Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.82

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009
















‘$1 million missing’ “° masks
int
from embassy funds. :-.

Driver is believed to have
suffered seizure behind wheel

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

Auditor General’s dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Report unable to FREEPORT - A man and woman were killed Sunday
when the truck they were in crashed into the Cumming

account for money Temple AME Church on Settler’s Way, bringing the

: traffic fatality count to five on Grand Bahama.
spent on Bahamian The identities or ages of the victims were still not
. ; known to police up to press time on Sunday.
office in Cuba Asst Supt Clarence Reckley said the accident occurred

around 2.55pm on Settler’s Way, near Columbus Drive,
involving a 1992 Chevy Truck, licensed T-6916.

He reported that the male driver and female passenger
were both fatally injured at the scene. It was believed that
the driver may have suffered a seizure while driving.

Police investigations revealed that the driver lost con-
trol of the vehicle, which ran off the road, crashing into the
eastern wall of Cummings Temple AME Church.

“Investigations suggest that the truck was travelling
west along Settlers Way in the left west bound lane when,
according to eye witnesses, it veered to the right and ran
off the road and crashed into the church wall,” ASP

SEE page eight

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AUDITORS claim to have
been unable to properly
account for almost a million dol-
lars worth of funds said to have
been spent on the establishment
of a Bahamian embassy in
Cuba.

The 2006/2007 Auditor Gen-
eral’s Report, in its section on
foreign audits, recommends that
to “promote transparency and
accountability complete
accounting and documentation
for the ...funds be provided for
audit scrutiny.”

Those funds include a sum of



Hundreds of thousands
missing from Ministry



DETAILS were sketchy
up to press time last
night, but according to






sani thesis ane gene m BL eee
; . three police officers int H ighlights discrepancies
Se er ee i were seriously injured in Minister Says Armed robberies Tribune Staff in the Ministry’s
eral, Miami, Florida) “for the : :

é : ; this car crash at the ral tl lel k Reporter accounts including
purchase of necessary furnish- i VITOR ULL Cc mreynolds@ large payments without
ings for the official residence Shirley Street/Mackey report supports y ge pay

tribunemedia.net any documentation and
over half a million dol-
lars of missing rent.

It is noted the Min-
istry made two pay-
ments of $385,195.40
for repairs of a 10-unit

Street junction on
Saturday night at
around 9.30pm.

This police vehicle
collided with a white
pick-up truck. Calls to

PTR ase ita tt

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@

(of the Bahamian Ambassador
to Cuba) and the embassy”.

In this instance, auditors
reviewing the accounts said they
were “unable to verify the accu-
racy” of a listing of items pur-

‘visa scam’
allegations

m By ALISON LOWE

HUNDREDS of
thousands of dollars
spent by the Ministry
of Housing in 2006 and
2007 and unaccounted

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Kenneth Russell





chased with the money as they
were “not provided with ade-

SEE page eight



police yesterday for
more information were
not returned.



Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FINDINGS in the latest Audi-
tor General’s Report appear to
“vindicate” former FNM chair-
man Carl Bethel in his allegations

tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
armed robberies at two Nas-
sau businesses this weekend
and the robbery of two peo-
ple who were attacked with

for is still missing and the sub-
ject of a police investigation,
Minister of Housing Kenneth
Russell said.

The Auditor General’s
Report on revenue and expen-
diture in the Ministry of Hous-

complex in Freeport, but there
is no documentation to prove
the work was carried out.

And large payments were
made to a company for materi-

SEE page eight

394-1378

Meee o al Pett tea

that there was a “visa scam” going
on in the Consular Division of
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

“T think that certainly the find-
ings of the auditor general cer-
tainly seem to support the essence
of the criticisms that I was making
about a lack of due diligence in
the visa section at that time,” said
Mr Bethel, now minister of edu-
cation.

“The Auditor General’s report
is all time dated, in that it would
relate to years prior to the date of
the report. So certainly they were
referring directly to the same doc-
umentation that I would’ve been
referring to and drew the same

a cutlass on Saturday.

An armed robber held up
an employee of the Super-
wash laundromat in Robin-
son Road shortly before 3am
on Sunday after he entered
the premises pretending to
be a customer.

He held the Superwash
attendant at gunpoint and
demanded cash before get-
ting away with an undeter-
mined amount of cash and
disappearing into the Mon-
tell Heights area.

The hold-up followed an
armed robbery at Sill’s

SEE page eight

Colon and stomach cancer
on the rise in the Bahamas

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

LOCAL doctors are concerned about a marked increase in
colon and stomach cancer in Bahamians and fear that the numbers
could go up drastically in the near future.

Consultant for medical oncology at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital Dr Theodore Turnquest told The Tribune he predicts that the
stomach and colon cancer levels in the Bahamas will develop “into
something more.”

SEE page eight

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS













































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Police operation results in 30
arrests in connection with drugs

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Assistant Commis- |
sioner of Police Marvin Dames
revealed that a police operation |
launched over the weekend in
Freeport resulted in the arrest of 30
persons in connection with illegal
drugs.

Of those persons arrested, 27 are
expected to be arraigned before the |
courts today, he said.

Mr Dames reported that a total of
seven persons were arrested for sup-
plying dangerous drugs, which result-
ed in the seizure of some $2,000 in
cash. The other arrests were for drug possession.

Mr Dames said “Operation Harvest Time”
was conducted at Coral Gardens, an area
known for illegal drug activity. The first phase
of the operation was launched on Friday and the
second phase on Saturday.

ACP Dames was extremely pleased with the
success of the operation in Freeport, which was
carried out by the DEU, CDU, Mobile Patrol,
and the newly implemented Anti-violence Inter-
vention Response Team (AVIT) on Grand
Bahama.

He said the first phase of the operation con-
sisted of those persons purchasing illegal drugs
and involved the stopping and searching of 30
vehicles, which resulted in the arrest of 30 per-
sons by police for possession of dangerous
drugs.

The second phase conducted on Saturday, he
said, concentrated those persons who sell illegal
drugs in the community.

“Operation Harvest Time” will be a model of
our approach as we move forward to policing

Marvin Dames



this island of Grand Bahama,” he
| said at a press briefing on Sunday at
Police 4Headquarters.

“We at the RBPF Grand Bahama
District are committed in our resolve
to cleaning up the communities of
Grand Bahama of all forms of crim-
inality and vices,” he said.

Mr Dames was also pleased with
| the seizure of the firearms in the past
several weeks on Grand Bahama.

“We seized more firearms over
the last few wecks than any other
| time in the history on this island. You

| could expect as we intensify our
= efforts throughout the island that
there would be more seizures,” he
said.

Mr Dames said police will be relentless in its
pursuit of criminals who seek to intimidate cit-
izens of Grand Bahama.

“There will be no room for you to hide; we
will find you wherever you go. I am sending
this warning out, change your life now because
we will be relentless.

“We will not rest until the Grand Bahama
community is free of those persons destroying
these beautiful neighbourhoods,” he said.

“We intend to pursue those persons out there
possessing firearms, selling drugs, and breaking
into people’s homes. We have over the last few
weeks stepped up our efforts and as a result
arrested persons in the act of breaking into
businesses and homes.

And that is a positive sign that our patrols are
becoming a little more effective and we have
increased visibility and so we are extremely
pleased. We understand that a lot of work
remains. We are committed in our resolve to
restoring law and order in the streets,” said Mr
Dames.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

‘Grand Bahama
Shipyard is
the number
one in world’

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Shipyard is the number
one shipyard in the world, ser-
vicing four times more ships
than its main rival.

The shipyard’s investment
here has now reached close to
$200 million, making it “the
biggest investment in the
Caribbean.”

These declarations were
made at the 11th annual Grand
Bahama Business Outlook in
Freeport.

According to Giora Israel,
senior vice president of port
development at Carnival Corpo-
ration, the shipyard is one of
Carnival Corporation’s major
investments in the Bahamas.

Carnival Corporation owns 80
per cent of the shipyard, while
the other 20 per cent is owned
by the Grand Bahama Port
Authority.

Commended

Mr Israel commended Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and
his government for supporting
such an investment. He also
thanked Sir Albert Miller, for-
mer Grand Bahama Port
Authority CEO and chairman
for his role.

“Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham is the right leader at
this right time to lead the coun-
try today,” he said followed by
applause.

“It was Mr
Ingraham who
negotiated the
shipyard and for
>) that we respect
. = him and his gov-
Hubert — ernment.”
Ingraham Mr Israel said
that the shipyard’s
acquisition of a new $60 million
dry dock last September has
brought its investment close to
$200 million on Grand Bahama.

“This is the biggest invest-
ment in the Caribbean here and
will continue grow.

“Today, this (the GB Ship-
yard) is the number one ship-
yard in the world servicing four
times more ships than the num-
ber two shipyard in the world; it
is just extraordinary,” he said.

According to Mr Israel, 80
per cent of the ships serviced
are tankers and cargo vessels
and general ships.

He explained that although
Carnival owns a lot of cruise
ships, the only way to have con-
tinuous employment year round
and have viable long term busi-
ness for Freeport was to make
the facility available to every-
body.

Mr Israel indicated that the
shipyard is also making signifi-
cant contributions to the
Freeport economy.

He noted that the employ-
ment of Bahamians has
increased continuously at the
facility.

“We have a lot of expatriates
working here. Because of the
specialty and professionalism
that we require in this industry
(we must employ) people that
have 10 and 20 years experi-
ence,” he explained.

“We have more Bahamians
who do not work in tourism that
work in the shipyard than in any
other industry in this country.”

“Tt is one of the largest users
of electricity from the local
power company. We are sus-
taining the economy of Freeport
where shipyard crews are using
rental apartments and housing,”

We have a great shipyard
here. It is a business we are
doing together and I think all in
Freeport will continue to sup-
port it,” Mr Israel said.

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New calls for redundancy
fund amid CLICO crisis

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CALLS for a redundancy
fund to help those who lose
employment when companies
close have been renewed now
170 CLICO (Bahamas)
employees could lose their
jobs.

The Trade Union Congress
(TUC) is calling on the Min-
istry of Labour to immediate-
ly act on recommendations
put forward by union presi-
dent Obie Ferguson to estab-
lish a redundancy fund to
which all employers would
contribute to assist workers
who lose employment as a
result of a company closing.

TUC secretary general
Tyrone Morris said the need
to establish a fund became
critical when CLICO
(Bahamas) staff learned last
week that their jobs are in
jeopardy.

The government appointed
accountant Craig Gomez as
liquidator of the company
under a Supreme Court order
on Tuesday in a move to
wind-up CLICO (Bahamas)
and over 100 agents and
employees were sent home on
Thursday while liquidators
assessed the situation.

Fate

The future employment of
CLICO (Bahamas) employ-
ees is still not known and Mr
Morris bemoaned the fate of
the Bahamian workers, some
of whom have worked at CLI-
CO (Bahamas) for more than
20 years, and the fact they
could be left to fend for them-
selves. He said: “Once again
the TUC is minded that this
recent closure of CLICO
(Bahamas) adds to the Glad-
stone Farm, Driftwood and
Pioneer Shipping where
affected employees were ter-

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| tion.
v “We
therefore
plead with
the Minister
of Labour
to act swift-
ly in pro-
tecting the interest of these
workers.

“In the meantime the TUC
invites the affected workers
at CLICO to contact us on
328-8973 for guidance.”

New Covenant Baptist
Church Bishop Simeon Hall
called a public meeting at the
church in East West Highway,
Nassau, to ascertain the
details of the closure as he is
one of about 29,000 policy-
holders affected by the wind-
up of CLICO (Bahamas).

He said: “I hope our gath-
ering will send a strong mes-
sage that we want to recover

Simeon Hall

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all of our money, and we
expect the government to pro-
tect our hard-earned dollars.

“We are sympathetic
towards the workers of CLI-
CO who were unceremoni-
ously left in limbo last week.

“IT do not know how this
will all end.

“Suffice to say that better
and more effective regulations
must be enforced to protect
persons who invest in compa-
nies that come to our shores.”

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Visa racket still unanswered

LATE IN the summer of 2006 a boat owner
complained to The Tribune that he had been
barred from Nassau’s visa department because
he had “blown the whistle” on a visa racket at
Norfolk House.

He had alleged that visas were being sup-
plied illegally to Haitian “mules” for $1,000 a
time. Human traffickers, he claimed, were col-
lecting up to 40 visas at a time from Norfolk
House while he — a legitimate Bahamian boat
owner — could not get a visa through regular
channels.

He said he had been virtually put out of
business because he was told he could no longer
get visas for the three Haitians he needed to
operate his freight boats between Nassau and
Haiti. These crewmen were essential, he said.

However, he had been told by the police that
he could no longer go to the visa department.
“They have barred me,” he said. “I am being
victimised for telling the truth.”

He said he had a tape recording of a visa
employee asking him to pay him $1,000 for a
visa for a crewman. He was willing to play the
recording on any radio station that would open
their airwaves to him.

In an attempt to verify this information, a
Tribune reporter sought out other sources in the
ministry. Not only was the boatman’s story ver-
ified, but it was verified many times over. Our
reporter was told that despite our initial story
about the scam, the “mules” were still there
collecting their visas. It was also alleged that
the 90-day visas were handled by traffickers to
include Haitians who were willing to pay the
price. These Haitians with their stamped visas
were then absorbed into the local Haitian com-
munities — virtually disappearing under the
radar of the law.

A spokesman for then foreign affairs minister
Fred Mitchell denied the story. “It was not cred-
ible,” said the minister’s spokesman, adding
that all “allegations made in connection with all
such stories have been turned over to the police
and their investigation is ongoing.” The
spokesman said that the police had asked them
not to comment further on the investigations,
but that in due course a statement on behalf of
Minister Mitchell would be made to parliament.

Time passed. There was no comment from
the Ministry. There was no report from the
police and Mr Mitchell made no report to par-
liament.

But the report did not die a natural death as
many had hoped. The public continued to ask
questions. And persons within the ministry con-
tinued their concern and agitation.

“The traffickers are still coming in with bun-
dles of passports, and they are still leaving with
the visas stamped in them,” said one source.
And said another: “On Mondays, Tuesdays and
Fridays, a whole boatload of visas are being
handed out.” This was an obvious exaggera-

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tion, but even one illegal visa is one too many.

The allegations centred on Haitian and Chi-
nese immigrants who, it was claimed, were pay-
ing large amounts of money to “traffickers”
who secured visas with the cooperation from
some corrupt public officials. Again there was
official denial. However, this time the ministry’s
wrath was turned on The Tribune for using
unnamed sources to open a Pandora’s box that
officials wanted sealed as quickly as possible.

Education Minister Carl Bethel, then in
Opposition, was levelling similar charges against
the foreign ministry in connection with illegal
Chinese immigrants. His allegations were dis-
missed as political mischief.

Now we have the Auditor General’s report
for 2006/7 — the relevant period — dealing
with the consular (visa) division of the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs.

The auditor, among other discrepancies with
the cash book, noted that in some instances
visa applications were not complete, for exam-
ple “signatures of applicants were missing; the
declaration to be signed by the applicant pur-
porting that the information was true and cor-
rect, was missing; the occupation of the appli-
cant was not indicated on the forms; the appli-
cant’s photograph was not attached.”

Also, the report continued: “Our review
showed that one person was able to sponsor
up to 16 persons in a given period.”

During the audit it was discovered that an
applicant sponsored several individuals to attend
a funeral service that had been held two days
before the application was made.

The “visa ledger showed that for the period
July 2004 to June 2007, over 9,000 visa were
granted.” However, there was no evidence of
“exit forms to substantiate the number of visa
holders who left the country.”

After reading the report, Mr Bethel believes
his 2006 claims against the Foreign Ministry
have been vindicated. However, Mr Mitchell,
the foreign minister during that period, consid-
ers Mr Bethel’s comments on the report “utter
nonsense.” He believes the findings were the
result of “just bureaucracy and errors of that
time.”

The Tribune has many questions among
them:

Was this matter ever sent to the police, if so
what were their findings and why was no report
made to parliament as promised at the time?

This episode shows the urgent need of a
Freedom of Information Act so that such prob-
lems can get instant attention rather than hav-
ing to wait almost three years for discussion
after the initial complaint.

In the meantime, whether it was a deliber-
ate “scam” or bureaucratic “errors of that
time,” it has done a lot of damage to this
country, and complicated its already compli-
cated immigration problems.



Appalled by
claims about
Detention
Centre

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The recent press stories have
been highlighting the conditions
at the Detention Centre on
Carmichael Road.

The alleged treatment the
detainees are being given is
absolutely appalling and the gov-
ernment's lack of care or concern
is even more of an embarrass-
ment to this country.

T understand that we do have a
serious immigration problem, and
I have seen the increased num-
ber of raids on various construc-
tion sites and places of work,
rounding up those who are work-
ing illegally.

This is a great effort on the
government's part, and there is
no excuse for these people to
have the right to work here with-
out the proper authorization to
do so.

However to treat them so
poorly and brutally as such, for
coming to the Bahamas, some
even en route to other countries,
to find a better life for themselves

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia net



and maybe eventually obtain the
right to work, should not be tol-
erated.

Amnesty International has
already condemned the treatment
of these people at the Centre.
Our country is struggling with a
severe economic downturn at the
moment, why continue to make
the country look bad to the inter-
national community by allowing
this barbaric treatment to take
place.

There has not been one word
from any government official con-
demning or questioning the
alleged actions of some of the
officers at the Detention Centre.

As a Bahamian in this day and
age, I am very sad to say and see
that we are still living as a nation
of hypocrites, filled with corrup-
tion and bribery.

This was something that has

plagued this wonderful island
nation since the 1980's and nei-
ther government has been able
to rid themselves of it since then.
This has become a nation of
racism and ignorance when it
comes to people's human rights,
and I am sadly appalled by all of
this.

We take so much for granted
here, beautiful beaches and
waters, which fuels our tourism
economy and gives our people
jobs.

But a time will come when this
will come to a grinding halt and it
will be too late to do anything
about it.

If our nation keeps up with this
attitude of ignorance and "turning
your eye" we will slowly see all
that is good slip away from us.

T hope this will open a few eyes
as to what is really going on and
make people realize that things
need to change NOW.

CONCERNED
Nassau,
February 27, 2009.

Development of a University
of the Bahamas is imperative

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As an academic visitor to the
Bahamas, I read with interest
your February 25th editorial
regarding the establishment of
Ross University, including the
welcoming comments of Prime
Minister Ingraham.

It is indeed a positive devel-
opment for The Bahamas to be
known as an education destina-
tion, offering highly-priced clin-
ical programmes mainly to non-
Bahamians.

The spin-off employment
opportunities and related
spending are laudable, espe-
cially with the uncertain state
of the mainstream tourism sec-
tor.

However, the establishment
of an offshore site for select
clinical offerings should not be
seen as a substitute for the full
development of the University
of the Bahamas.

The global economic down-
turn makes it more imperative
than ever that there be an
indigenous Bahamian universi-
ty to serve as a platform for
national success.





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In the current world econo-
my, only those jurisdictions with
a total commitment to well-sup-
ported universities will succeed.
We need look no further than
the commitment of US Presi-
dent Obama to grasp the levers
of education, science and
knowledge to battle the eco-
nomic crisis.

As President of the Universi-
ty of Prince Edward Island
(UPED, I am well aware of the
competitive advantages that a
fine university can mean for a
small island jurisdiction; with
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than half the population of The
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ship.

With the well-developed
strategies and plans that are in
place, there is no time like the
present to take the imperative
next step to create The Univer-
sity of the Bahamas.

To not do so at this critical
stage in the regional and world
economy would be to take a
step backward.

H WADE
MacLAUCHLAN
President and
Vice-Chancellor,
University of Prince
Edward Island,
February, 2009.

Plan for restoring civility is spot on

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Letter writer Marcus Smith today in his letter titled: Sugges-
tions for restoring law and order - showed us that there are some
clear thinking people and his plan for bringing back civility is

spot on.

Prime Minister Ingraham simply adopt Mr Marcus Smith’s
plan and we will finally be on the way to secing a Bahamas we

can be rightly proud of.

Don’t do it quickly with the ever contraction of the economy,
violent crime, robberies, rapes, murders will increase to an

unmanageable level.

Time is now - if you can shake up BEC leadership, then

shake up everywhere else.

Oh by the way...if we don’t do anything do you really think
anyone anywhere will believe It is Better in The Bahamas?

H HUMES
Nassau,
February 21, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 5

TIO URAAUUT UMNO MIPIM ILICM om Royal



m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

A FREEDOM OF INFORMA-
TION ACT must be passed so that
the public can gain access in a time-
ly manner to knowledge that will
enable them to push for necessary
improvements in the way Govern-
ment does business, according to a
Government Minister.

Reacting to the findings of the
Auditor General’s 2006/2007 report,
which reviews Government min-
istries and departments to check for
irregularities in how public funds are
accounted for, Education Minister
Carl Bethel said its findings high-
lights the need for the Act to be
passed.

The document highlights numer-
ous accounting discrepancies across
the spectrum of Government and
consequently makes recommenda-
tions about how procedures can be
enhanced to ensure greater trans-
parency and accountability in the
management of public money.

Despite being a review of
accounts during the 2006/2007 bud-
getary period, the report was only
tabled in the House of Assembly last
Wednesday.

On the front page of the report, a
memorandum from Financial Sec-



retary Ruth Millar, dated June 3,
2008, states that Government is
“working towards a position where-
by any audit issues arising are
resolved within an appropriate time-
frame, and procedures are consoli-
dated to prevent such issues recur-
ring.”

In relation to the School Boards
and Schools Accounts, which fall
under Mr Bethel’s ministry, the
report expresses its “grave concern”
about the fact that “cheques requir-
ing two signatories were being
processed with only one signature
affixed.”

Controls

“Management should implement
proper controls to ensure that the
required signatures are affixed
before cheques are issued,” advised
the auditors, who point out that not
doing so leaves the system open to
abuse.

The criticism was one that arose
with respect to numerous other Goy-
ernment accounts in the report.

Meanwhile, auditors, finding that
books were not balanced, certain
individuals were carrying out “too
many (accounting) related functions”
that should be segregated, and cer-
tain payments were not adequately

MP opens music

lab at new school

mg By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Lucaya MP Neko Grant, Min-
ister of Public Works, continues his commit-
ment to the development of well-rounded stu-
dents through his music ministry, having opened
a new Music Lab at the new Freeport Junior

High School on Friday.

Mr Grant, who started his music ministry in
1996, has contributed musical instruments to

*

Neko Sein

more than 20 organisations, including schools, junkanoo groups and

churches.

The MP recently donated some 34 musical instruments, valued at
$10,000, to the Freeport Bible Church.
“Giving the gift of music to the youth of our nation has provided me

with much satisfaction,” he said.

“This gift of musical instruments to Freeport Junior High School is
a further demonstration of my commitment to enriching the lives of cur-
rent and future students of this school.”

Minister Grant said many studies have shown that music educa-
tion has a positive affect on children and can enhance their performance

in other subjects.

He told students that music training can also lead to careers that can

provide economic benefit.

“You can also become actively involved in your church as organists

or pianist,” he added.

(fea h oS ita a
alt Ly aT

*
-*

‘aa?
aS ai

>
%
xt
"
ee

Rosetta St.



accounted for, recommended that
internal controls are strengthened
and “officers assigned the accounting
functions be trained in basic book-
keeping.”

They further noted that a school
administrator was found still to be
conducting business on behalf of a
school after being transferred.

Mr Bethel said that he has made



you the information they’re going
to say ‘Well we’ll give you it when
we know what the facts are’, where-
as with a legislative intervention that
information can come forward faster
and then people will be able to make
their minds up at a much earlier
time,” he said.

“Like it or not, public knowledge
shapes public opinion and can shape

a public response and form a public
response that would not otherwise
be in a position where it can be
forced. If the public don’t know they
don’t know what to demand, where-
as if they know, the sooner they
know, the quicker they can make
demands of public officials to satisfy
their demands based on their knowl-
edge.”







Ph: 325-3336



addressing “lapses and errors” in the
accounting of School Boards a “mat-
ter of priority” since taking up the
post in 2007.

He said that while School Boards,
established in 1996, allow for crucial
decentralisation of decision making,
they must “be accountable for how
the funds are spent.”

“We’ve been working very hard
with all the school boards and not
only have been seeking to audit all of
them and have them addressed on a
school board by school board basis
and we’ve also started a training pro-
gramme for school board members,
as to what to demand and to expect
in terms of proper accounting and
transparency in terms of school
board accounts,” he said.

The Minister added, however, that
so far he has not been given any evi-
dence to suggest that despite weak
controls in some instances, money
was misappropriated.

Nonetheless, Mr Bethel said it is
of concern that discrepancies such
as those highlighted in the 2006/2007
report only become known to the
public years after the observations
are made.

The passing of a Freedom of
Information Act (FOIA), which
would give members of the public
the right to demand timely access to
certain Government information, is
a manifesto commitment of the Free
National Movement.

Mr Bethel said “there’s no ques-
tion” that the passing of a FOIA is a
critical issue if findings and discrep-
ancies such as those made by the
Auditor General are to be reacted to
and addressed in an effective way.

“Tf you leave officialdom to give

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Aaa US tourists accused of

terrorising wild ducks
and slaughtering pet

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IT’S ATIME OF JOY AND spe ea
11'S AGRAND TIME OF Py OR
PRAISE AND CELEBRATION! — oy

cranes 2009 - East Street Tabernacle

be ME:
‘AWAKE? LET’S CELEBRATE!!””

GUEST SPEAKERS:
BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD Monday, March 9th, 2000

General erseer Bishop Dr. Elgarnet &. Rakming, Notional Overseer

BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON
General Preshytet

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN

Global Outreach Director

BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK

CBL [nstrector

MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE
Internationa! Director of Women’s Ministries
BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN
Reeoponal Gverseer of Jamaica, Cayman
Islands Guyana and French Guiana

and MINISTER SONDTA MARTIN
BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS
Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islunds

BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES
National Overseer of the Church of Gad
Bahumies, Turks é& Catoos Islincds

LIVE VIA RADIO BAHAMAS [3-441 AM ond
S10 AM

The Convention climaxes on Sanday, March 15th
with the afternoon Annuul Parade and Water
Baptismal Service, followed by the evening
Service hbraadcast live on 28S Radio and TV 13
log on to: WwW.cogophahamas.org
For live webcasting

Ministering in song and performance
gre: the Centennial Mass Choir, the Tab-
ernack: Concert Choir, the Chorch of
God National Choir, the Bahamas Public
Officers Choir, and other Choirs, Praise
Teams and singing Groups, along with
the Bahama B aad, the Youth ard

ety «duced th Church ol =f F
Gael and sadera Brass als.

Bring, the fainily andih

* bles ed!

ay od

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AMERICAN tourists
accused of terrorising a flock
of wild ducks and slaughter-
ing a pet duck on a private cay
off Long Island are wanted by
police.

The Adamo sailboat crew
from Daytona Beach, Florida,
posted details of their
escapades at Hog Cay, in Joe
Sound, on an Internet blog
along with pictures of a
plucked duck in a roasting
pan ready for the oven.

They are suspected of hav-
ing trespassed on the 200-acre
private island owned by
lawyer Peter Graham and his
family, and are thought to
have walked through the pri-
vate cottages and across land-
scaped lawns where they
chased dozens of West Indi-
an tree ducks with their dog
for over two hours before they
caught and killed a flightless
rowan belonging to the Gra-
hams.

The innards, guts and
wingtips of the duck’s carcass
were found surrounded by
empty Budweiser beer cans
on the beach by caretaker and
Bahamas National Trust war-
den Earl Wilson on Monday,
Peter Graham’s son Gregory
Graham told The Tribune.

Mr Graham said: “When
we saw the pictures on their
website we lost our minds. It’s
sickening.”

He was raised at the island
where his father increased the
once endangered population
of tree ducks, or whistling
ducks, across Long Island and
as far away as Cat Island, by
feeding them at a cost of
around $35,000 a year.

He has seen their numbers
flourish from just three in the
late 1960’s to around 1,500
today.

Mr Graham said: “It was
my father’s passion and he
passed it to all of us, and Earl
has dedicated his life to the
animals.”

But the place famed for
being teeming with wildlife
was shrouded by a deathly
quiet following the sailboaters
visit, Mr Graham said.

“The effect has been terri-

LUT 4S) iT rocks at the mice island.

ble,” he explained.

“When Earl went there on
Monday morning there was a
deaf silence, there wasn’t a
bird around. It was like a child
had died.

“The ducks are incredibly
sensitive and these people just
harassed them.”

Chasing protected West
Indian tree ducks with the
intention of killing them is
also a federal offence under
international CITES (Conven-
tion on International Trade in
Endangered Species) laws,
Bahamian and United States
law, and Mr Graham has
reported the offence to all rel-
evant authorities.

The boat was last seen in
Exuma and police in George
Town maintain they will
apprehend the suspected
offenders. The Defence Force
and Bahamas National Trust
wardens in the Exuma Land
and Sea Park are also on the
look-out for the boat, and Mr
Graham will travel to Exuma
today to assist.

As news of the offence has
spread, the sailboaters web-
site has attracted more than
30 comments from the offend-
ed community.

Mr Graham said: “I think
we all realise it is a real prob-
lem just because this is hap-
pening in all the islands and
no-one’s really spoken out
because it has never been as
obvious, but with the Internet
we are all seeing it immedi-



ately and we can see the neg-
ligence on the part of sail-
boaters.”

The offence comes just
weeks after two American
tourists were fined $1,000 by
an Exuma magistrate after
posting pictures on social net-
working site Facebook of
themselves grilling and eating
an iguana and harvesting juve-
nile conch.

Two of the men pictured
with the offenders have still
not been apprehended by
police despite Bahamas
National Trust Chief Execu-
tive Eric Carey reporting the
whereabouts of one of the
men believed to be living in
Nassau.

Mr Carey said: “Crimes
against the environment
should not be given less
importance than other crimes.

“Yes, serious crimes like
murder and armed robbery
need to be given priority, but
environmental crimes don’t
need to be treated as if they
are not of any level of impor-
tance.

“It’s really sad because Mr
Graham has for so many years
built this incredible private
wildlife reserve.

“Visitors to this country
should not carry out such bar-
baric behaviour.”

The sailboaters blog also
features pictures of a dinghy
filled with juvenile conch on a
visit to the Bahamas in 2007,
an prisonable offence.

ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE

is accepting applications for the
2009-2010 Academic Year

anish

One person - to teach Spanish to grades seven through ten

4& Mewertoe will dehvcr his ANNTAL ADDRESS. 5

Social Studies/History

One person - to teach Social Studies and History to grade eight to twelve. Experience in
preparing for external examinations is a requirement.

English Language/Literature
One person- to teach English Language/Literature to all grade levels. Experience in
preparing candidates for B.J.C and B.G.C.S.E examinations is required.

Two person - to teach English Language/Literature at the Grade seven and Eight levels.

Chemistry

Two persons - to teach Chemistry to grades nine through twelve. The applicant must
have experience in preparing students for external examinations.

One person - to teach General Science and Chemistry to all grade levels. The applicant
must have experience in preparing students for external examinations

Physical Education

One person - to teach Physical Education to all grade levels. The applicant must be
available to coach varsity teams in the core sports.

Mathematics
Three persons - to teach mathematics to all grade levels. Experience in preparing
students for external examinations (BJC, BGCSE & SAT) is a requirement

Biology
One person - to teach General science and Biology to all grade levels.
The applicant must have experience in preparing students for external
examinations

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited university and a Teacher’s
Certificate. Two letters of reference, copies of all degrees and certificate, and
two passport size photos should be submitted. A commitment to the values of
Catholic, Benedictine education is expected of our teachers. Only those persons who
have no difficulty with the Roman Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply. Please sub-
mit application and required documents to:

The Principal
St. Augustine’s College

P.O. Box N-3940
Nassau, Bahamas



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 7





Caribbean
region and
Canadian aid

Insight |

WORLD VIEW

m By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a consultant and
former Caribbean diplomat)

Is the midst of a troubling
global financial crisis, there
is a little good news for the coun-
tries of the Caribbean. The region
is to be one of the 20 “countries”
of the world on which the Gov-
ernment of Canada will now focus
its aid.

The full list of countries,
released by the Canadian Inter-
national Development Agency
(CIDA) on February 23rd, is sev-
en African nations, five Asian
countries, five Latin American
nations, Ukraine, the West Bank
and Gaza and “Caribbean.”

Eighty per cent of CIDA’s $1.5-
billion bilateral programming bud-
get, which represents about 53 per
cent of Canada's overall develop-
ment assistance funding, will be
targeted towards those countries.

Contrary to a story carried in a
Guyana newspaper on 26th Febru-
ary, Guyana is included in the
“Caribbean” countries that will
benefit from Canada’s refocused
aid which will promote regional
integration and regional approach-
es to common development issues
and challenges. Canada has dou-
bled its development assistance to
the Caribbean, and is the largest
bilateral donor to the region.

The point is that the govern-
ment of Canada has begun to act
on a commitment made in 2007
by its Prime Minister, Stephen
Harper, to “re-engage” with the
Americas, and this refocusing of its
aid to include five Latin Ameri-
can countries and the Caribbean is
being regarded as part of that
commitment.

Two days after CIDA
announced the refocusing of
Canadian aid, a private consulta-
tion was held in Ottawa between
Canadian officials and a few out-
siders of whom I was privileged
to be one. At that consultation,
Canada’s Minister of State respon-
sible for the Latin American and
Caribbean area, Peter Kent, per-
suasively reiterated his govern-
ment’s genuine desire to make a
real and lasting contribution to
Latin America and the Caribbean.

On the day that Kent empha-
sised Canada’s commitment to the
welfare of its hemispheric neigh-
bourhood, a former Canadian
Prime Minister, Joe Clark, writ-
ing in the Toronto newspaper, The
Globe and Mail, declared that “a
critical test of the response to the
(current) global financial crisis is
whether rich countries, including
Canada, will look beyond their
narrow national and economic
interests.” Clark made the point
that “virtually none of the “stimu-
lus packages” in rich countries
address this disproportionate
impact on the poor world,” and
he asked the question: “Why
shouldn't Canada focus on the
growing crisis in the Caribbean,
our own backyard?”

The “growing crisis in the
Caribbean” to which Clark
referred includes the fact that the
economies of all Caribbean coun-
ties are hard-hit by “sharp declines
in investment, remittances and aid
but also calamitous declines in
income from tourism.” Added to
this is escalating crime promoted
by drug trafficking and arms smug-
gling. As Clark points out, "mur-
der rates in the Caribbean are
higher than in any other region of
the world, and assault rates ...
above the world average.”

Part of the reason for the Cana-
dian government’s renewed inter-
est in the Caribbean is the rapid
increase in violent crime through-
out the region, and the growing
influence of drug lords. It is now
widely recognised that the crime
situation is frightening away
investment, contributing to the
migration of skilled people, cre-
ating refugees, corroding political
stability and eroding democracy.

Quite rightly, Canada has been
very concerned about promoting

ie
US)

Ute ta
PHONE: 322-2157



and safeguarding democracy
throughout Latin America and the
Caribbean, for while economic
growth is vitally important to the
enhancement of people’s lives, so
too is the quality of governance
under which they live.

Drug trafficking and crime
thrive on conditions of poverty,
unemployment and declining
investment. In this connection,
crime is intricately tied-up with
development, and the former will
not be dealt with effectively unless
the latter receives attention.

The refocusing of Canada’s aid
programme for the benefit of
Latin America and the Caribbean
comes not a moment too soon.
And while it will be good for the
Caribbean, it will also be good for
Canada.

Canada is not a super power
in the league of the United States,
and while it is linked to the US
geographically and economically,
it does not have to try to match
the areas to which the US pro-
vides aid, nor does it have to sup-
port all the causes that the US pur-
sues. It should be conducting a
foreign policy — including an aid
and trade policy — that serves the
interests of Canada and does the
most good. Scatter-shooting its aid
to far-flung countries, which are
not desperate, limits the amount of
money Canada can spend in areas
where it can be most effective —
the Caribbean and some Latin
American countries are clearly
such areas.

Stephen Harper and Caribbean
Heads of Government attending
the Summit of the Americas in
April are scheduled to have a
working breakfast. At that session,
Harper will raise the matter of
Canada and the Caribbean enter-
ing a formal trade and economic
arrangement to replace CARIB-
CAN, the arrangement under
which Caribbean countries enjoy
duty-free access to the Canadian
market for 83.2 per cent of their
exports.



@ SIR Ronald Sanders

A World Trade Organisation
waiver, allowing CARIBCAN,
expires in December 2011, and
while trade between Canada and
Caribbean Community and Com-
mon Market (CARICOM) coun-
tries is relatively small for both
sides, CARICOM nonetheless
enjoys a trade surplus with Cana-
da averaging about $1 billion over
the five years ending in 2006.

For Canada, trade in goods
with CARICOM countries con-
stitute a mere 0.02 per cent of its
total trade. Therefore, whether or
not Canada concludes an FTA
with CARICOM countries is nei-
ther here nor there for Canada
economically. But, it would be a
good opportunity for Canada to
show understanding and commit-
ment to its smaller neighbours by
negotiating an agreement that
places their development as a pri-
ority.

It will call for both sides — but
especially Canada — to throw the
rule book out the window and
focus instead on an economic part-
nership agreement rather than
simply a Free Trade Agreement.
CARICOM countries would have
little interest in the latter, and
Canada could take pride in the
former. It would begin to address
what Joe Clark describes in the
context of the current global finan-
cial crisis — but which is true of the
entire present economic order —
as the “disproportionate impact
on the poor.”

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

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NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica) will visit Freeport and
Nassau from 9 to 11 March 2009 and will be available to discuss any individual problems
concerning passports and nationality issues.

Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent by courier direct to the
High Commission in Kingston.

FREEPORT: MONDAY, 9 MARCH
10:00am to 4:00pm (Venue to be determined)

NASSAU: TUESDAY, 10 MARCH and WEDNESDAY, 11 MARCH

10:00am to 4:00pm at British Honorary Consul’s residence in Winton

Appointments for all 3 days can be booked by calling the
Honorary Consul in Nassau on 324-4089.

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘$1m missing’ from Hundreds of thousands missing from Ministry

embassy funds

FROM page one

quate documentation to determine items purchased and how }

much was spent.”

Meanwhile, another sum of $335,000 was noted by Auditors
to have been “trasnferred to a bank account in Cuba with
regard to the establishment of the office in Cuba.”

Auditors again stated that “due to inadequate record keep-
ing (they) could not verify how this money was spent.”

Under a section of the report relating to the Bahamas Con-
sulate General in Miami, Florida, auditors report that records
reflect that the sum of $274,000 was also “spent on behalf of
the Embassy’s office in Cuba” and adds, “this amount should
be reconciled.”

Auditors additionally reported that “six blank/open cheques

drawn on the Ministry’s account (Consulate General, Miami,
Florida) were with respect to expenditure relating to the
establishment of the Cuba Embassy.”

“We were unable to verify what the cheques were used for.
The normal purchasing procedures were not followed,” said
the report.

The establishment of the Bahamian embassy in Cuba has
been a point of contention politically.

Whilst in Cuba for a CARICOM conference in December
2008, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who had previously
declared his intention to close down the embassy should he
return to power, said Government had subsequently decided

to keep it open in part because of the amount expended by the

previous government in opening it and setting up an official
residence for the Ambassador.

Yesterday Minister of Foreign Affairs and Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette said the report “speaks for itself.”

“Tt is a report of the Auditor General of The Bahamas,
which is independent of the ministry of foreign affairs...any-
one who reads it can draw whatever conclusions from it,” he
said.

As to whether he was now aware of how the money, spent
by the ministry under his predecessor, Fred Mitchell, was
used, he said it was “spent on various items.”

“There have been significant changes in the budgetary allo-
cations to various missions overseas and also strengthening
accounting procedures as a result” of the report, he added.

Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell and Minister of Foreign Affairs
at the time of the establishment of the embassy told The Tri-
bune that Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Patricia
Rodgers, would have “all the explanations” for the points
raised by the Auditors with respect to the expenditure.

“There’s certainly no irregularity whatsoever and it would

all be properly accounted for. Audits have to do with what the

picture is on that particular day. The actual comments they
make seem to be directed more at record keeping than any
kind of misapproriation,” he said.




























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Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
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Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

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Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
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Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

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FROM page one

als supplied and renovations done, but audi-
tors were not provided with contracts or
any bids.

