Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.84

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SEE “THE ARTS’ SECTION

FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY



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police prone into fignt

LW Young
school officia
questions
media reports

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN L W Young school offi-
cial claims police need to
probe more deeply into a con-
frontation outside the school
on Monday as he fears that
stories of an off-duty police
officer having stepped in to
break up a fight might not be
the full story.

Telford Mullings, principal
of the high school in Bernard
Road, confirmed that a num-
ber of ninth-grade students at
the school were involved ina
dispute that broke out near
the school grounds shortly
before 4pm on Monday.

However, suggesting reports
reaching the media so far
about the incident may not be
the whole story, he stood up
for his students.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

“The way ZNS had it this gj By TANEKA
morning, they made it sound THOMPSON
like some of my students went Tribune Staff Reporter
out to deliberately beat up a tthompson@

police officer. It wasn’t like
that,” said Mr Mullings.

tribunemedia.net

AMERICAN federal
agents and state prosecutors

SEE page six

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remember the smart choice is
fnsurance Management.
Smart people you can trust.

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The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

PS
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AND REAL aide
SESS

Principal calls or

pe USB pile els

have been “illegally”
approaching local financial
institutions for information
instead of following proper
legal channels, former Attor-
ney General Alfred Sears said
in a call for more government
intervention in the matter.

While not being specific,
Mr Sears told the House of
Assembly that American offi-
cials sometimes coerce local
banks directly for assistance
in civil and criminal matters
in the US, rather than petition
them through the competent
authority, which would be the
Attorney General.

However, in an interview
with Tribune Business, State
Finance Minister Zhivargo
Laing branded Mr Sears'
assertions as "irresponsible",
adding that his ministry had
not heard of such harassment.

"They have been circum-
venting the proper channels,

SEE page six

©,

Quiznos Sus



THIS HONDA ACCORD burst into flames yesterday afternoon on Poinciana Avenue. The female driver
was shaken but escaped the fire without injury.

Former Attorney General claims
US agents ‘illegally approaching
local financial institutions’

Sy sa Ta Ss
VSR
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Ne TST

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

IT has been reported
that Swiss detectives have
visited Scots actor Sean
Connery at this Lyford Cay
home to question him in
connection with a civil suit
stemming out of a loan he
allegedly made to a former
friend.

According to The Daily
Mail newspaper of Lon-
don, Sir Sean, 78, is due to
appear in a court in Gene-
va, Switzerland, next week
in connection with the
action.

It is alleged that the
James Bond actor lent his

SEE page six





GSSSA athletes
off to fast start

SEE PAGE ELEVEN



Officials tour
Detention
Centre amid
hunger strike

Visit intended to confirm facility
‘being operated with transparency’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SENIOR Immigration
and Defence Force officials,
accompanied by social ser-
vices personnel and local
clergy, toured the Deten-
tion Centre on Monday in
response to allegations of
inhumane conditions
revealed in this newspaper,



The Tribune has confirmed.

Three people being held
at the Detention Centre
went on a hunger strike last
week to protest what they
described as inhumane con-
ditions.

Detainees of various
nationalities alleged they
were forced to endure sub-
standard living conditions,

SEE page six

‘Immediate action needed’ to address
impact of climate change on Bahamas

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

IMMEDIATE action must be taken to
address the potentially irreversible impact
of climate change in the Bahamas as one of
the world’s most vulnerable nations, experts

warned yesterday.

The undeniable effects of global warming
already being felt in the country’s low-lying |
subtropical islands were divulged by the
director of the Bahamas Environment Sci-
ence and Technology (BEST) commission
Philip Weech, department of meteorology
director Arthur Rolle and Economic Com-



PHILIP WEECH,

mission for Latin America and the Caribbean Director of the Bahamas
(ECLAC) director Neil Pierre at a meeting to Environment Science

SEE page eight

and Technology
commission

British banker’s bid to acquire
GBPA appears to have ended

BRITISH banker Roddie
Fleming’s attempt to acquire
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) appeared
to have ended in failure last
night, after it was announced
that the Sir Jack Hayward
Family Trust would not be
proceeding with the $100 mil-
lion deal to sell its stake to
him.

A brief statement last night
said: “Sir Jack Hayward's fam-
ily trustees announce that the
arrangements made in August
2007 for the acquisition by
Roddie Fleming's Family
Trust of their entire interest
in Freeport have come to an
end. Sir Jack's trustees are not
in negotiation with any other
potential purchaser.”

The announcement does

not come as a surprise, given
that speculation had intensi-
fied in recent weeks that Mr
Fleming and his partner,
Geoffrey Richards, did not
have the financing in place for

SEE page six

Unconfirmed reports
that resort to lay otf
almost 30 workers

UNCONFIRMED reports
last night were that the Ginn
Sur Mer resort in West End,
Grand Bahama is due to lay-
off almost 30 workers by the
end of this week.

See tomorrow’s Tribune
for more details on this story.



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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

IT’S A TIME OF JOY AND JUBILATION! ’

fP'S AGRAND TIME OF
PRAISE AND CELEBRATION!

mappervonsit

BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD
General cn Creer

BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON
General Preshytet

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN

Global Outreach Director

BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK
CBL Instructor

MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE

International Director of Women’s Ministries.

BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN
Regponal Overseer of Jamaica, (Cayenan
Islands Guyana and French Guiana

and MINISTER SONTA MARTIN

BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS
Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islands

BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES

National Overseer of the Church of Cex,
Bahamas, Turks & Catoos Islinds

Ministering in song amd performance
are: the Centennial Mass Choir, the Tab-
ernacle Concert Choir, the Chorch of
(ed National Choir, the Bahamas Public
Officers Choir, and other Choirs, Praise
Teaims and simping

Monday, March 9th, 2ish>

Bishop Dr. Elearnet &. Raking, National Oversser
é& Moderator will dehver his ANBUAL ADDRESS:
LIVE VIA RADIO BAHAMAS 154 AM ond
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The Convention climaxes on Sunday, March 15th
with the afternoon Anouul Parude and Water
Baptismal Service, folliwed by the evening
Service hraadcast live on 2NS Radio and TV 13,
log on to: Www.cogophahamas.org
For live webcasting



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

BPSU president satisfied
that industrial action by

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PRESIDENT of the Bahamas
Public Service Union John Pin-
der said he is satisfied that a
meeting between the heads of
the Airport Authority and man-
agement at the airport fire sta-
tion was successful in avoiding
industrial action by disgruntled
firemen.

Mr Pinder said the aim of the
meeting was to discuss the sus-
pension of a firefighter who
refused to participate in a train-
ing session conducted by a low-
er ranking colleague — a situa-
tion which reportedly sent many
senior officers at the station into
an uproar.

After the meeting the officer's
suspension was reversed and it
was decided that the practice of
allowing junior officers to train
superiors would be discontin-
ued, he said.

Mr Pinder added that during
that meeting, it was agreed that
promotion exercises at the fire
station would adhere to the
union's industrial agreement in
future, and only qualified per-
sons would be considered for
promotions.

Safety concerns were also
addressed, and the firefighters
were promised an adequate
number of gas masks and suffi-
cient gear.

"In that meeting, it was con-
sidered that the senior officers
will train the senior officers and
they have reversed the decision
to suspend that officer,” Mr Pin-
der told The Tribune.

"The meeting also mentioned
that the human resources area

a ee
Us)

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PHONE: 322-2157



John Pinder

is to be more impartial and try to
ensure that it guides managers
through the correct process in
terms of not violating our indus-
trial agreement in terms of the
grievance procedure and to
ensure that they are in line with
any disciplinary policies that the
government established ... so
we don't have to get to this point
again where there is a threat of
industrial action.

“We don't want to disrupt ser-
vices. We need to be proactive



and talk things out".

The union head said that dur-
ing the meeting, an example of
an “unfair” promotion was
raised.

"When we left that meeting,
the managing director made it
effective immediately that any
request for a promotion that
comes to him, all files on the
individual from the Fire Depart-
ment and human resources are
double-checked to ensure the
same background information is
there.

"Management has also
requested the policy guidelines
surrounding promotions".

Last week several firefighters
claimed the station was being
run like a "petty shop” and that
nepotism was rife.

There were claims that quali-
fied persons were being over-
looked by the human resources
department for promotions in
favour of less skilled employees.

These claims prompted a few
of the officers to call for the
removal of the fire chief, the Air-
port Authority human resources
manager and the director of
security at the airport.

security officers and porter are
allegedly taken into police custody

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - At least four security officers and a porter at the
Freeport Harbour Company have been taken into police custody in
connection with a drug investigation at Lucayan Harbour, it was

claimed yesterday.

Press liaison officer Assistant Superintendent Clarence Reckley
confirmed that several persons employed at Lucayan Harbour were tak-
en in for questioning as part of an ongoing investigation, but he would
not specify the nature of the investigation.

However, The Tribune has learned from a reliable source that five
persons were taken into custody in Freeport on Monday evening fol-
lowing the arrest of two women at Port Everglades in Fort Laud-

erdale, Florida.

The women, passengers on board the vessel Discovery, were arrest-
ed by US authorities after the discovery of a large quantity of illegal

drugs.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 3



Shane Gibson claims report being

-_politicised to make him look bad

0 In brief

woman in
custody after —
firearm and
drugs found

A MAN and a woman are }
in police custody following the
discovery of an illegal firearm :
and drugs at a private resi-

dence.

Shortly after 7pm on Mon- i
day, Mobile Division officers }
travelled to a Highbury Park :

home.

When the officers knocked }
at the door there was no}
response and a man was seen }
through a window running }
inside the house, press liaison }
officer Asst Supt Walter }

Evans reported.

Upon entry, police heard a }
rumbling sound in a back }
bathroom and forced their }
way into that area. A 31-year- }
old man was found with an
orange container. In the con- }
tainer was a clear ziploc bag }
with 111 foil wraps of mari-
juana and a brown plastic bag }
with a quantity of marijuana.

The man and a 23-year-old }
woman were taken into police ;
custody for questioning in this }

matter.

The total weight of the i
drugs is over one pound witha }
local street value of just over }

$1,000.

Two in court on

robbery charge

[WO men were arraigned }
in a Magistrate’s Court on ai

robbery charge yesterday.

Court dockets allege that :
Valentino Rolle, 21, of Nas- }
sau Village, and Dwayne:
Smith, 23, of Pinewood Gar- }

dens, on Sunday, March 1,

2009, at Royal Castle on Bail- ;
lou Hill Road robbed Alfred }
Sweeting of a gold chain val- }
ued at $1,288 and $290 in cash.

The men, who appeared
before Magistrate Derrence }
Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane, }
pleaded not guilty to the}
charge and elected to have a }
summary trial in the Magis- }
trate’s Court. The prosecution }
objected to the men being }
granted bail. Both accused
were remanded to Heri
Majesty’s Prison and are}
expected back in court on }

April 14 for a bail hearing.

Man charged
with armed
robhery

A 22-YEAR-OLD man :
was arraigned in a Magis- }
trate’s Court on ani
armed robbery charge on }

Monday.

It is alleged in court dockets }
that Lorenzo Joseph Philips :
on February 24 robbed Car- }
dinal Neely of two Motorola }
cellular telephones and a gray }
2000 Honda Legend valued }

at $9,450.
Philips,

was remanded
Majesty’s Prison.

The case has been
adjourned to July 27 for
the start of a preliminary :

inquiry.

Solid Wooes

who appeared }
before Magistrate Susan }
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau }
Street, was not required to }
enter a plea to the charge. He }
to Her }

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Minister of Housing
Shane Gibson accused the gov-
ernment and the auditor general of
politicising the Auditor General’s
2006/2007 Report to make him
look bad.

The Golden Gates MP has con-
tacted Auditor General Terrance
Bastian to inquire why certain
information in the document relat-
ing to the accounts at the Ministry
of Housing was again included
despite the accounting discrepancy
apparently occurring in a previous
budgetary period and appearing
in an earlier report.

That information was that there
was “no documentation” available
to show that $385,195.40 released
for “repairs of a 10-unit complex in
Freeport” was, in fact, used for
that purpose.

Current Minister of Housing
Kenneth Russell, appointed to that
position in May, 2007, told The
Tribune on Sunday that the money
“disappeared and police are doing
a full investigation into that.”

But Mr Gibson asked: “If this



“My point is, if they
are losing documents,
why should I be held
responsible? No
permanent secretary
would release any
cheques unless there is
proper documentations.
The PS is the official
accounts officer. It’s
all political.”



Shane Gibson

was addressed last year, which it
rightly should have been because it
was 2005 when it apparently
occurred, why is it being addressed
again in this report?”

He said on Monday that he was
still awaiting a response to his
inquiry, made that morning.

The Auditor General’s Report is
generally considered to be an
objective analysis of the state of
public accounts, carried out by a
department separate to those
departments and ministries whose

accounts are under scrutiny.

The latest report was tabled in
the House of Assembly last
Wednesday. It makes no specific
mention of anyone being respon-
sible for deficiencies in any of the
accounts scrutinised.

Nonetheless Mr Gibson said
based on what he has seen in rela-
tion to the handling of the Min-
istry of Housing’s accounts, he
would question the neutrality of
the report’s findings.

The MP showed The Tribune

Man charged with eight counts of stealing

A 20-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned in a Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday on multiple counts of

stealing.

Diallo Williamson, alias Diallo Colebrooke,
appeared before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in
Court 5, Bank Lane, charged with eight counts
stealing and four counts of causing damage.

Court dockets allege that on Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 18, Williamson, a resident of Barts Road,
while at Carmichael Road stole a car CD player
valued at $150 from a 2004 Kia Carens minivan,
the property of Virginia Bowleg. Court dockets
also allege that Williamson caused damage to a
rear glass of a 2004 Kia Carens minivan valued at

$223.

It is further alleged that on Wednesday, Febru-
ary 18 while at Allen Drive, Williamson stole a CD
player valued at $150 from a 1996 Honda Legend,

the property of Shantell Brown.

Court dockets also state that Williamson alleged-
ly caused $200 in damage to the left window of Ms

Brown’s car.

Court dockets also allege that on Sunday, Jan-
uary 4 while at Golden Gates, Williamson stole a
CD player valued at $150 and $100 cash, the prop-

erty of Raquel Roker.

Williamson pleaded guilty to the charges.

Williamson also pleaded guilty to stealing a car CD
player face and a Cannon digital camera, together

valued at $280, from a 2005 Chevrolet Impala, the

Cooper.

property of Theresa Evans.

He also admitted to causing damage to the right
rear panel of Ms Evans’ car. Additionally,
Williamson pleaded guilty to stealing two DVD
players and $200 in DVDs belonging to Jennifer

It is also alleged that Williamson while at Tall
Pines stole a Sony CD player valued at $200, an
assortment of CDs valued at $60, a bottle of Guc-
ci cologne valued at $40 and a set of floor mats val-
ued at $120 from a 1992 Mercury Cougar, the

property of Lloyd Allen.

Williamson pleaded not guilty to the charge.
The case has been adjourned to May 5.
It is further alleged that on Thursday, January 2,

while at Gladstone Road, Williamson stole a car

distributor cap valued at $900 from a brown 1993
Honda Accord, the property of Frederick Delan-

cy. Williamson pleaded not guilty to the charge and

the case was adjourned to May S.
Williamson was sentenced to a total of one year
imprisonment on the charges to which he pleaded

guilty and was also ordered to receive counselling

while on remand at Her Majesty’s Prison.

‘Soft target’ date for proposed
medical prescription drug plan

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT has a “soft
target” date of July 1 for the
launch of a proposed medical pre-
scription drug plan which would
help persons with "catastrophic
illnesses" afford medication,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
said in the House of Assembly.

If this target date is not met,
government hopes to have the
plan introduced by early October,
he said.

“We are seeking to determine a
date on which that is going to
begin, but right now I think it is
fair to say that July 1 is the target
date for the unemployment bene-
fit and if it is possible, for the med-
ical prescription (plan) to be done
the same time, otherwise our cur-
rent indications are October this
year for the introduction of the
prescription drug benefit,” Mr
Ingraham told parliament while
contributing to the 2008/2009 mid-
year budget debate on Monday.

The prime minister explained
that under the scheme, persons
suffering from chronic diseases —
for example diabetes and hyper-
tension — who are “unable to

afford to keep up the payments
for these medications”, will be
given access to certain drugs.

Mr Ingraham also said the gov-
ernment plans to initiate a pre-
scription drug plan for the elderly
and indigent before the national
drug plan is launched. This will
attempt to address the long wait
times that many in these cate-
gories have had to endure at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
(PMH) pharmacy.

“We are going to seek to do at
an earlier date a specific pro-
gramme to deal with the elderly
and the indigent and that might
come on earlier subject to discus-
sions that will be had by the Min-
istry of Health and others with
the insurance companies.

“Specifically, we want the elder-
ly not to necessarily have to wait
for hours and hours at the
Princess Margaret Hospital and
sometimes find that a particular
medication is not available on that
given date,” he said.

Mr Ingraham also spoke of
plans for a scheme which would
allow eligible persons to fill
monthly prescriptions by pre-
senting a card at a designated
pharmacy.

Leader of opposition business

Me

Wong's AL

a pag ore zl SCT

3d Queen sais Bed
| por ‘3B



in the House of Assembly Dr
Bernard Nottage credited the gov-
ernment's proposed health plans
for the elderly and chronically ill,
but said these barely "scratch the
surface" of the country's health-
care needs.

Speaking to The Tribune after
the morning debate, he said the
former PLP government's nation-
al health insurance plan, which
never came on stream, was a more
comprehensive approach.

"T think any assistance that can
be given to persons who are
chronically ill, or persons gener-
ally, would be welcomed. Prob-
lem is, I am wedded to a much
more ambitious healthcare pro-
gramme which seeks to do more
than provide drugs only for the
chronically ill.

“But I think the more impor-
tant thing is to introduce a pro-
gramme that will minimise the
risk of illnesses — and that's what's
wrong, in my opinion, with the
government's programme.”

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where, in the report tabled last
year on the period 2005/2006, audi-
tors noted that “three payments”
totalling $385,195.40 were released
for the Freeport repairs.

The payments were noted to
have been made on April 20, 2005,
July 1, 2005 and December 16,
2005.

Meanwhile, in the report tabled
last week on the 2006/2007 finan-
cial period, it is again noted that
the sum was released — but this
time in two payments.

“(The government) was so anx-
ious to become political with this
they must have advised (the audi-
tor general) to include it,” alleged
Mr Gibson.

Downplaying the significance of
the auditor’s findings, Mr Gibson
noted that in all such reports
throughout the years those prepar-
ing the document have found they
have been “unable to get certain
documents from certain min-
istries.”

“Tt’s always like that,” he said.

And he repeatedly emphasised
that where documents cannot be
found to verify how funds were
spent, this does not mean that they
do not exist, and he should “not be
held responsible for lost docu-
ments” at the ministry, where he
was minister from 2002 until Feb-
ruary, 2006, when former Killar-
ney MP Neville Wisdom took
over.

“My point is, if they are losing
documents, why should I be held
responsible? No permanent secre-

tary would release any cheques
unless there is proper documenta-
tions. The PS is the official
accounts officer. It’s all political,”
he said.

He added that it would be easy
enough for someone within the
ministry to “hide” a document if
they wanted to “make a minister
look bad.”

“T spoke to the former perma-
nent secretary (Leila Greene) and
she said she explained to them that
these things (records) were at the
Ministry of Housing. Now after
they moved her from Housing, just
so they could portray a certain pic-
ture, all of the records go missing,”
he said.

The most recent Auditor Gen-
eral’s Report highlighted a lack of
internal controls throughout the
public service which have left the
use of public funds open to the risk
of abuse in many instances.

It notes that throughout all
departments and ministries certain
documents required to verify accu-
rately how funds were used were
not available and makes recom-
mendations to tighten accounting
processes.

On Sunday, Minister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell said he
believes points raised in the report
regarding his former ministry’s
accounts related more to “record
keeping than to any malfeasance
or misappropriation.”

A message left for Auditor Gen-
eral Terrance Bastian was not
returned up to press time.






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Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 « Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

2009 health care debate 1s about to begin

THE UNITED States is on the verge of a
great debate about health care. President
Obama’s announcement of a comprehensive
$634 billion down payment over a decade
has put the issue on the political front-burn-
er.
Unlike 15 years ago under the Clintons,
expectation this time around is that at least
some important incremental reforms are
achievable.

As the haggling and lobbying begin, as
long-vested interests collide, there are many
questions to be resolved. There are also exist-
ing certainties.

With the Baby Boomers’ generation begin-
ning to retire, it is certain that health care
resources will be increasingly pressed. In
2007, the U.S. spent $2.2 trillion on health.
The Congressional Budget Office predicts
that would rise sharply from 16 per cent of the
gross domestic product, then to 25 per cent by
2025.

Much of the health-care dollar is spent on
patients in their final months of life and the 10
per cent of the very sickest account for 70 per
cent of the costs.

It is also beyond question that America
spends more on its health than any other
industrial nation. Despite that expenditure, it
does not rate anywhere near No. | in good
health attained or services delivered. Amer-
icans are not getting fair return on their
investment.

A major factor is that 46 million or so
Americans have no health care insurance,
and about 25 million more have too little to
protect them from bankruptcy and other eco-
nomic penalties, such as losing their homes to
pay medical bills. Obama’s plan is to reduce,
not eliminate, the number of uninsured.
Insuring everyone, according to experts,
would cost an additional $100 billion year, far
exceeding the proposed fund.

Businesses that once opposed national
health-care reforms have now mostly seen
the cost of company-paid insurance for their
employees increase steeply year by year.
Their ability to compete domestically or glob-
ally is seriously impaired. American manu-
facturers on average pay almost 60 per cent
more per hour for benefits than their overseas
competitors. Smaller businesses are unable to
provide any health care for their workers.

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Those who benefit richly from the status
quo — especially pharmaceuticals and insur-
ers — participated in preliminary reform
talks to try to tailor them to their special
interests. The thought is that upgrading health
care coverage is inevitable, given that Obama
has the populist wind at his back.

The details remain to be spelled out by
the White House, but a Congress historically
susceptible to the largesse of lobbyists would
shape the extent of the actual reforms. The
clash between private and governmental
approaches will take centre stage. President
Obama is enhancing government’s role and
pressing private insurers and providers of
drugs and medical devices to reduce costs.

The long-standing arguments over a sin-
gle-payer system (the federal government)
are premature, for it is not part of the presi-
dent’s package.

Single-payer systems are criticised by oppo-
nents as denying their users physician choice
and as inevitably leading to a rationing of
services.

For their part, private insurers are hailed by
supporters for preserving choice without
rationing care as well as delivering greater
efficiencies and lower costs through market
competition.

The debate will surely get very hot even
though Americans since 1965 have had expe-
rience with a limited form of single-payer
system. Its name is Medicare, the health
insurer for seniors.

The argument about governmental ineffi-
ciencies and higher costs are confounded by
the record. Medicare delivers services to its
clients at a saving of 14 per cent of what it
pays for the same services provided by private
insurers.

To help pay for these utterly essential
reforms, it is right to try to squeeze it out of a
bloated and inefficient medical care process
as well as to restore the top tax rate for those
earning $250,000 and more. Given how their
wealth has increased, they can afford it more
than a working poor family of four can afford
the $12,000 a year to buy private insurance.

For the former it is an inconvenience; for
the latter, it is an impossibility.

(This article was written by Harry Rosenfeld
C.2009 Albany Times Union).



Our leaders
need to find
their bearing

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas is in need of
change. We need a sense of
optimism that somehow things
will be different and better and
soon.

Such change doesn’t just hap-
pen. It has to be worked at. And
given the prevailing circum-
stances in The Bahamas, the
effort has to be hard and sus-
tained, demanding of a strong
and moral leadership, capable
of forging consensus, yet will-
ing to take risks in doing what is
right for the country.

It is for such leadership to
which we look to Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham as the
country faces its many prob-
lems, not least of which is the
grave economic crises, a conse-
quence of the global credit
crunch and accompanying
recession.

The Bahamas’ stratospheric
level of criminal violence and
poor outcomes in education are
among the perennial problems
requiring, as they have always
done, urgent attention.

Unfortunately, in the near
two years that Mr Ingraham has
been Prime Minister he has not
displayed the transformational
leadership he had convinced the
majority of Bahamians he was
capable of on May 2, 2007.

The Government’s apologists,
with politically conventional
reasoning, will argue that it has
done rather well, considering

letters@tribunemedia net



our political and economic cir-
cumstance.

The bigger issue, I feel, is
whether Mr Ingraham believes
that The Bahamas is in need of
radical transformation and
whether he is willing to throw
the significant power and pres-
tige of his office to effect such
fundamental change.

If he does, Mr Ingraham has
to look beyond the next elec-
tion and go for broke.

If Mr Ingraham has arrived
at this place, he must begin to
talk sincerely and frankly to the
Bahamian people, outlining a
clear vision for the future and
his path for getting there,
including the difficulties they
will have to endure.

He should tell people, too,
that in the current economic cir-
cumstance, many of his party's
electoral promises cannot be
kept.

To my mind, the mumbo-
jumbo about GDP, GFS, debt
ratios, recurrent expenditure,
etc, while important in the over-
all scheme of things, do not res-
onate with the single mother in
Jubilee Gardens who was laid
off last December and can no
longer meet her mortgage pay-
ments or the cab driver who

yesterday had only three short-
haul fares for the entire day.

Mr Ingraham should not be
afraid to send some of the
under performers in his bloated
administration to the parlia-
mentary back bench and con-
stitute a tight, action-oriented
‘war Cabinet’ to confront this
economic crisis.

He will find that there is
strong political support in the
society if he communicates
effectively and makes the case
that his actions are in the peo-
ple’s interest.

While, as Prime Minister, he
has the major responsibility, the
challenge of mobilising the
Bahamian people to action and
behaviour beyond individual
interests, is not solely Mr Ingra-
ham’s.

It is a job for all of us, includ-
ing the Opposition which must
see its mandate as being beyond
mere carping criticism.

Perhaps not unlike Mr Ingra-
ham, the PLP, with much talk
about its future leadership in
the air, is yet to find itself and
head on a clear visionary path,
post May 2007.

It has failed to articulate any
clear or alternative policy posi-
tions.

Hopefully, it will not be too
long before our leaders find
their bearing.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
February 27, 2009.

Slavery alive and kicking in the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have read articles from time to time about
workers and am in agreement with most of them.

that we have no one to look out for us, including
the “uncle toms” that serve as masters cracking

To set the record straight the problem isnot that day.

Bahamians are against foreign workers, the prob-
lem is that the foreign workers should possess
experience and knowledge to impart with their
counterparts (the Bahamian worker). If this is
not the case then why are they needed — simply

to collect lavish salaries?

The financial institutions are good examples
of top executives with little or no qualifications
work experience in the field is simply a joke. Yet
they obtain work permits, live in expensive homes
and condos, drive the latest model vehicles all at

whips all day long. Their only concern is that
they get their piece of the pie at the end of the

I would think it would be an interesting study to
see what the turn over rate is like at some of
these financial institutions and to hear their rea-
soning for the high rate of turnovers. This has
been going on for years yet some of us pretend

not to be aware because it does not affect us

the company’s expense while making the lives

of Bahamians miserable with their slave mental-

ities.

They get away with this because they are aware

Nassau,

directly. Sadly for the vast majority of the employ-
ees affected, they refrain from speaking out for
fear of being fired — and we talk about slavery
being abolished, do not fool yourself it is alive and
kicking in the Bahamas.

SIMONE BETHEL

February 21, 2009.

An immigration question Bahamians need answered

EDITOR, The Tribune.

While it appears on the sur-
face that our Immigration
Department is doing a good job
at rounding up illegal immi-
grants, one cannot help but

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notice that this seems directed
more towards Haitian nation-
als.

To my understanding a hot-
line has been established to
ensure prompt responses in
assisting with this effort.

In light of the economic con-
ditions in our country today,
and as this affects the entire
Bahamas, it is my view that
Bahamians should be advised
how is it that work permits or

approvals were given to bring
in more than one hundred
workers to participate in the
Michael Jordan Celebrity Invi-
tational.

Do you mean to tell me pro-
visions not be made for at least
50 Bahamians to be given
employment?

EMERALD SMITH
Nassau,
February 20, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

At least 12 major drug trafficking
organisations ‘operating in Bahamas’

International security
forces to meet at
Defence Force Base

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter ;
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

SECURITY forces from the
United States, Britain and i
across the Caribbean will meet }
at the Royal Bahamas :
Defence Force Base this week
in an international effort to ;
stop illicit drug trafficking at
sea. ;
The 25th annual Tradewinds }
exercise, designed to improve i
cooperation and inter-oper-
ability of Caribbean Basin

Partner Nations responding to i

regional security threats, will

involve security forces from 16 :

Caribbean countries, more
than 500 US service members

and the British Royal Marines.

They will meet at the Coral

Harbour base for two weeks of :

training exercises starting
today.

itime interdiction and search
and rescue operations with an
emphasis on command and
control.

Participants will practice
boarding party operations
training, evidence processing

and hazardous material identi- i

fication and handling.
Tradewinds 2009 is spon-
sored by the US Southern

Command (USSOUTHCOM) }
and utilises inceptor boats and :

extensive surveillance suites
provided by the USSOUTH-
COM-sponsored Enduring
Friendship programme.

It aims to successfully train
participants so they may
return to their respective

countries to further train their :

nation’s security forces.

US Marine Corps Forces
South exercise coordinator
Major Landon Hutchens said:
“The goals are to better coor-
dinate partner nations’ search
and rescue maritime interdic-
tion operations, increase mar-
itime domain awareness and
better coordinate end-game

seizure of illicit-trafficking ves- } :

sels that can be used to smug-
gle terrorist, weapons, explo-
sives or narcotics.”

Exercises will focus on mar- }

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

THE United States gov-
ernment has praised the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas in
its efforts to control the ille-
gal drugs trade in the 2009
International Narcotics Con-
trol Strategy Report
(INSCR).

In the report, the US’
Drug Enforcement Admin-
istration and OPBAT esti-
mate that there are 12 to 15
major drug trafficking organ-
isations operating in the
Bahamas.

US Embassy representa-
tive Jeff Dubel said the
report is a good reflection
on the Bahamian govern-
ment’s dedication to crack-
ing down on the illicit trade.

By working with the US
government and participat-
ing in the international drug
interdiction effort Operation
Bahamas Turks and Caicos
(OPBAT), the Bahamian
government seized 1,878
kilogrammes of cocaine,
approximately 12 metric tons
of marijuana, $3.9milllion in
cash, and the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit (DEU) arrested
1,030 people on drug-related

MP voices concern over US
‘protectionist’ legislative measures

THE financial services sector in
the Bahamas is being threatened by
growing “protectionist” legislative
measures in the United States,
Charlotte MP Alfred Sears said.

In the first session of the 110th
Congress, a Bill entitled “Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Act” was sponsored
in the United States Senate by Sen-
ators Levin and Coleman, and then

Senator Obama.

The objective of the Bill is “to
restrict the use of offshore tax
havens and abusive tax shelters to
inappropriately avoid Federal Tax-

ation, and for other purposes.”

Speaking on Monday in parlia-
“The Bill §
places the Bahamas on the initial
list of offshore secrecy jurisdictions
which should be deemed listed by
the Secretary of the Treasury and
subject to penal sanctions. Such
jurisdictions will be subject to a ‘rebuttable pre-
sumption’ that a US person exercised control of
an entity, where he/she directly or indirectly
formed or transferred assets to, was a beneficia-
ry of, or received money or property, or the use
thereof from a trust, formed, domiciled or oper-
ating in an offshore secrecy jurisdiction,” Mr

ment, Mr Sears said:

Sears said.

The former attorney general said that the Bill
also authorises the Secretary of the Treasury, in
consultation with the Secretary of State, the US
Attorney General and the chairman of the Fed-
eral Reserve, to take punitive measures against
such jurisdictions, including prohibiting any cor-
responding accounts or payable-through accounts

Ft



Alfred Sears

by US financial institutions or the
use of accredit, debit or charge card
in the United States.

Mr Sears called these legislative
measures “threatening” and recom-
mend that the FNM government
take measures now to protect the
financial services sector rather than
wait until the Bahamas is black-list-
ed again by the United States and
the OECD.

“T recommend that the govern-
ment of the Commonwealth of the
| Bahamas lobby the United States
to stop the passage of the Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Bill by the Unites
States House of Representatives and
Senate and to educate the Unites
States policy makers, media and
public of the true nature of the
Bahamian financial industry and the
collective commitment of the
Bahamas to fight money laundering
and the financing of terrorism,” he said.

He also suggested that the government pro-
mote the convening of a global forum on money
laundering and terrorist financing, under the aus-
pices of the United Nations, leading to the for-
mation of a global treaty.

“The government, in partnership with the pri-

vate sector, should invest in a policy research

Group hoping to organise
three annual trips to Cuba

A LOCAL group is hoping
to organise three annual trips
to Cuba to familiarise Bahami-
ans with the reality of life in
that country.

The Bahamas Cuba Friend-
ship Society (BCFS) said it
would like to raise funding for
the trips, which will be under-
taken “with a view to meeting
with comrades in Cuba”.

The group said it wants to
send three standing members
of the BCFS along with two
invited guests, who it intends
to familiarise with “Cuban real-
ity as it is live and experienced
by the Cuban people”.

Over the past several years,
sympathetic Bahamians have
largely confined their efforts
to raising awareness of the neg-
ative effects of the US embargo
on the Cuban population and
the plight of five anti-terror-
ism agents, known as the
Cuban Five, who are serving
lengthy jail sentences in the

However, in a statement
issued yesterday, the BCFS
said it wants to branch out and
become active on a number of
other fronts.

The group said it wishes to
showcase the work being done
by Cubans in the Bahamas,
highlight Bahamians who have
been educated in Cuba, and
increase awareness about
Cuban assistance to the people
of the Bahamas, particularly
those in need of eye
surgery.

The group also wants to
forge ties between academic
institutions in the two coun-
tries, perhaps leading to
teacher and student exchanges
— “all done with the goal in
mind of fostering mutual
understanding and respect
between the Cuban people and
their Bahamian counterparts”.

The BCFS said its aims are
to promote friendship, co-oper-
ation and solidarity between
the people of the Bahamas and
Cuba, focusing its efforts on:

¢ The exchange of informa-
tion about the respective coun-
tries

e¢ Public education in the
Bahamas about the history,
geography and current politi-
cal situation in Cuba

¢ The promotion of Cuban
culture in the Bahamas

¢ Support for Cuban sover-
eignty and self-determination;

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and opposition to interven-
tionist policies

¢ The provision of material
assistance to the Cuban people
when and where needed — for
example for reconstruction in
the aftermath of natural disas-
ters.

The group’s statement said:
“The Bahamas Cuba Friend-
ship Society upholds and
defends the right of the Cuban
people to determine their own
destiny and to freely pursue
their own social, economic and
cultural development.

“BCFS defends the right of
the Cuban people to self-deter-
mination and national sover-
eignty. This is an inalienable
right. BCFS strongly condemns
the economic, financial, eco-
nomic and cultural blockade
imposed by the US government

for over 48 years on the Cuban
people, which violates the most
elementary principles of human
rights and international law
and is a direct challenge to
Cuba's right to self-determina-
tion and national sovereignty.

“BCFS opposes the use of
immoral tools such as threats
of military intervention, trade,
cultural and scientific embar-
go, starvation diplomacy, and
the promotion of disinforma-
tion about Cuba.

“BCFS believes that Cuba's
commitment to the basic rights
of health, education and social
welfare set an example to the
world and that it has demon-
strated a high moral and
humanitarian character in its
international support and soli-
darity to other third world
countries.

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facility, at the College of the Bahamas, to conduct
economic intelligence monitoring of the global
economy and trends, to assess their impact on
the financial services industry in the Bahamas
and propose policy options to improve the com-
petitiveness of the Bahamian jurisdiction as a
centre of wealth management,” Mr Sears said.

offences throughout 2008.

Mr Dubel said: “Drug
busts are a success story. It
means we have got intelli-
gence working together.

“The more drugs we inter-
cede is actually a good sign,
it shows that everyone's
working together and hope-
fully they will be prosecut-
ed and they will stop.”

John Moppert, head of the
US Embassy's narcotics
affairs sector, commended
these efforts and said the US
remains committed to stem-
ming the flow of illegal drugs
through the Bahamas and
the United States.

He said priorities for 2009
are to rebuild the Defence
Force base in Great Inagua
as the severe damage caused
by Hurricane Ike in Septem-
ber forced US troops to tem-
porarily relocate their heli-
copters to Turks and Caicos,
leading to a slow-down in
operations last year.

Mr Moppart said: “We
agree that Great Inagua is
in a strategically important
location for not only nar-
cotics but also illegal immi-

gration, so we want to go
ahead and rebuild Great
Inagua and increase capaci-
ty.

“The first step is going to
be to get the base back up
and running and doing
repairs to the damage done
by Hurricane Ike.”

Further plans are in place
to station a Haitian police
officer in Great Inagua and
integrating Creole speakers
in the DEU to develop
information on Haitian drug
traffickers transiting the
Bahamas.

Mr Moppert said: “Much
of the illegal migration from
Haiti up to the Bahamas
comes through the windward
pass and up through Great
Inagua, so we have been dis-
cussing the possibility of sta-
tioning a Haitian officer at
Great Inagua for the last
couple of years.”

He also commended the
Bahamian government for
taking the initiative to turn
away all wooden-hulled
Haitian sloops passing Great
Inagua in the southern
Bahamas.

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OCU SS cy
NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica) will visit Freeport and
Nassau from 9 to 11 March 2009 and will be available to discuss any individual problems
concerning passports and nationality issues.

Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent by courier direct to the
High Commission in Kingston.

FREEPORT: MONDAY, 9 MARCH
10:00am to 4:00pm (Venue to be determined)

NASSAU: TUESDAY, 10 MARCH and WEDNESDAY, 11 MARCH

10:00am to 4:00pm at British Honorary Consul’s residence in Winton

Appointments for all 3 days can be booked by calling the
Honorary Consul in Nassau on 324-4089.



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Former AG claims US agents ‘illegally
approaching local financial institutions’

Detention Centre

FROM page one

abuse by guards and insuffi-

cient food.

Reports reaching this news- :
paper yesterday from the cen- }
tre were that the detainees are }

still striking.

Senior Deputy Director }
Roderick Bowe, who did not }
participate in Monday’s tour }
of the facility, said social ser- }
vices officials and clergymen }
went with Director of Immi- }
gration Jack Thompson and }
Commodore Clifford Scavella }
to act as independent eyes and }

ears.

“The purpose of the visit :
was to confirm that the Deten- ;
tion Centre is being operated
with transparency and that we }
are not running the detention :
centre as was previously }

claimed,” said Mr Bowe.

“They looked at the living
conditions and the state of the }

centre itself.”

This comes after requests
from The Tribune in the wake }
of detainee’s claims — which }
prompted international human
rights organisation Amnesty }
International to call for an }
independent investigation into ;
conditions at the centre — that }

the media be allowed access.

Last week Minister of State ;
for Immigration, Branville }
McCartney suggested that if :
an investigation by an inter- }
national body were to be per-

mitted, Immigration “would
want other persons to be }
there” as “these international }
reports tend to be aeeMely
wrong.”

Mr Bowe said he was
unable to comment on the |
findings of those who toured }

the facility. “I wish I could but i

I wasn’t there,” he added.

Asked which social services ;
personnel and clergy accom- }
panied officials on the visit, :
Mr Bowe said another officer :
would provide names later in ;
the day. No follow up calls
were received up to press time. }
A message left for Mr Thomp-
son, who was said to be in i

office, was not returned.

Meanwhile, Mr Bowe also }
confirmed that 114 illegal :
Haitian immigrants residing at }
the facility were repatriated }
onboard a Bahamasair 737 jet }
to Port-au-Prince, Haiti yes- i

terday morning.

The Haitians had been sent
to the Detention Centre after }
aseries of recent daily round- }

ups.

FROM page one

as they perceive the Mutual Legal
Assistance Treaty (MLAT) mecha-
nism between the Bahamas and the
United States of America for inter-
national co-operation as being too
time-consuming and cumbersome,"
Mr Sears, MP for Fort Charlotte, said
Monday during the 2008/2009 mid-
term budget debate.

Mr Sears, who resumed private
legal practice with his firm Sears and
Co folowing the PLP’s election
defeat in 2007, also recommended
that government "make an official
protest against the practice by agents
of the United States and other
OECD member countries who
undermine the legal process in the
Bahamas by secking to induce
Bahamian financial institutions and
professions to break the law.”

He added: "If the government
were to protest now, it would give
the Bahamas a tactical advantage or
the moral high ground, rather than
raising them when the Bahamas is
on the defensive or the object of an
imminent threat."

The MLAT is legislation that
enables US regulators and legal
authorities to seek information
through the Attorney General's
Office relevant to criminal cases they
are investigating through the
Bahamian court system and court
orders.

Other than MLAT, US authori-
ties can also request tax-related
information on specific criminal and
civil cases through the Tax Informa-
tion Exchange Agreement (TIEA)
with the Bahamas.

The Bahamas Financial Intelli-
gence Unit (FIU) also exchanges

information with its foreign counter-
parts, and there is regulator-to-regu-
lator co-operation between the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas and the
Securities Commission and their
counterparts, like the US Securities
and Exchange Commission (SEC).

This network gives a measure of
protection against “fishing expedi-
tions" to local financial institutions
and their clients.

In January, Mr Sears warned Tri-
bune Business of dire consequences
for the local financial sector if US
prosecutors were continually allowed
to circumvent existing treaties
between the two countries.

"The rule of law, which is one of
the major attractions for operating
in the Bahamas, will be eroded if US
agencies, with impunity, can come
into this jurisdiction, bypass the
treaty arrangements and just ignore

the comity between the Bahamas and
the US, flouting their own laws as
well as the laws of the Bahamas."

He urged government to make a
"very strong diplomatic protest"
against the practices.

In an interview with Tribune Busi-
ness, Mr Laing branded Mr Sears'
assertions as "irresponsible."

He said the country had received
only eight to 11 requests for tax
information from the US since the
FNM assumed office in 2007. Mr
Laing said his ministry had not
received any complaints from the
Bahamas Financial Services Board
(BFSB), other industry associates or
any Bahamian-based institutions.

Mr Laing also said government
"expected" to sign more MLATs
with other countries, especially
Brazil, considering the various
requests that had come in.

Principal calls for
police probe into fight |

FROM page one

The altercation — which
involved several 13/14-
year-old students, two
police officers and some
non-students — followed
closely behind another con-
frontation last Friday.

He said he had been led
to believe the fight
stemmed from threats
issued by people living at
a property near the school
to some male L W Young
students — and that the
off-duty officer who got
involved is related to those
who issued the threats.

“There’s a house on the
side of the school here
where the fence is broken

Pinder's Funeral Home
Seredor Hyon Mearare
PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570) 993-1351 * CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

A Memorial Service

for the late

Sylvia

Cole-
Tierney

will be held Wednesday, March 4, 2009,

4:00pm at

Pinder's Funeral

Home

Palmdale Ave., Palmdale, Rev. Charles
Sweeting will be officiating. She is
survived by her two brothers, Robert and

Charles (Chuck)

Hall:

two sisters,

Theodora (Teddy) Albury and Joan
Graham; two sister-in-law, Jean and June
Hall; one brother-in-law, Gary Albury; two
granddaughters, Jessica and Wendy Guy:
four nephews, Jock and Richard Hall,
Stuart and lan Graham: six nieces, Valerie
and Hope Albury, Dawn Walkine, Linda
Hall, Sheila Scott and Erin Paniagua.



and during the lunch hour
these guys (the non-stu-
dents) will always be talk-
ing to the girls (students).
So it may be over a girl,”
he added.

This comes after witness-
es quoted in yesterday’s
Tribune said that a gunshot
was fired by a passing
police officer when boys
attacked an off-duty offi-
cer who had allegedly tried
to break up a knife fight
near the school on Monday
afternoon.

A witness claimed the
off-duty officer held down
one of the students, who
had been brawling ona
side road, shortly before
other boys in the group ran
off and returned with rocks
to attack him.

But contrary to initial
reports, Mr Mullings said
he had doubts that the off-
duty officer was acting for
the reasons claimed when

he got involved.

“T don’t know if he came
to break up the fight. lam
led to believe that (the
non-LW Young students
involved in the fight) may
be his family or some rela-
tives or something,” he
said, adding that he heard
students were attacked by
local residents before they
retaliated.

The principal said he has
not had a chance to speak
at length with the boys he
knows to have been
involved — both of whom
were taking part in a track
and field day at the school
yesterday — but he has
heard from one that “some
threats were sent out from
the neighbour that some-
thing would happen after
school that afternoon.”

Mr Mullings said he
thinks police should have
taken those living on the
nearby property in for

questioning following
the alleged fight last Fri-
day.

“They should’ve taken all
of those people into cus-
tody,” he said.

Asked whether he thinks
the police investigation has
been comprehensive
enough so far, the princi-
pal said he “do(esn’t) think
so.”

The school official said
he was seeking to contact
police yesterday to discuss
the matter, but calls had
not been returned.

Speaking with The Tri-
bune before Mr Mullings
made his comment, police
press liaison officer Walter
Evans said that no-one has
yet been taken into custody
in connection with Mon-
day’s incident.

Messages seeking a
police response to the prin-
cipal’s concerns were not
returned up to press time.

ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE

is accepting applications for the
2009-2010 Academic Year

anish

One person - to teach Spanish to grades seven through ten

Social Studies/History

One person - to teach Social Studies and History to grade eight to twelve. Experience in
preparing for external examinations is a requirement.

English Language

iterature

One person- to teach English Language/Literature to all grade levels. Experience in
preparing candidates for B.J.C and B.G.C.S.E examinations is required.

Two person - to teach English Language/Literature at the Grade seven and Eight levels.

Chemistry

Two persons - to teach Chemistry to grades nine through twelve. The applicant must
have experience in preparing students for external examinations.

One person - to teach General Science and Chemistry to all grade levels. The applicant
must have experience in preparing students for external examinations

Physical Education

One person - to teach Physical Education to all grade levels. The applicant must be
available to coach varsity teams in the core sports.

Mathematics

Three persons - to teach mathematics to all grade levels. Experience in preparing
students for external examinations (BJC, BGCSE & SAT) is a requirement

One person -
The applicant
examinations

must

to teach General
have

Biology

experience

science and Biology to all
in preparing

grade levels.
students for external

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited university and a Teacher’s
Certificate. Two letters of reference, copies of all degrees and certificate, and
two passport size photos should be submitted. A commitment to the values of
Catholic, Benedictine education is expected of our teachers. Only those persons who
have no difficulty with the Roman Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply. Please sub-
mit application and required documents to:

The Principal
St. Augustine’s College

P.O. Box N-3940
Nassau, Bahamas



Detectives
visit Sean
Connery in
conmmection
With civil suit
FROM page one

friend, Jean René — a
French businessman — £3
million to help him buy
property in the early 1970s.

But when the two men’s
friendship ended around
1978, Sir Sean is alleged to
have sold off the assets his
friend offered to him as
security for the loan at a
“massive profit”, equivalent
to him having charged a
1000 per cent rate of inter-
est, according to The Daily
Mail.

Those assets reportedly
included diamonds, shares,
and property on the French
Riviera.

Mr René’s_ family
launched legal proceedings
to recover the profits from
the sales after he died in
Switzerland in 2002.

They claim, according to
the newspaper, that the
sales proceeds far exceeded
the value of the original
loan extended to Mr René
by Sir Sean.

A spokesman for the
actor’s Los Angeles-based
publicist said on Tuesday:
“We are looking into it.
Neither Sir Sean nor any-
one else is aware of it.”

British banker's
hid to acquire
GBPA appears
to have ended

FROM page one

their side of the deal.

Mr Fleming had reached
an agreement to acquire the
Hayward trust’s stake —
whether it is 50 per cent or
75 per cent is still being dis-
puted in the courts — in the
GBPA and its Port Group
Ltd affiliate amid the
intense ownership battle
that was being fought with
the late Edward St
George’s estate.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, though, said last
year that Government
would now allow Mr Flem-
ing to acquire 100 per cent
of the GBPA. Mr Fleming
had harboured hopes that
he could persuade the St
George estate to sell to
him, too.

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 7





Anger on Abaco over an alleged
attempt to stop crime rise report

PEOPLE in Abaco are furious over a
police attempt to stop the press reporting
a dramatic rise in crime on the island.

Supt Sean Neville-Smith has allegedly
told the local newspaper that it can no
longer carry crime reports “because they
reflect badly on the police.”

The publishers of The Abaconian,
David and Kathy Ralph, are unhappy
about the ban and are calling on readers
to phone in their crime news.

Readers, meanwhile, are angry at what
they see as a blatant attempt to keep
important information away from the
public.

The police attempt to gag the press
follows a worrying upsurge in crime in
Abaco and growing disgruntlement over
the police force’s effectiveness there.

Residents are concerned that the
recent kidnapping of a foreign investor,
the mugging of a well-known local
woman, and a spate of boat thefts will
turn away the yachtsmen and second-
home owners who form the backbone

Commission of inquiry

of the island economy.

Now they are calling for a town meet-
ing to thrash out the crime situation -
and demand better policing.

Locals are particularly alarmed by the
attempted kidnapping of a would-be
investor during the island’s Junkanoo
parade last month.

Money

The investor sought police help after
being released from the boot of his car
by a thief who demanded that he extract
money from an ATM machine in Marsh
Harbour.

When the investor told a policeman
of his plight, the officer allegedly replied:
“T can’t help - I’m here to patrol the
Junkanoo parade.”

Meanwhile, the kidnapper fled into
the crowd.

The investor had earlier been threat-
ened with a machete before being forced
into the trunk of his own car.

A local told The Tribune last night:
“This man was in Abaco to buy a resort
property. It’s hardly the kind of thing
that will encourage him to return.”

In the past, Abaco has been relatively
crime-free. But rising unemployment
and a tightening economy have pushed
up the theft rate.

Hardest hit have been visiting yachts,
some valued at $100,000 or more. On
more than one occasion, boats have
arrived in Abaco one day and been
stolen the next.

But the mugging of well-known resi-
dent Lily Sands, who is in her seventies,
has really brought home the changing
crime scene on the island.

Ms Sands was accosted by two peo-
ple with guns who forced her into her
own home in a normally quiet residential
area of Marsh Harbour.

Then they locked her in a closet before
stealing money and other items.

A resident said: “Boats are disap-
pearing like crazy. We have to get help

in Turks and Caicos

up here. We must get Nassau’s atten-
tion because this crime is going to kill the
economy.”

Mr and Mrs Ralph, who have been
running The Abaconian since 1993, said
they had been told by Supt Neville-Smith
that they would not be allowed any more
crime reports.

Backlash

“The people of Abaco are very upset,”
said Mrs Ralph. “We are going to get a
big backlash against this.”

Meanwhile, locals say a public meeting
is required to air grievances and call for
a police response to their concerns.

While Abaco enjoyed full employ-
ment, crime was low.

“But lay-offs will trigger an upsurge in
theft, they believe.

Messages left for Supt Neville-Smith
with officers at the Marsh Harbour
Police Station yesterday afternoon were
not returned up to press time.

Is 2005 our then prime min-
ister, Perry Christie, was
invited to open the new legisla-
tive building in the Turks &
Caicos Islands. He said the new
parliament would be "the forum
within which bold and innovative
ideas will be crystallized" by
Turks Islanders.

Well, he was certainly right
about that. In fact, the ideas were
so bold they led straight to a
British-appointed commission of
inquiry into corruption and mis-
rule that handed a "wide-rang-
ing" preliminary report to the gov-
ernor this past weekend. The rec-
ommendations will not be pub-
lished immediately, and a final
report is not due until the end of
April.

The commission was appointed
last year to inquire into corrup-
tion among members of the legis-
lature. It is led by a British jurist
(Sir Robin Auld), who took part
in the 1967 inquiry into casino
gambling in the Bahamas. Four
weeks of public hearings at the
Regent Palms Hotel ended on
February 11, and the commission
is now working on its report in
London.

But Chief Minister Michael
Misick saw the writing on the wall,
and did not even wait for the
interim report. He announced his
resignation in mid-February —
with effect from the end of this
month. And in a party meeting
this past Saturday, former immi-
gration minister Galmore
Williams was elected to lead the
People’s National Party, and will
presumably take over the pre-
miership next month.

How different are the present
circumstances from those halcy-
on days of 2006, when a slew of
PLP ministers led by Perry
Christie partied down at Misick's
celebrated wedding to sexy Amer-
ican starlet LisaRaye McCoy at
the ultra-luxurious Amanyara
Resort. The best man at the wed-
ding was none other than Obie
Wilchcombe, a cousin of Misick's,
who was then our minister of
tourism.

Misick became chief minister
in 2003, when the PNP won 8 out
of 13 seats in the legislature, and
he led the party to an even bigger
victory in 2007, almost wiping out
the once dominant People’s
Democratic Movement. When he
was first elected his declared
worth was only $50,000, but Mis-
ick told the commission recently
that he now had assets of $23 mil-
lion plus debts of $20 million.

Information about Misick's
finances did not come easily.
According to the commission's
chief counsel, Alex Milne, "when
he gave evidence (the premier)
was at times obtuse, unforthcom-
ing and verging on the trucu-
lent...The total that we could not
explain going into (his) bank
accounts was $10.4 million, which
is a lot of money.”

Misick also vastly inflated his
official remuneration. The cost of
the premier's office rose from
$170,000 in 2003 to over $4 million
today, a sum which includes a big-
ger salary than that of the British
prime minister. But those free-
spending days are over. Misick
himself acknowledged recently
that he was "mired in allegations
of corruption and scandal so
deep" he had no choice but to
step down.

The premier has criticised the
commission proceedings as "far-
reaching and intrusive" — a fact

confirmed by the recent banning
on Radio Turks & Caicos of a
controversial song by local per-
former Jack Nasty. The song fea-
tures a chorus that says "Every-
body's Business Getting Out",
and reports are that the CD has
been flying off the shelves since
the commission hearings.

"Everybody's — business"
includes testimony from Lis-
aRaye, who is engaged in a high-
ly publicised and stormy breakup
with Misick that has involved
threats and allegations of assault
by both parties. McCoy filed for
divorce last year after Misick was
accused of raping one of her girl-
friends, although Misick claimed
the sex was consensual. He also
fathered two children with a mis-
tress during his short-lived mar-
riage to McCoy.

"Everybody's business" also
includes the failure of government
ministers to declare their finan-
cial interests as required by law;
the corrupt sale of crown land to
foreigners; and millions of dollars
in payoffs to the governing party
from private interests — much of
it stashed in secret bank accounts
thousands of miles away in Belize.

These accounts disbursed large
amounts of irregular cash to the
premier and other top PNP lead-
ers with no accountability what-
soever, according to evidence giv-
en at the commission. In one case
over $100,000 was paid by the
PNP to LisaRaye's California-
based hair stylist. And Misick
himself received millions from the
party and directly from investors.

In closing remarks to the
inquiry, chief counsel Milne
described the PNP as "a multi-
million-dollar enterprise, bought
and paid for by a small number of
rich individuals, many if not most
of whom appear to have pros-
pered under the current govern-
ment. It acts, in effect if not by
design, as a conduit for large
amounts of unregulated and unde-
clared cash from individuals to
politicians."

Milne also showed that Misick
had borrowed many millions
more from a variety of individuals
and investment companies seek-
ing to do business in the territory,
with no evidence of any effort to
repay the money. "Copious evi-
dence” was also produced that
cabinet decisions were riddled
with conflict of interest.

"The Commission has seen evi-
dence of massive sums of money
being injected into a small political
economy which cannot possibly
be justified by the number of vot-
ers. The party accounts appear to
operate as a slush fund for the
senior members into which they
could apparently dip at will.”

Only about 36,000 people live
in the Turks & Caicos, which has
less than 7,000 voters spread
across 15 constituencies. Most
government revenue comes from
land sales and from the 200,000
tourists who visit each year. The
TCI is a self-governing British
colony that used to be adminis-
tered by the Bahamas, until we
became independent in 1973.

"Money has, in my submission,
distorted and corroded the politi-
cal fabric of this territory," Milne



continued. “It has undermined
the claim of the current adminis-
tration to any form of legitimacy
or respect. Small-scale graft has
been extrapolated to monstrous
proportions by an influx of monies
previously not seen. The road
back from this state of affairs will
be difficult.”

However, the commission is not
a police inquiry and its hearings
were not a trial. While its final
report will make recommenda-
tions to the British authorities, it
will not decide what happens to
individuals or to the territory as a
whole. "Those tasks will fall to
those who come after us," accord-
ing to Sir Robin, the commission
chairman.

"The most I can do...is to rec-
ommend further and more search-
ing investigations by the police
and/or some other public enforce-
ment body."

Nevertheless, Anthony Hall, a
Washington-based lawyer and
columnist with roots in both the
Bahamas and TCI, says the com-
mission has uncovered evidence
“of what amounts to a criminal
syndicate masquerading as a local
government. And this should
compel Sir Robin to make emer-
gency recommendations to miti-
gate our financial and reputation-
al losses, to say nothing of the
growing contingent liabilities of
the British government."

Meanwhile, the TCI Free Press
(published by Bahamian Gilbert
Morris, who has a résumé a mile
long on Wikipedia and claims
once to have been a Carmelite
monk), speaks glowingly of the
strong Bahamian connection
among the defence team hired by
Misick:

"Edward Fitzgerald QC has
tried some of the most stupen-
dous cases in recent British his-
tory and is married to an aristo-
crat; Maurice Glinton is the Cam-
bridge-educated intellectual
heavyweight; Raynard Rigby is
from an old line family from the
educational establishment of
Turks and Caicos and a potential
future prime minister of the
Bahamas; and Damian Gomez is
the son of the former archbishop
and himself a former supreme
court judge.”

Most observers see three pos-
sible outcomes from the commis-
sion's report — criminal prosecu-
tions, a general election, or sus-
pension of the constitution. This
last is something the British were
forced to do once before. In 1985,
former chief minister Norman
Saunders and his development
minister Stafford Missick, (a one-
time official of the Bahamas Cen-
tral Bank), were arrested in Mia-
mi on drug trafficking and bribery
charges. They were both convict-
ed and imprisoned in the US. A
revamped constitution was
restored two years later.

Tough Call cannot understand
why there is so little coverage in
the Bahamian media of this sala-
cious political drama that is
unfolding almost right before our
eyes — especially when there are
said to be as many Turks Islanders
living in the Bahamas as there are
remaining in TCI itself. After all,
there is nothing like a commis-







Michael Misick (AP)

sion of inquiry to throw light on
secret government, and transcripts
of the hearings are easily avail-
able online.

According to the Internet mail-
ing list, Turks & Caicos Informers,
" Alex Milne, counsel to the com-
mission, has stated that ‘Mon-
ey...has undermined the claim of
the current administration to any
form of legitimacy or respect.’ The
64 thousand dollar question then
is: What does one do with an ille-
gitimate government?"

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com



O In brief

search will end
for NFL players
off Florida coast

m CLEARWATER, Fla.

THE Coast Guard called off the
search Tuesday for two NFL players
and a third man lost at sea off the
Florida coast after their boat cap-
sized during a fishing trip, according
to Associated Press.

The Coast Guard said it doesn’t
believe anyone is on the surface of
the water and the search would end
at sundown. Still missing in rough,
cold water were Oakland Raiders
linebacker Marquis Cooper, free-
agent defensive lineman Corey
Smith and former South Florida
player William Bleakley.

“We're extremely confident that
if there are any survivors on the sur-
face of the water that we would have
found them,” Coast Guard Capt.
Timothy Close said.

Hopes were raised Monday when
rescue crews found a fourth man
who was aboard, 24-year-old for-
mer South Florida player Nick
Schuyler, who managed to stay with
the boat for more than 36 hours
after it overturned Saturday evening.

Prospects for survival were begin-
ning to look more grim throughout
the day.

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Climate change impact

FROM page one

discuss the Review of the Eco-
nomics of Climate Change in
the Caribbean (RECCC) at
the Breezes hotel in Cable
Beach.

As experts focused on the
economic impact climate
change will have on the
Bahamas they stressed how
long-term strategies must be
enacted before the highly neg-
ative impact of climate change
becomes irreversible and the
Bahama islands become unin-
habitable.

ECLAC director of the sub-
regional headquarters for the
Caribbean Neil Pierre
explained the RECCC aims to
present preliminary findings of

the affect of climate change at
December’s Climate Confer-
ence in Copenhagen when the
United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate
Change (UNFCCC) parties
will meet for the last time to
develop a new protocol before
the Kyoto Protocol runs out in
2012.

He said: “Immediate action
must be taken to address cli-
mate change and the longer
the action is delayed the
greater the costs in the future.

“Tf we delay by a decade of
two we will have a situation
that climate change becomes
unavoidable or irreversible and
we will reach a point of no

Bank of The Bahamas

IN TERNATIOWNAL

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE FOR THE SIX-MONTH PERIOD
ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008 WITH QUARTERLY AND YEAR

OVER YEAR COMPARISON

Aanagement is cautiously comforted with the strong financial results

osted for the review period. In this regard Total

iimost 9%, multiple times that of GDP, to $31.5 million while Net
Although the latter figure
epresents a fall-off when matched against the result for the same
eriod last year, it represents 62% of total Net Income for fiscal year
'008. Fotal Shareholders’ Equity stood at a healthy level $94 million
lemonstrating a capacity to absorb considerable business risk.

ncame settled slightly above $5 million.

aiven the current economic weakness and indications that such
‘onditions will persist for at least the remainder of the year, the
haintenance of sound prudential standards will continue as the key
ocus in all strategic initiatives. We are confident that the bank will
rogress through the challenging economic conditions and continue

9 promote stakeholder value.

Ince again we thank our directors for their sound stewardship, the
management and staff for their strong commitment to the continued
rowth and development of the bank and our customers and

hareholders for the confidence they continue to
1stitution.

ff
fthuwy
Paul J. |. McWeeney
Managing Director
BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements
For the Period Ended December 31, 7008

BANK OF THE BAHASDAS LIMITED

USAUDITED COSSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

{Expressed ims Rohomian dollirs|



December 31, June Ml,
204 ZINKE
ASSETS

Cash axl due from banks 5 Uh LS et] 5 1136S 73h
Accom with The Cenoral Bank of The Bahamas 44 354), 400 23 201 55
Investments 27,440,700 25,325 00M)
Lins sil aches CUomers, net S48 460 Bet S22 TUL ST
Accrued imerest receivable Th, 0G S845
Prepaid expenses aml other aeects 9741 024 4,527,770
In eenent panoply 4741, 700 ee |
Intangible nssets, net 393 242 7D S95
Fixed assets, nel 5 4 O47 §,242.957
Chetan liabilities ander apceyimets.,

guaninices and betters of credit 1 Sb BAS ts CR

MoTAL 45

LIABILITIES
Deposits irom customers and banks 5
Bonds puavalk:
Mortgage backed bods

Choques.and other tems in transit 11,866,182 11, 56-4432
Acton: payable and ether liahilities SARL U4 4b Sg
Deferred loan fees JARS OLE 2415
Interest payable on bonds 40a S76 FIG FER
Chividends puyalske pre ference shares 253 $00 $62 Su)
Acceplances, puaramtoes are letters of credit 4 SU Ae 4 OS 5H

Teen! liabilities
EQUITY
Share caguital

Share premium 23 S87 ot 28,587 36h
Treasury shames (30,24) (30244)
Retained camings J6933 746 eS

Total equity
TOTAL 5

BHASK OF THE BAH AALAS LIMITED

USA OPTED COONS CLI DATION INTEREIM ISOCOME STATEMENT

For the three and sig onthe ended Cescenber 31, Jie
eva bh cumpanatives for the three ara es, receih pote craked Beccersber 31 2007
CP aprpeend op Fain ppg dake



Taree Menthe
ia hey
SET INTEREST ASDMOTHER DaccHal
bites rues ¥ A143 1
beers! cytes tase Te Pec ie lay
herd Dice Deco TILT Pores
Lose nei peowision forlnan keumce 25.073 M3 Tah
it oon rece after cd peor eon Gor bean beovers TO Babe Td ee
Chhor Gankia? lenge SKLa 744 Laat Aol
Sat Eeveiec a8 er
QOS INTEREST EXPENSES naa thi 5 pei
227 [MOONE 4 SIBLE & 37 ea 3
ARKIBHIS PER SHARE C4LOULATEM
SET INCOME 5 TIMI F Le 5
UEPERESCE SARE ON IDES OS (280 Sun i281 2
VET INCOME AVAILABLE TC
COOMA SHAREHOLDERS 4 ase oF EAT AI0 4
VPAXGHTED A FRLACIE SLUMBER OF :
CON GM SHARES Pet LY eet OL
ARMIPHIS PER SHARE mir a #18 4

TH F1R,255 i

592002 B36 5
[7.000100
20.0001 000

hale | AOT

JD 44

U4 25h JSS

THR AIRIS5 = §

return.”

