12 15 Excessive (5 16 Secret store (5 1 8 Idler (8 19 Wildly excited (8 21 Hostility (6 22 Origin (6 26 To grind (4 27 Vague (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE C RYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Funny story about oriental s eafood (6 4 Reductions in capital growth (8 9 Two bills I stuck on a tree (6 10 Cop involved with the trial gets heated (8 12 Double act no longer seen (4 13 Big portion of Norwegian t rout (5 14 Well-established business (4 1 7 Early news from a rare book sale (5,7 20 It gives an impression of p ermanence (9,3 23 Some steak or grouse perhaps (4 2 4 Boards a coach (5 2 5 Water thoroughly (4 28 Is it won by the fastest guns in the West? (4,4 2 9 Many a call for courage (6 3 0 Negative poles seen to change? Absurd (8 31 Turn meant to amuse, perhaps (6 Down 1 Switch choices occasionally (2,3,3 2 Quality that needs r aising? (8 3 Live wildly in sin (4 5 Family ties for the mothers boy? (5,7 6 Cable from a European c entre (4 7 Make straight for this (6 8 I’m unfortunately upset by highly spiced foreign food (6 11 Bows? Nonsense! (12 15 Tolerate a show of r esistance (5 16 Work of monumental stupidity (5 18 By which railways earn extra money? (8 19 It gives us illumination l ike a star? (8 21 Get the boat in somehow (6 22 Amoney changer who had a farm (6 2 6 At liberty to be generous (4 27 Vehicle to move before take-off (4 Across:1 Liszt, 4 Stumble, 8 Cam, 9 Trappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 Kitchen, 21 Given away, 23 Obi, 24 Dresser, 25 Tenor. Down:1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, 4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, 12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, 22 Vie. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Wrong, 4 Frantic, 8 Set, 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 Paragon, 25 Dated. Down:1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 Avoid, 22 Mar. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 1 21314 1 516 1 7 1819 2 0 2122 2 32425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 1 21314 1 516 1 7 1819 2 0 2122 2 32425 2627 2829 3031T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Across 1 Understand fully (6 4 Close examination (8 9 Handsome young man (6 10 Pettily bothersome (8 12 Brisk steady pace (4 13 Highly skilled (5 14 Mark left by wound (4 17 Principal assistant (5-4,3 20 Remaining unresolved (4,2,3,3 23 Alcove (4 24 Ardent enthusiast (5 25 To caution (4 28 Compassionate (8 29 Elephant driver (6 30 Surreptitious (8 31 Occult (6 Down 1 Break (8 2 Exhaustive (8 3 Leave out (4 5 Simultaneous but unrelated (12 6 Advocate strongly (4 7 Stupidity (6 8 Semi-solid milk food (6 11 Important scientific advance (12 15 Excessive (5 16 Secret store (5 18 Idler (8 19 Wildly excited (8 21 Hostility (6 22 Origin (6 26 To grind (4 27 Vague (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Funny story about oriental seafood (6 4 Reductions in capital growth (8 9 Two bills I stuck on a tree (6 10 Cop involved with the trial gets heated (8 12 Double act no longer seen (4 13 Big portion of Norwegian trout (5 14 Well-established business (4 17 Early news from a rare book sale (5,7 20 It gives an impression of permanence (9,3 23 Some steak or grouse perhaps (4 24 Boards a coach (5 25 Water thoroughly (4 28 Is it won by the fastest guns in the West? (4,4 29 Many a call for courage (6 30 Negative poles seen to change? Absurd (8 31 Turn meant to amuse, perhaps (6 Down 1 Switch choices occasionally (2,3,3 2 Quality that needs raising? (8 3 Live wildly in sin (4 5 Family ties for the mothers boy? (5,7 6 Cable from a European centre (4 7 Make straight for this (6 8 I’m unfortunately upset by highly spiced foreign food (6 11 Bows? Nonsense! (12 15 Tolerate a show of