Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION

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Volume: 105 No.86



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FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 .
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BAHAMAS BIGGEST

PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)





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Nassau is world's

NO.1 cruise port

Carnival Corporation
expects to bring estimated
4.4m visitors to Bahamas
locations this year

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter :
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Nassau has
surpassed Cozumel this year
as the number one cruise port
in the world, attracting 1.1 mil-
lion cruise visitors, according
to Carnival Cruise Lines.

The cruise company expects
to bring an estimated 4.4 mil-
lion passengers to various loca-
tions in the Bahamas in 2009,

said Giora Israel, senior vice-
president of Carnival Corpo-
ration.

Mr Israel revealed that the
cruise line is projecting to bring
2.2 million passengers to Nas-
sau in 2009, and 1.8 million to
three other ports in the Family
Islands.

Carnival will also reach an
important milestone this year,
he said.

“We will be carrying this

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Students plead guilty to
causing grievous harm

MByALISONLOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THREE high school students pleaded guilty to causing griev-
ous harm yesterday after a fast food employee was left fighting
for life when she got caught up in a fight between a group of
teenagers.

A male Eight Mile Rock High School student is nueerd to

SEE page eight

WHY ARE SO MANY
Desuetan duinen ee SWITCHING TO

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Frequency i’

Lower Coat

Vea ado D gas od ag od ee
Bahamian owned
MOU es ama tes Pe
Pt bee ea eB A ad 1) EE

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Rain

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter -

A SECOND man charged
in the brutal 2008 murder of
a young woman whose half-
naked body was discovered
in bushes off Charles Saun-
ders Highway was arraigned
in a Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Devon Campbell, 29, of St
James Road, was arraigned
before Magistrate Ansella
Williams in Court One,
Bank Lane, charged in the
murder of Sheanda Newton.

According to police, the
body of the 19-year-old Blue
Hills resident was found clad
only in red underwear on
October 4, 2008. Her throat
appeared to have been slit.
Police also reported that
there. were signs that New-
ton had struggled to fight off
her killer.

It is alleged that Campbell

Volnmer Tiny 8) 1-11 Ane ace yesterday.

between Friday, October 3,
2008, and Saturday, October
4, 2008, intentionally caused
Newton’s death.

Campbell, who was not
represented by an attorney,
was not required to plead.

He is charged with
Michael Beckford, 29, of
Redland Acres, in Newton’s
murder.

Beckford was arraigned

on October 15, 2008, and the’

case was transferred to Court
10, Nassau Street.
Prosecutor Sergeant Sean
Thurston asked that Camp-
bell’s case also be transferred
to Court 10. Several relatives

of the deceased were present,

at yesterday’s hearing.
Campbell was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison until

the next hearing on April 22. |.

Before being escorted
from court, Campbell asked
the magistrate if he could
file a lawsuit if he is acquit-
ted.



_ Detainees ‘have —
‘seen improvements’



at Detention Centre

, since going to media

Repored chanses after



officials visited facility







@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@
tribunemedia.net



DETAINEES at the
Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre claim they
have seen some minor
improvements in their
living conditions since
they went to the media
with allegations of inhu-
mane treatment.

The reported changes
— including larger food
portions — came about
after the Director of
Immigration, .
Thompson, and Com-

Minister moves to
quell fears over
off-shore financial

-firm that the detention®

Jack.

modore of the Defence
Force, Clifford Scavella,
accompanied by repre-
sentatives from the
department of social ser-
vices, the clergy, and psy-
chologist Dr David Allen
toured the holding facili-
ty on Monday. ~
Deputy Director of
Immigration Roderick
Bowe said that the tour
was conducted to “con-









centre is being operated
with transparency and
that we are not running
the detention centre as
was previously claimed.”

Yesterday one

SEE page 12







service sector

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

-tthompson@tribunemedia.net

EDUCATION Minister Carl Bethel

Carl Bethel



sought to quell what he termed a "degree
of hysteria" being spread about the certainty of this country's
off-shore financial service sector.

Recent announcements made by US ‘Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner and British Prime Minister Gordon Brown —

which back a clampdown of off-shore “tax havens”

— do not

foreshadow:an immediate threat to the country's off-shore cen-

tres (OFCs), he said.

He conceded that while the recent developments indicate
there will be some impending "challenges" to the Bahamas' sec-

tor and other off-shore centres — an

SEE page 12

abrupt, unilateral shutdown

Skeletal remains are |
found off Dolphin Drive

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are trying to identify
a person whose skeletal remains
were found off Dolphin Drive on
Wednesday.

CID chief Ellsworth Moss said
items of what appeared to be
clothing were found “around” the
bones.

Several workmen discovered
the remains in a bushy area at

noon on Wednesday, police saidy*

The remains were taken,to
Rand Laboratory at Prirticess
Margaret Hospital.

Yesterday Chief Supt: Moss
said a doctor was examining the
remains to determine the esti-
mated age and gender of the
deceased.

Once this happens, police will
be armed with the facts necessary
to cross-check the findings
with their database of missing
people.



WN co SS a





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

Summer events
‘will revitalise’
hotel industry

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m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THOUSANDS of visitors arriving for inter-
national events in the Bahamas this summer
will revitalise the hotel industry, Hotel Workers
Union secretary general Leo Douglas has pre-
dicted.

As Atlantis prepares to host the month-long
Miss Universe pageant in August and the FIFA
(Fédération Internationale de Football Asso-
ciation) Congress in May, Mr Douglas said the
future is brightening for hotel workers.

He hopes there will be fewer job cuts and
new jobs generated for the thousands of hotel
staff who have been laid-off in recent months
owing to the decline in visitors and the eco-
nomic crisis.

The Miss Universe pageant is expected to
draw hundreds of visitors throughout August
and follows the FIFA Congress where a mini-
mum of three delegates will represent each of
the 208 member federations.

President of Kerzner International Bahamas
George Markantonis announced on Wednes-
day that staff will be hired temporarily at
Atlantis and hotels across New Providence dur-
ing the Miss Universe contest.

And although the jobs may not be perma-
nent, Mr Douglas said publicity generated by
the events should pave the way for a more buoy-
ant hotel industry going forward.

He said: “It’s one of the best things that could
happen to the country and it is a very good
thing for the hotel industry, which is suffering
right now, both here and all over the world.”

Mr Douglas commended the government and
Atlantis for putting the Bahamas forward as a
host for such events at a time when the industry
needs to be creative about bringing in guests.

He said: “The only thing we have said to peo-
ple in the hotel industry now is, ‘let’s try to be
very supportive’.

“They must understand how to do a much
better job with service and attitude — not only
for Bahamians in the hotel industry but for all
Bahamians.”

The union secretary hopes the boost in visi-
tors will allow Baha Mar to change its plans to
close the Wyndham hotel on Cable Beach
between August and October.



ATLANTIS WILL HOST the month-long Miss Uni-
verse pageant in August and the FIFA (Fédération
Internationale de Football Association) Congress.

“They should try to stay open because of this
so it can give a good feeling and get a good
message out there,” Mr Douglas said.

The union is encouraging hotels to keep line
staff during tough economic times and look to
executive positions when making cuts instead.

“The union says examine doing cuts from the
top,” Mr Douglas said. “They should under-
stand that is realistic. You cannot say you are
hurting and keep paying big salaries at the top
and cutting the bottom. We hope more job cuts
would be the last resort.”



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‘Major initiatives’ focus
on Andros and Abaco

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ANDROS and Abaco are the
focus of major initiatives on the part
of the Ministry of Agriculture to
encourage the development of agri-
culture and create new economic
opportunities for Bahamians, the
executive chairman of the Bahamas
Agricultural Industrial Corporation
said.

Speaking in the House of Assem-
bly yesterday, Edison Key charged
that “with the right support” agri-
culture, like tourism, can become a
“significant generator of employ-
ment and income” for Bahamians.

Outlining some of the ways BAIC
is seeking to boost this industry, Mr
Key said the corporation is encour-
aging the production of export qual-
ity products for the Bahamian and
export markets via the North
Andros Agricultural Expansion Pro-
ject.

This project will use 561 acres of
land located near the San Andros
Airport, which is to be “divided into
41 blocks of different sizes inclusive
of a greenhouse park and the head-
quarters for the North Andros Farm-
ers Association.”

The land is expected to nourish
the growth of vegetables, citrus trees,
tropical fruits and livestock, said the
South Abaco MP during his contri-
bution to the mid-year budget.

Meanwhile, a 1,500 acre “satellite
farm” in the same area is being “‘revi-
talised” and subdivided for livestock
farming, as the corporation also
seeks to establish the North Andros
Agro-Industrial Park, which will
emphasise agro-processing and orna-
mental plant production.

Modern technology will be put to
use in a new greenhouse park, and

two refrigerated trailers which will be
“leased at a nominal fee” to the
North Andros Farmer’s Association
are expected to heighten farmers’
chances of getting their goods to
market in the best condition possible,
Mr Key noted.

“We view this procurement as a
major step in improving the method
of transportation of agricultural
products,” he said.

Three tractors bought by the cor-
poration have already been put to
work in the same community.

Mr Key said that 500 acres of the
former Key and Sawyer/Bahama
Star Farms has been subdivided into
10 and five acre plots for leasing to
farmers in North Abaco. In Central
Abaco, south of Spring City, 640
acres have been sub-divided for the
same purpose.

He added: “I am pleased to report
that the first phase of the Farmers
Market Community Centre in Marsh
Harbour, Abaco has been complet-
ed in terms of lighting and ground
preparation. We also plan to estab-
lish an industrial park south of
Spring City.”

He affirmed that BAIC will con-
tinue to bring together buyers of
agricultural produce and Bahamian
farmers at meetings set up for this
purpose, so the direct shipment of
produce from farmers to Bahamian
markets can be planned.

“We are also dedicated to pro-
viding training and assistance in best
practices and modern methods of
farming and management. This com-
mitment is manifested in the farmers
empowerment workshops and
accounting and management work-
shops held in Abaco, Eleuthera and
Long Island,” he added.

Training in greenhouse technolo-
gy will also be offered to farmers
across the Bahamas.

THE TRIBUNE



Anglican
Archbishop
alldresses
homosexuality

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - In his
first visit to Grand
Bahama since his
enthronement, Rev Laish
Boyd, Bishop of the
Anglican Diocese of the
Bahamas and the Turks
and Caicos Islands, spoke
about the church’s posi-
tion on homosexuality.

Bishop Boyd said that
homosexuality is a very
pertinent topic for the
Anglican Communion,
one that was high on the
agenda at last year’s Lam-
bert Conference in Eng-
land.

“The position of the
Anglican Communion is
that homosexual practice
is contrary to scripture,
and that remains the deci-
sion of the church.

“There are all sorts of
views out there on this
matter, but this is the
church’s position,” Bishop
Boyd said.

He stated that the
majority of leaders and
bishops have maintained
that position.

There has been a lot of
controversy and division
in the Anglican Commu-
nion over the appointment
of the openly gay Episco-
pal Bishop Gene Robin-
son of New Hampshire.

Bishop Boyd said the
Anglican Communion has
faced many divisive issues
over the centuries and
over the last few decades
especially.

“The Episcopal Church
or Anglican Church in the
United States, where the
most contention is, has
had many dividing issues,”
he said.

In addition to the issue
of homosexuality, he said,
the ordination of women
still presents a problem
for many people.

“There are persons who
want to separate them-
selves for any number of
issues. But the Anglican
Communion for the most
part remains together.

“We remain committed
to staying together and
that was one of the things
that came up very strongly
in our Lambert Confer-
ence this past summer
when more than 700 bish-
ops from all over the
Anglican Communion
met.

“There are 70 million
Anglicans in 160 countries
on this Earth and most of
the bishops by far were
there, and that was the
consensus that we stay
together and try to work
through any differences
we may have.

“It (homosexuality) is
an issue that has caused
some to leave the church.
In spite of the issues, the
Anglican Church makes
every effort to stay
together,” said Bishop
Boyd.

Anglicans are currently
observing the Lenten sea-
son, which spans 40 week-
days beginning on Ash
Wednesday and culminat-
ing during Holy Week
with Holy Thursday,
Good Friday, and con-
cluding the Saturday
before Easter.

Bishop Boyd is the
third indigenous bishop to
undergo the rite as the
new Diocesan Bishop of
the Diocese of the
Bahamas and the Turks
and Caicos Island.

PSSST RTO ETT Ce ETC ID

THE Ministry of Education plans to
have a collection procedure in place
before the end of June to target those
who have defaulted on their educa-

tional guaranteed loans.

"Defaulted loans continue to be a
problem and we are now in the process
of interviewing a number of collection
agencies and entities and before the
end of this fiscal year we hope to imple-
ment some collection agency practices,"
Education Minister Carl Bethel said in
the House of Assembly during the last
day of debate on the mid-term budget

yesterday.

He said he understands that a number of per-
sons have lost jobs due to the economic down-
turn, but his ministry will seek to recoup money
owed by persons who are currently employed
and have the means to repay their loans.

Mr Bethel also urged persons with accounts in

arrears to arrange payments with the

ministry before action is initiated.
"We're seeking those persons who

can pay, if they lost their job that's one

thing, but if a person has a job — those

Carl Bethel

persons will be sought out, but we do
urge them to contact the scholarship
and educational loan department at the
ministry,” said the MP for the Sea
Breeze constituency.

For the 2008/2009 fiscal year,
government allocated $3 million for
its scholarship fund and $10.5
million for the Educational Guaran-

teed Loan Programme.

gramme.

Of that $10.5 million, $3.2 million was award-
ed to 349 new students and $7.2 million was
awarded to 743 students already in the pro-

Since the programme's inception in 2000 it has
been plagued with a high default rate.





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Pair in court on
fraud charges

A MAN and a woman were }
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court }
on fraud charges yesterday. :

Jaynell Indeira Bethel, 40, and }
Marvin Adelage Sturrup, 29, :
both of East Street, appeared }
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau }
Street yesterday on charges of }
forgery, uttering a forged docu- }
ment and fraud by false pre- ;
tences. ;

It is alleged in court dockets :
that the accused between }
December 8, 2008 and January 2, :
2009 forged Royal Bank of Cana-
da cheques in the amounts of }
$800, $1,500 and $1,800. It is also }
alleged that between December :
10, 2008 and January 8, 2009, the }
accused obtained cash totalling :
$2,300 from the Royal Bank of }
Canada, Bay Street, and also }
attempted to attain $1,800 from }
the same bank by means of fraud. }

The accused pleaded not guilty }
to the charges and were granted ;
bail in the sum of $4,000. :

Two in court
on drug charge:

mM By NATARIO McKENZIE:
Tribune Staff Reporter i

A 31-YEAR-OLD man and
a 23-year-old Jamaican woman
who were arrested on Monday }
in connection with the seizure of }
a quantity of marijuana }
appeared in a Magistrate’s }
Court yesterday on a drug pos- }
session charge. :

Police have charged Marvin
Rolle who also goes by the
aliases Andrew Rolle, Antho- }
ny Rolle and Lundy Rolle, }
along with Kayon Tasheika }
Ivey, alias Tanika Morley, with }
possession of marijuana with }
the intent to supply. i

Court dockets allege that the :
accused on Monday, March 2, }
were found in possession of a }
quantity of marijuana which :
authorities believe they intend- }
ed to supply to another. ;

Rolle and Ivey were }
arraigned before Magistrate }
Carolita Bethel in Court 8, }
Bank Lane, on Wednesday. The }
accused pleaded not guilty to }
the marijuana possession charge
and were remanded to Her }
Majesty’s Prison. The case has }
been adjourned to March 18 }
when a bail hearing will take :
place. According to the prose-
cution, the accused also have }
another case involving the }
seizure of a firearm and a quan- }
tity of drugs pending before the }
courts. ;

British PM supporting efforts that
could hit Bahamas financial sector

m@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

BRITISH Prime Minister
Gordon Brown has signalled
his support for efforts which
could severely impact the
Bahamas’ crucial financial
sector.

Explaining that his coun-
try will follow the United
States in its effort to restruc-
ture the rules governing the
banking industry, Mr Brown
placed particular emphasis
on curtailing the ability of cit-
izens to keep their money in
offshore banks in an effort
to avoid paying domestic tax-
es.

He told the United States
Congress on Wednesday: “

. you are also restructuring
your banks. So are we. But
how much safer would every-
body’s savings be if the whole
world finally came together
to outlaw shadow banking
systems and offshore tax
havens?”

Mr Brown’s statements
come at a critical time for the
Bahamas. Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham has already
voiced concern over calls
from European Union lead-
ers for an overhaul of the
international financial sys-
tem, including “a new system
of regulations for all finan-



BRITISH PM Gordon Brown (AP)

cial markets, products and
participants.”

“They again placed blame
for the international finan-
cial crisis on ‘offshore juris-
dictions’ or ‘tax havens’ as
they call us, where non-trans-
parent business is carried out,
and promised to prepare a
‘toolbox of sanctions to be
applied against such tax
havens’ which is to be pre-
sented to a summit of the
Group of 20 developed coun-
tries meeting in London on
April 2,” Mr Ingraham said.

The Stop Tax Haven
Abuse Bill pushed by then
Senator and now US Presi-
dent Barack Obama lists the

Bahamas as one of 34 secrecy
jurisdictions.

The Bill seeks authorisa-
tion for special measures
against foreign jurisdictions,
financial institutions and oth-
er entities which impede US
tax enforcement.

A portion of the Bill reads:
“Currently, the Treasury has
the authority under 311 of
the Patriot Act [31 USC
5318(a)] to impose financial
sanctions on foreign jurisdic-
tions, financial institutions,
or transactions found to be
of ‘primary money launder-
ing concern’. The Bill would
authorise Treasury to impose
the same sanctions on the
same types of entities if Trea-
sury finds them to be ‘imped-
ing US tax enforcement’.

“In addition, the Bill would
add to the list of possible
sanctions the ability to deny
foreign banks the authority
to issue credit cards for use in
the United States.”

Prime Minister Ingraham
pointed out that the Bahamas
has and will continue to do
everything in its power to
ensure that it cannot be “cor-
rectly identified” as an
“uncooperative” offshore
jurisdiction.

To this extent, Mr Ingra-
ham said, the country must
ensure that it follows inter-
national best practices at all
times.

Judge orders proceedings
against Haitian man be stayed

A SUPREME Court judge has ordered
that proceedings against a Haitian man accused
of having sex with a 10-year-old girl be

stayed.

Supreme Court Justice Jon Isaacs ruled on
Tuesday that the case against John Baptiste
be stayed on the grounds that the “continued
prosecution of the applicant is a breach of his
constitutional right to be tried within a rea-

sonable time.”

Baptiste had filed an application seeking
constitutional relief. He had also contended
that the continuation of criminal proceedings

GBPC responds to

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Power Company has
responded to criticism by the
Commonwealth Electrical Work-
ers Union over the hiring of new
temporary workers, stating that
the backlog in its customer ser-
vice area made this move neces-
sary.

“We at Grand Bahama Power
Company are surprised by the
Commonwealth Electrical Work-
ers Union’s reaction to our deci-
sion to hire four additional
Bahamian meter men,” the com-
pany said in a press release.

“In these most challenging eco-
nomic times, we are pleased to be
able to create temporary employ-
ment.”

The company said the four tem-
porary employees have been hired
for the interim to help clear a
backlog of work in the customer
service area of the company.

They explained that bringing in
a team to help assist the company
will decrease estimates of cus-
tomers’ billings, increase response
time to customer queries and assist
with reconnection and disconnec-
tion services.

“It has long been a standard
practice of our company to con-
tract temporary workers as the
need arises.

“We remain committed to the
advancement of our employees
and will continue to act in the best
interest of our customers and the
communities we serve,” said the
company.

The Commonwealth Electrical
Workers Union on Monday
accused the Power Company of
violating the Industrial Relations
Act by hiring the temporary work-
ers without informing the union.

CEWU president Keith
Knowles said the union never
received notification from the
company. He claims that the com-
pany breached the Industrial Rela-
tions Act by failing to consult and
inform the union of the hirings.

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He said the union was also con-
cerned about job security, salary
increases and promotion of the 10
current meter men on staff.

Mr Knowles said many of the
current meter readers have not
been elevated to the next level of
classification in meter reading
even though they are performing
at that level.

He said that the current meter
readers are being expected to train
temporary workers to read meters
and learn routes, putting their jobs
at risk.

Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny is a totally integrated utility
company serving the island’s
50,000 residents and commercial
establishments from east to west.
The company employs over 200
Bahamians.

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against him was “an abuse of process.”
Baptiste was arrested on March 26, 2005.
He was arraigned on March 30 ,2005 and bail

was refused as he has no legal right to be in the

country.

Prison since.

He has been on remand at Her Majesty’s

In his ruling, Justice Isaacs said the lapse of
time is “presumptively prejudicial”.

“Tam satisfied that the applicant’s right to

Inquiry to be held into
criticism by union | alleged immigration raid

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

AN INQUIRY into an
alleged raid by immigration
officers of a single mother’s
home will be held this week,
Minister of Immigration
Branville McCartney said.

The Minister contacted
Violet Hanna, 41, after read-
ing in The Tribune about
how unidentified armed offi-
cers from the Immigration
Department damaged her
fence and door when they
violently burst into her
home during the night last

s{ roe ,
$299 y
ne Se

Madeira
Location

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have a fair trial within a reasonable time has
been infringed when regard is had to the penal-
ty that may be imposed,” he said.



Ms Hanna and her 7-year-
old daughter Amber, both
Bahamian citizens, said they
were terrified by the event
and the mother-of-two
intends to sue the Immigra-
tion Department for dam-
ages as she no longer feels
safe in her Nassau Village
home.

During his contribution to
the mid-year budget debate
in the House of Assembly
on Wednesday, Mr McCart-
ney said: “With respect to
the article which appeared
in the newspaper about the
ordeal experience by the sin-
gle mother — an inquiry will
be heard this week with
respect to that matter.”

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MORI MSD
closure of loopholes

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

LOOPHOLES in the country's laws that allow Qagaiienetany:
foreign owned companies to move their earnings
abroad must be closed, former minister of tourism Obie Wilchcombe
said yesterday.

He highlighted the troubles of the now insolvent CLICO (Bahamas),
a auditor general's report that revealed loose accounting practices and
the global recession as prime reasons to take action now.

"So much of what we have and so much of what is earned in the
Bahamas does not stay in the Bahamas,” said Mr Wilchcombe in the
House of Assembly yesterday, adding that this money is needed to
build the economy and boost foreign reserves.

"Iam deeply concerned that we have multi-million dollar companies
in the Bahamas, making hundreds of millions of dollars and most of it
doesn't stay here,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe suggested that the government implement a “tem-
pered” corporate tax on foreign investors — not high enough to deter
investment but sufficient to make an impact on the suffering economy.

He also challenged the country to find ways to build its reserves
through agriculture and fisheries, in an effort to ensure the that coun-
try’s economy is sound independent of the tourism sector.

The next 10 months will be a period of "survival" for the country, Mr
Wilchcombe said, adding that this time must be used to create a proac-
tive economic recovery plan that harnesses local resources, the full
potential of which remains untapped.

"T think it's important, if we are going to move our country forward,
to understand that there are times when we must be aggressive, there are
times when we must take our message to where it's going to be effective
and we must discuss these matters. If we don't discuss these matters, then
we would forever be seen as a third world country,” he said.



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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Immigration revenue up nearly $10m

AT LEAST one ministry is earning money
for the country — Immigration.

Immigration Minister of State Branville
McCartney announced in the House that
between July 1 and December 31, 2008 the
Immigration Department had collected more
than $29.2 million — a revenue surplus of more
than $9.8 million.

He attributed the surplus to the new fee
structure, which was increased considerably on
July 1 last year, and to the department’s vigi-
lance in collecting outstanding fees.

Mr McCartney told the House that since the
formation of the department’s debt collection
unit there has been an improvement in the pay-
ment of permits.

For example, the unit investigated the depart-
ment’s Grand Bahama office. About 330 files
were audited and about $1.5 million were found
to be outstanding. Mr McCartney said that com-
panies in arrears will have none of their permits
renewed until they either pay the outstanding
fees or arrange a payment plan with the depart-
ment.

He wondered how these fees could have
possibly fallen into arrears, especially as each
approval letter makes it very clear that “the
permit will be issued upon receipt of the fee,
which should be in cash or certified cheque
only.”

The question is: How could Immigration
have issued the permits if no money was
received? Surely, employers were not using the
letter of approval as a permit and going without
the actual permit? This seems an impossibility.
The obvious answer is that staff were not doing
their job.

We recall an occasion several years ago when
we had to wait so long for an answer from Immi-
gration that we lost a very good job applicant.
When the approval letter eventually came, half
a year later, we ignored it.

Immigration called to find out what had hap-
pened to our cheque.

We told them what cliff they could jump
from.

How Immigration’s accounts receivable
could be in such a shocking state is a mystery as
Immigration’s approval letter makes it very
clear that “this letter is not authority for the
above named person to be employed as he can-
not be lawfully employed until he is in posses-
sion of valid work permit...” And to get a valid
work permit, one has to first pay the fee.

When The Tribune receives an Immigration
approval letter, it sends a cheque by messenger

to Immigration, then waits a few days before
calling to find out if the permit is ready for the
messenger to collect.

Having worked with Immigration in con-
nection with permits for so many years, we can
understand how some businesses, in desperate
need of specialist staff, would put a specialist to
work even before his permit had been approved.
It was a risky business, but it was encouraged by
the foot-dragging of Immigration in processing
applications, which often caused an employer to
lose an important employee for his business.

Immigration officials closed their eyes to this
infraction.

However, the employer was caught because
he had to pay for the permit from the date of
application — Immigration having assumed
that the employee had already been working
from that date.

However, businesses like The Tribune that
will not play Russian-roulette with Immigra-
tion are caught in an unfair trap.

The Tribune will not finalise any contract
unless it actually has the Immigration Board’s
approval.

Once that approval is given, the contract is
signed.

However, the future employee has then to
give his current employer notice.

This notice can vary from a month to three
months. This means that The Tribune has
already paid Immigration for a year’s permit,
dated from the day of Immigration’s approval.

However, by the time the staff member has
arrived in Nassau, The Tribune has paid Immi-
gration for three months that our candidate
was still on someone else’s payroll.

In other words, The Tribune has paid for a
year’s permit, but, depending upon when the
employee is free to join, has him on staff for
about eight months.

It is inequities like this that tempts employers
to play fast and lose with Immigration.

With the Immigration Board dedicating
Mondays to the approval of permits, many of
these delays in granting permits should be over-
come. However, there should be a new system
for the dating of a permit.

Just as Tuesday is Cabinet day, in the old
days under the UBP Mondays were Immigra-
tion days, and many problems that businesses
have encountered for years with this depart-
ment were avoided.

However, Mr McCartney and his new staff
have made a new start and seem to be making
progress — we wish them luck.





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Why are we
becoming such a
lawless society?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Currently The Bahamas Gov-
ernment and specifically The
Royal Bahamas Police Force
have many issues confronting
them. However, it has been stated
many times that most of these
problems start out as small mat-
ters but because they go
unchecked they become major
issues. Nevertheless, I am con-
cerned as it is not very long ago
that the Prime Minister raised the
issue about gambling being illegal
yet it is tolerated at a significant
level — probably even more so
since the introduction of the
Florida “Powerball” lottery. The
Prime Minister matter-of-factly
indicated that The Bahamas
should either make gambling
legal or we enforce the law. What
is the result? Business as usual.

Since the beginning of the year,
T have been appalled at the num-
ber of letters written complain-
ing about people’s businesses
making loud noise to the distur-
bance of other members of the
public.

We even had a Senator stating
that residents should be tolerant
of such intrusive behaviour in
these difficult economic times. I
am unable to relate to such a
statement which obviously indi-
cates that the innocent must exer-
cise such tolerance as opposed to
the perpetrator; What do the per-
petrators sacrifice? Recently we
had residents complaining about
the noise emanating from the
headquarters of the National
Trust, on Village Road, which
eventually evoked a response
from the President, Mr Carey. Mr
Carey apologised for the distur-
bance and said that in future all

letters@tribunemedia net



such noise will stop by 9pm unless
it is for a National Trust fund-
raising event when it will cease
by midnight. Again I fail to see
the logic of why the residents
should be required to be tolerant
of such invasive attacks on their
evening hours of relaxation. Fur-
thermore, I find it astonishing that
the National Trust would encour-
age such activities which seem to
be diametrically opposed to one
of their mandates. Have they for-
gotten that at night most birds
also try to sleep?

The most recent reports of dis-
turbance have been targeted at
the nightclub on West Bay Street
adjacent to the EI Greco hotel.
Again the rationale for this inva-
sion of privacy is in the name of
commerce and a “revitalization”
of the area and the wish to pro-
vide an attraction for the "Spring-
breakers" — if they ever arrive. I
am totally unable to grasp the
logic of these people who ratio-
nalize such thinking.

In the past I have been a victim
of this type of disturbance and
now find myself reading the Offi-
cial Gazette, on a daily basis, to
note who is applying for a "Music
and Dance" licence and then
going to extensive trouble to pur-
sue the matter before the Licens-
ing Board in an attempt to head-
off the problem before it gets
started.

I must confess, however, that I
do not recall the National Trust
applying for such a licence

although this could be an over-
sight on my part.

In all, of the cited cases above,
the disturbed residents have
called the Police with the result
that the noise level is reduced for
a limited period.

A short while after the Police
visitation, the volumes again esca-
late to the former level. Why is
this allowed to happen — do the
Police enquire if the
personal/business has a valid
licence? There are laws on the
books that prohibit persons from
being a public nuisance. There-
fore, when the Police are called to
such an incident why don’t they
issue a Summons on the spot and
fine the person breaching the
peace? If the Police are called to
the same offender more than
once then the fines should be
increased. When other laws on
the books are broken — eg steal-
ing — are the Police just as toler-
ant or are we going to have
another situation just like gam-
bling?

Yes, there are major issues to
deal with, but why not make a
start with the small matter of
being a public nuisance — the
effect is simple to execute and
implement, it puts much needed
cash in the Treasury and the pub-
lic immediately see the benefit
that something positive that is
being done to improve their qual-
ity of life.

There is no reason why such
actions shouldn’t be extended to
persons playing loud music from
their cars, trucks and SUV’s.
Peace on earth.

LAW ABIDING CITIZEN
Nassau,
March 3, 2009.

Something is deadly wrong with our
system of dealing with the mentally ill

EDITOR, The Tribune

Ihave recently gone through
an experience that I would not
want my worst enemy to go
through. You see I personally
know a man who, over the past
two months, had developed
what was suspected to be men-
tal disease (by laymen’s diag-
nosis).

The man would display over-
ly dramatic mood swings — from
as calm as can be to seriously
aggressive and obviously bel-
ligerent, all within minutes of
being in his presence. It was
not a pretty sight.

What seemed obvious to all
of us who were going through
this frightening and horrific
ordeal with this young man was
that he needed professional
help before he presented him-
self with situations which he
could get hurt or even killed;
or, much worse, he could hurt
or kill someone else.

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Tell me something — so far,
do you think that I sound like I
am exaggerating?

Let me tell you — I am cer-
tainly not!

Just ask the individuals who
were closely intertwined in this
whole imbroglio.

Anyway, as apprehensive
and frightened as we all were
of the whole scenario; and as
concerned as we all were for
this young man’s safety, the
safety of the general public, and,
of course, our own safety, we
all were (and are) in agreement
that members of our Police
Force have not been adequate-
ly trained, and the procedures
they are instructed to follow are
left wanting when charged to
expeditiously and efficiently
apprehend dangerous mentally
ill individuals.

What we were told, on more
than one occasion, was that the
Police cannot act unless the sub-
ject had a history of mental ill-
ness, Or was acting violently at
the time of the emergency call.
Can you believe that?

In the worst case what the
Police were telling us was that
we had to wait until this young
man killed someone before they

could be persuaded to act!

Did you hear what I said?
Do you think this is right?

I am willing to bet my peasy
head that even the policemen
in our country reading this letter
know that something is deadly
wrong with this system of deal-
ing with the mentally ill; and
something must be done before
some innocent person gets
killed — the subject or his victim.

When all was said and done,
this young man was committed
to Sandilands, thanks to the co-
ordinated efforts of the young
man’s family, friends, and Dr.
Nelson Clarke (Chief Psychia-
trist at Sandilands).

You can bet and believe that
a copy of this letter will find its
way to the desk of the Com-
missioner of Police, and also the
Chief Psychiatrist at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre.

And let us all hope and pray
that machinations would be ini-
tiated to alleviate this unequiv-
ocal deficiency in procedure and
training in attempting to appre-
hend the mentally ill.

MARVIN G. LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,
February 16, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 5



Minister: I don’t want

0 In brief

eoneeecseecrersccesseucseecrseuccrsosssessnssucrssescorsooreees

Red Cross
Fair this
Saturday

THE 67th Annual Red
Cross Fair will be held this
coming Saturday in the
lower gardens of Govern-
ment House.

The co-chairpersons of
this annual event, Pauline
Allen-Dean and Brendon
Watson, along with the
fair’s committee members
have once again organised
a fun-filled family event.

Each year the fair caters
to thousands of individuals
who pass through the gates
to enjoy themselves in a
wholesome family activity,
with games, food and
rides.

This year, there are the
usual favourites — conch
fritters, guava duff, straw
work crafted by local arti-
sans, hoop-la, punch board,
balloons, cotton candy, and
plants.

This event, one of the
major fundraisers of the
Bahamas Red Cross Soci-
ety, ensures the organisa-
tion’s continued work
through its various pro-
grammes.

Some of the Red Cross’
programmes include meals-
on-wheels, after-school
mentoring, summer camp,
first aid training, disaster
and emergency relief.

All of these activities are
funded by the Societies’
various fundraising efforts
and through the assistance
of the Red Cross staff and
numerous volunteers.

in our Own country

PRAISING the Enforcement
Unit of the Immigration Depart-
ment for its “outstanding work”
in apprehending illegal immi-
grants, Minister of State for
Immigration Branville McCart-
ney told the House of Assem-
bly during his contribution to
the budget debate that he does-
n’t “wish to wake up one morn-
ing in the Bahamas and ask,
where am I?”

“(I don’t wish) to find out that
we Bahamians are outnumbered
in our own country, or we find
ourselves as a minority in our
own country,” Mr McCartney
said.

So far this fiscal year, 3,512
illegal immigrants have been
repatriated.

“Most of the persons repatri-
ated this year were apprehended

this year. In fact, just yesterday, we repatri-
ated 128 persons,” Mr McCartney said.

Professional

He insisted that Immigration officers always
expected to conduct themselves in a profes-
sional manner when carrying out apprehen-

sions.

“Officers who step out of line are on their
own, and the Department will deal with them
very firmly. We will not compromise on this
issue. With respect to the article which
appeared in the newspaper about the ordeal
experienced by the single mother, an inquiry

will be heard this week with re

Branville McCartney



country $411

matter,” Mr McCartney said.

The Immigration Department
was allocated $18,695,006 in the
2008/2009 budget estimates. Of
that:

¢ $8.76 million was for salaries

¢ $3 million for overtime

¢ $2 million for repatriation
exercises

e¢ $1.3 million for Family
Island operations

Mr McCartney said that with
the exception of overtime, all
expenditure items have so far
remained within the budgeted
amounts.

However, he added that the
repatriation of illegal immi-
grants continues to absorb a
large portion of the departmen-
t’s -— and the countries -
resources.

Between July 1, 2008 and

December 31, repatriation exercises cost the

303,

Mr McCartney pointed out that employ-

allowed to e

tion motor.

spect to that gaigq

ers are still willing to hire illegal migrants.
“If employers were monitored and only

mploy people with valid docu-

mentation this would reduce the demand for
illegal labour.

“Apprehensions represent only one side of
the enforcement necessary to stop the migra-

“Both supply and demand must be con-
strained if word is to get back to those places
where illegals come from that it is no longer
possible for illegal migrants to obtain employ-
ment and find housing if they are illegal,” he

Clinical trial testing at the Princess
Margaret Hospital Oncology Centre

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE continuing effort by
Bahamian and American
oncologists to find the cause
for the aggressive ovarian
and breast cancer genes in
Bahamian women continued
yesterday at the Princess
Margaret Hospital Oncolo-
gy Centre with clinical trial
testing.

American oncologist Dr
Judith Hurley of the Uni-
versity of Miami together
with Bahamian oncologists
Doctors John Lunn,
Theodore Turnquest and
Duvaughn Curling will be
conducting cancer clinical
trials in Bahamian women.

The first phase of the clin-
ical testing was conducted in
November 2008 at the Can-
cer Society of the Bahamas
as a joint partnership effort
between Dr Hurley and the
Bahamian oncologists and

came as a result of the estab-
lishment of the Bahamas
Breast Cancer Initiative
(BBCI) which was spear-
headed by former US
Ambassador to the Bahamas
Ned L Siegel and his wife
Stephanie Siegel.

Findings

The BBCI was created
following alarming findings
by researchers and the
observations of Bahamian
and American medical pro-
fessionals and survivors.

The initiative is commit-
ted to creating greater
awareness of the importance
of early detection in saving
lives.

The Cancer Society of the
Bahamas and the University
of Miami are continuing
their tests for a mutated
gene they believe to be
prevalent in Bahamian

women. Altered genes such
as BRCA1 and BRCA2
make women more suscep-
tible to breast and ovarian
cancer.

The study began in 2002
after Dr Hurley and
Bahamian doctors noticed
that women in the Bahamas
were being diagnosed with
cancer at earlier ages
than women in other coun-
tries.

They carried out a prelim-
inary scan of breast cancer
patient charts from Princess
Margaret Hospital and
learned that 48 per cent of
the patients were diagnosed
before the age of 50.

A study of 18 Bahamian
breast cancer patients living
in South Florida was
launched because of this
find. In eight of these cases,
researchers found one or
more of three gene muta-
tions that can predispose
women to breast cancer.

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Department has a
Bahamians to be minority BUM

THE Department of
Immigration’s $9 million
surplus is the result of a
new fee structure, vigilance
by its officers and the for-
mation of a debt collection
unit, Minister of State for
Immigration Branville
McCartney told the House
of Assembly.

During his contribution
to the budget debate, Mr
McCartney said that the
newly formed unit, under
the direction of the depart-
ment’s director and finance
officer, has compiled a list
of companies owing out-
standing fees.

Companies

Their records revealed
that 70 companies have
been audited in New Prov-
idence and found to owe
the Bahamas government a
total of $834,718.

A similar exercise was
carried out in Grand
Bahama, where 330 files
were audited and around
$1.5 million were found to
be outstanding.

“As for those companies
who owe the department
money, the department will
not be minded to issue fur-
ther renewals without
either a settlement of out-
standing fees or a payment

MMB ten tlsraem tare!



plan arrangement,” Mr
McCartney said.

The state minister said
that the “big question” is
how did the fees fall into
arrears in the first place?

“It is apparent that once
persons have been issued
approval letters, they have
taken those letters to mean
‘go ahead and engage
workers’.

Payment

“This is done despite the
fact that the letter states
that payment must be made
within 30 days or the
offer will be withdrawn,”
he said.

Large companies, partic-
ularly hotel companies, and
persons requesting short
term work permits tend to
put persons to work before
paying, he said.

According to the Min-
istry of Finance’s revenue
budget estimates, the Immi-
gration Department’s total
revenue for the 2008/2009
fiscal year is forecasted to
be $38.7 million.

The revenue for the first
half of the year was fore-
cast to be $19.4 million, but
Mr McCartney said the
department had in fact col-
lected $29.2 million by
December 31, 2008.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





SECRECY

WE ALWAYS knew that
the rules didn't apply
equally to the powerful in
the same way that they
apply to the weak. Equality
under the law does not
seem to apply to the com-
munity of Nations.This
unfortunate fact was dra-
matically demonstrated this
week,

Just as the Cayman
Islands are waiting ner-
vously for an assault from
the authorities in the Unit-
ed Kingdom on their bank-
ing secrecy laws and The
Bahamas is hearing rum-
blings from Washington
that would appear to
endanger the international
financial industry in our
already battered economy,
an interesting matter in
making news.

That matter in the
refusal of the Union Bank
of Switzerland, UBS, to
hand over information on
the accounts of the 57,000

US citizens who have }

accounts with the bank.
Cayman and

bank.

about by the other animals,

the pigs gave their expla- ;
nation. That explanation ;
was that all animals were }
created equal but that some }
animals were more equal }

than others.

So to paraphrase George
Orwell, all Nations are }
equal but some are more ;

equal than others.

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327-1575 or 477-7610
Email: simon @cavesheights.com



The :
Bahamas should monitor :
this affair closely. It will be :
extremely enlightening to ;
observe what action the US
can or will take against }
Switzerland and its great }

Those of us who have }
read George Orwell's leg- }
endary book Animal Farm :
will remember that when }
the pigs took over the farm }
and then started to rule and }
behave like the farmers }
they overthrew and this sit- :
uation was complained :

Children invited to
name dolphin calf

BLUE LAGOON ISLAND
— For 20 years, Dolphin Encoun-
ters, located on Blue Lagoon
Island, has offered Bahamians
and visitors from around the
world the unique opportunity
to interact and learn about
friendly marine mammals in an
all-natural marine habitat.

As part of its 20th anniver-
sary celebration, Dolphin
Encounters is inviting the chil-
dren of the Bahamas to name
the latest addition to their dol-
phin family — a healthy male
calf.

The dolphin baby is the
fourth calf born to Princess on
October 11, 2008.

“Dolphin Encounters is very
fortunate to have another baby
calf born on Blue Lagoon Island
to Princess, our eldest dolphin,”
said Robert Meister, managing
director of Dolphin Encounters.

“Princess has been a part of
our beloved marine mammal
family from the very beginning.
Through our many educational
programmes, thousands of
school children have met her
and have come to love her and
all of our animals as much as we
do.

“We wanted the honour of
naming her boy calf to be given
to the children of the Bahamas.”

Students enrolled in any
grade from kindergarten to
grade 12 in the Bahamas are
invited to submit suggestions for
the name of the baby male dol-
phin. In keeping with Bahamian
culture, the name selected must
be related to island culture, his-
tory or geography.

All submissions must also
include the reason the student
feels the name should be cho-
sen.

The student whose name is
chosen will receive a special dol-
phin gift kit, a free dolphin
adventure programme for their
entire class where they will meet
the baby and Princess.

“The baby calf and mom are
doing very well,” said Kim Ter-
rell, marine mammal director at
Dolphin Encounters.

“Princess is an extraordinary
and experienced mother and has
given birth to three of our other
dolphins including Shawn, Aba-
co and Salvador. When dolphins

IT’S A TIME OF JOY AND JUBILAT. ION $

fP'S A GRAND TIME OF
PRAISE AND CELEBRALION!

TION

FyPROPHEGY,

BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD Monday, March 3th, 2009

General Ch erneer
BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON

General Preshytei

Bishop Dr. Elzarnet 8. Rabming, Natonal Overseer

& Mewlerator will dchver his ANNUAL ADDRESS.

S10 4M

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN

Global Outreach Director
BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK
CBL [nstrector

MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE

International Director of Women’s Ministries
BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN
Regional Overseer of Jamaica, Cayman

Islands Guyana and French Guiana
and MINISTER SONIA MARTIN

BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS
Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islands

BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES
National Overseer of the Church of Ceoxd,
Bahumus, Turks & Catoos Islinds

Ministering in song and performance
are: the Centennial Mass Choir, the Tab-
ernmacke Concert Choir, the Chorch of
Cod National Choir, the Bahamas Public
Officers Choir, and other Choirs

Teams ard acai Cromps,

‘Youth sien :
Chueh of {
and thcader: Bil rae

” is ves r ily) 4 na pe ble

LIVE ¥IA RADIO BAHAMAS 154) AM ane

The Convention climaxes on Sanday, March 15th
with the afternoon Annual Farude and Water
Baplismal Service, folliwed by the evening
Service hrnadeast live on 2WS Radio and TV 13,

log on to: WwW.cogophahamas.org

PRINCESS and her baby swim
together at Dolphin Encounters
on Blue Lagoon Island. The
school children of the Bahamas
are invited to name the dolphin
calf in a baby-naming contest as
part of Dolphin Encounters’ 20th
anniversary celebration.

successfully breed under human
care it is a scientific indicator
that they are completely adapt-
ed to the environment in which
they live. The fact that eleven
of our 18 dolphin family mem-
bers were born at Dolphin
Encounters makes us proud that
the all natural environment
which we have provided is ulti-
mately ideal for the Atlantic
Bottlenose Dolphin.”

“We have a great deal to cel-
ebrate and be proud of in our
20-year history, but nothing
compares to our extraordinary
animals that have brought joy
and a greater understanding of
marine mammals and the envi-
ronment in which they live to
Bahamians and visitors alike,”
Mr Meister said.

“We look forward to receiv-
ing submissions from students
and to announce the winning
name in April.”

The baby-naming contest is
free to students in the Bahamas

and entry forms are available
online at Dolphin Encounters
website or at the Dolphin
Encounters offices at One Mari-
na Drive Paradise Island. The
contest runs from March 1-
March 31, 2009.

Dolphin Encounters is a
member of the International
Marine Animal Trainers Asso-
ciation (IMATA), the largest
organisation of its kind.

In 1997, the facility was
accepted into the prestigious
Alliance of Marine Mammal
Parks and Aquariums (AMM-
PA), and in 2004 became an
accredited member of the
group, confirming its status as
one of the top marine parks in
the world.





A non-profit element of the
marine park is Project BEACH
(Bahamas Education Associa-
tion for Cetacean Health). It
was developed in close consul-
tation with the Bahamas
Department of Education, the
National Science Teachers
Association and BREEF
(Bahamas Reef Environment
Educational Foundation).

To date, thousands of local
students and teachers have ben-
efited from its innovative, on-
site and classroom programmes.

In 2003, Dolphin Encounters
and Project BEACH received
the prestigious Cacique Award,
the Bahamas Ministry of Touris-
m’s highest honour for excel-
lence in tourism.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

Request For

Expressions Of Interest/

ualifications

{EOI-09-01: Janitorial Services
EOI:09-02: Pest Control & Exterminating Services}

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited is
presently seeking expressions of interest from qualified
suppliers for the provision of the following services: -

1) Janitorial Services

2) Pest Control & Exterminating Services

Interested parties are requested to complete the RFEI/RFQ
Package, which may be collected from the Receptionist
Desk of the FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas)
Super Support Centre, East West Highway, Nassau,
Bahamas or requested via email to:

sourcing&supplymanagement@firstcaribbeanbank.com
as of Friday, March 06, 2009.

Please reply to: Sourcing & Supply Management

FirstCaribbean International Bank
East West Highway
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Ms. I. Hamilton

The deadline for submission is Monday, March 16, 2009 at
1:00pm. Eastern Time. Completed Qualification Packages
may be mailed or couriered to the address above.

Packages received after this date and time will not be accepted.





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Survey claim that most ‘godless’

0 In brief |

Two top Cuban
Officials resign all
party, govt posts

mM HAVANA

TWO of Cuba’s most prominent }
officials have resigned from all :
Communist Party and government :
posts after they were removed from }
the Cabinet and criticized by Fidel :
Castro, according to letters pub- ;
lished Thursday in the state press, :

according to Associated Press.

The letters from Vice President :
Carlos Lage and ousted Foreign :
Minister Felipe Perez Roque }
acknowledged they had commit- }
ted errors — which were not spec- }
ified — and promised to continue }
serving the country. Neither offered :
an apology for any wrongdoing, }

however.

The two were dismissed from :
Cuba’s Cabinet, the Council of i
Ministers, as part of a broad shake-
up on Monday. A day later, for- }
mer President Fidel Castro pub- }
lished a statement alleging they had :
been seduced by “the honey of
power” and hinted the two were }
demoted because their angling for :
leadership roles in a post-Castro :

Cuba had become unseemly.

University of

Miami president:

among health
Care experts at
Obama summit

Bg MIAMI

UNIVERSITY of Miami Pres-
ident Donna Shalala is among }
the health care experts gathered ;
at the White House to debate i
ideas for overhauling the nation’s }
system, according to Associated }

Press.

care and return to civilian life.

President Barack Obama sum- }
moned allies, skeptics and health ;
care figures of all stripes to Wash- }

ington on Thursday.

He’s pushing for universal :
health care coverage but wants ;
to be more open and inclusive }
than the Clinton administration }
during its failed reform attempt :

15 years ago.

Demeritte’s



places have less crime is rejected

A NASSAU pastor has rejected a
British survey’s claim that the most
“godless” places have less crime.

And he said Nassau’s own crime
problem would be much worse if the
Bahamas were not a Christian society.

Bishop Simeon Hall’s comments
came after a British survey found that
areas of Britain with a greater per-
centage of atheists also enjoyed less
crime.

“Such findings are contrary to most
of the studies that I have seen,” said
Bishop Hall of New Covenant Baptist
Church.

“Most serious Christians have a bet-
ter family life. However, I would agree
that everything we once thought foun-
dational is now being challenged.

“Even so, I think our crime rate
would be worse if we didn’t have Chris-





tians. You must remember
that criminals in our society
are a very small percentage
of the population.”

A British survey conduct-
ed by the think-tank Theos
found that eastern England,
which has fewer churchgo-
ers than elsewhere, is also |
the most virtuous.

The city of Norwich,
“capital” of East Anglia, has
a body of evangelicals, but
their attempts at “educa-
tion” have been branded
“indoctrination” by critics.
Statistically, it is one of the most god-
less places in the UK.