Addressing the impact in the
Bahamas is increasingly press-
ing as 80 per cent of the coun-
try’s land mass is within 1.5
metres of sea level, tempera-
tures are rising at a rate of up
to 4.5 degrees Centigrade per
100 years, a rate which could
double if no action is taken,
and the increasing frequency
and intensity of tropical storms
due to climate change threat-
ens the delicate balance of life
on the low-lying islands.

Mr Rolle explained how
severe flooding and storm
surges could force communi-
ties to relocate, and mangroves
should be cultivated to protect



Revenue grew by

place in this fine

Th, 144151

530, 1 68900
17 1
DO OCH

642,240 3h

M1364 Seal

1 IG 315
T3144 1

Pee

Shc Mianiha
ima eT
16MM 4 Sr
yas 1 7e Ihara he
MI Hamas
S01 pel 7 Ae
[aaa USA
475 IR 4073 404
[ka Be) hese
Lit 1 197 2h]
ALO & B23) fot
2011070 4 BEL aS
S47 Sir (Sb2 Say
1dc3T 4 LAR ITT
ne 1238 it
wie 4% 1b

coastal areas across the coun-
try from shore erosion, loss of
land and the contamination of
fresh water supplies.

The mangroves also protect
75 per cent of juvenile fish
species threatened by rising
sea temperatures, storms and
overfishing, and therefore the
Bahamian economy.

He added: “Coral reefs will
continue to suffer and we can
also expect the migration of
fish further north with a rise
in sea temperature which will
again impact tourism.”

Mr Rolle said government
must now strengthen coastal
monitoring, introduce energy
efficient technology, develop
sustainable tourism, encourage
cruise ships to use desalination
plants for fresh water, and

enforce land use regulations
and building codes to help pre-
vent irreversible damage.

And environmental laws to
improve energy efficiency,
water management and imple-
ment a climate change policy
are in progress, Mr Rolle said.

BEST Commission director
Philip Weech said although
government has accepted the
reality of climate change and
its present detrimental impact,
there is a need for a national
energy policy to increase effi-
ciency and diversify the use of
energy sources from wind, sun
and sea.

The cost of such long-term
plans could set the government
back $500 million over the next
15 years or more, but Mr
Weech said it is crucial for

Bahamians to view the invest-
ment in terms of its long-term
goals as the country’s geo-
graphic vulnerability is
enhanced by its total depen-
dence on food and oil imports.

He said: “Climate change is
a death sentence for small
island states.

“Tn all likelihood it will
cause some of the basic chem-
istry that sustains the Bahamas
to change, and if it changes we
will no longer continue to
grow, we will start the process
of erosion.

“Tt threatens the very basic
fabric of our ecosystems. If our
coral reefs disappear, the basic
fisheries resources we depend
on will disappear and our
islands could become unin-
habitable.”

(Expreseacd in Bahartinain dolls)

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

For the six months encksd December 31, D008
wath compel fives for the six month period caded December 31, 20007

Share Share Treasairy Retained

Capital Premium Shares Earnings Total
Bakines at Fuly |, 20007 2 reported § D340 5 IRSA FS I § BST 8 OT O44
Deferred Fees adjustment - - - (3.10 474) (3008 4754
Balance at July 1, 20M) es restabed + WS STR SEES) SMES SU Te
Met incon for the pericedl 6,251,f22 45 O25 1 22
Sale of ineasury shana BOT KS ny as
Dividends om preference

shears (Sl Sa) (Sel SO)

Dividends - a “ (2,435 357) (2495, 8)
Bakinee a Desens 3), ET 5 SHO S| FRAT AeA OS (HAS) & T4245 RT) O&O 68499
Balance at July 1, 2064 £ US o0o § Jae ee 8 (44) § eo 8 Sa
Met inecarriee . S011 70 5.011 170
Dividends i pre lire: (552, Sh) (352, Sah
Dividends (2,495, 357) 2495, 1)
Balance ot December 31, ket £ So 8 TAT Sd) See Sein Soo

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

(Expressed in Bahamian Dollars}

Period Emailed Period Ended
December 31, December 31,
DOE 207

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income S
Adjustments bor:
Nom (ash tienes

S,0llgT7 8 §

G25 1422

264] 14a] ee
06,86, | 10h
(26,373 0457)
12.033,930
(15.957T,1 76)

(460 HBT)
(10,740, 539395
13,138,541
3536042

Chamas in operating assct and labilitics
Incrense in loans ond advances ip customers, net
Increase in deposits [ram customers and banks

Net cash from (provided by) operating activities

CASH FLAWS FROM INVES TIS ACTIVITIES
Purchase of investments
Proceeds from the maturity of invesiments
Additions to investment property
Purchase of fixed assets
Net cash used i IV Cstine actives

(2,117,700) -
. TOO

(659,200) -
(435,576) (1187410)

na, 2500

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Dividends on preference shares
Dividends paid
Decrease in inderest payable
Net cash from financing activities

(562 S00)
(249533)
(34/12)
(3,092 55)

(2224248)

(362,500)
(2405 587)

(305 TRF

Mel oncrease in cash and cash equivalents 3990 749

Met cash amal cash equivalents al the beginning of the periced 167,127,389

(Cash and cash equivalents at the ered of the period 144 585,141 12R20 506

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Selected Explanatory Notes to the Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

For the period ended December 3], 2008
(Expressed in Bahamian Dollars)

1. General Information

Bank of The Bahamas Limited (the “Bank™), trading as Bank of The Balkans
International is meorporated under the laws of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. The Bank is licensed under the provisions of the Bank and Trust
Companies Regulations Act 2000, The Bank is also licensed as an authorized
dealer pursuant to the Exchange Control Regulations Act. The Bank is holder of
a broker dealer license from the Securities Commission.

The Bank's shares are publicly traded and listed on The Bahamas International
Securities Exchange. The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas
and The National Insurance Board own 31% of the issued shares. The remaining
shares are owned by approximately 4,000 Bahamian shareholders, The Banks
head office is located at Claughton House, Shirley and Charlotte Streets, The
registered office is located at Sassoon House Shirley Street, Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, The Bahamas,

z. Significant Accounting Policies

The significant accounting policies and methods of computation followed in the
preparation of these interim consolidated financial statements are the same as
those followed in the preparation of the annual consolidated financial statements
of the Bank for the year ended June 30, 2008, The annual consolidated financial
slatements are prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards (“IFRS”) and under the historical cost convention, as modified by the
revaluation of certain financial assets and liabilities and investment property that
are required to be remeasured at estimated fair value.

3. Cash and Cash Equivalents
200K 2007
Cash § 6,736,122 & 68e7 900
Due trom Banks ho 338 359 107,197 737
Cach and due from Banks Oh TO G8! 113,863,736
Account with The Central Rank of The Bahamas 48 390 dh 453,261 653
144,555, 141 167,127 389



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 9






RESULTS from day one of
the Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association’s
16th Annual Junior High
School Track & Field Meet
yesterday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track & Field Sta-
dium:

GIRLS 100 METER DASH BAN-
TAM (U13)
1. 498 Henderson, Janiece 12

$.C. McPherson18 13.74
13.58 1.4

2.511 Rolle, Whitney 125S.C.
McPherson18 13.66 13.64
1.4

3. 84 Deveaux, Shonte 12 Ana-
tol Rodgers 14.77 = 14.37
1.4

GIRLS 400 METER DASH BAN-
TAM (U13)

1.517 Williams, Jeorjett 12 S.C.
McPhersoni8 1:10.69

1:10.88

2. 495 Ferguson, D'Shanta 12
S.C. McPhersoni8 1:12.10
1:16.11

3. 325 Marc, Maxine
Nash 4 1:15.42

12 H.0.
1:17.37

GIRLS 1200 METER RUN BAN-
TAM (U13)

1. 434 Moxey, Taja
Young 1

2. 76 Bowe, Michaela
tol Rodgers

3. 92 McPhee, Charis
tol Rodgers

12 LW.
4:41.86

12 Ana-
4:47.56

12 Ana-
4:56.89

GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
BANTAM (U13)
1. C. McPherson (18) Sharks
55.74*
511 Rolle, Whitney 12
2) 517 Williams, Jeorjette 12
) 495 Ferguson, D'Shantay 12
) 498 Henderson, Janiece 12
2 a Reeves (8) Raptors

3

4

2

59.

1) ie Sturrup, D'Andrea 12
2) 154 Rahming, Brittia 12

3) 158 Rolle, Tara 12

4) 130 Adderley, Shantiqua 12
3L. W. Young (1) Eagles
1:01.23

1) 439 Ramsey, Rashai 12

2) 423 Goodman, Dondra 12
3) 422 Fernander, Taeliyah 12
4) 426 Johnson, Takessa 12

GIRLS LONG JUMP BANTAM
(U13)

1. 498 Henderson, Janiece 12
$.C. McPherson18

4.338m NWI 14-02.50

2. 84 Deveaux, Shonte 12 Ana-
tol Rodgers 3.81m
NWI 12-06.00

3.511 Rolle, Whitney 125S.C.
McPherson18 3.75m
NWI 12-03.75

GIRLS SHOT PUT (6LBS) BAN-
TAM (U13)

1. 158 Rolle, Tara 12 C.H.
Reeves 8 7.58m
24-10.50

2. 154 Rahming, Brittia 12 C.H.
Reeves 8 6.74m
22-01.50

3. 2 Alleyne, Ashley 12 AF.
Adderley 15 6.21m
20-04.50

BOYS 100 METRE DASH BAN-
TAM (U13)

1. 61 Lloyd, Fred 12 AF.
Adderley 15 14.07 13.59
0.3

2. 116 Hutchinson, Jervan 12

Anatol Rodgers 13.88
13.64 0.3

3.55 Forbes, Shaquan 12 AF.
Adderley15 14.27 14.11
0.3

BOYS 400 METER DASH BAN-
TAM (U13)

1. 64 Lullu, Jeffrey 12 ALF.
Adderley15 1:11.38 1:12.43
2. 448 Bastian, Carlton 12L.W.
Young 1 1:09.87 1:13.08
3.57 Gibson, Qyemah 12 AF.
Adderley15 1:09.35 1:13.57
BOYS 1200 METER RUN BAN-
TAM (U13)

1.51 Cooper, Tony 12 AF.
Adderley 15 4:24.88

2.205 Ramsey, Adrian 12
C.H. Reeves 8 4:26.89
3. 182 Dawkins, Navado 12

C.H. Reeves 8 4:27.10

BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
BANTAM (U13)
1. C. H. Reeves (8) Raptors
57.61
1) 214 Varance, Vernon 12
2) 185 Ferguson, Keiano 12
) 171 Altidor, Edwin 12

) 179 Bethel, Floyd 12
A. F. Adderley (15) Tigers
21
4 Lullu, Jeffrey 12
7 Gibson, Qyemah 12
5 Forbes, Shaquan 12
1 Lloyd, Fred 12
D. W. Davis (17) Pit Bulls
8.82
) 261 Charlton, Ajalon 12
) 266 Duncombe, Brandford 12
)2
)

moog

3
4
2
5
j
2
3
4
3
5
j
2
3
4

73 Jean Paul, Gary 12

BOYS LONG JUMP BANTAM
(U13)

1. 57 Gibson, Qyemah
Adderley 15

NWI 14-05.75

2. 105 Bodie, David
tol Rodgers

NWI 14-00.50

3. 611 Jean-Louis, Jeff 12T.A.
Thompson 4.04m
NWI 13-03.25

12 AF.
441m

12 Ana-
428m

GIRLS 100 METER DASH
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 438 Pearce, Byronece 14
L.W. Young 1 13.59
13.77 -0.8

2. 161 Smith, Ashanti
Reeves 8 13.88
0.8

3. 169 Whymms, Quetel 13
C.H. Reeves 8 13.94
14.01 -0.8

14 C.H.
13.83 -

GIRLS 400 METER DASH
JUNIOR (U15)

1.101 Williams, Spring 14
Anatol Rodgers =‘ 1:03.36
1:04.24

2. 35 Shaw, Gabrielle 13 AF.
Adderley15 1:08.55 1:07.02
3. 521 Young, Walternique 13
S.C. McPhersoni8 1:10.55
1:08.61

GIRLS 1500 METER RUN
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 577 David, Johnique

A. Thompson

13 T.

5:33.40@

2. 147 Johnson, Anastasia 14
C.H. Reeves 8

5:52.82@

3. 584 Jean-Louis, Lawand 13 T.
A. Thompson

5:58.80@

GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
JUNIOR (U15)
1. C. H. Reeves (8) Raptors
1.69 55.06
1) 147 Johnson, Anastasia 14
) 145 Ferguson, Roneka 14
) 169 Whymms, Quetel 13
) 161 Smith, Ashanti 14
L. W. Young (1) Eagles
59
408 Bethel, Dwaniquea 13
438 Pearce, Byronece 14
406 Bastian, Carlrinique 14
428 Knowles, Garnisha 14
H. 0. Nash (4) Lions

6.39
) 33
) 32

5.
)
)
)
)

2
3
4
2.
5
1
2
3
4
3
5
1) 331 Neely, Juliette 13

2) 326 Markland, Leshantie 13
GIRLS HIGH JUMP (3'8")
JUNIOR (U15)

1.162 Smith, Lydesha 14
C.H. Reeves8 1.45m@ 4-
09.00

2. 406 Bastian, Carlriniq 14 L.W.
Young 1 1.40m@ 4-07.00
3. 13 Deveaux, Lashantah 14
A.F. Adderley 15 1.35m@ 4-
05.00

GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K)
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 137 Cooper, Cynteses 13
C.H. Reeves 8

19.60m@ 64-04

2.151 Moxey, Jasmine 14
C.H. Reeves 8

18.92m 62-01

3. 507 Miller, Angel 14 S.C.
McPherson18 17.33m
56-10

BOYS 100 METER DASH
JUNIOR (U15)

1.59 Johnson, Lorman 13 AF.
Adderley 15 12.23 11.91
3.1

2. 356 Dames, Xavier 14H.0.
Nash 4 12.39 11.93

3.1

3. 188 Gibson, Keron 14C.H.
Reeves 8 12.62 12.37
3.1

BOYS 400 METER DASH
JUNIOR (U15)

1.549 Riley, Ashley 145.0.
McPherson18 55.22

54.12@

2. 398 Tinker, Ronaldo 144.0.
Nash 4 56.34 57.16@
3. 187 Gibson, Adrian 14C.H.
Reeves 8 59.26 57.61@
BOYS 1500 METER RUN
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 631 Young, Darren 13T.
A. Thompson 5:03.20

2.170 Almonor, Moses 14
C.H. Reeves 8 5:09.26

BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
JUNIOR (U15)

1. C. H. Reeves (8) Raptors
50.53

1) 188 Gibson, Keron 14

2) 193 Lightbourne, D'Andre 13
3) 189 Gibson, Keshon 14

4) 187 Gibson, Adrian 14

2 8. C. McPherson (18) Sharks

BAHAMAS FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION

WME er)
3

Bears FC

Caledonia FC
Cavalier FC

Sharks FC

Baha Juniors FC
Dynamos FC

OnE Ry] N

ite

Sunday, March 1, 2009

1:00 pm FC Nassau vs Caledonia FC 2:4

Se Co
yh OR AA g
Ooanhnn a=

RCCL ese MT ES0)

Goalscorers: Marcus Trail (Caledonia) 2, 24, 64th; Frank Negri (Caledonia)40th; Jonathon Shiel Rolle
(FC Nassau) 16th; Omar Kettle (FC Nassau) 79th

3:00 pm Dynamos FC vs Baha Juniors FC 3:1

Referee: D. Opsaint

Goalscorers: Mackinson Amichette (Dynamos) 22nd; Adam Miller (Dynamos) 36th; Jocelyn Gedeus
(Dynamos) 66th; Courtney Barnett (Baha Juniors) 6th:

ee Pa ay

Sunday, March 08, 2009 (Knock-Out Cup)

1:00 pm Bears FC vs Cavalier FC

3:00 pm Baha Juniors FC vs Caledonia FC

AS tem ey VRS a) 1d 8)

1. Lesley St. Fleur
2. Marcus Trail

3. Odaine McCallum
4. Duckerno Exlias
5. Andre Carey

6. Frank Negri
Femelle cualacce

8. Chedlet Pierre
9. Alex Thompson
Ome DI ela a

Beceem

er U-olen me
CEN
Sharks FC
Bie leSe me
Orolo came
Dynamos FC
Sharks FC
Bears FC
Orolo ume

GossA DAY ONE RESULTS PF

50.56
1) 555 Scavella, Leonardo 14
2) 542 Mott, Cornell 14

) 525 Cambridge, Derek 14
) 531 Ferguson, Keith 14
H. Nash (4) Lions

3
4
3
50.7

1) 384 Nairn, Laquan 13

2) 389 Resis, Cliff 13

3) 398 Tinker, Ronaldo 14

4) 356 Dames, Xavier 14
BOYS LONG JUMP JUNIOR
(U15)

1.534 Gibson, Rashad 14
$.C. McPherson18
5.68m* NWI 18-07.75
2. 531 Ferguson, Keith
McPherson18

NWI 18-06.00

3. 354 Coakley, Xavier
Nash 4 5.1
NWI 17-00.00

148.0.
5.64m@

13 H.0.
8m

BOYS HIGH JUMP (4'3")
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 354 Coakley, Xavier

Nash 4 1.
07.25

2.59 Johnson, Lorman
Adderley 15

5-04.50

3. 465 Huyler, Brandon 14
L.W. Young 1

1.46m 4-09.50

3. 452 Butler, Audley
Young 1

09.50

13 H.0.
7im* 5-

13 ALF.
1.64m@

14 L.W.
146m 4-

BOYS DISCUS THROW (1K)
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 621 Saunders, Marvin
A. Thompson
27.94m@ 91-08
2. 69 Rolle, Rashad
Adderley 15

88-05

3. 394 Swaby, Randon 14

14T.

13 AF.
26.94m@

H.O. Nash 4 24.64m
80-10

BOYS JAVELIN THROW
(600GMS) JUNIOR (U15)
1.187 Gibson, Adrian 14 (C.H.
Reeves 8 32.31M@
106-00

2. 605 Desir, Vilner 147. A.
Thompson 26.66m
87-06

3. 180 Campbell, Tareves 14
C.H. Reeves 8
26.37m 86-06

GIRLS 100 METER DASH INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)

1. 596 Strachan, Athoniqu 16 T.
A. Thompson 12.16

12.05 4.0

2.514 Stubbs, Roniqua 14
S.C. McPherson18 13.46
13.28 4.0

3. 311 Demeritte, Tekevia 15
H.O. Nash 4 13.40

13.29 4.0

GIRLS 400 METER DASH INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)

1. 340 Sands, Burdeca 15
H.O. Nash 4 1:07.82
1:08.46

2. 501 Joseph, Olivia
McPhersoni8 1:07.18
1:08.82

15 S.C.

3. 505 Marley, Tashan
McPhersoni8 1:10.10
1:10.91

148.0.

GIRLS 1500 METER RUN

eee Zz.



INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1. 329 Moncur, Khadijah 15
H.O. Nash 4 6:19.00
2.133 Butler, Raunice 14C.H.
Reeves 8 6:24.03

3. 419 Duquesne, Ysabel 16
L.W. Young 1

6:42.85

GIRLS 300 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1. 17 Ferguson, Ashley
Adderley15 55.41
2. 327 McKay, Danielle
Nash 4 58.54

3. 412 Carter, Samitra
Young 1 56.13

16 AF.
54.13

56.19
15 LW.
56.83

GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1. S. ©. McPherson (18) Sharks
54.64

1) 508 Minus, Raygene 15

2) 503 Knowles, Richea 15

) 505 Marley, Tashan 14

) 514 Stubbs, Roniqua 14

T. A. Thompson

5.05

) 588 McKenzie, Anastacia 16
) 591 Newton, Glendira 15

) 573 Cox, Jaynell 15

) 596 Strachan, Athonique 16
H. 0. Nash (4) Lions

6.

) 327 McKay, Danielle 15

) 311 Demeritte, Tekevia 15
) 322 Kemp, Randya 15

) 310 Curtis, Regine 15

GIRLS LONG JUMP INTERMEDI-
ATE (U17)

1.419 Duquesne, Ysabel 16
L.W. Young 1

4.45m NWI 14-07.25

2.508 Minus, Raygene 15
S.C. McPherson18

441m NWI 14-05.75

3. 302 Anderson, Shavanes 15
H.O. Nash 4 4.08m
NWI 13-04.75

GIRLS SHOT PUT (8LBS) INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)

1. 304 Bastian, Samantha 16
H.O. Nash 4 8.26m 27-01.25

2. 565 Armbrister, Shanae 15 T.

A. Thompson 6.91m
22-08.00

3. 520 Young, Nadia 15 S.C.
McPherson18 6.85m

22-05.75

GIRLS JAVELIN THROW

(600GMS) INTERMEDIATE
(U17)

1.310 Curtis, Regine 154.0.
Nash 4 26.01mM@
85-04

2. 304 Bastian, Samantha 16
H.O. Nash 4 20.32m
66-08

3. 133 Butler, Raunice 14C.H.
Reeves 8 18.40m
60-04

BOYS 100 METER DASH INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)
1. 530 Farrington, Davain 16

S.C. McPherson18 11.64
11.61@ 0.5

2. 202 Perry, Shawn 15 C.H.
Reeves 8 12.14 12.08
0.5

3. 547 Rahming, Alexander 15
$.C. McPherson18 12.19
12.20 0.5

TTD en ww wT

aams 7 aw mw 7

MURANO

15 H.0.



BOYS 400 METER DASH INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)
1.172 Ambrose, Jayson 15

C.H. Reeves 8 56.16

56.04

2. 272 Jamison, Julio 15 D.W.
Davis 17 56.63 57.26

3. 390 Riley, Alex 15H.0.
Nash 4 57.66 57.38

BOYS 1500 METER RUN INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)

1.545 Neymopur, Clenero 15
$.C. McPherson18
4:53.99

2. 539 Lafleur, Lopez
McPherson18

3. 629 Williams, Edward
A. Thompson

15 S.C.
5:01.42

16T.
5:06.34

BOYS 400 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1.195 Marshal, Andre 15C.H.
Reeves 8 1:07.18 1:06.83
2. 626 Sturrup, Jermaine 14 T.
A. Thompson 1:11.97
1:08.18

3. 186 Gale, Raymond 15
C.H. Reeves 8 1:09.58
1:09.63

BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1. S. ©. McPherson (18) Sharks
47.61
1) 540 Major, Paul 15
2) 530 Farrington, Davaine 16
) 544 Newman, Donovan 15
) 547 Rahming, Alexander 15
2 C. H. Reeves (8) Raptors
8.00
) 196 Martin, Shantwon 15
) 202 Perry, Shawn 15
) 195 Marshal, Andre 15
) 172 Ambrose, Jayson 15
T. A. Thompson
14

3
4
4
1
2
3
4
3
49,
1) 610 Jacques, Ricardo 14
2) 626 Sturrup, Jermaine 14
3) 624 Storr, Jeremy 16
4) 606 Ferguson, Samuel 16

BOYS TRIPLE JUMP INTERME-
DIATE (U17)
1. 396 Sweeting, Ricardo 15

H.O. Nash 4 11.34m
NWI 37-02.50

2. 272 Jamison, Julio 15 D.W.
Davis 17 11.33m
NWI 37-02.25

3. 62 Lockhart, Kenrico 15 AF.
Adderley 15 10.54m
NWI 34-07.00

BOYS DISCUS THROW (1

1/2K) INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1. 608 Hanna, Christopher 16 T.

A. Thompson 24.01m
78-09

2. 208 Rolle, Sidney 15C.H.
Reeves 8 23.16m

76-00

3. 532 Ferguson, Richard 15
S.C. McPherson18

22.00m 72-02

BOYS HIGH JUMP (4'8")
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1. 451 Burrows, Nicholas 15
L.W. Young 1

1.64m 5-04.50

2. 624 Storr, Jeremy
Thompson

5-02.50

3. 482 Sweeting, Kendal 16
L.W. Young 14

J1.59m 5-02.50

16T.A.
1.59m

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

ohnson pleased with performance

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE getting eliminated
in the first round of the Inde-
pendence Cup last week in the
Dominican Republic, Taureano
‘Reno’ Johnson said he was still
pleased with his performance.

“T was very impressed with my
performance because I moved
up in weight just for this tour-
nament as a part of my training
to build up my strength for the
upcoming games,” said Johnson,
who fought as a middleweight
instead of the welterweight.

“Nobody likes to go to a tour-
nament to lose, but I used this as
a part of my training to get my
strength going into the upcoming
World Games.”

Loss

Johnson, who won the
Bahamas’ first medal at the
championships when he secured
the bronze in 2007, lost 12-7 to
Willy Medina from the Domini-
can Republic in what was con-
sidered a hometown decision
by coach Andre Seymour.

“My performance, I was very
pleased with it,” Seymour said.



GSSSA

athletes off

to fast start
FROM page 11

Danielle McKay came the
closest in 56.19.

“It was good. I enjoyed
it,” said the 15-year-old
ninth grader, who success-
fully defended her title. “I
prayed to God and I knew
that I could do it.”

Andre Marshall of CH
Reeves made his debut in
the intermediate boys 400
hurdles. He ran 1:06.83,
compared to Jermaine Stur-
rup of TA Thompson, the
runner-up in 1:08.18.

“It was good. I had to
pray before I started since
this was my first time,” said
Marshall, a 14-year-old ninth
grader. “I asked God to let
me win this one.”

Another exciting series of
events was the 400.

In the bantam girls’ one-
lapper, Jeorjette Williams of
SC McPherson clocked
1:10.88 and Jeffrey Lullu of
AF Adderley carted off the
boys’ crown in 1:12.43.

Williams, an 11-year-old
grade seven student, said she
just wanted to get the race
finish.

“My coach told me to go
out hard in the first 100,
relax on the 150 and then
pick it up at the end,” she
stressed. “I think I did fairly
good. I was very pleased
with my performance.”

Lullu, another 11-year-old
seventh grader, said the
competition was stiff, but he
was determined “to win,”
even though he got some
stiff competition.

Spring Williams of Ana-
tol Rodgers was never chal-
lenged as she sped around
the track to win the junior
girls’ 400 in 1:04.24. Ashley
Riley of SC McPherson did
likewise in the boys’ one-
lapper in 54.12.

“Tt was great, but I knew I
could do better because I’m
in a track club,” said
Williams, a 14-year-old
member of the T-Bird Fly-
ers. “When I hit the 200, I
was tired.”

Noted 13-year-old Riley:
“T was a little nervous going
into it, but when I realized
what I could do, I just went
out there and ran. It was my
best performance.”

In the intermediate girls
division, Burdece Sands of
HO Nash (1:08.46) held off
Olivia Joseph of SC
McPherson (1:08.82) to win
her one-lapper.

“T felt it was kind of
tough, but I really went out
and did it,” said the 14-year-
old eighth grader. “I really
didn’t have anything left, so
I was glad I pulled it off.”

And Jayson Ambrose of
CH Reeves didn’t waste any
time in circling the track to
snatch the intermediate
boys’ title in 56.04, well
ahead of DW Davis’ Julio
Jamison (57.26).

“It was good. At first, it
was hard, but when I got on
the back stretch, it got easi-
er. When I got to the 200
and then the 100, I just
cruised home,” said
Ambrose, a 14-year-old
ninth grader.

“T felt the decision which went
in favour of the hometown boy
should have gone my way.

“But this is the kind of results
that you get when all of the
judges are from the host coun-
try and when you are going up
against a host competitor.”

Coming off his impressive
fifth place finish at the Olympic
Games in Beijing, China in
August, Johnson said he doesn’t
feel that he had a disappoint-
ing showing.

Instead, he summed it up as a
learning exsperience.

“IT made some mistakes, but I
felt I did enough to win the
fight,” he insisted. “But hey,
that’s the way the judges ruled
and I have to accept the deci-
sion.”

Training

After taking a break in train-
ing in January, Johnson said he
managed to get back on track to
get ready for the tournament,
training under the watchful eyes
of Ray Minus Jr, but he didn’t
anticipate performing as well as
he did, even though the scores
didn’t indicate it.

At the end of the Olympics,
Johnson said he was contem-
plating turning professional, but

he still hadn’t made a definitive
decision on his future as yet.

“We still have a lot of things
on the table that we are trying to
work out,” he pointed out.
“Money is something that ’'m
interested in making at this point.

“T haven’t made anything in
the past 15 years, so I think it’s
about time that I start looking
at my career. So whatever come
up and it’s profitable for me, I
will consider it.”

In the meantime, Johnson said
he was preparing to travel to the
Ponto Cup in May in Puerto
Rico, followed by the World
Championships in August and
the Commonwealth Games and
the Caribbean Games, so he had
a busy schedule ahead of him.

Add a major decision to make
as well.

“Nobody knows what will hap-
pen by then, or even tomorrow,”
he said. “I have some decisions to
make and whenever the time
come, I will make it.”

While Johnson got eliminated
in the first round in the Domini-
can Republic, he was joined by
Valentino Knowles, who also lost
his first round match 11-7 to
Ricardo Garfield from the
Dominican Republic.

But Carl Hield went all the
way to the final, losing the gold

MORE GSSSA ACTION

TA Thompson Wilfred Mckinney

CH Reeves Andrean Gidson wins.



medal to Jonathan Baptista from
the Dominican Republic. It was
the first time that the Bahamas
has won a silver medal at the
championships.

Johnson said he was quite
thrilled at the effort of his team-
mates.

Focus

“Carl pulled off a silver
medal. He deserved it. In fact, I
think he deserved the gold
medal,” Johnson said. “He
fought very well, he showed a
lot of technique and that his
training in Cuba has paid off.

“But he also showed a lot of
stickability because he went
through a whole lot. He was
suspended at one time, just like
I was, but we were able to over-
come these trials and still per-
fom very well.”

As for Knowles, who won a
bronze medal at last year’s
championships, Johnson said he
just got a bad break from the
first round, just like he did,
fighting against a hometown
boy.

“But he fought well too. It’s
just unfortunate that we didn’t
win our matches,” Johnson said.
“But you can expect for us to
both be back.”



SC Mcpherson Lorman Johnson leans to the tape for the win over Ho Nash
Xavier Dames.

H O Nash Xavier Coakley jumps.



Taureano johnson

Felipé Major/Tribune staff





SC Mcpherson Rashad Gibson wins .



THE TRIBUNE





8
'



p

PAGE



EDNESDAY, MARCH 4,



11
= F



2009

INSIDE ¢ Local sports news






Raptors take an early lead

CH Reeves holds 52 point
lead over SC McPherson

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER the first day of
competition at the Govern-
ment Secondary Schools
Sports Association’s Junior
High Schools Track and Field
Championships, the CH
Reeves Raptors have surged
out front in their quest to
regain their title.

The Raptors bolted ahead
by 51.5 points at the end of
yesterday’s competition at the

Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium. They have
accumulated a total of 374,
compared to their nearest
rival, the SC McPherson
Sharks with 322.50.

The HO Nash Lions are
surprisingly sitting in third
place with 264, while the
defending champions LW
Young Golden Eagles are in

sixth place with 211.50.

En route to taking their
lead, the Raptors are out front
in only the junior girls (under-
15) division with 75 and the
junior boys (U-15) with 82.

SC McPherson sits in front
of two divisions as well — ban-
tam girls (U-13) with 72 and
intermediate boys (U-17) with
75. HO Nash controls the

INTERMIDIATE girls 100 meters was won by TA Thompson Athonique Strachan.

GSSSA athletes off to fast start

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ANTHONIQUE Strachan
and Davain Farrington both
made it look so easy as they
sped past their rivals to easily
win the titles of the fastest girl
and boy in the Government
Secobdary Schools Sports Asso-
ciation’s Junior High Schools
for 2009.

Competing on the first of the
two-day meet for the juniors at
the Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium yesterday,
Strachan raced to a time of
12.05 seconds while Farrington
stopped the clock at 11.61.

Strachan, a 15-year-old ninth
grader at TA Thompson (for-
merly CC Sweeting Jr), said she
got out to a fast start and was
able to relax the rest of the way.

“T had competition, but they
just wasn’t prepared,” said a
confident Strachan, in repeat-
ing as the sprint champion, well
ahead of second place finisher
Roniqua Stubbs from SC
McPherson, who ran 13.28.

Farrington, a 15-year-old
ninth grader at SC McPherson,
said he didn’t get the drive out
of the blocks that he anticipat-
ed, but he made up for it with
his finish.

“T didn’t have any competi-
tion at all,” said Farrington, who
successfully defended his title

by leaving his nearest rival,
Shawn Perry from CH Reeves,
a distance behind in 12.08.

The junior girls’ century was
won by Byronece Pearce from
LW Young in 13.77, ahead of
CH Reeves’ Ashanti Smith
(13.83) and Quetel Whymms
(14.01).

“Tt was challenging because
the girls worked hard, but I had
to push myself, even thought I
had a cramp,” said the 14-year-
old Pearce, who is in the ninth
grade. “I did it for my team.”

The junior boys’ straight
away was almost a photo finish
with Lorman Johnson of AF
Adderley (11.91) nipping
Xavier Dames (11.93) of HO
Nash.

intermediate girls (U-17) with
89.50 and the AF Adderley
Fighting Tigers pace the way
in the bantam boys (U-13)
with 70.

The first day of competition
featured the finals in the 100,
400, 1200, 1500 and 4 x 100
metre relays on the track,
while there was a combina-
tion of all the events contest-
ed on the field.

Today, starting at 9 am, the
meet will be officially opened,
followed by the final day of
competition of the juniors.

“At first I was scared, but it
seemed like it all slipped away
from me,” said Dames, a 14-
year-old ninth grader. “I
thought I was going to catch
him, but he put up a good per-
formance.”

The bantam boys’ 100 was
also a close one to watch. But in
the end, it was Fred Lloyd of
AF Adderley, who snatched the
title in 13.59 with Jervan
Hutchinson of Anatol Rodgers
settling for second in 13.64.

“It was good. I treid my hard-
est,” said Lloyd, a 12-year-old
seventh grader, who was nurs-
ing a right ankle injury. “He
tried his best. I think I just want-
ed it a little more.”

Noted Hutchinson, an 11-

Coakley leads record-breaking performances

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THREE records tumbled on
day one of the Government
Secondary Schools Sports Asso-
ciation’s Junior High Schools
Track and Field Championships
yesterday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium.

One of them went to HO
Nash Lions’ Xavier Coakley in
the junior boys’ high jump and
in the same division, Rashad
Gibson of the SC McPherson
Sharks inked his name in the
books in the long jump.

The other was posted by the
Sharks’ bantam girls 4 x 100
metre relay team of Whitney
Rolle, Jeorjette Williams,
D’Shantay Ferguson and
Janiece Henderson.

Coakley cleared 5-feet, 7 1/2-
inches to surpass the previous
mark of 5-7 that was held by
Thomas Bellot of the CR Walk-
er Knights from 1997.

“T think it was good. On my
last attempt, I think I got too
excited and I lost concentra-
tion,” said Coakley, who was
hoping to at least match his per-
sonal best of 5-9.

Coakley said he was excited
to erase the record and he was
looking forward to improving
on his performance at the end
of the month when he tries out
for the national team going to
the Carifta Games in St. Lucia
over the Easter holiday week-
end.

In producing the most out-
standing performance on the
field yesterday, Coakley was shy
of the Carifta qualifying mark of
6-4. With a little more competi-

tion, Coakley said he hoped to
achieve that goal at the trials at
the end of the month.

The junior boys’ long jump
record stood at 18-7 1/4, which
was held by Latico Sands of the
Government High Magics from
1993. In another record-break-
ing performance, Rashad Gib-
son soared 18-7 3/4 to replace it.

And SC McPherson’s team
of Whitney Rolle, Jeorjette
Williams, D’Shantay Ferguson
and Janiece Henderson clocked
55.74 seconds to shatter the pre-
vious mark of 56.94 that was set
by AF Adderley back in 1996.

The Sharks ran away from
the rest of the field with their
nearest rivals, CH Reeves Rap-
tors team of D’ Andrea Sturrup,
Brittia Rahming, Tara Rolle
and Shantiqua Adderley com-
ing second in 59.39.

The LW Young Golden

Eagles’ team of Rashai Ram-
sey, Dondra Goodman,
Taeliyah Fernander and
Takessa Johnson came in third
in 1:01.23.

In the intermediate boys’ high
jump, LW Young’s Nicholas
Burrows was hoping to go over
the 6-7 record set by Ricardo
Jacques from the CC Sweeting
Cobras.

But he wasn’t even close, fin-
ishing with a best of 5-4 1/2, a
performance he accepted as he
prepare to celebrate his 15th
birthday on Sunday.

“T thought I did well, but I
was disappointed in myself
because I didn’t break the
record,” said Burrows, who out-
duelled TA Thompson’s Jeremy
Storr and his Golden Eagles’
team-mate Kendal Sweeting,
both of whom cleared 5-2 1/2.

“It’s all good. I did my best.”

Among the highlights will be
the 200, 800 and 4 x 400 final
on the track. The remainder
of the field events will also be
contested.

A total of eight schools are
participating.

Starting on Thursday and
running through Friday, the
GSSSA will stage the senior
segment of the champi-
onships. It’s expected that
another eight schools will be
in action.

¢ See scoreboard for the
complete point breakdown.



year-old seventh grader: “It was
challenging. The competition
was good. The race was good
too.”

Janiece Handerson of SC
McPherson claimed the bantam
girls’ sprint title in 13.58, hold-
ing off team-mate Whitney
Rolle (13.64).

The intermediate girls’ 300
hurdles was won by Ashley Fer-
guson of AF Adderley in 54.13.
She pulled away from the field
and was unchallenged as

SEE page 10





JOHNSON
PLEASED WITH
PERFORMANCE

oh

BNO

HERE’S a look at the point
standings after the first day of
competition at the GSSSA
Junior High Schools Track and
Field Championships yesterday
at the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and field Stadium:

COMBINED SCORES
TEAMS POINTS
CH Reeves 374

SC McPherson 322.50
HO Nash 264

TA Thompson 236
AF Adderley 213

LW Young 211.50
Anatol Rodgers 121
DW Davis 84

BANTAM BOYS (U-13)
SC McPherson 72

CH Reeves 50
Anatol Rodgers 48
LW Young 36
HO Nash 23

TA Thompson 17
AF Adderley 14

DW Davis 9
JUNIOR GIRLS (U-15)
CH Reeves 75
LW Young 55.50
HO Nash 37.50

SC McPherson = 31
TA Thompson 29
AF Adderley 25
Anatol Rodgers 17

DW Davis 3
INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U-17)
HO Nash 89.50

SC McPherson 72.50

TA Thompson 56

CH Reeves 46

LW Young 36

AF Adderley 31
Anatol Rodgers 7
DW Davis 6

BANTAM BOYS (U-13)
AF Adderley 70

CH Reeves 48
Anatolrodgers 42
DW Davis 20
TA Thompson 19
LW Young 19
SC McPherson 14
HO Nash 4

JUNIOR BOYS (U-15)
CH Reeves 82
HO Nash 66

TA Thompson 63
SC McPherson 58
AF Adderley 44
LW Young 21
DW Davis 12
Anatol Rodgers 7

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U-17)
SC McPherson 75

CH Reeves 73
TA Thompson 52
LW Young 4A
HO Nash 44
DW Davis 34

AF Adderley 29

Tal Hg

Rea
FISH FILLET
SANDWICH

ey





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



from invasive species

EVERYONE can help protect our country from inva-
sive species. What can you do to stop these sneaky
species? Prevention is the best cause of action!

Plant a native tree!

By becoming aware of what the species look like and
how they spread, we can make better choices in the types
of plants to grow and spread in our yards.

The government of The Bahamas has asked all Bahami-
ans to plant and register native trees as a part of the goal
of planting one million trees locally before the end of
2009.

Visit www.bahamasmtc.com for details.

REMOVE INVASIVE PLANTS
Growing fruits and vegetables in our gardens and asking
our local nurseries for only native plants is a great start.

BLUE LAGOON ISLAND
— There is a silent war going
on in The Bahamas, one that
leaves countless animals and
plants dead and others home-
less. This war has been waging
for decades and now new
invaders are joining the fight
to take over our beautiful
Bahamas, looking to steal pre-
cious land, water and resources
from us. These fearsome
pirate-like invaders — called
Invasive Species — quickly
establish themselves as the
dominant species and can
destroy our native ecosystems,
human health, and ultimately
all native life within The
Bahamas. If we are not pro-
active, these environmental
buccaneers could steal more
than just a few acres of land
or sea.

Dolphin Encounters — Pro-
ject BEACH, the non-profit
arm of the natural marine park
on Blue Lagoon Island, Ninth
Annual Marine Education
Poster Contest will focus on
invasive species in The
Bahamas. With the theme
“Pirates of the Caribbean —
Invasive Species in The
Bahamas,” this year’s compe-
tition invites students through-
out the country to learn more
about the invasives that are a
threat to our ecosystem and to
express their thoughts through
poster art.

“The Bahamas is a beautiful
country and if invasive species
spread and destroy our envi-
ronments, soon much of the
plant and wildlife that is unique
and special about The
Bahamas may be lost,” said
Annette Dempsey, Director of
Education at Dolphin Encoun-
ters. “Invasives are incredibly

Another step is to eradicate any and all invasives whenev-
er possible.

When we uproot and destroy these thieves we can limit
how fast they continue to spread and hopefully save some
native organisms.

LEARN ABOUT LIONFISH

When it comes to the lionfish, this fish can and should
be netted or speared whenever seen in the water. Once
the dorsal and pelvic spines are removed they are quite
edible and delicious! By encouraging Bahamians to learn
how to prepare this fish, we can start to decrease their
numbers in our oceans.

Spread the word.

Tell your family and friends and spread the word: let’s
save our native plants and animals and let’s save our coun-

try!

+ Thompson Bird

a
as]
4
9
al
—
=
O
=
Tm

Bernard Rd - Mackey St

Ends Saturday, March 7



British American Financial

British American Financial “BAF” is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Bahamian entity BAB
Holdings Limited. BAF recently celebrated its second year as a 100% Bahamian owned entity
having been acquired by the Bahamian Group during February 2007.

Established in 1920, British American Financial provides a full range of insurance and
investment services, including life & health insurance, mortgages, financial and retirement
planning, annuities, mutual funds and pension plans. The Company has three offices in Nassau at
Independence Drive, Rosetta St. Palmdale, and Carmichael Rd. Also full service branches in
Freeport, Abaco, Exuma and a network of career agents throughout the Family Islands. The
Company directly employs more than 200 Bahamians.

British American Financial is not related or affiliated in any way whatsoever with any other
company with a similar name “British American”, whether in the Bahamas, the Caribbean region
or anywhere else,

In celebration of our second anniversary as a fully Bahamian Company, we are pleased to
announce our offering of free financial consultations, along with weekly financial seminars to our
clients and the public at our Independence Drive Headquarters every Friday until the end of April
2009, The Company extends a special invitation to members of the public whorecently experienced
job losses and hardship as a result of the downturn in the economy.

Please direct any questions on this statement to Mr. I. Chester Cooper, President & CEO
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destructive to native ecosys-
tems. We encourage students
to learn about them and to tell
us their concerns.”

The Poster Contest is open
to all students residing in The
Bahamas, aged Kindergarten
through Grade 12. Entry is
free.

A panel of judges recognised
for their work in the marine
environment will select the
winners. Winning entries will
be prominently displayed
throughout The Bahamas in
recognition of the students’
efforts to help protect our
beautiful Bahamas.

Prizes for the competition
have also been generously
donated by vendors who share
a concern for our marine envi-
ronment including: Dolphin
Encounters, Bahama Divers,







: 4 .
MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURI

ir

Barefoot Sailing, Pirates of
Nassau, Blackbeard’s Cay, Stu-
art Cove’s, Sea Island Adven-
tures, Island World Adven-
tures, Paradise Dive Charters,
Flying Cloud, Seahorse Char-
ters, and Powerboat Adven-
tures.

“Unfortunately The
Bahamas has its fair share of
invasives,” adds Tanya Moss,
Education Coordinator at DE
— Project BEACH. “One
example is the Scaevola plant,
also known as the Hawaiian
Seagrape or White Inkberry.
With its lush green leaves and
quick growth rate, this invader
is a very popular landscaping
plant.

“As it rapidly spreads, the
Hawaiian Seagrape creates
thickets along our coastlines,
out-competing and killing our

a




S ——

TY Tommy Turnquest cuts the ribbon at the commissioning ceremony of the fire

Ten hms] Poster contest focuses on
invasive plants and animals

THE LIONFISH’S venomous
dorsal and pelvic spines are
fatal to potential predators and
hazardous to divers, snorkelers,
fishermen and beachgoers. Evi-
dence found in their stomach
contents has revealed that Lion-
fish are feeding on small fish
and crustaceans, including baby
lobster, crabs and snapper.

native plants such as Sea Oats,
Sea Lavender, Blue Inkberry,
Mangroves and numerous oth-
er plants in our country. With-
out these native plants to sta-
bilise the beach and prevent
erosion, there is no telling the
effect it may have on our
native Bahamian wildlife such
as birds, crabs, lizards or our
fish nurseries. If not removed,
the Hawaiian Seagrape may
take over our mangroves and
wetlands. The poster compe-
tition teaches students about
invasives, what they are and
their negative effect on our
environment. We look forward
to receiving entries and pro-
viding students with the oppor-
tunity to express their
thoughts.”

B TO OBTAIN FREE
ENTRY FORMS AND
RULES, a comprehensive fact
sheet about the theme of the
competition visit www.dolphi-
nencounters.com in the Edu-
cation section; call Dolphin
Encounters-Project BEACH
at 394-2200 extension 303; send
an e-mail to education@dol-
phinencounters.com; or fax
your request to 394-2244.

Entry forms can also be
picked up at the Dolphin
Encounters booth located at
the Paradise Island Ferry Ter-
minal. Deadline for entries to
be received is March 31.



p
F _
j j
|

*

truck to the Royal Bahamas Police Force in Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, on Sunday, March 1. Pictured from left are
Acting Deputy Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade; Head of the Fire Division Superintendent Jeffrey Dele-
veaux; director of SEEP and international consultant on disaster management Shaun Ingraham, and Superintendent
of Police for Eleuthera Theopholis Cunningham.

South Eleuthera residents’
govt collaboration praised

m By LLONELLA GILBERT

TARPUM BAY, Eleuthera -
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest commended
local and winter residents of

South Eleuthera for forming a
collaboration with the govern-
ment to meet critical community
needs through the creation of the
South Eleuthera Partnership
(SEEP).



SEEP was established after a
group of local citizens came
together to discuss ways to
increase the support given to the
fire and medical services.

Mr Turnquest said, “It is
impressive that SEEP, in just a
few short years, has provided
effective leadership for the refur-
bishment of the ambulance and
upgrading of ambulance
services and has purchased a fire
truck for service in South
Eleuthera.”

The minister was speaking at
a ceremony to celebrate the com-
missioning of the fire truck to the
Royal Bahamas Police Force, and
the re-commissioning of the
ambulance to the Ministry of
Health in Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera
on Sunday, March 1.

Also in attendance at the cere-
mony were Minister of Health
Hubert Minnis, Acting Deputy
Commissioner of Police Ellison
Greenslade, Head of the RBPF
Fire Division Superintendent Jef-
frey Deleveaux and Member of
Parliament for South Eleuthera
Oswald Ingraham.

Mr Turnquest said the govern-
ment has an essential role to play
in the provision of fire and emer-
gency services to citizens and
businesses.

He explained that the govern-
ment provided these services to
the people of South Eleuthera via
the police, primarily from Cen-
tral Eleuthera and Governor’s
Harbour, along with the Ministry
of Health, but that the services
needed to be closer to the com-
munity in the South.





u



THE TRIBUNE



ine

WEDNESDAY,



MARCH 4,



2009

{ SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Casino pull-out puts Churn hits
234 jobs in jeopardy

oO Kear Shoe

exacerbate
SBINIMUK NN Ce



m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

“GREY areas” in Bahami-
an labour laws could have
exacerbated a $5 million dis-
pute involving workers on an
Exuma-based private island
resort development, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
with the Labour Department
insisting that company lawyers
interpret often-ambiguous leg-
islation instead of seeking its
advice.

Harcourt Brown, the direc-
tor of labour, told Tribune
Business yesterday that some
labour laws are not very clear.

“We always advise any per-
sons calling the Department
for advice to contact their
attorneys,” said Mr Brown.
“The Labour Department can
only give advice.”

In the case of the Bock Cay
project, attorneys for laid-off
workers are alleging that from
2004 to 2008, staff may have
been paid according to a pro-
vision in the Employment Act
regarding overtime pay that
was amended in 2001.

A Bock Cay consultant,
Henry Rolle, told Tribune
Business that the developers
consulted the Labour Depart-
ment’s Exuma office when the
project began in 2004. They
were instructed to pay their
workers time-and-a-half on
Saturdays and double time on
Sundays, after they had
worked 10 hours per day
Monday through Friday.
Workers were also employed
on the Cay for almost one
month before they then
received a week off.

Double-time

After attorneys representing
laid-off Bock Cay workers last
year took the matter to the
Department of Labour for
conciliation talks with the
developers, their company,
Lignum Vitae Ltd, agreed to
pay double-time on Saturdays.

However, according to Mr
Brown, the developers would
not consider paying the
claimed multi-million retroac-
tive overtime payment unless
mandated to do so by a court
judgment.

Lignum Vitae Cay (LVC),
which was founded to act as
owner and developer for the
Bock Cay project, said yester-
day that it had at all times
complied with all Bahamian
labour laws.

“In July 2008, the manage-
ment of LVC met with the
Labour Office for the Exuma
area, and in a separate meet-
ing, met with the Department
of Labour in Nassau and made
inquiries as to whether LVC
was actually compensating its
employees properly,” the
company.

“In both meetings, the man-
agement was assured that
LVC was compensating its
employees correctly.

“That assurance was consis-
tent with views expressed by
the president of the Industrial
Tribunal in April 2008, in
related proceedings and with
long-established customs in
the local construction indus-
try.”

Last week, Fry’s Electronics
chief executive, and principal
in the Bock Cay development,
Randy Fry, met with labour
minister Dion Foulkes and
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham over several contentious
labour issues relating to Bock
Cay.

What Mr Brown described
as one of the most serious
issues was the developers’ rule
making it mandatory for
workers to leave the Cay on
off-days at their own expense.
This rule, though, quickly
became imprudent for work-
ers living outside the Exumas
after work hours were cut to
40 per week, making travel
every week a finical burden.

Mr Brown said the develop-
ers agreed in principle at the

SEE page 2B

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Isle of Capri’s decision not to
renew its lease of the Our Lucaya
resort’s casino, which expires at
end-May 2009, has placed a fur-
ther 234 Bahamian jobs in jeop-
ardy if a new operator cannot be
found to replace it within the next
three months.

Jill Haynes, Isle of Capri’s
director of corporate communi-
cations, confirmed that the US-
based casino operator had decid-
ed to terminate its operation of
the Isle-Our Lucaya casino as
part of a strategy to exit all inter-
national operations and focus on
its core US home markets.

She added that Isle of Capri
might extend its stay in Freeport
slightly, though, if a new operator
could be found to replace it, and
it was needed to ‘hold the fort’
so that a smooth transition could
be effected.

Ms Haynes said Isle-Our
Lucaya’s 234 staff were informed
by the casino’s general manager
of the company’s decision at a
staff meeting on Monday. If their
employment is to be continuous
and seamless, a replacement casi-
no operator will have to be found
well before the end of May 2009,
meaning that a successful search

Isle of Capri not renewing lease that
expires at end-May 2009, putting jobs in
danger if no replacement operator found
Wi Freeport casino suffers $1.713m loss
for year-to-date, with revenues down

23.2%

Wi Previous efforts to keep gaming
operator, with $6.9m tax write-off and
marketing subsidy, now seem in vain

will have to
be conclud-
ed in a hur-
ry.
If this
does not
happen,
Grand
Bahama’s
tourism
economy,
not to mention unemployment
rate, is likely to suffer a further
blow. Placing another 234 per-
sons on the unemployment line
will further depress economic
activity on an island where more



Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace

Tax unpaid on 2,785
shipping manifests

Auditor-General says ‘large number’ of import bills
released by Customs without evidence of duty payments

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Some 2,785 shipping mani-
fests were outstanding at the
end of the 2006-2007 fiscal year,
the Auditor-General has
revealed, his inspection reveal-
ing once again that “a large
number of bills of ladings” were
released by the Customs
Department without evidence
to show due taxes were collect-
ed.

The Auditor-General’s report
for the 2006-2007 fiscal year
detailed that “no dollar
amounts were submitted” on
the 2,785 outstanding shipping
manifests.

Without these, the import
duties owed to the Government
on these shipments could not
be calculated, and the Auditor-
General recommended that
Customs Department manage-
ment “ensure that outstanding
manifests are cleared without
further delay”.

Invoices

Manifests are the lists ship-
ping companies produce to
show that all cargoes they have
brought into the Bahamas are
accounted for, and with dollar
values and invoices attached, so
that the Customs Department
can calculate the correct import
duty/Excise Tax rates to be
applied.

In the instances referred to
by the Auditor-General, the
invoices showing the dollar val-
ue of imports brought into the
Bahamas are unlikely to have
been attached, creating a
bureaucratic headache for the
Customs Department. Until the
correct invoices are submitted,
Customs is unable to clear the
goods and holds on to them.

According to the Auditor-
General’s report, the largest
number of outstanding mani-
fests, some 800, were at the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport’s (LPIA) air freight sec-
tion.

Another 403 outstanding
manifests were at the John
Alfred Dock; some 380 at Kel-
ly’s Dock; another 370 at
Arawak Cay; and 62 and 30
respectively at Seaboard Marine
and Union Dock.

Outside Nassau, the largest
number of outstanding shipping
manifests uncovered by the
Auditor-General’s Department
were the 234 at Spanish Wells.

There were another 150 in Exu-
ma and its surrounding cays;
120 at Rock Sound in
Eleuthera; 100 in north
Eleuthera; 51 at Harbour
Island; and 35 at Governor’s
Harbour.

Stating that his department
had conducted a complete audit
of the incomplete manifests, the
Auditor-General added: “A
large number of bills of ladings

SEE page 2B

than 170 persons were laid off
earlier this year from the Our
Lucaya resort proper.

“Late yesterday [Monday]
afternoon, the employees were at
a meeting with the general man-
ager,” Ms Haynes told Tribune
Business. “The Government was
notified before the press release
was issued today [yesterday]. We
will not be renewing the lease
when it expires at the end of May.

“We are working with the Gov-
ernment to identify potential
operators, and if a potential oper-

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report.



ROYAL SFIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

premium
Cable TV



















demand services launch

fiscal 2009



m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SEE page 2B

* BISX-listed firm says pay-per-view off 17% year-
over-year, as subscribers drop-off due to economy
* Cable ‘in very early stages’ of exploring video-on-

* Capital spending of $15-$16m anticipated for

* Internet subscribers pass 40,000 mark

Cable Bahamas saw continued subscriber churn until the
2008 year-end, Tribune Business was told yesterday, especial-
ly in its premium cable services which were down 17 per cent
year-over-year, as customers became more discerning about
which packages they acquired.

Barry Williams, Cable Bahamas’ vice-president of finance,
said the BISX-listed company had experienced subscriber churn
- customers not renewing or dropping cable TV services -
“across the board” from the 2008 second quarter onwards.

“We did see some subscriber churn,” he told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We actually started to see it coming in the second quar-
ter, and it continued through to the end of the year. We still end-
ed up OK, but saw a drop in premium services.

“We saw it in the basic cable TV services, we saw it in the pre-



Local agriculture products suffer
femand decline despite $30m sales

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BAHAMIAN farmers have
seen declining sales trends for
their products since 2005, a year
in which they collectively pro-
duced $32 million worth of
fruits and vegetables, and
around $16 million in poultry
products, it was rvealed yester-
day.

Godfrey Dorsett, the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation’s
(BAIC) deputy general manag-
er, said both red meat and poul-
try production declined in 2006,
possibly as a direct result of
increasing food imports that

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and objectivity

controlled the market share for
the products Bahamian farm-
ers produced.

“Unfortunately, that simply
indicated that the market pro-
duction was shrinking while, at
the same time, imports were
increasing. These were com-
modities which farmers were
able to produce, but were
declining because they couldn’t
get market share - probably
because there were imports
competing and they were
unable to continue to increase,”
Mr Dorsett said.

He told the National Eco-
nomic Summit that there was a

SEE page 3B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Churn hits premium Cable TV

FROM page 1B

mium cable services, and we saw
it in pay-per-view. When we
looked at pay-per-view, it was
down 17 per cent year-over-year.

“The more discretionary ser-

vices are the ones that in bad
time, people will tend to look at
and make a decision as to
whether to have as much as they
take.”

As a result, Mr Williams said
Cable Bahamas had seen some
premium and pay-per-view sub-

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (A) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Likespike Corporation Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 18th day of February, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (A) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Quelantra Company Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 18th day of January, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR



NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (A) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-










(a) Thatchberri Company Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 18th day of January, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

a

Well-established Wholesaler

saleperson (females

requires a

are encouraged to

apply) for the snack food division. Individual
must have experience in sales with emphasis
on large food stores. Only individuals with a
proven record of being able to work
unsupervised and achieve results will be
considered. Must be able to drive standard
shift vehicle and be in possession of current
valid driver’s license. Individuals with their
own transportation will receive favorable

consideration. Company offers good benefits.

Submit applications to:
Sales
P.O.Box N-7124

Nassau, Bahamas
ae ES

scribers drop those packages in
favour of the less expensive basic
cable TV services, while some
basic subscribers had ceased tak-
ing the company’s services alto-
gether.

To combat the increased lev-
els of subscriber churns, Mr
Williams said Cable Bahamas had
started its Customer Retention
Focus in the 2008 third and fourth
quarters, calling customers to find
out what their needs were, and
how best to meet what they could
afford given the current econom-
ic environment.

Initiative

Adding that the initiative had
enabled the company and its
clients to often find “common
ground”, the Cable Bahamas
executive: “We took a real proac-
tive approach. We were assisting
customers in making better choic-
es in terms of what they selected
for viewing. Instead of everything,
they kept some stuff.”

Meanwhile, Cable Bahamas is
understood to be close to finalis-
ing the transaction to buy out its
major shareholder, Columbus
Communications, although Mr
Williams and other executives did
not comment on that yesterday.

Elsewhere, Mr Williams
revealed that Cable Bahamas was
“in the very early stages of explor-
ing the introduction of video-on-
demand services into this mar-
ket”, a strategy that, if it comes to
fruition, would likely see it com-
pete with the likes of IP Solutions
International, which has been
attempting to secure financing via




a private placement to launch its
own services.

The Cable Bahamas finance
head said the company invested
$2.5 million in fiscal 2008 on
upgrades to its Nassau-based
Internet system head-end, with a
further $3 million in capital
expenditure going on the con-
struction of its Freeport office.

“The Freeport administration
building should be completed by
the middle of this year,” Mr
Williams said. “The Nassau
upgrade to the head-end is com-
plete. The building and infra-
structure are all in. We’re migrat-
ing certain electronics from their
old location to the new and
upgraded head-end location.”

During fiscal 2009, Mr Williams
said Cable Bahamas had a “bit
of work to complete on the
upgrades to the IP (Internet Pro-
tocol) core. It’s 90 per cent done.
The majority of the heavy lifting
is done”.

For this coming year, Mr
Williams estimated that Cable
Bahamas would incur about $15-
$16 million in capital investment
spending. “It won’t be the same
level of projects that we had last
year - the buildings, the renova-
tions, Freeport and the IP core
upgrades. They’re not projects
that come along every year,” Mr
Williams added.

Recently completed initiatives
included the launch of Cable
Bahamas’ new Internet browser
e-mail service, Pronto, in a bid to
enhance the customer experience
and service, and upgrades to the
company’s customer service facil-
ity at its Robinson Road head-
quarters.

a)

Entry level book keeper urgently
needed must be proficient in
Microsoft Applications.

Please fax resume to 394-3885.
















LEGAL NOTICE






CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.







NOTICE is heraby gyven that the Creditors of the above-named
Company are required on or before April 2, 2008 to send their

names and addresses, wilh particulars of their dabls or claims,

and the names and addresses of their Atlomneys (if any], to
Mrs. Mara M Férére, Liquidator of Cabex Intemacional Lid.
oo FT Consultants Lid., P.O. Bow W-3882, Naseau, Bahamas

Dated the 4" day of March, 2009

Maria M4. Farare
Liquidator

Mr Williams said the latter ren-
ovations had increased the num-
ber of customer service/payment
stations to nine, a move designed
to enhance customer service and
eliminate long queues.

He added that Cable Bahamas
had “started to look into what
needs to be done” to renew its
existing cable licence/franchise
agreement, which expires - along
with the company’s exclusivity
(monopoly) - n October 2009.

“Preliminary work has been
done on that, and we expect our
discussions to go well with the
Government,” Mr Williams said.

On the Internet side, the Cable
Bahamas executive said the com-
pany had seen subscriber num-
bers pass the 40,000 mark by
year-end 2008, demand fuelled
by the service’s indispensability
to the business community and
education institutions.

Data services were also con-
tinuing to generate good growth,
Mr Williams added, given that
the demand for what was offered
by the company’s wholly-owned
Caribbean Crossings subsidiary
came mainly from commercial
clients.

Efficiency

To minimise costs and boost
efficiency further, Mr Williams
said Cable Bahamas had imple-
mented its ‘One-Tech Solution’
initiative. In the past, when
installing services at customers’
homes, he explained that usually
a minimum of two Cable
Bahamas technicians had been
required - especially if Internet
and cable TV was required.

Through focusing on training
and enhancing expertise, only one
technician was now needed to
perform such installations -
whether it was Internet TV or
both.

This, Mr Williams said, “brings
a lot more efficiency on staffing”.
Another similar initiative
launched by Cable Bahamas was
‘First Call Resolution’, where
rather than having to go through
several levels of technicians to
solve a problem, clients could call
in and be assured that the first
person they spoke to could deal
with the problem.

Cable Bahamas net income for
fiscal 2008 rose by 19.7 per cent,
to $25.8 million compared to
$21.6 million the year before. The
company exceeded its previous
year’s revenues by $5.4 million
or 7.2 per cent to $81.4 million,
compared to $75.963 million the
year before.

Cable Bahamas said data rev-
enues grew 19.7 per cent last year,
representing 15.1 per cent of total
revenues. Internet revenues grew
by 10.5 per cent, accounting for
30.3 per cent of the total, while
cable revenues represented 54.5
per cent of total revenues. The
company saw 10.3 per cent
growth in its digital TV services.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
beetle Mgr die lar 4
on Mondays

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites apolications for teaching positions available at
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Completed application forms with the requested supporting documents must be received by
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Nassau, The Bahamas

Providing quality education in a Christian enviranment by developing the whole child: soinitually,

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‘Grey areas’
exacerbate
$5m dispute

FROM page 1B

meeting to begin allowing
workers to stay on Bock Cay
during off-days, and the pro-
posal was put to the workers
for their approval.

“After discussions with
them and the minister, they
agreed to revisit that, and they
have now made an offer to
allow the workers to remain
on the Cay with certain condi-
tions to provide food and elec-
tricity,” Mr Brown said.

An attorney representing
Bock Cay workers, Errol
Mckinney, said he was is pre-
pared to take the overtime
back pay issue to the Supreme
Court should he not hear from
the developers by next week.

Tax unpaid on
2,785 shipping
manifests

FROM page 1B

were released without evidence
to suggest duties were collected.

“A number of office orders
were authorised by manage-
ment for the release of goods.
In some instances, duty entries
were absent from the record,
which is an indication that rele-
vant duties have not been col-
lected.”

Particular weaknesses were
highlighted in Exuma. The
Auditor-General’s report said:
“Our analysis of the records
provided revealed a large num-
ber of outstanding released
goods dated from January 2005
to September 2007.

“In many instances, the quan-
tity or description of goods was
not indicated, and as a result
the value of outstanding duty is
unknown.”

The Auditor-General recom-
mended: “Therefore, in an
effort to enhance efficiency and
effectiveness regarding revenue
collection, we recommended
that the present practice of
releasing goods without duty
being paid be revisited with a
view to strengthening the sys-
tem.”

The Auditor-General also
uncovered “tardiness” in the
Customs Department’s collec-
tion of airline passenger ticket
taxes, “which were received at
times in excess of two months’
late”.

And his report added:
“Audits were conducted
through the year on duty entries
at Customs House. It was
observed that the incorrect rate
of duty was applied in some
instances, for which queries
were raised with the Customs
Department.”

During the 2006-2007 fiscal
year, the Customs Department
dealt with 419 queries involv-
ing some $172,957 in duties that
were levied. Of these, 10 cases
were resolved, resulting in the
collection of $4,035 in out-
standing duties.

For the 2006-2007 fiscal year,
the Auditor-General said that
based on figures provided by
the Customs Department, for
that year it had collected some
$764.264 million compared to
$739.09 million the year before,
an increase of $25.175 million
or 3.4 per cent.

The vast majority of revenues
came from general import
duties, at 66 per cent, with
Stamp Duty on imports gener-
ating 19 per cent of the rev-
enues collected by Customs that
fiscal year, and air and sea
departure taxes another 10 per
cent.

Elsewhere, the Auditor-Gen-
eral’s audit of the Governmen-
t’s finances found that the accu-
mulated rent owed by residents
of the Government’s Public
Housing Rental Units, some of
which dated back to 1993, now
stood at $645,120. It found that
while a policy existed for resi-
dents to pay via salary deduc-
tion, but this was not being fol-
lowed. There was also the by-
now routine focus on outstand-
ing real property taxes, the
Auditor-General finding that
there were some $81.607 mil-
lion in such payments that the
Government had yet to collect
for fiscal 2006-2007. This figure
consisted of $67.965 million in
current taxes owed, and a
$13.642 million surcharge on
what homeowners already had
outstanding.

When added to previous
unpaid taxes, the Auditor-Gen-
eral said the Government had
failed to collect an accumulated
$363.262 million in real prop-
erty taxes over the years, a sum
it described as “exorbitant”.

He again urged that “imme-
diate measures be implemented,
whereby delinquent taxpayers
are made to settle their debts
in an expeditious manner”.



THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 3B



Huge policy ‘void’
over agriculture

Call for total overhaul of Department of Agriculture, which has
400 staff despite production being one-tenth of independence era

mg By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

Bahamian farmers yesterday insisted that
the Government implement a proper Nation-
al Policy on agriculture, with one calling for a
complete overhaul of the Bahamas’ Depart-
ment of Agriculture.

Owner and operator of Goodfellow Farms,
Tan Goodfellow, said the Department operates
with too many employees and not enough
direct results for the industry.

He said the Department of Agriculture
began with only 37 people shortly after the
Bahamas’ independence in 1973, and has now
increased to just under 400, while production
has decreased to one-tenth of what it once

Manutacturing’s
success linked

General Manager of Lucayan Tropical, Tim
Hauber, said the Bahamas’ lack of a Nation-
al Policy was a huge “void” for the country.

He said a 40-year gap between generation
farmers had stunted the industry, and injected
a contemporary farmer into the resurgent
industry who do not “know how to grow”.

Mr Goodfellow said a National Agricul-
ture Policy has to become important enough
to the Bahamas before it can be explored and
implemented, and said the Government must
focus only on strategies that work.

“How do we get to a national policy? How
do we achieve a national policy? It has to
become important enough that we actually
even look at it, and then once we define what
a national policy is - how to get there,” he
said.

Mr Goodfellow said raising tariffs on
imported food got the Bahamas into the prob-
lems with local food production, and should
not be a consideration moving forward.

“We can alter some of the tariffs possibly,
but I believe we have to learn how to compete
on an international level and on a national
level,” said Mr Goodfellow.

He believes the Government should focus
much more on educating the Bahamian pub-
lic as a way forward for the agriculture indus-
try.

“There is an opportunity for us to farm; we
just haven’t recognised the value of it yet,” he
said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BOTTICELLI HOLDINGS LTD.

to top industry

THE BAHAMAS has
enough infrastructure and land
to consider light manufacturing
as a viable industry for revital-
ising the economy, a Bahami-
an attorney said.

Ryan Pinder, speaking at the
National Economic Summit,
said the Bahamas needs a plan
going forward, and envisages
light manufacturing as an indus-
try that could help bolster the
economy in the long term.

He said the Bahamas should
link its need for light manufac-
turing with a the proven main-
stay of tourism in order for it
to be successful.

“Why would we import a lot
of our tourist products that we
sell? Why can’t we manufacture
those here, with maybe the
expertise of a foreign company
or not - maybe just on our own

Local agriculture
products suffer
Hemant decline

llespite $50m sales
FROM page 1B

tremendous demand for eggs in
the Bahamas when Gladstone
Farms ceased producing, and
was forced into receivership and
then liquidation, due to compe-
tition in the import-saturated
food market.

Mr Dorsett said only Bahami-
an-produced eggs could provide
the competitive prices and
nutritious product the market
deserved, but still consumers
favored imports.

“We were to the point where
we were bringing in Eggland
eggs and other name brands
that were demanding higher
prices, and the consumers were
buying it,” said Mr Dorsett.

“On the other hand, the local
egg producers who were pro-
ducing a fresher egg, as far as
we are concerned, a more nutri-
tiousd egg - because we know
what’s going into them - are los-
ing market share.”

Mr Dorsett said Bahamian
farmers produced 11 tonnes of
local beef, 45 tonnes of sheep’s
meat, 16 tonnes of goat meat
and 156 tonnes of pork in 2005,
with an estimated worth of
$920,000.

“Any commodity produced
in the Bahamas is fresher than
any commodity that comes in
from a foreign country into the
Bahamas,” he said. “Fresh meat
is slaughtered in the Bahamas,
and within one week is chilled
down and can be made avail-
able to the market. There can
be no meat brought into the
Bahamas under the pretext of
fresh, even though meat comes
in frozen and is thawed out and
represented as fresh.”

However, Mr Dorsett con-
tends that Bahamians still buy
the second grade imported
meats because they are cheap.

“We're trying to get more
commitment to local produc-
tion. As a result, BAIC has
stepped in and is launching a
‘Buy Fresh, Buy Bahamian’
campaign to encourage
Bahamians to buy more of the
local produce.”

- and sell those and develop that
into an export market,” said Mr
Pinder.

He said leveraging Bahami-
an experience and success in
areas such as tourism can help
promote other industries in the
country that can grow into
export markets.

Mr Pinder said the Bahamas
has the infrastructure on the
Family Islands, especially in
Freeport, to implement an
industry such as light manufac-
turing.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act 2000 BOTTICELLI HOLDINGS

LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 2nd
March 2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of BOT-
TICELLI HOLDINGS LTD. All persons having claims against
the above-named company are required to send their address and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 2nd April 2009.



THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

TENDER

MAKING AND/OR SUPPLYING UNIFORMS
FOR SECURITY OFFICERS, SCREENERS
AND FIREFIGHTERS

1. Bids are invited for a one year contract to manufacture uniforms for the Security
Officers, Screeners and Firefighters of the Airport Authority. The details for security
and firefighters are as follows:

Trousers (Male and Female)

Trousers (Male)-Dickies

Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(M/F)

Female Caps

Rain Coats

Shoulders Patches
Ties

Sweaters

Cap Badges

Dress Uniform Jackets
Trousers K-9 Unit
Shirts*

Senior Officers Shirts*
Shoes*

Belts*

(*Items are for Fire Fighters)

Trousers (Male and Female)-Dickies
Skirts

Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(Dickies)M/F
Male Peak Caps

Shoulders Bars

Belts (Male and Female)
Windbreakers

Shoes (Male and Female)

Safety Boots

Golf Shirts — K-9 Unit

Pants*

Boots*

Dress Pants Senior Officers*
Overalls*

Base Ball Caps*

Collection of the Bid Specifications and viewing of the samples of the uniforms may
be done at the Security Office (located in the former Police Station at Lynden Pindling
International Airport) between the hours of 9:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m., Monday thru Friday

up to March 10, 2009.

2. Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes addressed to the undersigned and the
envelope must specify “BID FOR UNIFORMS”. The Airport Authority reserves the
right to reject any envelope not properly addressed and/or not specifying “BID FOR
UNIFORMS”. Faxed bids will NOT be considered.

The Authority reserves the right to reject any and all bids without stating any

reason (s).

Bids should be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday March 31, 2009. Bids
received after the deadline will not be considered.

There will be a public opening of bids at 10:00 a.m. on Friday April 3, 2009. Interested
bidders may attend, and bring copies of the business licenses.

Acting General Manager

The Airport Authority
Lynden Pindling International Airport
P. O. Box AP59222

Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE

MORTLAKE OVERSEAS CORP
Co number: 84740 B

(“The Company’’)

The company whose principles place of business is
Burleigh Manor, Peel Road, Douglas, Isle of Man
IMI 5EP British Isles, hereby announces its intention
to discontinue the Company in the Bahamas and con-
tinue the company in the Isle of Man in accordance
with Part 1 of the Companies (Transfer of Domicile)
Act 1998. The Company’s name on continuance shall
be Mortlake Overseas Corp. Limited.

By order of the board:
\

Sig

J E McKenna (Director)

NOTICE OF SALE

Expocredit Corporation (‘the Company”) invites
offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Maris Subdivision’,
comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
South of Burnt Ground in the [sland of Long Island
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.

The Company makes no representations or warranties
with respect to the state of the Property which is
offered for sale “as is where is”.

The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing
& Law of Property Act.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase
price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within

Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
reserves the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers
addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
Partner, P, O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 30°
day of March, 2009.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT COM/com/00019
COMMERCIAL DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF CLICO (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
(In Liquidation)

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Petition of the
Winding-up of the above-named Company having its
registered office at Serville & Company, No. 13 East Ave.
Centerville in the City of Nassau, was on the 24th February,
2009 presented to the Court by the Registrar of Insurance
Companies, a statutory regulator, pursuant to Section 41
of the Insurance Act, Chapter 347 Statute law of The
Bahamas 2000 Revised Edition.

AND that the Petition is directed to be heart (in open
Court) before Justice Cheryl Albury, a Justice of the Supreme
Court, in the City of Nassau on Wednesday, 18th March,
2009 at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon at the Supreme Court
Annex, 3rd Floor, British American Bank Building,
Marlborough St., and any Creditor or contributory of the
said Company desirous to support or oppose the making
of an Order on the said Petition may appear at the time of
the hearing in person or by his Counsel for that purpose;
and a copy of the Petition will be furnished by the
undersigned to any Creditor or Contributory of the Company
requiring such copy on payment of the prescribed charge
for the same.

Chambers
Office of the Attorney General
3rd - 7th Floors,
Post Office Building
P.O. Box N-3007
East Hill St.
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorney for the Petitioner

NOTE: Any person who intends to appear on the hearing
of the said Petition must serve or send by post to the
abovenamed, notice in writing of his intention to do so.
The notice must state the name and address of the person,
or, if a firm, the name and address of the firm and must be
signed by the person or firm of his or their attorney (if any)
and must be signed or if posted, must be sent by post in
sufficient time to reach the above named not later than 4:00
o’clock in the afternoon of the 17th day of March, 2008.





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Casino pull-out puts 234 jobs in jeopardy

FROM page 1B

ator is found, we will remain
through the transition to a new
operator.”

However, Isle of Capri will exit
after May 31, 2009, “unless anoth-
er operator is found, and we assist
with the transition”.

In a brief interview with Tri-
bune Business during a break in
yesterday’s Cabinet meeting, Vin-



cent Vanderpool-Wallace, the
minister of tourism and aviation,
who has responsibility for casino
gaming, confirmed that Isle of
Capri’s lease expired at the end of
May 2009.

“They have been giving notice
that they are going to pull out of
their two overseas operations, the
Bahamas and Coventry,” the
minister confirmed. However, he
pointed out that “one doesn’t

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LOCK DESIGN INC.

— f—












Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138





(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LOCK DESIGN INC. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-











pany has therefore been struck off the Register.










ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)









Legal Notice

NOTICE
X-TREME RESOURCES INC.

— f—












Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138




(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of X-TREME RESOURCES INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and




the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETOILE LUMINEUSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Securit y

1.39
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.49

Abaco Markets

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

2.27
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Dectors Hospital
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

necessarily follow the other”, in
terms of the possible 234 job loss-
es and the Isle of Capri pull-out, if
another casino operator could be
found in time.

“We really are very keen, very
eager to have a good operator in
Grand Bahama,” Mr Vander-
pool- Wallace said.

“We all want to resolve this as
quickly as we possibly can to
ensure their is no loss, no inter-

ruption, when we transition from
one operator to another.

“We like to be a little bit pro-
motional, so we have a number of
operators quite interested in oper-
ating in the Bahamas. We have
these conversations occurring,
and when the opportunities come
up, we certainly point them in
that direction. But that’s as much
as we have done at the moment.”

Finding a replacement gaming

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUSHFIRE ALARM CORP.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that

in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of BUSHFIRE ALARM CORP. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NYANZA HOLDINGS INC.

— —

Notice is hereby given that

in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,

the dissolution of NYANZA

HOLDINGS INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore b

een struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GILLYASSE INC.

— f,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of GILLYASSE

INC. has been completed; a

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 3 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,656.82 | CHG -12.66 | %CHG -0.76 | YTD -55.54 | YTD % -3.24
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.85 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW. BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

1.41
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
1.55
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS
1.41
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.50
1.49
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

FG CAP

TTAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

zs

s Div $
0.070
0.992
0.319

-0.877

0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.111

0.240
0.598
0.542
0.698
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securit Ss Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
11.23 12.04 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387
2.9230
1.4376
3.3201
12.6816
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0401
1.0330 3.30
1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000
Fund Name Div $ Yield %
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CPFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3201
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

-0.58
0.28
-1.94
0.50
0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.06
4.01

4.10

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings.
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

operator is likely to prove difficult
in the current depressed economy
and market environment.

Explaining the rationale behind
Isle of Capri’s decision to exit
Grand Bahama, Ms Haynes said:
“We are focusing on our domestic
[US] operations. A similar thing
[to the Freeport casino] is hap-
pening with our property in
Coventry, the UK. We’re focus-
ing on other operations.”

Isle of Capri’s decision to exit
its Freeport casino operation will
not come as a surprise to many
seasoned observers, given that
the company has not enjoyed a
happy experience in Grand
Bahama since it took over the
property in 2003-2004.

The Isle-Our Lucaya has been
consistently loss making, and the
parent company’s US problems,
where it has only generated
$930,000 in net income for the
first nine months of its current
financial year, have compound-
ed the woes, making an exit the
only feasible strategy.

When asked whether Isle of
Capri’s Grand Bahama experi-
ence had been far from what was
expected, Ms Haynes replied yes-
terday: “I don’t know that I
would say that at this point. Our
employees have worked hard
there to deliver customer service
and the guest experience, and at
this point we’re just going to focus
on domestic operations and exit
international operations.”

For the nine months to January
25, 2009, Isle of Capri’s Our
Lucaya casino suffered a $1.713
million net operating loss, a 52
per cent increase upon the previ-
ous year’s $1.125 million net oper-
ating loss.

On the revenue front, for the
first nine months of the current
financial year, Isle-Our Lucaya’s
revenues dropped by 23.2 per
cent to $8.277 million, compared
to $10.79 million the year before.

As for the third quarter, rev-
enues generated at the Freeport
casino fell by 35.5 per cent to
$2.632 million, compared to
$4.081 million the year before.

And for the same three-month
period, the Isle of Capri saw its
net operating loss in Freeport
climb from $169,000 in the 2008
fiscal year to $639,000 this time
around.

Isle of Capri’s withdrawal is
also likely to further negatively
impact the already struggling Our
Lucaya resort if no replacement
operator is found. Casinos are
great drawers of visitors, and if
the facility closes then
Freeport/Grand Bahama loses
another major tourist attraction.

The former PLP government
did everything it could to keep
Isle of Capri in Freeport, and the
casino open. Just before the 2007
general election, it was able to
reverse a previous $9.4 million
loss provision after a new gam-
ing tax rate agreed with the Gov-
ernment enabled it to recover
$6.9 million in accrued taxes.

The gaming win tax rate was
slashed from 17 per cent to 9 per
cent for Isle of Capri, while it also
received a marketing subsidy
from the Government. Isle of
Capri had previously accrued
gaming taxes as high as $10 mil-
lion, and its pullout now means
that the returns from such a deal
are questionable.

The Government will now also
potentially lose casino taxes.
Together with the closure of the
Pinnacle Entertainment casino at
Exuma’s Four Seasons resort, the
episode highlights the difficulty
small gaming operators have in
achieving profitability in areas
that are not mass tourism desti-
nations. Isle of Capri had leased
the Our Lucaya casino under a
two-year lease that started on
June 1, 2007, and which could be
terminated by both itself and
Hutchison Whampoa (Our
Lucaya’s owner) with six months
notice from either side.

Annual rental payments under
the lease are $1.9 million.

The property is a 19,000
square-foot casino, and offers 303
slot machines, 25 table games and
a 110-seat restaurant.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ACOMA VALLEY CORP.

—S

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ACOMA VALLEY CORP. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IGUALAS.A.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of IGUALA S.A. has been completed; a Cer-

tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KAMDEN OCEAN CORP.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KAMDEN OCEAN CORP. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







APT 3-G

AEN CONFIDES IN HIS. BAUGHTER
AWD +++ [SUR BROTHERS WANT NO

JUDGE PARKER

KATHERING GOT
RID OF ME SO
SHE COULD SIZE



TURNS OUT YOU'RE THE BEST
OF THE LOT. FUNNY, ISN’T IT?

ROY THINKS 1’ AN OLD
FOOL FOR HANGING ON
TO tTAND I NEVER

HEAR FROM DAVEY.



YOU MUST HAVE
PASSED MUSTER!
SHE LIKES YOU...

I CAN TELL!




©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

® AND I LIKE HER.
SHE PROTECTS THE
PEOPLE GHE LOVES!

TVE NOTICED MOM
ALWANS STRAPS ME
INTO THIS THING

FOR THE LIFE OF ME,
IL DON'T KNOW WHY

T MEAN, WHAT DOES SHE
THINK I'M GOING To 00..7
MAY I HAVE THE TRY To RUN AWAY?

{ MY OAD RARELY SPEAKS AT
SALT, PLEASE?

} | ANO THEN ONLY OUT ;
Sw-4 THE DINNER TABLE p~----

“~-4 OF NECESSITY --~
N /

S.

CO)
3

merica Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

tures Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved
“] www.kingfeatures.com



MOM WANTS TO KNOW
IF (1S NECESSARY FOR
You TO MAKE THAT





NECESSARY.
TM DOING IT
FOR FUN!

pe ALL THAT MONEY TO
10 PAY OFF

THE JUDGE ?



Y OW,CMON, THATS
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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.







may be used











Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer



THEY many words of Gaur
eee oT Mare can Thm make
fram. the ethers chown beret
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mut contain the centre letter
nd tere Baer be of eter one!
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TODAY'S TARGET

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FOSTERDAF'S SOLUTION

ciln ile novel dsol
Geneve [PEO eye
Gevirw dim diet dre ein
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Ties pied pied tepid tine
Seed vire vic ried

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number

in the same block more than once. The difficulty

level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer































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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.













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EMail iad (13



Score One for the Defense

1 It's not profitable to 1 Like the cubed root of

make (7) carrot perhaps (5) = rel | || (oe | | t | ; ;
5 Laughter in company’s 5 Jets start out fom fa in er i North dealer. mond, East taking the queen with the
cancun ts them (13) Neither side vulnerable. ace and returning the nine to the
|| | | || | || NORTH king. South had eight cashable tricks
8 Made money illegally (13) 3 Provided food for a @J984 at this point, and in an effort to gain
9 Put off Ted’s return with domestic pet and wild Pee J Te at eye dT | ty | V¥KQ6 a ninth he led a low spade to the ten.
eal - i ‘a $KI65 fsficioy nur When eke
seul ; Fie a satisfactory return. When he led a

10 It distributes by air (7) 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on eT led eT WEST EAST heart, declarer won in dummy and

11 Puts up a house for sale, fhe, revede:t) AQ 47652 played a spade to the king. West took
perhaps (6) 5 Acquit the prisoner and || Es) fel ie = | I] W874 ¥10932 the ace and cashed the jack of dia-

12 Such a shop is somewhat empty the court (5) rey TT tT yt EE ae ee 5 oF ge US net pau
a 3 ave lost, so South made exactly
limited (6) . 6 They adopt aiid atti a (4 T ea} al | r_ | SOUTH hiss notrump.

15 They are entitled toa tudes when working (7,6) @K 103 At the second table, the defense
share of whatever is 7 Burdened — with a back Pe Py et | VAIS was far more effective. A diamond
left (7) seat driver? (7) #10743 was led here also, but instead of win-

17 Sea air adds a little weight | 11 Self-propelled transport (7) | LL oes Dawn The biddi #AQ9 a with the ace, East signaled with

bid : al 1 Learned person (7 j € bidding: e nine.
ae a ea N 5 Reject ts _ ae North Fast South West Declarer could not prevail

19 Different view put in writing and improves (5,2) N disdain (5) 2 Imperious 1& Pass INT Pass against this play. He also led a spade
by a dramatist (6,2,5) 14 Awild horse on land (6) — 8 Rigidly imposed (4,3,6) 3 NT and finessed the ten, but West took

20 Directions to prosecute fol- | 16 Cosy feature of a mountain = siganteedion 128 3 Narrow (7) Opening lead — two of diamonds. the queen and returned a diamond.
low (8) olen 183 a ; a East won the king with the ace

9 Factory (5) 4 Haphazard (6) The right time to win a trick is and returned the five, West’s J-8 gob-
21 Dope and sex orgy gets 18 Don't go on about me to a 10 Viewed as a 5 Sophisticated (5) crucial in many hands, and this bling up South’s 10-7, so here the
uncovered (7) improve matters (5) whole (7) ie applies just as much to the defenders — defense scored three diamonds and
s ; ; 11 Afiestedly superar 6 Lacking creativity as it does to the declarer. two spades to put declarer down one.
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution (13) Consider this deal from a team- — At the second table, East recog-
’ eee) of-four match. At both tables, the mized that it would be better to take
Across: 1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, Across: 1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 12 Hydrophobia (6) 7 Perplex (7) final fecetipas Tir cen 2 bat th 2 di de later ta tee
10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 : ; pee OEE) as Ee Pau 2 tee SL AES see) 1 ee
Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 15 Public service 11 Honours due to the contract was made at one table — when he could more effectively lead
24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, | Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 company (7) victor (7) while at the other it was defeated. through whatever values South
27 Essay. Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. 17 Male duck (5) At the first table, West led a dia- — might have in the suit.
Down: 2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Down: 2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 19 Ashow-off (13) 13 Demanding (7) Tomorrow: Triumph of mind over matter
Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, ; 14 Method (6) ate eee : :
Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 20 Fashion (5) ©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 21 Inexplicable 16 Tinge deeply (5)
Act up, 22 Quits. Annul, 22 Fancy. matter (7) 18 Ingress (5)



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eS



The Tribune



Street Plaza. Mrs
Knowles said she wants
to share the many blends
of flavors developed
from years of travel and
her curiosity for nutri-
tion.

“Tt all started with the
idea to make cupcakes
out of my garage. I was
the mother of a two -
year -old at the time and
I was tired of being
home doing nothing so I
decided to bake cup-
cakes. That did not
work, but all of a sudden
I got propelled into the
catering world and that ran for about two
years. We then went to the Farmers Market
and that created a demand. That led me to
want to open a market café where people can
come, buy our homemade products and also
get a deli wrap, soup and daily menu.”

Mrs Knowles also decided to do frozen
meals which are a result of her personal chef
service experience.

“We have frozen meals that people can

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

AS the number of eateries in the Bahamas contin-
ues to increase, many persons have probably
already indulged in Chinese, Greek, French, Italian,
Mexican or other countries' foods. However, how
many times has there been any buzz about Canadi-
an food? The answer would be probably be "never."
Fortunately, Julie-Andree Knowles of Le Petit
Gourmet is willing to change the way Bahamians
experience food in a healthy way.

Mrs Knowles is originally from Quebec,
Canada but her heart is now in the Bahamas
where she met and married her husband,
Matt Knowles and had a handsome son,
Adam. Mrs Knowles describes herself not as
a chef, but rather a person who really loves
to cook.

Over the last three years, Mrs Knowles
said her passion for food and love of people
along with life circumstances have led her on
a journey from the Farmer’s Market on East
Bay Street to her own place in the Shirley

PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from
qualified individuals for the position of PRINCIPAL, St. John’s College,
beginning September, 2009.

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in Education from a recognized
University, with at least (5) years accumulative administrative experience. The
applicant must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Providing leadership - set the climate and pace for success and high
achievement in the school.

ey]

pick up and store in the
freezer. They can then take
them down in the fridge and
warm it up later for dinner,”
Mrs Knowles said.

Explaining her knowledge
of so many exotic foods and
the reason she cooks with a
unique blend of spicy
Caribbean and flavorful
French styles, Mrs Knowles
said she used to be a fight
attendant which gave her the
opportunity to indulge in all
types of cuisine.

“T used to be a flight atten-
dant on Air Canada so I trav-
eled for seven years which
kind of opened my horizons

NOTICE is hereby given that



ae

food wise. I went to Germany
and Japan and actually I gath-
ered some of my recipes
through those experiences,”
Mrs Knowles said.

Mrs Knowles said her skills
are not all her own as her
family has roots in great food.

“Both of my grandfathers
were ‘jacks of all trades’. My
dad’s father started a ham-
burger joint in a small town
and people drove two hours
to go there to get a hamburg-
er from him. He also made a
type of ginger beer with his
secret recipe. My father
showed me the scars in his
hand from all the bottling he

NESLYN FREDERIC

- Organizing and supervising schedules, programmes, records and

procedures.

school

- Supervising and evaluating teachers and support staff.
- Managing records, school finances and end-of-year closing

procedures.

- Communicating with parents, community groups and organizations.
- Displaying consistent organizational and human relationship skills.
- Assisting the Education Department with and initiating Staff

Development Programmes.

Applicants should submit a cover letter,

Curriculum Vitae, copies of

degree certificates, three references and passport photographs to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Friday March 27th, 2009.



of COLLEGE GARDEN, PRINCE CHARLES,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 25" day of February,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAUDLAIN PIERRE of
EAST ST. SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 25'" day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





JULIE-
ANDREE
Knowles of Le
Petit Gourmet
displaying the
gorgeous pas-
tries and
breads baked
/ fresh daily.

i

did as back in those days
everything was manual. So it
is in the family I think. They
were doers- had an idea and
just went for it. That is what
inspired me very much in my
life,” Mrs Knowles said.

As for the health factor of
her market café, persons can
enjoy daily morning pastries,
spreads, breads, wraps, soups,
and sandwiches.

“When I looked around, I
realised I have to give options
to people. For example, when
I cook my ground beef, I
always take the time to strain
my meat so the fat is gone
and you just have the meat
left. It may take longer, but
what ever I dois good and
high quality and people can
eat in confidence that Iam
not going around the bush to
cut costs. Our goal is to facili-
tate the enjoyment of a good
meal,” Mrs Knowles said.

As much as she would like
to be a successful business,
she wants Le Petit Gourmet
to grow in such a manner that
the quality stays the same.

“There is no way around
that. I love my customers.
They know about my life and
my son. They are part of me
and making it an open
kitchen and an open atmos-
phere, they get to know me.
It’s music from Montreal, its
French music. I want people
to be happy and that means
the size of my business stays
enjoyable for me and my cus-
tomers. So when they come
here, they do not just get to
know me through the food
but they get to know me
through the ambiance,” Mrs
Knowles said.



THE TRIBUNE

Lionfish on the

@ By LLOYD ALLEN

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

UNTIL about 15 years ago, the Lionfish was
a relatively unknown fish in local waters, and
mostly indigenous to the indo pacific region -
the Indian and South Pacific Oceans, and the
Red Sea.

Now the waters of the Bahamas are
teeming with possibly hundreds of thou-
sands of these underwater water men-
aces, who are not only invading many
coral reefs and underwater crevices, but
are also a serious threat to the future of
local sea environments.

If left unchecked, the Lionfish could
eliminate many indigenous sea creatures
which some say could lead to a perma-
nent unbalance in the Bahamian marine
system.

Because of this concern, the Depart-
ment of Marine Resources (DMR) has
initiated a bold project which first
attempts to educate locals on the basic
facts of the Lionfish, and to then intro-
duce the fish as a food source which
could eventually eliminate the foreign
predator as a threat to local fish.

Nakisha Anderson, an assistant fish-
eries officer at DMR spoke recently at
the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial
Corporation’s Agribusiness Expo.

“While the Lionfish is eating out our
native fish species, what we are trying to
do is make a market for it. The more
people who start eating it, the more we
can control their numbers.”

To prepare the fish for consumption,
Ms Anderson said it is essential that the
fish’s venomous spines are removed first
because of the obvious health risk.

Ms Anderson said that people stung
by the fish describe the pain as a burning
sensation which could result in hospitali-
sation or possibly death. Officials say that
applying hot water and seeking medical
attention is the safest way of handing a
sting.

Assisting Ms Anderson was Chef
Gareth Bowe from DMR, who said his
tool of choice for removing the spines is a

pair of kitchen scissors.

He said a common
question from many
interested in cooking the
fish is whether the head
is edible. Although it is,
he prefers to dispose of
it because of it is difficult
to season and because of
its spiny exterior.

“Tt’s just the dorsal,
the anal, and the pelvic
fins that have venomous
spines.”

Making his specialty of the day, Mr
Bowe prepared what he called ‘Fillet
Lionfish Fingers,” a dish which takes
about 15 minutes.

First using a fillet knife, he separated
the meat from the fish, where he then
removed the scaly skin, and then washed
the fish in warm water. Next, he used
ripened limes to add initial seasoning, fol-
lowed by dipping the meat in an egg
based seasoning sauce. Although he was
unwilling to reveal all of his ingredients,
he did disclose some elements including
black pepper, seasoning salt, lime, Cajun
seasoning, minced garlic and three table
spoons of butter.

He said for the best results, the fish
should soak in the mixture for about two
hours. After it had been soaked, he
placed it in a container of white flour,
which was the final step before placing it
in the fryer.

Using extra virgin olive oil, he allowed
the meat portions to fully cook for about
four to five minute, allowing the exterior
to turn brown. In the end, the fish has the
appearance of grouper, with a taste many
say has to be acquired.

According to Tribune Taste, the fish
tastes like grouper or tuna, with some
also comparing it to fresh water trout.

This newest delicacy has also been
added to the menus of a couple local
restaurants including Shogun Restaurant,
and the August Moon Café.

With other restaurants and food stores
showing no real interest in offering the
fish to consumer, DMR is excited and
hopeful that through this expo, more
Bahamians may adopt the fish as a regu-
lar part of their diet.



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 7B



FROM top left to right and middle: Chef Bowe demonstrates the preparation of the Lion Fish to

ensure the poisonous spines are removed.

At bottom- the final product- fillet Lionfish Fingers.

Box:

‘a’
ca
=
Ke
=

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

DA 69806
c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





IN THIS Aug. 26, 2008 file photo,
“American Idol" judges, from left,
Simon Cowell, Kara DioGuardi,
Paula Abdul and Randy Jackson
arrive at a promotional event for
the show in New York.

What’s wrong with

American

Idol?

@ By TRIBUNE
Staff Writer

TWO or three years back,
American Idol was good, very
good. Every Tuesday night, my
wife and I had eyes and ears
locked on the telly to see and hear

tomorrow’s superstars.

Even now I can remember the
Clay Aikens, Kelly Clarksons and
Jordin Sparks of the world. Bit
players like Kelly Pickler and the
big bearded dude in the cowboy
hat were memorable, too.

Chris Daughtry, the bald-head-
ed hard rocker, came over strong-
ly. So did the little guy with the
floppy hair who was deeply in love

with himself. What was his name
again?

So what’s gone wrong? Every-
thing’s gone wrong, that’s what.

This year’s Idol series is dreary,
tedious junk interspersed with
more dreary, tedious junk, with
hardly a glimmer of true glamour
in sight.

Talent so far has been confined
to a bronze-headed teenager
named Alison (“Sixteen going on
40,” as we both remark when she
snarls out her lively numbers) and
a tiny blond who looks and sounds
like the real thing but still has far
to go.

The rest have been mediocrities
wrestling with largely forgettable
songs notable only for their lack of

melody and harmony.

What a sad shambles the whole
thing has become.

The early episodes of the 2009
season were based on a calamitous
format in which we heard per-
formers only in soundbites and
saw them only in flashes. There
was so much movement from one
to another that I became dizzy-
headed with confusion.

More than once I sought relief
by leaving the room to surf the
Internet.

The panel sounded, as usual,
like semi-articulate primates,
deploying the same old phrases
they’ve used since the series
began. Why don’t they extend
their vocabulary? What’s a vocab-
ulary, I hear them ask.

Simon Cowell’s calculated hos-
tility to all and sundry is now
wearing thin, especially as it
always emerges in the same mind-
killing English monotone.

Randy Jackson, with his con-
trived coolness, has said “What’s
up dog?” “Check this out” and
“You were a bit pitchy” at least 14
million times too often for me.

The irritatingly indecisive Paula
Abdul is as lost for words as ever,
stumbling around in a nomansland
between saying what she means
and trying not to cause offence.

And a fourth panellist, whose
name I haven’t even bothered to



check out, is an irrelevance who
gets in the way of everyone else.

No wonder Idol has lost its lus-
tre. [sometimes wonder if this
panel has a full-sized brain
between them, their range of
expression is so limited and super-
ficial.

When they appeared alongside
each other in four easy chairs
inside a wood-panelled mansion,
calling the quivering contestants in
for appraisal like medieval serf-
masters, our coffee pot was in
grave danger of being hurled
through the TV screen.

It’s hard to imagine any other
quartet so undeserving of the
praise that appears to be heaped
upon them.

Worst of all, the only true star
of the show - the host Ryan
Seacrest - is now somehow
reduced to a walk-on part after
being the production’s indispens-
able hub for years past.

No doubt Idol has this year
dared to be different in its attempt
to boost ratings. Unfortunately,
the major difference is that it’s
now far worse than the shows
we’ve been used to in the past.

Cowell and Co need to get their
act together if they really want
Idol to run and run.

At the moment, Google is
emerging as a much more enter-
taining option.



The early episodes
of the 2009 season
were based on a
calamitous format in
which we heard
performers only in
soundbites and saw
them only in flashes.
There was so

much movement from

one to another that |

became dizzy-headed

with confusion.



Island expressions

FROM page 10

sheer joy I feel while doing it. For most of my life I
ignored my God-given talents and I was not happy. }
Now that I am embracing them, I can feel myself as } [Ey
a person evolving and my work is evolving. My
painting is tied to my growth as a person. It is my }
release, my way of getting through each day,” Mr

Knowles said.

As painting is definitely not his only form of
expression, Mr Knowles said the medium which }
kept him going through all of his dark years was }
graphic design and in the last 5-6 years, fine pho- i

tography.

Mr Knowles said the things that are important to i §
him at this moment are his continued evolution as }
a person, and getting his studio business up and run- }
ning so that those around the Bahamas can appre- }

ciate island art work.

“The main thing I tell other young artists is to not i
get discouraged. When you are in the art profession,
you are almost always going to struggle as you
build a name and a reputation for yourself and
your work. However, if you love it then go for it.
Don't do pieces just because you think it will earn }
you some money, do it because it touches you deep
down in your emotional being,” Mr Knowles said. }

Bahamas Red Cross Fair

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

NOW that Spring is here, one of the most
exciting and highly anticipated events of the
year for Bahamians of all ages is the Bahamas
Red Cross Fair which will take place on Satur-
day, March 7 on the lower grounds of Govern-
ment House. Each year, the fair attracts thou-
sands of people who flock to Government
House to enjoy staples like conch fritters, pop-
corn, cotton candy, hamburgers, and play games
like hoop-la, and bingo, and to catch up with old
friends and party in the disco. There will be a
special treat for those in the disco as there will
be numerous special musical guests performing.
The fair is one of the organisation’s largest
fund-raising events with all proceeds going to
assist the Red Cross in its very important work.

So officials of the Red Cross are urging all
members of the public to attend.

i MRS SARGENT

? said she draws
inspiration for her
creations by think-
? ing about what

? best compliments
: the clothes or any-
: thing in relation to
? the individual.



Fun to see faces

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

THERE are many things that can
be classified as art. Art is such a
large part of our everyday lives, we
hardly even stop to think about it.
Look at the desk or table where you
are, right this minute. Someone
designed that. It is art. Your shoes
are art. Your coffee cup is art. Well
Juliette Sargent saw a face- and
made art.

Ms Sargent, owner of Fun to see
Faces, has been face painting for
about a year and a half.

“T schooled, lived and worked in
the United States and Japan for sev-
en years. After moving home, I
began face painting at the sugges-
tion of Carol Moss, a close cousin.
She wanted me to face paint at her
kids’ party since the clown was not
able to make it. I was amazed how
much fun it created for the kids and
also surprised how many adults
asked me to their kids’ parties. Since
then I had received further train-
ing from Michigan based artist,
Donna Novak, of Show Off Body
Art. I have also received further
training from New Jersey based
master clown, Robyn Thompson
(Moggie).”

Ms Sargent said the most reward-
ing thing about face painting is
being fulfilled about making good
use of her artistic abilities.

“T use to be really good at draw-
ing when I was in high school...I
had not practised my craft in over 12
years. Now, I am using that same
talent again. I am amazed. I am hap-
py to create a bit of amusement and
happiness in the people I paint or
people who see my paintings,” Mrs
Sargent said.

Although Ms Sargent is a 4th
grade teacher at Nassau Christian
Academy full time, she does find
time to express her love for face

painting.

“Tam an avid traveler. I love
reading and of course learning new
things, especially those that relate to
art. Today, face art competes with
education for my attention. When
not teaching my class, I can usually
be found wielding a paint brush on
the face of any willing participant. I
prefer face painting over tradition-
al canvas art because face painting is
quicker, easier and can be enjoyed
by everyone,” Ms Sargent said.

Face painting does not only have
a children clientele, but also sur-
prisingly, many adults enjoy the
craft participating with their chil-
dren or at private functions.

“Tam mostly invited to kids’ par-
ties. Occasionally, I get invited to
adult parties as well, especially
theme parties (Mardi Gras, Hal-
loween, Junkanoo, etc). I attend a
few fairs and corporate events. This
year, I was able to provide face
painting at the carnival. I am joined
by about four other painters at big
events.”

Mrs Sargent said she draws inspi-
ration for her creations by thinking
about what best compliments the
clothes or anything in relation to
the individual.

“Sometimes I am able to repli-
cate patterns and images that are
on their clothing. I also like looking
at my baby niece’s clothes. I like
the colors that are used to design
kids clothes and as a result I incor-
porate these colors in my art,” Ms
Sargent said.

Face painting can be a lot of fun,
but it can also be a lot of hard work.
Ms Sargent said those who want to
get into the field have much training
to consider.

“Train and seek the advice of per-
sons in that field and practise a lot.
Be sure to only use paints that are
intended for use on the skin,” Ms
Sargent said.











i

TAMPA tee

High: 69° F/21°C

Low: 43° F/6°C

he

a

@

KEY WEST
High: 71° F/22°C
Low: 56° F/13°C

@

ORLANDO >
High:70°F/21°C:
Low: 41° F/5°C

it

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Oe

Partly sunny, a
shower; breezy.

@ WEST PALM BEACH CO.

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 72° F/22° C @
Low: 55° F/13°C

High: 75°

a a

The ot AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and




Clear, breezy and
cool.







Partly sunny.



High: 74°
Low: 65° Low: 66°
[| _-68°-63° F

Sunny to partly
cloudy and breezy.






on

Windy in the morning;
partly sunny.






High: 76° High: 79°
Low: 69° Low: 70°



Sunny and

High:
Low:

AccuWeather RealFeel

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

High: 70° F/21°C
Low: 52° F/11°C

= AMI

High: 72° F/22° C
Low: 54°F/12°C

Q




FREEPORT

ABACO
High: 68° F/20° C

High: 66° F/19°C
Low: 49° F/9° C

NASSAU
High: 75° F/24° C
Low: 65° F/18°C

@

i

ANDROS

AW

High: 76° F/24° C
Low: 56° F/13°C

Low:52°F/11°C

i

Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday

Temperature

73° F/23° C
53° F/12° C
78° F/26° C

Normal high ....

Normal low
Last year's high
Last year's low



65° F/18° C
82° F/28° C
67° F/19° C

AY rr TODAY

8| eho
: EXT.




pleasant.




81°
70°





o|1|2

LOW

Today
Thursday
Friday

Saturday



MODERATE

Vv
3|4|5



6|7

HIGH



\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

greater the need for eye and skin protection.

High
12:49 a.m.
1:15 p.m.
2:00 a.m.
2:28 p.m.
3:14 a.m.
3:40 p.m.
4:22 a.m.
4:45 p.m.

Ht. (ft.
27
2.1
27
2.2
27
2.3

2.8
25

Low
7:21 a.m.
7:19 p.m.
8:32 a.m.
8:32 p.m.
9:40 a.m.
9:44 p.m.

10:40 a.m.
10:49 p.m.

a Pos

Ht. (ft.
0.3
0.0

0.3
0.0

0.2
-0.1

0.0
-0.2

Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:30 a.m. Moonrise. ... 11:37 a.m.

As of 1 p.m. yesterday .....cccccscssssssscssessseeen 0.00" Sunset....... 6:14 p.m. Moonset... . 12:58 a.m.

Year to date : :

Normal year to date oo... ccce cece eens 3.60" daly â„¢ Last New
AccuWeather.com

ELEUTHERA

High: 73° F/23° C
Low: 56° F/13°C

2s

a

Was
vw

GREAT EXUMA
High: 74° F/23° C
Low: 62°F/17°C

=

%.

Vr

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
72/22
24/-4
56/13
34/1
34/1
32/0
34/1
56/13
40/4
38/3
72/22
72/22
37/2
78/25
76/24

Today

Low

F/C
45/7
22/-5
32/0
16/-8
18/-7
18/-7
21/-6
31/0
32/0
25/-3
57/13
38/3
27/-2
66/18
60/15

Ww

pc
sn
$
pc
pc
$
pc
$
pc
pc
$
pc
Cc
sh
s

High
F/C
69/20
34/1
66/18
45/7
46/7
37/2
47/8
66/18
53/11
50/10
86/30
60/15
43/6
79/26
80/26

Thursday

Low

F/C
43/6
24/-4
46/7
32/0
32/0
26/-3
36/2
41/5
39/3
39/3
61/16
27/-2
38/3
65/18
64/17

Ww

pe
sn
s
pe
pe
pe
c
s
E
C
pe
pe
c
C

pc

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

High
F/C
46/7
60/15
56/13
70/21
63/17
64/17
52/11
60/15
72/22
35/1
59/15
67/19
36/2
74/23
70/21

Today

Low

F/C
35/1
36/2
48/8
48/8
47/8
50/10
40/4
49/9
56/13
29/-1
37/2
54/12
25/-3
54/12
47/8

WwW

pe
s
pe
pe
pe
r
pe
pe
s
pe
pe
s

$
s
Ss

High
F/C
55/12
68/20
74/23
68/20
71/21
64/17
64/17
70/21
74/23
41/5
66/18
75/23
44/6
86/30
75/23

Thursday

Low

F/C
47/8
46/7
46/7
45/7
55/12
50/10
53/11
57/13
63/17
28/-2
51/10
60/15
31/0
55/12
53/11

Ww

c
s

pe
pe
pe
pe
Ec

pe
s

pe
pe
pe
pe
pc
s

High

F/C

Philadelphia 33/0
Phoenix 83/28
Pittsburgh 36/2
Portland, OR 51/10
Raleigh-Durham 44/6
St. Louis 56/13
Salt Lake City 57/13
San Antonio 78/25
San Diego 64/17
San Francisco 58/14
Seattle 48/8
Tallahassee 63/17
Tampa 69/20
Tucson 82/27

Washington, DC 44/6

Today

Low

F/C
22/-5
58/14
22/-5
39/3
26/-3
42/5
33/0
61/16
55/12
46/7
39/3
35/1
50/10
55/12
27/-2

WwW

pc
pc
pc
sh
pc
pc
c

Ss

pc
sh
pc
S$

Ss

pc
pc

High
F/C
43/6
79/26
50/10
49/9
58/14
64/17
47/8
80/26
65/18
59/15
46/7
72/22
72/22
79/26
54/12

Thursday

Low W
F/C
32/0 pc
57/13 pc
42/5 ¢
37/2 ¢
38/3 pc
52/11 ¢
30/-1 ¢
62/16 pc
52/11 pc
46/7 c
33/0 ¢
43/6 s
56/13 s
52/11 pc
37/2 pc

Forecasts and graphics provided by

CATISLAND
High: 70° F/21°C
Low: 53° F/12°C

om
>
VW

~

LONGISLAND
High: 74° F/23°C



Mar. 10

Mar. 18

AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 a 4
SAN SALVADOR
High: 74° F/23° C
Low:57°F/14°C
wr
MAYAGUANA

Low: 57° F/14°C

>

aw

High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 59° F/15°C

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND
High: 77° F/25° C
Low: 55° F/13°C

High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 60°F/16°C

GREAT INAGUA .

High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 63° F/17°C

iF



Mar. 26

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg



Low
F/C
72/22
36/2
32/0
54/12
64/17
77/25
74/23
43/6
32/0
57/13
47/8
33/3
SoZ
45/7
32/0
41/5
63/17
58/14
77/25
14/-10
57/13
68/20
51/10
37/2
34/1
36/2
39/3
4/-15
57/13
24/-4
70/21
54/12
50/10
45/7
51/10
72/22
67/19
34/1
34/1
75/23
43/6
59/15
5/-15
18/-7
37/2
56/13
63/17
25/-3
34/1
36/2
75/23
53/11
46/7
72/22
65/18
59/15
54/12
65/18
67/19
34/1
32/0
59/15
70/21
39/3
19/-7
73/22
33/3
44/6
34/1
23/-5

Today

c
sn

48/8
88/31
80/26
91/32
25/-3
30/-1

38/3
92/33
88/31
28/-2

43/6

46/7
92/33
77/25
55/12
81/27
95/35
92/33
90/32
81/27
93/33

45/7

36/2
72/22
78/25
54/12

41/5
91/32

46/7
53/11

41/5

36/2

Thursday

Low
F/C
71/21
39/3
37/2
50/10
69/20
78/25
74/23
38/3
27/-2
63/17
42/5
39/3
Soril2
45/7
36/2
41/5
66/18
67/19
75/23
-2/-18
63/17
68/20
49/9
39/3
37/2
34/1
31/0
15/-9
56/13
21/-6
66/18
53/11
53/11
54/12
50/10
74/23
69/20
36/2
32/0
75/23
41/5
62/16
18/-7
21/-6
34/1
55/12
61/16
23/-5
36/2
38/3
80/26
53/11
43/6
73/22
67/19
72/22
57/13
64/17
66/18
25/-3
30/-1
59/15
62/16
43/6
35/1
75/23
28/-2
48/8
34/1
19/-7



WwW

$
r
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sh
r
c
pc
c
s

=

$
$
s
$
t
r
P
pe
$
$
c
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Pp
r
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sn

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace




PVT Sm Ho



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4th, 2009, PAGE 9C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Thursday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 74° F
Thursday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: SSW at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-8 Miles 74° F
Thursday: _ NW at 15-30 Knots 6-10 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F



0) Va EN ey

Los Angeles

64/50

Showers
EX Jj T-storms

Rain

Flurries
Snow

Ice



New ie Grond Bahama |
Tt (242) 502-6400

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and

precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

-0s Os 10s 20s {B0s"! 40s

Miami
72/56

Fronts

Cold =="
Wee %

Stationary Menge

AUTO INSURANCE

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Tek: (242) 336-2304









} Fun to

see Faces
see page eight

A taste of
Canada

See page six

The Tribune SECTION B

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009






“Bsr

expressions

@ By ALEX MISSICK Mr Knowles a resident
Features Staff Reporter of Little Exuma, started
drawing fresh out of his

WITH most artists looking to —‘iapers, and then took
up painting when he

make it to the big city to show- — \ent to Florida to attend
case their work, 26 -year- old _ the Art Institute of Ft

i i i Lauderdale.
graphic ene ee eae
Knowles, 7 es to keep his . prefers to live and paint
work and life as close to his on his home island

because of the connec-
tion he feels to his sur-
roundings.

“My family has been living on Little Exuma for five generations
and I am a big advocate of young people carrying out the traditions
of past generations. Additionally, I am just plain and simple, an
island boy and I owe everything I've achieved in my life to my
upbringing here,” Mr Knowles said.

One piece that is close to his heart, entitled “Flow” reflects on his
life experiences.

“For a period of about 2 or 3 years I had lost my creative "flow"
due to being weighed down by one personal tragedy after the next.
So it was a release, and | attribute this piece to my being able to be
the painter I am now,” he said.

The second piece, entitled “Reconnecting with... Mother” is a
mixed-media work, which Mr Knowles said he came up with one
day, as he was standing out in the rain barefoot. Mr Knowles said as
he walked he noticed the impression of his footprints being left in
the wet earth, and felt a visceral connection to Mother Nature.

The third piece, "Untitled II” was born simply from a graphic
inspired mood. Using
two recycled pieces of

i hs ui Pe aris. ie: wood Mr Knowles said
; ~:~ she wanted to create a

island home as possible.

ery i 5 j
A oe te ee) very graphic, colorful
aa... t 4 = | _ interchangeable piece

Lea {i i i ! (the two panels can be
' separated).

The fourth piece, is
called "Reflections..." Mr
Knowles said he had an
old discarded shelf,
which in its previous life
had been in the shower.

“Additionally I had
the pieces from an old
broken window and now ie oe i : P 5
that all of my work is cre- -m < = REFLECTIONS
ated with 100 per cent ci
recycled materials, I
wanted a way to combine =
them to create a small, : , ' * . ESOT
striking piece. If you look pokes i
closely you can pick out
the profiles of two
heads,” Mr Knowles said.

Last year he felt the
desire to do a fusion
piece, combining tribal
and Asian designs and
the result was “ Warrior”

“Fortunately I came
across an Arawak
inspired tattoo design by
an acquaintance of mine
who gave me the permis-
sion to use it in my piece.
The design itself was
done without stencils or
any guides whatsoever,
the entire design was
freehanded and I was
very happy with the out-

ee
‘a 1 ir tI
Tos

Mr Knowles said he
draws his inspiration
from his emotions, the
environment and the feel
of nature, even though
essentially everything can
be a source of inspira-
tion.

“The thing that inspires
me to keep at it is the

SEE page eight



RC Oa



Full Text

PAGE 1

n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net IT has been reported that Swiss detectives have visited Scots actor Sean Connery at this Lyford Cay home to question him in connection with a civil suit stemming out of a loan he allegedly made to a former friend. According to The Daily Mail newspaper of Lon don, Sir Sean, 78, is due to appear in a court in Gene va, Switzerland, next week in connection with the action. It is alleged that the James Bond actor lent his n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A N L W Young school offi cial claims police need to probe more deeply into a confrontation outside the schoolon Monday as he fears that s tories of an off-duty police officer having stepped in to break up a fight might not be the full story. Telford Mullings, principal of the high school in Bernard Road, confirmed that a number of ninth-grade students at the school were involved in a dispute that broke out near the school grounds shortly before 4pm on Monday. However, suggesting reports reaching the media so far about the incident may not be the whole story, he stood up for his students. “The way ZNS had it this morning, they made it sound like some of my students went out to deliberately beat up a police officer. It wasn’t like that,” said Mr Mullings. Principal calls for police probe into fight N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.84WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009PRICE – 75 ( Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 ) WEATHER PARTLYSUNNY, A SHOWER HIGH 75F LOW 65F F E A T U R E S SEE ‘THEARTS’ SECTION S P O R T S SEEPAGEELEVEN Island expressions GSSSAathletes off to fast start n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net AMERICAN federal agents and state prosecutors havebeen"illegally" approaching local financial institutions for information instead of following proper legal channels, former Attorney General Alfred Sears said in a call for more government intervention in the matter. While not being specific, Mr Sears told the House of Assembly that American officials sometimes coerce local banks directly for assistance in civil and criminal matters in the US, rather than petition them through the competent authority, which would be the Attorney General. However, in an interview with Tribune Business, State Finance Minister Zhivargo Laing branded Mr Sears' assertions as "irresponsible", adding that his ministry had not heard of such harassment. "They have been circum venting the proper channels, The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Former Attorney General claims US agents ‘illegally approaching local financial institutions’ Officials tour Detention Centre amid hunger strike SEE page six n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SENIOR Immigration and Defence Force officials, accompanied by social ser vices personnel and local clergy, toured the Detention Centre on Monday in response to allegations of inhumaneconditions revealed in this newspaper, The Tribune has confirmed. Three people being held at the Detention Centre went on a hunger strike last week to protest what they described as inhumane conditions. Detainees of various nationalities alleged they were forced to endure substandard living conditions, V isit intended to confirm facility ‘being operated with transparency’ SEE page six THIS HONDA ACCORD burst into flames yesterday afternoon on Poinciana Avenue. The female driver was shaken but escaped the fire without injury. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f C AR BURS TSINTOFLAMES n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net IMMEDIATE action must be taken to address the potentially irreversible impact of climate change in the Bahamas as one of the world’s most vulnerable nations, experts warned yesterday. The undeniable effects of global warming already being felt in the country’s low-lying subtropical islands were divulged by the director of the Bahamas Environment Sci ence and Technology (BEST Philip Weech, department of meteorology director Arthur Rolle and Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC ‘Immediate action needed’ to address impact of climate change on Bahamas PHILIP WEECH , Director of the Bahamas Environment Science and Technology commission SEE page eight BRITISH banker Roddie Fleming’s attempt to acquire the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA to have ended in failure last night, after it was announced that the Sir Jack Hayward Family Trust would not be proceeding with the $100 mil lion deal to sell its stake to him. A brief statement last night said: “Sir Jack Hayward's fam ily trustees announce that the arrangements made in August 2007 for the acquisition by Roddie Fleming's Family Trust of their entire interest in Freeport have come to an end. Sir Jack's trustees are not in negotiation with any other potential purchaser.” The announcement does not come as a surprise, given that speculation had intensified in recent weeks that Mr Fleming and his partner, Geoffrey Richards, did not have the financing in place for British banker’ s bid to acquire GBP A appears to have ended SEE page six UNCONFIRMED reports last night were that the Ginn Sur Mer resort in West End, Grand Bahama is due to layoff almost 30 workers by the end of this week. See tomorrow’s Tribune for more details on this story. Unconfirmed reports that resort to lay off almost 30 workers SEE page six SEE page six L W Young school official questions media reports Swiss detectives visit Sean Connery in connection with civil suit www.tribune242.com

PAGE 2

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net PRESIDENT of the Bahamas Public Service Union John Pinder said he is satisfied that a meeting between the heads of t he Airport Authority and mana gement at the airport fire station was successful in avoiding industrial action by disgruntled firemen. Mr Pinder said the aim of the m eeting was to discuss the susp ension of a firefighter who r efused to participate in a training session conducted by a lowe r ranking colleague – a situation which reportedly sent many s enior officers at the station into a n uproar. After the meeting the officer's suspension was reversed and it was decided that the practice of allowing junior officers to trains uperiors would be discontinu ed, he said. Mr Pinder added that during that meeting, it was agreed that p romotion exercises at the fire station would adhere to the union's industrial agreement inf uture, and only qualified persons would be considered for promotions. Safety concerns were also addressed, and the firefighters w ere promised an adequate number of gas masks and suffi c ient gear. "In that meeting, it was con sidered that the senior officers will train the senior officers and they have reversed the decision to suspend that officer," Mr Pin der told The Tribune. " The meeting also mentioned that the human resources area is to be more impartial and try to e nsure that it guides managers t hrough the correct process in terms of not violating our industrial agreement in terms of theg rievance procedure and to ensure that they are in line with any disciplinary policies that theg overnment established . . . so w e don't have to get to this point again where there is a threat of industrial action. We don't want to disrupt services. We need to be proactive and talk things out". The union head said that during the meeting, an example ofa n "unfair" promotion was raised. "When we left that meeting, the managing director made it effective immediately that any request for a promotion that comes to him, all files on thei ndividual from the Fire Department and human resources are double-checked to ensure the same background information is there. "Management has also r equested the policy guidelines surrounding promotions". Last week several firefighters c laimed the station was being run like a "petty shop" and that n epotism was rife. T here were claims that qualified persons were being overlooked by the human resources d epartment for promotions in f avour of less skilled employees. T hese claims prompted a few of the officers to call for the r emoval of the fire chief, the Airport Authority human resources m anager and the director of s ecurity at the airport. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – At least four security officers and a porter at the Freeport Harbour Company have been taken into police custody in connection with a drug investigation at Lucayan Harbour, it was claimed yesterday. Press liaison officer Assistant Superintendent Clarence Reckley confirmed that several persons employed at Lucayan Harbour were tak en in for questioning as part of an ongoing investigation, but he would not specify the nature of the investigation. However, The Tribune has learned from a reliable source that five persons were taken into custody in Freeport on Monday evening fol-l owing the arrest of two women at Port Everglades in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The women, passengers on board the vessel Discovery, were arrested by US authorities after the discovery of a large quantity of illegal drugs. BPSUpresident satisfied that industrial action by firemen has been avoided John Pinder Security officers and porter are allegedly taken into police custody

PAGE 3

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net GOVERNMENT has a “soft target” date of July 1 for the launch of a proposed medical prescription drug plan which would help persons with "catastrophic illnesses" afford medication, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said in the House of Assembly. If this target date is not met, government hopes to have the plan introduced by early October, he said. “We are seeking to determine a date on which that is going to begin, but right now I think it is fair to say that July 1 is the target date for the unemployment benefit and if it is possible, for the medical prescription (plan the same time, otherwise our cur rent indications are October this year for the introduction of the prescription drug benefit,” Mr Ingraham told parliament while contributing to the 2008/2009 midyear budget debate on Monday. The prime minister explained that under the scheme, persons suffering from chronic diseases – for example diabetes and hypertension – who are "unable to afford to keep up the payments for these medications”, will be given access to certain drugs. Mr Ingraham also said the gov ernment plans to initiate a pre scription drug plan for the elderly and indigent before the national drug plan is launched. This will attempt to address the long wait times that many in these categories have had to endure at the Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH “We are going to seek to do at an earlier date a specific pro gramme to deal with the elderly and the indigent and that might come on earlier subject to discus sions that will be had by the Ministry of Health and others with the insurance companies. “Specifically, we want the elderly not to necessarily have to wait for hours and hours at the Princess Margaret Hospital and sometimes find that a particular medication is not available on that given date,” he said. Mr Ingraham also spoke of plans for a scheme which would allow eligible persons to fill monthly prescriptions by presenting a card at a designated pharmacy. Leader of opposition business in the House of Assembly Dr Bernard Nottage credited the government's proposed health plans for the elderly and chronically ill, but said these barely "scratch the surface" of the country's healthcare needs. Speaking to The Tribune after the morning debate, he said the former PLP government's national health insurance plan, which never came on stream, was a more comprehensive approach. "I think any assistance that can be given to persons who are chronically ill, or persons gener ally, would be welcomed. Problem is, I am wedded to a much more ambitious healthcare programme which seeks to do more than provide drugs only for the chronically ill. “But I think the more important thing is to introduce a programme that will minimise the risk of illnesses – and that's what's wrong, in my opinion, with the government's programme.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $4,210 $4,210 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,410 $4,410Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n A MANand a woman are i n police custody following the discovery of an illegal firearm and drugs at a private residence. Shortly after 7pm on Monday, Mobile Division officers travelled to a Highbury Parkh ome. When the officers knocked at the door there was no response and a man was seen through a window running inside the house, press liaisono fficer Asst Supt Walter E vans reported. Upon entry, police heard a r umbling sound in a back bathroom and forced their way into that area. A 31-year-o ld man was found with an orange container. In the container was a clear ziploc bag w ith 111 foil wraps of marij uana and a brown plastic bag w ith a quantity of marijuana. The man and a 23-year-old woman were taken into police custody for questioning in this matter. T he total weight of the drugs is over one pound with a local street value of just over $1,000. T WO men were arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court on a robbery charge yesterday. Court dockets allege that Valentino Rolle, 21, of Nassau Village, and Dwayne S mith, 23, of Pinewood Gar dens, on Sunday, March 1, 2009, at Royal Castle on Bail lou Hill Road robbed Alfred S weeting of a gold chain val ued at $1,288 and $290 in cash. The men, who appeared b efore Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane, pleaded not guilty to thec harge and elected to have a s ummary trial in the Magis trate’s Court. The prosecution objected to the men beingg ranted bail. Both accused were remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison and aree xpected back in court on April 14 for a bail hearing. A 22-YEAR-OLDman was arraigned in a Magis trate’s Court onan armed robbery charge on Monday. It is alleged in court dockets that Lorenzo Joseph Philipson February 24 robbed Cardinal Neely of two Motorola cellular telephones and a gray 2000 Honda Legend valued at $9,450. Philips, who appeared before Magistrate Susan Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau Street, was not required to enter a plea to the charge. He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. Thecasehasbeen adjourned to July 27 for the start of a preliminary inquiry. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FORMERMinister of Housing S hane Gibson accused the government and the auditor general of politicising the Auditor General’s 2006/2007 Report to make him look bad. The Golden Gates MP has contacted Auditor General Terrance Bastian to inquire why certain information in the document relat-i ng to the accounts at the Ministry of Housing was again included despite the accounting discrepancy apparently occurring in a previous budgetary period and appearing in an earlier report. That information was that there was “no documentation” available to show that $385,195.40 releasedf or “repairs of a 10-unit complex in Freeport” was, in fact, used for that purpose. Current Minister of Housing Kenneth Russell, appointed to that position in May, 2007, told The Tribune on Sunday that the money “disappeared and police are doing a full investigation into that.” But Mr Gibson asked: “If this was addressed last year, which it rightly should have been because it was 2005 when it apparently occurred, why is it being addressed again in this report?” He said on Monday that he was still awaiting a response to his inquiry, made that morning. The Auditor General’s Report is generally considered to be an objective analysis of the state of public accounts, carried out by a department separate to those departments and ministries whose accounts are under scrutiny. The latest report was tabled in the House of Assembly last Wednesday. It makes no specific mention of anyone being responsible for deficiencies in any of the accounts scrutinised. Nonetheless Mr Gibson said based on what he has seen in relation to the handling of the Ministry of Housing’s accounts, he would question the neutrality of the report’s findings. The MP showed The Tribune where, in the report tabled last year on the period 2005/2006, auditors noted that “three payments” totalling $385,195.40 were released for the Freeport repairs. The payments were noted to h ave been made on April 20, 2005, July 1, 2005 and December 16, 2005. Meanwhile, in the report tabled last week on the 2006/2007 financial period, it is again noted that the sum was released – but this time in two payments. “(The government i ous to become political with this they must have advised (the auditor general) to include it,” alleged Mr Gibson. Downplaying the significance of the auditor’s findings, Mr Gibson noted that in all such reports throughout the years those preparing the document have found they h ave been “unable to get certain documents from certain ministries.” “It’s always like that,” he said. And he repeatedly emphasised that where documents cannot be found to verify how funds were spent, this does not mean that they do not exist, and he should “not be held responsible for lost docu ments” at the ministry, where he was minister from 2002 until February, 2006, when former Killarney MP Neville Wisdom took over. “My point is, if they are losing documents, why should I be held responsible? No permanent secretary would release any cheques unless there is proper documentations. The PS is the official accounts officer. It’s all political,” he said. He added that it would be easy e nough for someone within the ministry to “hide” a document if they wanted to “make a minister look bad.” “I spoke to the former permanent secretary (Leila Greene she said she explained to them that these things (records Ministry of Housing. Now after t hey moved her from Housing, just so they could portray a certain picture, all of the records go missing,” he said. The most recent Auditor General’s Report highlighted a lack of internal controls throughout the public service which have left the use of public funds open to the risk o f abuse in many instances. It notes that throughout all departments and ministries certain documents required to verify accurately how funds were used were not available and makes recommendations to tighten accounting processes. On Sunday, Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell said he believes points raised in the report regarding his former ministry’s accounts related more to “record keeping than to any malfeasance or misappropriation.” A message left for Auditor General Terrance Bastian was not returned up to press time. Shane Gibson claims report being politicised to make him look bad M M y y p p o o i i n n t t i i s s , , i i f f t t h h e e y y a a r r e e l l o o s s i i n n g g d d o o c c u u m m e e n n t t s s , , w w h h y y s s h h o o u u l l d d I I b b e e h h e e l l d d r r e e s s p p o o n n s s i i b b l l e e ? ? N N o o p p e e r r m m a a n n e e n n t t s s e e c c r r e e t t a a r r y y w w o o u u l l d d r r e e l l e e a a s s e e a a n n y y c c h h e e q q u u e e s s u u n n l l e e s s s s t t h h e e r r e e i i s s p p r r o o p p e e r r d d o o c c u u m m e e n n t t a a t t i i o o n n s s . . T T h h e e P P S S i i s s t t h h e e o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l a a c c c c o o u u n n t t s s o o f f f f i i c c e e r r . . I I t t s s a a l l l l p p o o l l i i t t i i c c a a l l . . S hane Gibson A 20-YEAR-OLDman was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday on multiple counts of stealing. Diallo Williamson, alias Diallo Colebrooke, appeared before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane, charged with eight counts stealing and four counts of causing damage. Court dockets allege that on Wednesday, February 18, Williamson, a resident of Barts Road, while at Carmichael Road stole a car CD player valued at $150 from a 2004 Kia Carens minivan, the property of Virginia Bowleg. Court dockets also allege that Williamson caused damage to a rear glass of a 2004 Kia Carens minivan valued at $223. I t is further alleged that on Wednesday, Febru ary 18 while at Allen Drive, Williamson stole a CD player valued at $150 from a 1996 Honda Legend, the property of Shantell Brown. Court dockets also state that Williamson alleged ly caused $200 in damage to the left window of Ms Brown’s car. Court dockets also allege that on Sunday, January 4 while at Golden Gates, Williamson stole a C D player valued at $150 and $100 cash, the prop erty of Raquel Roker. Williamson pleaded guilty to the charges. Williamson also pleaded guilty to stealing a car CD player face and a Cannon digital camera, together valued at $280, from a 2005 Chevrolet Impala, the property of Theresa Evans. He also admitted to causing damage to the right rear panel of Ms Evans’ car. Additionally, Williamson pleaded guilty to stealing two DVD players and $200 in DVDs belonging to Jennifer Cooper. It is also alleged that Williamson while at Tall Pines stole a Sony CD player valued at $200, an assortment of CDs valued at $60, a bottle of Gucci cologne valued at $40 and a set of floor mats valued at $120 from a 1992 Mercury Cougar, the property of Lloyd Allen. W illiamson pleaded not guilty to the charge. The case has been adjourned to May 5. It is further alleged that on Thursday, January 2, while at Gladstone Road, Williamson stole a car distributor cap valued at $900 from a brown 1993 Honda Accord, the property of Frederick Delan cy. Williamson pleaded not guilty to the charge and the case was adjourned to May 5. Williamson was sentenced to a total of one year i mprisonment on the charges to which he pleaded guilty and was also ordered to receive counselling while on remand at Her Majesty’s Prison. ‘Soft target’ date for proposed medical pr escription drug plan Man charged with eight counts of stealing Man and woman in custody after firearm and drugs found Two in court on robbery charge Man char ged with armed robbery In brief

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EDITOR, The Tribune. While it appears on the surface that our Immigration Department is doing a good job at rounding up illegal immigrants, one cannot help but notice that this seems directed more towards Haitian nationals. To my understanding a hot line has been established to ensure prompt responses in assisting with this effort. In light of the economic conditions in our country today, and as this affects the entire Bahamas, it is my view that Bahamians should be advised how is it that work permits or approvals were given to bring in more than one hundred workers to participate in the Michael Jordan Celebrity Invi tational. Do you mean to tell me provisions not be made for at least 50 Bahamians to be given employment? EMERALD SMITH Nassau, February 20, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. T he Bahamas is in need of change. We need a sense of optimism that somehow things will be different and better and s oon. Such change doesn’t just happen. It has to be worked at. And given the prevailing circumstances in The Bahamas, the effort has to be hard and sustained, demanding of a strong and moral leadership, capable of forging consensus, yet willing to take risks in doing what is right for the country. It is for such leadership to which we look to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham as the country faces its many problems, not least of which is the grave economic crises, a consequence of the global credit crunch and accompanying recession. The Bahamas’ stratospheric level of criminal violence and poor outcomes in education are among the perennial problems requiring, as they have always done, urgent attention. Unfortunately, in the near two years that Mr Ingraham has been Prime Minister he has not displayed the transformational leadership he had convinced the majority of Bahamians he was capable of on May 2, 2007. The Government’s apologists, with politically conventional reasoning, will argue that it has done rather well, considering our political and economic circumstance. The bigger issue, I feel, is whether Mr Ingraham believes that The Bahamas is in need of radical transformation and whether he is willing to throw the significant power and prestige of his office to effect such fundamental change. If he does, Mr Ingraham has to look beyond the next election and go for broke. If Mr Ingraham has arrived at this place, he must begin to t alk sincerely and frankly to the Bahamian people, outlining a clear vision for the future and his path for getting there, including the difficulties they will have to endure. He should tell people, too, that in the current economic cir cumstance, many of his party's electoral promises cannot be kept. To my mind, the mumbojumbo about GDP, GFS, debt ratios, recurrent expenditure, etc, while important in the overall scheme of things, do not resonate with the single mother in Jubilee Gardens who was laid off last December and can no longer meet her mortgage payments or the cab driver who yesterday had only three shorthaul fares for the entire day. M r Ingraham should not be afraid to send some of the under performers in his bloated administration to the parliam entary back bench and constitute a tight, action-oriented ‘war Cabinet’ to confront this economic crisis. He will find that there is strong political support in the society if he communicates effectively and makes the case that his actions are in the people’s interest. While, as Prime Minister, he has the major responsibility, the challenge of mobilising the Bahamian people to action and behaviour beyond individual interests, is not solely Mr Ingraham’s. It is a job for all of us, including the Opposition which must see its mandate as being beyond mere carping criticism. Perhaps not unlike Mr Ingraham, the PLP, with much talk about its future leadership in the air, is yet to find itself and head on a clear visionary path, post May 2007. It has failed to articulate any clear or alternative policy positions. Hopefully, it will not be too long before our leaders find their bearing. JERRY ROKER Nassau, February 27, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm 2009 health care debate is about to begin THE UNITED States is on the verge of a great debate about health care. President Obama’s announcement of a comprehensive $634 billion down payment over a decade has put the issue on the political front-burner. Unlike 15 years ago under the Clintons, expectation this time around is that at least some important incremental reforms are achievable. As the haggling and lobbying begin, as long-vested interests collide, there are many questions to be resolved. There are also existing certainties. With the Baby Boomers’ generation begin ning to retire, it is certain that health care resources will be increasingly pressed. In 2007, the U.S. spent $2.2 trillion on health. The Congressional Budget Office predicts that would rise sharply from 16 per cent of the gross domestic product, then to 25 per cent by 2025. Much of the health-care dollar is spent on patients in their final months of life and the 10 per cent of the very sickest account for 70 per cent of the costs. It is also beyond question that America s pends more on its health than any other i ndustrial nation. Despite that expenditure, it does not rate anywhere near No. 1 in good health attained or services delivered. Americans are not getting fair return on their investment. A major factor is that 46 million or so Americans have no health care insurance,a nd about 25 million more have too little to protect them from bankruptcy and other economic penalties, such as losing their homes to pay medical bills. Obama’s plan is to reduce, not eliminate, the number of uninsured. Insuring everyone, according to experts, would cost an additional $100 billion year, far exceeding the proposed fund. Businesses that once opposed national health-care reforms have now mostly seen the cost of company-paid insurance for their employees increase steeply year by year. Their ability to compete domestically or globally is seriously impaired. American manufacturers on average pay almost 60 per cent more per hour for benefits than their overseas competitors. Smaller businesses are unable to provide any health care for their workers. Those who benefit richly from the status quo especially pharmaceuticals and insurers participated in preliminary reform talks to try to tailor them to their special interests. The thought is that upgrading health care coverage is inevitable, given that Obama has the populist wind at his back. The details remain to be spelled out by the White House, but a Congress historically susceptible to the largesse of lobbyists would shape the extent of the actual reforms. The clash between private and governmental approaches will take centre stage. President Obama is enhancing government’s role and pressing private insurers and providers of drugs and medical devices to reduce costs. The long-standing arguments over a sin gle-payer system (the federal government are premature, for it is not part of the president’s package. Single-payer systems are criticised by opponents as denying their users physician choice and as inevitably leading to a rationing of services. For their part, private insurers are hailed by supporters for preserving choice without rationing care as well as delivering greatere fficiencies and lower costs through market c ompetition. The debate will surely get very hot even though Americans since 1965 have had experience with a limited form of single-payer system. Its name is Medicare, the health insurer for seniors. The argument about governmental ineffi c iencies and higher costs are confounded by the record. Medicare delivers services to its clients at a saving of 14 per cent of what it pays for the same services provided by private insurers. To help pay for these utterly essential reforms, it is right to try to squeeze it out of a bloated and inefficient medical care process as well as to restore the top tax rate for those earning $250,000 and more. Given how their wealth has increased, they can afford it more than a working poor family of four can afford the $12,000 a year to buy private insurance. For the former it is an inconvenience; for the latter, it is an impossibility. (This article was written by Harry Rosenfeld C.2009 Albany Times Union). Our leaders need to find thei r bearing LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net 35,0()),&( 63$&($SSUR[LPDWHO\VTXDUHIHHWRIVHFRQG VSDFHZLOOEHDYDLODEOH$SULOLQQHZO\ FRQVWUXFWHGEXLOGLQJDWWKHFRUQHURI0DUOERURXJK DQG&XPEHUODQG6WUHHWV7ZRRQVLWHFDU VSDFHVLQFOXGHG ,GHDOORFDWLRQIRURIIVKRUHEDQNWUXVWFRPSDQ\ ODZUPRURWKHUSURIHVVLRQV&RQWDFWZQHUDW EDITOR, The Tribune. I have read articles from time to time about workers and am in agreement with most of them. To set the record straight the problem is not that Bahamians are against foreign workers, the problem is that the foreign workers should possess experience and knowledge to impart with their counterparts (the Bahamian worker not the case then why are they needed simply to collect lavish salaries? The financial institutions are good examples of top executives with little or no qualifications work experience in the field is simply a joke. Yet they obtain work permits, live in expensive homes and condos, drive the latest model vehicles all at the company’s expense while making the lives of Bahamians miserable with their slave mentalities. They get away with this because they are aware that we have no one to look out for us, including the “uncle toms” that serve as masters cracking whips all day long. Their only concern is that they get their piece of the pie at the end of the day. I would think it would be an interesting study to see what the turn over rate is like at some of these financial institutions and to hear their reasoning for the high rate of turnovers. This has been going on for years yet some of us pretend not to be aware because it does not affect us directly. Sadly for the vast majority of the employ ees affected, they refrain from speaking out for fear of being fired and we talk about slavery being abolished, do not fool yourself it is alive and kicking in the Bahamas. SIMONE BETHEL Nassau, February 21, 2009. Sla very alive and kicking in the Bahamas An immigration question Bahamians need answered

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A LOCAL group is hoping to organise three annual tripsto Cuba to familiarise Bahami ans with the reality of life in that country. The Bahamas Cuba Friendship Society (BCFS would like to raise funding for the trips, which will be undertaken “with a view to meeting with comrades in Cuba”. The group said it wants to send three standing members of the BCFS along with two invited guests, who it intends to familiarise with “Cuban real ity as it is live and experienced by the Cuban people”. Over the past several years, sympathetic Bahamians have largely confined their effortsto raising awareness of the negative effects of the US embargo on the Cuban population and the plight of five anti-terrorism agents, known as the Cuban Five, who are serving lengthy jail sentences in the US. However, in a statement issued yesterday, the BCFS said it wants to branch out and become active on a number of other fronts. The group said it wishes to showcase the work being done by Cubans in the Bahamas, highlight Bahamians who have been educated in Cuba, and increase awareness about Cuban assistance to the people of the Bahamas, particularly those in need of eye surgery. The group also wants to forge ties between academic institutions in the two coun tries, perhaps leading to teacher and student exchanges “all done with the goal in mind of fostering mutual understanding and respect between the Cuban people and their Bahamian counterparts”. The BCFS said its aims are to promote friendship, co-oper ation and solidarity between the people of the Bahamas and Cuba, focusing its efforts on: The exchange of informa tion about the respective countries Public education in the Bahamas about the history, geography and current politi cal situation in Cuba The promotion of Cuban culture in the Bahamas Support for Cuban sover eignty and self-determination; and opposition to interven tionist policies The provision of material assistance to the Cuban people when and where needed – for example for reconstruction in the aftermath of natural disasters. The group’s statement said: “The Bahamas Cuba Friendship Society upholds and defends the right of the Cuban people to determine their own destiny and to freely pursue their own social, economic and cultural development. “BCFS defends the right of the Cuban people to self-determination and national sovereignty. This is an inalienable right. BCFS strongly condemns the economic, financial, economic and cultural blockade imposed by the US government for over 48 years on the Cuban people, which violates the most elementary principles of human rights and international law and is a direct challenge to Cuba's right to self-determination and national sovereignty. “BCFS opposes the use of immoral tools such as threats of military intervention, trade, cultural and scientific embargo, starvation diplomacy, and the promotion of disinforma tion about Cuba. “BCFS believes that Cuba's commitment to the basic rights of health, education and social welfare set an example to the world and that it has demonstrated a high moral and humanitarian character in its international support and solidarity to other third world countries. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 5 )25$/( n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net SECURITY forces from the United States, Britain and across the Caribbean will meet at the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Base this week in an international effort to stop illicit drug trafficking at sea. The 25th annual Tradewinds exercise, designed to improve cooperation and inter-operability of Caribbean Basin Partner Nations responding to regional security threats, will involve security forces from 16 Caribbean countries, more than 500 US service members and the British Royal Marines. They will meet at the Coral Harbour base for two weeks of training exercises starting today. Exercises will focus on maritime interdiction and search and rescue operations with an emphasis on command and control. Participants will practice boarding party operations training, evidence processingand hazardous material identification and handling. Tradewinds 2009 is sponsored by the US Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM and utilises inceptor boats and extensive surveillance suites provided by the USSOUTHCOM-sponsored Enduring Friendship programme. It aims to successfully train participants so they may return to their respective countries to further train their nation’s security forces. US Marine Corps Forces South exercise coordinator Major Landon Hutchens said: “The goals are to better coordinate partner nations’ search and rescue maritime interdiction operations, increase maritime domain awareness and better coordinate end-game seizure of illicit-trafficking ves sels that can be used to smug gle terrorist, weapons, explo sives or narcotics.” n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@ t ribunemedia.net THE United States government has praised the government of the Bahamas in its efforts to control the illegal drugs trade in the 2009I nternational Narcotics Control Strategy Report (INSCR In the report, the US’ Drug Enforcement Administration and OPBAT estim ate that there are 12 to 15 m ajor drug trafficking organi sations operating in the Bahamas. US Embassy representative Jeff Dubel said the report is a good reflection on the Bahamian government’s dedication to cracki ng down on the illicit trade. By working with the US government and participating in the international drug i nterdiction effort Operation B ahamas Turks and Caicos ( OPBAT), the Bahamian government seized 1,878 kilogrammes of cocaine, approximately 12 metric tons of marijuana, $3.9milllion in cash, and the Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU 1 ,030 people on drug-related offences throughout 2008. Mr Dubel said: “Drug busts are a success story. It m eans we have got intellig ence working together. The more drugs we intercede is actually a good sign, it shows that everyone's working together and hopefully they will be prosecuted and they will stop.” John Moppert, head of the U S Embassy's narcotics a ffairs sector, commended t hese efforts and said the US remains committed to stemming the flow of illegal drugs through the Bahamas and t he United States. H e said priorities for 2009 are to rebuild the Defence F orce base in Great Inagua a s the severe damage caused b y Hurricane Ike in September forced US troops to tem-p orarily relocate their heli c opters to Turks and Caicos, leading to a slow-down in operations last year. Mr Moppart said: “We agree that Great Inagua is in a strategically important location for not only narc otics but also illegal immigration, so we want to go ahead and rebuild Great Inagua and increase capacit y. The first step is going to b e to get the base back up and running and doing repairs to the damage done by Hurricane Ike.” Further plans are in place to station a Haitian police officer in Great Inagua and i ntegrating Creole speakers i n the DEU to develop i nformation on Haitian drug traffickers transiting the Bahamas. Mr Moppert said: “Much o f the illegal migration from H aiti up to the Bahamas comes through the windward p ass and up through Great I nagua, so we have been disc ussing the possibility of stationing a Haitian officer atG reat Inagua for the last c ouple of years.” He also commended the Bahamian government for taking the initiative to turn away all wooden-hulled Haitian sloops passing Great Inagua in the southern B ahamas. THE financial services sector in the Bahamas is being threatened by growing “protectionist” legislative measures in the United States, Ft Charlotte MP Alfred Sears said. In the first session of the 110th Congress, a Bill entitled “Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act” was sponsored in the United States Senate by Senators Levin and Coleman, and thenS enator Obama. The objective of the Bill is “to restrict the use of offshore tax havens and abusive tax shelters to inappropriately avoid Federal Tax ation, and for other purposes.” Speaking on Monday in parliament, Mr Sears said: “The Bill places the Bahamas on the initial list of offshore secrecy jurisdictions which should be deemed listed by the Secretary of the Treasury and s ubject to penal sanctions. Such jurisdictions will be subject to a ‘rebuttable presumption’ that a US person exercised control of an entity, where he/she directly or indirectly formed or transferred assets to, was a beneficiary of, or received money or property, or the use thereof from a trust, formed, domiciled or operating in an offshore secrecy jurisdiction,” Mr Sears said. The former attorney general said that the Bill also authorises the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State, the US Attorney General and the chairman of the Federal Reserve, to take punitive measures against such jurisdictions, including prohibiting any cor responding accounts or payable-through accounts by US financial institutions or the use of a credit, debit or charge card in the United States. Mr Sears called these legislative measures “threatening” and recommend that the FNM government take measures now to protect the financial services sector rather than wait until the Bahamas is black-listed again by the United States andt he OECD. “I recommend that the government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas lobby the United States to stop the passage of the Stop Tax Haven Abuse Bill by the Unites States House of Representatives and Senate and to educate the Unites States policy makers, media and public of the true nature of the Bahamian financial industry and the collective commitment of the B ahamas to fight money laundering and the financing of terrorism,” he said. He also suggested that the government promote the convening of a global forum on money laundering and terrorist financing, under the auspices of the United Nations, leading to the formation of a global treaty. “The government, in partnership with the private sector, should invest in a policy research facility, at the College of the Bahamas, to conduct economic intelligence monitoring of the global economy and trends, to assess their impact on the financial services industry in the Bahamas and propose policy options to improve the competitiveness of the Bahamian jurisdiction as a centre of wealth management,” Mr Sears said. At least 12 major drug trafficking organisations ‘operating in Bahamas’ MP voices concern over US ‘protectionist’ legislative measures Alfred Sears International security forces to meet at Defence Force Base Group hoping to organise thr ee annual trips to Cuba

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The altercation which involved several 13/14-y ear-old students, two police officers and some non-students followedc losely behind another confrontation last Friday. H e said he had been led to believe the fight stemmed from threatsi ssued by people living at a property near the school to some male L W Young students and that the off-duty officer who goti nvolved is related to those who issued the threats. “There’s a house on the side of the school here where the fence is broken and during the lunch hour these guys (the non-students) will always be talking to the girls (studentsS o it may be over a girl,” he added. This comes after witness e s quoted in yesterday’s Tribune said that a gunshot w as fired by a passing police officer when boys attacked an off-duty offi-c er who had allegedly tried to break up a knife fight n ear the school on Monday afternoon. A witness claimed the o ff-duty officer held down one of the students, who had been brawling on a side road, shortly before other boys in the group rano ff and returned with rocks to attack him. But contrary to initial reports, Mr Mullings said he had doubts that the off-d uty officer was acting for the reasons claimed when he got involved. “I don’t know if he came to break up the fight. I am led to believe that (then on-LW Young students involved in the fight) may be his family or some rela t ives or something,” he said, adding that he heard s tudents were attacked by local residents before they retaliated. T he principal said he has not had a chance to speak a t length with the boys he knows to have been involved both of whomw ere taking part in a track and field day at the school yesterday but he has heard from one that “some threats were sent out fromt he neighbour that something would happen after school that afternoon.” Mr Mullings said he thinks police should havet aken those living on the nearby property in for questioning following the alleged fight last Friday. “They should’ve taken all o f those people into cus tody,” he said. Asked whether he thinks t he police investigation has been comprehensive e nough so far, the princi pal said he “do(esn’t so.” T he school official said he was seeking to contact p olice yesterday to discuss the matter, but calls had not been returned. S peaking with T he Tribune before Mr Mullings made his comment, police press liaison officer Walter Evans said that no-one hasy et been taken into custody in connection with Monday’s incident. Messages seeking a police response to the prin-c ipal’s concerns were not returned up to press time. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE as they perceive the Mutual Legal A ssistance Treaty (MLAT nism between the Bahamas and the United States of America for international co-operation as being too time-consuming and cumbersome,"M r Sears, MP for Fort Charlotte, said Monday during the 2008/2009 midterm budget debate. Mr Sears, who resumed private legal practice with his firm Sears andC o following the PLP's election defeat in 2007, also recommended t hat government "make an official protest against the practice by agents o f the United States and other OECD member countries who undermine the legal process in theB ahamas by seeking to induce Bahamian financial institutions and professions to break the law.” He added: "If the government were to protest now, it would give the Bahamas a tactical advantage ort he moral high ground, rather than raising them when the Bahamas is on the defensive or the object of an imminent threat." The MLAT is legislation that e nables US regulators and legal authorities to seek information through the Attorney General's Office relevant to criminal cases they are investigating through the Bahamian court system and courto rders. Other than MLAT, US authorities can also request tax-relatedi nformation on specific criminal and civil cases through the Tax Informat ion Exchange Agreement (TIEA with the Bahamas. The Bahamas Financial Intellig ence Unit (FIU information with its foreign counterparts, and there is regulator-to-regulator co-operation between the Cen-t ral Bank of the Bahamas and the Securities Commission and their counterparts, like the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC This network gives a measure of p rotection against "fishing expeditions" to local financial institutions and their clients. In January, Mr Sears warned Tribune Business of dire consequences for the local financial sector if USp rosecutors were continually allowed to circumvent existing treaties between the two countries. " The rule of law, which is one of the major attractions for operating i n the Bahamas, will be eroded if US agencies, with impunity, can come into this jurisdiction, bypass thet reaty arrangements and just ignore the comity between the Bahamas and the US, flouting their own laws as well as the laws of the Bahamas." H e urged government to make a "very strong diplomatic protest" against the practices. In an interview with Tribune Business, Mr Laing branded Mr Sears'a ssertions as "irresponsible." He said the country had received only eight to 11 requests for tax information from the US since the FNM assumed office in 2007. Mr Laing said his ministry had notr eceived any complaints from the Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSBa ny Bahamian-based institutions. Mr Laing also said government " expected" to sign more MLATs with other countries, especially Brazil, considering the variousr equests that had come in. friend, Jean Ren a F rench businessman million to help him buy property in the early 1970s. B ut when the two men’s friendship ended around 1 978, Sir Sean is alleged to have sold off the assets his friend offered to him ass ecurity for the loan at a “massive profit”, equivalent to him having charged a 1000 per cent rate of interest, according to The DailyM ail. Those assets reportedly included diamonds, shares, and property on the French Riviera. M r Ren’s family launched legal proceedings to recover the profits from the sales after he died in Switzerland in 2002. T hey claim, according to the newspaper, that the sales proceeds far exceededt he value of the original loan extended to Mr Ren by Sir Sean. A spokesman for the actor’s Los Angeles-based publicist said on Tuesday: “We are looking into it. Neither Sir Sean nor anyone else is aware of it.” abuse by guards and insufficient food. Reports reaching this newspaper yesterday from the centre were that the detainees are still striking. Senior Deputy Director Roderick Bowe, who did not participate in Monday’s tour of the facility, said social services officials and clergymen went with Director of Immigration Jack Thompson and Commodore Clifford Scavella to act as independent eyes and ears. “The purpose of the visit was to confirm that the Detention Centre is being operated with transparency and that we are not running the detention centre as was previously claimed,” said Mr Bowe. “They looked at the living conditions and the state of the centre itself.” This comes after requests from The Tribune in the wake of detainee’s claims which prompted international human rights organisation Amnesty International to call for an independent investigation into conditions at the centre that the media be allowed access. Last week Minister of State for Immigration, Branville McCartney suggested that if an investigation by an international body were to be permitted, Immigration “would want other persons to be there” as “these international reports tend to be absolutely wrong.” Mr Bowe said he was unable to comment on the findings of those who toured the facility. “I wish I could butI wasn’t there,” he added. Asked which social services personnel and clergy accompanied officials on the visit,Mr Bowe said another officer would provide names later in the day. No follow up calls were received up to press time.A message left for Mr Thompson, who was said to be in office, was not returned. Meanwhile, Mr Bowe also confirmed that 114 illegal Haitian immigrants residing at the facility were repatriated onboard a Bahamasair 737 jet to Port-au-Prince, Haiti yesterday morning. The Haitians had been sent t o the Detention Centre after a series of recent daily roundups. their side of the deal. Mr Fleming had reached an agreement to acquire the Hayward trust’s stake whether it is 50 per cent or 75 per cent is still being disputed in the courts in the GBPA and its Port Group Ltd affiliate amid the intense ownership battle that was being fought with the late Edward St George’s estate. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, though, said last year that Government would now allow Mr Fleming to acquire 100 per cent of the GBPA. Mr Fleming had harboured hopes that he could persuade the St George estate to sell to him, too. Former AG claims USagents ‘illegally approaching local financial institutions’ FROM page one Principal calls for police probe into fight F ROM page one Detectives visit Sean Connery in connection with civil suit British banker s bid to acquire GBPA appears to have ended FROM page one FROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Detention Centre F ROM page one

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I N 2005 our then prime minister, Perry Christie, was invited to open the new legislative building in the Turks & Caicos Islands. He said the new parliament would be "the forum within which bold and innovative ideas will be crystallized" by Turks Islanders. Well, he was certainly right about that. In fact, the ideas wereso bold they led straight to a British-appointed commission of inquiry into corruption and mis rule that handed a "wide-rang ing" preliminary report to the gov ernor this past weekend. The recommendations will not be pub lished immediately, and a final report is not due until the end of April. The commission was appointed last year to inquire into corrup tion among members of the legis lature. It is led by a British jurist(Sir Robin Auld), who took part in the 1967 inquiry into casino gambling in the Bahamas. Four weeks of public hearings at the Regent Palms Hotel ended on February 11, and the commission is now working on its report in London. But Chief Minister Michael Misick saw the writing on the wall, and did not even wait for the interim report. He announced his resignation in mid-February with effect from the end of this month. And in a party meeting this past Saturday, former immi gration minister Galmore Williams was elected to lead the People’s National Party, and will presumably take over the premiership next month. How different are the present circumstances from those halcyon days of 2006, when a slew of PLP ministers led by Perry Christie partied down at Misick's celebrated wedding to sexy Amer ican starlet LisaRaye McCoy at the ultra-luxurious Amanyara Resort. The best man at the wed ding was none other than Obie Wilchcombe, a cousin of Misick's, who was then our minister of tourism. Misick became chief minister in 2003, when the PNP won 8 outof 13 seats in the legislature, and he led the party to an even bigger victory in 2007, almost wiping out the once dominant People’s Democratic Movement. When he was first elected his declared worth was only $50,000, but Misick told the commission recently that he now had assets of $23 million plus debts of $20 million. Information about Misick's finances did not come easily. According to the commission's chief counsel, Alex Milne, "when he gave evidence (the premier was at times obtuse, unforthcom ing and verging on the truculent...The total that we could not explain going into (his accounts was $10.4 million, which is a lot of money." Misick also vastly inflated his official remuneration. The cost of the premier's office rose from $170,000 in 2003 to over $4 million today, a sum which includes a bigger salary than that of the British prime minister. But those freespending days are over. Misick himself acknowledged recently that he was "mired in allegations of corruption and scandal so deep" he had no choice but to step down. The premier has criticised the commission proceedings as "farreaching and intrusive" a fact confirmed by the recent banning on Radio Turks & Caicos of a controversial song by local per former Jack Nasty. The song fea tures a chorus that says "Everybody's Business Getting Out", and reports are that the CD has been flying off the shelves since the commission hearings. "Everybody's business" includes testimony from Lis aRaye, who is engaged in a high ly publicised and stormy breakup with Misick that has involved threats and allegations of assault by both parties. McCoy filed for divorce last year after Misick was accused of raping one of her girlfriends, although Misick claimed the sex was consensual. He also fathered two children with a mis tress during his short-lived marriage to McCoy. "Everybody's business" also includes the failure of government ministers to declare their financial interests as required by law; the corrupt sale of crown land to foreigners; and millions of dollars in payoffs to the governing party from private interests much of it stashed in secret bank accounts thousands of miles away in Belize. These accounts disbursed large amounts of irregular cash to the premier and other top PNP lead ers with no accountability whatsoever, according to evidence giv en at the commission. In one case over $100,000 was paid by the PNP to LisaRaye's Californiabased hair stylist. And Misick himself received millions from the party and directly from investors. In closing remarks to the inquiry, chief counsel Milne described the PNP as "a multi million-dollar enterprise, bought and paid for by a small number of rich individuals, many if not most of whom appear to have prospered under the current govern ment. It acts, in effect if not by design, as a conduit for large amounts of unregulated and undeclared cash from individuals to politicians." Milne also showed that Misick had borrowed many millions more from a variety of individuals and investment companies seek ing to do business in the territory, with no evidence of any effort to repay the money. "Copious evidence" was also produced that cabinet decisions were riddled with conflict of interest. "The Commission has seen evi dence of massive sums of money being injected into a small political economy which cannot possibly be justified by the number of vot ers. The party accounts appear to operate as a slush fund for the senior members into which they could apparently dip at will." Only about 36,000 people live in the Turks & Caicos, which has less than 7,000 voters spread across 15 constituencies. Most government revenue comes from land sales and from the 200,000 tourists who visit each year. The TCI is a self-governing British colony that used to be administered by the Bahamas, until we became independent in 1973. "Money has, in my submission, distorted and corroded the political fabric of this territory," Milne continued. "It has undermined the claim of the current adminis tration to any form of legitimacy or respect. Small-scale graft has been extrapolated to monstrous proportions by an influx of monies previously not seen. The road back from this state of affairs will be difficult." However, the commission is not a police inquiry and its hearings were not a trial. While its final report will make recommendations to the British authorities, it will not decide what happens to individuals or to the territory as a whole. "Those tasks will fall to those who come after us," according to Sir Robin, the commission chairman. "The most I can dois to rec ommend further and more searching investigations by the police and/or some other public enforce ment body." Nevertheless, Anthony Hall, a Washington-based lawyer and columnist with roots in both the Bahamas and TCI, says the commission has uncovered evidence "of what amounts to a criminal syndicate masquerading as a local government. And this should compel Sir Robin to make emer gency recommendations to mitigate our financial and reputation al losses, to say nothing of the growing contingent liabilities of the British government." Meanwhile, the TCI Free Press (published by Bahamian Gilbert Morris, who has a rsum a mile long on Wikipedia and claims once to have been a Carmelite monk), speaks glowingly of the strong Bahamian connection among the defence team hired by Misick: "Edward Fitzgerald QC has tried some of the most stupen dous cases in recent British history and is married to an aristo crat; Maurice Glinton is the Cambridge-educated intellectual heavyweight; Raynard Rigby is from an old line family from the educational establishment of Turks and Caicos and a potential future prime minister of the Bahamas; and Damian Gomez is the son of the former archbishop and himself a former supreme court judge." Most observers see three possible outcomes from the commission's report criminal prosecutions, a general election, or sus pension of the constitution. This last is something the British were forced to do once before. In 1985, former chief minister Norman Saunders and his development minister Stafford Missick, (a onetime official of the Bahamas Central Bank), were arrested in Miami on drug trafficking and bribery charges. They were both convicted and imprisoned in the US. A revamped constitution was restored two years later. Tough Call cannot understand why there is so little coverage in the Bahamian media of this sala cious political drama that is unfolding almost right before our eyes especially when there are said to be as many Turks Islanders living in the Bahamas as there are remaining in TCI itself. After all, there is nothing like a commis sion of inquiry to throw light on secret government, and transcripts of the hearings are easily available online. According to the Internet mail ing list, Turks & Caicos Informers , " Alex Milne, counsel to the commission, has stated that ‘Moneyhas undermined the claim of the current administration to any form of legitimacy or respect.’ The 64 thousand dollar question then is: What does one do with an illegitimate government?" W hat do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 7 Commission of inquiry in Turks and Caicos M ichael Misick (AP P EOPLE in Abaco are furious over a p olice attempt to stop the press reporting a dramatic rise in crime on the island. Supt Sean Neville-Smith has allegedly told the local newspaper that it can no longer carry crime reports “because they reflect badly on the police.” T he publishers of T he Abaconian , D avid and Kathy Ralph, are unhappy about the ban and are calling on readers to phone in their crime news. Readers, meanwhile, are angry at what they see as a blatant attempt to keep important information away from the public. T he police attempt to gag the press follows a worrying upsurge in crime in Abaco and growing disgruntlement over the police force’s effectiveness there. R esidents are concerned that the r ecent kidnapping of a foreign investor, the mugging of a well-known local woman, and a spate of boat thefts will turn away the yachtsmen and secondhome owners who form the backbone o f the island economy. N ow they are calling for a town meeting to thrash out the crime situation and demand better policing. Locals are particularly alarmed by the attempted kidnapping of a would-be investor during the island’s Junkanoop arade last month. Money The investor sought police help after being released from the boot of his car by a thief who demanded that he extractm oney from an ATM machine in Marsh Harbour. When the investor told a policeman of his plight, the officer allegedly replied: I can’t help I’m here to patrol the Junkanoo parade.” Meanwhile, the kidnapper fled into the crowd. T he investor had earlier been threate ned with a machete before being forced into the trunk of his own car. A local told T he Tribune l ast night: This man was in Abaco to buy a resort property. It’s hardly the kind of thing that will encourage him to return.” In the past, Abaco has been relatively crime-free. But rising unemployment and a tightening economy have pushedu p the theft rate. H ardest hit have been visiting yachts, some valued at $100,000 or more. On more than one occasion, boats have arrived in Abaco one day and been stolen the next. But the mugging of well-known resident Lily Sands, who is in her seventies,h as really brought home the changing crime scene on the island. Ms Sands was accosted by two people with guns who forced her into hero wn home in a normally quiet residential a rea of Marsh Harbour. Then they locked her in a closet before stealing money and other items. A resident said: “Boats are disappearing like crazy. We have to get help u p here. We must get Nassau’s attent ion because this crime is going to kill the economy.” Mr and Mrs Ralph, who have been running The Abaconian since 1993, said they had been told by Supt Neville-Smith that they would not be allowed any morec rime reports. Backlash “The people of Abaco are very upset,” said Mrs Ralph. “We are going to get a big backlash against this.” M eanwhile, locals say a public meeting is required to air grievances and call for a police response to their concerns. While Abaco enjoyed full employm ent, crime was low. “But lay-offs will trigger an upsurge in theft, they believe. Messages left for Supt Neville-Smith w ith officers at the Marsh Harbour P olice Station yesterday afternoon were not returned up to press time. Anger on Abaco over an alleged attempt to stop crime rise report Search will end for NFL players off Florida coast In brief n CLEARWATER, Fla. THECoast Guard called off the search Tuesday for two NFL players and a third man lost at sea off the Florida coast after their boat capsized during a fishing trip, according to Associated Press. The Coast Guard said it doesn’t believe anyone is on the surface of the water and the search would end at sundown. Still missing in rough, cold water were Oakland Raiders linebacker Marquis Cooper, freeagent defensive lineman Corey Smith and former South Florida player William Bleakley. “We’re extremely confident that if there are any survivors on the surface of the water that we would have found them,” Coast Guard Capt. Timothy Close said. Hopes were raised Monday when rescue crews found a fourth man who was aboard, 24-year-old former South Florida player Nick Schuyler, who managed to stay with the boat for more than 36 hours after it overturned Saturday evening. Prospects for survival were beginning to look more grim throughout the day.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE discuss the Review of the Economics of Climate Change in the Caribbean (RECCC the Breezes hotel in Cable Beach. As experts focused on the economic impact climate change will have on the Bahamas they stressed how long-term strategies must be enacted before the highly negative impact of climate change becomes irreversible and the Bahama islands become uninhabitable. ECLAC director of the subregional headquarters for the Caribbean Neil Pierre explained the RECCC aims to p resent preliminary findings of the affect of climate change at December’s Climate Conference in Copenhagen when the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC will meet for the last time to develop a new protocol before the Kyoto Protocol runs out in 2012. He said: “Immediate action m ust be taken to address clim ate change and the longer the action is delayed the greater the costs in the future. “If we delay by a decade of two we will have a situation that climate change becomes unavoidable or irreversible and we will reach a point of no return.” Addressing the impact in the Bahamas is increasingly pressing as 80 per cent of the country’s land mass is within 1.5 metres of sea level, temperatures are rising at a rate of up to 4.5 degrees Centigrade per 100 years, a rate which could double if no action is taken, and the increasing frequency a nd intensity of tropical storms d ue to climate change threatens the delicate balance of life on the low-lying islands. Mr Rolle explained how severe flooding and storm surges could force communities to relocate, and mangroves should be cultivated to protect coastal areas across the country from shore erosion, loss of land and the contamination of fresh water supplies. The mangroves also protect 75 per cent of juvenile fish species threatened by rising sea temperatures, storms and overfishing, and therefore the Bahamian economy. He added: “Coral reefs will continue to suffer and we can also expect the migration of fish further north with a rise in sea temperature which will again impact tourism.” Mr Rolle said government must now strengthen coastal monitoring, introduce energy efficient technology, develop sustainable tourism, encourage cruise ships to use desalination plants for fresh water, and enforce land use regulations and building codes to help prevent irreversible damage. And environmental laws to improve energy efficiency, water management and implement a climate change policy are in progress, Mr Rolle said. BEST Commission director Philip Weech said although government has accepted the reality of climate change and its present detrimental impact, there is a need for a national energy policy to increase efficiency and diversify the use of energy sources from wind, sun and sea. The cost of such long-term plans could set the government back $500 million over the next 15 years or more, but Mr Weech said it is crucial for Bahamians to view the investment in terms of its long-term goals as the country’s geographic vulnerability is enhanced by its total dependence on food and oil imports. He said: “Climate change is a death sentence for small island states. “In all likelihood it will cause some of the basic chemistry that sustains the Bahamas to change, and if it changes we will no longer continue to grow, we will start the process of erosion. “It threatens the very basic fabric of our ecosystems. If our coral reefs disappear, the basic fisheries resources we depend on will disappear and our islands could become uninhabitable.” F ROM page one Climate change impact

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n By LLONELLA GILBERT TARPUM BAY, Eleuthera Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest commended local and winter residents of South Eleuthera for forming a collaboration with the government to meet critical community needs through the creation of the South Eleuthera Partnership (SEEP SEEP was established after a group of local citizens came together to discuss ways to increase the support given to the fire and medical services. Mr Turnquest said, “It is impressive that SEEP, in just a few short years, has provided effective leadership for the refurbishment of the ambulance and upgrading of ambulance services and has purchased a fire truck for service in South Eleuthera.” The minister was speaking at a ceremony to celebrate the com missioning of the fire truck to the Royal Bahamas Police Force, and the re-commissioning of the ambulance to the Ministry of Health in Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera on Sunday, March 1. Also in attendance at the ceremony were Minister of Health Hubert Minnis, Acting Deputy Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade, Head of the RBPF Fire Division Superintendent Jef frey Deleveaux and Member of Parliament for South Eleuthera Oswald Ingraham. Mr Turnquest said the government has an essential role to play in the provision of fire and emergency services to citizens and businesses. He explained that the govern ment provided these services to the people of South Eleuthera via the police, primarily from Central Eleuthera and Governor’s Harbour, along with the Ministry of Health, but that the services needed to be closer to the com munity in the South. B LUELAGOON ISLAND There is a silent war going on in The Bahamas, one that leaves countless animals and plants dead and others homeless. This war has been waging for decades and now new i nvaders are joining the fight t o take over our beautiful B ahamas, looking to steal precious land, water and resources from us. These fearsome pirate-like invaders – called Invasive Species quickly e stablish themselves as the dominant species and can d estroy our native ecosystems, h uman health, and ultimately a ll native life within The Bahamas. If we are not proactive, these environmentalb uccaneers could steal more than just a few acres of land or sea. Dolphin Encounters – Proj ect BEACH, the non-profit arm of the natural marine park on Blue Lagoon Island, Ninth Annual Marine Education Poster Contest will focus on i nvasive species in The Bahamas. With the theme “Pirates of the Caribbean – I nvasive Species in The B ahamas,” this year’s compe t ition invites students throughout the country to learn more about the invasives that are at hreat to our ecosystem and to express their thoughts through poster art. “The Bahamas is a beautiful country and if invasive species spread and destroy our environments, soon much of the p lant and wildlife that is unique a nd special about The Bahamas may be lost,” said A nnette Dempsey, Director of E ducation at Dolphin Encoun ters. “Invasives are incredibly d estructive to native ecosyst ems. We encourage students to learn about them and to tell us their concerns.” The Poster Contest is open to all students residing in The Bahamas, aged Kindergarten through Grade 12. Entry is f ree. A panel of judges recognised for their work in the marinee nvironment will select the winners. Winning entries will b e prominently displayed throughout The Bahamas in recognition of the students’ e fforts to help protect our beautiful Bahamas. P rizes for the competition have also been generouslyd onated by vendors who share a concern for our marine envi ronment including: Dolphin Encounters, Bahama Divers, B arefoot Sailing, Pirates of N assau, Blackbeard’s Cay, Stuart Cove’s, Sea Island Adventures, Island World Adventures, Paradise Dive Charters, Flying Cloud, Seahorse Charters, and Powerboat Adventures. Unfortunately The Bahamas has its fair share of invasives,” adds Tanya Moss,E ducation Coordinator at DE Project BEACH. “One e xample is the Scaevola plant, also known as the Hawaiian Seagrape or White Inkberry. W ith its lush green leaves and quick growth rate, this invader i s a very popular landscaping plant. As it rapidly spreads, the H awaiian Seagrape creates thickets along our coastlines, out-competing and killing our n ative plants such as Sea Oats, S ea Lavender, Blue Inkberry, M angroves and numerous othe r plants in our country. Witho ut these native plants to stab ilise the beach and prevent e rosion, there is no telling the e ffect it may have on our native Bahamian wildlife such as birds, crabs, lizards or ourf ish nurseries. If not removed, the Hawaiian Seagrape may take over our mangroves and wetlands. The poster compet ition teaches students about invasives, what they are and their negative effect on our e nvironment. We look forward t o receiving entries and prov iding students with the opportunity to express theirt houghts.” n T O OBTAIN FREE ENTRY FORMS AND RULES , a comprehensive fact sheet about the theme of the competition visit www.dolphinencounters.com in the Edu cation section; call DolphinE ncounters-Project BEACH a t 394-2200 extension 303; send an e-mail to education@dolp hinencounters.com; or fax y our request to 394-2244. E ntry forms can also be picked up at the Dolphin Encounters booth located at the Paradise Island Ferry Ter m inal. Deadline for entries to be received is March 31. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE www.babnancial.com 242-461-1000 Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501 British American Financial British American Financial BAFsawholly-ownedsubsidiaryoftheBahamianentityBAB HoldingsLimited.BAFrecentlycelebrateditssecondyearasa100%Bahamianownedentity havingbeenacquiredbytheBahamianGroupduringFebruary2007. Established in 1920, British American Financial providesafullrangeofinsuranceand investment services, including life & health insurance, mortgages, nancial and retirement planning, annuities,mutual funds and pension plans. The Company has three ofces in Nassau at IndependenceDrive,RosettaSt.Palmdale,andCarmichaelRd.Alsofullservicebranchesin Freeport, Abaco, Exuma and a network of career agents throughout the Family Islands. The Company directly employs more than 200 Bahamians. British American Financial is not related or afliated in any way whatsoever with any other companywithasimilarnamBritishAmerican,whetherintheBahamas,theCaribbeanregion or anywhere else. IncelebrationofoursecondanniversaryasafullyBahamianCompany,wearepleasedto announce our offering of free nancial consultations, along with weekly nancial seminars to our clients and the public at our Independence Drive Headquarters every Friday until the end of April 2009.TheCompanyextendsaspecialinvitationtomembersofthepublicwhorecentlyexperienced joblossesandhardshipasaresultofthedownturnintheeconomy. PleasedirectanyquestionsonthisstatementtoMr.I.ChesterCooper,President&CEO via email: ccooper@babnancial.com or Tel: 242-461-1003. EVERYONEcan help protect our country from invasive species. What can you do to stop these sneaky species? Prevention is the best cause of action! Plant a native tree! By becoming aware of what the species look like and h ow they spread, we can make better choices in the types o f plants to grow and spread in our yards. T he government of The Bahamas has asked all Bahamia ns to plant and register native trees as a part of the goal of planting one million trees locally before the end of 2009. Visit www.bahamasmtc.com for details. REMOVE INVASIVE PLANTS Growing fruits and vegetables in our gardens and asking our local nurseries for only native plants is a great start. Another step is to eradicate any and all invasives whenev-e r possible. When we uproot and destroy these thieves we can limit how fast they continue to spread and hopefully save somen ative organisms. LEARN ABOUT LIONFISH When it comes to the lionfish, this fish can and should b e netted or speared whenever seen in the water. Once the dorsal and pelvic spines are removed they are quite e dible and delicious! By encouraging Bahamians to learn how to prepare this fish, we can start to decrease their n umbers in our oceans. Spread the word. T ell your family and friends and spread the word: let’s s ave our native plants and animals and let’s save our country! Protecting our country from invasive species Poster contest focuses on invasive plants and animals THE LIONFISH’S venomous dorsal and pelvic spines are fatal to potential predators and hazardous to divers, snorkelers, fishermen and beachgoers. Evi-d ence found in their stomach contents has revealed that Lionfish are feeding on small fish and crustaceans, including baby lobster, crabs and snapper. MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest cuts the ribbon at the commissioning ceremony of the fire truck to the Royal Bahamas Police Force in Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, on Sunday, March 1. Pictured from left are Acting Deputy Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade; Head of the Fire Division Superintendent Jeffrey Deleveaux; director of SEEP and international consultant on disaster management Shaun Ingraham, and Superintendent of Police for Eleuthera Theopholis Cunningham. South Eleuthera residents’ g o vt colla boration praised

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor I sle of Capri’s decision not to renew its lease of the Our Lucaya resort’s casino, which expires at end-May 2009, has placed a furt her 234 Bahamian jobs in jeopardy if a new operator cannot be found to replace it within the next t hree months. Jill Haynes, Isle of Capri’s director of corporate communications, confirmed that the USbased casino operator had decid-e d to terminate its operation of the Isle-Our Lucaya casino asp art of a strategy to exit all inter national operations and focus on i ts core US home markets. She added that Isle of Capri might extend its stay in Freeport slightly, though, if a new operator could be found to replace it, andi t was needed to ‘hold the fort’ so that a smooth transition couldb e effected. Ms Haynes said Isle-Our Lucaya’s 234 staff were informedby the casino’s general manager of the company’s decision at a s taff meeting on Monday. If their employment is to be continuous a nd seamless, a replacement casi no operator will have to be found w ell before the end of May 2009, meaning that a successful search will have to be conclud-e d in a hurry. I f this does not h appen, Grand Bahama’s tourism economy, n ot to mention unemployment rate, is likely to suffer a further b low. Placing another 234 per sons on the unemployment line w ill further depress economic activity on an island where more than 170 persons were laid off earlier this year from the OurL ucaya resort proper. “Late yesterday [Monday] a fternoon, the employees were at a meeting with the general mana ger,” Ms Haynes told Tribune Business. “The Government was notified before the press release was issued today [yesterday]. We will not be renewing the lease w hen it expires at the end of May. “We are working with the Gove rnment to identify potential operators, and if a potential operIsle of Capri not renewing lease that expires at end-May 2009, putting jobs in danger if no replacement operator found Freeport casino suffers $1.713m loss for year-to-date, with revenues down 23.2% Previous efforts to keep gaming operator, with $6.9m tax write-off and marketing subsidy, now seem in vain n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Some 2,785 shipping manifests were outstanding at the end of the 2006-2007 fiscal year, the Auditor-General has revealed, his inspection reveal ing once again that “a large number of bills of ladings” were released by the Customs Department without evidence to show due taxes were collected. The Auditor-General’s report for the 2006-2007 fiscal year detailed that “no dollar amounts were submitted” on the 2,785 outstanding shipping manifests. Without these, the import duties owed to the Government on these shipments could not be calculated, and the AuditorGeneral recommended that Customs Department management “ensure that outstanding manifests are cleared without further delay”. I I n n v v o o i i c c e e s s Manifests are the lists ship ping companies produce to show that all cargoes they have brought into the Bahamas are accounted for, and with dollar values and invoices attached, so that the Customs Department can calculate the correct import duty/Excise Tax rates to be applied. In the instances referred to by the Auditor-General, the invoices showing the dollar value of imports brought into the Bahamas are unlikely to have been attached, creating a bureaucratic headache for the Customs Department. Until the correct invoices are submitted, Customs is unable to clear the goods and holds on to them. According to the AuditorGeneral’s report, the largest number of outstanding manifests, some 800, were at the Lynden Pindling International Airport’s (LPIA tion. Another 403 outstanding manifests were at the John Alfred Dock; some 380 at Kel ly’s Dock; another 370 at Arawak Cay; and 62 and 30 respectively at Seaboard Marine and Union Dock. Outside Nassau, the largest number of outstanding shipping manifests uncovered by the Auditor-General’s Department were the 234 at Spanish Wells. There were another 150 in Exuma and its surrounding cays; 120 at Rock Sound in Eleuthera; 100 in north Eleuthera; 51 at HarbourI sland; and 35 at Governor’s Harbour. Stating that his department had conducted a complete audit of the incomplete manifests, the Auditor-General added: “A large number of bills of ladings C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information c ontained is from a third party and The T ribune can not be h eld responsible for errors and/or omission from thed aily report. $3.56 $3.56 $3.36 Tax unpaid on 2,785 shipping manifests Auditor-General says ‘large number’ of import bills released by Customs without evidence of duty payments SEE page 2B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter “GREY areas” in Bahamian labour laws could have exacerbated a $5 million dispute involving workers on an Exuma-based private island resort development, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with the Labour Department insisting that company lawyers interpret often-ambiguous legislation instead of seeking its advice. Harcourt Brown, the director of labour, told Tribune Business yesterday that some labour laws are not very clear. “We always advise any persons calling the Department for advice to contact their attorneys,” said Mr Brown. “The Labour Department can only give advice.” In the case of the Bock Cay project, attorneys for laid-offw orkers are alleging that from 2 004 to 2008, staff may have been paid according to a provision in the Employment Act regarding overtime pay that was amended in 2001. A Bock Cay consultant, Henry Rolle, told TribuneB usiness that the developers consulted the Labour Department’s Exuma office when the project began in 2004. They were instructed to pay their workers time-and-a-half on Saturdays and double time on Sundays, after they had worked 10 hours per day Monday through Friday. Workers were also employed on the Cay for almost one month before they then received a week off. D D o o u u b b l l e e t t i i m m e e After attorneys representing laid-off Bock Cay workers last year took the matter to the Department of Labour for conciliation talks with the developers, their company, Lignum Vitae Ltd, agreed to pay double-time on Saturdays. However, according to Mr Brown, the developers would not consider paying the claimed multi-million retroactive overtime payment unless mandated to do so by a court judgment. Lignum Vitae Cay (LVC which was founded to act as owner and developer for the Bock Cay project, said yesterday that it had at all times complied with all Bahamian labour laws. “In July 2008, the management of LVC met with the Labour Office for the Exuma area, and in a separate meet ing, met with the Department of Labour in Nassau and made inquiries as to whether LVC was actually compensating its employees properly,” the company. “In both meetings, the management was assured that LVC was compensating its employees correctly. “That assurance was consistent with views expressed by the president of the Industrial Tribunal in April 2008, in related proceedings and with long-established customs in the local construction industry.” Last week, Fry’s Electronics chief executive, and principal in the Bock Cay development, Randy Fry, met with labour minister Dion Foulkes and Prime Minister Hubert Ingra ham over several contentious labour issues relating to Bock Cay. What Mr Brown described as one of the most serious issues was the developers’ rule making it mandatory for workers to leave the Cay on off-days at their own expense. This rule, though, quickly became imprudent for workers living outside the Exumas after work hours were cut to 40 per week, making travel every week a finical burden. Mr Brown said the develop ers agreed in principle at the ‘Grey areas’ exacerbate $5m dispute SEE page 2B Churn hits premium Cable TV Casino pull-out puts 234 jobs in jeopardy S EE page 4B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter B AHAMIAN farmers have seen declining sales trends for their products since 2005, a year in which they collectively produced $32 million worth of fruits and vegetables, and around $16 million in poultry products, it was rvealed yesterday. Godfrey Dorsett, the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation’s (BAIC er, said both red meat and poultry production declined in 2006, possibly as a direct result of increasing food imports that controlled the market share for the products Bahamian farm ers produced. “Unfortunately, that simply indicated that the market production was shrinking while, at the same time, imports were increasing. These were commodities which farmers were able to produce, but were declining because they couldn’t get market share probably because there were imports competing and they were unable to continue to increase,” Mr Dorsett said. He told the National Economic Summit that there was a Local agriculture products suffer demand decline despite $50m sales Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace SEE page 3B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Cable Bahamas saw continued subscriber churn until the 2 008 year-end, Tribune Business was told yesterday, especially in its premium cable services which were down 17 per cent y ear-over-year, as customers became more discerning about which packages they acquired. Barry Williams, Cable Bahamas’ vice-president of finance, said the BISX-listed company had experienced subscriber churn customers not renewing or dropping cable TV services across the board” from the 2008 second quarter onwards. “We did see some subscriber churn,” he told Tribune Busin ess. “We actually started to see it coming in the second quarter, and it continued through to the end of the year. We still ende d up OK, but saw a drop in premium services. “We saw it in the basic cable TV services, we saw it in the pre* BISX-listed firm says pay-per-view off 17% yearover-year, as subscribers drop-off due to economy * Cable ‘in very early stages’ of exploring video-ondemand services launch * Capital spending of $15-$16m anticipated for fiscal 2009 * Internet subscribers pass 40,000 mark S EE page 2B

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mium cable services, and we saw i t in pay-per-view. When we looked at pay-per-view, it was down 17 per cent year-over-year. “The more discretionary services are the ones that in bad t ime, people will tend to look at and make a decision as to whether to have as much as they take.” A s a result, Mr Williams said Cable Bahamas had seen some premium and pay-per-view subscribers drop those packages in f avour of the less expensive basic cable TV services, while some basic subscribers had ceased taking the company’s services alto-g ether. To combat the increased levels of subscriber churns, Mr Williams said Cable Bahamas had started its Customer Retention F ocus in the 2008 third and fourth quarters, calling customers to find out what their needs were, and how best to meet what they coulda fford given the current economic environment. I I n n i i t t i i a a t t i i v v e e Adding that the initiative had e nabled the company and its clients to often find “common ground”, the Cable Bahamas executive: “We took a real proac-t ive approach. We were assisting customers in making better choices in terms of what they selected for viewing. Instead of everything, they kept some stuff.” M eanwhile, Cable Bahamas is understood to be close to finalising the transaction to buy out its m ajor shareholder, Columbus Communications, although Mr W illiams and other executives did not comment on that yesterday. Elsewhere, Mr Williams revealed that Cable Bahamas was “in the very early stages of explor-i ng the introduction of video-ondemand services into this mar-k et”, a strategy that, if it comes to fruition, would likely see it comp ete with the likes of IP Solutions International, which has been attempting to secure financing via a private placement to launch its o wn services. The Cable Bahamas finance head said the company invested $2.5 million in fiscal 2008 onu pgrades to its Nassau-based Internet system head-end, with a further $3 million in capital expenditure going on the construction of its Freeport office. The Freeport administration building should be completed by the middle of this year,” Mr Williams said. “The Nassauu pgrade to the head-end is complete. The building and infrastructure are all in. We’re migrating certain electronics from their old location to the new and u pgraded head-end location.” During fiscal 2009, Mr Williams said Cable Bahamas had a “bit of work to complete on theu pgrades to the IP (Internet Protocol) core. It’s 90 per cent done. The majority of the heavy lifting is done”. For this coming year, Mr W illiams estimated that Cable Bahamas would incur about $15$16 million in capital investment spending. “It won’t be the same level of projects that we had last y ear the buildings, the renovations, Freeport and the IP core upgrades. They’re not projects that come along every year,” Mr Williams added. R ecently completed initiatives included the launch of CableB ahamas’ new Internet browser e-mail service, Pronto, in a bid to e nhance the customer experience and service, and upgrades to the company’s customer service facility at its Robinson Road head-q uarters. Mr Williams said the latter reno vations had increased the number of customer service/payment stations to nine, a move designed to enhance customer service ande liminate long queues. He added that Cable Bahamas had “started to look into what needs to be done” to renew its existing cable licence/franchise a greement, which expires along with the company’s exclusivity (monopoly “Preliminary work has been d one on that, and we expect our discussions to go well with the Government,” Mr Williams said. On the Internet side, the Cable Bahamas executive said the comp any had seen subscriber numbers pass the 40,000 mark by year-end 2008, demand fuelled by the service’s indispensabilityt o the business community and education institutions. Data services were also continuing to generate good growth, Mr Williams added, given that t he demand for what was offered by the company’s wholly-owned Caribbean Crossings subsidiary came mainly from commercial clients. E E f f f f i i c c i i e e n n c c y y To minimise costs and boost efficiency further, Mr Williams said Cable Bahamas had imple-m ented its ‘One-Tech Solution’ initiative. In the past, wheni nstalling services at customers’ homes, he explained that usually a minimum of two Cable Bahamas technicians had been required especially if Internet and cable TV was required. T hrough focusing on training a nd enhancing expertise, only one technician was now needed to p erform such installations whether it was Internet TV or b oth. This, Mr Williams said, “brings a lot more efficiency on staffing”. Another similar initiative launched by Cable Bahamas was ‘First Call Resolution’, where rather than having to go through several levels of technicians to solve a problem, clients could call i n and be assured that the first person they spoke to could deal with the problem. Cable Bahamas net income for fiscal 2008 rose by 19.7 per cent, to $25.8 million compared to $21.6 million the year before. The company exceeded its previous year’s revenues by $5.4 million o r 7.2 per cent to $81.4 million, compared to $75.963 million the year before. Cable Bahamas said data rev enues grew 19.7 per cent last year, representing 15.1 per cent of total revenues. Internet revenues grew by 10.5 per cent, accounting for 30.3 per cent of the total, while c able revenues represented 54.5 per cent of total revenues. The company saw 10.3 per cent growth in its digital TV services. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE +(/3:$17(' +(/3 :$17(' were released without evidence to suggest duties were collected. “A number of office orders were authorised by management for the release of goods. In some instances, duty entries were absent from the record, which is an indication that relevant duties have not been collected.” Particular weaknesses were highlighted in Exuma. The Auditor-General’s report said: “Our analysis of the records provided revealed a large number of outstanding released goods dated from January 2005 to September 2007. “In many instances, the quan tity or description of goods was not indicated, and as a result the value of outstanding duty is unknown.” The Auditor-General recommended: “Therefore, in an effort to enhance efficiency and effectiveness regarding revenue collection, we recommended that the present practice of releasing goods without dutyb eing paid be revisited with a view to strengthening the system.” The Auditor-General also uncovered “tardiness” in the Customs Department’s collec tion of airline passenger ticket t axes, “which were received at t imes in excess of two months’ late”. And his report added: “Audits were conducted through the year on duty entries at Customs House. It was observed that the incorrect rate of duty was applied in some instances, for which queries were raised with the Customs Department.” During the 2006-2007 fiscal year, the Customs Department dealt with 419 queries involving some $172,957 in duties that were levied. Of these, 10 cases were resolved, resulting in the collection of $4,035 in out standing duties. For the 2006-2007 fiscal year, the Auditor-General said that based on figures provided by the Customs Department, for that year it had collected some $764.264 million compared to $739.09 million the year before, an increase of $25.175 million or 3.4 per cent. The vast majority of revenues came from general import duties, at 66 per cent, with Stamp Duty on imports generating 19 per cent of the rev enues collected by Customs that fiscal year, and air and sea departure taxes another 10 per cent. Elsewhere, the Auditor-General’s audit of the Government’s finances found that the accumulated rent owed by residents of the Government’s Public Housing Rental Units, some of which dated back to 1993, now stood at $645,120. It found that while a policy existed for resi dents to pay via salary deduction, but this was not being followed. There was also the bynow routine focus on outstanding real property taxes, the Auditor-General finding that there were some $81.607 mil lion in such payments that the Government had yet to collect for fiscal 2006-2007. This figure consisted of $67.965 million in current taxes owed, and a $13.642 million surcharge on what homeowners already had outstanding. When added to previous unpaid taxes, the Auditor-General said the Government had failed to collect an accumulated $363.262 million in real property taxes over the years, a sum it described as “exorbitant”. He again urged that “imme diate measures be implemented, whereby delinquent taxpayers are made to settle their debts in an expeditious manner”. Tax unpaid on 2,785 shipping manifests meeting to begin allowing workers to stay on Bock Cay during off-days, and the proposal was put to the workers for their approval. “After discussions with them and the minister, they agreed to revisit that, and they have now made an offer to allow the workers to remain on the Cay with certain conditions to provide food and electricity,” Mr Brown said. An attorney representing Bock Cay workers, Errol Mckinney, said he was is prepared to take the overtime back pay issue to the Supreme Court should he not hear from the developers by next week. Grey areas’ e xacerbate $5m dispute F ROM page 1B FROM page 1B Churn hits premium Cable TV F ROM page 1B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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THE BAHAMAS has enough infrastructure and landto consider light manufacturing as a viable industry for revital i sing the economy, a Bahamian attorney said. Ryan Pinder, speaking at the National Economic Summit, said the Bahamas needs a plangoing forward, and envisages light manufacturing as an indus-t ry that could help bolster the e conomy in the long term. He said the Bahamas should link its need for light manufacturing with a the proven main stay of tourism in order for it to be successful. “Why would we import a lot of our tourist products that wesell? Why can’t we manufacture those here, with maybe the expertise of a foreign company or not maybe just on our own and sell those and develop that into an export market,” said Mr Pinder. He said leveraging Bahami a n experience and success in areas such as tourism can help promote other industries in the country that can grow into export markets. Mr Pinder said the Bahamas has the infrastructure on theF amily Islands, especially in F reeport, to implement an industry such as light manufacturing. n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter B ahamian farmers yesterday insisted that the Government implement a proper National Policy on agriculture, with one calling for a complete overhaul of the Bahamas’ Department of Agriculture. Owner and operator of Goodfellow Farms, Ian Goodfellow, said the Department operates w ith too many employees and not enough direct results for the industry. He said the Department of Agriculture began with only 37 people shortly after the Bahamas’ independence in 1973, and has now increased to just under 400, while production has decreased to one-tenth of what it once was. General Manager of Lucayan Tropical, Tim H auber, said the Bahamas’ lack of a National Policy was a huge “void” for the country. H e said a 40-year gap between generation farmers had stunted the industry, and injected a contemporary farmer into the resurgent industry who do not “know how to grow”. Mr Goodfellow said a National Agriculture Policy has to become important enough to the Bahamas before it can be explored and i mplemented, and said the Government must focus only on strategies that work. “How do we get to a national policy? How do we achieve a national policy? It has to become important enough that we actually even look at it, and then once we define whata national policy is how to get there,” he s aid. Mr Goodfellow said raising tariffs on imported food got the Bahamas into the problems with local food production, and shouldn ot be a consideration moving forward. “We can alter some of the tariffs possibly, but I believe we have to learn how to compete on an international level and on a national l evel,” said Mr Goodfellow. He believes the Government should focus much more on educating the Bahamian public as a way forward for the agriculture industry. “There is an opportunity for us to farm; we just haven’t recognised the value of it yet,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 3B 127,&(2)6$/( ( [SRFUHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQ&RPSDQ\f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t /DZRI3URSHUW\$FW 7(506 7HQSHUFHQWRIWKHSXUFKDVH S ULFHDWWKHWLPHRIFRQWUDFWDQGWKH EDODQFHXSRQFRPSOHWLRQZLWKLQ 6L[W\GD\VRIFRQWUDFW 7KLVVDOHLVVXEMHFWWRDUHVHUYHSULFH7KH&RPSDQ\ UHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\DQGDOORIIHUV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVPD\VXEPLWZULWWHQRIIHUV D GGUHVVHGWR([SRFUHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQFR0DQDJLQJ 3DUWQHU32%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDVWREH UHFHLYHGQRODWHUWKDQWKHFORVHRIEXVLQHVVRQWKHWKG D\RI0DUFK tremendous demand for eggs in the Bahamas when Gladstone Farms ceased producing, and was forced into receivership and then liquidation, due to competition in the import-saturated food market. Mr Dorsett said only Bahami an-produced eggs could provide the competitive prices and nutritious product the market deserved, but still consumers favored imports. “We were to the point where we were bringing in Eggland eggs and other name brands that were demanding higher prices, and the consumers were buying it,” said Mr Dorsett. “On the other hand, the local egg producers who were pro ducing a fresher egg, as far as we are concerned, a more nutri tiousd egg because we know what’s going into them are losing market share.” Mr Dorsett said Bahamian farmers produced 11 tonnes of local beef, 45 tonnes of sheep’s meat, 16 tonnes of goat meat and 156 tonnes of pork in 2005, with an estimated worth of $920,000. “Any commodity produced in the Bahamas is fresher than any commodity that comes in from a foreign country into the Bahamas,” he said. “Fresh meat is slaughtered in the Bahamas, and within one week is chilled down and can be made avail able to the market. There can be no meat brought into the Bahamas under the pretext of fresh, even though meat comes in frozen and is thawed out and represented as fresh.” However, Mr Dorsett con tends that Bahamians still buy the second grade imported meats because they are cheap. “We’re trying to get more commitment to local production. As a result, BAIC has stepped in and is launching a ‘Buy Fresh, Buy Bahamian’ campaign to encourage Bahamians to buy more of the local produce.” Local agricultur e pr oducts suffer demand decline despite $50m sales FROM page 1B Huge policy ‘void’ over agriculture Call for total overhaul of Department of Agriculture, which has 400 staff despite production being one-tenth of independence era Manufacturing’s success linked to top industry

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ator is found, we will remain through the transition to a new operator.” However, Isle of Capri will exit after May 31, 2009, “unless anoth-e r operator is found, and we assist with the transition”. In a brief interview with Tribune Business during a break in yesterday’s Cabinet meeting, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, the m inister of tourism and aviation, who has responsibility for casino g aming, confirmed that Isle of Capri’s lease expired at the end of May 2009. They have been giving notice that they are going to pull out of t heir two overseas operations, the Bahamas and Coventry,” the minister confirmed. However, he pointed out that “one doesn’t necessarily follow the other”, in t erms of the possible 234 job losses and the Isle of Capri pull-out, if a nother casino operator could be found in time. “We really are very keen, very e ager to have a good operator in Grand Bahama,” Mr Vanderp ool-Wallace said. “We all want to resolve this as quickly as we possibly can to ensure their is no loss, no interruption, when we transition from o ne operator to another. “We like to be a little bit prom otional, so we have a number of operators quite interested in operating in the Bahamas. We have t hese conversations occurring, and when the opportunities come u p, we certainly point them in that direction. But that’s as much as we have done at the moment.” Finding a replacement gaming operator is likely to prove difficult in the current depressed economy and market environment. Explaining the rationale behind Isle of Capri’s decision to exit Grand Bahama, Ms Haynes said: “We are focusing on our domestic [US] operations. A similar thing [to the Freeport casino] is happening with our property in Coventry, the UK. We’re focusing on other operations.” Isle of Capri’s decision to exit its Freeport casino operation will not come as a surprise to many s easoned observers, given that the company has not enjoyed a happy experience in GrandB ahama since it took over the property in 2003-2004. T he Isle-Our Lucaya has been consistently loss making, and the parent company’s US problems, w here it has only generated $930,000 in net income for the first nine months of its current f inancial year, have compounde d the woes, making an exit the o nly feasible strategy. W hen asked whether Isle of C apri’s Grand Bahama experie nce had been far from what was e xpected, Ms Haynes replied yest erday: “I don’t know that I w ould say that at this point. Our e mployees have worked hard there to deliver customer service and the guest experience, and at this point we’re just going to focus on domestic operations and exit i nternational operations.” For the nine months to January 25, 2009, Isle of Capri’s Our L ucaya casino suffered a $1.713 million net operating loss, a 52p er cent increase upon the previous year’s $1.125 million net oper-a ting loss. O n the revenue front, for the f irst nine months of the current f inancial year, Isle-Our Lucaya’s r evenues dropped by 23.2 per cent to $8.277 million, compared t o $10.79 million the year before. A s for the third quarter, reve nues generated at the Freeport c asino fell by 35.5 per cent to $2.632 million, compared to $ 4.081 million the year before. And for the same three-month p eriod, the Isle of Capri saw its net operating loss in Freeport climb from $169,000 in the 2008 f iscal year to $639,000 this time around. Isle of Capri’s withdrawal is also likely to further negatively impact the already struggling Our Lucaya resort if no replacement operator is found. Casinos are great drawers of visitors, and if the facility closes thenF reeport/Grand Bahama loses another major tourist attraction. The former PLP government d id everything it could to keep Isle of Capri in Freeport, and the casino open. Just before the 2007 general election, it was able to reverse a previous $9.4 million loss provision after a new gaming tax rate agreed with the Government enabled it to recover $6.9 million in accrued taxes. T he gaming win tax rate was slashed from 17 per cent to 9 per c ent for Isle of Capri, while it also received a marketing subsidy from the Government. Isle of Capri had previously accrued gaming taxes as high as $10 million, and its pullout now means that the returns from such a deal are questionable. T he Government will now also potentially lose casino taxes. Together with the closure of the Pinnacle Entertainment casino at Exuma’s Four Seasons resort, the episode highlights the difficulty small gaming operators have in achieving profitability in areas that are not mass tourism destinations. Isle of Capri had leased the Our Lucaya casino under a two-year lease that started on June 1, 2007, and which could be terminated by both itself and Hutchison Whampoa (Our L ucaya’s owner) with six months notice from either side. A nnual rental payments under t he lease are $1.9 million. The property is a 19,000 s quare-foot casino, and offers 303 slot machines, 25 table games and a 110-seat restaurant. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.411.410.000.0700.00020.10.00% 1 1.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.3190.26021.93.71% 0 .990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.3090.24010.71.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7 .904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.776.50-0.274,5000.4380.05014.80.77% 5 .001.49Consolidated Water BDRs1.551.49-0.060.1110.05213.43.49% 3 .002.27Doctor's Hospital2.402.400.000.2400.04010.01.67% 8 .106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6980.40015.03.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.005.070.077,0000.3370.15015.02.96% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1 .000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8 .205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 1 2.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 14.0014.00Bahamas Supermarkets11.2312.0414.00-0.0410.300N/M2.67% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.9230-0.58-2.54 1.43761.3773Colina Money Market Fund1.43760.284.38 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 817.85 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMST UESDAY, 3 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,656.82 | CHG -12.66 | %CHG -0.76 | YTD -55.54 | YTD % -3.24BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 31-Jan-09 23-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI2FWREHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Casino pull-out puts 234 jobs in jeopardy FROM page 1B

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APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN s return with hesitation (5 10 It distributes by air (7 1 1 Puts up a house for sale, perhaps (6 12 Such a shop is somewhat limited (6 15 They are entitled to a s hare of whatever is left (7 17 Sea air adds a little weight to one (5 19 Different view put in writing by a dramatist (6,2,5 20 Directions to prosecute follow (5 21 Dope and sex orgy gets uncovered (7 Down 1 Like the cubed root of carrot perhaps (5 2 Jets start out from them (13 3 Provided food for a domestic pet and wild deer (7 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on the roads (6 5 Acquit the prisoner and empty the court (5 6 They adopt different attitudes when working (7,6 7 Burdened with a back s eat driver? (7 11 Self-propelled transport (7 13 Sets one’s sights higher and improves (5,2 14 Awild horse on land (6 16 Cosy feature of a mountain glen (5 18 Don’t go on about me to improve matters (5 Across:1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, 10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, 24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, 27 Essay. Down:2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Act up, 22 Quits. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. Down:2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 Annul, 22 Fancy. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 1 5161718 1 9 2 021 1234567 8 910 111213 1 4 1 5161718 1 9 2 021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s S udoku Answer Y esterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Learned person (7 5 Reject with disdain (5 8 Rigidly imposed organisation (13 9 Factory (5 10 Viewed as a whole (7 11 Affectedly superior (2-2-2 12 Hydrophobia (6 15 Public service company (7 17 Male duck (5 19 Ashow-off (13 20 Fashion (5 21 Inexplicable matter (7 Down 1 Discard (5 2 Imperious (4,3,6 3 Narrow (7 4 Haphazard (6 5 Sophisticated (5 6 Lacking creativity (13 7 Perplex (7 11 Honours due to victor (7 13 Demanding (7 14 Method (6 16 Tinge deeply (5 18 Ingress (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 It’s not profitable to make (7 5 Laughter in company’s causing disorder (5 8 Made money illegally (13 9 Put off Ted’s return with hesitation (5 1 0 It distributes by air (7 11 Puts up a house for sale, perhaps (6 12 Such a shop is somewhat limited (6 1 5 They are entitled to a share of whatever is left (7 17 Sea air adds a little weight t o one (5 19 Different view put in writing by a dramatist (6,2,5 2 0 Directions to prosecute follow (5 21 Dope and sex orgy gets uncovered (7 D own 1 Like the cubed root of c arrot perhaps (5 2 Jets start out from them (13 3 Provided food for a domestic pet and wild d eer (7 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on t he roads (6 5 Acquit the prisoner and empty the court (5 6 They adopt different attitudes when working (7,6 7 Burdened with a back seat driver? (7 1 1 Self-propelled transport (7 1 3 Sets one’s sights higher and improves (5,2 14 Awild horse on land (6 1 6 Cosy feature of a mountain glen (5 18 Don’t go on about me to improve matters (5 Across:1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, 10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, 24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, 27 Essay. Down:2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Act up, 22 Quits. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. Down:2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 Annul, 22 Fancy. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 1 11213 1 4 1 5161718 19 2021 1234567 8 9 10 1 11213 1 4 1 5161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Learned person (7 5 Reject with disdain (5 8 Rigidly imposed organisation (13 9 Factory (5 1 0 Viewed as a whole (7 1 1 Affectedly superior (2-2-2 12 Hydrophobia (6 15 Public service c ompany (7 17 Male duck (5 19 Ashow-off (13 2 0 Fashion (5 21 Inexplicable matter (7 Down 1 Discard (5 2 Imperious (4,3,6 3 Narrow (7 4 Haphazard (6 5 Sophisticated (5 6 Lacking creativity (13 7 Perplex (7 1 1 Honours due to victor (7 13 Demanding (7 14 Method (6 16 Tinge deeply (5 18 Ingress (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It’s not profitable to make (7 5 Laughter in company’s causing disorder (5 8 Made money illegally (13 9 Put off Ted’s return with hesitation (5 10 It distributes by air (7 1 1 Puts up a house for sale, perhaps (6 1 2 Such a shop is somewhat limited (6 15 They are entitled to a share of whatever is left (7 1 7 Sea air adds a little weight to one (5 1 9 Different view put in writing by a dramatist (6,2,5 20 Directions to prosecute follow (5 21 Dope and sex orgy gets uncovered (7 Down 1 Like the cubed root of carrot perhaps (5 2 Jets start out from them (13 3 Provided food for a domestic pet and wild deer (7 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on the roads (6 5 Acquit the prisoner and empty the court (5 6 They adopt different attitudes when working (7,6 7 Burdened with a back s eat driver? (7 11 Self-propelled transport (7 13 Sets one’s sights higher and improves (5,2 14 Awild horse on land (6 16 Cosy feature of a mountain glen (5 18 Don’t go on about me to improve matters (5 Across:1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, 10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, 24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, 27 Essay. Down:2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Act up, 22 Quits. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. Down:2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 Annul, 22 Fancy. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker C hess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Learned person (7 5 Reject with disdain (5 8 Rigidly imposed organisation (13 9 Factory (5 10 Viewed as a whole (7 11 Affectedly superior (2-2-2 12 Hydrophobia (6 15 Public service company (7 17 Male duck (5 19 Ashow-off (13 20 Fashion (5 21 Inexplicable matter (7 Down 1 Discard (5 2 Imperious (4,3,6 3 Narrow (7 4 Haphazard (6 5 Sophisticated (5 6 Lacking creativity (13 7 Perplex (7 11 Honours due to victor (7 13 Demanding (7 14 Method (6 16 Tinge deeply (5 18 Ingress (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It’s not profitable to make (7 5 Laughter in company’s causing disorder (5 8 Made money illegally (13 9 Put off Ted’s return with hesitation (5 10 It distributes by air (7 11 Puts up a house for sale, perhaps (6 12 Such a shop is somewhat limited (6 15 They are entitled to a share of whatever is left (7 17 Sea air adds a little weight to one (5 19 Different view put in writing by a dramatist (6,2,5 20 Directions to prosecute follow (5 21 Dope and sex orgy gets uncovered (7 Down 1 Like the cubed root of carrot perhaps (5 2 Jets start out from them (13 3 Provided food for a domestic pet and wild deer (7 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on the roads (6 5 Acquit the prisoner and empty the court (5 6 They adopt different attitudes when working (7,6 7 Burdened with a back seat driver? (7 11 Self-propelled transport (7 13 Sets one’s sights higher and improves (5,2 14 Awild horse on land (6 16 Cosy feature of a mountain glen (5 18 Don’t go on about me to improve matters (5 Across:1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, 10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, 24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, 27 Essay. Down:2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Act up, 22 Quits. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. Down:2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 Annul, 22 Fancy. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Learned person (7 5 Reject with disdain (5 8 Rigidly imposed organisation (13 9 Factory (5 10 Viewed as a whole (7 11 Affectedly superior (2-2-2 12 Hydrophobia (6 15 Public service company (7 17 Male duck (5 19 Ashow-off (13 20 Fashion (5 21 Inexplicable matter (7 Down 1 Discard (5 2 Imperious (4,3,6 3 Narrow (7 4 Haphazard (6 5 Sophisticated (5 6 Lacking creativity (13 7 Perplex (7 11 Honours due to victor (7 13 Demanding (7 14 Method (6 16 Tinge deeply (5 18 Ingress (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It’s not profitable to make (7 5 Laughter in company’s causing disorder (5 8 Made money illegally (13 9 Put off Ted’s return with hesitation (5 10 It distributes by air (7 11 Puts up a house for sale, perhaps (6 12 Such a shop is somewhat limited (6 15 They are entitled to a share of whatever is left (7 17 Sea air adds a little weight to one (5 19 Different view put in writing by a dramatist (6,2,5 20 Directions to prosecute follow (5 21 Dope and sex orgy gets uncovered (7 Down 1 Like the cubed root of carrot perhaps (5 2 Jets start out from them (13 3 Provided food for a domestic pet and wild deer (7 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on the roads (6 5 Acquit the prisoner and empty the court (5 6 They adopt different attitudes when working (7,6 7 Burdened with a back seat driver? (7 11 Self-propelled transport (7 13 Sets one’s sights higher and improves (5,2 14 Awild horse on land (6 16 Cosy feature of a mountain glen (5 18 Don’t go on about me to improve matters (5 Across:1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, 10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, 24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, 27 Essay. Down:2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Act up, 22 Quits. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. Down:2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 Annul, 22 Fancy. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 9 10 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Learned person (7 5 Reject with disdain (5 8 Rigidly imposed organisation (13 9 Factory (5 10 Viewed as a whole (7 11 Affectedly superior (2-2-2 12 Hydrophobia (6 15 Public service company (7 17 Male duck (5 19 Ashow-off (13 20 Fashion (5 21 Inexplicable matter (7 Down 1 Discard (5 2 Imperious (4,3,6 3 Narrow (7 4 Haphazard (6 5 Sophisticated (5 6 Lacking creativity (13 7 Perplex (7 11 Honours due to victor (7 13 Demanding (7 14 Method (6 16 Tinge deeply (5 18 Ingress (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It’s not profitable to make (7 5 Laughter in company’s causing disorder (5 8 Made money illegally (13 9 Put off Ted’s return with hesitation (5 10 It distributes by air (7 11 Puts up a house for sale, perhaps (6 12 Such a shop is somewhat limited (6 15 They are entitled to a share of whatever is left (7 17 Sea air adds a little weight to one (5 19 Different view put in writing by a dramatist (6,2,5 20 Directions to prosecute follow (5 21 Dope and sex orgy gets uncovered (7 Down 1 Like the cubed root of carrot perhaps (5 2 Jets start out from them (13 3 Provided food for a domestic pet and wild deer (7 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on the roads (6 5 Acquit the prisoner and empty the court (5 6 They adopt different attitudes when working (7,6 7 Burdened with a back seat driver? (7 11 Self-propelled transport (7 13 Sets one’s sights higher and improves (5,2 14 Awild horse on land (6 16 Cosy feature of a mountain glen (5 18 Don’t go on about me to improve matters (5 Across:1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, 10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, 24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, 27 Essay. Down:2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Act up, 22 Quits. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. Down:2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 Annul, 22 Fancy. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Learned person (7 5 Reject with disdain (5 8 Rigidly imposed organisation (13 9 Factory (5 10 Viewed as a whole (7 11 Affectedly superior (2-2-2 12 Hydrophobia (6 15 Public service company (7 17 Male duck (5 19 Ashow-off (13 20 Fashion (5 21 Inexplicable matter (7 Down 1 Discard (5 2 Imperious (4,3,6 3 Narrow (7 4 Haphazard (6 5 Sophisticated (5 6 Lacking creativity (13 7 Perplex (7 11 Honours due to victor (7 13 Demanding (7 14 Method (6 16 Tinge deeply (5 18 Ingress (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It’s not profitable to make (7 5 Laughter in company’s causing disorder (5 8 Made money illegally (13 9 Put off Ted’s return with hesitation (5 10 It distributes by air (7 11 Puts up a house for sale, perhaps (6 12 Such a shop is somewhat limited (6 15 They are entitled to a share of whatever is left (7 17 Sea air adds a little weight to one (5 19 Different view put in writing by a dramatist (6,2,5 20 Directions to prosecute follow (5 21 Dope and sex orgy gets uncovered (7 Down 1 Like the cubed root of carrot perhaps (5 2 Jets start out from them (13 3 Provided food for a domestic pet and wild deer (7 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on the roads (6 5 Acquit the prisoner and empty the court (5 6 They adopt different attitudes when working (7,6 7 Burdened with a back seat driver? (7 11 Self-propelled transport (7 13 Sets one’s sights higher and improves (5,2 14 Awild horse on land (6 16 Cosy feature of a mountain glen (5 18 Don’t go on about me to improve matters (5 Across:1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, 10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, 24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, 27 Essay. Down:2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Act up, 22 Quits. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. Down:2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 Annul, 22 Fancy. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Learned person (7 5 Reject with disdain (5 8 Rigidly imposed organisation (13 9 Factory (5 10 Viewed as a whole (7 11 Affectedly superior (2-2-2 12 Hydrophobia (6 15 Public service company (7 17 Male duck (5 19 Ashow-off (13 20 Fashion (5 21 Inexplicable matter (7 Down 1 Discard (5 2 Imperious (4,3,6 3 Narrow (7 4 Haphazard (6 5 Sophisticated (5 6 Lacking creativity (13 7 Perplex (7 11 Honours due to victor (7 13 Demanding (7 14 Method (6 16 Tinge deeply (5 18 Ingress (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It’s not profitable to make (7 5 Laughter in company’s causing disorder (5 8 Made money illegally (13 9 Put off Ted’s return with hesitation (5 10 It distributes by air (7 11 Puts up a house for sale, perhaps (6 12 Such a shop is somewhat limited (6 15 They are entitled to a share of whatever is left (7 17 Sea air adds a little weight to one (5 19 Different view put in writing by a dramatist (6,2,5 20 Directions to prosecute follow (5 21 Dope and sex orgy gets uncovered (7 Down 1 Like the cubed root of carrot perhaps (5 2 Jets start out from them (13 3 Provided food for a domestic pet and wild deer (7 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on the roads (6 5 Acquit the prisoner and empty the court (5 6 They adopt different attitudes when working (7,6 7 Burdened with a back seat driver? (7 11 Self-propelled transport (7 13 Sets one’s sights higher and improves (5,2 14 Awild horse on land (6 16 Cosy feature of a mountain glen (5 18 Don’t go on about me to improve matters (5 Across:1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, 10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, 24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, 27 Essay. Down:2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Act up, 22 Quits. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. Down:2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 Annul, 22 Fancy. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u T a R gT E Across 1 Learned person (7 5 Reject with disdain (5 8 Rigidly imposed organisation (13 9 Factory (5 10 Viewed as a whole (7 11 Affectedly superior (2-2-2 12 Hydrophobia (6 15 Public service company (7 17 Male duck (5 19 Ashow-off (13 20 Fashion (5 21 Inexplicable matter (7 Down 1 Discard (5 2 Imperious (4,3,6 3 Narrow (7 4 Haphazard (6 5 Sophisticated (5 6 Lacking creativity (13 7 Perplex (7 11 Honours due to victor (7 13 Demanding (7 14 Method (6 16 Tinge deeply (5 18 Ingress (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It’s not profitable to make (7 5 Laughter in company’s causing disorder (5 8 Made money illegally (13 9 Put off Ted’s return with hesitation (5 10 It distributes by air (7 11 Puts up a house for sale, perhaps (6 12 Such a shop is somewhat limited (6 15 They are entitled to a share of whatever is left (7 17 Sea air adds a little weight to one (5 19 Different view put in writing by a dramatist (6,2,5 20 Directions to prosecute follow (5 21 Dope and sex orgy gets uncovered (7 Down 1 Like the cubed root of c arrot perhaps (5 2 Jets start out from them (13 3 Provided food for a domestic pet and wild deer (7 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on the roads (6 5 Acquit the prisoner and empty the court (5 6 They adopt different attitudes when working (7,6 7 Burdened with a back seat driver? (7 11 Self-propelled transport (7 13 Sets one’s sights higher and improves (5,2 14 Awild horse on land (6 16 Cosy feature of a mountain glen (5 18 Don’t go on about me to improve matters (5 Across:1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, 10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, 24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, 27 Essay. Down:2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Act up, 22 Quits. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. Down:2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 Annul, 22 Fancy. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 9 10 1 11213 1 4 1 5161718 19 2021 1 234567 8 9 10 1 11213 14 1 5161718 19 2021T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleY esterday s S udoku Answer Y esterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Learned person (7 5 Reject with disdain (5 8 Rigidly imposed organisation (13 9 Factory (5 10 Viewed as a whole (7 11 Affectedly superior (2-2-2 12 Hydrophobia (6 15 Public service company (7 17 Male duck (5 19 Ashow-off (13 20 Fashion (5 21 Inexplicable matter (7 Down 1 Discard (5 2 Imperious (4,3,6 3 Narrow (7 4 Haphazard (6 5 Sophisticated (5 6 Lacking creativity (13 7 Perplex (7 11 Honours due to victor (7 13 Demanding (7 14 Method (6 16 Tinge deeply (5 18 Ingress (5 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It’s not profitable to make (7 5 Laughter in company’s causing disorder (5 8 Made money illegally (13 9 Put off Ted’s return with hesitation (5 10 It distributes by air (7 11 Puts up a house for sale, perhaps (6 12 Such a shop is somewhat limited (6 15 They are entitled to a share of whatever is left (7 17 Sea air adds a little weight to one (5 19 Different view put in writing by a dramatist (6,2,5 20 Directions to prosecute follow (5 21 Dope and sex orgy gets uncovered (7 Down 1 Like the cubed root of carrot perhaps (5 2 Jets start out from them (13 3 Provided food for a domestic pet and wild deer (7 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on the roads (6 5 Acquit the prisoner and empty the court (5 6 They adopt different attitudes when working (7,6 7 Burdened with a back seat driver? (7 11 Self-propelled transport (7 13 Sets one’s sights higher and improves (5,2 14 Awild horse on land (6 16 Cosy feature of a mountain glen (5 18 Don’t go on about me to improve matters (5 Across:1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, 10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, 24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, 27 Essay. Down:2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Act up, 22 Quits. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. Down:2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 Annul, 22 Fancy. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 5B

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pick up and store in the freezer. They can then take them down in the fridge and warm it up later for dinner,” Mrs Knowles said. Explaining her knowledge of so many exotic foods and the reason she cooks with a unique blend of spicy Caribbean and flavorful French styles, Mrs Knowles said she used to be a fight attendant which gave her the opportunity to indulge in all types of cuisine. “I used to be a flight attendant on Air Canada so I traveled for seven years which kind of opened my horizons food wise. I went to Germany and Japan and actually I gathered some of my recipes through those experiences,” Mrs Knowles said. Mrs Knowles said her skills are not all her own as her family has roots in great food. “Both of my grandfathers were ‘jacks of all trades’. My dad’s father started a hamburger joint in a small town and people drove two hours to go there to get a hamburg er from him. He also made a type of ginger beer with his secret recipe. My father showed me the scars in his hand from all the bottling he did as back in those days everything was manual. So it is in the family I think. They were doershad an idea and just went for it. That is what inspired me very much in my life,” Mrs Knowles said. As for the health factor of her market caf, persons can enjoy daily morning pastries, spreads, breads, wraps, soups, and sandwiches. “When I looked around, I realised I have to give options to people. For example, when I cook my ground beef, I always take the time to strain my meat so the fat is gone and you just have the meat left. It may take longer, but what ever I do is good and high quality and people can eat in confidence that I am not going around the bush to cut costs. Our goal is to facilitate the enjoyment of a good meal,” Mrs Knowles said. As much as she would like to be a successful business, she wants Le Petit Gourmet to grow in such a manner that the quality stays the same. “There is no way around that. I love my customers. They know about my life and my son. They are part of me and making it an open kitchen and an open atmosphere, they get to know me. It’s music from Montreal, its French music. I want people to be happy and that means the size of my business stays enjoyable for me and my customers. So when they come here, they do not just get to know me through the food but they get to know me through the ambiance,” Mrs Knowles said. Mrs Knowles is originally from Quebec, Canada but her heart is now in the Bahamas where she met and married her husband, Matt Knowles and had a handsome son, Adam. Mrs Knowles describes herself not asa chef, but rather a person who really loves to cook. Over the last three years, Mrs Knowles said her passion for food and love of people along with life circumstances have led her on a journey from the Farmer’s Market on East Bay Street to her own place in the Shirley Street Plaza. Mrs Knowles said she wants to share the many blendso f flavors developed f rom years of travel and her curiosity for nutrition. “It all started with the idea to make cupcakes out of my garage. I was the mother of a two -y ear -old at the time and I was tired of being home doing nothing so I decided to bake cupcakes. That did not work, but all of a suddenI got propelled into the catering world and that ran for about two years. We then went to the Farmers Market and that created a demand. That led me to want to open a market caf where people can come, buy our homemade products and also get a deli wrap, soup and daily menu.” Mrs Knowles also decided to do frozen meals which are a result of her personal chef service experience. “We have frozen meals that people can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h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter AS the number of eateries in the Bahamas continues t o incr ease, man y persons ha v e probably alr e ady indulged in Chinese, Gr eek , French, Italian, Mexican or other countries' foods. However, how many times has there been any buzz about Canadian food? The answer would be probably be "never." Fortunately, Julie-Andree Knowles of Le Petit Gourmet is willing to change the way Bahamians experience food in a healthy way. Canada A TASTE OF JULIEA NDREE Knowles of Le Petit Gourmetd isplaying the gorgeous pastries and b reads baked fresh daily.

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Now the waters of the Bahamas are teeming with possibly hundreds of thousands of these underwater water men a ces, who are not only invading many coral reefs and underwater crevices, but are also a serious threat to the future of local sea environments. If left unchecked, the Lionfish could eliminate many indigenous sea creatures which some say could lead to a perma-n ent unbalance in the Bahamian marine s ystem. Because of this concern, the Depart ment of Marine Resources (DMR initiated a bold project which first attempts to educate locals on the basic facts of the Lionfish, and to then introduce the fish as a food source which could eventually eliminate the foreign predator as a threat to local fish. Nakisha Anderson, an assistant fish eries officer at DMR spoke recently at the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation’s Agribusiness Expo. “While the Lionfish is eating out our native fish species, what we are trying to do is make a market for it. The more people who start eating it, the more we can control their numbers.” To prepare the fish for consumption, Ms Anderson said it is essential that the fish’s venomous spines are removed first because of the obvious health risk. Ms Anderson said that people stung by the fish describe the pain as a burning sensation which could result in hospitalisation or possibly death. Officials say that applying hot water and seeking medical attention is the safest way of handing a sting. Assisting Ms Anderson was Chef Gareth Bowe from DMR, who said his tool of choice for removing the spines is a pair of kitchen scissors. He said a common question from many interested in cooking the fish is whether the head is edible. Although it is,he prefers to dispose of it because of it is difficult to season and because of its spiny exterior. “It’s just the dorsal, the anal, and the pelvic fins that have venomous spines.” Making his specialty of the day, Mr B owe prepared what he called ‘Fillet L ionfish Fingers,” a dish which takes about 15 minutes. First using a fillet knife, he separated the meat from the fish, where he then removed the scaly skin, and then washed the fish in warm water. Next, he used ripened limes to add initial seasoning, fol l owed by dipping the meat in an egg based seasoning sauce. Although he was unwilling to reveal all of his ingredients, he did disclose some elements including black pepper, seasoning salt, lime, Cajun seasoning, minced garlic and three table spoons of butter. He said for the best results, the fish should soak in the mixture for about two hours. After it had been soaked, he placed it in a container of white flour, which was the final step before placing it in the fryer. Using extra virgin olive oil, he allowed the meat portions to fully cook for about four to five minute, allowing the exterior to turn brown. In the end, the fish has the appearance of grouper, with a taste many say has to be acquired. According to Tribune Taste , the fish tastes like grouper or tuna, with some also comparing it to fresh water trout. This newest delicacy has also been added to the menus of a couple local restaurants including Shogun Restaurant, and the August Moon Caf. With other restaurants and food stores showing no real interest in offering the fish to consumer, DMR is excited and hopeful that through this expo, more Bahamians may adopt the fish as a regu lar part of their diet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n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net UNTIL about 15 years ago, the Lionfish was a relatively unknown fish in local waters, and mostly indigenous to the indo pacific region the Indian and South Pacific Oceans, and theR e d Sea. Lionfish on the menu F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f FROM top left to right and middle: Chef Bowe demonstrates the preparation of the Lion Fish to ensure the poisonous spines are removed. At bottomthe final productfillet Lionfish Fingers.

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n By TRIBUNE S taff Writer TWO or three years back, American Idol was good, very good. Every Tuesday night, my wife and I had eyes and ears locked on the telly to see and hear tomorrow’s superstars. Even now I can remember the Clay Aikens, Kelly Clarksons and Jordin Sparks of the world. Bit players like Kelly Pickler and the big bearded dude in the cowboy hat were memorable, too. Chris Daughtry, the bald-head ed hard rocker, came over strong ly. So did the little guy with the floppy hair who was deeply in love with himself. What was his name again? So what’s gone wrong? Every thing’s gone wrong, that’s what. This year’s Idol series is dreary, tedious junk interspersed with more dreary, tedious junk, with hardly a glimmer of true glamour in sight. Talent so far has been confined to a bronze-headed teenagern amed Alison (“Sixteen going on 40,” as we both remark when she snarls out her lively numbers) anda tiny blond who looks and sounds like the real thing but still has far to go. The rest have been mediocrities wrestling with largely forgettable songs notable only for their lack of melody and harmony. What a sad shambles the whole t hing has become. The early episodes of the 2009 season were based on a calamitous format in which we heard per formers only in soundbites and saw them only in flashes. There was so much movement from onet o another that I became dizzyheaded with confusion. More than once I sought relief by leaving the room to surf the Internet. The panel sounded, as usual, like semi-articulate primates,d eploying the same old phrases t hey’ve used since the series began. Why don’t they extend their vocabulary? What’s a vocabulary, I hear them ask. Simon Cowell’s calculated hostility to all and sundry is now wearing thin, especially as it always emerges in the same mindkilling English monotone. Randy Jackson, with his con trived coolness, has said “What’s up dog?” “Check this out” and “You were a bit pitchy” at least 14 million times too often for me. The irritatingly indecisive Paula Abdul is as lost for words as ever, stumbling around in a nomansland between saying what she means and trying not to cause offence. And a fourth panellist, whose name I haven’t even bothered to check out, is an irrelevance who gets in the way of everyone else. N o wonder Idol has lost its lustre. I sometimes wonder if this panel has a full-sized brain between them, their range of expression is so limited and superficial. When they appeared alongside e ach other in four easy chairs inside a wood-panelled mansion, calling the quivering contestants in for appraisal like medieval serfmasters, our coffee pot was in grave danger of being hurled through the TV screen. I t’s hard to imagine any other q uartet so undeserving of the praise that appears to be heaped upon them. Worst of all, the only true star of the show the host Ryan Seacrest is now somehow reduced to a walk-on part after being the production’s indispensable hub for years past. No doubt Idol has this year dared to be different in its attempt to boost ratings. Unfortunately, the major difference is that it’s now far worse than the shows we’ve been used to in the past. Cowell and Co need to get their act together if they really want Idol to run and run. At the moment, Google is emerging as a much more entertaining option. C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE American Idol? Whas wrong with n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter THERE are many things that can be classified as art. Art is such a large part of our everyday lives, we hardly even stop to think about it. Look at the desk or table where you are, right this minute. Someone designed that. It is art. Your shoes are art. Your coffee cup is art. Well Juliette Sargent saw a faceand made art. Ms Sargent, owner of Fun to see Faces, has been face painting for about a year and a half. “I schooled, lived and worked in the United States and Japan for seven years. After moving home, I began face painting at the suggestion of Carol Moss, a close cousin. She wanted me to face paint at her kids’ party since the clown was not able to make it. I was amazed how much fun it created for the kids and also surprised how many adults asked me to their kids’ parties. Since then I had received further train ing from Michigan based artist, Donna Novak, of Show Off Body Art. I have also received further training from New Jersey based master clown, Robyn Thompson (Moggie Ms Sargent said the most rewarding thing about face painting is being fulfilled about making good use of her artistic abilities. “I use to be really good at drawing when I was in high schoolI had not practised my craft in over 12 years. Now, I am using that same talent again. I am amazed. I am hap py to create a bit of amusement and happiness in the people I paint or people who see my paintings,” Mrs Sargent said. Although Ms Sargent is a 4th grade teacher at Nassau Christian Academy full time, she does find time to express her love for face painting. “I am an avid traveler. I love reading and of course learning new things, especially those that relate to art. Today, face art competes with education for my attention. When not teaching my class, I can usually be found wielding a paint brush on the face of any willing participant. I prefer face painting over traditional canvas art because face painting is quicker, easier and can be enjoyed by everyone,” Ms Sargent said. Face painting does not only have a children clientele, but also sur prisingly, many adults enjoy the craft participating with their children or at private functions. “I am mostly invited to kids’ parties. Occasionally, I get invited to adult parties as well, especially theme parties (Mardi Gras, Halloween, Junkanoo, etc). I attend a few fairs and corporate events. This year, I was able to provide face painting at the carnival. I am joined by about four other painters at big events.” Mrs Sargent said she draws inspi ration for her creations by thinking about what best compliments the clothes or anything in relation to the individual. “Sometimes I am able to replicate patterns and images that are on their clothing. I also like looking at my baby niece’s clothes. I like the colors that are used to design kids clothes and as a result I incorporate these colors in my art,” Ms Sargent said. Face painting can be a lot of fun, but it can also be a lot of hard work. Ms Sargent said those who want to get into the field have much training to consider. “Train and seek the advice of persons in that field and practise a lot. Be sure to only use paints that are intended for use on the skin,” Ms Sargent said. Fun to see faces sheer joy I feel while doing it. For most of my life I ignored my God-given talents and I was not happy. Now that I am embracing them, I can feel myself as a person evolving and my work is evolving. My painting is tied to my growth as a person. It is my release, my way of getting through each day,” Mr Knowles said. As painting is definitely not his only form of expression, Mr Knowles said the medium which kept him going through all of his dark years was graphic design and in the last 5-6 years, fine pho tography. Mr Knowles said the things that are important to him at this moment are his continued evolution as a person, and getting his studio business up and run ning so that those around the Bahamas can appreciate island art work. “The main thing I tell other young artists is to not get discouraged. When you are in the art profession, you are almost always going to struggle as you build a name and a reputation for yourself and your work. However, if you love it then go for it. Don't do pieces just because you think it will earn you some money, do it because it touches you deep down in your emotional being,” Mr Knowles said. Island expressions Bahamas Red Cr oss Fair FROM page 10 MRS SARGENT said she draws inspiration for her creations by thinking about what best compliments the clothes or anything in relation to the individual. J a s o n D e C r o w / A P P h o t o The early episodes of the 2009 season were based on a calamitous for mat in which we heard performers only in soundbites and saw them only in flashes. There was so much movement from one to another that I became dizzy-headed with confusion. IN THIS Aug. 26, 2008 file photo, "American Idol" judges, from left, Simon Cowell, Kara DioGuardi, Paula Abdul and Randy Jackson arrive at a promotional event for the show in New York. n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter NOWthat Spring is here, one of the most exciting and highly anticipated events of the year for Bahamians of all ages is the Bahamas Red Cross Fair which will take place on Saturday, March 7 on the lower grounds of Government House. Each year, the fair attracts thousands of people who flock to Government House to enjoy staples like conch fritters, popcorn, cotton candy, hamburgers, and play games like hoop-la, and bingo, and to catch up with old friends and party in the disco. There will be a special treat for those in the disco as there will be numerous special musical guests performing. The fair is one of the organisation’s largest fund-raising events with all proceeds going to assist the Red Cross in its very important work. So officials of the Red Cross are urging all members of the public to attend.

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 41F/5C Low: 43F/6C Low: 52F/11C Low: 55 F/13C Low: 54F/12C Low: 56F/13C Low: 65 F/18C Low: 49F/9C High: 70F/21C High: 69F/21C High: 70 F/21C High: 72F/22C High: 72F/22C High: 71 F/22 High: 75F/24C Low: 52F/11C High: 68 F/20C Low: 56 F/13 High: 73 F/23CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 55F/13C High: 77F/25C Low: 62 F/17C High: 74F/23C Low: 53 F/12C High: 70F/21C Low: 57 F/14C High: 74F/23C Low: 60F/16C High: 78 F/26C Low: 57F/14C High: 74 F/23C Low: 59 F/15C High: 78F/26C Low: 63F/17C High: 80F/27C Low: 56 F/13C High: 76F/24C High: 66F/19CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4TH, 2009, PAGE 9CTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Partly sunny, a shower; breezy . Clear, breezy and cool. Partly sunny.Sunny to partly cloudy and breezy. Windy in the morning; partly sunny. High: 75 Low: 65 High: 74 High: 76 High: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Sunny and pleasant. High: 81 Low: 66 Low: 69 Low: 70 AccuWeather RealFeel 71F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 61F 68-63F 74-65F 77-67F 79-69F Low: 70 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 73F/23C Low .................................................... 53F/12C Normal high ...................................... 78F/26C Normal low ........................................ 65F/18C Last year's high .................................. 82F/28C Last year's low .................................. 67F/19C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.98"Normal year to date ......................................3.60" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU First Full Last New Mar . 4 Mar . 10 Mar . 18 Mar . 26 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:30 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:14 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 11:37 a.m. Moonset . . . . 12:58 a.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:49 a.m.2.77:21 a.m.0.3 1:15 p.m.2.17:19 p.m.0.0 2:00 a.m.2.78:32 a.m.0.3 2:28 p.m.2.28:32 p.m.0.0 3:14 a.m.2.79:40 a.m.0.2 3:40 p.m. 2.39:44 p.m.-0.1 4:22 a.m. 2.810:40 a.m.0.0 4:45 p.m. 2.5 10:49 p.m.-0.2 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 90/3272/22s89/3171/21s Amsterdam45/736/2r46/739/3r Ankara, Turkey46/732/0c52/1137/2pc Athens64/1754/12s63/1750/10sh Auckland71/2164/17pc77/2569/20r Bangkok91/3277/25pc94/3478/25c Barbados84/2874/23pc84/2874/23pc Barcelona55/1243/6sh58/1438/3c Beijing39/332/0pc39/327/-2s Beirut63/1757/13c68/2063/17pc Belgrade56/1347/8r59/1542/5c Berlin48/838/3pc47/839/3r Bermuda 62/1655/12pc62/1655/12pc Bogota66/1845/7r66/1845/7r Brussels43/632/0r45/736/2c Budapest46/741/5sh48/841/5rBuenos Aires 72/2263/17r77/2566/18pc Cairo78/2558/14s81/2767/19pc Calcutta 97/3677/25s100/3775/23s Calgar y42/514/-10pc21/-6-2/-18sn Cancun79/2657/13s82/2763/17pc Caracas83/2868/20pc82/2768/20cCasablanca 63/17 51/10 r 65/1849/9sh Copenhagen 40/437/2pc41/539/3sh Dublin39/334/1sn43/637/2pcFrankfurt 54/12 36/2sh39/334/1r Geneva48/839/3r40/431/0sn Halifax26/-34/-15pc28/-215/-9pcHavana 77/25 57/13 pc80/2656/13pc Helsinki34/124/-4pc32/021/-6c Hong Kong 75/2370/21sh77/2566/18t Islamabad85/2954/12pc86/3053/11s Istanbul56/1350/10c65/1853/11cJerusalem 60/1545/7s68/2054/12pc Johannesburg 74/23 51/10s72/2250/10s Kingston 81/27 72/22pc83/2874/23s Lima83/2867/19sh82/2769/20sh London 43/6 34/1 pc41/536/2pc Madrid46/734/1r48/832/0r Manila90/3275/23pc88/3175/23pc Mexico City79/2643/6s80/2641/5s Monterrey86/3059/15s91/3262/16sMontreal 19/-75/-15s25/-318/-7pc Moscow 32/018/-7pc30/-121/-6sf Munich52/1137/2pc38/334/1sf Nairobi89/3156/13s92/3355/12s New Delhi88/3163/17pc88/3161/16s Oslo 31/025/-3sf28/-223/-5sn Paris 41/534/1r43/636/2pc Prague43/636/2c46/738/3r Rio de Janeiro87/3075/23pc92/3380/26pc Riyadh79/2653/11s77/2553/11s Rome57/1346/7r55/1243/6r St. Thomas 82/27 72/22pc81/2773/22sh San Juan88/3165/18pc95/3567/19s San Salvador88/3159/15s92/3372/22s Santiago86/3054/12s90/3257/13s Santo Domingo83/2865/18c81/2764/17s Sao Paulo85/2967/19t93/3366/18t Seoul 53/1134/1pc45/725/-3r Stockholm39/332/0sf36/230/-1pc Sydney77/2559/15r72/2259/15pc T aipei 78/25 70/21sh78/2562/16s Tokyo46/739/3r54/1243/6sh Toronto28/-219/-7pc41/535/1c Trinidad88/3173/22t91/3275/23r Vancouver47/838/3c46/728/-2pcVienna 49/9 44/6sh53/1148/8r Warsaw41/534/1c41/534/1r Winnipeg39/323/-5sn36/219/-7sn HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayThursdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SSE at 10-20 Knots3-5 Feet7-10 Miles74F Thursday:NW at 15-30 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:SSW at 12-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles74F Thursday:NW at 15-30 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:SSW at 15-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-8 Miles74F Thursday:NW at 15-30 Knots6-10 Feet7-10 Miles75F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 72/2245/7pc69/2043/6pc Anchorage24/-422/-5sn34/124/-4sn Atlanta 56/13 32/0s66/1846/7s Atlantic City34/116/-8pc45/732/0pc Baltimore34/118/-7pc46/732/0pcBoston 32/0 18/-7s37/226/-3pc Buffalo34/121/-6pc47/836/2c Charleston, SC56/1331/0s66/1841/5s Chicago40/432/0pc53/1139/3cCleveland 38/3 25/-3pc50/1039/3c Dallas72/2257/13s86/3061/16pc Denver72/2238/3pc60/1527/-2pc Detroit37/227/-2c43/638/3c Honolulu78/2566/18sh79/2665/18cHouston 76/24 60/15 s80/2664/17pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayThursday T odayThursday T odayThursday Indianapolis 46/735/1pc55/1247/8c Jacksonville60/1536/2s68/2046/7s Kansas City 56/13 48/8pc74/2346/7pc Las Vegas70/2148/8pc68/2045/7pc Little Rock63/1747/8pc71/2155/12pcLos Angeles 64/17 50/10r64/1750/10pc Louisville52/1140/4pc64/1753/11c Memphis60/1549/9pc70/2157/13pc Miami72/2256/13s74/2363/17s Minneapolis 35/1 29/-1pc41/528/-2pc Nashville59/1537/2pc66/1851/10pc New Orleans67/1954/12s75/2360/15pc New York36/225/-3s44/631/0pc Oklahoma City74/2354/12s86/3055/12pc Orlando 70/21 47/8 s75/2353/11s Philadelphia33/022/-5pc43/632/0pc Phoenix83/2858/14pc79/2657/13pc Pittsburgh36/222/-5pc50/1042/5c Portland, OR51/1039/3sh49/937/2c Raleigh-Durham 44/626/-3pc58/1438/3pc St. Louis56/1342/5pc64/1752/11cSalt Lake City 57/1333/0c47/830/-1c San Antonio 78/25 61/16 s80/2662/16pc San Diego64/1755/12pc65/1852/11pc San Francisco58/1446/7sh59/1546/7cSeattle 48/839/3pc46/733/0c T allahassee 63/1735/1s72/2243/6s Tampa69/2050/10s72/2256/13s Tucson82/2755/12pc79/2652/11pc Washington, DC44/627/-2pc54/1237/2pc UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-stormsRain Flurries SnowIce AccuWeather.com

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Mr Knowles a resident of Little Exuma, started drawing fresh out of his diapers, and then took up painting when he went to Florida to attend the Art Institute of Ft Lauderdale. Mr Knowles said he prefers to live and paint on his home islandb ecause of the connection he feels to his surroundings. “My family has been living on Little Exuma for five generations and I am a big advocate of young people carrying out the traditions of past generations. Additionally, I am just plain and simple, an island boy and I owe everything I've achieved in my life to myu pbringing here,” Mr Knowles said. O ne piece that is close to his heart, entitled “Flow” reflects on his life experiences. “For a period of about 2 or 3 years I had lost my creative "flow" due to being weighed down by one personal tragedy after the next. So it was a release, and I attribute this piece to my being able to bethe painter I am now,” he said. The second piece, entitled “Reconnecting with Mother” is a mixed-media work, which Mr Knowles said he came up with one day, as he was standing out in the rain barefoot. Mr Knowles said as he walked he noticed the impression of his footprints being left in the wet earth, and felt a visceral connection to Mother Nature. The third piece, "Untitled II" was born simply from a graphic inspired mood. Using two recycled pieces of wood Mr Knowles said he wanted to create a very graphic, colorful interchangeable piece (the two panels can be separated). The fourth piece, is called "Reflections..." Mr Knowles said he had an old discarded shelf, which in its previous life had been in the shower. “Additionally I had the pieces from an old broken window and now that all of my work is created with 100 per cent recycled materials, I wanted a way to combine them to create a small, striking piece. If you look closely you can pick out the profiles of two heads,” Mr Knowles said. Last year he felt the desire to do a fusion piece, combining tribal and Asian designs and the result was “ Warrior” “Fortunately I came across an Arawak inspired tattoo design by an acquaintance of mine who gave me the permission to use it in my piece. The design itself was done without stencils or any guides whatsoever, the entire design was freehanded and I was very happy with the outcome.” Mr Knowles said he draws his inspiration from his emotions, the environment and the feel of nature, even though essentially everything can be a source of inspiration. “The thing that inspires me to keep at it is the C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E Fun to see Faces See page eight WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 A taste of Canada See page six n By ALEX MISSICK Features Staff Reporter WITH most artists looking to make it to the big city to showcase t h eir w or k , 26 -y earold graphic designer, Michael Kno wles, likes to keep his w ork and life as close to his island home as possible. expressions ISLAND SEE page eight REFLECTIONS F LOW UNTITLED II REC ONNECTING WITH MO THER

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 9 RESULTS from day one of the Government Secondary Schools Sports Association’s 16th Annual Junior High School Track & Field Meet yesterday at the Thomas A. Robinson Track & Field Stadium: GIRLS 100 METER DASH BANTAM (U13 1. 498 Henderson, Janiece 12 S.C. McPherson18 13.74 13.58 1.4 2. 511 Rolle, Whitney 12 S.C. McPherson18 13.66 13.64 1.4 3. 84 Deveaux, Shonte 12 Anatol Rodgers 14.77 14.37 1.4 GIRLS 400 METER DASH BANTAM (U13 1. 517 Williams, Jeorjett 12 S.C. McPherson18 1:10.69 1:10.88 2. 495 Ferguson, D'Shanta 12 S.C. McPherson18 1:12.10 1 :16.11 3 . 325 Marc, Maxine 12 H.O. N ash 4 1:15.42 1:17.37 GIRLS 1200 METER RUN BANTAM (U13 1. 434 Moxey, Taja 12 L.W. Young 1 4:41.86 2. 76 Bowe, Michaela 12 Anatol Rodgers 4:47.56 3. 92 McPhee, Charis 12 Ana tol Rodgers 4:56.89 GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY BANTAM (U13 1 S. C. McPherson (18 55.74* 1) 511 Rolle, Whitney 12 2) 517 Williams, Jeorjette 12 3) 495 Ferguson, D'Shantay 12 4) 498 Henderson, Janiece 12 2 C. H. Reeves (8 59.39 1) 166 Sturrup, D'Andrea 12 2) 154 Rahming, Brittia 12 3) 158 Rolle, Tara 12 4) 130 Adderley, Shantiqua 12 3 L. W. Young (1 1 :01.23 1) 439 Ramsey, Rashai 12 2) 423 Goodman, Dondra 12 3) 422 Fernander, Taeliyah 12 4) 426 Johnson, Takessa 12 GIRLS LONG JUMP BANTAM (U13 1. 498 Henderson, Janiece 12 S.C. McPherson18 4.33m NWI 14-02.50 2. 84 Deveaux, Shonte 12 Anatol Rodgers 3.81mNWI 12-06.00 3. 511 Rolle, Whitney 12 S.C. McPherson18 3.75mNWI 12-03.75 GIRLS SHOT PUT (6LBSTAM (U13 1. 158 Rolle, Tara 12 C.H. Reeves 8 7.58m 24-10.50 2. 154 Rahming, Brittia 12 C.H. Reeves 8 6.74m 22-01.50 3. 2 Alleyne, Ashley 12 A.F. Adderley 15 6.21m 20-04.50 BOYS 100 METRE DASH BANTAM (U13 1. 61 Lloyd, Fred 12 A.F. Adderley 15 14.07 13.59 0.3 2. 116 Hutchinson, Jervan 12 Anatol Rodgers 13.88 13.64 0.3 3. 55 Forbes, Shaquan 12 A.F. Adderley 15 14.27 14.11 0.3 BOYS 400 METER DASH BANTAM (U13 1. 64 Lullu, Jeffrey 12 A.F. Adderley 15 1:11.38 1:12.43 2. 448 Bastian, Carlton 12 L.W. Young 1 1:09.87 1:13.03 3. 57 Gibson, Qyemah 12 A.F. Adderley 15 1:09.35 1:13.57 BOYS 1200 METER RUN BANTAM (U13 1. 51 Cooper, Tony 12 A.F. Adderley 15 4:24.88 2. 205 Ramsey, Adrian 12 C.H. Reeves 8 4:26.89 3. 182 Dawkins, Navado 12 C.H. Reeves 8 4:27.10 BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY B ANTAM (U13 1. C. H. Reeves (8 57.61 1) 214 Varance, Vernon 12 2) 185 Ferguson, Keiano 12 3) 171 Altidor, Edwin 12 4) 179 Bethel, Floyd 12 2 A. F. Adderley (15 58.21 1) 64 Lullu, Jeffrey 12 2) 57 Gibson, Qyemah 12 3) 55 Forbes, Shaquan 12 4) 61 Lloyd, Fred 12 3 D. W. Davis (17 58.82 1) 261 Charlton, Ajalon 12 2) 266 Duncombe, Brandford 12 3) 273 Jean Paul, Gary 12 4) BOYS LONG JUMP BANTAM ( U13) 1. 57 Gibson, Qyemah 12 A.F. Adderley 15 4.41m NWI 14-05.75 2. 105 Bodie, David 12 Anatol Rodgers 4.28m NWI 14-00.50 3. 611 Jean-Louis, Jeff 12 T. A. Thompson 4.04m NWI 13-03.25 GIRLS 100 METER DASH J UNIOR (U15 1. 438 Pearce, Byronece 14 L.W. Young 1 13.59 13.77 -0.8 2. 161 Smith, Ashanti 14 C.H. Reeves 8 13.88 13.83 0.8 3. 169 Whymms, Quetel 13 C.H. Reeves 8 13.94 14.01 -0.8 GIRLS 400 METER DASH JUNIOR (U15 1. 101 Williams, Spring 14 Anatol Rodgers 1:03.36 1:04.24 2. 35 Shaw, Gabrielle 13 A.F. Adderley 15 1:08.55 1:07.02 3. 521 Young, Walternique 13 S.C. McPherson18 1:10.55 1:08.61 GIRLS 1500 METER RUN JUNIOR (U15 1. 577 David, Johnique 13 T. A. Thompson 5:33.40@ 2. 147 Johnson, Anastasia 14 C.H. Reeves 8 5:52.82@ 3. 584 Jean-Louis, Lawand 13 T. A. Thompson 5:58.80@ GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY J UNIOR (U15 1. C. H. Reeves (8 1.69 55.06 1) 147 Johnson, Anastasia 14 2) 145 Ferguson, Roneka 14 3) 169 Whymms, Quetel 13 4) 161 Smith, Ashanti 14 2. L. W. Young (1 55.59 1) 408 Bethel, Dwaniquea 13 2) 438 Pearce, Byronece 14 3) 406 Bastian, Carlrinique 14 4) 428 Knowles, Garnisha 14 3 H. O. Nash (4 56.39 1) 331 Neely, Juliette 13 2) 326 Markland, Leshantie 13 GIRLS HIGH JUMP (3'8" JUNIOR (U15 1. 162 Smith, Lydesha 14 C.H. Reeves 8 1.45m@ 409.00 2. 406 Bastian, Carlriniq 14 L.W. Young 1 1.40m@ 4-07.00 3. 13 Deveaux, Lashantah 14 A.F. Adderley 15 1.35m@ 405.00 GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K JUNIOR (U15 1. 137 Cooper, Cynteses 13 C.H. Reeves 8 19.60m@ 64-04 2. 151 Moxey, Jasmine 14 C.H. Reeves 8 18.92m 62-01 3. 507 Miller, Angel 14 S.C. McPherson18 17.33m 56-10 BOYS 100 METER DASH JUNIOR (U15 1. 59 Johnson, Lorman 13 A.F. Adderley 15 12.23 11.91 3.1 2. 356 Dames, Xavier 14 H.O. Nash 4 12.39 11.93 3.1 3. 188 Gibson, Keron 14 C.H. Reeves 8 12.62 12.37 3.1 BOYS 400 METER DASH JUNIOR (U15 1. 549 Riley, Ashley 14 S.C. McPherson18 55.22 54.12@ 2. 398 Tinker, Ronaldo 14 H.O. Nash 4 56.34 57.16@ 3. 187 Gibson, Adrian 14 C.H. Reeves 8 59.26 57.61@ BOYS 1500 METER RUN JUNIOR (U15 1. 631 Young, Darren 13 T. A. Thompson 5:03.20 2. 170 Almonor, Moses 14 C.H. Reeves 8 5:09.26 BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY JUNIOR (U15 1. C. H. Reeves (8 50.53 1) 188 Gibson, Keron 14 2) 193 Lightbourne, D'Andre 13 3) 189 Gibson, Keshon 14 4) 187 Gibson, Adrian 14 2 S. C. McPherson (18 50.56 1) 555 Scavella, Leonardo 14 2) 542 Mott, Cornell 14 3) 525 Cambridge, Derek 14 4) 531 Ferguson, Keith 14 3 H. O. Nash (4 50.78 1) 384 Nairn, Laquan 13 2) 389 Resis, Cliff 13 3) 398 Tinker, Ronaldo 14 4) 356 Dames, Xavier 14 BOYS LONG JUMP JUNIOR (U15 1. 534 Gibson, Rashad 14 S.C. McPherson18 5.68m* NWI 18-07.75 2. 531 Ferguson, Keith 14 S.C. McPherson18 5.64m@ NWI 18-06.00 3. 354 Coakley, Xavier 13 H.O. Nash 4 5.18m NWI 17-00.00 BOYS HIGH JUMP (4'3" JUNIOR (U15 1. 354 Coakley, Xavier 13 H.O. Nash 4 1.71m* 507.25 2. 59 Johnson, Lorman 13 A.F. Adderley 15 1.64m@ 5-04.50 3. 465 Huyler, Brandon 14 L.W. Young 1 1.46m 4-09.50 3. 452 Butler, Audley 14 L.W. Young 1 1.46m 409.50 BOYS DISCUS THROW (1K JUNIOR (U15 ) 1. 621 Saunders, Marvin 14 T. A. Thompson 27.94m@ 91-08 2. 69 Rolle, Rashad 13 A.F. Adderley 15 26.94m@ 88-05 3. 394 Swaby, Randon 14 H.O. Nash 4 24.64m 80-10 BOYS JAVELIN THROW (600GMSU15 1. 187 Gibson, Adrian 14 C.H. Reeves 8 32.31m@ 106-00 2. 605 Desir, Vilner 14 T. A. Thompson 26.66m 87-06 3. 180 Campbell, Tareves 14 C.H. Reeves 8 26.37m 86-06 GIRLS 100 METER DASH INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. 596 Strachan, Athoniqu 16 T. A. Thompson 12.16 12.05 4.0 2. 514 Stubbs, Roniqua 14 S.C. McPherson18 13.46 13.28 4.0 3. 311 Demeritte, Tekevia 15 H.O. Nash 4 13.40 13.29 4.0 GIRLS 400 METER DASH INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. 340 Sands, Burdeca 15 H.O. Nash 4 1:07.82 1:08.46 2. 501 Joseph, Olivia 15 S.C. McPherson18 1:07.18 1:08.82 3. 505 Marley, Tashan 14 S.C. McPherson18 1:10.10 1:10.91 GIRLS 1500 METER RUN INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. 329 Moncur, Khadijah 15 H.O. Nash 4 6:19.00 2. 133 Butler, Raunice 14 C.H. Reeves 8 6:24.03 3. 419 Duquesne, Ysabel 16 L.W. Young 1 6:42.85 GIRLS 300 METER HURDLES INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. 17 Ferguson, Ashley 16 A.F. Adderley 15 55.41 54.13 2. 327 McKay, Danielle 15 H.O. Nash 4 58.54 56.19 3. 412 Carter, Samitra 15 L.W. Young 1 56.13 56.83 GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. S. C. McPherson (18 54.64 1) 508 Minus, Raygene 15 2) 503 Knowles, Richea 15 3) 505 Marley, Tashan 14 4) 514 Stubbs, Roniqua 14 2 T. A. Thompson 55.05 1) 588 McKenzie, Anastacia 16 2) 591 Newton, Glendira 15 3) 573 Cox, Jaynell 15 4) 596 Strachan, Athonique 16 3 H. O. Nash (4 56.43 1) 327 McKay, Danielle 15 2) 311 Demeritte, Tekevia 15 3) 322 Kemp, Randya 15 4) 310 Curtis, Regine 15 GIRLS LONG JUMP INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. 419 Duquesne, Ysabel 16 L.W. Young 1 4.45m NWI 14-07.25 2. 508 Minus, Raygene 15 S.C. McPherson18 4.41m NWI 14-05.75 3. 302 Anderson, Shavanes 15 H.O. Nash 4 4.08m NWI 13-04.75 GIRLS SHOT PUT (8LBSMEDIATE (U17 1. 304 Bastian, Samantha 16 H.O. Nash 4 8.26m 27-01.25 2. 565 Armbrister, Shanae 15 T. A. Thompson 6.91m 22-08.00 3. 520 Young, Nadia 15 S.C. McPherson18 6.85m 22-05.75 GIRLS JAVELIN THROW (600GMS (U17 1. 310 Curtis, Regine 15 H.O. Nash 4 26.01m@ 85-04 2. 304 Bastian, Samantha 16 H.O. Nash 4 20.32m 66-08 3. 133 Butler, Raunice 14 C.H. Reeves 8 18.40m 60-04 BOYS 100 METER DASH INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. 530 Farrington, Davain 16 S.C. McPherson18 11.64 11.61@ 0.5 2. 202 Perry, Shawn 15 C.H. Reeves 8 12.14 12.08 0.5 3. 547 Rahming, Alexander 15 S.C. McPherson18 12.19 12.20 0.5 BOYS 400 METER DASH INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. 172 Ambrose, Jayson 15 C.H. Reeves 8 56.16 56.04 2. 272 Jamison, Julio 15 D.W. Davis 17 56.63 57.26 3. 390 Riley, Alex 15 H.O. Nash 4 57.66 57.38 BOYS 1500 METER RUN INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. 545 Neymopur, Clenero 15 S .C. McPherson18 4 :53.99 2 . 5 39 Lafleur, Lopez 15 S.C. McPherson18 5:01.42 3. 629 Williams, Edward 16 T. A. Thompson 5:06.34 BOYS 400 METER HURDLES INTERMEDIATE (U17 1 . 1 95 Marshal, Andre 15 C.H. R eeves 8 1:07.18 1:06.83 2. 626 Sturrup, Jermaine 14 T. A. Thompson 1:11.97 1:08.18 3. 186 Gale, Raymond 15 C.H. Reeves 8 1:09.58 1:09.63 BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. S. C. McPherson (18 47.61 1 ) 540 Major, Paul 15 2 ) 530 Farrington, Davaine 16 3) 544 Newman, Donovan 15 4) 547 Rahming, Alexander 15 2 C. H. Reeves (8 48.00 1) 196 Martin, Shantwon 15 2) 202 Perry, Shawn 15 3) 195 Marshal, Andre 15 4) 172 Ambrose, Jayson 15 3 T. A. Thompson 49.14 1) 610 Jacques, Ricardo 14 2) 626 Sturrup, Jermaine 14 3 ) 624 Storr, Jeremy 16 4 ) 606 Ferguson, Samuel 16 BOYS TRIPLE JUMP INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. 396 Sweeting, Ricardo 15 H.O. Nash 4 11.34mN WI 37-02.50 2. 272 Jamison, Julio 15 D.W. Davis 17 11.33m NWI 37-02.25 3. 62 Lockhart, Kenrico 15 A.F. Adderley 15 10.54m NWI 34-07.00 BOYS DISCUS THROW (1 1/2K) INTERMEDIATE (U17) 1. 608 Hanna, Christopher 16 T. A. Thompson 24.01m 78-09 2. 208 Rolle, Sidney 15 C.H. Reeves 8 23.16m 76-00 3. 532 Ferguson, Richard 15 S.C. McPherson18 22.00m 72-02 BOYS HIGH JUMP (4'8" INTERMEDIATE (U17 1. 451 Burrows, Nicholas 15 L.W. Young 1 1.64m 5-04.50 2. 624 Storr, Jeremy 16 T. A. Thompson 1.59m 5-02.50 3. 482 Sweeting, Kendal 16 L.W. Young 1 J1.59m 5-02.50 As at March 1, 2009 TEAM NAMEPWDLGFGAPTS Bears FC 10 81134825 Caledonia FC 11812321525 Cavalier FC 9342201713 Sharks FC 10334222212 Baha Juniors FC 10316192910 Dynamos FC 11 2 45223310 FC Nassau 11 1 2 8 14 395 RECENT RESULTS Sunday, March 1, 2009 1:00 pmFC Nassau vs Caledonia FC 2:4Referee: S. Thompson Goalscorers: Marcus Trail (CaledoniaCaledonia (FC NassauFC Nassau 3:00 pm Dynamos FC vs Baha Juniors FC 3:1 Referee: D. Opsaint Goalscorers: Mackinson Amichette (DynamosDynamos (DynamosBaha Juniors UPCOMING MATCHES Sunday, March 08, 2009 (Knock-Out Cup 1:00 pm Bears FC vs Cavalier FC 3:00 pm Baha Juniors FC vs Caledonia FC LEADING GOALSCORERS 1. Lesley St. FleurBears FC14 2. Marcus Trail Caledonia FC10 3. Odaine McCallumCavalier FC74. Duckerno ExliasSharks FC7 5. Andre Carey Bears FC 7 6. Frank Negri Caledonia FC6 7. Ehren Hanna Dynamos FC 5 8. Chedlet Pierre Sharks FC 5 9. Alex ThompsonBears FC4 10. Dean FarryCaledonia FC4 BAHAMAS FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION SENIOR LEAGUE ST ANDINGS GSSSA DAY ONE RESULTS

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DESPITE getting eliminated in the first round of the Independence Cup last week in the Dominican Republic, Taureano ‘Reno’ Johnson said he was still pleased with his performance. “I was very impressed with my performance because I moved up in weight just for this tournament as a part of my training to build up my strength for the upcoming games,” said Johnson, w ho fought as a middleweight i nstead of the welterweight. Nobody likes to go to a tournament to lose, but I used this asa part of my training to get my strength going into the upcoming World Games.” Loss Johnson, who won the B ahamas’ first medal at the championships when he secured the bronze in 2007, lost 12-7 to Willy Medina from the Dominican Republic in what was considered a hometown decision by coach Andre Seymour. “My performance, I was very pleased with it,” Seymour said. “I felt the decision which went in favour of the hometown boy should have gone my way. “But this is the kind of results that you get when all of the judges are from the host country and when you are going up against a host competitor.” Coming off his impressive fifth place finish at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China in August, Johnson said he doesn’t feel that he had a disappointing showing. Instead, he summed it up as a learning exsperience. “I made some mistakes, but I felt I did enough to win the fight,” he insisted. “But hey, that’s the way the judges ruled and I have to accept the decision.” T raining After taking a break in training in January, Johnson said he managed to get back on track to get ready for the tournament, training under the watchful eyes of Ray Minus Jr, but he didn’t anticipate performing as well as he did, even though the scores didn’t indicate it. A t the end of the Olympics, Johnson said he was contemplating turning professional, but he still hadn’t made a definitive decision on his future as yet. “We still have a lot of things on the table that we are trying to work out,” he pointed out. “Money is something that I’m interested in making at this point. “I haven’t made anything in the past 15 years, so I think it’s about time that I start looking at my career. So whatever come up and it’s profitable for me, I will consider it.” In the meantime, Johnson said he was preparing to travel to the Ponto Cup in May in Puerto Rico, followed by the World Championships in August and the Commonwealth Games and the Caribbean Games, so he hada busy schedule ahead of him. Add a major decision to make as well. “Nobody knows what will happen by then, or even tomorrow,” he said. “I have some decisions to make and whenever the time come, I will make it.” While Johnson got eliminated in the first round in the Dominican Republic, he was joined by Valentino Knowles, who also lost his first round match 11-7 to Ricardo Garfield from the Dominican Republic. But Carl Hield went all the way to the final, losing the gold medal to Jonathan Baptista from the Dominican Republic. It was the first time that the Bahamas has won a silver medal at the championships. Johnson said he was quite thrilled at the effort of his teammates. Focus “Carl pulled off a silver medal. He deserved it. In fact, I think he deserved the gold medal,” Johnson said. “He fought very well, he showed a lot of technique and that his training in Cuba has paid off. “But he also showed a lot of stickability because he went through a whole lot. He was suspended at one time, just likeI was, but we were able to overcome these trials and still perfom very well.” As for Knowles, who won a bronze medal at last year’s championships, Johnson said he just got a bad break from the first round, just like he did, fighting against a hometown boy. “But he fought well too. It’s just unfortunate that we didn’tw in our matches,” Johnson said. “But you can expect for us to both be back.” Johnson pleased with performance Danielle McKay came the closest in 56.19. “It was good. I enjoyed it,” said the 15-year-oldn inth grader, who successf ully defended her title. “I prayed to God and I knew that I could do it.” Andre Marshall of CH Reeves made his debut in the intermediate boys 400 hurdles. He ran 1:06.83,c ompared to Jermaine Sturrup of TA Thompson, the runner-up in 1:08.18. “It was good. I had to pray before I started since this was my first time,” said Marshall, a 14-year-old ninth grader. “I asked God to let me win this one.” Another exciting series of events was the 400. In the bantam girls’ onelapper, Jeorjette Williams of SC McPherson clocked 1:10.88 and Jeffrey Lullu of AF Adderley carted off the boys’ crown in 1:12.43. Williams, an 11-year-old grade seven student, said she just wanted to get the race finish. “My coach told me to go out hard in the first 100, relax on the 150 and then pick it up at the end,” she stressed. “I think I did fairly good. I was very pleased with my performance.” Lullu, another 11-year-old seventh grader, said the competition was stiff, but he was determined “to win,” even though he got some stiff competition. Spring Williams of Anatol Rodgers was never challenged as she sped around the track to win the junior girls’ 400 in 1:04.24. Ashley Riley of SC McPherson did likewise in the boys’ onelapper in 54.12. “It was great, but I knew I could do better because I’m in a track club,” said Williams, a 14-year-old member of the T-Bird Flyers. “When I hit the 200, I was tired.” Noted 13-year-old Riley: “I was a little nervous going into it, but when I realized what I could do, I just went out there and ran. It was my best performance.” In the intermediate girls division, Burdece Sands of HO Nash (1:08.46 Olivia Joseph of SC McPherson (1:08.82 her one-lapper. “I felt it was kind of tough, but I really went out and did it,” said the 14-yearold eighth grader. “I really didn’t have anything left, so I was glad I pulled it off.” And Jayson Ambrose of CH Reeves didn’t waste any time in circling the track to snatch the intermediate boys’ title in 56.04, well ahead of DW Davis’ Julio Jamison (57.26 “It was good. At first, it was hard, but when I got on the back stretch, it got easier. When I got to the 200 and then the 100, I just cruised home,” said Ambrose, a 14-year-old ninth grader. Taureano johnson GSSSA athletes off to fast start F ROM page 11 MORE GSSSA ACTION TA Thompson Wilfred Mckinney SC Mcpherson Lorman Johnson leans to the tape for the win over Ho Nash Xavier Dames. SC Mcpherson Rashad Gibson wins . H O Nash Xavier Coakley jumps. CH Reeves Andrean Gidson wins. Felip Major /Tribune staff

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ANTHONIQUE Strachan and Davain Farrington both made it look so easy as they sped past their rivals to easily win the titles of the fastest girl and boy in the Government Secobdary Schools Sports Asso ciation’s Junior High Schools for 2009. Competing on the first of the two-day meet for the juniors at the Thomas A. Robinson Trackand Field Stadium yesterday, Strachan raced to a time of 12.05 seconds while Farrington stopped the clock at 11.61. Strachan, a 15-year-old ninth grader at TA Thompson (formerly CC Sweeting Jr), said she got out to a fast start and was able to relax the rest of the way. “I had competition, but they just wasn’t prepared,” said a confident Strachan, in repeat ing as the sprint champion, well ahead of second place finisher Roniqua Stubbs from SC McPherson, who ran 13.28. Farrington, a 15-year-old ninth grader at SC McPherson, said he didn’t get the drive out of the blocks that he anticipated, but he made up for it with his finish. “I didn’t have any competition at all,” said Farrington, who successfully defended his title by leaving his nearest rival, Shawn Perry from CH Reeves,a distance behind in 12.08. The junior girls’ century was won by Byronece Pearce from LW Young in 13.77, ahead of CH Reeves’ Ashanti Smith (13.83 (14.01 “It was challenging because the girls worked hard, but I had to push myself, even thought I had a cramp,” said the 14-yearold Pearce, who is in the ninth grade. “I did it for my team.” The junior boys’ straight away was almost a photo finish with Lorman Johnson of AF Adderley (11.91 Xavier Dames (11.93 Nash. “At first I was scared, but it seemed like it all slipped away from me,” said Dames, a 14year-old ninth grader. “I thought I was going to catch him, but he put up a good per formance.” The bantam boys’ 100 was also a close one to watch. But in the end, it was Fred Lloyd of AF Adderley, who snatched the title in 13.59 with Jervan Hutchinson of Anatol Rodgers settling for second in 13.64. “It was good. I treid my hard est,” said Lloyd, a 12-year-old seventh grader, who was nurs ing a right ankle injury. “He tried his best. I think I just wanted it a little more.” Noted Hutchinson, an 11year-old seventh grader: “It was challenging. The competition was good. The race was good too.” Janiece Handerson of SC McPherson claimed the bantam girls’ sprint title in 13.58, holding off team-mate Whitney Rolle (13.64 The intermediate girls’ 300 hurdles was won by Ashley Ferguson of AF Adderley in 54.13. She pulled away from the field and was unchallenged as C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Local sports news HERE’S a look at the point standings after the first day of competition at the GSSSA Junior High Schools Track and Field Championships yesterday at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and field Stadium: COMBINED SCORES TEAMSPOINTS CH Reeves374 SC McPherson322.50 HO Nash264 TA Thompson236 AF Adderley213 LW Young211.50 Anatol Rodgers121 DW Davis84 BANTAM BOYS (U-13 SC McPherson72 CH Reeves50 Anatol Rodgers48 LW Young36 HO Nash23 TA Thompson17 AF Adderley 14 DW Davis9 JUNIOR GIRLS (U-15 CH Reeves75 LW Young55.50 HO Nash 37.50 SC McPherson31 TA Thompson29 AF Adderley 25 Anatol Rodgers 17 DW Davis3 I NTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U-17 HO Nash89.50 SC McPherson 72.50 TA Thompson56 CH Reeves46 LW Young 36 AF Adderley 31 Anatol Rodgers 7 DW Davis6 BANTAM BOYS (U-13 AF Adderley70 CH Reeves 48 Anatol rodgers 42 DW Davis20 TA Thompson19 LW Young19S C McPherson14 HO Nash4 JUNIOR BOYS (U-15 CH Reeves 82 HO Nash66 TA Thompson 63 SC McPherson58 AF Adderley44 LW Young21 DW Davis12 Anatol Rodgers7 INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U-17 SC McPherson75 CH Reeves 73 TA Thompson52 LW Young44 HO Nash44 DW Davis34 AF Adderley29 GSSSA POINT STANDINGS INTERMIDIATE girls 100 meters was won by TA Thompson Athonique Strachan. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER the first day of competition at the Government Secondary SchoolsS ports Association’s Junior High Schools Track and Field C hampionships, the CH Reeves Raptors have surged out front in their quest tor egain their title. The Raptors bolted ahead b y 51.5 points at the end of yesterday’s competition at the Thomas A. Robinson Track a nd Field Stadium. They have a ccumulated a total of 374, compared to their nearest r ival, the SC McPherson Sharks with 322.50. The HO Nash Lions are s urprisingly sitting in third place with 264, while the d efending champions LW Young Golden Eagles are in sixth place with 211.50. E n route to taking their l ead, the Raptors are out front in only the junior girls (under1 5) division with 75 and the junior boys (U-15 SC McPherson sits in front o f two divisions as well – bantam girls (U-13 i ntermediate boys (U-17 75. HO Nash controls the intermediate girls (U-17 8 9.50 and the AF Adderley Fighting Tigers pace the way in the bantam boys (U-13 with 70. The first day of competition featured the finals in the 100,4 00, 1200, 1500 and 4 x 100 metre relays on the track, while there was a combina-t ion of all the events contested on the field. T oday, starting at 9 am, the meet will be officially opened, followed by the final day ofc ompetition of the juniors. Among the highlights will be t he 200, 800 and 4 x 400 final on the track. The remainder of the field events will also be contested. A total of eight schools are participating. S tarting on Thursday and running through Friday, the GSSSA will stage the seniors egment of the championships. It’s expected that a nother eight schools will be in action. See scoreboard for the c omplete point breakdown. Raptors take an early lead CH Reeves holds 52 point lead over SC McPherson GSSSA athletes of f to fast start SEE page 10 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THREE records tumbled on day one of the Government Secondary Schools Sports Association’s Junior High Schools Track and Field Championships yesterday at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Sta dium. One of them went to HO Nash Lions’ Xavier Coakley in the junior boys’ high jump and in the same division, Rashad Gibson of the SC McPherson Sharks inked his name in the books in the long jump. The other was posted by the Sharks’ bantam girls 4 x 100 metre relay team of Whitney Rolle, Jeorjette Williams, D’Shantay Ferguson and Janiece Henderson. Coakley cleared 5-feet, 7 1/2inches to surpass the previous mark of 5-7 that was held by Thomas Bellot of the CR Walker Knights from 1997. “I think it was good. On my last attempt, I think I got too excited and I lost concentration,” said Coakley, who was hoping to at least match his personal best of 5-9. Coakley said he was excited to erase the record and he was looking forward to improving on his performance at the end of the month when he tries out for the national team going to the Carifta Games in St. Lucia over the Easter holiday weekend. In producing the most outstanding performance on the field yesterday, Coakley was shy of the Carifta qualifying mark of 6-4. With a little more competition, Coakley said he hoped to achieve that goal at the trials at the end of the month. The junior boys’ long jump record stood at 18-7 1/4, which was held by Latico Sands of the Government High Magics from 1993. In another record-breaking performance, Rashad Gib son soared 18-7 3/4 to replace it. And SC McPherson’s team of Whitney Rolle, Jeorjette Williams, D’Shantay Ferguson and Janiece Henderson clocked 55.74 seconds to shatter the pre vious mark of 56.94 that was set by AF Adderley back in 1996. The Sharks ran away from the rest of the field with their nearest rivals, CH Reeves Raptors team of D’Andrea Sturrup, Brittia Rahming, Tara Rolle and Shantiqua Adderley coming second in 59.39. The LW Young Golden Eagles’ team of Rashai Ramsey, Dondra Goodman, Taeliyah Fernander and Takessa Johnson came in third in 1:01.23. In the intermediate boys’ high jump, LW Young’s Nicholas Burrows was hoping to go over the 6-7 record set by Ricardo Jacques from the CC Sweeting Cobras. But he wasn’t even close, finishing with a best of 5-4 1/2, a performance he accepted as he prepare to celebrate his 15th birthday on Sunday. “I thought I did well, but I was disappointed in myself because I didn’t break the record,” said Burrows, who outduelled TA Thompson’s Jeremy Storr and his Golden Eagles’ team-mate Kendal Sweeting, both of whom cleared 5-2 1/2. “It’s all good. I did my best.” Coakley leads record-breaking performances JOHNSON PLEASED WITH PERFORMANCE


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WEATHER

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Pim blowin’ it

HIGH 75F
LOW 65F

a PARTLY SUNNY,
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Volume: 105 No.84

ASE LTe
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SEE “THE ARTS’ SECTION

FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY



aU

police prone into fignt

LW Young
school officia
questions
media reports

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN L W Young school offi-
cial claims police need to
probe more deeply into a con-
frontation outside the school
on Monday as he fears that
stories of an off-duty police
officer having stepped in to
break up a fight might not be
the full story.

Telford Mullings, principal
of the high school in Bernard
Road, confirmed that a num-
ber of ninth-grade students at
the school were involved ina
dispute that broke out near
the school grounds shortly
before 4pm on Monday.

However, suggesting reports
reaching the media so far
about the incident may not be
the whole story, he stood up
for his students.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

“The way ZNS had it this gj By TANEKA
morning, they made it sound THOMPSON
like some of my students went Tribune Staff Reporter
out to deliberately beat up a tthompson@

police officer. It wasn’t like
that,” said Mr Mullings.

tribunemedia.net

AMERICAN federal
agents and state prosecutors

SEE page six

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OUL US

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TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

PS
a

las
ea fi abd

ary

AND REAL aide
SESS

Principal calls or

pe USB pile els

have been “illegally”
approaching local financial
institutions for information
instead of following proper
legal channels, former Attor-
ney General Alfred Sears said
in a call for more government
intervention in the matter.

While not being specific,
Mr Sears told the House of
Assembly that American offi-
cials sometimes coerce local
banks directly for assistance
in civil and criminal matters
in the US, rather than petition
them through the competent
authority, which would be the
Attorney General.

However, in an interview
with Tribune Business, State
Finance Minister Zhivargo
Laing branded Mr Sears'
assertions as "irresponsible",
adding that his ministry had
not heard of such harassment.

"They have been circum-
venting the proper channels,

SEE page six

©,

Quiznos Sus



THIS HONDA ACCORD burst into flames yesterday afternoon on Poinciana Avenue. The female driver
was shaken but escaped the fire without injury.

Former Attorney General claims
US agents ‘illegally approaching
local financial institutions’

Sy sa Ta Ss
VSR
a
Ne TST

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

IT has been reported
that Swiss detectives have
visited Scots actor Sean
Connery at this Lyford Cay
home to question him in
connection with a civil suit
stemming out of a loan he
allegedly made to a former
friend.

According to The Daily
Mail newspaper of Lon-
don, Sir Sean, 78, is due to
appear in a court in Gene-
va, Switzerland, next week
in connection with the
action.

It is alleged that the
James Bond actor lent his

SEE page six





GSSSA athletes
off to fast start

SEE PAGE ELEVEN



Officials tour
Detention
Centre amid
hunger strike

Visit intended to confirm facility
‘being operated with transparency’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SENIOR Immigration
and Defence Force officials,
accompanied by social ser-
vices personnel and local
clergy, toured the Deten-
tion Centre on Monday in
response to allegations of
inhumane conditions
revealed in this newspaper,



The Tribune has confirmed.

Three people being held
at the Detention Centre
went on a hunger strike last
week to protest what they
described as inhumane con-
ditions.

Detainees of various
nationalities alleged they
were forced to endure sub-
standard living conditions,

SEE page six

‘Immediate action needed’ to address
impact of climate change on Bahamas

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

IMMEDIATE action must be taken to
address the potentially irreversible impact
of climate change in the Bahamas as one of
the world’s most vulnerable nations, experts

warned yesterday.

The undeniable effects of global warming
already being felt in the country’s low-lying |
subtropical islands were divulged by the
director of the Bahamas Environment Sci-
ence and Technology (BEST) commission
Philip Weech, department of meteorology
director Arthur Rolle and Economic Com-



PHILIP WEECH,

mission for Latin America and the Caribbean Director of the Bahamas
(ECLAC) director Neil Pierre at a meeting to Environment Science

SEE page eight

and Technology
commission

British banker’s bid to acquire
GBPA appears to have ended

BRITISH banker Roddie
Fleming’s attempt to acquire
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) appeared
to have ended in failure last
night, after it was announced
that the Sir Jack Hayward
Family Trust would not be
proceeding with the $100 mil-
lion deal to sell its stake to
him.

A brief statement last night
said: “Sir Jack Hayward's fam-
ily trustees announce that the
arrangements made in August
2007 for the acquisition by
Roddie Fleming's Family
Trust of their entire interest
in Freeport have come to an
end. Sir Jack's trustees are not
in negotiation with any other
potential purchaser.”

The announcement does

not come as a surprise, given
that speculation had intensi-
fied in recent weeks that Mr
Fleming and his partner,
Geoffrey Richards, did not
have the financing in place for

SEE page six

Unconfirmed reports
that resort to lay otf
almost 30 workers

UNCONFIRMED reports
last night were that the Ginn
Sur Mer resort in West End,
Grand Bahama is due to lay-
off almost 30 workers by the
end of this week.

See tomorrow’s Tribune
for more details on this story.



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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

IT’S A TIME OF JOY AND JUBILATION! ’

fP'S AGRAND TIME OF
PRAISE AND CELEBRATION!

mappervonsit

BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD
General cn Creer

BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON
General Preshytet

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN

Global Outreach Director

BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK
CBL Instructor

MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE

International Director of Women’s Ministries.

BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN
Regponal Overseer of Jamaica, (Cayenan
Islands Guyana and French Guiana

and MINISTER SONTA MARTIN

BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS
Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islands

BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES

National Overseer of the Church of Cex,
Bahamas, Turks & Catoos Islinds

Ministering in song amd performance
are: the Centennial Mass Choir, the Tab-
ernacle Concert Choir, the Chorch of
(ed National Choir, the Bahamas Public
Officers Choir, and other Choirs, Praise
Teaims and simping

Monday, March 9th, 2ish>

Bishop Dr. Elearnet &. Raking, National Oversser
é& Moderator will dehver his ANBUAL ADDRESS:
LIVE VIA RADIO BAHAMAS 154 AM ond
S10 AM

The Convention climaxes on Sunday, March 15th
with the afternoon Anouul Parude and Water
Baptismal Service, folliwed by the evening
Service hraadcast live on 2NS Radio and TV 13,
log on to: Www.cogophahamas.org
For live webcasting



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

BPSU president satisfied
that industrial action by

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PRESIDENT of the Bahamas
Public Service Union John Pin-
der said he is satisfied that a
meeting between the heads of
the Airport Authority and man-
agement at the airport fire sta-
tion was successful in avoiding
industrial action by disgruntled
firemen.

Mr Pinder said the aim of the
meeting was to discuss the sus-
pension of a firefighter who
refused to participate in a train-
ing session conducted by a low-
er ranking colleague — a situa-
tion which reportedly sent many
senior officers at the station into
an uproar.

After the meeting the officer's
suspension was reversed and it
was decided that the practice of
allowing junior officers to train
superiors would be discontin-
ued, he said.

Mr Pinder added that during
that meeting, it was agreed that
promotion exercises at the fire
station would adhere to the
union's industrial agreement in
future, and only qualified per-
sons would be considered for
promotions.

Safety concerns were also
addressed, and the firefighters
were promised an adequate
number of gas masks and suffi-
cient gear.

"In that meeting, it was con-
sidered that the senior officers
will train the senior officers and
they have reversed the decision
to suspend that officer,” Mr Pin-
der told The Tribune.

"The meeting also mentioned
that the human resources area

a ee
Us)

ahah
PHONE: 322-2157



John Pinder

is to be more impartial and try to
ensure that it guides managers
through the correct process in
terms of not violating our indus-
trial agreement in terms of the
grievance procedure and to
ensure that they are in line with
any disciplinary policies that the
government established ... so
we don't have to get to this point
again where there is a threat of
industrial action.

“We don't want to disrupt ser-
vices. We need to be proactive



and talk things out".

The union head said that dur-
ing the meeting, an example of
an “unfair” promotion was
raised.

"When we left that meeting,
the managing director made it
effective immediately that any
request for a promotion that
comes to him, all files on the
individual from the Fire Depart-
ment and human resources are
double-checked to ensure the
same background information is
there.

"Management has also
requested the policy guidelines
surrounding promotions".

Last week several firefighters
claimed the station was being
run like a "petty shop” and that
nepotism was rife.

There were claims that quali-
fied persons were being over-
looked by the human resources
department for promotions in
favour of less skilled employees.

These claims prompted a few
of the officers to call for the
removal of the fire chief, the Air-
port Authority human resources
manager and the director of
security at the airport.

security officers and porter are
allegedly taken into police custody

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - At least four security officers and a porter at the
Freeport Harbour Company have been taken into police custody in
connection with a drug investigation at Lucayan Harbour, it was

claimed yesterday.

Press liaison officer Assistant Superintendent Clarence Reckley
confirmed that several persons employed at Lucayan Harbour were tak-
en in for questioning as part of an ongoing investigation, but he would
not specify the nature of the investigation.

However, The Tribune has learned from a reliable source that five
persons were taken into custody in Freeport on Monday evening fol-
lowing the arrest of two women at Port Everglades in Fort Laud-

erdale, Florida.

The women, passengers on board the vessel Discovery, were arrest-
ed by US authorities after the discovery of a large quantity of illegal

drugs.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 3



Shane Gibson claims report being

-_politicised to make him look bad

0 In brief

woman in
custody after —
firearm and
drugs found

A MAN and a woman are }
in police custody following the
discovery of an illegal firearm :
and drugs at a private resi-

dence.

Shortly after 7pm on Mon- i
day, Mobile Division officers }
travelled to a Highbury Park :

home.

When the officers knocked }
at the door there was no}
response and a man was seen }
through a window running }
inside the house, press liaison }
officer Asst Supt Walter }

Evans reported.

Upon entry, police heard a }
rumbling sound in a back }
bathroom and forced their }
way into that area. A 31-year- }
old man was found with an
orange container. In the con- }
tainer was a clear ziploc bag }
with 111 foil wraps of mari-
juana and a brown plastic bag }
with a quantity of marijuana.

The man and a 23-year-old }
woman were taken into police ;
custody for questioning in this }

matter.

The total weight of the i
drugs is over one pound witha }
local street value of just over }

$1,000.

Two in court on

robbery charge

[WO men were arraigned }
in a Magistrate’s Court on ai

robbery charge yesterday.

Court dockets allege that :
Valentino Rolle, 21, of Nas- }
sau Village, and Dwayne:
Smith, 23, of Pinewood Gar- }

dens, on Sunday, March 1,

2009, at Royal Castle on Bail- ;
lou Hill Road robbed Alfred }
Sweeting of a gold chain val- }
ued at $1,288 and $290 in cash.

The men, who appeared
before Magistrate Derrence }
Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane, }
pleaded not guilty to the}
charge and elected to have a }
summary trial in the Magis- }
trate’s Court. The prosecution }
objected to the men being }
granted bail. Both accused
were remanded to Heri
Majesty’s Prison and are}
expected back in court on }

April 14 for a bail hearing.

Man charged
with armed
robhery

A 22-YEAR-OLD man :
was arraigned in a Magis- }
trate’s Court on ani
armed robbery charge on }

Monday.

It is alleged in court dockets }
that Lorenzo Joseph Philips :
on February 24 robbed Car- }
dinal Neely of two Motorola }
cellular telephones and a gray }
2000 Honda Legend valued }

at $9,450.
Philips,

was remanded
Majesty’s Prison.

The case has been
adjourned to July 27 for
the start of a preliminary :

inquiry.

Solid Wooes

who appeared }
before Magistrate Susan }
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau }
Street, was not required to }
enter a plea to the charge. He }
to Her }

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Minister of Housing
Shane Gibson accused the gov-
ernment and the auditor general of
politicising the Auditor General’s
2006/2007 Report to make him
look bad.

The Golden Gates MP has con-
tacted Auditor General Terrance
Bastian to inquire why certain
information in the document relat-
ing to the accounts at the Ministry
of Housing was again included
despite the accounting discrepancy
apparently occurring in a previous
budgetary period and appearing
in an earlier report.

That information was that there
was “no documentation” available
to show that $385,195.40 released
for “repairs of a 10-unit complex in
Freeport” was, in fact, used for
that purpose.

Current Minister of Housing
Kenneth Russell, appointed to that
position in May, 2007, told The
Tribune on Sunday that the money
“disappeared and police are doing
a full investigation into that.”

But Mr Gibson asked: “If this



“My point is, if they
are losing documents,
why should I be held
responsible? No
permanent secretary
would release any
cheques unless there is
proper documentations.
The PS is the official
accounts officer. It’s
all political.”



Shane Gibson

was addressed last year, which it
rightly should have been because it
was 2005 when it apparently
occurred, why is it being addressed
again in this report?”

He said on Monday that he was
still awaiting a response to his
inquiry, made that morning.

The Auditor General’s Report is
generally considered to be an
objective analysis of the state of
public accounts, carried out by a
department separate to those
departments and ministries whose

accounts are under scrutiny.

The latest report was tabled in
the House of Assembly last
Wednesday. It makes no specific
mention of anyone being respon-
sible for deficiencies in any of the
accounts scrutinised.

Nonetheless Mr Gibson said
based on what he has seen in rela-
tion to the handling of the Min-
istry of Housing’s accounts, he
would question the neutrality of
the report’s findings.

The MP showed The Tribune

Man charged with eight counts of stealing

A 20-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned in a Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday on multiple counts of

stealing.

Diallo Williamson, alias Diallo Colebrooke,
appeared before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in
Court 5, Bank Lane, charged with eight counts
stealing and four counts of causing damage.

Court dockets allege that on Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 18, Williamson, a resident of Barts Road,
while at Carmichael Road stole a car CD player
valued at $150 from a 2004 Kia Carens minivan,
the property of Virginia Bowleg. Court dockets
also allege that Williamson caused damage to a
rear glass of a 2004 Kia Carens minivan valued at

$223.

It is further alleged that on Wednesday, Febru-
ary 18 while at Allen Drive, Williamson stole a CD
player valued at $150 from a 1996 Honda Legend,

the property of Shantell Brown.

Court dockets also state that Williamson alleged-
ly caused $200 in damage to the left window of Ms

Brown’s car.

Court dockets also allege that on Sunday, Jan-
uary 4 while at Golden Gates, Williamson stole a
CD player valued at $150 and $100 cash, the prop-

erty of Raquel Roker.

Williamson pleaded guilty to the charges.

Williamson also pleaded guilty to stealing a car CD
player face and a Cannon digital camera, together

valued at $280, from a 2005 Chevrolet Impala, the

Cooper.

property of Theresa Evans.

He also admitted to causing damage to the right
rear panel of Ms Evans’ car. Additionally,
Williamson pleaded guilty to stealing two DVD
players and $200 in DVDs belonging to Jennifer

It is also alleged that Williamson while at Tall
Pines stole a Sony CD player valued at $200, an
assortment of CDs valued at $60, a bottle of Guc-
ci cologne valued at $40 and a set of floor mats val-
ued at $120 from a 1992 Mercury Cougar, the

property of Lloyd Allen.

Williamson pleaded not guilty to the charge.
The case has been adjourned to May 5.
It is further alleged that on Thursday, January 2,

while at Gladstone Road, Williamson stole a car

distributor cap valued at $900 from a brown 1993
Honda Accord, the property of Frederick Delan-

cy. Williamson pleaded not guilty to the charge and

the case was adjourned to May S.
Williamson was sentenced to a total of one year
imprisonment on the charges to which he pleaded

guilty and was also ordered to receive counselling

while on remand at Her Majesty’s Prison.

‘Soft target’ date for proposed
medical prescription drug plan

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT has a “soft
target” date of July 1 for the
launch of a proposed medical pre-
scription drug plan which would
help persons with "catastrophic
illnesses" afford medication,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
said in the House of Assembly.

If this target date is not met,
government hopes to have the
plan introduced by early October,
he said.

“We are seeking to determine a
date on which that is going to
begin, but right now I think it is
fair to say that July 1 is the target
date for the unemployment bene-
fit and if it is possible, for the med-
ical prescription (plan) to be done
the same time, otherwise our cur-
rent indications are October this
year for the introduction of the
prescription drug benefit,” Mr
Ingraham told parliament while
contributing to the 2008/2009 mid-
year budget debate on Monday.

The prime minister explained
that under the scheme, persons
suffering from chronic diseases —
for example diabetes and hyper-
tension — who are “unable to

afford to keep up the payments
for these medications”, will be
given access to certain drugs.

Mr Ingraham also said the gov-
ernment plans to initiate a pre-
scription drug plan for the elderly
and indigent before the national
drug plan is launched. This will
attempt to address the long wait
times that many in these cate-
gories have had to endure at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
(PMH) pharmacy.

“We are going to seek to do at
an earlier date a specific pro-
gramme to deal with the elderly
and the indigent and that might
come on earlier subject to discus-
sions that will be had by the Min-
istry of Health and others with
the insurance companies.

“Specifically, we want the elder-
ly not to necessarily have to wait
for hours and hours at the
Princess Margaret Hospital and
sometimes find that a particular
medication is not available on that
given date,” he said.

Mr Ingraham also spoke of
plans for a scheme which would
allow eligible persons to fill
monthly prescriptions by pre-
senting a card at a designated
pharmacy.

Leader of opposition business

Me

Wong's AL

a pag ore zl SCT

3d Queen sais Bed
| por ‘3B



in the House of Assembly Dr
Bernard Nottage credited the gov-
ernment's proposed health plans
for the elderly and chronically ill,
but said these barely "scratch the
surface" of the country's health-
care needs.

Speaking to The Tribune after
the morning debate, he said the
former PLP government's nation-
al health insurance plan, which
never came on stream, was a more
comprehensive approach.

"T think any assistance that can
be given to persons who are
chronically ill, or persons gener-
ally, would be welcomed. Prob-
lem is, I am wedded to a much
more ambitious healthcare pro-
gramme which seeks to do more
than provide drugs only for the
chronically ill.

“But I think the more impor-
tant thing is to introduce a pro-
gramme that will minimise the
risk of illnesses — and that's what's
wrong, in my opinion, with the
government's programme.”

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where, in the report tabled last
year on the period 2005/2006, audi-
tors noted that “three payments”
totalling $385,195.40 were released
for the Freeport repairs.

The payments were noted to
have been made on April 20, 2005,
July 1, 2005 and December 16,
2005.

Meanwhile, in the report tabled
last week on the 2006/2007 finan-
cial period, it is again noted that
the sum was released — but this
time in two payments.

“(The government) was so anx-
ious to become political with this
they must have advised (the audi-
tor general) to include it,” alleged
Mr Gibson.

Downplaying the significance of
the auditor’s findings, Mr Gibson
noted that in all such reports
throughout the years those prepar-
ing the document have found they
have been “unable to get certain
documents from certain min-
istries.”

“Tt’s always like that,” he said.

And he repeatedly emphasised
that where documents cannot be
found to verify how funds were
spent, this does not mean that they
do not exist, and he should “not be
held responsible for lost docu-
ments” at the ministry, where he
was minister from 2002 until Feb-
ruary, 2006, when former Killar-
ney MP Neville Wisdom took
over.

“My point is, if they are losing
documents, why should I be held
responsible? No permanent secre-

tary would release any cheques
unless there is proper documenta-
tions. The PS is the official
accounts officer. It’s all political,”
he said.

He added that it would be easy
enough for someone within the
ministry to “hide” a document if
they wanted to “make a minister
look bad.”

“T spoke to the former perma-
nent secretary (Leila Greene) and
she said she explained to them that
these things (records) were at the
Ministry of Housing. Now after
they moved her from Housing, just
so they could portray a certain pic-
ture, all of the records go missing,”
he said.

The most recent Auditor Gen-
eral’s Report highlighted a lack of
internal controls throughout the
public service which have left the
use of public funds open to the risk
of abuse in many instances.

It notes that throughout all
departments and ministries certain
documents required to verify accu-
rately how funds were used were
not available and makes recom-
mendations to tighten accounting
processes.

On Sunday, Minister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell said he
believes points raised in the report
regarding his former ministry’s
accounts related more to “record
keeping than to any malfeasance
or misappropriation.”

A message left for Auditor Gen-
eral Terrance Bastian was not
returned up to press time.






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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

2009 health care debate 1s about to begin

THE UNITED States is on the verge of a
great debate about health care. President
Obama’s announcement of a comprehensive
$634 billion down payment over a decade
has put the issue on the political front-burn-
er.
Unlike 15 years ago under the Clintons,
expectation this time around is that at least
some important incremental reforms are
achievable.

As the haggling and lobbying begin, as
long-vested interests collide, there are many
questions to be resolved. There are also exist-
ing certainties.

With the Baby Boomers’ generation begin-
ning to retire, it is certain that health care
resources will be increasingly pressed. In
2007, the U.S. spent $2.2 trillion on health.
The Congressional Budget Office predicts
that would rise sharply from 16 per cent of the
gross domestic product, then to 25 per cent by
2025.

Much of the health-care dollar is spent on
patients in their final months of life and the 10
per cent of the very sickest account for 70 per
cent of the costs.

It is also beyond question that America
spends more on its health than any other
industrial nation. Despite that expenditure, it
does not rate anywhere near No. | in good
health attained or services delivered. Amer-
icans are not getting fair return on their
investment.

A major factor is that 46 million or so
Americans have no health care insurance,
and about 25 million more have too little to
protect them from bankruptcy and other eco-
nomic penalties, such as losing their homes to
pay medical bills. Obama’s plan is to reduce,
not eliminate, the number of uninsured.
Insuring everyone, according to experts,
would cost an additional $100 billion year, far
exceeding the proposed fund.

Businesses that once opposed national
health-care reforms have now mostly seen
the cost of company-paid insurance for their
employees increase steeply year by year.
Their ability to compete domestically or glob-
ally is seriously impaired. American manu-
facturers on average pay almost 60 per cent
more per hour for benefits than their overseas
competitors. Smaller businesses are unable to
provide any health care for their workers.

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Those who benefit richly from the status
quo — especially pharmaceuticals and insur-
ers — participated in preliminary reform
talks to try to tailor them to their special
interests. The thought is that upgrading health
care coverage is inevitable, given that Obama
has the populist wind at his back.

The details remain to be spelled out by
the White House, but a Congress historically
susceptible to the largesse of lobbyists would
shape the extent of the actual reforms. The
clash between private and governmental
approaches will take centre stage. President
Obama is enhancing government’s role and
pressing private insurers and providers of
drugs and medical devices to reduce costs.

The long-standing arguments over a sin-
gle-payer system (the federal government)
are premature, for it is not part of the presi-
dent’s package.

Single-payer systems are criticised by oppo-
nents as denying their users physician choice
and as inevitably leading to a rationing of
services.

For their part, private insurers are hailed by
supporters for preserving choice without
rationing care as well as delivering greater
efficiencies and lower costs through market
competition.

The debate will surely get very hot even
though Americans since 1965 have had expe-
rience with a limited form of single-payer
system. Its name is Medicare, the health
insurer for seniors.

The argument about governmental ineffi-
ciencies and higher costs are confounded by
the record. Medicare delivers services to its
clients at a saving of 14 per cent of what it
pays for the same services provided by private
insurers.

To help pay for these utterly essential
reforms, it is right to try to squeeze it out of a
bloated and inefficient medical care process
as well as to restore the top tax rate for those
earning $250,000 and more. Given how their
wealth has increased, they can afford it more
than a working poor family of four can afford
the $12,000 a year to buy private insurance.

For the former it is an inconvenience; for
the latter, it is an impossibility.

(This article was written by Harry Rosenfeld
C.2009 Albany Times Union).



Our leaders
need to find
their bearing

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas is in need of
change. We need a sense of
optimism that somehow things
will be different and better and
soon.

Such change doesn’t just hap-
pen. It has to be worked at. And
given the prevailing circum-
stances in The Bahamas, the
effort has to be hard and sus-
tained, demanding of a strong
and moral leadership, capable
of forging consensus, yet will-
ing to take risks in doing what is
right for the country.

It is for such leadership to
which we look to Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham as the
country faces its many prob-
lems, not least of which is the
grave economic crises, a conse-
quence of the global credit
crunch and accompanying
recession.

The Bahamas’ stratospheric
level of criminal violence and
poor outcomes in education are
among the perennial problems
requiring, as they have always
done, urgent attention.

Unfortunately, in the near
two years that Mr Ingraham has
been Prime Minister he has not
displayed the transformational
leadership he had convinced the
majority of Bahamians he was
capable of on May 2, 2007.

The Government’s apologists,
with politically conventional
reasoning, will argue that it has
done rather well, considering

letters@tribunemedia net



our political and economic cir-
cumstance.

The bigger issue, I feel, is
whether Mr Ingraham believes
that The Bahamas is in need of
radical transformation and
whether he is willing to throw
the significant power and pres-
tige of his office to effect such
fundamental change.

If he does, Mr Ingraham has
to look beyond the next elec-
tion and go for broke.

If Mr Ingraham has arrived
at this place, he must begin to
talk sincerely and frankly to the
Bahamian people, outlining a
clear vision for the future and
his path for getting there,
including the difficulties they
will have to endure.

He should tell people, too,
that in the current economic cir-
cumstance, many of his party's
electoral promises cannot be
kept.

To my mind, the mumbo-
jumbo about GDP, GFS, debt
ratios, recurrent expenditure,
etc, while important in the over-
all scheme of things, do not res-
onate with the single mother in
Jubilee Gardens who was laid
off last December and can no
longer meet her mortgage pay-
ments or the cab driver who

yesterday had only three short-
haul fares for the entire day.

Mr Ingraham should not be
afraid to send some of the
under performers in his bloated
administration to the parlia-
mentary back bench and con-
stitute a tight, action-oriented
‘war Cabinet’ to confront this
economic crisis.

He will find that there is
strong political support in the
society if he communicates
effectively and makes the case
that his actions are in the peo-
ple’s interest.

While, as Prime Minister, he
has the major responsibility, the
challenge of mobilising the
Bahamian people to action and
behaviour beyond individual
interests, is not solely Mr Ingra-
ham’s.

It is a job for all of us, includ-
ing the Opposition which must
see its mandate as being beyond
mere carping criticism.

Perhaps not unlike Mr Ingra-
ham, the PLP, with much talk
about its future leadership in
the air, is yet to find itself and
head on a clear visionary path,
post May 2007.

It has failed to articulate any
clear or alternative policy posi-
tions.

Hopefully, it will not be too
long before our leaders find
their bearing.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
February 27, 2009.

Slavery alive and kicking in the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have read articles from time to time about
workers and am in agreement with most of them.

that we have no one to look out for us, including
the “uncle toms” that serve as masters cracking

To set the record straight the problem isnot that day.

Bahamians are against foreign workers, the prob-
lem is that the foreign workers should possess
experience and knowledge to impart with their
counterparts (the Bahamian worker). If this is
not the case then why are they needed — simply

to collect lavish salaries?

The financial institutions are good examples
of top executives with little or no qualifications
work experience in the field is simply a joke. Yet
they obtain work permits, live in expensive homes
and condos, drive the latest model vehicles all at

whips all day long. Their only concern is that
they get their piece of the pie at the end of the

I would think it would be an interesting study to
see what the turn over rate is like at some of
these financial institutions and to hear their rea-
soning for the high rate of turnovers. This has
been going on for years yet some of us pretend

not to be aware because it does not affect us

the company’s expense while making the lives

of Bahamians miserable with their slave mental-

ities.

They get away with this because they are aware

Nassau,

directly. Sadly for the vast majority of the employ-
ees affected, they refrain from speaking out for
fear of being fired — and we talk about slavery
being abolished, do not fool yourself it is alive and
kicking in the Bahamas.

SIMONE BETHEL

February 21, 2009.

An immigration question Bahamians need answered

EDITOR, The Tribune.

While it appears on the sur-
face that our Immigration
Department is doing a good job
at rounding up illegal immi-
grants, one cannot help but

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notice that this seems directed
more towards Haitian nation-
als.

To my understanding a hot-
line has been established to
ensure prompt responses in
assisting with this effort.

In light of the economic con-
ditions in our country today,
and as this affects the entire
Bahamas, it is my view that
Bahamians should be advised
how is it that work permits or

approvals were given to bring
in more than one hundred
workers to participate in the
Michael Jordan Celebrity Invi-
tational.

Do you mean to tell me pro-
visions not be made for at least
50 Bahamians to be given
employment?

EMERALD SMITH
Nassau,
February 20, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

At least 12 major drug trafficking
organisations ‘operating in Bahamas’

International security
forces to meet at
Defence Force Base

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter ;
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

SECURITY forces from the
United States, Britain and i
across the Caribbean will meet }
at the Royal Bahamas :
Defence Force Base this week
in an international effort to ;
stop illicit drug trafficking at
sea. ;
The 25th annual Tradewinds }
exercise, designed to improve i
cooperation and inter-oper-
ability of Caribbean Basin

Partner Nations responding to i

regional security threats, will

involve security forces from 16 :

Caribbean countries, more
than 500 US service members

and the British Royal Marines.

They will meet at the Coral

Harbour base for two weeks of :

training exercises starting
today.

itime interdiction and search
and rescue operations with an
emphasis on command and
control.

Participants will practice
boarding party operations
training, evidence processing

and hazardous material identi- i

fication and handling.
Tradewinds 2009 is spon-
sored by the US Southern

Command (USSOUTHCOM) }
and utilises inceptor boats and :

extensive surveillance suites
provided by the USSOUTH-
COM-sponsored Enduring
Friendship programme.

It aims to successfully train
participants so they may
return to their respective

countries to further train their :

nation’s security forces.

US Marine Corps Forces
South exercise coordinator
Major Landon Hutchens said:
“The goals are to better coor-
dinate partner nations’ search
and rescue maritime interdic-
tion operations, increase mar-
itime domain awareness and
better coordinate end-game

seizure of illicit-trafficking ves- } :

sels that can be used to smug-
gle terrorist, weapons, explo-
sives or narcotics.”

Exercises will focus on mar- }

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

THE United States gov-
ernment has praised the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas in
its efforts to control the ille-
gal drugs trade in the 2009
International Narcotics Con-
trol Strategy Report
(INSCR).

In the report, the US’
Drug Enforcement Admin-
istration and OPBAT esti-
mate that there are 12 to 15
major drug trafficking organ-
isations operating in the
Bahamas.

US Embassy representa-
tive Jeff Dubel said the
report is a good reflection
on the Bahamian govern-
ment’s dedication to crack-
ing down on the illicit trade.

By working with the US
government and participat-
ing in the international drug
interdiction effort Operation
Bahamas Turks and Caicos
(OPBAT), the Bahamian
government seized 1,878
kilogrammes of cocaine,
approximately 12 metric tons
of marijuana, $3.9milllion in
cash, and the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit (DEU) arrested
1,030 people on drug-related

MP voices concern over US
‘protectionist’ legislative measures

THE financial services sector in
the Bahamas is being threatened by
growing “protectionist” legislative
measures in the United States,
Charlotte MP Alfred Sears said.

In the first session of the 110th
Congress, a Bill entitled “Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Act” was sponsored
in the United States Senate by Sen-
ators Levin and Coleman, and then

Senator Obama.

The objective of the Bill is “to
restrict the use of offshore tax
havens and abusive tax shelters to
inappropriately avoid Federal Tax-

ation, and for other purposes.”

Speaking on Monday in parlia-
“The Bill §
places the Bahamas on the initial
list of offshore secrecy jurisdictions
which should be deemed listed by
the Secretary of the Treasury and
subject to penal sanctions. Such
jurisdictions will be subject to a ‘rebuttable pre-
sumption’ that a US person exercised control of
an entity, where he/she directly or indirectly
formed or transferred assets to, was a beneficia-
ry of, or received money or property, or the use
thereof from a trust, formed, domiciled or oper-
ating in an offshore secrecy jurisdiction,” Mr

ment, Mr Sears said:

Sears said.

The former attorney general said that the Bill
also authorises the Secretary of the Treasury, in
consultation with the Secretary of State, the US
Attorney General and the chairman of the Fed-
eral Reserve, to take punitive measures against
such jurisdictions, including prohibiting any cor-
responding accounts or payable-through accounts

Ft



Alfred Sears

by US financial institutions or the
use of accredit, debit or charge card
in the United States.

Mr Sears called these legislative
measures “threatening” and recom-
mend that the FNM government
take measures now to protect the
financial services sector rather than
wait until the Bahamas is black-list-
ed again by the United States and
the OECD.

“T recommend that the govern-
ment of the Commonwealth of the
| Bahamas lobby the United States
to stop the passage of the Stop Tax
Haven Abuse Bill by the Unites
States House of Representatives and
Senate and to educate the Unites
States policy makers, media and
public of the true nature of the
Bahamian financial industry and the
collective commitment of the
Bahamas to fight money laundering
and the financing of terrorism,” he said.

He also suggested that the government pro-
mote the convening of a global forum on money
laundering and terrorist financing, under the aus-
pices of the United Nations, leading to the for-
mation of a global treaty.

“The government, in partnership with the pri-

vate sector, should invest in a policy research

Group hoping to organise
three annual trips to Cuba

A LOCAL group is hoping
to organise three annual trips
to Cuba to familiarise Bahami-
ans with the reality of life in
that country.

The Bahamas Cuba Friend-
ship Society (BCFS) said it
would like to raise funding for
the trips, which will be under-
taken “with a view to meeting
with comrades in Cuba”.

The group said it wants to
send three standing members
of the BCFS along with two
invited guests, who it intends
to familiarise with “Cuban real-
ity as it is live and experienced
by the Cuban people”.

Over the past several years,
sympathetic Bahamians have
largely confined their efforts
to raising awareness of the neg-
ative effects of the US embargo
on the Cuban population and
the plight of five anti-terror-
ism agents, known as the
Cuban Five, who are serving
lengthy jail sentences in the

However, in a statement
issued yesterday, the BCFS
said it wants to branch out and
become active on a number of
other fronts.

The group said it wishes to
showcase the work being done
by Cubans in the Bahamas,
highlight Bahamians who have
been educated in Cuba, and
increase awareness about
Cuban assistance to the people
of the Bahamas, particularly
those in need of eye
surgery.

The group also wants to
forge ties between academic
institutions in the two coun-
tries, perhaps leading to
teacher and student exchanges
— “all done with the goal in
mind of fostering mutual
understanding and respect
between the Cuban people and
their Bahamian counterparts”.

The BCFS said its aims are
to promote friendship, co-oper-
ation and solidarity between
the people of the Bahamas and
Cuba, focusing its efforts on:

¢ The exchange of informa-
tion about the respective coun-
tries

e¢ Public education in the
Bahamas about the history,
geography and current politi-
cal situation in Cuba

¢ The promotion of Cuban
culture in the Bahamas

¢ Support for Cuban sover-
eignty and self-determination;

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and opposition to interven-
tionist policies

¢ The provision of material
assistance to the Cuban people
when and where needed — for
example for reconstruction in
the aftermath of natural disas-
ters.

The group’s statement said:
“The Bahamas Cuba Friend-
ship Society upholds and
defends the right of the Cuban
people to determine their own
destiny and to freely pursue
their own social, economic and
cultural development.

“BCFS defends the right of
the Cuban people to self-deter-
mination and national sover-
eignty. This is an inalienable
right. BCFS strongly condemns
the economic, financial, eco-
nomic and cultural blockade
imposed by the US government

for over 48 years on the Cuban
people, which violates the most
elementary principles of human
rights and international law
and is a direct challenge to
Cuba's right to self-determina-
tion and national sovereignty.

“BCFS opposes the use of
immoral tools such as threats
of military intervention, trade,
cultural and scientific embar-
go, starvation diplomacy, and
the promotion of disinforma-
tion about Cuba.

“BCFS believes that Cuba's
commitment to the basic rights
of health, education and social
welfare set an example to the
world and that it has demon-
strated a high moral and
humanitarian character in its
international support and soli-
darity to other third world
countries.

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facility, at the College of the Bahamas, to conduct
economic intelligence monitoring of the global
economy and trends, to assess their impact on
the financial services industry in the Bahamas
and propose policy options to improve the com-
petitiveness of the Bahamian jurisdiction as a
centre of wealth management,” Mr Sears said.

offences throughout 2008.

Mr Dubel said: “Drug
busts are a success story. It
means we have got intelli-
gence working together.

“The more drugs we inter-
cede is actually a good sign,
it shows that everyone's
working together and hope-
fully they will be prosecut-
ed and they will stop.”

John Moppert, head of the
US Embassy's narcotics
affairs sector, commended
these efforts and said the US
remains committed to stem-
ming the flow of illegal drugs
through the Bahamas and
the United States.

He said priorities for 2009
are to rebuild the Defence
Force base in Great Inagua
as the severe damage caused
by Hurricane Ike in Septem-
ber forced US troops to tem-
porarily relocate their heli-
copters to Turks and Caicos,
leading to a slow-down in
operations last year.

Mr Moppart said: “We
agree that Great Inagua is
in a strategically important
location for not only nar-
cotics but also illegal immi-

gration, so we want to go
ahead and rebuild Great
Inagua and increase capaci-
ty.

“The first step is going to
be to get the base back up
and running and doing
repairs to the damage done
by Hurricane Ike.”

Further plans are in place
to station a Haitian police
officer in Great Inagua and
integrating Creole speakers
in the DEU to develop
information on Haitian drug
traffickers transiting the
Bahamas.

Mr Moppert said: “Much
of the illegal migration from
Haiti up to the Bahamas
comes through the windward
pass and up through Great
Inagua, so we have been dis-
cussing the possibility of sta-
tioning a Haitian officer at
Great Inagua for the last
couple of years.”

He also commended the
Bahamian government for
taking the initiative to turn
away all wooden-hulled
Haitian sloops passing Great
Inagua in the southern
Bahamas.

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OCU SS cy
NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica) will visit Freeport and
Nassau from 9 to 11 March 2009 and will be available to discuss any individual problems
concerning passports and nationality issues.

Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent by courier direct to the
High Commission in Kingston.

FREEPORT: MONDAY, 9 MARCH
10:00am to 4:00pm (Venue to be determined)

NASSAU: TUESDAY, 10 MARCH and WEDNESDAY, 11 MARCH

10:00am to 4:00pm at British Honorary Consul’s residence in Winton

Appointments for all 3 days can be booked by calling the
Honorary Consul in Nassau on 324-4089.



br? 111

aso O88 |



IndiGO is better for your business

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Former AG claims US agents ‘illegally
approaching local financial institutions’

Detention Centre

FROM page one

abuse by guards and insuffi-

cient food.

Reports reaching this news- :
paper yesterday from the cen- }
tre were that the detainees are }

still striking.

Senior Deputy Director }
Roderick Bowe, who did not }
participate in Monday’s tour }
of the facility, said social ser- }
vices officials and clergymen }
went with Director of Immi- }
gration Jack Thompson and }
Commodore Clifford Scavella }
to act as independent eyes and }

ears.

“The purpose of the visit :
was to confirm that the Deten- ;
tion Centre is being operated
with transparency and that we }
are not running the detention :
centre as was previously }

claimed,” said Mr Bowe.

“They looked at the living
conditions and the state of the }

centre itself.”

This comes after requests
from The Tribune in the wake }
of detainee’s claims — which }
prompted international human
rights organisation Amnesty }
International to call for an }
independent investigation into ;
conditions at the centre — that }

the media be allowed access.

Last week Minister of State ;
for Immigration, Branville }
McCartney suggested that if :
an investigation by an inter- }
national body were to be per-

mitted, Immigration “would
want other persons to be }
there” as “these international }
reports tend to be aeeMely
wrong.”

Mr Bowe said he was
unable to comment on the |
findings of those who toured }

the facility. “I wish I could but i

I wasn’t there,” he added.

Asked which social services ;
personnel and clergy accom- }
panied officials on the visit, :
Mr Bowe said another officer :
would provide names later in ;
the day. No follow up calls
were received up to press time. }
A message left for Mr Thomp-
son, who was said to be in i

office, was not returned.

Meanwhile, Mr Bowe also }
confirmed that 114 illegal :
Haitian immigrants residing at }
the facility were repatriated }
onboard a Bahamasair 737 jet }
to Port-au-Prince, Haiti yes- i

terday morning.

The Haitians had been sent
to the Detention Centre after }
aseries of recent daily round- }

ups.

FROM page one

as they perceive the Mutual Legal
Assistance Treaty (MLAT) mecha-
nism between the Bahamas and the
United States of America for inter-
national co-operation as being too
time-consuming and cumbersome,"
Mr Sears, MP for Fort Charlotte, said
Monday during the 2008/2009 mid-
term budget debate.

Mr Sears, who resumed private
legal practice with his firm Sears and
Co folowing the PLP’s election
defeat in 2007, also recommended
that government "make an official
protest against the practice by agents
of the United States and other
OECD member countries who
undermine the legal process in the
Bahamas by secking to induce
Bahamian financial institutions and
professions to break the law.”

He added: "If the government
were to protest now, it would give
the Bahamas a tactical advantage or
the moral high ground, rather than
raising them when the Bahamas is
on the defensive or the object of an
imminent threat."

The MLAT is legislation that
enables US regulators and legal
authorities to seek information
through the Attorney General's
Office relevant to criminal cases they
are investigating through the
Bahamian court system and court
orders.

Other than MLAT, US authori-
ties can also request tax-related
information on specific criminal and
civil cases through the Tax Informa-
tion Exchange Agreement (TIEA)
with the Bahamas.

The Bahamas Financial Intelli-
gence Unit (FIU) also exchanges

information with its foreign counter-
parts, and there is regulator-to-regu-
lator co-operation between the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas and the
Securities Commission and their
counterparts, like the US Securities
and Exchange Commission (SEC).

This network gives a measure of
protection against “fishing expedi-
tions" to local financial institutions
and their clients.

In January, Mr Sears warned Tri-
bune Business of dire consequences
for the local financial sector if US
prosecutors were continually allowed
to circumvent existing treaties
between the two countries.

"The rule of law, which is one of
the major attractions for operating
in the Bahamas, will be eroded if US
agencies, with impunity, can come
into this jurisdiction, bypass the
treaty arrangements and just ignore

the comity between the Bahamas and
the US, flouting their own laws as
well as the laws of the Bahamas."

He urged government to make a
"very strong diplomatic protest"
against the practices.

In an interview with Tribune Busi-
ness, Mr Laing branded Mr Sears'
assertions as "irresponsible."

He said the country had received
only eight to 11 requests for tax
information from the US since the
FNM assumed office in 2007. Mr
Laing said his ministry had not
received any complaints from the
Bahamas Financial Services Board
(BFSB), other industry associates or
any Bahamian-based institutions.

Mr Laing also said government
"expected" to sign more MLATs
with other countries, especially
Brazil, considering the various
requests that had come in.

Principal calls for
police probe into fight |

FROM page one

The altercation — which
involved several 13/14-
year-old students, two
police officers and some
non-students — followed
closely behind another con-
frontation last Friday.

He said he had been led
to believe the fight
stemmed from threats
issued by people living at
a property near the school
to some male L W Young
students — and that the
off-duty officer who got
involved is related to those
who issued the threats.

“There’s a house on the
side of the school here
where the fence is broken

Pinder's Funeral Home
Seredor Hyon Mearare
PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570) 993-1351 * CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

A Memorial Service

for the late

Sylvia

Cole-
Tierney

will be held Wednesday, March 4, 2009,

4:00pm at

Pinder's Funeral

Home

Palmdale Ave., Palmdale, Rev. Charles
Sweeting will be officiating. She is
survived by her two brothers, Robert and

Charles (Chuck)

Hall:

two sisters,

Theodora (Teddy) Albury and Joan
Graham; two sister-in-law, Jean and June
Hall; one brother-in-law, Gary Albury; two
granddaughters, Jessica and Wendy Guy:
four nephews, Jock and Richard Hall,
Stuart and lan Graham: six nieces, Valerie
and Hope Albury, Dawn Walkine, Linda
Hall, Sheila Scott and Erin Paniagua.



and during the lunch hour
these guys (the non-stu-
dents) will always be talk-
ing to the girls (students).
So it may be over a girl,”
he added.

This comes after witness-
es quoted in yesterday’s
Tribune said that a gunshot
was fired by a passing
police officer when boys
attacked an off-duty offi-
cer who had allegedly tried
to break up a knife fight
near the school on Monday
afternoon.

A witness claimed the
off-duty officer held down
one of the students, who
had been brawling ona
side road, shortly before
other boys in the group ran
off and returned with rocks
to attack him.

But contrary to initial
reports, Mr Mullings said
he had doubts that the off-
duty officer was acting for
the reasons claimed when

he got involved.

“T don’t know if he came
to break up the fight. lam
led to believe that (the
non-LW Young students
involved in the fight) may
be his family or some rela-
tives or something,” he
said, adding that he heard
students were attacked by
local residents before they
retaliated.

The principal said he has
not had a chance to speak
at length with the boys he
knows to have been
involved — both of whom
were taking part in a track
and field day at the school
yesterday — but he has
heard from one that “some
threats were sent out from
the neighbour that some-
thing would happen after
school that afternoon.”

Mr Mullings said he
thinks police should have
taken those living on the
nearby property in for

questioning following
the alleged fight last Fri-
day.

“They should’ve taken all
of those people into cus-
tody,” he said.

Asked whether he thinks
the police investigation has
been comprehensive
enough so far, the princi-
pal said he “do(esn’t) think
so.”

The school official said
he was seeking to contact
police yesterday to discuss
the matter, but calls had
not been returned.

Speaking with The Tri-
bune before Mr Mullings
made his comment, police
press liaison officer Walter
Evans said that no-one has
yet been taken into custody
in connection with Mon-
day’s incident.

Messages seeking a
police response to the prin-
cipal’s concerns were not
returned up to press time.

ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE

is accepting applications for the
2009-2010 Academic Year

anish

One person - to teach Spanish to grades seven through ten

Social Studies/History

One person - to teach Social Studies and History to grade eight to twelve. Experience in
preparing for external examinations is a requirement.

English Language

iterature

One person- to teach English Language/Literature to all grade levels. Experience in
preparing candidates for B.J.C and B.G.C.S.E examinations is required.

Two person - to teach English Language/Literature at the Grade seven and Eight levels.

Chemistry

Two persons - to teach Chemistry to grades nine through twelve. The applicant must
have experience in preparing students for external examinations.

One person - to teach General Science and Chemistry to all grade levels. The applicant
must have experience in preparing students for external examinations

Physical Education

One person - to teach Physical Education to all grade levels. The applicant must be
available to coach varsity teams in the core sports.

Mathematics

Three persons - to teach mathematics to all grade levels. Experience in preparing
students for external examinations (BJC, BGCSE & SAT) is a requirement

One person -
The applicant
examinations

must

to teach General
have

Biology

experience

science and Biology to all
in preparing

grade levels.
students for external

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited university and a Teacher’s
Certificate. Two letters of reference, copies of all degrees and certificate, and
two passport size photos should be submitted. A commitment to the values of
Catholic, Benedictine education is expected of our teachers. Only those persons who
have no difficulty with the Roman Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply. Please sub-
mit application and required documents to:

The Principal
St. Augustine’s College

P.O. Box N-3940
Nassau, Bahamas



Detectives
visit Sean
Connery in
conmmection
With civil suit
FROM page one

friend, Jean René — a
French businessman — £3
million to help him buy
property in the early 1970s.

But when the two men’s
friendship ended around
1978, Sir Sean is alleged to
have sold off the assets his
friend offered to him as
security for the loan at a
“massive profit”, equivalent
to him having charged a
1000 per cent rate of inter-
est, according to The Daily
Mail.

Those assets reportedly
included diamonds, shares,
and property on the French
Riviera.

Mr René’s_ family
launched legal proceedings
to recover the profits from
the sales after he died in
Switzerland in 2002.

They claim, according to
the newspaper, that the
sales proceeds far exceeded
the value of the original
loan extended to Mr René
by Sir Sean.

A spokesman for the
actor’s Los Angeles-based
publicist said on Tuesday:
“We are looking into it.
Neither Sir Sean nor any-
one else is aware of it.”

British banker's
hid to acquire
GBPA appears
to have ended

FROM page one

their side of the deal.

Mr Fleming had reached
an agreement to acquire the
Hayward trust’s stake —
whether it is 50 per cent or
75 per cent is still being dis-
puted in the courts — in the
GBPA and its Port Group
Ltd affiliate amid the
intense ownership battle
that was being fought with
the late Edward St
George’s estate.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, though, said last
year that Government
would now allow Mr Flem-
ing to acquire 100 per cent
of the GBPA. Mr Fleming
had harboured hopes that
he could persuade the St
George estate to sell to
him, too.

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 7





Anger on Abaco over an alleged
attempt to stop crime rise report

PEOPLE in Abaco are furious over a
police attempt to stop the press reporting
a dramatic rise in crime on the island.

Supt Sean Neville-Smith has allegedly
told the local newspaper that it can no
longer carry crime reports “because they
reflect badly on the police.”

The publishers of The Abaconian,
David and Kathy Ralph, are unhappy
about the ban and are calling on readers
to phone in their crime news.

Readers, meanwhile, are angry at what
they see as a blatant attempt to keep
important information away from the
public.

The police attempt to gag the press
follows a worrying upsurge in crime in
Abaco and growing disgruntlement over
the police force’s effectiveness there.

Residents are concerned that the
recent kidnapping of a foreign investor,
the mugging of a well-known local
woman, and a spate of boat thefts will
turn away the yachtsmen and second-
home owners who form the backbone

Commission of inquiry

of the island economy.

Now they are calling for a town meet-
ing to thrash out the crime situation -
and demand better policing.

Locals are particularly alarmed by the
attempted kidnapping of a would-be
investor during the island’s Junkanoo
parade last month.

Money

The investor sought police help after
being released from the boot of his car
by a thief who demanded that he extract
money from an ATM machine in Marsh
Harbour.

When the investor told a policeman
of his plight, the officer allegedly replied:
“T can’t help - I’m here to patrol the
Junkanoo parade.”

Meanwhile, the kidnapper fled into
the crowd.

The investor had earlier been threat-
ened with a machete before being forced
into the trunk of his own car.

A local told The Tribune last night:
“This man was in Abaco to buy a resort
property. It’s hardly the kind of thing
that will encourage him to return.”

In the past, Abaco has been relatively
crime-free. But rising unemployment
and a tightening economy have pushed
up the theft rate.

Hardest hit have been visiting yachts,
some valued at $100,000 or more. On
more than one occasion, boats have
arrived in Abaco one day and been
stolen the next.

But the mugging of well-known resi-
dent Lily Sands, who is in her seventies,
has really brought home the changing
crime scene on the island.

Ms Sands was accosted by two peo-
ple with guns who forced her into her
own home in a normally quiet residential
area of Marsh Harbour.

Then they locked her in a closet before
stealing money and other items.

A resident said: “Boats are disap-
pearing like crazy. We have to get help

in Turks and Caicos

up here. We must get Nassau’s atten-
tion because this crime is going to kill the
economy.”

Mr and Mrs Ralph, who have been
running The Abaconian since 1993, said
they had been told by Supt Neville-Smith
that they would not be allowed any more
crime reports.

Backlash

“The people of Abaco are very upset,”
said Mrs Ralph. “We are going to get a
big backlash against this.”

Meanwhile, locals say a public meeting
is required to air grievances and call for
a police response to their concerns.

While Abaco enjoyed full employ-
ment, crime was low.

“But lay-offs will trigger an upsurge in
theft, they believe.

Messages left for Supt Neville-Smith
with officers at the Marsh Harbour
Police Station yesterday afternoon were
not returned up to press time.

Is 2005 our then prime min-
ister, Perry Christie, was
invited to open the new legisla-
tive building in the Turks &
Caicos Islands. He said the new
parliament would be "the forum
within which bold and innovative
ideas will be crystallized" by
Turks Islanders.