resistance (5 16 Work of monumental stupidity (5 18 By which railways earn extra money? (8 19 It gives us illumination like a star? (8 21 Get the boat in somehow (6 22 Amoney changer who had a farm (6 26 At liberty to be generous (4 27 Vehicle to move before take-off (4 Across:1 Liszt, 4 Stumble, 8 Cam, 9 Trappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 Kitchen, 21 Given away, 23 Obi, 24 Dresser, 25 Tenor. Down:1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, 4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, 12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, 22 Vie. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Wrong, 4 Frantic, 8 Set, 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 Paragon, 25 Dated. Down:1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 Avoid, 22 Mar. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Across 1 Understand fully (6 4 Close examination (8 9 Handsome young man (6 10 Pettily bothersome (8 12 Brisk steady pace (4 13 Highly skilled (5 14 Mark left by wound (4 17 Principal assistant (5-4,3 20 Remaining unresolved (4,2,3,3 23 Alcove (4 24 Ardent enthusiast (5 25 To caution (4 28 Compassionate (8 29 Elephant driver (6 30 Surreptitious (8 31 Occult (6 Down 1 Break (8 2 Exhaustive (8 3 Leave out (4 5 Simultaneous but unrelated (12 6 Advocate strongly (4 7 Stupidity (6 8 Semi-solid milk food (6 11 Important scientific advance (12 15 Excessive (5 16 Secret store (5 18 Idler (8 19 Wildly excited (8 21 Hostility (6 22 Origin (6 26 To grind (4 27 Vague (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Funny story about oriental seafood (6 4 Reductions in capital growth (8 9 Two bills I stuck on a tree (6 10 Cop involved with the trial gets heated (8 12 Double act no longer seen (4 13 Big portion of Norwegian trout (5 14 Well-established business (4 17 Early news from a rare book sale (5,7 20 It gives an impression of permanence (9,3 23 Some steak or grouse perhaps (4 24 Boards a coach (5 25 Water thoroughly (4 28 Is it won by the fastest guns in the West? (4,4 29 Many a call for courage (6 30 Negative poles seen to change? Absurd (8 31 Turn meant to amuse, perhaps (6 Down 1 Switch choices occasionally (2,3,3 2 Quality that needs raising? (8 3 Live wildly in sin (4 5 Family ties for the mothers boy? (5,7 6 Cable from a European centre (4 7 Make straight for this (6 8 I’m unfortunately upset by highly spiced foreign food (6 11 Bows? Nonsense! (12 15 Tolerate a show of resistance (5 16 Work of monumental stupidity (5 18 By which railways earn extra money? (8 19 It gives us illumination like a star? (8 21 Get the boat in somehow (6 22 Amoney changer who had a farm (6 26 At liberty to be generous (4 27 Vehicle to move before take-off (4 Across:1 Liszt, 4 Stumble, 8 Cam, 9 Trappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 Kitchen, 21 Given away, 23 Obi, 24 Dresser, 25 Tenor. Down:1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, 4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, 12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, 22 Vie. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Wrong, 4 Frantic, 8 Set, 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 Paragon, 25 Dated. Down:1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 Avoid, 22 Mar. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 1 1 1 21314 1516 17 1819 20 2 122 2 32425 2 627 2829 3031 12345678 910 1 1 1 21314 1516 17 1819 20 2 122 2 32425 2 627 2829 3031 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s S udoku Answer Y esterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Across 1 Understand fully (6 4 Close examination (8 9 Handsome young man (6 10 Pettily bothersome (8 12 Brisk steady pace (4 13 Highly skilled (5 14 Mark left by wound (4 17 Principal assistant (5-4,3 20 Remaining unresolved (4,2,3,3 23 Alcove (4 24 Ardent enthusiast (5 25 To caution (4 28 Compassionate (8 29 Elephant driver (6 30 Surreptitious (8 31 Occult (6 Down 1 Break (8 2 Exhaustive (8 3 Leave out (4 5 Simultaneous but unrelated (12 6 Advocate strongly (4 7 Stupidity (6 8 Semi-solid milk food (6 11 Important scientific advance (12 15 Excessive (5 16 Secret store (5 18 Idler (8 19 Wildly excited (8 21 Hostility (6 22 Origin (6 26 To grind (4 27 Vague (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Funny story about oriental seafood (6 4 Reductions in capital growth (8 9 Two bills I stuck on a tree (6 10 Cop involved with the trial gets heated (8 12 Double act no longer seen (4 13 Big portion of Norwegian trout (5 14 Well-established business (4 17 Early news from a rare book sale (5,7 20 It gives an impression of permanence (9,3 23 Some steak or grouse perhaps (4 24 Boards a coach (5 25 Water thoroughly (4 28 Is it won by the fastest guns in the West? (4,4) 29 Many a call for courage (6 30 Negative poles seen to change? Absurd (8 31 Turn meant to amuse, perhaps (6 Down 1 Switch choices occasionally (2,3,3 2 Quality that needs raising? (8 3 Live wildly in sin (4 5 Family ties for the mothers boy? (5,7 6 Cable from a European centre (4 7 Make straight for this (6 8 I’m unfortunately upset by highly spiced foreign food (6 11 Bows? Nonsense! (12 15 Tolerate a show of resistance (5 16 Work of monumental stupidity (5 18 By which railways earn extra money? (8 19 It gives us illumination like a star? (8 21 Get the boat in somehow (6 22 Amoney changer who had a farm (6 26 At liberty to be generous (4 27 Vehicle to move before take-off (4 Across:1 Liszt, 4 Stumble, 8 Cam, 9 Trappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 Kitchen, 21 Given away, 23 Obi, 24 Dresser, 25 Tenor. Down:1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, 4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, 12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, 22 Vie. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Wrong, 4 Frantic, 8 Set, 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 Paragon, 25 Dated. Down:1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 Avoid, 22 Mar. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Across 1 Understand fully (6 4 Close examination (8 9 Handsome young man (6 10 Pettily bothersome (8 12 Brisk steady pace (4 13 Highly skilled (5 14 Mark left by wound (4 17 Principal assistant (5-4,3 20 Remaining unresolved (4,2,3,3 23 Alcove (4 24 Ardent enthusiast (5 25 To caution (4 28 Compassionate (8 29 Elephant driver (6 30 Surreptitious (8 31 Occult (6 Down 1 Break (8 2 Exhaustive (8 3 Leave out (4 5 Simultaneous but unrelated (12 6 Advocate strongly (4 7 Stupidity (6 8 Semi-solid milk food (6 11 Important scientific advance (12 15 Excessive (5 16 Secret store (5 18 Idler (8 19 Wildly excited (8 21 Hostility (6 22 Origin (6 26 To grind (4 27 Vague (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Funny story about oriental seafood (6 4 Reductions in capital growth (8 9 Two bills I stuck on a tree (6 10 Cop involved with the trial gets heated (8 12 Double act no longer seen (4 13 Big portion of Norwegian trout (5 14 Well-established business (4 17 Early news from a rare book sale (5,7 20 It gives an impression of permanence (9,3 23 Some steak or grouse perhaps (4 24 Boards a coach (5 25 Water thoroughly (4 28 Is it won by the fastest guns in the West? (4,4 29 Many a call for courage (6 30 Negative poles seen to change? Absurd (8 31 Turn meant to amuse, perhaps (6 Down 1 Switch choices occasionally (2,3,3 2 Quality that needs raising? (8 3 Live wildly in sin (4 5 Family ties for the mothers boy? (5,7 6 Cable from a European centre (4 7 Make straight for this (6 8 I’m unfortunately upset by