Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
WEATHER

FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY

HIGH
LOW

Pye mes Tacs daha

McDonald's downtown

m Lhe Tribune

755 ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE 7 1
68F ees cee ee

drive-thru is now open

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays



<2

Volume: 105 No.87





SUNNY AND =

|
| i

7 F

"i
i
AY f
i
i

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

SIT US TO
hw et ,

ill

Unemployment

at 13-Vear high

Jobless rate at
12.1% for New
Providence

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE latest unemployment
figures show that the number
of people out of work in the
Bahamas is at its highest level in
15 years.

Providing hard evidence of
the effect of the global eco-
nomic decline on the Bahamian
economy and labour force, the
Department of Statistics’ acting
director, Kalsie Dorsett,
revealed the figures at a press
conference yesterday.

Figures show that around half
of all people who are without
work in Grand Bahama lost
their jobs in the last six months,
with 48 per cent of these people
reporting having been “laid-off
or dismissed”.

In New Providence, one third
had become jobless in the same
period, and of these, 44 per cent
were laid off or dismissed.

Overall, in New Providence,
unemployment among the

RASS
Ww wv

——
BOS

Offer Good Until;
March t4th

| $900 | $300

per 5-pack

per 5-pack

i a) ee,



134,400-strong labour force rose
from 8.7 per cent in May of last
year to 12.1 per cent, based on
the interim survey conducted
last month.

This leaves a total of 16,315
people looking for a job on this
island alone.

Meanwhile, in Grand
Bahama, the number of people
without work jumped to 14.6
per cent, equivalent to 4,195 job
hunters in a labour force of
28,820.

To be defined as “unem-
ployed” an individual must have
been actively looking for, as
well as being “willing and able”
to work, during the reference
period.

The interim survey, unlike
the annual May survey, does
not reflect the number of “dis-
couraged” workers - another
important figure which includes
people without a job who have
stopped looking for one. How-
ever, Mrs Dorsett said that “ini-

SEE page 6



25ins deep: 4 ;900
J1ins deep: 52,500)
Lateral 4 Drwer: 53,200 |

~hESS THAN U.S. PRICES!

folate gD
af a7 se

UU Gra RSAC Ca

THE four men charged in connection with a $60,000 BTC

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

robbery. From left are: Medico Johnson, Angel Johnson,
Kellen Johnson (with dark blue jacked, face hidden) and Her-

mis Newbold.

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

FOUR Eleuthera men
accused of breaking into the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation (BTC)
complex on that island and
stealing nearly $60,000 worth
of cellular phones and phone
cards were arraigned in a
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Angel Johnson, 25, Hermis

Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time will
begin at 2am tomorrow, March
8, and will continue until 2am
on Sunday, November 1.

This is in keeping with the
policy adopted in October,
2006, to extend Daylight Sav-
ing Time to begin the second
Sunday in March and end the
first Sunday in November.

Remember to set your clocks
ahead one hour when you go
to bed tonight.

Newbold, 20, Kelin Johnson,
39, and Medico Johnson, 27,
all of Governor’s Harbour,
were arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez and
Magistrate Ansella Williams
in Court One, Bank Lane,
charged with shopbreaking
and stealing.

It is alleged that between

SEE page 6







PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

tht
ADLT & CHAMDON

Roberts hits

out on ‘sick’
BTC claims

Denies intervening to
get PLP backers jobs

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Former PLP minister
Bradley Roberts has blasted
Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing for what he
termed “sick and unfound-
ed” allegations that he hired
people politically at the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation.

Accusing Mr Laing of not
being forthright about the
matter, Mr Roberts claimed
that a purported internal
BTC document tabled by Mr
Laing in the House of
Assembly on Thursday failed
to show that he had person-
ally intervened to ensure
PLP supporters were hired
at BTC during his tenure.

“The basis for the junior
minister’s vicious and

CLICO
‘politics’
attacked

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Minister of State
for Finance James Smith
denounced the political finger-
pointing from both sides over
the CLICO (Bahamas) debacle
saying if any blame should be
cast for the company’s financial
problems it should lie at the feet
of the US financial crisis.

Mr Smith's statement came
in the wake of reported com-
ments from Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, who spoke
on the matter as the House of
Assembly wrapped up the
2008/2009 mid-year budget
debate on Thursday night.

Around midnight, parliament

SEE page 6

unfounded accusation
appears to be a three-page
typed internal document of
BTC which (he) sinisterly
conveyed was penned by me
that gave specific instructions
to BTC officials to hire per-
sons chosen by my PLP col-
leagues. I categorically deny
that I gave any such instruc-
tions and robustly condemn
the junior minister for his
unfounded, unsubstantiated
and sick allegations,” said Mr
Roberts in a statement issued
yesterday.

“The board minutes of
BTC will affirm that approval
was given to employ some
100 persons, mainly entry lev-
el positions, following
requests from senior man-
agers to which minister’s
approval was given in 2006.

SEE page 6

Jobless
urged to

register

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net



In the face of rising unem-
ployment, the government yes-
terday renewed its call for all
unemployed people, especially
“those with qualifications”, to
register as soon as possible with
the Labour Exchange so no
more permits for foreigners are
approved than need be.

Minister of Labour, Senator
Dion Foulkes, said the govern-
ment will “continue to do all it
can to minimise the downturn
on Bahamian families” and may
“heighten its stimulus package”
depending on “how things go
in the economy” over the next

SEE page 6

Students robbed
during track meet

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

STUDENTS were robbed
by three outsiders during a
track and field meet involv-
ing around 900 Government
High School students at
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

tre yesterday.

Police apprehended three
men alleged to have threat-
ened three students with a
screwdriver and a piece of
wood as they stood near the
swimming complex at the
sports centre in Thompson
Boulevard just before noon.

SEE page 6





PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

Rotary Club donates computer to Kelly family

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

SUPPORT has poured in for the Kel-
ly family after The Tribune reported
how robbers stole their computer which
was a Vital link to their chronically ill
daughter’s specialist in Miami.

The New Providence Rotary Club
donated a new computer to Ronald and
Lina Kelly of Great Britain Street after
burglars stole a laptop which provided
continuous access to the gastroenterol-
ogist at Jackson Memorial Hospital who
monitors their five-year-old daughter
Roshan’s rare condition.

Roshan was born with volvulus, a

twisting of the short intestine, and short-
bowel syndrome, which makes it difficult
for her to digest food and requires her to
be fed from an IV tube every four hours.

The club donated a computer in time
for the family to take it to the hospital in
Miami when they took Roshan there
for surgery last month, so they could
have it configured with programmes
allowing them 24-hour access to their
doctor.

Readers touched by the story pub-
lished in The Tribune on February 12
have since contacted the Rotary club
with offers to help the family.

President of the New Providence
Rotary Club Rodney Collie said: “This
story certainly touched the hearts of

many, and the professional manner in
which it was reported made it even more
appreciated.

“Many times in our society the only
stories that appear to get significant cov-
erage is ‘bad news’, but clearly this was
one of hope and represents what we
can do as corporate and civic citizens
to make a difference.

“As a result of your front page cov-
erage, we’ve had countless persons
approach us, willing to assist this family
and support our efforts.

“T would like to thank The Tribune
for helping to pass on a message of hope
and positive change to our communi-
CVn
Roshan travelled to Miami for surgery

to insert an IV port in her chest follow-
ing The Tribune’s publication last
month, and Mrs Kelly said she is recov-
ering well and desperate to go back to
school.

The mother-of-one, who is a full-time
caregiver for Roshan, said: “Since the
article appeared, a lot of people have
been calling me asking how she is.

“We are so grateful to Rotary for the
computer, without it we would be in
real trouble.

“But she is feeling well, even 24 hours
after the surgery she was jumping
around, it doesn’t hurt her.

“She wants to go back to school to see
her friends, but she still needs to be
careful.”

Police slammed for not apprehending

tourists accused of trespassing

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE POLICE have been slammed for failing
to apprehend tourists accused of trespassing,
chasing endangered birds and slaughtering a pet
duck on a private cay off Long Island.

Crew members of a US sailboat were seen
walking through the grounds of Hog Cay in Joe
Sound, Long Island, on Sunday, February 22,
and the following day they posted details on the
internet of how they chased the protected West
Indian tree ducks populating the island before
they caught and killed a rowan, a barnyard duck
owned by property owner Peter Graham and his
family, complete with photographs of the plucked
carcass in a roasting pan ready for the oven.

The innards, neck and wingtips of the duck
were found on the beach surrounded by Bud-
weiser beer cans by caretaker and Bahamas
National Trust warden Earl Wilson the following
morning.

He said the island — normally teeming with
around 1,500 endangered West Indian tree ducks,
or whistling ducks — was silent.

Mr Graham has been praised by the National
Trust for encouraging the population of West
Indian tree ducks to grow from just three in 1969
to nearly 2,000 across Long Island by feeding
them at a cost of around $35,000 a year.

However, the sensitive ducks were so disturbed
by the sailboaters’ escapades they have been hid-
ing since the event nearly two weeks ago.

Mr Wilson said: “It has just been so quiet, there
are no birds. They are very, very timid and they
just started to come back in the evenings, but

Saturday

MULTI

yesterday (Thursday) was the first time I have

seen them out in the morning.”

The crimes were reported to Inspector Dun-

combe at Simms Police Station in Long Island, but } ===

when the crew were seen in Exuma he referred :
the matter to Inspector Strachan in George Town. }

Inspector Duncombe told The Tribune the crew }
were wanted for questioning in relation to tres- }
passing allegations but officers in Exuma were }

: PICTURED in front of Murphy’s exhibit are Nicholas Colclough and

: Katherine Solomon.
Peter Graham’s daughter Amanda Graham }

has criticised the attitude of police in dealing }

Nicholas ‘adopts’
_spiny-tailed

“The general perception is that we should just

‘iguana at Ardastra

ture here, and perhaps that is the mentality of the :

unable to locate the sailboat after receiving the
report on February 26.

with the case and even hanging up when the fam-
ily have tried to call for updates.

She said: “We filed a complaint and they
haven’t done anything.

get over it but they are not seeing the bigger pic-

police themselves.”

The sailboat, from Daytona, Florida, has been : 2 Rs
? recently acquired a “parent.

reported to its home marina and US officials.

wae Hg ec sisinee ee . School, adopted Murphy from the Ardastra’s adopt-an-animal
by an Exuma magistrate for possession of juvenile
| on cams ita Eis boee ae oe ae named Murphy,” the eight-year-old told Katherine Solomon, wid-

a dinghy filled with baby conch and cooking an }

iguana on a barbecue.

Chief Executive of the Bahamas National Trust

Eric Carey said: “Crimes against the environ- }

ment should not be given less importance than : assured him that his donation will help feed and care for Murphy.

other crimes.

are not of any level of importance.”



MURPHY, a spiny-tailed iguana at Ardastra Gardens and Zoo,
Nicholas Colclough, a second grade student at St Andrews

programme.
“T chose Murphy because my friends in Canada have a dog

ow of Ardastra’s late owner Norman Solomon.

“T thought it would be cool to adopt an animal with that same
name.”

Mrs Solomon thanked Nicholas for his kind sponsorship and

Ardastra’s adopt-an-animal is a recently launched sponsorship

Tien eefiene oties Tex umrder and acqned : programme which allows children the opportunity to financially sup-

robbery need to be given priority, but environ- }

mental crimes don’t need to be treated as if they : : : a ; 3 ;
? animal and permitted to visit their animal at any time.

port an animal at the zoo for a period of one year.
The children are given an “adoption certificate” for the sponsored

5S Vo OFF

Montrose Avenue
Home & Bridal Center

Your favorite brands of:

China, Crystal, Pots, Pans

Dishes, Flatware, Glassware,
Kitchen Gadgets, Small Appliances
Gift Items, Table Linens and

much much more.

Expecting
Brides come
and register
your bridal

selection
TODAY.

THE TRIBUNE





“Man plead
guilty to stealing

e A 28-year-old man

: appeared in Magistrates Court
: yesterday facing several counts
? of stealing.

Shane Mackey, who

i: appeared before Magistrate
? Carolita Bethel in Court 8,
? Bank Lane, pleaded guilty to
? stealing hundreds of dollars
? from several people after fail-
? ing to deliver on the sale of a
? vehicle.

According to court dockets,

? it was alleged that between
? February 2 and February 13,
i Mackey, of Seville Avenue,
? conspired to commit the
? offence of stealing by reason
i of service.

It was further alleged that

i during that time, Mackey stole
: $1,500 cash from Jeanelle
? Francis, $600 cash from Lisa
i Lightbourne, $3,400 from
? Danny Altidor and $2,000
? from Nadia Campbell by rea-
? son of service.

Mackey was remanded to

Her Majesty’s Prison. He is
i expected to be sentenced on
? Monday.

Andrea Murphy, 26, plead-

? ed not guilty to two counts of
? conspiring to steal by reason of
? service.

She also plead not guilty of

i two counts of abettement to
? stealing.

Murphy was granted bail in

the sum of $7,500. The case
? has been adjourned to March

“Vangerine Nairn, 31, of

: Haven Subdivision, also plead-
? ed not guilty to one count of
? conspiring to steal by reason of
? service and one count of abet-
? tement to stealing.

She was also granted bail in

the sum of $7,500 with two
? sureties.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
822-2157



=>

March 7th, 2009

DISCOUNT

Super Party Center

Birthdays:

Dora, Princess,
Barbie, Diego,
Superman, Batman,
Hanah Montana,
1st, 40th & More

Anniversary!
25th, SOth

Baby Shower
Wedding Shower
Variety of Solid Colors

Balloons, party favors,
seasonal items.

We currently have Easter
ltems on display.

ROYAL DOULTON

Cuisinart CORELLE. (PYREX)

With any purchase you can register towin a $200, $300 and Grand Prize $500 Gift Certificate to be used
at Multi Discount Home & Bridal Center or Multi Discount Super Party Center.

BEAT ure
PRIiCces MoT
EVEN IM MLAMI!

APPLIANCES
VWVE ACCEPT ALI

BY |
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS

Salers

el eae ee te |
(Just North of Bahamas Bus & Truck Co)

Prone:

=~5-2040 = 3:

ed a ee

EVERYBODY
KNOWS WE
HAVE THE

IN NASSAU





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Ex-MP continues
justice fight for
murdered son

DETERMINED not to
allow the murder of his son
Mario to be swept under the
rug, former Trade Minister
Leslie Miller appeared on the
radio programme Real Talk
Live yesterday to shed light
once again on the many road-
blocks his family has endured
in their seven-year battle for
justice.

Explaining that he has per-
sonally spoken with Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham to
plead with him to not allow
the case to be buried like so
many others, Mr Miller said
he was assured someone from
the Attorney General’s Office
will be in contact with him.

Despite these assurances,
however, Mr Miller said his
son’s case has been postponed
once again and will not start
until October.

Mario was the victim of a
gruesome homicide nearly
seven years ago, and the trial
of two men accused of his
killing captured the attention
of the entire country.

When the trial concluded
last year it resulted in a hung
jury where 11 jurors found the
accused men guilty with one
juror insisting on returning an
innocent vote.

Mr Miller said: “The prime
minister told me that he
spoke to the AG (Michael
Barnett) and the AG was sup-
posed to call us to let my fam-
ily know that the case would
start. But I have not gotten a
call from the AG.

“And I have called the
prime minister every week
and it has not happened and it
will not happen,” Mr Miller
exclaimed.

During this statement Mr
Miller was interrupted by host
Ortland Bodie Jr, who asked
how he could not hear a word
from the AG’s office.

“You are a man who has
some influence, or who I
believe has some influence?!”
said Mr Bodie. “So what is
going to happen to you and




your family?” he asked.

“My father taught me years
ago,” Mr Miller continued,
“You don’t have to like pow-
er, but respect power because
it could destroy you and it
could malign your life.

“Now if somebody is
responsible for putting cases
forward — for example the
(Keith) Carey murder case
just happened. Mr Carey,
God bless him, got shot a few
years ago. Mario’s case is now
almost eight years old and the
man made a decision that it
will be done when he wants it
to be done. So there is noth-
ing my family or I can do
about it.

“T have spoken to the PM
on it. He is the leader of this
country. He told me that he
gave the AG instructions that
it has to be done and I would
get a call from the AG. I nev-
er got a call from the AG. I
called him again and I know I
will never get a call from (lead
prosecutor Bernard) Turner.
But that’s fine. Because Mr
Turner has the power and he
can do as he pleases,” Mr
Miller said.

However, as Mr Miller
added, he will one day be
back in Parliament “sooner
than others might think” and
there he will use that platform
where he is free from libel
prosecution to deal with this
matter.

“Because once you become
a regular citizen people take
advantage of you and do
whatever it is they have to do.
But I can live with that, and
my family has to live with that
until Mr Turner decides it is
time for this case to go for-
ward.

Following the programme,
Mr Turner contacted Mr
Miller and explained that he
was not responsible for bring-
ing trials before the court and
that the case ultimately is in
the hands of the defence
attorneys who allegedly need-
ed more time to prepare.



More lay-offs
in hotel sector

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GINN Resorts in Grand
Bahama announced yesterday
that due to the global financial
crisis it is forced to eliminate 28
workers from its Old Bahama
Bay and Ginn sur Mer proper-
ties.

To an already downtrodden
island, these further lay-offs are
just the most recent reminder
of what is yet to come in the
tourism industry as the interna-
tional financial crisis continues
to wreck havoc on the global
economy.

Citing these challenges, Ginn
officials said these the lay-offs
are a part of their efforts to
“streamline costs and maximise
efficiencies” at their Grand
Bahama properties.

These reductions in staff will

Ginn cuts 28 workers at
$4.9bn West End project,
Old Bahama Bay property

affect the hospitality operations
and “several other areas of the
company’s workforce,” a com-
pany press release said.

According to Ginn’s senior
vice-president Al Jones, the lay-
offs are an unfortunate result
of the unprecedented global
financial meltdown and is simi-
lar to what other companies are
facing both in the Bahamas and
around the world.

“The decision to reduce our
workforce was a very difficult
one to make, but given the
economy and the low levels of
occupancy at Old Bahama Bay,
we had no alternative,” Mr

Female lawyers group
receives scholarship aid

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Chapter of the Inter-
national Federation of Women
Lawyers (FIDA) received a
contribution of $5,000 from the
Alice Sauberli Trust Fund for
its scholarship fund.

Attorney Branford Christie
made the presentation to the
scholarship committee of FIDA
(Federacion Internacional de
Abogadas) at Maryann’s
Restaurant on Thursday.

Mr Christie, who attended
FIDA’s installation banquet in
January, had pledged to donate
$5,000 to the scholarship fund

IT’S A TIME OF JOY AND JUBILATION!

f’'S AGRAND TIME OF
PRAISE AND € ELEBRATION’ H



BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD Monday, March 9th, 2009

Genera! (erseer
BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON

General Preshytei

Bishop Dr. Elearnet B. Rahming, National Overseer

& Mewlerator will dchver his ANNUAL ADDRESS.

S10 AM

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN

Global Outreach Director
BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK

CBL [nstrector

MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE

Infermatronal Director of Women’s Ministries
BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN
Regional Overseer of Jamaica, Cayman

Islands Guyana and French Guiana

and MINISTER SONIA MARTIN
BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS

Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islands
BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES
National Overseer of the Church of Ceoxd,
Bahumus, Turks & Caioos Islincds

Ministering in song and performance
are: the Centennial Mass Choir, the Tah-
ernmacke Concert Choir, the Chorch of
Cod National Choir, the Bahamas Public
Officers Choir, and other Choirs

Teams and a ee See ali ith,

salers Blas

Youth ard

te Clee

LIVE ¥VIA RADIO BAHAMAS 13-4 AM and

The Convention climaxes on Sanday, March 15th
with the afternoon Annuul Parade and Water
Baplismal Service, folliwed by the evening
Service broadcast live on FNS Radio and TV 13,

log on to: WwW.cogophahamas.org

For live webcasting

on behalf of the Trust.

“T had the pleasure of acting
as master of ceremonies (at the
banquet) and I am aware of the
good works of the organisation,
and knowing that these are very
tough times I thought it would
be appropriate to make a
pledge toward the scholarship
fund,” he said.

Mr Christie said Mrs Sauber-
li was a former resident of
Grand Bahama. He stated that
prior to her death, her invest-
ment was realised and she
established a trust fund with the
proceeds.

Scholarship chairman
Charisse Brown, legal counsel
for the Grand Bahama Devel-
opment Company, said FIDA
is very grateful for the dona-
tion.

7

DAIHATSU

All medals. ore bocked by a 24-monh

Se Ue au)

Dre MBs emit oe ied

ee ry ec Red cos sl
birthday, Roor mots ond full tank of fuel.

_ EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

ATTHORISED DATHATST DEALER

Jones said.

“This is incredibly unfortu-
nate because our employees are
the most important resource
this company has and we great-
ly value their contributions.”

According to the statement,
although occupancy levels are
down at Old Bahama Bay,
progress continues at the Ginn
sur Mer development.

“The company is on sched-
ule for a December 31 comple-
tion date for infrastructure work
at the community which
includes internal road paving,
golf course construction, land-
scaping, water and sewer works

and other projects,” the state-
ment read.

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing recently com-
mented on the lay-offs that con-
tinue to plague Grand Bahama.
With an additional 234 employ-
ees set to be terminated by the
end of May from the Isle of
Capri, Mr Laing said that the
government must continue its
work to “turn things around”
in the local economy.

“That Ginn and others would
be having a similar reaction is
only indicative of the times of
which we find ourselves.

“And we have to empathise
with the people who are laid off
because it is a significant hard-
ship for them but this is what is
happening now and we have to
keep working on doing what we
can to turn things around. But it
is a global economic crisis and
that’s what we’re in,” he said.

Galleria Cinemas

EFFECTIVE

vee Be valle cadl= AT eave Dan oe
hook OFF OR OFENS AT ta) AAD TRAY

MARCH 06th, 2OOn

PWARCHWMEM | art A | ate | rib TMi [idea |

snecrnamen [vo [250 [wa [ose [as [ree
PYLEN PENS MADEA GOES TONAL | iid | ea | A | Gene [ead faceas |

MADE, GOES TO JAIL T ae ame



















ITEP BAT ceo |
PRMIDAY THE 13TH

100 WA te
4: 5

HE'S JUET MoT THAT 1100 RA
TAKCH ao | 1:35

PUM, BAM THER oo | 735 |



* Air conditioning

* 148 diesel engine Gelivers real power
with low noise and superb fuel economy |







* Rope hooks & footsteps for easy loading =

* Aulomatically-adjusting clutch for easy maintenance

* Exhaust broke system for stopping power

* Heavy-duty front & rear suspension systems protect cargo

* Titt/power steering & superb visibility ino comfortable cabin
* Wide, edrelong cargo bed with reinforced frame

Auto Mall, Shirley Street Copp. St ree
Open Mon to Fri 8am -
Sat Bam - 12n00n

Tel: 397-1700
E-mail: execmotoriadbatelnet. bs
Parts and service guaranteed



“ a
Available ls Grand Hahaa et Quality Aete Sales FFreeporl) © Queens Hay, 352-6127 « Abaco Motor Mall, Den Mactey Bhd, 367-2018



PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Challenge faces the conservative movement

ATLANTA — In his recent speech at the
Conservative Political Action Convention, Rush
Limbaugh referred repeatedly to “the conser-
vative movement.”

It’s an accurate phrase. In 21st century Amer-
ica, the conservatives function as a movement
while the liberals function as a party. The dis-
tinction is telling.

Roughly defined, a party is a collection of
groups motivated by different goals but loose-
ly committed to working together. A move-
ment, by contrast, is motivated by an ideology,
a central goal or collection of goals to which its
members pledge loyalty.

“Conservatism is what it is and it is forev-
er’ as Limbaugh put it. “It’s not something
you can bend and shape and flake and form.”

Now, party and movement each has its advan-
tages. A movement, by definition, offers a pas-
sion, energy and direction that are useful in
politics. It inspires loyalty and discipline from its
members, and deviation is frowned upon.

A party, on the other hand, lacks a powerful
internal energy and cohesion. At times, that
lack of defining cause can leave it wandering
through the political landscape. At other times,
that amorphous nature makes a party more
adaptable to change and more open to experi-
mentation.

Today, conservatism’s self identity as a move-
ment presents it with two challenges, one large
but probably temporary; the other existential.

As we saw over the last eight years, a move-
ment tends to lose discipline and sense of mis-
sion once it achieves power. It becomes what it
was trying to change, a phenomenon that has
repeated time and again. It happened to Repub-
licans, it happened in the French Revolution, it
happens always.

The process is captured perfectly in a scene
from George Orwell’s “Animal Farm.” The
animals, motivated by a core set of principles
such as “four legs good, two legs bad,” have
driven off their human bosses.

Victory is theirs; their movement has suc-
ceeded. Then one day, the animals peer through
the farmhouse window and are shocked to see
their leaders, the pigs, walking about on two legs
and acting just like the enemy they had ousted.

Today, the rank and file of the conservative
movement feels similarly betrayed, for good
reason. And now that they have been banished
from the luxuries of the farmhouse, their lead-
ers are back among them, trying to walk on

four legs again and regain credibility.

That’s what the unanimous House GOP vote
against the stimulus package was all about — it
was a gesture of contrition and renewed sub-
mission by leadership to movement ideology.
And given time, that will likely succeed in
repairing the rift.

The second problem is more difficult. Move-
ments are not eternal. They have an organic
lifespan. They rise out of a particular time and
place, they make their impact, and then one of
two things happens. Either they find within
themselves the ability to change with changing
times, or they wither.

That’s the challenge facing the conservative
movement. Times have changed dramatically.
Economically, politically, socially, demograph-
ically, today’s America is very different from the
America that gave birth to the conservative
movement.

The Cold War is over and forgotten; the ’60s
are over and forgotten. The Baby Boomers are
beginning to pass from the stage, as evidenced
by our first post-Boom president.

Those conservatives who understand that are
trying to find new applications and meaning in
their core principles, but that reinvention is dif-
ficult and takes time. Minnesota Gov. Tim Paw-
lenty, for example, told the CPAC convention
that while it is important to “honour and respect
and remember Ronald Reagan,” it’s also time to
move on.

“We need to develop new Ronald Reagans
and new reference points,” Pawlenty told a
Bloomberg reporter. “It would be as if Barack
Obama was going around and constantly talking
about Truman or LBJ. It’s just become a ref-
erence point that isn’t as relevant for young
people.”

But I doubt the conservative movement has
the flexibility to accept that message in all its
complex meanings. As Limbaugh told CPAC,
“The era of Reagan is over? When the hell do
you hear a Democrat say the era of FDR is
over? .... Our own movement has members try-
ing to throw Reagan out while the Democrats
Know they can’t accomplish what they want
unless they appeal to Reagan voters. We have
got to stamp this out within this movement,
because it will tear us apart.”

And if Limbaugh says it, it must be true.

(This article was written by Jay Bookman -
c.2009 Cox Newspapers).



TENDER FOR

The National Insurance Board invites tenders for coverage of its General
Insurance portfolio (property, etc.) for the year commencing june |, IW),
and subject to renewal tor a further two (2) years.

Suitably licensed insurance companies interested in submitting a tender, with
a detailed proposal, should collect an insurance bid package trom the Director's
Office, Ballou Hill Road, Nassau, Baharnas,

All tenders should be sealed, marked “Tender for General Insurance” and
should be hand delivered by 4:00 p.m. on March 31, 2009, to artive ar:

The Dhrector’s Office
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
Clittord Darling Complex
Baillow Hill Road
Nassau, Bahamas

The Board reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

Persons collecting the bid package must present a letter of authorization
from the licensed insurance company betore the package can be released.



Economy
hit by lack
of ‘interest’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I wish to make some comments
on your editorial entitled
"Bahamas policy on interest
rates".

Given that there are many
ways to skin a cat it is universally
accepted that the way to combat
an economic recession is by the
use of a combination of both fis-
cal and monetary policy. This has
been clearly demonstrated by the
Central Banks and Governments
in the United States, The UK and
Europe.

As you indicated the position
of the Bahamas is different from
that of the USA because it is
complicated by the fact that the
Central Bank is constantly in a
balancing act that seeks to main-
tain the parity of the Bahamian
dollar to the US dollar which
requires the maintenance of ade-
quate US dollar foreign currency
reserves. These reserves are
required to pay for the importa-
tion of goods into the Bahamas as
most of our imports are from the
United States. However, Gov-
ernment derives 70 per cent of its
revenue from the importation of
goods and thus the need for the
balancing act; increased imports
result in increased Government
revenue but decreased foreign
reserves and vice versa.

The second difference between
the Bahamas and the US is that
while there is a liquidity problem
in the US, there is no such liq-
uidity problem in The Bahamas
as the liquidity levels in the banks
currently stands at $300 million
which is double the $150 million
level which is generally consid-
ered the level at which there is
cause for concern.

The third difference is that for
the most part all of the retail
banks in The Bahamas are struc-
turally sound and none of them
has sought financial aid from the
lender of last resort which in our
case would be the Central Bank
of the Bahamas. Therefore,
unlike the US where both the
banks and the people are in a
state of acute distress, the banks
in the Bahamas are only in mild
state of discomfort because of
increasing loan default rates but
the Bahamian people like their
counterparts in the US are in
acute financial distress as is the
Bahamas Government.

The concern that the use of
monetary policy (lowering of
interest rates) will put pressure
on our foreign reserves and thus
threaten the parity of the
Bahamian dollar is understand-
able but people must understand
that fiscal policy (Government
spending for infrastructural devel-
opment) will also ultimately result
in a strain on our reserves
because those persons fortunate
enough to become employed as
result of Government spending
will also consume products and
services which will ultimately lead
to the importation of goods and
thus a drain on our foreign
reserves. Government's argument
against this is that the $120 mil-
lion that is being borrowed
through the IDB for the road
work project is a US dollar loan
and therefore will not be a drain
on our existing reserves. This is
true in the short term, but in the
long term the loan payments will
have to be paid back with US dol-
lars that will have to be sourced

Box:

‘a’
i
=
x
=

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia net



from our foreign reserves.

There are two important points
related to an economic recession
recovery that must be under-
stood. The first is that a country
has to spend its way out of a
recession. The ultimate purpose
of both fiscal and monetary poli-
cy is to create liquidity in the sys-
tem so that there is money avail-
able to be spent by consumers to
allow them to consume and mon-
ey available to businesses to allow
them to stay open to provide
goods and services for the con-
sumers. This is the theory behind
how spending aids the economy.

The second point is that for
every new dollar that enters the
economy it is probably spent at
least five times before it results in
any importation or drain on the
foreign reserves. Thus this veloc-
ity of money in and of itself helps
to stimulate the economy.

The editorial quotes a local
unnamed banker who makes the
point that Bahamians are at an
advantage compared to their
American counterparts, because
the rates of return on our savings
and Government bonds are high-
er than those in the United States.
He is absolutely correct but the
other side of the coin is that the
cost of borrowing funds in the
Bahamas is far greater than in
the United States. The interest
rate spreads in The Bahamas are
some of the highest in the world
and indeed this is one of the rea-
sons why the banks in this country
are so structurally sound or in lay-
man's terms "making so much
money". It is well known that
banks only need a 2 per cent
spread to make a good profit
however, the spreads in The
Bahamas can range from 5 per
cent to 10 per cent. In other
words the high cost of money eas-
ily offsets any potential gain that
savers and bond holders would
achieve given the higher rate of
return that they currently receive
on their savings compared to their
counterparts in the US.

As well, the unnamed banker
failed to disclose the fact that the
banks calculate the interest on
savings accounts based on the
minimum monthly balance and
not the average daily balance as is
the case in Canada.

Furthermore the interest is
paid into the savings accounts
either quarterly or biannually.
The net effect of these predatory
practices is that each year
Bahamians who have savings
accounts in the banks miss out on
millions of dollars because of the
way the interest is calculated.
Additionally to add insult to
injury during these hard eco-
nomic times First Caribbean
Bank has increased its banking
fees with regard to savings and
current accounts which will also
offset any potential gain from the
relatively higher savings rates. If
FCB is the good corporate citi-
zen that I believe it to be then it
should immediately reverse this
decision to increase the savings
and current account fees. Of
course if FCB's decides to stand
by their decision then account
holders always have the option

DA 69806

c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207

of moving their accounts to
another bank.

As well, if the Central Bank
were to decrease the discount
rate, the cost of Government bor-
rowing would be greatly reduced.
For example, if the national debt
is $3.5 billion and if interest rates
were lowered by 1 per cent then
Government's debt repayments
would be reduced by $35 million
per year. By the same token if
there are $6 billion of private
loans then this 1 per cent reduc-
tion would put another $60 mil-
lion into the economy each year.
Both of these are examples of the
positive effect of monetary policy
and both at no extra cost to Gov-
ernment.

The fact of the matter is that
we need to use a combination of
fiscal and monetary policy to
revive our economy. Of course a
lot of these issues would disap-
pear if we were to abandon
exchange control and dollarize
our economy but that's another
topic for another day.

JOHN RODGERS
Nassau,
March, 2009.

Baha Mar set
to ‘Miss’ out
EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am not a hotelier, but
something is out of whack
with the ongoing responses
by the BahaMar Group con-
cerning the Miss Universe
pageant in August. I am
hearing phrases like “com-
pelling circumstances” and
“leaving the door open” and
“overwhelming demand”; it
is like some financial tsunami
has to occur before a deci-
sion is made concerning
something that is inevitable.
I don’t get it, you have an
opportunity dropping in your
lap and you “cut up”. Maybe
BahaMar is in some other
business and the hotel thing
is just something they do on
the side. Supplying rooms for
visitors is what hotels do and
they are going to be a lot of
visitors before, during and
after the pageant, and a good
number of them really can-
not afford to stay over the
bridge.

If another property had
the gumption to send a group
from the Bahamas to lobby
for this pageant, then “all”
properties have a responsi-
bility to get on board. I am
sure the government will
offer some kind of incentive
to all and sundry. This is an
opportunity for all Bahami-
ans, and everyone has to be
on board.

I cannot even begin to
imagine what our competi-
tors further south and in the
north would have given to
get this event, and here we
are. Out of sheer gratitude
we must be seen to want to
be on board.

EDWARD
HUTCHESON
Nassau,

March 5, 2009.



A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

"I vex that despite all this }
crap that is going on in the }
tourism sector and our econ- }
omy, while in a local hotel on :
Cable Beach I passed a }
concierge dealing with a guest }
so rudely. The guest was only }
asking her (the concierge) to }
recommend a good restaurant :
and she treated him like any }
old common person on the }
street and answered him with
a grunt. The guest had to ask }
her to make a reservation, }
when she should have sug- i

gested that.

"I worked as a concierge in }
a four-diamond resort in
Florida and I can tell you that :
a concierge should be the epit- }
ome of service. I was disgust- }
ed, so imagine how the guest :
felt. No hotel anywhere can }
consider itself a part of the }
hospitality sector without }
excellent service. I think the }
government should get rid of }
the 15 per cent gratuity so }
these hotel workers can pre- :
tend to give me good service }
before I can tip their (back-

side)."

- Vex at Slack Employees.

"I vex that in this ailing }
economy more Bahamians ;
aren't thinking outside the }
box and trying to find solu-

tions to their own dilemma
instead of waiting for the gov-
ernment to fix things. I mean
it's only so much the govern-
ment can do anyway and that
have to go through parliament
anyway.

"Now is the time for cre-
ative and jobless Bahamians
to be make their own money,
start a lil’ business and just
work hard. ‘Cause things ain’
going to get better for a long
time and we in for a rough
ride."

- Concerned Citizen.

"T vex at how lightly it seem
that some leaders are taking
this CLICO liquidation fias-
co. Saying it is uncertain
whether we policy holders and
annuity holders will get our
full investments back. Then
they say these irregularities
were noted from years ago.

"Tell me why someone
somewhere with sense didn't
stop this madness before it
put people's life savings in
jeopardy? People who were
placed in positions of respon-
sibility need to be held
accountable for this - because
I ain’ want to lose out on a
sound investment while these
bigwigs sit pretty.”

- Scared all my money gone.

"I vex, vex cause a US
report cites anti-Haitian prej-
udice in my Bahamas. Now if
dem surveyors did see some
60,000 illegal Haitians or 20
per cent added to our 300,000
population on our small
islands, or same 20 per cent,
equal to 60,000,000 illegal
aliens added to their 300 mil-
lion US population, den dey
gon see dey is a big problem.

"Dem surveyors mussey
ain't even know dat dem ille-
gals even get free hospital, free
school, dey get free land to
live on in da bushes, dey don't
pay NIB tax, dey don't even
travel to Miami to shop and
come back an pay Customs
taxes like most of we Bahami-
ans. Dey is undercut we legal
union wage labourers an dey is
still Haitians cause dey born
Haitian for life an dey is wel-
come anytime to return home
to Haiti where dey like to fly
dey Haitian flags in my
Bahamian face an you dare
tell me I is prejudice.”

- Well Muddoes.

WHY YOU HAPPY?

"I happy because some
work is going on out east at
Eastern Road and Yamacraw
- McPherson's Bend - con-
crete kerbs, pea rock and four
comfortable benches that face
the sea add to the relaxing
atmosphere. Good work, peo-
ple!”

- Enjoying the Sea View

BSTCG calls for support to
_ ban sea turtle harvesting

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN an effort to gain traction
for a ban on sea turtle harvest-
ing, the Bahamas Sea Turtle
Conservation Group (BSTCG)
is urging concerned citizens to
inundate the Minister of Agri-
culture with letters of support
for the proposed legislation.

While commending Agricul-
ture Minister Larry Cartwright
for his efforts to protect marine
resources, co-chairman of
BSTCG Kim Aranha lamented
the fact that the turtle harvesting
ban is in danger of not being
passed due to dismal support
from Bahamians.

"He (Mr Cartwright) indicat-

¢ WANTED ¢ WANTED ¢ WANTED e









ed that parliament wanted to
hear from more Bahamians sup-
porting this Bill,” she said.

According to Ms Aranha, Mr
Cartwright told her while his
ministry has received numerous
letters from foreigners in sup-
port of the ban, local support
has been minimal at best.

Ms Aranha feels this lack of
input is due to the fact that many
Bahamians who support a ban
on all turtle harvesting are under
the impression that such a law
is already in place.

All species of marine turtles
have been classified by interna-
tional authorities as "threatened
with extinction” or endangered.

In the Bahamas, only the
Hawksbill Turtle is on the list of
animals protected by law against

British Colonial Hilton's
Sumptuous Breakfast Buffet Offer!

Take a break this weekend and
have breakfast at The Portofino Restaurant

Saturday & Sunday

Sunday Brunch

Offer valid for local resid
15%) gratuity added to all food,/bevera

capture. Other turtles are pro-
tected from capture during a
closed season which runs from
April 1 to July 31, once they are
over a certain size - but others
are fit for capture.

In November, Minister
Cartwright announced that as of
January 1, 2009, commercial har-
vesting of turtles and long-line
fishing would become illegal. His
statements came after months
of furor over what activists
termed "inhumane" treatment
of threatened sea turtles.

Activists claimed some fisher-
man haul the animals ashore
onto boat ramps, turn them on
their backs in the sun, tie their
flippers with straw and slaughter
them alive.

Mr Cartwright also said that

effective April 1, any turtle har-
vesting would be in breach of
the law. That legislation has not
yet been passed.