Cath Elliott, a writer for The
Guardian newspaper in London, said
the survey confirmed what atheists had



Bishop Simeon Hall

been saying for years: that
morals and ethics are not
linked to any particular reli-
gious group and that non-
believers are just as capable
of behaving decently as any-
one else.
’ In fact, she said, an atheist
§ is probably more capable of
telling right from wrong
because their morals come
from within “of their own
free will” rather than being
imposed by someone else.
“We don’t need any
mythical gods or holy books
to tell us right from wrong,” she wrote.
London, with the highest church
attendance in Britain, also has the worst
crime rate.
“There’s a lesson in there some-

where,” added Ms Elliott, “and ’m
delighted to say it is isn’t a biblical
one.”

At one time Norwich had 57 church-
es within the city walls. Now only 31
remain - and only nine of those are still
in use.

Overall, less than seven per cent of
Britain’s population is thought to
attend church regularly.

Bishop Hall declined to comment on
the survey itself because he said he
would need to “see the parameters and
who was doing the questioning.”

But he accepted that some so-called
believers used religion as a “cop out” to
escape accountability.

He said in the Bahamas “the quanti-
ty of churches has outdistanced the
quality of ministry - and that is part of
the problem.”





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS PART of the ongoing effort
to reach out to the community,
the Bain and Grants Town
Advancement Association offi-
cially launched its revitalisation
project earlier this week.

Rev Dr CB Moss, chairman of

the community over the past 12
years, will be the sponsoring the
project.

“The five principal pillars of the
project are health, education,
sports, economics, and culture.
Significant concerns to be
addressed by the commission
include social services, health,
environment, education and eco-

Rev Moss said the project will
also include expansive self-sus-
taining programmes such as the
Heritage Tourism Project and the
Y13 Project, a computer literacy
initiative.

The association is currently in
discussions with the Ministry of
Tourism, the College of the
Bahamas and several corporate,

view to partnering in various
aspects of the project.

“The main engine that will
power the target area out of its
economic and socially depressed
state will be the financial benefits
to the residents.

“Therefore, major emphasis
will be placed on economic activ-
ities at the individual and corpo-



Shalala was secretary of Health }
and Human Services under Pres- }
ident Bill Clinton. She also:
recently co-chaired a commission }
charged with helping wounded
military veterans get better health ;

the association, said although
there have been several previous
projects designed to renew the
Bain and Grants Town area along
with other inner-city communi-
ties, their project is different in a
number of ways.

“It is a private sector project
that is not sponsored by the gov-
ernment, there will be a bottom
up instead of a top down imple-
mentation and it will be driven by
the local people instead of out-
siders.

“The boundaries of the target
area include East Street on the
east, Nassau Street on the west,
Shirley Street on the north and
Cordeaux Avenue in the south.
Areas lying just outside these
areas may also be included in the
project,” he said.

Rev Moss said the association,
which has provided cultural,
social, academic, sporting, youth
and religious programmes within

Suneral Home

a

MABEET STREET : it. Biot

6T-20e7 = TEL: 323-572

ee i ee

Philomene
Joachin, 68,

a resident of Andros
Avenue & formerly of
$1. Louis Du Nord,
Haiti, will be held at Holy
Family Catholic Church,
| Robinson Road, on
| Saturday at 11 :00 a.m.

| Officiating will be Rev. Fr.

Roland Vilfort, s.m.m.

Interment follows in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads. Left to cherish her memories are her
children: Yna & Verjena Joseph, Rose Marie Joseph-
Johnson, Yo | ette, Fenise & Filonma Joseph; sisters:
Noelsil, Wilsanne & Sinatte Joachin; brothers: Joasius
& Sima Joadin, Prinsivil, Bermen & Renold Digue;
grandchildren: Rene Laguerre, Odilia Joseph, Yderick,
Emilie, Johanne & Mikerlange In Baptiste, Lifete Joseph,
Violeme & Guilene Borgela, Persilien In Baptiste,
Marianne, Chimene, Mamonvil, Elie, Guilene, Rony,
Charitable & Alaine Joseph, Sandra & Alex Thinis, Aglantis
Romann, Samlix, Naderge & Miriame In Francois, Andre
Johnson, Evline & Nadine Joseph, Neyisha Johnson,
Ruth In. Francois; sons-in-law: Dieu-Juste In Baptiste,
Bersius Borgela, Sameson In Francois, George Henry
Johnson & Amold Blanc; great grandchildren: Guylove
Jean Francois, Manedossa & Wouldline Joseph,
Mickinight & Stanley Laguerre, Sandou Joseph, Wilna,
Kettena & Fransico Charles, Alen, Ysland & Kesly Saint-
Fleur, James Victore, Cynthia & Withney In Francois,
Alexsandra Thinis, Woudish, Woudianna, Samlisha &
Sabrina In Francois, Kendera Thinis, Mario, Samlix,
Matthew, Denisha, Johnathan, Samantha & Samelique
In Franxois & Rosemilande In Phillip; cousins: Bertha
& Fourchard Borcejour, Perthomas, Jisilia, DiJean &
Florenne Joseph, Christiana, Josela, Joseline, Adrien,
Simone Joachin, Rosetta Guerline, Larry, Ronald,
Veronica, Genuir & the Noels. Friends may pay their last
respects at Demeritte’s Funeral Home, Market Street,
from 10-6:00 p.m: on Friday & on Saturday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

nomics,” he said.

civic and religious groups with a

rate levels,” Mr Moss said.

RG Dr C B Moss








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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Students plead guilty to

causing grievous harm

Chavez says US, Brazil
free to discuss Venezuela

@ CARACAS, Venezuela

VENEZUELAN President Hugo Chavez has
given Brazil’s president the green light to talk
about Venezuela with President Barack Obam,
acca.

Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva
plans to meet Obama on March 14 in Washing-
ton, and Chavez said the Brazilian leader told
him by phone that “he would like to talk with the
president of the United States about the case
of Venezuela.”

U.S.-Venezuelan relations remain prickly
despite the change of administrations in Wash- ;
ington, while Brazil’s left-leaning president has maintained friend-
ly relations both with the U.S. and the socialist Chavez.



Hugo ATS)

“We don’t need any intermediary to speak with any government i
on the planet, but since it’s Lula and in good faith, I told him yes, that
Chavez said Thursday in a televised }

I gave him the green light,”
speech, addressing troops.

Chavez added, however, that “I’ve told him I don’t have much

hope of that government changing.”

Silva’s office confirmed the two spoke by phone Wednesday and ;
agreed the Brazilian leader could bring up Venezuela with Obama. :
Chavez has condemned recent U.S. State Department reports
alleging human rights problems in Venezuela and a lack of cooper- i

ation in counter-drug efforts.










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Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am - 5:30pm
Saturday 9am - 2pm

TTT
TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
ShirleyStreet

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following positions for the
2009-2010 School Year

10-12)
7-12)

-Journalism/Literature (Gr,

-Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr,

-Math (Gr. 7-127)

-Physics (Gr. 10-12)

-Agriculture (Gr.7-9)

-Technical Drawing (Gr, 7-12)

-Accounts’Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)

-Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)

-Spanish (Gr.7-12)

-Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)

-Chemistry
-Business Studies (Gr, 10-12)

-Health Science (Gr, 7-9)

-General Science (Gr7 } =
-Computer Studies (Gr. 7
-Music (Gr. 7-12)
-Biology (Gr. 10-12)
Language Arts/Literature (Gr,

-Art/Craft (Gr, 7-12)

-Food Nutrition (Gr, 10-12)
-Clothing Construction (Gr.
-Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)
-Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

7-13)
7-12)

10-12)

Applicants must:

a practicing bom-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Christian School.

Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or Univerity
in the area of speci alization.

Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or
Diploma.

Have at least two years teaching
experience in the relevant subject areca
with excellent communications skills.

Applicants must have the ability to prepare

students for all examinations to the BIC;
BGOCSE levels

Be willing to participate in the high
school’s extra curricular programmes

Application must be picked up at the High
School Office on Shirley Street and be returmed
with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for application is
March 6th, 2009

FROM page one

have hit the victim in the
face with a rock when she
intervened in a brawl that
was underway in the park-
ing lot of the Kentucky Fried
Chicken restaurant in Martin
Town, Eight Mile Rock,
Grand Bahama, police said.

The woman, whose iden-
tity is not known, suffered
multiple facial fractures and
her condition is listed as seri-
ous. She remains in the
Rand Memorial Hospital in
Freeport, where she was

police said.

According to an official
report, police were alerted
to the scene of the attack at
around 3.22pm on Tuesday.

They said they met a
“large crowd of Eight Mile
Rock High students” in the
parking lot of the restaurant
and were informed that the

injuries “while trying to
assist one of the students
who was involved in the
fight.”

“As a result of an intense
investigation three students
were taken into custody and
charged for the offence.

“They appeared at the
Eight Mile Rock Magis-

March 5, where one of them
pleaded guilty to the offence
and the other two were dis-
charged. The lone male stu-
dent remains in custody
pending an updated report
on the victim’s condition.”
Police did not explain why
the incident was only made
known to the media two

taken by ambulance,

FROM page one

year over five million people from all
places in the world,” he announced at the
Grand Bahama Business Outlook in
Freeport.

Carnival Corporation is the largest
cruise operation in the world. It has 11
cruise companies, including brands such as
Carnival Cruise Lines, Holland America
Line, Princess Cruises and Seabourn
Cruise Line in North America; P and O
Cruises, Cunard Line and Ocean Village in
the United Kingdom; AIDA in Germany;
Costa Cruises in southern Europe; Ibero-
cruceros in Spain; and P and O Cruises
in Australia.

Mr Israel said Carnival Corporation
comprises 56 per cent of the cruise market
in the world, with 565 ports in 139 coun-
tries. He said this winter they have six

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employee suffered her

trate’s court on Thursday,

days after it occurred.

Nassau iS world’s
‘No.1 cruise port’

ships in Santos, Brazil, Shanghai, China,
and Dubai.

He also noted that some 84,000 persons
are employed worldwide with Carnival,
which has a total of 88 ships.

Mr Israel reported that Carnival will get
17 additional new ships this year.

“We get a new large Carnival ship every
71 days,” he explained.

Mr Israel indicated that cruise vacations
will not go away and Carnival Corporation
will continue to develop and grow with
the deployment of other brands.

North America is the major source of
business for Carnival Corporation. It is

presently focusing on pursuing growth
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“In Germany, there are 100 million peo-
ple and 84 million of them take 100 million
vacations a year.

“We only carry 600,000 of them on
cruise ships and we have long way to go,”
he said.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 9



Friend says Terrell Owens
has been cut by Cowboys

FOOTBALL
IRVING, Texas
Associated Press

DALLAS Cowboys receiv-
er Sam Hurd said Terrell
Owens sent him a text mes-
sage late Wednesday, saying
he had been cut by the team.

“He didn’t give me an
explanation. He just said,
“Wow,” Hurd said Thursday.
“I really didn’t believe that
he seen that coming.”

Hurd said Owens’ reaction
was “more shock than anger.”

“He said it’s tough, but it’s a
business,” Hurd said.

Cowboys owner Jerry Jones
indicated a few weeks ago
that T.O. was going to remain
in Dallas, where he’s had
three straight 1,000-yard sea-
sons. Jones’ abrupt reversal
was first reported Wednesday
night by ESPN.

The Cowboys reportedly
made another, more-expect-

ed move Thursday by releas-
ing safety Roy Williams.

The team had no comment
on either move.

The moves all seem to be
aimed toward an improved
atmosphere in the locker
room, something widely
viewed as a reason for the
Cowboys’ problems last sea-
son. A preseason Super Bowl
pick by many, Dallas missed
the playoffs after losing three
of its last four games, includ-
ing a blowout in the finale
when a victory would’ve
clinched a playoff berth.

Also this offseason, the
Cowboys have let go of Adam
“Pacman” Jones and Tank
Johnson.

Owens’ personality over-
shadowed his performance,
stretching thin his relation-
ship with coaches and some
teammates. It’s similar to the
circumstances around his
departures from the San Fran-

cisco 49ers and Philadelphia
Eagles.

Without him, offensive
coordinator Jason Garrett and
quarterback Tony Romo no
longer have to think about
whether No. 81 is happy.

“T know it takes a lot of
pressure off Romo,” Hurd
said. “A guy like him
demands the ball and you
want to get him the ball. Now
he can look at all of us and
see which one is open on any
given play. ... I don’t think
that was a problem. That’s
just what could and might
start happening.”

Dallas’ passing game likely
will now revolve around Roy
Williams, who was acquired
from Detroit for three 2009
draft picks in the middle of
last season. In addition to
Hurd, the Cowboys also have
Patrick Crayton and Miles
Austin.

As for Owens, it remains to

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Chairman’s Review
Of the Results

For the first quarter ended January 31, 2009

The consolidated net income of FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited for the
first quarter of fiscal 2009 was $15.8 million, an increase of $11.5 million over last year’s nei
income of $4.3 million. Earnings per share for the quarter was 13.2 cents, an increase of 9.€

cents over last year.

The first quarter earnings were driven primarily by a $7.9 million, or 26%, increase in net interes!
income over the prior year quarter. Total interest expense was reduced by $12.9 million, due tc
lower funding costs for deposits, combined, in part, with lower deposit volumes in the firs!
quarter. Net income, adjusted for non-recurring outsourced portfolio results, was $23.1 million
which demonstrates the resilience of the Bank’s core earnings.

Operating expenses for the quarter were $16.5 million. These continue to be well managed as
evidenced by the efficiency ratio improving over the comparative period.

The Bank’s total assets at January 31, 2009 stood at $4.1 billion. This reflects a growth in tota.

loans of $61.2 million.

The tier 1 capital ratio at the end of the quarter was 15.8%,

substantially in excess of the minimum requirement of 8% of risk-rated assets.

I consider these first quarter results satisfactory in the current economic conditions and they are
in line with management's expectations.

I thank our customers, shareholders and employees for their continuing loyalty and patronage
throughout the quarter and look forward to another successful year.

Prat be orsee!:

Michael K. Mansoor
Chairman

FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Balance Sheet
BS'000

Assets
Cash and due from banks
Securities
Loans and advances to customers
* Goodwill
Property and equipment
Other assets

Total assets

Liabilities
Total deposits
Other borrowed funds
Other liabilities
Debt securities in issue

Total liabilities

Equity
Share capital & reserves
Retained earnings

Total liabilities and equity

Unaudited
January 31, 2009

346,787
$36,436
2,600,315
187,747
25,514
116,874

4,113,673

3,242,201
173,740
82,519

Unaudited
January 31,2008 October 31, 2008

Audited

421,178
1,329,993
2,510,392
187,747
26,681
59,639

259,951
1,081,872
2,539,072
187,747
25,913
43,435

4,535,590 4,137,990

3,837,746 3,445,010

48,146 47,168
20,315 Fs

ee
3,498,460 3,906,207 3,492,178

390,948
224,265

446,579
182,804

477,230
168,582

-—
615,213 629,383 645,812

4,113,673

ee
at

4,535,590 4,137,990

vad nd

Director

be seen what kind of market
there is for a 35-year-old with
a proven track record — good
and bad.

His personality might be a
fit Al Davis and the Raiders.
Or maybe Daniel Snyder and
the Washington Redskins
might add another big-name
star to the roster, especially
to take advantage of the ani-
mosity T.O. might bring to his
two games a year against the
Cowboys and the Eagles.

“T don’t think (being
released) is going to stop him
from playing football,” Hurd
said. “He’s going to be back
on somebody’s team.”

Don’t look for him to
replace Laveranues Coles on
the Jets. The team has no
interest in Owens because of
the distractions he’d bring, a
person familiar with the
team’s thinking told The
Associated Press on Thurs-
day.

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity
BS'000

Balance at October 31, 2007

Net income for the period

Dividends

Revaluation gains/(losses)

Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve

Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands

Balance at January 31, 2008

Balance at October 31, 2008

Net income for the period

Dividends

Revaluation gains/(losses)

Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands
Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve

Balance at January 31, 2009

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Income
BS'000

Total interest income
Total interest expense

Net interest income

Operating income

Operating expenses
Loan loss expense

Net income

Weighted average number of common
shares outstanding for the period

Earnings per share (in cents)

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
BS'000

Net from (used in) operating activities

Net cash from financing activities

Net cash from (used in) investing activities

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Notes to Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

Three Months Ended

January 31, 2009

I. Accounting Policies



Mel Evans/AP Photo

IN THIS Dec. 28, 2008 file photo, Dallas Cowboys wide receiver
Terrell Owens (81) stands on the sidelines at the end of an NFL
football game against Philadelphia Eagles in Philadelphia. The Cow-
boys officially released Owens on Thursday, March 5, 2009, ending
a three-year run that produced as many big headlines as big plays.

Share Capital &

Retained Earni
Récicves ained Earnings

436,297 207,035 643,332
4,346 4,346
(30,054) (30,054)

8,683 8.683

1,599 1,477 3,076

446,579 182,804 629,383

413,847 231,965 645,812
15,847 15,847

. (24,043) (24,043)
(22,403) - (22,403)

(497) 497 :
390,947 615,213

Unaudited
Three Months Ended

January 31,2009

Audited
Year Ended

January 31, 2008 October 31, 2008

60,479 65,359 263,605

(21,932) (34,791) (108,028)

38,547 30,568 155,377

1,879 5.502 16.017

40,426 25,066 171,594



16,492 16.034 64,340
087 4,686 23,350
24,579 20,720 87,690

120,216,204 120,216,204 120,216,205

13.2 3.6 69.8

Unaudited
Three Months Ended
January 31, 2009

Unaudited
Three Months Ended
January 31, 2008

(111,117) 89.318

149,697 248,117
5,869 (391.955)
44,449 (54.520)
98,763 206,145

143,212 151.625

These consolidated interim financial statements are prepared in accordance with IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting policies used in the preparation of
these consolidated interim financial statements are consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended October 31, 2008,

The consolidated interim financial statements include the accounts of the following wholly owned subsidiaries:

FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International (Bahamas) Nominees Company Limited
FirstCaribbean International Land Holdings (TCI) Limited

2. Comparatives

Where necessary, comparative figures have been adjusted to comply with changes in presentation in the current year.





PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

SPORTS





ZH

POINT STANDINGS

C.R Walker Knights (CRW) 333.50
C.|. Gibson Rattlers (cv 247.50
C.V Bethel Stingrays( (ce 237.50
C.C Sweeting Cobras(CC 185
Doris Johnson Harn 600) J) 177.50
R.M Bailey Pacers(RM 146
G.H.S Magic(GHS 8
Anatol Rodgers(AR) 70

RESULTS

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS ie 100M
Etienne, Marva - CRW,

Seymour, Katrina — CIG, 12.09s
Colbrooke, Vashti - CIG, 12.50s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS ytd 400M
Seymour, Katrina - CIG, 57.19s
Adderley, Teshon — CVE , 57. Abs
Rolle, Lakeisha — RMB, 1:03.55s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS wi! 1500M
Cherilus, Angela — AR,

Lewis, Safara — CRW, 6:02. 20s
McIntosh, Crystal — RMB , 6:11.82

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS ee 100MH
Etienne, Marva - CRW, 16.17s

Sears, Hollina - CCS, 16.45s

Rolle, Tiffany — CIG, 17.70s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) 4X100M
RELAY

C.| Gibson — Rolle, Tiffany; Colebrooke,
Vashti; Jean Louis, Louisiana; Seymour,
Katrina, 51.48s

C.R Walker — Ettienne, Marva; Capron,





Seymour, Katrina — CIG, 5.07m
Martin, Sasha — G 2m
Rolle, Lakeisha — RMB, ‘433m

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) DISCUS
THROW

Williams, Racquel — CVB, 34.70m
Taylor, Jewel — CRW, 22.90m

Collie, Jasmine - GHS, 18.30m

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) JAVELIN
THROW

Prosper, Tawanna — CVB, 29.84m
Martin, Sasha — GHS, 28.61m

Rogers, Terranique - CCS, 25.22m

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) HIGH
JUMP

Sears, Hollina - CCS, 1.44m
Young, Lyndia — CRW, J1.44m
Lewis, Safara - CRW, 1.39m

INTERMEDIATE BOYS uty) 100M
Ferguson, O'Jay — CRW, 11.08s
Adderley, Tre - CVB, 11.20s

Finley, Toriano — AR, 11.23s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS uy 400M
Ferguson, O'Jay — CRW, 50.97s
Hanchell, Marlon — CVB, 53.28s
Davis, Patrick - CCS, 54.00s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS ae 1500M
Rolle, Percy — AR, 5:02.5

Wells, Denzil - ccs: 53 a8, 80s
Saunders, Carson — ccs. 5:12.22s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 100MH



Adderley, Tre; Farrington, Anthony ,
AS Ode y g y

Anatol Rodgers — Moss, Owen; Evans,
Trevel; Finley, Toriano; Bodie, Eusias ,
S

C.l Gibson — Valcin, Avens; Forbes, Rod-

ney; Pratt, Kevin; Knowles, Demarcus ,
47.338

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) LONG
JUMP

Adderley, Patrizio — CIG, 6.08m
Miller, Kareem — RMB, 5.80m
Martin, Stelin- GHS, 5.74m

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) SHOT PUT
Rolle, Matthew - GHS, 10.64m

Mackey, Samuel — CRW, 9.89m
Darling, Samuel — AR, 9.77m

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 100M
Kemp, lvanique — CRW, 11.89s
Knowles, Antonya — CRW, 12.525
Kelly, Cache — RMB, 12.835

SENIOR GIRLS (u20) 400M
Miller, Shaunte - GHS, 1:01.74s
Knowles, Antonya -— CRW, 1:02.46s
Justilien, Sydline - RMB, 1:04.71s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 1500M
Dean, Glendina - CRW, 5:42.24s
Conliffe, Queenell - DDJ, 6:02.59s
Zonicle, Danielle — DDJ, 6:05.51s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 3000M
Conliffe, Queenell — DDJ, 13:02.64s
Dean, Glendina — CRW, 43:10.95s

La'Chea; ean Edricka; Whylly,

Lashawn, 52.38s

C V. Bethel - Gaitor, ee Higgs,
on; Flowers,

Gregria; Adderley, Tes
Tonea, 53.47s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) LONG
JUMP

Davis Cup team ready

FROM page 11

“We are away from home,
playing on a different turf, but
we will just go out there and play
our game,” he said. “I’m playing
first, so I just have to do my
thing.

“T think the night matches is
going to be fun. We’re going to
have a lot more people around.
This is my second or third night
match, so it should be a lot of
fun.”

Noted Mullings, playing in the
best-of-five sets should work in
his favour: “The longer the
match, the better for me. So I
just need to go out there and
work hard and make him play,
wait for the right balls to attack
and just be real gritty out there
and gut it out.

“Tjust have to be patient and
wait for the opportunity to
attack.”

As for playing in the evening,
Mullings said it was best for him
because “it’s much cooler.”

On Saturday, the official
opening ceremonies will take
place at 5 pm. That will be fol-

Knights out front after Day One

FROM page 11

ishes in the Intermediate girls
from Marva Etienne.

The 15-year-old Etienne took
first place in the 100mH in
16.17s and again in the 100m in
12.07s.

Ivanique Kemp led the
Knights in the Senior Girls divi-
sion with a trio of first place fin-
ishes.

Kemp took the 100m with a
wind aided time of 11.89s, fin-
ished first in the 100mH in
14.72s and anchored her 400m
relay team to a first place finish
in 51.28s.

Not to be outdone in the
field, Elcardo Carey broke the
second record of the day for the
Knights in the Senior Boys’ shot
put.

Carey’s toss of 14.08m passed
the previous mark set last year
by Elvardo Carey of 13.70m.

Day one saw a myriad of oth-



Ferguson, Donshannon — CVB, 15.02s
Adderley, ‘Tre - CVB, 15.41s

Walkine, Marco — DDJ, 15.62s
INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 4X00M
RELAY

C.V Bethel — Lockhart, David; Sands, Neil;

lowed by the doubles with Bjorn
Munroe and Marvin Rolle
scheduled to play.

Both players are just as
enthused as the singles players.

Rolle, who teamed up last
year with Mark Knowles to win
the Bahamas’ only match in their
4-1 loss to Paraguay at the
National Tennis Center, said he
and Munroe had been working
out very well together.

“BJ is an experienced doubles
player. He won a Futures and
he’s done well at the pro level,”
Rolle pointed out. “So if we play
our game, we should do very
well.”

For Rolle, it really doesn’t
matter playing in the night
because they’ve done it before.

“We practised under the lights
and all of these guys played in
the night before,” he said. “So it
shouldn’t be nothing new
because we are all comfortable
playing under the lights.”

The tie is going to be an emo-
tional one for Munroe, whose
family buried his brother,
Lavaughn Munroe, a former
Davis Cup team member, the

er performances from athletes
looking to give their school the
effort needed to surpass the
Knights’ advantage, most
notably, the Rattlers’ Katrina
Seymour.

Seymour won three of her
four events and smashed a 19-
year-old mark in the Interme-
diate Girls’ 400m.

Seymour’s time of 57.19s eas-
ily bested the previous mark of
58.77s by Carmetta Mackey in
1990.

Seymour also took first place
in the long jump with a leap of
5.07m, anchored her team to a
first place finish in the 400m
relay in 52.38s and narrowly
missed the 100m title with a sec-
ond place finish to Etienne in
12.09s.

C.V Bethel’s Tamika Brown
also set a new record in the
Senior Girls’ triple jump.

Brown leapt 11.76m beating
the old mark of 11.73m set by

MARVA ETTIENNE soars on her first attempt of the Intermediate Girls’ Long
Jump. Etienne failed to place in the event but took first place in the 100m
and 100mH.

Kelly, Cache - RMB, 17.358
Lutus, Oguilene —
CVB, 18.09s

Zonicle, Danielle — DDJ, 14:11.71s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 100MH
Kemp, lvanique — CRW, 14.72s



aS
a

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 4X100M RELAY
C.R Walker — Kemp, lvanique; Knowles,
Antonya; Adderley, Mitchalyn; Saunders,
Cleshae, 51.288

R.M Bailey — Kelly, Cache; Johnson

ee Kay; an Vithlene: Justilien, Syd-
iene

C.1 Gibson - Brow Kenicka; Dames,

Avianna; Stubbs, Jarona; Brown, Vanessa,

Ads
SENIOR GIRLS (20) TRIPLE JUMP
Bain, Tamika — CVB, 11.76m

Zonicle, Danielle — DDu, 10.99m
Brown, Vanessa — CIG, 10.97m

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) HIGH JUMP
Crooks, Tanya — CIG, 1.50m
Brown, Jakia - DDJ, 1.35m

Ewing, Gardia —- RMB, J1.35m
Brown, Kenicka — CIG, J1.35m
Kelly, Cache — RMB, J1.35m

SENIOR GIRLS mat) DISCUS THROW
Thurston, Keisha - CCS, 27.95m

Belle, Jenesta - CVB, 26.74m
Johnson, Shantia - CRW, 25.80m

SENIOR GIRLS Tr JAVELIN THROW
Brown, Jakia - DDJ, 30.17m

Gordon, Giavanna -— CCS, 27.45m
Zonicle, Danielle - DDJ, 27.20m

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 100M
Mackey, Trevor — DDJ, 10.59s
Richardson, Charles - CRW, 10.76s
Hinsey, Ulysses — CVB, 10.99s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 400M
Deveaux, Delano — DDu, 49.54s
Williams, Ramon — CIG, 51.03s
Thompson, Ishmael - CCS, 53.53s

TRIBUNE SPORTS

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 1500M
Altidor, Kevin - CCS, 4:29.03s
Burrows, Crashad — DDu, 4:38.76s
Pierre, Sedel — CVB, 4:39.03s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 5000M
Seveus, Vicnel — CIG, 19:52.97s
Louis, Jefferson - CRW, 20:20.59s
Burrows, Crashad — DDu, 20:29.85s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 110MH
Thompson, Roneko - CRW, 16.46s
Cash, Cody — CIG, 16.86s
Lightbourne, Dellano — CRW, 16.96s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 4X100M RELAY
C.V Bethel — McKinney, Austin; Fowler,
Kendal; Hinsey, Ulysses; Johnson
Demitrius , 43.76s

C.R Walker — Richardson, Charles;
Stubbs, Javano; Moss, Omar; Collie,
Dominic, 44.15s

Doris Johnson — Williams, Tyreco; Clarke,
Michsel; Deveaux, Delano; Mackey,
Trevor, 44.17s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) TRIPLE JUMP
Clark, Clinton - CVB, 14.20m
Babbs, Tehneil - CRW, 13.79m
King, Ramano — CIG, 13.53m

SENIOR BOYS (U20) HIGH JUMP
Rolle, Rendol - DDJ, 1.80m

King, Ramano — CIG, J1.80m
Stubbs, Ashton - CRW, 1.75m
Bromwell, Brandon — CVB, 1.75m

SENIOR BOYS (U20) SHOT PUT
Carey, Elcardo — CRW, 14.08m
Johnson, Rio — CVB, 11.71m
Strachan, Shawn — RMB, 11.66m

HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN RIA SUZURI

weekend before they left for
Paraguay.

Munroe said all of the play-
ers had made a commitment to
play in his memory, so he had a
little more incentive to go out
and play in the doubles.

“T feel pretty confident. Del-
gado is pretty tough in doubles,
but he’s playing with a junior
who is less experienced, so hope-
fully we can get to the junior a
little bit more,” Munroe said.

“Me and Marvin have been
playing well in practice. We have
been gelling, so we feel pretty
good about the whole tie. Even
the guys playing in the singles.
So it’s a pivotal match and we
feel comfortable about it.”

Like everybody, Munroe said
it didn’t matter playing in the
night, but they preferred that
than to play in the extreme heat
in the day.

“It shouldn’t really matter
because we’ve practised here in
the night under the lights,” he
said. “We just have to be ready
to play and I think all of the guys
are confident that we will do
very well.”




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sports

NLT |
FREEDOM FARM SCHEDULE

¢ Here’s a look at the schedule of games this
weekend in the Freedom Farm Baseball League
in Yamacraw:

TEE BALL

11 am Raptors vs Sidewinders

1 pm Blue Claws vs Sand Gnats

3 pm Knights vs Grasshoppers
COACH PITCH

10 am Angels vs Cubs

12:30 pm Diamondbacks vs Astros
3 pm Athletics vs Blue Jays
MINOR LEAGUE

10 am Red Sox vs vs Rockies
12:30 pm Royals vs Mets

MAJOR LEAGUE

12:30 pm Reds vs Marlins

3 pm Indians vs Mariners

JUNIOR LEAGUE

10 am Dodgers vs Cardinals

12:30 pm Yankees vs Twins
SENIOR LEAGUE

Saturday

3 pm Pirates vs Phillies

Sunday

3 pm Tigers vs Rangers

BASEBALL

¢ Here’s a look at the schedule of games this
weekend at the Junior Baseball League of Nas-
sau at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams.
T BALL:

Friday

6 pm Jujus vs Dillies

Saturday

9 am Coco Plums vs Seagrapes
10:15 am Guineps vs Dillies
COACH PITCH:

Friday

7:30 pm Bees vs Green Turtles
Saturday

11:30 am Mosquitoes vs Wasps

1 pm Bees vs Boas

3 pm Sandflies vs Green turtles
Sunday

3 pm Boas vs Wasps

9-10:

Friday

6 pm Barracudas vs Dolphins
7:30 pm Red Snappers vs Turbots
Saturday

Noon Eels vs Octopus

Sunday

4:30 pm Barracudas vs Eels
11-12:

Saturday

10 am vs Wild Dogs (11-0) vs Conchs (10-3)
1:30 pm White Crowns vs Marlins
3:30 Parrots vs Conchs

Sunday

4:30 pm Wild Dogs vs Marlins
13-15:

Saturday

9 am Silverjacks vs Sharks

11 am Stingrays vs Raccoons

1 pm Potcakes vs Sharks

3 pm Raccoons vs Silverjacks
16-18:

Sunday

2:30 pm Lucayans vs Tainos

4 pm Arawaks vs Caribs

¢ THE New Providence Basketball Association
will complete its regular season tonight at the CI
Gibson Gymnasium with just one game on tap.
The Cola-Cola Explorers will take on the John-
son’s Jumping Jumpers.

Then on Moday night, the first round of the
postseason will get underway.

BASKETBALL

¢ THE schedule of game for the Baptist Sports
Council’s 2009 Joyce Minus

Basketball Classic on Saturday at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex are as follows:

COURT ONE

10 am Macedonia vs Golden Gates (15)

11 am First Baptist vs Zion South Beach (15)
Noon Golden Gates vs Miracle Working (19)
1 pm Mercy Seat vs Macedonia (19)

2 pm BIBA vs City of Praise (M)

3 pm Ebenezer vs Temple Fellowship (M)
COURT TWO

10 am Miracle Working vs Latter-Day (15)

11 am Faith United vs Temple Fellowship (15)
Noon Faith United vs Mircale Working (19)

1 pm Golden Gates vs Temple Fellowship (19)
2 pm Christian Tabernacle vs Church of the
Nazarene (M)

3 pm New Bethlehem vs Evangelistic Center (M)

PAGE



F

FRIDAY, MARCH 6,







BASKETBALL |
NPBA POSTSEASON

11



ts

2009

C.V. Bethel’s Donshannon Braynen clears a hurdle on his way to winning the Intermediate Boys’ 100m Hur-

dles in 15.02s.





Davis Cup team ready

: ll By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE first round of the American Zone

? Two Davis Cup tie will feature Timothy
: Neilly and Devin Mullings in the first
i two singles matches today at the Yacht y
? Golf Club in Paraguay, Lambare.

But instead of playing during the day,

i the best-of-five matches will be contest-
i ed in the evening to avoid the intense
? heat in Paraguay.

Speaking from their hotel, which is in

? walking distance to the tennis complex,
? team captain John Farrington said it was
? extremely hot in Paraguay, but they had
i acouple days to practise and everybody
? was upbeat for the start of competition.

“They’re well prepared and ready to

: go,” he said. “We’re all ready, very pos-
i itive and upbeat. We’re looking forward

to playing tomorrow (today). Everybody
is in good spirits.

“Everything is fine. The people are
treating us very well. We are enjoying
it.”

Neilly, the number two seeded player
on the team, will be matched against
Paraguay’s top seed Ramon Delgado in
the first match at 4 pm.

The second singles will follow with top
seed Devin Mullings taking on
Paraguay’s No.2 seed Nicolas Salama.

“Tt’s a little hotter than we had antici-
pated, but we will be fine,” Farrington
said. “TI think it will be beneficial to all of
us playing in the evening rather than in
the heat.”

Neilly said they had a good week of
practice and now he was ready to play,
especially with the matches being in the
evening.

SEE page 10



COWBOYS
CUT T.O.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

C.R. Walker's O.J Ferguson powers down the home stretch in his record-breaking performance in the Intermediate Boys’ 400m Finals. Ferguson set a new GSSSA
i mark of 50.97s.

Four new
GSSSA records

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

IN WHAT has become commonplace in the Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools Sports Association annu-
al meet, one perennial powerhouse heads the leader-
board by a comfortable margin after the first day of
competition.

The C.R Walker Knights grabbed a firm hold of
the top spot with 333.50 points, a substantial 86 point
advantage over their nearest competitors.

The C.I Gibson Rattlers are in second with 247.50
points, a slim 10 point margin over the third placed
C.V Bethel Stingrays with 237.50 points.

The C.C Sweeting Cobras, 185 points and Doris
Johnson Mystic Marlins, 177.50 points, round out
the top five.

The Knights dominated the sprints in several divi-
sions including one record breaking performance.

O’Jay Ferguson broke a 16-year-old record in the
Intermediate Boys’ 400m with a blistering time of
50.97 seconds.

The previous mark of 51.02s was set by Mark Stur-
rup in 1993.

Ferguson finished nearly three seconds ahead of
the remainder of the field, with C.V Bethel’s Marlon
Hanchell placing second in 53.28s.

Ferguson returned a short time later to take first
place in the 100m, with a wind aided time of 11.06s.

The Knights received another pair of first place fin-

SEE page 10

Striking Red Pillbox hat, with tulle facial veil and large
tulle bow at the back of the hat.
Suits Church, Weddings and Teas



GIVE _IN

TO TEMPTATION





PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Minister moves to quell
fears over off-shore
financial service sector

FROM page one

does not make sense.

"There is some degree of
hysteria being sown about
moves to counter 'tax haven
abuse’ in the US and opening
gambits being made by the

Europeans in their efforts to
shut down off-shore financial
service centres (OFC)," Min-
ister Bethel said during his
contribution the mid-year bud-
get debate yesterday. "Much
of this hysteria fails to recog-
nise that the shapers of policy

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in these countries also recog-
nise that they cannot provoke
a capital flight from the
already ailing economies."

He reasoned that the major-
ity of money funneled through
OFCs are "immediately re-
invested" in US and other for-
eign stock and currency mar-
kets for an investment return.
If tax regulators institute an
arbitrary crackdown on OFCs,
this would in turn cause pri-
vate investors to withdraw
their investments from OFC-
based trading brokerage
accounts and transfer them
into safety deposit boxes,
according to Mr Bethel.

"Such a flight of capital
would provoke an even
greater economic crisis,” he
said. "This is well known to
financial analysts. So, while
there indeed will be chal-
lenges, the notion that is creep-
ing in that reforms will be
abrupt and arbitrary and uni-
lateral does not persuade me.
It will not make sense in an
already volatile and fragile
international financial system.

In spite on any impending
clampdowns, Mr Bethel said
the country's off-shore sector
will emerge from the turbu-
lence.

"It is obvious that there will
be additional pressures
brought to bear, but we have
weathered such storms before
and the Bahamas, as an estab-
lished OFC, has shown the
strength and the resilience to
adapt, reform and to weather
such storms," said Mr Bethel.

On Wednesday, Mr Geith-
ner told the Senate Finance
Committee in Washington,
DC, that the American gov-
ernment will build an "ambi-
tious” plan to crack down on
companies that use offshore
centres to avoid paying taxes.

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Timothy Geithner (AP)

closing tax loopholes are of
vital importance — under-
scored by the US' collapsing
economy and government
record budget deficit, Mr Gei-
thner said.

"We’re going to have a
much more ambitious effort
to deal with offshore tax
havens,” he told the panel. He
made similar remarks the day
before at the US House Ways
and Means Committee.

However, Mr Bethel argued,
a careful study of statements
made by Mr Geithner shows
he put the legislative attempts
of the US Senators in the con-
text of a broader international,
not a unilateral effort to com-
bat tax evasion — not tax
avoidance.

Ata joint session of the US
Congress on Wednesday,
British Prime Minister Gor-
don Brown urged world lead-
ers to “outlaw shadow banking
systems and offshore tax
havens."

On Monday, U.S. Senator
Carl Levin introduced the
"Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act",
an expanded version of previ-
ous legislation Mr Levin co-
sponsored in 2007 with then
Senator Barack Obama.

ps a Tok. (242) 393.4002 aos

Detainees ‘have
seen improvements’
at Detention Centre
‘since going to media

FROM page one

} Carmichael Road detainee said that, after initial com-
? plaints that food provisions were insufficient, pasta was
? served with the detainee’s usual cheese sandwich for lunch
: on Wednesday.

And that night, a more substantial “spaghetti dinner”

was served, in contrast to the regular offering.

A statement released last week by the Department of

: Immigration in response to claims of substandard condi-
? tions and abuse by guards maintained detainees are fed

“three times daily” and the “quantity of meals is always

adequate.”

Other changes witnessed by detainees include the

: arrival of a team yesterday morning to do some paint
? work and “clean up” the site.

Detainees had claimed there were only two function-

ing toilets for use by hundreds of people, and said that
: many housed at the facility urinated/excreted on the
? grounds, creating an unsanitary environment.

It was not clear yesterday whether it was this that was

being cleaned up.

A message left for Mr Thompson yesterday secking

? more information on the Department’s efforts in this

: regard and on the findings of Monday’s tour, as well as a
? second visit allegedly undertaken by Mr Thompson to

: the centre yesterday morning, was not returned up to

? press time despite assurances from Mr Thompson that it
: would be.

However, in his mid-year budget contribution to par-

liament on Wednesday evening, Minister of State for
i Immigration, Branville McCartney referred to certain
: upgrades that would be carried out at the facility.

“Let me be the first to say that the Detention Centre is

: not all we want it to be. This problem has been further
? escalated following the recent fire to one of its dormito-
? ry blocks. The Department will execute a few small jobs
: in the area of painting and minor repairs to ensure the
: best comfort of all detainees,

” he said.
Mr McCartney said priority would be placed on paint-

: ing, landscaping, improving the playground and laun-
: dry/wash area, library and security. He did not link these
: efforts to claims made by the detainees.

A detainee yesterday told The Tribune that those

housed at the facility are pleased to see some improve-
} ments being made.

However, he added that they are still going without

items such as towels, sheets or blankets.

Meanwhile, Dr Allen confirmed that his report to the

Immigration Department on his trip to the centre was
: sent to the department yesterday afternoon.

He said he did not wish to reveal the content of that

report before it had been seen by Immigration officials.

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Insurer
inherited
‘wrongly

priced’
policies

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamas-based health
insurer yesterday blamed
“inappropriate pricing” by
British American Financial
for the major premium hikes
experienced by individual
policyholders it had inherit-
ed from the latter, and said
the only alternatives to
increasing rates were cither
to cancel coverage or sell the
policies to a new buyer.

Tina Cambridge, Generali
Worldwide’s regional direc-
tor for the Bahamas,
responding to Tribune Busi-
ness’s article yesterday that
reflected the concerns of the
company’s individual health
insurance policyholders over
the new premiums, which in
the case of elderly clients
had doubled, a 100 per cent
increase, said the new rates
had brought premiums in
line with each customer’s
perceived risk and likely lev-
el of claims.

In a written response to
several Tribune Business
questions, Ms Cambridge
said Generali’s Bahamian
operation had only turned its
attention to the individual
health policies it had
acquired from British Amer-
ican Financial once it had
dealt with the larger group
health portfolio.

Portfolio

Effectively confirming the
details in Tribune Business’s
article yesterday, Ms Cam-
bridge said of the individual
health portfolio: “Our
assessment revealed that the
block of individual policies
which we inherited had been
inappropriately priced.

The premiums were too
low for the level of benefits
offered, and they were also
too low given the ages of
many of the individuals
enrolled in that portfolio.”

This confirms what Tri-
bune Business had been told
yesterday, namely that
British American Financial’s
premium rates were too low,
and did not match the risk
attached to each policyhold-
er and their likely level of
claims. As a result, its health
portfolio had been highly
unprofitable, the main rea-
son it sought an exit and sold
that book of business to
Generali Worldwide.

Unwilling to suffer the same
experience, Generali has
embarked on a major premi-
um re-pricing that caught
many of its individual policy-

SEE page 6B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE

ISMNC



FRIDAY,



McAGR (CoH 0:



2009



| SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



‘Plan B’ switch on _ Ritz-Carlton

Airport financing

WH Airport Authority and NAD drop plans for Fitch credit
rating due to unreasonable terms agency was asking for
MW Hoping to seal finance package next week after Citibank

meets with borrowers

Mj Open to increasing interest rate of return to investors, and

possibly dropping $80m tranche

lj Less than initial $310m being sought, with plans to fund

seamless transition to second phase
construction dropped

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Obtaining an internationally-
recognised credit rating for the
first phase financing of Lynden
Pindling International Airport’s
(LPIA) redevelopment has
been abandoned, Tribune Busi-
ness was told last night, with the
Airport Authority now seeking
less than the initial $310 million
and prepared to offer higher
interest rates to keep investors
in the deal.

Frank Watson, the Authori-
ty’s chairman, said the idea of
obtaining a credit rating - an

indication of the Authority’s
and it subsidiary, the Nassau
Airport Development Compa-
ny’s (NAD), ability to repay the
borrowing - for the LPIA
financing had been “taken off
the table” for the time being
due to the onerous require-
ments Fitch had been seeking
to impose on the deal.

The Authority chairman said
the deadline for closing the air-
port redevelopment financing
had been extended again, from
February 27, 2009, as a result,

SEE page 2B

40% higher build costs
hit Family Island hotels

Owner laments shipping costs, and automatic
15% gratuity that has ‘destroyed’ service

@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

Small Family island hote-
liers feel the government is
“neglecting” them, as they try
to build and maintain proper-
ties with construction costs 40
per cent more than those on
New Providence, it was
revealed yesterday. And they
were expected to do this with

The road to
improved
transport

lm By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

UNIFICATION of the
public transportation sector,
and the rerouting of roads,
are key to alleviating traffic
congestion on New Provi-
dence, industry representa-
tives said yesterday, while
the role of government is
still a bone of contention.

Dr Ian Strachan, a College
of the Bahamas Professor
and member of the local
think-tank, the 1962 Society,
said the public transporta-
tion system needed to be
scrutinised, but the Govern-
ment seems not to want to
fix the problem.

“The political directorate
does not want to solve the
traffic problems in the capi-
tal, and I can safely say that
we know how to,” Dr Stra-
chan said.

He said a report, called the
Dylan report, was drafted
over a decade ago, outlining
the major causes of traffic
congestion. It explained the
rerouting and public transit
systems that were necessary,
and what road corridors
should be made one-way in
order to alleviate traffic con-
gestion.

“There is no need to think
about what we ought to do
because the work has
already been done,” said Dr

SEE page 2B

little or no investment incen-
tives. Elliot Greene, owner of
the Mangrove Cay Inn,
speaking at the National Eco-
nomic Summit, said shipping
costs have driven building
materials and other prices on
the Family Islands through the
roof, hurting domestic tourism
that the Ministry of Tourism

SEE page 4B

for a better life

call us today at 396-1300

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA |



healthcare

developer is sued
over ‘$200k bill’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The development company behind the $1 billion Ritz-
Carlton Rose Island project is being sued, along with its

main shareholder and principal, by a Florida-based archi-
tect firm that is alleging they have failed to meet their

contractual obligations to pay it more than $200,000 for
work rendered.

The lawsuit, filed in the US District Court for the south-

ern district of Florida on February 20, 2009, by Palm
Beach-based Garcia Stromberg, a professional architects

firm, named among the defendants the Ritz-Carlton Rose
Island Hotel Company; the company’s developer and main
shareholder, Miami-based Gencom Group; Gencom’s prin-
cipal, Karim Alibhai; and another shareholder in the

ae

aa
Frank Watson



Bahamian project, Marriott International.

Garcia Stromberg alleged that it had signed three con-
tracts to provide architecture consulting and design services
to the Ritz-Carlton Rose Island project. These contracts,
which it claimed had been signed on September 28, 2007,
June 26, 2008, and June 18, 2008, were, respectively, for the
provision of services relating to the project itself; the design
of the Departure Facility at the Nassau Harbour Club;
and for the Ritz-Carlton Resort, Hotel and Suites on Rose
Island itself.

“The project giving rise to this cause of action is known
as the Ritz-Carlton Resort, Hotel and Suites, located on
Rose Island, the Bahamas,” the lawsuit alleged.

“On or about September 28, 2007, a contract was entered
into between the plaintiff, Garcia Stromberg, and the

SEE page 4B

BEG chairmen clash over cut in tariff rates

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s (BEC)
chairman has criticised as “ill-conceived” a deci-
sion by his predecessor to cut company’s basic tar-
iff rate in 2003, arguing that it contributed to net
losses that peaked at $21 million in its 2008 finan-
cial year.

Fred Gottlieb, responding to former BEC exec-
utive chairman Al Jarrett, who in a Tribune Busi-
ness article on Monday accused the current
administration and Board of seeking to
“demonise” him despite “piggybacking” on the
ideas/plans he left in place, said he was “unaware
of any specific and/or significant ideas/plans left in
place by Mr Jarrett (as he claims), which the pre-
sent Board consciously decided to continue or
to implement”.

Denying that BEC’s Board had any intention of

“demonising” Mr Jarrett, the current incumbent
of the chairman’s seat acknowledged that while
the Corporation did generate $14.1 million in net
income for the financial year to September 30,
2004, this was due to “a number of ‘one off? fac-
tors that took place during the financial year”.

These included, said Mr Gottlieb, bad debt
recoveries, increased payments by the Govern-
ment, increased customer demand and reduced
maintenance costs resulting from the installation
of what were then, new gas turbines.

These boosts to BEC’s financial performance
were never repeated, Mr Gottlieb said. And while
the Corporation generated a $15.3 million net
profit in its 2005 financial year (Mr Jarrett left his
post in early 2005, almost half-way through the
period), the current chairman said this was large-
ly due to another ‘one-off’ event - the $14 million

SEE page 5B

FAMILY GUARDIAN

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seeking a mason, skilled in steel
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The best candidate must have
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Salary will reflect experience and
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Please contact our office at (242)
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NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

MAYBOLE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000 No. 45
of 2000, the Dissolution of MAYBOLE LIMITED has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date

of completion of the dissolution was the 25th day of February,
2009.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
SUPREME COURT No. CLE/Qui/ 01715

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT tract of

land containing by admeasurement 3.50 Acres
situate Southwestwards of “Airdale Subdivision”
and North of “Joan’s Heights” in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Davco Limited whose
Registered Office is in the City of Nassau, New
Providence, Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court
to have its Title to the following land investigated
under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in
a Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

ALL THAT tract of land containing 3.50 Acres situate
approximately 335 Feet Southwestwards of the
Northern portion of “Airdale Subdivision” and North
of “Joan’s Heights Subdivision” in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence aforesaid bounded
NORTHEASTWARDLY by land formerly the property
of Alfred Patterson but now the property of O’Brien
Loans Co. and running thereon Seven hundred and
Twelve and Eighty-nine One-hundredths (712.89) Feet
SOUTHEASTWARDLY by a Ten (10) Feet wide Road
Reservation leading to “Airdale Subdivision” aforesaid
and running thereon Two hundred and Fifteen and
Fifty One-hundredths (215.50) Feet
SOUTHWESTWARDLY by the said Ten (10) Feet
wide Road Reservation and running thereon Six
hundred and Eighty-five and Seventy-eight One-
hundredths (685.78) Feet and
NORTHWESTWARDLY by the Cornelius Forbes
Subdivision and running thereon Two hundred (200.00)
Feet which said tract has such position shape marks
boudaries and dimensions as are shown on the diagram
or plan filed herein and thereon edged in “PINK”.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau; or

(2) The Chamers of James M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed
forms, verified by an Affidavit and other related
requirements to be filed therewith by the 16th day of
April A.D., 2009. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a Statement of its, his or her Claim together
with the other related requirement by the 16th day of
April A.D., 2009, will operate as a bar to such claim.

JAMES M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER



PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

‘Plan B’ switch on
Airport financing

The road to
improved

transport
FROM page 1B

Strachan.

He said the $141 million
that the Government has
allocated for road develop-
ment and repair will not help
with the traffic situation on
New Providence. “What we
are borrowing money to do
now is not to fix the traffic
congestion,” he said.

“Experts will confirm that
we just don’t have the space
to build the kind of roads
needed to alleviate traffic
through that means.”

Dr Strachan, speaking at
the National Economic Sum-
mit, said the Government
was currently drafting a plan
for the unification of the
public jitney system.

“There are people under
the employ of this govern-
ment and the employ of the
Bahamian people who know
what is to be done,” he said.

FROM page 1B

but both it and NAD were hop-
ing to close the protracted fund-
raising next week once their
financial advisers, Citibank, had
spoken to the likely investors.

If Citibank was able to keep
them all on board, Mr Watson
said there would be no change
in the terms of the financing.
The financing is currently struc-
tured into three tranches - a
$140 million bank credit facility;
a $90 million senior secured
bond facility; and an $80 mil-
lion participating debt facility.

Those were the initial sums
sought. However, Mr Watson
confirmed that the deal had
been restructured so that the
first phase financing was now
seeking less than the original
$310 million.

He also confirmed to Tribune
Business that the Airport

Authority and NAD were pre-













































NOTICE OF SALE

Expocredit Corporation (‘the Company”) invites
offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Maris Subdivision”,
comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
South of Burnt Ground in the [sland of Long Island
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.

The Company makes no representations or warranties
with respect to the state of the Property which is
offered for sale “as is where 1s”.

The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing
& Law of Property Act.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase
price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
reserves the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers
addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
Partner, P- O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 30°
day of March, 2009.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMERCIAL DIVISION

2009
COM/com/00019

IN THE MATTER OF CLICO (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
(In Liquidation)

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Petition of the
Winding-up of the above-named Company having its
registered office at Serville & Company, No. 13 East Ave.
Centerville in the City of Nassau, was on the 24th February,
2009 presented to the Court by the Registrar of Insurance
Companies, a statutory regulator, pursuant to Section 41
of the Insurance Act, Chapter 347 Statute Law of The
Bahamas 2000 Revised Edition.

AND that the Petition is directed to be heard (in open
Court) before Justice Cheryl Albury, a Justice of the Supreme
Court, in the City of Nassau on Wednesday, 18th March,
2009 at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon at the Supreme Court
Annex, 3rd Floor, British American Bank Building,
Marlborough St., and any Creditor or contributory of the
said Company desirous to support or oppose the making
of an Order on the said Petition may appear at the time of
the hearing in person or by his Counsel for that purpose;
and a copy of the Petition will be furnished by the
undersigned to any Creditor or Contributory of the Company

pared to raise the interest rates
(the actual rate of return)
investors would receive if that
was what was necessary to keep
the financing on track.

This newspaper has been told
that the Airport Authority and
NAD are prepared to increase
the 8 per cent coupon initially
attached to the 23-year, $90 mil-
lion fixed-rate bond tranche to
either 8.5 per cent or 9 per cent,
in a bid to make the financing
more attractive in the absence
of the Fitch rating.

Mr Watson could not confirm
those rates, but said the Airport
Authority and NAD were also
prepared to waive/drop the $80
million participating debt facil-
ity if that was necessary to keep
the financing on track.

“We hope we will settle it
some time next week,” Mr Wat-
son said of the airport financing.
“Fitch have placed some
requirements upon us. It just
seems that they’re not prepared
to approve it [the credit rat-
ing].”

The Airport Authority chair-
man said it would be “a ridicu-
lous situation” if it and NAD
had given into Fitch’s demands.
He explained that the problem
was not with the airport financ-
ing itself, which is sound and
backed by the passenger user
facility fee revenue streams,
plus LPIA’s physical assets, but
Fitch’s skittishness regarding
securitisation deals such as this
in general.

The rating agency and its
counterparts have been heavily
criticised for failing to spot the
emerging credit crisis, and over-
rating mortgage backed securi-
ties issues. “They don’t want to
do anything that might come
back to haunt them in a sub-
stantial way,” Mr Watson said. “
We just got caught in the cross-
hairs of the global economy. We
got the impression they [Fitch]
were saying they don’t want to
do it at all.

“What our advisers said is
that the requirements they were
seeking were such that if we did
that, we would not need to bor-
row money.”

Describing the credit rating
as “off the table for the first
phase”, Mr Watson said:
“We’ve moved away from that,
and Citibank is going back to
the lenders. Hopefully, we’ll be
able to settle the matter soon.
The plan is sound, and unless



THE TRIBUNE

the bottom drops out of the
tourism economy, we’ll be all
right.”

He added that the Airport
Authority and NAD had
reduced the $310 million they
were seeking after dropping
plans to, in the first financing
round, also raise some funds to
enable the second phase con-
struction to start immediately
the first phase was finished.

“For the time being, we’re
going to fund the first phase,”
Mr Watson said. “Included in
the borrowing we were doing
for the first phase would have
been some funds to start the
second phase, while we were
negotiating the remaining
financing. We had to drop that
because of the requirements
Fitch was asking for.”

With the Airport Authority
and NAD having moved to
“Plan B”, Mr Watson said: “I
know our group is prepared to
look at [increasing] interest
rates, if that will make it more
attractive for the lenders.

“Tf Citibank is able to keep
all the investors in, it will be the
same package we'll take. If the
bank is not able to do so, we
will look at not financing that
$80 million and move on. We’ve
determined we’re going to build
it. It’s a decision that’s firm in
the Board and government’s
mind.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

THE PILOT CLUB OF NASSAU

presents

A Grand Movie Premier: |

“ALL ABOUT STEWE™

Staring Sandra Bell ick

Postponed to a date
to be announced.

Proceeds in aid of the construction of a
pool for Person with Disabilities

aL

Well-established Wholesaler

saleperson (females

requires a
are encouraged to

requiring such copy on payment of the prescribed charge

for the same.

Chambers
Office of the Attorney General
3rd - 7th Floors,
Post Office Building
P.O. Box N-3007
East Hill St.
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorney for the Petitioner

NOTE: Any person who intends to appear on the hearing

apply) for the snack food division. Individual
must have experience in sales with emphasis
on large food stores. Only individuals with a
proven record of being able to work
unsupervised and achieve results will be
considered. Must be able to drive standard
shift vehicle and be in possession of current
valid driver’s license. Individuals with their
own transportation will receive favorable

consideration. Company offers good benefits.

of the said Petition must serve or send by post to the
abovenamed, notice in writing of his intention to do so.
The notice must state the name and address of the person,
or, if a firm, the name and address of the firm and must be
signed by the person or firm of his or their attorney (if any)
and must be signed or if posted, must be sent by post in
sufficient time to reach the above named not later than 4:00
o’clock in the afternoon of the 17th day of March, 2008.

Submit applications to:
SECs
P.O.Box N-7124

Nassau, Bahamas
eee |





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 3B





$2.3m in unpaid work permit fees uncovered

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

More than $2.3 million in
unpaid work permit fees was
uncovered after the Department
of Immigration’s debt collection
unit audited some 400 companies
in Nassau and Freeport, the min-
ister of state for immigration has
disclosed.

Making his contribution to the
mid-year Budget debate,
Branville McCartney said 70 New
Providence-based companies had
been audited by the Departmen-
t’s new unit and found to owe the
Government a _ collective
$834,718.74 in unpaid work per-
mit fees.

Adding that a further 24 Nas-
sau-based companies had been
identified for the audit exercise,
Mr McCartney said a similar
exercise in Grand Bahama had
exposed $1.5 million in outstand-
ing permit fees. Some 330 files
had been audited on that island.

The minister of state warned
that companies who owed the
Department of Immigration mon-
ey would not be granted any new
work permits for expatriate staff
until the outstanding fees were
paid, or a payment plan worked
out.

Explaining how the work per-
mit fee arrears had been allowed
to accrue, Mr McCartney said: “Tt
is apparent that once persons
[companies] have been issued
approval letters, they have taken
those letters to mean ‘go ahead
and engage workers’. This is
done despite the fact that the let-
ter states that payment must be

* Immigration audit exposes 400 companies in Nassau and Freeport as
owing fees, with 24 more to be investigated
* Department 50.7% ahead of revenue targets for Budget year 2008-2009



Branville McCartney

made within 30 days or the offer
will be withdrawn.

“Large companies, particularly
hotel companies, and persons
requesting short-term work per-
mits, tend to put persons to work
before payment.”

Mr McCartney attributed the
fact that the Department of
Immigration had exceeded, by
50.7 per cent, projected revenue
collection for the fiscal 2008-2009
first half to the compliance

efforts. Another factor, he added,
was the increase in work permit
fees that took place on July 1,
2008, the start of the current Bud-
get year.

Revenue

For the period July 1, 2008, to
December 31, 2008, the Depart-
ment of Immigration had collect-
ed $29,248 million in revenue, Mr
McCartney told the House of
Assembly, compared to a pro-
jected $19.406 million.

And from the Budget year start
on July 1 to March 2, 2009, the
Department of Immigration had
collected $32.827 million in vari-
ous permit fees. This was less than
$6 million below the full-year
revenue target of $238.651 mil-
lion, and there are still almost
four months of the 2008-2009 fis-
cal year to run.

Mr McCartney added that ille-
gal immigration into the Bahamas
was at least partly fuelled by the
demand for cheap, migrant labour
among some Bahamian employ-
ers.

He said: “Most migrants arrive
intending to work, with the
knowledge that previous

FirstCaribbean in
$11.6 profit rise

FirstCaribbean yesterday
said its 2009 first quarter
results showed an $11.6 mil-
lion improvement in prof-
itability compared to a simi-
lar period last year, with
total assets in excess of $4
billion.

The bank added that its
Tier 1 capital ratio was 15.8
per cent, substantially in
excess of the Central Bank’s
minimum requirement of 8
per cent.

FirstCaribbean said it was
a member of the CIBC
Canada Group, and that it
was a financially and opera-
tionally strong institution. It
was responding to unsub-
stantiated rumours about its
financial health that had
prompted some customers to
withdraw deposits

PRIME OFFICE
SPACE

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second floor

space will be available April,

2009 in newly

constructed building at the corner of Marlborough

and Cumberland Streets.

spaces included.

Two (2) on-site car

Ideal location for offshore bank, trust company,
law firm, or other professions.

Contact Owner at:

362-6006



PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central

Education Authority

invites applications from

qualified individuals for the position of PRINCIPAL, St. John’s College,
beginning September, 2009.

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in Education from a recognized
University, with at least (5) years accumulative administrative experience. The
applicant must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Providing leadership - set the climate and pace for success and high
achievement in the school.

- Organizing and supervising schedules, programmes, records and

procedures.

school

- Supervising and evaluating teachers and support staff.
- Managing records, school finances and end-of-year closing

procedures.

- Communicating with parents, community groups and organizations.

- Displaying consistent organizational and human relationship skills.

- Assisting the Education Department with and initiating Staff
Development Programmes.

Applicants should submit a cover letter,

Curriculum Vitae, copies of

degree certificates, three references and passport photographs to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY

P. O. BOX N-656

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Friday March 27th, 2009.



migrants, who also arrived ille-
gally, managed to find work and
regularise their stay.
“Employers are willing to
employ illegal migrants. The lack
of legal status in the country

obliges these workers to be com-
pliant to employers’ requests, as
they are outside the protection
of worker’s rights, and it allows
employers to pay migrants low
wages.

“If employers were monitored
and only allowed to employ peo-
ple with valid documentation, this
would reduce the demand for ille-
gal labour.

“ Apprehensions represent
only one side of the enforcement
necessary to stop the migration
motor. Both supply and demand
must be constrained if word is to
get back to those places where
Ulegals come from that it is no
longer possible for illegal
migrants to obtain employment
and find housing if they are ille-
gal.”

es i ventages

INVESTMENT RISK MANAGER
in a major international Venture Fund in Nassau

We are looking te strengthen our team in Nassau.

If vou have

* A sound degree in a life science related field, such as pharmacology, biology,
nutritional sciences or medicine andor sound business background in nutrition
or food and beverage products

* Post pradugte qualifications andor an MBA or equivalent

* Hands-on analytical and research experience, preferably in a Venture Capital or
Private Equity environment

* Experience in accounting, valuation and risk management for Venture Capital

* Passion for a healthy lifestyle and the right food

* Exeellent oral and written communications skills in English (other languages a
plus)

* Bahamian Cilizenship, you want to live and work in an international

environment right here in Nassau, with frequent travels abroad

We are

The world’s foremost Venture Fund in Health, Wellness and Nutrition, The Partnership
invests in the life seienees Held and is particularly interested in identifying nutritional

products,
chromic disesses,

We offer

dietary supplements,

medical foods

and innovative

approaches to prevent

A job which will involve search and analysis of companies in the area of health, wellness
and nutrition and preparation of investment decisions by investment committee. A
competitive salary package commensurate with the experience and qualifications will be

offered.

lf you are attracted by this unique opportunity, or have questions, please contact IVC

S.A.. P.O.

Dr naesseelerl ov ember

Americas

Bux

N-74532, Wassau or

The deadline for applications is 20-March-2C009,

FAX:
oom for the athention of HURLAN RESOURCES —Ref: IRA Was

327-0096 or EMAIL:

THE BAHAMAS RED

re

CROSS

“OUR WORLD. YOUR MOVE. BECOME

INVOLVED.”

SATURDAY,
MARCH 7'", 2009
12 NOON - UNTIL





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Ritz-Carlton developer is
sued over ‘$200k bill’

FROM page 1B

‘owners’, namely the Gencom
Group, Alibhai, Barry, Ritz-
Carlton Rose Island Hotel
Company, and Marriott Inter-
national.”

Garcia Stromberg alleged
that the contract would see it
provide consultation and design
services for the Ritz-Carlton
Hotel, and the accompanying
fractional condos, marina vil-
lage and its town homes and
condos, and utilities, waste and
fuel facilities.

Alleging that the developers

were “contractually obligated
to compensate it” for its ser-
vices and expenses, and that it
had performed all its obliga-
tions, Garcia Stromberg
claimed: “The defendants mate-
rially breached said contract by
failing to make the required
payments to the plaintiff as
detailed thereunder.” It alleged
it was owed some $17,719.
Work on the Ritz-Carlton
Rose Island project was sus-
pended on October 7, 2008,
after its principal financier and
major equity partner, Lehman
Brothers’ private equity arm,

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHOCOLATE FOUNTAIN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
WATEREDGE OCEAN LTD.

—_— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WATEREDGE OCEAN LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ZAKARIAH
HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUMMERCREST HOLDINGS INC.

—_— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SUMMERCREST HOLDINGS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

plunged into bankruptcy in late
September 2008.

Nick Ward, Gencom’s pro-
ject manager and the Ritz-Carl-
ton Rose Island Hotel Compa-
ny’s managing partner, wrote
in a letter to the project’s con-
tractors and vendors, which has
been seen by Tribune Business:
“This is to notify you that you
are hereby instructed to sus-
pend all work related to the
Rose Island project until fur-
ther notice.

“This action is prompted by
Lehman Brothers Holdings fil-
ing a Chapter 11 bankruptcy
proceeding on Monday, Sep-
tember 15. Ritz-Carlton Rose
Island Hotel Company has
financed the project at Rose
Island, the Bahamas, with
Lehman Brothers Holdings.

“Our business, like many oth-
ers, has been affected by the
abrupt and unprecedented
bankruptcy filing by its lender,
which has caused delays and
complicated the funding of all
Lehman’s loans, including the

were trying to resolve the
financing impasse, and added:
“Our goal is to have a plan in
place for re-funding within the
next 90 to 120 days.” That has
not been achieved due to the
credit crunch.

Garcia Stromberg, though,
alleged that the contract with
Ritz-Carlton Rose Island Hotel
Company said the suspension
would have no effect on its con-
tract, and that it would be com-
pensated for all previous ser-
vices rendered.

In a similar vein, Garcia
Stromberg alleged that it had
not been paid the $132,974 it
claimed it was owed for work
done on the departure facility at
the Nassau Harbour Club, the
point at which guests departing
for Rose Island will embark.

And it also alleged it was
owed $27,610 for work done on
the ‘Harbour Master’ section of
the Rose Island contract, for
which it again claimed it had
performed all its obligations
without being compensated.

Rose Island project.”
Mr. Ward said the developers

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HENRIDINE COOPER

of MACKEY STREET, P.O. BOX N-44, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27" day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MONTRES INTERNATIONAL
HOLDING LTD.

— *—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MONTRES INTERNATIONAL HOLD-
INGS LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHIP N DALE VENTURE LTD.

= ¢; =—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CHIP N DALE VENTURE LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAWPRONT
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 27th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



40% higher build costs
hit Family Island hotels

FROM page 1B

has recently tried to revive.

Mr Greene said more government resources were channelled
into subsidies and incentives for multi-million dollar resorts,
while small Family Island properties were largely ignored.

He said he was forced to pay $1.50 per case of soda if he pur-
chased in Nassau for his business, and it was cheaper for him to
leave Andros to purchase fish.

“If you don’t go fishing yourself - it’s cheaper for me to buy
fish in Nassau,” he said.

Mr Greene said the main cause of the disparity in costs
between Nassau and the Family Islands was the cost of shipping
goods.

“These things are driving up the cost to Bahamians who
want to vacation on the Family Islands,” said moderator and
founder of the summit, Lynden Nairn.

Regattas

Mr Greene experiences his greatest level of Bahamian clients
during special events, such as regattas and homecomings. How-
ever, at other times Bahamians complain that his rooms are too
expensive.

“The Bahamians, per se, will come, but they will assume that
the rooms are not worth the money. We have to convince them
- as a Starter - that it is worth the money,” said Mr Greene.

He said his hotel receives publicity only by word of mouth
from repeat customers - mostly Americans and Canadians -
and through his own website.

Mr Greene said the Government needs to step in and show
small hotels the way, as well as offer financial assistance. He
added that he was forced to do everything himself when build-
ing his business in order to save costs.

“It’s almost impossible to (get money from government). I
won’t say you won't get it - I won’t dare say that - but it’s
almost impossible,” said Mr Greene.

“You can hardly get to them to put out your problems. Most
of the time they come to you once a year, and then that’s dead.

“Even if you think something good, you don’t see them often
enough to put it forward and then the idea is gone.”

As a kicker, Mr Greene aired his angst over the automatic 15
per cent gratuity attached to restaurant and other hospitality
bills, saying it had destroyed service in the Bahamas.

“If you don’t get a tip you don’t deserve it. Everybody’s not
going to be alike, but you always will get more than 15 per
cent,” he said. “You get that because you deserve it. If you
don’t get that, it’s because you don’t deserve it.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TIMOTHE PAUL of EAST
STREET, P.O.BOX N-7060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27 day of February, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHELET JEAN JACQUES
of CARMICHEL ROAD, FAITH AVENUE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27" day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUDYONNY HOLDINGS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GAMTONFIELD
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE



BEC chairmen clash
over cut in tariff rates

FROM page 1B

sale of all BEC’s shares in Cable
Bahamas.

“Tf this amount, which has
nothing to do with recurrent
revenue or expenditure, is tak-
en out of the profit and loss
statement for the 2005 financial
year, then the Corporation only
made a profit of $1.3 million -
down nearly $10 million from
the 2003 financial year, repre-
senting a significant reduction,”
Mr Gottlieb said yesterday.

Continuing, he said BEC sub-
sequently moved into the red,
suffering an almost-$3 million
loss in its 2006 financial year,
followed by an $11.7 million net
loss in the year to September
30, 2007. As global oil prices
peaked last year, Mr Gottlieb
said net losses spiked at $21 mil-
lion for BEC’s 2008 financial
year.

“Tt is not being suggested that
the tariff reduction implement-
ed in 2003 was the only factor
contributing to BEC’s subse-
quent financial deterioration,
but it certainly was and contin-
ues to be a major factor,” Mr
Gottlieb added.

“The decision by Mr Jarrett
to reduce the tariffs in 2003 was
ill-conceived as, it appears, it
was made without proper pri-
or consultation/investigation to
determine the extent of the
adverse financial consequences
to the Corporation that would
result therefrom.”

Mr Jarrett, who chaired BEC
from June 2002 until the 2005
first quarter, had questioned to
Tribune Business earlier this
week how the tariff rate reduc-
tion could be responsible for
the Corporation’s current finan-
cial predicament, given that its



Ministry of National Security



“The decision
by Mr Jarrett
to reduce the
tariffs in 2003
was ill-con-
ceived ....”



Fred Gottlieb

2004 financial year — the first
full year after the new rates
were in force — saw BEC have
one of its most successful years
ever by generating $14.1 mil-
lion in net profits.

Unfortunate

Mr Gottlieb, though, in a pre-
vious interview with this news-
paper, had argued that the
reduction in BEC’s basic tariff
rate “had the effect of sucking
$18 million of revenue away per
year, and that’s unfortunate.
Because up until then, BEC was
in position to have the neces-
sary economic ratings to get
financing for its capital projects.
That was significantly under-
mined.”

This was repeated on
Wednesday by Phenton Ney-
mour, minister of state for the
environment, who said the basic
tariff rate reduction, and deci-
sion to pay interest on BEC cus-
tomers’ security deposits, had
reduced the Corporation’s rev-
enues and cash flow by some
$20 million per year - or $100
million over five years.

Mr Neymour also criticised
the refinancing of the $128 mil-
lion Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB) loan that was
carried out under Mr Jarrett’s
watch, as did Mr Gottlieb, both
arguing that this exchange of
long-term for short-term bor-
rowing had “increased costs,
reduced cash flow and other
financial concerns”.

Mr Gottlieb, while acknowl-
edging that this had initially
resulted in “lower interest rate
costs amounting to approxi-
mately $10 million for the 2004
financial year”, added: “Unfor-
tunately, this ill advised action
to pay off the IDB loan came
back to haunt the Corporation
in later years, as the variable
interest rate subsequently rose
considerably, with the result
that servicing the new loan is
now much more expensive than
it was to service the long term
IDB loan.”

Mr Jarrett, though, had told
Tribune Business that by re-
financing the IDB loan -initial-
ly taken out in 1989 to finance
Family Island infrastructure
development, when the IDB
was the ‘only game in town’,
had saved BEC both increased
interest rate and foreign
exchange costs.

The IDB loan had used sev-
eral currency baskets, including
euros, yen, swiss francs and
deutchsmarks, and the US dol-
lar’s depreciation against these
currencies when he was chair-
man, Mr Jarrett said, meant
BEC was requiring ever-
increasing amounts of foreign
currency to re-pay them, result-
ing in foreign exchange losses.

These foreign exchange loss-
es, Mr Jarrett said, had reached
$2 million in 2002 and $4.5 mil-
lion in 2003, making re-financ-

(a NB33

Office of The Parliamentary Commissioner

NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT BYE-ELECTION

South Andros Constituency Polling Division 3B

ing imperative. The new loan,
which paid out the IDB, was for
a term of 11 years, not a short-
term loan, he added.

He produced an April 1,
2003, letter from then-minister
of state for finance, James
Smith, backing the IDB loan re-
financing. Mr Smith said the
IDB’s loan covenants “may now
be inappropriate”, especially
the $633,000 maximum per
annum dividends imposed on
the Government.

In addition, Mr Jarrett pro-
duced documents showing that
the basket of IDB loans had
variable interest rates attached
of between 5.27 per cent to 8.38
per cent, compared to the 2.25
per cent rate attached to the
proposed re-financing loan.

Meanwhile, Mr Neymour
said the contracts signed with
the Bahamas Electrical Work-
ers Union, one for the period
2003-2007, and the other for
2007-2012, had increased BEC’s
labour and pension costs by $27
million and $17 million respec-
tively.

He added that BEC had
saved $11.326 million in cus-
toms duty, and $7.928 million
on stamp duty, as a result of the
two-year moratorium on tax
payments introduced in July
2008.

This, Mr Neymour said, was
the key factor in reducing
BEC’s losses to a projected $1.5
million for fiscal 2009. BEC
spent some $350 million on fuel
in its last fiscal year.

Mr Neymour indicated that
an increase in BEC’s basic tariff
rate had been recommended.

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 5B

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OREM GROUP S.A.

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act (No.
45 of 2000). OREM GROUP S.A. is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 15th
day of February, 2009.

Mikhail Nechvolodov,
Business Address,
LLC “PRAVO VYBORA” 109316,
Volgogradsky Prospect,
2, Moscow, Russian Federation
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
MARIS SERVICES INC.

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act (No.
45 of 2000). MARIS SERVICES INC. is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 15th
day of February, 2009.

Mikhail Nechvolodov,
Business Address,
LLC “PRAVO VYBORA” 109316,
Volgogradsky Prospect,
2, Moscow, Russian Federation
Liquidator



A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their

Kemp's Bay and Johnson's Bay
In the Kemp's Bay Town Area
Of the South Andros District

own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
. on behalf of companies clients.

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.
NOTICE ts hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was elected as a Town Committee Member for the

shswecumtionad Toumekste' Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

Box:

Candidate's
Urmeme

Other Names
in full

Occupation

and address DA 69806

c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

WANTED

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidares in the said election were as follows:-

by March 14, 2009.

Candidate's
Furname

Other Names
In full

Votes
Polled

Une Direct

The Anglican Central Education Authority

roice, ime Hie

JOHNSON-HEWITT. Jacqueline a...

MCKINNEY ooo... .Weronica Barbara _

AX
Date: 27" February, 2009

Sign: Franceta Neely
RETURNING OFFICER

in
he

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites apolications for teaching positions available at
St. John's College and St. Anne’s School on New Providence, and Bishop Michael Eldon
School on Grand Bahama

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY
Andros Ave. — Englerston Subdivision

Engin Language and Literature
Mathematics
Pnyscs General Science Grades 7-12

Guidance Counselor

(2 positions)

(2 positions)

G (1 position’

Bishop Michael Elden School, Freeport Grand Baharia
2 bedrooms,

I bath Qualifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from an accredited

University together with a Teacher's Certificate from an accredited

© Comprises: i
P Teachers College,

Property 3,600 sq. ft/
Building 733 sq. ft.

Applications may be collected from the Education Department located on Sands Road off of East

For conditions of Street,

sale and other
information,

Completed application forms with the requested supporting documents must be received by
please contact: 5

the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 13" March 2009, and must be addressed to:-
Phone:
356-1685,

502-1929
or 356-1608

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P. 0. Box W656
Nassau, The Bahamas
Interested persons should submit offers in writing to:
The Manager
Credit Risk Management
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than March 13, 2009

Providing quality education ina Christian enviranment by developing the whale child: spiritually
acadenicaly, oiencally and socially thus oreoaning fhe ole for ie.

=





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Insurer inherited ‘wrongly priced’ policies

FROM page 1B

holders - especially the elder-
ly ones, who have suffered the
most drastic premium rises -
by surprise.

It has also closed the indi-
vidual health portfolio to new
business, instead - as Ms Cam-
bridge emphasised - wanting
to focus on growing its



Bahamas-based group health
business, the area that it spe-
cialises in worldwide.

Still, some individual poli-
cyholders are likely to per-
ceive the major premium
increases as an attempt to
‘price them out of the market’
and push them to switch to
another carrier, if they can.

Younger insureds, who are

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008






SUPREME COURT

No. CLE/Qui/ 01714

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT piece or
parcel of land containing by admeasurement
11,971 Sq. Feet situate on the North side of Wulff
Road and 98 Ft. West of Darling Street in the
Southern District of the Island of New










Providence, Bahamas.

understood to have experi-
enced 30 per cent premium
increases through Generali’s
revised premium rates, would
be able to find a new carrier
with relative case but elderly
patients, because of the high
risk they pose through likely
needing more frequent med-
ical treatment, would probably
not be taken on by another
carrier.

“Our options based on our
analysis were to sell the indi-
vidual portfolio or to cancel
the coverage,” Ms Cambridge
told Tribune Business. “We
realised, however, that if we
were simply to cancel the poli-
cies, it would have left some
individuals without insurance
cover and for some, based on
their ages and health condi-
tions, it would have made it

very difficult for them to find
alternatives.

“In order to provide an
appropriate solution, we have
moved to create an age-band-
ed premium structure, which
provides for a fairer and more
appropriate premium for each
risk presented.

“For those individuals who
could, we knew that they
would see alternative cover
through another carrier. We
fully expect that some indi-
viduals would elect coverage
with other carriers. However,
for those who could not, due
to their age or health condi-
tions, Generali decided that
the honourable thing to do
would be to find a way to
assure that the health plans
for these individuals would
not terminate.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Davco Limited whose
Registered Office is in the City of Nassau, New
Providence, Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court
to have its Title to the following land investigated under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the said Court in accordance
with the provisions of the said Act.














ALL THAT piece or parcel of land containing by
admeasurement 11,971 Square Feet situate on the
Northern side of Wulff Road and approximately 98 Feet
West of Darling Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas aforesaid bounded
NORTHWARDLY by land described in Plan No. 1233
and running thereon Eighty-seven and Fifty-four One-
hundredths (87.54) Feet on the East partly by land now
or formerly the property of Kathleen Darling and partly
by land now or formerly the property of Cleomie Clarke
and running thereon jointly One hundred and Fifty-eight
and Fourteen One-hundredths (158.14) Feet on the
SOUTH partly by the said Wulff Road and running
thereon Fifty-two and Eighty-four One-hundredths
(52.84) Feet and partly by land formerly the property of
the Petitioner but presently occupied by Preston Stuart
and Byron Campbell and running thereon Forty-five and
Eleven One-hundredths (45.11) Feet on the WEST partly
by the land lastly described and running thereon Seventy-
eight and Twenty One-hundredths (78.20) Feet and partly
by land now or formerly the property of the Estate of
one Poitier and running thereon Eighty-six and Thirty-
two One-hundredths (86.32) Feet which said piece or
parcel of land has such position shape marks boundaries
and dimensions as or shown on the diagram or plan filed
herein and thereon edged in “PINK”.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office
hours at the following places:-

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau; or

(2) The Chamers of James M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed forms,
verified by an Affidavit and other related requirements
to be filed therewith by the 16th day of April A.D., 2009.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of its, his or her Claim together with the other related
requirement by the 16th day of April A.D., 2009, will
operate as a bar to such claim.

JAMES M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Momey 21 Work

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that AUNTENY DELVA of TAKE-
ME CORNER, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of
FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality



“Our options
based on our
analysis were to
sell the individual
portfolio or to
cancel the
coverage.”



Tina Cambridge

Ms Cambridge said that to
make health coverage “more
affordable” for elderly policy-
holders, Generali had creat-
ed a modified coverage and
benefits scheme, which
brought in “increased co-pay-
ments for certain services and
facilities”. These clients,
though, would still retain
major medical coverage.

Tribune Business was told
on Wednesday that Generali’s
new plan was less favourable
to elderly policyholders than
the coverage they currently
enjoyed, because it raised the
amount they had to pay for
treatment at Doctors Hospi-
tal from 20 per cent to 40 per
cent, with the insurer’s expo-

sure reduced from 80 per cent
to 60 per cent.

Sources added that the age
at which the lifetime maxi-
mum Generali would pay for
a policyholder’s medical
expenses was reduced from $1
million to $100,000 has also
been lowered under the new
proposed policy, from 70
years-old to 65.

But Ms Cambridge said:
“The actual premium impact
of this change varied from
individual to individual,
dependent on their age and
previous plan design.

“For many individuals,
there were actual decreases in
premium. However, older
individuals received premium
levels that more appropriately
reflected their age.”

She added: “We feel the
results of our efforts best
serves the needs of individuals
in our plan, and those who
could not find an alternative
may still maintain coverage
with us. The new product
design also enables them to
stay covered without even
higher increases that would
have been necessary to main-
tain their previous level of
benefits.”

and Citizenship,

P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport,

Bahamas.

Il

IN THE ESTATE OF Jeannine Marie
Therese Dusseault a.k.a. Jeannine
Marie Therese Buraglia a.k.a Jeannine
Buraglia late of 300 Joliette #208
Longueuil, Quebec in Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
above Estate are required to send the
same duly certified in writing to the
undersigned on or before the 5th day of

March A.D.,

2009, after which date the

Executors will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims
of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate of
Jeannine Marie Therese Dusseault
a.k.a. Jeannine Marie Therese Buraglia
a.k.a Jeannine Buraglia are requested
to make full settlement on or before the
date hereinbefore mentioned.

NADIA A. WRIGHT
Attorney for the Executors
Chancellors Chambers
P.O. Box N-4589
Nassau, Bahamas

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 5 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.28 | CHG 4.43 | %CHG 0.27 | YTD -52.08 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 811.61 | YTD -2.79% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW. BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & EN Ob MARION
s

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Fince
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

Securit

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB 31.72
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED) 0.00
RND Holdings 0.45

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CPFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Previous Close Today's Close

mide. Over-The- joules Securities
id $ sk $

Change Daily Vol.

Prime + 1.75%
T%

Prime + 1.75%

Last Price Weekly Vol.

-35 0.40
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

29.00

Sone

55
BISX Listed Mute Funds

4.10

MARKET TERMS

st 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
bated price for Set volume

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided aby closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of CG idl
s

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

om
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

0.480
0.000

0.000
0.000

31-Jan-09

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

gful
FINDEX - The Fideli ie Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ETIENNE DALMOND of
P.O. BOX AB-20334, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27 day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

MOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCING
CASPIAN SEA LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 23rd day of February, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2009.

G. H. Johnsen

Liquidator of

MOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCING CASPIAN SEA
LIMITED

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION NIGER INC.

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-
named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau,
Bahamas on or before 31st day of March, A.D., 2009.
In default thereof they will be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 4th day of March, A.D., 2009.

Gary H. Johnsen
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, TEXAS 77060

NOTICE
ESSO EXPLORTION AND
PRODUCTION NIGER INC.

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
NIGER INC. is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said Company commenced
on the 4th day of March, 2009 when its

Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Gary
Johnsen of 16945 Northcase Drive, Houston

Texas 77060.
Dated the 22nd day of December, 2009

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named
Company





THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 7B

THE TRIBUNE'S



APT 3-G

AT THE HOSPITAL Ei Rv ase
WHEW, WHAT A NIGHT,” ) NOT ME,
I'M DEAD ON MY FEET.Z/ Joe. TM
HAPPY WHEN
IM BUSY.

NOW THAT YOU MENTION IT;
TOMMIE, YOU PO LOOK HAPPY!

s| ARE YOU SURE THERE
ISN'T ANOTHER REASON?

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THAT IMPRESSED WITH
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ARE YOU KIODING? YOU ENJOY
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19 by North America Syndicata, Inc. World rights reserved.



© 2009 by King Feut
www.Blondie.com























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CALVIN & HOBBES

1% BOXES TO Go, AND TLL
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THE PROPELLER BEANIE. THEY






©1989 Universat Press Syndicate

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



*No WONDER YOUR COMPUTER CRASHES...
THERES NO STEERIN’ WHEEL.”

Difficulty Level * % * 3/05

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down

1 Inexpensive fish will suit 2 Wild herbs we found in
him (10) Israel (7)

8 Jewish teacher in Arab | break bail in order to
biophysics (6) prove | was
Notedly brisk (7) elsewhere (5)
Rubens, for example, puts Hit with explosive —
himself out (7) bandage needed (6)
Correct some work the | lament about
men did wrongly (5) disorder (7)
Carry on with a It stoops to
summary (6) conquer (5)
Walk a short way and Wealth is about to
turn (6) provide security for
Report about the initial girl in nursery — tale (10)
forms of aquatic life (5) Respects one’s
Fashionable substitute for testimonials (10)
wood or metal (7) Mother’s pet dog? (7)
Time of day when engine Seat of Empire (7)
breaks down — about One taps a cask
five (7) with it (6)
They’re inclined to prevent A revolutionary
steps being taken (5) invention (5)
He can rely ona Article written about the
permanent occupation professional stage,
(4,6) perhaps (5)

Sailing ship (10)
Damp (5)
Tearfully
sentimental (7)

Relate to (7)

EASY PUZZLE

The Lone Star

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution aa
12 Vile smell (6)
Across: 1 Sherpa, 4 Boards, 9
Signora, 10 Frame, 11 Eerie, 12 Ill
will, 13 Part company, 18 Proverb, 20

Ruche, 22 Opine, 23 Average, 24

Across: 1 Assign, 4 Acacia, 9
Journal, 10 Acute, 11 Cider, 12 14 To escape (3,3)
Nemesis, 13 Mollycoddle, 18 In .

force, 20 Sable, 22 Grasp, 23 Tye nateotedig())

Bleats, 25 Stared. Unequal, 24 Riddle, 25 In debt. 19 Previous (7)
Down: 1 Sister, 2 Eager, 3 Protest, 5 Down: 1 Abject, 2 Sound, 3

Offal, 6 Realign, 7 Stella, 8 Haricot General, 5 Charm, 6 Counsel, 7 21 Ignorant (7)

bean, 14 Anodise, 15 Perfect, 16 Averse, 8 Blank cheque, 14 22 Religious belief (5)

Aplomb, 17 Defend, 19 Exert, 21 Offhand, 15 Discern, 16 Ginger, 17
Chair. Pellet, 19 Repel, 21 Brute. 23 Very small (5-5)







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©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

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Sudoku Answer



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Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer

































Difficulty Level *& *& &

7

Across Down

Vast (7)
Artful expedient (5)
A nut (6)

Canadian

policeman (7)



Unbend (5)

Et cetera (3,2,5)
Chicanery (5-5)
Fellow soldier (7)
Judgment (7)
Nothing more
than (6)
Unsuitable (5)

To groove spirally (5)





















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

















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2/4/811/3 917/6/5 Bs ait Baie
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Upping the Percentages

South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.

NORTH
AQ985
Â¥VAI6
93
&974
WEST EAST
43 a7
Â¥10983 VÂ¥KQ542
Q1052 #176
$K 32 11086
SOUTH
@KIJ1062
v7
@AK84
&AQS
The bidding:
South West North = East
1¢ Pass 3% Pass
6%

Opening lead — ten of hearts.

Whenever declarer is faced with a
situation where the sucecss of the
contract depends upon winning a
finesse, he should first seek some
alternative method of play by which
the finesse can be avoided. The num-
ber of cases where a finesse can be
eliminated in favor of a superior line
of play occurs far more often than is
generally realized.

For example, take this hand where
making six spades superficially
appears to depend on a successful
finesse in clubs. But if declarer relies
solely on the hope that East was dealt

Tomorrow

the club king, he will suffer a one-
trick defeat. While there is a 50 per-
cent chance that East was dealt the
king of clubs, this does not necessar-
ily mean that there is only a 50 per-
cent chance to make the contract.

South’s chance of bringing in the
slam is considerably greater than 50
percent, provided he takes the
preparatory steps necessary to
increase his chances. With correct
play, South can elevate his probabil-
ity of success to better than 70 per-
cent.

After winning the ace of hearts,
he draws two rounds of trumps and
ruffs a heart. The A-K of diamonds
are cashed and a diamond is rutted.
Dummy’s last heart is trumped, and
the eight of diamonds is led. When
West produces the quccn, the slam
becomes a certainty. Instead of ruff-
ing, declarer allows West to win the
trick, and a club is discarded from
dummy!

Whatever West returns, the con-
tract is made. If West leads a club,
South scores the queen, while if a
heart is led, dummy discards a sec-
ond club as declarer ruffs in his hand.

Note that at no point during the
play does declarer relinquish his
chance of making the contract via a
club finesse. But by eliminating the
red suits first, he also eliminates the
need for the finesse whenever West
started with the majority of the miss-
ing diamonds.

: Test your play.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.



Full Text


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The Tribune



BAHAMAS EDITION

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www.tribune242.com





Volume: 105 No.86



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Vian





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FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 .
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A eS ae

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)





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Nassau is world's

NO.1 cruise port

Carnival Corporation
expects to bring estimated
4.4m visitors to Bahamas
locations this year

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter :
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Nassau has
surpassed Cozumel this year
as the number one cruise port
in the world, attracting 1.1 mil-
lion cruise visitors, according
to Carnival Cruise Lines.

The cruise company expects
to bring an estimated 4.4 mil-
lion passengers to various loca-
tions in the Bahamas in 2009,

said Giora Israel, senior vice-
president of Carnival Corpo-
ration.

Mr Israel revealed that the
cruise line is projecting to bring
2.2 million passengers to Nas-
sau in 2009, and 1.8 million to
three other ports in the Family
Islands.

Carnival will also reach an
important milestone this year,
he said.

“We will be carrying this

SEE page eight

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Students plead guilty to
causing grievous harm

MByALISONLOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THREE high school students pleaded guilty to causing griev-
ous harm yesterday after a fast food employee was left fighting
for life when she got caught up in a fight between a group of
teenagers.

A male Eight Mile Rock High School student is nueerd to

SEE page eight

WHY ARE SO MANY
Desuetan duinen ee SWITCHING TO

Faster v*

reat) tien

Frequency i’

Lower Coat

Vea ado D gas od ag od ee
Bahamian owned
MOU es ama tes Pe
Pt bee ea eB A ad 1) EE

La sR es a a DY
AAA Seda M TA Ls sa lah hc





Rain

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter -

A SECOND man charged
in the brutal 2008 murder of
a young woman whose half-
naked body was discovered
in bushes off Charles Saun-
ders Highway was arraigned
in a Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Devon Campbell, 29, of St
James Road, was arraigned
before Magistrate Ansella
Williams in Court One,
Bank Lane, charged in the
murder of Sheanda Newton.

According to police, the
body of the 19-year-old Blue
Hills resident was found clad
only in red underwear on
October 4, 2008. Her throat
appeared to have been slit.
Police also reported that
there. were signs that New-
ton had struggled to fight off
her killer.

It is alleged that Campbell

Volnmer Tiny 8) 1-11 Ane ace yesterday.

between Friday, October 3,
2008, and Saturday, October
4, 2008, intentionally caused
Newton’s death.

Campbell, who was not
represented by an attorney,
was not required to plead.

He is charged with
Michael Beckford, 29, of
Redland Acres, in Newton’s
murder.

Beckford was arraigned

on October 15, 2008, and the’

case was transferred to Court
10, Nassau Street.
Prosecutor Sergeant Sean
Thurston asked that Camp-
bell’s case also be transferred
to Court 10. Several relatives

of the deceased were present,

at yesterday’s hearing.
Campbell was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison until

the next hearing on April 22. |.

Before being escorted
from court, Campbell asked
the magistrate if he could
file a lawsuit if he is acquit-
ted.



_ Detainees ‘have —
‘seen improvements’



at Detention Centre

, since going to media

Repored chanses after



officials visited facility







@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@
tribunemedia.net



DETAINEES at the
Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre claim they
have seen some minor
improvements in their
living conditions since
they went to the media
with allegations of inhu-
mane treatment.

The reported changes
— including larger food
portions — came about
after the Director of
Immigration, .
Thompson, and Com-

Minister moves to
quell fears over
off-shore financial

-firm that the detention®

Jack.

modore of the Defence
Force, Clifford Scavella,
accompanied by repre-
sentatives from the
department of social ser-
vices, the clergy, and psy-
chologist Dr David Allen
toured the holding facili-
ty on Monday. ~
Deputy Director of
Immigration Roderick
Bowe said that the tour
was conducted to “con-









centre is being operated
with transparency and
that we are not running
the detention centre as
was previously claimed.”

Yesterday one

SEE page 12







service sector

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

-tthompson@tribunemedia.net

EDUCATION Minister Carl Bethel

Carl Bethel



sought to quell what he termed a "degree
of hysteria" being spread about the certainty of this country's
off-shore financial service sector.

Recent announcements made by US ‘Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner and British Prime Minister Gordon Brown —

which back a clampdown of off-shore “tax havens”

— do not

foreshadow:an immediate threat to the country's off-shore cen-

tres (OFCs), he said.

He conceded that while the recent developments indicate
there will be some impending "challenges" to the Bahamas' sec-

tor and other off-shore centres — an

SEE page 12

abrupt, unilateral shutdown

Skeletal remains are |
found off Dolphin Drive

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are trying to identify
a person whose skeletal remains
were found off Dolphin Drive on
Wednesday.

CID chief Ellsworth Moss said
items of what appeared to be
clothing were found “around” the
bones.

Several workmen discovered
the remains in a bushy area at

noon on Wednesday, police saidy*

The remains were taken,to
Rand Laboratory at Prirticess
Margaret Hospital.

Yesterday Chief Supt: Moss
said a doctor was examining the
remains to determine the esti-
mated age and gender of the
deceased.

Once this happens, police will
be armed with the facts necessary
to cross-check the findings
with their database of missing
people.



WN co SS a


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

Summer events
‘will revitalise’
hotel industry

jardew

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m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THOUSANDS of visitors arriving for inter-
national events in the Bahamas this summer
will revitalise the hotel industry, Hotel Workers
Union secretary general Leo Douglas has pre-
dicted.

As Atlantis prepares to host the month-long
Miss Universe pageant in August and the FIFA
(Fédération Internationale de Football Asso-
ciation) Congress in May, Mr Douglas said the
future is brightening for hotel workers.

He hopes there will be fewer job cuts and
new jobs generated for the thousands of hotel
staff who have been laid-off in recent months
owing to the decline in visitors and the eco-
nomic crisis.

The Miss Universe pageant is expected to
draw hundreds of visitors throughout August
and follows the FIFA Congress where a mini-
mum of three delegates will represent each of
the 208 member federations.

President of Kerzner International Bahamas
George Markantonis announced on Wednes-
day that staff will be hired temporarily at
Atlantis and hotels across New Providence dur-
ing the Miss Universe contest.

And although the jobs may not be perma-
nent, Mr Douglas said publicity generated by
the events should pave the way for a more buoy-
ant hotel industry going forward.

He said: “It’s one of the best things that could
happen to the country and it is a very good
thing for the hotel industry, which is suffering
right now, both here and all over the world.”

Mr Douglas commended the government and
Atlantis for putting the Bahamas forward as a
host for such events at a time when the industry
needs to be creative about bringing in guests.

He said: “The only thing we have said to peo-
ple in the hotel industry now is, ‘let’s try to be
very supportive’.

“They must understand how to do a much
better job with service and attitude — not only
for Bahamians in the hotel industry but for all
Bahamians.”

The union secretary hopes the boost in visi-
tors will allow Baha Mar to change its plans to
close the Wyndham hotel on Cable Beach
between August and October.



ATLANTIS WILL HOST the month-long Miss Uni-
verse pageant in August and the FIFA (Fédération
Internationale de Football Association) Congress.

“They should try to stay open because of this
so it can give a good feeling and get a good
message out there,” Mr Douglas said.

The union is encouraging hotels to keep line
staff during tough economic times and look to
executive positions when making cuts instead.

“The union says examine doing cuts from the
top,” Mr Douglas said. “They should under-
stand that is realistic. You cannot say you are
hurting and keep paying big salaries at the top
and cutting the bottom. We hope more job cuts
would be the last resort.”



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‘Major initiatives’ focus
on Andros and Abaco

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ANDROS and Abaco are the
focus of major initiatives on the part
of the Ministry of Agriculture to
encourage the development of agri-
culture and create new economic
opportunities for Bahamians, the
executive chairman of the Bahamas
Agricultural Industrial Corporation
said.

Speaking in the House of Assem-
bly yesterday, Edison Key charged
that “with the right support” agri-
culture, like tourism, can become a
“significant generator of employ-
ment and income” for Bahamians.

Outlining some of the ways BAIC
is seeking to boost this industry, Mr
Key said the corporation is encour-
aging the production of export qual-
ity products for the Bahamian and
export markets via the North
Andros Agricultural Expansion Pro-
ject.

This project will use 561 acres of
land located near the San Andros
Airport, which is to be “divided into
41 blocks of different sizes inclusive
of a greenhouse park and the head-
quarters for the North Andros Farm-
ers Association.”

The land is expected to nourish
the growth of vegetables, citrus trees,
tropical fruits and livestock, said the
South Abaco MP during his contri-
bution to the mid-year budget.

Meanwhile, a 1,500 acre “satellite
farm” in the same area is being “‘revi-
talised” and subdivided for livestock
farming, as the corporation also
seeks to establish the North Andros
Agro-Industrial Park, which will
emphasise agro-processing and orna-
mental plant production.

Modern technology will be put to
use in a new greenhouse park, and

two refrigerated trailers which will be
“leased at a nominal fee” to the
North Andros Farmer’s Association
are expected to heighten farmers’
chances of getting their goods to
market in the best condition possible,
Mr Key noted.

“We view this procurement as a
major step in improving the method
of transportation of agricultural
products,” he said.

Three tractors bought by the cor-
poration have already been put to
work in the same community.

Mr Key said that 500 acres of the
former Key and Sawyer/Bahama
Star Farms has been subdivided into
10 and five acre plots for leasing to
farmers in North Abaco. In Central
Abaco, south of Spring City, 640
acres have been sub-divided for the
same purpose.

He added: “I am pleased to report
that the first phase of the Farmers
Market Community Centre in Marsh
Harbour, Abaco has been complet-
ed in terms of lighting and ground
preparation. We also plan to estab-
lish an industrial park south of
Spring City.”

He affirmed that BAIC will con-
tinue to bring together buyers of
agricultural produce and Bahamian
farmers at meetings set up for this
purpose, so the direct shipment of
produce from farmers to Bahamian
markets can be planned.

“We are also dedicated to pro-
viding training and assistance in best
practices and modern methods of
farming and management. This com-
mitment is manifested in the farmers
empowerment workshops and
accounting and management work-
shops held in Abaco, Eleuthera and
Long Island,” he added.

Training in greenhouse technolo-
gy will also be offered to farmers
across the Bahamas.

THE TRIBUNE



Anglican
Archbishop
alldresses
homosexuality

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - In his
first visit to Grand
Bahama since his
enthronement, Rev Laish
Boyd, Bishop of the
Anglican Diocese of the
Bahamas and the Turks
and Caicos Islands, spoke
about the church’s posi-
tion on homosexuality.

Bishop Boyd said that
homosexuality is a very
pertinent topic for the
Anglican Communion,
one that was high on the
agenda at last year’s Lam-
bert Conference in Eng-
land.

“The position of the
Anglican Communion is
that homosexual practice
is contrary to scripture,
and that remains the deci-
sion of the church.

“There are all sorts of
views out there on this
matter, but this is the
church’s position,” Bishop
Boyd said.

He stated that the
majority of leaders and
bishops have maintained
that position.

There has been a lot of
controversy and division
in the Anglican Commu-
nion over the appointment
of the openly gay Episco-
pal Bishop Gene Robin-
son of New Hampshire.

Bishop Boyd said the
Anglican Communion has
faced many divisive issues
over the centuries and
over the last few decades
especially.

“The Episcopal Church
or Anglican Church in the
United States, where the
most contention is, has
had many dividing issues,”
he said.

In addition to the issue
of homosexuality, he said,
the ordination of women
still presents a problem
for many people.

“There are persons who
want to separate them-
selves for any number of
issues. But the Anglican
Communion for the most
part remains together.

“We remain committed
to staying together and
that was one of the things
that came up very strongly
in our Lambert Confer-
ence this past summer
when more than 700 bish-
ops from all over the
Anglican Communion
met.

“There are 70 million
Anglicans in 160 countries
on this Earth and most of
the bishops by far were
there, and that was the
consensus that we stay
together and try to work
through any differences
we may have.

“It (homosexuality) is
an issue that has caused
some to leave the church.
In spite of the issues, the
Anglican Church makes
every effort to stay
together,” said Bishop
Boyd.

Anglicans are currently
observing the Lenten sea-
son, which spans 40 week-
days beginning on Ash
Wednesday and culminat-
ing during Holy Week
with Holy Thursday,
Good Friday, and con-
cluding the Saturday
before Easter.

Bishop Boyd is the
third indigenous bishop to
undergo the rite as the
new Diocesan Bishop of
the Diocese of the
Bahamas and the Turks
and Caicos Island.

PSSST RTO ETT Ce ETC ID

THE Ministry of Education plans to
have a collection procedure in place
before the end of June to target those
who have defaulted on their educa-

tional guaranteed loans.

"Defaulted loans continue to be a
problem and we are now in the process
of interviewing a number of collection
agencies and entities and before the
end of this fiscal year we hope to imple-
ment some collection agency practices,"
Education Minister Carl Bethel said in
the House of Assembly during the last
day of debate on the mid-term budget

yesterday.

He said he understands that a number of per-
sons have lost jobs due to the economic down-
turn, but his ministry will seek to recoup money
owed by persons who are currently employed
and have the means to repay their loans.

Mr Bethel also urged persons with accounts in

arrears to arrange payments with the

ministry before action is initiated.
"We're seeking those persons who

can pay, if they lost their job that's one

thing, but if a person has a job — those

Carl Bethel

persons will be sought out, but we do
urge them to contact the scholarship
and educational loan department at the
ministry,” said the MP for the Sea
Breeze constituency.

For the 2008/2009 fiscal year,
government allocated $3 million for
its scholarship fund and $10.5
million for the Educational Guaran-

teed Loan Programme.

gramme.

Of that $10.5 million, $3.2 million was award-
ed to 349 new students and $7.2 million was
awarded to 743 students already in the pro-

Since the programme's inception in 2000 it has
been plagued with a high default rate.


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Pair in court on
fraud charges

A MAN and a woman were }
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court }
on fraud charges yesterday. :

Jaynell Indeira Bethel, 40, and }
Marvin Adelage Sturrup, 29, :
both of East Street, appeared }
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau }
Street yesterday on charges of }
forgery, uttering a forged docu- }
ment and fraud by false pre- ;
tences. ;

It is alleged in court dockets :
that the accused between }
December 8, 2008 and January 2, :
2009 forged Royal Bank of Cana-
da cheques in the amounts of }
$800, $1,500 and $1,800. It is also }
alleged that between December :
10, 2008 and January 8, 2009, the }
accused obtained cash totalling :
$2,300 from the Royal Bank of }
Canada, Bay Street, and also }
attempted to attain $1,800 from }
the same bank by means of fraud. }

The accused pleaded not guilty }
to the charges and were granted ;
bail in the sum of $4,000. :

Two in court
on drug charge:

mM By NATARIO McKENZIE:
Tribune Staff Reporter i

A 31-YEAR-OLD man and
a 23-year-old Jamaican woman
who were arrested on Monday }
in connection with the seizure of }
a quantity of marijuana }
appeared in a Magistrate’s }
Court yesterday on a drug pos- }
session charge. :

Police have charged Marvin
Rolle who also goes by the
aliases Andrew Rolle, Antho- }
ny Rolle and Lundy Rolle, }
along with Kayon Tasheika }
Ivey, alias Tanika Morley, with }
possession of marijuana with }
the intent to supply. i

Court dockets allege that the :
accused on Monday, March 2, }
were found in possession of a }
quantity of marijuana which :
authorities believe they intend- }
ed to supply to another. ;

Rolle and Ivey were }
arraigned before Magistrate }
Carolita Bethel in Court 8, }
Bank Lane, on Wednesday. The }
accused pleaded not guilty to }
the marijuana possession charge
and were remanded to Her }
Majesty’s Prison. The case has }
been adjourned to March 18 }
when a bail hearing will take :
place. According to the prose-
cution, the accused also have }
another case involving the }
seizure of a firearm and a quan- }
tity of drugs pending before the }
courts. ;

British PM supporting efforts that
could hit Bahamas financial sector

m@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

BRITISH Prime Minister
Gordon Brown has signalled
his support for efforts which
could severely impact the
Bahamas’ crucial financial
sector.

Explaining that his coun-
try will follow the United
States in its effort to restruc-
ture the rules governing the
banking industry, Mr Brown
placed particular emphasis
on curtailing the ability of cit-
izens to keep their money in
offshore banks in an effort
to avoid paying domestic tax-
es.

He told the United States
Congress on Wednesday: “

. you are also restructuring
your banks. So are we. But
how much safer would every-
body’s savings be if the whole
world finally came together
to outlaw shadow banking
systems and offshore tax
havens?”

Mr Brown’s statements
come at a critical time for the
Bahamas. Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham has already
voiced concern over calls
from European Union lead-
ers for an overhaul of the
international financial sys-
tem, including “a new system
of regulations for all finan-



BRITISH PM Gordon Brown (AP)

cial markets, products and
participants.”

“They again placed blame
for the international finan-
cial crisis on ‘offshore juris-
dictions’ or ‘tax havens’ as
they call us, where non-trans-
parent business is carried out,
and promised to prepare a
‘toolbox of sanctions to be
applied against such tax
havens’ which is to be pre-
sented to a summit of the
Group of 20 developed coun-
tries meeting in London on
April 2,” Mr Ingraham said.

The Stop Tax Haven
Abuse Bill pushed by then
Senator and now US Presi-
dent Barack Obama lists the

Bahamas as one of 34 secrecy
jurisdictions.

The Bill seeks authorisa-
tion for special measures
against foreign jurisdictions,
financial institutions and oth-
er entities which impede US
tax enforcement.

A portion of the Bill reads:
“Currently, the Treasury has
the authority under 311 of
the Patriot Act [31 USC
5318(a)] to impose financial
sanctions on foreign jurisdic-
tions, financial institutions,
or transactions found to be
of ‘primary money launder-
ing concern’. The Bill would
authorise Treasury to impose
the same sanctions on the
same types of entities if Trea-
sury finds them to be ‘imped-
ing US tax enforcement’.

“In addition, the Bill would
add to the list of possible
sanctions the ability to deny
foreign banks the authority
to issue credit cards for use in
the United States.”

Prime Minister Ingraham
pointed out that the Bahamas
has and will continue to do
everything in its power to
ensure that it cannot be “cor-
rectly identified” as an
“uncooperative” offshore
jurisdiction.

To this extent, Mr Ingra-
ham said, the country must
ensure that it follows inter-
national best practices at all
times.

Judge orders proceedings
against Haitian man be stayed

A SUPREME Court judge has ordered
that proceedings against a Haitian man accused
of having sex with a 10-year-old girl be

stayed.

Supreme Court Justice Jon Isaacs ruled on
Tuesday that the case against John Baptiste
be stayed on the grounds that the “continued
prosecution of the applicant is a breach of his
constitutional right to be tried within a rea-

sonable time.”

Baptiste had filed an application seeking
constitutional relief. He had also contended
that the continuation of criminal proceedings

GBPC responds to

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Power Company has
responded to criticism by the
Commonwealth Electrical Work-
ers Union over the hiring of new
temporary workers, stating that
the backlog in its customer ser-
vice area made this move neces-
sary.

“We at Grand Bahama Power
Company are surprised by the
Commonwealth Electrical Work-
ers Union’s reaction to our deci-
sion to hire four additional
Bahamian meter men,” the com-
pany said in a press release.

“In these most challenging eco-
nomic times, we are pleased to be
able to create temporary employ-
ment.”

The company said the four tem-
porary employees have been hired
for the interim to help clear a
backlog of work in the customer
service area of the company.

They explained that bringing in
a team to help assist the company
will decrease estimates of cus-
tomers’ billings, increase response
time to customer queries and assist
with reconnection and disconnec-
tion services.

“It has long been a standard
practice of our company to con-
tract temporary workers as the
need arises.

“We remain committed to the
advancement of our employees
and will continue to act in the best
interest of our customers and the
communities we serve,” said the
company.

The Commonwealth Electrical
Workers Union on Monday
accused the Power Company of
violating the Industrial Relations
Act by hiring the temporary work-
ers without informing the union.

CEWU president Keith
Knowles said the union never
received notification from the
company. He claims that the com-
pany breached the Industrial Rela-
tions Act by failing to consult and
inform the union of the hirings.

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He said the union was also con-
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Mr Knowles said many of the
current meter readers have not
been elevated to the next level of
classification in meter reading
even though they are performing
at that level.

He said that the current meter
readers are being expected to train
temporary workers to read meters
and learn routes, putting their jobs
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against him was “an abuse of process.”
Baptiste was arrested on March 26, 2005.
He was arraigned on March 30 ,2005 and bail

was refused as he has no legal right to be in the

country.

Prison since.

He has been on remand at Her Majesty’s

In his ruling, Justice Isaacs said the lapse of
time is “presumptively prejudicial”.

“Tam satisfied that the applicant’s right to

Inquiry to be held into
criticism by union | alleged immigration raid

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

AN INQUIRY into an
alleged raid by immigration
officers of a single mother’s
home will be held this week,
Minister of Immigration
Branville McCartney said.

The Minister contacted
Violet Hanna, 41, after read-
ing in The Tribune about
how unidentified armed offi-
cers from the Immigration
Department damaged her
fence and door when they
violently burst into her
home during the night last

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have a fair trial within a reasonable time has
been infringed when regard is had to the penal-
ty that may be imposed,” he said.



Ms Hanna and her 7-year-
old daughter Amber, both
Bahamian citizens, said they
were terrified by the event
and the mother-of-two
intends to sue the Immigra-
tion Department for dam-
ages as she no longer feels
safe in her Nassau Village
home.

During his contribution to
the mid-year budget debate
in the House of Assembly
on Wednesday, Mr McCart-
ney said: “With respect to
the article which appeared
in the newspaper about the
ordeal experience by the sin-
gle mother — an inquiry will
be heard this week with
respect to that matter.”

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m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

LOOPHOLES in the country's laws that allow Qagaiienetany:
foreign owned companies to move their earnings
abroad must be closed, former minister of tourism Obie Wilchcombe
said yesterday.

He highlighted the troubles of the now insolvent CLICO (Bahamas),
a auditor general's report that revealed loose accounting practices and
the global recession as prime reasons to take action now.

"So much of what we have and so much of what is earned in the
Bahamas does not stay in the Bahamas,” said Mr Wilchcombe in the
House of Assembly yesterday, adding that this money is needed to
build the economy and boost foreign reserves.

"Iam deeply concerned that we have multi-million dollar companies
in the Bahamas, making hundreds of millions of dollars and most of it
doesn't stay here,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe suggested that the government implement a “tem-
pered” corporate tax on foreign investors — not high enough to deter
investment but sufficient to make an impact on the suffering economy.

He also challenged the country to find ways to build its reserves
through agriculture and fisheries, in an effort to ensure the that coun-
try’s economy is sound independent of the tourism sector.

The next 10 months will be a period of "survival" for the country, Mr
Wilchcombe said, adding that this time must be used to create a proac-
tive economic recovery plan that harnesses local resources, the full
potential of which remains untapped.

"T think it's important, if we are going to move our country forward,
to understand that there are times when we must be aggressive, there are
times when we must take our message to where it's going to be effective
and we must discuss these matters. If we don't discuss these matters, then
we would forever be seen as a third world country,” he said.



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380-FLIX


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Immigration revenue up nearly $10m

AT LEAST one ministry is earning money
for the country — Immigration.

Immigration Minister of State Branville
McCartney announced in the House that
between July 1 and December 31, 2008 the
Immigration Department had collected more
than $29.2 million — a revenue surplus of more
than $9.8 million.

He attributed the surplus to the new fee
structure, which was increased considerably on
July 1 last year, and to the department’s vigi-
lance in collecting outstanding fees.

Mr McCartney told the House that since the
formation of the department’s debt collection
unit there has been an improvement in the pay-
ment of permits.

For example, the unit investigated the depart-
ment’s Grand Bahama office. About 330 files
were audited and about $1.5 million were found
to be outstanding. Mr McCartney said that com-
panies in arrears will have none of their permits
renewed until they either pay the outstanding
fees or arrange a payment plan with the depart-
ment.

He wondered how these fees could have
possibly fallen into arrears, especially as each
approval letter makes it very clear that “the
permit will be issued upon receipt of the fee,
which should be in cash or certified cheque
only.”

The question is: How could Immigration
have issued the permits if no money was
received? Surely, employers were not using the
letter of approval as a permit and going without
the actual permit? This seems an impossibility.
The obvious answer is that staff were not doing
their job.

We recall an occasion several years ago when
we had to wait so long for an answer from Immi-
gration that we lost a very good job applicant.
When the approval letter eventually came, half
a year later, we ignored it.

Immigration called to find out what had hap-
pened to our cheque.

We told them what cliff they could jump
from.

How Immigration’s accounts receivable
could be in such a shocking state is a mystery as
Immigration’s approval letter makes it very
clear that “this letter is not authority for the
above named person to be employed as he can-
not be lawfully employed until he is in posses-
sion of valid work permit...” And to get a valid
work permit, one has to first pay the fee.

When The Tribune receives an Immigration
approval letter, it sends a cheque by messenger

to Immigration, then waits a few days before
calling to find out if the permit is ready for the
messenger to collect.

Having worked with Immigration in con-
nection with permits for so many years, we can
understand how some businesses, in desperate
need of specialist staff, would put a specialist to
work even before his permit had been approved.
It was a risky business, but it was encouraged by
the foot-dragging of Immigration in processing
applications, which often caused an employer to
lose an important employee for his business.

Immigration officials closed their eyes to this
infraction.

However, the employer was caught because
he had to pay for the permit from the date of
application — Immigration having assumed
that the employee had already been working
from that date.

However, businesses like The Tribune that
will not play Russian-roulette with Immigra-
tion are caught in an unfair trap.

The Tribune will not finalise any contract
unless it actually has the Immigration Board’s
approval.

Once that approval is given, the contract is
signed.

However, the future employee has then to
give his current employer notice.

This notice can vary from a month to three
months. This means that The Tribune has
already paid Immigration for a year’s permit,
dated from the day of Immigration’s approval.

However, by the time the staff member has
arrived in Nassau, The Tribune has paid Immi-
gration for three months that our candidate
was still on someone else’s payroll.

In other words, The Tribune has paid for a
year’s permit, but, depending upon when the
employee is free to join, has him on staff for
about eight months.

It is inequities like this that tempts employers
to play fast and lose with Immigration.

With the Immigration Board dedicating
Mondays to the approval of permits, many of
these delays in granting permits should be over-
come. However, there should be a new system
for the dating of a permit.

Just as Tuesday is Cabinet day, in the old
days under the UBP Mondays were Immigra-
tion days, and many problems that businesses
have encountered for years with this depart-
ment were avoided.

However, Mr McCartney and his new staff
have made a new start and seem to be making
progress — we wish them luck.





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Why are we
becoming such a
lawless society?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Currently The Bahamas Gov-
ernment and specifically The
Royal Bahamas Police Force
have many issues confronting
them. However, it has been stated
many times that most of these
problems start out as small mat-
ters but because they go
unchecked they become major
issues. Nevertheless, I am con-
cerned as it is not very long ago
that the Prime Minister raised the
issue about gambling being illegal
yet it is tolerated at a significant
level — probably even more so
since the introduction of the
Florida “Powerball” lottery. The
Prime Minister matter-of-factly
indicated that The Bahamas
should either make gambling
legal or we enforce the law. What
is the result? Business as usual.

Since the beginning of the year,
T have been appalled at the num-
ber of letters written complain-
ing about people’s businesses
making loud noise to the distur-
bance of other members of the
public.

We even had a Senator stating
that residents should be tolerant
of such intrusive behaviour in
these difficult economic times. I
am unable to relate to such a
statement which obviously indi-
cates that the innocent must exer-
cise such tolerance as opposed to
the perpetrator; What do the per-
petrators sacrifice? Recently we
had residents complaining about
the noise emanating from the
headquarters of the National
Trust, on Village Road, which
eventually evoked a response
from the President, Mr Carey. Mr
Carey apologised for the distur-
bance and said that in future all

letters@tribunemedia net



such noise will stop by 9pm unless
it is for a National Trust fund-
raising event when it will cease
by midnight. Again I fail to see
the logic of why the residents
should be required to be tolerant
of such invasive attacks on their
evening hours of relaxation. Fur-
thermore, I find it astonishing that
the National Trust would encour-
age such activities which seem to
be diametrically opposed to one
of their mandates. Have they for-
gotten that at night most birds
also try to sleep?

The most recent reports of dis-
turbance have been targeted at
the nightclub on West Bay Street
adjacent to the EI Greco hotel.
Again the rationale for this inva-
sion of privacy is in the name of
commerce and a “revitalization”
of the area and the wish to pro-
vide an attraction for the "Spring-
breakers" — if they ever arrive. I
am totally unable to grasp the
logic of these people who ratio-
nalize such thinking.

In the past I have been a victim
of this type of disturbance and
now find myself reading the Offi-
cial Gazette, on a daily basis, to
note who is applying for a "Music
and Dance" licence and then
going to extensive trouble to pur-
sue the matter before the Licens-
ing Board in an attempt to head-
off the problem before it gets
started.

I must confess, however, that I
do not recall the National Trust
applying for such a licence

although this could be an over-
sight on my part.

In all, of the cited cases above,
the disturbed residents have
called the Police with the result
that the noise level is reduced for
a limited period.

A short while after the Police
visitation, the volumes again esca-
late to the former level. Why is
this allowed to happen — do the
Police enquire if the
personal/business has a valid
licence? There are laws on the
books that prohibit persons from
being a public nuisance. There-
fore, when the Police are called to
such an incident why don’t they
issue a Summons on the spot and
fine the person breaching the
peace? If the Police are called to
the same offender more than
once then the fines should be
increased. When other laws on
the books are broken — eg steal-
ing — are the Police just as toler-
ant or are we going to have
another situation just like gam-
bling?

Yes, there are major issues to
deal with, but why not make a
start with the small matter of
being a public nuisance — the
effect is simple to execute and
implement, it puts much needed
cash in the Treasury and the pub-
lic immediately see the benefit
that something positive that is
being done to improve their qual-
ity of life.

There is no reason why such
actions shouldn’t be extended to
persons playing loud music from
their cars, trucks and SUV’s.
Peace on earth.

LAW ABIDING CITIZEN
Nassau,
March 3, 2009.

Something is deadly wrong with our
system of dealing with the mentally ill

EDITOR, The Tribune

Ihave recently gone through
an experience that I would not
want my worst enemy to go
through. You see I personally
know a man who, over the past
two months, had developed
what was suspected to be men-
tal disease (by laymen’s diag-
nosis).

The man would display over-
ly dramatic mood swings — from
as calm as can be to seriously
aggressive and obviously bel-
ligerent, all within minutes of
being in his presence. It was
not a pretty sight.

What seemed obvious to all
of us who were going through
this frightening and horrific
ordeal with this young man was
that he needed professional
help before he presented him-
self with situations which he
could get hurt or even killed;
or, much worse, he could hurt
or kill someone else.

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PROTECTION
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Tell me something — so far,
do you think that I sound like I
am exaggerating?

Let me tell you — I am cer-
tainly not!

Just ask the individuals who
were closely intertwined in this
whole imbroglio.

Anyway, as apprehensive
and frightened as we all were
of the whole scenario; and as
concerned as we all were for
this young man’s safety, the
safety of the general public, and,
of course, our own safety, we
all were (and are) in agreement
that members of our Police
Force have not been adequate-
ly trained, and the procedures
they are instructed to follow are
left wanting when charged to
expeditiously and efficiently
apprehend dangerous mentally
ill individuals.

What we were told, on more
than one occasion, was that the
Police cannot act unless the sub-
ject had a history of mental ill-
ness, Or was acting violently at
the time of the emergency call.
Can you believe that?

In the worst case what the
Police were telling us was that
we had to wait until this young
man killed someone before they

could be persuaded to act!

Did you hear what I said?
Do you think this is right?

I am willing to bet my peasy
head that even the policemen
in our country reading this letter
know that something is deadly
wrong with this system of deal-
ing with the mentally ill; and
something must be done before
some innocent person gets
killed — the subject or his victim.

When all was said and done,
this young man was committed
to Sandilands, thanks to the co-
ordinated efforts of the young
man’s family, friends, and Dr.
Nelson Clarke (Chief Psychia-
trist at Sandilands).

You can bet and believe that
a copy of this letter will find its
way to the desk of the Com-
missioner of Police, and also the
Chief Psychiatrist at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre.

And let us all hope and pray
that machinations would be ini-
tiated to alleviate this unequiv-
ocal deficiency in procedure and
training in attempting to appre-
hend the mentally ill.

MARVIN G. LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,
February 16, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 5



Minister: I don’t want

0 In brief

eoneeecseecrersccesseucseecrseuccrsosssessnssucrssescorsooreees

Red Cross
Fair this
Saturday

THE 67th Annual Red
Cross Fair will be held this
coming Saturday in the
lower gardens of Govern-
ment House.

The co-chairpersons of
this annual event, Pauline
Allen-Dean and Brendon
Watson, along with the
fair’s committee members
have once again organised
a fun-filled family event.

Each year the fair caters
to thousands of individuals
who pass through the gates
to enjoy themselves in a
wholesome family activity,
with games, food and
rides.

This year, there are the
usual favourites — conch
fritters, guava duff, straw
work crafted by local arti-
sans, hoop-la, punch board,
balloons, cotton candy, and
plants.

This event, one of the
major fundraisers of the
Bahamas Red Cross Soci-
ety, ensures the organisa-
tion’s continued work
through its various pro-
grammes.

Some of the Red Cross’
programmes include meals-
on-wheels, after-school
mentoring, summer camp,
first aid training, disaster
and emergency relief.

All of these activities are
funded by the Societies’
various fundraising efforts
and through the assistance
of the Red Cross staff and
numerous volunteers.

in our Own country

PRAISING the Enforcement
Unit of the Immigration Depart-
ment for its “outstanding work”
in apprehending illegal immi-
grants, Minister of State for
Immigration Branville McCart-
ney told the House of Assem-
bly during his contribution to
the budget debate that he does-
n’t “wish to wake up one morn-
ing in the Bahamas and ask,
where am I?”

“(I don’t wish) to find out that
we Bahamians are outnumbered
in our own country, or we find
ourselves as a minority in our
own country,” Mr McCartney
said.

So far this fiscal year, 3,512
illegal immigrants have been
repatriated.

“Most of the persons repatri-
ated this year were apprehended

this year. In fact, just yesterday, we repatri-
ated 128 persons,” Mr McCartney said.

Professional

He insisted that Immigration officers always
expected to conduct themselves in a profes-
sional manner when carrying out apprehen-

sions.

“Officers who step out of line are on their
own, and the Department will deal with them
very firmly. We will not compromise on this
issue. With respect to the article which
appeared in the newspaper about the ordeal
experienced by the single mother, an inquiry

will be heard this week with re

Branville McCartney



country $411

matter,” Mr McCartney said.

The Immigration Department
was allocated $18,695,006 in the
2008/2009 budget estimates. Of
that:

¢ $8.76 million was for salaries

¢ $3 million for overtime

¢ $2 million for repatriation
exercises

e¢ $1.3 million for Family
Island operations

Mr McCartney said that with
the exception of overtime, all
expenditure items have so far
remained within the budgeted
amounts.

However, he added that the
repatriation of illegal immi-
grants continues to absorb a
large portion of the departmen-
t’s -— and the countries -
resources.

Between July 1, 2008 and

December 31, repatriation exercises cost the

303,

Mr McCartney pointed out that employ-

allowed to e

tion motor.

spect to that gaigq

ers are still willing to hire illegal migrants.
“If employers were monitored and only

mploy people with valid docu-

mentation this would reduce the demand for
illegal labour.

“Apprehensions represent only one side of
the enforcement necessary to stop the migra-

“Both supply and demand must be con-
strained if word is to get back to those places
where illegals come from that it is no longer
possible for illegal migrants to obtain employ-
ment and find housing if they are illegal,” he

Clinical trial testing at the Princess
Margaret Hospital Oncology Centre

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE continuing effort by
Bahamian and American
oncologists to find the cause
for the aggressive ovarian
and breast cancer genes in
Bahamian women continued
yesterday at the Princess
Margaret Hospital Oncolo-
gy Centre with clinical trial
testing.

American oncologist Dr
Judith Hurley of the Uni-
versity of Miami together
with Bahamian oncologists
Doctors John Lunn,
Theodore Turnquest and
Duvaughn Curling will be
conducting cancer clinical
trials in Bahamian women.

The first phase of the clin-
ical testing was conducted in
November 2008 at the Can-
cer Society of the Bahamas
as a joint partnership effort
between Dr Hurley and the
Bahamian oncologists and

came as a result of the estab-
lishment of the Bahamas
Breast Cancer Initiative
(BBCI) which was spear-
headed by former US
Ambassador to the Bahamas
Ned L Siegel and his wife
Stephanie Siegel.

Findings

The BBCI was created
following alarming findings
by researchers and the
observations of Bahamian
and American medical pro-
fessionals and survivors.

The initiative is commit-
ted to creating greater
awareness of the importance
of early detection in saving
lives.

The Cancer Society of the
Bahamas and the University
of Miami are continuing
their tests for a mutated
gene they believe to be
prevalent in Bahamian

women. Altered genes such
as BRCA1 and BRCA2
make women more suscep-
tible to breast and ovarian
cancer.

The study began in 2002
after Dr Hurley and
Bahamian doctors noticed
that women in the Bahamas
were being diagnosed with
cancer at earlier ages
than women in other coun-
tries.

They carried out a prelim-
inary scan of breast cancer
patient charts from Princess
Margaret Hospital and
learned that 48 per cent of
the patients were diagnosed
before the age of 50.

A study of 18 Bahamian
breast cancer patients living
in South Florida was
launched because of this
find. In eight of these cases,
researchers found one or
more of three gene muta-
tions that can predispose
women to breast cancer.

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Department has a
Bahamians to be minority BUM

THE Department of
Immigration’s $9 million
surplus is the result of a
new fee structure, vigilance
by its officers and the for-
mation of a debt collection
unit, Minister of State for
Immigration Branville
McCartney told the House
of Assembly.

During his contribution
to the budget debate, Mr
McCartney said that the
newly formed unit, under
the direction of the depart-
ment’s director and finance
officer, has compiled a list
of companies owing out-
standing fees.

Companies

Their records revealed
that 70 companies have
been audited in New Prov-
idence and found to owe
the Bahamas government a
total of $834,718.

A similar exercise was
carried out in Grand
Bahama, where 330 files
were audited and around
$1.5 million were found to
be outstanding.

“As for those companies
who owe the department
money, the department will
not be minded to issue fur-
ther renewals without
either a settlement of out-
standing fees or a payment

MMB ten tlsraem tare!



plan arrangement,” Mr
McCartney said.

The state minister said
that the “big question” is
how did the fees fall into
arrears in the first place?

“It is apparent that once
persons have been issued
approval letters, they have
taken those letters to mean
‘go ahead and engage
workers’.

Payment

“This is done despite the
fact that the letter states
that payment must be made
within 30 days or the
offer will be withdrawn,”
he said.

Large companies, partic-
ularly hotel companies, and
persons requesting short
term work permits tend to
put persons to work before
paying, he said.

According to the Min-
istry of Finance’s revenue
budget estimates, the Immi-
gration Department’s total
revenue for the 2008/2009
fiscal year is forecasted to
be $38.7 million.

The revenue for the first
half of the year was fore-
cast to be $19.4 million, but
Mr McCartney said the
department had in fact col-
lected $29.2 million by
December 31, 2008.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





SECRECY

WE ALWAYS knew that
the rules didn't apply
equally to the powerful in
the same way that they
apply to the weak. Equality
under the law does not
seem to apply to the com-
munity of Nations.This
unfortunate fact was dra-
matically demonstrated this
week,

Just as the Cayman
Islands are waiting ner-
vously for an assault from
the authorities in the Unit-
ed Kingdom on their bank-
ing secrecy laws and The
Bahamas is hearing rum-
blings from Washington
that would appear to
endanger the international
financial industry in our
already battered economy,
an interesting matter in
making news.

That matter in the
refusal of the Union Bank
of Switzerland, UBS, to
hand over information on
the accounts of the 57,000

US citizens who have }

accounts with the bank.
Cayman and

bank.

about by the other animals,

the pigs gave their expla- ;
nation. That explanation ;
was that all animals were }
created equal but that some }
animals were more equal }

than others.

So to paraphrase George
Orwell, all Nations are }
equal but some are more ;

equal than others.

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Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on
327-1575 or 477-7610
Email: simon @cavesheights.com



The :
Bahamas should monitor :
this affair closely. It will be :
extremely enlightening to ;
observe what action the US
can or will take against }
Switzerland and its great }

Those of us who have }
read George Orwell's leg- }
endary book Animal Farm :
will remember that when }
the pigs took over the farm }
and then started to rule and }
behave like the farmers }
they overthrew and this sit- :
uation was complained :

Children invited to
name dolphin calf

BLUE LAGOON ISLAND
— For 20 years, Dolphin Encoun-
ters, located on Blue Lagoon
Island, has offered Bahamians
and visitors from around the
world the unique opportunity
to interact and learn about
friendly marine mammals in an
all-natural marine habitat.

As part of its 20th anniver-
sary celebration, Dolphin
Encounters is inviting the chil-
dren of the Bahamas to name
the latest addition to their dol-
phin family — a healthy male
calf.

The dolphin baby is the
fourth calf born to Princess on
October 11, 2008.

“Dolphin Encounters is very
fortunate to have another baby
calf born on Blue Lagoon Island
to Princess, our eldest dolphin,”
said Robert Meister, managing
director of Dolphin Encounters.

“Princess has been a part of
our beloved marine mammal
family from the very beginning.
Through our many educational
programmes, thousands of
school children have met her
and have come to love her and
all of our animals as much as we
do.

“We wanted the honour of
naming her boy calf to be given
to the children of the Bahamas.”

Students enrolled in any
grade from kindergarten to
grade 12 in the Bahamas are
invited to submit suggestions for
the name of the baby male dol-
phin. In keeping with Bahamian
culture, the name selected must
be related to island culture, his-
tory or geography.

All submissions must also
include the reason the student
feels the name should be cho-
sen.

The student whose name is
chosen will receive a special dol-
phin gift kit, a free dolphin
adventure programme for their
entire class where they will meet
the baby and Princess.

“The baby calf and mom are
doing very well,” said Kim Ter-
rell, marine mammal director at
Dolphin Encounters.

“Princess is an extraordinary
and experienced mother and has
given birth to three of our other
dolphins including Shawn, Aba-
co and Salvador. When dolphins

IT’S A TIME OF JOY AND JUBILAT. ION $

fP'S A GRAND TIME OF
PRAISE AND CELEBRALION!

TION

FyPROPHEGY,

BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD Monday, March 3th, 2009

General Ch erneer
BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON

General Preshytei

Bishop Dr. Elzarnet 8. Rabming, Natonal Overseer

& Mewlerator will dchver his ANNUAL ADDRESS.

S10 4M

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN

Global Outreach Director
BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK
CBL [nstrector

MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE

International Director of Women’s Ministries
BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN
Regional Overseer of Jamaica, Cayman

Islands Guyana and French Guiana
and MINISTER SONIA MARTIN

BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS
Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islands

BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES
National Overseer of the Church of Ceoxd,
Bahumus, Turks & Catoos Islinds

Ministering in song and performance
are: the Centennial Mass Choir, the Tab-
ernmacke Concert Choir, the Chorch of
Cod National Choir, the Bahamas Public
Officers Choir, and other Choirs

Teams ard acai Cromps,

‘Youth sien :
Chueh of {
and thcader: Bil rae

” is ves r ily) 4 na pe ble

LIVE ¥IA RADIO BAHAMAS 154) AM ane

The Convention climaxes on Sanday, March 15th
with the afternoon Annual Farude and Water
Baplismal Service, folliwed by the evening
Service hrnadeast live on 2WS Radio and TV 13,

log on to: WwW.cogophahamas.org

PRINCESS and her baby swim
together at Dolphin Encounters
on Blue Lagoon Island. The
school children of the Bahamas
are invited to name the dolphin
calf in a baby-naming contest as
part of Dolphin Encounters’ 20th
anniversary celebration.

successfully breed under human
care it is a scientific indicator
that they are completely adapt-
ed to the environment in which
they live. The fact that eleven
of our 18 dolphin family mem-
bers were born at Dolphin
Encounters makes us proud that
the all natural environment
which we have provided is ulti-
mately ideal for the Atlantic
Bottlenose Dolphin.”

“We have a great deal to cel-
ebrate and be proud of in our
20-year history, but nothing
compares to our extraordinary
animals that have brought joy
and a greater understanding of
marine mammals and the envi-
ronment in which they live to
Bahamians and visitors alike,”
Mr Meister said.

“We look forward to receiv-
ing submissions from students
and to announce the winning
name in April.”

The baby-naming contest is
free to students in the Bahamas

and entry forms are available
online at Dolphin Encounters
website or at the Dolphin
Encounters offices at One Mari-
na Drive Paradise Island. The
contest runs from March 1-
March 31, 2009.

Dolphin Encounters is a
member of the International
Marine Animal Trainers Asso-
ciation (IMATA), the largest
organisation of its kind.

In 1997, the facility was
accepted into the prestigious
Alliance of Marine Mammal
Parks and Aquariums (AMM-
PA), and in 2004 became an
accredited member of the
group, confirming its status as
one of the top marine parks in
the world.





A non-profit element of the
marine park is Project BEACH
(Bahamas Education Associa-
tion for Cetacean Health). It
was developed in close consul-
tation with the Bahamas
Department of Education, the
National Science Teachers
Association and BREEF
(Bahamas Reef Environment
Educational Foundation).

To date, thousands of local
students and teachers have ben-
efited from its innovative, on-
site and classroom programmes.

In 2003, Dolphin Encounters
and Project BEACH received
the prestigious Cacique Award,
the Bahamas Ministry of Touris-
m’s highest honour for excel-
lence in tourism.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

Request For

Expressions Of Interest/

ualifications

{EOI-09-01: Janitorial Services
EOI:09-02: Pest Control & Exterminating Services}

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited is
presently seeking expressions of interest from qualified
suppliers for the provision of the following services: -

1) Janitorial Services

2) Pest Control & Exterminating Services

Interested parties are requested to complete the RFEI/RFQ
Package, which may be collected from the Receptionist
Desk of the FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas)
Super Support Centre, East West Highway, Nassau,
Bahamas or requested via email to:

sourcing&supplymanagement@firstcaribbeanbank.com
as of Friday, March 06, 2009.

Please reply to: Sourcing & Supply Management

FirstCaribbean International Bank
East West Highway
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Ms. I. Hamilton

The deadline for submission is Monday, March 16, 2009 at
1:00pm. Eastern Time. Completed Qualification Packages
may be mailed or couriered to the address above.

Packages received after this date and time will not be accepted.


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Survey claim that most ‘godless’

0 In brief |

Two top Cuban
Officials resign all
party, govt posts

mM HAVANA

TWO of Cuba’s most prominent }
officials have resigned from all :
Communist Party and government :
posts after they were removed from }
the Cabinet and criticized by Fidel :
Castro, according to letters pub- ;
lished Thursday in the state press, :

according to Associated Press.

The letters from Vice President :
Carlos Lage and ousted Foreign :
Minister Felipe Perez Roque }
acknowledged they had commit- }
ted errors — which were not spec- }
ified — and promised to continue }
serving the country. Neither offered :
an apology for any wrongdoing, }

however.

The two were dismissed from :
Cuba’s Cabinet, the Council of i
Ministers, as part of a broad shake-
up on Monday. A day later, for- }
mer President Fidel Castro pub- }
lished a statement alleging they had :
been seduced by “the honey of
power” and hinted the two were }
demoted because their angling for :
leadership roles in a post-Castro :

Cuba had become unseemly.

University of

Miami president:

among health
Care experts at
Obama summit

Bg MIAMI

UNIVERSITY of Miami Pres-
ident Donna Shalala is among }
the health care experts gathered ;
at the White House to debate i
ideas for overhauling the nation’s }
system, according to Associated }

Press.

care and return to civilian life.

President Barack Obama sum- }
moned allies, skeptics and health ;
care figures of all stripes to Wash- }

ington on Thursday.

He’s pushing for universal :
health care coverage but wants ;
to be more open and inclusive }
than the Clinton administration }
during its failed reform attempt :

15 years ago.

Demeritte’s



places have less crime is rejected

A NASSAU pastor has rejected a
British survey’s claim that the most
“godless” places have less crime.

And he said Nassau’s own crime
problem would be much worse if the
Bahamas were not a Christian society.

Bishop Simeon Hall’s comments
came after a British survey found that
areas of Britain with a greater per-
centage of atheists also enjoyed less
crime.

“Such findings are contrary to most
of the studies that I have seen,” said
Bishop Hall of New Covenant Baptist
Church.

“Most serious Christians have a bet-
ter family life. However, I would agree
that everything we once thought foun-
dational is now being challenged.

“Even so, I think our crime rate
would be worse if we didn’t have Chris-





tians. You must remember
that criminals in our society
are a very small percentage
of the population.”

A British survey conduct-
ed by the think-tank Theos
found that eastern England,
which has fewer churchgo-
ers than elsewhere, is also |
the most virtuous.

The city of Norwich,
“capital” of East Anglia, has
a body of evangelicals, but
their attempts at “educa-
tion” have been branded
“indoctrination” by critics.
Statistically, it is one of the most god-
less places in the UK.

Cath Elliott, a writer for The
Guardian newspaper in London, said
the survey confirmed what atheists had



Bishop Simeon Hall

been saying for years: that
morals and ethics are not
linked to any particular reli-
gious group and that non-
believers are just as capable
of behaving decently as any-
one else.
’ In fact, she said, an atheist
§ is probably more capable of
telling right from wrong
because their morals come
from within “of their own
free will” rather than being
imposed by someone else.
“We don’t need any
mythical gods or holy books
to tell us right from wrong,” she wrote.
London, with the highest church
attendance in Britain, also has the worst
crime rate.
“There’s a lesson in there some-

where,” added Ms Elliott, “and ’m
delighted to say it is isn’t a biblical
one.”

At one time Norwich had 57 church-
es within the city walls. Now only 31
remain - and only nine of those are still
in use.

Overall, less than seven per cent of
Britain’s population is thought to
attend church regularly.

Bishop Hall declined to comment on
the survey itself because he said he
would need to “see the parameters and
who was doing the questioning.”

But he accepted that some so-called
believers used religion as a “cop out” to
escape accountability.

He said in the Bahamas “the quanti-
ty of churches has outdistanced the
quality of ministry - and that is part of
the problem.”





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS PART of the ongoing effort
to reach out to the community,
the Bain and Grants Town
Advancement Association offi-
cially launched its revitalisation
project earlier this week.

Rev Dr CB Moss, chairman of

the community over the past 12
years, will be the sponsoring the
project.

“The five principal pillars of the
project are health, education,
sports, economics, and culture.
Significant concerns to be
addressed by the commission
include social services, health,
environment, education and eco-

Rev Moss said the project will
also include expansive self-sus-
taining programmes such as the
Heritage Tourism Project and the
Y13 Project, a computer literacy
initiative.

The association is currently in
discussions with the Ministry of
Tourism, the College of the
Bahamas and several corporate,

view to partnering in various
aspects of the project.

“The main engine that will
power the target area out of its
economic and socially depressed
state will be the financial benefits
to the residents.

“Therefore, major emphasis
will be placed on economic activ-
ities at the individual and corpo-



Shalala was secretary of Health }
and Human Services under Pres- }
ident Bill Clinton. She also:
recently co-chaired a commission }
charged with helping wounded
military veterans get better health ;

the association, said although
there have been several previous
projects designed to renew the
Bain and Grants Town area along
with other inner-city communi-
ties, their project is different in a
number of ways.

“It is a private sector project
that is not sponsored by the gov-
ernment, there will be a bottom
up instead of a top down imple-
mentation and it will be driven by
the local people instead of out-
siders.

“The boundaries of the target
area include East Street on the
east, Nassau Street on the west,
Shirley Street on the north and
Cordeaux Avenue in the south.
Areas lying just outside these
areas may also be included in the
project,” he said.

Rev Moss said the association,
which has provided cultural,
social, academic, sporting, youth
and religious programmes within

Suneral Home

a

MABEET STREET : it. Biot

6T-20e7 = TEL: 323-572

ee i ee

Philomene
Joachin, 68,

a resident of Andros
Avenue & formerly of
$1. Louis Du Nord,
Haiti, will be held at Holy
Family Catholic Church,
| Robinson Road, on
| Saturday at 11 :00 a.m.

| Officiating will be Rev. Fr.

Roland Vilfort, s.m.m.

Interment follows in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads. Left to cherish her memories are her
children: Yna & Verjena Joseph, Rose Marie Joseph-
Johnson, Yo | ette, Fenise & Filonma Joseph; sisters:
Noelsil, Wilsanne & Sinatte Joachin; brothers: Joasius
& Sima Joadin, Prinsivil, Bermen & Renold Digue;
grandchildren: Rene Laguerre, Odilia Joseph, Yderick,
Emilie, Johanne & Mikerlange In Baptiste, Lifete Joseph,
Violeme & Guilene Borgela, Persilien In Baptiste,
Marianne, Chimene, Mamonvil, Elie, Guilene, Rony,
Charitable & Alaine Joseph, Sandra & Alex Thinis, Aglantis
Romann, Samlix, Naderge & Miriame In Francois, Andre
Johnson, Evline & Nadine Joseph, Neyisha Johnson,
Ruth In. Francois; sons-in-law: Dieu-Juste In Baptiste,
Bersius Borgela, Sameson In Francois, George Henry
Johnson & Amold Blanc; great grandchildren: Guylove
Jean Francois, Manedossa & Wouldline Joseph,
Mickinight & Stanley Laguerre, Sandou Joseph, Wilna,
Kettena & Fransico Charles, Alen, Ysland & Kesly Saint-
Fleur, James Victore, Cynthia & Withney In Francois,
Alexsandra Thinis, Woudish, Woudianna, Samlisha &
Sabrina In Francois, Kendera Thinis, Mario, Samlix,
Matthew, Denisha, Johnathan, Samantha & Samelique
In Franxois & Rosemilande In Phillip; cousins: Bertha
& Fourchard Borcejour, Perthomas, Jisilia, DiJean &
Florenne Joseph, Christiana, Josela, Joseline, Adrien,
Simone Joachin, Rosetta Guerline, Larry, Ronald,
Veronica, Genuir & the Noels. Friends may pay their last
respects at Demeritte’s Funeral Home, Market Street,
from 10-6:00 p.m: on Friday & on Saturday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

nomics,” he said.

civic and religious groups with a

rate levels,” Mr Moss said.

RG Dr C B Moss








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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Students plead guilty to

causing grievous harm

Chavez says US, Brazil
free to discuss Venezuela

@ CARACAS, Venezuela

VENEZUELAN President Hugo Chavez has
given Brazil’s president the green light to talk
about Venezuela with President Barack Obam,
acca.

Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva
plans to meet Obama on March 14 in Washing-
ton, and Chavez said the Brazilian leader told
him by phone that “he would like to talk with the
president of the United States about the case
of Venezuela.”

U.S.-Venezuelan relations remain prickly
despite the change of administrations in Wash- ;
ington, while Brazil’s left-leaning president has maintained friend-
ly relations both with the U.S. and the socialist Chavez.



Hugo ATS)

“We don’t need any intermediary to speak with any government i
on the planet, but since it’s Lula and in good faith, I told him yes, that
Chavez said Thursday in a televised }

I gave him the green light,”
speech, addressing troops.

Chavez added, however, that “I’ve told him I don’t have much

hope of that government changing.”

Silva’s office confirmed the two spoke by phone Wednesday and ;
agreed the Brazilian leader could bring up Venezuela with Obama. :
Chavez has condemned recent U.S. State Department reports
alleging human rights problems in Venezuela and a lack of cooper- i

ation in counter-drug efforts.










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Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am - 5:30pm
Saturday 9am - 2pm

TTT
TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
ShirleyStreet

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following positions for the
2009-2010 School Year

10-12)
7-12)

-Journalism/Literature (Gr,

-Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr,

-Math (Gr. 7-127)

-Physics (Gr. 10-12)

-Agriculture (Gr.7-9)

-Technical Drawing (Gr, 7-12)

-Accounts’Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)

-Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)

-Spanish (Gr.7-12)

-Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)

-Chemistry
-Business Studies (Gr, 10-12)

-Health Science (Gr, 7-9)

-General Science (Gr7 } =
-Computer Studies (Gr. 7
-Music (Gr. 7-12)
-Biology (Gr. 10-12)
Language Arts/Literature (Gr,

-Art/Craft (Gr, 7-12)

-Food Nutrition (Gr, 10-12)
-Clothing Construction (Gr.
-Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)
-Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

7-13)
7-12)

10-12)

Applicants must:

a practicing bom-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Christian School.

Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or Univerity
in the area of speci alization.

Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or
Diploma.

Have at least two years teaching
experience in the relevant subject areca
with excellent communications skills.

Applicants must have the ability to prepare

students for all examinations to the BIC;
BGOCSE levels

Be willing to participate in the high
school’s extra curricular programmes

Application must be picked up at the High
School Office on Shirley Street and be returmed
with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for application is
March 6th, 2009

FROM page one

have hit the victim in the
face with a rock when she
intervened in a brawl that
was underway in the park-
ing lot of the Kentucky Fried
Chicken restaurant in Martin
Town, Eight Mile Rock,
Grand Bahama, police said.

The woman, whose iden-
tity is not known, suffered
multiple facial fractures and
her condition is listed as seri-
ous. She remains in the
Rand Memorial Hospital in
Freeport, where she was

police said.

According to an official
report, police were alerted
to the scene of the attack at
around 3.22pm on Tuesday.

They said they met a
“large crowd of Eight Mile
Rock High students” in the
parking lot of the restaurant
and were informed that the

injuries “while trying to
assist one of the students
who was involved in the
fight.”

“As a result of an intense
investigation three students
were taken into custody and
charged for the offence.

“They appeared at the
Eight Mile Rock Magis-

March 5, where one of them
pleaded guilty to the offence
and the other two were dis-
charged. The lone male stu-
dent remains in custody
pending an updated report
on the victim’s condition.”
Police did not explain why
the incident was only made
known to the media two

taken by ambulance,

FROM page one

year over five million people from all
places in the world,” he announced at the
Grand Bahama Business Outlook in
Freeport.

Carnival Corporation is the largest
cruise operation in the world. It has 11
cruise companies, including brands such as
Carnival Cruise Lines, Holland America
Line, Princess Cruises and Seabourn
Cruise Line in North America; P and O
Cruises, Cunard Line and Ocean Village in
the United Kingdom; AIDA in Germany;
Costa Cruises in southern Europe; Ibero-
cruceros in Spain; and P and O Cruises
in Australia.