highly spiced foreign food (6 11 Bows? Nonsense! (12 15 Tolerate a show of resistance (5 16 Work of monumental stupidity (5 18 By which railways earn extra money? (8 19 It gives us illumination like a star? (8 21 Get the boat in somehow (6 22 Amoney changer who had a farm (6 26 At liberty to be generous (4 27 Vehicle to move before take-off (4 Across:1 Liszt, 4 Stumble, 8 Cam, 9 Trappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 Kitchen, 21 Given away, 23 Obi, 24 Dresser, 25 Tenor. Down:1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, 4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, 12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, 22 Vie. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Wrong, 4 Frantic, 8 Set, 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 Paragon, 25 Dated. Down:1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 Avoid, 22 Mar. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Across 1 Understand fully (6 4 Close examination (8 9 Handsome young man (6 10 Pettily bothersome (8 12 Brisk steady pace (4 13 Highly skilled (5 14 Mark left by wound (4 17 Principal assistant (5-4,3 20 Remaining unresolved (4,2,3,3 23 Alcove (4 24 Ardent enthusiast (5 25 To caution (4 28 Compassionate (8 29 Elephant driver (6 30 Surreptitious (8 31 Occult (6 Down 1 Break (8 2 Exhaustive (8 3 Leave out (4 5 Simultaneous but unrelated (12 6 Advocate strongly (4 7 Stupidity (6 8 Semi-solid milk food (6 11 Important scientific advance (12 15 Excessive (5 16 Secret store (5 18 Idler (8 19 Wildly excited (8 21 Hostility (6 22 Origin (6 26 To grind (4 27 Vague (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Funny story about oriental seafood (6 4 Reductions in capital growth (8 9 Two bills I stuck on a tree (6 10 Cop involved with the trial gets heated (8 12 Double act no longer seen (4 13 Big portion of Norwegian trout (5 14 Well-established business (4 17 Early news from a rare book sale (5,7 20 It gives an impression of permanence (9,3 23 Some steak or grouse perhaps (4 24 Boards a coach (5 25 Water thoroughly (4 28 Is it won by the fastest guns in the West? (4,4 29 Many a call for courage (6 30 Negative poles seen to change? Absurd (8 31 Turn meant to amuse, perhaps (6 Down 1 Switch choices occasionally (2,3,3 2 Quality that needs raising? (8 3 Live wildly in sin (4 5 Family ties for the mothers boy? (5,7 6 Cable from a European centre (4 7 Make straight for this (6 8 I’m unfortunately upset by highly spiced foreign food (6 11 Bows? Nonsense! (12 15 Tolerate a show of resistance (5 16 Work of monumental stupidity (5 18 By which railways earn extra money? (8 19 It gives us illumination like a star? (8 21 Get the boat in somehow (6 22 Amoney changer who had a farm (6 26 At liberty to be generous (4 27 Vehicle to move before take-off (4 Across:1 Liszt, 4 Stumble, 8 Cam, 9 Trappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 Kitchen, 21 Given away, 23 Obi, 24 Dresser, 25 Tenor. Down:1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, 4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, 12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, 22 Vie. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Wrong, 4 Frantic, 8 Set, 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 Paragon, 25 Dated. Down:1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 Avoid, 22 Mar. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u c e s s h Across 1 Across 1 Understand fully (6 4 Close examination (8 9 Handsome young man (6 10 Pettily bothersome (8 12 Brisk steady pace (4 13 Highly skilled (5 14 Mark left by wound (4 17 Principal assistant (5-4,3 20 Remaining unresolved (4,2,3,3 23 Alcove (4 24 Ardent enthusiast (5 25 To caution (4 28 Compassionate (8 29 Elephant driver (6 30 Surreptitious (8 31 Occult (6 Down 1 Break (8 2 Exhaustive (8 3 Leave out (4 5 Simultaneous but unrelated (12 6 Advocate strongly (4 7 Stupidity (6 8 Semi-solid milk food (6 11 Important scientific advance (12 15 Excessive (5 16 Secret store (5 18 Idler (8 19 Wildly excited (8 21 Hostility (6 22 Origin (6 26 To grind (4 27 Vague (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Funny story about oriental seafood (6 4 Reductions in capital growth (8 9 Two bills I stuck on a tree (6 10 Cop involved with the trial gets heated (8 12 Double act no longer seen (4 13 Big portion of Norwegian trout (5 14 Well-established business (4 17 Early news from a rare book sale (5,7 20 It gives an impression of permanence (9,3 23 Some steak or grouse perhaps (4 24 Boards a coach (5 25 Water thoroughly (4 28 Is it won by the fastest guns in the West? (4,4 29 Many a call for courage (6 30 Negative poles seen to change? Absurd (8 31 Turn meant to amuse, perhaps (6 Down 1 Switch choices occasionally (2,3,3 2 Quality that needs raising? (8 3 Live wildly in sin (4 5 Family ties for the mothers boy? (5,7 6 Cable from a European centre (4 7 Make straight for this (6 8 I’m unfortunately upset by highly spiced foreign food (6 11 Bows? Nonsense! (12 15 Tolerate a show of resistance (5 16 Work of monumental stupidity (5 18 By which railways earn extra money? (8 19 It gives us illumination like a star? (8 21 Get the boat in somehow (6 22 Amoney changer who had a farm (6 26 At liberty to be generous (4 27 Vehicle to move before take-off (4 Across:1 Liszt, 4 Stumble, 8 Cam, 9 Trappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 Kitchen, 21 Given away, 23 Obi, 24 Dresser, 25 Tenor. Down:1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, 4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, 12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, 22 Vie. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Wrong, 4 Frantic, 8 Set, 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 Paragon, 25 Dated. Down:1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 Avoid, 22 Mar. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031 12345678 910 11 121314 1516 17 1819 20 2122 232425 2627 2829 3031T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Across 1 Understand fully (6 4 Close examination (8 9 Handsome young man (6 10 Pettily bothersome (8 12 Brisk steady pace (4 13 Highly skilled (5 14 Mark left by wound (4 17 Principal assistant (5-4,3 20 Remaining unresolved (4,2,3,3 23 Alcove (4 24 Ardent enthusiast (5 25 To caution (4 28 Compassionate (8 29 Elephant driver (6 30 Surreptitious (8 31 Occult (6 Down 1 Break (8 2 Exhaustive (8 3 Leave out (4 5 Simultaneous but unrelated (12 6 Advocate strongly (4 7 Stupidity (6 8 Semi-solid milk food (6 11 Important scientific advance (12 15 Excessive (5 16 Secret store (5 18 Idler (8 19 Wildly excited (8 21 Hostility (6 22 Origin (6 26 To grind (4 27 Vague (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Funny story about oriental seafood (6 4 Reductions in capital growth (8 9 Two bills I stuck on a tree (6 10 Cop involved with the trial gets heated (8 12 Double act no longer seen (4 13 Big portion of Norwegian trout (5 14 Well-established business (4 17 Early news from a rare book sale (5,7 20 It gives an impression of permanence (9,3 23 Some steak or grouse perhaps (4 24 Boards a coach (5 25 Water thoroughly (4 28 Is it won by the fastest guns in the West? (4,4 29 Many a call for courage (6 30 Negative poles seen to change? Absurd (8 31 Turn meant to amuse, perhaps (6 Down 1 Switch choices occasionally (2,3,3 2 Quality that needs raising? (8 3 Live wildly in sin (4 5 Family ties for the mothers boy? (5,7 6 Cable from a European centre (4 7 Make straight for this (6 8 I’m unfortunately upset by highly spiced foreign food (6 11 Bows? Nonsense! (12 