Auditors also struggled to settle the Min-
istry’s Corporation Sole Current Account,
which was $89,465.31 overdrawn in April,
2007, as they were not presented with bank
reconciliation statements for the period
under review and the amount could not be
compared with the cash book as it was not
being balanced.

The whereabouts of the unaccounted
money is still unknown and is part of an
intensive police investigation into corrup-
tion in the Ministry of Housing during that
period, Mr Russell said.

“T don’t know the details of it but we are
still trying to find out what happened to
the money connected to the ten apartments
in Freeport,” he said.

“The money has disappeared and I think
the police are doing a full investigation into
that.”

The Auditor General also discovered an
outstanding $645,120.34 in rent which
should have been accumulated from ten-
ants of public rental units from as far back
as 1993.

And the report recommends all outstand-
ing rent is collected and a system is put in
place to ensure rental income remains cur-
rent as a matter of urgency.

Mr Russell said: “People in the rental
units claim they have paid, but there is no
record in our system to show that they paid.

“We will update the system to ensure
that we can account for these funds coming
through the Ministry for the public rental
unit accounts, and even the money that is
used through the Bahamas Mortgage corpo-
ration.

“We haven’t changed the whole system
yet but we have persons who are directly
responsible for monthly rents.”

In addition the auditor general found
official receipts were not issued for money
received from Abaco and Freeport for the
sale of property, and recommends official
receipts are issued and recorded in the cash

book to provide an audit trail and enhance
transparency and accountability.

A large number of general receipt books
were not provided for audit inspection and
were not seen in the cash book, and perti-
nent information was omitted from the cash
book which was not being balanced.

Receipt books should be provided for
audit inspection immediately, and the cash
book should be properly maintained, the
report states.

Mr Russell said: “We are trying to keep
everything accounted for now.

“We have already put in place for the
accounts on a regular basis and the account
is run directly by the Permanent Secretary.

“We scrutinise everything.”

Adding: “There was no record of any-
thing being kept, so we don’t know what
happened to the missing money. The police
will continue their investigation and hope-
fully they will announce something soon.”

PLP MP for Golden Gates Shane Gibson,
former Housing Minister, was not available
for comment before The Tribune went to
press.

Reve

Is cutting the store in half

Colon and stomach cancer
on the rise in the Bahamas

FROM page one

“With colon cancer, we are
seeing an increase with newly
diagnosed colon cancer cases a
year, and we are also seeing an
increase in the amount of stom-
ach cancer cases we have a year
within the public sector,” Dr
Turnquest said.

He explained that while
there was no actual study done,
doctors have been monitoring
cases of stomach and colon can-
cer through the tumour registry
at Princess Margaret Hospital.

“We are able to see trends
(more) quickly by using that
registry than anyone else would
be able to. We see population
trends and we try to see what is
going on in 2008 as opposed to
2002 and so forth,” he said.

Dr Turnquest said he thinks
colon and stomach cancer levels
are up in the country due to
poor diets and the lack of exer-
cise.

“We have a high fat, low
fibre diet. All the bad things
that people can do to get colon
cancer, we do it. Lack of exer-
cise, obesity, high body mass
index, and every particularly
bad thing to do we do, hence
the increase in these diseases,”
Dr Turnquest said.

However, he said there are
many changes that Bahamians
can make to their diets and
lifestyles to decrease their risk
of developing these types of
cancer.

“Tf you look at the body mass

of most Bahamians it is very
high. Most of our population is
technically at overweight or
obese levels. A precious few of
us fall into the normal body
mass index. Bahamians can start
increasing the amount of fibre
in their diet, actually get out
there and exercise and drop a
few pounds,” Dr Turnquest
said.

According to the oncology
channel’s website, stomach can-
cer occurs twice as often in men
and it is more common in peo-
ple over the age of 55.

In the United States, inci-
dence is higher in African
Americans than in Caucasians.

Changes in diet and food
preparation have led to a recent
decrease in the number of cases
of cancer of the lower stomach
(distal gastric cancer).

However, cases of cancer of
the upper stomach (proximal
gastric cancer) have increased,
primarily as a result of the
prevalence of obesity and gas-
troesophageal reflux disease
(GERD).

According to the US’
National Cancer Institute
(NCI), approximately 760,000
cases of stomach cancer are
diagnosed worldwide and more
than 24,000 cases are diagnosed
in the United States each year.
Incidence is highest in Japan,
South America, Eastern
Europe, and parts of the Middle
East.

Worldwide, stomach cancer
is the second leading cause of
cancer-related deaths.

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Armed robberies
and cutlass attack
are investigated

FROM page one

Drugs and Notions store in
Kennedy Subdivision on Fri-
day afternoon.

Two men entered the store
at around lpm and one,
dressed in a yellow T-shirt and
black trousers, threatened
staff with a silver handgun to
steal cash, cell phone cards
and other items.

The pair then robbed a cus-
tomer of her beige coloured
1999 Mazda Millennium and
escaped in the car heading
west.

Assistant Superintendent
of Police Walter Evans said:
“Intensive investigations have
been launched into these mat-
ters.”

Also under investigation is
the brutal attack of a man who
was slashed with a cutlass, and
a woman who was beaten, by

aman they know.

The attacker approached
the pair as they were talking
in front of the man’s home in
Palm Beach Street sometime
after 8pm on Saturday and
demanded cash as he threat-
ened them with the blade.

The attacker threw the cut-
lass at the man’s head, and the
woman, of the Balfour
Avenue area, was beaten and
her left hand was injured.

Both were treated at
Princess Margaret Hospital in
Shirley Street and the woman
has since been discharged.

The man suffered from
head lacerations and is in sta-
ble condition in hospital.

Anyone with any informa-
tion which may assist police
investigations should call
police on 919 or call
Crimestoppers anonymously
on 328-8477.

Two killed as car
crashes into church

FROM page one

Reckley said.

“Additional information obtained from relatives of the
driver is that he suffers from seizures.”

A portion of Settler’s Way, from the crosswalk at Taber-
nacle Baptist Academy extending just past the Jehovah Wit-
ness Church, was cordoned off about an hour with police tape
to prevent traffic entering the area.

The vehicle was extensive damaged.

The bodies of the victims were removed from the wreck-
age and taken by Ambulance to Rand Memorial hospital,
where doctors pronounced them officially dead.

Mr Reckley said the two deaths are recorded as the fourth
and fifth traffic fatalities for the year.

He said the accident is still under investigation by police.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 9



Armed robberies investigated

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
Police are investigating two sepa-
rate incidents in the West Grand
Bahama area, where persons
were assaulted and robbed by
gunmen.

Supt Wendell Deveaux, officer
in charge of the West End Dis-
trict, reported that police have
arrested one man who is assist-
ing them with their investigation
into one of the matters.

Mr Deveaux reported that the
first incident occurred around
9.30pm on Friday at Eight Mile
Rock.

A 31-year-old male resident
of Jones Town, Eight Mile Rock,
told police that he was walking

through Batelco Corner when a
man armed with a black handgun
held him up, putting him in fear
for his life.

Investigations are continuing
into the matter.

Supt Deveaux said police
received a report of a second inci-
dent on Saturday around 10.42pm
at West End.

He reported that a 37-year-old
man and a 23-year-old woman
were accosted by two armed men
who put him in fear for his life.

The man told police that the
suspects were wearing tan Dickies
and had cloths over their faces.

Supt Deveaux said a 24-year-
old male resident of West End
was taken into custody and is
assisting police with their investi-
gation into the incident.

He said police are searching

for a second suspect in connec-
tion with the matter.

Police are also investigating
an armed robbery that occurred
at Lewis Yard early Saturday
morning.

Supt Deveaux said sometime
around 5.58 am on Saturday, a
56-year-old male resident of
Hawksbill, with other persons,
was in Lewis Yard when two dark
men armed with a handgun
robbed him of cash.

There was no arrest in the
matter. Police are continuing their
investigations.

Supt Deveaux reported that
21 arrests were made over the
weekend in the West End Dis-
trict.

He said nine persons were
charged for various criminal
offences.

FROM page one

conclusions.

“So it does give me a sense of vindication if you
will that these findings are finally coming to light,”
he said.

His comments appeared to be supported by those
of current minister of foreign affairs and deputy
prime minister Brent Symonette, who said he
believes the report “speaks for itself”, adding that
“changes have been made to make sure that kind of
issue does not recur.”

In the 2006/2007 report, tabled in the House of
Assembly last week, a section on the Consular Divi-
sion of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs notes in some
instances visa application forms were processed
despite not containing all required information.

They were often found to be missing applicants’
signatures, declarations by the applicant that the
information was true and correct as well as details of
their occupation and their photograph.

In relation to seamen applying for visas, auditors
said that documents such as their “identity”, their
financial information, immigration status, what type
of visa was granted, and general receipts to support
payment having been made, were missing.

In these instances, auditors recommended that
in future such information must be included and
submitted before visas are granted.

Auditors also raised concern that their review
found that one person was “able to sponsor up to six-
teen people in a given period” for visas.

They said they were “unable to determine” from
the ministry whether there were any established
guidelines determining the number of people a per-
son is able to sponsor, but they recommend that
guidelines be established to provide a “greater lev-
el of assurance that only genuine requests are con-
sidered.”

Meanwhile, auditors added that a “large num-
ber” of general receipt books relating to visa appli-
cations were not provided for audit inspection and
were not “seen in the cash book.”

They also noted that they “found that pertinent
information was omitted from the cash book, which
was not being balanced.”

Yesterday, former Minister of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell described Mr Bethel’s comments on

Minister says report supports
‘visa scam’ allegations

the report as “utter nonsense.”

He said that he believes the Auditor General
made the same observations directly to the Perma-
nent Secretary “at the time” and “corrective mea-
sures were taken to deal with it.”

“T don’t think there’s anything there really. I think
it’s just bureaucracy and errors of that time, I don’t
think there’s any fire behind it,” he added.

In 2005 and 2006, Mr Bethel, then FNM party
Chairman and a senator, claimed to have evidence
that there was a visa scandal going on in the consular
division of the Ministry.

He alleged that there was political interference in
the issuance of visas and that the number of visas
issued shot up under Mr Mitchell’s tenure.

Mr Mitchell denied the claims, and challenged
the FNM to present any such evidence to the police.

Yesterday Mr Symonette said that “there have
been changes at the consular division and there
have been changes in the way that visas can be
issued.”

“Various controls have been put in place to make
sure this type of thing does not recur in the future,”
he added.

The 2006/2007 report also states that 9,000 visas
were granted between July 2004 and June 2007. It
adds that auditors were unable to determine how
many of these people left the country as they were
“not presented with exit forms” to substantiate such
a determination.

Mr Symonette said that this is “of serious concern”
but highlighted certain impediments to the Gov-
ernment keeping track of the movements of such
individuals.

“When you leave The Bahamas, I leave The
Bahamas, many other people leave The Bahamas
there are no exit forms and that is a concern. We
don’t know if the people do leave and it is a con-
cern,” he said, adding, however, that many countries
do not have such a system.

Mr Symonette said he expects that with the intro-
duction of electronic visas, a programme being insti-
tuted in conjunction with the issuance of e-pass-
ports, the Government will be better able to moni-
tor people granted visas for a specific time period.

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Town meeting addresses Road.

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YOUR FUTURE

IS ABOUT TO GET BRIGHTER

m@ By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

PUBLIC Works and Transport
Minister Neko Grant assured res-
idents of the communities affected
by the New Providence Road
Improvement Project (NPRIP)
that their opinions are vital to the
success of the project.

“As tax payers who wish to be
assured that public monies are
being wisely spent, and as residents
or business owners of these com-
munities in which road works will
commence, I assure you that your
presence and input are essential
to the success of this undertaking,”
he said.

Residents and business owners
attended a town meeting organ-
ised by the Project Execution Unit
of the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport. The town meeting,
held at SuperClubs Breezes
Resort, Cable Beach, was organ-
ised to disseminate information,
receive feedback and address
queries regarding the road works.

Two months ago, government
signed a $120-million contract with
Jose Cartellone Construccciones
Civiles of Argentina, South Amer-
ica, for the re-launch of the com-
pletion of the road works.

The project is expected to be
completed in 33 months and is
funded by the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB). It
includes approximately 15.7 miles
of roads, 19 corridors and five
major intersections.

Mr Grant said his ministry is
“committed to the execution of
this project in strict adherence to
the specifications.”

“We also committed to execu-
tion of this project in a manner
that would create minimal discom-
fort and inconvenience to residen-
tial and commercial property own-
ers and the general public who may
utilise these routes on a regular
basis. Furthermore, we promised
to make every effort to keep the
public informed at every stage of
the project’s progress,” he said.

The town meeting specifically
addressed issues relevant to the
first three corridors to be construct-
ed. They are:

- Corridor four (Bethel Avenue
extension) at a cost of $8.6 million
- Corridor five — the road to be
constructed from John F Kennedy
Drive/Farrington Road junction
through Rock Crusher Road onto

NEKO GRANT, Minister of Public Works
and Transport, addresses a town meet-
ing organised by the Project Execution
Unit of the Ministry on the New Provi-
dence Road Improvement Project. Colin
Higgs, Permanent Secretary in the Min-
istry of Public Works and Transport, is
pictured seated.

Ww
oO
=
c
°o
7)
—
a
=a
@
<=
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=
2)
=
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—



West Bay Street at a cost of $5.1
million

- Corridor 18 which commences
at this point on West Bay Street
and continues along to Saunders
Beach at a cost of $2.3 million

- Section 24 at the Bethel
Avenue/John F Kennedy Drive
junction at a cost of $6.8 million

tives of the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport were opened
for residents and business owners
to raise questions and express their
concerns.

“In addition to the lodging of
verbal complaints or queries at
these information booths, partici-
pants are encouraged to put their
concerns in writing,” said Minis-

addressed to the Permanent Secre-
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Transport to which a response will
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tunity for your records.”

Also in attendance at the meet-
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Hubert Minnis, Minister of Nation-
al Security Tommy Turnquest and
Attorney General and Minister of

Following the meeting, informa-
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submission

Legal Affairs Senator Michael Bar-

should be nett.

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“We are being recognised as one of the leading
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Bimini Bay Resort is currently the largest mari-
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2009 opening of Spa Chakra Bimini, the first of its
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THE TRIBUNE

S
ke
MONDAY, MARCH 2,

wa
ale

Russian stops
‘the Hammer’
Pitt in the
first round

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

RICHARD ‘the Hammer’
Pitt didn’t get a chance to get
started against Russian welter-
weight Khabib Alakhuerdiev.

Friday night at the Seminole
Hard Rock Cafe, Alakhuerdiev
wasted little time in stopping
Pitt two minutes and 19 seconds
in the first round after dropping
the Bahamian three times.

“The fight turned out to be a
tougher fighter than we
though,” said Pitt’s
manager/trainer Ray Minus Jr.
“Anthony ‘Psycho’ Woods
fought this same guy a couple
months ago and so we though
that Richard Pitt who is around
the same level, had a chance.”

The 26-year-old
Alakhuerdiev, who remained
undefeated at 9-0 with his
fourth technical knockout,
caught Pitt with a left hook to
the body for the first eight
count.

After he got up, minus said
Pittt moved around and man-
aged to score some points, but
he caught another left-right
body shot for the second eight
count.

Caught

Again after he got up, Minus
said Pitt went after his oppo-
nent, but he was caught for the
third time, this time forcing the
referee to step in and call off
the fight on the flurry of punch-
es.
Pitt, dropped his record to 3-

“He was doing fairly okay as
he was boxing, but he didn’t
pull out the kind of response
that we planned,” said Minus, of
Pitt, who received a mandatory
30-day suspension. “He wants
to get back in the gym and get
another fight in Florida.

“Everybody recognize that
he’s a good fighter, but he just
have to execute. So right now,
he’s excited about getting back
in the gym and improve his per-
formance before he get back
into the gym.”

Pitt, who was working in Exu-
ma, had not fought since June
30, 2007 when he won an unan-
imous six round decision over
Dencil ‘Death’ Miller at the CI
Gibson Gymnasium.

Although they only put in
three weeks of training prior to
going to Hollywood, Minus said
he felt Pitt was ready because
he was doing a lot of running
and staying in shape in Exuma.

Next month, Minus said he
intend to take both light heavy-
weight Ryan ‘Big Youth’
McKenzie and heavyweight Jer-
ry ‘Big Daddy’ Butler to Cana-
da to fight on March 20 at Casi-
no Rama.

“Those two guys have been
in training and they are look-
ing forward to it,” Minus said.
“So we are expecting some
good performances from both
of them.”

The fights for the local boxers
are being arranged through
First Class Promotions, headed
by Michelle Minus.

First Class Promotions, whose
12-month suspension by the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
has been lifted, is preparing to
host Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey’s British Common-
wealth against Charles ‘the Cru-
sader’ Adamu from Ghana.

The fight is scheduled for
May 23 at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

But Minus said they are just
waiting on Adamu to sign his
contract.

Once he does that, Minus
said they will submit it to the
British Boxing Board for their
approval and then to the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
for sanctioning.

PAGE 11



ts

2009



BAHAMIAN SENIOR’S SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY LEGACY WILL BE HARD TO MATCH

Bianca Stuart jumps

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

HEN Bianca
Stuart gradu-
ates from
Southern IIli-
nois University this year, she will
leave behind a legacy that will
probably be hard to duplicate.

Meanwhile, sprinters Cache
Armbrister and Nivea Smith are
just getting started with their
Auburn University careers in the
Southeastern Conference.

Stuart, the Bahamian senior,
ended her campaign at the State
Farm Missouri Valley Conference
Indoor Championships with her
fourth straight title in the wom-
en’s long jump.

On Saturday at the University
of Iowa in Cedar Falls, Stuart
cleared 21-feet, 6 1/4-inches to
lead the Salukis to victory in her
speciality.

The mark, which surpassed the
All-Time Conference record of
20-11 1/2, MVC meet of 20-9 and
the UNI Dome of 20-8 1/2, now
have Stuart ranked at number
three in the nation as she also
went over the NCAA automatic
qualifying mark of 20-10.

Stuart, who turns 22 on May
17, ended up third in the final of
the 60 metre final in a season’s
best of 7.62 seconds. Jeanne Mid-
dleton of Indiana State won in a
season’s best of 7.51, followed by
‘Yomeaqua Brents of Illinois State
in her season’s best of 7.58 as
well.

Alexandria Oembler, of Mis-
souri State, had to settle for
eighth place in 7.87.

Stuart, a graduate of Queen’s
College, clocked 7.61 for the sec-
ond fastest qualifying time in win-
ning the first of three heats.

Middleton turned in the fastest
time of 7.56 in winning the third
heat. Oembler had the sixth
fastest time of 7.74. Oembler was
second in the second heat.

0 fourth straight



SUCCESSFUL LEGACY: Bianca Stuart pictured in a file me during a university meet.

Just before running in the 60,
Oembler participated in the final
of the 60, placing fourth in 8.79.
Meredith Haynes of Southern Illi-
nois went under the NCAA pro-
visional time of 8.43 in winning
the race in 8.42.

At the Southeastern Confer-
ence Championship at the Nut-
ter Fieldhouse at the University
of Kentucky over the weekend,
nivea Smith and Cache Armbris-
ter were both third in their sec-
tions of the women’s 200 final.

Competing in the first final,
Smith, the Grand Bahamian
native in her freshman year, was
timed in 23.92 behind Tennessee’s
juniot Lynne Layne in 23.53 and

Lousiana State’s sophomore
Kenyanna Wilson in 23.85.

Cache Armbrister, the sopho-
more at Auburn University, ran
23.93 for her third place in section
two. Samantha Henry, a junior
from Louisiana State, won in
23.45 and Alishea Usery, a fresh-
man from Fllrida, was seconsd in
23:19.

Surpassed

Combined together, Smith fin-
ished fifth overall just ahead of
Armbrister. All four competitors
ahead of them - Henry, Layne,
Usery and Wilson in that order -
surpassed the NCAA provisional











Bahamas team’s

trip to Paraguay

AEM tM OY
ARYL bloc

Late arrival should be no problem, says captain

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

THE Bahamas’ Davis Cup
team had to spend the weekend
in Miami, Florida, but captain
John Farrington said he doesn’t
expect their late arrival in
Paraguay to have any effect on
the way they play in the first
round of the American Zone II
Davis Cup tie.

The young team, comprising of
Devin Mullings, Timothy Neilly,
Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle,
were scheduled to leave for
Paraguay on Friday to spend at
least a week getting acclimatized.

But because of a visa problem,
the team had to stay in Miami.
They are now due to leave today
and should arrive in Paraguay on
Tuesday. “We were able to prac-
tice, which was the most impor-
tant thing,” said Farrington, who
had the team together for the first
time since the players all played in
the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Asso-
ciation’s December Invitational

at the National Tennis Center.

“Everybody look good. Every-
body is working hard. The team is
ready.”

The team will be out to avenge
last year’s 4-1 loss to Paraguay at
the National Tennis Center when
they play at the Yacht Golf Club
in Paraguayo, Lambare from Fri-
day to Sunday.

The official draw is scheduled
for Wednesday when the team
will get to find out who will be
matched against the team from
Paraguay, comprising of Ramon
Delgado, Juan Carlos Ramirez,
Nicolas Salama and Diego
Galeano. “T think out chances are
good playing them at home,” Far-
rington projected. “Devin has
been playing in a few tourna-
ments and Marvin has also played
in acouple of tournaments.,

“Timmy was practicing hard
with Layton Hewith and BJ has
been playing in tournaments too.
So everybody look good. We
should have no excuses. We just
need to go out there and play and
we are confident that we can

Devin Mullings

ia
fe

;

Timothy Neilly

come home with the win.”

Although they are on the road,
Farrington said the Bahamas has
been successful playing away
against some big teams and they
have had their share of success
at home as well.

“In Davis Cup, anything is pos-
sible,” Farrington summed up.

Having experienced some of
the hostile environment that the
Bahamas has faced in the past,
Farrington said he doesn’t expect
the players to encounter that type
of problem because the Davis
Cup rules are strict and the chair

qualifying time of 23.90.

In the preliminaries on Satur-
day, Smith won the fourth of sev-
en heats in 23.98 and Armbrister
was second in the third heat in
23.94 behind Henry’s winning
time of 23.30.

Armbrister, however, had the
fifth fastest qualifying time just
ahead of Smith’s sixth place.

The two former Carifta team-
mates also contested the 60, but
neither advanced to the final.

Armbrister, a graduate from
St. Augustine’s College, had the
best showing when she ran 7.57
for 14th overall, coming in fifth in
heat one. Smith was 17th in 7.64.

Another SAC graduate, Ger-

Marvin Rolle

umpire have been enforcing the
rules.

“So for the large part of it, we
are protected by the ITF’s rules,
so we should be fin,” he said. “I
just hope that we don’t create a
problem for ourselves in our atti-
tude and what we demonstrate.

“Tf we can go up there and
keep our head together, some-
thing that I intend to continue to
upon them, and play, we should
be okay. There’s nothing we can
do with the crowd unless the
umpire takes control.”

Before leaving Miami today,

ard Brown, in his sophomore year
at Auburn, competed in the
men’s long jump where he was
13th with his best leap of 21-2 1/2.

Brown, coming off an injury
season last year, was fifth in flight
one. Christian Taylor, a freshman
from Florida, won the event with
a leap of 25-3 1/2.

Next weekend, a host of ath-
letes, including Olympic sprinter
Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson, hurdler
Krystal Bodie and high jumper
Jamal Wilson, will compete at the
National Junior College Athletic
Association (NJCAA) Indoor
Championships.

The championships will be
staged at Texas Tech University.



Farrington said they intend to
have one last practice this morn-
ing just so that the players can
stay sharp.

Once they get into Paraguay,
he said they should be able to
make the adjustment to the red
clay courts at the playing facilities.
The only concern, if he has one,
would be the weather.

But Farrington said they play-
ers have all traveled before and
they have been able to stay right
in and make the adjustment, so he
doesn’t see it being a major chal-
lenge.



PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



| ate



‘Resurrection Day is coming’

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

PUBLIC relations officer
Bob Brown is calling it “Res-
urrection Day” as the Bahamas

Powerlifting Federation
relaunches its National Power-
lifting Championships.
Scheduled for March 21 at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
starting at 9am, Brown said the
championships will be back

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Mi Relaunch of National Powerlifting Championships

after a hiatus bigger and better.

“This time, we are showcas-
ing 70 percent of new, vibrant
strong lifters,” according to
Brown, who was a former
national champion. “They will
be coming from all over the
place.”

The College of the Bahamas,
under the leadership of Keith
Cox, have been grooming some
new competitors and John Mills
has taken talented Leslie White
under his wings.

“Why we’re calling it Resur-
rection Day, it’s because a lot of
the past lifters like Falcon
Major, Keith Capron, myself,
Kevin Woodside, Arlington
Clarke and Delvin ‘Blue Boy’
Scott, who benched over 600
pounds, have all been working
with a new breed of power-
lifters,” Brown pointed out.

“So we are looking forward
to one of the best champi-
onships ever as Resurrection
Day on March 21 take place.
We are looking forward to a
great time that day.”

Not to be left out is Grand
Bahama, who are expected to
coming to town with a contin-
gent of competitors led by sen-
sational Bernard ‘Spikes’ Rolle.

“Spikes, who has been a pio-
neer of powerlifting, is going to
give it his best because he does-
n’t know how long he will con-
tinue to be in the sport,” Brown
stressed.

The Federation, under the
leadership of veteran president
Rex Burnside, is looking for-
ward to returning to the inter-
national scene, if not at the
World Championships, at some



ao . |
i

TITRA ne EnCheneiccasenchetin

other big meet to “let the world
know that we are still around,”
Brown stated.

“That’s why we are calling
this championship Resurrection
Day because we want to get
back out there competing again
and to get our national team
back in place.”

Calling themselves the “old
Pilgrims or Gladiators,” Brown
said the big names in the sport
are eager to see what their new
protégés are capable of doing
when the championships take
place.

“We are anticipating a con-

ite

tingent from COB, a contingent
from all of the major gyms. We
are anticipating at least 70 com-
petitors participating,” Brown
said. All of the competitors will
compete in the benchpress,
squats and the deadlift. But he
noted that in the event a com-
petitor is only good in one
event, there will be a prize for
the competitor who excel the
best in either event.

“We're trying to motivate the
young new competitors and that
is one way that we feel we can
do it,” Brown proclaimed.

Another, he said, is for some






AFTER losing their seaon
openers, last year's 19-and-
under champions and runners-
up First Baptist and Macedo-
nia got revenge on Saturday
as the Baptist Sports Council
continued its 2009 Joyce

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for provision of General Insurance
Services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:

on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 690/09

All Risks General Insurance

(a) Commercial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents); and
(b) Computers, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment

Tender No. 691/09

Motor Insurance - Commercial & Private Vehicles

Tender No. 692/09

Accident Insurance - Money & Burglary

Tender No. 693/09

Liability Insurance - Personal & Public

Tender No. 694/09
Professional Indemnity

[Officers, Directors, Professional Staff, Engineers,

Accountants, Attorneys]
&

Tender No. 695/09
Marine Insurance

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163





of the top powerlifters, who
have been in training, to sit on
the side and let the newcomers
take the stage, rather than dis-
couraging those ones who might
be on the par with the renown
competitors. Brown, one of
those competitors who was
intending to compete in the
championships, said between
August and September, the fans
can look for more of the old
guards to step out and compete.

But he said the focus is on
trying to showcase the young
new lifters on “Resurrection
Day.”

First Baptist and Macedonia gain
revenge after losing season openers

Minus Basketball Classic on
Saturday at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.

First Baptist blasted Tem-
ple Fellowship 37-14, while
Macedonia had to go an extra
three minutes for a 35-31 over-
time win over Golden Gates
No.2 in one of the most excit-
ing games played.

The other thriller came in
the 19-and-under division as
Miracle Working Church of
God stayed undefeated with
a 48-47 nipping of the Latter-
Day Saints in double over-
time.

¢ In other results posted,
Latter-Day Saints (15) won
27-24 over Temple

Fellowship; Macedonia (15)
blasted Miracle Working
Church of God

25-15; Zion South Beach
(15) held off Golden Gates
19-18; Faith United

(15) won 39-32 over First
Baptist; Evangelistic Center
(Men) nipped

Bahamas Harvest 33-32;
Temple Fellowship (Men)
knocked off City of

Praise 32-20; Faith United
(Men) def. Mercy Seat 29-22.

¢ Here's a summary of the
games played:
First Baptist 37, Temple Fel-

lowship 14: Edrico McGregor
had a game high 15 for First
Baptist as they climbed to 1-1
on the year. Najee Bethel and
Tavaughn Gibson both had
four in Temple Fellowship's
season's debut.

Macedonia 35, Golden
Gates No.2 31: Marvin
Roberts pumped in a game
high 16 points to lift Macedo-
nia to a 1-1 record. The game
was tied at 31-31 at the end of
regulation. Rio Johnson had
eight for Golden Gates, who
didn't score in the extra three
minutes.

Miracle Working Church of
God 48, Latter-Day 47: Allen
Curry had 13 in Latter-Day's
first loss after winning their
opener.

Faith United 39, First Bap-
tist 32; Delano Forbes' game
high 19 points led Faith Unit-
ed to their season opening 15-
and-under win. Leon Saun-
ders had 18 in the loss for First
Baptist.

Zion South Beach 19, Gold-
en Gates 18: Asenio Wood-
side scored eight as Zion
South Beach made a success-
ful debut in the 15-and-under
division.

Perez Hall had eight in
Golden Gates’ debut on the
losing end.

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Macedonia 25, Miracle
Working Church of God 15:
Geno Bullard lid up

the nets for a game high 10
for Macedonia's 15-and-under
debut.

Shaquille Davis had nine in
a losing effort for Miracle
Working Church of God.

Latter-Day 27, Temple Fel-
lowship 24: Jermaine Rolle
had eight points for Latter-
Day Saints’ 15-and-under win.
Antonious Collie had eight for
Temple Fellowship, who fell
to 1-1.

Temple Fellowship 32, City
of Praise 20: Edwin Burrows
had a game high 10 to lead a
balanced scoring attack in this
marquee men's game. Jeff
Rolle had six in the loss.

Faith United 29, Mercy Seat
22: Denero Moss canned a
game high 13 to lead Faith
United to their 19-and-under
season opening victory.

Cordero McDonald had six
in the loss.

New Bethlehem 32, Calvary
Bible 24: Theo Cleare scored a
game high 14 points to pace
the winners in this men's
encounter.

Evangelistic Center 33,
Bahamas Harvest 32: Tyrone
Sands had 15 points for Even-
gelistic Center men's season
debut win. Imara Thompson
had a game high 16 as
Bahamas Harvest fell to 1-1.

° Here's a look at the sched-
ule fo Saturday, March 7:

Court One

10 am Macedonia vs Golden
Gates (15)

11 am First Baptist vs Zion
South Beach (15)

Noon Golden Gates No.2
vs Miracle Working Church
of God (19)

1 pm Mercy Seat vs First
Baptist (19)

2 pm BIBA vs City of Praise
(M) .

3 pm Macedonia vs Temple
Fellowship (M).

Court Two

10 am Miracle Working
Church of God vs Latter-Day
Saints

(15)

11 am Faith Unied vs Tem-
ple Fellowship (15)

Noon Macedonia vs
Ebenezer (19)

1 pm Golden Gates vs Tem-
ple Fellowship (19)

2 pm Christian Tabernacle
vs Church of Nazarene (M)

3 pm New Bethlehem vs
Evangelistic Center (M).



TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 13



Gy aE

BFA: preparations well underway
for hosting 64th FIFA Congress

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

As the local governing body
for football prepares to host
the international Congress for
member federations of the
world’s most popular sport,
the association remains opti-
mistic in their ability to host a
successful event.

The Bahamas Football
Association will to host the
64th FIFA Congress, May 31st
— June 3rd at the Atlantis
Resort, Paradise Island and
BFA President Anton Sealy
reports that preparations for
the international event have
been ahead of schedule.

“Preparations are well
underway, we have been
meeting with the various gov-
ernment agencies that are
gong to be intimately involved
in this for t\he past several
weeks,” he said, “We have
also solidified our arrange-
ments with the Atlantis hotel.
Things are going very well, we
are actually ahead of our
schedule and we are very
pleased with the way things
are going at the moment.”

Each of the 208 member
federations from the global



“The members are very excited to
come here and I hope that our
people will be as welcoming and
as warm as I know they can be and
just show off this beautiful country
to these people, may of whom
have never been here before.”



football community will be
represented by a minimum of
three delegates and with a pre-
ponderance of international
media and guests, the FIFA
Congress promises to be one
of the most populated events
hosted in the country.

“It is going to be perhaps
the largest, certainly the most
countries represented in the
Bahamas, at one event,” Sealy
said,

“The members are very
excited to come here and I
hope that our people will be as
welcoming and as warm as I
know they can be and just

Anton Sealy

show off this beautiful country
to these people, may of whom
have never been here before.”

According to the organiza-
tion’s website, The FIFA Con-
gress is considered “the most
critical organ of football’s
international governing body.”

What originally began as a
bi-annual meeting has been
increased to once per year
since 1998 and at the congress
member federations discuss a
myriad of topics and decision
making including governing
statutes, methods by which
they are implemented, an
annual report, acceptance of

NPBA plays four exciting
games over weekend

WITH its regular season starting to wind
down, the New Providence Basketball Asso-
ciation played four exciting games over the
weekend, two at the CI Gibson Gymnasi-
um and two at the CI Gibson Gymnasium.

On Saturday at their home base at CI Gib-
son, the Foxies Pros pulled off a big 77-72
victory over the Coca-Cola Explorers just
after the Police Crimestoppers held off the

Falcons 85-83.

In the Pros win, Dereck Ferguson scored a
side high 18 points. Lamar Watkins paced
the losing Explorers with a game high 23.

Vernon Stubbs came up with 18 to aid in
the Crimestoppers’ win in the opening game.
Renaldo Baillou also had 18 in a losing effort

for the Falcons.

On Friday at Kendal Isaacs, the defending

OVERSEAS NEWS

champions Commonwealth Bank Giants suf-
fered a heartbreaking 71-70 loss to the John-
son’s Trucking Jumpers, while runners-up
Electro Telecom Cybots knocked off the Y-
Care Wreckers 98-95.

Brian Bain exploded for 31 points in the
win for the Cybots, Breston Rolle had 31 in
the loss for the Wreckers.

And Floyd Armbrister exploded for 30

points to help the Truckers in the win.

Giants.

Garvin Lightbourne had 27 in the loss for the

Another double header will be played
tonight at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. In the
opener at 7 pm, the Entertainers will enter-
tain the Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders and in

the 8 pm feature contest, the Giants will

play the Jumpers.



Mark Wilson wins PGA's Mayakoba Classic

@ PLAYA DEL
CARMEN, Mexico

Mark Wilson came south of the
border to work. Although his job
took him to a Mexican resort, and
he stayed at a hotel near the
beach, never once during the
Mayakoba Golf Classic did he
hear any mariachis play.

Not until the eight guys in som-
breros and matching cream-col-
ored suits were playing in his hon-
or. The co-leader after the sec-
ond and third rounds, Wilson
went ahead for good on the sec-
ond hole Sunday, then held on
through dark clouds and wild
winds over the back nine to
secure his second career PGA
Tour victory.

“Holes that we saw earlier in
the week hitting 3-wood and 8-
iron into, we were hitting driver
and 3-wood into,” said Wilson,
who shot a final-round 68 and fin-
ished at 267, two stokes ahead of
J.J. Henry. “It was definitely a
different challenge.”

Wilson opened this tournament
with a birdie and remained steady
all week. He got to the 13th tee
box leading Henry by three
strokes, but was up only one by
the time he tapped in for bogey
on 14. Then he bogeyed 16, too.

Henry, however, was having
just as tough of a time. He
bogeyed 16 and 17, then turned
up his palms in frustration when
the wind grabbed his approach
on 18. Although he parred the
hole, it wasn’t enough. When
Wilson’s approach on 18 landed
on the back of the green, it was
time to cue the mariachis.

“Once I hit the 3 wood, it was
just pure joy,” Wilson said. “You
know, you're so nervous and you
somehow pull off one of the best
shots (of the) week. It’s just pure
joy and satisfaction that the hard
work went in and that you didn’t
get overwhelmed by the situation
and hit a good shot.”

Henry also shot 68 to finish
alone in second at 269.

“(It was) extremely difficult,
but it was the same for every-
body,” said Henry, who still had
his best finish since 2006.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165



new national associations and
elections.

Vote

Each national association is
represented by one vote
regardless of international
football prowess.

This will be the sixth Con-
gress held in the CONCA-
CAF region.

Sealy said with the cross-
section of people which will
be in town for the event,
sports tourism has the oppor-
tunity to pay even further div-
idends for the Bahamas
beyond the four day Congress.

“T have made a point to the
various ministries that I have
spoken to that we are going
to have some very influential
people and from a personal
standpoint who I would like
to see return not only as a
FIFA delegate but to do some
further investments in this
country as well,” he said, “I
as president was very hum-
bled by FIFA’s acceptance of
our bid and so we are looking
to a great time here in the next
few weeks.”

The BFA President noted
that support from various gov-
ernment agencies would be
vital in ensuring the success
of the prestigious event.

“T would like to encourage
our people to put their best
foot forward. I know the gov-
ernment has taken some
proactive steps and a lot of
work in participation of this
Congress,” he said, “From the
Prime Minister’s offense right
down they have been inti-
mately involved in making
sure that we the local orga-
nizing community have every-
thing that we need to enable
FIFA to be confident in know-
ing that they are coming to a
secure country and a country
where they have all the facili-
ties that are necessary to host
a conference of this magni-
tude.”

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SATURDAY,
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12 NOON - UNTIL





PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS







SPORTS



|



TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR'S David Bentley, right, misses from the
penalty spot during a shootout at the end of the English League
Cup final soccer match at Wembley Stadium in London.



MANCHESTER UNITED manager Alex Ferguson lifts the trophy fol-
lowing the English League Cup final between Manchester United and
Tottenham Hotspur at Wembley Stadium, London Sunday March 1,

2009.

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Martin Ricket/AP Photo/PA

Stephen Pond, POOL/AP Photo



Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP Photo

BEN FOSTER OF MANCHESTER UNITED makes a save from Tottenham Hotspur's Jamie O'Hara during the penalty shootout in the ae League
Cup final soccer match at Wembley Stadium in London, Sunday, March 1, 2009.

m WEMBLEY, England

Manchester United won the
League Cup with a 4-1 penalty
shootout victory over Tottenham
on Sunday that kept the English
Premier League leaders on course
for an unprecedented five tro-
phies this season, according to the
Associated Press.

After a 0-0 draw through extra
time, United goalkeeper Ben Fos-
ter saved Tottenham’s first
shootout kick from Jamie O’Hara
and David Bentley missed the
third before Anderson hit the
winning penalty.

The victory gave United its sec-
ond trophy of the season follow-
ing December’s Club World Cup
title. The Red Devils also lead
the Premier League by seven
points and are in contention for
the Champions League and FA
Cup.

In Sunday’s Premier League
action, Aston Villa’s chances of
qualifying for the Champions
League were dented when the
home side squandered a two-goal
lead in the final minutes against
Stoke to draw 2-2 at Villa Park.

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The result means Villa remains
fourth, in the final Champions
League slot, three points behind
Liverpool in third and sixth points
clear of Arsenal, which is fifth.

Stoke stays 19th, below Mid-
dlesbrough on goal difference.

West Ham moved up to sev-
enth after a 1-0 win over Man-
chester City at Upton Park on
Sunday. Blackburn moved out of
the relegation zone on goal dif-
ference with a 2-1 win at Hull, a
fiery game that saw both sides
reduced to 10 men.



MILAN (AP) — AC Milan
slipped further behind Inter
Milan and Juventus in the Serie A
title race after losing to Sampdo-
ria 2-1.

Antonio Cassano gave the
Genoa side the lead in the first
half, and Gianpaolo Pazzini dou-
bled it early in the second.
Alexandre Pato scored in the 80th
minute to give Milan some hope,
and Emerson had a goal disal-
lowed.

Inter, which hosted AS Roma
later Sunday, is in first place with
59 points, followed by Juventus



with 53, AC Milan with 48 and
Fiorentina with 46.

Cassano gave Sampdoria the
lead in the 33rd minute. He
tapped in the ball at the far post
after Marius Stankevicius headed
Angelo Palombo’s corner.

Fiorentina and Genoa, the two
teams chasing the fourth Cham-
pions League qualification place,
both failed to win.

Fiorentina drew 1-1 at last-
place Reggina, with Emiliano
Bonnazzoli’s goal equalizing
Alessio Sestu’s opener for Reg-
gina. Genoa was unable to break-
down stubborn defending by
Siena in their 0-0 draw.

Also Sunday, it was: Atalanta
0, Chievo Verona 2; Cagliari 0,
Torino 0; Palermo 0, Catania 4;
and Udinese 2, Lecce 0.



MADRID (AP) — Malaga’s
pursuit of a Champions League
spot lost momentum after a 2-0
loss to Recreativo Huelva, while
Deportivo La Coruna bolstered
its European ambitions with a 1-
0 win at last-place Numancia.

Albert Camunas gave Recre-
ativo the lead in the 54th minute,

© CRICKET: WEST INDIES vs ENGLAND
Sarwan strikes 291 to end England hopes of comeback win



MANCHESTER UNIT-
ED captain Rio Ferdi-
nand lifts the trophy
lifts the trophy follow-
ing the English League
Cup final between
Manchester United
and Tottenham Hot-
spur at Wembley Sta-
dium, London Sunday
March 1, 2009.

Stephen Pond,
POOL/AP Photo

and 10 minutes later Adrian Col-
unga added a goal to hand Mala-
ga only its third loss in 15 games.

Juan Rodriguez scored from a
sharp angle with 15 minutes to
play as Deportivo rallied from
Thursday’s UEFA Cup exit to
join Malaga and Valencia —
which played Valladolid later
Sunday — on 39 pomts. The three
clubs are only two points behind
fourth-placed Villarreal, which
occupies the final Champions
League spot and will attempt to
consolidate its position against
lowly Real Betis later Sunday.

Barcelona also played later,
and needed to snap a three-game
winless streak at Atletico Madrid
to get its title campaign back on
track. The Catalan giant led Real
Madrid by 12 points going into
2009, but has since let Madrid
narrow that gap to just four

Barcelona has 60 points,
Madrid has 56, Sevilla is third
with 47 and Villarreal has 41.

In Sunday’s other 25th round
results, it was: Almeria 2, Getafe
1; Racing Santander 1, Osasuna 1;
and Sporting Gijon 0, Mallorca
1.

Thalia Codrington/AP Photo

WEST INDIES' Denesh Ramdin, right, is clean bowled by England's Graeme Swann, unseen, for 166 runs as wick-
etkeeper Tim Ambrose reacts during the fourth day of the fourth cricket Test match at Kensington Oval in
Bridgetown, Barbados, Sunday, March 1, 2009.



WEST INDIES" Denesh
Ramdin, centre, plays a shot Pe
as England’ S wicketkeeper
Tim Ambrose, right, and
captain Andrew Strauss
looks on, during the fourth
day of the fourth cricket Test
match at Kensington Oval in
Bridgetown, Barbados, Sun-
day, March 1, 2009.

Thalia Codrington/AP Photo

Rammnaresh Sarwan struck 291 to end
England's hopes of completing a come-
back Test series victory in the
Caribbean and open up the chance of
them losing it on the final day here.

Sarwan's vigil at Kensington Oval,
which lasted 11 hours and 40 minutes,
was the cornerstone of West Indies’
749 for nine, the second largest total
England have conceded in Test history.

It meant they began their second
innings 149 runs in arrears and were
required to save a match they had tar-
geted as a must-win - they will resume
on six without loss in the morning.



THE TRIBUNE



Honour roll
Students pay
courtesy call
on Governor
General

HONOUR roll students of
the H O Nash Junior High
School paid a courtesy call
on Governor General
Arthur Hanna on Wednes-
day, February 25, at Govern-
ment House.

Seated from left are Sherry
Strachan, Governor-General
Hanna, Evon Wisdom and
Dora Boston.

Raymond A Bethel/BIS

SL Ee)



thecal
yar

Aerie

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 15










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Airport
PUNO eA a

loss slashed
wh

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Airport Authority’s
net loss for fiscal 2008 was
slashed by 76.4 per cent to
$1.527 million, its audited
financial statements have
revealed, its performance
benefiting from the passen-
ger user facility fee’s intro-
duction and the airport’s
transfer to private sector
management.

The Authority’s financials
for the year to June 30, 2008,
showed that the entity that
owns Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA)
managed to reduce its net
loss almost four-fold - down
from $6.534 million — due
largely to the extra $32.666
million in revenues earned
from the passenger facility
fee and security charges.

These fees were intro-
duced for the first time that
financial year, so prior year
comparatives are slightly
misleading, but for perhaps
the first time LPIA’s rev-
enue streams are starting to
match expenses, a feat
helped by the airport’s lease
to the Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD)
and the management skills of
Vancouver Airport Services
(YVRAS).

Reverse

For the 12 months to June
30, 2008, the Airport
Authority was able to
reverse a $9.359 million
operating loss and parlay
that into $12.23 million of
operating profits, helped in
no small measure by the new
fees/charges.

However, a tripling of
interest and bank charges
from $1.552 million the pre-
vious year to $4.773 million
in 2008, plus a quadrupling
in finance costs to $1.857
million, saw the Airport
Authority’s total non-operat-
ing expenses increase to
$14.757 million. That repre-
sented a 44.5 per cent year-
over-year increase.

As aresult, the Airport
Authority’s loss before
receiving a government sub-
sidy was $2.527 million, yet
this paled into relative
insignificance against the
2007 comparative of $19.569
million.

Especially noteworthy, as
far as Bahamian taxpayers
are concerned, was that the
Government only subsidized
the Airport Authority to the

SEE page 9B



Scotiabank appoints
receiver for resort

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Scotiabank (Bahamas) has
appointed a receiver for the
troubled $250 million Chub
Cay resort project, Tribune
Business can reveal, the latest
move in a battle over the
developers’ failure to repay a
$45 million loan.

Sources familiar with the sit-
uation told this newspaper
that the Bahamian bank had
within the last two weeks
secured the appointment of
Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez as
receiver for the Berry Islands-
based project and its proper-
ties, via the mortgages it holds
on them and associated land
parcels.

It is understood that Mr
Gomez, whose role will be to
protect and secure the resort’s
assets, and take over running
the existing operating facili-
ties, will be the receiver for
properties held in the name
of both Chub Cay Resorts Ltd
and Chub Club Associates
Ltd. He will likely remain in
place until a buyer is found to
take over Chub Cay.

@ Bahamian bank names Craig A.
'Tony' Gomez to protect assets at
$250m Chub Cay project

Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez



His appointment likely
means that Mr Gomez, an

Ex-BEC chair accuses
Government of trying to

‘demonise'

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A former Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation (BEC)
executive chairman has hit
back at claims the basic tariff
rate reductions initiated on his
watch are responsible for the
Corporation’s current finan-
cial woes, and accused the cur-
rent administration and Board
of seeking to “demonise” him
despite “piggybacking” on the
ideas/plans he left in place.

Al Jarrett, who chaired
BEC from June 2002 until the
2005 first quarter, questioned
how the tariff rate reduction
could be responsible for the
Corporation’s current finan-
cial predicament given that its
2004 financial year — the first
full year after the new rates
were in force — saw BEC have
one of its most successful
years ever by generating $14.1
million in net profits.

Mr Jarrett was responding
to BEC’s current chairman,
Fred Gottlieb, who had
blamed the Corporation’s sub-
sequent annual losses — now
running at $18 million per year

SEE page 8B

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his efforts

Denies tariff cuts
responsible for BEC
financial woes, and
says current
government trying
to ‘piggyback’ off
ideas

medical emergencies
don't study economics

accountant and partner at
Baker Tilly Gomez, will be in
for a busy and eventful time in
the forthcoming months, hav-
ing also just been appointed
as CLICO (Bahamas) provi-
sional liquidator by the
Bahamian Supreme Court.

Chub Cay, which was
unveiled with much fanfare as
the so-called ‘anchor project’
for the Berry Islands and
North Andros just five years
ago, is the first such major
mixed-use resort project to
suffer being placed into
receivership.

Its fate is a prime example
of just how bad a toll the glob-
al economic downturn, and
especially the freezing of cred-
it/debt markets, has exacted

SEE page 11B





FamGuard’s
finance head in
resignation

In separate development, accounting
error causes company to ‘overstate’ net
income in 2008 unaudited interims

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Family Guardian’s chief financial officer, Cecile
Greene, has resigned from the BISX-listed life and health
insurer, Tribune Business can confirm.

Patricia Hermanns, Family Guardian’s president,
acknowledged that Ms Greene had left the company
when contacted by Tribune Business, saying: “Cecile
has resigned.” She declined to comment on the reasons

why she had left.

Rising star

Ms Greene’s unexpected departure from Family
Guardian has been widely talked about within the
Bahamian insurance industry. She was considered to be
a rapidly-rising star in that sector, and the wider financial
services arena, and is highly regarded by colleagues and

peers alike.

SEE page 10B



Government stimulus
focus ‘a bit misguided"

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government’s focus on stim-
ulating the economy through capital
budget construction-related projects
is “a bit misguided”, a former minis-
ter has told Tribune Business,
because it fails to address the need to
maintain foreign currency inflows
that stabilise the exchange rate and
import reserves.

James Smith, former minister of
state for finance, said that while
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s
mid-year Budget communication had
“sounded the correct notes” on the
potentially severe recession, and rein-

SEE page 7B

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GDP ratio

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







There was an increase in trading activity last week in the Bahamian market, as
investors traded in six out of the 25 listed securitie,s of which three declined and
three remained unchanged. There were no advancers in the market this week.

BISX CLOSING CHANGE
SYMBOL PRICE

AML 1.41
FOREX Rates Weekly % BBL One:

BOB 7.00
CAD$ ea BPF $17.00
GBP 1.4298 BSL $9.58

EUR 1.2659 BWL $3.15

CAB 13.95
Commodities Weekly % CBL " 77

Crude Oil 44.40 CIB Mods
Gold 941.70 CWCB $1.73
G AVA IN International Stock Market Indexes: at oe

TO TEMPTATION Goce FBB $2.37
FCC $0.30
DJIA 7,062.93 FCL $5.00

S & P.500 735.09
NASDAQ 1,377.84 a : . i
Nikkei 7,968.42 ICD $5.50

JSJ $10.50
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1
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Oo 9S

FINDEX 817.84 = (-2.04%) YTD

VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE

-17.54%
-4.55%
8.38%
-6.78%
-5.99%
0.00%
-0.57%
-8.29%
0.00%
0.00%
-23.11%
-5.88%
-0.51%
0.00%
0.00%
-8.29%
0.00%
-1.33%
-10.28%
5.41%
0.00%

@
ae
No
[Stee

saO0900==0000
eS
oO

INS
co ©

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 42,931 shares
changed hands, representing
a significant increase of
26,270 shares versus last
week's trading volume of
16,661 shares.

Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB) was the volume
leader and big decliner last
week, with 20,000 shares
trading, its stock falling by
$0.64 to end the week at a
new 52-week low of $7.

Finance Corporation of
the Bahamas (FIN) also saw
its share price decline by
$0.28 to $11 on a volume of
6,492 shares. Focol Holdings
(FCL) traded 15,000 shares,
its stock falling by $0.18 to
end the week at a new 52-
week low of $5.

BOND MARKET

No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.

COMPANY NEWS:

Earnings Releases:

There were no financial
results reported by any of
the 24-listed companies dur-
ing the week.

Private Placement
Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extend-
ing the deadline of its private
placement offering. The pre-
ferred shares will be paying a
dividend rate of prime + 1.75
per cent, payable semi-annu-
ally.

Dividends/AGM Notes

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.05 per share,
payable on February 27,
2009, to all shareholders of
record date February 13,
2009.

Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.10 per share,
payable on March 3, 2009, to
all shareholders of record
date February 24, 2009.

Focol Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be holding
its Annual General Meeting
on Thursday March 19, 2009,
at 10.30am in the Board-
room at there Corporate
Office in Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

Finance Corporation of
the Bahamas (FIN)
announced it will be holding
its Annual General Meeting
on Thursday, March 19,
2009, at 6.30pm in the Gov-
ernor's Ballroom at The
British Colonial Hilton
Hotel.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
etto Melle] ars
on Mondays





THE TRIBUNE

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FINCO) is “in the
final stages” of introducing a
property title insurance
scheme for its clients, a move
that might reduce home buy-
ing costs and shorten the
transaction closing window by
eliminating the need for an
attorney’s opinion.

Tanya McCartney, FIN-
CO’s managing director, writ-
ing in the company’s 2008
annual report, said: “We are in
the final stages of preparation
for the introduction of prop-
erty title insurance.

“In this way, clients will be
able to have funds advanced
quickly without lengthy delays
for legal opinions of title.

“RBC Royal Bank of Cana-

da has been instrumental in
providing guidance in devel-
oping policies and procedures
associated with this product.”

Whether FINCO’s property
title insurance coverage results
in cost savings for mortgage
borrowers is likely to depend
on whether the premiums
charged are lower than the
fees demanded by attorneys
for their work on real estate
transactions.

These fees are normally 2.5
per cent of the property’s pur-
chase price.

Title insurance, which is in
widespread use in many juris-
dictions, such as the US, pro-
vides homeowners and real
estate purchasers with cover-
age should the title to their
properties at a later stage be
shown to be defective.

It is starting to catch on in

the Bahamas, Higgs & John-
son having formed an affiliate
title brokerage agency. Jason
Kinsale, developer of The Bal-
moral real estate project, used
the recent Bahamas Business
Outlook conference to push
for title insurance, arguing that
it was even more critical in a
depressed economy to reduce
the transaction closing time
by eliminating the need for
lengthy attorney searches to
determine whether there was
clean title.

Growth

In her message to FINCO
shareholders, Ms McCartney
said the bank saw 10 per cent
growth in its mortgage port-
folio in the year to October
31, 2008.

5m back pay dispute

headed for the Tribunal

@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

A dispute over $5 million
in back pay allegedly owed
to workers on a private
island resort development
will have to go to the Indus-
trial Tribunal, the Minister
of Labour has told Tribune
Business.

Dion Foulkes said a recent
meeting between himself,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and the principal
investor in the Exuma-based
Bock Cay project, John Fry,
owner of multi-million Cali-
fornia retailer Fry’s Elec-
tronics, produced no solu-
tion.

Mr Foulkes, though, said
some progress was being
made in amending the devel-
oper’s rule requiring workers
to leave Bock Cay during the
weekends, which has proven
financially imprudent for
those living outside of Exu-
ma.

Workers on site said the
taxing travel expenses had
seen the development lose
around 60 per cent of its
workforce, which was down
to 47 from 120, according to
a worker who wished to
remain anonymous because
of a pending lawsuit with the
company.

“Guys are falling off one
by one,” he said.

Bock Cay workers, accord-
ing to former timekeeper
Ken Clarke, were made to
leave Bock Cay on Fridays
and return on Sundays at
their own expense.

Commute

Workers who lived Nassau
were spending up to $2,100
per year on the commute, a
figure some said made
employment with the com-
pany nonsensical.

The worker said he and
others were preparing a writ
in readiness to launch a legal
action against the developer
for the allegedly overdue
back pay.

The worker also told Tri-
bune Business that Mr Fry
visited Bock Cay shortly
after his meeting with gov-
ernment ministers, and
announced to the workforce
that his company was not
obligated to pay the alleged-
ly year-old overdue over-
time.

Last year, Bahamian attor-
ney Errol Mckinney accused
Bock Cay of owing its work-
ers up to $5 million for four
years of back pay. This was
denied by the developers,
who said everything they had
done was in accordance with
the law.

Work on Bock Cay initial-
ly lasted for 10 hours per
day, seven days per week,
for 28 continuous days. Fol-
lowing almost a month of
work, employees were given
a week off without pay.

According to Mr Mckin-
ney, the company then
allegedly compensated
employees incorrectly for
overtime and vacation pay.

However, workers alleged
that Bock Cay had recently
changed employee work
hours and implemented new
overtime pay rates.

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Much of that growth
appeared to come from the
institution’s Blockbuster
Mortgage Campaign, FINCO
seeing a 14 per cent increase
in the value of mortgages writ-
ten — from $71 million in 2007
to $81 million — during the
promotion’s four months.

Ms McCartney said client
surveys showed FINCO had
“exceeded benchmarks” for
customer service, with 88 per
cent of customers indicating
they felt treated as if they






MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 3B

FINCO ‘in final stages' on property title insurance

were long-term, valued bor-
rowers.

Some 93 per cent of line
customers were served with-
in 10 minutes, and trailer calls
showed 95 per cent of cus-
tomers felt FINCO had
adhered to quality customer
service standards.

Looking ahead, Ms McCart-
ney said that, not surprisingly,
2009 would be a “challenging
year”, but FINCO was opti-
mistic of continued growth
and profitability.

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She added: “In the year
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“A comprehensive sales
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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
No.45 of 2000

TIBOR LTD.

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE GOVERNMENT is aim-
ing to decrease the Bahamas’
$500 million food import bill by
implementing initiatives to jump-
start commercial and subsistence
farming, while using new tech-
nology to bring livestock rearing
to levels that could be sustain-
able.

The recent global food short-
age, coupled with a spate of nat-
ural disasters and a rise in fuel
costs, have increased the price of
consumer goods across-the-board,
and forced grocery stores to raise
prices.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said the Food and Agricul-
ture Organisation (FAO) had
warned last year of an impend-
ing global food crisis that could be
of “undetermined proportion and
incalculable effect”.

“The increased frequency of
storms and the occurrence of pro-
tracted droughts, perhaps the out-
come of global warming, have
also affected crop yields and con-
tributed to a doomsday scenario
affecting rich and poor nations
alike,” the Prime Minister said.

This, Mr Ingraham added,
underscores the importance of
investing in the agri-business sec-
tor in an effort to “promote local-
ly sustainable agricultural and
marine production.

“This is important, because it
will not only create employment
and raise the incomes of produc-
ers, but also affect savings in for-
eign exchange that would other-
wise be expended for imports,”
said Mr Ingraham. “There is no
better time than now for us as a
people to re-define agriculture.”

Opening the second annual
Bahamas Agricultural, Marine

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
No.45 of 2000, the Dissolution of TIBOR LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of the
dissolution was the 16" February, 2009.

David J. Rounce
Liquidator

PRIME OFFICE
el =

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second floor
space will be available April, 2009 in newly
constructed building at the corner of Marlborough
and Cumberland Streets. Two (2) on-site car
spaces included.

Ideal location for offshore bank, trust company,
law firm, or other professions.

Contact Owner at:

362-6006



DIESEL MECHANIC WANTED

A well established local company is seeking to employ a certified Diesel Mechanic on a
full time basis. Successful candidate must possess diesel mechanic certification from a
recognized training institution and have a minimum of 5 years experience in the field.

* Candidate must have extensive knowledge and experience on diesel engine
trucks and trailers.

* Must be able to use computer diagnostic equipment to troubleshoot and correct
engine problems.

* Must be able to implement and maintain a preventative maintenance program
for the company’s fleet of vehicles throughout the Bahamas.

* Must have experience with auto-marine hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical
systems.

* Experience with emergency generators and electric motors would be a plus.
* Must be willing to work flexible hours and travel to the family islands.

Salary based on certification and experience and compensation and benefit package is
very competitive.

Deadline for applying: March 18, 2009
DA 67911 c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassu, Bahamas



OUTSTANDING CHILDREN IN THE ARTS NOTICE

The public is invited to nominate outstanding children in Music, Drama and
Dance for the First Annual “Outstanding Children In The Arts” Awards.

Awards Ceremony will take place at the First Annual Children’s Ball scheduled
for Saturday 18" April, 2009 at Sandal Royal Bahamian Resort, Cable Beach
Nassau, Bahamas.

The Awards Programme is sponsored by the ADISA Foundation for children.
The Awards will acknowledge, celebrate and reward the contributions of
children to the Artistic Culture of The Bahamas. The Competition is open to
children from Pre School to High School. The prizes will include Scholarship
Grants for the winners in each category.

Closing date for the entries is Friday 27" February, 2009. Nomination forms
are available upon request from the Adisa Foundation P.O. Box N-555 Nassau,
Bahamas, telephone 242-326-0159 (day time) or 394-3018 (night time), e-mail:
adisa.bahamas@ gmail.com.

The Adisa Foundation







FOOD FOR THOUGHT: The second annual Bahamaas Agricultural, Marine Resources and Agribusiness

Exp was opened by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham.

Resources and Agribusiness
Expo, Mr Ingraham said urbani-
sation and the movement of
labour into tourism, banking, con-

struction, the public sector and
retail, had led to a decline in
interest in food production.
“Farms and backyard gardens

‘Mission’ set to lower
$500m food imports





—. “ al ‘3 i. é,

declined as a result,” he said. Lar-
ry Cartwright, minister of agri-
culture and marine resources, said
the Bahamas has embarked on a

“mission to grow as much of its
food as possible”.

“Recently, the backyard gar-
dening programme was launched
with a view to encouraging per-
sons to plant agricultural crops
to supplement their household
needs,” he said.

Plots

Mr Cartwright said his Ministry
has also leased plots of land to
encourage individuals to start
small and medium-sized farms.
However, it was discovered that
much of the land was still not
being used, or was being misused.

“We have discovered that in a
number of cases, land leased for
the purpose of food production
has been diverted from that pur-
pose to speculative purposes. We
do not propose to regularise such
unauthorised diversions, or per-
mit the same to continue,” said
Mr Ingraham

He said government will con-
tinue to upgrade agricultural ser-
vices and “establish a farmer’s
credit programme, and a hurri-

; cane and disaster insurance fund”.
For Uchat sales and travel information contact Mr Cartwright said the crop

Performance Air at 362-1608 | 362-2302. insurance plan 1s in its final stages,

or and will assist in servicing the
deficits accrued by farmers fol-
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ae
ol

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications for teaching positions available at
St. John's College and St. Anne's School on New Providence, and Bishop Michael Eldon
School on Grand Bahama

English Language and Literature Grades 7-12
Mathematics
Physics General Science Grades 7-12
Guidance Counselor

(2 positions)
(2 positions)
{1 position)
Bishop Michael Elden School, Freeport Grand Bahama

Grades 7-12

Qualifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from an accredited
University together with a Teacher's Certificate from an accredited
Teacher's College.

Applications may be collected from the Education Department located on Sands Road off of East
Street,

Completed application forms with the requested supporting documents must be received by
the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 13"° March 2009, and must be addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
FP. 0. Box N656
Nassau, The Bahamas

Providing quality education in a Christian enviranment by developing the whale child: spiritually

acadencally, physically and socially thus preparing the ofa for fe.





THE TRIBUNE



a =>
Bahamas not alone

on low savings rate

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE BAHAMAS is not alone
in the world in having a danger-
ously low 2.5 per cent savings
rate, coupled with a rapidly
depleting social security fund in
the shape of the National Insur-
ance Board, a Chamber of Com-
merce seminar has revealed.

According to the Chamber’s
pension plan administrator, Cle-
ora Farquharson, countries such
as the US, which had a savings
rate in the 2008 second quarter
of 2.7 per cent, and the UK,
which had a 2009 first quarter sav-
ings rate projected at 1.1 per cent,
also have massive shortfalls in
their state-owned pension funds.

Hailing the Chamber fund as
the most affordable, benefit laden
and progressive plan on the mar-
ket, Ms Farquharson, a Fidelity
executive, told prospective clients
they should not wait for the Gov-
ernment to make it mandatory to
have a pension plan, but should
begin saving now.

“According to their own study
(NIB), which they conducted in
2001, the fund is projected to be
depleted by 2029, and this phe-
nomenon is not limited to the
Bahamas,” Ms Farquharson said.
“Pension reform is the buzz word
in the international community.

“In the United Kingdom, for
example, it is estimated that
about 12 million Britons are not
saving enough for their retire-
ment. In the United States, their
guaranteed corporation is pro-
jecting roughly a $23 million
shortfall over the next 10 years. In
China, their retiree numbers are
expected to jump to about 100
million in 2020, and their current
pension shortfall is estimated at
$300 billion.”

The Chgamber’s executive
director, Philip Simon, said there
had been overwhelming interest
in its pension plan since its incep-
tion last month, both from New
Providence-based and Family
Island companies.

Representatives from several
small and medium-sized busi-
nesses quizzed members of Roy-
alFidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust, which manages and admin-
isters the investment contribu-
tions, on the benefits of their plan
versus others.Ms Farquharson
said the Chamber pension plan
was open to both individuals and

companies. There were trustee
services, she added, and it was
portable, providing flexible
investment options, administra-
tive solutions and additional plan
benefits. The client assets will be
held in a private trust, separate
from RoyalFidelity’s assets.
“We take protection of our
clients’ assets seriously,” Ms Far-
quharson said. “In the unfortu-
nate event that RoyalFidelity
becomes bankrupt, our creditors
cannot touch your money to sat-
isfy our debt obligations. This was
just one of the many provisions
we put in place to increase the

level of competence that our
clients have come to expect.”

RoyalFidelity and Chamber
executives reiterated that
Bahamians were charged with
taking responsibility for their own
retirement security by saving for
the future now. “Less than one-
third of all Bahamians have more
than $1,000 in their bank
accounts, and this was really pri-
or to the economic downturn,”
said Ms Farquharson. The infor-
mation workshop was held to
introduce the Chamber’s month-
old pension plan to its members
and to the general public.

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MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 5B

Vacation - Paradise.
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Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents on ly.

Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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Reporter

Golf Cart Sales dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Facilities Manager
Fax 363-6873
Email- Pizolfcarts/omail.com

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) has created a new
website to focus on investing
in Grand Bahama, its newly-
appointed president has
announced.

Tan Rolle said the launch of

Please inclade amount of golf carts requested, bid price with contact infcemetion,






































NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT ALL SECTIONS
AND DEPARTMENTS OF THE PUBLIC
TREASURY OF THE BAHAMAS HAVE BEEN
RELOCATED TO THE FIRST AND SECOND
FLOORS OF THE BRITISH AMERICAN
FIANCIAL CENTRE, MARLBOROUGH ST. &
NAVY LION RD.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL
322-4561-4

New Providence Classical School
Invites K4 through Grade 5 Parents

To an Evening of Educational Consultation
Come hear a Presentation on an Education Model
that truly works and is producing astounding
results!

Come and Hear how your child can have:

A Foundation for life-long learning
Mastery in Learning
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Place: British Colonial Hilton Bay Street, Nassau

Date: Wednesday, 4th March 2009
Time: 5:30 -7:30 pm

R.S.V.P. 394-7393/4

the new website, www.invest-
grandbahama.com, was
required because many busi-
ness people do not initially
equate the name, Grand
Bahama Port Authority, with
investment.

“The name Grand Bahama
Port Authority is a misnomer.
Business people do not ini-
tially think investment when
they hear Port Authority. In
this regard, we have created
the website, which specifically
caters to investing on Grand
Bahama,” he said.

The website, which features
several major investments on
Grand Bahama, details the
many competitive advantages,
including the tax-free status,
that have transformed
Freeport into a major invest-
ment centre with a relatively
high standard of living.

Inward investment into
Freeport was somewhat
stalled two years ago, when
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority’s two principal
shareholders - the Hayward
family trust and late Edward
St George’s estate - became
embroiled in a legal dispute
over its ownership. That bitter
legal fight has continued to
this day.

At that time, there were
concerns that the behind-the-
scenes distractions at the Port
Authority had created a cli-
mate of uncertainty in
Freeport, discouraging poten-
tial investment and investors.

Yet Freeport has since seen
several major investments
come to fruition, including the
opening of Ross University,

av K,
Saf

“We must also be
transparent in our
operations. There
are things that we
can and will do to
improve
transparency and
accountability.”



lan Rolle

the Fenestration Glass Ser-
vices company, and the $900
million acquisition of BOR-
CO, and its transformation

into Vopak Terminal
Bahamas.
Planning

Mr Rolle said a critical
component in the continued
internal development of any
organisation lies in succession
planning, which is an essen-
tial element for how the Port
moves forward.

“We must also be transpar-
ent in our operations. There
are things that we can and will
do to improve transparency
and accountability,” said Mr
Rolle.

He added that the Port will
relaunch the GBPA.com web-
site on April 1, to provide per-
sons with a better under-
standing of “who we are, what
we do, and what we offer”.

By the end of the year, he
said GBPA.com will allow
online payment, but for its
launch the eServices compo-

Port creates new
website targeting
Freeport investors

nent of the site will allow users
to get immediate responses to
queries.

“You will be able to down-
load restrictive covenants spe-
cific to your area. The licence
fee schedule will also be avail-
able online,” Mr Rolle added.

Mr Rolle said business
licensees in good standing, and
who have a website, will be
allowed to have a link from
gbpa.com.

He said the site will feature
the Port’s latest news and
developments.

The Port Authority is also
taking a proactive approach
to addressing the fundamental
problems that affect progress
in Freeport.

A major revitalization of
downtown Freeport will get
underway on April 1. Mr
Rolle explained that the pro-
ject will occur in three phases,
having a major impact on the
town centre and breathing
new life into the once-popular
native and tourist area.

He said a full-scale clean-
up of the area will be con-
ducted, with new landscaping,
signage, benches, lighting and
other aesthetically pleasing
features.

Mr Rolle stressed that
vagrancy must be addressed
in order for the revitalisation
project to be successful.

Mr Rolle said one or two
buildings for a Halfway
House, to be operated by the
Grand Bahama Christian
Council, have been identified.
The Port will provide the
building and water.

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 7B



Stimulus focus

FROM page 1B

forced that it had to be “more
than business as usual”, it had
failed to focus on the areas where
a stimulus was most needed.

Adding that the Bahamas’
national debt-to-GDP ratio was
already likely to have passed the
40 per cent threshold, above
which its sovereign credit rating
may come under pressure, Mr
Smith expressed concern over
whether the largest spending item
in the 2009-2010 Budget might be
debt redemption/principal repay-
ment costs.

With the Government and its
fiscal position facing some “strong
headwinds”, Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business: “What we want
to avoid is debt servicing items
becoming the largest item in the
Budget, because if that happens,
we will really be headed down
the road of the third world.”

To ensure the Bahamas had
access to an emergency line of
foreign currency if 1t needed, Mr
Smith suggested that had he been
in office he would have opened
talks with the International Mon-
etary Fund (IMF) about access
to a stand-by line of credit.

This, he added, would be espe-
cially important if all other
sources of foreign currency
financing dried up, particularly
since other countries might be
competing for the same facilities.
And if the Bahamas’ credit rating
was impacted by the current glob-
al economic downturn, it might
not be able to borrow from the
capital and credit markets at the
favourable interest rates it had
previously enjoyed.

“T would have had some chats
with the IMF for a stand-by facil-
ity, in case all the other countries
in the region are lining up,” Mr
Smith said. “They’re going to
need some stand-by foreign cur-
rency to fall back on if this thing
goes on for a long time, and we
do not get enough foreign cur-
rency to support imports.

“You’ve got to explore all of
the options open to you and jug-
gle interest rates. The important
thing, in a Bahamian context and
in a foreign exchange rate regime,
is to get foreign currency inflows
and stabilize the currency,
because the last thing you want is
a run on the dollar.”

While there had been “insuffi-
cient details” in the mid-year
Budget statement to allow for a
thorough analysis of the Govern-
ment’s proposed stimulus pack-
age, Mr Smith said it appeared
to be primarily focused on boost-
ing the construction sector
through the construction of roads,
public buildings, schools, docks
and such like.

“That’s almost the capital bud-
get,” the former minister said,
and while not wanting to diminish
the impact spending in the con-
struction industry would have,
added that the sector was esti-
mated to account for only 10 per
cent of per annum gross domestic
product (GDP).

Mr Smith added that efforts to
boost the construction industry
would assist domestic demand,
but the demand that the Bahamas
really wanted to stimulate was
outside the Bahamas, primarily
in the shape of tourists.

While not wanting to “second
guess” the Ministry of Tourism’s
promotional plans, Mr Smith said:
“We have to take a page out of
the books of retailers. The one
item they don’t cut back on is
advertising because they want
people to keep spending. Tourism
is similar to a retail outlet, and
while there is a recession in the
US, people are still travelling to
Jamaica, Belize and Florida.”

The former minister said it was
vital to stimulate tourism demand
for Bahamas vacations, and visi-
tor spending, given that this
would be the prime source of for-
eign currency inflows with for-
eign direct investment depressed.
To this end, he suggested expand-
ing the tourism marketing bud-
get, and focusing on areas less hit
by the recession, such as Cana-
da, whose cities were a similar
flight time from the Bahamas’
core US east coast market.

RBC

Royal Bank
asi), of Canada

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown Allot-
ments, Love Hill Settlement, An-
dros. Containing a two-storey res.
Appraised value: $100,000

(806) Lot #13, Block 4 of Coral Wa-
terways, Section One, Coral Harbour,
New Providence with two houses
and a swimming pool, #312 N.P.
bounded Northwardly by a canal
or waterway of the said Subdivision
known as Flamingo waterway and
running 102.004 ft. Eastwardly by
lot #14 and 146.145ft Southwardly
by areservation for a private road.
Appraised value: $530,000

(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with
a parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom
condominium — Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised value:
$750,000

(433) Lot#27 of Village Allotment#14
in the Eastern District, containing
residence situated on Denver Street
off Parkgate Road in the Ann’s Town
Constituency, New Providence. Prop-
erty size 2,500 sqft Building size 990
sqft. Appraised value: $50,000

(400) Property situated in Calabash
Bay on the Island of Andros. 75’ x
150’ and containing thereon a small
grocery store 480 sqft. and an in-
complete 3 bed 2 bath house 900
sqft. Appraised value: $65,000

(301) Lot #2 in block #8, Steward
Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-
sion situated in Western District of
New Providence, approx. size 8,800
sq. ft. with a split level containing
two bed, two bath, living, dining &
family rooms, kitchen and utility
room — approx. size of building 2,658
sqft Appraised value: $322,752

(702) Lot #20 with residential prop-
erty located Skyline Heights.
Appraised value $280,000

(902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150 x
150 on Queens Highway just south
of Palmetto Point with a two sto-
rey stone building containing two
apartments. Each unit has 3 bed/2
1/2 bath, kitchen, living room and
3 linen closets. Appraised value:
$287,209

(400) Lot #14 situated in the settle-
ment of Love Hill on the Island of
Andros totalling 20,000 sqft Property
contains a two storey 5 bedroom,
3 bathroom residence.

Appraised value: $185,000

(105) Lot containing 2 storey bldg.
with three bed, two and a half bath

(902) 0.281 acre of vacant land off
Queen's Highway, Governor’s Har-
bour, Eleuthera.

Appraised value: $31,320

(702) Undeveloped lots # 4A, 16,
17, 18 and 19 located Chapman
Estates, West Bay. Appraised value:
$348,000

(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-
fan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivi-
sion. Grand Bahama, 18750 sqft.
Appraised value: TBA

(565) Vacantlot#5 located Eleuthera
Island Shores, Seaside Drive Section B,
Block#15, Eleuthera, Bahamas. 9,691
sqft, Appraised value: $27,620

(402) Lot89, Block7 Aberdeen Drive,
Bahamia West Replat Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, consist-
ing of 12,100 sqft.

Appraised value: $51,000

(800) Vacant property located Baha-
mia South. Block 16 lot 9A, Freeport,
Grand Bahama consisting of 24,829.20
sqft. Appraised value: $52,000

(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sqft)
situated in Mango Lane Section “B”
Block#15, Eleuthera Island Shores,

residence, and 30’ x 86’ situated Bai-
ley Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value: $235,000

(902) Lot containing commercial
building housing a sports bar, res-
taurant and a2 storey commercial
building on Queens Highway Tar-
pum Bay Eleuthera.

Appraised value: $180,000

(902) Lot#31 situated at the inter-
section of Albert & Victoria Streets
in Hatchet Bay containing a2 sto-
rey concrete building with an in-
complete 2bed 1 bath apt and store
downstairs. Property approx 2250

sq ft.
Appraised value: $65,000

(810) Description: Lot #60 Skyline
Lakes Subdivision approximately
13,000 square feet containing a split
level residence about 10 years old.
Living space is approx 2,633 sq ft,
with covered patios approx 480 sq
ft, walkways & driveways approx
102 sq ft. Located on the ground
floor is the garage, foyer, powder
room, 2 bedrooms with closets, 1
complete bathroom, sunken living
room, dining room, kitchen, play
room & utility room. Located on the
upper flooris the master bedroom
& bathroom, walk-in closets & tiled
balcony.

Appraised value: $453,000

(908) Lot# 23 located in the Subdi-
vision of Spring City, Abaco. Con-
taining a one storey house with 2
bed/1 bath. Wooden structure.
Appraised value: $60,000

(801) Lot #18 in Sandilands Allot-
ment on the western side of Cross-
wind Road between Seabreeze Lane
and Pineyard Road in the Eastern
Distract of The Island of New Prov-
idence-The Bahamas.,containing
single storey private residence com-
prising the following: covered entry
porch, living room, dining room,
kitchen, laundry room, family room,
sitting area, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom
and patio. The total area ofland is
approximately 7,641 square feet.
Appraised value: $289,426

(801) Two parcels of land containing
21,120 sq.ft. situated on the southern
side of East Shirley Street and 100
feet west ofits junction with “Shirlea”
in the Eastern District, New Provi-
dence. Situated thereon is a Gas
Station and Auto Repair Shop.
Appraised value: $799,497

(601) Lot #17 located Village Allot-
ment with fourplex,

Appraised value: $500,000

Eleuthera.
Appraised value: $50,189

(902) Vacant lot of land situated
in South Palmetto Point, Eleuthera
measuring 97x127x82x121.
Appraised value $38,000

(909) Vacantresidential Lot# 63 (7800
sqft) Crown Allotments located Mur-
phy Town, Abaco.

Appraised value: $18,000

(908) Vacantresidential Lot#30com-
prising of 1.02 acre located Dundas
Town, Abaco.

Appraised value $20,000

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block #5 Unit #1 Devonshire
Appraised value $30,000

(108) Vacant canal lot #71 Silver
Cove Court, Silver Cove Subdivi-
sion Zoned Tourist Commercial.
Approximately 0.4 acre.
Appraised value: $175,000

(802) Vacant Commercial Lot No:
3A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision
VI containing 3 acres located Free-
port, Grand Bahama.

Appraised value: $750,000

(902) Property contains 9,660 sq,
ft lot #17 Block Section ‘A’ of the
subdivision called Eleuthera Island
Shores, three miles Northwest of
Hatchet Bay. On this site is a house
that is six years old containing three
bedrooms, 2 baths (one incomplete),
living room, dining room, kitchen,
utility room with a gross floor area
of 1,217 sq.ft. Eleuthera Shores is a
residential development. Appraised
value $99,000.00

(701) Lot ofland having the number
16 in Block number 16 in Section
Three of the Subdivision called
and known as Sea Breeze Estates
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
a three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $277,000

(701) Lot ofland being lot number
11 in Block number 10 ona plan of
allotments laid out by Village Estates
Limited and filed in the dept of Land
& Surveys as number 142 N.P. and
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $165,000

(565) Lot # 1018 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Subdivision situate in the
South Western District of the island
of New Providence Containing a sin-
gle storey private residence 3 bed-
room 2 bath. Property approx. size
6,000 sqft Building approx size 2,400
sqft Appraised value: $173,176

(205) Lot B - 50 ft x 115.73 ft situ-
ated on the north side of Shell Fish
Road, being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster Road
with a one half duplex residential
premises. Appraised value: TBA

(808) Lot #3 Block 24 in the Cen-
treville Subdivision . Building #109/
Eastern side of Collins Avenue .
Comprising commercial 2,800 sq
ft commercial building.
Appraised value: $582,000

(901) Lot #32 containing 4 bed-
room 2bath concrete structure
located Triana Shores Harbour Is-
land, Eleuthera. Property size 80’ x
120’ x 80’ 120 feet Appraised value:
$332,735

(909) Lot# 22 with (5000 sqft) Crown
Allotments located Dundas Town,
Abaco Containing a one storey house
with 3 bed/1 bath -Wooden Struc-
ture. Appraised value: $50,000

(908) Lot#52 Crown Allotments lo-
cated Murphy Town, Abaco. Contain-
ing a one storey house with 3 bed/2

VACANT PROPERTIES

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block F Bahamia South Subdivision.
Appraised value $35,700

(569) Vacant property located in Sub-
division called “Culmerville” being
a portion of Lot #47 anda portion of
Lot #57. Appraised value: $24,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land situate in the settlement of James
Cistern on the Island of Eleuthera
one of the Islands of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas measuring
approx 10,000 sq.ft.

Appraised value TBA

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot No. 102 in the Sub-
division known as “EXUMA HAR-
BOUR’ in the Island of Great Exuma
measuring 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised
value $20,000.00.

(202) Vacant lot ofland containing
41,164 sqft, Lot #8, Love Estate, Phase
1, 2,300 ft. south of West Bay Street,
Western District, New Providence.
Appraised value $165,000

(202) Vacant lot ofland containing
1.786 acre, situated east of Knowles
Drive, approximately 1,420 ft. south-
ward of Harold Road in the western

OFFICERS

bath —- Concrete Block Structure —
Appraised value: $200,000

(108) Lot #1 Block #6 Winton Heights
Subdivision Easter District, N P The
propertyis approximately 14,834
sq ft in total. Property contains a
house of 2963 sq ft.

Appraised value: $433,000

(902) Parcel of land located on the
south side of Dry Hill Road in Pal-
metto Point containing 1.087 acres
with partially started structure.
Appraised value: $38,000

(902) Property contains 23,125 sq ft
lot #30 Lover's Hill Subdivision with
two storey structure approximately
15 years old. House contains Three
bedrooms, Two baths, living room,
dining room, t.v. room, kitchen, attic
space and Double car garage with a
gross floor area of 3,378 sq. ft. Lover’s
Hill is a residential development.
Appraised value $254,154.00

(902) Property contains approx.
5,800 sq. ft. situated in North Pal-
metto Point with a single storey con-
crete structure approx. 18 years old.
House contains three bedrooms,
two baths, living room, dining room
and kitchen with a gross floor area
of 1,444.26 sq. ft. Palmetto Point is
a residential developed area. Ap-
praised value $128,766.00

(101-N) Singel Family Resi-
dence-810 sqft, 2 bed,1 bath Lot#
3 Block #1 Eastville Subdivision East-
ern District, New Providence.
Appraised value: $65,000

(910) Lot #12 Maderia Park, a small
subdivision on the outskirts of Treas-
ure Cay, Abaco having an area of
9,444 square feet residence contain-
ing a concrete block structure with
asphalt shingle roof comprises of
three bedrooms, two bathrooms,
family room, living room, dining
room, and kitchen. Appraised value:
$147,000

(501) Property situated on Wil-
liams Lane off Kemp Road, New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a two-storey house and an apart-
ment building consisting of 1800
sqft. Appraised value $100,000

(501) All that piece of land being Par-
cel #3 and Parcel #4 situated on the
South side of Prince Charles Drive,
New Providence, Bahamas contain-
ing a commercial building housing
two shop space on the ground floor
and three shop space on the second
floor with a large storage area in the
rear. Total area 8400 sqft.

district of New Providence, Baha-
mas. Appraised value: $ 170,000

(501) Vacant property consisting
of Lot #894 situated in the Freep-
ort Ridge Subdivision, Section #1,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
Appraised value: TBA

(501) Ten (10) acres of land situ-
ated on Woods Cay, knownas Little
Abaco, between Cooper's Town and
Cedar Harbour in Abaco, Bahamas.
The property is undeveloped witha
view ofthe sea from both the North
and South side. Appraised value:
$1,078,750

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land Lot #977, Pinewood Gardens
Subdivision, Southern District, New
Providence. Appraised value: TBA.

(201) Lot No. 11703 Bahama Sound
Subd. Number 11 West, Great Exuma.
Size: approx. 10,000 sqft.
Appraised value: TBA.

(201) Lot No. 11698 Bahama Sound
Subd. #11 West, Great Exuma. Size:
approx. 10,000saqft.

Appraised value: TBA.

(201) Lot No. 10 Southeast Cor-

Appraised value: $366,650

(501) All that piece, parcel or land
having an approximate area of 2100
sqft situated on the Western side of
Blue Hill Road about 70 ft North of
Peter Street and about 115 ft south
of Laird Street in the Southern Dis-
trict of New Providence, Bahamas
containing a commercial building
housing a two bed/one bath unit on
the top floor and a store on the first
floor. Appraised value: $154,000

(501) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #39 in the Highbury
Park Subdivision in the Eastern Dis-
trict of New Providence, Bahamas
containing a3-bedroom/2-bathroom
house. Appraised value: $131,000

(501) All that piece, parcel or lot
of land situated on Cowpen Road
(1000 ft east of the Faith Avenue Junc-
tion) in the Southern District of New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a duplex apartment comprising of
two - 2-bedroom/1-bathroom apart-
ments. Appraised value: $150,000

(201) Lot of land situated on Fire
Trail Road being a partition of Glad-
ston Allot#41 New Providence, Ba-
hamas containing townhouse apart-
ment unit and two proposed units
(completed as is).

Appraised value: $237,714

(800) All that parcel or lot of land
being Lots #10 and 11 in Block 29
of Coconut Grove Subdivision, con-
taining a shopping plaza. The lotis
trapezium in shape, 8,383 square
feet. Appraised value $500,000

(560) Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-
division, Russell Island, Spanish
Wells. Property size 11,323 sqft,
building size 2236 sqft containing
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, an
eat-in kitchen, dining room, laun-
dry room, covered porch, a one car
garage, and a covered water tank.
Appraised value: $299,000

(901) Lot #57 block # Trianna Shores
containing 3 bed 2 bath front room,
dining room, & kitchen. Concrete
structure, 1926.40 sq. ft wooden deck
321.60 sq.ft. property 9600 sqft.
Appraised value: $448,645

(901) Lot “k” Barrack Street, Harbour
Island containing a2 storey concrete
building with 4 bed 4 bath, dining
room & kitchen -Building 2934.56
sqft property 6563 sqft.
Appraised value: $479,228

ner of Mandarin Drive, Sugar Apple
Road, Sans Souci Subdivision. Size:
14,368sqft. Appraised value: TBA.

(008) All that piece parcel oflot and
land on the Island of Great Exumasit-
uated about 10 1/2 miles Northwest-
wardly of George Town which said
piece parcel or lot ofland is #10750
Bahama Sound O.A.E. 10,900 sqft.
Appraised value: $65,000

(008) All that piece parcel or lot
of land designated as Lot Number
563 on aplan of a Subdivision called
or known as Bahama Highlands #4.
11,223.41 sqft. Appraised value:
$87,000

(008) All that piece parcel orlotland
being Lot # 12032 in the Bahama
Sound of Exuma Subdivision #
11 West, Great Exuma, Bahamas.
Appraised value: $224,000

(008) A parcel ofland situate about
the eastern portion of The Forest
Estate in the vicinity of the settle-
ments of Southside and The Forest
being Lot# 4803 in Bahama Sound
of Exuma 6, Exuma The Bahamas.
Appraised value $25,000

“From a more general per-
spective, we do not want to stim-
ulate local demand so much,
which is why this is a bit misguid-
ed. Not to ignore the issue, but
while we’re doing that, I think
resources are more appropriately
used to stimulate demand from
outside,” Mr Smith said of the
Government’s plans. “The
demand we want to stimulate is
demand from the outside, for
travel. While it’s important to
have local demand, Bahamian
dollars are less important than
US dollars.” This would repre-
sent the best way of mitigating
the global economic downturn’s
impact on the Bahamas, Mr
Smith said, backing the Ministry
of Tourism’s plans to reduce air-
lift and airfare costs coming into
the Bahamas. Tourism, after all,
was the Bahamas’ largest indus-
try, accounting for most employ-
ment and economic activity. He
added: “We need a continuous
inflow of foreign currency to sta-
bilize the Bahamian dollar and
finance import needs, even in the
case of the stimulus package. We
import all we consume, so we ulti-
mately want to have the objec-
tive of increasing foreign curren-
cy inflows on the recurrent side
through tourism expenditure.

COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE
Tel: 242-356-8568

800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
801) Mr. Jerome Pinder

802) Mr. Brian Knowles

805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O’brien
806) Mrs. Lois Hollis

807) Mr. Lester Cox

808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
810) Miss LaPaige Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or
242-302-3800

(201) Ms. Nicola Walker

(202) Mr. Robert Pantry

(205) Mrs. Anya Major

NASSAU MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-8700

(701) Mr. James Strachan

702) Mr. Antonio Eyma 724) Mrs. Faye Higgs

301) Ms. Thyra Johnson 725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson 565) Mrs. Catherine Davis

MACKEY STREET BRANCH 569) Mrs. Vanessa Scott

Tel: 242-393-3097 NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT

601) Ms. Cherelle Martinborough Tel: 242-377-7179

JOHN E KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH 433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss

Tel: 242-325-4711 LYFORD CAY BRANCH

401) Mrs. Renea Walkine Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037

402) Mrs. Chandra Gilbert 101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson

PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA

Tel: 242-393-7505/8 Tel: 242-332-2856/8

501) Mr. Keith Lloyd

902) Ms. Nicole Evans
505) Ms. Patricia Russell HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
CABLE BEACH BRANCH

Tel:242-333-2230
Tel: 242-327-6077 901) Ms. Velderine Laroda
466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts ANDROS TOWN BRANCH
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE Tel: 242-368-2071
Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180 400) Mrs. Rose Bethel
716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

Tel: 242-367-2420
723) Ms. Deidre King 908) Mrs. Joyce Riviere

909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier

910) Miss Cyprianna Williams
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel:242-347-3031

105) Miss. Ganiatu Tinubu
GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND

Tel: 242-337-0101

100) Mrs. Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH

Tel: 242-336-3251

008) Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-6631/2

101-F) Ms. Garnell Frith
102) Ms. Elaine Collie

103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-Cartwright
108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
SPANISH WELLS

Tel: 242-333-4131 or
242-333-4145

(560) Mr. Walter Carey

(
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RBC Royal

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED Bank of Canada

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean /bahamas

™ Trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. ® The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





x-BEC chair accuses Government
of trying to 'demonise' his efforts

FROM page 1B

— and inability to obtain debt
financing without it being gov-
ernment guaranteed, on the
tariff rate cuts he had intro-
duced.

“The former government
administration directed BEC
to reduce the tariffs,” Mr Got-
tlieb said in an interview with
Tribune Business, which was
published last week.

“It had the effect of suck-
ing $18 million of revenue
away per year, and that’s
unfortunate. Because up until
then, BEC was in position to

have the necessary economic
ratings to get financing for its
capital projects. That was sig-
nificantly undermined.”

But BEC’s annual report
for its financial year that end-
ed on September 30, 2004,
showed that despite the
$16.246 million less that the
Corporation earned from elec-
tricity sales as a result of the
tariff cut, it still generated a
27.08 per cent increase in net
profitability — from $11.143
million in 2003 to $14.16 mil-
lion the following year.

“In the 2004 annual report,
we reduced costs by as much
as $28 million and gave away

NOTICE OF SALE

Expocredit Corporation (‘the Company”) invites
offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Maris Subdivision’,
comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
South of Burnt Ground in the [sland of Long Island
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.

The Company makes no representations or warranties
with respect to the state of the Property which is
offered for sale “as is where 1s”.

The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing

& Law of Property Act.

TERMS:

Ten percent (10%) of the purchase

price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
reserves the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may

submit written offers

addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
Partner, P, O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 30"

day of March, 2009.

$16 million,” Mr Jarrett told
Tribune Business.

Referring to Mr Gottlieb’s
comments about the impact
of the base tariff cuts, he
replied: “If one wants to make
that case, how do you explain
that there was a major
increase in net profitability the
year I gave the reduction?
2004 was BEC’s best year in
terms of cost effectiveness and
efficiency. If we’d taken back
the tariff cut we'd given, prof-
its would have been $31 mil-
lion.

“TI make no apologies for
the rate reduction. It was the
right thing to do then, and it’s
still the right thing to do.

“T was pleased to do it. I did
it for the Bahamian people,
who deserve it.

“They’ve sacrificed so much
with the rates and Customs
duty.”

Mr Jarrett said Mr Got-
tleb’s comments “don’t pan
out on the evidence”, adding
that BEC’s ongoing problems
stemmed from its own internal
efficiencies, low workforce
productivity, maintenance
issues and the need for better
management, not to mention
the rapid increase in global oil
prices that last July peaked at
$147 million per barrel.

The former BEC chairman
said BEC’s financial position
was also partly attributable to
the 10 per cent Customs duty
rate that the Ministry of
Finance, in 1994 under the
first Ingraham administration,
imposed on the Corporation’s
oil imports. That duty rate has

“I make no apologies for the
rate reduction. It was the right
thing to do then, and it’s still the
right thing to do. I was pleased
to do it. I did it for the Bahamian
people, who deserve it. They’ve
sacrificed so much with the rates
and Customs duty.”



currently been removed as a
result of the two-year payment
moratorium announced in the
2008-2009 Budget.

Paper

A December 6, 2004, Cabi-
net paper presented to the for-
mer Christie administration,
said the decision to impose the
10 per cent Customs duty rate
had been taken without con-
sultation with BEC manage-
ment.

Its effect had been to cre-
ate “an unbearable 17 per cent
rate” for BEC to pay on its
oil imports, when added to the
7 per cent Stamp Duty it was
already paying.

The paper said: “Although
the 7 per cent Stamp Tax is
eventually recoverable, the 10
per cent is not passed on to
the public and has a negative
effect on the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation’s financial

ee
TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
ShirleyStreet

Invites applications from qualified Christian

performance and working cap-
ital position.

“The carrying cost of the 10
per cent duty, which has not
been passed on to the cus-
tomers in the surcharge, as
well as the additional cost of
$16.2 million associated with
the ‘true up’ formula used dur-
ing the fiscal year have also
created a burden of at least
25 per cent of customers’
usage of electricity borne by
BEC during the year......

“We are therefore recom-
mending the elimination of
this customs duty of 10 per
cent pro-rated over a three-
year period by 3.3 per cent to
put the Corporation in a posi-
tion to raise all funds inde-
pendently on the strength of
its balance sheet perfor-
mance.”

Mr Jarrett added: “BEC
was able to generate enough
revenue to live with that up
until 2004, 2005, when rising
global oil prices exposed the
folly of the FNM govern-
ment.”

The current Ingraham
administration appears to
share similar views, given the
two-year moratorium it has
imposed to enable BEC to
restructure and sort out its bal-
ance sheet without having to
pay taxes worth 17 per cent
of its fuel imports’ value.

The Government has also
continued with another policy
proposed in that 2004 Cabi-
net paper, namely writing off
taxes and import duties owed
by BEC against the unpaid
electricity receivables owed to
the Corporation by other gov-
ernment ministries, agencies
and departments.

Scapegoat

Given this, Mr Jarrett said
he feared the current govern-
ment was seeking to
“demonise” and scapegoat
himself, and all that had been
done at BEC under the
Christie administration, to jus-
tify what it was doing now
despite the fact they had
adopted many of the same
policies and plans.

“They’re piggybacking on
what I did, and the value of
that,” Mr Jarrett added.
“They’ve brought no new
ideas to BEC. All they’re
doing is piggybacking on what
I did and putting a new face
on it.”

On the customs duty situa-
tion, the 2004 Cabinet paper
noted: “Further exacerbating
this problem is the high cost of
government receivables ($45.5
million at fiscal year 2004)
which is not being systemati-
cally reduced by government
from the fixed monthly pay-
ments of $700,000, compared
to average monthly billings of
$900,000 for usage by the
Government and its depen-
dent agencies.”

Mr Jarrett told Tribune
Business that accounts receiv-
ables stood at $104 million
when he entered BEC back
in June 2002.

To deal with that, the
December 2004 Cabinet paper
had suggested offsetting the
$45.5 million in government
receivables owed to BEC with
the $28.5 million in customs
duties owed by BEC.

teachers for the following positions for the
20109-2010 School Year

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, SOPHONIE BASTIAN of
Tyler Street, P.O. Box CB-12401, Nassau, Bahamas intends
to change my name to SOPHONIE BASTIEN. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

-Journalism/Literature (Gr, 10-12)
-Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr, 7-12)
-Math (Gr. 7-127)
-Physics (Gr. 10-12)
-Agriculture (Gr.7-9)
-Technical Drawing (Gr, 7-12)
-Accounts‘Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
-Physical Education (Gr, 7-12)
-Spanish (Gr.7-12)
-Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)
(Chemistry
-Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
-Health Science (Gr, 7-9)
-General Science (Gr.7 -9)
-Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)
-Music (Gr. 7-12)
-Biology (Gr. 10-12)

Language Arts/Literature (Gr, 7-12)
-Art/Craft (Gr, 7-12)
-Food Nutrition (Gr, 10-12)
-Clothing Construction (Gr. 1(-12)
-Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)

-Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION
CLE/GEN/00239

2006

BETWEEN

KENDRICK CLARKE
Plaintiff
AND

FELIX DELANCY
Defendant

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thereby is wholly responsible for the traffic
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2003 in the vicinity of East Street and Wilson
Track and the Plaintiff claims damages,
interests and costs against you.

AND THAT it has been ordered by
the Supreme Court that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action on you be effected
by this advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that
you must within fourteen (14) days from the
publication ofthis advertisement inclusive ofthe
day of such publication, acknowledge service
of the said Writ of Summons by completing
a prescribed form of Acknowledgement of
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NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of JAMES ALEXANDER WALLACE late
of West Bay Street in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Island of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of the
same certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the 21st day March A.D., 2009, and if required, prove
such debts or claims, or in default be excluded from
any distribution; after the above date the assets will
be distributed having regard only to the proved debts
or claims of which the Administrator shall have had Notice.

Application must be picked up at the High
School Office on Shirley Street and be returned
with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph and three references to:

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.
CHAMBERS
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the aforementioned date.

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.,
Attorneys for the Administrator
Alvernia Court, 94 Dowdeswell Street
P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff

Deadline for application is
March 6th, 2009





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 9B





Airport Authority's jam
loss slashed 76.4%

FROM page 1B

tune of $1 million in its 2008
financial year, compared toa
$13.035 million hand-out giv-
en the year before.

Reducing the Airport
Authority’s drain on the
Treasury is understood to
have been a key component
in the 10-year management
contract handed to YVRAS,
which has a deadline by
when it must make the air-
port profitable. YVRAS
earned $844,902 in manage-
ment fees during 2008.

Since its incorporation in
2000, the Airport Authority
has been another financial
burden for the taxpayer and
the Government, its accumu-
lated deficit — total losses -
after eight years in existence
standing at $45.164 million.

For 2008, the commercial
expertise YVRAS has
brought to bear on NAD
and the Airport Authority
was already starting to show
through, with revenues from
terminal leases and retail
concessions, refueling royal-
ties, car parking and adver-
tising all above 2007 levels.

Yet apart from the passen-
ger facility fee, all aeronauti-
cal revenues — landing fees,
baggage claim fees, loading
bridges and aircraft parking

fees — were behind prior year
comparatives.

From a balance sheet per-
spective, the main activity in
2008 was the refinancing of a
$65 million bridging loan
provided by a lending syndi-
cate of banks. That re-
financing, completed in
November 2007, rescheduled
the Airport Authority’s debt
from short to long-term, as a
syndicate stepped forward
with an $80 million term
loan that is payable within
seven years.

Replaced

That term loan is itself
being replaced by the $80
million participating debt
facility that forms the third
tranche of the $310 million
financing round for LPIA’s
first phase redevelopment.
Some $50 million of the $80
million required is being put
up by the Government.

But, as a requirement of
the initial $80 million term
loan, the financial statements
said the Airport Authority
had “established a restricted
debt service reserve account
with Citibank, New York”.
That account’s balance stood
at $5.3 million as at June 30,
2008.

And, to manage interest

NOTICE

MARATHON INVEST & TRADE S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies

Act. 2000

MARATHON INVEST & TRADE

S.A. is in dissolution as of February 26, 2009

Athinoula Vasiliou of Ioanni Kyrakide 12A,
Apostolos Andreas, 3067 Limassol, Cyprus is the

Liquidator.

NOTICE

GOLDHAWK MANAGEMENT BUSINESS

CORPORATION
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000 GOLDHAWK MANAGEMENT BUSINESS
CORPORATION. is in dissolution as of February

26, 2009

Diana Demetriou of Stavrou Stylianide 1A, Mesa
Yitonia, 4003 Limassol, Cyprus is the Liquidator.

NOTICE

FRESHWATER INCORPORATED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies

Act. 2000
is in dissolution as

FRESHWATER INCORPORATED.
of February 26, 2009

Amanda Cacoyanni of 284 Arch Makarios III
Ave., Fortuna Court, Block B, 3105 Limassol,
Cyprus is the Liquidator.

SHOLM
CONSTRUCTION LTD.

204


























costs, NAD has set a policy
that it will keep “50 per cent
of its borrowings at fixed
rates of interest”, a target it
was in compliance with at
June 30, 2008.

As at year-end 2008, the
sums owed by the Airport
Authority to the National
Insurance Board (NIB) had
more than tripled to $61,341,
compared to $17,486 the
year before.

A $1.543 million payable
was also owed to the

Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration (BEC).

Also on the balance sheet
is a more than-$20 million
advance from the Ministry of
Finance which, during 2006,
gave $2.5 million to help set
up NAD. A further $17.994
million was advanced by the
Ministry to help purchase
security equipment and
enhance security measures.

No interest was attached
to these advances, and no
maturity date specified.

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Deadline for applications is Tuesday, March 31st, 09
Download brochure at www.cob.edu.bs

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cS Fs LL” ac. a3 1.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 27 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.48 | CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -42.88 | YTD % -2.50
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.88 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%
WWVW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $

1.39 Abaco Markets 1.41 1.41 0.00 0.070
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992
7.00 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.319
0.63. Benchmark 0.63. 0.63 0.00 -0.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.105
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00
12.61 Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95 0.00
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83 0.00
4.80 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.77 6.77 0.00
1.78 Consolidated Water BDRs 1.71 1.73 0.02
2.27 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00
6.02 Famguard 7.76 7.76 0.00
11.00 Finco 11.00 11.00 0.00
10.45 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 10.45 0.00
5.00 Focol (S) 5.00 5.00 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

f2ahH 1

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Morery 20 Vitork
â„¢& T.

Div $

0.055
1.255
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00
8.60 J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
FBB17 0.00. 7%
100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low

1000.00

Securi Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22

S2wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $

-0.041

Div $ P/E
0.300

0.000

0.001

0.480
0.000

ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets 11.23 12.04 14.00

RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387 0.35 4.40
2.9230 -0.58 -2.54
1.4376 0.28 4.38
3.3201 -1.94 -11.33

12.6816 0.50 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59

1.0000 0.00 0.00.
9.1005 0.06 -13.33
1.0401 4.01 4.01
1.0330 3.30 3.30
1.0410 4.10 4.10

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
del

Fund Name Div $ Yield %

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3773 Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund

1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3781
2.9230

1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
jast 52 weeks
ighted price for daily volume
ted price for daily volume
Change - Cha m day to day
Daily Vol. -N raded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin: gs
(S) - 4for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Weekly Vol. - Tre

EPS $ - A company’

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meanin: gful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



FamGuard's finance head in resignation

FROM page 1B

In a separate development,
it has been confirmed to Tri-
bune Business by sources
familiar with the situation that











the net income presented by
Family Guardian’s parent,
BISX-listed FamGuard Cor-
poration, was “overstated”
during the first three quarters
of 2008 due to an accounting
error since picked up.

Please be advised that effective March 2, 2009
Betty K. Agencies will resume its regular twice
weekly service from Miami, Florida to Nassau.









Schedule:

Departs Miami on Monday





Arrives in Nassau on Tuesday







Departs Miami on Wednesday





Arrives in Nassau on Thursday





Nassau
East St. North, Kelly’s Dock
P.O. Box N-351
Nassau, Bahamas
242-322-2142













3701 N.W. South River Drive
Miami, Florida 33142








Legal Notice

NOTICE
CORONA ELLINGTON INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JIGGER Ill LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of January 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GARAMOND S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

But there is nothing to sug-
gest that Ms Greene’s depar-
ture is linked to this, or that
she was directly responsible
in any way.

The financial statements
impacted, this newspaper
understands, are the three
interim reports presented to
shareholders for the nine
months to September 30, 2008.

It is unclear what the
accounting error was, or its
magnitude, but the reports
presented to shareholders last
year were unaudited, mean-
ing they had not been scruti-
nized or approved by Fam-
Guard’s external auditors.

The error was picked up
internally and rectified during
the 2008 fourth quarter, Tri-
bune Business understands,
and FamGuard’s year-end
results will not be impacted
by it. The insurer’s 2008 per-
formance is said to have still
been profitable.

Shareholders are only like-
ly to see the changes when the
company starts publishing its
quarterly results for fiscal
2009, as the 2008 comparatives
would have to be restated.

“It all happened in 12
months,” one source told Tri-
bune Business. “There was no
fraud. There was nothing dis-
honest that went on. It was
just an unfortunate mistake.

“Publicly traded companies
of this size, in this country, are
relatively small, and if you
make an accounting error it
tends to be material.”

Reiterating that the
accounts impacted were unau-
dited management accounts,
the source said the three quar-
terly statements issued by
FamGuard last year were not
subject to the same level of
scrutiny as year-end accounts
examined by external audi-
tors.

Unaudited

For the nine months to
September 30, 2008, Fam-
Guard’s unaudited accounts
showed the company had gen-
erated a net profit of $5.22
million, compared to $6.527
million in net income for the
year before.

A major factor behind the
more than-$1 million swing

a)

Entry level book keeper urgently
needed must be proficient in
Microsoft Applications.

Please fax resume to 394-3885.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETOILE LUMINEUSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HORNBILL HALLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BREATH OF DAWN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



“It all happened in 12 months.
There was no fraud. There was
nothing dishonest that went on. It
was just an unfortunate mistake.
Publicly traded companies of this
size, in this country, are relatively
small, and if you make an accounting
error it tends to be material.”



was a $2.14 million reversal
on FamGuard’s paper
gains/losses from its various
investments in equities, a
$1.368 million gain for the first
nine months of 2007 com-
pared to a $736,724 loss last
year due to the stock market
slide.

When contacted by Tri-
bune Business, Ms Hermanns
declined to comment on
whether FamGuard’s interim
financial statements issued in
2008 had overstated net
income. She said the compa-
ny was currently undergoing
its year-end 2008 audit, and
because it was in a closed peri-
od, she did not want to make
any comments on its financial
performance.

“We are currently finishing
our audit for 2008. That is
being finalised as we speak,
so until that is done I don’t
want to make any comment,”
Ms Hermanns said.

When pressed on the over-
statement/accounting error
issue, she replied: “I can’t
speak specifically to that at
this point. With financial state-
ments, we have to be careful
how we present that, and I do

not want to make sweeping
statements without a full
review from the auditors. I
cannot speak without having
the benefit of the audit being
completed... We’re not aware
of any substantial variations
in our financials.

“We will review our finan-
cials once the audit is com-
pleted, and that should be this
month. We anticipate that
being at the end of March, and
then we will provide full
access. Everything will be
clear, with full transparency.”

Ms Hermanns did, though,
say the major difference
between FamGuard’s 2008
and 2007 financial perfor-
mances was the paper
gain/loss on its equity invest-
ments, which are described as
‘changes in unrealized appre-
ciation of equity investments’.

“The most significant
change to our financial state-
ments that we anticipate over
the prior year is the swing in
equities,” she added. “Obvi-
ously, our equities were way
down compared to the prior
year. That will be the biggest
change in our financial state-
ments.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HOT PASTY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUNBEACH ISLAND INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RHUBARBE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of January 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 11B



Scotiabank appoints
receiver for resort

FROM page 1B

on foreign direct investment
projects that the Bahamas was
counting on to generate jobs
and economic growth. Numer-
ous other projects, including
the Ritz-Carlton Rose Island,
Royal Island, Ginn sur mer
and Rum Cay Resort Marina,
have all been impacted to
some degree by the immense
difficulty — if not impossibility
— of obtaining debt financing
at reasonable cost and terms.

As for Chub Cay, the
receiver’s appointment comes
as little surprise. Tribune Busi-
ness had been told that the
project’s Homeowners Asso-
ciation had been locked in
last-ditch talks with Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) to avert the
bank’s foreclosure plan when
it reported last month that
some 20 per cent of the 50 full-
time operational staff were
laid-off. Those talks seeming-
ly failed to produce a solution.

Scotiabank (Bahamas) had
launched a legal action against
its three main principals -
Kaye Pearson, Walt McCro-
ry and Bob Moss — in the US
District Court for the southern
district of Florida just before
Christmas 2008, alleging that
they had defaulted on the
repayment of a $45 million
loan.

The bank alleged that the
trio had guaranteed the
“financing for the develop-
ment of vacation residences,
a marina, a clubhouse and
related improvements for
more than 800 acres on Chub
Cay in the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas”. As a result, it
has been seeking to call in the



$4 million loan guarantee
proffered by Messrs McCro-
ry, Pearson and Moss.

In its lawsuit, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) alleged that the
trio owed $44.010 million in
unpaid principal on the July
28, 2006, loan, plus interest,
cost and expenses, including
attorneys’ fees.

Deadline

The bank also alleged that
the three developer principals
had guaranteed that construc-
tion work on Chub Cay would
be completed by December
31, 2007, a deadline that had
been missed. Some $38.6 mil-
lion worth of work, Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) claimed,
needed to be done to bring
the project to completion.

“They’re [the developers]
still looking for an investor
partner, and right now the
Homeowners Association are
funding the operational
expenses” of the resort and
Marina, one source had told
Tribune Business of the situa-
tion at Rum Cay. “Negotia-
tions are still ongoing.”

That new equity partner at
one stage looked like being
Dutch-based real estate and
resort developer, La Perla
International Living, which
has developed resort and res-
idential

communities in nations
including Antigua, Panama,
Spain, France and Vietnam.
However, talks between the
two sides were said to have
broken down more than a
month ago.

In their response to Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) Florida law-



suit, Mr McCrory and Mr
Moss, while admitting the loan
default, denied they were
responsible for paying the $4
million guarantee as the bank
had already been able to call
this in via a previously pledged
stand-by credit facility.

The duo also alleged that
Bahamian law firm, Graham,
Thompson & Co, had failed
to protect their interests in
talks with Scotiabank
(Bahamas), because while its
Freeport office had repre-
sented themselves, the Nas-
sau office acted for the bank.

There is nothing to suggest
that Graham, Thompson &
Co, and its partners, attorneys,
associates and staff, have done
anything wrong in relation to
the affair, and they are not
named as defendants in rela-
tion to the Chub Cay dispute.

Apart from Scotiabank
(Bahamas) and _ other
financiers, Chub Cay’s woes
have also impacted Bahami-
an contractors engaged on the
project’s construction. Tribune
Business previously reported
that Osprey Developers and
Gunite Pools had obtained
separate default judgments
worth a total $468,000 against
the development over alleged-
ly unpaid bills.

The whole episode again
illustrates the potential dam-
age that could be done to the
Bahamas’ tourism and eco-
nomic reputation by unfin-
ished resort developments,
especially in instances where
developers allegedly leave
unpaid bills and debts.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
MATERIALS MANAGEMENT DIRECTORATE

A Ae
5 t,
w

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY
OF MEDICAL & SURGICAL ITEMS

PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from
qualified individuals for the position of PRINCIPAL, St. John’s College,
beginning September, 2009.

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in Education from a recognized
University, with at least (5) years accumulative administrative experience. The
applicant must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Providing leadership - set the climate and pace for success and high
achievement in the school.

- Organizing and supervising schedules, programmes, records and
procedures.

- Supervising and evaluating teachers and support staff.

- Managing records, school finances and end-of-year closing
procedures.

- Communicating with parents, community groups and organizations.

- Displaying consistent organizational and human relationship skills.

- Assisting the Education Department with and initiating Staff
Development Programmes.

school

Applicants should submit a cover letter, Curriculum Vitae, copies of
degree certificates, three references and passport photographs to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Friday March 27th, 2009.





THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

TENDER

MAKING AND/OR SUPPLYING UNIFORMS
FOR SECURITY OFFICERS, SCREENERS
PAV CO MES

Bids are invited for a one year contract to manufacture uniforms for the Security
Officers, Screeners and Firefighters of the Airport Authority. The details for security
and firefighters are as follows:

Trousers (Male and Female)
Trousers (Male)-Dickies

Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(M/F)
Female Caps

Rain Coats

Shoulders Patches

Trousers (Male and Female)-Dickies
Skirts

Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(Dickies)M/F
Male Peak Caps

Shoulders Bars

Tenders are invited from qualified Contractors for the supply pois Malo smale)

of Medical & Surgical Items for the Materials Management
Directorate, Public Hospitals Authority, for a period of one (1) year.

Ties Windbreakers

Sweaters Shoes (Male and Female)
Cap Badges Safety Boots

Dress Uniform Jackets Golf Shirts — K-9 Unit
Trousers K-9 Unit Pants*

Shirts* Boots*

Senior Officers Shirts* Dress Pants Senior Officers*
Shoes* Overalls*

Belts* Base Ball Caps*

Tender documents, which include instructions to Tenderers,
specifications and other relevant information, can be collected
9:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at the Materials
Management Directorate, Princess Margaret Hospital’s compound,
Shirley Street.

(*Items are for Fire Fighters)

Collection of the Bid Specifications and viewing of the samples of the uniforms may
be done at the Security Office (located in the former Police Station at Lynden Pindling
International Airport) between the hours of 9:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m., Monday thru Friday
up to March 10, 2009.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or
packaged identified as “ TENDER TO SUPPLY MEDICAL
& SURGICAL ITEMS FOR THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS

AUTHORITY?” and addressed to:

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes addressed to the undersigned and the
envelope must specify “BID FOR UNIFORMS”. The Airport Authority reserves the
right to reject any envelope not properly addressed and/or not specifying “BID FOR
UNIFORMS”. Faxed bids will NOT be considered.

The Chairman
Tenders Committee
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace West
Collins Avenue
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas

The Authority reserves the right to reject any and all bids without stating any
reason (s).

Bids should be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday March 31, 2009. Bids
received after the deadline will not be considered.

All Tenders must be received at the above address by 5:00 p.m. on
20% April 2009.

There will be a public opening of bids at 10:00 a.m. on Friday April 3, 2009. Interested
bidders may attend, and bring copies of the business licenses.

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate of up to date
National Insurance Contributions should accompany all proposal.

Acting General Manager
The Airport Authority
Lynden Pindling International Airport
P. O. Box AP59222
Nassau, Bahamas

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any or all Tender(s).







JUDGE PARKER

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SOUNPS

INTERESTING! Tt WANTED A THANK YOU,
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MOM JUMPS QUT OF
KER SKIN!



©1989 Universal Press Syndicate



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©2009 by North America Syndleata, Inc. World rights reserved.

www. kingfeatures.com





HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

/ I WST HOPE YOUR FATHER DIDN'T
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HOME EARLY AFTER A LONG
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et Sal olen ute a sole Clan Pe | | | | | Neither side vulnerable. made, but if West has it, the contract
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king hard? (7) a; Sign tora iS et fe eee es ¥K95 lénp of clube lead with the ace- and
working hard’ ign for a missing ing-of-clubs lead with the ace an
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broadcast (5,4) 21 They prohibit flags (7) » deepest an fie a Flower (5) : outh refuses to try the diamon
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start (5) America to get extra 11 Shame (9) 4 Sorrow (7) finesses — especially when the risking it. Instead, he wins with the
29 Formerly in older style (4) money (5) > 12 First night of film (8) 5 Ancestry (7) finesses win. But the fact is that ace and exits with the jack of clubs,
30 Our respect will be 25 Athenian garret (5) ” 13. A criminal (5) 7 Wander stealthily (5) finesses should be avoided like the — saddling West with the lead.
misplaced for such an 26 Decapitated their son may < 15 Abominable (7) 8 Urgently enthusiastic plague, and should be taken only West is helpless. If he cashes the
10 be (4 Lu : when no better option is available. king of diamonds, it is all over, while
oppressor (10) e (4) 17 Metal wind (6,2,2) ‘ : ae
: 9 Hair style (8) Consider this deal where declarer _ if he leads a heart or a club — giving
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14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20. ~=Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 30 Bavarian leather 26 Knock




unconscious (4)









THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 13B



INSIGHT



G H T

FEEDBACK

Re: Degrees -
Time for a rethink



YOUR argument regarding
university degrees has some
merit, as I can testify as one
who has experienced it from
both ends of the spectrum.

Having entered the work
market in the 1960s, when less
than five per cent of the UK’s
population went to college, I
was never given the opportu-
nity to see a university degree
as a realistic option. I didn’t
even consider it at the time.

Like most of my generation,
I entered my profession
(accountancy) as an 18-year-
old, after taking the then stan-
dard three advanced level
GCE (General Certificate of
Education) subjects, which
was regarded as the “gold
standard” for having had a
sound basic education. I
signed articles with a small
provincial accountancy firm
and learned my profession “at
the knee of a master” — as
you put it — while being paid
a pittance during training.

Whatever the limitations of
this system, it taught me
everything I needed to know
about becoming a practising
accountant. Much of the work
was routine, boring even, but
it showed me all I needed to
know about providing accoun-
tancy services to an accept-
able standard while observing
all the ethical considerations
of such a position. When my
examinations came around, I
was able to pass, if not with
flying colours, at least with
adequate marks, so I was able
to “qualify” while earning a
living, albeit a very humble
one.

Some of my fellow trainees,
working with other bigger and
more prestigious firms, actu-
ally paid their employers (or
at least their parents did) for
the privilege of being taught
the business. The sums paid
were considerably less than
the fees and living expenses
one now has to find to put a
student through university.

By the time I was in my ear-
ly twenties, I had qualified as a
chartered accountant and was
in a position, had I chosen so
to do, to marry, buy a home
and have a family. My path
was set and, for the most part,
I have been pleased with the
living accountancy has given
me, though I would be the
first to acknowledge that it is
not one of the world’s most
exciting occupations.

By contrast, my own chil-
dren have completed very
long and expensive university
courses (I believe I have
invested at least a quarter of a
million dollars in educating
two of my children at tertiary
level) and they are still uncer-
tain about which path to take.

All of this begs the ques-
tion: if university education
isn’t supposed to guide stu-
dents towards career goals,
then what is it for? I have seen
no evidence in my own life
that graduates are noticeably
better informed than anyone
else, except in their own lim-
ited area of speciality, and it
could be argued that pro-
longed college careers leave
them unsuited for the world
of “real work” rather than the
theory-based assignments they
have been used to.

Your term “scammed into
indebtedness” is about right. I
think the old system of arti-
cles and indentureships is
much to be preferred over
what we have now, where uni-
versities have made a flour-
ishing business out of people’s
sometimes ill thought out
desire to obtain a degree. The
cost is too high, and the results
are often unsatisfactory.

JPL (Expat accountant)

DO the math. My son went
to a North American univer-
sity. The fees were more than
$20,000 a year. He was there
for four years. The cost of
accommodation was substan-
tial. I estimate the total price
tag (to me) of educating him

to bachelor degree level was,
taking everything into
account, $150,000. When he
came out of college, he didn’t
know what to do. He now
works in a bar. The money
would have been better spent
being put towards his first
home. You’re right — the
recession will make us all see
sense.
Nassau Dad

I MUST say that I was very
pleased with your article today
entitled “Degrees: Time To
Rethink". Your piece really
hit home for me as I share
some of your views on post-
secondary education.

Two things in particular that
stood out to me were how col-
lege/university graduates are
ill-prepared for the careers
they are about to enter; and
how vocational training is not
up to standard compared toa
college/university degree for
some.

If I had one wish it would
be for vocational and technical
training to be taken very seri-
ously in The Bahamas. I can
be a personal testament to
what I am saying because I am
enrolled in The Electronics
and Avionics Technology pro-
gramme at George T Baker
Aviation School in Miami,
Florida. This school does not
award degrees, but diplomas
and certifications to students
after the completion of a pro-
gramme.

My school is highly recog-
nised in Miami and through-
out parts of the state of Flori-
da for best preparing students
for entry into the workforce.
In the surrounding area are
sponsors and businesses
owned and operated by grad-
uates of Baker Aviation and
they also employ graduates
from the school well before
they complete their pro-
gramme. Besides first-hand
witnessing what I am writing
about I have proof to what
you wrote about in your arti-
cle on students having these
degrees and can't perform the
duties of a job.

