Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 105 No.85

SE Nesta

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MLE |

Jae Sas

New temporary
notel sector jouls

Miss Universe = UMA ve TRADEWINDS ste eS

pageant to bring |
work and visitors

PAINT SALE

FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY

The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com
THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009



P. 0. Box N3723
Tel:326- 1875



PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

WSS

Tm SME
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

hes



More CLICO
concerns raised

Questions over loans of more
than $70m to foreign affiliates



@ TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

CONCERNS are being raised as to whether
CLICO (Bahamas) could have violated the country's
Exchange Control laws regarding loans of more
than $70 million to its foreign affiliates, which were in
turn invested in the now devastated Florida real estate
market.

However, CLICO (Bahamas) may have been able to
legally avoid Bahamian exchange laws by using US dol-
lar annuities clients invested in its Turks & Caicos branch.
These assets in the Turks & Caicos branch represented



m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

HOTEL workers who have
suffered financial hardships in
recent months have new hope
as the Miss Universe pageant
will offer temporary employ-
ment to those in the hospitality
sector.

As Atlantis was declared offi-
cial host of the multi-million
dollar month-long international
contest yesterday, president of
Kerzner International Bahamas
George Markantonis said addi-
tional workers will be required
to assist the 89 competing beau-
ty queens and their entourage at
the Paradise Island hotel in
August.

And various hotels, set to
host at least five additional
pageant events, can also expect
an influx of visitors, bringing a
temporary boost to the industry
after hundreds of workers were
laid-off in recent months.

Mr Markantonis said: “What-
ever benefits Atlantis also ben-
efits the whole community and
the whole country.

“We will bring in more tem-
porary labour that in turn will
be felt in the community, and
it is our intention to give as
much benefit to all the hotels if
we can.

“T expect we will be bringing

SEE page nine



ee a}
pee ls






















MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECU-
RITY Tommy Turnquest speaks to
Major Ladon Hutchens of the US
Marine Corp, while Timothy Zafni-
ga-Brown, Chargé d’Affaires at the
US Embassy, looks on.

Mr Turnquest opened the 25th
annual Tradewinds conference yes-
terday, which, he said, has made a
significant contribution towards
improving maritime security.

Tradewinds is a joint exercise
designed to develop and encourage
partnerships among law enforce-
ment officials throughout the
region.

It is an annual event that con-
sists of a combined ground and
marine exercise within the
Caribbean Basin. The Bahamas last
hosted the exercise in 2005.

“This exercise is yet another
demonstration of the US govern-
ment’s commitment to the peace
and security of the Bahamas, the
Caribbean region and the Western
Hemisphere through a continuous
programme of cooperation among
all partner nations,” Mr Turnquest
said.























BETH C s
CD YT a SS

RU hy

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WEATHERING the eco-
nomic malaise better than most,
the Abaco economy is a “mod-
el” for the rest of The Bahamas,
South Abaco MP Edison Key,
said in the House of Assembly
yesterday.

“While we are feeling the
effects of the downturn in the
US economy, the affect on Aba-
co’s economy has been less than

ACN T GRC















South Abaco MP Edison Key

in other islands.

“In fact, I dare to state that
Abaco is a model for other
islands to emulate, with hun-
dreds of second home owners
who have built (homes) and

SEE page eight

Single mother intends to sue
Immigration Department

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

A SINGLE mother terrified by the violent intrusion of armed
immigration officers who raided her home last week intends to
sue the Department of Immigration for damages.

Violet Hanna, 41, and her daughter Amber, 7, were sleeping
when she claims the officers broke apart the gate securing the

SEE page nine

the main financing for loans made to Wellington Pre-
serve Corporation's Florida Project.

Yesterday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told The
Tribune that he "was told that the monies did not leave

the Bahamas."

Central Bank Governor Wendy Craigg also told The
Tribune that Bank records do not reflect any application
by CLICO (Bahamas) or an approval granted by the
Bank to authorise loans worth $73.6 million of its Bahami-
an assets to foreign affiliates.

When asked if the Central Bank was worried about oth-
er institutions circumventing exchange control regula-
tions to invest abroad, Ms Craigg said a system was in
place to deter any breach of the exchange control regu-

lations.

"Our experience suggests that this is not a normal

SEE page eight



Mitchell wants PM to give
full disclosure on the
swift liquidation of CLICO

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER foreign affairs
minister Fred Mitchell called
on Prime Minister Ingraham to
give a full and frank disclosure
on the reasons for the swift liq-
uidation of CLICO Bahamas
Ltd, questioning whether there
might have been any conflict of
interest or “insider trading” to
justify a raid of the assets of the
insurance company.

Yesterday, Guyana’s Presi-
dent Bharrat Jagdeo also
expressed concern over the
manner in which the Bahamas
handled the issue with the liq-
uidation of CLICO Bahamas.

President Jagdeo said that the
Bahamian regulator had failed
to contact Guyana before mak-
ing the decision to do so,
although that person was
“instructed by the Bahamian
Prime Minister to do so.” As a
result of CLICO Bahamas’ liq-
uldation, the government of
Guyana had to place CLICO
(Guyana) under judicial man-
agement.

President Jagdeo stressed that
he felt it was important for var-
ious Governors of Central

rr: UP oc 25% Off Se et



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER

Banks of Trinidad and Tobago,
Barbados and the Bahamas to
meet before the heads of state
of each country can hold talks,
as he expressed his concern that
the local regulators of the vari-
ous territories seemed to be
operating in isolation.

Mr Mitchell in his address to
the media yesterday echoed
some of these concerns when
he asked whether the Govern-
ment attempted to directly
intervene with the Government
of Trinidad and Tobago, the
ultimate owner of CLICO.

“We heard from our Prime
Minister that the President of
Guyana called the Prime Min-
ister of the Bahamas to inquire
about CLICO’s Guyana’s assets
in CLICO Bahamas. Yet on the
face of a Government guaran-
tee by the CLICO company in

SEE page nine











MTV GUIDE CANCELLED

DUE to economies on
newsprint caused by the
recession, The Tribune has
decided to cancel the TV
guide. We apologise to read-
ers for any inconvenience.



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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Sandilands auxiliary nurses stage protest

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

APPROXIMATELY two
dozen nurse aids stationed at the
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre
and the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital (PMH) protested in Rawson
Square yesterday against what
they called "slave-like" working
conditions.

The protesters waved placards
saying, "Those who implemented
the unfair shifts, please try work-
ing it", and "What is (more)
important, patient care or
shift system?" - while singing

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gospel hymns.

The demonstration drew the
attention of curious tourists and
locals alike, including several
members of the Opposition, who
delayed their entrance into yes-
terday's parliament session to
take in the scene.

The auxiliary nurses - support
staff for trained nurses - are in
an uproar over a new shift system
implemented by the Public Hos-
pital Authority (PHA) on Feb-
ruary 16 which affects auxiliary
nurses at PMH, Sandilands and
the Rand Lab in Grand Bahama.

"Prior to the implementation
of the shift they have in place
now, they were working 10-hour
shifts for four nights a week and
then having four nights off.

“They want them to now work
the eight-hour shift, which they
have no problem with.

“But we want them to consider
the fact that a number of persons
are only used to working night
shifts and they kind of built a
lifestyle around (that).

“The new system causes a lot
of them to now work morning,
evening and nights," said presi-
dent of the Bahamas Public Ser-
vice Union (BPSU) John Pinder.

Mr Pinder said the problem

began when some aides were
scheduled to work night shifts
ending at 11pm, only to be forced
to return to work at 7am the next
day.

He said this represents a vio-
lation of the union's industrial
agreement which states staff must
have a 12-hour rest period
between shifts.

The BPSU wants a meeting
with PHA officials to address
these concerns and claimed a
complaint lodged on February 12
was not acknowledged.

Yesterday, PHA managing
director Herbert Brown said to
his knowledge the new shift sys-
tem did not violate the union's
industrial agreement or the
Employment Act.

He acknowledged that a few
incidents were brought to his
attention where aides were being
scheduled to work a 7am shift
the day after leaving work at
11pm — an oversight that princi-
pal nursing officers from PMH
and Sandilands are presently
reviewing.

He said while some staff “are
not happy with the new shift sys-
tem,” the principal nursing offi-
cers are willing to work with
them to accommodate requests

for working hours, where possi-
ble.

The protest did not disrupt ser-
vices at PMH or Sandilands, he
said.

However, Mr Brown said that
four aides from Sandilands and
seven from PMH who were
scheduled to work yesterday
morning took part in the indus-
trial action. He said it was too
early to tell if they would be
penalised for their participation.

The aides are calling for the
old system to return: "The shift
what they implemented now,
you'll find more time with your
institution that you will with your
family. A lot of times when the
shifts are being made up, you do
not have a 12-hour rest period in
between. If they can't get it
together then they need to leave
the shift as is," said an auxiliary
nurse who has worked at PMH
for nearly 20 years.

Kenyatta Gibson
jets a standing
ovation from FNIVIs

FNM Mem-
ber of Parlia-
ment for
Kennedy Keny-
atta Gibson last
month attended
his first party
council meeting
and garnered a
standing ovation i
on ie Kenyatta Gibson
headquarters on Mackey Street.

Entering the hall to a “thunder-
ous applause,” Mr Gibson was
enthusiastically received by many
council members who sources said
welcomed the former PLP mem-
ber with “open arms.”

Although he was not scheduled
to speak, Mr Gibson was asked to
approach the podium and say a
few words after his overwhelming
welcome.

When this announcement was
made, a source at the meeting told
The Tribune, council members
“leapt to their feet” in a roaring
applause, “which continued at
intervals all through his address.”

Mr Gibson, in his brief address
to the council, said that he was
humbled by the overwhelming
show of support he has received.
He also expressed his gratification
for the warm reception and
pledged to do all he could to make
sure that he returns Kennedy to
its rightful place in the FNM’s col-
umn.



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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 3



Laing: Govt
must continue |
work to ‘turn
things around’
in economy

m@ By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of State
for Finance Zhivargo
Laing yesterday empha-
sised that with the 234
employees being termi-
nated when the Isle of
Capri closes its doors in
Grand Bahama by the
end of May, government
must continue its work to
“turn things around” in
the local economy.

Also commenting
briefly on reports that an
additional 30 persons
may soon be laid off
from Ginn’s Old Bahama
Bay property, Mr Laing
said that this is again
another case of where
businesses “all over the
world” are trying to
respond to the tough
economic times.

“So that Ginn and oth-
ers would be having a
similar reaction is only
indicative of the times of
which we find ourselves.
And we have to
empathise with the peo-
ple who are laid off
because it is a significant
hardship for them, but
this is what is happening
now and we have to keep
working on doing what
we can to turn things
around. But it is a global
economic crisis and that’s
what we’re in,” he said.

Decision

On Tuesday, senior
director of corporate
communications at Our
Lucaya Isle of Capri
Casino Jill Haynes said
that the move to close
the property came asa
result of a decision the
company recently made
in accordance with its
strategic corporate plan.

The company will
reportedly not renew its
lease - which expires in
May - and will be shut-
ting down operations in
the Bahamas and the
United Kingdom.

The Isle of Capri will
now focus, Ms Haynes
said, on the 18 casinos
and 8,000 employees that
the St Louis Missouri
company has in North
America.

Likewise, Ryan Juli-
son, a spokesman for
Ginn, noted that the
company is “continuous-
ly looking” at ways to
save money.

In an interview with
the Nassau Guardian, Mr
Julison said that he could
not confirm that Ginn
was about to lay off 30
persons, but did state
that “our efforts to cre-
ate the best resort we can
with the biggest cost effi-
ciency is an effort that
we’re analysing and look-
ing at every day.”

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Christie makes decision
on Pleasant Bridgewater
Senate replacement

Announcement will be made during or after mid-year budget debate

mw By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

OVER a month after he first said he
would soon name a new senator to replace
Pleasant Bridgewater, Opposition leader
Perry Christie now anticipates announc-
ing his selection during or after the mid-
year budget debate in the House of Assem-

bly.

Ms Bridgewater resigned her seat on
January 24 prompting the need for Mr
Christie to select a new appointee to take

her vacant seat in the Senate.

On January 26, former Prime Minister Christie
told the media that he would select a replacement
“at the earliest opportunity” and on February 2 he
said that within a week a new senator would be

seated.

Yesterday, asked whether he was having some
difficulty making his selection, Mr Christie said
“no”, and declared that he was already “done” with

Perry Christie



February.

the decision.

“T just have to do the formal — the let-
ters and so forth.

“It’s just a question of whether I do it
during this debate or immediately after,”
he said.

Mr Christie previously confirmed that
he intends for another Grand Bahama res-
ident to take up the post formally held by
Mrs Bridgewater. He said he had received
about six recommendations for the post.

“T think in my own mind a decision is
made, but I want to be absolutely careful
about speaking to it until such time as nec-
essary checks are made on all the relevant
people who are under discussion,” he said in early

The Senate has met several times since the resig-
nation of Mrs Bridgewater, who was charged with

abetment to extort and conspiracy to extort $25

million from US actor John Travolta. The Police
Act and the National Library and Information Ser-
vices Act have been debated since she stepped down.

Ministry confirms TB tests
at Prince George Whart

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Ministry of Health con-
firmed yesterday that they have
been conducting tests for
tuberculosis at Prince George
Wharf after a security guard,
who was admitted to the hos-
pital for a stroke, tested posi-
tive for the disease.

Speaking with The Tribune
at the House of Assembly yes-
terday, Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis said that his
ministry has just completed
their tests at the wharf and the
surrounding area.

However, he could not con-
firm the precise number of
individuals who have tested
positive for being exposed to
the disease or the number of
persons who have been con-
firmed to be infected with TB.

Team

However, Dr Minnis said
that his officers were quick to
mobilise a screening team to
test persons in and around the
facility as soon as they were
notified of the initial case.

As the Prince George Wharf
houses the docking facility for a
number of cruise lines, Dr Min-
nis was quick to assure the pub-
lic that tourists were at “no
risk” of contracting the disease
as persons must be in “constant
and prolonged” interaction
with an infected person to
catch TB.

“Tourists at airports or wher-
ever are at no risk,” Dr Minnis
said.

“All those who worked with-
in the vicinity would be
screened and there were a cer-
tain number who would have
been positive. What ‘positive’
means is that they were only
exposed. An example is, if ’m

eieelaree

ANVASY

Dr Hubert Minnis



here with the flu, everyone
around here would have been
exposed to the flu. They would
not have the flu, and they
won't get the flu, but if you
tested them, the test would
show positive that they have
been exposed to the flu,” he
said.

On Tuesday, The Tribune
revealed that at least 18 people
have tested positive to being
exposed to tuberculosis in a
series of tests conducted in and
around Prince George Wharf.

According to sources at the
site who have been personally
tested over the last week, eight
individuals returned positive in
one day, with another 10 being
identified over the course of
the screenings.

This number included
Defence Force officers sta-
tioned at the Port’s adminis-
tration offices and workers in
and around the Port’s Wel-
come Centre through which
hundreds of tourists pass every
day.

However, as Dr Minnis
pointed out, these persons who
have tested positive do not nec-

essarily have TB at this time,
but have been exposed to the
disease.

Dr Minnis said that once an
individual comes back positive,
a chest x-ray is taken to ensure
that it is just an exposure and
that they do not have full-
blown TB.

While he could not confirm
the exact number of persons
who tested positive, Dr Min-
nis said that his ministry had
all of these persons properly
screened between Tuesday and
yesterday.

Classic symptoms of tuber-
culosis are a chronic cough with
blood-tinged sputum, fever,
night sweats and weight loss.

Symptoms

“Infection of other organs
causes a wide range of symp-
toms. The diagnosis relies on
radiology — commonly chest
X-rays — a tuberculin skin test,
blood tests, as well as micro-
scopic examination and micro-
biological culture of bodily flu-
ids. Tuberculosis treatment is
difficult and requires long
courses of multiple antibiotics,”
according to a website on TB.

Tuberculosis is spread
through the air when persons
who have the disease cough,
sneeze, or spit. One-third of
the world’s current population
has been infected with
mycobacterium tuberculosis
and new infections occur at a
rate of “one per second.”

“However, most of these cas-
es will not develop the full-
blown disease — asymptomatic,
latent infection is most com-
mon.

“About one in 10 of these
latent infections will eventual-
ly progress to active disease,
which, if left untreated, kills
more than half of its victims,”
the website warns.

nL

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Bayparl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

email:info@colesofnassau.com



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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

LOL

TCO ESM IRV ER TE SEO C Te Co PL Ry Pee





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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Officers who disgrace their uniform

FOR YEARS illegal immigration in this
country has been a major social problem. Over
the years it has been almost impossible to stop
the flow of illegal persons entering the country
because of corruption that runs so deeply in
this society that no one knows who to trust any-
more.

As someone, commenting on the dismal sit-
uation, said: “We are steeped in a corrupt cul-
ture — there seems no way out!”

Corrupt underground networks, operating
both here and in Haiti, make it possible for
Haitians to show passports stamped in Haiti
giving them legal entry into the Bahamas. How-
ever, the passport holder has never left the
Bahamas. Somehow “the man” — as the under-
ground operator is identified — has a route by
which he sends passports from the Bahamas to
Haiti to be stamped and returned to the holder
in the Bahamas. The passport has made the
trip by itself with no human person attached.
When it is returned to its owner in the Bahamas,
“the man” is paid his fee and life goes on as usu-
al.

Now that public opinion is forcing a solution
to the illegal immigration problem, this lack of
trust is the cause of many innocent people being
hurt and the sanctity of their homes violated.
That is why law enforcement officers — be they
police or immigration officers — must approach
each situation with the greatest of care, remem-
bering that they are dealing with human beings
whose only crime is that they are trying to find
a safe haven from a cruel world.

In the chase for immigrants, officers
approach their prey assuming their guilt. Often
this is not the case.

Therefore, they should never forget their
own or their victim’s humanity.

Where is the need for smashing down doors
and destroying property?

Usually the person on the other side of the
door is so petrified that they are no threat to
anyone.

There is mistrust on both sides of that closed
door.

The victim, having had so many experiences
with dishonest officials is afraid to open the
door, and the officer trying to enter, having
experienced so many forged passports, rejects
the offer of being shown yet another one —
although this one might be legitimate.

These officers must always remember that
one day the tables could be turned. Sometime in
the unforeseeable future they could be in the
same position of that trembling little immigrant
with nowhere to hide.

About a year and a half ago, walking to a bus

Sirst Baptist Church

stop a young woman was picked up by two
policemen in a patrol car. They took her for
a “drive” bombarding her with questions. They
detected a slight Jamaican accent. They wanted
to know where she lived. She refused to tell
them fearing that on every payday they would
be at her doorstep for a bribe. She told them
that she was in the Bahamas legally and that her
employer had all her papers in to renew her
permit. The employer was only awaiting a reply
from Immigration.

The police officers would have none of her
explanation. They threatened to take her to
the Detention Centre if she did not pay them
$300. She had no money. She asked one of the
officers to lend her his cell phone so that she
could call a friend to bring her the ransom. One
of them handed her his cell. The friend deliv-
ered the $300 to the officers, but they did not
release her. Instead they drove her to
Yamacraw, leaving her in a desolate area faced
with having to walk half across New Providence
to find her way home.

Why didn’t her employers report the inci-
dent? They were too terrified of being at the
mercy of dishonest officers who could take their
revenge. And so they dropped the matter. If
the Police Commissioner hasn’t caught up with
these two rogues yet, they are still committing
highway robbery in the security of a Bahamian
police officer’s uniform.

And then there was the young man who told
his story on a radio talk show. He said he was
picked up in Freeport for a minor traffic infrac-
tion. The police officer promised not to book
him if he gave him $200. The young man had
only $50, which he readily handed to the police-
man. He was asked if he had an ATM card.
Because of the threats he went to the nearest
ATM machine, put his card in, drew out $150,
and handed it to the cop.

Another Bahamian officer had disgraced his
uniform as he drove into the sunset — with
$200 stolen dollars tucked securely in his pock-
et.

And so with suspicion on both sides, police
officers should be very careful how they sift
through the legal and illegal. At no time should
they disgrace their uniform and the country
and people they serve.

Remember we are all made of flesh and
blood with the same hopes and dreams, and
injustice and physical cruelty hurts the
oppressed as much as it does the oppressor. It
is true that many should not be in our country,
but for God’s sake show some compassion. We
can say this because daily we deal with cries of
the oppressed.



PLP needs a
complete
overhaul

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The present administration
has been accused of not com-
ing up with solutions to the
country’s economic problems.
The fact that this accusation has
come from the other side of the
floor has not raised any eye-
brows but it has given some
clarity to how the opposition
perceives its responsibility
regarding the issue of leader-
ship. Our culture is adverse to
those among us who are prone
to “shoot their mouth off” with-
out cause or reason, and the fact
that no other country has come
up with a solution to this prob-
lem should have given the
opposition “pause”, but no, it
seems that they are concerned
with having something to say,
than actually saying something.

Forrester Carroll has sug-
gested that his party needs to
get their house in order, if they
expect to win the next election,
but I think he was putting it
lightly. His party has to go
through a restructuring from
the ground up and dust off the
book of principles that made
the party a viable political enti-
ty, and, there is a building per-
ception that this once great par-
ty is just sitting by waiting for

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



something bad to happen, as it
did with its last victory. Hard
times often cause people to
reflect and for many the FNM
party has achieved the status
of a viable political entity as the
PLP continues its decline. This
viability has nothing to do with
them being liked, the jury is still
out on that verdict, but, they
have shown that they have a
penchant for coming through in
the tough times. They were test-
ed in 1992 with Hurricane
Andrew and the varied infra-
structural problems they inher-
ited, and again in 2007 when it
seems like political entrench-
ment was bringing out the worst
in people.

It is unlikely that Mr Ingra-
ham is going to allow the mis-
steps of the past to happen
again, and if the persons in his
party can just bide their time
and allow for “transition”, it is
just possible that we will see
what this nation is able to do.
The last forty years have had
us fighting among ourselves,

while the “foreign investors”
have had a field day with the
land that we are supposed to be
possessing. We have given up
too much just to be driving
around in late model vehicles
and dressing nicely. Forty years
ago we were able to feed our-
selves in the areas of poultry,
beef and dairy products, but
back then the investors had to
deal with some “fellas” who
weren't getting up off anything
except the plan was long term.
That old regime had its issues
also, but they are never going to
be accused of not putting this
country first, and this, is our
mandate in the era we call the
modern Bahamas. And, this has
to happen, before we wake up
and see our inheritance taken
away from “us”.

The PLP has to show that
there is an emotionally prag-
matic connection to the intel-
lect they claim to have in their
party. Singular successes are not
enough, they make for good
copies at business seminars, but
viability is about transference
and transition.

EDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau,
February 26, 2009.

Freeporters should not tolerate
people talking down to them

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Even in these times we as Freeporters should
not take being talked down to by anyone and as
a Bahamian citizen I take great objection to the
CEO of Carnival Cruise Lines publicly making
known his choice, etc, etc, of who Carnival likes
to be Prime Minister and how the present Prime
Minister was so co-operative when the dry-dock

company was being formed.

To my knowledge only Bahamians have a vote

in the Bahamas.

Before we rush in blinded — the proposed new

any stake. I understand the preferred location is
owned by Grand Bahama Port Authority so

cruise port.

GBPA if you really want to put a financial stim-
ulus in the Freeport market commit now without
delay that Freeport and Grand Bahamians will
own no less than 30 per cent of the proposed

Carnival if they wish could be offered 15 per
cent and the balance of 55 per cent GBPA.

This is one chance for the new imaged GBPA

to really show if what they say is actually true —

Iam not going to hold my breathe, but have

hopes.

cruise port should have a major shareholding in

the hands of the common Bahamian with a pref-
erence for residents on Grand Bahama.
The Bahamas Government should not have

Freeport,

J PERCENTIE

February 25, 2009.

No need to repeat Freeport news

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Every evening on ZNS-TV
Channel 11 the Freeport News
is shown at 6.30pm and then
the local Nassau news is shown.
During the Nassau News the
Freeport news is repeated
again.

This is very annoying after
you have just watched it previ-

ously you then are interested in
and looking to see and hear the
Nassau News. Do they not get
enough News from Nassau that
they have to repeat the
Freeport News?

In my humble opinion it is
not necessary to repeat the
Freeport news again as it has
been shown just before the Nas-
sau news comes on. ZNS TV at

7pm should focus more on the
Nassau news and news happen-
ing in other islands outside of
the Northern Bahamas scope
that the Freeport News covers.

A BAHAMIAN
NEWS LOVER
Nassau,

March, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 5



Forbes: time to remake |

the Bahamas anew again

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

SOUTH Andros MP Picewell
Forbes continued his push for a
shift in the thinking of local politi-
cians, even ruffling a few feathers
in his own political party, as he
made his contribution to the mid-
year budget in the House of
Assembly this week.

Declaring that politicians have
been “flamming” and “making
stuff up on the fly” for too long,
Mr Forbes said that it is high time
to remake the Bahamas “anew
again.”

“We need the promise of Major-
ity Rule and while the majority
may look and act like they are in
charge, we know and they know
who is really in charge around
here,” Mr Forbes told parliament
on Monday.

“We have dressed up the UBP
with black UBPs, we have creat-
ed a generation of political elites
and I call them the black oligarchy
- that’s a big word Mr Speaker.
The white oligarchy was that way
because they had the money and
the colour. Well, the black oli-
garchy are that way because they
control the two political parties and
the little cliques say who leads and
who follows.

“Mr Speaker, it was a time for a
change in 1992, 1997, 2002, 2007

Picewell Forbes



and 2009. We want a change today.
The prime minister said it was time
for a change and we gave him 10
years and what did he change?
Then he came back and wanted
another chance. What did he
change or is working on changing
that will be of a major import to the
21st century Bahamas? Well Mr
Speaker, it’s time for us to know it
is not all about men, we have had
Sir Lynden, Hubert Ingraham and
Perry Christie. It’s not about ego
and they have all had that. But it’s
about country first and making the
necessary adjustments to meet the
new challenges of a modern
Bahamas,” he said.

Mr Forbes even questioned what
would change if Bahamians gave
his own party leader, Perry
Christie, another chance at lead-

Govt made ‘tough decisions’ on

Family Island capital projects



m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT had to make some “very tough decisions” on which
Family Island capital projects to fund in light of the downturn in the glob-
al economy, Minister of State for Lands and Local Government Byran
Woodside said in parliament yesterday.

Addressing the impact the worldwide economic slump has had on
the less inhabited Bahamian islands, Mr Woodside said that the central
government had to call on local governments to more fully justify and “pri-
oritise” all expenditure they were seeking.

“Funding for capital projects within the various Family Islands was not
released during the first six months of the (2008/2009) fiscal period.
Being fully aware of the negative impact the downturn would have on the
Bahamas, this prudent and visionary government undertook an in-depth
review of the various submissions for capital projects and made some very
tough decisions relative to the areas of expenditure,” said Mr Woodside.

“Local government district councils were requested to prioritise their
submissions for capital funding and provide detailed costs to ensure that
there would be no overruns that would require contingency funding,” he

added.

He said that districts which “provided the requisite information were
provided with allocations for capital works” in January 2009.

Those allocations amounted to a total of $1,289,199 — with Central Aba-
co ($133,677), Long Island ($120,000), Central Eleuthera ($101,000),
Hope Town and South Andros ($100,000) receiving the most funding.

ing the country.

“Even if we give Christie anoth-
er chance - the problem is really
the system. It doesn’t work for the
man in the streets and it never
will,” he said.

Mr Forbes added that if there is
going to be a new kind of
Bahamas, where “Bahamians run
the show”, then there has to be a
serious look at leadership “in all
sectors of our society.”

“A new Bahamas will require a
country-wide strategy. No longer
will we run the Bahamas with man-
ifestos or action plans - that’s old
school. We need to run a Bahamas
with a country document. A docu-
ment that shows where we are all
headed so that we can all dream
and find our rightful place in the
new Bahamian society.

“The 1960s mentality politician
will say ‘nonsense, we are in
charge.’ But Mr Speaker, in charge
of what? Each other? Mr Speaker,
it is time for us to take a truthful
look at this chamber and deal with
matters such as this one. Many
Bahamians are feeling second class
and when people are feeling this
way the proliferation of superficial
facts from august bodies like the
World Bank about our GDP and
per capita income means nothing.
They know what they are feeling in
our society today.

“Mr Speaker, the time has come
for us to apologise to the Bahami-
an people for being men of limited
vision and imagination. We have
asked the people to believe in us
when we were not proven and they
gave three leaders a chance with
no track record to assess or to be
guided by, in the likes of the father
of our Nation - Sir Lynden Pin-
dling, Hubert Ingraham and Perry
Christie, who all served as prime
ministers, with the former serving
until this day.

“The Bahamian people gave
young people of colour a chance
and in some views we have never
returned the favour. Others have
been more generous in their com-
ments and said that we have done
great as a country of 46 years.”

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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FIRST AID

from the largest state economy in
the US, Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation marketing experts have
included California and other
parts of the western US in an
aggressive television advertising
campaign.

The expansion of a strong mar-
keting presence in the western US
is part of the ministry’s business
plan, which was presented to the
public by Minister of Tourism and
Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace shortly after his appoint-
ment.

“The entire Caribbean would
say the western United States is
untapped,” said Rene Mack, pres-
ident in the Ministry of Tourism’s
public relations agency, Weber
Shandwick.

The lack of direct flights and
the abundance of inconvenient air
connections make travel to the
Caribbean from the west coast dif-
ficult, he said.

However, he pointed out that
the Bahamas has had success in
creating awareness among Los
Angeles residents and others on

Govt to set up technical training body

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE government is setting up a joint public/private body to help
shape technical training available in the country to better enable stu-
dents to meet industry demands, Education Minister Carl Bethel said
in the House of Assembly yesterday.

Persons in the private sector have long complained that they have dif-
ficulty finding recruits with the necessary skills to take up jobs across
a range of industries.

Even at present, with unemployment rising, certain fields still require
labour to be brought in from abroad as there are few Bahamians with
the necessary skills.

Aiming to address this problem and leave a lasting stamp on_teach-
ing in the Bahamas, Minister Bethel said the government would like to
follow the example of other Caribbean countries and set up a pub-
lic/private sector council which will liase with the Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute (BT VI) to ensure that students are emerging
with the most useful qualifications.

Officials from the Ministry of Education are set to travel to three
Caribbean countries - Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica -
in coming months to review their successes in this regard.

“The National Workforce Development Council is a construct that
we are seeking to put together that would provide a forum for inter-
ested private sector businesses and business leaders to have an input,
a direct connection with the curriculum officers and administration at
BTVI so that the expectations of the industry in terms of what they are
looking for in their entry level employees, that those expectations
will have a greater reflection in the curriculum of BT VI and in the qual-
ity of training,” said Mr Bethel.

“Once we’ve done that consultancy, going around getting the back-
ground information, then we will move to actualise the creation of it,
bring the legislation forward,” he added.

Mr Bethel said if the move is successful, the intention is to expand the
cooperation between the public and private sector “throughout other
parts of the curriculum”’, so that education across the board - not just
in the technical fields - can be tailored more closely to respond to the
needs of the market.

The minister said that overhauling the curriculum as a whole is a pri-
ority for him at this time - one which he said he will be pursuing “very
aggressively” in coming months.

“As was recommended 40 years ago, (the Ministry is interested in)
set(ting) up committees with public school teachers and private school
teachers so that we’ll have subject-based curriculum committees to
revise the curriculum so we can get rid of this narrow, very superficial
curriculum that we presently have in core subjects, and try to improve
the way we teach reading, maths, history, geography, civics and social
studies,” said Mr Bethel.

“The critical thing is that we hope to be able to make greater
progress in the meeting of expectations.”






40 Year Wa uranties
Metal serine

ew aero

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace



the west coast through public rela-
tions — unpaid media placements.

He said the Bahamas’ had a
strong public relations presence
in the west even before advertising
efforts had been put in place.

“You are in the Los Angeles
Times,” Mr Mack said. “We are in
the newspapers in Phoenix, New
Mexico. We ignore no one.”

Kim Hunter, president and
CEO of LaGrant Communica-
tions, a public relations agency
specialising in the African Amer-
ican consumer market for the
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation,
recommended more robust
attempts to attract travellers from
the west coast. He pointed out that
Hawaii captures more Los Ange-
les travellers than the Bahamas
even though the Bahamas is clos-
er to Los Angeles.

Honolulu is 2,559 miles from
Los Angles — 38 miles farther
away than Nassau. He said Los
Angeles and other western cities
could provide a boom for
Bahamas tourism.

“This is a huge, untapped mar-
ket,” Mr Hunter said.

“T will give you one example,
Jamaica, our competition. They
sell Jamaica from Los Angeles
because you have a lift there that
goes non-stop to Montego Bay as
well as to Ocho Rios. It is the
same distance from us in Los
Angeles to go from LA to Jamaica
as it is to go from LA to Hawaii.”

At the moment, he said, the
Bahamas is just scratching the sur-
face of the benefits that Los Ange-
les has to offer.

Through proper media and cor-
porate partnerships, much more
can be contributed to Bahamian
tourism by Los Angeles residents
and others on the west coast, Mr
Hunter said.

“Part of it is the invitation,” he
said. “If you don’t give the invite
to journalists, if you don’t give the
invitation to prospective con-
sumers, they will never come. That
western region of the United
States is a huge opportunity to
you. Because I can tell you now,
your competition is wooing that
market.”

Portland and Seattle are among
the notable cities for tourism tar-
geting, Mr Hunter said. He point-
ed out that the cities endure rain
frequently and their residents
would be pleased to experience
good weather and beautiful beach-
es.

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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS
7

Three remaining

concrete stack units

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Vopak Terminal Bahamas :
will demolish the three remaining concrete }
stack units at the former Bahamas Oil

Refinery Company plant on Saturday.

The 40-year-old landmarks — which stand
350ft tall - are coming down to make way for
the construction of additional oil storage }
tanks at Vopak, which is presently under-

going a major expansion project.

Maxwell Sweeting, vice-president of }
Vopak, said the event will be attended by ;
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and resi- }
dents of Grand Bahama, particularly from

the nearby surrounding settlements.

Vopak held a town meeting on Tuesday
evening at the Church of the Good Shep- }

herd for residents of Pinder’s Point,
Hunters, and Lewis Yard.

Representatives from the Cleveland :
Wrecking Company, Dykon Explosives, and
Bahamian Contractor Don Moss attended
the meeting to allay any concerns residents

may have about the implosion.

“We want the community to be a part of }
this event and we have started an art com- }
petition for students of Lewis Yard Prima- }
ry School to depict what they expect to see
on Saturday. The winning student will get }
the honour of pushing the button, along ;
with the prime minister, to implode the }

three stacks,” Mr Sweeting said.

Vopak demolished three steel stacks last
year with no disruption to residents in the }

area.

Chester Grace, blaster estimator at
Dykon, said over 200 pounds of explosives }

will be used for the implosion.

He noted that Dykon has 25 years expe-
rience in the field. The entire implosion

should be completed within five minutes,
he said.

“There will be some noise when the blast
goes off, but vibrations will be minimal }

when the stacks hit the ground,” he said.
He said a lot of dust debris is expected,

but it is no cause for concern to residents in

the area.

“We don’t think residents will have to :
evacuate because it is not going to be an }
immediate problem to them,” said Mr

Grace.

Invited persons will watch the implosion }
from a safe designated area some 1,000ft
away, on land that has been cleared for the }
Greenfield Expansion Project, which is esti- }
mated at between $250 million to $300 mil- i

lion.

Vopak is an independent oil storage hub

for customers from around the world.

Vopak and First Reserve Corporation }
purchased the BORCO plant last April. :
The company will have invested $1 billion i
when the expansion of the facility is com- }

pleted on Grand Bahama.



LEADING MEDICAL EXPERTS TO HOST CANCER CLINIC: (I-r) Professor Arthur Porter CEO of McGill
University Health Centre and managing director of the Cancer Centre and director of radiation
oncology; Professor Karol Sikora, Dean of the Buckingham School of Medicine, director of medical
oncology at the Cancer Centre, and Dr Conville Brown, co-founder and CEO of the centre.

New director of medical oncology
appointed at Bahamas Cancer Centre

PROFESSOR Karol Sikora, Dean of the
Buckingham School of Medicine and author
of the most widely-used cancer textbook in
graduate medical school in the United King-
dom, has been appointed director of medical
oncology at the Bahamas Cancer Centre, it
was announced yesterday.

“We are indeed honoured to announce that
one of the leading authorities, both in academia
and in cancer treatment practice, Dr Karol
Sikora, the Dean of the Buckingham School of
Medicine and author of two definitive texts on
cancer, has accepted the position of director
of medical oncology at the Cancer Centre at the
Centreville Medical Pavilion,” said Dr Conville
Brown, co-founder and CEO of the centre.

e e
Facility

The centre opened its radiation oncology
division in January 2004 while moving into its
new $12 million-comprehensive state-of-the-
art cancer screening, diagnosis and treatment
facility at 72 Collins Avenue. The medical
oncology division of the centre opened in Jan-
uary 2009.

“Dr Sikora is author of ‘The Treatment of
Cancer,’ the standard British post-graduate
textbook on cancer, and his new work, “The
Economics of Cancer,’ is already making its
impact felt. He is also an advisor on cancer to
the World Health Organisation and the medical
director of CancerPartnersUK, which admin-
isters a $100 million-public/private trust for the
radiation treatment of government-referred
patients, not dissimilar to our local model at the
Cancer Centre,” Dr Brown said.

“As a leading voice in cancer research and
therapy, Dr Sikora will bring additional strength
and depth of knowledge to our very strong
team that is committed to the fight against can-
cer, the number two killer of adult men and
women in the Bahamas.”

Professor Sikora will also be supported by the
Cancer Centre’s two senior staff medical oncol-
ogists — Dr Nevein Girgis, who holds a PhD in

medical oncology from the National Cancer
Institute at Cairo University in Egypt, and Dr
Osama Kellini, who holds a Masters Degree in
clinical oncology (medical and radiation oncol-
ogy), and was a former medical director of the
Nassau Institute Oncology Centre in Cairo,
Egypt.

Professor Arthur Porter, CEO of McGill
University Health Centre, serves as managing
director of the centre, and its director of radia-
tion oncology. Both experts will be in Nassau
later this week for the second in a series of
monthly professors’ cancer clinics. The clinic
will be held this Saturday.

“Constructing the centre and equipping it
with the most sensitive, advanced, and state-of-
the-art diagnostic and treatment equipment
was a huge step toward meeting the goal of
being able to provide the very best cancer care
for Bahamians at home,” said Dr Brown.

“But ultimately it is the people in any medical
facility who make the real difference. Now,
with the affiliation of not one, but two of the
leading voices in cancer study and treatment
onboard, we are excited about the prospects of
making a real dent in the destructive path of
cancer.”

Medical professors and Dr Porter and Dr
Sikora lead a team of more than 20 full-time
medical and paramedical professionals provid-
ing all modalities of diagnosis and treatment —
radiation, chemotherapy and surgical.

Professor Porter is assisted by two staff radi-
ation oncologists — Dr Margo Munroe, a
Bahamian trained in Alberta, Canada, and Dr
Memory Nsingo, a second clinical oncologist
(medical and radiation) from Zimbabwe.

The Cancer Centre is one of the few cancer
treatment facilities equipped for paediatric
treatment and surgery, a division headed by
American Board-certified paediatric haema-
tologist-oncologist Dr Corrine Sin Quee.

The Cancer Centre is the only facility in the
western hemisphere and the second in the
world outside the US to be accredited
by the American College of Radiation Oncol-

ogy.

‘Location: Carmichael Road ,

PRIME OFFICE
SPACE

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second floor
space will be available April, 2009 in newly
constructed building at the corner of Marlborough
and Cumberland Streets. Two (2) on-site car
spaces included.

Ideal location for offshore bank, trust company,
law firm, or other professions.

Contact Owner at:

362-6006

of Dance

Instructor: Adanecia Kemp

Rallet, Jazz, Modern, Tap, Liturgical

Classes available for adults and children ages

3 & up.

x Monday, Wednesday & Friday
- 4:00p.m. -— 7:00p.m.

immediately
“Worth of the Detention Centre
Phone: 361-4294/5 |



f'S A GRAND TIME OF

IT’S A TIME OF JOY AND JUBILATION!

PRAISE ax ELEBRATION? 4

Medical Association of the
Bahamas

37 Annual Conference 2009

Formal Opening Night Session I:

A FREE PUBLIC LECTURE

“Medical Care is Expensive...

Is Quality Care for All
Realistic?”

Presenter
Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter pc, Mp, MBA, FACR, FACRO,

irector-General and CEO of the McGill University Health Cente

FAAMA

Councillor Privy Council of Canada
Montreal, Canada.

Wednesday, March, 11 2009, 6:30 PM

GUEST SPEAKERS:

BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD Monday, March 9th, 2009

Genera! ()érseer
BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON

General Preshytet

Bishop Dr. Elearnet B. Rabming, Mateonal Oyveroser
& Moderator will dehver his ANBUAL ADDRESS |
LIVE VIA RADIO BAHAMAS (1344) AM ond

S10 AM

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN

Global Quireach Director

BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK
CBL [nstrector

MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE

International Director of Women’s Ministries

BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN

Regional Gverseer of Jamaica, Cayman

The Convention climaxes on Sanday, March 15th
with the afternoon Annoul Parade and Water
Baptismal Service, followed by the evening
Service brnadesst live on FNS Radio and TV 13,

log on to: WWW.cogophahamas.org
For live webcasting

Islands Guyana and French Guiana

and MINISTER SONLA MARTIN
BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS

Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islands

BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES

National Qwerseer of the Church of God,

Bahumus, Turks & Caioos Islinds

British Colonial Hilton Hotel

Ministering in song and performance
gre: the Centennial Mass Choir, the Tab-
[3% ernacle Concert Choir, the Chorch of
God National Choir, the Bahamas Public
Officers Choir, and other Choirs
oe oe and - Groups, al vith
GETTING IT RIGHT IN HEALTH CARE: - a Youth and

he Right Treatment, Right Time, Right Outcomes & the Right Price 2
. suders [i =
Sessions II-IV Thursday 12: 8:30pm — 7:00pm

Sessions V-VIII Friday 13": 8:30am — 7:00pm fn te fly a al

MAB Conference: March 11" —





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

%

cin

.

! 1
be mo
ZN

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for provision of General Insurance
Services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 690/09
All Risks General Insurance
(a) Commercial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents); and
(b) Computers, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment

Tender No. 691/09
Motor Insurance - Commercial & Private Vehicles

Tender No. 692/09
Accident Insurance - Money & Burglary

Tender No. 693/09
Liability Insurance - Personal & Public

Tender No. 694/09
Professional Indemnity
[Officers, Directors, Professional Staff, Engineers,
Accountants, Attorneys]

&

Tender No. 695/09
Marine Insurance

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163



PCM Ce ite
at Centreville
CeCe eT
announces the

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Questions over loans
of more than $70m
to foreign affiliates

FROM page one

activity, although obviously the Bank would
be concerned were such a practice to become
the norm among companies in the local market,
as it would, inevitably, impact negatively on
the stock of reserves.

"The official system provides checks and
balances that would deter unauthorized trans-
fer of investment capital and violators would be
guilty of an offence under the Schedule to the
Exchange Control Regulations. They could
be subject to sanction, including court action,"
she said.

If CLICO (Bahamas) Ltd had lent the $73.6
million through its local operations, the com-
pany would have required approval from the
Central Bank to extend loans to its foreign
affiliates, regardless of the source of these
funds and whether held in Bahamian dollars or
foreign currency.

"For example, if CLICO had amassed these
funds from its foreign operations and lent them
via the Bahamian subsidiary company, such
actions would still require exchange control

FROM page one

reside for long periods in Abaco,
creating long-term sustainable
employment for many Bahami-
ans,” said Mr Key, as he con-
tributed to the mid-year budget
debate.

approval.

"A review of our Exchange Control records
does not reflect that the Central Bank cither
received an application from CLICO
(Bahamas) Ltd or granted approval for CLICO
(Bahamas) Ltd to lend $73.6 million of its
assets to its foreign affiliates," Ms Craigg said.

While giving an update on the situation in the
House of Assembly on Monday, Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham said a wind-up order giv-
en on February 24 was ordered by the Registrar
of Insurance because the company's liabilities
outweighed its assets by $9 million. He added
that its Turks & Caicos branch could not pay
$2.6 million in claims.

He said that since 2004, CLICO (Bahamas)
began writing "excessive cash advances" to its
subsidiary CLICO Enterprises Ltd, which were
ultimately invested in the declining Florida
real estate market.

The Bahamas serves as a parent jurisdiction
for the Turks & Caicos and Belize, however it
is a separate entity from CLICO operations
in Trinidad and Tobago, and other jurisdic-
tions.

Abaco economy ‘is model
for the rest of Bahamas’

Mr Key, Bahamas Agricul-
tural and Industrial Corporation
executive chairman, added in an
interview after his speech that
the model makes Abaco less sus-
ceptible to the seasonal nature of
hotel and short-term vacation-
based tourism.

“In Abaco we have year-
round tourism because of the
second home owners. They
spend up to six or eight months
there. They are wealthy and they
employ a lot of Bahamians from
all over,” said Mr Key.

Having recently visited Cat
Island, Mr Key said he felt that
the “beautiful” island had all the
potential to sustain a second

home community that Abaco
has and could benefit accord-
ingly.

Meanwhile, he added that
with its proximity to the United
States, Andros also has potential
to benefit from this model of
development.

Mr Key’s comments come in
the wake of lay-offs at hotels in
New Providence (Atlantis and
Wyndham), Grand Bahama
(Our Lucaya) and Abaco
(Winding Bay) in the last four
months.

On Tuesday 200 more jobs in
Grand Bahama were left in lim-
bo when an announcement was
made that Isle of Capri would
not be renewing its contract to

run the casino at the Our Lucaya
hotel in Freeport when it expires
in May.

Tourist arrivals to The
Bahamas were down by close to
five per cent in 2008 over the
previous year, according to
the Central Bank of the
Bahamas.

Despite Mr Key’s optimistic
assessment, the second home
model of development has come
under fire from local communi-
ties in the past for contributing to
lifting local land prices out of
the price range of average
Bahamians in favour of foreign-
ers who do not spend the major-
ity of the year at the properties
they purchase.

Professor of Oncology,
The Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter,
PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FRCPC,
Director General & CEO, McGill University

Health Centre, Managing Director,

Professors’
Cancer Clinic

Professor of Medical Oncology,
Prof. Karol Sikora,

MA, MB BChir, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM
Dean of the University of Buckingham
School of Medicine,
author of over 300 papers
& Director of Medical Oncology

at The Cancer Centre

The Cancer Centre

Clinic open to the public
The Cancer Centre at
Centreville Medical Pavilion
72 Collins Avenue
Saturday, March 7

10:00am - 3:00pm

Limited appointments available.

LCC Cer mm cys) aM Ie





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 9



DAYANA MENDOZA, Miss
Universe 2008, at yesterday’s
press conference.

Photo: Derek Smith



New temporary
jobs in hotel sector

FROM page one

in a lot of additional people when our hotels
reach 100 per cent level, not permanently, but
in the afterglow we will hopefully get the loss
back.”

Miss Universe organisation president Paula
Shugart said the pageant also will be hiring local
workers to assist in the event.

And Robert Sands, vice president of external
affairs for BahaMar, said every hotel will seek to
benefit both during the event and from the
expected long-term boost it will bring to the
industry.

However, he said, it is too early to speculate on
the possibility of cancelling the planned two-
month closure of the Wyndham hotel in Cable
Beach this year.

“Our position has not changed,” he said. “But
if there is overriding and compelling indication of
definitive demand I am sure we will look at those
reasons to make adjustments.”

Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Van-

derpool-Wallace’s principal focus is on the rosy
“afterglow” expected to follow the event as a
result of publicity generated by televising the
pageant in more than 170 countries.

He intends to send the beauty queens to as
many Family Islands as possible to expose the
range and variety of experiences the Bahamas
has to offer, and will inform viewers around the
world about how to travel to the Bahamas at a
time when it will be easier than ever before as a
result of recent adjustments to visa requirements.

He said: “The whole idea is making sure that
we are having your country shown in the best
possible light, and publicity has a much higher
credibility than advertising.

“It is much more scientific than it has
ever been and the cost is lower than it has ever
been.”

The government has put up $2.9 million to
host the event, and additional costs including
transportation, food and beverages, and import-
ing production trucks, will be covered by the pri-
vate sector in an unprecedented show of sup-
port, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

FROM page one

backyard of her home in Price
Street, Nassau Village, with a
maul and then broke a hinge
on the back door to gain
access to her property at
around 4am on February 24.

The Bahamian mother-of-
two said she offered to show
her passport to the armed offi-
cers who never identified
themselves as being from the
Immigration Department.
However, they declined to
look at it.

Ms Hanna said the officers
left behind the maul used to
break down the gate and beat
the door. As yet, she said, the
Immigration Department has
not arranged to repair the
damage.

Since the raid Ms Hanna
and her daughter have felt
unsafe in their home and both
have fallen ill with pneumo-
nia.

Amber is being treated in
the children’s ward of Princess
Margaret Hospital for the ill-
ness, which Ms Hanna attrib-
utes to post-traumatic stress.

Her daughter, a pupil at
Kingsway Academy, cried and
vomited while about seven
armed officers interrogated
the pair. Her mother said the
child was so disturbed by the
raid that she has since been
too afraid to be in the house
without holding her mother’s
hand or to stay there at night,
Ms Hanna said.

Immigration Minister
Branville McCartney said he
would meet with Ms Hanna
and launch an investigation
into the incident after reading
about it in The Tribune on
Thursday.

However, Ms Hanna has
not heard from Mr McCart-
ney since his initial phone call
on Friday and they have made
no arrangements to meet.

She said: “I would like to
meet him to find out when
they are going to fix my stuff,
that is the only thing Iam con-
cerned with.

“T was in my safety zone
and it was damaged.

“T have hired a lawyer who

Single mother intends to sue
Immigration Department

WOOD AND COLD-FORMED STEEL
TRUSSES

DESIGN
ENGINEERING
COMPETITIVE PRICING

FAST BIDDING INFORMATION

361-7764

Road to City Dump after Premix
Email:ggongora@coralwave.com

AUTHORED
KAUN ROC TURER



KIDZ CITY

is looking into filing a lawsuit
against the Immigration
Department for pain and suf-
fering and damage to my
home.

“Tam not doing it because
of money, I am doing it
because I need safety for my
house and safety for my chil-
dren.”

Ms Hanna, who works at
Nassau Airport three days a

week, said she now needs
security bars for my door
because she no longer feels
safe as a single parent living in
Nassau Village.

She added: “I am not feeling
well and my daughter is in
hospital because she got sick
from vomiting and she is asth-
matic.

“It is most definitely
because of the stress.”

STOREWIDE SALE
15% STOREWIDE

Mitchell wants full disclosure

FROM page one

Trinidad, now apparently owned by the Government of Trinidad
and Tobago, our own Prime Minister of the Bahamas cannot say
whether he has spoken to the Prime Minister of Trinidad and

Tobago about this matter.

“The former Prime Minister of Barbados, Owen Arthur has
suggested that since this is a trans-border, CARICOM-wide issue,
all Heads of Government should get together and in the spirit of
functional co-operation settle the CLICO matter and other trans-

border financial services issues,” he said.

Mr Mitchell added that while the Prime Minister is on the bureau
of CARICOM and can seek to convene an early meeting of Heads
of government, he has thus far decided to do “nothing”.

“The concern about this Government’s actions continues to
grow when one sees the listed assets of CLICO Bahamas which
include 14 million in cash. It raises whether there was any risk to the
company that would have required a liquidation order and whether
or not there was any conflict of interest or any insider trading or any
disposition to allow a raid of the assets of CLICO in the Bahamas.
There must be full and frank disclosure by all public officials

involved in this matter,” he said.

any
f ey

Nursery — Grade 6

Location: Carmichael Road, immediately north of the Detention Centre

Telephone: 361-4295 * Fax: 341-4296
Computers throughout the curriculum

Daily use of the AutoSkills Reading & Math Software
National and International exposure to fields in Science Math and Technology

Qualified Teachers
Small Student/Teacher Ratio

Placement Examination for grades 1-6
Saturday, March 21st, 2009
9:00a.m. — 12noon

Scholarships offered to students with highest placement scores

Application forms are available at the School’s Office.
Application forms should be completed and returned by Friday, March 18th.

The application fee is $20.00

The Remnant MiniVersity & Academy
of Math Science & Technology



10% OFF WITH CREDIT CARD

OPEN CALL FOR A YOUTH MIX TALENT

Dance Judge

on the T.V. Show
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March 11-13,2009,
Wednesday - Friday 3PM - 9PM

March 14, 2009,

Saturday 12PM - 9PM

NATIONAL CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

For More Information Contact 393-2884
Dance (Hip-Hop, Folk, Praise-Gospel, Performing Arts) Voice (Rap, RMB & Folk)

Sale Start Friday Feb. 27th
Ends Saturday March 7th

Montrose Avenue and Oxford Street (2 doors North of Multi-Discount)

P.O. Box N-1552

Nassau, Bahamas

Pe
‘LAS

Phone: 323-3460
Monday - Saturday - 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM
































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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A green econom

in the Bahamas

This is one in a series of articles
discussing the potential opportunities for
the Bahamas in the emerging green
economy. Colin Lightbourn, who wrote
this piece, is a real estate business owner
and developer. He is a private pilot and
past president of the Bahamas National
Trust.

To comment, discuss and submit ideas
about these articles please visit
www.thegreenislands.com

We

Maker's Bap

Baker’s Bay
GOLF & OCEAN CLUB

As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians
on our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to
apply for the position of:

Golf Course Construction
Assistant Manager

Attributes to include:

* 5-8 years experience in Golf Course Construction and
Management at leading Golf Club.
Knowledge of all phases of Golf course design and
construction activities including vertical golf construction
(club houses, maintenance facilities irrigation pump stations)
Turf Management Degree.
A thorough understanding of all phases of maintenance and
repair to courses, practice range and equipment.
Extensive experience working with city planners, engineers,
architects, and contractors.
Knowledgeable in all phases of construction contracts
related to golf projects.
Detail oriented, a skilled planner, ability to prioritize with
excellent communication skills.
Computer literate.
Willing to live on an out island.
Ability to work on own initiative is important.

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need
apply.

Applications can be submitted to:

Director, Human Resources and Training
P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or sbowe@bakersbayclub.com

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009

ro



Ip THE Chinese lan-
guage, the two symbols
that make up the word "crisis"
are often translated as signify-
ing “danger” and “opportuni-
ty”. Many people read this as
suggesting that even the most
dangerous situations carry
within them the seeds of gen-
uine possibility. A web search
displays more than half a mil-
lion references arguing cither
for or against this interpreta-
tion, but whatever its accuracy,
the relevance of the proverb
to today's world is clear.

In mental health terms, a cri-
sis does not refer to an event or
situation, but to one’s reaction
to that event or situation. A
crisis is dangerous because we
have the potential to overre-
act to it, panic, and make irra-
tional decisions that are not in
our own best interest.

We can witness this on a
daily basis where various
labour and economic statistics
are published and the world
markets go into a tailspin
resulting in massive job cuts
and sell-offs, which in turn ini-
tiates another round of panic,
and so on.

Furthermore, even in the
definition of so positive a word

c

as ‘opportunity’, there are ref-
erences to threats and uncer-
tainties. Among the word's
numerous definitions, two are:
“an uncertain event with a pos-
itive probable consequence”
and “the combination of an
asset, a threat and an occasion
that may give rise to an inci-
dent”.

I believe that tremendous
opportunities are at our
doorstep as we look to what
lies ahead. A time for change is
upon us; a time for planning
and rebuilding, a time to
strengthen and foster the
things that should not be dam-
aged by an ailing economy —
our health, our families and
our incredibly beautiful coun-
try.

Recession

Most countries around the
world have been in a recession
for over a year and eventually
the cycle will hit bottom and
enter into the recovery period
followed by an expansion. For
the last 100-plus years eco-
nomic expansions have come
on the heels of industrial and
technological revolutions of
human ingenuity.

Humans discovered steel

COMMONWEALTH BANK

DIVIDEND NOTICE

TO COMMON SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of Directors of Commonwealth Bank Limited has
Declared a Quarterly Dividend for Common, “A”, “B’, “C’, “D’,
“BE”, “F”, “G”, “H” and “I? Preference Shares, to all shareholders
of record at March 13, 2009, as follows:-

Common

“A’ Preference
“B’ Preference
“C” Preference
“D” Preference
“E” Preference
“F” Preference
“G” Preference
“H” Preference
“ Preference

5c per share

7% pe rannum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% pe rannum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% pe rannum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly

The payment will be made on March 31, 2009 through
Colina Financial Advisors Limited, the Registrar & Transfer
Agent, in the usual manner.

Charlene A. Bosfield
Corporate Secretary

During the month of March, come to any QVS Pharmacy
(Village Road or Seagrapes Shopping Centre) and for
every bottle of Dasani water you buy, partial proceeds

will be donated to The Bahamas Red Cross.

On March 22nd, World Water Day, every cent from

your water purchase goes to the charity.

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and harnessed electricity,
invented mass production and
created automobiles and air
travel. Now, new horizons are
visible through the internet
and the information age. It
leaves one to ask what will the
next recovery and expansion
consist of and how can The
Bahamas and our people put
ourselves in a position to ben-
efit?

For decades the struggle for
oil has wreaked havoc across
the globe. Experts including
Fortune 500 companies are
now acknowledging that the
existing energy model is not
sustainable and has created too
much dependence on external
sources.

Some estimate that oil
reserves have peaked or are
about to peak. That, com-
pounded with China and Indi-
a’s emerging markets and
increased demand for oil,
means we are left scrambling
for solutions to meet future
global energy demand. Major
oil companies are investing
heavily in the production and
research of alternative energy
(www.bpsolar.com and
www.shell.com/solar)

In 2004, Shell opened a
solar plant in Germany suffi-
cient to power 1,800 house-
holds. As of 2006, the state of
Texas had developed enough
wind capacity to power more
than 600,000 average Ameri-
can homes. General Electric,
one of the largest US compa-
nies, announced earlier this
year that it will invest $6 billion
into alternative energy by the
year 2010. In addition to alter-
native energy, large and small
companies across the globe are
designing and manufacturing
everything imaginable in
preparation for the next eco-
nomic expansion — the green
renaissance.

The Bahamas has always
been fortunate to have natural
beauty and proximity to the
United States. We are also for-
tunate to have such a small
population in relation to our
land mass. However, in a glob-
alised world where places
resembling the Bahamas can
even be manufactured - con-
sider Dubai’s Palm Island and
The World Islands — we have
to be more inventive in order
to stay competitive.

There are several statistics




about how many people live
in the Bahamas: for argumen-
t’s sake, let’s say there are
320,000 people today. The esti-
mated population density is 23
people per square kilome-
tre. Globally this ranks num-
ber 188 out of 238 countries in
terms of population density.

For reference, Bermuda is
7 at 1,211 people/sq. km.,
Jamaica is #51 and The United
States is 177, at) 31
people/sq.km. The least dense
population in the world is
Greenland at 0.026
people/sq.km.

This number for the
Bahamas is a little misleading
because the majority of the
population is located on New
Providence. If New Providence
were a country itself rt would
rank as the 12th most densely
populated country behind
Bangladesh and, at the other
end, Inagua as its own coun-
try would be the third least
densely populated country in
the world behind only Green-
land and The Falkland Islands.

























Population

To put it in perspective, if
Paradise Island had the same
density as Inagua there would
be four or five people living
on the entire island. The rest of
the Bahamian islands are clos-
er to Inagua’s population den-
sity than they are to New Prov-
idence.

With the green renaissance
on the horizon, it may be a
blessing in disguise that The
Bahamas’ Family Islands nev-
er developed to their full
potential. The green renais-
sance brings new opportuni-
ties for Improving our tourism
product and infrastructure,
establishing agriculture and
manufacturing bases and cre-
ate a bigger role and reason
for Bahamians to do business
in the family islands.

It is also likely the only way
to solve the overcrowding we
are facing on New Providence.
The capacity is there to achieve
this through a more sustain-
able and well-planned process.

As long as we can build this
new economy while effectively
managing our resources we can
develop a brand and products
that leaves the world green
with envy.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 682/09
STORAGE TANK #11
CLEANING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236





THE TRIBUNE

Sp



HURSDAY, MARCH 5,



PAGE 1

or





tS

2009

CH REEVES Tre Barry wins as H O Nash Xavier Coakley tries to catch him.

Raptors

reclaim

Defending champs LW

title

Young finishes sixth

Recognising our athletes’

latest accomplishments



CONGRATULATIONS to
Bianca Stuart.

Over the weekend, she
became the latest Bahamian
collegiate star to close out her
indoor career on a successful
note.

Stuart, who turns 22 on May
17, soared to her fourth con-
secutive triumph in the wom-
en's long jump at the State
Farm Missouri Valley Confer-
ence Championships at the
University of Iowa in Cedar
Falls.

She also closed the chapter
in her collegiate sting by inking
her name on the All-time Con-
ference and UNI Dome
records, a feat that a modest
Stuart took in her stride as she
surpassed the performance of
another Bahamian Dedra
Davis, who excelled at Missouri
State back in the early 1990s.

Stuart is following a long line
of stellar Bahamian female
long jumpers in college, includ-
ing Shonel Ferguson, Jackie
Edwards, Davis, Natasha
Brown and Grand Bahamian
Daphne Saunders.

She's currently chasing the
national record that is shared
by Ferguson and Edwards and
the way she's performing, her
coach Andre Scott said it's only
a matter of time before she
joins the elite of jumpers, who
have surpassed the 22-feet bar-
rier.

So far, the only two Bahami-
ans to achieve that feat are Fer-
guson and Edwards.

While Ferguson has since
retired and is now running a
successful business, Edwards is
still competing.

Last year, however, Stuart
upstaged Edwards at the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations' National
Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium in what could be termed
the "changing of the guard".

But in the end, Edwards'
performance during the year
enabled her to eventually go
to the Olympic Games in Bei-
jing, China in August. Stuart
had to stay at home, but she
has vowed that this year will
be totally different.

OPINION

She has promised that when
the national team head to the
IAAF World Championships
in Berlin, Germany in August,
she intends to make her first
major senior trip.

But she knows that she will
have to duplicate her feat last
June when this year's nationals
are held in June, or at least
attain the A qualifying stan-
dards for the championships
when the outdoor season gets
underway.

Stuart, in an interview with
The Tribune, said it's just a
matter of time and she urged
everybody to be "patient" with
her.

With the type of perfor-
mance she already turned in so
far this year, Stuart should be
well on her way to making her
giant leap on the senior inter-
national scene and she has't
started her outdoor campaign
at college yet.

Talking about college,
Grand Bahamian superstar
Nivea Smith has joined her for-
mer Carifta team-mates and
she's already gotten off to a
great start. As a freshman at



@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net net

Benen by a dominating per-

B sernane from the male half of

their roster, the C.H. Reeves
Raptors track and field team reclaimed
their usual spot atop the leaderboard.

The Raptors totalled 711 points, near-
ly 120 points ahead of their nearest com-
petitors, to take home the Junior High
School Championship in the Govern-
ment Secondary School Sports Associa-
tion’s 16th Annual Track and Field
Meet.

The S.C. McPherson Sharks finished
second with 591.50 points, H.O. Nash
Lions were third with 501 points while
the T.A. Thompson Scorpions and A.F.
Adderley Tigers tied for fourth with 432
points.

Last year’s champions, the L.W.

Auburn University, Smith is
starting to take the form of a
mega superstar.

She's competing along side
Cache Armbrister in the Tigers
connection at Auburn Univer-
sity. The two should raise some
eyebrows in college this year,
according to their Bahamian
assistant coach at Auburn,
Henry Rolle.

The duo, along with Sheni-
qua 'Q' Ferguson, who is
expected to join them in
August, are following in the
footsteps of Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and should be the
era replacements for the retired
Golden Girls, Pauline Davis-
Thompson, Eldece Clarke-
Lewis and Sevatheda Fynes.

It would be good, since we
missed out at the opportunity
to qualify for the Olympics, to
have the return of our wom-
en's 4x 100 relay team. Could
you imigine seeing the mixture
of the veterans Ferguson-
McKenzie and Chandra Stur-
rup combining with the youth-
ful Ferguson, Smith and Arm-
brister?

Ferguson already got a taste
of the big league when she
competed at the Olympics last
year. Hopefully this will be the
year that Smith and Armbrister
make the transition from the
junior to the senior ranks at
the World Championships.

Like Stuart said about soar-
ing over the 22-feet barrier,
let's just be "patient" as the
sprinters keep the Bahamas on







Young Golden Eagles fell to sixth place
with 416.50 points while Anatol Rodgers
and D.W. Davis rounded out the field
with 222 and 153 points respectively.

The Raptors won four of a six con-
tested divisions including sweeping all
three male categories and the junior
girls.

Their most commanding win on the
male side came in the Intermediate boys
division with 162 points, well ahead of
the Sharks with 148.

In the Bantam division, the Raptors
won by a slim three point margin over
the Tigers, 109-106 and an even slim-
mer two point margin in the Junior Boys
division, 133-131 over the Sharks.

The Junior girls won by a sizable 36.5
point margin over the Eagles, 1552-
115.50.

The Sharks and Lions spilt the remain-
ing divisions with S.C. McPherson taking
the Bantam girls with 110 points and
H.O. Nash with 149.50 points to claim

THE
| FIGHTING
FINNEGANS



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

the Intermediate girls.

Raptors Head Coach, Fritz Grant, said
the win came as a result of a concen-
trated team effort including the staff,
students and parents.

I must give God thanks for the overall
team effort.

“The support from the parents lead
to us having two persons in each event
and that is one of the major differences
between this year and last year. Last
year we may have had to miss one or
two persons but this year we were not
going to make the same mistake. We
were going to get everybody there, ready
to compete and they did extremely well
running and in the field as well,” he said.
“The program that we run we have
established has made it extremely easy to
identify talent and to be able to develop
the talent. It is good to identify the talent
but you have to develop it and give them

SEE page 12

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The men's national team is
in Paraguay competing in the
first round of the American
Zone II Davis Cup tie. The
team, captained by John Far-
rington, will be in action this
weekend.

Led by Olympian Devin
Mullings, the team doesn't
have any player with a high
ATP computer ranking. But
what they possess is a lot of
heart.

The other members are
Timothy Neilly, Bjorn Munroe

SEE page 12



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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Raptors reclaim title

FROM page 11

the necessary skills and tech-
nique to be able to get them
to compete at this level. We
have standards for our ath-
letes to achieve and asa
result of that we are able to
put together very good
teams.”

Grant, the nationally
renowned head coach at the
Carifta level, said his team
performed exceptionally well
on the track and in the field,
with a few unexpected sur-
prises which helped propel
them to victory.

“Not only track athletes,
you have to be balanced
because this is track and field.
We are balanced across the
board and as a result of that
the kids performed excep-
tionally well this year. I was
surprised by the 800m we
really did so well there that
some of the kids really sur-
prised me,” he said. “A lot of
them put in the work and it
has been obvious in the
standings of the meet. We did

our best motivating them and
trying to get them to stay
focused which is a challenge,
and thanks to the coaching
staff and the overall C.H
Reeves team and we had a
cheering section that really
motivated the kids and as a
result of that most of them
finished hard at the line.”

Grant cited the example of
hurdler Shantwon Martin,
who shook off disaster in the
intermediate boys’ hurdles
for a second place finish, as
the personification of the
effort his team gave across
the board in order to reclaim
the title.

“Even in the hurdles,
Shantwon Martin fell down
but he did not stay on the
ground he got up and dove
across the line,” he said.
“That is the type of passion
and type of effort that these
kids put in and they ought to
complimented for recaptur-
ing the title. It is something
that we worked on and pre-
pared for since the beginning
of the season and thank God
it came to reality.”

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165

SAAS =>

NISSAN

CH REEVES Vashi Mortimer wins the 100 metre hurdles.

SC MCPHERSON Whitney Rolle during the 4 x400 meter relay .

FROM page 11

and Marvin Rolle.

There's not one player on
the team, who in the past, have
demonstrated that they are
always in a position to play
their best regardless of the cir-
cumstances they find them-
selves in. Mullings, last year,
got his feet wet when he
teamed up with Mark Knowles
to play the Bryan brothers in
the first round of the men's
doubles at the Olympic Games
in Beijing, China. The two per-
formed their best, but it was
obvious that the Bryans were
just a little more prepared than

they were.

In the process, Mullings was
accepted to play in the singles
and even though he got elimi-
nated in the first round, he per-
formed as best as he could. I'm
sure that the experience he
gained will pay off for him in
Paraguay this weekend.

Having lost 4-1 to Paraguay
here at the National Tennis
Center last year, the Bahamas
will have its work cut out for
them in Paraguay. But Farring-
ton said as long as the players
perform up to their standard,
the team should do very well.

The Bahamas is trying to
regain its position in Zone One.
It may not happen at this tie,



































but the future looks bright for
the team with the players being
so young. The experience
gained will certainly help them
in the long run whenever they
get in a position to contend for
the next level.

HIELD TAKES RIGHTFUL PLACE

Persistence and determina-
tion have finally paid off for
Carl Hield.

Last year, Hield and his
mother had indicated that they
were peeved with the Bahamas
Boxing Federation after he was
denied from getting a chance
to try and qualify for the
Olympic Games in Beijing,
China in August. Hield had
even contemplated competing
for another country.

With a change of heart,
Hield travelled to the Inde-
pendence Cup with team-mates

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Taureano 'Reno' Johnson and
Valentino Knowles and he
emerged as the only one to suc-
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silver in the light welterweight
division at the tournament in
the Dominican Republic.

Hield joined Johnson and
Knowles, who won the previ-
ous two bronze medals at the
tournament. But he went a step
further in securing the silver.

He should be commended
for his stickability to put his
difference with the federation
behind him and put the country
first. His decision paid off and
now he gives the Bahamas
another boxer to keep the lega-
cy alive for the amateur pro-
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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 13



Zz
Ll
©
LL
Z
Z

NVOSINNIS

Finnegans

â„¢ By JOHN MARQUIS

(former international boxing writer)

NCE you reach 65, it’s like you
are above the 27,000 feet mark
on Mount Everest. It’s called the

Death Zone.

Those still struggling to reach the top
earn your heartfelt respect. Those who
fall off the higher ridges are offered an
equally heartfelt salute on the way down.

So it was this week when I
learned of the death of Chris
Finnegan, former world light
heavyweight title challenger, and
a gutsy gold medallist at the
Mexico Olympics 41 years ago.

Tt was even more poignant that
Chris should die only four
months after his celebrated
brother Kevin, former British
and European middleweight
champion and one of the few
men to have stayed on his feet
during two brutal fights with the
virtually indestructible Marvin
Hagler.

More alarming still was that

eel PTT eles

BY yA Att)
NiaREL

| )
|
ih

a

el
f INDOOR

both these bruising (and booz-
ing) brothers were actually
younger than me when they
passed over into that great big
gymnasium in the sky. Chris was
64, Kevin a mere 60. So tragic
that such bright lights should fade
so suddenly.

It seems only a week or so ago
that I watched them at their
peak, fighting in London’s great
boxing arenas, the Royal Albert
Hall and Wembley Arena.

And surely it was only a few
months back - 1975, actually -
when French fight fans used me
as a stepladder into the ring after

Kevin was beaten in a European
title fight in Monte Carlo.

The Finnegans were memo-
rable for many reasons, but
among them was their mischie-
vous sense of humour, which
brought lustre to a fight scene
already ablaze with talent.

Chris Finnegan was a brick-
layer from Iver in Bucking-
hamshire. Kevin was an artist
who liked to tell reporters he
made a living from two kinds of
canvas - the one that covers a
boxing ring, and the framed vari-
ety on which he splurged his oil
paint.

Chris was taller and more out-
going than his younger brother.
Kevin was reserved, a quietish
character with a wry smile who
liked to take off into the coun-
tryside with his brush and pal-
lette.

Both were formidable boxers,
but neither really punched his
weight, and Chris in particular
was happy to concede that pints
of Guinness were a major part
of their sporting success.

Chris first found fame with
that Olympic gold, but the real
high point of his career was his
brave loss to Bob Foster in a
world title battle. After suffer-

OUTDOOR

ELM eT New PLAT eT ice

PaaS

* ACCESSORIES

TW les

eee ie)

* HEADBOARDS



ing a knockout late in the fight,
Chris said being hit by Foster
was like being struck by a long,
hard pole with a glove on the
end.

A rugged southpaw, he took
on the best in Britain and
Europe and always acquitted
himself well in front of his ador-
ing fans. For me, his two most
memorable fights were against
‘Gypsy’ Johnny Frankham for
the British title in the 1970s,
when the wily Romany won and
then lost the crown in a matter of
months to his old friend (and
foe).

Kevin was a classier fighter
altogether, a fact readily
acknowledged by Chris last fall
when his younger brother died.
“He was like cream,” he said,

SEE page 14

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MINISTRY OF FINANCE

Departmental Notice

Sale By Tender

It is hereby notified that the under-mentioned vehicles have
been forfeited to the Crown following breaches of the Laws of
The Bahamas and will be sold by tender:-

Plate Number

| Year

—

| Make
|



| Mitsubishi Lancer

o7 Ford Ranger
__| Chevy Cavalier _



(Ford Ranger
| Chevy Lumina





__| Ford Ranger _





These vehicles may be inspected by contacting Supt. David G.
Beneby at Customs Headquarters, Thompson Boulevard,
telephone number 326-4401, during the hours of 9:00am. -
9:00pm. Monday to Friday.

Tender forms for submission are obtainable from the Office of
the Comptroller of Customs, Thompson Boulevard, Nassau.

Tenders should be submitted in SEALED ENVELOPES to the
Office of the Comptroller of Customs, Customs Department
Nassau, Bahamas.

The face of the envelope should bear the words:-
“TENDER FOR CONFISCATED VEHICLE”

Tenders submitted with the foregoing should be received by
12:00 noon, March 10%, 2009.

=o Sets from $2899.00

CO come ANT eet
*Reg.$3299.00

The right is reserved to reject any or all tenders and the
vehicles are being sold “as is where is’.

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Ehurd Cunningham

P.O. Box C.B. 12762-128 East Bay Street -- Nassau, Bahamas : : !
Acting Financial Secretary

T: (242) 393-1444 F: (242) 393-2237





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





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or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and®
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hr@bakersbayclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009



Cliff McBride/AP Photo



IN THIS still image taken from video, Nick Schuyler is taken from a Coast Guard helicopter to Tampa General
Hospital in Tampa, Fla. on Monday March 2, 2009. The Coast Guard says former University of South Florida play-
er Schuyler was rescued Monday off the Florida coast. Authorities say Oakland Raiders linebacker Marquis Coop-
er, Detroit Lions free agent Corey Smith and former South Florida player, William Bleakley, remain missing.

Private search on
for missing NFL
players in Gulf

m@ FOOTBALL
TAMPA, Fla.
Associated Press

PRIVATE BOATS and
planes searched Wednesday for
two NFL players and a third
man missing for four days since
their boat capsized in the Gulf
of Mexico off Florida, family
members said.

The Coast Guard called off
the official search Tuesday for
Oakland Raiders linebacker
Marquis Cooper, who owned

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East St. North, Kelly’s Dock
P.O. Box N-351

JACKSONVILLE
1737 Jessie St.
Jacksonville, Fl 32206

Phone: 904-758-4360
Fax: 904-758-4361

Phone: 242-322-2142
Fax: 242-322-6089



3701 N.W. South River Dr.
Miami, Florida 33142

Phone: 305-635-4650
Fax: 305-635-465 |

ABACO

Don Mackay Blvd.
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P.O. Box AB-20116
Phone: 242-367-0593
Fax: 242-367-0594

the boat, free-agent NFL defen-
sive lineman Corey Smith and
former South Florida player
William Bleakley. But their
families appealed for help to
keep hunting.

Two or three charters left in
the late morning from a St.
Petersburg marina and at least
one had friends of the families
of the missing men aboard, said
Don Beggs, who owns one of
the local docks. Three private
planes also had searched,
according to Cooper’s father,
Bruce Cooper.

A fourth man on the fishing
trip, Nick Schuyler, was rescued
Monday after crews found him
clinging to the boat. His doctor
said it’s a “miracle” Schuyler
survived in the cold water for
nearly two days after the boat
carrying the men on a fishing
trip overturned in rough seas
off the Florida coast Saturday.

Dr. Mark Rumbak said the
24-year-old is in good condition
but will remain in intensive care
in case there are complications.
Schuyler was in 63-degree Gulf
of Mexico water for around 46
hours and probably could have

lived only another five to 10
hours if he wasn’t rescued Mon-
day, Rumbak said.

“T think he is extremely for-
tunate having been in the water
for 46, 47 hours and that he’s
even alive,” Rumbak said. “I
can’t explain it. Some divine
providence, I really think.”

The missing men’s families
have set up an e-mail address
for experienced pilots and
boaters to contact them. Coast
Guard Capt. Timothy Close
said the agency wouldn’t pre-
vent private searches, but dis-
couraged them, saying they
could be dangerous. He said
authorities believed if there
were more survivors, they
would have been found.

Free-agent defensive tackle
Tank Johnson, a childhood
friend and college teammate of
Cooper at Washington, was tak-
ing a lead role in the renewed
search. Johnson, who played for
the Dallas Cowboys last season,
said the family has not given up
hope that the men are still alive.

“T truly believe he is out there
somewhere being strong,” John-
son said.

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‘The fighting
‘Finnegans

FROM page 13

i “He just flowed.”

i Defensively, Kevin was
? among the best. He could slip
? punches like a ghost, moving
i his weight deftly from one foot
? to the other, counter punching
? with fluency and grace as his
: opponents charged in.

i Even against tough maraud-
? ers like Leicester’s Tony Sib-
i son - another of Hagler’s vic-
? tims - Kevin was impudently
? understated. With his slick
: footwork and unruffled
? demeanour, he was an
? extremely hard man to beat.

; Had he carried more fire-
i power in his fists, he would
? have become a world champi-
? on without a doubt.

i Both brothers were products
? of the famous Craven Arms
? pub gym in Battersea, London,
? where a Cockney character
? called Freddie Hill was their
? mentor and trainer.

i After belting each other
? senseless in sparring sessions
:? in the gym upstairs, the broth-
? ers would adjourn to the bar
? downstairs and replace lost
i sweat with pints of best strong
? Trish stout.

? When Kevin fought a mon-
? ster from Marseilles called
? Gratien Tonna in Monaco, the
i irrepressible Freddie regaled
i reporters with a pre-fight
; description of the French hard-
? man even before we had set
? eyes on him.

i “He’s got lips like rolls of
lino,” he said. “He’s built like a
? mechanical earth-mover, wiv
i eyes like headlamps. I’m glad
? it’s Kevin who’s getting in the
? ring wiv ’im, not me.”

? Freddie Hill and The
? Finnegans could have been a
? stage act, so quick was their
? wit, so colourful their delivery.
? The London fight scene would
? have been a much duller place
? without them.

? Though you have to concede
? that both brothers lacked just
? that little extra that makes
? world champions, you also
? have to acknowledge that nei-
? ther ducked a fight, even
; against the best.

“Though you have
to concede that
both brothers
: lacked just that lit-
tle extra that makes
? world champions,
you also have to
acknowledge that
neither ducked a
fight, even against
the best.”

: — Chris’s blistering battle with
? Bob Foster was voted fight of
? the year and Kevin’s two close
? encounters with Marvin Hagler
? were rated minor classics for
? ringcraft and guile.

i Last year I walked up
? Lavender Hill in Battersea to
? see if I could identify the cor-
? ner where the Craven Arms
? once stood. If my judgment is
? correct, it’s now occupied by a
i fast food takeaway.

? For a few minutes, I tried to
? recall those days 30 years ago
i when I climbed the stairs at
the back of the pub into Fred-
? die Hill’s gym, sniffed the lina-
i ment and watched the
? Finnegans going through their
paces.

iI recalled the easy banter,
? the happy camaraderie that
? was the mark of London gyms
i in those glory days of British
i boxing, when the country
? boasted four world champions
? and the likes of Chris and
i Kevin Finnegan provided the
? laughs in what has always been
? a deadly serious sport.

i Bespectacled Freddie, towel
? round his neck, was always
? leaning on the ropes, barking
i orders at his young fighters,
: willing them to greater heights.
i Sometimes he’d get so excit-
i ed that his round, rimless glass-
? es would steam up, and his wal-
? rus-style moustache would
i? twitch alarmingly.

? “Don’t stand around like a
? pair o’ bleedin’ pansies,” he’d
? shout, “throw a jab, move in
i wiv the ’ook, that’s it...right
? cross. Lovely!”

? = =Dear old Freddie has, of
i course, long gone. I didn’t
: realise then, only five or six
? months ago, that Chris and
? Kevin would follow him so
? quickly into boxing history, just
? like the Craven Arms itself.

i Nothing is forever, of course.
? But just occasionally, as with
? Freddie and the Finnegan
? brothers, you wish they were.





THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS
oa . Yea “per } tour Defence Force hase

STUDENTS FROM the Govern-
ment High School in New Provi-
dence and the Preston H Albury
1 High School in Rock Sound,
Eleuthera, recently visited the
Defence Force Base at Coral Har-
bour, where they were given a
complete tour of the facility.

=

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THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 15

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Web: www.buildersmalibahamas.com Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com



THE TRIBUNE

OU





IMI
‘not changed’
Baha Mar’s
closure plan

* But company leaves door
open if ‘overwhelming
demand’, with senior
executive saying Miss
Universe is ‘priceless
opportunity’ to market
Bahamas to world tourist
audience

* Senior Baha Mar
delegation in Beijing for
eight days in bid to move
$2.6bn project forward



nto) OlamsEsUNLels
@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Baha Mar has “not changed
at this point in time” its deci-
sion to close the Wyndham
resort and Crystal Palace casi-
no from August 17-October
5, 2009, Tribune Business was
told yesterday, despite the
Bahamas being awarded the
Miss Universe pageant at the
end of August.

When asked whether the
Cable Beach Resorts own-
er/developer might reverse its
closure plans to accommodate
the expected influx of com-
petitors, guests and media for
the August 30, 2009, event, a
senior executive told Tribune
Business: “There’s nothing to
that at this point in time.”

Vernice Walkine, the Min-
istry of Tourism’s director-
general, yesterday predicted
that all New Providence hotel
rooms would be full as a result
of hosting the Miss Universe
Pageant.

However, Robert Sands,
Baha Mar’s senior vice-presi-
dent for governmental and
external affairs, said: “A num-
ber of people have raised that
question, but the plan is to be
closed during this period.

“The reality is that this [the
pageant] has come at a time
when we’ve made arrange-

SEE page 9B





ine

1 HOUR S$ AY



MARCH 5,

SS

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Concern over ‘doubling’
of Generali premiums

Wi Insurer closes individual health policy portfolio acquired
from British American Financial to new business

WM But policyholders slam as ‘crazy’ premium increases for new

scheme, which have doubled in some cases, with many fearing

having to cancel and lose coverage

Hi Move to re-price likely driven by lack of profitability

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamas-based health
insurer has closed the individ-
ual health portfolio it inherit-
ed from British American
Financial to new business and,
in some cases, doubled the
premiums being charged to
policyholders, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, a move that
has left some unable to afford
coverage.

In a letter sent to individ-
ual health insurance plan pol-
icyholders, Tina Cambridge,
Generali Worldwide’s region-
al director for the Bahamas,
informed them that the com-
pany would not take on any
new business for the portfo-

lio it had acquired. Instead,
Generali is offering Bahamian
policyholders the opportuni-
ty to maintain their health
insurance coverage under a
new plan and associated ben-
efits, which they have until
April 1, 2009, to accept.

Concern

The new plan, though, has
been met with concern and
consternation by many Gen-
erali policyholders, who are
objecting to the premium
hikes across-the-board.

One policyholder, who said
her individual medical insur-
ance plan premium had “dou-
bled” from a three-figure toa
monthly four-figure sum,

Concerns on labour
group effectiveness

* BECon chief says worries exist over whether
government will consider its labour-related
recommendations, or whether it will be ‘shut out’
* Tripartite grouping has ‘a great deal of potential

that is not being realised’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Concerns have emerged over
whether the Government will
seriously consider labour-relat-
ed recommendations made by
TRIFOR, the tripartite group
featuring trade union, employer
and government representa-
tives, as it “has a great deal of
potential that is not being
realised”.

Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employer’s Confederation’s
(BECon) president, told Tri-
bune Business in a recent inter-
view that TRIFOR’s different
constituents were assessing the
group’s make-up, and whether
it had the ability to do what it
needed to do.

“TRIFOR has met this year,
meeting every other week,” Mr
Nutt told this newspaper,
adding that the group was now
looking at holding monthly
meetings.

He added: “We’re basically
in a situation of trying to look at
the make-up of TRIFOR as far

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as its role; what it should be
doing, and does it have the abil-
ity to do things it should do?

“Tt’s a situation of trying to
determine what TRIFOR’s role
is, what it can accomplish, and
its make-up.”

SEE page 10B

/

described the “huge increase”
as “crazy”.

One source said the premi-
um increase could not be jus-
tified on the basis of claims
they had submitted, because
they had not made many.

“We're still reeling from the
shock and trying to decide
what to do,” the source said.
“People are going to cancel,
and then the already overbur-
dened public health system is
going to be further burdened.”

The source suggested that
Generali’s new plan was less
favourable than the coverage
they currently enjoyed,
because it raised the amount
policyholders had to pay for

SEE page 4B

7 information conte is from arty
party and The Tribune can not be hel
responsible for errors and/or omission
fromthe dally report,



|
Ooenmucn

ve)
ee cerer Thess
; aati

Features:

Mas

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neyGram,. @)

® Bank of The Bahamas

[HTERANATIGONAL

Online at
Bank Bahamas Online.com



Bank keeps its
non-performing
loans ‘just above’

5% of portfolio

* Eyeing preference share issue ‘fairly soon’ to
reduce costs of capital, as deposit rates start to
come down due to $370m liquidity

* Net income down 18% at near $5m for half-
year, but bank ‘comfortable’ with results due to
focus on prudential norms

* Expects to receive Carmichael Road branch
by October, with 20 jobs added

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bank of the Bahamas International’s
managing director yesterday said the insti-
tution had restricted non-performing loans
to “just above 5 per cent” of its total loan
portfolio during the fiscal 2009 first half,
below the industry average, as it gears up
for a preference share issue later this year
that is designed to reduce its funding costs.

Speaking after the bank unveiled an 18
per cent drop in half-year net income to

SEE page 8B



@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE LYNDEN Pindling International Airport (LPIA) will
receive a swift and temporary makeover as the Bahamas pre-
pares to receive invaluable exposure from the 2009 Miss Uni-
verse pageant.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and avia-
tion, said the airport, which has often been described as an
embarrassment because of the state of its infrastructure, will con-
tinue its redevelopment up to the pageant, with some “masks”
put in place near its August 30, 2009, staging to improve aes-
thetics.

“In terms of the kind of welcome we have in place, certainly

SEE page 7B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





FROM AGENTS TO BROKERS:
Donna and James Rees.



n Abaconian
couple who
have been
married for 28
years, James and Donna Rees,
have both earned the BRI cer-
tification and moved up from
agents to brokers at ERA
Dupuch Real Estate.

“It’s pretty easy to spot our
office,” says Mr Rees of the
Marsh Harbour premises.

“It’s in the Stratton Insur-
ance Building.

“That’s the one on the cor-
ner by the only stop light in
Abaco.”

The office by the island’s
only traffic light, and the red,
white and blue ERA Dupuch
sign, isn’t all that sets the Rees
duo apart.