15 Tolerate a show of resistance (5 16 Work of monumental stupidity (5 18 By which railways earn extra money? (8 19 It gives us illumination like a star? (8 21 Get the boat in somehow (6 22 Amoney changer who had a farm (6 26 At liberty to be generous (4 27 Vehicle to move before take-off (4 Across:1 Liszt, 4 Stumble, 8 Cam, 9 Trappists, 10 Fancied, 11 Entry, 13 Raisin, 15 Insult, 18 Risen, 19 Kitchen, 21 Given away, 23 Obi, 24 Dresser, 25 Tenor. Down:1 Lucifer, 2 Semantics, 3 Tutti, 4 Shandy, 5 Umpteen, 6 Bus, 7 Essay, 12 Touch down, 14 Innings, 16 Tangier, 17 Skewer, 18 Rigid, 20 Tryst, 22 Vie. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Wrong, 4 Frantic, 8 Set, 9 Footloose, 10 Reflect, 11 Other, 13 Loathe, 15 Edward, 18 Sudan, 19 Tearful, 21 Armadillo, 23 Ray, 24 Paragon, 25 Dated. Down:1 Wastrel, 2 Out of hand, 3 Gaffe, 4 Frosty, 5 All told, 6 Too, 7 Clear, 12 Headfirst, 14 Hangdog, 16 Delayed, 17 Stolen, 18 Swamp, 20 Avoid, 22 Mar. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1 2345678 9 10 1 1 121314 1 516 1 7 1 819 20 2122 232425 2627 2 829 3031 1 2345678 9 10 1 1 121314 1 516 1 7 1 819 20 2122 232425 2627 2 829 3031 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R P AGE 6C, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 27

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 56F/13C Low: 59F/15C Low: 64F/18C Low: 66 F/19C Low: 66F/19C Low: 68F/20C Low: 71 F/22C Low: 63F/17C High: 84F/29C High: 80F/27C High: 82 F/28C High: 81F/27C High: 82F/28C High: 78 F/26 High: 81F/27C Low: 64F/18C High: 80 F/27C Low: 64 F/18 High: 82 F/28CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 60F/16C High: 83F/28C Low: 69 F/21C High: 79F/26C Low: 60 F/16C High: 79F/26C Low: 64 F/18C High: 82F/28C Low: 65F/18C High: 84 F/29C Low: 63F/17C High: 81 F/27C Low: 63 F/17C High: 83F/28C Low: 64F/18C High: 83F/28C Low: 65 F/18C High: 85F/29C High: 79F/26CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 9TH, 2009, PAGE 7CTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Bright and sunny. Clear and moonlit.Mostly sunny.Bright and sunny. Mostly sunny. High: 81 Low: 71 High: 82 High: 80 High: 82 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny and pleasant. High: 82 Low: 70 Low: 69 Low: 69 AccuWeather RealFeel 88F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 69F 81-71F 80-70F 79-71F 82-75F Low: 71 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 77F/25C Low .................................................... 68F/20C Normal high ...................................... 79F/26C Normal low ........................................ 65F/18C Last year's high .................................. 90F/32C Last year's low .................................. 73F/23C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.98"Normal year to date ......................................3.88" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Full Last New First Mar . 10 Mar . 18 Mar . 26 Apr . 2 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:25 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:16 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 6:05 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 6:16 a.m. Today T uesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 7:15 a.m.2.912:49 a.m.-0.3 7:35 p.m.2.91:23 p.m.-0.2 8:04 a.m.3.01:43 a.m.-0.4 8:23 p.m.3.02:08 p.m.-0.3 8:49 a.m.2.92:32 a.m.-0.4 9:08 p.m. 3.12:50 p.m.-0.3 9:31 a.m. 2.83:19 a.m.-0.4 9:52 p.m. 3.1 3:31 p.m.