For example: The USPS
had openings for electronics
technicians at a new facility
they are opening in Opa Loc-
ka. The recruiter for The
USPS said that the pro-
gramme being offered at Bak-
er Aviation is exactly what is
needed for the job openings.
He stressed the importance of
the hands-on skills that we
were acquiring in our train-
ing. When our Electronics
Technology students were
compared to students of ITT-
Tech for the job, Baker stu-
dents were far more suited for
what they need their people
to know. ITT-Tech students
were not even able to pass the
examination, while students
from my school were able to
pass the exam. The point Iam
trying to make is that ITT-
Tech offers a Bachelor's
degree and Baker Aviation
offers certificates. ITT-Tech
has a huge tuition and Bak-
er's is more affordable. One
can pass the exam and the oth-
er can't.

I feel that I have been
pushed aside when applying
for scholarships here at home
because I will not be getting a
degree when I graduate. It is
hard to stand out next to
someone with a Bachelor's in
Engineering when all I am
getting is a diploma and vari-
ous certifications. So will it be
Mr Big Bad Bachelor's
Degree or me? It isn't fair, but
such is life. I have an uncle
that I stay with in Miami who
has an MBA. And he has a
business where he generates
most of his money from road
maintenace contracts and
landscaping jobs. He stresses
that if he knew then what he
knows now, he would have
gone into a different field.
HVAC being one of the main
ones because he knows that
the "blue collar" jobs generate



a lot of business, which means
more money at the end of the
day.

One final thought for you,
sir. Look at this in terms of
someone who is trained for a
particular job. Who would you
prefer to perform mainte-
nance on your aircraft. A
mechanic with a bachelor's
degree, that consists of a
bunch of literature, art appre-
ciation, economics and half of
the time of study in contact
hours? OR a vocational stu-
dent trained in every aspect
of aviation maintenance from
safety to quality assuarance,
with hands-on training every
day dealing with an aircraft,
whose classroom is a hangar
and the various aircraft? Not
to de-value the other mechan-
ic but, my money is on the sec-
ond one, sir. Good day and
GOD bless!

Derek Dames

I AM very delighted at the
fact that there is a force out
there that is still making its
way into the minds of our peo-
ple. Commendations are in
order for a well thought
through and written article. I
have always been an advocate
for vocational/skills training.

As a young man growing
up I was trained in entrepre-
neurship and business devel-
opment which I was able to
apply in the workplace. I start-
ed my own business at twenty-
one years of age and operated
it for five years. Had it not
been for the hands-on train-
ing I received during those
times, I wouldn’t have been
the person I am today.

Admittedly, I am complet-
ing a degree in business man-
agement and it’s nothing like
being trained or prepared for
the working world. Everyone
these days seems to just study
to pass the exams that will
land them a degree. That’s not
right, that cannot be good for
the future of our economies
in this region.

Some graduates have no
practical knowledge, neither
can they perform with any
semblance of efficiency and
effectiveness.

Ilaud you for the steps you
have taken in bringing to the
forefront this viewpoint about
rethinking this concept of
degrees. Nothing is wrong
with attaining a degree. How-
ever, something is definitely
wrong when you do not pos-
sess the ability to effectively
meet the demands of the
workforce.

Thank you for this article. It
is a reminder for me that I
must still stand up for contin-
uous reviewing of the needs
of the workforce both nation-
ally and globally and ensure
that my voice is heard among
those who are doing the same.

All the best

Riccii Ricardo

YOU are so right. Students
now have four or five years
after leaving high school to
consider all the things they
might do in life; then, when
they graduate from college,
they still don’t know, so they
enter a period of professional
training, if they’re lucky, even-
tually finding themselves
ready for the workplace when
they’re about 26 or 27; that’s
ten whole years later than
people of my generation. We
need to wake up. College
degrees, like much else in
modern life, are a con trick
played on gullible people.
They are pretty much mean-
ingless when it comes to gaug-
ing brainpower or suitability
for employment.

George Hammond (Expat
engineer)

I TOOK articles to become
an attorney and, like you, have
never felt “unduly deprived”
by not having had a university
education. In fact, non-gradu-
ates tend to mature much
more quickly and become use-

a

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

DEGREES: TIME FOR A RETHINK

Recession could force a review of the university system



ful in the office/workshop at
an age when they are still
young enough to enjoy their
money.

I think you’re absolutely
right; old-style apprenticeships
are the way forward, so long
as secondary schools can turn
out students at the required
level.

Nassau attorney

WE should all follow the
example of the medical pro-
fession, whose degrees have
always been vocationally
based.

If you go to a teaching hos-
pital and graduate with a
bachelor of medicine degree,
that means you can function
as a doctor, though you still
require a lot of on-the-job
training before you can gain

seniority in the profession.

As far as I am aware,
trainee doctors have always
undergone hands-on training
to gain their degrees because
theory alone is obviously use-
less in a hospital or clinic envi-
ronment.

J B Barrett

YOUR article made me feel
much better about not having
sent my own children to uni-
versity. They have done very
well for themselves without
college degrees and I’m not
sure that an expensive higher
education would have put
them in a better position. It is
something that has troubled
me a lot over the years, but I
was reassured by what you
said.

ALS, Grand Bahama



“Some of
my fellow
trainees,
working with
other bigger
and more

paid their
employers
(or at least
their parents
did) for the
privilege of
being taught
the business.”



Re: Power game
(PLP leadership)

YOU would have thought
that Forrester Carroll JP, who-
ever he is, would have learned
some hard lessons from the
fate suffered by fellow mem-
bers of the PLP when they
choose to tackle The Tribune.

He tried to be facetious ina
letter to Mr Marquis and was
promptly “mashed up” in only
two sentences. Surely all intel-
ligent men know that you nev-
er take on a professional in
his own ballpark.

Please, Mr Carroll, and all
like you, show some sense in
these matters.

Vivienne, Nassau

Re: Enough of this foolish-
ness (Fred Mitchell)

I HAVE only just caught up
with your article on Mr Fred
Mitchell, the former Minister
of Foreign Affairs. My father
said it was “brutally brilliant”,
which I agree with. Can you
please reproduce this article
and others from the Insight
section in pamphlets so they
can be studied in our schools?

AB Adderley

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL &
SANDILANDS REHABILITAION CENTRE

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF
PROVISIONS & FOOD ITEMS

Tenders are invited from qualified Contractors for the supply of
Provisions and Foods Items for the Princess Margaret Hospital and
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals Authority, for a period

of one (1) year.

Tender documents, which include instructions to Tenderers, specifications
and other relevant information, can be collected 9:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday at the Materials Management Directorate,
Princess Margaret Hospital’s compound, Shirley Street.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or packaged
identified as “ TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF PROVISIONS AND
FOODS ITEMS FOR THE PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL

AND SANDILANDS REHABILITATION CENTRE” and addressed
to:

The Chairman
Tenders Committee

Public Hospitals Authority

Third Terrace West
Collins Avenue
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address by 5:00 p.m. on 20% April 2009.

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate of up to date

National Insurance Contributions

should accompany all proposal.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any or all Tender(s).





PAGE 14B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



—

JUST CALL me the non-stop Stirling engine. This Rhessi satellite, launched seven years ago ona
two-year mission to record solar flares, is still going strong and still taking pictures with an ever-
reliable Stirling engine at its heart: one reason why NASA engineers believe they can bank on Stirlings

for deep-space missions of 15 years and more.

How a 200-year-old gas
CITI COLI CO YAY om I ITom NOBLE

FROM page one

the entire United States.”

But what to do when the sun goes down?
One solution is pumped storage — using the
daytime power to pump water to a reservoir
high in the mountains — then releasing it in
the evening to drive generators as it rushes
back downhill.

Bruce Osborn, CEO of Stirling Energy
Systems, has been working to develop the
engine for 25 years.

“This exciting world record shows that
using these dishes will be a cost-effective and
environmentally friendly way of producing
power,” he says.

“We are now actively engaged in preparing
it for mass production.”

Mass dish production also will be under-
taken by the Infinia company, of Washington
state, which after an investment of $50 mil-
lion, plans to start making 30,000 dishes this
year for sale worldwide.

Company chief J D Sitton told me: “The
Stirling engine’s moment has finally come.”
Remarkably, Infinia first planned to use the
Stirling engine in a fully implantable heart
pump 20 years ago. “This was to be an
engine driven by a piece of fully-shielded
plutonium the size of your pinkie fingertip,”
said Mr Sitton.

“We had to drop the idea when it became
clear that plutonium might have been attrac-
tive to people (terrorists) who didn’t neces-
sarily have the best interests of the patient at
heart.”

Design

However, the design lived on — and grew
a thousand-fold into the much larger Stirling
engine at the centre of the company’s new
solar dishes, which will be rolling off the pro-
duction line at Infinia’s new factory any day
now.

“Our first target market is Spain. It has the
right climate and landscape for our dishes,”
said Mr Sitton.

The company has also partnered with
Massachusetts-based Emergence Bio Energy
to build a device for poor countries such as
Bangladesh which would “co-generate” elec-
tricity and heat.

That Stirling-powered device runs on
methane gas “produced by a digester that
converts livestock manure and agricultural
wastes into combustible biogas.” In other
words, it runs on manure. In its first experi-
ment two villages were successfully powered
for eight hours a day.

Nowhere has the Stirling engine got its

Box:

‘a’
ca
=
x
=



admirers more starry-eyed than in outer
space.

Dick Shaltens is chief of the Power and In-
Space Propulsion Division of NASA, the
American space organisation.

He says: “I see the Stirling engine playing a
major role.

“T see it in deep space probes, on the plan-
et Mars, on the lunar surface, even on aster-
oids, anywhere there is insufficient solar ener-
gy to sustain a NASA mission.”

He forecast. “I can see the Stirling working
on a spacecraft on a 15-year mission. It is
that reliable.”

A good example of the Stirling’s reliabili-
ty is the Rhessi spacecraft, launched in 2002
to photograph the sun. It was originally a
two-year mission and the Stirling’s job was to
keep the instruments cool. Today, seven years
later, the Rhessi is still flying — and still
working!

Dishwasher

Back down here on earth, Britain’s Nation-
al Grid is about to start selling a “home pow-
er plant” powered by a Stirling engine to
replace the traditional boiler. Manufactured
by Disenco of Sheffield, the heat source is gas,
it looks just like an ordinary dishwasher in the
kitchen, and it will cost around $5,000.

But it will provide heat, light and power at
savings of up to 35 per cent with a much
smaller carbon footprint. And the home-
owner will even be able to sell surplus power
back to the electricity company.

Also planning a Stirling home power plant
is the British Baxi company. The company
Microgen, working with Baxi, expects a mar-
ket of 150,000 of these devices over the next
four years.

James Rizzo, who once ran the Maltese
Ministry of Tourism, took up the Stirling
engine 30 years ago as a hobby. Now chair-
man of the British Stirling Engine Society, he
says: "Most technical universities in Japan
are working on the Stirling engine as the
engine of the future. The Japanese navy is
now putting Stirling engines in their sub-
marines following Sweden.

"Robert Stirling's invention may prove to
be as important to the 21st century as James
Watt's steam engine was to the 19th and 20th
centuries."

The stranglehold that Middle Eastern oil
producers now have on the rest of the world
may well be loosened by the ghostly fingers of
the Rev Robert Stirling, who only wanted to
save his parishioners from the long ago dan-
ger of exploding steam engines. Now he can
help save the world.

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.
Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to
DA 69806
c/o The Tribune

P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.



It’s no joke
for Jo King

YOUR name can often define you. Those with ridiculous
monikers rarely thank their parents for the burdens silly
names impose upon them. INSIGHT investigates...

Bm By TRIBUNE
STAFF WRITER

MY MATERNAL grand-
mother refused to marry the
first man she loved because
his surname was Skinner.
“There is no possibility that I
will spend the rest of my life
being known as Mrs Skinner,”
she told her friends and fami-
ly defiantly.

I also recall a shamefaced
man in an English bankruptcy
court who admitted changing
his name to ‘Smith’ by deed
poll because his real name was
Crapper.

“T couldn’t live with it any-
more,” he informed the offi-
cial receiver, admitting that
his surname had imposed
impossible burdens upon him
which he could no longer
endure.

A family I knew called Uren
were none too pleased with
their surname, either, and 76-
year-old Stan Still remains sto-
ically outraged by his, admit-
ting to a British newspaper:
“It’s been a blooming mill-
stone round my neck for my
entire life.”

Now a survey has been con-
cluded to record the silliest
names in Britain, with bear-
ers being asked how they’ve
fared over the years with
labels they could do without.

Mr Still, a former RAF
man, recalls with something
less than amusement how
senior officers used to shout:

“Still, get a move on!”

And Doug Hole, from Pen-
rith, Cumbria, was under-
standably reluctant to discuss
his name with researchers,
having already taken enough
flak over the years for an
affliction imposed upon him
by his parents.

However, Rose Bush was
more forthcoming. “Many
have remarked on my name,
but what they say is usually
positive,” she told the Daily
Mail.

Enraged

Mary Christmas, Sonny Day
and Chris Cross were not too
annoyed, either, but Terry
Bull and Anna Sassin were
enraged.

You can imagine how one
woman felt when she was con-
stantly asked: “Are you Jo
King?”

Believe it or not, my father
had a mortician friend called
Phil Graves while a village
confectioner of my acquain-
tance was named Ava Sweet.

A well-known pasty maker
in Cornwall bears the unfor-
tunate name Choak, while a
Nottingham woman called
Pepper claimed to have a
brother called Zoltan.

Justin Case has taken a fair
bit of playful mockery over
the years, but not so much as
Barry Cade, Tim Burr and
Ray Gunn, all of whom fig-
ured in the list.

A spokesman for the web-
site responsible for the survey
said parents probably hadn’t
recognised the implications of
their offspring’s unfortunate
names at the time.

“There must be tremendous
embarrassment every time
they have to introduce them-
selves,” he added.

“Even their teachers must
have had to hold back their
smiles sometimes.”

Talking about teachers, I
must record an admirable but
poker-faced teacher at my first
school called Miss Daft. It says
much for her disciplinary skills
that no-one ever dared to
mock — or even mention —
her name in her presence.

However, her colleague Mr
E Raser was known as ‘Rub-
ber’ behind his back while a
butcher called McIntosh Carv-
er was referred to cheekily by
locals as ‘Mac the Knife’.

So what’s in a name? Ask
Helen Back, who has appar-
ently been to Hell and Back
since she was so christened 40
years ago.

Not to mention Mancunian
Ben Twilley, who rejects all
inquiries about his name with
a firm: “No comment.” Hard-
ly surprising when you think
about it.

¢ Do you know
any silly names?
Fax 328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net

Analysis: Cuba waiting
and watching Obama

m@ HAVANA
Associated Press

AMID TWO WARS and an eco-
nomic crisis, Cuba policy hardly ranks
at the top of President Barack Oba-
ma’s long agenda.

But circumstances are pressuring
Obama to make a move on Cuba soon
— or miss an opportunity to advance
his pledge to restore America’s lead-
ership in the world and in its own
hemisphere.

Conversations with Cuban officials
here suggest that unless the Obama
administration signals its intentions
quickly and clearly, it will disappoint
not only Cuba, but also many Latin
American leaders watching for signs
that the U.S. is ready to chart a dramatic new
course in the region.

The unofficial target for action seems to be late
April, when Obama travels to the Summit of the
Americas, being held on the Caribbean island of
Trinidad. Cuba is not invited, but will nonetheless
be on many participants’ minds.

More frequently than in the past, Latin Ameri-
can leaders have been flocking to Cuba in recent
months, and late last year 33 Latin American and
Caribbean nations called for an end to the U.S.
embargo. Guatemalan President Alvaro Colon,
leading a country long viewed as a loyal US. ally,
even apologized during a recent visit for his coun-
try’s supporting role in the 1961 failed Bay of Pigs
invasion.

Relationship

Fundamental change in the long-calcified Cuban-
American relationship appears possible now
because of the dual change in leadership in Havana
and Washington.

In Cuba, an ailing Fidel Castro relinquished the
presidency to his younger brother Raul, who has
spent the past year maintaining the country’s social-
ist system while delivering modest adjustments
and coping with the destruction wrought by three
hurricanes. Any hopes that the post-Fidel era
would lead to a rapid unraveling of Communist
rule have faded.

In Washington, Obama won the presidency in a
campaign in which he pledged a willingness to
speak to America’s rivals and enemies. Also, the
voting indicated that the hard-core anti-Castro
groups in the United States are less key to electoral
success, reducing their ability to block closer rela-
tions.

During a visit to Cuba last week by news exec-
utives of The Associated Press, Cuban govern-
ment officials refused to speak publicly on the
topic. That in itself could be a sign of how critical-
ly important they consider this period: The gov-
ernment does not wish any isolated comments to
impede potential progress.

An air of expectancy is palpable, especially after
a US. Senate staff report Feb. 23 issued by Richard
Lugar, the influential Indiana Republican who is
the ranking member of the foreign relations com-
mittee. It stated what would seem obvious to many:



Barack Obama

that the 50-year U.S. policy of shun-
ning communist Cuba by imposing a
strict trade embargo has failed to pro-
duce significant change in the island’s
government.

Lugar says it is time to re-evaluate
the policy of trying to isolate Cuba
economically, and deal with it “in a
way that enhances U.S. interests.”

While Cuban officials do not agree
with everything in the Lugar report, it
was widely viewed here as positive.
However, Cubans also have a long
memory. Havana and Washington
have periodically been on the verge of
breakthroughs, only to watch those
efforts be derailed by events.

And Cubans note that Obama has
specifically said he favors keeping the
embargo, although he wants to ease restrictions on
Cuban-Americans traveling to their homeland and
sending money and gifts to relatives.

Overtures

With Obama’s foreign policy team still coming
together, Cuba sees itself as sitting in the stands,
waiting for the match to begin. From a Cuban
perspective, the first serve goes to the U.S. side.
Cubans take the position that they have always
been open to overtures from the U.S. for better
relations, but not at any cost.

Economic relations with the U.S. could certain-
ly make life easier for the country’s 11 million
people, making food and other imports cheaper
and opening possibilities for greater tourism and
investments.

Concerns about human rights and political free-
dom in Cuba and Cuba’s support for leftist guerrilla
movements have been the main reasons cited by
American presidents since John F. Kennedy for
attempting to isolate the Caribbean nation.

As President Jimmy Carter moved towards eas-
ing relations, a public furor erupted in late 1978
over the presence of MiG 23 jets inside Cuba, and
the window of opportunity slammed shut. Again
during the Clinton years, Cuba’s downing of two
civilian planes sent towards Cuba by an anti-Cas-
tro group in Florida arrested possibilities for
progress in 1996.

The eight years of George W. Bush, which saw
U.S.-Cuban contacts at a recent low, have come to
a close. At the very least, it’s easy to envision a
return to some of the contacts and negotiations that
existed in earlier decades, even with the embargo
in place. If Obama reaches out to Cuba, the think-
ing goes, Cuba will be waiting to take his hand.

Meanwhile, some of the rhetoric from Wash-
ington that used to fall on Cuba seems to be shift-
ing to Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez, the US. critic
who after 10 years in power just won a referendum
removing limits on the number of times he can
run for re-election.

Cubans warn the Obama administration against
repeating the same mistakes with Venezuela that
the U.S. made with Cuba. The risk, they say, is that
Washington could find itself in the same position
decades down the line, trying to extricate itself
from a diplomatic impasse.



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

=

5-Day FORECAST

(

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y 337
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ORLANDO > \
» High:61°FAG°C
[i Low: 39° F/4°C Ce i .

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Partly sunny.

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High: 65° F/18°C
Low: 57° F/14°C

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Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Today Tuesday

High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 73/22 43/6 s 71/21 44/6 pc Indianapolis
Anchorage 18/-7 10/-12 s 27/-2 17/-8 sf Jacksonville
Atlanta 38/3 23/-5 s 50/10 30/-1 s Kansas City
Atlantic City 28/-2 13/-10 sn 29/-1 16/-8 pc Las Vegas
Baltimore 27/-2 13/-10 sn 32/0 16/-8 s Little Rock
Boston 34/1 16/-8 sn 27/-2 15/-9 sn Los Angeles
Buffalo 15/-9 38/-13 sf 22/-5 17/-8 s Louisville
Charleston,SC = 45/7 23/-5 pe 53/11 26/3 s Memphis
Chicago 28/-2 11/-11_ pe 36/2 26/-3 pc Miami
Cleveland 21/-6 11/-11 $s 27/-2 16/-8 s Minneapolis
Dallas 60/15 40/4 s 72/22 55/12 pe Nashville
Denver 70/21 38/3 pe 71/21 36/2 pc New Orleans
Detroit 24/-4 13/-10 pc 32/0 18/-7 s New York
Honolulu 79/26 68/20 s 80/26 67/19 pc Oklahoma City
Houston 6417 42/5 s 72/22 56/13 pe Orlando

@ WEST PALM BEACH



Breezy early;

Beautiful with

otherwise, clear. sunshine.
High: 72°
Low: 60° Low: 63°
70°-63° F

High: 68° F/20° C
Low: 44° F/7°C

Q

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 68° F/20° C @
Low: 46° F/8° C

@
MIAMI
High: 69° F/21°C
Low: 49° F/9°C



Today
Low
F/C F/C
34/1 11/-11

High

53/11
40/4
74/23
48/8
70/21

30/-1
22/-5
50/10
27/-2
56/13
37/2 20/-6
44/6 26/-3
69/20 46/7
24/-4 11/-11
37/2 17/-8
54/12 39/3
26/-3 14/-10
58/14 36/2
61/16 36/2

Ww

Ss
$

High
F/C
43/6
56/13
45/7
73/22
53/11
67/19
44/6
53/11
70/21
31/0
46/7
60/15
25/-3
65/18
65/18

Tuesday

Low

F/C
23/-5
33/0
36/2
50/10
39/3
54/12
26/-3
39/3
54/12
19/-7
30/-1
48/8
18/-7
45/7
42/5

ABACO
High: 67° F/19° C

Ce



ANDROS

High: 79° F/26° C
Low: 60° F/16°C

Ww

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Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis

Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego

San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa

Tucson
Washington, DC

High: 73° F/23° C

Low: 60° F/16°C
ae
a?
a
FREEPORT
High: 66° F/19°C
Low: 55° F/13°C
NASSAU

=

Partly sunny.

High:
Low:

79°
65°

ICE c dt

73°-62° F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Low: 60° F/16°C
@

High
F/C
27/-2
89/31
24/-4
55/12
33/0
35/1
55/12
70/21
68/20
61/16
53/11
56/13
59/15
88/31
29/-1

Today

Low

F/C
13/-10
59/15
12/-11
40/4
15/-9
20/-6
33/3
47/8
58/14
51/10
40/4
27/-2
37/2
53/11
19/-7

WwW

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sn
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GREAT EXUMA

ELEUTHERA







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LOW

3|4|5

MODERATE

=

Partly sunny.





Clouds and sun;
breezy, pleasant.







High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 60° F/16°C

a

High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 62°F/17°C

=

High
F/C

26/-3

83/28

Tuesday

Low

F/C
15/-9
59/15

30/-1 14/-10

50/10
38/3
46/7

58/14

76/24

66/18

58/14

52/11

60/15

62/16

85/29
36/2

37/2
17/-8
33/0
38/3
57/13
54/12
46/7
39/3
26/-3
44/6
54/12
22/-5

WwW

nD MN
oO

High: 77° High: 81°
Low: 69° Low: 69° a
ETCH cl
82°-67° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _HI.(ft.
Tod 14:14am. 23 5:16am. 0.1
mv 44:45pm. 28 5:16pm. -0.1
12:10pm. 22 6:14am. 0.2
PALMANAG cia. 03
Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Wednesday24oam. 27 72am. 03
Temperature Y445 p.m. : 7:19 p.m. 0.0
HIGH oeceeeecccececesesteseseetsteseeeeteseseeceseees 79° F/26° C 0am. 27 832am. 023
Low nagenranensaeen 70° F/21° C Thursday 9-98 a 29 8:39 oa. 0.0
Normal high .... 78° F/26° C ——————— eee
Normal low 65° F/18° C
Last year’s HIGH sssccccccscecescececene srr c | ONT U(IIN
Last year's lOW o.ccecseseseteeeeeeeees 70° F/21°C
Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:32 a.m. Moonrise..... 9:48 a.m.
As of 1 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccssseccscseeeeessseeee 0.00" Sunset....... 6:13 p.m. Moonset... . 11:54 p.m.
Year to date i
Normal year to date oo... cece ceeeceeeeee 3.49" ay am My New
218, phe
-
AccuWeather.com = as 4
Forecasts and graphics provided by Ss i Ped
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar. 4 Mar.10 Mar.18 Mar. 26
CATISLAND
High: 79° F/26° C
Low: 58° F/14°C
=
a SAN SALVADOR
High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 61°F/16°C
— 5
ii
LONGISLAND
High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 61° F/16°C MAYAGUANA

High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 68° F/20° C

Ge

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CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGEDISLAND Nist:88-F/28°¢
High: 81° F/27°C :

Low: 60°F/16°C
GREAT INAGUA

High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 71° F/22°C

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The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

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Wortp Cities

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

‘
oF NOES”

High
F/C
88/31
49/9
39/3
58/14
72/22
91/32
84/28
58/14
Eve
57/13
54/12
47/8
72/22
65/18
48/8
46/7
90/32
66/18
90/32
47/8
80/26
83/28
64/17
43/6
48/8
47/8
48/8
45/7
73/22
30/-1
73/22
75/23
51/10
51/10
71/21
83/28
85/29
50/10
57/13
86/30
76/24
75/23
13/-10
29/-1
45/7
87/30
90/32
32/0
49/9
43/6
92/33
72/22
59/15
82/27
100/37
93/33
82/27
83/28
93/33
48/8
34/1
77/25
75/23
48/8
16/-8
88/31
49/9
48/8
38/3
19/-7

iil

Today

Low
F/C
71/21
39/3
30/-1
54/12
62/16
79/26
75/23
47/8
28/-2
43/8
44/6
36/2
60/15
46/7
33/0
40/4
73/22
46/7
66/18
25/-3
52/11
69/20
50/10
33/3
37/2
40/4
43/6
41/5
47/8
21/-6
66/18
56/13
44/6
45/7
56/13
73/22
66/18
39/3
39/3
73/22
39/3
59/15
2/-16
19/-7
40/4
56/13
54/12
28/-2
35/1
39/3
78/25
45/7
47/8
73/22
70/21
71/21
50/10
68/20
68/20
32/0
30/-1
63/17
65/18
39/3
6/-14
76/24
42/5
45/7
30/-1
6/-14





pc
$

sn
pc
Cc

pc
pc
r

sh
sh
pc
sn

High
F/C
88/31
47/8
46/7
64/17
72/22
93/33
85/29
54/12
45/7
62/16
56/13
44/6
64/17
65/18
47/8
45/7
86/30
72/22
93/33
44/6
80/26
84/28
61/16
41/5
45/7
52/11
44/6
42/5
72/22
30/-1
77/25
83/28
50/10
54/12
76/24
82/27
85/29
48/8
50/10
86/30
81/27
89/31
13/-10
27/-2
41/5
89/31
95/35
38/3
48/8
42/5
90/32
70/21
57/13
83/28
89/31
94/34
78/25
82/27
90/32
48/8
36/2
81/27
72/22
50/10
23/-5
89/31
48/8
50/10
38/3
27/-2

Tuesday
Low
F/C
72/22
38/3
29/-1
54/12
ile
79/26
74/23
45/7
30/-1
57/13
45/7
33/0
55/12
47/8
37/2
41/5
68/20
55/12
75/23
26/-3
58/14
70/21
43/8
39/3
36/2
37/2
33/0
15/-9
52/11
27/-2
68/20
53/11
47/8
44/6
55/12
72/22
68/20
45/7
36/2
75/23
41/5
63/17
4/-15
19/-7
33/0
56/13
59/15
28/-2
41/5
36/2
77/25
52/11
52/11
74/23
64/17
71/21
50/10
69/20
68/20
32/0
32/0
68/20
65/18
41/5
14/-10
75/23
40/4
45/7
37/2
15/-9

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

MONDAY, MARCH 2np, 2009, PAGE 15B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: SSW at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-8 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 6-10 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

aS
Washington
29/19)

, Kansas City)
as

Le.
iy Yow)

yet
qwarmen) / | \“ausing
38/23,
El Paso,

40/22

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice

Miami
69/46

Fronts
Cold

War flitenflltenilte

Stationary Mangal

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

-0s Os 10s 20s /30s)) 40s



-10s







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Engine without us:
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te.

~ New Providence Grond Bahama Abaco Eleuthera Exum
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ad





MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

be







i Ca aa 1

@ By NOEL YOUNG
Copyright 2009
Edit International

AN ALMOST forgotten
invention from 200 years ago
may answer the world’s ener-
gy problems and end our
reliance on oil by using the
greatest source of power
known to man — the sun.

It’s known as the Stirling
Engine and it’s already work-
ing in satellites whizzing round
the globe...in a collection of
giant gleaming dishes trapping
the desert sun in New Mexi-
co...powering a tiny car noise-
lessly along the roads of New
Hampshire. And experts
expect it to bring clean water
to millions across the planet.

In Britain two big compa-
nies plan to start marketing
“home power plants” this
spring using Stirlings which
will light and heat the house,
cut the homeowner’s power
costs by one-third — and allow
him to sell surplus power back
to the electricity company.

Everyone on earth will soon
know of the odd invention in
1816 by Scottish minister
Robert Stirling who designed
it in his church workshop by
oil lamp because Edison’s
electric light bulb was still 60
years in the future.

Successful

His engine came out at the
same time as the highly suc-
cessful steam engine which
powered the industrial revo-
lution. As the steam engine
became safer and more
sophisticated, interest in the
Stirling engine fell away and it
was largely forgotten — until
now.

And that ‘now’ is breath
taking.

The giant dishes in New
Mexico, which focus the sun’s
rays on an engine have the
astonishing potential of pro-
viding the electricity for the
entire United States during
daylight hours.

The car, developed by
America’s leading inventor

The stories behind the news

How a 200-year-old gas
engine could save the world

WHILE Bahamians reel
under the weight of high
electricity bills, they are
failing to make use of
the one resource they

possess in abundance.
INSIGHT reports...

Dean Kamen, is an all-elec-
tric hybrid, part-powered by
a much smaller Stirling engine.
He believes it can be in pro-
duction in two years and show
the world a dramatic way to
slash the use of oil and curb
carbon emissions.

Producing clean water in
developing countries is anoth-
er field in which the Stirling
technology has already shown
its worth.

Yet the Stirling is a puzzle
among engines. It was largely
ignored as the industrial revo-
lution of the 19th century
turned into the space race of
the 20th century. But people
who came in contact with it
loved it. The Stirling became a
cult. Fans formed societies,
who built models and attend-
ed meetings. For much of that
time, the engine was known
simply as the “hot air engine.”

In 1960, the Philips organ-
isation of Holland, which
spent millions trying to devel-
op it, finally dubbed it “the
Stirling Engine”.

In America, Ford also spent
a fortune trying to adapt it to
drive a car before giving up in
the 1970s.

But Stirling fans carried on.
Hundreds of enthusiasts gath-
ered last year at the Kew Gar-
dens Steam Museum in Lon-
don for a display of working
models.

One household fan driven
by a Stirling engine could be
seen whirring away very effec-
tively. A similar one is now
available commercially from
an American company, for sit-
ting on top of a hot stove.

A Glasgow museum even
has a gramophone powered
by a tiny Stirling engine.

The basic Stirling is decep-
tively simple. Gas or air inside
a completely enclosed cylin-
der expands as it’s heated at
one end — and contracts as it
is cooled at the other. This
movement of the gas drives a
piston, which turns a wheel
outside the engine. The heat
source can be anything you
like.

One demonstration model,

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RIGHT: The Disenco home power plant, with a Stirling engine
at its heart. It's about the same size and no more obtrusive than
the average dishwasher - but it will slash your energy bills and
vastly reduce the size of your carbon footprint.

sold by the American Stirling
company for around $500,
(available on e-Bay) is driven
by the heat from the palm of
your hand. Whatever the size
of the engine, there are
absolutely NO emissions.
The big comeback started
on a winter’s day in 2008 in
the New Mexico desert. The
sun was beating down and the
temperature was zero.

Mirrors

At the US top secret San-
dia National Laboratory, giant
dishes had been built, each
composed of 82 mirrors. They
would catch the glare of the
sun as it moved across the sky
and focus the heat on a Stir-
ling engine.

The beam of intense heat,
hot enough to melt metal,
started the engine pumping
away, generating electricity.

By the end of that day, Jan-
uary 31, one of the mirror
dishes had set a world record;
an all-time high of 31 per cent
of the energy pouring down
from the sun was converted
into power going into the elec-
tricity grid.

The engine used at Sandia

ABOVE: A tricycle built for two with one added plus: less ped-
aling than usual ! It's powered by a Stirling engine and was
on show at the exhibition in Kew, London last year

in the SES dishes
is a sealed system
filled with hydro-
gen. As the gas
heats and cools, its
pressure rises and
falls. The change in
pressure drives pistons
inside the engine, pro-
ducing mechanical
power, which in turn
drives a generator and
makes electricity.
Chuck

Andraka, lead
Sandia project
engineer, said
the use in the
Mojave desert pro-
ject was “the largest
proposed overall use of
Stirling engines” so far. “Soon
we will see these large fields of
systems begin operation in the
desert south-west of the US.”

Now Stirling Energy Sys-
tems, the company behind the
experiment, has signed agree-
ments with two big California
electricity companies which
will between them require up
to 70,000 solar dish engine
units. Work started on pre-
production models of the mir-
ror dishes in the Detroit area
in February.

There are now two Califor-

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already under

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one in the Mojave desert.

Combined eventual output

will be about 1600 megawatts

— about the same as a major

nuclear power station. Work is

scheduled to start in 2010.
An Irish company, NTR,

invested $100 million, becom-

ing the biggest shareholder —

LEFT: A Swedish submarine surfaces ...
they have to do very often because their power comes
from no-emission Stirling engines. Now the Japanese
Navy is following suit - and installing Stirlings on their

not something

BELOW: Giant dishes at the Sandia National Laboratory
in New Mexico, capture the sun's rays and turn them into
electricity into electricity via Stirling engines, mounted in

the center.



- TF
r q _—
7 a 4

7 4
_

and
the
race to
really
make
the Stirling engine
commercial has
really begun.

“Just 30,000 of the dish-
es, in the Mojave desert, will
provide enough power needed
in daylight hours by the city
of San Diego, with a popula-
tion of 1.2 million,” said a
spokeswoman for the Sandia
National Laboratory. “A solar
farm 100 miles square could
generate enough power for

SEE page two





Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.82MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 73F LOW 60F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S How a 200-year-old gas engine could save the world SEEPAGEELEVEN Fourth straight title for Bianca Stuart n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net AUDITORS claim to have been unable to properlya ccount for almost a million doll ars worth of funds said to have been spent on the establishment of a Bahamian embassy in Cuba. The 2006/2007 Auditor General’s Report, in its section on foreign audits, recommends that to “promote transparency and accountability completea ccounting and documentation for the ...funds be provided fora udit scrutiny.” Those funds include a sum of $300,000 which auditors note was transferred to the opera tional account (Consulate General, Miami, Florida) “for the purchase of necessary furnishings for the official residence (of the Bahamian Ambassador to Cuba) and the embassy”. In this instance, auditors reviewing the accounts said they were “unable to verify the accuracy” of a listing of items pur chased with the money as they were “not provided with adeAuditor General’s Report unable to account for money spent on Bahamian office in Cuba The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY Try our Big Breakfast Sandwich I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate ‘$1 million missing’ from embassy funds Two killed as car crashes into church n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A man and woman were killed Sunday when the truck they were in crashed into the CummingT emple AME Church on Settler’s Way, bringing the t raffic fatality count to five on Grand Bahama. The identities or ages of the victims were still not known to police up to press time on Sunday. Asst Supt Clarence Reckley said the accident occurred around 2.55pm on Settler’s Way, near Columbus Drive, involving a 1992 Chevy Truck, licensed T-6916. He reported that the male driver and female passenger w ere both fatally injured at the scene. It was believed that the driver may have suffered a seizure while driving. Police investigations revealed that the driver lost con trol of the vehicle, which ran off the road, crashing into the e astern wall of Cummings Temple AME Church. “Investigations suggest that the truck was travelling west along Settlers Way in the left west bound lane when, a ccording to eye witnesses, it veered to the right and ran o ff the road and crashed into the church wall,” ASP Driver is believed to have suffered seizure behind wheel F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f DETAILS were sketchy up to press time last night, but according to eye-witness reports three police officers were seriously injured in this car crash at the Shirley Street/Mackey Street junction on Saturday night at around 9.30pm. This police vehicle collided with a white pick-up truck. Calls to police yesterday for more information were not returned. POLICE OFFICERS IN CARCRASH SEE page eight SEE page eight n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net POLICE are investigating armed robberies at two Nassau businesses this weekend and the robbery of two people who were attacked with a cutlass on Saturday. An armed robber held up an employee of the Superwash laundromat in Robin son Road shortly before 3am on Sunday after he entered the premises pretending to be a customer. He held the Superwash attendant at gunpoint and demanded cash before get ting away with an undetermined amount of cash and disappearing into the Montell Heights area. The hold-up followed an armed robbery at Sill’s Armed robberies and cutlass attack are investigated SEE page eight n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FINDINGS in the latest Audi tor General’s Report appear to “vindicate” former FNM chair man Carl Bethel in his allegations that there was a “visa scam” going on in the Consular Division of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. “I think that certainly the findings of the auditor general cer tainly seem to support the essence of the criticisms that I was making about a lack of due diligence in the visa section at that time,” said Mr Bethel, now minister of education. “The Auditor General’s report is all time dated, in that it would relate to years prior to the date of the report. So certainly they were referring directly to the same doc umentation that I would’ve been referring to and drew the same SEE page nine Minister says report supports ‘visa scam’ allegations n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net HUNDREDS of thousands of dollars spent by the Ministry of Housing in 2006 and 2007 and unaccounted for is still missing and the sub ject of a police investigation, Minister of Housing Kenneth Russell said. The Auditor General’s Report on revenue and expenditure in the Ministry of Housing three years ago highlights discrepancies in the Ministry’s accounts including large payments without any documentation and over half a million dollars of missing rent. It is noted the Ministry made two pay ments of $385,195.40 for repairs of a 10-unit complex in Freeport, but there is no documentation to prove the work was carried out. And large payments were made to a company for materi Hundreds of thousands missing from Ministry n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter LOCAL doctors are concerned about a marked increase in colon and stomach cancer in Bahamians and fear that the numbers could go up drastically in the near future. Consultant for medical oncology at the Princess Margaret Hos pital Dr Theodore Turnquest told The Tribune he predicts that the stomach and colon cancer levels in the Bahamas will develop “into something more.” Kenneth Russell SEE page eight Colon and stomach cancer on the rise in the Bahamas SEE page eight www.tribune242.com

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCALNEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Assistant Commissioner of Police Marvin Dames revealed that a police operation l aunched over the weekend in F reeport resulted in the arrest of 30 p ersons in connection with illegal drugs. Of those persons arrested, 27 are expected to be arraigned before the courts today, he said. Mr Dames reported that a total of seven persons were arrested for supplying dangerous drugs, which resulte d in the seizure of some $2,000 in c ash. The other arrests were for drug possession. Mr Dames said “Operation Harvest Time” was conducted at Coral Gardens, an area known for illegal drug activity. The first phase of the operation was launched on Friday and the second phase on Saturday. ACP Dames was extremely pleased with the s uccess of the operation in Freeport, which was c arried out by the DEU, CDU, Mobile Patrol, and the newly implemented Anti-violence Interv ention Response Team (AVIT B ahama. H e said the first phase of the operation consisted of those persons purchasing illegal drugs and involved the stopping and searching of 30v ehicles, which resulted in the arrest of 30 persons by police for possession of dangerous drugs. The second phase conducted on Saturday, he said, concentrated those persons who sell illegal drugs in the community. “Operation Harvest Time” will be a model of o ur approach as we move forward to policing this island of Grand Bahama,” he said at a press briefing on Sunday at P olice Headquarters. We at the RBPF Grand Bahama District are committed in our resolve to cleaning up the communities of Grand Bahama of all forms of criminality and vices,” he said. Mr Dames was also pleased with t he seizure of the firearms in the past s everal weeks on Grand Bahama. “We seized more firearms over the last few weeks than any other time in the history on this island. You could expect as we intensify our efforts throughout the island that there would be more seizures,” he said. Mr Dames said police will be relentless in its pursuit of criminals who seek to intimidate citizens of Grand Bahama. “There will be no room for you to hide; we will find you wherever you go. I am sending t his warning out, change your life now because w e will be relentless. We will not rest until the Grand Bahama c ommunity is free of those persons destroying t hese beautiful neighbourhoods,” he said. We intend to pursue those persons out there possessing firearms, selling drugs, and breaking into people’s homes. We have over the last feww eeks stepped up our efforts and as a result arrested persons in the act of breaking into businesses and homes. And that is a positive sign that our patrols are b ecoming a little more effective and we have increased visibility and so we are extremely pleased. We understand that a lot of work r emains. We are committed in our resolve to r estoring law and order in the streets,” said Mr D ames. Police operation results in 30 arrests in connection with drugs M arvin Dames

PAGE 3

n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net CALLS for a redundancy fund to help those who lose employment when companies close have been renewed now 170 CLICO (Bahamas employees could lose their j obs. T he Trade Union Congress ( TUC) is calling on the Mini stry of Labour to immediately act on recommendations put forward by union president Obie Ferguson to estab-l ish a redundancy fund to which all employers would contribute to assist workers who lose employment as a result of a company closing. TUC secretary general Tyrone Morris said the need to establish a fund becamec ritical when CLICO (Bahamas week that their jobs are in jeopardy. The government appointed accountant Craig Gomez as liquidator of the company under a Supreme Court ordero n Tuesday in a move to wind-up CLICO (Bahamas and over 100 agents ande mployees were sent home on Thursday while liquidators assessed the situation. F F a a t t e e T he future employment of C LICO (Bahamas ees is still not known and Mr Morris bemoaned the fate oft he Bahamian workers, some of whom have worked at CLIC O (Bahamas 2 0 years, and the fact they c ould be left to fend for thems elves. He said: “Once again the TUC is minded that this recent closure of CLICO( Bahamas) adds to the Gladstone Farm, Driftwood and Pioneer Shipping where affected employees were terminated without any compensa-t ion. “We therefore plead with the Minister o f Labour to act swiftly in protecting the interest of thesew orkers. “In the meantime the TUC invites the affected workersa t CLICO to contact us on 328-8973 for guidance.” N ew Covenant Baptist Church Bishop Simeon Hall called a public meeting at thec hurch in East West Highway, Nassau, to ascertain the d etails of the closure as he is one of about 29,000 policyholders affected by the wind-u p of CLICO (Bahamas He said: “I hope our gathe ring will send a strong message that we want to recover all of our money, and we expect the government to protect our hard-earned dollars. “We are sympathetic towards the workers of CLICO who were unceremoniously left in limbo last week. “I do not know how this will all end. “Suffice to say that better a nd more effective regulations must be enforced to protect persons who invest in companies that come to our shores.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Post Bed 3 pc Queen Post Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,950 $3,950 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,150 $4,150Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News..................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,15 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports........................................P11,12,13,14 Advt .........................................................P16 BUSINESS/SPORTS SECTION Business ...................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Comics ......................................................P12 Insight.............................................P13,14,16 W eather.....................................................P15 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES REAL EST ATE GUIDE 20 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES New calls for redundancy fund amid CLICO crisis ‘Grand Bahama Shipyard ist he number one in world’ In brief Simeon Hall n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Grand Bahama Shipyard is the number one shipyard in the world, ser-v icing four times more ships than its main rival. The shipyard’s investment here has now reached close to $ 200 million, making it “the biggest investment in the Caribbean.” These declarations were made at the 11th annual GrandB ahama Business Outlook in Freeport. According to Giora Israel, senior vice president of port d evelopment at Carnival Corporation, the shipyard is one of Carnival Corporation’s major investments in the Bahamas. Carnival Corporation owns 80 per cent of the shipyard, while t he other 20 per cent is owned by the Grand Bahama Port A uthority. C C o o m m m m e e n n d d e e d d Mr Israel commended Prime M inister Hubert Ingraham and his government for supporting such an investment. He also thanked Sir Albert Miller, former Grand Bahama PortA uthority CEO and chairman for his role. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is the right leader at this right time to lead the country today,” he said followed by applause. It was Mr Ingraham whon egotiated the shipyard and for t hat we respect him and his government.” Mr Israel said that the shipyard’s a cquisition of a new $60 million dry dock last September hasb rought its investment close to $200 million on Grand Bahama. This is the biggest investment in the Caribbean here and will continue grow. “Today, this (the GB Shipyard) is the number one ship y ard in the world servicing four times more ships than the num b er two shipyard in the world; it is just extraordinary,” he said. A ccording to Mr Israel, 80 per cent of the ships serviced are tankers and cargo vessels and general ships. He explained that although C arnival owns a lot of cruise ships, the only way to have cont inuous employment year round and have viable long term busi-n ess for Freeport was to make the facility available to everyb ody. Mr Israel indicated that the s hipyard is also making significant contributions to the F reeport economy. He noted that the employ ment of Bahamians has increased continuously at the facility. “We have a lot of expatriates working here. Because of the specialty and professionalism that we require in this industry (we must employ have 10 and 20 years experi ence,” he explained. “We have more Bahamians who do not work in tourism that work in the shipyard than in any other industry in this country.” “It is one of the largest users of electricity from the local power company. We are sus taining the economy of Freeport where shipyard crews are using rental apartments and housing,” We have a great shipyard here. It is a business we are doing together and I think all in Freeport will continue to support it,” Mr Israel said. Hubert I ngraham

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EDITOR, The Tribune. As an academic visitor to the Bahamas, I read with interest your February 25th editorial regarding the establishment of Ross University, including the welcoming comments of Prime Minister Ingraham. It is indeed a positive devel opment for The Bahamas to be known as an education destina tion, offering highly-priced clinical programmes mainly to nonBahamians. The spin-off employment opportunities and related spending are laudable, espe cially with the uncertain state of the mainstream tourism sector. However, the establishment of an offshore site for select clinical offerings should not be seen as a substitute for the full development of the University of the Bahamas. The global economic downturn makes it more imperative than ever that there be an indigenous Bahamian universi ty to serve as a platform for national success. In the current world econo my, only those jurisdictions with a total commitment to well-supported universities will succeed. We need look no further than the commitment of US Presi dent Obama to grasp the levers of education, science and knowledge to battle the eco nomic crisis. As President of the University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI competitive advantages that a fine university can mean for a small island jurisdiction; with 140,000 inhabitants, PEI has less than half the population of The Bahamas. UPEI has enabled Prince Edward Island to stand out with globally distinctive platforms in (eg and fish health, biosciences and island studies, in addition to the immeasurable benefits of training and retaining indigenous intellectual talent and leadership. With the well-developed strategies and plans that are in place, there is no time like the present to take the imperative next step to create The Univer sity of the Bahamas. To not do so at this critical stage in the regional and world economy would be to take a step backward. H WADE MacLAUCHLAN President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Prince Edward Island, February, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Letter writer Marcus Smith today in his letter titled: Suggestions for restoring law and order showed us that there are some clear thinking people and his plan for bringing back civility is spot on. Prime Minister Ingraham simply adopt Mr Marcus Smith’s plan and we will finally be on the way to seeing a Bahamas we can be rightly proud of. Don’t do it quickly with the ever contraction of the economy, violent crime, robberies, rapes, murders will increase to an unmanageable level. Time is now if you can shake up BEC leadership, then shake up everywhere else. Oh by the way...if we don’t do anything do you really think anyone anywhere will believe It is Better in The Bahamas? H HUMES Nassau, February 21, 2009. E DITOR, The Tribune . T he recent press stories have b een highlighting the conditions at the Detention Centre on Carmichael Road. T he alleged treatment the detainees are being given is absolutely appalling and the government's lack of care or concern is even more of an embarrassment to this country. I understand that we do have a serious immigration problem, and I have seen the increased number of raids on various construct ion sites and places of work, r ounding up those who are worki ng illegally. T his is a great effort on the g overnment's part, and there is no excuse for these people to h ave the right to work here with out the proper authorization to do so. However to treat them so poorly and brutally as such, for coming to the Bahamas, some even en route to other countries, to find a better life for themselves and maybe eventually obtain the right to work, should not be tolerated. A mnesty International has a lready condemned the treatment of these people at the Centre. O ur country is struggling with a s evere economic downturn at the moment, why continue to make the country look bad to the international community by allowing t his barbaric treatment to take place. T here has not been one word from any government official cond emning or questioning the alleged actions of some of the officers at the Detention Centre. As a Bahamian in this day and age, I am very sad to say and seet hat we are still living as a nation of hypocrites, filled with corrup-t ion and bribery. This was something that has p lagued this wonderful island n ation since the 1980's and neit her government has been able t o rid themselves of it since then. This has become a nation of racism and ignorance when itc omes to people's human rights, and I am sadly appalled by all of this. We take so much for granted here, beautiful beaches and waters, which fuels our tourism economy and gives our people jobs. B ut a time will come when this will come to a grinding halt and it w ill be too late to do anything a bout it. I f our nation keeps up with this a ttitude of ignorance and "turning y our eye" we will slowly see all that is good slip away from us. I hope this will open a few eyes as to what is really going on and make people realize that things need to change NOW. CONCERNED Nassau, February 27, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm Visa racket still unanswered L ATE IN the summer of 2006 a boat owner complained to The Tribune that he had beenb arred from Nassau’s visa department because he had “blown the whistle” on a visa racket at N orfolk House. He had alleged that visas were being supplied illegally to Haitian “mules” for $1,000 a time. Human traffickers, he claimed, were collecting up to 40 visas at a time from NorfolkH ouse while he a legitimate Bahamian boat owner could not get a visa through regularc hannels. He said he had been virtually put out of b usiness because he was told he could no longer get visas for the three Haitians he needed to operate his freight boats between Nassau and Haiti. These crewmen were essential, he said. H owever, he had been told by the police that h e could no longer go to the visa department. “They have barred me,” he said. “I am being v ictimised for telling the truth.” He said he had a tape recording of a visa e mployee asking him to pay him $1,000 for a visa for a crewman. He was willing to play the recording on any radio station that would open their airwaves to him. In an attempt to verify this information, a Tribune reporter sought out other sources in the ministry. Not only was the boatman’s story ver ified, but it was verified many times over. Our reporter was told that despite our initial story a bout the scam, the “mules” were still there collecting their visas. It was also alleged that the 90-day visas were handled by traffickers to include Haitians who were willing to pay the price. These Haitians with their stamped visas were then absorbed into the local Haitian communities virtually disappearing under the radar of the law. A spokesman for then foreign affairs minister F red Mitchell denied the story. “It was not credible,” said the minister’s spokesman, adding that all “allegations made in connection with all such stories have been turned over to the police and their investigation is ongoing.” The spokesman said that the police had asked them not to comment further on the investigations,but that in due course a statement on behalf of Minister Mitchell would be made to parliament. T ime passed. There was no comment from the Ministry. There was no report from the p olice and Mr Mitchell made no report to par liament. But the report did not die a natural death as many had hoped. The public continued to ask questions. And persons within the ministry con-t inued their concern and agitation. “The traffickers are still coming in with bun d les of passports, and they are still leaving with the visas stamped in them,” said one source. And said another: “On Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays, a whole boatload of visas are being handed out.” This was an obvious exaggerat ion, but even one illegal visa is one too many. The allegations centred on Haitian and Chin ese immigrants who, it was claimed, were paying large amounts of money to “traffickers’” w ho secured visas with the cooperation from some corrupt public officials. Again there was official denial. However, this time the ministry’s wrath was turned on The Tribune for using unnamed sources to open a Pandora’s box thato fficials wanted sealed as quickly as possible. Education Minister Carl Bethel, then in O pposition, was levelling similar charges against the foreign ministry in connection with illegal C hinese immigrants. His allegations were dismissed as political mischief. Now we have the Auditor General’s report for 2006/7 the relevant period dealingw ith the consular (visa i stry of Foreign Affairs. The auditor, among other discrepancies with t he cash book, noted that in some instances visa applicationswere not complete, for examp le “signatures of applicants were missing; the declaration to be signed by the applicant purporting that the information was true and correct, was missing; the occupation of the applicant was not indicated on the forms; the appli cant’s photograph was not attached.” Also, the report continued: “Our review showed that one person was able to sponsor up to 16 persons in a given period.” D uring the audit it was discovered that an applicant sponsored several individuals to attenda funeral service that had been held two days before the application was made. The “visa ledger showed that for the period July 2004 to June 2007, over 9,000 visa were granted.” However, there was no evidence of “exit forms to substantiate the number of visa holders who left the country.” A fter reading the report, Mr Bethel believes his 2006 claims against the Foreign Ministry have been vindicated. However, Mr Mitchell, the foreign minister during that period, considers Mr Bethel’s comments on the report “utter nonsense.” He believes the findings were the result of “just bureaucracy and errors of that time.” The Tribune has many questions among t hem: Was this matter ever sent to the police, if so w hat were their findings and why was no report made to parliament as promised at the time? This episode shows the urgent need of a Freedom of Information Act so that such problems can get instant attention rather than hav-i ng to wait almost three years for discussion after the initial complaint. I n the meantime, whether it was a deliberate “scam” or bureaucratic “errors of that time,” it has done a lot of damage to this country, and complicated its already complicated immigration problems. Appalled by claims about Detention Centre LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Development of a University of the Bahamas is imperative Plan for restoring civility is spot on

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACTmust be passed so that the public can gain access in a timely manner to knowledge that will enable them to push for necessary improvements in the way Government does business, according to a Government Minister. Reacting to the findings of the Auditor General’s 2006/2007 report, which reviews Government ministries and departments to check for irregularities in how public funds are accounted for, Education Minister Carl Bethel said its findings highlights the need for the Act to be passed. The document highlights numerous accounting discrepancies across the spectrum of Government and consequently makes recommendations about how procedures can be enhanced to ensure greater transparency and accountability in the management of public money. Despite being a review of accounts during the 2006/2007 budgetary period, the report was only tabled in the House of Assembly last Wednesday. On the front page of the report, a memorandum from Financial Secretary Ruth Millar, dated June 3, 2008, states that Government is “working towards a position whereby any audit issues arising are resolved within an appropriate timeframe, and procedures are consolidated to prevent such issues recurring.” In relation to the School Boards and Schools Accounts, which fall under Mr Bethel’s ministry, the report expresses its “grave concern” about the fact that “cheques requiring two signatories were being processed with only one signature affixed.” Controls “Management should implement proper controls to ensure that the required signatures are affixed before cheques are issued,” advised the auditors, who point out that not doing so leaves the system open to a buse. The criticism was one that arose with respect to numerous other Government accounts in the report. Meanwhile, auditors, finding that books were not balanced, certain individuals were carrying out “too many (accounting that should be segregated, and cert ain payments were not adequately accounted for, recommended that internal controls are strengthened and “officers assigned the accounting functions be trained in basic bookkeeping.” They further noted that a school administrator was found still to be conducting business on behalf of a school after being transferred. Mr Bethel said that he has made addressing “lapses and errors” in the accounting of School Boards a “matter of priority” since taking up the post in 2007. He said that while School Boards, established in 1996, allow for crucial decentralisation of decision making, they must “be accountable for how the funds are spent.” “We’ve been working very hard with all the school boards and not only have been seeking to audit all of them and have them addressed on a school board by school board basis and we’ve also started a training programme for school board members, as to what to demand and to expect in terms of proper accounting and transparency in terms of school board accounts,” he said. The Minister added, however, that so far he has not been given any evidence to suggest that despite weak controls in some instances, money was misappropriated. Nonetheless, Mr Bethel said it is of concern that discrepancies such as those highlighted in the 2006/2007 report only become known to the public years after the observations are made. The passing of a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA would give members of the public the right to demand timely access to certain Government information, is a manifesto commitment of the Free National Movement. Mr Bethel said “there’s no question” that the passing of a FOIA is a critical issue if findings and discrepancies such as those made by the Auditor General are to be reacted to and addressed in an effective way. “If you leave officialdom to give you the information they’re going to say ‘Well we’ll give you it when we know what the facts are’, whereas with a legislative intervention that information can come forward faster and then people will be able to make their minds up at a much earlier time,” he said. “Like it or not, public knowledge shapes public opinion and can shape a public response and form a public response that would not otherwise be in a position where it can be forced. If the public don’t know they don’t know what to demand, whereas if they know, the sooner they know, the quicker they can make demands of public officials to satisfy their demands based on their knowledge.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCALNEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464W E SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 Minister:Freedom of Information Act must be passed Carl Bethel n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – Lucaya MP Neko Grant, Minister of Public Works, continues his commitment to the development of well-rounded students through his music ministry, having opened a new Music Lab at the new Freeport Junior High School on Friday. Mr Grant, who started his music ministry in 1996, has contributed musical instruments to more than 20 organisations, including schools, junkanoo groups and c hurches. The MP recently donated some 34 musical instruments, valued at $10,000, to the Freeport Bible Church. “Giving the gift of music to the youth of our nation has provided me with much satisfaction,” he said. “This gift of musical instruments to Freeport Junior High School is a further demonstration of my commitment to enriching the lives of cur rent and future students of this school.” Minister Grant said many studies have shown that music educat ion has a positive affect on children and can enhance their performance in other subjects. He told students that music training can also lead to careers that can provide economic benefit. “You can also become actively involved in your church as organists or pianist,” he added. MP opens music lab at new school N eko Grant

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALNEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A MERICANtourists accused of terrorising a flock of wild ducks and slaughtering a pet duck on a private cay off Long Island are wanted by police. The Adamo sailboat crew f rom Daytona Beach, Florida, posted details of their escapades at Hog Cay, in Joe Sound, on an Internet blog along with pictures of a p lucked duck in a roasting p an ready for the oven. They are suspected of havi ng trespassed on the 200-acre p rivate island owned by lawyer Peter Graham and his family, and are thought to have walked through the priv ate cottages and across lands caped lawns where they c hased dozens of West India n tree ducks with their dog for over two hours before they c aught and killed a flightless r owan belonging to the Grah ams. T he innards, guts and wingtips of the duck’s carcass were found surrounded by empty Budweiser beer cans on the beach by caretaker andB ahamas National Trust warden Earl Wilson on Monday, P eter Graham’s son Gregory Graham told The Tribune. Mr Graham said: “When we saw the pictures on their website we lost our minds. It’s s ickening.” He was raised at the island where his father increased theo nce endangered population of tree ducks, or whistling ducks, across Long Island anda s far away as Cat Island, by feeding them at a cost of around $35,000 a year. He has seen their numbers f lourish from just three in the late 1960’s to around 1,500 today. M r Graham said: “It was my father’s passion and he passed it to all of us, and Earlh as dedicated his life to the a nimals.” But the place famed for being teeming with wildlifew as shrouded by a deathly quiet following the sailboaters visit, Mr Graham said. “The effect has been terrible,” he explained. “When Earl went there on Monday morning there was a d eaf silence, there wasn’t a b ird around. It was like a child had died. “The ducks are incredibly s ensitive and these people just harassed them.” Chasing protected West I ndian tree ducks with the i ntention of killing them is also a federal offence under international CITES (Convent ion on International Trade in Endangered Species) laws, Bahamian and United Statesl aw, and Mr Graham has r eported the offence to all relevant authorities. The boat was last seen in E xuma and police in George Town maintain they will apprehend the suspectedo ffenders. The Defence Force and Bahamas National Trust wardens in the Exuma Land and Sea Park are also on thel ook-out for the boat, and Mr Graham will travel to Exuma today to assist. A s news of the offence has spread, the sailboaters website has attracted more than3 0 comments from the offende d community. Mr Graham said: “I think we all realise it is a real problem just because this is happening in all the islands and no-one’s really spoken outb ecause it has never been as obvious, but with the Internet we are all seeing it immediately and we can see the negligence on the part of sailboaters.” T he offence comes just w eeks after two American tourists were fined $1,000 by an Exuma magistrate afterp osting pictures on social networking site Facebook of themselves grilling and eating a n iguana and harvesting juven ile conch. Two of the men pictured with the offenders have still n ot been apprehended by police despite Bahamas National Trust Chief Execu-t ive Eric Carey reporting the w hereabouts of one of the men believed to be living in Nassau. M r Carey said: “Crimes against the environment should not be given lessi mportance than other crimes. “Yes, serious crimes like murder and armed robbery need to be given priority, bute nvironmental crimes don’t need to be treated as if they are not of any level of impor t ance. “It’s really sad because Mr Graham has for so many yearsb uilt this incredible private w ildlife reserve. “Visitors to this country should not carry out such barbaric behaviour.” The sailboaters blog also features pictures of a dinghyf illed with juvenile conch on a visit to the Bahamas in 2007, an prisonable offence. UStourists accused of terrorising wild ducks and slaughtering pet D UCKSON r ocks at the private island. D UCKS g ather on the 200-acre private island.

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n BySIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a consultant and former Caribbean diplomat) I N the midst of a troubling global financial crisis, there is a little good news for the countries of the Caribbean. The regionis to be one of the 20 “countries” of the world on which the Government of Canada will now focusits aid. The full list of countries, released by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA en African nations, five Asian countries, five Latin American nations, Ukraine, the West Bankand Gaza and “Caribbean.” Eighty per cent of CIDA’s $1.5billion bilateral programming bud get, which represents about 53 per cent of Canada's overall development assistance funding, will be targeted towards those countries. Contrary to a story carried in a Guyana newspaper on 26th Febru ary, Guyana is included in the “Caribbean” countries that will benefit from Canada’s refocused aid which will promote regional integration and regional approaches to common development issues and challenges. Canada has doubled its development assistance to the Caribbean, and is the largest bilateral donor to the region. The point is that the govern ment of Canada has begun to acton a commitment made in 2007 by its Prime Minister, Stephen Harper, to “re-engage” with the Americas, and this refocusing of its aid to include five Latin Ameri can countries and the Caribbean isbeing regarded as part of that commitment. Two days after CIDA announced the refocusing of Canadian aid, a private consulta tion was held in Ottawa between Canadian officials and a few out siders of whom I was privilegedto be one. At that consultation, Canada’s Minister of State responsible for the Latin American and Caribbean area, Peter Kent, persuasively reiterated his government’s genuine desire to make a real and lasting contribution to Latin America and the Caribbean. On the day that Kent emphasised Canada’s commitment to the welfare of its hemispheric neighbourhood, a former Canadian Prime Minister, Joe Clark, writing in the Toronto newspaper, The Globe and Mail, declared that “a critical test of the response to the (current whether rich countries, including Canada, will look beyond their narrow national and economic interests.” Clark made the point that “virtually none of the “stimulus packages” in rich countries address this disproportionate impact on the poor world,” and he asked the question: “Why shouldn't Canada focus on the growing crisis in the Caribbean, our own backyard?” The “growing crisis in the Caribbean” to which Clark referred includes the fact that the economies of all Caribbean coun ties are hard-hit by “sharp declines in investment, remittances and aid but also calamitous declines in income from tourism.” Added to this is escalating crime promoted by drug trafficking and arms smuggling. As Clark points out, "mur der rates in the Caribbean are higher than in any other region of the world, and assault rates ... above the world average.” Part of the reason for the Canadian government’s renewed inter est in the Caribbean is the rapid increase in violent crime throughout the region, and the growing influence of drug lords. It is now widely recognised that the crime situation is frightening away investment, contributing to the migration of skilled people, cre ating refugees, corroding political stability and eroding democracy. Quite rightly, Canada has been very concerned about promoting and safeguarding democracy throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, for while economic growth is vitally important to the enhancement of people’s lives, so too is the quality of governance under which they live. Drug trafficking and crime thrive on conditions of poverty, unemployment and declining investment. In this connection, crime is intricately tied-up with development, and the former will not be dealt with effectively unless the latter receives attention. The refocusing of Canada’s aid programme for the benefit of Latin America and the Caribbean comes not a moment too soon. And while it will be good for the Caribbean, it will also be good for Canada. Canada is not a super power in the league of the United States, and while it is linked to the US geographically and economically, it does not have to try to match the areas to which the US provides aid, nor does it have to support all the causes that the US pur sues. It should be conducting a foreign policy – including an aid and trade policy – that serves the interests of Canada and does the most good. Scatter-shooting its aid to far-flung countries, which are not desperate, limits the amount of money Canada can spend in areas where it can be most effective – the Caribbean and some Latin American countries are clearly such areas. Stephen Harper and Caribbean Heads of Government attending the Summit of the Americas in April are scheduled to have a working breakfast. At that session, Harper will raise the matter of Canada and the Caribbean entering a formal trade and economic arrangement to replace CARIB CAN, the arrangement under which Caribbean countries enjoy duty-free access to the Canadian market for 83.2 per cent of their exports. A World Trade Organisation waiver, allowing CARIBCAN, expires in December 2011, and while trade between Canada and Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM tries is relatively small for both sides, CARICOM nonetheless enjoys a trade surplus with Canada averaging about $1 billion over the five years ending in 2006. For Canada, trade in goods with CARICOM countries constitute a mere 0.02 per cent of its total trade. Therefore, whether or not Canada concludes an FTA with CARICOM countries is neither here nor there for Canada economically. But, it would be a good opportunity for Canada to show understanding and commitment to its smaller neighbours by negotiating an agreement that places their development as a pri ority. It will call for both sides – but especially Canada – to throw the rule book out the window and focus instead on an economic part nership agreement rather than simply a Free Trade Agreement. CARICOM countries would have little interest in the latter, and Canada could take pride in the former. It would begin to address what Joe Clark describes in the context of the current global finan cial crisis – but which is true of the entire present economic order as the “disproportionate impact on the poor.” R esponses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 7 ,WVWLPHWKHVPDOOPDQDQG\RXQJ SHRSOHVLGHDVDUHOLVWHQHGWR /HWVQLWHWKH%DKDPLDQSHRSOHt VWRSGLYLGLQJWKHPZLWKSDUW\SROLWLFV \HDUVRILQGHSHQGHQFHtZHVWLOO DUHQRWKDSS\ZLWKSDUW\SROLWLFV \HDUV,QGHSHQGHQFHORRNLQJRXW IRUWKHSHRSOH HVZHFDQ 7KHSHRSOHDUHOLVWHQLQJ 7KHVLWHWKH\ZLOODOOEHZDWFKLQJ:LQ\RXUSKRQHFDUG #*#/#5 r557'5' +.& )5(( Caribbean region and Canadian aid WORLDVIEW n SIRRonald Sanders

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALNEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor the services described belowBiddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe & RUSRUDWLRQV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ2IFH Blue Hill & Tucker Roads Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 T endersaretobeaddressedto: Mr. Kevin Basden General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: onorbefore26thMarch,2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. Submissions should be marked as follows: Tender No. 682/09 6725$*(7$1. &/($1,1*(59,&(6 &/,)721,(5:(5$7,21 TheCorporationreservestherighttoaccept or reject any or all proposals. For all inquiries regarding the tenders DQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236 quate documentation to determine items purchased and how much was spent.” Meanwhile, another sum of $335,000 was noted by Auditors to have been “trasnferred to a bank account in Cuba with regard to the establishment of the office in Cuba.” Auditors again stated that “due to inadequate record keeping (they Under a section of the report relating to the Bahamas Consulate General in Miami, Florida, auditors report that records reflect that the sum of $274,000 was also “spent on behalf of the Embassy’s office in Cuba” and adds, “this amount should be reconciled.” Auditors additionally reported that “six blank/open cheques drawn on the Ministry’s account (Consulate General, Miami, Florida) were with respect to expenditure relating to the establishment of the Cuba Embassy.” “We were unable to verify what the cheques were used for. The normal purchasing procedures were not followed,” said the report. The establishment of the Bahamian embassy in Cuba has been a point of contention politically. Whilst in Cuba for a CARICOM conference in December 2008, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who had previously declared his intention to close down the embassy should he return to power, said Government had subsequently decided to keep it open in part because of the amount expended by the previous government in opening it and setting up an official residence for the Ambassador. Yesterday Minister of Foreign Affairs and Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette said the report “speaks for itself.” “It is a report of the Auditor General of The Bahamas, which is independent of the ministry of foreign affairs...anyone who reads it can draw whatever conclusions from it,” he said. As to whether he was now aware of how the money, spent by the ministry under his predecessor, Fred Mitchell, was used, he said it was “spent on various items.” “There have been significant changes in the budgetary allocations to various missions overseas and also strengthening accounting procedures as a result” of the report, he added. Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell and Minister of Foreign Affairs at the time of the establishment of the embassy told The Tribune that Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Patricia Rodgers, would have “all the explanations” for the points raised by the Auditors with respect to the expenditure. “There’s certainly no irregularity whatsoever and it would all be properly accounted for. Audits have to do with what the picture is on that particular day. The actual comments theym ake seem to be directed more at record keeping than any kind of misapproriation,” he said. Drugs and Notions store in Kennedy Subdivision on Friday afternoon. Two men entered the store at around 1pm and one, dressed in a yellow T-shirt and black trousers, threatened staff with a silver handgun to steal cash, cell phone cards and other items. T he pair then robbed a cust omer of her beige coloured 1999 Mazda Millennium and escaped in the car heading west. Assistant Superintendent of Police Walter Evans said: “Intensive investigations haveb een launched into these mat ters.” Also under investigation is the brutal attack of a man who was slashed with a cutlass, anda woman who was beaten, by a man they know. The attacker approached the pair as they were talking in front of the man’s home in Palm Beach Street sometime after 8pm on Saturday and demanded cash as he threatened them with the blade. The attacker threw the cut lass at the man’s head, and the woman, of the Balfour A venue area, was beaten and h er left hand was injured. Both were treated at Princess Margaret Hospital in Shirley Street and the woman has since been discharged. The man suffered from h ead lacerations and is in sta ble condition in hospital. Anyone with any informa tion which may assist police investigations should call police on 919 or call Crimestoppers anonymouslyo n 3 28-8477 . R eckley said. “Additional information obtained from relatives of the driver is that he suffers from seizures.” A portion of Settler’s Way, from the crosswalk at Taber nacle Baptist Academy extending just past the Jehovah Witness Church, was cordoned off about an hour with police tape to prevent traffic entering the area. The vehicle was extensive damaged. The bodies of the victims were removed from the wreck age and taken by Ambulance to Rand Memorial hospital, where doctors pronounced them officially dead. Mr Reckley said the two deaths are recorded as the fourth and fifth traffic fatalities for the year. He said the accident is still under investigation by police. als supplied and renovations done, but auditors were not provided with contracts or any bids. Auditors also struggled to settle the Ministry’s Corporation Sole Current Account, which was $89,465.31 overdrawn in April, 2007, as they were not presented with bank reconciliation statements for the period under review and the amount could not be compared with the cash book as it was not being balanced. The whereabouts of the unaccounted money is still unknown and is part of an intensive police investigation into corruption in the Ministry of Housing during that period, Mr Russell said. “I don’t know the details of it but we are still trying to find out what happened to the money connected to the ten apartments in Freeport,” he said. “The money has disappeared and I think the police are doing a full investigation into that.” The Auditor General also discovered an outstanding $645,120.34 in rent which should have been accumulated from tenants of public rental units from as far back as 1993. And the report recommends all outstanding rent is collected and a system is put in place to ensure rental income remains current as a matter of urgency. Mr Russell said: “People in the rental units claim they have paid, but there is no record in our system to show that they paid. “We will update the system to ensure that we can account for these funds coming through the Ministry for the public rental unit accounts, and even the money that is used through the Bahamas Mortgage corporation. “We haven’t changed the whole system yet but we have persons who are directly responsible for monthly rents.” In addition the auditor general found official receipts were not issued for money received from Abaco and Freeport for the sale of property, and recommends official receipts are issued and recorded in the cash book to provide an audit trail and enhance transparency and accountability. A large number of general receipt books were not provided for audit inspection and were not seen in the cash book, and pertinent information was omitted from the cash book which was not being balanced. Receipt books should be provided for audit inspection immediately, and the cash book should be properly maintained, the report states. Mr Russell said: “We are trying to keep everything accounted for now. “We have already put in place for the accounts on a regular basis and the account is run directly by the Permanent Secretary. “We scrutinise everything.” Adding: “There was no record of anything being kept, so we don’t know what happened to the missing money. The police will continue their investigation and hopefully they will announce something soon.” PLP MP for Golden Gates Shane Gibson, former Housing Minister, was not available for comment before The Tribune went to press. “With colon cancer, we are seeing an increase with newly diagnosed colon cancer cases a year, and we are also seeing an increase in the amount of stomach cancer cases we have a year within the public sector,” Dr Turnquest said. He explained that while there was no actual study done, doctors have been monitoring cases of stomach and colon cancer through the tumour registry at Princess Margaret Hospital. “We are able to see trends (more registry than anyone else would be able to. We see population trends and we try to see what is going on in 2008 as opposed to2 002 and so forth,” he said. Dr Turnquest said he thinks colon and stomach cancer levels are up in the country due to poor diets and the lack of exercise. “We have a high fat, low f ibre diet. All the bad things t hat people can do to get colon cancer, we do it. Lack of exercise, obesity, high body mass index, and every particularly bad thing to do we do, hence the increase in these diseases,” Dr Turnquest said. However, he said there are many changes that Bahamians can make to their diets and lifestyles to decrease their risk of developing these types of cancer. “If you look at the body mass of most Bahamians it is very high. Most of our population is technically at overweight or obese levels. A precious few of us fall into the normal body mass index. Bahamians can start increasing the amount of fibre in their diet, actually get out there and exercise and drop a few pounds,” Dr Turnquest said. According to the oncology channel’s website, stomach cancer occurs twice as often in men and it is more common in people over the age of 55. In the United States, incidence is higher in African Americans than in Caucasians. Changes in diet and food preparation have led to a recent decrease in the number of cases of cancer of the lower stomach (distal gastric cancer However, cases of cancer of the upper stomach (proximal gastric cancer) have increased, primarily as a result of the prevalence of obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD According to the US’ National Cancer Institute (NCI cases of stomach cancer are diagnosed worldwide and more than 24,000 cases are diagnosed in the United States each year. Incidence is highest in Japan, South America, Eastern Europe, and parts of the Middle East. Worldwide, stomach cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. ‘$1m missing’ from embassy funds F ROM page one Hundreds of thousands missing from Ministry F ROM page one Colon and stomach cancer on the rise in the Bahamas F ROM page one Armed robberies and cutlass attack are investigated Two killed as car crashes into church FROM page one FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALNEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 9 E is for Excellence. TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz E-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667For over 60 years now, the letter E has been synonomous with comfort, safety and elegance. Its a tradition which thenew generation Mercedes-Benz E-Class is proud to continue. The driving experience is sublime as it always has been, but more dynamic than ever with its direct steering, more precise gear shifting and new suspension tuning. And like all the classes of MercedesBenz, the E-Class IS the definition of driving enjoyment. Few of its competitors come near its breathtaking power, impressive fuel economy, superb handling and the sophisticated elegance of its interior design. No wonder the E-Class epitomises what makes a Mercedes-Benz. Get yours today! conclusions. So it does give me a sense of vindication if you will that these findings are finally coming to light,”he said. His comments appeared to be supported by those o f current minister of foreign affairs and deputy prime minister Brent Symonette, who said he believes the report “speaks for itself”, adding that “changes have been made to make sure that kind of i ssue does not recur.” In the 2006/2007 report, tabled in the House of A ssembly last week, a section on the Consular Division of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs notes in some i nstances visa application forms were processed despite not containing all required information. T hey were often found to be missing applicants’ signatures, declarations by the applicant that the i nformation was true and correct as well as details of their occupation and their photograph. In relation to seamen applying for visas, auditors s aid that documents such as their “identity”, their financial information, immigration status, what type o f visa was granted, and general receipts to support payment having been made, were missing. I n these instances, auditors recommended that in future such information must be included and s ubmitted before visas are granted. Auditors also raised concern that their review found that one person was “able to sponsor up to sixt een people in a given period” for visas. They said they were “unable to determine” from t he ministry whether there were any established guidelines determining the number of people a per s on is able to sponsor, but they recommend that guidelines be established to provide a “greater level of assurance that only genuine requests are considered.” Meanwhile, auditors added that a “large numb er” of general receipt books relating to visa applications were not provided for audit inspection andw ere not “seen in the cash book.” They also noted that they “found that pertinent i nformation was omitted from the cash book, which was not being balanced.” Yesterday, former Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell described Mr Bethel’s comments on the report as “utter nonsense.” H e said that he believes the Auditor General made the same observations directly to the Permanent Secretary “at the time” and “corrective measures were taken to deal with it.” I don’t think there’s anything there really. I think i t’s just bureaucracy and errors of that time, I don’t think there’s any fire behind it,” he added. In 2005 and 2006, Mr Bethel, then FNM party C hairman and a senator, claimed to have evidence that there was a visa scandal going on in the consular d ivision of the Ministry. He alleged that there was political interference in the issuance of visas and that the number of visas issued shot up under Mr Mitchell’s tenure. Mr Mitchell denied the claims, and challenged t he FNM to present any such evidence to the police. Yesterday Mr Symonette said that “there have b een changes at the consular division and there have been changes in the way that visas can be i ssued.” “Various controls have been put in place to make sure this type of thing does not recur in the future,” he added. The 2006/2007 report also states that 9,000 visas w ere granted between July 2004 and June 2007. It adds that auditors were unable to determine how m any of these people left the country as they were “not presented with exit forms” to substantiate such a determination. Mr Symonette said that this is “of serious concern” but highlighted certain impediments to the Government keeping track of the movements of such individuals. When you leave The Bahamas, I leave The Bahamas, many other people leave The Bahamas t here are no exit forms and that is a concern. We don’t know if the people do leave and it is a conc ern,” he said, adding, however, that many countries do not have such a system. Mr Symonette said he expects that with the introduction of electronic visas, a programme being instituted in conjunction with the issuance of e-passports, the Government will be better able to monitor people granted visas for a specific time period. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORTGrand Bahama Police are investigating two separate incidents in the West Grand B ahama area, where persons w ere assaulted and robbed by gunmen. Supt Wendell Deveaux, officer in charge of the West End Dist rict, reported that police have arrested one man who is assisting them with their investigation into one of the matters. M r Deveaux reported that the f irst incident occurred around 9.30pm on Friday at Eight Mile Rock. A 31-year-old male resident o f Jones Town, Eight Mile Rock, told police that he was walking through Batelco Corner when a m an armed with a black handgun held him up, putting him in fear for his life. Investigations are continuing into the matter. Supt Deveaux said police received a report of a second incident on Saturday around 10.42pm at West End. H e reported that a 37-year-old man and a 23-year-old woman were accosted by two armed men who put him in fear for his life. The man told police that the suspects were wearing tan Dickies and had cloths over their faces. Supt Deveaux said a 24-yearold male resident of West End w as taken into custody and is assisting police with their investigation into the incident. He said police are searching for a second suspect in connect ion with the matter. Police are also investigating an armed robbery that occurred at Lewis Yard early Saturday morning. Supt Deveaux said sometime around 5.58 am on Saturday, a 56-year-old male resident of Hawksbill, with other persons, w as in Lewis Yard when two dark men armed with a handgun robbed him of cash. There was no arrest in the matter. Police are continuing their investigations. Supt Deveaux reported that 21 arrests were made over the weekend in the West End Dist rict. He said nine persons were charged for various criminal offences. Armed robberies investigated F ROM page one Minister says report supports ‘visa scam’ allegations

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALNEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By KATHRYN CAMPBELL PUBLIC Works and Transport M inister Neko Grant assured residents of the communities affected by the New Providence Road Improvement Project (NPRIP that their opinions are vital to the success of the project. “As tax payers who wish to be assured that public monies are being wisely spent, and as residents o r business owners of these communities in which road works will commence, I assure you that your presence and input are essential to the success of this undertaking,” he said. Residents and business owners attended a town meeting organised by the Project Execution Unit o f the Ministry of Public Works and Transport. The town meeting, held at SuperClubs Breezes Resort, Cable Beach, was organ ised to disseminate information, receive feedback and address queries regarding the road works. Two months ago, government signed a $120-million contract with Jose Cartellone ConstrucccionesC iviles of Argentina, South America, for the re-launch of the completion of the road works. The project is expected to be completed in 33 months and is funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB includes approximately 15.7 miles of roads, 19 corridors and five m ajor intersections. Mr Grant said his ministry is “committed to the execution of this project in strict adherence to the specifications.” “We also committed to execution of this project in a manner that would create minimal discom fort and inconvenience to resident ial and commercial property owners and the general public who may utilise these routes on a regular basis. Furthermore, we promised to make every effort to keep the public informed at every stage of the project’s progress,” he said. The town meeting specifically addressed issues relevant to thef irst three corridors to be construct ed. They are: Corridor four (Bethel Avenue extension) at a cost of $8.6 million Corridor five – the road to be constructed from John F Kennedy Drive/Farrington Road junction through Rock Crusher Road onto West Bay Street at a cost of $5.1 million Corridor 18 which commences at this point on West Bay Street and continues along to Saunders Beach at a cost of $2.3 million Section 24 at the Bethel Avenue/John F Kennedy Drive junction at a cost of $6.8 million Following the meeting, information booths manned by representatives of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport were opened for residents and business owners to raise questions and express their concerns. “In addition to the lodging of verbal complaints or queries at these information booths, participants are encouraged to put their concerns in writing,” said Minister Grant. “In this regard, the written submission should be addressed to the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Public Works and Transport to which a response will be provided at the earliest opportunity for your records.” Also in attendance at the meeting were Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis, Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest and Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator Michael Barnett. Town meeting addresses Road Improvement Project concerns NEKO GRANT , Minister of Public Works and Transport, addresses a town meeti ng organised by the Project Execution U nit of the Ministry on the New Provid ence Road Improvement Project. Colin Higgs, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Public Works and Transport, is pictured seated. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S THEexclusive Small Luxury Hotels of the World (SLH and Marina to its elite portfolio of over 480 independent luxury hotels throughout the world. Small Luxury Hotels of the World will play a vital role in attracting global awareness for Bimini, branding it as a luxury and chic destination. “We are always looking for hidden gems to add further breadth and depth to the Small Luxury Hotels of the World brand and Bimini Bay, withouta doubt, is exactly that,” said Paul Kerr, chief exec utive officer of SLH. “Bimini Bay Resort and Marina offers the genuine luxury experience our discerning travellers expect when visiting the Caribbean, making it a terrific new addition to SLH.” Ash Tembe, vice-president of sales and marketing for Bimini Bay Resort and Marina, said: “Beinga part of a brand such as SLH is extremely valuable in aiding to the success of Bimini Bay Resort and Marina. “We are being recognised as one of the leading small luxury hotels of the world, introducing the colourful and quaint island of Bimini to everyone.” Bimini Bay Resort is currently the largest marina in the Bahamas and is home to stores like John Bull and upscale clothing boutiques located in Fish erman’s Village, the resort’s marketplace overlooking the marina. The resort also looks forward to the future opening of the Bimini Bay Casino and the 2009 opening of Spa Chakra Bimini, the first of its brand to debut in the Caribbean. Bimini Bay Resort and Marina added to Small Luxury Hotels of the World brand

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Bahamas team’s trip to Paraguay delayed by visa woes C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Manchester United celebrate n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net W HEN Bianca S tuart graduates from S outhern Illinois University this year, she will leave behind a legacy that will probably be hard to duplicate. Meanwhile, sprinters Cache A rmbrister and Nivea Smith are just getting started with theirA uburn University careers in the Southeastern Conference. S tuart, the Bahamian senior, ended her campaign at the State F arm Missouri Valley Conference Indoor Championships with her fourth straight title in the women’s long jump. On Saturday at the University o f Iowa in Cedar Falls, Stuart cleared 21-feet, 6 1/4-inches to l ead the Salukis to victory in her speciality. T he mark, which surpassed the All-Time Conference record of 20-11 1/2, MVC meet of 20-9 and the UNI Dome of 20-8 1/2, now have Stuart ranked at number t hree in the nation as she also went over the NCAA automatic q ualifying mark of 20-10. Stuart, who turns 22 on May 1 7, ended up third in the final of the 60 metre final in a season’s best of 7.62 seconds. Jeanne Mid dleton of Indiana State won in a season’s best of 7.51, followed by Y omeaqua Brents of Illinois State in her season’s best of 7.58 as w ell. Alexandria Oembler, of Miss ouri State, had to settle for eighth place in 7.87. Stuart, a graduate of Queen’s College, clocked 7.61 for the second fastest qualifying time in win n ing the first of three heats. Middleton turned in the fastest t ime of 7.56 in winning the third heat. Oembler had the sixth f astest time of 7.74. Oembler was second in the second heat. Just before running in the 60, O embler participated in the final of the 60, placing fourth in 8.79. Meredith Haynes of Southern Illi nois went under the NCAA provisional time of 8.43 in winning t he race in 8.42. At the Southeastern Confere nce Championship at the Nut ter Fieldhouse at the University o f Kentucky over the weekend, nivea Smith and Cache Armbris ter were both third in their sec t ions of the women’s 200 final. Competing in the first final, S mith, the Grand Bahamian native in her freshman year, was timed in 23.92 behind Tennessee’s juniot Lynne Layne in 23.53 and Lousiana State’s sophomore K enyanna Wilson in 23.85. Cache Armbrister, the sopho more at Auburn University, ran 23.93 for her third place in section two. Samantha Henry, a junior f rom Louisiana State, won in 23.45 and Alishea Usery, a freshm an from Fllrida, was seconsd in 23.79. S S u u r r p p a a s s s s e e d d Combined together, Smith fin ished fifth overall just ahead of Armbrister. All four competitors a head of them Henry, Layne, Usery and Wilson in that order surpassed the NCAA provisional qualifying time of 23.90. I n the preliminaries on Satur day, Smith won the fourth of sev en heats in 23.98 and Armbrister was second in the third heat in 23.94 behind Henry’s winning t ime of 23.30. Armbrister, however, had the f ifth fastest qualifying time just ahead of Smith’s sixth place. T he two former Carifta teammates also contested the 60, but neither advanced to the final. A rmbrister, a graduate from St. Augustine’s College, had the b est showing when she ran 7.57 for 14th overall, coming in fifth in heat one. Smith was 17th in 7.64. Another SAC graduate, Gerard Brown, in his sophomore year a t Auburn, competed in the men’s long jump where he was 13th with his best leap of 21-2 1/2. Brown, coming off an injury season last year, was fifth in flight o ne. Christian Taylor, a freshman from Florida, won the event with a leap of 25-3 1/2. Next weekend, a host of athl etes, including Olympic sprinter Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson, hurdler Krystal Bodie and high jumperJ amal Wilson, will compete at the National Junior College Athletic A ssociation (NJCAA Championships. The championships will be staged at Texas Tech University. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas’ Davis Cup team had to spend the weekend in Miami, Florida, but captain John Farrington said he doesn’t expect their late arrival in Paraguay to have any effect on the way they play in the first round of the American Zone II Davis Cup tie. The young team, comprising of Devin Mullings, Timothy Neilly, Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle, were scheduled to leave for Paraguay on Friday to spend at least a week getting acclimatized. But because of a visa problem, the team had to stay in Miami. They are now due to leave today and should arrive in Paraguay on Tuesday. “We were able to practice, which was the most important thing,” said Farrington, who had the team together for the first time since the players all played in the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association’s December Invitational at the National Tennis Center. “Everybody look good. Everybody is working hard. The team is ready.” The team will be out to avenge last year’s 4-1 loss to Paraguay at the National Tennis Center when they play at the Yacht Golf Club in Paraguayo, Lambare from Friday to Sunday. The official draw is scheduled for Wednesday when the team will get to find out who will be matched against the team from Paraguay, comprising of Ramon Delgado, Juan Carlos Ramirez, Nicolas Salama and Diego Galeano. “I think out chances are good playing them at home,” Farrington projected. “Devin has been playing in a few tourna ments and Marvin has also played in a couple of tournaments., “Timmy was practicing hard with Layton Hewith and BJ has been playing in tournaments too. So everybody look good. We should have no excuses. We just need to go out there and play and we are confident that we can come home with the win.” Although they are on the road, Farrington said the Bahamas has been successful playing away against some big teams and they have had their share of success at home as well. “In Davis Cup, anything is possible,” Farrington summed up. Having experienced some of the hostile environment that the Bahamas has faced in the past, Farrington said he doesn’t expect the players to encounter that type of problem because the Davis Cup rules are strict and the chair umpire have been enforcing the rules. “So for the large part of it, we are protected by the ITF’s rules, so we should be fin,” he said. “I just hope that we don’t create a problem for ourselves in our attitude and what we demonstrate. “If we can go up there and keep our head together, some thing that I intend to continue to upon them, and play, we should be okay. There’s nothing we can do with the crowd unless the umpire takes control.” Before leaving Miami today, Farrington said they intend to have one last practice this morning just so that the players can stay sharp. Once they get into Paraguay, he said they should be able to make the adjustment to the red clay courts at the playing facilities. The only concern, if he has one, would be the weather. But Farrington said they players have all traveled before and they have been able to stay right in and make the adjustment, so he doesn’t see it being a major chal lenge. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net RICHARD ‘the Hammer’ Pitt didn’t get a chance to get started against Russian welterweight Khabib Alakhuerdiev. Friday night at the Seminole Hard Rock Cafe, Alakhuerdiev wasted little time in stopping Pitt two minutes and 19 seconds in the first round after dropping the Bahamian three times. “The fight turned out to be a tougher fighter than we though,” said Pitt’s manager/trainer Ray Minus Jr. “Anthony ‘Psycho’ Woodsf ought this same guy a couple months ago and so we though that Richard Pitt who is around the same level, had a chance.” The 26-year-old Alakhuerdiev, who remained undefeated at 9-0 with his fourth technical knockout, caught Pitt with a left hook to the body for the first eight count. After he got up, minus said Pittt moved around and managed to score some points, but he caught another left-right body shot for the second eight count. C C a a u u g g h h t t Again after he got up, Minus said Pitt went after his opponent, but he was caught for the third time, this time forcing the referee to step in and call off the fight on the flurry of punches. P itt, dropped his record to 37. “He was doing fairly okay as he was boxing, but he didn’tp ull out the kind of response that we planned,” said Minus, of Pitt, who received a mandatory 30-day suspension. “He wants to get back in the gym and get another fight in Florida. “Everybody recognize that he’s a good fighter, but he just have to execute. So right now, he’s excited about getting back in the gym and improve his performance before he get back into the gym.” Pitt, who was working in Exu ma, had not fought since June 30, 2007 when he won an unanimous six round decision over Dencil ‘Death’ Miller at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. Although they only put in three weeks of training prior to going to Hollywood, Minus said he felt Pitt was ready because he was doing a lot of running and staying in shape in Exuma. Next month, Minus said he intend to take both light heavy weight Ryan ‘Big Youth’ McKenzie and heavyweight Jerry ‘Big Daddy’ Butler to Canada to fight on March 20 at Casi no Rama. “Those two guys have been in training and they are look ing forward to it,” Minus said. “So we are expecting some good performances from both of them.” The fights for the local boxers are being arranged through First Class Promotions, headed by Michelle Minus. First Class Promotions, whose 12-month suspension by the Bahamas Boxing Commission has been lifted, is preparing to host Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey’s British Commonwealth against Charles ‘the Cru sader’ Adamu from Ghana. The fight is scheduled for May 23 at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. But Minus said they are just waiting on Adamu to sign his contract. Once he does that, Minus said they will submit it to the British Boxing Board for their approval and then to the Bahamas Boxing Commission for sanctioning. SPORTS IN BRIEF Bianca Stuart jumps to fourth straight title B AHAMIANSENIOR S S OUTHERN I LLINOIS U NIVERSITYLEGACYWILLBEHARDTOMATCH Russian stops ‘the Hammer’ Pitt in the first round TENNIS: DAVISCUP Devin Mullings Timothy Neilly Marvin Rolle Bjorn Munroe Late arrival should be no problem, says captain SUCCESSFUL LEGACY: Bianca Stuart pictured in a file photo during a university meet.

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A FTER losing their seaon openers, last year's 19-andunder champions and runnersup First Baptist and Macedo nia got revenge on Saturday as the Baptist Sports Councilc ontinued its 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Classic on S aturday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. F irst Baptist blasted Temp le Fellowship 37-14, while Macedonia had to go an extra three minutes for a 35-31 overtime win over Golden Gates No.2 in one of the most excit ing games played. T he other thriller came in the 19-and-under division as Miracle Working Church ofG od stayed undefeated with a 48-47 nipping of the LatterDay Saints in double overtime. In other results posted, Latter-Day Saints (15 27-24 over Temple Fellowship; Macedonia (15 blasted Miracle Working Church of God 25-15; Zion South Beach (15 19-18; Faith United (15 Baptist; Evangelistic Center (Men Bahamas Harvest 33-32; Temple Fellowship (Men knocked off City of Praise 32-20; Faith United (Men Here's a summary of the games played: First Baptist 37, Temple Fellowship 14: Edrico McGregor h ad a game high 15 for First Baptist as they climbed to 1-1o n the year. Najee Bethel and T avaughn Gibson both had four in Temple Fellowship's season's debut. Macedonia 35, Golden Gates No.2 31: Marvin Roberts pumped in a game h igh 16 points to lift Macedonia to a 1-1 record. The game was tied at 31-31 at the end ofr egulation. Rio Johnson had e ight for Golden Gates, who didn't score in the extra three minutes. Miracle Working Church of God 48, Latter-Day 47: Allen Curry had 13 in Latter-Day's first loss after winning their opener. Faith United 39, First Bap tist 32: Delano Forbes' game high 19 points led Faith United to their season opening 15and-under win. Leon Saunders had 18 in the loss for First Baptist. Zion South Beach 19, Golden Gates 18: Asenio Wood side scored eight as Zion South Beach made a successful debut in the 15-and-under division. Perez Hall had eight in Golden Gates' debut on the losing end. Macedonia 25, Miracle W orking Church of God 15: Geno Bullard lid up the nets for a game high 10 f or Macedonia's 15-and-under debut. Shaquille Davis had nine in a losing effort for Miracle Working Church of God. L atter-Day 27, Temple Fellowship 24: Jermaine Rolle had eight points for LatterDay Saints' 15-and-under win. Antonious Collie had eight forT emple Fellowship, who fell to 1-1. Temple Fellowship 32, City of Praise 20: Edwin Burrows had a game high 10 to lead a balanced scoring attack in this marquee men's game. Jeff Rolle had six in the loss. Faith United 29, Mercy Seat 22: Denero Moss canned a game high 13 to lead Faith United to their 19-and-under season opening victory. Cordero McDonald had six in the loss. New Bethlehem 32, Calvary Bible 24: Theo Cleare scored a game high 14 points to pace the winners in this men's encounter. Evangelistic Center 33, Bahamas Harvest 32: Tyrone Sands had 15 points for Evengelistic Center men's season debut win. Imara Thompson had a game high 16 as Bahamas Harvest fell to 1-1. Here's a look at the schedule fo Saturday, March 7: Court One 10 am Macedonia vs Golden Gates (15 11 am First Baptist vs Zion South Beach (15 Noon Golden Gates No.2 vs Miracle Working Church of God (19 1 pm Mercy Seat vs First Baptist (19 2 pm BIBA vs City of Praise (M 3 pm Macedonia vs Temple Fellowship (M Court Two 10 am Miracle Working Church of God vs Latter-Day Saints (15 11 am Faith Unied vs Temple Fellowship (15 Noon Macedonia vs Ebenezer (19 1 pm Golden Gates vs Temple Fellowship (19 2 pm Christian Tabernacle vs Church of Nazarene (M 3 pm New Bethlehem vs Evangelistic Center (M n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net PUBLIC relations officer Bob Brown is calling it “Resurrection Day” as the Bahamas Powerlifting Federation relaunches its National Powerlifting Championships. Scheduled for March 21 at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium starting at 9 am, Brown said the championships will be back after a hiatus bigger and better. “This time, we are showcasing 70 percent of new, vibrant strong lifters,” according to Brown, who was a former national champion. “They will be coming from all over the place.” The College of the Bahamas, under the leadership of Keith Cox, have been grooming some new competitors and John Mills has taken talented Leslie White under his wings. “Why we’re calling it Resurrection Day, it’s because a lot of the past lifters like Falcon Major, Keith Capron, myself, Kevin Woodside, Arlington C larke and Delvin ‘Blue Boy’ Scott, who benched over 600 pounds, have all been working with a new breed of powerlifters,” Brown pointed out. “So we are looking forward to one of the best championships ever as Resurrection Day on March 21 take place. We are looking forward to a great time that day.” Not to be left out is Grand Bahama, who are expected to coming to town with a contingent of competitors led by sensational Bernard ‘Spikes’ Rolle. “Spikes, who has been a pioneer of powerlifting, is going to give it his best because he doesn’t know how long he will continue to be in the sport,” Brown stressed. The Federation, under the leadership of veteran president Rex Burnside, is looking forward to returning to the international scene, if not at the World Championships, at some other big meet to “let the world know that we are still around,” Brown stated. “That’s why we are calling this championship Resurrection Day because we want to get back out there competing again and to get our national team back in place.” Calling themselves the “old Pilgrims or Gladiators,” Brown said the big names in the sport are eager to see what their new protgs are capable of doing when the championships take place. “We are anticipating a con tingent from COB, a contingent from all of the major gyms. We are anticipating at least 70 competitors participating,” Brown said. All of the competitors will compete in the benchpress, squats and the deadlift. But he noted that in the event a competitor is only good in one event, there will be a prize for the competitor who excel the best in either event. “We’re trying to motivate the young new competitors and that is one way that we feel we can do it,” Brown proclaimed. Another, he said, is for some of the top powerlifters, who have been in training, to sit on the side and let the newcomers take the stage, rather than discouraging those ones who might be on the par with the renown competitors. Brown, one of those competitors who was intending to compete in the championships, said between August and September, the fans can look for more of the old guards to step out and compete. But he said the focus is on trying to showcase the young new lifters on “Resurrection Day.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor provision of General Insurance Services described below.Biddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQIFH%OXH+LOOt7XFNHURDGV Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 7HQGHUVDUHWREHDGGUHVVHGWR Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. 6XEPLVVLRQVVKRXOGEHPDUNHGDVIROORZV Tender No. 690/09 $OOLVNV*HQHUDO,QVXUDQFH (acial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents (bs, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment Tender No. 691/09 0RWRU,QVXUDQFH&RPPHUFLDOtULYDWHHKLFOHV Tender No. 692/09 $FFLGHQW,QVXUDQFHRQH\t%XUJODU\ Tender No. 693/09 /LDELOLW\,QVXUHUVRQDOtXEOLF Tender No. 694/09 Professional Indemnity >2IFHU'LUHFWRU3URIHVVLRQDO6WDII(QJLQHHU Accountants, Attorneys] t Tender No. 695/09 Marine Insurance 7KH&RUSRUDWLRQUHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRDFFHSWRUUHMHFWDQ\RUDOOSURSRVDOV )RUDOOLQTXLULHVUHJDUGLQJWKHWHQGHUVtVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163 POWERLIFTING ‘Resurrection Day is coming’ Relaunch of National Powerlifting Championships THINKING BIG: Public relations officer Bob Brown. BSC: 2009 JOYCE MINUS BASKETBALL CLASSIC F ir st Baptist and Macedonia gain r e v eng e after losing season opener s

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n B y RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net As the local governing body for football prepares to host the international Congress for member federations of the world’s most popular sport, the association remains optimistic in their ability to host a s uccessful event. The Bahamas Football Association will to host the 64th FIFA Congress, May 31st June 3rd at the Atlantis R esort, Paradise Island and BFA President Anton Sealy reports that preparations for the international event haveb een ahead of schedule. Preparations are well underway, we have been meeting with the various gove rnment agencies that are gong to be intimately involved in this for t\he past severalw eeks,” he said, “We have also solidified our arrangements with the Atlantis hotel. Things are going very well, we are actually ahead of our s chedule and we are very pleased with the way things are going at the moment.” Each of the 208 member federations from the global f ootball community will be represented by a minimum of three delegates and with a pre-p onderance of international media and guests, the FIFA C ongress promises to be one of the most populated events hosted in the country. It is going to be perhaps the largest, certainly the most c ountries represented in the Bahamas, at one event,” Sealy said, The members are very excited to come here and I h ope that our people will be as welcoming and as warm as I know they can be and just s how off this beautiful country to these people, may of whom have never been here before.” A ccording to the organization’s website, The FIFA Cong ress is considered “the most critical organ of football’s international governing body.” W hat originally began as a bi-annual meeting has been i ncreased to once per year since 1998 and at the congress member federations discuss am yriad of topics and decision making including governing s tatutes, methods by which they are implemented, an annual report, acceptance of new national associations and elections. V V o o t t e e Each national association is r epresented by one vote regardless of international football prowess. This will be the sixth Congress held in the CONCAC AF region. S ealy said with the crosssection of people which will be in town for the event, s ports tourism has the opportunity to pay even further divi dends for the Bahamas b eyond the four day Congress. “I have made a point to the v arious ministries that I have spoken to that we are going t o have some very influential people and from a personal s tandpoint who I would like to see return not only as a F IFA delegate but to do some further investments in this country as well,” he said, “I a s president was very humbled by FIFA’s acceptance of our bid and so we are looking t o a great time here in the next f ew weeks.” T he BFA President noted that support from various government agencies would be vital in ensuring the successo f the prestigious event. “I would like to encourage o ur people to put their best foot forward. I know the gove rnment has taken some proactive steps and a lot of w ork in participation of this Congress,” he said, “From the P rime Minister’s offense right down they have been intimately involved in making s ure that we the local organizing community have everything that we need to enable F IFA to be confident in knowi ng that they are coming to a s ecure country and a country where they have all the facilities that are necessary to host a conference of this magni-t ude.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 13 TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor the services described belowBiddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQV$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ2IFH Blue Hill & Tucker Roads Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 Tendersaretobeaddressedto: Mr. Kevin Basden General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: onorbefore26thMarch,2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. Submissions should be marked as follows: Tender No. 688/09 %866,1*(59,&(6 &/,)721,(5:(5$7,21 The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals. For all inquiries regarding the tenders DQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW 0U$QWKRQ\)RUEHV at telephone 302-1165 W ITH its regular season starting to wind down, the New Providence Basketball Asso ciation played four exciting games over the weekend, two at the CI Gibson Gymnasium and two at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. O n Saturday at their home base at CI Gibson, the Foxies Pros pulled off a big 77-72 victory over the Coca-Cola Explorers just after the Police Crimestoppers held off the Falcons 85-83. I n the Pros win, Dereck Ferguson scored a side high 18 points. Lamar Watkins paced the losing Explorers with a game high 23. V ernon Stubbs came up with 18 to aid in the Crimestoppers’ win in the opening game. R enaldo Baillou also had 18 in a losing effort for the Falcons. On Friday at Kendal Isaacs, the defending c hampions Commonwealth Bank Giants suffered a heartbreaking 71-70 loss to the John son’s Trucking Jumpers, while runners-up Electro Telecom Cybots knocked off the YCare Wreckers 98-95. B rian Bain exploded for 31 points in the win for the Cybots, Breston Rolle had 31 in the loss for the Wreckers. And Floyd Armbrister exploded for 30 points to help the Truckers in the win.G arvin Lightbourne had 27 in the loss for the Giants. Another double header will be played t onight at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. In the opener at 7 pm, the Entertainers will entert ain the Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders and in the 8 pm feature contest, the Giants will play the Jumpers. BFA: preparations well underway for hosting 64th FIFACongress FOOTBALL “The members are very excited to come here and I hope that our people will be as welcoming and as warm as I know they can be and just show off this beautiful country to these people, may of whom have never been here before.” Anton Sealy NPBA plays four exciting games over weekend n PLAYA DEL C ARMEN, Mexico M ark Wilson came south of the border to work. Although his job took him to a Mexican resort, and he stayed at a hotel near the beach, never once during the Mayakoba Golf Classic did he hear any mariachis play. Not until the eight guys in sombreros and matching cream-colored suits were playing in his honor. The co-leader after the sec ond and third rounds, Wilson went ahead for good on the second hole Sunday, then held on through dark clouds and wild winds over the back nine to secure his second career PGA Tour victory. “Holes that we saw earlier in the week hitting 3-wood and 8iron into, we were hitting driver and 3-wood into,” said Wilson, who shot a final-round 68 and finished at 267, two stokes ahead of J.J. Henry. “It was definitely a different challenge.” Wilson opened this tournament with a birdie and remained steady all week. He got to the 13th tee box leading Henry by three strokes, but was up only one by the time he tapped in for bogey on 14. Then he bogeyed 16, too. Henry, however, was having just as tough of a time. He bogeyed 16 and 17, then turned up his palms in frustration when the wind grabbed his approach on 18. Although he parred the hole, it wasn’t enough. When Wilson’s approach on 18 landed on the back of the green, it was time to cue the mariachis. “Once I hit the 3 wood, it was just pure joy,” Wilson said. “You know, you’re so nervous and you somehow pull off one of the best shots (of the joy and satisfaction that the hard work went in and that you didn’t get overwhelmed by the situation and hit a good shot.” Henry also shot 68 to finish alone in second at 269. “(It was but it was the same for everybody,” said Henry, who still had his best finish since 2006. Mark Wilson wins PGAs Mayakoba Classic OVERSEAS NEWS

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Bright +Effective 322-2188/9 You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. Long life Spirallamps 2 0 0 8 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR'S David Bentley, right, misses from the penalty spot during a shootout at the end of the English League Cup final soccer match at Wembley Stadium in London. n WEMBLEY, England Manchester United won the L eague Cup with a 4-1 penalty shootout victory over Tottenham on Sunday that kept the English Premier League leaders on course for an unprecedented five tro phies this season, according to the Associated Press . After a 0-0 draw through extra time, United goalkeeper Ben Fost er saved Tottenham’s first shootout kick from Jamie O’Hara and David Bentley missed the third before Anderson hit the winning penalty. The victory gave United its second trophy of the season follow i ng December’s Club World Cup title. The Red Devils also lead t he Premier League by seven points and are in contention for t he Champions League and FA Cup. In Sunday’s Premier League action, Aston Villa’s chances of qualifying for the ChampionsL eague were dented when the home side squandered a two-goal lead in the final minutes against Stoke to draw 2-2 at Villa Park. The result means Villa remains f ourth, in the final Champions League slot, three points behind L iverpool in third and sixth points clear of Arsenal, which is fifth. Stoke stays 19th, below Middlesbrough on goal difference. West Ham moved up to sev enth after a 1-0 win over Manchester City at Upton Park on Sunday. Blackburn moved out of the relegation zone on goal diff erence with a 2-1 win at Hull, a fiery game that saw both sides reduced to 10 men. MILAN (AP slipped further behind Inter Milan and Juventus in the Serie A title race after losing to Sampdoria 2-1. Antonio Cassano gave the Genoa side the lead in the first half, and Gianpaolo Pazzini doubled it early in the second. Alexandre Pato scored in the 80th minute to give Milan some hope, and Emerson had a goal disallowed. Inter, which hosted AS Roma later Sunday, is in first place with 59 points, followed by Juventus with 53, AC Milan with 48 and F iorentina with 46. Cassano gave Sampdoria the l ead in the 33rd minute. He tapped in the ball at the far post after Marius Stankevicius headed Angelo Palombo’s corner. Fiorentina and Genoa, the two teams chasing the fourth Champions League qualification place, both failed to win. Fiorentina drew 1-1 at lastp lace Reggina, with Emiliano Bonnazzoli’s goal equalizing Alessio Sestu’s opener for Reggina. Genoa was unable to breakdown stubborn defending by Siena in their 0-0 draw. Also Sunday, it was: Atalanta 0, Chievo Verona 2; Cagliari 0, Torino 0; Palermo 0, Catania 4; and Udinese 2, Lecce 0. MADRID (AP pursuit of a Champions League spot lost momentum after a 2-0 loss to Recreativo Huelva, while Deportivo La Coruna bolstered its European ambitions with a 1-0 win at last-place Numancia. Albert Camunas gave Recre ativo the lead in the 54th minute, and 10 minutes later Adrian Col u nga added a goal to hand Mala ga only its third loss in 15 games. J uan Rodriguez scored from a sharp angle with 15 minutes to play as Deportivo rallied from Thursday’s UEFA Cup exit to join Malaga and Valencia which played Valladolid later Sunday on 39 points. The three clubs are only two points behind fourth-placed Villarreal, which o ccupies the final Champions League spot and will attempt to consolidate its position against lowly Real Betis later Sunday. Barcelona also played later, and needed to snap a three-game winless streak at Atletico Madrid to get its title campaign back on track. The Catalan giant led Real Madrid by 12 points going into 2009, but has since let Madrid narrow that gap to just four Barcelona has 60 points, Madrid has 56, Sevilla is third with 47 and Villarreal has 41. In Sunday’s other 25th round results, it was: Almeria 2, Getafe 1; Racing Santander 1, Osasuna 1; and Sporting Gijon 0, Mallorca 1. MANCHESTER UNITED captain Rio Ferdin and lifts the trophy lifts the trophy following the English League Cup final between Manchester United and Tottenham Hotspur at Wembley Stadium, London Sunday March 1, 2009. EUROPEANSOCCERROUNDUP Man United win League Cup after penalty shootout MANCHESTER UNITED manager Alex Ferguson lifts the trophy following the English League Cup final between Manchester United and Tottenham Hotspur at Wembley Stadium, London Sunday March 1, 2009. BEN FOSTER OF MANCHESTER UNITED makes a save from Tottenham Hotspur's Jamie O'Hara during the penalty shootout in the English League Cup final soccer match at Wembley Stadium in London, Sunday, March 1, 2009. M a r t i n R i c k e t / A P P h o t o / P A S t e p h e n P o n d , P O O L / A P P h o t o Stephen Pond, POOL/ AP Photo K i r s t y W i g g l e s w o r t h / A P P h o t o WEST INDIES' Denesh Ramdin, right, is clean bowled by England's Graeme Swann, unseen, for 166 runs as wicketkeeper Tim Ambrose reacts during the fourth day of the fourth cricket Test match at Kensington Oval in Bridgetown, Barbados, Sunday, March 1, 2009. CRICKET: WESTINDIES vs ENGLAND T h a l i a C o d r i n g t o n / A P P h o t o Thalia Codrington /AP Photo WEST INDIES' Denesh Ramdin, centre, plays a shot as England's wicketkeeper Tim Ambrose, right, and captain Andrew Strauss looks on, during the fourth day of the fourth cricket Test match at Kensington Oval in Bridgetown, Barbados, Sunday, March 1, 2009. Ramnaresh Sarwan struck 291 to end England's hopes of completing a come back Test series victory in the Caribbean and open up the chance of them losing it on the final day here. Sarwan's vigil at Kensington Oval, which lasted 11 hours and 40 minutes, was the cornerstone of West Indies' 749 for nine, the second largest total England have conceded in Test history. It meant they began their second innings 149 runs in arrears and were required to save a match they had targeted as a must-win they will resume on six without loss in the morning. Sarwan strikes 291 to end England hopes of comeback win

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALNEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 15 H ONOUR roll students of the H O Nash Junior High School paid a courtesy call on Governor General Arthur Hanna on Wednesday, February 25, at Government House. S eated from left are Sherry S trachan, Governor-General Hanna, Evon Wisdom and D ora Boston. R a y m o n d A B e t h e l / B I S Honour roll students pay courtesy call on Governor General

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FamGuard’s finance head in resignation n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Family Guardian’s chief financial officer, Cecile Greene, has resigned from the BISX-listed life and healthi nsurer, Tribune Business can confirm. Patricia Hermanns, Family Guardian’s president, a cknowledged that Ms Greene had left the company when contacted by Tribune Business, saying: “Cecile has resigned.” She declined to comment on the reasonsw hy she had left. R R i i s s i i n n g g s s t t a a r r M s Greene’s unexpected departure from Family Guardian has been widely talked about within the B ahamian insurance industry. She was considered to be a rapidly-rising star in that sector, and the wider financial services arena, and is highly regarded by colleagues andp eers alike. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information c ontained is from a t hird party and The Tribune can not be h eld responsible for e rrors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.34 $3.56 $3.36 ,)&--$)&'(t$$"t # $#($ '# $%!)'%$$!'-" ($!&'$&('%'%#$&" )&$)&(($%!#''( !'$%&* !-!(f f n n r r f f n n r r f f f f t t b b b b n n r r f f r r n n t t n nr r b b n n b r t f bn n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor S cotiabank (Bahamas appointed a receiver for the troubled $250 million ChubC ay resort project, T ribune Business can reveal, the latest move in a battle over the developers’ failure to repay a $45 million loan. S ources familiar with the situation told this newspaper that the Bahamian bank hadw ithin the last two weeks secured the appointment of C raig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez as receiver for the Berry Islandsbased project and its proper-t ies, via the mortgages it holds on them and associated land p arcels. It is understood that Mr Gomez, whose role will be top rotect and secure the resort’s assets, and take over running the existing operating facilities, will be the receiver for properties held in the nameo f both Chub Cay Resorts Ltd and Chub Club Associates Ltd. He will likely remain in place until a buyer is found to take over Chub Cay. His appointment likely means that Mr Gomez, an accountant and partner at Baker Tilly Gomez, will be inf or a busy and eventful time in the forthcoming months, having also just been appointeda s CLICO (Bahamas sional liquidator by the B ahamian Supreme Court. Chub Cay, which was unveiled with much fanfare ast he so-called ‘anchor project’ for the Berry Islands and N orth Andros just five years ago, is the first such major mixed-use resort project tos uffer being placed into receivership. Its fate is a prime example o f just how bad a toll the global economic downturn, and especially the freezing of credit/debt markets, has exacted Scotiabank appoints receiver for resort Bahamian bank names Craig A. 'Tony' Gomez to protect assets at $250m Chub Cay project SEE page 11B C raig ‘Tony’ Gomez Airport Authority’s loss slashed 76.4% In separate development, accounting e rror causes company to 'overstate' net income in 2008 unaudited interims SEE page 10B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Airport Authority’s net loss for fiscal 2008 wass lashed by 76.4 per cent to $1.527 million, its audited f inancial statements have revealed, its performance benefiting from the passen-g er user facility fee’s introduction and the airport’s transfer to private sectorm anagement. The Authority’s financials f or the year to June 30, 2008, showed that the entity that owns Lynden Pindling Inter-n ational Airport (LPIA managed to reduce its net l oss almost four-fold – down from $6.534 million – due largely to the extra $32.666m illion in revenues earned from the passenger facility f ee and security charges. T hese fees were intro duced for the first time that financial year, so prior year comparatives are slightly misleading, but for perhapst he first time LPIA’s revenue streams are starting to match expenses, a feath elped by the airport’s lease to the Nassau Airport Devel o pment Company (NAD and the management skills of Vancouver Airport Services( YVRAS). R R e e v v e e r r s s e e For the 12 months to June 30, 2008, the AirportA uthority was able to reverse a $9.359 million operating loss and parlay that into $12.23 million of operating profits, helped inn o small measure by the new fees/charges. However, a tripling of i nterest and bank charges from $1.552 million the previous year to $4.773 million i n 2008, plus a quadrupling in finance costs to $1.857 million, saw the Airport Authority’s total non-operating expenses increase to $14.757 million. That represented a 44.5 per cent yearover-year increase. As a result, the Airport Authority’s loss before receiving a government sub sidy was $2.527 million, yet this paled into relative insignificance against the 2007 comparative of $19.569 million. Especially noteworthy, as far as Bahamian taxpayers are concerned, was that the Government only subsidized the Airport Authority to the SEE page 9B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A former Bahamas Elec tricity Corporation (BEC e xecutive chairman has hit back at claims the basic tariff r ate reductions initiated on his watch are responsible for the Corporation’s current finan-c ial woes, and accused the current administration and Board of seeking to “demonise” him despite “piggybacking” on the ideas/plans he left in place. Al Jarrett, who chaired BEC from June 2002 until the 2005 first quarter, questioned how the tariff rate reduction could be responsible for the Corporation’s current financial predicament given that its 2004 financial year – the first full year after the new rates were in force – saw BEC have one of its most successful years ever by generating $14.1 million in net profits. Mr Jarrett was responding to BEC’s current chairman, Fred Gottlieb, who had blamed the Corporation’s subsequent annual losses – now running at $18 million per year Ex-BEC chair accuses Government of trying to 'demonise' his efforts Denies tariff cuts responsible for BEC financial woes, and says current government trying to 'piggyback' off ideas SEE page 8B n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor T he Government’s focus on stim ulating the economy through capital budget construction-related projects is “a bit misguided”, a former minis ter has told Tribune Business, because it fails to address the need to maintain foreign currency inflows t hat stabilise the exchange rate and import reserves. J ames Smith, former minister of state for finance, said that while Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s mid-year Budget communication had “sounded the correct notes” on the potentially severe recession, and reinGovernment stimulus focus 'a bit misguided' * Former minister says more important to focus on tourism, and stabilising foreign currency inflows, than boosting local demand through construction spend * Says Bahamas already well above 40% debt-toGDP ratio SEE page 7B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE b b n n r r n n b b t t b b t t b b f f b b b b n n b b r r b b " bt 9. "(-31f!$#0--+' '(**2-.-5,'-+$192-%(4(,&. "$9($51-4$00-4(#$,"$ ,#$ !$7-,#9n . 0)(,&. "$1.$0,(29 "0$1-%20-.(" ** ,#1" .(,&9'-30$"30(279 *+-0 **3!(2' &-30+$2$12 30 ,2! 0 &7+ ,#$,2$02 (,+$,2--+9 (*$*(4$09-,"($0$04("$9--* 8$!-9 0,-5*$,,($,20$9$,29'(*#0$,* 7&0-3,# $% rt nrtnrbb ROYAL FIDELITY MARKET WRAP I NTERNATIONAL MARKETS FOREX Rates Weekly % Change CAD$ 1.2732 + 1.81 GBP 1.4298 0.99 EUR 1.2659 1.33 Commodities Weekly % Change Crude Oil 44.40 + 11.56 Gold 941.70 5.27 International Stock Market Indexes: Weekly % Change DJIA 7,062.93 4.11 S & P 500 735.09 4.54 NASDAQ1,377.84 4.40 Nikkei 7,568.42 + 2.05 T HEBAHAMIANSTOCKMARKET FINDEX 817.84(-2.04% BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUMEYTDPRICE SYMBOL PRICECHANGE AML $1.41$0-17.54% BBL $0.63 $0-4.55% BOB $7.00 $-0.64 20,000 -8.38% BPF $11.00 $0-6.78% BSL $9.58 $0-5.99% BWL $3.15 $-00.00% CAB $13.95 $0-0.57% CBL $6.77 $1,150 -3.29% CHL $2.83 $189 0.00% CIB $10.45 $0 0.00% CWCB $1.73 $-0.310 -23.11% DHS $2.40 $0 -5.88% FAM $7.76 $0 -0.51% FBB $2.37 $100 0.00% FCC $0.30 $0 0.00% FCL $5.00 $-0.18 15,000 -3.29% FCLB $1.00 $-0 0.00% FIN$11.00 $-0.28 6,492 -7.33% ICD $5.50 $0 -10.28% JSJ $10.50 $0 -5.41% PRE $10.00 $0 0.00% E QUITY MARKET A total of 42,931 shares c hanged hands, representing a significant increase of 2 6,270 shares versus last week's trading volume of 16,661 shares. B ank of the Bahamas (BOB l eader and big decliner last week, with 20,000 shares trading, its stock falling by$ 0.64 to end the week at a new 52-week low of $7. F inance Corporation of the Bahamas (FIN its share price decline by $0.28 to $11 on a volume of 6,492 shares. Focol Holdings( FCL) traded 15,000 shares, its stock falling by $0.18 to end the week at a new 52week low of $5. B OND MARKET No notes traded in the B ahamian market last week. C OMPANY NEWS: Earnings Releases: T here were no financial results reported by any of the 24-listed companies during the week. P rivate Placement Offerings: FOCOL Holdings (FCL announced it will be extend ing the deadline of its private placement offering. The preferred shares will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable semi-annually. Dividends/AGM Notes Commonwealth Bank (CBL dend of $0.05 per share, payable on February 27, 2009, to all shareholders of record date February 13, 2009. Bank of the Bahamas (BOB dend of $0.10 per share, payable on March 3, 2009, to all shareholders of record date February 24, 2009. Focol Holdings (FCL announced it will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Thursday March 19, 2009, at 10.30am in the Boardroom at there Corporate Office in Freeport, Grand Bahama. Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FIN announced it will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, March 19, 2009, at 6.30pm in the Governor's Ballroom at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel. T here was an increase in trading activity last week in the Bahamian market, as i nvestors traded in six out of the 25 listed securitie,s of which three declined and t hree remained unchanged. There were no advancers in the market this week. I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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n B y CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter A dispute over $5 million i n back pay allegedly owed to workers on a private island resort development will have to go to the Industrial Tribunal, the Ministero f Labour has told Tribune Business. Dion Foulkes said a recent m eeting between himself, Prime Minister Hubert I ngraham and the principal investor in the Exuma-based Bock Cay project, John Fry,o wner of multi-million California retailer Fry’s Electronics, produced no solution. Mr Foulkes, though, said s ome progress was being made in amending the developer’s rule requiring workers t o leave Bock Cay during the weekends, which has proven financially imprudent fort hose living outside of Exu ma. W orkers on site said the taxing travel expenses had seen the development losea round 60 per cent of its workforce, which was down to 47 from 120, according toa worker who wished to remain anonymous becauseo f a pending lawsuit with the company. Guys are falling off one by one,” he said. Bock Cay workers, according to former timekeeper Ken Clarke, were made to leave Bock Cay on Fridays and return on Sundays at their own expense. C C o o m m m m u u t t e e Workers who lived Nassau were spending up to $2,100 per year on the commute, a figure some said made employment with the company nonsensical. The worker said he and others were preparing a writ in readiness to launch a legal action against the developer for the allegedly overdue back pay. The worker also told Tribune Business that Mr Fry visited Bock Cay shortly after his meeting with government ministers, and announced to the workforce that his company was not obligated to pay the allegedly year-old overdue overtime. Last year, Bahamian attorney Errol Mckinney accused Bock Cay of owing its workers up to $5 million for four years of back pay. This was denied by the developers, who said everything they had done was in accordance with the law. Work on Bock Cay initially lasted for 10 hours per day, seven days per week, for 28 continuous days. Following almost a month of work, employees were given a week off without pay. According to Mr Mckinney, the company then allegedly compensated employees incorrectly for overtime and vacation pay. However, workers alleged that Bock Cay had recently changed employee work hours and implemented new overtime pay rates. n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Finance Corporation of the B ahamas (FINCO f inal stages” of introducing a property title insurance scheme for its clients, a move that might reduce home buying costs and shorten the transaction closing window by eliminating the need for an attorney’s opinion. Tanya McCartney, FINCO’s managing director, writing in the company’s 2008 a nnual report, said: “We are in t he final stages of preparation for the introduction of prop-e rty title insurance. “In this way, clients will be able to have funds advanced quickly without lengthy delays for legal opinions of title. RBC Royal Bank of Canada has been instrumental in providing guidance in develo ping policies and procedures associated with this product.” Whether FINCO’s property title insurance coverage results in cost savings for mortgage borrowers is likely to depend on whether the premiums charged are lower than the f ees demanded by attorneys for their work on real estate transactions. T hese fees are normally 2.5 per cent of the property’s purchase price. Title insurance, which is in widespread use in many jurisdictions, such as the US, provides homeowners and real estate purchasers with coverage should the title to their p roperties at a later stage be shown to be defective. It is starting to catch on in the Bahamas, Higgs & Johnson having formed an affiliate title brokerage agency. JasonK insale, developer of The Balmoral real estate project, used the recent Bahamas BusinessO utlook conference to push for title insurance, arguing that it was even more critical in a depressed economy to reduce the transaction closing time by eliminating the need for lengthy attorney searches to determine whether there was c lean title. G G r r o o w w t t h h In her message to FINCO s hareholders, Ms McCartney said the bank saw 10 per cent g rowth in its mortgage portfolio in the year to October 31, 2008. Much of that growth a ppeared to come from the institution’s BlockbusterM ortgage Campaign, FINCO seeing a 14 per cent increase in the value of mortgages writ-t en – from $71 million in 2007 to $81 million – during the promotion’s four months. Ms McCartney said client surveys showed FINCO had exceeded benchmarks” for customer service, with 88 per cent of customers indicatingt hey felt treated as if they were long-term, valued borr owers. Some 93 per cent of line c ustomers were served within 10 minutes, and trailer calls showed 95 per cent of cus-t omers felt FINCO had adhered to quality customer service standards. Looking ahead, Ms McCartney said that, not surprisingly, 2 009 would be a “challenging year”, but FINCO was optimistic of continued growtha nd profitability. She added: “In the year a head, we will focus on the organic growth of our clientb ase. We will benefit from the expertise of a sales effectiveness coach engaged by RBCR oyal Bank of Canada. “A comprehensive sales strategy to maximise opportunities for business development will be implemented in 2 009, with an emphasis on cross-referral between ourselves and Royal Bank ofC anada.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 3B FINCO 'in final stages' on property title insurance $5m back pay dispute headed for theTribunal Dion Foulkes Hubert Ingraham