Well, he was certainly right
about that. In fact, the ideas were
so bold they led straight to a
British-appointed commission of
inquiry into corruption and mis-
rule that handed a "wide-rang-
ing" preliminary report to the gov-
ernor this past weekend. The rec-
ommendations will not be pub-
lished immediately, and a final
report is not due until the end of
April.

The commission was appointed
last year to inquire into corrup-
tion among members of the legis-
lature. It is led by a British jurist
(Sir Robin Auld), who took part
in the 1967 inquiry into casino
gambling in the Bahamas. Four
weeks of public hearings at the
Regent Palms Hotel ended on
February 11, and the commission
is now working on its report in
London.

But Chief Minister Michael
Misick saw the writing on the wall,
and did not even wait for the
interim report. He announced his
resignation in mid-February —
with effect from the end of this
month. And in a party meeting
this past Saturday, former immi-
gration minister Galmore
Williams was elected to lead the
People’s National Party, and will
presumably take over the pre-
miership next month.

How different are the present
circumstances from those halcy-
on days of 2006, when a slew of
PLP ministers led by Perry
Christie partied down at Misick's
celebrated wedding to sexy Amer-
ican starlet LisaRaye McCoy at
the ultra-luxurious Amanyara
Resort. The best man at the wed-
ding was none other than Obie
Wilchcombe, a cousin of Misick's,
who was then our minister of
tourism.

Misick became chief minister
in 2003, when the PNP won 8 out
of 13 seats in the legislature, and
he led the party to an even bigger
victory in 2007, almost wiping out
the once dominant People’s
Democratic Movement. When he
was first elected his declared
worth was only $50,000, but Mis-
ick told the commission recently
that he now had assets of $23 mil-
lion plus debts of $20 million.

Information about Misick's
finances did not come easily.
According to the commission's
chief counsel, Alex Milne, "when
he gave evidence (the premier)
was at times obtuse, unforthcom-
ing and verging on the trucu-
lent...The total that we could not
explain going into (his) bank
accounts was $10.4 million, which
is a lot of money.”

Misick also vastly inflated his
official remuneration. The cost of
the premier's office rose from
$170,000 in 2003 to over $4 million
today, a sum which includes a big-
ger salary than that of the British
prime minister. But those free-
spending days are over. Misick
himself acknowledged recently
that he was "mired in allegations
of corruption and scandal so
deep" he had no choice but to
step down.

The premier has criticised the
commission proceedings as "far-
reaching and intrusive" — a fact

confirmed by the recent banning
on Radio Turks & Caicos of a
controversial song by local per-
former Jack Nasty. The song fea-
tures a chorus that says "Every-
body's Business Getting Out",
and reports are that the CD has
been flying off the shelves since
the commission hearings.

"Everybody's — business"
includes testimony from Lis-
aRaye, who is engaged in a high-
ly publicised and stormy breakup
with Misick that has involved
threats and allegations of assault
by both parties. McCoy filed for
divorce last year after Misick was
accused of raping one of her girl-
friends, although Misick claimed
the sex was consensual. He also
fathered two children with a mis-
tress during his short-lived mar-
riage to McCoy.

"Everybody's business" also
includes the failure of government
ministers to declare their finan-
cial interests as required by law;
the corrupt sale of crown land to
foreigners; and millions of dollars
in payoffs to the governing party
from private interests — much of
it stashed in secret bank accounts
thousands of miles away in Belize.

These accounts disbursed large
amounts of irregular cash to the
premier and other top PNP lead-
ers with no accountability what-
soever, according to evidence giv-
en at the commission. In one case
over $100,000 was paid by the
PNP to LisaRaye's California-
based hair stylist. And Misick
himself received millions from the
party and directly from investors.

In closing remarks to the
inquiry, chief counsel Milne
described the PNP as "a multi-
million-dollar enterprise, bought
and paid for by a small number of
rich individuals, many if not most
of whom appear to have pros-
pered under the current govern-
ment. It acts, in effect if not by
design, as a conduit for large
amounts of unregulated and unde-
clared cash from individuals to
politicians."

Milne also showed that Misick
had borrowed many millions
more from a variety of individuals
and investment companies seek-
ing to do business in the territory,
with no evidence of any effort to
repay the money. "Copious evi-
dence” was also produced that
cabinet decisions were riddled
with conflict of interest.

"The Commission has seen evi-
dence of massive sums of money
being injected into a small political
economy which cannot possibly
be justified by the number of vot-
ers. The party accounts appear to
operate as a slush fund for the
senior members into which they
could apparently dip at will.”

Only about 36,000 people live
in the Turks & Caicos, which has
less than 7,000 voters spread
across 15 constituencies. Most
government revenue comes from
land sales and from the 200,000
tourists who visit each year. The
TCI is a self-governing British
colony that used to be adminis-
tered by the Bahamas, until we
became independent in 1973.

"Money has, in my submission,
distorted and corroded the politi-
cal fabric of this territory," Milne



continued. “It has undermined
the claim of the current adminis-
tration to any form of legitimacy
or respect. Small-scale graft has
been extrapolated to monstrous
proportions by an influx of monies
previously not seen. The road
back from this state of affairs will
be difficult.”

However, the commission is not
a police inquiry and its hearings
were not a trial. While its final
report will make recommenda-
tions to the British authorities, it
will not decide what happens to
individuals or to the territory as a
whole. "Those tasks will fall to
those who come after us," accord-
ing to Sir Robin, the commission
chairman.

"The most I can do...is to rec-
ommend further and more search-
ing investigations by the police
and/or some other public enforce-
ment body."

Nevertheless, Anthony Hall, a
Washington-based lawyer and
columnist with roots in both the
Bahamas and TCI, says the com-
mission has uncovered evidence
“of what amounts to a criminal
syndicate masquerading as a local
government. And this should
compel Sir Robin to make emer-
gency recommendations to miti-
gate our financial and reputation-
al losses, to say nothing of the
growing contingent liabilities of
the British government."

Meanwhile, the TCI Free Press
(published by Bahamian Gilbert
Morris, who has a résumé a mile
long on Wikipedia and claims
once to have been a Carmelite
monk), speaks glowingly of the
strong Bahamian connection
among the defence team hired by
Misick:

"Edward Fitzgerald QC has
tried some of the most stupen-
dous cases in recent British his-
tory and is married to an aristo-
crat; Maurice Glinton is the Cam-
bridge-educated intellectual
heavyweight; Raynard Rigby is
from an old line family from the
educational establishment of
Turks and Caicos and a potential
future prime minister of the
Bahamas; and Damian Gomez is
the son of the former archbishop
and himself a former supreme
court judge.”

Most observers see three pos-
sible outcomes from the commis-
sion's report — criminal prosecu-
tions, a general election, or sus-
pension of the constitution. This
last is something the British were
forced to do once before. In 1985,
former chief minister Norman
Saunders and his development
minister Stafford Missick, (a one-
time official of the Bahamas Cen-
tral Bank), were arrested in Mia-
mi on drug trafficking and bribery
charges. They were both convict-
ed and imprisoned in the US. A
revamped constitution was
restored two years later.

Tough Call cannot understand
why there is so little coverage in
the Bahamian media of this sala-
cious political drama that is
unfolding almost right before our
eyes — especially when there are
said to be as many Turks Islanders
living in the Bahamas as there are
remaining in TCI itself. After all,
there is nothing like a commis-







Michael Misick (AP)

sion of inquiry to throw light on
secret government, and transcripts
of the hearings are easily avail-
able online.

According to the Internet mail-
ing list, Turks & Caicos Informers,
" Alex Milne, counsel to the com-
mission, has stated that ‘Mon-
ey...has undermined the claim of
the current administration to any
form of legitimacy or respect.’ The
64 thousand dollar question then
is: What does one do with an ille-
gitimate government?"

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com



O In brief

search will end
for NFL players
off Florida coast

m CLEARWATER, Fla.

THE Coast Guard called off the
search Tuesday for two NFL players
and a third man lost at sea off the
Florida coast after their boat cap-
sized during a fishing trip, according
to Associated Press.

The Coast Guard said it doesn’t
believe anyone is on the surface of
the water and the search would end
at sundown. Still missing in rough,
cold water were Oakland Raiders
linebacker Marquis Cooper, free-
agent defensive lineman Corey
Smith and former South Florida
player William Bleakley.

“We're extremely confident that
if there are any survivors on the sur-
face of the water that we would have
found them,” Coast Guard Capt.
Timothy Close said.

Hopes were raised Monday when
rescue crews found a fourth man
who was aboard, 24-year-old for-
mer South Florida player Nick
Schuyler, who managed to stay with
the boat for more than 36 hours
after it overturned Saturday evening.

Prospects for survival were begin-
ning to look more grim throughout
the day.

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THE TRIBUNE



Climate change impact

FROM page one

discuss the Review of the Eco-
nomics of Climate Change in
the Caribbean (RECCC) at
the Breezes hotel in Cable
Beach.

As experts focused on the
economic impact climate
change will have on the
Bahamas they stressed how
long-term strategies must be
enacted before the highly neg-
ative impact of climate change
becomes irreversible and the
Bahama islands become unin-
habitable.

ECLAC director of the sub-
regional headquarters for the
Caribbean Neil Pierre
explained the RECCC aims to
present preliminary findings of

the affect of climate change at
December’s Climate Confer-
ence in Copenhagen when the
United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate
Change (UNFCCC) parties
will meet for the last time to
develop a new protocol before
the Kyoto Protocol runs out in
2012.

He said: “Immediate action
must be taken to address cli-
mate change and the longer
the action is delayed the
greater the costs in the future.

“Tf we delay by a decade of
two we will have a situation
that climate change becomes
unavoidable or irreversible and
we will reach a point of no

Bank of The Bahamas

IN TERNATIOWNAL

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE FOR THE SIX-MONTH PERIOD
ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008 WITH QUARTERLY AND YEAR

OVER YEAR COMPARISON

Aanagement is cautiously comforted with the strong financial results

osted for the review period. In this regard Total

iimost 9%, multiple times that of GDP, to $31.5 million while Net
Although the latter figure
epresents a fall-off when matched against the result for the same
eriod last year, it represents 62% of total Net Income for fiscal year
'008. Fotal Shareholders’ Equity stood at a healthy level $94 million
lemonstrating a capacity to absorb considerable business risk.

ncame settled slightly above $5 million.

aiven the current economic weakness and indications that such
‘onditions will persist for at least the remainder of the year, the
haintenance of sound prudential standards will continue as the key
ocus in all strategic initiatives. We are confident that the bank will
rogress through the challenging economic conditions and continue

9 promote stakeholder value.

Ince again we thank our directors for their sound stewardship, the
management and staff for their strong commitment to the continued
rowth and development of the bank and our customers and

hareholders for the confidence they continue to
1stitution.

ff
fthuwy
Paul J. |. McWeeney
Managing Director
BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements
For the Period Ended December 31, 7008

BANK OF THE BAHASDAS LIMITED

USAUDITED COSSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

{Expressed ims Rohomian dollirs|



December 31, June Ml,
204 ZINKE
ASSETS

Cash axl due from banks 5 Uh LS et] 5 1136S 73h
Accom with The Cenoral Bank of The Bahamas 44 354), 400 23 201 55
Investments 27,440,700 25,325 00M)
Lins sil aches CUomers, net S48 460 Bet S22 TUL ST
Accrued imerest receivable Th, 0G S845
Prepaid expenses aml other aeects 9741 024 4,527,770
In eenent panoply 4741, 700 ee |
Intangible nssets, net 393 242 7D S95
Fixed assets, nel 5 4 O47 §,242.957
Chetan liabilities ander apceyimets.,

guaninices and betters of credit 1 Sb BAS ts CR

MoTAL 45

LIABILITIES
Deposits irom customers and banks 5
Bonds puavalk:
Mortgage backed bods

Choques.and other tems in transit 11,866,182 11, 56-4432
Acton: payable and ether liahilities SARL U4 4b Sg
Deferred loan fees JARS OLE 2415
Interest payable on bonds 40a S76 FIG FER
Chividends puyalske pre ference shares 253 $00 $62 Su)
Acceplances, puaramtoes are letters of credit 4 SU Ae 4 OS 5H

Teen! liabilities
EQUITY
Share caguital

Share premium 23 S87 ot 28,587 36h
Treasury shames (30,24) (30244)
Retained camings J6933 746 eS

Total equity
TOTAL 5

BHASK OF THE BAH AALAS LIMITED

USA OPTED COONS CLI DATION INTEREIM ISOCOME STATEMENT

For the three and sig onthe ended Cescenber 31, Jie
eva bh cumpanatives for the three ara es, receih pote craked Beccersber 31 2007
CP aprpeend op Fain ppg dake



Taree Menthe
ia hey
SET INTEREST ASDMOTHER DaccHal
bites rues ¥ A143 1
beers! cytes tase Te Pec ie lay
herd Dice Deco TILT Pores
Lose nei peowision forlnan keumce 25.073 M3 Tah
it oon rece after cd peor eon Gor bean beovers TO Babe Td ee
Chhor Gankia? lenge SKLa 744 Laat Aol
Sat Eeveiec a8 er
QOS INTEREST EXPENSES naa thi 5 pei
227 [MOONE 4 SIBLE & 37 ea 3
ARKIBHIS PER SHARE C4LOULATEM
SET INCOME 5 TIMI F Le 5
UEPERESCE SARE ON IDES OS (280 Sun i281 2
VET INCOME AVAILABLE TC
COOMA SHAREHOLDERS 4 ase oF EAT AI0 4
VPAXGHTED A FRLACIE SLUMBER OF :
CON GM SHARES Pet LY eet OL
ARMIPHIS PER SHARE mir a #18 4

TH F1R,255 i

592002 B36 5
[7.000100
20.0001 000

hale | AOT

JD 44

U4 25h JSS

THR AIRIS5 = §

return.”

Addressing the impact in the
Bahamas is increasingly press-
ing as 80 per cent of the coun-
try’s land mass is within 1.5
metres of sea level, tempera-
tures are rising at a rate of up
to 4.5 degrees Centigrade per
100 years, a rate which could
double if no action is taken,
and the increasing frequency
and intensity of tropical storms
due to climate change threat-
ens the delicate balance of life
on the low-lying islands.

Mr Rolle explained how
severe flooding and storm
surges could force communi-
ties to relocate, and mangroves
should be cultivated to protect



Revenue grew by

place in this fine

Th, 144151

530, 1 68900
17 1
DO OCH

642,240 3h

M1364 Seal

1 IG 315
T3144 1

Pee

Shc Mianiha
ima eT
16MM 4 Sr
yas 1 7e Ihara he
MI Hamas
S01 pel 7 Ae
[aaa USA
475 IR 4073 404
[ka Be) hese
Lit 1 197 2h]
ALO & B23) fot
2011070 4 BEL aS
S47 Sir (Sb2 Say
1dc3T 4 LAR ITT
ne 1238 it
wie 4% 1b

coastal areas across the coun-
try from shore erosion, loss of
land and the contamination of
fresh water supplies.

The mangroves also protect
75 per cent of juvenile fish
species threatened by rising
sea temperatures, storms and
overfishing, and therefore the
Bahamian economy.

He added: “Coral reefs will
continue to suffer and we can
also expect the migration of
fish further north with a rise
in sea temperature which will
again impact tourism.”

Mr Rolle said government
must now strengthen coastal
monitoring, introduce energy
efficient technology, develop
sustainable tourism, encourage
cruise ships to use desalination
plants for fresh water, and

enforce land use regulations
and building codes to help pre-
vent irreversible damage.

And environmental laws to
improve energy efficiency,
water management and imple-
ment a climate change policy
are in progress, Mr Rolle said.

BEST Commission director
Philip Weech said although
government has accepted the
reality of climate change and
its present detrimental impact,
there is a need for a national
energy policy to increase effi-
ciency and diversify the use of
energy sources from wind, sun
and sea.

The cost of such long-term
plans could set the government
back $500 million over the next
15 years or more, but Mr
Weech said it is crucial for

Bahamians to view the invest-
ment in terms of its long-term
goals as the country’s geo-
graphic vulnerability is
enhanced by its total depen-
dence on food and oil imports.

He said: “Climate change is
a death sentence for small
island states.

“Tn all likelihood it will
cause some of the basic chem-
istry that sustains the Bahamas
to change, and if it changes we
will no longer continue to
grow, we will start the process
of erosion.

“Tt threatens the very basic
fabric of our ecosystems. If our
coral reefs disappear, the basic
fisheries resources we depend
on will disappear and our
islands could become unin-
habitable.”

(Expreseacd in Bahartinain dolls)

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

For the six months encksd December 31, D008
wath compel fives for the six month period caded December 31, 20007

Share Share Treasairy Retained

Capital Premium Shares Earnings Total
Bakines at Fuly |, 20007 2 reported § D340 5 IRSA FS I § BST 8 OT O44
Deferred Fees adjustment - - - (3.10 474) (3008 4754
Balance at July 1, 20M) es restabed + WS STR SEES) SMES SU Te
Met incon for the pericedl 6,251,f22 45 O25 1 22
Sale of ineasury shana BOT KS ny as
Dividends om preference

shears (Sl Sa) (Sel SO)

Dividends - a “ (2,435 357) (2495, 8)
Bakinee a Desens 3), ET 5 SHO S| FRAT AeA OS (HAS) & T4245 RT) O&O 68499
Balance at July 1, 2064 £ US o0o § Jae ee 8 (44) § eo 8 Sa
Met inecarriee . S011 70 5.011 170
Dividends i pre lire: (552, Sh) (352, Sah
Dividends (2,495, 357) 2495, 1)
Balance ot December 31, ket £ So 8 TAT Sd) See Sein Soo

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

(Expressed in Bahamian Dollars}

Period Emailed Period Ended
December 31, December 31,
DOE 207

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income S
Adjustments bor:
Nom (ash tienes

S,0llgT7 8 §

G25 1422

264] 14a] ee
06,86, | 10h
(26,373 0457)
12.033,930
(15.957T,1 76)

(460 HBT)
(10,740, 539395
13,138,541
3536042

Chamas in operating assct and labilitics
Incrense in loans ond advances ip customers, net
Increase in deposits [ram customers and banks

Net cash from (provided by) operating activities

CASH FLAWS FROM INVES TIS ACTIVITIES
Purchase of investments
Proceeds from the maturity of invesiments
Additions to investment property
Purchase of fixed assets
Net cash used i IV Cstine actives

(2,117,700) -
. TOO

(659,200) -
(435,576) (1187410)

na, 2500

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Dividends on preference shares
Dividends paid
Decrease in inderest payable
Net cash from financing activities

(562 S00)
(249533)
(34/12)
(3,092 55)

(2224248)

(362,500)
(2405 587)

(305 TRF

Mel oncrease in cash and cash equivalents 3990 749

Met cash amal cash equivalents al the beginning of the periced 167,127,389

(Cash and cash equivalents at the ered of the period 144 585,141 12R20 506

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
Selected Explanatory Notes to the Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

For the period ended December 3], 2008
(Expressed in Bahamian Dollars)

1. General Information

Bank of The Bahamas Limited (the “Bank™), trading as Bank of The Balkans
International is meorporated under the laws of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. The Bank is licensed under the provisions of the Bank and Trust
Companies Regulations Act 2000, The Bank is also licensed as an authorized
dealer pursuant to the Exchange Control Regulations Act. The Bank is holder of
a broker dealer license from the Securities Commission.

The Bank's shares are publicly traded and listed on The Bahamas International
Securities Exchange. The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas
and The National Insurance Board own 31% of the issued shares. The remaining
shares are owned by approximately 4,000 Bahamian shareholders, The Banks
head office is located at Claughton House, Shirley and Charlotte Streets, The
registered office is located at Sassoon House Shirley Street, Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, The Bahamas,

z. Significant Accounting Policies

The significant accounting policies and methods of computation followed in the
preparation of these interim consolidated financial statements are the same as
those followed in the preparation of the annual consolidated financial statements
of the Bank for the year ended June 30, 2008, The annual consolidated financial
slatements are prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards (“IFRS”) and under the historical cost convention, as modified by the
revaluation of certain financial assets and liabilities and investment property that
are required to be remeasured at estimated fair value.

3. Cash and Cash Equivalents
200K 2007
Cash § 6,736,122 & 68e7 900
Due trom Banks ho 338 359 107,197 737
Cach and due from Banks Oh TO G8! 113,863,736
Account with The Central Rank of The Bahamas 48 390 dh 453,261 653
144,555, 141 167,127 389
TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 9






RESULTS from day one of
the Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association’s
16th Annual Junior High
School Track & Field Meet
yesterday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track & Field Sta-
dium:

GIRLS 100 METER DASH BAN-
TAM (U13)
1. 498 Henderson, Janiece 12

$.C. McPherson18 13.74
13.58 1.4

2.511 Rolle, Whitney 125S.C.
McPherson18 13.66 13.64
1.4

3. 84 Deveaux, Shonte 12 Ana-
tol Rodgers 14.77 = 14.37
1.4

GIRLS 400 METER DASH BAN-
TAM (U13)

1.517 Williams, Jeorjett 12 S.C.
McPhersoni8 1:10.69

1:10.88

2. 495 Ferguson, D'Shanta 12
S.C. McPhersoni8 1:12.10
1:16.11

3. 325 Marc, Maxine
Nash 4 1:15.42

12 H.0.
1:17.37

GIRLS 1200 METER RUN BAN-
TAM (U13)

1. 434 Moxey, Taja
Young 1

2. 76 Bowe, Michaela
tol Rodgers

3. 92 McPhee, Charis
tol Rodgers

12 LW.
4:41.86

12 Ana-
4:47.56

12 Ana-
4:56.89

GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
BANTAM (U13)
1. C. McPherson (18) Sharks
55.74*
511 Rolle, Whitney 12
2) 517 Williams, Jeorjette 12
) 495 Ferguson, D'Shantay 12
) 498 Henderson, Janiece 12
2 a Reeves (8) Raptors

3

4

2

59.

1) ie Sturrup, D'Andrea 12
2) 154 Rahming, Brittia 12

3) 158 Rolle, Tara 12

4) 130 Adderley, Shantiqua 12
3L. W. Young (1) Eagles
1:01.23

1) 439 Ramsey, Rashai 12

2) 423 Goodman, Dondra 12
3) 422 Fernander, Taeliyah 12
4) 426 Johnson, Takessa 12

GIRLS LONG JUMP BANTAM
(U13)

1. 498 Henderson, Janiece 12
$.C. McPherson18

4.338m NWI 14-02.50

2. 84 Deveaux, Shonte 12 Ana-
tol Rodgers 3.81m
NWI 12-06.00

3.511 Rolle, Whitney 125S.C.
McPherson18 3.75m
NWI 12-03.75

GIRLS SHOT PUT (6LBS) BAN-
TAM (U13)

1. 158 Rolle, Tara 12 C.H.
Reeves 8 7.58m
24-10.50

2. 154 Rahming, Brittia 12 C.H.
Reeves 8 6.74m
22-01.50

3. 2 Alleyne, Ashley 12 AF.
Adderley 15 6.21m
20-04.50

BOYS 100 METRE DASH BAN-
TAM (U13)

1. 61 Lloyd, Fred 12 AF.
Adderley 15 14.07 13.59
0.3

2. 116 Hutchinson, Jervan 12

Anatol Rodgers 13.88
13.64 0.3

3.55 Forbes, Shaquan 12 AF.
Adderley15 14.27 14.11
0.3

BOYS 400 METER DASH BAN-
TAM (U13)

1. 64 Lullu, Jeffrey 12 ALF.
Adderley15 1:11.38 1:12.43
2. 448 Bastian, Carlton 12L.W.
Young 1 1:09.87 1:13.08
3.57 Gibson, Qyemah 12 AF.
Adderley15 1:09.35 1:13.57
BOYS 1200 METER RUN BAN-
TAM (U13)

1.51 Cooper, Tony 12 AF.
Adderley 15 4:24.88

2.205 Ramsey, Adrian 12
C.H. Reeves 8 4:26.89
3. 182 Dawkins, Navado 12

C.H. Reeves 8 4:27.10

BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
BANTAM (U13)
1. C. H. Reeves (8) Raptors
57.61
1) 214 Varance, Vernon 12
2) 185 Ferguson, Keiano 12
) 171 Altidor, Edwin 12

) 179 Bethel, Floyd 12
A. F. Adderley (15) Tigers
21
4 Lullu, Jeffrey 12
7 Gibson, Qyemah 12
5 Forbes, Shaquan 12
1 Lloyd, Fred 12
D. W. Davis (17) Pit Bulls
8.82
) 261 Charlton, Ajalon 12
) 266 Duncombe, Brandford 12
)2
)

moog

3
4
2
5
j
2
3
4
3
5
j
2
3
4

73 Jean Paul, Gary 12

BOYS LONG JUMP BANTAM
(U13)

1. 57 Gibson, Qyemah
Adderley 15

NWI 14-05.75

2. 105 Bodie, David
tol Rodgers

NWI 14-00.50

3. 611 Jean-Louis, Jeff 12T.A.
Thompson 4.04m
NWI 13-03.25

12 AF.
441m

12 Ana-
428m

GIRLS 100 METER DASH
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 438 Pearce, Byronece 14
L.W. Young 1 13.59
13.77 -0.8

2. 161 Smith, Ashanti
Reeves 8 13.88
0.8

3. 169 Whymms, Quetel 13
C.H. Reeves 8 13.94
14.01 -0.8

14 C.H.
13.83 -

GIRLS 400 METER DASH
JUNIOR (U15)

1.101 Williams, Spring 14
Anatol Rodgers =‘ 1:03.36
1:04.24

2. 35 Shaw, Gabrielle 13 AF.
Adderley15 1:08.55 1:07.02
3. 521 Young, Walternique 13
S.C. McPhersoni8 1:10.55
1:08.61

GIRLS 1500 METER RUN
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 577 David, Johnique

A. Thompson

13 T.

5:33.40@

2. 147 Johnson, Anastasia 14
C.H. Reeves 8

5:52.82@

3. 584 Jean-Louis, Lawand 13 T.
A. Thompson

5:58.80@

GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
JUNIOR (U15)
1. C. H. Reeves (8) Raptors
1.69 55.06
1) 147 Johnson, Anastasia 14
) 145 Ferguson, Roneka 14
) 169 Whymms, Quetel 13
) 161 Smith, Ashanti 14
L. W. Young (1) Eagles
59
408 Bethel, Dwaniquea 13
438 Pearce, Byronece 14
406 Bastian, Carlrinique 14
428 Knowles, Garnisha 14
H. 0. Nash (4) Lions

6.39
) 33
) 32

5.
)
)
)
)

2
3
4
2.
5
1
2
3
4
3
5
1) 331 Neely, Juliette 13

2) 326 Markland, Leshantie 13
GIRLS HIGH JUMP (3'8")
JUNIOR (U15)

1.162 Smith, Lydesha 14
C.H. Reeves8 1.45m@ 4-
09.00

2. 406 Bastian, Carlriniq 14 L.W.
Young 1 1.40m@ 4-07.00
3. 13 Deveaux, Lashantah 14
A.F. Adderley 15 1.35m@ 4-
05.00

GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K)
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 137 Cooper, Cynteses 13
C.H. Reeves 8

19.60m@ 64-04

2.151 Moxey, Jasmine 14
C.H. Reeves 8

18.92m 62-01

3. 507 Miller, Angel 14 S.C.
McPherson18 17.33m
56-10

BOYS 100 METER DASH
JUNIOR (U15)

1.59 Johnson, Lorman 13 AF.
Adderley 15 12.23 11.91
3.1

2. 356 Dames, Xavier 14H.0.
Nash 4 12.39 11.93

3.1

3. 188 Gibson, Keron 14C.H.
Reeves 8 12.62 12.37
3.1

BOYS 400 METER DASH
JUNIOR (U15)

1.549 Riley, Ashley 145.0.
McPherson18 55.22

54.12@

2. 398 Tinker, Ronaldo 144.0.
Nash 4 56.34 57.16@
3. 187 Gibson, Adrian 14C.H.
Reeves 8 59.26 57.61@
BOYS 1500 METER RUN
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 631 Young, Darren 13T.
A. Thompson 5:03.20

2.170 Almonor, Moses 14
C.H. Reeves 8 5:09.26

BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
JUNIOR (U15)

1. C. H. Reeves (8) Raptors
50.53

1) 188 Gibson, Keron 14

2) 193 Lightbourne, D'Andre 13
3) 189 Gibson, Keshon 14

4) 187 Gibson, Adrian 14

2 8. C. McPherson (18) Sharks

BAHAMAS FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION

WME er)
3

Bears FC

Caledonia FC
Cavalier FC

Sharks FC

Baha Juniors FC
Dynamos FC

OnE Ry] N

ite

Sunday, March 1, 2009

1:00 pm FC Nassau vs Caledonia FC 2:4

Se Co
yh OR AA g
Ooanhnn a=

RCCL ese MT ES0)

Goalscorers: Marcus Trail (Caledonia) 2, 24, 64th; Frank Negri (Caledonia)40th; Jonathon Shiel Rolle
(FC Nassau) 16th; Omar Kettle (FC Nassau) 79th

3:00 pm Dynamos FC vs Baha Juniors FC 3:1

Referee: D. Opsaint

Goalscorers: Mackinson Amichette (Dynamos) 22nd; Adam Miller (Dynamos) 36th; Jocelyn Gedeus
(Dynamos) 66th; Courtney Barnett (Baha Juniors) 6th:

ee Pa ay

Sunday, March 08, 2009 (Knock-Out Cup)

1:00 pm Bears FC vs Cavalier FC

3:00 pm Baha Juniors FC vs Caledonia FC

AS tem ey VRS a) 1d 8)

1. Lesley St. Fleur
2. Marcus Trail

3. Odaine McCallum
4. Duckerno Exlias
5. Andre Carey

6. Frank Negri
Femelle cualacce

8. Chedlet Pierre
9. Alex Thompson
Ome DI ela a

Beceem

er U-olen me
CEN
Sharks FC
Bie leSe me
Orolo came
Dynamos FC
Sharks FC
Bears FC
Orolo ume

GossA DAY ONE RESULTS PF

50.56
1) 555 Scavella, Leonardo 14
2) 542 Mott, Cornell 14

) 525 Cambridge, Derek 14
) 531 Ferguson, Keith 14
H. Nash (4) Lions

3
4
3
50.7

1) 384 Nairn, Laquan 13

2) 389 Resis, Cliff 13

3) 398 Tinker, Ronaldo 14

4) 356 Dames, Xavier 14
BOYS LONG JUMP JUNIOR
(U15)

1.534 Gibson, Rashad 14
$.C. McPherson18
5.68m* NWI 18-07.75
2. 531 Ferguson, Keith
McPherson18

NWI 18-06.00

3. 354 Coakley, Xavier
Nash 4 5.1
NWI 17-00.00

148.0.
5.64m@

13 H.0.
8m

BOYS HIGH JUMP (4'3")
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 354 Coakley, Xavier

Nash 4 1.
07.25

2.59 Johnson, Lorman
Adderley 15

5-04.50

3. 465 Huyler, Brandon 14
L.W. Young 1

1.46m 4-09.50

3. 452 Butler, Audley
Young 1

09.50

13 H.0.
7im* 5-

13 ALF.
1.64m@

14 L.W.
146m 4-

BOYS DISCUS THROW (1K)
JUNIOR (U15)

1. 621 Saunders, Marvin
A. Thompson
27.94m@ 91-08
2. 69 Rolle, Rashad
Adderley 15

88-05

3. 394 Swaby, Randon 14

14T.

13 AF.
26.94m@

H.O. Nash 4 24.64m
80-10

BOYS JAVELIN THROW
(600GMS) JUNIOR (U15)
1.187 Gibson, Adrian 14 (C.H.
Reeves 8 32.31M@
106-00

2. 605 Desir, Vilner 147. A.
Thompson 26.66m
87-06

3. 180 Campbell, Tareves 14
C.H. Reeves 8
26.37m 86-06

GIRLS 100 METER DASH INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)

1. 596 Strachan, Athoniqu 16 T.
A. Thompson 12.16

12.05 4.0

2.514 Stubbs, Roniqua 14
S.C. McPherson18 13.46
13.28 4.0

3. 311 Demeritte, Tekevia 15
H.O. Nash 4 13.40

13.29 4.0

GIRLS 400 METER DASH INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)

1. 340 Sands, Burdeca 15
H.O. Nash 4 1:07.82
1:08.46

2. 501 Joseph, Olivia
McPhersoni8 1:07.18
1:08.82

15 S.C.

3. 505 Marley, Tashan
McPhersoni8 1:10.10
1:10.91

148.0.

GIRLS 1500 METER RUN

eee Zz.



INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1. 329 Moncur, Khadijah 15
H.O. Nash 4 6:19.00
2.133 Butler, Raunice 14C.H.
Reeves 8 6:24.03

3. 419 Duquesne, Ysabel 16
L.W. Young 1

6:42.85

GIRLS 300 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1. 17 Ferguson, Ashley
Adderley15 55.41
2. 327 McKay, Danielle
Nash 4 58.54

3. 412 Carter, Samitra
Young 1 56.13

16 AF.
54.13

56.19
15 LW.
56.83

GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1. S. ©. McPherson (18) Sharks
54.64

1) 508 Minus, Raygene 15

2) 503 Knowles, Richea 15

) 505 Marley, Tashan 14

) 514 Stubbs, Roniqua 14

T. A. Thompson

5.05

) 588 McKenzie, Anastacia 16
) 591 Newton, Glendira 15

) 573 Cox, Jaynell 15

) 596 Strachan, Athonique 16
H. 0. Nash (4) Lions

6.

) 327 McKay, Danielle 15

) 311 Demeritte, Tekevia 15
) 322 Kemp, Randya 15

) 310 Curtis, Regine 15

GIRLS LONG JUMP INTERMEDI-
ATE (U17)

1.419 Duquesne, Ysabel 16
L.W. Young 1

4.45m NWI 14-07.25

2.508 Minus, Raygene 15
S.C. McPherson18

441m NWI 14-05.75

3. 302 Anderson, Shavanes 15
H.O. Nash 4 4.08m
NWI 13-04.75

GIRLS SHOT PUT (8LBS) INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)

1. 304 Bastian, Samantha 16
H.O. Nash 4 8.26m 27-01.25

2. 565 Armbrister, Shanae 15 T.

A. Thompson 6.91m
22-08.00

3. 520 Young, Nadia 15 S.C.
McPherson18 6.85m

22-05.75

GIRLS JAVELIN THROW

(600GMS) INTERMEDIATE
(U17)

1.310 Curtis, Regine 154.0.
Nash 4 26.01mM@
85-04

2. 304 Bastian, Samantha 16
H.O. Nash 4 20.32m
66-08

3. 133 Butler, Raunice 14C.H.
Reeves 8 18.40m
60-04

BOYS 100 METER DASH INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)
1. 530 Farrington, Davain 16

S.C. McPherson18 11.64
11.61@ 0.5

2. 202 Perry, Shawn 15 C.H.
Reeves 8 12.14 12.08
0.5

3. 547 Rahming, Alexander 15
$.C. McPherson18 12.19
12.20 0.5

TTD en ww wT

aams 7 aw mw 7

MURANO

15 H.0.



BOYS 400 METER DASH INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)
1.172 Ambrose, Jayson 15

C.H. Reeves 8 56.16

56.04

2. 272 Jamison, Julio 15 D.W.
Davis 17 56.63 57.26

3. 390 Riley, Alex 15H.0.
Nash 4 57.66 57.38

BOYS 1500 METER RUN INTER-
MEDIATE (U17)

1.545 Neymopur, Clenero 15
$.C. McPherson18
4:53.99

2. 539 Lafleur, Lopez
McPherson18

3. 629 Williams, Edward
A. Thompson

15 S.C.
5:01.42

16T.
5:06.34

BOYS 400 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1.195 Marshal, Andre 15C.H.
Reeves 8 1:07.18 1:06.83
2. 626 Sturrup, Jermaine 14 T.
A. Thompson 1:11.97
1:08.18

3. 186 Gale, Raymond 15
C.H. Reeves 8 1:09.58
1:09.63

BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1. S. ©. McPherson (18) Sharks
47.61
1) 540 Major, Paul 15
2) 530 Farrington, Davaine 16
) 544 Newman, Donovan 15
) 547 Rahming, Alexander 15
2 C. H. Reeves (8) Raptors
8.00
) 196 Martin, Shantwon 15
) 202 Perry, Shawn 15
) 195 Marshal, Andre 15
) 172 Ambrose, Jayson 15
T. A. Thompson
14

3
4
4
1
2
3
4
3
49,
1) 610 Jacques, Ricardo 14
2) 626 Sturrup, Jermaine 14
3) 624 Storr, Jeremy 16
4) 606 Ferguson, Samuel 16

BOYS TRIPLE JUMP INTERME-
DIATE (U17)
1. 396 Sweeting, Ricardo 15

H.O. Nash 4 11.34m
NWI 37-02.50

2. 272 Jamison, Julio 15 D.W.
Davis 17 11.33m
NWI 37-02.25

3. 62 Lockhart, Kenrico 15 AF.
Adderley 15 10.54m
NWI 34-07.00

BOYS DISCUS THROW (1

1/2K) INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1. 608 Hanna, Christopher 16 T.

A. Thompson 24.01m
78-09

2. 208 Rolle, Sidney 15C.H.
Reeves 8 23.16m

76-00

3. 532 Ferguson, Richard 15
S.C. McPherson18

22.00m 72-02

BOYS HIGH JUMP (4'8")
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1. 451 Burrows, Nicholas 15
L.W. Young 1

1.64m 5-04.50

2. 624 Storr, Jeremy
Thompson

5-02.50

3. 482 Sweeting, Kendal 16
L.W. Young 14

J1.59m 5-02.50

16T.A.
1.59m

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

ohnson pleased with performance

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE getting eliminated
in the first round of the Inde-
pendence Cup last week in the
Dominican Republic, Taureano
‘Reno’ Johnson said he was still
pleased with his performance.

“T was very impressed with my
performance because I moved
up in weight just for this tour-
nament as a part of my training
to build up my strength for the
upcoming games,” said Johnson,
who fought as a middleweight
instead of the welterweight.

“Nobody likes to go to a tour-
nament to lose, but I used this as
a part of my training to get my
strength going into the upcoming
World Games.”

Loss

Johnson, who won the
Bahamas’ first medal at the
championships when he secured
the bronze in 2007, lost 12-7 to
Willy Medina from the Domini-
can Republic in what was con-
sidered a hometown decision
by coach Andre Seymour.

“My performance, I was very
pleased with it,” Seymour said.



GSSSA

athletes off

to fast start
FROM page 11

Danielle McKay came the
closest in 56.19.

“It was good. I enjoyed
it,” said the 15-year-old
ninth grader, who success-
fully defended her title. “I
prayed to God and I knew
that I could do it.”

Andre Marshall of CH
Reeves made his debut in
the intermediate boys 400
hurdles. He ran 1:06.83,
compared to Jermaine Stur-
rup of TA Thompson, the
runner-up in 1:08.18.

“It was good. I had to
pray before I started since
this was my first time,” said
Marshall, a 14-year-old ninth
grader. “I asked God to let
me win this one.”

Another exciting series of
events was the 400.

In the bantam girls’ one-
lapper, Jeorjette Williams of
SC McPherson clocked
1:10.88 and Jeffrey Lullu of
AF Adderley carted off the
boys’ crown in 1:12.43.

Williams, an 11-year-old
grade seven student, said she
just wanted to get the race
finish.

“My coach told me to go
out hard in the first 100,
relax on the 150 and then
pick it up at the end,” she
stressed. “I think I did fairly
good. I was very pleased
with my performance.”

Lullu, another 11-year-old
seventh grader, said the
competition was stiff, but he
was determined “to win,”
even though he got some
stiff competition.

Spring Williams of Ana-
tol Rodgers was never chal-
lenged as she sped around
the track to win the junior
girls’ 400 in 1:04.24. Ashley
Riley of SC McPherson did
likewise in the boys’ one-
lapper in 54.12.

“Tt was great, but I knew I
could do better because I’m
in a track club,” said
Williams, a 14-year-old
member of the T-Bird Fly-
ers. “When I hit the 200, I
was tired.”

Noted 13-year-old Riley:
“T was a little nervous going
into it, but when I realized
what I could do, I just went
out there and ran. It was my
best performance.”

In the intermediate girls
division, Burdece Sands of
HO Nash (1:08.46) held off
Olivia Joseph of SC
McPherson (1:08.82) to win
her one-lapper.

“T felt it was kind of
tough, but I really went out
and did it,” said the 14-year-
old eighth grader. “I really
didn’t have anything left, so
I was glad I pulled it off.”

And Jayson Ambrose of
CH Reeves didn’t waste any
time in circling the track to
snatch the intermediate
boys’ title in 56.04, well
ahead of DW Davis’ Julio
Jamison (57.26).

“It was good. At first, it
was hard, but when I got on
the back stretch, it got easi-
er. When I got to the 200
and then the 100, I just
cruised home,” said
Ambrose, a 14-year-old
ninth grader.

“T felt the decision which went
in favour of the hometown boy
should have gone my way.

“But this is the kind of results
that you get when all of the
judges are from the host coun-
try and when you are going up
against a host competitor.”

Coming off his impressive
fifth place finish at the Olympic
Games in Beijing, China in
August, Johnson said he doesn’t
feel that he had a disappoint-
ing showing.

Instead, he summed it up as a
learning exsperience.

“IT made some mistakes, but I
felt I did enough to win the
fight,” he insisted. “But hey,
that’s the way the judges ruled
and I have to accept the deci-
sion.”

Training

After taking a break in train-
ing in January, Johnson said he
managed to get back on track to
get ready for the tournament,
training under the watchful eyes
of Ray Minus Jr, but he didn’t
anticipate performing as well as
he did, even though the scores
didn’t indicate it.

At the end of the Olympics,
Johnson said he was contem-
plating turning professional, but

he still hadn’t made a definitive
decision on his future as yet.

“We still have a lot of things
on the table that we are trying to
work out,” he pointed out.
“Money is something that ’'m
interested in making at this point.

“T haven’t made anything in
the past 15 years, so I think it’s
about time that I start looking
at my career. So whatever come
up and it’s profitable for me, I
will consider it.”

In the meantime, Johnson said
he was preparing to travel to the
Ponto Cup in May in Puerto
Rico, followed by the World
Championships in August and
the Commonwealth Games and
the Caribbean Games, so he had
a busy schedule ahead of him.

Add a major decision to make
as well.

“Nobody knows what will hap-
pen by then, or even tomorrow,”
he said. “I have some decisions to
make and whenever the time
come, I will make it.”

While Johnson got eliminated
in the first round in the Domini-
can Republic, he was joined by
Valentino Knowles, who also lost
his first round match 11-7 to
Ricardo Garfield from the
Dominican Republic.

But Carl Hield went all the
way to the final, losing the gold

MORE GSSSA ACTION

TA Thompson Wilfred Mckinney

CH Reeves Andrean Gidson wins.



medal to Jonathan Baptista from
the Dominican Republic. It was
the first time that the Bahamas
has won a silver medal at the
championships.

Johnson said he was quite
thrilled at the effort of his team-
mates.

Focus

“Carl pulled off a silver
medal. He deserved it. In fact, I
think he deserved the gold
medal,” Johnson said. “He
fought very well, he showed a
lot of technique and that his
training in Cuba has paid off.

“But he also showed a lot of
stickability because he went
through a whole lot. He was
suspended at one time, just like
I was, but we were able to over-
come these trials and still per-
fom very well.”

As for Knowles, who won a
bronze medal at last year’s
championships, Johnson said he
just got a bad break from the
first round, just like he did,
fighting against a hometown
boy.

“But he fought well too. It’s
just unfortunate that we didn’t
win our matches,” Johnson said.
“But you can expect for us to
both be back.”



SC Mcpherson Lorman Johnson leans to the tape for the win over Ho Nash
Xavier Dames.

H O Nash Xavier Coakley jumps.



Taureano johnson

Felipé Major/Tribune staff





SC Mcpherson Rashad Gibson wins .
THE TRIBUNE





8
'



p

PAGE



EDNESDAY, MARCH 4,



11
= F



2009

INSIDE ¢ Local sports news






Raptors take an early lead

CH Reeves holds 52 point
lead over SC McPherson

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER the first day of
competition at the Govern-
ment Secondary Schools
Sports Association’s Junior
High Schools Track and Field
Championships, the CH
Reeves Raptors have surged
out front in their quest to
regain their title.

The Raptors bolted ahead
by 51.5 points at the end of
yesterday’s competition at the

Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium. They have
accumulated a total of 374,
compared to their nearest
rival, the SC McPherson
Sharks with 322.50.

The HO Nash Lions are
surprisingly sitting in third
place with 264, while the
defending champions LW
Young Golden Eagles are in

sixth place with 211.50.

En route to taking their
lead, the Raptors are out front
in only the junior girls (under-
15) division with 75 and the
junior boys (U-15) with 82.

SC McPherson sits in front
of two divisions as well — ban-
tam girls (U-13) with 72 and
intermediate boys (U-17) with
75. HO Nash controls the

INTERMIDIATE girls 100 meters was won by TA Thompson Athonique Strachan.

GSSSA athletes off to fast start

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ANTHONIQUE Strachan
and Davain Farrington both
made it look so easy as they
sped past their rivals to easily
win the titles of the fastest girl
and boy in the Government
Secobdary Schools Sports Asso-
ciation’s Junior High Schools
for 2009.

Competing on the first of the
two-day meet for the juniors at
the Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium yesterday,
Strachan raced to a time of
12.05 seconds while Farrington
stopped the clock at 11.61.

Strachan, a 15-year-old ninth
grader at TA Thompson (for-
merly CC Sweeting Jr), said she
got out to a fast start and was
able to relax the rest of the way.

“T had competition, but they
just wasn’t prepared,” said a
confident Strachan, in repeat-
ing as the sprint champion, well
ahead of second place finisher
Roniqua Stubbs from SC
McPherson, who ran 13.28.

Farrington, a 15-year-old
ninth grader at SC McPherson,
said he didn’t get the drive out
of the blocks that he anticipat-
ed, but he made up for it with
his finish.

“T didn’t have any competi-
tion at all,” said Farrington, who
successfully defended his title

by leaving his nearest rival,
Shawn Perry from CH Reeves,
a distance behind in 12.08.

The junior girls’ century was
won by Byronece Pearce from
LW Young in 13.77, ahead of
CH Reeves’ Ashanti Smith
(13.83) and Quetel Whymms
(14.01).

“Tt was challenging because
the girls worked hard, but I had
to push myself, even thought I
had a cramp,” said the 14-year-
old Pearce, who is in the ninth
grade. “I did it for my team.”

The junior boys’ straight
away was almost a photo finish
with Lorman Johnson of AF
Adderley (11.91) nipping
Xavier Dames (11.93) of HO
Nash.

intermediate girls (U-17) with
89.50 and the AF Adderley
Fighting Tigers pace the way
in the bantam boys (U-13)
with 70.

The first day of competition
featured the finals in the 100,
400, 1200, 1500 and 4 x 100
metre relays on the track,
while there was a combina-
tion of all the events contest-
ed on the field.

Today, starting at 9 am, the
meet will be officially opened,
followed by the final day of
competition of the juniors.

“At first I was scared, but it
seemed like it all slipped away
from me,” said Dames, a 14-
year-old ninth grader. “I
thought I was going to catch
him, but he put up a good per-
formance.”

The bantam boys’ 100 was
also a close one to watch. But in
the end, it was Fred Lloyd of
AF Adderley, who snatched the
title in 13.59 with Jervan
Hutchinson of Anatol Rodgers
settling for second in 13.64.

“It was good. I treid my hard-
est,” said Lloyd, a 12-year-old
seventh grader, who was nurs-
ing a right ankle injury. “He
tried his best. I think I just want-
ed it a little more.”

Noted Hutchinson, an 11-

Coakley leads record-breaking performances

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THREE records tumbled on
day one of the Government
Secondary Schools Sports Asso-
ciation’s Junior High Schools
Track and Field Championships
yesterday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium.

One of them went to HO
Nash Lions’ Xavier Coakley in
the junior boys’ high jump and
in the same division, Rashad
Gibson of the SC McPherson
Sharks inked his name in the
books in the long jump.

The other was posted by the
Sharks’ bantam girls 4 x 100
metre relay team of Whitney
Rolle, Jeorjette Williams,
D’Shantay Ferguson and
Janiece Henderson.

Coakley cleared 5-feet, 7 1/2-
inches to surpass the previous
mark of 5-7 that was held by
Thomas Bellot of the CR Walk-
er Knights from 1997.

“T think it was good. On my
last attempt, I think I got too
excited and I lost concentra-
tion,” said Coakley, who was
hoping to at least match his per-
sonal best of 5-9.

Coakley said he was excited
to erase the record and he was
looking forward to improving
on his performance at the end
of the month when he tries out
for the national team going to
the Carifta Games in St. Lucia
over the Easter holiday week-
end.

In producing the most out-
standing performance on the
field yesterday, Coakley was shy
of the Carifta qualifying mark of
6-4. With a little more competi-

tion, Coakley said he hoped to
achieve that goal at the trials at
the end of the month.

The junior boys’ long jump
record stood at 18-7 1/4, which
was held by Latico Sands of the
Government High Magics from
1993. In another record-break-
ing performance, Rashad Gib-
son soared 18-7 3/4 to replace it.

And SC McPherson’s team
of Whitney Rolle, Jeorjette
Williams, D’Shantay Ferguson
and Janiece Henderson clocked
55.74 seconds to shatter the pre-
vious mark of 56.94 that was set
by AF Adderley back in 1996.

The Sharks ran away from
the rest of the field with their
nearest rivals, CH Reeves Rap-
tors team of D’ Andrea Sturrup,
Brittia Rahming, Tara Rolle
and Shantiqua Adderley com-
ing second in 59.39.

The LW Young Golden

Eagles’ team of Rashai Ram-
sey, Dondra Goodman,
Taeliyah Fernander and
Takessa Johnson came in third
in 1:01.23.

In the intermediate boys’ high
jump, LW Young’s Nicholas
Burrows was hoping to go over
the 6-7 record set by Ricardo
Jacques from the CC Sweeting
Cobras.

But he wasn’t even close, fin-
ishing with a best of 5-4 1/2, a
performance he accepted as he
prepare to celebrate his 15th
birthday on Sunday.

“T thought I did well, but I
was disappointed in myself
because I didn’t break the
record,” said Burrows, who out-
duelled TA Thompson’s Jeremy
Storr and his Golden Eagles’
team-mate Kendal Sweeting,
both of whom cleared 5-2 1/2.

“It’s all good. I did my best.”

Among the highlights will be
the 200, 800 and 4 x 400 final
on the track. The remainder
of the field events will also be
contested.

A total of eight schools are
participating.

Starting on Thursday and
running through Friday, the
GSSSA will stage the senior
segment of the champi-
onships. It’s expected that
another eight schools will be
in action.

¢ See scoreboard for the
complete point breakdown.



year-old seventh grader: “It was
challenging. The competition
was good. The race was good
too.”

Janiece Handerson of SC
McPherson claimed the bantam
girls’ sprint title in 13.58, hold-
ing off team-mate Whitney
Rolle (13.64).

The intermediate girls’ 300
hurdles was won by Ashley Fer-
guson of AF Adderley in 54.13.
She pulled away from the field
and was unchallenged as

SEE page 10





JOHNSON
PLEASED WITH
PERFORMANCE

oh

BNO

HERE’S a look at the point
standings after the first day of
competition at the GSSSA
Junior High Schools Track and
Field Championships yesterday
at the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and field Stadium:

COMBINED SCORES
TEAMS POINTS
CH Reeves 374

SC McPherson 322.50
HO Nash 264

TA Thompson 236
AF Adderley 213

LW Young 211.50
Anatol Rodgers 121
DW Davis 84

BANTAM BOYS (U-13)
SC McPherson 72

CH Reeves 50
Anatol Rodgers 48
LW Young 36
HO Nash 23

TA Thompson 17
AF Adderley 14

DW Davis 9
JUNIOR GIRLS (U-15)
CH Reeves 75
LW Young 55.50
HO Nash 37.50

SC McPherson = 31
TA Thompson 29
AF Adderley 25
Anatol Rodgers 17

DW Davis 3
INTERMEDIATE GIRLS (U-17)
HO Nash 89.50

SC McPherson 72.50

TA Thompson 56

CH Reeves 46

LW Young 36

AF Adderley 31
Anatol Rodgers 7
DW Davis 6

BANTAM BOYS (U-13)
AF Adderley 70

CH Reeves 48
Anatolrodgers 42
DW Davis 20
TA Thompson 19
LW Young 19
SC McPherson 14
HO Nash 4

JUNIOR BOYS (U-15)
CH Reeves 82
HO Nash 66

TA Thompson 63
SC McPherson 58
AF Adderley 44
LW Young 21
DW Davis 12
Anatol Rodgers 7

INTERMEDIATE BOYS (U-17)
SC McPherson 75

CH Reeves 73
TA Thompson 52
LW Young 4A
HO Nash 44
DW Davis 34

AF Adderley 29

Tal Hg

Rea
FISH FILLET
SANDWICH

ey


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



from invasive species

EVERYONE can help protect our country from inva-
sive species. What can you do to stop these sneaky
species? Prevention is the best cause of action!

Plant a native tree!

By becoming aware of what the species look like and
how they spread, we can make better choices in the types
of plants to grow and spread in our yards.

The government of The Bahamas has asked all Bahami-
ans to plant and register native trees as a part of the goal
of planting one million trees locally before the end of
2009.

Visit www.bahamasmtc.com for details.

REMOVE INVASIVE PLANTS
Growing fruits and vegetables in our gardens and asking
our local nurseries for only native plants is a great start.

BLUE LAGOON ISLAND
— There is a silent war going
on in The Bahamas, one that
leaves countless animals and
plants dead and others home-
less. This war has been waging
for decades and now new
invaders are joining the fight
to take over our beautiful
Bahamas, looking to steal pre-
cious land, water and resources
from us. These fearsome
pirate-like invaders — called
Invasive Species — quickly
establish themselves as the
dominant species and can
destroy our native ecosystems,
human health, and ultimately
all native life within The
Bahamas. If we are not pro-
active, these environmental
buccaneers could steal more
than just a few acres of land
or sea.

Dolphin Encounters — Pro-
ject BEACH, the non-profit
arm of the natural marine park
on Blue Lagoon Island, Ninth
Annual Marine Education
Poster Contest will focus on
invasive species in The
Bahamas. With the theme
“Pirates of the Caribbean —
Invasive Species in The
Bahamas,” this year’s compe-
tition invites students through-
out the country to learn more
about the invasives that are a
threat to our ecosystem and to
express their thoughts through
poster art.

“The Bahamas is a beautiful
country and if invasive species
spread and destroy our envi-
ronments, soon much of the
plant and wildlife that is unique
and special about The
Bahamas may be lost,” said
Annette Dempsey, Director of
Education at Dolphin Encoun-
ters. “Invasives are incredibly

Another step is to eradicate any and all invasives whenev-
er possible.

When we uproot and destroy these thieves we can limit
how fast they continue to spread and hopefully save some
native organisms.

LEARN ABOUT LIONFISH

When it comes to the lionfish, this fish can and should
be netted or speared whenever seen in the water. Once
the dorsal and pelvic spines are removed they are quite
edible and delicious! By encouraging Bahamians to learn
how to prepare this fish, we can start to decrease their
numbers in our oceans.

Spread the word.

Tell your family and friends and spread the word: let’s
save our native plants and animals and let’s save our coun-

try!

+ Thompson Bird

a
as]
4
9
al
—
=
O
=
Tm

Bernard Rd - Mackey St

Ends Saturday, March 7



British American Financial

British American Financial “BAF” is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Bahamian entity BAB
Holdings Limited. BAF recently celebrated its second year as a 100% Bahamian owned entity
having been acquired by the Bahamian Group during February 2007.

Established in 1920, British American Financial provides a full range of insurance and
investment services, including life & health insurance, mortgages, financial and retirement
planning, annuities, mutual funds and pension plans. The Company has three offices in Nassau at
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British American Financial is not related or affiliated in any way whatsoever with any other
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In celebration of our second anniversary as a fully Bahamian Company, we are pleased to
announce our offering of free financial consultations, along with weekly financial seminars to our
clients and the public at our Independence Drive Headquarters every Friday until the end of April
2009, The Company extends a special invitation to members of the public whorecently experienced
job losses and hardship as a result of the downturn in the economy.

Please direct any questions on this statement to Mr. I. Chester Cooper, President & CEO
via email: ccooper @ babfinancial.com or Tel: 242-461-1003,





\ British
b9"t American

FINANCIAL

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501

MORTGAGES * MUTUAL FUNDS ¢ LIFE INSURANCE * HEALTH INSURANCE
ANNUITIES & PENSION PLANS * FINANCIAL PLANNING & INVESTMENTS





destructive to native ecosys-
tems. We encourage students
to learn about them and to tell
us their concerns.”

The Poster Contest is open
to all students residing in The
Bahamas, aged Kindergarten
through Grade 12. Entry is
free.

A panel of judges recognised
for their work in the marine
environment will select the
winners. Winning entries will
be prominently displayed
throughout The Bahamas in
recognition of the students’
efforts to help protect our
beautiful Bahamas.

Prizes for the competition
have also been generously
donated by vendors who share
a concern for our marine envi-
ronment including: Dolphin
Encounters, Bahama Divers,







: 4 .
MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURI

ir

Barefoot Sailing, Pirates of
Nassau, Blackbeard’s Cay, Stu-
art Cove’s, Sea Island Adven-
tures, Island World Adven-
tures, Paradise Dive Charters,
Flying Cloud, Seahorse Char-
ters, and Powerboat Adven-
tures.

“Unfortunately The
Bahamas has its fair share of
invasives,” adds Tanya Moss,
Education Coordinator at DE
— Project BEACH. “One
example is the Scaevola plant,
also known as the Hawaiian
Seagrape or White Inkberry.
With its lush green leaves and
quick growth rate, this invader
is a very popular landscaping
plant.

“As it rapidly spreads, the
Hawaiian Seagrape creates
thickets along our coastlines,
out-competing and killing our

a




S ——

TY Tommy Turnquest cuts the ribbon at the commissioning ceremony of the fire

Ten hms] Poster contest focuses on
invasive plants and animals

THE LIONFISH’S venomous
dorsal and pelvic spines are
fatal to potential predators and
hazardous to divers, snorkelers,
fishermen and beachgoers. Evi-
dence found in their stomach
contents has revealed that Lion-
fish are feeding on small fish
and crustaceans, including baby
lobster, crabs and snapper.

native plants such as Sea Oats,
Sea Lavender, Blue Inkberry,
Mangroves and numerous oth-
er plants in our country. With-
out these native plants to sta-
bilise the beach and prevent
erosion, there is no telling the
effect it may have on our
native Bahamian wildlife such
as birds, crabs, lizards or our
fish nurseries. If not removed,
the Hawaiian Seagrape may
take over our mangroves and
wetlands. The poster compe-
tition teaches students about
invasives, what they are and
their negative effect on our
environment. We look forward
to receiving entries and pro-
viding students with the oppor-
tunity to express their
thoughts.”

B TO OBTAIN FREE
ENTRY FORMS AND
RULES, a comprehensive fact
sheet about the theme of the
competition visit www.dolphi-
nencounters.com in the Edu-
cation section; call Dolphin
Encounters-Project BEACH
at 394-2200 extension 303; send
an e-mail to education@dol-
phinencounters.com; or fax
your request to 394-2244.

Entry forms can also be
picked up at the Dolphin
Encounters booth located at
the Paradise Island Ferry Ter-
minal. Deadline for entries to
be received is March 31.



p
F _
j j
|

*

truck to the Royal Bahamas Police Force in Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, on Sunday, March 1. Pictured from left are
Acting Deputy Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade; Head of the Fire Division Superintendent Jeffrey Dele-
veaux; director of SEEP and international consultant on disaster management Shaun Ingraham, and Superintendent
of Police for Eleuthera Theopholis Cunningham.

South Eleuthera residents’
govt collaboration praised

m By LLONELLA GILBERT

TARPUM BAY, Eleuthera -
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest commended
local and winter residents of

South Eleuthera for forming a
collaboration with the govern-
ment to meet critical community
needs through the creation of the
South Eleuthera Partnership
(SEEP).



SEEP was established after a
group of local citizens came
together to discuss ways to
increase the support given to the
fire and medical services.

Mr Turnquest said, “It is
impressive that SEEP, in just a
few short years, has provided
effective leadership for the refur-
bishment of the ambulance and
upgrading of ambulance
services and has purchased a fire
truck for service in South
Eleuthera.”

The minister was speaking at
a ceremony to celebrate the com-
missioning of the fire truck to the
Royal Bahamas Police Force, and
the re-commissioning of the
ambulance to the Ministry of
Health in Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera
on Sunday, March 1.

Also in attendance at the cere-
mony were Minister of Health
Hubert Minnis, Acting Deputy
Commissioner of Police Ellison
Greenslade, Head of the RBPF
Fire Division Superintendent Jef-
frey Deleveaux and Member of
Parliament for South Eleuthera
Oswald Ingraham.

Mr Turnquest said the govern-
ment has an essential role to play
in the provision of fire and emer-
gency services to citizens and
businesses.

He explained that the govern-
ment provided these services to
the people of South Eleuthera via
the police, primarily from Cen-
tral Eleuthera and Governor’s
Harbour, along with the Ministry
of Health, but that the services
needed to be closer to the com-
munity in the South.


u



THE TRIBUNE



ine

WEDNESDAY,



MARCH 4,



2009

{ SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Casino pull-out puts Churn hits
234 jobs in jeopardy

oO Kear Shoe

exacerbate
SBINIMUK NN Ce



m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

“GREY areas” in Bahami-
an labour laws could have
exacerbated a $5 million dis-
pute involving workers on an
Exuma-based private island
resort development, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
with the Labour Department
insisting that company lawyers
interpret often-ambiguous leg-
islation instead of seeking its
advice.

Harcourt Brown, the direc-
tor of labour, told Tribune
Business yesterday that some
labour laws are not very clear.

“We always advise any per-
sons calling the Department
for advice to contact their
attorneys,” said Mr Brown.
“The Labour Department can
only give advice.”

In the case of the Bock Cay
project, attorneys for laid-off
workers are alleging that from
2004 to 2008, staff may have
been paid according to a pro-
vision in the Employment Act
regarding overtime pay that
was amended in 2001.

A Bock Cay consultant,
Henry Rolle, told Tribune
Business that the developers
consulted the Labour Depart-
ment’s Exuma office when the
project began in 2004. They
were instructed to pay their
workers time-and-a-half on
Saturdays and double time on
Sundays, after they had
worked 10 hours per day
Monday through Friday.
Workers were also employed
on the Cay for almost one
month before they then
received a week off.

Double-time

After attorneys representing
laid-off Bock Cay workers last
year took the matter to the
Department of Labour for
conciliation talks with the
developers, their company,
Lignum Vitae Ltd, agreed to
pay double-time on Saturdays.

However, according to Mr
Brown, the developers would
not consider paying the
claimed multi-million retroac-
tive overtime payment unless
mandated to do so by a court
judgment.

Lignum Vitae Cay (LVC),
which was founded to act as
owner and developer for the
Bock Cay project, said yester-
day that it had at all times
complied with all Bahamian
labour laws.

“In July 2008, the manage-
ment of LVC met with the
Labour Office for the Exuma
area, and in a separate meet-
ing, met with the Department
of Labour in Nassau and made
inquiries as to whether LVC
was actually compensating its
employees properly,” the
company.

“In both meetings, the man-
agement was assured that
LVC was compensating its
employees correctly.

“That assurance was consis-
tent with views expressed by
the president of the Industrial
Tribunal in April 2008, in
related proceedings and with
long-established customs in
the local construction indus-
try.”

Last week, Fry’s Electronics
chief executive, and principal
in the Bock Cay development,
Randy Fry, met with labour
minister Dion Foulkes and
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham over several contentious
labour issues relating to Bock
Cay.

What Mr Brown described
as one of the most serious
issues was the developers’ rule
making it mandatory for
workers to leave the Cay on
off-days at their own expense.
This rule, though, quickly
became imprudent for work-
ers living outside the Exumas
after work hours were cut to
40 per week, making travel
every week a finical burden.

Mr Brown said the develop-
ers agreed in principle at the

SEE page 2B

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Isle of Capri’s decision not to
renew its lease of the Our Lucaya
resort’s casino, which expires at
end-May 2009, has placed a fur-
ther 234 Bahamian jobs in jeop-
ardy if a new operator cannot be
found to replace it within the next
three months.

Jill Haynes, Isle of Capri’s
director of corporate communi-
cations, confirmed that the US-
based casino operator had decid-
ed to terminate its operation of
the Isle-Our Lucaya casino as
part of a strategy to exit all inter-
national operations and focus on
its core US home markets.

She added that Isle of Capri
might extend its stay in Freeport
slightly, though, if a new operator
could be found to replace it, and
it was needed to ‘hold the fort’
so that a smooth transition could
be effected.

Ms Haynes said Isle-Our
Lucaya’s 234 staff were informed
by the casino’s general manager
of the company’s decision at a
staff meeting on Monday. If their
employment is to be continuous
and seamless, a replacement casi-
no operator will have to be found
well before the end of May 2009,
meaning that a successful search

Isle of Capri not renewing lease that
expires at end-May 2009, putting jobs in
danger if no replacement operator found
Wi Freeport casino suffers $1.713m loss
for year-to-date, with revenues down

23.2%

Wi Previous efforts to keep gaming
operator, with $6.9m tax write-off and
marketing subsidy, now seem in vain

will have to
be conclud-
ed in a hur-
ry.
If this
does not
happen,
Grand
Bahama’s
tourism
economy,
not to mention unemployment
rate, is likely to suffer a further
blow. Placing another 234 per-
sons on the unemployment line
will further depress economic
activity on an island where more



Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace

Tax unpaid on 2,785
shipping manifests

Auditor-General says ‘large number’ of import bills
released by Customs without evidence of duty payments

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Some 2,785 shipping mani-
fests were outstanding at the
end of the 2006-2007 fiscal year,
the Auditor-General has
revealed, his inspection reveal-
ing once again that “a large
number of bills of ladings” were
released by the Customs
Department without evidence
to show due taxes were collect-
ed.

The Auditor-General’s report
for the 2006-2007 fiscal year
detailed that “no dollar
amounts were submitted” on
the 2,785 outstanding shipping
manifests.

Without these, the import
duties owed to the Government
on these shipments could not
be calculated, and the Auditor-
General recommended that
Customs Department manage-
ment “ensure that outstanding
manifests are cleared without
further delay”.

Invoices

Manifests are the lists ship-
ping companies produce to
show that all cargoes they have
brought into the Bahamas are
accounted for, and with dollar
values and invoices attached, so
that the Customs Department
can calculate the correct import
duty/Excise Tax rates to be
applied.

In the instances referred to
by the Auditor-General, the
invoices showing the dollar val-
ue of imports brought into the
Bahamas are unlikely to have
been attached, creating a
bureaucratic headache for the
Customs Department. Until the
correct invoices are submitted,
Customs is unable to clear the
goods and holds on to them.

According to the Auditor-
General’s report, the largest
number of outstanding mani-
fests, some 800, were at the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport’s (LPIA) air freight sec-
tion.

Another 403 outstanding
manifests were at the John
Alfred Dock; some 380 at Kel-
ly’s Dock; another 370 at
Arawak Cay; and 62 and 30
respectively at Seaboard Marine
and Union Dock.

Outside Nassau, the largest
number of outstanding shipping
manifests uncovered by the
Auditor-General’s Department
were the 234 at Spanish Wells.

There were another 150 in Exu-
ma and its surrounding cays;
120 at Rock Sound in
Eleuthera; 100 in north
Eleuthera; 51 at Harbour
Island; and 35 at Governor’s
Harbour.

Stating that his department
had conducted a complete audit
of the incomplete manifests, the
Auditor-General added: “A
large number of bills of ladings

SEE page 2B

than 170 persons were laid off
earlier this year from the Our
Lucaya resort proper.

“Late yesterday [Monday]
afternoon, the employees were at
a meeting with the general man-
ager,” Ms Haynes told Tribune
Business. “The Government was
notified before the press release
was issued today [yesterday]. We
will not be renewing the lease
when it expires at the end of May.

“We are working with the Gov-
ernment to identify potential
operators, and if a potential oper-

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report.



ROYAL SFIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

premium
Cable TV



















demand services launch

fiscal 2009



m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SEE page 2B

* BISX-listed firm says pay-per-view off 17% year-
over-year, as subscribers drop-off due to economy
* Cable ‘in very early stages’ of exploring video-on-

* Capital spending of $15-$16m anticipated for

* Internet subscribers pass 40,000 mark

Cable Bahamas saw continued subscriber churn until the
2008 year-end, Tribune Business was told yesterday, especial-
ly in its premium cable services which were down 17 per cent
year-over-year, as customers became more discerning about
which packages they acquired.

Barry Williams, Cable Bahamas’ vice-president of finance,
said the BISX-listed company had experienced subscriber churn
- customers not renewing or dropping cable TV services -
“across the board” from the 2008 second quarter onwards.

“We did see some subscriber churn,” he told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We actually started to see it coming in the second quar-
ter, and it continued through to the end of the year. We still end-
ed up OK, but saw a drop in premium services.

“We saw it in the basic cable TV services, we saw it in the pre-



Local agriculture products suffer
femand decline despite $30m sales

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BAHAMIAN farmers have
seen declining sales trends for
their products since 2005, a year
in which they collectively pro-
duced $32 million worth of
fruits and vegetables, and
around $16 million in poultry
products, it was rvealed yester-
day.

Godfrey Dorsett, the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation’s
(BAIC) deputy general manag-
er, said both red meat and poul-
try production declined in 2006,
possibly as a direct result of
increasing food imports that

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a

and objectivity

controlled the market share for
the products Bahamian farm-
ers produced.

“Unfortunately, that simply
indicated that the market pro-
duction was shrinking while, at
the same time, imports were
increasing. These were com-
modities which farmers were
able to produce, but were
declining because they couldn’t
get market share - probably
because there were imports
competing and they were
unable to continue to increase,”
Mr Dorsett said.

He told the National Eco-
nomic Summit that there was a

SEE page 3B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Churn hits premium Cable TV

FROM page 1B

mium cable services, and we saw
it in pay-per-view. When we
looked at pay-per-view, it was
down 17 per cent year-over-year.

“The more discretionary ser-

vices are the ones that in bad
time, people will tend to look at
and make a decision as to
whether to have as much as they
take.”

As a result, Mr Williams said
Cable Bahamas had seen some
premium and pay-per-view sub-

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (A) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Likespike Corporation Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 18th day of February, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (A) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Quelantra Company Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 18th day of January, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR



NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (A) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-










(a) Thatchberri Company Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 18th day of January, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

a

Well-established Wholesaler

saleperson (females

requires a

are encouraged to

apply) for the snack food division. Individual
must have experience in sales with emphasis
on large food stores. Only individuals with a
proven record of being able to work
unsupervised and achieve results will be
considered. Must be able to drive standard
shift vehicle and be in possession of current
valid driver’s license. Individuals with their
own transportation will receive favorable

consideration. Company offers good benefits.

Submit applications to:
Sales
P.O.Box N-7124

Nassau, Bahamas
ae ES

scribers drop those packages in
favour of the less expensive basic
cable TV services, while some
basic subscribers had ceased tak-
ing the company’s services alto-
gether.

To combat the increased lev-
els of subscriber churns, Mr
Williams said Cable Bahamas had
started its Customer Retention
Focus in the 2008 third and fourth
quarters, calling customers to find
out what their needs were, and
how best to meet what they could
afford given the current econom-
ic environment.

Initiative

Adding that the initiative had
enabled the company and its
clients to often find “common
ground”, the Cable Bahamas
executive: “We took a real proac-
tive approach. We were assisting
customers in making better choic-
es in terms of what they selected
for viewing. Instead of everything,
they kept some stuff.”

Meanwhile, Cable Bahamas is
understood to be close to finalis-
ing the transaction to buy out its
major shareholder, Columbus
Communications, although Mr
Williams and other executives did
not comment on that yesterday.

Elsewhere, Mr Williams
revealed that Cable Bahamas was
“in the very early stages of explor-
ing the introduction of video-on-
demand services into this mar-
ket”, a strategy that, if it comes to
fruition, would likely see it com-
pete with the likes of IP Solutions
International, which has been
attempting to secure financing via




a private placement to launch its
own services.

The Cable Bahamas finance
head said the company invested
$2.5 million in fiscal 2008 on
upgrades to its Nassau-based
Internet system head-end, with a
further $3 million in capital
expenditure going on the con-
struction of its Freeport office.

“The Freeport administration
building should be completed by
the middle of this year,” Mr
Williams said. “The Nassau
upgrade to the head-end is com-
plete. The building and infra-
structure are all in. We’re migrat-
ing certain electronics from their
old location to the new and
upgraded head-end location.”

During fiscal 2009, Mr Williams
said Cable Bahamas had a “bit
of work to complete on the
upgrades to the IP (Internet Pro-
tocol) core. It’s 90 per cent done.
The majority of the heavy lifting
is done”.

For this coming year, Mr
Williams estimated that Cable
Bahamas would incur about $15-
$16 million in capital investment
spending. “It won’t be the same
level of projects that we had last
year - the buildings, the renova-
tions, Freeport and the IP core
upgrades. They’re not projects
that come along every year,” Mr
Williams added.

Recently completed initiatives
included the launch of Cable
Bahamas’ new Internet browser
e-mail service, Pronto, in a bid to
enhance the customer experience
and service, and upgrades to the
company’s customer service facil-
ity at its Robinson Road head-
quarters.

a)

Entry level book keeper urgently
needed must be proficient in
Microsoft Applications.

Please fax resume to 394-3885.
















LEGAL NOTICE






CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.







NOTICE is heraby gyven that the Creditors of the above-named
Company are required on or before April 2, 2008 to send their

names and addresses, wilh particulars of their dabls or claims,

and the names and addresses of their Atlomneys (if any], to
Mrs. Mara M Férére, Liquidator of Cabex Intemacional Lid.
oo FT Consultants Lid., P.O. Bow W-3882, Naseau, Bahamas

Dated the 4" day of March, 2009

Maria M4. Farare
Liquidator

Mr Williams said the latter ren-
ovations had increased the num-
ber of customer service/payment
stations to nine, a move designed
to enhance customer service and
eliminate long queues.

He added that Cable Bahamas
had “started to look into what
needs to be done” to renew its
existing cable licence/franchise
agreement, which expires - along
with the company’s exclusivity
(monopoly) - n October 2009.

“Preliminary work has been
done on that, and we expect our
discussions to go well with the
Government,” Mr Williams said.

On the Internet side, the Cable
Bahamas executive said the com-
pany had seen subscriber num-
bers pass the 40,000 mark by
year-end 2008, demand fuelled
by the service’s indispensability
to the business community and
education institutions.

Data services were also con-
tinuing to generate good growth,
Mr Williams added, given that
the demand for what was offered
by the company’s wholly-owned
Caribbean Crossings subsidiary
came mainly from commercial
clients.

Efficiency

To minimise costs and boost
efficiency further, Mr Williams
said Cable Bahamas had imple-
mented its ‘One-Tech Solution’
initiative. In the past, when
installing services at customers’
homes, he explained that usually
a minimum of two Cable
Bahamas technicians had been
required - especially if Internet
and cable TV was required.

Through focusing on training
and enhancing expertise, only one
technician was now needed to
perform such installations -
whether it was Internet TV or
both.

This, Mr Williams said, “brings
a lot more efficiency on staffing”.
Another similar initiative
launched by Cable Bahamas was
‘First Call Resolution’, where
rather than having to go through
several levels of technicians to
solve a problem, clients could call
in and be assured that the first
person they spoke to could deal
with the problem.

Cable Bahamas net income for
fiscal 2008 rose by 19.7 per cent,
to $25.8 million compared to
$21.6 million the year before. The
company exceeded its previous
year’s revenues by $5.4 million
or 7.2 per cent to $81.4 million,
compared to $75.963 million the
year before.

Cable Bahamas said data rev-
enues grew 19.7 per cent last year,
representing 15.1 per cent of total
revenues. Internet revenues grew
by 10.5 per cent, accounting for
30.3 per cent of the total, while
cable revenues represented 54.5
per cent of total revenues. The
company saw 10.3 per cent
growth in its digital TV services.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
beetle Mgr die lar 4
on Mondays

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites apolications for teaching positions available at
St. John's College and St. Anne's School on New Providence, and Bishop Michael Eldon

School on Grand Bahama.

English Language and Literature

Math
Phys C5) Senet B Soence
iuidance Counselor

2 positions |

# positions,

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Bishop Michael Ekdon School, Freeport Grand Bahama

lifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from an accredited
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Applications may be collected from the Education Department located on Sands Road off of East

Street,

Completed application forms with the requested supporting documents must be received by
the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 13° March 2009, and must be addressed to:-

Anglican Central Education Authority

The Director of Education

PF. 0. Box N656
Nassau, The Bahamas

Providing quality education in a Christian enviranment by developing the whole child: soinitually,

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fhe ohte for fe.



‘Grey areas’
exacerbate
$5m dispute

FROM page 1B

meeting to begin allowing
workers to stay on Bock Cay
during off-days, and the pro-
posal was put to the workers
for their approval.

“After discussions with
them and the minister, they
agreed to revisit that, and they
have now made an offer to
allow the workers to remain
on the Cay with certain condi-
tions to provide food and elec-
tricity,” Mr Brown said.

An attorney representing
Bock Cay workers, Errol
Mckinney, said he was is pre-
pared to take the overtime
back pay issue to the Supreme
Court should he not hear from
the developers by next week.

Tax unpaid on
2,785 shipping
manifests

FROM page 1B

were released without evidence
to suggest duties were collected.

“A number of office orders
were authorised by manage-
ment for the release of goods.
In some instances, duty entries
were absent from the record,
which is an indication that rele-
vant duties have not been col-
lected.”

Particular weaknesses were
highlighted in Exuma. The
Auditor-General’s report said:
“Our analysis of the records
provided revealed a large num-
ber of outstanding released
goods dated from January 2005
to September 2007.

“In many instances, the quan-
tity or description of goods was
not indicated, and as a result
the value of outstanding duty is
unknown.”

The Auditor-General recom-
mended: “Therefore, in an
effort to enhance efficiency and
effectiveness regarding revenue
collection, we recommended
that the present practice of
releasing goods without duty
being paid be revisited with a
view to strengthening the sys-
tem.”

The Auditor-General also
uncovered “tardiness” in the
Customs Department’s collec-
tion of airline passenger ticket
taxes, “which were received at
times in excess of two months’
late”.

And his report added:
“Audits were conducted
through the year on duty entries
at Customs House. It was
observed that the incorrect rate
of duty was applied in some
instances, for which queries
were raised with the Customs
Department.”

During the 2006-2007 fiscal
year, the Customs Department
dealt with 419 queries involv-
ing some $172,957 in duties that
were levied. Of these, 10 cases
were resolved, resulting in the
collection of $4,035 in out-
standing duties.

For the 2006-2007 fiscal year,
the Auditor-General said that
based on figures provided by
the Customs Department, for
that year it had collected some
$764.264 million compared to
$739.09 million the year before,
an increase of $25.175 million
or 3.4 per cent.

The vast majority of revenues
came from general import
duties, at 66 per cent, with
Stamp Duty on imports gener-
ating 19 per cent of the rev-
enues collected by Customs that
fiscal year, and air and sea
departure taxes another 10 per
cent.

Elsewhere, the Auditor-Gen-
eral’s audit of the Governmen-
t’s finances found that the accu-
mulated rent owed by residents
of the Government’s Public
Housing Rental Units, some of
which dated back to 1993, now
stood at $645,120. It found that
while a policy existed for resi-
dents to pay via salary deduc-
tion, but this was not being fol-
lowed. There was also the by-
now routine focus on outstand-
ing real property taxes, the
Auditor-General finding that
there were some $81.607 mil-
lion in such payments that the
Government had yet to collect
for fiscal 2006-2007. This figure
consisted of $67.965 million in
current taxes owed, and a
$13.642 million surcharge on
what homeowners already had
outstanding.

When added to previous
unpaid taxes, the Auditor-Gen-
eral said the Government had
failed to collect an accumulated
$363.262 million in real prop-
erty taxes over the years, a sum
it described as “exorbitant”.

He again urged that “imme-
diate measures be implemented,
whereby delinquent taxpayers
are made to settle their debts
in an expeditious manner”.
THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 3B



Huge policy ‘void’
over agriculture

Call for total overhaul of Department of Agriculture, which has
400 staff despite production being one-tenth of independence era

mg By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

Bahamian farmers yesterday insisted that
the Government implement a proper Nation-
al Policy on agriculture, with one calling for a
complete overhaul of the Bahamas’ Depart-
ment of Agriculture.

Owner and operator of Goodfellow Farms,
Tan Goodfellow, said the Department operates
with too many employees and not enough
direct results for the industry.

He said the Department of Agriculture
began with only 37 people shortly after the
Bahamas’ independence in 1973, and has now
increased to just under 400, while production
has decreased to one-tenth of what it once

Manutacturing’s
success linked

General Manager of Lucayan Tropical, Tim
Hauber, said the Bahamas’ lack of a Nation-
al Policy was a huge “void” for the country.

He said a 40-year gap between generation
farmers had stunted the industry, and injected
a contemporary farmer into the resurgent
industry who do not “know how to grow”.

Mr Goodfellow said a National Agricul-
ture Policy has to become important enough
to the Bahamas before it can be explored and
implemented, and said the Government must
focus only on strategies that work.

“How do we get to a national policy? How
do we achieve a national policy? It has to
become important enough that we actually
even look at it, and then once we define what
a national policy is - how to get there,” he
said.

Mr Goodfellow said raising tariffs on
imported food got the Bahamas into the prob-
lems with local food production, and should
not be a consideration moving forward.

“We can alter some of the tariffs possibly,
but I believe we have to learn how to compete
on an international level and on a national
level,” said Mr Goodfellow.

He believes the Government should focus
much more on educating the Bahamian pub-
lic as a way forward for the agriculture indus-
try.

“There is an opportunity for us to farm; we
just haven’t recognised the value of it yet,” he
said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BOTTICELLI HOLDINGS LTD.

to top industry

THE BAHAMAS has
enough infrastructure and land
to consider light manufacturing
as a viable industry for revital-
ising the economy, a Bahami-
an attorney said.

Ryan Pinder, speaking at the
National Economic Summit,
said the Bahamas needs a plan
going forward, and envisages
light manufacturing as an indus-
try that could help bolster the
economy in the long term.

He said the Bahamas should
link its need for light manufac-
turing with a the proven main-
stay of tourism in order for it
to be successful.

“Why would we import a lot
of our tourist products that we
sell? Why can’t we manufacture
those here, with maybe the
expertise of a foreign company
or not - maybe just on our own

Local agriculture
products suffer
Hemant decline

llespite $50m sales
FROM page 1B

tremendous demand for eggs in
the Bahamas when Gladstone
Farms ceased producing, and
was forced into receivership and
then liquidation, due to compe-
tition in the import-saturated
food market.

Mr Dorsett said only Bahami-
an-produced eggs could provide
the competitive prices and
nutritious product the market
deserved, but still consumers
favored imports.

“We were to the point where
we were bringing in Eggland
eggs and other name brands
that were demanding higher
prices, and the consumers were
buying it,” said Mr Dorsett.

“On the other hand, the local
egg producers who were pro-
ducing a fresher egg, as far as
we are concerned, a more nutri-
tiousd egg - because we know
what’s going into them - are los-
ing market share.”

Mr Dorsett said Bahamian
farmers produced 11 tonnes of
local beef, 45 tonnes of sheep’s
meat, 16 tonnes of goat meat
and 156 tonnes of pork in 2005,
with an estimated worth of
$920,000.

“Any commodity produced
in the Bahamas is fresher than
any commodity that comes in
from a foreign country into the
Bahamas,” he said. “Fresh meat
is slaughtered in the Bahamas,
and within one week is chilled
down and can be made avail-
able to the market. There can
be no meat brought into the
Bahamas under the pretext of
fresh, even though meat comes
in frozen and is thawed out and
represented as fresh.”

However, Mr Dorsett con-
tends that Bahamians still buy
the second grade imported
meats because they are cheap.

“We're trying to get more
commitment to local produc-
tion. As a result, BAIC has
stepped in and is launching a
‘Buy Fresh, Buy Bahamian’
campaign to encourage
Bahamians to buy more of the
local produce.”

- and sell those and develop that
into an export market,” said Mr
Pinder.

He said leveraging Bahami-
an experience and success in
areas such as tourism can help
promote other industries in the
country that can grow into
export markets.

Mr Pinder said the Bahamas
has the infrastructure on the
Family Islands, especially in
Freeport, to implement an
industry such as light manufac-
turing.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act 2000 BOTTICELLI HOLDINGS

LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 2nd
March 2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of BOT-
TICELLI HOLDINGS LTD. All persons having claims against
the above-named company are required to send their address and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 2nd April 2009.



THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

TENDER

MAKING AND/OR SUPPLYING UNIFORMS
FOR SECURITY OFFICERS, SCREENERS
AND FIREFIGHTERS

1. Bids are invited for a one year contract to manufacture uniforms for the Security
Officers, Screeners and Firefighters of the Airport Authority. The details for security
and firefighters are as follows:

Trousers (Male and Female)

Trousers (Male)-Dickies

Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(M/F)

Female Caps

Rain Coats

Shoulders Patches
Ties

Sweaters

Cap Badges

Dress Uniform Jackets
Trousers K-9 Unit
Shirts*

Senior Officers Shirts*
Shoes*

Belts*

(*Items are for Fire Fighters)

Trousers (Male and Female)-Dickies
Skirts

Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(Dickies)M/F
Male Peak Caps

Shoulders Bars

Belts (Male and Female)
Windbreakers

Shoes (Male and Female)

Safety Boots

Golf Shirts — K-9 Unit

Pants*

Boots*

Dress Pants Senior Officers*
Overalls*

Base Ball Caps*

Collection of the Bid Specifications and viewing of the samples of the uniforms may
be done at the Security Office (located in the former Police Station at Lynden Pindling
International Airport) between the hours of 9:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m., Monday thru Friday

up to March 10, 2009.

2. Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes addressed to the undersigned and the
envelope must specify “BID FOR UNIFORMS”. The Airport Authority reserves the
right to reject any envelope not properly addressed and/or not specifying “BID FOR
UNIFORMS”. Faxed bids will NOT be considered.

The Authority reserves the right to reject any and all bids without stating any

reason (s).

Bids should be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday March 31, 2009. Bids
received after the deadline will not be considered.

There will be a public opening of bids at 10:00 a.m. on Friday April 3, 2009. Interested
bidders may attend, and bring copies of the business licenses.

Acting General Manager

The Airport Authority
Lynden Pindling International Airport
P. O. Box AP59222

Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE

MORTLAKE OVERSEAS CORP
Co number: 84740 B

(“The Company’’)

The company whose principles place of business is
Burleigh Manor, Peel Road, Douglas, Isle of Man
IMI 5EP British Isles, hereby announces its intention
to discontinue the Company in the Bahamas and con-
tinue the company in the Isle of Man in accordance
with Part 1 of the Companies (Transfer of Domicile)
Act 1998. The Company’s name on continuance shall
be Mortlake Overseas Corp. Limited.

By order of the board:
\

Sig

J E McKenna (Director)

NOTICE OF SALE

Expocredit Corporation (‘the Company”) invites
offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Maris Subdivision’,
comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
South of Burnt Ground in the [sland of Long Island
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.

The Company makes no representations or warranties
with respect to the state of the Property which is
offered for sale “as is where is”.

The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing
& Law of Property Act.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase
price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within

Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
reserves the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers
addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
Partner, P, O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 30°
day of March, 2009.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT COM/com/00019
COMMERCIAL DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF CLICO (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
(In Liquidation)

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Petition of the
Winding-up of the above-named Company having its
registered office at Serville & Company, No. 13 East Ave.
Centerville in the City of Nassau, was on the 24th February,
2009 presented to the Court by the Registrar of Insurance
Companies, a statutory regulator, pursuant to Section 41
of the Insurance Act, Chapter 347 Statute law of The
Bahamas 2000 Revised Edition.

AND that the Petition is directed to be heart (in open
Court) before Justice Cheryl Albury, a Justice of the Supreme
Court, in the City of Nassau on Wednesday, 18th March,
2009 at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon at the Supreme Court
Annex, 3rd Floor, British American Bank Building,
Marlborough St., and any Creditor or contributory of the
said Company desirous to support or oppose the making
of an Order on the said Petition may appear at the time of
the hearing in person or by his Counsel for that purpose;
and a copy of the Petition will be furnished by the
undersigned to any Creditor or Contributory of the Company
requiring such copy on payment of the prescribed charge
for the same.

Chambers
Office of the Attorney General
3rd - 7th Floors,
Post Office Building
P.O. Box N-3007
East Hill St.
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorney for the Petitioner

NOTE: Any person who intends to appear on the hearing
of the said Petition must serve or send by post to the
abovenamed, notice in writing of his intention to do so.
The notice must state the name and address of the person,
or, if a firm, the name and address of the firm and must be
signed by the person or firm of his or their attorney (if any)
and must be signed or if posted, must be sent by post in
sufficient time to reach the above named not later than 4:00
o’clock in the afternoon of the 17th day of March, 2008.


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Casino pull-out puts 234 jobs in jeopardy

FROM page 1B

ator is found, we will remain
through the transition to a new
operator.”

However, Isle of Capri will exit
after May 31, 2009, “unless anoth-
er operator is found, and we assist
with the transition”.

In a brief interview with Tri-
bune Business during a break in
yesterday’s Cabinet meeting, Vin-



cent Vanderpool-Wallace, the
minister of tourism and aviation,
who has responsibility for casino
gaming, confirmed that Isle of
Capri’s lease expired at the end of
May 2009.

“They have been giving notice
that they are going to pull out of
their two overseas operations, the
Bahamas and Coventry,” the
minister confirmed. However, he
pointed out that “one doesn’t

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LOCK DESIGN INC.

— f—












Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138





(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LOCK DESIGN INC. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-











pany has therefore been struck off the Register.










ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)









Legal Notice

NOTICE
X-TREME RESOURCES INC.

— f—












Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138




(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of X-TREME RESOURCES INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and




the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETOILE LUMINEUSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Securit y

1.39
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.49

Abaco Markets

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

2.27
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Dectors Hospital
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

necessarily follow the other”, in
terms of the possible 234 job loss-
es and the Isle of Capri pull-out, if
another casino operator could be
found in time.

“We really are very keen, very
eager to have a good operator in
Grand Bahama,” Mr Vander-
pool- Wallace said.

“We all want to resolve this as
quickly as we possibly can to
ensure their is no loss, no inter-

ruption, when we transition from
one operator to another.

“We like to be a little bit pro-
motional, so we have a number of
operators quite interested in oper-
ating in the Bahamas. We have
these conversations occurring,
and when the opportunities come
up, we certainly point them in
that direction. But that’s as much
as we have done at the moment.”

Finding a replacement gaming

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUSHFIRE ALARM CORP.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that

in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of BUSHFIRE ALARM CORP. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NYANZA HOLDINGS INC.

— —

Notice is hereby given that

in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,

the dissolution of NYANZA

HOLDINGS INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore b

een struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GILLYASSE INC.

— f,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of GILLYASSE

INC. has been completed; a

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 3 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,656.82 | CHG -12.66 | %CHG -0.76 | YTD -55.54 | YTD % -3.24
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.85 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW. BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

1.41
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
1.55
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS
1.41
11.00
7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.50
1.49
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.07
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

FG CAP

TTAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

zs

s Div $
0.070
0.992
0.319

-0.877

0.105
0.055
1.309
0.118
0.438
0.111

0.240
0.598
0.542
0.698
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securit Ss Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
11.23 12.04 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387
2.9230
1.4376
3.3201
12.6816
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1005
1.0401
1.0330 3.30
1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000
Fund Name Div $ Yield %
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CPFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3201
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

-0.58
0.28
-1.94
0.50
0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.06
4.01

4.10

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings.
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

operator is likely to prove difficult
in the current depressed economy
and market environment.

Explaining the rationale behind
Isle of Capri’s decision to exit
Grand Bahama, Ms Haynes said:
“We are focusing on our domestic
[US] operations. A similar thing
[to the Freeport casino] is hap-
pening with our property in
Coventry, the UK. We’re focus-
ing on other operations.”

Isle of Capri’s decision to exit
its Freeport casino operation will
not come as a surprise to many
seasoned observers, given that
the company has not enjoyed a
happy experience in Grand
Bahama since it took over the
property in 2003-2004.

The Isle-Our Lucaya has been
consistently loss making, and the
parent company’s US problems,
where it has only generated
$930,000 in net income for the
first nine months of its current
financial year, have compound-
ed the woes, making an exit the
only feasible strategy.

When asked whether Isle of
Capri’s Grand Bahama experi-
ence had been far from what was
expected, Ms Haynes replied yes-
terday: “I don’t know that I
would say that at this point. Our
employees have worked hard
there to deliver customer service
and the guest experience, and at
this point we’re just going to focus
on domestic operations and exit
international operations.”

For the nine months to January
25, 2009, Isle of Capri’s Our
Lucaya casino suffered a $1.713
million net operating loss, a 52
per cent increase upon the previ-
ous year’s $1.125 million net oper-
ating loss.

On the revenue front, for the
first nine months of the current
financial year, Isle-Our Lucaya’s
revenues dropped by 23.2 per
cent to $8.277 million, compared
to $10.79 million the year before.

As for the third quarter, rev-
enues generated at the Freeport
casino fell by 35.5 per cent to
$2.632 million, compared to
$4.081 million the year before.

And for the same three-month
period, the Isle of Capri saw its
net operating loss in Freeport
climb from $169,000 in the 2008
fiscal year to $639,000 this time
around.

Isle of Capri’s withdrawal is
also likely to further negatively
impact the already struggling Our
Lucaya resort if no replacement
operator is found. Casinos are
great drawers of visitors, and if
the facility closes then
Freeport/Grand Bahama loses
another major tourist attraction.

The former PLP government
did everything it could to keep
Isle of Capri in Freeport, and the
casino open. Just before the 2007
general election, it was able to
reverse a previous $9.4 million
loss provision after a new gam-
ing tax rate agreed with the Gov-
ernment enabled it to recover
$6.9 million in accrued taxes.

The gaming win tax rate was
slashed from 17 per cent to 9 per
cent for Isle of Capri, while it also
received a marketing subsidy
from the Government. Isle of
Capri had previously accrued
gaming taxes as high as $10 mil-
lion, and its pullout now means
that the returns from such a deal
are questionable.

The Government will now also
potentially lose casino taxes.
Together with the closure of the
Pinnacle Entertainment casino at
Exuma’s Four Seasons resort, the
episode highlights the difficulty
small gaming operators have in
achieving profitability in areas
that are not mass tourism desti-
nations. Isle of Capri had leased
the Our Lucaya casino under a
two-year lease that started on
June 1, 2007, and which could be
terminated by both itself and
Hutchison Whampoa (Our
Lucaya’s owner) with six months
notice from either side.

Annual rental payments under
the lease are $1.9 million.

The property is a 19,000
square-foot casino, and offers 303
slot machines, 25 table games and
a 110-seat restaurant.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ACOMA VALLEY CORP.

—S

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ACOMA VALLEY CORP. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IGUALAS.A.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of IGUALA S.A. has been completed; a Cer-

tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KAMDEN OCEAN CORP.

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KAMDEN OCEAN CORP. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




APT 3-G

AEN CONFIDES IN HIS. BAUGHTER
AWD +++ [SUR BROTHERS WANT NO

JUDGE PARKER

KATHERING GOT
RID OF ME SO
SHE COULD SIZE



TURNS OUT YOU'RE THE BEST
OF THE LOT. FUNNY, ISN’T IT?

ROY THINKS 1’ AN OLD
FOOL FOR HANGING ON
TO tTAND I NEVER

HEAR FROM DAVEY.



YOU MUST HAVE
PASSED MUSTER!
SHE LIKES YOU...

I CAN TELL!




©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

® AND I LIKE HER.
SHE PROTECTS THE
PEOPLE GHE LOVES!

TVE NOTICED MOM
ALWANS STRAPS ME
INTO THIS THING

FOR THE LIFE OF ME,
IL DON'T KNOW WHY

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THINK I'M GOING To 00..7
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tures Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved
“] www.kingfeatures.com



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FOR FUN!

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.







may be used











Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer



THEY many words of Gaur
eee oT Mare can Thm make
fram. the ethers chown beret
Th kine 6 ore. eich etter
nao be weed anc one Boh
mut contain the centre letter
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ame Jetber wound Ho plirels.
TODAY'S TARGET

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lube bone.

FOSTERDAF'S SOLUTION

ciln ile novel dsol
Geneve [PEO eye
Gevirw dim diet dre ein
adil epi erick ericied fei
Ties pied pied tepid tine
Seed vire vic ried

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number

in the same block more than once. The difficulty

level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer































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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.













Came





















EMail iad (13



Score One for the Defense

1 It's not profitable to 1 Like the cubed root of

make (7) carrot perhaps (5) = rel | || (oe | | t | ; ;
5 Laughter in company’s 5 Jets start out fom fa in er i North dealer. mond, East taking the queen with the
cancun ts them (13) Neither side vulnerable. ace and returning the nine to the
|| | | || | || NORTH king. South had eight cashable tricks
8 Made money illegally (13) 3 Provided food for a @J984 at this point, and in an effort to gain
9 Put off Ted’s return with domestic pet and wild Pee J Te at eye dT | ty | V¥KQ6 a ninth he led a low spade to the ten.
eal - i ‘a $KI65 fsficioy nur When eke
seul ; Fie a satisfactory return. When he led a

10 It distributes by air (7) 4 Sailor joins a Scotsman on eT led eT WEST EAST heart, declarer won in dummy and

11 Puts up a house for sale, fhe, revede:t) AQ 47652 played a spade to the king. West took
perhaps (6) 5 Acquit the prisoner and || Es) fel ie = | I] W874 ¥10932 the ace and cashed the jack of dia-

12 Such a shop is somewhat empty the court (5) rey TT tT yt EE ae ee 5 oF ge US net pau
a 3 ave lost, so South made exactly
limited (6) . 6 They adopt aiid atti a (4 T ea} al | r_ | SOUTH hiss notrump.

15 They are entitled toa tudes when working (7,6) @K 103 At the second table, the defense
share of whatever is 7 Burdened — with a back Pe Py et | VAIS was far more effective. A diamond
left (7) seat driver? (7) #10743 was led here also, but instead of win-

17 Sea air adds a little weight | 11 Self-propelled transport (7) | LL oes Dawn The biddi #AQ9 a with the ace, East signaled with

bid : al 1 Learned person (7 j € bidding: e nine.
ae a ea N 5 Reject ts _ ae North Fast South West Declarer could not prevail

19 Different view put in writing and improves (5,2) N disdain (5) 2 Imperious 1& Pass INT Pass against this play. He also led a spade
by a dramatist (6,2,5) 14 Awild horse on land (6) — 8 Rigidly imposed (4,3,6) 3 NT and finessed the ten, but West took

20 Directions to prosecute fol- | 16 Cosy feature of a mountain = siganteedion 128 3 Narrow (7) Opening lead — two of diamonds. the queen and returned a diamond.
low (8) olen 183 a ; a East won the king with the ace

9 Factory (5) 4 Haphazard (6) The right time to win a trick is and returned the five, West’s J-8 gob-
21 Dope and sex orgy gets 18 Don't go on about me to a 10 Viewed as a 5 Sophisticated (5) crucial in many hands, and this bling up South’s 10-7, so here the
uncovered (7) improve matters (5) whole (7) ie applies just as much to the defenders — defense scored three diamonds and
s ; ; 11 Afiestedly superar 6 Lacking creativity as it does to the declarer. two spades to put declarer down one.
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution (13) Consider this deal from a team- — At the second table, East recog-
’ eee) of-four match. At both tables, the mized that it would be better to take
Across: 1 Ideal, 8 Browning, 9 Solve, Across: 1 Stock, 8 Coleslaw, 9 12 Hydrophobia (6) 7 Perplex (7) final fecetipas Tir cen 2 bat th 2 di de later ta tee
10 Straw hat, 11 Reach, 12 Woo, 16 Snoop, 10 Macaroni, 11 Roomy, 12 : ; pee OEE) as Ee Pau 2 tee SL AES see) 1 ee
Battle, 17 Dramas, 18 Bed, 23 Aside, Hop, 16 Braise, 17 Opaque, 18 15 Public service 11 Honours due to the contract was made at one table — when he could more effectively lead
24 Succumbs, 25 Fiend, 26 Gluttons, | Mud, 23 Stage, 24 Pancakes, 25 company (7) victor (7) while at the other it was defeated. through whatever values South
27 Essay. Jaunt, 26 Couscous, 27 Libya. 17 Male duck (5) At the first table, West led a dia- — might have in the suit.
Down: 2 Diocesan, 3 Advocate, 4 Down: 2 Tandoori, 3 Chow mein, 4 19 Ashow-off (13) 13 Demanding (7) Tomorrow: Triumph of mind over matter
Grotto, 5 Sweat, 6 Light, 7 Agate, 12 Tomato, 5 Pecan, 6 Bloom, 7 Await, ; 14 Method (6) ate eee : :
Web, 13 Odd, 14 Warships, 15 12 Hem, 13 Pod, 14 Pastrami, 15 20 Fashion (5) ©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
Gardenia, 19 Ebbing, 20 Usage, 21 Burgundy, 19 Useful, 20 Spice, 21 21 Inexplicable 16 Tinge deeply (5)
Act up, 22 Quits. Annul, 22 Fancy. matter (7) 18 Ingress (5)
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eS



The Tribune



Street Plaza. Mrs
Knowles said she wants
to share the many blends
of flavors developed
from years of travel and
her curiosity for nutri-
tion.

“Tt all started with the
idea to make cupcakes
out of my garage. I was
the mother of a two -
year -old at the time and
I was tired of being
home doing nothing so I
decided to bake cup-
cakes. That did not
work, but all of a sudden
I got propelled into the
catering world and that ran for about two
years. We then went to the Farmers Market
and that created a demand. That led me to
want to open a market café where people can
come, buy our homemade products and also
get a deli wrap, soup and daily menu.”

Mrs Knowles also decided to do frozen
meals which are a result of her personal chef
service experience.

“We have frozen meals that people can

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

AS the number of eateries in the Bahamas contin-
ues to increase, many persons have probably
already indulged in Chinese, Greek, French, Italian,
Mexican or other countries' foods. However, how
many times has there been any buzz about Canadi-
an food? The answer would be probably be "never."
Fortunately, Julie-Andree Knowles of Le Petit
Gourmet is willing to change the way Bahamians
experience food in a healthy way.

Mrs Knowles is originally from Quebec,
Canada but her heart is now in the Bahamas
where she met and married her husband,
Matt Knowles and had a handsome son,
Adam. Mrs Knowles describes herself not as
a chef, but rather a person who really loves
to cook.

Over the last three years, Mrs Knowles
said her passion for food and love of people
along with life circumstances have led her on
a journey from the Farmer’s Market on East
Bay Street to her own place in the Shirley

PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from
qualified individuals for the position of PRINCIPAL, St. John’s College,
beginning September, 2009.

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in Education from a recognized
University, with at least (5) years accumulative administrative experience. The
applicant must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Providing leadership - set the climate and pace for success and high
achievement in the school.

ey]

pick up and store in the
freezer. They can then take
them down in the fridge and
warm it up later for dinner,”
Mrs Knowles said.

Explaining her knowledge
of so many exotic foods and
the reason she cooks with a
unique blend of spicy
Caribbean and flavorful
French styles, Mrs Knowles
said she used to be a fight
attendant which gave her the
opportunity to indulge in all
types of cuisine.

“T used to be a flight atten-
dant on Air Canada so I trav-
eled for seven years which
kind of opened my horizons

NOTICE is hereby given that



ae

food wise. I went to Germany
and Japan and actually I gath-
ered some of my recipes
through those experiences,”
Mrs Knowles said.

Mrs Knowles said her skills
are not all her own as her
family has roots in great food.

“Both of my grandfathers
were ‘jacks of all trades’. My
dad’s father started a ham-
burger joint in a small town
and people drove two hours
to go there to get a hamburg-
er from him. He also made a
type of ginger beer with his
secret recipe. My father
showed me the scars in his
hand from all the bottling he

NESLYN FREDERIC

- Organizing and supervising schedules, programmes, records and

procedures.

school

- Supervising and evaluating teachers and support staff.
- Managing records, school finances and end-of-year closing

procedures.

- Communicating with parents, community groups and organizations.
- Displaying consistent organizational and human relationship skills.
- Assisting the Education Department with and initiating Staff

Development Programmes.

Applicants should submit a cover letter,

Curriculum Vitae, copies of

degree certificates, three references and passport photographs to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Friday March 27th, 2009.



of COLLEGE GARDEN, PRINCE CHARLES,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 25" day of February,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAUDLAIN PIERRE of
EAST ST. SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 25'" day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





JULIE-
ANDREE
Knowles of Le
Petit Gourmet
displaying the
gorgeous pas-
tries and
breads baked
/ fresh daily.

i

did as back in those days
everything was manual. So it
is in the family I think. They
were doers- had an idea and
just went for it. That is what
inspired me very much in my
life,” Mrs Knowles said.

As for the health factor of
her market café, persons can
enjoy daily morning pastries,
spreads, breads, wraps, soups,
and sandwiches.

“When I looked around, I
realised I have to give options
to people. For example, when
I cook my ground beef, I
always take the time to strain
my meat so the fat is gone
and you just have the meat
left. It may take longer, but
what ever I dois good and
high quality and people can
eat in confidence that Iam
not going around the bush to
cut costs. Our goal is to facili-
tate the enjoyment of a good
meal,” Mrs Knowles said.

As much as she would like
to be a successful business,
she wants Le Petit Gourmet
to grow in such a manner that
the quality stays the same.

“There is no way around
that. I love my customers.
They know about my life and
my son. They are part of me
and making it an open
kitchen and an open atmos-
phere, they get to know me.
It’s music from Montreal, its
French music. I want people
to be happy and that means
the size of my business stays
enjoyable for me and my cus-
tomers. So when they come
here, they do not just get to
know me through the food
but they get to know me
through the ambiance,” Mrs
Knowles said.
THE TRIBUNE

Lionfish on the

@ By LLOYD ALLEN

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

UNTIL about 15 years ago, the Lionfish was
a relatively unknown fish in local waters, and
mostly indigenous to the indo pacific region -
the Indian and South Pacific Oceans, and the
Red Sea.

Now the waters of the Bahamas are
teeming with possibly hundreds of thou-
sands of these underwater water men-
aces, who are not only invading many
coral reefs and underwater crevices, but
are also a serious threat to the future of
local sea environments.

If left unchecked, the Lionfish could
eliminate many indigenous sea creatures
which some say could lead to a perma-
nent unbalance in the Bahamian marine
system.

Because of this concern, the Depart-
ment of Marine Resources (DMR) has
initiated a bold project which first
attempts to educate locals on the basic
facts of the Lionfish, and to then intro-
duce the fish as a food source which
could eventually eliminate the foreign
predator as a threat to local fish.

Nakisha Anderson, an assistant fish-
eries officer at DMR spoke recently at
the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial
Corporation’s Agribusiness Expo.

“While the Lionfish is eating out our
native fish species, what we are trying to
do is make a market for it. The more
people who start eating it, the more we
can control their numbers.”

To prepare the fish for consumption,
Ms Anderson said it is essential that the
fish’s venomous spines are removed first
because of the obvious health risk.

Ms Anderson said that people stung
by the fish describe the pain as a burning
sensation which could result in hospitali-
sation or possibly death. Officials say that
applying hot water and seeking medical
attention is the safest way of handing a
sting.

Assisting Ms Anderson was Chef
Gareth Bowe from DMR, who said his
tool of choice for removing the spines is a

pair of kitchen scissors.

He said a common
question from many
interested in cooking the
fish is whether the head
is edible. Although it is,
he prefers to dispose of
it because of it is difficult
to season and because of
its spiny exterior.

“Tt’s just the dorsal,
the anal, and the pelvic
fins that have venomous
spines.”

Making his specialty of the day, Mr
Bowe prepared what he called ‘Fillet
Lionfish Fingers,” a dish which takes
about 15 minutes.

First using a fillet knife, he separated
the meat from the fish, where he then
removed the scaly skin, and then washed
the fish in warm water. Next, he used
ripened limes to add initial seasoning, fol-
lowed by dipping the meat in an egg
based seasoning sauce. Although he was
unwilling to reveal all of his ingredients,
he did disclose some elements including
black pepper, seasoning salt, lime, Cajun
seasoning, minced garlic and three table
spoons of butter.

He said for the best results, the fish
should soak in the mixture for about two
hours. After it had been soaked, he
placed it in a container of white flour,
which was the final step before placing it
in the fryer.

Using extra virgin olive oil, he allowed
the meat portions to fully cook for about
four to five minute, allowing the exterior
to turn brown. In the end, the fish has the
appearance of grouper, with a taste many
say has to be acquired.

According to Tribune Taste, the fish
tastes like grouper or tuna, with some
also comparing it to fresh water trout.

This newest delicacy has also been
added to the menus of a couple local
restaurants including Shogun Restaurant,
and the August Moon Café.

With other restaurants and food stores
showing no real interest in offering the
fish to consumer, DMR is excited and
hopeful that through this expo, more
Bahamians may adopt the fish as a regu-
lar part of their diet.



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009, PAGE 7B



FROM top left to right and middle: Chef Bowe demonstrates the preparation of the Lion Fish to

ensure the poisonous spines are removed.

At bottom- the final product- fillet Lionfish Fingers.

Box:

‘a’
ca
=
Ke
=

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

DA 69806
c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





IN THIS Aug. 26, 2008 file photo,
“American Idol" judges, from left,
Simon Cowell, Kara DioGuardi,
Paula Abdul and Randy Jackson
arrive at a promotional event for
the show in New York.

What’s wrong with

American

Idol?

@ By TRIBUNE
Staff Writer

TWO or three years back,
American Idol was good, very
good. Every Tuesday night, my
wife and I had eyes and ears
locked on the telly to see and hear

tomorrow’s superstars.

Even now I can remember the
Clay Aikens, Kelly Clarksons and
Jordin Sparks of the world. Bit
players like Kelly Pickler and the
big bearded dude in the cowboy
hat were memorable, too.

Chris Daughtry, the bald-head-
ed hard rocker, came over strong-
ly. So did the little guy with the
floppy hair who was deeply in love

with himself. What was his name
again?

So what’s gone wrong? Every-
thing’s gone wrong, that’s what.

This year’s Idol series is dreary,
tedious junk interspersed with
more dreary, tedious junk, with
hardly a glimmer of true glamour
in sight.

Talent so far has been confined
to a bronze-headed teenager
named Alison (“Sixteen going on
40,” as we both remark when she
snarls out her lively numbers) and
a tiny blond who looks and sounds
like the real thing but still has far
to go.

The rest have been mediocrities
wrestling with largely forgettable
songs notable only for their lack of

melody and harmony.

What a sad shambles the whole
thing has become.

The early episodes of the 2009
season were based on a calamitous
format in which we heard per-
formers only in soundbites and
saw them only in flashes. There
was so much movement from one
to another that I became dizzy-
headed with confusion.

More than once I sought relief
by leaving the room to surf the
Internet.

The panel sounded, as usual,
like semi-articulate primates,
deploying the same old phrases
they’ve used since the series
began. Why don’t they extend
their vocabulary? What’s a vocab-
ulary, I hear them ask.

Simon Cowell’s calculated hos-
tility to all and sundry is now
wearing thin, especially as it
always emerges in the same mind-
killing English monotone.

Randy Jackson, with his con-
trived coolness, has said “What’s
up dog?” “Check this out” and
“You were a bit pitchy” at least 14
million times too often for me.

The irritatingly indecisive Paula
Abdul is as lost for words as ever,
stumbling around in a nomansland
between saying what she means
and trying not to cause offence.

And a fourth panellist, whose
name I haven’t even bothered to



check out, is an irrelevance who
gets in the way of everyone else.

No wonder Idol has lost its lus-
tre. [sometimes wonder if this
panel has a full-sized brain
between them, their range of
expression is so limited and super-
ficial.

When they appeared alongside
each other in four easy chairs
inside a wood-panelled mansion,
calling the quivering contestants in
for appraisal like medieval serf-
masters, our coffee pot was in
grave danger of being hurled
through the TV screen.

It’s hard to imagine any other
quartet so undeserving of the
praise that appears to be heaped
upon them.

Worst of all, the only true star
of the show - the host Ryan
Seacrest - is now somehow
reduced to a walk-on part after
being the production’s indispens-
able hub for years past.

No doubt Idol has this year
dared to be different in its attempt
to boost ratings. Unfortunately,
the major difference is that it’s
now far worse than the shows
we’ve been used to in the past.

Cowell and Co need to get their
act together if they really want
Idol to run and run.

At the moment, Google is
emerging as a much more enter-
taining option.



The early episodes
of the 2009 season
were based on a
calamitous format in
which we heard
performers only in
soundbites and saw
them only in flashes.
There was so

much movement from

one to another that |

became dizzy-headed

with confusion.



Island expressions

FROM page 10

sheer joy I feel while doing it. For most of my life I
ignored my God-given talents and I was not happy. }
Now that I am embracing them, I can feel myself as } [Ey
a person evolving and my work is evolving. My
painting is tied to my growth as a person. It is my }
release, my way of getting through each day,” Mr

Knowles said.

As painting is definitely not his only form of
expression, Mr Knowles said the medium which }
kept him going through all of his dark years was }
graphic design and in the last 5-6 years, fine pho- i

tography.

Mr Knowles said the things that are important to i §
him at this moment are his continued evolution as }
a person, and getting his studio business up and run- }
ning so that those around the Bahamas can appre- }

ciate island art work.

“The main thing I tell other young artists is to not i
get discouraged. When you are in the art profession,
you are almost always going to struggle as you
build a name and a reputation for yourself and
your work. However, if you love it then go for it.
Don't do pieces just because you think it will earn }
you some money, do it because it touches you deep
down in your emotional being,” Mr Knowles said. }

Bahamas Red Cross Fair

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

NOW that Spring is here, one of the most
exciting and highly anticipated events of the
year for Bahamians of all ages is the Bahamas
Red Cross Fair which will take place on Satur-
day, March 7 on the lower grounds of Govern-
ment House. Each year, the fair attracts thou-
sands of people who flock to Government
House to enjoy staples like conch fritters, pop-
corn, cotton candy, hamburgers, and play games
like hoop-la, and bingo, and to catch up with old
friends and party in the disco. There will be a
special treat for those in the disco as there will
be numerous special musical guests performing.
The fair is one of the organisation’s largest
fund-raising events with all proceeds going to
assist the Red Cross in its very important work.

So officials of the Red Cross are urging all
members of the public to attend.

i MRS SARGENT

? said she draws
inspiration for her
creations by think-
? ing about what

? best compliments
: the clothes or any-
: thing in relation to
? the individual.



Fun to see faces

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

THERE are many things that can
be classified as art. Art is such a
large part of our everyday lives, we
hardly even stop to think about it.
Look at the desk or table where you
are, right this minute. Someone
designed that. It is art. Your shoes
are art. Your coffee cup is art. Well
Juliette Sargent saw a face- and
made art.

Ms Sargent, owner of Fun to see
Faces, has been face painting for
about a year and a half.

“T schooled, lived and worked in
the United States and Japan for sev-
en years. After moving home, I
began face painting at the sugges-
tion of Carol Moss, a close cousin.
She wanted me to face paint at her
kids’ party since the clown was not
able to make it. I was amazed how
much fun it created for the kids and
also surprised how many adults
asked me to their kids’ parties. Since
then I had received further train-
ing from Michigan based artist,
Donna Novak, of Show Off Body
Art. I have also received further
training from New Jersey based
master clown, Robyn Thompson
(Moggie).”

Ms Sargent said the most reward-
ing thing about face painting is
being fulfilled about making good
use of her artistic abilities.

“T use to be really good at draw-
ing when I was in high school...I
had not practised my craft in over 12
years. Now, I am using that same
talent again. I am amazed. I am hap-
py to create a bit of amusement and
happiness in the people I paint or
people who see my paintings,” Mrs
Sargent said.

Although Ms Sargent is a 4th
grade teacher at Nassau Christian
Academy full time, she does find
time to express her love for face

painting.

“Tam an avid traveler. I love
reading and of course learning new
things, especially those that relate to
art. Today, face art competes with
education for my attention. When
not teaching my class, I can usually
be found wielding a paint brush on
the face of any willing participant. I
prefer face painting over tradition-
al canvas art because face painting is
quicker, easier and can be enjoyed
by everyone,” Ms Sargent said.

Face painting does not only have
a children clientele, but also sur-
prisingly, many adults enjoy the
craft participating with their chil-
dren or at private functions.

“Tam mostly invited to kids’ par-
ties. Occasionally, I get invited to
adult parties as well, especially
theme parties (Mardi Gras, Hal-
loween, Junkanoo, etc). I attend a
few fairs and corporate events. This
year, I was able to provide face
painting at the carnival. I am joined
by about four other painters at big
events.”

Mrs Sargent said she draws inspi-
ration for her creations by thinking
about what best compliments the
clothes or anything in relation to
the individual.

“Sometimes I am able to repli-
cate patterns and images that are
on their clothing. I also like looking
at my baby niece’s clothes. I like
the colors that are used to design
kids clothes and as a result I incor-
porate these colors in my art,” Ms
Sargent said.

Face painting can be a lot of fun,
but it can also be a lot of hard work.
Ms Sargent said those who want to
get into the field have much training
to consider.

“Train and seek the advice of per-
sons in that field and practise a lot.
Be sure to only use paints that are
intended for use on the skin,” Ms
Sargent said.








i

TAMPA tee

High: 69° F/21°C

Low: 43° F/6°C

he

a

@

KEY WEST
High: 71° F/22°C
Low: 56° F/13°C

@

ORLANDO >
High:70°F/21°C:
Low: 41° F/5°C

it

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Oe

Partly sunny, a
shower; breezy.

@ WEST PALM BEACH CO.

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 72° F/22° C @
Low: 55° F/13°C

High: 75°

a a

The ot AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and




Clear, breezy and
cool.







Partly sunny.



High: 74°
Low: 65° Low: 66°
[| _-68°-63° F

Sunny to partly
cloudy and breezy.






on

Windy in the morning;
partly sunny.






High: 76° High: 79°
Low: 69° Low: 70°



Sunny and

High:
Low:

AccuWeather RealFeel

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

High: 70° F/21°C
Low: 52° F/11°C

= AMI

High: 72° F/22° C
Low: 54°F/12°C

Q




FREEPORT

ABACO
High: 68° F/20° C

High: 66° F/19°C
Low: 49° F/9° C

NASSAU
High: 75° F/24° C
Low: 65° F/18°C

@

i

ANDROS

AW

High: 76° F/24° C
Low: 56° F/13°C

Low:52°F/11°C

i

Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday

Temperature

73° F/23° C
53° F/12° C
78° F/26° C

Normal high ....

Normal low
Last year's high
Last year's low



65° F/18° C
82° F/28° C
67° F/19° C

AY rr TODAY

8| eho
: EXT.




pleasant.




81°
70°





o|1|2

LOW

Today
Thursday
Friday

Saturday



MODERATE

Vv
3|4|5



6|7

HIGH



\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

greater the need for eye and skin protection.

High
12:49 a.m.
1:15 p.m.
2:00 a.m.
2:28 p.m.
3:14 a.m.
3:40 p.m.
4:22 a.m.
4:45 p.m.

Ht. (ft.
27
2.1
27
2.2
27
2.3

2.8
25

Low
7:21 a.m.
7:19 p.m.
8:32 a.m.
8:32 p.m.
9:40 a.m.
9:44 p.m.

10:40 a.m.
10:49 p.m.

a Pos

Ht. (ft.
0.3
0.0

0.3
0.0

0.2
-0.1

0.0
-0.2

Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:30 a.m. Moonrise. ... 11:37 a.m.

As of 1 p.m. yesterday .....cccccscssssssscssessseeen 0.00" Sunset....... 6:14 p.m. Moonset... . 12:58 a.m.

Year to date : :

Normal year to date oo... ccce cece eens 3.60" daly â„¢ Last New
AccuWeather.com

ELEUTHERA

High: 73° F/23° C
Low: 56° F/13°C

2s

a

Was
vw

GREAT EXUMA
High: 74° F/23° C
Low: 62°F/17°C

=

%.

Vr

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
72/22
24/-4
56/13
34/1
34/1
32/0
34/1
56/13
40/4
38/3
72/22
72/22
37/2
78/25
76/24

Today

Low

F/C
45/7
22/-5
32/0
16/-8
18/-7
18/-7
21/-6
31/0
32/0
25/-3
57/13
38/3
27/-2
66/18
60/15

Ww

pc
sn
$
pc
pc
$
pc
$
pc
pc
$
pc
Cc
sh
s

High
F/C
69/20
34/1
66/18
45/7
46/7
37/2
47/8
66/18
53/11
50/10
86/30
60/15
43/6
79/26
80/26

Thursday

Low

F/C
43/6
24/-4
46/7
32/0
32/0
26/-3
36/2
41/5
39/3
39/3
61/16
27/-2
38/3
65/18
64/17

Ww

pe
sn
s
pe
pe
pe
c
s
E
C
pe
pe
c
C

pc

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

High
F/C
46/7
60/15
56/13
70/21
63/17
64/17
52/11
60/15
72/22
35/1
59/15
67/19
36/2
74/23
70/21

Today

Low

F/C
35/1
36/2
48/8
48/8
47/8
50/10
40/4
49/9
56/13
29/-1
37/2
54/12
25/-3
54/12
47/8

WwW

pe
s
pe
pe
pe
r
pe
pe
s
pe
pe
s

$
s
Ss

High
F/C
55/12
68/20
74/23
68/20
71/21
64/17
64/17
70/21
74/23
41/5
66/18
75/23
44/6
86/30
75/23

Thursday

Low

F/C
47/8
46/7
46/7
45/7
55/12
50/10
53/11
57/13
63/17
28/-2
51/10
60/15
31/0
55/12
53/11

Ww

c
s

pe
pe
pe
pe
Ec

pe
s

pe
pe
pe
pe
pc
s

High

F/C

Philadelphia 33/0
Phoenix 83/28
Pittsburgh 36/2
Portland, OR 51/10
Raleigh-Durham 44/6
St. Louis 56/13
Salt Lake City 57/13
San Antonio 78/25
San Diego 64/17
San Francisco 58/14
Seattle 48/8
Tallahassee 63/17
Tampa 69/20
Tucson 82/27

Washington, DC 44/6

Today

Low

F/C
22/-5
58/14
22/-5
39/3
26/-3
42/5
33/0
61/16
55/12
46/7
39/3
35/1
50/10
55/12
27/-2

WwW

pc
pc
pc
sh
pc
pc
c

Ss

pc
sh
pc
S$

Ss

pc
pc

High
F/C
43/6
79/26
50/10
49/9
58/14
64/17
47/8
80/26
65/18
59/15
46/7
72/22
72/22
79/26
54/12

Thursday

Low W
F/C
32/0 pc
57/13 pc
42/5 ¢
37/2 ¢
38/3 pc
52/11 ¢
30/-1 ¢
62/16 pc
52/11 pc
46/7 c
33/0 ¢
43/6 s
56/13 s
52/11 pc
37/2 pc

Forecasts and graphics provided by

CATISLAND
High: 70° F/21°C
Low: 53° F/12°C

om
>
VW

~

LONGISLAND
High: 74° F/23°C



Mar. 10

Mar. 18

AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 a 4
SAN SALVADOR
High: 74° F/23° C
Low:57°F/14°C
wr
MAYAGUANA

Low: 57° F/14°C

>

aw

High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 59° F/15°C

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND
High: 77° F/25° C
Low: 55° F/13°C

High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 60°F/16°C

GREAT INAGUA .

High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 63° F/17°C

iF



Mar. 26

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg



Low
F/C
72/22
36/2
32/0
54/12
64/17
77/25
74/23
43/6
32/0
57/13
47/8
33/3
SoZ
45/7
32/0
41/5
63/17
58/14
77/25
14/-10
57/13
68/20
51/10
37/2
34/1
36/2
39/3
4/-15
57/13
24/-4
70/21
54/12
50/10
45/7
51/10
72/22
67/19
34/1
34/1
75/23
43/6
59/15
5/-15
18/-7
37/2
56/13
63/17
25/-3
34/1
36/2
75/23
53/11
46/7
72/22
65/18
59/15
54/12
65/18
67/19
34/1
32/0
59/15
70/21
39/3
19/-7
73/22
33/3
44/6
34/1
23/-5

Today

c
sn

48/8
88/31
80/26
91/32
25/-3
30/-1

38/3
92/33
88/31
28/-2

43/6

46/7
92/33
77/25
55/12
81/27
95/35
92/33
90/32
81/27
93/33

45/7

36/2
72/22
78/25
54/12

41/5
91/32

46/7
53/11

41/5

36/2

Thursday

Low
F/C
71/21
39/3
37/2
50/10
69/20
78/25
74/23
38/3
27/-2
63/17
42/5
39/3
Soril2
45/7
36/2
41/5
66/18
67/19
75/23
-2/-18
63/17
68/20
49/9
39/3
37/2
34/1
31/0
15/-9
56/13
21/-6
66/18
53/11
53/11
54/12
50/10
74/23
69/20
36/2
32/0
75/23
41/5
62/16
18/-7
21/-6
34/1
55/12
61/16
23/-5
36/2
38/3
80/26
53/11
43/6
73/22
67/19
72/22
57/13
64/17
66/18
25/-3
30/-1
59/15
62/16
43/6
35/1
75/23
28/-2
48/8
34/1
19/-7



WwW

$
r
pc
sh
r
c
pc
c
s

=

$
$
s
$
t
r
P
pe
$
$
c
r
Pp
r
r

sn

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace




PVT Sm Ho



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4th, 2009, PAGE 9C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Thursday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 74° F
Thursday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: SSW at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-8 Miles 74° F
Thursday: _ NW at 15-30 Knots 6-10 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F



0) Va EN ey

Los Angeles

64/50

Showers
EX Jj T-storms

Rain

Flurries
Snow

Ice



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Tt (242) 502-6400

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and

precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

-0s Os 10s 20s {B0s"! 40s

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72/56

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} Fun to

see Faces
see page eight

A taste of
Canada

See page six

The Tribune SECTION B

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009






“Bsr

expressions

@ By ALEX MISSICK Mr Knowles a resident
Features Staff Reporter of Little Exuma, started
drawing fresh out of his

WITH most artists looking to —‘iapers, and then took
up painting when he

make it to the big city to show- — \ent to Florida to attend
case their work, 26 -year- old _ the Art Institute of Ft

i i i Lauderdale.
graphic ene ee eae
Knowles, 7 es to keep his . prefers to live and paint
work and life as close to his on his home island

because of the connec-
tion he feels to his sur-
roundings.

“My family has been living on Little Exuma for five generations
and I am a big advocate of young people carrying out the traditions
of past generations. Additionally, I am just plain and simple, an
island boy and I owe everything I've achieved in my life to my
upbringing here,” Mr Knowles said.

One piece that is close to his heart, entitled “Flow” reflects on his
life experiences.

“For a period of about 2 or 3 years I had lost my creative "flow"
due to being weighed down by one personal tragedy after the next.
So it was a release, and | attribute this piece to my being able to be
the painter I am now,” he said.

The second piece, entitled “Reconnecting with... Mother” is a
mixed-media work, which Mr Knowles said he came up with one
day, as he was standing out in the rain barefoot. Mr Knowles said as
he walked he noticed the impression of his footprints being left in
the wet earth, and felt a visceral connection to Mother Nature.

The third piece, "Untitled II” was born simply from a graphic
inspired mood. Using
two recycled pieces of

i hs ui Pe aris. ie: wood Mr Knowles said
; ~:~ she wanted to create a

island home as possible.

ery i 5 j
A oe te ee) very graphic, colorful
aa... t 4 = | _ interchangeable piece

Lea {i i i ! (the two panels can be
' separated).

The fourth piece, is
called "Reflections..." Mr
Knowles said he had an
old discarded shelf,
which in its previous life
had been in the shower.

“Additionally I had
the pieces from an old
broken window and now ie oe i : P 5
that all of my work is cre- -m < = REFLECTIONS
ated with 100 per cent ci
recycled materials, I
wanted a way to combine =
them to create a small, : , ' * . ESOT
striking piece. If you look pokes i
closely you can pick out
the profiles of two
heads,” Mr Knowles said.

Last year he felt the
desire to do a fusion
piece, combining tribal
and Asian designs and
the result was “ Warrior”

“Fortunately I came
across an Arawak
inspired tattoo design by
an acquaintance of mine
who gave me the permis-
sion to use it in my piece.
The design itself was
done without stencils or
any guides whatsoever,
the entire design was
freehanded and I was
very happy with the out-

ee
‘a 1 ir tI
Tos

Mr Knowles said he
draws his inspiration
from his emotions, the
environment and the feel
of nature, even though
essentially everything can
be a source of inspira-
tion.

“The thing that inspires
me to keep at it is the

SEE page eight



RC Oa