-0.3 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 87/3070/21s87/3069/20s Amsterdam42/540/4c44/636/2r Ankara, Turkey54/1236/2c55/1229/-1r Athens63/1747/8s63/1744/6s Auckland65/1855/12sh67/1958/14c Bangkok95/3579/26pc93/3377/25pc Barbados84/2874/23s84/2874/23pc Barcelona57/1344/6sh58/1449/9pc Beijing55/1225/-3s52/1130/-1pc Beirut65/1854/12sh65/1860/15pc Belgrade53/1136/2r43/637/2c Berlin38/332/0sn41/537/2sh Bermuda 73/2262/16pc68/2059/15pc Bogota66/1848/8r65/1848/8t Brussels43/637/2c43/633/0r Budapest52/1132/0sh45/734/1cBuenos Aires 75/2368/20pc78/2568/20pc Cairo73/2250/10s72/2258/14s Calcutta 93/3373/22s96/3578/25c Calgar y-6/-21-20/-28sn4/-15-9/-22pc Cancun84/2863/17s86/3064/17s Caracas83/2866/18pc84/2867/19pcCasablanca 64/17 52/11 pc 74/2358/14c Copenhagen 42/538/3c44/637/2c Dublin45/741/5sh48/845/7pcFrankfurt 42/5 36/2r44/637/2r Geneva38/335/1sf38/337/2sn Halifax35/118/-7c37/221/-6sHavana 85/29 61/16 s85/2960/15s Helsinki32/028/-2sn30/-123/-5sn Hong Kong 72/2263/17pc73/2264/17pc Islamabad75/2350/10pc80/2648/8s Istanbul55/1244/6sh50/1038/3rJerusalem 60/1544/6s58/1443/6sh Johannesburg 76/24 54/12t74/2354/12t Kingston 82/27 74/23pc84/2875/23s Lima85/2970/21c83/2869/20c London 48/8 41/5 pc50/1039/3r Madrid64/1734/1pc68/2036/2s Manila91/3275/23s87/3075/23s Mexico City77/2546/7s75/2346/7s Monterrey85/2962/16s96/3558/14pcMontreal 32/025/-3sn41/528/-2pc Moscow 33/033/0sn36/231/0c Munich31/028/-2sn35/132/0sn Nairobi91/3256/13s91/3258/14s New Delhi88/3159/15pc93/3359/15s Oslo 34/126/-3sn33/025/-3sf Paris 48/843/6sh53/1136/2r Prague39/334/1sn40/434/1r Rio de Janeiro85/2974/23pc83/2874/23c Riyadh88/3159/15s86/3057/13s Rome61/1637/2pc55/1243/6s St. Thomas 81/27 71/21s81/2773/22pc San Juan81/2765/18c90/3264/17t San Salvador92/3372/22s91/3271/21s Santiago90/3255/12pc88/3154/12s Santo Domingo83/2866/18pc82/2766/18pc Sao Paulo81/2767/19t78/2566/18r Seoul 54/1225/-3s50/1025/-3s Stockholm36/230/-1sn34/128/-2sf Sydney73/2263/17pc73/2263/17s T aipei 68/20 59/15sh73/2261/16pc Tokyo54/1248/8c59/1546/7pc Toronto40/426/-3pc42/533/0r Trinidad86/3076/24r79/2674/23r Vancouver38/323/-5sf38/326/-3pcVienna 44/6 33/0c45/741/5r Warsaw40/430/-1r37/233/0c Winnipeg24/-40/-17sn5/-15-11/-23sn HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayTuesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 65/1838/3pc65/1836/2pc Anchorage31/022/-5sn33/023/-5sn Atlanta 76/24 55/12pc81/2755/12pc Atlantic City59/1531/0pc47/840/4r Baltimore64/1739/3pc49/943/6rBoston 37/2 27/-2sn41/534/1pc Buffalo40/429/-1c41/537/2r Charleston, SC80/2657/13s80/2657/13pc Chicago47/839/3pc51/1023/-5tCleveland 42/5 36/2pc54/1244/6r Dallas81/2765/18t80/2651/10t Denver60/1523/-5pc38/316/-8pc Detroit46/735/1pc51/1036/2r Honolulu78/2567/19pc79/2668/20pcHouston 81/27 68/20 pc83/2862/16pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayTuesday T odayTuesday T odayTuesday Indianapolis 57/1349/9pc64/1740/4t Jacksonville81/2754/12s82/2756/13s Kansas City 60/15 48/8t56/1320/-6t Las Vegas67/1944/6pc67/1941/5s Little Rock73/2261/16t80/2650/10tLos Angeles 65/18 48/8s67/1948/8s Louisville67/1957/13pc74/2347/8t Memphis76/2462/16t80/2649/9t Miami82/2764/17s82/2766/18s Minneapolis 42/5 28/-2pc33/05/-15sn Nashville71/2158/14t77/2551/10c New Orleans79/2664/17pc79/2664/17s New York45/735/1r42/538/3r Oklahoma City75/2356/13t73/2236/2pc Orlando 84/28 57/13 s84/2857/13s Philadelphia54/1240/4pc47/842/5r Phoenix75/2352/11s76/2451/10s Pittsburgh50/1037/2pc55/1248/8r Portland, OR46/729/-1c47/828/-2pc Raleigh-Durham 80/2650/10pc64/1755/12c St. Louis64/1753/11pc71/2134/1tSalt Lake City 40/424/-4sn37/220/-6c San Antonio 83/28 66/18 pc85/2963/17c San Diego61/1651/10pc62/1651/10s San Francisco57/1342/5pc60/1542/5sSeattle 38/325/-3sf42/526/-3pc T allahassee 81/2749/9pc80/2653/11s Tampa80/2660/15s80/2661/16s Tucson71/2148/8pc71/2145/7s Washington, DC69/2042/5pc49/945/7r UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuWeather.com


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E7KQS164V_AEUU8F INGEST_TIME 2012-01-26T17:14:27Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01260
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES