Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com




TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009

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Shot ined as students

Clash With police officer

Altercation
near LW
Young Junior
High School

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

A GUNSHOT was fired when
schoolboys attacked an off-duty
police officer who attempted to
break up a knife fight near LW
Young Junior High School.

The altercation erupted just
minutes after classes ended at the
school in Bernard Road and a
group of boys, believed to be in
grade nine at the school, started
fighting on a side road immediate-
ly west of the school.

Police say an off-duty police
officer in the area stepped in to
break up the fight and confiscated
a knife from one of the boys.

An eye-witness told The Tri-
bune how the officer held one of
the boys while the others ran out
of the side road before returning to
launch an attack on the police offi-
cer.

He said: “After the boys ran
out another boy who didn't have a
shirt on ran into the yard and
grabbed two big rocks and burst
them through, he was going mad.

“He threw the rocks and burst
the man who was holding the boy
in the knee caps.

“As he came running back
through the corner a red police car
pulled up and bust a shot in the
air.”

Assistant Superintendent of
Police Walter Evans said the police

SEE page eight

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



FIREFIGHTERS PUT OUT A BLAZE on Dunmore Street yesterday that destroyed a wooden home.

No one was injured in the fire.

TB tests conducted in and

around Prince George Whart

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AT LEAST 18 people have
tested positive to being exposed
to tuberculosis in a series of tests
conducted in and around Prince
George Wharf.

According to sources at the site
who have been personally tested

The Taste

on

Tuesdays!!

large
pi bade) cit Sere .

Bde) ioe ‘ett ) fh
nis) (laa) Glase



Valid only on Tuesdays!

over the last week, eight individ-
uals returned positive in one day,
with another 10 being identified
over the course of the screenings.

This number includes Defence
Force officers stationed at the
Port’s administration offices and
workers in and around the Port’s
Welcome Centre through which
hundreds of tourists funnel every
day.

Sources at the site explained
that those who have tested posi-
tive do not necessarily have TB at
this time, but have been exposed
to the infectious and often dead-
ly disease.

Classic symptoms of tubercu-
losis are a chronic cough with
blood-tinged sputum, fever, night
sweats and weight loss.

“Infection of other organs caus-
es a wide range of symptoms. The
diagnosis relies on radiology —
commonly chest X-rays — a
tuberculin skin test, blood tests, as
well as microscopic examination
and microbiological culture of
bodily fluids. Tuberculosis treat-
ment is difficult and requires long
courses of multiple antibiotics,” a
website on TB reads.

SEE page eight

Part of $200m

Timmy

fund downtown

revitalisation

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A $200 million loan being
arranged by government will
in part be put towards fund-
ing downtown revitalisation —
potentially including the pur-
chase of a significant amount
of property along the area’s
waterfront.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham elaborated on how
the loan, which he revealed
was being sought by the Gov-
ernment when he made his
mid-year budget statement to
Parliament last week, will be
spent in the House of Assem-
bly yesterday.

He said that government is
“proposing to enter into nego-
tiations with a view to pur-
chasing the Kelly’s (dock)
property and premises” locat-
ed on East Street and Woodes
Rodger’s Wharf, as well as a

SEE page eight












NIB files over 100
cases for back payments
in the past month

‘Multitude of businesses and
self employed owe money’

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE National Insurance Board has filed over 100 cases last
month before the courts of businesses or persons who owe the
Board monies in back payments, its director Algernon Cargill

revealed yesterday.

In an exclusive interview with The Tribune yesterday, Mr
Cargill revealed that there were a multitude of businesses and
self employed persons who owe the National Insurance

Board “quite a bit of money.”

These entities range from law firms, to jewellery companies,
and in terms of kind of businesses, Mr Cargill said that unfor-
tunately it is “just about every type”.

“This is the way it has been allowed to happen and now we
have to resolve it. And I can tell you that the National Insur-
ance Board is on a very proactive step to ensure that all
employers who owe money pay, and pay on time. Now to tell
you who owes, I can’t do that, but I can say there are quite a

SEE page eight



PM says CLICO policyholders
should still pay their premiums

CLICO (Bahamas) policy-
holders should still pay their pre-
miums to ensure possibility of
their policies being transferred to
another company, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said during a
communication in the House of
Assembly yesterday.

“Tf the Liquidator enters into
an agreement with a local insurer,
he can only transfer policies that

are in force and not those that
have lapsed due to non-pay-
ment,” Mr Ingraham said.
While the prime minister said
that it is still too early to deter-
mine whether or not policy hold-
ers will lose any money but it is
quite possible that all the policies
can be sold to a viable insurer

SEE page eight

Almost 200 Government IT
workers set to share $555,000

ALMOST 200 Government IT workers are
expected to share $555,000 set to be re-allocated
to the public service budget in the wake of a 2006

decision to increase their pay.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham noted this yes-
terday in the House of Assembly as he commented
on the reasons for the intended re-allocation of $9.5
million to the Department of the Public Service

from other ministries/agencies.

His comments came prior to Members of Parlia-
ment debating the mid-year budget report.

According to Minister of State with responsibili-
ty for the public service, Zhivargo Laing, govern-
ment decided to increase the worker’s pay in 2006

SEE page eight



Zhivargo Laing

Proposed unemployment assistance
Could he on stream by July 1st

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

NEARLY $20 million of pro-
posed unemployment assistance
could come on stream on July 1 to
provide eligible persons aid for up
to six and a half months, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham revealed yes-
terday.

Legislation to support this scheme
will be brought to Parliament as ear-
ly as this month, he added.

The scheme will allow qualified

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persons to claim 50 per cent of their
wages, providing they contributed to
the National Insurance Board (NIB)
while they were employed. Eligible
persons will receive this aid for 13
to 26 weeks. However it is still
unclear how government will deter-
mine who is eligible to receive this
support.

In order to sustain the continua-
tion of this scheme, government is
proposing a new fee which would
require employees and employers to

SEE page eight





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

STORE WIDE

Piero dat

m@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

a
UO
O
is
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JONES Communication
Limited has until June 25 to
pay $180,000 in delinquent
National Insurance contribu-

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Company given date to pay
40% of $430,000 owed to NIB

tions that were collected from
the company’s employees, but
never handed over to the
Board, The Tribune has
learned.

Last week, Jones Commu-
nication’s CEO Wendall Jones
pleaded guilty to owing NIB
over $430,000 in back pay-
ments in Court 11 on Nassau
Street. The case was
adjourned to June 25.

According to the general
guidelines of the National
Insurance, the company has
up until that time to pay 40
per cent of the total amount
before any payment negotia-
tions can be entered into.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Director of NIB

re
ar Ta DI
AE

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The two
persons killed in a traffic
accident on Grand
Bahama are 64-year-old
Edwin Rolle of Freeport
and 45-year-old Lynn
Clarke of Deadman’s
Reef.

Rolle, a resident of No
57 Whymper Lane, was
driving a 1992 Chevy
Truck that crashed into
the Cumming Temple
AME Church on Settler’s
Way around 2.55pm on
Sunday.

It is believed that he
may have suffered a
seizure behind the wheel.
Clarke was a passenger in
the vehicle.

They were both fatally
injured at the scene. Their
deaths are recorded as
the fourth and fifth traffic
fatalities for the year on
Grand Bahama.

Traffic police are still
investigating the accident.

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Algernon Cargill refrained
from commenting on any one
entity that is in arrears with
payments to the Board.

However, he did outline
that NIB has started a very
“proactive” measure to ensure
that all employers who owe
money pay, “and pay on
time.”

“Now, to tell you who owes,
I can’t do that, but I can say
there are quite a significant
number of employers who
have not paid on time,” Mr
Cargill said.

The normal policy of NIB
is that 40 per cent of out-
standing payments — which
represents the funds that were
actually deducted from an
employee’s salary — be paid
before they can enter into an
agreement to replenish all oth-
er outstanding monies.

“That is why we insist on 40
per cent,” Mr Cargill said,
“because that is the amount
that was deducted from an
employee’s salary. That is
what they would have taken
from the employee and still
did not pay over to the Board.
So to enter into an agreement
we would at least require that
amount to be paid,” he said.

However, as there are cases
currently before the courts,
Mr Cargill said that he could
not comment any further on
the matter nor could he even
confirm — despite the fact
that it is now public knowl-
edge — that the board has
Jones Communication or any

Jones Communication must
pay $180,000 by June 25th

Algernon Cargill



other business before the
courts.

“But those who do owe the
NIB any amount of funds, our
normal policy is that the 40
per cent, which represents the
employee’s contribution that
was deducted and retained by
the employer, be paid into the
Board and any negotiations

would commence after
the employee’s portion be
paid.”

Mr Cargill said that in such
cases, an agreement must be
realised on these outstanding
monies before the court con-
venes again.

“Normally how it works is
that if any defendant is before
the courts, the court would
give a date to come back. By
the date the defendant comes
back the defendant should
have formalised an arrange-
ment with the Board. And the
only way to formalise an
arrangement is to pay the 40
per cent,” he said.

A source inside Jones Com-
munications told The Tribune
yesterday that the company is
financially viable and capable
of meeting its obligations.

Sea turtles campaigner
is receiving threats

ANIMAL welfare activist Jane Mather has been receiving tele-
phone threats over her campaign to halt the catching of sea turtles.

The threats have occurred several times over the past week, with one
caller saying: “We know where you live.”

Mts Mather, a leading animal campaigner in The Bahamas for many
years, has been a high-profile voice in the fight to save protected log-

gerhead turtles.

Some fishermen are angry at being deprived of income from turtles,
which have been an island delicacy for generations.
Mts Mather told The Tribune: “It’s quite unnerving to get threats, but

it’s not the first time.”

Some years ago, a policeman armed with a shotgun threatened Mrs
Mather over a campaign against ill-treatment of guard dogs.

As a result of the latest threats, she and her husband are tightening
security around their home. Police have been informed.

DNA expert, archaeologist to
speak at Heritage Day event

A DNA expert and an
archaeologist will be principal
speakers at a Heritage Day
event in Hope Town, Abaco,
this weekend.

Prof Peter Roberts, a
Bahamian lecturer at Georgia
State University, will speak on
genealogical research in The
Bahamas. He plans to offer
affordable DNA test kits to
those wishing to trace their
ancestry.

The second speaker, Roberts
Carr, is executive director of
Archaeological and Historical

Conservancy Inc., a Florida not-
for-profit organisation dedicat-
ed to investigating and preserv-
ing historic sites in Florida and
The Bahamas.

He is field director of the
Preacher’s Cave project in
Eleuthera.

Heritage Day is set for Sat-
urday, March 7, beginning at
9.30am. The theme is “All of
We Is One Family.”

Traditional Bahamian food
and local crafts will be on offer
together with youth and boating
activities.

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

0 In brief Fred Mitchell denies claim Bahamas was



New form needed
by workers for
short-term National
Insurance benefits

AS OF yesterday, all
claims submitted by work-
ers for short-term National
Insurance benefits must be
accompanied by a new
employers certification
form.

The new Med 4 form is a
single-sheet addition to the
Med 1, Med 1A and Med 2
forms. It requires the
employer to certify that an
employee is, was or will be
off from work for a stated
period.

Said the National Insur-
ance Board in a statement:
“In the past, only attending
physicians and claimants
were required to provide
information on claims for
sickness, maternity and
injury benefits. Unfortu-
nately, this permitted per-
sons to receive income-
replacement when they
were, in fact, not off from
work and were not losing
any income.

“To address this and to
improve the claims manage-
ment process, employers
are now required to confirm
the period that an employee
is off from work by means
of the new Med 4 form.
Claims for sickness, mater-
nity and injury benefits will
not be processed without
it.”

The processing time for
short-term benefits is cur-
rently pegged at three
working days. NIB said the
Med 4 form is not intended
to slow the process, but
rather to ensure that claims
are only approved for per-
sons who qualify.

The new form will be
among those that each
employer will be required
to have in his workplace.
Currently, all places of busi-
ness are required to keep
on-hand C10 (monthly con-
tribution statement) forms;
B60 (interim report of acci-
dent) forms; and B44
(employer’s report on acci-
dent at work) forms.

The new Med 4 form will
be placed on the board’s
website for easy access.

complicit with US in Aristide operation

m By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell has denied a book’s claim that The
Bahamas was complicit with the United
States in staging a clandestine operation that
resulted in the kidnapping and ultimate
removal from office of former president of
Haiti Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

The ex-minister has accused the book’s
author of a “grave libel” against The
Bahamas.

Randall Robinson, an American author, said in his
recent book, “An Unbroken Agony: Haiti, from Revo-
lution to the kidnapping of a President”, that Mr Mitchell
was “something of a lickspittle” or follower of the former
Assistant Secretary of State for the United States, Roger
Noriega.

Most renowned for his advocacy on behalf of Haitian
immigrants and the former president, Mr Robinson sug-
gested that Mr Aristide was “kidnapped” along with his
Haitian-American wife “by American soldiers and flown,
against his will, to the isolated Central African Republic.”

According to Mr Mitchell, the book outright suggests
that The Bahamas was complicit in this “scheme.”

However, the former minister said that both of these
assertions are totally “untrue.”

Admitting that he had received a call from a “US
official” on the night President Aristide is alleged to
have resigned (February 29, 2004), Mr Mitchell said he
was informed by the official that Mr Aristide had asked
the US for assistance in leaving the country.

According to Mr Mitchell, the official explained that
the US government had agreed to help, and that the
former president was at that very moment aboard an ait-
craft headed for “an undisclosed location.” At the time,



Fred Mitchell

he said, the US was looking for a country
that would take the former president but
had not yet found one.

“The official asked would the Bahamas
be willing to accept Mr Aristide,” Mr Mitchell
said. “A foreign minister could not decide
this. Was this Mr Aristide’s wish? Why would
the United States not give him asylum? The
official said US law prohibited it.”

Mr Mitchell said he called K D Knight,
Jamaica’s then foreign minister, who
informed him that he had spoken to Mr Aris-
tide just a day earlier and at that time there
was “no hint of resignation.”

Mr Mitchell again denied that The
Bahamas was complicit in any scheme to overthrow
Haiti’s government.

“Tt is interesting that Haiti’s opposition accused us of
exactly the opposite, of in fact propping up Mr Aris-
tide,” Mr Mitchell said.

“That, too, was not true. Poverty drives thousands of
illegal migrants to leave the north of Haiti every year and
pass through The Bahamas. Many stay in The Bahamas
to the extent that our country can claim to host more
Caricom nationals than any other Caricom nation.

“We believed that the legitimate government of Haiti
had been overthrown. We made it clear, though, that we
had to deal with whomever held the power in Haiti. The
alternative was to risk the stability of our country by
being overrun with illegal migrants. Caricom accepted
this.

“During the 2004 crisis, The Bahamas and Caricom
sought support from South Africa to help the Haitian
police force to restore order. I appeared at the United
Nations with K D Knight of Jamaica just before Mr
Aristide’s departure to seek troops from the United
Nations to stop the insurrection. The political opposition
in Haiti denounced us. Mr Robinson’s book gravely
libels our country,” he said.

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GB Power Company accused of violating Act

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Common-
wealth Electrical Workers Union is
accusing Grand Bahama Power
Company of violating the Industrial
Relations Act by hiring temporary
meter readers without notifying the
union.

Keith Knowles, president of the
CEWU, said the union received no
formal notification from manage-
ment concerning the employment
of the three Bahamians who were
brought in to work on Monday.

“We were totally in the dark and
we think that itis disrespectful. ..and
a display of poor relations on the
part of the company,” said Mr
Knowles.

There are currently 10 meter read-
ers on staff at the Power Company in
Freeport. There are concerns over
job security, salary increases and pro-
motions.

Mr Knowles said that many of the

PRAISE AND CELEBRATION!
(0S PHB. CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS!!!

4

March

current meter-men have not been
elevated to the next level of classifi-
cation in meter reading even though
they are performing at that level.

He believes that it is unfair that
the meter men are being expected to
train the temporary workers to read
meters and learn the routes, putting
their jobs at risk.

“They are performing duties of
the next classification and are only
getting the minimal salary, and we
have instructed them not to conduct
any training at this time.

“What is of concern is that we are
now faced with a global crisis and
there are so many uncertainties rel-
ative to job losses, terminations, lay-
offs, etc.

Mr Knowles believes that the
Power Company wants to increase
the number of daily disconnections
on the island.

He felt that the Power Company
should have consulted with the union
before hiring additional meter read-
ers.

President Knowles claims that the

-15, 2009 - East Street Tabernacle

company breached the Industrial
Relations Act, referring to the sched-
ules of the code of industrial rela-
tions practice Chapter 321 of the
Industrial Relations Statues of Laws
of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

He noted that Part One of the
Third Schedule states that good
industrial relations are the joint
responsibility of management and
employees and trade unions repre-
senting them.

Mr Knowles also pointed out that
the act calls for communication and
consultation between management
and trade unions in times of change.

“These codes of conduct mandat-
ed by law are very serious and
should be adhered to.

“We are, therefore, requesting the
Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes to
put a stop to these employers who
violate these codes,” he said.

The Tribune contacted the Power
Company’s executive office for com-
ments, but our call was not returned
up to press time on Monday.

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com * P.O. Box N-121

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“AWAKE? LET’S CELEBRATE!”
GUEST SPEAKERS:
BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD Monday, March 9th, 2009

General erseer Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, National Overseer

_ _ all = & Mewlerator will dchver his ANNUAL ADDRESS.
BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON ft yye'via Rapio BAH ANAS 1540 Ant aad
General Preshytei :

S10 AM

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN
Global Outreach Director
BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK
CBL [nstrector
MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE
Imermutional Director of Women’s Ministries
BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN
Kegponal Gyverseer of Jamaica, Cayman
Islands Guyane and French Guiana

and MINISTER SONTA MARTIN
BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS

Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islands

BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES

National Qwerseer of the Church of Good,
Bahumus, Turks & Caions Islands

The Convention climaxes on Sunday, March 15th 7
with the afternoon Annuul Parade and Water
Baptismal Service, followed by the evening

Service braadesst live on ¥8S Radio and TV 13,

log on to: Www.cogophahamas.org
For live webcasting

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Teams and singing Groups, along with
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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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Lavish expensive embassy in Cuba

‘$1 million missing’ from embassy funds —
Hundreds of thousands missing from Ministry of
Housing — Minister says report supports ‘visa
scam’ allegations at Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

These Tribune headlines yesterday are
enough to make a nation angry at the cavalier
manner in which their hard-earned taxes have
been handled, especially at a time like this when
the country is strapped for cash.

The Tribune’s articles were gleaned from
the Auditor General’s report for the 2006/2007
fiscal year. It’s now 2009 and Bahamians are
just finding out about the lack of cooperation
given the Auditor as he tried to follow a paper
trail of the public’s disappearing funds. These
funds — recorded as missing — are still unac-
counted for. We hope government will not leave
their whereabouts in limbo forever.

The Auditor says his staff cannot account for
about a million dollars worth of funds claimed
to have been spent on the Bahamas embassy in
Cuba. Maybe he should go to Havana and take
a look.

“This is the fanciest embassy of any
Caribbean country that I have been to!” a wide-
eyed Caribbean ambassador commented to a
Tribune reporter in December. The occasion
was the Caricom conference held in Havana.

The Auditor’s report, tabled in the House,
said that included in the unaccounted for million
was $300,000 transferred to the operational
account of the Consulate General in Miami
“for the purchase of necessary furnishings for
the official residence (of the Bahamian Ambas-
sador to Cuba) and the embassy.”

Reviewing these accounts the auditors said
they were “unable to verify the accuracy” of a
listing of items purchased with the money as
they were “not provided with adequate docu-
mentation to determine items purchased and
how much was spent.”

Another sum of $335,000 was “transferred to
a bank account in Cuba with regard to the estab-
lishment of the office in Cuba.” And said the
auditors: “Due to inadequate record keeping
(they) could not verify how this money was
spent.”

Another item auditors recommended should
be reconciled involved $274,000 also spent on
the embassy and handled through the Con-
sulate in Miami. “Six blank/open cheques drawn
on the Ministry’s account (Consulate General,
Miami) were also for the Cuban embassy. We
were unable to verify what the cheques were
used for. The normal purchasing procedures

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were not followed,” said the auditors. One of
our reporters, who has been to Cuba on assign-
ment three times since 2006, watched the
embassy in the making. She saw the finished
product in December and marvelled at the fur-
nishings and lavish appointments. Money, she
said, was obviously no object, “it was really
over the top.”

The dark highly polished furniture and wood
paneling — probably mahogany — was the
highlight of the ambassador’s office and recep-
tion area. Visitors waiting in the reception room
sat on no ordinary chairs — Oh, no! exclaimed
our reporter, these were heavy, expensive look-
ing upholstered chairs carved from a dark wood.

The public areas were lavish, she said — the
reception area, dining room and living room.
She thought it was a “lot of fancy stuff” to be
put in one office, she said in describing the
ambassador’s office.

Former Immigration Director Vernon Bur-
rows probably doesn’t know what cloud he has
landed on after being catapulted from the rab-
bit-warren-like offices of Immigration to the
plush Bahamian embassy and residence in Cuba
as ambassador.

As he took the delegation on a tour of the
four-bedroom residence — he still had to decide
which room he would call his own — he mar-
velled at the size of the kitchen’s pantry.

The large kitchen, obviously designed to be
used to prepare menus for official functions,
was staffed by three Cuban women, who smiled
and waved as the delegates were taken through
their kitchen.

There was also a smaller kitchen, probably
used for every day fare.

It was an embassy, designed obviously to
make a statement about a people puffed up
with their own importance with more money to
show off than common sense.

Or is it the image that our former foreign
minister Fred Mitchell thinks should reflect the
importance of the Bahamian people — a people
many of whom are now jobless and living in a
country that probably does not have one foreign
embassy to match the one furnished for it in
Cuba by the PLP government.

No wonder when Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham saw this eye-opening expense tick-
et, paid for by the Bahamas Treasury, he had to
change his mind about closing the Bahamas’
embassy in Cuba.

Too much of the people’s money has been
invested in it, he said.



PLP must stop
sitting on the
political wall

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There have been recent arti-
cles giving the former Prime
Minister the inside track on
securing his leadership in the
opposition party.

The most recent offering
suggests that his position will
not be contested in the
upcoming convention.

This may be good for the
stability of the party, and I
agree with John Marquis and
Oswald Brown that his posi-
tion is secured; but I do not
think that it is best for his par-
ty or this country.

If Mr Christie continues in
the mode we have been accus-
tomed to, it will only help the
FNM, and while I congratu-
late the FNM and Mr Ingra-
ham on the job they are doing,
the PLP needs to wake up and

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



smell the cerassee. I want to
reiterate, the PLP will not be
able to make a credible show-
ing if they continue standing
on the sidewalk or sitting on
the wall, waiting for an
“event” to milk or get political
mileage.

Those things show up, but it
is best that when they do, they
meet you “busy”, and not just
busy with snide and sarcastic
remarks. Political bystander-
ing.

It is time for the nation’s
finest to employ the intellect
they talk so much about.

If you are the best party, the
country has ever seen, let’s see
it demonstrated.

We need to see the begin-
nings of transition within the
party.

Our history is clear on this
issue, the last two leaders of
substance in this nation have
been outsiders who went
against convention and put the
nation before the party and
inspired a majority of the pop-
ulace.

Can the PLP show the
nation that it is not about the
party? That it is not about per-
sons who see their relevance
in being “nice” and all those
other descriptive terms peo-
ple use to mask their inability
to address the problems and
issues that are real. We are
going to see.

EDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau,
February 27, 2009.

Where is registrar of companies,
where is the board of BISX?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Richard Coulson’s comments City Markets;
let chips fall were they may in your February
26, edition sort of indicates that we could be
heading for a major closure of a retailer which
will have a considerable economic and social

impact.

I don’t agree with Mr Coulson’s suggestion
that Winn Dixie Stores (Bahamas) had any
moral, ethical or legal reason to advise their
minority shareholders of their intent to sell —
that was very public and the Winn Dixie share-
holding private. Further the sale of those shares
did not require the approval of a general meet-

ing.

What is required however is that the cur-
rent board is and must hold annually an annu-
al general meeting — present to the share-
holders an Independent Audit report — nom-
inate and elect directors annually — appoint

the Auditors annually.

cent shareholders do have a legal case against
the Board as a result. Will the company be

actually in business in June, 2009 that is what
the employees, shareholders and the public
need to know?

Now Neal & Massy from Trinidad own seem-
ingly 60 per cent of BSL Holdings, admitted by

J Barry Farrington in his Guardian interview.

I notice that Bahamas Supermarkets shares
dropped from the artificial value for months
now of $15.60 to $8.42 but in the real world
without any dividends I suggest the shares on
facts not fiction might be worth 8.42 cents.

Where is the registrar of companies — where
is the board of BISX?

We have already had one corporate closure

loss.

It is very clear the current chairman from

his recent comment to The Nassau Guardian
has no immediate intention of doing any of
the above so, in my opinion, the minority 27 per

Nassau,

this week let’s not have another which will
affect over 800 employees and, of course, eco-
nomically impact the Bahamas Hotel Employ-
ees Pension fund who have a $25 million invest-
ment in BSL Holdings which would be a total

T HUTCHINSON
February 26, 2009.

Come out and be a part of the historic
National Torchbearers Youth Association

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To realise the voice of a
young people is to realise a
dream.

To understand the past and
present struggles of a nation is
to lay the foundation of an

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awesome and dynamic future.

We have toiled long and
hard and know that anything
worth fighting for is a pros-
perous gain.

We know a danger of a
voiceless youth is to kill the
spirit of a country.

We know that to give up in
the face of adversity is to
admit defeat to fear, injustice
and poverty of the mind.

In light of the recent Gen-
eral Election of the Free
National Movements youth
arm, The National Torch-
bearers Youth Association, a
heartfelt congratulations is
due to all those duly elected
officers whose primary goal is
to deliver a message carried
by the darlings of our
Bahamaland with the under-
lying tones of peace, unity and
a selfless drive that prospers
all who seek the betterment
of this country.

As our organisation experi-
ences this paradigm shift, we

the general members, a major-
ity’s voice, accepted democ-
racy as the structure to house
our right to choose and re-
elected Mr Jamal Moss to lead
as President of our historic
organisation.

His commitment to lead a
mass choir of young dynam-
ics supports his vision that one
day we can harmonise the
songs of triumph and success,
pitching our common goals as
key notes in our melody.

The National Torchbearers
Youth Association meets
every second and fourth
Wednesday of the month at
7.30pm at the FNM Head-
quarters on Mackey Street.

We invite you to come out
and be a part of our historic
organisation where your voic-
es can be heard.

AKITA
LIGHTBOURNE
Nassau,

February, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 5



MP claims he has evidence that

a Cabinet Minister is corrupt

PM: Miss Universe Pageant
will expose Bahamas to its
largest global audience

A FOUR-MONTH period this summer
will see the country “exposed to a larger
global audience than at any time in the
history of the Bahamas”, according to
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham made this observation as
he confirmed that on August 30 2009, as
prefaced in The Tribune on Saturday, the
Bahamas will host the Miss Universe
Pageant — an event which attracts millions
of viewers worldwide.

The staging of the global beauty pageant
will take place three months after hun-
dreds of visitors will descend on the
Bahamas for the 59th Congress of the
International Federation of Association
Football (FIFA), another event which Mr
Ingraham said would “pump millions” into
the national economy.

The FIFA conference, scheduled to take place at Atlantis in late
May/early June 2009, will draw delegates, conference organisers
and 250 representatives of the international media.

It will follow on the heels of the Commonwealth Local
Government Conference, scheduled for May 11 -— 14 in Grand
Bahama.

Last week Mr Ingraham tabled a bill seeking to reallocate $5.4
million to the Ministry of Tourism for the remainder of the
2008/2009 budgetary period for advertising in non-US markets, web
development and hosting of the pageant.

Mr Ingraham said that the Ministry of Tourism wished to express
its thanks and appreciation to the private sector, whose commit-
ments in relation to the Miss Universe pageant mean that the
“cost to the government of the Bahamas has been significantly
reduced.”

Meanwhile, he added that even though Atlantis will be the pri-
mary venue for the event, the “full breadth of the Bahamas will be
exposed to a large global audience”, with prospective beauty
queens touring the islands in advance of the final show.

“We note that in our current economic condition the promo-
tional value of these events is considerable,” said Mr Ingraham.

The additional money expected to be allocated to the Ministry
of Tourism bring its total funds for the 2008/2009 budgetary peri-
od to $97 million.

The prime minister noted that this includes $4 million original-
ly intended to go towards the ministry’s efforts in relation to a num-
ber of “anchor projects which didn’t come about”, which was
therefore allowed to be spent on advertising.

Asked yesterday which projects he was referring to, Mr Ingra-
ham declined to comment, saying he had said all he had intended

- Mitchell says
Tribune headline

LO eM NOTE UE



was inaccurate

FORMER Minister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell held a press
conference to address what he
called the “inaccuracy” of the
headline in yesterday’s Tribune.

The headline, which read “$1
million missing’ from embassy
funds”, was followed a story based
on comments made by the Audi-
tor General in his 2006/2007 report
about funds said to have been
expended towards the establish-
ment of a Bahamian embassy in
Cuba during Mr Mitchell’s tenure.

Mr Mitchell said: “The head-
line does not reflect what the sto-
ry itself says and neither does the
Auditor General’s report say that
a million dollars is missing.”

“In the report, it points out
irregularities in the procedures
which meant that on the particular
day or days the audit was done,
certain documentation was not
available to prove and to trace
how the funds were actually spent.
It is possible that the very next
day the information was available.

“When you say funds are miss-
ing it gives the impression that
there was theft or malfeasance
when there was none. Certainly
none that I was aware of.”

He noted that the report does
not suggest any malfeasance.

Mr Mitchell said that with the
PLP having “carriage of the Pub-
lic Accounts Committee” he
intends to refer the matter to that
committee “so we can get more
specific answers with regard to the
comments of the Auditor Gener-
al.”

Yesterday’s Tribune story noted
that according to the Auditor

General, $300,000 was transferred
to the operational account of the
Bahamas Consulate General in
Miami to buy furnishings for the
official residence of the Bahamian
Ambassador to Cuba and the
embassy. However, auditors
reviewing the accounts said they
were “unable to verify the accu-
racy” of a listing of items pur-
chased with the money as they
were “not provided with adequate
documentation to determine items
purchased and how much was
spent.”

Meanwhile, $335,000 was not-
ed by auditors to have been
“transferred to a bank account in
Cuba with regard to the establish-
ment of the office in Cuba” — but
“due to inadequate record keeping
(they) could not verify how this
money was spent.”

A section of the report relating
to the Bahamas Consulate Gen-
eral in Miami notes that according
to auditors, $274,000 was also
“spent on behalf of the Embassy’s
office in Cuba”. It adds: “this
amount should be reconciled.”

Auditors also said they were
“unable to verify” what six blank
cheques, drawn on a ministry
account in relation to the Cuba
Embassy, were used for. “The nor-
mal purchasing procedures were
not followed,” said the report.

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m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A CROSS-AISLE war of
words broke out in the
House of Assembly yester-
day after a PLP MP claimed
he had evidence that a Cab-
inet Minister is corrupt.

Frank Smith’s threat -
which prompted Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
to challenge him to imme-
diately “name and shame”
any of his ministers if he
has the evidence - was
aborted shortly after when
the St Thomas More MP
was called on to explain the
nature of the evidence he
had and which Cabinet
minister he was referring
to.

The episode began when
Mr Smith claimed that he
has documentary evidence
from the Customs Depart-
ment showing that “one of
(Mr Ingraham’s) own Cab-
inet ministers is corrupt and
he refuses to deal with it.”

“T will table these docu-
ments,” he said, holding

Frank Smith’s
threat prompts
war of words

several sheets of paper in
one raised hand.

At this point, members of
the Opposition called on
him to explain the nature
of the documents he intend-
ed to table before he did so.

Mr Smith said: “I’ve said
what I’ve said - (the prime
minister’s) asked for these
documents before and ’m
bringing them now.

“Twill provide the proof.
Here’s the proof and he can
determine which minister it
is.

The St Thomas More MP
then launched into a con-
tinuation of his contribu-
tion on the mid-year bud-
get report, causing govern-
ment MPs to call on the
House Speaker to interject
and make Mr Smith explain
himself or withdraw his
statement about corruption

Frank Smith

from the record.
Education Minister and
MP for Seabreeze Carl
Bethel said: “He has made
an allegation that someone
in Cabinet is corrupt and
he’s waving around some
paper - we can’t just move
on. He must specify. He
must be called upon to jus-
tify what he’s saying. Name
the person as he was chal-
lenged to do or withdraw
the statement entirely.”
Mr Smith responded with



saying that “this is as far as
I’m going to go today.”

“If you take exception to
me laying these documents
on the table, which are duly
executed documents, then
I think we have a problem.

“Mr Speaker, if you take
a look at the documents
you will see, you can read
the evidence,” he said,
again not specifying which
Cabinet minister he was
making the corruption alle-
gation about.

The Speaker of the
House, Alvin Smith, then
pushed the MP again, ask-
ing “what is the document
saying.”

The St Thomas More MP
then concluded his efforts,
stating “ll deal with this
another time,” causing gov-
ernment MPs to be heard
complaining that he had not
substantiated his statement.

At the prompting of the
Speaker, Mr Smith then
agreed to withdraw his
statement about corruption
within the Cabinet before
continuing with his contri-
bution to the budget
debate.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Effects of winter storm
reach Florida airports

m@ FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.

THE MASSIVE late winter snowstorm pummeling the
Northeast has caused dozens of flight cancelations and delays
as long as five hours at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood Inter-
national Airport, according to Associated Press.

An airport spokesman says 24 outbound flights and 28
incoming ones have been nixed as of Monday afternoon.
Gregory Meyer says the longest delays have been for flights
leaving to the airports in Baltimore, Philadelphia and New
York’s LaGuardia.

Hundreds of flights nationwide have been canceled because
of the storm. The weather is also blamed for four deaths. Pow-
er outages have been a problem in New Jersey, Virginia and
the Carolinas, where more than 300,000 customers have been
without electricity.

r

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

MURDER accused Dwight
Knowles and Sean Brown
both surrendered to police
custody after learning that
they were wanted in connec-






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F

tion with the February 2006
homicide of businessman Kei-
th Carey, two police officers
testified yesterday.

Brown turned himself into
police in the Berry Islands and
Knowles surrendered to police
at his lawyer’s office here in
New Providence, the court
heard yesterday.

Both men, along with Jamal

Glinton, are accused of the
murder and also face charges
of armed robbery and con-
spiracy to commit armed rob-
bery.
Keith Carey, 43, was
gunned down on the steps of
the Bank of the Bahamas on
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway on February 27,
2006. He was killed before he
was able to deposit money
that belonged to the gas sta-
tion that he operated.

Inspector Kenry Stubbs told
the court yesterday that on
March 20, 2006, a slim, dark
skinned man came into the
Berry Islands police station
claiming that he was the one
police were looking for in con-
nection with the murder of Mr
Carey. Inspector Stubbs told
the court that the man, whom
he subsequently identified as
Sean Brown, was searched.
He testified that Brown was
asked to remove a bandage
from his right hand, revealing

that he had only a thumb on
that hand. The witness told
the court that Brown claimed
that he had received the injury
during a traffic accident in
Eleuthera in 2005.

Inspector Stubbs testified
that he later went to a motel in
Great Harbour Cay where the
owner gave him a receipt in
the name of Sean Morley. He
said that the room in which
Brown had been staying was
searched, but with negative
results.

Inspector Stubbs told the
court that Brown was later
brought to New Providence
and handed over to the Cen-
tral Detective Unit.

Information

Detective Sergeant
Franklyn Hinsey told the
court that on March 7, 2006,
while on duty at the Central
Detective Unit, he received
information regarding a sus-
pect wanted in connection
with the murder of Mr Carey.

He told the court that
around 6.39pm, he, Inspector
Fernander and another offi-
cer went to the law office of
attorney Cecil Hilton. There,
he said, Mr Hilton handed
over his client Dwight
Knowles, who also goes by the

Pair accused of murder
‘turned themselves in after
learning they were wanted’

aliases of Dwight Morrison,
Dwight Morley and Derek
Knowles.

Detective Hinsey told the
court that he arrested
Knowles and cautioned him.
Detective Hinsey told the
court that Knowles said, “My
lawyer told me to tell y’all
about what happened at the
Bank of the Bahamas, Har-
rold Road, when the man got
shot.”

Detective Hinsey told the
court that he subsequently
transported Knowles to the
Central Detective Unit.

Knowles’ attorney Perry
Albury suggested during
cross-examination that his
client had not said what the
officer claimed he did. Detec-
tive Hinsey, however, stuck
by his testimony.

The trial has been
adjourned until Thursday at
10am.

Deputy director of Public
Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-
Bethel, Stephanie Pintard,
Anthony Delaney and Lennox
Coleby are prosecuting the
case.

Attorneys Craig Butler and
Devard Francis are repre-
senting Jamal Glinton, attor-
ney Dorsey McPhee is repre-
senting Sean Brown and attor-
ney Perry Albury is repre-
senting Dwight Knowles.

TRU eee aL



WORKERS TAKE UP seaweed from Long Wharf Beach as part of the Ministry of the Environment’s

beautification programme.

m@ By GLADSTONE
THURSTON

THE R M Bailey Park is
to be transformed into a
recreational facility similar
to the Fish Fry at Nassau’s
Western Esplanade, Minis-
ter of the Environment Earl
Deveaux Said.

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ing recreational value in all
our public places by stimu-
lating economic activity and
putting people to work doing
things that help improve the
ambiance of our natural
environment,” said Mr
Deveaux.

In a weekend interview,
the minister updated the
media on the government’s
beautification and clean-up
programme launched in
downtown Nassau on
December 9, 2008.

Mr Deveaux said the Envi-
ronmental Court will be
made operational again to
address littering and indis-
criminate dumping.

Objectives

The beautification and
clean-up programme has two
main objectives — to provide
jobs for unemployed persons
and to address “increased
criticism about the filth in
New Providence,” Mr
Deveaux said.

“We are now entering a
phase where you will sce us
in Bain and Grant’s Towns
taking out derelict vehicles
and garbage from junkanoo
shacks, residential areas and
business places,” he said.

New native Bahamian
trees are going to be planted
in parks and along the high-
ways’ median strips.

“We will keep the pro-
gramme going but in a sus-
tainable way where the road
verges, parks and beaches
will be cleaned,” said Mr
Deveaux.

He said there will be
boardwalks created at places
like the R M Bailey Park
“where we expect that they
would look similar to the

Fish Fry where we would
have benches, observation
places and parking spaces.”

Already the ministry has
advertised its schedule for
regular residential garbage
collection utilising new
equipment.

Also, there is a pro-
gramme for householders
and business operators to
have their garbage disposed
of into the landfill, he said,
adding that those who indis-
criminately litter will be
prosecuted.

There is already approval
for the Environmental Court
to meet on Saturdays.

“There is a large element
of public education that is
going to be important,” said
the minister, “but our first
duty is to dispose of the lit-
ter and have such means
available to the general pub-
lic in a way that it is not a
burden to them.”

The response to the pro-
gramme, he said “has been
tremendous.”

The Ministry of Tourism
complimented the effort and
the government praised the
Department of Environ-
mental Health Services,
headed by director Melony
McKenzie.

“We are more than
pleased that we are getting
the kind of support in the
public domain from the
clients we are seeking to
serve,” said Mr Deveaux.

“We believe it will only
get better.

“As we make bins avail-
able, as we make the routine
of garbage collection and
disposal better, people will
respond accordingly.

“Everybody is happier in a
cleaner, healthier environ-
ment.”



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 7



Abaco launches Bahamas

Christian Network on TV

ABACO officially became the first Family Island
to launch a television station with the opening of the
Bahamas Christian Network on the weekend.

Attending the official launch on Saturday in Dun-
das Town, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham com-
mended Silbert and Dolly Mills on this achieve-
ment.

“T am happy to join Silbert and Dolly Mills on the
occasion of the official opening of the Bahamas
Christian Network television station here in Dundas
Town, Abaco. Silbert, you are a trailblazer and an
entrepreneur extraordinaire. You make your fami-
ly and friends and our community here in Abaco
very proud of your vision and your accomplish-
ments. And of course, as a descendant of Mayagua-
na, you are a source of pride for all Mayaguani-
ans,” Mr Ingraham said.

The prime minister said that he is extremely
impressed with the new television station and has not
seen its like anywhere in the Bahamas.

“T’ve not been in a station in the Bahamas like this
before and I have been to them all. Now the entire
Bahamas is going to be exposed to Pastor Mills’
immense talent and programming. I am confident
that Pastor Mills will deliver a television service
which will make not only Abaco, but the

Bahamas proud.

“T commend both Dolly and Pastor Mills for their
hard work and commitment to excellence, principles
which have served them well in the operation of all
their business undertakings,” he said.

Minister of National Security and Minister with
responsibility for broadcasting Tommy Turnquest
said that this new television station opens new vistas
for Abaco and gives the island a new voice.

“What the people of Abaco will watch, and the
new voice it will hear, will come to them from the
Bahamas Christian Network, BCN, with Mr Silbert
Mills at its helm. It has been said that with the con-
stant need for information, changes in lifestyles,
economic and social advancement, and the demands
on families and working parents, television is step-
ping into many of the traditional roles of the family,
the church and schools.

“BCN has determined that programmes reflective
of our status as a Christian nation is what will guide
any influence it would exercise here in Abaco.

“Mr Mills and Radio Abaco have already distin-
guished themselves by providing important media
service on Abaco, including the news insert on the
island aired by an existing television station,” Mr
Turnquest said.

Postal worker retires after 40 years of service

m@ By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

AFTER 40 years of service to
the Bahamas Post Office Depart-
ment, Dolores Pinder officially
retires today.

She joined the Post Office
Department as a dispatcher in the
Sands Road location and climbed
the ranks to retire as senior super-
intendent of the Cable Beach
Post Office, a post she has held
for seven years.

“I did the work of the senior
officer when I started working at
the Post Office. I enjoyed it and
learned a lot. I was responsible
for registered mail between Nas-

relationships she formed particu-
larly during her tenure at the
Cable Beach branch.

“T interacted with a lot of
clients and made many friends
and formed lasting relationships.
To this day I still communicate
with some of them and I also
communicate with former co-
workers who left the Post Office,”
said Mrs. Pinder.

One of those persons is Tina
Johnson, a client who resides in
Mayaguana. Another was a Visi-
tor from Bermuda who acciden-
tally left her wallet in the Post
Office. After receiving a phone
call from Mrs Pinder she later

sau and the Family Islands. Then
Isorted the mail to and from the
Family Islands. I continued in reg-
istered mail then moved to the
stamp counter,” said Mrs Pinder.

She worked at the Shirley
Street branch for five months, the
Penny Savings Bank section, and
she held brief stints at the post
office in Clarence Bain building.

Mrs Pinder said that with the
exception of an ancillary worker,
she was the first woman to be
employed in the dispatching
department then located on
Sands Road.

“T worked with men like Mr



Letisha Henderson/BIS

DELORES PINDER, a 40-year postal
worker retires from the Public Service.

Lunn, Kenneth Moss and Charles
Williams and other men. I did not
encounter any discrimination as
the first female in that area. The
heavy mail bags had to be lifted,
but the men did that. We had a
good relationship. They didn’t
show me any disrespect. I enjoyed
working with men,” she said.
Mrs Pinder has fond recollec-
tions of her years in the public
service. Included in them are the

returned to collect it and they
have been friends ever since.

Asked to describe her 40 years
of service, Mrs Pinder said, “I
enjoyed my work. You have to
like what you do. If I had to do it
all over again I would do it the
same way.”

Prior to going on pre-retire-
ment leave, Mrs Pinder received a
plaque and a gift from Postmaster
General Godfrey Clarke. She also
attended a four-day pre-retire-
ment planning seminar organised
by the Department of Public Ser-
vice which she said she thor-
oughly enjoyed.

aw

Kelare

we ama
A PRECIOUS GIFT
TOANY FAMILY



POU RITES OA eC
NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica) will visit Freeport and
Nassau from 9 to 11 March 2009 and will be available to discuss any individual problems
concerning passports and nationality issues.

Easy Financing 8% fixed rate with
10% Down Payment.
We handle the paper work!

Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent by courier direct to the
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FREEPORT: MONDAY, 9 MARCH (5
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NASSAU: TUESDAY, 10 MARCH and WEDNESDAY, 11 MARCH

10:00am to 4:00pm at British Honorary Consul’s residence in Winton



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mel #7.) 42



Peg Oc)
Tel. (242) 352-3601 / 350-9000

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34' 1984 Wellcraft Californian - Asking: $98,000.00
2 Diesel 3126 Caterpillar engines. Westerbeke Generator
12,000 btu A/C, Sleeps 4
Stove, refrigerator, Microwave, Head/Shower

Water Maker/Ice Maker

Electronics equipped for fishing and Island Hopping.
Very well kept. Must see.

Reason for selling is to upgrade to larger boat.

ROC AR YL Yaa Te UR

ae em OR ORGS eta M eer Mer ete Ecce
terms of sale, The Purchase and Sales Agreement constitutes your legal docu-
ment and supersedes any and all communication and proposals whether written
I ad eMac aie ec





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Pj der: Tyneral Home

vier Beyond ‘Miaurere”

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570) 993-1951 * CELL: 357-4617

FANNIE PINDER President

A Memorial Service

for the late
Sylvia
Cole-

will be held at 4:00pm at Pinder's
Palmdale
Palmdale, Rev. Charles Sweeting will

Funeral Home

be officiating. She is survived

brothers, Robert and Charles (Chuck)
Hall; two sisters, Theodora (Teddy)
Albury and Joan Graham; two sister-in-
law, Jean and June Hall; one brother-in-
law, Gary Albury; two granddaughters,

FROM page one

company also owns.

ham said.

FROM page one

he saw the large crowd of school.
boys surrounding the police offi

alr.

as the shot was fired. No one
was injured.

According to eyewitnesses,
around six police cars and a
police bike arrived at the scene
near 3 G’s Snacks on Bernard
Road following the incident,
but no arrests were made.

ASP Evans said investiga-
tors are following significant
leads and key players have
been identified.

A schoolgirl in grade eight
at LW Nash said students were
shaken by the shooting just
metres from the school around
five minutes after the final
school bell sounded at 3.10pm.

She said most pupils were in
the schoolyard waiting to be
collected when they heard the
gunfire.

“T was scared,” she said.

“T thought someone was
coming running down here to
shoot up.

“Everyone had just come
out of school so the majority of
children were out here.

“A lot of people went to see
what happened but when I
reached everything was fin-
ished.”

Ave.,

by her two

Jessica and Wendy Guy; four nephews,

Jock and Richard Hall, Stuart and lan

Graham; six nieces, Valerie

Albury, Dawn Walkine, Linda Hall,
Sheila Scott and Erin Paniagua.

Totally Yours,
Totally Yaris

Mall at Marathon
March 27 & 28



FROM page one

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dilapidated building on Bay Street which the

“We expect that owner will either cause his
property to be developed or consider selling it
to government or the government will con-
sider what is in the public interest,” he said.

Mr Ingraham added that one of the options
being considered by the Government as it
moves ahead with the revitalisation of the
downtown area is extending Woodes Rodger’s
Wharf as far as Armstrong Street.

“Whether there will simply be a boardwalk
or if there’ll be vehicular traffic up to some
point (has yet to be determined),” Mr Ingra-

Shot fired

officer had been passing when



cer and took the initiative to }
intercede by firing a shot in the :

The boys ran from the scene

Part of $200m loan

The Prime Minister previously informed
parliament that the loan would go towards
filling the gap left by a 7.6 per cent shortfall in
revenue compared to forecasts for the first six
months of the 2008/2009 budgetary period —
amounting to $51.6 million — and to funding
Government’s “stimulus programme,” con-
sisting of accelerated capital works projects.

Yesterday he also confirmed that one of
the capital projects specifically set to be fund-
ed by the loan will be the dredging work
required at Nassau Harbour to make way for
some of the world’s largest cruise ships to dock
there by the end of this year.

According to the Prime Minister, bids from

FROM page one

significant number of employers
who have not paid on time,” Mr
Cargill said.

In its efforts to enhance con-
tribution payments, and bring
about effective changes at NIB,
the Board recently completed
its 8th Actuarial Review, which
called for the strengthening of
penalties for late or non-pay-
ment of contributions and “to
introduce new legal measures
such as garnishing to assist the
compliance effort.”

In his address to the Rotary
Club of West Nassau last
month, Mr Cargill foreshad-
owed these recent develop-
ments.

Mr Cargill: “You might be
aware of our increased efforts
to ensure delinquent employers
honour their NIB contributions.
While legal measures are our
last resort, and the Courts are
utilized only as a last resort, we
are seeing a significant increase

FROM page one

The Tribune tried to reach Ministry of Health

added.

NIB files over
100 cases for
back payments
in the past month

in legal cases and, in fact, incar-
cerations.

“The ability of the Board to
take effective punitive measures
will be critical going forward,
because, unfortunately, many
of the 16,000 employers in this
country (that includes busi-
nesses and self-employed per-
sons) are not paying contribu-
tions regularly or at all. And
many who are paying are not
paying on time,” he said.

While non-compliance places
workers in a very precarious
position, NIB’s fund is designed
to protect employees, and as
such is obligated to pay benefits
even if the employer is behind
on their contributions, Mr
Cargill revealed.

international firms to conduct the work are
now being evaluated.

He said Government expects to award the
contract by early April, for work to begin by
July 1, 2009, and to be completed by around
October.

As aresult of dredging, he added, between
six and 14 acres of new land may be created.
He said that 1,200 feet of additional land will
be formed at Arawak Cay and will be bulk-
headed — a “very expensive operation,” he

Downtown redevelopment will require
“hefty public sector investment of up to $100
million,” said the Prime Minister, as he invited
members of parliament to give their views on
the issue as they contribute to the mid-year
budget debate.

Almost 200 govt
IT workers set to
share $555,000
FROM page one

and the payments will be
retroactive to 2004.

Mr Laing said the decision
affects those workers in the
public service payscale D.

“That’s where you put all
of the people who work in the
information technology area.
Those scales were created
many years ago and really the
kind of work IT people do
today is far more expansive
than what they would’ve been
called to do in that D scale
(before).

“So they’re now upgrading
the scale so the compensation
for the scale is enhanced,” he
said.



TB tests conducted

officials yesterday for confirmation on the number of
persons tested during this most recent outbreak.

However, with the permanent secretary out of
office, acting Permanent Secretary Creswell Sturrup
said he would have to inquire about the matter as he
was relatively new to the post and did not know
about the outbreak off-hand.

The Tribune did not receive a return call up until
press time last night.

Tuberculosis is spread through the air, when per-

sons who have the disease cough, sneeze, or spit.
One third of the world’s current population have
been infected with mycobacterium tuberculosis,
and new infections occur at a rate of “one per sec-
ond.”

“However, most of these cases will not develop
the full-blown disease; asymptomatic, latent infection
is most common. About one in ten of these latent
infections will eventually progress to active disease,
which, if left untreated, kills more than half of its vic-
tims,” the website warns.

contribute one per cent of the insur-
able wage to government. A tenta-
tive date of January 1, 2010 is being
considered for this new tax, Mr
Ingraham told Parliament during his
contribution to the 2008/2009 mud-

“T previously indicated that the

Proposed unemployment assistance

Government was considering an
unemployment insurance pro-
gramme for workers in the
Bahamas,” the Prime Minister said.
“T am pleased to say that the actu-
arial work is virtually complete and
that we expect to be able to bring
legislation to Parliament during the
course of this month or certainly by
early next month at the latest with a
view to producing an unemployment
benefit for employed persons.”

While the prime minister did not
specify the length of time a person
must be unemployed to qualify for
the aid, he said government will try
to accommodate as many out of
work people as possible.

“We are seeking to affect a
scheme that will guarantee for a lim-
ited period of time (between 13 and
26 weeks) persons to get up to 50
per cent of what they would have
been contributing towards.

“In other words someone who

was contributing on the basis of earn-
ings of $400 or more per week would
be eligible to receive one-half of that
as an unemployment benefit under
the scheme for this period," he
said.

Mr Ingraham also said govern-
ment funds “in the double digits" —
but not more than $20 million —
will be transferred from NIB's Med-
ical Reserve Fund for the unem-
ployment assistance plan.

To sustain this programme,
employees and employers will have
to contribute about one per cent of
the insurable weekly wage at a
breakdown of either 60 per cent paid
by the employer and 40 per cent paid
by the employee, or a breakdown
of 50 per cent and 50 per cent,
respectively, Mr Ingraham said.

For example, the insurable wage
ceiling of $400 per week would
amount to a contribution $4 per
week to the scheme.

"Eventually it is going to be
required for employers and employ-
ees to pay a sum of money towards
the continual operation of unem-
ployment scheme in the Bahamas,"
he said, adding that due to the cur-
rent economic downturn this new
fee will not be required until early
next year.

After the morning session, leader
of opposition business in the House
of Assembly Dr Bernard Nottage
told The Tribune he could not suffi-
ciently analyse the effectiveness of
the proposed scheme based on the
minimal details provided by Mr
Ingraham.

"What we don't know is what you
have to do to qualify, in other words,
how long you've been unemployed,
what happens to people who have
been unemployed prior to the 'crisis'
but who also have been paying
National Insurance contributions
over the years, but there are some
questions to be answered before one
can give a reasonable evaluation of
it," he said.

PM on CLICO policyholders

FROM page one

here in The Bahamas who can assume the business
and provide the coverage that CLICO policyholders
purchased without any loss to the policyholders

Mr Ingraham’s communication outlined the series
of events that placed CLICO in its current state,
including a $73.6 million loan from CLICO to a
real-estate company that — through the significant
decline in the Florida real estate market — ulti-
mately compromised the insurer’s “financial integri-
ty”.

The Prime Minister also stressed that the decision
to liquidate CLICO was taken only after very care-
ful consideration of the interest of the policyholders,
staff and creditors of the company in the Bahamas
and in the region and only after discussions by the
Registrar with the principals of the company over
many months urging and directing them to inject
additional capital and liquidity into the CLICO,
without success.

“The overriding evidence suggested that in order
to protect the policyholders, numbering some 23,000
in The Bahamas and 29,000 in the region, which is
the ultimate responsibility of the Registrar of Insur-
ance Companies, steps had to be taken to ensure that
the assets of CLICO were not further compro-
mised,” Mr Ingraham said.

The Prime Minister said since 2004 CLICO began
making excessive cash advances called “loans to
subsidiary” to CLICO Enterprises Limited.

Loans were granted at a rate of interest of 12 per
cent per annum with no fixed maturity date.

In 2007, loans to subsidiary represented 58.56 per
cent of total assets and 68 per cent of invested assets.

Mr Ingraham said that these advances to CLI-
CO Enterprises Limited were made to the US based
Wellington Preserve Corporation’s, Florida real-
estate project.

This US investment is in respect of a 600-acre
real estate development with a reputed value of $80
million. A write-down of $25 million occurred in
2007, mainly as a result of the decline of sales in the
Florida real estate market and the non-completion
of the project. As at December 31, 2008, loans to
subsidiaries of CLICO were $73.6 million.

Mr Ingraham said that it was these advances total-
ing $73.6 million by CLICO that compromised its
financial integrity, as neither Wellington Preserve
Corporation nor CLICO Enterprises Limited are in
a position to repay the loans from the company.

“Additionally, with the significant decline in the
Florida real estate market and the $65 million need-
ed to complete the Wellington Preserve Project,
the market value of the property is now substantially
less than its initial book value, further deteriorating
the financial situation,” the prime minister said.

He said that it appears that CLICO never sought
the required “no objection” from The Bahamas
Registrar of Insurance Companies in connection
with the Company’s investments, loans to sub-
sidiaries or related party transactions.

“Concern was expressed about this matter and a
request was made for information regarding all
investments undertaken by the company within and
outside The Bahamas. In fact, at one of the 2007 pru-
dential meetings, the Registrar of Insurance Com-
panies demanded that the company return the then
$53 million invested in order to reduce the inter-
company loan balances. The company gave assur-
ances that it would, I am advised, but failed to do
so,” Mr Ingraham said.

It was after the receipt of the 2007 audited finan-
cial statements in July 2008 that the extent of the real
estate investments was again highlighted. On
December 22, 2008, a letter was sent to CLICO
placing the following requirements and restrictions
on its operations:

That it realize repayment of all inter-company
balances not later than Friday, January 9, 2009, and,
that

e¢ Any investments/advances of any nature to
related parties and or subsidiaries; or

¢ Any advances/loans of any nature to non-relat-
ed parties other than policy loans in the normal
course of business; or

¢ Any borrowings or mortgages; or

¢ Any investments in real estate; or

e¢ Any advances to directors or senior manage-
ment; or

¢ Any dividend payments to shareholders; or

e Any guarantees to any entity; or

e Any new or changes to the company’s insurance
products;

Require the prior approval of the Registrar of
Insurance Companies.

“The investments were not repaid within the time
given. CLICO, however, requested to meet with the
Minister of State for Finance to inform its position.
The Minister agreed to a meeting which was sched-
uled for January 29, 2009, which CLICO subse-
quently requested be rescheduled. The new meet-
ing was rescheduled for February 5, 2009, which
CLICO also failed to attend,” the prime minister
said.

“The Government regards this matter as a very
serious one and will continue to monitor the situa-
tion with CLICO and provide regular updates to
the public,” the prime minister said.

On February 24, 2009, a winding-up Order was
granted by the Supreme Court appointing Craig
Gomez of Baker Tilley Gomez as Provisional Liq-
uidator for CLICO.

A hearing of the application for liquidation is
scheduled to be heard on March 17, 2009.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



ai

Survivor clinging
to overturned NFL
player's boat

SPORTS
TAMPA, Fla. i
Associated Press :



A MISSING boater found
clinging to an overturned

boat was rescued Monday
off Florida’s Gulf Coast, but
the search continued for two }
NFL players and another }
man aboard who didn’t }
return from a weekend fish- }

ing trip.

Survivor Nick Schuyler, a
former University of South }
Florida player, told rescuers }
that the 21-foot boat was }
anchored when it flipped
Saturday evening in rough :
seas and that the others got }
separated from the boat, }
Capt. Timothy M. Close }
said. Schuyler, who was }
wearing a life vest, had been }

clinging to the boat since
then.

with free-agent defensive
lineman Corey Smith and

former South Florida play-

er William Bleakley,
remained missing.
Television footage showed

Schuyler conscious but weak
as he was being taken off a
helicopter at Tampa Gener- }
al Hospital and placed ona }
stretcher. The hospital }
declined immediate com- }

ment.

Guard would search for the

three missing men for “quite

awhile.”
The four left Clearwater

Pass early Saturday in calm }
weather, but heavy winds }
picked up through the day }
and the seas got heavy, with }

waves of 7 feet and higher,

peaking at 15 feet on Sun-

day. A relative alerted the

Coast Guard early Sunday
after the men did not return :

as expected.
The Coast Guard had
searched about

Everglades-manufactured
boat by Monday morning.

Everglades boats are built }
with compressed foam }
encased in Fiberglas, which }
makes them difficult or }

impossible to sink.

Waves had subsided to 6 }
to 8 feet, still enough for a }
small craft advisory, Nation- }
al Weather Service meteo- }

rologist Todd Barron said.

Cooper and Smith, who

were teammates with the

Tampa Bay Buccaneers in }
2004, have been on fishing }
trips before, according to }
Ron Del Duca, Smith’s }

agent.

Richmond, Va., is 6-foot-2,

250 pounds and had 30 tack-
les, including three sacks, }
and an interception in 12 :

games last season for the
Detroit Lions.

Cooper, 26, who is 6-foot-

3, 230 pounds, has spent five

seasons with five different ;

teams, appearing in 26

games with the Buccaneers
in 2004 and 2005, but playing }

sparingly since. He grew up

in Gilbert, Ariz., and his }
father Bruce is a prominent }
sportscaster for KPNX-TV }

in Phoenix.

Knicks sign 7-1
center Samb to
10-day contract

@ BASKETBALL
NEW YORK

Assocaited Press

THE NEW YORK Knicks
signed 7-foot-1 center Cheikh :
Samb to a 10-day contract }

Monday.

Samb, a second-round draft
pick in 2006, joins his fourth }

team this season. He started

with Detroit, was traded to }
Denver and then traded to }

the Los Angeles Clippers.

Samb, from Senegal, aver-

aged 0.9 points, 1.4 rebounds

and 0.63 blocks in 16 games

for the Clippers before he
was waived Feb. 16.

In 20 career games, he’s
averaged 1.1 points, 1.5 :

rebounds and 5.4 minutes
The Knicks’
increased to 13 players.

The boat belongs to Oak-
land Raiders linebacker }
Marquis Cooper, who along }

Close said the Coast

16,000 }
square miles of ocean for the }

The 29-year-old Smith of }

roster i

BGDSA opens new season this week

ON Saturday, the Bahamas Govern-
ment Departmental Softball Association
will officially open its 31st season at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

Thora Sweeting, who has served as
the association’s president for the past 12
years, said it had grown by leaps and
bounds and was now considered the
most exciting recreational league in the
country.

“The league has served a positive pur-
pose since its inception,” said Sweeting,
referring to the initial season in 1979.
“It has brought persons in the Public
Service together, engendering friend-
ships which are sustained and memories
that will last a life time.”

Sweeting said over the years the
BGDSA had made significant progress
in softball, both locally and internation-
ally and she anticipated that the future
shone brightly as evident through the
tremendous interest and support dis-
played by both their fans and spectators.

“Tam so excited about our 31st
anniversary, the opportunities and chal-
lenges that are ahead of us as we move
forward and attempt to accomplish all of
our goals for 2009,” she said.

“T hope that each of you share my
excitement, as I look forward with eager
anticipation to the full support of our
members and fans.”

On Saturday at noon at Baillou Hills,
Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister will deliver the
keynote address at Baillou Hills.

Alvin Smith, the Speaker of the House
of Assembly and former president of the
BGDSA, along with Romell ‘Fish’

LOS ANGELES Angels’ Kendry Morales slides home to score against the Colorado Rockies in the first inning Monday, March 2, 2009,

Knowles, president of the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation, are both expected to
make brief remarks.

Throwing out the ceremonial pitches
are Reginald Ferguson, Commissioner
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force; Clif-
ford ‘Butch’ Scavalla, the Commodore of
the Royal Bahamas Defence Force; Ken
Griffin, president and CEO of Bahamas
Telecommunications Company; Joe
Johnson, manager of Premier Importers
and Sandy Schaefer, president of Robin
Hood Enterprises.

Entertainment will be provided by the
Aquinas College Marching Band, CC
Sweeting Dance Group, RM Bailey and
CR Walker Junkanoo Groups and God
Missionary Dance Angels.

The opening ceremonies will climax
with a junkanoo rush-out and fireworks
display at 6:30 pm.

At 1:45 pm, there will be the releasing
of the balloons.

At 2 pm, the first game will get under-
way between the 2008 ladies champions
Police Royals against 2008 runners-up
Finance Health Invaders.

Shortly afterwards, 2008 and sixteen
(16) consecutive men’s champions
Defence Force Floaters will battle 2008
runners-up Police Chiefs.

The bouncing castle, ballooons and
lots of prizes will be given out to the
children and fans on opening day.
Thompson Trading personnel will be on
hand to give out paraphernalia while
supplies last.

The opening ceremony will be broad-
cast live on 104.5 FM from 2-6 pm.

In her president’s report of 2008,

aa i zo NNNENN)

â„¢

_*

during a spring training baseball game in Tucson, Ariz.

Los Angeles Angels
beat Rockies 12-3

@ BASEBALL
TUCSON, Ariz.
Associated Press

ANGELS ace John Lackey showed
why he gets paid to pitch and not hit in
his spring debut.

Lackey did just about everything right
in Los Angeles’ 12-3 victory over the
Colorado Rockies on Monday while on
the mound, throwing two innings of hit-
less ball.

“The arm felt great,” Lackey said. “I
didn’t throw the ball inside for strikes
like I needed to, but other than that, it
was a pretty good place to start.”

The Angels ace retired all six batters
he faced, with one strikeout.

Lackey had such an easy time he went
to the bullpen after his designated two
innings to throw a 10-pitch bullpen ses-
sion.

At the plate, though, Lackey barely
moved the bat off his shoulder during a
three-pitch strikeout.

“(I was) told not to swing at any-
thing,” Lackey said, laughing. “It would
have cost me something.”

The Angels have good reason to pro-
tect Lackey. He missed the first six
weeks of the 2008 season because of a
strained triceps.

Lackey, who ended up going 12-5 with
a 3.75 ERA, said he spent extra time
on an exercise program to strengthen
his elbow and shoulder as a preventative
measure.

“Thave not felt any pain going back to
last spring,” Lackey said.

While Lackey barely broke a sweat,
Colorado starting pitcher Franklin

Morales was rocked for seven runs on

nine hits.

a,

Sweeting said the season got underway
with pomp and circumstance. The games,
according to Sweeting, were well attend-
ed and the fans support was not where it
ought to be, however, some adjustments
would be made to correct the situation.

“We had an excellent softball season
and for the first time for a very long time
that the league finished its season extra
early, which was a plus,” she said.

“We had one death in the league last
year, Charles ‘Wire’ Smith, a former
player of the Defence Force Floaters.
He is sadly missed by all of the mem-
bers and fans.”

This year’s Player’s Appreciation Day
on Saturday, July 25 will be held in his
honour and called the “Charles ‘Wire’
Smith Plater’s Appreciation Day.”

Sweeting took the time out to con-
gratulate the three-time defending ladies’
champions Police Royals and 16-time
men’s champions Royal Defence Force
Floaters.

The runners-up were the Finance
Health Invaders in the ladies’ division
and the Police Chiefs in the men. The
Floaters won the pennant in the men’s
Paradise League, the Chiefs in the men’s
Tropical League and the Invaders in the
ladies.

The league, which is comprised of
eight ladies and ten men’s teams, could
not be as successful without the com-
passionate, sensitive and patience exhib-
ited by the umpires, namely Dave Mor-
timer, Van Johnson, Darren Mortimer,
Phil Culmer, Robert Smith, Cyril Smith,
Michael Hanna, Thomas Sears and Ross
Coleby.

le to hi
7 4
Ps i



BGDSA president Thora Soon



Sweeting also mentioned chief statis-
ticlans Marjorie Delaney and Rozina
Taylor, as well as scorers Althea Clarke,
Loretta Maycock, Karen Richardson,
Bridgette Sweeting, Celestine Ford,
Christine Jenoure and Ms McCardy for
their efforts.

All teams are advised that rosters and
entrance fees must be brought in before
May 3. Any teams in violation of meet-
ing the deadline will not be allowed to
play unless they meet their obligation.

Billups set to play
Pistons at Palace
for 1st time

: â„¢ BASKETBALL
:? DETROIT
i a Associated Press
| ? CHAUNCEY BILLUPS

? acknowledges it will be emo-
? tional to play at The Palace
? for the first tume as an ex-Pis-
? ton.
i = Just wait until the Denver
? Nuggets guard hears and sees
? the reaction Tuesday night
? from fans who still adore him
? and wish he was still playing
? for their team.
i Billups will likely hear one
? of the loudest ovations an ex-
? Detroit player has heard in his
? first game back in the Motor
i City.
i = It might only trail the out-
? pouring of appreciation for
: Gordie Howe, when the Hall
? of Fame player known as Mr.
i Hockey was representing the
? Hartford Whalers in the 1980
? NHL All-Star game at Joe
? Louis Arena.
i “Tm sure it will be emo-
? tional,” Billups said. “I had a
? lot of great years there. I’m
? sure it’s always going to be my
? home away from home. It will
? be pretty emotional, but it will
? be a lot of fun.”
i Pistons president of basket-
? ball operations Joe Dumars —
? the man who traded Billups
? — has no doubt what kind of
? reception Billups will get.
i “Chauncey should get a
? tremendous ovation,” Dumars
? told The Associated Press on
i Monday. “And, he will get a
? tremendous ovation.

“He deserves it.”

i Detroit made the unpopu-
? lar move to create playing time
? for second-year pro Rodney
? Stuckey, to clear about $20
? million in salary cap space and
? to give the team a new look in

Elaine Thompson/AP Photos

Angels’ catcher Jeff Mathis had two
homers among the seven extra-base hits
Morales allowed. Mathis went 2-for-2
with three RBI.

“Tm not frustrated at all. I know any-
body can have a bad day,” Morales said
through an interpreter. “I understand
that as long as I am able to command
the fastball on both sides of the plate it
is going to be fine. Mentally and physi-
cally lam ina good place right now.”

Morales, after throwing two shutout
innings against the Chicago White Sox
in his first spring appearance, gave up a
third homer to Brandon Wood.

Wood, who was 3-for-4 with three
RBIs, also had a run-scoring double.

The Rockies left-handed pitcher is
among the candidates to earn the final
spot in the starting rotation.

“T am not concerned about (the start-
ing job) because I can’t control that,”
Morales said. “The biggest thing is I feel
good mentally and physically and just
had a rough outing and have to move
on. Iam not going to lose sleep about it
because it is out of my control.”

The Rockies continued to struggle at
the plate. They did not get a hit until
Yorvit Torrealba had a single in the
fifth. Matt Murton had a two-run homer.

The Angels’ Adam Pavkovich went
3-for-5 with four RBIs. Andrew Romine
also had three hits. Notes: Los Angeles
center fielder Reggie Willits was
scratched with tightness in his abductor
muscle of his left leg. The third year
player is 2-for-6 with an RBI so far this
spring.



LOS ANGELES Angels’ Chris Pettit races
toward third after hitting a triple as Colorado
Rockies players relay the ball to the infield in
the third inning Monday, March 2, 2009,
during a spring training baseball game in
Tucson, Ariz.

i the postseason.

In the short term, the trade

hasn’t helped the Pistons out.

If they can add a star or two

i this summer or next, it might
? be viewed differently.

Billups was one of the most

i popular Pistons during his sev-
? en-plus seasons with the fran-
? chise he helped win the 2004
? NBA title as finals MVP,

advance to at least the East-

: ern Conference finals the past
? six years and win 50 or more
i games every year as an All-

Star point guard.
Ben Wallace was the face of

i those teams, but Billups was
i? the voice.

He was the first to speak to

i reporters after games — win
? or lose — and that in part led
? to fans getting to know one of
? the most likable players in the
? league. Billups is looking for-
? ward to seeing the red-white-

and-blue clad fans again and

? perhaps chatting a few up at
? courtside.

“Tt will be fun to get back

to that city that I love so dear-
? ly, the fans that I love so dear-
i? ly,” Billups said.

His fame in Detroit has only

? grown this season because the
? Pistons have plummeted from
? NBA elite to mediocre status
? since he was traded to Den-
? ver on Nov. 3, 2008 along with
? Antonio McDyess and Cheikh

:

Samb for Allen Iverson.



PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



THE BAHAMAS OLYMPIC ASSOCIATION

BOA continues bid to revamp image

@ by RENALDO
DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

In a continued effort to
revamp its image and separate
the new Bahamas Olympic
Association from the old
regime, association executives
continue to seek necessary
constitutional amendments,
and foster the development of
the relationship between var-
ious core sports.

BOA Secretary General,
Romell Knowles said to avoid
many of the transgressions
made in the past, the associa-
tion will ratify its constitution
and operate under compliance
with the International
Olympic Committee.

“We need to make sure that
the majority of the voting
rights always stay with the fed-
eration and we will make sure
that is spelt out very clearly
in the constitution. We will be
reviewing some changes nec-

Mi Executives seek constitutional amendments
H Move to build links between core sports

essary to take place in our
constitution that should bring
us in compliance with the
IOC,” he said, “As of now the
current draft of the constitu-
tion is not in compliance and
we will be working diligently
behind the scenes to correct
the flaws to make the present
to our membership and to the
IOC so that the constitution
is aligned and can be accept-
ed.”

Recently, Judo, Wrestling
and Gymnastics have been
added to the list of BOA core
sports, expanding the contin-
uously growing lists of disci-
plines. “Gymnastics, Judo and
Wrestling have been approved
by the Association and we will
be reaching out to them in

Clarins shows
commitment to
Grand Bahama

Company sponsors golf classic

Grand Bahama Island — In keeping with their desire
and commitment to become good corporate citizens of
Grand Bahama, Clarins recently participated as spon-
sors of the American Women's Club Golf Classic which
was held on February 21st at the Reef Golf Course in

Lucaya.

Not only did the leading beauty line company assist
as Saphire Sponsors of the event, they also donated 130
Clarins gift bags, 71 of which were men’s bags which
consisted of one Clarins men product along with a sun
care product and a lip balm, and 59 women's bags which
consisted of a Clarins product along with a sun care and

lip balm.

Gift bags

Mr. Sylvain Clement, Grand Bahama branch
manager was on hand at the awards ceremony to assist
in handing out the gift bags containing their high quality

line of skin care products.

"We are pleased to be helping in some small way to
help make this worthy charitible event a success. We are
here to assist in the community as best we can,” said Mr.

Clement.

Since 1954, the Clarins Group has used its unrivalled
expertise in the field of beauty to produce the safest,
most effective products that deliver genuine results.
The Clarins Group has always made safe use a number-
one priority and, believing in the true efficacy of plants,
has no ingredients of animal origin in its formulas.

The Clarins product line is available at Esthetics Plus
Day Spa in Freeport and Prestige Perfumes in Port

Lucaya.



short order,” Knowles said,
“One of the things we want
to ensure is that the constitu-
tion will always be followed
when it comes to membership.
In the past it did not speak
very clearly on what it takes to
become a member of the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion so we want to clear that

up.”
Inclusion

Knowles, who also serves as
President of the Bahamas
Softball Federation said his
organization has experienced
the hurdles of inclusion into
the BOA.

“There has been some dis-
crepancies in the past, partic-

ularly for us in softball, we had
experiences where for a num-
ber of years we had been try-
ing to gain membership and
it was just not a clear process.
We want to eliminate any
doubts by any federation
which wishes to join the BOA,
the process will not be diffi-
cult to find,” he said, “Those
sports that are not Olympic
sports we want to include
them somehow. We are an all
inclusive organization, obvi-
ously our chief concern is
development of the Olympic
sports but we want to include
others as well that may not be
Olympic sports at this time.”

With the inclusion of more
sports under the BOA
umbrella, Knowles vowed the

association would have greater
transparency in how the aid
the development of each fed-
eration.

“Everyone wants to know
what is happening with the
solidarity fund and how to
access it and what is available.
Vice President Algernon
Cargill has also been charged
with the responsibility of
putting together a format to
pass on the federations so that
know how to access these
funds,” he said, “There is a
process that we in the BOA
have to follow and we will be
sharing that information in
due course. In the past infor-
mation has not been as forth-
coming as we would have
liked.”

“One of the
things we want to
ensure is that the
constitution will
always be followed
when it comes to
membership. In
the past it did not
speak very clearly
on what it takes to
become a member
of the Bahamas
Olympic
Association so we
want to clear that

up. 9



Romell Knowles

JAR TOUR OF BAHAMAS/MJ TIME TRIALS AND ROAD RACES



Cycling profile grows in Bahamas

Events increasingly
put spotlight on
the sport at home
and abroad

The Bahamas may not yet be a hotbed
of cycling, but events such as the JAR
Tour of the Bahamas and the MJ Time
Trials and Road Races have become
increasingly high profile in recent years
both locally and internationally.

The second edition of the MJ Time Tri-
als began as a series of Individual Time
Trials but in order to offer something for
everyone the organisers added a few road
races to the MJ TT series and this proved
to be very appealing to numerous cyclists.

The events took place on the western
side of the island of New Providence and
began on January 9, 2009 with a 10k time
trial and culminated on Saturday past
February 28, 2009 with a 40K time trial.

In between those dates were four oth-

Level 1

1st Place —- Tony Mackey
2nd Place — Justin Minnis

3rd Place — Antoniece Simmons
Ath Place — Amanda Graham

Level 2

Level 3

er time trials and three road races.

Among the many participants were
upcoming junior, Tony Mackey, and oth-
er more seasoned cyclists including but
not limited to, Lee Farmer, Jaime Not-
tage, John Cox, , Barron “Turbo” Mus-
grove ,Carmel Stucki, Christine Gangel-
hoff, Mark Holowesko, Wayne “Curly”
Price and Juliana Glinton. Not to be over-
looked was outstanding junior Jay
“Flash” Major who finished second over-
all in the very competitive Level 3 cate-

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UPDATE



HERE’S a look at the
results of the Junior Base-
ball League of Nassau
games played over the
weekend at the St.
Andrew’s Field of
Dreams:

TEE BALL
Grasshoppers def. Sand
Gnats 17-11

Knights def. Sidewinders
15-9

Raptors def. Blue Claws
COACH PITCH

Astros and Bluejays
played to 16-16 tie.

Cubs def. Athletics 13-10
Diamondbacks and
Angels played to 13-13
tie.

Sunday March 1

Cubs def. Astros 16-3
MINOR LEAGUE
Mets def. Rockies 3-2
Rays def. Royals 9-6
MAJOR LEAGUE
Indians def. Marlins 10-0
Reds def. Mariners 7-6
JUNIOR LEAGUE
Yankees and Cardinals
played to 12-12 tie.
Twins def. Dodgers 7-4
SENIOR LEAGUE
Phillies def. Tigers 18-13
Rangers def. Pirates 16-1



The routes consisted of cyclists taking
in sights and scenes while racing along
the Sir Lynden Pindling International
Airport, Coral Harbour Round-About,
Lyford Cay Hill at Templeton building,
and the South Ocean Blvd. loop, down to
Jaws Beach around Clifton Pier and onto
the newly constructed road just south of
the Albany Project.

The cyclists competed at 3 different

oO NPBA 2008-2009 Season

1st Place - Jamie Nottage
2nd Place — Wayne Price
3rd Place — Mark Davies
Ath Place — Carmel Stucki
Overall Winner’s Floating Trophy: Jamie Nottage

ist Place — lee Paniner

2nd Place — Jay Major

3rd Place — Baron Turbo Musgrove
4th Place — Mark Holowesko
Overall Winner’s Floating Trophy: Lee Farmer

Listed below are the first four finishers in the overall
event and the winners of the Floating trophies for First
Place in each category.

Overall Winner’s Floating Trophy: Tony Mackey



levels 1,2 and 3. The speed average for

level 1 was 17-19 mph, level 2 was 20-23
mph and level 3 was 24-27 mph. To deter-
mine the winner points from 10 to 1 were
given for each event, then the total points
were added together for each competitor.
Trophies were given to the first 4 posi-
tions in each category and an overall win-
ner’s floating trophy was given to the

individual with the most cumulative

points in the events.

THE New Providence Basketball Associa-
tion will wind down its regular season this
week at the CI Gibson Gymnasium.
Here’s a look at the schedule of games left

to be played:

Wednesday March 4

Electro Telecom Cybots VS Coke Explorers

Commonwealth Bank Giants

VS Police

Friday March 6, 2009

Coke Explorers VS Johnson Trucking Jumpers

Saturday March 7, 2008

2008/2009 Playoff kicks off at 7pm best 2 out of three
Here’s a look at the team standings at this point:

Vince Ferguson Division
John Archer Division

Electro Telecom Cybots 13-4
Commonwealth Bank Giants 13-3
Sunshine Auto Ruff-Riders 10-7
Police Crime Stoppers 10-7
Coca Cola Explorers 5-11
Cable Bahamas Entertainers 1-16
South West Printing Falcons 3-15
Y-Care Wreckers 9-9
Johnson Trucking Jumpers 11-6
Malcolm Park Boys 9-8





THE TRIBUNE

E TUESDAY, MARCH 3,



PAGE 11



ts

2009

"= Wh, LOS ANGELES

-- - \/) ANGELS BEAT

oe » ROCKIES 12-3

~~



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

COACH Andre Scott called
Bianca Stuart’s impressive per-
formance at the State Farm
Missouri Valley Conference
Indoor Championships over the
weekend as a “One Jump Won-
der.”

Stuart, the Bahamian rising
long jump star, emerged as the
Co-Female Field Athlete of the
Meet when she helped South-
ern I}]inois Salukis win the
women’s title with an 11-point
decision over Wichita State.

Selected along with Indiana
State’s Kylie Hutson, Stuart
racked up a total of 19 points
with her victory in her specialty
in the long jump, third in the
60 metres and sixth in the triple
jump.

Scott said the significance of
Stuart’s performances were the
facts that her leaps of 21-feet, 6
1/4-inches in the long jump and
39-2 both came on her first
attempts.

“She was a one jump won-
der,” Scott said. “It was a good
opener for her, so I just stopped
her. There was no need for her
to continue in the long jump
because there was no one who
would come close to her.

“Tt was a clutch performance.
She put it down the way she
should and she got the job done.
She also had the prelims of the
60 to run in, so we decided not
to let her use too much of her
legs. That was another reason
for her only taking one jump.”

Stuart, who completed her
senior indoor campaign by win-
ning the long jump title for the
fourth consecutive year, the first
by any athlete at the MVC.



STUART emerged as the Co-Female Field Athlete of the Meet when she helped Southern Illinois Salukis win

the women’s title.

“Everybody expected it so I
just tried to prove that I could
do it four times,” she said. “I
was excited. I guess. It was a
good feeling.

“It was for the team, not just
for me, so I was glad that I was
able to pull it off.”

Stuart’s winning leap turned
out to be a series of record
breaking feats that also allowed
her to earn a third place ranking
in the NCAA going into the
National Indoor Champi-
onships.

While she triumphed in the
long jump, Stuart, however, fell
short in the 60, clocking a sea-
son’s best of 7.62 seconds for
third place. Scott said he only

decided at the last minute to
enter Stuart in the triple jump to
garner a couple more points to
cushion their lead.

“She was another one jump
wonder because she only took
that one,” Scott said. “She want-
ed to take a couple more, but
she had the 60 final to run right
after she took that jump.

“We didn’t want to take any
risk of interrupting that perfor-
mance (in the 60), so we didn’t
allow her to jump anymore. She
did her job for us.”

Stuart, the 21-year-old
Queen’s College graduate, said
she never competed in the triple
jump, but when she was asked
to do it to secure some more

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points for the Salukis, she didn’t
hesitate.

“Tt was all about getting the
points for the team,” she insisted.

For the NCAAs, Scott said
the plan was for Stuart to go and
do exactly what she did at the
MVC and that is jump.

“If she can do the same type
of performance she did this
weekend, she will undoubtedly
be in the top five,” Scott said.
“Once we get into the final, she
can just go after the title. But it
won’t be easy.”

Stuart, who first qualified for
the NCAAs in January, said she
just wanted to compete at the
best of her ability.

“Those girls really compete

hard. Everybody try to fight for
the top spot,” Stuart said. “It’s
pretty much the same girls that
[I’ve competed with for the past
couple of years, so we all fight
hard.”

Having qualified for the
nationals for the past two sea-
sons, Stuart has had a best
showing of 13th. But her goal
is to surpass that as she also
goes after another lofty feat —
the 22-ft barrier.

“T’m getting there. ’'m being
patient. So slowly be surely I

will get there so that I can go to
the World Championships,”
said Stuart, who hopes that she
will not be left at home when
the Bahamas national team
head to Berlin, Germany in
august.

Last year, Stuart painfully sat
at home after she failed to make
the team for the Olympic
Games in Beijing, China. But
this year, she said she was jump-
ing with vengeance as she tried
to secure her spot on the World
Championship team.

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

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mg By LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE Department of Immigra-
tion challenged itself to better
execute its functions as it official-
ly launched its 70th anniversary
celebrations at Christ Communi-
ty Church on Sunday.

In attendance were Anita
Bernard, secretary to the Cabi-
net; Brent Symonette, Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of
Foreign Affairs and Branville
McCartney, Minister of State for
Immigration who addressed the
department’s personnel.

The Bahamas Immigration
Department was established by
an Act of Parliament on January
1, 1939. In its initial stages, the
Department was comprised of 12
persons. Its portfolio fell under
the Colonial Secretary of his
Majesty’s Government, England.

The mission of the department
is “to regulate the movement of
people across the borders of the
Bahamas so as to ensure the secu-
rity, facilitate economic advance-
ment and promote the harmo-
nious social development of

Kristaan HA fiovalam II/BIS

THE DEPARTMENT of Immigration kicked of its 70th anniversary cele-
brations on Sunday, March 1, 2009 at the Christ Community Church on
Bellot Road. Pictured is a representation of the department amongst the

congregation.

the Bahamas.”

It is against this backdrop that
the anniversary is being held
under the theme “Historic Past,
Dynamic Future”, Mr McCart-
ney said.

“It is from this backdrop that

we as a department seek to per-

ml

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form our duties and functions in
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, while being mindful of
the challenge to remain globally
competitive, so that generations
of unborn Bahamians can benefit
from the legacy left by their fore-
fathers,” he said.

Mr McCartney then challenged
the department to improve in
areas where it has not performed
well and “to raise the bench-
mark” in those areas where it has
done a great job.

As an organisation in a global
community, he told the depart-
ment that it must be prepared to
handle the various challenges it
will face, one being the global
economic downturn, which has
directly impacted the country’s
premier industry — tourism.

“Immigration’s role in our soci-
ety is vital, at every tier in the
department what we do is criti-
cal,” he said.

Mr McCartney also said lead-
ers of the department have com-
mitted to training and retraining
of staff, so as to enhance the pro-
ductivity within the workplace.

“We have committed to refo-
cusing our attention to customer
service. As we are all aware, peo-
ple are the most important ele-
ment in any business and they
determine your success or fail-
ure,” he said.

Mr McCartney thanked the
pastor of Christ Community
Church Dr Deanza Cunningham
for hosting the department. “It is
through our working together —
church, government and commu-
nity - that we will be able to build
a successful nation,” he said.









FirstCaribbean: $20m project ‘Leaves

THE TRIBUNE

usin

TUESDAY,



MARCH 3,

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

‘No decision’ on
possible lay-offs

Bank dismisses downsizing claims as ‘rumours’

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter and
NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FirstCaribbean Internation-
al Bank (Bahamas) managing
director yesterday said “no
decision” had been made on
any downsizing, as speculation
swirled throughout the
Bahamian financial services
industry that as many as 100-
160 staff at the commercial
bank might be laid off.

Sharon Brown, telling Tri-
bune Business that the BISX-
listed financial institution did
not “respond to rumours”,
said FirstCaribbean continued
to monitor the general eco-
nomic climate, and its poten-
tial impact on its operations,
as all other Bahamas-based
businesses did.

On the lay-off speculation,
she said: “At this point, we’ve
not made any decision.” Ms
Brown said FirstCaribbean
would first discuss any lay-offs
with any staff that might be
impacted.

And she added: “It’s a
rumour in the market. Like
any other business, everyone
is monitoring the economic
situation. Everyone has to do
that. All prudent businesses
do that.”

Release

Ms Brown’s comments were
reinforced in a FirstCaribbean
press release issued in
response to Tribune Busi-
ness’s inquiries.

The statement said: “We do
not respond to rumors, and
like all businesses in the

CLICO ‘insolvent’

to tune of $9m

Colinalmperial, Atlantic Medical, Family
Guardian and British American among suitors,

with no bail-out coming from government

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



CLICO (Bahamas) was estimated to be insolvent to the tune of $9
million when it was placed into provisional liquidation, the Prime
Minister told the House of Assembly yesterday, as he effectively end-
ed any lingering hopes the creditors may have had that the company
would be bailed-out by his government.

Providing an update on the current situation, Hubert Ingraham
said the February 24 winding-up petition was initiated by the Registrar
of Insurance due to the fact that the company’s liabilities exceeded its

SEE page 2B

Cable profits grow 19.7%

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

CABLE BAHAMAS net income for fiscal 2008 rose by 19.7
per cent, to $25.8 million compared to $21.6 million the year
before, as the BISX-listed utility provider again enjoyed strong
growth across most revenue streams.

The company exceeded its previous year’s revenues by $5.4
million or 7.2 per cent to $81.4 million, compared to $75.963 mil-
lion the year before.

Cable Bahamas said data revenues grew 19.7 per cent last
year, representing 15.1 per cent of total revenues. Internet rev-

SEE page 5B

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Bahamas we are continuing
to monitor the economic situ-
ation and impact on our busi-
ness. If any issues arise
impacting our staff, it is our
custom to discuss with them
and their representatives first
before discussing anything in
the public domain.”

Dion Foulkes, minister of
labour, told Tribune Business
yesterday that he had received
no details regarding impend-
ing lay-offs at FirstCaribbean,
describing the claims as just a
“rumour”.

Darron

Cash, First-

Caribbean’s chief financial
officer, told Tribune Business
to speak to Ms Brown when
contacted by this newspaper.

Yet the press release and
Ms Brown’s statements are far

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

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first plans behind

* Eleuthera-based developer adjusts to market conditions, moving
from large condo hotel to boutique, high-end villa-style residences
* Hoping for ‘imminent start’ once government approvals
received, as banks and five-star brands removed from equation

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A resort developer yesterday told Tribune
Business he had adjusted his Eleuthera-based
project from a condo hotel to a 20-40 strong
hotel villa complex, the first phase of which
will likely represent a $15-$20 million invest-
ment.

Eddie Lauth, the principal behind the
French Leave development at the former
Club Med site in Governor’s Harbour, said his
adjustments to changing market conditions -
the absence of bank and debt financing, and
the onerous requirements of five-star hotel
brands - had created a project that was “the
right scale” for Eleuthera and other Family
Islands.

Many Eleuthera residents have expressed
scepticism over whether the French Leave
development will ever materialise, given that
little construction has gone into the ground
since the project was first approved by the

former Christie admin-
istration in 2004.

However, Mr Lauth
said he and his fellow
investors had “never
thrown in the towel”
despite the numerous
setbacks they had
encountered, and were
hoping “to start [con-
struction] in the imme-
diate future” once all
outstanding government
approvals were received.

Recounting the project’s recent history
since an autumn 2007 Town Meeting was held
in Eleuthera, Mr Lauth said the condo hotel
plans hit a roadblock when the global credit
crisis led to the “collapse” of the $200 million
bond issue that was being organised to finance
it by Standard Bank of South Africa.

SEE page 5B

oo Cem mec HU



CLICO affair represents a damning
indictment on financial regulation

aybe he did
not intend to.
But without
explicitly stat-

ing it, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham’s statement yesterday
to the House of Assembly on
CLICO (Bahamas) provided a
damning indictment of the
insurance regulatory regime and
its lack of enforcement bite.
For Mr Ingraham confirmed
that the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office had harboured major
concerns about the massive
exposure/risk concentration the
insurer had built-up in loans to

Experienced financial experts

Strong investment performance

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wholly-owned subsidiaries, the
investments that were to even-
tually sink it, as far back as
2004.
Detailing
(Bahamas) had “never sought

that CLICO

the required ‘no objection’”
from the Registrar to its invest-
ment strategy, not to mention
its loans to subsidiaries and



related party wheelings and
dealings, the Prime Minister
revealed that the regulator first
expressed its concerns almost
five years ago - back in 2004.
“In several prudential meet-
ings from as early as 2004, 2006
and 2007, I am advised, concern

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009



















FROM page 1B
Nassau Airport
eee Saeeny assets by $9 million. In addition,
its Turks & Caicos branch was
unable to pay $2.6 million in
claims.

Some, led by Bishop Simeon
Hall, had called on the Govern-
ment to bail-out CLICO
(Bahamas), thus protecting the
investments made by its life and
health insurance policyholders,
plus annuity depositors.

Yet the Prime Minister said
yesterday that he did not antici-
pate the Government “providing
any guarantees for the operations
of CLICO (Bahamas)”. Such a
position, although not what cred-
itors will want to hear, is not sur-
prising.

The size of CLICO (Bahamas)
solvency deficiency is still uncer-
tain, given that some 59 per cent
of its assets, as at year-end 2007,
were tied up in the Florida-based
Wellington Preserve real estate
investment.

That investment was already
written-down, or impaired, in val-
ue from $80 million to $65 mil-
lion in 2007, and the further
plunge in Florida real estate val-
ues means that the liquidator
would only realise a ‘rock bot-
tom’ value if it were to be sold -
certainly well below the sums
invested so far.

In addition, with the national
debt - already possibly at 45-46
per cent of gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP), according to Tribune
Business calculations - and fiscal
deficit expanding well beyond the
Government’s targets, revenues
projected to be off by $150 mil-
lion, and a $200 million loan being

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape Supply

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks
a qualified landscape supplier(s) to grow trees, palms,
shrubs and groundcover (items) in accordance with the
required schedule and speculations for completion of
Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. This is a supply
only contract.

Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th,
2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs




























TENDERFOR
GENERAL INSURANCE

The National Insurance Board invites tenders for coverage of its General
Insurance portfolio (property, etc.) for the year commencing June 1, 2009,
and subject to renewal for a further two (2) years.

Suttably licensed insurance companies interested in submitting a tender, with
a detailed proposal, should collect an insurance bid package from the Director's
Office, Baillou Hill Road, Nassau, Bahamas.

All tenders should be sealed, marked “Tender for General Insurance” and
should be hand delivered by 4:00 p.m. on March 31, 2009, to artive at:

The Ditector’s Office
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
Clifford Darling Complex
Ballou Hill Road
Nassau, Bahamas

The Board reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

Persons collecting the bid package must present a letter of authorization
from the licensed tnsurance company before the package can be teleased.

4



“There’s no
preferred company.
There are four
companies in the
Bahamas who have
expressed an interest,
all of whom appear to
be capable of pur-
chasing, and there
will be a selection

from that list.”

Hubert Ingrabam

drawn down, the last thing the
Ingraham administration will
want to do is take on more debt
and commitments by bailing-out
CLICO (Bahamas).

Meanwhile, the Prime Minis-
ter announced yesterday that four
other insurance companies, who
he declined to name, had
expressed an interest in acquir-
ing CLICO (Bahamas) life and
health insurance book of busi-
ness,

A sales package is likely to be
presented to the four suitors
before the coming weekend.
After that, they will be expected
to approach the liquidator for any
additional information they need,
and then make an offer if they so
choose. Any sale would have to
be approved by the Registrar of
Insurance and the Supreme
Court.

Tribune Business understands
that the four suitors are Coli-
nalmperial Insurance Company,
Family Guardian Insurance Com-
pany, British American Financial
and Atlantic Medical. It is also
understood that Harold Antor, a
principal with Tristar Insurance
Agents & Brokers, is interested,
too, and foreign interest is also
beginning to stir.

The Prime Minister said yes-
terday: “I understand there are
four insurance companies in the
Bahamas that have expressed an
interest, and that they, on the face
of it, are entities that are likely
to have the capability to do so.

“The liquidator [Craig ‘Tony’
Gomez] by this weekend is going
to be in a position to have finan-
cial offers made by those poten-
tially competing entities.”

In response to claims from the
Opposition that Colinalmperial

>.

~SSS,

THE TRIBUNE

Senior executives from the Bahamas-
based Grant Thornton accounting firm
have met with the minister of state for

finance to discuss several issues, including
matters affecting their profession and the

need for pensions and investment fund

legislation.

Paul Andy Gomez, Grant Thornton’s
Bahamian managing partner, and the fir-
m’s assurances and advisory partner,
Kendrick Christie, also discussed the
recession’s impact on the business com-
munity with Zhivargo Laing. The meeting
was part of Grant Thornton’s initiative
to meet with financial services industry
stakeholders on public interest issues.

Pictured, from L to R: Paul Andy Gomez,
Zhivargo Laing, and Kendrick Christie

had already been selected as the
buyer, Mr Ingraham said:
“There’s no preferred company.
There are four companies in the
Bahamas who have expressed an
interest, all of whom appear to
be capable of purchasing, and
there will be a selection from that
list.

“The many persons who own
these [CLICO] policies would
want to know if they stand to lose
money. It is still too early to
determine whether or not policy-
holders will lose any money.
However, it is quite possible that
all the policies can be sold to a
viable insurer here in the
Bahamas, who can assume the
business and provide the coverage
that CLICO policyholders pur-
chased without any loss to the
policyholders.”

Mr Ingraham said there some
23,191 policyholders in the
Bahamas, to whom CLICO
(Bahamas) owed $44 million in
habilities. Some 90 agents, all of
whom have been told to remain
at home, and 51 administrative
staff were based here. The latter
group are still working, but the
Prime Minister emphasised that
their employment was unlikely to
continue indefinitely.

All told, when CLICO
(Bahamas) branches in Turks &
Caicos and Belize were factored
in, along with policies held over
from the now-closed Barbados
and Cayman branches, the com-
pany had issued 29,017 policies
and $100 million in liabilities.

Mr Ingraham said yesterday:
“T am advised that CLICO’s oper-
ations in the Bahamas had some
17,297 life insurance policies with
annual premiums of $5.1 million;
11,230 accident and sickness
health policies with annual pre-
miums of $3.2 million; 2,689 annu-
ities with annual premiums of $4.6
million; and 7,402 group policies
with annual premiums of $1.8 mil-
lion.

“All told, the total individual
and group policies amount to
some 38,618 with annual premi-
ums of $14.8 million.”

Of the company’s assets, Mr
Ingraham said $32 million worth
were located in the Bahamas.
This consisted of $14 million in
cash, bonds and fixed deposits;
$14 million invested in Grand
Bahama wholesaler, GB Mill-
works, its land and buildings; 12.5
acres of land in the Westridge
area of Nassau, valued at $3 mil-
lion; and $1 million invested in
townhouses in Freeport.



CLICO ‘insolvent’ to tune of $9m

The “excessive cash advances”
CLICO (Bahamas) started mak-
ing to its subsidiary, CLICO
Enterprises, and which were ulti-
mately largely invested in the
Florida-based Wellington Pre-
serve real estate project, began
in 2004.

Some $37.092 million was
advanced to CLICO Enterprises
that year, and this increased to
$53.761 million in 2005 and
$68.302 million in 2006, before
declining to $57.010 million in
2007. Yet according to the com-
pany’s unaudited financials for
2008, this exposure ballooned to
$73.6 million.

“Tn 2007, loans to subsidiaries
represented 58.56 per cent of total
assets and 68 per cent of invested
assets,” Mr Ingraham said.

“These advances to CLICO
Enterprises were made to
Wellington Preserve Corpora-
tion’s Florida project. This US
real estate investment was
financed mainly from US dollar
annuities placed in the Turks &
Caicos Islands subsidiary,
advances from CL Financial and
a US mortgage on the property
where both Wellington Preserve
Corporation and CLICO are
mortgagors.

“This US investment is in
respect of a 600-acre real estate
development with a reputed val-
ue of $80 million.

“A write-down of $25 million
occurred in 2007, mainly as a
result of the decline of sales in
the Florida real estate market and
the non-completion of the pro-
ject. As at December 31, 2008,
loans to subsidiaries of CLICO
were $73.6 million.

“Tt was these advances,
totalling $73.6 million, by CLICO
that compromised its financial
integrity, as neither Wellington
Preserve Corporation nor CLI-
CO Enterprises are in a position
to repay the loans from the com-
pany.

“Additionally, with the signifi-
cant decline in the Florida real
estate market and the $65 million
needed to complete the Welling-
ton Preserve Project, the market
value of the property is now sub-
stantially less than its initial book
value, further deteriorating the
financial situation.”

Mr Ingraham added that
investors who purchased CLICO
(Bahamas) annuities, attracted in
by the above-market rates of
return, were not in “as
favourable” position as the insur-
ance policyholders.



TEMPTATION



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 3B



Lucayan Tropical to buy 300 acres

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

Lucayan Tropical, the Bahamian-
owned Hydroponics farmer, will increase
production with the acquisition this year
of 300 acres of land in Andros owned by
the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial
Corporation (BAIC), the company’s
marketing manager told Tribune Busi-
ness. He said the Bahamas was currently
only producing to 5 per cent of its agri-
cultural potential.

Roger Rolle, who is also Lucayan
Tropical’s sales manager, said although
the company has not identified what

Company set to expand in Andros with new crops, as executive says Bahamas producing 5% of agricultural potential

crops they intend to seed farm on the
Andros site, they will move away from
the tomatoes and lettuce they produce
through hydroponics in New Providence.

“We have not decided what crops yet,
but possibly bananas, potatoes... We’re
going to look at what the major prod-
ucts are that are consumed in New Prov-
idence,” he said. Lucayan Tropical
presently produces Beefsteak Tomatoes,
Plum Tomatoes, Grape Tomatoes, Cher-
ry Tomatoes, Romaine Lettuce and their

own mix of loose-leaf lettuce they call
the Lucayan Mix, at its Airport Industri-
al Park site in Western New Providence.

The company distributes its wares to
Bahamian food stores at a price that,
according to Mr Rolle, is lower than
imported produce.

“We distribute locally to major food
stores Super Value, City Markets, Cost
Rite, Solomons,” he said. “Our product is
world class at a standard price and the
best quality by far.”

While speaking at the second annual
Agricultural, Marine Resources and
Agribusiness exposition, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham restated the urgency
of developing a sustainable agricultural
sector in the Bahamas.

He said that apart from food produc-
tion, the growth of farms and farming
will produce much-needed jobs.

The Prime Minister said food produc-
tion stands at 10 per cent of agricultural
potential throughout the Bahamas, with

some 2,000 farmers operating. “By
increasing production to 50 per cent of
our potential we could create significant
activity in the economy, beginning with
the creation of a significant number of
additional jobs,” he said.

Mr Rolle said he thought production
was around 5 per cent of potential, but
agrees that 50 per cent would be an
acceptable level to be sufficiently sus-
tainable and to lower import costs for
produce significantly.

& Direetion!

The Anglican Central Education Authority

‘No decision’ on
possible lay-offs

FROM page 1B

from an unequivocal
‘absolutely no lay-offs or
downsizing’ in tone and con-
tent. Reading between the
lines, some might argue that
lay-offs at FirstCaribbean are
likely to be coming, possibly
imminently, although no final
decision may have been made
- and the affected employees
not yet informed.

Several financial industry
sources, speaking to Tribune
Business on condition of
anonymity, suggested that the
100-160 figure being bandied
about was too high, and cuts
that deep - impacting 10-20
per cent of the bank’s staff -
would be impossible, given
that it would impact customer
service and efficiency.

There is nothing to suggest,
though, that FirstCaribbean is
in financial trouble, or that
depositors or creditors are in
any danger.

Speaking to the company’s
fiscal 2008 performance, Ms
Brown said: “We’re very

CU ee ty

proud, certainly in terms of
the results we able to achieve
in the current economic envi-
ronment.”

One analyst told Tribune
Business yesterday that the
FirstCaribbean Bahamian
unit’s net income for the 2008
fourth quarter, of $26.641 mil-
lion, which was flat against
2007 comparatives, had been
in line with his expectations.

And Ms Brown said that
subsequent to the 2008 first
quarter, when the bank’s net
income was impacted by
accounting issues related to
hedging and other aspects,
FirstCaribbean had been
“pretty much around the $26
million mark every quarter -
$26.2 million in the second
quarter; $26.7 million in the
third quarter; and $26.6 mil-
lion in the fourth quarter”.

“All the issues took place
in the first quarter,” she
added.

FirstCaribbean’s net income
for the year to October 31,
2008, dropped by 26.6 per cent
to $83.904 million, compared

to $109.86 million. While total
interest income was down at
$263.605 million, compared to
$288.601 million, the decline
in total customer deposits
ensured interest expense
dropped to $108.028 million
from $141.441 million.

More critically, at year-end
2008, some $200.853 million
worth of FirstCaribbean loans
had been impaired, repre-
senting 7.9 per cent of its total
loan book. When this was
added to the $368.069 million
loans that were past due, but
not impaired, some 22.4 per
cent of FirstCaribbean’s loan
portfolio was either impaired
or past due at the year-end
date. FirstCaribbean saw a
67.7 per cent rise in loans to
the business community and
government that were not
impaired, but were past due,
at year-end 2008. In particular,
the value of these loans that
were 31-60 days past due rose
year-over-year to $82.26 mil-
lion, compared to $21.679 mil-
lion the year before, not far
off a quadrupling.

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites

apolications for teaching posite

és available at

St. John's College and St. Anne’s School on New Providence, and Bishop Michael Eldon
School on Grand Bahama.

English Language and Literature
Mathematics

Pniysics General Science
Guidance Counselor

Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12

Grades 7-12

(2 positions)
(2 positions)
{1 position)
Bishop Michael Eden School, Freeport Grand Bahama

Qualifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from an accredited
University together with a Teacher's Certificate from an accredited

Applications
Street,

Completed

Teacher's College.

may be collected from the Education Department located

d on Sands Road off of East

d application forms with the requested supporting documents must be received by

the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 13° March 2009, and must be addressed to:-

The Director of Education

Anglican Central Education Authority

P. 0. Box N656

Nassau, The Bahamas

Providing quality education in a Christian enviranment by developing the whale child: spiritually
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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





enor TTL

An indictment on financial regulation

a
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

D-111 Qualified Environmental Monitor

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks a
Qualified Environmental Monitor for Stage 1 of the LPIA
Expansion Project. The scope of services includes:

Review and approve contractors’ environmental plans;
Develop inspection check lists and inspect the work of
contractors for compliance to environmental plans;
Facilitate and communicate with regulatory authorities on
behalf of the Project on environmental issues; and
Prepare weekly and monthly reports.

Interested proponents must be qualified, familiar with local
regulatory laws and agencies and familiar with International
Best Practices (Equator Principles, IFC Standards}.

Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up
after 1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 5th, 2009 at
3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

trucks and trailers.

engine problems.

systems.

P.O. Box N-3207
Nassu, Bahamas





DIESEL MECHANIC WANTED

A well established local company is seeking to employ a certified Diesel Mechanic on a
full time basis. Successful candidate must possess diesel mechanic certification from a
recognized training institution and have a minimum of 5 years experience in the field.

* Candidate must have extensive knowledge and experience on diesel engine

* Must be able to use computer diagnostic equipment to troubleshoot and correct

* Must be able to implement and maintain a preventative maintenance program
for the company’s fleet of vehicles throughout the Bahamas.

* Must have experience with auto-marine hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical

* Experience with emergency generators and electric motors would be a plus.

* Must be willing to work flexible hours and travel to the family islands.

Salary based on certification and experience and compensation and benefit package is
very competitive.

Deadline for applying: March 18, 2009
DA 67911 c/o The Tribune

FROM page 1B

was expressed about this mat-
ter,” the Prime Minister con-
tinued yesterday, “and a request
was made for information
regarding all investments under-
taken by the company within
and outside the Bahamas.

“In fact, at one of the 2007
prudential meetings, the Reg-
istrar of Insurance Companies
demanded that the company
return the then $53 million
invested in order to reduce the
inter-company loan balances.
The company gave assurances
that it would, I am advised, but
failed to do so.”

What this appears to show is
that despite recognising the
problem from an early stage -
the high risk concentration, with
more than 50 per cent of the
company’s exposure tied up in
one asset (and a related party
loan at that) - the Bahamian
regulator failed to act proac-
tively, and aggressively, to force
CLICO (Bahamas) and its
Trinidad parent to comply. It
barked, but never bit.

And CLICO (Bahamas) and
CL Financial recognised this.
Their now-empty assurances
seem to have been designed to
‘fob off? and keep the Regis-
trar’s Office at arm’s length, all
the while smugly confident that
the Bahamian regulator would
not take decisive action against
them and their non-compliance.

The big question, as Tribune
Business sees it, is this: KNOW-
ING THE POTENTIAL
PROBLEMS AT CLICO
BAHAMAS, WHY DID THE
REGISTRAR OF INSUR-
ANCE NOT IMMEDIATELY
BAR THE COMPANY





PRINCIPAL NEEDED



“It’s a failure on many levels, and
certainly the regulatory authorities
were not aggressively trying to
stop these guys getting in more
deposits and more liabilities. They
should have fought this company’s
case a long time ago, and stopped
it issuing annuities and liabilities”

PINION

FROM WRITING NEW
BUSINESS, BOTH INSUR-
ANCE AND ANNUITIES,
UNTIL THE SITUATION
WAS REMEDIED TO THE
REGULATOR’S SATISFAC-
TION?

Doing so may well have given
the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office the necessary leverage
to force CLICO (Bahamas) and
its owner to comply. The fact it
did not raised many questions
about the level of oversight
scrutiny and enforcement the
insurer was subjected to, not to
mention the Registrar’s sanc-
tions powers - or lack of them.

One financial executive told
Tribune Business yesterday:
“Tt’s a failure on many levels,
and certainly the regulatory
authorities were not aggres-
sively trying to stop these guys
getting in more deposits and
more liabilities. They should
have fought this company’s case
a long time ago, and stopped it
issuing annuities and liabilities”
until its problems had been
solved.

Rather than accept what
proved to be an ultimately
worthless $57 million guaran-
tee for CL Financial, which
promised to make good any
hole left on CLICO (Bahamas)
balance sheet if the Florida-
based real estate investment
bombed, the financial executive
questioned why Bahamian reg-
ulators did not impose tougher
requirements.



Apart from requiring CL
Financial to place $57 million
into an escrow account in the
Bahamas, the executive sug-
gested that regulators should
have asked for letters of credit
from a reputable financial insti-
tution to guarantee that the
exposure would be covered.

Another strategy, they sug-
gested, would have been to
insist on taking a first charge
mortgage over some of CL
Financial’s assets. This is what
Trinidad & Tobago’s govern-
ment had done, taking over CL
Financial’s 55 per cent stake in
Republic Bank and its share-
holding in a methanol plant in
return for injecting capital/liq-
uidity into the troubled financial
conglomerate.

Belatedly, the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office moved
towards taking decisive action,
but only on December 22, 2008,
just two months before CLICO
(Bahamas) was placed into lig-
uidation. The regulator called
for the repayment of all inter-
company loan balances by Jan-
uary 9, 2009, and imposed a
number of other restrictions on
the insurer, but by then it was
too late given CL Financial’s
woes.

While ultimately commend-
able, in Tribune Business’s opin-
ion this was a classic case of
shutting the stable door long
after the horse has bolted. It
would be unfair, though, to
blame this episode entirely on
the existing Registrar of Insur-





J&J CHISHOLM







CONSTRUCTION LTD.



















We have many unique home and apartment designs






The Anglican Central

Education Authority

invites applications from

qualified individuals for the position of PRINCIPAL, St. John’s College,

beginning September, 2009.

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in Education from a recognized
University, with at least (5) years accumulative administrative experience. The

applicant must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Providing leadership - set the climate and pace for success and high

achievement in the school.

- Organizing and supervising schedules, programmes, records and

procedures.

school

- Supervising and evaluating teachers and support staff.
- Managing records, school finances and end-of-year closing

procedures.

- Communicating with parents, community groups and organizations.
- Displaying consistent organizational and human relationship skills.
- Assisting the Education Department with and initiating Staff

Development Programmes.

Applicants should submit a cover letter,

Curriculum Vitae, copies of

degree certificates, three references and passport photographs to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION

ready to build. Free washer & dryer with any
contact signed before Sule 32, 2009,

ance, Lennox McCartney, who
only took office just over one
year ago, and inherited much
of the CLICO (Bahamas) mess
from his predecessor, Dr Roger
Brown.

Inevitably, perhaps, the CLI-
CO (Bahamas) affair and the
plight of the policyholders and
annuity depositors will become
politicised. True to form, among
those to leap instantly into the
fray was former foreign affairs
minister Fred Mitchell, who
claimed there had been “shock-
ing negligence” on the Govern-
ment’s part, especially since the
Registrar of Insurance had
known of CLICO (Bahamas)
problems for at least eight
months.

Mr Mitchell’s statement is
probably quite true. But what
he does not mention is that the
records show that CLICO
(Bahamas) high-risk investment
strategy began under the for-
mer Christie administration in
2004, with $37 million sent over-
seas, and this had expanded to
$68.302 million by year-end
2006 - the last full year that the
PLP government was in power
for. Therefore, the former
administration is perhaps even
more culpable than the Ingra-
ham government for failing to
take decisive action at a much
earlier stage to avert CLICO
(Bahamas) collapse.

If there is any good to come
from the whole sorry CLICO
(Bahamas) mess, and policy-
holders, depositors and credi-
tors can be forgiven for not see-
ing it this way, it would be to
get the regulations for the
Domestic Insurance Act tabled
in Parliament, so that the new
legislation can finally come into
effect almost four years after it
was passed.

But even that may not be
enough. As we all know, the
Bahamas has more than enough
laws on the books - the problem
is, they are not enforced. The
Domestic Insurance Act’s
implementation must be accom-
panied by the equipping of the
Registrar’s Office with the
resources, staff and technical
expertise for it to rigorously
enforce the law, and show it
means what it says.

Clearly, CLICO (Bahamas)
never believed it did. And this
speaks to wider problem that
funs through much of Bahamian
financial services regulation
(with the exception of the Cen-
tral Bank). Failure to enforce
the laws on the books under-
mines the integrity of the whole
supervisory regime, with peo-
ple taking encouragement from
the fact the rules are rarely
enforced and, if they are, the
most they can expect is a slap
on the wrist. Just look at the
Securities Commission’s recent
admissions on low compliance
rates on regulatory capital and
audited financial statements fil-
ing, and its failure to enforce
compliance. This, of course, cre-
ates a wider problem for the
Bahamas, as the Organisation
for Economic Co-Operation
and Development (OECD) and
its G-7 sponsors bear down on
this nation’s financial services
industry once again. Its regula-
tory defects will once again be
in the spotlight. As one attorney
once told Tribune Business:
“We do just enough to fly under
the radar” when it comes to
financial services supervision.
Going forward, that may not be
enough. When will someone in
authority wake up?

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

Box:

DA 69806

c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Friday March 27th, 2009.

by March 14, 2009.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 5B



$20m project ‘Leaves’ first plans behind

FROM page 1B

“While this was totally out of
our control, we did decide at
this time, not to rely any fur-
ther on the banks or, rely any
further on the various five star
hotel companies (that we liter-
ally spent a few years negotiat-
ing with) to commit, to starting
the project in the immediate
future,” Mr Lauth said.

As a result, he and his team
spent time assessing resort-
based developments across the
Caribbean and the Bahamas,
examining what had worked
and what had not.

As a result, he said they
realised that mega resorts,
involving huge infrastructure
and billions in investment, were
not right for the Family Islands,
since their scale and footprint
were totally out of whack with
local communities.

Instead, they decided to focus
on the single-villa, cottage-
based style of resorts such as
Pink Sands and Aman, and
adopted the premise of the
Anguilla-based St Regis resort,
which was financed from real
estate pre-sales and its own
resources, rather than the
banks.

As a result, the French Leave
South Beach Hotel Villas Pro-
gramme was submitted to the

Government for consideration
in spring 2008.

“Right now, we would say the
first phase is around $15-$20
million,” Mr Lauth told Tribune
Business. He added that this
phase would include some 20
oceanfront villas, with con-
struction of two-four of those
starting “right away” once final
approvals were received from
the Government.

Also included in phase one
would be the project’s recep-
tion area, pool and dining facil-
ities. “The hotel villa pro-
gramme is 20-40 hotel villas on
20 hotel villa sites, with an infin-
ity edge swimming pool, indoor
dining, outdoor dining pavilion,
tennis courts and reception,”
Mr Lauth said.

“The project is very similar
to the concept of the Pink Sands
Hotel on Harbour Island,
whereby, they have single,
detached cottages versus stan-
dard hotel rooms and/or stan-
dard condo hotel rooms.

“Presently, there is virtually
no market demand from buy-
ers to purchase, or banks and
hedge funds to finance, stan-
dard resort hotel rooms or stan-
dard resort condo hotels, any-
where in the
Caribbean/Bahamas market or,
the United States. It is antici-
pated that 100 per cent of the
French Leave South Beach

Cable profits grow 19.7%

FROM page 1B

enues grew by 10.5 per cent, accounting for 30.3 per cent of the
total, while cable revenues represented 54.5 per cent of total rev-
enues. The company saw 10.3 per cent growth in its digital TV

services.

“All business segments i.e. cable television, Internet, and
Data contributed considerably to the 2008 results, with Data and
Internet having the largest year-over-year revenue growth,”
Cable Bahamas said in a statement.

Operating expenses for the company last year saw a increase
of 2 per cent, up around $800,000 from the previous year’s

$37.8 million.

According to the company, the revenue growth last year was
“complemented by the careful management of operating
expenses” ,which accounted for the “modest” expenses increase.

The company’s earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation
and amortization reached $42.7 million, which represented an
increase of $4.6 million or 12.2 per cent over 2007.

Cable Bahamas operating income increased by around 13
per cent, up $3.5 million from $26.7 million in 2007.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
FARRINGTON INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution.
Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and par-
ticulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the

March 27, 2009.

Hotel Villas will participate in
the hotel rental programme.
“There seems to be a lot
more interest in something that
is more specialised, more bou-
tique and more high-end.
There’s absolutely no demand
for hotels and condo hotels.”

Mistake

On French Leave South
Beach Hotel Villas, Mr Lauth
acknowledged that previous
plans for French Leave may
have been a mistake, and
added: “This is the way to go.
Scale for the Family Islands is
critical. It has to be the right
scale, and we’re convinced this
is the right scale.

“There’s no better time than
right now to build. A lot of peo-
ple want work, the price is good,
and it really is the best time
now.”

Adding that there would be a
maximum of 40 villas, 20 on the
oceanfront and 20 with an
ocean view, Mr Lauth said: “It’s
so important for us to start, get
some work going, so people can
see the quality we’re talking
about. This is all self-financing.
We have it all lined up.

“We’ve never thrown in the
towel, and when the market
changes, you have either two
choices - change or get out of
the way. We’re very excited

about where we are right now.
We’re hoping we get the sup-
port of the Government, and
can start in the immediate
future.”

Mr Lauth said site clearance
had begun at French Leave two
weeks ago, and there was still
buyer interest, with 50 per cent
of the villas already pre-sold.
However, he added that the
project had been 100 per cent
pre-sold in early 2008, but 50
per cent of those buyers had
pulled out after construction
was unable to start as expect-
ed.

“With the pre-sales in place
for the start of the French
Leave Hotel Villas last Spring
of 2008, it was necessary for us
to begin the development no
later than Summer 2008, as we
had requested,” Mr Lauth
explained.

“Unfortunately, the
approvals for the same were not
received until October 9, 2008,
in the midst of the economic
meltdown. Without the
approvals last summer, some of
the pre-sales were in fact can-
celled, and thus it was neces-
sary for us to reduce staff on
site. It was necessary for us
again to revise our land plan to
accommodate the remaining
buyers and the potential new
buyers.

“Today, we continue to

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WHITE STALLION
INDUSTRIAL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 26th day of Januray 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)

FOUNTAIN STRAND LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the
Dissolution of FOUNTAIN STRAND LTD. has been completed,
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion of the
dissolution was the 13th day of February, 2009.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

endeavor to move forward with
closings for the hotel villa pro-
gramme, now in progress.
Recently, we've reached out to
Government officials to seek
assistance in helping us expe-
dite the remaining applications
for investment approval that we
submitted on January 12, 2009.”

In addition, Mr Lauth said
the developers also wanted to

re-open the former Club Med
marina, renaming it the French
Leave Marina, providing boat
owners with refuelling oppor-
tunities.

He added that he was in talks
with a Bahamian investor group
regarding a restaurant concept
that would be situated at the
marina.

FOR SALE

Two and Four Passenger Golf Carts

2003 Club Fairway Village Golf Cart $/N FQOR2 7294094
2003 Club Farway Village Golf Cart S/N PQ0327296096
2003 Club Farway Village Golf Cart $/N FQO327296097
2003 Club Farway Village Goll Cart i/N RQdg2? 294096
2003 Club Fairway Village Golf Cart $/N FQ03272946102
2003 Club Farway Village Golf Cart 3/N RQ0g27296103
2003 Club Farway Village Golf Cart 3/N RQcg27296104
2006 Club Carryall ll Bectic 3.75 HP. S/N 60511606767

No Phone Calls

Please send bids for golf carts no later than March iq
2009 to the attention of:-

Golf Cart Sales
Facilities Manager
Fax 363-6873
Email- Pigolfcarts(@amail.com

Please inclade amount of golf carts requested, bid price with contact infoemation,



a
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company













REQUEST FOR

QUOTATION

M-100, Test Well Drilling

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks the services
of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling
Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope

of services includes:










Drilling and pump testing of a 6’ pilot hole;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Return Well;

Flow testing of the 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Discharge testing of the 10” Feed Water Return Well;
Geophysical logging and flow testing of Pilot Hole and wells;
Water temperature logging and analysis of water quality and

chemistry;

Professional supervision, (i.e. Hydrologist).

Request for Quotation Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009.

Request for Quotation closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at

3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:
Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BRORERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 2 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.29 | CHG -0.19 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -43.07 | YTD % -2.52
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.84 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit Previous Close _Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $
Abaco Markets 0.070
Bahamas Property Fund 0.992
Bank of Bahamas 0.319
Benchmark -0.877
Bahamas Waste 0.105
Fidelity Bank 0.055
Cable Bahamas 1.255
Colina Holdings 0.118
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Dectors Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
6.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
11.23 12.04 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387 0.35
2.9230 -0.58
1.4376 0.28
3.3201 -1.94
12.6816 0.50
100.5606 0.56
96.4070 -3.59
1.0000 0.00
9.1005
1.0401 4.01
1.0330 3.30
1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Div $

7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.55
2.27
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
1.73
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50

7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
1.55
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50

0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

The Low Down Dirty Facts

5,000
1,724 11.0

55.6

What Is Litter?

Litter is any material that is disposed of incorrectly or
waste in the wrong place.

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

FBB17

FBB22 100.00

S2wk-Low EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

Main Types of Litter in The Bahamas

Beverage bottles
Fast food wrappers,containers and cups
Debris from unsecured loads
Abandoned or derelict vehicles
Household and commercial waste

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3201
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

Fidelity International Investment Fund 0.06
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0410 FG Financial Diversified Fund 4.10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(SS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

A message from the
Department of Environmental Health









SORRY, RANDY...

GUESS I
WHEN RANDY

RETURNS, HE

TECLSE KATHERING

THE JUPGE DIP
NOT WANT TO
TALK TO FUML

TICKET! THREE WEEKS
ON A FS

LUXURY &

CRUISE & OD



T COULD ORDER AN OFFICIAL
CHOCOLATE FROSTED
SUGAR BOMBS







© 2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved



MY GALL WENT

OVER THE FENCE
WHERE THAT
MEAN VOS



LOOK AT THIS, HOBBES!







“YOU WERE EXTREMELY “GEE, 1 MUST BE COMIN’
DOWN WITH SOMETHIN.”

NICE TODAY, DENNIS.”

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down
2 Once said to bea

Across
Fancy a number to be
perfect (5)
Victorian poet getting
sunburnt (8)
Possibly loves to find the
right answer (5)
War that’s breaking out in
Panama? (5,3)
Stretch — of river? (5)
Semi-wooden
court (3)
Unfriendly action (6)
Plays produced in
Madras (6)
In which to spend the rest
of your life (3)
A team competing
away (5)
Gives way and dies (8)
An addict may be
fined (5)
They welcome fare
increases (8)
Composition makes easy
point (5)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10
Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13
Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19
Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24
Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There,
29 Erst, 30 Persecutor.

Down: 1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele,
4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8
Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe,
16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20
Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25
Attic, 26 Heir.

MISUNDERSTOOD! | >









SEE, IT HAS A BATTERY-
POWERED PROPELLER ON
YP AND A BIG STAR ON
THE FRONT! ISNT THAT

IT WAS WONDERFUL
MEETING YOU, APRIL__.
S| LET'S HAVE LUNCH!
ACTUALLY, IT’S “TT
YOU HE WANTS
TO SPEAK TO...
HE'S IN THE
KITCHEN!

KATHERINE!
TiLt CALL YOU!

BUT ENOUGH ABOUT ME,
WHAT DO YOU WANT











www.Blondie.com.






IL VONTKNOW.HE oN ia
JUST ALWAYS SEEMS
To GE INA BAV



YoU HAVE TO SEND IN FOUR
BOX "PROOF OF PURCHASE.
SENS" TO GET IT, IT SANS,












Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday











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©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserve

THEM WE HAVE
IN COMMON...

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©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

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SO GRE. cad REREAD
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FOR GAME PLAYING
AND TEXTING

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ASULUTRAL

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Saturday’s
Sudoku Answer

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Saturday’s
Kakuro Answer





















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Difficulty Level * 3/02

bishop (8)

He should know how to
press a suit (8)

About the end of
December, reached
Santa’s base (6)

One outcome of hard
work? (5)

Clue that’s illuminating (5)
Stone made entrance (5)
Large roll of paper of
intricate design (3)

Not even curious (3)

The fighter’s craft (8)
Where flowers grow | get a
flower (8)

Outflowing currency (6)
Actual language used in
an American era (5)
Behave awkwardly when
you get the bill and get put
out (3,2)

Leaves with all debts
settled (5)

Across
1 A basis for soups (5)
8 Shredded cabbage
salad (8)
9 Pry furtively (5)
10 Form of pasta (8)
11 Spacious (5)
12 Plant used in
brewing (3)
16 To stew in closed
pan (6)
Yesterday’s Easy Solution 17 Impervious to
light (6)
18 Wet soft earth (3)
23 Point in

EASY PUZZLE

Across: 1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10
Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere,
13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet,
19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, development (5)
24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 24 Crepes (8)

29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. 25 Pleasure trip (5)
Down: 1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 26 A North African
Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 dish (8)

Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 27 North African
Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18
Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete,
23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun.

country (5)





















Difficulty Level *

7

Type of Indian
cooking (8)

Fried noodles dish
(4,4)

Pulpy salad

fruit (6)

Hickory nut (5)
Bear flowers (5)
Be in store for (5)
Edge (3)

Legume (3)
Seasoned smoked
beef (8)

A French

wine (8)
Advantageous (6)
An aromatic
flavouring (5)
Declare invalid (5)
Highly

decorated (5)











. annem é very ~ eee

































3/02







8/4 5/2/6/9]1 3/7 ES
3/7 918/5]/1/4 2/6 48/6 4/9|7BN4 3 9
116 81512419 713 ES cso Ba
519 7/1/3\/6/2 8\4 9/2 2/8/9 B79
4/3 217/9/8/5 6|1 3/4 5/1/2 M9 2 1
9/5 4/6/8/3/7 1/2 SUM 0 [3 Io 3 AEN
7/2 3/9/1/5/6 4/8 47/2 1 a7 2/5 8 3
618 1[4/7/2/3 915 9/8 2MN9)4|7 6 8







Famous Hand

South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
#Q109
910876
@K9
kK Q62
WEST EAST
3876543 aK?
V¥KQ3 ¥942
53 #310842
&5 &I97
SOUTH
aA
VAIS
#AQ76
&A 108 43
The bidding:
South West North East
L& 26 Dble 34
44 Pass 6 &

Opening lead — six of spades.

The United States won the 1996
World Olympiad Women’s Teams,
defeating China in the 96-deal final.
The final margin over the Chinese,
who during the past two decades
have become a world bridge power,
was 70 International Match Points.

In the final, the Chinese women
got off to a fast start, leading by 20
IMPs after the first 32 deals. But the
Americans gained 66 IMPs in the

next 16 deals and never trailed again.

Today’s deal is the one that thrust
the U.S. into the lead for good. When
Jill Blanchard and [rina Levitina held
the North-South cards, they reached
six clubs as shown. Blanchard’s dou-
ble of two spades was of the “nega-
tive” variety, and Levitina cuebid
four spades over East’s three-spade
nuisance bid to indicate a powerful
hand. Blanchard felt a five-club bid
would not do justice to her excellent
support for that suit, so she leaped to
slam.

West led a low spade, and East
withheld the king as South won with
the ace. Declarer drew three rounds
of trumps, ending in dummy, and
ruffed a spade in her hand, felling the
king. This allowed Levitina to dis-
card one of her heart losers on the
spade queen, so the slam came
rolling home.

At the other table, the Chinese
South, Zhang Yalan, also opened one
club, but her bid was strong, artificial
and forcing, saying nothing about
clubs. Juanita Chambers bid three
spades, and North, Gu Ling, bid
three notrump, ending the auction
without the Chinese locating their
excellent club fit. North made 11
tricks, but the Americans gained 12
IMPs,

Tomorrow: Score one for the defense.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.



THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 7B

ith



a =e





B

o D YUEN 6 Nn oD

Ca

For this dynamic group of
seniors, being part of a bi-
weekly gym class is something
far different from a responsibil-
ity or chore, it is who they are.

The class which is made up of
about 20 mostly retired women,
meets at Body Zone every
Tuesday and Thursday, where



The Tribune





@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

While the golden years
are commonly thought of
as a time to take a back
seat ” life, one group of they take part in aerobics and
seniors is going full trottle various light-weightlifting rou-

into the best days of their tines.
lives e Eighty one-year-old Betty

Roberts said she has been





AT TOP- 81 year-old Betty
Roberts and 66 year-old
Mary Darville are all smiles
after a recent work-out at
Body Zone.

a bett

DO YOU ever experience
that sinking feeling when you
hear, “Do we have to talk
about this?” or do you find
yourself saying, “Why do we
have to go over this over and
over again?” Why is it we feel
we have to repeat things and
in the process feel or be
accused of being a nag? We are
all guilty of giving someone less
than our full attention when
they want to talk to us. Some
people seem to be so much bet-
ter at listening. Is it just our
individual personalities, the way
we have been brought up or is
it something we can learn and
change ourselves? We know
that we can learn how to drive a
car, learn a foreign language
and re-sculpt our bodies when
we really want to. So what is
stopping us learning how to
become a better listener and
why would it be important?
Sometimes we may glance at
the television, newspaper,
change the subject or just drift
off mid conversation. In other
words, just not participate or
be present. As we half listen,
sometimes we already have the
answers to all of the speaker's
problems and all too often
jump in with advice, judgments
and opinions. But all we have
really done is listen to the con-
tents of the conversation and
missed the feelings behind the
words. By the end of the con-
versation the speaker may well
feel unsatisfied because they
were not understood and
accepted. If this becomes or has
always been the way that a cou-
ple relates or communicates
with each other, then in time
there will be an unwillingness to
open up and be honest. This
erodes at the very core of the
couple bond and knowingly or
unknowingly denies the depth
of mntimacy to develop. To have
a relationship where you can
relax, be open and be accepted
for yourself is very freeing. It
makes you happier, more ful-
filled and it is what everyone is
looking for.

So what we are really talk-

working out with the group
from the start of the class near-

ly ayear ago, and added that before then she was a regular at the

The grandmother said during the class, she takes part in aerobic
exercises, as well as minimal weights and other gym activities.

“T’ve got achy bones, and I’ve already gone to the physiothera-
pist which cost me a lot of money and didn’t do me any good.”

She said her experience at the gym is much less strenuous and
way more fun, especially because she was able to forge meaningful

friendships with the other ladies.

Where commitment to routine workouts may seem an issues for
most people, these women all delight in their weekly workouts and
in the quality time they get to spend with their workout buddies.

Sixty six-year-old Mary Darville, like Mrs Roberts has aching
bones, and rarely gets to talk to people face to face in her home.

Mrs Darville said: “Coming to the gym allows me to get out, see
people, instead of staying home and watching TV.”

Now suffering from severe arthritis in both of her hands and
feet, Mrs Darville said going to the gym enables her to be more
mobile and painless, “and is certainly beneficial, and helps to keep

me going.”

Instructor Della Thomas, said it is an absolute joy to work with
the women and said her decision to begin the class came from a
desire to make the gym a place where the elderly can feel at

home.

“Looking around in the gyms I saw that the elderly were
neglected. I saw that they would just hang around but were obvi-

ously in need of special attention.”

The routines which can last anywhere between 15 minutes to a
half hour, are designed around a thorough body workout for the
ladies, with as little strain on their bodies as possible.

With the class gaining significant increases in membership over
the past few month, interested seniors are invited to sign-up and
become a part of the exciting group.

How to become



ing about is effective listening
which essentially is listening
with empathy. This means see-
ing things from the other per-
son's point of view, putting you-
self in their shoes. It requires
full attention; not interrupting
with your views and opinions.
Asking questions and for clari-
fications encourages the speak-
er to open up and lets them
know that you are really listen-
ing. Acknowledge the speak-
er’s feelings, not your own, and
only give solutions if asked.
More than not the speaker only
wants a sympathetic car not a
quick fix. All these things may
be difficult to do or remember
but by consciously practising
this on a daily basis it becomes
easier and in time becomes
almost effortless. Some people
are very good at applying these
principles in their work situa-
tion but not at home with their
nearest and dearest. Becoming
aware and acknowledging our
behavior and how it affects
everyone around us is not an
easy thing to do. Men often say
that women do all the nageing
but nagging is just repeating
something over and over. This
means that someone was not

er listener

listening or picking up on the
escalating feelings of frustra-
tion and urgency. The way to
avoid getting to this stage is to
listen, be totally honest and
open up. This does not mean
that you have to agree to every-
thing that is being said and
there is no doubt that lack of
agreement can cause problems.
However once we feel our
point of view is understood
then most people are receptive
to trying to iron out the prob-
lems. Not everything can or
needs to be ironed out. It is pos-
sible to agree to disagree.

The timing for all this good
listening and talking is very
important. Most people would
agree that being tired, angry,
or ina hurry were not the best
times. By first acknowledging
your partner's feelings it is then
quite reasonable to ask for a
different time, place or condi-
tion to discuss it. Asking for a
time- out is a sensible decision
if you know the conditions
would not be favorable for a
healthy discussion. Once you
have mastered this and you
both see how much happier you
both feel, then you can expand
this into your most intimate life.
Listening to sexual feed back
can be difficult for many to
hear and it is so easy to take it
as criticism. Just like anger and
nagging, it is important to see it
as a way to make both of you
happy. Expressing your feel-
ings takes the guess work out
and allows both to teach the
other. Do not be discouraged
if tt does not come quickly or
easily. Our needs and wants
change with the passage of time
just like our bodies.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Thera-
pist. She is a Registered Nurse
and a Certified Clinical Sex Thera-
pist located at The Centre for
Renewing Relationships,
Grosvenor's Close West. She
can be contacted by calling 356-
7983 or by email at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com

A
60 YEAR-OLD Evangeline Nixon works up a sweat on the elliptical.

THE BAHAMAS RED

CROSS

rah 2008

“OUR WORLD. YOUR MOVE. BECOME
INVOLVED.”

WV HRD
ches gcomm

CONCH FRITTERS

SATURDAY,
MARCH 7'", 2009
12 NOON - UNTIL





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH



BY
BERNADETTE
GIBSON

Shoe dermatitis



TODAY I will address a con- }
dition referred to as shoe der-
matitis. Shoe dermatitis is amed- }
ical condition which is caused by }
contact of the foot with chemicals
in the material of footwear. This }
condition can be either irritant :

or allergic.

Irritant shoe dermatitis is often i
caused by wearing shoes that are }
wet, poorly fitting or that have }
uneven linings. However, in the ;
case of allergic (contact) der- }
matitis, there are many different }
substances that can cause this }
condition, which is quite com- }
mon and is frequently compli- }
cated by secondary infections or }

eczema.

I am certain that we are all }
owners of a variety of footwear }
styles: casual, formal, work and }
athletic shoes. The majority of
our footwear is imported and }
made from leather, rubber and
other synthetic materials. The : |
most recent US statistics revealed :
that ninety-eight per cent of all



lk,

shoes are imported, therefore it is

impossible to identify precisely

all their constituent components.
It is during the manufacturing
and finishing of footwear many
chemicals are used.

Sources of Shoe
Contact Dermatitis:
Historically, leather, dyes and
rubber allergens were seen as
the most common causes of

shoe dermatitis. Today, shoe }
dermatitis may occur if a person

is sensitive to the rubber or elas-
tic compounds in shoes, form
inserts or from elastic glues used
to bind shoe components. Oth-
er identifiable causes of shoe
dermatitis are cements, dichro-
mate used in tanning, dyes, anti-
mildew agents, formaldehyde,
and nickel eyelets or nickel arch
supports.

Some signs and symptoms
of shoe dermatitis:

The most common site first
involved with shoe dermatitis is
the dorsal (top) surface of the }
big toe and on the insteps (top ;
of foot). It later extends by }
spreading to the other toes and
dorsal (top) aspect of the foot. }
Skin lesions may be acute, pre- }
senting as red, blistering, ooz-

ing and usually symmetrical.

This dermatitis can range }
from mild, itchy rash to severe }
itching with swelling and small :
blisters. In severe cases, open }
sores may present and can result ;
in secondary bacterial infections. ;
If any such signs are present, }
seek professional help for prop- }

er diagnosis and treatment.

Prevent shoe dermatitis:

As a pedorthist and a mem- }
ber of the health care team, the }
design of footwear determines }
to a large extent the appearance }
of shoe dermatitis. Once the con-
dition is present, the pedorthist ;
should refer the individual toa }
physician for a medical evalua- }
tion. Once this condition is diag-
nosed, footwear is than part of :

the treatment.

A pedorthist as an expert in i
footwear can aid the physician }
and the patient with the selec- }
tion of footwear without materi-
als that may cause shoe dermati- }
tis. Substituting products made }
of different materials that do not :
cause allergic reactions will lessen
the likelihood of future episodes }

M
Ba

of shoe dermatitis. “Vegetable- ;

tanned” footwear can be substi-
tuted as an alternative for the }
hypersensitive individual. This
type of footwear contains no rub- }

ber or formaldehyde.

Finally, it is important to }
recognise that shoe dermatitis is
quite common, affecting children } a
and adults regardless of race. recently were the recipients of
Patients with shoe dermatitis can }
use special types of shoes pre- }
pared from non-sensitising sub-
stances. I would also suggest that :
measures to control sweating
may be very helpful for the
patient who suffers from shoe
dermatitis. Socks or stockings }
made of absorbent cotton (e.g.
Thorlos or Balega socks that }
have a unique rapid moisture
evaporation system) should }
always be worn. Avoid wet
shoes, poorly fitting shoes or self
treatment and seek professional ;
help to treat or prevent shoe der- }

matitis.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board
Certified Pedorthist, is the propri-

etor of Foot Solutions, a health and 3

wellness franchise that focuses on
foot care and proper shoe fit
located in the Sandyport Plaza,
Nassau.

"The views expressed are those of
the author and does not necessari-
ly represent those of Foot Solu-
lions Incorporated or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated compa-
nies. Please direct any questions

or comments to nassau@footsolu- :

lions.com or 327-FEET (3338).

INFANTS born at the
i Princess Margaret Hospital

? 30 safety car seats donated
i jointly by the Rotary Club of
i East Nassau and Multi Discount
? furniture company. The dona-
: tion was part of a Christmas
: card promotion that the rotary
club began in December.
According to the National
i? SAFE KIDS Campaign and
i National Highway Traffic Safe-
i ty Administration (NHTSA) an
? agency of the Executive Branch
of the United States Govern-
ment, part of the US Depart-
ment of Transportation, car
i seats reduce the risk of death
: by 71 per cent for infants and by
i 54 per cent for children ages 1-
i 4, and reduces the need for hos-
i pitalisation by 69 per cent for
i children ages 4 and under.
i The proper use of child car
i restraints would prevent many
i of these deaths and injuries. In a
i crash at just 30 mph, an unre-
i strained child would be thrown
i forward with a force 30 to 60
i times their body weight. They
i would be thrown about inside
i the vehicle, injuring themselves
i and quite possibly seriously
i injuring (or even killing) other
? people inside the vehicle. They
? are also likely to be ejected

‘'@mebenaoacwnea

The month of

arch

in the

r



from the car through one of the
windows.

It is not safe to hold a child
on your lap. In a crash, the child
could be crushed between your
body and part of the car's inte-
rior. Even if you are using a seat
belt, the child would be torn
from your arms - you would not
be able to hold onto them, no
matter how hard you try. It is
also dangerous to put a seat belt
around yourself and a child (or
around two children).

The Rotary Club of East
Nassau's message is that the
safest way for children to trav-
el in cars is to use a child seat
that is suitable for their weight
and size. A properly fitted child
restraint keeps the child in their
seat, preventing them from
being thrown about inside or
ejected from the vehicle. This
reduces the likelihood of your
child being killed or injured in a
crash. The law requires all chil-
dren traveling in cars to use the
correct child restraint until they
are either 135 cm in height or
the age of 12 (which ever they
reach first). After this they must
use an adult seat belt.

“We are delighted to be able
to raise funds for a such worthy
cause. We would like to thank
Multi-Discount Furniture and

den



a ry
ial

The larger varieties of
tomatoes tend to do best in
our cooler weather so future
sowings should feature small-
er, earlier varieties. I like to
grow Roma during the spring,
an Italian type that produces
elongated fruits in abun-
dance. All tomato varieties
are either determinate or
indeterminate. Determinate
varieties produce their har-
vest all at one time and the
plants then die. Indetermi-
nate tomatoes continue to
grow and bear over a very
long period of time but their
returns diminish remarkably.
This leads to the home gar-
dener having to uproot a mas-
sive vine that has still has

THE vegetable gardens
we started in September
or October should have
produced well and be at
their peak by the begin-
ning of March. But
March is the last month
of winter and that is a
reminder that warmer
weather will be coming
and we will need to
adjust our crops to
accommodate the
change.

fruits attached.

Roma tomatoes are determinate so we must re-sow them
every month to ensure a continuous supply. The last Romas can
be sown in May and give us early summer tomatoes when most
other varieties stop producing fruits.

The time comes when even Roma tomatoes are no match for
our summer conditions and this is when cherry tomatoes, par-
ticularly large- fruited varieties, come into their own.

Sweet peppers tend to produce well into summer but the
fruits get smaller. I like to grow Cubanelle, a large, flat Italian-
type sweet pepper that takes summer in its stride. These can be
started in March with perhaps another sowing in May to guar-
antee plenty of summer sweetness.

March signifies the end of the cool weather crops such as
spinach, garden peas, broccoli, cauliflower and others. New
Zealand spinach or Malabar spinach can be substituted for leaf
spinach if you like to cook the herb rather than eat the leaves
raw. Bok choi Chinese cabbage grows well in spring and can be
started in March. Zucchini and yellow summer squash can also
be sown now. Fennel is a warmth loving herb-cum-vegetable
that should bring rewards from a March sowing.

There will be changes in our flowerbeds as the weather gets
warmer. Kalanchoe will stop flowering but remain as a succu-
lent plant. I like to plant caladium bulbs nearby to maintain
colour while the Kalanchoe lacks flowers.

The stalwarts of summer are marigolds, vinca, zinnias, cos-
mos and Mexican sunflowers. All of these annuals can take our
summer heat and flower with abandon.

Many flowering shrubs will begin to pick up and start show-
ing signs of renewal while others, winter bloomers, will slowly
decrease their flower output. Shrubs should be fertilised at least
twice a year and the beginning of spring is a good time for the
first application. Hibiscus bushes and bougainvillea vines seem
to do extraordinarily well with seemingly little help from man.
Without regular feeding shrubs will weaken and become sus-
ceptible to insect predation.

Citrus and fruit trees should be given a make-over three
times a year, in spring, summer and autumn. Water deeply
around the drip line and the bole then apply Sequestrene 138
chelated iron to the base of each trunk using a level teaspoon of
iron to 3 gallons of water. Apply citrus or fruit tree granular fer-
tilizer to the drip line and also sprinkle some between the drip
line and the trunk. Finish by spraying the foliage with a solution
containing micronutrients and a spreader-sticker. The end of
March would be a good time to start this regimen.



Rotary Club of East Nassau donates car seats



THIRTY safety car seats were donated jointly by the Rotary Club of East Nassau and Multi Discount furniture com-
pany to infants at Princess Margaret Hospital.

distributed to mothers who
would not be able to afford
them”, said Brian Moodie, the
president of the Rotary Club
of East Nassau.

Appliances for their assistance
with procurement and dona-
tion of three additional car
seats. We anticipate the car
seats will be put to good use

as reducing child mortality is
one of the goals for Rotary
International. The seats will
be split between the pediatric
and various infant units and



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 9B



MA) ASK THE DOCTOR

¢|n an effort to provide the community with information on advances in the treatment of cancer and blood disorders, Dr
Theodore Turnquest and Dr DuVaughn Curling will be providing a weekly "Ask the Doctor’ column. The purpose of this col-
umn will be to provide clear and concise information in layman's terms for all to understand. We hope that this will be of



ONE of the charts indictating pressure points in the feet for the magnetic therapy.

Doing it with

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

AS Bahamians continue to struggle with reports of major
increases in cancer and diabetes, one Bahamian entrepre-
neur, Henry Butler, went on a quest to find relief for his own
ailments and discovered magnetic therapy through a device
called therapeutic apparatus for the body (TAB) which he
feels will benefit Bahamians from all walks of life.

Mr Butler said the discovery was made

during a trip to China for a trade show four

years ago.

“T was introduced to this company at the
trade show that was distributing this device.

I had a shoulder injury and they did a
demonstration on my shoulder. With the
magnets, you can place them on pressure
points about the body for any pain or dis-
comfort. After they placed it on my shoul-
der for a period of time, I was able to take

my shoulder from the side of my body up to

a full range of movement without any
pain,” Mr Butler said.

Magnetic therapy has an ancient heritage

and has occupied a central role in Chinese
medicine for over 2000 years. Magnetic

therapy is mentioned in some of the earliest

writings in Egypt, India and Greece. Until
recently the scientific explanation of mag-
netic action was not available. Magnetic

therapy utilises the natural energy of mag-

netism that is important to human existence

and overall health. A magnetic field pro-
vides a (natural) way to assist the body’s
normal healing processes as it passes
through all tissues and cells. Studies show

that magnets can be an effective therapy for

the relief of pain by blocking pain sensa-
tions. Applying magnetic fields to an

injured area improves blood flow and oxy-

gen to enhance the body’s natural healing

process. The improved blood flow and fluid
exchange to the injured tissue helps reduce

pain and inflammation.

Today in Japan and other Asian coun-
tries, therapeutic magnets are licensed as
medical devices. Magnetic therapy has

found favor in Australia, Russia and many

European countries, especially Germany

where medical insurance covers some of the
costs. Contemporary western medicine uses
magnetic energy for diagnosis with magnet-

ic resonance imaging (MRI), and, as a
method to accelerate the healing of bone
fractures.

Many claims about magnetic therapy
come from the fact that some cells and tis-
sues in the human body give off electro-
magnetic impulses. Some practitioners
think the presence of illness or injury dis-

rupts these fields. Magnets produce energy

fields of different strengths, which they

believe can penetrate the human body, cor-
recting disturbances and restoring health to

the afflicted systems, organs, and cells.

Most magnets
marketed to con-
sumers are static
magnets, also called
constant magnets,
because the mag-
netic field doesn’t
change. They are
usually made of
magnetised metal
or lodestone. Static
magnets are differ-
ent from electromagnets, which only have
an energy field while electricity is passing
through them.

As for the Bahamian response to the
device, Mr Butler said he has gotten a
tremendous response since he had intro-
duced the product three years ago.

Emerson Thurston, one of Mr Butler’s
customers, shared his experience with the
machine.

“Since I have been using this machine I
have seen miraculous results. My blood
pressure has been reduced since I started
using it. It is very good. I am using it now
for my heart and kidney. I can bend and
whine now and before I couldn’t do that. I
also had issues sleeping and after a week of
using the TAB, my family has to wake me
up to go to work,” Mr Thurston said.

Mr Butler said the TAB machine can run
from $400 if someone wants to purchase
one for the entire home. With the popula-
tion aging and the cost of traditional health
care spiraling upward, Mr Butler believes
that magnetic therapy, for reasons of sim-
plicity, effectiveness and economy, will
become an important form of alternative
therapy in the future.

With most of the chronic
conditions we have today as it
relates to hypertension and
diabetes, it can reduce swelling
in the body, arthritis and even
with men, it corrects blood flow
it they have erectile dysfunction.
- HENRY BUTLER

“With most of the chronic conditions we
have today as it relates to hypertension and
diabetes, it can reduce swelling in the body,
arthritis and even with men, it corrects
blood flow if they have erectile dysfunc-
tion,” Mr Butler said

According to the FDA, magnets used for
magnetic therapy are generally considered
safe. However, implantable medical devices
such as pacemakers, defibrillators, or infu-
sion pumps may be adversely affected by
magnets.

(GY SKINCARE
The top extrinsic causes of dry skin

EXTRINSIC refers to exter-
nal factors that impact skin
health, such as our environment
and lifestyle. Below are some
of the major extrinsic causes of
dry skin.

Weather / Environmental
elements
Cold winds and low tempera-
tures can dry out skin, depriving

aeK

Smoking can have a drying
effect on skin: it drains skin and
body of vitamins A and C and
constricts blood vessels (which
equates to less blood flow) -
meaning smoking is somewhat
like suffocating skin from the
inside.

Excess intake of alcoholic
beverages and certain medica-
tions (such as nasal deconges-

it of balanced levels of oils, and
contributing to premature
aging.

Prolonged exposure to the
sun causes water to evaporate
from skin. Forced air heating
also dries out skin: warm, dry
air acts like a sponge, soaking
up moisture from everything it
touches.

Lifestyle

The trend of low-fat or fat-
free diets can deprive our bodies
of skin-friendly Essential Fatty
Acids (EFAs) critical to all parts
of a healthy functioning body.
They help protect against water
loss within cells and throughout
skin, helping to prevent dryness,
keeping skin supple and hydrat-
ed. An EFA deficiency can
result in chronic itching, dry-
ness, scaling, and thinning.

tants) can also contribute to dry
skin.

¢ Sarah Simpson is a skin care
therapist at the Dermal Clinic.
Visit her and her team of skin and
body therapists at One Sandyport
Plaza (the same building as
Ballys Gym). For more informa-
tion visit www.dermal-clinic.com
or call 327.6788

great help to the public and look forward to your feedback.

The doctors will address all cancer and blood related questions. Every effort will be made to respond to questions submit-

ted. E-mail questions to: Oncology.consultants@gmail.com.

QUESTION: What is an oncologist
and a hematologist?

Answer: Oncology and Hematology are both
subspecialties within the field of general internal
medicine. Like all subspecialists, physicians
within the fields of oncology/hematology must
first complete training in general internal med-
icine which usually takes 3 years and then go on
to complete further training called a “fellow-
ship” in their subspecialty which usually takes an
additional two years. Oncology is the study
and treatment of malignant tumors generally
referred to by the public as cancers. Hematol-
ogy is the study of blood disorders which
includes not only cancers of the blood but also
“benign” diseases like anemia, sickle cell dis-
ease, clotting disorders and many others. Even
though they are two separate and distinct fields
unto their own there is considerable overlap
between the two and therefore in many
instances the fellowships are combined into a
single 3 year fellowship program resulting in a
physician who is a hematology/oncology spe-
cialist.

So what does this mean for the patient?

It is important for the patient to understand
that in today’s medical world many diseases
require a team approach, with expertise from
many different fields. This is particularly true
for the management of cancer patients who fre-
quently encounter many different specialists
while undergoing treatment.

These other physicians may include:

1. A surgeon who would be responsible for
any biopsies or excisions or exploratory surgery
to be performed.

2. A radiation oncologist. There are some
cancers that require radiation as a part of the
treatment management which would be per-
formed by a radiation oncologist. Let’s pause
for a moment of clarification as this point is
often confusing to the community. A radiation
oncologist uses different types of radiation in the
forms photons electrons or neutrons to treat a
cancer while a medical oncologist uses
chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of
cancers.

3. A radiologist. Once a patient has been
diagnosed with a particular type of cancer one of
the things that needs to be determined is
whether there are other organs that may be
involved. This process is frequently called stag-
ing which may involve many different modalities
such as CT scans and MRI's which would be
performed by the radiologist.

4. A psychiatrist. The news of cancer can

often be traumatic for an individual and patients
may experience symptoms of depression, anxi-
ety, anger and many other emotions and may
require psychiatric help.

5. A pathologist. Once a biopsy or surgery
has been performed, it is the pathologist’s
responsibility to identify the type of cancer that
is present.The pathologist does this by taking
cells from the surgical specimen and looking at
them under the microscope and also performing
special lab test to assist them in obtaining a
final diagnosis. The pathologist is usually nev-
er seen by the actual patient but as one can see
the pathologist plays a pivotal role as without a
diagnosis no treatment can occur.

There are many other physicians that the
oncology patient may encounter during the
course of their treatment.

The important thing to remember is that care
of the cancer patient is multidisciplinary, con-
sisting of many different medical specialties. It
is the job of the medical oncologist to co-ordi-
nate all of these disciplines into one, making
the appropriate referrals when necessary to
ensure that the patient is afforded the best pos-
sible care.

The medical oncologist will also treat the can-
cer itself with medications called chemothera-
pies. How these treatments are delivered and
their side effects will be discussed on another
day.

Hematology which as mentioned above is the
study of disorders of the “blood” can be broken
down into two broad categories. 1- Malignant
hematology which deals with cancers of the
blood and is therefore much like medical oncol-
ogy and 2- “benign” hematology which encom-
passes many different diseases such as anemias,
thallasemias, disorders of bleeding, sickle cell
disease and many others. The hematologist
tends to work along in consultation with a gen-
eral internist to provide care for patients with
blood disorders throughout their life time.

We hope that this initial article will help the
public to better understand the fields of oncol-
ogy and hematology and we look forward to
fostering a nurturing relationship in the future as
we move forward and continue our battle
against this disease.

¢ Dr Theodore Turnquest’s and Dr DeVaughn
Curling’s office is located at 94 Nassau Street,
Nassau, Bahamas. Their office telephone contact is
242-325-6284.

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Economic contractions:

“For us to give birth to a new era, we
must be willingly prepared to endure the

labor pains.”
MICHELLE MILLER

Some may argue that present eco-
nomic challenges dwarf in compari-
son to the insurmountable hardships
of war, epidemics and extreme pover-
ty experienced by past generations.

Colorful scrolls of world history are
stained with many periods of incredi-
ble impoverishment burdened by the
travelers of the

past. And in a time without the lux-
ury of modern conveniences, those
brave souls employed their imagina-
tion and improved their overall sense
of preparation; which enabled them
to overcome those obstacles and lay
the foundation on which we have built
our very lives.

When you observe the severity of
challenges endured by the nation
builders of yesteryear, what kind of
adversity are you personally prepared
to face? When life brings moments of
uncertainty, are you quick to panic or
are you faithfully prepared to over-
come?

These are the questions to ponder
as you continue to draw new conclu-
sions about your life challenges. You
are directly responsible for the growth
and development of your understand-
ing; the degree to which you are mak-
ing a concerted effort to deepen your
insight and ability to face adversities,
determines your confidence to suc-
ceed.

This article seeks to tickle your
thinking and inspire a broader per-
spective on the ingredients necessary
for the dawning of a new era.



The Joy of the Pain of Childbirth

Consider if you will, that today’s chal-
lenges are not a happenstance; instead
they are fundamental components of a
natural paradigm

shift; which moves you away from fear
and panic towards confidence and prepa-
ration.

Let’s take the analogy of child birth,
in which contractions are painful but nec-
essary. Contractions are defined as ‘the
tightening and shortening of the uterine
muscles during labor causing effacement
and dilation of the cervix and contributing
to the descent of the baby.’

Contractions may be irregular at first,
but gradually become regular, eventually
pushing the baby out of the uterus.

This is a beautiful process in which
those involved are fully prepared to
receive a new life into the world. And
despite excruciating labor pains, birthing
of new life is a natural aspect of the
human evolution.

This of course speaks volumes about
the depth of our capacity to deal with life
adversities, economic or otherwise. The
key point

here is - preparation and not panic aides
the successful process of new

life. The medical professionals are ade-
quately trained and the female body
undergo natural adjustments to endure
the often time challenging process of

childbirth.

Thus, given the current contractions of
the economic walls, the world is on the
verge of birthing a new era; overflowing
with hope and possibility.

This is not a time for you to panic but a
time to become adequately prepared.

1. Take stock of yourself
2. Reassess your coping skills
3. Clarify your conclusions

You must be prepared for the future
opportunities that are hidden within
present obstacles. It is better to pre-
pared for an opportunity and not have
one than to have opportunity for which
you are unprepared.

Final thoughts...

Despite the endless negative news
about today’s challenges; we know that
generations of the past have successful-
ly faced more severe adversities.

They courageously accepted that they
had to bear the burden of birthing the
moments of their time; creating major
progress, which was passed on today’s
generation.

And now the tables have turned; it is
now our time to use our imagination and
competently give birth to another new
era, which

will ultimately be passed on to the
generation of tomorrow.

However, the success of such a chal-
lenge, demands facing some crucial real-
ities:-

a. We are not exempt from life adver-
sities

b. We are the children of courageous

souls

c. It is our responsibility to give birth
to our own era

Like our ancestors, we must believe
that the magnitude of our strength is
greater than any challenge life may pre-
sent; finding the fortitude and will to
embrace life on a silver screen.

Taking this broader perspective culti-
vates a deeper understanding that adver-
sities are a natural part of change; and
change must be embraced and endured,
before it can be enjoyed.

Remember — you are innately empow-
ered to face any challenge; but you must
continue to build your sense of prepara-
tion in order to take advantage of new
possibilities.

Rest assured that the economic con-
tractions will subside and a new era will
emerge. You can choose to remain in a
state of panic or become better prepared;
you have the power to make change hap-
pen.

If you are ready to build your prepara-
tion and embrace new opportunities, you
are an ideal candidate for my upcoming
No Excuses

Goals Program. Please send an email to
coach4ward@Yahoo.com or
call 429-6770. Seats Are Limited!

¢ Michelle M Miller is a certified Life-Coach
and Stress Management Consultant. She is
the Principal Coach of the Coaching Studio,
which is located on Madeira Street, Palm-
dale. Questions or comments can be sent to
P.O. Box CB-13060 — email —
coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone 429-
6770.

The proper work

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

ALTHOUGH polite society says that looks are
not everything, you have to concede that they
mean something. The first impression of many
people is based on appearance from their clothes,
posture, height and even their hair.

Lately, more and more people have been the vic-
tims of "bad hair days” because it seems that cer-
tain employers have become more concerned with
how employees wear their hair than how well they
perform on the job.

Many would venture to ask, what does hair have
to do with how I perform? How important are
hairstyles in the workplace? President of Cynergy
Counselling and Consultants, Cyndi Williams-
Rahming said hair is an extremely important com-
ponent on any workforce and something that
should be taken very seriously.

“Hair is extremely important because it is a part
of your physique and a physical appearance par-
ticularly for persons who have to deal with cus-
tomers on a daily basis,” Mrs Rahming said.

Mrs Rahming said that most companies carry a
uniform or dress policy that may make it easier on
employees.

“Most companies have an employee uniform
policy which encompasses your hair to your feet.
Hair has to be neatly done. Most companies do not
normally allow braids or dreadlocks. Some places
require you to have your hair under a cap or a
net,” Mrs Rahming said.

When it comes to those who are new to the job
market, Mrs Rahming said she would advise them
to keep their hair and appearance as subtle and
simple as possible.

“From a consultant’s point of view, I do not
advise people who come to me looking for jobs to
colour their hair. [ have from time to time coloured
my own hair from brown to black and vice versa
but nothing red, green or yellow that stands out.
Maybe in the fashion industry that may work out
but depending on the type of job the person is
looking for that is not acceptable, especially for
front desk or an office job,” Mrs Rahming said.

Mrs Rahming said that clients and customers

Just this once

hotel room.

really want to see what they consider to be a cor-
porate professional image when it comes to ser-
vice.

“You have to really be able to impress that
person the very first time they see you and that
is going to mean that you have to dress to
impress. You never get a second chance to
make a first impression. The title does not
matter. If you are an owner, a driver or a
salesman, you should always have your hair
one colour. I do have people who have asked
my advice on streaking their hair in the work-
place, and I think it is acceptable as long as the
streaks are not loud and overbearing,” Mrs Rah-
ming said.

With some persons, having the right image for a
corporation can be challenging.

“Persons try to portray their personality through
clothing, and so it sometimes is considered to be
an individual thing and it is hard to convince
some people that this is a lifestyle change that
they have to do. It takes time and won’t happen
overnight because change is a process, however, the
first step is defining what image you want to pro-
ject,” Mrs Rahming said.

When it comes to those ladies who wear weaves
in the workplace, Mrs Rahming suggests buying
quality weave and find someone who will install it
to make it look as neat as possible. This means
investing a little more dollars for weave or exten-
sions that will last and look realistic.

“Tt has to be neat, clean and in place. A lot of
the businesses that I consult for do not allow
the ‘fan up do style’. It has to be back in one or
in a style that is as compact as possible. I under-
stand the expression of self, but by the same
token when you express yourself it has to be
done in a way where you present yourself
in society in a positive image that causes
people to hire you or date you — you
have to look at the bigger picture, long
term,” Mrs Rahming said.

¢ Tell us what you think e-mail your
comments to tribune@tribuneme-
dia.net or send us a fax at 328-2398.

themselves to the confines of
a monogamous relationship,
and feel “variety is the spice of
life.”

However for her, the deci-
sion to be a part of the act will
only happen again should she

FROM page 12

at the time she was on the
island of San Salvador taking
part in a college research pro-
ject.

She said her Mr X was a res-
ident of the island she'd only
met briefly during her arrival.

Noting that there was noth-
ing special about him other
than his physically appeal, she
admits that she was attracted
to him from the moment their
eyes first connected.

She said after working in the
same area for a few hours, the
guy soon offered to buy her a
drink, which was followed by a
casual conversation.

About three hours later, she
told him that she was ready to
leave, and invited him to her

After they got there, there
was some more small talk, kiss-
ing and the rest is history.

Afterwards she said she did
feel trashy, and said the reality
of her decision soon flooded
her mind.

“T though Oh my God, I'm
now one of ‘those’ women.”

Now eight years later, she
feels the act itself was in poor
taste, but has a new respect for
women who can do it.

“The whole one night stand
was a new thing for me, but
after going through the experi-
ence it was an eye opening and
humbling experience, because
now I realise that some things
just happen.”

Chanel claims she has friends
that have one-night-stands all
the time, who refuse to limit

be single, and without any sort
of commitment to anyone.

24-year-old graphic design-
er Rose Beckford, tells of an
experience with a guy from col-
lege whom she had only known
for a short time and who she
conveniently linked up with to
satisfy a desire.

She said at the time she was
not involved in a relationship,
and considered it natural to
give herself to the near
stranger.

Now that she is in a rela-
tionship, she feels all the right
elements exist for a monoga-
mous relationship, but added
that her book on one night
stands remains a very real pos-
sibility.

30-year-old professional

Brenda Reimer, said she too
has taken part in a one night
fling, but insist that the rules
need to be self evident from
the start.

“There's nothing wrong with
two consenting adults coming
together for something they
both really want, but you obvi-
ously need to take certain pre-
cautions.”

Brenda said safe sex is a
must for her, added with an
understanding on both sides
that the act is a one time thing,
with no other expectations.

As with most women who
do end up feeling guilty and
regretful of their encounters,
she said that happens because
of a double standard in soci-
ety which allows men to have
as many sexual partners as
they desire, and where a wom-
an's desire to maintain a
wholesome image limits her to
just one partner.

Although there are some
women who obviously have no



qualms on chance encounters,
there however remains two
realities when it comes to one-
night-stands and women.

The first is, although most
women may want to measure
up to the same levels of sexual
indiscretion as their male coun-
terparts, the feeling of regret
is a certain deterrent to a sec-
ond such encounter.

The second is that unlike the
average male who may take the
bait of a one nighter whether
involved or not and feeling no
weight, the average woman will
only seriously consider having
a one night stand if she is
unconfined to the boundaries
of a committed relationship,
and able to handle the back-
lash of being viewed as a
“loose” woman by society.

¢ Tell us what you think by
sending us a fax at 328-2398 or
e-mail us at lallen@tribuneme-
dia.net

Developing
_a positive
body image

: Mi By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

WOMEN in the Bahamas

: are under great pressure to
? measure up to a certain social
? and cultural ideal of beauty,
? which can lead to poor body
? image. Women are constant-
? ly bombarded with "Barbie-
i like" doll images in a society
? that is plagued by obesity. By
? presenting an ideal that is so
? difficult to achieve and main-
? tain, the diet product and
? gym industries are assured of
? growth and profits. It is no
? accident that youth is increas-
? ingly promoted, along with
? thinness, as an essential cri-
? terion of beauty. The mes-
? sage being sent out is either
? all women need to lose
? weight or that the natural
? aging process is not some-
? thing to look forward to.

With a positive or healthy

? body image, a woman has a
? real perception of her size
? and shape, and she feels com-
? fortable with her body. With
i a negative body image, a
? woman has a distorted per-
? ception of her shape and size,
? compares her body to others,
? and feels shame and anxiety
? about her body.

Being unhappy with one’s

i body can affect how someone
? thinks and feels about them-
? selves as a person. A poor
? body image can lead to emo-
? tional distress, low self-
i esteem, dieting, anxiety,
? depression, and eating disor-
i ders. Developing a positive
? body image and a healthy
? mental attitude is crucial to
? a woman's happiness and
? wellness.

College of the Bahamas

: Student, Tina Miller, said she

? feels that Bahamian society

? also places heavy emphasis

? on body image due to the
? diversified culture.

“Everybody has their days

' i and although I struggle with
=: my weight, I try to look in the
mirror and try to find a posi-

: tive aspect. I have a certain

aura. In my opinion it is not

$ every day you can look 100

per cent, but there are days
where you can have inner
beauty that shines brighter
than your outer beauty,” Ms
Miller said.

Ms Miller said she feels
there is not a lot of cultural
interaction because a lot of
people do not feel accepted in
society because their bodies
or features are not what is
expected of them.

“If you go into the nail
salons, beauty salons and
beauty supply stores, women
spend a lot of money on
beauty or what they think is

= beauty to be accepted.
; Women bleach their skin, add

false eye lashes and sew in 26
inch weaves. The men do it
too. They have to have the
best outfits and the latest
rides and haircuts just to be
accepted. There is a lot of cul-
tural tension especially in the
more abundant races in the

? Bahamas such as the Cubans,
: Jamaicans and Haitians that
? live here. If someone is too
? black, their nose is what we
: call ‘spread’ then automati-
? cally they are put into a class
? based on their looks,” Ms
? Miller said.

Other pressures can come

: from those who interact in a
i person’s everyday life. Fami-
: ly and friends can influence
? one’s body image with posi-
§ tive and negative comments.

A doctor's health advice can
be misinterpreted and affect
how a woman sees herself
and feels about her body as
well. When this happens,
there is a need to learn how
to love exactly what is seen

i in the mirror on a daily basis.

Everyone wants to look

i their best but a healthy body
i is not always linked to
? appearance. In fact, healthy
i bodies come in all shapes and
: sizes. Changing one’s body
i image can mean changing the
i way they think about their
: body. At the same time,
: healthy lifestyle choices are
i also key to improving body
: image. Healthy eating can
i promote healthy skin and
i? hair, along with strong bones.
: Regular exercise has been
: shown to boost self-esteem,
i self-image, and energy levels
? and plenty of rest is key to
: stress management.

“When I look in the mir-

? ror I know I may not be a size
? double zero or I may not
: have the lightest skin color,
? but I know I am fearfully and
? wonderfully made by God
: and if this is the body he gave
? me then I will do everything I
? can to take care of it,” Ms
i Miller said.



ise












wt ORLANDO

High:63°FA7°C . Sunshine. Partly cloudy with Partly sunny and Partly sunny and Sunshine and Mostly sunny, breezy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
- ee a ae spotty showers. breezy. breezy. comfortable. and pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
i Low: 36° F/2°C 5 5 5 :
. @ - High: 75 High: 77 High: 78 High: 79
TAMPA =} f High: 72° Low: 63° Low: 65° Low: 66° Low: 69° Low: 70° sede ED
au i , PETE Ear
High: 62° F/17° C ' \ | _-69°-62°F 70°-64° F 74°-66° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.
Low: 37°F/3°C 2 r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel a an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:10pm. 22 6:14am. 0.2
e @ re elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, 6:13 p.m. 0.0
oe ,, (i nt re
j : Wednesday'2:49 a.m. 2/ 7:21am. 0.3
3 a Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Thirstay 0am. 07 S32am. 03
; Ya ABACO Temperature 2:28pm. 22 8:32pm. 0.0
A High: 64° F/18° C FUNGI es cceatcates Qacarvareeetacecaaeee caceeeae® 73° F/23° C Frida 314am. 27 O40am. 02
. “a L 5° F 41°C LOW sessshasscccagetes 62° FA7° C y 3:40pm. 23 9:44pm. -04
- ow: 52° F/ Normal high ..... TORS gE es
” ; Normal low 65° F/18° C
be jp Ses @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's HIgh osscccsssescseecrseene 7° Fea CNT CII
' —— High: 68° F/20°C | year's OW a... 68° F/20° C oa ae i ie
"Ou Low: 42°F/6°C Precipitation ss unrise...... °31.a.m. Moonrise... . 10:39 a.m.
. = As of 1 p.m. yesterday ou... 0.29" Sunset....... 6:13 p.m. Moonset......... none
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT i Year to date : First Full Last New
High: 69° F/21°C @ High: 63° FA7°C Normal year to date oo... 3.54" - - =
Low: 46° F/8° C Low: 49° F/9°C 1s
AccuWeather.com e
o @ Forecasts and graphics provided by oie ay
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.4 Mar.10 9 Mar.18 = Mar. 26
High: 68° F/20° C EL ELT HERA
Low: 46° F/8°C NASSAU a ¥ °FA2°C
High: 72° F/22°C ow: 54° F/I
Low: 63° F/17°C
a 2.
KEY WEST CO. CATISLAND
High: 64° F/18°C High: 70° F/21°C
Low: 52° F/11°C Low: 53° F/12°C
@
GREAT EXUMA O SAN SALVADOR
High: 72° F/22° C i ab. 70 °
Low: 59°F/15°C High: 75° F/24° C
; " Low: 58°F/14°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ; ANDROS | f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 74° F/23°C
Low: 55° F/13°C ©:
LONGISLAND
Low: 59° F/15°C
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 80° F/27° C
F/C FIC FC FC F/C FIC F/C FIC FC FC Fic FC mt Low: 65° F/18° C
Albuquerque 71/21 44/6 pe 72/22 45/7 c Indianapolis 35/1 23/-5 s 45/7 35/1 pe Philadelphia 25/-3 11/-11 s 33/0 22/-5 pc
Anchorage 25/-3 13/-10 sf 24/-4 13/-10 sn Jacksonville 55/12 29/-1 5 6116 39/3 s Phoenix 85/29 59/15 pce 83/28 58/14 c CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 46/7 26/-3 s 59/15 40/4 s Kansas City 45/7 36/2 s = 61/16 45/7 pc _—~Pittsburgh 24/-4 10/-12 s 341 22/5 po RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:81°F/27°c
Atlantic City 28/2 11/-11 s 34/1 20/-6 pc Las Vegas 73/22 50/10 pe 70/21 48/8 s Portland,OR 5643 37/2 c 51/10 39/3 sh High: 76° F/24° C Low: 64°F/18°C
Baltimore 27/-2 13/-10 s 36/2 23/-5 pc Little Rock 53/11 35/1 s 64417 51/10 pe Raleigh-Durham 35/1 17/-8 s 43/6 30/-1 pe Low:57°F/14°C
Boston 27/-2 13/-10 peo 28/-2 18/-7 s Los Angeles 67/19 52/41 pe 6417 50/10 c St. Louis 40/4 31/0 pe 57/13 44/6 pc . aie.
Buffalo 18/-7 15/-9 s 29/-1 19/-7 pc Louisville 38/3 29/-1 s 52/1 43/6 pe Salt Lake City 58/14 38/3 c 542 33/0 ¢ GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 47/8 26/-3 s 56/13 33/0 s Memphis 49/9 39/3 pce 60/15 53/11 pc San Antonio 74/23 5713 s 82/27 61/16 s High: 80° F/27° C
Chicago 36/2 20/-6 pc 40/4 30/-1 pc Miami 68/20 54/12 s 72/22 59/15 San Diego 68/20 56/13 pc 66/18 55/12 pc Low 67°FAG°C
Cleveland 25/-3 13/-10 s 36/2 27/-2 pc Minneapolis 34/1 21/-6 c 36/2 26/-3 pc San Francisco 58/14 48/8 r 58/14 46/7 + .
Dallas 68/20 51/10 s 81/27 59/15 s Nashville 43/6 25/-3 s 58/14 43/6 pc Seattle 5010 37/2 c 48/8 39/3 pc
Denver 71/21 36/2 pe 67/19 34/1 pc New Orleans 57/13 44/6 s 70/21 58/14 s Tallahassee 58/14 28/-2 s 66/18 37/2 s calli. %
Detroit 28/-2 18/-7 $s 37/2 27/-2 c New York 23/-5 15/-9 pc 33/0 24/-4 § Tampa 62/16 43/6 s 69/20 50/10 s >
Honolulu 80/26 69/20 pc 78/25 66/18 c Oklahoma City 63/17 47/8 s 76/24 49/9 § Tucson 85/29 54/12 po 82/27 53/11 c Vw
Houston 68/20 54/12 s 76/24 60/15 s Orlando 63/17 39/3 s 70/21 45/7 $s Washington, DC 28/-2 18/-7 s 39/3 29/-1 pc














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Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
47/8
44/6
64/17
72/22
93/33
85/29
57/13
43/6
62/16
53/11
44/6
67/19
65/18
46/7
48/8
84/28
72/22
93/33
37/2
13/22
78/25
65/18
43/6
45/7
50/10
50/10
42/5
70/21
32/0
75/23
85/29
50/10
52/11
76/24
82/27
86/30
48/8
52/11
90/32
79/26
81/27
14/-10
32/0
43/6
89/31
93/33
36/2
50/10
40/4
90/32
70/21
57/13
83/28
90/32
86/30
79/26
82/27
90/32
45/7
37/2
82/27
72/22
49/9
22/-5
86/30
47/8
48/8
37/2
27/-2

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
70/21
33/3
32/0
54/12
59/15
79/26
74/23
45/7
30/-1
57/13
45/7
33/0
57/13
47/8
37/2
41/5
68/20
55/12
Sie
17/-8
57/13
66/18
43/8
37/2
36/2
34/1
37/2
12/-11
52/11
25/-3
66/18
55/12
45/7
44/6
55/12
72/22
68/20
36/2
36/2
79/26
41/5
55/12
3/-16
21/-6
33/0
56/13
61/16
27/-2
37/2
35/1
77/25
52/11
43/8
74/23
73/22
61/16
50/10
69/20
68/20
32/0
34/1
68/20
67/19
41/5
9/-12
73/22
37/2
44/6
32/0
17/-8







pe

pc
pc
sh
pc
t
S$
pc
sh
pc
Cc
C
pc
sh
r

s
t
c
c
c

pc

Wednesday

High
F/C
90/32
50/10
45/7
64/17
73/22
91/32
84/28
55/12
39/3
63/17
63/17
48/8
62/16
66/18
45/7
50/10
75/23
74/23
97/36
40/4
79/26
83/28
63/17
43/6
39/3
52/11
46/7
26/-3
79/26
34/1
79/26
85/29
59/15
55/12
74/23
81/27
84/28
41/5
46/7
86/30
79/26
86/30
19/-7
30/-1
52/11
91/32
93/33
31/0
41/5
45/7
89/31
77/25
61/16
82/27
90/32
94/34
84/28
83/28
91/32
50/10
37/2
79/26
75/23
52/11
30/-1
89/31
47/8
53/11
43/6
32/0

Low
F/C
72/22

WwW

Ss

41/5 6

27/-2
54/12
61/16
77/25
74/23
40/4
32/0
57/13
47/8
38/3
55/12
45/7
30/-1
41h
64/17
58/14
17/25
21/-6
57/13
68/20
51/10
39/3
34/1
36/2
34/1
10/-12
67/13
28/-2
73/22
54/12
52/11
43/6
51/10
72/22
67/19
32/0
34/1
75/23
415
59/15
7/-13
14/-10
33/0
56/13
61/16
25/-3
30/-1
36/2
77/25
55/12
50/10
72/22
65/18
71/21
52/11
67/19
67/19
34/1
34/1
59/15
68/20
45/7
21/-6
74/23
41/5
49/9
34/1
19/-7

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





TUESDAY, MARCH O3rp, 2009, PAGE 11C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariINE FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: SSW at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-8 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 6-10 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Los Angeles

67/52

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice

Miami
68/54

Fronts
Cold ==

War iets

Stationary eag~=afi

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.





-10s



-0s Os— 10s 20s /303)) 40s



AUTO INSURANCE

Never st
CUBIS will

Our

out us!

if Smart choice 1s
| five Management
z ow) © you can trust.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAB AM AS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“New Proven Galo Abaca | Heuthera | Exum
REND SIAN Be (ET) SSG Tek OND) IATA | Tek (289) SG0-TEAD | Ts (242) 434-2304

[EEE Se







WHEN love is wrapped up
in a steamy night of passion,
do the usual rules of what

women want still apply?
Compared to men, the average women
today is looking for a partner who can
make her laugh, is intelligent, has a sense
of self, is someone who will make a good
father and somewhere down the list,
someone who is physically attractive.
With most one-night-stands being con-
sidered a common and likely choice by

THE TRIBUNE

MACE,

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN

Tribune Features Reporter e lallen@tribunemedia.net

the average man, most men find it hard
to believe that women are just as capable
of having a similar encounter, with no
strings attached.

Speaking with three women who
shared their experiences of a one time
chance encounter, Tribune Woman
learned of some common rules of
engagement when it comes to random
encounters from the female perspective.
All names have been changed.

The first, a 26-year-old banker,
Chanel Williams, said that contrary to
the common belief, that one-night-

stands are exclusive to men, women
too are beings capable of handling a
chance encounter without wanting any-
thing else.

“Yow re basing the experience pure-
ly on attraction, but the question of
whether he would make a good hus-
band or father never even crossed my
mind, it was only about fulfilling that
need for that time.”

Chanel recalls her steamy experience
which happened when she was 18, where

SEE page 10

PAGE

TUESDAY, MARCH 3,

12B

2009

Wedding Date:

June 20, 2009

eA BUTTONS

Pa vA



Wedding Bells

Oo gar: Pret
&
Rodman Deleveaux

See you at
21st Annual

Bahamas
Bridal Show

12 noon Sunday March 29,2009

WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT
CABLE BEACH



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Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
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Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway « 394-1759





Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.83TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER SUNSHINE HIGH 72F LOW 63F F E A T U R E S SEE‘WOMAN’ SECTION S P O R T S Just this SEEPAGEELEVEN once Stuart ‘most outstanding field athlete’ n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net AT LEAST18 people have tested positive to being exposed to tuberculosis in a series of tests conducted in and around Prince George Wharf. According to sources at the site who have been personally tested over the last week, eight individ uals returned positive in one day, with another 10 being identified over the course of the screenings. This number includes Defence Force officers stationed at the Port’s administration offices and workers in and around the Port’s Welcome Centre through which hundreds of tourists funnel every day. Sources at the site explained that those who have tested positive do not necessarily have TB at this time, but have been exposed to the infectious and often deadly disease. Classic symptoms of tubercu losis are a chronic cough with blood-tinged sputum, fever, night sweats and weight loss. “Infection of other organs causes a wide range of symptoms. The diagnosis relies on radiology commonly chest X-rays a tuberculin skin test, blood tests, as well as microscopic examination and microbiological culture of bodily fluids. Tuberculosis treatment is difficult and requires long courses of multiple antibiotics,” a website on TB reads. The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Shot fired as students clash with police officer n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A GUNSHOT was fired when s choolboys attacked an off-duty police officer who attempted to b reak up a knife fight near LW Young Junior High School. T he altercation erupted just minutes after classes ended at the s chool in Bernard Road and a group of boys, believed to be in grade nine at the school, started fighting on a side road immediate ly west of the school. P olice say an off-duty police officer in the area stepped in to b reak up the fight and confiscated a knife from one of the boys. An eye-witness told The Tribune how the officer held one of the boys while the others ran out of the side road before returning to launch an attack on the police offi cer. He said: “After the boys ran out another boy who didn't have a shirt on ran into the yard and grabbed two big rocks and burst them through, he was going mad. “He threw the rocks and burst the man who was holding the boy in the knee caps. “As he came running back through the corner a red police car pulled up and bust a shot in the air.” Assistant Superintendent of Police Walter Evans said the police FIREFIGHTERS PUT OUT A BLAZE on Dunmore Street yesterday that destroyed a wooden home. No one was injured in the fire. SEE page eight WOODEN HOME IS DESTROYED BY BLAZE T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f CLICO (Bahamas holders should still pay their premiums to ensure possibility of their policies being transferred to a nother company, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said during a c ommunication in the House of Assembly yesterday. “If the Liquidator enters into an agreement with a local insurer, he can only transfer policies that are in force and not those that have lapsed due to non-payment,” Mr Ingraham said. While the prime minister said t hat it is still too early to determine whether or not policy holde rs will lose any money but it is quite possible that all the policies can be sold to a viable insurer PM says CLICO policyholders should still pay their premiums n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net NEARLY $20 million of proposed unemployment assistance could come on stream on July 1 to provide eligible persons aid for up to six and a half months, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham revealed yesterday. Legislation to support this scheme will be brought to Parliament as early as this month, he added. The scheme will allow qualified persons to claim 50 per cent of their wages, providing they contributed to the National Insurance Board (NIB while they were employed. Eligible persons will receive this aid for 13 to 26 weeks. However it is still unclear how government will determine who is eligible to receive this support. In order to sustain the continua tion of this scheme, government is proposing a new fee which would require employees and employers to ALMOST200 Government IT workers are expected to share $555,000 set to be re-allocated to the public service budget in the wake of a 2006 decision to increase their pay. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham noted this yesterday in the House of Assembly as he commented on the reasons for the intended re-allocation of $9.5 million to the Department of the Public Service from other ministries/agencies. His comments came prior to Members of Parliament debating the mid-year budget report. According to Minister of State with responsibility for the public service, Zhivargo Laing, govern ment decided to increase the worker’s pay in 2006 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A $200 million loan being arranged by government will in part be put towards funding downtown revitalisation potentially including the pur chase of a significant amount of property along the area’s waterfront. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham elaborated on how the loan, which he revealed was being sought by the Government when he made his mid-year budget statement to Parliament last week, will be spent in the House of Assembly yesterday. He said that government is “proposing to enter into nego tiations with a view to purchasing the Kelly’s (dock property and premises” locat ed on East Street and Woodes Rodger’s Wharf, as well as a Almost 200 Go vernment IT workers set to share $555,000 SEE page eight SEE page eight Zhivargo Laing Pr oposed unemployment assistance could be on str eam by July 1st SEE page eight Part of $200m loan will help fund downtown revitalisation SEE page eight SEE page eight NIBfiles over 100 cases for back payments in the past month n B y PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net THE National Insurance Board has filed over 100 cases last m onth before the courts of businesses or persons who owe the Board monies in back payments, its director Algernon Cargillr evealed yesterday. In an exclusive interview with The Tribune yesterday, Mr C argill revealed that there were a multitude of businesses and self employed persons who owe the National Insurance Board “quite a bit of money.” These entities range from law firms, to jewellery companies, and in terms of kind of businesses, Mr Cargill said that unfort unately it is “just about every type”. “This is the way it has been allowed to happen and now we h ave to resolve it. And I can tell you that the National Insurance Board is on a very proactive step to ensure that all e mployers who owe money pay, and pay on time. Now to tell you who owes, I can’t do that, but I can say there are quite a SEE page eight TB tests conducted in and around Prince George Wharf ‘Multitude of businesses and self employed owe mone Altercation near LW Young Junior High School www.tribune242.com

PAGE 2

A DNA expert and an archaeologist will be principal speakers at a Heritage Day event in Hope Town, Abaco, this weekend. Prof Peter Roberts, a Bahamian lecturer at Georgia State University, will speak on genealogical research in The Bahamas. He plans to offer affordable DNA test kits to those wishing to trace their ancestry. The second speaker, Roberts Carr, is executive director of Archaeological and Historical Conservancy Inc., a Florida notfor-profit organisation dedicated to investigating and preserving historic sites in Florida and The Bahamas. He is field director of the Preacher’s Cave project in Eleuthera. Heritage Day is set for Saturday, March 7, beginning at 9.30am. The theme is “All of We Is One Family.” Traditional Bahamian food and local crafts will be on offer together with youth and boating activities. n By PAUL G T URNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net J ONES Communication Limited has until June 25 to pay $180,000 in delinquent National Insurance contributions that were collected from the company’s employees, but never handed over to theB oard, T he Tribune h as learned. Last week, Jones Communication’s CEO Wendall Jonesp leaded guilty to owing NIB over $430,000 in back paym ents in Court 11 on Nassau Street. The case was adjourned to June 25. A ccording to the general guidelines of the National I nsurance, the company has up until that time to pay 40 per cent of the total amountb efore any payment negotia tions can be entered into. S peaking with T he Tribune yesterday, Director of NIB Algernon Cargill refrained from commenting on any one entity that is in arrears withp ayments to the Board. However, he did outline that NIB has started a very “proactive” measure to ensuret hat all employers who owe money pay, “and pay on t ime.” “Now, to tell you who owes, I can’t do that, but I can say t here are quite a significant number of employers who h ave not paid on time,” Mr Cargill said. The normal policy of NIB i s that 40 per cent of out standing payments which r epresents the funds that were actually deducted from an employee’s salary be paidb efore they can enter into an agreement to replenish all oth er outstanding monies. “That is why we insist on 40 per cent,” Mr Cargill said, because that is the amount that was deducted from an employee’s salary. That isw hat they would have taken from the employee and still d id not pay over to the Board. So to enter into an agreement we would at least require thata mount to be paid,” he said. However, as there are cases c urrently before the courts, Mr Cargill said that he could not comment any further ont he matter nor could he even confirm despite the fact that it is now public knowledge that the board has Jones Communication or any o ther business before the courts. “But those who do owe the N IB any amount of funds, our normal policy is that the 40 p er cent, which represents the employee’s contribution that was deducted and retained byt he employer, be paid into the Board and any negotiations w ould commence after the employee’s portion be paid.” M r Cargill said that in such cases, an agreement must be realised on these outstanding monies before the court convenes again. Normally how it works is that if any defendant is before the courts, the court wouldg ive a date to come back. By the date the defendant comes b ack the defendant should have formalised an arrangement with the Board. And theo nly way to formalise an arrangement is to pay the 40 p er cent,” he said. A source inside Jones Communications told The Tribune y esterday that the company is financially viable and capable of meeting its obligations. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ANIMAL welfare activist Jane Mather has been receiving tele phone threats over her campaign to halt the catching of sea turtles. The threats have occurred several times over the past week, with one caller saying: “We know where you live.” M rs Mather, a leading animal campaigner in The Bahamas for many years, has been a high-profile voice in the fight to save protected log g erhead turtles. Some fishermen are angry at being deprived of income from turtles, w hich have been an island delicacy for generations. Mrs Mather told The Tribune: “It’s quite unnerving to get threats, but it’s not the first time.” Some years ago, a policeman armed with a shotgun threatened Mrs Mather over a campaign against ill-treatment of guard dogs. As a result of the latest threats, she and her husband are tightening security around their home. Police have been informed. Jones Communication must pay $180,000 by June 25th Company given date to pay 40% of $430,000 owed to NIB Algernon Cargill n By DENISE M AYCOCK Tribune Freeport R eporter dmaycock@ tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The two persons killed in a traffica ccident on Grand Bahama are 64-year-old Edwin Rolle of Freeport and 45-year-old Lynn Clarke of Deadman’sR eef. Rolle, a resident of No 57 Whymper Lane, wasd riving a 1992 Chevy Truck that crashed into t he Cumming Temple AME Church on Settler’s Way around 2.55pm onS unday. It is believed that he may have suffered a seizure behind the wheel. Clarke was a passenger int he vehicle. They were both fatally injured at the scene. Their deaths are recorded as the fourth and fifth trafficf atalities for the year on Grand Bahama. T raffic police are still investigating the accident. Two killed in traffic accident are named Sea turtles campaigner is r eceiving thr eats DNA expert, archaeologist to speak at Heritage Day event

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009, PAGE 3 n B y PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FORMER Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell has denied a book’s claim that The Bahamas was complicit with the United States in staging a clandestine operation that r esulted in the kidnapping and ultimate removal from office of former president of Haiti Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The ex-minister has accused the book’s author of a “grave libel” against The Bahamas. Randall Robinson, an American author, said in his recent book, “An Unbroken Agony: Haiti, from Revolution to the kidnapping of a President”, that Mr Mitchell w as “something of a lickspittle” or follower of the former Assistant Secretary of State for the United States, Roger Noriega. Most renowned for his advocacy on behalf of Haitian immigrants and the former president, Mr Robinson suggested that Mr Aristide was “kidnapped” along with his Haitian-American wife “by American soldiers and flown, against his will, to the isolated Central African Republic.” According to Mr Mitchell, the book outright suggests t hat The Bahamas was complicit in this “scheme.” However, the former minister said that both of these assertions are totally “untrue.” Admitting that he had received a call from a “US official” on the night President Aristide is alleged to have resigned (February 29, 2004 was informed by the official that Mr Aristide had asked the US for assistance in leaving the country. According to Mr Mitchell, the official explained that the US government had agreed to help, and that the f ormer president was at that very moment aboard an aircraft headed for “an undisclosed location.” At the time, he said, the US was looking for a country t hat would take the former president but had not yet found one. “The official asked would the Bahamas be willing to accept Mr Aristide,” Mr Mitchell said. “A foreign minister could not decide this. Was this Mr Aristide’s wish? Why would the United States not give him asylum? The official said US law prohibited it.” Mr Mitchell said he called K D Knight, J amaica’s then foreign minister, who informed him that he had spoken to Mr Aristide just a day earlier and at that time there was “no hint of resignation.” Mr Mitchell again denied that The Bahamas was complicit in any scheme to overthrow Haiti’s government. “It is interesting that Haiti’s opposition accused us of exactly the opposite, of in fact propping up Mr Arist ide,” Mr Mitchell said. “That, too, was not true. Poverty drives thousands of illegal migrants to leave the north of Haiti every year and pass through The Bahamas. Many stay in The Bahamas to the extent that our country can claim to host more Caricom nationals than any other Caricom nation. “We believed that the legitimate government of Haiti had been overthrown. We made it clear, though, that we had to deal with whomever held the power in Haiti. The a lternative was to risk the stability of our country by being overrun with illegal migrants. Caricom accepted this. “During the 2004 crisis, The Bahamas and Caricom sought support from South Africa to help the Haitian police force to restore order. I appeared at the United Nations with K D Knight of Jamaica just before Mr Aristide’s departure to seek troops from the United Nations to stop the insurrection. The political opposition in Haiti denounced us. Mr Robinson’s book gravely libels our country,” he said. AS OFyesterday, all claims submitted by workers for short-term National Insurance benefits must be accompanied by a new employers certification form. The new Med 4 form is a single-sheet addition to the Med 1, Med 1A and Med 2 forms. It requires the employer to certify that an employee is, was or will be off from work for a stated period. Said the National Insurance Board in a statement:“In the past, only attending physicians and claimants were required to provide information on claims for sickness, maternity and injury benefits. Unfortunately, this permitted per-sons to receive incomereplacement when they were, in fact, not off from work and were not losingany income. “To address this and to improve the claims management process, employers are now required to confirm the period that an employee is off from work by means of the new Med 4 form. Claims for sickness, maternity and injury benefits will not be processed without it.” The processing time for short-term benefits is currently pegged at three working days. NIB said the Med 4 form is not intended to slow the process, but rather to ensure that claims are only approved for persons who qualify. The new form will be among those that each employer will be requiredto have in his workplace. Currently, all places of busi ness are required to keepo n-hand C10 (monthly con tribution statement) forms;B60 (interim report of accident) forms; and B44 (employer’s report on accident at work) forms. The new Med 4 form will be placed on the board’s website for easy access. New form needed by workers for short-term National Insurance benefits In brief Fred Mitchell denies claim Bahamas was complicit with US in Aristide operation F red Mitchell n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The Commonwealth Electrical Workers Union is accusing Grand Bahama Power Company of violating the Industrial Relations Act by hiring temporary meter readers without notifying the union. Keith Knowles, president of the CEWU, said the union received no formal notification from management concerning the employment of the three Bahamians who were brought in to work on Monday. “We were totally in the dark and we think that it is disrespectfulanda display of poor relations on the part of the company,” said Mr Knowles. There are currently 10 meter read ers on staff at the Power Company in Freeport. There are concerns over job security, salary increases and promotions. Mr Knowles said that many of the current meter-men have not been elevated to the next level of classification in meter reading even though they are performing at that level. He believes that it is unfair that the meter men are being expected to train the temporary workers to read meters and learn the routes, putting their jobs at risk. “They are performing duties of the next classification and are only getting the minimal salary, and we have instructed them not to conduct any training at this time. “What is of concern is that we are now faced with a global crisis and there are so many uncertainties rel ative to job losses, terminations, layoffs, etc. Mr Knowles believes that the Power Company wants to increase the number of daily disconnections on the island. He felt that the Power Company should have consulted with the union before hiring additional meter read ers. President Knowles claims that the company breached the Industrial Relations Act, referring to the schedules of the code of industrial rela tions practice Chapter 321 of the Industrial Relations Statues of Laws of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. He noted that Part One of the Third Schedule states that good industrial relations are the joint responsibility of management and employees and trade unions representing them. Mr Knowles also pointed out that the act calls for communication and consultation between management and trade unions in times of change. “These codes of conduct mandated by law are very serious and should be adhered to. “We are, therefore, requesting the Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes to put a stop to these employers who violate these codes,” he said. The Tribune contacted the Power Company’s executive office for com ments, but our call was not returned up to press time on Monday. GB Power Company accused of violating Act

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EDITOR, The Tribune. To realise the voice of a young people is to realise a dream. To understand the past and present struggles of a nation is to lay the foundation of an awesome and dynamic future. We have toiled long and hard and know that anything worth fighting for is a prosperous gain. We know a danger of a voiceless youth is to kill the spirit of a country. We know that to give up in the face of adversity is to admit defeat to fear, injustice and poverty of the mind. In light of the recent General Election of the Free National Movements youth arm, The National Torchbearers Youth Association, a heartfelt congratulations is due to all those duly elected officers whose primary goal is to deliver a message carried by the darlings of our Bahamaland with the underlying tones of peace, unity anda selfless drive that prospers all who seek the betterment of this country. As our organisation experi ences this paradigm shift, we the general members, a majority’s voice, accepted democracy as the structure to house our right to choose and reelected Mr Jamal Moss to lead as President of our historic organisation. His commitment to lead a mass choir of young dynamics supports his vision that one day we can harmonise the songs of triumph and success, pitching our common goals as key notes in our melody. The National Torchbearers Youth Association meets every second and fourth Wednesday of the month at 7.30pm at the FNM Headquarters on Mackey Street. We invite you to come out and be a part of our historic organisation where your voices can be heard. AKIA LIGHTBOURNE Nassau, February, 2009. E DITOR, The Tribune. There have been recent articles giving the former Prime Minister the inside track ons ecuring his leadership in the opposition party. The most recent offering s uggests that his position will not be contested in the u pcoming convention. This may be good for the stability of the party, and I agree with John Marquis and O swald Brown that his posit ion is secured; but I do not think that it is best for his part y or this country. If Mr Christie continues in the mode we have been accus-t omed to, it will only help the FNM, and while I congratul ate the FNM and Mr Ingraham on the job they are doing, t he PLP needs to wake up and smell the cerassee. I want to reiterate, the PLP will not be a ble to make a credible showi ng if they continue standing o n the sidewalk or sitting on t he wall, waiting for an “event” to milk or get political mileage. Those things show up, but it i s best that when they do, they meet you “busy”, and not just b usy with snide and sarcastic remarks. Political bystanderi ng. It is time for the nation’s f inest to employ the intellect they talk so much about. I f you are the best party, the country has ever seen, let’s see i t demonstrated. W e need to see the beginnings of transition within the party. Our history is clear on this issue, the last two leaders ofs ubstance in this nation have been outsiders who went against convention and put the n ation before the party and inspired a majority of the popu lace. Can the PLP show the nation that it is not about the party? That it is not about pers ons who see their relevance i n being “nice” and all those other descriptive terms peop le use to mask their inability to address the problems and issues that are real. We areg oing to see. E DWARD HUTCHESON Nassau, F ebruary 27, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm Lavish expensive embassy in Cuba ‘$1 million missing’ from embassy funds H undreds of thousands missing from Ministry of H ousing Minister says report supports ‘visa scam’ allegations at Ministry of Foreign Affairs. These Tribune headlines yesterday are enough to make a nation angry at the cavalier m anner in which their hard-earned taxes have been handled, especially at a time like this when the country is strapped for cash. The Tribune’s articles were gleaned from t he Auditor General’s report for the 2006/2007 f iscal year. It’s now 2009 and Bahamians are just finding out about the lack of cooperation g iven the Auditor as he tried to follow a paper trail of the public’s disappearing funds. These f unds recorded as missing are still unaccounted for. We hope government will not leave their whereabouts in limbo forever. The Auditor says his staff cannot account for about a million dollars worth of funds claimed t o have been spent on the Bahamas embassy in Cuba. Maybe he should go to Havana and take a look. “This is the fanciest embassy of any C aribbean country that I have been to!” a wideeyed Caribbean ambassador commented to a Tribune reporter in December. The occasion was the Caricom conference held in Havana. The Auditor’s report, tabled in the House, s aid that included in the unaccounted for million was $300,000 transferred to the operational a ccount of the Consulate General in Miami “for the purchase of necessary furnishings for t he official residence (of the Bahamian Ambas sador to Cuba) and the embassy.” R eviewing these accounts the auditors said they were “unable to verify the accuracy” of a listing of items purchased with the money as they were “not provided with adequate docu mentation to determine items purchased and h ow much was spent.” Another sum of $335,000 was “transferred to a bank account in Cuba with regard to the estab lishment of the office in Cuba.” And said the a uditors: “Due to inadequate record keeping (they spent.” Another item auditors recommended should be reconciled involved $274,000 also spent ont he embassy and handled through the Con sulate in Miami. “Six blank/open cheques drawn o n the Ministry’s account (Consulate General, Miami) were also for the Cuban embassy. We w ere unable to verify what the cheques were used for. The normal purchasing procedures were not followed,” said the auditors. One of o ur reporters, who has been to Cuba on assignm ent three times since 2006, watched the embassy in the making. She saw the finished product in December and marvelled at the furnishings and lavish appointments. Money, she s aid, was obviously no object, “it was really over the top.” The dark highly polished furniture and wood paneling probably mahogany was theh ighlight of the ambassador’s office and recept ion area. Visitors waiting in the reception room sat on no ordinary chairs Oh, no! exclaimed o ur reporter, these were heavy, expensive look ing upholstered chairs carved from a dark wood. T he public areas were lavish, she said the reception area, dining room and living room. She thought it was a “lot of fancy stuff” to be put in one office, she said in describing the ambassador’s office. F ormer Immigration Director Vernon Burrows probably doesn’t know what cloud he has l anded on after being catapulted from the rab bit-warren-like offices of Immigration to the p lush Bahamian embassy and residence in Cuba as ambassador. As he took the delegation on a tour of the four-bedroom residence he still had to decide which room he would call his own he marv elled at the size of the kitchen’s pantry. The large kitchen, obviously designed to be u sed to prepare menus for official functions, was staffed by three Cuban women, who smiled a nd waved as the delegates were taken through their kitchen. T here was also a smaller kitchen, probably used for every day fare. It was an embassy, designed obviously to make a statement about a people puffed up with their own importance with more money to s how off than common sense. Or is it the image that our former foreign m inister Fred Mitchell thinks should reflect the importance of the Bahamian people a people m any of whom are now jobless and living in a country that probably does not have one foreign embassy to match the one furnished for it in Cuba by the PLP government. No wonder when Prime Minister Hubert I ngraham saw this eye-opening expense tick et, paid for by the Bahamas Treasury, he had to c hange his mind about closing the Bahamas’ embassy in Cuba. T oo much of the people’s money has been invested in it, he said. PLP must stop sitting on the political wall LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net +(/3:$17(' '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* $67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP 35,0()),&( 63$&($SSUR[LPDWHO\VTXDUHIHHWRIVHFRQG VSDFHZLOOEHDYDLODEOH$SULOLQQHZO\ FRQVWUXFWHGEXLOGLQJDWWKHFRUQHURI0DUOERURXJK DQG&XPEHUODQG6WUHHWV7ZRRQVLWHFDU VSDFHVLQFOXGHG ,GHDOORFDWLRQIRURIIVKRUHEDQNWUXVWFRPSDQ\ ODZUPRURWKHUSURIHVVLRQV&RQWDFWZQHUDW E DITOR, The Tribune. Richard Coulson’s comments City Markets; l et chips fall were they may in your February 26, edition sort of indicates that we could be h eading for a major closure of a retailer which will have a considerable economic and social impact. I don’t agree with Mr Coulson’s suggestion that Winn Dixie Stores (Bahamas moral, ethical or legal reason to advise their minority shareholders of their intent to sell that was very public and the Winn Dixie share-h olding private. Further the sale of those shares did not require the approval of a general meet ing. What is required however is that the cur rent board is and must hold annually an annu a l general meeting present to the shareholders an Independent Audit report nom inate and elect directors annually appoint t he Auditors annually. It is very clear the current chairman from his recent comment to The Nassau Guardian has no immediate intention of doing any of the above so, in my opinion, the minority 27 per c ent shareholders do have a legal case against the Board as a result. Will the company be actually in business in June, 2009 that is whatt he employees, shareholders and the public need to know? N ow Neal & Massy from Trinidad own seem ingly 60 per cent of BSL Holdings, admitted by J Barry Farrington in his Guardian interview. I notice that Bahamas Supermarkets shares dropped from the artificial value for months now of $15.60 to $8.42 but in the real world without any dividends I suggest the shares on facts not fiction might be worth 8.42 cents. W here is the registrar of companies where is the board of BISX? We have already had one corporate closure this week let’s not have another which will affect over 800 employees and, of course, eco n omically impact the Bahamas Hotel Employees Pension fund who have a $25 million invest ment in BSL Holdings which would be a total l oss. T HUTCHINSON Nassau, February 26, 2009. Where is registrar of companies, where is the board of BISX? Come out and be a par t of the historic National T or c hbearers Youth Association

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FORMER Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell held a press conference to address what he called the “inaccuracy” of the headline in yesterday’s Tribune . The headline, which read “$1 million missing’ from embassy funds”, was followed a story based on comments made by the Audi tor General in his 2006/2007 report about funds said to have been expended towards the establishment of a Bahamian embassy in Cuba during Mr Mitchell’s tenure. Mr Mitchell said: “The headline does not reflect what the sto ry itself says and neither does the Auditor General’s report say that a million dollars is missing.” “In the report, it points out irregularities in the procedures which meant that on the particular day or days the audit was done, certain documentation was not available to prove and to trace how the funds were actually spent. It is possible that the very next day the information was available. “When you say funds are miss ing it gives the impression that there was theft or malfeasance when there was none. Certainly none that I was aware of.” He noted that the report does not suggest any malfeasance. Mr Mitchell said that with the PLP having “carriage of the Public Accounts Committee” he intends to refer the matter to that committee “so we can get more specific answers with regard to the comments of the Auditor Gener al.” Yesterday’s Tribune story noted that according to the Auditor General, $300,000 was transferred to the operational account of the Bahamas Consulate General in Miami to buy furnishings for the official residence of the Bahamian Ambassador to Cuba and the embassy. However, auditors reviewing the accounts said they were “unable to verify the accu racy” of a listing of items purchased with the money as they were “not provided with adequate documentation to determine items purchased and how much was spent.” Meanwhile, $335,000 was not ed by auditors to have been “transferred to a bank account in Cuba with regard to the establish ment of the office in Cuba” – but “due to inadequate record keeping (they money was spent.” A section of the report relating to the Bahamas Consulate General in Miami notes that according to auditors, $274,000 was also “spent on behalf of the Embassy’s office in Cuba”. It adds: “this amount should be reconciled.” Auditors also said they were “unable to verify” what six blank cheques, drawn on a ministry account in relation to the Cuba Embassy, were used for. “The normal purchasing procedures were not followed,” said the report. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009, PAGE 5 6DOHVHUVRQQHO :DQWHG$SSOLFDQWVPXVW HDUVRIDJH +DYHJRRGFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOVDQG DQDSSUHFLDWLRQIRUFXVWRPHUVHUYLFH %HKRQHVWDQGGHSHQGDEOH %HDEOHWRZRUNH[LEOHKRXUV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVVKRXOGFDOOIRU DQDSSRLQWPHQWWLPHWROORXWDQ DSSOLFDWLRQIRUP-2+16KRHDQG$FFHVVRULHV n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net A CROSS-AISLE war of w ords broke out in the House of Assembly yesterday after a PLP MP claimed he had evidence that a Cabinet Minister is corrupt. Frank Smith’s threat which prompted Prime M inister Hubert Ingraham t o challenge him to immed iately “name and shame” any of his ministers if he has the evidence was aborted shortly after when the St Thomas More MP was called on to explain the nature of the evidence he h ad and which Cabinet m inister he was referring to. T he episode began when Mr Smith claimed that he has documentary evidence from the Customs Department showing that “one of (Mr Ingraham’s inet ministers is corrupt and h e refuses to deal with it.” I will table these documents,” he said, holding several sheets of paper in o ne raised hand. A t this point, members of t he Opposition called on h im to explain the nature o f the documents he intended to table before he did so. M r Smith said: “I’ve said w hat I’ve said (the prime m inister’s) asked for these documents before and I’m bringing them now. I will provide the proof. Here’s the proof and he can determine which minister it is. T he St Thomas More MP then launched into a continuation of his contribu-t ion on the mid-year budget report, causing governm ent MPs to call on the House Speaker to interject and make Mr Smith explain h imself or withdraw his statement about corruption from the record. Education Minister and M P for Seabreeze Carl Bethel said: “He has made an allegation that someone i n Cabinet is corrupt and h e’s waving around some p aper we can’t just move on. He must specify. Hem ust be called upon to just ify what he’s saying. Name the person as he was challenged to do or withdraw the statement entirely.” Mr Smith responded with saying that “this is as far as I’m going to go today.” “If you take exception to me laying these documents on the table, which are duly executed documents, then I think we have a problem. “Mr Speaker, if you take a look at the documents you will see, you can read the evidence,” he said, again not specifying which C abinet minister he was making the corruption allegation about. T he Speaker of the H ouse, Alvin Smith, then pushed the MP again, aski ng “what is the document s aying.” T he St Thomas More MP then concluded his efforts,s tating “I’ll deal with this a nother time,” causing government MPs to be heard complaining that he had not substantiated his statement. At the prompting of the Speaker, Mr Smith then agreed to withdraw his s tatement about corruption w ithin the Cabinet before c ontinuing with his contrib ution to the budget d ebate. A FOUR-MONTH period this summer w ill see the country “exposed to a larger g lobal audience than at any time in the h istory of the Bahamas”, according to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham. Mr Ingraham made this observation as he confirmed that on August 30 2009, as prefaced in The Tribune on Saturday, the Bahamas will host the Miss UniverseP ageant – an event which attracts millions o f viewers worldwide. The staging of the global beauty pageant will take place three months after hundreds of visitors will descend on the Bahamas for the 59th Congress of the International Federation of AssociationF ootball (FIFA Ingraham said would “pump millions” into the national economy. The FIFA conference, scheduled to take place at Atlantis in late May/early June 2009, will draw delegates, conference organisers and 250 representatives of the international media. It will follow on the heels of the Commonwealth Local G overnment Conference, scheduled for May 11 – 14 in Grand B ahama. L ast week Mr Ingraham tabled a bill seeking to reallocate $5.4 million to the Ministry of Tourism for the remainder of the 2 008/2009 budgetary period for advertising in non-US markets, web development and hosting of the pageant. Mr Ingraham said that the Ministry of Tourism wished to express its thanks and appreciation to the private sector, whose commitments in relation to the Miss Universe pageant mean that the cost to the government of the Bahamas has been significantly reduced.” M eanwhile, he added that even though Atlantis will be the prim ary venue for the event, the “full breadth of the Bahamas will be exposed to a large global audience”, with prospective beauty q ueens touring the islands in advance of the final show. We note that in our current economic condition the promot ional value of these events is considerable,” said Mr Ingraham. T he additional money expected to be allocated to the Ministry of Tourism bring its total funds for the 2008/2009 budgetary perio d to $97 million. The prime minister noted that this includes $4 million originally intended to go towards the ministry’s efforts in relation to a num-b er of “anchor projects which didn’t come about”, which was t herefore allowed to be spent on advertising. A sked yesterday which projects he was referring to, Mr Ingraham declined to comment, saying he had said all he had intended to. MP claims he has evidence that a Cabinet Minister is corrupt Frank Smith Frank Smith’s threat prompts war of words PM: Miss Universe Pageant will expose Bahamas to its largest global audience Mitchell says Tribune headline was inaccurate Hubert Ingraham

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n ByGLADSTONE THURSTON THE R M Bailey Park is to be transformed into a recreational facility similar to the Fish Fry at Nassau’s Western Esplanade, Minister of the Environment Earl Deveaux said. “We want to create a last ing recreational value in all our public places by stimulating economic activity and putting people to work doing things that help improve the ambiance of our natural environment,” said Mr Deveaux. In a weekend interview, the minister updated the media on the government’s beautification and clean-up programme launched in downtown Nassau on December 9, 2008. Mr Deveaux said the Envi ronmental Court will be made operational again to address littering and indis criminate dumping. Objectives The beautification and clean-up programme has two main objectives – to provide jobs for unemployed persons and to address “increased criticism about the filth in New Providence,” Mr Deveaux said. “We are now entering a phase where you will see us in Bain and Grant’s Towns taking out derelict vehicles and garbage from junkanoo shacks, residential areas and business places,” he said. New native Bahamian trees are going to be planted in parks and along the high ways’ median strips. “We will keep the programme going but in a sustainable way where the road verges, parks and beaches will be cleaned,” said Mr Deveaux. He said there will be boardwalks created at places like the R M Bailey Park “where we expect that they would look similar to the Fish Fry where we would have benches, observation places and parking spaces.” Already the ministry has advertised its schedule for regular residential garbage collection utilising new equipment. Also, there is a programme for householders and business operators to have their garbage disposed of into the landfill, he said, adding that those who indiscriminately litter will be prosecuted. There is already approval for the Environmental Court to meet on Saturdays. “There is a large element of public education that is going to be important,” said the minister, “but our first duty is to dispose of the litter and have such means available to the general pub lic in a way that it is not a burden to them.” The response to the programme, he said “has been tremendous.” The Ministry of Tourism complimented the effort and the government praised the Department of Environmental Health Services, headed by director Melony McKenzie. “We are more than pleased that we are getting the kind of support in the public domain from the clients we are seeking to serve,” said Mr Deveaux. “We believe it will only get better. “As we make bins available, as we make the routine of garbage collection and disposal better, people will respond accordingly. “Everybody is happier in a cleaner, healthier environ ment.” n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter MURDER accused Dwight Knowles and Sean Brown b oth surrendered to police c ustody after learning that t hey were wanted in connect ion with the February 2006 homicide of businessman Keith Carey, two police officers testified yesterday. Brown turned himself into police in the Berry Islands and Knowles surrendered to police a t his lawyer’s office here in New Providence, the court heard yesterday. Both men, along with Jamal Glinton, are accused of the murder and also face charges of armed robbery and conspiracy to commit armed robbery. K eith Carey, 43, was g unned down on the steps of t he Bank of the Bahamas o n T onique Williams-Darling H ighway o n February 27, 2 006. He was killed before he was able to deposit money that belonged to the gas station that he operated. Inspector Kenry Stubbs told the court yesterday that on March 20, 2006, a slim, dark s kinned man came into the Berry Islands police station claiming that he was the one p olice were looking for in conn ection with the murder of Mr C arey. Inspector Stubbs told the court that the man, whomh e subsequently identified as S ean Brown, was searched. He testified that Brown was asked to remove a bandage from his right hand, revealing t hat he had only a thumb on that hand. The witness told the court that Brown claimed that he had received the injury during a traffic accident in Eleuthera in 2005. Inspector Stubbs testified t hat he later went to a motel in Great Harbour Cay where the owner gave him a receipt in the name of Sean Morley. He said that the room in which Brown had been staying was searched, but with negative results. Inspector Stubbs told the c ourt that Brown was later b rought to New Providence a nd handed over to the Cent ral Detective Unit. Information DetectiveSergeant F ranklyn Hinsey told the c ourt that on March 7, 2006, w hile on duty at the Central D etective Unit, he received i nformation regarding a susp ect wanted in connection with the murder of Mr Carey. He told the court that around 6.39pm, he, Inspector Fernander and another officer went to the law office of attorney Cecil Hilton. There, h e said, Mr Hilton handed over his client Dwight Knowles, who also goes by the a liases of Dwight Morrison, Dwight Morley and Derek Knowles. Detective Hinsey told the court that he arrested Knowles and cautioned him. Detective Hinsey told the c ourt that Knowles said, “My lawyer told me to tell y’all about what happened at the Bank of the Bahamas, Harrold Road, when the man got shot.” Detective Hinsey told the court that he subsequently transported Knowles to the C entral Detective Unit. K nowles’ attorney Perry A lbury suggested during c ross-examination that his c lient had not said what the o fficer claimed he did. Detective Hinsey, however, stuck by his testimony. The trial has been adjourned until Thursday at 10am. Deputy director of Public P rosecutions Cheryl GrantBethel, Stephanie Pintard, Anthony Delaney and Lennox C oleby are prosecuting the c ase. A ttorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis are repre-s enting Jamal Glinton, attor n ey Dorsey McPhee is representing Sean Brown and attorney Perry Albury is repre senting Dwight Knowles. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Pair accused of murder ‘turned themselves in after learning they were wanted’ WORKERS TAKE UP seaweed from Long Wharf Beach as part of the Ministry of the Environment’s b eautification programme. BEAUTIFICATION AND CLEANUP PROGRAMME MOVES SOUTH n F ORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. THE MASSIVElate winter snowstorm pummeling the Northeast has caused dozens of flight cancelations and delays as long as five hours at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, according to Associated Press. An airport spokesman says 24 outbound flights and 28 i ncoming ones have been nixed as of Monday afternoon. G regory Meyer says the longest delays have been for flights l eaving to the airports in Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York’s LaGuardia. Hundreds of flights nationwide have been canceled because of the storm. The weather is also blamed for four deaths. Power outages have been a problem in New Jersey, Virginia and the Carolinas, where more than 300,000 customers have been without electricity. Effects of winter storm reach Florida airports

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009, PAGE 7 Abaco launches Bahamas Christian Network on TV n By KATHRYN CAMPBELL AFTER 40 years of service to the Bahamas Post Office Department, Dolores Pinder officially retires today. She joined the Post Office Department as a dispatcher in the Sands Road location and climbed the ranks to retire as senior superintendent of the Cable Beach Post Office, a post she has held for seven years. “I did the work of the senior officer when I started working at the Post Office. I enjoyed it and learned a lot. I was responsible for registered mail between Nassau and the Family Islands. ThenI sorted the mail to and from the Family Islands. I continued in reg istered mail then moved to the stamp counter,” said Mrs Pinder. She worked at the Shirley Street branch for five months, the Penny Savings Bank section, andshe held brief stints at the post office in Clarence Bain building. Mrs Pinder said that with the exception of an ancillary worker, she was the first woman to be employed in the dispatching department then located on Sands Road. “I worked with men like Mr Lunn, Kenneth Moss and Charles Williams and other men. I did not encounter any discrimination as the first female in that area. The heavy mail bags had to be lifted, but the men did that. We had a good relationship. They didn’t show me any disrespect. I enjoyed working with men,” she said. Mrs Pinder has fond recollec tions of her years in the public service. Included in them are the relationships she formed particu larly during her tenure at the Cable Beach branch. “I interacted with a lot of clients and made many friends and formed lasting relationships. To this day I still communicate with some of them and I also communicate with former coworkers who left the Post Office,” said Mrs. Pinder. One of those persons is Tina Johnson, a client who resides in Mayaguana. Another was a visitor from Bermuda who accidentally left her wallet in the Post Office. After receiving a phone call from Mrs Pinder she later returned to collect it and they have been friends ever since. Asked to describe her 40 years of service, Mrs Pinder said, “I enjoyed my work. You have to like what you do. If I had to do it all over again I would do it the same way.” Prior to going on pre-retire ment leave, Mrs Pinder received a plaque and a gift from Postmaster General Godfrey Clarke. She also attended a four-day pre-retire ment planning seminar organised by the Department of Public Ser vice which she said she thor oughly enjoyed. Postal worker retires after 40 years of service DELORES PINDER , a 40-year postal worker retires from the Public Service. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S ABACO officially became the first Family Island to launch a television station with the opening of the Bahamas Christian Network on the weekend. Attending the official launch on Saturday in Dundas Town, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham commended Silbert and Dolly Mills on this achievement. “I am happy to join Silbert and Dolly Mills on the occasion of the official opening of the Bahamas Christian Network television station here in Dundas Town, Abaco. Silbert, you are a trailblazer and an entrepreneur extraordinaire. You make your family and friends and our community here in Abacovery proud of your vision and your accomplishments. And of course, as a descendant of Mayaguana, you are a source of pride for all Mayaguanians,” Mr Ingraham said. The prime minister said that he is extremely impressed with the new television station and has not seen its like anywhere in the Bahamas. “I’ve not been in a station in the Bahamas like this before and I have been to them all. Now the entire Bahamas is going to be exposed to Pastor Mills’ immense talent and programming. I am confident that Pastor Mills will deliver a television service which will make not only Abaco, but the Bahamas proud. “I commend both Dolly and Pastor Mills for their hard work and commitment to excellence, principles which have served them well in the operation of all their business undertakings,” he said. Minister of National Security and Minister with responsibility for broadcasting Tommy Turnquest said that this new television station opens new vistas for Abaco and gives the island a new voice. “What the people of Abaco will watch, and the new voice it will hear, will come to them from the Bahamas Christian Network, BCN, with Mr Silbert Mills at its helm. It has been said that with the constant need for information, changes in lifestyles, economic and social advancement, and the demands on families and working parents, television is stepping into many of the traditional roles of the family, the church and schools. “BCN has determined that programmes reflective of our status as a Christian nation is what will guide any influence it would exercise here in Abaco. “Mr Mills and Radio Abaco have already distinguished themselves by providing important media service on Abaco, including the news insert on the island aired by an existing television station,” Mr Turnquest said.

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contribute one per cent of the insurable wage to government. A tenta tive date of January 1, 2010 is beingc onsidered for this new tax, Mr Ingraham told Parliament during his c ontribution to the 2008/2009 midterm budget debate yesterday. I previously indicated that the Government was considering an unemployment insurance pro gramme for workers in the B ahamas,” the Prime Minister said. “I am pleased to say that the actuarial work is virtually complete and that we expect to be able to bring legislation to Parliament during the course of this month or certainly by early next month at the latest with a view to producing an unemployment benefit for employed persons.” W hile the prime minister did not specify the length of time a person must be unemployed to qualify for the aid, he said government will try to accommodate as many out of work people as possible. “We are seeking to affect a scheme that will guarantee for a lim ited period of time (between 13 and 2 6 weeks) persons to get up to 50 per cent of what they would have been contributing towards. “In other words someone who was contributing on the basis of earnings of $400 or more per week would be eligible to receive one-half of that a s an unemployment benefit under the scheme for this period," he said. Mr Ingraham also said government funds "in the double digits" but not more than $20 million will be transferred from NIB's Med ical Reserve Fund for the unem ployment assistance plan. T o sustain this programme, employees and employers will have to contribute about one per cent of the insurable weekly wage at a breakdown of either 60 per cent paid by the employer and 40 per cent paid by the employee, or a breakdown of 50 per cent and 50 per cent, respectively, Mr Ingraham said. F or example, the insurable wage ceiling of $400 per week would amount to a contribution $4 per week to the scheme. " Eventually it is going to be required for employers and employe es to pay a sum of money towards the continual operation of unemp loyment scheme in the Bahamas," he said, adding that due to the cur rent economic downturn this new fee will not be required until early next year. A fter the morning session, leader of opposition business in the House o f Assembly Dr Bernard Nottage told The Tribune he could not suffic iently analyse the effectiveness of the proposed scheme based on the minimal details provided by Mr Ingraham. "What we don't know is what you have to do to qualify, in other words, how long you've been unemployed, w hat happens to people who have been unemployed prior to the 'crisis'b ut who also have been paying National Insurance contributions o ver the years, but there are some questions to be answered before one can give a reasonable evaluation of it," he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE officer had been passing when he saw the large crowd of schoolboys surrounding the police officer and took the initiative to intercede by firing a shot in the air. The boys ran from the scene as the shot was fired. No one w as injured. According to eyewitnesses, around six police cars and a police bike arrived at the scene near 3 G’s Snacks on Bernard Road following the incident, but no arrests were made. ASP Evans said investigators are following significant leads and key players haveb een identified. A schoolgirl in grade eight a t LW Nash said students were shaken by the shooting just m etres from the school around five minutes after the final school bell sounded at 3.10pm. She said most pupils were in the schoolyard waiting to bec ollected when they heard the gunfire. I was scared,” she said. “I thought someone was c oming running down here to shoot up. “Everyone had just come out of school so the majority of children were out here. A lot of people went to see what happened but when Ir eached everything was finished.” dilapidated building on Bay Street which the company also owns. “We expect that owner will either cause his property to be developed or consider selling it to government or the government will cons ider what is in the public interest,” he said. Mr Ingraham added that one of the options being considered by the Government as it moves ahead with the revitalisation of the downtown area is extending Woodes Rodger’s Wharf as far as Armstrong Street. “Whether there will simply be a boardwalk or if there’ll be vehicular traffic up to some point (has yet to be determined h am said. The Prime Minister previously informed parliament that the loan would go towards filling the gap left by a 7.6 per cent shortfall in r evenue compared to forecasts for the first six months of the 2008/2009 budgetary period amounting to $51.6 million and to funding Government’s “stimulus programme,” consisting of accelerated capital works projects. Y esterday he also confirmed that one of the capital projects specifically set to be funded by the loan will be the dredging work required at Nassau Harbour to make way for s ome of the world’s largest cruise ships to dock there by the end of this year. According to the Prime Minister, bids from international firms to conduct the work are n ow being evaluated. He said Government expects to award the contract by early April, for work to begin by July 1, 2009, and to be completed by around October. A s a result of dredging, he added, between six and 14 acres of new land may be created. He said that 1,200 feet of additional land will be formed at Arawak Cay and will be bulkh eaded a “very expensive operation,” he added. Downtown redevelopment will require “hefty public sector investment of up to $100 million,” said the Prime Minister, as he invitedm embers of parliament to give their views on the issue as they contribute to the mid-year budget debate. s ignificant number of employers who have not paid on time,” Mr Cargill said. In its efforts to enhance contribution payments, and bring about effective changes at NIB, the Board recently completed its 8th Actuarial Review, which called for the strengthening of p enalties for late or non-payment of contributions and “to introduce new legal measures such as garnishing to assist the compliance effort.” In his address to the Rotary Club of West Nassau last month, Mr Cargill foreshadowed these recent developm ents. M r Cargill: “You might be aware of our increased effortst o ensure delinquent employers h onour their NIB contributions. While legal measures are ourl ast resort, and the Courts are utilized only as a last resort, we a re seeing a significant increase in legal cases and, in fact, incarcerations. “The ability of the Board to take effective punitive measures will be critical going forward, b ecause, unfortunately, many of the 16,000 employers in this country (that includes businesses and self-employed persons) are not paying contributions regularly or at all. And many who are paying are not paying on time,” he said. While non-compliance places workers in a very precariousp osition, NIB’s fund is designed to protect employees, and ass uch is obligated to pay benefits even if the employer is behind o n their contributions, Mr Cargill revealed. here in The Bahamas who can assume the business and provide the coverage that CLICO policyholders purchased without any loss to the policyholders Mr Ingraham’s communication outlined the series of events that placed CLICO in its current state, including a $73.6 million loan from CLICO to a real-estate company that through the significant decline in the Florida real estate market ulti mately compromised the insurer’s “financial integrity”. The Prime Minister also stressed that the decision to liquidate CLICO was taken only after very careful consideration of the interest of the policyholders, staff and creditors of the company in the Bahamas and in the region and only after discussions by the Registrar with the principals of the company over many months urging and directing them to inject additional capital and liquidity into the CLICO, without success. “The overriding evidence suggested that in order to protect the policyholders, numbering some 23,000 in The Bahamas and 29,000 in the region, which is the ultimate responsibility of the Registrar of Insurance Companies, steps had to be taken to ensure that the assets of CLICO were not further compromised,” Mr Ingraham said. The Prime Minister said since 2004 CLICO began making excessive cash advances called “loans to subsidiary” to CLICO Enterprises Limited. Loans were granted at a rate of interest of 12 per cent per annum with no fixed maturity date. In 2007, loans to subsidiary represented 58.56 per cent of total assets and 68 per cent of invested assets. Mr Ingraham said that these advances to CLICO Enterprises Limited were made to the US based Wellington Preserve Corporation’s, Florida realestate project. This US investment is in respect of a 600-acre real estate development with a reputed value of $80 million. A write-down of $25 million occurred in 2007, mainly as a result of the decline of sales in the Florida real estate market and the non-completion of the project. As at December 31, 2008, loans to subsidiaries of CLICO were $73.6 million. Mr Ingraham said that it was these advances totaling $73.6 million by CLICO that compromised its financial integrity, as neither Wellington Preserve Corporation nor CLICO Enterprises Limited are in a position to repay the loans from the company. “Additionally, with the significant decline in the Florida real estate market and the $65 million need ed to complete the Wellington Preserve Project, the market value of the property is now substantially less than its initial book value, further deteriorating the financial situation,” the prime minister said. H e said that it appears that CLICO never sought the required “no objection” from The Bahamas Registrar of Insurance Companies in connection with the Company’s investments, loans to subsidiaries or related party transactions. “Concern was expressed about this matter and a request was made for information regarding all investments undertaken by the company within and outside The Bahamas. In fact, at one of the 2007 prudential meetings, the Registrar of Insurance Companies demanded that the company return the then $53 million invested in order to reduce the intercompany loan balances. The company gave assurances that it would, I am advised, but failed to do so,” Mr Ingraham said. It was after the receipt of the 2007 audited financial statements in July 2008 that the extent of the real estate investments was again highlighted. On December 22, 2008, a letter was sent to CLICO placing the following requirements and restrictions on its operations: That it realize repayment of all inter-company balances not later than Friday, January 9, 2009, and, that Any investments/advances of any nature to related parties and or subsidiaries; or Any advances/loans of any nature to non-related parties other than policy loans in the normal course of business; or Any borrowings or mortgages; or Any investments in real estate; or Any advances to directors or senior manage ment; or Any dividend payments to shareholders; or Any guarantees to any entity; or Any new or changes to the company’s insurance products; Require the prior approval of the Registrar of Insurance Companies. “The investments were not repaid within the time given. CLICO, however, requested to meet with the Minister of State for Finance to inform its position. The Minister agreed to a meeting which was scheduled for January 29, 2009, which CLICO subsequently requested be rescheduled. The new meet ing was rescheduled for February 5, 2009, which CLICO also failed to attend,” the prime minister said. “The Government regards this matter as a very serious one and will continue to monitor the situa tion with CLICO and provide regular updates to the public,” the prime minister said. On February 24, 2009, a winding-up Order was granted by the Supreme Court appointing Craig Gomez of Baker Tilley Gomez as Provisional Liquidator for CLICO. A hearing of the application for liquidation is scheduled to be heard on March 17, 2009. a nd the payments will be retroactive to 2004. Mr Laing said the decision affects those workers in the p ublic service payscale D. That’s where you put all of the people who work in the information technology area. Those scales were createdm any years ago and really the kind of work IT people do today is far more expansive t han what they would’ve been called to do in that D scale ( before). “So they’re now upgrading the scale so the compensation for the scale is enhanced,” he said. T he Tribune tried to reach Ministry of Health officials yesterday for confirmation on the number of persons tested during this most recent outbreak. However, with the permanent secretary out of office, acting Permanent Secretary Creswell Sturrup s aid he would have to inquire about the matter as he was relatively new to the post and did not know a bout the outbreak off-hand. The Tribune did not receive a return call up until press time last night. Tuberculosis is spread through the air, when persons who have the disease cough, sneeze, or spit. One third of the world’s current population haveb een infected with mycobacterium tuberculosis, and new infections occur at a rate of “one per sec-o nd.” “However, most of these cases will not develop t he full-blown disease; asymptomatic, latent infection is most common. About one in ten of these latent i nfections will eventually progress to active disease, which, if left untreated, kills more than half of its vic tims,” the website warns. F ROM page one Part of $200m loan Shot fired F ROM page one F ROM page one Pr oposed unemployment assistance PM on CLICO policyholders FROM page one F ROM page one TB tests conducted FROM page one NIBfiles over 100 cases for back payments in the past month Almost 200 govt ITworkers set to share $555,000 FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009, PAGE 9 n S PORTS TAMPA, Fla. Associated Press A MISSINGboater found clinging to an overturned boat was rescued Monday off Florida’s Gulf Coast, but the search continued for two NFL players and another man aboard who didn’t return from a weekend fishing trip. Survivor Nick Schuyler, a former University of South Florida player, told rescuers that the 21-foot boat was anchored when it flipped Saturday evening in roughseas and that the others got separated from the boat, Capt. Timothy M. Close said. Schuyler, who was wearing a life vest, had been clinging to the boat since then. The boat belongs to Oakland Raiders linebacker Marquis Cooper, who along with free-agent defensive lineman Corey Smith and former South Florida play-er William Bleakley, remained missing. Television footage showed Schuyler conscious but weak as he was being taken off a helicopter at Tampa Gener al Hospital and placed on a stretcher. The hospital declined immediate com-ment. Close said the Coast Guard would search for the three missing men for “quite awhile.” The four left Clearwater Pass early Saturday in calm weather, but heavy winds picked up through the day and the seas got heavy, with waves of 7 feet and higher, peaking at 15 feet on Sunday. A relative alerted the Coast Guard early Sunday after the men did not return as expected. The Coast Guard had searched about 16,000 square miles of ocean for the Everglades-manufactured boat by Monday morning. Everglades boats are built with compressed foam encased in Fiberglas, whichm akes them difficult or i mpossible to sink. Waves had subsided to 6 to 8 feet, still enough for a small craft advisory, National Weather Service meteorologist Todd Barron said. C ooper and Smith, who were teammates with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2004, have been on fishing trips before, according to Ron Del Duca, Smith’s agent. The 29-year-old Smith of Richmond, Va., is 6-foot-2, 250 pounds and had 30 tackles, including three sacks, and an interception in 12 games last season for the Detroit Lions. Cooper, 26, who is 6-foot3, 230 pounds, has spent five seasons with five different teams, appearing in 26 games with the Buccaneers in 2004 and 2005, but playing sparingly since. He grew up in Gilbert, Ariz., and his father Bruce is a prominent sportscaster for KPNX-TV in Phoenix. Survivor clinging to overturned NFL player’s boat SPORTS IN BRIEF n BASKETBALL NEW YORK Assocaited Press THE NEW YORKKnicks signed 7-foot-1 center Cheikh Samb to a 10-day contractMonday. Samb, a second-round draft pick in 2006, joins his fourth team this season. He started with Detroit, was traded to Denver and then traded to the Los Angeles Clippers. Samb, from Senegal, averaged 0.9 points, 1.4 rebounds and 0.63 blocks in 16 games for the Clippers before he was waived Feb. 16. In 20 career games, he’s averaged 1.1 points, 1.5 rebounds and 5.4 minutes The Knicks’ roster increased to 13 players. Knicks sign 7-1 center Samb to 10-day contract ON Saturday, the Bahamas Government Departmental Softball Association will officially open its 31st season at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. Thora Sweeting, who has served as the association’s president for the past 12 years, said it had grown by leaps and bounds and was now considered the most exciting recreational league in the country. “The league has served a positive purpose since its inception,” said Sweeting, referring to the initial season in 1979. “It has brought persons in the Public Service together, engendering friendships which are sustained and memories that will last a life time.” Sweeting said over the years the BGDSA had made significant progress in softball, both locally and internationally and she anticipated that the future shone brightly as evident through the tremendous interest and support displayed by both their fans and spectators. “I am so excited about our 31st anniversary, the opportunities and challenges that are ahead of us as we move forward and attempt to accomplish all of our goals for 2009,” she said. “I hope that each of you share my excitement, as I look forward with eager anticipation to the full support of our members and fans.” On Saturday at noon at Baillou Hills, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister will deliver the keynote address at Baillou Hills. Alvin Smith, the Speaker of the House of Assembly and former president of the BGDSA, along with Romell ‘Fish’ Knowles, president of the Bahamas Softball Federation, are both expected to make brief remarks. Throwing out the ceremonial pitches are Reginald Ferguson, Commissioner of the Royal Bahamas Police Force; Clifford ‘Butch’ Scavalla, the Commodore of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force; Ken Griffin, president and CEO of Bahamas Telecommunications Company; Joe Johnson, manager of Premier Importers and Sandy Schaefer, president of Robin Hood Enterprises. Entertainment will be provided by the Aquinas College Marching Band, CC Sweeting Dance Group, RM Bailey and CR Walker Junkanoo Groups and God Missionary Dance Angels. The opening ceremonies will climax with a junkanoo rush-out and fireworks display at 6:30 pm. At 1:45 pm, there will be the releasing of the balloons. At 2 pm, the first game will get underway between the 2008 ladies champions Police Royals against 2008 runners-up Finance Health Invaders. Shortly afterwards, 2008 and sixteen (16 Defence Force Floaters will battle 2008 runners-up Police Chiefs. The bouncing castle, ballooons and lots of prizes will be given out to the children and fans on opening day. Thompson Trading personnel will be on hand to give out paraphernalia while supplies last. The opening ceremony will be broadcast live on 104.5 FM from 2-6 pm. In her president’s report of 2008, Sweeting said the season got underway with pomp and circumstance. The games, according to Sweeting, were well attended and the fans support was not where it ought to be, however, some adjustments would be made to correct the situation. “We had an excellent softball season and for the first time for a very long time that the league finished its season extra early, which was a plus,” she said. “We had one death in the league last year, Charles ‘Wire’ Smith, a former player of the Defence Force Floaters. He is sadly missed by all of the members and fans.” This year’s Player’s Appreciation Day on Saturday, July 25 will be held in his honour and called the “Charles ‘Wire’ Smith Plater’s Appreciation Day.” Sweeting took the time out to congratulate the three-time defending ladies’ champions Police Royals and 16-time men’s champions Royal Defence Force Floaters. The runners-up were the Finance Health Invaders in the ladies’ division and the Police Chiefs in the men. The Floaters won the pennant in the men’s Paradise League, the Chiefs in the men’s Tropical League and the Invaders in the ladies. The league, which is comprised of eight ladies and ten men’s teams, could not be as successful without the com passionate, sensitive and patience exhibited by the umpires, namely Dave Mortimer, Van Johnson, Darren Mortimer, Phil Culmer, Robert Smith, Cyril Smith, Michael Hanna, Thomas Sears and Ross Coleby. Sweeting also mentioned chief statisticians Marjorie Delaney and Rozina Taylor, as well as scorers Althea Clarke, Loretta Maycock, Karen Richardson, Bridgette Sweeting, Celestine Ford, Christine Jenoure and Ms McCardy for their efforts. All teams are advised that rosters and entrance fees must be brought in before May 3. Any teams in violation of meeting the deadline will not be allowed to play unless they meet their obligation. BGDSA opens new season this week BGDSA president Thora Sweeting n BASEBALL TUCSON, Ariz. Associated Press ANGELS ace John Lackey showed why he gets paid to pitch and not hit in his spring debut. Lackey did just about everything right in Los Angeles’ 12-3 victory over the Colorado Rockies on Monday while on the mound, throwing two innings of hitless ball. “The arm felt great,” Lackey said. “I didn’t throw the ball inside for strikes like I needed to, but other than that, it was a pretty good place to start.” The Angels ace retired all six batters he faced, with one strikeout. Lackey had such an easy time he went to the bullpen after his designated two innings to throw a 10-pitch bullpen session. At the plate, though, Lackey barely moved the bat off his shoulder during a three-pitch strikeout. “(I was thing,” Lackey said, laughing. “It would have cost me something.” The Angels have good reason to protect Lackey. He missed the first six weeks of the 2008 season because of a strained triceps. Lackey, who ended up going 12-5 with a 3.75 ERA, said he spent extra time on an exercise program to strengthen his elbow and shoulder as a preventative measure. “I have not felt any pain going back to last spring,” Lackey said. While Lackey barely broke a sweat, Colorado starting pitcher Franklin Morales was rocked for seven runs on nine hits. Angels’ catcher Jeff Mathis had two homers among the seven extra-base hits Morales allowed. Mathis went 2-for-2 with three RBI. “I’m not frustrated at all. I know any body can have a bad day,” Morales said through an interpreter. “I understand that as long as I am able to command the fastball on both sides of the plate it is going to be fine. Mentally and physically I am in a good place right now.” Morales, after throwing two shutout innings against the Chicago White Sox in his first spring appearance, gave up a third homer to Brandon Wood. Wood, who was 3-for-4 with three RBIs, also had a run-scoring double. The Rockies left-handed pitcher is among the candidates to earn the final spot in the starting rotation. “I am not concerned about (the starting job) because I can’t control that,” Morales said. “The biggest thing is I feel good mentally and physically and just had a rough outing and have to move on. I am not going to lose sleep about it because it is out of my control.” The Rockies continued to struggle at the plate. They did not get a hit until Yorvit Torrealba had a single in the fifth. Matt Murton had a two-run homer. The Angels’ Adam Pavkovich went 3-for-5 with four RBIs. Andrew Romine also had three hits. Notes: Los Angeles center fielder Reggie Willits was scratched with tightness in his abductor muscle of his left leg. The third year player is 2-for-6 with an RBI so far this spring. Los Angeles Angels beat Rockies 12-3 n BASKETBALL DETROIT Associated Press CHAUNCEY BILLUPS acknowledges it will be emotional to play at The Palace for the first time as an ex-Pis ton. Just wait until the Denver Nuggets guard hears and sees the reaction Tuesday night from fans who still adore him and wish he was still playing for their team. Billups will likely hear one of the loudest ovations an exDetroit player has heard in his first game back in the Motor City. It might only trail the outpouring of appreciation for Gordie Howe, when the Hall of Fame player known as Mr. Hockey was representing the Hartford Whalers in the 1980 NHL All-Star game at Joe Louis Arena. “I’m sure it will be emo tional,” Billups said. “I had a lot of great years there. I’m sure it’s always going to be my home away from home. It will be pretty emotional, but it will be a lot of fun.” Pistons president of basketball operations Joe Dumars the man who traded Billups has no doubt what kind of reception Billups will get. “Chauncey should get a tremendous ovation,” Dumars told The Associated Press on Monday. “And, he will get a tremendous ovation. “He deserves it.” Detroit made the unpopular move to create playing time for second-year pro Rodney Stuckey, to clear about $20 million in salary cap space and to give the team a new look in the postseason. In the short term, the trade hasn’t helped the Pistons out. If they can add a star or two this summer or next, it might be viewed differently. Billups was one of the most popular Pistons during his seven-plus seasons with the franchise he helped win the 2004 NBA title as finals MVP, advance to at least the Eastern Conference finals the past six years and win 50 or more games every year as an AllStar point guard. Ben Wallace was the face of those teams, but Billups was the voice. He was the first to speak to reporters after games win or lose and that in part led to fans getting to know one of the most likable players in the league. Billups is looking forward to seeing the red-whiteand-blue clad fans again and perhaps chatting a few up at courtside. “It will be fun to get back to that city that I love so dearly, the fans that I love so dear ly,” Billups said. His fame in Detroit has only grown this season because the Pistons have plummeted from NBA elite to mediocre status since he was traded to Den ver on Nov. 3, 2008 along with Antonio McDyess and Cheikh Samb for Allen Iverson. Billups set to play Pistons at Palace for 1st time LOS ANGELES Angels' Kendry Morales slides home to score against the Colorado Rockies in the first inning Monday, March 2, 2009, during a spring training baseball game in Tucson, Ariz. E l a i n e T h o m p s o n / A P P h o t o s LOS ANGELES Angels' Chris Pettit races toward third after hitting a triple as Colorado Rockies players relay the ball to the infield in the third inning Monday, March 2, 2009, during a spring training baseball game in Tucson, Ariz.

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n by RENALDO D ORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net I n a continued effort to r evamp its image and separate the new Bahamas Olympic Association from the old regime, association executivesc ontinue to seek necessary constitutional amendments, and foster the development of the relationship between vari ous core sports. BOA Secretary General, R omell Knowles said to avoid m any of the transgressions m ade in the past, the association will ratify its constitution a nd operate under compliance with the International O lympic Committee. “We need to make sure that the majority of the votingr ights always stay with the federation and we will make suret hat is spelt out very clearly i n the constitution. We will be reviewing some changes necessary to take place in our constitution that should bringu s in compliance with the I OC,” he said, “As of now the current draft of the constitution is not in compliance and we will be working diligently behind the scenes to correct the flaws to make the presentt o our membership and to the IOC so that the constitution i s aligned and can be accepted.” Recently, Judo, Wrestling a nd Gymnastics have been added to the list of BOA core sports, expanding the contin-u ously growing lists of disciplines. “Gymnastics, Judo and W restling have been approved by the Association and we will be reaching out to them in short order,” Knowles said, “One of the things we wantt o ensure is that the constitut ion will always be followed when it comes to membership. In the past it did not speak very clearly on what it takes to become a member of the Bahamas Olympic Associa-t ion so we want to clear that up.” I I n n c c l l u u s s i i o o n n Knowles, who also serves as P resident of the Bahamas Softball Federation said his organization has experiencedt he hurdles of inclusion into the BOA. There has been some dis crepancies in the past, particularly for us in softball, we had experiences where for a num-b er of years we had been tryi ng to gain membership and it was just not a clear process. We want to eliminate any doubts by any federation which wishes to join the BOA, the process will not be diffi-c ult to find,” he said, “Those sports that are not Olympic s ports we want to include them somehow. We are an all inclusive organization, obvi-o usly our chief concern is development of the Olympic sports but we want to includeo thers as well that may not be Olympic sports at this time.” W ith the inclusion of more sports under the BOA umbrella, Knowles vowed the association would have greater transparency in how the aidt he development of each fede ration. “Everyone wants to know what is happening with the solidarity fund and how to access it and what is available. Vice President AlgernonC argill has also been charged with the responsibility of p utting together a format to pass on the federations so that know how to access thesef unds,” he said, “There is a process that we in the BOA have to follow and we will bes haring that information in due course. In the past inform ation has not been as forthcoming as we would have liked.” THEBAHAMASOLYMPIC ASSOCIATION BOA continues bid to revamp image Executives seek constitutional amendments Move to build links between core sports One of the t hings we want to ensure is that the c onstitution will a lways be followed when it comes to membership. Int he past it did not s peak very clearly on what it takes to b ecome a member o f the Bahamas Olympic Association so wew ant to clear that u p.” Romell Kno wles Grand Bahama Island – In keeping with their desire a nd commitment to become good corporate citizens of Grand Bahama, Clarins recently participated as sponsors of the American Women's Club Golf Classic which was held on February 21st at the Reef Golf Course in Lucaya. N ot only did the leading beauty line company assist as S aphire Sponsors of the event, they also donated 130 Clarins gift bags, 71 of which were men’s bags which c onsisted of one Clarins men product along with a sun care product and a lip balm, and 59 women's bags which c onsisted ofa Clarins product along with a sun care and lip balm. G G i i f f t t b b a a g g s s Mr. Sylvain Clement, Grand Bahama branch m anagerwas on hand at the awards ceremony to assist in handing out the gift bags containing their high quality line of skin care products. "We are pleased to be helping in some small way to help makethis worthy charitible event a success. We areh ere to assist in the community as best we can," said Mr. Clement. Since 1954, the Clarins Group has used its unrivalled e xpertise in the field of beauty to produce the safest, most effective products that deliver genuine results. The Clarins Group has always made safe use a numberone priority and, believing in the true efficacy of plants, has no ingredients of animal origin in its formulas. The Clarins product line is available at Esthetics Plus Day Spa in Freeport andPrestige Perfumesin Port Lucaya. HERE’S a look at the results of the Junior Baseball League of Nassau games played over the weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams: TEE BALL Grasshoppers def. Sand Gnats 17-11 Knights def. Sidewinders 15-9 Raptors def. Blue Claws 19-7 COACH PITCH Astros and Bluejays played to 16-16 tie. Cubs def. Athletics 13-10 Diamondbacks and Angels played to 13-13 tie. Sunday March 1 Cubs def. Astros 16-3 MINOR LEAGUE Mets def. Rockies 3-2 Rays def. Royals 9-6 MAJOR LEAGUE Indians def. Marlins 10-0 Reds def. Mariners 7-6 JUNIOR LEAGUE Yankees and Cardinals played to 12-12 tie. Twins def. Dodgers 7-4 SENIOR LEAGUE Phillies def. Tigers 18-13 Rangers def. Pirates 16-1 T he Bahamas may not yet be a hotbed of cycling, but events such as the JAR Tour of the Bahamas and the MJ Time Trials and Road Races have become increasingly high profile in recent years both locally and internationally. The second edition of the MJ Time Tri als began as a series of Individual Time T rials but in order to offer something for everyone the organisers added a few road races to the MJ TT series and this proved to be very appealing to numerous cyclists. The events took place on the western side of the island of New Providence and began on January 9, 2009 with a 10k time trial and culminated on Saturday past February 28, 2009 with a 40K time trial. In between those dates were four oth er time trials and three road races. A mong the many participants were upcoming junior, Tony Mackey, and other more seasoned cyclists including but not limited to, Lee Farmer, Jaime Nottage, John Cox, , Barron “Turbo” Musgrove ,Carmel Stucki, Christine Gangel hoff, Mark Holowesko, Wayne “Curly” Price and Juliana Glinton. Not to be overlooked was outstanding junior Jay “Flash” Major who finished second overall in the very competitive Level 3 category. The routes consisted of cyclists taking in sights and scenes while racing along the Sir Lynden Pindling International Airport, Coral Harbour Round-About, Lyford Cay Hill at Templeton building, and the South Ocean Blvd. loop, down to Jaws Beach around Clifton Pier and onto the newly constructed road just south of the Albany Project. The cyclists competed at 3 different levels 1, 2 and 3. The speed average for level 1 was 17-19 mph, level 2 was 20-23 mph and level 3 was 24-27 mph. To determine the winner points from 10 to 1 were given for each event, then the total points were added together for each competitor. Trophies were given to the first 4 positions in each category and an overall winner’s floating trophy was given to the individual with the most cumulative points in the events. Listed below are the first four finishers in the overall event and the winners of the Floating tr ophies for First Place in each categor y . Level 1 1st Place – T ony Mackey 2nd Place – Justin Minnis 3rd Place – Antoniece Simmons 4th Place – Amanda Graham Overall W inner’s Floating Trophy: Tony Mackey L evel 2 1st Place – Jamie Nottage 2nd Place – Wayne Price3 rd Place – Mark Davies 4th Place – Car mel Stucki Overall Winner’s Floating Trophy: Jamie Nottage Level 3 1st Place – Lee Farmer 2nd Place – Jay Major 3r d Place – Bar on T urbo Musgr ove 4th Place – Mark Holowesko Overall W inner’s Floating Trophy: Lee Farmer Cycling profile grows in Bahamas F F I I R R S S T T F F O O U U R R F F I I N N I I S S H H E E R R S S Events increasingly put spotlight on the sport at home and abroad JARTOUR OF BAHAMAS/MJ TIME TRIALS AND ROAD RACES Clarins shows commitment to Grand Bahama Company sponsors golf classic JBLN UPDATE THE New Providence Basketball Association will wind down its regular season this week at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. Here’s a look at the schedule of games left to be played: Wednesday March 4 Electro Telecom Cybots VS Coke Explorers Commonwealth Bank Giants VS Police Friday March 6, 2009 Coke Explorers VS Johnson Trucking Jumpers Saturday March 7, 2008 2008/2009 Playoff kicks off at 7pm best 2 out of three Here’s a look at the team standings at this point: Vince Ferguson Division John Archer Division Electro Telecom Cybots 13-4 Commonwealth Bank Giants 13-3 Sunshine Auto Ruff-Riders 10-7 Police Crime Stoppers 10-7 Coca Cola Explorers 5-11 Cable Bahamas Entertainers 1-16 South West Printing Falcons 3-15 Y-Care Wreckers 9-9 Johnson Trucking Jumpers 11-6 Malcolm Park Boys 9-8 NPB A 2008-2009 Season

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n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net COACH Andre Scott called Bianca Stuart’s impressive performance at the State Farm Missouri Valley Conference Indoor Championships over the weekend as a “One Jump Wonder.” Stuart, the Bahamian rising long jump star, emerged as the C o-Female Field Athlete of the M eet when she helped Southe rn Illinois Salukis win the women’s title with an 11-point decision over Wichita State. Selected along with Indiana State’s Kylie Hutson, Stuart racked up a total of 19 points with her victory in her specialty in the long jump, third in the 60 metres and sixth in the triple jump. Scott said the significance of Stuart’s performances were the facts that her leaps of 21-feet, 6 1 /4-inches in the long jump and 3 9-2 both came on her first attempts. “She was a one jump wonder,” Scott said. “It was a good opener for her, so I just stopped her. There was no need for her to continue in the long jump because there was no one whowould come close to her. “It was a clutch performance. She put it down the way she should and she got the job done.She also had the prelims of the 60 to run in, so we decided not to let her use too much of her legs. That was another reason for her only taking one jump.” Stuart, who completed her senior indoor campaign by winning the long jump title for the fourth consecutive year, the firstby any athlete at the MVC. “Everybody expected it so I just tried to prove that I could do it four times,” she said. “I was excited. I guess. It was a good feeling. “It was for the team, not just for me, so I was glad that I was able to pull it off.” Stuart’s winning leap turned out to be a series of record breaking feats that also allowed her to earn a third place ranking in the NCAA going into the National Indoor Champi onships. While she triumphed in the long jump, Stuart, however, fell short in the 60, clocking a sea son’s best of 7.62 seconds for third place. Scott said he only decided at the last minute to enter Stuart in the triple jump to garner a couple more points to cushion their lead. “She was another one jump wonder because she only took that one,” Scott said. “She want-ed to take a couple more, but she had the 60 final to run right after she took that jump. “We didn’t want to take any risk of interrupting that performance (in the 60 allow her to jump anymore. She did her job for us.” Stuart, the 21-year-old Queen’s College graduate, said she never competed in the triple jump, but when she was asked to do it to secure some more points for the Salukis, she didn’t hesitate. “It was all about getting the points for the team,” she insisted. For the NCAAs, Scott said the plan was for Stuart to go and do exactly what she did at the MVC and that is jump. “If she can do the same type of performance she did this weekend, she will undoubtedly be in the top five,” Scott said. “Once we get into the final, she can just go after the title. But it won’t be easy.” Stuart, who first qualified for the NCAAs in January, said she just wanted to compete at the best of her ability. “Those girls really compete hard. Everybody try to fight for the top spot,” Stuart said. “It’sp retty much the same girls that I’ve competed with for the past couple of years, so we all fight hard.” Having qualified for the nationals for the past two seasons, Stuart has had a best showing of 13th. But her goal is to surpass that as she also goes after another lofty feat – the 22-ft barrier. “I’m getting there. I’m being patient. So slowly be surely I will get there so that I can go to the World Championships,”s aid Stuart, who hopes that she will not be left at home when the Bahamas national team head to Berlin, Germany in august. Last year, Stuart painfully sat at home after she failed to make the team for the Olympic Games in Beijing, China. But this year, she said she was jumping with vengeance as she tried to secure her spot on the World Championship team. C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 Stuart named most outstanding field athlete STUART emerged as the Co-Female Field Athlete of the Meet when she helped Southern Illinois Salukis win the women’s title. I NSIDE International sports news LOS ANGELES ANGELS BEAT ROCKIES 12-3

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n By LINDSAY THOMPSON THE Department of Immigration challenged itself to better execute its functions as it officially launched its 70th anniversary c elebrations at Christ Community Church on Sunday. In attendance were Anita Bernard, secretary to the Cabinet; Brent Symonette, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs and Branville McCartney, Minister of State for Immigration who addressed the d epartment’s personnel. The Bahamas Immigration Department was established by an Act of Parliament on January 1, 1939. In its initial stages, the Department was comprised of 12 persons. Its portfolio fell under the Colonial Secretary of his Majesty’s Government, England. T he mission of the department is “to regulate the movement of people across the borders of the Bahamas so as to ensure the security, facilitate economic advancement and promote the harmonious social development of the Bahamas.” It is against this backdrop that the anniversary is being held under the theme “Historic Past, Dynamic Future”, Mr McCartney said. “It is from this backdrop that we as a department seek to per form our duties and functions in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, while being mindful of the challenge to remain globally competitive, so that generations of unborn Bahamians can benefit from the legacy left by their forefathers,” he said. Mr McCartney then challenged the department to improve in areas where it has not performed well and “to raise the benchmark” in those areas where it has done a great job. As an organisation in a global community, he told the department that it must be prepared to handle the various challenges it will face, one being the global economic downturn, which has directly impacted the country’s premier industry – tourism. “Immigration’s role in our society is vital, at every tier in the department what we do is critical,” he said. Mr McCartney also said leaders of the department have committed to training and retraining of staff, so as to enhance the productivity within the workplace. “We have committed to refocusing our attention to customer service. As we are all aware, people are the most important element in any business and they determine your success or fail ure,” he said. Mr McCartney thanked the pastor of Christ Community Church Dr Deanza Cunningham for hosting the department. “It is through our working together – church, government and commun ity that we will be able to build a successful nation,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE w ww.babnancial.com 242-461-1000 Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-5601 MORTGAGES MUTUAL FUNDS L IFE INSURANCE HEALTHINSURANCE ANNUITIES & PENSION PLANS FINANCIAL PLANNING & INVESTMENTS EveryoneneedsshelterfromthestormProtect your loved ones with affordable plans, designed to meet y our individual needs.Flexible plans Life policies L ow-cost Term Life “Grow-up” Plans D on’t get caught outside in the storm.Callustoday.Weprovide Financial Solutions for Life! Celebrating89years intheBahamas and2years fullyBahamian! Department of Immigration commits to enhanced service THE DEPARTMENT of Immigration kicked of its 70th anniversary celeb rations on Sunday, March 1, 2009 at the Christ Community Church on B ellot Road. Pictured is a representation of the department amongst the congregation. K r i s t a a n H A I n g r a h a m I I / B I S

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.34 $3.56 $3.36 ! ' + 0b"-+1rffb%rffbfnrr "$ ,%/-,1r!$#r! 1'"-,#-+(,(2+(, & 1$#"-++2,(16b'$2,(10&/-2,#%*--/*-" 1(-,-.$,01,$51/ * /&$0$ 0(#$1$// "$4(1'#(,(,& /$ b-2/+$1)(1"'$,4(1'&/ ,(1$ "-2,1$/1-.0b 01$%2**6%2/,(0'$#b !2*-20-"$ ,t!$ "'3($40"$/$#. /)(,&0. "$r.--*0'$ 1$#&6+b$ / (/.-/10'-..(,& ,#/$01 2/ ,10bnnnb!$""%n #%% $20m project ‘Leaves’ first plans behind CLICO ‘insolvent’ to tune of $9m M aybe he did not intend to. But without explicitly stati ng it, Prime Minister Hubert I ngraham’s statement yesterday to the House of Assembly on CLICO (Bahamas damning indictment of the insurance regulatory regime and its lack of enforcement bite. For Mr Ingraham confirmed t hat the Registrar of Insurance’s Office had harboured major concerns about the massive exposure/risk concentration the insurer had built-up in loans to wholly-owned subsidiaries, the investments that were to even tually sink it, as far back as 2004. Detailing that CLICO (Bahamas the required ‘no objection’” from the Registrar to its investment strategy, not to mention its loans to subsidiaries and related party wheelings and dealings, the Prime Minister revealed that the regulator first expressed its concerns almost five years ago back in 2004. “In several prudential meetings from as early as 2004, 2006 and 2007, I am advised, concern CLICO affair represents a damning indictment on financial regulation SEE page 4B T RIB UNE B USINESS O PINION n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CLICO (Bahamas m illion when it was placed into provisional liquidation, the Prime Minister told the House of Assembly yesterday, as he effectively end ed any lingering hopes the creditors may have had that the company would be bailed-out by his government. Providing an update on the current situation, Hubert Ingraham said the February 24 winding-up petition was initiated by the Registrar of Insurance due to the fact that the company’s liabilities exceeded its ColinaImperial, Atlantic Medical, Family Guardian and British American among suitors, with no bail-out coming from government SEE page 2B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A resort developer yesterday told Tribune Business he had adjusted his Eleuthera-based project from a condo hotel to a 20-40 strong hotel villa complex, the first phase of which will likely represent a $15-$20 million investment. Eddie Lauth, the principal behind the French Leave development at the former Club Med site in Governor’s Harbour, said his adjustments to changing market conditions the absence of bank and debt financing, and the onerous requirements of five-star hotel brands had created a project that was “the right scale” for Eleuthera and other Family Islands. Many Eleuthera residents have expressed scepticism over whether the French Leave development will ever materialise, given that little construction has gone into the ground since the project was first approved by the former Christie administration in 2004. However, Mr Lauth said he and his fellow investors had “never thrown in the towel” despite the numerous setbacks they had encountered, and were hoping “to start [construction] in the immediate future” once all outstanding government approvals were received. Recounting the project’s recent history since an autumn 2007 Town Meeting was held in Eleuthera, Mr Lauth said the condo hotel plans hit a roadblock when the global credit crisis led to the “collapse” of the $200 million bond issue that was being organised to finance it by Standard Bank of South Africa. * Eleuthera-based developer adjusts to market conditions, moving from large condo hotel to boutique, high-end villa-style residences * Hoping for ‘imminent start’ once government approvals received, as banks and five-star brands removed from equation SEE page 5B Eddie Lauth n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter andN EIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamasd irector yesterday said “no decision” had been made on a ny downsizing, as speculation swirled throughout the Bahamian financial servicesi ndustry that as many as 100160 staff at the commercial b ank might be laid off. Sharon Brown, telling Tribune Business that the BISX-l isted financial institution did not “respond to rumours”, said FirstCaribbean continued to monitor the general economic climate, and its poten t ial impact on its operations, as all other Bahamas-based businesses did. O n the lay-off speculation, she said: “At this point, we’ve not made any decision.” MsB rown said FirstCaribbean would first discuss any lay-offs w ith any staff that might be impacted. And she added: “It’s a r umour in the market. Like any other business, everyone is monitoring the economic situation. Everyone has to do that. All prudent businessesd o that.” R R e e l l e e a a s s e e Ms Brown’s comments were reinforced in a FirstCaribbean press release issued inr esponse to Tribune Business’s inquiries. The statement said: “We do n ot respond to rumors, and like all businesses in the B ahamas we are continuing to monitor the economic situation and impact on our busi-n ess. If any issues arise impacting our staff, it is our c ustom to discuss with them and their representatives first before discussing anything int he public domain.” Dion Foulkes, minister of labour, told Tribune Business yesterday that he had received no details regarding impend-i ng lay-offs at FirstCaribbean, describing the claims as just a “rumour”. D arron Cash, FirstCaribbean’s chief financial o fficer, told Tribune Business to speak to Ms Brown when contacted by this newspaper. Y et the press release and Ms Brown’s statements are far FirstCaribbean: ‘No decision’ on possible lay-offs Bank dismisses downsizing claims as ‘rumour SEE page 3B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter CABLE BAHAMAS net income for fiscal 2008 rose by 19.7 per cent, to $25.8 million compared to $21.6 million the year before, as the BISX-listed utility provider again enjoyed strong growth across most revenue streams. The company exceeded its previous year’s revenues by $5.4 million or 7.2 per cent to $81.4 million, compared to $75.963 million the year before. Cable Bahamas said data revenues grew 19.7 per cent last year, representing 15.1 per cent of total revenues. Internet revCable profits grow 19.7% SEE page 5B

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assets by $9 million. In addition, i ts Turks & Caicos branch was unable to pay $2.6 million in claims. Some, led by Bishop Simeon H all, had called on the Governm ent to bail-out CLICO ( Bahamas), thus protecting the i nvestments made by its life and h ealth insurance policyholders, plus annuity depositors. Y et the Prime Minister said yesterday that he did not anticip ate the Government “providing any guarantees for the operationso f CLICO (Bahamas p osition, although not what credi tors will want to hear, is not surp rising. The size of CLICO (Bahamas s olvency deficiency is still uncertain, given that some 59 per cent o f its assets, as at year-end 2007, were tied up in the Florida-basedW ellington Preserve real estate investment. T hat investment was already written-down, or impaired, in val ue from $80 million to $65 mil lion in 2007, and the further plunge in Florida real estate val u es means that the liquidator would only realise a ‘rock bott om’ value if it were to be sold certainly well below the sums i nvested so far. In addition, with the national debt already possibly at 45-46 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP B usiness calculations and fiscal deficit expanding well beyond the G overnment’s targets, revenues projected to be off by $150 mill ion, and a $200 million loan being d rawn down, the last thing the Ingraham administration willw ant to do is take on more debt and commitments by bailing-out C LICO (Bahamas Meanwhile, the Prime Minister announced yesterday that four o ther insurance companies, who he declined to name, hade xpressed an interest in acquiring CLICO (Bahamas h ealth insurance book of busi ness. A sales package is likely to be presented to the four suitors before the coming weekend. A fter that, they will be expected to approach the liquidator for anya dditional information they need, and then make an offer if they so c hoose. Any sale would have to be approved by the Registrar of Insurance and the Supreme Court. Tribune Business understands t hat the four suitors are ColinaImperial Insurance Company, F amily Guardian Insurance Com pany, British American Financial a nd Atlantic Medical. It is also understood that Harold Antor, a principal with Tristar Insurance Agents & Brokers, is interested, too, and foreign interest is also b eginning to stir. The Prime Minister said yest erday: “I understand there are four insurance companies in theB ahamas that have expressed an interest, and that they, on the face o f it, are entities that are likely to have the capability to do so. The liquidator [Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez] by this weekend is going t o be in a position to have financial offers made by those poten tially competing entities.” In response to claims from the Opposition that ColinaImperial h ad already been selected as the buyer, Mr Ingraham said: “There’s no preferred company. There are four companies in the B ahamas who have expressed an interest, all of whom appear to be capable of purchasing, and there will be a selection from that l ist. “The many persons who own t hese [CLICO] policies would want to know if they stand to lose m oney. It is still too early to determine whether or not policyholders will lose any money. However, it is quite possible that all the policies can be sold to av iable insurer here in the Bahamas, who can assume theb usiness and provide the coverage that CLICO policyholders purc hased without any loss to the policyholders.” Mr Ingraham said there some 23,191 policyholders in the Bahamas, to whom CLICO( Bahamas) owed $44 million in liabilities. Some 90 agents, all ofw hom have been told to remain at home, and 51 administrative s taff were based here. The latter group are still working, but the P rime Minister emphasised that their employment was unlikely to continue indefinitely. All told, when CLICO (Bahamas Caicos and Belize were factored in, along with policies held over f rom the now-closed Barbados and Cayman branches, the com p any had issued 29,017 policies and $100 million in liabilities. M r Ingraham said yesterday: “I am advised that CLICO’s operations in the Bahamas had some 17,297 life insurance policies with annual premiums of $5.1 million; 1 1,230 accident and sickness health policies with annual pre m iums of $3.2 million; 2,689 annuities with annual premiums of $4.6 m illion; and 7,402 group policies with annual premiums of $1.8 million. “All told, the total individual and group policies amount to s ome 38,618 with annual premiums of $14.8 million.” O f the company’s assets, Mr Ingraham said $32 million worth were located in the Bahamas. This consisted of $14 million in cash, bonds and fixed deposits;$ 14 million invested in Grand Bahama wholesaler, GB Millw orks, its land and buildings; 12.5 acres of land in the Westridge a rea of Nassau, valued at $3 mil lion; and $1 million invested in townhouses in Freeport. T he “excessive cash advances” CLICO (Bahamas ing to its subsidiary, CLICO Enterprises, and which were ultim ately largely invested in the Florida-based Wellington Preserve real estate project, began in 2004. S ome $37.092 million was advanced to CLICO Enterprises t hat year, and this increased to $53.761 million in 2005 and $ 68.302 million in 2006, before declining to $57.010 million in 2007. Yet according to the company’s unaudited financials for 2008, this exposure ballooned to$ 73.6 million. “In 2007, loans to subsidiaries r epresented 58.56 per cent of total assets and 68 per cent of invested a ssets,” Mr Ingraham said. “These advances to CLICO Enterprises were made to Wellington Preserve Corporation’s Florida project. This USr eal estate investment was financed mainly from US dollara nnuities placed in the Turks & Caicos Islands subsidiary, a dvances from CL Financial and a US mortgage on the property w here both Wellington Preserve Corporation and CLICO are mortgagors. “This US investment is in respect of a 600-acre real estate development with a reputed val ue of $80 million. A write-down of $25 million occurred in 2007, mainly as ar esult of the decline of sales in the Florida real estate market and t he non-completion of the pro ject. As at December 31, 2008, loans to subsidiaries of CLICO were $73.6 million. “It was these advances, t otalling $73.6 million, by CLICO that compromised its financiali ntegrity, as neither Wellington Preserve Corporation nor CLI C O Enterprises are in a position to repay the loans from the company. “Additionally, with the significant decline in the Florida real e state market and the $65 million needed to complete the Welling t on Preserve Project, the market value of the property is now sub stantially less than its initial book value, further deteriorating the financial situation.” M r Ingraham added that investors who purchased CLICO ( Bahamas) annuities, attracted in by the above-market rates of r eturn, were not in “as favourable” position as the insurance policyholders. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD a qualified landscapesupplier(sto grow trees, palms, shrubs and groundcover (itemswith the required schedule and speculations for completion of Stage 1 of the LPIAExpansion Project. This is a supply only contract. Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after 1:00 pm , on Thursday, February 12th, 2009. Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. P rice Inquiry P-120 Landscape SupplyContact: Traci Brisby C ontract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project REQUEST FORPROPOSAL The National Insurance Board invites tenders for coverage of its General Insurance portfolio (property, etc.) for the year commencing June 1, 2009, and subject to renewal for a further two (2. Suitably licensed insurance companies interested in submitting a tender, with a detailed proposal, should collect an insurance bid package from the Director’s Office, Baillou Hill Road, Nassau, Bahamas. All tenders should be sealed, marked “Tender for General Insurance” and should be hand delivered by 4:00 p.m. on March 31, 2009, to arrive at: The Director’s Office THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD Clifford Darling Complex Baillou Hill Road Nassau, Bahamas The Board reserves the right to reject any or all tenders. Persons collecting the bid package must present a letter of authorization from the licensed insurance company before the package can be released. TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE Senior executives from the Bahamasbased Grant Thornton accounting firm have met with the minister of state for finance to discuss several issues, including matters affecting their profession and the need for pensions and investment fund legislation. Paul Andy Gomez, Grant Thornton’s Bahamian managing partner, and the firm’s assurances and advisory partner, Kendrick Christie, also discussed the recession’s impact on the business community with Zhivargo Laing. The meeting was part of Grant Thornton’s initiative to meet with financial services industry stakeholders on public interest issues. Pictured, from L to R: Paul Andy Gomez, Zhivargo Laing, and Kendrick Christie GRANT THORNTON PARTNERS MEET WITH MINISTER CLICO ‘insolvent’ to tune of $9m FROM page 1B “There’s no preferred company. T here are four companies in the Bahamas who have e xpressed an interest, all of whom appear to be capable of purchasing, and there will be a selection from that list. Hubert Ingraham

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n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter Lucayan Tropical, the Bahamianowned Hydroponics farmer, will increase p roduction with the acquisition this year of 300 acres of land in Andros owned by the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAICm arketing manager told Tribune Business. He said the Bahamas was currently only producing to 5 per cent of its agricultural potential. Roger Rolle, who is also Lucayan T ropical’s sales manager, said although the company has not identified what crops they intend to seed farm on the Andros site, they will move away from the tomatoes and lettuce they produce through hydroponics in New Providence. We have not decided what crops yet, but possibly bananas, potatoes We’re going to look at what the major products are that are consumed in New Providence,” he said. Lucayan Tropical presently produces Beefsteak Tomatoes, Plum Tomatoes, Grape Tomatoes, Cherry Tomatoes, Romaine Lettuce and their own mix of loose-leaf lettuce they call the Lucayan Mix, at its Airport Industrial Park site in Western New Providence. The company distributes its wares to B ahamian food stores at a price that, according to Mr Rolle, is lower than imported produce. “We distribute locally to major food stores Super Value, City Markets, Cost Rite, Solomons,” he said. “Our product is world class at a standard price and the best quality by far.” While speaking at the second annual Agricultural, Marine Resources and Agribusiness exposition, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham restated the urgency o f developing a sustainable agricultural sector in the Bahamas. He said that apart from food production, the growth of farms and farming will produce much-needed jobs. The Prime Minister said food production stands at 10 per cent of agricultural potential throughout the Bahamas, with some 2,000 farmers operating. “By increasing production to 50 per cent of our potential we could create significant activity in the economy, beginning with t he creation of a significant number of additional jobs,” he said. Mr Rolle said he thought production was around 5 per cent of potential, but agrees that 50 per cent would be an acceptable level to be sufficiently sustainable and to lower import costs for produce significantly. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009, PAGE 3B Lucayan Tropical to buy 300 acres Company set to expand in Andros with new crops, as executive says Bahamas producing 5% of agricultural potential FirstCaribbean: ‘No decision’ on possible lay-offs from an unequivocal ‘absolutely no lay-offs ord ownsizing’ in tone and content. Reading between the lines, some might argue that lay-offs at FirstCaribbean are likely to be coming, possiblyi mminently, although no final decision may have been made and the affected employeesn ot yet informed. Several financial industry sources, speaking to Tribune Business on condition ofa nonymity, suggested that the 100-160 figure being bandied about was too high, and cutst hat deep impacting 10-20 per cent of the bank’s staff w ould be impossible, given that it would impact customer service and efficiency. T here is nothing to suggest, though, that FirstCaribbean is in financial trouble, or that depositors or creditors are in any danger. S peaking to the company’s fiscal 2008 performance, Ms Brown said: “We’re very p roud, certainly in terms of the results we able to achieve in the current economic environment.” One analyst told Tribune B usiness yesterday that the FirstCaribbean Bahamian unit’s net income for the 2008f ourth quarter, of $26.641 million, which was flat against 2 007 comparatives, had been in line with his expectations. And Ms Brown said that s ubsequent to the 2008 first quarter, when the bank’s net income was impacted by a ccounting issues related to hedging and other aspects, FirstCaribbean had been “pretty much around the $26 million mark every quarter -$ 26.2 million in the second quarter; $26.7 million in the third quarter; and $26.6 mil-l ion in the fourth quarter”. “All the issues took place i n the first quarter,” she added. FirstCaribbean’s net income f or the year to October 31, 2008, dropped by 26.6 per cent t o $83.904 million, compared t o $109.86 million. While total interest income was down at $263.605 million, compared to $288.601 million, the decline in total customer depositse nsured interest expense dropped to $108.028 million from $141.441 million. M ore critically, at year-end 2008, some $200.853 million w orth of FirstCaribbean loans had been impaired, representing 7.9 per cent of its totall oan book. When this was added to the $368.069 million loans that were past due, but n ot impaired, some 22.4 per cent of FirstCaribbean’s loan portfolio was either impaired or past due at the year-end date. FirstCaribbean saw a6 7.7 per cent rise in loans to the business community and government that were noti mpaired, but were past due, at year-end 2008. In particular, t he value of these loans that were 31-60 days past due rose year-over-year to $82.26 mil-l ion, compared to $21.679 million the year before, not far o ff a quadrupling. FROM page 1B

PAGE 16

was expressed about this matter,” the Prime Minister continued yesterday, “and a request was made for information regarding all investments undert aken by the company within a nd outside the Bahamas. In fact, at one of the 2007 prudential meetings, the Registrar of Insurance Companies demanded that the company return the then $53 million invested in order to reduce the inter-company loan balances. The company gave assurances that it would, I am advised, but failed to do so.” What this appears to show is that despite recognising the problem from an early stage the high risk concentration, with more than 50 per cent of the company’s exposure tied up in one asset (and a related party loan at that) the Bahamian regulator failed to act proactively, and aggressively, to force CLICO (Bahamas Trinidad parent to comply. It barked, but never bit. And CLICO (Bahamas CL Financial recognised this. Their now-empty assurances seem to have been designed to ‘fob off’ and keep the Registrar’s Office at arm’s length, all the while smugly confident that the Bahamian regulator would n ot take decisive action against t hem and their non-compliance. T he big question, as Tribune Business sees it, is this: KNOWING THE POTENTIAL PROBLEMS AT CLICO BAHAMAS, WHY DID THE REGISTRAR OF INSURANCE NOT IMMEDIATELYB AR THE COMPANY FROM WRITING NEW BUSINESS, BOTH INSURANCE AND ANNUITIES, UNTIL THE SITUATION WAS REMEDIED TO THE REGULATOR’S SATISFACTION? Doing so may well have given the Registrar of Insurance’s Office the necessary leverage to force CLICO (Bahamas its owner to comply. The fact it did not raised many questions about the level of oversight scrutiny and enforcement the insurer was subjected to, not to mention the Registrar’s sanc tions powers or lack of them. One financial executive told Tribune Business yesterday: “It’s a failure on many levels, and certainly the regulatory authorities were not aggressively trying to stop these guys getting in more deposits and more liabilities. They should have fought this company’s casea long time ago, and stopped it issuing annuities and liabilities” until its problems had been solved. Rather than accept what proved to be an ultimately worthless $57 million guaran tee for CL Financial, which p romised to make good any h ole left on CLICO (Bahamas balance sheet if the Floridabased real estate investment bombed, the financial executive questioned why Bahamian regulators did not impose tougher requirements. Apart from requiring CL Financial to place $57 million into an escrow account in the Bahamas, the executive suggested that regulators should have asked for letters of credit from a reputable financial institution to guarantee that the exposure would be covered. Another strategy, they suggested, would have been to insist on taking a first charge mortgage over some of CL Financial’s assets. This is what Trinidad & Tobago’s government had done, taking over CL Financial’s 55 per cent stake in Republic Bank and its share holding in a methanol plant in return for injecting capital/liquidity into the troubled financial conglomerate. Belatedly, the Registrar of Insurance’s Office moved towards taking decisive action, but only on December 22, 2008, just two months before CLICO (Bahamas uidation. The regulator called for the repayment of all intercompany loan balances by January 9, 2009, and imposed a number of other restrictions on the insurer, but by then it was too late given CL Financial’s woes. W hile ultimately commenda ble, in T ribune Business’s o pin ion this was a classic case of shutting the stable door long after the horse has bolted. It would be unfair, though, to blame this episode entirely on the existing Registrar of Insurance, Lennox McCartney, who only took office just over one year ago, and inherited much of the CLICO (Bahamas from his predecessor, Dr Roger Brown. Inevitably, perhaps, the CLICO (Bahamas plight of the policyholders and annuity depositors will become politicised. True to form, among those to leap instantly into the fray was former foreign affairs minister Fred Mitchell, who claimed there had been “shocking negligence” on the Government’s part, especially since the Registrar of Insurance had known of CLICO (Bahamas problems for at least eight months. Mr Mitchell’s statement is probably quite true. But what he does not mention is that the records show that CLICO (Bahamas strategy began under the former Christie administration in 2004, with $37 million sent overseas, and this had expanded to $68.302 million by year-end 2006 the last full year that the PLP government was in power for. Therefore, the former administration is perhaps even more culpable than the Ingra ham government for failing to take decisive action at a much earlier stage to avert CLICO (Bahamas If there is any good to come from the whole sorry CLICO (Bahamas holders, depositors and creditors can be forgiven for not see ing it this way, it would be to get the regulations for the Domestic Insurance Act tabled in Parliament, so that the new legislation can finally come into effect almost four years after it was passed. But even that may not be enough. As we all know, the Bahamas has more than enough laws on the books the problem is, they are not enforced. The Domestic Insurance Act’s implementation must be accompanied by the equipping of the Registrar’s Office with the resources, staff and technical expertise for it to rigorously enforce the law, and show it means what it says. Clearly, CLICO (Bahamas never believed it did. And this speaks to wider problem that funs through much of Bahamian financial services regulation (with the exception of the Cen tral Bank). Failure to enforce t he laws on the books undermines the integrity of the whole supervisory regime, with people taking encouragement from the fact the rules are rarely enforced and, if they are, the most they can expect is a slapon the wrist. Just look at the Securities Commission’s recent admissions on low compliance rates on regulatory capital and audited financial statements filing, and its failure to enforce compliance. This, of course, cre ates a wider problem for the Bahamas, as the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD its G-7 sponsors bear down on this nation’s financial services industry once again. Its regulatory defects will once again be in the spotlight. As one attorney once told Tribune Business: “We do just enough to fly under the radar” when it comes to financial services supervision. Going forward, that may not be enough. When will someone in authority wake up? C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD Qualified Environmental Monitor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope of services includes: 5HYLHZDQGDSSURYHFRQWUDFWRUVHQYLURQPHQWDOSODQV 'HYHORSLQVSHFWLRQFKHFNOLVWVDQGLQVSHFWWKHZRUNRI FRQWUDFWRUVIRUFRPSOLDQFHWRHQYLURQPHQWDOSODQV )DFLOLWDWHDQGFRPPXQLFDWHZLWKUHJXODWRU\DXWKRULWLHVRQ EHKDOIRIWKH3URMHFWRQHQYLURQPHQWDOLVVXHVDQG 3UHSDUHZHHNO\DQGPRQWKO\UHSRUWV ,QWHUHVWHGSURSRQHQWVPXVWEHTXDOLILHGIDPLOLDUZLWKORFDO UHJXODWRU\ODZVDQGDJHQFLHVDQGIDPLOLDUZLWK,QWHUQDWLRQDO %HVW3UDFWLFHV(TXDWRU3ULQFLSOHV,)&6WDQGDUGVf 5HTXHVW)RU3URSRVDO3DFNDJHVZLOOEHDYDLODEOHIRUSLFNXS after 1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009. 5HTXHVWIRU3URSRVDOFORVLQJLV Thursday, March 5th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. D -111 Qualified Environmental MonitorContact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project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n indictment on financial regulation T HE CLICOAFFAIR F ROM page 1B “It’s a failure on many levels, and certainly the regulatory authorities were not aggressively trying to stop these guys getting in more deposits and more liabilities. They should have fought this company’s case a long time ago, and stopped it issuing annuities and liabilities” O PINION

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“While this was totally out of our control, we did decide at this time, not to rely any further on the banks or, rely any further on the various five star hotel companies (that we literally spent a few years negotiating with) to commit, to starting the project in the immediate future,” Mr Lauth said. As a result, he and his team spent time assessing resortbased developments across the Caribbean and the Bahamas, examining what had worked and what had not. As a result, he said they realised that mega resorts, involving huge infrastructureand billions in investment, were n ot right for the Family Islands, s ince their scale and footprint w ere totally out of whack with local communities. Instead, they decided to focus on the single-villa, cottagebased style of resorts such as Pink Sands and Aman, and adopted the premise of the Anguilla-based St Regis resort, which was financed from real estate pre-sales and its own resources, rather than the banks. As a result, the French Leave South Beach Hotel Villas Programme was submitted to the Government for consideration in spring 2008. “Right now, we would say the first phase is around $15-$20 million,” Mr Lauth told Tribune Business. He added that this phase would include some 20 oceanfront villas, with construction of two-four of those starting “right away” once final approvals were received from the Government. Also included in phase one would be the project’s reception area, pool and dining facilities. “The hotel villa programme is 20-40 hotel villas on 20 hotel villa sites, with an infinity edge swimming pool, indoor dining, outdoor dining pavilion, tennis courts and reception,” Mr Lauth said. “The project is very similar to the concept of the Pink Sands Hotel on Harbour Island, whereby, they have single, detached cottages versus standard hotel rooms and/or standard condo hotel rooms. “Presently, there is virtually no market demand from buyers to purchase, or banks and hedge funds to finance, standard resort hotel rooms or standard resort condo hotels, anywhere in the Caribbean/Bahamas market or, the United States. It is anticipated that 100 per cent of the French Leave South Beach Hotel Villas will participate in the hotel rental programme. “There seems to be a lot more interest in something that is more specialised, more boutique and more high-end. There’s absolutely no demand for hotels and condo hotels.” M M i i s s t t a a k k e e On French Leave South Beach Hotel Villas, Mr Lauth acknowledged that previous plans for French Leave may have been a mistake, and added: “This is the way to go. Scale for the Family Islands is critical. It has to be the right scale, and we’re convinced this is the right scale. “There’s no better time than right now to build. A lot of people want work, the price is good, and it really is the best time now.” Adding that there would be a maximum of 40 villas, 20 on the oceanfront and 20 with an ocean view, Mr Lauth said: “It’s so important for us to start, get some work going, so people can see the quality we’re talking about. This is all self-financing. We have it all lined up. “We’ve never thrown in the towel, and when the market changes, you have either two choices change or get out of the way. We’re very excited about where we are right now. We’re hoping we get the support of the Government, and can start in the immediate future.” Mr Lauth said site clearance had begun at French Leave two weeks ago, and there was still buyer interest, with 50 per cent of the villas already pre-sold. However, he added that the project had been 100 per cent pre-sold in early 2008, but 50 per cent of those buyers had pulled out after construction was unable to start as expected. “With the pre-sales in place for the start of the French Leave Hotel Villas last Spring of 2008, it was necessary for us to begin the development no later than Summer 2008, as we had requested,” Mr Lauth explained. “Unfortunately, the approvals for the same were not received until October 9, 2008, in the midst of the economic meltdown. Without the approvals last summer, some of the pre-sales were in fact cancelled, and thus it was necessary for us to reduce staff on site. It was necessary for us again to revise our land plan to accommodate the remaining buyers and the potential new buyers. “Today, we continue to endeavor to move forward with closings for the hotel villa programme, now in progress. Recently, we've reached out to Government officials to seek assistance in helping us expedite the remaining applications for investment approval that we submitted on January 12, 2009.” In addition, Mr Lauth said the developers also wanted to re-open the former Club Med marina, renaming it the French Leave Marina, providing boat owners with refuelling opportunities. He added that he was in talks with a Bahamian investor group regarding a restaurant concept that would be situated at the marina. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009, PAGE 5B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.411.410.000.0700.00020.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.3190.26021.93.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.2550.24011.11.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.004420.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.776.770.000.4380.05015.50.74% 5.001.55Consolidated Water BDRs1.731.55-0.180.1110.05214.03.35% 3.002.27Doctor's Hospital2.402.400.000.2400.04010.01.67% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.001,3500.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6820.40015.33.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.005.000.000.3370.15014.83.00% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.005,0000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.001,7240.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref6.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 14.0014.00Bahamas Supermarkets11.2312.0414.00-0.0410.300N/M2.67% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.9230-0.58-2.54 1.43761.3773Colina Money Market Fund1.43760.284.38 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S131-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 31-Jan-09 23-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525F INDEX: CLOSE 817.84 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSMONDAY, 2 MARCH 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.29 | CHG -0.19 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -43.07 | YTD % -2.52BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIAExpansion Project. The scope of services includes: 'ULOOLQJDQGSXPSWHVWLQJRIDSLORWKROH 'ULOOLQJDQGFDVLQJRID)HHG:DWHU6XSSO\:HOO 'ULOOLQJDQGFDVLQJRID)HHG:DWHU5HWXUQ:HOO )ORZWHVWLQJRIWKH)HHG:DWHU6XSSO\:HOO 'LVFKDUJHWHVWLQJRIWKH)HHG:DWHU5HWXUQ:HOO *HRSK\VLFDOORJJLQJDQGIORZWHVWLQJRI3LORW+ROHDQGZHOOV :DWHUWHPSHUDWXUHORJJLQJDQGDQDO\VLVRIZDWHUTXDOLW\DQG FKHPLVWU\ 3URIHVVLRQDOVXSHUYLVLRQ+\GURORJLVWf 5HTXHVWIRU4XRWDWLRQ3DFNDJHVZLOOEHDYDLODEOHIRUSLFNXSDIWHU 1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009. 5HTXHVWIRU4XRWDWLRQFORVLQJLV Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. M-100, Test Well DrillingContact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project 5(48(67)25QUOTATION : 7KH/RZ'RZQ'LUW\)DFWV $PHVVDJHIURPWKH 'HSDUWPHQWRI(QYLURQPHQWDO +HDOWK /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-DQXUD\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $20m project ‘Leaves’ first plans behind F ROM page 1B e nues grew by 10.5 per cent, accounting for 30.3 per cent of the total, while cable revenues represented 54.5 per cent of total rev e nues. The company saw 10.3 per cent growth in its digital TV services. “All business segments i.e. cable television, Internet, and D ata contributed considerably to the 2008 results, with Data and Internet having the largest year-over-year revenue growth,” C able Bahamas said in a statement. Operating expenses for the company last year saw a increase of 2 per cent, up around $800,000 from the previous year’s$ 37.8 million. According to the company, the revenue growth last year was “complemented by the careful management of operating expenses” ,which accounted for the “modest” expenses increase. The company’s earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation a nd amortization reached $42.7 million, which represented an increase of $4.6 million or 12.2 per cent over 2007. Cable Bahamas operating income increased by around 13 per cent, up $3.5 million from $26.7 million in 2007. Cable profits grow 19.7% FROM page 1B

PAGE 18

APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN 9 Possibly loves to find the r ight answer (5 10 War that’s breaking out in Panama? (5,3 11 Stretch of river? (5 12 Semi-wooden court (3 16 Unfriendly action (6 17 Plays produced in Madras (6 18 In which to spend the rest of your life (3 23 Ateam competing away (5 2 4 Gives way and dies (8 25 An addict may be fined (5 26 They welcome fare increases (8 27 Composition makes easy point (5 Down 2 Once said to be a bishop (8 3 He should know how to p ress a suit (8 4 About the end of D ecember, reached Santa’s base (6 5 One outcome of hard w ork? (5 6 Clue that’s illuminating (5 7 Stone made entrance (5 12 Large roll of paper of i ntricate design (3 13 Not even curious (3 14 The fighters craft (8 15 Where flowers grow I get a flower (8 19 Outflowing currency (6 20 Actual language used in an American era (5 2 1 Behave awkwardly when you get the bill and get put out (3,2 22 Leaves with all debts settled (5 Across:1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10 Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13 Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19 Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24 Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There, 29 Erst, 30 Persecutor. Down:1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele, 4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8 Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe, 16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20 Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25 Attic, 26 Heir. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10 Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere, 13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet, 19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, 24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. Down:1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18 Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete, 23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1 819 2 0212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1 819 2 0212223 24 25 26 27T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleSaturday s S udoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. S aturday’s K akuro AnswerAcross 1 Abasis for soups (5 8 Shredded cabbage salad (8 9 Pry furtively (5 10 Form of pasta (8 1 1 Spacious (5 12 Plant used in brewing (3 16 To stew in closed pan (6 17 Impervious to light (6 18 Wet soft earth (3 23 Point in development (5 24 Crepes (8 25 Pleasure trip (5 26 ANorth African dish (8 27 North African country (5 Down 2 Type of Indian cooking (8 3 Fried noodles dish (4,4 4 Pulpy salad fruit (6 5 Hickory nut (5 6 Bear flowers (5 7 Be in store for (5 12 Edge (3 13 Legume (3 14 Seasoned smoked beef (8 15 AFrench wine (8 19 Advantageous (6 20 An aromatic flavouring (5 21 Declare invalid (5 22 Highly decorated (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Fancy a number to be perfect (5 8 Victorian poet getting sunburnt (8 9 Possibly loves to find the r ight answer (5 10 War that’s breaking out in P anama? (5,3 11 Stretch of river? (5 1 2 Semi-wooden court (3 1 6 Unfriendly action (6 17 Plays produced in M adras (6 18 In which to spend the rest of your life (3 23 Ateam competing away (5 24 Gives way and dies (8 25 An addict may be f ined (5 26 They welcome fare increases (8 27 Composition makes easy point (5 Down 2 Once said to be a bishop (8 3 He should know how to press a suit (8 4 About the end of D ecember, reached Santa’s base (6 5 One outcome of hard work? (5 6 Clue that’s illuminating (5) 7 Stone made entrance (5 1 2 Large roll of paper of intricate design (3 1 3 Not even curious (3 14 The fighters craft (8 1 5 Where flowers grow I get a flower (8 19 Outflowing currency (6 20 Actual language used in an American era (5 21 Behave awkwardly when you get the bill and get put out (3,2 22 Leaves with all debts settled (5 Across:1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10 Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13 Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19 Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24 Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There, 29 Erst, 30 Persecutor. Down:1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele, 4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8 Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe, 16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20 Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25 Attic, 26 Heir. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10 Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere, 13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet, 19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, 24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. Down:1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18 Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete, 23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 1 2131415 1617 1 819 2 0212223 2 4 2 5 2 6 2 7 1234567 8 9 10 11 1 2131415 1617 1 819 2 0212223 2 4 2 5 2 6 2 7Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleS aturday s S udoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Abasis for soups (5 8 Shredded cabbage s alad (8 9 Pry furtively (5 1 0 Form of pasta (8 11 Spacious (5 1 2 Plant used in brewing (3 16 To stew in closed p an (6 17 Impervious to light (6 18 Wet soft earth (3 23 Point in development (5 2 4 Crepes (8 25 Pleasure trip (5 2 6 ANorth African dish (8 27 North African country (5 Down 2 Type of Indian c ooking (8 3 Fried noodles dish (4,4 4 Pulpy salad fruit (6 5 Hickory nut (5 6 Bear flowers (5 7 Be in store for (5 1 2 Edge (3 13 Legume (3 1 4 Seasoned smoked beef (8 15 AFrench wine (8 1 9 Advantageous (6 20 An aromatic flavouring (5 21 Declare invalid (5 22 Highly decorated (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 Fancy a number to be perfect (5 8 Victorian poet getting sunburnt (8 9 Possibly loves to find the right answer (5 1 0 War that’s breaking out in Panama? (5,3 1 1 Stretch of river? (5 12 Semi-wooden court (3 16 Unfriendly action (6 1 7 Plays produced in Madras (6 1 8 In which to spend the rest of your life (3 23 Ateam competing a way (5 24 Gives way and dies (8 2 5 An addict may be fined (5 2 6 They welcome fare increases (8 27 Composition makes easy p oint (5 Down 2 Once said to be a bishop (8 3 He should know how to press a suit (8 4 About the end of December, reached S anta’s base (6 5 One outcome of hard work? (5 6 Clue that’s illuminating (5 7 Stone made entrance (5 12 Large roll of paper of intricate design (3 13 Not even curious (3 1 4 The fighters craft (8 15 Where flowers grow I get a flower (8 19 Outflowing currency (6 20 Actual language used in a n American era (5 21 Behave awkwardly when y ou get the bill and get put out (3,2 22 Leaves with all debts s ettled (5 A cross:1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10 Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13 E ssen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19 Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24 Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There, 29 Erst, 30 Persecutor. Down:1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele, 4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8 Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe, 16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20 Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25 Attic, 26 Heir. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionA cross:1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10 Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere, 1 3 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet, 19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, 24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. Down:1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18 Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete, 23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Abasis for soups (5 8 Shredded cabbage salad (8 9 Pry furtively (5 10 Form of pasta (8 11 Spacious (5 12 Plant used in brewing (3 16 To stew in closed pan (6 17 Impervious to light (6 18 Wet soft earth (3 23 Point in development (5 24 Crepes (8 25 Pleasure trip (5 26 ANorth African dish (8 27 North African country (5 Down 2 Type of Indian cooking (8 3 Fried noodles dish (4,4 4 Pulpy salad fruit (6 5 Hickory nut (5 6 Bear flowers (5 7 Be in store for (5 12 Edge (3 13 Legume (3 14 Seasoned smoked beef (8 15 AFrench wine (8 19 Advantageous (6 20 An aromatic flavouring (5 21 Declare invalid (5 22 Highly decorated (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Fancy a number to be perfect (5 8 Victorian poet getting sunburnt (8 9 Possibly loves to find the right answer (5 10 War that’s breaking out in Panama? (5,3 11 Stretch of river? (5 12 Semi-wooden court (3 16 Unfriendly action (6 17 Plays produced in Madras (6 18 In which to spend the rest of your life (3 23 Ateam competing away (5 24 Gives way and dies (8 25 An addict may be fined (5 26 They welcome fare increases (8 27 Composition makes easy point (5 Down 2 Once said to be a bishop (8 3 He should know how to press a suit (8 4 About the end of December, reached Santa’s base (6 5 One outcome of hard work? (5 6 Clue that’s illuminating (5 7 Stone made entrance (5 12 Large roll of paper of intricate design (3 13 Not even curious (3 14 The fighters craft (8 15 Where flowers grow I get a flower (8 19 Outflowing currency (6 20 Actual language used in an American era (5 21 Behave awkwardly when you get the bill and get put out (3,2 22 Leaves with all debts settled (5 Across:1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10 Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13 Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19 Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24 Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There, 29 Erst, 30 Persecutor. Down:1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele, 4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8 Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe, 16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20 Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25 Attic, 26 Heir. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10 Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere, 13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet, 19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, 24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. Down:1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18 Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete, 23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s K akuro AnswerAcross 1 Abasis for soups (5 8 Shredded cabbage salad (8 9 Pry furtively (5 10 Form of pasta (8 11 Spacious (5 12 Plant used in brewing (3 16 To stew in closed pan (6 17 Impervious to light (6 18 Wet soft earth (3 23 Point in development (5 24 Crepes (8 25 Pleasure trip (5 26 ANorth African dish (8 27 North African country (5 Down 2 Type of Indian cooking (8 3 Fried noodles dish (4,4 4 Pulpy salad fruit (6 5 Hickory nut (5 6 Bear flowers (5 7 Be in store for (5 12 Edge (3 13 Legume (3 14 Seasoned smoked beef (8 15 AFrench wine (8 19 Advantageous (6 20 An aromatic flavouring (5 21 Declare invalid (5 22 Highly decorated (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Fancy a number to be perfect (5 8 Victorian poet getting sunburnt (8 9 Possibly loves to find the right answer (5 10 War that’s breaking out in Panama? (5,3 11 Stretch of river? (5 12 Semi-wooden court (3 16 Unfriendly action (6 17 Plays produced in Madras (6 18 In which to spend the rest of your life (3 23 Ateam competing away (5 24 Gives way and dies (8 25 An addict may be fined (5 26 They welcome fare increases (8 27 Composition makes easy point (5 Down 2 Once said to be a bishop (8 3 He should know how to press a suit (8 4 About the end of December, reached Santa’s base (6 5 One outcome of hard work? (5 6 Clue that’s illuminating (5 7 Stone made entrance (5 12 Large roll of paper of intricate design (3 13 Not even curious (3 14 The fighters craft (8 15 Where flowers grow I get a flower (8 19 Outflowing currency (6 20 Actual language used in an American era (5 21 Behave awkwardly when you get the bill and get put out (3,2 22 Leaves with all debts settled (5 Across:1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10 Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13 Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19 Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24 Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There, 29 Erst, 30 Persecutor. Down:1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele, 4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8 Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe, 16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20 Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25 Attic, 26 Heir. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10 Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere, 13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet, 19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, 24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. Down:1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18 Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete, 23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1 234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleS aturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Abasis for soups (5 8 Shredded cabbage salad (8 9 Pry furtively (5 10 Form of pasta (8 11 Spacious (5 12 Plant used in brewing (3 16 To stew in closed pan (6 17 Impervious to light (6 18 Wet soft earth (3 23 Point in development (5 24 Crepes (8 25 Pleasure trip (5 26 ANorth African dish (8 27 North African country (5 Down 2 Type of Indian cooking (8 3 Fried noodles dish (4,4 4 Pulpy salad fruit (6 5 Hickory nut (5 6 Bear flowers (5 7 Be in store for (5 12 Edge (3 13 Legume (3 14 Seasoned smoked beef (8 15 AFrench wine (8 19 Advantageous (6 20 An aromatic flavouring (5 21 Declare invalid (5 22 Highly decorated (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Fancy a number to be perfect (5 8 Victorian poet getting sunburnt (8 9 Possibly loves to find the right answer (5 10 War that’s breaking out in Panama? (5,3 11 Stretch of river? (5 12 Semi-wooden court (3 16 Unfriendly action (6 17 Plays produced in Madras (6 18 In which to spend the rest of your life (3 23 Ateam competing away (5 24 Gives way and dies (8 25 An addict may be fined (5 26 They welcome fare increases (8 27 Composition makes easy point (5 Down 2 Once said to be a bishop (8 3 He should know how to press a suit (8 4 About the end of December, reached Santa’s base (6 5 One outcome of hard work? (5 6 Clue that’s illuminating (5 7 Stone made entrance (5 12 Large roll of paper of intricate design (3 13 Not even curious (3 14 The fighters craft (8 15 Where flowers grow I get a flower (8 19 Outflowing currency (6 20 Actual language used in an American era (5 21 Behave awkwardly when you get the bill and get put out (3,2 22 Leaves with all debts settled (5 Across:1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10 Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13 Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19 Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24 Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There, 29 Erst, 30 Persecutor. Down:1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele, 4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8 Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe, 16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20 Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25 Attic, 26 Heir. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10 Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere, 13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet, 19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, 24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. Down:1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18 Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete, 23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Abasis for soups (5 8 Shredded cabbage salad (8 9 Pry furtively (5 10 Form of pasta (8 11 Spacious (5 12 Plant used in brewing (3 16 To stew in closed pan (6 17 Impervious to light (6 18 Wet soft earth (3 23 Point in development (5 24 Crepes (8 25 Pleasure trip (5 26 ANorth African dish (8 27 North African country (5 Down 2 Type of Indian cooking (8 3 Fried noodles dish (4,4 4 Pulpy salad fruit (6 5 Hickory nut (5 6 Bear flowers (5 7 Be in store for (5 12 Edge (3 13 Legume (3 14 Seasoned smoked beef (8 15 AFrench wine (8 19 Advantageous (6 20 An aromatic flavouring (5 21 Declare invalid (5 22 Highly decorated (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Fancy a number to be perfect (5 8 Victorian poet getting sunburnt (8 9 Possibly loves to find the right answer (5 10 War that’s breaking out in Panama? (5,3 11 Stretch of river? (5 12 Semi-wooden court (3 16 Unfriendly action (6 17 Plays produced in Madras (6 18 In which to spend the rest of your life (3 23 Ateam competing away (5 24 Gives way and dies (8 25 An addict may be fined (5 26 They welcome fare increases (8 27 Composition makes easy point (5 Down 2 Once said to be a bishop (8 3 He should know how to press a suit (8 4 About the end of December, reached Santa’s base (6 5 One outcome of hard work? (5 6 Clue that’s illuminating (5 7 Stone made entrance (5 12 Large roll of paper of intricate design (3 13 Not even curious (3 14 The fighters craft (8 15 Where flowers grow I get a flower (8 19 Outflowing currency (6 20 Actual language used in an American era (5 21 Behave awkwardly when you get the bill and get put out (3,2 22 Leaves with all debts settled (5 Across:1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10 Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13 Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19 Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24 Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There, 29 Erst, 30 Persecutor. Down:1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele, 4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8 Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe, 16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20 Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25 Attic, 26 Heir. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10 Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere, 13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet, 19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, 24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. Down:1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18 Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete, 23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s K akuro AnswerAcross 1 Abasis for soups (5 8 Shredded cabbage salad (8 9 Pry furtively (5 10 Form of pasta (8 11 Spacious (5 12 Plant used in brewing (3 16 To stew in closed pan (6 17 Impervious to light (6 18 Wet soft earth (3 23 Point in development (5 24 Crepes (8 25 Pleasure trip (5 26 ANorth African dish (8 27 North African country (5 Down 2 Type of Indian cooking (8 3 Fried noodles dish (4,4 4 Pulpy salad fruit (6 5 Hickory nut (5 6 Bear flowers (5 7 Be in store for (5 12 Edge (3 13 Legume (3 14 Seasoned smoked beef (8 15 AFrench wine (8 19 Advantageous (6 20 An aromatic flavouring (5 21 Declare invalid (5 22 Highly decorated (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Fancy a number to be perfect (5 8 Victorian poet getting sunburnt (8 9 Possibly loves to find the right answer (5 10 War that’s breaking out in Panama? (5,3 11 Stretch of river? (5 12 Semi-wooden court (3 16 Unfriendly action (6 17 Plays produced in Madras (6 18 In which to spend the rest of your life (3 23 Ateam competing away (5 24 Gives way and dies (8 25 An addict may be fined (5 26 They welcome fare increases (8 27 Composition makes easy point (5 Down 2 Once said to be a bishop (8 3 He should know how to press a suit (8 4 About the end of December, reached Santa’s base (6 5 One outcome of hard work? (5 6 Clue that’s illuminating (5 7 Stone made entrance (5 12 Large roll of paper of intricate design (3 13 Not even curious (3 14 The fighters craft (8 15 Where flowers grow I get a flower (8 19 Outflowing currency (6 20 Actual language used in an American era (5 21 Behave awkwardly when you get the bill and get put out (3,2 22 Leaves with all debts settled (5 Across:1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10 Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13 Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19 Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24 Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There, 29 Erst, 30 Persecutor. Down:1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele, 4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8 Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe, 16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20 Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25 Attic, 26 Heir. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10 Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere, 13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet, 19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, 24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. Down:1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18 Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete, 23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27T ribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Saturday s S udoku Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u T a R gT E S aturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Abasis for soups (5 8 Shredded cabbage salad (8 9 Pry furtively (5 10 Form of pasta (8 11 Spacious (5 12 Plant used in brewing (3 16 To stew in closed pan (6 17 Impervious to light (6 18 Wet soft earth (3 23 Point in development (5 24 Crepes (8 25 Pleasure trip (5 26 ANorth African dish (8 27 North African country (5 Down 2 Type of Indian cooking (8 3 Fried noodles dish (4,4 4 Pulpy salad fruit (6 5 Hickory nut (5 6 Bear flowers (5 7 Be in store for (5 12 Edge (3 13 Legume (3 14 Seasoned smoked beef (8 15 AFrench wine (8 19 Advantageous (6 20 An aromatic flavouring (5 21 Declare invalid (5 22 Highly decorated (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Fancy a number to be perfect (5 8 Victorian poet getting sunburnt (8 9 Possibly loves to find the right answer (5 10 War that’s breaking out in Panama? (5,3 11 Stretch of river? (5 12 Semi-wooden court (3 16 Unfriendly action (6 17 Plays produced in Madras (6 18 In which to spend the rest of your life (3 23 Ateam competing away (5 24 Gives way and dies (8 25 An addict may be fined (5 26 They welcome fare increases (8 27 Composition makes easy point (5 Down 2 Once said to be a bishop (8 3 He should know how to press a suit (8 4 About the end of December, reached Santa’s base (6 5 One outcome of hard work? (5 6 Clue that’s illuminating (5 7 Stone made entrance (5 12 Large roll of paper of intricate design (3 13 Not even curious (3 14 The fighters craft (8 15 Where flowers grow I get a flower (8 19 Outflowing currency (6 20 Actual language used in an American era (5 21 Behave awkwardly when you get the bill and get put out (3,2 22 Leaves with all debts settled (5 Across:1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10 Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13 Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19 Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24 Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There, 29 Erst, 30 Persecutor. Down:1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele, 4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8 Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe, 16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20 Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25 Attic, 26 Heir. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10 Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere, 13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet, 19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, 24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. Down:1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18 Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete, 23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 1 1 12131415 1617 1 819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 1 1 12131415 1617 1 819 20212223 24 25 26 27Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleS aturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Saturday’s K akuro Answer Across 1 Abasis for soups (5 8 Shredded cabbage salad (8 9 Pry furtively (5 10 Form of pasta (8 11 Spacious (5 12 Plant used in brewing (3 16 To stew in closed pan (6 17 Impervious to light (6 18 Wet soft earth (3 23 Point in development (5 24 Crepes (8 25 Pleasure trip (5 26 ANorth African dish (8 27 North African country (5 Down 2 Type of Indian cooking (8 3 Fried noodles dish (4,4 4 Pulpy salad fruit (6 5 Hickory nut (5 6 Bear flowers (5 7 Be in store for (5 12 Edge (3 13 Legume (3 14 Seasoned smoked beef (8 15 AFrench wine (8 19 Advantageous (6 20 An aromatic flavouring (5 21 Declare invalid (5 22 Highly decorated (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Fancy a number to be perfect (5 8 Victorian poet getting sunburnt (8 9 Possibly loves to find the right answer (5 10 War that’s breaking out in Panama? (5,3 11 Stretch of river? (5 12 Semi-wooden court (3 16 Unfriendly action (6 17 Plays produced in Madras (6 18 In which to spend the rest of your life (3 23 Ateam competing away (5 24 Gives way and dies (8 25 An addict may be fined (5 26 They welcome fare increases (8 27 Composition makes easy point (5 Down 2 Once said to be a bishop (8 3 He should know how to press a suit (8 4 About the end of December, reached Santa’s base (6 5 One outcome of hard work? (5 6 Clue that’s illuminating (5 7 Stone made entrance (5 12 Large roll of paper of intricate design (3 13 Not even curious (3 14 The fighters craft (8 15 Where flowers grow I get a flower (8 19 Outflowing currency (6 20 Actual language used in an American era (5 21 Behave awkwardly when you get the bill and get put out (3,2 22 Leaves with all debts settled (5 Across:1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10 Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13 Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19 Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24 Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There, 29 Erst, 30 Persecutor. Down:1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele, 4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8 Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe, 16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20 Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25 Attic, 26 Heir. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10 Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere, 13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet, 19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, 24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. Down:1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18 Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete, 23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R P AGE 6B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 T HE TRIBUNE

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For this dynamic group of seniors, being part of a biweekly gym class is something far different from a responsibility or chore, it is who they are. The class which is made up of about 20 mostly retired women, meets at Body Zone every Tuesday and Thursday, where they take part in aerobics and various light-weightlifting routines. Eighty one-year-old Betty Roberts said she has been working out with the group from the start of the class nearly a year ago, and added that before then she was a regular at the gym. The grandmother said during the class, she takes part in aerobic exercises, as well as minimal weights and other gym activities. “I’ve got achy bones, and I’ve already gone to the physiotherapist which cost me a lot of money and didn’t do me any good.” She said her experience at the gym is much less strenuous and way more fun, especially because she was able to forge meaningful friendships with the other ladies. Where commitment to routine workouts may seem an issues for most people, these women all delight in their weekly workouts and in the quality time they get to spend with their workout buddies. Sixty six-year-old Mary Darville, like Mrs Roberts has aching bones, and rarely gets to talk to people face to face in her home. Mrs Darville said: “Coming to the gym allows me to get out, see people, instead of staying home and watching TV.” Now suffering from severe arthritis in both of her hands and feet, Mrs Darville said going to the gym enables her to be more mobile and painless, “and is certainly beneficial, and helps to keep me going.” Instructor Della Thomas, said it is an absolute joy to work with the women and said her decision to begin the class came from a desire to make the gym a place where the elderly can feel at home. “Looking around in the gyms I saw that the elderly were neglected. I saw that they would just hang around but were obviously in need of special attention.” The routines which can last anywhere between 15 minutes to a half hour, are designed around a thorough body workout for the ladies, with as little strain on their bodies as possible. With the class gaining significant increases in membership over the past few month, interested seniors are invited to sign-up andb ecome a part of the exciting group. C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009, PAGE 7B health BODYANDMIND T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e DO YOUever experience that sinking feeling when you hear, “Do we have to talk about this?” or do you find yourself saying, “Why do we have to go over this over and over again?” Why is it we feel we have to repeat things and in the process feel or be accused of being a nag? We are all guilty of giving someone less than our full attention when they want to talk to us. Some people seem to be so much better at listening. Is it just our individual personalities, the way we have been brought up or is it something we can learn and change ourselves? We know that we can learn how to drive a car, learn a foreign language and re-sculpt our bodies when we really want to. So what is stopping us learning how to become a better listener and why would it be important? Sometimes we may glance at the television, newspaper, change the subject or just drift off mid conversation. In other words, just not participate or be present. As we half listen, sometimes we already have the answers to all of the speaker's problems and all too often jump in with advice, judgments and opinions. But all we have really done is listen to the contents of the conversation and missed the feelings behind the words. By the end of the conversation the speaker may well feel unsatisfied because they were not understood and accepted. If this becomes or has always been the way that a couple relates or communicates with each other, then in time there will be an unwillingness to open up and be honest. This erodes at the very core of the couple bond and knowingly or unknowingly denies the depth of intimacy to develop. To have a relationship where you can relax, be open and be accepted for yourself is very freeing. It makes you happier, more ful filled and it is what everyone is looking for. So what we are really talking about is effective listening which essentially is listening with empathy. This means seeing things from the other person's point of view, putting you self in their shoes. It requires full attention; not interrupting with your views and opinions. Asking questions and for clarifications encourages the speaker to open up and lets them know that you are really listening. Acknowledge the speaker’s feelings, not your own, and only give solutions if asked. More than not the speaker only wants a sympathetic ear not a quick fix. All these things may be difficult to do or remember but by consciously practising this on a daily basis it becomes easier and in time becomes almost effortless. Some people are very good at applying these principles in their work situa tion but not at home with their nearest and dearest. Becoming aware and acknowledging our behavior and how it affects everyone around us is not an easy thing to do. Men often say that women do all the nagging but nagging is just repeating something over and over. This means that someone was not listening or picking up on the escalating feelings of frustration and urgency. The way to avoid getting to this stage is to listen, be totally honest and open up. This does not mean that you have to agree to everything that is being said and there is no doubt that lack of agreement can cause problems. However once we feel our point of view is understood then most people are receptive to trying to iron out the problems. Not everything can or needs to be ironed out. It is possible to agree to disagree. The timing for all this good listening and talking is very important. Most people would agree that being tired, angry, or in a hurry were not the best times. By first acknowledging your partner's feelings it is then quite reasonable to ask for a different time, place or condition to discuss it. Asking for a timeout is a sensible decision if you know the conditions would not be favorable for a healthy discussion. Once you have mastered this and you both see how much happier you both feel, then you can expand this into your most intimate life. Listening to sexual feed back can be difficult for many to hear and it is so easy to take it as criticism. Just like anger and nagging, it is important to see it as a way to make both of you happy. Expressing your feelings takes the guess work out and allows both to teach the other. Do not be discouraged if it does not come quickly or easily. Our needs and wants change with the passage of time just like our bodies. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist located at The Centre for Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's Close West. She can be contacted by calling 3567983 or by email at relateba hamas@yahoo.com How to become a better listener By Maggie Bain n By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net While the golden years are commonly thought of as a time to take a back seat in life, one group of seniors is going full trottle into the best days of their lives. Fit at any age 60 YEAR-OLD Evangeline Nixon works up a sweat on the elliptical. AT TOP81 year-old Betty Roberts and 66 year-old Mary Darville are all smilesa fter a recent work-out at Body Zone.

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G REEN SCENE BY GARDENER JACK garden March The larger varieties of tomatoes tend to do best in our cooler weather so future sowings should feature smaller, earlier varieties. I like to grow Roma during the spring, an Italian type that produces elongated fruits in abundance. All tomato varieties are either determinate or indeterminate. Determinate varieties produce their harvest all at one time and the plants then die. Indeterminate tomatoes continue to grow and bear over a very long period of time but their returns diminish remarkably. This leads to the home gardener having to uproot a mas sive vine that has still has fruits attached. Roma tomatoes are determinate so we must re-sow them every month to ensure a continuous supply. The last Romas can be sown in May and give us early summer tomatoes when most other varieties stop producing fruits. The time comes when even Roma tomatoes are no match for our summer conditions and this is when cherry tomatoes, particularly largefruited varieties, come into their own. Sweet peppers tend to produce well into summer but the fruits get smaller. I like to grow Cubanelle, a large, flat Italiantype sweet pepper that takes summer in its stride. These can be started in March with perhaps another sowing in May to guar a ntee plenty of summer sweetness. M arch signifies the end of the cool weather crops such as spinach, garden peas, broccoli, cauliflower and others. New Zealand spinach or Malabar spinach can be substituted for leaf spinach if you like to cook the herb rather than eat the leaves raw. Bok choi Chinese cabbage grows well in spring and can be started in March. Zucchini and yellow summer squash can also be sown now. Fennel is a warmth loving herb-cum-vegetablet hat should bring rewards from a March sowing. There will be changes in our flowerbeds as the weather gets warmer. Kalanchoe will stop flowering but remain as a succulent plant. I like to plant caladium bulbs nearby to maintain colour while the Kalanchoe lacks flowers. The stalwarts of summer are marigolds, vinca, zinnias, cos mos and Mexican sunflowers. All of these annuals can take our summer heat and flower with abandon. Many flowering shrubs will begin to pick up and start showing signs of renewal while others, winter bloomers, will slowly decrease their flower output. Shrubs should be fertilised at least twice a year and the beginning of spring is a good time for the first application. Hibiscus bushes and bougainvillea vines seem to do extraordinarily well with seemingly little help from man. Without regular feeding shrubs will weaken and become sus ceptible to insect predation. Citrus and fruit trees should be given a make-over three times a year, in spring, summer and autumn. Water deeply around the drip line and the bole then apply Sequestrene 138 chelated iron to the base of each trunk using a level teaspoon of iron to 3 gallons of water. Apply citrus or fruit tree granular fertilizer to the drip line and also sprinkle some between the drip line and the trunk. Finish by spraying the foliage with a solution containing micronutrients and a spreader-sticker. The end of March would be a good time to start this regimen. C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INFANTS born at the Princess Margaret Hospital recently were the recipients of 30 safety car seats donated jointly by the Rotary Club of East Nassau and Multi Discount furniture company. The donation was part of a Christmas card promotion that the rotary club began in December. According to the National SAFE KIDS Campaign and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA agency of the Executive Branch of the United States Government, part of the US Depart ment of Transportation, car seats reduce the risk of death by 71 per cent for infants and by 54 per cent for children ages 14, and reduces the need for hospitalisation by 69 per cent for children ages 4 and under. The proper use of child car restraints would prevent many of these deaths and injuries. In a crash at just 30 mph, an unrestrained child would be thrown forward with a force 30 to 60 times their body weight. They would be thrown about inside the vehicle, injuring themselves and quite possibly seriously injuring (or even killing people inside the vehicle. They are also likely to be ejected from the car through one of the windows. It is not safe to hold a child on your lap. In a crash, the child could be crushed between your body and part of the car's inte rior. Even if you are using a seat belt, the child would be torn from your arms you would not be able to hold onto them, no matter how hard you try. It is also dangerous to put a seat belt around yourself and a child (or around two children). The Rotary Club of East Nassau's message is that the safest way for children to trav el in cars is to use a child seat that is suitable for their weight and size. A properly fitted child restraint keeps the child in their seat, preventing them from being thrown about inside or ejected from the vehicle. This reduces the likelihood of your child being killed or injured in a crash. The law requires all children traveling in cars to use the correct child restraintuntil they are either 135 cm in height or the age of 12 (which ever they reach first). After this they must use an adult seat belt. “We are delighted to be able to raise funds for a such worthy cause. We would like to thank Multi-Discount Furniture and Appliances for their assistance with procurement and donation of three additional car seats. We anticipate the car seats will be put to good use as reducing child mortality is one of the goals for Rotary International. The seats will be split between the pediatric and various infant units and distributed to mothers who would not be able to afford them”, said Brian Moodie, the president of the Rotary Club of East Nassau. TODAYI will address a condition referred to as shoe dermatitis. Shoe dermatitis is a medical condition which is caused by contact of the foot with chemicals in the material of footwear. Thi s condition can be either irritant or allergic. Irritant shoe dermatitis is often caused by wearing shoes that are wet, poorly fitting or that have uneven linings. However, in the case of allergic (contactmatitis , there are many different substances that can cause this condition, which is quite common and is frequently complicated by secondary infections or eczema. I am certain that we are all owners of a variety of footwear styles: casual, formal, work and athletic shoes. The majority of our footwear is imported and made from leather, rubber and other synthetic materials. The most recent US statistics revealed that ninety-eight per cent of all shoes are imported, therefore it is impossible to identify precisely all their constituent components. It is during the manufacturing and finishing of footwear many chemicals are used. Sources of Shoe Contact Dermatitis: Historically, leather, dyes and rubber allergens were seen as the most common causes of shoe dermatitis. Today, shoe dermatitis may occur if a personi s sensitive to the rubber or elastic compounds in shoes, form i nserts or from elastic glues used to bind shoe components. Other identifiable causes of shoe dermatitis are cements, dichro mate used in tanning, dyes, antimildew agents, formaldehyde, and nickel eyelets or nickel arch supports. Some signs and symptoms of shoe dermatitis: The most common site first involved with shoe dermatitis is the dorsal (top big toe and on the insteps (top of foot). It later extends bys preading to the other toes and dorsal (top Skin lesions may be acute, pre senting as red, blistering, ooz ing and usually symmetrical. This dermatitis can range from mild, itchy rash to severei tching with swelling and small blisters. In severe cases, open sores may present and can result in secondary bacterial infections. If any such signs are present, seek professional help for proper diagnosis and treatment. Prevent shoe dermatitis: As a pedorthist and a member of the health care team, the design of footwear determines to a large extent the appearance of shoe dermatitis. Once the condition is present, the pedorthist should refer the individual to a physician for a medical evaluation. Once this condition is diag nosed, footwear is than part of the treatment. A pedorthist as an expert in footwear can aid the physician and the patient with the selection of footwear without materials that may cause shoe dermati tis. Substituting products made of different materials that do not cause allergic reactions will lessen the likelihood of future episodes of shoe dermatitis. “Vegetabletanned” footwear can be substi tuted as an alternative for the hypersensitive individual. This type of footwear contains no rub ber or formaldehyde. Finally, it is important to recognise that shoe dermatitis is quite common, affecting children and adults regardless of race. Patients with shoe dermatitis can use special types of shoes prepared from non-sensitising substances. I would also suggest that measures to control sweating may be very helpful for the patient who suffers from shoe dermatitis. Socks or stockings made of absorbent cotton (e.g. Thorlos or Balega socks that have a unique rapid moisture evaporation system) should always be worn. Avoid wet shoes, poorly fitting shoes or self treatment and seek professional help to treat or prevent shoe dermatitis. Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. "The views expressed are those of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footsolu tions.com or 327-FEET (3338 Shoe dermatitis B y B ERNADETTE G IBSON Rotary Club of East Nassau donates car seats THIRTY safety car seats were donated jointly by the Rotary Club of East Nassau and Multi Discount furniture company to infants at Princess Margaret Hospital. T HE vegetable gardens we started in September or October should have p roduced well and be at their peak by the beginning of March. But March is the last month of winter and that is a reminder that warmer w eather will be coming and we will need to adjust our cr ops t o accommodate the change. The month of in the

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ASK THE DOCTOR M r Butler said the discovery was made during a trip to China for a trade show four years ago. “I was introduced to this company at the t rade show that was distributing this device. I had a shoulder injury and they did a d emonstration on my shoulder. With the magnets, you can place them on pressure p oints about the body for any pain or discomfort. After they placed it on my shoulder for a period of time, I was able to take my shoulder from the side of my body up toa full range of movement without any pain,” Mr Butler said. M agnetic therapy has an ancient heritage and has occupied a central role in Chinese medicine for over 2000 years. Magnetic therapy is mentioned in some of the earliest w ritings in Egypt, India and Greece. Until recently the scientific explanation of magnetic action was not available. Magnetic therapy utilises the natural energy of mag netism that is important to human existence and overall health. A magnetic field pro v ides a (natural normal healing processes as it passes through all tissues and cells. Studies show that magnets can be an effective therapy fort he relief of pain by blocking pain sensa tions. Applying magnetic fields to an injured area improves blood flow and oxy gen to enhance the body’s natural healing process. The improved blood flow and fluid exchange to the injured tissue helps reduce pain and inflammation. Today in Japan and other Asian countries, therapeutic magnets are licensed as medical devices. Magnetic therapy has found favor in Australia, Russia and many European countries, especially Germany where medical insurance covers some of the costs. Contemporary western medicine uses magnetic energy for diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI method to accelerate the healing of bone fractures. Many claims about magnetic therapy come from the fact that some cells and tissues in the human body give off electromagnetic impulses. Some practitioners think the presence of illness or injury disrupts these fields. Magnets produce energy fields of different strengths, which they believe can penetrate the human body, correcting disturbances and restoring health to the afflicted systems, organs, and cells. Most magnets marketed to consumers are static magnets, also calledc onstant magnets, because the mag netic field doesn’t c hange. They are usually made ofm agnetised metal or lodestone. Staticm agnets are different from electromagnets, which only have a n energy field while electricity is passing through them. As for the Bahamian response to the device, Mr Butler said he has gotten at remendous response since he had introduced the product three years ago. E merson Thurston, one of Mr Butler’s customers, shared his experience with the machine. “Since I have been using this machine I have seen miraculous results. My blood pressure has been reduced since I started u sing it. It is very good. I am using it now for my heart and kidney. I can bend and whine now and before I couldn’t do that. I also had issues sleeping and after a week of u sing the TAB, my family has to wake me up to go to work,” Mr Thurston said. Mr Butler said the TAB machine can run from $400 if someone wants to purchase one for the entire home. With the population aging and the cost of traditional health c are spiraling upward, Mr Butler believes that magnetic therapy, for reasons of simp licity, effectiveness and economy, will become an important form of alternative therapy in the future. “With most of the chronic conditions we have today as it relates to hypertension and diabetes, it can reduce swelling in the body, arthritis and even with men, it corrects blood flow if they have erectile dysfunction,” Mr Butler said According to the FDA, magnets used for magnetic therapy are generally considered safe. However, implantable medical devices such as pacemakers, defibrillators, or infu sion pumps may be adversely affected by magnets. C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009, PAGE 9B EXTRINSIC refers to exter nal factors that impact skin health, such as our environment and lifestyle. Below are some of the major extrinsic causes of dry skin. Weather / Environmental elements Cold winds and low tempera tures can dry out skin, depriving it of balanced levels of oils, and contributing to premature aging. Prolonged exposure to the sun causes water to evaporate from skin. Forced air heating also dries out skin: warm, dry air acts like a sponge, soaking up moisture from everything it touches. Lifestyle The trend of low-fat or fatfree diets can deprive our bodies of skin-friendly Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs of a healthy functioning body. They help protect against water loss within cells and throughout skin, helping to prevent dryness, keeping skin supple and hydrated. An EFA deficiency can result in chronic itching, dryness, scaling, and thinning. Smoking can have a drying effect on skin: it drains skin and body of vitamins A and C and constricts blood vessels (which equates to less blood flow) meaning smoking is somewhat like suffocating skin from the inside. Excess intake of alcoholic beverages and certain medica tions (such as nasal decongestants) can also contribute to dry skin. Sarah Simpson is a skin care therapist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her and her team of skin and body therapists at One Sandyport Plaza (the same building as Ballys Gym). For more informa tion visit www.dermal-clinic.com or call 327.6788 The top extrinsic causes of dr y skin By SARAH SIMPSON SKIN CARE n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter AS Bahamians continue to struggle with reports of major i ncr eases in cancer and diabetes, one Bahamian entrepren eur, Henry Butler, went on a quest to find relief for his own a ilments and discovered magnetic therapy through a device c alled t her apeutic apparatus for the body (TAB) which he f eels will benefit Bahamians from all walks of life. Doing it with magnets ONE of the charts indictating pressure points in the feet for the magnetic therapy. With most of the chronic conditions we have today as it relates to hypertension and diabetes, it can reduce swelling in the body, arthritis and even with men, it corrects blood flow if they have erectile dysfunction. HENRY BUTLER Q UESTION : What is an oncologist and a hematologist? In an effort to provide the community with information on advances in the treatment of cancer and blood disorders, Dr Theodore Turnquest and Dr DuVaughn Curling will be providing a weekly "Ask the Doctor" column. The purpose of this column will be to provide clear and concise information in layman's terms for all to understand. We hope that this will be of g reat help to the public and look forward to your feedback. The doctors will address all cancer and blood related questions. Every effort will be made to respond to questions submitted. E-mail questions to: Oncology.consultants@gmail.com. A A n n s s w w e e r r : Oncology and Hematology are both subspecialties within the field of general internal medicine. Like all subspecialists, physicians within the fields of oncology/hematology must first complete training in general internal medicine which usually takes 3 years and then go on to complete further training called a “fellowship” in their subspecialty which usually takes an additional two years. Oncology is the study and treatment of malignant tumors generally referred to by the public as cancers. Hematology is the study of blood disorders which includes not only cancers of the blood but also “benign” diseases like anemia, sickle cell disease, clotting disorders and many others. Even though they are two separate and distinct fields unto their own there is considerable overlap between the two and therefore in many instances the fellowships are combined into a single 3 year fellowship program resulting in a physician who is a hematology/oncology specialist. S S o o w w h h a a t t d d o o e e s s t t h h i i s s m m e e a a n n f f o o r r t t h h e e p p a a t t i i e e n n t t ? ? It is important for the patient to understand that in today's medical world many diseases require a team approach, with expertise from many different fields. This is particularly true for the management of cancer patients who frequently encounter many different specialists while undergoing treatment. These other physicians may include: 1. A surgeon who would be responsible for any biopsies or excisions or exploratory surgery to be performed. 2. A radiation oncologist. There are some cancers that require radiation as a part of the treatment management which would be performed by a radiation oncologist. Let’s pause for a moment of clarification as this point is often confusing to the community. A radiation oncologist uses different types of radiation in the forms photons electrons or neutrons to treat a cancer while a medical oncologist uses chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancers. 3 . A radiologist. Once a patient has been diagnosed with a particular type of cancer one of the things that needs to be determined is whether there are other organs that may be involved. This process is frequently called staging which may involve many different modalities such as CT scans and MRI's which would bep erformed by the radiologist. 4. A psychiatrist. The news of cancer can often be traumatic for an individual and patients may experience symptoms of depression, anxiety, anger and many other emotions and may require psychiatric help. 5. A pathologist. Once a biopsy or surgery has been performed, it is the pathologist’s responsibility to identify the type of cancer that is present.The pathologist does this by taking cells from the surgical specimen and looking at them under the microscope and also performing special lab test to assist them in obtaining a final diagnosis. The pathologist is usually never seen by the actual patient but as one can see the pathologist plays a pivotal role as without a diagnosis no treatment can occur. There are many other physicians that the oncology patient may encounter during the course of their treatment. The important thing to remember is that care of the cancer patient is multidisciplinary, consisting of many different medical specialties. It is the job of the medical oncologist to co-ordinate all of these disciplines into one, making the appropriate referrals when necessary to ensure that the patient is afforded the best possible care. The medical oncologist will also treat the cancer itself with medications called chemotherapies. How these treatments are delivered and their side effects will be discussed on another day. Hematology which as mentioned above is the study of disorders of the “blood” can be broken down into two broad categories. 1Malignant hematology which deals with cancers of the blood and is therefore much like medical oncology and 2- “benign” hematology which encompasses many different diseases such as anemias, thallasemias, disorders of bleeding, sickle cell disease and many others. The hematologist tends to work along in consultation with a gen eral internist to provide care for patients with blood disorders throughout their life time. We hope that this initial article will help the public to better understand the fields of oncol ogy and hematology and we look forward to f ostering a nurturing relationship in the future as we move forward and continue our battle against this disease. Dr Theodore Turnquest’s and Dr DeVaughn Curling’s office is located at 94 Nassau Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Their office telephone contact is 242-325-6284.

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n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter ALTHOUGH polite society says that looks are not everything, you have to concede that they mean something. The first impression of many people is based on appearance from their clothes, posture, height and even their hair. Lately, more and more people have been the victims of "bad hair days" because it seems that cer-tain employers have become more concerned with how employees wear their hair than how well they perform on the job. Many would venture to ask, what does hair have to do with how I perform? How important are hairstyles in the workplace? President of Cynergy Counselling and Consultants, Cyndi WilliamsRahming said hair is an extremely important component on any workforce and something thats hould be taken very seriously. Hair is extremely important because it is a part of your physique and a physical appearance par ticularly for persons who have to deal with customers on a daily basis,” Mrs Rahming said. Mrs Rahming said that most companies carry a uniform or dress policy that may make it easier on employees. “Most companies have an employee uniform policy which encompasses your hair to your feet. Hair has to be neatly done. Most companies do not normally allow braids or dreadlocks. Some places require you to have your hair under a cap or a net,” Mrs Rahming said. When it comes to those who are new to the job market, Mrs Rahming said she would advise them to keep their hair and appearance as subtle and simple as possible. “From a consultant’s point of view, I do not advise people who come to me looking for jobs to colour their hair. I have from time to time coloured my own hair from brown to black and vice versa but nothing red, green or yellow that stands out. Maybe in the fashion industry that may work out but depending on the type of job the person is looking for that is not acceptable, especially for front desk or an office job,” Mrs Rahming said. Mrs Rahming said that clients and customers really want to see what they consider to be a corporate professional image when it comes to ser v ice. “You have to really be able to impress that person the very first time they see you and that is going to mean that you have to dress to impress. You never get a second chance to make a first impression. The title does not matter. If you are an owner, a driver or as alesman, you should always have your hair o ne colour. I do have people who have asked my advice on streaking their hair in the work place, and I think it is acceptable as long as the streaks are not loud and overbearing,” Mrs Rah ming said. With some persons, having the right image for a corporation can be challenging. “Persons try to portray their personality through clothing, and so it sometimes is considered to be an individual thing and it is hard to convince some people that this is a lifestyle change that they have to do. It takes time and won’t happen overnight because change is a process, however, the first step is defining what image you want to project,” Mrs Rahming said. When it comes to those ladies who wear weaves in the workplace, Mrs Rahming suggests buying quality weave and find someone who will install it to make it look as neat as possible. This means investing a little more dollars for weave or exten sions that will last and look realistic. “It has to be neat, clean and in place. A lot of the businesses that I consult for do not allow the ‘fan up do style’. It has to be back in one or in a style that is as compact as possible. I understand the expression of self, but by the same token when you express yourself it has to be done in a way where you present yourself in society in a positive image that causes people to hire you or date you you have to look at the bigger picture, long term,” Mrs Rahming said. Tell us what you think e-mail your comments to tribune@tribunemedia.net or send us a fax at 328-2398. THE COACH APPROACH C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE “For us to give birth to a new era, we must be willingly prepared to endure the labor pains.” M ICHELLE MILLER Some may argue that present economic challenges dwarf in compari-son to the insurmountable hardships of war, epidemics and extreme poverty experienced by past generations. Colorful scrolls of world history are stained with many periods of incredible impoverishment burdened by the travelers of the past. And in a time without the luxury of modern conveniences, those brave souls employed their imagination and improved their overall sense of preparation; which enabled them to overcome those obstacles and lay the foundation on which we have built our very lives. When you observe the severity of challenges endured by the nation builders of yesteryear, what kind of adversity are you personally prepared to face? When life brings moments of uncertainty, are you quick to panic or are you faithfully prepared to over-c ome? These are the questions to ponder as you continue to draw new conclusions about your life challenges. You are directly responsible for the growth and development of your understanding; the degree to which you are making a concerted effort to deepen your insight and ability to face adversities, determines your confidence to succeed. This article seeks to tickle your thinking and inspire a broader perspective on the ingredients necessary for the dawning of a new era. The Joy of the Pain of Childbirth C onsider if you will, that today’s challenges are not a happenstance; instead they are fundamental components of a natural paradigm shift; which moves you away from fear and panic towards confidence and preparation. Let’s take the analogy of child birth, in which contractions are painful but necessary.Contractions are defined as ‘the tightening and shortening of the uterine muscles during labor causing effacement and dilation of the cervix and contributing to the descent of the baby.’ Contractions may be irregular at first, but gradually become regular, eventually pushing the baby out of the uterus. This is a beautiful process in which t hose involved are fully prepared to r eceive a new life into the world. And d espite excruciating labor pains, birthing of new life is a natural aspect of the human evolution. This of course speaks volumes about the depth of our capacity to deal with life adversities, economic or otherwise. The key point here is preparation and not panic aides the successful process of new life.The medical professionals are adequately trained and the female body undergo natural adjustments to endure the often time challenging process of childbirth. Thus, given the current contractions of the economic walls, the world is on the verge of birthing a new era; overflowing with hope and possibility. This is not a time for you to panic but a time to become adequately prepared. 1 1 . . T T a a k k e e s s t t o o c c k k o o f f y y o o u u r r s s e e l l f f 2 2 . . R R e e a a s s s s e e s s s s y y o o u u r r c c o o p p i i n n g g s s k k i i l l l l s s 3 3 . . C C l l a a r r i i f f y y y y o o u u r r c c o o n n c c l l u u s s i i o o n n s s You must be prepared for the future opportunities that are hidden within present obstacles. It is better to prepared for an opportunity and not have one than to have opportunity for which you are unprepared. Final thoughts Despite the endless negative news about today’s challenges; we know that generations of the past have successfully faced more severe adversities. They courageously accepted that they had to bear the burden of birthing the moments of their time; creating major progress, which was passed on today’s generation. And now the tables have turned; it is now our time to use our imagination and competently give birth to another new era, which will ultimately be passed on to the generation of tomorrow. However, the success of such a challenge, demands facing some crucial realities:a. We are not exempt from life adversities b. We are the children of courageous souls c. It is our responsibility to give birth to our own era Like our ancestors, we must believe that the magnitude of our strength is greater than any challenge life may present; finding the fortitude and will to embrace life on a silver screen. Taking this broader perspective cultivates a deeper understanding that adversities are a natural part of change; and change must be embraced and endured, before it can be enjoyed. Remember – you are innately empowered to face any challenge; but you must continue to build your sense of preparation in order to take advantage of new possibilities. Rest assured that the economic contractions will subside and a new era will emerge.You can choose to remain in a state of panic or become better prepared; you have the power to make change happen. If you are ready to build your preparation and embrace new opportunities, you are an ideal candidate for my upcoming No Excuses Goals Program. Please send an email to coach4ward@Yahoo.com or call 429-6770.Seats Are Limited! Michelle M Miller is a certified Life-Coach a nd Stress Management Consultant.She is t he Principal Coach of the Coaching Studio, w hich is located on Madeira Street, Palmdale.Questions or comments can be sent to P.O. Box CB-13060 – email – coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone 4296770. B y Michelle M M iller, CC Economic contractions: A time to panic or prepare? n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter WOMEN in the Bahamas are under great pressure to measure up to a certain social and cultural ideal of beauty, which can lead to poor body image. Women are constantly bombarded with "Barbielike" doll images in a society that is plagued by obesity. By presenting an ideal that is so difficult to achieve and maintain, the diet product and gym industries are assured of growth and profits. It is no accident that youth is increasingly promoted, along with thinness, as an essential criterion of beauty. The message being sent out is either all women need to lose weight or that the natural aging process is not something to look forward to. With a positive or healthy body image, a woman has a r eal perception of her size a nd shape, and she feels comfortable with her body. With a negative body image, a woman has a distorted perception of her shape and size, compares her body to others, and feels shame and anxiety about her body. Being unhappy with one’s body can affect how someone thinks and feels about themselves as a person. A poor body image can lead to emot ional distress, low selfe steem, dieting, anxiety, d epression, and eating disorders. Developing a positive body image and a healthy mental attitude is crucial to a woman's happiness and wellness. College of the Bahamas Student, Tina Miller, said she feels that Bahamian society also places heavy emphasis on body image due to the diversified culture. “Everybody has their days and although I struggle with my weight, I try to look in the mirror and try to find a positive aspect. I have a certain aura. In my opinion it is not every day you can look 100 per cent, but there are days where you can have inner beauty that shines brighter than your outer beauty,” Ms Miller said. Ms Miller said she feels there is not a lot of cultural interaction because a lot of people do not feel accepted in society because their bodies or features are not what is expected of them. “If you go into the nail salons, beauty salons and beauty supply stores, women spend a lot of money on beauty or what they think is beauty to be accepted. Women bleach their skin, add false eye lashes and sew in 26 inch weaves. The men do it too. They have to have the best outfits and the latest rides and haircuts just to be accepted. There is a lot of cul tural tension especially in the more abundant races in the Bahamas such as the Cubans, Jamaicans and Haitians that live here. If someone is too black, their nose is what we call ‘spread’ then automatically they are put into a class based on their looks,” Ms Miller said. Other pressures can come from those who interact in a person’s everyday life. Family and friends can influence one’s body image with posi tive and negative comments. A doctor's health advice can be misinterpreted and affect how a woman sees herself and feels about her body as well. When this happens, there is a need to learn how to love exactly what is seen in the mirror on a daily basis. Everyone wants to look their best but a healthy body is not always linked to appearance. In fact, healthy bodies come in all shapes and sizes. Changing one’s body image can mean changing the way they think about their body. At the same time, healthy lifestyle choices are also key to improving body image. Healthy eating can promote healthy skin and hair, along with strong bones. Regular exercise has been shown to boost self-esteem, self-image, and energy levels and plenty of rest is key to stress management. “When I look in the mirror I know I may not be a size double zero or I may not have the lightest skin color, but I know I am fearfully and wonderfully made by God and if this is the body he gave me then I will do everything I can to take care of it,” Ms Miller said. Developing a positive body image The proper work hairstyle at the time she was on the island of San Salvador taking part in a college research pro ject. She said her Mr X was a resident of the island she'd only met briefly during her arrival. Noting that there was noth ing special about him other than his physically appeal, she admits that she was attracted to him from the moment their eyes first connected. She said after working in the same area for a few hours, the guy soon offered to buy her a drink, which was followed by a casual conversation. About three hours later, she told him that she was ready to leave, and invited him to her hotel room. After they got there, there was some more small talk, kissing and the rest is history. Afterwards she said she did feel trashy, and said the reality of her decision soon flooded her mind. “I though Oh my God, I'm now one of ‘those’ women.” Now eight years later, she feels the act itself was in poor taste, but has a new respect for women who can do it. “The whole one night stand was a new thing for me, but after going through the experience it was an eye opening and humbling experience, because now I realise that some things just happen.” Chanel claims she has friends that have one-night-stands all the time, who refuse to limit themselves to the confines of a monogamous relationship, and feel “variety is the spice of life.” However for her, the decision to be a part of the act will only happen again should she be single, and without any sort of commitment to anyone. 24-year-old graphic designer Rose Beckford, tells of an experience with a guy from college whom she had only known for a short time and who she conveniently linked up with to satisfy a desire. She said at the time she was not involved in a relationship, and considered it natural to give herself to the near stranger. Now that she is in a relationship, she feels all the right elements exist for a monoga mous relationship, but added that her book on one night stands remains a very real pos sibility. 30-year-old professional Brenda Reimer, said she too has taken part in a one night fling, but insist that the rules need to be self evident from the start. “There's nothing wrong with two consenting adults coming together for something they both really want, but you obvi ously need to take certain precautions.” Brenda said safe sex is a must for her, added with an understanding on both sides that the act is a one time thing, with no other expectations. As with most women who do end up feeling guilty and regretful of their encounters, she said that happens because of a double standard in society which allows men to have as many sexual partners as they desire, and where a wom an's desire to maintain a wholesome image limits her to just one partner. Although there are some women who obviously have no qualms on chance encounters, there however remains two realities when it comes to onenight-stands and women. The first is, although most women may want to measure up to the same levels of sexual indiscretion as their male counterparts, the feeling of regret is a certain deterrent to a second such encounter. The second is that unlike the average male who may take the bait of a one nighter whether involved or not and feeling no weight, the average woman will only seriously consider having a one night stand if she is unconfined to the boundaries of a committed relationship, and able to handle the backlash of being viewed as a “loose” woman by society. Tell us what you think by sending us a fax at 328-2398 or e-mail us at lallen@tribunemedia.net Just this once FROM page 12

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 36F/2C Low: 37F/3C Low: 42F/6C Low: 46 F/8C Low: 46F/8C Low: 52F/11C Low: 63 F/17C Low: 49F/9C High: 63F/17C High: 62F/17C High: 68 F/20C High: 69F/21C High: 68F/20C High: 64 F/18 High: 72F/22C Low: 52F/11C High: 64 F/18C Low: 54 F/12 High: 71 F/22CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 57F/14C High: 76F/24C Low: 59 F/15C High: 72F/22C Low: 53 F/12C High: 70F/21C Low: 58 F/14C High: 75F/24C Low: 64F/18C High: 81 F/27C Low: 59F/15C High: 75 F/24C Low: 65 F/18C High: 80F/27C Low: 67F/19C High: 80F/27C Low: 55 F/13C High: 74F/23C High: 63F/17CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 03RD, 2009, PAGE 11CTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Sunshine. Partly cloudy with spotty showers. Partly sunny and breezy. Partly sunny and breezy. Sunshine and comfortable. High: 72 Low: 63 High: 75 High: 77 High: 78 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny, breezy and pleasant. High: 79 Low: 65 Low: 66 Low: 69 AccuWeather RealFeel 68F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 58F 69-62F 70-64F 74-66F 76-67F Low: 70 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 73F/23C Low .................................................... 62F/17C Normal high ...................................... 78F/26C Normal low ........................................ 65F/18C Last year's high .................................. 75F/24C Last year's low .................................. 68F/20C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.29" Year to date ..................................................0.98"Normal year to date ......................................3.54" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU First Full Last New Mar . 4 Mar . 10 Mar . 18 Mar . 26 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:31 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:13 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 10:39 a.m. Moonset . . . . . . . . . none Today W ednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:10 p.m.2.26:14 a.m.0.2 -----6:13 p.m.0.0 12:49 a.m.2.77:21 a.m.0.3 1:15 p.m.2.17:19 p.m.0.0 2:00 a.m.2.78:32 a.m.0.3 2:28 p.m. 2.28:32 p.m.0.0 3:14 a.m. 2.79:40 a.m.0.2 3:40 p.m. 2.3 9:44 p.m.-0.1 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 90/3270/21s90/3272/22s Amsterdam47/838/3sh50/1041/5r Ankara, Turkey44/632/0pc45/727/-2pc Athens64/1754/12pc64/1754/12s Auckland72/2259/15s73/2261/16c Bangkok93/3379/26t91/3277/25pc Barbados85/2974/23pc84/2874/23s Barcelona57/1345/7c55/1240/4r Beijing43/630/-1pc39/332/0c Beirut62/1657/13sh63/1757/13sh Belgrade53/1145/7c63/1747/8r Berlin44/633/0pc48/838/3s Bermuda 67/1957/13r62/1655/12pc Bogota65/1847/8r66/1845/7t Brussels46/737/2c45/730/-1r Budapest48/841/5sh50/1041/5rBuenos Aires 84/2868/20t75/2364/17r Cairo72/2255/12s74/2358/14s Calcutta 93/3375/23s97/3677/25s Calgar y37/217/-8c40/421/-6pc Cancun73/2257/13pc79/2657/13pc Caracas78/2566/18pc83/2868/20sCasablanca 65/18 48/8 sh 63/1751/10pc Copenhagen 43/637/2c43/639/3pc Dublin45/736/2r39/334/1snFrankfurt 50/10 34/1pc52/1136/2r Geneva50/1037/2c46/734/1r Halifax42/512/-11r26/-310/-12pcHavana 70/21 52/11 s79/2657/13s Helsinki32/025/-3sn34/128/-2sf Hong Kong 75/2366/18c79/2673/22s Islamabad85/2955/12c85/2954/12pc Istanbul50/1045/7pc59/1552/11pcJerusalem 52/1144/6c55/1243/6sh Johannesburg 76/24 55/12t74/2351/10s Kingston 82/27 72/22pc81/2772/22pc Lima86/3068/20pc84/2867/19sh London 48/8 36/2 r41/532/0c Madrid52/1136/2sh46/734/1r Manila90/3279/26c86/3075/23pc Mexico City79/2641/5s79/2641/5s Monterrey81/2755/12s86/3059/15sMontreal 14/-103/-16s19/-77/-13s Moscow 32/021/-6c30/-114/-10c Munich43/633/0c52/1133/0pc Nairobi89/3156/13sh91/3256/13s New Delhi93/3361/16s93/3361/16pc Oslo 36/227/-2c31/025/-3sn Paris 50/1037/2pc41/530/-1r Prague40/435/1c45/736/2c Rio de Janeiro90/3277/25pc89/3177/25s Riyadh70/2152/11pc77/2555/12s Rome57/1348/8sh61/1650/10r St. Thomas 83/28 74/23pc82/2772/22r San Juan90/3273/22t90/3265/18c San Salvador86/3061/16s94/3471/21s Santiago79/2650/10pc84/2852/11s Santo Domingo82/2769/20sh83/2867/19sh Sao Paulo90/3268/20pc91/3267/19t Seoul 45/732/0c50/1034/1pc Stockholm37/234/1c37/234/1sf Sydney82/2768/20pc79/2659/15sh T aipei 72/22 67/19sh75/2368/20sh Tokyo49/941/5r52/1145/7r Toronto22/-59/-12s30/-121/-6pc Trinidad86/3073/22t89/3174/23sh Vancouver47/837/2c47/841/5shVienna 48/8 44/6c53/1149/9sh Warsaw37/232/0c43/634/1c Winnipeg27/-217/-8pc32/019/-7sn HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayWednesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SSE at 10-20 Knots3-5 Feet7-10 Miles74F Wednesday:NW at 15-30 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:SSW at 12-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles74F Wednesday:NW at 15-30 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:SSW at 15-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-8 Miles74F Wednesday:NW at 15-30 Knots6-10 Feet7-10 Miles75F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 71/2144/6pc72/2245/7c Anchorage25/-313/-10sf24/-413/-10sn Atlanta 46/7 26/-3s59/1540/4s Atlantic City28/-211/-11s34/120/-6pc Baltimore27/-213/-10s36/223/-5pcBoston 27/-2 13/-10pc28/-218/-7s Buffalo18/-715/-9s29/-119/-7pc Charleston, SC47/826/-3s56/1333/0s Chicago36/220/-6pc40/430/-1pcCleveland 25/-3 13/-10s36/227/-2pc Dallas68/2051/10s81/2759/15s Denver71/2136/2pc67/1934/1pc Detroit28/-218/-7s37/227/-2c Honolulu80/2669/20pc78/2566/18cHouston 68/20 54/12 s76/2460/15s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayWednesday T odayWednesday T odayWednesday Indianapolis 35/123/-5s45/735/1pc Jacksonville55/1229/-1s61/1639/3s Kansas City 45/7 36/2s61/1645/7pc Las Vegas73/2250/10pc70/2148/8s Little Rock53/1135/1s64/1751/10pcLos Angeles 67/19 52/11pc64/1750/10c Louisville38/329/-1s52/1143/6pc Memphis49/939/3pc60/1553/11pc Miami68/2054/12s72/2259/15s Minneapolis 34/1 21/-6c36/226/-3pc Nashville43/625/-3s58/1443/6pc New Orleans57/1344/6s70/2158/14s New York23/-515/-9pc33/024/-4s Oklahoma City63/1747/8s76/2449/9s Orlando 63/17 39/3 s70/2145/7s Philadelphia25/-311/-11s33/022/-5pc Phoenix85/2959/15pc83/2858/14c Pittsburgh24/-410/-12s34/122/-5pc Portland, OR56/1337/2c51/1039/3sh Raleigh-Durham 35/117/-8s43/630/-1pc St. Louis40/431/0pc57/1344/6pcSalt Lake City 58/1438/3c54/1233/0c San Antonio 74/23 57/13 s82/2761/16s San Diego68/2056/13pc66/1855/12pc San Francisco58/1448/8r58/1446/7rSeattle 50/1037/2c48/839/3pc T allahassee 58/1428/-2s66/1837/2s Tampa62/1643/6s69/2050/10s Tucson85/2954/12pc82/2753/11c Washington, DC28/-218/-7s39/329/-1pc UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms RainFlurries Snow Ice AccuWeather.com

PAGE 24

O C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE PAGE 12B SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009 just this nce n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net WHEN love is wrapped up in a steamy night of passion, do the usual rules of what women want still apply? Compared to men, the average women today is looking for a partner who can make her laugh, is intelligent, has a sense of self, is someone who will make a good father and somewhere down the list, someone who is physically attractive. With most one-night-stands being con sidered a common and likely choice by the average man, most men find it hard to believe that women are just as capable of having a similar encounter, with no strings attached. Speaking with three women who shared their experiences of a one time chance encounter, Tribune Woman learned of some common rules of engagement when it comes to random encounters from the female perspective. All names have been changed. The first, a 26-year-old banker, Chanel Williams, said that contrary to the common belief, that one-nightstands are exclusive to men, women too are beings capable of handling a chance encounter without wanting anything else. “You’re basing the experience purely on attraction, but the question of whether he would make a good husband or father never even crossed my mind, it was only a bout fulfilling that need for that time.” Chanel recalls her steamy experience which happened when she was 18, where SEE page 10


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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com




TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009

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Shot ined as students

Clash With police officer

Altercation
near LW
Young Junior
High School

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

A GUNSHOT was fired when
schoolboys attacked an off-duty
police officer who attempted to
break up a knife fight near LW
Young Junior High School.

The altercation erupted just
minutes after classes ended at the
school in Bernard Road and a
group of boys, believed to be in
grade nine at the school, started
fighting on a side road immediate-
ly west of the school.

Police say an off-duty police
officer in the area stepped in to
break up the fight and confiscated
a knife from one of the boys.

An eye-witness told The Tri-
bune how the officer held one of
the boys while the others ran out
of the side road before returning to
launch an attack on the police offi-
cer.

He said: “After the boys ran
out another boy who didn't have a
shirt on ran into the yard and
grabbed two big rocks and burst
them through, he was going mad.

“He threw the rocks and burst
the man who was holding the boy
in the knee caps.

“As he came running back
through the corner a red police car
pulled up and bust a shot in the
air.”

Assistant Superintendent of
Police Walter Evans said the police

SEE page eight

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



FIREFIGHTERS PUT OUT A BLAZE on Dunmore Street yesterday that destroyed a wooden home.

No one was injured in the fire.

TB tests conducted in and

around Prince George Whart

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AT LEAST 18 people have
tested positive to being exposed
to tuberculosis in a series of tests
conducted in and around Prince
George Wharf.

According to sources at the site
who have been personally tested

The Taste

on

Tuesdays!!

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Valid only on Tuesdays!

over the last week, eight individ-
uals returned positive in one day,
with another 10 being identified
over the course of the screenings.

This number includes Defence
Force officers stationed at the
Port’s administration offices and
workers in and around the Port’s
Welcome Centre through which
hundreds of tourists funnel every
day.

Sources at the site explained
that those who have tested posi-
tive do not necessarily have TB at
this time, but have been exposed
to the infectious and often dead-
ly disease.

Classic symptoms of tubercu-
losis are a chronic cough with
blood-tinged sputum, fever, night
sweats and weight loss.

“Infection of other organs caus-
es a wide range of symptoms. The
diagnosis relies on radiology —
commonly chest X-rays — a
tuberculin skin test, blood tests, as
well as microscopic examination
and microbiological culture of
bodily fluids. Tuberculosis treat-
ment is difficult and requires long
courses of multiple antibiotics,” a
website on TB reads.

SEE page eight

Part of $200m

Timmy

fund downtown

revitalisation

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A $200 million loan being
arranged by government will
in part be put towards fund-
ing downtown revitalisation —
potentially including the pur-
chase of a significant amount
of property along the area’s
waterfront.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham elaborated on how
the loan, which he revealed
was being sought by the Gov-
ernment when he made his
mid-year budget statement to
Parliament last week, will be
spent in the House of Assem-
bly yesterday.

He said that government is
“proposing to enter into nego-
tiations with a view to pur-
chasing the Kelly’s (dock)
property and premises” locat-
ed on East Street and Woodes
Rodger’s Wharf, as well as a

SEE page eight












NIB files over 100
cases for back payments
in the past month

‘Multitude of businesses and
self employed owe money’

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE National Insurance Board has filed over 100 cases last
month before the courts of businesses or persons who owe the
Board monies in back payments, its director Algernon Cargill

revealed yesterday.

In an exclusive interview with The Tribune yesterday, Mr
Cargill revealed that there were a multitude of businesses and
self employed persons who owe the National Insurance

Board “quite a bit of money.”

These entities range from law firms, to jewellery companies,
and in terms of kind of businesses, Mr Cargill said that unfor-
tunately it is “just about every type”.

“This is the way it has been allowed to happen and now we
have to resolve it. And I can tell you that the National Insur-
ance Board is on a very proactive step to ensure that all
employers who owe money pay, and pay on time. Now to tell
you who owes, I can’t do that, but I can say there are quite a

SEE page eight



PM says CLICO policyholders
should still pay their premiums

CLICO (Bahamas) policy-
holders should still pay their pre-
miums to ensure possibility of
their policies being transferred to
another company, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said during a
communication in the House of
Assembly yesterday.

“Tf the Liquidator enters into
an agreement with a local insurer,
he can only transfer policies that

are in force and not those that
have lapsed due to non-pay-
ment,” Mr Ingraham said.
While the prime minister said
that it is still too early to deter-
mine whether or not policy hold-
ers will lose any money but it is
quite possible that all the policies
can be sold to a viable insurer

SEE page eight

Almost 200 Government IT
workers set to share $555,000

ALMOST 200 Government IT workers are
expected to share $555,000 set to be re-allocated
to the public service budget in the wake of a 2006

decision to increase their pay.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham noted this yes-
terday in the House of Assembly as he commented
on the reasons for the intended re-allocation of $9.5
million to the Department of the Public Service

from other ministries/agencies.

His comments came prior to Members of Parlia-
ment debating the mid-year budget report.

According to Minister of State with responsibili-
ty for the public service, Zhivargo Laing, govern-
ment decided to increase the worker’s pay in 2006

SEE page eight



Zhivargo Laing

Proposed unemployment assistance
Could he on stream by July 1st

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

NEARLY $20 million of pro-
posed unemployment assistance
could come on stream on July 1 to
provide eligible persons aid for up
to six and a half months, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham revealed yes-
terday.

Legislation to support this scheme
will be brought to Parliament as ear-
ly as this month, he added.

The scheme will allow qualified

epee ee cle ea to Fidelity DebtSAVER

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NASSAU AND BAHAME:A

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persons to claim 50 per cent of their
wages, providing they contributed to
the National Insurance Board (NIB)
while they were employed. Eligible
persons will receive this aid for 13
to 26 weeks. However it is still
unclear how government will deter-
mine who is eligible to receive this
support.

In order to sustain the continua-
tion of this scheme, government is
proposing a new fee which would
require employees and employers to

SEE page eight


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

STORE WIDE

Piero dat

m@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

a
UO
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is
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JONES Communication
Limited has until June 25 to
pay $180,000 in delinquent
National Insurance contribu-

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Company given date to pay
40% of $430,000 owed to NIB

tions that were collected from
the company’s employees, but
never handed over to the
Board, The Tribune has
learned.

Last week, Jones Commu-
nication’s CEO Wendall Jones
pleaded guilty to owing NIB
over $430,000 in back pay-
ments in Court 11 on Nassau
Street. The case was
adjourned to June 25.

According to the general
guidelines of the National
Insurance, the company has
up until that time to pay 40
per cent of the total amount
before any payment negotia-
tions can be entered into.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Director of NIB

re
ar Ta DI
AE

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The two
persons killed in a traffic
accident on Grand
Bahama are 64-year-old
Edwin Rolle of Freeport
and 45-year-old Lynn
Clarke of Deadman’s
Reef.

Rolle, a resident of No
57 Whymper Lane, was
driving a 1992 Chevy
Truck that crashed into
the Cumming Temple
AME Church on Settler’s
Way around 2.55pm on
Sunday.

It is believed that he
may have suffered a
seizure behind the wheel.
Clarke was a passenger in
the vehicle.

They were both fatally
injured at the scene. Their
deaths are recorded as
the fourth and fifth traffic
fatalities for the year on
Grand Bahama.

Traffic police are still
investigating the accident.

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Algernon Cargill refrained
from commenting on any one
entity that is in arrears with
payments to the Board.

However, he did outline
that NIB has started a very
“proactive” measure to ensure
that all employers who owe
money pay, “and pay on
time.”

“Now, to tell you who owes,
I can’t do that, but I can say
there are quite a significant
number of employers who
have not paid on time,” Mr
Cargill said.

The normal policy of NIB
is that 40 per cent of out-
standing payments — which
represents the funds that were
actually deducted from an
employee’s salary — be paid
before they can enter into an
agreement to replenish all oth-
er outstanding monies.

“That is why we insist on 40
per cent,” Mr Cargill said,
“because that is the amount
that was deducted from an
employee’s salary. That is
what they would have taken
from the employee and still
did not pay over to the Board.
So to enter into an agreement
we would at least require that
amount to be paid,” he said.

However, as there are cases
currently before the courts,
Mr Cargill said that he could
not comment any further on
the matter nor could he even
confirm — despite the fact
that it is now public knowl-
edge — that the board has
Jones Communication or any

Jones Communication must
pay $180,000 by June 25th

Algernon Cargill



other business before the
courts.

“But those who do owe the
NIB any amount of funds, our
normal policy is that the 40
per cent, which represents the
employee’s contribution that
was deducted and retained by
the employer, be paid into the
Board and any negotiations

would commence after
the employee’s portion be
paid.”

Mr Cargill said that in such
cases, an agreement must be
realised on these outstanding
monies before the court con-
venes again.

“Normally how it works is
that if any defendant is before
the courts, the court would
give a date to come back. By
the date the defendant comes
back the defendant should
have formalised an arrange-
ment with the Board. And the
only way to formalise an
arrangement is to pay the 40
per cent,” he said.

A source inside Jones Com-
munications told The Tribune
yesterday that the company is
financially viable and capable
of meeting its obligations.

Sea turtles campaigner
is receiving threats

ANIMAL welfare activist Jane Mather has been receiving tele-
phone threats over her campaign to halt the catching of sea turtles.

The threats have occurred several times over the past week, with one
caller saying: “We know where you live.”

Mts Mather, a leading animal campaigner in The Bahamas for many
years, has been a high-profile voice in the fight to save protected log-

gerhead turtles.

Some fishermen are angry at being deprived of income from turtles,
which have been an island delicacy for generations.
Mts Mather told The Tribune: “It’s quite unnerving to get threats, but

it’s not the first time.”

Some years ago, a policeman armed with a shotgun threatened Mrs
Mather over a campaign against ill-treatment of guard dogs.

As a result of the latest threats, she and her husband are tightening
security around their home. Police have been informed.

DNA expert, archaeologist to
speak at Heritage Day event

A DNA expert and an
archaeologist will be principal
speakers at a Heritage Day
event in Hope Town, Abaco,
this weekend.

Prof Peter Roberts, a
Bahamian lecturer at Georgia
State University, will speak on
genealogical research in The
Bahamas. He plans to offer
affordable DNA test kits to
those wishing to trace their
ancestry.

The second speaker, Roberts
Carr, is executive director of
Archaeological and Historical

Conservancy Inc., a Florida not-
for-profit organisation dedicat-
ed to investigating and preserv-
ing historic sites in Florida and
The Bahamas.

He is field director of the
Preacher’s Cave project in
Eleuthera.

Heritage Day is set for Sat-
urday, March 7, beginning at
9.30am. The theme is “All of
We Is One Family.”

Traditional Bahamian food
and local crafts will be on offer
together with youth and boating
activities.

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

0 In brief Fred Mitchell denies claim Bahamas was



New form needed
by workers for
short-term National
Insurance benefits

AS OF yesterday, all
claims submitted by work-
ers for short-term National
Insurance benefits must be
accompanied by a new
employers certification
form.

The new Med 4 form is a
single-sheet addition to the
Med 1, Med 1A and Med 2
forms. It requires the
employer to certify that an
employee is, was or will be
off from work for a stated
period.

Said the National Insur-
ance Board in a statement:
“In the past, only attending
physicians and claimants
were required to provide
information on claims for
sickness, maternity and
injury benefits. Unfortu-
nately, this permitted per-
sons to receive income-
replacement when they
were, in fact, not off from
work and were not losing
any income.

“To address this and to
improve the claims manage-
ment process, employers
are now required to confirm
the period that an employee
is off from work by means
of the new Med 4 form.
Claims for sickness, mater-
nity and injury benefits will
not be processed without
it.”

The processing time for
short-term benefits is cur-
rently pegged at three
working days. NIB said the
Med 4 form is not intended
to slow the process, but
rather to ensure that claims
are only approved for per-
sons who qualify.

The new form will be
among those that each
employer will be required
to have in his workplace.
Currently, all places of busi-
ness are required to keep
on-hand C10 (monthly con-
tribution statement) forms;
B60 (interim report of acci-
dent) forms; and B44
(employer’s report on acci-
dent at work) forms.

The new Med 4 form will
be placed on the board’s
website for easy access.

complicit with US in Aristide operation

m By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell has denied a book’s claim that The
Bahamas was complicit with the United
States in staging a clandestine operation that
resulted in the kidnapping and ultimate
removal from office of former president of
Haiti Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

The ex-minister has accused the book’s
author of a “grave libel” against The
Bahamas.

Randall Robinson, an American author, said in his
recent book, “An Unbroken Agony: Haiti, from Revo-
lution to the kidnapping of a President”, that Mr Mitchell
was “something of a lickspittle” or follower of the former
Assistant Secretary of State for the United States, Roger
Noriega.

Most renowned for his advocacy on behalf of Haitian
immigrants and the former president, Mr Robinson sug-
gested that Mr Aristide was “kidnapped” along with his
Haitian-American wife “by American soldiers and flown,
against his will, to the isolated Central African Republic.”

According to Mr Mitchell, the book outright suggests
that The Bahamas was complicit in this “scheme.”

However, the former minister said that both of these
assertions are totally “untrue.”

Admitting that he had received a call from a “US
official” on the night President Aristide is alleged to
have resigned (February 29, 2004), Mr Mitchell said he
was informed by the official that Mr Aristide had asked
the US for assistance in leaving the country.

According to Mr Mitchell, the official explained that
the US government had agreed to help, and that the
former president was at that very moment aboard an ait-
craft headed for “an undisclosed location.” At the time,



Fred Mitchell

he said, the US was looking for a country
that would take the former president but
had not yet found one.

“The official asked would the Bahamas
be willing to accept Mr Aristide,” Mr Mitchell
said. “A foreign minister could not decide
this. Was this Mr Aristide’s wish? Why would
the United States not give him asylum? The
official said US law prohibited it.”

Mr Mitchell said he called K D Knight,
Jamaica’s then foreign minister, who
informed him that he had spoken to Mr Aris-
tide just a day earlier and at that time there
was “no hint of resignation.”

Mr Mitchell again denied that The
Bahamas was complicit in any scheme to overthrow
Haiti’s government.

“Tt is interesting that Haiti’s opposition accused us of
exactly the opposite, of in fact propping up Mr Aris-
tide,” Mr Mitchell said.

“That, too, was not true. Poverty drives thousands of
illegal migrants to leave the north of Haiti every year and
pass through The Bahamas. Many stay in The Bahamas
to the extent that our country can claim to host more
Caricom nationals than any other Caricom nation.

“We believed that the legitimate government of Haiti
had been overthrown. We made it clear, though, that we
had to deal with whomever held the power in Haiti. The
alternative was to risk the stability of our country by
being overrun with illegal migrants. Caricom accepted
this.

“During the 2004 crisis, The Bahamas and Caricom
sought support from South Africa to help the Haitian
police force to restore order. I appeared at the United
Nations with K D Knight of Jamaica just before Mr
Aristide’s departure to seek troops from the United
Nations to stop the insurrection. The political opposition
in Haiti denounced us. Mr Robinson’s book gravely
libels our country,” he said.

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GB Power Company accused of violating Act

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Common-
wealth Electrical Workers Union is
accusing Grand Bahama Power
Company of violating the Industrial
Relations Act by hiring temporary
meter readers without notifying the
union.

Keith Knowles, president of the
CEWU, said the union received no
formal notification from manage-
ment concerning the employment
of the three Bahamians who were
brought in to work on Monday.

“We were totally in the dark and
we think that itis disrespectful. ..and
a display of poor relations on the
part of the company,” said Mr
Knowles.

There are currently 10 meter read-
ers on staff at the Power Company in
Freeport. There are concerns over
job security, salary increases and pro-
motions.

Mr Knowles said that many of the

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current meter-men have not been
elevated to the next level of classifi-
cation in meter reading even though
they are performing at that level.

He believes that it is unfair that
the meter men are being expected to
train the temporary workers to read
meters and learn the routes, putting
their jobs at risk.

“They are performing duties of
the next classification and are only
getting the minimal salary, and we
have instructed them not to conduct
any training at this time.

“What is of concern is that we are
now faced with a global crisis and
there are so many uncertainties rel-
ative to job losses, terminations, lay-
offs, etc.

Mr Knowles believes that the
Power Company wants to increase
the number of daily disconnections
on the island.

He felt that the Power Company
should have consulted with the union
before hiring additional meter read-
ers.

President Knowles claims that the

-15, 2009 - East Street Tabernacle

company breached the Industrial
Relations Act, referring to the sched-
ules of the code of industrial rela-
tions practice Chapter 321 of the
Industrial Relations Statues of Laws
of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

He noted that Part One of the
Third Schedule states that good
industrial relations are the joint
responsibility of management and
employees and trade unions repre-
senting them.

Mr Knowles also pointed out that
the act calls for communication and
consultation between management
and trade unions in times of change.

“These codes of conduct mandat-
ed by law are very serious and
should be adhered to.

“We are, therefore, requesting the
Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes to
put a stop to these employers who
violate these codes,” he said.

The Tribune contacted the Power
Company’s executive office for com-
ments, but our call was not returned
up to press time on Monday.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Lavish expensive embassy in Cuba

‘$1 million missing’ from embassy funds —
Hundreds of thousands missing from Ministry of
Housing — Minister says report supports ‘visa
scam’ allegations at Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

These Tribune headlines yesterday are
enough to make a nation angry at the cavalier
manner in which their hard-earned taxes have
been handled, especially at a time like this when
the country is strapped for cash.

The Tribune’s articles were gleaned from
the Auditor General’s report for the 2006/2007
fiscal year. It’s now 2009 and Bahamians are
just finding out about the lack of cooperation
given the Auditor as he tried to follow a paper
trail of the public’s disappearing funds. These
funds — recorded as missing — are still unac-
counted for. We hope government will not leave
their whereabouts in limbo forever.

The Auditor says his staff cannot account for
about a million dollars worth of funds claimed
to have been spent on the Bahamas embassy in
Cuba. Maybe he should go to Havana and take
a look.

“This is the fanciest embassy of any
Caribbean country that I have been to!” a wide-
eyed Caribbean ambassador commented to a
Tribune reporter in December. The occasion
was the Caricom conference held in Havana.

The Auditor’s report, tabled in the House,
said that included in the unaccounted for million
was $300,000 transferred to the operational
account of the Consulate General in Miami
“for the purchase of necessary furnishings for
the official residence (of the Bahamian Ambas-
sador to Cuba) and the embassy.”

Reviewing these accounts the auditors said
they were “unable to verify the accuracy” of a
listing of items purchased with the money as
they were “not provided with adequate docu-
mentation to determine items purchased and
how much was spent.”

Another sum of $335,000 was “transferred to
a bank account in Cuba with regard to the estab-
lishment of the office in Cuba.” And said the
auditors: “Due to inadequate record keeping
(they) could not verify how this money was
spent.”

Another item auditors recommended should
be reconciled involved $274,000 also spent on
the embassy and handled through the Con-
sulate in Miami. “Six blank/open cheques drawn
on the Ministry’s account (Consulate General,
Miami) were also for the Cuban embassy. We
were unable to verify what the cheques were
used for. The normal purchasing procedures

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were not followed,” said the auditors. One of
our reporters, who has been to Cuba on assign-
ment three times since 2006, watched the
embassy in the making. She saw the finished
product in December and marvelled at the fur-
nishings and lavish appointments. Money, she
said, was obviously no object, “it was really
over the top.”

The dark highly polished furniture and wood
paneling — probably mahogany — was the
highlight of the ambassador’s office and recep-
tion area. Visitors waiting in the reception room
sat on no ordinary chairs — Oh, no! exclaimed
our reporter, these were heavy, expensive look-
ing upholstered chairs carved from a dark wood.

The public areas were lavish, she said — the
reception area, dining room and living room.
She thought it was a “lot of fancy stuff” to be
put in one office, she said in describing the
ambassador’s office.

Former Immigration Director Vernon Bur-
rows probably doesn’t know what cloud he has
landed on after being catapulted from the rab-
bit-warren-like offices of Immigration to the
plush Bahamian embassy and residence in Cuba
as ambassador.

As he took the delegation on a tour of the
four-bedroom residence — he still had to decide
which room he would call his own — he mar-
velled at the size of the kitchen’s pantry.

The large kitchen, obviously designed to be
used to prepare menus for official functions,
was staffed by three Cuban women, who smiled
and waved as the delegates were taken through
their kitchen.

There was also a smaller kitchen, probably
used for every day fare.

It was an embassy, designed obviously to
make a statement about a people puffed up
with their own importance with more money to
show off than common sense.

Or is it the image that our former foreign
minister Fred Mitchell thinks should reflect the
importance of the Bahamian people — a people
many of whom are now jobless and living in a
country that probably does not have one foreign
embassy to match the one furnished for it in
Cuba by the PLP government.

No wonder when Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham saw this eye-opening expense tick-
et, paid for by the Bahamas Treasury, he had to
change his mind about closing the Bahamas’
embassy in Cuba.

Too much of the people’s money has been
invested in it, he said.



PLP must stop
sitting on the
political wall

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There have been recent arti-
cles giving the former Prime
Minister the inside track on
securing his leadership in the
opposition party.

The most recent offering
suggests that his position will
not be contested in the
upcoming convention.

This may be good for the
stability of the party, and I
agree with John Marquis and
Oswald Brown that his posi-
tion is secured; but I do not
think that it is best for his par-
ty or this country.

If Mr Christie continues in
the mode we have been accus-
tomed to, it will only help the
FNM, and while I congratu-
late the FNM and Mr Ingra-
ham on the job they are doing,
the PLP needs to wake up and

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



smell the cerassee. I want to
reiterate, the PLP will not be
able to make a credible show-
ing if they continue standing
on the sidewalk or sitting on
the wall, waiting for an
“event” to milk or get political
mileage.

Those things show up, but it
is best that when they do, they
meet you “busy”, and not just
busy with snide and sarcastic
remarks. Political bystander-
ing.

It is time for the nation’s
finest to employ the intellect
they talk so much about.

If you are the best party, the
country has ever seen, let’s see
it demonstrated.

We need to see the begin-
nings of transition within the
party.

Our history is clear on this
issue, the last two leaders of
substance in this nation have
been outsiders who went
against convention and put the
nation before the party and
inspired a majority of the pop-
ulace.

Can the PLP show the
nation that it is not about the
party? That it is not about per-
sons who see their relevance
in being “nice” and all those
other descriptive terms peo-
ple use to mask their inability
to address the problems and
issues that are real. We are
going to see.

EDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau,
February 27, 2009.

Where is registrar of companies,
where is the board of BISX?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Richard Coulson’s comments City Markets;
let chips fall were they may in your February
26, edition sort of indicates that we could be
heading for a major closure of a retailer which
will have a considerable economic and social

impact.

I don’t agree with Mr Coulson’s suggestion
that Winn Dixie Stores (Bahamas) had any
moral, ethical or legal reason to advise their
minority shareholders of their intent to sell —
that was very public and the Winn Dixie share-
holding private. Further the sale of those shares
did not require the approval of a general meet-

ing.

What is required however is that the cur-
rent board is and must hold annually an annu-
al general meeting — present to the share-
holders an Independent Audit report — nom-
inate and elect directors annually — appoint

the Auditors annually.

cent shareholders do have a legal case against
the Board as a result. Will the company be

actually in business in June, 2009 that is what
the employees, shareholders and the public
need to know?

Now Neal & Massy from Trinidad own seem-
ingly 60 per cent of BSL Holdings, admitted by

J Barry Farrington in his Guardian interview.

I notice that Bahamas Supermarkets shares
dropped from the artificial value for months
now of $15.60 to $8.42 but in the real world
without any dividends I suggest the shares on
facts not fiction might be worth 8.42 cents.

Where is the registrar of companies — where
is the board of BISX?

We have already had one corporate closure

loss.

It is very clear the current chairman from

his recent comment to The Nassau Guardian
has no immediate intention of doing any of
the above so, in my opinion, the minority 27 per

Nassau,

this week let’s not have another which will
affect over 800 employees and, of course, eco-
nomically impact the Bahamas Hotel Employ-
ees Pension fund who have a $25 million invest-
ment in BSL Holdings which would be a total

T HUTCHINSON
February 26, 2009.

Come out and be a part of the historic
National Torchbearers Youth Association

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To realise the voice of a
young people is to realise a
dream.

To understand the past and
present struggles of a nation is
to lay the foundation of an

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awesome and dynamic future.

We have toiled long and
hard and know that anything
worth fighting for is a pros-
perous gain.

We know a danger of a
voiceless youth is to kill the
spirit of a country.

We know that to give up in
the face of adversity is to
admit defeat to fear, injustice
and poverty of the mind.

In light of the recent Gen-
eral Election of the Free
National Movements youth
arm, The National Torch-
bearers Youth Association, a
heartfelt congratulations is
due to all those duly elected
officers whose primary goal is
to deliver a message carried
by the darlings of our
Bahamaland with the under-
lying tones of peace, unity and
a selfless drive that prospers
all who seek the betterment
of this country.

As our organisation experi-
ences this paradigm shift, we

the general members, a major-
ity’s voice, accepted democ-
racy as the structure to house
our right to choose and re-
elected Mr Jamal Moss to lead
as President of our historic
organisation.

His commitment to lead a
mass choir of young dynam-
ics supports his vision that one
day we can harmonise the
songs of triumph and success,
pitching our common goals as
key notes in our melody.

The National Torchbearers
Youth Association meets
every second and fourth
Wednesday of the month at
7.30pm at the FNM Head-
quarters on Mackey Street.

We invite you to come out
and be a part of our historic
organisation where your voic-
es can be heard.

AKITA
LIGHTBOURNE
Nassau,

February, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 5



MP claims he has evidence that

a Cabinet Minister is corrupt

PM: Miss Universe Pageant
will expose Bahamas to its
largest global audience

A FOUR-MONTH period this summer
will see the country “exposed to a larger
global audience than at any time in the
history of the Bahamas”, according to
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham made this observation as
he confirmed that on August 30 2009, as
prefaced in The Tribune on Saturday, the
Bahamas will host the Miss Universe
Pageant — an event which attracts millions
of viewers worldwide.

The staging of the global beauty pageant
will take place three months after hun-
dreds of visitors will descend on the
Bahamas for the 59th Congress of the
International Federation of Association
Football (FIFA), another event which Mr
Ingraham said would “pump millions” into
the national economy.

The FIFA conference, scheduled to take place at Atlantis in late
May/early June 2009, will draw delegates, conference organisers
and 250 representatives of the international media.

It will follow on the heels of the Commonwealth Local
Government Conference, scheduled for May 11 -— 14 in Grand
Bahama.

Last week Mr Ingraham tabled a bill seeking to reallocate $5.4
million to the Ministry of Tourism for the remainder of the
2008/2009 budgetary period for advertising in non-US markets, web
development and hosting of the pageant.

Mr Ingraham said that the Ministry of Tourism wished to express
its thanks and appreciation to the private sector, whose commit-
ments in relation to the Miss Universe pageant mean that the
“cost to the government of the Bahamas has been significantly
reduced.”

Meanwhile, he added that even though Atlantis will be the pri-
mary venue for the event, the “full breadth of the Bahamas will be
exposed to a large global audience”, with prospective beauty
queens touring the islands in advance of the final show.

“We note that in our current economic condition the promo-
tional value of these events is considerable,” said Mr Ingraham.

The additional money expected to be allocated to the Ministry
of Tourism bring its total funds for the 2008/2009 budgetary peri-
od to $97 million.

The prime minister noted that this includes $4 million original-
ly intended to go towards the ministry’s efforts in relation to a num-
ber of “anchor projects which didn’t come about”, which was
therefore allowed to be spent on advertising.

Asked yesterday which projects he was referring to, Mr Ingra-
ham declined to comment, saying he had said all he had intended

- Mitchell says
Tribune headline

LO eM NOTE UE



was inaccurate

FORMER Minister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell held a press
conference to address what he
called the “inaccuracy” of the
headline in yesterday’s Tribune.

The headline, which read “$1
million missing’ from embassy
funds”, was followed a story based
on comments made by the Audi-
tor General in his 2006/2007 report
about funds said to have been
expended towards the establish-
ment of a Bahamian embassy in
Cuba during Mr Mitchell’s tenure.

Mr Mitchell said: “The head-
line does not reflect what the sto-
ry itself says and neither does the
Auditor General’s report say that
a million dollars is missing.”

“In the report, it points out
irregularities in the procedures
which meant that on the particular
day or days the audit was done,
certain documentation was not
available to prove and to trace
how the funds were actually spent.
It is possible that the very next
day the information was available.

“When you say funds are miss-
ing it gives the impression that
there was theft or malfeasance
when there was none. Certainly
none that I was aware of.”

He noted that the report does
not suggest any malfeasance.

Mr Mitchell said that with the
PLP having “carriage of the Pub-
lic Accounts Committee” he
intends to refer the matter to that
committee “so we can get more
specific answers with regard to the
comments of the Auditor Gener-
al.”

Yesterday’s Tribune story noted
that according to the Auditor

General, $300,000 was transferred
to the operational account of the
Bahamas Consulate General in
Miami to buy furnishings for the
official residence of the Bahamian
Ambassador to Cuba and the
embassy. However, auditors
reviewing the accounts said they
were “unable to verify the accu-
racy” of a listing of items pur-
chased with the money as they
were “not provided with adequate
documentation to determine items
purchased and how much was
spent.”

Meanwhile, $335,000 was not-
ed by auditors to have been
“transferred to a bank account in
Cuba with regard to the establish-
ment of the office in Cuba” — but
“due to inadequate record keeping
(they) could not verify how this
money was spent.”

A section of the report relating
to the Bahamas Consulate Gen-
eral in Miami notes that according
to auditors, $274,000 was also
“spent on behalf of the Embassy’s
office in Cuba”. It adds: “this
amount should be reconciled.”

Auditors also said they were
“unable to verify” what six blank
cheques, drawn on a ministry
account in relation to the Cuba
Embassy, were used for. “The nor-
mal purchasing procedures were
not followed,” said the report.

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m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A CROSS-AISLE war of
words broke out in the
House of Assembly yester-
day after a PLP MP claimed
he had evidence that a Cab-
inet Minister is corrupt.

Frank Smith’s threat -
which prompted Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
to challenge him to imme-
diately “name and shame”
any of his ministers if he
has the evidence - was
aborted shortly after when
the St Thomas More MP
was called on to explain the
nature of the evidence he
had and which Cabinet
minister he was referring
to.

The episode began when
Mr Smith claimed that he
has documentary evidence
from the Customs Depart-
ment showing that “one of
(Mr Ingraham’s) own Cab-
inet ministers is corrupt and
he refuses to deal with it.”

“T will table these docu-
ments,” he said, holding

Frank Smith’s
threat prompts
war of words

several sheets of paper in
one raised hand.

At this point, members of
the Opposition called on
him to explain the nature
of the documents he intend-
ed to table before he did so.

Mr Smith said: “I’ve said
what I’ve said - (the prime
minister’s) asked for these
documents before and ’m
bringing them now.

“Twill provide the proof.
Here’s the proof and he can
determine which minister it
is.

The St Thomas More MP
then launched into a con-
tinuation of his contribu-
tion on the mid-year bud-
get report, causing govern-
ment MPs to call on the
House Speaker to interject
and make Mr Smith explain
himself or withdraw his
statement about corruption

Frank Smith

from the record.
Education Minister and
MP for Seabreeze Carl
Bethel said: “He has made
an allegation that someone
in Cabinet is corrupt and
he’s waving around some
paper - we can’t just move
on. He must specify. He
must be called upon to jus-
tify what he’s saying. Name
the person as he was chal-
lenged to do or withdraw
the statement entirely.”
Mr Smith responded with



saying that “this is as far as
I’m going to go today.”

“If you take exception to
me laying these documents
on the table, which are duly
executed documents, then
I think we have a problem.

“Mr Speaker, if you take
a look at the documents
you will see, you can read
the evidence,” he said,
again not specifying which
Cabinet minister he was
making the corruption alle-
gation about.

The Speaker of the
House, Alvin Smith, then
pushed the MP again, ask-
ing “what is the document
saying.”

The St Thomas More MP
then concluded his efforts,
stating “ll deal with this
another time,” causing gov-
ernment MPs to be heard
complaining that he had not
substantiated his statement.

At the prompting of the
Speaker, Mr Smith then
agreed to withdraw his
statement about corruption
within the Cabinet before
continuing with his contri-
bution to the budget
debate.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Effects of winter storm
reach Florida airports

m@ FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.

THE MASSIVE late winter snowstorm pummeling the
Northeast has caused dozens of flight cancelations and delays
as long as five hours at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood Inter-
national Airport, according to Associated Press.

An airport spokesman says 24 outbound flights and 28
incoming ones have been nixed as of Monday afternoon.
Gregory Meyer says the longest delays have been for flights
leaving to the airports in Baltimore, Philadelphia and New
York’s LaGuardia.

Hundreds of flights nationwide have been canceled because
of the storm. The weather is also blamed for four deaths. Pow-
er outages have been a problem in New Jersey, Virginia and
the Carolinas, where more than 300,000 customers have been
without electricity.

r

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

MURDER accused Dwight
Knowles and Sean Brown
both surrendered to police
custody after learning that
they were wanted in connec-






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tion with the February 2006
homicide of businessman Kei-
th Carey, two police officers
testified yesterday.

Brown turned himself into
police in the Berry Islands and
Knowles surrendered to police
at his lawyer’s office here in
New Providence, the court
heard yesterday.

Both men, along with Jamal

Glinton, are accused of the
murder and also face charges
of armed robbery and con-
spiracy to commit armed rob-
bery.
Keith Carey, 43, was
gunned down on the steps of
the Bank of the Bahamas on
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway on February 27,
2006. He was killed before he
was able to deposit money
that belonged to the gas sta-
tion that he operated.

Inspector Kenry Stubbs told
the court yesterday that on
March 20, 2006, a slim, dark
skinned man came into the
Berry Islands police station
claiming that he was the one
police were looking for in con-
nection with the murder of Mr
Carey. Inspector Stubbs told
the court that the man, whom
he subsequently identified as
Sean Brown, was searched.
He testified that Brown was
asked to remove a bandage
from his right hand, revealing

that he had only a thumb on
that hand. The witness told
the court that Brown claimed
that he had received the injury
during a traffic accident in
Eleuthera in 2005.

Inspector Stubbs testified
that he later went to a motel in
Great Harbour Cay where the
owner gave him a receipt in
the name of Sean Morley. He
said that the room in which
Brown had been staying was
searched, but with negative
results.

Inspector Stubbs told the
court that Brown was later
brought to New Providence
and handed over to the Cen-
tral Detective Unit.

Information

Detective Sergeant
Franklyn Hinsey told the
court that on March 7, 2006,
while on duty at the Central
Detective Unit, he received
information regarding a sus-
pect wanted in connection
with the murder of Mr Carey.

He told the court that
around 6.39pm, he, Inspector
Fernander and another offi-
cer went to the law office of
attorney Cecil Hilton. There,
he said, Mr Hilton handed
over his client Dwight
Knowles, who also goes by the

Pair accused of murder
‘turned themselves in after
learning they were wanted’

aliases of Dwight Morrison,
Dwight Morley and Derek
Knowles.

Detective Hinsey told the
court that he arrested
Knowles and cautioned him.
Detective Hinsey told the
court that Knowles said, “My
lawyer told me to tell y’all
about what happened at the
Bank of the Bahamas, Har-
rold Road, when the man got
shot.”

Detective Hinsey told the
court that he subsequently
transported Knowles to the
Central Detective Unit.

Knowles’ attorney Perry
Albury suggested during
cross-examination that his
client had not said what the
officer claimed he did. Detec-
tive Hinsey, however, stuck
by his testimony.

The trial has been
adjourned until Thursday at
10am.

Deputy director of Public
Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-
Bethel, Stephanie Pintard,
Anthony Delaney and Lennox
Coleby are prosecuting the
case.

Attorneys Craig Butler and
Devard Francis are repre-
senting Jamal Glinton, attor-
ney Dorsey McPhee is repre-
senting Sean Brown and attor-
ney Perry Albury is repre-
senting Dwight Knowles.

TRU eee aL



WORKERS TAKE UP seaweed from Long Wharf Beach as part of the Ministry of the Environment’s

beautification programme.

m@ By GLADSTONE
THURSTON

THE R M Bailey Park is
to be transformed into a
recreational facility similar
to the Fish Fry at Nassau’s
Western Esplanade, Minis-
ter of the Environment Earl
Deveaux Said.

“We want to create a last-

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ing recreational value in all
our public places by stimu-
lating economic activity and
putting people to work doing
things that help improve the
ambiance of our natural
environment,” said Mr
Deveaux.

In a weekend interview,
the minister updated the
media on the government’s
beautification and clean-up
programme launched in
downtown Nassau on
December 9, 2008.

Mr Deveaux said the Envi-
ronmental Court will be
made operational again to
address littering and indis-
criminate dumping.

Objectives

The beautification and
clean-up programme has two
main objectives — to provide
jobs for unemployed persons
and to address “increased
criticism about the filth in
New Providence,” Mr
Deveaux said.

“We are now entering a
phase where you will sce us
in Bain and Grant’s Towns
taking out derelict vehicles
and garbage from junkanoo
shacks, residential areas and
business places,” he said.

New native Bahamian
trees are going to be planted
in parks and along the high-
ways’ median strips.

“We will keep the pro-
gramme going but in a sus-
tainable way where the road
verges, parks and beaches
will be cleaned,” said Mr
Deveaux.

He said there will be
boardwalks created at places
like the R M Bailey Park
“where we expect that they
would look similar to the

Fish Fry where we would
have benches, observation
places and parking spaces.”

Already the ministry has
advertised its schedule for
regular residential garbage
collection utilising new
equipment.

Also, there is a pro-
gramme for householders
and business operators to
have their garbage disposed
of into the landfill, he said,
adding that those who indis-
criminately litter will be
prosecuted.

There is already approval
for the Environmental Court
to meet on Saturdays.

“There is a large element
of public education that is
going to be important,” said
the minister, “but our first
duty is to dispose of the lit-
ter and have such means
available to the general pub-
lic in a way that it is not a
burden to them.”

The response to the pro-
gramme, he said “has been
tremendous.”

The Ministry of Tourism
complimented the effort and
the government praised the
Department of Environ-
mental Health Services,
headed by director Melony
McKenzie.

“We are more than
pleased that we are getting
the kind of support in the
public domain from the
clients we are seeking to
serve,” said Mr Deveaux.

“We believe it will only
get better.

“As we make bins avail-
able, as we make the routine
of garbage collection and
disposal better, people will
respond accordingly.

“Everybody is happier in a
cleaner, healthier environ-
ment.”
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 7



Abaco launches Bahamas

Christian Network on TV

ABACO officially became the first Family Island
to launch a television station with the opening of the
Bahamas Christian Network on the weekend.

Attending the official launch on Saturday in Dun-
das Town, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham com-
mended Silbert and Dolly Mills on this achieve-
ment.

“T am happy to join Silbert and Dolly Mills on the
occasion of the official opening of the Bahamas
Christian Network television station here in Dundas
Town, Abaco. Silbert, you are a trailblazer and an
entrepreneur extraordinaire. You make your fami-
ly and friends and our community here in Abaco
very proud of your vision and your accomplish-
ments. And of course, as a descendant of Mayagua-
na, you are a source of pride for all Mayaguani-
ans,” Mr Ingraham said.

The prime minister said that he is extremely
impressed with the new television station and has not
seen its like anywhere in the Bahamas.

“T’ve not been in a station in the Bahamas like this
before and I have been to them all. Now the entire
Bahamas is going to be exposed to Pastor Mills’
immense talent and programming. I am confident
that Pastor Mills will deliver a television service
which will make not only Abaco, but the

Bahamas proud.

“T commend both Dolly and Pastor Mills for their
hard work and commitment to excellence, principles
which have served them well in the operation of all
their business undertakings,” he said.

Minister of National Security and Minister with
responsibility for broadcasting Tommy Turnquest
said that this new television station opens new vistas
for Abaco and gives the island a new voice.

“What the people of Abaco will watch, and the
new voice it will hear, will come to them from the
Bahamas Christian Network, BCN, with Mr Silbert
Mills at its helm. It has been said that with the con-
stant need for information, changes in lifestyles,
economic and social advancement, and the demands
on families and working parents, television is step-
ping into many of the traditional roles of the family,
the church and schools.

“BCN has determined that programmes reflective
of our status as a Christian nation is what will guide
any influence it would exercise here in Abaco.

“Mr Mills and Radio Abaco have already distin-
guished themselves by providing important media
service on Abaco, including the news insert on the
island aired by an existing television station,” Mr
Turnquest said.

Postal worker retires after 40 years of service

m@ By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

AFTER 40 years of service to
the Bahamas Post Office Depart-
ment, Dolores Pinder officially
retires today.

She joined the Post Office
Department as a dispatcher in the
Sands Road location and climbed
the ranks to retire as senior super-
intendent of the Cable Beach
Post Office, a post she has held
for seven years.

“I did the work of the senior
officer when I started working at
the Post Office. I enjoyed it and
learned a lot. I was responsible
for registered mail between Nas-

relationships she formed particu-
larly during her tenure at the
Cable Beach branch.

“T interacted with a lot of
clients and made many friends
and formed lasting relationships.
To this day I still communicate
with some of them and I also
communicate with former co-
workers who left the Post Office,”
said Mrs. Pinder.

One of those persons is Tina
Johnson, a client who resides in
Mayaguana. Another was a Visi-
tor from Bermuda who acciden-
tally left her wallet in the Post
Office. After receiving a phone
call from Mrs Pinder she later

sau and the Family Islands. Then
Isorted the mail to and from the
Family Islands. I continued in reg-
istered mail then moved to the
stamp counter,” said Mrs Pinder.

She worked at the Shirley
Street branch for five months, the
Penny Savings Bank section, and
she held brief stints at the post
office in Clarence Bain building.

Mrs Pinder said that with the
exception of an ancillary worker,
she was the first woman to be
employed in the dispatching
department then located on
Sands Road.

“T worked with men like Mr



Letisha Henderson/BIS

DELORES PINDER, a 40-year postal
worker retires from the Public Service.

Lunn, Kenneth Moss and Charles
Williams and other men. I did not
encounter any discrimination as
the first female in that area. The
heavy mail bags had to be lifted,
but the men did that. We had a
good relationship. They didn’t
show me any disrespect. I enjoyed
working with men,” she said.
Mrs Pinder has fond recollec-
tions of her years in the public
service. Included in them are the

returned to collect it and they
have been friends ever since.

Asked to describe her 40 years
of service, Mrs Pinder said, “I
enjoyed my work. You have to
like what you do. If I had to do it
all over again I would do it the
same way.”

Prior to going on pre-retire-
ment leave, Mrs Pinder received a
plaque and a gift from Postmaster
General Godfrey Clarke. She also
attended a four-day pre-retire-
ment planning seminar organised
by the Department of Public Ser-
vice which she said she thor-
oughly enjoyed.

aw

Kelare

we ama
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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Pj der: Tyneral Home

vier Beyond ‘Miaurere”

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570) 993-1951 * CELL: 357-4617

FANNIE PINDER President

A Memorial Service

for the late
Sylvia
Cole-

will be held at 4:00pm at Pinder's
Palmdale
Palmdale, Rev. Charles Sweeting will

Funeral Home

be officiating. She is survived

brothers, Robert and Charles (Chuck)
Hall; two sisters, Theodora (Teddy)
Albury and Joan Graham; two sister-in-
law, Jean and June Hall; one brother-in-
law, Gary Albury; two granddaughters,

FROM page one

company also owns.

ham said.

FROM page one

he saw the large crowd of school.
boys surrounding the police offi

alr.

as the shot was fired. No one
was injured.

According to eyewitnesses,
around six police cars and a
police bike arrived at the scene
near 3 G’s Snacks on Bernard
Road following the incident,
but no arrests were made.

ASP Evans said investiga-
tors are following significant
leads and key players have
been identified.

A schoolgirl in grade eight
at LW Nash said students were
shaken by the shooting just
metres from the school around
five minutes after the final
school bell sounded at 3.10pm.

She said most pupils were in
the schoolyard waiting to be
collected when they heard the
gunfire.

“T was scared,” she said.

“T thought someone was
coming running down here to
shoot up.

“Everyone had just come
out of school so the majority of
children were out here.

“A lot of people went to see
what happened but when I
reached everything was fin-
ished.”

Ave.,

by her two

Jessica and Wendy Guy; four nephews,

Jock and Richard Hall, Stuart and lan

Graham; six nieces, Valerie

Albury, Dawn Walkine, Linda Hall,
Sheila Scott and Erin Paniagua.

Totally Yours,
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FROM page one

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dilapidated building on Bay Street which the

“We expect that owner will either cause his
property to be developed or consider selling it
to government or the government will con-
sider what is in the public interest,” he said.

Mr Ingraham added that one of the options
being considered by the Government as it
moves ahead with the revitalisation of the
downtown area is extending Woodes Rodger’s
Wharf as far as Armstrong Street.

“Whether there will simply be a boardwalk
or if there’ll be vehicular traffic up to some
point (has yet to be determined),” Mr Ingra-

Shot fired

officer had been passing when



cer and took the initiative to }
intercede by firing a shot in the :

The boys ran from the scene

Part of $200m loan

The Prime Minister previously informed
parliament that the loan would go towards
filling the gap left by a 7.6 per cent shortfall in
revenue compared to forecasts for the first six
months of the 2008/2009 budgetary period —
amounting to $51.6 million — and to funding
Government’s “stimulus programme,” con-
sisting of accelerated capital works projects.

Yesterday he also confirmed that one of
the capital projects specifically set to be fund-
ed by the loan will be the dredging work
required at Nassau Harbour to make way for
some of the world’s largest cruise ships to dock
there by the end of this year.

According to the Prime Minister, bids from

FROM page one

significant number of employers
who have not paid on time,” Mr
Cargill said.

In its efforts to enhance con-
tribution payments, and bring
about effective changes at NIB,
the Board recently completed
its 8th Actuarial Review, which
called for the strengthening of
penalties for late or non-pay-
ment of contributions and “to
introduce new legal measures
such as garnishing to assist the
compliance effort.”