They are comfortable with
the state of real estate in Aba-
co, which is holding its own
against the fallout that top-
pled the US housing market
following the sub-prime lend-
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“Its wonderful to see James
and Donna work together.
They are like yin and yang.
Donna does all the tasks
James doesn’t like to do, and
James does those Donna

doesn’t like.”



“While the market here is
seeing adjustments, we have
not seen the losses that are
taking place in the United
States,” said Donna Rees.

“Tn fact, the lower end prop-
erties have not lost much val-
ue at all.”

If Abaco properties have
staved off the roller coaster
ride experienced elsewhere,
the couple are familiar with
the market’s ups and downs.
Born and raised in the
Bahamas, they moved to
Florida during their children’s
school years, returning when
the last child entered college
in 2003.

Fluctuates

“In time, everything fluctu-
ates up and down,” says Mr
Rees.

“In Florida, during the ear-
ly ‘80s, Port Saint Lucie had
18,000 people and our first
house was around $30,000.
When we left there in 2003
there were 140,000 people,
and that same type of house
was $125,000.

“We are not that concerned
and will continue to do our
best.

“Abaco is a very special
place.

“My Dad had seen several
up and downturns during his
years here.”

Mr Rees’ father, the late
Colyn Rees, was one of Aba-
co’s best-known citizens.

If Abaco has staying pow-
er even in challenging eco-
nomic teams, showing prop-
erty in the chain of scattered
islands takes its own kind of
stamina, says ERA Dupuch
Real Estate founder and pres-

Peter Dupuch
ident, Peter Dupuch.

Annoyed

“Nassau agents in some
firms get annoyed if they have
to drive from an office in town
to Coral Harbour and some-
one doesn’t show up,” says Mr
Dupuch.

“Imagine doing what Don-
na and James do.

“They may have a showing
in the morning in Treasure
Cay and one in the afternoon
in Schooner Bay.

“That’s a long drive for
someone to say: ‘Sorry, it’s not
what I was looking for.’ Or
they may have to go by plane,
boat, buggy or golf cart, or cut
through the bush with a cut-
lass.

“Sul, they have worked
hard and that’s why they have
been successful.”

Beyond success, Mr Dupuch
said there was something spe-
cial about Donna and James
Rees, who have been each
other’s best friend since early
childhood.

“It’s wonderful to see James
and Donna work together.
They are like yin and yang.
Donna does all the tasks
James doesn’t like to do, and
James does those Donna
doesn’t like.

“Between them, every detail
is covered and it’s great to see
that after five years back in
the Bahamas they have both
earned the BRI certification,”
he said.

Founded in 1993, ERA
Dupuch Real Estate has
offices or agents in Nassau,
Abaco, Eleuthera and Long
Island.

GIVE IN

TO TEMPTATION



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 3B



Pageant to attract
millions to Nassau

lm By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE MISS Universe
Pageant is expected to draw
millions of dollars, directly and
indirectly, into the Bahamain
economy through retail spend-
ing and hotel room nights this
summer, when it is held at the
Atlantis Resort, Paradise
Island, on August 30.

Paula Shugart, Miss Uni-
verse’s president, could not
say what the size of the eco-
nomic boost brought to the
Bahamas would be. Howev-
er, she did reveal that the
organization’s per diem, or
expenditure per day, was in
the hundreds of thousands of
dollars.

“For Miss Universe, we
have a lot of staff and crew
who also come. I can tell you,
just in our per diem alone, the
six figures that are left behind
in a host (country), and that’s
nothing with the casinos, too,”
she said.

“Aside from the worldwide
exposure from the telecast,
and one thing that the minister
hit on, is the fact that this is a
month-long event.”

The event itself draws huge
crowds of “pageant fans”, and
New Providence is expected
to benefit through increased
room bookings at New Provi-
dence hotels. Pageant night is
traditionally attended by a
sold-out live audience.

“Pageant fans from the

Vernice Walkine

United States alone, they are
all planning to come, and want
to know what the details are,”
said Ms Shugart. “They will
all be coming and there is a
direct economic impact from
them.”

Vernice Walkine, the Min-
istry of Tourism’s director-
general, said all New Provi-
dence hotels are expected to
benefit from the visitors the
pageant draws to the island.

“It is my expectation that
we will use every available
hotel room,” she said.

At Atlantis itself, as a direct
result of the pageant, the com-
pany will take on more staff
come August, though most of



the labour will likely be only
temporary.

George Markantonis, presi-
dent of Kerzner International
(Bahamas), said the hotel will
be bringing on temporary
labour to assist with this spe-
cial event.

“As the major employer
outside of the Government, I
expect that we will possibly
be bringing in additional peo-
ple when our hotels reach 100
per cent levels, to help us with
those specific moments in time
when we need to deal with
special events,” he said. “Does
that mean that’s permanent
employment. No!”

“We will be bringing on

Due to the passing of a Staff Member we will be

CLOSED

SATURDAY, March 7th, 2009

to allow the Team to pay their last respects.

We will re-open

at 9:30am on Monday, March 9th, 2009

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused.

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more temporary labour. That,
in turn, hopefully will be felt in
the community.”

The Miss Universe Organi-
zation itself said it will hire
Bahamians to supplement the
labour that will be brought in
from the US.

“This is a huge worldwide
telecast, so it really takes not
only the people we bring, but
it takes the people we hire
locally to participate in it.”

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RECESSION

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE












































This is to say that the Big Harvest Community Sunday School, and
Christian Training Centra, locaied Woods Alley, off Market Street
Nassau Bahamas, is nota Church neither a Mission of the Church
of God of Prophecy, neither any other Church.

The above mention estate, is that of Blshop Caphas Ferguson, and
his Farnily, They have decided to have il develop and used for the
under privilege children, and young people, in the community.

This ig all done to the honor and glory of God,

NOTICE

Please be advised that effective March 2, 2009
Betty K. Agencies will resume its regular twice
weekly service from Miami, Florida to Nassau.

Schedule:

Departs Miami on Monday
Arrives in Nassau on Tuesday

Departs Miami on Wednesday
Arrives in Nassau on Thursday

Nassau
East St. North, Kelly’s Dock
P.O. Box N-351
Nassau, Bahamas
242-322-2142

3701 N.W. South River Drive
Miami, Florida 33142

nl
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

REQUEST FOR

QUOTATION

M-100, Test Well Drilling

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks the services
of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling
Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope
of services includes:

Drilling and pump testing of a 6” pilot hole;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Return Well;

Flow testing of the 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Discharge testing of the 10” Feed Water Return Well;
Geophysical logging and flow testing of Pilot Hole and wells;
Water temperature logging and analysis of water quality and
chemistry;

Professional supervision, (i.e. Hydrologist).

Request for Quotation Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009.

Request for Quotation closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at
3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

irstCaribbean

Are you seeking an

DIRECTOR TALENT MANAGEMENT

This role will be accountable for making a significant contribution to the

management and development of the careers of FirstCaribbean’s talent
with a special focus on high performing and high potential banking
professionals.

Concern over ‘doubling’
of Generali premiums

FROM page 1B

treatment at Doctors Hospi-
tal from 20 per cent to 40 per
cent, with the insurer’s expo-
sure reduced from 80 per cent
to 60 per cent.

They added that the age at
which the lifetime maximum
Generali would pay for a pol-
icyholder’s medical expenses
is reduced from $1 million to
$100,000 has also been low-
ered under the new proposed
policy, from 70 years-old to
65

“The new plan is supposed
to be better, but we don’t see
where it’s better,” the source
said. They questioned why
Generali had decided to
increase premiums “all at
once”, rather than go through
a series of phased increases,
and questioned why the com-
pany had chosen to do it at
this time - when the economy

was gripped by recession, and
Bahamians were already
struggling to make ends meet.

Medical

Elderly Generali policy-
holders, in particular, are
unlikely to obtain medical
coverage with other insurance
firms because they will be con-
sidered high risk, and possi-
bly large claimants, with no
catrier wanting that exposure.

However, one insurance
industry source, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition
of anonymity, said Generali
needed to increase the premi-
um rates to match the risk
associated with the portfolio.
They pointed out that Coli-
naImperial had to carry out a
similar re-pricing last year,
after experiencing losses on
its medical portfolio, due toa
high level of claims and the

THE PILOT CLUB OF NASSAU

pres ‘Hed

A Grand Movie Premier:

“ALL ABOUT STEVE’

Staring Sandra Bellock

Postponed to a date
to be announced.

Proceeds in aid of the construction of a
pool for Person with Disabilities



Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOLDEN DRAGON GROUP LIMITED

— }—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GOLDEN DRAGON GROUP LIMITED

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DELLWAY MANAGMENT INC.

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DELLWAY MANAGMENT INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

“,.. we have recently made the
decision to cease all new
enrollment to the individual
insurance plan included in the

ortfolio we purchased.”



increased cost of drugs and
medical treatments.

“The problem British
American had is that they
were losing huge amounts of
business,” the source said. “It
wasn’t profitable and was
priced wrongly. They’re
[Generali] just correcting it.

In her letter to policyhold-
ers, which has been seen by
Tribune Business, Ms Cam-
bridge said Generali had
moved to “better understand
the unique aspects of our new
portfolio” in the year since it
was acquired from British
American Financial.

She added that this was
intended to help the company
“plan and prepare for the
changes that we intend to
implement as part of being a
leader in group employee ben-
efits within the Bahamas and
the broader Caribbean
region”.

Ms Cambridge emphasised
that the last point was key, as
Generali Worldwide was a
group health insurer, “and not
traditionally a provider of

The Tribune

insurance to individuals”.

She added: “Our mandate
is to provide a full range of
group employee benefit prod-
ucts to local, regional and
multinational companies.

“As such, we have recently
made the decision to cease all
new enrollment to the indi-
vidual health insurance plan
included in the portfolio we
purchased. All of the brokers
we work with have been duly
notified of this change.”

Ms Cambridge reassured
Generali clients that their cov-
erage would not automatical-
ly be terminated, and if they
did not confirm they wanted
to drop the plan, they would
automatically be converted to
the new scheme by March 31,
2009.

Tribune Business was yes-
terday promised by Generali
that it would provide a
detailed response to this news-
paper’s questions by the close
of the business day at 5pm
yesterday. But a response was
not received by press time last
night.

Real Estate |

Wate ola ums Thiet

mL Tl ae aL ed



Everywhere Buyers Ce

oe ac

fa

J&J CHISHOLM
CONSTRUCTION LTD,

We fave many unique home and apartment designs
ready to buice. Free washer & dryer with any
contract signed before Sule 32, 2009,

exciting career opportunity?

For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit

our website:

www firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

@A £28 f)

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 5B



Regulator reassures
on financial system

The Central Bank of the
Bahamas yesterday moved to
reeassure Bahamians about
the soundness of the commer-
cial banking system, saying the
placing of CLICO (Bahamas)
into provisional liquidation
had no impact on the sector
it regulates.

Acknowledging that this
development had created con-
cern about “the possible
spillover effects” on the bank-
ing system, the Central Bank
said any fears were “exagger-
ated and unfounded”.

It added: “The Central
Bank’s ongoing inquiries have
indicated that CLICO’s fail-
ure has not posed any threat
to the stability of Bahamian
commercial banks, which all
continue to operate as going
concerns. All of our domestic
banks are highly capitalised,
with levels substantially in
excess of the minimum
requirement of 8 per cent of
risk weighted assets, as rec-
ommended by the Basle Com-
mittee.

“Also, the CLICO Group is
not directly connected through
ownership with any banking
operations in the Bahamas.
As we have been advised that
the Group represented about
1 per cent of the Bahamian
Dollar insurance market, this
removes the possibility of con-
tagion for the system as a
whole.”

Saying it was concerned
about “unsubstantiated mate-
rial” that had surfaced about
the soundness of some
Bahamas-based financial insti-
tutions, the Central Bank

trucks and trailers.

engine problems.

systems.

very competitive.



AiVlatehmereclie



added: “In the present envi-
ronment, such unfounded
assertions could unnecessarily
exacerbate the uncertainty
being experienced by cus-
tomers to the detriment of the
financial system.

“Local banking operations
are subject to focused pru-
dential supervision by the
Central Bank, with some of
their activities being moni-
tored, if not daily, on a week-
ly basis.

“This oversight has intensi-
fied during the current peri-
od of economic stress, with
priority given to monitoring

DIESEL MECHANIC wanicev

A well established local company is seeking to employ a certified Diesel Mechanic on a
full time basis. Successful candidate must possess diesel mechanic certification from a
recognized training institution and have a minimum of 5 years experience in the field.

* Candidate must have extensive knowledge and experience on diesel engine

* Must be able to use computer diagnostic equipment to troubleshoot and correct

* Must be able to implement and maintain a preventative maintenance program
for the company’s fleet of vehicles throughout the Bahamas.

* Must have experience with auto-marine hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical

* Experience with emergency generators and electric motors would be a plus.
* Must be willing to work flexible hours and travel to the family islands.

Salary based on certification and experience and compensation and benefit package is

Deadline for applying: March 18, 2009

DA 67911 c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassu, Bahamas

those risks that are most ele-
vated for banks under these
circumstances -that is, those
in respect of their lending
operations. Banks have been
prompted to adopt more for-
ward looking, aggressive
approaches in making loss
provisions for bad loans, in
order to identify and pre-emp-
tively address problems.

“Institutions have also been
encouraged to mitigate risks,
where possible, by restructur-
ing loan facilities for cus-
tomers who might be experi-
encing hardships with meet-
ing their obligations.”



PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central
qualified individuals for the position of PRINCIPAL, St. John’s College,
beginning September, 2009.

Education Authority

invites applications from

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in Education from a recognized
University, with at least (5) years accumulative administrative experience. The
applicant must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Providing leadership - set the climate and pace for success and high
achievement in the school.

- Organizing and supervising schedules, programmes, records and

procedures.

school

- Supervising and evaluating teachers and support staff.
- Managing records, school finances and end-of-year closing

procedures.

- Communicating with parents, community groups and organizations.

- Displaying consistent organizational and human relationship skills.

- Assisting the Education Department with and initiating Staff
Development Programmes.

Applicants should submit a cover letter,

Curriculum Vitae, copies of

degree certificates, three references and passport photographs to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY

P. O. BOX N-656

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Friday March 27th, 2009.









RBC
SSG) FINCO

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE



BC March 2009

Parcel of Land Romer Street Fox Hill, N.P.
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedroom, (1) Bathroom

Property Size:4,961 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,014 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $115,000.00

From Fox Hill Road turn onto Romer Street (Church Of God
Prophecy and Fox Hill Community Centre junction) travel east
east on Romer Street to the third corner on the right travel south
to the fourth house on the left which is at a dead end. The subject
is a split level residence painted blue and trimmed white aith a
tiled entrance patio

Lot#3005, Sir Linden Pindling Estates, N.P
Single Family Residence

3 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,153 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $164,000.00

From Charles Saunders Highway enter Sir Lynden Pindling Estates
and travel south on Lady Marguerite Pindling Avenue to the second
street on the left(Lauren Street) travel east onLauren street to the
second corner on left (Pear Tree Avenue); Travel north on Pear
Tree Avenue to the subject, the fitteenth property on the left. The
subject is lime green trimmed white.






Lot# 3, Doris Johnson Estates
Single Family Residence
3Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,065 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,688 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $189,000.00

From Gladstone Road travel east along Rocky Pine Road for
approximately 1,444 feet and turn left on Dame Doris Drive then
another left and the subject property is the third from corner.

Lot situate approximately 70 ft westward of Florida Court
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,750 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $227,000.00

Travel east on Balfour Avenue to the first right (Florida Court) from
Florida Court take the first right onto a 10ft wide road reservation
and the subject is the second house on the left white trimmed

grey.

Lot#4, BIk#11, Miller's Heights Subdivision
Single Family Residence w/ efficency apartment
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathroom

Apartment 1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,390 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $174,000.00

From Carmichael Road travelling west turn left onto East Avenue
travel south on east Avenue to the first corner on the right travel
west thereon to the first corner on the left (Margaret Avenue}
continue on Margaret Avenue pass the first intersection and the
subject is the second property on the right. The subject is painted
white trimmed purple.

Lot#42, Foxdale Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,329 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,247 sq.ft
Appraised Value: 191,000.00

Road, take the first left Fox Drive then the third right Sparrow Lane
and the subject property is the last on the left.

Lot#3375/76 Sir Lynden Pindling Estates, N.P.

Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,500 sq.ft

Building Size:1,150 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $161,000.00

From East Street & Bamboo Boulevard (south beach Police
Station) travel east on Bamboo Boulevard to the round-about
continue traveling eastward on C.W.Saunders Highway take the
second right, Lady Margueritte Pindling Avenue, then take the first
Pt Laue Street and the subject property is the sixteenth lot on
the right.

Lot#23 Malcolm Road East
Single Family Residence

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 860 sq.ft
Appraised value: $129,200.00



Contact Numbers 393-2004

HOUSES



From East Street South - travel east along Malcolm Road and
turn right on Winder Terrace to the first road on the left continue
for about 200 ft and the subject property is on the left.

Lot#336, Golden Gates Estates#2

Single Family Residence

3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms
roperty Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,890 sq. ft

Appraised Value: $207,000.00

Travel west on Carmichael Road from Blue Hill Road turn onto
the third left Golden Sun Drive the comer after St.Gregory's
Anglican Church and before Carmichael Primary School travel
south on Sun Drive to the first, travel west pass the second comer
on the right and the subject fourth property on the right. The
subject is painted white trimmed white.



Lot 1 off Jean Street, R.E. Cooper Subdivision, N.P
Single Family Residence

5 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,161 sq.ft

Building size: 1,136 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $230,000.00

From Prince Charles Drive, turn into Jean Sireet travel north on

Jean Street to R.E. Cooper subdivision continue directly into r.E.
Cooper Subdivision and the subject is the ninth property on the

left. House is white trimmed green.

Lot#711 Golden Gates #2, Subdivision, N.P
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,300 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $158,500.00

From Carmichael Road & Antigua Street (Golden Gates Assemblies
Church) travel south on Antigua Street and the subject property
is the sixth lot on the right past the first corner on the right.

Lot#2, Partition of Allotment No. 52 Cool Acres, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,867 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,716 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $229,000.00

Travel south on Fox Hill Road to Johnson Barber Shop, turn onto
the first right and travel east to the second corner on the left, travel
south to the T-Junction and the subject is straight ahead. The
house is painted olive trimmed white/beige.

Lot#26, Frelia Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,220 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $192,000.00

From Faith Avenue and Fire Trail east on Faith Avenue, follow the
curve around to the right (approximately 0.6 of a mile east of Faith
Avenue take the first left into Frelia Subdivision, then the first right
and the subject property is the last lots on the right.

Lot#124 Bel-Air Estates, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 969 sq.ft
Appraised Value: 153,000.00

From Carmichael Road and Faith Avenue travel east on Carmichael
____ Way then the fourth right, Harbour
Close, and the subject property is the third on the left.

Lot situated northernside of Victoria St & Lancaster Rd, lvanhoe
Subdivision, N.P

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms - Single Family Residence

Property Size: 12,600 sq.ft

Building Size: 3,104 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $439,000.00

From Mackey Street and Windsor Road (by Wendy's Resturant)
travel east on Windsor Road take the secod left to Victor Road,
then the first right which is Lancaster Road, the subject property
is the first on the left on the corner.

Lot#187, Twynam Heights Subdivision

Single Family Residence

5 Bedroom, 3 Bedroom

Property Size: 8,000 sq.ft

BuildingSize: 2,688 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $317,000.00

Travel East on Prince Charles drive to the corner east os Super

Value Winton turn right and the subject is the second house on
the left. The subject is painted lime green and trimmed white.

VACANT LAND

Lot#53, Lower Bogue Eleuthera
Vacant land

Property Size: 10,782 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $46,000.00

Travel westward on Skyline and Northward Bay Street the subject
re iv vacant land after Save More Drug Store on the right
and side.

Lot#9A, of 3 Parcels of Allotment 67, north of Carmichael Road
Vacant Land

Property Size: 9,945 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $85,000.00

From Carmichael Road -north along Faith Avenue for approximately
2,512 feet to a road reservation turn right and continue for
approximately 586 ft and turn right onto an 18ft road reservation.

Lot 500ft, West of Marigold Road & South of Hanna Road
Vacant Land

Property Size: 16,102 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 140,000.00

APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS

Lot#70 Gamble Heights

Triplex Apartment

1-1 Bed, 1 Bath, /2 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathrooms

Property Size: 7,750 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,360 sq.ft

Appraised Value:$308,000.00

From Blue Hill Road & Faith United Way, travel east on Faith
United Way and the subject property is on the right hand side,
200 feet east of Faith United Church and opposite a heavy
equipment depot.

Unit#4, Hillcrest Tower Condominium, N.P.
Condominium

2 Bedroom, 2 Bathrooms

Unit Size: 1,110 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 200,000.00

Travel south on Collin Avenue to Third Terrace turn west on third
terrace and the subject is contained within the second building on
the right which is a condominium complex. The subject complex.
The subject complex is painted lime green and trimmed white.

Lot#5, Block#25 situate in Gleniston Gardens, N.P

Duplex Apartment

Each with 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom

init Size: 9,900 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,837 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 260,000.00

From Prince Charle Drive & Beatrice Avenue take the third right
Gleniston Park Avenue and the subject property is the fifth lot on
the left (presently the third building)

Lot#8 Hanover Court, N.P
Duplex Apartment

2-2 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Bathrooms
Property size: 5,670 sq.ft
Building Size: 2,107 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $283,000.00

From Fox Hill road turn onto Sea Breeze lane travel west on Sea
Breeze Lane and turn on th e first corner after the Christian Life
Centre continue north and the subject is the fourth property on
the right. White trimmed with an unpainted wall which is to be
sprayed with the marble creek spray on exterior.

Lot Rocky pine Road

Duplex Apartment

Each Unit 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 4,875 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,716 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $218,000.00

From Carmichael Road -travel north along Gladstone Road to
Rocky Pine Road turn right and continue to the third corner , turn
right and continue for about 1,438 feet and the subject property
is on the right.(enclosed with a chain link fence).

Lot East Windsor Place Soldier Road
Duplex Apartment

2- (2) Bathrooms, (1) Bathroom
Property Size: 6,000sq.ft

Building Size: 1,580 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $172,000.00

Travel East on Soldier Road to the intersection near Sugar Kid
Bowe Food Store turn right and travel to the end of this street,
across the intersection at the curve turn east and the subject is
the first property on the left, which is a duplex. The duplex is
ent painted blue and trimmed white with enclosed

fencing.

Properly situated 350 feet south Adelaide & Coral Harbour
Duplex Apartment

1-3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathroom, 1-1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Property Size: 5,691 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,000 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $285,000.00

Travel along Carmichael Road to the roundabout continue west
onto Adelaide Road turn left at the fourth corner which is an
unpaved entrance road continue south on this road and the subject
is the fourth house on the left split level green trimmed white.

Lot#10, Blk#11, Millers Heights Subdivision, N.P
Duplex Apartment

1-2 Bedrooms., 1 Bathroom

1 - 2 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size:1 ,444 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 194,000.00

From Carmichael Road travelling west, turn left onto East Avenue,
travel south on East Avenue to the first corner on the right travel
north thereon to the first corner on the left (Margaret Avenue)

continue on Marafret Ave pass the first intersection and the subject
is the fifth property on the right painted mustard trimmed peach.

Lot#17, Blk#27 Shirley Heights
Two Storey Multi-Family Dwelling
2-2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
1-3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Appraised value: $252,000.00

From Wulff Road & Mt. Royal Avenue travel north on Mt. Royal
take the fifth right, Ludlow Street and the subject property is the
fourth on the left.

We providing financing to qualified buyers

CONTACT INFORMATION
RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre

®Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada
â„¢The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada

RBG
a] FINO





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 7B

Airport to receive
Pageant makeover

FROM page 1B

we have that in hand - what
the place looks like. We will
have that in hand, but there
is no doubt that the schedule
that has already been started
with the redevelopment of the
airport is going to continue on
the same pace,” Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said.

“And to the degree that that
is going to interfere in any
way, Shape or form, in terms
of what the airport looks like,
we are going to mask that as
best we can.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said this is where the country
will have to preen for the cam-
eras. He said the Ministry of
Tourism was secking to
employ someone who, when
the cameras arrive, help their
crews to identify positive and
beautiful aspects of the
Bahamas.

“We are identifying some-
body to work along with the
technicians and the camera-
men to make certain that we
point the cameras in the right
direction,” said Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace.

He said, though, that Nas-
sau and Paradise Island are
already much cleaner than
they have ever been before.

The Ministry of Tourism
recently spent millions of dol-
lars on advertising for the
Bahamas, even buying a spot

Vincent Vanderpool-Wa

in the Super Bowl broadcast,
which is one of the most cost-
ly spots in television advertis-
ing.

However, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant was a unique
opportunity for the Bahamas
to go beyond prepared ads
and embrace a more first-per-
son publicity that live televised
events bring to a country.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

e Public is hereby aavised tna’

or the;

Eastern Disctrict of the Islands of New Providence one of the Island

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas the mother of CHRISPIN
TAMARIO NOEL intends to change my child’s name to CHRISPIN
TAMARIO WRIGHT, If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) day

after the date of publication of this notice.

“This is the sophisticated
part of marketing that people
don’t think about,” he said.
“The whole idea is making
sure that you are having your
country shown in the best pos-
sible light, that’s what it’s all
about.

“Publicity has a much high-
er credibility than advertising.
Most people know that you
created that ad to make your-
self look good, but publicity
is someone else saying some-
thing positive about you,
which is a lot more powerful.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said that recently relaxed Visa
requirements for visitors cold
encourage people to come to
the Bahamas for the event,
as the Bahamas will be the
smallest nation to ever host
the Miss Universe Pageant,
and one of the closest to the
US borders.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL &
SANDILANDS REHABILITAION CENTRE

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF
PROVISIONS & FOOD ITEMS

Tenders are invited from qualified Contractors for the supply of
Provisions and Foods Items for the Princess Margaret Hospital and
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals Authority, for a period

of one (1) year.

Tender documents, which include instructions to Tenderers, specifications
and other relevant information, can be collected 9:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday at the Materials Management Directorate,
Princess Margaret Hospital’s compound, Shirley Street.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or packaged
identified as “ TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF PROVISIONS AND
FOODS ITEMS FOR THE PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL
AND SANDILANDS REHABILITATION CENTRE” and addressed

to:

The Chairman
Tenders Committee

Public Hospitals Authority

Third Terrace West
Collins Avenue
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address by 5:00 p.m. on 20" April 2009.

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate of up to date

National Insurance Contributions

should accompany all proposal.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any or all Tender(s).





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 9B

OOO BUSINESS eee
Pageant has ‘not changed’ Baha Mar’s closure plan

FROM page 1B

ments to close during the peri-
od. The Sheraton Cable Beach
will be open to facilitate any
demand there is for rooms.”

But still leaving the door
open to a reversal of the clo-
sure decision, Mr Sands said:
“The bottom line is, if there
is a compelling reason, an
overwhelming demand for
business that guarantees room
occupancies for that period,
that is a possibility.

“At this point, the plans are
to be closed. Our position has
not changed at this point in
time.”

Baha Mar earlier this year
announced that it had decided
to close the Wyndham Nas-
sau resort and Crystal Palace
casino for two months this
summer in a bid to reduce
losses, given that this period
accounts for most of the red
ink incurred per annum.

Publicity

Still, Mr Sands, who is also
the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion’s president, said the TV
exposure and general publici-
ty the Bahamas would receive
as a result of hosting the Miss
Universe pageant was an
“almost priceless opportuni-
ty” to market this nation as a
tourist destination, and max-
imise visitor numbers during a
depressed economy.

“T think the real benefit, in
addition to some short-term
ones, is the publicity the des-
tination will incur as a result of
the pageant,” Mr Sands said,
pointing out that the Miss
Universe franchise was jointly
owned 50/50 by NBC and the
Donald Trump Organisation.

“We believe there is equi-
ty, as a destination, to be able
to blow the horn for Bahamas
tourism in a world fashion,
and that’s where the real ben-
efits will occur.

“That publicity that will
occur from the Bahamas being
in the spotlight on prime time,
network and cable TV, is an







“We believe there is equity, as a
destination, to be able to blow the
horn for Bahamas tourism in a
world fashion, and that’s where

the real benefits



almost priceless opportunity.

“We should not be thinking
of it in terms of the event
itself, but the wider opportu-
nity. The biggest viewing audi-
ence for this event is Latin
America, and hopefully this
will be an opportunity to cul-
tivate these markets.”

Mr Sands recalled when
charter flights used to bring
Latin American tourists to the
Bahamas during the summer
months, filling in a gap dur-
ing the slow part of the
tourism calendar.

Pre-publicity in the run-up
to the Miss Universe Pagean-

will occur.”

Robert Sands

added: “That has a certain
sexiness to it, that projection
of the Bahamas as a viable
tourist destination.

“It allows the Bahamas to
be placed in the mindset of
the travelling public when
there are so many choices out
there.”

Delegation

Meanwhile, Mr Sands con-
firmed that a senior, cight-
man Baha Mar delegation had
arrived in Beijing yesterday
for eight days of talks with the

Pictured left to right: Edgar Moxey, CA, PriceWaterhouseCoopers
Partner and former BICA president, Raymond Winder, Managing
Partner, Deloitte & Touche, Paul Andy Gomez, CA, Managing Partner,
Grant Thornton, Daniel Ferguson, CA, BICA President and Managing
Partner, Daniel H. Ferguson & Associates, Clifford Johnson, CA,
Managing Partner, PriceWaterhouseCoopers and Hubert Chipman,
CA, Managing Partner, Ernst & Young.

China Export-Import Bank
and China State Construction,
in a bid to progress their pos-

t’s staging would also show-
case the Bahamas. Mr Sands

NOTICE

MOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCING
CASPIAN SEA LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has

been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant

to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar

General on the 23rd day of February, A.D., 2009.
Dated the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2009.

G. H. Johnsen

Liquidator of

MOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCING

CASPIAN SEA LIMITED

OTICE

ACCOUNTANTS AND MEMBERS OF THE
BAHAMAS INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED

ACCOUNTANTS (“THE BICA”),
the governing body for licensed accountants in The
Bahamas, enjoy the Sir Victor Sassoon Heart Ball held on
February 14, 2009 at the Sheraton Hotel in Cable Beach.












sible partnership for the $2.6
billion Cable Beach redevel-
opment.

Among the Baha Mar exec-
utives in China are the devel-
oper’s vice-chairman, John
Forelle, number two to Sarkis
Izmirlian; Don Robinson,
head of Baha Mar Resorts;
and John Pagano, head of
Baha Mar Development
Company.

“As we speak, there’s a
senior delegation of Baha Mar

Cine Voice, One Bis, Line Dinegtion!

The Anglican Central Education Authority

officials in Beijing,” Mr Sands
said. “They arrived late yes-
terday, and are meeting with
the China Ex-Im Bank and
China State Construction as a
follow-up to the meetings held
the other week.

“They should be there for
at least eight days, and hope-
fully it’s positive news they
come back with from this.”

Among the issues being dis-
cussed are “advanced negoti-
ations” on the terms of a

Memorandum of Under-
standing “as to how we go for-
ward” and construction agree-
ments.

“They'll be looking at the
terms of reference, how the
parties relate and inter-relate,
and some financing opportu-
nities,” Mr Sands said.

“It seems to be headed in
the right direction. The series
of meetings we had have
pushed us further forwards,
rather than backwards.”

fr

ay
s

* : a

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites apolications for teaching positions available at
St. John's College and St. Anne's School on New Providence, and Bishop Michael Eldon

School on Grand Bahama.

English Language and Literature
Mathematics

Physics) General Science
Guidance Counselor

Grakes 7-12
Grades 7-12

Grades 7-12

(2 positions)
(2 positions)
(1 position)

Bishop Michael Eden School, Freeport Grand Bahama

Qualifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from an accredited
University together with a Teacher's Certificate from an accredited
Teacher's Collage.

Applications may be collected from the Education Department located on Sands Road off of East

Street,

Completed application forms with the requested supporting documents must be received by
the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 13" March 2009, and must be addressed to:-

Anglican Central Education Authority

The Director of Education

P. 0. Box N656
Nassau, The Bahamas

Providing quality education ina Christian enviranment by developing the whale child: spiritually
acadennvcaily, physically and socially thus preparing the of for Ae.

“gg thine ait



PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

ADVERTISEMENT
VACANCY

MANAGER | (HUMAN RESOURCES)

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified
persons for the post of Manager | (Human Resources), Corporate Office, Public

Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration, Management, Public
Administration, Human Resources, Psychology, or equivalent;

Five (5) years experience in Human Resources;

Knowledge of HR practices and related laws;

Excellent communication skills (oral and written) analytical and
conceptualized thinking skills; computer skills; negotiation and conflict

resolution skills;

* Ability to organize and prioritize multiple work assignments ;

The Manager 1, (Human Resources) Corporate Office will report to the
Deputy Director/Operations, Human Resources, Corporate Office.

JOB SUMMARY

The Manager 1, (Human Resources), Corporate Office is responsible for
coordinating all matters relating to the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) for
the Corporate Office, Institutions and Agencies. Also, the processing of Human
Resources matters forwardedto Corporate Office fromthe InstitutionsandAgencies.

DUTIES:

1. Liaises with Institutions/Agencies, Corporate Office and Provider of
Services for all Employee Assistance Program (EAP) referrals:
Coordinates appointments and reports for all EAP referrals;
Prepares monthly management reports on EAP and Human

Resources Activities;

Processes assigned HR duties, i.e., selection and recruitment:

Ensures compliance with policies and procedures;

Develops and designs systems and surveys to ensure a proactive
approach to HR Management;
7. Participates on various ad hoc committees;

The post of Manager 1 (Human Resources) is in Scale HAAS1

($38,150 x 700 - $44,450).

Letter of application and curricula vitae should be submitted through your Head
of Department to the Director of Human Resources, Corporate Office, Public
Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or P.O. Box N-8200 Nassau,
Bahamas no later than 16th March, 2009.





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS eer ese
Concerns on labour group effectiveness

FROM page 1B

One of the proposals TRI-
FOR representatives were
examining, said Mr Nutt, was
whether the full group should
meet less frequently - perhaps
on a monthly basis - and
appoint ad-hoc committees to
examine specific labour-relat-
ed issues and amendments to
legislation. These committees
would then report to the full
committee once their month’s
work was completed.

“It’s really a situation to
determine whether TRIFOR
can be an effective group. It has
a great deal of potential, but it’s

not been realised,” Mr Nutt told
Tribune Business.

“T think the major concern is
whether the recommendations
of TRIFOR will be considered
by the Government. As TRI-
FOR is a grouping of employ-
ers, employees and government,
if we have certain recommen-
dations and the Government
shuts us out,” Mr Nutt said,
then its efforts will have been
entirely in vain.

The two major issues that
TRIFOR has been examining
are the use of biometric data
for security and timekeeping,
plus child labour.

However, Mr Nutt said: “It’s

Hing WAY

KINGSWAY ACADEMY ELEMENTARY

almost as if the things we were
looking at went on the back-
burner.” This was as a result of
the global economic downturn’s
impact on the Bahamian econ-
omy and resulting redundancies
across many industries.

Meanwhile, both Mr Nutt
and Dionisio D’Aguilar, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president, told Tribune
Business that they had received
anecdotal evidence to suggest
theft from businesses was on
the increase due to the
depressed economy.

“T’ve heard reports that that
is the case, but other than that,
[ve not heard anything specific
as to what is happening,” Mr
Nutt said.

“Unfortunately, the econom-
ic climate does lead to that type
of increase in criminal activity.”

Mr D’ Aguilar added: “I don’t
think employees theft is increas-
ing, but customer theft is. That’s
my perspective from talking to a
number of companies and busi-
ness owners with whom I’m
involved.

“Theft is a difficult thing to
measure. There’s the theft you

see, such as shrinkage from the
cash registers, and theft you
don’t see, which is the stealing
of products.

“My gut tells me that
Bahamian businesses have
already, because we received a
lot of advanced warnings that
things were going to get tough,
have put in place procedures
designed to mitigate the desire
to steal.”

The Chamber president
added: “There’s no doubt we’re
seeing an increase in customer
theft. There are more desper-
ate people out there, so there’s
been an increase in theft at the
front end.”

However, he suggested inter-
nal pilferage and shrinkage by
employees had been reduced
because workers were “more
afraid of losing their jobs”. In
addition, it was now “damn dif-
ficult” for employees to find
jobs with other companies, giv-
en the downsizing that was tak-
ing place, forcing many to
accept that they needed to “toe
the line with the rules” to
ensure they remained in
employment.

Dollar mixed before Europe
interest-rate decisions

m@ NEW YORK

The dollar edged lower against the euro and the pound Wednes-
day after the Federal Reserve said the U.S. economy has slowed fur-
ther in the last two months, while markets anticipated interest-rate
cuts by the European Central Bank and Bank of England, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

The 16-nation euro edged up to $1.2639 in late New York trad-
ing from $1.2590 late Tuesday, while the British pound gained to
$1.4156 from $1.4077.

The Fed said Wednesday the outlook for a quick recovery is
bleak, with the central bank's latest snapshot of business activity
showing sharp cutbacks and widespread production declines.

The survey is used by the Fed to get a better idea of what's
occurring at the ground level of the economy and will figure into dis-
cussions among Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues
when they meet next on March 17-18.

The Fed is widely expected to hold its key interest rate at a
record low at that meeting as well as through the rest of this year
to help revive the economy, which has been stuck in a recession
since December 2007.

Today, the European Central Bank is expected to cut its bench-
mark rate by half a percentage point to 1.5 percent, and the Bank
of England is expected to lower its rate to 0.5 percent, also by
half a percentage point.

Analysts say the cuts are largely priced into the European cur-
rencies.

Investors are also waiting to hear if the ECB will commit to so-
called quantitative easing, which is an effort to boost bank lending
by upping the amount of money in the system.

Lower interest rates can weaken a currency as investors move
funds to where they earn better returns elsewhere; quantitative eas-

ing can also prompt inflation, which devalues a currency.

The Federal Reserve and Bank of Japan have already announced
such untraditional policies, and the Bank of England is thought to
be on the verge of increasing the domestic money supply.

Meanwhile, the greenback rose to 99.22 Japanese yen from 98.32
yen late Tuesday.

Also on Wednesday, the Institute for Supply Management, a pri-
vate trade group, said that its index measuring the health of the U.S.
services sector fell to 41.6 in February from 42.9 in January. Ana-
lysts had expected a slightly lower reading, but any number under
50 is an indicator of contraction. The index has been falling for five
months straight.

About three-fourths of the American work force is employed in
the services sector, which includes the hotel, retail and health care
industries, as well as financial institutions.

In other late trading, the dollar dropped to 1.2737 Canadian
dollars from 1.2880 late Tuesday, and slipped to 1.1715 Swiss francs
from 1.1748 francs.

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OFFSHORE CONTRACTORS LIMITED

Kingsway Academy will be holding entrance
examinations for students wishing to enter
Kindergarten 4 on SATURDAY MARCH 13, 2009.
Parents are asked to collect Application Forms
from The Elementary school office before the testing
date from 8:30a.m. - 4:00p.m.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, OFFSHORE CONTRACTORS LIMITED, has
been Dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 19th day of February, 2009.

For further information contact the school at
telephone numbers:

324-5049, 324-2158 or 324-6269

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

2007
CrE/eu1/330

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of EvERETTE
STANFORD MILLER and HELEN DIANNE MILLER

Mrs. Gillian Albert
c/o GO TRUST S.A.
Rue des Pierres-du-Niton 17,
1207 Geneva, Switzerland
Liquidator

AND

IN THE MATTER of the QUIETING
OF TITLES ACT OF 19539

AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE two (2)
pieces, parcels or tracts of land totaling 133.64
acres situate Eastwardly of the Settlement of
Deep Creek in the Island of Eleuthera, Bahamas
being immediately West of “The Delancy Estate”
on the Northern side of Queen’s Highway, called
and known as “The Wallace Estate” and more
particularly described as follows:

a

Well-established Wholesaler requires a
saleperson (females are encouraged to
apply) for the snack food division. Individual
must have experience in sales with emphasis
on large food stores. Only individuals with a
proven record of being able to work
unsupervised and achieve results will be
considered. Must be able to drive standard
shift vehicle and be in possession of current
valid driver’s license. Individuals with their
own transportation will receive favorable

; TMT
in
= .
Fl

MORE

1. ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of
land totaling 129.98 acres bounded on
the South by land owned by various
owners from Deep Creek Settlement
on the West partly by land owned
by various owners from Deep Creek
Settlement and partly by a twelve (12)
foot wide Road Reservation called
“Free Town Road” on the North by
land owned by various owners from
Deep Creek Settlement and on the East
by a tract of land called and known as
“Delancy Estates”; and

ale Trip Airfare $69 * 3 9

Nassau — Mangrove Cay
Nassau — Congo Town
Nassau — San Andros

consideration. Company offers good benefits. Nassau — Fresh Creek

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract
of land totaling 3.66 acres bounded
Southwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
Westwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
Northwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
and Eastwardly by a twelve (12) foot
wide Road Reservation called and

known as “Free Town Road”.

Submit applications to:
Sales
P.O.Box N-7124
Nassau, Bahamas

For ticket sales and travel information contact
Partormance Air af 362-1608 | D&D. 2302.

or

Ww, Perormance-aircom Linens # AD PP LA-Tat

NOTICE



EVERETTE STanrorD MILLER and HELEN Dianne MILLER claim to
be the owners in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and have made application to the Supreme Court in
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting
Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provision of
the said Act.

EG CAPITAL

BROEREBAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

&

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 3 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,656.82 | CHG -12.66 | %CHG -0.76 | YTD -55.54 | YTD % -3.24
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.85 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $

Abaco Markets 1.41 1.41 0.070
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992
Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.319
Benchmark 0.63 0.63 -0.877 zB
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.105 5 (a)
Fidelity Bank 0.055
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal office hours

Div $ in the following places:

The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said
aa ue City of Nassau;
2.83
6.77
1.55

2.37
13.95
2.83
6.50
1.49

1.309
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.698
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

The Administrators Office at Rock Sound,
Eleuthera;

2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50

2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50

Dector's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securit Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 0.00 1%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
11.23 12.04 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387 0.35 4.40
2.9230 -0.58 -2.54
1.4376 0.28 4.38
3.3201 -1.94 -11.33
12.6816 0.50 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0401

The Chambers of Bethel, Moss &
Co., Cumberland House, Cumberland
& Duke Streets, New Providence,
Bahamas, Attorneys for the Petitioners

Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB17
FBB22

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
a right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the 21st day of April, 2009 from the
publication of the Notice inclusive of the day of such publication file
Notice in the Supreme Court in the city of Nassau 1n the Island of New
providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned
a statement of his/her claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. The failure of any such person to file
and serve a statement of his/her claim within the time fixed by the
Notice aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly VoL EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3201
11.8789

100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000

30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

-3.59 Dated this 13th day of February, A. D., 2009

0.00

0.06

4.01

1.0330 3.30

1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

-3.59
0.00
-13.33
4.01
1.0000
1.0000

3.30
4.10

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

BETHEL, MOSS & CO.
Chambers Cumberland House
Cumberland & Duke Streets
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioners

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





The Tribune oo

OBITUARIES
& RELIGION



} | The Tribune
Ce Me , My Vsiec. M4
" i i , i
\ wr
» \0
TA | 4,09),
101.9

f
Your choice for the family



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

Sunset In One Land, Is Sunrise In Another
We do this with warm and precious memories
In remembrance of our beloved
The late

Nathaniel Edward Strachan

Bloomed: April 1st, 1943
Faded: March 2nd, 2008

The death of people whom we love brings sorrow and deep pain;
But if our loved one knows the Lord, our loss becomes their gain
Daddy, we know that death is not our enemy, and it does not
possess the
Finality that some of us dread. We choose to live knowing that
there is something waiting for believers beyond this life - some-
thing far better, because what the caterpillar thinks is the end of
life, the butterfly knows is just the beginning and because Christ
lives, death is not a tragedy, but triumph. It is in this vein we can
Rejoice in our sorrow, knowing you are present with the Lord

All is well daddy, safely rest, God is nigh
In Loving Memory; Wendy, Philippa, Orinoco, Shantell, Aaron

Mikhilo, Nathalie and your eight + one grandchildren who loved
you dearly

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Card of Thanks

The Late Jane Mutiny Ramsey,
August 18th, 1924 - January 4th, 2009

We give God thanks for placing so many wonderful persons in
our lives. You have demonstrated your care, compassion and
love. Your words of comfort, encouragement, prayers and
support have helped us to stay focused during these
challenging times, We appreciate everything that you have
done for us. Words are never sufficient to express our
innermost feelings. Please be assured that your involvement
with us 18 fully noted.

God bless each oft You,

Irom: Prince Hepburn and Family

CARD OF THANKS
and
APPRECIATION

4 te

We the family of the late Florance Elizabeth Rolle, wish to express our
deep appreciation and thanks fo all those persons who called, sent
flaral arrangements/wreaths, sent food and drinks and assisted in
anyway during her illness and recent death. Special thanks to Fr.
Michael Kelly, ss.cc, Deacons Peter Rahming and Maxwell Johnson,
Mr. Francis Richardson, Our Lady's Choirs & Faith Community, Mrs.
Claudette Rolle, (Director of Catholic Education), Principal, present and
former teachers and students of Our Lady's Primary School, doctors
and nurses of A&E, Female Medical 2, and Eye Ward of PMH,
Managment and staff of Demeritte’s Funeral Home for a job well done,
_ — af kindness and words of comfort, made our lass more
arable

May God richly bless all you.
The Family





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 3

dock of Foes dWuneral Dhapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ° Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

PASTOR NEWTON |
NEVILLE
ROXBURY, 86

of Scrub Hill, Long Island, will be
held on Saturday, 7 March, 2009, :
11:00 a.m. at Church of God of}
| Prophecy, Shirley Street.
Officiating will be Bishop:
Elgarnet B. Rahming & Bishop
George E. Thompson, assisted by |
Minister Charles Johnson. }
Internment will follow in:
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Cherished Memories will linger in the hearts of his devoted :
Wife: Iva Roxbury; Children: Mildred Hepburn, Jencie Davis, :
Melvern Hall, Carlton Roxbury, Priscilla Ambrister, Newtlyn Higgs, }
Kaaren Whyte, James, Jewel, Delsene Inghram, Georgina Fernander, }
Samuel Johnson, Owen and Val Barrette, Stephen Gilbert, Bishop :
Geogfrey and Althea Hepburn; Thirty-four (34) Grandchildren: ;
Newton Roxbury 2nd , Percy Roxbury , Tyrone Rolle, Dade County }
Police Woman Princess Cunnungham,Dywane and Dwight Roxbury, :
Kelsy Roxbury, Candice Simmon, Kelfine Ramsey, William Butler, }
Roberta Hall of Alanta, Cpl. 339 Keno Ambrister , PC 107 Roger:
Higgs Jr., Jeremiane Roxbury, Kenyatta Ambrister, Florence Butler, :
Latoya Ambrister, Freneka and Fredrick Jr. Ambrister, LaGayla :
Goodman, Javon Whyle, Terron and Vashiti Roberto, Kemon Hanna,
Dario, Daniel Leadon, Fernander, Newton Roxbury 3rd, Tashama :
and Michael, Fernander, Robert Young of Miami, Margaret Ferguson }
of Maimi, Morganne, Cruz and Zehavago Whyte, Vernique Major, !
Ronaldo Roach, Lekeshia, Uvanka and Alverez Roxbury, Felicia
Ambrister, Melvin and Deslarie Burrows, Deshea, Deneshia, Kevanna, :
Kevin Jr. , Demetrvsand, Renard Higgs, Jamesia Goodman, James,
Anthonysha, Imani, Heaven, Abraham, Requel, Samatha Johnson,
Jeremiah, Percey Jr., Melama, Prescola, Nichole, Kendrick, Devano, }
Samatha, Davanta, Shavanta, Logeny and Kiante Ambrister, Donnelly :
Butler, Dunecka, Renato Ramsey, Jeffery Simon, Kelsy Roxbury, :
Lady, Sandy Rolle and Coral Roxbury, Fifty-eight(58) Great-

Grandchildren; One (1) Sister: Louis Moss, Two (2) Brother: ;
Ruben and Jerald Roxbury; One (1) Aunt: Alecia Morris, Two (2)
Brothers-in-law: Carrol Moss and Holly Wilson; Seven (7) Sons-
in-law: Robert Davis of Miami, Robert Hall, Roger Higgs of Long:
Island, Fredrick Ambrister, Cecil Whyte, Kevin Ingram, Michael }
Fernander; Two (2) Sisters-in-law: Faith and Viola Roxbury; One :
(1) Daughter-in-law: Helen Roxbury, Three (3) God-daughter: ;
Lenia Knowles, Julia Taylor and Crystal Knowles, Numerous Nieces }
and Nephews ; and a host of other relatives and friends including: !
The entire Long Island family, Dr. Margo Monroe, Dr. Ruben Roberts, !

Dr. Grey, Dr. Turnquest, Dr. Currling, Dr. Burrows, Dr. Carrol, The
Doctors and Nurses of the oncology Dept. at Princess Margaret
Hospital, Male Medical One, The entire Sunshine Park Community,
Pastoral Care Jackson Memorial Hospital, Liberty City family and
the Church of God Church family. And a host of other relatives
and friends to numerous to mention.

In Lieu of Flowers, donations are to be made to The Cancer
Society of The Bahamas.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT AT THE ROCK
OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL, WULFF ROAD AND
PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. AND ON
SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 10 A.M UNTIL
SERVICE TIME.

LOUISIANNE
METELLUS, 74

of Wulff Road, will be held on
Saturday, 7 March 2009, 1:00
p-m. at New Testament Baptist
Church, Dolphin Dr., J.F.K. Drive.
Officiating will be Minister Paul
Daceus, assisted by other ministers
of the gospel. Interment will
follow in Old Trail Cemetery, Old
Trail Road.

Left to cherish Her memories are

Her Three (3) Sons: Volvick,

Nervar, and Nelson; Two (2) Daughters: Jacqueline and Zanna;
Numerous Grand Children including: Marc Evans, Lance,
Candace, Wesley, Vanessa, Jack, Cassandra, Evener, Ritchie, Stephen,
Alie, Celisha, Altiesha, Stephanie, Volcy, Ebony, Keisha, Zena,
Thomas, Jacqueline; Step Children: Brianna, Rosena, Jean, Kenol,
Kenel, Maxene Meteluss; Nieces: Mireille, Micheline, Chantel,
Charitable, Arlete, Damise, Elza, Lorna and Katie; Nephews: Walter,
Janice, and Chanslor; Brother-in-laws: Theopha, Tanis; Sister-in-
Laws: Marie, Isalia, Camelia; One (1) Daughter-in-law: Claricia;
One (1) Aunt: Nariolaine and a host of other relatives including:
The Dorvilien Family, The Munroe Family, The Octelus Family,
The Joseph Family, The Allen Family and The Dauphin Family.
And a host of other relatives and friends to numerous to mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT AT THE ROCK
OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL, WULFF ROAD AND
PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. AND ON
SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 12 NOON UNTIL
SERVICE TIME.





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar Crest funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

SANDRA COLLETTE
"Peachie' McSWWEENEY
THOMPSON, 61

a resident of Yellow Elder Gardens and
formerly of Sunshine Park and Freeport, Grand
Bahama, will be held at 11am Saturday, March
7th, 2009 at The Parish Church of the Most
Holy Trinity, Trinity Way, Stapledon Gardens.
Officiating will be The Venerable E. Etienne
E. Bowleg PhD. OBE. J.P., assisted by The
Rev'd Fr. Mervin Johnson, BA., B.Th. M. Th.
and The Rev'd Fr. John K. Kabiga, B.A., B.Th.

Kennedy Drive.

Precious memories of Sandra Collette will always linger in the hearts of her Her survivors include her children, Preston (and

; ! : his wife Hazel); Leo Freddie (and his wife Dora); Lionel (and his wife
Sheresse and Shawn Toussaint (Turks Island); grandchildren, Raysheen, :

loving husband, Wellington (Jack) Thompson; her loving children, LaShannon
LaShandra, Shawn Jr., Theo, Torry and Sandro; sisters, Carmell McSweeney

McSweeney; nieces, Condra, Charmaine, (Miami, Fla.), Jovaughn, Aliaya,
Dorisha, Terria (Atlanta), Tamara; nephews, Conrad Jr., Charmon, Kervin,

Laurencine and Adranna McSweeney; mother-in-law, Doreen Thompson;

Damianos and Nicey Major; cousins, Grachion Sands and family, Avis Sands

family, Teresa Mackey and family, Andrew and Francis McSweeney, Sandra

and family, Todd family (New York), McSweeney and Major families, Nicola,
Basil and Scottie Damianos, Marie, Nicola, Marcus Major, Basil Hall and

Collins, Judy Major and family, (Freeport), Pearl Nixon (Freeport), Delores

Langford Bethel and Congregation, Church of God Temple, Freeport, Residents
of Esher Court, Mayfield Park (Freeport); childhood friends, Fort Fincastle

Paulette Walker, Linda Carey Jarret, Nellie and Anita Turnquest, Symonetts
family, Major family, Pastor Geoffrey Wood, Ms. Margaret Claridge and
children, Alexis, Tomasina, Keith and Anastacia; numerous other relatives

Fla.), Carl and Merlease Bethel, Sunshine Park community including, Mrs

College graduation class 1966, Thompson, Jennings and Butler families.

Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12noon to 6pm, and on
: Saturday from 9:30am at the church until service time.

FLORA "Florina"
JOHNSON, 79

a resident of #14 Grosham Close, Bel Air
| : Estates and formerly of Black Point, South
' Andros, will be held 11am, Sunday, March 8th,
: 2009 at The Grants Town Seventh-Day
: Adventist Church, Wellington Street. Officiating
! will be Pastor Errol Tinker, Andrew Burrows
: and Peter Joseph, Elders Kenny Deveaux, Roger

' Forbes, Norman Seymour and Willard Barr.
M. Ed. Interment will be made in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. :

Interment will be made at Woodlawn Gardens,

Soldier Road.

Cynthia); Maxine (and her husband Vernall Rolle) and Jennifer Moss. She

: : was predeceased by Inspector Zebedee (and Alice and Ethlyn Miller). Her
Jennings and Stephanie McSweeney; brothers, Rudolph Bernard and Terrance |

25 grandchildren, Peggy (and Lindrick Sands), Alice (and Pastor Errol

Tinker), Tanya (and Neville Miller); Robert, Diane, Maxwell, Adrian, Prescott,

/ i ) ‘ Lancelot and Pandora Johnson, Craig Johnson, Chequita Johnson, Nicole
Kieran, Kristian, Shaquille, Zhivargo, Jamaal, Nathan and Terrance Jr.; grand :
nieces, Sharatia (Miami, Fla), Micah, Kiara (Freeport), Arianna, Allegua !
(Miami, Fla.) and Charde; grand nephews, Jabari, Anhwar, Ngozi (Miami, } Audley Rahming), Stephenson Smith, Dr. Shaneeta, Lianne and Lionel
Fla), Richard Jr., Xavier, Deontai, Kayshon and Peter Jr.; sisters-in-law, |

Gaitor, and Tavia Tynes, Christopher (and Eleanor), Leo (and Cherise),
Roderick (and Nicole), Vernal, Dwight (and Zerlene) Rolle, Wendy (and

Lorenzo Johnson and Jamaal Moss; numerous great grandchildren including,

. ‘ Levardo, Ramon, Deandre and Chrislyn Sands, Jason and Brittany Tinker,
aunt, Alfred Butler; step aunts, Ethel Ferguson, Gladys Lightbourne, Susanna :

LaPrea and Nevelle Miller; brothers and sisters, Ishmael Rahming (and

I Pac | Daisy), and Hencle Rahming (and Geneva) of Miami, FI., Flossie Rolle (and
and family, Wilfred Butler and family, Kipling Butler and family, Perez Butler :
and family, Don Butler, Rudoph McSweeney Sr. and family, Juliette and Joe :
Mackey and family, (Rock Sound), Eddie and James McSweeney (Rock ! Charles, Elisha, Dr. Elliston, Malferth and Ernest Rahming, Rosetta Gibson,
Sound), Glen and Arnett McSweeney and family, Kolamae Pedican and :

Jeremiah), Manekerbel Canter (and Alphonso), John Gordon, and Louise
Johnson of South Andros; numerous nieces and nephews including, Clarence,

and Ivy Rolle, Leonard, Kendal, Bernadine, Linda and Sheila Rahming,

1 J ra ! Gardwell Rahming, Minera Rolle of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Ettamae
(Sandy) Bethel, Ruth Ferguson, Deidre, Ian, Michael, Trevor Ford and Ingrid :

Ford Knowles and family, Cola, Patna, Deidre, Elaine, Avis and Robert Hall !

McKenzie, Cedric Rahming, Ella King of Freeport, Grand Bahama and Mae
Dawn Rahming-Harper of Miramar, FI., Patricia Bowe, Eulie, Eva, Patrick,

‘ John Jr. and Frankie Gordon, Thaddeus, Elijah and Bethsheba Rahming,

é : , l : Rosemary Thompson and Priscilla Williams, Nethlie Markland, Sandra Miller,
family, Gilda and Hiram Thompson and family; special friends, Kevin and :

Sandra Sands Johnson and family, (Freeport), Phillip and Virginia Gibson :
and family, (Turks), Leslie Johnson, Blanche Moss and family, Patricia Carey :

Thelma and Arlington Rahming, Evelyn, Ethlyn Rahming, Annabel, Herbert,
Reeliabelle, Coralee Young, Emmerita, Unamae, Susiemae, Alphonso, and
Berkley Canter, Janetta Pratt and Solomon Canter, Eloise, Vernita, Geraldine,

Pearl ‘ Gertrude and Emmerson Rolle, Esther and Samuel Duncombe, Joseph Johnson
Lockhart (Freeport), Marge Bowleg, Valarie King, Blanche Moss, Pastor :

of South Andros, Ivan and Sidney Bethel; numerous grand nieces and

: nephews, close relatives and friends including, Angela Johnson, Kendrick
: K. H. Moss, Mazella Rahming, Catherine Roker, Susan Thompson and
crew including, Mrs. Burnside and children, Stanley, Jackson, Julia and :
Wayman, Zelia Thompson Bethel, Pastor Henry and Nehemiah Francis, |

Manencha Miller of South Andros, Pastor Leonard Miller, Myrtle Thompson,
Epsie Clarke and Mrs Rolle, Wilfred Taylor, Mrs Janet Fynes-Bain, Veronica

* Saunders of Abaco and her family, Dr. John and Shezarah Carey, Joan
: Newbold, Audrey Carey, Janice Johnson, Francita Seymour, Norman and

> , k c ves ! Claudia Seymour, Percy Miller, Roger Forbes, Pastor Prince Hepburn, John
and friends, Sheila McSweeney, Patrice McSweeney, Edith Burns and family, :

(Turks Island), Agatha Delancy (Turks Island), Vernell Greene (Opa Locka, } Cleare and the Faculty of the School of Science and Technology, College of

‘ : its : The Bahamas, Felix Stubbs and staff of IBM Bahamas Limited, the Grants
Thirza Dean and family, Mrs Dorsett and family, Mrs Bastian and family, :

Mrs Veronica Gibbs, Mrs Shirley Braynen, Mrs Betty Woodside, Aquinas |
' Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home,

; ‘ Robinson Road and First Street on Saturday from 12noon to 6pm and a the
Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home, +

Musgrove, Cyril Johnson, Dr. Linda Davis, Margo Blackwell, Dr. Brendamae

Town Church family and others too numerous to mention.

church on Sunday from 9:30am to service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 5

Codar Crest frmeral Frome

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Service For

PHILLIP EDWIN
ROLLE, 44

a resident of Price Street, Nassau
Village will be held at 2pm,
Saturday, March 7th, 2009 at New
Hope Missionary Baptist Church,
Jones Heights. Officiating will be
Rev. Edmond R. King. Interment
will be made in the Old Trail
Cemetery, Abundant Life Road.

Left with treasured memories are his
mother, Ivy Davis Rolle; three children, Vanessa, Phillipa
and Princess Rolle; five brothers, Lionell Jr. and Norman
Rolle, Rodney Butler, Otis and James Rolle; one sister, Gloria
Rolle; two uncles, Jonathan Butler and Adam Rolle; three
aunts, Sybil, Carolyn and Carmie Butler; two great grand
aunts, Beatrice Clarke and Louise Musgrove; one brother-
in-law, Donald Nairn; three sisters-in-law, Sheva Rolle,
Shanell Roberts and Gina Knowles; sixteen nieces, Monique
Major, Norma, Shantell, Sharelle, Shanika, Raquel Butler,
Patricia, Meril, Sanovia, Navrissa, Chamaine, Stacey, Jenny,
Shonell, Samantha Neely, and Naomi Adderley; fifteen
nephews, Kerall, Sharven, Romandeo, Lionel Theophilus I,
Marcus, Shanton, Darren, Shanari, Geraldo, Stephen, Norman
Jr., Kevin and Marvin Rolle, Antonio Adderley and Terrance
Neely Jr.; six grand nieces, De'Vencia, Shandria, De'Chan, In Lov : ME Or
Jadorn, Shanyia, Branika; six grand nephews, Adrin Butler, N LOVING IWIEMORY \/F

Terry Rolle, Daryl Riley Jr., Geraldo Rolle, De'Vante Rolle, vA ror tf ?
Essamae Rolle, Freda, Lucy, Sabrina, Kendal, Adrian, Lavardo, ~ He Sania ed fr ~G LILLE,
Jessie, Bridgette, Adam, Wellie, Helena Musgrove, Julian T

and Bennie; cousins, Crayelora, Melvel, Alfred, Basil, Birdie 1949 - 2008,
and Paul Musgrove and a host of other relatives and friends
including, Minister A., Salad Armbrister, Rayfield, Tracy,
Monk, Pinky, Preston, Terrance Neely Sr., Verlin Knowles,
Lurinda Allen, Pam, John Adderley, Pedro Bannister, Steven,
Alicia Miller, Lisa, Deangelo, Cordell, Face, Trick, Ms. Die,
Recie, Tevrance, Tina, Alexas, Coricka, Lullie Musgrove, the
Nassau Village, Price Street Crew, Rolleville, Strachan Alley Leff at woe fll ir wink rexacnalarved jy,
and Evans families, Kirk Moss, Rosemell Rolle, Rudy Ferguson, Re mot dundewead avith times of sorrow, J aio pour the savestine af tervarron

Gloria Bodie, Judy Munroe, Jennifer Morley, Audrey Johnson, My die L Fscteoumed mech, Cone! friend: goad times, aud at loved ane’ touch
Elmna Poitier, Beverley Adderley, Preston Rolle, Laundry Senha: wep tives bere ereeecal ll Sant Lerenhen it ron corer ranalar evief
Dept. S.R.C., Cecil Moxey and Julius families. Light up your bearts amd chare with me, God svanis we wow, be set sve free.

rag for nae eines, J ame peitowsing ree paar Cae

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest You Fane ere ants en Rane
Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from GONE But Nor FORGOTTEN.
12noon until 6pm and on Saturday from 10am until 12noon From Your Sons, Grneson, Fantily er Friends.

and at the church from 12:30pm until service time.





PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rotsiew Memoual
ee

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

iy RVICES FOR

UNERAL SE

? Malcolm, Verlene Palacious, Dawn Palacious, Vernon Symonette
i and family, Clementina, Cheri, David and Mona Hanna, the Cox,
? Hanchell, Williams, and Finley Family, Glen Bannister, Samuel
? Nixon, (Fuzzy), Earl Burrows, father Murray, Father Rodney

: Burrows, Rev. Carl Farquharson, numerous godchildren, the Medical

of Matthew Town, Inagua will be : Teams at the Inagua Community Clinic and the Princess Margaret

held Saturday at 11:00 am at St. } Hospital and the entire Inagua Community.

Philips Anglican Church, Matthew }

Town, Inagua. Officiating will be } Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite at Restview Mortuary

Arch Deacon James Palacious, } and Crematorium Ltd. on Thursday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and

assisted by other ministers of the } at St. Philips Anglican Church on Friday in Matthew Town, Inagua

gospel and interment will follow in : until service time on Saturday.

BOLTON
PALACIOUS, 72

the church cemetery.

He is was predeceased by his son, Floyd Henry Palacious. He is }
survived by his wife, Prudence; sons: Anthony, Iverne, Douglas, }
Chester, Benson and Tamario; daughters: Madeline Haxby, Donna }
Weir, Cherilynne Ferguson, Brendalee Williams, and Tamika;

stepchildren: Jennifer, Edwin, Jason and Tom; sons-in-law: Eugene :
Weir, Wilfred Ferguson, and Sammie Williams; daughters-in-law: }
Antoinette, Felese, Deidre, Cindy and Maranda; brothers: Dwight, }
Irvin, Michael, Franklyn, Archdeacon James, Eric, Eugene, and }
Fredrick; sisters: Bloneva Malcolm, Pamela Seyfert and Terasita }
Palacious; uncle: Norman Beckford; grand children: Christopher }
and Michelle, Kristina, Nakessa and Brain, Dulia and Deon, Terez, }
Rosie, Hope Deangelo, Justin, Leverne, Rozario, Tereco, Henya, }
Antonia, Jensen, Shaneka and Thomas, Chevano, Chequille, }
Mantano, Douglas Jr., Paige, Peyton, Chester Jr., Darren, Marcia, }

Brashad, Courtney, Shaquella, Shanab, Leshantia, Raymando, : He is survived by his: father: Vernon; mother: Vanria; sisters:
Raynaldo, Jays) Alphonso, Raygina and Wayoshea; great grand: Brevonne, Nadia, Sinta and Gwyneth; brother: Vernon Jr.; his grand
Naketra, Brain Jr., Deon Jr., Delon, Dillon, Derenique, Derek J is ? mothers: Miriam Adderley and Berthamae Sturrup; aunts: Lorraine,
Isaac, Stefon, Tezar, talaia, Tanajh, and Amia; sisters-in-law: Edith, i Joy, Shena, Meredith, Olivia, and Ismae; uncles, Neville, Everette,
Georgina, Dee, Sonia, Gwen, Rev. Angela, Joann, Mag, Jean, i Mackey, Daniel Leroy, and Samuel Adderley, Dwayne McKenzie,
Louise, Caroline, Mariah, Ruthy » Mable, Effie, Welma and Em; i Omar, Desi, Zhivrgo, and Fernando; great grand aunts: Ada Smith,
brothers-in-law: wolf, Paul, Mitch, Berkley and Oz; DEERE = AN nitred Sturrup, Gloria Butler, Marina Knowles, Paula Hanna,
nieces and nephews including: Ransford, Irvin, Wilhame, Kim, : Keva Hepburn, Dorothy Sturrup; niece: Breanna Miller; his ramping
Deborah, Drew, Wells, Dion, Davey, Shawnie, Binca, Akelia, i buddies: Jay, PJ, TJ, Neko and the students of grade 8; the teachers,
vanessa Mickara, Adrianne, Keturah, Imalasha, Carlos, Phyleia, : students, and administration of North Long Island High School;
Franzano, Anzio, Anzwa, Susma, Jessica, Lindsay, Ferrando, Jamal, : the doctors and nurses of Simms Clinic and a host of other relatives
Pandora, Norenzen, Elvis, Margaret, Llewellyn, Vedamae, Ruby, : and friends including: Leon Wilchombe, Eugene Butler, Edmund
Cleveland, Theda, Ricardo; Cousins including: Theda and J C hn : Butler Jr, Gary Grant of Great Harbour Cay, Marvin Sturrup and
pode, Margo, Jervis, Violet, Adel, Leo, Basil, Homer, Dino, ? James Smith, and the entire community of Burnt Ground, Long
Beatrice, Margaret, Wanda, Corrine, Cynthia, Ophelia, Robert | Igand
(Bob), Luther, Leroy (Old Man), and Isaac Roker; Other relatives ; :

and friends including: Leonardo McKenzie and Charlene Brown, : Veins ae ‘ ‘ i :

sa ee g will be held in the Irenic Suite at Restview Mortuary and
The Beckford nd Wildgoose Families, Josep h, Carl and Melvin i Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Thursday from
Lewis, Annie Brooks, Isadora Hendfield, Mercedes Harvey and : 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and on Friday at Burnt Ground Gospel Chapel
family, Esther and Karen Palacious, Wilfred Seymour, Advado } 1,417 service time on Saturday.

MASTER
DONOVAN JARVIS
ADDERLEY, 13

of Burnt Ground, Long Island will
be held on Saturday, March 7th, 2009
at 3:00pm at Burnt Ground Gospel
Chapel Burnt Ground, Long Island.
Officiating will be Pastor Ricardo
Turner, assisted by Pastor Ezekiel
Adderley. Interment will be in
Glinton’s Public Cemetery.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 7

Rotsieas Memoual
pny te ay “aR

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

INEZ DAISY
MILLER, 73

of South Beach Estates will be held }
on Sunday, March 8th, 2009 at }
| 2:30pm St. Agnes Anglican Church,
Balliou Hill Roads. Officiating will |
be The Venerable Archdeacon I }
| Ranfurly Brown, assisted by Rev’d :
| Fr. Bernard Been, Canon Warren }
Rolle, Deacon Neil Nairn. Interment
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, }

Soldier Roads

Left with cherished memories are her: SONS: Burton, Bernard, }
Baldwin, Bradley, Berkley, Byron, DAUGHTERS: Patrice, :
Paulette, Phyllis Whitfield of New Providence; SISTERS, Althea }
Farrington, Grace Morton (Philadelphia, PA), Elizabeth Roxbury }
(Freeport, Grand Bahama), Renora Bridgette (Delray Beach, :
Florida) and; SISTER-IN LAW: Willimae Miller, BROTHERS-
IN-LAW: James Roxbury (Freeport, Grand Bahama), Ronald and }
Henry Miller DAUGHTERS-IN-LAW: Sharmane Miller, :
Winnifred Miller (Freeport, Grand Bahama) and Cherisse Miller; :
SON-IN-LAW: Henry Whitfield, GRANDCHILDREN: }
Christopher, Quinton, Mia, Geoffrey, Bernard Jr., Tiffany, Krystal, : yet tee
Deando, Jada, Bradley Jr., Cindy, Kyle, Michael, Amber, Joshua, | Samuel, Obie, and David Pratt; sisters-in-law: Glendina, Carol,
Keanna and Jonathan; GREAT GRANDCHILDREN: Cameron :
Wells and Sanaa Barnes; NIECES & NEPHEWS INCLUDING: }
Corafay Whylly, Trevor, Larry, Gregory, Tyrone, Dewitt, Brent, }
Linda Bullard, Dexter, Basil, Stephen, Brian, Kevin, Warren, Joe, :
Maurice Alexander, Monique, Daphne, Tracey, Monique, William, }
Philip, Donald, Kim, Stuart, Lynda, Tony, Deborah, Kirkwood, :
Kervin, Kenrick, Mark, Cheryl Moss, Samuel, Oscar, Philip, }
Darrold, Robertha, Joel, Mispah, Corrine, Ronald Jr., Charity, ;
emiiemias Amedis, Norile-n,Grevon, Eat lance loss Enos Anissa Forbes, Herb and Shaunell Oembler, Edward and Valerie
OTHER RELATIVES AND FRIENDS INCLUDING: Dr. Archie }
Donaldson, Bernadette Minnis, Teneil Cartwright, Sonia Williams,
Shannon Farrington, Ophelia, Judith, Rowena, Lillian, Roslyn, }
Debbie, Patrice, Wendy, Earl, the Fox Family, the Family of Black :
Point-Staniel Cay, the Family of Grand Bahama, and The Florida }
Family, the St.Agnes Church Family, The Acklins and Crooked ¢ | ockhart of Elizabeth estate Clinic, and the entire settlements of

Family, the Community of South Beach Estates, The Class of | Burnt Ground and S eymour’s, Lone Island.

‘49’ Eastern Senior, The Taxi Drivers.

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview Memorial
Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on }

Saturday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and at the church on Sunday 7 Church in Long Island on Friday until service time on Saturday.

i from 12:30 pm at the church until service time.

OLIVE VIOLA
SMITH

of Long Island will be held at St.
Mary’s Magdalene Anglican Church,
Glinton’s, Long Island on Saturday,
March 7th, 2009 at 10:00am.
Officiating will be Father Mark R.
Lindsey Fox, assisted by Father
Earnest Pratt. Interment will be in
Seymour’s Cemetery, Long Island.

Left to cherish her memories are her sons: Daniel, Ambrose
“Smackey”, Joseph, Rexville, and Arlington Smith. Daughters:
Joanna Smith and Jane Forbes. Grandchildren: Shanique, Tashika,
Alistair, Donavan, Rex-Delano, and Miguel Smith, Rashad and
Baron Forbes, Javon and Michaela Kelly. Great grand children:
Alistair Jr., Charlie and Dominque Smith, and Jayden Forbes.
Daughters-in-law: Dorothy, Susan, Joycelyn and Millestine Smith.
Son-in-law: Barry Forbes. Sisters: Edith Wilson, Geneva Dames,
Rowena Gibson, Christina and Idella Adderley, Ignes Taylor,
Charlottes Smith, and Frieda Pratt, brothers: Granville, George,

Margaret, and Viviana Pratt and Angela Smith., brothers-in-law:
Maxwell and Ezekiel Adderley, Rueben Gibson, James and L.G.
Smith, and Lernux Taylor, twenty eight nieces and thirty seven
nephews. Many other relatives and special friends: Elouise Gibson,
Carla Bethel, Cora Adderley, Delores Gibson, Ronnie Anderson,
James, Ruth, Donnie, Murriel, Prudence, Dave, and Fredrick
Nottage, Norine and Prince Moxey, Inez and Eddison Minnis,
Paul Farquarhson, Father Earnest and Taddius Pratt, Arnold and

Missick, deacon Raymond Forbes, Emily Smith, Michael Kelly,
Clara Dean, Cynthia Thompson, Joanne Higgs, Eva Rolle, Irene
Bain, Canon Basil Tynes, the prayer team of St. Barnabas Parish,
Aldeon Miller, Estelle Walkes, Jacqueline Williams, support staff
of Uriah McPhee School, Pearline Morley, Kevin Rahming and
ASP Neville Adderley, Nurse Miller and Nurse Clarke, Nurse

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview Memorial

Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on
Thursday March 5th 2009 from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and at the





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematouum Lioniled

Bone Cicadnines Gina?”

EEPORT
11A East Coral Roda preopet. G.B., Bahamas
Box F-4
Telephone: (24d) a73- riie7 (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

JAMES
DEVEAUX, 41

OF WEDDELL AVENUE,

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA : }
WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY, :
MARCH 7, 2009 AT 11:00 A.M. :

-| AT THE CHAPEL AT RESTVIEW }
MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND :

CREMATORIUM LIMITED,
CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT,
GRAND

RICHARD MUNROE. CREMATION WILL FOLLOW.

Cunningham, Brittney Kemp, Quinnae Moore and Aliyah Valsin;
Cunningham, Calvin Kemp, Jonathan Lightbourne, Shonya Kemp,

Valsin; grandnieces:

and special friend Joyann Hall and family.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE” OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND:

CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

FROM 9:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

BAHAMA.!
OFFICIATING WILL BE REV. |

MRS. EDNA LOUISE
KIKIVARAKIS, 88

OF #11 MAN-O-CIRCLE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF NASSAU,
NEW PROVIDENCE DIED AT HER
RESIDENCE ON MONDAY,
MARCH 2, 2009.

She is survived by 5 sons: Henry,
Anthony, Michael and Jeffrey Kikivarakis and Keith Brice; 4
daughters-in-law: Joy, Deborah, Debra and Ella Kikivarakis; 15

i grandchildren: Katherine Laster, Nicole Kikivarakis-McKenzie,
: Tamika Nelson, Karen, Sonia, Dominic, Damien, Anthony Jr.,
Left to cherish his memories are his children: Shawn and Tameko |
Deveaux; sisters: Sylvia Turnquest, Margaret Cunningham and
Mary Ellen Kemp; brothers: Joel Williams, Wilton Kemp, Garnet |
Bowe, Charles Valsin and Stanmitz Kemp; grandmother: Rosalie :
Bowe; nieces: Nadia Hall, Joanne Williams, LaKeisha Bowe, }
Racquel Turnquest, Dakota Williams, Garnell Bowe, Carla }
: RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND
nephews: Kelsey and Marc Williams, Carlington and James :
: FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON MONDAY, MARCH 16,
Elton Turnquest Jr., Charles Valsin Jr., Whitney Hield and Daniel ;
Conique and Talia Lightbourne; :
grandnephews: Rashad and Mateo Williams, James Cunningham }
and Conan Lightbourne; aunts: Monica Pettifrere, Veronica :
Francois and Shirley Laing; uncles: James Bowe and Carl Pinder; }
grandaunt: Mabel Rogers; in-laws: John Lightbourne, Luke :
Cunningham, Elton Turnquest, Karen Williams and Nathalie }
Bowe; cousins: Maude Clarke, Joan, Virginia, Carl Pinder, Rodney :
Carmen, Lisa Louis, Candice Bowe, Bernard Bethel, Lousette }
Joseph, Jayline Moss, Renese Remy, Sheryl Rolle, Lucita Johnson, :
Sonia Tynes, Scotty Evans and a host of other relatives and friends }
including: Preston Kemp and family, John Kemp and family, :
Janet Donahue and family, Darren Malcolm and family, Otnell :
“Scrooge” Paul and family, Maxine Rasta Rice, Whitney Hield, :
Quinton Moore, Asheko Hall, Dr. Leviticus Rolle and the staff }
at the Rand Memorial Hospital, Garden Villas “The Ghetto” crew }

Kareen, Kim, Jeffrey Jr., Veronique, Dorainey, Scentique and
Jarvis Kikivarakis; 13 great grandchildren; numerous nieces,
nephews and a host of other relatives and friends especially her
care givers Grace Ellis and Sybilene Russell.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE” OF
CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,
2009 FROM 12:00 NOON TO 5:00 P.M

DEATH NOTICE

MR. DANIEL
WILLIAMS, 87

OF #17 BERKLEY DRIVE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF WEST END,
GRAND BAHAMA DIED AT HIS
RESIDENCE ON WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 2009.

He is survived by his daughter:
Coramae Thomas; stepsons: Dudrick,
Ashley and Pedro Edwards;
grandchildren: Bradley Brown, Bonita Pratt, Stephon Brown,
Vernon, Owen and Oscar Thomas, Elsa Bartlett, Alitha Lightbourne,

: Tanya and Natalee Brown; numerous great grandchildren and

FREEPORT. GRAND BAHAMA ON ERIDAY FROM 10:00 | great-great grandchildren; 2 sons-in-law: Dennis Thomas and

A..M. TO 5:00 P.M AND AT THE CHAPEL ON SATURDAY }
| Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.

Nathanial Brown; and a host of other relatives and friends.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

f Ca - a ¢ PF bs f
FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 304-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

DEATH NOTICES FOR

MR. JOSEPH
EZEKIEL BAILEY, 65

OF #65 EAST CORAL ROAD,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF ST.
MARY’S, JAMAICA DIED AT
THE PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL, NASSAU, NEW
PROVIDENCE ON TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 24, 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Christina Bailey; sons: Mark,
Randy, John and Broahdy Bailey; daughters: Nicole Turner,
Dorothy, Nadine and Kista Bailey, Carla West and Shantel
Grant; sister: Vata Bailey; brothers: Frank, Ben and Junior
Bailey; numerous grandchildren, nieces, nephew and a host
of other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.

MS. LYNN LYATTE
CLARKE, 46

OF DEADMAN’S REEF,
GRAND BAHAM AND
FORMERLY OF SOUTH
MASTIC POINT, ANDROS
DIED ON SUNDAY, MARCH
1, 2009,

She is survived by her 2 daughters:
Johnell Rolle and Johnett Davis; 2 grandchildren: Jamazio
and Dianell; 6 sisters: Minister Beulahmae Fowler, Araline
Mackey, Leading Marine Doramae Clarke of R.B.D.F, Sherry,
Darnell and Karen Clarke; 3 brothers: Eddison, Dave and
Dwight Clarke; 4 aunts: Julia Fowler, Perneshia Taylor,
Elouise and Viola Hopkins; | grandaunt: Louise Colebrooke;
numerous nieces, nephews and a host of other relatives and
friends.

Funeral arrangement will be announced at a later date.

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 9

wily

EAST SUN RISE MORTUARY

—S- —

“A New Commitment To Service’

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

DEACONESS ANNIE
CAMPBELL, 80

of 3rd Street, The Grove and formerly of Kemp’s
Bay, Andros will be held on Sunday at 1 p.m. at
The Church of God Temple, Coconut Grove and
Crooked Island Street. Officiating will by Bishop
Lindo Wallace, assisted by Bishop Rudolph Pinder
Sr., Interment will follow in St. Barnabas Church
Cemetery.

Margaret Campbell and their children: Jermaine

and Vanessa Campbell, Fiona, Vanturi and Angelique

Campbell; Theodore and Min. Doreen Campbell

and their children Calpurnia Campbell, Martin

Forbes, Cyprianna, Cp] 2515 Theodore Campbell

Jr., Theodore I, Cassius, Dino, Crystallaire and

Shandrea Campbell, Ricardo and Shanequa Francis,

Freddie and Shekera Carrol; Vaneria Campbell-Rolle

and her children, Vanessa Campbell-Rolle, Latanya Rolle and Tamone Humes; ASP Ronald
and Doreth Campbell and their children, LaRhonda, Ronald Jr., Bianca and Ronald Campbell
IL., and Latoya Paris; Rev. Johnathan and Dedra Campbell and their children: Omar Neely,
Adario, Justan and Dekia Campbell; Insp. Solomon and Sgt. 1720 Valeria Cash and their
children: Tameka Johnson, Shamar, Crystal, Sullivan, Solomon and Akira Cash. Sgt 1214
Marvin and Nurse Altheameze Watson and their children: Travaz, Travaughn, Travayne and
Rekeima Watson; Rev. Joycelyn and Eureka Vixamar and their children: Branique and Branae
Coakley, Jaquan Campbell, Cynthia, Cindy and Adderley Vixamar; Numerous great-grand
children including: Sherell Lewis, Rashan, Kianne, and Simone Campbell, Vanessa Campbell,
Kaylan Campbell, Jasmine Bethel, Claron Morley, Azurnique and Jermaine Campbell Jr., V’ajha
Clarke, Travaz Watson II, Omar and Deandrea Sturrup, Frediesha Carrol, Theodore Campbell,
Syldiko McKenzie and Justan Campbell Jr.; Her surviving siblings include: Simeon, Philip,
Leslie, Samuel, Hassam, Clinton and James Brown; Maureen Symonette, Arabella Johnson,
Lucille McIntosh, Joanna Brown and Cleo Anderson; Brothers-in-law: Ellis Ferguson, Joseph
Symonette, Wesley Johnson and Glenroy Anderson; Sisters in law: Mildred, Loma, Willesy,
Sheila and Cheryl Brown; Nieces and nephews too numerous to mention, Other relatives and
friends including: Winnis Bowleg, Rona Bastian, Florenda Duncombe, Manencha Clarke, Sis.
Lydia McKenzie and Bread of Life School, Sis. Beckford, Anatol Young, Barry & Claudette
Rolle, Leona Carey, Carrie Powell and Clarence & Estelle Cunningham of New York; Roy and
Mary Bullard of Opalocka, Florida; Hon Tommy Turnquest, The Campbell Family, Hon. Cynthia
Pratt, Sandra Bastian, Mildred Knowles, Rev. & Sis. Reginald Saunders, Theresa Moxey-
Ingraham, Cynthia Damalie, Phillicia Ellisnor, Helen Ferguson, Carolyn Saunders, Maudleen
Josey & Family, Ruth Malcolm, Patrice Campbell, Rev. Vera Rigby, Rev. Fr. Sebastian Campbell,
Oscar Campbell, Rev. Carl Campbell, Joyce Saunders & Family, Meredith Martin, Rev. Francina
Watson, Natasha Adderley, Umiqua Hepburn, The Romer family, Sally Hutcheson and family,
Rudolph Smith, Hester Dawkins, Mrs. Petty, Bro. Farquharson, Joyce Coakley & Family, Bishop
Lindo & Olga Wallace, Crusaders Brass Band, Royal Ambassador’s Band, The Church of God
Temple Family, Leon Smith, Bernice Bullard, The Bevans Family, Willamae McKenzie &
Family, Volare Clarke, The Bowe Family, The Glass Family, Estella Lynes, Patrick Bethel, Gen.
Supt. of Highway Church of God - Bishop Robert A. & Mother Modena McPhee, St. Cecilia
Community (Especially Third Street), Doctors and Nurses of Female Medical Ward I of P.M.H.,
Staff of Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Staff of Southern Police Station and Detective Unit,
The Royal Bahamas Police Force Band, Staff of Pharm-Chemical Ltd., Ministry of Education,
Staff of Jones Communications Network, Kelly’s Home Centre, Staff of Atlantis, Staff of
Claridge Primary School, Staff of St. Cecilia’s School & Church Parish, Staff of Commonwealth
Building Supplies, Staff of Renova Spa, Staff of College of The Bahamas, Staff of Central Bank,
Dupuch and Turnquest Law Firm, Bahamas National Council for Disability and The Dorcas
Committee of The Church of God Temple.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street, Palmdale from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and again on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and at the Church from
noon on Sunday until service time.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 ¢ Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117





PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

Evergreen Mortuary '

EXCELLENT IN THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE

For all of your Fumeral Service Noods,
We will be pleased to serve jane with boner.

Tel: 242-394.7999
Fax: 242-74 7090
2#hrs: 242-341-5309
on 322-3242
Cell: 5i5-975F

DENALEE E. PENN L.F.D.E.

ee Mackey Strat South
MARL AGING/ FUNERAL DIRECTOR

(Opposite Mingic Muffler) Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR 3

Errol Edward Gilbert, 71

of New Bight Cat Island will be :
held on Saturday at Our Lady of }
the Holy Souls Catholic Church, :
Deveaux Street, at 2:45 p.m. !
Officiating will be Fr. Michael }
Kelly, ss.cc. Interment will follow :
in the Catholic Cemetery, Tyler }

) Street.

Left to cherish fond memories his }

Brothers: Edmund and Peter }

Gilbert; Sisters: Queen Elizabeth, :

and Winnest Gilbert, Minerva Hall :
& Ellen Hepburn; Sisters-in-law, Judy & Majorie Gilbert; }
brothers-in-law, Leon Hall and Ishmael Hepburn; nieces :
and nephews, Lovell, Bethany, Lauren and Sophia Gilbert }
of Canada, Loretta, Louis, Louis Jr., and Jaden Johnson, :
Patrick and Chavasse Gilbert, Margaret Gilbert of Tennesse,
Christine King, Stacey and Desiree Forbes, Anthony (Tony) }
and Antoneak Gilbert, Ronique Deveaux, and Rashad Moss, :
Indi, Italia and Laterio Hepburn, Edmund Jr., Nathaniel }
Smith, Florene, Sonia, Gilbert, Elrod and Shamar Munnings, }
Llonella Gilbert, Carol Hall, Ralph and Dennis Smith; :
cousins including, Rufus Johnson, John and Eldrige }
Johnson, Anthony, Harriet, and Leonard Johnson, William, }
Orman, Medris, Timothy, Brady, Florence, Jackie Johnson; :
other relatives and friends including, the Gilbert family, |
Johnson family, Holman and Estermae Gilbert, Wilworth :
Campbell, Rosyln Johnson and family, Elsie Johnson and !
family, Hazel and family, Michael Harris and family, Paula }
& Sam Romer, Dr. Kapuno & Nurse Rose Saunders and :
Staff at Smith's Bay Communtiy Clinic; Rosie McKinney }
& family, Bradley Dorsette & family, Dwayne Adderely :
and family, Michael & Zephaniah Rolle and family, Albert |
Armbrister, Rev. Father Glenn Nixon, Deacon Rahming, }
Holy Redeemer Catholic Church family, and members of :

the Cat Island Community.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Evergreen }

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Mortuary, Mackey Street on Friday from 10:00a.m. - 6:00
p.m. and again on Saturday at the church from 2:45 p.m.
until service time.

Oswald Frazer, 82

of St. Vincent Road and formerly of
Lower Bogue Eleuthera will be
held at Wesley Methodist Church,
Baillou Hill Road at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Carla R.
Culmer, assisted by Sis. Tezel
Anderson. Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish fond memories are

(6) Sons: Levock, Johnsthon,

Sargeant 1114 Londie, Police

Constable 282 Bertram Sr., Petty
Officer Remond Sr. and Horace Frazer; five (5) daughters,
Vernisha Gaitor, Susan Darville, Jestina Lloyd, Nursing
Officer Bertha Mae Sands, Petty Officer Joy Moss; one (1)
sister, Thelma Neilly of Lower Bogue Eleuthera; five (5)
sons-in-law, Inspector Edney Gaitor, Lincoln Darville,
Julian Llyod, Gary Sands and Police Corporal 2241 Cyril
Anthony Moss; four (4) daughters-in-law, Natasha, Arnetta,
Sophia and Sylvia Frazer; numerous grand-children
including, Dominic & Edney Gaitor, Yvette Archer, Lincoln
Jr., Lazette Darville, Mario, Shandia, Jonathia, Jonique,
Johnson Jr., & Jonovia, Marguritta Basden, Tamara, Indira,
Lonette, Lonique, Londey Jr., Jermaine, Jenardo, Bertram
Jr., Jeraldo, Quenell, Jerano, Bertrannique, Remond Jr.,
Nevado, Nikel Frazer, Shantonne, Shantae & Deisha Llyod,
Gary Jr., Tenaz Sands, Dwight Baker Jr., Anthonique and
Antonesia Moss; Great-grand-children, Daija & Dabria and
Tion Gaitor, Brendan and Julian Archer Jr., Benjamin &
John Basden & Shanya Frazer; sisters-in-law: Geneva Kelly,
Shirley Johnson, Mara Cash and Olga Frazer; one (1) brother-
in-law, Harrison Kelly; two (2) grand-sons-in-law, Julian
Archer and Benjamin Basden; one (1) grand-daughter-in-
law, Vinette Gaitor; numerous nieces, nephews and other
relatives including, staff of the People Pharmacy, staff of
Mable Walker Primary School, Staff of Bank of Nova Scotia,
the staff of Main Operating Theatre P.M. Hospital, Fire
Branch of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, The Royal
Bahamas Defense Force, Rev. Carla Culmer and Wesley
Methodist Church family.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Evergreen
Mortuary Mackey Street, on Friday from 1 0:00a.m. - 6:00
p.m. and again on Saturday at the church until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Evergreen Mortuary |

EXCELLENT IM THE SERVICE WE. PROVIDE

For all of your Funeral Service Meads,
We will be pleased to serve you with honor

Tel: 242-794-7999

Fax: 242-3 04790

24hwe: 242-341-5309
or 322-3242

Celk565-9758

DEN ALBEE BE, PENN LF.DURE,

; Mackey Street Soarth
KAN AGING FUNERAL DIRECTOR

(Opposite Minute Muffler) Nassau, Bahaniat

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR 3

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 11

Keijero and Keisher Ferguson, Mannie, Corey and Sheena

: Brown, Carli, Wensel Newton and Dwight Newbold, Nursing
: Officer Sister Terry Bain, Attorney-at-law Linda Evans, Rev.
: Jeffrey Evans, A.S.P. Walter Evans, 1860 Rae Evans, Chrisitine
: Sawyer, Chantelle Gentle, Samuel Evans, Theresa Bonaby,
: Able Seaman, Sherry Gibson, Melonie Bodie, Phillip and
: Ricardo Whylly, a host of other relatives and friends; Basil
: Sawyer and family, Inez and Edward Harris, Theresa Smith
: and Iren from Miami Florida, Bernita Oliver and family Lilly
: McDonald and Family, the Thompson family, Maxine and
: Laurie, Ricardo Evan, Claudette and family, the Rahming
: family, the Sweeting family, the descendants of Thomas

Clarke and Family Almada Bowe, Anthony Adderley, Ethlee
Ferguson and family, Elizean and family, the descendant of

: Samuel Ferguson, the descendants of Marrie Bodie and

Carlies Lovise Ferguson-Sawyer, 65

of Rocky Pine Road and!
formerly of the Forest Exuma :
| will be held on Saturday at South :
Beach Union Baptist Church }
Summer Haven Estate off Blue :
Hill Road South at 1:00 p.m. :
Officiating will be Rev. Wilton }
McKenzie Assisted by other }
Ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will follow in:
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, :
JFK Drive.

Cherished memories are held by: Children: Rickey Sawyer, !
Ken Saunders (predeceased) Carla Mejias and Denise :
Ferguson-Hanna; Adopted daughters, Kizzy Brown and :
Cola Minns; Adopted sons, Prince Rolle, Alexander Phillips,
Trevor Sweeting, and Tyrone Clarke; One son-in-law, :
Baton Hanna; Two Daughters-in-law, Raquel Saunders :
and Simona Sawyer; grandchildren, Shavantae and Natijus }
Mejias, Olivia, Ishia, Reshae, Rickey Jr, and Akeel Sawyer, :
Kennen, and Kentonio Saunders, Dentawn Grant and Tanay :
Hanna; One sister, Bernadette Ferguson; Three brothers, :
Cedric Ferguson, Timothy Ferguson, and Benjamin :
Ferguson; One Aunt, Lillis Ferguson; five sisters- In- law, !
Edna, Jenny, and Helen Ferguson, Shirley Whylly and :
Eloise Sawyer; nieces and nephews, Elaine and Norman :
Lightfoot, Stephanie and Buster Evans, Keith and Kate }
Ferguson, Caron and Barry Brown, Hansel and Joann }
Ferguson, Shirley and Dennis Grant, Nikitha and Dennis :
Forbes, Sharinda and Wyberg Brown, Audrus and Tori }
Glinton, Terron and Tanya Armbrister, Dwayne and Stacia :
Davis, Anita and Leon Saunders, Sandra, Steve, Audrey, !
Brendell, Portia, Treaser, Florinda, Floyd, Fredrick, Terry :
and Crystal Ferguson, Tavari Armbrister, Bruno, Quincey, :
Stacey, Veronica Tina Moxey, Melvern Loyd, Valencia }
Moss, Norlaine, Normica and Niyah Lightfoot, Keilera, ;

: Family, Mary Clarke and Family, Shirley Davis, the
: descendants of Daniel Taylor and family, the descendants of
: Florence Clarke and Family, the descendants of J.B. Ferguson

and family and Ruthymae Ferguson and family, the Mortimer

: family, Melissa, Shantel, Bernadette, Charmaine, and Presilla,

Rose Curtis and Family, Shelia Adderley and Family, The
Armbrister Family, Wendy Darling and family, Arthur Bodie

: and Family, descendants of Peter Bodie and family, Levis

Farquason and family, the Brown family Natius Mejias,

: Roland Clarke and family, Ellen Wilkinson and the Gator

family, Michael Young and family, the Johnson family, the
Lowe family, the Wilderness Crew, Housekeeping Department
of Atlantis Royal Towers, Housekeeping of Crystal Palace,

: the Tour Desk Agents, The Community of Rocky Pines, The
: Wet Money Crew Cable Beach and The entire Forest Exuma
: Community.

: Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at Evergreen

Mortuary Mackey Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. - 6:00
p.m. and again on Saturday from 12:00 noon until service
time.

DEATH NOTICE

VERONIA AUGUSTINE, 65

of Strachan’s Alley off Kemp Road
died on Thursday, February 26,
2009.

She is survived by her husband,
Ulnickk Agenor; children, Berry,
Claude, Prince, Sonny, Lilian, Lucie
and Eddie Codet.

Funeral announcement will be
\) announced at a later date.





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

Evergreen Mortuary

EXCELLENT [MN THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE

For all of your Funeral Service Needs,
We will be pleased to serve you with honor.

Tel: 242-344-7999
Fox: 242-504 7000
24hrs- 242-341-5309
of 322-7242
Cell 565.9755

DENALEE E. PENN L.P.D.&E

Mackey Street South
MANAGING FUNERAL DIRECTOR

(Oppose Minute Mufther) Masse, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

EDVARD FICIEN, 32

of Balfour Avenue and
formerly of Port De Prince,
Haiti, will be held on Saturday
at Queen of Peace Catholic
Church, Faith Avenue at 3pm.
Officiating will be Father
Roland Vilfort. Interment will
follow in Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

) He is survived by one

daughter, Fmcisca Diana-
Ficien; father, Arnold Ficien of Haiti; mother, Almarie
Vincient; brothers, Saintamand Ficien of Haiti, Marc
Anthonie Ficien, Limage Ficien, Bolivard Ficien, Jean
Herold Ficien; sisters, Emilienne Ficien, Josianna Ficien,
Silvitha Ficien, Albertha Ficien, Anitha Ficien, Misleine
Ficien; uncles, Fernand Vincient of Miami, Willy Vincient
of Haiti, Willy Vincient of Haiti; aunts, Mrs. Fernand
Vincient of Haiti, Saintamse Ficien of Haiti , Saintamse
Ficien of Haiti, Orphise Ficien of Haiti, McNarcel Ficien
of Miami, Elianne Ficien of Miami, Mrs. Meriguesr
Toussaint of Miami; nieces, Bethsaida Ficien, Sancherley,
Berlauge, Dania, Marckenly, Widline, Asbina, cousins,
Corvensky Ficien of Ferlin Vincient, Jimmy Ficien of
Dama Vincent, Clerf Ficien of Sendy, Clint Ficien, of
Miami, Sony Ficien of Miami, Delius Vixamar, Georg
Joseph, Eugene Joseph, Richerson Jacques, Jacquessy
Jacques, Lesley Apliste, Jacques Ougustin, Eugene,
Rocine, Wilkens Elize, Michelet Jacques, Lo Jelusnia,
Alberta, Duvencia, Yolette, Altida, Roseline Ficien,
Elmisa Eugen, Ann Eugena, Ferlin Vincient, Fenly
Vincient, Damas Vincient, Sandy Vincient, Family and
Friend including, Tacy, Emilienne Tacy, Altanase
Ougust, Bernadin Toussaint, Wesley Toussaint, Frantz,
Anaise, Ilouis, Morice, Cerlus Renette, Duveny, Boline,
Manise, Odette, Ulrick, Jn Baptist, Nuclosse, Erilia,
Clias, Scanne, Jho, Bellot, Escarne, Fanelia, Dania, other
relatives and friends.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Vaughn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

TAMICA AGATHA
t Tammy te
STURRUP, 29

of Boilfish Drive will be held on Saturday
March 7, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at Epiphany
Methodist Church, Wulff Road.
Officiating will be Rev. Frederick Kelly,
assisted by Pastor Jacob Shaw. Interment
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Precious memories will forever linger
in the hearts of her parents: Linda E. Braynen-Cleare, Derek D. Cleare
and Min. Ethan G. Sturrup Fairweather; three children: Videll, Anfernee
and Crystal; grandmothers: Cleora Bryanen, Theresa D. Fairweather
of Fla., and Rosalie Cleare Munroe; grandfather: Basil Munroe; five
sisters: Mia Cleare Sturrup, Lindira Cleare, Ghandise, Elisa and
Lavenia Fairweather; two brothers: Ethan I and Ethan I Fairweather;
four nieces: Sha'Mia, Tiarah, Heaven and Adisher; two nephews:
Shannondoah Jr., and Ricardo Jr.; one brother-in-law: Shannondoah
Sturrup Sr.; twelve aunts: Joyann Braynen of Freeport, Catherine
"Kim" Woodside, Kelly Braynen, Paulette Ferguson, Barbara Jean
Percentie, Judith Albury of New York, Anthea Lewis of Freeport,
Cheryl Clarke, Ertha Knowles, Vanda Rahming, Vernita Cleare,
Georgette Rahming and Italia Whylly; fifteen uncles: Donnie, Marcus,
Chuck, Perry Braynen Sr., Burton and Floyd Cleare, Dedrick Rahming,
Michael & Mitchell Munroe, Eustace Sturrup of Abaco, Douglas
Sturrup of Tampa, Fla., Peter G. Bowleg of Atlanta, Georgia, Former
Sen. Trevor R. Whylly, Kenneth Ferguson and Andrew Albury of New
Jersey; grand aunts: Gladys Saunders of the Bluff, Eleuthera, Dency
Moss and Dorothy Fredric of Miami, Angela and Louise Kelly of
Freeport, Barbara Woods of Harbour Island, Regina Johnson, Totsie
Paul Albury of Fort Lauderdale, Sister Cecilia Albury; granduncles:
Rev. Frederick Kelly, Frank Kelly of Freeport, Harrison Barry of Bluff,
Eleuthera and Charles (Small) Naim; Godparents: Dianna Reckley,
Linda McDonald and Sgt. Anthony Saunders; one hundred and five
cousins including: Perry Jr. and Kelson Braynen, Davin Culmer of
Freeport and Shirley Bodden of the Bluff, Eleuthera; and a host of
other relatives and friends including: Theo and Ruth Tsvoussis and
the Staff of Dry Clean Alternative, Urban Renewal Project, Mr. Anthony
and Linda Duncombe, Marvin Duncombe and family, The Team of
Central Police Station, Samuel Higgs, Donnalee Cleare, Patricia
Fairweather, Dianna Pinder Rolle, Alvian Davis, Jewel Brown, Alovette,
Jackie and Marco, Shawn Deveaux, Hubert and Viola Lightbourne,
Dr. Winston Churchill Rolle, Maria Carey and the Frazier Family,
Lydia Hanna and Family, Ceclie Bonaby and the Staff of
Harbourside/Atlantis.

Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O. Jones
Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on Friday from
10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:00 a.m.
to service time.

Wulff Road and Primrose Street,
Opposite Studio of Draperies
Telephone: 326-9800/1 © 24 Hour Emergency
434-9220/380-8077





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 13

_Gommontrealth duneral Home

Independence Drive e« Phone: 341-4055

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR

ANDREW NAT
MONCUR, 54

affectionately called "Emperor"

of Church-hill Subdivision will be
held on Saturday 11:00 a.m. at
Evangelistic Temple, Collins
Avenue. Rev. Dr. Gary Curry,
assisted by Rev. Dr. Vaughan Cash
will officiate, and interment will
follow in the Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his memories: Mother: Mavis Moncur; Sisters:
Jenniemae Hutcheson, Dianne Thompson and Sophia Chandler
Brothers: Cleveland Moncur of Hollywood Florida, Ricardo,
Francisco And Valentine Chandler; Nephews: Dion Decosta,
Bjorn and Joseph Moncur, Terrel Williams, Francisco and
Ricardo Chandler, Dario Hutcheson, Plato and Caron Thompson
and Caden Rolle

Nieces: Takara Chandler and Sanea Colebrooke; Aunts: Naomi
Moncur, Rosemae Smith and Esther Minns; Uncles: Henry
Carter Moncur, Silbert Burrows and Neville Minns; Sisters-in-
law: Verlene Moncur, Courtney and Shenik Chandler; Brother-
in-law: Plato Thompson; Cousins: Judy Seymour, Yvonne
Rolle, Dave Williams, Melvise Glinton, Ian Smith, Shenna
Moncur, Christopher Moncur, Pastor Henry Roger Moncur of
Freeport, Sophia Christie, Lydia Thompson, Coleman Wring,
Christopher Minns, Kendal Smith of Dallas Texas, Tony Smith
of New Jersey, Tyrone Smith, Sara Saunders of Vero Beach,
Florida, Carla Floyd of Sebastian, Florida, Olivia Wells of
Melbourne, Florida, Tiffany Stubbs of Georgia and Jullian Smith
of Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Relatives and Friends: Eulie
Lafleur, Miriam and Emeline Seymour and Family, Margaret
Woodside and Family, Blossom Rolle and Family, Virginia Rolle
and Family, Merlene Decosta and Family, Cynthia Dean and
Family, Dorton and Elsie Chandler, Vernon Chandler and Family,
Jeffery Chandler, Curlene Williams, Ashton Henfield and Family,
Sandra Woodside, Oralee Maycock, Virginia Godfrey, Gerald
and Iris Cartwright, Rolley Gibson and Family, David
Lightbourne and Family, Bobby Lightbourne, Donna Nottage
and Family, Electa Lloyd and Family, Ms. Bain and Family,
Fannie Joseph, Lillian Prophet and Family of Miami, Florida,
the Evangelistic Temple Family, the Parish of Christ the King,
the Churchill Subdivision family, Henry Farrington and family
and Mrs Clarice Bain and many more family and friends too
numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may view the remain at THE CHAPEL
OF MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Friday from 11:00-6:30 p.m.
and at the church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to service time.

Retired
Prison Officer
LEROY LEONARD
DORSETTE, 66

of Pinewood Gardens will be held

{on Saturday 11:00 a.m. at

Evangelic Assembly, Baillou Hill

Road and Flemming Street. Pastor

Patrick V. Smith, assisted by

Pastor Sharon Nairn and other

Ministers of The Gospel will officiate and interment will follow
in the Old Trail Cemetery, Abundant Life Road.

Cherished memories are held by: Sons: Wesley Ford and Ricardo
Dorsette; Daughter: Royann Dorsette; Sisters: Sybil Nairn and
Jennie Smith ; Grand-children: Travis Evans, Deangelo, Darcel,
Gina, Darinique, Thorn and Tario Dorsette, John Darcy and
Wesney Forde; Great grand-children: Makai and Destiny;
Nieces: Charlene and Carvette Dorsette, Jacqueline Nairn,
Patrice Martin, Melinda Bowe, Margaret McDonald, Deborah
Llghtbourne and Karen Isaacs; Nephews: Carver Dorsette,
Barry, Sherman, Huel, Kendal and Drexel Nairn; Sister-in-law:
Margaret Woodside; Brother-in-law: Neville Woodside Sr.;
Grand nieces: Sandra Burrell, Karen Rolle, Deandra McDonald,
Krista Dean, Shakira Murphy, Melissa and Raquel Lightbourne,
Kendeisha and Keneisha Brown, Kenisha, Verinique and
Shenique Nairn; Grand nephews: Athama Bowe, Richard
Lightbourne, Matthew, Kendal and Patrick Nairn, Gregory,
Jamaal and Javon Clarke and Travis Williams; Other relatives:
the staff of WEMCO Secutirty and Her Majesty’s Prison, Dudley
McDonald, Edward Rolle, Anton Dean, Derrick Lightbourne,
Elder and Pastor Anthony and Sharon Nairn, Karen, Tanya,
Nina, Van, Neville, The Honorable Baron Woodside, Andrew
Davis and the entire community of Pinewood Gardens.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL
OF MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME,
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Friday from 10:30-6:30 p.m.
and at the church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m to service time.





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

Trurtiss dHemortal dortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 ¢ 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

oN

MOTHER AGNES
LOUISE GLASS, 85

of Third Street, Coconut Grove will
be held on Saturday at 11:00 A.M.
at Mt. Tabor Full Gospel Church,
Willow Tree Avenue and Mt. Tabor
Drive, Pinewood Gardens.
Officiating will be Bishop Dr. Lindo
Wallace and Bishop Neil Ellis.
Interment in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her husband of 66 years Leroy
Alfred Glass Sr., Six Sons Alfred (who predeceased her) Joseph,
Donald Sr., Leroy II, Wilfred and David Glass; Three Daughters
Sheila Glass-Frazier (who pre deceased her), Althea and Violet
Glass; One Step-daughter Virginia Bowe; Six Daughters-in-
law: Sybil, Emily, Daisy, Crecola, Gizelle and Mary Glass; Four
Brothers: Rev. Dr. Samuel, Daniel, Alfred and Amos Saunders;
Eight Sisters: Gloria Dorsett, Olga Higgs, Naomi Major,
Shirleymae Brown, Sylvia Charlton, Jenny Charlton, Brenda
Saunders and Mary-Ann Wilson; Five Brothers-in-law: Arthur
Dorsett, Sidney Major, Edward Brown, Levi Charlton and Anthony
Wilson; Two Sisters-in-law: Roslyn and Sarah Saunders. Twenty-
two Grandchildren: Darin, Brady Sr., Joseph Jr. (predeceased),
Tiffany, Dr. Donald Jr., Denver, LeeVant, Shannell (predeceased),
LaVaren, Carvyann, Cherylann, William, Geleesa, Yolanda, Jonel
and Joel Glass; Karen Johnson, Portia Johnson, Kathryn Gibson,
Ashva Kemp, Sharmane Miller and Lanet Rolle. Seven
Grandchildren-in-law: Elizabeth, Gabriel Johnson Sr., Ersley
Johnson II, Byron Miller, Wayde Rolle, Ramon Gibson and
Amanda Glass. Sixteen Great-grandchildren: Lakera, Brady Jr.,
Keeshad and Channell Glass, Shaneeseeanne Burrows, Ashley
Kemp, Jada and Michael Miller, Ersley III, Peyton and Eilyah
Johnson, Khaire, Khairon and Gabriel Johnson Jr., Shayla Rolle,
and Retyah Gibson. Special Friends including; Bishop Dr. Lindo
Wallace & Family, Mother Cynthia Pratt and Family; The Rose
Family, The Campbell Family, Brother Hubert Bowe & Family,
Lydia McKenzie & Family, Leonard Dames & Family, Elias Rolle
& Family, Brother Daniel Penn & Family, John Rolle & Family,
Willie Rolle & Family of Exuma, The Church of God Temple
Family; The Grant’s Town Seventh Day Adventist Family, The
3'¢ Street Coconut Grove Community and The Bahamas Taxi Cab

Union,. Special Thanks to Community Nurse Barnett; Charmaine
Williams, the staff of Accident & Emergency, the Staff of Female
Medical Wards 1 & 2 at the Princess Margaret Hospital and Dr.
Ilsa Taylor Grant and her team. A host of nieces and nephews
and other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson
Road and Fifth Street on Friday from 10:00 A.M. until 6:00 P.M.
and at the church on Saturday from 10:00 A.M. until service time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MOTHER MAUD
FERGUSON
CLARKE, 78

of Montell Heights and formerly of
Bottle Creek, Turks Island, will be
held on Saturday, March 7th at
11:00 a.m. at Pentecostal Church
of Faith in God, Bell Road, Montell
Heights. Officiating will be Pastor
Dean M. Wells, Jr., assisted by
Pastor Sam McIntosh and Apostle
Raymond Wells. Interment will
follow in Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish her memories are one daughter, Clarissa Neymour;
grandchildren, Sherman and Sharmene Smith, Lefred and Carla
Gaitor; 6 great grandchildren, Sherzel, Sherman, Jr., Stephon and
Solomon Smith, Clarissa and Celia Gaitor; one brother, Lambert
Ferguson; adopted children, Olive Kela Beckford, Maud, Auvell,
Gulema, Sharmaine, Jania, Macara, Khalia, Kevinguid, Kerinigue,
Austino, Sharon, Margaret Gardiner, Ethel Williams; one son-in-law,
John Neymour; one sister-in-law, Julia Ferguson; nieces, Maud Smith,
Diana & Amanda Ferguson, Patricia Williams, Evelyn Ellis, Mary
Wells, Annamae Missick, Hazel Bullard, Carolene, Sis & Lydia
Ferguson; nephews, Louis, Houston, Tyrone, Emmanuel, Rynell, Ken,
Wellington and Jonathon Ferguson, Eddie Taylor, Jacob and Steven
Campbell; grand nieces: Donna, Mary, Martha, Ruth, Brit, Raquel,
Tiffany, Patrice, Rose, Terry, Christine, Maria, Crystal, Kera, Beauthnie,
Sophia, Shandech; grand nephews: Pastor Dean M. Wells, Jr., Apostle
Raymond Wells, Rev. D'Angelo Missick, Howard, Steven, Edward,
Sammy, Joey, Kendo, Tristan, Christopher Gibson, Deneko, Bryant;
cousins including: Mila, Consuela, James, Timothy and Harold Gray,
Mable Leandra, Elva Ferguson, Alma Roberts, Pastor Sam McIntosh,
Rosalie Williams, Rosental Hanna, Patronella Barr, Bloneva Brown;
other relatives and friends including: Lane Stubbs & family, Ethel
Cleare & family, Marie Sumner & family, Veronica Moultrie & family,
the McQueen family, the Gray family, Teazel Bowe & family, Lucy
Weech & family, Beryl Henfield & family, Tryrone Strachan, Sony
Morley & family, Stephanie McKenzie & family, Corine Davis &
family, Bishop Edward & Mother Rosalyn Missick, Pastor Quebell
Martin & family, the Gardiner family, Henfield family, the Holbert
family, Franklin & Rose Johnson, Leslie Bowe & family, Mary
Rahming & family, Marietta Smith & family, the Ferguson family,
Godfrey Beckford, International Revival Fellowship Church family,
The Montell Heights Community, several god-children, and many
others too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers Chapel, #10
Palmetto Avenue and Acklins Street off Market and East Streets on
Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 15

Shreeling’s Dolontal
dHorhaary And Drematortin

84 Blue Hill Road ¢ P.O. Box N-8161 ¢ Tel: 325-7867
e Fax: 325-7867

: Colonial Mortuary and Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd.
: from 10:00am on Friday until 6:00pm and on Saturday
‘ from 8:30 am at the Church until service time.

MS. LINDA
ANISKA

ROLLE, 26

a resident of King Street, will be ;
held at Apostle of the End Time :
Church, Ferguson and West ;
Street on Saturday, 7th March, :
2009, at 10:00 a.m. Officiating :
will be Rev. Carlos Wallace. Interment will follow in the

Western Cemetery, Nassau Street.

Left to cherish her memories is her: Daughter: Shavanlay :
White; Mother: Erzulia Pierre; Father: Brian Rolle; Two :!

Brothers: Henry Rolle and Laven Stuart; Two Sisters:

Aunts: Jackie and Joyclen Pierre and Debroah Johnson;
Miami, Julien and Lucien Pierre of Haiti, Kenneth, Reuben,
Tyrone Rolle; Cousins: Gina and Bridgette Pierre of Haiti,
Miami, Maxwell, Terry and Gilda Pierre, Tah'Zyiion Gray,
Nathalie, Brenda and Susie Pierre of Miami, Raymund St.
Georges, Sylvia Thompson, Justina and Shelamea Adderly,
Bridgette, Porcia, Theresa Williams and Mark Johnson;
Pierre, Michael, Joanne and Charles Stuart, Dudley, Laam,
Andrea Jenoune, Annette, Brittney, Dominique, Lekiesha,

The King Street Family, Sam Smith Lane, Martin Street,
Hospital Lane and Tashanna Rolle and families.

MS. CHARITY
MARY BURNSIDE,
a7

a resident of Bernard Road, will
be held at St. Anselm's Catholic
Church, Bernard Road on
Saturday, 7th March, 2009 at 2:00
p.m. Officiating will be
Monsignor Preston Moss.

‘ Interment will follow in the Church's Cemetery.
Lavette and Lashan Stuart; Grandmother: Erzulie Pierre; :
Two Nieces: Shyniyah Miller and Tasarah Haley; Three :
: Amette Burrows, Derry Ferguson and Dellarese McPhee;
Fourteen Uncles: Gilbert, Harold and Claude Pierre of }
: and Alonzo McPhee; Two Adopted Daughters: Melissa
Elridge, Roscoe, Thadeus, Eric, Matthew, Alexander and :
: Brian, Aderia, Darrian, Antiniqua, Alexia and Razado;
Dr. Mark and Eugene Pierre of Colombia, Luke Pierre of ;
Boston, Lenousha, Kelie, Zukner and Ronald Pierre of }

Left to cherish her memories is her: Three Daughters:
Three Sons-in-Law: Bernard Burrows, Cavalle Ferguson
Burnside and Angelique Watson; Six Grand-Children:

Very Special Friend: David Rolle; Sister: Elizabeth Rolle;
Two Brothers: Cody and Isaacs Burnside; Uncle: Errol

‘ Johnson; Aunt: Miriam Symonette; Nieces and Nephews:
: Larry, Chuck, Venera, Franchot, Shadwell, Vanessa,
‘ Annishka, Firstina, Geronimo, Hosanna, Rosetta, Leroy,
‘ Adam, Leslienn, Jonathan, Gregory, Patrick, Shadrack,
and a host of other relatives and friends including: Seymore !
: Darling, Belinda and Jamie; Sister-in-Law: Pandora
Yolende, Kelly, Mekki, Cecilia, Thelma, Mary Owens, }
Tenisha Grant, Gloria, Nicole, Wentzy, Pamela Ferguson, !
: The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints Sweeting's
‘ Colonial Mortuary and Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd.
: from 10:00am on Friday until6.00pm and on Saturday
: from 9:30 am and at the Church from 1:00pm until service
The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints Sweeting's !

Benson, Euturpie, Ashley, WPC#2034 Paulette Douglas

Burnside; and a host of other relatives and friends.

time.





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

—

'
pees et oc ee !

=GateWaut fa

emoriat Fiuners i

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Chagel

Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.

President/Managing Director

Pel, [buss (feb) pa ag af pa |
Ash jdt Gully eed pat pel poe jepsy
Po, tepity i Petal ey

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nt yu He al

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~THIGherISerpleclisitne Real MlEncel lence |

DEATH NOTICE / atta TNE SERVICE

DEATH NOTICE

Date of Birth: June 17, 1930
of Death: March 3rd, 2009

Mrs. Bessiemae Violet Greene nee
Strachan, 69 formerly of Mangrove
Cay, Andros, Bahamas and,
subsequently, a resident at #6 Pyfrom
Bend, Marathon Estates, Nassau, N.
| P., Bahamas died at the Princess
Margaret Hospital on March 3rd,

2009.
She is survived by Twelve Children:
Reverend Tyrone M. Greene, Joann Rolle, Stephanie Greene,
Elvamae Johnson, Elvis Greene, Jack Greene (Chicago,
Illinois), Jerome Greene (New York), Theola Edgecombe,
Sharon Evans, Ivan Greene, Miguel and Michelle Greene;
one aunt, [val Bain; Twenty-two Grand children: Othello,
Lashan, Lakera, Latoya, Tiffany, Quinton, Kristin, Bridgette,
Neville, Ryan, Lesceia, Marcus, Oneal, Brian, Julian, Shauntray,
Joshua, Garreth, Elvistina, Ivanique, Ashanti, Starasia, and
Ivan, Jr.; Eleven Great-Grand children: Oprah, Anphernique,
Mercedes, Danero, Arvin, Jr., Quintonique, Opal, Brittany,
Demaro, Paris, and Odessa; Two Sons-in Law: Gary
Edgecombe and Troy Evans; Three Daughters-in-Law: Linda
Greene (Chicago, Illinois), Dianne Greene (New York), and
Karen Greene; Three Brothers: Carlington, Sylvanus, and
Harold Strachan; Four Sisters: Leola Bullard, Francess Butler,
and Margaret Clyde and Keta Bannister; Brothers-in-Law:
Alexander Bullard, Edison Butler, Keith Clyde, Reliston
Greene, Otis Rolle, George Johnson, and Samuel Wright;
Sisters-in-Law: Maegrethel Strachan, Jacqueline Strachan,
Gerelean Rolle, Jestina Johnson, Heterlyn Wright, Maria
Bowleg, Angela Neymour, and Beverly Greene, Thirty-three
nephews, Thirty-two nieces, special friends: Reverend Harry
Davis, Vernal & Mavis Strachan and Anetta Rolle and numerous
other relatives and friends including nurse Denise Bowleg
Mangrove Clinic, Nelson and Godfrey Rolle, Dr. Magnus, Dr.

Bullard, Dr. Rhema and the staff of A & E Trauma facilities -

| at the Princess Margaret Hospital.
Mrs. Bessiemae Violet Greene nee Strachan, 69 |

Services entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel
Mount Royal Ave and Kenwood Street.

John Livingstone Hanna, 64

a resident of Moore Avenue will be
held on Saturday March 7th 2009,
10am at Church of God of
Prophecy, East Street Tabernacle.
Officiating will be Bishop Franklyn
Ferguson assisted by other ministers
of the gospel and interment will
follow in the Old Trail Cemetery
Abundant Life Road .

He is survived by a host of many

family and friends including,
cousins, Samuel Hanna, Albertha Kemp, Mazel Deveaux,
Irene Murphy of Nassau, Elmina Forbes, Daniel, Reverend
Ruben, Dr. Amos & Cox of Miami, Florida, Bishop Leviticus
H Cox of Texas, Elder James L Cox of Plant Cay, Fla., Ralph
Hanna of Orlando, Fla., Thomas, Sammy and Eaterlene
Edwards of Miami, Fla., and friends including Velma Humes,
Samuel Humes Jr., Netisha Rahming, Sanicka and Alvaree
Humes, Howard Kemp, Rev Donald and Paula Carey, Rev.
Tyrone and Dolly Knowles, Rev Jackson and Eunice, Patterson
and Patricia James, Elphraim and Silvia Jones, Charmane
Hanna and Paul Dyer, Lisa Monica Velthy, Sharmaine, Dwayne
and Jenald Deveaux, Berdimae, Melva and Mildred Cox of
Miami, Fla., Alins and Virginia Hanna, Hayward and Veota
Cox, Albert and Deaconess Ivadell Carey, Ineaz, Clarina,
Bishop Kirk Murphy, Gertrude, Derek, Derek and Marve
Murphy, Barrington Murphy, Lamuel Moss, Inell Williams,
Felton Cox, Bishop Franklin Ferguson and the Church of God
of Prophecy family and a host of other relatives and friends.

Services entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel
Mount Royal Ave and Kenwood Street.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 17

Aemeritte’s SJ uneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

KERRY
ROBINSON-
MUNNINGS, 38

Gardens, JFK Drive.

Beautiful and cherished memories will forever be embedded }
in the hearts of his family and friends especially his Mother: |
Drucilla Munnings; Father: George Robinson; Adopted }
Mother: Linda Demeritte; Stepmother: Cassandra Robinson; |
1 Son: Jason; Brothers: Kevin "K-Man", Stephen, Deon and }
George Robinson Jr.; Adopted Brother: Tereko Williams; |
Sisters: Sandra Evans, Sophia, Samantha, Italia and Bridgette
Robinson, Sabrina Wilchombe, Shantel Pitcher, Roquelle :
Pyfrom and Sharona Johnson; aunts: Cynthia Hanna, Elizabeth |
Munnings of Carol City, Florida, Audrey Davis & Patricia |
: Left to cherish his memories are, Father, Phillip Sturrup;
: sisters, Carolyn Taylor, Donna Smith-Wallace, Brendalee
: Williams-Sturrup, Phillipa and Portia Sturrup; brother, Bernard
: Taylor; aunts, Beatrice & Phyllis Taylor, Savaleta Minnis;
: uncles, Edward Adderley, Thaddeus Minnis, Samuel Taylor,
: James Miller; nieces: Jasmine Lewis, Yolanda Goodman,
: Caryn Francois, Shonte Sturrup; nephews: Jamaal Lewis,
: Antonio Francois, Karl Wallace Jr.; brother-in-Law: Karl
: Wallace; numerous other relatives and friends including
: Andrew Hillhouse, Henrietta and Valderez Miller, Diane,
: Leonard, Linda, Janet Taylor, Monique Simmons, Marguerite
: and Tamica Taylor, Carlton Seymour, Roberto Goodman,
: Rudolph Lewis, Andrew Campbell, Mable Adderley, Rosalie
: Neymour and family, Hetty Goodman and family, Lillian
Johnson and family, Louise Ritchie and family, Donald Rolle
: and family, William and Alexander Goodman, Mary Clarke
: and family, Millie, Margo, Donald Bain, the staff of Sandilands
: Rehabilitation Centre, the Young Street, Windsor Lane and
: Deveaux Street family.

the Agape Full Gospel Baptist Church, doctors and nurses at ;

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
: Saturday at the church from 8:45 a.m. until service time.

Robinson; 1 Uncle: Carlton Robinson; Nephews: Travis, Sean,
Kenzitte, Aidan, Brandon, Nathan, Deondre, Davonye,
Matthew; Nieces: Shacara, Kaylisa, Deonya, Shaynadia,
Shauna, Angel, Rachel and Taleigha; brothers-in-law: Kenrad
Wilchombe, John Pitcher, Richard Pyfrom and Tomicko
Johnson; Uncle-in-law: Jack Davis; Godchildren: Raya,
Samara, Nikki, Adrianna, Gavanne, Jamico; numerous cousins,
relatives and friends including: Frank Rolle, Mr. Tracy Johnson
and family of Raleigh, North Carolina, Beverly Robinson,
Drucilla Rodriquez, Cassandra Adderley, Michelle Knowles,
Maria Lewis, Carolyn Williams and family, Adrian Rolle,
Jason McBride, Tavaris Fowler, Ronald Holder, Dwayne
Sturrup, Marcellus, Rhonda Nixon, Melinda, Don, Erin Munez,
Maria Gibson and family, Georgina Robinson, Dwayne Lamm,
Cecil Mackey, Agatha Williams and family, Rosenell Dean,
Adrian Walkes and family, Big Mike and family, Mice, Ding,
Cuba, Vaughn, Yardy, Jah, Duane Miller, Jeffrey Strachan,
Anastacia Dorsett and family, Troy Levarity, Eddie, Dr.
Herbert Orlander and Marva, Overseer Helen McPhee and

Male Chest Ward - PMH, Mary Capron and family, Staff at
SuperClub Breezes especially the kitchen staff, Staff at
Radisson Crystal Palace, Farm Road Community, Staff of

i New Oriental Laundry & Cleaners, Cabinet World Softball
: Team, Transfiguration Baptist Church family, Michael
: Cartwright and family, Paul Barnett and family, Anthony
: Strachan and family, the Music Makers and One Family
: Junkanoo Groups.

a resident of Lundlow Street, will Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte’s Funeral

be held at Agape Full Gospel |
Baptist Church, Golden Palm :
Estates off Kennedy Subdivision, |
on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. }
Officiating will be Overseer }
Helen McPhee. Interment }
follows in Lakeview Memorial |

Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

RON
ANTONIO
STURRUP, 36

a resident of Windsor Lane, will
be held at St. Cecelia's Catholic
Church, 3rd & 4th Streets,
Coconut Grove, on Saturday at
9:45 a.m. Officiating will be Fr.
Simeon Roberts. Cremation
follows.





PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Armeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

ARCHER, 85

Drive.

She is survived by her devoted husband of sixty-seven years, Bertram
Sr; six daughters: Jane Brown, Barbara Newbold, Debra Gibson, }
Laverne Rolle, Patricia Archer and Martha McFall; five sons: Bertram
Jr., Herbert, Mark, Franklyn and Sherwin Archer; seven daughters- ;
in-law: Lenora, Sylvia, Cynthia, Evamae, Janice, Mary and Annamae }
Archer; four sons-in-law: Quentin Brown, Kirklyn Newbold, Brian
Rolle and Nelson McFall; one sister: Reverend Merle Forbes; one
brother: Herbert McPhee; one brotherin-law: Noel Brown; forty- }
six grandchildren: Linda Sands, Cheryl Rollins, Quentin Jr., Jeffery,
Marcus, & Sgt. 87 Lex Brown, Bert, Giovanni & Brett Archer, ;
Clevette Gibson, Kamron, Kaivonne, Krishina, Shermaine & Keilya
Newbold, Adrian, Keno, Turkessa, Tavares, Shanera, Shakirio,

Shavargo, Shavonne, Shawn, Patrick, Mark, Jamal, Omar, Lateisha,

Williams, Nyoka & Shavonne Major, William and Enero Davis;
fifty one great-grand and numerous great-great grandchildren; twelve
nieces: Barbara Baillou, Ruthlee Pratt, Marva Black, Nellie Dean,
Olga Dawkins, Brenda Hall, Tiny Bowe, Betty Cox, Patrice Gardiner,
Beryl Basden, Joanna Bethel, Antoinette Ferguson; nine nephews:

Brown Jr., Leon & Kenny Edgecombe; twelve godchildren: Maureen,
Shavonne, Pastor Andrew, Charles, Eric, Nadine, Rhonda, Jackie,
Keith, Shanelle, Philip & Tyrone Brown; five adopted children:
Sandra Burrows, Karen Knowles, J'ann Davis, Renae Jones, Angela
Rolle; cousins: Euterpie Newbold; Dorith Grant, Eleanor Linden;
numerous other relatives and friends including: Doreen Brown, Bob
Saunders, Blossie Meadows, Winifred Forbes, Van Hutchinson, Bert
Williams, The Gilcud family, Gittens family, Burrows family, Higgs
family, Marilyn Johnson and family, Winifred Bain and family,
Daniel's family, Dawkins family, Stuart's family, Green family,
Nesbitt family, Boziene Town family, Helena Butler and family,
Rosetta Brennen, Dorothy Barr and family, Deacon AJ. & Gloria
Dorsette and family, Cornette Martin and family, Lycetta Adderley

family, Audrey Bastian and family, Josephine Burrows and family,
Lilly Fox and family, Georgiemae and Georgina Dean, Pearl
Butterfield, Leon and Annamae Taylor and family; special thanks

: to: Rev. Godfrey & Althea Hepburn and The Livelystone Church
MARTHA McPHEE ? and Highway Church of God, Bishop Clifford Rahming, Bishop
? Oswald Rolle, Bishop Sherwin & Dorothy Smith and The Good
: Shepherd Church of God Family, Church of God of Prophecy Wulff
a resident of Archers Close, Bozene }
Town, will be held at Livelystone | Seventh Day Adventist Church, Atlantis Housekeeping dept. &
Church of God, Knowles Drive, }
Tonique Williams-Darling Highway,
on Sunday at 12:00 noon. Officiating }
will be Rev. Andrew Brown, Bishop } Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on Sunday at the
Hubert Pinder & Bishop Godfrey
Hepburn. Interment follows in }
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK

Family, Bishop Hubert & Paulette Pinder, Bishop Robert McPhee

Road, staff of The Public Treasury, staff of Bahamasair, Hillview
Paradise Utilities.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

church from 1la.m. until service time.

FRANKLYN
OSWALD
LEOPOLD
RAHMING, 13

a resident of Cottonwood Street,
Pinewood Gardens, will be held at
Mt. Carey Baptist Church, Fox Hill
Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Enoch
Beckford II, assisted by Rev. Warren
Henderson & Elder Theodore

: Rahming. Interment follows in Mt. Carey's Church Cemetery.
Latara & P.C. 30578 Shayne Archer, Kadisha Saunders, Anishka

Knowles, Vernard, Trevor, Rashad & P.C. 414 Landrail Gibson, : Left to cherish his memories are his parents: Earnestine and Franklin
Tasia & Teron Rolle, Shakeisha Penn, Shaneka Davis, Tiffany | "Pancho" Rahming; Grandparents: Hesterlina and Prince Miller;
? Sisters: Dara and Japera Rahming; Nephew: Jalen Geason; Aunts
: and Uncles: Florence Kemp (Danny), Dudley McDonald (Margaret),
: Pamela Cox, Solomon Cox, Evangeline McDonald (Donald), Ernest
i Miller (Michelle), Lillian Moss, Audrey McKinney (Harry), Erma
on, : Mackey (Raymond), Jacqueline Armbrister (Arlington), Stephanie
Jacob & Phillip McPhee, Randolph Ferguson, Leon Forbes, Noel : Rahming, Tracey Rahming, Daniel Rahming, Sally Ferguson, Virginia
? Rahming; Godparents: Veronica Ward, Dianne Bannister, Brenda
i? Bostwick, Bill Wallace, Brenzil Rolle, Donald Cash; Cousins:
Doneva and Donathan McDonald, Ernelle and Ernest Miller, Maxiann
: Woodside (Barry), Daniel Kemp, Tanya Stubbs (Stephen), Freddy
? and Samuel Bain, Darrell, Juan, Kevin and Richelle Moss, Toni
: Cash (family), Tamu and Koji McKinney, Twana Lockhart, Khalil
: and Trequain Rahming, Tamika and Janiqua Armbrister, Anastasia
? Farrington (family), Safiya Major (family), Tresor Rahming, Terron
? Musgrove; The Miller Family, The Rahming and Cox Families, The
? Jordan Prince William School Family, Wesley Methodist Church
: Family, The Mt. Carey Baptist Church Band and Congregation,
: Domino Pizza and the Judicial Staff, Sports Department, Ministry
i: of Youth, Sports and Culture and many, many more.
and family, Marie Cleare and family, Gwendolyn Rowe-Bain and }

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
i Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the
? church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 19

Aemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ERNEST
JEREMIAH
SMITH, 82

at First Baptist Church,

Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

and Oswald Ferguson, Althea Rolle, Margaret Taylor,
Inspector Sidney, Reynard, John, Marlon and Corporal

Hilton Rolle, Baron and Norman Smith, Herman, Gretchen
' Bowe, Dion, Denise and Bertram Bethel Jr., Mildred
| Hendfield, Jackie, Blanche, and Donna Sears, Ian and
: Carlos Ferguson, Maxine Knowles, Arthur Ferguson,
: Latoya Rolle. Stacy Dames, Sherell Higgins, Raquel
Forbes, Orduna Hepburn, Const Lashawn Burrows, Jason

: Minnis, Luann Chea, Omar , Alex and O'Neil McKenzie,
a resident of Harry Cay, |

Little Exuma will be held Rolle, Mannix and Tiffany Barton, Sheree Minnis, Brian

Market Street, on Saturday Anderson, Therese Gardiner, Iris Paul, Const: 2972 Keisha
at 11:00 a — Officiatin Johnson, Winifred Newbold, Dr. Venard McPhee, Nurse
dic he Ree. De E ic : Gen Bowe, Sigrid Bain, Dwayne, Adrian, Sherrine, Elspeth
fae . 4 _ Bee Jackson, Stephen Hepburn, Tanya Rolle, Janice Bethel,
Louis Rolle & Associate Ministers Interment ‘ilowe in j Poa oak ey, ey ately Tommy ale Creel
. : Newbold, Kenyon, Karl, Karla, Kenrissa, and Oliva

: McPhee, Ezzerinne and Sandra Rolle; numerous relatives

Left to cherish his memories are his devoted wife of 53 pe eee ae jeekson ee
ears: Ellen Smith; adopted children: Ruth and Chnsto her Recheh Feeusou BOs ely ReOe my ney MGENEe)
Bullard: adopted pndcularee: Renaldo Swan and path pooner ere a a eae aa ee
ee ae oe oe eel Mai 4 Sithwand Remilds McPhee, Minister Catherine Saunders, Rev. Louis Rolle,
ee ; : Rev Harold Bodie, Mr. Anthony Moss Member of
Cooper; sisters-in-law: Hazel Smith, Bernice, Satara and }

Abe Bullard: ants: Ee Sawyer Rosai Dil and Rosatind Morey and family Theresa Blak an fai
and nephews Including: Kendal and Ethel McPhee, Retired {Dona ena rel Care Gomes pains Eeroy
Nursing Officer Gloria Gardner, Advilda Dames ‘Yvonne les SN ee a ay Mt one nae
Bethel, Shelia and Oralee McPhee Nurse Willamae _ and Molly Sapp, Emerson Smith, Shelia McKenzie, Rupert
Lotmore Marionette Strachan Naomi Sumner, Arnold : Sumner, Ikena Poitier, Cleveland, Basil and Arnold

dR on A aetan, Ragen Ma tha. Gla aca ‘amir Ferguson, Thomas, Rudy and Cleo Glass of Miami Florida,
fete ae a : ° ’ + Emma Brennen and family, Mary Knowles & Family,

: Helen and Warren Rolle and family, Joan Sawyer, Veronica

: Marshall Alexander Taylor and family, Clifford & Jr
Emest Mephos dor, Buri and Florida Rolle 147% | Sqachan an fal, God Son Creel Moly, Rey and
Henfj 1 dc oe Decherd Rake nae Minis ee Burnell : Mrs. Earl Francis, the entire Smith and Bullard Family,
Bullard a Mason Sane Ernestine Flowers, Hope ee
J ohnson. Sheila Roberts Charles Johnson, Michael Alfred 2 ee ey
Kirkwood Evnell Patrick and Patricia McKenzie J annette pps Canc tan y, ee a aeaea ees zig oo
and Theresa J phaser: Sandra Gibson Donna Hanna, Paula Government Clinic, George Town and Or bes Hill, Exuma,
Rolle, Elsie Winder, Patrick Smith, Kendal Reckley, especially Nurse Beth Coakley and Diane Cooper, E he
Sandra Ferguson, Johnathan Miller, Nelda Armbrister, ents REMY) Maly Say auc. Boros: atlamly,

Evie Wallace, Etta Johnson,Judith Strachan, Wellington : .. Hig
Gibson, Daniel Knowles, Berthamae and Barbara Marshall, | Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral

Synaida and Happy Brice; numerous Grandnieces and } re
Nephews including: Trudymae and Nicholas Smith, Anya | Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Tinker, Petra Rolle, Eula Morley, Drameco McKinney, :

Charlisa and Tina Nairn, Nestor Taylor, Kenny and Lerman

Parliament Exuma, Allan & Retta Dames and family,

Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on





PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Demeritte’s SH uneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

MORRIS
NATHANAEL
RUDOLPH
HEPBURN, 60

Archer.
Governor's Harbour Public Cemetery.

Left to cherish his fond memories his wife: Christine Hepburn;
daughters: La'kecia Rolle, Kristen Hepburn, Phyllis, Indira and Ishka; }
sons: Mauricio Hepburn, Michael Sr., Craig Sr. and Khlaas; i |
grandchildren: Devisha and David Brice, Khadesha, Michael, Alexander, }
Jaynne, Kentay, Addoniz, Selina, Syesha, Craig Mitchell, Alliyah }
Meadows and Khadesha Gibson; step-father: Jehu Sands; sisters: Judy :
Sands-Simmons and Sharon Sands-Johnson; sisters-in-law: Vashti :
Mitchell, Winifred Carter of Connecticut, Pearl Gayle of Boca Raton, :
FI. and Terricita Jones of Freeport; brothers-in-law: Paul Simmons }
Sr., Arthur Johnson and Richard Mitchell; aunts: Kathleen McKennie }

of Waukegan, Illinois, Prudence Knowles of Rock Sound, Eleuthera, Frances Farrington is survived by: husband Hillary Farrington; Sister-
: in-law, Viola Rolle; 9 children: Shirley Mae McKinney, Mrs. Shelia

Helen, Handora and Jeanette Ferguson and Rowena Rolle of Exuma; } Demeritte, Mrs. Diana Gilbert, Andrea, Henry, JoAnna, David, James

uncles: David Hepburn, Addington Culmer, Charles and Eardley { anq Eleanor Farrington of Miami Florida; 20 Grandchildren: Mrs.

Hepburn, Eric Cutis, Raymond Rolle of Gregory Town and Alex } Thelma Taylor, Min. Sherese Ferguson, Mrs. Malinda Gentle Smith,

McKennie of Waukegan, Illinois; granduncles: James Stubbs, Wesley : Sherrine and Kelsey Fisher, DeAngelo Johnson, Mrs. Michelle Collie,
i Valentino and Sharell Lewis, PC 447 Ricardo and Wendia Ferguson,

Sands, Daria and Daniar Johnson, Laurice Harrison, Mabel Darling | Tanya, Gary, Nicole, MaeAnn and Carlos Demeritte, Ciera Gilbert,

and Andrea Newbold of Freeport, Audrey and Joann Beneby, Elizabeth Pavid Jr, Farrington, Marvin Storr, Ashley Dean and Valentino

Penn, Donalee Ferguson of Opa Locka, FI., Patrice and Terricita McKinney of Atlanta, Georgia; 14 Great grand: Charles Jr., AI, and
i Chloe Collie, Bradley Wright, Afuah Johnson, Shekinah, Elkanak,

Keshona Sands; Nephews: Paul Jr., Pachino Simmons, Darron Sands, Elshadae, Shamaalye, Tia Strachan-Smith, Tykeio Taylor, Telsy Jr.,

Dario and Dino Johnson and Terrance Sands, Laurent Harrison, Angelo } x @zia and Shevrondecia; 3 Great Great Grand: Shakorey, Shacassio,

Brennen Jr., George Bonaby, Glen and Jeffery Beneby, John and James | ya7amanique; other relatives and friends: Maizer Kemp, Evangelist

Marshall; grandnephew: Robin Rankine; cousins: Melvina and Preston } Rudell Brisset, Shirley Strachan of the Cove, Cat Island, Etoy McKenzie,

Albury, Eleanor, Paula, Sandra, Linda, Eloise, Elizabeth, Deborah, : Eloise Ferguson, Stephanie Marshall, Alberta Smith, Louana Hepburn,

Lewis Jr., Sara, Benjamin, Kermit, Jackie, Naomi, Inez, Hilliard, Ruth, : Rosie and Claretta Mackey, Silvia and Nathalie Ramsey, Geniece

Louise, Carol, Christopher Sr., and Craig Lewis, Vernice, Devon, } Rolle, Deveese and Demeek Moncur, Hilbert Brooks, Silbert and

Delano, and Delmar Hepburn, Catherine Knowles-Stubbs, Cavin, Agarett Evans, Moses Deveaux, Norman Smith, Samuel and Carl

Carl, Corey and Crystal Knowles, Conrad Hepburn, Lashayne Johnson, : Mackey, Pastor Ellington Ferguson, Charles Collie and Stephen Gilbert.

and Keegan Culmer. A host of other relatives and friends including: } prince Hepbum, Mabel Newton, Jennis Woods, Nurse Linda Outten,
? Barbara Reckley, WPS 1641 Susan Smith, Brenda, Adriana and Stella

James Cistern, Eleuthera, Eric Johnson and family, Dewitt Fernander } Kelly, Ruth, Cieomi, Loretta, Bursel and Jerome Woods, Anthony

and family, Melvina Albury and family, Diane Gray-Ferguson and i Jones and Father Berkley Smith. Friends: Cynthia, Bertha, and Eva.

family, Patricia Thurston and family, Ann Wallace and family, Minister |
Leverne Rolle, Rev. Dr. Charles Rolle and Mt. Nebo Union Baptist } priends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

Church Family, Father Jonathan Archer of St Patrick's Anglican Church, ! Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the

Governor's Harbour, Minister Lanora Davis and family, Exanna : shnneh ton 100 a.4n: antl service Tine,

Dormeus and family, Arnett Dorsett and the staff of National Literacy ;

Andrea Hanna and Rose Nairn; grandaunts: Susan Clarke, Merlene,

and Perry Ferguson; nieces: Shekera Sands, Pryia Simmons, Ladarsia

Mitchell; grandnieces: Danae Rankine, Darrinique, Darronise and

Queenie Gibson and family, the offspring of the late Labon Rolle of

i services, Pastor Joseph Cox and El-Shaddai Ministries International,
: The Bahamas Red Cross Society, Dr Delton Farquarson, Doctors and
i Nurses of Male Surgical Wards I & II, the Medical staff of Male
i Medical II of the Princess Margaret Hospital, the Fowler Street
i Community, the Governor's Harbour Community, the James Cistern
i Community and Demeritte's Funeral Home.

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

sig Gna ales See Gene Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Thursday & on Friday at the
formerly of Governor's Harbour : church in Eleuthera from 6:00 p.m. until service time on Saturday.
Eleuthera, will be held at St. Patrick's }
Anglican Parish, Governor's Harbour, }
Eleuthera on Saturday at II :00 a.m. }
Officiating will be Fr. Jonathan }

Interment follows in :

FRANCES
ROBERTS
FARRINGTON, 81

a resident of #15 Kiki Street &
formerly of Cove, Cat Island, will be
held at Our Lady of the Holy Souls
Catholic Church, on Saturday at 12:00
noon. Officiating will be Fr. Michael
Kelly, ss.cc., assisted by Rev. Deacon
Peter Rahming & Rev. Deacon
Maxwell Johnson. Interment follows
in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 21

‘© ) Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

WINSTON
ALEXANDER
MONCUR, 91

OF WULFF AND VILLAGE

ROAD WILL BE HELD ON

SATURDAY, MARCH 7TH,

9:00 A.M. AT ST. GEORGE'S §

ANGUCAN CHURCH,

MONTROSE AVENUE. FR. G.

KINGSLEY KNOWLES,

ASSISTED BY FRE.

KIRKLAND RUSSELL AND

REV. DR. ROLAND HAMILTON WILL OFFICIATE.
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOWIN THE EASTERN CEMETERY,
DOWDESWELL STREET.

Catechist Hartman Moncur; one step brother, Jonathan Johnson;

Pratt, Vander, & Pandora Johnson; 2 sisters-in-law, Leen & Laura

Willisy, & Montgomery Brown, Tyrone Strachan, William Bullard,
Roman Nicolls, & Baldwin Johnson Sr.; nieces, Mavis, Deanna,
Eloise, Judy, Hattie, Zona, Laura, & Florence Moncur, Nurse
Rose, Patsy, & Cyprianna Strachan, Lennor Johnson, Icelyn
Nicolls, Rosemary Archer, Janet & Elmeda Brown, Louise
Beecham, Telma Seymour (of Florida), Louise Sutherland, Pearl
Bullard, & Sheila Gordon; grand nephews, Leroy, Patrick, Jeffery,

Shayne, John, Myron Jr., Deran, Everette Jr., Myles, Miguel, Eric,
Kennedy, Adrian, Halson, Sadaam, Jason, & Jeffery Moncur,
& Larry Major, Richard, Christopher, Andy, Ian, Montgomery, &

& Tyrone Hepburn, Walshaw & Darren; grand nieces, Daryl
Poitier, Tamara Collie, Anya Miller, Rose Leen, Melanie, Laurie,

Dr. Marissa, Chrystal, & Jacquice Moncur, Jewel Moss, Marie &

, Nicole Smith, Romain, Romania, Ramona & Nicolls, Kendra
| Sands, Ceandra & Deandra Stubbs, Prisca Bannister, Tiffany
| Hanna, Racquel Strachan, Sophia McKinney, Kay, Denise, &
| Susan Hepburn, Renae Davies, Pat Albury, Arlett Morley, Tiffany
| Brown, Luekimia, Cookie & Candy Seymour; cousins, Lemuel,
| Maxwell, Devese, Cecil, June, & Mr. & Mrs. Eris Moncur, Lenny
| & Anthony Cumberbatch (of Freeport Grand Bahama), Horatio
/ Bannister, Ophelia Munnings, Maxine Stevens, Sandra Collie,
| Lauretta Minnis, Marina Basden, Madlyne Hanna, Maria, Gershen,
} | & Corrol Strachan, Miriam, Netta, & Althea MacMillian, Deann
| | Fritzgerald, Leila & Prescola King, Princess Roberts, Andrea of
| Florida, Nurse Enid Sawyer, Iris & Doramae Seymour & Hazel
| Brown (of Smith's Bay, Cat Island); other relatives & friends
| incuding, Felix, Patrick, Father Edward, Eloise, Norman Lilly,
| David, Clifford, Melvin, Ozwell, Warren, Earl, Earleen, Hilda,
| Mildred, Elmore, Lemonde, Robert, Wilerforce, Stanley, Garnet,
| Rupbert, Daniel, Mary, Clifton, & Everette Seymour (of Hatchet
_ Bay, Eleuthera), Rev. Dr. Gamet, Osbourne, Paul, Garth, Whitney,
_ Elaine, Joseph, James & Simeon King, Ceasarine Hepburn, Cabrina
| Adderly, Athama & Anthony Bowe, Mr. & Mrs. Wenzel Nicholls,
LEFT TO CHERISH HIS MEMORIES ARE, one brother, | Rosa Belle Bethel, Shirley Gibson, Milcha Sullivan, Nora Newbold,
’ ; : | Cynthia Stubbs, Mr. & Mrs. John Deveaux (of Smith's Bay Cat
5 step sisters, Astrid Adderley, Louise Gomez, Nurse Isabelle _ Island), Pearl Laing, Jelita Poitier, Mary Farrington, Edris Edwards,
| Louse Rolle, Lillian Newbold, Shakita & Isadora Bethel, Andy

Moncur Both of Knowles, Cat Island; nephews, Caleb Hepburn, | Gomez, Alton, John, Gayle, Nelson, Fordes, & Agatha Moncur,

Sidney, Wendel Sr., Caleb, Edward, Philip Sr., Cephas, Myron, | Christian Knowles, Joseph Strachan, Jennifer Lloyd, Esther

Henry, & Everette Moncur (of Coral Springs Florida), Joseph, _ Thompson, Edna & Felix Russell (of Grand Bahama), Emily Bain,
| Vangeline Grant, Eugie Cadet, Atlanta Rolle, Myrton Simms,
| Ellison, Ashton, & Desmond Greenslade, Orick Pratt, E. K. Minnis,
| Pastor Roy Hanna, Pastor Wendall MacMillian, Pastor R. I. Hanna,
| Lucia Rolle, Anthony & Alex Knowles, Roland, Rodney, &
| Veronica Brown, Pernell Edwards, Dr. Joseph Evans, The Staff
| Male Medical II of Princess Magaret Hospital,The Moncur,
= | Seymour, King, Adderley, Bannister (of Tea Bay, Cat Island &
Julian, Wendel Jr., Allen, Edison, Wayne, Philip Jr., Rayal, Navardo, | staniard Creek, Andros), Hepburn, Johnson (of Staniard Creek,
| Andros), Strachan, Turner, Greenslade, Edwards, Pratt, Lightbourne,
| Dorsette, & Deveaux Family, the entire community of Knowles,

Jensel Watkins, Baldwin Johnson Jr., Franklyn, Mustapha, Edward, | gmith's Bay & Tea Bay, Cat Island, The Culmer's Ville, Hawkins

Trevor, Everette & Brent Strachan, Kevin Taylor, Garth, Albert, | yt], & Canaan Lane community of New Providence and other
| friends & family too numerous to mention.

Nolan Brown, Harry Murphy, Craig & Rudolph Nottage, Dawyne |

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECTS AT BETHEL
ao . é | BROTHERS MORTICIANS, #44 NASSAU STREET ON FRIDA
Priscilla, Esther, Latoya, Verlisa, Shameka, Myra, Monet, Miracle, | Y FROM 10:00 A.M. TO 6:00 PM. AND ON SATURDAY AT

| THE CHURCH FROM 8:00 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.





PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

STELLA MAE
SAW YER, nee ROLLE,
52

:
; Cemetery.

Rolle, Sandy Rolle, Charlene Rolle, Sheila Smith and family, family

, Oliver and family, Leslie Curtis; godchildren, Aljamon Francis, Stephana
' Nicholls and Jada Deal, and countless other friends and relatives,
: Angela Neely, Arlene Nicholls, Joann Sands, Jeanette Francis, Dr.
i Jennifer Deveaux, Tyrone Palmer, Percy Miller and family, the children
| of Alfred and Mary Brown, the Thompson's, the Curry, the Palmers,
| the Roberts and Francis families of St. Paul Street Chippingham,

of Victor Road Coral Heights West, will |
be held on Saturday, March 7, at 11 a.m. | |
1 at Golden Gates Ministries, Carmichael] | Ferriston Lockhart, staff of Ernst and Young, Cheryll Newell and

Road, Pastor Ivan D. Rolle will officiate. |

Interment will follow at Lake View | Heart Association, Pastor Ivan and Ruthann Rolle, members of Comfort

| House Ministires, Pastor Cleon and Vonchelle Munroe and members
| of Firm Foundation Ministries, Pastor Graylin and Jannie Moxey and
Stella's life touched so many and she | family, the Mangrove Cay, Andros family, Aquinas College Class of
has left to cherish memories, husband, Timothy Sawyer; daughters; | 1974,
Letisha Paul, and Eugeneal Sawyer; sons, Renaldo and Stefan Sawyer; | . .
step son, Sanjay Sawyer; son-in-law, Sarrazian Eric Paul; grand | In leiu of flowers donations can be made to The Bahamas Downs
daughter; Gabrielle Paul; sisters, Thelma Johnson, Janet Mackey, June | Syndrome Association and Bahamas Heart Association.
Dean; brothers, Eleon Rolle, Nicholas Rolle, Herman Rolle; step | ; ; a
mother-in-law, Patricia Sawyer; sisters-in-law, Karen and Pia Rolle, | Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Zoe Major, Carlis Lightbourne, Lenora Albury, Kim, Rev. Denise, Faye, | Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
Anne and Nancy Sawyer; brothers-in-law, Alvah Johnson, Christopher | at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.
Mackey, Larry, Brian, Oscar, Alvin and Odinga Sawyer; nephews, Rev. |
Julian Johnson, Fabian, Kevin, Omar, Doyle, Patrick, Aaron, Hermis |
and Cameron Rolle, Torell Thompson, Jermaine, Christof and Jervon |
Mackey, Angelo Hield, Wayde Beneby, Eddie and Jevon Major, Alex ;
and Myles Sawyer, Mark King; nieces, Barbara King, Denise Sands, |
Lisa and Valencia Johnson, Theria and Toya Thompson, Shivanthi Hall, ;
Erica Rolle-De Luca, Monique, Aquilla, Talia, Lauren, Kaylee and |
Janea Rolle, Angelique Hield, Crystal Mackey, Tameka Beneby, Allisa |
Morris, Dawn Calixte, Shawnta and Anita Lightbourn, Lauren Albury, |
Brianette and Bianca-Sawyer; aunts, Kathrina King, Doris Moxey, |
Emerald Jones, Lorraine Sawyer, Gladys Taylor, Lola Major, Alma |
Canty, Patricia Rolle, Eloise Johnson; uncles, Moody and Wilton Moxey, |
Hubert King, Henry Sawyer, Percival Higgs; grand nieces, Fabianne, |
Fayonne, Gia, Ashley, Thalia and Olivia Rolle, Tanisha Sands, |
Andrewnique Knowles, Maghan and Marrissa Johnson and Tiamone |
Sweeting, Ayani Bailey, Laila McKenzie; grand nephews, Beres and_ |
Davario Rolle, Ty and Trae Sands, Mark King Jr., Wayden Beneby, | FOLLOW IN THE SOUTHERN CEMETERY, COWPEN ROAD.
Tevon and Ryan Johnson, Tavares Roker, Malik Knowles, Orville | ; ; ‘

Arahna and Marcian Thompson, Relatives Elon and Beryl Moxey, | She is survived by one (1) grand nephew, Samuel Sweeting; grand
Henrietta King, Brenda Mitchell, Arinthia Moxey, Sammy, Archiemore, | niece-in-law, Natasha Sweeting; great-grand mieces and nephews,
Floyd, Clay, Prince and Densa Moxey, Doranell Gibson, Donnalee | Sammella, Samanpha, Danyelle and Nathaniel Sweeting; friends and
Burrows, Prenell Rolle, Jacqueline King, Carolyn Williams, Rochelle | family, Robert and Amy Miller, Arnand and Eric Miller, Valerie McBean,
and Brenard King, Joanne Demeritte, Leonard and Stephanie Longley, |
Geraldine Ferguson, Leonie and Alpheus Jones, Victor Rolle and family, | Vera Chase, Neta Seymour, Merline Stubbs, Allan Stubbs, Kenrick
Roland Rolle and family, Majorie Stuart and family, Lorraine Clarke |
and family, Ambassador Davy Rolle and family, Wendy Craigg and |
family, Dr Christopher Basden, Archbishop Partick C Pinder, Rev. |
Samuel Pinder, Paulette Turnquest, James Pinder, Pat Sawyer, Faye | BROTHERS MORTICIANS, #44 NASSAU STREET ON FRIDAY
i FROM 10:00A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. AND ON SATURDA Y AT THE

of the late Nora and Bosie Miller, Doris Burrows and family, Nicola |

Everette Jackson and family, Inez Paul and family, the Coral Harbour
Community, Danika James, Monadue Steede, Carol Mackey, Dr.

members of the Downs Syndrome Association, members of the Bahamas

CORDELLA
STUBBS, 81

OF LIFEBUOY STREET, OFF EAST
STREET, AND FORMERLY OF
HANOVER, JAMAICA, WILL BE
HELD ON SATURDAY, MARCH 7,
11:00 A.M. AT CHRISTIAN GOSPEL
CHURCH, FLINT AND
HONEYCOMBE STREET. PASTOR
DWAYNE WRIGHT ASSISTED BY
PASTOR ANTHONY NEWTON WILL
OFFICIATE. INTERMENT WILL

Mary Stubbs, Nurse Monique Hutchinson, Patrice Ellis, Cynthia Gibson,
Stubbs, Lora Stubbs, the Butler Family, and the Church Family.
FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECTS AT BETHEL

CHURCH FROM 10:00 A.M. UNTIL SERYICE TIME.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

EULAH MAE
FRANCIS, 77

OF THOMPSON COURT, OAKES
FIELD WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, MARCH 7TH, 3:00 P.M.

AT ST. MATTHEW'S ANGLICAN
CHURCH, EAST SHIRLEY STREET.
ARCHBISHOP DREXEL GOMEZ

foem ASSISTED BY FR. JAMES
fae) MOULTRIE, FR. DON HAYNES
ey AND ARCHDEACON JAMES
PALACIOUS WILL OFFICIATE.
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE CHURCH'S CEMETERY.

She is survived by two grandchildren: Shannon and Shennique Davis;
Sister-in-Law: Mrs. Maria Francis; Nieces: Angela & Lorenzo Gibson
(Kwasi & Laurel) Denise Francis (Andre Hayne) Elaine & Raymond
Collie (Raynell) Mrs. Ethel Rolle, Patrica and Freddy Mackey, Carmen
Ingraham, Faye & Jeffrey Swaby; Nephews: Dr. Rudolph & Mary
Francis, Omari & Dr. Shani Francis-Smith, Tellis & Doris Ingraham,
Nigel & Ann Ingraham, Larry & Patrice Ingraham, Chef Don &
Michelle Ingraham, Howard Ingraham. RELATIVES: Mr. & Mrs.
William Lightbourne & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Francis & Family,
Basil Francis & Family, Ms. Dorothy Davis, Mr. Wendell Francis &
Family, Mrs. Thelma Ford & Family, Archbishop Drexel & Mrs.
Gomez & Family, Myrtle Gomez, Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Gomez &
Family, Dr. Perry & Mrs. Gomez, Mr. & Mrs. Roger Gomez & Family,
Anita & Antonia Roberts, Miss Veronica Gomez, Leonie McCartney,
Ophelia Fox, Naomi Gomez, Bloneva Rahming, Peggy Francis, Mr.
& Mrs. Rodney Heastie & Family, Ms. Brenda Heastie, Miss Annette
Heastie & Family, Mrs. Carolyn Heastie & Family, Ms. Karen Jervis
& Family, Mrs. Pauline Bastian & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Tyrone Heastie
& Family; Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Rodgers & Family, Ms. Coralee Heastie,
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Heastie & Family, The Stuart Family, The Pople
Family, The Woods Family, The Braynen Family, The Gomez Family
& The Francis Family; SPECIAL FRIENDS: Mr. Lowell- Mortimer,
Mrs. Yvonne Bethel, Sir Orville & Lady Turnquest, Sir Cyril & Lady
Fountain, Dr. & Mrs. Austin Davis, Ms. Alicia & Lewis White &
Family, Mr. Samuel Spence, Mr. & Mrs. Nathaniel Levarity & Family,
Dr. David Barnett, Ms. Constance Mackey & Family, Mrs. Christine
Rolle, The Mortimer Family, Mr. & Mrs. Edward Williams, Mrs.
Sonia Dames, Mrs. Stella Nicholls, Ms. Pat Bowe, Mrs. Dorothy
Ferguson-Horton, Mrs. Constance Lunn, Mrs. Maxine Eldon & Family,
Mrs. Trudy Miller, Mrs. Geneva Thurston, Mr. George & Satella Cox,
Mrs. Orry Sands, Mrs. Margaret Claridge, Ms. Cynthia Donaldson,
Ms. Olga Reid, Mrs. Lovely Forbes, Mr. Ivan Conliffe, Sandra Mackey,
Juliette Barnett, Claudette Allens, The Pedal Pushers - Corrine Fountain,
Mavis Adderley, Edith Powell, Beryl Campbell, Grace Wallace, Louise
Gibson, Patricia Treco, Roberta Sands, Inez Saunders, Hyacinth
Saunders, Clara Gibson, Dawn Arnold, Ehurd Cunningham, Shirley
Francis. The Altar Guild & St. Mathews Church Family, Archdeacon
James & Angela Palacious, Fr. James & Mrs. Moultrie PHD., Fr. Don
Haynes.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECTS AT BETHEL
BROTHERS MORTICIANS, #44 NASSAU STREET ON FRIDAY
FROM 10:00 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. AND ON SATURDAY FROM
10:00 A.M. TO 12:30 PM. AND AT THE CHURCH FROM 1:30
P.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 23

diatler’s Huneral Home

& Qrenatortiun

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Funeral Announcement For

MRS. CARMEN
TURNER
BODIE, 82

of 5th Street, Coconut
Grove and formerly of
Tea Bay, Cat Island will
be held on Saturday at
11:00 a.m. at Christ the
King Anglican Church,
Ridgeland Park.
Officiating will be Rev'd Rodney Burrows, assisted
by other members of the clergy. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

She is survived by Three (3) Daughters:
Esthermae Bodie, Annamae Farquharson and
Sandra Bodie-Smith; Two (2) Sons: Terrance and
Vernon Bodie of Fresh Creek, Andros; Three (3)
Brothers: Cedric, Leland and Eric Turner; Eight
(8) Grandchildren: Shannon Nicole Johnson,
Tanya and Leo Farquharson Jr., Tyrone Kellman
Sr., Tremaine Bodie, Thalia Bodie, Deandra Smith
and Chevette Russell; Seven (7)
Greatgrandchildren; Two (2) Daughters-in-
Law: Jane and Renae Bodie; Two (2) Sons-in-
Law: Force Chief Petty Officer Hubert Smith and
Leo Farquharson Sr.; Eight (8) Sisters-in-Law;
Mildred, Leoni and Agnes Turner of Miami,
Florida, Anita, Ulean, Dotlyn, Grenelda and Ethel
Bodie; Three (3) Brothers-in-Law: Carlton,
Harold and Israel Bodie; Numerous Nieces and
Nephews and a host of other relatives and friends
too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’
Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Blue Hill Road
& Oxford Avenue on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until
service time at the church.





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

diutler’s Muneral Homes & Drematorim

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

MS. ELEANOR
MAE BUTLER, 64

=) | of New York and formerly of |

ie | Mason’s Addition will be held }

"| on Saturday, March 7th, 2009 |

~ | at 9:00 a.m. at Zion Baptist :

Church, East and Shirley :

Streets. Officiating will be |

y} Pastor T.G. Morrison, assisted |

by Rev. Anthony Sampson. }

Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier }

Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her son: Echendu

Sisters: Sister Mary Johnson and Mrs. Sheila Ferguson
of Freeport, Grand Bahama; Three (3) Sisters-in-law:

including Caregivers at Metropolitan Hospital, New

Margaret Hospital, Pastor George Kelly, Officers and
members of Metropolitan Baptist Church, Rev. Betty

to mention.

; church on Saturday from 8:00 a.m. until service.

MRS. VALERIE
RENIA
KNOWLES, 31

of Baldwin Avenue will be
} held on Saturday, March 7th,
| 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at New
Destiny Baptist Cathedral,
) Blue Hill Road. Officiating
will be Bishop Delton D.
Fernander, assisted by other

| ministers of Religion. Interment will follow in

. ee Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
Nwanodi; Daughter-in-Law: Yuka Shimizu Nwanodi; }

Six (6) Sisters: Sylvia Demeritte-Forbes, Kathleen |
Demeritte, Dorothy Dames, Marjorie Johnson, Joan }
Butler and Rosetta Johnson; Two (2) Brothers: Charles :
Butler of California and Tellis Butler; Two (2) Adopted }

Left to cherish her memories are her husband: Samuel
Knowles Jr.; Parents: Russell and Sylvia Davis; Five
(5) Stepchildren: Ntieado, Juerissa, Theodore, Samdon

: and Samgie Knowles; One (1) Sister: Sonia Grant;
: One (1) Brother: Edwin Evans; Grandmother:

a | Nathalie Butler; Grandfather: Thomas Moss; Two
Virginia, Coralee and Thelma Butler; Four (4) |

Brothers-in-Law: Charlie Forbes, Leonard Dames, |
Maxwell Johnson and Clement Johnson; Two (2) :
Aunts; Alice Rosmond Tucker and Clara Gibson of |
Miami, Florida; Numerous Nieces, Nephews and :
Cousins and a host of other relatives and friends |

(2) Nieces: Racquel Renia Russell Davis and Jasmine
Grant; One (1) Nephew: Brandon Grant; Father-in-
Law: Samuel Knowles; Mother-in-Law: Lucinda
Knowles; Seven (7) Sisters-in-Law: Kathleen, Diane,
Marion, Lucille, Beatrice, Albertha and Paulamae;
Three (3) Brothers-in-Law: Ruel Grant, Livingston

: and Phillip Knowles; Nine (9) Aunts; Eighteen (18)
York, The Physiotherapy Department of Princess ! uncles; Godchildren: Tahje, Francis, Xavier, K.K.,
: Hakeem and Javan; Numerous Cousins, Grandaunts,

L i Granduncles and a host of other relatives and friends
of New York, Pastor T.G. Morrison and the family of |

Zion Baptist Church and many others too numerous |
: Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral

a : ' Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral :

Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on |
Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the |

too numerous to mention.

Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the
church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until service.









THURSDAY
Carey Alby



Pg, 25 The Tribune

alee
= EN AWAY
== STORIES
2 ie
CHURCH

EVENTS



PG 26 ® Thursday, March 5, 2009

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE Church of God of
Prophecy (CGP) this year is
celebrating its centennial
anniversary, where it will
honour and remember some
of its founding leaders, and
from March 8-15, host its
88th annual National
Convention of the Church of
God of Prophecy of the
Commonwealth of the

Bahamas.

In 1909, the first ever local Church
of God was established through Taylor
Street, where it was then known as the
Stanley Jumper Church - named after
the church‘s pastor Reverend Stanley
Ferguson.

The church which stands as the old-
est pentecostal ministry in the
Bahamas, according to some of its
leaders has over the years survived
criticism from outsiders who viewed
initial followers as crazed fanatics.

According to Bishop Franklin
Ferguson of CGP East Street, this
anniversary stands as a living testimo-
ny to those who would have laboured
in the early days to secure and validate
the development of the church.

“This anniversary is significant
because over the years, we have been
able to see the development of our
people who have come from a time
where we were scorned, looked down
upon, and recognised as a people who
were crazy, which was how we got the
name “jumpers.”

He said as a people, the church has
been continuously blessed by God in
being sustained by His grace, and is
able to say after 100 years that God’s
truth has cemented its place as a
church of integrity and truth.

Over the years, some of the defining
moments for CGP included the
appointment of the first Bahamian
overseer Rev Stanley Ferguson, who
served in that position from 1924 to
1934.

That year, Rev Ferguson was suc-
ceeded by Bishop Alvin S Moss who
filled the role up until 1974. For the
next 25 years, Bishop Brice H
Thompson served as overseer where
he was replaced by the current Bishop
Elgarnet B Rahming.

Another historic year for the CGP
was 1929, where at that time it held its
first local convention.

Bishop Ferguson also said: “We
have moved on from having services in
houses and under trees, to structured
churches, and even our members have
moved from people who were consid-
ered undereducated to functioning to

SEE page 31

RELIGION

‘JUMPER CHURCH’ LEAPS TO

100 year
milestone



CTA HL TSO

The Tribune

CSI

WORLD DAY OF PRAYER

eThe World Day Of Prayer
Committee invites members of the
public to attend the World Day of
Prayer service and fellowship meal on
Friday March 6, at 7pm at The
Salvation Army Citadel, Mackey
Street. The evening’s speaker will be

Reverend Angela Palacious who
will speak on the theme: “In Christ
There Are Many Members Yet One
Body"

World Day of Prayer is a world-
wide movement of Christian women
of many traditions who come togeth-
er to observe a common day of
prayer each year, and who, in many
countries, have a continuing relation-
ship in prayer and service.

It is a movement initiated and car-
ried out by women in more than 170
countries

and regions, with one highlight
being the annual day of celebration
being held the first Friday of March.

The movement brings women of
various races, cultures, and traditions
in closer fellowship, understanding,
and action throughout the year.

Through World Day of Prayer,
women around the world, affirm their
faith in Jesus Christ, share their hopes
and fears, their joys and sorrows,
their opportunities and needs and
become aware of the whole world
and no longer live in isolation.

They are also enriched by the faith
experience of Christians of other
countries and cultures through prayer
with and for them.

Please go to www.worlddayof-
prayer.net for further information

LENTEN TEA

eThe Anglican Church of The
Epiphany will hold it annual Lenten
Tea and Fashion Show at the church
on Prince Charles Drive on Sunday
March & at 3 pm. Tickets are $10 and
are available at the door. Please
come to enjoy an afternoon of fun
and fellowship.

SU a Ut

@ Did you recently give birth to
the newest little angel on earth?
Have you and your beloved recent-
ly tied the knot? Is your church
planning a special event? Tribune
Religion wants to hear from you!

We want to know about the spe-
cial things going on in your life, so
go ahead and send in your wedding
photographs, birth announcements
and church activities schedule to be
posted in upcoming Tribune
Religion sections.

This service is free. Send all
information, including (especially)
photographs, to features@tribune-
media.net. Information can be
hand delivered to The Tribune at
Shirley and Deveaux Streets or call
the Religion section @ 502.2368.





The Tribune

RELIGION

The impossible separation

SOMETIMES we cannot forget the
wilderness that we are in because we
cannot even eat. We are so broken we
do not even see the table set before us:
eyes swollen shut with weeping, heart
heavy and spirit crushed. We are obliv-
ious to any comfort or consolation.
Desolate, despairing, despondent and
dejected we feel as if we will bleed to
death, while others just pass by on the
other side.

Romans 8:35-39 was given to us as a
gift for such a time as this: “Who will
separate us from the love of Christ?
Will hardship, or distress, or persecu-
tion, or famine, or nakedness, or peril,
or sword? As it is written, For your
sake we are being killed all day long;
we are accounted as sheep to be
slaughtered. No, in all these things we
are more than conquerors through
him, who loved us. For I am convinced
that neither death, nor life, nor angels,
nor rulers, nor things present, nor
things to come, nor powers, nor height,
nor depth, nor anything else in all cre-
ation, will be able to separate us from
the love of God in Christ Jesus our
Lord.”

Are you permitting someone to sep-
arate you from the love of Christ? You

Ea

REV. ANGELA
PALACIOUS

need to take the initiative for yourself
to establish, or re-establish your prior-
ities and ask God to separate you from
the influence or power of this person.
Then remember you are always free to
pray and talk to God in the secret place
of your own heart.

What is the nature of your hard-
ship? What is the extent of your dis-
tress? Why are you suffering persecu-
tion and in what form? What are you
starving for in your time of famine? Of
what have you been stripped in your
time of nakedness? How great is your
peril? Who is holding the sword?

No matter what your individual
answer, St Paul is convinced that you
will be more than a conqueror through
the One who loved us enough to die on
the cross. When you open yourself to a
saving faith you too will become con-
vinced that you do not have to be

Traditional Anglicans want
to join Catholic Church

@ VATICAN CITY

THE Vatican is considering welcom-
ing into the Roman Catholic Church a
group of traditional Anglicans who
broke away from the global Anglican
Communion nearly two decades ago
over women’s ordination and other
issues, officials say.

Vatican officials stress that no decision
has been made and no announcement is
imminent. Still, Anglicans across the
spectrum of belief are closely watching
for any signs of movement.

Absorbing the breakaway Traditional
Anglican Communion would be a small
but notable victory for Pope Benedict
XVI, who has made unifying Christians
a goal of his papacy.

At the same time, any invitation by
the Vatican is likely to upset leaders of
the 77 million-member Anglican
Communion and would hurt the
Vatican’s decades-long efforts to
strengthen ties with that fellowship of
churches. Anglicans split with Rome in
1534 when English King Henry VII was
refused a marriage annulment.

The Traditional Anglican
Communion formed in 1990 as an asso-
ciation of orthodox Anglicans concerned

about what they considered the liberal
tilt in Anglican churches, including the
ordination of women. Members of the
group are generally Anglo-Catholic,
emphasizing continuity with Catholic
tradition and the importance of the
sacraments. The fellowship says it has
spread to 41 countries and has 400,000
members, although only about half are
regular churchgoers.

The traditional group aims to unify the
Anglican and Catholic churches, accord-
ing to Archbishop John Hepworth of
Australia, who is the leader, or primate,
of the Traditional Anglican
Communion. They have accepted the
ministry of the pope, but also want to
maintain their Anglican traditions —
one of several potential impediments to
unification.

“We seek a communal and ecclesial
way of being Anglican Catholics in com-
munion with the Holy See,” the group
wrote, in a letter Hepworth presented
two years ago to the Vatican’s
Congregation for the Doctrine of the
Faith. The head of that Vatican office,
Cardinal William Levada, wrote
Hepworth in July 2008, saying he was
giving “serious attention” to the TAC’s
proposal.

afraid of dying, because you will not be
separated from Christ in death, as a
result of the reality of the resurrection.
There is nothing in life that need sepa-
rate us because no matter the circum-
stance, we are free to abide in Jesus if
we invite Him to abide in us. The
angels are under His authority, rulers
on earth need not be permitted to
weaken our faith as Daniel modeled
for us in the lions’ den.

There is nothing in our present situ-
ation, nothing in the future, and noth-
ing in our past that can separate us
from God if we do not desire it to be
so.
Not even the powers of Satan or any
other evil spirits, demons, imps, princi-
palities of any kind are strong enough
to sever the bonds of love that Christ
has for us. Nothing in the heights,
down in the depths or anything, any-
where in creation, has the power to
cancel out the price Christ paid.

So what are we waiting for? Let us
explore all the blessings such a rela-
tionship has to offer. Let us not be the
cause of a separation from the best
friend we will ever have, the
Redeemer we certainly need, and the
ongoing sustaining love of Christ

Thursday, March 5, 2009 ® PG 27

embodied in the Holy Spirit’s presence.

We have the pillar of cloud and the
pillar of fire on the inside of us.

‘The cloud of unknowing’ as one
author calls it, and the fire of enlight-
enment that Pentecost introduced. We
are ready for anything God requires of
us. We are not alone and we are not
helpless with Christ on our side.

Not even the
powers of Satan or
any other evil
spirits, demons,
imps, principalities
of any kind are
strong enough

to sever the bonds
of love that

Christ has for us.

NOTICE

You are invited to come and
worship! Global Village
Church Queens College
Auditorium 9:30 Sunday

Morning.

ont ie

You are not happy with our
product, return in seven
days for a complete refund





PG 28 ® Thursday, March 5, 2009

Tourism

THE GREAT DEPRESSION of
the 1930's was viewed by some as a
time of wonderful opportunities and
by others as time of crisis.

Here we are today in the Bahamas,
a place where we've stated that God
lives and that the Bahamas is a
Christian nation. I really don't mean
to burst your bubble, but I think it's
only fair that I should inform you;
that the Bahamas is not a Christian
nation but rather we are an insane
nation.

As you're reading this article, I'm
quite aware that as an educated per-
son you know the definition of insan-
ity. Therefore for the purpose of this
exercise please allow me to share this
definition with the handful of people
who don't know.

Insanity: Doing the same
things over and over, yet
expecting a different result

Now, maybe not you; but I’m con-
vinced beyond all reasonable doubt
that we are truly an insane nation, as
I listen to the various leaders, profes-
sionals and experts speak on matters
of national interest such as tourism,
finance, crime and education.

Tourism - The true God of the
Bahamas: The geniuses / experts in
governments and the Ministry of
Tourism have been and are spending
and investing millions of dollars in
promoting and marketing tourism.
Meanwhile very little financial invest-
ing is done in the masses of people
who work within this lame cash cow.

This is the kind of statement and
remark that stirs “HELL” up in the
hefty salary makers, reclining office
chairs, out of touch, big wigs, and
pencil pushers in this ministry. Do I
care if this and other statements stir
up “HELL” within these folks
throughout the length and breadth of
this country? No, not one bit do I
care.

Listen up! Everything rises and
falls upon leadership, if the product
of tourism is broken; it's not the



PASTOR

tourist’s fault. To the contrary, its
because of incompetent, visionless
leadership. Do you know that people
are still traveling? It's just that
they're not coming to the Bahamas in
the numbers that we would like. Yes I
do agree that September 11,2001 had
an impact on tourist travel, but from
then to now (don't fool ‘yaself’) peo-
ple are traveling.

I know that a new minister of
tourism has just recently been
appointed and that's good; but as in
the game of baseball or softball “what
good is there in having a new pitcher,
when he's got to play ball with the
same incompetent team that can't
field or hit the ball?”

The fall of tourism hasn't just hap-
pen; this one sided game has been
played on an uneven field for many
years. Whenever emphasis is placed
on tourism, its primary areas were
West Bay Street, down town Bay
Street and Paradise Island. What has
changed with this twisted view today?
Nothing much, other than it’s now
Atlantis, the Bar-Mar project,
Albany, etc;

Again, why listen to me? It seems
that you guys have all of the answers
to your tourism woes. But then again
if this was the case, why is it that the
Bahamas is not ranked in the top 5
places of choice for tourist travel in
the western hemisphere?

There was a time when the Bahamas
was able to hold its own in tourism as
we promoted our sun, sand & sea; and
most of all our service was at its best.
But Mr Minister, Mr/ Ms Director of
Tourism, let me assure you that you're
prematurely channeling your efforts
and financial resources outside as you
promote a broken (yet) easily

Share your ne

The Tribune wants to hear from people

who are making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are

raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in th
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your

story.



RELIGION

repairable industry.

Anything that has to do with hospi-
tality service from Atlantis in the
north to the smallest restaurant at
South Beach and the family islands
needs to be on the same accord with
total quality service. (TQS). When
and wherever there is a breach of this
service whether it is from an employ-
er or an employee, such person or
persons should be dealt with accord-
ingly as a first time offender. In the
event of a second offense it should be
made known publicly that that person
or business establishment has been
removed from the hospitality indus-
try.

Herein lays the bedrock or root
cause of TQS in the tourism industry.
Unprecedented attention and efforts
have been centered on service to and
for the tourist dollar; meanwhile very
little and in most cases no TQS is
focused on Bahamians _ serving
Bahamians.

This travesty has led to multiple
problems and breaches in the tourism
industry, because it's these same
Bahamians that are offering visitors
the sloppy services.

Here's one of the biggest mistakes
many of our leaders are making as it
relates to tourism and the economy.
We've got visionless leaders (reli-
gious, government, civic) waiting on
President Barack Obama to fix or

The Tribune

turn around America's economy.
Meanwhile, very little internal over-
hauling, adjustments or diversifica-
tion is being intensively done to pre-
pare the masses. The people that are
loosing their jobs daily in the
Bahamas and the other families that
are being devastated through crimes
and other ills didn't vote for
President Obama, so why is it that
they've got to wait on him for vision-
ary leadership?

Again, I'm not Bishop, Apostle or
Doctor Allen; I have no books or cd's
for sale, you guys are the qualified,
educated professionals; therefore
why should you or any other pay
attention to what I'm saying?

Remember!

Hosea.4:6. Where there is no vision,
the people perish (NOT THE LEAD-
ERS) Therefore stop being silly and
getting “swing” within and outside the
church by eloquent speeches. Are your
government officials and religious
leaders crying about how tough things
are? No, they're living and enjoying
the good life; while you're always rob-
bing Peter to pay Paul.

¢ For questions or comments contact
us via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.225-3859 or 441-2021

NOTICE
“FREE”

Fire Insurance
Contract
Jesus Christ & Co.

for
Salivation!

For more information
Read John 3-16





The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, March 5, 2009 ® PG 29

(Coy THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS rat

Methodist Men of Mark

IN 1897, Methodist Minister George
Lester in his book In Sunny Isles pays
tribute to Methodist ‘men of mark’,
who through truth and righteousness
created church life and the social con-
ditions for that time and the next seven
decades. On this high pedestal he
places the names of William Turton,
Roger Moore, Theophilus Pugh,
Charles Penny, Thomas Lofthouse,
John Corlett, Thomas Pearson, Isaac
Pearson, Hilton Cheeseborough and
Henry Bleby. Others were ‘men worth
remembering’ because of their aggres-
sive evangelism through the adversity
of hurricanes, epidemic diseases and
giving heroic attention of the sick and
dying.

Penny and Corlett ministered to the
liberated Africans and were instru-
mental in the growth and development
of Wesley Methodist Church and its
Yoruba congregation. Among the ear-
liest leaders of the Wesley Methodist
Church were Yoruba tribesmen:
Monday Ranger, Alladay Adderley,
Britain Eneas and Domingo Weir - all
men whose descendants carried on the
tradition of being avid churchmen. The



name of Corlett also lived on -
Frederick Corlett of the Yoruba tribe
died in 1911 at the home of his son
John in Bilney Lane. It is interesting to
note that the son John Corlett was a
founder member of the Bilney Lane
Orthodox African Church inspired by
Marcus Garvey.

Lofthouse was the father of a strand
of the oligarchic dynasty that ruled the
Bahamas for almost 100 years. His son
Thomas Hilton Cheeseborough
Lofthouse opened the ‘Big Store’ on
Marlborough Street and his son Charles
was the composer of Goombay songs -
‘Bahama Mama ' and 'Mama Don't
Want no Peas and Rice’ were huge
world wide hits in the 1930s. The last of
the dynasty was Sir Stafford Lofthouse
Sands, father of Bahamian tourism.

The growth of Methodism after

emancipation was phenomenal. In 1835
there were only four ministers for the
1,799 members of the four circuits
(Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, Haiti and
Bermuda). In the Bahamas, Methodism
spread to Exuma (1837), New
Providence Wesley (1838), Marsh
Harbour (1843), Cat Island (1844) and
through Eleuthera (1845 - 1864). Also,
in 1841, St Paul’ was returned from the
Anglicans to the Methodists.

The Methodist Mission continued to
expand from 1869 until 1975 due to the
disestablishment of the Anglican
Church and the controversy caused by
the Tractarian Ritualistic Movement
and segregation of black and white
members. Another reason for the
growth was the longer tenure of the
ministers in one location. In the earliest
days of Turton, Routledge and Dowson
they rotated every ten or twelve weeks.
Then it became customary for inter-
change of stations yearly. In later times,
the ministry was permanent with the
option for change after a service of ten
years.

Up until the end of the 19th Century
not a great number of Bahamian men

took up the Methodist ministry but
eight served in the Bahamas and sever-
al ministered in the USA, Canada and
the West Indies.

George Lester praises the stalwart
contribution of 'men of mark’ and 'men
of worth’ - many long dead or moved
on - “They constructed no melancholy
theories; but having planted many a
"Rose of Sharon’ and made their por-
tion of the desert smile, they departed
in the faith that the green margin would
spread as the seasons of God came
round, till the mantle of heaven cov-
ered the earth and ended with Eden, as
it had begun.”

Thus the Methodists achieved a dom-
inant position in religion, economics
and politics that remained unchal-
lenged until the rise of the Roman
Catholic and Pentecostal denomina-
tions competed for souls in the early
20th Century and the Baptist coalition
with the progressive Liberal Party in
the 1960s ushered in the modern era of
majority rule.

(Next time - Part 20: Baptist Men of
Mark)



Church of God of Prophecy
East Street Tabernacle
celebrates it’s men’s
ministry 20th anniversary

TWENTY years ago, the Men’s
Fellowship at the Church of God of
Prophecy East Street Tabernacle was
established by the late, Bishop
Nathaniel Beneby in 1989 to encourage
the brothers’ involvement in church
ministry, to encourage strong leadership
among the brothers and foster a closer
relationship between the Pastor and the
brothers of the church.

On Sunday February 22, the Men’s
Ministry celebrated their 20th anniver-
sary. The highlight of the service was
the ‘Brother of the Year Award’ which
was presented to Brother Cecil N Hall
for outstanding service to the ministry.
Also during the morning service, on the
occasion of their 20th Anniversary, the
Men’s Ministry, presented Senior Pastor,
Bishop Franklin M Ferguson and his
wife, Rovena, with a seven day Southern
Caribbean Cruise which will take place
in May.

The celebration climaxed in the after-
noon as scores of Men’s Fellowship
Choirs from around the island came
together for a time of singing and rejoic-
ing. Refreshments was served in the
cafeteria afterwards.

(Submitted by Rovena Ferguson)





PG 30 ® Thursday, March 5, 2009

| —

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

WHILE many churches in the coun-
try try to support their members, this
can be difficult for family island
churches with insufficient resources.
However, members of the St Faith’s
Anglican Church in Stanyard Creek,
Andros, recently came together to
support the children of the parish and
the community by hosting a family fun
day.

Priest in charge, Father Donald
Kerr, said the fun day held last week-
end was simply to raise funds for a new

=“

.

railing in the church, activities for the
youth and to have a Sunday school for
the kids.

“There are a lot of young people up
here and we are really trying to
reestablish and revamp the entire
community in terms of bringing young
people into the church by putting on
events,” Father Kerr said.

Father Kerr has been the priest in
charge for the St Stephen’s parish in
the central Andros district for two
years, over seeing the five churches in
the parish.

Father Kerr said for some time the
congregation of St Faith’s has some-

ms *

RELIGION

|

what disappeared, but is now on the
verge of coming back but with mostly
young people involved.

“By having the young people
involved, it makes a healthier church
because they come in and take their
rightful positions,” Father Kerr said.

Father Kerr said there are a lot of
after school activities the church is try-
ing to provide for the children not only
from St Faith’s, but within the
Stanyard Creek community.

“They get help with their homework
and their social needs as well. We are
trying to let the church play a pivotal
role within the community because

CHILDREN of
St Faith’s
Anglican
Church enjoy-
TCIM rA
with a game of
basketball and
swing set on
the park and
church grounds
in Stanyard
Creek, Andros.

The Tribune



i

P k



St. Faith's Anglican Church hosts family fun day

this church is the largest in the island’s
parish. This church has to have activi-
ties in order for the community to
function,” Father Kerr said.

Father Kerr said the fun day was
also to establish a bond between the
community and family life where they
can come out and make contributions
to their church.

“The kids enjoy coming to the
church because they find fellowship.
We are trying our endeavored best to
continue to bring the community
together through different events like
basket ball tournaments and so forth,”
Father Kerr said.





The Tribune

rh. =e




Church of God of
Prophecy East Street
Tabernacle celebrates it’s
8th annual Ushers Day

ON Sunday, February 1, the Ushers
of the Church of God of Prophecy, East
Street Tabernacle took time off from
their routine as they were relieved from
their duties for the day to receive spe-
cial recognition for their hard work over
the past year.

Speaking on this occasion was Bishop
Randall Howard, General Overseer for
the Church of God of Prophecy
Worldwide, whose presence marked the
first time that a general overseer would
have ministered in a local church other
than during annual conventions, which
made this occasion historic for the
church at East Street.

Receiving special honour for their
dedication and commitment to the
usher ministry were: Sister Winnifred
Williamson and Brothers: Raymond
Pratt and Joseph Henfield.

RELIGION

Thursday, March 5, 2009 ® PG 31

2 H importance of

= @ By BISHOP V. G. CLARKE

Calvary Deliverance Church

i HOPE has been defined as “a

i: feeling that what is wanted will

i happen; or “a desire accompanied

i by expectations.” In the scripture,
i hope is closely connected to faith,

i “Now faith is the substance of

i things hoped for, the evidence of

: things not seen.” (Hebrews 11:1).

i Man cannot survive without

i hope; it is what gives meaning to

i all of life. It is a fact that “we are

: saved by hoped”, as stated in

? Romans 8:24. Victor Frank in his

? book, “Man's Search for Meaning”,
: graphically tells how he was able to
i survive the horrors of a Nazi con-

i centration camp by focusing on the
: hope of liberation and deliverance,
: rather than on the suffering and

i death that was happening all

? around him.

i The minister frequently faces cir-
: cumstances and situations that are
i discouraging and defeating on the

i surface - a scathing criticism, a

i? financial reverse, a lack of spiritual

yi results and a piling up of people's

: problems. To handle these difficul-
i ties on the human level is impossi-
i ble. To fight with carnal weapon is
? useless, such an approach assures

i defeat. What is needed is a spiritu-
: alsolution. The first step in spiri-

.j tually solving any problem is to
~ i transcend it - to get above. Don't

i try to slug it out on the fleshly

i level, get in the spiritual realm.

i How is this done? By developing
: the “feeling that what is wanted

i will happen.” By exercising faith











































Jumper Church leaps to hundred year milestone

FROM page 26

all levels of society.”

This week, the church will begin its
celebrations with a historic exhibition
of photos and artifacts dating as far
back to the early 1900s. Scheduled to be
held at its East Street tabernacle locat-
ed between Sunlight Village and
Cottage off East Street, the event will
officially be opened by Bishop
Rahming, and will be available to the
general public for viewing.

Then on Sunday, the church will start
its convention which is scheduled to be
broadcasted live over the radio, televi-

sion, and the Internet.

According to a press release from the
church’s press office: “This service will
be one of high praise and worship,
involving our choirs, dancers, bands and
the spoken word.”

Slated as keynote speaker for the
event is the General Presbyter for the
Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean Islands
Bishop Brice H Thompson.

On Monday, the convention will con-
tinue with an address from the National
overseer Bishop Rahming who will
reflect on the history and challenges of
the church, and will also present future
plans for CGP.

Other speakers during the week :
include Bishop Randall E Howard the }

General overseer, Bishop Clayton

Martin who is the overseer of Jamaica, }
Bishop Adrian Varlack, Bishop David :

Bryan, and Bishop Benjamin Feliz.

Following dozens of events and cele- ;
brations expected to unfold during the }
eight day festivities, the event will cul- :
minate with a Baptismal service at the ;

Western Esplanade.

The church is inviting all in the com- :
munity to show support by attend its ;
events, and remains committed to its }
true mission, which is to spread the :

word of the Father.

i and hope, remember that such a
i feeling will not come automatical-

fly; it will come only as a conscious
1} act of the will.

Hope arises out of a concentra-

't tion on the good and positive

: things (Phil. 4:8). We must not

i focus on the difficult: but on the

? fact that God will bring deliver-

i ance. To transcend a problem (to
practise hope) does not mean that

: we will leave the problem; it simply
i means that by viewing it from
God's perspective, we will see it as
i it really is.

When we understand the true
nature of the problem, we will then
be able to confront it properly.
Keep in mind however, that this is
: not possible without first exercising
faith and hope. We must under-
stand that it is hope that gives us
? the spiritual insights and power
necessary to take the fear out of
? the future.



PG 32 © Thursday, March 5, 2009



Not Settling

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallan@tribunemedia.net

GOSPEL recording artist Ricardo
Clarke, who just last week released
his debut gospel/reggae album titled
Not Settling, has taking the local
Christian community by storm with
lyrics which not only speak of the
challenges of being saved or unsaved,
but also on the realities of living in an
economically crunched environment.

Ricardo was backed by the Higher
Level Band, along with a wide mix of
gospel artists at a concert last Friday at
the Calvary Deliverance Church. The
event was considered an overwhelming
success.

Ricardo who is also the son of
Bishop VG = Clarke of Calvary
Deliverance, during his on stage per-
formance gave audience members a
heart to heart look into the reality of
Christian life and growth as he has
experienced it.

Giving reference to a Bible scripture
where Elijah instructed a servant to
repeat a task, Ricardo said God works
in a way where if he wants to show you
something, even if you overlook it the
first time, he‘ll take you back to that

place over and over until you see his
vision.

“Sometimes you could repeat a
process, but you wont get manifesta-
tion the first time...If you repeat a
process, God is going to let you hear a
sound that you didn‘t hear the first
time.”

For Ricardo, this message was mani-
fested through his love for music.
Ricardo said although he has long
embraced the art of spoken word, it
was never until he attempted to share
his message through music that his pur-
pose was truly fulfilled.

“Sometimes you work so hard to get
people to understand your spoken
word which they rarely get, and it’s like
in a heartbeat they’re singing the same
message in a song that you couldn’t get
them to connect with, and I feel glad to
know that I could get to share more of
what I have to say through music.”

After being saved for more than 10
years, Ricardo explained that some of
the same challenges and distractions
that affected him as an unsaved youth,
still affect many young people today.

“T definitely was not saved from the
womb, but I always had a healthy
respect for the church and for what my
personal life could do to my family.

RELIGION

Prior to me coming into the kingdom I
had a pretty active social life, I was a
party animal.”

Although he had always lived by the
golden rule, Ricardo said in his early
days he too took part in excessive par-
tying, drinking, smoking, and
immersed himself always in the compa-
ny of several female friends.

He said at that time, the presence of
God remained in his life, reminding
him of a higher calling.

Along the way, Ricardo said he has

The Tribune

Pe Om Ale da
performs for the
crowd at the ‘Not
Settling’ concert
held at the Calvary
Deliverance

‘Cv lceae

ee
|

PLT LO Mera Cmte ISMclNel OTN Ce ls Reni Heights.



been encouraged by one particular
scripture that has not only feed him
when he was weak, but which has also
guided him when he was lost.

Proverbs 11.25 which reads: “The
liberal soul shall be made fat, and he
that watereth shall be watereth also
himself.

Now that he is doing what he loves
and able to spread the word of the
Father, Ricardo said he hopes to con-
tinue spreading positive messages of
Christianity and of God.



Full Text

PAGE 1

n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net WEATHERING the economic malaise better than most, the Abaco economy is a “mod el” for the rest of The Bahamas, South Abaco MP Edison Key, said in the House of Assembly yesterday. “While we are feeling the effects of the downturn in the US economy, the affect on Aba co’s economy has been less than in other islands. “In fact, I dare to state that Abaco is a model for other islands to emulate, with hun dreds of second home owners who have built (homes N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R New temporary hotel sector jobs C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.85THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 74F LOW 66F The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY I N S I D E C LASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E CARS! CARS! CARS!!! C LASSIFIEDSTRADER JOBSAND HELPWANTED OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE L L O O A A D D S S O O F F More CLICO concerns raised n T ANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net CONCERNS are being raised as to whether CLICO (Bahamas Exchange Control laws regarding loans of more than $70 million to its foreign affiliates, which were in turn invested in the now devastated Florida real estate market. H owever, CLICO (Bahamas legally avoid Bahamian exchange laws by using US dol lar annuities clients invested in its Turks & Caicos branch. These assets in the Turks & Caicos branch representedt he main financing for loans made to Wellington Pre serve Corporation's Florida Project. Yesterday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told The Tribune that he "was told that the monies did not leavet he Bahamas." Central Bank Governor Wendy Craigg also told The Tribune that Bank records do not reflect any applicationb y CLICO (Bahamas B ank to authorise loans worth $73.6 million of its Bahami an assets to foreign affiliates. When asked if the Central Bank was worried about other institutions circumventing exchange control regula t ions to invest abroad, Ms Craigg said a system was in place to deter any breach of the exchange control regulations. " Our experience suggests that this is not a normal SEE page eight MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest speaks to Major Ladon Hutchens of the USM arine Corp, while Timothy Z ga-Brown, Charg d’Affaires at the USEmbassy, looks on. M r Turnquest opened the 25th annual Tradewinds conference yest erday, which, he said, has made a significant contribution towards improving maritime security. Tradewinds is a joint exercise designed to develop and encourage partnerships among law enforcement officials throughout the region. It is an annual event that con sists of a combined ground and marine exercise within the Caribbean Basin. The Bahamas last hosted the exercise in 2005. “This exercise is yet another demonstration of the US government’s commitment to the peace and security of the Bahamas, the Caribbean region and the Western Hemisphere through a continuous programme of cooperation among all partner nations,” Mr Turnquest said. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net H OTEL workers who have suffered financial hardships in recent months have new hope as the Miss Universe pageant w ill offer temporary employ ment to those in the hospitality sector. A s Atlantis was declared offi cial host of the multi-million dollar month-long international contest yesterday, president of K erzner International Bahamas George Markantonis said addi tional workers will be required t o assist the 89 competing beau ty queens and their entourage at the Paradise Island hotel in August. A nd various hotels, set to host at least five additional pageant events, can also expecta n influx of visitors, bringing a temporary boost to the industry after hundreds of workers were laid-off in recent months. Mr Markantonis said: “What ever benefits Atlantis also benefits the whole community and the whole country. “We will bring in more temporary labour that in turn will be felt in the community, and it is our intention to give as much benefit to all the hotels if we can. “I expect we will be bringing n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FORMER foreign affairs minister Fred Mitchell called on Prime Minister Ingraham to give a full and frank disclosure on the reasons for the swift liq uidation of CLICO Bahamas Ltd, questioning whether there might have been any conflict of interest or “insider trading” to justify a raid of the assets of the insurance company. Yesterday, Guyana’s President Bharrat Jagdeo also expressed concern over the manner in which the Bahamas handled the issue with the liq uidation of CLICO Bahamas. President Jagdeo said that the Bahamian regulator had failed to contact Guyana before making the decision to do so, although that person was “instructed by the Bahamian Prime Minister to do so.” As a result of CLICO Bahamas’ liq uidation, the government of Guyana had to place CLICO (Guyana agement. President Jagdeo stressed that he felt it was important for various Governors of Central Banks of Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados and the Bahamas to meet before the heads of state of each country can hold talks, as he expressed his concern that the local regulators of the various territories seemed to be operating in isolation. Mr Mitchell in his address to the media yesterday echoed some of these concerns when he asked whether the Government attempted to directly intervene with the Government of Trinidad and Tobago, the ultimate owner of CLICO. “We heard from our Prime Minister that the President of Guyana called the Prime Minister of the Bahamas to inquire about CLICO’s Guyana’s assets in CLICO Bahamas. Yet on the face of a Government guarantee by the CLICO company in Mitchell wants PM to give full disclosure on the swift liquidation of CLICO SEE page nine MINISTEROPENS TRADEWINDS CONFERENCE Questions over loans of more than $70m to foreign affiliates Miss Universe pageant to bring work and visitors SEE page nine n TV GUIDE CANCELLED DUEtoeconomieson newsprint caused by the recession, The Tribune has decided to cancel the TV guide. We apologise to readers for any inconvenience. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A SINGLE mother terrified by the violent intrusion of armed immigration officers who raided her home last week intends to sue the Department of Immigration for damages. Violet Hanna, 41, and her daughter Amber, 7, were sleeping when she claims the officers broke apart the gate securing the Single mother intends to sue Immigration Department SEE page nine South Abaco MP Edison Key Abaco economy ‘is model for the rest of the Bahamas’ SEE page eight www.tribune242.com

PAGE 2

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net APPROXIMATELY two dozen nurse aids stationed at the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre and the Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH Square yesterday against what they called "slave-like" working conditions. The protesters waved placards saying, "Those who implemented the unfair shifts, please try working it", and "What is (more important, patient care or shift system?" while singing gospel hymns. The demonstration drew the attention of curious tourists and locals alike, including several members of the Opposition, who delayed their entrance into yesterday's parliament session to take in the scene. The auxiliary nurses support staff for trained nurses are in an uproar over a new shift system implemented by the Public Hospital Authority (PHA ruary 16 which affects auxiliary nurses at PMH, Sandilands and the Rand Lab in Grand Bahama. "Prior to the implementation of the shift they have in place now, they were working 10-hour shifts for four nights a week and then having four nights off. “They want them to now work the eight-hour shift, which they have no problem with. “But we want them to consider the fact that a number of persons are only used to working night shifts and they kind of built a lifestyle around (that “The new system causes a lot of them to now work morning, evening and nights," said president of the Bahamas Public Ser vice Union (BPSU Mr Pinder said the problem began when some aides were scheduled to work night shifts ending at 11pm, only to be forced to return to work at 7am the next day. He said this represents a violation of the union's industrial agreement which states staff must have a 12-hour rest period between shifts. The BPSU wants a meeting with PHA officials to address these concerns and claimed a complaint lodged on February 12 was not acknowledged. Yesterday, PHA managing director Herbert Brown said to his knowledge the new shift system did not violate the union's industrial agreement or the Employment Act. He acknowledged that a few incidents were brought to his attention where aides were being scheduled to work a 7am shift the day after leaving work at 11pm – an oversight that principal nursing officers from PMH and Sandilands are presently reviewing. He said while some staff "are not happy with the new shift system,” the principal nursing offi cers are willing to work with them to accommodate requests for working hours, where possible. The protest did not disrupt services at PMH or Sandilands, he said. However, Mr Brown said that four aides from Sandilands and seven from PMH who were scheduled to work yesterday morning took part in the industrial action. He said it was too early to tell if they would be penalised for their participation. The aides are calling for the old system to return: "The shift what they implemented now, you'll find more time with your institution that you will with your family. A lot of times when the shifts are being made up, you do not have a 12-hour rest period in between. If they can't get it together then they need to leave the shift as is," said an auxiliary nurse who has worked at PMH for nearly 20 years. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THE TRIBUNE FNM Member of Parliamentfor Kennedy Keny a tta Gibson last month attended h is first party council meeting and garnered a standing ovation at the FNM’s headquarters on Mackey Street. Entering the hall to a “thundero us applause,” Mr Gibson was enthusiastically received by many council members who sources said welcomed the former PLP member with “open arms.” Although he was not scheduled to speak, Mr Gibson was asked to approach the podium and say a few words after his overwhelmingw elcome. When this announcement was made, a source at the meeting told The Tribune , council members “leapt to their feet” in a roaring applause, “which continued at intervals all through his address.” Mr Gibson, in his brief address to the council, said that he was humbled by the overwhelming show of support he has received. He also expressed his gratification for the warm reception and pledged to do all he could to make sure that he returns Kennedy to its rightful place in the FNM’s col umn. Sandilands auxiliary nurses stage protest Kenyatta Gibson gets a standing ovation fr om FNMs Kenyatta Gibson

PAGE 3

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 3 n B y PAUL G T URNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net M INISTER of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing yesterday emphasised that with the 234 employees being terminated when the Isle ofC apri closes its doors in Grand Bahama by the end of May, government must continue its work to “turn things around” in the local economy. Also commenting b riefly on reports that an a dditional 30 persons m ay soon be laid off f rom Ginn’s Old Bahama B ay property, Mr Laing s aid that this is again another case of where b usinesses “all over the world” are trying to respond to the tough e conomic times. “So that Ginn and othe rs would be having a similar reaction is only indicative of the times ofw hich we find ourselves. And we have to e mpathise with the people who are laid off because it is a significant h ardship for them, but this is what is happening n ow and we have to keep working on doing what we can to turn things around. But it is a global economic crisis and that’s what we’re in,” he said. Decision O n Tuesday, senior d irector of corporate communications at OurL ucaya Isle of Capri C asino Jill Haynes said that the move to close the property came as a result of a decision thec ompany recently made in accordance with its strategic corporate plan. The company will reportedly not renew its lease which expires in May and will be shutt ing down operations in t he Bahamas and the U nited Kingdom. The Isle of Capri will now focus, Ms Hayness aid, on the 18 casinos and 8,000 employees that the St Louis Missouri company has in North America. Likewise, Ryan Julison, a spokesman for Ginn, noted that the company is “continuously looking” at ways to save money. In an interview with the Nassau Guardian, Mr Julison said that he could not confirm that Ginn was about to lay off 30 persons, but did state that “our efforts to cre ate the best resort we can with the biggest cost efficiency is an effort that we’re analysing and looking at every day.” n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net OVER a month after he first said he w ould soon name a new senator to replace Pleasant Bridgewater, Opposition leader Perry Christie now anticipates announcing his selection during or after the midyear budget debate in the House of Assembly. Ms Bridgewater resigned her seat on January 24 prompting the need for Mr Christie to select a new appointee to take her vacant seat in the Senate. On January 26, former Prime Minister Christie told the media that he would select a replacement “at the earliest opportunity” and on February 2 he said that within a week a new senator would be seated. Yesterday, asked whether he was having some difficulty making his selection, Mr Christie said “no”, and declared that he was already “done” with the decision. “I just have to do the formal the letters and so forth. “It’s just a question of whether I do it during this debate or immediately after,” he said. Mr Christie previously confirmed that he intends for another Grand Bahama resident to take up the post formally held by Mrs Bridgewater. He said he had received about six recommendations for the post. “I think in my own mind a decision is made, but I want to be absolutely careful about speaking to it until such time as necessary checks are made on all the relevant people who are under discussion,” he said in early February. The Senate has met several times since the resignation of Mrs Bridgewater, who was charged with abetment to extort and conspiracy to extort $25 million from US actor John Travolta. The Police Act and the National Library and Information Services Act have been debated since she stepped down. n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE Ministry of Health conf irmed yesterday that they have b een conducting tests for tuberculosis at Prince George Wharf after a security guard,w ho was admitted to the hos pital for a stroke, tested positive for the disease. Speaking with The Tribune a t the House of Assembly yesterday, Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said that his m inistry has just completed their tests at the wharf and the surrounding area. H owever, he could not conf irm the precise number of individuals who have tested positive for being exposed to the disease or the number of persons who have been con firmed to be infected with TB. Team However, Dr Minnis said that his officers were quick to m obilise a screening team to test persons in and around the facility as soon as they weren otified of the initial case. As the Prince George Wharf houses the docking facility for an umber of cruise lines, Dr Minnis was quick to assure the public that tourists were at “no risk” of contracting the disease as persons must be in “constant and prolonged” interaction with an infected person to catch TB. “Tourists at airports or wherever are at no risk,” Dr Minnis said. “All those who worked with in the vicinity would be screened and there were a certain number who would have been positive. What ‘positive’ means is that they were only exposed. An example is, if I’m h ere with the flu, everyone around here would have been exposed to the flu. They wouldn ot have the flu, and they won’t get the flu, but if you tested them, the test would s how positive that they have been exposed to the flu,” he said. On Tuesday, The Tribune r evealed that at least 18 people have tested positive to being exposed to tuberculosis in a series of tests conducted in and around Prince George Wharf. According to sources at the site who have been personally t ested over the last week, eight individuals returned positive in one day, with another 10 being identified over the course of the screenings. This number included Defence Force officers sta tioned at the Port’s administration offices and workers in and around the Port’s Welcome Centre through which hundreds of tourists pass every day. However, as Dr Minnis pointed out, these persons who have tested positive do not nece ssarily have TB at this time, b ut have been exposed to the disease. Dr Minnis said that once an i ndividual comes back positive, a chest x-ray is taken to ensure that it is just an exposure andt hat they do not have fullblown TB. While he could not confirm the exact number of persons w ho tested positive, Dr Minnis said that his ministry had all of these persons properly s creened between Tuesday and yesterday. Classic symptoms of tuberculosis are a chronic cough with b lood-tinged sputum, fever, night sweats and weight loss. Symptoms Infection of other organs causes a wide range of symp toms. The diagnosis relies onr adiology commonly chest X-rays a tuberculin skin test, blood tests, as well as micro s copic examination and microb iological culture of bodily flu ids. Tuberculosis treatment is difficult and requires long courses of multiple antibiotics,” according to a website on TB. Tuberculosis is spread through the air when persons w ho have the disease cough, sneeze, or spit. One-third of the world’s current populationh as been infected with mycobacterium tuberculosis and new infections occur at a rate of “one per second.” “However, most of these cases will not develop the fullblown disease – asymptomatic, latent infection is most common. “About one in 10 of these latent infections will eventually progress to active disease, which, if left untreated, kills more than half of its victims,” the website warns. Christie makes decision on Pleasant Bridgewater Senate replacement Perry Christie Ministry confirms TB tests at Prince George Wharf Dr Hubert Minnis Laing:Govt must continue work to ‘turn things around’ in economy Announcement will be made during or after mid-year budget debate Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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E DITOR, The Tribune. The present administration has been accused of not coming up with solutions to the country’s economic problems. The fact that this accusation has come from the other side of the floor has not raised any eyebrows but it has given some c larity to how the opposition perceives its responsibility regarding the issue of leadership. Our culture is adverse to those among us who are prone to “shoot their mouth off” witho ut cause or reason, and the fact that no other country has come up with a solution to this problem should have given the opposition “pause”, but no, it seems that they are concerned with having something to say, than actually saying something. Forrester Carroll has sugg ested that his party needs to get their house in order, if they expect to win the next election, but I think he was putting it lightly. His party has to go through a restructuring from the ground up and dust off the book of principles that made the party a viable political entity, and, there is a building perception that this once great par ty is just sitting by waiting for something bad to happen, as it did with its last victory. Hard times often cause people to reflect and for many the FNM party has achieved the status of a viable political entity as the PLP continues its decline. This viability has nothing to do with them being liked, the jury is still out on that verdict, but, they have shown that they have a penchant for coming through in the tough times. They were tested in 1992 with Hurricane Andrew and the varied infrastructural problems they inherited, and again in 2007 when it seems like political entrenchment was bringing out the worst in people. It is unlikely that Mr Ingra ham is going to allow the missteps of the past to happen again, and if the persons in hisp arty can just bide their time and allow for “transition”, it is just possible that we will see what this nation is able to do. The last forty years have had us fighting among ourselves, w hile the “foreign investors” have had a field day with the land that we are supposed to be possessing. We have given up too much just to be driving around in late model vehicles and dressing nicely. Forty years ago we were able to feed ourselves in the areas of poultry, beef and dairy products, butb ack then the investors had to deal with some “fellas” who weren’t getting up off anything except the plan was long term. That old regime had its issues also, but they are never going to be accused of not putting this country first, and this, is our mandate in the era we call the modern Bahamas. And, this has to happen, before we wake up and see our inheritance taken away from “us”. The PLP has to show that there is an emotionally pragmatic connection to the intellect they claim to have in their party. Singular successes are not enough, they make for good copies at business seminars, but viability is about transference and transition. EDWARD HUTCHESON Nassau, February 26, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm Officers who disgrace their uniform FOR YEARS illegal immigration in this c ountry has been a major social problem. Over the years it has been almost impossible to stop t he flow of illegal persons entering the country because of corruption that runs so deeply in this society that no one knows who to trust anymore. As someone, commenting on the dismal sit u ation, said: “We are steeped in a corrupt culture there seems no way out!” C orrupt underground networks, operating both here and in Haiti, make it possible for H aitians to show passports stamped in Haiti giving them legal entry into the Bahamas. How e ver, the passport holder has never left the Bahamas. Somehow “the man” as the under ground operator is identified has a route by which he sends passports from the Bahamas to Haiti to be stamped and returned to the holder i n the Bahamas. The passport has made the trip by itself with no human person attached.W hen it is returned to its owner in the Bahamas, “the man” is paid his fee and life goes on as usu a l. Now that public opinion is forcing a solution to the illegal immigration problem, this lack of trust is the cause of many innocent people being hurt and the sanctity of their homes violated. That is why law enforcement officers be they police or immigration officers must approach e ach situation with the greatest of care, remembering that they are dealing with human beings w hose only crime is that they are trying to find a safe haven from a cruel world. In the chase for immigrants, officers approach their prey assuming their guilt. Often this is not the case. Therefore, they should never forget their own or their victim’s humanity. W here is the need for smashing down doors and destroying property? U sually the person on the other side of the door is so petrified that they are no threat to anyone. There is mistrust on both sides of that closed door. The victim, having had so many experiences with dishonest officials is afraid to open the door, and the officer trying to enter, having experienced so many forged passports, rejects the offer of being shown yet another one although this one might be legitimate. These officers must always remember that one day the tables could be turned. Sometime in the unforeseeable future they could be in the same position of that trembling little immigrant with nowhere to hide. About a year and a half ago, walking to a bus stop a young woman was picked up by two p olicemen in a patrol car. They took her for a“drive” bombarding her with questions. They d etected a slight Jamaican accent. They wanted to know where she lived. She refused to tell them fearing that on every payday they would be at her doorstep for a bribe. She told them that she was in the Bahamas legally and that here mployer had all her papers in to renew her permit. The employer was only awaiting a replyf rom Immigration. The police officers would have none of her e xplanation. They threatened to take her to the Detention Centre if she did not pay them $ 300. She had no money. She asked one of the officers to lend her his cell phone so that she could call a friend to bring her the ransom. One of them handed her his cell. The friend delivered the $300 to the officers, but they did not r elease her. Instead they drove her to Yamacraw, leaving her in a desolate area facedw ith having to walk half across New Providence to find her way home. W hy didn’t her employers report the inci dent? They were too terrified of being at the mercy of dishonest officers who could take their revenge. And so they dropped the matter. If the Police Commissioner hasn’t caught up with these two rogues yet, they are still committing highway robbery in the security of a Bahamian p olice officer’s uniform. And then there was the young man who told h is story on a radio talk show. He said he was picked up in Freeport for a minor traffic infraction. The police officer promised not to book him if he gave him $200. The young man had only $50, which he readily handed to the policeman. He was asked if he had an ATM card. Because of the threats he went to the nearest A TM machine, put his card in, drew out $150, and handed it to the cop. A nother Bahamian officer had disgraced his uniform as he drove into the sunset with $200 stolen dollars tucked securely in his pocket. And so with suspicion on both sides, police officers should be very careful how they sift through the legal and illegal. At no time should they disgrace their uniform and the country and people they serve. Remember we are all made of flesh and blood with the same hopes and dreams, and injustice and physical cruelty hurts the oppressed as much as it does the oppressor. It is true that many should not be in our country, but for God’s sake show some compassion. We can say this because daily we deal with cries of the oppressed. PLP needs a complete overhaul LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net EDITOR, The Tribune. Even in these times we as Freeporters should not take being talked down to by anyone and as a Bahamian citizen I take great objection to the CEO of Carnival Cruise Lines publicly making known his choice, etc, etc, of who Carnival likes to be Prime Minister and how the present Prime Minister was so co-operative when the dry-dock company was being formed. To my knowledge only Bahamians have a vote in the Bahamas. Before we rush in blinded the proposed new cruise port should have a major shareholding in the hands of the common Bahamian with a preference for residents on Grand Bahama. The Bahamas Government should not have any stake. I understand the preferred location is owned by Grand Bahama Port Authority so GBPA if you really want to put a financial stim ulus in the Freeport market commit now without delay that Freeport and Grand Bahamians will own no less than 30 per cent of the proposed cruise port. Carnival if they wish could be offered 15 per cent and the balance of 55 per cent GBPA. This is one chance for the new imaged GBPA to really show if what they say is actually true I am not going to hold my breathe, but have hopes. J PERCENTIE Freeport, February 25, 2009. F r eeporters should not tolerate people talking down to them EDITOR, The Tribune. Every evening on ZNS-TV Channel 11 the Freeport News is shown at 6.30pm and then the local Nassau news is shown. During the Nassau News the Freeport news is repeated again. This is very annoying after you have just watched it previ ously you then are interested in and looking to see and hear the Nassau News. Do they not get enough News from Nassau that they have to repeat the Freeport News? In my humble opinion it is not necessary to repeat the Freeport news again as it has been shown just before the Nassau news comes on. ZNS TV at 7pm should focus more on the Nassau news and news happen ing in other islands outside of the Northern Bahamas scope that the Freeport News covers. A BAHAMIAN NEWS LOVER Nassau, March, 2009. No need to repeat Freeport news

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n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net SOUTH Andros MP Picewell Forbes continued his push for a shift in the thinking of local politicians, even ruffling a few feathers in his own political party, as he made his contribution to the midyear budget in the House of Assembly this week. Declaring that politicians have been “flamming” and “making stuff up on the fly” for too long, Mr Forbes said that it is high time to remake the Bahamas “anew again.” “We need the promise of Majority Rule and while the majority may look and act like they are in charge, we know and they know who is really in charge around here,” Mr Forbes told parliament on Monday. “We have dressed up the UBP with black UBPs, we have created a generation of political elites and I call them the black oligarchy that’s a big word Mr Speaker. The white oligarchy was that way because they had the money and the colour. Well, the black oligarchy are that way because they control the two political parties and the little cliques say who leads and who follows. “Mr Speaker, it was a time for a change in 1992, 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2009. We want a change today. The prime minister said it was time for a change and we gave him 10 years and what did he change? Then he came back and wanted another chance. What did he change or is working on changing that will be of a major import to the 21st century Bahamas? Well Mr Speaker, it’s time for us to know it is not all about men, we have had Sir Lynden, Hubert Ingraham and Perry Christie. It’s not about ego and they have all had that. But it’s about country first and making the necessary adjustments to meet the new challenges of a modern Bahamas,” he said. Mr Forbes even questioned what would change if Bahamians gave his own party leader, Perry Christie, another chance at leading the country. “Even if we give Christie another chance the problem is really the system. It doesn’t work for the man in the streets and it never will,” he said. Mr Forbes added that if there is going to be a new kind of Bahamas, where “Bahamians run the show”, then there has to be a serious look at leadership “in all sectors of our society.” “A new Bahamas will require a country-wide strategy. No longer will we run the Bahamas with manifestos or action plans that’s old school. We need to run a Bahamas with a country document. A document that shows where we are all headed so that we can all dream and find our rightful place in the new Bahamian society. “The 1960s mentality politician will say ‘nonsense, we are in charge.’ But Mr Speaker, in charge of what? Each other? Mr Speaker, it is time for us to take a truthful look at this chamber and deal with matters such as this one. Many Bahamians are feeling second class and when people are feeling this way the proliferation of superficial facts from august bodies like the World Bank about our GDP and per capita income means nothing. They know what they are feeling in our society today. “Mr Speaker, the time has come for us to apologise to the Bahami an people for being men of limited vision and imagination. We have asked the people to believe in us when we were not proven and they gave three leaders a chance with no track record to assess or to be guided by, in the likes of the father of our Nation Sir Lynden Pindling, Hubert Ingraham and Perry Christie, who all served as prime ministers, with the former serving until this day. “The Bahamian people gave young people of colour a chance and in some views we have never returned the favour. Others have been more generous in their comments and said that we have done great as a country of 46 years.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464W E SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 JUSTICE EMMANUEL OSADEBAY , left, is pictured being sworn in as Acting P resident of the Court of Appeal b y Governor General Arthur H anna on Tuesday March 3, 2009 at Government House. n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net GOVERNMENT had to make some “very tough decisions” on which Family Island capital projects to fund in light of the downturn in the global economy, Minister of State for Lands and Local Government Byran Woodside said in parliament yesterday. Addressing the impact the worldwide economic slump has had on the less inhabited Bahamian islands, Mr Woodside said that the central government had to call on local governments to more fully justify and “pri oritise” all expenditure they were seeking. “Funding for capital projects within the various Family Islands was not released during the first six months of the (2008/2009 Being fully aware of the negative impact the downturn would have on the Bahamas, this prudent and visionary government undertook an in-depth review of the various submissions for capital projects and made some very tough decisions relative to the areas of expenditure,” said Mr Woodside. “Local government district councils were requested to prioritise their submissions for capital funding and provide detailed costs to ensure that there would be no overruns that would require contingency funding,” he added. He said that districts which “provided the requisite information were provided with allocations for capital works” in January 2009. Those allocations amounted to a total of $1,289,199 – with Central Aba co ($133,677$120,000$101,000 Hope Town and South Andros ($100,000 Govt made ‘tough decisions’ on Family Island capital projects Forbes:time to remake the Bahamas anew again P icewell Forbes P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S A cting President of the Court of Appeal sworn in

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THE Bahamas last month launched massive television advertising reaching consumers as far away as Los Angeles, California – the largest metropolitan population in the United States. In an effort to attract travellers from the largest state economy in the US, Ministry of Tourism and Aviation marketing experts have included California and other parts of the western US in an aggressive television advertising campaign. The expansion of a strong marketing presence in the western US is part of the ministry’s business plan, which was presented to the public by Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent VanderpoolWallace shortly after his appointment. “The entire Caribbean would say the western United States is untapped,” said Rene Mack, president in the Ministry of Tourism’s public relations agency, Weber Shandwick. The lack of direct flights and the abundance of inconvenient air connections make travel to the Caribbean from the west coast difficult, he said. However, he pointed out that the Bahamas has had success in creating awareness among Los Angeles residents and others on the west coast through public relations – unpaid media placements. He said the Bahamas’ had a strong public relations presence in the west even before advertising efforts had been put in place. “You are in the Los Angeles Times,” Mr Mack said. “We are in the newspapers in Phoenix, New Mexico. We ignore no one.” Kim Hunter, president and CEO of LaGrant Communications, a public relations agency specialising in the African American consumer market for the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, recommended more robust attempts to attract travellers from the west coast. He pointed out that Hawaii captures more Los Angeles travellers than the Bahamas even though the Bahamas is closer to Los Angeles. Honolulu is 2,559 miles from Los Angles – 38 miles farther away than Nassau. He said Los Angeles and other western cities could provide a boom for Bahamas tourism. This is a huge, untapped market,” Mr Hunter said. “I will give you one example, Jamaica, our competition. They sell Jamaica from Los Angeles because you have a lift there that goes non-stop to Montego Bay as well as to Ocho Rios. It is the same distance from us in LosA ngeles to go from LA to Jamaica as it is to go from LA to Hawaii.” At the moment, he said, the Bahamas is just scratching the surface of the benefits that Los Angeles has to offer. Through proper media and corporate partnerships, much more can be contributed to Bahamian tourism by Los Angeles residents and others on the west coast, Mr Hunter said. “Part of it is the invitation,” he said. “If you don’t give the invite to journalists, if you don’t give the invitation to prospective consumers, they will never come. That western region of the United States is a huge opportunity to you. Because I can tell you now, your competition is wooing that market.” Portland and Seattle are among the notable cities for tourism targeting, Mr Hunter said. He pointed out that the cities endure rain frequently and their residents would be pleased to experience good weather and beautiful beach es. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Aggressive tourism marketing reaches the US west coast Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE government is setting up a joint public/private body to help shape technical training available in the country to better enable students to meet industry demands, Education Minister Carl Bethel said in the House of Assembly yesterday. Persons in the private sector have long complained that they have difficulty finding recruits with the necessary skills to take up jobs acrossa range of industries. Even at present, with unemployment rising, certain fields still require labour to be brought in from abroad as there are few Bahamians with the necessary skills. A iming to address this problem and leave a lasting stamp on teaching in the Bahamas, Minister Bethel said the government would like to follow the example of other Caribbean countries and set up a public/private sector council which will liase with the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI with the most useful qualifications. Officials from the Ministry of Education are set to travel to three C aribbean countries Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica in coming months to review their successes in this regard. The National Workforce Development Council is a construct that we are seeking to put together that would provide a forum for interested private sector businesses and business leaders to have an input, a direct connection with the curriculum officers and administration at BTVI so that the expectations of the industry in terms of what they are looking for in their entry level employees, that those expectations will have a greater reflection in the curriculum of BTVI and in the qual-i ty of training,” said Mr Bethel. “Once we’ve done that consultancy, going around getting the backg round information, then we will move to actualise the creation of it, bring the legislation forward,” he added. Mr Bethel said if the move is successful, the intention is to expand the cooperation between the public and private sector “throughout other parts of the curriculum”, so that education across the board not just in the technical fields can be tailored more closely to respond to the needs of the market. The minister said that overhauling the curriculum as a whole is a priority for him at this time one which he said he will be pursuing “very aggressively” in coming months. “As was recommended 40 years ago, (the Ministry is interested in set(ting teachers so that we’ll have subject-based curriculum committees to revise the curriculum so we can get rid of this narrow, very superficial curriculum that we presently have in core subjects, and try to improve the way we teach reading, maths, history, geography, civics and social studies,” said Mr Bethel. “The critical thing is that we hope to be able to make greater progress in the meeting of expectations.” Govt to set up technical training body

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tWKHLJKWULFH6HVVLRQV,,,97KXUVGD\WK 6HVVLRQV9WK PROFESSOR Karol Sikora, Dean of the Buckingham School of Medicine and author of the most widely-used cancer textbook in graduate medical school in the United Kingdom, has been appointed director of medical oncology at the Bahamas Cancer Centre, it was announced yesterday. “We are indeed honoured to announce that one of the leading authorities, both in academia and in cancer treatment practice, Dr Karol Sikora, the Dean of the Buckingham School of Medicine and author of two definitive texts on cancer, has accepted the position of director of medical oncology at the Cancer Centre at the Centreville Medical Pavilion,” said Dr Conville Brown, co-founder and CEO of the centre. Facility The centre opened its radiation oncology division in January 2004 while moving into its new $12 million-comprehensive state-of-theart cancer screening, diagnosis and treatment facility at 72 Collins Avenue. The medical oncology division of the centre opened in Janu ary 2009. “Dr Sikora is author of ‘The Treatment of C ancer,’ the standard British post-graduate textbook on cancer, and his new work, ‘The Economics of Cancer,’ is already making its impact felt. He is also an advisor on cancer to the World Health Organisation and the medical director of CancerPartnersUK, which administers a $100 million-public/private trust for the radiation treatment of government-referred patients, not dissimilar to our local model at the Cancer Centre,” Dr Brown said. “As a leading voice in cancer research and therapy, Dr Sikora will bring additional strength and depth of knowledge to our very strong team that is committed to the fight against cancer, the number two killer of adult men and women in the Bahamas.” Professor Sikora will also be supported by the Cancer Centre’s two senior staff medical oncol ogists – Dr Nevein Girgis, who holds a PhD in medical oncology from the National Cancer Institute at Cairo University in Egypt, and Dr Osama Kellini, who holds a Masters Degree in clinical oncology (medical and radiation oncology), and was a former medical director of the Nassau Institute Oncology Centre in Cairo, Egypt. Professor Arthur Porter, CEO of McGill University Health Centre, serves as managing director of the centre, and its director of radiation oncology. Both experts will be in Nassau later this week for the second in a series of monthly professors’ cancer clinics. The clinic will be held this Saturday. “Constructing the centre and equipping it with the most sensitive, advanced, and state-ofthe-art diagnostic and treatment equipment was a huge step toward meeting the goal of being able to provide the very best cancer care for Bahamians at home,” said Dr Brown. “But ultimately it is the people in any medical facility who make the real difference. Now, with the affiliation of not one, but two of the leading voices in cancer study and treatment onboard, we are excited about the prospects of making a real dent in the destructive path of cancer.” Medical professors and Dr Porter and Dr Sikora lead a team of more than 20 full-time medical and paramedical professionals providing all modalities of diagnosis and treatment – radiation, chemotherapy and surgical. Professor Porter is assisted by two staff radiation oncologists – Dr Margo Munroe, a Bahamian trained in Alberta, Canada, and DrM emory Nsingo, a second clinical oncologist (medical and radiation The Cancer Centre is one of the few cancer treatment facilities equipped for paediatric treatment and surgery, a division headed by American Board-certified paediatric haema tologist-oncologist Dr Corrine Sin Quee. The Cancer Centre is the only facility in the western hemisphere and the second in the world outside the US to be accredited by the American College of Radiation Oncol ogy. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Vopak Terminal Bahamas will demolish the three remaining concrete stack units at the former Bahamas Oil R efinery Company plant on Saturday. The 40-year-old landmarks – which stand 350ft tall are coming down to make way for the construction of additional oil storage tanks at Vopak, which is presently undergoing a major expansion project. Maxwell Sweeting, vice-president of Vopak, said the event will be attended by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and residents of Grand Bahama, particularly from the nearby surrounding settlements. Vopak held a town meeting on Tuesday evening at the Church of the Good Shepherd for residents of Pinder’s Point, Hunters, and Lewis Yard. Representatives from the Cleveland Wrecking Company, Dykon Explosives, and Bahamian Contractor Don Moss attended the meeting to allay any concerns residents may have about the implosion. “We want the community to be a part of this event and we have started an art competition for students of Lewis Yard Prima-ry School to depict what they expect to see on Saturday. The winning student will get the honour of pushing the button, along with the prime minister, to implode the three stacks,” Mr Sweeting said. Vopak demolished three steel stacks last year with no disruption to residents in the area. Chester Grace, blaster estimator at Dykon, said over 200 pounds of explosives will be used for the implosion. He noted that Dykon has 25 years experience in the field. The entire implosion should be completed within five minutes,he said. “There will be some noise when the blast goes off, but vibrations will be minimal when the stacks hit the ground,” he said. He said a lot of dust debris is expected, but it is no cause for concern to residents in the area. “We don’t think residents will have to evacuate because it is not going to be an immediate problem to them,” said Mr Grace. Invited persons will watch the implosion from a safe designated area some 1,000ft away, on land that has been cleared for the Greenfield Expansion Project, which is esti mated at between $250 million to $300 million. Vopak is an independent oil storage hub for customers from around the world. Vopak and First Reserve Corporation purchased the BORCO plant last April. The company will have invested $1 billion when the expansion of the facility is completed on Grand Bahama. LEADING MEDICAL EXPERTS TO HOST CANCER CLINIC: (l-r University Health Centre and managing director of the Cancer Centre and director of radiation oncology; Professor Karol Sikora, Dean of the Buckingham School of Medicine, director of medicalo ncology at the Cancer Centre, and Dr Conville Brown, co-founder and CEO of the centre. New director of medical oncology appointed at Bahamas Cancer Centre Three remaining concrete stack units to be demolished

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor provision of General Insurance Services described below.Biddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe & RUSRUDWLRQ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQIFH%OXH+LOOt7XFNHURDGV Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 7HQGHUVDUHWREHDGGUHVVHGWR Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. 6XEPLVVLRQVVKRXOGEHPDUNHGDVIROORZV Tender No. 690/09 $ OOLVNV*HQHUDO,QVXUDQFH (acial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents ( b) Computers, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment Tender No. 691/09 0RWRU,QVXUDQFH&RPPHUFLDOtULYDWHHKLFOHV T ender No. 692/09 $ FFLGHQW,QVXUDQFHRQH\t%XUJODU\ T ender No. 693/09 / LDELOLW\,QVXUHUVRQDOtXEOLF T ender No. 694/09 Professional Indemnity > 2IFHU'LUHFWRU3URIHVVLRQDO6WDII(QJLQHHU A ccountants, Attorneys] t Tender No. 695/09 Marine Insurance 7KH&RUSRUDWLRQUHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRDFFHSWRUUHMHFWDQ\RUDOOSURSRVDOV )RUDOOLQTXLULHVUHJDUGLQJWKHWHQGHUVtVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW M r. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163 Limited appointments available. Kindly phone Salome to reserve. 502-9610 Professor of Medical Oncology, Prof. Karol Sikora, MA, MB BChir, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM Dean of the University of Buckingham School of Medicine, author of over 300 papers & Director of Medical Oncology at The Cancer Centre The Cancer Centre at Centreville Medical Pavilion announces the Professors Cancer ClinicClinic open to the public The Cancer Centre at Centreville Medical Pavilion 72 Collins Avenue Saturday, March 7 10:00am 3:00pmProfessor of Oncology, The Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter, PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FRCPC, Director General & CEO, McGill University Health Centre, Managing Director, The Cancer Centre reside for long periods in Abaco, creating long-term sustainablee mployment for many Bahamia ns,” said Mr Key, as he contributed to the mid-year budget debate. M r Key, Bahamas Agricul tural and Industrial Corporation executive chairman, added in ani nterview after his speech that the model makes Abaco less susceptible to the seasonal nature of hotel and short-term vacationb ased tourism. “In Abaco we have yearround tourism because of the s econd home owners. They spend up to six or eight months there. They are wealthy and theye mploy a lot of Bahamians from a ll over,” said Mr Key. Having recently visited Cat Island, Mr Key said he felt thatt he “beautiful” island had all the potential to sustain a second home community that Abaco has and could benefit accordi ngly. M eanwhile, he added that with its proximity to the United States, Andros also has potential t o benefit from this model of development. Mr Key’s comments come in t he wake of lay-offs at hotels in N ew Providence (Atlantis and Wyndham), Grand Bahama ( Our Lucaya) and Abaco (Winding Bay months. On Tuesday 200 more jobs in G rand Bahama were left in limbo when an announcement was made that Isle of Capri would not be renewing its contract to run the casino at the Our Lucaya hotel in Freeport when it expires i n May. T ourist arrivals to The Bahamas were down by close to five per cent in 2008 over the p revious year, according to the Central Bank of the Bahamas. D espite Mr Key’s optimistic a ssessment, the second home model of development has come u nder fire from local communities in the past for contributing to lifting local land prices out of the price range of average B ahamians in favour of foreigners who do not spend the majority of the year at the properties they purchase. activity, although obviously the Bank would be concerned were such a practice to become t he norm among companies in the local market, a s it would, inevitably, impact negatively on t he stock of reserves. "The official system provides checks and b alances that would deter unauthorized transf er of investment capital and violators would be g uilty of an offence under the Schedule to the E xchange Control Regulations. They could b e subject to sanction, including court action," she said. If CLICO (Bahamas m illion through its local operations, the company would have required approval from the Central Bank to extend loans to its foreign affiliates, regardless of the source of these f unds and whether held in Bahamian dollars or foreign currency. "For example, if CLICO had amassed these f unds from its foreign operations and lent them v ia the Bahamian subsidiary company, such a ctions would still require exchange control approval. "A review of our Exchange Control records d oes not reflect that the Central Bank either received an application from CLICO (Bahamas (Bahamas assets to its foreign affiliates," Ms Craigg said. While giving an update on the situation in the H ouse of Assembly on Monday, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said a wind-up order given on February 24 was ordered by the Registrar of Insurance because the company's liabilities o utweighed its assets by $9 million. He added that its Turks & Caicos branch could not pay $2.6 million in claims. H e said that since 2004, CLICO (Bahamas b egan writing "excessive cash advances" to its s ubsidiary CLICO Enterprises Ltd, which were ultimately invested in the declining Florida real estate market. T he Bahamas serves as a parent jurisdiction for the Turks & Caicos and Belize, however it i s a separate entity from CLICO operations in Trinidad and Tobago, and other jurisdictions. Questions over loans of more than $70m to foreign affiliates FROM page one FROM page one Abaco economy ‘is model for the rest of Bahamas’

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in a lot of additional people when our hotels reach 100 per cent level, not permanently, buti n the afterglow we will hopefully get the loss b ack.” M iss Universe organisation president Paula Shugart said the pageant also will be hiring local workers to assist in the event. And Robert Sands, vice president of external affairs for BahaMar, said every hotel will seek tob enefit both during the event and from the e xpected long-term boost it will bring to the industry. However, he said, it is too early to speculate on the possibility of cancelling the planned twomonth closure of the Wyndham hotel in Cable Beach this year. Our position has not changed,” he said. “But if there is overriding and compelling indication of d efinitive demand I am sure we will look at those reasons to make adjustments.” Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vand erpool-Wallace’s principal focus is on the rosy “afterglow” expected to follow the event as a result of publicity generated by televising the pageant in more than 170 countries. He intends to send the beauty queens to as many Family Islands as possible to expose the range and variety of experiences the Bahamash as to offer, and will inform viewers around the world about how to travel to the Bahamas at a time when it will be easier than ever before as a result of recent adjustments to visa requirements. He said: “The whole idea is making sure that we are having your country shown in the best possible light, and publicity has a much higherc redibility than advertising. It is much more scientific than it has ever been and the cost is lower than it has ever been.” The government has put up $2.9 million to host the event, and additional costs including transportation, food and beverages, and importing production trucks, will be covered by the private sector in an unprecedented show of sup p ort, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. backyard of her home in Price Street, Nassau Village, with a maul and then broke a hinge on the back door to gain access to her property at a round 4am on February 24. T he Bahamian mother-oft wo said she offered to show h er passport to the armed offic ers who never identified t hemselves as being from the Immigration Department. However, they declined to look at it. Ms Hanna said the officers left behind the maul used to break down the gate and beat t he door. As yet, she said, the Immigration Department has not arranged to repair the damage. S ince the raid Ms Hanna and her daughter have felt unsafe in their home and both have fallen ill with pneumo n ia. Amber is being treated in the children’s ward of PrincessM argaret Hospital for the illn ess, which Ms Hanna attrib utes to post-traumatic stress. Her daughter, a pupil at Kingsway Academy, cried andv omited while about seven armed officers interrogated the pair. Her mother said thec hild was so disturbed by the raid that she has since been too afraid to be in the house without holding her mother’s hand or to stay there at night, Ms Hanna said. Immigration Minister Branville McCartney said he would meet with Ms Hanna and launch an investigation into the incident after reading a bout it in T he Tribune o n Thursday. However, Ms Hanna has not heard from Mr McCartney since his initial phone call on Friday and they have made no arrangements to meet. She said: “I would like to meet him to find out when they are going to fix my stuff, that is the only thing I am concerned with. “I was in my safety zone and it was damaged. “I have hired a lawyer who is looking into filing a lawsuit against the ImmigrationD epartment for pain and suffering and damage to my home. “I am not doing it because of money, I am doing it because I need safety for my house and safety for my child ren.” M s Hanna, who works at N assau Airport three days a week, said she now needs security bars for my doorb ecause she no longer feels safe as a single parent living in Nassau Village. She added: “I am not feeling well and my daughter is in hospital because she got sick from vomiting and she is asthm atic. It is most definitely b ecause of the stress.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 9 .,'=&,7< 0RQWURVH$YHQXHDQG[IRUGWUHHWGRRUVRUWKRIXOWL'LVFRXQWf 6725(:,'(6$/( 6DOHWDU (QGVDWXUGD\DUFKWK %,* '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* $67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP Trinidad, now apparently owned by the Government of Trinidad a nd Tobago, our own Prime Minister of the Bahamas cannot say whether he has spoken to the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago about this matter. The former Prime Minister of Barbados, Owen Arthur has suggested that since this is a trans-border, CARICOM-wide issue, all Heads of Government should get together and in the spirit of functional co-operation settle the CLICO matter and other trans-b order financial services issues,” he said. Mr Mitchell added that while the Prime Minister is on the bureau of CARICOM and can seek to convene an early meeting of Heads o f government, he has thus far decided to do “nothing”. “The concern about this Government’s actions continues to grow when one sees the listed assets of CLICO Bahamas whichi nclude 14 million in cash. It raises whether there was any risk to the c ompany that would have required a liquidation order and whether or not there was any conflict of interest or any insider trading or any disposition to allow a raid of the assets of CLICO in the Bahamas. T here must be full and frank disclosure by all public officials involved in this matter,” he said. New temporary jobs in hotel sector FROM page one D AYANA MENDOZA , Miss U niverse 2008, at yesterday’s p ress conference. P hoto: Derek Smith FROM page one Mitchell wants full disclosure FROM page one Single mother intends to sue Immigration Department

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I N THE Chinese lang uage, the two symbols that make up the word "crisis" are often translated as signifying “danger” and “opportunit y”. Many people read this as suggesting that even the most dangerous situations carry within them the seeds of genuine possibility. A web search displays more than half a million references arguing either for or against this interpretat ion, but whatever its accuracy, the relevance of the proverb t o today's world is clear. In mental health terms, a cris is does not refer to an event or situation, but to one’s reaction t o that event or situation. A c risis is dangerous because we have the potential to overre-a ct to it, panic, and make irrational decisions that are not in our own best interest. W e can witness this on a daily basis where various labour and economic statistics a re published and the world markets go into a tailspin resulting in massive job cutsa nd sell-offs, which in turn initiates another round of panic, and so on. F urthermore, even in the definition of so positive a word as 'opportunity', there are references to threats and uncertainties. Among the word's numerous definitions, two are: “an uncertain event with a positive probable consequence” a nd “the combination of an asset, a threat and an occasion that may give rise to an incident”. I believe that tremendous o pportunities are at our d oorstep as we look to what lies ahead.A time for change is u pon us; a time for planning a nd rebuilding, a time to strengthen and foster the t hings that should not be damaged by an ailing economy –o ur health, our families and o ur incredibly beautiful country. Recession Most countries around the world have been in a recessionf or over a year and eventually t he cycle will hit bottom and enter into the recovery period f ollowed by an expansion.For the last 100-plus years economic expansions have come o n the heels of industrial and technological revolutions ofh uman ingenuity. H umans discovered steel and harnessed electricity, i nvented mass production and c reated automobiles and air travel. Now, new horizons are visible through the internet and the information age.It leaves one to ask what will the next recovery and expansion consist of and how can TheB ahamas and our people put ourselves in a position to bene fit? For decades the struggle for o il has wreaked havoc across the globe. Experts including Fortune 500 companies aren ow acknowledging that the existing energy model is not sustainable and has created too m uch dependence on external sources. Some estimate that oil r eserves have peaked or are about to peak. That, compounded with China and Indi-a ’s emerging markets and increased demand for oil, means we are left scrambling for solutions to meet futureg lobal energy demand.Major oil companies are investing heavily in the production andr esearch of alternative energy (www.bpsolar.com and www.shell.com/solar) In 2004, Shell opened a solar plant in Germany sufficient to power 1,800 house-h olds.As of 2006, the state of Texas had developed enough w ind capacity to power more than 600,000 average American homes. General Electric, o ne of the largest US companies, announced earlier this y ear that it will invest $6 billion into alternative energy by the year 2010. In addition to altern ative energy, large and small companies across the globe are d esigning and manufacturing everything imaginable in preparation for the next eco nomic expansion – the green renaissance. T he Bahamas has always been fortunate to have natural beauty and proximity to the United States.We are also fortunate to have such a small population in relation to our land mass. H owever, in a glob alised world where places r esembling the Bahamas can even be manufactured – consider Dubai’s Palm Island and T he World Islands – we have to be more inventive in order to stay competitive. There are several statistics about how many people live i n the Bahamas: for argument ’s sake, let’s say there are 320,000 people today.The estimated population density is 23 people per square kilometre.Globally this ranks number 188 out of 238 countries in terms of population density. F or reference, Bermuda is #7 at 1,211 people/sq. km., J amaica is #51 and The United States is #177 at 31 p eople/sq.km.The least dense population in the world is Greenlandat0.026p eople/sq.km. This number for the Bahamas is a little misleading b ecause the majority of the population is located on New Providence. If New Providence w ere a country itself it would rank as the 12th most densely populated country behindB angladesh and, at the other end, Inagua as its own country would be the third least densely populated country int he world behind only Greenland and The Falkland Islands. Population To put it in perspective, if Paradise Island had the same density as Inagua there would be four or five people living on the entire island.The rest of t he Bahamian islands are closer to Inagua’s population dens ity than they are to New Providence. With the green renaissance on the horizon, it may be a blessing in disguise that TheB ahamas’ Family Islands never developed to their full p otential. The green renaissance brings new opportuni t ies for improving our tourism product and infrastructure, e stablishing agriculture and m anufacturing bases and cre ate a bigger role and reason for Bahamians to do business in the family islands. It is also likely the only way to solve the overcrowding we a re facing on New Providence. The capacity is there to achieve this through a more sustainable and well-planned process. As long as we can build this new economy while effectivelym anaging our resources we can develop a brand and products that leaves the world green w ith envy. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor the services described belowBiddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ2IFH Blue Hill & Tucker Roads Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 Tendersaretobeaddressedto: Mr. Kevin Basden General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: onorbefore26thMarch,2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. Submissions should be marked as follows: Tender No. 682/09 6725$*(7$1. &/($1,1*(59,&(6 &/,)721,(5:(5$7,21 TheCorporationreservestherighttoaccept or reject any or all proposals. For all inquiries regarding the tenders DQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236 Village Rd. Shopping Centre 393-2393 or 393-4293 Seagrapes Shopping Centre 364-5978 or 364-5979 e: info@qvsbahamas.com QUENCH YOUR THIRSTANDYOUR SOUL. During the month of March, come to any QVS Pharmacy (Village Road or Seagrapes Shopping Centre) and for every bottle of Dasani water you buy, partial proceeds will be donated to The Bahamas Red Cross. On March 22nd, World Water Day, every cent from your water purchase goes to the charity.QVS Pharmacy & HelpUsHelpTheBahamas. Help Fill Up Someone Else’s Cup... 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t $ WWULEXWHVWRLQFOXGH \HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQ*ROI&RXUVH&RQVWUXFWLRQDQG 0DQDJHPHQWDWOHDGLQJ*ROI&OXE .QRZOHGJHRIDOOSKDVHVRI*ROIFRXUVHGHVLJQDQG FRQVWUXFWLRQDFWLYLWLHVLQFOXGLQJYHUWLFDOJROIFRQVWUXFWLRQ FOXEKRXVHVPDLQWHQDQFHIDFLOLWLHVLUULJDWLRQSXPSVWDWLRQVf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t&($1&/8%$VSDUWRIRXUFRPPLWPHQWWRHPSOR\%DKDPLDQV RQRXUSURMHFWZHDUHVHHNLQJTXDOLHG%DKDPLDQVWRD SSO\IRUWKHSRVLWLRQRI* ROI&RXUVH&RQVWUXFWLRQ $VVLVWDQWDQDJHU DIVIDEND NOTICE TO COMMON SHAREHOLDERS T he Board of Directors of Commonwealth Bank Limited has Declared a Quarterly Dividend for Common, E,F,G,H andI Preference Shares, to all shareholders o f record at March 13, 2009, as follows:C ommon5c per share “A” Preference 7% per annum payable quarterly B” Preference 7%per annum payable quarterly “C” Preference 7% per annum payable quarterly “D” Preference 7% per annum payable quarterly “E” Preference 7% per annum payable quarterly “F” Preference 7% per annum payable quarterly “G” Preference 7% per annum payable quarterly Preference 7%per annum payable quarterly “I” Preference 7%per annum payable quarterly The payment will be made on March 31, 2009 through Colina Financial Advisors Limited, the Registrar & Transfer Agent, in the usual manner. C harlene A. Bosfield Corporate Secretary A green economy in the Bahamas A green economy in the Bahamas A green economy in the Bahamas A green economy in the Bahamas A green economy in the Bahamas A green economy in the Bahamas A green economy in the Bahamas A green economy in the Bahamas A green economy in the Bahamas A green economy in the Bahamas This is one in a series of articles discussing the potential opportunities fort he Bahamas in the emerging green e conomy. Colin Lightbourn, who wrote this piece, is a real estate business owner and developer. He is a private pilot and past president of the Bahamas National Trust. To comment, discuss and submit ideas a bout these articlesplease visit www.thegreenislands.com

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C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Boxing tribute CONGRATULATIONS to Bianca Stuart. Over the weekend, she became the latest Bahamian collegiate star to close out heri ndoor career on a successful note. Stuart, who turns 22 on May 17, soared to her fourth consecutive triumph in the women's long jump at the State Farm Missouri Valley Confer ence Championships at the University of Iowa in Cedar Falls. She also closed the chapter in her collegiate sting by inking her name on the All-time Conference and UNI Dome records, a feat that a modest Stuart took in her stride as she surpassed the performance of another Bahamian DedraDavis, who excelled at Missouri State back in the early 1990s. Stuart is following a long line of stellar Bahamian female long jumpers in college, includ ing Shonel Ferguson, Jackie Edwards, Davis, Natasha Brown and Grand Bahamian Daphne Saunders. She's currently chasing the national record that is shared by Ferguson and Edwards and the way she's performing, her coach Andre Scott said it's onlya matter of time before she joins the elite of jumpers, who have surpassed the 22-feet bar rier. So far, the only two Bahamians to achieve that feat are Fer guson and Edwards. While Ferguson has since retired and is now running a successful business, Edwards is still competing. Last year, however, Stuart upstaged Edwards at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations' NationalOpen Track and Field Championships at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Sta dium in what could be termed the "changing of the guard". But in the end, Edwards' performance during the year enabled her to eventually goto the Olympic Games in Beijing, China in August. Stuart had to stay at home, but she has vowed that this year willbe totally different. She has promised that when the national team head to the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany in August, she intends to make her first major senior trip. But she knows that she will have to duplicate her feat last June when this year's nationalsare held in June, or at least attain the A qualifying standards for the championships when the outdoor season gets underway. Stuart, in an interview with The Tribune , said it's just a matter of time and she urged everybody to be "patient" with her. With the type of perfor mance she already turned in so far this year, Stuart should be well on her way to making her giant leap on the senior international scene and she has't started her outdoor campaign at college yet. Talking about college, Grand Bahamian superstar Nivea Smith has joined her former Carifta team-mates and she's already gotten off to a great start. As a freshman at Auburn University, Smith is starting to take the form of a mega superstar. She's competing along side Cache Armbrister in the Tigersc onnection at Auburn University. The two should raise some eyebrows in college this year, according to their Bahamian assistant coach at Auburn, Henry Rolle. The duo, along with Sheni qua 'Q' Ferguson, who is expected to join them in August, are following in the footsteps of Debbie FergusonMcKenzie and should be the era replacements for the retired Golden Girls, Pauline DavisThompson, Eldece ClarkeLewis and Sevatheda Fynes. It would be good, since we missed out at the opportunity to qualify for the Olympics, to have the return of our women's 4 x 100 relay team. Could you imigine seeing the mixture of the veterans FergusonMcKenzie and Chandra Sturrup combining with the youthful Ferguson, Smith and Armbrister? Ferguson already got a taste of the big league when she competed at the Olympics last year. Hopefully this will be the year that Smith and Armbrister make the transition from the junior to the senior ranks at the World Championships. Like Stuart said about soaring over the 22-feet barrier, let's just be "patient" as the sprinters keep the Bahamas on track. DAVIS CUP The men's national team is in Paraguay competing in the first round of the American Zone II Davis Cup tie. The team, captained by John Farrington, will be in action this weekend. Led by Olympian Devin Mullings, the team doesn't have any player with a high ATP computer ranking. But what they possess is a lot of heart. The other members are Timothy Neilly, Bjorn Munroe OPINION STUBBS Recognising our athletes’ latest accomplishments SEE page 12 CH REEVES Tre Barry wins as H O Nash Xavier Coakley tries to catch him. THE F IGHTING FINNEGANS n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net B A CKEDby a dominating performance from the male half of their roster, the C.H. Reeves R aptors track and field team reclaimed their usual spot atop the leaderboard. T he Raptors totalled 711 points, near ly 120 points ahead of their nearest com petitors, to take home the Junior High S chool Championship in the Govern ment Secondary School Sports Associa t ion’s 16th Annual Track and Field Meet. The S.C. McPherson Sharks finished s econd with 591.50 points, H.O. Nash Lions were third with 501 points while the T.A. Thompson Scorpions and A.F. Adderley Tigers tied for fourth with 432 points. L ast year’s champions, the L.W. Y oung Golden Eagles fell to sixth place with 416.50 points while Anatol Rodgers and D.W. Davis rounded out the fieldw ith 222 and 153 points respectively. The Raptors won four of a six cont ested divisions including sweeping all three male categories and the junior g irls. Their most commanding win on the male side came in the Intermediate boysd ivision with 162 points, well ahead of the Sharks with 148. I n the Bantam division, the Raptors won by a slim three point margin over the Tigers, 109-106 and an even slim-m er two point margin in the Junior Boys division, 133-131 over the Sharks. The Junior girls won by a sizable 36.5 point margin over the Eagles, 1552115.50. T he Sharks and Lions spilt the remaining divisions with S.C. McPherson taking the Bantam girls with 110 points and H.O. Nash with 149.50 points to claim t he Intermediate girls. Raptors Head Coach, Fritz Grant, said the win came as a result of a concen-t rated team effort including the staff, students and parents. I must give God thanks for the overall team effort. The support from the parents lead to us having two persons in each event and that is one of the major differencesb etween this year and last year. Last year we may have had to miss one or t wo persons but this year we were not going to make the same mistake. We were going to get everybody there, readyt o compete and they did extremely well running and in the field as well,” he said. “The program that we run we have established has made it extremely easy to identify talent and to be able to developt he talent. It is good to identify the talent but you have to develop it and give them Raptors r eclaim title Defending champs LW Y oung f inishes sixth SEE page 12 Felip Major /Tribune staff

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and Marvin Rolle. There's not one player on the team, who in the past, have demonstrated that they are always in a position to play their best regardless of the circumstances they find them selves in. Mullings, last year, got his feet wet when he teamed up with Mark Knowles to play the Bryan brothers in the first round of the men's doubles at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China. The two per formed their best, but it was obvious that the Bryans were just a little more prepared than they were. In the process, Mullings was accepted to play in the singles and even though he got eliminated in the first round, he per formed as best as he could. I'm sure that the experience he gained will pay off for him in Paraguay this weekend. Having lost 4-1 to Paraguay here at the National Tennis Center last year, the Bahamas will have its work cut out for them in Paraguay. But Farrington said as long as the players perform up to their standard, the team should do very well. The Bahamas is trying to regain its position in Zone One. It may not happen at this tie, but the future looks bright for the team with the players being so young. The experience gained will certainly help them in the long run whenever they get in a position to contend for the next level. HIELD TAKES RIGHTFUL PLACE Persistence and determination have finally paid off for Carl Hield. Last year, Hield and his mother had indicated that they were peeved with the Bahamas Boxing Federation after he was denied from getting a chance to try and qualify for the Olympic Games in Beijing, China in August. Hield had even contemplated competing for another country. With a change of heart, Hield travelled to the Independence Cup with team-mates Taureano 'Reno' Johnson and Valentino Knowles and he emerged as the only one to succeed with a medal, securing a silver in the light welterweight division at the tournament in the Dominican Republic. Hield joined Johnson and Knowles, who won the previous two bronze medals at the tournament. But he went a step further in securing the silver. He should be commended for his stickability to put his difference with the federation behind him and put the country first. His decision paid off and now he gives the Bahamas another boxer to keep the legacy alive for the amateur pro gramme on the international scene. Congrats Hield. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor the services described belowB iddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe & RUSRUDWLRQV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ2IFH B lue Hill & Tucker Roads C ontact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 Tendersaretobeaddressedto: Mr. Kevin Basden General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: onorbefore26thMarch,2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. Submissions should be marked as follows: T ender No. 688/09 % 866,1*(59,&(6 & /,)721,(5:(5$7,21 T he Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals. For all inquiries regarding the tenders DQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW 0U$QWKRQ\)RUEHV at telephone 302-1165 FROM page 11 Recognising our athletes’ latest accomplishments the necessary skills and technique to be able to get themt o compete at this level. We have standards for our athletes to achieve and as a result of that we are able to put together very goodt eams.” Grant, the nationally renowned head coach at the Carifta level, said his team performed exceptionally wello n the track and in the field, with a few unexpected surprises which helped propel them to victory. “Not only track athletes, you have to be balancedb ecause this is track and field. We are balanced across the board and as a result of thatt he kids performed exceptionally well this year. I was s urprised by the 800m we r eally did so well there that some of the kids really surp rised me,” he said. “A lot of them put in the work and it has been obvious in thes tandings of the meet. We did our best motivating them and trying to get them to stay focused which is a challenge,a nd thanks to the coaching staff and the overall C.H Reeves team and we had a cheering section that really motivated the kids and as a result of that most of themf inished hard at the line.” G rant cited the example of hurdler Shantwon Martin, who shook off disaster in the intermediate boys’ hurdles for a second place finish, ast he personification of the effort his team gave across the board in order to reclaim the title. “Even in the hurdles, Shantwon Martin fell downb ut he did not stay on the ground he got up and dove across the line,” he said. That is the type of passion and type of effort that these k ids put in and they ought to complimented for recapturing the title. It is somethingt hat we worked on and prepared for since the beginning o f the season and thank God it came to reality.” Raptors reclaim title FROM page 11 CH REEVES Vashi Mortimer wins the 100 metre hurdles. SC MCPHERSON Whitney Rolle during the 4 x400 meter relay . JUNIOR boys Martin Shantwon win s the long jump.

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So it was this week when I learned of the death of Chris Finnegan, former world light heavyweight title challenger, anda gutsy gold medallist at the Mexico Olympics 41 years ago. It was even more poignant that Chris should die only four months after his celebratedbrother Kevin, former British and European middleweight champion and one of the few men to have stayed on his feet during two brutal fights with the virtually indestructible Marvin Hagler. More alarming still was that both these bruising (and boozing) brothers were actually younger than me when they passed over into that great big gymnasium in the sky. Chris was 64, Kevin a mere 60. So tragic that such bright lights should fade so suddenly. It seems only a week or so ago that I watched them at their peak, fighting in London’s great boxing arenas, the Royal Albert Hall and Wembley Arena. And surely it was only a few months back 1975, actually when French fight fans used me as a stepladder into the ring after Kevin was beaten in a European title fight in Monte Carlo. The Finnegans were memorable for many reasons, but among them was their mischievous sense of humour, which brought lustre to a fight scene already ablaze with talent. Chris Finnegan was a bricklayer from Iver in Buckinghamshire. Kevin was an artist who liked to tell reporters he made a living from two kinds of canvas the one that covers a boxing ring, and the framed variety on which he splurged his oil paint. Chris was taller and more outgoing than his younger brother. Kevin was reserved, a quietish character with a wry smile who liked to take off into the countryside with his brush and pallette. Both were formidable boxers, but neither really punched his weight, and Chris in particular was happy to concede that pints of Guinness were a major part of their sporting success. Chris first found fame with that Olympic gold, but the real high point of his career was his brave loss to Bob Foster in a world title battle. After suffer ing a knockout late in the fight, Chris said being hit by Foster was like being struck by a long, hard pole with a glove on the end. A rugged southpaw, he took on the best in Britain and Europe and always acquitted himself well in front of his adoring fans. For me, his two most memorable fights were against ‘Gypsy’ Johnny Frankham for the British title in the 1970s, when the wily Romany won and then lost the crown in a matter of months to his old friend (and foe). Kevin was a classier fighter altogether, a fact readily acknowledged by Chris last fall when his younger brother died. “He was like cream,” he said, n By JOHN MARQUIS (former international boxing writer O N CE you reach 65, it’s like you are above the 27,000 feet mark o n Mount Everest. It’s called the Deat h Zone. T hose still struggling to reach the top earn your heartfelt respect. Those who fall off the higher ridges are offered an eq u ally heartfelt salute on the way down. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 13 (03/2<0(17,7<
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“He just flowed.” Defensively, Kevin was among the best. He could slip p unches like a ghost, moving h is weight deftly from one foot t o the other, counter punching with fluency and grace as his opponents charged in. Even against tough marauders like Leicester’s Tony Sibson another of Hagler’s victims Kevin was impudently understated. With his slick footwork and unruffled demeanour, he was an extremely hard man to beat. Had he carried more firepower in his fists, he would h ave become a world champion without a doubt. Both brothers were products of the famous Craven Arms pub gym in Battersea, London, where a Cockney character called Freddie Hill was their mentor and trainer. After belting each other senseless in sparring sessions in the gym upstairs, the broth ers would adjourn to the bar downstairs and replace lost sweat with pints of best strong Irish stout. When Kevin fought a monster from Marseilles called Gratien Tonna in Monaco, the i rrepressible Freddie regaled r eporters with a pre-fight d escription of the French hardman even before we had set eyes on him. “He’s got lips like rolls of lino,” he said. “He’s built like a mechanical earth-mover, wiv eyes like headlamps. I’m glad it’s Kevin who’s getting in the ring wiv ’im, not me.” Freddie Hill and The Finnegans could have been a stage act, so quick was their wit, so colourful their delivery. The London fight scene would have been a much duller place without them. Though you have to concede that both brothers lacked just that little extra that makes world champions, you also have to acknowledge that neither ducked a fight, even against the best. Chris’s blistering battle with Bob Foster was voted fight of the year and Kevin’s two close encounters with Marvin Hagler were rated minor classics for ringcraft and guile. Last year I walked up Lavender Hill in Battersea to see if I could identify the corner where the Craven Arms once stood. If my judgment is correct, it’s now occupied by a fast food takeaway. For a few minutes, I tried to recall those days 30 years ago when I climbed the stairs at the back of the pub into Freddie Hill’s gym, sniffed the linament and watched the Finnegans going through their paces. I recalled the easy banter, the happy camaraderie that was the mark of London gyms in those glory days of British boxing, when the country boasted four world champions and the likes of Chris and Kevin Finnegan provided the laughs in what has always beena deadly serious sport. Bespectacled Freddie, towel round his neck, was always leaning on the ropes, barking orders at his young fighters, willing them to greater heights. Sometimes he’d get so excit ed that his round, rimless glasses would steam up, and his walrus-style moustache would twitch alarmingly. “Don’t stand around like a pair o’ bleedin’ pansies,” he’d shout, “throw a jab, move in wiv the ’ook, that’s it...right cross. Lovely!” Dear old Freddie has, of course, long gone. I didn’t realise then, only five or six months ago, that Chris and Kevin would follow him so quickly into boxing history, just like the Craven Arms itself. Nothing is forever, of course. But just occasionally, as with Freddie and the Finnegan brothers, you wish they were. n FOOTBALL TAMPA, Fla. A ssociated Press PRIVATE BOATSand planes searched Wednesday for two NFL players and a third man missing for four days since their boat capsized in the Gulf of Mexico off Florida, family members said. The Coast Guard called off the official search Tuesday for Oakland Raiders linebacker Marquis Cooper, who owned the boat, free-agent NFL defensive lineman Corey Smith and former South Florida player William Bleakley. But their families appealed for help to keep hunting. Two or three charters left in the late morning from a St. Petersburg marina and at least one had friends of the families of the missing men aboard, said Don Beggs, who owns one of the local docks. Three private planes also had searched, according to Cooper’s father,B ruce Cooper. A fourth man on the fishing trip, Nick Schuyler, was rescued Monday after crews found him clinging to the boat. His doctor said it’s a “miracle” Schuyler survived in the cold water for nearly two days after the boatc arrying the men on a fishing trip overturned in rough seas off the Florida coast Saturday. Dr. Mark Rumbak said the 24-year-old is in good condition but will remain in intensive care in case there are complications. Schuyler was in 63-degree Gulf of Mexico water for around 46 hours and probably could have lived only another five to 10 hours if he wasn’t rescued Mon day, Rumbak said. “I think he is extremely fortunate having been in the water for 46, 47 hours and that he’s even alive,” Rumbak said. “I can’t explain it. Some divine providence, I really think.” The missing men’s families have set up an e-mail address for experienced pilots and boaters to contact them. Coast Guard Capt. Timothy Close said the agency wouldn’t pre v ent private searches, but disc ouraged them, saying they could be dangerous. He said authorities believed if there were more survivors, they would have been found. Free-agent defensive tackle Tank Johnson, a childhoodf riend and college teammate of Cooper at Washington, was taking a lead role in the renewed search. Johnson, who played for the Dallas Cowboys last season, said the family has not given up hope that the men are still alive. “I truly believe he is out there somewhere being strong,” Johnson said. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS %HWW\.QRZVKLSVIURP-DFNVRQYLOOH)ORULGD 7R 1DVVDX$EDFR%DKDPDV6KLSSLQJ\RXU/&/RUIXOOFRQWDLQHUORDGVWRWKH %DKDPDVMXVWJRWHDVLHUZKHWKHUPXOWLSOHVKLSPHQWV RUMXVW)URP&DOLIRUQLDWR1HEUDVND1HZ
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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 15 STUDENTS FROM the Government High School in New Providence and the Preston H Albury High School in Rock Sound, Eleuthera, recently visited the Defence Force Base at Coral Harbour, where they were given a complete tour of the facility. High school students tour Defence Force base

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Insurer closes individual health policy portfolio acquired from British American Financial to new business But policyholders slam as ‘crazy’ premium increases for new scheme, which have doubled in some cases, with many fearingh aving to cancel and lose coverage Move to re-price likely driven by lack of profitability n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Edito r Concerns have emerged over whether the Government will seriously consider labour-related recommendations made by TRIFOR, the tripartite group featuring trade union, employer and government representa tives, as it “has a great deal of potential that is not being realised”. Brian Nutt, the Bahamas Employer’s Confederation’s (BECon bune Business in a recent inter view that TRIFOR’s different constituents were assessing the group’s make-up, and whether it had the ability to do what it needed to do. “TRIFOR has met this year, meeting every other week,” Mr Nutt told this newspaper, adding that the group was now looking at holding monthly meetings. He added: “We’re basically in a situation of trying to look at the make-up of TRIFOR as far as its role; what it should be doing, and does it have the abil ity to do things it should do? It’s a situation of trying to d etermine what TRIFOR’s role is, what it can accomplish, and its make-up.” C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.56 $3.56 $3.36 #% f$#&'b %,0,/+!!"0&)/,+)&+" ))) ntrn rb ' ,+/0+&/%$ %.&/0&"b ,* )0!b nr tbn 0,ft--,&+0*"+0,+)4ft,+,."#,."-b*b &#&!&/+,0 "-0"!-.&)f.! 51.+("45.&2") ,+45."%0(&+$&"3/5&**&+$,,)5r%,1." 1.&045*5.&2" Bank keeps its non-performing loans ‘just above’ 5% of portfolio Pageant has ‘not changed’ Baha Mar’s closure plan Concerns on labour group effectiveness * BECon chief says worries exist over whether government will consider its labour -related recommendations, or whether it will be ‘shut out’* T ripartite grouping has ‘a great deal of potential that is not being realised’ SEE page 10B n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor Baha Mar has “not changed at this point in time” its deci sion to close the Wyndham r esort and Crystal Palace casi no from August 17-October 5, 2009, Tribune Business was told yesterday, despite the Bahamas being awarded theM iss Universe pageant at the end of August. When asked whether the C able Beach Resorts owner/developer might reverse its c losure plans to accommodate the expected influx of comp etitors, guests and media for the August 30, 2009, event, a senior executive told Tribune Business: “There’s nothing to that at this point in time.” Vernice Walkine, the Ministry of Tourism’s directorgeneral, yesterday predicted that all New Providence hotel rooms would be full as a result of hosting the Miss Universe Pageant. However, Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president for governmental and external affairs, said: “A num ber of people have raised that question, but the plan is to be closed during this period. “The reality is that this [the pageant] has come at a time when we’ve made arrange * But company leaves door open if ‘overwhelming demand’, with senior executive saying Miss Universe is ‘priceless opportunity’ to market Bahamas to world tourist audience* Senior Baha Mar delegation in Beijing for eight days in bid to move $2.6bn project forward Robert Sands SEE page 9B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Bank of the Bahamas International’s m anaging director yesterday said the institution had restricted non-performing loans to “just above 5 per cent” of its total loan p ortfolio during the fiscal 2009 first half, below the industry average, as it gears up f or a preference share issue later this year that is designed to reduce its funding costs. S peaking after the bank unveiled an 18 per cent drop in half-year net income to * Eyeing preference share issue ‘fairly soon’ to reduce costs of capital, as deposit rates start to come down due to $370m liquidity* Net income down 18% at near $5m for halfyear, but bank ‘comfortable’ with results due to focus on prudential norms* Expects to receive Carmichael Road branch by October, with 20 jobs added S EE page 8B Paul McWeeney n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Bahamas-based health insurer has closed the individ-u al health portfolio it inherited from British American F inancial to new business and, in some cases, doubled the premiums being charged top olicyholders, Tribune Business can reveal, a move that h as left some unable to afford coverage. In a letter sent to individu al health insurance plan policyholders, Tina Cambridge, Generali Worldwide’s regional director for the Bahamas, informed them that the com-p any would not take on any new business for the portfol io it had acquired. Instead, Generali is offering Bahamian p olicyholders the opportunity to maintain their health insurance coverage under an ew plan and associated benefits, which they have until A pril 1, 2009, to accept. C C o o n n c c e e r r n n T he new plan, though, has been met with concern and consternation by many Gen erali policyholders, who are objecting to the premiumh ikes across-the-board. One policyholder, who said her individual medical insur ance plan premium had “dou bled” from a three-figure to a m onthly four-figure sum, d escribed the “huge increase” as “crazy”. O ne source said the premium increase could not be jus tified on the basis of claims t hey had submitted, because they had not made many. We’re still reeling from the shock and trying to decide what to do,” the source said. “People are going to cancel, a nd then the already overburdened public health system is going to be further burdened.” The source suggested that Generali’s new plan was less favourable than the coverage they currently enjoyed,b ecause it raised the amount policyholders had to pay for Concern over ‘doubling’ of Generali premiums SEE page 4B n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter THE LYNDEN Pindling International Airport (LPIA receive a swift and temporary makeover as the Bahamas prepares to receive invaluable exposure from the 2009 Miss Uni v erse pageant. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, said the airport, which has often been described as an embarrassment because of the state of its infrastructure, will con tinue its redevelopment up to the pageant, with some “masks” p ut in place near its August 30, 2009, staging to improve aes thetics. “In terms of the kind of welcome we have in place, certainly Airport to receive Pageant makeover SEE page 7B

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A n Abaconian c ouple who have been married for 28 years, James and Donna Rees, have both earned the BRI certification and moved up from agents to brokers at ERA Dupuch Real Estate. It’s pretty easy to spot our o ffice,” says Mr Rees of the Marsh Harbour premises. It’s in the Stratton Insura nce Building. “That’s the one on the corner by the only stop light in Abaco.” The office by the island’s only traffic light, and the red,w hite and blue ERA Dupuch sign, isn’t all that sets the Rees duo apart. T hey are comfortable with the state of real estate in Abaco, which is holding its own a gainst the fallout that toppled the US housing market following the sub-prime lendi ng crisis and recession. While the market here is seeing adjustments, we have not seen the losses that aret aking place in the United States,” said Donna Rees. “In fact, the lower end properties have not lost much value at all.” I f Abaco properties have staved off the roller coaster ride experienced elsewhere,t he couple are familiar with the market’s ups and downs. B orn and raised in the Bahamas, they moved to Florida during their children’ss chool years, returning when the last child entered college i n 2003. F F l l u u c c t t u u a a t t e e s s “In time, everything fluctuates up and down,” says MrR ees. “In Florida, during the early s, Port Saint Lucie had 18,000 people and our first house was around $30,000.W hen we left there in 2003 therewere 140,000 people, and that same typeof house was$125,000. “Weare not that concerned a nd will continue to do our best. “Abaco is a very special p lace. “My Dad had seen several up and downturns during his years here.” Mr Rees’ father, the late C olyn Rees, was one of Aba co’s best-known citizens. If Abaco has staying power even in challenging eco nomic teams, showing property in the chain of scattered islands takes its own kind of stamina, says ERA Dupuch Real Estate founder and pres i dent, Peter Dupuch. A A n n n n o o y y e e d d Nassau agents in some f irms get annoyed if they have to drive from an office in town t o Coral Harbour and someone doesn’t show up,” says Mr Dupuch. “Imagine doing what Donna and James do. “They may have a showing in the morning in Treasure Cay and one in the afternoon i n Schooner Bay. “That’s a long drive for someone to say: ‘Sorry, it’s notw hat I was looking for.’ Or t hey may have to go by plane, boat, buggy or golf cart, or cut through the bush with a cut-l ass. “Still, they have worked hard and that’s why they have been successful.” Beyond success, Mr Dupuch said there was something special about Donna and JamesR ees, who have been each o ther’s best friend since early childhood. “It’s wonderful to see James and Donna work together.T hey are like yin and yang. Donna does all the tasks James doesn’t like to do, and J ames does those Donna d oesn’t like. “Between them, every detail is covered and it’s great to seet hat after five years back in the Bahamas they have both earned the BRI certification,” he said. F ounded in 1993, ERA Dupuch Real Estate has offices or agents in Nassau, Abaco, Eleuthera and Long Island. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 677 1111 nassau 688 1111 freeport www.indigonetworks.com still with Vonage? onephone gives you everything vonage has and more!switch now and get 1stmonth free! what you get? vonageResidential Basic Plan ( includes monthly taxes & fees)$23.49In-Plan Calling Destinations US, Canada only International Telephone Number US only(Virtual NumberLocal Phone Numbere.g. 242-677-XXXXNot availableMonthly Contract No(2 year minCLASS Features Local Customer Service & Support Buy Bahamian Family Island & Caribbean Calling Plan Family Island In-Network FREE Calls $19.95US, Canada, 10 Europe Destinations US, Canada, UKFREEYES YESYESYES YESFREE No NoYes No No Abaco couple ‘broker’ success in real estate FROMAGENTSTOBROKERS: Donna and James Rees. “It’s wonderful to see James and Donna work together. They are like yin and yang. Donna does all the tasks James doesn’t like to do, and James does those Donna doesn’t like.” Peter Dupuch

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter T HE MISS Universe Pageant is expected to draw millions of dollars, directly and indirectly, into the Bahamaine conomy through retail spending and hotel room nights this s ummer, when it is held at the Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island, on August 30. P aula Shugart, Miss Universe’s president, could not s ay what the size of the economic boost brought to the Bahamas would be. Howev-e r, she did reveal that the organization’s per diem, or expenditure per day, was int he hundreds of thousands of dollars. For Miss Universe, we have a lot of staff and crew who also come. I can tell you,j ust in our per diem alone, the six figures that are left behind i n a host (country nothing with the casinos, too,” she said. Aside from the worldwide exposure from the telecast, a nd one thing that the minister hit on, is the fact that this is a month-long event.” The event itself draws huge crowds of “pageant fans”, and New Providence is expectedt o benefit through increased room bookings at New Provi dence hotels. Pageant night is t raditionally attended by a sold-out live audience. Pageant fans from the U nited States alone, they are all planning to come, and want t o know what the details are,” said Ms Shugart. “They will all be coming and there is ad irect economic impact from them.” Vernice Walkine, the Ministry of Tourism’s directorgeneral, said all New Provi-d ence hotels are expected to benefit from the visitors the pageant draws to the island. “It is my expectation that we will use every availableh otel room,” she said. At Atlantis itself, as a direct result of the pageant, the com-p any will take on more staff come August, though most of t he labour will likely be only temporary. G eorge Markantonis, president of Kerzner International (Bahamasb e bringing on temporary labour to assist with this special event. “As the major employer outside of the Government, Ie xpect that we will possibly be bringing in additional people when our hotels reach 100 per cent levels, to help us with those specific moments in timew hen we need to deal with special events,” he said. “Does that mean that’s permanente mployment. No!” “We will be bringing on more temporary labour. That, in turn, hopefully will be felt in the community.” T he Miss Universe Organization itself said it will hire Bahamians to supplement the labour that will be brought in from the US. “This is a huge worldwide t elecast, so it really takes not only the people we bring, but it takes the people we hirel ocally to participate in it.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 3B Due to the passing of a Staff Member we will beCLOSEDSATURDAY, March 7th, 2009to allow the Team to pay their last respects.We will re-open at 9:30am on Monday, March 9th, 2009We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused. Pageant to attract millions to Nassau Vernice Walkine

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t reatment at Doctors Hospital from 20 per cent to 40 per cent, with the insurer’s exposure reduced from 80 per cent to 60 per cent. T hey added that the age at which the lifetime maximum Generali would pay for a policyholder’s medical expensesi s reduced from $1 million to $100,000 has also been lowe red under the new proposed policy, from 70 years-old to 65. The new plan is supposed to be better, but we don’t see where it’s better,” the sources aid. They questioned why Generali had decided to i ncrease premiums “all at once”, rather than go through a series of phased increases, a nd questioned why the company had chosen to do it at t his time when the economy was gripped by recession, and B ahamians were already struggling to make ends meet. M M e e d d i i c c a a l l E lderly Generali policyholders, in particular, are unlikely to obtain medical coverage with other insurancef irms because they will be considered high risk, and possib ly large claimants, with no carrier wanting that exposure. However, one insurance i ndustry source, speaking to Tribune Business on condition o f anonymity, said Generali needed to increase the premium rates to match the riska ssociated with the portfolio. T hey pointed out that ColinaImperial had to carry out a similar re-pricing last year,a fter experiencing losses on its medical portfolio, due to a h igh level of claims and the i ncreased cost of drugs and medical treatments. The problem British American had is that they were losing huge amounts ofb usiness,” the source said. “It wasn’t profitable and was p riced wrongly. They’re [Generali] just correcting it. In her letter to policyholde rs, which has been seen by Tribune Business, Ms Cambridge said Generali hadm oved to “better understand the unique aspects of our new p ortfolio” in the year since it was acquired from British American Financial. S he added that this was intended to help the company plan and prepare for the changes that we intend to implement as part of being al eader in group employee ben efits within the Bahamas and t he broader Caribbean region”. Ms Cambridge emphasised t hat the last point was key, as Generali Worldwide was a group health insurer, “and not traditionally a provider of i nsurance to individuals”. She added: “Our mandate i s to provide a full range of group employee benefit products to local, regional andm ultinational companies. “As such, we have recently m ade the decision to cease all new enrollment to the individual health insurance plani ncluded in the portfolio we purchased. All of the brokers we work with have been dulyn otified of this change.” Ms Cambridge reassured G enerali clients that their coverage would not automatical ly be terminated, and if they d id not confirm they wanted to drop the plan, they would a utomatically be converted to the new scheme by March 31, 2009. T ribune Business was yes terday promised by Generali t hat it would provide a detailed response to this news paper’s questions by the close o f the business day at 5pm yesterday. But a response was not received by press time last night. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIAExpansion Project. The scope of services includes: 'ULOOLQJDQGSXPSWHVWLQJRIDSLORWKROH 'ULOOLQJDQGFDVLQJRID)HHG:DWHU6XSSO\:HOO 'ULOOLQJDQGFDVLQJRID)HHG:DWHU5HWXUQ:HOO )ORZWHVWLQJRIWKH)HHG:DWHU6XSSO\:HOO 'LVFKDUJHWHVWLQJRIWKH)HHG:DWHU5HWXUQ:HOO *HRSK\VLFDOORJJLQJDQGIORZWHVWLQJRI3LORW+ROHDQGZHOOV :DWHUWHPSHUDWXUHORJJLQJDQGDQDO\VLVRIZDWHUTXDOLW\DQG FKHPLVWU\ 3URIHVVLRQDOVXSHUYLVLRQ+\GURORJLVWf 5HTXHVWIRU4XRWDWLRQ3DFNDJHVZLOOEHDYDLODEOHIRUSLFNXSDIWHU 1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009. 5HTXHVWIRU4XRWDWLRQFORVLQJLV Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. M-100, Test Well DrillingContact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project 5(48(67)25QUOTATION 127,&( 3 OHDVHEHDGYLVHGWKDHIIHFWLY0DUF %HWW\$JHQFLHVZLOOUHVXPHLWVUHJXODUWZLFH ZHHNOVHUYLFHIURP0LDPL)ORULGDWR1DVVDX6 F KHGXOH ' HSDUWVLDPLRQRQGD\ $UULYHVLQDVVDXRQXHVGD\ 'HSDUWVLDPLRQ:HGQHVGD\ $UULYHVLQDVVDXRQKXUVGD\1DVVDX (DVWWRUWK.HOO\V'RFN 3 1 DVVDX%DKDPDV RXWKLYHU'ULYH Concern over ‘doubling’ of Generali premiums F ROM page 1B “... we have recently made the decision to cease all new enrollment to the individual insurance plan included in the p ortfolio we purchased.”

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he Central Bank of the Bahamas yesterday moved to reeassure Bahamians aboutt he soundness of the commercial banking system, saying the placing of CLICO (Bahamas into provisional liquidation had no impact on the sectori t regulates. Acknowledging that this development had created concern about “the possible spillover effects” on the banking system, the Central Banks aid any fears were “exaggerated and unfounded”. It added: “The Central B ank’s ongoing inquiries have indicated that CLICO’s failu re has not posed any threat to the stability of Bahamian commercial banks, which allc ontinue to operate as going concerns. All of our domestic banks are highly capitalised,w ith levels substantially in excess of the minimum r equirement of 8 per cent of risk weighted assets, as recommended by the Basle Com m ittee. “Also, the CLICO Group is n ot directly connected through ownership with any banking operations in the Bahamas.A s we have been advised that the Group represented about 1 per cent of the Bahamian Dollar insurance market, this removes the possibility of con t agion for the system as a whole.” Saying it was concerned about “unsubstantiated material” that had surfaced aboutt he soundness of some Bahamas-based financial institutions, the Central Bank a dded: “In the present environment, such unfounded a ssertions could unnecessarily exacerbate the uncertainty being experienced by cus-t omers to the detriment of the financial system. Local banking operations are subject to focused prudential supervision by theC entral Bank, with some of their activities being monit ored, if not daily, on a week ly basis. “This oversight has intensi f ied during the current peri od of economic stress, with priority given to monitoring t hose risks that are most elevated for banks under these c ircumstances -that is, those in respect of their lending operations. Banks have beenp rompted to adopt more forward looking, aggressive a pproaches in making loss provisions for bad loans, in order to identify and pre-emp-t ively address problems. “Institutions have also been e ncouraged to mitigate risks, where possible, by restructuring loan facilities for cus t omers who might be experi encing hardships with meeting their obligations.” Regulator reassures on financial system Wendy Craigg Wendy Craig

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we have that in hand what t he place looks like. We will have that in hand, but there is no doubt that the schedule that has already been started with the redevelopment of thea irport is going to continue on the same pace,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. “And to the degree that that i s going to interfere in any way, shape or form, in terms o f what the airport looks like, we are going to mask that as best we can.” M r Vanderpool-Wallace said this is where the country will have to preen for the cam-e ras. He said the Ministry of Tourism was seeking to e mploy someone who, when the cameras arrive, help their crews to identify positive andb eautiful aspects of the Bahamas. We are identifying somebody to work along with the technicians and the camera-m en to make certain that we point the cameras in the right d irection,” said Mr Vanderpool-Wallace. He said, though, that Nass au and Paradise Island are already much cleaner than they have ever been before. The Ministry of Tourism recently spent millions of dollars on advertising for the B ahamas, even buying a spot i n the Super Bowl broadcast, which is one of the most costl y spots in television advertising. However, Mr VanderpoolW allace said the Miss Universe Pageant was a unique opportunity for the Bahamas to go beyond prepared ads and embrace a more first-person publicity that live televised e vents bring to a country. This is the sophisticated part of marketing that people d on’t think about,” he said. “The whole idea is making sure that you are having yourc ountry shown in the best possible light, that’s what it’s all about. “Publicity has a much higher credibility than advertising. Most people know that you c reated that ad to make yourself look good, but publicity i s someone else saying something positive about you, which is a lot more powerful.” M r Vanderpool-Wallace said that recently relaxed Visa r equirements for visitors cold encourage people to come to the Bahamas for the event,a s the Bahamas will be the smallest nation to ever host the Miss Universe Pageant, and one of the closest to the US borders. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 7B 7(1'(5)257+(/< 3529,6,216t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f 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW 7$0$5$$/,&,$:5,*+7 RIWKH ( DVWHUQ'LVFWULFWRIWKH,VODQGVRI1HZ3URYLGHQFHRQHRIWKH,VODQGV RIWKH&RPPRQZHDOWKRI7KH%DKDPDVWKHPRWKHURI &+5,63,1 7 $0$5,212(/ L QWHQGVWRFKDQJHFKLOGQDPHWR & +5,63,1 7$0$5,2:5,*+7 ,IWKHUHDUHDQ\REMHFWLRQVWRWKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH 'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ZULWHVXFKREMHFWLRQVWRWKH &KLHI3DVVSRUW 2IFHU31DVVDX%DKDPDVQRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\GD\V DIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH Airport to receive Pageant makeover FROM page 1B Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

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m ents to close during the period. The Sheraton Cable Beach will be open to facilitate any demand there is for rooms.” But still leaving the door o pen to a reversal of the closure decision, Mr Sands said: “The bottom line is, if there is a compelling reason, an overwhelming demand forb usiness that guarantees room occupancies for that period, that is a possibility. “At this point, the plans are to be closed. Our position hasn ot changed at this point in t ime.” Baha Mar earlier this year announced that it had decidedt o close the Wyndham Nassau resort and Crystal Palace c asino for two months this s ummer in a bid to reduce losses, given that this period a ccounts for most of the red ink incurred per annum. P P u u b b l l i i c c i i t t y y S till, Mr Sands, who is also the Bahamas Hotel Association’s president, said the TVe xposure and general publicity the Bahamas would receive a s a result of hosting the Miss Universe pageant was an “almost priceless opportuni-t y” to market this nation as a tourist destination, and maxi mise visitor numbers during a depressed economy. “I think the real benefit, in a ddition to some short-term ones, is the publicity the destination will incur as a result of t he pageant,” Mr Sands said, pointing out that the Miss Universe franchise was jointlyo wned 50/50 by NBC and the Donald Trump Organisation. We believe there is equity, as a destination, to be able to blow the horn for Bahamast ourism in a world fashion, and that’s where the real bene fits will occur. “That publicity that will occur from the Bahamas beingi n the spotlight on prime time, network and cable TV, is an almost priceless opportunity. “We should not be thinking of it in terms of the event itself, but the wider opportunity. The biggest viewing audience for this event is LatinA merica, and hopefully this will be an opportunity to cult ivate these markets.” Mr Sands recalled when charter flights used to bringL atin American tourists to the Bahamas during the summer months, filling in a gap dur-i ng the slow part of the tourism calendar. P re-publicity in the run-up to the Miss Universe Pageant’s staging would also show-c ase the Bahamas. Mr Sands added: “That has a certain sexiness to it, that projection of the Bahamas as a viable tourist destination. “It allows the Bahamas to be placed in the mindset oft he travelling public when there are so many choices out t here.” D D e e l l e e g g a a t t i i o o n n M eanwhile, Mr Sands confirmed that a senior, eightman Baha Mar delegation had arrived in Beijing yesterdayf or eight days of talks with the China Export-Import Bank and China State Construction,i n a bid to progress their poss ible partnership for the $2.6 b illion Cable Beach redevelopment. A mong the Baha Mar executives in China are the developer’s vice-chairman, John F orelle, number two to Sarkis Izmirlian; Don Robinson, h ead of Baha Mar Resorts; a nd John Pagano, head of B aha Mar Development Company. As we speak, there’s a senior delegation of Baha Mar o fficials in Beijing,” Mr Sands s aid. “They arrived late yesterday, and are meeting with t h e China Ex-Im Bank and China State Construction as a follow-up to the meetings held t he other week. “They should be there for a t least eight days, and hopef ully it’s positive news they c ome back with from this.” Among the issues being disc ussed are “advanced negotiations” on the terms of a M emorandum of Understanding “as to how we go forward” and construction agreements. They’ll be looking at the t erms of reference, how the parties relate and inter-relate, and some financing opportunities,” Mr Sands said. “It seems to be headed in t he right direction. The series of meetings we had have pushed us further forwards, rather than backwards.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 9B 127,&( 0 2%,/(;3/25$7,21$1''8&,1* &$63,$1($/,0,7(' 3 XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRIWKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWQRWLFH L KHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUSXUVXDQW WR&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHG7KH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ ' DWHGWKHUGGD\RIDUFK* +-RKQVHQ /LTXLGDWRURI 02%,/(;3/25$7,21$1'3 52'8&,1* &$63,$1($/,0,7(' Pageant has ‘not changed’ Baha Mar’s closure plan F ROM page 1B e believe there is equity, as a destination, to be able to blow the horn for Bahamas tourism in a world fashion, and that’s where the real benefits will occur. Robert Sands

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m ents to close during the period. The Sheraton Cable Beach will be open to facilitate any demand there is for rooms.” But still leaving the door o pen to a reversal of the closure decision, Mr Sands said: “The bottom line is, if there is a compelling reason, an overwhelming demand forb usiness that guarantees room occupancies for that period, that is a possibility. “At this point, the plans are to be closed. Our position hasn ot changed at this point in t ime.” Baha Mar earlier this year announced that it had decidedt o close the Wyndham Nassau resort and Crystal Palace c asino for two months this s ummer in a bid to reduce losses, given that this period a ccounts for most of the red ink incurred per annum. P P u u b b l l i i c c i i t t y y S till, Mr Sands, who is also the Bahamas Hotel Association’s president, said the TVe xposure and general publicity the Bahamas would receive a s a result of hosting the Miss Universe pageant was an “almost priceless opportuni-t y” to market this nation as a tourist destination, and maxi mise visitor numbers during a depressed economy. “I think the real benefit, in a ddition to some short-term ones, is the publicity the destination will incur as a result of t he pageant,” Mr Sands said, pointing out that the Miss Universe franchise was jointlyo wned 50/50 by NBC and the Donald Trump Organisation. We believe there is equity, as a destination, to be able to blow the horn for Bahamast ourism in a world fashion, and that’s where the real bene fits will occur. “That publicity that will occur from the Bahamas beingi n the spotlight on prime time, network and cable TV, is an almost priceless opportunity. “We should not be thinking of it in terms of the event itself, but the wider opportunity. The biggest viewing audience for this event is LatinA merica, and hopefully this will be an opportunity to cult ivate these markets.” Mr Sands recalled when charter flights used to bringL atin American tourists to the Bahamas during the summer months, filling in a gap dur-i ng the slow part of the tourism calendar. P re-publicity in the run-up to the Miss Universe Pageant’s staging would also show-c ase the Bahamas. Mr Sands added: “That has a certain sexiness to it, that projection of the Bahamas as a viable tourist destination. “It allows the Bahamas to be placed in the mindset oft he travelling public when there are so many choices out t here.” D D e e l l e e g g a a t t i i o o n n M eanwhile, Mr Sands confirmed that a senior, eightman Baha Mar delegation had arrived in Beijing yesterdayf or eight days of talks with the China Export-Import Bank and China State Construction,i n a bid to progress their poss ible partnership for the $2.6 b illion Cable Beach redevelopment. A mong the Baha Mar executives in China are the developer’s vice-chairman, John F orelle, number two to Sarkis Izmirlian; Don Robinson, h ead of Baha Mar Resorts; a nd John Pagano, head of B aha Mar Development Company. As we speak, there’s a senior delegation of Baha Mar o fficials in Beijing,” Mr Sands s aid. “They arrived late yesterday, and are meeting with t h e China Ex-Im Bank and China State Construction as a follow-up to the meetings held t he other week. “They should be there for a t least eight days, and hopef ully it’s positive news they c ome back with from this.” Among the issues being disc ussed are “advanced negotiations” on the terms of a M emorandum of Understanding “as to how we go forward” and construction agreements. They’ll be looking at the t erms of reference, how the parties relate and inter-relate, and some financing opportunities,” Mr Sands said. “It seems to be headed in t he right direction. The series of meetings we had have pushed us further forwards, rather than backwards.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 9B 127,&( 0 2%,/(;3/25$7,21$1''8&,1* &$63,$1($/,0,7(' 3 XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRIWKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWQRWLFH L KHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUSXUVXDQW WR&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHG7KH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ ' DWHGWKHUGGD\RIDUFK* +-RKQVHQ /LTXLGDWRURI 02%,/(;3/25$7,21$1'3 52'8&,1* &$63,$1($/,0,7(' Pageant has ‘not changed’ Baha Mar’s closure plan F ROM page 1B e believe there is equity, as a destination, to be able to blow the horn for Bahamas tourism in a world fashion, and that’s where the real benefits will occur. Robert Sands

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One of the proposals TRIFOR representatives were examining, said Mr Nutt, was whether the full group should meet less frequently perhaps on a monthly basis and appoint ad-hoc committees to examine specific labour-related issues and amendments to legislation. These committees would then report to the full committee once their month’s work was completed. “It’s really a situation to determine whether TRIFOR can be an effective group. It hasa great deal of potential, but it’s not been realised,” Mr Nutt told Tribune Business. think the major concern is whether the recommendationsof TRIFOR will be considered by the Government. As TRIFOR is a grouping of employers, employees and government, if we have certain recommendations and the Government shuts us out,” Mr Nutt said, then its efforts will have been entirely in vain. The two major issues that TRIFOR has been examining are the use of biometric data for security and timekeeping, plus child labour. However, Mr Nutt said: “It’s almost as if the things we were looking at went on the backburner.” This was as a result of the global economic downturn’s impact on the Bahamian economy and resulting redundancies across many industries. Meanwhile, both Mr Nutt and Dionisio D’Aguilar, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president, told Tribune Business that they had received anecdotal evidence to suggest theft from businesses was on the increase due to the depressed economy. “I’ve heard reports that that is the case, but other than that, I’ve not heard anything specific as to what is happening,” Mr Nutt said. “Unfortunately, the economic climate does lead to that type of increase in criminal activity.” Mr D’Aguilar added: “I don’t t hink employees theft is increasing, but customer theft is. That’s my perspective from talking to a number of companies and business owners with whom I’m involved. “Theft is a difficult thing to measure. There’s the theft you see, such as shrinkage from the cash registers, and theft you don’t see, which is the stealing of products. “My gut tells me that Bahamian businesses have already, because we received a lot of advanced warnings that things were going to get tough, have put in place procedures designed to mitigate the desire to steal.” The Chamber president added: “There’s no doubt we’re seeing an increase in customer theft. There are more desperate people out there, so there’s been an increase in theft at the front end.” However, he suggested internal pilferage and shrinkage by employees had been reduced because workers were “more afraid of losing their jobs”. In addition, it was now “damn dif-f icult” for employees to find jobs with other companies, given the downsizing that was taking place, forcing many to accept that they needed to “toe the line with the rules” to ensure they remained in employment. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.411.410.000.0700.00020.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.3190.26021.93.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.776.50-0.274,5000.4380.05014.80.77% 5.001.49Consolidated Water BDRs1.551.49-0.060.1110.05213.43.49% 3.002.27Doctor's Hospital2.402.400.000.2400.04010.01.67%8 .106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 1 4.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6980.40015.03.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.005.070.077,0000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 14.0014.00Bahamas Supermarkets11.2312.0414.00-0.0410.300N/M2.67% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.9230-0.58-2.54 1.43761.3773Colina Money Market Fund1.43760.284.38 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 817.85 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTUESDAY, 3 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,656.82 | CHG -12.66 | %CHG -0.76 | YTD -55.54 | YTD % -3.24BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 31-Jan-09 23-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan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t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t&2 &KDPEHUV&XPEHUODQG+RXVH &XPEHUODQGt'XNHWUHHWV 1DVVDX%DKDPDV $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHUV +(/3 :$17(' 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW RI KDV EHHQ'LVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJ W WKH&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGWKH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKHWKGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 0 UV*LOOLDQ$OEHUW 5XHGHVLHUUHVGXLWRQ *HQHYDZLW]HUODQG /LTXLGDWRU Concerns on labour group effectiveness F ROM page 1B n NEW YORK The dollar edged lower against the euro and the pound Wednesday after the Federal Reserve said the U.S. economy has slowed further in the last two months, while markets anticipated interest-rate cuts by the European Central Bank and Bank of England, according to the Associated Press . The 16-nation euro edged up to $1.2639 in late New York trading from $1.2590 late Tuesday, while the British pound gained to $1.4156 from $1.4077. The Fed said Wednesday the outlook for a quick recovery is b leak, with the central bank's latest snapshot of business activity s howing sharp cutbacks and widespread production declines. T he survey is used by the Fed to get a better idea of what's occurring at the ground level of the economy and will figure into discussions among Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues when they meet next on March 17-18. The Fed is widely expected to hold its key interest rate at a record low at that meeting as well as through the rest of this year to help revive the economy, which has been stuck in a recession since December 2007. Today, the European Central Bank is expected to cut its benchmark rate by half a percentage point to 1.5 percent, and the Bank of England is expected to lower its rate to 0.5 percent, also by half a percentage point. Analysts say the cuts are largely priced into the European currencies. Investors are also waiting to hear if the ECB will commit to socalled quantitative easing, which is an effort to boost bank lending b y upping the amount of money in the system. L ower interest rates can weaken a currency as investors move f unds to where they earn better returns elsewhere; quantitative easing can also prompt inflation, which devalues a currency. The Federal Reserve and Bank of Japan have already announced such untraditional policies, and the Bank of England is thought to be on the verge of increasing the domestic money supply. Meanwhile, the greenback rose to 99.22 Japanese yen from 98.32 yen late Tuesday. Also on Wednesday, the Institute for Supply Management, a private trade group, said that its index measuring the health of the U.S. services sector fell to 41.6 in February from 42.9 in January. Analysts had expected a slightly lower reading, but any number under 50 is an indicator of contraction. The index has been falling for five months straight. A bout three-fourths of the American work force is employed in t he services sector, which includes the hotel, retail and health care industries, as well as financial institutions. In other late trading, the dollar dropped to 1.2737 Canadian dollars from 1.2880 late Tuesday, and slipped to 1.1715 Swiss francs from 1.1748 francs. Dollar mixed before Europe interest-rate decisions

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES Errol Edward Gilbert, 71 of New Bight Cat Island will be held on Saturday at Our Lady of the Holy Souls Catholic Church, Deveaux Street, at 2:45 p.m. Officiating will be Fr. Michael Kelly, ss.cc. Interment will follow in the Catholic Cemetery, Tyler Street. Left to cherish fond memories his Brothers: Edmund and Peter Gilbert; Sisters: Queen Elizabeth, and Winnest Gilbert, Minerva Hall & Ellen Hepburn; Sisters-in-law, Judy & Majorie Gilbert; brothers-in-law, Leon Hall and Ishmael Hepburn; nieces and nephews, Lovell, Bethany, Lauren and Sophia Gilbert of Canada, Loretta, Louis, Louis Jr., and Jaden Johnson, Patrick and Chavasse Gilbert, Margaret Gilbert of Tennesse, Christine King, Stacey and Desiree Forbes, Anthony (Tony) and Antoneak Gilbert, Ronique Deveaux, and Rashad Moss, Indi, Italia and Laterio Hepburn, Edmund Jr., Nathaniel Smith, Florene, Sonia, Gilbert, Elrod and Shamar Munnings, Llonella Gilbert, Carol Hall, Ralph and Dennis Smith; cousins including, Rufus Johnson, John and Eldrige Johnson, Anthony, Harriet, and Leonard Johnson, William, Ornan, Medris, Timothy, Brady, Florence, Jackie Johnson; other relatives and friends including, the Gilbert family, Johnson family, Holman and Estermae Gilbert, Wilworth Campbell, Rosyln Johnson and family, Elsie Johnson and family, Hazel and family, Michael Harris and family, Paula& Sam Romer, Dr. Kapuno & Nurse Rose Saunders and Staff at Smith's Bay Communtiy Clinic; Rosie McKinney& family, Bradley Dorsette & family, Dwayne Adderely and family, Michael & Zephaniah Rolle and family, Albert Armbrister, Rev. Father Glenn Nixon, Deacon Rahming, Holy Redeemer Catholic Church family, and members of the Cat Island Community. Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Evergreen Mortuary, Mackey Street on Friday from 10:00a.m. 6:00 p.m. and again on Saturday at the church from 2:45 p.m. until service time.Oswald Frazer, 82of St. Vincent Road and formerly ofLower Bogue Eleuthera will be held at Wesley Methodist Church, Baillou Hill Road at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. Carla R. Culmer, assisted by Sis. Tezel Anderson. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road. Left to cherish fond memories are (6 : Levock, Johnsthon, Sargeant 1114 Londie, Police Constable 282 Bertram Sr., Petty Officer Remond Sr. and Horace Frazer; five (5 Vernisha Gaitor, Susan Darville, Jestina Lloyd, Nursing Officer Bertha Mae Sands, Petty Officer Joy Moss; one (1 sister, Thelma Neilly of Lower Bogue Eleuthera; five (5 sons-in-law, Inspector Edney Gaitor, Lincoln Darville, Julian Llyod, Gary Sands and Police Corporal 2241 Cyril Anthony Moss; four (4, Natasha, Arnetta, Sophia and Sylvia Frazer; numerous grand-children including, Dominic & Edney Gaitor, Yvette Archer, Lincoln Jr., Lazette Darville, Mario, Shandia, Jonathia, Jonique, Johnson Jr., & Jonovia, Marguritta Basden, Tamara, Indira, Lonette, Lonique, Londey Jr., Jermaine, Jenardo, Bertram Jr., Jeraldo, Quenell, Jerano, Bertrannique, Remond Jr., Nevado, Nikel Frazer, Shantonne, Shantae & Deisha Llyod, Gary Jr., Tenaz Sands, Dwight Baker Jr., Anthonique and Antonesia Moss; Great-grand-children, Daija & Dabria and Tion Gaitor, Brendan and Julian Archer Jr., Benjamin & John Basden & Shanya Frazer; sisters-in-law: Geneva Kelly, Shirley Johnson, Mara Cash and Olga Frazer; one (1in-law, Harrison Kelly; two (2, Julian Archer and Benjamin Basden; one (1-inIaw, Vinette Gaitor; numerous nieces, nephews and other relatives including, staff of the People Pharmacy, staff of Mable Walker Primary School, Staff of Bank of Nova Scotia, the staff of Main Operating Theatre P.M. Hospital, Fire Branch of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, The Royal Bahamas Defense Force, Rev. Carla Culmer and Wesley Methodist Church family. Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Evergreen Mortuary Mackey Street, on Friday from 1 0:00a.m. 6:00 p.m. and again on Saturday at the church until service time. FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

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THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 11 Carlies Lovise Ferguson-Sawyer, 65of Rocky Pine Road andformerly of the Forest Exuma will be held on Saturday at South Beach Union Baptist Church Summer Haven Estate off Blue Hill Road South at 1:00 p.m. Officiating will be Rev. Wilton McKenzie Assisted by other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment will follow in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive. Cherished memories are held by: Children: Rickey Sawyer, Ken Saunders (predeceased Ferguson-Hanna; Adopted daughters, Kizzy Brown and Cola Minns; Adopted sons, Prince Rolle, Alexander Phillips, Trevor Sweeting, and Tyrone Clarke; One son-in-law, Baton Hanna; Two Daughters-in-law, Raquel Saunders and Simona Sawyer; grandchildren, Shavantae and Natijus Mejias, Olivia, Ishia, Reshae, Rickey Jr, and Akeel Sawyer, Kennen, and Kentonio Saunders, Dentawn Grant and Tanay Hanna; One sister, Bernadette Ferguson; Three brothers, Cedric Ferguson, Timothy Ferguson, and Benjamin Ferguson; One Aunt, Lillis Ferguson; five sistersInlaw , Edna, Jenny, and Helen Ferguson, Shirley Whylly and Eloise Sawyer; nieces and nephews , Elaine and Norman Lightfoot, Stephanie and Buster Evans, Keith and Kate Ferguson, Caron and Barry Brown, Hansel and Joann Ferguson, Shirley and Dennis Grant, Nikitha and Dennis Forbes, Sharinda and Wyberg Brown, Audrus and Tori Glinton, Terron and Tanya Armbrister, Dwayne and Stacia Davis, Anita and Leon Saunders, Sandra, Steve, Audrey, Brendell, Portia, Treaser, Florinda, Floyd, Fredrick, Terry and Crystal Ferguson, Tavari Armbrister, Bruno, Quincey, Stacey, Veronica Tina Moxey, Melvern Loyd, Valencia Moss, Norlaine, Normica and Niyah Lightfoot, Keilera, Keijero and Keisher Ferguson, Mannie, Corey and Sheena Brown, Carli, Wensel Newton and Dwight Newbold, Nursing Officer Sister Terry Bain, Attorney-at-law Linda Evans, Rev. Jeffrey Evans, A.S.P. Walter Evans, 1860 Rae Evans, Chrisitine Sawyer, Chantelle Gentle, Samuel Evans, Theresa Bonaby, Able Seaman, Sherry Gibson, Melonie Bodie, Phillip and Ricardo Whylly, a host of other relatives and friends; Basil Sawyer and family, Inez and Edward Harris, Theresa Smith and Iren from Miami Florida, Bernita Oliver and family Lilly McDonald and Family, the Thompson family, Maxine and Laurie, Ricardo Evan, Claudette and family, the Rahming family, the Sweeting family, the descendants of Thomas Clarke and Family Almada Bowe, Anthony Adderley, Ethlee Ferguson and family, Elizean and family, the descendant of Samuel Ferguson, the descendants of Marrie Bodie and Family, Mary Clarke and Family, Shirley Davis, the descendants of Daniel Taylor and family, the descendants of Florence Clarke and Family, the descendants of J.B. Ferguson and family and Ruthymae Ferguson and family, the Mortimer family, Melissa, Shantel, Bernadette, Charmaine, and Presilla, Rose Curtis and Family, Shelia Adderley and Family, The Armbrister Family, Wendy Darling and family, Arthur Bodie and Family, descendants of Peter Bodie and family, Levis Farquason and family, the Brown family Natius Mejias, Roland Clarke and family, Ellen Wilkinson and the Gator family, Michael Young and family, the Johnson family, the Lowe family, the Wilderness Crew, Housekeeping Department of Atlantis Royal Towers, Housekeeping of Crystal Palace, the Tour Desk Agents, The Community of Rocky Pines, The Wet Money Crew Cable Beach and The entire Forest Exuma Community. Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at Evergreen Mortuary Mackey Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. and again on Saturday from 12:00 noon until service time.DEATH NOTICEVERONIA AUGUSTINE, 65of Strachan’sAlley off Kemp Road died on Thursday, February 26, 2009. She is survived by her husband, Ulrickk Agenor; children, Berry, Claude, Prince, Sonny, Lilian, Lucie and Eddie Codet. Funeral announcement will be announced at a later date. FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

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P AGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES EDVARD FICIEN, 32of Balfour Avenue and formerly of Port De Prince, Haiti, will be held on Saturday at Queen of Peace Catholic Church, Faith Avenue at 3pm. Officiating will be Father Roland Vilfort. Interment will follow in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and Spikenard Roads. He is survived by one daughter, Fmcisca DianaFicien; father, Arnold Ficien of Haiti; mother, Almarie Vincient; brothers, Saintamand Ficien of Haiti, Marc Anthonie Ficien, Limage Ficien, Bolivard Ficien, Jean Herold Ficien; sisters, Emilienne Ficien, Josianna Ficien, Silvitha Ficien, Albertha Ficien, Anitha Ficien, Misleine Ficien; uncles, Fernand Vincient of Miami, Willy Vincient of Haiti, Willy Vincient of Haiti; aunts, Mrs. Fernand Vincient of Haiti, Saintamse Ficien of Haiti , Saintamse Ficien of Haiti, Orphise Ficien of Haiti, McNarcel Ficien of Miami, Elianne Ficien of Miami, Mrs. Meriguesr Toussaint of Miami; nieces, Bethsaida Ficien, Sancherley, Berlauge, Dania, Marckenly, Widline, Asbina, cousins, Corvensky Ficien of Ferlin Vincient, Jimmy Ficien of Dama Vincent, Clerf Ficien of Sendy, Clint Ficien, of Miami, Sony Ficien of Miami, Delius Vixamar, Georg Joseph, Eugene Joseph, Richerson Jacques, Jacquessy Jacques, Lesley Apliste, Jacques Ougustin, Eugene, Rocine, Wilkens Elize, Michelet Jacques, Lo Jelusnia, Alberta, Duvencia, Yolette, Altida, Roseline Ficien, Elmisa Eugen, Ann Eugena, Ferlin Vincient, Fenly Vincient, Damas Vincient, Sandy Vincient, Family and Friend including, Tacy, Emilienne Tacy, Altanase Ougust, Bernadin Toussaint, Wesley Toussaint, Frantz, Anaise, Ilouis, Morice, Cerlus Renette, Duveny, Boline, Manise, Odette, Ulrick, Jn Baptist, Nuclosse, Erilia, Clias, Scanne, Jho, Bellot, Escarne, Fanelia, Dania, other relatives and friends. FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

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RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS Pg. 25The Tribune THURSDAY March 5, 2009

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The Tribune P G 26 Thursday, March 5, 2009 RELIGION n Did you recently give birth to the newest little angel on earth? Have you and your beloved recently tied the knot? Is your church planning a special event? Tribune Religion wants to hear from you! We want to know about the special things going on in your life, so go ahead and send in your wedding photographs, bir th announcements and chur ch activities schedule to be posted in upcoming T ribune Religion sections. This ser vice is fr ee. Send all infor mation, including (especially photographs, to featur es@tribune media.net. Infor mation can be hand deliver ed to The T ribune at Shirley and Deveaux Str eets or call the Religion section @ 502.2368. RELIGIOUS NOTES WORLD DAY OF PRAYER The World Day Of Prayer Committee invites members of the public to attend the World Day of Prayer service and fellowship meal on Friday March 6, at 7pm at The Salvation Army Citadel, Mackey Street. The evening’s speaker will be Reverend Angela Palacious who will speak on the theme: “In Christ There Are Many Members Yet One Body" World Day of Prayer is a worldwide movement of Christian women of many traditions who come together to obser ve a common day of prayer each year, and who, in many countries, have a continuing relationship in prayer and service. It is a movement initiated and carried out by women in more than 170 countries and regions, with one highlight being the annual day of celebration being held the first Friday of Mar ch. The movement brings women of various races, cultures, and traditions in closer fellowship, understanding, and action throughout the year. Through World Day of Prayer, women around the world, affirm their faith in Jesus Christ, share their hopes and fears, their joys and sor r ows, their opportunities and needs and become awar e of the whole world and no longer live in isolation. They are also enriched by the faith experience of Christians of other countries and cultures through prayer with and for them. Please go to www.worlddayofprayer.netfor further information LENTEN TEA The Anglican Chur ch of The Epiphany will hold it annual Lenten Tea and Fashion Show at the church on Prince Charles Drive on Sunday March 8 at 3 pm. Tickets are $10 and are available at the door. Please come to enjoy an after noon of fun and fellowship. ] ] WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!! n B y LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THE Church of God of Prophecy (CGPhis year is celebrating its centennial anniversary, where it will honour and remember some of its founding leaders, and from March 8-15, host its 88th annual National Convention of the Church of God of Pr ophecy of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. In 1909, the first ever local Church of God was established through Taylor Street, where it was then known as the Stanley Jumper Church named after the church‘s pastor Reverend Stanley Ferguson. The church which stands as the oldest pentecostal ministry in the Bahamas, according to some of its leaders has over the years survived criticism from outsiders who viewed initial followers as crazed fanatics. Accor ding to Bishop Franklin Ferguson of CGP East Street, this anniversar y stands as a living testimo ny to those who would have laboured in the early days to secur e and validate the development of the chur ch. “This anniversary is significant because over the years, we have been able to see the development of our people who have come from a time wher e we were scorned, looked down upon, and recognised as a people who were crazy, which was how we got the name ‘jumpers.’” He said as a people, the chur ch has been continuously blessed by God in being sustained by His grace, and is able to say after 100 years that God’s truth has cemented its place as a church of integrity and truth. Over the years, some of the defining moments for CGP included the appointment of the first Bahamian overseer Rev Stanley Fer guson, who served in that position from 1924 to 1934. That year, Rev Ferguson was succeeded by Bishop Alvin S Moss who filled the role up until 1974. For the next 25 years, Bishop Brice H Thompson served as overseer where he was r eplaced by the cur r ent Bishop Elgarnet B Rahming. Another historic year for the CGP was 1929, wher e at that time it held its first local convention. Bishop Fer guson also said: “We have moved on from having services in houses and under trees, to structured chur ches, and even our members have moved fr om people who wer e considered undereducated to functioning to SEE page 31 100 year milestone ‘JUMPER CHURCH’ LEAPS TO Bishop Franklin Ferguson

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MEDITATION The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, March 5, 2009 P G 27 SOMETIMES we cannot forget the wilderness that we are in because we cannot even eat. We are so broken we do not even see the table set before us: eyes swollen shut with weeping, heart heavy and spirit crushed. We are obliv-i ous to any comfort or consolation. D esolate, despairing, despondent and dejected we feel as if we will bleed to death, while others just pass by on the other side. Romans 8:35-39 was given to us as a gift for such a time as this: “Who will separate us from the love of Christ? Will hardship, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written, For your sake we are being killed all day long; we are accounted as sheep to be slaughtered. No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him, who loved us. For I am convinced that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor rulers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.” Are you permitting someone to separate you fr om the love of Christ? You need to take the initiative for yourself to establish, or re-establish your priorities and ask God to separate you from the influence or power of this person. Then remember you are always free to pray and talk to God in the secret place of your own heart. What is the natur e of your hardship? What is the extent of your distress? Why are you suffering persecution and in what form? What are you starving for in your time of famine? Of what have you been stripped in your time of nakedness? How great is your peril? Who is holding the sword? No matter what your individual answer, St Paul is convinced that you will be more than a conqueror through the One who loved us enough to die on the cr oss. When you open yourself to a saving faith you too will become convinced that you do not have to be afraid of dying, because you will not be separated from Christ in death, as a result of the reality of the resurrection. There is nothing in life that need separate us because no matter the circumstance, we are free to abide in Jesus ifw e invite Him to abide in us. The a ngels are under His authority, rulers on earth need not be permitted to weaken our faith as Daniel modeled for us in the lions’ den. There is nothing in our present situation, nothing in the future, and nothing in our past that can separate us from God if we do not desire it to be so. Not even the powers of Satan or any other evil spirits, demons, imps, principalities of any kind are strong enough to sever the bonds of love that Christ has for us. Nothing in the heights, down in the depths or anything, anywhere in creation, has the power to cancel out the price Christ paid. So what are we waiting for? Let us explore all the blessings such a relationship has to offer. Let us not be the cause of a separation fr om the best friend we will ever have, the Redeemer we certainly need, and the ongoing sustaining love of Christ embodied in the Holy Spirit’s presence. We have thepillar of cloud and the pillar of fire on the inside of us. ‘The cloud of unknowing’ as one author calls it, and the fire of enlightenment that Pentecost introduced. Wea re ready for anything God requires of u s. We are not alone and we are not helpless with Christ on our side. The impossible separation REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS Not even the powers of Satan or any other evil spirits, demons, imps, principalities of any kind are strong enough to sever the bonds of love that Christ has for us. n VATICAN CITY THE Vatican is considering welcoming into the Roman Catholic Church a gr oup of traditional Anglicans who br oke away fr om the global Anglican Communion nearly two decades ago over women’s ordination and other issues, officials say. Vatican officials stress that no decision has been made and no announcement is imminent. Still, Anglicans across the spectrum of belief are closely watching for any signs of movement. Absorbing the br eakaway T raditional Anglican Communion would be a small but notable victory for Pope Benedict XVI, who has made unifying Christians a goal of his papacy. At the same time, any invitation by the Vatican is likely to upset leaders of the 77 million-member Anglican Communion and would hur t the V atican’ s decades-long ef forts to strengthen ties with that fellowship of churches. Anglicans split with Rome in 1534 when English King Henry VIII was refused a marriage annulment. The T raditional Anglican Communion formed in 1990 as an association of orthodox Anglicans concerned about what they consider ed the liberal tilt in Anglican chur ches, including the ordination of women. Members of the group are generally Anglo-Catholic, emphasizing continuity with Catholic tradition and the importance of the sacraments. The fellowship says it has spread to 41 countries and has 400,000 members, although only about half arer egular chur chgoers. The traditional gr oup aims to unify the Anglican and Catholic churches, according to Archbishop John Hepworth of Australia, who is the leader, or primate, of the Traditional Anglican Communion. They have accepted the ministry of the pope, but also want to maintain their Anglican traditions one of several potential impediments to unification. e seek a communal and ecclesial way of being Anglican Catholics in communion with the Holy See,” the group wrote, in a letter Hepworth presented two years ago to the V atican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. The head of that Vatican office, Car dinal W illiam Levada, wr ote Hepwor th in July 2008, saying he was giving “serious attention” to the TAC’s pr oposal. Traditional Anglicans want to join Catholic Church RELIGION TODAY

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CRISIS OR OPPORTUNITY THE GREAT DEPRESSIONof the 1930's was viewed by some as a time of wonderful opportunities and by others as time of crisis. Here we are today in the Bahamas, a place where we've stated that God lives and that the Bahamas is a Christian nation. I really don't mean to burst your bubble, but I think it's only fair that I should inform you; that the Bahamas is not a Christian nation but rather we are an insane nation. As you'r e reading this article, I'm quite aware that as an educated person you know the definition of insanity. Therefore for the purpose of this exercise please allow me to share this definition with the handful of people who don't know. Insanity: Doing the same things over and over, yet expecting a different result Now, maybe not you; but I'm convinced beyond all r easonable doubt that we ar e truly an insane nation, as I listen to the various leaders, professionals and exper ts speak on matters of national interest such as tourism, finance, crime and education. T T o o u u r r i i s s m m T T h h e e t t r r u u e e G G o o d d o o f f t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s : : The geniuses / exper ts in gover nments and the Ministry of T ourism have been and are spending and investing millions of dollars in promoting and marketing tourism. Meanwhile very little financial investing is done in the masses of people who work within this lame cash cow. This is the kind of statement and r emark that stirs “HELL” up in the hefty salary makers, reclining office chairs, out of touch, big wigs, and pencil pushers in this ministry. Do I care if this and other statements stir up “HELL” within these folks throughout the length and breadth of this country? No, not one bit do I car e. Listen up! Ever ything rises and falls upon leadership, if the product of tourism is br oken; it's not the tourist’s fault. To the contrary, its because of incompetent, visionless leadership. Do you know that people are still traveling? It's just that they're not coming to the Bahamas in the numbers that we would like. Yes I do agree that September 11,2001 had an impact on tourist travel, but from then to now (don't fool ‘yaself’) people are traveling. I know that a new minister of tourism has just recently been appointed and that's good; but as in the game of baseball or softball w w h h a a t t g g o o o o d d i i s s t t h h e e r r e e i i n n h h a a v v i i n n g g a a n n e e w w p p i i t t c c h h e e r r , , w w h h e e n n h h e e ' ' s s g g o o t t t t o o p p l l a a y y b b a a l l l l w w i i t t h h t t h h e e s s a a m m e e i i n n c c o o m m p p e e t t e e n n t t t t e e a a m m t t h h a a t t c c a a n n ' ' t t f f i i e e l l d d o o r r h h i i t t t t h h e e b b a a l l l l ? ? The fall of tourism hasn't just hap pen; this one sided game has been played on an uneven field for many years. Whenever emphasis is placed on tourism, its primar y areas were West Bay Street, down town Bay Street and Paradise Island. What has changed with this twisted view today? Nothing much, other than it’ s now Atlantis, the Bar-Mar project, Albany, etc; Again, why listen to me? It seems that you guys have all of the answers to your tourism woes. But then again if this was the case, why is it that the Bahamas is not ranked in the top 5 places of choice for tourist travel in the wester n hemispher e? Ther e was a time when the Bahamas was able to hold its own in tourism as we promoted our sun, sand & sea; and most of all our service was at its best. But Mr Minister, Mr/ Ms Director ofT ourism, let me assur e you that you'r e prematurely channeling your efforts and financial resources outside as youpr omote a br oken (yet repairable industry. Anything that has to do with hospitality service from Atlantis in the north to the smallest restaurant at South Beach and the family islands needs to be on the same accord with total quality service. (TQS and wherever there is a breach of this service whether it is from an employer or an employee, such person or persons should be dealt with accordingly as a first time offender. In the event of a second offense it should be made known publicly that that person or business establishment has been removed from the hospitality industry. Herein lays the bedrock or root cause of TQS in the tourism industry. Unprecedented attention and efforts have been centered on service to and for the tourist dollar; meanwhile very little and in most cases no TQS is focused on Bahamians serving Bahamians. This travesty has led to multiple problems and breaches in the tourism industry, because it's these same Bahamians that are offering visitors the sloppy services. Here's one of the biggest mistakes many of our leaders ar e making as it r elates to tourism and the economy . W e've got visionless leaders (r eligious, government, civic) waiting on Pr esident Barack Obama to fix or turn around America's economy. Meanwhile, very little internal overhauling, adjustments or diversification is being intensively done to prepare the masses. The people that are loosing their jobs daily in the Bahamas and the other families that are being devastated through crimes and other ills didn't vote for President Obama, so why is it that they've got to wait on him for visionary leadership? Again, I'm not Bishop, Apostle or Doctor Allen; I have no books or cd's for sale, you guys are the qualified, educated professionals; therefore why should you or any other pay attention to what I'm saying? Remember! H H o o s s e e a a . . 4 4 : : 6 6 . . W W h h e e r r e e t t h h e e r r e e i i s s n n o o v v i i s s i i o o n n , , t t h h e e p p e e o o p p l l e e p p e e r r i i s s h h (NOT THE LEADERS) Therefore stop being silly and getting “swing” within and outside the church by eloquent speeches. Are your government officials and religious leaders crying about how tough things are? No, they're living and enjoying the good life; while you're always robbing Peter to pay Paul. For questions or comments contact us via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.225-3859 or 441-2021 The Tribune P G 28 Thursday, March 5, 2009 RELIGION PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN Tourism PART 1 Share your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS The Tribune Thursday, March 5, 2009 P G 29 RELIGION IN 1897, Methodist Minister George L ester in his book I n Sunny Isles p ays t ribute to Methodist 'men of mark', who through truth and righteousness created church life and the social conditions for that time and the next seven decades. On this high pedestal he places the names of William Turton, Roger Moore, Theophilus Pugh, Charles Penny, Thomas Lofthouse, John Corlett, Thomas Pearson, Isaac Pearson, Hilton Cheeseborough and Henry Bleby. Others were 'men worth remembering' because of their aggressive evangelism through the adversityof hurricanes, epidemic diseases and giving heroic attention of the sick and dying. Penny and Corlett ministered to the liberated Africans and were instrumental in the growth and development of Wesley Methodist Church and its Yoruba congregation. Among the earliest leaders of the Wesley Methodist Church were Yoruba tribesmen: Monday Ranger, Alladay Adderley, Britain Eneas and Domingo Weir all men whose descendants car ried on the tradition of being avid chur chmen. The name of Corlett also lived on Frederick Corlett of the Yoruba tribe died in 1911 at the home of his son John in Bilney Lane. It is interesting to note that the son John Corlettwas a founder member of the Bilney Lane Orthodox African Church inspired by Marcus Garvey. Lofthouse was the father of a strand of the oligarchic dynasty that ruled the Bahamas for almost 100 years. His son Thomas Hilton Cheeseborough Lofthouse opened the 'Big Store' on Marlborough Street and his son Charles was the composer of Goombay songs -' Bahama Mama ' and 'Mama Don't Want no Peas and Rice ' were huge world wide hits in the 1930s. The last of the dynasty was Sir Staf for d Lofthouse Sands, father of Bahamian tourism. The growth of Methodism after emancipation was phenomenal. In 1835 t here were only four ministers for the 1 ,799 members of the four circuits (Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, Haiti and Bermuda). In the Bahamas, Methodism spread to Exuma (1837 Providence Wesley (1838 Harbour (18431844 through Eleuthera (1845 1864 in 1841, St Paul' was returned from the Anglicans to the Methodists. The Methodist Mission continued to expand from 1869 until 1975 due to the disestablishment of the Anglican Church and the controversy caused by the Tractarian Ritualistic Movement and segregation of black and white members. Another reason for the growth was the longer tenure of the ministers in one location. In the earliest days of Turton, Routledge and Dowson they rotated every ten or twelve weeks. Then it became customary for interchange of stations yearly. In later times, the ministry was permanent with the option for change after a service of ten years. Up until the end of the 19th Centur y not a gr eat number of Bahamian men took up the Methodist ministry but e ight served in the Bahamas and severa l ministered in the USA, Canada and the West Indies. George Lester praises the stalwart contribution of 'men of mark' and 'men of worth' many long dead or moved on - “They constructed no melancholy theories; but having planted many a 'Rose of Sharon' and made their portion of the desert smile, they departed in the faith that the green margin would spread as the seasons of God came round, till the mantle of heaven covered the earth and ended with Eden, as it had begun.” Thus the Methodists achieved a dominant position in religion, economics and politics that remained unchallenged until the rise of the Roman Catholic and Pentecostal denominations competed for souls in the early 20th Century and the Baptist coalition with the progressive Liberal Party in the 1960s ushered in the modern era of majority rule. (Next time Par t 20: Baptist Men of Mark) Methodist Men of Mark JIM LAWLOR PART 19 TWENTY years ago, the Men’s Fellowship at the Church of God of Pr ophecy East Str eet T abernacle was established by the late, Bishop Nathaniel Beneby in 1989 to encourage the br others’ involvement in chur ch ministr y , to encourage str ong leadership among the brothers and foster a closer relationship between the Pastor and the brothers of the church. On Sunday February 22, the Men’s Ministr y celebrated their 20th anniver sary. The highlight of the service was the ‘Brother of the Year Award’ which was pr esented to Br other Cecil N Hall for outstanding ser vice to the ministr y . Also during the morning service, on the occasion of their 20th Anniversary, the Men’s Ministry, presented Senior Pastor, Bishop Franklin M Ferguson and his wife, Rovena, with a seven day Souther n Caribbean Cruise which will take place in May. The celebration climaxed in the after noon as scor es of Men’ s Fellowship Choirs from around the island came together for a time of singing and rejoicing. Refreshments was served in the cafeteria afterwards. (Submitted by Rovena Fer guson) Church of God of Prophecy East Street Tabernacle celebrates it’s men’s ministry 20th anniversary

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The Tribune P G 30 Thursday, March 5, 2009 RELIGION n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter WHILE many chur ches in the country try to support their members, this can be difficult for family island churches with insufficient resources. However, members of the St Faith’s Anglican Church in Stanyard Creek, Andr os, r ecently came together to support the children of the parish and the community by hosting a family fun day . Priest in char ge, Father Donald Kerr, said the fun day held last weekend was simply to raise funds for a new railing in the church, activities for the youth and to have a Sunday school for the kids. “Ther e are a lot of young people up here and we are really trying to reestablish and revamp the entire community in terms of bringing young people into the chur ch by putting on events,” Father Kerr said. Father Kerr has been the priest in char ge for the St Stephen’ s parish in the central Andr os district for two years, over seeing the five churches in the parish. Father Kerr said for some time the congregation of St Faith’s has somewhat disappeared, but is now on the ver ge of coming back but with mostly young people involved. “By having the young people involved, it makes a healthier church because they come in and take their rightful positions,” Father Kerr said. Father Ker r said there are a lot of after school activities the church is trying to provide for the children not only fr om St Faith’ s, but within the Stanyar d Creek community. “They get help with their homework and their social needs as well. W e ar e trying to let the church play a pivotal role within the community because this church is the largest in the island’s parish. This chur ch has to have activi ties in or der for the community to function,” Father Ker r said. Father Kerr said the fun day was also to establish a bond between the community and family life where they can come out and make contributions to their church. “The kids enjoy coming to the chur ch because they find fellowship. W e are trying our endeavored best to continue to bring the community together thr ough dif fer ent events like basket ball tournaments and so forth,” Father Kerr said. St. Faith’s Anglican Church hosts family fun day CHILDREN of St Faith’s Anglican Chur ch enjoying fun day with a game of basketball and swing set on the park and church grounds in Stanyard Creek, Andros.

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The Tribune Thursday, March 5, 2009 P G 31 RELIGION ON Sunday, February 1, the Ushers of the Church of God of Prophecy, East Street Tabernacle took time off from their r outine as they were relieved from their duties for the day to r eceive special recognition for their hard work over the past year . Speaking on this occasion was Bishop Randall Howar d, General Overseer for the Chur ch of God of Pr ophecy W orldwide, whose presence marked the first time that a general overseer would have ministered in a local church other than during annual conventions, which made this occasion historic for the chur ch at East Street. Receiving special honour for their dedication and commitment to the usher ministr y wer e: Sister W innifred W illiamson and Br others: Raymond Pratt and Joseph Henfield. Church of God of Prophecy East Street Tabernacle celebrates it’s 8th annual Ushers Day n By BISHOP V.G.CLARKE Calvary Deliverance Church HOPEhas been defined as “a feeling that what is wanted will happen; or “a desire accompaniedb y expectations.” In the scripture, hope is closely connected to faith, “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” (Hebrews 11:1 Man cannot survive without hope; it is what gives meaning to all of life. It is a fact that “we are saved by hoped”, as stated in Romans 8:24. Victor Frank in his book, “Man's Search for Meaning”, graphically tells how he was able to survive the horrors of a Nazi concentration camp by focusing on the hope of liberation and deliverance, rather than on the suffering and death that was happening all around him. The minister frequently faces circumstances and situations that are discouraging and defeating on the sur face a scathing criticism, a financial reverse, a lack of spiritualr esults and a piling up of people's problems. To handle these difficulties on the human level is impossi ble. T o fight with carnal weapon is useless, such an approach assures defeat. What is needed is a spiritual solution. The first step in spiritually solving any problem is to transcend it to get above. Don't try to slug it out on the fleshly level, get in the spiritual realm. How is this done? By developing the “feeling that what is wanted will happen.” By exercising faith and hope, remember that such a feeling will not come automatically; it will come only as a conscious act of the will. Hope arises out of a concentration on the good and positive things (Phil. 4:8e must not focus on the difficult: but on the fact that God will bring deliverance. To transcend a problem (to practise hope) does not mean that we will leave the problem; it simply means that by viewing it from God's perspective, we will see it as it really is. When we understand the true natur e of the pr oblem, we will then be able to confr ont it pr operly . Keep in mind however , that this is not possible without first exer cising faith and hope. W e must under stand that it is hope that gives us the spiritual insights and power necessar y to take the fear out of the futur e. hope The importance of all levels of society This week, the church will begin its celebrations with a historic exhibition of photos and ar tifacts dating as far back to the early 1900s. Scheduled to be held at its East Street tabernacle located between Sunlight Village and Cottage off East Street, the event will of ficially be opened by Bishop Rahming, and will be available to the general public for viewing. Then on Sunday , the chur ch will star t its convention which is scheduled to be broadcasted live over the radio, television, and the Internet. According to a press release from the church’s press office: “This service will be one of high praise and worship, involving our choirs, dancers, bands and the spoken word.” Slated as keynote speaker for the event is the General Pr esbyter for the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean Islands Bishop Brice H Thompson. On Monday, the convention will continue with an address from the National overseer Bishop Rahming who willr eflect on the history and challenges of the church, and will also present future plans for CGP. Other speakers during the week include Bishop Randall E Howard the General overseer, Bishop Clayton Martin who is the overseer of Jamaica, Bishop Adrian V arlack, Bishop David Bryan, and Bishop Benjamin Feliz. Following dozens of events and celebrations expected to unfold during the eight day festivities, the event will cul minate with a Baptismal service at the Western Esplanade. The church is inviting all in the community to show support by attend its events, and r emains committed to its true mission, which is to spread the word of the Father. FROM page 26 Jumper church leaps to hundred year milestone

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The Tribune P G 32 Thursday, March 5, 2009 RELIGION n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallan@tribunemedia.net GOSPEL recording artist Ricardo Clarke, who just last week released his debut gospel/reggae album titled Not Settling, has taking the local Christian community by stor m with lyrics which not only speak of the challenges of being saved or unsaved, but also on the r ealities of living in an economically crunched environment. Ricardo was backed by the Higher Level Band, along with a wide mix of gospel artists at a concert last Friday at the Calvar y Deliverance Chur ch. The event was considered an overwhelming success. Ricar do who is also the son of Bishop VG Clarke of Calvar y Deliverance, during his on stage per formance gave audience members a heart to heart look into the reality of Christian life and growth as he has experienced it. Giving reference to a Bible scripture where Elijah instructed a servant tor epeat a task, Ricar do said God works in a way wher e if he wants to show you something, even if you overlook it the first time, he‘ll take you back to that place over and over until you see his vision. “Sometimes you could repeat a process, but you wont get manifestation the first timeIf you r epeat a pr ocess, God is going to let you hear a sound that you didn‘t hear the first time.” For Ricardo, this message was manifested through his love for music. Ricar do said although he has long embraced the art of spoken word, it was never until he attempted to share his message thr ough music that his pur pose was tr uly fulfilled. “Sometimes you work so har d to get people to understand your spoken word which they rarely get, and it’s like in a heartbeat they’re singing the same message in a song that you couldn’t get them to connect with, and I feel glad to know that I could get to share more of what I have to say thr ough music.” After being saved for mor e than 10 years, Ricar do explained that some of the same challenges and distractions that affected him as an unsaved youth, still af fect many young people today . “I definitely was not saved from the womb, but I always had a healthyr espect for the chur ch and for what my personal life could do to my family . Prior to me coming into the kingdom I had a pr etty active social life, I was a party animal.” Although he had always lived by the golden r ule, Ricar do said in his early days he too took par t in excessive par tying, drinking, smoking, and immersed himself always in the company of several female friends. He said at that time, the presence of God r emained in his life, reminding him of a higher calling. Along the way, Ricardo said he has been encouraged by one particular scriptur e that has not only feed him when he was weak, but which has also guided him when he was lost. Pr overbs 11.25 which r eads: “The liberal soul shall be made fat, and he that watereth shall be watereth also himself. Now that he is doing what he loves and able to spread the word of the Father , Ricardo said he hopes to continue spreading positive messages of Christianity and of God. Not Settling RICARDO clarke signs an album for Reubin Heights. RICARDO CLARKE p erforms for the crowd at the ‘Not Settling’ concerth eld at the Calvary Deliverance Church.


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THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009



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IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

hes



More CLICO
concerns raised

Questions over loans of more
than $70m to foreign affiliates



@ TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

CONCERNS are being raised as to whether
CLICO (Bahamas) could have violated the country's
Exchange Control laws regarding loans of more
than $70 million to its foreign affiliates, which were in
turn invested in the now devastated Florida real estate
market.

However, CLICO (Bahamas) may have been able to
legally avoid Bahamian exchange laws by using US dol-
lar annuities clients invested in its Turks & Caicos branch.
These assets in the Turks & Caicos branch represented



m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

HOTEL workers who have
suffered financial hardships in
recent months have new hope
as the Miss Universe pageant
will offer temporary employ-
ment to those in the hospitality
sector.

As Atlantis was declared offi-
cial host of the multi-million
dollar month-long international
contest yesterday, president of
Kerzner International Bahamas
George Markantonis said addi-
tional workers will be required
to assist the 89 competing beau-
ty queens and their entourage at
the Paradise Island hotel in
August.

And various hotels, set to
host at least five additional
pageant events, can also expect
an influx of visitors, bringing a
temporary boost to the industry
after hundreds of workers were
laid-off in recent months.

Mr Markantonis said: “What-
ever benefits Atlantis also ben-
efits the whole community and
the whole country.

“We will bring in more tem-
porary labour that in turn will
be felt in the community, and
it is our intention to give as
much benefit to all the hotels if
we can.

“T expect we will be bringing

SEE page nine



ee a}
pee ls






















MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECU-
RITY Tommy Turnquest speaks to
Major Ladon Hutchens of the US
Marine Corp, while Timothy Zafni-
ga-Brown, Chargé d’Affaires at the
US Embassy, looks on.

Mr Turnquest opened the 25th
annual Tradewinds conference yes-
terday, which, he said, has made a
significant contribution towards
improving maritime security.

Tradewinds is a joint exercise
designed to develop and encourage
partnerships among law enforce-
ment officials throughout the
region.

It is an annual event that con-
sists of a combined ground and
marine exercise within the
Caribbean Basin. The Bahamas last
hosted the exercise in 2005.

“This exercise is yet another
demonstration of the US govern-
ment’s commitment to the peace
and security of the Bahamas, the
Caribbean region and the Western
Hemisphere through a continuous
programme of cooperation among
all partner nations,” Mr Turnquest
said.























BETH C s
CD YT a SS

RU hy

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WEATHERING the eco-
nomic malaise better than most,
the Abaco economy is a “mod-
el” for the rest of The Bahamas,
South Abaco MP Edison Key,
said in the House of Assembly
yesterday.

“While we are feeling the
effects of the downturn in the
US economy, the affect on Aba-
co’s economy has been less than

ACN T GRC















South Abaco MP Edison Key

in other islands.

“In fact, I dare to state that
Abaco is a model for other
islands to emulate, with hun-
dreds of second home owners
who have built (homes) and

SEE page eight

Single mother intends to sue
Immigration Department

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

A SINGLE mother terrified by the violent intrusion of armed
immigration officers who raided her home last week intends to
sue the Department of Immigration for damages.

Violet Hanna, 41, and her daughter Amber, 7, were sleeping
when she claims the officers broke apart the gate securing the

SEE page nine

the main financing for loans made to Wellington Pre-
serve Corporation's Florida Project.

Yesterday Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told The
Tribune that he "was told that the monies did not leave

the Bahamas."

Central Bank Governor Wendy Craigg also told The
Tribune that Bank records do not reflect any application
by CLICO (Bahamas) or an approval granted by the
Bank to authorise loans worth $73.6 million of its Bahami-
an assets to foreign affiliates.

When asked if the Central Bank was worried about oth-
er institutions circumventing exchange control regula-
tions to invest abroad, Ms Craigg said a system was in
place to deter any breach of the exchange control regu-

lations.

"Our experience suggests that this is not a normal

SEE page eight



Mitchell wants PM to give
full disclosure on the
swift liquidation of CLICO

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER foreign affairs
minister Fred Mitchell called
on Prime Minister Ingraham to
give a full and frank disclosure
on the reasons for the swift liq-
uidation of CLICO Bahamas
Ltd, questioning whether there
might have been any conflict of
interest or “insider trading” to
justify a raid of the assets of the
insurance company.

Yesterday, Guyana’s Presi-
dent Bharrat Jagdeo also
expressed concern over the
manner in which the Bahamas
handled the issue with the liq-
uidation of CLICO Bahamas.

President Jagdeo said that the
Bahamian regulator had failed
to contact Guyana before mak-
ing the decision to do so,
although that person was
“instructed by the Bahamian
Prime Minister to do so.” As a
result of CLICO Bahamas’ liq-
uldation, the government of
Guyana had to place CLICO
(Guyana) under judicial man-
agement.

President Jagdeo stressed that
he felt it was important for var-
ious Governors of Central

rr: UP oc 25% Off Se et



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER

Banks of Trinidad and Tobago,
Barbados and the Bahamas to
meet before the heads of state
of each country can hold talks,
as he expressed his concern that
the local regulators of the vari-
ous territories seemed to be
operating in isolation.

Mr Mitchell in his address to
the media yesterday echoed
some of these concerns when
he asked whether the Govern-
ment attempted to directly
intervene with the Government
of Trinidad and Tobago, the
ultimate owner of CLICO.

“We heard from our Prime
Minister that the President of
Guyana called the Prime Min-
ister of the Bahamas to inquire
about CLICO’s Guyana’s assets
in CLICO Bahamas. Yet on the
face of a Government guaran-
tee by the CLICO company in

SEE page nine











MTV GUIDE CANCELLED

DUE to economies on
newsprint caused by the
recession, The Tribune has
decided to cancel the TV
guide. We apologise to read-
ers for any inconvenience.
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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Sandilands auxiliary nurses stage protest

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

APPROXIMATELY two
dozen nurse aids stationed at the
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre
and the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital (PMH) protested in Rawson
Square yesterday against what
they called "slave-like" working
conditions.

The protesters waved placards
saying, "Those who implemented
the unfair shifts, please try work-
ing it", and "What is (more)
important, patient care or
shift system?" - while singing

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gospel hymns.

The demonstration drew the
attention of curious tourists and
locals alike, including several
members of the Opposition, who
delayed their entrance into yes-
terday's parliament session to
take in the scene.

The auxiliary nurses - support
staff for trained nurses - are in
an uproar over a new shift system
implemented by the Public Hos-
pital Authority (PHA) on Feb-
ruary 16 which affects auxiliary
nurses at PMH, Sandilands and
the Rand Lab in Grand Bahama.

"Prior to the implementation
of the shift they have in place
now, they were working 10-hour
shifts for four nights a week and
then having four nights off.

“They want them to now work
the eight-hour shift, which they
have no problem with.

“But we want them to consider
the fact that a number of persons
are only used to working night
shifts and they kind of built a
lifestyle around (that).

“The new system causes a lot
of them to now work morning,
evening and nights," said presi-
dent of the Bahamas Public Ser-
vice Union (BPSU) John Pinder.

Mr Pinder said the problem

began when some aides were
scheduled to work night shifts
ending at 11pm, only to be forced
to return to work at 7am the next
day.

He said this represents a vio-
lation of the union's industrial
agreement which states staff must
have a 12-hour rest period
between shifts.

The BPSU wants a meeting
with PHA officials to address
these concerns and claimed a
complaint lodged on February 12
was not acknowledged.

Yesterday, PHA managing
director Herbert Brown said to
his knowledge the new shift sys-
tem did not violate the union's
industrial agreement or the
Employment Act.

He acknowledged that a few
incidents were brought to his
attention where aides were being
scheduled to work a 7am shift
the day after leaving work at
11pm — an oversight that princi-
pal nursing officers from PMH
and Sandilands are presently
reviewing.

He said while some staff “are
not happy with the new shift sys-
tem,” the principal nursing offi-
cers are willing to work with
them to accommodate requests

for working hours, where possi-
ble.

The protest did not disrupt ser-
vices at PMH or Sandilands, he
said.

However, Mr Brown said that
four aides from Sandilands and
seven from PMH who were
scheduled to work yesterday
morning took part in the indus-
trial action. He said it was too
early to tell if they would be
penalised for their participation.

The aides are calling for the
old system to return: "The shift
what they implemented now,
you'll find more time with your
institution that you will with your
family. A lot of times when the
shifts are being made up, you do
not have a 12-hour rest period in
between. If they can't get it
together then they need to leave
the shift as is," said an auxiliary
nurse who has worked at PMH
for nearly 20 years.

Kenyatta Gibson
jets a standing
ovation from FNIVIs

FNM Mem-
ber of Parlia-
ment for
Kennedy Keny-
atta Gibson last
month attended
his first party
council meeting
and garnered a
standing ovation i
on ie Kenyatta Gibson
headquarters on Mackey Street.

Entering the hall to a “thunder-
ous applause,” Mr Gibson was
enthusiastically received by many
council members who sources said
welcomed the former PLP mem-
ber with “open arms.”

Although he was not scheduled
to speak, Mr Gibson was asked to
approach the podium and say a
few words after his overwhelming
welcome.

When this announcement was
made, a source at the meeting told
The Tribune, council members
“leapt to their feet” in a roaring
applause, “which continued at
intervals all through his address.”

Mr Gibson, in his brief address
to the council, said that he was
humbled by the overwhelming
show of support he has received.
He also expressed his gratification
for the warm reception and
pledged to do all he could to make
sure that he returns Kennedy to
its rightful place in the FNM’s col-
umn.



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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 3



Laing: Govt
must continue |
work to ‘turn
things around’
in economy

m@ By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of State
for Finance Zhivargo
Laing yesterday empha-
sised that with the 234
employees being termi-
nated when the Isle of
Capri closes its doors in
Grand Bahama by the
end of May, government
must continue its work to
“turn things around” in
the local economy.

Also commenting
briefly on reports that an
additional 30 persons
may soon be laid off
from Ginn’s Old Bahama
Bay property, Mr Laing
said that this is again
another case of where
businesses “all over the
world” are trying to
respond to the tough
economic times.

“So that Ginn and oth-
ers would be having a
similar reaction is only
indicative of the times of
which we find ourselves.
And we have to
empathise with the peo-
ple who are laid off
because it is a significant
hardship for them, but
this is what is happening
now and we have to keep
working on doing what
we can to turn things
around. But it is a global
economic crisis and that’s
what we’re in,” he said.

Decision

On Tuesday, senior
director of corporate
communications at Our
Lucaya Isle of Capri
Casino Jill Haynes said
that the move to close
the property came asa
result of a decision the
company recently made
in accordance with its
strategic corporate plan.

The company will
reportedly not renew its
lease - which expires in
May - and will be shut-
ting down operations in
the Bahamas and the
United Kingdom.

The Isle of Capri will
now focus, Ms Haynes
said, on the 18 casinos
and 8,000 employees that
the St Louis Missouri
company has in North
America.

Likewise, Ryan Juli-
son, a spokesman for
Ginn, noted that the
company is “continuous-
ly looking” at ways to
save money.

In an interview with
the Nassau Guardian, Mr
Julison said that he could
not confirm that Ginn
was about to lay off 30
persons, but did state
that “our efforts to cre-
ate the best resort we can
with the biggest cost effi-
ciency is an effort that
we’re analysing and look-
ing at every day.”

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Christie makes decision
on Pleasant Bridgewater
Senate replacement

Announcement will be made during or after mid-year budget debate

mw By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

OVER a month after he first said he
would soon name a new senator to replace
Pleasant Bridgewater, Opposition leader
Perry Christie now anticipates announc-
ing his selection during or after the mid-
year budget debate in the House of Assem-

bly.

Ms Bridgewater resigned her seat on
January 24 prompting the need for Mr
Christie to select a new appointee to take

her vacant seat in the Senate.

On January 26, former Prime Minister Christie
told the media that he would select a replacement
“at the earliest opportunity” and on February 2 he
said that within a week a new senator would be

seated.

Yesterday, asked whether he was having some
difficulty making his selection, Mr Christie said
“no”, and declared that he was already “done” with

Perry Christie



February.

the decision.

“T just have to do the formal — the let-
ters and so forth.

“It’s just a question of whether I do it
during this debate or immediately after,”
he said.

Mr Christie previously confirmed that
he intends for another Grand Bahama res-
ident to take up the post formally held by
Mrs Bridgewater. He said he had received
about six recommendations for the post.

“T think in my own mind a decision is
made, but I want to be absolutely careful
about speaking to it until such time as nec-
essary checks are made on all the relevant
people who are under discussion,” he said in early

The Senate has met several times since the resig-
nation of Mrs Bridgewater, who was charged with

abetment to extort and conspiracy to extort $25

million from US actor John Travolta. The Police
Act and the National Library and Information Ser-
vices Act have been debated since she stepped down.

Ministry confirms TB tests
at Prince George Whart

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Ministry of Health con-
firmed yesterday that they have
been conducting tests for
tuberculosis at Prince George
Wharf after a security guard,
who was admitted to the hos-
pital for a stroke, tested posi-
tive for the disease.

Speaking with The Tribune
at the House of Assembly yes-
terday, Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis said that his
ministry has just completed
their tests at the wharf and the
surrounding area.

However, he could not con-
firm the precise number of
individuals who have tested
positive for being exposed to
the disease or the number of
persons who have been con-
firmed to be infected with TB.

Team

However, Dr Minnis said
that his officers were quick to
mobilise a screening team to
test persons in and around the
facility as soon as they were
notified of the initial case.

As the Prince George Wharf
houses the docking facility for a
number of cruise lines, Dr Min-
nis was quick to assure the pub-
lic that tourists were at “no
risk” of contracting the disease
as persons must be in “constant
and prolonged” interaction
with an infected person to
catch TB.

“Tourists at airports or wher-
ever are at no risk,” Dr Minnis
said.

“All those who worked with-
in the vicinity would be
screened and there were a cer-
tain number who would have
been positive. What ‘positive’
means is that they were only
exposed. An example is, if ’m

eieelaree

ANVASY

Dr Hubert Minnis



here with the flu, everyone
around here would have been
exposed to the flu. They would
not have the flu, and they
won't get the flu, but if you
tested them, the test would
show positive that they have
been exposed to the flu,” he
said.

On Tuesday, The Tribune
revealed that at least 18 people
have tested positive to being
exposed to tuberculosis in a
series of tests conducted in and
around Prince George Wharf.

According to sources at the
site who have been personally
tested over the last week, eight
individuals returned positive in
one day, with another 10 being
identified over the course of
the screenings.

This number included
Defence Force officers sta-
tioned at the Port’s adminis-
tration offices and workers in
and around the Port’s Wel-
come Centre through which
hundreds of tourists pass every
day.

However, as Dr Minnis
pointed out, these persons who
have tested positive do not nec-

essarily have TB at this time,
but have been exposed to the
disease.

Dr Minnis said that once an
individual comes back positive,
a chest x-ray is taken to ensure
that it is just an exposure and
that they do not have full-
blown TB.

While he could not confirm
the exact number of persons
who tested positive, Dr Min-
nis said that his ministry had
all of these persons properly
screened between Tuesday and
yesterday.

Classic symptoms of tuber-
culosis are a chronic cough with
blood-tinged sputum, fever,
night sweats and weight loss.

Symptoms

“Infection of other organs
causes a wide range of symp-
toms. The diagnosis relies on
radiology — commonly chest
X-rays — a tuberculin skin test,
blood tests, as well as micro-
scopic examination and micro-
biological culture of bodily flu-
ids. Tuberculosis treatment is
difficult and requires long
courses of multiple antibiotics,”
according to a website on TB.

Tuberculosis is spread
through the air when persons
who have the disease cough,
sneeze, or spit. One-third of
the world’s current population
has been infected with
mycobacterium tuberculosis
and new infections occur at a
rate of “one per second.”

“However, most of these cas-
es will not develop the full-
blown disease — asymptomatic,
latent infection is most com-
mon.

“About one in 10 of these
latent infections will eventual-
ly progress to active disease,
which, if left untreated, kills
more than half of its victims,”
the website warns.

nL

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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

LOL

TCO ESM IRV ER TE SEO C Te Co PL Ry Pee


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Officers who disgrace their uniform

FOR YEARS illegal immigration in this
country has been a major social problem. Over
the years it has been almost impossible to stop
the flow of illegal persons entering the country
because of corruption that runs so deeply in
this society that no one knows who to trust any-
more.

As someone, commenting on the dismal sit-
uation, said: “We are steeped in a corrupt cul-
ture — there seems no way out!”

Corrupt underground networks, operating
both here and in Haiti, make it possible for
Haitians to show passports stamped in Haiti
giving them legal entry into the Bahamas. How-
ever, the passport holder has never left the
Bahamas. Somehow “the man” — as the under-
ground operator is identified — has a route by
which he sends passports from the Bahamas to
Haiti to be stamped and returned to the holder
in the Bahamas. The passport has made the
trip by itself with no human person attached.
When it is returned to its owner in the Bahamas,
“the man” is paid his fee and life goes on as usu-
al.

Now that public opinion is forcing a solution
to the illegal immigration problem, this lack of
trust is the cause of many innocent people being
hurt and the sanctity of their homes violated.
That is why law enforcement officers — be they
police or immigration officers — must approach
each situation with the greatest of care, remem-
bering that they are dealing with human beings
whose only crime is that they are trying to find
a safe haven from a cruel world.

In the chase for immigrants, officers
approach their prey assuming their guilt. Often
this is not the case.

Therefore, they should never forget their
own or their victim’s humanity.

Where is the need for smashing down doors
and destroying property?

Usually the person on the other side of the
door is so petrified that they are no threat to
anyone.

There is mistrust on both sides of that closed
door.

The victim, having had so many experiences
with dishonest officials is afraid to open the
door, and the officer trying to enter, having
experienced so many forged passports, rejects
the offer of being shown yet another one —
although this one might be legitimate.

These officers must always remember that
one day the tables could be turned. Sometime in
the unforeseeable future they could be in the
same position of that trembling little immigrant
with nowhere to hide.

About a year and a half ago, walking to a bus

Sirst Baptist Church

stop a young woman was picked up by two
policemen in a patrol car. They took her for
a “drive” bombarding her with questions. They
detected a slight Jamaican accent. They wanted
to know where she lived. She refused to tell
them fearing that on every payday they would
be at her doorstep for a bribe. She told them
that she was in the Bahamas legally and that her
employer had all her papers in to renew her
permit. The employer was only awaiting a reply
from Immigration.

The police officers would have none of her
explanation. They threatened to take her to
the Detention Centre if she did not pay them
$300. She had no money. She asked one of the
officers to lend her his cell phone so that she
could call a friend to bring her the ransom. One
of them handed her his cell. The friend deliv-
ered the $300 to the officers, but they did not
release her. Instead they drove her to
Yamacraw, leaving her in a desolate area faced
with having to walk half across New Providence
to find her way home.

Why didn’t her employers report the inci-
dent? They were too terrified of being at the
mercy of dishonest officers who could take their
revenge. And so they dropped the matter. If
the Police Commissioner hasn’t caught up with
these two rogues yet, they are still committing
highway robbery in the security of a Bahamian
police officer’s uniform.

And then there was the young man who told
his story on a radio talk show. He said he was
picked up in Freeport for a minor traffic infrac-
tion. The police officer promised not to book
him if he gave him $200. The young man had
only $50, which he readily handed to the police-
man. He was asked if he had an ATM card.
Because of the threats he went to the nearest
ATM machine, put his card in, drew out $150,
and handed it to the cop.

Another Bahamian officer had disgraced his
uniform as he drove into the sunset — with
$200 stolen dollars tucked securely in his pock-
et.

And so with suspicion on both sides, police
officers should be very careful how they sift
through the legal and illegal. At no time should
they disgrace their uniform and the country
and people they serve.

Remember we are all made of flesh and
blood with the same hopes and dreams, and
injustice and physical cruelty hurts the
oppressed as much as it does the oppressor. It
is true that many should not be in our country,
but for God’s sake show some compassion. We
can say this because daily we deal with cries of
the oppressed.



PLP needs a
complete
overhaul

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The present administration
has been accused of not com-
ing up with solutions to the
country’s economic problems.
The fact that this accusation has
come from the other side of the
floor has not raised any eye-
brows but it has given some
clarity to how the opposition
perceives its responsibility
regarding the issue of leader-
ship. Our culture is adverse to
those among us who are prone
to “shoot their mouth off” with-
out cause or reason, and the fact
that no other country has come
up with a solution to this prob-
lem should have given the
opposition “pause”, but no, it
seems that they are concerned
with having something to say,
than actually saying something.

Forrester Carroll has sug-
gested that his party needs to
get their house in order, if they
expect to win the next election,
but I think he was putting it
lightly. His party has to go
through a restructuring from
the ground up and dust off the
book of principles that made
the party a viable political enti-
ty, and, there is a building per-
ception that this once great par-
ty is just sitting by waiting for

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



something bad to happen, as it
did with its last victory. Hard
times often cause people to
reflect and for many the FNM
party has achieved the status
of a viable political entity as the
PLP continues its decline. This
viability has nothing to do with
them being liked, the jury is still
out on that verdict, but, they
have shown that they have a
penchant for coming through in
the tough times. They were test-
ed in 1992 with Hurricane
Andrew and the varied infra-
structural problems they inher-
ited, and again in 2007 when it
seems like political entrench-
ment was bringing out the worst
in people.

It is unlikely that Mr Ingra-
ham is going to allow the mis-
steps of the past to happen
again, and if the persons in his
party can just bide their time
and allow for “transition”, it is
just possible that we will see
what this nation is able to do.
The last forty years have had
us fighting among ourselves,

while the “foreign investors”
have had a field day with the
land that we are supposed to be
possessing. We have given up
too much just to be driving
around in late model vehicles
and dressing nicely. Forty years
ago we were able to feed our-
selves in the areas of poultry,
beef and dairy products, but
back then the investors had to
deal with some “fellas” who
weren't getting up off anything
except the plan was long term.
That old regime had its issues
also, but they are never going to
be accused of not putting this
country first, and this, is our
mandate in the era we call the
modern Bahamas. And, this has
to happen, before we wake up
and see our inheritance taken
away from “us”.

The PLP has to show that
there is an emotionally prag-
matic connection to the intel-
lect they claim to have in their
party. Singular successes are not
enough, they make for good
copies at business seminars, but
viability is about transference
and transition.

EDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau,
February 26, 2009.

Freeporters should not tolerate
people talking down to them

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Even in these times we as Freeporters should
not take being talked down to by anyone and as
a Bahamian citizen I take great objection to the
CEO of Carnival Cruise Lines publicly making
known his choice, etc, etc, of who Carnival likes
to be Prime Minister and how the present Prime
Minister was so co-operative when the dry-dock

company was being formed.

To my knowledge only Bahamians have a vote

in the Bahamas.

Before we rush in blinded — the proposed new

any stake. I understand the preferred location is
owned by Grand Bahama Port Authority so

cruise port.

GBPA if you really want to put a financial stim-
ulus in the Freeport market commit now without
delay that Freeport and Grand Bahamians will
own no less than 30 per cent of the proposed

Carnival if they wish could be offered 15 per
cent and the balance of 55 per cent GBPA.

This is one chance for the new imaged GBPA

to really show if what they say is actually true —

Iam not going to hold my breathe, but have

hopes.

cruise port should have a major shareholding in

the hands of the common Bahamian with a pref-
erence for residents on Grand Bahama.
The Bahamas Government should not have

Freeport,

J PERCENTIE

February 25, 2009.

No need to repeat Freeport news

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Every evening on ZNS-TV
Channel 11 the Freeport News
is shown at 6.30pm and then
the local Nassau news is shown.
During the Nassau News the
Freeport news is repeated
again.

This is very annoying after
you have just watched it previ-

ously you then are interested in
and looking to see and hear the
Nassau News. Do they not get
enough News from Nassau that
they have to repeat the
Freeport News?

In my humble opinion it is
not necessary to repeat the
Freeport news again as it has
been shown just before the Nas-
sau news comes on. ZNS TV at

7pm should focus more on the
Nassau news and news happen-
ing in other islands outside of
the Northern Bahamas scope
that the Freeport News covers.

A BAHAMIAN
NEWS LOVER
Nassau,

March, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 5



Forbes: time to remake |

the Bahamas anew again

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

SOUTH Andros MP Picewell
Forbes continued his push for a
shift in the thinking of local politi-
cians, even ruffling a few feathers
in his own political party, as he
made his contribution to the mid-
year budget in the House of
Assembly this week.

Declaring that politicians have
been “flamming” and “making
stuff up on the fly” for too long,
Mr Forbes said that it is high time
to remake the Bahamas “anew
again.”

“We need the promise of Major-
ity Rule and while the majority
may look and act like they are in
charge, we know and they know
who is really in charge around
here,” Mr Forbes told parliament
on Monday.

“We have dressed up the UBP
with black UBPs, we have creat-
ed a generation of political elites
and I call them the black oligarchy
- that’s a big word Mr Speaker.
The white oligarchy was that way
because they had the money and
the colour. Well, the black oli-
garchy are that way because they
control the two political parties and
the little cliques say who leads and
who follows.

“Mr Speaker, it was a time for a
change in 1992, 1997, 2002, 2007

Picewell Forbes



and 2009. We want a change today.
The prime minister said it was time
for a change and we gave him 10
years and what did he change?
Then he came back and wanted
another chance. What did he
change or is working on changing
that will be of a major import to the
21st century Bahamas? Well Mr
Speaker, it’s time for us to know it
is not all about men, we have had
Sir Lynden, Hubert Ingraham and
Perry Christie. It’s not about ego
and they have all had that. But it’s
about country first and making the
necessary adjustments to meet the
new challenges of a modern
Bahamas,” he said.

Mr Forbes even questioned what
would change if Bahamians gave
his own party leader, Perry
Christie, another chance at lead-

Govt made ‘tough decisions’ on

Family Island capital projects



m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT had to make some “very tough decisions” on which
Family Island capital projects to fund in light of the downturn in the glob-
al economy, Minister of State for Lands and Local Government Byran
Woodside said in parliament yesterday.

Addressing the impact the worldwide economic slump has had on
the less inhabited Bahamian islands, Mr Woodside said that the central
government had to call on local governments to more fully justify and “pri-
oritise” all expenditure they were seeking.

“Funding for capital projects within the various Family Islands was not
released during the first six months of the (2008/2009) fiscal period.
Being fully aware of the negative impact the downturn would have on the
Bahamas, this prudent and visionary government undertook an in-depth
review of the various submissions for capital projects and made some very
tough decisions relative to the areas of expenditure,” said Mr Woodside.

“Local government district councils were requested to prioritise their
submissions for capital funding and provide detailed costs to ensure that
there would be no overruns that would require contingency funding,” he

added.

He said that districts which “provided the requisite information were
provided with allocations for capital works” in January 2009.

Those allocations amounted to a total of $1,289,199 — with Central Aba-
co ($133,677), Long Island ($120,000), Central Eleuthera ($101,000),
Hope Town and South Andros ($100,000) receiving the most funding.

ing the country.

“Even if we give Christie anoth-
er chance - the problem is really
the system. It doesn’t work for the
man in the streets and it never
will,” he said.

Mr Forbes added that if there is
going to be a new kind of
Bahamas, where “Bahamians run
the show”, then there has to be a
serious look at leadership “in all
sectors of our society.”

“A new Bahamas will require a
country-wide strategy. No longer
will we run the Bahamas with man-
ifestos or action plans - that’s old
school. We need to run a Bahamas
with a country document. A docu-
ment that shows where we are all
headed so that we can all dream
and find our rightful place in the
new Bahamian society.

“The 1960s mentality politician
will say ‘nonsense, we are in
charge.’ But Mr Speaker, in charge
of what? Each other? Mr Speaker,
it is time for us to take a truthful
look at this chamber and deal with
matters such as this one. Many
Bahamians are feeling second class
and when people are feeling this
way the proliferation of superficial
facts from august bodies like the
World Bank about our GDP and
per capita income means nothing.
They know what they are feeling in
our society today.

“Mr Speaker, the time has come
for us to apologise to the Bahami-
an people for being men of limited
vision and imagination. We have
asked the people to believe in us
when we were not proven and they
gave three leaders a chance with
no track record to assess or to be
guided by, in the likes of the father
of our Nation - Sir Lynden Pin-
dling, Hubert Ingraham and Perry
Christie, who all served as prime
ministers, with the former serving
until this day.

“The Bahamian people gave
young people of colour a chance
and in some views we have never
returned the favour. Others have
been more generous in their com-
ments and said that we have done
great as a country of 46 years.”

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THE TRIBUNE



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FIRST AID

from the largest state economy in
the US, Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation marketing experts have
included California and other
parts of the western US in an
aggressive television advertising
campaign.

The expansion of a strong mar-
keting presence in the western US
is part of the ministry’s business
plan, which was presented to the
public by Minister of Tourism and
Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace shortly after his appoint-
ment.

“The entire Caribbean would
say the western United States is
untapped,” said Rene Mack, pres-
ident in the Ministry of Tourism’s
public relations agency, Weber
Shandwick.

The lack of direct flights and
the abundance of inconvenient air
connections make travel to the
Caribbean from the west coast dif-
ficult, he said.

However, he pointed out that
the Bahamas has had success in
creating awareness among Los
Angeles residents and others on

Govt to set up technical training body

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE government is setting up a joint public/private body to help
shape technical training available in the country to better enable stu-
dents to meet industry demands, Education Minister Carl Bethel said
in the House of Assembly yesterday.

Persons in the private sector have long complained that they have dif-
ficulty finding recruits with the necessary skills to take up jobs across
a range of industries.

Even at present, with unemployment rising, certain fields still require
labour to be brought in from abroad as there are few Bahamians with
the necessary skills.

Aiming to address this problem and leave a lasting stamp on_teach-
ing in the Bahamas, Minister Bethel said the government would like to
follow the example of other Caribbean countries and set up a pub-
lic/private sector council which will liase with the Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute (BT VI) to ensure that students are emerging
with the most useful qualifications.

Officials from the Ministry of Education are set to travel to three
Caribbean countries - Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica -
in coming months to review their successes in this regard.

“The National Workforce Development Council is a construct that
we are seeking to put together that would provide a forum for inter-
ested private sector businesses and business leaders to have an input,
a direct connection with the curriculum officers and administration at
BTVI so that the expectations of the industry in terms of what they are
looking for in their entry level employees, that those expectations
will have a greater reflection in the curriculum of BT VI and in the qual-
ity of training,” said Mr Bethel.

“Once we’ve done that consultancy, going around getting the back-
ground information, then we will move to actualise the creation of it,
bring the legislation forward,” he added.

Mr Bethel said if the move is successful, the intention is to expand the
cooperation between the public and private sector “throughout other
parts of the curriculum”’, so that education across the board - not just
in the technical fields - can be tailored more closely to respond to the
needs of the market.

The minister said that overhauling the curriculum as a whole is a pri-
ority for him at this time - one which he said he will be pursuing “very
aggressively” in coming months.

“As was recommended 40 years ago, (the Ministry is interested in)
set(ting) up committees with public school teachers and private school
teachers so that we’ll have subject-based curriculum committees to
revise the curriculum so we can get rid of this narrow, very superficial
curriculum that we presently have in core subjects, and try to improve
the way we teach reading, maths, history, geography, civics and social
studies,” said Mr Bethel.

“The critical thing is that we hope to be able to make greater
progress in the meeting of expectations.”






40 Year Wa uranties
Metal serine

ew aero

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace



the west coast through public rela-
tions — unpaid media placements.

He said the Bahamas’ had a
strong public relations presence
in the west even before advertising
efforts had been put in place.

“You are in the Los Angeles
Times,” Mr Mack said. “We are in
the newspapers in Phoenix, New
Mexico. We ignore no one.”

Kim Hunter, president and
CEO of LaGrant Communica-
tions, a public relations agency
specialising in the African Amer-
ican consumer market for the
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation,
recommended more robust
attempts to attract travellers from
the west coast. He pointed out that
Hawaii captures more Los Ange-
les travellers than the Bahamas
even though the Bahamas is clos-
er to Los Angeles.

Honolulu is 2,559 miles from
Los Angles — 38 miles farther
away than Nassau. He said Los
Angeles and other western cities
could provide a boom for
Bahamas tourism.

“This is a huge, untapped mar-
ket,” Mr Hunter said.

“T will give you one example,
Jamaica, our competition. They
sell Jamaica from Los Angeles
because you have a lift there that
goes non-stop to Montego Bay as
well as to Ocho Rios. It is the
same distance from us in Los
Angeles to go from LA to Jamaica
as it is to go from LA to Hawaii.”

At the moment, he said, the
Bahamas is just scratching the sur-
face of the benefits that Los Ange-
les has to offer.

Through proper media and cor-
porate partnerships, much more
can be contributed to Bahamian
tourism by Los Angeles residents
and others on the west coast, Mr
Hunter said.

“Part of it is the invitation,” he
said. “If you don’t give the invite
to journalists, if you don’t give the
invitation to prospective con-
sumers, they will never come. That
western region of the United
States is a huge opportunity to
you. Because I can tell you now,
your competition is wooing that
market.”

Portland and Seattle are among
the notable cities for tourism tar-
geting, Mr Hunter said. He point-
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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS
7

Three remaining

concrete stack units

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Vopak Terminal Bahamas :
will demolish the three remaining concrete }
stack units at the former Bahamas Oil

Refinery Company plant on Saturday.

The 40-year-old landmarks — which stand
350ft tall - are coming down to make way for
the construction of additional oil storage }
tanks at Vopak, which is presently under-

going a major expansion project.

Maxwell Sweeting, vice-president of }
Vopak, said the event will be attended by ;
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and resi- }
dents of Grand Bahama, particularly from

the nearby surrounding settlements.

Vopak held a town meeting on Tuesday
evening at the Church of the Good Shep- }

herd for residents of Pinder’s Point,
Hunters, and Lewis Yard.

Representatives from the Cleveland :
Wrecking Company, Dykon Explosives, and
Bahamian Contractor Don Moss attended
the meeting to allay any concerns residents

may have about the implosion.

“We want the community to be a part of }
this event and we have started an art com- }
petition for students of Lewis Yard Prima- }
ry School to depict what they expect to see
on Saturday. The winning student will get }
the honour of pushing the button, along ;
with the prime minister, to implode the }

three stacks,” Mr Sweeting said.

Vopak demolished three steel stacks last
year with no disruption to residents in the }

area.

Chester Grace, blaster estimator at
Dykon, said over 200 pounds of explosives }

will be used for the implosion.

He noted that Dykon has 25 years expe-
rience in the field. The entire implosion

should be completed within five minutes,
he said.

“There will be some noise when the blast
goes off, but vibrations will be minimal }

when the stacks hit the ground,” he said.
He said a lot of dust debris is expected,

but it is no cause for concern to residents in

the area.

“We don’t think residents will have to :
evacuate because it is not going to be an }
immediate problem to them,” said Mr

Grace.

Invited persons will watch the implosion }
from a safe designated area some 1,000ft
away, on land that has been cleared for the }
Greenfield Expansion Project, which is esti- }
mated at between $250 million to $300 mil- i

lion.

Vopak is an independent oil storage hub

for customers from around the world.

Vopak and First Reserve Corporation }
purchased the BORCO plant last April. :
The company will have invested $1 billion i
when the expansion of the facility is com- }

pleted on Grand Bahama.



LEADING MEDICAL EXPERTS TO HOST CANCER CLINIC: (I-r) Professor Arthur Porter CEO of McGill
University Health Centre and managing director of the Cancer Centre and director of radiation
oncology; Professor Karol Sikora, Dean of the Buckingham School of Medicine, director of medical
oncology at the Cancer Centre, and Dr Conville Brown, co-founder and CEO of the centre.

New director of medical oncology
appointed at Bahamas Cancer Centre

PROFESSOR Karol Sikora, Dean of the
Buckingham School of Medicine and author
of the most widely-used cancer textbook in
graduate medical school in the United King-
dom, has been appointed director of medical
oncology at the Bahamas Cancer Centre, it
was announced yesterday.

“We are indeed honoured to announce that
one of the leading authorities, both in academia
and in cancer treatment practice, Dr Karol
Sikora, the Dean of the Buckingham School of
Medicine and author of two definitive texts on
cancer, has accepted the position of director
of medical oncology at the Cancer Centre at the
Centreville Medical Pavilion,” said Dr Conville
Brown, co-founder and CEO of the centre.

e e
Facility

The centre opened its radiation oncology
division in January 2004 while moving into its
new $12 million-comprehensive state-of-the-
art cancer screening, diagnosis and treatment
facility at 72 Collins Avenue. The medical
oncology division of the centre opened in Jan-
uary 2009.

“Dr Sikora is author of ‘The Treatment of
Cancer,’ the standard British post-graduate
textbook on cancer, and his new work, “The
Economics of Cancer,’ is already making its
impact felt. He is also an advisor on cancer to
the World Health Organisation and the medical
director of CancerPartnersUK, which admin-
isters a $100 million-public/private trust for the
radiation treatment of government-referred
patients, not dissimilar to our local model at the
Cancer Centre,” Dr Brown said.

“As a leading voice in cancer research and
therapy, Dr Sikora will bring additional strength
and depth of knowledge to our very strong
team that is committed to the fight against can-
cer, the number two killer of adult men and
women in the Bahamas.”

Professor Sikora will also be supported by the
Cancer Centre’s two senior staff medical oncol-
ogists — Dr Nevein Girgis, who holds a PhD in

medical oncology from the National Cancer
Institute at Cairo University in Egypt, and Dr
Osama Kellini, who holds a Masters Degree in
clinical oncology (medical and radiation oncol-
ogy), and was a former medical director of the
Nassau Institute Oncology Centre in Cairo,
Egypt.

Professor Arthur Porter, CEO of McGill
University Health Centre, serves as managing
director of the centre, and its director of radia-
tion oncology. Both experts will be in Nassau
later this week for the second in a series of
monthly professors’ cancer clinics. The clinic
will be held this Saturday.

“Constructing the centre and equipping it
with the most sensitive, advanced, and state-of-
the-art diagnostic and treatment equipment
was a huge step toward meeting the goal of
being able to provide the very best cancer care
for Bahamians at home,” said Dr Brown.

“But ultimately it is the people in any medical
facility who make the real difference. Now,
with the affiliation of not one, but two of the
leading voices in cancer study and treatment
onboard, we are excited about the prospects of
making a real dent in the destructive path of
cancer.”

Medical professors and Dr Porter and Dr
Sikora lead a team of more than 20 full-time
medical and paramedical professionals provid-
ing all modalities of diagnosis and treatment —
radiation, chemotherapy and surgical.

Professor Porter is assisted by two staff radi-
ation oncologists — Dr Margo Munroe, a
Bahamian trained in Alberta, Canada, and Dr
Memory Nsingo, a second clinical oncologist
(medical and radiation) from Zimbabwe.

The Cancer Centre is one of the few cancer
treatment facilities equipped for paediatric
treatment and surgery, a division headed by
American Board-certified paediatric haema-
tologist-oncologist Dr Corrine Sin Quee.

The Cancer Centre is the only facility in the
western hemisphere and the second in the
world outside the US to be accredited
by the American College of Radiation Oncol-

ogy.

‘Location: Carmichael Road ,

PRIME OFFICE
SPACE

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second floor
space will be available April, 2009 in newly
constructed building at the corner of Marlborough
and Cumberland Streets. Two (2) on-site car
spaces included.

Ideal location for offshore bank, trust company,
law firm, or other professions.

Contact Owner at:

362-6006

of Dance

Instructor: Adanecia Kemp

Rallet, Jazz, Modern, Tap, Liturgical

Classes available for adults and children ages

3 & up.

x Monday, Wednesday & Friday
- 4:00p.m. -— 7:00p.m.

immediately
“Worth of the Detention Centre
Phone: 361-4294/5 |



f'S A GRAND TIME OF

IT’S A TIME OF JOY AND JUBILATION!

PRAISE ax ELEBRATION? 4

Medical Association of the
Bahamas

37 Annual Conference 2009

Formal Opening Night Session I:

A FREE PUBLIC LECTURE

“Medical Care is Expensive...

Is Quality Care for All
Realistic?”

Presenter
Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter pc, Mp, MBA, FACR, FACRO,

irector-General and CEO of the McGill University Health Cente

FAAMA

Councillor Privy Council of Canada
Montreal, Canada.

Wednesday, March, 11 2009, 6:30 PM

GUEST SPEAKERS:

BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD Monday, March 9th, 2009

Genera! ()érseer
BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON

General Preshytet

Bishop Dr. Elearnet B. Rabming, Mateonal Oyveroser
& Moderator will dehver his ANBUAL ADDRESS |
LIVE VIA RADIO BAHAMAS (1344) AM ond

S10 AM

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN

Global Quireach Director

BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK
CBL [nstrector

MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE

International Director of Women’s Ministries

BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN

Regional Gverseer of Jamaica, Cayman

The Convention climaxes on Sanday, March 15th
with the afternoon Annoul Parade and Water
Baptismal Service, followed by the evening
Service brnadesst live on FNS Radio and TV 13,

log on to: WWW.cogophahamas.org
For live webcasting

Islands Guyana and French Guiana

and MINISTER SONLA MARTIN
BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS

Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islands

BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES

National Qwerseer of the Church of God,

Bahumus, Turks & Caioos Islinds

British Colonial Hilton Hotel

Ministering in song and performance
gre: the Centennial Mass Choir, the Tab-
[3% ernacle Concert Choir, the Chorch of
God National Choir, the Bahamas Public
Officers Choir, and other Choirs
oe oe and - Groups, al vith
GETTING IT RIGHT IN HEALTH CARE: - a Youth and

he Right Treatment, Right Time, Right Outcomes & the Right Price 2
. suders [i =
Sessions II-IV Thursday 12: 8:30pm — 7:00pm

Sessions V-VIII Friday 13": 8:30am — 7:00pm fn te fly a al

MAB Conference: March 11" —


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

%

cin

.

! 1
be mo
ZN

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for provision of General Insurance
Services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 690/09
All Risks General Insurance
(a) Commercial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents); and
(b) Computers, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment

Tender No. 691/09
Motor Insurance - Commercial & Private Vehicles

Tender No. 692/09
Accident Insurance - Money & Burglary

Tender No. 693/09
Liability Insurance - Personal & Public

Tender No. 694/09
Professional Indemnity
[Officers, Directors, Professional Staff, Engineers,
Accountants, Attorneys]

&

Tender No. 695/09
Marine Insurance

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163



PCM Ce ite
at Centreville
CeCe eT
announces the

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Questions over loans
of more than $70m
to foreign affiliates

FROM page one

activity, although obviously the Bank would
be concerned were such a practice to become
the norm among companies in the local market,
as it would, inevitably, impact negatively on
the stock of reserves.

"The official system provides checks and
balances that would deter unauthorized trans-
fer of investment capital and violators would be
guilty of an offence under the Schedule to the
Exchange Control Regulations. They could
be subject to sanction, including court action,"
she said.

If CLICO (Bahamas) Ltd had lent the $73.6
million through its local operations, the com-
pany would have required approval from the
Central Bank to extend loans to its foreign
affiliates, regardless of the source of these
funds and whether held in Bahamian dollars or
foreign currency.

"For example, if CLICO had amassed these
funds from its foreign operations and lent them
via the Bahamian subsidiary company, such
actions would still require exchange control

FROM page one

reside for long periods in Abaco,
creating long-term sustainable
employment for many Bahami-
ans,” said Mr Key, as he con-
tributed to the mid-year budget
debate.

approval.

"A review of our Exchange Control records
does not reflect that the Central Bank cither
received an application from CLICO
(Bahamas) Ltd or granted approval for CLICO
(Bahamas) Ltd to lend $73.6 million of its
assets to its foreign affiliates," Ms Craigg said.

While giving an update on the situation in the
House of Assembly on Monday, Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham said a wind-up order giv-
en on February 24 was ordered by the Registrar
of Insurance because the company's liabilities
outweighed its assets by $9 million. He added
that its Turks & Caicos branch could not pay
$2.6 million in claims.

He said that since 2004, CLICO (Bahamas)
began writing "excessive cash advances" to its
subsidiary CLICO Enterprises Ltd, which were
ultimately invested in the declining Florida
real estate market.

The Bahamas serves as a parent jurisdiction
for the Turks & Caicos and Belize, however it
is a separate entity from CLICO operations
in Trinidad and Tobago, and other jurisdic-
tions.

Abaco economy ‘is model
for the rest of Bahamas’

Mr Key, Bahamas Agricul-
tural and Industrial Corporation
executive chairman, added in an
interview after his speech that
the model makes Abaco less sus-
ceptible to the seasonal nature of
hotel and short-term vacation-
based tourism.

“In Abaco we have year-
round tourism because of the
second home owners. They
spend up to six or eight months
there. They are wealthy and they
employ a lot of Bahamians from
all over,” said Mr Key.

Having recently visited Cat
Island, Mr Key said he felt that
the “beautiful” island had all the
potential to sustain a second

home community that Abaco
has and could benefit accord-
ingly.

Meanwhile, he added that
with its proximity to the United
States, Andros also has potential
to benefit from this model of
development.

Mr Key’s comments come in
the wake of lay-offs at hotels in
New Providence (Atlantis and
Wyndham), Grand Bahama
(Our Lucaya) and Abaco
(Winding Bay) in the last four
months.

On Tuesday 200 more jobs in
Grand Bahama were left in lim-
bo when an announcement was
made that Isle of Capri would
not be renewing its contract to

run the casino at the Our Lucaya
hotel in Freeport when it expires
in May.

Tourist arrivals to The
Bahamas were down by close to
five per cent in 2008 over the
previous year, according to
the Central Bank of the
Bahamas.

Despite Mr Key’s optimistic
assessment, the second home
model of development has come
under fire from local communi-
ties in the past for contributing to
lifting local land prices out of
the price range of average
Bahamians in favour of foreign-
ers who do not spend the major-
ity of the year at the properties
they purchase.

Professor of Oncology,
The Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter,
PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FRCPC,
Director General & CEO, McGill University

Health Centre, Managing Director,

Professors’
Cancer Clinic

Professor of Medical Oncology,
Prof. Karol Sikora,

MA, MB BChir, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM
Dean of the University of Buckingham
School of Medicine,
author of over 300 papers
& Director of Medical Oncology

at The Cancer Centre

The Cancer Centre

Clinic open to the public
The Cancer Centre at
Centreville Medical Pavilion
72 Collins Avenue
Saturday, March 7

10:00am - 3:00pm

Limited appointments available.

LCC Cer mm cys) aM Ie


THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 9



DAYANA MENDOZA, Miss
Universe 2008, at yesterday’s
press conference.

Photo: Derek Smith



New temporary
jobs in hotel sector

FROM page one

in a lot of additional people when our hotels
reach 100 per cent level, not permanently, but
in the afterglow we will hopefully get the loss
back.”

Miss Universe organisation president Paula
Shugart said the pageant also will be hiring local
workers to assist in the event.

And Robert Sands, vice president of external
affairs for BahaMar, said every hotel will seek to
benefit both during the event and from the
expected long-term boost it will bring to the
industry.

However, he said, it is too early to speculate on
the possibility of cancelling the planned two-
month closure of the Wyndham hotel in Cable
Beach this year.

“Our position has not changed,” he said. “But
if there is overriding and compelling indication of
definitive demand I am sure we will look at those
reasons to make adjustments.”

Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Van-

derpool-Wallace’s principal focus is on the rosy
“afterglow” expected to follow the event as a
result of publicity generated by televising the
pageant in more than 170 countries.

He intends to send the beauty queens to as
many Family Islands as possible to expose the
range and variety of experiences the Bahamas
has to offer, and will inform viewers around the
world about how to travel to the Bahamas at a
time when it will be easier than ever before as a
result of recent adjustments to visa requirements.

He said: “The whole idea is making sure that
we are having your country shown in the best
possible light, and publicity has a much higher
credibility than advertising.

“It is much more scientific than it has
ever been and the cost is lower than it has ever
been.”

The government has put up $2.9 million to
host the event, and additional costs including
transportation, food and beverages, and import-
ing production trucks, will be covered by the pri-
vate sector in an unprecedented show of sup-
port, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

FROM page one

backyard of her home in Price
Street, Nassau Village, with a
maul and then broke a hinge
on the back door to gain
access to her property at
around 4am on February 24.

The Bahamian mother-of-
two said she offered to show
her passport to the armed offi-
cers who never identified
themselves as being from the
Immigration Department.
However, they declined to
look at it.

Ms Hanna said the officers
left behind the maul used to
break down the gate and beat
the door. As yet, she said, the
Immigration Department has
not arranged to repair the
damage.

Since the raid Ms Hanna
and her daughter have felt
unsafe in their home and both
have fallen ill with pneumo-
nia.

Amber is being treated in
the children’s ward of Princess
Margaret Hospital for the ill-
ness, which Ms Hanna attrib-
utes to post-traumatic stress.

Her daughter, a pupil at
Kingsway Academy, cried and
vomited while about seven
armed officers interrogated
the pair. Her mother said the
child was so disturbed by the
raid that she has since been
too afraid to be in the house
without holding her mother’s
hand or to stay there at night,
Ms Hanna said.

Immigration Minister
Branville McCartney said he
would meet with Ms Hanna
and launch an investigation
into the incident after reading
about it in The Tribune on
Thursday.

However, Ms Hanna has
not heard from Mr McCart-
ney since his initial phone call
on Friday and they have made
no arrangements to meet.

She said: “I would like to
meet him to find out when
they are going to fix my stuff,
that is the only thing Iam con-
cerned with.

“T was in my safety zone
and it was damaged.

“T have hired a lawyer who

Single mother intends to sue
Immigration Department

WOOD AND COLD-FORMED STEEL
TRUSSES

DESIGN
ENGINEERING
COMPETITIVE PRICING

FAST BIDDING INFORMATION

361-7764

Road to City Dump after Premix
Email:ggongora@coralwave.com

AUTHORED
KAUN ROC TURER



KIDZ CITY

is looking into filing a lawsuit
against the Immigration
Department for pain and suf-
fering and damage to my
home.

“Tam not doing it because
of money, I am doing it
because I need safety for my
house and safety for my chil-
dren.”

Ms Hanna, who works at
Nassau Airport three days a

week, said she now needs
security bars for my door
because she no longer feels
safe as a single parent living in
Nassau Village.

She added: “I am not feeling
well and my daughter is in
hospital because she got sick
from vomiting and she is asth-
matic.

“It is most definitely
because of the stress.”

STOREWIDE SALE
15% STOREWIDE

Mitchell wants full disclosure

FROM page one

Trinidad, now apparently owned by the Government of Trinidad
and Tobago, our own Prime Minister of the Bahamas cannot say
whether he has spoken to the Prime Minister of Trinidad and

Tobago about this matter.

“The former Prime Minister of Barbados, Owen Arthur has
suggested that since this is a trans-border, CARICOM-wide issue,
all Heads of Government should get together and in the spirit of
functional co-operation settle the CLICO matter and other trans-

border financial services issues,” he said.

Mr Mitchell added that while the Prime Minister is on the bureau
of CARICOM and can seek to convene an early meeting of Heads
of government, he has thus far decided to do “nothing”.

“The concern about this Government’s actions continues to
grow when one sees the listed assets of CLICO Bahamas which
include 14 million in cash. It raises whether there was any risk to the
company that would have required a liquidation order and whether
or not there was any conflict of interest or any insider trading or any
disposition to allow a raid of the assets of CLICO in the Bahamas.
There must be full and frank disclosure by all public officials

involved in this matter,” he said.

any
f ey

Nursery — Grade 6

Location: Carmichael Road, immediately north of the Detention Centre

Telephone: 361-4295 * Fax: 341-4296
Computers throughout the curriculum

Daily use of the AutoSkills Reading & Math Software
National and International exposure to fields in Science Math and Technology

Qualified Teachers
Small Student/Teacher Ratio

Placement Examination for grades 1-6
Saturday, March 21st, 2009
9:00a.m. — 12noon

Scholarships offered to students with highest placement scores

Application forms are available at the School’s Office.
Application forms should be completed and returned by Friday, March 18th.

The application fee is $20.00

The Remnant MiniVersity & Academy
of Math Science & Technology



10% OFF WITH CREDIT CARD

OPEN CALL FOR A YOUTH MIX TALENT

Dance Judge

on the T.V. Show
fimerica’s Best Dance Grew

era ere aa

March 11-13,2009,
Wednesday - Friday 3PM - 9PM

March 14, 2009,

Saturday 12PM - 9PM

NATIONAL CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

For More Information Contact 393-2884
Dance (Hip-Hop, Folk, Praise-Gospel, Performing Arts) Voice (Rap, RMB & Folk)

Sale Start Friday Feb. 27th
Ends Saturday March 7th

Montrose Avenue and Oxford Street (2 doors North of Multi-Discount)

P.O. Box N-1552

Nassau, Bahamas

Pe
‘LAS

Phone: 323-3460
Monday - Saturday - 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM
































A line up you won’t
soon forget.

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Authorized Dealer for Mercedes-Benz
Subaru and lsuzu vehicles

> New & Used Cars & Trucks

> Sales, Parts & Service

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Wulff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau
PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A green econom

in the Bahamas

This is one in a series of articles
discussing the potential opportunities for
the Bahamas in the emerging green
economy. Colin Lightbourn, who wrote
this piece, is a real estate business owner
and developer. He is a private pilot and
past president of the Bahamas National
Trust.

To comment, discuss and submit ideas
about these articles please visit
www.thegreenislands.com

We

Maker's Bap

Baker’s Bay
GOLF & OCEAN CLUB

As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians
on our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to
apply for the position of:

Golf Course Construction
Assistant Manager

Attributes to include:

* 5-8 years experience in Golf Course Construction and
Management at leading Golf Club.
Knowledge of all phases of Golf course design and
construction activities including vertical golf construction
(club houses, maintenance facilities irrigation pump stations)
Turf Management Degree.
A thorough understanding of all phases of maintenance and
repair to courses, practice range and equipment.
Extensive experience working with city planners, engineers,
architects, and contractors.
Knowledgeable in all phases of construction contracts
related to golf projects.
Detail oriented, a skilled planner, ability to prioritize with
excellent communication skills.
Computer literate.
Willing to live on an out island.
Ability to work on own initiative is important.

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need
apply.

Applications can be submitted to:

Director, Human Resources and Training
P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or sbowe@bakersbayclub.com

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009

ro



Ip THE Chinese lan-
guage, the two symbols
that make up the word "crisis"
are often translated as signify-
ing “danger” and “opportuni-
ty”. Many people read this as
suggesting that even the most
dangerous situations carry
within them the seeds of gen-
uine possibility. A web search
displays more than half a mil-
lion references arguing cither
for or against this interpreta-
tion, but whatever its accuracy,
the relevance of the proverb
to today's world is clear.

In mental health terms, a cri-
sis does not refer to an event or
situation, but to one’s reaction
to that event or situation. A
crisis is dangerous because we
have the potential to overre-
act to it, panic, and make irra-
tional decisions that are not in
our own best interest.

We can witness this on a
daily basis where various
labour and economic statistics
are published and the world
markets go into a tailspin
resulting in massive job cuts
and sell-offs, which in turn ini-
tiates another round of panic,
and so on.

Furthermore, even in the
definition of so positive a word

c

as ‘opportunity’, there are ref-
erences to threats and uncer-
tainties. Among the word's
numerous definitions, two are:
“an uncertain event with a pos-
itive probable consequence”
and “the combination of an
asset, a threat and an occasion
that may give rise to an inci-
dent”.

I believe that tremendous
opportunities are at our
doorstep as we look to what
lies ahead. A time for change is
upon us; a time for planning
and rebuilding, a time to
strengthen and foster the
things that should not be dam-
aged by an ailing economy —
our health, our families and
our incredibly beautiful coun-
try.

Recession

Most countries around the
world have been in a recession
for over a year and eventually
the cycle will hit bottom and
enter into the recovery period
followed by an expansion. For
the last 100-plus years eco-
nomic expansions have come
on the heels of industrial and
technological revolutions of
human ingenuity.

Humans discovered steel

COMMONWEALTH BANK

DIVIDEND NOTICE

TO COMMON SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of Directors of Commonwealth Bank Limited has
Declared a Quarterly Dividend for Common, “A”, “B’, “C’, “D’,
“BE”, “F”, “G”, “H” and “I? Preference Shares, to all shareholders
of record at March 13, 2009, as follows:-

Common

“A’ Preference
“B’ Preference
“C” Preference
“D” Preference
“E” Preference
“F” Preference
“G” Preference
“H” Preference
“ Preference

5c per share

7% pe rannum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% pe rannum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% pe rannum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly

The payment will be made on March 31, 2009 through
Colina Financial Advisors Limited, the Registrar & Transfer
Agent, in the usual manner.

Charlene A. Bosfield
Corporate Secretary

During the month of March, come to any QVS Pharmacy
(Village Road or Seagrapes Shopping Centre) and for
every bottle of Dasani water you buy, partial proceeds

will be donated to The Bahamas Red Cross.

On March 22nd, World Water Day, every cent from

your water purchase goes to the charity.

©2009 CrealiveRel

Seve

Harbour Bay
HALF IS
50.% OFF

The other half
Is 15.% OFF

Ask about Our
Gift with
Purchase

QVS Pharmacy & |)/\5\)\||
Help Us Help The Bahamas.

Is cutting the store in half



Village Rd. Shopping Centre

393-2393 or 393-4293

Seagrapes Shopping Centre
364-5978 or 364-5979

e: info@qvsbahamas.com

Extra 10% off for
Privilege Cards &
Corporate Partners

Sens

and harnessed electricity,
invented mass production and
created automobiles and air
travel. Now, new horizons are
visible through the internet
and the information age. It
leaves one to ask what will the
next recovery and expansion
consist of and how can The
Bahamas and our people put
ourselves in a position to ben-
efit?

For decades the struggle for
oil has wreaked havoc across
the globe. Experts including
Fortune 500 companies are
now acknowledging that the
existing energy model is not
sustainable and has created too
much dependence on external
sources.

Some estimate that oil
reserves have peaked or are
about to peak. That, com-
pounded with China and Indi-
a’s emerging markets and
increased demand for oil,
means we are left scrambling
for solutions to meet future
global energy demand. Major
oil companies are investing
heavily in the production and
research of alternative energy
(www.bpsolar.com and
www.shell.com/solar)

In 2004, Shell opened a
solar plant in Germany suffi-
cient to power 1,800 house-
holds. As of 2006, the state of
Texas had developed enough
wind capacity to power more
than 600,000 average Ameri-
can homes. General Electric,
one of the largest US compa-
nies, announced earlier this
year that it will invest $6 billion
into alternative energy by the
year 2010. In addition to alter-
native energy, large and small
companies across the globe are
designing and manufacturing
everything imaginable in
preparation for the next eco-
nomic expansion — the green
renaissance.

The Bahamas has always
been fortunate to have natural
beauty and proximity to the
United States. We are also for-
tunate to have such a small
population in relation to our
land mass. However, in a glob-
alised world where places
resembling the Bahamas can
even be manufactured - con-
sider Dubai’s Palm Island and
The World Islands — we have
to be more inventive in order
to stay competitive.

There are several statistics




about how many people live
in the Bahamas: for argumen-
t’s sake, let’s say there are
320,000 people today. The esti-
mated population density is 23
people per square kilome-
tre. Globally this ranks num-
ber 188 out of 238 countries in
terms of population density.

For reference, Bermuda is
7 at 1,211 people/sq. km.,
Jamaica is #51 and The United
States is 177, at) 31
people/sq.km. The least dense
population in the world is
Greenland at 0.026
people/sq.km.

This number for the
Bahamas is a little misleading
because the majority of the
population is located on New
Providence. If New Providence
were a country itself rt would
rank as the 12th most densely
populated country behind
Bangladesh and, at the other
end, Inagua as its own coun-
try would be the third least
densely populated country in
the world behind only Green-
land and The Falkland Islands.

























Population

To put it in perspective, if
Paradise Island had the same
density as Inagua there would
be four or five people living
on the entire island. The rest of
the Bahamian islands are clos-
er to Inagua’s population den-
sity than they are to New Prov-
idence.

With the green renaissance
on the horizon, it may be a
blessing in disguise that The
Bahamas’ Family Islands nev-
er developed to their full
potential. The green renais-
sance brings new opportuni-
ties for Improving our tourism
product and infrastructure,
establishing agriculture and
manufacturing bases and cre-
ate a bigger role and reason
for Bahamians to do business
in the family islands.

It is also likely the only way
to solve the overcrowding we
are facing on New Providence.
The capacity is there to achieve
this through a more sustain-
able and well-planned process.

As long as we can build this
new economy while effectively
managing our resources we can
develop a brand and products
that leaves the world green
with envy.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 682/09
STORAGE TANK #11
CLEANING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236


THE TRIBUNE

Sp



HURSDAY, MARCH 5,



PAGE 1

or





tS

2009

CH REEVES Tre Barry wins as H O Nash Xavier Coakley tries to catch him.

Raptors

reclaim

Defending champs LW

title

Young finishes sixth

Recognising our athletes’

latest accomplishments



CONGRATULATIONS to
Bianca Stuart.

Over the weekend, she
became the latest Bahamian
collegiate star to close out her
indoor career on a successful
note.

Stuart, who turns 22 on May
17, soared to her fourth con-
secutive triumph in the wom-
en's long jump at the State
Farm Missouri Valley Confer-
ence Championships at the
University of Iowa in Cedar
Falls.

She also closed the chapter
in her collegiate sting by inking
her name on the All-time Con-
ference and UNI Dome
records, a feat that a modest
Stuart took in her stride as she
surpassed the performance of
another Bahamian Dedra
Davis, who excelled at Missouri
State back in the early 1990s.

Stuart is following a long line
of stellar Bahamian female
long jumpers in college, includ-
ing Shonel Ferguson, Jackie
Edwards, Davis, Natasha
Brown and Grand Bahamian
Daphne Saunders.

She's currently chasing the
national record that is shared
by Ferguson and Edwards and
the way she's performing, her
coach Andre Scott said it's only
a matter of time before she
joins the elite of jumpers, who
have surpassed the 22-feet bar-
rier.

So far, the only two Bahami-
ans to achieve that feat are Fer-
guson and Edwards.

While Ferguson has since
retired and is now running a
successful business, Edwards is
still competing.

Last year, however, Stuart
upstaged Edwards at the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations' National
Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium in what could be termed
the "changing of the guard".

But in the end, Edwards'
performance during the year
enabled her to eventually go
to the Olympic Games in Bei-
jing, China in August. Stuart
had to stay at home, but she
has vowed that this year will
be totally different.

OPINION

She has promised that when
the national team head to the
IAAF World Championships
in Berlin, Germany in August,
she intends to make her first
major senior trip.

But she knows that she will
have to duplicate her feat last
June when this year's nationals
are held in June, or at least
attain the A qualifying stan-
dards for the championships
when the outdoor season gets
underway.

Stuart, in an interview with
The Tribune, said it's just a
matter of time and she urged
everybody to be "patient" with
her.

With the type of perfor-
mance she already turned in so
far this year, Stuart should be
well on her way to making her
giant leap on the senior inter-
national scene and she has't
started her outdoor campaign
at college yet.

Talking about college,
Grand Bahamian superstar
Nivea Smith has joined her for-
mer Carifta team-mates and
she's already gotten off to a
great start. As a freshman at



@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net net

Benen by a dominating per-

B sernane from the male half of

their roster, the C.H. Reeves
Raptors track and field team reclaimed
their usual spot atop the leaderboard.

The Raptors totalled 711 points, near-
ly 120 points ahead of their nearest com-
petitors, to take home the Junior High
School Championship in the Govern-
ment Secondary School Sports Associa-
tion’s 16th Annual Track and Field
Meet.

The S.C. McPherson Sharks finished
second with 591.50 points, H.O. Nash
Lions were third with 501 points while
the T.A. Thompson Scorpions and A.F.
Adderley Tigers tied for fourth with 432
points.

Last year’s champions, the L.W.

Auburn University, Smith is
starting to take the form of a
mega superstar.

She's competing along side
Cache Armbrister in the Tigers
connection at Auburn Univer-
sity. The two should raise some
eyebrows in college this year,
according to their Bahamian
assistant coach at Auburn,
Henry Rolle.

The duo, along with Sheni-
qua 'Q' Ferguson, who is
expected to join them in
August, are following in the
footsteps of Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and should be the
era replacements for the retired
Golden Girls, Pauline Davis-
Thompson, Eldece Clarke-
Lewis and Sevatheda Fynes.

It would be good, since we
missed out at the opportunity
to qualify for the Olympics, to
have the return of our wom-
en's 4x 100 relay team. Could
you imigine seeing the mixture
of the veterans Ferguson-
McKenzie and Chandra Stur-
rup combining with the youth-
ful Ferguson, Smith and Arm-
brister?

Ferguson already got a taste
of the big league when she
competed at the Olympics last
year. Hopefully this will be the
year that Smith and Armbrister
make the transition from the
junior to the senior ranks at
the World Championships.

Like Stuart said about soar-
ing over the 22-feet barrier,
let's just be "patient" as the
sprinters keep the Bahamas on







Young Golden Eagles fell to sixth place
with 416.50 points while Anatol Rodgers
and D.W. Davis rounded out the field
with 222 and 153 points respectively.

The Raptors won four of a six con-
tested divisions including sweeping all
three male categories and the junior
girls.

Their most commanding win on the
male side came in the Intermediate boys
division with 162 points, well ahead of
the Sharks with 148.

In the Bantam division, the Raptors
won by a slim three point margin over
the Tigers, 109-106 and an even slim-
mer two point margin in the Junior Boys
division, 133-131 over the Sharks.

The Junior girls won by a sizable 36.5
point margin over the Eagles, 1552-
115.50.

The Sharks and Lions spilt the remain-
ing divisions with S.C. McPherson taking
the Bantam girls with 110 points and
H.O. Nash with 149.50 points to claim

THE
| FIGHTING
FINNEGANS



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

the Intermediate girls.

Raptors Head Coach, Fritz Grant, said
the win came as a result of a concen-
trated team effort including the staff,
students and parents.

I must give God thanks for the overall
team effort.

“The support from the parents lead
to us having two persons in each event
and that is one of the major differences
between this year and last year. Last
year we may have had to miss one or
two persons but this year we were not
going to make the same mistake. We
were going to get everybody there, ready
to compete and they did extremely well
running and in the field as well,” he said.
“The program that we run we have
established has made it extremely easy to
identify talent and to be able to develop
the talent. It is good to identify the talent
but you have to develop it and give them

SEE page 12

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DAVIS CUP

The men's national team is
in Paraguay competing in the
first round of the American
Zone II Davis Cup tie. The
team, captained by John Far-
rington, will be in action this
weekend.

Led by Olympian Devin
Mullings, the team doesn't
have any player with a high
ATP computer ranking. But
what they possess is a lot of
heart.

The other members are
Timothy Neilly, Bjorn Munroe

SEE page 12



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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Raptors reclaim title

FROM page 11

the necessary skills and tech-
nique to be able to get them
to compete at this level. We
have standards for our ath-
letes to achieve and asa
result of that we are able to
put together very good
teams.”

Grant, the nationally
renowned head coach at the
Carifta level, said his team
performed exceptionally well
on the track and in the field,
with a few unexpected sur-
prises which helped propel
them to victory.

“Not only track athletes,
you have to be balanced
because this is track and field.
We are balanced across the
board and as a result of that
the kids performed excep-
tionally well this year. I was
surprised by the 800m we
really did so well there that
some of the kids really sur-
prised me,” he said. “A lot of
them put in the work and it
has been obvious in the
standings of the meet. We did

our best motivating them and
trying to get them to stay
focused which is a challenge,
and thanks to the coaching
staff and the overall C.H
Reeves team and we had a
cheering section that really
motivated the kids and as a
result of that most of them
finished hard at the line.”

Grant cited the example of
hurdler Shantwon Martin,
who shook off disaster in the
intermediate boys’ hurdles
for a second place finish, as
the personification of the
effort his team gave across
the board in order to reclaim
the title.

“Even in the hurdles,
Shantwon Martin fell down
but he did not stay on the
ground he got up and dove
across the line,” he said.
“That is the type of passion
and type of effort that these
kids put in and they ought to
complimented for recaptur-
ing the title. It is something
that we worked on and pre-
pared for since the beginning
of the season and thank God
it came to reality.”

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165

SAAS =>

NISSAN

CH REEVES Vashi Mortimer wins the 100 metre hurdles.

SC MCPHERSON Whitney Rolle during the 4 x400 meter relay .

FROM page 11

and Marvin Rolle.

There's not one player on
the team, who in the past, have
demonstrated that they are
always in a position to play
their best regardless of the cir-
cumstances they find them-
selves in. Mullings, last year,
got his feet wet when he
teamed up with Mark Knowles
to play the Bryan brothers in
the first round of the men's
doubles at the Olympic Games
in Beijing, China. The two per-
formed their best, but it was
obvious that the Bryans were
just a little more prepared than

they were.

In the process, Mullings was
accepted to play in the singles
and even though he got elimi-
nated in the first round, he per-
formed as best as he could. I'm
sure that the experience he
gained will pay off for him in
Paraguay this weekend.

Having lost 4-1 to Paraguay
here at the National Tennis
Center last year, the Bahamas
will have its work cut out for
them in Paraguay. But Farring-
ton said as long as the players
perform up to their standard,
the team should do very well.

The Bahamas is trying to
regain its position in Zone One.
It may not happen at this tie,



































but the future looks bright for
the team with the players being
so young. The experience
gained will certainly help them
in the long run whenever they
get in a position to contend for
the next level.

HIELD TAKES RIGHTFUL PLACE

Persistence and determina-
tion have finally paid off for
Carl Hield.

Last year, Hield and his
mother had indicated that they
were peeved with the Bahamas
Boxing Federation after he was
denied from getting a chance
to try and qualify for the
Olympic Games in Beijing,
China in August. Hield had
even contemplated competing
for another country.

With a change of heart,
Hield travelled to the Inde-
pendence Cup with team-mates

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silver in the light welterweight
division at the tournament in
the Dominican Republic.

Hield joined Johnson and
Knowles, who won the previ-
ous two bronze medals at the
tournament. But he went a step
further in securing the silver.

He should be commended
for his stickability to put his
difference with the federation
behind him and put the country
first. His decision paid off and
now he gives the Bahamas
another boxer to keep the lega-
cy alive for the amateur pro-
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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 13



Zz
Ll
©
LL
Z
Z

NVOSINNIS

Finnegans

â„¢ By JOHN MARQUIS

(former international boxing writer)

NCE you reach 65, it’s like you
are above the 27,000 feet mark
on Mount Everest. It’s called the

Death Zone.

Those still struggling to reach the top
earn your heartfelt respect. Those who
fall off the higher ridges are offered an
equally heartfelt salute on the way down.

So it was this week when I
learned of the death of Chris
Finnegan, former world light
heavyweight title challenger, and
a gutsy gold medallist at the
Mexico Olympics 41 years ago.

Tt was even more poignant that
Chris should die only four
months after his celebrated
brother Kevin, former British
and European middleweight
champion and one of the few
men to have stayed on his feet
during two brutal fights with the
virtually indestructible Marvin
Hagler.

More alarming still was that

eel PTT eles

BY yA Att)
NiaREL

| )
|
ih

a

el
f INDOOR

both these bruising (and booz-
ing) brothers were actually
younger than me when they
passed over into that great big
gymnasium in the sky. Chris was
64, Kevin a mere 60. So tragic
that such bright lights should fade
so suddenly.

It seems only a week or so ago
that I watched them at their
peak, fighting in London’s great
boxing arenas, the Royal Albert
Hall and Wembley Arena.

And surely it was only a few
months back - 1975, actually -
when French fight fans used me
as a stepladder into the ring after

Kevin was beaten in a European
title fight in Monte Carlo.

The Finnegans were memo-
rable for many reasons, but
among them was their mischie-
vous sense of humour, which
brought lustre to a fight scene
already ablaze with talent.

Chris Finnegan was a brick-
layer from Iver in Bucking-
hamshire. Kevin was an artist
who liked to tell reporters he
made a living from two kinds of
canvas - the one that covers a
boxing ring, and the framed vari-
ety on which he splurged his oil
paint.

Chris was taller and more out-
going than his younger brother.
Kevin was reserved, a quietish
character with a wry smile who
liked to take off into the coun-
tryside with his brush and pal-
lette.

Both were formidable boxers,
but neither really punched his
weight, and Chris in particular
was happy to concede that pints
of Guinness were a major part
of their sporting success.

Chris first found fame with
that Olympic gold, but the real
high point of his career was his
brave loss to Bob Foster in a
world title battle. After suffer-

OUTDOOR

ELM eT New PLAT eT ice

PaaS

* ACCESSORIES

TW les

eee ie)

* HEADBOARDS



ing a knockout late in the fight,
Chris said being hit by Foster
was like being struck by a long,
hard pole with a glove on the
end.

A rugged southpaw, he took
on the best in Britain and
Europe and always acquitted
himself well in front of his ador-
ing fans. For me, his two most
memorable fights were against
‘Gypsy’ Johnny Frankham for
the British title in the 1970s,
when the wily Romany won and
then lost the crown in a matter of
months to his old friend (and
foe).

Kevin was a classier fighter
altogether, a fact readily
acknowledged by Chris last fall
when his younger brother died.
“He was like cream,” he said,

SEE page 14

Call to advertise: 502-2371

yw â„¢N
Baker's Bay

GOLF & OCEAN CLUB

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

Sous Chef

Key Responsibilities

* Required to skillfully prepare international cuisine.

¢ Assist in ordering food supplies and kitchen equipment as
needed.

* Will be required to oversee majority of cooking and methods
of food preparation.

* Along with the Executive Chef, instruct kitchen employees
in the finer points of cooking.

* Assist in planning meals; making of menus, and assigning
prices.

* Assist in butchering and/or prepares meats and poultry for
cooking.

Qualifications

* High School diploma or equivalent

* Culinary degree from approved school or completion of an
approved apprentice program is preferred
5 to 10 years in different supervisory positions in the
kitchens including sous chef and/or chef d’ cuisine position.
Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred.
Highly skilled cooking ability in all areas of kitchen including
the ability to prepare various ethnic cuisines.

¢ Experience working in multiple operations preferred.

* Aminimum of two years international experience an asset.

* Experience in opening a property a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work
in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a
self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career,

submit your resume to the attention of the Director of HR &
Training, j 1 or by fax at 242-367-0613.

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009



MINISTRY OF FINANCE

Departmental Notice

Sale By Tender

It is hereby notified that the under-mentioned vehicles have
been forfeited to the Crown following breaches of the Laws of
The Bahamas and will be sold by tender:-

Plate Number

| Year

—

| Make
|



| Mitsubishi Lancer

o7 Ford Ranger
__| Chevy Cavalier _



(Ford Ranger
| Chevy Lumina





__| Ford Ranger _





These vehicles may be inspected by contacting Supt. David G.
Beneby at Customs Headquarters, Thompson Boulevard,
telephone number 326-4401, during the hours of 9:00am. -
9:00pm. Monday to Friday.

Tender forms for submission are obtainable from the Office of
the Comptroller of Customs, Thompson Boulevard, Nassau.

Tenders should be submitted in SEALED ENVELOPES to the
Office of the Comptroller of Customs, Customs Department
Nassau, Bahamas.

The face of the envelope should bear the words:-
“TENDER FOR CONFISCATED VEHICLE”

Tenders submitted with the foregoing should be received by
12:00 noon, March 10%, 2009.

=o Sets from $2899.00

CO come ANT eet
*Reg.$3299.00

The right is reserved to reject any or all tenders and the
vehicles are being sold “as is where is’.

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The successful bidder will, on making full payment assume all
risks for the item(s) sold and for making arrangements for its
removal with seven (7) days after payment.

Ehurd Cunningham

P.O. Box C.B. 12762-128 East Bay Street -- Nassau, Bahamas : : !
Acting Financial Secretary

T: (242) 393-1444 F: (242) 393-2237


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and®
share your story.

Baker's Bap

GOLF & OCEAN CLUB

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

Assistant Marketing Manager

Key Requirements

* A demonstrated track record of sales to high net
worth clients

¢ Extensive experience maintaining strong long term
customer relationships with significant add-on/repeat
business

* Astrong existing network with high net worth clients in
the U.S.A. , Europe and The Bahamas

* Ability to develop and implement marketing
campaigns to high net worth clients

Qualifications
Bachelor’s degree in Sales, Marketing or related
subject; professional certifications
Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth
real estate promotions
Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power
Point, Microsoft Word, Excel and Asset Manager
Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership
and customer relations skills
Must have excellent written and verbal
communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to
work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be
a self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive
and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of:The Director of HR & Training,

hr@bakersbayclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613

Deadline for Application/resume is March 17th, 2009



Cliff McBride/AP Photo



IN THIS still image taken from video, Nick Schuyler is taken from a Coast Guard helicopter to Tampa General
Hospital in Tampa, Fla. on Monday March 2, 2009. The Coast Guard says former University of South Florida play-
er Schuyler was rescued Monday off the Florida coast. Authorities say Oakland Raiders linebacker Marquis Coop-
er, Detroit Lions free agent Corey Smith and former South Florida player, William Bleakley, remain missing.

Private search on
for missing NFL
players in Gulf

m@ FOOTBALL
TAMPA, Fla.
Associated Press

PRIVATE BOATS and
planes searched Wednesday for
two NFL players and a third
man missing for four days since
their boat capsized in the Gulf
of Mexico off Florida, family
members said.

The Coast Guard called off
the official search Tuesday for
Oakland Raiders linebacker
Marquis Cooper, who owned

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Phone: 305-635-4650
Fax: 305-635-465 |

ABACO

Don Mackay Blvd.
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
P.O. Box AB-20116
Phone: 242-367-0593
Fax: 242-367-0594

the boat, free-agent NFL defen-
sive lineman Corey Smith and
former South Florida player
William Bleakley. But their
families appealed for help to
keep hunting.

Two or three charters left in
the late morning from a St.
Petersburg marina and at least
one had friends of the families
of the missing men aboard, said
Don Beggs, who owns one of
the local docks. Three private
planes also had searched,
according to Cooper’s father,
Bruce Cooper.

A fourth man on the fishing
trip, Nick Schuyler, was rescued
Monday after crews found him
clinging to the boat. His doctor
said it’s a “miracle” Schuyler
survived in the cold water for
nearly two days after the boat
carrying the men on a fishing
trip overturned in rough seas
off the Florida coast Saturday.

Dr. Mark Rumbak said the
24-year-old is in good condition
but will remain in intensive care
in case there are complications.
Schuyler was in 63-degree Gulf
of Mexico water for around 46
hours and probably could have

lived only another five to 10
hours if he wasn’t rescued Mon-
day, Rumbak said.

“T think he is extremely for-
tunate having been in the water
for 46, 47 hours and that he’s
even alive,” Rumbak said. “I
can’t explain it. Some divine
providence, I really think.”

The missing men’s families
have set up an e-mail address
for experienced pilots and
boaters to contact them. Coast
Guard Capt. Timothy Close
said the agency wouldn’t pre-
vent private searches, but dis-
couraged them, saying they
could be dangerous. He said
authorities believed if there
were more survivors, they
would have been found.

Free-agent defensive tackle
Tank Johnson, a childhood
friend and college teammate of
Cooper at Washington, was tak-
ing a lead role in the renewed
search. Johnson, who played for
the Dallas Cowboys last season,
said the family has not given up
hope that the men are still alive.

“T truly believe he is out there
somewhere being strong,” John-
son said.

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‘The fighting
‘Finnegans

FROM page 13

i “He just flowed.”

i Defensively, Kevin was
? among the best. He could slip
? punches like a ghost, moving
i his weight deftly from one foot
? to the other, counter punching
? with fluency and grace as his
: opponents charged in.

i Even against tough maraud-
? ers like Leicester’s Tony Sib-
i son - another of Hagler’s vic-
? tims - Kevin was impudently
? understated. With his slick
: footwork and unruffled
? demeanour, he was an
? extremely hard man to beat.

; Had he carried more fire-
i power in his fists, he would
? have become a world champi-
? on without a doubt.

i Both brothers were products
? of the famous Craven Arms
? pub gym in Battersea, London,
? where a Cockney character
? called Freddie Hill was their
? mentor and trainer.

i After belting each other
? senseless in sparring sessions
:? in the gym upstairs, the broth-
? ers would adjourn to the bar
? downstairs and replace lost
i sweat with pints of best strong
? Trish stout.

? When Kevin fought a mon-
? ster from Marseilles called
? Gratien Tonna in Monaco, the
i irrepressible Freddie regaled
i reporters with a pre-fight
; description of the French hard-
? man even before we had set
? eyes on him.

i “He’s got lips like rolls of
lino,” he said. “He’s built like a
? mechanical earth-mover, wiv
i eyes like headlamps. I’m glad
? it’s Kevin who’s getting in the
? ring wiv ’im, not me.”

? Freddie Hill and The
? Finnegans could have been a
? stage act, so quick was their
? wit, so colourful their delivery.
? The London fight scene would
? have been a much duller place
? without them.

? Though you have to concede
? that both brothers lacked just
? that little extra that makes
? world champions, you also
? have to acknowledge that nei-
? ther ducked a fight, even
; against the best.

“Though you have
to concede that
both brothers
: lacked just that lit-
tle extra that makes
? world champions,
you also have to
acknowledge that
neither ducked a
fight, even against
the best.”

: — Chris’s blistering battle with
? Bob Foster was voted fight of
? the year and Kevin’s two close
? encounters with Marvin Hagler
? were rated minor classics for
? ringcraft and guile.

i Last year I walked up
? Lavender Hill in Battersea to
? see if I could identify the cor-
? ner where the Craven Arms
? once stood. If my judgment is
? correct, it’s now occupied by a
i fast food takeaway.

? For a few minutes, I tried to
? recall those days 30 years ago
i when I climbed the stairs at
the back of the pub into Fred-
? die Hill’s gym, sniffed the lina-
i ment and watched the
? Finnegans going through their
paces.

iI recalled the easy banter,
? the happy camaraderie that
? was the mark of London gyms
i in those glory days of British
i boxing, when the country
? boasted four world champions
? and the likes of Chris and
i Kevin Finnegan provided the
? laughs in what has always been
? a deadly serious sport.

i Bespectacled Freddie, towel
? round his neck, was always
? leaning on the ropes, barking
i orders at his young fighters,
: willing them to greater heights.
i Sometimes he’d get so excit-
i ed that his round, rimless glass-
? es would steam up, and his wal-
? rus-style moustache would
i? twitch alarmingly.

? “Don’t stand around like a
? pair o’ bleedin’ pansies,” he’d
? shout, “throw a jab, move in
i wiv the ’ook, that’s it...right
? cross. Lovely!”

? = =Dear old Freddie has, of
i course, long gone. I didn’t
: realise then, only five or six
? months ago, that Chris and
? Kevin would follow him so
? quickly into boxing history, just
? like the Craven Arms itself.

i Nothing is forever, of course.
? But just occasionally, as with
? Freddie and the Finnegan
? brothers, you wish they were.


THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS
oa . Yea “per } tour Defence Force hase

STUDENTS FROM the Govern-
ment High School in New Provi-
dence and the Preston H Albury
1 High School in Rock Sound,
Eleuthera, recently visited the
Defence Force Base at Coral Har-
bour, where they were given a
complete tour of the facility.

=

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THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 15

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THE TRIBUNE

OU





IMI
‘not changed’
Baha Mar’s
closure plan

* But company leaves door
open if ‘overwhelming
demand’, with senior
executive saying Miss
Universe is ‘priceless
opportunity’ to market
Bahamas to world tourist
audience

* Senior Baha Mar
delegation in Beijing for
eight days in bid to move
$2.6bn project forward



nto) OlamsEsUNLels
@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Baha Mar has “not changed
at this point in time” its deci-
sion to close the Wyndham
resort and Crystal Palace casi-
no from August 17-October
5, 2009, Tribune Business was
told yesterday, despite the
Bahamas being awarded the
Miss Universe pageant at the
end of August.

When asked whether the
Cable Beach Resorts own-
er/developer might reverse its
closure plans to accommodate
the expected influx of com-
petitors, guests and media for
the August 30, 2009, event, a
senior executive told Tribune
Business: “There’s nothing to
that at this point in time.”

Vernice Walkine, the Min-
istry of Tourism’s director-
general, yesterday predicted
that all New Providence hotel
rooms would be full as a result
of hosting the Miss Universe
Pageant.

However, Robert Sands,
Baha Mar’s senior vice-presi-
dent for governmental and
external affairs, said: “A num-
ber of people have raised that
question, but the plan is to be
closed during this period.

“The reality is that this [the
pageant] has come at a time
when we’ve made arrange-

SEE page 9B





ine

1 HOUR S$ AY



MARCH 5,

SS

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Concern over ‘doubling’
of Generali premiums

Wi Insurer closes individual health policy portfolio acquired
from British American Financial to new business

WM But policyholders slam as ‘crazy’ premium increases for new

scheme, which have doubled in some cases, with many fearing

having to cancel and lose coverage

Hi Move to re-price likely driven by lack of profitability

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamas-based health
insurer has closed the individ-
ual health portfolio it inherit-
ed from British American
Financial to new business and,
in some cases, doubled the
premiums being charged to
policyholders, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, a move that
has left some unable to afford
coverage.

In a letter sent to individ-
ual health insurance plan pol-
icyholders, Tina Cambridge,
Generali Worldwide’s region-
al director for the Bahamas,
informed them that the com-
pany would not take on any
new business for the portfo-

lio it had acquired. Instead,
Generali is offering Bahamian
policyholders the opportuni-
ty to maintain their health
insurance coverage under a
new plan and associated ben-
efits, which they have until
April 1, 2009, to accept.

Concern

The new plan, though, has
been met with concern and
consternation by many Gen-
erali policyholders, who are
objecting to the premium
hikes across-the-board.

One policyholder, who said
her individual medical insur-
ance plan premium had “dou-
bled” from a three-figure toa
monthly four-figure sum,

Concerns on labour
group effectiveness

* BECon chief says worries exist over whether
government will consider its labour-related
recommendations, or whether it will be ‘shut out’
* Tripartite grouping has ‘a great deal of potential

that is not being realised’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Concerns have emerged over
whether the Government will
seriously consider labour-relat-
ed recommendations made by
TRIFOR, the tripartite group
featuring trade union, employer
and government representa-
tives, as it “has a great deal of
potential that is not being
realised”.

Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employer’s Confederation’s
(BECon) president, told Tri-
bune Business in a recent inter-
view that TRIFOR’s different
constituents were assessing the
group’s make-up, and whether
it had the ability to do what it
needed to do.

“TRIFOR has met this year,
meeting every other week,” Mr
Nutt told this newspaper,
adding that the group was now
looking at holding monthly
meetings.

He added: “We’re basically
in a situation of trying to look at
the make-up of TRIFOR as far

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as its role; what it should be
doing, and does it have the abil-
ity to do things it should do?

“Tt’s a situation of trying to
determine what TRIFOR’s role
is, what it can accomplish, and
its make-up.”

SEE page 10B

/

described the “huge increase”
as “crazy”.

One source said the premi-
um increase could not be jus-
tified on the basis of claims
they had submitted, because
they had not made many.

“We're still reeling from the
shock and trying to decide
what to do,” the source said.
“People are going to cancel,
and then the already overbur-
dened public health system is
going to be further burdened.”

The source suggested that
Generali’s new plan was less
favourable than the coverage
they currently enjoyed,
because it raised the amount
policyholders had to pay for

SEE page 4B

7 information conte is from arty
party and The Tribune can not be hel
responsible for errors and/or omission
fromthe dally report,



|
Ooenmucn

ve)
ee cerer Thess
; aati

Features:

Mas

Money Safe.
Money Fast.

neyGram,. @)

® Bank of The Bahamas

[HTERANATIGONAL

Online at
Bank Bahamas Online.com



Bank keeps its
non-performing
loans ‘just above’

5% of portfolio

* Eyeing preference share issue ‘fairly soon’ to
reduce costs of capital, as deposit rates start to
come down due to $370m liquidity

* Net income down 18% at near $5m for half-
year, but bank ‘comfortable’ with results due to
focus on prudential norms

* Expects to receive Carmichael Road branch
by October, with 20 jobs added

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bank of the Bahamas International’s
managing director yesterday said the insti-
tution had restricted non-performing loans
to “just above 5 per cent” of its total loan
portfolio during the fiscal 2009 first half,
below the industry average, as it gears up
for a preference share issue later this year
that is designed to reduce its funding costs.

Speaking after the bank unveiled an 18
per cent drop in half-year net income to

SEE page 8B



@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE LYNDEN Pindling International Airport (LPIA) will
receive a swift and temporary makeover as the Bahamas pre-
pares to receive invaluable exposure from the 2009 Miss Uni-
verse pageant.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and avia-
tion, said the airport, which has often been described as an
embarrassment because of the state of its infrastructure, will con-
tinue its redevelopment up to the pageant, with some “masks”
put in place near its August 30, 2009, staging to improve aes-
thetics.

“In terms of the kind of welcome we have in place, certainly

SEE page 7B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





FROM AGENTS TO BROKERS:
Donna and James Rees.



n Abaconian
couple who
have been
married for 28
years, James and Donna Rees,
have both earned the BRI cer-
tification and moved up from
agents to brokers at ERA
Dupuch Real Estate.

“It’s pretty easy to spot our
office,” says Mr Rees of the
Marsh Harbour premises.

“It’s in the Stratton Insur-
ance Building.

“That’s the one on the cor-
ner by the only stop light in
Abaco.”

The office by the island’s
only traffic light, and the red,
white and blue ERA Dupuch
sign, isn’t all that sets the Rees
duo apart.

They are comfortable with
the state of real estate in Aba-
co, which is holding its own
against the fallout that top-
pled the US housing market
following the sub-prime lend-
ing crisis and recession.















































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“Its wonderful to see James
and Donna work together.
They are like yin and yang.
Donna does all the tasks
James doesn’t like to do, and
James does those Donna

doesn’t like.”



“While the market here is
seeing adjustments, we have
not seen the losses that are
taking place in the United
States,” said Donna Rees.

“Tn fact, the lower end prop-
erties have not lost much val-
ue at all.”

If Abaco properties have
staved off the roller coaster
ride experienced elsewhere,
the couple are familiar with
the market’s ups and downs.
Born and raised in the
Bahamas, they moved to
Florida during their children’s
school years, returning when
the last child entered college
in 2003.

Fluctuates

“In time, everything fluctu-
ates up and down,” says Mr
Rees.

“In Florida, during the ear-
ly ‘80s, Port Saint Lucie had
18,000 people and our first
house was around $30,000.
When we left there in 2003
there were 140,000 people,
and that same type of house
was $125,000.

“We are not that concerned
and will continue to do our
best.

“Abaco is a very special
place.

“My Dad had seen several
up and downturns during his
years here.”

Mr Rees’ father, the late
Colyn Rees, was one of Aba-
co’s best-known citizens.

If Abaco has staying pow-
er even in challenging eco-
nomic teams, showing prop-
erty in the chain of scattered
islands takes its own kind of
stamina, says ERA Dupuch
Real Estate founder and pres-

Peter Dupuch
ident, Peter Dupuch.

Annoyed

“Nassau agents in some
firms get annoyed if they have
to drive from an office in town
to Coral Harbour and some-
one doesn’t show up,” says Mr
Dupuch.

“Imagine doing what Don-
na and James do.

“They may have a showing
in the morning in Treasure
Cay and one in the afternoon
in Schooner Bay.

“That’s a long drive for
someone to say: ‘Sorry, it’s not
what I was looking for.’ Or
they may have to go by plane,
boat, buggy or golf cart, or cut
through the bush with a cut-
lass.

“Sul, they have worked
hard and that’s why they have
been successful.”

Beyond success, Mr Dupuch
said there was something spe-
cial about Donna and James
Rees, who have been each
other’s best friend since early
childhood.

“It’s wonderful to see James
and Donna work together.
They are like yin and yang.
Donna does all the tasks
James doesn’t like to do, and
James does those Donna
doesn’t like.

“Between them, every detail
is covered and it’s great to see
that after five years back in
the Bahamas they have both
earned the BRI certification,”
he said.

Founded in 1993, ERA
Dupuch Real Estate has
offices or agents in Nassau,
Abaco, Eleuthera and Long
Island.

GIVE IN

TO TEMPTATION
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 3B



Pageant to attract
millions to Nassau

lm By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE MISS Universe
Pageant is expected to draw
millions of dollars, directly and
indirectly, into the Bahamain
economy through retail spend-
ing and hotel room nights this
summer, when it is held at the
Atlantis Resort, Paradise
Island, on August 30.

Paula Shugart, Miss Uni-
verse’s president, could not
say what the size of the eco-
nomic boost brought to the
Bahamas would be. Howev-
er, she did reveal that the
organization’s per diem, or
expenditure per day, was in
the hundreds of thousands of
dollars.

“For Miss Universe, we
have a lot of staff and crew
who also come. I can tell you,
just in our per diem alone, the
six figures that are left behind
in a host (country), and that’s
nothing with the casinos, too,”
she said.

“Aside from the worldwide
exposure from the telecast,
and one thing that the minister
hit on, is the fact that this is a
month-long event.”

The event itself draws huge
crowds of “pageant fans”, and
New Providence is expected
to benefit through increased
room bookings at New Provi-
dence hotels. Pageant night is
traditionally attended by a
sold-out live audience.

“Pageant fans from the

Vernice Walkine

United States alone, they are
all planning to come, and want
to know what the details are,”
said Ms Shugart. “They will
all be coming and there is a
direct economic impact from
them.”

Vernice Walkine, the Min-
istry of Tourism’s director-
general, said all New Provi-
dence hotels are expected to
benefit from the visitors the
pageant draws to the island.

“It is my expectation that
we will use every available
hotel room,” she said.

At Atlantis itself, as a direct
result of the pageant, the com-
pany will take on more staff
come August, though most of



the labour will likely be only
temporary.

George Markantonis, presi-
dent of Kerzner International
(Bahamas), said the hotel will
be bringing on temporary
labour to assist with this spe-
cial event.

“As the major employer
outside of the Government, I
expect that we will possibly
be bringing in additional peo-
ple when our hotels reach 100
per cent levels, to help us with
those specific moments in time
when we need to deal with
special events,” he said. “Does
that mean that’s permanent
employment. No!”

“We will be bringing on

Due to the passing of a Staff Member we will be

CLOSED

SATURDAY, March 7th, 2009

to allow the Team to pay their last respects.

We will re-open

at 9:30am on Monday, March 9th, 2009

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused.

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more temporary labour. That,
in turn, hopefully will be felt in
the community.”

The Miss Universe Organi-
zation itself said it will hire
Bahamians to supplement the
labour that will be brought in
from the US.

“This is a huge worldwide
telecast, so it really takes not
only the people we bring, but
it takes the people we hire
locally to participate in it.”

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE












































This is to say that the Big Harvest Community Sunday School, and
Christian Training Centra, locaied Woods Alley, off Market Street
Nassau Bahamas, is nota Church neither a Mission of the Church
of God of Prophecy, neither any other Church.

The above mention estate, is that of Blshop Caphas Ferguson, and
his Farnily, They have decided to have il develop and used for the
under privilege children, and young people, in the community.

This ig all done to the honor and glory of God,

NOTICE

Please be advised that effective March 2, 2009
Betty K. Agencies will resume its regular twice
weekly service from Miami, Florida to Nassau.

Schedule:

Departs Miami on Monday
Arrives in Nassau on Tuesday

Departs Miami on Wednesday
Arrives in Nassau on Thursday

Nassau
East St. North, Kelly’s Dock
P.O. Box N-351
Nassau, Bahamas
242-322-2142

3701 N.W. South River Drive
Miami, Florida 33142

nl
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

REQUEST FOR

QUOTATION

M-100, Test Well Drilling

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks the services
of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling
Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope
of services includes:

Drilling and pump testing of a 6” pilot hole;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Return Well;

Flow testing of the 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Discharge testing of the 10” Feed Water Return Well;
Geophysical logging and flow testing of Pilot Hole and wells;
Water temperature logging and analysis of water quality and
chemistry;

Professional supervision, (i.e. Hydrologist).

Request for Quotation Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009.

Request for Quotation closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at
3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

irstCaribbean

Are you seeking an

DIRECTOR TALENT MANAGEMENT

This role will be accountable for making a significant contribution to the

management and development of the careers of FirstCaribbean’s talent
with a special focus on high performing and high potential banking
professionals.

Concern over ‘doubling’
of Generali premiums

FROM page 1B

treatment at Doctors Hospi-
tal from 20 per cent to 40 per
cent, with the insurer’s expo-
sure reduced from 80 per cent
to 60 per cent.

They added that the age at
which the lifetime maximum
Generali would pay for a pol-
icyholder’s medical expenses
is reduced from $1 million to
$100,000 has also been low-
ered under the new proposed
policy, from 70 years-old to
65

“The new plan is supposed
to be better, but we don’t see
where it’s better,” the source
said. They questioned why
Generali had decided to
increase premiums “all at
once”, rather than go through
a series of phased increases,
and questioned why the com-
pany had chosen to do it at
this time - when the economy

was gripped by recession, and
Bahamians were already
struggling to make ends meet.

Medical

Elderly Generali policy-
holders, in particular, are
unlikely to obtain medical
coverage with other insurance
firms because they will be con-
sidered high risk, and possi-
bly large claimants, with no
catrier wanting that exposure.

However, one insurance
industry source, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition
of anonymity, said Generali
needed to increase the premi-
um rates to match the risk
associated with the portfolio.
They pointed out that Coli-
naImperial had to carry out a
similar re-pricing last year,
after experiencing losses on
its medical portfolio, due toa
high level of claims and the

THE PILOT CLUB OF NASSAU

pres ‘Hed

A Grand Movie Premier:

“ALL ABOUT STEVE’

Staring Sandra Bellock

Postponed to a date
to be announced.

Proceeds in aid of the construction of a
pool for Person with Disabilities



Legal Notice

NOTICE
GOLDEN DRAGON GROUP LIMITED

— }—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GOLDEN DRAGON GROUP LIMITED

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DELLWAY MANAGMENT INC.

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DELLWAY MANAGMENT INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

“,.. we have recently made the
decision to cease all new
enrollment to the individual
insurance plan included in the

ortfolio we purchased.”



increased cost of drugs and
medical treatments.

“The problem British
American had is that they
were losing huge amounts of
business,” the source said. “It
wasn’t profitable and was
priced wrongly. They’re
[Generali] just correcting it.

In her letter to policyhold-
ers, which has been seen by
Tribune Business, Ms Cam-
bridge said Generali had
moved to “better understand
the unique aspects of our new
portfolio” in the year since it
was acquired from British
American Financial.

She added that this was
intended to help the company
“plan and prepare for the
changes that we intend to
implement as part of being a
leader in group employee ben-
efits within the Bahamas and
the broader Caribbean
region”.

Ms Cambridge emphasised
that the last point was key, as
Generali Worldwide was a
group health insurer, “and not
traditionally a provider of

The Tribune

insurance to individuals”.

She added: “Our mandate
is to provide a full range of
group employee benefit prod-
ucts to local, regional and
multinational companies.

“As such, we have recently
made the decision to cease all
new enrollment to the indi-
vidual health insurance plan
included in the portfolio we
purchased. All of the brokers
we work with have been duly
notified of this change.”

Ms Cambridge reassured
Generali clients that their cov-
erage would not automatical-
ly be terminated, and if they
did not confirm they wanted
to drop the plan, they would
automatically be converted to
the new scheme by March 31,
2009.

Tribune Business was yes-
terday promised by Generali
that it would provide a
detailed response to this news-
paper’s questions by the close
of the business day at 5pm
yesterday. But a response was
not received by press time last
night.

Real Estate |

Wate ola ums Thiet

mL Tl ae aL ed



Everywhere Buyers Ce

oe ac

fa

J&J CHISHOLM
CONSTRUCTION LTD,

We fave many unique home and apartment designs
ready to buice. Free washer & dryer with any
contract signed before Sule 32, 2009,

exciting career opportunity?

For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit

our website:

www firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

@A £28 f)

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 5B



Regulator reassures
on financial system

The Central Bank of the
Bahamas yesterday moved to
reeassure Bahamians about
the soundness of the commer-
cial banking system, saying the
placing of CLICO (Bahamas)
into provisional liquidation
had no impact on the sector
it regulates.

Acknowledging that this
development had created con-
cern about “the possible
spillover effects” on the bank-
ing system, the Central Bank
said any fears were “exagger-
ated and unfounded”.

It added: “The Central
Bank’s ongoing inquiries have
indicated that CLICO’s fail-
ure has not posed any threat
to the stability of Bahamian
commercial banks, which all
continue to operate as going
concerns. All of our domestic
banks are highly capitalised,
with levels substantially in
excess of the minimum
requirement of 8 per cent of
risk weighted assets, as rec-
ommended by the Basle Com-
mittee.

“Also, the CLICO Group is
not directly connected through
ownership with any banking
operations in the Bahamas.
As we have been advised that
the Group represented about
1 per cent of the Bahamian
Dollar insurance market, this
removes the possibility of con-
tagion for the system as a
whole.”

Saying it was concerned
about “unsubstantiated mate-
rial” that had surfaced about
the soundness of some
Bahamas-based financial insti-
tutions, the Central Bank

trucks and trailers.

engine problems.

systems.

very competitive.



AiVlatehmereclie



added: “In the present envi-
ronment, such unfounded
assertions could unnecessarily
exacerbate the uncertainty
being experienced by cus-
tomers to the detriment of the
financial system.

“Local banking operations
are subject to focused pru-
dential supervision by the
Central Bank, with some of
their activities being moni-
tored, if not daily, on a week-
ly basis.

“This oversight has intensi-
fied during the current peri-
od of economic stress, with
priority given to monitoring

DIESEL MECHANIC wanicev

A well established local company is seeking to employ a certified Diesel Mechanic on a
full time basis. Successful candidate must possess diesel mechanic certification from a
recognized training institution and have a minimum of 5 years experience in the field.

* Candidate must have extensive knowledge and experience on diesel engine

* Must be able to use computer diagnostic equipment to troubleshoot and correct

* Must be able to implement and maintain a preventative maintenance program
for the company’s fleet of vehicles throughout the Bahamas.

* Must have experience with auto-marine hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical

* Experience with emergency generators and electric motors would be a plus.
* Must be willing to work flexible hours and travel to the family islands.

Salary based on certification and experience and compensation and benefit package is

Deadline for applying: March 18, 2009

DA 67911 c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassu, Bahamas

those risks that are most ele-
vated for banks under these
circumstances -that is, those
in respect of their lending
operations. Banks have been
prompted to adopt more for-
ward looking, aggressive
approaches in making loss
provisions for bad loans, in
order to identify and pre-emp-
tively address problems.

“Institutions have also been
encouraged to mitigate risks,
where possible, by restructur-
ing loan facilities for cus-
tomers who might be experi-
encing hardships with meet-
ing their obligations.”



PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central
qualified individuals for the position of PRINCIPAL, St. John’s College,
beginning September, 2009.

Education Authority

invites applications from

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in Education from a recognized
University, with at least (5) years accumulative administrative experience. The
applicant must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Providing leadership - set the climate and pace for success and high
achievement in the school.

- Organizing and supervising schedules, programmes, records and

procedures.

school

- Supervising and evaluating teachers and support staff.
- Managing records, school finances and end-of-year closing

procedures.

- Communicating with parents, community groups and organizations.

- Displaying consistent organizational and human relationship skills.

- Assisting the Education Department with and initiating Staff
Development Programmes.

Applicants should submit a cover letter,

Curriculum Vitae, copies of

degree certificates, three references and passport photographs to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY

P. O. BOX N-656

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Friday March 27th, 2009.









RBC
SSG) FINCO

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE



BC March 2009

Parcel of Land Romer Street Fox Hill, N.P.
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedroom, (1) Bathroom

Property Size:4,961 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,014 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $115,000.00

From Fox Hill Road turn onto Romer Street (Church Of God
Prophecy and Fox Hill Community Centre junction) travel east
east on Romer Street to the third corner on the right travel south
to the fourth house on the left which is at a dead end. The subject
is a split level residence painted blue and trimmed white aith a
tiled entrance patio

Lot#3005, Sir Linden Pindling Estates, N.P
Single Family Residence

3 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,153 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $164,000.00

From Charles Saunders Highway enter Sir Lynden Pindling Estates
and travel south on Lady Marguerite Pindling Avenue to the second
street on the left(Lauren Street) travel east onLauren street to the
second corner on left (Pear Tree Avenue); Travel north on Pear
Tree Avenue to the subject, the fitteenth property on the left. The
subject is lime green trimmed white.






Lot# 3, Doris Johnson Estates
Single Family Residence
3Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,065 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,688 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $189,000.00

From Gladstone Road travel east along Rocky Pine Road for
approximately 1,444 feet and turn left on Dame Doris Drive then
another left and the subject property is the third from corner.

Lot situate approximately 70 ft westward of Florida Court
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,750 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $227,000.00

Travel east on Balfour Avenue to the first right (Florida Court) from
Florida Court take the first right onto a 10ft wide road reservation
and the subject is the second house on the left white trimmed

grey.

Lot#4, BIk#11, Miller's Heights Subdivision
Single Family Residence w/ efficency apartment
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathroom

Apartment 1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,390 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $174,000.00

From Carmichael Road travelling west turn left onto East Avenue
travel south on east Avenue to the first corner on the right travel
west thereon to the first corner on the left (Margaret Avenue}
continue on Margaret Avenue pass the first intersection and the
subject is the second property on the right. The subject is painted
white trimmed purple.

Lot#42, Foxdale Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,329 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,247 sq.ft
Appraised Value: 191,000.00

Road, take the first left Fox Drive then the third right Sparrow Lane
and the subject property is the last on the left.

Lot#3375/76 Sir Lynden Pindling Estates, N.P.

Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,500 sq.ft

Building Size:1,150 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $161,000.00

From East Street & Bamboo Boulevard (south beach Police
Station) travel east on Bamboo Boulevard to the round-about
continue traveling eastward on C.W.Saunders Highway take the
second right, Lady Margueritte Pindling Avenue, then take the first
Pt Laue Street and the subject property is the sixteenth lot on
the right.

Lot#23 Malcolm Road East
Single Family Residence

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 860 sq.ft
Appraised value: $129,200.00



Contact Numbers 393-2004

HOUSES



From East Street South - travel east along Malcolm Road and
turn right on Winder Terrace to the first road on the left continue
for about 200 ft and the subject property is on the left.

Lot#336, Golden Gates Estates#2

Single Family Residence

3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms
roperty Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,890 sq. ft

Appraised Value: $207,000.00

Travel west on Carmichael Road from Blue Hill Road turn onto
the third left Golden Sun Drive the comer after St.Gregory's
Anglican Church and before Carmichael Primary School travel
south on Sun Drive to the first, travel west pass the second comer
on the right and the subject fourth property on the right. The
subject is painted white trimmed white.



Lot 1 off Jean Street, R.E. Cooper Subdivision, N.P
Single Family Residence

5 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,161 sq.ft

Building size: 1,136 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $230,000.00

From Prince Charles Drive, turn into Jean Sireet travel north on

Jean Street to R.E. Cooper subdivision continue directly into r.E.
Cooper Subdivision and the subject is the ninth property on the

left. House is white trimmed green.

Lot#711 Golden Gates #2, Subdivision, N.P
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,300 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $158,500.00

From Carmichael Road & Antigua Street (Golden Gates Assemblies
Church) travel south on Antigua Street and the subject property
is the sixth lot on the right past the first corner on the right.

Lot#2, Partition of Allotment No. 52 Cool Acres, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,867 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,716 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $229,000.00

Travel south on Fox Hill Road to Johnson Barber Shop, turn onto
the first right and travel east to the second corner on the left, travel
south to the T-Junction and the subject is straight ahead. The
house is painted olive trimmed white/beige.

Lot#26, Frelia Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,220 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $192,000.00

From Faith Avenue and Fire Trail east on Faith Avenue, follow the
curve around to the right (approximately 0.6 of a mile east of Faith
Avenue take the first left into Frelia Subdivision, then the first right
and the subject property is the last lots on the right.

Lot#124 Bel-Air Estates, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 969 sq.ft
Appraised Value: 153,000.00

From Carmichael Road and Faith Avenue travel east on Carmichael
____ Way then the fourth right, Harbour
Close, and the subject property is the third on the left.

Lot situated northernside of Victoria St & Lancaster Rd, lvanhoe
Subdivision, N.P

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms - Single Family Residence

Property Size: 12,600 sq.ft

Building Size: 3,104 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $439,000.00

From Mackey Street and Windsor Road (by Wendy's Resturant)
travel east on Windsor Road take the secod left to Victor Road,
then the first right which is Lancaster Road, the subject property
is the first on the left on the corner.

Lot#187, Twynam Heights Subdivision

Single Family Residence

5 Bedroom, 3 Bedroom

Property Size: 8,000 sq.ft

BuildingSize: 2,688 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $317,000.00

Travel East on Prince Charles drive to the corner east os Super

Value Winton turn right and the subject is the second house on
the left. The subject is painted lime green and trimmed white.

VACANT LAND

Lot#53, Lower Bogue Eleuthera
Vacant land

Property Size: 10,782 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $46,000.00

Travel westward on Skyline and Northward Bay Street the subject
re iv vacant land after Save More Drug Store on the right
and side.

Lot#9A, of 3 Parcels of Allotment 67, north of Carmichael Road
Vacant Land

Property Size: 9,945 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $85,000.00

From Carmichael Road -north along Faith Avenue for approximately
2,512 feet to a road reservation turn right and continue for
approximately 586 ft and turn right onto an 18ft road reservation.

Lot 500ft, West of Marigold Road & South of Hanna Road
Vacant Land

Property Size: 16,102 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 140,000.00

APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS

Lot#70 Gamble Heights

Triplex Apartment

1-1 Bed, 1 Bath, /2 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathrooms

Property Size: 7,750 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,360 sq.ft

Appraised Value:$308,000.00

From Blue Hill Road & Faith United Way, travel east on Faith
United Way and the subject property is on the right hand side,
200 feet east of Faith United Church and opposite a heavy
equipment depot.

Unit#4, Hillcrest Tower Condominium, N.P.
Condominium

2 Bedroom, 2 Bathrooms

Unit Size: 1,110 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 200,000.00

Travel south on Collin Avenue to Third Terrace turn west on third
terrace and the subject is contained within the second building on
the right which is a condominium complex. The subject complex.
The subject complex is painted lime green and trimmed white.

Lot#5, Block#25 situate in Gleniston Gardens, N.P

Duplex Apartment

Each with 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom

init Size: 9,900 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,837 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 260,000.00

From Prince Charle Drive & Beatrice Avenue take the third right
Gleniston Park Avenue and the subject property is the fifth lot on
the left (presently the third building)

Lot#8 Hanover Court, N.P
Duplex Apartment

2-2 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Bathrooms
Property size: 5,670 sq.ft
Building Size: 2,107 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $283,000.00

From Fox Hill road turn onto Sea Breeze lane travel west on Sea
Breeze Lane and turn on th e first corner after the Christian Life
Centre continue north and the subject is the fourth property on
the right. White trimmed with an unpainted wall which is to be
sprayed with the marble creek spray on exterior.

Lot Rocky pine Road

Duplex Apartment

Each Unit 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 4,875 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,716 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $218,000.00

From Carmichael Road -travel north along Gladstone Road to
Rocky Pine Road turn right and continue to the third corner , turn
right and continue for about 1,438 feet and the subject property
is on the right.(enclosed with a chain link fence).

Lot East Windsor Place Soldier Road
Duplex Apartment

2- (2) Bathrooms, (1) Bathroom
Property Size: 6,000sq.ft

Building Size: 1,580 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $172,000.00

Travel East on Soldier Road to the intersection near Sugar Kid
Bowe Food Store turn right and travel to the end of this street,
across the intersection at the curve turn east and the subject is
the first property on the left, which is a duplex. The duplex is
ent painted blue and trimmed white with enclosed

fencing.

Properly situated 350 feet south Adelaide & Coral Harbour
Duplex Apartment

1-3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathroom, 1-1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Property Size: 5,691 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,000 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $285,000.00

Travel along Carmichael Road to the roundabout continue west
onto Adelaide Road turn left at the fourth corner which is an
unpaved entrance road continue south on this road and the subject
is the fourth house on the left split level green trimmed white.

Lot#10, Blk#11, Millers Heights Subdivision, N.P
Duplex Apartment

1-2 Bedrooms., 1 Bathroom

1 - 2 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size:1 ,444 sq.ft

Appraised Value: 194,000.00

From Carmichael Road travelling west, turn left onto East Avenue,
travel south on East Avenue to the first corner on the right travel
north thereon to the first corner on the left (Margaret Avenue)

continue on Marafret Ave pass the first intersection and the subject
is the fifth property on the right painted mustard trimmed peach.

Lot#17, Blk#27 Shirley Heights
Two Storey Multi-Family Dwelling
2-2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
1-3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Appraised value: $252,000.00

From Wulff Road & Mt. Royal Avenue travel north on Mt. Royal
take the fifth right, Ludlow Street and the subject property is the
fourth on the left.

We providing financing to qualified buyers

CONTACT INFORMATION
RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre

®Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada
â„¢The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada

RBG
a] FINO


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 7B

Airport to receive
Pageant makeover

FROM page 1B

we have that in hand - what
the place looks like. We will
have that in hand, but there
is no doubt that the schedule
that has already been started
with the redevelopment of the
airport is going to continue on
the same pace,” Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said.

“And to the degree that that
is going to interfere in any
way, Shape or form, in terms
of what the airport looks like,
we are going to mask that as
best we can.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said this is where the country
will have to preen for the cam-
eras. He said the Ministry of
Tourism was secking to
employ someone who, when
the cameras arrive, help their
crews to identify positive and
beautiful aspects of the
Bahamas.

“We are identifying some-
body to work along with the
technicians and the camera-
men to make certain that we
point the cameras in the right
direction,” said Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace.

He said, though, that Nas-
sau and Paradise Island are
already much cleaner than
they have ever been before.

The Ministry of Tourism
recently spent millions of dol-
lars on advertising for the
Bahamas, even buying a spot

Vincent Vanderpool-Wa

in the Super Bowl broadcast,
which is one of the most cost-
ly spots in television advertis-
ing.

However, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant was a unique
opportunity for the Bahamas
to go beyond prepared ads
and embrace a more first-per-
son publicity that live televised
events bring to a country.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

e Public is hereby aavised tna’

or the;

Eastern Disctrict of the Islands of New Providence one of the Island

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas the mother of CHRISPIN
TAMARIO NOEL intends to change my child’s name to CHRISPIN
TAMARIO WRIGHT, If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) day

after the date of publication of this notice.

“This is the sophisticated
part of marketing that people
don’t think about,” he said.
“The whole idea is making
sure that you are having your
country shown in the best pos-
sible light, that’s what it’s all
about.

“Publicity has a much high-
er credibility than advertising.
Most people know that you
created that ad to make your-
self look good, but publicity
is someone else saying some-
thing positive about you,
which is a lot more powerful.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said that recently relaxed Visa
requirements for visitors cold
encourage people to come to
the Bahamas for the event,
as the Bahamas will be the
smallest nation to ever host
the Miss Universe Pageant,
and one of the closest to the
US borders.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL &
SANDILANDS REHABILITAION CENTRE

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF
PROVISIONS & FOOD ITEMS

Tenders are invited from qualified Contractors for the supply of
Provisions and Foods Items for the Princess Margaret Hospital and
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals Authority, for a period

of one (1) year.

Tender documents, which include instructions to Tenderers, specifications
and other relevant information, can be collected 9:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday at the Materials Management Directorate,
Princess Margaret Hospital’s compound, Shirley Street.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or packaged
identified as “ TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF PROVISIONS AND
FOODS ITEMS FOR THE PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL
AND SANDILANDS REHABILITATION CENTRE” and addressed

to:

The Chairman
Tenders Committee

Public Hospitals Authority

Third Terrace West
Collins Avenue
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address by 5:00 p.m. on 20" April 2009.

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate of up to date

National Insurance Contributions

should accompany all proposal.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any or all Tender(s).


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 9B

OOO BUSINESS eee
Pageant has ‘not changed’ Baha Mar’s closure plan

FROM page 1B

ments to close during the peri-
od. The Sheraton Cable Beach
will be open to facilitate any
demand there is for rooms.”

But still leaving the door
open to a reversal of the clo-
sure decision, Mr Sands said:
“The bottom line is, if there
is a compelling reason, an
overwhelming demand for
business that guarantees room
occupancies for that period,
that is a possibility.

“At this point, the plans are
to be closed. Our position has
not changed at this point in
time.”

Baha Mar earlier this year
announced that it had decided
to close the Wyndham Nas-
sau resort and Crystal Palace
casino for two months this
summer in a bid to reduce
losses, given that this period
accounts for most of the red
ink incurred per annum.

Publicity

Still, Mr Sands, who is also
the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion’s president, said the TV
exposure and general publici-
ty the Bahamas would receive
as a result of hosting the Miss
Universe pageant was an
“almost priceless opportuni-
ty” to market this nation as a
tourist destination, and max-
imise visitor numbers during a
depressed economy.

“T think the real benefit, in
addition to some short-term
ones, is the publicity the des-
tination will incur as a result of
the pageant,” Mr Sands said,
pointing out that the Miss
Universe franchise was jointly
owned 50/50 by NBC and the
Donald Trump Organisation.

“We believe there is equi-
ty, as a destination, to be able
to blow the horn for Bahamas
tourism in a world fashion,
and that’s where the real ben-
efits will occur.

“That publicity that will
occur from the Bahamas being
in the spotlight on prime time,
network and cable TV, is an







“We believe there is equity, as a
destination, to be able to blow the
horn for Bahamas tourism in a
world fashion, and that’s where

the real benefits



almost priceless opportunity.

“We should not be thinking
of it in terms of the event
itself, but the wider opportu-
nity. The biggest viewing audi-
ence for this event is Latin
America, and hopefully this
will be an opportunity to cul-
tivate these markets.”

Mr Sands recalled when
charter flights used to bring
Latin American tourists to the
Bahamas during the summer
months, filling in a gap dur-
ing the slow part of the
tourism calendar.

Pre-publicity in the run-up
to the Miss Universe Pagean-

will occur.”

Robert Sands

added: “That has a certain
sexiness to it, that projection
of the Bahamas as a viable
tourist destination.

“It allows the Bahamas to
be placed in the mindset of
the travelling public when
there are so many choices out
there.”

Delegation

Meanwhile, Mr Sands con-
firmed that a senior, cight-
man Baha Mar delegation had
arrived in Beijing yesterday
for eight days of talks with the

Pictured left to right: Edgar Moxey, CA, PriceWaterhouseCoopers
Partner and former BICA president, Raymond Winder, Managing
Partner, Deloitte & Touche, Paul Andy Gomez, CA, Managing Partner,
Grant Thornton, Daniel Ferguson, CA, BICA President and Managing
Partner, Daniel H. Ferguson & Associates, Clifford Johnson, CA,
Managing Partner, PriceWaterhouseCoopers and Hubert Chipman,
CA, Managing Partner, Ernst & Young.

China Export-Import Bank
and China State Construction,
in a bid to progress their pos-

t’s staging would also show-
case the Bahamas. Mr Sands

NOTICE

MOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCING
CASPIAN SEA LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has

been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant

to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar

General on the 23rd day of February, A.D., 2009.
Dated the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2009.

G. H. Johnsen

Liquidator of

MOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCING

CASPIAN SEA LIMITED

OTICE

ACCOUNTANTS AND MEMBERS OF THE
BAHAMAS INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED

ACCOUNTANTS (“THE BICA”),
the governing body for licensed accountants in The
Bahamas, enjoy the Sir Victor Sassoon Heart Ball held on
February 14, 2009 at the Sheraton Hotel in Cable Beach.












sible partnership for the $2.6
billion Cable Beach redevel-
opment.

Among the Baha Mar exec-
utives in China are the devel-
oper’s vice-chairman, John
Forelle, number two to Sarkis
Izmirlian; Don Robinson,
head of Baha Mar Resorts;
and John Pagano, head of
Baha Mar Development
Company.

“As we speak, there’s a
senior delegation of Baha Mar

Cine Voice, One Bis, Line Dinegtion!

The Anglican Central Education Authority

officials in Beijing,” Mr Sands
said. “They arrived late yes-
terday, and are meeting with
the China Ex-Im Bank and
China State Construction as a
follow-up to the meetings held
the other week.

“They should be there for
at least eight days, and hope-
fully it’s positive news they
come back with from this.”

Among the issues being dis-
cussed are “advanced negoti-
ations” on the terms of a

Memorandum of Under-
standing “as to how we go for-
ward” and construction agree-
ments.

“They'll be looking at the
terms of reference, how the
parties relate and inter-relate,
and some financing opportu-
nities,” Mr Sands said.

“It seems to be headed in
the right direction. The series
of meetings we had have
pushed us further forwards,
rather than backwards.”

fr

ay
s

* : a

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites apolications for teaching positions available at
St. John's College and St. Anne's School on New Providence, and Bishop Michael Eldon

School on Grand Bahama.

English Language and Literature
Mathematics

Physics) General Science
Guidance Counselor

Grakes 7-12
Grades 7-12

Grades 7-12

(2 positions)
(2 positions)
(1 position)

Bishop Michael Eden School, Freeport Grand Bahama

Qualifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from an accredited
University together with a Teacher's Certificate from an accredited
Teacher's Collage.

Applications may be collected from the Education Department located on Sands Road off of East

Street,

Completed application forms with the requested supporting documents must be received by
the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 13" March 2009, and must be addressed to:-

Anglican Central Education Authority

The Director of Education

P. 0. Box N656
Nassau, The Bahamas

Providing quality education ina Christian enviranment by developing the whale child: spiritually
acadennvcaily, physically and socially thus preparing the of for Ae.

“gg thine ait



PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

ADVERTISEMENT
VACANCY

MANAGER | (HUMAN RESOURCES)

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified
persons for the post of Manager | (Human Resources), Corporate Office, Public

Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration, Management, Public
Administration, Human Resources, Psychology, or equivalent;

Five (5) years experience in Human Resources;

Knowledge of HR practices and related laws;

Excellent communication skills (oral and written) analytical and
conceptualized thinking skills; computer skills; negotiation and conflict

resolution skills;

* Ability to organize and prioritize multiple work assignments ;

The Manager 1, (Human Resources) Corporate Office will report to the
Deputy Director/Operations, Human Resources, Corporate Office.

JOB SUMMARY

The Manager 1, (Human Resources), Corporate Office is responsible for
coordinating all matters relating to the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) for
the Corporate Office, Institutions and Agencies. Also, the processing of Human
Resources matters forwardedto Corporate Office fromthe InstitutionsandAgencies.

DUTIES:

1. Liaises with Institutions/Agencies, Corporate Office and Provider of
Services for all Employee Assistance Program (EAP) referrals:
Coordinates appointments and reports for all EAP referrals;
Prepares monthly management reports on EAP and Human

Resources Activities;

Processes assigned HR duties, i.e., selection and recruitment:

Ensures compliance with policies and procedures;

Develops and designs systems and surveys to ensure a proactive
approach to HR Management;
7. Participates on various ad hoc committees;

The post of Manager 1 (Human Resources) is in Scale HAAS1

($38,150 x 700 - $44,450).

Letter of application and curricula vitae should be submitted through your Head
of Department to the Director of Human Resources, Corporate Office, Public
Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or P.O. Box N-8200 Nassau,
Bahamas no later than 16th March, 2009.


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS eer ese
Concerns on labour group effectiveness

FROM page 1B

One of the proposals TRI-
FOR representatives were
examining, said Mr Nutt, was
whether the full group should
meet less frequently - perhaps
on a monthly basis - and
appoint ad-hoc committees to
examine specific labour-relat-
ed issues and amendments to
legislation. These committees
would then report to the full
committee once their month’s
work was completed.

“It’s really a situation to
determine whether TRIFOR
can be an effective group. It has
a great deal of potential, but it’s

not been realised,” Mr Nutt told
Tribune Business.

“T think the major concern is
whether the recommendations
of TRIFOR will be considered
by the Government. As TRI-
FOR is a grouping of employ-
ers, employees and government,
if we have certain recommen-
dations and the Government
shuts us out,” Mr Nutt said,
then its efforts will have been
entirely in vain.

The two major issues that
TRIFOR has been examining
are the use of biometric data
for security and timekeeping,
plus child labour.

However, Mr Nutt said: “It’s

Hing WAY

KINGSWAY ACADEMY ELEMENTARY

almost as if the things we were
looking at went on the back-
burner.” This was as a result of
the global economic downturn’s
impact on the Bahamian econ-
omy and resulting redundancies
across many industries.

Meanwhile, both Mr Nutt
and Dionisio D’Aguilar, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president, told Tribune
Business that they had received
anecdotal evidence to suggest
theft from businesses was on
the increase due to the
depressed economy.

“T’ve heard reports that that
is the case, but other than that,
[ve not heard anything specific
as to what is happening,” Mr
Nutt said.

“Unfortunately, the econom-
ic climate does lead to that type
of increase in criminal activity.”

Mr D’ Aguilar added: “I don’t
think employees theft is increas-
ing, but customer theft is. That’s
my perspective from talking to a
number of companies and busi-
ness owners with whom I’m
involved.

“Theft is a difficult thing to
measure. There’s the theft you

see, such as shrinkage from the
cash registers, and theft you
don’t see, which is the stealing
of products.

“My gut tells me that
Bahamian businesses have
already, because we received a
lot of advanced warnings that
things were going to get tough,
have put in place procedures
designed to mitigate the desire
to steal.”

The Chamber president
added: “There’s no doubt we’re
seeing an increase in customer
theft. There are more desper-
ate people out there, so there’s
been an increase in theft at the
front end.”

However, he suggested inter-
nal pilferage and shrinkage by
employees had been reduced
because workers were “more
afraid of losing their jobs”. In
addition, it was now “damn dif-
ficult” for employees to find
jobs with other companies, giv-
en the downsizing that was tak-
ing place, forcing many to
accept that they needed to “toe
the line with the rules” to
ensure they remained in
employment.

Dollar mixed before Europe
interest-rate decisions

m@ NEW YORK

The dollar edged lower against the euro and the pound Wednes-
day after the Federal Reserve said the U.S. economy has slowed fur-
ther in the last two months, while markets anticipated interest-rate
cuts by the European Central Bank and Bank of England, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

The 16-nation euro edged up to $1.2639 in late New York trad-
ing from $1.2590 late Tuesday, while the British pound gained to
$1.4156 from $1.4077.

The Fed said Wednesday the outlook for a quick recovery is
bleak, with the central bank's latest snapshot of business activity
showing sharp cutbacks and widespread production declines.

The survey is used by the Fed to get a better idea of what's
occurring at the ground level of the economy and will figure into dis-
cussions among Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues
when they meet next on March 17-18.

The Fed is widely expected to hold its key interest rate at a
record low at that meeting as well as through the rest of this year
to help revive the economy, which has been stuck in a recession
since December 2007.

Today, the European Central Bank is expected to cut its bench-
mark rate by half a percentage point to 1.5 percent, and the Bank
of England is expected to lower its rate to 0.5 percent, also by
half a percentage point.

Analysts say the cuts are largely priced into the European cur-
rencies.

Investors are also waiting to hear if the ECB will commit to so-
called quantitative easing, which is an effort to boost bank lending
by upping the amount of money in the system.

Lower interest rates can weaken a currency as investors move
funds to where they earn better returns elsewhere; quantitative eas-

ing can also prompt inflation, which devalues a currency.

The Federal Reserve and Bank of Japan have already announced
such untraditional policies, and the Bank of England is thought to
be on the verge of increasing the domestic money supply.

Meanwhile, the greenback rose to 99.22 Japanese yen from 98.32
yen late Tuesday.

Also on Wednesday, the Institute for Supply Management, a pri-
vate trade group, said that its index measuring the health of the U.S.
services sector fell to 41.6 in February from 42.9 in January. Ana-
lysts had expected a slightly lower reading, but any number under
50 is an indicator of contraction. The index has been falling for five
months straight.

About three-fourths of the American work force is employed in
the services sector, which includes the hotel, retail and health care
industries, as well as financial institutions.

In other late trading, the dollar dropped to 1.2737 Canadian
dollars from 1.2880 late Tuesday, and slipped to 1.1715 Swiss francs
from 1.1748 francs.

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OFFSHORE CONTRACTORS LIMITED

Kingsway Academy will be holding entrance
examinations for students wishing to enter
Kindergarten 4 on SATURDAY MARCH 13, 2009.
Parents are asked to collect Application Forms
from The Elementary school office before the testing
date from 8:30a.m. - 4:00p.m.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No. 45
of 2000, OFFSHORE CONTRACTORS LIMITED, has
been Dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 19th day of February, 2009.

For further information contact the school at
telephone numbers:

324-5049, 324-2158 or 324-6269

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

2007
CrE/eu1/330

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of EvERETTE
STANFORD MILLER and HELEN DIANNE MILLER

Mrs. Gillian Albert
c/o GO TRUST S.A.
Rue des Pierres-du-Niton 17,
1207 Geneva, Switzerland
Liquidator

AND

IN THE MATTER of the QUIETING
OF TITLES ACT OF 19539

AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE two (2)
pieces, parcels or tracts of land totaling 133.64
acres situate Eastwardly of the Settlement of
Deep Creek in the Island of Eleuthera, Bahamas
being immediately West of “The Delancy Estate”
on the Northern side of Queen’s Highway, called
and known as “The Wallace Estate” and more
particularly described as follows:

a

Well-established Wholesaler requires a
saleperson (females are encouraged to
apply) for the snack food division. Individual
must have experience in sales with emphasis
on large food stores. Only individuals with a
proven record of being able to work
unsupervised and achieve results will be
considered. Must be able to drive standard
shift vehicle and be in possession of current
valid driver’s license. Individuals with their
own transportation will receive favorable

; TMT
in
= .
Fl

MORE

1. ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of
land totaling 129.98 acres bounded on
the South by land owned by various
owners from Deep Creek Settlement
on the West partly by land owned
by various owners from Deep Creek
Settlement and partly by a twelve (12)
foot wide Road Reservation called
“Free Town Road” on the North by
land owned by various owners from
Deep Creek Settlement and on the East
by a tract of land called and known as
“Delancy Estates”; and

ale Trip Airfare $69 * 3 9

Nassau — Mangrove Cay
Nassau — Congo Town
Nassau — San Andros

consideration. Company offers good benefits. Nassau — Fresh Creek

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract
of land totaling 3.66 acres bounded
Southwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
Westwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
Northwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
and Eastwardly by a twelve (12) foot
wide Road Reservation called and

known as “Free Town Road”.

Submit applications to:
Sales
P.O.Box N-7124
Nassau, Bahamas

For ticket sales and travel information contact
Partormance Air af 362-1608 | D&D. 2302.

or

Ww, Perormance-aircom Linens # AD PP LA-Tat

NOTICE



EVERETTE STanrorD MILLER and HELEN Dianne MILLER claim to
be the owners in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and have made application to the Supreme Court in
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting
Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provision of
the said Act.

EG CAPITAL

BROEREBAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

&

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 3 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,656.82 | CHG -12.66 | %CHG -0.76 | YTD -55.54 | YTD % -3.24
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.85 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $

Abaco Markets 1.41 1.41 0.070
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992
Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.319
Benchmark 0.63 0.63 -0.877 zB
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.105 5 (a)
Fidelity Bank 0.055
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal office hours

Div $ in the following places:

The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said
aa ue City of Nassau;
2.83
6.77
1.55

2.37
13.95
2.83
6.50
1.49

1.309
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.698
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

The Administrators Office at Rock Sound,
Eleuthera;

2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50

2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50

Dector's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securit Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 0.00 1%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
11.23 12.04 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387 0.35 4.40
2.9230 -0.58 -2.54
1.4376 0.28 4.38
3.3201 -1.94 -11.33
12.6816 0.50 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0401

The Chambers of Bethel, Moss &
Co., Cumberland House, Cumberland
& Duke Streets, New Providence,
Bahamas, Attorneys for the Petitioners

Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB17
FBB22

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
a right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the 21st day of April, 2009 from the
publication of the Notice inclusive of the day of such publication file
Notice in the Supreme Court in the city of Nassau 1n the Island of New
providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned
a statement of his/her claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. The failure of any such person to file
and serve a statement of his/her claim within the time fixed by the
Notice aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly VoL EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3201
11.8789

100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000

30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

-3.59 Dated this 13th day of February, A. D., 2009

0.00

0.06

4.01

1.0330 3.30

1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

-3.59
0.00
-13.33
4.01
1.0000
1.0000

3.30
4.10

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

BETHEL, MOSS & CO.
Chambers Cumberland House
Cumberland & Duke Streets
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioners

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


The Tribune oo

OBITUARIES
& RELIGION



} | The Tribune
Ce Me , My Vsiec. M4
" i i , i
\ wr
» \0
TA | 4,09),
101.9

f
Your choice for the family
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

Sunset In One Land, Is Sunrise In Another
We do this with warm and precious memories
In remembrance of our beloved
The late

Nathaniel Edward Strachan

Bloomed: April 1st, 1943
Faded: March 2nd, 2008

The death of people whom we love brings sorrow and deep pain;
But if our loved one knows the Lord, our loss becomes their gain
Daddy, we know that death is not our enemy, and it does not
possess the
Finality that some of us dread. We choose to live knowing that
there is something waiting for believers beyond this life - some-
thing far better, because what the caterpillar thinks is the end of
life, the butterfly knows is just the beginning and because Christ
lives, death is not a tragedy, but triumph. It is in this vein we can
Rejoice in our sorrow, knowing you are present with the Lord

All is well daddy, safely rest, God is nigh
In Loving Memory; Wendy, Philippa, Orinoco, Shantell, Aaron

Mikhilo, Nathalie and your eight + one grandchildren who loved
you dearly

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Card of Thanks

The Late Jane Mutiny Ramsey,
August 18th, 1924 - January 4th, 2009

We give God thanks for placing so many wonderful persons in
our lives. You have demonstrated your care, compassion and
love. Your words of comfort, encouragement, prayers and
support have helped us to stay focused during these
challenging times, We appreciate everything that you have
done for us. Words are never sufficient to express our
innermost feelings. Please be assured that your involvement
with us 18 fully noted.

God bless each oft You,

Irom: Prince Hepburn and Family

CARD OF THANKS
and
APPRECIATION

4 te

We the family of the late Florance Elizabeth Rolle, wish to express our
deep appreciation and thanks fo all those persons who called, sent
flaral arrangements/wreaths, sent food and drinks and assisted in
anyway during her illness and recent death. Special thanks to Fr.
Michael Kelly, ss.cc, Deacons Peter Rahming and Maxwell Johnson,
Mr. Francis Richardson, Our Lady's Choirs & Faith Community, Mrs.
Claudette Rolle, (Director of Catholic Education), Principal, present and
former teachers and students of Our Lady's Primary School, doctors
and nurses of A&E, Female Medical 2, and Eye Ward of PMH,
Managment and staff of Demeritte’s Funeral Home for a job well done,
_ — af kindness and words of comfort, made our lass more
arable

May God richly bless all you.
The Family


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 3

dock of Foes dWuneral Dhapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ° Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

PASTOR NEWTON |
NEVILLE
ROXBURY, 86

of Scrub Hill, Long Island, will be
held on Saturday, 7 March, 2009, :
11:00 a.m. at Church of God of}
| Prophecy, Shirley Street.
Officiating will be Bishop:
Elgarnet B. Rahming & Bishop
George E. Thompson, assisted by |
Minister Charles Johnson. }
Internment will follow in:
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Cherished Memories will linger in the hearts of his devoted :
Wife: Iva Roxbury; Children: Mildred Hepburn, Jencie Davis, :
Melvern Hall, Carlton Roxbury, Priscilla Ambrister, Newtlyn Higgs, }
Kaaren Whyte, James, Jewel, Delsene Inghram, Georgina Fernander, }
Samuel Johnson, Owen and Val Barrette, Stephen Gilbert, Bishop :
Geogfrey and Althea Hepburn; Thirty-four (34) Grandchildren: ;
Newton Roxbury 2nd , Percy Roxbury , Tyrone Rolle, Dade County }
Police Woman Princess Cunnungham,Dywane and Dwight Roxbury, :
Kelsy Roxbury, Candice Simmon, Kelfine Ramsey, William Butler, }
Roberta Hall of Alanta, Cpl. 339 Keno Ambrister , PC 107 Roger:
Higgs Jr., Jeremiane Roxbury, Kenyatta Ambrister, Florence Butler, :
Latoya Ambrister, Freneka and Fredrick Jr. Ambrister, LaGayla :
Goodman, Javon Whyle, Terron and Vashiti Roberto, Kemon Hanna,
Dario, Daniel Leadon, Fernander, Newton Roxbury 3rd, Tashama :
and Michael, Fernander, Robert Young of Miami, Margaret Ferguson }
of Maimi, Morganne, Cruz and Zehavago Whyte, Vernique Major, !
Ronaldo Roach, Lekeshia, Uvanka and Alverez Roxbury, Felicia
Ambrister, Melvin and Deslarie Burrows, Deshea, Deneshia, Kevanna, :
Kevin Jr. , Demetrvsand, Renard Higgs, Jamesia Goodman, James,
Anthonysha, Imani, Heaven, Abraham, Requel, Samatha Johnson,
Jeremiah, Percey Jr., Melama, Prescola, Nichole, Kendrick, Devano, }
Samatha, Davanta, Shavanta, Logeny and Kiante Ambrister, Donnelly :
Butler, Dunecka, Renato Ramsey, Jeffery Simon, Kelsy Roxbury, :
Lady, Sandy Rolle and Coral Roxbury, Fifty-eight(58) Great-

Grandchildren; One (1) Sister: Louis Moss, Two (2) Brother: ;
Ruben and Jerald Roxbury; One (1) Aunt: Alecia Morris, Two (2)
Brothers-in-law: Carrol Moss and Holly Wilson; Seven (7) Sons-
in-law: Robert Davis of Miami, Robert Hall, Roger Higgs of Long:
Island, Fredrick Ambrister, Cecil Whyte, Kevin Ingram, Michael }
Fernander; Two (2) Sisters-in-law: Faith and Viola Roxbury; One :
(1) Daughter-in-law: Helen Roxbury, Three (3) God-daughter: ;
Lenia Knowles, Julia Taylor and Crystal Knowles, Numerous Nieces }
and Nephews ; and a host of other relatives and friends including: !
The entire Long Island family, Dr. Margo Monroe, Dr. Ruben Roberts, !

Dr. Grey, Dr. Turnquest, Dr. Currling, Dr. Burrows, Dr. Carrol, The
Doctors and Nurses of the oncology Dept. at Princess Margaret
Hospital, Male Medical One, The entire Sunshine Park Community,
Pastoral Care Jackson Memorial Hospital, Liberty City family and
the Church of God Church family. And a host of other relatives
and friends to numerous to mention.

In Lieu of Flowers, donations are to be made to The Cancer
Society of The Bahamas.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT AT THE ROCK
OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL, WULFF ROAD AND
PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. AND ON
SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 10 A.M UNTIL
SERVICE TIME.

LOUISIANNE
METELLUS, 74

of Wulff Road, will be held on
Saturday, 7 March 2009, 1:00
p-m. at New Testament Baptist
Church, Dolphin Dr., J.F.K. Drive.
Officiating will be Minister Paul
Daceus, assisted by other ministers
of the gospel. Interment will
follow in Old Trail Cemetery, Old
Trail Road.

Left to cherish Her memories are

Her Three (3) Sons: Volvick,

Nervar, and Nelson; Two (2) Daughters: Jacqueline and Zanna;
Numerous Grand Children including: Marc Evans, Lance,
Candace, Wesley, Vanessa, Jack, Cassandra, Evener, Ritchie, Stephen,
Alie, Celisha, Altiesha, Stephanie, Volcy, Ebony, Keisha, Zena,
Thomas, Jacqueline; Step Children: Brianna, Rosena, Jean, Kenol,
Kenel, Maxene Meteluss; Nieces: Mireille, Micheline, Chantel,
Charitable, Arlete, Damise, Elza, Lorna and Katie; Nephews: Walter,
Janice, and Chanslor; Brother-in-laws: Theopha, Tanis; Sister-in-
Laws: Marie, Isalia, Camelia; One (1) Daughter-in-law: Claricia;
One (1) Aunt: Nariolaine and a host of other relatives including:
The Dorvilien Family, The Munroe Family, The Octelus Family,
The Joseph Family, The Allen Family and The Dauphin Family.
And a host of other relatives and friends to numerous to mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT AT THE ROCK
OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL, WULFF ROAD AND
PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. AND ON
SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 12 NOON UNTIL
SERVICE TIME.


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar Crest funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

SANDRA COLLETTE
"Peachie' McSWWEENEY
THOMPSON, 61

a resident of Yellow Elder Gardens and
formerly of Sunshine Park and Freeport, Grand
Bahama, will be held at 11am Saturday, March
7th, 2009 at The Parish Church of the Most
Holy Trinity, Trinity Way, Stapledon Gardens.
Officiating will be The Venerable E. Etienne
E. Bowleg PhD. OBE. J.P., assisted by The
Rev'd Fr. Mervin Johnson, BA., B.Th. M. Th.
and The Rev'd Fr. John K. Kabiga, B.A., B.Th.

Kennedy Drive.

Precious memories of Sandra Collette will always linger in the hearts of her Her survivors include her children, Preston (and

; ! : his wife Hazel); Leo Freddie (and his wife Dora); Lionel (and his wife
Sheresse and Shawn Toussaint (Turks Island); grandchildren, Raysheen, :

loving husband, Wellington (Jack) Thompson; her loving children, LaShannon
LaShandra, Shawn Jr., Theo, Torry and Sandro; sisters, Carmell McSweeney

McSweeney; nieces, Condra, Charmaine, (Miami, Fla.), Jovaughn, Aliaya,
Dorisha, Terria (Atlanta), Tamara; nephews, Conrad Jr., Charmon, Kervin,

Laurencine and Adranna McSweeney; mother-in-law, Doreen Thompson;

Damianos and Nicey Major; cousins, Grachion Sands and family, Avis Sands

family, Teresa Mackey and family, Andrew and Francis McSweeney, Sandra

and family, Todd family (New York), McSweeney and Major families, Nicola,
Basil and Scottie Damianos, Marie, Nicola, Marcus Major, Basil Hall and

Collins, Judy Major and family, (Freeport), Pearl Nixon (Freeport), Delores

Langford Bethel and Congregation, Church of God Temple, Freeport, Residents
of Esher Court, Mayfield Park (Freeport); childhood friends, Fort Fincastle

Paulette Walker, Linda Carey Jarret, Nellie and Anita Turnquest, Symonetts
family, Major family, Pastor Geoffrey Wood, Ms. Margaret Claridge and
children, Alexis, Tomasina, Keith and Anastacia; numerous other relatives

Fla.), Carl and Merlease Bethel, Sunshine Park community including, Mrs

College graduation class 1966, Thompson, Jennings and Butler families.

Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12noon to 6pm, and on
: Saturday from 9:30am at the church until service time.

FLORA "Florina"
JOHNSON, 79

a resident of #14 Grosham Close, Bel Air
| : Estates and formerly of Black Point, South
' Andros, will be held 11am, Sunday, March 8th,
: 2009 at The Grants Town Seventh-Day
: Adventist Church, Wellington Street. Officiating
! will be Pastor Errol Tinker, Andrew Burrows
: and Peter Joseph, Elders Kenny Deveaux, Roger

' Forbes, Norman Seymour and Willard Barr.
M. Ed. Interment will be made in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. :

Interment will be made at Woodlawn Gardens,

Soldier Road.

Cynthia); Maxine (and her husband Vernall Rolle) and Jennifer Moss. She

: : was predeceased by Inspector Zebedee (and Alice and Ethlyn Miller). Her
Jennings and Stephanie McSweeney; brothers, Rudolph Bernard and Terrance |

25 grandchildren, Peggy (and Lindrick Sands), Alice (and Pastor Errol

Tinker), Tanya (and Neville Miller); Robert, Diane, Maxwell, Adrian, Prescott,

/ i ) ‘ Lancelot and Pandora Johnson, Craig Johnson, Chequita Johnson, Nicole
Kieran, Kristian, Shaquille, Zhivargo, Jamaal, Nathan and Terrance Jr.; grand :
nieces, Sharatia (Miami, Fla), Micah, Kiara (Freeport), Arianna, Allegua !
(Miami, Fla.) and Charde; grand nephews, Jabari, Anhwar, Ngozi (Miami, } Audley Rahming), Stephenson Smith, Dr. Shaneeta, Lianne and Lionel
Fla), Richard Jr., Xavier, Deontai, Kayshon and Peter Jr.; sisters-in-law, |

Gaitor, and Tavia Tynes, Christopher (and Eleanor), Leo (and Cherise),
Roderick (and Nicole), Vernal, Dwight (and Zerlene) Rolle, Wendy (and

Lorenzo Johnson and Jamaal Moss; numerous great grandchildren including,

. ‘ Levardo, Ramon, Deandre and Chrislyn Sands, Jason and Brittany Tinker,
aunt, Alfred Butler; step aunts, Ethel Ferguson, Gladys Lightbourne, Susanna :

LaPrea and Nevelle Miller; brothers and sisters, Ishmael Rahming (and

I Pac | Daisy), and Hencle Rahming (and Geneva) of Miami, FI., Flossie Rolle (and
and family, Wilfred Butler and family, Kipling Butler and family, Perez Butler :
and family, Don Butler, Rudoph McSweeney Sr. and family, Juliette and Joe :
Mackey and family, (Rock Sound), Eddie and James McSweeney (Rock ! Charles, Elisha, Dr. Elliston, Malferth and Ernest Rahming, Rosetta Gibson,
Sound), Glen and Arnett McSweeney and family, Kolamae Pedican and :

Jeremiah), Manekerbel Canter (and Alphonso), John Gordon, and Louise
Johnson of South Andros; numerous nieces and nephews including, Clarence,

and Ivy Rolle, Leonard, Kendal, Bernadine, Linda and Sheila Rahming,

1 J ra ! Gardwell Rahming, Minera Rolle of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Ettamae
(Sandy) Bethel, Ruth Ferguson, Deidre, Ian, Michael, Trevor Ford and Ingrid :

Ford Knowles and family, Cola, Patna, Deidre, Elaine, Avis and Robert Hall !

McKenzie, Cedric Rahming, Ella King of Freeport, Grand Bahama and Mae
Dawn Rahming-Harper of Miramar, FI., Patricia Bowe, Eulie, Eva, Patrick,

‘ John Jr. and Frankie Gordon, Thaddeus, Elijah and Bethsheba Rahming,

é : , l : Rosemary Thompson and Priscilla Williams, Nethlie Markland, Sandra Miller,
family, Gilda and Hiram Thompson and family; special friends, Kevin and :

Sandra Sands Johnson and family, (Freeport), Phillip and Virginia Gibson :
and family, (Turks), Leslie Johnson, Blanche Moss and family, Patricia Carey :

Thelma and Arlington Rahming, Evelyn, Ethlyn Rahming, Annabel, Herbert,
Reeliabelle, Coralee Young, Emmerita, Unamae, Susiemae, Alphonso, and
Berkley Canter, Janetta Pratt and Solomon Canter, Eloise, Vernita, Geraldine,

Pearl ‘ Gertrude and Emmerson Rolle, Esther and Samuel Duncombe, Joseph Johnson
Lockhart (Freeport), Marge Bowleg, Valarie King, Blanche Moss, Pastor :

of South Andros, Ivan and Sidney Bethel; numerous grand nieces and

: nephews, close relatives and friends including, Angela Johnson, Kendrick
: K. H. Moss, Mazella Rahming, Catherine Roker, Susan Thompson and
crew including, Mrs. Burnside and children, Stanley, Jackson, Julia and :
Wayman, Zelia Thompson Bethel, Pastor Henry and Nehemiah Francis, |

Manencha Miller of South Andros, Pastor Leonard Miller, Myrtle Thompson,
Epsie Clarke and Mrs Rolle, Wilfred Taylor, Mrs Janet Fynes-Bain, Veronica

* Saunders of Abaco and her family, Dr. John and Shezarah Carey, Joan
: Newbold, Audrey Carey, Janice Johnson, Francita Seymour, Norman and

> , k c ves ! Claudia Seymour, Percy Miller, Roger Forbes, Pastor Prince Hepburn, John
and friends, Sheila McSweeney, Patrice McSweeney, Edith Burns and family, :

(Turks Island), Agatha Delancy (Turks Island), Vernell Greene (Opa Locka, } Cleare and the Faculty of the School of Science and Technology, College of

‘ : its : The Bahamas, Felix Stubbs and staff of IBM Bahamas Limited, the Grants
Thirza Dean and family, Mrs Dorsett and family, Mrs Bastian and family, :

Mrs Veronica Gibbs, Mrs Shirley Braynen, Mrs Betty Woodside, Aquinas |
' Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home,

; ‘ Robinson Road and First Street on Saturday from 12noon to 6pm and a the
Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home, +

Musgrove, Cyril Johnson, Dr. Linda Davis, Margo Blackwell, Dr. Brendamae

Town Church family and others too numerous to mention.

church on Sunday from 9:30am to service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 5

Codar Crest frmeral Frome

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Service For

PHILLIP EDWIN
ROLLE, 44

a resident of Price Street, Nassau
Village will be held at 2pm,
Saturday, March 7th, 2009 at New
Hope Missionary Baptist Church,
Jones Heights. Officiating will be
Rev. Edmond R. King. Interment
will be made in the Old Trail
Cemetery, Abundant Life Road.

Left with treasured memories are his
mother, Ivy Davis Rolle; three children, Vanessa, Phillipa
and Princess Rolle; five brothers, Lionell Jr. and Norman
Rolle, Rodney Butler, Otis and James Rolle; one sister, Gloria
Rolle; two uncles, Jonathan Butler and Adam Rolle; three
aunts, Sybil, Carolyn and Carmie Butler; two great grand
aunts, Beatrice Clarke and Louise Musgrove; one brother-
in-law, Donald Nairn; three sisters-in-law, Sheva Rolle,
Shanell Roberts and Gina Knowles; sixteen nieces, Monique
Major, Norma, Shantell, Sharelle, Shanika, Raquel Butler,
Patricia, Meril, Sanovia, Navrissa, Chamaine, Stacey, Jenny,
Shonell, Samantha Neely, and Naomi Adderley; fifteen
nephews, Kerall, Sharven, Romandeo, Lionel Theophilus I,
Marcus, Shanton, Darren, Shanari, Geraldo, Stephen, Norman
Jr., Kevin and Marvin Rolle, Antonio Adderley and Terrance
Neely Jr.; six grand nieces, De'Vencia, Shandria, De'Chan, In Lov : ME Or
Jadorn, Shanyia, Branika; six grand nephews, Adrin Butler, N LOVING IWIEMORY \/F

Terry Rolle, Daryl Riley Jr., Geraldo Rolle, De'Vante Rolle, vA ror tf ?
Essamae Rolle, Freda, Lucy, Sabrina, Kendal, Adrian, Lavardo, ~ He Sania ed fr ~G LILLE,
Jessie, Bridgette, Adam, Wellie, Helena Musgrove, Julian T

and Bennie; cousins, Crayelora, Melvel, Alfred, Basil, Birdie 1949 - 2008,
and Paul Musgrove and a host of other relatives and friends
including, Minister A., Salad Armbrister, Rayfield, Tracy,
Monk, Pinky, Preston, Terrance Neely Sr., Verlin Knowles,
Lurinda Allen, Pam, John Adderley, Pedro Bannister, Steven,
Alicia Miller, Lisa, Deangelo, Cordell, Face, Trick, Ms. Die,
Recie, Tevrance, Tina, Alexas, Coricka, Lullie Musgrove, the
Nassau Village, Price Street Crew, Rolleville, Strachan Alley Leff at woe fll ir wink rexacnalarved jy,
and Evans families, Kirk Moss, Rosemell Rolle, Rudy Ferguson, Re mot dundewead avith times of sorrow, J aio pour the savestine af tervarron

Gloria Bodie, Judy Munroe, Jennifer Morley, Audrey Johnson, My die L Fscteoumed mech, Cone! friend: goad times, aud at loved ane’ touch
Elmna Poitier, Beverley Adderley, Preston Rolle, Laundry Senha: wep tives bere ereeecal ll Sant Lerenhen it ron corer ranalar evief
Dept. S.R.C., Cecil Moxey and Julius families. Light up your bearts amd chare with me, God svanis we wow, be set sve free.

rag for nae eines, J ame peitowsing ree paar Cae

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest You Fane ere ants en Rane
Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from GONE But Nor FORGOTTEN.
12noon until 6pm and on Saturday from 10am until 12noon From Your Sons, Grneson, Fantily er Friends.

and at the church from 12:30pm until service time.


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rotsiew Memoual
ee

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

iy RVICES FOR

UNERAL SE

? Malcolm, Verlene Palacious, Dawn Palacious, Vernon Symonette
i and family, Clementina, Cheri, David and Mona Hanna, the Cox,
? Hanchell, Williams, and Finley Family, Glen Bannister, Samuel
? Nixon, (Fuzzy), Earl Burrows, father Murray, Father Rodney

: Burrows, Rev. Carl Farquharson, numerous godchildren, the Medical

of Matthew Town, Inagua will be : Teams at the Inagua Community Clinic and the Princess Margaret

held Saturday at 11:00 am at St. } Hospital and the entire Inagua Community.

Philips Anglican Church, Matthew }

Town, Inagua. Officiating will be } Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite at Restview Mortuary

Arch Deacon James Palacious, } and Crematorium Ltd. on Thursday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and

assisted by other ministers of the } at St. Philips Anglican Church on Friday in Matthew Town, Inagua

gospel and interment will follow in : until service time on Saturday.

BOLTON
PALACIOUS, 72

the church cemetery.

He is was predeceased by his son, Floyd Henry Palacious. He is }
survived by his wife, Prudence; sons: Anthony, Iverne, Douglas, }
Chester, Benson and Tamario; daughters: Madeline Haxby, Donna }
Weir, Cherilynne Ferguson, Brendalee Williams, and Tamika;

stepchildren: Jennifer, Edwin, Jason and Tom; sons-in-law: Eugene :
Weir, Wilfred Ferguson, and Sammie Williams; daughters-in-law: }
Antoinette, Felese, Deidre, Cindy and Maranda; brothers: Dwight, }
Irvin, Michael, Franklyn, Archdeacon James, Eric, Eugene, and }
Fredrick; sisters: Bloneva Malcolm, Pamela Seyfert and Terasita }
Palacious; uncle: Norman Beckford; grand children: Christopher }
and Michelle, Kristina, Nakessa and Brain, Dulia and Deon, Terez, }
Rosie, Hope Deangelo, Justin, Leverne, Rozario, Tereco, Henya, }
Antonia, Jensen, Shaneka and Thomas, Chevano, Chequille, }
Mantano, Douglas Jr., Paige, Peyton, Chester Jr., Darren, Marcia, }

Brashad, Courtney, Shaquella, Shanab, Leshantia, Raymando, : He is survived by his: father: Vernon; mother: Vanria; sisters:
Raynaldo, Jays) Alphonso, Raygina and Wayoshea; great grand: Brevonne, Nadia, Sinta and Gwyneth; brother: Vernon Jr.; his grand
Naketra, Brain Jr., Deon Jr., Delon, Dillon, Derenique, Derek J is ? mothers: Miriam Adderley and Berthamae Sturrup; aunts: Lorraine,
Isaac, Stefon, Tezar, talaia, Tanajh, and Amia; sisters-in-law: Edith, i Joy, Shena, Meredith, Olivia, and Ismae; uncles, Neville, Everette,
Georgina, Dee, Sonia, Gwen, Rev. Angela, Joann, Mag, Jean, i Mackey, Daniel Leroy, and Samuel Adderley, Dwayne McKenzie,
Louise, Caroline, Mariah, Ruthy » Mable, Effie, Welma and Em; i Omar, Desi, Zhivrgo, and Fernando; great grand aunts: Ada Smith,
brothers-in-law: wolf, Paul, Mitch, Berkley and Oz; DEERE = AN nitred Sturrup, Gloria Butler, Marina Knowles, Paula Hanna,
nieces and nephews including: Ransford, Irvin, Wilhame, Kim, : Keva Hepburn, Dorothy Sturrup; niece: Breanna Miller; his ramping
Deborah, Drew, Wells, Dion, Davey, Shawnie, Binca, Akelia, i buddies: Jay, PJ, TJ, Neko and the students of grade 8; the teachers,
vanessa Mickara, Adrianne, Keturah, Imalasha, Carlos, Phyleia, : students, and administration of North Long Island High School;
Franzano, Anzio, Anzwa, Susma, Jessica, Lindsay, Ferrando, Jamal, : the doctors and nurses of Simms Clinic and a host of other relatives
Pandora, Norenzen, Elvis, Margaret, Llewellyn, Vedamae, Ruby, : and friends including: Leon Wilchombe, Eugene Butler, Edmund
Cleveland, Theda, Ricardo; Cousins including: Theda and J C hn : Butler Jr, Gary Grant of Great Harbour Cay, Marvin Sturrup and
pode, Margo, Jervis, Violet, Adel, Leo, Basil, Homer, Dino, ? James Smith, and the entire community of Burnt Ground, Long
Beatrice, Margaret, Wanda, Corrine, Cynthia, Ophelia, Robert | Igand
(Bob), Luther, Leroy (Old Man), and Isaac Roker; Other relatives ; :

and friends including: Leonardo McKenzie and Charlene Brown, : Veins ae ‘ ‘ i :

sa ee g will be held in the Irenic Suite at Restview Mortuary and
The Beckford nd Wildgoose Families, Josep h, Carl and Melvin i Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Thursday from
Lewis, Annie Brooks, Isadora Hendfield, Mercedes Harvey and : 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and on Friday at Burnt Ground Gospel Chapel
family, Esther and Karen Palacious, Wilfred Seymour, Advado } 1,417 service time on Saturday.

MASTER
DONOVAN JARVIS
ADDERLEY, 13

of Burnt Ground, Long Island will
be held on Saturday, March 7th, 2009
at 3:00pm at Burnt Ground Gospel
Chapel Burnt Ground, Long Island.
Officiating will be Pastor Ricardo
Turner, assisted by Pastor Ezekiel
Adderley. Interment will be in
Glinton’s Public Cemetery.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 7

Rotsieas Memoual
pny te ay “aR

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

INEZ DAISY
MILLER, 73

of South Beach Estates will be held }
on Sunday, March 8th, 2009 at }
| 2:30pm St. Agnes Anglican Church,
Balliou Hill Roads. Officiating will |
be The Venerable Archdeacon I }
| Ranfurly Brown, assisted by Rev’d :
| Fr. Bernard Been, Canon Warren }
Rolle, Deacon Neil Nairn. Interment
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, }

Soldier Roads

Left with cherished memories are her: SONS: Burton, Bernard, }
Baldwin, Bradley, Berkley, Byron, DAUGHTERS: Patrice, :
Paulette, Phyllis Whitfield of New Providence; SISTERS, Althea }
Farrington, Grace Morton (Philadelphia, PA), Elizabeth Roxbury }
(Freeport, Grand Bahama), Renora Bridgette (Delray Beach, :
Florida) and; SISTER-IN LAW: Willimae Miller, BROTHERS-
IN-LAW: James Roxbury (Freeport, Grand Bahama), Ronald and }
Henry Miller DAUGHTERS-IN-LAW: Sharmane Miller, :
Winnifred Miller (Freeport, Grand Bahama) and Cherisse Miller; :
SON-IN-LAW: Henry Whitfield, GRANDCHILDREN: }
Christopher, Quinton, Mia, Geoffrey, Bernard Jr., Tiffany, Krystal, : yet tee
Deando, Jada, Bradley Jr., Cindy, Kyle, Michael, Amber, Joshua, | Samuel, Obie, and David Pratt; sisters-in-law: Glendina, Carol,
Keanna and Jonathan; GREAT GRANDCHILDREN: Cameron :
Wells and Sanaa Barnes; NIECES & NEPHEWS INCLUDING: }
Corafay Whylly, Trevor, Larry, Gregory, Tyrone, Dewitt, Brent, }
Linda Bullard, Dexter, Basil, Stephen, Brian, Kevin, Warren, Joe, :
Maurice Alexander, Monique, Daphne, Tracey, Monique, William, }
Philip, Donald, Kim, Stuart, Lynda, Tony, Deborah, Kirkwood, :
Kervin, Kenrick, Mark, Cheryl Moss, Samuel, Oscar, Philip, }
Darrold, Robertha, Joel, Mispah, Corrine, Ronald Jr., Charity, ;
emiiemias Amedis, Norile-n,Grevon, Eat lance loss Enos Anissa Forbes, Herb and Shaunell Oembler, Edward and Valerie
OTHER RELATIVES AND FRIENDS INCLUDING: Dr. Archie }
Donaldson, Bernadette Minnis, Teneil Cartwright, Sonia Williams,
Shannon Farrington, Ophelia, Judith, Rowena, Lillian, Roslyn, }
Debbie, Patrice, Wendy, Earl, the Fox Family, the Family of Black :
Point-Staniel Cay, the Family of Grand Bahama, and The Florida }
Family, the St.Agnes Church Family, The Acklins and Crooked ¢ | ockhart of Elizabeth estate Clinic, and the entire settlements of

Family, the Community of South Beach Estates, The Class of | Burnt Ground and S eymour’s, Lone Island.

‘49’ Eastern Senior, The Taxi Drivers.

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview Memorial
Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on }

Saturday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and at the church on Sunday 7 Church in Long Island on Friday until service time on Saturday.

i from 12:30 pm at the church until service time.

OLIVE VIOLA
SMITH

of Long Island will be held at St.
Mary’s Magdalene Anglican Church,
Glinton’s, Long Island on Saturday,
March 7th, 2009 at 10:00am.
Officiating will be Father Mark R.
Lindsey Fox, assisted by Father
Earnest Pratt. Interment will be in
Seymour’s Cemetery, Long Island.

Left to cherish her memories are her sons: Daniel, Ambrose
“Smackey”, Joseph, Rexville, and Arlington Smith. Daughters:
Joanna Smith and Jane Forbes. Grandchildren: Shanique, Tashika,
Alistair, Donavan, Rex-Delano, and Miguel Smith, Rashad and
Baron Forbes, Javon and Michaela Kelly. Great grand children:
Alistair Jr., Charlie and Dominque Smith, and Jayden Forbes.
Daughters-in-law: Dorothy, Susan, Joycelyn and Millestine Smith.
Son-in-law: Barry Forbes. Sisters: Edith Wilson, Geneva Dames,
Rowena Gibson, Christina and Idella Adderley, Ignes Taylor,
Charlottes Smith, and Frieda Pratt, brothers: Granville, George,

Margaret, and Viviana Pratt and Angela Smith., brothers-in-law:
Maxwell and Ezekiel Adderley, Rueben Gibson, James and L.G.
Smith, and Lernux Taylor, twenty eight nieces and thirty seven
nephews. Many other relatives and special friends: Elouise Gibson,
Carla Bethel, Cora Adderley, Delores Gibson, Ronnie Anderson,
James, Ruth, Donnie, Murriel, Prudence, Dave, and Fredrick
Nottage, Norine and Prince Moxey, Inez and Eddison Minnis,
Paul Farquarhson, Father Earnest and Taddius Pratt, Arnold and

Missick, deacon Raymond Forbes, Emily Smith, Michael Kelly,
Clara Dean, Cynthia Thompson, Joanne Higgs, Eva Rolle, Irene
Bain, Canon Basil Tynes, the prayer team of St. Barnabas Parish,
Aldeon Miller, Estelle Walkes, Jacqueline Williams, support staff
of Uriah McPhee School, Pearline Morley, Kevin Rahming and
ASP Neville Adderley, Nurse Miller and Nurse Clarke, Nurse

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview Memorial

Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on
Thursday March 5th 2009 from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and at the


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematouum Lioniled

Bone Cicadnines Gina?”

EEPORT
11A East Coral Roda preopet. G.B., Bahamas
Box F-4
Telephone: (24d) a73- riie7 (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

JAMES
DEVEAUX, 41

OF WEDDELL AVENUE,

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA : }
WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY, :
MARCH 7, 2009 AT 11:00 A.M. :

-| AT THE CHAPEL AT RESTVIEW }
MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND :

CREMATORIUM LIMITED,
CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT,
GRAND

RICHARD MUNROE. CREMATION WILL FOLLOW.

Cunningham, Brittney Kemp, Quinnae Moore and Aliyah Valsin;
Cunningham, Calvin Kemp, Jonathan Lightbourne, Shonya Kemp,

Valsin; grandnieces:

and special friend Joyann Hall and family.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE” OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND:

CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

FROM 9:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

BAHAMA.!
OFFICIATING WILL BE REV. |

MRS. EDNA LOUISE
KIKIVARAKIS, 88

OF #11 MAN-O-CIRCLE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF NASSAU,
NEW PROVIDENCE DIED AT HER
RESIDENCE ON MONDAY,
MARCH 2, 2009.

She is survived by 5 sons: Henry,
Anthony, Michael and Jeffrey Kikivarakis and Keith Brice; 4
daughters-in-law: Joy, Deborah, Debra and Ella Kikivarakis; 15

i grandchildren: Katherine Laster, Nicole Kikivarakis-McKenzie,
: Tamika Nelson, Karen, Sonia, Dominic, Damien, Anthony Jr.,
Left to cherish his memories are his children: Shawn and Tameko |
Deveaux; sisters: Sylvia Turnquest, Margaret Cunningham and
Mary Ellen Kemp; brothers: Joel Williams, Wilton Kemp, Garnet |
Bowe, Charles Valsin and Stanmitz Kemp; grandmother: Rosalie :
Bowe; nieces: Nadia Hall, Joanne Williams, LaKeisha Bowe, }
Racquel Turnquest, Dakota Williams, Garnell Bowe, Carla }
: RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND
nephews: Kelsey and Marc Williams, Carlington and James :
: FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON MONDAY, MARCH 16,
Elton Turnquest Jr., Charles Valsin Jr., Whitney Hield and Daniel ;
Conique and Talia Lightbourne; :
grandnephews: Rashad and Mateo Williams, James Cunningham }
and Conan Lightbourne; aunts: Monica Pettifrere, Veronica :
Francois and Shirley Laing; uncles: James Bowe and Carl Pinder; }
grandaunt: Mabel Rogers; in-laws: John Lightbourne, Luke :
Cunningham, Elton Turnquest, Karen Williams and Nathalie }
Bowe; cousins: Maude Clarke, Joan, Virginia, Carl Pinder, Rodney :
Carmen, Lisa Louis, Candice Bowe, Bernard Bethel, Lousette }
Joseph, Jayline Moss, Renese Remy, Sheryl Rolle, Lucita Johnson, :
Sonia Tynes, Scotty Evans and a host of other relatives and friends }
including: Preston Kemp and family, John Kemp and family, :
Janet Donahue and family, Darren Malcolm and family, Otnell :
“Scrooge” Paul and family, Maxine Rasta Rice, Whitney Hield, :
Quinton Moore, Asheko Hall, Dr. Leviticus Rolle and the staff }
at the Rand Memorial Hospital, Garden Villas “The Ghetto” crew }

Kareen, Kim, Jeffrey Jr., Veronique, Dorainey, Scentique and
Jarvis Kikivarakis; 13 great grandchildren; numerous nieces,
nephews and a host of other relatives and friends especially her
care givers Grace Ellis and Sybilene Russell.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE” OF
CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,
2009 FROM 12:00 NOON TO 5:00 P.M

DEATH NOTICE

MR. DANIEL
WILLIAMS, 87

OF #17 BERKLEY DRIVE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF WEST END,
GRAND BAHAMA DIED AT HIS
RESIDENCE ON WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 2009.

He is survived by his daughter:
Coramae Thomas; stepsons: Dudrick,
Ashley and Pedro Edwards;
grandchildren: Bradley Brown, Bonita Pratt, Stephon Brown,
Vernon, Owen and Oscar Thomas, Elsa Bartlett, Alitha Lightbourne,

: Tanya and Natalee Brown; numerous great grandchildren and

FREEPORT. GRAND BAHAMA ON ERIDAY FROM 10:00 | great-great grandchildren; 2 sons-in-law: Dennis Thomas and

A..M. TO 5:00 P.M AND AT THE CHAPEL ON SATURDAY }
| Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.

Nathanial Brown; and a host of other relatives and friends.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

f Ca - a ¢ PF bs f
FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 304-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

DEATH NOTICES FOR

MR. JOSEPH
EZEKIEL BAILEY, 65

OF #65 EAST CORAL ROAD,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF ST.
MARY’S, JAMAICA DIED AT
THE PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL, NASSAU, NEW
PROVIDENCE ON TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 24, 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Christina Bailey; sons: Mark,
Randy, John and Broahdy Bailey; daughters: Nicole Turner,
Dorothy, Nadine and Kista Bailey, Carla West and Shantel
Grant; sister: Vata Bailey; brothers: Frank, Ben and Junior
Bailey; numerous grandchildren, nieces, nephew and a host
of other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.

MS. LYNN LYATTE
CLARKE, 46

OF DEADMAN’S REEF,
GRAND BAHAM AND
FORMERLY OF SOUTH
MASTIC POINT, ANDROS
DIED ON SUNDAY, MARCH
1, 2009,

She is survived by her 2 daughters:
Johnell Rolle and Johnett Davis; 2 grandchildren: Jamazio
and Dianell; 6 sisters: Minister Beulahmae Fowler, Araline
Mackey, Leading Marine Doramae Clarke of R.B.D.F, Sherry,
Darnell and Karen Clarke; 3 brothers: Eddison, Dave and
Dwight Clarke; 4 aunts: Julia Fowler, Perneshia Taylor,
Elouise and Viola Hopkins; | grandaunt: Louise Colebrooke;
numerous nieces, nephews and a host of other relatives and
friends.

Funeral arrangement will be announced at a later date.

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 9

wily

EAST SUN RISE MORTUARY

—S- —

“A New Commitment To Service’

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

DEACONESS ANNIE
CAMPBELL, 80

of 3rd Street, The Grove and formerly of Kemp’s
Bay, Andros will be held on Sunday at 1 p.m. at
The Church of God Temple, Coconut Grove and
Crooked Island Street. Officiating will by Bishop
Lindo Wallace, assisted by Bishop Rudolph Pinder
Sr., Interment will follow in St. Barnabas Church
Cemetery.

Margaret Campbell and their children: Jermaine

and Vanessa Campbell, Fiona, Vanturi and Angelique

Campbell; Theodore and Min. Doreen Campbell

and their children Calpurnia Campbell, Martin

Forbes, Cyprianna, Cp] 2515 Theodore Campbell

Jr., Theodore I, Cassius, Dino, Crystallaire and

Shandrea Campbell, Ricardo and Shanequa Francis,

Freddie and Shekera Carrol; Vaneria Campbell-Rolle

and her children, Vanessa Campbell-Rolle, Latanya Rolle and Tamone Humes; ASP Ronald
and Doreth Campbell and their children, LaRhonda, Ronald Jr., Bianca and Ronald Campbell
IL., and Latoya Paris; Rev. Johnathan and Dedra Campbell and their children: Omar Neely,
Adario, Justan and Dekia Campbell; Insp. Solomon and Sgt. 1720 Valeria Cash and their
children: Tameka Johnson, Shamar, Crystal, Sullivan, Solomon and Akira Cash. Sgt 1214
Marvin and Nurse Altheameze Watson and their children: Travaz, Travaughn, Travayne and
Rekeima Watson; Rev. Joycelyn and Eureka Vixamar and their children: Branique and Branae
Coakley, Jaquan Campbell, Cynthia, Cindy and Adderley Vixamar; Numerous great-grand
children including: Sherell Lewis, Rashan, Kianne, and Simone Campbell, Vanessa Campbell,
Kaylan Campbell, Jasmine Bethel, Claron Morley, Azurnique and Jermaine Campbell Jr., V’ajha
Clarke, Travaz Watson II, Omar and Deandrea Sturrup, Frediesha Carrol, Theodore Campbell,
Syldiko McKenzie and Justan Campbell Jr.; Her surviving siblings include: Simeon, Philip,
Leslie, Samuel, Hassam, Clinton and James Brown; Maureen Symonette, Arabella Johnson,
Lucille McIntosh, Joanna Brown and Cleo Anderson; Brothers-in-law: Ellis Ferguson, Joseph
Symonette, Wesley Johnson and Glenroy Anderson; Sisters in law: Mildred, Loma, Willesy,
Sheila and Cheryl Brown; Nieces and nephews too numerous to mention, Other relatives and
friends including: Winnis Bowleg, Rona Bastian, Florenda Duncombe, Manencha Clarke, Sis.
Lydia McKenzie and Bread of Life School, Sis. Beckford, Anatol Young, Barry & Claudette
Rolle, Leona Carey, Carrie Powell and Clarence & Estelle Cunningham of New York; Roy and
Mary Bullard of Opalocka, Florida; Hon Tommy Turnquest, The Campbell Family, Hon. Cynthia
Pratt, Sandra Bastian, Mildred Knowles, Rev. & Sis. Reginald Saunders, Theresa Moxey-
Ingraham, Cynthia Damalie, Phillicia Ellisnor, Helen Ferguson, Carolyn Saunders, Maudleen
Josey & Family, Ruth Malcolm, Patrice Campbell, Rev. Vera Rigby, Rev. Fr. Sebastian Campbell,
Oscar Campbell, Rev. Carl Campbell, Joyce Saunders & Family, Meredith Martin, Rev. Francina
Watson, Natasha Adderley, Umiqua Hepburn, The Romer family, Sally Hutcheson and family,
Rudolph Smith, Hester Dawkins, Mrs. Petty, Bro. Farquharson, Joyce Coakley & Family, Bishop
Lindo & Olga Wallace, Crusaders Brass Band, Royal Ambassador’s Band, The Church of God
Temple Family, Leon Smith, Bernice Bullard, The Bevans Family, Willamae McKenzie &
Family, Volare Clarke, The Bowe Family, The Glass Family, Estella Lynes, Patrick Bethel, Gen.
Supt. of Highway Church of God - Bishop Robert A. & Mother Modena McPhee, St. Cecilia
Community (Especially Third Street), Doctors and Nurses of Female Medical Ward I of P.M.H.,
Staff of Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Staff of Southern Police Station and Detective Unit,
The Royal Bahamas Police Force Band, Staff of Pharm-Chemical Ltd., Ministry of Education,
Staff of Jones Communications Network, Kelly’s Home Centre, Staff of Atlantis, Staff of
Claridge Primary School, Staff of St. Cecilia’s School & Church Parish, Staff of Commonwealth
Building Supplies, Staff of Renova Spa, Staff of College of The Bahamas, Staff of Central Bank,
Dupuch and Turnquest Law Firm, Bahamas National Council for Disability and The Dorcas
Committee of The Church of God Temple.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street, Palmdale from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and again on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and at the Church from
noon on Sunday until service time.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 ¢ Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

Evergreen Mortuary '

EXCELLENT IN THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE

For all of your Fumeral Service Noods,
We will be pleased to serve jane with boner.

Tel: 242-394.7999
Fax: 242-74 7090
2#hrs: 242-341-5309
on 322-3242
Cell: 5i5-975F

DENALEE E. PENN L.F.D.E.

ee Mackey Strat South
MARL AGING/ FUNERAL DIRECTOR

(Opposite Mingic Muffler) Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR 3

Errol Edward Gilbert, 71

of New Bight Cat Island will be :
held on Saturday at Our Lady of }
the Holy Souls Catholic Church, :
Deveaux Street, at 2:45 p.m. !
Officiating will be Fr. Michael }
Kelly, ss.cc. Interment will follow :
in the Catholic Cemetery, Tyler }

) Street.

Left to cherish fond memories his }

Brothers: Edmund and Peter }

Gilbert; Sisters: Queen Elizabeth, :

and Winnest Gilbert, Minerva Hall :
& Ellen Hepburn; Sisters-in-law, Judy & Majorie Gilbert; }
brothers-in-law, Leon Hall and Ishmael Hepburn; nieces :
and nephews, Lovell, Bethany, Lauren and Sophia Gilbert }
of Canada, Loretta, Louis, Louis Jr., and Jaden Johnson, :
Patrick and Chavasse Gilbert, Margaret Gilbert of Tennesse,
Christine King, Stacey and Desiree Forbes, Anthony (Tony) }
and Antoneak Gilbert, Ronique Deveaux, and Rashad Moss, :
Indi, Italia and Laterio Hepburn, Edmund Jr., Nathaniel }
Smith, Florene, Sonia, Gilbert, Elrod and Shamar Munnings, }
Llonella Gilbert, Carol Hall, Ralph and Dennis Smith; :
cousins including, Rufus Johnson, John and Eldrige }
Johnson, Anthony, Harriet, and Leonard Johnson, William, }
Orman, Medris, Timothy, Brady, Florence, Jackie Johnson; :
other relatives and friends including, the Gilbert family, |
Johnson family, Holman and Estermae Gilbert, Wilworth :
Campbell, Rosyln Johnson and family, Elsie Johnson and !
family, Hazel and family, Michael Harris and family, Paula }
& Sam Romer, Dr. Kapuno & Nurse Rose Saunders and :
Staff at Smith's Bay Communtiy Clinic; Rosie McKinney }
& family, Bradley Dorsette & family, Dwayne Adderely :
and family, Michael & Zephaniah Rolle and family, Albert |
Armbrister, Rev. Father Glenn Nixon, Deacon Rahming, }
Holy Redeemer Catholic Church family, and members of :

the Cat Island Community.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Evergreen }

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Mortuary, Mackey Street on Friday from 10:00a.m. - 6:00
p.m. and again on Saturday at the church from 2:45 p.m.
until service time.

Oswald Frazer, 82

of St. Vincent Road and formerly of
Lower Bogue Eleuthera will be
held at Wesley Methodist Church,
Baillou Hill Road at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Carla R.
Culmer, assisted by Sis. Tezel
Anderson. Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish fond memories are

(6) Sons: Levock, Johnsthon,

Sargeant 1114 Londie, Police

Constable 282 Bertram Sr., Petty
Officer Remond Sr. and Horace Frazer; five (5) daughters,
Vernisha Gaitor, Susan Darville, Jestina Lloyd, Nursing
Officer Bertha Mae Sands, Petty Officer Joy Moss; one (1)
sister, Thelma Neilly of Lower Bogue Eleuthera; five (5)
sons-in-law, Inspector Edney Gaitor, Lincoln Darville,
Julian Llyod, Gary Sands and Police Corporal 2241 Cyril
Anthony Moss; four (4) daughters-in-law, Natasha, Arnetta,
Sophia and Sylvia Frazer; numerous grand-children
including, Dominic & Edney Gaitor, Yvette Archer, Lincoln
Jr., Lazette Darville, Mario, Shandia, Jonathia, Jonique,
Johnson Jr., & Jonovia, Marguritta Basden, Tamara, Indira,
Lonette, Lonique, Londey Jr., Jermaine, Jenardo, Bertram
Jr., Jeraldo, Quenell, Jerano, Bertrannique, Remond Jr.,
Nevado, Nikel Frazer, Shantonne, Shantae & Deisha Llyod,
Gary Jr., Tenaz Sands, Dwight Baker Jr., Anthonique and
Antonesia Moss; Great-grand-children, Daija & Dabria and
Tion Gaitor, Brendan and Julian Archer Jr., Benjamin &
John Basden & Shanya Frazer; sisters-in-law: Geneva Kelly,
Shirley Johnson, Mara Cash and Olga Frazer; one (1) brother-
in-law, Harrison Kelly; two (2) grand-sons-in-law, Julian
Archer and Benjamin Basden; one (1) grand-daughter-in-
law, Vinette Gaitor; numerous nieces, nephews and other
relatives including, staff of the People Pharmacy, staff of
Mable Walker Primary School, Staff of Bank of Nova Scotia,
the staff of Main Operating Theatre P.M. Hospital, Fire
Branch of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, The Royal
Bahamas Defense Force, Rev. Carla Culmer and Wesley
Methodist Church family.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Evergreen
Mortuary Mackey Street, on Friday from 1 0:00a.m. - 6:00
p.m. and again on Saturday at the church until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Evergreen Mortuary |

EXCELLENT IM THE SERVICE WE. PROVIDE

For all of your Funeral Service Meads,
We will be pleased to serve you with honor

Tel: 242-794-7999

Fax: 242-3 04790

24hwe: 242-341-5309
or 322-3242

Celk565-9758

DEN ALBEE BE, PENN LF.DURE,

; Mackey Street Soarth
KAN AGING FUNERAL DIRECTOR

(Opposite Minute Muffler) Nassau, Bahaniat

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR 3

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 11

Keijero and Keisher Ferguson, Mannie, Corey and Sheena

: Brown, Carli, Wensel Newton and Dwight Newbold, Nursing
: Officer Sister Terry Bain, Attorney-at-law Linda Evans, Rev.
: Jeffrey Evans, A.S.P. Walter Evans, 1860 Rae Evans, Chrisitine
: Sawyer, Chantelle Gentle, Samuel Evans, Theresa Bonaby,
: Able Seaman, Sherry Gibson, Melonie Bodie, Phillip and
: Ricardo Whylly, a host of other relatives and friends; Basil
: Sawyer and family, Inez and Edward Harris, Theresa Smith
: and Iren from Miami Florida, Bernita Oliver and family Lilly
: McDonald and Family, the Thompson family, Maxine and
: Laurie, Ricardo Evan, Claudette and family, the Rahming
: family, the Sweeting family, the descendants of Thomas

Clarke and Family Almada Bowe, Anthony Adderley, Ethlee
Ferguson and family, Elizean and family, the descendant of

: Samuel Ferguson, the descendants of Marrie Bodie and

Carlies Lovise Ferguson-Sawyer, 65

of Rocky Pine Road and!
formerly of the Forest Exuma :
| will be held on Saturday at South :
Beach Union Baptist Church }
Summer Haven Estate off Blue :
Hill Road South at 1:00 p.m. :
Officiating will be Rev. Wilton }
McKenzie Assisted by other }
Ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will follow in:
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, :
JFK Drive.

Cherished memories are held by: Children: Rickey Sawyer, !
Ken Saunders (predeceased) Carla Mejias and Denise :
Ferguson-Hanna; Adopted daughters, Kizzy Brown and :
Cola Minns; Adopted sons, Prince Rolle, Alexander Phillips,
Trevor Sweeting, and Tyrone Clarke; One son-in-law, :
Baton Hanna; Two Daughters-in-law, Raquel Saunders :
and Simona Sawyer; grandchildren, Shavantae and Natijus }
Mejias, Olivia, Ishia, Reshae, Rickey Jr, and Akeel Sawyer, :
Kennen, and Kentonio Saunders, Dentawn Grant and Tanay :
Hanna; One sister, Bernadette Ferguson; Three brothers, :
Cedric Ferguson, Timothy Ferguson, and Benjamin :
Ferguson; One Aunt, Lillis Ferguson; five sisters- In- law, !
Edna, Jenny, and Helen Ferguson, Shirley Whylly and :
Eloise Sawyer; nieces and nephews, Elaine and Norman :
Lightfoot, Stephanie and Buster Evans, Keith and Kate }
Ferguson, Caron and Barry Brown, Hansel and Joann }
Ferguson, Shirley and Dennis Grant, Nikitha and Dennis :
Forbes, Sharinda and Wyberg Brown, Audrus and Tori }
Glinton, Terron and Tanya Armbrister, Dwayne and Stacia :
Davis, Anita and Leon Saunders, Sandra, Steve, Audrey, !
Brendell, Portia, Treaser, Florinda, Floyd, Fredrick, Terry :
and Crystal Ferguson, Tavari Armbrister, Bruno, Quincey, :
Stacey, Veronica Tina Moxey, Melvern Loyd, Valencia }
Moss, Norlaine, Normica and Niyah Lightfoot, Keilera, ;

: Family, Mary Clarke and Family, Shirley Davis, the
: descendants of Daniel Taylor and family, the descendants of
: Florence Clarke and Family, the descendants of J.B. Ferguson

and family and Ruthymae Ferguson and family, the Mortimer

: family, Melissa, Shantel, Bernadette, Charmaine, and Presilla,

Rose Curtis and Family, Shelia Adderley and Family, The
Armbrister Family, Wendy Darling and family, Arthur Bodie

: and Family, descendants of Peter Bodie and family, Levis

Farquason and family, the Brown family Natius Mejias,

: Roland Clarke and family, Ellen Wilkinson and the Gator

family, Michael Young and family, the Johnson family, the
Lowe family, the Wilderness Crew, Housekeeping Department
of Atlantis Royal Towers, Housekeeping of Crystal Palace,

: the Tour Desk Agents, The Community of Rocky Pines, The
: Wet Money Crew Cable Beach and The entire Forest Exuma
: Community.

: Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at Evergreen

Mortuary Mackey Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. - 6:00
p.m. and again on Saturday from 12:00 noon until service
time.

DEATH NOTICE

VERONIA AUGUSTINE, 65

of Strachan’s Alley off Kemp Road
died on Thursday, February 26,
2009.

She is survived by her husband,
Ulnickk Agenor; children, Berry,
Claude, Prince, Sonny, Lilian, Lucie
and Eddie Codet.

Funeral announcement will be
\) announced at a later date.


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

Evergreen Mortuary

EXCELLENT [MN THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE

For all of your Funeral Service Needs,
We will be pleased to serve you with honor.

Tel: 242-344-7999
Fox: 242-504 7000
24hrs- 242-341-5309
of 322-7242
Cell 565.9755

DENALEE E. PENN L.P.D.&E

Mackey Street South
MANAGING FUNERAL DIRECTOR

(Oppose Minute Mufther) Masse, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

EDVARD FICIEN, 32

of Balfour Avenue and
formerly of Port De Prince,
Haiti, will be held on Saturday
at Queen of Peace Catholic
Church, Faith Avenue at 3pm.
Officiating will be Father
Roland Vilfort. Interment will
follow in Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

) He is survived by one

daughter, Fmcisca Diana-
Ficien; father, Arnold Ficien of Haiti; mother, Almarie
Vincient; brothers, Saintamand Ficien of Haiti, Marc
Anthonie Ficien, Limage Ficien, Bolivard Ficien, Jean
Herold Ficien; sisters, Emilienne Ficien, Josianna Ficien,
Silvitha Ficien, Albertha Ficien, Anitha Ficien, Misleine
Ficien; uncles, Fernand Vincient of Miami, Willy Vincient
of Haiti, Willy Vincient of Haiti; aunts, Mrs. Fernand
Vincient of Haiti, Saintamse Ficien of Haiti , Saintamse
Ficien of Haiti, Orphise Ficien of Haiti, McNarcel Ficien
of Miami, Elianne Ficien of Miami, Mrs. Meriguesr
Toussaint of Miami; nieces, Bethsaida Ficien, Sancherley,
Berlauge, Dania, Marckenly, Widline, Asbina, cousins,
Corvensky Ficien of Ferlin Vincient, Jimmy Ficien of
Dama Vincent, Clerf Ficien of Sendy, Clint Ficien, of
Miami, Sony Ficien of Miami, Delius Vixamar, Georg
Joseph, Eugene Joseph, Richerson Jacques, Jacquessy
Jacques, Lesley Apliste, Jacques Ougustin, Eugene,
Rocine, Wilkens Elize, Michelet Jacques, Lo Jelusnia,
Alberta, Duvencia, Yolette, Altida, Roseline Ficien,
Elmisa Eugen, Ann Eugena, Ferlin Vincient, Fenly
Vincient, Damas Vincient, Sandy Vincient, Family and
Friend including, Tacy, Emilienne Tacy, Altanase
Ougust, Bernadin Toussaint, Wesley Toussaint, Frantz,
Anaise, Ilouis, Morice, Cerlus Renette, Duveny, Boline,
Manise, Odette, Ulrick, Jn Baptist, Nuclosse, Erilia,
Clias, Scanne, Jho, Bellot, Escarne, Fanelia, Dania, other
relatives and friends.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Vaughn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

TAMICA AGATHA
t Tammy te
STURRUP, 29

of Boilfish Drive will be held on Saturday
March 7, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at Epiphany
Methodist Church, Wulff Road.
Officiating will be Rev. Frederick Kelly,
assisted by Pastor Jacob Shaw. Interment
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Precious memories will forever linger
in the hearts of her parents: Linda E. Braynen-Cleare, Derek D. Cleare
and Min. Ethan G. Sturrup Fairweather; three children: Videll, Anfernee
and Crystal; grandmothers: Cleora Bryanen, Theresa D. Fairweather
of Fla., and Rosalie Cleare Munroe; grandfather: Basil Munroe; five
sisters: Mia Cleare Sturrup, Lindira Cleare, Ghandise, Elisa and
Lavenia Fairweather; two brothers: Ethan I and Ethan I Fairweather;
four nieces: Sha'Mia, Tiarah, Heaven and Adisher; two nephews:
Shannondoah Jr., and Ricardo Jr.; one brother-in-law: Shannondoah
Sturrup Sr.; twelve aunts: Joyann Braynen of Freeport, Catherine
"Kim" Woodside, Kelly Braynen, Paulette Ferguson, Barbara Jean
Percentie, Judith Albury of New York, Anthea Lewis of Freeport,
Cheryl Clarke, Ertha Knowles, Vanda Rahming, Vernita Cleare,
Georgette Rahming and Italia Whylly; fifteen uncles: Donnie, Marcus,
Chuck, Perry Braynen Sr., Burton and Floyd Cleare, Dedrick Rahming,
Michael & Mitchell Munroe, Eustace Sturrup of Abaco, Douglas
Sturrup of Tampa, Fla., Peter G. Bowleg of Atlanta, Georgia, Former
Sen. Trevor R. Whylly, Kenneth Ferguson and Andrew Albury of New
Jersey; grand aunts: Gladys Saunders of the Bluff, Eleuthera, Dency
Moss and Dorothy Fredric of Miami, Angela and Louise Kelly of
Freeport, Barbara Woods of Harbour Island, Regina Johnson, Totsie
Paul Albury of Fort Lauderdale, Sister Cecilia Albury; granduncles:
Rev. Frederick Kelly, Frank Kelly of Freeport, Harrison Barry of Bluff,
Eleuthera and Charles (Small) Naim; Godparents: Dianna Reckley,
Linda McDonald and Sgt. Anthony Saunders; one hundred and five
cousins including: Perry Jr. and Kelson Braynen, Davin Culmer of
Freeport and Shirley Bodden of the Bluff, Eleuthera; and a host of
other relatives and friends including: Theo and Ruth Tsvoussis and
the Staff of Dry Clean Alternative, Urban Renewal Project, Mr. Anthony
and Linda Duncombe, Marvin Duncombe and family, The Team of
Central Police Station, Samuel Higgs, Donnalee Cleare, Patricia
Fairweather, Dianna Pinder Rolle, Alvian Davis, Jewel Brown, Alovette,
Jackie and Marco, Shawn Deveaux, Hubert and Viola Lightbourne,
Dr. Winston Churchill Rolle, Maria Carey and the Frazier Family,
Lydia Hanna and Family, Ceclie Bonaby and the Staff of
Harbourside/Atlantis.

Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O. Jones
Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on Friday from
10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:00 a.m.
to service time.

Wulff Road and Primrose Street,
Opposite Studio of Draperies
Telephone: 326-9800/1 © 24 Hour Emergency
434-9220/380-8077


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 13

_Gommontrealth duneral Home

Independence Drive e« Phone: 341-4055

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR

ANDREW NAT
MONCUR, 54

affectionately called "Emperor"

of Church-hill Subdivision will be
held on Saturday 11:00 a.m. at
Evangelistic Temple, Collins
Avenue. Rev. Dr. Gary Curry,
assisted by Rev. Dr. Vaughan Cash
will officiate, and interment will
follow in the Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his memories: Mother: Mavis Moncur; Sisters:
Jenniemae Hutcheson, Dianne Thompson and Sophia Chandler
Brothers: Cleveland Moncur of Hollywood Florida, Ricardo,
Francisco And Valentine Chandler; Nephews: Dion Decosta,
Bjorn and Joseph Moncur, Terrel Williams, Francisco and
Ricardo Chandler, Dario Hutcheson, Plato and Caron Thompson
and Caden Rolle

Nieces: Takara Chandler and Sanea Colebrooke; Aunts: Naomi
Moncur, Rosemae Smith and Esther Minns; Uncles: Henry
Carter Moncur, Silbert Burrows and Neville Minns; Sisters-in-
law: Verlene Moncur, Courtney and Shenik Chandler; Brother-
in-law: Plato Thompson; Cousins: Judy Seymour, Yvonne
Rolle, Dave Williams, Melvise Glinton, Ian Smith, Shenna
Moncur, Christopher Moncur, Pastor Henry Roger Moncur of
Freeport, Sophia Christie, Lydia Thompson, Coleman Wring,
Christopher Minns, Kendal Smith of Dallas Texas, Tony Smith
of New Jersey, Tyrone Smith, Sara Saunders of Vero Beach,
Florida, Carla Floyd of Sebastian, Florida, Olivia Wells of
Melbourne, Florida, Tiffany Stubbs of Georgia and Jullian Smith
of Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Relatives and Friends: Eulie
Lafleur, Miriam and Emeline Seymour and Family, Margaret
Woodside and Family, Blossom Rolle and Family, Virginia Rolle
and Family, Merlene Decosta and Family, Cynthia Dean and
Family, Dorton and Elsie Chandler, Vernon Chandler and Family,
Jeffery Chandler, Curlene Williams, Ashton Henfield and Family,
Sandra Woodside, Oralee Maycock, Virginia Godfrey, Gerald
and Iris Cartwright, Rolley Gibson and Family, David
Lightbourne and Family, Bobby Lightbourne, Donna Nottage
and Family, Electa Lloyd and Family, Ms. Bain and Family,
Fannie Joseph, Lillian Prophet and Family of Miami, Florida,
the Evangelistic Temple Family, the Parish of Christ the King,
the Churchill Subdivision family, Henry Farrington and family
and Mrs Clarice Bain and many more family and friends too
numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may view the remain at THE CHAPEL
OF MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Friday from 11:00-6:30 p.m.
and at the church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to service time.

Retired
Prison Officer
LEROY LEONARD
DORSETTE, 66

of Pinewood Gardens will be held

{on Saturday 11:00 a.m. at

Evangelic Assembly, Baillou Hill

Road and Flemming Street. Pastor

Patrick V. Smith, assisted by

Pastor Sharon Nairn and other

Ministers of The Gospel will officiate and interment will follow
in the Old Trail Cemetery, Abundant Life Road.

Cherished memories are held by: Sons: Wesley Ford and Ricardo
Dorsette; Daughter: Royann Dorsette; Sisters: Sybil Nairn and
Jennie Smith ; Grand-children: Travis Evans, Deangelo, Darcel,
Gina, Darinique, Thorn and Tario Dorsette, John Darcy and
Wesney Forde; Great grand-children: Makai and Destiny;
Nieces: Charlene and Carvette Dorsette, Jacqueline Nairn,
Patrice Martin, Melinda Bowe, Margaret McDonald, Deborah
Llghtbourne and Karen Isaacs; Nephews: Carver Dorsette,
Barry, Sherman, Huel, Kendal and Drexel Nairn; Sister-in-law:
Margaret Woodside; Brother-in-law: Neville Woodside Sr.;
Grand nieces: Sandra Burrell, Karen Rolle, Deandra McDonald,
Krista Dean, Shakira Murphy, Melissa and Raquel Lightbourne,
Kendeisha and Keneisha Brown, Kenisha, Verinique and
Shenique Nairn; Grand nephews: Athama Bowe, Richard
Lightbourne, Matthew, Kendal and Patrick Nairn, Gregory,
Jamaal and Javon Clarke and Travis Williams; Other relatives:
the staff of WEMCO Secutirty and Her Majesty’s Prison, Dudley
McDonald, Edward Rolle, Anton Dean, Derrick Lightbourne,
Elder and Pastor Anthony and Sharon Nairn, Karen, Tanya,
Nina, Van, Neville, The Honorable Baron Woodside, Andrew
Davis and the entire community of Pinewood Gardens.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL
OF MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME,
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Friday from 10:30-6:30 p.m.
and at the church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m to service time.


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

Trurtiss dHemortal dortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 ¢ 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

oN

MOTHER AGNES
LOUISE GLASS, 85

of Third Street, Coconut Grove will
be held on Saturday at 11:00 A.M.
at Mt. Tabor Full Gospel Church,
Willow Tree Avenue and Mt. Tabor
Drive, Pinewood Gardens.
Officiating will be Bishop Dr. Lindo
Wallace and Bishop Neil Ellis.
Interment in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her husband of 66 years Leroy
Alfred Glass Sr., Six Sons Alfred (who predeceased her) Joseph,
Donald Sr., Leroy II, Wilfred and David Glass; Three Daughters
Sheila Glass-Frazier (who pre deceased her), Althea and Violet
Glass; One Step-daughter Virginia Bowe; Six Daughters-in-
law: Sybil, Emily, Daisy, Crecola, Gizelle and Mary Glass; Four
Brothers: Rev. Dr. Samuel, Daniel, Alfred and Amos Saunders;
Eight Sisters: Gloria Dorsett, Olga Higgs, Naomi Major,
Shirleymae Brown, Sylvia Charlton, Jenny Charlton, Brenda
Saunders and Mary-Ann Wilson; Five Brothers-in-law: Arthur
Dorsett, Sidney Major, Edward Brown, Levi Charlton and Anthony
Wilson; Two Sisters-in-law: Roslyn and Sarah Saunders. Twenty-
two Grandchildren: Darin, Brady Sr., Joseph Jr. (predeceased),
Tiffany, Dr. Donald Jr., Denver, LeeVant, Shannell (predeceased),
LaVaren, Carvyann, Cherylann, William, Geleesa, Yolanda, Jonel
and Joel Glass; Karen Johnson, Portia Johnson, Kathryn Gibson,
Ashva Kemp, Sharmane Miller and Lanet Rolle. Seven
Grandchildren-in-law: Elizabeth, Gabriel Johnson Sr., Ersley
Johnson II, Byron Miller, Wayde Rolle, Ramon Gibson and
Amanda Glass. Sixteen Great-grandchildren: Lakera, Brady Jr.,
Keeshad and Channell Glass, Shaneeseeanne Burrows, Ashley
Kemp, Jada and Michael Miller, Ersley III, Peyton and Eilyah
Johnson, Khaire, Khairon and Gabriel Johnson Jr., Shayla Rolle,
and Retyah Gibson. Special Friends including; Bishop Dr. Lindo
Wallace & Family, Mother Cynthia Pratt and Family; The Rose
Family, The Campbell Family, Brother Hubert Bowe & Family,
Lydia McKenzie & Family, Leonard Dames & Family, Elias Rolle
& Family, Brother Daniel Penn & Family, John Rolle & Family,
Willie Rolle & Family of Exuma, The Church of God Temple
Family; The Grant’s Town Seventh Day Adventist Family, The
3'¢ Street Coconut Grove Community and The Bahamas Taxi Cab

Union,. Special Thanks to Community Nurse Barnett; Charmaine
Williams, the staff of Accident & Emergency, the Staff of Female
Medical Wards 1 & 2 at the Princess Margaret Hospital and Dr.
Ilsa Taylor Grant and her team. A host of nieces and nephews
and other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson
Road and Fifth Street on Friday from 10:00 A.M. until 6:00 P.M.
and at the church on Saturday from 10:00 A.M. until service time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MOTHER MAUD
FERGUSON
CLARKE, 78

of Montell Heights and formerly of
Bottle Creek, Turks Island, will be
held on Saturday, March 7th at
11:00 a.m. at Pentecostal Church
of Faith in God, Bell Road, Montell
Heights. Officiating will be Pastor
Dean M. Wells, Jr., assisted by
Pastor Sam McIntosh and Apostle
Raymond Wells. Interment will
follow in Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish her memories are one daughter, Clarissa Neymour;
grandchildren, Sherman and Sharmene Smith, Lefred and Carla
Gaitor; 6 great grandchildren, Sherzel, Sherman, Jr., Stephon and
Solomon Smith, Clarissa and Celia Gaitor; one brother, Lambert
Ferguson; adopted children, Olive Kela Beckford, Maud, Auvell,
Gulema, Sharmaine, Jania, Macara, Khalia, Kevinguid, Kerinigue,
Austino, Sharon, Margaret Gardiner, Ethel Williams; one son-in-law,
John Neymour; one sister-in-law, Julia Ferguson; nieces, Maud Smith,
Diana & Amanda Ferguson, Patricia Williams, Evelyn Ellis, Mary
Wells, Annamae Missick, Hazel Bullard, Carolene, Sis & Lydia
Ferguson; nephews, Louis, Houston, Tyrone, Emmanuel, Rynell, Ken,
Wellington and Jonathon Ferguson, Eddie Taylor, Jacob and Steven
Campbell; grand nieces: Donna, Mary, Martha, Ruth, Brit, Raquel,
Tiffany, Patrice, Rose, Terry, Christine, Maria, Crystal, Kera, Beauthnie,
Sophia, Shandech; grand nephews: Pastor Dean M. Wells, Jr., Apostle
Raymond Wells, Rev. D'Angelo Missick, Howard, Steven, Edward,
Sammy, Joey, Kendo, Tristan, Christopher Gibson, Deneko, Bryant;
cousins including: Mila, Consuela, James, Timothy and Harold Gray,
Mable Leandra, Elva Ferguson, Alma Roberts, Pastor Sam McIntosh,
Rosalie Williams, Rosental Hanna, Patronella Barr, Bloneva Brown;
other relatives and friends including: Lane Stubbs & family, Ethel
Cleare & family, Marie Sumner & family, Veronica Moultrie & family,
the McQueen family, the Gray family, Teazel Bowe & family, Lucy
Weech & family, Beryl Henfield & family, Tryrone Strachan, Sony
Morley & family, Stephanie McKenzie & family, Corine Davis &
family, Bishop Edward & Mother Rosalyn Missick, Pastor Quebell
Martin & family, the Gardiner family, Henfield family, the Holbert
family, Franklin & Rose Johnson, Leslie Bowe & family, Mary
Rahming & family, Marietta Smith & family, the Ferguson family,
Godfrey Beckford, International Revival Fellowship Church family,
The Montell Heights Community, several god-children, and many
others too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers Chapel, #10
Palmetto Avenue and Acklins Street off Market and East Streets on
Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 15

Shreeling’s Dolontal
dHorhaary And Drematortin

84 Blue Hill Road ¢ P.O. Box N-8161 ¢ Tel: 325-7867
e Fax: 325-7867

: Colonial Mortuary and Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd.
: from 10:00am on Friday until 6:00pm and on Saturday
‘ from 8:30 am at the Church until service time.

MS. LINDA
ANISKA

ROLLE, 26

a resident of King Street, will be ;
held at Apostle of the End Time :
Church, Ferguson and West ;
Street on Saturday, 7th March, :
2009, at 10:00 a.m. Officiating :
will be Rev. Carlos Wallace. Interment will follow in the

Western Cemetery, Nassau Street.

Left to cherish her memories is her: Daughter: Shavanlay :
White; Mother: Erzulia Pierre; Father: Brian Rolle; Two :!

Brothers: Henry Rolle and Laven Stuart; Two Sisters:

Aunts: Jackie and Joyclen Pierre and Debroah Johnson;
Miami, Julien and Lucien Pierre of Haiti, Kenneth, Reuben,
Tyrone Rolle; Cousins: Gina and Bridgette Pierre of Haiti,
Miami, Maxwell, Terry and Gilda Pierre, Tah'Zyiion Gray,
Nathalie, Brenda and Susie Pierre of Miami, Raymund St.
Georges, Sylvia Thompson, Justina and Shelamea Adderly,
Bridgette, Porcia, Theresa Williams and Mark Johnson;
Pierre, Michael, Joanne and Charles Stuart, Dudley, Laam,
Andrea Jenoune, Annette, Brittney, Dominique, Lekiesha,

The King Street Family, Sam Smith Lane, Martin Street,
Hospital Lane and Tashanna Rolle and families.

MS. CHARITY
MARY BURNSIDE,
a7

a resident of Bernard Road, will
be held at St. Anselm's Catholic
Church, Bernard Road on
Saturday, 7th March, 2009 at 2:00
p.m. Officiating will be
Monsignor Preston Moss.

‘ Interment will follow in the Church's Cemetery.
Lavette and Lashan Stuart; Grandmother: Erzulie Pierre; :
Two Nieces: Shyniyah Miller and Tasarah Haley; Three :
: Amette Burrows, Derry Ferguson and Dellarese McPhee;
Fourteen Uncles: Gilbert, Harold and Claude Pierre of }
: and Alonzo McPhee; Two Adopted Daughters: Melissa
Elridge, Roscoe, Thadeus, Eric, Matthew, Alexander and :
: Brian, Aderia, Darrian, Antiniqua, Alexia and Razado;
Dr. Mark and Eugene Pierre of Colombia, Luke Pierre of ;
Boston, Lenousha, Kelie, Zukner and Ronald Pierre of }

Left to cherish her memories is her: Three Daughters:
Three Sons-in-Law: Bernard Burrows, Cavalle Ferguson
Burnside and Angelique Watson; Six Grand-Children:

Very Special Friend: David Rolle; Sister: Elizabeth Rolle;
Two Brothers: Cody and Isaacs Burnside; Uncle: Errol

‘ Johnson; Aunt: Miriam Symonette; Nieces and Nephews:
: Larry, Chuck, Venera, Franchot, Shadwell, Vanessa,
‘ Annishka, Firstina, Geronimo, Hosanna, Rosetta, Leroy,
‘ Adam, Leslienn, Jonathan, Gregory, Patrick, Shadrack,
and a host of other relatives and friends including: Seymore !
: Darling, Belinda and Jamie; Sister-in-Law: Pandora
Yolende, Kelly, Mekki, Cecilia, Thelma, Mary Owens, }
Tenisha Grant, Gloria, Nicole, Wentzy, Pamela Ferguson, !
: The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints Sweeting's
‘ Colonial Mortuary and Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd.
: from 10:00am on Friday until6.00pm and on Saturday
: from 9:30 am and at the Church from 1:00pm until service
The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints Sweeting's !

Benson, Euturpie, Ashley, WPC#2034 Paulette Douglas

Burnside; and a host of other relatives and friends.

time.


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

—

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emoriat Fiuners i

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Chagel

Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.

President/Managing Director

Pel, [buss (feb) pa ag af pa |
Ash jdt Gully eed pat pel poe jepsy
Po, tepity i Petal ey

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~THIGherISerpleclisitne Real MlEncel lence |

DEATH NOTICE / atta TNE SERVICE

DEATH NOTICE

Date of Birth: June 17, 1930
of Death: March 3rd, 2009

Mrs. Bessiemae Violet Greene nee
Strachan, 69 formerly of Mangrove
Cay, Andros, Bahamas and,
subsequently, a resident at #6 Pyfrom
Bend, Marathon Estates, Nassau, N.
| P., Bahamas died at the Princess
Margaret Hospital on March 3rd,

2009.
She is survived by Twelve Children:
Reverend Tyrone M. Greene, Joann Rolle, Stephanie Greene,
Elvamae Johnson, Elvis Greene, Jack Greene (Chicago,
Illinois), Jerome Greene (New York), Theola Edgecombe,
Sharon Evans, Ivan Greene, Miguel and Michelle Greene;
one aunt, [val Bain; Twenty-two Grand children: Othello,
Lashan, Lakera, Latoya, Tiffany, Quinton, Kristin, Bridgette,
Neville, Ryan, Lesceia, Marcus, Oneal, Brian, Julian, Shauntray,
Joshua, Garreth, Elvistina, Ivanique, Ashanti, Starasia, and
Ivan, Jr.; Eleven Great-Grand children: Oprah, Anphernique,
Mercedes, Danero, Arvin, Jr., Quintonique, Opal, Brittany,
Demaro, Paris, and Odessa; Two Sons-in Law: Gary
Edgecombe and Troy Evans; Three Daughters-in-Law: Linda
Greene (Chicago, Illinois), Dianne Greene (New York), and
Karen Greene; Three Brothers: Carlington, Sylvanus, and
Harold Strachan; Four Sisters: Leola Bullard, Francess Butler,
and Margaret Clyde and Keta Bannister; Brothers-in-Law:
Alexander Bullard, Edison Butler, Keith Clyde, Reliston
Greene, Otis Rolle, George Johnson, and Samuel Wright;
Sisters-in-Law: Maegrethel Strachan, Jacqueline Strachan,
Gerelean Rolle, Jestina Johnson, Heterlyn Wright, Maria
Bowleg, Angela Neymour, and Beverly Greene, Thirty-three
nephews, Thirty-two nieces, special friends: Reverend Harry
Davis, Vernal & Mavis Strachan and Anetta Rolle and numerous
other relatives and friends including nurse Denise Bowleg
Mangrove Clinic, Nelson and Godfrey Rolle, Dr. Magnus, Dr.

Bullard, Dr. Rhema and the staff of A & E Trauma facilities -

| at the Princess Margaret Hospital.
Mrs. Bessiemae Violet Greene nee Strachan, 69 |

Services entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel
Mount Royal Ave and Kenwood Street.

John Livingstone Hanna, 64

a resident of Moore Avenue will be
held on Saturday March 7th 2009,
10am at Church of God of
Prophecy, East Street Tabernacle.
Officiating will be Bishop Franklyn
Ferguson assisted by other ministers
of the gospel and interment will
follow in the Old Trail Cemetery
Abundant Life Road .

He is survived by a host of many

family and friends including,
cousins, Samuel Hanna, Albertha Kemp, Mazel Deveaux,
Irene Murphy of Nassau, Elmina Forbes, Daniel, Reverend
Ruben, Dr. Amos & Cox of Miami, Florida, Bishop Leviticus
H Cox of Texas, Elder James L Cox of Plant Cay, Fla., Ralph
Hanna of Orlando, Fla., Thomas, Sammy and Eaterlene
Edwards of Miami, Fla., and friends including Velma Humes,
Samuel Humes Jr., Netisha Rahming, Sanicka and Alvaree
Humes, Howard Kemp, Rev Donald and Paula Carey, Rev.
Tyrone and Dolly Knowles, Rev Jackson and Eunice, Patterson
and Patricia James, Elphraim and Silvia Jones, Charmane
Hanna and Paul Dyer, Lisa Monica Velthy, Sharmaine, Dwayne
and Jenald Deveaux, Berdimae, Melva and Mildred Cox of
Miami, Fla., Alins and Virginia Hanna, Hayward and Veota
Cox, Albert and Deaconess Ivadell Carey, Ineaz, Clarina,
Bishop Kirk Murphy, Gertrude, Derek, Derek and Marve
Murphy, Barrington Murphy, Lamuel Moss, Inell Williams,
Felton Cox, Bishop Franklin Ferguson and the Church of God
of Prophecy family and a host of other relatives and friends.

Services entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel
Mount Royal Ave and Kenwood Street.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 17

Aemeritte’s SJ uneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

KERRY
ROBINSON-
MUNNINGS, 38

Gardens, JFK Drive.

Beautiful and cherished memories will forever be embedded }
in the hearts of his family and friends especially his Mother: |
Drucilla Munnings; Father: George Robinson; Adopted }
Mother: Linda Demeritte; Stepmother: Cassandra Robinson; |
1 Son: Jason; Brothers: Kevin "K-Man", Stephen, Deon and }
George Robinson Jr.; Adopted Brother: Tereko Williams; |
Sisters: Sandra Evans, Sophia, Samantha, Italia and Bridgette
Robinson, Sabrina Wilchombe, Shantel Pitcher, Roquelle :
Pyfrom and Sharona Johnson; aunts: Cynthia Hanna, Elizabeth |
Munnings of Carol City, Florida, Audrey Davis & Patricia |
: Left to cherish his memories are, Father, Phillip Sturrup;
: sisters, Carolyn Taylor, Donna Smith-Wallace, Brendalee
: Williams-Sturrup, Phillipa and Portia Sturrup; brother, Bernard
: Taylor; aunts, Beatrice & Phyllis Taylor, Savaleta Minnis;
: uncles, Edward Adderley, Thaddeus Minnis, Samuel Taylor,
: James Miller; nieces: Jasmine Lewis, Yolanda Goodman,
: Caryn Francois, Shonte Sturrup; nephews: Jamaal Lewis,
: Antonio Francois, Karl Wallace Jr.; brother-in-Law: Karl
: Wallace; numerous other relatives and friends including
: Andrew Hillhouse, Henrietta and Valderez Miller, Diane,
: Leonard, Linda, Janet Taylor, Monique Simmons, Marguerite
: and Tamica Taylor, Carlton Seymour, Roberto Goodman,
: Rudolph Lewis, Andrew Campbell, Mable Adderley, Rosalie
: Neymour and family, Hetty Goodman and family, Lillian
Johnson and family, Louise Ritchie and family, Donald Rolle
: and family, William and Alexander Goodman, Mary Clarke
: and family, Millie, Margo, Donald Bain, the staff of Sandilands
: Rehabilitation Centre, the Young Street, Windsor Lane and
: Deveaux Street family.

the Agape Full Gospel Baptist Church, doctors and nurses at ;

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
: Saturday at the church from 8:45 a.m. until service time.

Robinson; 1 Uncle: Carlton Robinson; Nephews: Travis, Sean,
Kenzitte, Aidan, Brandon, Nathan, Deondre, Davonye,
Matthew; Nieces: Shacara, Kaylisa, Deonya, Shaynadia,
Shauna, Angel, Rachel and Taleigha; brothers-in-law: Kenrad
Wilchombe, John Pitcher, Richard Pyfrom and Tomicko
Johnson; Uncle-in-law: Jack Davis; Godchildren: Raya,
Samara, Nikki, Adrianna, Gavanne, Jamico; numerous cousins,
relatives and friends including: Frank Rolle, Mr. Tracy Johnson
and family of Raleigh, North Carolina, Beverly Robinson,
Drucilla Rodriquez, Cassandra Adderley, Michelle Knowles,
Maria Lewis, Carolyn Williams and family, Adrian Rolle,
Jason McBride, Tavaris Fowler, Ronald Holder, Dwayne
Sturrup, Marcellus, Rhonda Nixon, Melinda, Don, Erin Munez,
Maria Gibson and family, Georgina Robinson, Dwayne Lamm,
Cecil Mackey, Agatha Williams and family, Rosenell Dean,
Adrian Walkes and family, Big Mike and family, Mice, Ding,
Cuba, Vaughn, Yardy, Jah, Duane Miller, Jeffrey Strachan,
Anastacia Dorsett and family, Troy Levarity, Eddie, Dr.
Herbert Orlander and Marva, Overseer Helen McPhee and

Male Chest Ward - PMH, Mary Capron and family, Staff at
SuperClub Breezes especially the kitchen staff, Staff at
Radisson Crystal Palace, Farm Road Community, Staff of

i New Oriental Laundry & Cleaners, Cabinet World Softball
: Team, Transfiguration Baptist Church family, Michael
: Cartwright and family, Paul Barnett and family, Anthony
: Strachan and family, the Music Makers and One Family
: Junkanoo Groups.

a resident of Lundlow Street, will Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte’s Funeral

be held at Agape Full Gospel |
Baptist Church, Golden Palm :
Estates off Kennedy Subdivision, |
on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. }
Officiating will be Overseer }
Helen McPhee. Interment }
follows in Lakeview Memorial |

Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

RON
ANTONIO
STURRUP, 36

a resident of Windsor Lane, will
be held at St. Cecelia's Catholic
Church, 3rd & 4th Streets,
Coconut Grove, on Saturday at
9:45 a.m. Officiating will be Fr.
Simeon Roberts. Cremation
follows.


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Armeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

ARCHER, 85

Drive.

She is survived by her devoted husband of sixty-seven years, Bertram
Sr; six daughters: Jane Brown, Barbara Newbold, Debra Gibson, }
Laverne Rolle, Patricia Archer and Martha McFall; five sons: Bertram
Jr., Herbert, Mark, Franklyn and Sherwin Archer; seven daughters- ;
in-law: Lenora, Sylvia, Cynthia, Evamae, Janice, Mary and Annamae }
Archer; four sons-in-law: Quentin Brown, Kirklyn Newbold, Brian
Rolle and Nelson McFall; one sister: Reverend Merle Forbes; one
brother: Herbert McPhee; one brotherin-law: Noel Brown; forty- }
six grandchildren: Linda Sands, Cheryl Rollins, Quentin Jr., Jeffery,
Marcus, & Sgt. 87 Lex Brown, Bert, Giovanni & Brett Archer, ;
Clevette Gibson, Kamron, Kaivonne, Krishina, Shermaine & Keilya
Newbold, Adrian, Keno, Turkessa, Tavares, Shanera, Shakirio,

Shavargo, Shavonne, Shawn, Patrick, Mark, Jamal, Omar, Lateisha,

Williams, Nyoka & Shavonne Major, William and Enero Davis;
fifty one great-grand and numerous great-great grandchildren; twelve
nieces: Barbara Baillou, Ruthlee Pratt, Marva Black, Nellie Dean,
Olga Dawkins, Brenda Hall, Tiny Bowe, Betty Cox, Patrice Gardiner,
Beryl Basden, Joanna Bethel, Antoinette Ferguson; nine nephews:

Brown Jr., Leon & Kenny Edgecombe; twelve godchildren: Maureen,
Shavonne, Pastor Andrew, Charles, Eric, Nadine, Rhonda, Jackie,
Keith, Shanelle, Philip & Tyrone Brown; five adopted children:
Sandra Burrows, Karen Knowles, J'ann Davis, Renae Jones, Angela
Rolle; cousins: Euterpie Newbold; Dorith Grant, Eleanor Linden;
numerous other relatives and friends including: Doreen Brown, Bob
Saunders, Blossie Meadows, Winifred Forbes, Van Hutchinson, Bert
Williams, The Gilcud family, Gittens family, Burrows family, Higgs
family, Marilyn Johnson and family, Winifred Bain and family,
Daniel's family, Dawkins family, Stuart's family, Green family,
Nesbitt family, Boziene Town family, Helena Butler and family,
Rosetta Brennen, Dorothy Barr and family, Deacon AJ. & Gloria
Dorsette and family, Cornette Martin and family, Lycetta Adderley

family, Audrey Bastian and family, Josephine Burrows and family,
Lilly Fox and family, Georgiemae and Georgina Dean, Pearl
Butterfield, Leon and Annamae Taylor and family; special thanks

: to: Rev. Godfrey & Althea Hepburn and The Livelystone Church
MARTHA McPHEE ? and Highway Church of God, Bishop Clifford Rahming, Bishop
? Oswald Rolle, Bishop Sherwin & Dorothy Smith and The Good
: Shepherd Church of God Family, Church of God of Prophecy Wulff
a resident of Archers Close, Bozene }
Town, will be held at Livelystone | Seventh Day Adventist Church, Atlantis Housekeeping dept. &
Church of God, Knowles Drive, }
Tonique Williams-Darling Highway,
on Sunday at 12:00 noon. Officiating }
will be Rev. Andrew Brown, Bishop } Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on Sunday at the
Hubert Pinder & Bishop Godfrey
Hepburn. Interment follows in }
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK

Family, Bishop Hubert & Paulette Pinder, Bishop Robert McPhee

Road, staff of The Public Treasury, staff of Bahamasair, Hillview
Paradise Utilities.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

church from 1la.m. until service time.

FRANKLYN
OSWALD
LEOPOLD
RAHMING, 13

a resident of Cottonwood Street,
Pinewood Gardens, will be held at
Mt. Carey Baptist Church, Fox Hill
Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Enoch
Beckford II, assisted by Rev. Warren
Henderson & Elder Theodore

: Rahming. Interment follows in Mt. Carey's Church Cemetery.
Latara & P.C. 30578 Shayne Archer, Kadisha Saunders, Anishka

Knowles, Vernard, Trevor, Rashad & P.C. 414 Landrail Gibson, : Left to cherish his memories are his parents: Earnestine and Franklin
Tasia & Teron Rolle, Shakeisha Penn, Shaneka Davis, Tiffany | "Pancho" Rahming; Grandparents: Hesterlina and Prince Miller;
? Sisters: Dara and Japera Rahming; Nephew: Jalen Geason; Aunts
: and Uncles: Florence Kemp (Danny), Dudley McDonald (Margaret),
: Pamela Cox, Solomon Cox, Evangeline McDonald (Donald), Ernest
i Miller (Michelle), Lillian Moss, Audrey McKinney (Harry), Erma
on, : Mackey (Raymond), Jacqueline Armbrister (Arlington), Stephanie
Jacob & Phillip McPhee, Randolph Ferguson, Leon Forbes, Noel : Rahming, Tracey Rahming, Daniel Rahming, Sally Ferguson, Virginia
? Rahming; Godparents: Veronica Ward, Dianne Bannister, Brenda
i? Bostwick, Bill Wallace, Brenzil Rolle, Donald Cash; Cousins:
Doneva and Donathan McDonald, Ernelle and Ernest Miller, Maxiann
: Woodside (Barry), Daniel Kemp, Tanya Stubbs (Stephen), Freddy
? and Samuel Bain, Darrell, Juan, Kevin and Richelle Moss, Toni
: Cash (family), Tamu and Koji McKinney, Twana Lockhart, Khalil
: and Trequain Rahming, Tamika and Janiqua Armbrister, Anastasia
? Farrington (family), Safiya Major (family), Tresor Rahming, Terron
? Musgrove; The Miller Family, The Rahming and Cox Families, The
? Jordan Prince William School Family, Wesley Methodist Church
: Family, The Mt. Carey Baptist Church Band and Congregation,
: Domino Pizza and the Judicial Staff, Sports Department, Ministry
i: of Youth, Sports and Culture and many, many more.
and family, Marie Cleare and family, Gwendolyn Rowe-Bain and }

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
i Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the
? church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 19

Aemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ERNEST
JEREMIAH
SMITH, 82

at First Baptist Church,

Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

and Oswald Ferguson, Althea Rolle, Margaret Taylor,
Inspector Sidney, Reynard, John, Marlon and Corporal

Hilton Rolle, Baron and Norman Smith, Herman, Gretchen
' Bowe, Dion, Denise and Bertram Bethel Jr., Mildred
| Hendfield, Jackie, Blanche, and Donna Sears, Ian and
: Carlos Ferguson, Maxine Knowles, Arthur Ferguson,
: Latoya Rolle. Stacy Dames, Sherell Higgins, Raquel
Forbes, Orduna Hepburn, Const Lashawn Burrows, Jason

: Minnis, Luann Chea, Omar , Alex and O'Neil McKenzie,
a resident of Harry Cay, |

Little Exuma will be held Rolle, Mannix and Tiffany Barton, Sheree Minnis, Brian

Market Street, on Saturday Anderson, Therese Gardiner, Iris Paul, Const: 2972 Keisha
at 11:00 a — Officiatin Johnson, Winifred Newbold, Dr. Venard McPhee, Nurse
dic he Ree. De E ic : Gen Bowe, Sigrid Bain, Dwayne, Adrian, Sherrine, Elspeth
fae . 4 _ Bee Jackson, Stephen Hepburn, Tanya Rolle, Janice Bethel,
Louis Rolle & Associate Ministers Interment ‘ilowe in j Poa oak ey, ey ately Tommy ale Creel
. : Newbold, Kenyon, Karl, Karla, Kenrissa, and Oliva

: McPhee, Ezzerinne and Sandra Rolle; numerous relatives

Left to cherish his memories are his devoted wife of 53 pe eee ae jeekson ee
ears: Ellen Smith; adopted children: Ruth and Chnsto her Recheh Feeusou BOs ely ReOe my ney MGENEe)
Bullard: adopted pndcularee: Renaldo Swan and path pooner ere a a eae aa ee
ee ae oe oe eel Mai 4 Sithwand Remilds McPhee, Minister Catherine Saunders, Rev. Louis Rolle,
ee ; : Rev Harold Bodie, Mr. Anthony Moss Member of
Cooper; sisters-in-law: Hazel Smith, Bernice, Satara and }

Abe Bullard: ants: Ee Sawyer Rosai Dil and Rosatind Morey and family Theresa Blak an fai
and nephews Including: Kendal and Ethel McPhee, Retired {Dona ena rel Care Gomes pains Eeroy
Nursing Officer Gloria Gardner, Advilda Dames ‘Yvonne les SN ee a ay Mt one nae
Bethel, Shelia and Oralee McPhee Nurse Willamae _ and Molly Sapp, Emerson Smith, Shelia McKenzie, Rupert
Lotmore Marionette Strachan Naomi Sumner, Arnold : Sumner, Ikena Poitier, Cleveland, Basil and Arnold

dR on A aetan, Ragen Ma tha. Gla aca ‘amir Ferguson, Thomas, Rudy and Cleo Glass of Miami Florida,
fete ae a : ° ’ + Emma Brennen and family, Mary Knowles & Family,

: Helen and Warren Rolle and family, Joan Sawyer, Veronica

: Marshall Alexander Taylor and family, Clifford & Jr
Emest Mephos dor, Buri and Florida Rolle 147% | Sqachan an fal, God Son Creel Moly, Rey and
Henfj 1 dc oe Decherd Rake nae Minis ee Burnell : Mrs. Earl Francis, the entire Smith and Bullard Family,
Bullard a Mason Sane Ernestine Flowers, Hope ee
J ohnson. Sheila Roberts Charles Johnson, Michael Alfred 2 ee ey
Kirkwood Evnell Patrick and Patricia McKenzie J annette pps Canc tan y, ee a aeaea ees zig oo
and Theresa J phaser: Sandra Gibson Donna Hanna, Paula Government Clinic, George Town and Or bes Hill, Exuma,
Rolle, Elsie Winder, Patrick Smith, Kendal Reckley, especially Nurse Beth Coakley and Diane Cooper, E he
Sandra Ferguson, Johnathan Miller, Nelda Armbrister, ents REMY) Maly Say auc. Boros: atlamly,

Evie Wallace, Etta Johnson,Judith Strachan, Wellington : .. Hig
Gibson, Daniel Knowles, Berthamae and Barbara Marshall, | Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral

Synaida and Happy Brice; numerous Grandnieces and } re
Nephews including: Trudymae and Nicholas Smith, Anya | Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Tinker, Petra Rolle, Eula Morley, Drameco McKinney, :

Charlisa and Tina Nairn, Nestor Taylor, Kenny and Lerman

Parliament Exuma, Allan & Retta Dames and family,

Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Demeritte’s SH uneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

MORRIS
NATHANAEL
RUDOLPH
HEPBURN, 60

Archer.
Governor's Harbour Public Cemetery.

Left to cherish his fond memories his wife: Christine Hepburn;
daughters: La'kecia Rolle, Kristen Hepburn, Phyllis, Indira and Ishka; }
sons: Mauricio Hepburn, Michael Sr., Craig Sr. and Khlaas; i |
grandchildren: Devisha and David Brice, Khadesha, Michael, Alexander, }
Jaynne, Kentay, Addoniz, Selina, Syesha, Craig Mitchell, Alliyah }
Meadows and Khadesha Gibson; step-father: Jehu Sands; sisters: Judy :
Sands-Simmons and Sharon Sands-Johnson; sisters-in-law: Vashti :
Mitchell, Winifred Carter of Connecticut, Pearl Gayle of Boca Raton, :
FI. and Terricita Jones of Freeport; brothers-in-law: Paul Simmons }
Sr., Arthur Johnson and Richard Mitchell; aunts: Kathleen McKennie }

of Waukegan, Illinois, Prudence Knowles of Rock Sound, Eleuthera, Frances Farrington is survived by: husband Hillary Farrington; Sister-
: in-law, Viola Rolle; 9 children: Shirley Mae McKinney, Mrs. Shelia

Helen, Handora and Jeanette Ferguson and Rowena Rolle of Exuma; } Demeritte, Mrs. Diana Gilbert, Andrea, Henry, JoAnna, David, James

uncles: David Hepburn, Addington Culmer, Charles and Eardley { anq Eleanor Farrington of Miami Florida; 20 Grandchildren: Mrs.

Hepburn, Eric Cutis, Raymond Rolle of Gregory Town and Alex } Thelma Taylor, Min. Sherese Ferguson, Mrs. Malinda Gentle Smith,

McKennie of Waukegan, Illinois; granduncles: James Stubbs, Wesley : Sherrine and Kelsey Fisher, DeAngelo Johnson, Mrs. Michelle Collie,
i Valentino and Sharell Lewis, PC 447 Ricardo and Wendia Ferguson,

Sands, Daria and Daniar Johnson, Laurice Harrison, Mabel Darling | Tanya, Gary, Nicole, MaeAnn and Carlos Demeritte, Ciera Gilbert,

and Andrea Newbold of Freeport, Audrey and Joann Beneby, Elizabeth Pavid Jr, Farrington, Marvin Storr, Ashley Dean and Valentino

Penn, Donalee Ferguson of Opa Locka, FI., Patrice and Terricita McKinney of Atlanta, Georgia; 14 Great grand: Charles Jr., AI, and
i Chloe Collie, Bradley Wright, Afuah Johnson, Shekinah, Elkanak,

Keshona Sands; Nephews: Paul Jr., Pachino Simmons, Darron Sands, Elshadae, Shamaalye, Tia Strachan-Smith, Tykeio Taylor, Telsy Jr.,

Dario and Dino Johnson and Terrance Sands, Laurent Harrison, Angelo } x @zia and Shevrondecia; 3 Great Great Grand: Shakorey, Shacassio,

Brennen Jr., George Bonaby, Glen and Jeffery Beneby, John and James | ya7amanique; other relatives and friends: Maizer Kemp, Evangelist

Marshall; grandnephew: Robin Rankine; cousins: Melvina and Preston } Rudell Brisset, Shirley Strachan of the Cove, Cat Island, Etoy McKenzie,

Albury, Eleanor, Paula, Sandra, Linda, Eloise, Elizabeth, Deborah, : Eloise Ferguson, Stephanie Marshall, Alberta Smith, Louana Hepburn,

Lewis Jr., Sara, Benjamin, Kermit, Jackie, Naomi, Inez, Hilliard, Ruth, : Rosie and Claretta Mackey, Silvia and Nathalie Ramsey, Geniece

Louise, Carol, Christopher Sr., and Craig Lewis, Vernice, Devon, } Rolle, Deveese and Demeek Moncur, Hilbert Brooks, Silbert and

Delano, and Delmar Hepburn, Catherine Knowles-Stubbs, Cavin, Agarett Evans, Moses Deveaux, Norman Smith, Samuel and Carl

Carl, Corey and Crystal Knowles, Conrad Hepburn, Lashayne Johnson, : Mackey, Pastor Ellington Ferguson, Charles Collie and Stephen Gilbert.

and Keegan Culmer. A host of other relatives and friends including: } prince Hepbum, Mabel Newton, Jennis Woods, Nurse Linda Outten,
? Barbara Reckley, WPS 1641 Susan Smith, Brenda, Adriana and Stella

James Cistern, Eleuthera, Eric Johnson and family, Dewitt Fernander } Kelly, Ruth, Cieomi, Loretta, Bursel and Jerome Woods, Anthony

and family, Melvina Albury and family, Diane Gray-Ferguson and i Jones and Father Berkley Smith. Friends: Cynthia, Bertha, and Eva.

family, Patricia Thurston and family, Ann Wallace and family, Minister |
Leverne Rolle, Rev. Dr. Charles Rolle and Mt. Nebo Union Baptist } priends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

Church Family, Father Jonathan Archer of St Patrick's Anglican Church, ! Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the

Governor's Harbour, Minister Lanora Davis and family, Exanna : shnneh ton 100 a.4n: antl service Tine,

Dormeus and family, Arnett Dorsett and the staff of National Literacy ;

Andrea Hanna and Rose Nairn; grandaunts: Susan Clarke, Merlene,

and Perry Ferguson; nieces: Shekera Sands, Pryia Simmons, Ladarsia

Mitchell; grandnieces: Danae Rankine, Darrinique, Darronise and

Queenie Gibson and family, the offspring of the late Labon Rolle of

i services, Pastor Joseph Cox and El-Shaddai Ministries International,
: The Bahamas Red Cross Society, Dr Delton Farquarson, Doctors and
i Nurses of Male Surgical Wards I & II, the Medical staff of Male
i Medical II of the Princess Margaret Hospital, the Fowler Street
i Community, the Governor's Harbour Community, the James Cistern
i Community and Demeritte's Funeral Home.

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

sig Gna ales See Gene Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Thursday & on Friday at the
formerly of Governor's Harbour : church in Eleuthera from 6:00 p.m. until service time on Saturday.
Eleuthera, will be held at St. Patrick's }
Anglican Parish, Governor's Harbour, }
Eleuthera on Saturday at II :00 a.m. }
Officiating will be Fr. Jonathan }

Interment follows in :

FRANCES
ROBERTS
FARRINGTON, 81

a resident of #15 Kiki Street &
formerly of Cove, Cat Island, will be
held at Our Lady of the Holy Souls
Catholic Church, on Saturday at 12:00
noon. Officiating will be Fr. Michael
Kelly, ss.cc., assisted by Rev. Deacon
Peter Rahming & Rev. Deacon
Maxwell Johnson. Interment follows
in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 21

‘© ) Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

WINSTON
ALEXANDER
MONCUR, 91

OF WULFF AND VILLAGE

ROAD WILL BE HELD ON

SATURDAY, MARCH 7TH,

9:00 A.M. AT ST. GEORGE'S §

ANGUCAN CHURCH,

MONTROSE AVENUE. FR. G.

KINGSLEY KNOWLES,

ASSISTED BY FRE.

KIRKLAND RUSSELL AND

REV. DR. ROLAND HAMILTON WILL OFFICIATE.
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOWIN THE EASTERN CEMETERY,
DOWDESWELL STREET.

Catechist Hartman Moncur; one step brother, Jonathan Johnson;

Pratt, Vander, & Pandora Johnson; 2 sisters-in-law, Leen & Laura

Willisy, & Montgomery Brown, Tyrone Strachan, William Bullard,
Roman Nicolls, & Baldwin Johnson Sr.; nieces, Mavis, Deanna,
Eloise, Judy, Hattie, Zona, Laura, & Florence Moncur, Nurse
Rose, Patsy, & Cyprianna Strachan, Lennor Johnson, Icelyn
Nicolls, Rosemary Archer, Janet & Elmeda Brown, Louise
Beecham, Telma Seymour (of Florida), Louise Sutherland, Pearl
Bullard, & Sheila Gordon; grand nephews, Leroy, Patrick, Jeffery,

Shayne, John, Myron Jr., Deran, Everette Jr., Myles, Miguel, Eric,
Kennedy, Adrian, Halson, Sadaam, Jason, & Jeffery Moncur,
& Larry Major, Richard, Christopher, Andy, Ian, Montgomery, &

& Tyrone Hepburn, Walshaw & Darren; grand nieces, Daryl
Poitier, Tamara Collie, Anya Miller, Rose Leen, Melanie, Laurie,

Dr. Marissa, Chrystal, & Jacquice Moncur, Jewel Moss, Marie &

, Nicole Smith, Romain, Romania, Ramona & Nicolls, Kendra
| Sands, Ceandra & Deandra Stubbs, Prisca Bannister, Tiffany
| Hanna, Racquel Strachan, Sophia McKinney, Kay, Denise, &
| Susan Hepburn, Renae Davies, Pat Albury, Arlett Morley, Tiffany
| Brown, Luekimia, Cookie & Candy Seymour; cousins, Lemuel,
| Maxwell, Devese, Cecil, June, & Mr. & Mrs. Eris Moncur, Lenny
| & Anthony Cumberbatch (of Freeport Grand Bahama), Horatio
/ Bannister, Ophelia Munnings, Maxine Stevens, Sandra Collie,
| Lauretta Minnis, Marina Basden, Madlyne Hanna, Maria, Gershen,
} | & Corrol Strachan, Miriam, Netta, & Althea MacMillian, Deann
| | Fritzgerald, Leila & Prescola King, Princess Roberts, Andrea of
| Florida, Nurse Enid Sawyer, Iris & Doramae Seymour & Hazel
| Brown (of Smith's Bay, Cat Island); other relatives & friends
| incuding, Felix, Patrick, Father Edward, Eloise, Norman Lilly,
| David, Clifford, Melvin, Ozwell, Warren, Earl, Earleen, Hilda,
| Mildred, Elmore, Lemonde, Robert, Wilerforce, Stanley, Garnet,
| Rupbert, Daniel, Mary, Clifton, & Everette Seymour (of Hatchet
_ Bay, Eleuthera), Rev. Dr. Gamet, Osbourne, Paul, Garth, Whitney,
_ Elaine, Joseph, James & Simeon King, Ceasarine Hepburn, Cabrina
| Adderly, Athama & Anthony Bowe, Mr. & Mrs. Wenzel Nicholls,
LEFT TO CHERISH HIS MEMORIES ARE, one brother, | Rosa Belle Bethel, Shirley Gibson, Milcha Sullivan, Nora Newbold,
’ ; : | Cynthia Stubbs, Mr. & Mrs. John Deveaux (of Smith's Bay Cat
5 step sisters, Astrid Adderley, Louise Gomez, Nurse Isabelle _ Island), Pearl Laing, Jelita Poitier, Mary Farrington, Edris Edwards,
| Louse Rolle, Lillian Newbold, Shakita & Isadora Bethel, Andy

Moncur Both of Knowles, Cat Island; nephews, Caleb Hepburn, | Gomez, Alton, John, Gayle, Nelson, Fordes, & Agatha Moncur,

Sidney, Wendel Sr., Caleb, Edward, Philip Sr., Cephas, Myron, | Christian Knowles, Joseph Strachan, Jennifer Lloyd, Esther

Henry, & Everette Moncur (of Coral Springs Florida), Joseph, _ Thompson, Edna & Felix Russell (of Grand Bahama), Emily Bain,
| Vangeline Grant, Eugie Cadet, Atlanta Rolle, Myrton Simms,
| Ellison, Ashton, & Desmond Greenslade, Orick Pratt, E. K. Minnis,
| Pastor Roy Hanna, Pastor Wendall MacMillian, Pastor R. I. Hanna,
| Lucia Rolle, Anthony & Alex Knowles, Roland, Rodney, &
| Veronica Brown, Pernell Edwards, Dr. Joseph Evans, The Staff
| Male Medical II of Princess Magaret Hospital,The Moncur,
= | Seymour, King, Adderley, Bannister (of Tea Bay, Cat Island &
Julian, Wendel Jr., Allen, Edison, Wayne, Philip Jr., Rayal, Navardo, | staniard Creek, Andros), Hepburn, Johnson (of Staniard Creek,
| Andros), Strachan, Turner, Greenslade, Edwards, Pratt, Lightbourne,
| Dorsette, & Deveaux Family, the entire community of Knowles,

Jensel Watkins, Baldwin Johnson Jr., Franklyn, Mustapha, Edward, | gmith's Bay & Tea Bay, Cat Island, The Culmer's Ville, Hawkins

Trevor, Everette & Brent Strachan, Kevin Taylor, Garth, Albert, | yt], & Canaan Lane community of New Providence and other
| friends & family too numerous to mention.

Nolan Brown, Harry Murphy, Craig & Rudolph Nottage, Dawyne |

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECTS AT BETHEL
ao . é | BROTHERS MORTICIANS, #44 NASSAU STREET ON FRIDA
Priscilla, Esther, Latoya, Verlisa, Shameka, Myra, Monet, Miracle, | Y FROM 10:00 A.M. TO 6:00 PM. AND ON SATURDAY AT

| THE CHURCH FROM 8:00 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

STELLA MAE
SAW YER, nee ROLLE,
52

:
; Cemetery.

Rolle, Sandy Rolle, Charlene Rolle, Sheila Smith and family, family

, Oliver and family, Leslie Curtis; godchildren, Aljamon Francis, Stephana
' Nicholls and Jada Deal, and countless other friends and relatives,
: Angela Neely, Arlene Nicholls, Joann Sands, Jeanette Francis, Dr.
i Jennifer Deveaux, Tyrone Palmer, Percy Miller and family, the children
| of Alfred and Mary Brown, the Thompson's, the Curry, the Palmers,
| the Roberts and Francis families of St. Paul Street Chippingham,

of Victor Road Coral Heights West, will |
be held on Saturday, March 7, at 11 a.m. | |
1 at Golden Gates Ministries, Carmichael] | Ferriston Lockhart, staff of Ernst and Young, Cheryll Newell and

Road, Pastor Ivan D. Rolle will officiate. |

Interment will follow at Lake View | Heart Association, Pastor Ivan and Ruthann Rolle, members of Comfort

| House Ministires, Pastor Cleon and Vonchelle Munroe and members
| of Firm Foundation Ministries, Pastor Graylin and Jannie Moxey and
Stella's life touched so many and she | family, the Mangrove Cay, Andros family, Aquinas College Class of
has left to cherish memories, husband, Timothy Sawyer; daughters; | 1974,
Letisha Paul, and Eugeneal Sawyer; sons, Renaldo and Stefan Sawyer; | . .
step son, Sanjay Sawyer; son-in-law, Sarrazian Eric Paul; grand | In leiu of flowers donations can be made to The Bahamas Downs
daughter; Gabrielle Paul; sisters, Thelma Johnson, Janet Mackey, June | Syndrome Association and Bahamas Heart Association.
Dean; brothers, Eleon Rolle, Nicholas Rolle, Herman Rolle; step | ; ; a
mother-in-law, Patricia Sawyer; sisters-in-law, Karen and Pia Rolle, | Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Zoe Major, Carlis Lightbourne, Lenora Albury, Kim, Rev. Denise, Faye, | Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
Anne and Nancy Sawyer; brothers-in-law, Alvah Johnson, Christopher | at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.
Mackey, Larry, Brian, Oscar, Alvin and Odinga Sawyer; nephews, Rev. |
Julian Johnson, Fabian, Kevin, Omar, Doyle, Patrick, Aaron, Hermis |
and Cameron Rolle, Torell Thompson, Jermaine, Christof and Jervon |
Mackey, Angelo Hield, Wayde Beneby, Eddie and Jevon Major, Alex ;
and Myles Sawyer, Mark King; nieces, Barbara King, Denise Sands, |
Lisa and Valencia Johnson, Theria and Toya Thompson, Shivanthi Hall, ;
Erica Rolle-De Luca, Monique, Aquilla, Talia, Lauren, Kaylee and |
Janea Rolle, Angelique Hield, Crystal Mackey, Tameka Beneby, Allisa |
Morris, Dawn Calixte, Shawnta and Anita Lightbourn, Lauren Albury, |
Brianette and Bianca-Sawyer; aunts, Kathrina King, Doris Moxey, |
Emerald Jones, Lorraine Sawyer, Gladys Taylor, Lola Major, Alma |
Canty, Patricia Rolle, Eloise Johnson; uncles, Moody and Wilton Moxey, |
Hubert King, Henry Sawyer, Percival Higgs; grand nieces, Fabianne, |
Fayonne, Gia, Ashley, Thalia and Olivia Rolle, Tanisha Sands, |
Andrewnique Knowles, Maghan and Marrissa Johnson and Tiamone |
Sweeting, Ayani Bailey, Laila McKenzie; grand nephews, Beres and_ |
Davario Rolle, Ty and Trae Sands, Mark King Jr., Wayden Beneby, | FOLLOW IN THE SOUTHERN CEMETERY, COWPEN ROAD.
Tevon and Ryan Johnson, Tavares Roker, Malik Knowles, Orville | ; ; ‘

Arahna and Marcian Thompson, Relatives Elon and Beryl Moxey, | She is survived by one (1) grand nephew, Samuel Sweeting; grand
Henrietta King, Brenda Mitchell, Arinthia Moxey, Sammy, Archiemore, | niece-in-law, Natasha Sweeting; great-grand mieces and nephews,
Floyd, Clay, Prince and Densa Moxey, Doranell Gibson, Donnalee | Sammella, Samanpha, Danyelle and Nathaniel Sweeting; friends and
Burrows, Prenell Rolle, Jacqueline King, Carolyn Williams, Rochelle | family, Robert and Amy Miller, Arnand and Eric Miller, Valerie McBean,
and Brenard King, Joanne Demeritte, Leonard and Stephanie Longley, |
Geraldine Ferguson, Leonie and Alpheus Jones, Victor Rolle and family, | Vera Chase, Neta Seymour, Merline Stubbs, Allan Stubbs, Kenrick
Roland Rolle and family, Majorie Stuart and family, Lorraine Clarke |
and family, Ambassador Davy Rolle and family, Wendy Craigg and |
family, Dr Christopher Basden, Archbishop Partick C Pinder, Rev. |
Samuel Pinder, Paulette Turnquest, James Pinder, Pat Sawyer, Faye | BROTHERS MORTICIANS, #44 NASSAU STREET ON FRIDAY
i FROM 10:00A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. AND ON SATURDA Y AT THE

of the late Nora and Bosie Miller, Doris Burrows and family, Nicola |

Everette Jackson and family, Inez Paul and family, the Coral Harbour
Community, Danika James, Monadue Steede, Carol Mackey, Dr.

members of the Downs Syndrome Association, members of the Bahamas

CORDELLA
STUBBS, 81

OF LIFEBUOY STREET, OFF EAST
STREET, AND FORMERLY OF
HANOVER, JAMAICA, WILL BE
HELD ON SATURDAY, MARCH 7,
11:00 A.M. AT CHRISTIAN GOSPEL
CHURCH, FLINT AND
HONEYCOMBE STREET. PASTOR
DWAYNE WRIGHT ASSISTED BY
PASTOR ANTHONY NEWTON WILL
OFFICIATE. INTERMENT WILL

Mary Stubbs, Nurse Monique Hutchinson, Patrice Ellis, Cynthia Gibson,
Stubbs, Lora Stubbs, the Butler Family, and the Church Family.
FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECTS AT BETHEL

CHURCH FROM 10:00 A.M. UNTIL SERYICE TIME.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

EULAH MAE
FRANCIS, 77

OF THOMPSON COURT, OAKES
FIELD WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, MARCH 7TH, 3:00 P.M.

AT ST. MATTHEW'S ANGLICAN
CHURCH, EAST SHIRLEY STREET.
ARCHBISHOP DREXEL GOMEZ

foem ASSISTED BY FR. JAMES
fae) MOULTRIE, FR. DON HAYNES
ey AND ARCHDEACON JAMES
PALACIOUS WILL OFFICIATE.
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE CHURCH'S CEMETERY.

She is survived by two grandchildren: Shannon and Shennique Davis;
Sister-in-Law: Mrs. Maria Francis; Nieces: Angela & Lorenzo Gibson
(Kwasi & Laurel) Denise Francis (Andre Hayne) Elaine & Raymond
Collie (Raynell) Mrs. Ethel Rolle, Patrica and Freddy Mackey, Carmen
Ingraham, Faye & Jeffrey Swaby; Nephews: Dr. Rudolph & Mary
Francis, Omari & Dr. Shani Francis-Smith, Tellis & Doris Ingraham,
Nigel & Ann Ingraham, Larry & Patrice Ingraham, Chef Don &
Michelle Ingraham, Howard Ingraham. RELATIVES: Mr. & Mrs.
William Lightbourne & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Francis & Family,
Basil Francis & Family, Ms. Dorothy Davis, Mr. Wendell Francis &
Family, Mrs. Thelma Ford & Family, Archbishop Drexel & Mrs.
Gomez & Family, Myrtle Gomez, Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Gomez &
Family, Dr. Perry & Mrs. Gomez, Mr. & Mrs. Roger Gomez & Family,
Anita & Antonia Roberts, Miss Veronica Gomez, Leonie McCartney,
Ophelia Fox, Naomi Gomez, Bloneva Rahming, Peggy Francis, Mr.
& Mrs. Rodney Heastie & Family, Ms. Brenda Heastie, Miss Annette
Heastie & Family, Mrs. Carolyn Heastie & Family, Ms. Karen Jervis
& Family, Mrs. Pauline Bastian & Family, Mr. & Mrs. Tyrone Heastie
& Family; Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Rodgers & Family, Ms. Coralee Heastie,
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Heastie & Family, The Stuart Family, The Pople
Family, The Woods Family, The Braynen Family, The Gomez Family
& The Francis Family; SPECIAL FRIENDS: Mr. Lowell- Mortimer,
Mrs. Yvonne Bethel, Sir Orville & Lady Turnquest, Sir Cyril & Lady
Fountain, Dr. & Mrs. Austin Davis, Ms. Alicia & Lewis White &
Family, Mr. Samuel Spence, Mr. & Mrs. Nathaniel Levarity & Family,
Dr. David Barnett, Ms. Constance Mackey & Family, Mrs. Christine
Rolle, The Mortimer Family, Mr. & Mrs. Edward Williams, Mrs.
Sonia Dames, Mrs. Stella Nicholls, Ms. Pat Bowe, Mrs. Dorothy
Ferguson-Horton, Mrs. Constance Lunn, Mrs. Maxine Eldon & Family,
Mrs. Trudy Miller, Mrs. Geneva Thurston, Mr. George & Satella Cox,
Mrs. Orry Sands, Mrs. Margaret Claridge, Ms. Cynthia Donaldson,
Ms. Olga Reid, Mrs. Lovely Forbes, Mr. Ivan Conliffe, Sandra Mackey,
Juliette Barnett, Claudette Allens, The Pedal Pushers - Corrine Fountain,
Mavis Adderley, Edith Powell, Beryl Campbell, Grace Wallace, Louise
Gibson, Patricia Treco, Roberta Sands, Inez Saunders, Hyacinth
Saunders, Clara Gibson, Dawn Arnold, Ehurd Cunningham, Shirley
Francis. The Altar Guild & St. Mathews Church Family, Archdeacon
James & Angela Palacious, Fr. James & Mrs. Moultrie PHD., Fr. Don
Haynes.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECTS AT BETHEL
BROTHERS MORTICIANS, #44 NASSAU STREET ON FRIDAY
FROM 10:00 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. AND ON SATURDAY FROM
10:00 A.M. TO 12:30 PM. AND AT THE CHURCH FROM 1:30
P.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009, PAGE 23

diatler’s Huneral Home

& Qrenatortiun

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Funeral Announcement For

MRS. CARMEN
TURNER
BODIE, 82

of 5th Street, Coconut
Grove and formerly of
Tea Bay, Cat Island will
be held on Saturday at
11:00 a.m. at Christ the
King Anglican Church,
Ridgeland Park.
Officiating will be Rev'd Rodney Burrows, assisted
by other members of the clergy. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

She is survived by Three (3) Daughters:
Esthermae Bodie, Annamae Farquharson and
Sandra Bodie-Smith; Two (2) Sons: Terrance and
Vernon Bodie of Fresh Creek, Andros; Three (3)
Brothers: Cedric, Leland and Eric Turner; Eight
(8) Grandchildren: Shannon Nicole Johnson,
Tanya and Leo Farquharson Jr., Tyrone Kellman
Sr., Tremaine Bodie, Thalia Bodie, Deandra Smith
and Chevette Russell; Seven (7)
Greatgrandchildren; Two (2) Daughters-in-
Law: Jane and Renae Bodie; Two (2) Sons-in-
Law: Force Chief Petty Officer Hubert Smith and
Leo Farquharson Sr.; Eight (8) Sisters-in-Law;
Mildred, Leoni and Agnes Turner of Miami,
Florida, Anita, Ulean, Dotlyn, Grenelda and Ethel
Bodie; Three (3) Brothers-in-Law: Carlton,
Harold and Israel Bodie; Numerous Nieces and
Nephews and a host of other relatives and friends
too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’
Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Blue Hill Road
& Oxford Avenue on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until
service time at the church.


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

diutler’s Muneral Homes & Drematorim

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

MS. ELEANOR
MAE BUTLER, 64

=) | of New York and formerly of |

ie | Mason’s Addition will be held }

"| on Saturday, March 7th, 2009 |

~ | at 9:00 a.m. at Zion Baptist :

Church, East and Shirley :

Streets. Officiating will be |

y} Pastor T.G. Morrison, assisted |

by Rev. Anthony Sampson. }

Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier }

Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her son: Echendu

Sisters: Sister Mary Johnson and Mrs. Sheila Ferguson
of Freeport, Grand Bahama; Three (3) Sisters-in-law:

including Caregivers at Metropolitan Hospital, New

Margaret Hospital, Pastor George Kelly, Officers and
members of Metropolitan Baptist Church, Rev. Betty

to mention.

; church on Saturday from 8:00 a.m. until service.

MRS. VALERIE
RENIA
KNOWLES, 31

of Baldwin Avenue will be
} held on Saturday, March 7th,
| 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at New
Destiny Baptist Cathedral,
) Blue Hill Road. Officiating
will be Bishop Delton D.
Fernander, assisted by other

| ministers of Religion. Interment will follow in

. ee Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
Nwanodi; Daughter-in-Law: Yuka Shimizu Nwanodi; }

Six (6) Sisters: Sylvia Demeritte-Forbes, Kathleen |
Demeritte, Dorothy Dames, Marjorie Johnson, Joan }
Butler and Rosetta Johnson; Two (2) Brothers: Charles :
Butler of California and Tellis Butler; Two (2) Adopted }

Left to cherish her memories are her husband: Samuel
Knowles Jr.; Parents: Russell and Sylvia Davis; Five
(5) Stepchildren: Ntieado, Juerissa, Theodore, Samdon

: and Samgie Knowles; One (1) Sister: Sonia Grant;
: One (1) Brother: Edwin Evans; Grandmother:

a | Nathalie Butler; Grandfather: Thomas Moss; Two
Virginia, Coralee and Thelma Butler; Four (4) |

Brothers-in-Law: Charlie Forbes, Leonard Dames, |
Maxwell Johnson and Clement Johnson; Two (2) :
Aunts; Alice Rosmond Tucker and Clara Gibson of |
Miami, Florida; Numerous Nieces, Nephews and :
Cousins and a host of other relatives and friends |

(2) Nieces: Racquel Renia Russell Davis and Jasmine
Grant; One (1) Nephew: Brandon Grant; Father-in-
Law: Samuel Knowles; Mother-in-Law: Lucinda
Knowles; Seven (7) Sisters-in-Law: Kathleen, Diane,
Marion, Lucille, Beatrice, Albertha and Paulamae;
Three (3) Brothers-in-Law: Ruel Grant, Livingston

: and Phillip Knowles; Nine (9) Aunts; Eighteen (18)
York, The Physiotherapy Department of Princess ! uncles; Godchildren: Tahje, Francis, Xavier, K.K.,
: Hakeem and Javan; Numerous Cousins, Grandaunts,

L i Granduncles and a host of other relatives and friends
of New York, Pastor T.G. Morrison and the family of |

Zion Baptist Church and many others too numerous |
: Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral

a : ' Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral :

Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on |
Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the |

too numerous to mention.

Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the
church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until service.






THURSDAY
Carey Alby



Pg, 25 The Tribune

alee
= EN AWAY
== STORIES
2 ie
CHURCH

EVENTS
PG 26 ® Thursday, March 5, 2009

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE Church of God of
Prophecy (CGP) this year is
celebrating its centennial
anniversary, where it will
honour and remember some
of its founding leaders, and
from March 8-15, host its
88th annual National
Convention of the Church of
God of Prophecy of the
Commonwealth of the

Bahamas.

In 1909, the first ever local Church
of God was established through Taylor
Street, where it was then known as the
Stanley Jumper Church - named after
the church‘s pastor Reverend Stanley
Ferguson.

The church which stands as the old-
est pentecostal ministry in the
Bahamas, according to some of its
leaders has over the years survived
criticism from outsiders who viewed
initial followers as crazed fanatics.

According to Bishop Franklin
Ferguson of CGP East Street, this
anniversary stands as a living testimo-
ny to those who would have laboured
in the early days to secure and validate
the development of the church.

“This anniversary is significant
because over the years, we have been
able to see the development of our
people who have come from a time
where we were scorned, looked down
upon, and recognised as a people who
were crazy, which was how we got the
name “jumpers.”

He said as a people, the church has
been continuously blessed by God in
being sustained by His grace, and is
able to say after 100 years that God’s
truth has cemented its place as a
church of integrity and truth.

Over the years, some of the defining
moments for CGP included the
appointment of the first Bahamian
overseer Rev Stanley Ferguson, who
served in that position from 1924 to
1934.

That year, Rev Ferguson was suc-
ceeded by Bishop Alvin S Moss who
filled the role up until 1974. For the
next 25 years, Bishop Brice H
Thompson served as overseer where
he was replaced by the current Bishop
Elgarnet B Rahming.

Another historic year for the CGP
was 1929, where at that time it held its
first local convention.

Bishop Ferguson also said: “We
have moved on from having services in
houses and under trees, to structured
churches, and even our members have
moved from people who were consid-
ered undereducated to functioning to

SEE page 31

RELIGION

‘JUMPER CHURCH’ LEAPS TO

100 year
milestone



CTA HL TSO

The Tribune

CSI

WORLD DAY OF PRAYER

eThe World Day Of Prayer
Committee invites members of the
public to attend the World Day of
Prayer service and fellowship meal on
Friday March 6, at 7pm at The
Salvation Army Citadel, Mackey
Street. The evening’s speaker will be

Reverend Angela Palacious who
will speak on the theme: “In Christ
There Are Many Members Yet One
Body"

World Day of Prayer is a world-
wide movement of Christian women
of many traditions who come togeth-
er to observe a common day of
prayer each year, and who, in many
countries, have a continuing relation-
ship in prayer and service.

It is a movement initiated and car-
ried out by women in more than 170
countries

and regions, with one highlight
being the annual day of celebration
being held the first Friday of March.

The movement brings women of
various races, cultures, and traditions
in closer fellowship, understanding,
and action throughout the year.

Through World Day of Prayer,
women around the world, affirm their
faith in Jesus Christ, share their hopes
and fears, their joys and sorrows,
their opportunities and needs and
become aware of the whole world
and no longer live in isolation.

They are also enriched by the faith
experience of Christians of other
countries and cultures through prayer
with and for them.

Please go to www.worlddayof-
prayer.net for further information

LENTEN TEA

eThe Anglican Church of The
Epiphany will hold it annual Lenten
Tea and Fashion Show at the church
on Prince Charles Drive on Sunday
March & at 3 pm. Tickets are $10 and
are available at the door. Please
come to enjoy an afternoon of fun
and fellowship.

SU a Ut

@ Did you recently give birth to
the newest little angel on earth?
Have you and your beloved recent-
ly tied the knot? Is your church
planning a special event? Tribune
Religion wants to hear from you!

We want to know about the spe-
cial things going on in your life, so
go ahead and send in your wedding
photographs, birth announcements
and church activities schedule to be
posted in upcoming Tribune
Religion sections.

This service is free. Send all
information, including (especially)
photographs, to features@tribune-
media.net. Information can be
hand delivered to The Tribune at
Shirley and Deveaux Streets or call
the Religion section @ 502.2368.


The Tribune

RELIGION

The impossible separation

SOMETIMES we cannot forget the
wilderness that we are in because we
cannot even eat. We are so broken we
do not even see the table set before us:
eyes swollen shut with weeping, heart
heavy and spirit crushed. We are obliv-
ious to any comfort or consolation.
Desolate, despairing, despondent and
dejected we feel as if we will bleed to
death, while others just pass by on the
other side.

Romans 8:35-39 was given to us as a
gift for such a time as this: “Who will
separate us from the love of Christ?
Will hardship, or distress, or persecu-
tion, or famine, or nakedness, or peril,
or sword? As it is written, For your
sake we are being killed all day long;
we are accounted as sheep to be
slaughtered. No, in all these things we
are more than conquerors through
him, who loved us. For I am convinced
that neither death, nor life, nor angels,
nor rulers, nor things present, nor
things to come, nor powers, nor height,
nor depth, nor anything else in all cre-
ation, will be able to separate us from
the love of God in Christ Jesus our
Lord.”

Are you permitting someone to sep-
arate you from the love of Christ? You

Ea

REV. ANGELA
PALACIOUS

need to take the initiative for yourself
to establish, or re-establish your prior-
ities and ask God to separate you from
the influence or power of this person.
Then remember you are always free to
pray and talk to God in the secret place
of your own heart.

What is the nature of your hard-
ship? What is the extent of your dis-
tress? Why are you suffering persecu-
tion and in what form? What are you
starving for in your time of famine? Of
what have you been stripped in your
time of nakedness? How great is your
peril? Who is holding the sword?

No matter what your individual
answer, St Paul is convinced that you
will be more than a conqueror through
the One who loved us enough to die on
the cross. When you open yourself to a
saving faith you too will become con-
vinced that you do not have to be

Traditional Anglicans want
to join Catholic Church

@ VATICAN CITY

THE Vatican is considering welcom-
ing into the Roman Catholic Church a
group of traditional Anglicans who
broke away from the global Anglican
Communion nearly two decades ago
over women’s ordination and other
issues, officials say.

Vatican officials stress that no decision
has been made and no announcement is
imminent. Still, Anglicans across the
spectrum of belief are closely watching
for any signs of movement.

Absorbing the breakaway Traditional
Anglican Communion would be a small
but notable victory for Pope Benedict
XVI, who has made unifying Christians
a goal of his papacy.

At the same time, any invitation by
the Vatican is likely to upset leaders of
the 77 million-member Anglican
Communion and would hurt the
Vatican’s decades-long efforts to
strengthen ties with that fellowship of
churches. Anglicans split with Rome in
1534 when English King Henry VII was
refused a marriage annulment.

The Traditional Anglican
Communion formed in 1990 as an asso-
ciation of orthodox Anglicans concerned

about what they considered the liberal
tilt in Anglican churches, including the
ordination of women. Members of the
group are generally Anglo-Catholic,
emphasizing continuity with Catholic
tradition and the importance of the
sacraments. The fellowship says it has
spread to 41 countries and has 400,000
members, although only about half are
regular churchgoers.

The traditional group aims to unify the
Anglican and Catholic churches, accord-
ing to Archbishop John Hepworth of
Australia, who is the leader, or primate,
of the Traditional Anglican
Communion. They have accepted the
ministry of the pope, but also want to
maintain their Anglican traditions —
one of several potential impediments to
unification.

“We seek a communal and ecclesial
way of being Anglican Catholics in com-
munion with the Holy See,” the group
wrote, in a letter Hepworth presented
two years ago to the Vatican’s
Congregation for the Doctrine of the
Faith. The head of that Vatican office,
Cardinal William Levada, wrote
Hepworth in July 2008, saying he was
giving “serious attention” to the TAC’s
proposal.

afraid of dying, because you will not be
separated from Christ in death, as a
result of the reality of the resurrection.
There is nothing in life that need sepa-
rate us because no matter the circum-
stance, we are free to abide in Jesus if
we invite Him to abide in us. The
angels are under His authority, rulers
on earth need not be permitted to
weaken our faith as Daniel modeled
for us in the lions’ den.

There is nothing in our present situ-
ation, nothing in the future, and noth-
ing in our past that can separate us
from God if we do not desire it to be
so.
Not even the powers of Satan or any
other evil spirits, demons, imps, princi-
palities of any kind are strong enough
to sever the bonds of love that Christ
has for us. Nothing in the heights,
down in the depths or anything, any-
where in creation, has the power to
cancel out the price Christ paid.

So what are we waiting for? Let us
explore all the blessings such a rela-
tionship has to offer. Let us not be the
cause of a separation from the best
friend we will ever have, the
Redeemer we certainly need, and the
ongoing sustaining love of Christ

Thursday, March 5, 2009 ® PG 27

embodied in the Holy Spirit’s presence.

We have the pillar of cloud and the
pillar of fire on the inside of us.

‘The cloud of unknowing’ as one
author calls it, and the fire of enlight-
enment that Pentecost introduced. We
are ready for anything God requires of
us. We are not alone and we are not
helpless with Christ on our side.

Not even the
powers of Satan or
any other evil
spirits, demons,
imps, principalities
of any kind are
strong enough

to sever the bonds
of love that

Christ has for us.

NOTICE

You are invited to come and
worship! Global Village
Church Queens College
Auditorium 9:30 Sunday

Morning.

ont ie

You are not happy with our
product, return in seven
days for a complete refund


PG 28 ® Thursday, March 5, 2009

Tourism

THE GREAT DEPRESSION of
the 1930's was viewed by some as a
time of wonderful opportunities and
by others as time of crisis.

Here we are today in the Bahamas,
a place where we've stated that God
lives and that the Bahamas is a
Christian nation. I really don't mean
to burst your bubble, but I think it's
only fair that I should inform you;
that the Bahamas is not a Christian
nation but rather we are an insane
nation.

As you're reading this article, I'm
quite aware that as an educated per-
son you know the definition of insan-
ity. Therefore for the purpose of this
exercise please allow me to share this
definition with the handful of people
who don't know.

Insanity: Doing the same
things over and over, yet
expecting a different result

Now, maybe not you; but I’m con-
vinced beyond all reasonable doubt
that we are truly an insane nation, as
I listen to the various leaders, profes-
sionals and experts speak on matters
of national interest such as tourism,
finance, crime and education.

Tourism - The true God of the
Bahamas: The geniuses / experts in
governments and the Ministry of
Tourism have been and are spending
and investing millions of dollars in
promoting and marketing tourism.
Meanwhile very little financial invest-
ing is done in the masses of people
who work within this lame cash cow.

This is the kind of statement and
remark that stirs “HELL” up in the
hefty salary makers, reclining office
chairs, out of touch, big wigs, and
pencil pushers in this ministry. Do I
care if this and other statements stir
up “HELL” within these folks
throughout the length and breadth of
this country? No, not one bit do I
care.

Listen up! Everything rises and
falls upon leadership, if the product
of tourism is broken; it's not the



PASTOR

tourist’s fault. To the contrary, its
because of incompetent, visionless
leadership. Do you know that people
are still traveling? It's just that
they're not coming to the Bahamas in
the numbers that we would like. Yes I
do agree that September 11,2001 had
an impact on tourist travel, but from
then to now (don't fool ‘yaself’) peo-
ple are traveling.

I know that a new minister of
tourism has just recently been
appointed and that's good; but as in
the game of baseball or softball “what
good is there in having a new pitcher,
when he's got to play ball with the
same incompetent team that can't
field or hit the ball?”

The fall of tourism hasn't just hap-
pen; this one sided game has been
played on an uneven field for many
years. Whenever emphasis is placed
on tourism, its primary areas were
West Bay Street, down town Bay
Street and Paradise Island. What has
changed with this twisted view today?
Nothing much, other than it’s now
Atlantis, the Bar-Mar project,
Albany, etc;

Again, why listen to me? It seems
that you guys have all of the answers
to your tourism woes. But then again
if this was the case, why is it that the
Bahamas is not ranked in the top 5
places of choice for tourist travel in
the western hemisphere?

There was a time when the Bahamas
was able to hold its own in tourism as
we promoted our sun, sand & sea; and
most of all our service was at its best.
But Mr Minister, Mr/ Ms Director of
Tourism, let me assure you that you're
prematurely channeling your efforts
and financial resources outside as you
promote a broken (yet) easily

Share your ne

The Tribune wants to hear from people

who are making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are

raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in th
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your

story.



RELIGION

repairable industry.

Anything that has to do with hospi-
tality service from Atlantis in the
north to the smallest restaurant at
South Beach and the family islands
needs to be on the same accord with
total quality service. (TQS). When
and wherever there is a breach of this
service whether it is from an employ-
er or an employee, such person or
persons should be dealt with accord-
ingly as a first time offender. In the
event of a second offense it should be
made known publicly that that person
or business establishment has been
removed from the hospitality indus-
try.

Herein lays the bedrock or root
cause of TQS in the tourism industry.
Unprecedented attention and efforts
have been centered on service to and
for the tourist dollar; meanwhile very
little and in most cases no TQS is
focused on Bahamians _ serving
Bahamians.

This travesty has led to multiple
problems and breaches in the tourism
industry, because it's these same
Bahamians that are offering visitors
the sloppy services.

Here's one of the biggest mistakes
many of our leaders are making as it
relates to tourism and the economy.
We've got visionless leaders (reli-
gious, government, civic) waiting on
President Barack Obama to fix or

The Tribune

turn around America's economy.
Meanwhile, very little internal over-
hauling, adjustments or diversifica-
tion is being intensively done to pre-
pare the masses. The people that are
loosing their jobs daily in the
Bahamas and the other families that
are being devastated through crimes
and other ills didn't vote for
President Obama, so why is it that
they've got to wait on him for vision-
ary leadership?

Again, I'm not Bishop, Apostle or
Doctor Allen; I have no books or cd's
for sale, you guys are the qualified,
educated professionals; therefore
why should you or any other pay
attention to what I'm saying?

Remember!

Hosea.4:6. Where there is no vision,
the people perish (NOT THE LEAD-
ERS) Therefore stop being silly and
getting “swing” within and outside the
church by eloquent speeches. Are your
government officials and religious
leaders crying about how tough things
are? No, they're living and enjoying
the good life; while you're always rob-
bing Peter to pay Paul.

¢ For questions or comments contact
us via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.225-3859 or 441-2021

NOTICE
“FREE”

Fire Insurance
Contract
Jesus Christ & Co.

for
Salivation!

For more information
Read John 3-16


The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, March 5, 2009 ® PG 29

(Coy THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS rat

Methodist Men of Mark

IN 1897, Methodist Minister George
Lester in his book In Sunny Isles pays
tribute to Methodist ‘men of mark’,
who through truth and righteousness
created church life and the social con-
ditions for that time and the next seven
decades. On this high pedestal he
places the names of William Turton,
Roger Moore, Theophilus Pugh,
Charles Penny, Thomas Lofthouse,
John Corlett, Thomas Pearson, Isaac
Pearson, Hilton Cheeseborough and
Henry Bleby. Others were ‘men worth
remembering’ because of their aggres-
sive evangelism through the adversity
of hurricanes, epidemic diseases and
giving heroic attention of the sick and
dying.

Penny and Corlett ministered to the
liberated Africans and were instru-
mental in the growth and development
of Wesley Methodist Church and its
Yoruba congregation. Among the ear-
liest leaders of the Wesley Methodist
Church were Yoruba tribesmen:
Monday Ranger, Alladay Adderley,
Britain Eneas and Domingo Weir - all
men whose descendants carried on the
tradition of being avid churchmen. The



name of Corlett also lived on -
Frederick Corlett of the Yoruba tribe
died in 1911 at the home of his son
John in Bilney Lane. It is interesting to
note that the son John Corlett was a
founder member of the Bilney Lane
Orthodox African Church inspired by
Marcus Garvey.

Lofthouse was the father of a strand
of the oligarchic dynasty that ruled the
Bahamas for almost 100 years. His son
Thomas Hilton Cheeseborough
Lofthouse opened the ‘Big Store’ on
Marlborough Street and his son Charles
was the composer of Goombay songs -
‘Bahama Mama ' and 'Mama Don't
Want no Peas and Rice’ were huge
world wide hits in the 1930s. The last of
the dynasty was Sir Stafford Lofthouse
Sands, father of Bahamian tourism.

The growth of Methodism after

emancipation was phenomenal. In 1835
there were only four ministers for the
1,799 members of the four circuits
(Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, Haiti and
Bermuda). In the Bahamas, Methodism
spread to Exuma (1837), New
Providence Wesley (1838), Marsh
Harbour (1843), Cat Island (1844) and
through Eleuthera (1845 - 1864). Also,
in 1841, St Paul’ was returned from the
Anglicans to the Methodists.

The Methodist Mission continued to
expand from 1869 until 1975 due to the
disestablishment of the Anglican
Church and the controversy caused by
the Tractarian Ritualistic Movement
and segregation of black and white
members. Another reason for the
growth was the longer tenure of the
ministers in one location. In the earliest
days of Turton, Routledge and Dowson
they rotated every ten or twelve weeks.
Then it became customary for inter-
change of stations yearly. In later times,
the ministry was permanent with the
option for change after a service of ten
years.

Up until the end of the 19th Century
not a great number of Bahamian men

took up the Methodist ministry but
eight served in the Bahamas and sever-
al ministered in the USA, Canada and
the West Indies.

George Lester praises the stalwart
contribution of 'men of mark’ and 'men
of worth’ - many long dead or moved
on - “They constructed no melancholy
theories; but having planted many a
"Rose of Sharon’ and made their por-
tion of the desert smile, they departed
in the faith that the green margin would
spread as the seasons of God came
round, till the mantle of heaven cov-
ered the earth and ended with Eden, as
it had begun.”

Thus the Methodists achieved a dom-
inant position in religion, economics
and politics that remained unchal-
lenged until the rise of the Roman
Catholic and Pentecostal denomina-
tions competed for souls in the early
20th Century and the Baptist coalition
with the progressive Liberal Party in
the 1960s ushered in the modern era of
majority rule.

(Next time - Part 20: Baptist Men of
Mark)



Church of God of Prophecy
East Street Tabernacle
celebrates it’s men’s
ministry 20th anniversary

TWENTY years ago, the Men’s
Fellowship at the Church of God of
Prophecy East Street Tabernacle was
established by the late, Bishop
Nathaniel Beneby in 1989 to encourage
the brothers’ involvement in church
ministry, to encourage strong leadership
among the brothers and foster a closer
relationship between the Pastor and the
brothers of the church.

On Sunday February 22, the Men’s
Ministry celebrated their 20th anniver-
sary. The highlight of the service was
the ‘Brother of the Year Award’ which
was presented to Brother Cecil N Hall
for outstanding service to the ministry.
Also during the morning service, on the
occasion of their 20th Anniversary, the
Men’s Ministry, presented Senior Pastor,
Bishop Franklin M Ferguson and his
wife, Rovena, with a seven day Southern
Caribbean Cruise which will take place
in May.

The celebration climaxed in the after-
noon as scores of Men’s Fellowship
Choirs from around the island came
together for a time of singing and rejoic-
ing. Refreshments was served in the
cafeteria afterwards.

(Submitted by Rovena Ferguson)


PG 30 ® Thursday, March 5, 2009

| —

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

WHILE many churches in the coun-
try try to support their members, this
can be difficult for family island
churches with insufficient resources.
However, members of the St Faith’s
Anglican Church in Stanyard Creek,
Andros, recently came together to
support the children of the parish and
the community by hosting a family fun
day.

Priest in charge, Father Donald
Kerr, said the fun day held last week-
end was simply to raise funds for a new

=“

.

railing in the church, activities for the
youth and to have a Sunday school for
the kids.

“There are a lot of young people up
here and we are really trying to
reestablish and revamp the entire
community in terms of bringing young
people into the church by putting on
events,” Father Kerr said.

Father Kerr has been the priest in
charge for the St Stephen’s parish in
the central Andros district for two
years, over seeing the five churches in
the parish.

Father Kerr said for some time the
congregation of St Faith’s has some-

ms *

RELIGION

|

what disappeared, but is now on the
verge of coming back but with mostly
young people involved.

“By having the young people
involved, it makes a healthier church
because they come in and take their
rightful positions,” Father Kerr said.

Father Kerr said there are a lot of
after school activities the church is try-
ing to provide for the children not only
from St Faith’s, but within the
Stanyard Creek community.

“They get help with their homework
and their social needs as well. We are
trying to let the church play a pivotal
role within the community because

CHILDREN of
St Faith’s
Anglican
Church enjoy-
TCIM rA
with a game of
basketball and
swing set on
the park and
church grounds
in Stanyard
Creek, Andros.

The Tribune



i

P k



St. Faith's Anglican Church hosts family fun day

this church is the largest in the island’s
parish. This church has to have activi-
ties in order for the community to
function,” Father Kerr said.

Father Kerr said the fun day was
also to establish a bond between the
community and family life where they
can come out and make contributions
to their church.

“The kids enjoy coming to the
church because they find fellowship.
We are trying our endeavored best to
continue to bring the community
together through different events like
basket ball tournaments and so forth,”
Father Kerr said.


The Tribune

rh. =e




Church of God of
Prophecy East Street
Tabernacle celebrates it’s
8th annual Ushers Day

ON Sunday, February 1, the Ushers
of the Church of God of Prophecy, East
Street Tabernacle took time off from
their routine as they were relieved from
their duties for the day to receive spe-
cial recognition for their hard work over
the past year.

Speaking on this occasion was Bishop
Randall Howard, General Overseer for
the Church of God of Prophecy
Worldwide, whose presence marked the
first time that a general overseer would
have ministered in a local church other
than during annual conventions, which
made this occasion historic for the
church at East Street.

Receiving special honour for their
dedication and commitment to the
usher ministry were: Sister Winnifred
Williamson and Brothers: Raymond
Pratt and Joseph Henfield.

RELIGION

Thursday, March 5, 2009 ® PG 31

2 H importance of

= @ By BISHOP V. G. CLARKE

Calvary Deliverance Church

i HOPE has been defined as “a

i: feeling that what is wanted will

i happen; or “a desire accompanied

i by expectations.” In the scripture,
i hope is closely connected to faith,

i “Now faith is the substance of

i things hoped for, the evidence of

: things not seen.” (Hebrews 11:1).

i Man cannot survive without

i hope; it is what gives meaning to

i all of life. It is a fact that “we are

: saved by hoped”, as stated in

? Romans 8:24. Victor Frank in his

? book, “Man's Search for Meaning”,
: graphically tells how he was able to
i survive the horrors of a Nazi con-

i centration camp by focusing on the
: hope of liberation and deliverance,
: rather than on the suffering and

i death that was happening all

? around him.

i The minister frequently faces cir-
: cumstances and situations that are
i discouraging and defeating on the

i surface - a scathing criticism, a

i? financial reverse, a lack of spiritual

yi results and a piling up of people's

: problems. To handle these difficul-
i ties on the human level is impossi-
i ble. To fight with carnal weapon is
? useless, such an approach assures

i defeat. What is needed is a spiritu-
: alsolution. The first step in spiri-

.j tually solving any problem is to
~ i transcend it - to get above. Don't

i try to slug it out on the fleshly

i level, get in the spiritual realm.

i How is this done? By developing
: the “feeling that what is wanted

i will happen.” By exercising faith











































Jumper Church leaps to hundred year milestone

FROM page 26

all levels of society.”

This week, the church will begin its
celebrations with a historic exhibition
of photos and artifacts dating as far
back to the early 1900s. Scheduled to be
held at its East Street tabernacle locat-
ed between Sunlight Village and
Cottage off East Street, the event will
officially be opened by Bishop
Rahming, and will be available to the
general public for viewing.

Then on Sunday, the church will start
its convention which is scheduled to be
broadcasted live over the radio, televi-

sion, and the Internet.

According to a press release from the
church’s press office: “This service will
be one of high praise and worship,
involving our choirs, dancers, bands and
the spoken word.”

Slated as keynote speaker for the
event is the General Presbyter for the
Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean Islands
Bishop Brice H Thompson.

On Monday, the convention will con-
tinue with an address from the National
overseer Bishop Rahming who will
reflect on the history and challenges of
the church, and will also present future
plans for CGP.

Other speakers during the week :
include Bishop Randall E Howard the }

General overseer, Bishop Clayton

Martin who is the overseer of Jamaica, }
Bishop Adrian Varlack, Bishop David :

Bryan, and Bishop Benjamin Feliz.

Following dozens of events and cele- ;
brations expected to unfold during the }
eight day festivities, the event will cul- :
minate with a Baptismal service at the ;

Western Esplanade.

The church is inviting all in the com- :
munity to show support by attend its ;
events, and remains committed to its }
true mission, which is to spread the :

word of the Father.

i and hope, remember that such a
i feeling will not come automatical-

fly; it will come only as a conscious
1} act of the will.

Hope arises out of a concentra-

't tion on the good and positive

: things (Phil. 4:8). We must not

i focus on the difficult: but on the

? fact that God will bring deliver-

i ance. To transcend a problem (to
practise hope) does not mean that

: we will leave the problem; it simply
i means that by viewing it from
God's perspective, we will see it as
i it really is.

When we understand the true
nature of the problem, we will then
be able to confront it properly.
Keep in mind however, that this is
: not possible without first exercising
faith and hope. We must under-
stand that it is hope that gives us
? the spiritual insights and power
necessary to take the fear out of
? the future.
PG 32 © Thursday, March 5, 2009



Not Settling

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallan@tribunemedia.net

GOSPEL recording artist Ricardo
Clarke, who just last week released
his debut gospel/reggae album titled
Not Settling, has taking the local
Christian community by storm with
lyrics which not only speak of the
challenges of being saved or unsaved,
but also on the realities of living in an
economically crunched environment.

Ricardo was backed by the Higher
Level Band, along with a wide mix of
gospel artists at a concert last Friday at
the Calvary Deliverance Church. The
event was considered an overwhelming
success.

Ricardo who is also the son of
Bishop VG = Clarke of Calvary
Deliverance, during his on stage per-
formance gave audience members a
heart to heart look into the reality of
Christian life and growth as he has
experienced it.

Giving reference to a Bible scripture
where Elijah instructed a servant to
repeat a task, Ricardo said God works
in a way where if he wants to show you
something, even if you overlook it the
first time, he‘ll take you back to that

place over and over until you see his
vision.

“Sometimes you could repeat a
process, but you wont get manifesta-
tion the first time...If you repeat a
process, God is going to let you hear a
sound that you didn‘t hear the first
time.”

For Ricardo, this message was mani-
fested through his love for music.
Ricardo said although he has long
embraced the art of spoken word, it
was never until he attempted to share
his message through music that his pur-
pose was truly fulfilled.

“Sometimes you work so hard to get
people to understand your spoken
word which they rarely get, and it’s like
in a heartbeat they’re singing the same
message in a song that you couldn’t get
them to connect with, and I feel glad to
know that I could get to share more of
what I have to say through music.”

After being saved for more than 10
years, Ricardo explained that some of
the same challenges and distractions
that affected him as an unsaved youth,
still affect many young people today.

“T definitely was not saved from the
womb, but I always had a healthy
respect for the church and for what my
personal life could do to my family.

RELIGION

Prior to me coming into the kingdom I
had a pretty active social life, I was a
party animal.”

Although he had always lived by the
golden rule, Ricardo said in his early
days he too took part in excessive par-
tying, drinking, smoking, and
immersed himself always in the compa-
ny of several female friends.

He said at that time, the presence of
God remained in his life, reminding
him of a higher calling.

Along the way, Ricardo said he has

The Tribune

Pe Om Ale da
performs for the
crowd at the ‘Not
Settling’ concert
held at the Calvary
Deliverance

‘Cv lceae

ee
|

PLT LO Mera Cmte ISMclNel OTN Ce ls Reni Heights.



been encouraged by one particular
scripture that has not only feed him
when he was weak, but which has also
guided him when he was lost.

Proverbs 11.25 which reads: “The
liberal soul shall be made fat, and he
that watereth shall be watereth also
himself.

Now that he is doing what he loves
and able to spread the word of the
Father, Ricardo said he hopes to con-
tinue spreading positive messages of
Christianity and of God.





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