Mr Israel said Carnival Corporation
comprises 56 per cent of the cruise market
in the world, with 565 ports in 139 coun-
tries. He said this winter they have six

& eve

Is cutting the store in half

Harbour Bay
H ALF IS

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He also noted that some 84,000 persons
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Mr Israel reported that Carnival will get
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“We get a new large Carnival ship every
71 days,” he explained.

Mr Israel indicated that cruise vacations
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business for Carnival Corporation. It is

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“In the next 120 days, we will have four
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geared to the Euro market. We will be
getting two ships delivered in one day at
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great potential.

“In Germany, there are 100 million peo-
ple and 84 million of them take 100 million
vacations a year.

“We only carry 600,000 of them on
cruise ships and we have long way to go,”
he said.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 9



Friend says Terrell Owens
has been cut by Cowboys

FOOTBALL
IRVING, Texas
Associated Press

DALLAS Cowboys receiv-
er Sam Hurd said Terrell
Owens sent him a text mes-
sage late Wednesday, saying
he had been cut by the team.

“He didn’t give me an
explanation. He just said,
“Wow,” Hurd said Thursday.
“I really didn’t believe that
he seen that coming.”

Hurd said Owens’ reaction
was “more shock than anger.”

“He said it’s tough, but it’s a
business,” Hurd said.

Cowboys owner Jerry Jones
indicated a few weeks ago
that T.O. was going to remain
in Dallas, where he’s had
three straight 1,000-yard sea-
sons. Jones’ abrupt reversal
was first reported Wednesday
night by ESPN.

The Cowboys reportedly
made another, more-expect-

ed move Thursday by releas-
ing safety Roy Williams.

The team had no comment
on either move.

The moves all seem to be
aimed toward an improved
atmosphere in the locker
room, something widely
viewed as a reason for the
Cowboys’ problems last sea-
son. A preseason Super Bowl
pick by many, Dallas missed
the playoffs after losing three
of its last four games, includ-
ing a blowout in the finale
when a victory would’ve
clinched a playoff berth.

Also this offseason, the
Cowboys have let go of Adam
“Pacman” Jones and Tank
Johnson.

Owens’ personality over-
shadowed his performance,
stretching thin his relation-
ship with coaches and some
teammates. It’s similar to the
circumstances around his
departures from the San Fran-

cisco 49ers and Philadelphia
Eagles.

Without him, offensive
coordinator Jason Garrett and
quarterback Tony Romo no
longer have to think about
whether No. 81 is happy.

“T know it takes a lot of
pressure off Romo,” Hurd
said. “A guy like him
demands the ball and you
want to get him the ball. Now
he can look at all of us and
see which one is open on any
given play. ... I don’t think
that was a problem. That’s
just what could and might
start happening.”

Dallas’ passing game likely
will now revolve around Roy
Williams, who was acquired
from Detroit for three 2009
draft picks in the middle of
last season. In addition to
Hurd, the Cowboys also have
Patrick Crayton and Miles
Austin.

As for Owens, it remains to

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Chairman’s Review
Of the Results

For the first quarter ended January 31, 2009

The consolidated net income of FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited for the
first quarter of fiscal 2009 was $15.8 million, an increase of $11.5 million over last year’s nei
income of $4.3 million. Earnings per share for the quarter was 13.2 cents, an increase of 9.€

cents over last year.

The first quarter earnings were driven primarily by a $7.9 million, or 26%, increase in net interes!
income over the prior year quarter. Total interest expense was reduced by $12.9 million, due tc
lower funding costs for deposits, combined, in part, with lower deposit volumes in the firs!
quarter. Net income, adjusted for non-recurring outsourced portfolio results, was $23.1 million
which demonstrates the resilience of the Bank’s core earnings.

Operating expenses for the quarter were $16.5 million. These continue to be well managed as
evidenced by the efficiency ratio improving over the comparative period.

The Bank’s total assets at January 31, 2009 stood at $4.1 billion. This reflects a growth in tota.

loans of $61.2 million.

The tier 1 capital ratio at the end of the quarter was 15.8%,

substantially in excess of the minimum requirement of 8% of risk-rated assets.

I consider these first quarter results satisfactory in the current economic conditions and they are
in line with management's expectations.

I thank our customers, shareholders and employees for their continuing loyalty and patronage
throughout the quarter and look forward to another successful year.

Prat be orsee!:

Michael K. Mansoor
Chairman

FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Balance Sheet
BS'000

Assets
Cash and due from banks
Securities
Loans and advances to customers
* Goodwill
Property and equipment
Other assets

Total assets

Liabilities
Total deposits
Other borrowed funds
Other liabilities
Debt securities in issue

Total liabilities

Equity
Share capital & reserves
Retained earnings

Total liabilities and equity

Unaudited
January 31, 2009

346,787
$36,436
2,600,315
187,747
25,514
116,874

4,113,673

3,242,201
173,740
82,519

Unaudited
January 31,2008 October 31, 2008

Audited

421,178
1,329,993
2,510,392
187,747
26,681
59,639

259,951
1,081,872
2,539,072
187,747
25,913
43,435

4,535,590 4,137,990

3,837,746 3,445,010

48,146 47,168
20,315 Fs

ee
3,498,460 3,906,207 3,492,178

390,948
224,265

446,579
182,804

477,230
168,582

-—
615,213 629,383 645,812

4,113,673

ee
at

4,535,590 4,137,990

vad nd

Director

be seen what kind of market
there is for a 35-year-old with
a proven track record — good
and bad.

His personality might be a
fit Al Davis and the Raiders.
Or maybe Daniel Snyder and
the Washington Redskins
might add another big-name
star to the roster, especially
to take advantage of the ani-
mosity T.O. might bring to his
two games a year against the
Cowboys and the Eagles.

“T don’t think (being
released) is going to stop him
from playing football,” Hurd
said. “He’s going to be back
on somebody’s team.”

Don’t look for him to
replace Laveranues Coles on
the Jets. The team has no
interest in Owens because of
the distractions he’d bring, a
person familiar with the
team’s thinking told The
Associated Press on Thurs-
day.

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity
BS'000

Balance at October 31, 2007

Net income for the period

Dividends

Revaluation gains/(losses)

Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve

Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands

Balance at January 31, 2008

Balance at October 31, 2008

Net income for the period

Dividends

Revaluation gains/(losses)

Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands
Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve

Balance at January 31, 2009

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Income
BS'000

Total interest income
Total interest expense

Net interest income

Operating income

Operating expenses
Loan loss expense

Net income

Weighted average number of common
shares outstanding for the period

Earnings per share (in cents)

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
BS'000

Net from (used in) operating activities

Net cash from financing activities

Net cash from (used in) investing activities

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Notes to Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

Three Months Ended

January 31, 2009

I. Accounting Policies



Mel Evans/AP Photo

IN THIS Dec. 28, 2008 file photo, Dallas Cowboys wide receiver
Terrell Owens (81) stands on the sidelines at the end of an NFL
football game against Philadelphia Eagles in Philadelphia. The Cow-
boys officially released Owens on Thursday, March 5, 2009, ending
a three-year run that produced as many big headlines as big plays.

Share Capital &

Retained Earni
Récicves ained Earnings

436,297 207,035 643,332
4,346 4,346
(30,054) (30,054)

8,683 8.683

1,599 1,477 3,076

446,579 182,804 629,383

413,847 231,965 645,812
15,847 15,847

. (24,043) (24,043)
(22,403) - (22,403)

(497) 497 :
390,947 615,213

Unaudited
Three Months Ended

January 31,2009

Audited
Year Ended

January 31, 2008 October 31, 2008

60,479 65,359 263,605

(21,932) (34,791) (108,028)

38,547 30,568 155,377

1,879 5.502 16.017

40,426 25,066 171,594



16,492 16.034 64,340
087 4,686 23,350
24,579 20,720 87,690

120,216,204 120,216,204 120,216,205

13.2 3.6 69.8

Unaudited
Three Months Ended
January 31, 2009

Unaudited
Three Months Ended
January 31, 2008

(111,117) 89.318

149,697 248,117
5,869 (391.955)
44,449 (54.520)
98,763 206,145

143,212 151.625

These consolidated interim financial statements are prepared in accordance with IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting policies used in the preparation of
these consolidated interim financial statements are consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended October 31, 2008,

The consolidated interim financial statements include the accounts of the following wholly owned subsidiaries:

FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International (Bahamas) Nominees Company Limited
FirstCaribbean International Land Holdings (TCI) Limited

2. Comparatives

Where necessary, comparative figures have been adjusted to comply with changes in presentation in the current year.


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

SPORTS





ZH

POINT STANDINGS

C.R Walker Knights (CRW) 333.50
C.|. Gibson Rattlers (cv 247.50
C.V Bethel Stingrays( (ce 237.50
C.C Sweeting Cobras(CC 185
Doris Johnson Harn 600) J) 177.50
R.M Bailey Pacers(RM 146
G.H.S Magic(GHS 8
Anatol Rodgers(AR) 70

RESULTS

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS ie 100M
Etienne, Marva - CRW,

Seymour, Katrina — CIG, 12.09s
Colbrooke, Vashti - CIG, 12.50s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS ytd 400M
Seymour, Katrina - CIG, 57.19s
Adderley, Teshon — CVE , 57. Abs
Rolle, Lakeisha — RMB, 1:03.55s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS wi! 1500M
Cherilus, Angela — AR,

Lewis, Safara — CRW, 6:02. 20s
McIntosh, Crystal — RMB , 6:11.82

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS ee 100MH
Etienne, Marva - CRW, 16.17s

Sears, Hollina - CCS, 16.45s

Rolle, Tiffany — CIG, 17.70s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) 4X100M
RELAY

C.| Gibson — Rolle, Tiffany; Colebrooke,
Vashti; Jean Louis, Louisiana; Seymour,
Katrina, 51.48s

C.R Walker — Ettienne, Marva; Capron,





Seymour, Katrina — CIG, 5.07m
Martin, Sasha — G 2m
Rolle, Lakeisha — RMB, ‘433m

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) DISCUS
THROW

Williams, Racquel — CVB, 34.70m
Taylor, Jewel — CRW, 22.90m

Collie, Jasmine - GHS, 18.30m

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) JAVELIN
THROW

Prosper, Tawanna — CVB, 29.84m
Martin, Sasha — GHS, 28.61m

Rogers, Terranique - CCS, 25.22m

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) HIGH
JUMP

Sears, Hollina - CCS, 1.44m
Young, Lyndia — CRW, J1.44m
Lewis, Safara - CRW, 1.39m

INTERMEDIATE BOYS uty) 100M
Ferguson, O'Jay — CRW, 11.08s
Adderley, Tre - CVB, 11.20s

Finley, Toriano — AR, 11.23s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS uy 400M
Ferguson, O'Jay — CRW, 50.97s
Hanchell, Marlon — CVB, 53.28s
Davis, Patrick - CCS, 54.00s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS ae 1500M
Rolle, Percy — AR, 5:02.5

Wells, Denzil - ccs: 53 a8, 80s
Saunders, Carson — ccs. 5:12.22s

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 100MH



Adderley, Tre; Farrington, Anthony ,
AS Ode y g y

Anatol Rodgers — Moss, Owen; Evans,
Trevel; Finley, Toriano; Bodie, Eusias ,
S

C.l Gibson — Valcin, Avens; Forbes, Rod-

ney; Pratt, Kevin; Knowles, Demarcus ,
47.338

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) LONG
JUMP

Adderley, Patrizio — CIG, 6.08m
Miller, Kareem — RMB, 5.80m
Martin, Stelin- GHS, 5.74m

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) SHOT PUT
Rolle, Matthew - GHS, 10.64m

Mackey, Samuel — CRW, 9.89m
Darling, Samuel — AR, 9.77m

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 100M
Kemp, lvanique — CRW, 11.89s
Knowles, Antonya — CRW, 12.525
Kelly, Cache — RMB, 12.835

SENIOR GIRLS (u20) 400M
Miller, Shaunte - GHS, 1:01.74s
Knowles, Antonya -— CRW, 1:02.46s
Justilien, Sydline - RMB, 1:04.71s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 1500M
Dean, Glendina - CRW, 5:42.24s
Conliffe, Queenell - DDJ, 6:02.59s
Zonicle, Danielle — DDJ, 6:05.51s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 3000M
Conliffe, Queenell — DDJ, 13:02.64s
Dean, Glendina — CRW, 43:10.95s

La'Chea; ean Edricka; Whylly,

Lashawn, 52.38s

C V. Bethel - Gaitor, ee Higgs,
on; Flowers,

Gregria; Adderley, Tes
Tonea, 53.47s

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17) LONG
JUMP

Davis Cup team ready

FROM page 11

“We are away from home,
playing on a different turf, but
we will just go out there and play
our game,” he said. “I’m playing
first, so I just have to do my
thing.

“T think the night matches is
going to be fun. We’re going to
have a lot more people around.
This is my second or third night
match, so it should be a lot of
fun.”

Noted Mullings, playing in the
best-of-five sets should work in
his favour: “The longer the
match, the better for me. So I
just need to go out there and
work hard and make him play,
wait for the right balls to attack
and just be real gritty out there
and gut it out.

“Tjust have to be patient and
wait for the opportunity to
attack.”

As for playing in the evening,
Mullings said it was best for him
because “it’s much cooler.”

On Saturday, the official
opening ceremonies will take
place at 5 pm. That will be fol-

Knights out front after Day One

FROM page 11

ishes in the Intermediate girls
from Marva Etienne.

The 15-year-old Etienne took
first place in the 100mH in
16.17s and again in the 100m in
12.07s.

Ivanique Kemp led the
Knights in the Senior Girls divi-
sion with a trio of first place fin-
ishes.

Kemp took the 100m with a
wind aided time of 11.89s, fin-
ished first in the 100mH in
14.72s and anchored her 400m
relay team to a first place finish
in 51.28s.

Not to be outdone in the
field, Elcardo Carey broke the
second record of the day for the
Knights in the Senior Boys’ shot
put.

Carey’s toss of 14.08m passed
the previous mark set last year
by Elvardo Carey of 13.70m.

Day one saw a myriad of oth-



Ferguson, Donshannon — CVB, 15.02s
Adderley, ‘Tre - CVB, 15.41s

Walkine, Marco — DDJ, 15.62s
INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17) 4X00M
RELAY

C.V Bethel — Lockhart, David; Sands, Neil;

lowed by the doubles with Bjorn
Munroe and Marvin Rolle
scheduled to play.

Both players are just as
enthused as the singles players.

Rolle, who teamed up last
year with Mark Knowles to win
the Bahamas’ only match in their
4-1 loss to Paraguay at the
National Tennis Center, said he
and Munroe had been working
out very well together.

“BJ is an experienced doubles
player. He won a Futures and
he’s done well at the pro level,”
Rolle pointed out. “So if we play
our game, we should do very
well.”

For Rolle, it really doesn’t
matter playing in the night
because they’ve done it before.

“We practised under the lights
and all of these guys played in
the night before,” he said. “So it
shouldn’t be nothing new
because we are all comfortable
playing under the lights.”

The tie is going to be an emo-
tional one for Munroe, whose
family buried his brother,
Lavaughn Munroe, a former
Davis Cup team member, the

er performances from athletes
looking to give their school the
effort needed to surpass the
Knights’ advantage, most
notably, the Rattlers’ Katrina
Seymour.

Seymour won three of her
four events and smashed a 19-
year-old mark in the Interme-
diate Girls’ 400m.

Seymour’s time of 57.19s eas-
ily bested the previous mark of
58.77s by Carmetta Mackey in
1990.

Seymour also took first place
in the long jump with a leap of
5.07m, anchored her team to a
first place finish in the 400m
relay in 52.38s and narrowly
missed the 100m title with a sec-
ond place finish to Etienne in
12.09s.

C.V Bethel’s Tamika Brown
also set a new record in the
Senior Girls’ triple jump.

Brown leapt 11.76m beating
the old mark of 11.73m set by

MARVA ETTIENNE soars on her first attempt of the Intermediate Girls’ Long
Jump. Etienne failed to place in the event but took first place in the 100m
and 100mH.

Kelly, Cache - RMB, 17.358
Lutus, Oguilene —
CVB, 18.09s

Zonicle, Danielle — DDJ, 14:11.71s

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 100MH
Kemp, lvanique — CRW, 14.72s



aS
a

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) 4X100M RELAY
C.R Walker — Kemp, lvanique; Knowles,
Antonya; Adderley, Mitchalyn; Saunders,
Cleshae, 51.288

R.M Bailey — Kelly, Cache; Johnson

ee Kay; an Vithlene: Justilien, Syd-
iene

C.1 Gibson - Brow Kenicka; Dames,

Avianna; Stubbs, Jarona; Brown, Vanessa,

Ads
SENIOR GIRLS (20) TRIPLE JUMP
Bain, Tamika — CVB, 11.76m

Zonicle, Danielle — DDu, 10.99m
Brown, Vanessa — CIG, 10.97m

SENIOR GIRLS (U20) HIGH JUMP
Crooks, Tanya — CIG, 1.50m
Brown, Jakia - DDJ, 1.35m

Ewing, Gardia —- RMB, J1.35m
Brown, Kenicka — CIG, J1.35m
Kelly, Cache — RMB, J1.35m

SENIOR GIRLS mat) DISCUS THROW
Thurston, Keisha - CCS, 27.95m

Belle, Jenesta - CVB, 26.74m
Johnson, Shantia - CRW, 25.80m

SENIOR GIRLS Tr JAVELIN THROW
Brown, Jakia - DDJ, 30.17m

Gordon, Giavanna -— CCS, 27.45m
Zonicle, Danielle - DDJ, 27.20m

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 100M
Mackey, Trevor — DDJ, 10.59s
Richardson, Charles - CRW, 10.76s
Hinsey, Ulysses — CVB, 10.99s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 400M
Deveaux, Delano — DDu, 49.54s
Williams, Ramon — CIG, 51.03s
Thompson, Ishmael - CCS, 53.53s

TRIBUNE SPORTS

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 1500M
Altidor, Kevin - CCS, 4:29.03s
Burrows, Crashad — DDu, 4:38.76s
Pierre, Sedel — CVB, 4:39.03s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 5000M
Seveus, Vicnel — CIG, 19:52.97s
Louis, Jefferson - CRW, 20:20.59s
Burrows, Crashad — DDu, 20:29.85s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 110MH
Thompson, Roneko - CRW, 16.46s
Cash, Cody — CIG, 16.86s
Lightbourne, Dellano — CRW, 16.96s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) 4X100M RELAY
C.V Bethel — McKinney, Austin; Fowler,
Kendal; Hinsey, Ulysses; Johnson
Demitrius , 43.76s

C.R Walker — Richardson, Charles;
Stubbs, Javano; Moss, Omar; Collie,
Dominic, 44.15s

Doris Johnson — Williams, Tyreco; Clarke,
Michsel; Deveaux, Delano; Mackey,
Trevor, 44.17s

SENIOR BOYS (U20) TRIPLE JUMP
Clark, Clinton - CVB, 14.20m
Babbs, Tehneil - CRW, 13.79m
King, Ramano — CIG, 13.53m

SENIOR BOYS (U20) HIGH JUMP
Rolle, Rendol - DDJ, 1.80m

King, Ramano — CIG, J1.80m
Stubbs, Ashton - CRW, 1.75m
Bromwell, Brandon — CVB, 1.75m

SENIOR BOYS (U20) SHOT PUT
Carey, Elcardo — CRW, 14.08m
Johnson, Rio — CVB, 11.71m
Strachan, Shawn — RMB, 11.66m

HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN RIA SUZURI

weekend before they left for
Paraguay.

Munroe said all of the play-
ers had made a commitment to
play in his memory, so he had a
little more incentive to go out
and play in the doubles.

“T feel pretty confident. Del-
gado is pretty tough in doubles,
but he’s playing with a junior
who is less experienced, so hope-
fully we can get to the junior a
little bit more,” Munroe said.

“Me and Marvin have been
playing well in practice. We have
been gelling, so we feel pretty
good about the whole tie. Even
the guys playing in the singles.
So it’s a pivotal match and we
feel comfortable about it.”

Like everybody, Munroe said
it didn’t matter playing in the
night, but they preferred that
than to play in the extreme heat
in the day.

“It shouldn’t really matter
because we’ve practised here in
the night under the lights,” he
said. “We just have to be ready
to play and I think all of the guys
are confident that we will do
very well.”




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sports

NLT |
FREEDOM FARM SCHEDULE

¢ Here’s a look at the schedule of games this
weekend in the Freedom Farm Baseball League
in Yamacraw:

TEE BALL

11 am Raptors vs Sidewinders

1 pm Blue Claws vs Sand Gnats

3 pm Knights vs Grasshoppers
COACH PITCH

10 am Angels vs Cubs

12:30 pm Diamondbacks vs Astros
3 pm Athletics vs Blue Jays
MINOR LEAGUE

10 am Red Sox vs vs Rockies
12:30 pm Royals vs Mets

MAJOR LEAGUE

12:30 pm Reds vs Marlins

3 pm Indians vs Mariners

JUNIOR LEAGUE

10 am Dodgers vs Cardinals

12:30 pm Yankees vs Twins
SENIOR LEAGUE

Saturday

3 pm Pirates vs Phillies

Sunday

3 pm Tigers vs Rangers

BASEBALL

¢ Here’s a look at the schedule of games this
weekend at the Junior Baseball League of Nas-
sau at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams.
T BALL:

Friday

6 pm Jujus vs Dillies

Saturday

9 am Coco Plums vs Seagrapes
10:15 am Guineps vs Dillies
COACH PITCH:

Friday

7:30 pm Bees vs Green Turtles
Saturday

11:30 am Mosquitoes vs Wasps

1 pm Bees vs Boas

3 pm Sandflies vs Green turtles
Sunday

3 pm Boas vs Wasps

9-10:

Friday

6 pm Barracudas vs Dolphins
7:30 pm Red Snappers vs Turbots
Saturday

Noon Eels vs Octopus

Sunday

4:30 pm Barracudas vs Eels
11-12:

Saturday

10 am vs Wild Dogs (11-0) vs Conchs (10-3)
1:30 pm White Crowns vs Marlins
3:30 Parrots vs Conchs

Sunday

4:30 pm Wild Dogs vs Marlins
13-15:

Saturday

9 am Silverjacks vs Sharks

11 am Stingrays vs Raccoons

1 pm Potcakes vs Sharks

3 pm Raccoons vs Silverjacks
16-18:

Sunday

2:30 pm Lucayans vs Tainos

4 pm Arawaks vs Caribs

¢ THE New Providence Basketball Association
will complete its regular season tonight at the CI
Gibson Gymnasium with just one game on tap.
The Cola-Cola Explorers will take on the John-
son’s Jumping Jumpers.

Then on Moday night, the first round of the
postseason will get underway.

BASKETBALL

¢ THE schedule of game for the Baptist Sports
Council’s 2009 Joyce Minus

Basketball Classic on Saturday at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex are as follows:

COURT ONE

10 am Macedonia vs Golden Gates (15)

11 am First Baptist vs Zion South Beach (15)
Noon Golden Gates vs Miracle Working (19)
1 pm Mercy Seat vs Macedonia (19)

2 pm BIBA vs City of Praise (M)

3 pm Ebenezer vs Temple Fellowship (M)
COURT TWO

10 am Miracle Working vs Latter-Day (15)

11 am Faith United vs Temple Fellowship (15)
Noon Faith United vs Mircale Working (19)

1 pm Golden Gates vs Temple Fellowship (19)
2 pm Christian Tabernacle vs Church of the
Nazarene (M)

3 pm New Bethlehem vs Evangelistic Center (M)

PAGE



F

FRIDAY, MARCH 6,







BASKETBALL |
NPBA POSTSEASON

11



ts

2009

C.V. Bethel’s Donshannon Braynen clears a hurdle on his way to winning the Intermediate Boys’ 100m Hur-

dles in 15.02s.





Davis Cup team ready

: ll By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE first round of the American Zone

? Two Davis Cup tie will feature Timothy
: Neilly and Devin Mullings in the first
i two singles matches today at the Yacht y
? Golf Club in Paraguay, Lambare.

But instead of playing during the day,

i the best-of-five matches will be contest-
i ed in the evening to avoid the intense
? heat in Paraguay.

Speaking from their hotel, which is in

? walking distance to the tennis complex,
? team captain John Farrington said it was
? extremely hot in Paraguay, but they had
i acouple days to practise and everybody
? was upbeat for the start of competition.

“They’re well prepared and ready to

: go,” he said. “We’re all ready, very pos-
i itive and upbeat. We’re looking forward

to playing tomorrow (today). Everybody
is in good spirits.

“Everything is fine. The people are
treating us very well. We are enjoying
it.”

Neilly, the number two seeded player
on the team, will be matched against
Paraguay’s top seed Ramon Delgado in
the first match at 4 pm.

The second singles will follow with top
seed Devin Mullings taking on
Paraguay’s No.2 seed Nicolas Salama.

“Tt’s a little hotter than we had antici-
pated, but we will be fine,” Farrington
said. “TI think it will be beneficial to all of
us playing in the evening rather than in
the heat.”

Neilly said they had a good week of
practice and now he was ready to play,
especially with the matches being in the
evening.

SEE page 10



COWBOYS
CUT T.O.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

C.R. Walker's O.J Ferguson powers down the home stretch in his record-breaking performance in the Intermediate Boys’ 400m Finals. Ferguson set a new GSSSA
i mark of 50.97s.

Four new
GSSSA records

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

IN WHAT has become commonplace in the Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools Sports Association annu-
al meet, one perennial powerhouse heads the leader-
board by a comfortable margin after the first day of
competition.

The C.R Walker Knights grabbed a firm hold of
the top spot with 333.50 points, a substantial 86 point
advantage over their nearest competitors.

The C.I Gibson Rattlers are in second with 247.50
points, a slim 10 point margin over the third placed
C.V Bethel Stingrays with 237.50 points.

The C.C Sweeting Cobras, 185 points and Doris
Johnson Mystic Marlins, 177.50 points, round out
the top five.

The Knights dominated the sprints in several divi-
sions including one record breaking performance.

O’Jay Ferguson broke a 16-year-old record in the
Intermediate Boys’ 400m with a blistering time of
50.97 seconds.

The previous mark of 51.02s was set by Mark Stur-
rup in 1993.

Ferguson finished nearly three seconds ahead of
the remainder of the field, with C.V Bethel’s Marlon
Hanchell placing second in 53.28s.

Ferguson returned a short time later to take first
place in the 100m, with a wind aided time of 11.06s.

The Knights received another pair of first place fin-

SEE page 10

Striking Red Pillbox hat, with tulle facial veil and large
tulle bow at the back of the hat.
Suits Church, Weddings and Teas



GIVE _IN

TO TEMPTATION


PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Minister moves to quell
fears over off-shore
financial service sector

FROM page one

does not make sense.

"There is some degree of
hysteria being sown about
moves to counter 'tax haven
abuse’ in the US and opening
gambits being made by the

Europeans in their efforts to
shut down off-shore financial
service centres (OFC)," Min-
ister Bethel said during his
contribution the mid-year bud-
get debate yesterday. "Much
of this hysteria fails to recog-
nise that the shapers of policy

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in these countries also recog-
nise that they cannot provoke
a capital flight from the
already ailing economies."

He reasoned that the major-
ity of money funneled through
OFCs are "immediately re-
invested" in US and other for-
eign stock and currency mar-
kets for an investment return.
If tax regulators institute an
arbitrary crackdown on OFCs,
this would in turn cause pri-
vate investors to withdraw
their investments from OFC-
based trading brokerage
accounts and transfer them
into safety deposit boxes,
according to Mr Bethel.

"Such a flight of capital
would provoke an even
greater economic crisis,” he
said. "This is well known to
financial analysts. So, while
there indeed will be chal-
lenges, the notion that is creep-
ing in that reforms will be
abrupt and arbitrary and uni-
lateral does not persuade me.
It will not make sense in an
already volatile and fragile
international financial system.

In spite on any impending
clampdowns, Mr Bethel said
the country's off-shore sector
will emerge from the turbu-
lence.

"It is obvious that there will
be additional pressures
brought to bear, but we have
weathered such storms before
and the Bahamas, as an estab-
lished OFC, has shown the
strength and the resilience to
adapt, reform and to weather
such storms," said Mr Bethel.

On Wednesday, Mr Geith-
ner told the Senate Finance
Committee in Washington,
DC, that the American gov-
ernment will build an "ambi-
tious” plan to crack down on
companies that use offshore
centres to avoid paying taxes.

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Timothy Geithner (AP)

closing tax loopholes are of
vital importance — under-
scored by the US' collapsing
economy and government
record budget deficit, Mr Gei-
thner said.

"We’re going to have a
much more ambitious effort
to deal with offshore tax
havens,” he told the panel. He
made similar remarks the day
before at the US House Ways
and Means Committee.

However, Mr Bethel argued,
a careful study of statements
made by Mr Geithner shows
he put the legislative attempts
of the US Senators in the con-
text of a broader international,
not a unilateral effort to com-
bat tax evasion — not tax
avoidance.

Ata joint session of the US
Congress on Wednesday,
British Prime Minister Gor-
don Brown urged world lead-
ers to “outlaw shadow banking
systems and offshore tax
havens."

On Monday, U.S. Senator
Carl Levin introduced the
"Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act",
an expanded version of previ-
ous legislation Mr Levin co-
sponsored in 2007 with then
Senator Barack Obama.

ps a Tok. (242) 393.4002 aos

Detainees ‘have
seen improvements’
at Detention Centre
‘since going to media

FROM page one

} Carmichael Road detainee said that, after initial com-
? plaints that food provisions were insufficient, pasta was
? served with the detainee’s usual cheese sandwich for lunch
: on Wednesday.

And that night, a more substantial “spaghetti dinner”

was served, in contrast to the regular offering.

A statement released last week by the Department of

: Immigration in response to claims of substandard condi-
? tions and abuse by guards maintained detainees are fed

“three times daily” and the “quantity of meals is always

adequate.”

Other changes witnessed by detainees include the

: arrival of a team yesterday morning to do some paint
? work and “clean up” the site.

Detainees had claimed there were only two function-

ing toilets for use by hundreds of people, and said that
: many housed at the facility urinated/excreted on the
? grounds, creating an unsanitary environment.

It was not clear yesterday whether it was this that was

being cleaned up.

A message left for Mr Thompson yesterday secking

? more information on the Department’s efforts in this

: regard and on the findings of Monday’s tour, as well as a
? second visit allegedly undertaken by Mr Thompson to

: the centre yesterday morning, was not returned up to

? press time despite assurances from Mr Thompson that it
: would be.

However, in his mid-year budget contribution to par-

liament on Wednesday evening, Minister of State for
i Immigration, Branville McCartney referred to certain
: upgrades that would be carried out at the facility.

“Let me be the first to say that the Detention Centre is

: not all we want it to be. This problem has been further
? escalated following the recent fire to one of its dormito-
? ry blocks. The Department will execute a few small jobs
: in the area of painting and minor repairs to ensure the
: best comfort of all detainees,

” he said.
Mr McCartney said priority would be placed on paint-

: ing, landscaping, improving the playground and laun-
: dry/wash area, library and security. He did not link these
: efforts to claims made by the detainees.

A detainee yesterday told The Tribune that those

housed at the facility are pleased to see some improve-
} ments being made.

However, he added that they are still going without

items such as towels, sheets or blankets.

Meanwhile, Dr Allen confirmed that his report to the

Immigration Department on his trip to the centre was
: sent to the department yesterday afternoon.

He said he did not wish to reveal the content of that

report before it had been seen by Immigration officials.

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Insurer
inherited
‘wrongly

priced’
policies

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamas-based health
insurer yesterday blamed
“inappropriate pricing” by
British American Financial
for the major premium hikes
experienced by individual
policyholders it had inherit-
ed from the latter, and said
the only alternatives to
increasing rates were cither
to cancel coverage or sell the
policies to a new buyer.

Tina Cambridge, Generali
Worldwide’s regional direc-
tor for the Bahamas,
responding to Tribune Busi-
ness’s article yesterday that
reflected the concerns of the
company’s individual health
insurance policyholders over
the new premiums, which in
the case of elderly clients
had doubled, a 100 per cent
increase, said the new rates
had brought premiums in
line with each customer’s
perceived risk and likely lev-
el of claims.

In a written response to
several Tribune Business
questions, Ms Cambridge
said Generali’s Bahamian
operation had only turned its
attention to the individual
health policies it had
acquired from British Amer-
ican Financial once it had
dealt with the larger group
health portfolio.

Portfolio

Effectively confirming the
details in Tribune Business’s
article yesterday, Ms Cam-
bridge said of the individual
health portfolio: “Our
assessment revealed that the
block of individual policies
which we inherited had been
inappropriately priced.

The premiums were too
low for the level of benefits
offered, and they were also
too low given the ages of
many of the individuals
enrolled in that portfolio.”

This confirms what Tri-
bune Business had been told
yesterday, namely that
British American Financial’s
premium rates were too low,
and did not match the risk
attached to each policyhold-
er and their likely level of
claims. As a result, its health
portfolio had been highly
unprofitable, the main rea-
son it sought an exit and sold
that book of business to
Generali Worldwide.

Unwilling to suffer the same
experience, Generali has
embarked on a major premi-
um re-pricing that caught
many of its individual policy-

SEE page 6B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE

ISMNC



FRIDAY,



McAGR (CoH 0:



2009



| SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



‘Plan B’ switch on _ Ritz-Carlton

Airport financing

WH Airport Authority and NAD drop plans for Fitch credit
rating due to unreasonable terms agency was asking for
MW Hoping to seal finance package next week after Citibank

meets with borrowers

Mj Open to increasing interest rate of return to investors, and

possibly dropping $80m tranche

lj Less than initial $310m being sought, with plans to fund

seamless transition to second phase
construction dropped

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Obtaining an internationally-
recognised credit rating for the
first phase financing of Lynden
Pindling International Airport’s
(LPIA) redevelopment has
been abandoned, Tribune Busi-
ness was told last night, with the
Airport Authority now seeking
less than the initial $310 million
and prepared to offer higher
interest rates to keep investors
in the deal.

Frank Watson, the Authori-
ty’s chairman, said the idea of
obtaining a credit rating - an

indication of the Authority’s
and it subsidiary, the Nassau
Airport Development Compa-
ny’s (NAD), ability to repay the
borrowing - for the LPIA
financing had been “taken off
the table” for the time being
due to the onerous require-
ments Fitch had been seeking
to impose on the deal.

The Authority chairman said
the deadline for closing the air-
port redevelopment financing
had been extended again, from
February 27, 2009, as a result,

SEE page 2B

40% higher build costs
hit Family Island hotels

Owner laments shipping costs, and automatic
15% gratuity that has ‘destroyed’ service

@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

Small Family island hote-
liers feel the government is
“neglecting” them, as they try
to build and maintain proper-
ties with construction costs 40
per cent more than those on
New Providence, it was
revealed yesterday. And they
were expected to do this with

The road to
improved
transport

lm By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

UNIFICATION of the
public transportation sector,
and the rerouting of roads,
are key to alleviating traffic
congestion on New Provi-
dence, industry representa-
tives said yesterday, while
the role of government is
still a bone of contention.

Dr Ian Strachan, a College
of the Bahamas Professor
and member of the local
think-tank, the 1962 Society,
said the public transporta-
tion system needed to be
scrutinised, but the Govern-
ment seems not to want to
fix the problem.

“The political directorate
does not want to solve the
traffic problems in the capi-
tal, and I can safely say that
we know how to,” Dr Stra-
chan said.

He said a report, called the
Dylan report, was drafted
over a decade ago, outlining
the major causes of traffic
congestion. It explained the
rerouting and public transit
systems that were necessary,
and what road corridors
should be made one-way in
order to alleviate traffic con-
gestion.

“There is no need to think
about what we ought to do
because the work has
already been done,” said Dr

SEE page 2B

little or no investment incen-
tives. Elliot Greene, owner of
the Mangrove Cay Inn,
speaking at the National Eco-
nomic Summit, said shipping
costs have driven building
materials and other prices on
the Family Islands through the
roof, hurting domestic tourism
that the Ministry of Tourism

SEE page 4B

for a better life

call us today at 396-1300

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA |



healthcare

developer is sued
over ‘$200k bill’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The development company behind the $1 billion Ritz-
Carlton Rose Island project is being sued, along with its

main shareholder and principal, by a Florida-based archi-
tect firm that is alleging they have failed to meet their

contractual obligations to pay it more than $200,000 for
work rendered.

The lawsuit, filed in the US District Court for the south-

ern district of Florida on February 20, 2009, by Palm
Beach-based Garcia Stromberg, a professional architects

firm, named among the defendants the Ritz-Carlton Rose
Island Hotel Company; the company’s developer and main
shareholder, Miami-based Gencom Group; Gencom’s prin-
cipal, Karim Alibhai; and another shareholder in the

ae

aa
Frank Watson



Bahamian project, Marriott International.

Garcia Stromberg alleged that it had signed three con-
tracts to provide architecture consulting and design services
to the Ritz-Carlton Rose Island project. These contracts,
which it claimed had been signed on September 28, 2007,
June 26, 2008, and June 18, 2008, were, respectively, for the
provision of services relating to the project itself; the design
of the Departure Facility at the Nassau Harbour Club;
and for the Ritz-Carlton Resort, Hotel and Suites on Rose
Island itself.

“The project giving rise to this cause of action is known
as the Ritz-Carlton Resort, Hotel and Suites, located on
Rose Island, the Bahamas,” the lawsuit alleged.

“On or about September 28, 2007, a contract was entered
into between the plaintiff, Garcia Stromberg, and the

SEE page 4B

BEG chairmen clash over cut in tariff rates

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s (BEC)
chairman has criticised as “ill-conceived” a deci-
sion by his predecessor to cut company’s basic tar-
iff rate in 2003, arguing that it contributed to net
losses that peaked at $21 million in its 2008 finan-
cial year.

Fred Gottlieb, responding to former BEC exec-
utive chairman Al Jarrett, who in a Tribune Busi-
ness article on Monday accused the current
administration and Board of seeking to
“demonise” him despite “piggybacking” on the
ideas/plans he left in place, said he was “unaware
of any specific and/or significant ideas/plans left in
place by Mr Jarrett (as he claims), which the pre-
sent Board consciously decided to continue or
to implement”.

Denying that BEC’s Board had any intention of

“demonising” Mr Jarrett, the current incumbent
of the chairman’s seat acknowledged that while
the Corporation did generate $14.1 million in net
income for the financial year to September 30,
2004, this was due to “a number of ‘one off? fac-
tors that took place during the financial year”.

These included, said Mr Gottlieb, bad debt
recoveries, increased payments by the Govern-
ment, increased customer demand and reduced
maintenance costs resulting from the installation
of what were then, new gas turbines.

These boosts to BEC’s financial performance
were never repeated, Mr Gottlieb said. And while
the Corporation generated a $15.3 million net
profit in its 2005 financial year (Mr Jarrett left his
post in early 2005, almost half-way through the
period), the current chairman said this was large-
ly due to another ‘one-off’ event - the $14 million

SEE page 5B

FAMILY GUARDIAN

DN La INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

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NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

MAYBOLE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000 No. 45
of 2000, the Dissolution of MAYBOLE LIMITED has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date

of completion of the dissolution was the 25th day of February,
2009.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
SUPREME COURT No. CLE/Qui/ 01715

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT tract of

land containing by admeasurement 3.50 Acres
situate Southwestwards of “Airdale Subdivision”
and North of “Joan’s Heights” in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Davco Limited whose
Registered Office is in the City of Nassau, New
Providence, Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court
to have its Title to the following land investigated
under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in
a Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

ALL THAT tract of land containing 3.50 Acres situate
approximately 335 Feet Southwestwards of the
Northern portion of “Airdale Subdivision” and North
of “Joan’s Heights Subdivision” in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence aforesaid bounded
NORTHEASTWARDLY by land formerly the property
of Alfred Patterson but now the property of O’Brien
Loans Co. and running thereon Seven hundred and
Twelve and Eighty-nine One-hundredths (712.89) Feet
SOUTHEASTWARDLY by a Ten (10) Feet wide Road
Reservation leading to “Airdale Subdivision” aforesaid
and running thereon Two hundred and Fifteen and
Fifty One-hundredths (215.50) Feet
SOUTHWESTWARDLY by the said Ten (10) Feet
wide Road Reservation and running thereon Six
hundred and Eighty-five and Seventy-eight One-
hundredths (685.78) Feet and
NORTHWESTWARDLY by the Cornelius Forbes
Subdivision and running thereon Two hundred (200.00)
Feet which said tract has such position shape marks
boudaries and dimensions as are shown on the diagram
or plan filed herein and thereon edged in “PINK”.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau; or

(2) The Chamers of James M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed
forms, verified by an Affidavit and other related
requirements to be filed therewith by the 16th day of
April A.D., 2009. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a Statement of its, his or her Claim together
with the other related requirement by the 16th day of
April A.D., 2009, will operate as a bar to such claim.

JAMES M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER



PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

‘Plan B’ switch on
Airport financing

The road to
improved

transport
FROM page 1B

Strachan.

He said the $141 million
that the Government has
allocated for road develop-
ment and repair will not help
with the traffic situation on
New Providence. “What we
are borrowing money to do
now is not to fix the traffic
congestion,” he said.

“Experts will confirm that
we just don’t have the space
to build the kind of roads
needed to alleviate traffic
through that means.”

Dr Strachan, speaking at
the National Economic Sum-
mit, said the Government
was currently drafting a plan
for the unification of the
public jitney system.

“There are people under
the employ of this govern-
ment and the employ of the
Bahamian people who know
what is to be done,” he said.

FROM page 1B

but both it and NAD were hop-
ing to close the protracted fund-
raising next week once their
financial advisers, Citibank, had
spoken to the likely investors.

If Citibank was able to keep
them all on board, Mr Watson
said there would be no change
in the terms of the financing.
The financing is currently struc-
tured into three tranches - a
$140 million bank credit facility;
a $90 million senior secured
bond facility; and an $80 mil-
lion participating debt facility.

Those were the initial sums
sought. However, Mr Watson
confirmed that the deal had
been restructured so that the
first phase financing was now
seeking less than the original
$310 million.

He also confirmed to Tribune
Business that the Airport

Authority and NAD were pre-













































NOTICE OF SALE

Expocredit Corporation (‘the Company”) invites
offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Maris Subdivision”,
comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
South of Burnt Ground in the [sland of Long Island
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.

The Company makes no representations or warranties
with respect to the state of the Property which is
offered for sale “as is where 1s”.

The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing
& Law of Property Act.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase
price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
reserves the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers
addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
Partner, P- O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 30°
day of March, 2009.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMERCIAL DIVISION

2009
COM/com/00019

IN THE MATTER OF CLICO (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
(In Liquidation)

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Petition of the
Winding-up of the above-named Company having its
registered office at Serville & Company, No. 13 East Ave.
Centerville in the City of Nassau, was on the 24th February,
2009 presented to the Court by the Registrar of Insurance
Companies, a statutory regulator, pursuant to Section 41
of the Insurance Act, Chapter 347 Statute Law of The
Bahamas 2000 Revised Edition.

AND that the Petition is directed to be heard (in open
Court) before Justice Cheryl Albury, a Justice of the Supreme
Court, in the City of Nassau on Wednesday, 18th March,
2009 at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon at the Supreme Court
Annex, 3rd Floor, British American Bank Building,
Marlborough St., and any Creditor or contributory of the
said Company desirous to support or oppose the making
of an Order on the said Petition may appear at the time of
the hearing in person or by his Counsel for that purpose;
and a copy of the Petition will be furnished by the
undersigned to any Creditor or Contributory of the Company

pared to raise the interest rates
(the actual rate of return)
investors would receive if that
was what was necessary to keep
the financing on track.

This newspaper has been told
that the Airport Authority and
NAD are prepared to increase
the 8 per cent coupon initially
attached to the 23-year, $90 mil-
lion fixed-rate bond tranche to
either 8.5 per cent or 9 per cent,
in a bid to make the financing
more attractive in the absence
of the Fitch rating.

Mr Watson could not confirm
those rates, but said the Airport
Authority and NAD were also
prepared to waive/drop the $80
million participating debt facil-
ity if that was necessary to keep
the financing on track.

“We hope we will settle it
some time next week,” Mr Wat-
son said of the airport financing.
“Fitch have placed some
requirements upon us. It just
seems that they’re not prepared
to approve it [the credit rat-
ing].”

The Airport Authority chair-
man said it would be “a ridicu-
lous situation” if it and NAD
had given into Fitch’s demands.
He explained that the problem
was not with the airport financ-
ing itself, which is sound and
backed by the passenger user
facility fee revenue streams,
plus LPIA’s physical assets, but
Fitch’s skittishness regarding
securitisation deals such as this
in general.

The rating agency and its
counterparts have been heavily
criticised for failing to spot the
emerging credit crisis, and over-
rating mortgage backed securi-
ties issues. “They don’t want to
do anything that might come
back to haunt them in a sub-
stantial way,” Mr Watson said. “
We just got caught in the cross-
hairs of the global economy. We
got the impression they [Fitch]
were saying they don’t want to
do it at all.

“What our advisers said is
that the requirements they were
seeking were such that if we did
that, we would not need to bor-
row money.”

Describing the credit rating
as “off the table for the first
phase”, Mr Watson said:
“We’ve moved away from that,
and Citibank is going back to
the lenders. Hopefully, we’ll be
able to settle the matter soon.
The plan is sound, and unless



THE TRIBUNE

the bottom drops out of the
tourism economy, we’ll be all
right.”

He added that the Airport
Authority and NAD had
reduced the $310 million they
were seeking after dropping
plans to, in the first financing
round, also raise some funds to
enable the second phase con-
struction to start immediately
the first phase was finished.

“For the time being, we’re
going to fund the first phase,”
Mr Watson said. “Included in
the borrowing we were doing
for the first phase would have
been some funds to start the
second phase, while we were
negotiating the remaining
financing. We had to drop that
because of the requirements
Fitch was asking for.”

With the Airport Authority
and NAD having moved to
“Plan B”, Mr Watson said: “I
know our group is prepared to
look at [increasing] interest
rates, if that will make it more
attractive for the lenders.

“Tf Citibank is able to keep
all the investors in, it will be the
same package we'll take. If the
bank is not able to do so, we
will look at not financing that
$80 million and move on. We’ve
determined we’re going to build
it. It’s a decision that’s firm in
the Board and government’s
mind.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

THE PILOT CLUB OF NASSAU

presents

A Grand Movie Premier: |

“ALL ABOUT STEWE™

Staring Sandra Bell ick

Postponed to a date
to be announced.

Proceeds in aid of the construction of a
pool for Person with Disabilities

aL

Well-established Wholesaler

saleperson (females

requires a
are encouraged to

requiring such copy on payment of the prescribed charge

for the same.

Chambers
Office of the Attorney General
3rd - 7th Floors,
Post Office Building
P.O. Box N-3007
East Hill St.
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorney for the Petitioner

NOTE: Any person who intends to appear on the hearing

apply) for the snack food division. Individual
must have experience in sales with emphasis
on large food stores. Only individuals with a
proven record of being able to work
unsupervised and achieve results will be
considered. Must be able to drive standard
shift vehicle and be in possession of current
valid driver’s license. Individuals with their
own transportation will receive favorable

consideration. Company offers good benefits.

of the said Petition must serve or send by post to the
abovenamed, notice in writing of his intention to do so.
The notice must state the name and address of the person,
or, if a firm, the name and address of the firm and must be
signed by the person or firm of his or their attorney (if any)
and must be signed or if posted, must be sent by post in
sufficient time to reach the above named not later than 4:00
o’clock in the afternoon of the 17th day of March, 2008.

Submit applications to:
SECs
P.O.Box N-7124

Nassau, Bahamas
eee |


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 3B





$2.3m in unpaid work permit fees uncovered

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

More than $2.3 million in
unpaid work permit fees was
uncovered after the Department
of Immigration’s debt collection
unit audited some 400 companies
in Nassau and Freeport, the min-
ister of state for immigration has
disclosed.

Making his contribution to the
mid-year Budget debate,
Branville McCartney said 70 New
Providence-based companies had
been audited by the Departmen-
t’s new unit and found to owe the
Government a _ collective
$834,718.74 in unpaid work per-
mit fees.

Adding that a further 24 Nas-
sau-based companies had been
identified for the audit exercise,
Mr McCartney said a similar
exercise in Grand Bahama had
exposed $1.5 million in outstand-
ing permit fees. Some 330 files
had been audited on that island.

The minister of state warned
that companies who owed the
Department of Immigration mon-
ey would not be granted any new
work permits for expatriate staff
until the outstanding fees were
paid, or a payment plan worked
out.

Explaining how the work per-
mit fee arrears had been allowed
to accrue, Mr McCartney said: “Tt
is apparent that once persons
[companies] have been issued
approval letters, they have taken
those letters to mean ‘go ahead
and engage workers’. This is
done despite the fact that the let-
ter states that payment must be

* Immigration audit exposes 400 companies in Nassau and Freeport as
owing fees, with 24 more to be investigated
* Department 50.7% ahead of revenue targets for Budget year 2008-2009



Branville McCartney

made within 30 days or the offer
will be withdrawn.

“Large companies, particularly
hotel companies, and persons
requesting short-term work per-
mits, tend to put persons to work
before payment.”

Mr McCartney attributed the
fact that the Department of
Immigration had exceeded, by
50.7 per cent, projected revenue
collection for the fiscal 2008-2009
first half to the compliance

efforts. Another factor, he added,
was the increase in work permit
fees that took place on July 1,
2008, the start of the current Bud-
get year.