"T think there are a lot of peo-
ple who are not aware the law
has not been passed,” said Ms
Aranha.

Now the BSTCG is taking
action - through a mass e-mail
petitioning like-minded Bahami-
ans to e-mail or fax Mr
Cartwright their opinions.

Less than 24 hours after an
initial plea was sent to her e-mail
contact list, Ms Aranha said she
received 65 calls and e-mails of
support. She expects this number
to increase to the hundreds in
the coming days.

"Unless we band together and
write letters of support it will not

get passed, and turtle pie will
stay on the menu, and the taunt-
ing and teasing, the hacking and
torture of turtles will continue,"
Ms Aranha said.

She also said the group was
not trying to stifle local fisher-
men's trade and claimed that
"very few people eat sea turtles.”

"We're not really trying to
stop an industry because there is
no industry. There's absolutely
no advantage to harvesting them
except for people to torture
them.

"We have to be mindful for
future generations and the rest
of the Bahamians need to stand
up and protect our resources,”
she said.

For more information visit
www.saveourseaturtles.com.

eall: 322.3301 ext. 4045

WANTED ¢ WANTED e

OSCAR INGRAHAM is wanted by police for
questioning in connection with a burglary which
occurred on January 28. His last known address
was in Strachan's Corner.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

i ENTAA, EXTRA

EXTRA,

Large Shipment
of


























° THE parents of a
teenage girl are asking the
public’s assistance in locat-

ing their daughter who ani al
went missing last month. . — > ie
On Tuesday, February 17, i Pa

Eldricka Ingraham, a 14-
year-old student of DW
Davis School, was reported
missing by a relative.

According to the report,
Eldricka went to school in
her uniform (a green plaid
skirt and yellow blouse)
and never returned home.
She is approximately 4 feet
5 inches tall and weighs
about 110 pounds. Anyone
with information on her
whereabouts is asked to
contact the police at 919,
324-2030, 502-9991, or
328-TIPS.

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

TROPICAL
rs eel

eee UE
PHONE: 322-2157



$995

Lesko eT

item - LL al

$24.95

12 renin Jpn





oe _



CD)
British Colonial Hilton

Phin ea =

Travel should take you places

i



PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Unemployment rate [XRiiiteeetecoeria ‘No logic’ in CLICO

now in double digits

FROM page one

tial indications” were that there
was not “that much of a differ-
ence” in this figure.

She said: “The results of the
survey further show that for the
first time since 2005 the unem-
ployment rate for both New
Providence and Grand Bahama
reached the two digit figure:
12.1 per cent for the former and
14.6 per cent for the latter.

In both islands these are the
highest unemployment rates
experienced since the early
1990s.

The unemployed numbers, in
New Providence, increased by
4,540 people (38 per cent). In
Grand Bahama the unem-
ployed numbers increased by
55 per cent or 1,500 people.

In 2005 unemployment in
New Providence stood at 10.9
per cent, while a total of 11 per
cent were unemployed in Grand
Bahama.

Contextualising the latest fig-
ures, Mrs Dorsett noted that
high rates of 14 per cent were
recorded in New Providence in
1994, and 16.9 per cent in
Grand Bahama in 1992.

Ms Dorsett said the Febru-
ary, 2009, survey found that the
sectors which shed the most
workers in New Providence
were the hotel and restaurant
sector, declining by 10 per cent,
and the construction industry,
which fell by nine per cent.

She added that behind these
two industries, transportation
was the hardest hit - although
the precise rate of decline was
unavailable.

Highlighting the dependency
of the Bahamian economy on
the United States’ economy,
this information became avail-
able on the same day latest
unemployment figures in the
US show the number of people
without a job in that country is
at the highest level in 25 years,
at 8.1 per cent.

The Bahamian statistics were
compiled as part of an interim
survey conducted by the
Department of Statistics in Feb-
ruary in the face of widespread

speculation about the severity
of the unemployment level.

The Department normally
only surveys households for an
annual report in May.

The findings confirm the
expectations of many observers,
including Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, who forecast
in his address to the nation in
January that the figures would
“reach double digits” later this
year as a result of the gloomy
prospects for the global and
domestic economies.

Ms Dorsett noted that even
within the space of time it took
to compile the figures more lay-
offs occurred - most notably at
liquidated insurer CLICO -
which would impact the statis-
tics.

According to the department,
data shows that of those peo-
ple employed, as many as 9.2
per cent had been employed at
their current job for under eight
months.

Of these workers, one quarter
indicated that their reason for
leaving their last job was that
the business had ceased opera-
tions, had dismissed them or
laid them off.

In Grand Bahama, 10 per
cent of people were in this posi-
tion. Meanwhile, a greater pro-
portion - one third - had left
their previous job for the rea-
sons previously cited.

Grand Bahama’s unemploy-
ment level is significantly high-
er among women (17.7 per
cent) than men (11.7 per cent).

In New Providence, the pic-
ture is different - with 12.4 per
cent of men found to be unem-
ployed, compared to 11.9 per
cent of women.

The government announced
during the mid-year budget
debate that an unemployment
benefit fund is expected to be
brought into effect on July 1,
2009, with enabling legislation
likely to be proposed in parlia-
ment on March 25.

Unemployed workers will be
able to benefit from assistance
for a period anticipated to be
between 16 and 23 weeks, said
Prime Minister Ingraham.

Students robbed

FROM page one

One of the boys was robbed
of his jewellery, and other per-
sonal items were stolen by the
men who had pulled up in a
Nissan Sentra.

Chief Supt Hulan Hanna
said: “The police were able to
locate these persons nearby and








three men were taken into cus-
tody. The vehicle has been
impounded by police on suspi-
cion of being a stolen vehicle.
The three men are likely to be
charged.” The boys were not
injured by the robbers.

They were attending the
Government Senior Schools
Sports Association 16th annual
track and field meet.

No Peace

=

te i . ‘
‘Anow Jesus,

‘Know Peace)

FROM page one

few months.

This comes as the government described the latest unemployment
figures - the highest in 15 years - as “indicative of what’s going on
in the international economy”.

Those figures, released yesterday, place the number of people out
of work in New Providence at over 16,000 and in Grand Bahama
at over 4,000 - equivalent to a 12.1 and 14.6 per cent unemployment
rate respectively (see lead story).

Mr Foulkes said: “The unemployment figures for New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama are indicative of what’s going on in the
international economy.

“As you know there’s been a drastic decline, almost a melt-
down in some industrialised nations. For example, in France the
unemloyment rate in January was 15.4 per cent - the highest in
many, many years. In the US the Department of Labour released
their figure - it’s the highest for the last 26 years at 8.1 per cent.
These indicators obviosuly have an adverse effect on the Bahami-
an economy,” said Mr Foulkes.

He said the Unemployment Benefit Fund, which Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham announced during the mid year budget debate,
would be implemented on July 1, 2009. It should “bring some
relief to a lot of families now experiencing a hard time.”

Meanwhile, a training programme for unemployed people expect-
ed to be implemented shortly will have a “work component”
whereby those training to obtain new skills will undertake intern-
ship type work for which they will be given a stipend - providing
some level of employment.

Mr Foulkes said that with “200-400” work permit renewal appli-
cations coming before the Department of Immigration and Labour
ona weekly basis, it is imperative that Bahamians register with the
Labour Exchange if they are to be considered for jobs for which
they may be qualified.

“We want to ensure that those Bahamians who have qualifica-
tions fill those jobs before we give any renewals to foreigners in the
country. We can only know that if they register with the Labour
Exchange, because the Department of Labour sits on the Immi-
gration Board and whenever a permit comes up for review we are
able to make an intervention.”

Asked whether the new statistics would require the government
to alter any of its plans, or if consideration would have been made
for unemployment reaching this level, Mr Foulkes said: “It is
something we anticipated given anecdotal information that was
coming to us for the year 2008.”

‘We have a planned programme over the course of the next 12
months. If things continue to deteriorate, which is possible, we
will increase our economic stimulus,” he added.

In terms of what form a heightened stimulus would take, Mr
Foulkes said it would be a “multi-faceted approach.”

“It would be more social assistance, more jobs being provided by
the government through the various stimulus packages that we
are currently doing,” he said.

political mudslinging

FROM page one

unanimously passed the gov-
ernment’s 2008/2009 mid-year
budget and associated bills.

The former Central Bank
governor, who served as state
finance minister during the
Christie administration, said he
didn't "see the logic" behind
slinging political mud. He rea-
soned that the fault for the
CLICO (Bahamas) insolvency
is borne from the $73.6 million
the company loaned to its for-
eign affiliates - which was in
turn invested in the troubled
Florida-based Wellington Pre-
serve real estate investment.

The government should now
focus on handling the matter at
hand, said Mr Smith, suggesting
more regional communication
with Trinidad and Tobago mov-
ing forward.

While saying he didn't want
to cast political aspersions
about the issue on Thursday
night, Prime Minister Ingraham
fired back at some calls in the
PLP for full disclosure on the
CLICO breakdown. He also
struck out at members oppo-
site by saying that CLICO's
"excessive" lending began in
2004 - while the PLP was in
office.

Yesterday, Opposition
spokesman on foreign affairs
and foreign trade Fred Mitchell
- who has publicly chastised the
Ingraham administration for its
move to put the company in
provisional liquidation last
week - labelled these assertions
"hogwash".

He said by connecting the
dots from public statements by

Mr Ingraham and Registrar of
Insurance Lennox McCartney,
the urgency of the matter was
revealed as early as eight
months ago.

"A look at the public record,
by his (Mr Ingraham's) state-
ments and the Registrar of
Insurance's statements - they
clearly show that negligence
from July, 2008. So they have to
bear that responsibility," he
said yesterday.

Mr Mitchell also defended
his government's record.
"Someone can break into your
house, steal money from your
bank and you may not be aware
of it. You assume that the par-
ty (responsible) was regulating
it. So what is the utility in say-
ing it's the PLP's fault?"

In a lengthy statement on the
issue during Monday's session
of parliament, the prime minis-
ter said "excessive cash
advances" to CLICO Enter-
prises Ltd began in 2004. After
several prudential meetings
starting in 2004, 2006 and 2007,
concern was expressed and
demands made by the Regis-
trar of Insurance that the com-
pany return the then $53 mil-
lion invested. This request,
despite company assurances,
was not met, Mr Ingraham said.

"It was after the receipt of
the 2007 audited financial state-
ments in July, 2008, that the
extent of the real estate invest-
ments was again highlighted,"
he added.

In December, 2008, certain
restrictions were placed on the
company but the investments
were not repaid in the speci-
fied time.

Ex-minister hits back at Laing’s BTC claims

ment following an interview

FROM page one

“The vacancies were adver-
tised internally and externally.
To the best of my knowledge
the selection process was open
and transparent and the suc-
cessful applicants were quali-
fied,” he added.

Nonetheless, the document
tabled by Mr Laing clearly sug-
gests that certain job candi-
dates’ political affiliation,
whether they lived in particu-
lar constituency, and involve-
ment with the PLP were a con-
sideration in the BTC hiring
process in 2007.

It entails a computer pro-
duced table entitled “BTC Out-
standing Approvals”, with
headings including “advertised
positions”, “departments”,
“name of candidates inter-
viewed”’, “selected candidates”
and “recommended by/com-
ments”’.

Mr Roberts name is noted
next to the names of numerous
people approved for employ-

with the corporation under the
“recommended by” heading.

In other cases, candidates
who were approved from
among a larger list of individu-
als identified as having been
interviewed for certain jobs
have a variety of other PLP
MPs’ and ministers’ names next
to them, indicating that these
individuals “recommended”
them for employment at the
government corporation.

In the case of a Jeanette Fer-
guson, the document states, in
computerised text, that she was
“recommended by” then MP
Michael Halkitis. Next to his
name, the document states that
she is a “strong party support-
er.”

A Samantha Ferguson was
approved by MP John Carey.
Next to her name, it says “Fer-
guson is chairman of the
Carmichael PLP branch.”

Meanwhile, in the case of
four others, the document reads
“MP Michael Halkitis supports.
Lives in Adelaide Village”,

BTC theft: Four
plead not guilty

FROM page one

“MP Malcolm Adderley sup-
ports. Lives in Elizabeth
Estates” and “I spoke with MP
(Anthony) Moss on 13/2/7 and
he confirmed his support for
(the named individual).”

According to the document,
which is not signed by anyone
nor contains any evidence of
who would have been responsi-
ble for preparing it, all of the
individuals approved for
employment at BTC got this
approval in March, 2007 — just
two months before the general
election.

The document appears to
show that many individuals
approved for jobs on the basis
of recommendations by political
figures were not the same indi-
viduals who the document iden-
tifies as having been “selected”
on the basis of their perfor-
mance at an interview, bring-
ing into question whether they
were the most qualified candi-
dates for the job.

As he spoke about the docu-
ment in the House of Assem-
bly late Thursday night, Mr
Laing said: “Here we are in this
place and they (opposition
MPs) say to us ‘you are hiring
your supporters’. And I say to
them, ‘I can’t help you, we’re
not doing that’.”’

Speaking towards the closure
of the mid-year budget debate,
his comments came after
numerous PLP MPs alleged

that the government has been
“victimising”’ PLP civil servants
and had politicised the
hiring/firing process.

Mr Laing’s statement on Mr
Robert’s alleged interventions
caused Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham to get up from his
seat, turn and shake Mr Laing’s
hand, and announce that he was
“very proud” of him for it.

Asked yesterday who pre-
pared the document, Mr
Roberts told The Tribune to
“ask Zhivargo Laing that.”

Meanwhile, pressed as to
whether he would consider that
it shows evidence of people
being selected for employment
based on their political affilia-
tion, whether or not there is evi-
dence that he directed for them
to be, Mr Roberts said: “You
can make up your own mind.”

Mr Roberts said his record
reflects that he has hired people
without reference to their poli-
tics.

“One of the last major
apointments I made was a per-
son who people said had FNM
sympathies,” he added.

He said Mr Laing “failed to
tell Parliament and the Bahami-
an people that it was the FNM
government who just before the
2002 general election hired
some 200 persons at BTC on
six-month contracts. I gave
approval to regularise these per-
sons without fanfare.”
















Comes joinjus’as we know, Jesus Personally
by listening and studying the Word of God

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
pt al Ee ad

SUNDAY SERVICES
MMOmUInK Woestum Service

Aduit Ed

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
uth Minty Macaotingy
RADIO MINISTRY

Tis | - TEMPLE TIA

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

SEV Ce UBC eR Al
CREM ere ER Oa obs
SEN OM mE toe Rng

Sunday, March 1, 2009, and Monday, March 2, 2009, the accused
broke into and entered the BTC complex at Pine Street.

It is alleged they stole 9,510 $5 phone cards valued at $47,550, 17
$10 phone cards valued at $170, six $20 phone cards valued at
$120, and six $50 phone cards valued at $300. It is also alleged they
stole several cellular phones together valued at nearly $7,000.

The men, represented by attorney Langton Hilton, pleaded not
guilty to the charges.

The prosecutor, Sergeant Sean Thurston, objected to bail.

Attorney Hilton told the court that the men had been in custody
since Monday. Angel Johnson, Kelin Johnson and Medico Johnson
were granted $7,500 bail with two sureties. The case has been
adjourned to April 21.

Newbold was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison until Monday
when a decision will be made on whether he should get bail.

Grace and eer Wesleyan Chureh
Ce eM Me
North America

Worship Tune: Efacm, & 6pcm.
Prayer Times 2021 Saint,
Charch School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O7.Box S8-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

‘OKO

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, MARCH 8TH, 2009
11:30 a.m. Speaker:

Pastor Cranston Knowles

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching tiam& 7:30pm EVWANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday Gpm - 2N5 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

PasiorH. Mills

"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are*
| Pastor: A. Mills * Prone: 393-0563 * Box N-a22 |

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MARCH 8TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Andre Bethel
11:00 a.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Rev. Carla Culmer
7:00 a.m. Bro.Emest Miller/Board of Music Ministry



“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009, PAGE 7





When is a hospital, a Hospital?

@ By BAHAMAS PATIENT
ADVOCACY

THE 2007 annual report of
the Hospital Board that was
tabled in parliament last
December raises some impor-
tant issues of public interest.

One of those issues is
whether the Hospitals Board
has the ability to function as a
regulator of private hospitals
and clinics under the Hospi-
tal and Health Care Facilities
Act, 1998.

For example, the Hospital
Board has a duty under the
Act to investigate a complaint
into the “diagnosis, treatment
and care” of a patient in a hos-
pital or clinic licensed by the
Hospital Board.

But it seems the Hospitals
Board’s view is that it licenses
the building and its facilities,
and has no duty to oversee the
quality of health care services
provided. The Act itself
defines a hospital as "a build-
ing where beds are available
for the admission of persons
requiring treatment for any
sickness”.

Accountability

Experts say this description
is not adequate. It does not
require a central legal entity
that is responsible and
accountable for all medical
services provided under its
roof. Such a structure, accord-
ing to advisors, would be in
the best interest of the com-
munity for the obvious rea-
sons of safety and ethics.
There is a disconnect here
which can adversely affect
quality assurance in medical
treatment.

Medical advisors to
Bahamas Patient Advocacy
see a hospital as an institution
which accepts patients for
medical treatment, within an
organisation with a centralised
authority responsible for qual-
ity assurance in the delivery
of healthcare services.

It should be the medical ser-
vices that are being licensed
— not just the building - in

Harbour Bay
HALF IS

S0).°% OFF

The other half
Is 15.% OFF

Ask about Our
Gift with

4

order to properly reflect the
modern concept of what a
hospital is. The public needs a
single source of accountability
in healthcare facilities, and a
licensing board to enforce it.
On this basis, a “hospital”,
together with its medical ser-
vices, needs a regulatory defi-
nition as a single (legal) entity.

Under current law, private
hospitals may function as a
collection of independent
physicians providing medical
services, by having practicing
privileges, in a building with
beds and nursing services,
among other things. The
patients would then be admit-
ted as patients of the individ-
ual physician. Sections of the
building may be leased or
managed by different corpo-
rate entities, providing other
medical services.

This structure diffuses
authority and accountability.
For instance, the Act requires
that a healthcare facility
should (among other things)
provide sufficient numbers of
qualified staff who can admin-
ister appropriate care to the
patients admitted.

Authority

But if a hospital is a building
with beds, without medical
management authority, and
medical services are provided
by independent doctors, can
“the hospital” exercise author-
ity to restrict admissions to
only those patients that “hos-
pital” is able to treat?

Or can a private hospital
make the appropriate medical
staff available, if there is no
overall authority that employs
or manages medical profes-
sionals at the hospital?

BPA advisors say that a new
institutional definition is
required, making it clear that

& Sve

Is cutting the store in half

; A a
lt ye
ders. Me.



a hospital is a single interest
entity accountable for the
medical services provided
there. A hospital has to
uphold its own interest
beyond the interests of inde-
pendent professionals and
entities within it. This would
place the hospital in a proper
position to oversee the safe
delivery of healthcare services.

A hospital also needs to
have an internal quality man-
agement structure, which can
immediately respond to any
concerns arising. To do this,
a hospital needs to collect data
on all patients admitted in
order to know whether its
operating units are doing a
good job, and it needs suffi-
cient qualified staff to enable
it to respond.

Common interest

The interests of the patient,
the doctors, and the hospital,
must be one seamless and sin-
gle interest, to improve patient
outcomes. That is the purpose
of a hospital.

Usually a hospital has a
Chief of Medical Staff, or
Chief Medical Officer (CMO).
The CMO has the authority
to ensure the competency of
the doctors practicing there.
He also has responsibility for
the integrity of the hospital
system. That integrity would

include an effective “call” sys-
tem, to ensure that all patients
have medical care available
24/7, so no patient in crisis is
left unattended. In public
health care, a CMO would, or
should, resign in the event of
such a “systems failure”.
Should a private heath care
facility, not also be held to a
similar standard of account-
ability?

The licensing board should
require an independent audit
of the hospital’s health care
services by an outside review
body. This external accredita-
tion could also be used by a
hospital to enhance its cre-
dentials and image. The Hos-
pital Board could thus carry
out its quality assurance- over-
sight function at no expense
to the board, or challenge to
its limited resources.

Law changes

But the 2007 report propos-
es changes to the Act that
would seriously weaken the
Hospitals Board as an over-
sight body.

The board wants the gov-
ernment to amend the Act to
remove the provision for
investigation of complaints,
eliminate the need to provide
notifications of deaths, and
reduce penalties for failure to
comply with licensing require-
ments.

But at the same time, the
Hospitals Board is also
proposing a new and exten-
sive set of hospital regulations.
So, on the one hand, the
board says it wants to reduce
its oversight responsibility, but

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that

HENLEY BIRTHWICK

PERRY of WINTON HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX N-3702,

NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is

applying to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 6 day of March, 2009 to the Minister

responsible for nationality
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



and Citizenship, P.O. Box

Extra 10% off for

Privilege Cards &
Corporate Partners

on the other hand, it wants to
increase regulatory require-
ments?

The BPA advocates that the
board’s oversight capacity be
strengthened, and that the
Hospital Board embrace its
oversight function of quality
assurance, as per the petition
on its website below.

We urge our parliamentari-
ans to consider the Hospital
Board’s report in terms of the
public interest in a safe system

of health care, and oversight
assurance of this.

Good business sense should
dictate that the more confi-
dence the public has in our
local institutions — including
statutory boards — the less like-
ly we will be to spend our mon-
ey abroad for medical care.

¢ For more information, visit:
www. bahamaspatientadvocacy.org







NOTICE is hereby

iven that LENLINE MITCHELL

of MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is



applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and




Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen




of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any



reason why registration/ naturalization should not be




granted, should send a written and signed statement of




the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of




MARCH 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality



and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

















Ea













Well-established Wholesaler

saleperson (females

requires a

are encouraged to

apply) for the snack food division. Individual




must have experience in sales with emphasis




on large food stores. Only individuals with a






proven record

of being able to work

unsupervised and achieve results will be



considered. Must be able to drive standard






shift vehicle and be in possession of current



valid driver’s license. Individuals with their






own transportation will receive favorable





consideration. Company offers good benefits.







Submit applications to:
SPC
P.O.Box N-7124

Nassau, Bahamas
——— ee el

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2008/CLE/qui/01870

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising an area of 13, 436 square feet situate approximately
500 feet west of Lincoln Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach
Court on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions
as are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Mary Jane Smith

era.

Harbour Bay East BAY St. tel.394-5767

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Mary Jane Smith of the Southern
District, of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas in respect of: - ALL
THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising an area of 13,
436 square feet situate approximately 500 feet west of Lincoln
Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach Courton the Island
of New Providence one of the Islands in the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions as
are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Purchase

FG CAPITAL
BROKERAG

Ek ADVISORY SERYIC-ES

cam 1

ROYAL = FIDELITY

MMomey at Woek

oe ee & T.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 6 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.36 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -52.00 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.86 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
WVWVW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

Div $
1.39
11.00
7.00

1.45
11.00
7.00

1.45
11.00
7.00

0.070
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.895
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.07
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.43

0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.59
1.43

0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.59
1.50

Mary Jane Smith claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having
Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the petition shall on or before the 27" of April A.D.,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before
the 27" of April A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:The Registry of
the Supreme Court;

The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for the
Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00

2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00

2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00

0.30

5.50

8.60
10.00

0.30
5.50

0.30
5.50

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low

1000.00

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22 100.00

S2wk-Low EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Symbol RE
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

4.540
0.000
0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

0.00 0.00

0.45 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months

0.00
0.55

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3781
2.9230

1.3812

1.4387
2.8988
1.4428

30-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
27-Feb-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-O7
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

3.3201
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000

3.3201
12.6816
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005

1.0401

0.06

4.01

1.0330 3.30

1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

Dated the 27" day of January A.D., 2009

1.0000
1.0000

3.30
4.10

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Des 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S14) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100







id )
JUDGE PARKER

BARCELONAY
WHAT TAKES
YOU TO
SPAIN?

HOW COME NOBODY
IN MR. B'S CARPOOL
HAS GOTTEN
FIRED YET?

OF PEOPLE
ARE LOSING
THEIR JOBS!

T BOUGHT A

SURPRISE PRESENT
COR STRIPE

HOBBES, I DID IT/ T ATE
ENOUGH BOXES OF CEREAL
TO GET ALL THE PROOF OF

PURCHASE SEALS I NEED! WAIT TO GET IT!
4
SSN




See
Sere

“Do I LOOK LIKE
T NEED COOKIES2”

A CONFERENCE...
ENVIRONMENTAL

z
S
3
&
at
8
g
3
E
5
a
S
2
$
E
4
£
€
5
2
z
2
8
8

PROBABLY \—

BECAUSE



NOW T CAN
ORDER MY BEANIE!
OW BOY! T CANT



“HOW ABOUT SOME
THIN MINTS?”

DREADING BOSS ISN'T A
My "IDIOT" SAWED-OFF,
CLIENT :

=

Sunday

ANP I HAVE
AN EARLY

---60 I'D BETIER
BE GOING AND LET
YOU GET BACK

TO YOUR FRIENDS!

MINE MAKES \3

ATTILA THE
HUN LOOK
LIKE MICKEY \\

HOURS AND
49 MINUTES

MOUSE!



WHAT
DIV You

anne Bury £4 6092)

pron, ou eomude si



4 ANO I'M SURE
YOUR BEANIE WILL
Be THE TALK OF
THE REST HOME,



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

















Difficulty Level * *&*&&











3/06

©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

APT 3-G

IL SAW GARY N SMART MAN’

THIS WEEKEND.
HE APOLOGIZED.

GIVEN THE CURRENT STATE OF THE STOCK
MARKET AND THE FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

eer



KES TT ee TT

PORE Bee



:| DOES THIS MEAN HIS JOB
AT THE HOSPITAL 1S
FINISHED; TOMMIE ?

wONE OF THE WISEST DECISIONS I MADE LAST
YEAR WAS To PUT

Inc. World rights reserved.

www.kingfeatures.com

©2008 by North America Syndi

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

IMSICK AN? TIRE? 2, I WISH You
oe Meee NG a OM WOULON'T THe NEIGHBORS
LATE AT NIGHT JH WERE NOT



7



GETTING ALONG /

cHlss
BLOUNE
©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc, World rights reserved,







Li Meaty (eer a WO,
perry: pois, hi ieee
hee he ges tired Sage
gain Uke pods bc Lag
rhachmae, ong Bearden elo
ast pee crane Pe appear ke
hee roel cud her bee, dee
he ocd a charged Ee Lad
mee ee oe bet rs, nat ar
fe cohen ee ee

Hite Src Debee fo ac! ed
ho eel es eee
i's game o hep, lee,
bape"

Che ED a 2 ig i,
ie th fe. Be Beal 2 ie aie,
cama Tal 2 2 ges Bhd es.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of



each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty



level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.







Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer









































Difficulty Level % er



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down

Across

1 Famous composer? Hear
hear! (5)

4 Take a trip? (7)

8 Part of a wheel that
projects about a
centimetre (3)

9 Brothers not on speaking
terms with one another (9)
Imagined to be highly
favoured? (7)

Way in which the sentry
loses his head (5)

Such fruit is to be put in
water (6)

Stalin's ultimate strategy
had an offensive

element (6)

How bread’s gone up? (5)
Place to thicken stew (7)
Betrayed — like a bride in
church may be (5,4)

Sash 50% too big (3)

One who treats wounds —
in the chest? (7)

He sings or follows half the
score (5)

10

11

13

15

18

19

21

23
24

25

1
2

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Cheapskate, 8 Rabbi, 9
Allegro, 10 Flemish, 11 Emend, 12
Resume, 14 Stroll, 17 Newts, 19
Plastic, 21 Evening, 22 Ramps, 23
Life tenant.

Down: 2 Hebrews, 3 Alibi, 4 Swathe,

5 Ailment, 6 Eagle, 7 Goldilocks, 8

References, 13 Mastiff, 15 Ottoman,

16 Spigot, 18 Wheel, 20 Apron.

A match for the devil (7)

| can’t mess around with
the meanings of words (9)
All for those making

notes (5)

A drink mixed and
swallowed by the shy (6)
Numerous men put in
place around the East (7)
Transport of internal
combustion (3)

Attempt at sex appeal, we
hear (5)

Feel depressed when you
land (6,4)

Games period shown in
new inn sign (7)

City in great trouble (7)

A sticker for the

traditional method of
roasting (6)

Stiff clothes I’d put on (5)
Hear a way to forma
meeting (5)

Contend it’s a quarter after
six (3)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Windjammer, 8 Humid, 9
Maudlin, 10 Concern, 11 Texas, 12
Stench, 14 Get off, 17 Opium, 19
Earlier, 21 Unaware, 22 Faith, 23
Teeny-weeny.

Down: 2 Immense, 3 Dodge, 4
Almond, 5 Mountie, 6 Relax, 7 And
so forth, 8 Hocus-pocus, 13
Comrade, 15 Opinion, 16 Merely, 18
Inapt, 20 Rifle.

- we @ |



Across

1
4
8
9
10
11
13
15

18

19
21

23
24

25

Treat unjustly (5)
Wild with anxiety (7)
Determined (3)
Free to roam (9)
Ponder (7)
Additional (5)
Detest (6)

Name of eight
English kings (6)
Norttheast African
country (5)
Lachrymose (7)
Bony-plated
burrowing animal (9)
Beam of light (3)
Model of
excellence (7)
Unfashionable (5)

Eee ed ae cee ed

Down

1 A profligate (7)

2 Without deliberation
(3,2,4)

3 Social
blunder (5)

4 Cold in manner (6)

5 Everything
considered (3,4)

6 Excessively (3)

7 Acquit (5)
Precipitately (9)
Downcast (7)

Held up (7)
Obtained by
theft (6)
Inundate (5)
Shun (5)

To spoil (3)











©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

























1/218 IM 1 (3/5
3/1/9 Be7i9/8 6/3
MN | 3 BNE 7 4 1
6/2|7 9/8 ao 8/4
916 MN 7/211 BRO [6
8/4/9 Ma9lsi6 7\2
4/1|2 BORG 2 1 §
7/31 4/2 B@9 6/3
oe 6 911 RS 2/1

















+ Cabo ne: Ca

Test Your Play

1. You are declarer with the West — stage because the suit is blocked.

hand at Three Notrump. North leads
the queen of hearts, on which South
plays the king, and you duck. When
South returns the eight of hearts, you
win with the ace and cash the A-K of
diamonds, learning that South started
with three to the jack. How would
you continue?

West East
@AJ109 406
VA3 96542
#10976 #AKQ52
AKT $8 3

2. You are declarer with the West
hand at Four Hearts, South having
overcalled your partner’s opening
one-diamond bid with one spade.
North leads the queen of spades.
How would you play the hand?

West East
4952 @A64
Â¥KQ642 W173
4Q)63 #AK 1074
hA #0 10

EK

1. It would be wrong to take a
spade finesse at this point, because if
it lost to North’s king, you would go
down one, losing four heart tricks
and a spade. A far better plan is to
lead a heart from dummy at trick five
and discard a diamond! This allows
you to eventually score five diamond
tricks, which you can’t do at this

The first two tricks disclosed that
North started with at most five
hearts, so there is no way you can
lose more than four tricks on the sug-
gested line of play.

2. There is a danger of losing an
extra trump trick on top of the obvi-
ous two spade losers and the trump
ace. Your best chance to make the
contract lies in winning the spade
queen with the ace and returning a
low trump from dummy.

Let’s assume South follows low
and that you win the trump lead with
the king, which is very likely in view
of the bidding. The correct play now
is the queen of trumps. If the tramps
are divided 3-2, all your worries are
over. South can take the ace of
trumps and cash two spade tricks, but
you will then have the rest of the
tricks.

The key play is the queen of
trumps at trick three, rather than
leading a low trump to dummy’s
jack. Leading the queen guards
against the possibility that South
might have started with something
like # KJ1083 ¥ A8 @ 92 # K854, in
which case he would take dummy’s
jack of trumps with the ace, cash two
spade tricks and then lead another
spade, promoting North’s ten of
hearts into the setting trick.

Tomorrow: A delicate situation.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.



THE TRIBUNE





Knights

claim

GSSSA title

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE C.R Walker Knights
built an 86 point lead after day
one, and nearly doubled their
margin on day two to claim the
tenth Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association
Track and Field Championship
in School History.

The Knights delivered anoth-
er dominating performance on
the culminating day of the 16th
annual GSSSA Championships
claiming three of the four con-
tested divisions.

C.R Walker totaled 614.50
points, 151 points ahead of the
second place finishers, the C.V
Bethel Stingrays who totaled
463.50.

The C.I Gibson Rattlers fin-
ished third with 449.50 points,
C.C Sweeting Cobras were
fourth with 333.50 and with a
win on the final race of the day
- the Senior Boys’ 1600m relay,
the Doris Johnson Mystic Mar-
lins edged out the R.M Bailey
Pacers for fifth place with
303.50.

The Knights won the Inter-
mediate Girls, Senior Girls, and
Senior Boys divisions by an
average margin of 30 points and
lost the Intermediate Boys divi-
sion by just 11 points to the
Stingrays.

The Knights trio of talented
sprinters, O’Jay Ferguson, Mar-
va Etienne and Ivanique Kemp
added to their sprint titles from
day one.

Ferguson, in the Intermedi-
ate Boys’ division added to his
100m and 400m crowns from
opening day with a first place
finish in the 200m and a thrilling
come from behind anchor leg
that gave the Knights 1600m
relay team the unexpected win.

Kemp added to her three first
place finishes in the Senior
Girls’ division on day one
(100m, 100mH, 400m relay)
with a win in the 200m and as a
member of the winning 1600m
relay team.

In the Intermediate Girls
division, Etienne finished third
in the 200m and was a member
of the winning 1600m relay
team to go along with her first
place finishes in the 100m and



JOF

SATURDAY, MARCH 7,

PAGE 9



t

2009



INSIDE ¢ Local sports news

tenth

Elvardo Carey continued his
dominance in the field for the
Knights after setting a new
record in the Senior Boys’ shot

put.

Carey added to his medal
haul with a win in the Javelin
and just missed a first place fin-
ish in the Discus, losing by just
0.03m.

C.I Gibson’s Katrina Sey-
mour continued to be one of
the leading performers of the
meet.

Seymour broke her second
record of the meet in the Inter-
mediate Girls’ division when
she surpassed the 16 year old
mark.

Her time of 24.45s beat out
Altrice Taylor’s time of 24.57s
set in 1993.

Knights Head Coach Floyd
Armbrister said his team was
able to repeat due to a full team
effort from a wide cross-section
of student athletes.

“It feels good because we
have a great mixture of kids.
These kids come from different
backgrounds. A lot of people
look at C.R Walker and they
see the kind of structure we
have and they say negative
things like C.R Walker is doing
this and doing that. But I think
the public needs to look at the
positive side and see that these
kids are doing something con-
structive in society,” he said, “I
would like for all the schools,
especially a new school like
Anatol Rodgers to take pages
from C.R Walker so we can
make this whole Bahamas a
better place. I would like to take
my hats off to all he coaches at
the schools who have worked
so hard. I know the Minister
was out here and he can see
now that the competition is not
a a blowout but everyone is
competing. It is not about win-
ing or losing but about how we
play the game.”

Armbrister noted the bene-
fits his team has reaped because
many of his students are mem-
bers of local track clubs such as
Club Monica, Roadrunners,
Spirit of Excellence and
Jumpers Inc, but also lauded
the work of his staff who have
managed to mold elite athletes
who do not belong to any mem-
bers of the aforementioned



TENNIS

BAHAMAS TRAIL
ON DAY ONE AT
DAVIS CUP

THE Bahamas men’s national team
fell behind 1-0 in the first match of the
American Zone II Davis Cup tie yes-
terday in Paraguay.



~~

Grand Bahamian native Timothy

Neilly, playing at the number two se
lost in three straight sets, 6-1, 6-4
Paraguay’s top seed Ramon Del



—
2 to

at the Yacht Golf Club in Parasua

Lambare.

The second match betwe
Bahamas’top seedallt



Paraguay’s Nal
was in progress
The final resu
Depending on



match, today’s doubles will be a prvota
one for the Bahamas. The team of
Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle will
try to keep the Bahamas
hopes alive when they play
the team of Delgado and
Galeano in the doubles. j
The reverse singles are set

for Sunday.

The matches are being
played in the evening si
because of the intense heat in ~

Paraguay.





100mH from day one. clubs.

FINAL POINTS STANDINGS INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) DISCUS
Swann, Leewood (RMB), 35.67m

C.R Walker (CRW) 614.50 Moncur, Anthony (CVB), 27.23m

C.V Bethel (CVB) 463.50 Farrington, Anthony (CVB), 25.80m

C.I Gibson (CIG) 449.50

C.C Sweeting (CCS) 333 INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) JAVELIN

Doris Johnson Marlins (DDJ) 303.50 Albury, Isaac (DDJ), 43.60m

R.M Bailey Pacers (RMB) 300 Dorsette, Tavari (CRW), 43,42m

G.H.S Magic (GHS) 148 Martin, Stelin (GHS), 43.07m

Anatol Rodgers (AR) 132

DAY TWO COMPLETE RESULTS

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 200M
Ferguson, O'Jay (CRW), 22.10s
Finley, Toriano (AR), 22.90s
Farrington, Anthony (CVB), 23.51s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 800M
Hanchell, Marlon (CVB), 2:11.36s
Davis, Patrick (CCS), 2:13.89s

Mott, Derinardo (CIG), 2:16.27s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 3000M
Wells, Denzil (CCS), 11:15.21s

Rolle, Cleso (DDJ), 11:20.66s

Rolle, Percy (AR), 11:22.03

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 400MH
Higgs, Delvano (CRW), 1:02.73s
Sands, Chris (CCS), 1:03.32s
Ferguson (CVB), 1:04.48s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 4X400M RELAY
CRW - Ferguson, O'Jay; Higgs, Delvano; Stuart,
Travonn; Dabio, Javaun, 3:40.72s

RMB - Butler, Giovanni; Edgecombe, Jason; Swann,
Leewood; Darville, Brandon, 3:43.79s

CVB - Lockhart, David; Hanchell, Marlon; Moncur,
Anthony, McKenzie, Shaquille, 3:45.57s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) TRIPLE JUMP
McDonald (GHS), 13.30m

Bullard, Delmaro (RMB), 12.62m

Nottage, Leroy (DDJ), 12.45m

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) HIGH JUMP
Ingraham, Ronald (CIG), 1.94m

McDonald (GHS), 1.91m

Edgecombe, Jason (RMB), 1.71m

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) 200M
Seymour, Katrina (CIG),24.45s
Adderley, Teshon (CVB),25.12s
Etienne, Marva (CRW), 25.31s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) 800M
Cherilus, Angela (AR), 2:42.64s
Lewis, Safara (CRW), 2:46.33s
Stubbs, Ashley (CRW), 2:48.84s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) 300MH
Sears, Hollina (CCS), 49.20s

Lewis, Safara (CRW), 50.07s
Rahming, Edricka (CRW), 50.08s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) 4X400M

CRW - Lewis, Safara; Etienne, Marva; Rahming,
Edricka; Stubbs, Ashley, 4:15.30s

CIG - Robert, Cassandria; Colebrooke, Vashti; Sey-
mour, Katrina; Rolle, Tiffany, 4:22.16s

CVB - Flowers, Tonea; Adderley, Teshon; Watt, Ear-
nisha; Hart, Kennisha, 4:43.29s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) TRIPLE JUMP
Rogers, Terranique (CCS), 9.51m

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) SHOT PUT
Williams, Racquel (CVB), 12.69m
Hutchinson, Danielle (CVB), 8.59m
Rahming, Samara (DDJ), 8.17m

en the
evin Mullings and 4
Diego Galeano
press time.