In his address to the Rotary
Club of West Nassau last
month, Mr Cargill foreshad-
owed these recent develop-
ments.

Mr Cargill: “You might be
aware of our increased efforts
to ensure delinquent employers
honour their NIB contributions.
While legal measures are our
last resort, and the Courts are
utilized only as a last resort, we
are seeing a significant increase

FROM page one

The Tribune tried to reach Ministry of Health

added.

NIB files over
100 cases for
back payments
in the past month

in legal cases and, in fact, incar-
cerations.

“The ability of the Board to
take effective punitive measures
will be critical going forward,
because, unfortunately, many
of the 16,000 employers in this
country (that includes busi-
nesses and self-employed per-
sons) are not paying contribu-
tions regularly or at all. And
many who are paying are not
paying on time,” he said.

While non-compliance places
workers in a very precarious
position, NIB’s fund is designed
to protect employees, and as
such is obligated to pay benefits
even if the employer is behind
on their contributions, Mr
Cargill revealed.

international firms to conduct the work are
now being evaluated.

He said Government expects to award the
contract by early April, for work to begin by
July 1, 2009, and to be completed by around
October.

As aresult of dredging, he added, between
six and 14 acres of new land may be created.
He said that 1,200 feet of additional land will
be formed at Arawak Cay and will be bulk-
headed — a “very expensive operation,” he

Downtown redevelopment will require
“hefty public sector investment of up to $100
million,” said the Prime Minister, as he invited
members of parliament to give their views on
the issue as they contribute to the mid-year
budget debate.

Almost 200 govt
IT workers set to
share $555,000
FROM page one

and the payments will be
retroactive to 2004.

Mr Laing said the decision
affects those workers in the
public service payscale D.

“That’s where you put all
of the people who work in the
information technology area.
Those scales were created
many years ago and really the
kind of work IT people do
today is far more expansive
than what they would’ve been
called to do in that D scale
(before).

“So they’re now upgrading
the scale so the compensation
for the scale is enhanced,” he
said.



TB tests conducted

officials yesterday for confirmation on the number of
persons tested during this most recent outbreak.

However, with the permanent secretary out of
office, acting Permanent Secretary Creswell Sturrup
said he would have to inquire about the matter as he
was relatively new to the post and did not know
about the outbreak off-hand.

The Tribune did not receive a return call up until
press time last night.

Tuberculosis is spread through the air, when per-

sons who have the disease cough, sneeze, or spit.
One third of the world’s current population have
been infected with mycobacterium tuberculosis,
and new infections occur at a rate of “one per sec-
ond.”

“However, most of these cases will not develop
the full-blown disease; asymptomatic, latent infection
is most common. About one in ten of these latent
infections will eventually progress to active disease,
which, if left untreated, kills more than half of its vic-
tims,” the website warns.

contribute one per cent of the insur-
able wage to government. A tenta-
tive date of January 1, 2010 is being
considered for this new tax, Mr
Ingraham told Parliament during his
contribution to the 2008/2009 mud-

“T previously indicated that the

Proposed unemployment assistance

Government was considering an
unemployment insurance pro-
gramme for workers in the
Bahamas,” the Prime Minister said.
“T am pleased to say that the actu-
arial work is virtually complete and
that we expect to be able to bring
legislation to Parliament during the
course of this month or certainly by
early next month at the latest with a
view to producing an unemployment
benefit for employed persons.”

While the prime minister did not
specify the length of time a person
must be unemployed to qualify for
the aid, he said government will try
to accommodate as many out of
work people as possible.

“We are seeking to affect a
scheme that will guarantee for a lim-
ited period of time (between 13 and
26 weeks) persons to get up to 50
per cent of what they would have
been contributing towards.

“In other words someone who

was contributing on the basis of earn-
ings of $400 or more per week would
be eligible to receive one-half of that
as an unemployment benefit under
the scheme for this period," he
said.

Mr Ingraham also said govern-
ment funds “in the double digits" —
but not more than $20 million —
will be transferred from NIB's Med-
ical Reserve Fund for the unem-
ployment assistance plan.

To sustain this programme,
employees and employers will have
to contribute about one per cent of
the insurable weekly wage at a
breakdown of either 60 per cent paid
by the employer and 40 per cent paid
by the employee, or a breakdown
of 50 per cent and 50 per cent,
respectively, Mr Ingraham said.

For example, the insurable wage
ceiling of $400 per week would
amount to a contribution $4 per
week to the scheme.

"Eventually it is going to be
required for employers and employ-
ees to pay a sum of money towards
the continual operation of unem-
ployment scheme in the Bahamas,"
he said, adding that due to the cur-
rent economic downturn this new
fee will not be required until early
next year.

After the morning session, leader
of opposition business in the House
of Assembly Dr Bernard Nottage
told The Tribune he could not suffi-
ciently analyse the effectiveness of
the proposed scheme based on the
minimal details provided by Mr
Ingraham.

"What we don't know is what you
have to do to qualify, in other words,
how long you've been unemployed,
what happens to people who have
been unemployed prior to the 'crisis'
but who also have been paying
National Insurance contributions
over the years, but there are some
questions to be answered before one
can give a reasonable evaluation of
it," he said.

PM on CLICO policyholders

FROM page one

here in The Bahamas who can assume the business
and provide the coverage that CLICO policyholders
purchased without any loss to the policyholders

Mr Ingraham’s communication outlined the series
of events that placed CLICO in its current state,
including a $73.6 million loan from CLICO to a
real-estate company that — through the significant
decline in the Florida real estate market — ulti-
mately compromised the insurer’s “financial integri-
ty”.

The Prime Minister also stressed that the decision
to liquidate CLICO was taken only after very care-
ful consideration of the interest of the policyholders,
staff and creditors of the company in the Bahamas
and in the region and only after discussions by the
Registrar with the principals of the company over
many months urging and directing them to inject
additional capital and liquidity into the CLICO,
without success.

“The overriding evidence suggested that in order
to protect the policyholders, numbering some 23,000
in The Bahamas and 29,000 in the region, which is
the ultimate responsibility of the Registrar of Insur-
ance Companies, steps had to be taken to ensure that
the assets of CLICO were not further compro-
mised,” Mr Ingraham said.

The Prime Minister said since 2004 CLICO began
making excessive cash advances called “loans to
subsidiary” to CLICO Enterprises Limited.

Loans were granted at a rate of interest of 12 per
cent per annum with no fixed maturity date.

In 2007, loans to subsidiary represented 58.56 per
cent of total assets and 68 per cent of invested assets.

Mr Ingraham said that these advances to CLI-
CO Enterprises Limited were made to the US based
Wellington Preserve Corporation’s, Florida real-
estate project.

This US investment is in respect of a 600-acre
real estate development with a reputed value of $80
million. A write-down of $25 million occurred in
2007, mainly as a result of the decline of sales in the
Florida real estate market and the non-completion
of the project. As at December 31, 2008, loans to
subsidiaries of CLICO were $73.6 million.

Mr Ingraham said that it was these advances total-
ing $73.6 million by CLICO that compromised its
financial integrity, as neither Wellington Preserve
Corporation nor CLICO Enterprises Limited are in
a position to repay the loans from the company.

“Additionally, with the significant decline in the
Florida real estate market and the $65 million need-
ed to complete the Wellington Preserve Project,
the market value of the property is now substantially
less than its initial book value, further deteriorating
the financial situation,” the prime minister said.

He said that it appears that CLICO never sought
the required “no objection” from The Bahamas
Registrar of Insurance Companies in connection
with the Company’s investments, loans to sub-
sidiaries or related party transactions.

“Concern was expressed about this matter and a
request was made for information regarding all
investments undertaken by the company within and
outside The Bahamas. In fact, at one of the 2007 pru-
dential meetings, the Registrar of Insurance Com-
panies demanded that the company return the then
$53 million invested in order to reduce the inter-
company loan balances. The company gave assur-
ances that it would, I am advised, but failed to do
so,” Mr Ingraham said.

It was after the receipt of the 2007 audited finan-
cial statements in July 2008 that the extent of the real
estate investments was again highlighted. On
December 22, 2008, a letter was sent to CLICO
placing the following requirements and restrictions
on its operations:

That it realize repayment of all inter-company
balances not later than Friday, January 9, 2009, and,
that

e¢ Any investments/advances of any nature to
related parties and or subsidiaries; or

¢ Any advances/loans of any nature to non-relat-
ed parties other than policy loans in the normal
course of business; or

¢ Any borrowings or mortgages; or

¢ Any investments in real estate; or

e¢ Any advances to directors or senior manage-
ment; or

¢ Any dividend payments to shareholders; or

e Any guarantees to any entity; or

e Any new or changes to the company’s insurance
products;

Require the prior approval of the Registrar of
Insurance Companies.

“The investments were not repaid within the time
given. CLICO, however, requested to meet with the
Minister of State for Finance to inform its position.
The Minister agreed to a meeting which was sched-
uled for January 29, 2009, which CLICO subse-
quently requested be rescheduled. The new meet-
ing was rescheduled for February 5, 2009, which
CLICO also failed to attend,” the prime minister
said.

“The Government regards this matter as a very
serious one and will continue to monitor the situa-
tion with CLICO and provide regular updates to
the public,” the prime minister said.

On February 24, 2009, a winding-up Order was
granted by the Supreme Court appointing Craig
Gomez of Baker Tilley Gomez as Provisional Liq-
uidator for CLICO.

A hearing of the application for liquidation is
scheduled to be heard on March 17, 2009.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



ai

Survivor clinging
to overturned NFL
player's boat

SPORTS
TAMPA, Fla. i
Associated Press :



A MISSING boater found
clinging to an overturned

boat was rescued Monday
off Florida’s Gulf Coast, but
the search continued for two }
NFL players and another }
man aboard who didn’t }
return from a weekend fish- }

ing trip.

Survivor Nick Schuyler, a
former University of South }
Florida player, told rescuers }
that the 21-foot boat was }
anchored when it flipped
Saturday evening in rough :
seas and that the others got }
separated from the boat, }
Capt. Timothy M. Close }
said. Schuyler, who was }
wearing a life vest, had been }

clinging to the boat since
then.

with free-agent defensive
lineman Corey Smith and

former South Florida play-

er William Bleakley,
remained missing.
Television footage showed

Schuyler conscious but weak
as he was being taken off a
helicopter at Tampa Gener- }
al Hospital and placed ona }
stretcher. The hospital }
declined immediate com- }

ment.

Guard would search for the

three missing men for “quite

awhile.”
The four left Clearwater

Pass early Saturday in calm }
weather, but heavy winds }
picked up through the day }
and the seas got heavy, with }

waves of 7 feet and higher,

peaking at 15 feet on Sun-

day. A relative alerted the

Coast Guard early Sunday
after the men did not return :

as expected.
The Coast Guard had
searched about

Everglades-manufactured
boat by Monday morning.

Everglades boats are built }
with compressed foam }
encased in Fiberglas, which }
makes them difficult or }

impossible to sink.

Waves had subsided to 6 }
to 8 feet, still enough for a }
small craft advisory, Nation- }
al Weather Service meteo- }

rologist Todd Barron said.

Cooper and Smith, who

were teammates with the

Tampa Bay Buccaneers in }
2004, have been on fishing }
trips before, according to }
Ron Del Duca, Smith’s }

agent.

Richmond, Va., is 6-foot-2,

250 pounds and had 30 tack-
les, including three sacks, }
and an interception in 12 :

games last season for the
Detroit Lions.

Cooper, 26, who is 6-foot-

3, 230 pounds, has spent five

seasons with five different ;

teams, appearing in 26

games with the Buccaneers
in 2004 and 2005, but playing }

sparingly since. He grew up

in Gilbert, Ariz., and his }
father Bruce is a prominent }
sportscaster for KPNX-TV }

in Phoenix.

Knicks sign 7-1
center Samb to
10-day contract

@ BASKETBALL
NEW YORK

Assocaited Press

THE NEW YORK Knicks
signed 7-foot-1 center Cheikh :
Samb to a 10-day contract }

Monday.

Samb, a second-round draft
pick in 2006, joins his fourth }

team this season. He started

with Detroit, was traded to }
Denver and then traded to }

the Los Angeles Clippers.

Samb, from Senegal, aver-

aged 0.9 points, 1.4 rebounds

and 0.63 blocks in 16 games

for the Clippers before he
was waived Feb. 16.

In 20 career games, he’s
averaged 1.1 points, 1.5 :

rebounds and 5.4 minutes
The Knicks’
increased to 13 players.

The boat belongs to Oak-
land Raiders linebacker }
Marquis Cooper, who along }

Close said the Coast

16,000 }
square miles of ocean for the }

The 29-year-old Smith of }

roster i

BGDSA opens new season this week

ON Saturday, the Bahamas Govern-
ment Departmental Softball Association
will officially open its 31st season at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

Thora Sweeting, who has served as
the association’s president for the past 12
years, said it had grown by leaps and
bounds and was now considered the
most exciting recreational league in the
country.

“The league has served a positive pur-
pose since its inception,” said Sweeting,
referring to the initial season in 1979.
“It has brought persons in the Public
Service together, engendering friend-
ships which are sustained and memories
that will last a life time.”

Sweeting said over the years the
BGDSA had made significant progress
in softball, both locally and internation-
ally and she anticipated that the future
shone brightly as evident through the
tremendous interest and support dis-
played by both their fans and spectators.

“Tam so excited about our 31st
anniversary, the opportunities and chal-
lenges that are ahead of us as we move
forward and attempt to accomplish all of
our goals for 2009,” she said.

“T hope that each of you share my
excitement, as I look forward with eager
anticipation to the full support of our
members and fans.”

On Saturday at noon at Baillou Hills,
Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister will deliver the
keynote address at Baillou Hills.

Alvin Smith, the Speaker of the House
of Assembly and former president of the
BGDSA, along with Romell ‘Fish’

LOS ANGELES Angels’ Kendry Morales slides home to score against the Colorado Rockies in the first inning Monday, March 2, 2009,

Knowles, president of the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation, are both expected to
make brief remarks.

Throwing out the ceremonial pitches
are Reginald Ferguson, Commissioner
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force; Clif-
ford ‘Butch’ Scavalla, the Commodore of
the Royal Bahamas Defence Force; Ken
Griffin, president and CEO of Bahamas
Telecommunications Company; Joe
Johnson, manager of Premier Importers
and Sandy Schaefer, president of Robin
Hood Enterprises.

Entertainment will be provided by the
Aquinas College Marching Band, CC
Sweeting Dance Group, RM Bailey and
CR Walker Junkanoo Groups and God
Missionary Dance Angels.

The opening ceremonies will climax
with a junkanoo rush-out and fireworks
display at 6:30 pm.

At 1:45 pm, there will be the releasing
of the balloons.

At 2 pm, the first game will get under-
way between the 2008 ladies champions
Police Royals against 2008 runners-up
Finance Health Invaders.

Shortly afterwards, 2008 and sixteen
(16) consecutive men’s champions
Defence Force Floaters will battle 2008
runners-up Police Chiefs.

The bouncing castle, ballooons and
lots of prizes will be given out to the
children and fans on opening day.
Thompson Trading personnel will be on
hand to give out paraphernalia while
supplies last.

The opening ceremony will be broad-
cast live on 104.5 FM from 2-6 pm.

In her president’s report of 2008,

aa i zo NNNENN)

â„¢

_*

during a spring training baseball game in Tucson, Ariz.

Los Angeles Angels
beat Rockies 12-3

@ BASEBALL
TUCSON, Ariz.
Associated Press

ANGELS ace John Lackey showed
why he gets paid to pitch and not hit in
his spring debut.

Lackey did just about everything right
in Los Angeles’ 12-3 victory over the
Colorado Rockies on Monday while on
the mound, throwing two innings of hit-
less ball.

“The arm felt great,” Lackey said. “I
didn’t throw the ball inside for strikes
like I needed to, but other than that, it
was a pretty good place to start.”

The Angels ace retired all six batters
he faced, with one strikeout.

Lackey had such an easy time he went
to the bullpen after his designated two
innings to throw a 10-pitch bullpen ses-
sion.

At the plate, though, Lackey barely
moved the bat off his shoulder during a
three-pitch strikeout.

“(I was) told not to swing at any-
thing,” Lackey said, laughing. “It would
have cost me something.”

The Angels have good reason to pro-
tect Lackey. He missed the first six
weeks of the 2008 season because of a
strained triceps.

Lackey, who ended up going 12-5 with
a 3.75 ERA, said he spent extra time
on an exercise program to strengthen
his elbow and shoulder as a preventative
measure.

“Thave not felt any pain going back to
last spring,” Lackey said.

While Lackey barely broke a sweat,
Colorado starting pitcher Franklin

Morales was rocked for seven runs on

nine hits.

a,

Sweeting said the season got underway
with pomp and circumstance. The games,
according to Sweeting, were well attend-
ed and the fans support was not where it
ought to be, however, some adjustments
would be made to correct the situation.

“We had an excellent softball season
and for the first time for a very long time
that the league finished its season extra
early, which was a plus,” she said.

“We had one death in the league last
year, Charles ‘Wire’ Smith, a former
player of the Defence Force Floaters.
He is sadly missed by all of the mem-
bers and fans.”

This year’s Player’s Appreciation Day
on Saturday, July 25 will be held in his
honour and called the “Charles ‘Wire’
Smith Plater’s Appreciation Day.”

Sweeting took the time out to con-
gratulate the three-time defending ladies’
champions Police Royals and 16-time
men’s champions Royal Defence Force
Floaters.

The runners-up were the Finance
Health Invaders in the ladies’ division
and the Police Chiefs in the men. The
Floaters won the pennant in the men’s
Paradise League, the Chiefs in the men’s
Tropical League and the Invaders in the
ladies.

The league, which is comprised of
eight ladies and ten men’s teams, could
not be as successful without the com-
passionate, sensitive and patience exhib-
ited by the umpires, namely Dave Mor-
timer, Van Johnson, Darren Mortimer,
Phil Culmer, Robert Smith, Cyril Smith,
Michael Hanna, Thomas Sears and Ross
Coleby.

le to hi
7 4
Ps i



BGDSA president Thora Soon



Sweeting also mentioned chief statis-
ticlans Marjorie Delaney and Rozina
Taylor, as well as scorers Althea Clarke,
Loretta Maycock, Karen Richardson,
Bridgette Sweeting, Celestine Ford,
Christine Jenoure and Ms McCardy for
their efforts.

All teams are advised that rosters and
entrance fees must be brought in before
May 3. Any teams in violation of meet-
ing the deadline will not be allowed to
play unless they meet their obligation.

Billups set to play
Pistons at Palace
for 1st time

: â„¢ BASKETBALL
:? DETROIT
i a Associated Press
| ? CHAUNCEY BILLUPS

? acknowledges it will be emo-
? tional to play at The Palace
? for the first tume as an ex-Pis-
? ton.
i = Just wait until the Denver
? Nuggets guard hears and sees
? the reaction Tuesday night
? from fans who still adore him
? and wish he was still playing
? for their team.
i Billups will likely hear one
? of the loudest ovations an ex-
? Detroit player has heard in his
? first game back in the Motor
i City.
i = It might only trail the out-
? pouring of appreciation for
: Gordie Howe, when the Hall
? of Fame player known as Mr.
i Hockey was representing the
? Hartford Whalers in the 1980
? NHL All-Star game at Joe
? Louis Arena.
i “Tm sure it will be emo-
? tional,” Billups said. “I had a
? lot of great years there. I’m
? sure it’s always going to be my
? home away from home. It will
? be pretty emotional, but it will
? be a lot of fun.”
i Pistons president of basket-
? ball operations Joe Dumars —
? the man who traded Billups
? — has no doubt what kind of
? reception Billups will get.
i “Chauncey should get a
? tremendous ovation,” Dumars
? told The Associated Press on
i Monday. “And, he will get a
? tremendous ovation.

“He deserves it.”

i Detroit made the unpopu-
? lar move to create playing time
? for second-year pro Rodney
? Stuckey, to clear about $20
? million in salary cap space and
? to give the team a new look in

Elaine Thompson/AP Photos

Angels’ catcher Jeff Mathis had two
homers among the seven extra-base hits
Morales allowed. Mathis went 2-for-2
with three RBI.

“Tm not frustrated at all. I know any-
body can have a bad day,” Morales said
through an interpreter. “I understand
that as long as I am able to command
the fastball on both sides of the plate it
is going to be fine. Mentally and physi-
cally lam ina good place right now.”

Morales, after throwing two shutout
innings against the Chicago White Sox
in his first spring appearance, gave up a
third homer to Brandon Wood.

Wood, who was 3-for-4 with three
RBIs, also had a run-scoring double.

The Rockies left-handed pitcher is
among the candidates to earn the final
spot in the starting rotation.

“T am not concerned about (the start-
ing job) because I can’t control that,”
Morales said. “The biggest thing is I feel
good mentally and physically and just
had a rough outing and have to move
on. Iam not going to lose sleep about it
because it is out of my control.”

The Rockies continued to struggle at
the plate. They did not get a hit until
Yorvit Torrealba had a single in the
fifth. Matt Murton had a two-run homer.

The Angels’ Adam Pavkovich went
3-for-5 with four RBIs. Andrew Romine
also had three hits. Notes: Los Angeles
center fielder Reggie Willits was
scratched with tightness in his abductor
muscle of his left leg. The third year
player is 2-for-6 with an RBI so far this
spring.



LOS ANGELES Angels’ Chris Pettit races
toward third after hitting a triple as Colorado
Rockies players relay the ball to the infield in
the third inning Monday, March 2, 2009,
during a spring training baseball game in
Tucson, Ariz.

i the postseason.

In the short term, the trade

hasn’t helped the Pistons out.

If they can add a star or two

i this summer or next, it might
? be viewed differently.

Billups was one of the most

i popular Pistons during his sev-
? en-plus seasons with the fran-
? chise he helped win the 2004
? NBA title as finals MVP,

advance to at least the East-

: ern Conference finals the past
? six years and win 50 or more
i games every year as an All-

Star point guard.
Ben Wallace was the face of

i those teams, but Billups was
i? the voice.

He was the first to speak to

i reporters after games — win
? or lose — and that in part led
? to fans getting to know one of
? the most likable players in the
? league. Billups is looking for-
? ward to seeing the red-white-

and-blue clad fans again and

? perhaps chatting a few up at
? courtside.

“Tt will be fun to get back

to that city that I love so dear-
? ly, the fans that I love so dear-
i? ly,” Billups said.

His fame in Detroit has only

? grown this season because the
? Pistons have plummeted from
? NBA elite to mediocre status
? since he was traded to Den-
? ver on Nov. 3, 2008 along with
? Antonio McDyess and Cheikh

:

Samb for Allen Iverson.
PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



THE BAHAMAS OLYMPIC ASSOCIATION

BOA continues bid to revamp image

@ by RENALDO
DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

In a continued effort to
revamp its image and separate
the new Bahamas Olympic
Association from the old
regime, association executives
continue to seek necessary
constitutional amendments,
and foster the development of
the relationship between var-
ious core sports.

BOA Secretary General,
Romell Knowles said to avoid
many of the transgressions
made in the past, the associa-
tion will ratify its constitution
and operate under compliance
with the International
Olympic Committee.

“We need to make sure that
the majority of the voting
rights always stay with the fed-
eration and we will make sure
that is spelt out very clearly
in the constitution. We will be
reviewing some changes nec-

Mi Executives seek constitutional amendments
H Move to build links between core sports

essary to take place in our
constitution that should bring
us in compliance with the
IOC,” he said, “As of now the
current draft of the constitu-
tion is not in compliance and
we will be working diligently
behind the scenes to correct
the flaws to make the present
to our membership and to the
IOC so that the constitution
is aligned and can be accept-
ed.”

Recently, Judo, Wrestling
and Gymnastics have been
added to the list of BOA core
sports, expanding the contin-
uously growing lists of disci-
plines. “Gymnastics, Judo and
Wrestling have been approved
by the Association and we will
be reaching out to them in

Clarins shows
commitment to
Grand Bahama

Company sponsors golf classic

Grand Bahama Island — In keeping with their desire
and commitment to become good corporate citizens of
Grand Bahama, Clarins recently participated as spon-
sors of the American Women's Club Golf Classic which
was held on February 21st at the Reef Golf Course in

Lucaya.

Not only did the leading beauty line company assist
as Saphire Sponsors of the event, they also donated 130
Clarins gift bags, 71 of which were men’s bags which
consisted of one Clarins men product along with a sun
care product and a lip balm, and 59 women's bags which
consisted of a Clarins product along with a sun care and

lip balm.

Gift bags

Mr. Sylvain Clement, Grand Bahama branch
manager was on hand at the awards ceremony to assist
in handing out the gift bags containing their high quality

line of skin care products.

"We are pleased to be helping in some small way to
help make this worthy charitible event a success. We are
here to assist in the community as best we can,” said Mr.

Clement.

Since 1954, the Clarins Group has used its unrivalled
expertise in the field of beauty to produce the safest,
most effective products that deliver genuine results.
The Clarins Group has always made safe use a number-
one priority and, believing in the true efficacy of plants,
has no ingredients of animal origin in its formulas.

The Clarins product line is available at Esthetics Plus
Day Spa in Freeport and Prestige Perfumes in Port

Lucaya.



short order,” Knowles said,
“One of the things we want
to ensure is that the constitu-
tion will always be followed
when it comes to membership.
In the past it did not speak
very clearly on what it takes to
become a member of the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion so we want to clear that

up.”
Inclusion

Knowles, who also serves as
President of the Bahamas
Softball Federation said his
organization has experienced
the hurdles of inclusion into
the BOA.

“There has been some dis-
crepancies in the past, partic-

ularly for us in softball, we had
experiences where for a num-
ber of years we had been try-
ing to gain membership and
it was just not a clear process.
We want to eliminate any
doubts by any federation
which wishes to join the BOA,
the process will not be diffi-
cult to find,” he said, “Those
sports that are not Olympic
sports we want to include
them somehow. We are an all
inclusive organization, obvi-
ously our chief concern is
development of the Olympic
sports but we want to include
others as well that may not be
Olympic sports at this time.”

With the inclusion of more
sports under the BOA
umbrella, Knowles vowed the

association would have greater
transparency in how the aid
the development of each fed-
eration.

“Everyone wants to know
what is happening with the
solidarity fund and how to
access it and what is available.
Vice President Algernon
Cargill has also been charged
with the responsibility of
putting together a format to
pass on the federations so that
know how to access these
funds,” he said, “There is a
process that we in the BOA
have to follow and we will be
sharing that information in
due course. In the past infor-
mation has not been as forth-
coming as we would have
liked.”

“One of the
things we want to
ensure is that the
constitution will
always be followed
when it comes to
membership. In
the past it did not
speak very clearly
on what it takes to
become a member
of the Bahamas
Olympic
Association so we
want to clear that

up. 9



Romell Knowles

JAR TOUR OF BAHAMAS/MJ TIME TRIALS AND ROAD RACES



Cycling profile grows in Bahamas

Events increasingly
put spotlight on
the sport at home
and abroad

The Bahamas may not yet be a hotbed
of cycling, but events such as the JAR
Tour of the Bahamas and the MJ Time
Trials and Road Races have become
increasingly high profile in recent years
both locally and internationally.

The second edition of the MJ Time Tri-
als began as a series of Individual Time
Trials but in order to offer something for
everyone the organisers added a few road
races to the MJ TT series and this proved
to be very appealing to numerous cyclists.

The events took place on the western
side of the island of New Providence and
began on January 9, 2009 with a 10k time
trial and culminated on Saturday past
February 28, 2009 with a 40K time trial.

In between those dates were four oth-

Level 1

1st Place —- Tony Mackey
2nd Place — Justin Minnis

3rd Place — Antoniece Simmons
Ath Place — Amanda Graham

Level 2

Level 3

er time trials and three road races.

Among the many participants were
upcoming junior, Tony Mackey, and oth-
er more seasoned cyclists including but
not limited to, Lee Farmer, Jaime Not-
tage, John Cox, , Barron “Turbo” Mus-
grove ,Carmel Stucki, Christine Gangel-
hoff, Mark Holowesko, Wayne “Curly”
Price and Juliana Glinton. Not to be over-
looked was outstanding junior Jay
“Flash” Major who finished second over-
all in the very competitive Level 3 cate-

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UPDATE



HERE’S a look at the
results of the Junior Base-
ball League of Nassau
games played over the
weekend at the St.
Andrew’s Field of
Dreams:

TEE BALL
Grasshoppers def. Sand
Gnats 17-11

Knights def. Sidewinders
15-9

Raptors def. Blue Claws
COACH PITCH

Astros and Bluejays
played to 16-16 tie.

Cubs def. Athletics 13-10
Diamondbacks and
Angels played to 13-13
tie.

Sunday March 1

Cubs def. Astros 16-3
MINOR LEAGUE
Mets def. Rockies 3-2
Rays def. Royals 9-6
MAJOR LEAGUE
Indians def. Marlins 10-0
Reds def. Mariners 7-6
JUNIOR LEAGUE
Yankees and Cardinals
played to 12-12 tie.
Twins def. Dodgers 7-4
SENIOR LEAGUE
Phillies def. Tigers 18-13
Rangers def. Pirates 16-1



The routes consisted of cyclists taking
in sights and scenes while racing along
the Sir Lynden Pindling International
Airport, Coral Harbour Round-About,
Lyford Cay Hill at Templeton building,
and the South Ocean Blvd. loop, down to
Jaws Beach around Clifton Pier and onto
the newly constructed road just south of
the Albany Project.

The cyclists competed at 3 different

oO NPBA 2008-2009 Season

1st Place - Jamie Nottage
2nd Place — Wayne Price
3rd Place — Mark Davies
Ath Place — Carmel Stucki
Overall Winner’s Floating Trophy: Jamie Nottage

ist Place — lee Paniner

2nd Place — Jay Major

3rd Place — Baron Turbo Musgrove
4th Place — Mark Holowesko
Overall Winner’s Floating Trophy: Lee Farmer

Listed below are the first four finishers in the overall
event and the winners of the Floating trophies for First
Place in each category.

Overall Winner’s Floating Trophy: Tony Mackey



levels 1,2 and 3. The speed average for

level 1 was 17-19 mph, level 2 was 20-23
mph and level 3 was 24-27 mph. To deter-
mine the winner points from 10 to 1 were
given for each event, then the total points
were added together for each competitor.
Trophies were given to the first 4 posi-
tions in each category and an overall win-
ner’s floating trophy was given to the

individual with the most cumulative

points in the events.

THE New Providence Basketball Associa-
tion will wind down its regular season this
week at the CI Gibson Gymnasium.
Here’s a look at the schedule of games left

to be played:

Wednesday March 4

Electro Telecom Cybots VS Coke Explorers

Commonwealth Bank Giants

VS Police

Friday March 6, 2009

Coke Explorers VS Johnson Trucking Jumpers

Saturday March 7, 2008

2008/2009 Playoff kicks off at 7pm best 2 out of three
Here’s a look at the team standings at this point:

Vince Ferguson Division
John Archer Division

Electro Telecom Cybots 13-4
Commonwealth Bank Giants 13-3
Sunshine Auto Ruff-Riders 10-7
Police Crime Stoppers 10-7
Coca Cola Explorers 5-11
Cable Bahamas Entertainers 1-16
South West Printing Falcons 3-15
Y-Care Wreckers 9-9
Johnson Trucking Jumpers 11-6
Malcolm Park Boys 9-8


THE TRIBUNE

E TUESDAY, MARCH 3,



PAGE 11



ts

2009

"= Wh, LOS ANGELES

-- - \/) ANGELS BEAT

oe » ROCKIES 12-3

~~



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

COACH Andre Scott called
Bianca Stuart’s impressive per-
formance at the State Farm
Missouri Valley Conference
Indoor Championships over the
weekend as a “One Jump Won-
der.”

Stuart, the Bahamian rising
long jump star, emerged as the
Co-Female Field Athlete of the
Meet when she helped South-
ern I}]inois Salukis win the
women’s title with an 11-point
decision over Wichita State.

Selected along with Indiana
State’s Kylie Hutson, Stuart
racked up a total of 19 points
with her victory in her specialty
in the long jump, third in the
60 metres and sixth in the triple
jump.

Scott said the significance of
Stuart’s performances were the
facts that her leaps of 21-feet, 6
1/4-inches in the long jump and
39-2 both came on her first
attempts.

“She was a one jump won-
der,” Scott said. “It was a good
opener for her, so I just stopped
her. There was no need for her
to continue in the long jump
because there was no one who
would come close to her.

“Tt was a clutch performance.
She put it down the way she
should and she got the job done.
She also had the prelims of the
60 to run in, so we decided not
to let her use too much of her
legs. That was another reason
for her only taking one jump.”

Stuart, who completed her
senior indoor campaign by win-
ning the long jump title for the
fourth consecutive year, the first
by any athlete at the MVC.



STUART emerged as the Co-Female Field Athlete of the Meet when she helped Southern Illinois Salukis win

the women’s title.

“Everybody expected it so I
just tried to prove that I could
do it four times,” she said. “I
was excited. I guess. It was a
good feeling.

“It was for the team, not just
for me, so I was glad that I was
able to pull it off.”

Stuart’s winning leap turned
out to be a series of record
breaking feats that also allowed
her to earn a third place ranking
in the NCAA going into the
National Indoor Champi-
onships.

While she triumphed in the
long jump, Stuart, however, fell
short in the 60, clocking a sea-
son’s best of 7.62 seconds for
third place. Scott said he only

decided at the last minute to
enter Stuart in the triple jump to
garner a couple more points to
cushion their lead.

“She was another one jump
wonder because she only took
that one,” Scott said. “She want-
ed to take a couple more, but
she had the 60 final to run right
after she took that jump.

“We didn’t want to take any
risk of interrupting that perfor-
mance (in the 60), so we didn’t
allow her to jump anymore. She
did her job for us.”

Stuart, the 21-year-old
Queen’s College graduate, said
she never competed in the triple
jump, but when she was asked
to do it to secure some more

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points for the Salukis, she didn’t
hesitate.

“Tt was all about getting the
points for the team,” she insisted.

For the NCAAs, Scott said
the plan was for Stuart to go and
do exactly what she did at the
MVC and that is jump.

“If she can do the same type
of performance she did this
weekend, she will undoubtedly
be in the top five,” Scott said.
“Once we get into the final, she
can just go after the title. But it
won’t be easy.”

Stuart, who first qualified for
the NCAAs in January, said she
just wanted to compete at the
best of her ability.

“Those girls really compete

hard. Everybody try to fight for
the top spot,” Stuart said. “It’s
pretty much the same girls that
[I’ve competed with for the past
couple of years, so we all fight
hard.”

Having qualified for the
nationals for the past two sea-
sons, Stuart has had a best
showing of 13th. But her goal
is to surpass that as she also
goes after another lofty feat —
the 22-ft barrier.

“T’m getting there. ’'m being
patient. So slowly be surely I

will get there so that I can go to
the World Championships,”
said Stuart, who hopes that she
will not be left at home when
the Bahamas national team
head to Berlin, Germany in
august.

Last year, Stuart painfully sat
at home after she failed to make
the team for the Olympic
Games in Beijing, China. But
this year, she said she was jump-
ing with vengeance as she tried
to secure her spot on the World
Championship team.

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THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Department of Immigration
commits to enhanced service

mg By LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE Department of Immigra-
tion challenged itself to better
execute its functions as it official-
ly launched its 70th anniversary
celebrations at Christ Communi-
ty Church on Sunday.

In attendance were Anita
Bernard, secretary to the Cabi-
net; Brent Symonette, Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of
Foreign Affairs and Branville
McCartney, Minister of State for
Immigration who addressed the
department’s personnel.

The Bahamas Immigration
Department was established by
an Act of Parliament on January
1, 1939. In its initial stages, the
Department was comprised of 12
persons. Its portfolio fell under
the Colonial Secretary of his
Majesty’s Government, England.

The mission of the department
is “to regulate the movement of
people across the borders of the
Bahamas so as to ensure the secu-
rity, facilitate economic advance-
ment and promote the harmo-
nious social development of

Kristaan HA fiovalam II/BIS

THE DEPARTMENT of Immigration kicked of its 70th anniversary cele-
brations on Sunday, March 1, 2009 at the Christ Community Church on
Bellot Road. Pictured is a representation of the department amongst the

congregation.

the Bahamas.”

It is against this backdrop that
the anniversary is being held
under the theme “Historic Past,
Dynamic Future”, Mr McCart-
ney said.

“It is from this backdrop that

we as a department seek to per-

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form our duties and functions in
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, while being mindful of
the challenge to remain globally
competitive, so that generations
of unborn Bahamians can benefit
from the legacy left by their fore-
fathers,” he said.

Mr McCartney then challenged
the department to improve in
areas where it has not performed
well and “to raise the bench-
mark” in those areas where it has
done a great job.

As an organisation in a global
community, he told the depart-
ment that it must be prepared to
handle the various challenges it
will face, one being the global
economic downturn, which has
directly impacted the country’s
premier industry — tourism.

“Immigration’s role in our soci-
ety is vital, at every tier in the
department what we do is criti-
cal,” he said.

Mr McCartney also said lead-
ers of the department have com-
mitted to training and retraining
of staff, so as to enhance the pro-
ductivity within the workplace.

“We have committed to refo-
cusing our attention to customer
service. As we are all aware, peo-
ple are the most important ele-
ment in any business and they
determine your success or fail-
ure,” he said.

Mr McCartney thanked the
pastor of Christ Community
Church Dr Deanza Cunningham
for hosting the department. “It is
through our working together —
church, government and commu-
nity - that we will be able to build
a successful nation,” he said.






FirstCaribbean: $20m project ‘Leaves

THE TRIBUNE

usin

TUESDAY,



MARCH 3,

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

‘No decision’ on
possible lay-offs

Bank dismisses downsizing claims as ‘rumours’

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter and
NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FirstCaribbean Internation-
al Bank (Bahamas) managing
director yesterday said “no
decision” had been made on
any downsizing, as speculation
swirled throughout the
Bahamian financial services
industry that as many as 100-
160 staff at the commercial
bank might be laid off.

Sharon Brown, telling Tri-
bune Business that the BISX-
listed financial institution did
not “respond to rumours”,
said FirstCaribbean continued
to monitor the general eco-
nomic climate, and its poten-
tial impact on its operations,
as all other Bahamas-based
businesses did.

On the lay-off speculation,
she said: “At this point, we’ve
not made any decision.” Ms
Brown said FirstCaribbean
would first discuss any lay-offs
with any staff that might be
impacted.

And she added: “It’s a
rumour in the market. Like
any other business, everyone
is monitoring the economic
situation. Everyone has to do
that. All prudent businesses
do that.”

Release

Ms Brown’s comments were
reinforced in a FirstCaribbean
press release issued in
response to Tribune Busi-
ness’s inquiries.

The statement said: “We do
not respond to rumors, and
like all businesses in the

CLICO ‘insolvent’

to tune of $9m

Colinalmperial, Atlantic Medical, Family
Guardian and British American among suitors,

with no bail-out coming from government

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



CLICO (Bahamas) was estimated to be insolvent to the tune of $9
million when it was placed into provisional liquidation, the Prime
Minister told the House of Assembly yesterday, as he effectively end-
ed any lingering hopes the creditors may have had that the company
would be bailed-out by his government.

Providing an update on the current situation, Hubert Ingraham
said the February 24 winding-up petition was initiated by the Registrar
of Insurance due to the fact that the company’s liabilities exceeded its

SEE page 2B

Cable profits grow 19.7%

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

CABLE BAHAMAS net income for fiscal 2008 rose by 19.7
per cent, to $25.8 million compared to $21.6 million the year
before, as the BISX-listed utility provider again enjoyed strong
growth across most revenue streams.

The company exceeded its previous year’s revenues by $5.4
million or 7.2 per cent to $81.4 million, compared to $75.963 mil-
lion the year before.

Cable Bahamas said data revenues grew 19.7 per cent last
year, representing 15.1 per cent of total revenues. Internet rev-

SEE page 5B

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Bahamas we are continuing
to monitor the economic situ-
ation and impact on our busi-
ness. If any issues arise
impacting our staff, it is our
custom to discuss with them
and their representatives first
before discussing anything in
the public domain.”

Dion Foulkes, minister of
labour, told Tribune Business
yesterday that he had received
no details regarding impend-
ing lay-offs at FirstCaribbean,
describing the claims as just a
“rumour”.

Darron

Cash, First-

Caribbean’s chief financial
officer, told Tribune Business
to speak to Ms Brown when
contacted by this newspaper.

Yet the press release and
Ms Brown’s statements are far

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

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first plans behind

* Eleuthera-based developer adjusts to market conditions, moving
from large condo hotel to boutique, high-end villa-style residences
* Hoping for ‘imminent start’ once government approvals
received, as banks and five-star brands removed from equation

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A resort developer yesterday told Tribune
Business he had adjusted his Eleuthera-based
project from a condo hotel to a 20-40 strong
hotel villa complex, the first phase of which
will likely represent a $15-$20 million invest-
ment.

Eddie Lauth, the principal behind the
French Leave development at the former
Club Med site in Governor’s Harbour, said his
adjustments to changing market conditions -
the absence of bank and debt financing, and
the onerous requirements of five-star hotel
brands - had created a project that was “the
right scale” for Eleuthera and other Family
Islands.

Many Eleuthera residents have expressed
scepticism over whether the French Leave
development will ever materialise, given that
little construction has gone into the ground
since the project was first approved by the

former Christie admin-
istration in 2004.

However, Mr Lauth
said he and his fellow
investors had “never
thrown in the towel”
despite the numerous
setbacks they had
encountered, and were
hoping “to start [con-
struction] in the imme-
diate future” once all
outstanding government
approvals were received.

Recounting the project’s recent history
since an autumn 2007 Town Meeting was held
in Eleuthera, Mr Lauth said the condo hotel
plans hit a roadblock when the global credit
crisis led to the “collapse” of the $200 million
bond issue that was being organised to finance
it by Standard Bank of South Africa.

SEE page 5B

oo Cem mec HU



CLICO affair represents a damning
indictment on financial regulation

aybe he did
not intend to.
But without
explicitly stat-

ing it, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham’s statement yesterday
to the House of Assembly on
CLICO (Bahamas) provided a
damning indictment of the
insurance regulatory regime and
its lack of enforcement bite.
For Mr Ingraham confirmed
that the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office had harboured major
concerns about the massive
exposure/risk concentration the
insurer had built-up in loans to

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wholly-owned subsidiaries, the
investments that were to even-
tually sink it, as far back as
2004.
Detailing
(Bahamas) had “never sought

that CLICO

the required ‘no objection’”
from the Registrar to its invest-
ment strategy, not to mention
its loans to subsidiaries and



related party wheelings and
dealings, the Prime Minister
revealed that the regulator first
expressed its concerns almost
five years ago - back in 2004.
“In several prudential meet-
ings from as early as 2004, 2006
and 2007, I am advised, concern

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009



















FROM page 1B
Nassau Airport
eee Saeeny assets by $9 million. In addition,
its Turks & Caicos branch was
unable to pay $2.6 million in
claims.

Some, led by Bishop Simeon
Hall, had called on the Govern-
ment to bail-out CLICO
(Bahamas), thus protecting the
investments made by its life and
health insurance policyholders,
plus annuity depositors.

Yet the Prime Minister said
yesterday that he did not antici-
pate the Government “providing
any guarantees for the operations
of CLICO (Bahamas)”. Such a
position, although not what cred-
itors will want to hear, is not sur-
prising.

The size of CLICO (Bahamas)
solvency deficiency is still uncer-
tain, given that some 59 per cent
of its assets, as at year-end 2007,
were tied up in the Florida-based
Wellington Preserve real estate
investment.

That investment was already
written-down, or impaired, in val-
ue from $80 million to $65 mil-
lion in 2007, and the further
plunge in Florida real estate val-
ues means that the liquidator
would only realise a ‘rock bot-
tom’ value if it were to be sold -
certainly well below the sums
invested so far.

In addition, with the national
debt - already possibly at 45-46
per cent of gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP), according to Tribune
Business calculations - and fiscal
deficit expanding well beyond the
Government’s targets, revenues
projected to be off by $150 mil-
lion, and a $200 million loan being

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape Supply

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks
a qualified landscape supplier(s) to grow trees, palms,
shrubs and groundcover (items) in accordance with the
required schedule and speculations for completion of
Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. This is a supply
only contract.

Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th,
2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs




























TENDERFOR
GENERAL INSURANCE

The National Insurance Board invites tenders for coverage of its General
Insurance portfolio (property, etc.) for the year commencing June 1, 2009,
and subject to renewal for a further two (2) years.

Suttably licensed insurance companies interested in submitting a tender, with
a detailed proposal, should collect an insurance bid package from the Director's
Office, Baillou Hill Road, Nassau, Bahamas.

All tenders should be sealed, marked “Tender for General Insurance” and
should be hand delivered by 4:00 p.m. on March 31, 2009, to artive at:

The Ditector’s Office
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
Clifford Darling Complex
Ballou Hill Road
Nassau, Bahamas

The Board reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

Persons collecting the bid package must present a letter of authorization
from the licensed tnsurance company before the package can be teleased.

4



“There’s no
preferred company.
There are four
companies in the
Bahamas who have
expressed an interest,
all of whom appear to
be capable of pur-
chasing, and there
will be a selection

from that list.”

Hubert Ingrabam

drawn down, the last thing the
Ingraham administration will
want to do is take on more debt
and commitments by bailing-out
CLICO (Bahamas).

Meanwhile, the Prime Minis-
ter announced yesterday that four
other insurance companies, who
he declined to name, had
expressed an interest in acquir-
ing CLICO (Bahamas) life and
health insurance book of busi-
ness,

A sales package is likely to be
presented to the four suitors
before the coming weekend.
After that, they will be expected
to approach the liquidator for any
additional information they need,
and then make an offer if they so
choose. Any sale would have to
be approved by the Registrar of
Insurance and the Supreme
Court.

Tribune Business understands
that the four suitors are Coli-
nalmperial Insurance Company,
Family Guardian Insurance Com-
pany, British American Financial
and Atlantic Medical. It is also
understood that Harold Antor, a
principal with Tristar Insurance
Agents & Brokers, is interested,
too, and foreign interest is also
beginning to stir.

The Prime Minister said yes-
terday: “I understand there are
four insurance companies in the
Bahamas that have expressed an
interest, and that they, on the face
of it, are entities that are likely
to have the capability to do so.

“The liquidator [Craig ‘Tony’
Gomez] by this weekend is going
to be in a position to have finan-
cial offers made by those poten-
tially competing entities.”

In response to claims from the
Opposition that Colinalmperial

>.

~SSS,

THE TRIBUNE

Senior executives from the Bahamas-
based Grant Thornton accounting firm
have met with the minister of state for

finance to discuss several issues, including
matters affecting their profession and the

need for pensions and investment fund

legislation.

Paul Andy Gomez, Grant Thornton’s
Bahamian managing partner, and the fir-
m’s assurances and advisory partner,
Kendrick Christie, also discussed the
recession’s impact on the business com-
munity with Zhivargo Laing. The meeting
was part of Grant Thornton’s initiative
to meet with financial services industry
stakeholders on public interest issues.

Pictured, from L to R: Paul Andy Gomez,
Zhivargo Laing, and Kendrick Christie

had already been selected as the
buyer, Mr Ingraham said:
“There’s no preferred company.
There are four companies in the
Bahamas who have expressed an
interest, all of whom appear to
be capable of purchasing, and
there will be a selection from that
list.

“The many persons who own
these [CLICO] policies would
want to know if they stand to lose
money. It is still too early to
determine whether or not policy-
holders will lose any money.
However, it is quite possible that
all the policies can be sold to a
viable insurer here in the
Bahamas, who can assume the
business and provide the coverage
that CLICO policyholders pur-
chased without any loss to the
policyholders.”

Mr Ingraham said there some
23,191 policyholders in the
Bahamas, to whom CLICO
(Bahamas) owed $44 million in
habilities. Some 90 agents, all of
whom have been told to remain
at home, and 51 administrative
staff were based here. The latter
group are still working, but the
Prime Minister emphasised that
their employment was unlikely to
continue indefinitely.

All told, when CLICO
(Bahamas) branches in Turks &
Caicos and Belize were factored
in, along with policies held over
from the now-closed Barbados
and Cayman branches, the com-
pany had issued 29,017 policies
and $100 million in liabilities.

Mr Ingraham said yesterday:
“T am advised that CLICO’s oper-
ations in the Bahamas had some
17,297 life insurance policies with
annual premiums of $5.1 million;
11,230 accident and sickness
health policies with annual pre-
miums of $3.2 million; 2,689 annu-
ities with annual premiums of $4.6
million; and 7,402 group policies
with annual premiums of $1.8 mil-
lion.

“All told, the total individual
and group policies amount to
some 38,618 with annual premi-
ums of $14.8 million.”

Of the company’s assets, Mr
Ingraham said $32 million worth
were located in the Bahamas.
This consisted of $14 million in
cash, bonds and fixed deposits;
$14 million invested in Grand
Bahama wholesaler, GB Mill-
works, its land and buildings; 12.5
acres of land in the Westridge
area of Nassau, valued at $3 mil-
lion; and $1 million invested in
townhouses in Freeport.



CLICO ‘insolvent’ to tune of $9m

The “excessive cash advances”
CLICO (Bahamas) started mak-
ing to its subsidiary, CLICO
Enterprises, and which were ulti-
mately largely invested in the
Florida-based Wellington Pre-
serve real estate project, began
in 2004.

Some $37.092 million was
advanced to CLICO Enterprises
that year, and this increased to
$53.761 million in 2005 and
$68.302 million in 2006, before
declining to $57.010 million in
2007. Yet according to the com-
pany’s unaudited financials for
2008, this exposure ballooned to
$73.6 million.

“Tn 2007, loans to subsidiaries
represented 58.56 per cent of total
assets and 68 per cent of invested
assets,” Mr Ingraham said.

“These advances to CLICO
Enterprises were made to
Wellington Preserve Corpora-
tion’s Florida project. This US
real estate investment was
financed mainly from US dollar
annuities placed in the Turks &
Caicos Islands subsidiary,
advances from CL Financial and
a US mortgage on the property
where both Wellington Preserve
Corporation and CLICO are
mortgagors.

“This US investment is in
respect of a 600-acre real estate
development with a reputed val-
ue of $80 million.

“A write-down of $25 million
occurred in 2007, mainly as a
result of the decline of sales in
the Florida real estate market and
the non-completion of the pro-
ject. As at December 31, 2008,
loans to subsidiaries of CLICO
were $73.6 million.

“Tt was these advances,
totalling $73.6 million, by CLICO
that compromised its financial
integrity, as neither Wellington
Preserve Corporation nor CLI-
CO Enterprises are in a position
to repay the loans from the com-
pany.

“Additionally, with the signifi-
cant decline in the Florida real
estate market and the $65 million
needed to complete the Welling-
ton Preserve Project, the market
value of the property is now sub-
stantially less than its initial book
value, further deteriorating the
financial situation.”

Mr Ingraham added that
investors who purchased CLICO
(Bahamas) annuities, attracted in
by the above-market rates of
return, were not in “as
favourable” position as the insur-
ance policyholders.



TEMPTATION
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 3B



Lucayan Tropical to buy 300 acres

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

Lucayan Tropical, the Bahamian-
owned Hydroponics farmer, will increase
production with the acquisition this year
of 300 acres of land in Andros owned by
the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial
Corporation (BAIC), the company’s
marketing manager told Tribune Busi-
ness. He said the Bahamas was currently
only producing to 5 per cent of its agri-
cultural potential.

Roger Rolle, who is also Lucayan
Tropical’s sales manager, said although
the company has not identified what

Company set to expand in Andros with new crops, as executive says Bahamas producing 5% of agricultural potential

crops they intend to seed farm on the
Andros site, they will move away from
the tomatoes and lettuce they produce
through hydroponics in New Providence.

“We have not decided what crops yet,
but possibly bananas, potatoes... We’re
going to look at what the major prod-
ucts are that are consumed in New Prov-
idence,” he said. Lucayan Tropical
presently produces Beefsteak Tomatoes,
Plum Tomatoes, Grape Tomatoes, Cher-
ry Tomatoes, Romaine Lettuce and their

own mix of loose-leaf lettuce they call
the Lucayan Mix, at its Airport Industri-
al Park site in Western New Providence.

The company distributes its wares to
Bahamian food stores at a price that,
according to Mr Rolle, is lower than
imported produce.

“We distribute locally to major food
stores Super Value, City Markets, Cost
Rite, Solomons,” he said. “Our product is
world class at a standard price and the
best quality by far.”

While speaking at the second annual
Agricultural, Marine Resources and
Agribusiness exposition, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham restated the urgency
of developing a sustainable agricultural
sector in the Bahamas.

He said that apart from food produc-
tion, the growth of farms and farming
will produce much-needed jobs.

The Prime Minister said food produc-
tion stands at 10 per cent of agricultural
potential throughout the Bahamas, with

some 2,000 farmers operating. “By
increasing production to 50 per cent of
our potential we could create significant
activity in the economy, beginning with
the creation of a significant number of
additional jobs,” he said.

Mr Rolle said he thought production
was around 5 per cent of potential, but
agrees that 50 per cent would be an
acceptable level to be sufficiently sus-
tainable and to lower import costs for
produce significantly.

& Direetion!

The Anglican Central Education Authority

‘No decision’ on
possible lay-offs

FROM page 1B

from an unequivocal
‘absolutely no lay-offs or
downsizing’ in tone and con-
tent. Reading between the
lines, some might argue that
lay-offs at FirstCaribbean are
likely to be coming, possibly
imminently, although no final
decision may have been made
- and the affected employees
not yet informed.

Several financial industry
sources, speaking to Tribune
Business on condition of
anonymity, suggested that the
100-160 figure being bandied
about was too high, and cuts
that deep - impacting 10-20
per cent of the bank’s staff -
would be impossible, given
that it would impact customer
service and efficiency.

There is nothing to suggest,
though, that FirstCaribbean is
in financial trouble, or that
depositors or creditors are in
any danger.

Speaking to the company’s
fiscal 2008 performance, Ms
Brown said: “We’re very

CU ee ty

proud, certainly in terms of
the results we able to achieve
in the current economic envi-
ronment.”

One analyst told Tribune
Business yesterday that the
FirstCaribbean Bahamian
unit’s net income for the 2008
fourth quarter, of $26.641 mil-
lion, which was flat against
2007 comparatives, had been
in line with his expectations.

And Ms Brown said that
subsequent to the 2008 first
quarter, when the bank’s net
income was impacted by
accounting issues related to
hedging and other aspects,
FirstCaribbean had been
“pretty much around the $26
million mark every quarter -
$26.2 million in the second
quarter; $26.7 million in the
third quarter; and $26.6 mil-
lion in the fourth quarter”.

“All the issues took place
in the first quarter,” she
added.

FirstCaribbean’s net income
for the year to October 31,
2008, dropped by 26.6 per cent
to $83.904 million, compared

to $109.86 million. While total
interest income was down at
$263.605 million, compared to
$288.601 million, the decline
in total customer deposits
ensured interest expense
dropped to $108.028 million
from $141.441 million.

More critically, at year-end
2008, some $200.853 million
worth of FirstCaribbean loans
had been impaired, repre-
senting 7.9 per cent of its total
loan book. When this was
added to the $368.069 million
loans that were past due, but
not impaired, some 22.4 per
cent of FirstCaribbean’s loan
portfolio was either impaired
or past due at the year-end
date. FirstCaribbean saw a
67.7 per cent rise in loans to
the business community and
government that were not
impaired, but were past due,
at year-end 2008. In particular,
the value of these loans that
were 31-60 days past due rose
year-over-year to $82.26 mil-
lion, compared to $21.679 mil-
lion the year before, not far
off a quadrupling.

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites

apolications for teaching posite

és available at

St. John's College and St. Anne’s School on New Providence, and Bishop Michael Eldon
School on Grand Bahama.

English Language and Literature
Mathematics

Pniysics General Science
Guidance Counselor

Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12

Grades 7-12

(2 positions)
(2 positions)
{1 position)
Bishop Michael Eden School, Freeport Grand Bahama

Qualifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from an accredited
University together with a Teacher's Certificate from an accredited

Applications
Street,

Completed

Teacher's College.

may be collected from the Education Department located

d on Sands Road off of East

d application forms with the requested supporting documents must be received by

the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 13° March 2009, and must be addressed to:-

The Director of Education

Anglican Central Education Authority

P. 0. Box N656

Nassau, The Bahamas

Providing quality education in a Christian enviranment by developing the whale child: spiritually
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NOW. IN ST: OCK!


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





enor TTL

An indictment on financial regulation

a
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

D-111 Qualified Environmental Monitor

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks a
Qualified Environmental Monitor for Stage 1 of the LPIA
Expansion Project. The scope of services includes:

Review and approve contractors’ environmental plans;
Develop inspection check lists and inspect the work of
contractors for compliance to environmental plans;
Facilitate and communicate with regulatory authorities on
behalf of the Project on environmental issues; and
Prepare weekly and monthly reports.

Interested proponents must be qualified, familiar with local
regulatory laws and agencies and familiar with International
Best Practices (Equator Principles, IFC Standards}.

Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up
after 1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 5th, 2009 at
3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

trucks and trailers.

engine problems.

systems.

P.O. Box N-3207
Nassu, Bahamas





DIESEL MECHANIC WANTED

A well established local company is seeking to employ a certified Diesel Mechanic on a
full time basis. Successful candidate must possess diesel mechanic certification from a
recognized training institution and have a minimum of 5 years experience in the field.

* Candidate must have extensive knowledge and experience on diesel engine

* Must be able to use computer diagnostic equipment to troubleshoot and correct

* Must be able to implement and maintain a preventative maintenance program
for the company’s fleet of vehicles throughout the Bahamas.

* Must have experience with auto-marine hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical

* Experience with emergency generators and electric motors would be a plus.

* Must be willing to work flexible hours and travel to the family islands.

Salary based on certification and experience and compensation and benefit package is
very competitive.

Deadline for applying: March 18, 2009
DA 67911 c/o The Tribune

FROM page 1B

was expressed about this mat-
ter,” the Prime Minister con-
tinued yesterday, “and a request
was made for information
regarding all investments under-
taken by the company within
and outside the Bahamas.

“In fact, at one of the 2007
prudential meetings, the Reg-
istrar of Insurance Companies
demanded that the company
return the then $53 million
invested in order to reduce the
inter-company loan balances.
The company gave assurances
that it would, I am advised, but
failed to do so.”

What this appears to show is
that despite recognising the
problem from an early stage -
the high risk concentration, with
more than 50 per cent of the
company’s exposure tied up in
one asset (and a related party
loan at that) - the Bahamian
regulator failed to act proac-
tively, and aggressively, to force
CLICO (Bahamas) and its
Trinidad parent to comply. It
barked, but never bit.

And CLICO (Bahamas) and
CL Financial recognised this.
Their now-empty assurances
seem to have been designed to
‘fob off? and keep the Regis-
trar’s Office at arm’s length, all
the while smugly confident that
the Bahamian regulator would
not take decisive action against
them and their non-compliance.

The big question, as Tribune
Business sees it, is this: KNOW-
ING THE POTENTIAL
PROBLEMS AT CLICO
BAHAMAS, WHY DID THE
REGISTRAR OF INSUR-
ANCE NOT IMMEDIATELY
BAR THE COMPANY





PRINCIPAL NEEDED



“It’s a failure on many levels, and
certainly the regulatory authorities
were not aggressively trying to
stop these guys getting in more
deposits and more liabilities. They
should have fought this company’s
case a long time ago, and stopped
it issuing annuities and liabilities”

PINION

FROM WRITING NEW
BUSINESS, BOTH INSUR-
ANCE AND ANNUITIES,
UNTIL THE SITUATION
WAS REMEDIED TO THE
REGULATOR’S SATISFAC-
TION?

Doing so may well have given
the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office the necessary leverage
to force CLICO (Bahamas) and
its owner to comply. The fact it
did not raised many questions
about the level of oversight
scrutiny and enforcement the
insurer was subjected to, not to
mention the Registrar’s sanc-
tions powers - or lack of them.

One financial executive told
Tribune Business yesterday:
“Tt’s a failure on many levels,
and certainly the regulatory
authorities were not aggres-
sively trying to stop these guys
getting in more deposits and
more liabilities. They should
have fought this company’s case
a long time ago, and stopped it
issuing annuities and liabilities”
until its problems had been
solved.

Rather than accept what
proved to be an ultimately
worthless $57 million guaran-
tee for CL Financial, which
promised to make good any
hole left on CLICO (Bahamas)
balance sheet if the Florida-
based real estate investment
bombed, the financial executive
questioned why Bahamian reg-
ulators did not impose tougher
requirements.



Apart from requiring CL
Financial to place $57 million
into an escrow account in the
Bahamas, the executive sug-
gested that regulators should
have asked for letters of credit
from a reputable financial insti-
tution to guarantee that the
exposure would be covered.

Another strategy, they sug-
gested, would have been to
insist on taking a first charge
mortgage over some of CL
Financial’s assets. This is what
Trinidad & Tobago’s govern-
ment had done, taking over CL
Financial’s 55 per cent stake in
Republic Bank and its share-
holding in a methanol plant in
return for injecting capital/liq-
uidity into the troubled financial
conglomerate.

Belatedly, the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office moved
towards taking decisive action,
but only on December 22, 2008,
just two months before CLICO
(Bahamas) was placed into lig-
uidation. The regulator called
for the repayment of all inter-
company loan balances by Jan-
uary 9, 2009, and imposed a
number of other restrictions on
the insurer, but by then it was
too late given CL Financial’s
woes.

While ultimately commend-
able, in Tribune Business’s opin-
ion this was a classic case of
shutting the stable door long
after the horse has bolted. It
would be unfair, though, to
blame this episode entirely on
the existing Registrar of Insur-





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The Anglican Central

Education Authority

invites applications from

qualified individuals for the position of PRINCIPAL, St. John’s College,

beginning September, 2009.

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in Education from a recognized
University, with at least (5) years accumulative administrative experience. The

applicant must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Providing leadership - set the climate and pace for success and high

achievement in the school.

- Organizing and supervising schedules, programmes, records and

procedures.

school

- Supervising and evaluating teachers and support staff.
- Managing records, school finances and end-of-year closing

procedures.

- Communicating with parents, community groups and organizations.
- Displaying consistent organizational and human relationship skills.
- Assisting the Education Department with and initiating Staff

Development Programmes.

Applicants should submit a cover letter,

Curriculum Vitae, copies of

degree certificates, three references and passport photographs to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION

ready to build. Free washer & dryer with any
contact signed before Sule 32, 2009,

ance, Lennox McCartney, who
only took office just over one
year ago, and inherited much
of the CLICO (Bahamas) mess
from his predecessor, Dr Roger
Brown.

Inevitably, perhaps, the CLI-
CO (Bahamas) affair and the
plight of the policyholders and
annuity depositors will become
politicised. True to form, among
those to leap instantly into the
fray was former foreign affairs
minister Fred Mitchell, who
claimed there had been “shock-
ing negligence” on the Govern-
ment’s part, especially since the
Registrar of Insurance had
known of CLICO (Bahamas)
problems for at least eight
months.

Mr Mitchell’s statement is
probably quite true. But what
he does not mention is that the
records show that CLICO
(Bahamas) high-risk investment
strategy began under the for-
mer Christie administration in
2004, with $37 million sent over-
seas, and this had expanded to
$68.302 million by year-end
2006 - the last full year that the
PLP government was in power
for. Therefore, the former
administration is perhaps even
more culpable than the Ingra-
ham government for failing to
take decisive action at a much
earlier stage to avert CLICO
(Bahamas) collapse.

If there is any good to come
from the whole sorry CLICO
(Bahamas) mess, and policy-
holders, depositors and credi-
tors can be forgiven for not see-
ing it this way, it would be to
get the regulations for the
Domestic Insurance Act tabled
in Parliament, so that the new
legislation can finally come into
effect almost four years after it
was passed.

But even that may not be
enough. As we all know, the
Bahamas has more than enough
laws on the books - the problem
is, they are not enforced. The
Domestic Insurance Act’s
implementation must be accom-
panied by the equipping of the
Registrar’s Office with the
resources, staff and technical
expertise for it to rigorously
enforce the law, and show it
means what it says.

Clearly, CLICO (Bahamas)
never believed it did. And this
speaks to wider problem that
funs through much of Bahamian
financial services regulation
(with the exception of the Cen-
tral Bank). Failure to enforce
the laws on the books under-
mines the integrity of the whole
supervisory regime, with peo-
ple taking encouragement from
the fact the rules are rarely
enforced and, if they are, the
most they can expect is a slap
on the wrist. Just look at the
Securities Commission’s recent
admissions on low compliance
rates on regulatory capital and
audited financial statements fil-
ing, and its failure to enforce
compliance. This, of course, cre-
ates a wider problem for the
Bahamas, as the Organisation
for Economic Co-Operation
and Development (OECD) and
its G-7 sponsors bear down on
this nation’s financial services
industry once again. Its regula-
tory defects will once again be
in the spotlight. As one attorney
once told Tribune Business:
“We do just enough to fly under
the radar” when it comes to
financial services supervision.
Going forward, that may not be
enough. When will someone in
authority wake up?

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to

Box:

DA 69806

c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Friday March 27th, 2009.

by March 14, 2009.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 5B



$20m project ‘Leaves’ first plans behind

FROM page 1B

“While this was totally out of
our control, we did decide at
this time, not to rely any fur-
ther on the banks or, rely any
further on the various five star
hotel companies (that we liter-
ally spent a few years negotiat-
ing with) to commit, to starting
the project in the immediate
future,” Mr Lauth said.

As a result, he and his team
spent time assessing resort-
based developments across the
Caribbean and the Bahamas,
examining what had worked
and what had not.

As a result, he said they
realised that mega resorts,
involving huge infrastructure
and billions in investment, were
not right for the Family Islands,
since their scale and footprint
were totally out of whack with
local communities.

Instead, they decided to focus
on the single-villa, cottage-
based style of resorts such as
Pink Sands and Aman, and
adopted the premise of the
Anguilla-based St Regis resort,
which was financed from real
estate pre-sales and its own
resources, rather than the
banks.

As a result, the French Leave
South Beach Hotel Villas Pro-
gramme was submitted to the

Government for consideration
in spring 2008.

“Right now, we would say the
first phase is around $15-$20
million,” Mr Lauth told Tribune
Business. He added that this
phase would include some 20
oceanfront villas, with con-
struction of two-four of those
starting “right away” once final
approvals were received from
the Government.

Also included in phase one
would be the project’s recep-
tion area, pool and dining facil-
ities. “The hotel villa pro-
gramme is 20-40 hotel villas on
20 hotel villa sites, with an infin-
ity edge swimming pool, indoor
dining, outdoor dining pavilion,
tennis courts and reception,”
Mr Lauth said.

“The project is very similar
to the concept of the Pink Sands
Hotel on Harbour Island,
whereby, they have single,
detached cottages versus stan-
dard hotel rooms and/or stan-
dard condo hotel rooms.

“Presently, there is virtually
no market demand from buy-
ers to purchase, or banks and
hedge funds to finance, stan-
dard resort hotel rooms or stan-
dard resort condo hotels, any-
where in the
Caribbean/Bahamas market or,
the United States. It is antici-
pated that 100 per cent of the
French Leave South Beach

Cable profits grow 19.7%

FROM page 1B

enues grew by 10.5 per cent, accounting for 30.3 per cent of the
total, while cable revenues represented 54.5 per cent of total rev-
enues. The company saw 10.3 per cent growth in its digital TV

services.

“All business segments i.e. cable television, Internet, and
Data contributed considerably to the 2008 results, with Data and
Internet having the largest year-over-year revenue growth,”
Cable Bahamas said in a statement.

Operating expenses for the company last year saw a increase
of 2 per cent, up around $800,000 from the previous year’s

$37.8 million.

According to the company, the revenue growth last year was
“complemented by the careful management of operating
expenses” ,which accounted for the “modest” expenses increase.

The company’s earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation
and amortization reached $42.7 million, which represented an
increase of $4.6 million or 12.2 per cent over 2007.

Cable Bahamas operating income increased by around 13
per cent, up $3.5 million from $26.7 million in 2007.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
FARRINGTON INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution.
Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and par-
ticulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the

March 27, 2009.

Hotel Villas will participate in
the hotel rental programme.
“There seems to be a lot
more interest in something that
is more specialised, more bou-
tique and more high-end.
There’s absolutely no demand
for hotels and condo hotels.”

Mistake

On French Leave South
Beach Hotel Villas, Mr Lauth
acknowledged that previous
plans for French Leave may
have been a mistake, and
added: “This is the way to go.
Scale for the Family Islands is
critical. It has to be the right
scale, and we’re convinced this
is the right scale.

“There’s no better time than
right now to build. A lot of peo-
ple want work, the price is good,
and it really is the best time
now.”

Adding that there would be a
maximum of 40 villas, 20 on the
oceanfront and 20 with an
ocean view, Mr Lauth said: “It’s
so important for us to start, get
some work going, so people can
see the quality we’re talking
about. This is all self-financing.
We have it all lined up.

“We’ve never thrown in the
towel, and when the market
changes, you have either two
choices - change or get out of
the way. We’re very excited

about where we are right now.
We’re hoping we get the sup-
port of the Government, and
can start in the immediate
future.”

Mr Lauth said site clearance
had begun at French Leave two
weeks ago, and there was still
buyer interest, with 50 per cent
of the villas already pre-sold.
However, he added that the
project had been 100 per cent
pre-sold in early 2008, but 50
per cent of those buyers had
pulled out after construction
was unable to start as expect-
ed.

“With the pre-sales in place
for the start of the French
Leave Hotel Villas last Spring
of 2008, it was necessary for us
to begin the development no
later than Summer 2008, as we
had requested,” Mr Lauth
explained.

“Unfortunately, the
approvals for the same were not
received until October 9, 2008,
in the midst of the economic
meltdown. Without the
approvals last summer, some of
the pre-sales were in fact can-
celled, and thus it was neces-
sary for us to reduce staff on
site. It was necessary for us
again to revise our land plan to
accommodate the remaining
buyers and the potential new
buyers.

“Today, we continue to

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WHITE STALLION
INDUSTRIAL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 26th day of Januray 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)

FOUNTAIN STRAND LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the
Dissolution of FOUNTAIN STRAND LTD. has been completed,
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion of the
dissolution was the 13th day of February, 2009.

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

endeavor to move forward with
closings for the hotel villa pro-
gramme, now in progress.
Recently, we've reached out to
Government officials to seek
assistance in helping us expe-
dite the remaining applications
for investment approval that we
submitted on January 12, 2009.”

In addition, Mr Lauth said
the developers also wanted to

re-open the former Club Med
marina, renaming it the French
Leave Marina, providing boat
owners with refuelling oppor-
tunities.

He added that he was in talks
with a Bahamian investor group
regarding a restaurant concept
that would be situated at the
marina.

FOR SALE

Two and Four Passenger Golf Carts

2003 Club Fairway Village Golf Cart $/N FQOR2 7294094
2003 Club Farway Village Golf Cart S/N PQ0327296096
2003 Club Farway Village Golf Cart $/N FQO327296097
2003 Club Farway Village Goll Cart i/N RQdg2? 294096
2003 Club Fairway Village Golf Cart $/N FQ03272946102
2003 Club Farway Village Golf Cart 3/N RQ0g27296103
2003 Club Farway Village Golf Cart 3/N RQcg27296104
2006 Club Carryall ll Bectic 3.75 HP. S/N 60511606767

No Phone Calls

Please send bids for golf carts no later than March iq
2009 to the attention of:-

Golf Cart Sales
Facilities Manager
Fax 363-6873
Email- Pigolfcarts(@amail.com

Please inclade amount of golf carts requested, bid price with contact infoemation,



a
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company













REQUEST FOR

QUOTATION

M-100, Test Well Drilling

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks the services
of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling
Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope

of services includes:










Drilling and pump testing of a 6’ pilot hole;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Return Well;

Flow testing of the 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Discharge testing of the 10” Feed Water Return Well;
Geophysical logging and flow testing of Pilot Hole and wells;
Water temperature logging and analysis of water quality and

chemistry;

Professional supervision, (i.e. Hydrologist).

Request for Quotation Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009.

Request for Quotation closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at

3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:
Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BRORERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 2 MARCH 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.29 | CHG -0.19 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -43.07 | YTD % -2.52
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.84 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit Previous Close _Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $
Abaco Markets 0.070
Bahamas Property Fund 0.992
Bank of Bahamas 0.319
Benchmark -0.877
Bahamas Waste 0.105
Fidelity Bank 0.055
Cable Bahamas 1.255
Colina Holdings 0.118
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Dectors Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
6.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
11.23 12.04 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387 0.35
2.9230 -0.58
1.4376 0.28
3.3201 -1.94
12.6816 0.50
100.5606 0.56
96.4070 -3.59
1.0000 0.00
9.1005
1.0401 4.01
1.0330 3.30
1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Div $

7.00
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.55
2.27
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
1.73
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50

7.00
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
1.55
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50

0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

The Low Down Dirty Facts

5,000
1,724 11.0

55.6

What Is Litter?

Litter is any material that is disposed of incorrectly or
waste in the wrong place.

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

FBB17

FBB22 100.00

S2wk-Low EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

Main Types of Litter in The Bahamas

Beverage bottles
Fast food wrappers,containers and cups
Debris from unsecured loads
Abandoned or derelict vehicles
Household and commercial waste

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3201
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

Fidelity International Investment Fund 0.06
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0410 FG Financial Diversified Fund 4.10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(SS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

A message from the
Department of Environmental Health






SORRY, RANDY...

GUESS I
WHEN RANDY

RETURNS, HE

TECLSE KATHERING

THE JUPGE DIP
NOT WANT TO
TALK TO FUML

TICKET! THREE WEEKS
ON A FS

LUXURY &

CRUISE & OD



T COULD ORDER AN OFFICIAL
CHOCOLATE FROSTED
SUGAR BOMBS







© 2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved



MY GALL WENT

OVER THE FENCE
WHERE THAT
MEAN VOS



LOOK AT THIS, HOBBES!







“YOU WERE EXTREMELY “GEE, 1 MUST BE COMIN’
DOWN WITH SOMETHIN.”

NICE TODAY, DENNIS.”

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down
2 Once said to bea

Across
Fancy a number to be
perfect (5)
Victorian poet getting
sunburnt (8)
Possibly loves to find the
right answer (5)
War that’s breaking out in
Panama? (5,3)
Stretch — of river? (5)
Semi-wooden
court (3)
Unfriendly action (6)
Plays produced in
Madras (6)
In which to spend the rest
of your life (3)
A team competing
away (5)
Gives way and dies (8)
An addict may be
fined (5)
They welcome fare
increases (8)
Composition makes easy
point (5)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Bedraggled, 6 Rood, 10
Aisle, 11 Paralysis, 12 Cheering, 13
Essen, 15 Pursers, 17 Degrade, 19
Sweated, 21 Bacilli, 22 Robin, 24
Contacts, 27 Panel game, 28 There,
29 Erst, 30 Persecutor.

Down: 1 Beau, 2 Discharge, 3 Anele,
4 Gipsies, 5 Enraged, 7 Oasis, 8
Disinherit, 9 Allergic, 14 Apostrophe,
16 Entangle, 18 Allotment, 20
Declare, 21 Banners, 23 Bonus, 25
Attic, 26 Heir.

MISUNDERSTOOD! | >









SEE, IT HAS A BATTERY-
POWERED PROPELLER ON
YP AND A BIG STAR ON
THE FRONT! ISNT THAT

IT WAS WONDERFUL
MEETING YOU, APRIL__.
S| LET'S HAVE LUNCH!
ACTUALLY, IT’S “TT
YOU HE WANTS
TO SPEAK TO...
HE'S IN THE
KITCHEN!

KATHERINE!
TiLt CALL YOU!

BUT ENOUGH ABOUT ME,
WHAT DO YOU WANT











www.Blondie.com.






IL VONTKNOW.HE oN ia
JUST ALWAYS SEEMS
To GE INA BAV



YoU HAVE TO SEND IN FOUR
BOX "PROOF OF PURCHASE.
SENS" TO GET IT, IT SANS,












Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday











APT 3-G

L PREFER To USE
A PACIFIER



SHE'S A
TROUBLED





INSTEAD OF
MY THOMBS

CoS

q

www. kingfeatures.com

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE



LITTLE

NF

©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserve

THEM WE HAVE
IN COMMON...

R

ge 4

EXEL

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

SOMETHING FRENCH TOAST ST}

SO GRE. cad REREAD
| Re MALOUAL Abe



Sy wy
¢ “i -
: a




I DON'T KNOW WHERE VERA
AND I WENT WRONG WITH
OUR KI0S.77



T'M SAVING THESE BABIES
FOR GAME PLAYING
AND TEXTING

‘©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc, World rights reserved



LETS SHOW Y TELL THEM WE

h
VF ff

Mes sea \
NR TOY
















HAY ay wera ol lear
DeADEES Oe LaPe: Ci N Milce
Prairie Wettars ehivans here? Th
mineinye a wane earch latter may
be UI cone vind. ach ema
ora Las canine bller wal
i: UU Le ah cide
besten ned. Hic Pern
THAT'S TARGET

Ceca 1b very prd Sr aarcallact
af (ir kore). EAL
ASULUTRAL

rele















Saturday’s
Sudoku Answer

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Saturday’s
Kakuro Answer





















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Difficulty Level * 3/02

bishop (8)

He should know how to
press a suit (8)

About the end of
December, reached
Santa’s base (6)

One outcome of hard
work? (5)

Clue that’s illuminating (5)
Stone made entrance (5)
Large roll of paper of
intricate design (3)

Not even curious (3)

The fighter’s craft (8)
Where flowers grow | get a
flower (8)

Outflowing currency (6)
Actual language used in
an American era (5)
Behave awkwardly when
you get the bill and get put
out (3,2)

Leaves with all debts
settled (5)

Across
1 A basis for soups (5)
8 Shredded cabbage
salad (8)
9 Pry furtively (5)
10 Form of pasta (8)
11 Spacious (5)
12 Plant used in
brewing (3)
16 To stew in closed
pan (6)
Yesterday’s Easy Solution 17 Impervious to
light (6)
18 Wet soft earth (3)
23 Point in

EASY PUZZLE

Across: 1 Side by side, 6 Spur, 10
Gusto, 11 Dishonour, 12 Premiere,
13 Felon, 15 Heinous, 17 Trumpet,
19 Magenta, 21 Seeming, 22 Storm, development (5)
24 Pacified, 27 Offensive, 28 Inept, 24 Crepes (8)

29 Norm, 30 Lederhosen. 25 Pleasure trip (5)
Down: 1 Sage, 2 Deserving, 3 26 A North African
Bloom, 4 Sadness, 5 Descent, 7 dish (8)

Prowl, 8 Raring to go, 9 Coiffure, 14 27 North African
Thumbs down, 16 Ornament, 18
Priceless, 20 Apprise, 21 Secrete,
23 Offer, 25 Faith, 26 Stun.

country (5)





















Difficulty Level *

7

Type of Indian
cooking (8)

Fried noodles dish
(4,4)

Pulpy salad

fruit (6)

Hickory nut (5)
Bear flowers (5)
Be in store for (5)
Edge (3)

Legume (3)
Seasoned smoked
beef (8)

A French

wine (8)
Advantageous (6)
An aromatic
flavouring (5)
Declare invalid (5)
Highly

decorated (5)











. annem é very ~ eee

































3/02







8/4 5/2/6/9]1 3/7 ES
3/7 918/5]/1/4 2/6 48/6 4/9|7BN4 3 9
116 81512419 713 ES cso Ba
519 7/1/3\/6/2 8\4 9/2 2/8/9 B79
4/3 217/9/8/5 6|1 3/4 5/1/2 M9 2 1
9/5 4/6/8/3/7 1/2 SUM 0 [3 Io 3 AEN
7/2 3/9/1/5/6 4/8 47/2 1 a7 2/5 8 3
618 1[4/7/2/3 915 9/8 2MN9)4|7 6 8







Famous Hand

South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
#Q109
910876
@K9
kK Q62
WEST EAST
3876543 aK?
V¥KQ3 ¥942
53 #310842
&5 &I97
SOUTH
aA
VAIS
#AQ76
&A 108 43
The bidding:
South West North East
L& 26 Dble 34
44 Pass 6 &

Opening lead — six of spades.

The United States won the 1996
World Olympiad Women’s Teams,
defeating China in the 96-deal final.
The final margin over the Chinese,
who during the past two decades
have become a world bridge power,
was 70 International Match Points.

In the final, the Chinese women
got off to a fast start, leading by 20
IMPs after the first 32 deals. But the
Americans gained 66 IMPs in the

next 16 deals and never trailed again.

Today’s deal is the one that thrust
the U.S. into the lead for good. When
Jill Blanchard and [rina Levitina held
the North-South cards, they reached
six clubs as shown. Blanchard’s dou-
ble of two spades was of the “nega-
tive” variety, and Levitina cuebid
four spades over East’s three-spade
nuisance bid to indicate a powerful
hand. Blanchard felt a five-club bid
would not do justice to her excellent
support for that suit, so she leaped to
slam.

West led a low spade, and East
withheld the king as South won with
the ace. Declarer drew three rounds
of trumps, ending in dummy, and
ruffed a spade in her hand, felling the
king. This allowed Levitina to dis-
card one of her heart losers on the
spade queen, so the slam came
rolling home.

At the other table, the Chinese
South, Zhang Yalan, also opened one
club, but her bid was strong, artificial
and forcing, saying nothing about
clubs. Juanita Chambers bid three
spades, and North, Gu Ling, bid
three notrump, ending the auction
without the Chinese locating their
excellent club fit. North made 11
tricks, but the Americans gained 12
IMPs,

Tomorrow: Score one for the defense.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.
THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 7B

ith



a =e





B

o D YUEN 6 Nn oD

Ca

For this dynamic group of
seniors, being part of a bi-
weekly gym class is something
far different from a responsibil-
ity or chore, it is who they are.

The class which is made up of
about 20 mostly retired women,
meets at Body Zone every
Tuesday and Thursday, where



The Tribune





@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

While the golden years
are commonly thought of
as a time to take a back
seat ” life, one group of they take part in aerobics and
seniors is going full trottle various light-weightlifting rou-

into the best days of their tines.
lives e Eighty one-year-old Betty

Roberts said she has been





AT TOP- 81 year-old Betty
Roberts and 66 year-old
Mary Darville are all smiles
after a recent work-out at
Body Zone.

a bett

DO YOU ever experience
that sinking feeling when you
hear, “Do we have to talk
about this?” or do you find
yourself saying, “Why do we
have to go over this over and
over again?” Why is it we feel
we have to repeat things and
in the process feel or be
accused of being a nag? We are
all guilty of giving someone less
than our full attention when
they want to talk to us. Some
people seem to be so much bet-
ter at listening. Is it just our
individual personalities, the way
we have been brought up or is
it something we can learn and
change ourselves? We know
that we can learn how to drive a
car, learn a foreign language
and re-sculpt our bodies when
we really want to. So what is
stopping us learning how to
become a better listener and
why would it be important?
Sometimes we may glance at
the television, newspaper,
change the subject or just drift
off mid conversation. In other
words, just not participate or
be present. As we half listen,
sometimes we already have the
answers to all of the speaker's
problems and all too often
jump in with advice, judgments
and opinions. But all we have
really done is listen to the con-
tents of the conversation and
missed the feelings behind the
words. By the end of the con-
versation the speaker may well
feel unsatisfied because they
were not understood and
accepted. If this becomes or has
always been the way that a cou-
ple relates or communicates
with each other, then in time
there will be an unwillingness to
open up and be honest. This
erodes at the very core of the
couple bond and knowingly or
unknowingly denies the depth
of mntimacy to develop. To have
a relationship where you can
relax, be open and be accepted
for yourself is very freeing. It
makes you happier, more ful-
filled and it is what everyone is
looking for.

So what we are really talk-

working out with the group
from the start of the class near-

ly ayear ago, and added that before then she was a regular at the

The grandmother said during the class, she takes part in aerobic
exercises, as well as minimal weights and other gym activities.

“T’ve got achy bones, and I’ve already gone to the physiothera-
pist which cost me a lot of money and didn’t do me any good.”

She said her experience at the gym is much less strenuous and
way more fun, especially because she was able to forge meaningful

friendships with the other ladies.

Where commitment to routine workouts may seem an issues for
most people, these women all delight in their weekly workouts and
in the quality time they get to spend with their workout buddies.

Sixty six-year-old Mary Darville, like Mrs Roberts has aching
bones, and rarely gets to talk to people face to face in her home.

Mrs Darville said: “Coming to the gym allows me to get out, see
people, instead of staying home and watching TV.”

Now suffering from severe arthritis in both of her hands and
feet, Mrs Darville said going to the gym enables her to be more
mobile and painless, “and is certainly beneficial, and helps to keep

me going.”

Instructor Della Thomas, said it is an absolute joy to work with
the women and said her decision to begin the class came from a
desire to make the gym a place where the elderly can feel at

home.

“Looking around in the gyms I saw that the elderly were
neglected. I saw that they would just hang around but were obvi-

ously in need of special attention.”

The routines which can last anywhere between 15 minutes to a
half hour, are designed around a thorough body workout for the
ladies, with as little strain on their bodies as possible.

With the class gaining significant increases in membership over
the past few month, interested seniors are invited to sign-up and
become a part of the exciting group.

How to become



ing about is effective listening
which essentially is listening
with empathy. This means see-
ing things from the other per-
son's point of view, putting you-
self in their shoes. It requires
full attention; not interrupting
with your views and opinions.
Asking questions and for clari-
fications encourages the speak-
er to open up and lets them
know that you are really listen-
ing. Acknowledge the speak-
er’s feelings, not your own, and
only give solutions if asked.
More than not the speaker only
wants a sympathetic car not a
quick fix. All these things may
be difficult to do or remember
but by consciously practising
this on a daily basis it becomes
easier and in time becomes
almost effortless. Some people
are very good at applying these
principles in their work situa-
tion but not at home with their
nearest and dearest. Becoming
aware and acknowledging our
behavior and how it affects
everyone around us is not an
easy thing to do. Men often say
that women do all the nageing
but nagging is just repeating
something over and over. This
means that someone was not

er listener

listening or picking up on the
escalating feelings of frustra-
tion and urgency. The way to
avoid getting to this stage is to
listen, be totally honest and
open up. This does not mean
that you have to agree to every-
thing that is being said and
there is no doubt that lack of
agreement can cause problems.
However once we feel our
point of view is understood
then most people are receptive
to trying to iron out the prob-
lems. Not everything can or
needs to be ironed out. It is pos-
sible to agree to disagree.

The timing for all this good
listening and talking is very
important. Most people would
agree that being tired, angry,
or ina hurry were not the best
times. By first acknowledging
your partner's feelings it is then
quite reasonable to ask for a
different time, place or condi-
tion to discuss it. Asking for a
time- out is a sensible decision
if you know the conditions
would not be favorable for a
healthy discussion. Once you
have mastered this and you
both see how much happier you
both feel, then you can expand
this into your most intimate life.
Listening to sexual feed back
can be difficult for many to
hear and it is so easy to take it
as criticism. Just like anger and
nagging, it is important to see it
as a way to make both of you
happy. Expressing your feel-
ings takes the guess work out
and allows both to teach the
other. Do not be discouraged
if tt does not come quickly or
easily. Our needs and wants
change with the passage of time
just like our bodies.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Thera-
pist. She is a Registered Nurse
and a Certified Clinical Sex Thera-
pist located at The Centre for
Renewing Relationships,
Grosvenor's Close West. She
can be contacted by calling 356-
7983 or by email at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com

A
60 YEAR-OLD Evangeline Nixon works up a sweat on the elliptical.

THE BAHAMAS RED

CROSS

rah 2008

“OUR WORLD. YOUR MOVE. BECOME
INVOLVED.”

WV HRD
ches gcomm

CONCH FRITTERS

SATURDAY,
MARCH 7'", 2009
12 NOON - UNTIL


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH



BY
BERNADETTE
GIBSON

Shoe dermatitis



TODAY I will address a con- }
dition referred to as shoe der-
matitis. Shoe dermatitis is amed- }
ical condition which is caused by }
contact of the foot with chemicals
in the material of footwear. This }
condition can be either irritant :

or allergic.

Irritant shoe dermatitis is often i
caused by wearing shoes that are }
wet, poorly fitting or that have }
uneven linings. However, in the ;
case of allergic (contact) der- }
matitis, there are many different }
substances that can cause this }
condition, which is quite com- }
mon and is frequently compli- }
cated by secondary infections or }

eczema.

I am certain that we are all }
owners of a variety of footwear }
styles: casual, formal, work and }
athletic shoes. The majority of
our footwear is imported and }
made from leather, rubber and
other synthetic materials. The : |
most recent US statistics revealed :
that ninety-eight per cent of all



lk,

shoes are imported, therefore it is

impossible to identify precisely

all their constituent components.
It is during the manufacturing
and finishing of footwear many
chemicals are used.

Sources of Shoe
Contact Dermatitis:
Historically, leather, dyes and
rubber allergens were seen as
the most common causes of

shoe dermatitis. Today, shoe }
dermatitis may occur if a person

is sensitive to the rubber or elas-
tic compounds in shoes, form
inserts or from elastic glues used
to bind shoe components. Oth-
er identifiable causes of shoe
dermatitis are cements, dichro-
mate used in tanning, dyes, anti-
mildew agents, formaldehyde,
and nickel eyelets or nickel arch
supports.

Some signs and symptoms
of shoe dermatitis:

The most common site first
involved with shoe dermatitis is
the dorsal (top) surface of the }
big toe and on the insteps (top ;
of foot). It later extends by }
spreading to the other toes and
dorsal (top) aspect of the foot. }
Skin lesions may be acute, pre- }
senting as red, blistering, ooz-

ing and usually symmetrical.

This dermatitis can range }
from mild, itchy rash to severe }
itching with swelling and small :
blisters. In severe cases, open }
sores may present and can result ;
in secondary bacterial infections. ;
If any such signs are present, }
seek professional help for prop- }

er diagnosis and treatment.

Prevent shoe dermatitis:

As a pedorthist and a mem- }
ber of the health care team, the }
design of footwear determines }
to a large extent the appearance }
of shoe dermatitis. Once the con-
dition is present, the pedorthist ;
should refer the individual toa }
physician for a medical evalua- }
tion. Once this condition is diag-
nosed, footwear is than part of :

the treatment.

A pedorthist as an expert in i
footwear can aid the physician }
and the patient with the selec- }
tion of footwear without materi-
als that may cause shoe dermati- }
tis. Substituting products made }
of different materials that do not :
cause allergic reactions will lessen
the likelihood of future episodes }

M
Ba

of shoe dermatitis. “Vegetable- ;

tanned” footwear can be substi-
tuted as an alternative for the }
hypersensitive individual. This
type of footwear contains no rub- }

ber or formaldehyde.

Finally, it is important to }
recognise that shoe dermatitis is
quite common, affecting children } a
and adults regardless of race. recently were the recipients of
Patients with shoe dermatitis can }
use special types of shoes pre- }
pared from non-sensitising sub-
stances. I would also suggest that :
measures to control sweating
may be very helpful for the
patient who suffers from shoe
dermatitis. Socks or stockings }
made of absorbent cotton (e.g.
Thorlos or Balega socks that }
have a unique rapid moisture
evaporation system) should }
always be worn. Avoid wet
shoes, poorly fitting shoes or self
treatment and seek professional ;
help to treat or prevent shoe der- }

matitis.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board
Certified Pedorthist, is the propri-

etor of Foot Solutions, a health and 3

wellness franchise that focuses on
foot care and proper shoe fit
located in the Sandyport Plaza,
Nassau.

"The views expressed are those of
the author and does not necessari-
ly represent those of Foot Solu-
lions Incorporated or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated compa-
nies. Please direct any questions

or comments to nassau@footsolu- :

lions.com or 327-FEET (3338).

INFANTS born at the
i Princess Margaret Hospital

? 30 safety car seats donated
i jointly by the Rotary Club of
i East Nassau and Multi Discount
? furniture company. The dona-
: tion was part of a Christmas
: card promotion that the rotary
club began in December.
According to the National
i? SAFE KIDS Campaign and
i National Highway Traffic Safe-
i ty Administration (NHTSA) an
? agency of the Executive Branch
of the United States Govern-
ment, part of the US Depart-
ment of Transportation, car
i seats reduce the risk of death
: by 71 per cent for infants and by
i 54 per cent for children ages 1-
i 4, and reduces the need for hos-
i pitalisation by 69 per cent for
i children ages 4 and under.
i The proper use of child car
i restraints would prevent many
i of these deaths and injuries. In a
i crash at just 30 mph, an unre-
i strained child would be thrown
i forward with a force 30 to 60
i times their body weight. They
i would be thrown about inside
i the vehicle, injuring themselves
i and quite possibly seriously
i injuring (or even killing) other
? people inside the vehicle. They
? are also likely to be ejected

‘'@mebenaoacwnea

The month of

arch

in the

r



from the car through one of the
windows.

It is not safe to hold a child
on your lap. In a crash, the child
could be crushed between your
body and part of the car's inte-
rior. Even if you are using a seat
belt, the child would be torn
from your arms - you would not
be able to hold onto them, no
matter how hard you try. It is
also dangerous to put a seat belt
around yourself and a child (or
around two children).

The Rotary Club of East
Nassau's message is that the
safest way for children to trav-
el in cars is to use a child seat
that is suitable for their weight
and size. A properly fitted child
restraint keeps the child in their
seat, preventing them from
being thrown about inside or
ejected from the vehicle. This
reduces the likelihood of your
child being killed or injured in a
crash. The law requires all chil-
dren traveling in cars to use the
correct child restraint until they
are either 135 cm in height or
the age of 12 (which ever they
reach first). After this they must
use an adult seat belt.

“We are delighted to be able
to raise funds for a such worthy
cause. We would like to thank
Multi-Discount Furniture and

den



a ry
ial

The larger varieties of
tomatoes tend to do best in
our cooler weather so future
sowings should feature small-
er, earlier varieties. I like to
grow Roma during the spring,
an Italian type that produces
elongated fruits in abun-
dance. All tomato varieties
are either determinate or
indeterminate. Determinate
varieties produce their har-
vest all at one time and the
plants then die. Indetermi-
nate tomatoes continue to
grow and bear over a very
long period of time but their
returns diminish remarkably.
This leads to the home gar-
dener having to uproot a mas-
sive vine that has still has

THE vegetable gardens
we started in September
or October should have
produced well and be at
their peak by the begin-
ning of March. But
March is the last month
of winter and that is a
reminder that warmer
weather will be coming
and we will need to
adjust our crops to
accommodate the
change.

fruits attached.

Roma tomatoes are determinate so we must re-sow them
every month to ensure a continuous supply. The last Romas can
be sown in May and give us early summer tomatoes when most
other varieties stop producing fruits.

The time comes when even Roma tomatoes are no match for
our summer conditions and this is when cherry tomatoes, par-
ticularly large- fruited varieties, come into their own.

Sweet peppers tend to produce well into summer but the
fruits get smaller. I like to grow Cubanelle, a large, flat Italian-
type sweet pepper that takes summer in its stride. These can be
started in March with perhaps another sowing in May to guar-
antee plenty of summer sweetness.

March signifies the end of the cool weather crops such as
spinach, garden peas, broccoli, cauliflower and others. New
Zealand spinach or Malabar spinach can be substituted for leaf
spinach if you like to cook the herb rather than eat the leaves
raw. Bok choi Chinese cabbage grows well in spring and can be
started in March. Zucchini and yellow summer squash can also
be sown now. Fennel is a warmth loving herb-cum-vegetable
that should bring rewards from a March sowing.

There will be changes in our flowerbeds as the weather gets
warmer. Kalanchoe will stop flowering but remain as a succu-
lent plant. I like to plant caladium bulbs nearby to maintain
colour while the Kalanchoe lacks flowers.

The stalwarts of summer are marigolds, vinca, zinnias, cos-
mos and Mexican sunflowers. All of these annuals can take our
summer heat and flower with abandon.

Many flowering shrubs will begin to pick up and start show-
ing signs of renewal while others, winter bloomers, will slowly
decrease their flower output. Shrubs should be fertilised at least
twice a year and the beginning of spring is a good time for the
first application. Hibiscus bushes and bougainvillea vines seem
to do extraordinarily well with seemingly little help from man.
Without regular feeding shrubs will weaken and become sus-
ceptible to insect predation.

Citrus and fruit trees should be given a make-over three
times a year, in spring, summer and autumn. Water deeply
around the drip line and the bole then apply Sequestrene 138
chelated iron to the base of each trunk using a level teaspoon of
iron to 3 gallons of water. Apply citrus or fruit tree granular fer-
tilizer to the drip line and also sprinkle some between the drip
line and the trunk. Finish by spraying the foliage with a solution
containing micronutrients and a spreader-sticker. The end of
March would be a good time to start this regimen.



Rotary Club of East Nassau donates car seats



THIRTY safety car seats were donated jointly by the Rotary Club of East Nassau and Multi Discount furniture com-
pany to infants at Princess Margaret Hospital.

distributed to mothers who
would not be able to afford
them”, said Brian Moodie, the
president of the Rotary Club
of East Nassau.

Appliances for their assistance
with procurement and dona-
tion of three additional car
seats. We anticipate the car
seats will be put to good use

as reducing child mortality is
one of the goals for Rotary
International. The seats will
be split between the pediatric
and various infant units and
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2009, PAGE 9B



MA) ASK THE DOCTOR

¢|n an effort to provide the community with information on advances in the treatment of cancer and blood disorders, Dr
Theodore Turnquest and Dr DuVaughn Curling will be providing a weekly "Ask the Doctor’ column. The purpose of this col-
umn will be to provide clear and concise information in layman's terms for all to understand. We hope that this will be of



ONE of the charts indictating pressure points in the feet for the magnetic therapy.

Doing it with

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

AS Bahamians continue to struggle with reports of major
increases in cancer and diabetes, one Bahamian entrepre-
neur, Henry Butler, went on a quest to find relief for his own
ailments and discovered magnetic therapy through a device
called therapeutic apparatus for the body (TAB) which he
feels will benefit Bahamians from all walks of life.

Mr Butler said the discovery was made

during a trip to China for a trade show four

years ago.

“T was introduced to this company at the
trade show that was distributing this device.

I had a shoulder injury and they did a
demonstration on my shoulder. With the
magnets, you can place them on pressure
points about the body for any pain or dis-
comfort. After they placed it on my shoul-
der for a period of time, I was able to take

my shoulder from the side of my body up to

a full range of movement without any
pain,” Mr Butler said.

Magnetic therapy has an ancient heritage

and has occupied a central role in Chinese
medicine for over 2000 years. Magnetic

therapy is mentioned in some of the earliest

writings in Egypt, India and Greece. Until
recently the scientific explanation of mag-
netic action was not available. Magnetic

therapy utilises the natural energy of mag-

netism that is important to human existence

and overall health. A magnetic field pro-
vides a (natural) way to assist the body’s
normal healing processes as it passes
through all tissues and cells. Studies show

that magnets can be an effective therapy for

the relief of pain by blocking pain sensa-
tions. Applying magnetic fields to an

injured area improves blood flow and oxy-

gen to enhance the body’s natural healing

process. The improved blood flow and fluid
exchange to the injured tissue helps reduce

pain and inflammation.

Today in Japan and other Asian coun-
tries, therapeutic magnets are licensed as
medical devices. Magnetic therapy has

found favor in Australia, Russia and many

European countries, especially Germany

where medical insurance covers some of the
costs. Contemporary western medicine uses
magnetic energy for diagnosis with magnet-

ic resonance imaging (MRI), and, as a
method to accelerate the healing of bone
fractures.

Many claims about magnetic therapy
come from the fact that some cells and tis-
sues in the human body give off electro-
magnetic impulses. Some practitioners
think the presence of illness or injury dis-

rupts these fields. Magnets produce energy

fields of different strengths, which they

believe can penetrate the human body, cor-
recting disturbances and restoring health to

the afflicted systems, organs, and cells.

Most magnets
marketed to con-
sumers are static
magnets, also called
constant magnets,
because the mag-
netic field doesn’t
change. They are
usually made of
magnetised metal
or lodestone. Static
magnets are differ-
ent from electromagnets, which only have
an energy field while electricity is passing
through them.

As for the Bahamian response to the
device, Mr Butler said he has gotten a
tremendous response since he had intro-
duced the product three years ago.

Emerson Thurston, one of Mr Butler’s
customers, shared his experience with the
machine.

“Since I have been using this machine I
have seen miraculous results. My blood
pressure has been reduced since I started
using it. It is very good. I am using it now
for my heart and kidney. I can bend and
whine now and before I couldn’t do that. I
also had issues sleeping and after a week of
using the TAB, my family has to wake me
up to go to work,” Mr Thurston said.

Mr Butler said the TAB machine can run
from $400 if someone wants to purchase
one for the entire home. With the popula-
tion aging and the cost of traditional health
care spiraling upward, Mr Butler believes
that magnetic therapy, for reasons of sim-
plicity, effectiveness and economy, will
become an important form of alternative
therapy in the future.

With most of the chronic
conditions we have today as it
relates to hypertension and
diabetes, it can reduce swelling
in the body, arthritis and even
with men, it corrects blood flow
it they have erectile dysfunction.
- HENRY BUTLER

“With most of the chronic conditions we
have today as it relates to hypertension and
diabetes, it can reduce swelling in the body,
arthritis and even with men, it corrects
blood flow if they have erectile dysfunc-
tion,” Mr Butler said

According to the FDA, magnets used for
magnetic therapy are generally considered
safe. However, implantable medical devices
such as pacemakers, defibrillators, or infu-
sion pumps may be adversely affected by
magnets.

(GY SKINCARE
The top extrinsic causes of dry skin

EXTRINSIC refers to exter-
nal factors that impact skin
health, such as our environment
and lifestyle. Below are some
of the major extrinsic causes of
dry skin.

Weather / Environmental
elements
Cold winds and low tempera-
tures can dry out skin, depriving

aeK

Smoking can have a drying
effect on skin: it drains skin and
body of vitamins A and C and
constricts blood vessels (which
equates to less blood flow) -
meaning smoking is somewhat
like suffocating skin from the
inside.

Excess intake of alcoholic
beverages and certain medica-
tions (such as nasal deconges-

it of balanced levels of oils, and
contributing to premature
aging.

Prolonged exposure to the
sun causes water to evaporate
from skin. Forced air heating
also dries out skin: warm, dry
air acts like a sponge, soaking
up moisture from everything it
touches.

Lifestyle

The trend of low-fat or fat-
free diets can deprive our bodies
of skin-friendly Essential Fatty
Acids (EFAs) critical to all parts
of a healthy functioning body.
They help protect against water
loss within cells and throughout
skin, helping to prevent dryness,
keeping skin supple and hydrat-
ed. An EFA deficiency can
result in chronic itching, dry-
ness, scaling, and thinning.

tants) can also contribute to dry
skin.

¢ Sarah Simpson is a skin care
therapist at the Dermal Clinic.
Visit her and her team of skin and
body therapists at One Sandyport
Plaza (the same building as
Ballys Gym). For more informa-
tion visit www.dermal-clinic.com
or call 327.6788

great help to the public and look forward to your feedback.

The doctors will address all cancer and blood related questions. Every effort will be made to respond to questions submit-

ted. E-mail questions to: Oncology.consultants@gmail.com.

QUESTION: What is an oncologist
and a hematologist?

Answer: Oncology and Hematology are both
subspecialties within the field of general internal
medicine. Like all subspecialists, physicians
within the fields of oncology/hematology must
first complete training in general internal med-
icine which usually takes 3 years and then go on
to complete further training called a “fellow-
ship” in their subspecialty which usually takes an
additional two years. Oncology is the study
and treatment of malignant tumors generally
referred to by the public as cancers. Hematol-
ogy is the study of blood disorders which
includes not only cancers of the blood but also
“benign” diseases like anemia, sickle cell dis-
ease, clotting disorders and many others. Even
though they are two separate and distinct fields
unto their own there is considerable overlap
between the two and therefore in many
instances the fellowships are combined into a
single 3 year fellowship program resulting in a
physician who is a hematology/oncology spe-
cialist.

So what does this mean for the patient?

It is important for the patient to understand
that in today’s medical world many diseases
require a team approach, with expertise from
many different fields. This is particularly true
for the management of cancer patients who fre-
quently encounter many different specialists
while undergoing treatment.

These other physicians may include:

1. A surgeon who would be responsible for
any biopsies or excisions or exploratory surgery
to be performed.

2. A radiation oncologist. There are some
cancers that require radiation as a part of the
treatment management which would be per-
formed by a radiation oncologist. Let’s pause
for a moment of clarification as this point is
often confusing to the community. A radiation
oncologist uses different types of radiation in the
forms photons electrons or neutrons to treat a
cancer while a medical oncologist uses
chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of
cancers.

3. A radiologist. Once a patient has been
diagnosed with a particular type of cancer one of
the things that needs to be determined is
whether there are other organs that may be
involved. This process is frequently called stag-
ing which may involve many different modalities
such as CT scans and MRI's which would be
performed by the radiologist.

4. A psychiatrist. The news of cancer can

often be traumatic for an individual and patients
may experience symptoms of depression, anxi-
ety, anger and many other emotions and may
require psychiatric help.

5. A pathologist. Once a biopsy or surgery
has been performed, it is the pathologist’s
responsibility to identify the type of cancer that
is present.The pathologist does this by taking
cells from the surgical specimen and looking at
them under the microscope and also performing
special lab test to assist them in obtaining a
final diagnosis. The pathologist is usually nev-
er seen by the actual patient but as one can see
the pathologist plays a pivotal role as without a
diagnosis no treatment can occur.

There are many other physicians that the
oncology patient may encounter during the
course of their treatment.

The important thing to remember is that care
of the cancer patient is multidisciplinary, con-
sisting of many different medical specialties. It
is the job of the medical oncologist to co-ordi-
nate all of these disciplines into one, making
the appropriate referrals when necessary to
ensure that the patient is afforded the best pos-
sible care.

The medical oncologist will also treat the can-
cer itself with medications called chemothera-
pies. How these treatments are delivered and
their side effects will be discussed on another
day.

Hematology which as mentioned above is the
study of disorders of the “blood” can be broken
down into two broad categories. 1- Malignant
hematology which deals with cancers of the
blood and is therefore much like medical oncol-
ogy and 2- “benign” hematology which encom-
passes many different diseases such as anemias,
thallasemias, disorders of bleeding, sickle cell
disease and many others. The hematologist
tends to work along in consultation with a gen-
eral internist to provide care for patients with
blood disorders throughout their life time.

We hope that this initial article will help the
public to better understand the fields of oncol-
ogy and hematology and we look forward to
fostering a nurturing relationship in the future as
we move forward and continue our battle
against this disease.

¢ Dr Theodore Turnquest’s and Dr DeVaughn
Curling’s office is located at 94 Nassau Street,
Nassau, Bahamas. Their office telephone contact is
242-325-6284.

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Economic contractions:

“For us to give birth to a new era, we
must be willingly prepared to endure the

labor pains.”
MICHELLE MILLER

Some may argue that present eco-
nomic challenges dwarf in compari-
son to the insurmountable hardships
of war, epidemics and extreme pover-
ty experienced by past generations.

Colorful scrolls of world history are
stained with many periods of incredi-
ble impoverishment burdened by the
travelers of the

past. And in a time without the lux-
ury of modern conveniences, those
brave souls employed their imagina-
tion and improved their overall sense
of preparation; which enabled them
to overcome those obstacles and lay
the foundation on which we have built
our very lives.

When you observe the severity of
challenges endured by the nation
builders of yesteryear, what kind of
adversity are you personally prepared
to face? When life brings moments of
uncertainty, are you quick to panic or
are you faithfully prepared to over-
come?

These are the questions to ponder
as you continue to draw new conclu-
sions about your life challenges. You
are directly responsible for the growth
and development of your understand-
ing; the degree to which you are mak-
ing a concerted effort to deepen your
insight and ability to face adversities,
determines your confidence to suc-
ceed.

This article seeks to tickle your
thinking and inspire a broader per-
spective on the ingredients necessary
for the dawning of a new era.



The Joy of the Pain of Childbirth

Consider if you will, that today’s chal-
lenges are not a happenstance; instead
they are fundamental components of a
natural paradigm

shift; which moves you away from fear
and panic towards confidence and prepa-
ration.

Let’s take the analogy of child birth,
in which contractions are painful but nec-
essary. Contractions are defined as ‘the
tightening and shortening of the uterine
muscles during labor causing effacement
and dilation of the cervix and contributing
to the descent of the baby.’

Contractions may be irregular at first,
but gradually become regular, eventually
pushing the baby out of the uterus.

This is a beautiful process in which
those involved are fully prepared to
receive a new life into the world. And
despite excruciating labor pains, birthing
of new life is a natural aspect of the
human evolution.

This of course speaks volumes about
the depth of our capacity to deal with life
adversities, economic or otherwise. The
key point

here is - preparation and not panic aides
the successful process of new

life. The medical professionals are ade-
quately trained and the female body
undergo natural adjustments to endure
the often time challenging process of

childbirth.

Thus, given the current contractions of
the economic walls, the world is on the
verge of birthing a new era; overflowing
with hope and possibility.

This is not a time for you to panic but a
time to become adequately prepared.

1. Take stock of yourself
2. Reassess your coping skills
3. Clarify your conclusions

You must be prepared for the future
opportunities that are hidden within
present obstacles. It is better to pre-
pared for an opportunity and not have
one than to have opportunity for which
you are unprepared.

Final thoughts...

Despite the endless negative news
about today’s challenges; we know that
generations of the past have successful-
ly faced more severe adversities.

They courageously accepted that they
had to bear the burden of birthing the
moments of their time; creating major
progress, which was passed on today’s
generation.

And now the tables have turned; it is
now our time to use our imagination and
competently give birth to another new
era, which

will ultimately be passed on to the
generation of tomorrow.

However, the success of such a chal-
lenge, demands facing some crucial real-
ities:-

a. We are not exempt from life adver-
sities

b. We are the children of courageous

souls

c. It is our responsibility to give birth
to our own era

Like our ancestors, we must believe
that the magnitude of our strength is
greater than any challenge life may pre-
sent; finding the fortitude and will to
embrace life on a silver screen.

Taking this broader perspective culti-
vates a deeper understanding that adver-
sities are a natural part of change; and
change must be embraced and endured,
before it can be enjoyed.

Remember — you are innately empow-
ered to face any challenge; but you must
continue to build your sense of prepara-
tion in order to take advantage of new
possibilities.

Rest assured that the economic con-
tractions will subside and a new era will
emerge. You can choose to remain in a
state of panic or become better prepared;
you have the power to make change hap-
pen.

If you are ready to build your prepara-
tion and embrace new opportunities, you
are an ideal candidate for my upcoming
No Excuses

Goals Program. Please send an email to
coach4ward@Yahoo.com or
call 429-6770. Seats Are Limited!

¢ Michelle M Miller is a certified Life-Coach
and Stress Management Consultant. She is
the Principal Coach of the Coaching Studio,
which is located on Madeira Street, Palm-
dale. Questions or comments can be sent to
P.O. Box CB-13060 — email —
coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone 429-
6770.

The proper work

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

ALTHOUGH polite society says that looks are
not everything, you have to concede that they
mean something. The first impression of many
people is based on appearance from their clothes,
posture, height and even their hair.

Lately, more and more people have been the vic-
tims of "bad hair days” because it seems that cer-
tain employers have become more concerned with
how employees wear their hair than how well they
perform on the job.

Many would venture to ask, what does hair have
to do with how I perform? How important are
hairstyles in the workplace? President of Cynergy
Counselling and Consultants, Cyndi Williams-
Rahming said hair is an extremely important com-
ponent on any workforce and something that
should be taken very seriously.

“Hair is extremely important because it is a part
of your physique and a physical appearance par-
ticularly for persons who have to deal with cus-
tomers on a daily basis,” Mrs Rahming said.

Mrs Rahming said that most companies carry a
uniform or dress policy that may make it easier on
employees.

“Most companies have an employee uniform
policy which encompasses your hair to your feet.
Hair has to be neatly done. Most companies do not
normally allow braids or dreadlocks. Some places
require you to have your hair under a cap or a
net,” Mrs Rahming said.

When it comes to those who are new to the job
market, Mrs Rahming said she would advise them
to keep their hair and appearance as subtle and
simple as possible.

“From a consultant’s point of view, I do not
advise people who come to me looking for jobs to
colour their hair. [ have from time to time coloured
my own hair from brown to black and vice versa
but nothing red, green or yellow that stands out.
Maybe in the fashion industry that may work out
but depending on the type of job the person is
looking for that is not acceptable, especially for
front desk or an office job,” Mrs Rahming said.

Mrs Rahming said that clients and customers

Just this once

hotel room.

really want to see what they consider to be a cor-
porate professional image when it comes to ser-
vice.

“You have to really be able to impress that
person the very first time they see you and that
is going to mean that you have to dress to
impress. You never get a second chance to
make a first impression. The title does not
matter. If you are an owner, a driver or a
salesman, you should always have your hair
one colour. I do have people who have asked
my advice on streaking their hair in the work-
place, and I think it is acceptable as long as the
streaks are not loud and overbearing,” Mrs Rah-
ming said.

With some persons, having the right image for a
corporation can be challenging.

“Persons try to portray their personality through
clothing, and so it sometimes is considered to be
an individual thing and it is hard to convince
some people that this is a lifestyle change that
they have to do. It takes time and won’t happen
overnight because change is a process, however, the
first step is defining what image you want to pro-
ject,” Mrs Rahming said.

When it comes to those ladies who wear weaves
in the workplace, Mrs Rahming suggests buying
quality weave and find someone who will install it
to make it look as neat as possible. This means
investing a little more dollars for weave or exten-
sions that will last and look realistic.

“Tt has to be neat, clean and in place. A lot of
the businesses that I consult for do not allow
the ‘fan up do style’. It has to be back in one or
in a style that is as compact as possible. I under-
stand the expression of self, but by the same
token when you express yourself it has to be
done in a way where you present yourself
in society in a positive image that causes
people to hire you or date you — you
have to look at the bigger picture, long
term,” Mrs Rahming said.

¢ Tell us what you think e-mail your
comments to tribune@tribuneme-
dia.net or send us a fax at 328-2398.

themselves to the confines of
a monogamous relationship,
and feel “variety is the spice of
life.”

However for her, the deci-
sion to be a part of the act will
only happen again should she

FROM page 12

at the time she was on the
island of San Salvador taking
part in a college research pro-
ject.

She said her Mr X was a res-
ident of the island she'd only
met briefly during her arrival.

Noting that there was noth-
ing special about him other
than his physically appeal, she
admits that she was attracted
to him from the moment their
eyes first connected.

She said after working in the
same area for a few hours, the
guy soon offered to buy her a
drink, which was followed by a
casual conversation.

About three hours later, she
told him that she was ready to
leave, and invited him to her

After they got there, there
was some more small talk, kiss-
ing and the rest is history.

Afterwards she said she did
feel trashy, and said the reality
of her decision soon flooded
her mind.

“T though Oh my God, I'm
now one of ‘those’ women.”

Now eight years later, she
feels the act itself was in poor
taste, but has a new respect for
women who can do it.

“The whole one night stand
was a new thing for me, but
after going through the experi-
ence it was an eye opening and
humbling experience, because
now I realise that some things
just happen.”

Chanel claims she has friends
that have one-night-stands all
the time, who refuse to limit

be single, and without any sort
of commitment to anyone.

24-year-old graphic design-
er Rose Beckford, tells of an
experience with a guy from col-
lege whom she had only known
for a short time and who she
conveniently linked up with to
satisfy a desire.

She said at the time she was
not involved in a relationship,
and considered it natural to
give herself to the near
stranger.

Now that she is in a rela-
tionship, she feels all the right
elements exist for a monoga-
mous relationship, but added
that her book on one night
stands remains a very real pos-
sibility.

30-year-old professional

Brenda Reimer, said she too
has taken part in a one night
fling, but insist that the rules
need to be self evident from
the start.

“There's nothing wrong with
two consenting adults coming
together for something they
both really want, but you obvi-
ously need to take certain pre-
cautions.”

Brenda said safe sex is a
must for her, added with an
understanding on both sides
that the act is a one time thing,
with no other expectations.

As with most women who
do end up feeling guilty and
regretful of their encounters,
she said that happens because
of a double standard in soci-
ety which allows men to have
as many sexual partners as
they desire, and where a wom-
an's desire to maintain a
wholesome image limits her to
just one partner.

Although there are some
women who obviously have no



qualms on chance encounters,
there however remains two
realities when it comes to one-
night-stands and women.

The first is, although most
women may want to measure
up to the same levels of sexual
indiscretion as their male coun-
terparts, the feeling of regret
is a certain deterrent to a sec-
ond such encounter.

The second is that unlike the
average male who may take the
bait of a one nighter whether
involved or not and feeling no
weight, the average woman will
only seriously consider having
a one night stand if she is
unconfined to the boundaries
of a committed relationship,
and able to handle the back-
lash of being viewed as a
“loose” woman by society.

¢ Tell us what you think by
sending us a fax at 328-2398 or
e-mail us at lallen@tribuneme-
dia.net

Developing
_a positive
body image

: Mi By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

WOMEN in the Bahamas

: are under great pressure to
? measure up to a certain social
? and cultural ideal of beauty,
? which can lead to poor body
? image. Women are constant-
? ly bombarded with "Barbie-
i like" doll images in a society
? that is plagued by obesity. By
? presenting an ideal that is so
? difficult to achieve and main-
? tain, the diet product and
? gym industries are assured of
? growth and profits. It is no
? accident that youth is increas-
? ingly promoted, along with
? thinness, as an essential cri-
? terion of beauty. The mes-
? sage being sent out is either
? all women need to lose
? weight or that the natural
? aging process is not some-
? thing to look forward to.

With a positive or healthy

? body image, a woman has a
? real perception of her size
? and shape, and she feels com-
? fortable with her body. With
i a negative body image, a
? woman has a distorted per-
? ception of her shape and size,
? compares her body to others,
? and feels shame and anxiety
? about her body.

Being unhappy with one’s

i body can affect how someone
? thinks and feels about them-
? selves as a person. A poor
? body image can lead to emo-
? tional distress, low self-
i esteem, dieting, anxiety,
? depression, and eating disor-
i ders. Developing a positive
? body image and a healthy
? mental attitude is crucial to
? a woman's happiness and
? wellness.

College of the Bahamas

: Student, Tina Miller, said she

? feels that Bahamian society

? also places heavy emphasis

? on body image due to the
? diversified culture.

“Everybody has their days

' i and although I struggle with
=: my weight, I try to look in the
mirror and try to find a posi-

: tive aspect. I have a certain

aura. In my opinion it is not

$ every day you can look 100

per cent, but there are days
where you can have inner
beauty that shines brighter
than your outer beauty,” Ms
Miller said.

Ms Miller said she feels
there is not a lot of cultural
interaction because a lot of
people do not feel accepted in
society because their bodies
or features are not what is
expected of them.

“If you go into the nail
salons, beauty salons and
beauty supply stores, women
spend a lot of money on
beauty or what they think is

= beauty to be accepted.
; Women bleach their skin, add

false eye lashes and sew in 26
inch weaves. The men do it
too. They have to have the
best outfits and the latest
rides and haircuts just to be
accepted. There is a lot of cul-
tural tension especially in the
more abundant races in the

? Bahamas such as the Cubans,
: Jamaicans and Haitians that
? live here. If someone is too
? black, their nose is what we
: call ‘spread’ then automati-
? cally they are put into a class
? based on their looks,” Ms
? Miller said.

Other pressures can come

: from those who interact in a
i person’s everyday life. Fami-
: ly and friends can influence
? one’s body image with posi-
§ tive and negative comments.

A doctor's health advice can
be misinterpreted and affect
how a woman sees herself
and feels about her body as
well. When this happens,
there is a need to learn how
to love exactly what is seen

i in the mirror on a daily basis.

Everyone wants to look

i their best but a healthy body
i is not always linked to
? appearance. In fact, healthy
i bodies come in all shapes and
: sizes. Changing one’s body
i image can mean changing the
i way they think about their
: body. At the same time,
: healthy lifestyle choices are
i also key to improving body
: image. Healthy eating can
i promote healthy skin and
i? hair, along with strong bones.
: Regular exercise has been
: shown to boost self-esteem,
i self-image, and energy levels
? and plenty of rest is key to
: stress management.

“When I look in the mir-

? ror I know I may not be a size
? double zero or I may not
: have the lightest skin color,
? but I know I am fearfully and
? wonderfully made by God
: and if this is the body he gave
? me then I will do everything I
? can to take care of it,” Ms
i Miller said.
ise












wt ORLANDO

High:63°FA7°C . Sunshine. Partly cloudy with Partly sunny and Partly sunny and Sunshine and Mostly sunny, breezy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
- ee a ae spotty showers. breezy. breezy. comfortable. and pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
i Low: 36° F/2°C 5 5 5 :
. @ - High: 75 High: 77 High: 78 High: 79
TAMPA =} f High: 72° Low: 63° Low: 65° Low: 66° Low: 69° Low: 70° sede ED
au i , PETE Ear
High: 62° F/17° C ' \ | _-69°-62°F 70°-64° F 74°-66° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.
Low: 37°F/3°C 2 r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel a an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:10pm. 22 6:14am. 0.2
e @ re elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, 6:13 p.m. 0.0
oe ,, (i nt re
j : Wednesday'2:49 a.m. 2/ 7:21am. 0.3
3 a Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Thirstay 0am. 07 S32am. 03
; Ya ABACO Temperature 2:28pm. 22 8:32pm. 0.0
A High: 64° F/18° C FUNGI es cceatcates Qacarvareeetacecaaeee caceeeae® 73° F/23° C Frida 314am. 27 O40am. 02
. “a L 5° F 41°C LOW sessshasscccagetes 62° FA7° C y 3:40pm. 23 9:44pm. -04
- ow: 52° F/ Normal high ..... TORS gE es
” ; Normal low 65° F/18° C
be jp Ses @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's HIgh osscccsssescseecrseene 7° Fea CNT CII
' —— High: 68° F/20°C | year's OW a... 68° F/20° C oa ae i ie
"Ou Low: 42°F/6°C Precipitation ss unrise...... °31.a.m. Moonrise... . 10:39 a.m.
. = As of 1 p.m. yesterday ou... 0.29" Sunset....... 6:13 p.m. Moonset......... none
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT i Year to date : First Full Last New
High: 69° F/21°C @ High: 63° FA7°C Normal year to date oo... 3.54" - - =
Low: 46° F/8° C Low: 49° F/9°C 1s
AccuWeather.com e
o @ Forecasts and graphics provided by oie ay
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.4 Mar.10 9 Mar.18 = Mar. 26
High: 68° F/20° C EL ELT HERA
Low: 46° F/8°C NASSAU a ¥ °FA2°C
High: 72° F/22°C ow: 54° F/I
Low: 63° F/17°C
a 2.
KEY WEST CO. CATISLAND
High: 64° F/18°C High: 70° F/21°C
Low: 52° F/11°C Low: 53° F/12°C
@
GREAT EXUMA O SAN SALVADOR
High: 72° F/22° C i ab. 70 °
Low: 59°F/15°C High: 75° F/24° C
; " Low: 58°F/14°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ; ANDROS | f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 74° F/23°C
Low: 55° F/13°C ©:
LONGISLAND
Low: 59° F/15°C
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 80° F/27° C
F/C FIC FC FC F/C FIC F/C FIC FC FC Fic FC mt Low: 65° F/18° C
Albuquerque 71/21 44/6 pe 72/22 45/7 c Indianapolis 35/1 23/-5 s 45/7 35/1 pe Philadelphia 25/-3 11/-11 s 33/0 22/-5 pc
Anchorage 25/-3 13/-10 sf 24/-4 13/-10 sn Jacksonville 55/12 29/-1 5 6116 39/3 s Phoenix 85/29 59/15 pce 83/28 58/14 c CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 46/7 26/-3 s 59/15 40/4 s Kansas City 45/7 36/2 s = 61/16 45/7 pc _—~Pittsburgh 24/-4 10/-12 s 341 22/5 po RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:81°F/27°c
Atlantic City 28/2 11/-11 s 34/1 20/-6 pc Las Vegas 73/22 50/10 pe 70/21 48/8 s Portland,OR 5643 37/2 c 51/10 39/3 sh High: 76° F/24° C Low: 64°F/18°C
Baltimore 27/-2 13/-10 s 36/2 23/-5 pc Little Rock 53/11 35/1 s 64417 51/10 pe Raleigh-Durham 35/1 17/-8 s 43/6 30/-1 pe Low:57°F/14°C
Boston 27/-2 13/-10 peo 28/-2 18/-7 s Los Angeles 67/19 52/41 pe 6417 50/10 c St. Louis 40/4 31/0 pe 57/13 44/6 pc . aie.
Buffalo 18/-7 15/-9 s 29/-1 19/-7 pc Louisville 38/3 29/-1 s 52/1 43/6 pe Salt Lake City 58/14 38/3 c 542 33/0 ¢ GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 47/8 26/-3 s 56/13 33/0 s Memphis 49/9 39/3 pce 60/15 53/11 pc San Antonio 74/23 5713 s 82/27 61/16 s High: 80° F/27° C
Chicago 36/2 20/-6 pc 40/4 30/-1 pc Miami 68/20 54/12 s 72/22 59/15 San Diego 68/20 56/13 pc 66/18 55/12 pc Low 67°FAG°C
Cleveland 25/-3 13/-10 s 36/2 27/-2 pc Minneapolis 34/1 21/-6 c 36/2 26/-3 pc San Francisco 58/14 48/8 r 58/14 46/7 + .
Dallas 68/20 51/10 s 81/27 59/15 s Nashville 43/6 25/-3 s 58/14 43/6 pc Seattle 5010 37/2 c 48/8 39/3 pc
Denver 71/21 36/2 pe 67/19 34/1 pc New Orleans 57/13 44/6 s 70/21 58/14 s Tallahassee 58/14 28/-2 s 66/18 37/2 s calli. %
Detroit 28/-2 18/-7 $s 37/2 27/-2 c New York 23/-5 15/-9 pc 33/0 24/-4 § Tampa 62/16 43/6 s 69/20 50/10 s >
Honolulu 80/26 69/20 pc 78/25 66/18 c Oklahoma City 63/17 47/8 s 76/24 49/9 § Tucson 85/29 54/12 po 82/27 53/11 c Vw
Houston 68/20 54/12 s 76/24 60/15 s Orlando 63/17 39/3 s 70/21 45/7 $s Washington, DC 28/-2 18/-7 s 39/3 29/-1 pc














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HIGH \. HIGH

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Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
47/8
44/6
64/17
72/22
93/33
85/29
57/13
43/6
62/16
53/11
44/6
67/19
65/18
46/7
48/8
84/28
72/22
93/33
37/2
13/22
78/25
65/18
43/6
45/7
50/10
50/10
42/5
70/21
32/0
75/23
85/29
50/10
52/11
76/24
82/27
86/30
48/8
52/11
90/32
79/26
81/27
14/-10
32/0
43/6
89/31
93/33
36/2
50/10
40/4
90/32
70/21
57/13
83/28
90/32
86/30
79/26
82/27
90/32
45/7
37/2
82/27
72/22
49/9
22/-5
86/30
47/8
48/8
37/2
27/-2

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
70/21
33/3
32/0
54/12
59/15
79/26
74/23
45/7
30/-1
57/13
45/7
33/0
57/13
47/8
37/2
41/5
68/20
55/12
Sie
17/-8
57/13
66/18
43/8
37/2
36/2
34/1
37/2
12/-11
52/11
25/-3
66/18
55/12
45/7
44/6
55/12
72/22
68/20
36/2
36/2
79/26
41/5
55/12
3/-16
21/-6
33/0
56/13
61/16
27/-2
37/2
35/1
77/25
52/11
43/8
74/23
73/22
61/16
50/10
69/20
68/20
32/0
34/1
68/20
67/19
41/5
9/-12
73/22
37/2
44/6
32/0
17/-8







pe

pc
pc
sh
pc
t
S$
pc
sh
pc
Cc
C
pc
sh
r

s
t
c
c
c

pc

Wednesday

High
F/C
90/32
50/10
45/7
64/17
73/22
91/32
84/28
55/12
39/3
63/17
63/17
48/8
62/16
66/18
45/7
50/10
75/23
74/23
97/36
40/4
79/26
83/28
63/17
43/6
39/3
52/11
46/7
26/-3
79/26
34/1
79/26
85/29
59/15
55/12
74/23
81/27
84/28
41/5
46/7
86/30
79/26
86/30
19/-7
30/-1
52/11
91/32
93/33
31/0
41/5
45/7
89/31
77/25
61/16
82/27
90/32
94/34
84/28
83/28
91/32
50/10
37/2
79/26
75/23
52/11
30/-1
89/31
47/8
53/11
43/6
32/0

Low
F/C
72/22

WwW

Ss

41/5 6

27/-2
54/12
61/16
77/25
74/23
40/4
32/0
57/13
47/8
38/3
55/12
45/7
30/-1
41h
64/17
58/14
17/25
21/-6
57/13
68/20
51/10
39/3
34/1
36/2
34/1
10/-12
67/13
28/-2
73/22
54/12
52/11
43/6
51/10
72/22
67/19
32/0
34/1
75/23
415
59/15
7/-13
14/-10
33/0
56/13
61/16
25/-3
30/-1
36/2
77/25
55/12
50/10
72/22
65/18
71/21
52/11
67/19
67/19
34/1
34/1
59/15
68/20
45/7
21/-6
74/23
41/5
49/9
34/1
19/-7

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





TUESDAY, MARCH O3rp, 2009, PAGE 11C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariINE FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: SSW at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-8 Miles 74° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 6-10 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Los Angeles

67/52

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice

Miami
68/54

Fronts
Cold ==

War iets

Stationary eag~=afi

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.





-10s



-0s Os— 10s 20s /303)) 40s



AUTO INSURANCE

Never st
CUBIS will

Our

out us!

if Smart choice 1s
| five Management
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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAB AM AS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“New Proven Galo Abaca | Heuthera | Exum
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[EEE Se




WHEN love is wrapped up
in a steamy night of passion,
do the usual rules of what

women want still apply?
Compared to men, the average women
today is looking for a partner who can
make her laugh, is intelligent, has a sense
of self, is someone who will make a good
father and somewhere down the list,
someone who is physically attractive.
With most one-night-stands being con-
sidered a common and likely choice by

THE TRIBUNE

MACE,

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN

Tribune Features Reporter e lallen@tribunemedia.net

the average man, most men find it hard
to believe that women are just as capable
of having a similar encounter, with no
strings attached.

Speaking with three women who
shared their experiences of a one time
chance encounter, Tribune Woman
learned of some common rules of
engagement when it comes to random
encounters from the female perspective.
All names have been changed.

The first, a 26-year-old banker,
Chanel Williams, said that contrary to
the common belief, that one-night-

stands are exclusive to men, women
too are beings capable of handling a
chance encounter without wanting any-
thing else.

“Yow re basing the experience pure-
ly on attraction, but the question of
whether he would make a good hus-
band or father never even crossed my
mind, it was only about fulfilling that
need for that time.”

Chanel recalls her steamy experience
which happened when she was 18, where

SEE page 10

PAGE

TUESDAY, MARCH 3,

12B

2009

Wedding Date:

June 20, 2009

eA BUTTONS

Pa vA



Wedding Bells

Oo gar: Pret
&
Rodman Deleveaux

See you at
21st Annual

Bahamas
Bridal Show

12 noon Sunday March 29,2009

WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT
CABLE BEACH



=

Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway « 394-1759