Revenue

For the period July 1, 2008, to
December 31, 2008, the Depart-
ment of Immigration had collect-
ed $29,248 million in revenue, Mr
McCartney told the House of
Assembly, compared to a pro-
jected $19.406 million.

And from the Budget year start
on July 1 to March 2, 2009, the
Department of Immigration had
collected $32.827 million in vari-
ous permit fees. This was less than
$6 million below the full-year
revenue target of $238.651 mil-
lion, and there are still almost
four months of the 2008-2009 fis-
cal year to run.

Mr McCartney added that ille-
gal immigration into the Bahamas
was at least partly fuelled by the
demand for cheap, migrant labour
among some Bahamian employ-
ers.

He said: “Most migrants arrive
intending to work, with the
knowledge that previous

FirstCaribbean in
$11.6 profit rise

FirstCaribbean yesterday
said its 2009 first quarter
results showed an $11.6 mil-
lion improvement in prof-
itability compared to a simi-
lar period last year, with
total assets in excess of $4
billion.

The bank added that its
Tier 1 capital ratio was 15.8
per cent, substantially in
excess of the Central Bank’s
minimum requirement of 8
per cent.

FirstCaribbean said it was
a member of the CIBC
Canada Group, and that it
was a financially and opera-
tionally strong institution. It
was responding to unsub-
stantiated rumours about its
financial health that had
prompted some customers to
withdraw deposits

PRIME OFFICE
SPACE

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second floor

space will be available April,

2009 in newly

constructed building at the corner of Marlborough

and Cumberland Streets.

spaces included.

Two (2) on-site car

Ideal location for offshore bank, trust company,
law firm, or other professions.

Contact Owner at:

362-6006



PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central

Education Authority

invites applications from

qualified individuals for the position of PRINCIPAL, St. John’s College,
beginning September, 2009.

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in Education from a recognized
University, with at least (5) years accumulative administrative experience. The
applicant must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Providing leadership - set the climate and pace for success and high
achievement in the school.

- Organizing and supervising schedules, programmes, records and

procedures.

school

- Supervising and evaluating teachers and support staff.
- Managing records, school finances and end-of-year closing

procedures.

- Communicating with parents, community groups and organizations.

- Displaying consistent organizational and human relationship skills.

- Assisting the Education Department with and initiating Staff
Development Programmes.

Applicants should submit a cover letter,

Curriculum Vitae, copies of

degree certificates, three references and passport photographs to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY

P. O. BOX N-656

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Friday March 27th, 2009.



migrants, who also arrived ille-
gally, managed to find work and
regularise their stay.
“Employers are willing to
employ illegal migrants. The lack
of legal status in the country

obliges these workers to be com-
pliant to employers’ requests, as
they are outside the protection
of worker’s rights, and it allows
employers to pay migrants low
wages.

“If employers were monitored
and only allowed to employ peo-
ple with valid documentation, this
would reduce the demand for ille-
gal labour.

“ Apprehensions represent
only one side of the enforcement
necessary to stop the migration
motor. Both supply and demand
must be constrained if word is to
get back to those places where
Ulegals come from that it is no
longer possible for illegal
migrants to obtain employment
and find housing if they are ille-
gal.”

es i ventages

INVESTMENT RISK MANAGER
in a major international Venture Fund in Nassau

We are looking te strengthen our team in Nassau.

If vou have

* A sound degree in a life science related field, such as pharmacology, biology,
nutritional sciences or medicine andor sound business background in nutrition
or food and beverage products

* Post pradugte qualifications andor an MBA or equivalent

* Hands-on analytical and research experience, preferably in a Venture Capital or
Private Equity environment

* Experience in accounting, valuation and risk management for Venture Capital

* Passion for a healthy lifestyle and the right food

* Exeellent oral and written communications skills in English (other languages a
plus)

* Bahamian Cilizenship, you want to live and work in an international

environment right here in Nassau, with frequent travels abroad

We are

The world’s foremost Venture Fund in Health, Wellness and Nutrition, The Partnership
invests in the life seienees Held and is particularly interested in identifying nutritional

products,
chromic disesses,

We offer

dietary supplements,

medical foods

and innovative

approaches to prevent

A job which will involve search and analysis of companies in the area of health, wellness
and nutrition and preparation of investment decisions by investment committee. A
competitive salary package commensurate with the experience and qualifications will be

offered.

lf you are attracted by this unique opportunity, or have questions, please contact IVC

S.A.. P.O.

Dr naesseelerl ov ember

Americas

Bux

N-74532, Wassau or

The deadline for applications is 20-March-2C009,

FAX:
oom for the athention of HURLAN RESOURCES —Ref: IRA Was

327-0096 or EMAIL:

THE BAHAMAS RED

re

CROSS

“OUR WORLD. YOUR MOVE. BECOME

INVOLVED.”

SATURDAY,
MARCH 7'", 2009
12 NOON - UNTIL


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Ritz-Carlton developer is
sued over ‘$200k bill’

FROM page 1B

‘owners’, namely the Gencom
Group, Alibhai, Barry, Ritz-
Carlton Rose Island Hotel
Company, and Marriott Inter-
national.”

Garcia Stromberg alleged
that the contract would see it
provide consultation and design
services for the Ritz-Carlton
Hotel, and the accompanying
fractional condos, marina vil-
lage and its town homes and
condos, and utilities, waste and
fuel facilities.

Alleging that the developers

were “contractually obligated
to compensate it” for its ser-
vices and expenses, and that it
had performed all its obliga-
tions, Garcia Stromberg
claimed: “The defendants mate-
rially breached said contract by
failing to make the required
payments to the plaintiff as
detailed thereunder.” It alleged
it was owed some $17,719.
Work on the Ritz-Carlton
Rose Island project was sus-
pended on October 7, 2008,
after its principal financier and
major equity partner, Lehman
Brothers’ private equity arm,

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHOCOLATE FOUNTAIN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
WATEREDGE OCEAN LTD.

—_— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WATEREDGE OCEAN LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ZAKARIAH
HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUMMERCREST HOLDINGS INC.

—_— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SUMMERCREST HOLDINGS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

plunged into bankruptcy in late
September 2008.

Nick Ward, Gencom’s pro-
ject manager and the Ritz-Carl-
ton Rose Island Hotel Compa-
ny’s managing partner, wrote
in a letter to the project’s con-
tractors and vendors, which has
been seen by Tribune Business:
“This is to notify you that you
are hereby instructed to sus-
pend all work related to the
Rose Island project until fur-
ther notice.

“This action is prompted by
Lehman Brothers Holdings fil-
ing a Chapter 11 bankruptcy
proceeding on Monday, Sep-
tember 15. Ritz-Carlton Rose
Island Hotel Company has
financed the project at Rose
Island, the Bahamas, with
Lehman Brothers Holdings.

“Our business, like many oth-
ers, has been affected by the
abrupt and unprecedented
bankruptcy filing by its lender,
which has caused delays and
complicated the funding of all
Lehman’s loans, including the

were trying to resolve the
financing impasse, and added:
“Our goal is to have a plan in
place for re-funding within the
next 90 to 120 days.” That has
not been achieved due to the
credit crunch.

Garcia Stromberg, though,
alleged that the contract with
Ritz-Carlton Rose Island Hotel
Company said the suspension
would have no effect on its con-
tract, and that it would be com-
pensated for all previous ser-
vices rendered.

In a similar vein, Garcia
Stromberg alleged that it had
not been paid the $132,974 it
claimed it was owed for work
done on the departure facility at
the Nassau Harbour Club, the
point at which guests departing
for Rose Island will embark.

And it also alleged it was
owed $27,610 for work done on
the ‘Harbour Master’ section of
the Rose Island contract, for
which it again claimed it had
performed all its obligations
without being compensated.

Rose Island project.”
Mr. Ward said the developers

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HENRIDINE COOPER

of MACKEY STREET, P.O. BOX N-44, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27" day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MONTRES INTERNATIONAL
HOLDING LTD.

— *—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MONTRES INTERNATIONAL HOLD-
INGS LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHIP N DALE VENTURE LTD.

= ¢; =—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CHIP N DALE VENTURE LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAWPRONT
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 27th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



40% higher build costs
hit Family Island hotels

FROM page 1B

has recently tried to revive.

Mr Greene said more government resources were channelled
into subsidies and incentives for multi-million dollar resorts,
while small Family Island properties were largely ignored.

He said he was forced to pay $1.50 per case of soda if he pur-
chased in Nassau for his business, and it was cheaper for him to
leave Andros to purchase fish.

“If you don’t go fishing yourself - it’s cheaper for me to buy
fish in Nassau,” he said.

Mr Greene said the main cause of the disparity in costs
between Nassau and the Family Islands was the cost of shipping
goods.

“These things are driving up the cost to Bahamians who
want to vacation on the Family Islands,” said moderator and
founder of the summit, Lynden Nairn.

Regattas

Mr Greene experiences his greatest level of Bahamian clients
during special events, such as regattas and homecomings. How-
ever, at other times Bahamians complain that his rooms are too
expensive.

“The Bahamians, per se, will come, but they will assume that
the rooms are not worth the money. We have to convince them
- as a Starter - that it is worth the money,” said Mr Greene.

He said his hotel receives publicity only by word of mouth
from repeat customers - mostly Americans and Canadians -
and through his own website.

Mr Greene said the Government needs to step in and show
small hotels the way, as well as offer financial assistance. He
added that he was forced to do everything himself when build-
ing his business in order to save costs.

“It’s almost impossible to (get money from government). I
won’t say you won't get it - I won’t dare say that - but it’s
almost impossible,” said Mr Greene.

“You can hardly get to them to put out your problems. Most
of the time they come to you once a year, and then that’s dead.

“Even if you think something good, you don’t see them often
enough to put it forward and then the idea is gone.”

As a kicker, Mr Greene aired his angst over the automatic 15
per cent gratuity attached to restaurant and other hospitality
bills, saying it had destroyed service in the Bahamas.

“If you don’t get a tip you don’t deserve it. Everybody’s not
going to be alike, but you always will get more than 15 per
cent,” he said. “You get that because you deserve it. If you
don’t get that, it’s because you don’t deserve it.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TIMOTHE PAUL of EAST
STREET, P.O.BOX N-7060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27 day of February, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHELET JEAN JACQUES
of CARMICHEL ROAD, FAITH AVENUE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27" day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUDYONNY HOLDINGS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GAMTONFIELD
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE



BEC chairmen clash
over cut in tariff rates

FROM page 1B

sale of all BEC’s shares in Cable
Bahamas.

“Tf this amount, which has
nothing to do with recurrent
revenue or expenditure, is tak-
en out of the profit and loss
statement for the 2005 financial
year, then the Corporation only
made a profit of $1.3 million -
down nearly $10 million from
the 2003 financial year, repre-
senting a significant reduction,”
Mr Gottlieb said yesterday.

Continuing, he said BEC sub-
sequently moved into the red,
suffering an almost-$3 million
loss in its 2006 financial year,
followed by an $11.7 million net
loss in the year to September
30, 2007. As global oil prices
peaked last year, Mr Gottlieb
said net losses spiked at $21 mil-
lion for BEC’s 2008 financial
year.

“Tt is not being suggested that
the tariff reduction implement-
ed in 2003 was the only factor
contributing to BEC’s subse-
quent financial deterioration,
but it certainly was and contin-
ues to be a major factor,” Mr
Gottlieb added.

“The decision by Mr Jarrett
to reduce the tariffs in 2003 was
ill-conceived as, it appears, it
was made without proper pri-
or consultation/investigation to
determine the extent of the
adverse financial consequences
to the Corporation that would
result therefrom.”

Mr Jarrett, who chaired BEC
from June 2002 until the 2005
first quarter, had questioned to
Tribune Business earlier this
week how the tariff rate reduc-
tion could be responsible for
the Corporation’s current finan-
cial predicament, given that its



Ministry of National Security



“The decision
by Mr Jarrett
to reduce the
tariffs in 2003
was ill-con-
ceived ....”



Fred Gottlieb

2004 financial year — the first
full year after the new rates
were in force — saw BEC have
one of its most successful years
ever by generating $14.1 mil-
lion in net profits.

Unfortunate

Mr Gottlieb, though, in a pre-
vious interview with this news-
paper, had argued that the
reduction in BEC’s basic tariff
rate “had the effect of sucking
$18 million of revenue away per
year, and that’s unfortunate.
Because up until then, BEC was
in position to have the neces-
sary economic ratings to get
financing for its capital projects.
That was significantly under-
mined.”

This was repeated on
Wednesday by Phenton Ney-
mour, minister of state for the
environment, who said the basic
tariff rate reduction, and deci-
sion to pay interest on BEC cus-
tomers’ security deposits, had
reduced the Corporation’s rev-
enues and cash flow by some
$20 million per year - or $100
million over five years.

Mr Neymour also criticised
the refinancing of the $128 mil-
lion Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB) loan that was
carried out under Mr Jarrett’s
watch, as did Mr Gottlieb, both
arguing that this exchange of
long-term for short-term bor-
rowing had “increased costs,
reduced cash flow and other
financial concerns”.

Mr Gottlieb, while acknowl-
edging that this had initially
resulted in “lower interest rate
costs amounting to approxi-
mately $10 million for the 2004
financial year”, added: “Unfor-
tunately, this ill advised action
to pay off the IDB loan came
back to haunt the Corporation
in later years, as the variable
interest rate subsequently rose
considerably, with the result
that servicing the new loan is
now much more expensive than
it was to service the long term
IDB loan.”

Mr Jarrett, though, had told
Tribune Business that by re-
financing the IDB loan -initial-
ly taken out in 1989 to finance
Family Island infrastructure
development, when the IDB
was the ‘only game in town’,
had saved BEC both increased
interest rate and foreign
exchange costs.

The IDB loan had used sev-
eral currency baskets, including
euros, yen, swiss francs and
deutchsmarks, and the US dol-
lar’s depreciation against these
currencies when he was chair-
man, Mr Jarrett said, meant
BEC was requiring ever-
increasing amounts of foreign
currency to re-pay them, result-
ing in foreign exchange losses.

These foreign exchange loss-
es, Mr Jarrett said, had reached
$2 million in 2002 and $4.5 mil-
lion in 2003, making re-financ-

(a NB33

Office of The Parliamentary Commissioner

NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT BYE-ELECTION

South Andros Constituency Polling Division 3B

ing imperative. The new loan,
which paid out the IDB, was for
a term of 11 years, not a short-
term loan, he added.

He produced an April 1,
2003, letter from then-minister
of state for finance, James
Smith, backing the IDB loan re-
financing. Mr Smith said the
IDB’s loan covenants “may now
be inappropriate”, especially
the $633,000 maximum per
annum dividends imposed on
the Government.

In addition, Mr Jarrett pro-
duced documents showing that
the basket of IDB loans had
variable interest rates attached
of between 5.27 per cent to 8.38
per cent, compared to the 2.25
per cent rate attached to the
proposed re-financing loan.

Meanwhile, Mr Neymour
said the contracts signed with
the Bahamas Electrical Work-
ers Union, one for the period
2003-2007, and the other for
2007-2012, had increased BEC’s
labour and pension costs by $27
million and $17 million respec-
tively.

He added that BEC had
saved $11.326 million in cus-
toms duty, and $7.928 million
on stamp duty, as a result of the
two-year moratorium on tax
payments introduced in July
2008.

This, Mr Neymour said, was
the key factor in reducing
BEC’s losses to a projected $1.5
million for fiscal 2009. BEC
spent some $350 million on fuel
in its last fiscal year.

Mr Neymour indicated that
an increase in BEC’s basic tariff
rate had been recommended.

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 5B

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OREM GROUP S.A.

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act (No.
45 of 2000). OREM GROUP S.A. is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 15th
day of February, 2009.

Mikhail Nechvolodov,
Business Address,
LLC “PRAVO VYBORA” 109316,
Volgogradsky Prospect,
2, Moscow, Russian Federation
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
MARIS SERVICES INC.

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act (No.
45 of 2000). MARIS SERVICES INC. is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 15th
day of February, 2009.

Mikhail Nechvolodov,
Business Address,
LLC “PRAVO VYBORA” 109316,
Volgogradsky Prospect,
2, Moscow, Russian Federation
Liquidator



A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their

Kemp's Bay and Johnson's Bay
In the Kemp's Bay Town Area
Of the South Andros District

own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
. on behalf of companies clients.

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.
NOTICE ts hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was elected as a Town Committee Member for the

shswecumtionad Toumekste' Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

Box:

Candidate's
Urmeme

Other Names
in full

Occupation

and address DA 69806

c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

WANTED

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidares in the said election were as follows:-

by March 14, 2009.

Candidate's
Furname

Other Names
In full

Votes
Polled

Une Direct

The Anglican Central Education Authority

roice, ime Hie

JOHNSON-HEWITT. Jacqueline a...

MCKINNEY ooo... .Weronica Barbara _

AX
Date: 27" February, 2009

Sign: Franceta Neely
RETURNING OFFICER

in
he

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites apolications for teaching positions available at
St. John's College and St. Anne’s School on New Providence, and Bishop Michael Eldon
School on Grand Bahama

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY
Andros Ave. — Englerston Subdivision

Engin Language and Literature
Mathematics
Pnyscs General Science Grades 7-12

Guidance Counselor

(2 positions)

(2 positions)

G (1 position’

Bishop Michael Elden School, Freeport Grand Baharia
2 bedrooms,

I bath Qualifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from an accredited

University together with a Teacher's Certificate from an accredited

© Comprises: i
P Teachers College,

Property 3,600 sq. ft/
Building 733 sq. ft.

Applications may be collected from the Education Department located on Sands Road off of East

For conditions of Street,

sale and other
information,

Completed application forms with the requested supporting documents must be received by
please contact: 5

the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 13" March 2009, and must be addressed to:-
Phone:
356-1685,

502-1929
or 356-1608

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P. 0. Box W656
Nassau, The Bahamas
Interested persons should submit offers in writing to:
The Manager
Credit Risk Management
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than March 13, 2009

Providing quality education ina Christian enviranment by developing the whale child: spiritually
acadenicaly, oiencally and socially thus oreoaning fhe ole for ie.

=


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Insurer inherited ‘wrongly priced’ policies

FROM page 1B

holders - especially the elder-
ly ones, who have suffered the
most drastic premium rises -
by surprise.

It has also closed the indi-
vidual health portfolio to new
business, instead - as Ms Cam-
bridge emphasised - wanting
to focus on growing its



Bahamas-based group health
business, the area that it spe-
cialises in worldwide.

Still, some individual poli-
cyholders are likely to per-
ceive the major premium
increases as an attempt to
‘price them out of the market’
and push them to switch to
another carrier, if they can.

Younger insureds, who are

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008






SUPREME COURT

No. CLE/Qui/ 01714

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT piece or
parcel of land containing by admeasurement
11,971 Sq. Feet situate on the North side of Wulff
Road and 98 Ft. West of Darling Street in the
Southern District of the Island of New










Providence, Bahamas.

understood to have experi-
enced 30 per cent premium
increases through Generali’s
revised premium rates, would
be able to find a new carrier
with relative case but elderly
patients, because of the high
risk they pose through likely
needing more frequent med-
ical treatment, would probably
not be taken on by another
carrier.

“Our options based on our
analysis were to sell the indi-
vidual portfolio or to cancel
the coverage,” Ms Cambridge
told Tribune Business. “We
realised, however, that if we
were simply to cancel the poli-
cies, it would have left some
individuals without insurance
cover and for some, based on
their ages and health condi-
tions, it would have made it

very difficult for them to find
alternatives.

“In order to provide an
appropriate solution, we have
moved to create an age-band-
ed premium structure, which
provides for a fairer and more
appropriate premium for each
risk presented.

“For those individuals who
could, we knew that they
would see alternative cover
through another carrier. We
fully expect that some indi-
viduals would elect coverage
with other carriers. However,
for those who could not, due
to their age or health condi-
tions, Generali decided that
the honourable thing to do
would be to find a way to
assure that the health plans
for these individuals would
not terminate.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Davco Limited whose
Registered Office is in the City of Nassau, New
Providence, Bahamas is applying to the Supreme Court
to have its Title to the following land investigated under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the said Court in accordance
with the provisions of the said Act.














ALL THAT piece or parcel of land containing by
admeasurement 11,971 Square Feet situate on the
Northern side of Wulff Road and approximately 98 Feet
West of Darling Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas aforesaid bounded
NORTHWARDLY by land described in Plan No. 1233
and running thereon Eighty-seven and Fifty-four One-
hundredths (87.54) Feet on the East partly by land now
or formerly the property of Kathleen Darling and partly
by land now or formerly the property of Cleomie Clarke
and running thereon jointly One hundred and Fifty-eight
and Fourteen One-hundredths (158.14) Feet on the
SOUTH partly by the said Wulff Road and running
thereon Fifty-two and Eighty-four One-hundredths
(52.84) Feet and partly by land formerly the property of
the Petitioner but presently occupied by Preston Stuart
and Byron Campbell and running thereon Forty-five and
Eleven One-hundredths (45.11) Feet on the WEST partly
by the land lastly described and running thereon Seventy-
eight and Twenty One-hundredths (78.20) Feet and partly
by land now or formerly the property of the Estate of
one Poitier and running thereon Eighty-six and Thirty-
two One-hundredths (86.32) Feet which said piece or
parcel of land has such position shape marks boundaries
and dimensions as or shown on the diagram or plan filed
herein and thereon edged in “PINK”.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office
hours at the following places:-

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, in the City of Nassau; or

(2) The Chamers of James M. Thompson Terrace
House, First Terrace and Collins Avenue in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of its, his or her Claim in the prescribed forms,
verified by an Affidavit and other related requirements
to be filed therewith by the 16th day of April A.D., 2009.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of its, his or her Claim together with the other related
requirement by the 16th day of April A.D., 2009, will
operate as a bar to such claim.

JAMES M. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Momey 21 Work

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that AUNTENY DELVA of TAKE-
ME CORNER, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of
FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality



“Our options
based on our
analysis were to
sell the individual
portfolio or to
cancel the
coverage.”



Tina Cambridge

Ms Cambridge said that to
make health coverage “more
affordable” for elderly policy-
holders, Generali had creat-
ed a modified coverage and
benefits scheme, which
brought in “increased co-pay-
ments for certain services and
facilities”. These clients,
though, would still retain
major medical coverage.

Tribune Business was told
on Wednesday that Generali’s
new plan was less favourable
to elderly policyholders than
the coverage they currently
enjoyed, because it raised the
amount they had to pay for
treatment at Doctors Hospi-
tal from 20 per cent to 40 per
cent, with the insurer’s expo-

sure reduced from 80 per cent
to 60 per cent.

Sources added that the age
at which the lifetime maxi-
mum Generali would pay for
a policyholder’s medical
expenses was reduced from $1
million to $100,000 has also
been lowered under the new
proposed policy, from 70
years-old to 65.

But Ms Cambridge said:
“The actual premium impact
of this change varied from
individual to individual,
dependent on their age and
previous plan design.

“For many individuals,
there were actual decreases in
premium. However, older
individuals received premium
levels that more appropriately
reflected their age.”

She added: “We feel the
results of our efforts best
serves the needs of individuals
in our plan, and those who
could not find an alternative
may still maintain coverage
with us. The new product
design also enables them to
stay covered without even
higher increases that would
have been necessary to main-
tain their previous level of
benefits.”

and Citizenship,

P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport,

Bahamas.

Il

IN THE ESTATE OF Jeannine Marie
Therese Dusseault a.k.a. Jeannine
Marie Therese Buraglia a.k.a Jeannine
Buraglia late of 300 Joliette #208
Longueuil, Quebec in Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
above Estate are required to send the
same duly certified in writing to the
undersigned on or before the 5th day of

March A.D.,

2009, after which date the

Executors will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims
of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate of
Jeannine Marie Therese Dusseault
a.k.a. Jeannine Marie Therese Buraglia
a.k.a Jeannine Buraglia are requested
to make full settlement on or before the
date hereinbefore mentioned.

NADIA A. WRIGHT
Attorney for the Executors
Chancellors Chambers
P.O. Box N-4589
Nassau, Bahamas

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 5 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.28 | CHG 4.43 | %CHG 0.27 | YTD -52.08 | YTD % -3.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 811.61 | YTD -2.79% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW. BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & EN Ob MARION
s

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Fince
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

Securit

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB 31.72
Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED) 0.00
RND Holdings 0.45

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CPFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Previous Close Today's Close

mide. Over-The- joules Securities
id $ sk $

Change Daily Vol.

Prime + 1.75%
T%

Prime + 1.75%

Last Price Weekly Vol.

-35 0.40
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

29.00

Sone

55
BISX Listed Mute Funds

4.10

MARKET TERMS

st 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
bated price for Set volume

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided aby closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of CG idl
s

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

om
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

0.480
0.000

0.000
0.000

31-Jan-09

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

gful
FINDEX - The Fideli ie Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ETIENNE DALMOND of
P.O. BOX AB-20334, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27 day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

MOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCING
CASPIAN SEA LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 23rd day of February, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2009.

G. H. Johnsen

Liquidator of

MOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCING CASPIAN SEA
LIMITED

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION NIGER INC.

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-
named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau,
Bahamas on or before 31st day of March, A.D., 2009.
In default thereof they will be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 4th day of March, A.D., 2009.

Gary H. Johnsen
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, TEXAS 77060

NOTICE
ESSO EXPLORTION AND
PRODUCTION NIGER INC.

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
NIGER INC. is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said Company commenced
on the 4th day of March, 2009 when its

Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Gary
Johnsen of 16945 Northcase Drive, Houston

Texas 77060.
Dated the 22nd day of December, 2009

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named
Company


THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 7B

THE TRIBUNE'S



APT 3-G

AT THE HOSPITAL Ei Rv ase
WHEW, WHAT A NIGHT,” ) NOT ME,
I'M DEAD ON MY FEET.Z/ Joe. TM
HAPPY WHEN
IM BUSY.

NOW THAT YOU MENTION IT;
TOMMIE, YOU PO LOOK HAPPY!

s| ARE YOU SURE THERE
ISN'T ANOTHER REASON?

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g/

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ARE YOU
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YOUR NEW
HOUSE YET?





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THAT IMPRESSED WITH
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AT THIS BED AND

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ARE YOU KIODING? YOU ENJOY
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WON'T ACCEPT ANY Se

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19 by North America Syndicata, Inc. World rights reserved.



© 2009 by King Feut
www.Blondie.com























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‘pOAISSe, SIUBY PYONA aU] ‘AIEOIPUAG semnneaH1 Gur Aq GOOZE





CALVIN & HOBBES

1% BOXES TO Go, AND TLL
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PURCHASE SEALS” To ORDER,
THE PROPELLER BEANIE. THEY






©1989 Universat Press Syndicate

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



*No WONDER YOUR COMPUTER CRASHES...
THERES NO STEERIN’ WHEEL.”

Difficulty Level * % * 3/05

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down

1 Inexpensive fish will suit 2 Wild herbs we found in
him (10) Israel (7)

8 Jewish teacher in Arab | break bail in order to
biophysics (6) prove | was
Notedly brisk (7) elsewhere (5)
Rubens, for example, puts Hit with explosive —
himself out (7) bandage needed (6)
Correct some work the | lament about
men did wrongly (5) disorder (7)
Carry on with a It stoops to
summary (6) conquer (5)
Walk a short way and Wealth is about to
turn (6) provide security for
Report about the initial girl in nursery — tale (10)
forms of aquatic life (5) Respects one’s
Fashionable substitute for testimonials (10)
wood or metal (7) Mother’s pet dog? (7)
Time of day when engine Seat of Empire (7)
breaks down — about One taps a cask
five (7) with it (6)
They’re inclined to prevent A revolutionary
steps being taken (5) invention (5)
He can rely ona Article written about the
permanent occupation professional stage,
(4,6) perhaps (5)

Sailing ship (10)
Damp (5)
Tearfully
sentimental (7)

Relate to (7)

EASY PUZZLE

The Lone Star

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution aa
12 Vile smell (6)
Across: 1 Sherpa, 4 Boards, 9
Signora, 10 Frame, 11 Eerie, 12 Ill
will, 13 Part company, 18 Proverb, 20

Ruche, 22 Opine, 23 Average, 24

Across: 1 Assign, 4 Acacia, 9
Journal, 10 Acute, 11 Cider, 12 14 To escape (3,3)
Nemesis, 13 Mollycoddle, 18 In .

force, 20 Sable, 22 Grasp, 23 Tye nateotedig())

Bleats, 25 Stared. Unequal, 24 Riddle, 25 In debt. 19 Previous (7)
Down: 1 Sister, 2 Eager, 3 Protest, 5 Down: 1 Abject, 2 Sound, 3

Offal, 6 Realign, 7 Stella, 8 Haricot General, 5 Charm, 6 Counsel, 7 21 Ignorant (7)

bean, 14 Anodise, 15 Perfect, 16 Averse, 8 Blank cheque, 14 22 Religious belief (5)

Aplomb, 17 Defend, 19 Exert, 21 Offhand, 15 Discern, 16 Ginger, 17
Chair. Pellet, 19 Repel, 21 Brute. 23 Very small (5-5)







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©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

{he ten
ety a!
Chamtan
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Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer



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Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer

































Difficulty Level *& *& &

7

Across Down

Vast (7)
Artful expedient (5)
A nut (6)

Canadian

policeman (7)



Unbend (5)

Et cetera (3,2,5)
Chicanery (5-5)
Fellow soldier (7)
Judgment (7)
Nothing more
than (6)
Unsuitable (5)

To groove spirally (5)





















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

















5/9/117\/2 6/4/8/3| [ZEN ;
2/4/811/3 917/6/5 Bs ait Baie
S161 71418 Sit 9/2 8 6 7/49 N63 1
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1/2/915|7 3/8/4\6 31097 2/9RMi 3
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Upping the Percentages

South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.

NORTH
AQ985
Â¥VAI6
93
&974
WEST EAST
43 a7
Â¥10983 VÂ¥KQ542
Q1052 #176
$K 32 11086
SOUTH
@KIJ1062
v7
@AK84
&AQS
The bidding:
South West North = East
1¢ Pass 3% Pass
6%

Opening lead — ten of hearts.

Whenever declarer is faced with a
situation where the sucecss of the
contract depends upon winning a
finesse, he should first seek some
alternative method of play by which
the finesse can be avoided. The num-
ber of cases where a finesse can be
eliminated in favor of a superior line
of play occurs far more often than is
generally realized.

For example, take this hand where
making six spades superficially
appears to depend on a successful
finesse in clubs. But if declarer relies
solely on the hope that East was dealt

Tomorrow

the club king, he will suffer a one-
trick defeat. While there is a 50 per-
cent chance that East was dealt the
king of clubs, this does not necessar-
ily mean that there is only a 50 per-
cent chance to make the contract.

South’s chance of bringing in the
slam is considerably greater than 50
percent, provided he takes the
preparatory steps necessary to
increase his chances. With correct
play, South can elevate his probabil-
ity of success to better than 70 per-
cent.

After winning the ace of hearts,
he draws two rounds of trumps and
ruffs a heart. The A-K of diamonds
are cashed and a diamond is rutted.
Dummy’s last heart is trumped, and
the eight of diamonds is led. When
West produces the quccn, the slam
becomes a certainty. Instead of ruff-
ing, declarer allows West to win the
trick, and a club is discarded from
dummy!

Whatever West returns, the con-
tract is made. If West leads a club,
South scores the queen, while if a
heart is led, dummy discards a sec-
ond club as declarer ruffs in his hand.

Note that at no point during the
play does declarer relinquish his
chance of making the contract via a
club finesse. But by eliminating the
red suits first, he also eliminates the
need for the finesse whenever West
started with the majority of the miss-
ing diamonds.

: Test your play.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.



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PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THOUSANDS of visitors arriving for international events in the Bahamas this summer will revitalise the hotel industry, Hotel Workers Union secretary general Leo Douglas has predicted. As Atlantis prepares to host the month-long Miss Universe pageant in August and the FIFA (Fdration Internationale de Football Association) Congress in May, Mr Douglas said the future is brightening for hotel workers. He hopes there will be fewer job cuts and new jobs generated for the thousands of hotel staff who have been laid-off in recent months owing to the decline in visitors and the economic crisis. The Miss Universe pageant is expected to draw hundreds of visitors throughout August and follows the FIFA Congress where a minimum of three delegates will represent each of the 208 member federations. President of Kerzner International Bahamas George Markantonis announced on Wednesday that staff will be hired temporarily at Atlantis and hotels across New Providence dur ing the Miss Universe contest. And although the jobs may not be permanent, Mr Douglas said publicity generated by the events should pave the way for a more buoyant hotel industry going forward. He said: “It’s one of the best things that could happen to the country and it is a very good thing for the hotel industry, which is suffering right now, both here and all over the world.” Mr Douglas commended the government and Atlantis for putting the Bahamas forward as a host for such events at a time when the industry needs to be creative about bringing in guests. He said: “The only thing we have said to peop le in the hotel industry now is, ‘let’s try to be very supportive’. “They must understand how to do a much better job with service and attitude – not only for Bahamians in the hotel industry but for all Bahamians.” The union secretary hopes the boost in visitors will allow Baha Mar to change its plans to close the Wyndham hotel on Cable Beach b etween August and October. “They should try to stay open because of this so it can give a good feeling and get a good message out there,” Mr Douglas said. The union is encouraging hotels to keep line staff during tough economic times and look to executive positions when making cuts instead. “The union says examine doing cuts from the top,” Mr Douglas said. “They should under stand that is realistic. You cannot say you are hurting and keep paying big salaries at the top and cutting the bottom. We hope more job cuts would be the last resort.” THE Ministry of Education plans to have a collection procedure in place before the end of June to target those who have defaulted on their educational guaranteed loans. "Defaulted loans continue to be a problem and we are now in the process of interviewing a number of collection agencies and entities and before the end of this fiscal year we hope to imple ment some collection agency practices," Education Minister Carl Bethel said in the House of Assembly during the last day of debate on the mid-term budget yesterday. He said he understands that a number of persons have lost jobs due to the economic downturn, but his ministry will seek to recoup money owed by persons who are currently employed and have the means to repay their loans. Mr Bethel also urged persons with accounts in arrears to arrange payments with the ministry before action is initiated. "We're seeking those persons who can pay, if they lost their job that's one thing, but if a person has a job – those persons will be sought out, but we do urge them to contact the scholarship and educational loan department at the ministry," said the MP for the Sea Breeze constituency. For the 2008/2009 fiscal year, government allocated $3 million for its scholarship fund and $10.5 million for the Educational Guaran teed Loan Programme. Of that $10.5 million, $3.2 million was awarded to 349 new students and $7.2 million was awarded to 743 students already in the programme. Since the programme's inception in 2000 it has been plagued with a high default rate. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@ t ribunemedia.net FREEPORT – In his first visit to Grand Bahama since his enthronement, Rev Laish Boyd, Bishop of the A nglican Diocese of the Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands, spoke about the church’s position on homosexuality. B ishop Boyd said that homosexuality is a veryp ertinent topic for the Anglican Communion, one that was high on the agenda at last year’s Lam-b ert Conference in England. “The position of the Anglican Communion is that homosexual practice is contrary to scripture, a nd that remains the decis ion of the church. “There are all sorts of views out there on thism atter, but this is the church’s position,” Bishop Boyd said. H e stated that the m ajority of leaders and bishops have maintained that position. T here has been a lot of controversy and division in the Anglican Commu n ion over the appointment o f the openly gay Episcopal Bishop Gene Robinson of New Hampshire. Bishop Boyd said the Anglican Communion has faced many divisive issueso ver the centuries and over the last few decades especially. “The Episcopal Church o r Anglican Church in the United States, where the most contention is, has h ad many dividing issues,” he said. In addition to the issue o f homosexuality, he said, the ordination of women still presents a problem for many people. There are persons who want to separate themselves for any number of i ssues. But the Anglican Communion for the most part remains together. We remain committed to staying together and that was one of the things that came up very strongly i n our Lambert Conference this past summer when more than 700 bish-o ps from all over the Anglican Communion met. “There are 70 million Anglicans in 160 countries on this Earth and most of the bishops by far were there, and that was the consensus that we stay together and try to work through any differences we may have. “It (homosexuality an issue that has caused some to leave the church. In spite of the issues, the Anglican Church makes every effort to stay together,” said Bishop Boyd. Anglicans are currently observing the Lenten season, which spans 40 week days beginning on Ash Wednesday and culminating during Holy Week with Holy Thursday, Good Friday, and con cluding the Saturday before Easter. Bishop Boyd is the third indigenous bishop to undergo the rite as the new Diocesan Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Island. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A NDROS and Abaco are the focus of major initiatives on the part of the Ministry of Agriculture to encourage the development of agri culture and create new economic opportunities for Bahamians, the executive chairman of the Bahamas Agricultural Industrial Corporation said. Speaking in the House of Assembly yesterday, Edison Key charged that “with the right support” agriculture, like tourism, can become a “significant generator of employment and income” for Bahamians. Outlining some of the ways BAIC is seeking to boost this industry, Mr Key said the corporation is encour aging the production of export quality products for the Bahamian and export markets via the North Andros Agricultural Expansion Project. This project will use 561 acres of land located near the San Andros Airport, which is to be “divided into 41 blocks of different sizes inclusive of a greenhouse park and the headquarters for the North Andros Farm ers Association.” The land is expected to nourish the growth of vegetables, citrus trees, tropical fruits and livestock, said the South Abaco MP during his contri bution to the mid-year budget. Meanwhile, a 1,500 acre “satellite farm” in the same area is being “revitalised” and subdivided for livestock farming, as the corporation also seeks to establish the North Andros Agro-Industrial Park, which will emphasise agro-processing and ornamental plant production. Modern technology will be put to use in a new greenhouse park, and two refrigerated trailers which will be “leased at a nominal fee” to the North Andros Farmer’s Association are expected to heighten farmers’ chances of getting their goods to m arket in the best condition possible, Mr Key noted. “We view this procurement as a major step in improving the method of transportation of agricultural products,” he said. Three tractors bought by the cor poration have already been put to work in the same community. M r Key said that 500 acres of the formerKeyand Sawyer/Bahama Star Farms has been subdivided into 10 and five acre plots for leasing to farmers in North Abaco. In Central Abaco, south of Spring City, 640 acres have been sub-divided for the same purpose. He added: “I am pleased to report that the first phase of the Farmers Market Community Centre in Marsh Harbour, Abaco has been completed in terms of lighting and ground preparation. We also plan to estab lish an industrial park south of Spring City.” He affirmed that BAIC will continue to bring together buyers of agricultural produce and Bahamian farmers at meetings set up for this purpose, so the direct shipment of produce from farmers to Bahamian markets can be planned. “We are also dedicated to providing training and assistance in best practices and modern methods of farming and management. This commitment is manifested in the farmers empowerment workshops and accounting and management work shops held in Abaco, Eleuthera and Long Island,” he added. Training in greenhouse technology will also be offered to farmers across the Bahamas. Anglican Archbishop addresses homosexuality Summer events ‘will revitalise’ hotel industry A TLANTIS WILL HOST t he month-long Miss Univ erse pageant in August and the FIFA (Fdration Internationale de Football Association) Congress. ‘Major initiatives’ focus on Andros and Abaco Ministr y tar gets those who have defaulted on educational guaranteed loans Carl Bethel

PAGE 3

n By PAUL G T URNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net BRITISH Prime Minister Gordon Brown has signalled his support for efforts which could severely impact the Bahamas’ crucial financial sector. Explaining that his country will follow the United States in its effort to restructure the rules governing the banking industry, Mr Brown placed particular emphasis on curtailing the ability of citizens to keep their money in o ffshore banks in an effort t o avoid paying domestic taxes. H e told the United States C ongress on Wednesday: “. . . you are also restructuring your banks. So are we. But how much safer would every b ody’s savings be if the whole world finally came together to outlaw shadow banking systems and offshore tax havens?” Mr Brown’s statements come at a critical time for the B ahamas. Prime Minister H ubert Ingraham has already v oiced concern over calls from European Union lead-e rs for an overhaul of the i nternational financial system, including “a new system of regulations for all finan c ial markets, products and participants.” “They again placed blame for the international financial crisis on ‘offshore jurisdictions’ or ‘tax havens’ as t hey call us, where non-transp arent business is carried out, and promised to prepare a ‘toolbox of sanctions to bea pplied against such tax havens’ which is to be presented to a summit of the Group of 20 developed countries meeting in London on April 2,” Mr Ingraham said. The Stop Tax Haven A buse Bill pushed by then S enator and now US Presid ent Barack Obama lists the Bahamas as one of 34 secrecy jurisdictions. The Bill seeks authorisat ion for special measures a gainst foreign jurisdictions, financial institutions and other entities which impede US tax enforcement. A portion of the Bill reads: “Currently, the Treasury has the authority under 311 of t he Patriot Act [31 USC 5 318(a s anctions on foreign jurisdictions, financial institutions, or transactions found to be of ‘primary money launderi ng concern’. The Bill would a uthorise Treasury to impose t he same sanctions on the s ame types of entities if Treas ury finds them to be ‘impedi ng US tax enforcement’. “In addition, the Bill would add to the list of possibles anctions the ability to deny foreign banks the authority t o issue credit cards for use in the United States.” P rime Minister Ingraham pointed out that the Bahamas has and will continue to doe verything in its power to ensure that it cannot be “corr ectly identified” as an “uncooperative” offshore jurisdiction. T o this extent, Mr Ingraham said, the country must e nsure that it follows international best practices at all times. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The Grand Bahama Power Company has responded to criticism by the Commonwealth Electrical Worke rs Union over the hiring of new temporary workers, stating that t he backlog in its customer service area made this move necessary. “We at Grand Bahama Power Company are surprised by the Commonwealth Electrical Workers Union’s reaction to our deci sion to hire four additional Bahamian meter men,” the company said in a press release. “In these most challenging economic times, we are pleased to be able to create temporary employment.” The company said the four temporary employees have been hired for the interim to help clear a backlog of work in the customer service area of the company. They explained that bringing in a team to help assist the company will decrease estimates of customers’ billings, increase response time to customer queries and assist with reconnection and disconnection services. “It has long been a standard practice of our company to con tract temporary workers as the need arises. “We remain committed to the advancement of our employees and will continue to act in the best interest of our customers and the communities we serve,” said the company. The Commonwealth Electrical Workers Union on Monday accused the Power Company of violating the Industrial Relations Act by hiring the temporary work ers without informing the union. CEWU president Keith Knowles said the union never received notification from the company. He claims that the com pany breached the Industrial Relations Act by failing to consult and inform the union of the hirings. H e said the union was also concerned about job security, salary increases and promotion of the 10 current meter men on staff. Mr Knowles said many of the current meter readers have not been elevated to the next level of classification in meter reading even though they are performing a t that level. He said that the current meter readers are being expected to train temporary workers to read meters and learn routes, putting their jobs at risk. Grand Bahama Power Compa ny is a totally integrated utility company serving the island’s 50,000 residents and commercial establishments from east to west. The company employs over 200 Bahamians. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 3 A MAN and a woman were arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court on fraud charges yesterday. Jaynell Indeira Bethel, 40, and Marvin Adelage Sturrup, 29, both of East Street, appeared before Magistrate Susan Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau Street yesterday on charges of forgery, uttering a forged document and fraud by false pretences. It is alleged in court dockets that the accused between December 8, 2008 and January 2, 2009 forged Royal Bank of Canada cheques in the amounts of $800, $1,500 and $1,800. It is also alleged that between December 10, 2008 and January 8, 2009, the accused obtained cash totalling $2,300 from the Royal Bank of Canada, Bay Street, and also attempted to attain $1,800 from the same bank by means of fraud. The accused pleaded not guilty to the charges and were granted bail in the sum of $4,000. n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A 31-YEAR-OLDman and a 23-year-old Jamaican woman who were arrested on Monday in connection with the seizure of a quantity of marijuana appeared in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday on a drug possession charge. Police have charged Marvin Rolle who also goes by the aliases Andrew Rolle, Anthony Rolle and Lundy Rolle, along with Kayon Tasheika Ivey, alias Tanika Morley, with possession of marijuana with the intent to supply. Court dockets allege that the accused on Monday, March 2, were found in possession of a quantity of marijuana which authorities believe they intended to supply to another. Rolle and Ivey were arraigned before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane, on Wednesday. The accused pleaded not guilty tot he marijuana possession charge and were remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been adjourned to March 18 when a bail hearing will take place. According to the prose cution, the accused also have another case involving the seizure of a firearm and a quan-t ity of drugs pending before the courts. A SUPREME Court judge has ordered that proceedings against a Haitian man accused of having sex with a 10-year-old girl be stayed. S upreme Court Justice Jon Isaacs ruled on Tuesday that the case against John Baptiste be stayed on the grounds that the “continuedp rosecution of the applicant is a breach of his constitutional right to be tried within a rea sonable time.” Baptiste had filed an application seeking c onstitutional relief. He had also contended t hat the continuation of criminal proceedings a gainst him was “an abuse of process.” Baptiste was arrested on March 26, 2005. He was arraigned on March 30 ,2005 and bail was refused as he has no legal right to be in thec ountry. He has been on remand at Her Majesty’s Prison since. I n his ruling, Justice Isaacs said the lapse of time is “presumptively prejudicial”. “I am satisfied that the applicant’s right to have a fair trial within a reasonable time hasb een infringed when regard is had to the penalt y that may be imposed,” he said. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@ tribunemedia.net A N INQUIRY into an alleged raid by immigration officers of a single mother’s home will be held this week, Minister of Immigration Branville McCartney said. The Minister contacted Violet Hanna, 41, after reading in The Tribune about how unidentified armed officers from the Immigration Department damaged her fence and door when they violently burst into her home during the night last week. Ms Hanna and her 7-yearold daughter Amber, both Bahamian citizens, said they were terrified by the event and the mother-of-two intends to sue the Immigration Department for damages as she no longer feels safe in her Nassau Villageh ome. During his contribution to the mid-year budget debate in the House of Assembly on Wednesday, Mr McCartney said: “With respect to the article which appeared in the newspaper about the ordeal experience by the single mother – an inquiry will be heard this week with respect to that matter.” British PM supporting efforts that could hit Bahamas financial sector GBPC responds to criticism by union n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net LOOPHOLES in the country's laws that allow foreign owned companies to move their earnings abroad must be closed, former minister of tourism Obie Wilchcombe said yesterday. He highlighted the troubles of the now insolvent CLICO (Bahamas a auditor general's report that revealed loose accounting practices and the global recession as prime reasons to take action now. "So much of what we have and so much of what is earned in the Bahamas does not stay in the Bahamas,” said Mr Wilchcombe in the House of Assembly yesterday, adding that this money is needed to build the economy and boost foreign reserves. "I am deeply concerned that we have multi-million dollar companies in the Bahamas, making hundreds of millions of dollars and most of it doesn't stay here,” he said. Mr Wilchcombe suggested that the government implement a “tempered” corporate tax on foreign investors – not high enough to deter investment but sufficient to make an impact on the suffering economy. He also challenged the country to find ways to build its reserves through agriculture and fisheries, in an effort to ensure the that country’s economy is sound independent of the tourism sector. The next 10 months will be a period of "survival" for the country, Mr Wilchcombe said, adding that this time must be used to create a proactive economic recovery plan that harnesses local resources, the full potential of which remains untapped. "I think it's important, if we are going to move our country forward, to understand that there are times when we must be aggressive, there are times when we must take our message to where it's going to be effective and we must discuss these matters. If we don't discuss these matters, then we would forever be seen as a third world country,” he said. BRITISH PM Gordon Brown (AP Wilchcombe calls for closure of loopholes Obie Wilchcombe Judge orders proceedings a gainst Haitian man be sta yed Inquiry to be held into alleged immigration raid Pair in court on fraud charges Two in court on drug charge