SENIOR BOYS (U20) 200M
Mackey, Trevor (DDJ), 21.50s
Deveaux, Delano (DDJ), 21.54s
Hinsey, Ulysses (CVB), 22.01s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 300M
Altidor, Kevin (CCS), 2:02.22s
Williams, Ramon (CIG), 2:03.38s
Mitchell, Jason (CRW), 2:06.45s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 3000M STEEPLECHASE
Pierre, Sedel (CVB), 11:18.01s

Seveus, Vicnel (CIG), 11:22.55s

Williams, Valentino (CCS), 11:29.69s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 400MH
Lightbourne, Dellano (CRW), 1:00.38s
Hall, Jerwaine (CIG), 1:01.97s
Hanna, Peter (CVB), 1:02.23s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 4X400M RELAY

Doris Johnson - Deveaux, Delano; Burrows, Crashad;
Clarke, Michael; Hughes, Jean, 3:33.38s

C.| Gibson - Williams, Ramon; Hall, Jerwaine; Cash,
Cody, Sturrup, Rashard, 3:36.59s

C.C Sweeting - Lightbourne, Perez; Altidor, Kevin;
Payne, Byron; Thompson, Ishmael, 3:42.17s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) LONG JUMP
Richardson, Charles (CRW), 6.85m
Clark, Clinton (CVB), 6.69m

Babbs, Tehneil (CRW), 6.64m

SENIOR BOYS (U20) DISCUS
Strachan, Shawn (RMB), 39.36m
Carey, Elvardo (CRW), 39.93m
Rolle, Cordell (RMB), 35.15m

SENIOR BOYS (U20) JAVELIN
Carey, Elvardo (CRW), 48.45m
Smith, Harold (CVB), 42.27m
Dawkins, Phillip (CCS), 41.44m

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 200M
Kemp, lvanique (CRW), 24.63s
Knowles, Antonya (CRW), 25.78s

PHYSICAL
THERAPY
‘COULD
IMPROVE
CARIFTA
HOPES’

















Kelly, Cache (RMB), 26.88s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 800M
Miller, Shaunte (GHS), 2:35.70s
Dean, Glendin (CRW), 22:38.65s
Darling, Rashan (RMB), 2:44.59s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 400MH
Crooks, Tanya (CIG), 1:12.47s
Adderley, Mitchalyn (CRW), 1:15.44s
Justilien, Sydline (RMB), 1:15.79s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 4X400MH

C.R Walker - Dean, Glendina; Kemp, Ivanique;
Knowles, Antonya; Adderley, Mitchalyn, 4:15.65s
R.M Bailey - Justilien, Sydline; Kelly, Cache; Johnson,
Tonia-Kay; Darling, Rashan, 4:28.62s

C.| Gibson - Crooks, Tanya; Dames, Avianna; Moss,
Ratrice; Wallace, Latonya, 4:36.49s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) SHOT PUT
Belle, Jenesta (CVB), 10.42m
Gordon, Giavanna (CCS), 9.12m
Gibson, Robin (CIG), 8.86m

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) LONG JUMP
Stuart, Shatyna (CVB), 4.76m

Kelly, Cache (RMB), 4.73m

Dames, Avianna (CIG), 4.72m



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



BGDSA season begins today

ON Saturday, the Bahamas Govern-
ment Departmental Softball Associa-
tion will officially open its 31st season at
the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

Thora Sweeting, who has served as
the association’s president for the past
12 years, said it had grown by leaps and
bounds and was now considered the
most exciting recreational league in the
country.

“The league has served a positive
purpose since its inception,” said Sweet-
ing, referring to the initial season in
1979. “It has brought persons in the
Public Service together, engendering
friendships which are sustained and
memories that will last a life time.”

Sweeting said over the years the
BGDSA had made significant progress
in softball, both locally and interna-
tionally and she anticipated that the
future shone brightly as evident through
the tremendous interest and support
displayed by both their fans and spec-
tators.

“Tam so excited about our 31st
anniversary, the opportunities and chal-
lenges that are ahead of us as we move
forward and attempt to accomplish all
of our goals for 2009,” she said.

“T hope that each of you share my
excitement, as I look forward with eager
anticipation to the full support of our
members and fans.”

Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture
set to give the keynote address

On Saturday at noon at Baillou Hills,
Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister will deliver the
Keynote address at Baillou Hills.

Alvin Smith, the Speaker of the
House of Assembly and former presi-
dent of the BGDSA, along with Romell
‘Fish’ Knowles, president of the
Bahamas Softball Federation, are both
expected to make brief remarks.

Throwing out the ceremonial pitches
are Reginald Ferguson, Commissioner
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force;
Clifford ‘Butch’ Scavalla, the Com-
modore of the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force; Ken Griffin, president and CEO
of Bahamas Telecommunications Com-
pany; Joe Johnson, manager of Premier
Importers and Sandy Schaefer, presi-
dent of Robin Hood Enterprises.

Entertainment will be provided by
the Aquinas College Marching Band,
CC Sweeting Dance Group, RM Bailey
and CR Walker Junkanoo Groups and
God Missionary Dance Angels.

The opening ceremonies will climax
with a junkanoo rush-out and fireworks
display at 6:30 pm.

At 1:45 pm, there will be the releasing
of the balloons.

At 2 pm, the first game will get under-
way between the 2008 ladies champi-
ons Police Royals against 2008 runners-
up Finance Health Invaders.

Shortly afterwards, 2008 and sixteen
(16) consecutive men’s champions
Defence Force Floaters will battle 2008
runners-up Police Chiefs.

The bouncing castle, ballooons and
lots of prizes will be given out to the
children and fans on opening day.
Thompson Trading personnel will be
on hand to give out paraphernalia while
supplies last.

The opening ceremony will be broad-
cast live on 104.5 FM from 2-6 pm.

In her president’s report of 2008,
Sweeting said the season got underway
with pomp and circumstance. The
games, according to Sweeting, were well
attended and the fans support was not
where it ought to be, however, some
adjustments would be made to correct
the situation.

“We had an excellent softball season
and for the first time for a very long

time that the league finished its season
extra early, which was a plus,” she said.

“We had one death in the league last
year, Charles ‘Wire’ Smith, a former
player of the Defence Force Floaters.
He is sadly missed by all of the mem-
bers and fans.”

This year’s Player’s Appreciation Day
on Saturday, July 25 will be held in his
honour and called the “Charles ‘Wire’
Smith Plater’s Appreciation Day.”

Sweeting took the time out to con-
gratulate the three-time defending
ladies’ champions Police Royals and
16-time men’s champions Royal
Defence Force Floaters.

The runners-up were the Finance
Health Invaders in the ladies’ division
and the Police Chiefs in the men. The
Floaters won the pennant in the men’s
Paradise League, the Chiefs in the
men’s Tropical League and the Invaders
in the ladies.

The league, which is comprised of
eight ladies and ten men’s teams, could
not be as successful without the com-
passionate, sensitive and patience exhib-
ited by the umpires, namely Dave Mor-
timer, Van Johnson, Darren Mortimer,
Phil Culmer, Robert Smith, Cyril Smith,
Michael Hanna, Thomas Sears and
Ross Coleby.

Sweeting also mentioned chief sta-
tisticians Marjorie Delaney and Rozina

men Soe



Taylor, as well as scorers Althea Clarke,
Loretta Maycock, Karen Richardson,
Bridgette Sweeting, Celestine Ford,
Christine Jenoure and Ms McCardy for
their efforts.

All teams are advised that rosters
and entrance fees must be brought in
before May 3. Any teams in violation of
meeting the deadline will not be
allowed to play unless they meet their
obligation.




@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

OVER the past two decades,
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations has
watched as its front running
position at the Carifta Games
has dropped dramatically all the
way down to sixth.

And every year, the question
is asked: When and how will we
regain our status as a power-
house in the region?

On Thursday night at the
Wellness Center at the College
of the Bahamas,
Orthopedic/Neuromuscular
Therapist, Edwardo Thompson
and chiropractor Dr. Dwight
Marshall provided some insight
on how to achieve that status. It
could start this year, if they are
given a chance to travel with
the national team heading to St.
Lucia.

The two therapists, who have
been working with a number of
the junior and even elite ath-
letes in the country, may have
addressed a group of parents,
coaches and athletes whom they
were able to convince.

Absence

But Thompson admitted that
they were disappointed that the
powers that be who needed to
hear their plea were not in
attendance.

“Tt could have been better. I
expected more people to be
here, but the truth of the matter
is that we needed to inform the
coaches and the public at large
about what’s happening and
what needs to happen as we
raise the level to get our ath-
letes to go where they need to
go,” said

Thompson, who heads the
International Orthopedic Sports
Therapy.

Although they didn’t attract
some of the “movers and shak-
ers” in the athletic world,
Thompson said they have writ-
ten to the BAAA and the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture, outlining their plans and
their desire to travel with the

Carifta team over the Easter
holiday weekend.

Thompson said they intend
to host another meeting when
they can actually present their
case in the same type of manner
to the BAAA and hopefully
that will convince them to give
them the opportunity to travel
with the team.

During their presentation,
Thompson and Marshall used
a power point demonstration to
show the things they intend to
introduce to the national team
level, a plan they say that other
countries are doing and will def-
initely make a difference in the
Bahamas’ success or failure.

Pre-event therapy

They discussed the impor-
tance of pre-event sports thera-
py, post-event sports therapy,
sports recovery, performance
enhancement and performance
nutrition, giving the argument
that there are “no short cuts to
a dream.”

“We have to look at how we
can enhance certain areas,”
Thompson said.

“We know that there are cer-
tain things that can be done and
we presented them tonight.
Hopefully it will be accepted by
the BAAA.” Public relations
officer Kermit Taylor and Ray
Hepburn, the president of the
New Providence Amateur Ath-
letic Association were among
those in attendance. But nei-
ther acted on behalf of the asso-
ciation.

Hepburn, who will also trav-
el as the manager of the Carifta
team, said he was so impressed
with what he heard that he’s
definitely going to lobby to have
the therapists a part of the con-
tingent going to St. Lucia.

“The rest of the world is
ahead of us and these are the
things to help us get to the next
level,” he said. “So if the rest
of the world is doing it, I don’t
see why we can’t do it too.”

Marshall said for a long time,
he and Thompson having been
trying to implement their plan
into the whole sporting com-
munity, but track and field has

been more in the forefront
because we work with so many
of the athletes.

“The Bahamas has the ath-
letes on the world stage. Now
we have to put the sporting cast
out there as we inform our ath-
letes about what is out there
and what we can provide to
keep them on top,” Marshall
said.

If allowed to travel, Thomp-
son and Marshall said they will
ensure that the national teams
will have a orthopedic sports
therapist, a chiropractor and a
bio mechanics sports thera-
pist/sports massage therapist.

And all of the things that are
taken for granted will be sup-
plied on the trip for the ath-
letes.

That includes first aid service,
water, heat/ice pack treatment,
whirlpool, stretching area,
recovery tent, athletes lounge

tent, magnet insoles and form
balls.

Impresssion

Bradley Cooper, the athletic
coach at the College of the
Bahamas, who hosted the meet-
ing, said the concept is some-
thing that should be imple-
mented on all national teams.

“We are a very passive peo-
ple and a passive nation,” he
added. “We don’t know how to
be aggressive. But this is just
showing us the things that we
need to do to become champi-
ons.”

Coach Greg Cash of Spirit of
Excellence Track Club said the
presentation was definitely “an
eye opener” for him.

“T know I’ve advocated for
some of these things for us to
have whenever we travel,” Cash
said. “I know for years we have



- 4 i

BLAST FROM

THE PAST

DO you remember the days of the Hobby
Horse Race Track? Those were considered the
“good old days” when spectators rushed to the
Cable Beach strip to particpate in horse racing
betting. Above, Tribune Sports brings back the
those memories. There’s a photo of some of the
horses in action and you can see some of the
patrons as they gear up for the action.



w“
oO
=
oO
=
—
=
S|
=
eo
—
a
=
-
a
=

suffered because of our prepa-
ration for the national team, not
just in track and field, in other
sports like basketball.

“But now that we can go
from the physical part of the
sport to the scientific aspect, I
think it will go a long way in
enhancing us as a nation. So I
say let’s run with it.”

Another coach Dexter Bodie
said the presentation was a very
“strong and powerful” one, but
he felt that more time is needed
to properly provide the full
impact.

“Tt’s an excellent idea, I know
it can work and I hope that
whenever they do it again, there
will be more people out because
here was a lot of food for
thought and the only way we
can improve is to use the scien-
tific methods that are coming
up,” Bodie said.

Suzette Bethel, mother of



Pauliann Bethel, said she was
very impressed with what she
heard.

“As a parent, I’m always con-
cerned about the injuries that
my daughter sustained and I’ve
found out that there are things
that we should be doing that we
are not doing,” she said. “I feel
if we know these things, we can
help our athletes a lot better.”

And Perry Thompson, father
of Zhivago Thompson, said he
got some valuable information
on the preparation of the ath-
letes and life in general.

“T’ve always wondered why
the rest of the Caribbean is
ahead of us but like it was indi-
cated in the presentation, the
scientific methods is one of the
key components and there are a
number of things that we need
to implement so that we as a
country won’t suffer,” Thomp-
son stated.











THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORTL A 3. (/1

5-Day FORECAST

STUUR ee i

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST









Sa NG


































































y (= Today Sunday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
y C 4. = v -_ High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: ENE at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
aN -. o|1|2 3|4|5 6|7 8|9|1o| 1 Fe Fi Fe FIC Sunday: __ENE at 10-20 Knots 5-8Feet___7-10 Miles 74° F
ba iin On a = Acapulco 88/31 70/21 s 88/31 70/21 S FREEPORT Today: ENE at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 74°F
nd oe a i. Low MODERATE | HIGH | V.HIGH Amsterdam 46/7 39/3 pc 48/8 39/3 r Sunday: ENE at 12-25 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
pw ORLANDO) A , : . Ankara, Turkey 56/13 39/3 sh s4/12 37/2 = ABAGO Today: SSW at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-8 Miles 74° F
High:80°F/27°C ee Breezy with plenty of Mainly clear and Breezy with a full day Partly sunny. Bright and sunny. Sunshine and patchy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 61/16 46/7 t 63/17 48/8 pe Sunday: __ ENE at 10-20 Knots 6-10 Feet___—7-10 Miles 75° F
VA ede ow i sunshine. breezy. of sunshine. clouds. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 72/22 61/16 sh 70/21 60/15 pc
Co — . High: | Higher | Highs er | High: a G8 TO at
TAMPA Jy { High: 79 Low: 68 Low: 70 Low: 71 Low: 70 Low: 69 SS ESS Barcelona 50/15 47/8 s 6116 S0/10 s nif: DRECA
ivan ae 7 PEE aie TIT ‘i
High:80°F/27°C oe Br°-68" F B2°-70" F High _Hi(f.) Low HLL) Bate ee ee ee ae
g po ° be a ) : ae - = — << - a a5 — Beirut 82/27 68/20 pc 69/20 58/14 pc
Low: 56° F/13°C h a a The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 4:22 a.m. 2.8 10:40am. 0.0 Belgrade 45/7 38/3 1 A1/5 85/1 4
* Lo levati the h body— thing that effects h Id feels. Te tt flect the high and the low for the day. : ‘ - :
ai. @ \ } . elevation on tne numan boay—everytning that elects now warm or cold a person leels. lemperatures renect tné nign an @ 1OW Tor the day. 7 p.m. ae p.m. 7 Berlin 41/5 34/1 sh 45/7 36/2 c
: \ . 22 a.m. . 4 p.m. -U. Bermuda 70/21 66/18 s 74/23 68/20 s
7 43pm 27 Bogota 66/18 48/8 r 67/19 47/8 t
Y —
2 ll Z Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Monday 75am. 29 124d0am.03 Brussels 48/8 41/5 pc 48/8 39/3 r
[ r Temperature 7:35 p.m. 29 1:23pm. -0.2 Budapest 49/9 41/5 sh 45/7 = 38/3 c
ABACO Pp P
p q : i ° F/25° ; : i
/ = High: 76° F/24° C IGM. ssssscestrates Seesta eect oete dat btaghiees vr F/25" C Tuesday S0dam. 30 143am. 04 Buenos Aires 84/28 64/17 pc 81/27 66/18 pe
4 _ leeo°FN5'C Oeste acct 66° F/19° C 823pm,. 30 208pm. -03 Cairo 92/33 61/16 c 78/25 52/11 s
: Normal high .... 78° F/26°C | Calcutta 99/37 78/25 s 98/36 75/23 s
) ~
i Normal low 65° F/18° C Calgary 35/1 5/-15 sn 6/-14 -13/-25 sn
; yom _ @ WEST PALM BEACH ©: re 85° F/20° C ST re Cancun 81/27 64/17 pc 85/29 65/18 pc
— High: 78° F/26° C i Last year's low phaay eaeateieenm a 72° F/22° C " " Caracas 82/27 67/19 c 84/28 65/18 +
Pe Low: 63° F/A7°C @ Precipitation “_ eites a a.m. Lala one p.m. Casablanca 66/18 53/11 s 74/23 57/13 pe
As of 1 p.m. yesterday oo... cscs 0.00" unsel....... ‘lo p.m. Moonset. .... vam. — Copenhagen 42/5 39/3 sn 42/5 39/3 r erAtlanta)
© FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Y% :
«| ear to date Last New First Dublin 52/11 37/2 5 41/5 34/1 sn
High: 79° F/26° C @ High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date oo... 3.77" oe Frankfurt 45/7 37/2 c 46/7 34/1 sh
Low: 66° F/19°C Low: 57° F/14°C Geneva 42/5 36/2 c 48/8 41/5 c
AccuWeather.com ir Halifax 49/9 33/0 c 41/5 23/-5 sn
Re @ = Forecasts and graphics provided by | i ke Havana 83/28 60/15 pe 85/29 60/15 s Showers —
\ MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 ; Mar.18 Mar.26 Apr. 2 Helsinki 32/0 28/-2 c 30/-1 27/-2 sn T-storms eared
High: 80° F/27° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 66/18 59/15 1 68/20 63/17 c Rain = eae
ia Low:63°F/17°C NASSAU High: 77° F/25° C Islamabad 77/25 49/9 pc 81/27 49/9 pe Flurries Coll
High: 79° F/26° C Low: 61° F/16°C Istanbul 56/13 45/7 Fr 59/15 46/7 sh Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Warm Low: 68° F/20°C Jerusalem 84/28 62/16 s 63/17 43/6 pc Ice precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Seionay
a Johannesburg 73/22 54/12 t 77/25 57/135 Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. awe.
KEY WEST am Kingston 83/28 74/23 pc 83/28 74/23 pc = F
High:77° F/25°C _ CAT ISLAND Lima 85/29. 71/21 sh 85/29 71/21 10s -0s [J0Si) 10s | 20s [08H 40s
Low: 66° F/19°C High: 75° F/24” C London 54/12 41/5 po 42/5 39/3 sn
3 Low:57°F/14°C Madrid 57/13 37/2 pc 66/18 37/2 s
@ - Manila 95/35 75/23 s 93/33 75/23 sh
r Mexico City 81/27 45/7 s 77/25 = 43/6 s
ae 3 Monterrey 91/32 64/17 s 93/33 65/18 pc ra By,
i GREAT EXUMA in SAN SALVADOR Montreal 48/8 34/1 43/6 341 c e
_ High: 77° F/25° C High: 78° F/26° C Moscow 32/0 27/-2 sn 36/2 30/-1 sn
Low: 68°F/20°C Lew 60°FN6°C Munich 32/0 26/-3 sn 37/2 36/2 1
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ANDROS ’ Nairobi 87/30 55/12 pe 90/32 56/13 s

High: 80° F/27° C - 5 New Delhi 90/32 59/15 pc 90/32 59/15 s
Low:62° F/17°C “en = Oslo 32/0 28/-2 sf 32/0 30/-1 sn N t t
at ae. oe eee ever S OUI |
a Prague 43/6 33/0 sh 40/4 38/3 c aCe, t t
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 84/28 74/23 sh 83/28 75/23 sh CIN Saiiae W ] O UuS e
_ - a

highs and tonights's lows.








High: 76° F/24° C Riyadh 83/28 55/12 s 86/30 59/15 s
a crac sae sir 415 po S82. 418 s seg IEE Pc
Today sunday Today Sunday Today sina MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 81/27 71/21 pe 81/27 71/21 s Con 1€S. to Auto Insurance,

i i igh: 79° F/26° San J 91/32 69/20 88/31 71/21 t apres BS : :

aaa eee 2 torre sso GB Tt gees eiatt choice is
Albuquerque 62/16 32/0 pc 61/16 37/2 s Indianapolis 66/18 50/10 c 6216 46/7 t Philadelphia 62/16 47/8 po 65/18 43/6 pc CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santiago 90/32 56/12 s 90/32 58/12 s rance Management.
Anchorage 25/-3 10/-12 s 27-2 18/-7 s Jacksonville 79/26 49/9 s 79/26 52/11 s Phoenix 72/22 49/9 s 74/23 50410 s mae yok Sone SO al i } peop e you can trust
Atlanta 76/24 50410 pe 75/23 55/12 pc KansasCity 62/16 48/8 t 59/15 39/3 +r _ Pittsburgh 67/19 5241 pe 66/18 436 ¢t RAGGEDISLAND — High:80°F/27°c - eo ot ee cv “i ia hte .
Atlantic City 60/15 49/9 pc 66/18 42/5 pc Las Vegas 64/17 41/5 s 68/20 45/7 s Portland, OR 47/8 37/2 pc 47/8 341 sn High: 78° F/26° C Low: 61° F/16°C Snekhol RM DBO aR 20s 1
Baltimore 68/20 46/7 pe 70/21 46/7 pc Little Rock 74/23 6146 pe 76/24 57/13 t Raleigh-Durham 75/23 53/11 s 81/27 53/11 s Low:58°F/14°C sen — 31/27 63/17 79/28 62/16 el \ ge ee .
Boston 56/13 43/6 pe 48/8 33/0 1 LosAngeles 64/17 48/8 pc 64/17 50/10 s St Louis 66/18 5713 c 68/20 45/7 ¢t ° oneee FEeURIRTGEGE AGHUEGSTGEER
Buffalo 54/12 39/3 r 40/4 37/2 + Louisville 74/23 57/13 pe 74/23 53/11 t SaltLakeCity 41/5 28/-2 c 45/7 29/-1 c GREATINAGUA Te Ba? 43/6 pc ee eee N URANCE MANAGEMENT
Charleston, SC 73/22 53/11 s 78/25 56/13 s Memphis 76/24 61/16 pc 75/23 50/15 t SanAntonio 79/26 65/18 pc 83/28 65/18 t High: 80° F/27°C Toh 46/7 34/1 + 42/5 32/0 c (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 48/8 39/3 6 48/8 330 6 — Miami 80/26 64/17 s 80/26 66/18 s San Diego 62/16 52/11 pe 62/16 53/11 s Low: 62°F/A7°C Trinidad 86/30 73/22 t 90/81 77/95 sh N _
Cleveland 56/13 44/6 sh 5412 45/7 1 Minneapolis 38/3 25/-3 c 34/1 22/-5 sn San Francisco 59/15 45/7 pe 57/13 44/6 s§ i Taner 46I7 28/-2 c 41/5 23/-5 pe N p id 6 Bot Ab th F
Dallas 78/25 64/17 c 86/30 62/16 t Nashville 75/23 55/12 po 71/21 55/12 t Seattle 45/7 34/1 sh 43/6 32/0 sn ~NEW FrOVICenCe } Urdnd banana C0 evinerd xurid
D 39/3 24/-4 55/12 26/-3 New Orl 78/25 63/17 79/26 63/17 Tallah 78/25 46/7 78/25 52/11 mae are ee kl (242) 502-6400 Tel (242) 350-3500 | Tel (242) 367-4204 he (242) 332-2862 hl (242) 336-2304
enver 5 c Z pce ew Urieans pe Cc allanasseeé s $ ee Warsaw 44/5 31/0 sh 39/3 34/1 c a p a " le hy * ; . ; .
Detroit 52/11 38/3 r 50/10 36/2 r New York 60/15 499 pe 57/13 44/6 + Tampa 80/26 58/14 s 80/26 63/17 s an Winnipeg 16/-8 10/-12 pc 31/0 14/-10 sn g aie \ Ss
Honolulu 78/25 67/19 pc 79/26 67/19 pc OklahomaCity 74/23 49/9 c 74/23 49/9 pe — Tucson 69/20 446 s 71/21 478 s —— Weathok (Wie Houston 78/25 67/19 po 80/26 64/17 c Orlando 80/26 56/13 s 83/28 59/15 s Washington, DC 70/21 52/11 pe 70/21 51/10 pe storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

NASSAU

( a a 4
& i > >
EVENTS CAPT

A r
I fl
' ,

Bs iim



DR Traves had the opportunity to dialogue with Janyne Hodder, president of the College of the Seen

e¢ DR TOM TRAVES, president of Dal-
housie University of Nova Scotia, Canada,
became the first president of that institution to
pay an official visit to the Bahamas.

The president met with local Dalhousie
alumni at a grand reception at the Eastern
Road home of businessman Franklyn Wilson (a
1969 graduate) and his wife Sharon Wilson.

Dalhousie is one Canada’s leading universi-
ties, located in beautiful downtown Halifax.
Its students rank fourth in terms of the number
of national academic awards won. The student-
faculty ratio is 14 to 1 — the lowest in Canada.

Dalhousie professors are among Canada’s
research leaders, winning more than 80 per
cent of the research awards in Nova Scotia,
and often providing special research and learn-

ing opportunities for students.

Dalhousie has 10 faculties and undergradu-
ates can choose from 3,500 unique courses.

During his address, Dr Traves noted the
financial strength of the university, pointing
out that Dalhousie is relatively free of debt
and has an endowment which is already one of
the largest in Canada and is growing, even in
the face of challenging economic realities.

Mr Traves said Dalhousie University is pre-
pared to contribute to the advancement of
national educational objectives in the Bahamas
and has undertaken to explore possible strate-
gies for doing so.

In addition to an impressive roster of alum-
ni from the Bahamas, there is currently 56
Bahamians enrolled at the university.



X A p>. > ee ~
: Ww : » 2 , 4 pone y
; | y f f | !
i y ‘ . 4 _ 4 7
by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP
URED ON CAMERA



THE PRESIDENT of Dalhousie and alumnus Keitra Pratt listen to Dr Robin Roberts outline how he learned to
perform kidney transplants at Dalhousie’s medical school, one of the best in Canada.



FLOYD DYKEMAN, vice president of external rela-
tions for Dalhousie University, chats privately with
alumnus Donovan Ingraham, whose father, Don
Ingraham, is an executive at the RIU Hotel on Par-
adise Island and was the chef for the reception.

* |




: oâ„¢
i . 7
a

MELISSA Williams-Rolle, a 2001 graduate, and
Sean Rolle speak with Shanrese Bain, a 1997
graduate.

i ha



DR TRAVES is given a broad introduction to the Bahamas by alumni Dr Danny Davis, registrar at the
College of the Bahamas; Keith Beneby and Dominio Williams a senior accountant at Deloitte.

DR KIRKLAND Culmer (medicine 1965); economist, attorney and author Anthony Thompson (honors, com-
merce 1965); former principal nursing officer at Princess Margaret Hospital, Dorothy Davis Phillips, (nursing
studies 1967); businessman Franklyn Wilson (honors , commerce, 1968) share a brief moment with Dr Traves.





cl

TONYA GALANIS, the first Bahamian principal of the
Eugene Dupuch Law School, welcomed the opportu-
nity to explore areas of possible co-operation with
Dalhousie’s law school, the oldest in the Common-
wealth outside the UK.



CO,

rie
KARA Culmer-Wilson, an accounting major at Dalhousie, and her mother Olga Culmer, chief financial officer
at Bacardi.

PROMINENT educators attended the reception,
including Dr Celestine Williams, president of the
Bahamas Baptist Community College and her hus-
band McPherson Williams.





Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E7MI8OQU4_IFQK5K INGEST_TIME 2012-01-26T19:30:49Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01259
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.87SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND WARM HIGH 79F LOW 68F THE latest unemployment figures show that the number of people out of work in the Bahamas is at its highest level in 15 years. Providing hard evidence of the effect of the global economic decline on the Bahamian economy and labour force, the Department of Statistics’ acting director, Kalsie Dorsett, revealed the figures at a press conference yesterday. Figures show that around half of all people who are without work in Grand Bahama lost their jobs in the last six months, with 48 per cent of these people reporting having been “laid-off or dismissed”. In New Providence, one third had become jobless in the same period, and of these, 44 per cent were laid off or dismissed. Overall, in New Providence, unemployment among the 134,400-strong labour force rose from 8.7 per cent in May of last year to 12.1 per cent, based on the interim survey conducted last month. This leaves a total of 16,315 people looking for a job on this island alone. Meanwhile, in Grand Bahama, the number of people without work jumped to 14.6 per cent, equivalent to 4,195 job hunters in a labour force of 28,820. To be defined as “unemployed” an individual must have been actively looking for, as well as being “willing and able” to work, during the reference period. The interim survey, unlike the annual May survey, does not reflect the number of “discouraged” workers another important figure which includes people without a job who have stopped looking for one. How ever, Mrs Dorsett said that “iniJobless rate at 12.1% for New Pr o vidence The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY www.tribune242.com Unemployment at 15-year high SEE page 6 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Roberts hits out on ‘sick’ BTC claims Former PLP minister Bradley Roberts has blasted Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing for what he termed “sick and unfounded” allegations that he hired people politically at theB ahamas Telecommunications Corporation. Accusing Mr Laing of not being forthright about the matter, Mr Roberts claimed that a purported internal BTC document tabled by MrL aing in the House of A ssembly on Thursday failed to show that he had person ally intervened to ensure PLP supporters were hired at BTC during his tenure. “The basis for the junior minister’s vicious and unfounded accusation appears to be a three-page typed internal document of BTC which (he conveyed was penned by me that gave specific instructions to BTC officials to hire persons chosen by my PLP colleagues. I categorically deny that I gave any such instructions and robustly condemn the junior minister for his unfounded, unsubstantiated and sick allegations,” said Mr Roberts in a statement issued yesterday. “The board minutes of BTC will affirm that approval was given to employ some 100 persons, mainly entry level positions, following requests from senior managers to which minister’s approval was given in 2006. n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Denies inter v ening to g et PLP bac k er s jobs F OUR CHAR GED IN $60,000 BTC THEFT FOUR Eleuthera men accused of breaking into the Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation (BTC complex on that island and stealing nearly $60,000 worth of cellular phones and phone cards were arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Angel Johnson, 25, Hermis Newbold, 20, Kelin Johnson, 39, and Medico Johnson, 27, all of Governor’s Harbour, were arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez and Magistrate Ansella Williams in Court One, Bank Lane, charged with shopbreaking and stealing. It is alleged that between THE four men charged in connection with a $60,000 BTC robbery. From left are: Medico Johnson, Angel Johnson, Kellen Johnson (with dark blue jacked, face hidden mis Newbold. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Daylight Saving Time will begin at 2am tomorrow, March 8, and will continue until 2am on Sunday, November 1. This is in keeping with the policy adopted in October, 2006, to extend Daylight Sav ing Time to begin the second Sunday in March and end the first Sunday in November. Remember to set your clocks ahead one hour when you go to bed tonight. Daylight Saving T ime n By NATARIO MCKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter SEE page 6 FORMER Minister of State for Finance James Smith denounced the political fingerpointing from both sides over the CLICO (Bahamas saying if any blame should be cast for the company's financial problems it should lie at the feet of the US financial crisis. Mr Smith's statement came in the wake of reported com ments from Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who spoke on the matter as the House of Assembly wrapped up the 2008/2009 mid-year budget debate on Thursday night. Around midnight, parliament In the face of rising unemployment, the government yesterday renewed its call for all unemployed people, especially “those with qualifications”, to register as soon as possible with the Labour Exchange so no more permits for foreigners are approved than need be. Minister of Labour, Senator Dion Foulkes, said the government will “continue to do all it can to minimise the downturn on Bahamian families” and may “heighten its stimulus package” depending on “how things go in the economy” over the next STUDENTS were robbed by three outsiders during a track and field meet involving around 900 Government High School students at Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre yesterday. Police apprehended three men alleged to have threatened three students with a screwdriver and a piece of wood as they stood near the swimming complex at the sports centre in Thompson Boulevard just before noon. Students robbed during track meet n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net SEE page 6 SEE page 6 SEE page 6 SEE page 6 Jobless urged to r egister CLICO ‘politics’ attacked n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net SUPPORT has poured in for the Kelly family after The Tribune reported how robbers stole their computer which was a vital link to their chronically ill daughter’s specialist in Miami. The New Providence Rotary Club donated a new computer to Ronald and L ina Kelly of Great Britain Street after b urglars stole a laptop which provided c ontinuous access to the gastroenterologist at Jackson Memorial Hospital who monitors their five-year-old daughter Roshan’s rare condition. Roshan was born with volvulus, a twisting of the short intestine, and shortbowel syndrome, which makes it difficult for her to digest food and requires her to be fed from an IV tube every four hours. The club donated a computer in time for the family to take it to the hospital in Miami when they took Roshan there for surgery last month, so they could have it configured with programmes allowing them 24-hour access to their doctor. Readers touched by the story published in The Tribune on February 12 have since contacted the Rotary club with offers to help the family. President of the New Providence Rotary Club Rodney Collie said: “This story certainly touched the hearts of many, and the professional manner in which it was reported made it even more appreciated. “Many times in our society the only stories that appear to get significant coverage is ‘bad news’, but clearly this was one of hope and represents what we can do as corporate and civic citizens to make a difference. “As a result of your front page coverage, we’ve had countless persons approach us, willing to assist this family and support our efforts. “I would like to thank The Tribune for helping to pass on a message of hope and positive change to our community.” Roshan travelled to Miami for surgery to insert an IV port in her chest following The Tribune’s publication last month, and Mrs Kelly said she is recovering well and desperate to go back to school. The mother-of-one, who is a full-time caregiver for Roshan, said: “Since the article appeared, a lot of people have been calling me asking how she is. “We are so grateful to Rotary for the computer, without it we would be in real trouble. “But she is feeling well, even 24 hours after the surgery she was jumping around, it doesn’t hurt her. “She wants to go back to school to see her friends, but she still needs to be careful.” A 28-year-old man appeared in Magistrates Court yesterday facing several counts of stealing. Shane Mackey, who appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane, pleaded guilty to stealing hundreds of dollars from several people after failing to deliver on the sale of a vehicle. According to court dockets, it was alleged that between February 2 and February 13, Mackey, of Seville Avenue, conspired to commit the offence of stealing by reason of service. It was further alleged that during that time, Mackey stole $1,500 cash from Jeanelle Francis, $600 cash from Lisa Lightbourne, $3,400 from Danny Altidor and $2,000 from Nadia Campbell by rea son of service. Mackey was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. He is expected to be sentenced on Monday. Andrea Murphy, 26, pleaded not guilty to two counts of conspiring to steal by reason of service. She also plead not guilty of two counts of abettement to stealing. Murphy was granted bail in the sum of $7,500. The case has been adjourned to March 9. Vangerine Nairn, 31, of Haven Subdivision, also pleaded not guilty to one count of conspiring to steal by reason of service and one count of abettement to stealing. She was also granted bail in the sum of $7,500 with two sureties. Crime BRIEFS Man pleads guilty to stealing n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE POLICE have been slammed for failing to apprehend tourists accused of trespassing, chasing endangered birds and slaughtering a pet duck on a private cay off Long Island. Crew members of a US sailboat were seen walking through the grounds of Hog Cay in Joe Sound, Long Island, on Sunday, February 22, and the following day they posted details on the internet of how they chased the protected West Indian tree ducks populating the island before t hey caught and killed a rowan, a barnyard duck o wned by property owner Peter Graham and his family, complete with photographs of the plucked carcass in a roasting pan ready for the oven. The innards, neck and wingtips of the duck were found on the beach surrounded by Budweiser beer cans by caretaker and Bahamas National Trust warden Earl Wilson the following morning. He said the island – normally teeming with around 1,500 endangered West Indian tree ducks, or whistling ducks – was silent. Mr Graham has been praised by the National Trust for encouraging the population of West Indian tree ducks to grow from just three in 1969 to nearly 2,000 across Long Island by feeding them at a cost of around $35,000 a year. However, the sensitive ducks were so disturbed by the sailboaters’ escapades they have been hid ing since the event nearly two weeks ago. Mr Wilson said: “It has just been so quiet, there are no birds. They are very, very timid and they just started to come back in the evenings, but yesterday (Thursday seen them out in the morning.” The crimes were reported to Inspector Duncombe at Simms Police Station in Long Island, but when the crew were seen in Exuma he referred the matter to Inspector Strachan in George Town. Inspector Duncombe told The Tribune the crew were wanted for questioning in relation to trespassing allegations but officers in Exuma were unable to locate the sailboat after receiving the report on February 26. Peter Graham’s daughter Amanda Graham has criticised the attitude of police in dealing with the case and even hanging up when the family have tried to call for updates. She said: “We filed a complaint and they haven’t done anything. “The general perception is that we should just get over it but they are not seeing the bigger picture here, and perhaps that is the mentality of the police themselves.” The sailboat, from Daytona, Florida, has been reported to its home marina and US officials. The suspected offence occurred just weeks after two American tourists were fined $1,000 by an Exuma magistrate for possession of juvenile conch and an iguana, posting pictures on social networking website Facebook of themselves with a dinghy filled with baby conch and cooking an iguana on a barbecue. C hief Executive of the Bahamas National Trust Eric Carey said: “Crimes against the environment should not be given less importance than other crimes. “Yes, serious crimes like murder and armed robbery need to be given priority, but environmental crimes don’t need to be treated as if theya re not of any level of importance.” Rotary Club donates computer to Kelly family Police slammed for not apprehending tourists accused of trespassing Nicholas ‘adopts’ spiny-tailed iguana at Ardastra MURPHY, a spiny-tailed iguana at Ardastra Gardens and Zoo, recently acquired a “parent.” Nicholas Colclough, a second grade student at St Andrews School, adopted Murphy from the Ardastra’s adopt-an-animal programme. “I chose Murphy because my friends in Canada have a dog named Murphy,” the eight-year-old told Katherine Solomon, widow of Ardastra’s late owner Norman Solomon. “I thought it would be cool to adopt an animal with that same name.” Mrs Solomon thanked Nicholas for his kind sponsorship and assured him that his donation will help feed and care for Murphy. Ardastra’s adopt-an-animal is a recently launched sponsorship programme which allows children the opportunity to financially sup port an animal at the zoo for a period of one year. The children are given an “adoption certificate” for the sponsored animal and permitted to visit their animal at any time. PICTURED in front of Murphy’s exhibit are Nicholas Colclough and K atherine Solomon.

PAGE 3

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009, PAGE 3 GINN Resorts in Grand Bahama announced yesterday that due to the global financial crisis it is forced to eliminate 28 workers from its Old Bahama Bay and Ginn sur Mer properties. To an already downtrodden island, these further lay-offs are just the most recent reminder of what is yet to come in the tourism industry as the international financial crisis continues to wreck havoc on the global economy. Citing these challenges, Ginn officials said these the lay-offs are a part of their efforts to streamline costs and maximise efficiencies” at their Grand Bahama properties. These reductions in staff will affect the hospitality operations and “several other areas of the company’s workforce,” a company press release said. According to Ginn’s senior vice-president Al Jones, the layoffs are an unfortunate result of the unprecedented global financial meltdown and is similar to what other companies are facing both in the Bahamas and a round the world. The decision to reduce our w orkforce was a very difficult one to make, but given the economy and the low levels of occupancy at Old Bahama Bay, we had no alternative,” Mr Jones said. “This is incredibly unfortunate because our employees are the most important resource this company has and we greatly value their contributions.” According to the statement, although occupancy levels are down at Old Bahama Bay, progress continues at the Ginn sur Mer development. The company is on schedu le for a December 31 comple t ion date for infrastructure work at the community which includes internal road paving, golf course construction, landscaping, water and sewer works and other projects,” the statement read. Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing recently commented on the lay-offs that continue to plague Grand Bahama.W ith an additional 234 employees set to be terminated by the end of May from the Isle of Capri, Mr Laing said that the government must continue its work to “turn things around” in the local economy. “That Ginn and others would be having a similar reaction is only indicative of the times of which we find ourselves. “And we have to empathise with the people who are laid off because it is a significant hardship for them but this is what is happening now and we have to keep working on doing what we can to turn things around. But it is a global economic crisis and that’s what we’re in,” he said. More lay-offs in hotel sector Ginn cuts 28 workers at $4.9bn West End project, Old Bahama Bay property n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net DETERMINED not to allow the murder of his son Mario to be swept under the rug, former Trade Minister Leslie Miller appeared on the radio programme Real Talk Live yesterday to shed light once again on the many roadblocks his family has endured in their seven-year battle for justice. Explaining that he has personally spoken with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham to plead with him to not allow the case to be buried like so many others, Mr Miller said he was assured someone from the Attorney General’s Office will be in contact with him. Despite these assurances, however, Mr Miller said his son’s case has been postponed once again and will not start until October. Mario was the victim of a gruesome homicide nearly seven years ago, and the trial of two men accused of his killing captured the attention of the entire country. When the trial concluded last year it resulted in a hung jury where 11 jurors found the accused men guilty with one juror insisting on returning an innocent vote. Mr Miller said: “The prime minister told me that he spoke to the AG (Michael Barnett) and the AG was supposed to call us to let my family know that the case would start. But I have not gotten ac all from the AG. And I have called the prime minister every week and it has not happened and it will not happen,” Mr Miller exclaimed. During this statement Mr Miller was interrupted by hostO rtland Bodie Jr, who asked how he could not hear a word from the AG’s office. “You are a man who has some influence, or who I believe has some influence?!” said Mr Bodie. “So what is going to happen to you and your family?” he asked. “My father taught me years ago,” Mr Miller continued, “You don’t have to like power, but respect power because it could destroy you and it could malign your life. “Now if somebody is responsible for putting cases forward – for example the (Keith just happened. Mr Carey, God bless him, got shot a few years ago. Mario’s case is now almost eight years old and the man made a decision that it will be done when he wants it to be done. So there is nothing my family or I can do about it. “I have spoken to the PM on it. He is the leader of this country. He told me that he gave the AG instructions that it has to be done and I would get a call from the AG. I never got a call from the AG. I called him again and I know I will never get a call from (lead prosecutor Bernard) Turner. But that’s fine. Because Mr Turner has the power and he can do as he pleases,” Mr Miller said. However, as Mr Miller added, he will one day be back in Parliament “sooner than others might think” and there he will use that platform where he is free from libel prosecution to deal with this matter. “Because once you become a regular citizen people takea dvantage of you and do w hatever it is they have to do. But I can live with that, and my family has to live with that until Mr Turner decides it is time for this case to go forward. Following the programme, M r Turner contacted Mr Miller and explained that he was not responsible for bring ing trials before the court and that the case ultimately is in the hands of the defence attorneys who allegedly needed more time to prepare. Ex-MP continues justice fight for murdered son FREEPORT – The Grand Bahama Chapter of the International Federation of Women Lawyers (FIDA contribution of $5,000 from the Alice Sauberli Trust Fund for its scholarship fund. Attorney Branford Christie made the presentation to the scholarship committee of FIDA (Federacion Internacional de Abogadas) at Maryann’s Restaurant on Thursday. Mr Christie, who attended FIDA’s installation banquet in January, had pledged to donate $5,000 to the scholarship fund on behalf of the Trust. “I had the pleasure of acting a s master of ceremonies (at the b anquet) and I am aware of the g ood works of the organisation, and knowing that these are very tough times I thought it would be appropriate to make a pledge toward the scholarship fund,” he said. Mr Christie said Mrs Sauber li was a former resident of Grand Bahama. He stated that prior to her death, her investment was realised and she established a trust fund with the proceeds. Scholarship chairman Charisse Brown, legal counsel for the Grand Bahama Devel opment Company, said FIDA is very grateful for the donation. Female lawyers group receives scholarship aid n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune FreeportR eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

PAGE 4

E E D D I I T T O O R R , , T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e . . I wish to make some comments on your editorial entitled "Bahamas policy on interest r ates". Given that there are many ways to skin a cat it is universally accepted that the way to combat an economic recession is by theu se of a combination of both fiscal and monetary policy. This has been clearly demonstrated by the Central Banks and Governments i n the United States, The UK and Europe. As you indicated the position o f the Bahamas is different from t hat of the USA because it is complicated by the fact that the C entral Bank is constantly in a balancing act that seeks to main t ain the parity of the Bahamian dollar to the US dollar whichr equires the maintenance of ade quate US dollar foreign currency r eserves. These reserves are required to pay for the importation of goods into the Bahamas as most of our imports are from the United States. However, Gov e rnment derives 70 per cent of its revenue from the importation ofg oods and thus the need for the balancing act; increased imports result in increased Government revenue but decreased foreign reserves and vice versa. T he second difference between the Bahamas and the US is thatw hile there is a liquidity problem in the US, there is no such liq u idity problem in The Bahamas as the liquidity levels in the banks currently stands at $300 million which is double the $150 million level which is generally conside red the level at which there is cause for concern. T he third difference is that for the most part all of the retail b anks in The Bahamas are structurally sound and none of them has sought financial aid from the lender of last resort which in our case would be the Central Bank o f the Bahamas. Therefore, unlike the US where both the b anks and the people are in a state of acute distress, the banks i n the Bahamas are only in mild state of discomfort because of increasing loan default rates but the Bahamian people like their counterparts in the US are in a cute financial distress as is the Bahamas Government. T he concern that the use of monetary policy (lowering of i nterest rates) will put pressure on our foreign reserves and thus t hreaten the parity of the Bahamian dollar is understand a ble but people must understand that fiscal policy (Government s pending for infrastructural development) will also ultimately result in a strain on our reserves because those persons fortunate enough to become employed as result of Government spending will also consume products and services which will ultimately lead to the importation of goods and thus a drain on our foreign reserves. Government's argument against this is that the $120 million that is being borrowed through the IDB for the road work project is a US dollar loan and therefore will not be a drain on our existing reserves. This is true in the short term, but in the long term the loan payments will have to be paid back with US dol lars that will have to be sourced from our foreign reserves. T here are two important points related to an economic recession recovery that must be understood. The first is that a country h as to spend its way out of a recession. The ultimate purpose of both fiscal and monetary policy is to create liquidity in the system so that there is money available to be spent by consumers to a llow them to consume and money available to businesses to allow t hem to stay open to provide goods and services for the con-s umers. This is the theory behind how spending aids the economy. T he second point is that for every new dollar that enters the economy it is probably spent at l east five times before it results in any importation or drain on the f oreign reserves. Thus this velocity of money in and of itself helpst o stimulate the economy. The editorial quotes a local u nnamed banker who makes the point that Bahamians are at an advantage compared to their A merican counterparts, because the rates of return on our savingsa nd Government bonds are higher than those in the United States. H e is absolutely correct but the other side of the coin is that the cost of borrowing funds in the Bahamas is far greater than in the United States. The interest r ate spreads in The Bahamas are some of the highest in the worlda nd indeed this is one of the reasons why the banks in this country a re so structurally sound or in lay man's terms "making so much money". It is well known that banks only need a 2 per cent spread to make a good profit h owever, the spreads in The Bahamas can range from 5 per c ent to 10 per cent. In other words the high cost of money eas i ly offsets any potential gain that savers and bond holders would achieve given the higher rate of return that they currently receive on their savings compared to their c ounterparts in the US. As well, the unnamed banker f ailed to disclose the fact that the banks calculate the interest on s avings accounts based on the minimum monthly balance and n ot the average daily balance as is the case in Canada. Furthermore the interest is paid into the savings accountse ither quarterly or biannually. The net effect of these predatory practices is that each year Bahamians who have savings accounts in the banks miss out on millions of dollars because of the way the interest is calculated. Additionally to add insult to injury during these hard economic times First Caribbean Bank has increased its banking fees with regard to savings and current accounts which will also offset any potential gain from the relatively higher savings rates. If FCB is the good corporate citi zen that I believe it to be then it should immediately reverse this decision to increase the savings and current account fees. Of course if FCB's decides to stand by their decision then account holders always have the option of moving their accounts to a nother bank. As well, if the Central Bank were to decrease the discount rate, the cost of Government borr owing would be greatly reduced. For example, if the national debt is $3.5 billion and if interest rates were lowered by 1 per cent then Government's debt repaymentsw ould be reduced by $35 million per year. By the same token if there are $6 billion of private loans then this 1 per cent reduct ion would put another $60 million into the economy each year. Both of these are examples of the p ositive effect of monetary policy a nd both at no extra cost to Government. T he fact of the matter is that we need to use a combination of f iscal and monetary policy to revive our economy. Of course al ot of these issues would disap pear if we were to abandon e xchange control and dollarize our economy but that's another topic for another day. JOHN RODGERS N assau, March, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm ATLANTA In his recent speech at the Conservative Political Action Convention, Rush Limbaugh referred repeatedly to “the conservative movement.” I t’s an accurate phrase. In 21st century America, the conservatives function as a movement while the liberals function as a party. The distinction is telling. R oughly defined, a party is a collection of groups motivated by different goals but loosely committed to working together. A movement, by contrast, is motivated by an ideology, a central goal or collection of goals to which its members pledge loyalty. “Conservatism is what it is and it is forev er”’ as Limbaugh put it. “It’s not something y ou can bend and shape and flake and form.” Now, party and movement each has its advant ages. A movement, by definition, offers a passion, energy and direction that are useful in politics. It inspires loyalty and discipline from its members, and deviation is frowned upon. A party, on the other hand, lacks a powerful internal energy and cohesion. At times, that lack of defining cause can leave it wandering through the political landscape. At other times, that amorphous nature makes a party more adaptable to change and more open to experimentation. T oday, conservatism’s self identity as a move ment presents it with two challenges, one large b ut probably temporary; the other existential. As we saw over the last eight years, a movem ent tends to lose discipline and sense of mission once it achieves power. It becomes what it was trying to change, a phenomenon that has repeated time and again. It happened to Republicans, it happened in the French Revolution, it happens always. The process is captured perfectly in a scene from George Orwell’s “Animal Farm.” The animals, motivated by a core set of principles such as “four legs good, two legs bad,” have driven off their human bosses. Victory is theirs; their movement has succeeded. Then one day, the animals peer through the farmhouse window and are shocked to see their leaders, the pigs, walking about on two legs and acting just like the enemy they had ousted. Today, the rank and file of the conservative movement feels similarly betrayed, for good reason. And now that they have been banished from the luxuries of the farmhouse, their leaders are back among them, trying to walk on four legs again and regain credibility. That’s what the unanimous House GOP vote against the stimulus package was all about it was a gesture of contrition and renewed subm ission by leadership to movement ideology. And given time, that will likely succeed in repairing the rift. The second problem is more difficult. Movem ents are not eternal. They have an organic lifespan. They rise out of a particular time and place, they make their impact, and then one of two things happens. Either they find within themselves the ability to change with changing times, or they wither. That’s the challenge facing the conservative movement. Times have changed dramatically.E conomically, politically, socially, demographically, today’s America is very different from the A merica that gave birth to the conservative movement. The Cold War is over and forgotten; the s are over and forgotten. The Baby Boomers are b eginning to pass from the stage, as evidenced by our first post-Boom president. Those conservatives who understand that are trying to find new applications and meaning in their core principles, but that reinvention is difficult and takes time. Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, for example, told the CPAC conventiont hat while it is important to “honour and respect and remember Ronald Reagan,” it’s also time to m ove on. “We need to develop new Ronald Reagans a nd new reference points,” Pawlenty told a Bloomberg reporter. “It would be as if Barack Obama was going around and constantly talking about Truman or LBJ. It’s just become a reference point that isn’t as relevant for young people.” But I doubt the conservative movement has the flexibility to accept that message in all its complex meanings. As Limbaugh told CPAC, “The era of Reagan is over? When the hell do you hear a Democrat say the era of FDR is over? .... Our own movement has members trying to throw Reagan out while the Democrats know they can’t accomplish what they want unless they appeal to Reagan voters. We have got to stamp this out within this movement, because it will tear us apart.” And if Limbaugh says it, it must be true. (This article was written by Jay Bookman c.2009 Cox Newspapers). Economy hit by lack of ‘interest’ LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Challenge faces the conservative movement : $ 1 7 ( '6DOHV&DUHHU $PXOWLIDFHWWHGFRPPXQLFDWLRQVFRQVXOWLQJFRPSDQ\WKDW LVFXUUHQWO\XQGHUJRLQJPDUNHWH[SDQVLRQZLVKHVWRHPSOR\ H[SHULHQFHGFRPPLVVLRQVDOHVH[HFXWLYH7KHLGHDOSHUVRQZRXOG KDYHPLQLPXPRIWKUHH\HDUVLQFRPPLVVLRQVDOHVKDYHWKHLU RZQSULYDWHYHKLFOHDQGWUDFNUHFRUGDVWRSSHUIRUPHU:DUH ORRNLQJIRUH[FHOOHQWFRPPXQLFDWRUVWKDWDUHGULYHQ&DQGLGDWHV PXVWKDYHFRPSXWHUVNLOOVDQGEHDEOHSUHSDUHSXEOLFSUHVHQWDWLRQV RQEHKDOIRIFRPSDQLHVFOLHQWV $GHJUHHLQPDUNHWLQJRUEXVLQHVVLVSUHIHUUHGEXWQRWDPXVW 3HUVRQVLQWHUHVWHGVKRXOGVXEPLW&9DQGUHIHUHQFHOHWWHUVWR %R['$ FRKHULEXQH 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV E\DU E DITOR, The Tribune. I am not a hotelier, but something is out of whack w ith the ongoing responses by the BahaMar Group concerning the Miss Universe pageant in August. I am hearing phrases like “comp elling circumstances” and “leaving the door open” and overwhelming demand”; it is like some financial tsunami h as to occur before a decision is made concerning something that is inevitable. I don’t get it, you have an opportunity dropping in your l ap and you “cut up”. Maybe BahaMar is in some other b usiness and the hotel thing is just something they do on t he side. Supplying rooms for visitors is what hotels do and they are going to be a lot of visitors before, during and after the pageant, and a good n umber of them really can not afford to stay over theb ridge. If another property had t he gumption to send a group from the Bahamas to lobby f or this pageant, then “all” properties have a responsi b ility to get on board. I am sure the government will o ffer some kind of incentive to all and sundry. This is an opportunity for all Bahamians, and everyone has to be on board. I cannot even begin to imagine what our competi tors further south and in the north would have given to get this event, and here we are. Out of sheer gratitude we must be seen to want to be on board. EDWARD HUTCHESON Nassau, March 5, 2009. Baha Mar set to ‘Miss’ out

PAGE 5

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009, PAGE 5 n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net "I vex that despite all this crap that is going on in the tourism sector and our economy, while in a local hotel on Cable Beach I passed a concierge dealing with a guest so rudely. The guest was only asking her (the concierge r ecommend a good restaurant and she treated him like any old common person on the street and answered him with a grunt. The guest had to ask her to make a reservation, when she should have suggested that. "I worked as a concierge in a four-diamond resort in Florida and I can tell you thata concierge should be the epitome of service. I was disgusted, so imagine how the guest felt. No hotel anywhere can consider itself a part of the hospitality sector without excellent service. I think the g overnment should get rid of t he 15 per cent gratuity so t hese hotel workers can pretend to give me good service b efore I can tip their (backside)." Vex at Slack Employees. "I vex that in this ailing economy more Bahamians aren't thinking outside thebox and trying to find solutions to their own dilemma instead of waiting for the gov ernment to fix things. I mean it's only so much the government can do anyway and that have to go through parliament anyway. "Now is the time for creative and jobless Bahamiansto be make their own money, s tart a lil' business and just work hard. 'Cause things ain' going to get better for a long time and we in for a rough ride." Concerned Citizen. "I vex at how lightly it seem that some leaders are taking this CLICO liquidation fias co. Saying it is uncertain whether we policy holders and annuity holders will get our full investments back. Then they say these irregularities were noted from years ago. "Tell me why someone somewhere with sense didn't stop this madness before it put people's life savings in jeopardy? People who were placed in positions of respon sibility need to be held accountable for this becauseI ain' want to lose out on a sound investment while these bigwigs sit pretty." Scared all my money gone. "I vex, vex cause a US report cites anti-Haitian prej udice in my Bahamas. Now if dem surveyors did see some 60,000 illegal Haitians or 20 per cent added to our 300,000 population on our small islands, or same 20 per cent, equal to 60,000,000 illegal aliens added to their 300 million US population, den dey gon see dey is a big problem. "Dem surveyors mussey ain't even know dat dem illegals even get free hospital, free school, dey get free land to live on in da bushes, dey don't pay NIB tax, dey don't even travel to Miami to shop andcome back an pay Customs taxes like most of we Bahamians. Dey is undercut we legal union wage labourers an dey is still Haitians cause dey born Haitian for life an dey is welcome anytime to return home to Haiti where dey like to fly dey Haitian flags in my Bahamian face an you dare tell me I is prejudice." Well Muddoes. WHY YOU HAPPY? "I happy because some work is going on out east at Eastern Road and Yamacraw McPherson's Bend concrete kerbs, pea rock and four comfortable benches that face the sea add to the relaxing atmosphere. Good work, people!” Enjoying the Sea View WHY YOU VEX? n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net I N an effort to gain traction for a ban on sea turtle harvesting, the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group (BSTCG is urging concerned citizens to inundate the Minister of Agriculture with letters of support for the proposed legislation. While commending Agriculture Minister Larry Cartwright for his efforts to protect marine resources, co-chairman of BSTCG Kim Aranha lamented the fact that the turtle harvesting ban is in danger of not being passed due to dismal support from Bahamians. " He (Mr Cartwright ed that parliament wanted to hear from more Bahamians supporting this Bill," she said. According to Ms Aranha, Mr Cartwright told her while his ministry has received numerous letters from foreigners in support of the ban, local support has been minimal at best. Ms Aranha feels this lack of input is due to the fact that many Bahamians who support a ban on all turtle harvesting are under the impression that such a law is already in place. All species of marine turtles have been classified by international authorities as "threatened with extinction" or endangered. In the Bahamas, only the Hawksbill Turtle is on the list of animals protected by law against capture. Other turtles are protected from capture during a closed season which runs from April 1 to July 31, once they are over a certain size but others are fit for capture. In November, Minister Cartwright announced that as of January 1, 2009, commercial harvesting of turtles and long-line fishing would become illegal. His statements came after months of furor over what activists termed "inhumane" treatment of threatened sea turtles. Activists claimed some fisherman haul the animals ashore onto boat ramps, turn them on their backs in the sun, tie their flippers with straw and slaughter them alive. Mr Cartwright also said that effective April 1, any turtle harvesting would be in breach of the law. That legislation has not yet been passed. "I think there are a lot of people who are not aware the law has not been passed," said Ms Aranha. Now the BSTCG is taking action through a mass e-mail petitioning like-minded Bahamians to e-mail or fax Mr Cartwright their opinions. Less than 24 hours after an initial plea was sent to her e-mail contact list, Ms Aranha said she received 65 calls and e-mails of support. She expects this number to increase to the hundreds in the coming days. "Unless we band together and write letters of support it will not get passed, and turtle pie will stay on the menu, and the taunting and teasing, the hacking and torture of turtles will continue," Ms Aranha said. She also said the group was not trying to stifle local fishermen's trade and claimed that "very few people eat sea turtles.” "We're not really trying to stop an industry because there is no industry. There's absolutely no advantage to harvesting them except for people to torture them. "We have to be mindful for future generations and the rest of the Bahamians need to stand up and protect our resources," she said. For more information visit www.saveourseaturtles.com. BSTCG calls for support to ban sea turtle harvesting MISSING GIRL THE parents of a teenage girl are asking the public’s assistance in locat i ng their daughter who went missing last month. On Tuesday, February 17, Eldricka Ingraham, a 14year-old student of D W Davis School, was reported m issing by a relative. A ccording to the report, E ldricka went to school in her uniform (a green plaid skirt and yellow blouse) and never returned home. She is approximately 4 feet 5 inches tall and weighs about 110 pounds. Anyone with information on her whereabouts is asked to contact the police at 919, 324-2030, 502-9991, or 328-TIPS. OSCAR INGRAHAM is wanted by police for questioning in connection with a burglary whicho ccurred on January 28. His last known address was in Strachan's Corner. WANTED WANTED WANTED WANTED WANTED

PAGE 6

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE tial indications” were that there was not “that much of a difference” in this figure. She said: “The results of the survey further show that for the first time since 2005 the unemployment rate for both New Providence and Grand Bahama reached the two digit figure: 12.1 per cent for the former and 14.6 per cent for the latter. In both islands these are the highest unemployment rates experienced since the early 1990s. The unemployed numbers, in New Providence, increased by 4,540 people (38 per cent Grand Bahama the unemployed numbers increased by 55 per cent or 1,500 people. In 2005 unemployment in New Providence stood at 10.9 per cent, while a total of 11 per cent were unemployed in Grand Bahama. Contextualising the latest figures, Mrs Dorsett noted that h igh rates of 14 per cent were r ecorded in New Providence in 1 994, and 16.9 per cent in Grand Bahama in 1992. Ms Dorsett said the February, 2009, survey found that the sectors which shed the most workers in New Providence were the hotel and restaurant sector, declining by 10 per cent, and the construction industry, which fell by nine per cent. She added that behind these two industries, transportationwas the hardest hit although the precise rate of decline was unavailable. Highlighting the dependency of the Bahamian economy on the United States’ economy, this information became avail able on the same day latest unemployment figures in the US show the number of people without a job in that country is at the highest level in 25 years, at 8.1 per cent. The Bahamian statistics were compiled as part of an interim survey conducted by the Department of Statistics in February in the face of widespread speculation about the severity of the unemployment level. The Department normally only surveys households for an annual report in May. The findings confirm the expectations of many observers, including Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who forecast in his address to the nation in January that the figures would reach double digits” later this year as a result of the gloomy prospects for the global and domestic economies. Ms Dorsett noted that even within the space of time it took to compile the figures more layoffs occurred most notably at liquidated insurer CLICO which would impact the statistics. A ccording to the department, data shows that of those people employed, as many as 9.2 per cent had been employed at their current job for under eight months. Of these workers, one quarter indicated that their reason for leaving their last job was that the business had ceased operations, had dismissed them or laid them off. In Grand Bahama, 10 per cent of people were in this position. Meanwhile, a greater proportion one third had left their previous job for the reasons previously cited. G rand Bahama’s unemploym ent level is significantly highe r among women (17.7 per cent) than men (11.7 per cent). In New Providence, the picture is different with 12.4 per cent of men found to be unemployed, compared to 11.9 per cent of women. T he government announced during the mid-year budget debate that an unemployment benefit fund is expected to be brought into effect on July 1, 2009, with enabling legislation likely to be proposed in parlia ment on March 25. Unemployed workers will be able to benefit from assistance for a period anticipated to be between 16 and 23 weeks, said Prime Minister Ingraham. “The vacancies were adver tised internally and externally. To the best of my knowledge the selection process was open and transparent and the successful applicants were quali fied,” he added. Nonetheless, the document tabled by Mr Laing clearly sug gests that certain job candi dates’ political affiliation, whether they lived in particu lar constituency, and involvement with the PLP were a consideration in the BTC hiring process in 2007. It entails a computer produced table entitled “BTC Out standing Approvals”, with headings including “advertised positions”, “departments”, “name of candidates interviewed”, “selected candidates” and “recommended by/comments”. Mr Roberts name is noted next to the names of numerousp eople approved for employ ment following an interview w ith the corporation under the “recommended by” heading. In other cases, candidates who were approved from among a larger list of individuals identified as having been interviewed for certain jobsh ave a variety of other PLP M Ps’ and ministers’ names next to them, indicating that these individuals “recommended” them for employment at the government corporation. In the case of a Jeanette Ferguson, the document states, inc omputerised text, that she was “recommended by” then MP Michael Halkitis. Next to his name, the document states that she is a “strong party support er.” A Samantha Ferguson was approved by MP John Carey. Next to her name, it says “Ferguson is chairman of the Carmichael PLP branch.” Meanwhile, in the case of four others, the document reads “MP Michael Halkitis supports. Lives in Adelaide Village”, “MP Malcolm Adderley sup p orts. Lives in Elizabeth Estates” and “I spoke with MP (Anthony he confirmed his support for (the named individual According to the document, which is not signed by anyonen or contains any evidence of w ho would have been responsi ble for preparing it, all of the individuals approved for employment at BTC got this approval in March, 2007 – just two months before the general election. T he document appears to show that many individuals approved for jobs on the basis of recommendations by political figures were not the same indi viduals who the document iden tifies as having been “selected” on the basis of their performance at an interview, bringing into question whether they were the most qualified candidates for the job. As he spoke about the docu ment in the House of Assembly late Thursday night, Mr Laing said: “Here we are in this place and they (opposition MPs) say to us ‘you are hiring your supporters’. And I say to them, ‘I can’t help you, we’re not doing that’.” Speaking towards the closure of the mid-year budget debate, his comments came after numerous PLP MPs alleged that the government has been victimising” PLP civil servants and had politicised the hiring/firing process. Mr Laing’s statement on Mr Robert’s alleged interventions caused Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham to get up from hiss eat, turn and shake Mr Laing’s h and, and announce that he was “very proud” of him for it. Asked yesterday who prepared the document, Mr Roberts told The Tribune to “ask Zhivargo Laing that.” Meanwhile, pressed as to w hether he would consider that it shows evidence of people being selected for employment based on their political affiliation, whether or not there is evi dence that he directed for them to be, Mr Roberts said: “You can make up your own mind.” Mr Roberts said his record reflects that he has hired people without reference to their politics. “One of the last major apointments I made was a person who people said had FNM sympathies,” he added. He said Mr Laing “failed to tell Parliament and the Bahamian people that it was the FNM government who just before the 2002 general election hired some 200 persons at BTC on six-month contracts. I gave approval to regularise these persons without fanfare.” few months. This comes as the government described the latest unemployment figures the highest in 15 years as “indicative of what’s going on in the international economy”. Those figures, released yesterday, place the number of people out of work in New Providence at over 16,000 and in Grand Bahama at over 4,000 equivalent to a 12.1 and 14.6 per cent unemployment rate respectively (see lead story Mr Foulkes said: “The unemployment figures for New Providence and Grand Bahama are indicative of what’s going on in the international economy. “As you know there’s been a drastic decline, almost a meltdown in some industrialised nations. For example, in France the unemloyment rate in January was 15.4 per cent the highest in many, many years. In the US the Department of Labour released their figure it’s the highest for the last 26 years at 8.1 per cent. These indicators obviosuly have an adverse effect on the Bahamian economy,” said Mr Foulkes. He said the Unemployment Benefit Fund, which Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced during the mid year budget debate, would be implemented on July 1, 2009. It should “bring some relief to a lot of families now experiencing a hard time.” Meanwhile, a training programme for unemployed people expected to be implemented shortly will have a “work component” whereby those training to obtain new skills will undertake internship type work for which they will be given a stipend providing some level of employment. Mr Foulkes said that with -400” work permit renewal applications coming before the Department of Immigration and Labour on a weekly basis, it is imperative that Bahamians register with the Labour Exchange if they are to be considered for jobs for which they may be qualified. “We want to ensure that those Bahamians who have qualifications fill those jobs before we give any renewals to foreigners in the country. We can only know that if they register with the Labour Exchange, because the Department of Labour sits on the Immigration Board and whenever a permit comes up for review we are able to make an intervention.” Asked whether the new statistics would require the government to alter any of its plans, or if consideration would have been made for unemployment reaching this level, Mr Foulkes said: “It is something we anticipated given anecdotal information that was coming to us for the year 2008.” “We have a planned programme over the course of the next 12 months. If things continue to deteriorate, which is possible, we will increase our economic stimulus,” he added. In terms of what form a heightened stimulus would take, Mr Foulkes said it would be a “multi-faceted approach.” “It would be more social assistance, more jobs being provided by the government through the various stimulus packages that we are currently doing,” he said. unanimously passed the government's 2008/2009 mid-year budget and associated bills. The former Central Bank governor, who served as state finance minister during the Christie administration, said he didn't "see the logic" behind slinging political mud. He reasoned that the fault for the CLICO (Bahamas is borne from the $73.6 million the company loaned to its foreign affiliates which was in turn invested in the troubled Florida-based Wellington Preserve real estate investment. The government should now focus on handling the matter at hand, said Mr Smith, suggesting more regional communicationw ith Trinidad and Tobago movi ng forward. W hile saying he didn't want t o cast political aspersions a bout the issue on Thursday n ight, Prime Minister Ingraham f ired back at some calls in the PLP for full disclosure on the CLICO breakdown. He also struck out at members oppo site by saying that CLICO's "excessive" lending began in 2004 while the PLP was in office. Yesterday, Opposition spokesman on foreign affairs and foreign trade Fred Mitchellwho has publicly chastised the Ingraham administration for its move to put the company in provisional liquidation last week labelled these assertions "hogwash". He said by connecting the dots from public statements by Mr Ingraham and Registrar of Insurance Lennox McCartney, the urgency of the matter was revealed as early as eight months ago. "A look at the public record, by his (Mr Ingraham's ments and the Registrar of Insurance's statements they clearly show that negligence from July, 2008. So they have to bear that responsibility," he said yesterday. Mr Mitchell also defended his government's record. "Someone can break into your house, steal money from your bank and you may not be aware of it. You assume that the party (responsible it. So what is the utility in saying it's the PLP's fault?" In a lengthy statement on the issue during Monday's session of parliament, the prime minister said "excessive cash advances" to CLICO Enterprises Ltd began in 2004. After several prudential meetings starting in 2004, 2006 and 2007, concern was expressed and demands made by the Registrar of Insurance that the company return the then $53 million invested. This request, despite company assurances, was not met, Mr Ingraham said. "It was after the receipt of the 2007 audited financial statements in July, 2008, that the extent of the real estate investments was again highlighted," he added. In December, 2008, certain restrictions were placed on the company but the investments were not repaid in the specified time. One of the boys was robbed of his jewellery, and other per sonal items were stolen by the men who had pulled up in a Nissan Sentra. Chief Supt Hulan Hanna said: “The police were able to locate these persons nearby and three men were taken into cus tody. The vehicle has been impounded by police on suspicion of being a stolen vehicle. The three men are likely to be charged.” The boys were not injured by the robbers. They were attending the Government Senior Schools Sports Association 16th annual track and field meet. Sunday, March 1, 2009, and Monday, March 2, 2009, the accused broke into and entered the BTC complex at Pine Street. It is alleged they stole 9,510 $5 phone cards valued at $47,550, 17 $10 phone cards valued at $170, six $20 phone cards valued at $120, and six $50 phone cards valued at $300. It is also alleged they stole several cellular phones together valued at nearly $7,000. The men, represented by attorney Langton Hilton, pleaded not guilty to the charges. The prosecutor, Sergeant Sean Thurston, objected to bail. Attorney Hilton told the court that the men had been in custody since Monday. Angel Johnson, Kelin Johnson and Medico Johnson were granted $7,500 bail with two sureties. The case has been adjourned to April 21. Newbold was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison until Monday when a decision will be made on whether he should get bail. Unemployment rate now in double digits F ROM page one Students r obbed FROM page one FROM page one BTC theft: Four plead not guilty F ROM page one Ex-minister hits back at Laing’s BTC claims FROM page one ‘No logic’ in CLICO political mudslinging Stimulus may accelerate F ROM page one

PAGE 7

n B y BAHAMAS PATIENT ADVOCACY THE2007 annual report of the Hospital Board that wast abled in parliament last December raises some important issues of public interest. One of those issues is w hether the Hospitals Board has the ability to function as a regulator of private hospitalsand clinics under the Hospital and Health Care FacilitiesA ct, 1998. F or example, the Hospital Board has a duty under the Act to investigate a complainti nto the “diagnosis, treatment and care” of a patient in a hosp ital or clinic licensed by the Hospital Board. But it seems the Hospitals B oard’s view is that it licenses the building and its facilities, a nd has no duty to oversee the quality of health care services provided. The Act itselfd efines a hospital as "a building where beds are available for the admission of personsr equiring treatment for any sickness”. Accountability Experts say this description i s not adequate. It does not require a central legal entity t hat is responsible and accountable for all medical services provided under itsr oof. Such a structure, according to advisors, would be int he best interest of the community for the obvious reas ons of safety and ethics. There is a disconnect here which can adversely affectq uality assurance in medical treatment. Medical advisors to Bahamas Patient Advocacy see a hospital as an institution which accepts patients for medical treatment, within an organisation with a centraliseda uthority responsible for qual ity assurance in the delivery of healthcare services. I t should be the medical ser vices that are being licensed not just the building – in order to properly reflect the m odern concept of what a hospital is. The public needs a single source of accountability in healthcare facilities, and a licensing board to enforce it.O n this basis, a “hospital”, together with its medical services, needs a regulatory definition as a single (legal U nder current law, private hospitals may function as a c ollection of independent physicians providing medical services, by having practicingp rivileges, in a building with beds and nursing services, among other things. Thep atients would then be admitted as patients of the individu al physician. Sections of the building may be leased or managed by different corpo-r ate entities, providing other medical services. T his structure diffuses authority and accountability. For instance, the Act requirest hat a healthcare facility should (among other things p rovide sufficient numbers of qualified staff who can administer appropriate care to thep atients admitted. Authority But if a hospital is a building w ith beds, without medical management authority, and medical services are provided by independent doctors, can “the hospital” exercise author-i ty to restrict admissions to only those patients that “hos pital” is able to treat? Or can a private hospital make the appropriate medicals taff available, if there is no overall authority that employs or manages medical profes s ionals at the hospital? BPA advisors say that a new i nstitutional definition is required, making it clear that a hospital is a single interest e ntity accountable for the medical services provided there. A hospital has to uphold its own interest beyond the interests of inde-p endent professionals and entities within it. This would place the hospital in a proper position to oversee the safed elivery of healthcare services. A hospital also needs to h ave an internal quality management structure, which can immediately respond to anyc oncerns arising. To do this, a hospital needs to collect data on all patients admitted ino rder to know whether its operating units are doing a g ood job, and it needs sufficient qualified staff to enable it to respond. Common interest The interests of the patient, the doctors, and the hospital,m ust be one seamless and single interest, to improve patient o utcomes. That is the purpose of a hospital. Usually a hospital has a C hief of Medical Staff, or Chief Medical Officer (CMO T he CMO has the authority to ensure the competency of the doctors practicing there.H e also has responsibility for the integrity of the hospital system. That integrity would include an effective “call” system, to ensure that all patients have medical care available 24/7, so no patient in crisis is left unattended. In public h ealth care, a CMO would, or s hould, resign in the event of such a “systems failure”. Should a private heath care facility, not also be held to as imilar standard of accounta bility? The licensing board should require an independent audit of the hospital’s health care services by an outside review body. This external accredita-t ion could also be used by a hospital to enhance its credentials and image. The Hos-p ital Board could thus carry out its quality assuranceovers ight function at no expense to the board, or challenge to its limited resources. Law changes But the 2007 report propos es changes to the Act that w ould seriously weaken the Hospitals Board as an over s ight body. The board wants the government to amend the Act tor emove the provision for investigation of complaints, e liminate the need to provide notifications of deaths, and reduce penalties for failure toc omply with licensing require ments. B ut at the same time, the Hospitals Board is also proposing a new and exten s ive set of hospital regulations. So, on the one hand, the board says it wants to reduce its oversight responsibility, but on the other hand, it wants to increase regulatory requirements? The BPA advocates that the board’s oversight capacity be s trengthened, and that the H ospital Board embrace its oversight function of quality assurance, as per the petition on its website below. W e urge our parliamentaria ns to consider the Hospital Board’s report in terms of the public interest in a safe system of health care, and oversight assurance of this. Good business sense should dictate that the more confidence the public has in our l ocal institutions – including s tatutory boards – the less likely we will be to spend our money abroad for medical care. For more information, visit: www.bahamaspatientadvocacy.org C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009, PAGE 7 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.596.590.003,0500.4380.05015.00.76% 5.001.43Consolidated Water BDRs1.431.500.070.1110.05213.53.47% 3.002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.8950.40011.73.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44281.3812Colina Money Market Fund1.44280.634.45 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S131-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 27-Feb-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 813.86 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSFRIDAY, 6 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.36 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -52.00 | YTD % -3.04BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases +(/3 :$17(' &20021:($/7+)7+(%$+$0$6&/(TXL ,17+(0$77(52)$//7+$7 $1',17+($77(5 $1',17+($77(5 127,&( $// 7+$7 127,&(,6+(5(%<*,9(1 WK WK 7KH5HJLVWU\RI WKHXSUHPH&RXUW WK *5$+$07+203621t&2 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW +(1/(<%,57+:,&. 3 (55
PAGE 8

A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN T IGER Wild with anxiety (7 8 Determined (3 9 Free to roam (9 10 Ponder (7 1 1 Additional (5 13 Detest (6 15 Name of eight English kings (6 18 Norttheast African country (5 19 Lachrymose (7 21 Bony-plated burrowing animal (9 23 Beam of light (3 24 Model of excellence (7 2 5 Unfashionable (5 Down 1 Aprofligate (7 2 Without deliberation (3,2,4 3 Social blunder (5 4 Cold in manner (6 5 Everything considered (3,4 6 Excessively (3 7 Acquit (5 12 Precipitately (9 14 Downcast (7 16 Held up (7 17 Obtained by theft (6 18 Inundate (5 20 Shun (5 22 To spoil (3 fbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 Famous composer? Hear h ear! (5 4 Take a trip? (7 8 Part of a wheel that projects about a c entimetre (3 9 Brothers not on speaking terms with one another (9 1 0 Imagined to be highly favoured? (7 1 1 Way in which the sentry loses his head (5 13 Such fruit is to be put in w ater (6 1 5 Stalin’s ultimate strategy h ad an offensive element (6 1 8 How bread’s gone up? (5 19 Place to thicken stew (7 21 Betrayed like a bride in church may be (5,4 23 Sash 50% too big (3 2 4 One who treats wounds in the chest? (7 25 He sings or follows half the score (5 D own 1 Amatch for the devil (7 2 I can’t mess around with the meanings of words (9 3 All for those making notes (5 4 Adrink mixed and swallowed by the shy (6 5 Numerous men put in p lace around the East (7 6 Transport of internal c ombustion (3 7 Attempt at sex appeal, we hear (5 1 2 Feel depressed when you land (5,4 14 Games period shown in new inn sign (7 1 6 City in great trouble (7 17 Asticker for the traditional method of roasting (6 18 Stiff clothes I’d put on (5 2 0 Hear a way to form a meeting (5 22 Contend it’s a quarter after six (3 Across:1 Cheapskate, 8 Rabbi, 9 Allegro, 10 Flemish, 11 Emend, 12 R esume, 14 Stroll, 17 Newts, 19 P lastic, 21 Evening, 22 Ramps, 23 Life tenant. Down:2 Hebrews, 3 Alibi, 4 Swathe, 5 Ailment, 6 Eagle, 7 Goldilocks, 8 References, 13 Mastiff, 15 Ottoman, 1 6 Spigot, 18 Wheel, 20 Apron. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Windjammer, 8 Humid, 9 Maudlin, 10 Concern, 11 Texas, 12 S tench, 14 Get off, 17 Opium, 19 E arlier, 21 Unaware, 22 Faith, 23 Teeny-weeny. Down:2 Immense, 3 Dodge, 4 Almond, 5 Mountie, 6 Relax, 7 And so forth, 8 Hocus-pocus, 13 C omrade, 15 Opinion, 16 Merely, 18 Inapt, 20 Rifle. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 9 1 01112 13141516 17 1 81920 2 12223 2425 1 234567 8 9 1 01112 13141516 17 1 81920 2 12223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Treat unjustly (5 4 Wild with anxiety (7 8 Determined (3 9 Free to roam (9 10 Ponder (7 11 Additional (5 13 Detest (6 15 Name of eight English kings (6 18 Norttheast African country (5 19 Lachrymose (7 21 Bony-plated burrowing animal (9 23 Beam of light (3 24 Model of excellence (7 25 Unfashionable (5 Down 1 Aprofligate (7 2 Without deliberation (3,2,4 3 Social blunder (5 4 Cold in manner (6 5 Everything considered (3,4 6 Excessively (3 7 Acquit (5 12 Precipitately (9 14 Downcast (7 16 Held up (7 17 Obtained by theft (6 18 Inundate (5 20 Shun (5 22 To spoil (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Famous composer? Hear hear! (5 4 Take a trip? (7 8 Part of a wheel that projects about a centimetre (3 9 Brothers not on speaking terms with one another (9 10 Imagined to be highly favoured? (7 11 Way in which the sentry loses his head (5 13 Such fruit is to be put in water (6 15 Stalin’s ultimate strategy had an offensive element (6 18 How bread’s gone up? (5 19 Place to thicken stew (7 21 Betrayed like a bride in church may be (5,4 23 Sash 50% too big (3 24 One who treats wounds in the chest? (7 25 He sings or follows half the score (5 Down 1 Amatch for the devil (7 2 I can’t mess around with the meanings of words (9 3 All for those making notes (5 4 Adrink mixed and swallowed by the shy (6 5 Numerous men put in place around the East (7 6 Transport of internal combustion (3 7 Attempt at sex appeal, we hear (5 12 Feel depressed when you land (5,4 14 Games period shown in new inn sign (7 16 City in great trouble (7 17 Asticker for the traditional method of roasting (6 18 Stiff clothes I’d put on (5 20 Hear a way to form a meeting (5 22 Contend it’s a quarter after six (3 Across:1 Cheapskate, 8 Rabbi, 9 Allegro, 10 Flemish, 11 Emend, 12 Resume, 14 Stroll, 17 Newts, 19 Plastic, 21 Evening, 22 Ramps, 23 Life tenant. Down:2 Hebrews, 3 Alibi, 4 Swathe, 5 Ailment, 6 Eagle, 7 Goldilocks, 8 References, 13 Mastiff, 15 Ottoman, 16 Spigot, 18 Wheel, 20 Apron. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Windjammer, 8 Humid, 9 Maudlin, 10 Concern, 11 Texas, 12 Stench, 14 Get off, 17 Opium, 19 Earlier, 21 Unaware, 22 Faith, 23 Teeny-weeny. Down:2 Immense, 3 Dodge, 4 Almond, 5 Mountie, 6 Relax, 7 And so forth, 8 Hocus-pocus, 13 Comrade, 15 Opinion, 16 Merely, 18 Inapt, 20 Rifle. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 89 101112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425 1234567 89 101112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Treat unjustly (5 4 Wild with anxiety (7 8 Determined (3 9 Free to roam (9 10 Ponder (7 11 Additional (5 13 Detest (6 15 Name of eight English kings (6 18 Norttheast African country (5 19 Lachrymose (7 21 Bony-plated burrowing animal (9 23 Beam of light (3 24 Model of excellence (7 25 Unfashionable (5 Down 1 Aprofligate (7 2 Without deliberation (3,2,4 3 Social blunder (5 4 Cold in manner (6 5 Everything considered (3,4 6 Excessively (3 7 Acquit (5 12 Precipitately (9 14 Downcast (7 16 Held up (7 17 Obtained by theft (6 18 Inundate (5 20 Shun (5 22 To spoil (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Famous composer? Hear hear! (5 4 Take a trip? (7 8 Part of a wheel that projects about a centimetre (3 9 Brothers not on speaking terms with one another (9 10 Imagined to be highly favoured? (7 11 Way in which the sentry loses his head (5 13 Such fruit is to be put in water (6 15 Stalin’s ultimate strategy had an offensive element (6 18 How bread’s gone up? (5 19 Place to thicken stew (7 21 Betrayed like a bride in church may be (5,4 23 Sash 50% too big (3 24 One who treats wounds in the chest? (7 25 He sings or follows half the score (5 Down 1 Amatch for the devil (7 2 I can’t mess around with the meanings of words (9 3 All for those making notes (5 4 Adrink mixed and swallowed by the shy (6 5 Numerous men put in place around the East (7 6 Transport of internal combustion (3 7 Attempt at sex appeal, we hear (5 12 Feel depressed when you land (5,4 14 Games period shown in new inn sign (7 16 City in great trouble (7 17 Asticker for the traditional method of roasting (6 18 Stiff clothes I’d put on (5 20 Hear a way to form a meeting (5 22 Contend it’s a quarter after six (3 Across:1 Cheapskate, 8 Rabbi, 9 Allegro, 10 Flemish, 11 Emend, 12 Resume, 14 Stroll, 17 Newts, 19 Plastic, 21 Evening, 22 Ramps, 23 Life tenant. Down:2 Hebrews, 3 Alibi, 4 Swathe, 5 Ailment, 6 Eagle, 7 Goldilocks, 8 References, 13 Mastiff, 15 Ottoman, 16 Spigot, 18 Wheel, 20 Apron. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Windjammer, 8 Humid, 9 Maudlin, 10 Concern, 11 Texas, 12 Stench, 14 Get off, 17 Opium, 19 Earlier, 21 Unaware, 22 Faith, 23 Teeny-weeny. Down:2 Immense, 3 Dodge, 4 Almond, 5 Mountie, 6 Relax, 7 And so forth, 8 Hocus-pocus, 13 Comrade, 15 Opinion, 16 Merely, 18 Inapt, 20 Rifle. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 101112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425 1234567 8 9 101112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Treat unjustly (5 4 Wild with anxiety (7 8 Determined (3 9 Free to roam (9 10 Ponder (7 11 Additional (5 13 Detest (6 15 Name of eight English kings (6 18 Norttheast African country (5 19 Lachrymose (7 21 Bony-plated burrowing animal (9 23 Beam of light (3 24 Model of excellence (7 25 Unfashionable (5 Down 1 Aprofligate (7 2 Without deliberation (3,2,4 3 Social blunder (5 4 Cold in manner (6 5 Everything considered (3,4 6 Excessively (3 7 Acquit (5 12 Precipitately (9 14 Downcast (7 16 Held up (7 17 Obtained by theft (6 18 Inundate (5 20 Shun (5 22 To spoil (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Famous composer? Hear hear! (5 4 Take a trip? (7 8 Part of a wheel that projects about a centimetre (3 9 Brothers not on speaking terms with one another (9 10 Imagined to be highly favoured? (7 11 Way in which the sentry loses his head (5 13 Such fruit is to be put in water (6 15 Stalin’s ultimate strategy had an offensive element (6 18 How bread’s gone up? (5 19 Place to thicken stew (7 21 Betrayed like a bride in church may be (5,4 23 Sash 50% too big (3 24 One who treats wounds in the chest? (7 25 He sings or follows half the score (5 Down 1 Amatch for the devil (7 2 I can’t mess around with the meanings of words (9 3 All for those making notes (5 4 Adrink mixed and swallowed by the shy (6 5 Numerous men put in place around the East (7 6 Transport of internal combustion (3 7 Attempt at sex appeal, we hear (5 12 Feel depressed when you land (5,4 14 Games period shown in new inn sign (7 16 City in great trouble (7 17 Asticker for the traditional method of roasting (6 18 Stiff clothes I’d put on (5 20 Hear a way to form a meeting (5 22 Contend it’s a quarter after six (3 Across:1 Cheapskate, 8 Rabbi, 9 Allegro, 10 Flemish, 11 Emend, 12 Resume, 14 Stroll, 17 Newts, 19 Plastic, 21 Evening, 22 Ramps, 23 Life tenant. Down:2 Hebrews, 3 Alibi, 4 Swathe, 5 Ailment, 6 Eagle, 7 Goldilocks, 8 References, 13 Mastiff, 15 Ottoman, 16 Spigot, 18 Wheel, 20 Apron. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Windjammer, 8 Humid, 9 Maudlin, 10 Concern, 11 Texas, 12 Stench, 14 Get off, 17 Opium, 19 Earlier, 21 Unaware, 22 Faith, 23 Teeny-weeny. Down:2 Immense, 3 Dodge, 4 Almond, 5 Mountie, 6 Relax, 7 And so forth, 8 Hocus-pocus, 13 Comrade, 15 Opinion, 16 Merely, 18 Inapt, 20 Rifle. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 89 101112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425 1234567 89 101112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Treat unjustly (5 4 Wild with anxiety (7 8 Determined (3 9 Free to roam (9 10 Ponder (7 11 Additional (5 13 Detest (6 15 Name of eight English kings (6 18 Norttheast African country (5 19 Lachrymose (7 21 Bony-plated burrowing animal (9 23 Beam of light (3 24 Model of excellence (7 25 Unfashionable (5 Down 1 Aprofligate (7 2 Without deliberation (3,2,4 3 Social blunder (5 4 Cold in manner (6 5 Everything considered (3,4 6 Excessively (3 7 Acquit (5 12 Precipitately (9 14 Downcast (7 16 Held up (7 17 Obtained by theft (6 18 Inundate (5 20 Shun (5 22 To spoil (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Famous composer? Hear hear! (5 4 Take a trip? (7 8 Part of a wheel that projects about a centimetre (3 9 Brothers not on speaking terms with one another (9 10 Imagined to be highly favoured? (7 11 Way in which the sentry loses his head (5 13 Such fruit is to be put in water (6 15 Stalin’s ultimate strategy had an offensive element (6 18 How bread’s gone up? (5 19 Place to thicken stew (7 21 Betrayed like a bride in church may be (5,4 23 Sash 50% too big (3 24 One who treats wounds in the chest? (7 25 He sings or follows half the score (5 Down 1 Amatch for the devil (7 2 I can’t mess around with the meanings of words (9 3 All for those making notes (5 4 Adrink mixed and swallowed by the shy (6 5 Numerous men put in place around the East (7 6 Transport of internal combustion (3 7 Attempt at sex appeal, we hear (5 12 Feel depressed when you land (5,4 14 Games period shown in new inn sign (7 16 City in great trouble (7 17 Asticker for the traditional method of roasting (6 18 Stiff clothes I’d put on (5 20 Hear a way to form a meeting (5 22 Contend it’s a quarter after six (3 Across:1 Cheapskate, 8 Rabbi, 9 Allegro, 10 Flemish, 11 Emend, 12 Resume, 14 Stroll, 17 Newts, 19 Plastic, 21 Evening, 22 Ramps, 23 Life tenant. Down:2 Hebrews, 3 Alibi, 4 Swathe, 5 Ailment, 6 Eagle, 7 Goldilocks, 8 References, 13 Mastiff, 15 Ottoman, 16 Spigot, 18 Wheel, 20 Apron. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Windjammer, 8 Humid, 9 Maudlin, 10 Concern, 11 Texas, 12 Stench, 14 Get off, 17 Opium, 19 Earlier, 21 Unaware, 22 Faith, 23 Teeny-weeny. Down:2 Immense, 3 Dodge, 4 Almond, 5 Mountie, 6 Relax, 7 And so forth, 8 Hocus-pocus, 13 Comrade, 15 Opinion, 16 Merely, 18 Inapt, 20 Rifle. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 89 101112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425 1234567 89 101112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Treat unjustly (5 4 Wild with anxiety (7 8 Determined (3 9 Free to roam (9 10 Ponder (7 11 Additional (5 13 Detest (6 15 Name of eight English kings (6 18 Norttheast African country (5 19 Lachrymose (7 21 Bony-plated burrowing animal (9 23 Beam of light (3 24 Model of excellence (7 25 Unfashionable (5 Down 1 Aprofligate (7 2 Without deliberation (3,2,4 3 Social blunder (5 4 Cold in manner (6 5 Everything considered (3,4 6 Excessively (3 7 Acquit (5 12 Precipitately (9 14 Downcast (7 16 Held up (7 17 Obtained by theft (6 18 Inundate (5 20 Shun (5 22 To spoil (3 fbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Famous composer? Hear hear! (5 4 Take a trip? (7 8 Part of a wheel that projects about a centimetre (3 9 Brothers not on speaking terms with one another (9 10 Imagined to be highly favoured? (7 11 Way in which the sentry loses his head (5 13 Such fruit is to be put in water (6 15 Stalin’s ultimate strategy had an offensive element (6 18 How bread’s gone up? (5 19 Place to thicken stew (7 21 Betrayed like a bride in church may be (5,4 23 Sash 50% too big (3 24 One who treats wounds in the chest? (7 25 He sings or follows half the score (5 Down 1 Amatch for the devil (7 2 I can’t mess around with the meanings of words (9 3 All for those making notes (5 4 Adrink mixed and swallowed by the shy (6 5 Numerous men put in place around the East (7 6 Transport of internal combustion (3 7 Attempt at sex appeal, we hear (5 12 Feel depressed when you land (5,4 14 Games period shown in new inn sign (7 16 City in great trouble (7 17 Asticker for the traditional method of roasting (6 18 Stiff clothes I’d put on (5 20 Hear a way to form a meeting (5 22 Contend it’s a quarter after six (3 Across:1 Cheapskate, 8 Rabbi, 9 Allegro, 10 Flemish, 11 Emend, 12 Resume, 14 Stroll, 17 Newts, 19 Plastic, 21 Evening, 22 Ramps, 23 Life tenant. Down:2 Hebrews, 3 Alibi, 4 Swathe, 5 Ailment, 6 Eagle, 7 Goldilocks, 8 References, 13 Mastiff, 15 Ottoman, 16 Spigot, 18 Wheel, 20 Apron. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Windjammer, 8 Humid, 9 Maudlin, 10 Concern, 11 Texas, 12 Stench, 14 Get off, 17 Opium, 19 Earlier, 21 Unaware, 22 Faith, 23 Teeny-weeny. Down:2 Immense, 3 Dodge, 4 Almond, 5 Mountie, 6 Relax, 7 And so forth, 8 Hocus-pocus, 13 Comrade, 15 Opinion, 16 Merely, 18 Inapt, 20 Rifle. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 89 101112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425 1234567 89 101112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u c e s s h Across 1 Treat unjustly (5 4 Wild with anxiety (7 8 Determined (3 9 Free to roam (9 10 Ponder (7 11 Additional (5 13 Detest (6 15 Name of eight English kings (6 18 Norttheast African country (5 19 Lachrymose (7 21 Bony-plated burrowing animal (9 23 Beam of light (3 24 Model of excellence (7 25 Unfashionable (5 Down 1 Aprofligate (7 2 Without deliberation (3,2,4 3 Social blunder (5 4 Cold in manner (6 5 Everything considered (3,4 6 Excessively (3 7 Acquit (5 12 Precipitately (9 14 Downcast (7 16 Held up (7 17 Obtained by theft (6 18 Inundate (5 20 Shun (5 22 To spoil (3 fbrf J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Famous composer? Hear hear! (5 4 Take a trip? (7 8 Part of a wheel that projects about a centimetre (3 9 Brothers not on speaking terms with one another (9 10 Imagined to be highly favoured? (7 11 Way in which the sentry loses his head (5 13 Such fruit is to be put in water (6 15 Stalin’s ultimate strategy had an offensive element (6 18 How bread’s gone up? (5 19 Place to thicken stew (7 21 Betrayed like a bride in church may be (5,4 23 Sash 50% too big (3 24 One who treats wounds in the chest? (7 25 He sings or follows half the score (5 Down 1 Amatch for the devil (7 2 I can’t mess around with the meanings of words (9 3 All for those making notes (5 4 Adrink mixed and swallowed by the shy (6 5 Numerous men put in place around the East (7 6 Transport of internal combustion (3 7 Attempt at sex appeal, we hear (5 12 Feel depressed when you land (5,4 14 Games period shown in new inn sign (7 16 City in great trouble (7 17 Asticker for the traditional method of roasting (6 18 Stiff clothes I’d put on (5 20 Hear a way to form a meeting (5 22 Contend it’s a quarter after six (3 Across:1 Cheapskate, 8 Rabbi, 9 Allegro, 10 Flemish, 11 Emend, 12 Resume, 14 Stroll, 17 Newts, 19 Plastic, 21 Evening, 22 Ramps, 23 Life tenant. Down:2 Hebrews, 3 Alibi, 4 Swathe, 5 Ailment, 6 Eagle, 7 Goldilocks, 8 References, 13 Mastiff, 15 Ottoman, 16 Spigot, 18 Wheel, 20 Apron. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Windjammer, 8 Humid, 9 Maudlin, 10 Concern, 11 Texas, 12 Stench, 14 Get off, 17 Opium, 19 Earlier, 21 Unaware, 22 Faith, 23 Teeny-weeny. Down:2 Immense, 3 Dodge, 4 Almond, 5 Mountie, 6 Relax, 7 And so forth, 8 Hocus-pocus, 13 Comrade, 15 Opinion, 16 Merely, 18 Inapt, 20 Rifle. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 101112 13141516 17 1 81920 212223 2425 1234567 8 9 101112 13141516 17 1 81920 212223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a BY STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Treat unjustly (5 4 Wild with anxiety (7 8 Determined (3 9 Free to roam (9 10 Ponder (7 11 Additional (5 13 Detest (6 15 Name of eight English kings (6 18 Norttheast African country (5 19 Lachrymose (7 21 Bony-plated burrowing animal (9 23 Beam of light (3 24 Model of excellence (7 25 Unfashionable (5 Down 1 Aprofligate (7 2 Without deliberation (3,2,4 3 Social blunder (5 4 Cold in manner (6 5 Everything considered (3,4 6 Excessively (3 7 Acquit (5 12 Precipitately (9 14 Downcast (7 16 Held up (7 17 Obtained by theft (6 18 Inundate (5 20 Shun (5 22 To spoil (3 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Famous composer? Hear hear! (5 4 Take a trip? (7 8 Part of a wheel that projects about a centimetre (3 9 Brothers not on speaking terms with one another (9 10 Imagined to be highly favoured? (7 11 Way in which the sentry loses his head (5 13 Such fruit is to be put in water (6 15 Stalin’s ultimate strategy had an offensive element (6 18 How bread’s gone up? (5 19 Place to thicken stew (7 21 Betrayed like a bride in church may be (5,4 23 Sash 50% too big (3 24 One who treats wounds in the chest? (7 25 He sings or follows half the score (5 Down 1 Amatch for the devil (7 2 I can’t mess around with the meanings of words (9 3 All for those making notes (5 4 Adrink mixed and swallowed by the shy (6 5 Numerous men put in place around the East (7 6 Transport of internal combustion (3 7 Attempt at sex appeal, we hear (5 12 Feel depressed when you land (5,4 14 Games period shown in new inn sign (7 16 City in great trouble (7 17 Asticker for the traditional method of roasting (6 18 Stiff clothes I’d put on (5 20 Hear a way to form a meeting (5 22 Contend it’s a quarter after six (3 Across:1 Cheapskate, 8 Rabbi, 9 Allegro, 10 Flemish, 11 Emend, 12 Resume, 14 Stroll, 17 Newts, 19 Plastic, 21 Evening, 22 Ramps, 23 Life tenant. Down:2 Hebrews, 3 Alibi, 4 Swathe, 5 Ailment, 6 Eagle, 7 Goldilocks, 8 References, 13 Mastiff, 15 Ottoman, 16 Spigot, 18 Wheel, 20 Apron. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Windjammer, 8 Humid, 9 Maudlin, 10 Concern, 11 Texas, 12 Stench, 14 Get off, 17 Opium, 19 Earlier, 21 Unaware, 22 Faith, 23 Teeny-weeny. Down:2 Immense, 3 Dodge, 4 Almond, 5 Mountie, 6 Relax, 7 And so forth, 8 Hocus-pocus, 13 Comrade, 15 Opinion, 16 Merely, 18 Inapt, 20 Rifle. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1234567 89 1 01112 13141516 17 181920 212223 2425 1234567 89 1 01112 13141516 1 7 181920 212223 2425 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 I NSIDE Local sports news n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THE C.R Walker Knights built an 86 point lead after day one, and nearly doubled their margin on day two to claim the tenth Government Secondary Schools Sports Association Track and Field Championship in School History. The Knights delivered another dominating performance on the culminating day of the 16th annual GSSSA Championships claiming three of the four cont ested divisions. C .R Walker totaled 614.50 p oints, 151 points ahead of the second place finishers, the C.V Bethel Stingrays who totaled 463.50. The C.I Gibson Rattlers finished third with 449.50 points, C.C Sweeting Cobras weref ourth with 333.50 and with a win on the final race of the daythe Senior Boys’ 1600m relay, the Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins edged out the R.M Bailey Pacers for fifth place with 303.50. The Knights won the Intermediate Girls, Senior Girls, and Senior Boys divisions by an average margin of 30 points and lost the Intermediate Boys division by just 11 points to the Stingrays. The Knights trio of talented sprinters, O’Jay Ferguson, Marva Etienne and Ivanique Kemp added to their sprint titles from day one. Ferguson, in the Intermediate Boys’ division added to his 100m and 400m crowns from opening day with a first place finish in the 200m and a thrilling come from behind anchor leg that gave the Knights 1600m relay team the unexpected win. Kemp added to her three first place finishes in the Senior Girls’ division on day one (100m, 100mH, 400m relay with a win in the 200m and as a member of the winning 1600m relay team. In the Intermediate Girls division, Etienne finished third in the 200m and was a member of the winning 1600m relay team to go along with her first place finishes in the 100m and 100mH from day one. Elvardo Carey continued his dominance in the field for the Knights after setting a new record in the Senior Boys’ shot put. Carey added to his medal haul with a win in the Javelin and just missed a first place finish in the Discus, losing by just 0.03m. C.I Gibson’s Katrina Seymour continued to be one of the leading performers of the meet. Seymour broke her second record of the meet in the Intermediate Girls’ division when she surpassed the 16 year old mark. Her time of 24.45s beat out Altrice Taylor’s time of 24.57s set in 1993. Knights Head Coach Floyd Armbrister said his team was able to repeat due to a full team effort from a wide cross-section of student athletes. “It feels good because we have a great mixture of kids. These kids come from different backgrounds. A lot of people look at C.R Walker and they see the kind of structure we have and they say negative things like C.R Walker is doing this and doing that. But I think the public needs to look at the positive side and see that these kids are doing something con structive in society,” he said, “I would like for all the schools, especially a new school like Anatol Rodgers to take pages from C.R Walker so we can make this whole Bahamas a better place. I would like to take my hats off to all he coaches att he schools who have worked so hard. I know the Minister was out here and he can see now that the competition is nota a blowout but everyone is competing. It is not about win ing or losing but about how we p lay the game.” A rmbrister noted the benefits his team has reaped because many of his students are members of local track clubs such as Club Monica, Roadrunners, Spirit of Excellence and Jumpers Inc, but also lauded the work of his staff who have managed to mold elite athletes who do not belong to any members of the aforementioned clubs. Knights claim tenth GSSSA title P HYSICAL T HERAPY ‘COULD IMPROVE C ARIFTA H OPES’ BAHAMAS TRAIL ON DAY ONE AT DAVIS CUP THE Bahamas men’s national team fell behind 1-0 in the first match of the American Zone II Davis Cup tie yes terday in Paraguay. G rand Bahamian native Timothy N eilly, playing at the number two seed, lost in three straight sets, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2 to Paraguay’s top seed Ramon Delgado at the Yacht Golf Club in Paraguayo, Lambare. The second match between the Bahamas’top seed Devin Mullings andP araguay’s No.2 seed Diego Galeano was in progress up to press time. The final results was not available. Depending on the outcome of that match, today’s doubles will be a pivotal one for the Bahamas. The team of Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle will try to keep the Bahamas hopes alive when they play the team of Delgado and Galeano in the doubles. The reverse singles are set for Sunday. The matches are being played in the evening because of the intense heat in Paraguay. TENNIS FINAL POINTS STANDINGS C.R Walker (CRW614.50 C.V Bethel (CVB 463.50 C.I Gibson (CIG 449.50 C.C Sweeting (CCS333 Doris Johnson Marlins (DDJ303.50 R.M Bailey Pacers (RMB300 G.H.S Magic (GHS148 Anatol Rodgers (AR132 DAY TWO COMPLETE RESULTS INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Ferguson, O'Jay (CRW Finley, Toriano (AR Farrington, Anthony (CVB INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Hanchell, Marlon (CVB Davis, Patrick (CCS Mott, Derinardo (CIG INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Wells, Denzil (CCS Rolle, Cleso (DDJ Rolle, Percy (AR INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Higgs, Delvano (CRW Sands, Chris (CCS Ferguson (CVB INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 CRW Ferguson, O'Jay; Higgs, Delvano; Stuart, Travonn; Dabio, Javaun, 3:40.72s RMB Butler, Giovanni; Edgecombe, Jason; Swann, Leewood; Darville, Brandon, 3:43.79s CVB Lockhart, David; Hanchell, Marlon; Moncur, Anthony, McKenzie, Shaquille, 3:45.57s INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 McDonald (GHS Bullard, Delmaro (RMB Nottage, Leroy (DDJ INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Swann, Leewood (RMB Moncur, Anthony (CVB Farrington, Anthony (CVB INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Albury, Isaac (DDJ Dorsette, Tavari (CRW Martin, Stelin (GHS INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Ingraham, Ronald (CIG McDonald (GHS Edgecombe, Jason (RMB INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 Seymour, Katrina (CIG Adderley, Teshon (CVB Etienne, Marva (CRW INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 Cherilus, Angela (AR Lewis, Safara (CRW Stubbs, Ashley (CRW INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 Sears, Hollina (CCS Lewis, Safara (CRW Rahming, Edricka (CRW INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 CRW Lewis, Safara; Etienne, Marva; Rahming, Edricka; Stubbs, Ashley, 4:15.30s CIG Robert, Cassandria; Colebrooke, Vashti; Seymour, Katrina; Rolle, Tiffany, 4:22.16s CVB Flowers, Tonea; Adderley, Teshon; Watt, Earnisha; Hart, Kennisha, 4:43.29s INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 Rogers, Terranique (CCS INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 Williams, Racquel (CVB Hutchinson, Danielle (CVB Rahming, Samara (DDJ SENIOR BOYS (U20 Mackey, Trevor (DDJ Deveaux, Delano (DDJ Hinsey, Ulysses (CVB SENIOR BOYS (U20 Altidor, Kevin (CCS Williams, Ramon (CIG Mitchell, Jason (CRW SENIOR BOYS (U20 Pierre, Sedel (CVB Seveus, Vicnel (CIG Williams, Valentino (CCS SENIOR BOYS (U20 Lightbourne, Dellano (CRW Hall, Jerwaine (CIG Hanna, Peter (CVB SENIOR BOYS (U20 Doris Johnson Deveaux, Delano; Burrows, Crashad; Clarke, Michael; Hughes, Jean, 3:33.38s C.I Gibson Williams, Ramon; Hall, Jerwaine; Cash, Cody, Sturrup, Rashard, 3:36.59s C.C Sweeting Lightbourne, Perez; Altidor, Kevin; Payne, Byron; Thompson, Ishmael, 3:42.17s SENIOR BOYS (U20 Richardson, Charles (CRW Clark, Clinton (CVB Babbs, Tehneil (CRW SENIOR BOYS (U20 Strachan, Shawn (RMB Carey, Elvardo (CRW Rolle, Cordell (RMB SENIOR BOYS (U20 Carey, Elvardo (CRW Smith, Harold (CVB Dawkins, Phillip (CCS SENIOR GIRLS (U20 Kemp, Ivanique (CRW Knowles, Antonya (CRW Kelly, Cache (RMB SENIOR GIRLS (U20 Miller, Shaunte (GHS Dean, Glendin (CRW Darling, Rashan (RMB SENIOR GIRLS (U20 Crooks, Tanya (CIG Adderley, Mitchalyn (CRW Justilien, Sydline (RMB SENIOR GIRLS (U20 C.R Walker Dean, Glendina; Kemp, Ivanique; Knowles, Antonya; Adderley, Mitchalyn, 4:15.65s R.M Bailey Justilien, Sydline; Kelly, Cache; Johnson, Tonia-Kay; Darling, Rashan, 4:28.62s C.I Gibson Crooks, Tanya; Dames, Avianna; Moss, Ratrice; Wallace, Latonya, 4:36.49s SENIOR GIRLS (U20 Belle, Jenesta (CVB Gordon, Giavanna (CCS Gibson, Robin (CIG SENIOR GIRLS (U20 Stuart, Shatyna (CVB Kelly, Cache (RMB Dames, Avianna (CIG GSSSA 16TH ANNUAL SENIOR TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

PAGE 10

n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net OVER the past two decades, the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations has watched as its front running position at the Carifta Games has dropped dramatically all the way down to sixth. And every year, the question is asked: When and how will we regain our status as a powerhouse in the region? On Thursday night at the Wellness Center at the College of the Bahamas, Orthopedic/Neuromuscular Therapist, Edwardo Thompson and chiropractor Dr. Dwight Marshall provided some insight on how to achieve that status. It could start this year, if they are given a chance to travel with the national team heading to St. Lucia. The two therapists, who have been working with a number of the junior and even elite ath letes in the country, may have addressed a group of parents, coaches and athletes whom they were able to convince. Absence But Thompson admitted that they were disappointed that the powers that be who needed to hear their plea were not in attendance. “It could have been better. I expected more people to be here, but the truth of the matter is that we needed to inform the coaches and the public at large about what’s happening and what needs to happen as we raise the level to get our athletes to go where they need to go,” said Thompson, who heads the International Orthopedic Sports Therapy. Although they didn’t attract some of the “movers and shak ers” in the athletic world, Thompson said they have written to the BAAA and the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, outlining their plans and their desire to travel with the Carifta team over the Easter holiday weekend. Thompson said they intend to host another meeting when they can actually present their case in the same type of manner to the BAAA and hopefully that will convince them to give them the opportunity to travel with the team. During their presentation, Thompson and Marshall used a power point demonstration to show the things they intend to introduce to the national team level, a plan they say that other countries are doing and will definitely make a difference in the Bahamas’ success or failure. Pre-event therapy They discussed the importance of pre-event sports therapy, post-event sports therapy, sports recovery, performance enhancement and performance nutrition, giving the argument that there are “no short cuts to a dream.” “We have to look at how we can enhance certain areas,” Thompson said. “We know that there are cer tain things that can be done and we presented them tonight. Hopefully it will be accepted by the BAAA.” Public relations officer Kermit Taylor and Ray Hepburn, the president of the New Providence Amateur Athletic Association were among those in attendance. But nei ther acted on behalf of the association. Hepburn, who will also travel as the manager of the Carifta team, said he was so impressed with what he heard that he’s definitely going to lobby to have the therapists a part of the con tingent going to St. Lucia. “The rest of the world is ahead of us and these are the things to help us get to the next level,” he said. “So if the rest of the world is doing it, I don’t see why we can’t do it too.” Marshall said for a long time, he and Thompson having been trying to implement their plan into the whole sporting community, but track and field has been more in the forefront because we work with so many of the athletes. “The Bahamas has the ath letes on the world stage. Now we have to put the sporting cast out there as we inform our athletes about what is out there and what we can provide to keep them on top,” Marshall said. If allowed to travel, Thompson and Marshall said they will ensure that the national teams will have a orthopedic sports therapist, a chiropractor and a bio mechanics sports therapist/sports massage therapist. And all of the things that are taken for granted will be supplied on the trip for the ath letes. That includes first aid service, water, heat/ice pack treatment, whirlpool, stretching area, recovery tent, athletes lounge tent, magnet insoles and form balls. Impresssion Bradley Cooper, the athletic coach at the College of the Bahamas, who hosted the meeting, said the concept is something that should be implemented on all national teams. “We are a very passive peo ple and a passive nation,” he added. “We don’t know how to be aggressive. But this is just showing us the things that we need to do to become champions.” Coach Greg Cash of Spirit of Excellence Track Club said the presentation was definitely “an eye opener” for him. “I know I’ve advocated for some of these things for us to have whenever we travel,” Cash said. “I know for years we have suffered because of our prepa ration for the national team, not just in track and field, in other sports like basketball. “But now that we can go from the physical part of the sport to the scientific aspect, I think it will go a long way in enhancing us as a nation. So I say let’s run with it.” Another coach Dexter Bodie said the presentation was a very “strong and powerful” one, but he felt that more time is needed to properly provide the full impact. “It’s an excellent idea, I know it can work and I hope that whenever they do it again, there will be more people out because here was a lot of food for thought and the only way we can improve is to use the scientific methods that are coming up,” Bodie said. Suzette Bethel, mother of Pauliann Bethel, said she was very impressed with what she heard. “As a parent, I’m always con cerned about the injuries that my daughter sustained and I’ve found out that there are things that we should be doing that we are not doing,” she said. “I feel if we know these things, we can help our athletes a lot better.” And Perry Thompson, father of Zhivago Thompson, said he got some valuable information on the preparation of the athletes and life in general. “I’ve always wondered why the rest of the Caribbean is ahead of us but like it was indi cated in the presentation, the scientific methods is one of the key components and there are a number of things that we need to implement so that we as a country won’t suffer,” Thompson stated. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS K e r m i t T a y l o r / P h o t o s ON Saturday, the Bahamas Government Departmental Softball Associa-t ion will officially open its 31st season at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. Thora Sweeting, who has served as the association’s president for the past 12 years, said it had grown by leaps and bounds and was now considered the most exciting recreational league in the country. “The league has served a positive p urpose since its inception,” said Sweeting, referring to the initial season in 1979. “It has brought persons in the Public Service together, engendering friendships which are sustained and memories that will last a life time.” Sweeting said over the years the BGDSA had made significant progressi n softball, both locally and internationally and she anticipated that the future shone brightly as evident through the tremendous interest and support displayed by both their fans and spectators. “I am so excited about our 31st anniversary, the opportunities and challenges that are ahead of us as we move forward and attempt to accomplish all o f our goals for 2009,” she said. “I hope that each of you share my excitement, as I look forward with eager anticipation to the full support of our members and fans.” On Saturday at noon at Baillou Hills, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister will deliver the keynote address at Baillou Hills. Alvin Smith, the Speaker of the House of Assembly and former president of the BGDSA, along with Romell ‘Fish’ Knowles, president of theB ahamas Softball Federation, are both expected to make brief remarks. Throwing out the ceremonial pitches are Reginald Ferguson, Commissioner of the Royal Bahamas Police Force; Clifford ‘Butch’ Scavalla, the Commodore of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force; Ken Griffin, president and CEO of Bahamas Telecommunications Company; Joe Johnson, manager of Premier Importers and Sandy Schaefer, president of Robin Hood Enterprises. Entertainment will be provided by the Aquinas College Marching Band, CC Sweeting Dance Group, RM Bailey and CR Walker Junkanoo Groups and God Missionary Dance Angels. The opening ceremonies will climax with a junkanoo rush-out and fireworks d isplay at 6:30 pm. At 1:45 pm, there will be the releasing of the balloons. At 2 pm, the first game will get underway between the 2008 ladies champions Police Royals against 2008 runnersup Finance Health Invaders. Shortly afterwards, 2008 and sixteen (16D efence Force Floaters will battle 2008 runners-up Police Chiefs. The bouncing castle, ballooons and lots of prizes will be given out to the children and fans on opening day. Thompson Trading personnel will be on hand to give out paraphernalia while supplies last. The opening ceremony will be broadcast live on 104.5 FM from 2-6 pm. In her president’s report of 2008, Sweeting said the season got underway with pomp and circumstance. The games, according to Sweeting, were well attended and the fans support was not where it ought to be, however, some adjustments would be made to correct the situation. “We had an excellent softball season a nd for the first time for a very long time that the league finished its season extra early, which was a plus,” she said. We had one death in the league last year, Charles ‘Wire’ Smith, a former player of the Defence Force Floaters. He is sadly missed by all of the members and fans.” This year’s Player’s Appreciation Day on Saturday, July 25 will be held in his honour and called the “Charles ‘Wire’ Smith Plater’s Appreciation Day.” S weeting took the time out to congratulate the three-time defending ladies’ champions Police Royals and 16-time men’s champions Royal Defence Force Floaters. The runners-up were the Finance Health Invaders in the ladies’ division and the Police Chiefs in the men. TheF loaters won the pennant in the men’s Paradise League, the Chiefs in the men’s Tropical League and the Invaders in the ladies. The league, which is comprised of eight ladies and ten men’s teams, could not be as successful without the compassionate, sensitive and patience exhibited by the umpires, namely Dave Mortimer, Van Johnson, Darren Mortimer, P hil Culmer, Robert Smith, Cyril Smith, Michael Hanna, Thomas Sears and Ross Coleby. Sweeting also mentioned chief statisticians Marjorie Delaney and Rozina Taylor, as well as scorers Althea Clarke, Loretta Maycock, Karen Richardson, Bridgette Sweeting, Celestine Ford, Christine Jenoure and Ms McCardy for their efforts. All teams are advised that rosters a nd entrance fees must be brought in before May 3. Any teams in violation of meeting the deadline will not be allowed to play unless they meet their obligation. BGDSA season begins today M inister of Youth, Sports and Culture s et to give the keynote address Thora Sweeting DO you remember the days of the Hobby Horse Race Track? Those were considered the good old days” when spectators rushed to the C able Beach strip to particpate in horse racing b etting. Above, Tribune Sports brings back the those memories. There’s a photo of some of the h orses in action and you can see some of the p atrons as they gear up for the action. BLAST FROM THE PAST Physical therapy ‘could be key to improving Carifta hopes’ Edwardo Thompson and Dr. Dwight Marshall address the audience on the benefits of therapy.

PAGE 11

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 53F/12C Low: 56F/13C Low: 63F/17C Low: 66 F/19C Low: 63F/17C Low: 66F/19C Low: 68 F/20C Low: 57F/14C High: 80F/27C High: 80F/27C High: 78 F/26C High: 79F/26C High: 80F/27C High: 77 F/25 High: 79F/26C Low: 59F/15C High: 76 F/24C Low: 61 F/16 High: 77 F/25CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 58F/14C High: 78F/26C Low: 68 F/20C High: 77F/25C Low: 57 F/14C High: 75F/24C Low: 60 F/16C High: 78F/26C Low: 61F/16C High: 80 F/27C Low: 60F/16C High: 76 F/24C Low: 59 F/15C High: 79F/26C Low: 62F/17C High: 80F/27C Low: 62 F/17C High: 80F/27C High: 75F/24CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MARCH 7TH, 2009, PAGE 11THE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Breezy with plenty of sunshine. Mainly clear and breezy. Breezy with a full day of sunshine. Partly sunny. Bright and sunny. High: 79 Low: 68 High: 81 High: 81 High: 82 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Sunshine and patchy clouds. High: 82 Low: 70 Low: 71 Low: 70 AccuWeather RealFeel 76F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 66F 79-71F 87-68F 82-70F 88-68F Low: 69 TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 77F/25C Low .................................................... 66F/19C Normal high ...................................... 78F/26C Normal low ........................................ 65F/18C Last year's high .................................. 85F/29C Last year's low .................................. 72F/22C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.98"Normal year to date ......................................3.77" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Full Last New First Mar . 10 Mar . 18 Mar . 26 Apr . 2 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:27 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:15 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 2:55 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 3:50 a.m. Today Sunday Monday T uesday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 4:22 a.m.2.810:40 a.m.0.0 4:45 p.m.2.510:49 p.m.-0.2 6:22 a.m.2.912:34 p.m.-0.1 6:43 p.m.2.7----7:15 a.m.2.912:49 a.m.-0.3 7:35 p.m. 2.91:23 p.m.-0.2 8:04 a.m. 3.01:43 a.m.-0.4 8:23 p.m. 3.0 2:08 p.m.-0.3 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 88/3170/21s88/3170/21s Amsterdam46/739/3pc48/839/3r Ankara, Turkey56/1339/3sh54/1237/2r Athens61/1646/7t63/1748/8pc Auckland72/2261/16sh70/2160/15pc Bangkok96/3578/25c94/3478/25t Barbados84/2874/23sh84/2874/23s Barcelona59/1547/8s61/1650/10s Beijing52/1137/2s57/1332/0s Beirut82/2768/20pc69/2058/14pc Belgrade45/738/3r41/535/1r Berlin41/534/1sh45/736/2c Bermuda 70/2166/18s74/2368/20s Bogota66/1848/8r67/1947/8t Brussels48/841/5pc48/839/3r Budapest49/941/5sh45/738/3cBuenos Aires 84/2864/17pc81/2766/18pc Cairo92/3361/16c78/2552/11s Calcutta 99/3778/25s98/3675/23s Calgar y35/15/-15sn6/-14-13/-25sn Cancun81/2764/17pc85/2965/18pc Caracas82/2767/19c84/2865/18rCasablanca 66/18 53/11 s 74/2357/13pc Copenhagen 42/539/3sn42/539/3r Dublin52/1137/2r41/534/1snFrankfurt 45/7 37/2c46/734/1sh Geneva42/536/2c48/841/5c Halifax49/933/0c41/523/-5snHavana 83/28 60/15 pc85/2960/15s Helsinki32/028/-2c30/-127/-2sn Hong Kong 66/1859/15r68/2063/17c Islamabad77/2549/9pc81/2749/9pc Istanbul56/1345/7r59/1546/7shJerusalem 84/2862/16s63/1743/6pc Johannesburg 73/22 54/12t77/2557/13s Kingston 83/28 74/23pc83/2874/23pc Lima85/2971/21sh85/2971/21c London 54/12 41/5 pc42/539/3sn Madrid57/1337/2pc66/1837/2s Manila95/3575/23s93/3375/23sh Mexico City81/2745/7s77/2543/6s Monterrey91/3264/17s93/3365/18pcMontreal 48/834/1c43/634/1c Moscow 32/027/-2sn36/230/-1sn Munich32/026/-3sn37/236/2r Nairobi87/3055/12pc90/3256/13s New Delhi90/3259/15pc90/3259/15s Oslo 32/028/-2sf32/030/-1sn Paris 50/1043/6pc52/1137/2r Prague43/633/0sh40/438/3c Rio de Janeiro84/2874/23sh83/2875/23sh Riyadh83/2855/12s86/3059/15s Rome57/1341/5pc55/1241/5s St. Thomas 81/27 71/21pc81/2771/21s San Juan91/3269/20pc88/3171/21t San Salvador91/3266/18s90/3271/21pc Santiago90/3255/12s90/3255/12s Santo Domingo82/2763/17pc81/2764/17s Sao Paulo80/2665/18t77/2566/18t Seoul 49/928/-2pc46/730/-1c Stockholm34/130/-1sf36/232/0sn Sydney81/2763/17pc79/2662/16r T aipei 68/20 60/15r71/2165/18sh Tokyo54/1243/6pc52/1143/6r Toronto46/734/1r42/532/0c Trinidad86/3073/22t89/3177/25sh Vancouver46/728/-2c41/523/-5pcVienna 45/7 39/3r49/943/6c Warsaw41/531/0sh39/334/1c Winnipeg16/-810/-12pc31/014/-10sn HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodaySundayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:ENE at 12-25 Knots3-5 Feet7-10 Miles74F Sunday:ENE at 10-20 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:ENE at 15-30 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles74F Sunday:ENE at 12-25 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:SSW at 15-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-8 Miles74F Sunday:ENE at 10-20 Knots6-10 Feet7-10 Miles75F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 62/1632/0pc61/1637/2s Anchorage25/-310/-12s27/-218/-7s Atlanta 76/24 50/10pc75/2355/12pc Atlantic City60/1549/9pc66/1842/5pc Baltimore68/2046/7pc70/2146/7pcBoston 56/13 43/6pc48/833/0r Buffalo54/1239/3r40/437/2r Charleston, SC73/2253/11s78/2556/13s Chicago48/839/3r48/833/0rCleveland 56/13 44/6sh54/1245/7r Dallas78/2564/17c86/3062/16t Denver39/324/-4c55/1226/-3pc Detroit52/1138/3r50/1036/2r Honolulu78/2567/19pc79/2667/19pcHouston 78/25 67/19 pc80/2664/17c HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySunday T odaySunday T odaySunday Indianapolis 66/1850/10c62/1646/7t Jacksonville79/2649/9s79/2652/11s Kansas City 62/16 48/8t59/1539/3r Las Vegas64/1741/5s68/2045/7s Little Rock74/2361/16pc76/2457/13tLos Angeles 64/17 48/8pc64/1750/10s Louisville74/2357/13pc74/2353/11t Memphis76/2461/16pc75/2359/15t Miami80/2664/17s80/2666/18s Minneapolis 38/3 25/-3c34/122/-5sn Nashville75/2355/12pc71/2155/12t New Orleans78/2563/17pc79/2663/17c New York60/1549/9pc57/1344/6r Oklahoma City74/2349/9c74/2349/9pc Orlando 80/26 56/13 s83/2859/15s Philadelphia62/1647/8pc65/1843/6pc Phoenix72/2249/9s74/2350/10s Pittsburgh67/1952/11pc66/1843/6t Portland, OR47/837/2pc47/834/1sn Raleigh-Durham 75/2353/11s81/2753/11s St. Louis66/1857/13c68/2045/7tSalt Lake City 41/528/-2c45/729/-1c San Antonio 79/26 65/18 pc83/2865/18t San Diego62/1652/11pc62/1653/11s San Francisco59/1545/7pc57/1344/6sSeattle 45/734/1sh43/632/0sn T allahassee 78/2546/7s78/2552/11s Tampa80/2658/14s80/2663/17s Tucson69/2044/6s71/2147/8s Washington, DC70/2152/11pc70/2151/10pc UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries SnowIce AccuWeather.com

PAGE 12

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE the scene N ASSAU E VENTS C APTURED O N C AMERA by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP DR TOM TRAVES,president of Dalhousie University of Nova Scotia, Canada, became the first president of that institution to pay an official visit to the Bahamas. The president met with local Dalhousie alumni at a grand reception at the Eastern Road home of businessman Franklyn Wilson (a 1969 graduate) and his wife Sharon Wilson. Dalhousie is one Canada’s leading universities, located in beautiful downtown Halifax. Its students rank fourth in terms of the numbero f national academic awards won. The studentfaculty ratio is 14 to 1 – the lowest in Canada. Dalhousie professors are among Canada’s research leaders, winning more than 80 per cent of the research awards in Nova Scotia, and often providing special research and learn ing opportunities for students. Dalhousie has 10 faculties and undergradu ates can choose from 3,500 unique courses. During his address, Dr Traves noted the financial strength of the university, pointing out that Dalhousie is relatively free of debt and has an endowment which is already one of the largest in Canada and is growing, even in the face of challenging economic realities. Mr Traves said Dalhousie University is prepared to contribute to the advancement ofn ational educational objectives in the Bahamas and has undertaken to explore possible strategies for doing so. In addition to an impressive roster of alumni from the Bahamas, there is currently 56 Bahamians enrolled at the university. Dalhousie University the President visits DR Traves had the opportunity to dialogue with Janyne Hodder, president of the College of the Bahamas. DR KIRKLAND Culmer (medicine 1965); economist, attorney and author Anthony Thompson (honors, commerce 1965); former principal nursing officer at Princess Margaret Hospital, Dorothy Davis Phillips, (nursing studies 1967); businessman Franklyn Wilson (honors , commerce, 1968) share a brief moment with Dr Traves. KARA Culmer-Wilson, an accounting major at Dalhousie, and her mother Olga Culmer, chief financial officer at Bacardi. THE PRESIDENT of Dalhousie and alumnus Keitra Pratt listen to Dr Robin Roberts outline how he learned to perform kidney transplants at Dalhousie’s medical school, one of the best in Canada. MELISSA Williams-Rolle, a 2001 graduate, and Sean Rolle speak with Shanrese Bain, a 1997 graduate. DR TRAVES is given a broad introduction to the Bahamas by alumni Dr Danny Davis, registrar at the College of the Bahamas; Keith Beneby and Dominio Williams a senior accountant at Deloitte. FLOYD DYKEMAN, vice president of external rela tions for Dalhousie University, chats privately with alumnus Donovan Ingraham, whose father, Don Ingraham, is an executive at the RIU Hotel on Paradise Island and was the chef for the reception. TONYA GALANIS, the first Bahamian principal of the Eugene Dupuch Law School, welcomed the opportunity to explore areas of possible co-operation with Dalhousie’s law school, the oldest in the Commonwealth outside the UK. PROMINENT educators attended the reception, including Dr Celestine Williams, president of the Bahamas Baptist Community College and her husband McPherson Williams.




WEATHER

FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY

HIGH
LOW

Pye mes Tacs daha

McDonald's downtown

m Lhe Tribune

755 ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE 7 1
68F ees cee ee

drive-thru is now open

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays



<2

Volume: 105 No.87





SUNNY AND =

|
| i

7 F

"i
i
AY f
i
i

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

SIT US TO
hw et ,

ill

Unemployment

at 13-Vear high

Jobless rate at
12.1% for New
Providence

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE latest unemployment
figures show that the number
of people out of work in the
Bahamas is at its highest level in
15 years.

Providing hard evidence of
the effect of the global eco-
nomic decline on the Bahamian
economy and labour force, the
Department of Statistics’ acting
director, Kalsie Dorsett,
revealed the figures at a press
conference yesterday.

Figures show that around half
of all people who are without
work in Grand Bahama lost
their jobs in the last six months,
with 48 per cent of these people
reporting having been “laid-off
or dismissed”.

In New Providence, one third
had become jobless in the same
period, and of these, 44 per cent
were laid off or dismissed.

Overall, in New Providence,
unemployment among the

RASS
Ww wv

——
BOS

Offer Good Until;
March t4th

| $900 | $300

per 5-pack

per 5-pack

i a) ee,



134,400-strong labour force rose
from 8.7 per cent in May of last
year to 12.1 per cent, based on
the interim survey conducted
last month.

This leaves a total of 16,315
people looking for a job on this
island alone.

Meanwhile, in Grand
Bahama, the number of people
without work jumped to 14.6
per cent, equivalent to 4,195 job
hunters in a labour force of
28,820.

To be defined as “unem-
ployed” an individual must have
been actively looking for, as
well as being “willing and able”
to work, during the reference
period.

The interim survey, unlike
the annual May survey, does
not reflect the number of “dis-
couraged” workers - another
important figure which includes
people without a job who have
stopped looking for one. How-
ever, Mrs Dorsett said that “ini-

SEE page 6



25ins deep: 4 ;900
J1ins deep: 52,500)
Lateral 4 Drwer: 53,200 |

~hESS THAN U.S. PRICES!

folate gD
af a7 se

UU Gra RSAC Ca

THE four men charged in connection with a $60,000 BTC

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

robbery. From left are: Medico Johnson, Angel Johnson,
Kellen Johnson (with dark blue jacked, face hidden) and Her-

mis Newbold.

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

FOUR Eleuthera men
accused of breaking into the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation (BTC)
complex on that island and
stealing nearly $60,000 worth
of cellular phones and phone
cards were arraigned in a
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Angel Johnson, 25, Hermis

Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time will
begin at 2am tomorrow, March
8, and will continue until 2am
on Sunday, November 1.

This is in keeping with the
policy adopted in October,
2006, to extend Daylight Sav-
ing Time to begin the second
Sunday in March and end the
first Sunday in November.

Remember to set your clocks
ahead one hour when you go
to bed tonight.

Newbold, 20, Kelin Johnson,
39, and Medico Johnson, 27,
all of Governor’s Harbour,
were arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez and
Magistrate Ansella Williams
in Court One, Bank Lane,
charged with shopbreaking
and stealing.

It is alleged that between

SEE page 6







PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

tht
ADLT & CHAMDON

Roberts hits

out on ‘sick’
BTC claims

Denies intervening to
get PLP backers jobs

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Former PLP minister
Bradley Roberts has blasted
Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing for what he
termed “sick and unfound-
ed” allegations that he hired
people politically at the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation.

Accusing Mr Laing of not
being forthright about the
matter, Mr Roberts claimed
that a purported internal
BTC document tabled by Mr
Laing in the House of
Assembly on Thursday failed
to show that he had person-
ally intervened to ensure
PLP supporters were hired
at BTC during his tenure.

“The basis for the junior
minister’s vicious and

CLICO
‘politics’
attacked

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Minister of State
for Finance James Smith
denounced the political finger-
pointing from both sides over
the CLICO (Bahamas) debacle
saying if any blame should be
cast for the company’s financial
problems it should lie at the feet
of the US financial crisis.

Mr Smith's statement came
in the wake of reported com-
ments from Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, who spoke
on the matter as the House of
Assembly wrapped up the
2008/2009 mid-year budget
debate on Thursday night.

Around midnight, parliament

SEE page 6

unfounded accusation
appears to be a three-page
typed internal document of
BTC which (he) sinisterly
conveyed was penned by me
that gave specific instructions
to BTC officials to hire per-
sons chosen by my PLP col-
leagues. I categorically deny
that I gave any such instruc-
tions and robustly condemn
the junior minister for his
unfounded, unsubstantiated
and sick allegations,” said Mr
Roberts in a statement issued
yesterday.

“The board minutes of
BTC will affirm that approval
was given to employ some
100 persons, mainly entry lev-
el positions, following
requests from senior man-
agers to which minister’s
approval was given in 2006.

SEE page 6

Jobless
urged to

register

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net



In the face of rising unem-
ployment, the government yes-
terday renewed its call for all
unemployed people, especially
“those with qualifications”, to
register as soon as possible with
the Labour Exchange so no
more permits for foreigners are
approved than need be.

Minister of Labour, Senator
Dion Foulkes, said the govern-
ment will “continue to do all it
can to minimise the downturn
on Bahamian families” and may
“heighten its stimulus package”
depending on “how things go
in the economy” over the next

SEE page 6

Students robbed
during track meet

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

STUDENTS were robbed
by three outsiders during a
track and field meet involv-
ing around 900 Government
High School students at
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

tre yesterday.

Police apprehended three
men alleged to have threat-
ened three students with a
screwdriver and a piece of
wood as they stood near the
swimming complex at the
sports centre in Thompson
Boulevard just before noon.

SEE page 6


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

Rotary Club donates computer to Kelly family

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

SUPPORT has poured in for the Kel-
ly family after The Tribune reported
how robbers stole their computer which
was a Vital link to their chronically ill
daughter’s specialist in Miami.

The New Providence Rotary Club
donated a new computer to Ronald and
Lina Kelly of Great Britain Street after
burglars stole a laptop which provided
continuous access to the gastroenterol-
ogist at Jackson Memorial Hospital who
monitors their five-year-old daughter
Roshan’s rare condition.

Roshan was born with volvulus, a

twisting of the short intestine, and short-
bowel syndrome, which makes it difficult
for her to digest food and requires her to
be fed from an IV tube every four hours.

The club donated a computer in time
for the family to take it to the hospital in
Miami when they took Roshan there
for surgery last month, so they could
have it configured with programmes
allowing them 24-hour access to their
doctor.

Readers touched by the story pub-
lished in The Tribune on February 12
have since contacted the Rotary club
with offers to help the family.

President of the New Providence
Rotary Club Rodney Collie said: “This
story certainly touched the hearts of

many, and the professional manner in
which it was reported made it even more
appreciated.

“Many times in our society the only
stories that appear to get significant cov-
erage is ‘bad news’, but clearly this was
one of hope and represents what we
can do as corporate and civic citizens
to make a difference.

“As a result of your front page cov-
erage, we’ve had countless persons
approach us, willing to assist this family
and support our efforts.

“T would like to thank The Tribune
for helping to pass on a message of hope
and positive change to our communi-
CVn
Roshan travelled to Miami for surgery

to insert an IV port in her chest follow-
ing The Tribune’s publication last
month, and Mrs Kelly said she is recov-
ering well and desperate to go back to
school.

The mother-of-one, who is a full-time
caregiver for Roshan, said: “Since the
article appeared, a lot of people have
been calling me asking how she is.

“We are so grateful to Rotary for the
computer, without it we would be in
real trouble.

“But she is feeling well, even 24 hours
after the surgery she was jumping
around, it doesn’t hurt her.

“She wants to go back to school to see
her friends, but she still needs to be
careful.”

Police slammed for not apprehending

tourists accused of trespassing

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE POLICE have been slammed for failing
to apprehend tourists accused of trespassing,
chasing endangered birds and slaughtering a pet
duck on a private cay off Long Island.

Crew members of a US sailboat were seen
walking through the grounds of Hog Cay in Joe
Sound, Long Island, on Sunday, February 22,
and the following day they posted details on the
internet of how they chased the protected West
Indian tree ducks populating the island before
they caught and killed a rowan, a barnyard duck
owned by property owner Peter Graham and his
family, complete with photographs of the plucked
carcass in a roasting pan ready for the oven.

The innards, neck and wingtips of the duck
were found on the beach surrounded by Bud-
weiser beer cans by caretaker and Bahamas
National Trust warden Earl Wilson the following
morning.

He said the island — normally teeming with
around 1,500 endangered West Indian tree ducks,
or whistling ducks — was silent.

Mr Graham has been praised by the National
Trust for encouraging the population of West
Indian tree ducks to grow from just three in 1969
to nearly 2,000 across Long Island by feeding
them at a cost of around $35,000 a year.

However, the sensitive ducks were so disturbed
by the sailboaters’ escapades they have been hid-
ing since the event nearly two weeks ago.

Mr Wilson said: “It has just been so quiet, there
are no birds. They are very, very timid and they
just started to come back in the evenings, but

Saturday

MULTI

yesterday (Thursday) was the first time I have

seen them out in the morning.”

The crimes were reported to Inspector Dun-

combe at Simms Police Station in Long Island, but } ===

when the crew were seen in Exuma he referred :
the matter to Inspector Strachan in George Town. }

Inspector Duncombe told The Tribune the crew }
were wanted for questioning in relation to tres- }
passing allegations but officers in Exuma were }

: PICTURED in front of Murphy’s exhibit are Nicholas Colclough and

: Katherine Solomon.
Peter Graham’s daughter Amanda Graham }

has criticised the attitude of police in dealing }

Nicholas ‘adopts’
_spiny-tailed

“The general perception is that we should just

‘iguana at Ardastra

ture here, and perhaps that is the mentality of the :

unable to locate the sailboat after receiving the
report on February 26.

with the case and even hanging up when the fam-
ily have tried to call for updates.

She said: “We filed a complaint and they
haven’t done anything.

get over it but they are not seeing the bigger pic-

police themselves.”

The sailboat, from Daytona, Florida, has been : 2 Rs
? recently acquired a “parent.

reported to its home marina and US officials.

wae Hg ec sisinee ee . School, adopted Murphy from the Ardastra’s adopt-an-animal
by an Exuma magistrate for possession of juvenile
| on cams ita Eis boee ae oe ae named Murphy,” the eight-year-old told Katherine Solomon, wid-

a dinghy filled with baby conch and cooking an }

iguana on a barbecue.

Chief Executive of the Bahamas National Trust

Eric Carey said: “Crimes against the environ- }

ment should not be given less importance than : assured him that his donation will help feed and care for Murphy.

other crimes.

are not of any level of importance.”



MURPHY, a spiny-tailed iguana at Ardastra Gardens and Zoo,
Nicholas Colclough, a second grade student at St Andrews

programme.
“T chose Murphy because my friends in Canada have a dog

ow of Ardastra’s late owner Norman Solomon.

“T thought it would be cool to adopt an animal with that same
name.”

Mrs Solomon thanked Nicholas for his kind sponsorship and

Ardastra’s adopt-an-animal is a recently launched sponsorship

Tien eefiene oties Tex umrder and acqned : programme which allows children the opportunity to financially sup-

robbery need to be given priority, but environ- }

mental crimes don’t need to be treated as if they : : : a ; 3 ;
? animal and permitted to visit their animal at any time.

port an animal at the zoo for a period of one year.
The children are given an “adoption certificate” for the sponsored

5S Vo OFF

Montrose Avenue
Home & Bridal Center

Your favorite brands of:

China, Crystal, Pots, Pans

Dishes, Flatware, Glassware,
Kitchen Gadgets, Small Appliances
Gift Items, Table Linens and

much much more.

Expecting
Brides come
and register
your bridal

selection
TODAY.

THE TRIBUNE





“Man plead
guilty to stealing

e A 28-year-old man

: appeared in Magistrates Court
: yesterday facing several counts
? of stealing.

Shane Mackey, who

i: appeared before Magistrate
? Carolita Bethel in Court 8,
? Bank Lane, pleaded guilty to
? stealing hundreds of dollars
? from several people after fail-
? ing to deliver on the sale of a
? vehicle.

According to court dockets,

? it was alleged that between
? February 2 and February 13,
i Mackey, of Seville Avenue,
? conspired to commit the
? offence of stealing by reason
i of service.

It was further alleged that

i during that time, Mackey stole
: $1,500 cash from Jeanelle
? Francis, $600 cash from Lisa
i Lightbourne, $3,400 from
? Danny Altidor and $2,000
? from Nadia Campbell by rea-
? son of service.

Mackey was remanded to

Her Majesty’s Prison. He is
i expected to be sentenced on
? Monday.

Andrea Murphy, 26, plead-

? ed not guilty to two counts of
? conspiring to steal by reason of
? service.

She also plead not guilty of

i two counts of abettement to
? stealing.

Murphy was granted bail in

the sum of $7,500. The case
? has been adjourned to March

“Vangerine Nairn, 31, of

: Haven Subdivision, also plead-
? ed not guilty to one count of
? conspiring to steal by reason of
? service and one count of abet-
? tement to stealing.

She was also granted bail in

the sum of $7,500 with two
? sureties.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
822-2157



=>

March 7th, 2009

DISCOUNT

Super Party Center

Birthdays:

Dora, Princess,
Barbie, Diego,
Superman, Batman,
Hanah Montana,
1st, 40th & More

Anniversary!
25th, SOth

Baby Shower
Wedding Shower
Variety of Solid Colors

Balloons, party favors,
seasonal items.

We currently have Easter
ltems on display.

ROYAL DOULTON

Cuisinart CORELLE. (PYREX)

With any purchase you can register towin a $200, $300 and Grand Prize $500 Gift Certificate to be used
at Multi Discount Home & Bridal Center or Multi Discount Super Party Center.

BEAT ure
PRIiCces MoT
EVEN IM MLAMI!

APPLIANCES
VWVE ACCEPT ALI

BY |
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS

Salers

el eae ee te |
(Just North of Bahamas Bus & Truck Co)

Prone:

=~5-2040 = 3:

ed a ee

EVERYBODY
KNOWS WE
HAVE THE

IN NASSAU


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Ex-MP continues
justice fight for
murdered son

DETERMINED not to
allow the murder of his son
Mario to be swept under the
rug, former Trade Minister
Leslie Miller appeared on the
radio programme Real Talk
Live yesterday to shed light
once again on the many road-
blocks his family has endured
in their seven-year battle for
justice.

Explaining that he has per-
sonally spoken with Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham to
plead with him to not allow
the case to be buried like so
many others, Mr Miller said
he was assured someone from
the Attorney General’s Office
will be in contact with him.

Despite these assurances,
however, Mr Miller said his
son’s case has been postponed
once again and will not start
until October.

Mario was the victim of a
gruesome homicide nearly
seven years ago, and the trial
of two men accused of his
killing captured the attention
of the entire country.

When the trial concluded
last year it resulted in a hung
jury where 11 jurors found the
accused men guilty with one
juror insisting on returning an
innocent vote.

Mr Miller said: “The prime
minister told me that he
spoke to the AG (Michael
Barnett) and the AG was sup-
posed to call us to let my fam-
ily know that the case would
start. But I have not gotten a
call from the AG.

“And I have called the
prime minister every week
and it has not happened and it
will not happen,” Mr Miller
exclaimed.

During this statement Mr
Miller was interrupted by host
Ortland Bodie Jr, who asked
how he could not hear a word
from the AG’s office.

“You are a man who has
some influence, or who I
believe has some influence?!”
said Mr Bodie. “So what is
going to happen to you and




your family?” he asked.

“My father taught me years
ago,” Mr Miller continued,
“You don’t have to like pow-
er, but respect power because
it could destroy you and it
could malign your life.

“Now if somebody is
responsible for putting cases
forward — for example the
(Keith) Carey murder case
just happened. Mr Carey,
God bless him, got shot a few
years ago. Mario’s case is now
almost eight years old and the
man made a decision that it
will be done when he wants it
to be done. So there is noth-
ing my family or I can do
about it.

“T have spoken to the PM
on it. He is the leader of this
country. He told me that he
gave the AG instructions that
it has to be done and I would
get a call from the AG. I nev-
er got a call from the AG. I
called him again and I know I
will never get a call from (lead
prosecutor Bernard) Turner.
But that’s fine. Because Mr
Turner has the power and he
can do as he pleases,” Mr
Miller said.

However, as Mr Miller
added, he will one day be
back in Parliament “sooner
than others might think” and
there he will use that platform
where he is free from libel
prosecution to deal with this
matter.

“Because once you become
a regular citizen people take
advantage of you and do
whatever it is they have to do.
But I can live with that, and
my family has to live with that
until Mr Turner decides it is
time for this case to go for-
ward.

Following the programme,
Mr Turner contacted Mr
Miller and explained that he
was not responsible for bring-
ing trials before the court and
that the case ultimately is in
the hands of the defence
attorneys who allegedly need-
ed more time to prepare.



More lay-offs
in hotel sector

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GINN Resorts in Grand
Bahama announced yesterday
that due to the global financial
crisis it is forced to eliminate 28
workers from its Old Bahama
Bay and Ginn sur Mer proper-
ties.

To an already downtrodden
island, these further lay-offs are
just the most recent reminder
of what is yet to come in the
tourism industry as the interna-
tional financial crisis continues
to wreck havoc on the global
economy.

Citing these challenges, Ginn
officials said these the lay-offs
are a part of their efforts to
“streamline costs and maximise
efficiencies” at their Grand
Bahama properties.

These reductions in staff will

Ginn cuts 28 workers at
$4.9bn West End project,
Old Bahama Bay property

affect the hospitality operations
and “several other areas of the
company’s workforce,” a com-
pany press release said.

According to Ginn’s senior
vice-president Al Jones, the lay-
offs are an unfortunate result
of the unprecedented global
financial meltdown and is simi-
lar to what other companies are
facing both in the Bahamas and
around the world.

“The decision to reduce our
workforce was a very difficult
one to make, but given the
economy and the low levels of
occupancy at Old Bahama Bay,
we had no alternative,” Mr

Female lawyers group
receives scholarship aid

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Chapter of the Inter-
national Federation of Women
Lawyers (FIDA) received a
contribution of $5,000 from the
Alice Sauberli Trust Fund for
its scholarship fund.

Attorney Branford Christie
made the presentation to the
scholarship committee of FIDA
(Federacion Internacional de
Abogadas) at Maryann’s
Restaurant on Thursday.

Mr Christie, who attended
FIDA’s installation banquet in
January, had pledged to donate
$5,000 to the scholarship fund

IT’S A TIME OF JOY AND JUBILATION!

f’'S AGRAND TIME OF
PRAISE AND € ELEBRATION’ H



BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD Monday, March 9th, 2009

Genera! (erseer
BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON

General Preshytei

Bishop Dr. Elearnet B. Rahming, National Overseer

& Mewlerator will dchver his ANNUAL ADDRESS.

S10 AM

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN

Global Outreach Director
BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK

CBL [nstrector

MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE

Infermatronal Director of Women’s Ministries
BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN
Regional Overseer of Jamaica, Cayman

Islands Guyana and French Guiana

and MINISTER SONIA MARTIN
BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS

Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islands
BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES
National Overseer of the Church of Ceoxd,
Bahumus, Turks & Caioos Islincds

Ministering in song and performance
are: the Centennial Mass Choir, the Tah-
ernmacke Concert Choir, the Chorch of
Cod National Choir, the Bahamas Public
Officers Choir, and other Choirs

Teams and a ee See ali ith,

salers Blas

Youth ard

te Clee

LIVE ¥VIA RADIO BAHAMAS 13-4 AM and

The Convention climaxes on Sanday, March 15th
with the afternoon Annuul Parade and Water
Baplismal Service, folliwed by the evening
Service broadcast live on FNS Radio and TV 13,

log on to: WwW.cogophahamas.org

For live webcasting

on behalf of the Trust.

“T had the pleasure of acting
as master of ceremonies (at the
banquet) and I am aware of the
good works of the organisation,
and knowing that these are very
tough times I thought it would
be appropriate to make a
pledge toward the scholarship
fund,” he said.

Mr Christie said Mrs Sauber-
li was a former resident of
Grand Bahama. He stated that
prior to her death, her invest-
ment was realised and she
established a trust fund with the
proceeds.

Scholarship chairman
Charisse Brown, legal counsel
for the Grand Bahama Devel-
opment Company, said FIDA
is very grateful for the dona-
tion.

7

DAIHATSU

All medals. ore bocked by a 24-monh

Se Ue au)

Dre MBs emit oe ied

ee ry ec Red cos sl
birthday, Roor mots ond full tank of fuel.

_ EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

ATTHORISED DATHATST DEALER

Jones said.

“This is incredibly unfortu-
nate because our employees are
the most important resource
this company has and we great-
ly value their contributions.”

According to the statement,
although occupancy levels are
down at Old Bahama Bay,
progress continues at the Ginn
sur Mer development.

“The company is on sched-
ule for a December 31 comple-
tion date for infrastructure work
at the community which
includes internal road paving,
golf course construction, land-
scaping, water and sewer works

and other projects,” the state-
ment read.

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing recently com-
mented on the lay-offs that con-
tinue to plague Grand Bahama.
With an additional 234 employ-
ees set to be terminated by the
end of May from the Isle of
Capri, Mr Laing said that the
government must continue its
work to “turn things around”
in the local economy.

“That Ginn and others would
be having a similar reaction is
only indicative of the times of
which we find ourselves.

“And we have to empathise
with the people who are laid off
because it is a significant hard-
ship for them but this is what is
happening now and we have to
keep working on doing what we
can to turn things around. But it
is a global economic crisis and
that’s what we’re in,” he said.

Galleria Cinemas

EFFECTIVE

vee Be valle cadl= AT eave Dan oe
hook OFF OR OFENS AT ta) AAD TRAY

MARCH 06th, 2OOn

PWARCHWMEM | art A | ate | rib TMi [idea |

snecrnamen [vo [250 [wa [ose [as [ree
PYLEN PENS MADEA GOES TONAL | iid | ea | A | Gene [ead faceas |

MADE, GOES TO JAIL T ae ame



















ITEP BAT ceo |
PRMIDAY THE 13TH

100 WA te
4: 5

HE'S JUET MoT THAT 1100 RA
TAKCH ao | 1:35

PUM, BAM THER oo | 735 |



* Air conditioning

* 148 diesel engine Gelivers real power
with low noise and superb fuel economy |







* Rope hooks & footsteps for easy loading =

* Aulomatically-adjusting clutch for easy maintenance

* Exhaust broke system for stopping power

* Heavy-duty front & rear suspension systems protect cargo

* Titt/power steering & superb visibility ino comfortable cabin
* Wide, edrelong cargo bed with reinforced frame

Auto Mall, Shirley Street Copp. St ree
Open Mon to Fri 8am -
Sat Bam - 12n00n

Tel: 397-1700
E-mail: execmotoriadbatelnet. bs
Parts and service guaranteed



“ a
Available ls Grand Hahaa et Quality Aete Sales FFreeporl) © Queens Hay, 352-6127 « Abaco Motor Mall, Den Mactey Bhd, 367-2018
PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Challenge faces the conservative movement

ATLANTA — In his recent speech at the
Conservative Political Action Convention, Rush
Limbaugh referred repeatedly to “the conser-
vative movement.”

It’s an accurate phrase. In 21st century Amer-
ica, the conservatives function as a movement
while the liberals function as a party. The dis-
tinction is telling.

Roughly defined, a party is a collection of
groups motivated by different goals but loose-
ly committed to working together. A move-
ment, by contrast, is motivated by an ideology,
a central goal or collection of goals to which its
members pledge loyalty.

“Conservatism is what it is and it is forev-
er’ as Limbaugh put it. “It’s not something
you can bend and shape and flake and form.”

Now, party and movement each has its advan-
tages. A movement, by definition, offers a pas-
sion, energy and direction that are useful in
politics. It inspires loyalty and discipline from its
members, and deviation is frowned upon.

A party, on the other hand, lacks a powerful
internal energy and cohesion. At times, that
lack of defining cause can leave it wandering
through the political landscape. At other times,
that amorphous nature makes a party more
adaptable to change and more open to experi-
mentation.

Today, conservatism’s self identity as a move-
ment presents it with two challenges, one large
but probably temporary; the other existential.

As we saw over the last eight years, a move-
ment tends to lose discipline and sense of mis-
sion once it achieves power. It becomes what it
was trying to change, a phenomenon that has
repeated time and again. It happened to Repub-
licans, it happened in the French Revolution, it
happens always.

The process is captured perfectly in a scene
from George Orwell’s “Animal Farm.” The
animals, motivated by a core set of principles
such as “four legs good, two legs bad,” have
driven off their human bosses.

Victory is theirs; their movement has suc-
ceeded. Then one day, the animals peer through
the farmhouse window and are shocked to see
their leaders, the pigs, walking about on two legs
and acting just like the enemy they had ousted.

Today, the rank and file of the conservative
movement feels similarly betrayed, for good
reason. And now that they have been banished
from the luxuries of the farmhouse, their lead-
ers are back among them, trying to walk on

four legs again and regain credibility.

That’s what the unanimous House GOP vote
against the stimulus package was all about — it
was a gesture of contrition and renewed sub-
mission by leadership to movement ideology.
And given time, that will likely succeed in
repairing the rift.

The second problem is more difficult. Move-
ments are not eternal. They have an organic
lifespan. They rise out of a particular time and
place, they make their impact, and then one of
two things happens. Either they find within
themselves the ability to change with changing
times, or they wither.

That’s the challenge facing the conservative
movement. Times have changed dramatically.
Economically, politically, socially, demograph-
ically, today’s America is very different from the
America that gave birth to the conservative
movement.

The Cold War is over and forgotten; the ’60s
are over and forgotten. The Baby Boomers are
beginning to pass from the stage, as evidenced
by our first post-Boom president.

Those conservatives who understand that are
trying to find new applications and meaning in
their core principles, but that reinvention is dif-
ficult and takes time. Minnesota Gov. Tim Paw-
lenty, for example, told the CPAC convention
that while it is important to “honour and respect
and remember Ronald Reagan,” it’s also time to
move on.

“We need to develop new Ronald Reagans
and new reference points,” Pawlenty told a
Bloomberg reporter. “It would be as if Barack
Obama was going around and constantly talking
about Truman or LBJ. It’s just become a ref-
erence point that isn’t as relevant for young
people.”

But I doubt the conservative movement has
the flexibility to accept that message in all its
complex meanings. As Limbaugh told CPAC,
“The era of Reagan is over? When the hell do
you hear a Democrat say the era of FDR is
over? .... Our own movement has members try-
ing to throw Reagan out while the Democrats
Know they can’t accomplish what they want
unless they appeal to Reagan voters. We have
got to stamp this out within this movement,
because it will tear us apart.”

And if Limbaugh says it, it must be true.

(This article was written by Jay Bookman -
c.2009 Cox Newspapers).



TENDER FOR

The National Insurance Board invites tenders for coverage of its General
Insurance portfolio (property, etc.) for the year commencing june |, IW),
and subject to renewal tor a further two (2) years.

Suitably licensed insurance companies interested in submitting a tender, with
a detailed proposal, should collect an insurance bid package trom the Director's
Office, Ballou Hill Road, Nassau, Baharnas,

All tenders should be sealed, marked “Tender for General Insurance” and
should be hand delivered by 4:00 p.m. on March 31, 2009, to artive ar:

The Dhrector’s Office
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
Clittord Darling Complex
Baillow Hill Road
Nassau, Bahamas

The Board reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

Persons collecting the bid package must present a letter of authorization
from the licensed insurance company betore the package can be released.



Economy
hit by lack
of ‘interest’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I wish to make some comments
on your editorial entitled
"Bahamas policy on interest
rates".

Given that there are many
ways to skin a cat it is universally
accepted that the way to combat
an economic recession is by the
use of a combination of both fis-
cal and monetary policy. This has
been clearly demonstrated by the
Central Banks and Governments
in the United States, The UK and
Europe.

As you indicated the position
of the Bahamas is different from
that of the USA because it is
complicated by the fact that the
Central Bank is constantly in a
balancing act that seeks to main-
tain the parity of the Bahamian
dollar to the US dollar which
requires the maintenance of ade-
quate US dollar foreign currency
reserves. These reserves are
required to pay for the importa-
tion of goods into the Bahamas as
most of our imports are from the
United States. However, Gov-
ernment derives 70 per cent of its
revenue from the importation of
goods and thus the need for the
balancing act; increased imports
result in increased Government
revenue but decreased foreign
reserves and vice versa.

The second difference between
the Bahamas and the US is that
while there is a liquidity problem
in the US, there is no such liq-
uidity problem in The Bahamas
as the liquidity levels in the banks
currently stands at $300 million
which is double the $150 million
level which is generally consid-
ered the level at which there is
cause for concern.

The third difference is that for
the most part all of the retail
banks in The Bahamas are struc-
turally sound and none of them
has sought financial aid from the
lender of last resort which in our
case would be the Central Bank
of the Bahamas. Therefore,
unlike the US where both the
banks and the people are in a
state of acute distress, the banks
in the Bahamas are only in mild
state of discomfort because of
increasing loan default rates but
the Bahamian people like their
counterparts in the US are in
acute financial distress as is the
Bahamas Government.

The concern that the use of
monetary policy (lowering of
interest rates) will put pressure
on our foreign reserves and thus
threaten the parity of the
Bahamian dollar is understand-
able but people must understand
that fiscal policy (Government
spending for infrastructural devel-
opment) will also ultimately result
in a strain on our reserves
because those persons fortunate
enough to become employed as
result of Government spending
will also consume products and
services which will ultimately lead
to the importation of goods and
thus a drain on our foreign
reserves. Government's argument
against this is that the $120 mil-
lion that is being borrowed
through the IDB for the road
work project is a US dollar loan
and therefore will not be a drain
on our existing reserves. This is
true in the short term, but in the
long term the loan payments will
have to be paid back with US dol-
lars that will have to be sourced

Box:

‘a’
i
=
x
=

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia net



from our foreign reserves.

There are two important points
related to an economic recession
recovery that must be under-
stood. The first is that a country
has to spend its way out of a
recession. The ultimate purpose
of both fiscal and monetary poli-
cy is to create liquidity in the sys-
tem so that there is money avail-
able to be spent by consumers to
allow them to consume and mon-
ey available to businesses to allow
them to stay open to provide
goods and services for the con-
sumers. This is the theory behind
how spending aids the economy.

The second point is that for
every new dollar that enters the
economy it is probably spent at
least five times before it results in
any importation or drain on the
foreign reserves. Thus this veloc-
ity of money in and of itself helps
to stimulate the economy.

The editorial quotes a local
unnamed banker who makes the
point that Bahamians are at an
advantage compared to their
American counterparts, because
the rates of return on our savings
and Government bonds are high-
er than those in the United States.
He is absolutely correct but the
other side of the coin is that the
cost of borrowing funds in the
Bahamas is far greater than in
the United States. The interest
rate spreads in The Bahamas are
some of the highest in the world
and indeed this is one of the rea-
sons why the banks in this country
are so structurally sound or in lay-
man's terms "making so much
money". It is well known that
banks only need a 2 per cent
spread to make a good profit
however, the spreads in The
Bahamas can range from 5 per
cent to 10 per cent. In other
words the high cost of money eas-
ily offsets any potential gain that
savers and bond holders would
achieve given the higher rate of
return that they currently receive
on their savings compared to their
counterparts in the US.

As well, the unnamed banker
failed to disclose the fact that the
banks calculate the interest on
savings accounts based on the
minimum monthly balance and
not the average daily balance as is
the case in Canada.

Furthermore the interest is
paid into the savings accounts
either quarterly or biannually.
The net effect of these predatory
practices is that each year
Bahamians who have savings
accounts in the banks miss out on
millions of dollars because of the
way the interest is calculated.
Additionally to add insult to
injury during these hard eco-
nomic times First Caribbean
Bank has increased its banking
fees with regard to savings and
current accounts which will also
offset any potential gain from the
relatively higher savings rates. If
FCB is the good corporate citi-
zen that I believe it to be then it
should immediately reverse this
decision to increase the savings
and current account fees. Of
course if FCB's decides to stand
by their decision then account
holders always have the option

DA 69806

c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207

of moving their accounts to
another bank.

As well, if the Central Bank
were to decrease the discount
rate, the cost of Government bor-
rowing would be greatly reduced.
For example, if the national debt
is $3.5 billion and if interest rates
were lowered by 1 per cent then
Government's debt repayments
would be reduced by $35 million
per year. By the same token if
there are $6 billion of private
loans then this 1 per cent reduc-
tion would put another $60 mil-
lion into the economy each year.
Both of these are examples of the
positive effect of monetary policy
and both at no extra cost to Gov-
ernment.

The fact of the matter is that
we need to use a combination of
fiscal and monetary policy to
revive our economy. Of course a
lot of these issues would disap-
pear if we were to abandon
exchange control and dollarize
our economy but that's another
topic for another day.

JOHN RODGERS
Nassau,
March, 2009.

Baha Mar set
to ‘Miss’ out
EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am not a hotelier, but
something is out of whack
with the ongoing responses
by the BahaMar Group con-
cerning the Miss Universe
pageant in August. I am
hearing phrases like “com-
pelling circumstances” and
“leaving the door open” and
“overwhelming demand”; it
is like some financial tsunami
has to occur before a deci-
sion is made concerning
something that is inevitable.
I don’t get it, you have an
opportunity dropping in your
lap and you “cut up”. Maybe
BahaMar is in some other
business and the hotel thing
is just something they do on
the side. Supplying rooms for
visitors is what hotels do and
they are going to be a lot of
visitors before, during and
after the pageant, and a good
number of them really can-
not afford to stay over the
bridge.

If another property had
the gumption to send a group
from the Bahamas to lobby
for this pageant, then “all”
properties have a responsi-
bility to get on board. I am
sure the government will
offer some kind of incentive
to all and sundry. This is an
opportunity for all Bahami-
ans, and everyone has to be
on board.

I cannot even begin to
imagine what our competi-
tors further south and in the
north would have given to
get this event, and here we
are. Out of sheer gratitude
we must be seen to want to
be on board.

EDWARD
HUTCHESON
Nassau,

March 5, 2009.



A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

"I vex that despite all this }
crap that is going on in the }
tourism sector and our econ- }
omy, while in a local hotel on :
Cable Beach I passed a }
concierge dealing with a guest }
so rudely. The guest was only }
asking her (the concierge) to }
recommend a good restaurant :
and she treated him like any }
old common person on the }
street and answered him with
a grunt. The guest had to ask }
her to make a reservation, }
when she should have sug- i

gested that.

"I worked as a concierge in }
a four-diamond resort in
Florida and I can tell you that :
a concierge should be the epit- }
ome of service. I was disgust- }
ed, so imagine how the guest :
felt. No hotel anywhere can }
consider itself a part of the }
hospitality sector without }
excellent service. I think the }
government should get rid of }
the 15 per cent gratuity so }
these hotel workers can pre- :
tend to give me good service }
before I can tip their (back-

side)."

- Vex at Slack Employees.

"I vex that in this ailing }
economy more Bahamians ;
aren't thinking outside the }
box and trying to find solu-

tions to their own dilemma
instead of waiting for the gov-
ernment to fix things. I mean
it's only so much the govern-
ment can do anyway and that
have to go through parliament
anyway.

"Now is the time for cre-
ative and jobless Bahamians
to be make their own money,
start a lil’ business and just
work hard. ‘Cause things ain’
going to get better for a long
time and we in for a rough
ride."

- Concerned Citizen.

"T vex at how lightly it seem
that some leaders are taking
this CLICO liquidation fias-
co. Saying it is uncertain
whether we policy holders and
annuity holders will get our
full investments back. Then
they say these irregularities
were noted from years ago.

"Tell me why someone
somewhere with sense didn't
stop this madness before it
put people's life savings in
jeopardy? People who were
placed in positions of respon-
sibility need to be held
accountable for this - because
I ain’ want to lose out on a
sound investment while these
bigwigs sit pretty.”

- Scared all my money gone.

"I vex, vex cause a US
report cites anti-Haitian prej-
udice in my Bahamas. Now if
dem surveyors did see some
60,000 illegal Haitians or 20
per cent added to our 300,000
population on our small
islands, or same 20 per cent,
equal to 60,000,000 illegal
aliens added to their 300 mil-
lion US population, den dey
gon see dey is a big problem.

"Dem surveyors mussey
ain't even know dat dem ille-
gals even get free hospital, free
school, dey get free land to
live on in da bushes, dey don't
pay NIB tax, dey don't even
travel to Miami to shop and
come back an pay Customs
taxes like most of we Bahami-
ans. Dey is undercut we legal
union wage labourers an dey is
still Haitians cause dey born
Haitian for life an dey is wel-
come anytime to return home
to Haiti where dey like to fly
dey Haitian flags in my
Bahamian face an you dare
tell me I is prejudice.”

- Well Muddoes.

WHY YOU HAPPY?

"I happy because some
work is going on out east at
Eastern Road and Yamacraw
- McPherson's Bend - con-
crete kerbs, pea rock and four
comfortable benches that face
the sea add to the relaxing
atmosphere. Good work, peo-
ple!”

- Enjoying the Sea View

BSTCG calls for support to
_ ban sea turtle harvesting

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN an effort to gain traction
for a ban on sea turtle harvest-
ing, the Bahamas Sea Turtle
Conservation Group (BSTCG)
is urging concerned citizens to
inundate the Minister of Agri-
culture with letters of support
for the proposed legislation.

While commending Agricul-
ture Minister Larry Cartwright
for his efforts to protect marine
resources, co-chairman of
BSTCG Kim Aranha lamented
the fact that the turtle harvesting
ban is in danger of not being
passed due to dismal support
from Bahamians.

"He (Mr Cartwright) indicat-

¢ WANTED ¢ WANTED ¢ WANTED e









ed that parliament wanted to
hear from more Bahamians sup-
porting this Bill,” she said.

According to Ms Aranha, Mr
Cartwright told her while his
ministry has received numerous
letters from foreigners in sup-
port of the ban, local support
has been minimal at best.

Ms Aranha feels this lack of
input is due to the fact that many
Bahamians who support a ban
on all turtle harvesting are under
the impression that such a law
is already in place.

All species of marine turtles
have been classified by interna-
tional authorities as "threatened
with extinction” or endangered.

In the Bahamas, only the
Hawksbill Turtle is on the list of
animals protected by law against

British Colonial Hilton's
Sumptuous Breakfast Buffet Offer!

Take a break this weekend and
have breakfast at The Portofino Restaurant

Saturday & Sunday

Sunday Brunch

Offer valid for local resid
15%) gratuity added to all food,/bevera

capture. Other turtles are pro-
tected from capture during a
closed season which runs from
April 1 to July 31, once they are
over a certain size - but others
are fit for capture.

In November, Minister
Cartwright announced that as of
January 1, 2009, commercial har-
vesting of turtles and long-line
fishing would become illegal. His
statements came after months
of furor over what activists
termed "inhumane" treatment
of threatened sea turtles.

Activists claimed some fisher-
man haul the animals ashore
onto boat ramps, turn them on
their backs in the sun, tie their
flippers with straw and slaughter
them alive.

Mr Cartwright also said that

effective April 1, any turtle har-
vesting would be in breach of
the law. That legislation has not
yet been passed.

"T think there are a lot of peo-
ple who are not aware the law
has not been passed,” said Ms
Aranha.

Now the BSTCG is taking
action - through a mass e-mail
petitioning like-minded Bahami-
ans to e-mail or fax Mr
Cartwright their opinions.

Less than 24 hours after an
initial plea was sent to her e-mail
contact list, Ms Aranha said she
received 65 calls and e-mails of
support. She expects this number
to increase to the hundreds in
the coming days.

"Unless we band together and
write letters of support it will not

get passed, and turtle pie will
stay on the menu, and the taunt-
ing and teasing, the hacking and
torture of turtles will continue,"
Ms Aranha said.

She also said the group was
not trying to stifle local fisher-
men's trade and claimed that
"very few people eat sea turtles.”

"We're not really trying to
stop an industry because there is
no industry. There's absolutely
no advantage to harvesting them
except for people to torture
them.

"We have to be mindful for
future generations and the rest
of the Bahamians need to stand
up and protect our resources,”
she said.

For more information visit
www.saveourseaturtles.com.

eall: 322.3301 ext. 4045

WANTED ¢ WANTED e

OSCAR INGRAHAM is wanted by police for
questioning in connection with a burglary which
occurred on January 28. His last known address
was in Strachan's Corner.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

i ENTAA, EXTRA

EXTRA,

Large Shipment
of


























° THE parents of a
teenage girl are asking the
public’s assistance in locat-

ing their daughter who ani al
went missing last month. . — > ie
On Tuesday, February 17, i Pa

Eldricka Ingraham, a 14-
year-old student of DW
Davis School, was reported
missing by a relative.

According to the report,
Eldricka went to school in
her uniform (a green plaid
skirt and yellow blouse)
and never returned home.
She is approximately 4 feet
5 inches tall and weighs
about 110 pounds. Anyone
with information on her
whereabouts is asked to
contact the police at 919,
324-2030, 502-9991, or
328-TIPS.

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

TROPICAL
rs eel

eee UE
PHONE: 322-2157



$995

Lesko eT

item - LL al

$24.95

12 renin Jpn





oe _



CD)
British Colonial Hilton

Phin ea =

Travel should take you places

i
PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Unemployment rate [XRiiiteeetecoeria ‘No logic’ in CLICO

now in double digits

FROM page one

tial indications” were that there
was not “that much of a differ-
ence” in this figure.

She said: “The results of the
survey further show that for the
first time since 2005 the unem-
ployment rate for both New
Providence and Grand Bahama
reached the two digit figure:
12.1 per cent for the former and
14.6 per cent for the latter.

In both islands these are the
highest unemployment rates
experienced since the early
1990s.

The unemployed numbers, in
New Providence, increased by
4,540 people (38 per cent). In
Grand Bahama the unem-
ployed numbers increased by
55 per cent or 1,500 people.

In 2005 unemployment in
New Providence stood at 10.9
per cent, while a total of 11 per
cent were unemployed in Grand
Bahama.

Contextualising the latest fig-
ures, Mrs Dorsett noted that
high rates of 14 per cent were
recorded in New Providence in
1994, and 16.9 per cent in
Grand Bahama in 1992.

Ms Dorsett said the Febru-
ary, 2009, survey found that the
sectors which shed the most
workers in New Providence
were the hotel and restaurant
sector, declining by 10 per cent,
and the construction industry,
which fell by nine per cent.

She added that behind these
two industries, transportation
was the hardest hit - although
the precise rate of decline was
unavailable.

Highlighting the dependency
of the Bahamian economy on
the United States’ economy,
this information became avail-
able on the same day latest
unemployment figures in the
US show the number of people
without a job in that country is
at the highest level in 25 years,
at 8.1 per cent.

The Bahamian statistics were
compiled as part of an interim
survey conducted by the
Department of Statistics in Feb-
ruary in the face of widespread

speculation about the severity
of the unemployment level.

The Department normally
only surveys households for an
annual report in May.

The findings confirm the
expectations of many observers,
including Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, who forecast
in his address to the nation in
January that the figures would
“reach double digits” later this
year as a result of the gloomy
prospects for the global and
domestic economies.

Ms Dorsett noted that even
within the space of time it took
to compile the figures more lay-
offs occurred - most notably at
liquidated insurer CLICO -
which would impact the statis-
tics.

According to the department,
data shows that of those peo-
ple employed, as many as 9.2
per cent had been employed at
their current job for under eight
months.

Of these workers, one quarter
indicated that their reason for
leaving their last job was that
the business had ceased opera-
tions, had dismissed them or
laid them off.

In Grand Bahama, 10 per
cent of people were in this posi-
tion. Meanwhile, a greater pro-
portion - one third - had left
their previous job for the rea-
sons previously cited.

Grand Bahama’s unemploy-
ment level is significantly high-
er among women (17.7 per
cent) than men (11.7 per cent).

In New Providence, the pic-
ture is different - with 12.4 per
cent of men found to be unem-
ployed, compared to 11.9 per
cent of women.

The government announced
during the mid-year budget
debate that an unemployment
benefit fund is expected to be
brought into effect on July 1,
2009, with enabling legislation
likely to be proposed in parlia-
ment on March 25.

Unemployed workers will be
able to benefit from assistance
for a period anticipated to be
between 16 and 23 weeks, said
Prime Minister Ingraham.

Students robbed

FROM page one

One of the boys was robbed
of his jewellery, and other per-
sonal items were stolen by the
men who had pulled up in a
Nissan Sentra.

Chief Supt Hulan Hanna
said: “The police were able to
locate these persons nearby and








three men were taken into cus-
tody. The vehicle has been
impounded by police on suspi-
cion of being a stolen vehicle.
The three men are likely to be
charged.” The boys were not
injured by the robbers.

They were attending the
Government Senior Schools
Sports Association 16th annual
track and field meet.

No Peace

=

te i . ‘
‘Anow Jesus,

‘Know Peace)

FROM page one

few months.

This comes as the government described the latest unemployment
figures - the highest in 15 years - as “indicative of what’s going on
in the international economy”.

Those figures, released yesterday, place the number of people out
of work in New Providence at over 16,000 and in Grand Bahama
at over 4,000 - equivalent to a 12.1 and 14.6 per cent unemployment
rate respectively (see lead story).

Mr Foulkes said: “The unemployment figures for New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama are indicative of what’s going on in the
international economy.

“As you know there’s been a drastic decline, almost a melt-
down in some industrialised nations. For example, in France the
unemloyment rate in January was 15.4 per cent - the highest in
many, many years. In the US the Department of Labour released
their figure - it’s the highest for the last 26 years at 8.1 per cent.
These indicators obviosuly have an adverse effect on the Bahami-
an economy,” said Mr Foulkes.

He said the Unemployment Benefit Fund, which Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham announced during the mid year budget debate,
would be implemented on July 1, 2009. It should “bring some
relief to a lot of families now experiencing a hard time.”

Meanwhile, a training programme for unemployed people expect-
ed to be implemented shortly will have a “work component”
whereby those training to obtain new skills will undertake intern-
ship type work for which they will be given a stipend - providing
some level of employment.

Mr Foulkes said that with “200-400” work permit renewal appli-
cations coming before the Department of Immigration and Labour
ona weekly basis, it is imperative that Bahamians register with the
Labour Exchange if they are to be considered for jobs for which
they may be qualified.

“We want to ensure that those Bahamians who have qualifica-
tions fill those jobs before we give any renewals to foreigners in the
country. We can only know that if they register with the Labour
Exchange, because the Department of Labour sits on the Immi-
gration Board and whenever a permit comes up for review we are
able to make an intervention.”

Asked whether the new statistics would require the government
to alter any of its plans, or if consideration would have been made
for unemployment reaching this level, Mr Foulkes said: “It is
something we anticipated given anecdotal information that was
coming to us for the year 2008.”

‘We have a planned programme over the course of the next 12
months. If things continue to deteriorate, which is possible, we
will increase our economic stimulus,” he added.

In terms of what form a heightened stimulus would take, Mr
Foulkes said it would be a “multi-faceted approach.”

“It would be more social assistance, more jobs being provided by
the government through the various stimulus packages that we
are currently doing,” he said.

political mudslinging

FROM page one

unanimously passed the gov-
ernment’s 2008/2009 mid-year
budget and associated bills.

The former Central Bank
governor, who served as state
finance minister during the
Christie administration, said he
didn't "see the logic" behind
slinging political mud. He rea-
soned that the fault for the
CLICO (Bahamas) insolvency
is borne from the $73.6 million
the company loaned to its for-
eign affiliates - which was in
turn invested in the troubled
Florida-based Wellington Pre-
serve real estate investment.

The government should now
focus on handling the matter at
hand, said Mr Smith, suggesting
more regional communication
with Trinidad and Tobago mov-
ing forward.

While saying he didn't want
to cast political aspersions
about the issue on Thursday
night, Prime Minister Ingraham
fired back at some calls in the
PLP for full disclosure on the
CLICO breakdown. He also
struck out at members oppo-
site by saying that CLICO's
"excessive" lending began in
2004 - while the PLP was in
office.

Yesterday, Opposition
spokesman on foreign affairs
and foreign trade Fred Mitchell
- who has publicly chastised the
Ingraham administration for its
move to put the company in
provisional liquidation last
week - labelled these assertions
"hogwash".

He said by connecting the
dots from public statements by

Mr Ingraham and Registrar of
Insurance Lennox McCartney,
the urgency of the matter was
revealed as early as eight
months ago.

"A look at the public record,
by his (Mr Ingraham's) state-
ments and the Registrar of
Insurance's statements - they
clearly show that negligence
from July, 2008. So they have to
bear that responsibility," he
said yesterday.

Mr Mitchell also defended
his government's record.
"Someone can break into your
house, steal money from your
bank and you may not be aware
of it. You assume that the par-
ty (responsible) was regulating
it. So what is the utility in say-
ing it's the PLP's fault?"

In a lengthy statement on the
issue during Monday's session
of parliament, the prime minis-
ter said "excessive cash
advances" to CLICO Enter-
prises Ltd began in 2004. After
several prudential meetings
starting in 2004, 2006 and 2007,
concern was expressed and
demands made by the Regis-
trar of Insurance that the com-
pany return the then $53 mil-
lion invested. This request,
despite company assurances,
was not met, Mr Ingraham said.

"It was after the receipt of
the 2007 audited financial state-
ments in July, 2008, that the
extent of the real estate invest-
ments was again highlighted,"
he added.

In December, 2008, certain
restrictions were placed on the
company but the investments
were not repaid in the speci-
fied time.

Ex-minister hits back at Laing’s BTC claims

ment following an interview

FROM page one

“The vacancies were adver-
tised internally and externally.
To the best of my knowledge
the selection process was open
and transparent and the suc-
cessful applicants were quali-
fied,” he added.

Nonetheless, the document
tabled by Mr Laing clearly sug-
gests that certain job candi-
dates’ political affiliation,
whether they lived in particu-
lar constituency, and involve-
ment with the PLP were a con-
sideration in the BTC hiring
process in 2007.

It entails a computer pro-
duced table entitled “BTC Out-
standing Approvals”, with
headings including “advertised
positions”, “departments”,
“name of candidates inter-
viewed”’, “selected candidates”
and “recommended by/com-
ments”’.

Mr Roberts name is noted
next to the names of numerous
people approved for employ-

with the corporation under the
“recommended by” heading.

In other cases, candidates
who were approved from
among a larger list of individu-
als identified as having been
interviewed for certain jobs
have a variety of other PLP
MPs’ and ministers’ names next
to them, indicating that these
individuals “recommended”
them for employment at the
government corporation.

In the case of a Jeanette Fer-
guson, the document states, in
computerised text, that she was
“recommended by” then MP
Michael Halkitis. Next to his
name, the document states that
she is a “strong party support-
er.”

A Samantha Ferguson was
approved by MP John Carey.
Next to her name, it says “Fer-
guson is chairman of the
Carmichael PLP branch.”

Meanwhile, in the case of
four others, the document reads
“MP Michael Halkitis supports.
Lives in Adelaide Village”,

BTC theft: Four
plead not guilty

FROM page one

“MP Malcolm Adderley sup-
ports. Lives in Elizabeth
Estates” and “I spoke with MP
(Anthony) Moss on 13/2/7 and
he confirmed his support for
(the named individual).”

According to the document,
which is not signed by anyone
nor contains any evidence of
who would have been responsi-
ble for preparing it, all of the
individuals approved for
employment at BTC got this
approval in March, 2007 — just
two months before the general
election.

The document appears to
show that many individuals
approved for jobs on the basis
of recommendations by political
figures were not the same indi-
viduals who the document iden-
tifies as having been “selected”
on the basis of their perfor-
mance at an interview, bring-
ing into question whether they
were the most qualified candi-
dates for the job.

As he spoke about the docu-
ment in the House of Assem-
bly late Thursday night, Mr
Laing said: “Here we are in this
place and they (opposition
MPs) say to us ‘you are hiring
your supporters’. And I say to
them, ‘I can’t help you, we’re
not doing that’.”’

Speaking towards the closure
of the mid-year budget debate,
his comments came after
numerous PLP MPs alleged

that the government has been
“victimising”’ PLP civil servants
and had politicised the
hiring/firing process.

Mr Laing’s statement on Mr
Robert’s alleged interventions
caused Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham to get up from his
seat, turn and shake Mr Laing’s
hand, and announce that he was
“very proud” of him for it.

Asked yesterday who pre-
pared the document, Mr
Roberts told The Tribune to
“ask Zhivargo Laing that.”

Meanwhile, pressed as to
whether he would consider that
it shows evidence of people
being selected for employment
based on their political affilia-
tion, whether or not there is evi-
dence that he directed for them
to be, Mr Roberts said: “You
can make up your own mind.”

Mr Roberts said his record
reflects that he has hired people
without reference to their poli-
tics.

“One of the last major
apointments I made was a per-
son who people said had FNM
sympathies,” he added.

He said Mr Laing “failed to
tell Parliament and the Bahami-
an people that it was the FNM
government who just before the
2002 general election hired
some 200 persons at BTC on
six-month contracts. I gave
approval to regularise these per-
sons without fanfare.”
















Comes joinjus’as we know, Jesus Personally
by listening and studying the Word of God

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
pt al Ee ad

SUNDAY SERVICES
MMOmUInK Woestum Service

Aduit Ed

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
uth Minty Macaotingy
RADIO MINISTRY

Tis | - TEMPLE TIA

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

SEV Ce UBC eR Al
CREM ere ER Oa obs
SEN OM mE toe Rng

Sunday, March 1, 2009, and Monday, March 2, 2009, the accused
broke into and entered the BTC complex at Pine Street.

It is alleged they stole 9,510 $5 phone cards valued at $47,550, 17
$10 phone cards valued at $170, six $20 phone cards valued at
$120, and six $50 phone cards valued at $300. It is also alleged they
stole several cellular phones together valued at nearly $7,000.

The men, represented by attorney Langton Hilton, pleaded not
guilty to the charges.

The prosecutor, Sergeant Sean Thurston, objected to bail.

Attorney Hilton told the court that the men had been in custody
since Monday. Angel Johnson, Kelin Johnson and Medico Johnson
were granted $7,500 bail with two sureties. The case has been
adjourned to April 21.

Newbold was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison until Monday
when a decision will be made on whether he should get bail.

Grace and eer Wesleyan Chureh
Ce eM Me
North America

Worship Tune: Efacm, & 6pcm.
Prayer Times 2021 Saint,
Charch School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O7.Box S8-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

‘OKO

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, MARCH 8TH, 2009
11:30 a.m. Speaker:

Pastor Cranston Knowles

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching tiam& 7:30pm EVWANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday Gpm - 2N5 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

PasiorH. Mills

"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are*
| Pastor: A. Mills * Prone: 393-0563 * Box N-a22 |

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MARCH 8TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Andre Bethel
11:00 a.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Rev. Carla Culmer
7:00 a.m. Bro.Emest Miller/Board of Music Ministry



“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009, PAGE 7





When is a hospital, a Hospital?

@ By BAHAMAS PATIENT
ADVOCACY

THE 2007 annual report of
the Hospital Board that was
tabled in parliament last
December raises some impor-
tant issues of public interest.

One of those issues is
whether the Hospitals Board
has the ability to function as a
regulator of private hospitals
and clinics under the Hospi-
tal and Health Care Facilities
Act, 1998.

For example, the Hospital
Board has a duty under the
Act to investigate a complaint
into the “diagnosis, treatment
and care” of a patient in a hos-
pital or clinic licensed by the
Hospital Board.

But it seems the Hospitals
Board’s view is that it licenses
the building and its facilities,
and has no duty to oversee the
quality of health care services
provided. The Act itself
defines a hospital as "a build-
ing where beds are available
for the admission of persons
requiring treatment for any
sickness”.

Accountability

Experts say this description
is not adequate. It does not
require a central legal entity
that is responsible and
accountable for all medical
services provided under its
roof. Such a structure, accord-
ing to advisors, would be in
the best interest of the com-
munity for the obvious rea-
sons of safety and ethics.
There is a disconnect here
which can adversely affect
quality assurance in medical
treatment.

Medical advisors to
Bahamas Patient Advocacy
see a hospital as an institution
which accepts patients for
medical treatment, within an
organisation with a centralised
authority responsible for qual-
ity assurance in the delivery
of healthcare services.

It should be the medical ser-
vices that are being licensed
— not just the building - in

Harbour Bay
HALF IS

S0).°% OFF

The other half
Is 15.% OFF

Ask about Our
Gift with

4

order to properly reflect the
modern concept of what a
hospital is. The public needs a
single source of accountability
in healthcare facilities, and a
licensing board to enforce it.
On this basis, a “hospital”,
together with its medical ser-
vices, needs a regulatory defi-
nition as a single (legal) entity.

Under current law, private
hospitals may function as a
collection of independent
physicians providing medical
services, by having practicing
privileges, in a building with
beds and nursing services,
among other things. The
patients would then be admit-
ted as patients of the individ-
ual physician. Sections of the
building may be leased or
managed by different corpo-
rate entities, providing other
medical services.

This structure diffuses
authority and accountability.
For instance, the Act requires
that a healthcare facility
should (among other things)
provide sufficient numbers of
qualified staff who can admin-
ister appropriate care to the
patients admitted.

Authority

But if a hospital is a building
with beds, without medical
management authority, and
medical services are provided
by independent doctors, can
“the hospital” exercise author-
ity to restrict admissions to
only those patients that “hos-
pital” is able to treat?

Or can a private hospital
make the appropriate medical
staff available, if there is no
overall authority that employs
or manages medical profes-
sionals at the hospital?

BPA advisors say that a new
institutional definition is
required, making it clear that

& Sve

Is cutting the store in half

; A a
lt ye
ders. Me.



a hospital is a single interest
entity accountable for the
medical services provided
there. A hospital has to
uphold its own interest
beyond the interests of inde-
pendent professionals and
entities within it. This would
place the hospital in a proper
position to oversee the safe
delivery of healthcare services.

A hospital also needs to
have an internal quality man-
agement structure, which can
immediately respond to any
concerns arising. To do this,
a hospital needs to collect data
on all patients admitted in
order to know whether its
operating units are doing a
good job, and it needs suffi-
cient qualified staff to enable
it to respond.

Common interest

The interests of the patient,
the doctors, and the hospital,
must be one seamless and sin-
gle interest, to improve patient
outcomes. That is the purpose
of a hospital.

Usually a hospital has a
Chief of Medical Staff, or
Chief Medical Officer (CMO).
The CMO has the authority
to ensure the competency of
the doctors practicing there.
He also has responsibility for
the integrity of the hospital
system. That integrity would

include an effective “call” sys-
tem, to ensure that all patients
have medical care available
24/7, so no patient in crisis is
left unattended. In public
health care, a CMO would, or
should, resign in the event of
such a “systems failure”.
Should a private heath care
facility, not also be held to a
similar standard of account-
ability?

The licensing board should
require an independent audit
of the hospital’s health care
services by an outside review
body. This external accredita-
tion could also be used by a
hospital to enhance its cre-
dentials and image. The Hos-
pital Board could thus carry
out its quality assurance- over-
sight function at no expense
to the board, or challenge to
its limited resources.

Law changes

But the 2007 report propos-
es changes to the Act that
would seriously weaken the
Hospitals Board as an over-
sight body.

The board wants the gov-
ernment to amend the Act to
remove the provision for
investigation of complaints,
eliminate the need to provide
notifications of deaths, and
reduce penalties for failure to
comply with licensing require-
ments.

But at the same time, the
Hospitals Board is also
proposing a new and exten-
sive set of hospital regulations.
So, on the one hand, the
board says it wants to reduce
its oversight responsibility, but

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that

HENLEY BIRTHWICK

PERRY of WINTON HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX N-3702,

NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is

applying to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 6 day of March, 2009 to the Minister

responsible for nationality
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



and Citizenship, P.O. Box

Extra 10% off for

Privilege Cards &
Corporate Partners

on the other hand, it wants to
increase regulatory require-
ments?

The BPA advocates that the
board’s oversight capacity be
strengthened, and that the
Hospital Board embrace its
oversight function of quality
assurance, as per the petition
on its website below.

We urge our parliamentari-
ans to consider the Hospital
Board’s report in terms of the
public interest in a safe system

of health care, and oversight
assurance of this.

Good business sense should
dictate that the more confi-
dence the public has in our
local institutions — including
statutory boards — the less like-
ly we will be to spend our mon-
ey abroad for medical care.

¢ For more information, visit:
www. bahamaspatientadvocacy.org







NOTICE is hereby

iven that LENLINE MITCHELL

of MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is



applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and




Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen




of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any



reason why registration/ naturalization should not be




granted, should send a written and signed statement of




the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of




MARCH 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality



and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

















Ea













Well-established Wholesaler

saleperson (females

requires a

are encouraged to

apply) for the snack food division. Individual




must have experience in sales with emphasis




on large food stores. Only individuals with a






proven record

of being able to work

unsupervised and achieve results will be



considered. Must be able to drive standard






shift vehicle and be in possession of current



valid driver’s license. Individuals with their






own transportation will receive favorable





consideration. Company offers good benefits.







Submit applications to:
SPC
P.O.Box N-7124

Nassau, Bahamas
——— ee el

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2008/CLE/qui/01870

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising an area of 13, 436 square feet situate approximately
500 feet west of Lincoln Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach
Court on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions
as are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Mary Jane Smith

era.

Harbour Bay East BAY St. tel.394-5767

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Mary Jane Smith of the Southern
District, of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas in respect of: - ALL
THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising an area of 13,
436 square feet situate approximately 500 feet west of Lincoln
Boulevard and north side of Palm Beach Courton the Island
of New Providence one of the Islands in the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions as
are shown on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Purchase

FG CAPITAL
BROKERAG

Ek ADVISORY SERYIC-ES

cam 1

ROYAL = FIDELITY

MMomey at Woek

oe ee & T.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 6 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.36 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -52.00 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 813.86 | YTD -2.52% | 2008 -12.31%
WVWVW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

Div $
1.39
11.00
7.00

1.45
11.00
7.00

1.45
11.00
7.00

0.070
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.895
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.07
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.43

0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.59
1.43

0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.59
1.50

Mary Jane Smith claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having
Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the petition shall on or before the 27" of April A.D.,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before
the 27" of April A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:The Registry of
the Supreme Court;

The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for the
Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

2.16
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00

2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00

2.16
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00

0.30

5.50

8.60
10.00

0.30
5.50

0.30
5.50

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low

1000.00

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22 100.00

S2wk-Low EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Symbol RE
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED)
RND Holdings

4.540
0.000
0.002

0.000
0.000
0.000

0.00 0.00

0.45 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months

0.00
0.55

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3781
2.9230

1.3812

1.4387
2.8988
1.4428

30-Jan-09
28-Feb-09
27-Feb-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-O7
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

3.3201
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000

3.3201
12.6816
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005

1.0401

0.06

4.01

1.0330 3.30

1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

Dated the 27" day of January A.D., 2009

1.0000
1.0000

3.30
4.10

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Des 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S14) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100




id )
JUDGE PARKER

BARCELONAY
WHAT TAKES
YOU TO
SPAIN?

HOW COME NOBODY
IN MR. B'S CARPOOL
HAS GOTTEN
FIRED YET?

OF PEOPLE
ARE LOSING
THEIR JOBS!

T BOUGHT A

SURPRISE PRESENT
COR STRIPE

HOBBES, I DID IT/ T ATE
ENOUGH BOXES OF CEREAL
TO GET ALL THE PROOF OF

PURCHASE SEALS I NEED! WAIT TO GET IT!
4
SSN




See
Sere

“Do I LOOK LIKE
T NEED COOKIES2”

A CONFERENCE...
ENVIRONMENTAL

z
S
3
&
at
8
g
3
E
5
a
S
2
$
E
4
£
€
5
2
z
2
8
8

PROBABLY \—

BECAUSE



NOW T CAN
ORDER MY BEANIE!
OW BOY! T CANT



“HOW ABOUT SOME
THIN MINTS?”

DREADING BOSS ISN'T A
My "IDIOT" SAWED-OFF,
CLIENT :

=

Sunday

ANP I HAVE
AN EARLY

---60 I'D BETIER
BE GOING AND LET
YOU GET BACK

TO YOUR FRIENDS!

MINE MAKES \3

ATTILA THE
HUN LOOK
LIKE MICKEY \\

HOURS AND
49 MINUTES

MOUSE!



WHAT
DIV You

anne Bury £4 6092)

pron, ou eomude si



4 ANO I'M SURE
YOUR BEANIE WILL
Be THE TALK OF
THE REST HOME,



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

















Difficulty Level * *&*&&











3/06

©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

APT 3-G

IL SAW GARY N SMART MAN’

THIS WEEKEND.
HE APOLOGIZED.

GIVEN THE CURRENT STATE OF THE STOCK
MARKET AND THE FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

eer



KES TT ee TT

PORE Bee



:| DOES THIS MEAN HIS JOB
AT THE HOSPITAL 1S
FINISHED; TOMMIE ?

wONE OF THE WISEST DECISIONS I MADE LAST
YEAR WAS To PUT

Inc. World rights reserved.

www.kingfeatures.com

©2008 by North America Syndi

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

IMSICK AN? TIRE? 2, I WISH You
oe Meee NG a OM WOULON'T THe NEIGHBORS
LATE AT NIGHT JH WERE NOT



7



GETTING ALONG /

cHlss
BLOUNE
©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc, World rights reserved,







Li Meaty (eer a WO,
perry: pois, hi ieee
hee he ges tired Sage
gain Uke pods bc Lag
rhachmae, ong Bearden elo
ast pee crane Pe appear ke
hee roel cud her bee, dee
he ocd a charged Ee Lad
mee ee oe bet rs, nat ar
fe cohen ee ee

Hite Src Debee fo ac! ed
ho eel es eee
i's game o hep, lee,
bape"

Che ED a 2 ig i,
ie th fe. Be Beal 2 ie aie,
cama Tal 2 2 ges Bhd es.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of



each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty



level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.







Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer









































Difficulty Level % er



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down

Across

1 Famous composer? Hear
hear! (5)

4 Take a trip? (7)

8 Part of a wheel that
projects about a
centimetre (3)

9 Brothers not on speaking
terms with one another (9)
Imagined to be highly
favoured? (7)

Way in which the sentry
loses his head (5)

Such fruit is to be put in
water (6)

Stalin's ultimate strategy
had an offensive

element (6)

How bread’s gone up? (5)
Place to thicken stew (7)
Betrayed — like a bride in
church may be (5,4)

Sash 50% too big (3)

One who treats wounds —
in the chest? (7)

He sings or follows half the
score (5)

10

11

13

15

18

19

21

23
24

25

1
2

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Cheapskate, 8 Rabbi, 9
Allegro, 10 Flemish, 11 Emend, 12
Resume, 14 Stroll, 17 Newts, 19
Plastic, 21 Evening, 22 Ramps, 23
Life tenant.

Down: 2 Hebrews, 3 Alibi, 4 Swathe,

5 Ailment, 6 Eagle, 7 Goldilocks, 8

References, 13 Mastiff, 15 Ottoman,

16 Spigot, 18 Wheel, 20 Apron.

A match for the devil (7)

| can’t mess around with
the meanings of words (9)
All for those making

notes (5)

A drink mixed and
swallowed by the shy (6)
Numerous men put in
place around the East (7)
Transport of internal
combustion (3)

Attempt at sex appeal, we
hear (5)

Feel depressed when you
land (6,4)

Games period shown in
new inn sign (7)

City in great trouble (7)

A sticker for the

traditional method of
roasting (6)

Stiff clothes I’d put on (5)
Hear a way to forma
meeting (5)

Contend it’s a quarter after
six (3)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Windjammer, 8 Humid, 9
Maudlin, 10 Concern, 11 Texas, 12
Stench, 14 Get off, 17 Opium, 19
Earlier, 21 Unaware, 22 Faith, 23
Teeny-weeny.

Down: 2 Immense, 3 Dodge, 4
Almond, 5 Mountie, 6 Relax, 7 And
so forth, 8 Hocus-pocus, 13
Comrade, 15 Opinion, 16 Merely, 18
Inapt, 20 Rifle.

- we @ |



Across

1
4
8
9
10
11
13
15

18

19
21

23
24

25

Treat unjustly (5)
Wild with anxiety (7)
Determined (3)
Free to roam (9)
Ponder (7)
Additional (5)
Detest (6)

Name of eight
English kings (6)
Norttheast African
country (5)
Lachrymose (7)
Bony-plated
burrowing animal (9)
Beam of light (3)
Model of
excellence (7)
Unfashionable (5)

Eee ed ae cee ed

Down

1 A profligate (7)

2 Without deliberation
(3,2,4)

3 Social
blunder (5)

4 Cold in manner (6)

5 Everything
considered (3,4)

6 Excessively (3)

7 Acquit (5)
Precipitately (9)
Downcast (7)

Held up (7)
Obtained by
theft (6)
Inundate (5)
Shun (5)

To spoil (3)











©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

























1/218 IM 1 (3/5
3/1/9 Be7i9/8 6/3
MN | 3 BNE 7 4 1
6/2|7 9/8 ao 8/4
916 MN 7/211 BRO [6
8/4/9 Ma9lsi6 7\2
4/1|2 BORG 2 1 §
7/31 4/2 B@9 6/3
oe 6 911 RS 2/1

















+ Cabo ne: Ca

Test Your Play

1. You are declarer with the West — stage because the suit is blocked.

hand at Three Notrump. North leads
the queen of hearts, on which South
plays the king, and you duck. When
South returns the eight of hearts, you
win with the ace and cash the A-K of
diamonds, learning that South started
with three to the jack. How would
you continue?

West East
@AJ109 406
VA3 96542
#10976 #AKQ52
AKT $8 3

2. You are declarer with the West
hand at Four Hearts, South having
overcalled your partner’s opening
one-diamond bid with one spade.
North leads the queen of spades.
How would you play the hand?

West East
4952 @A64
Â¥KQ642 W173
4Q)63 #AK 1074
hA #0 10

EK

1. It would be wrong to take a
spade finesse at this point, because if
it lost to North’s king, you would go
down one, losing four heart tricks
and a spade. A far better plan is to
lead a heart from dummy at trick five
and discard a diamond! This allows
you to eventually score five diamond
tricks, which you can’t do at this

The first two tricks disclosed that
North started with at most five
hearts, so there is no way you can
lose more than four tricks on the sug-
gested line of play.

2. There is a danger of losing an
extra trump trick on top of the obvi-
ous two spade losers and the trump
ace. Your best chance to make the
contract lies in winning the spade
queen with the ace and returning a
low trump from dummy.

Let’s assume South follows low
and that you win the trump lead with
the king, which is very likely in view
of the bidding. The correct play now
is the queen of trumps. If the tramps
are divided 3-2, all your worries are
over. South can take the ace of
trumps and cash two spade tricks, but
you will then have the rest of the
tricks.

The key play is the queen of
trumps at trick three, rather than
leading a low trump to dummy’s
jack. Leading the queen guards
against the possibility that South
might have started with something
like # KJ1083 ¥ A8 @ 92 # K854, in
which case he would take dummy’s
jack of trumps with the ace, cash two
spade tricks and then lead another
spade, promoting North’s ten of
hearts into the setting trick.

Tomorrow: A delicate situation.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.
THE TRIBUNE





Knights

claim

GSSSA title

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE C.R Walker Knights
built an 86 point lead after day
one, and nearly doubled their
margin on day two to claim the
tenth Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association
Track and Field Championship
in School History.

The Knights delivered anoth-
er dominating performance on
the culminating day of the 16th
annual GSSSA Championships
claiming three of the four con-
tested divisions.

C.R Walker totaled 614.50
points, 151 points ahead of the
second place finishers, the C.V
Bethel Stingrays who totaled
463.50.

The C.I Gibson Rattlers fin-
ished third with 449.50 points,
C.C Sweeting Cobras were
fourth with 333.50 and with a
win on the final race of the day
- the Senior Boys’ 1600m relay,
the Doris Johnson Mystic Mar-
lins edged out the R.M Bailey
Pacers for fifth place with
303.50.

The Knights won the Inter-
mediate Girls, Senior Girls, and
Senior Boys divisions by an
average margin of 30 points and
lost the Intermediate Boys divi-
sion by just 11 points to the
Stingrays.

The Knights trio of talented
sprinters, O’Jay Ferguson, Mar-
va Etienne and Ivanique Kemp
added to their sprint titles from
day one.

Ferguson, in the Intermedi-
ate Boys’ division added to his
100m and 400m crowns from
opening day with a first place
finish in the 200m and a thrilling
come from behind anchor leg
that gave the Knights 1600m
relay team the unexpected win.

Kemp added to her three first
place finishes in the Senior
Girls’ division on day one
(100m, 100mH, 400m relay)
with a win in the 200m and as a
member of the winning 1600m
relay team.

In the Intermediate Girls
division, Etienne finished third
in the 200m and was a member
of the winning 1600m relay
team to go along with her first
place finishes in the 100m and



JOF

SATURDAY, MARCH 7,

PAGE 9



t

2009



INSIDE ¢ Local sports news

tenth

Elvardo Carey continued his
dominance in the field for the
Knights after setting a new
record in the Senior Boys’ shot

put.

Carey added to his medal
haul with a win in the Javelin
and just missed a first place fin-
ish in the Discus, losing by just
0.03m.

C.I Gibson’s Katrina Sey-
mour continued to be one of
the leading performers of the
meet.

Seymour broke her second
record of the meet in the Inter-
mediate Girls’ division when
she surpassed the 16 year old
mark.

Her time of 24.45s beat out
Altrice Taylor’s time of 24.57s
set in 1993.

Knights Head Coach Floyd
Armbrister said his team was
able to repeat due to a full team
effort from a wide cross-section
of student athletes.

“It feels good because we
have a great mixture of kids.
These kids come from different
backgrounds. A lot of people
look at C.R Walker and they
see the kind of structure we
have and they say negative
things like C.R Walker is doing
this and doing that. But I think
the public needs to look at the
positive side and see that these
kids are doing something con-
structive in society,” he said, “I
would like for all the schools,
especially a new school like
Anatol Rodgers to take pages
from C.R Walker so we can
make this whole Bahamas a
better place. I would like to take
my hats off to all he coaches at
the schools who have worked
so hard. I know the Minister
was out here and he can see
now that the competition is not
a a blowout but everyone is
competing. It is not about win-
ing or losing but about how we
play the game.”

Armbrister noted the bene-
fits his team has reaped because
many of his students are mem-
bers of local track clubs such as
Club Monica, Roadrunners,
Spirit of Excellence and
Jumpers Inc, but also lauded
the work of his staff who have
managed to mold elite athletes
who do not belong to any mem-
bers of the aforementioned



TENNIS

BAHAMAS TRAIL
ON DAY ONE AT
DAVIS CUP

THE Bahamas men’s national team
fell behind 1-0 in the first match of the
American Zone II Davis Cup tie yes-
terday in Paraguay.



~~

Grand Bahamian native Timothy

Neilly, playing at the number two se
lost in three straight sets, 6-1, 6-4
Paraguay’s top seed Ramon Del



—
2 to

at the Yacht Golf Club in Parasua

Lambare.

The second match betwe
Bahamas’top seedallt



Paraguay’s Nal
was in progress
The final resu
Depending on



match, today’s doubles will be a prvota
one for the Bahamas. The team of
Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle will
try to keep the Bahamas
hopes alive when they play
the team of Delgado and
Galeano in the doubles. j
The reverse singles are set

for Sunday.

The matches are being
played in the evening si
because of the intense heat in ~

Paraguay.





100mH from day one. clubs.

FINAL POINTS STANDINGS INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) DISCUS
Swann, Leewood (RMB), 35.67m

C.R Walker (CRW) 614.50 Moncur, Anthony (CVB), 27.23m

C.V Bethel (CVB) 463.50 Farrington, Anthony (CVB), 25.80m

C.I Gibson (CIG) 449.50

C.C Sweeting (CCS) 333 INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) JAVELIN

Doris Johnson Marlins (DDJ) 303.50 Albury, Isaac (DDJ), 43.60m

R.M Bailey Pacers (RMB) 300 Dorsette, Tavari (CRW), 43,42m

G.H.S Magic (GHS) 148 Martin, Stelin (GHS), 43.07m

Anatol Rodgers (AR) 132

DAY TWO COMPLETE RESULTS

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 200M
Ferguson, O'Jay (CRW), 22.10s
Finley, Toriano (AR), 22.90s
Farrington, Anthony (CVB), 23.51s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 800M
Hanchell, Marlon (CVB), 2:11.36s
Davis, Patrick (CCS), 2:13.89s

Mott, Derinardo (CIG), 2:16.27s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 3000M
Wells, Denzil (CCS), 11:15.21s

Rolle, Cleso (DDJ), 11:20.66s

Rolle, Percy (AR), 11:22.03

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 400MH
Higgs, Delvano (CRW), 1:02.73s
Sands, Chris (CCS), 1:03.32s
Ferguson (CVB), 1:04.48s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 4X400M RELAY
CRW - Ferguson, O'Jay; Higgs, Delvano; Stuart,
Travonn; Dabio, Javaun, 3:40.72s

RMB - Butler, Giovanni; Edgecombe, Jason; Swann,
Leewood; Darville, Brandon, 3:43.79s

CVB - Lockhart, David; Hanchell, Marlon; Moncur,
Anthony, McKenzie, Shaquille, 3:45.57s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) TRIPLE JUMP
McDonald (GHS), 13.30m

Bullard, Delmaro (RMB), 12.62m

Nottage, Leroy (DDJ), 12.45m

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) HIGH JUMP
Ingraham, Ronald (CIG), 1.94m

McDonald (GHS), 1.91m

Edgecombe, Jason (RMB), 1.71m

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) 200M
Seymour, Katrina (CIG),24.45s
Adderley, Teshon (CVB),25.12s
Etienne, Marva (CRW), 25.31s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) 800M
Cherilus, Angela (AR), 2:42.64s
Lewis, Safara (CRW), 2:46.33s
Stubbs, Ashley (CRW), 2:48.84s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) 300MH
Sears, Hollina (CCS), 49.20s

Lewis, Safara (CRW), 50.07s
Rahming, Edricka (CRW), 50.08s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) 4X400M

CRW - Lewis, Safara; Etienne, Marva; Rahming,
Edricka; Stubbs, Ashley, 4:15.30s

CIG - Robert, Cassandria; Colebrooke, Vashti; Sey-
mour, Katrina; Rolle, Tiffany, 4:22.16s

CVB - Flowers, Tonea; Adderley, Teshon; Watt, Ear-
nisha; Hart, Kennisha, 4:43.29s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) TRIPLE JUMP
Rogers, Terranique (CCS), 9.51m

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) SHOT PUT
Williams, Racquel (CVB), 12.69m
Hutchinson, Danielle (CVB), 8.59m
Rahming, Samara (DDJ), 8.17m

en the
evin Mullings and 4
Diego Galeano
press time.



SENIOR BOYS (U20) 200M
Mackey, Trevor (DDJ), 21.50s
Deveaux, Delano (DDJ), 21.54s
Hinsey, Ulysses (CVB), 22.01s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 300M
Altidor, Kevin (CCS), 2:02.22s
Williams, Ramon (CIG), 2:03.38s
Mitchell, Jason (CRW), 2:06.45s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 3000M STEEPLECHASE
Pierre, Sedel (CVB), 11:18.01s

Seveus, Vicnel (CIG), 11:22.55s

Williams, Valentino (CCS), 11:29.69s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 400MH
Lightbourne, Dellano (CRW), 1:00.38s
Hall, Jerwaine (CIG), 1:01.97s
Hanna, Peter (CVB), 1:02.23s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 4X400M RELAY

Doris Johnson - Deveaux, Delano; Burrows, Crashad;
Clarke, Michael; Hughes, Jean, 3:33.38s

C.| Gibson - Williams, Ramon; Hall, Jerwaine; Cash,
Cody, Sturrup, Rashard, 3:36.59s

C.C Sweeting - Lightbourne, Perez; Altidor, Kevin;
Payne, Byron; Thompson, Ishmael, 3:42.17s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) LONG JUMP
Richardson, Charles (CRW), 6.85m
Clark, Clinton (CVB), 6.69m

Babbs, Tehneil (CRW), 6.64m

SENIOR BOYS (U20) DISCUS
Strachan, Shawn (RMB), 39.36m
Carey, Elvardo (CRW), 39.93m
Rolle, Cordell (RMB), 35.15m

SENIOR BOYS (U20) JAVELIN
Carey, Elvardo (CRW), 48.45m
Smith, Harold (CVB), 42.27m
Dawkins, Phillip (CCS), 41.44m

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 200M
Kemp, lvanique (CRW), 24.63s
Knowles, Antonya (CRW), 25.78s

PHYSICAL
THERAPY
‘COULD
IMPROVE
CARIFTA
HOPES’

















Kelly, Cache (RMB), 26.88s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 800M
Miller, Shaunte (GHS), 2:35.70s
Dean, Glendin (CRW), 22:38.65s
Darling, Rashan (RMB), 2:44.59s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 400MH
Crooks, Tanya (CIG), 1:12.47s
Adderley, Mitchalyn (CRW), 1:15.44s
Justilien, Sydline (RMB), 1:15.79s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 4X400MH

C.R Walker - Dean, Glendina; Kemp, Ivanique;
Knowles, Antonya; Adderley, Mitchalyn, 4:15.65s
R.M Bailey - Justilien, Sydline; Kelly, Cache; Johnson,
Tonia-Kay; Darling, Rashan, 4:28.62s

C.| Gibson - Crooks, Tanya; Dames, Avianna; Moss,
Ratrice; Wallace, Latonya, 4:36.49s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) SHOT PUT
Belle, Jenesta (CVB), 10.42m
Gordon, Giavanna (CCS), 9.12m
Gibson, Robin (CIG), 8.86m

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) LONG JUMP
Stuart, Shatyna (CVB), 4.76m

Kelly, Cache (RMB), 4.73m

Dames, Avianna (CIG), 4.72m
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



BGDSA season begins today

ON Saturday, the Bahamas Govern-
ment Departmental Softball Associa-
tion will officially open its 31st season at
the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

Thora Sweeting, who has served as
the association’s president for the past
12 years, said it had grown by leaps and
bounds and was now considered the
most exciting recreational league in the
country.

“The league has served a positive
purpose since its inception,” said Sweet-
ing, referring to the initial season in
1979. “It has brought persons in the
Public Service together, engendering
friendships which are sustained and
memories that will last a life time.”

Sweeting said over the years the
BGDSA had made significant progress
in softball, both locally and interna-
tionally and she anticipated that the
future shone brightly as evident through
the tremendous interest and support
displayed by both their fans and spec-
tators.

“Tam so excited about our 31st
anniversary, the opportunities and chal-
lenges that are ahead of us as we move
forward and attempt to accomplish all
of our goals for 2009,” she said.

“T hope that each of you share my
excitement, as I look forward with eager
anticipation to the full support of our
members and fans.”

Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture
set to give the keynote address

On Saturday at noon at Baillou Hills,
Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister will deliver the
Keynote address at Baillou Hills.

Alvin Smith, the Speaker of the
House of Assembly and former presi-
dent of the BGDSA, along with Romell
‘Fish’ Knowles, president of the
Bahamas Softball Federation, are both
expected to make brief remarks.

Throwing out the ceremonial pitches
are Reginald Ferguson, Commissioner
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force;
Clifford ‘Butch’ Scavalla, the Com-
modore of the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force; Ken Griffin, president and CEO
of Bahamas Telecommunications Com-
pany; Joe Johnson, manager of Premier
Importers and Sandy Schaefer, presi-
dent of Robin Hood Enterprises.

Entertainment will be provided by
the Aquinas College Marching Band,
CC Sweeting Dance Group, RM Bailey
and CR Walker Junkanoo Groups and
God Missionary Dance Angels.

The opening ceremonies will climax
with a junkanoo rush-out and fireworks
display at 6:30 pm.

At 1:45 pm, there will be the releasing
of the balloons.

At 2 pm, the first game will get under-
way between the 2008 ladies champi-
ons Police Royals against 2008 runners-
up Finance Health Invaders.

Shortly afterwards, 2008 and sixteen
(16) consecutive men’s champions
Defence Force Floaters will battle 2008
runners-up Police Chiefs.

The bouncing castle, ballooons and
lots of prizes will be given out to the
children and fans on opening day.
Thompson Trading personnel will be
on hand to give out paraphernalia while
supplies last.

The opening ceremony will be broad-
cast live on 104.5 FM from 2-6 pm.

In her president’s report of 2008,
Sweeting said the season got underway
with pomp and circumstance. The
games, according to Sweeting, were well
attended and the fans support was not
where it ought to be, however, some
adjustments would be made to correct
the situation.

“We had an excellent softball season
and for the first time for a very long

time that the league finished its season
extra early, which was a plus,” she said.

“We had one death in the league last
year, Charles ‘Wire’ Smith, a former
player of the Defence Force Floaters.
He is sadly missed by all of the mem-
bers and fans.”

This year’s Player’s Appreciation Day
on Saturday, July 25 will be held in his
honour and called the “Charles ‘Wire’
Smith Plater’s Appreciation Day.”

Sweeting took the time out to con-
gratulate the three-time defending
ladies’ champions Police Royals and
16-time men’s champions Royal
Defence Force Floaters.

The runners-up were the Finance
Health Invaders in the ladies’ division
and the Police Chiefs in the men. The
Floaters won the pennant in the men’s
Paradise League, the Chiefs in the
men’s Tropical League and the Invaders
in the ladies.

The league, which is comprised of
eight ladies and ten men’s teams, could
not be as successful without the com-
passionate, sensitive and patience exhib-
ited by the umpires, namely Dave Mor-
timer, Van Johnson, Darren Mortimer,
Phil Culmer, Robert Smith, Cyril Smith,
Michael Hanna, Thomas Sears and
Ross Coleby.

Sweeting also mentioned chief sta-
tisticians Marjorie Delaney and Rozina

men Soe



Taylor, as well as scorers Althea Clarke,
Loretta Maycock, Karen Richardson,
Bridgette Sweeting, Celestine Ford,
Christine Jenoure and Ms McCardy for
their efforts.

All teams are advised that rosters
and entrance fees must be brought in
before May 3. Any teams in violation of
meeting the deadline will not be
allowed to play unless they meet their
obligation.




@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

OVER the past two decades,
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations has
watched as its front running
position at the Carifta Games
has dropped dramatically all the
way down to sixth.

And every year, the question
is asked: When and how will we
regain our status as a power-
house in the region?

On Thursday night at the
Wellness Center at the College
of the Bahamas,
Orthopedic/Neuromuscular
Therapist, Edwardo Thompson
and chiropractor Dr. Dwight
Marshall provided some insight
on how to achieve that status. It
could start this year, if they are
given a chance to travel with
the national team heading to St.
Lucia.

The two therapists, who have
been working with a number of
the junior and even elite ath-
letes in the country, may have
addressed a group of parents,
coaches and athletes whom they
were able to convince.

Absence

But Thompson admitted that
they were disappointed that the
powers that be who needed to
hear their plea were not in
attendance.

“Tt could have been better. I
expected more people to be
here, but the truth of the matter
is that we needed to inform the
coaches and the public at large
about what’s happening and
what needs to happen as we
raise the level to get our ath-
letes to go where they need to
go,” said

Thompson, who heads the
International Orthopedic Sports
Therapy.

Although they didn’t attract
some of the “movers and shak-
ers” in the athletic world,
Thompson said they have writ-
ten to the BAAA and the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture, outlining their plans and
their desire to travel with the

Carifta team over the Easter
holiday weekend.

Thompson said they intend
to host another meeting when
they can actually present their
case in the same type of manner
to the BAAA and hopefully
that will convince them to give
them the opportunity to travel
with the team.

During their presentation,
Thompson and Marshall used
a power point demonstration to
show the things they intend to
introduce to the national team
level, a plan they say that other
countries are doing and will def-
initely make a difference in the
Bahamas’ success or failure.

Pre-event therapy

They discussed the impor-
tance of pre-event sports thera-
py, post-event sports therapy,
sports recovery, performance
enhancement and performance
nutrition, giving the argument
that there are “no short cuts to
a dream.”

“We have to look at how we
can enhance certain areas,”
Thompson said.

“We know that there are cer-
tain things that can be done and
we presented them tonight.
Hopefully it will be accepted by
the BAAA.” Public relations
officer Kermit Taylor and Ray
Hepburn, the president of the
New Providence Amateur Ath-
letic Association were among
those in attendance. But nei-
ther acted on behalf of the asso-
ciation.

Hepburn, who will also trav-
el as the manager of the Carifta
team, said he was so impressed
with what he heard that he’s
definitely going to lobby to have
the therapists a part of the con-
tingent going to St. Lucia.

“The rest of the world is
ahead of us and these are the
things to help us get to the next
level,” he said. “So if the rest
of the world is doing it, I don’t
see why we can’t do it too.”

Marshall said for a long time,
he and Thompson having been
trying to implement their plan
into the whole sporting com-
munity, but track and field has

been more in the forefront
because we work with so many
of the athletes.

“The Bahamas has the ath-
letes on the world stage. Now
we have to put the sporting cast
out there as we inform our ath-
letes about what is out there
and what we can provide to
keep them on top,” Marshall
said.

If allowed to travel, Thomp-
son and Marshall said they will
ensure that the national teams
will have a orthopedic sports
therapist, a chiropractor and a
bio mechanics sports thera-
pist/sports massage therapist.

And all of the things that are
taken for granted will be sup-
plied on the trip for the ath-
letes.

That includes first aid service,
water, heat/ice pack treatment,
whirlpool, stretching area,
recovery tent, athletes lounge

tent, magnet insoles and form
balls.

Impresssion

Bradley Cooper, the athletic
coach at the College of the
Bahamas, who hosted the meet-
ing, said the concept is some-
thing that should be imple-
mented on all national teams.

“We are a very passive peo-
ple and a passive nation,” he
added. “We don’t know how to
be aggressive. But this is just
showing us the things that we
need to do to become champi-
ons.”

Coach Greg Cash of Spirit of
Excellence Track Club said the
presentation was definitely “an
eye opener” for him.

“T know I’ve advocated for
some of these things for us to
have whenever we travel,” Cash
said. “I know for years we have



- 4 i

BLAST FROM

THE PAST

DO you remember the days of the Hobby
Horse Race Track? Those were considered the
“good old days” when spectators rushed to the
Cable Beach strip to particpate in horse racing
betting. Above, Tribune Sports brings back the
those memories. There’s a photo of some of the
horses in action and you can see some of the
patrons as they gear up for the action.



w“
oO
=
oO
=
—
=
S|
=
eo
—
a
=
-
a
=

suffered because of our prepa-
ration for the national team, not
just in track and field, in other
sports like basketball.

“But now that we can go
from the physical part of the
sport to the scientific aspect, I
think it will go a long way in
enhancing us as a nation. So I
say let’s run with it.”

Another coach Dexter Bodie
said the presentation was a very
“strong and powerful” one, but
he felt that more time is needed
to properly provide the full
impact.

“Tt’s an excellent idea, I know
it can work and I hope that
whenever they do it again, there
will be more people out because
here was a lot of food for
thought and the only way we
can improve is to use the scien-
tific methods that are coming
up,” Bodie said.

Suzette Bethel, mother of



Pauliann Bethel, said she was
very impressed with what she
heard.

“As a parent, I’m always con-
cerned about the injuries that
my daughter sustained and I’ve
found out that there are things
that we should be doing that we
are not doing,” she said. “I feel
if we know these things, we can
help our athletes a lot better.”

And Perry Thompson, father
of Zhivago Thompson, said he
got some valuable information
on the preparation of the ath-
letes and life in general.

“T’ve always wondered why
the rest of the Caribbean is
ahead of us but like it was indi-
cated in the presentation, the
scientific methods is one of the
key components and there are a
number of things that we need
to implement so that we as a
country won’t suffer,” Thomp-
son stated.








THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORTL A 3. (/1

5-Day FORECAST

STUUR ee i

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST









Sa NG


































































y (= Today Sunday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
y C 4. = v -_ High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: ENE at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
aN -. o|1|2 3|4|5 6|7 8|9|1o| 1 Fe Fi Fe FIC Sunday: __ENE at 10-20 Knots 5-8Feet___7-10 Miles 74° F
ba iin On a = Acapulco 88/31 70/21 s 88/31 70/21 S FREEPORT Today: ENE at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 74°F
nd oe a i. Low MODERATE | HIGH | V.HIGH Amsterdam 46/7 39/3 pc 48/8 39/3 r Sunday: ENE at 12-25 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
pw ORLANDO) A , : . Ankara, Turkey 56/13 39/3 sh s4/12 37/2 = ABAGO Today: SSW at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-8 Miles 74° F
High:80°F/27°C ee Breezy with plenty of Mainly clear and Breezy with a full day Partly sunny. Bright and sunny. Sunshine and patchy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 61/16 46/7 t 63/17 48/8 pe Sunday: __ ENE at 10-20 Knots 6-10 Feet___—7-10 Miles 75° F
VA ede ow i sunshine. breezy. of sunshine. clouds. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 72/22 61/16 sh 70/21 60/15 pc
Co — . High: | Higher | Highs er | High: a G8 TO at
TAMPA Jy { High: 79 Low: 68 Low: 70 Low: 71 Low: 70 Low: 69 SS ESS Barcelona 50/15 47/8 s 6116 S0/10 s nif: DRECA
ivan ae 7 PEE aie TIT ‘i
High:80°F/27°C oe Br°-68" F B2°-70" F High _Hi(f.) Low HLL) Bate ee ee ee ae
g po ° be a ) : ae - = — << - a a5 — Beirut 82/27 68/20 pc 69/20 58/14 pc
Low: 56° F/13°C h a a The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 4:22 a.m. 2.8 10:40am. 0.0 Belgrade 45/7 38/3 1 A1/5 85/1 4
* Lo levati the h body— thing that effects h Id feels. Te tt flect the high and the low for the day. : ‘ - :
ai. @ \ } . elevation on tne numan boay—everytning that elects now warm or cold a person leels. lemperatures renect tné nign an @ 1OW Tor the day. 7 p.m. ae p.m. 7 Berlin 41/5 34/1 sh 45/7 36/2 c
: \ . 22 a.m. . 4 p.m. -U. Bermuda 70/21 66/18 s 74/23 68/20 s
7 43pm 27 Bogota 66/18 48/8 r 67/19 47/8 t
Y —
2 ll Z Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Monday 75am. 29 124d0am.03 Brussels 48/8 41/5 pc 48/8 39/3 r
[ r Temperature 7:35 p.m. 29 1:23pm. -0.2 Budapest 49/9 41/5 sh 45/7 = 38/3 c
ABACO Pp P
p q : i ° F/25° ; : i
/ = High: 76° F/24° C IGM. ssssscestrates Seesta eect oete dat btaghiees vr F/25" C Tuesday S0dam. 30 143am. 04 Buenos Aires 84/28 64/17 pc 81/27 66/18 pe
4 _ leeo°FN5'C Oeste acct 66° F/19° C 823pm,. 30 208pm. -03 Cairo 92/33 61/16 c 78/25 52/11 s
: Normal high .... 78° F/26°C | Calcutta 99/37 78/25 s 98/36 75/23 s
) ~
i Normal low 65° F/18° C Calgary 35/1 5/-15 sn 6/-14 -13/-25 sn
; yom _ @ WEST PALM BEACH ©: re 85° F/20° C ST re Cancun 81/27 64/17 pc 85/29 65/18 pc
— High: 78° F/26° C i Last year's low phaay eaeateieenm a 72° F/22° C " " Caracas 82/27 67/19 c 84/28 65/18 +
Pe Low: 63° F/A7°C @ Precipitation “_ eites a a.m. Lala one p.m. Casablanca 66/18 53/11 s 74/23 57/13 pe
As of 1 p.m. yesterday oo... cscs 0.00" unsel....... ‘lo p.m. Moonset. .... vam. — Copenhagen 42/5 39/3 sn 42/5 39/3 r erAtlanta)
© FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Y% :
«| ear to date Last New First Dublin 52/11 37/2 5 41/5 34/1 sn
High: 79° F/26° C @ High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date oo... 3.77" oe Frankfurt 45/7 37/2 c 46/7 34/1 sh
Low: 66° F/19°C Low: 57° F/14°C Geneva 42/5 36/2 c 48/8 41/5 c
AccuWeather.com ir Halifax 49/9 33/0 c 41/5 23/-5 sn
Re @ = Forecasts and graphics provided by | i ke Havana 83/28 60/15 pe 85/29 60/15 s Showers —
\ MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 ; Mar.18 Mar.26 Apr. 2 Helsinki 32/0 28/-2 c 30/-1 27/-2 sn T-storms eared
High: 80° F/27° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 66/18 59/15 1 68/20 63/17 c Rain = eae
ia Low:63°F/17°C NASSAU High: 77° F/25° C Islamabad 77/25 49/9 pc 81/27 49/9 pe Flurries Coll
High: 79° F/26° C Low: 61° F/16°C Istanbul 56/13 45/7 Fr 59/15 46/7 sh Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Warm Low: 68° F/20°C Jerusalem 84/28 62/16 s 63/17 43/6 pc Ice precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Seionay
a Johannesburg 73/22 54/12 t 77/25 57/135 Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. awe.
KEY WEST am Kingston 83/28 74/23 pc 83/28 74/23 pc = F
High:77° F/25°C _ CAT ISLAND Lima 85/29. 71/21 sh 85/29 71/21 10s -0s [J0Si) 10s | 20s [08H 40s
Low: 66° F/19°C High: 75° F/24” C London 54/12 41/5 po 42/5 39/3 sn
3 Low:57°F/14°C Madrid 57/13 37/2 pc 66/18 37/2 s
@ - Manila 95/35 75/23 s 93/33 75/23 sh
r Mexico City 81/27 45/7 s 77/25 = 43/6 s
ae 3 Monterrey 91/32 64/17 s 93/33 65/18 pc ra By,
i GREAT EXUMA in SAN SALVADOR Montreal 48/8 34/1 43/6 341 c e
_ High: 77° F/25° C High: 78° F/26° C Moscow 32/0 27/-2 sn 36/2 30/-1 sn
Low: 68°F/20°C Lew 60°FN6°C Munich 32/0 26/-3 sn 37/2 36/2 1
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ANDROS ’ Nairobi 87/30 55/12 pe 90/32 56/13 s

High: 80° F/27° C - 5 New Delhi 90/32 59/15 pc 90/32 59/15 s
Low:62° F/17°C “en = Oslo 32/0 28/-2 sf 32/0 30/-1 sn N t t
at ae. oe eee ever S OUI |
a Prague 43/6 33/0 sh 40/4 38/3 c aCe, t t
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 84/28 74/23 sh 83/28 75/23 sh CIN Saiiae W ] O UuS e
_ - a

highs and tonights's lows.








High: 76° F/24° C Riyadh 83/28 55/12 s 86/30 59/15 s
a crac sae sir 415 po S82. 418 s seg IEE Pc
Today sunday Today Sunday Today sina MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 81/27 71/21 pe 81/27 71/21 s Con 1€S. to Auto Insurance,

i i igh: 79° F/26° San J 91/32 69/20 88/31 71/21 t apres BS : :

aaa eee 2 torre sso GB Tt gees eiatt choice is
Albuquerque 62/16 32/0 pc 61/16 37/2 s Indianapolis 66/18 50/10 c 6216 46/7 t Philadelphia 62/16 47/8 po 65/18 43/6 pc CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santiago 90/32 56/12 s 90/32 58/12 s rance Management.
Anchorage 25/-3 10/-12 s 27-2 18/-7 s Jacksonville 79/26 49/9 s 79/26 52/11 s Phoenix 72/22 49/9 s 74/23 50410 s mae yok Sone SO al i } peop e you can trust
Atlanta 76/24 50410 pe 75/23 55/12 pc KansasCity 62/16 48/8 t 59/15 39/3 +r _ Pittsburgh 67/19 5241 pe 66/18 436 ¢t RAGGEDISLAND — High:80°F/27°c - eo ot ee cv “i ia hte .
Atlantic City 60/15 49/9 pc 66/18 42/5 pc Las Vegas 64/17 41/5 s 68/20 45/7 s Portland, OR 47/8 37/2 pc 47/8 341 sn High: 78° F/26° C Low: 61° F/16°C Snekhol RM DBO aR 20s 1
Baltimore 68/20 46/7 pe 70/21 46/7 pc Little Rock 74/23 6146 pe 76/24 57/13 t Raleigh-Durham 75/23 53/11 s 81/27 53/11 s Low:58°F/14°C sen — 31/27 63/17 79/28 62/16 el \ ge ee .
Boston 56/13 43/6 pe 48/8 33/0 1 LosAngeles 64/17 48/8 pc 64/17 50/10 s St Louis 66/18 5713 c 68/20 45/7 ¢t ° oneee FEeURIRTGEGE AGHUEGSTGEER
Buffalo 54/12 39/3 r 40/4 37/2 + Louisville 74/23 57/13 pe 74/23 53/11 t SaltLakeCity 41/5 28/-2 c 45/7 29/-1 c GREATINAGUA Te Ba? 43/6 pc ee eee N URANCE MANAGEMENT
Charleston, SC 73/22 53/11 s 78/25 56/13 s Memphis 76/24 61/16 pc 75/23 50/15 t SanAntonio 79/26 65/18 pc 83/28 65/18 t High: 80° F/27°C Toh 46/7 34/1 + 42/5 32/0 c (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 48/8 39/3 6 48/8 330 6 — Miami 80/26 64/17 s 80/26 66/18 s San Diego 62/16 52/11 pe 62/16 53/11 s Low: 62°F/A7°C Trinidad 86/30 73/22 t 90/81 77/95 sh N _
Cleveland 56/13 44/6 sh 5412 45/7 1 Minneapolis 38/3 25/-3 c 34/1 22/-5 sn San Francisco 59/15 45/7 pe 57/13 44/6 s§ i Taner 46I7 28/-2 c 41/5 23/-5 pe N p id 6 Bot Ab th F
Dallas 78/25 64/17 c 86/30 62/16 t Nashville 75/23 55/12 po 71/21 55/12 t Seattle 45/7 34/1 sh 43/6 32/0 sn ~NEW FrOVICenCe } Urdnd banana C0 evinerd xurid
D 39/3 24/-4 55/12 26/-3 New Orl 78/25 63/17 79/26 63/17 Tallah 78/25 46/7 78/25 52/11 mae are ee kl (242) 502-6400 Tel (242) 350-3500 | Tel (242) 367-4204 he (242) 332-2862 hl (242) 336-2304
enver 5 c Z pce ew Urieans pe Cc allanasseeé s $ ee Warsaw 44/5 31/0 sh 39/3 34/1 c a p a " le hy * ; . ; .
Detroit 52/11 38/3 r 50/10 36/2 r New York 60/15 499 pe 57/13 44/6 + Tampa 80/26 58/14 s 80/26 63/17 s an Winnipeg 16/-8 10/-12 pc 31/0 14/-10 sn g aie \ Ss
Honolulu 78/25 67/19 pc 79/26 67/19 pc OklahomaCity 74/23 49/9 c 74/23 49/9 pe — Tucson 69/20 446 s 71/21 478 s —— Weathok (Wie Houston 78/25 67/19 po 80/26 64/17 c Orlando 80/26 56/13 s 83/28 59/15 s Washington, DC 70/21 52/11 pe 70/21 51/10 pe storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

NASSAU

( a a 4
& i > >
EVENTS CAPT

A r
I fl
' ,

Bs iim



DR Traves had the opportunity to dialogue with Janyne Hodder, president of the College of the Seen

e¢ DR TOM TRAVES, president of Dal-
housie University of Nova Scotia, Canada,
became the first president of that institution to
pay an official visit to the Bahamas.

The president met with local Dalhousie
alumni at a grand reception at the Eastern
Road home of businessman Franklyn Wilson (a
1969 graduate) and his wife Sharon Wilson.

Dalhousie is one Canada’s leading universi-
ties, located in beautiful downtown Halifax.
Its students rank fourth in terms of the number
of national academic awards won. The student-
faculty ratio is 14 to 1 — the lowest in Canada.

Dalhousie professors are among Canada’s
research leaders, winning more than 80 per
cent of the research awards in Nova Scotia,
and often providing special research and learn-

ing opportunities for students.

Dalhousie has 10 faculties and undergradu-
ates can choose from 3,500 unique courses.

During his address, Dr Traves noted the
financial strength of the university, pointing
out that Dalhousie is relatively free of debt
and has an endowment which is already one of
the largest in Canada and is growing, even in
the face of challenging economic realities.

Mr Traves said Dalhousie University is pre-
pared to contribute to the advancement of
national educational objectives in the Bahamas
and has undertaken to explore possible strate-
gies for doing so.

In addition to an impressive roster of alum-
ni from the Bahamas, there is currently 56
Bahamians enrolled at the university.



X A p>. > ee ~
: Ww : » 2 , 4 pone y
; | y f f | !
i y ‘ . 4 _ 4 7
by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP
URED ON CAMERA



THE PRESIDENT of Dalhousie and alumnus Keitra Pratt listen to Dr Robin Roberts outline how he learned to
perform kidney transplants at Dalhousie’s medical school, one of the best in Canada.



FLOYD DYKEMAN, vice president of external rela-
tions for Dalhousie University, chats privately with
alumnus Donovan Ingraham, whose father, Don
Ingraham, is an executive at the RIU Hotel on Par-
adise Island and was the chef for the reception.

* |




: oâ„¢
i . 7
a

MELISSA Williams-Rolle, a 2001 graduate, and
Sean Rolle speak with Shanrese Bain, a 1997
graduate.

i ha



DR TRAVES is given a broad introduction to the Bahamas by alumni Dr Danny Davis, registrar at the
College of the Bahamas; Keith Beneby and Dominio Williams a senior accountant at Deloitte.

DR KIRKLAND Culmer (medicine 1965); economist, attorney and author Anthony Thompson (honors, com-
merce 1965); former principal nursing officer at Princess Margaret Hospital, Dorothy Davis Phillips, (nursing
studies 1967); businessman Franklyn Wilson (honors , commerce, 1968) share a brief moment with Dr Traves.





cl

TONYA GALANIS, the first Bahamian principal of the
Eugene Dupuch Law School, welcomed the opportu-
nity to explore areas of possible co-operation with
Dalhousie’s law school, the oldest in the Common-
wealth outside the UK.



CO,

rie
KARA Culmer-Wilson, an accounting major at Dalhousie, and her mother Olga Culmer, chief financial officer
at Bacardi.

PROMINENT educators attended the reception,
including Dr Celestine Williams, president of the
Bahamas Baptist Community College and her hus-
band McPherson Williams.