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune I have recently gone through an experience that I would not want my worst enemy to go through. You see I personally know a man who, over the past two months, had developed what was suspected to be mental disease (by laymen’s diag nosis). The man would display overly dramatic mood swings – from as calm as can be to seriously aggressive and obviously bel ligerent, all within minutes of being in his presence. It was not a pretty sight. What seemed obvious to all of us who were going through t his frightening and horrific o rdeal with this young man was that he needed professional help before he presented himself with situations which he could get hurt or even killed; or, much worse, he could hurt or kill someone else. Tell me something – so far, do you think that I sound like I am exaggerating? Let me tell you – I am certainly not! Just ask the individuals who were closely intertwined in this whole imbroglio. Anyway, as apprehensive and frightened as we all were of the whole scenario; and as concerned as we all were for this young man’s safety, the safety of the general public, and, of course, our own safety, we all were (and are that members of our Police Force have not been adequate ly trained, and the procedures they are instructed to follow are l eft wanting when charged to e xpeditiously and efficiently apprehend dangerous mentally ill individuals. What we were told, on more than one occasion, was that the Police cannot act unless the subject had a history of mental illness, or was acting violently at the time of the emergency call. Can you believe that? In the worst case what the Police were telling us was that we had to wait until this young man killed someone before they could be persuaded to act! Did you hear what I said? Do you think this is right? I am willing to bet my peasy head that even the policemen in our country reading this letter know that something is deadly wrong with this system of dealing with the mentally ill; and something must be done before some innocent person gets killed – the subject or his victim. When all was said and done, this young man was committed to Sandilands, thanks to the coordinated efforts of the young man’s family, friends, and Dr. Nelson Clarke (Chief Psychia trist at Sandilands). You can bet and believe that a copy of this letter will find its w ay to the desk of the Commissioner of Police, and also the Chief Psychiatrist at Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre. And let us all hope and pray that machinations would be initiated to alleviate this unequivocal deficiency in procedure and training in attempting to apprehend the mentally ill. MARVIN G. LIGHTBOURN Nassau, February 16, 2009 EDITOR, The Tribune. Currently The Bahamas Gove rnment and specifically The Royal Bahamas Police Force have many issues confronting them. However, it has been stated m any times that most of these p roblems start out as small matters but because they go unchecked they become major issues. Nevertheless, I am conc erned as it is not very long ago that the Prime Minister raised the issue about gambling being illegal yet it is tolerated at a significant l evel probably even more so since the introduction of the Florida “Powerball” lottery. The Prime Minister matter-of-factly i ndicated that The Bahamas s hould either make gambling legal or we enforce the law. What is the result? Business as usual. S ince the beginning of the year, I have been appalled at the number of letters written complaining about people’s businessesm aking loud noise to the disturb ance of other members of the public. We even had a Senator stating that residents should be tolerant o f such intrusive behaviour in these difficult economic times. I am unable to relate to such a statement which obviously indi-c ates that the innocent must exerc ise such tolerance as opposed to the perpetrator; What do the perpetrators sacrifice? Recently we had residents complaining about t he noise emanating from the headquarters of the NationalT rust, on Village Road, which eventually evoked a response f rom the President, Mr Carey. Mr Carey apologised for the disturbance and said that in future all such noise will stop by 9pm unless it is for a National Trust fundr aising event when it will cease by midnight. Again I fail to see the logic of why the residents should be required to be tolerant of such invasive attacks on theire vening hours of relaxation. Furthermore, I find it astonishing that the National Trust would encourage such activities which seem to b e diametrically opposed to one of their mandates. Have they forgotten that at night most birds also try to sleep? T he most recent reports of disturbance have been targeted at t he nightclub on West Bay Street adjacent to the EI Greco hotel. A gain the rationale for this invasion of privacy is in the name ofc ommerce and a "revitalization" o f the area and the wish to prov ide an attraction for the "Springb reakers" if they ever arrive. I am totally unable to grasp the l ogic of these people who rationalize such thinking. I n the past I have been a victim of this type of disturbance andn ow find myself reading the Official Gazette, on a daily basis, to n ote who is applying for a "Music and Dance" licence and then going to extensive trouble to pur sue the matter before the Licensing Board in an attempt to heado ff the problem before it gets started. I must confess, however, that I do not recall the National Trust a pplying for such a licence although this could be an oversight on my part. In all, of the cited cases above, t he disturbed residents have called the Police with the result that the noise level is reduced for a limited period. A short while after the Police v isitation, the volumes again escalate to the former level. Why is this allowed to happen do the Police enquire if the p ersonal/business has a valid licence? There are laws on the books that prohibit persons from being a public nuisance. Theref ore, when the Police are called to such an incident why don’t they issue a summons on the spot and fine the person breaching the p eace? If the Police are called to t he same offender more than once then the fines should be increased. When other laws on t he books are broken eg stealing are the Police just as tolerant or are we going to have another situation just like gam-b ling? Y es, there are major issues to deal with, but why not make a start with the small matter of being a public nuisance the e ffect is simple to execute and implement, it puts much needed cash in the Treasury and the public immediately see the benefitt hat something positive that is b eing done to improve their quality of life. There is no reason why such actions shouldn’t be extended to p ersons playing loud music from their cars, trucks and SUV’s.P eace on earth. L AW ABIDING CITIZEN Nassau, March 3, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm Immigration revenue up nearly $10m A T LEAST one ministry is earning money f or the country Immigration. Immigration Minister of State Branville McCartney announced in the House that between July 1 and December 31, 2008 the I mmigration Department had collected more than $29.2 million a revenue surplus of more than $9.8 million. He attributed the surplus to the new fee s tructure, which was increased considerably on J uly 1 last year, and to the department’s vigilance in collecting outstanding fees. Mr McCartney told the House that since the formation of the department’s debt collection u nit there has been an improvement in the pay ment of permits. F or example, the unit investigated the department’s Grand Bahama office. About 330 files w ere audited and about $1.5 million were found to be outstanding. Mr McCartney said that companies in arrears will have none of their permits renewed until they either pay the outstanding fees or arrange a payment plan with the departm ent. He wondered how these fees could have p ossibly fallen into arrears, especially as each approval letter makes it very clear that “the p ermit will be issued upon receipt of the fee, which should be in cash or certified cheque only.” The question is: How could Immigration have issued the permits if no money was r eceived? Surely, employers were not using the letter of approval as a permit and going withoutt he actual permit? This seems an impossibility. The obvious answer is that staff were not doing t heir job. We recall an occasion several years ago when we had to wait so long for an answer from Immigration that we lost a very good job applicant. When the approval letter eventually came, half a year later, we ignored it. Immigration called to find out what had happened to our cheque. We told them what cliff they could jump from. How Immigration’s accounts receivable could be in such a shocking state is a mystery as Immigration’s approval letter makes it very clear that “this letter is not authority for the above named person to be employed as he cannot be lawfully employed until he is in posses sion of valid work permit” And to get a valid work permit, one has to first pay the fee. When The Tribune receives an Immigration approval letter, it sends a cheque by messenger t o Immigration, then waits a few days before c alling to find out if the permit is ready for the messenger to collect. Having worked with Immigration in connection with permits for so many years, we can u nderstand how some businesses, in desperate need of specialist staff, would put a specialist to work even before his permit had been approved. It was a risky business, but it was encouraged byt he foot-dragging of Immigration in processing a pplications, which often caused an employer to lose an important employee for his business. Immigration officials closed their eyes to this infraction. H owever, the employer was caught because he had to pay for the permit from the date ofa pplication Immigration having assumed that the employee had already been working f rom that date. However, businesses like The Tribune that will not play Russian-roulette with Immigration are caught in an unfair trap. The Tribune will not finalise any contract u nless it actually has the Immigration Board’s approval. O nce that approval is given, the contract is signed. H owever, the future employee has then to give his current employer notice. This notice can vary from a month to three months. This means that The Tribune has already paid Immigration for a year’s permit, d ated from the day of Immigration’s approval. However, by the time the staff member has a rrived in Nassau, The Tribune has paid Immigration for three months that our candidate w as still on someone else’s payroll. In other words, The Tribune has paid for a year’s permit, but, depending upon when the employee is free to join, has him on staff for about eight months. It is inequities like this that tempts employers to play fast and lose with Immigration. With the Immigration Board dedicating Mondays to the approval of permits, many of these delays in granting permits should be overcome. However, there should be a new system for the dating of a permit. Just as Tuesday is Cabinet day, in the old days under the UBP Mondays were Immigration days, and many problems that businesses have encountered for years with this depart ment were avoided. However, Mr McCartney and his new staff have made a new start and seem to be making progress we wish them luck. Why are we becoming such a lawless society? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Something is deadly wrong with our system of dealing with the mentally ill

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n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter T HE continuing effort by Bahamian and American oncologists to find the causef or the aggressive ovarian and breast cancer genes in Bahamian women continued yesterday at the PrincessM argaret Hospital Oncolo g y Centre with clinical trial testing. American oncologist Dr J udith Hurley of the University of Miami together with Bahamian oncologists D octors John Lunn, T heodore Turnquest and D uvaughn Curling will be conducting cancer clinical trials in Bahamian women. The first phase of the clin ical testing was conducted in November 2008 at the Cancer Society of the Bahamas as a joint partnership effort between Dr Hurley and the Bahamian oncologists and came as a result of the estab lishment of the Bahamas B reast Cancer Initiative (BBCI headed by former US A mbassador to the Bahamas N ed L Siegel and his wife Stephanie Siegel. Findings The BBCI was created following alarming findings b y researchers and the o bservations of Bahamian a nd American medical professionals and survivors. The initiative is commit ted to creating greater awareness of the importance of early detection in saving lives. The Cancer Society of the Bahamas and the University of Miami are continuing their tests for a mutated gene they believe to be prevalent in Bahamian women. Altered genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2m ake women more susceptible to breast and ovarian cancer. T he study began in 2002 a fter Dr Hurley and Bahamian doctors noticed that women in the Bahamas were being diagnosed withc ancer at earlier ages than women in other countries. They carried out a preliminary scan of breast cancer patient charts from Princess Margaret Hospital and l earned that 48 per cent of t he patients were diagnosed before the age of 50. A study of 18 Bahamian breast cancer patients living in South Florida was launched because of this find. In eight of these cases, researchers found one or more of three gene mutations that can predispose women to breast cancer. PRAISING the Enforcement Unit of the Immigration Department for its “outstanding work” in apprehending illegal immigrants, Minister of State for Immigration Branville McCartney told the House of Assembly during his contribution to the budget debate that he doesn’t “wish to wake up one morning in the Bahamas and ask, where am I?” “(I don’t wish we Bahamians are outnumbered i n our own country, or we find o urselves as a minority in our own country,” Mr McCartney said. S o far this fiscal year, 3,512 illegal immigrants have been r epatriated. Most of the persons repatriated this year were apprehended t his year. In fact, just yesterday, we repatriated 128 persons,” Mr McCartney said. Professional H e insisted that Immigration officers always expected to conduct themselves in a profes-s ional manner when carrying out apprehen s ions. “Officers who step out of line are on their own, and the Department will deal with them very firmly. We will not compromise on this issue. With respect to the article which appeared in the newspaper about the ordeal experienced by the single mother, an inquiry w ill be heard this week with respect to that matter,” Mr McCartney said. The Immigration Department was allocated $18,695,006 in the 2008/2009 budget estimates. Of that: $8.76 million was for salaries $3 million for overtime $2 million for repatriation exercises $1.3 million for Family Island operations Mr McCartney said that with the exception of overtime, all expenditure items have so far r emained within the budgeted a mounts. However, he added that the repatriation of illegal immig rants continues to absorb a large portion of the department ’s – and the countries – r esources. Between July 1, 2008 and D ecember 31, repatriation exercises cost the country $411,353. M r McCartney pointed out that employers are still willing to hire illegal migrants. “If employers were monitored and only a llowed to employ people with valid documentation this would reduce the demand for i llegal labour. “Apprehensions represent only one side of the enforcement necessary to stop the migrat ion motor. “Both supply and demand must be cons trained if word is to get back to those places where illegals come from that it is no longer possible for illegal migrants to obtain employ m ent and find housing if they are illegal,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 5 T HE 67th Annual Red Cross Fair will be held this coming Saturday in the lower gardens of Government House. T he co-chairpersons of t his annual event, Pauline A llen-Dean and Brendon Watson, along with the fair’s committee members have once again organiseda fun-filled family event. E ach year the fair caters t o thousands of individuals w ho pass through the gates to enjoy themselves in a wholesome family activity, with games, food and rides. T his year, there are the usual favourites – conch f ritters, guava duff, straw w ork crafted by local artisans, hoop-la, punch board, balloons, cotton candy, and p lants. This event, one of the major fundraisers of the B ahamas Red Cross Socie ty, ensures the organisation’s continued work through its various programmes. Some of the Red Cross’ programmes include meals-o n-wheels, after-school mentoring, summer camp, first aid training, disaster and emergency relief. All of these activities are funded by the Societies’ v arious fundraising efforts a nd through the assistance of the Red Cross staff and numerous volunteers. THE Department of Immigration’s $9 million surplus is the result of a new fee structure, vigilance by its officers and the formation of a debt collection unit, Minister of State for Immigration Branville McCartney told the House o f Assembly. D uring his contribution t o the budget debate, Mr McCartney said that the newly formed unit, under the direction of the departm ent’s director and finance o fficer, has compiled a list o f companies owing outstanding fees. Companies Their records revealed t hat 70 companies have b een audited in New Provi dence and found to owe the Bahamas government at otal of $834,718. A similar exercise was carried out in Grand Bahama, where 330 files were audited and around $1.5 million were found to be outstanding. “As for those companies w ho owe the department m oney, the department will n ot be minded to issue furt her renewals without e ither a settlement of outs tanding fees or a payment plan arrangement,” Mr McCartney said. The state minister said that the “big question” is how did the fees fall into arrears in the first place? “It is apparent that once persons have been issued approval letters, they have t aken those letters to mean go ahead and engage w orkers’. Payment “This is done despite the fact that the letter states that payment must be made within 30 days or the offer will be withdrawn,” h e said. L arge companies, particularly hotel companies, and p ersons requesting short t erm work permits tend to p ut persons to work before paying, he said. A ccording to the Min i stry of Finance’s revenue budget estimates, the Immigration Department’s total revenue for the 2008/2009 fiscal year is forecasted to be $38.7 million. The revenue for the first h alf of the year was forec ast to be $19.4 million, but M r McCartney said the d epartment had in fact coll ected $29.2 million by D ecember 31, 2008. Minister:I don’t want Bahamians to be minority in our own country Department has a $9 million surplus Branville McCartney Red Cross Fair this Saturday In brief Clinical trial testing at the Princess Mar garet Hospital Oncology Centre

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BLUE LAGOON ISLAND For 20 years, Dolphin Encounters, located on Blue Lagoon Island, has offered Bahamians and visitors from around the world the unique opportunity to interact and learn about friendly marine mammals in an all-natural marine habitat. As part of its 20th annivers ary celebration, Dolphin Encounters is inviting the children of the Bahamas to name the latest addition to their dolphin family – a healthy male calf. The dolphin baby is the fourth calf born to Princess on October 11, 2008. Dolphin Encounters is very fortunate to have another baby calf born on Blue Lagoon Island to Princess, our eldest dolphin,” said Robert Meister, managing director of Dolphin Encounters. “Princess has been a part of our beloved marine mammal family from the very beginning. T hrough our many educational p rogrammes, thousands of school children have met her and have come to love her and all of our animals as much as we do. “We wanted the honour of naming her boy calf to be given to the children of the Bahamas.” Students enrolled in any g rade from kindergarten to grade 12 in the Bahamas are invited to submit suggestions for the name of the baby male dolphin. In keeping with Bahamian culture, the name selected must be related to island culture, history or geography. All submissions must also i nclude the reason the student feels the name should be chosen. The student whose name is chosen will receive a special dolphin gift kit, a free dolphin adventure programme for their entire class where they will meet the baby and Princess. The baby calf and mom are doing very well,” said Kim Ter rell, marine mammal director at Dolphin Encounters. “Princess is an extraordinary and experienced mother and has given birth to three of our other dolphins including Shawn, Aba co and Salvador. When dolphins successfully breed under human care it is a scientific indicator that they are completely adapted to the environment in which they live. The fact that eleven of our 18 dolphin family members were born at Dolphin Encounters makes us proud that the all natural environment which we have provided is ultimately ideal for the Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphin.” “We have a great deal to celebrate and be proud of in our 20-year history, but nothing compares to our extraordinary animals that have brought joy and a greater understanding of marine mammals and the environment in which they live to Bahamians and visitors alike,” Mr Meister said. “We look forward to receiving submissions from students and to announce the winning name in April.” The baby-naming contest is free to students in the Bahamas and entry forms are available online at Dolphin Encounters website or at the Dolphin Encounters offices at One Marina Drive Paradise Island. The contest runs from March 1– March 31, 2009. Dolphin Encounters is a member of the International Marine Animal Trainers Asso ciation (IMATA organisation of its kind. In 1997, the facility was accepted into the prestigious Alliance of Marine Mammal Parks and Aquariums (AMM PA), and in 2004 became an accredited member of the group, confirming its status as one of the top marine parks in the world. A non-profit element of the marine park is Project BEACH (Bahamas Education Association for Cetacean Health). It was developed in close consul tation with the Bahamas Department of Education, the National Science Teachers Association and BREEF (Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation). To date, thousands of local students and teachers have benefited from its innovative, onsite and classroom programmes. In 2003, Dolphin Encounters and Project BEACH received the prestigious Cacique Award, the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism’s highest honour for excellence in tourism. WE ALWAYSknew that the rules didn't apply e qually to the powerful in the same way that they apply to the weak. Equality under the law does not seem to apply to the community of Nations.This unfortunate fact was dramatically demonstrated this week. J ust as the Cayman I slands are waiting nerv ously for an assault from t he authorities in the Unite d Kingdom on their banki ng secrecy laws and The Bahamas is hearing rumblings from Washingtont hat would appear to endanger the international financial industry in our already battered economy, a n interesting matter in making news. That matter in the r efusal of the Union Bank o f Switzerland, UBS, to h and over information on the accounts of the 57,000 US citizens who have accounts with the bank. Cayman and The Bahamas should monitor t his affair closely. It will be e xtremely enlightening to o bserve what action the US c an or will take against S witzerland and its great bank. T hose of us who have r ead George Orwell's lege ndary book Animal Farm will remember that whent he pigs took over the farm a nd then started to rule and behave like the farmers they overthrew and this sit uation was complained about by the other animals, the pigs gave their expla nation. That explanationw as that all animals were c reated equal but that some a nimals were more equal t han others. S o to paraphrase George O rwell, all Nations are equal but some are more equal than others. VIEW FROM AFAR B Y J OHN I SSA BANK SECRECY Children invited to name dolphin calf PRINCESS and her baby swim t ogether at Dolphin Encounters o n Blue Lagoon Island. The s chool children of the Bahamas are invited to name the dolphinc alf in a baby-naming contest as p art of Dolphin Encounters’ 20th anniversary celebration.

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n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter A S PARTof the ongoing effort to reach out to the community,t he Bain and Grants Town A dvancement Association offic ially launched its revitalisation project earlier this week. Rev Dr C B Moss, chairman of t he association, said although there have been several previousp rojects designed to renew the B ain and Grants Town area along w ith other inner-city communities, their project is different in a number of ways. It is a private sector project that is not sponsored by the government, there will be a bottomu p instead of a top down implementation and it will be driven by the local people instead of outsiders. The boundaries of the target area include East Street on the east, Nassau Street on the west, S hirley Street on the north and Cordeaux Avenue in the south. Areas lying just outside these areas may also be included in the p roject,” he said. Rev Moss said the association, which has provided cultural, s ocial, academic, sporting, youth and religious programmes within the community over the past 12 y ears, will be the sponsoring the project. “The five principal pillars of the project are health, education, sports, economics, and culture. S ignificant concerns to be addressed by the commission i nclude social services, health, e nvironment, education and economics,” he said. Rev Moss said the project will a lso include expansive self-sustaining programmes such as the Heritage Tourism Project and the Y13 Project, a computer literacy initiative. T he association is currently in discussions with the Ministry of T ourism, the College of the B ahamas and several corporate, civic and religious groups with a view to partnering in various a spects of the project. “The main engine that will power the target area out of its economic and socially depressed state will be the financial benefits t o the residents. “Therefore, major emphasis w ill be placed on economic activi ties at the individual and corporate levels,” Mr Moss said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 7 75%OFFUp to Fri. March 6th Sat. March 7th 10:00am 4pm Cash&Carry!Office Supplies & Furniture, School Supplies, Stationary and MUCH MORE!Parking Lot Robinson Rd.Tel: 393-5964SALETent Head on down to John Bull Business Centre for great savings at the annual... FKLOGUHQ
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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE year over five million people from all places in the world,” he announced at the Grand Bahama Business Outlook in Freeport. Carnival Corporation is the largest c ruise operation in the world. It has 11 cruise companies, including brands such as Carnival Cruise Lines, Holland America Line, Princess Cruises and Seabourn C ruise Line in North America; P and O Cruises, Cunard Line and Ocean Village in the United Kingdom; AIDA in Germany; C osta Cruises in southern Europe; Iberocruceros in Spain; and P and O Cruises i n Australia. Mr Israel said Carnival Corporation comprises 56 per cent of the cruise market i n the world, with 565 ports in 139 countries. He said this winter they have six s hips in Santos, Brazil, Shanghai, China, and Dubai. He also noted that some 84,000 persons are employed worldwide with Carnival, w hich has a total of 88 ships. Mr Israel reported that Carnival will get 17 additional new ships this year. We get a new large Carnival ship every 7 1 days,” he explained. M r Israel indicated that cruise vacations w ill not go away and Carnival Corporation w ill continue to develop and grow with t he deployment of other brands. North America is the major source of business for Carnival Corporation. It is p resently focusing on pursuing growth opportunities in Europe. “In the next 120 days, we will have four brand new ships, each costing $700 million, g eared to the Euro market. We will be getting two ships delivered in one day at the cost of $1.3 billion,” he said. M r Israel said the German market has g reat potential. In Germany, there are 100 million peop le and 84 million of them take 100 million v acations a year. We only carry 600,000 of them on cruise ships and we have long way to go,” he said. have hit the victim in the face with a rock when she intervened in a brawl that was underway in the parking lot of the Kentucky FriedC hicken restaurant in Martin T own, Eight Mile Rock, G rand Bahama, police said. The woman, whose identity is not known, suffered multiple facial fractures and her condition is listed as serious. She remains in the Rand Memorial Hospital inF reeport, where she was taken by ambulance, police said. According to an official r eport, police were alerted t o the scene of the attack at a round 3.22pm on Tuesday. They said they met a “large crowd of Eight Mile Rock High students” in the parking lot of the restaurant and were informed that thee mployee suffered her injuries “while trying to assist one of the studentsw ho was involved in the f ight.” As a result of an intense investigation three students were taken into custody and charged for the offence. “They appeared at the Eight Mile Rock Magis-t rate’s court on Thursday, March 5, where one of them pleaded guilty to the offencea nd the other two were disc harged. The lone male stud ent remains in custody pending an updated report on the victim’s condition.” Police did not explain why the incident was only made known to the media twod ays after it occurred. FROM page one Nassau is world’s ‘No.1 cruise por FROM page one Students plead guilty to causing grievous harm n CARACAS, Venezuela VENEZUELANPresident Hugo Chavez has given Brazil’s president the green light to talk about Venezuela with President Barack Obam, acca. Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva plans to meet Obama on March 14 in Washing-t on, and Chavez said the Brazilian leader told him by phone that “he would like to talk with the president of the United States about the case of Venezuela.” U.S.-Venezuelan relations remain prickly despite the change of administrations in Washington, while Brazil’s left-leaning president has maintained friend-ly relations both with the U.S. and the socialist Chavez. “We don’t need any intermediary to speak with any government o n the planet, but since it’s Lula and in good faith, I told him yes, that I gave him the green light,” Chavez said Thursday in a televised speech, addressing troops. Chavez added, however, that “I’ve told him I don’t have much hope of that government changing.” Silva’s office confirmed the two spoke by phone Wednesday and agreed the Brazilian leader could bring up Venezuela with Obama. Chavez has condemned recent U.S. State Department reports alleging human rights problems in Venezuela and a lack of cooper-a tion in counter-drug efforts. Chavez says US, Brazil free to discuss Venezuela Hugo Chavez (AP

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 9 n F OOTBALL IRVING, Texas Associated Press DALLASCowboys receiver Sam Hurd said Terrell Owens sent him a text mes-s age late Wednesday, saying he had been cut by the team. “He didn’t give me an explanation. He just said, ‘Wow,”’ Hurd said Thursday. “I really didn’t believe thath e seen that coming.” H urd said Owens’ reaction was “more shock than anger.” He said it’s tough, but it’s a business,” Hurd said. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones i ndicated a few weeks ago that T.O. was going to remain in Dallas, where he’s hadt hree straight 1,000-yard seasons. Jones’ abrupt reversal w as first reported Wednesday night by ESPN. The Cowboys reportedly m ade another, more-expected move Thursday by releasing safety Roy Williams. The team had no comment on either move. The moves all seem to be a imed toward an improved a tmosphere in the locker room, something widely viewed as a reason for the Cowboys’ problems last season. A preseason Super Bowlp ick by many, Dallas missed the playoffs after losing three of its last four games, includ-i ng a blowout in the finale w hen a victory would’ve clinched a playoff berth. A lso this offseason, the Cowboys have let go of Adam “Pacman” Jones and TankJ ohnson. Owens’ personality overs hadowed his performance, stretching thin his relationship with coaches and somet eammates. It’s similar to the circumstances around his d epartures from the San Francisco 49ers and Philadelphia Eagles. Without him, offensive coordinator Jason Garrett and quarterback Tony Romo nol onger have to think about w hether No. 81 is happy. “I know it takes a lot of pressure off Romo,” Hurd said. “A guy like him demands the ball and youw ant to get him the ball. Now he can look at all of us and see which one is open on anyg iven play. ... I don’t think t hat was a problem. That’s just what could and might s tart happening.” Dallas’ passing game likely will now revolve around RoyW illiams, who was acquired from Detroit for three 2009 d raft picks in the middle of last season. In addition to Hurd, the Cowboys also haveP atrick Crayton and Miles Austin. A s for Owens, it remains to be seen what kind of market there is for a 35-year-old with a proven track record good and bad. His personality might be a f it Al Davis and the Raiders. O r maybe Daniel Snyder and the Washington Redskins might add another big-name star to the roster, especially to take advantage of the ani-m osity T.O. might bring to his two games a year against the Cowboys and the Eagles. I don’t think (being r eleased) is going to stop him from playing football,” Hurd s aid. “He’s going to be back on somebody’s team.” Don’t look for him to r eplace Laveranues Coles on the Jets. The team has no i nterest in Owens because of the distractions he’d bring, a person familiar with thet eam’s thinking told The Associated Press on Thursd ay. Friend says Terrell Owens has been cut by Cowboys IN THIS Dec. 28, 2008 file photo, Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Terrell Owens (81f ootball game against Philadelphia Eagles in Philadelphia. The Cowboys officially released Owens on Thursday, March 5, 2009, ending a three-year run that produced as many big headlines as big plays. Mel Evans/ AP Photo

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ishes in the Intermediate girls from Marva Etienne. The 15-year-old Etienne took first place in the 100mH in 16.17s and again in the 100m in 12.07s. Ivanique Kemp led the Knights in the Senior Girls division with a trio of first place finishes. Kemp took the 100m with a wind aided time of 11.89s, finished first in the 100mH in 14.72s and anchored her 400m relay team to a first place finish in 51.28s. Not to be outdone in the field, Elcardo Carey broke the second record of the day for the Knights in the Senior Boys’ shot put. Carey’s toss of 14.08m passed the previous mark set last year by Elvardo Carey of 13.70m. Day one saw a myriad of other performances from athletes looking to give their school the effort needed to surpass the Knights’ advantage, most notably, the Rattlers’ Katrina Seymour. Seymour won three of her four events and smashed a 19year-old mark in the Interme diate Girls’ 400m. Seymour’s time of 57.19s easily bested the previous mark of 58.77s by Carmetta Mackey in 1990. Seymour also took first place in the long jump with a leap of 5.07m, anchored her team to a first place finish in the 400m relay in 52.38s and narrowly missed the 100m title with a second place finish to Etienne in 12.09s. C.V Bethel’s Tamika Brown also set a new record in the Senior Girls’ triple jump. Brown leapt 11.76m beating the old mark of 11.73m set by Tina Ferguson in 2004. The two-day meet concludes today at the Thomas A. Robinson Stadium, beginning at 9am. “We are away from home, p laying on a different turf, but w e will just go out there and play our game,” he said. “I’m playing first, so I just have to do my thing. “I think the night matches is going to be fun. We’re going tohave a lot more people around. T his is my second or third night match, so it should be a lot of fun.” Noted Mullings, playing in the best-of-five sets should work in his favour: “The longer the match, the better for me. So I just need to go out there and work hard and make him play, wait for the right balls to attack and just be real gritty out there and gut it out. just have to be patient and wait for the opportunity to attack.” As for playing in the evening, Mullings said it was best for him because “it’s much cooler.” On Saturday, the official opening ceremonies will take place at 5 pm. That will be fol lowed by the doubles with Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle scheduled to play. Both players are just as enthused as the singles players. Rolle, who teamed up last year with Mark Knowles to win the Bahamas’ only match in their 4-1 loss to Paraguay at the National Tennis Center, said he and Munroe had been working out very well together. “BJ is an experienced doubles player. He won a Futures and he’s done well at the pro level,” Rolle pointed out. “So if we play our game, we should do very well.” For Rolle, it really doesn’t matter playing in the night because they’ve done it before. “We practised under the lights and all of these guys played in the night before,” he said. “So it shouldn’t be nothing new because we are all comfortable playing under the lights.” The tie is going to be an emotional one for Munroe, whose family buried his brother, Lavaughn Munroe, a former Davis Cup team member, the weekend before they left for Paraguay. Munroe said all of the players had made a commitment to play in his memory, so he had a little more incentive to go out and play in the doubles. “I feel pretty confident. Delgado is pretty tough in doubles, but he’s playing with a junior who is less experienced, so hope fully we can get to the junior a little bit more,” Munroe said. “Me and Marvin have been playing well in practice. We have been gelling, so we feel pretty good about the whole tie. Even the guys playing in the singles. So it’s a pivotal match and we feel comfortable about it.” Like everybody, Munroe said it didn’t matter playing in the night, but they preferred that than to play in the extreme heat in the day. “It shouldn’t really matter because we’ve practised here in the night under the lights,” he said. “We just have to be ready to play and I think all of the guys are confident that we will do very well.” POINT STANDINGS C.R Walker Knights(CRW 333.50 C.I. Gibson Rattlers(CIG 247.50 C.V Bethel Stingrays(CVB 237.50 C .C Sweeting Cobras(CCS 1 85 Doris Johnson Marlins(DDJ 177.50 R.M Bailey Pacers(RMB 146 G.H.S Magic(GHS 83 Anatol Rodgers(AR 70 RESULTS I NTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 Etienne, Marva – CRW,12.07s Seymour, Katrina – CIG, 12.09s Colbrooke, Vashti – CIG, 12.50s INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 Seymour, Katrina – CIG, 57.19s Adderley, Teshon – CVB , 57.45s Rolle, Lakeisha – RMB, 1:03.55s INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 Cherilus, Angela – AR, 5:41.11s Lewis, Safara – CRW, 6:02.20s McIntosh, Crystal – RMB , 6:11.82s I NTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 Etienne, Marva – CRW, 16.17s S ears, Hollina – CCS, 16.45s Rolle, Tiffany – CIG, 17.70s INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 RELAY C.I Gibson – Rolle, Tiffany; Colebrooke, Vashti; Jean Louis, Louisianna; Seymour, Katrina, 51.48s C.R Walker – Ettienne, Marva; Capron, La'Chea; Rahming, Edricka; Whylly, Lashawn, 52.38sC V. Bethel – Gaitor, Lyndisha; Higgs, Gregria; Adderley, Teshon; Flowers, Tonea, 53.47s INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 J UMP Seymour, Katrina – CIG, 5.07m M artin, Sasha – GHS, 4.52m Rolle, Lakeisha – RMB, 4.33m INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 THROW Williams, Racquel – CVB, 34.70m Taylor, Jewel – CRW, 22.90m C ollie, Jasmine – GHS, 18.30m INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 THROW Prosper, Tawanna – CVB, 29.84m Martin, Sasha – GHS, 28.61m Rogers, Terranique – CCS, 25.22m INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U17 JUMP Sears, Hollina – CCS, 1.44m Young, Lyndia – CRW, J1.44m Lewis, Safara – CRW, 1.39m INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Ferguson, O'Jay – CRW, 11.08s Adderley, Tre – CVB, 11.20s Finley, Toriano – AR, 11.23s I NTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 F erguson, O'Jay – CRW, 50.97s Hanchell, Marlon – CVB, 53.28s Davis, Patrick – CCS, 54.00s INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Rolle, Percy – AR, 5:02.50s W ells, Denzil – CCS, 5:06.89s Saunders, Carson – CCS, 5:12.22s I NTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Ferguson, Donshannon – CVB, 15.02s Adderley, Tre – CVB, 15.41s Walkine, Marco – DDJ, 15.62s INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 RELAY C.V Bethel – Lockhart, David; Sands, Neil; Adderley, Tre; Farrington, Anthony , 4 5.04s Anatol Rodgers – Moss, Owen; Evans, Trevel; Finley, Toriano; Bodie, Eusias , 46.17s C .I Gibson – Valcin, Avens; Forbes, Rodney; Pratt, Kevin; Knowles, Demarcus , 47.33s I NTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 JUMP Adderley, Patrizio – CIG, 6.08m Miller, Kareem – RMB, 5.80m Martin, Stelin – GHS, 5.74m I NTERMEDIATE BOYS (U17 Rolle, Matthew – GHS, 10.64m Mackey, Samuel – CRW, 9.89m Darling, Samuel – AR, 9.77m SENIOR GIRLS (U20 K emp, Ivanique – CRW, 11.89s Knowles, Antonya – CRW, 12.52s Kelly, Cache – RMB, 12.83s SENIOR GIRLS (U20 Miller, Shaunte – GHS, 1:01.74s Knowles, Antonya – CRW, 1:02.46sJ ustilien, Sydline – RMB, 1:04.71s SENIOR GIRLS (U20 Dean, Glendina – CRW, 5:42.24s Conliffe, Queenell – DDJ, 6:02.59s Zonicle, Danielle – DDJ, 6:05.51s S ENIOR GIRLS (U20 Conliffe, Queenell – DDJ, 13:02.64s Dean, Glendina – CRW, 13:10.95s Zonicle, Danielle – DDJ, 14:11.71s SENIOR GIRLS (U20 Kemp, Ivanique – CRW, 14.72s Kelly, Cache – RMB, 17.35s Lutus, Oguilene – CVB, 18.09s SENIOR GIRLS (U20 C.R Walker – Kemp, Ivanique; Knowles, Antonya; Adderley, Mitchalyn; Saunders, Cleshae, 51.28s R.M Bailey – Kelly, Cache; Johnson, Tonia-Kay; Oliver, Vithlene; Justilien, Sydliene, 52.58s C.I Gibson – Brown, Kenicka; Dames, Avianna; Stubbs, Jarona; Brown, Vanessa, 53.40s SENIOR GIRLS (U20 Bain, Tamika – CVB, 11.76m Zonicle, Danielle – DDJ, 10.99m B rown, Vanessa – CIG, 10.97m SENIOR GIRLS (U20 C rooks, Tanya – CIG, 1.50m Brown, Jakia – DDJ, 1.35m E wing, Gardia – RMB, J1.35m B rown, Kenicka – CIG, J1.35m K elly, Cache – RMB, J1.35m S ENIOR GIRLS (U20 Thurston, Keisha – CCS, 27.95m Belle, Jenesta – CVB, 26.74m Johnson, Shantia – CRW, 25.80m SENIOR GIRLS (U20 Brown, Jakia – DDJ, 30.17m Gordon, Giavanna – CCS, 27.45m Zonicle, Danielle – DDJ, 27.20m SENIOR BOYS (U20 Mackey, Trevor – DDJ, 10.59s Richardson, Charles – CRW, 10.76s Hinsey, Ulysses – CVB, 10.99s SENIOR BOYS (U20 D eveaux, Delano – DDJ, 49.54s W illiams, Ramon – CIG, 51.03s Thompson, Ishmael – CCS, 53.53s SENIOR BOYS (U20 Altidor, Kevin – CCS, 4:29.03s Burrows, Crashad – DDJ, 4:38.76s Pierre, Sedel – CVB, 4:39.03s SENIOR BOYS (U20 S eveus, Vicnel – CIG, 19:52.97s Louis, Jefferson – CRW, 20:20.59s Burrows, Crashad – DDJ, 20:29.85s SENIOR BOYS (U20 Thompson, Roneko – CRW, 16.46s Cash, Cody – CIG, 16.86s Lightbourne, Dellano – CRW, 16.96s SENIOR BOYS (U20 C .V Bethel – McKinney, Austin; Fowler, Kendal; Hinsey, Ulysses; Johnson Demitrius , 43.76s C.R Walker – Richardson, Charles; Stubbs, Javano; Moss, Omar; Collie, Dominic, 44.15s Doris Johnson – Williams, Tyreco; Clarke, M ichsel; Deveaux, Delano; Mackey, Trevor, 44.17s SENIOR BOYS (U20 Clark, Clinton – CVB, 14.20m Babbs, Tehneil – CRW, 13.79m King, Ramano – CIG, 13.53m SENIOR BOYS (U20 Rolle, Rendol – DDJ, 1.80m King, Ramano – CIG, J1.80m Stubbs, Ashton CRW, 1.75m Bromwell, Brandon – CVB, 1.75m SENIOR BOYS (U20 Carey, Elcardo – CRW, 14.08m J ohnson, Rio – CVB, 11.71m Strachan, Shawn – RMB, 11.66m C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t 322-2188/9 Ill FROM page 11 FROM page 11 Knights out front after Day One GSSSA SENIOR HIGH TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS RESULTS Davis Cup team ready MARVA ETTIENNE soars on her first attempt of the Intermediate Girls’ Long Jump. Etienne failed to place in the event but took first place in the 100m and 100mH.

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C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE International sports news BASEBALL F REEDOM FARM SCHEDULE Here’s a look at the schedule of games this w eekend in the Freedom Farm Baseball League in Yamacraw: TEE BALL 11 am Raptors vs Sidewinders 1 pm Blue Claws vs Sand Gnats 3 pm Knights vs Grasshoppers COACH PITCH 10 am Angels vs Cubs 12:30 pm Diamondbacks vs Astros 3 pm Athletics vs Blue Jays MINOR LEAGUE 1 0 am Red Sox vs vs Rockies 1 2:30 pm Royals vs Mets MAJOR LEAGUE 12:30 pm Reds vs Marlins 3 pm Indians vs Mariners J UNIOR LEAGUE 10 am Dodgers vs Cardinals 12:30 pm Yankees vs Twins S ENIOR LEAGUE S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 3 pm Pirates vs Phillies S S u u n n d d a a y y 3 pm Tigers vs Rangers BASEBALL J BLN SCHEDULE Here’s a look at the schedule of games this weekend at the Junior Baseball League of Nas-s au at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams. T BALL: F F r r i i d d a a y y 6 pm Jujus vs Dillies S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 9 am Coco Plums vs Seagrapes 1 0:15 am Guineps vs Dillies C OACH PITCH: F F r r i i d d a a y y 7:30 pm Bees vs Green Turtles S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 11:30 am Mosquitoes vs Wasps 1 pm Bees vs Boas 3 pm Sandflies vs Green turtles S S u u n n d d a a y y 3 pm Boas vs Wasps 9 9 1 1 0 0 : : F F r r i i d d a a y y 6 pm Barracudas vs Dolphins 7:30 pm Red Snappers vs Turbots S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y Noon Eels vs Octopus S S u u n n d d a a y y 4 :30 pm Barracudas vs Eels 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 : : S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 10 am vs Wild Dogs (11-010-3 1:30 pm White Crowns vs Marlins3 :30 Parrots vs Conchs S S u u n n d d a a y y 4:30 pm Wild Dogs vs Marlins 1 1 3 3 1 1 5 5 : : S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 9 am Silverjacks vs Sharks 1 1 am Stingrays vs Raccoons 1 pm Potcakes vs Sharks 3 pm Raccoons vs Silverjacks 1 1 6 6 1 1 8 8 : : S S u u n n d d a a y y 2 :30 pm Lucayans vs Tainos 4 pm Arawaks vs Caribs BASKETBALL NPBA POSTSEASON THE New Providence Basketball Association will complete its regular season tonight at the CI Gibson Gymnasium with just one game on tap. The Cola-Cola Explorers will take on the John son’s Jumping Jumpers. Then on Moday night, the first round of the postseason will get underway. BASKETBALL BSC SCHEDULE THE schedule of game for the Baptist Sports Council’s 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Classic on Saturday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex are as follows: COURT ONE 10 am Macedonia vs Golden Gates (15 11 am First Baptist vs Zion South Beach (15 Noon Golden Gates vs Miracle Working (19 1 pm Mercy Seat vs Macedonia (19 2 pm BIBA vs City of Praise (M 3 pm Ebenezer vs Temple Fellowship (M COURT TWO 10 am Miracle Working vs Latter-Day (15 11 am Faith United vs Temple Fellowship (15 Noon Faith United vs Mircale Working (19 1 pm Golden Gates vs Temple Fellowship (19 2 pm Christian Tabernacle vs Church of the Nazarene (M 3 pm New Bethlehem vs Evangelistic Center (M sports NOTES T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f C.R. Walker’s O.J Ferguson powers down the home stretch in his record-breaking performance in the Intermediate Boys’ 400m Finals. Ferguson set a new GSSSA mark of 50.97s. Knights out front after Day One n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net IN WHAT has become commonplace in the Gov ernment Secondary Schools Sports Association annual meet, one perennial powerhouse heads the leaderboard by a comfortable margin after the first day of competition. The C.R Walker Knights grabbed a firm hold of the top spot with 333.50 points, a substantial 86 point advantage over their nearest competitors. The C.I Gibson Rattlers are in second with 247.50 points, a slim 10 point margin over the third placed C.V Bethel Stingrays with 237.50 points. The C.C Sweeting Cobras, 185 points and Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins, 177.50 points, round out the top five. The Knights dominated the sprints in several divi sions including one record breaking performance. O’Jay Ferguson broke a 16-year-old record in the Intermediate Boys’ 400m with a blistering time of 50.97 seconds. The previous mark of 51.02s was set by Mark Sturrup in 1993. Ferguson finished nearly three seconds ahead of the remainder of the field, with C.V Bethel’s Marlon Hanchell placing second in 53.28s. Ferguson returned a short time later to take first place in the 100m, with a wind aided time of 11.06s. The Knights received another pair of first place finFour new GSSSA records n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE first round of the American Zone Two Davis Cup tie will feature Timothy Neilly and Devin Mullings in the first two singles matches today at the Yacht y Golf Club in Paraguay, Lambare. But instead of playing during the day, the best-of-five matches will be contested in the evening to avoid the intense heat in Paraguay. Speaking from their hotel, which is in walking distance to the tennis complex, team captain John Farrington said it was extremely hot in Paraguay, but they had a couple days to practise and everybody was upbeat for the start of competition. “They’re well prepared and ready to go,” he said. “We’re all ready, very positive and upbeat. We’re looking forward to playing tomorrow (today is in good spirits. “Everything is fine. The people are treating us very well. We are enjoying it.” Neilly, the number two seeded player on the team, will be matched against Paraguay’s top seed Ramon Delgado in the first match at 4 pm. The second singles will follow with top seed Devin Mullings taking on Paraguay’s No.2 seed Nicolas Salama. “It’s a little hotter than we had anticipated, but we will be fine,” Farrington said. “I think it will be beneficial to all of us playing in the evening rather than in the heat.” Neilly said they had a good week of practice and now he was ready to play, especially with the matches being in the evening. Davis Cup team ready SEE page 10 SEE page 10 C.V. Bethel’s Donshannon Braynen clears a hurdle on his way to winning the Intermediate Boys’ 100m Hurdles in 15.02s. COWBOYS CUT T.O.

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does not make sense. "There is some degree of hysteria being sown about m oves to counter 'tax haven a buse' in the US and opening g ambits being made by the Europeans in their efforts to shut down off-shore financial service centres (OFC ister Bethel said during his c ontribution the mid-year budg et debate yesterday. "Much o f this hysteria fails to recognise that the shapers of policy in these countries also recognise that they cannot provoke a capital flight from the already ailing economies." H e reasoned that the majori ty of money funneled through O FCs are "immediately reinvested" in US and other foreign stock and currency markets for an investment return. I f tax regulators institute an a rbitrary crackdown on OFCs, this would in turn cause priv ate investors to withdraw t heir investments from OFCb ased trading brokerage accounts and transfer them into safety deposit boxes,a ccording to Mr Bethel. "Such a flight of capital would provoke an even greater economic crisis," he s aid. "This is well known to financial analysts. So, while there indeed will be chall enges, the notion that is creepi ng in that reforms will be a brupt and arbitrary and unilateral does not persuade me.I t will not make sense in an a lready volatile and fragile international financial system. In spite on any impending clampdowns, Mr Bethel said the country's off-shore sector will emerge from the turbulence. " It is obvious that there will b e additional pressures brought to bear, but we have w eathered such storms before a nd the Bahamas, as an estab l ished OFC, has shown the strength and the resilience to adapt, reform and to weathers uch storms," said Mr Bethel. O n Wednesday, Mr Geithner told the Senate FinanceC ommittee in Washington, D C, that the American gov ernment will build an "ambi tious" plan to crack down on companies that use offshorec entres to avoid paying taxes. Reeling in tax evaders and c losing tax loopholes are of vital importance underscored by the US' collapsing economy and government r ecord budget deficit, Mr Geithner said. "We’re going to have a m uch more ambitious effort t o deal with offshore tax h avens," he told the panel. He made similar remarks the dayb efore at the US House Ways a nd Means Committee. However, Mr Bethel argued, a careful study of statements made by Mr Geithner shows he put the legislative attempts of the US Senators in the context of a broader international, n ot a unilateral effort to comb at tax evasion not tax avoidance. A t a joint session of the US C ongress on Wednesday, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown urged world leaders to "outlaw shadow bankings ystems and offshore tax h avens." On Monday, U.S. Senator C arl Levin introduced the " Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act", an expanded version of previ ous legislation Mr Levin cosponsored in 2007 with thenS enator Barack Obama. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE C armichael Road detainee said that, after initial comp laints that food provisions were insufficient, pasta was served with the detainee’s usual cheese sandwich for lunch on Wednesday. And that night, a more substantial “spaghetti dinner” was served, in contrast to the regular offering. A statement released last week by the Department of Immigration in response to claims of substandard condit ions and abuse by guards maintained detainees are fed three times daily” and the “quantity of meals is always a dequate.” Other changes witnessed by detainees include the a rrival of a team yesterday morning to do some paint w ork and “clean up” the site. Detainees had claimed there were only two functioning toilets for use by hundreds of people, and said that many housed at the facility urinated/excreted on the grounds, creating an unsanitary environment. It was not clear yesterday whether it was this that was being cleaned up. A message left for Mr Thompson yesterday seeking more information on the Department’s efforts in this r egard and on the findings of Monday’s tour, as well as a second visit allegedly undertaken by Mr Thompson to the centre yesterday morning, was not returned up to p ress time despite assurances from Mr Thompson that it w ould be. H owever, in his mid-year budget contribution to parliament on Wednesday evening, Minister of State forI mmigration, Branville McCartney referred to certain u pgrades that would be carried out at the facility. “Let me be the first to say that the Detention Centre is not all we want it to be. This problem has been further escalated following the recent fire to one of its dormitory blocks. The Department will execute a few small jobs in the area of painting and minor repairs to ensure the best comfort of all detainees,” he said. M r McCartney said priority would be placed on painti ng, landscaping, improving the playground and laun dry/wash area, library and security. He did not link thesee fforts to claims made by the detainees. A detainee yesterday told T he Tribune t hat those housed at the facility are pleased to see some improve ments being made. However, he added that they are still going without i tems such as towels, sheets or blankets. Meanwhile, Dr Allen confirmed that his report to the Immigration Department on his trip to the centre wass ent to the department yesterday afternoon. He said he did not wish to reveal the content of that report before it had been seen by Immigration officials. Minister moves to quell fears over off-shore financial service sector FROM page one Detainees ‘have seen improvements’ at Detention Centre since going to media FROM page one Timothy Geithner (AP

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Airport Authority and NAD drop plans for Fitch credit rating due to unreasonable terms agency was asking for Hoping to seal finance package next week after Citibank meets with borrowers Open to increasing interest rate of return to investors, and possibly dropping $80m tranche Less than initial $310m being sought, with plans to fund seamless transition to second phase construction dropped n By CHESTER ROBARDSB usiness Reporter Small Family island hote liers feel the government is “neglecting” them, as they tryt o build and maintain proper ties with construction costs 40 p er cent more than those on New Providence, it was revealed yesterday. And they were expected to do this with little or no investment incentives. Elliot Greene, owner of the Mangrove Cay Inn,s peaking at the National Economic Summit, said shipping costs have driven building materials and other prices on the Family Islands through the roof, hurting domestic tourism t hat the Ministry of Tourism C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.56 $3.56 $3.36 for a better lifeHEALTH INSURANCE SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com call us today at 396-1300 A SUBSIDIARY OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating healthcare medical fund raisers long lines at clinics in debt for lifecustomized health plan with 24/7 customer service n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A Bahamas-based health i nsurer yesterday blamed “inappropriate pricing” by B ritish American Financial for the major premium hikes experienced by individualp olicyholders it had inherited from the latter, and said the only alternatives to increasing rates were either to cancel coverage or sell thep olicies to a new buyer. Tina Cambridge, Generali Worldwide’s regional director for the Bahamas, responding to Tribune Busi n ess’s article yesterday that reflected the concerns of the c ompany’s individual health insurance policyholders over the new premiums, which int he case of elderly clients had doubled, a 100 per cent i ncrease, said the new rates had brought premiums in line with each customer’sp erceived risk and likely level of claims. In a written response to several Tribune Business questions, Ms Cambridges aid Generali’s Bahamian operation had only turned its attention to the individual health policies it had acquired from British Amer-i can Financial once it had dealt with the larger group health portfolio. P P o o r r t t f f o o l l i i o o Effectively confirming the d etails in Tribune Business’s article yesterday, Ms Cambridge said of the individual health portfolio: “Our assessment revealed that the block of individual policies which we inherited had been inappropriately priced. The premiums were too low for the level of benefits offered, and they were also too low given the ages of many of the individuals enrolled in that portfolio.” This confirms what Tribune Business had been told yesterday, namely that British American Financial’s premium rates were too low, and did not match the risk attached to each policyholder and their likely level of claims. As a result, its health portfolio had been highly unprofitable, the main reason it sought an exit and sold that book of business to Generali Worldwide. Unwilling to suffer the same experience, Generali has embarked on a major premium re-pricing that caught many of its individual policyInsurer inherited ‘wrongly priced’ policies SEE page 6B Ritz-Carlton developer is sued over ‘$200k bill’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s (BEC chairman has criticised as “ill-conceived” a deci-s ion by his predecessor to cut company’s basic tariff rate in 2003, arguing that it contributed to net losses that peaked at $21 million in its 2008 finan cial year. Fred Gottlieb, responding to former BEC executive chairman Al Jarrett, who in a Tribune Busi ness article on Monday accused the current a dministration and Board of seeking to demonise” him despite “piggybacking” on the ideas/plans he left in place, said he was “unaware of any specific and/or significant ideas/plans left in place by Mr Jarrett (as he claims sent Board consciously decided to continue or to implement”. Denying that BEC’s Board had any intention of “demonising” Mr Jarrett, the current incumbent of the chairman’s seat acknowledged that while the Corporation did generate $14.1 million in net income for the financial year to September 30, 2004, this was due to “a number of ‘one off’ fac tors that took place during the financial year”. These included, said Mr Gottlieb, bad debt recoveries, increased payments by the Govern ment, increased customer demand and reduced maintenance costs resulting from the installation of what were then, new gas turbines. These boosts to BEC’s financial performance were never repeated, Mr Gottlieb said. And while the Corporation generated a $15.3 million net profit in its 2005 financial year (Mr Jarrett left his post in early 2005, almost half-way through the period), the current chairman said this was largely due to another ‘one-off’ event the $14 million BEC chairmen clash over cut in tariff rates SEE page 5B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The development company behind the $1 billion RitzCarlton Rose Island project is being sued, along with itsm ain shareholder and principal, by a Florida-based archit ect firm that is alleging they have failed to meet their contractual obligations to pay it more than $200,000 for work rendered. The lawsuit, filed in the US District Court for the southern district of Florida on February 20, 2009, by Palm Beach-based Garcia Stromberg, a professional architects firm, named among the defendants the Ritz-Carlton Rose Island Hotel Company; the company’s developer and main shareholder, Miami-based Gencom Group; Gencom’s principal, Karim Alibhai; and another shareholder in the Bahamian project, Marriott International. G arcia Stromberg alleged that it had signed three cont racts to provide architecture consulting and design services t o the Ritz-Carlton Rose Island project. These contracts, which it claimed had been signed on September 28, 2007, June 26, 2008, and June 18, 2008, were, respectively, for the provision of services relating to the project itself; the design of the Departure Facility at the Nassau Harbour Club; and for the Ritz-Carlton Resort, Hotel and Suites on Rose Island itself. The project giving rise to this cause of action is known as the Ritz-Carlton Resort, Hotel and Suites, located on Rose Island, the Bahamas,” the lawsuit alleged. “On or about September 28, 2007, a contract was entered into between the plaintiff, Garcia Stromberg, and the S EE page 4B 40% higher build costs hit Family Island hotels Owner laments shipping costs, and automatic 15% gratuity that has ‘destroyed’ service SEE page 4B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter UNIFICATION of the public transportation sector, and the rerouting of roads, are key to alleviating traffic congestion on New Providence, industry representatives said yesterday, while the role of government is still a bone of contention. Dr Ian Strachan, a College of the Bahamas Professor and member of the local think-tank, the 1962 Society, said the public transportation system needed to be scrutinised, but the Government seems not to want to fix the problem. “The political directorate does not want to solve the traffic problems in the capital, and I can safely say that we know how to,” Dr Strachan said. He said a report, called the Dylan report, was drafted over a decade ago, outlining the major causes of traffic congestion. It explained the rerouting and public transit systems that were necessary, and what road corridors should be made one-way in order to alleviate traffic congestion. “There is no need to think about what we ought to do because the work has already been done,” said Dr The road to improved tr anspor t SEE page 2B Frank Watson n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Obtaining an internationallyrecognised credit rating for the first phase financing of Lynden Pindling International Airport’s (LPIA been abandoned, Tribune Business was told last night, with the Airport Authority now seeking less than the initial $310 million and prepared to offer higher interest rates to keep investors in the deal. Frank Watson, the Authority’s chairman, said the idea of obtaining a credit rating an indication of the Authority’s and it subsidiary, the Nassau Airport Development Compan y’s (NAD b orrowing for the LPIA financing had been “taken off the table” for the time being due to the onerous requirements Fitch had been seeking to impose on the deal. T he Authority chairman said t he deadline for closing the airport redevelopment financing had been extended again, from February 27, 2009, as a result, ‘Plan B’ switch on Airport financing SEE page 2B

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but both it and NAD were hoping to close the protracted fundraising next week once their financial advisers, Citibank, had spoken to the likely investors. If Citibank was able to keep them all on board, Mr Watson said there would be no change in the terms of the financing. The financing is currently structured into three tranches a $140 million bank credit facility;a $90 million senior secured bond facility; and an $80 million participating debt facility. Those were the initial sums sought. However, Mr Watson confirmed that the deal had been restructured so that the first phase financing was now seeking less than the original $310 million. He also confirmed to Tribune Business that the Airport Authority and NAD were prepared to raise the interest rates (the actual rate of return investors would receive if that was what was necessary to keep the financing on track. This newspaper has been told that the Airport Authority and NAD are prepared to increase the 8 per cent coupon initially attached to the 23-year, $90 million fixed-rate bond tranche to either 8.5 per cent or 9 per cent, in a bid to make the financing more attractive in the absence of the Fitch rating. Mr Watson could not confirm those rates, but said the Airport Authority and NAD were also prepared to waive/drop the $80 million participating debt facility if that was necessary to keep the financing on track. “We hope we will settle it some time next week,” Mr Watson said of the airport financing. “Fitch have placed some requirements upon us. It just seems that they’re not prepared to approve it [the credit rati ng].” T he Airport Authority chair m an said it would be “a ridiculous situation” if it and NAD had given into Fitch’s demands. He explained that the problem was not with the airport financing itself, which is sound and backed by the passenger user facility fee revenue streams, plus LPIA’s physical assets, but Fitch’s skittishness regarding securitisation deals such as this in general. The rating agency and its counterparts have been heavily criticised for failing to spot the emerging credit crisis, and overrating mortgage backed securities issues. “They don’t want to do anything that might come back to haunt them in a substantial way,” Mr Watson said. “ We just got caught in the crosshairs of the global economy. We got the impression they [Fitch] were saying they don’t want to do it at all. “What our advisers said is that the requirements they were seeking were such that if we did that, we would not need to bor row money.” Describing the credit rating as “off the table for the first phase”, Mr Watson said: “We’ve moved away from that, and Citibank is going back to the lenders. Hopefully, we’ll be able to settle the matter soon. The plan is sound, and unless the bottom drops out of the tourism economy, we’ll be all right.” He added that the Airport Authority and NAD had reduced the $310 million they were seeking after dropping plans to, in the first financing round, also raise some funds to enable the second phase construction to start immediately the first phase was finished. “For the time being, we’re going to fund the first phase,” Mr Watson said. “Included in the borrowing we were doing for the first phase would have been some funds to start the second phase, while we were negotiating the remaining financing. We had to drop that because of the requirements Fitch was asking for.” With the Airport Authority and NAD having moved to “Plan B”, Mr Watson said: “I know our group is prepared to look at [increasing] interest rates, if that will make it more a ttractive for the lenders. If Citibank is able to keep a ll the investors in, it will be the same package we’ll take. If the bank is not able to do so, we will look at not financing that $80 million and move on. We’ve determined we’re going to build it. It’s a decision that’s firm in the Board and government’s mind.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 127,&(2)6$/( ( [SRFUHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQ&RPSDQ\f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t /DZRI3URSHUW\$FW 7(506 7HQSHUFHQWRIWKHSXUFKDVH S ULFHDWWKHWLPHRIFRQWUDFWDQGWKH EDODQFHXSRQFRPSOHWLRQZLWKLQ 6L[W\GD\VRIFRQWUDFW 7KLVVDOHLVVXEMHFWWRDUHVHUYHSULFH7KH&RPSDQ\ U HVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\DQGDOORIIHUV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVPD\VXEPLWZULWWHQRIIHUV D GGUHVVHGWR([SRFUHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQFR0DQDJLQJ 3DUWQHU32%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDVWREH UHFHLYHGQRODWHUWKDQWKHFORVHRIEXVLQHVVRQWKHWKG D\RI0DUFK +(/3 :$17(' S trachan. H e said the $141 million that the Government has allocated for road development and repair will not help with the traffic situation onN ew Providence. “What we are borrowing money to do now is not to fix the traffic congestion,” he said. “Experts will confirm that w e just don’t have the space to build the kind of roads needed to alleviate traffic through that means.” D r Strachan, speaking at the National Economic Summ it, said the Government was currently drafting a plan for the unification of thep ublic jitney system. “There are people under t he employ of this government and the employ of the Bahamian people who knoww hat is to be done,” he said. The road to improved transport FROM page 1B ‘Plan B’ switch on Airport financing FROM page 1B Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who arem aking news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor More than $2.3 million in unpaid work permit fees was uncovered after the Department of Immigration’s debt collection u nit audited some 400 companies i n Nassau and Freeport, the minister of state for immigration has disclosed. Making his contribution to the mid-year Budget debate, Branville McCartney said 70 New Providence-based companies had b een audited by the Department’s new unit and found to owe the Government a collective $834,718.74 in unpaid work per-mit fees. Adding that a further 24 Nassau-based companies had been i dentified for the audit exercise, M r McCartney said a similar exercise in Grand Bahama had exposed $1.5 million in outstanding permit fees. Some 330 files had been audited on that island. The minister of state warned that companies who owed the D epartment of Immigration mone y would not be granted any new work permits for expatriate staff until the outstanding fees were paid, or a payment plan worked out. Explaining how the work perm it fee arrears had been allowed to accrue, Mr McCartney said: “It is apparent that once persons [companies] have been issued a pproval letters, they have taken those letters to mean ‘go ahead and engage workers’. This is d one despite the fact that the letter states that payment must be m ade within 30 days or the offer w ill be withdrawn. “Large companies, particularly hotel companies, and persons requesting short-term work permits, tend to put persons to workb efore payment.” Mr McCartney attributed the f act that the Department of Immigration had exceeded, by 5 0.7 per cent, projected revenue collection for the fiscal 2008-2009 first half to the compliance efforts. Another factor, he added, was the increase in work permit f ees that took place on July 1, 2 008, the start of the current Budget year. R R e e v v e e n n u u e e F or the period July 1, 2008, to December 31, 2008, the Department of Immigration had collected $29.248 million in revenue, Mr M cCartney told the House of A ssembly, compared to a projected $19.406 million. And from the Budget year start on July 1 to March 2, 2009, the D epartment of Immigration had collected $32.827 million in various permit fees. This was less than $6 million below the full-year r evenue target of $238.651 mill ion, and there are still almost four months of the 2008-2009 fiscal year to run. M r McCartney added that illegal immigration into the Bahamasw as at least partly fuelled by the demand for cheap, migrant labour a mong some Bahamian employers. He said: “Most migrants arrive intending to work, with the knowledge that previous migrants, who also arrived illegally, managed to find work and r egularise their stay. Employers are willing to employ illegal migrants. The lack of legal status in the country obliges these workers to be compliant to employers’ requests, as t hey are outside the protection o f worker’s rights, and it allows employers to pay migrants low wages. “If employers were monitored a nd only allowed to employ peop le with valid documentation, this would reduce the demand for illegal labour. “ Apprehensions represent o nly one side of the enforcement necessary to stop the migration motor. Both supply and demand must be constrained if word is to g et back to those places where i llegals come from that it is no longer possible for illegal migrants to obtain employment and find housing if they are illeg al.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 3B 7KH$QJOLFDQ&HQWUDO(GXFDWLRQ$XWKRULW\LQYLWHVDSSOLFDWLRQVIURP TXDOLHGLQGLYLGXDOVIRUWKHSRVLWLRQRI35,1&,3-RKQ&ROOHJH EHJLQQLQJHSWHPEHU 7KHDSSOLFDQWPXVWKDYH0DVWHUV'HJUHHLQ(GXFDWLRQIURPUHFRJQL]HG 8QLYHUVLW\ZLWKDWOHDVW\HDUVDFFXPXODWLYHDGPLQLVWUDWLYHH[SHULHQFH7KH DSSOLFDQWPXVWDOVREHFRPSXWHUOLWHUDWH .H\MREIXQFWLRQVDQGUHVSRQVLELOLWLHVLQFOXGH URYLGLQJOHDGHUVKLSVHWWKHFOLPDWHDQGSDFHIRUVXFFHVVDQGKLJK DFKLHYHPHQWLQWKHVFKRRO UJDQL]LQJDQGVXSHUYLVLQJVFKHGXOHVSURJUDPPHVUHFRUGVDQG SURFHGXUHV XSHUYLVLQJDQGHYDOXDWLQJWHDFKHUVDQGVXSSRUWVWDI DQDJLQJUHFRUGVVFKRROQDQFHVDQGHQGRI\HDUFORVLQJ &RPPXQLFDWLQJZLWKSDUHQWVFRPPXQLW\JURXSVDQGRUJDQL]DWLRQV 'LVSOD\LQJFRQVLVWHQWRUJDQL]DWLRQDODQGKXPDQUHODWLRQVKLSVNLOOV $VVLVWLQJWKH(GXFDWLRQ'HSDUWPHQWZLWKDQGLQLWLDWLQJWDI 'HYHORSPHQWURJUDPPHV $SSOLFDQWVVKRXOGVXEPLWFRYHUOHWWHU&XUULFXOXP9LWDHFRSLHVRI GHJUHHFHUWLFDWHVWKUHHUHIHUHQFHVDQGSDVVSRUWSKRWRJUDSKVWR7+(',5(&725)('8&$7,21 $1*/,&$1&(175$/('8&$7,21$87+25,7< 3 1$66$8%$+$0$67KHGHDGOLQHIRU 35,0()),&( 63$&($SSUR[LPDWHO\VTXDUHIHHWRIVHFRQG VSDFHZLOOEHDYDLODEOH$SULOLQQHZO\ FRQVWUXFWHGEXLOGLQJDWWKHFRUQHURI0DUOERURXJK DQG&XPEHUODQG6WUHHWV7ZRRQVLWHFDU VSDFHVLQFOXGHG ,GHDOORFDWLRQIRURIIVKRUHEDQNWUXVWFRPSDQ\ ODZUPRURWKHUSURIHVVLRQV&RQWDFWZQHUDW $2.3m in unpaid work permit fees uncovered * Immigration audit exposes 400 companies in Nassau and Freeport as owing fees, with 24 more to be investigated * Department 50.7% ahead of revenue targets for Budget year 2008-2009 Branville McCartney FirstCaribbean yesterday said its 2009 first quarter results showed an $11.6 million improvement in profitability compared to a simi lar period last year, with total assets in excess of $4 billion. T he bank added that its T ier 1 capital ratio was 15.8 per cent, substantially in excess of the Central Bank’s minimum requirement of 8 per cent. FirstCaribbean said it was a member of the CIBCC anada Group, and that it was a financially and operationally strong institution. It was responding to unsubstantiated rumours about its financial health that had prompted some customers to withdraw deposits FirstCaribbean in $11.6 profit rise

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‘owners’, namely the Gencom Group, Alibhai, Barry, RitzCarlton Rose Island Hotel Company, and Marriott International.” Garcia Stromberg alleged that the contract would see it provide consultation and design services for the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, and the accompanying fractional condos, marina village and its town homes and condos, and utilities, waste and fuel facilities. Alleging that the developers were “contractually obligated to compensate it” for its services and expenses, and that it had performed all its obligations, Garcia Stromberg claimed: “The defendants materially breached said contract by failing to make the required payments to the plaintiff as detailed thereunder.” It alleged it was owed some $17,719. Work on the Ritz-Carlton Rose Island project was suspended on October 7, 2008, after its principal financier and major equity partner, Lehman Brothers’ private equity arm, plunged into bankruptcy in late September 2008. Nick Ward, Gencom’s project manager and the Ritz-Carlton Rose Island Hotel Company’s managing partner, wrote in a letter to the project’s contractors and vendors, which has been seen by Tribune Business: “This is to notify you that you are hereby instructed to suspend all work related to the Rose Island project until further notice. “This action is prompted by Lehman Brothers Holdings filing a Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding on Monday, September 15. Ritz-Carlton Rose Island Hotel Company has financed the project at Rose Island, the Bahamas, with Lehman Brothers Holdings. “Our business, like many others, has been affected by the abrupt and unprecedented bankruptcy filing by its lender, which has caused delays and complicated the funding of all Lehman’s loans, including the Rose Island project.” Mr. Ward said the developers were trying to resolve the financing impasse, and added: “Our goal is to have a plan in place for re-funding within the next 90 to 120 days.” That has not been achieved due to the credit crunch. Garcia Stromberg, though, alleged that the contract with Ritz-Carlton Rose Island Hotel Company said the suspension would have no effect on its contract, and that it would be compensated for all previous services rendered. In a similar vein, Garcia Stromberg alleged that it had not been paid the $132,974 it claimed it was owed for work done on the departure facility at the Nassau Harbour Club, the point at which guests departing for Rose Island will embark. And it also alleged it was owed $27,610 for work done on the ‘Harbour Master’ section of the Rose Island contract, for which it again claimed it had performed all its obligations without being compensated. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf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f1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Ritz-Carlton developer is sued over ‘$200k bill’ FROM page 1B has recently tried to revive. Mr Greene said more government resources were channelled into subsidies and incentives for multi-million dollar resorts,w hile small Family Island properties were largely ignored. H e said he was forced to pay $1.50 per case of soda if he purchased in Nassau for his business, and it was cheaper for him to leave Andros to purchase fish. “If you don’t go fishing yourself it’s cheaper for me to buy fish in Nassau,” he said. M r Greene said the main cause of the disparity in costs between Nassau and the Family Islands was the cost of shipping goods. “These things are driving up the cost to Bahamians who want to vacation on the Family Islands,” said moderator andf ounder of the summit, Lynden Nairn. R R e e g g a a t t t t a a s s M r Greene experiences his greatest level of Bahamian clients during special events, such as regattas and homecomings. Howe ver, at other times Bahamians complain that his rooms are too expensive. “The Bahamians, per se, will come, but they will assume that t he rooms are not worth the money. We have to convince them as a starter that it is worth the money,” said Mr Greene. H e said his hotel receives publicity only by word of mouth from repeat customers mostly Americans and Canadians and through his own website. M r Greene said the Government needs to step in and show small hotels the way, as well as offer financial assistance. He a dded that he was forced to do everything himself when building his business in order to save costs. “It’s almost impossible to (get money from government w on’t say you won’t get it I won’t dare say that but it’s almost impossible,” said Mr Greene. “You can hardly get to them to put out your problems. Most of the time they come to you once a year, and then that’s dead. “Even if you think something good, you don’t see them often e nough to put it forward and then the idea is gone.” As a kicker, Mr Greene aired his angst over the automatic 15 per cent gratuity attached to restaurant and other hospitalityb ills, saying it had destroyed service in the Bahamas. “If you don’t get a tip you don’t deserve it. Everybody’s not g oing to be alike, but you always will get more than 15 per cent,” he said. “You get that because you deserve it. If you don’t get that, it’s because you don’t deserve it.” 40% higher build costs hit Family Island hotels F ROM page 1B

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sale of all BEC’s shares in Cable Bahamas. “If this amount, which has nothing to do with recurrent revenue or expenditure, is taken out of the profit and loss statement for the 2005 financial year, then the Corporation only m ade a profit of $1.3 million d own nearly $10 million from t he 2003 financial year, representing a significant reduction,”Mr Gottlieb said yesterday. Continuing, he said BEC subsequently moved into the red, suffering an almost-$3 million loss in its 2006 financial year, followed by an $11.7 million net loss in the year to September 30, 2007. As global oil prices peaked last year, Mr Gottlieb said net losses spiked at $21 million for BEC’s 2008 financial year. “It is not being suggested that the tariff reduction implemented in 2003 was the only factor c ontributing to BEC’s subseq uent financial deterioration, but it certainly was and continues to be a major factor,” Mr Gottlieb added. “The decision by Mr Jarrett to reduce the tariffs in 2003 was ill-conceived as, it appears, it was made without proper prior consultation/investigation to determine the extent of the adverse financial consequences to the Corporation that wouldresult therefrom.” Mr Jarrett, who chaired BEC f rom June 2002 until the 2005 f irst quarter, had questioned to Tribune Business earlier this week how the tariff rate reduction could be responsible for the Corporation’s current financial predicament, given that its 2004 financial year – the first full year after the new rates were in force – saw BEC have one of its most successful years ever by generating $14.1 million in net profits. U U n n f f o o r r t t u u n n a a t t e e Mr Gottlieb, though, in a pre vious interview with this newspaper, had argued that the reduction in BEC’s basic tariff rate “had the effect of sucking $18 million of revenue away per year, and that’s unfortunate. Because up until then, BEC was in position to have the necessary economic ratings to get financing for its capital projects. That was significantly undermined.” This was repeated on Wednesday by Phenton Neymour, minister of state for the environment, who said the basic tariff rate reduction, and decision to pay interest on BEC cus tomers’ security deposits, had reduced the Corporation’s revenues and cash flow by some $20 million per year or $100 million over five years. Mr Neymour also criticised the refinancing of the $128 million Inter-American Development Bank (IDB carried out under Mr Jarrett’s watch, as did Mr Gottlieb, both arguing that this exchange of long-term for short-term borrowing had “increased costs, reduced cash flow and other financial concerns”. Mr Gottlieb, while acknowledging that this had initially resulted in “lower interest rate costs amounting to approximately $10 million for the 2004 financial year”, added: “Unfortunately, this ill advised action to pay off the IDB loan came back to haunt the Corporation in later years, as the variable interest rate subsequently rose considerably, with the result that servicing the new loan is now much more expensive than it was to service the long term IDB loan.” Mr Jarrett, though, had told Tribune Business that by refinancing the IDB loan -initially taken out in 1989 to finance Family Island infrastructure development, when the IDB was the ‘only game in town’, had saved BEC both increased interest rate and foreign exchange costs. The IDB loan had used several currency baskets, including euros, yen, swiss francs and deutchsmarks, and the US dollar’s depreciation against these currencies when he was chair man, Mr Jarrett said, meant BEC was requiring everincreasing amounts of foreign currency to re-pay them, result ing in foreign exchange losses. These foreign exchange losses, Mr Jarrett said, had reached $2 million in 2002 and $4.5 million in 2003, making re-financ ing imperative. The new loan, which paid out the IDB, was for a term of 11 years, not a shortterm loan, he added. He produced an April 1, 2003, letter from then-minister of state for finance, James Smith, backing the IDB loan refinancing. Mr Smith said the IDB’s loan covenants “may now be inappropriate”, especially the $633,000 maximum per annum dividends imposed on the Government. In addition, Mr Jarrett produced documents showing that the basket of IDB loans had variable interest rates attached of between 5.27 per cent to 8.38 per cent, compared to the 2.25 per cent rate attached to the proposed re-financing loan. Meanwhile, Mr Neymour said the contracts signed with the Bahamas Electrical Workers Union, one for the period 2003-2007, and the other for 2007-2012, had increased BEC’s labour and pension costs by $27 million and $17 million respectively. He added that BEC had saved $11.326 million in customs duty, and $7.928 million on stamp duty, as a result of the two-year moratorium on tax payments introduced in July 2008. This, Mr Neymour said, was the key factor in reducing BEC’s losses to a projected $1.5 million for fiscal 2009. BEC spent some $350 million on fuel in its last fiscal year. Mr Neymour indicated that an increase in BEC’s basic tariff rate had been recommended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chairmen clash over cut in tariff rates FROM page 1B “The decision b y Mr Jarrett to reduce the t ariffs in 2003 was ill-conc eived ....” Fred Gottlieb

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h olders especially the elderly ones, who have suffered the most drastic premium rises -by surprise. It has also closed the indiv idual health portfolio to new business, instead as Ms Cambridge emphasised wanting to focus on growing its Bahamas-based group health business, the area that it spe-c ialises in worldwide. Still, some individual policyholders are likely to perceive the major premium increases as an attempt to ‘price them out of the market’ a nd push them to switch to another carrier, if they can. Younger insureds, who are understood to have experienced 30 per cent premiumi ncreases through Generali’s revised premium rates, would be able to find a new carrier with relative ease but elderly patients, because of the high risk they pose through likely n eeding more frequent medical treatment, would probably not be taken on by another carrier. “Our options based on our a nalysis were to sell the indiv idual portfolio or to cancel the coverage,” Ms Cambridge told Tribune Business. “We realised, however, that if we were simply to cancel the policies, it would have left somei ndividuals without insurance cover and for some, based on t heir ages and health conditions, it would have made it very difficult for them to find alternatives. In order to provide an appropriate solution, we have moved to create an age-banded premium structure, which provides for a fairer and more appropriate premium for each r isk presented. “For those individuals who could, we knew that they would see alternative cover through another carrier. Wef ully expect that some indiv iduals would elect coverage with other carriers. However, for those who could not, due to their age or health conditions, Generali decided that the honourable thing to dow ould be to find a way to assure that the health plans f or these individuals would not terminate.” Ms Cambridge said that to make health coverage “more affordable” for elderly policy-h olders, Generali had created a modified coverage and benefits scheme, whichb rought in “increased co-payments for certain services and f acilities”. These clients, though, would still retain major medical coverage. T ribune Business was told on Wednesday that Generali’s new plan was less favourablet o elderly policyholders than the coverage they currently e njoyed, because it raised the amount they had to pay for treatment at Doctors Hospi-t al from 20 per cent to 40 per cent, with the insurer’s exposure reduced from 80 per cent to 60 per cent. S ources added that the age at which the lifetime maximum Generali would pay fora policyholder’s medical expenses was reduced from $1 million to $100,000 has also b een lowered under the new proposed policy, from 70 years-old to 65. But Ms Cambridge said: “The actual premium impacto f this change varied from i ndividual to individual, dependent on their age and previous plan design. “For many individuals, there were actual decreases in premium. However, olderi ndividuals received premium levels that more appropriately r eflected their age.” She added: “We feel the results of our efforts bests erves the needs of individuals in our plan, and those who could not find an alternativem ay still maintain coverage with us. The new product d esign also enables them to stay covered without even higher increases that would have been necessary to main-t ain their previous level of benefits.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.451.450.000.0700.00020.70.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.2440.26028.73.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.506.590.099,0000.4380.05015.00.76% 5.001.43Consolidated Water BDRs1.491.43-0.060.1110.05212.93.64% 3.002.16Doctor's Hospital2.162.160.000.2400.0409.01.85% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6980.40015.03.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.075.070.000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09%1 2.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 0.000.00Bahamas Supermarkets (NOT QUOTED0.000.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8988-1.40-3.35 1.44281.3812Colina Money Market Fund1.44280.634.45 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 811.61 | YTD -2.79% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 5 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,660.28 | CHG 4.43 | %CHG 0.27 | YTD -52.08 | YTD % -3.04BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 28-Feb-09 27-Feb-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 127,&( 02%,/(;3/25$7,21$1''8&,1* & $63,$1($/,0,7(' 3XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRIWKH , QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWQRWLFH LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDV E HHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUSXUVXDQW WR&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHG7KH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ ' DWHGWKHUGGD\RIDUFK *+-RKQVHQ /LTXLGDWRURI 02%,/(;3/25$7,21$1' 3 52'8&,1*&$63,$1($ /,0,7(' 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW (7,(11('$/021'RI 3%2;0$56++$5%285$%$&2 % $+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ DVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQ Z KRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ VKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQG V LJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\V IURPWKH WK GD\ RI )HEUXDU\ WRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 1 1 2 7 , & ( (662(;3/257,21$1' 352'8&7,21,*(5,1& 1 2 7 , & ( ,6 +(5(%<*,9(1DVIROORZV (662(;3/25$7,21$1''8&7,21 1,*(5,1& LVLQGLVVROXWLRQXQGHUWKH SURYLVLRQVRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV &RPSDQLHV 7KHGLVVROXWLRQRIWKHVDLG&RPSDQ\FRPPHQFHG $UWLFOHVRI'LVVROXWLRQZHUHVXEPLWWHGWRDQG UHJLVWHUHGE\WKHHJLVWUDU*HQHUDO 7KH/LTXLGDWRURIWKHVDLG&RPSDQ\LV*DU\ -RKQVHQRIRUWKFDVH'ULYH+RXVWRQ 7 'DWHGWKHQGGD\RI'HFHPEHU +$55<%$1'6/2%26.< 0$1$*(0(17&2/7' $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\ 1 2 7 , & ( (662(;3/25$7,21$1' 352'8&7,21,*(5,1& &UHGLWRUVKDYLQJGHEWVRUFODLPVDJDLQVWWKHDERYH QDPHG&RPSDQ\DUHUHTXLUHGWRVHQGSDUWLFXODUV WKHUHRIWRWKHXQGHUVLJQHG3%R[1DVVDX %DKDPDVRQRUEHIRUHGD\RI0DUFK ,QGHIDXOWWKHUHRIWKH\ZLOOEHH[FOXGHGIURPWKH EHQHRIDQ\GLVWULEXWLRQPDGHWKH/LTXLGDWRU 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RIDUFK *DU\+-RKQVHQ /LTXLGDWRU RUWKFKDVH'ULYH Insurer inherited ‘wrongly priced’ policies FROM page 1B “Our options based on oura nalysis were to s ell the individual portfolio or to c ancel the c overage.” T ina Cambridge

PAGE 19

APT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN TIGER Unbend (5 7 Et cetera (3,2,5 8 Chicanery (5-5 13 Fellow soldier (7 15 Judgment (7 1 6 Nothing more than (6 18 Unsuitable (5 20 To groove spirally (5 frbfrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Inexpensive fish will suit him (10 8 Jewish teacher in Arab biophysics (5 9 Notedly brisk (7 10 Rubens, for example, puts h imself out (7 11 Correct some work the m en did wrongly (5 12 Carry on with a s ummary (6 1 4 Walk a short way and turn (6 1 7 Report about the initial forms of aquatic life (5 1 9 Fashionable substitute for wood or metal (7 2 1 Time of day when engine breaks down about f ive (7 22 They’re inclined to prevent s teps being taken (5 23 He can rely on a p ermanent occupation (4,6 Down 2 Wild herbs we found in Israel (7 3 I break bail in order to prove I was elsewhere (5 4 Hit with explosive b andage needed (6 5 I lament about d isorder (7 6 It stoops to c onquer (5 7 Wealth is about to provide security forg irl in nurserytale (10 8 Respects one’s t estimonials (10 13 Mothers pet dog? (7 1 5 Seat of Empire (7 16 One taps a cask w ith it (6 18 Arevolutionary i nvention (5 20 Article written about the p rofessional stage, perhaps (5 Across:1 Sherpa, 4 Boards, 9 Signora, 10 Frame, 11 Eerie, 12 Ill will, 13 Part company, 18 Proverb, 20 R uche, 22 Opine, 23 Average, 24 B leats, 25 Stared. Down:1 Sister, 2 Eager, 3 Protest, 5 Offal, 6 Realign, 7 Stella, 8 Haricot bean, 14 Anodise, 15 Perfect, 16 A plomb, 17 Defend, 19 Exert, 21 C hair. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Assign, 4 Acacia, 9 Journal, 10 Acute, 11 Cider, 12 Nemesis, 13 Mollycoddle, 18 In f orce, 20 Sable, 22 Grasp, 23 U nequal, 24 Riddle, 25 In debt. Down:1 Abject, 2 Sound, 3 General, 5 Charm, 6 Counsel, 7 Averse, 8 Blank cheque, 14 O ffhand, 15 Discern, 16 Ginger, 17 P ellet, 19 Repel, 21 Brute. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 9 1 011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 8 9 1 011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker C hess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sailing ship (10 8 Damp (5 9 Tearfully sentimental (7 10 Relate to (7 11 The Lone Star state (5 12 Vile smell (6 14 To escape (3,3 17 Anarcotic drug (5 19 Previous (7 21 Ignorant (7 22 Religious belief (5 23 Very small (5-5 Down 2 Vast (7 3 Artful expedient (5 4 Anut (6 5 Canadian policeman (7 6 Unbend (5 7 Et cetera (3,2,5 8 Chicanery (5-5 13 Fellow soldier (7 15 Judgment (7 16 Nothing more than (6 18 Unsuitable (5 20 To groove spirally (5 frbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Inexpensive fish will suit him (10 8 Jewish teacher in Arab biophysics (5 9 Notedly brisk (7 10 Rubens, for example, puts himself out (7 11 Correct some work the men did wrongly (5 12 Carry on with a summary (6 14 Walk a short way and turn (6 17 Report about the initial forms of aquatic life (5 19 Fashionable substitute for wood or metal (7 21 Time of day when engine breaks down about five (7 22 They’re inclined to prevent steps being taken (5 23 He can rely on a permanent occupation (4,6 Down 2 Wild herbs we found in Israel (7 3 I break bail in order to prove I was elsewhere (5 4 Hit with explosive bandage needed (6 5 I lament about disorder (7 6 It stoops to conquer (5 7 Wealth is about to provide security for girl in nurserytale (10 8 Respects one’s testimonials (10 13 Mothers pet dog? (7 15 Seat of Empire (7 16 One taps a cask with it (6 18 Arevolutionary invention (5 20 Article written about the professional stage, perhaps (5 Across:1 Sherpa, 4 Boards, 9 Signora, 10 Frame, 11 Eerie, 12 Ill will, 13 Part company, 18 Proverb, 20 Ruche, 22 Opine, 23 Average, 24 Bleats, 25 Stared. Down:1 Sister, 2 Eager, 3 Protest, 5 Offal, 6 Realign, 7 Stella, 8 Haricot bean, 14 Anodise, 15 Perfect, 16 Aplomb, 17 Defend, 19 Exert, 21 Chair. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Assign, 4 Acacia, 9 Journal, 10 Acute, 11 Cider, 12 Nemesis, 13 Mollycoddle, 18 In force, 20 Sable, 22 Grasp, 23 Unequal, 24 Riddle, 25 In debt. Down:1 Abject, 2 Sound, 3 General, 5 Charm, 6 Counsel, 7 Averse, 8 Blank cheque, 14 Offhand, 15 Discern, 16 Ginger, 17 Pellet, 19 Repel, 21 Brute. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sailing ship (10 8 Damp (5 9 Tearfully sentimental (7 10 Relate to (7 11 The Lone Star state (5 12 Vile smell (6 14 To escape (3,3 17 Anarcotic drug (5 19 Previous (7 21 Ignorant (7 22 Religious belief (5 23 Very small (5-5 Down 2 Vast (7 3 Artful expedient (5 4 Anut (6 5 Canadian policeman (7 6 Unbend (5 7 Et cetera (3,2,5 8 Chicanery (5-5 13 Fellow soldier (7 15 Judgment (7 16 Nothing more than (6 18 Unsuitable (5 20 To groove spirally (5 frbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Inexpensive fish will suit him (10 8 Jewish teacher in Arab biophysics (5 9 Notedly brisk (7 10 Rubens, for example, puts himself out (7 11 Correct some work the men did wrongly (5 12 Carry on with a summary (6 14 Walk a short way and turn (6 17 Report about the initial forms of aquatic life (5 19 Fashionable substitute for wood or metal (7 21 Time of day when engine breaks down about five (7 22 They’re inclined to prevent steps being taken (5 23 He can rely on a permanent occupation (4,6 Down 2 Wild herbs we found in Israel (7 3 I break bail in order to prove I was elsewhere (5 4 Hit with explosive bandage needed (6 5 I lament about disorder (7 6 It stoops to conquer (5 7 Wealth is about to provide security for girl in nurserytale (10 8 Respects one’s testimonials (10 13 Mothers pet dog? (7 15 Seat of Empire (7 16 One taps a cask with it (6 18 Arevolutionary invention (5 20 Article written about the professional stage, perhaps (5 Across:1 Sherpa, 4 Boards, 9 Signora, 10 Frame, 11 Eerie, 12 Ill will, 13 Part company, 18 Proverb, 20 Ruche, 22 Opine, 23 Average, 24 Bleats, 25 Stared. Down:1 Sister, 2 Eager, 3 Protest, 5 Offal, 6 Realign, 7 Stella, 8 Haricot bean, 14 Anodise, 15 Perfect, 16 Aplomb, 17 Defend, 19 Exert, 21 Chair. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Assign, 4 Acacia, 9 Journal, 10 Acute, 11 Cider, 12 Nemesis, 13 Mollycoddle, 18 In force, 20 Sable, 22 Grasp, 23 Unequal, 24 Riddle, 25 In debt. Down:1 Abject, 2 Sound, 3 General, 5 Charm, 6 Counsel, 7 Averse, 8 Blank cheque, 14 Offhand, 15 Discern, 16 Ginger, 17 Pellet, 19 Repel, 21 Brute. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 9 1 011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 8 9 1 011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sailing ship (10 8 Damp (5 9 Tearfully sentimental (7 10 Relate to (7 11 The Lone Star state (5 12 Vile smell (6 14 To escape (3,3 17 Anarcotic drug (5 19 Previous (7 21 Ignorant (7 22 Religious belief (5 23 Very small (5-5 Down 2 Vast (7 3 Artful expedient (5 4 Anut (6 5 Canadian policeman (7 6 Unbend (5 7 Et cetera (3,2,5 8 Chicanery (5-5 13 Fellow soldier (7 15 Judgment (7 16 Nothing more than (6 18 Unsuitable (5 20 To groove spirally (5 frbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Inexpensive fish will suit him (10 8 Jewish teacher in Arab biophysics (5 9 Notedly brisk (7 10 Rubens, for example, puts himself out (7 11 Correct some work the men did wrongly (5 12 Carry on with a summary (6 14 Walk a short way and turn (6 17 Report about the initial forms of aquatic life (5 19 Fashionable substitute for wood or metal (7 21 Time of day when engine breaks down about five (7 22 They’re inclined to prevent steps being taken (5 23 He can rely on a permanent occupation (4,6 Down 2 Wild herbs we found in Israel (7 3 I break bail in order to prove I was elsewhere (5 4 Hit with explosive bandage needed (6 5 I lament about disorder (7 6 It stoops to conquer (5 7 Wealth is about to provide security for girl in nurserytale (10 8 Respects one’s testimonials (10 13 Mothers pet dog? (7 15 Seat of Empire (7 16 One taps a cask with it (6 18 Arevolutionary invention (5 20 Article written about the professional stage, perhaps (5 Across:1 Sherpa, 4 Boards, 9 Signora, 10 Frame, 11 Eerie, 12 Ill will, 13 Part company, 18 Proverb, 20 Ruche, 22 Opine, 23 Average, 24 Bleats, 25 Stared. Down:1 Sister, 2 Eager, 3 Protest, 5 Offal, 6 Realign, 7 Stella, 8 Haricot bean, 14 Anodise, 15 Perfect, 16 Aplomb, 17 Defend, 19 Exert, 21 Chair. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Assign, 4 Acacia, 9 Journal, 10 Acute, 11 Cider, 12 Nemesis, 13 Mollycoddle, 18 In force, 20 Sable, 22 Grasp, 23 Unequal, 24 Riddle, 25 In debt. Down:1 Abject, 2 Sound, 3 General, 5 Charm, 6 Counsel, 7 Averse, 8 Blank cheque, 14 Offhand, 15 Discern, 16 Ginger, 17 Pellet, 19 Repel, 21 Brute. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sailing ship (10 8 Damp (5 9 Tearfully sentimental (7 10 Relate to (7 11 The Lone Star state (5 12 Vile smell (6 14 To escape (3,3 17 Anarcotic drug (5 19 Previous (7 21 Ignorant (7 22 Religious belief (5 23 Very small (5-5 Down 2 Vast (7 3 Artful expedient (5 4 Anut (6 5 Canadian policeman (7 6 Unbend (5 7 Et cetera (3,2,5 8 Chicanery (5-5 13 Fellow soldier (7 15 Judgment (7 16 Nothing more than (6 18 Unsuitable (5 20 To groove spirally (5 fbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Inexpensive fish will suit him (10 8 Jewish teacher in Arab biophysics (5 9 Notedly brisk (7 10 Rubens, for example, puts himself out (7 11 Correct some work the men did wrongly (5 12 Carry on with a summary (6 14 Walk a short way and turn (6 17 Report about the initial forms of aquatic life (5 19 Fashionable substitute for wood or metal (7 21 Time of day when engine breaks down about five (7 22 They’re inclined to prevent steps being taken (5 23 He can rely on a permanent occupation (4,6 Down 2 Wild herbs we found in Israel (7 3 I break bail in order to prove I was elsewhere (5 4 Hit with explosive bandage needed (6 5 I lament about disorder (7 6 It stoops to conquer (5 7 Wealth is about to provide security for girl in nurserytale (10 8 Respects one’s testimonials (10 13 Mothers pet dog? (7 15 Seat of Empire (7 16 One taps a cask with it (6 18 Arevolutionary invention (5 20 Article written about the professional stage, perhaps (5 Across:1 Sherpa, 4 Boards, 9 Signora, 10 Frame, 11 Eerie, 12 Ill will, 13 Part company, 18 Proverb, 20 Ruche, 22 Opine, 23 Average, 24 Bleats, 25 Stared. Down:1 Sister, 2 Eager, 3 Protest, 5 Offal, 6 Realign, 7 Stella, 8 Haricot bean, 14 Anodise, 15 Perfect, 16 Aplomb, 17 Defend, 19 Exert, 21 Chair. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Assign, 4 Acacia, 9 Journal, 10 Acute, 11 Cider, 12 Nemesis, 13 Mollycoddle, 18 In force, 20 Sable, 22 Grasp, 23 Unequal, 24 Riddle, 25 In debt. Down:1 Abject, 2 Sound, 3 General, 5 Charm, 6 Counsel, 7 Averse, 8 Blank cheque, 14 Offhand, 15 Discern, 16 Ginger, 17 Pellet, 19 Repel, 21 Brute. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sailing ship (10 8 Damp (5 9 Tearfully sentimental (7 10 Relate to (7 11 The Lone Star state (5 12 Vile smell (6 14 To escape (3,3 17 Anarcotic drug (5 19 Previous (7 21 Ignorant (7 22 Religious belief (5 23 Very small (5-5 Down 2 Vast (7 3 Artful expedient (5 4 Anut (6 5 Canadian policeman (7 6 Unbend (5 7 Et cetera (3,2,5 8 Chicanery (5-5 13 Fellow soldier (7 15 Judgment (7 16 Nothing more than (6 18 Unsuitable (5 20 To groove spirally (5 frbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Inexpensive fish will suit him (10 8 Jewish teacher in Arab biophysics (5 9 Notedly brisk (7 10 Rubens, for example, puts himself out (7 11 Correct some work the men did wrongly (5 12 Carry on with a summary (6 14 Walk a short way and turn (6 17 Report about the initial forms of aquatic life (5 19 Fashionable substitute for wood or metal (7 21 Time of day when engine breaks down about five (7 22 They’re inclined to prevent steps being taken (5 23 He can rely on a permanent occupation (4,6 Down 2 Wild herbs we found in Israel (7 3 I break bail in order to prove I was elsewhere (5 4 Hit with explosive bandage needed (6 5 I lament about disorder (7 6 It stoops to conquer (5 7 Wealth is about to provide security for girl in nurserytale (10 8 Respects one’s testimonials (10 13 Mothers pet dog? (7 15 Seat of Empire (7 16 One taps a cask with it (6 18 Arevolutionary invention (5 20 Article written about the professional stage, perhaps (5 Across:1 Sherpa, 4 Boards, 9 Signora, 10 Frame, 11 Eerie, 12 Ill will, 13 Part company, 18 Proverb, 20 Ruche, 22 Opine, 23 Average, 24 Bleats, 25 Stared. Down:1 Sister, 2 Eager, 3 Protest, 5 Offal, 6 Realign, 7 Stella, 8 Haricot bean, 14 Anodise, 15 Perfect, 16 Aplomb, 17 Defend, 19 Exert, 21 Chair. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Assign, 4 Acacia, 9 Journal, 10 Acute, 11 Cider, 12 Nemesis, 13 Mollycoddle, 18 In force, 20 Sable, 22 Grasp, 23 Unequal, 24 Riddle, 25 In debt. Down:1 Abject, 2 Sound, 3 General, 5 Charm, 6 Counsel, 7 Averse, 8 Blank cheque, 14 Offhand, 15 Discern, 16 Ginger, 17 Pellet, 19 Repel, 21 Brute. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u T a R gT E Across 1 Sailing ship (10 8 Damp (5 9 Tearfully sentimental (7 10 Relate to (7 11 The Lone Star state (5 12 Vile smell (6 14 To escape (3,3 17 Anarcotic drug (5 19 Previous (7 21 Ignorant (7 22 Religious belief (5 23 Very small (5-5 Down 2 Vast (7 3 Artful expedient (5 4 Anut (6 5 Canadian policeman (7 6 Unbend (5 7 Et cetera (3,2,5 8 Chicanery (5-5 13 Fellow soldier (7 15 Judgment (7 16 Nothing more than (6 18 Unsuitable (5 20 To groove spirally (5 fbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Inexpensive fish will suit him (10 8 Jewish teacher in Arab biophysics (5 9 Notedly brisk (7 10 Rubens, for example, puts himself out (7 11 Correct some work the men did wrongly (5 12 Carry on with a summary (6 14 Walk a short way and turn (6 17 Report about the initial forms of aquatic life (5 19 Fashionable substitute for wood or metal (7 21 Time of day when engine breaks down about five (7 22 They’re inclined to prevent steps being taken (5 23 He can rely on a permanent occupation (4,6 Down 2 Wild herbs we found in Israel (7 3 I break bail in order to prove I was elsewhere (5 4 Hit with explosive bandage needed (6 5 I lament about disorder (7 6 It stoops to conquer (5 7 Wealth is about to provide security for girl in nurserytale (10 8 Respects one’s testimonials (10 13 Mothers pet dog? (7 15 Seat of Empire (7 16 One taps a cask with it (6 18 Arevolutionary invention (5 20 Article written about the professional stage, perhaps (5 Across:1 Sherpa, 4 Boards, 9 Signora, 10 Frame, 11 Eerie, 12 Ill will, 13 Part company, 18 Proverb, 20 Ruche, 22 Opine, 23 Average, 24 Bleats, 25 Stared. Down:1 Sister, 2 Eager, 3 Protest, 5 Offal, 6 Realign, 7 Stella, 8 Haricot bean, 14 Anodise, 15 Perfect, 16 Aplomb, 17 Defend, 19 Exert, 21 Chair. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Assign, 4 Acacia, 9 Journal, 10 Acute, 11 Cider, 12 Nemesis, 13 Mollycoddle, 18 In force, 20 Sable, 22 Grasp, 23 Unequal, 24 Riddle, 25 In debt. Down:1 Abject, 2 Sound, 3 General, 5 Charm, 6 Counsel, 7 Averse, 8 Blank cheque, 14 Offhand, 15 Discern, 16 Ginger, 17 Pellet, 19 Repel, 21 Brute. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 1 6 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 1 6 17181920 2122 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a BY STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Sailing ship (10 8 Damp (5 9 Tearfully sentimental (7 10 Relate to (7 11 The Lone Star state (5 12 Vile smell (6 14 To escape (3,3 17 Anarcotic drug (5 19 Previous (7 21 Ignorant (7 22 Religious belief (5 23 Very small (5-5 Down 2 Vast (7 3 Artful expedient (5 4 Anut (6 5 Canadian policeman (7 6 Unbend (5 7 Et cetera (3,2,5 8 Chicanery (5-5 13 Fellow soldier (7 15 Judgment (7 16 Nothing more than (6 18 Unsuitable (5 20 To groove spirally (5 frbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Inexpensive fish will suit him (10 8 Jewish teacher in Arab biophysics (5 9 Notedly brisk (7 10 Rubens, for example, puts himself out (7 11 Correct some work the men did wrongly (5 12 Carry on with a summary (6 14 Walk a short way and turn (6 17 Report about the initial forms of aquatic life (5 19 Fashionable substitute for wood or metal (7 21 Time of day when engine breaks down about five (7 22 They’re inclined to prevent steps being taken (5 23 He can rely on a permanent occupation (4,6 Down 2 Wild herbs we found in Israel (7 3 I break bail in order to prove I was elsewhere (5 4 Hit with explosive bandage needed (6 5 I lament about disorder (7 6 It stoops to conquer (5 7 Wealth is about to provide security for girl in nurserytale (10 8 Respects one’s testimonials (10 13 Mothers pet dog? (7 15 Seat of Empire (7 16 One taps a cask with it (6 18 Arevolutionary invention (5 20 Article written about the professional stage, perhaps (5 Across:1 Sherpa, 4 Boards, 9 Signora, 10 Frame, 11 Eerie, 12 Ill will, 13 Part company, 18 Proverb, 20 Ruche, 22 Opine, 23 Average, 24 Bleats, 25 Stared. Down:1 Sister, 2 Eager, 3 Protest, 5 Offal, 6 Realign, 7 Stella, 8 Haricot bean, 14 Anodise, 15 Perfect, 16 Aplomb, 17 Defend, 19 Exert, 21 Chair. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Assign, 4 Acacia, 9 Journal, 10 Acute, 11 Cider, 12 Nemesis, 13 Mollycoddle, 18 In force, 20 Sable, 22 Grasp, 23 Unequal, 24 Riddle, 25 In debt. Down:1 Abject, 2 Sound, 3 General, 5 Charm, 6 Counsel, 7 Averse, 8 Blank cheque, 14 Offhand, 15 Discern, 16 Ginger, 17 Pellet, 19 Repel, 21 Brute. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1 23456 7 8 9 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 8 9 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009, PAGE 7B