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter T HE GOVERNMENT is aiming to decrease the Bahamas’ $500 million food import bill by implementing initiatives to jump-s tart commercial and subsistence farming, while using new technology to bring livestock rearing to levels that could be sustaina ble. T he recent global food shortage, coupled with a spate of natural disasters and a rise in fuel costs, have increased the price ofc onsumer goods across-the-board, and forced grocery stores to raise prices. Prime Minister Hubert Ingrah am said the Food and Agricult ure Organisation (FAO warned last year of an impending global food crisis that could be of “undetermined proportion andi ncalculable effect”. “The increased frequency of storms and the occurrence of protracted droughts, perhaps the outcome of global warming, have also affected crop yields and con-t ributed to a doomsday scenario affecting rich and poor nationsa like,” the Prime Minister said. This, Mr Ingraham added, u nderscores the importance of investing in the agri-business sector in an effort to “promote locally sustainable agricultural and marine production. This is important, because it will not only create employmenta nd raise the incomes of producers, but also affect savings in fore ign exchange that would otherwise be expended for imports,” s aid Mr Ingraham. “There is no better time than now for us as a people to re-define agriculture.” Opening the second annual Bahamas Agricultural, Marine Resources and Agribusiness Expo, Mr Ingraham said urbanis ation and the movement of labour into tourism, banking, construction, the public sector and retail, had led to a decline in i nterest in food production. “Farms and backyard gardens declined as a result,” he said. Lar ry Cartwright, minister of agri-c ulture and marine resources, said the Bahamas has embarked on a mission to grow as much of its food as possible”. Recently, the backyard gardening programme was launched w ith a view to encouraging per sons to plant agricultural crops to supplement their household needs,” he said. P P l l o o t t s s Mr Cartwright said his Ministry h as also leased plots of land to encourage individuals to start s mall and medium-sized farms. However, it was discovered that much of the land was still not being used, or was being misused. “We have discovered that in a n umber of cases, land leased for the purpose of food productionh as been diverted from that pur pose to speculative purposes. We d o not propose to regularise such unauthorised diversions, or per mit the same to continue,” said M r Ingraham He said government will con t inue to upgrade agricultural ser vices and “establish a farmer’s c redit programme, and a hurricane and disaster insurance fund”. Mr Cartwright said the crop insurance plan is in its final stages, and will assist in servicing the deficits accrued by farmers following natural disasters such as hurricanes. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 35,0()),&( 63$&($SSUR[LPDWHO\VTXDUHIHHWRIVHFRQG VSDFHZLOOEHDYDLODEOH$SULOLQQHZO\ FRQVWUXFWHGEXLOGLQJDWWKHFRUQHURI0DUOERURXJK DQG&XPEHUODQG6WUHHWV7ZRRQVLWHFDU VSDFHVLQFOXGHG ,GHDOORFDWLRQIRURIIVKRUHEDQNWUXVWFRPSDQ\ ODZUPRURWKHUSURIHVVLRQV&RQWDFWZQHUDW 127,&( ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW 7,%25/7'1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV RIWKH'LVVROXWLRQRI7,%25/,0,7(' KDVEHHQFRPSOHWHG&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQKDV EHHQLVVXHGDQGWKH&RPSDQ\KDVWKHUHIRUHEHHQ VWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHU7KHGDWHRIFRPSOHWLRQRIWKH GLVVROXWLRQZDVWKHWK)HEUXDU\ 'DYLG-RXQFH /LTXLGDWRU ‘Mission’ set to lower $500m food imports FOODFORTHOUGHT: The second annual Bahamaas Agricultural, Marine Resources and Agribusiness Exp was opened by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham.

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE BAHAMAS is not alone in the world in having a dangerously low 2.5 per cent savings r ate, coupled with a rapidly depleting social security fund in the shape of the National Insurance Board, a Chamber of Comm erce seminar has revealed. According to the Chamber’s pension plan administrator, Cleora Farquharson, countries such as the US, which had a savings r ate in the 2008 second quarter of 2.7 per cent, and the UK, which had a 2009 first quarter savings rate projected at 1.1 per cent, a lso have massive shortfalls in their state-owned pension funds. Hailing the Chamber fund as the most affordable, benefit laden and progressive plan on the mar-k et, Ms Farquharson, a Fidelity executive, told prospective clients they should not wait for the Government to make it mandatory to h ave a pension plan, but should begin saving now. “According to their own study (NIB 2 001, the fund is projected to be depleted by 2029, and this phen omenon is not limited to the Bahamas,” Ms Farquharson said. Pension reform is the buzz word i n the international community. “In the United Kingdom, for example, it is estimated that about 12 million Britons are not s aving enough for their retirement. In the United States, their g uaranteed corporation is projecting roughly a $23 million s hortfall over the next 10 years. In China, their retiree numbers are expected to jump to about 100 million in 2020, and their current pension shortfall is estimated at $ 300 billion.” The Chgamber’s executive d irector, Philip Simon, said there had been overwhelming interest i n its pension plan since its inception last month, both from New Providence-based and Family Island companies. Representatives from several small and medium-sized businesses quizzed members of Roy alFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust, which manages and admini sters the investment contributions, on the benefits of their plan versus others.Ms Farquharson said the Chamber pension plan was open to both individuals and c ompanies. There were trustee services, she added, and it was portable, providing flexible investment options, administrat ive solutions and additional plan benefits. The client assets will be held in a private trust, separate from RoyalFidelity’s assets. We take protection of our c lients’ assets seriously,” Ms Farquharson said. “In the unfortunate event that RoyalFidelity becomes bankrupt, our creditors c annot touch your money to satisfy our debt obligations. This was just one of the many provisions we put in place to increase the l evel of competence that our clients have come to expect.” RoyalFidelity and Chamber executives reiterated that B ahamians were charged with taking responsibility for their own retirement security by saving for the future now. “Less than onet hird of all Bahamians have more t han $1,000 in their bank accounts, and this was really prior to the economic downturn,” said Ms Farquharson. The inform ation workshop was held to introduce the Chamber’s monthold pension plan to its members and to the general public. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 5B Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.M inimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 * $69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum f our persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory t axes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on s tandard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours p rior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM Bahamas not alone on low savings rate

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA website to focus on investingi n Grand Bahama, its newlyappointed president has announced. Ian Rolle said the launch of the new website, www.investg randbahama.com, was required because many business people do not initially equate the name, Grand Bahama Port Authority, with i nvestment. “The name Grand Bahama Port Authority is a misnomer. Business people do not init ially think investment when t hey hear Port Authority. In this regard, we have created t he website, which specifically c aters to investing on Grand Bahama,” he said. The website, which features s everal major investments on Grand Bahama, details the many competitive advantages, including the tax-free status, that have transformed Freeport into a major investment centre with a relativelyh igh standard of living. Inward investment into Freeport was somewhat s talled two years ago, when the Grand Bahama Port A uthority’s two principal s hareholders the Hayward family trust and late Edward St George’s estate became embroiled in a legal disputeo ver its ownership. That bitter legal fight has continued to this day. At that time, there were concerns that the behind-thescenes distractions at the Port Authority had created a climate of uncertainty inF reeport, discouraging potential investment and investors. Y et Freeport has since seen several major investments come to fruition, including the opening of Ross University, the Fenestration Glass Serv ices company, and the $900 million acquisition of BORCO, and its transformationi nto Vopak Terminal Bahamas. P P l l a a n n n n i i n n g g M r Rolle said a critical component in the continued i nternal development of any organisation lies in succession planning, which is an essen-t ial element for how the Port moves forward. We must also be transparent in our operations. There are things that we can and will do to improve transparency and accountability,” said Mr Rolle. H e added that the Port will relaunch the GBPA.com web site on April 1, to provide persons with a better under standing of “who we are, what w e do, and what we offer”. By the end of the year, he said GBPA.com will allowo nline payment, but for its launch the eServices compo nent of the site will allow users to get immediate responses to queries. “You will be able to downl oad restrictive covenants specific to your area. The licence fee schedule will also be availa ble online,” Mr Rolle added. Mr Rolle said business l icensees in good standing, and who have a website, will be allowed to have a link from gbpa.com. H e said the site will feature the Port’s latest news and developments. The Port Authority is also t aking a proactive approach to addressing the fundamental p roblems that affect progress i n Freeport. A major revitalization of downtown Freeport will get u nderway on April 1. Mr R olle explained that the proj ect will occur in three phases, h aving a major impact on the town centre and breathing n ew life into the once-popular native and tourist area. H e said a full-scale cleanup of the area will be cond ucted, with new landscaping, signage, benches, lighting and o ther aesthetically pleasing features. Mr Rolle stressed that vagrancy must be addressed i n order for the revitalisation project to be successful. Mr Rolle said one or two buildings for a Halfway House, to be operated by the Grand Bahama Christian Council, have been identified.T he Port will provide the building and water. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 127,&(77+(%/,&3/($6(%($'9,6('7+$7$//(&7,216 $1''(3$570(176 7+(38%/,& 75($685< 7+(%$+$0$6+$ 5(/2&$7('77+($1'(&21' )/2256)7+(%5,7,6+$0(5,&$1 ),$1&,$/&(175($5/%2528*+ 1$9
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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 7B H OUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGSVACANT PROPERTIES(401rown Allotm ents, Love Hill Settlement, Andros. Containing a two-storey res. A ppraised value: $100,000 (806) Lot #13, Block 4 of Coral Wa-terways, Section One, Coral Harbour, N ew Providence with two houses and a swimming pool, #312 N.P. bounded Northwardly by a canal o r waterway of the said Subdivision known as Flamingo waterway and running 102.004 ft. Eastwardly bylot #14 and 146.145ft Southwardly by a reservation for a private road. Appraised value: $530,000 (806Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with a parcel situated between Lot #1, Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom condominium – Sunset View Villas, W est Bay Street. Appraised value: $750,000 (433)Lot #27 of Village Allotment #14 i n the Eastern District, containing residence situated on Denver Street off Parkgate Road in the AnnsTown C onstituency, New Providence. Prop-erty size 2,500 sqft Building size 990 sqft. Appraised value: $50,000(400) Property situated in Calabash B ay on the Island of Andros. 75’ x 150’ and containing thereon a small grocery store 480 sqft. and an inc omplete 3 bed 2 bath house 900 sqft. Appraised value: $65,000 (301Lot #2 in block #8, Steward Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-s ion situated in Western District of N ew Providence, approx. size 8,800 sq. ft. with a split level containing two bed, two bath, living, dining & f amily rooms, kitchen and utility room – approx. size of building 2,658 sqft Appraised value: $322,752(702)Lot #20 with residential prop-erty located Skyline Heights. A ppraised value $280,000 ( 902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150 x 1 50 on Queens Highway just south of Palmetto Point with a two storey stone building containing two apartments. Each unit has 3 bed/2 1 /2 bath, kitchen, living room and 3 linen closets. Appraised value: $287,209(400)Lot #14 situated in the settle-ment of Love Hill on the Island of A ndros totalling 20,000 sqft Property contains a two storey 5 bedroom, 3 bathroom residence. A ppraised value: $185,000(105) Lot containing 2 storey bldg. w ith three bed, two and a half bath residence, and 30’ x 86’ situated Bai-l ey Town, North Bimini. Appraised value: $235,000 (902Lot containing commercial building housing a sports bar, res-taurant and a 2 storey commercial b uilding on Queens Highway Tarpum Bay Eleuthera. Appraised value: $180,000 (902Lot#31 situated at the inter-section of Albert & Victoria Streets in Hatchet Bay containing a 2 storey concrete building with an in-complete 2bed 1 bath apt and store downstairs. Property approx 2250 sq ft. Appraised value: $65,000(810) Description: Lot #60 Skyline L akes Subdivision approximately 13,000 square feet containing a split level residence about 10 years old. L iving space is approx 2,633 sq ft, with covered patios approx 480 sq ft, walkways & driveways approx 1 02 sq ft. Located on the ground oor is the garage, foyer, powder room, 2 bedrooms with closets, 1 c omplete bathroom, sunken living room, dining room, kitchen, play r oom & utility room. Located on the upper oor is the master bedroom & bathroom, walk-in closets & tiled b alcony. Appraised value: $453,000 ( 908)Lot# 23 located in the Subdi-vision of Spring City, Abaco. Containing a one storey house with 2 b ed/1 bath. Wooden structure. A ppraised value: $60,000(801 Lot #18 in Sandilands Allot-m ent on the western side of Cross-wind Road between Seabreeze Lane and Pineyard Road in the Eastern D istract of The Island of New Prov-idence-The Bahamas.,containing single storey private residence com-p rising the following: covered entry porch, living room, dining room, kitchen, laundry room, family room, s itting area, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom and patio. The total area of land is approximately 7,641 square feet. Appraised value: $289,426(801) Twoparcels of land containing 21,120 sq.ft. situated on the southern s ide of East Shirley Street and 100 feet west of its junction with Shirleain the Eastern District, New Provi-d ence. Situated thereon is a Gas Station and Auto Repair Shop. Appraised value: $799,497( 601) Lot #17 located Village Allot-ment with fourplex, Appraised value: $500,000 (902Property contains 9,660 sq, f t lot #17 Block Section A’ of the subdivision called Eleuthera Island Shores, three miles Northwest of H atchet Bay. On this site is a house that is six years old containing three bedrooms, 2 baths (one incompletel iving room, dining room, kitchen, utility room with a gross oor area of 1,217 sq.ft. Eleuthera Shores is a r esidential development. Appraised value $99,000.00(701)Lot of land having the number 16 in Block number 16 in Section Three of the Subdivision called and known as Sea Breeze Estates situated in the Eastern District of New Providence. Property contains a three bed, two bath residence. Appraised value: $277,000(701)Lot of land being lot number 11 in Block number 10 on a plan of a llotments laid out byVillage Estates Limited and led in the dept of Land & Surveys as number 142 N.P. and s ituated in the Eastern District of New Providence. Property contains three bed, two bath residence. A ppraised value: $165,000 ( 565) Lot # 1018 in Golden Gates Estates #2 Subdivision situate in the South Western District of the island o f New Providence Containing a sin-gle storey private residence 3 bed-room 2 bath. Property approx. size 6 ,000 sqft Building approx size 2,400 sqft Appraised value: $173,176 ( 205) Lot B 50 ft x 115.73 ft situ-a ted on the north side of Shell Fish Road, being the third lot west of FireTrail Road and east of Hamster Road w ith a one half duplex residential premises. Appraised value: TBA (808Lot # 3 Block 24 in the Cen-treville Subdivision . Building #109/Eastern side of Collins Avenue . C omprising commercial 2,800 sq ft commercial building. Appraised value: $582,000 (901Lot #32 containing 4 bedr oom 2bath concrete structure located Triana Shores Harbour Is-l and, Eleuthera. Property size 80’ x 120’ x 80’ 120 feet Appraised value: $332,735 (909)Lot# 22 with (5000 sqftrown Allotments located Dundas Town, A baco Containing a one storey house with 3 bed/1 bath – Wooden Struc-ture. Appraised value: $50,000 (908)Lot# 52 Crown Allotments lo-cated Murphy Town, Abaco. Contain-i ng a one storey house with 3 bed/2 bath – Concrete Block Structure – A ppraised value: $200,000(108)Lot #1 Block #6 Winton Heights S ubdivision Easter District, N P.The property is approximately 14,834 sq ft in total. Property contains a h ouse of 2963 sq ft. Appraised value: $433,000 ( 902) Parcel of land located on the south side of Dry Hill Road in Pal-metto Point containing 1.087 acres with partially started structure. Appraised value: $38,000(902) Property contains 23,125 sq ft lot #30 Lovers Hill Subdivision with two storey structure approximately 15 years old. House contains Three bedrooms, Two baths, living room, d ining room, t.v. room, kitchen, attic space and Double car garage with a gross oor area of 3,378 sq. ft. Lovers H ill is a residential development. Appraised value $254,154.00 ( 902) Property contains approx. 5,800 sq. ft. situated in North Pal-metto Point with a single storey con-c rete structure approx. 18 years old. House contains three bedrooms, t wo baths, living room, dining room and kitchen with a gross oor area of 1,444.26 sq. ft. Palmetto Point is a residential developed area. Appraised value $128,766.00 (101-N S ingel Family Residence-810 sqft, 2 bed,1 bath Lot # 3 Block #1 Eastville Subdivision East-e rn District, New Providence. A ppraised value: $65,000(910)Lot #12 Maderia Park, a small s ubdivision on the outskirts of Treas-ure Cay, Abaco having an area of 9,444 square feet residence contain-i ng a concrete block structure with asphalt shingle roof comprises of three bedrooms, two bathrooms, f amily room, living room, dining room, and kitchen. Appraised value: $147,000 (501Property situated on Will iams Lane off Kemp Road, New Providence, Bahamas containing a two-storey house and an apartment building consisting of 1800 s qft. Appraised value $100,000(501)All that piece of land being Par-cel #3 and Parcel #4 situated on the S outh side of Prince Charles Drive,New Providence, Bahamas contain-ing a commercial building housing t wo shop space on the ground oor and three shop space on the second oor with a large storage area in the r ear. Total area 8400 sqft. Appraised value: $366,650(501All that piece, parcel or land having an approximate area of 2100 s qft situated on the Western side of Blue Hill Road about 70 ft North of Peter Street and about 115 ft south o f Laird Street in the Southern Dis-trict of New Providence, Bahamas containing a commercial building h ousing a two bed/one bath unit on the top oor and a store on the rst oor. Appraised value: $154,000(501All that piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #39 in the Highbury Park Subdivision in the Eastern Dis-trict of New Providence, Bahamas containing a 3-bedroom/2-bathroom house. Appraised value: $131,000 ( 501) All that piece, parcel or lot of land situated on Cowpen Road (1000 ft east of the Faith Avenue Junc-t ion) in the Southern District of New Providence, Bahamas containing a duplex apartment comprising of t wo 2-bedroom/1-bathroom apart-ments. Appraised value: $150,000 ( 201) Lot of land situated on FireTrail Road being a partition of Glad-s ton Allot #41 New Providence, Ba-hamas containing townhouse apart-ment unit and two proposed units ( completed as is). Appraised value: $237,714 (800All that parcel or lot of land being Lots #10 and 11 in Block 29 of Coconut Grove Subdivision, con-t aining a shopping plaza. The lot is t rapezium in shape, 8,383 square feet. Appraised value $500,000( 560) Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-division, Russell Island, Spanish Wells. Property size 11,323 sqft, b uilding size 2236 sqft containing 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, an eat-in kitchen, dining room, laun-d ry room, covered porch, a one car garage, and a covered water tank. Appraised value: $299,000(901Trianna Shores containing 3 bed 2 bath front room, dining room, & kitchen. Concrete s tructure, 1926.40 sq. ft wooden deck 321.60 sq.ft. property 9600 sqft. Appraised value: $448,645(901K” Barrack Street, Harbour Island containing a 2 storey concrete b uilding with 4 bed 4 bath, dining room & kitchen -Building 2934.56 sqft property 6563 sqft. A ppraised value: $479,228OFFICERSPROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALEContact Account Ofcer listed below by using number code for each property.(9020.281 acre of vacant land off Queens Highway, Governors Harbour, Eleuthera. Appraised value: $31,320 ( 702) Undeveloped lots # 4A, 16, 17, 18 and 19 located Chapman Estates, West Bay. Appraised value: $348,000 (701Undeveloped lot #149. Seafan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivision. Grand Bahama, 18750 sqft. Appraised value: TBA(565) Vacant lot #5 located Eleuthera Island Shores, Seaside Drive Section B,Block #15, Eleuthera, Bahamas. 9,691 sqft, Appraised value: $27,620(402)Lot 89, Block 7 Aberdeen Drive,Bahamia West Replat Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama, consisting of 12,100 sqft. Appraised value: $51,000(800) Vacant property located Baha-mia South. Block 16 lot 9A, Freeport, Grand Bahama consisting of 24,829.20 sqft. Appraised value: $52,000(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sqftsituated in Mango Lane Section B” Block #15, Eleuthera Island Shores, Eleuthera. Appraised value: $50,189 (902Vacant lot of land situated i n South Palmetto Point, Eleuthera m easuring 97x127x82x121. Appraised value $38,000(909) Vacant residential Lot# 63 (7800 sqft) Crown Allotments located Mur-phy Town, Abaco. Appraised value: $18,000(908)Vacant residential Lot# 30 com-prising of 1.02 acre located Dundas Town, Abaco. Appraised value $20,000 (108Vacant Single Family Lot #5 Block #5 Unit #1 Devonshire Appraised value $30,000 (108Vacant canal lot #71 Silver Cove Court, Silver Cove Subdivision Zoned Tourist Commercial. Approximately 0.4 acre. Appraised value: $175,000 (802Vacant Commercial Lot No: 3A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision VI containing 3 acres located Freeport, Grand Bahama. Appraised value: $750,000 (108Vacant Single Family Lot #5 Block F Bahamia South Subdivision. Appraised value $35,700(569)Vacant property located in Sub-d ivision called Culmerville” being a portion of Lot #47 and a portion of Lot #57. Appraised value: $24,000 (569cel or lot of land situate in the settlement of James Cistern on the Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas measuring approx 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised value TBA (569All that piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 102 in the Sub-d ivision known as EXUMA HAR-BOUR” in the Island of Great Exuma measuring 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised value $20,000.00. (202) Vacant lot of land containing 41,164 sqft, Lot #8, Love Estate, Phase 1, 2,300 ft. south of West Bay Street, Western District, New Providence. Appraised value $165,000(202) Vacant lot of land containing 1.786 acre, situated east of Knowles Drive, approximately 1,420 ft. south-ward of Harold Road in the western district of New Providence, Bahamas. Appraised value: $ 170,000 (501Vacant property consisting o f Lot #894 situated in the Freepo rt Ridge Subdivision, Section #1, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas. Appraised value: TBA (501Ten (10es of land situ-ated on Woods Cay, known as Little Abaco, between CoopersTown and Cedar Harbour in Abaco, Bahamas. The property is undeveloped with a view of the sea from both the North and South side. Appraised value: $1,078,750 (569All that piece parcel or lot of land Lot # 977, Pinewood Gardens Subdivision, Southern District, New Providence. Appraised value: TBA. (201)Lot No. 11703 Bahama Sound Subd. Number 11 West, Great Exuma. Size: approx. 10,000 sqft. Appraised value: TBA. (201)Lot No. 11698 Bahama Sound Subd. # 11 West, Great Exuma. Size: approx. 10,000sqft. Appraised value: TBA. (201Lot No. 10 Southeast Cor-ner of Mandarin Drive, Sugar Apple Road, Sans Souci Subdivision. Size: 14,368sqft. Appraised value: TBA. (008cel of lot and l and on the Island of Great Exuma sit-uated about 10 1/2 miles Northwest-wardly of George Town which said piece parcel or lot of land is #10750 Bahama Sound O.A.E. 10,900 sqft. Appraised value: $65,000 (008All that piece parcel or lot of land designated as Lot Number 563 on a plan of a Subdivision called or known as Bahama Highlands #4. 11,223.41 sqft. Appraised value: $87,000(008cel or lot land being Lot # 12032 in the Bahama Sound of Exuma Subdivision # 11 West, Great Exuma, Bahamas. Appraised value: $224,000(008) Aparcel of land situate about the eastern portion of The Forest Estate in the vicinity of the settlements of Southside and The Forest being Lot # 4803 in Bahama Sound of Exuma 6, Exuma The Bahamas. Appraised value $25,000COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE Tel: 242-356-8568 (800. Monique Crawford (801. Jerome Pinder (802. Brian Knowles (805. Tiffany Simms O’brien (806. Lois Hollis (807. Lester Cox (808. DaShann Clare-Paul (810iss LaPaige Gardiner PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or 242-302-3800 (201. Nicola Walker (202. Robert Pantry (205. Anya Major NASSAU MAIN BRANCH Tel: 242-322-8700 (701. James Strachan (702. Antonio Eyma (301. Thyra Johnson (304. Alicia Thompson MACKEY STREETBRANCH Tel: 242-393-3097 (601. Cherelle Martinborough JOHN F. KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH Tel: 242-325-4711 (401. Renea Walkine (402. Chandra Gilbert PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE Tel: 242-393-7505/8 (501. Keith Lloyd (505. Patricia Russell CABLE BEACH BRANCH Tel: 242-327-6077 (466. Winnifred Roberts LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180 (716. Ingrid Simon (717. Nancy Swaby (723. Deidre King (724. Faye Higgs (725. Marguerite Johnson (565. Catherine Davis (569. Vanessa Scott NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT Tel: 242-377-7179 (433. Suzette Hall-Moss LYFORD CAYBRANCH Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037 (101-N. Lindsey Peterson GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA Tel: 242-332-2856/8 (902. Nicole Evans HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH Tel:242-333-2230 (901. Velderine Laroda ANDROS TOWN BRANCH Tel: 242-368-2071 (400. Rose Bethel MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO Tel: 242-367-2420 (908. Joyce Riviere (909. Sylvia Poitier (910iss Cyprianna Williams BIMINI BRANCH Tel:242-347-3031 (105iss. Ganiatu Tinubu GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND Tel: 242-337-0101 (100. Lucy Wells EXUMA BRANCH Tel: 242-336-3251 (008. Jocyelyn Mackey FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH Tel: 242-352-6631/2 (101-F. Garnell Frith (102. Elaine Collie (103. Damita Newbold-Cartwright (108. Sylvie Carey SPANISH WELLS Tel: 242-333-4131 or 242-333-4145 (560. Walter Carey f orced that it had to be “more than business as usual”, it had failed to focus on the areas where a stimulus was most needed. A dding that the Bahamas’ national debt-to-GDP ratio was already likely to have passed the 40 per cent threshold, above w hich its sovereign credit rating m ay come under pressure, Mr Smith expressed concern over whether the largest spending item in the 2009-2010 Budget might bed ebt redemption/principal repayment costs. With the Government and its fiscal position facing some “strong h eadwinds”, Mr Smith told Trib une Business: “What we want to avoid is debt servicing items becoming the largest item in the Budget, because if that happens,w e will really be headed down the road of the third world.” To ensure the Bahamas had access to an emergency line of f oreign currency if it needed, Mr S mith suggested that had he been in office he would have opened talks with the International Monetary Fund (IMFt o a stand-by line of credit. This, he added, would be especially important if all other sources of foreign currency f inancing dried up, particularly since other countries might be c ompeting for the same facilities. And if the Bahamas’ credit ratingw as impacted by the current glob al economic downturn, it might n ot be able to borrow from the capital and credit markets at the favourable interest rates it had previously enjoyed. “I would have had some chats w ith the IMF for a stand-by facility, in case all the other countriesi n the region are lining up,” Mr Smith said. “They’re going to n eed some stand-by foreign currency to fall back on if this thing goes on for a long time, and we do not get enough foreign currency to support imports. “You’ve got to explore all of the options open to you and jugg le interest rates. The important thing, in a Bahamian context andi n a foreign exchange rate regime, is to get foreign currency inflows a nd stabilize the currency, because the last thing you want is a run on the dollar.” While there had been “insuffi cient details” in the mid-year B udget statement to allow for a thorough analysis of the Govern-m ent’s proposed stimulus package, Mr Smith said it appeared t o be primarily focused on boost ing the construction sector through the construction of roads, public buildings, schools, docks and such like. That’s almost the capital budget,” the former minister said, a nd while not wanting to diminish the impact spending in the cons truction industry would have, added that the sector was esti mated to account for only 10 per cent of per annum gross domestic product (GDP M r Smith added that efforts to boost the construction industry w ould assist domestic demand, but the demand that the Bahamas really wanted to stimulate was outside the Bahamas, primarilyi n the shape of tourists. While not wanting to “second guess” the Ministry of Tourism’s promotional plans, Mr Smith said: “We have to take a page out of the books of retailers. The one item they don’t cut back on is advertising because they want people to keep spending. Tourism is similar to a retail outlet, and while there is a recession in the US, people are still travelling to Jamaica, Belize and Florida.” The former minister said it was vital to stimulate tourism demand for Bahamas vacations, and visi tor spending, given that this would be the prime source of foreign currency inflows with foreign direct investment depressed. To this end, he suggested expanding the tourism marketing budget, and focusing on areas less hit by the recession, such as Canada, whose cities were a similar flight time from the Bahamas’ core US east coast market. “From a more general perspective, we do not want to stim ulate local demand so much, which is why this is a bit misguided. Not to ignore the issue, but while we’re doing that, I think resources are more appropriately used to stimulate demand from outside,” Mr Smith said of the Government’s plans. “The demand we want to stimulate is demand from the outside, for travel. While it’s important to have local demand, Bahamian dollars are less important than US dollars.” This would repre sent the best way of mitigating the global economic downturn’s impact on the Bahamas, Mr Smith said, backing the Ministry of Tourism’s plans to reduce airlift and airfare costs coming into the Bahamas. Tourism, after all, was the Bahamas’ largest industry, accounting for most employ ment and economic activity. He added: “We need a continuous inflow of foreign currency to sta bilize the Bahamian dollar and finance import needs, even in the case of the stimulus package. We import all we consume, so we ultimately want to have the objec tive of increasing foreign curren cy inflows on the recurrent side through tourism expenditure. Stimulus focus F ROM page 1B

PAGE 23

and inability to obtain debt financing without it being government guaranteed, on the tariff rate cuts he had introduced. The former government administration directed BEC to reduce the tariffs,” Mr Gottlieb said in an interview with Tribune Business, which was published last week. “It had the effect of sucki ng $18 million of revenue away per year, and that’s u nfortunate. Because up until then, BEC was in position to have the necessary economic ratings to get financing for its capital projects. That was sig-n ificantly undermined.” But BEC’s annual report for its financial year that ended on September 30, 2004, showed that despite the$ 16.246 million less that the C orporation earned from electricity sales as a result of the tariff cut, it still generated a2 7.08 per cent increase in net profitability – from $11.143 million in 2003 to $14.16 mil-l ion the following year. “In the 2004 annual report, w e reduced costs by as much a s $28 million and gave away $16 million,” Mr Jarrett told Tribune Business. Referring to Mr Gottlieb’s c omments about the impact of the base tariff cuts, he replied: “If one wants to make that case, how do you explain that there was a majori ncrease in net profitability the y ear I gave the reduction? 2004 was BEC’s best year in terms of cost effectiveness ande fficiency. If we’d taken back the tariff cut we’d given, profits would have been $31 mil-l ion. “I make no apologies for t he rate reduction. It was the r ight thing to do then, and it’s still the right thing to do. I was pleased to do it. I did it for the Bahamian people, who deserve it. “They’ve sacrificed so much w ith the rates and Customs d uty.” Mr Jarrett said Mr Gottlieb’s comments “don’t pano ut on the evidence”, adding that BEC’s ongoing problems s temmed from its own internal efficiencies, low workforce productivity, maintenancei ssues and the need for better management, not to mention the rapid increase in global oil prices that last July peaked at $147 million per barrel. T he former BEC chairman said BEC’s financial position was also partly attributable tot he 10 per cent Customs duty rate that the Ministry of F inance, in 1994 under the first Ingraham administration, imposed on the Corporation’so il imports. That duty rate has currently been removed as a r esult of the two-year payment moratorium announced in the 2008-2009 Budget. P P a a p p e e r r A December 6, 2004, Cabi net paper presented to the former Christie administration,s aid the decision to impose the 10 per cent Customs duty rate had been taken without con s ultation with BEC manage ment. I ts effect had been to cre ate “an unbearable 17 per cent rate” for BEC to pay on itso il imports, when added to the 7 per cent Stamp Duty it was a lready paying. The paper said: “Although the 7 per cent Stamp Tax ise ventually recoverable, the 10 per cent is not passed on to t he public and has a negative effect on the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s financial performance and working capi tal position. “The carrying cost of the 10 per cent duty, which has notb een passed on to the customers in the surcharge, as w ell as the additional cost of $16.2 million associated with the ‘true up’ formula used dur-i ng the fiscal year have also created a burden of at least 2 5 per cent of customers’ usage of electricity borne by BEC during the year We are therefore recommending the elimination of this customs duty of 10 perc ent pro-rated over a threeyear period by 3.3 per cent to p ut the Corporation in a position to raise all funds independently on the strength ofi ts balance sheet perfor mance.” M r Jarrett added: “BEC was able to generate enough revenue to live with that upu ntil 2004, 2005, when rising global oil prices exposed the folly of the FNM government.” The current Ingraham a dministration appears to share similar views, given the two-year moratorium it has imposed to enable BEC to restructure and sort out its bal a nce sheet without having to pay taxes worth 17 per cent of its fuel imports’ value. The Government has also continued with another policy proposed in that 2004 Cabi-n et paper, namely writing off taxes and import duties owed by BEC against the unpaid electricity receivables owed to the Corporation by other gov-e rnment ministries, agencies a nd departments. S S c c a a p p e e g g o o a a t t Given this, Mr Jarrett said he feared the current govern-m ent was seeking to “demonise” and scapegoat h imself, and all that had been done at BEC under the Christie administration, to jus-t ify what it was doing now despite the fact they had adopted many of the samep olicies and plans. “They’re piggybacking on what I did, and the value of t hat,” Mr Jarrett added. “They’ve brought no new ideas to BEC. All they’red oing is piggybacking on what I did and putting a new face o n it.” On the customs duty situation, the 2004 Cabinet papern oted: “Further exacerbating this problem is the high cost of government receivables ($45.5m illion at fiscal year 2004) which is not being systematic ally reduced by government from the fixed monthly paym ents of $700,000, compared to average monthly billings of $900,000 for usage by theG overnment and its depen dent agencies.” M r Jarrett told Tribune Business that accounts receiv ables stood at $104 million w hen he entered BEC back in June 2002. To deal with that, the December 2004 Cabinet paper had suggested offsetting the$ 45.5 million in government receivables owed to BEC with the $28.5 million in customs duties owed by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f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t/DZRI3URSHUW\$FW 7(506 7HQSHUFHQWRIWKHSXUFKDVH SULFHDWWKHWLPHRIFRQWUDFWDQGWKHE DODQFHXSRQFRPSOHWLRQZLWKLQ 6L[W\GD\VRIFRQWUDFW 7 KLVVDOHLVVXEMHFWWRDUHVHUYHSULFH7KH&RPSDQ\ UHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\DQGDOORIIHUV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVPD\VXEPLWZULWWHQRIIHUV DGGUHVVHGWR([SRFUHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQFR0DQDJLQJ3 DUWQHU32%R[1DVVDX%DKDPDVWREH UHFHLYHGQRODWHUWKDQWKHFORVHRIEXVLQHVVRQWKHWKGD\RI0DUFK Ex-BEC chair accuses Government of trying to 'demonise' his efforts FROM page 1B “I make no apologies for the rate reduction. It was the rightt hing to do then, and it’s still the right thing to do. I was pleased to do it. I did it for the Bahamian people, who deserve it. They’ve sacrificed so much with the rates and Customs duty.”

PAGE 24

tune of $1 million in its 2008 financial year, compared to a $13.035 million hand-out giv-en the year before. R educing the Airport Authority’s drain on the T reasury is understood to have been a key component i n the 10-year management contract handed to YVRAS, which has a deadline byw hen it must make the airport profitable. YVRAS e arned $844,902 in management fees during 2008. Since its incorporation in 2 000, the Airport Authority has been another financial b urden for the taxpayer and the Government, its accumulated deficit – total losses –a fter eight years in existence standing at $45.164 million. For 2008, the commercial expertise YVRAS has brought to bear on NADa nd the Airport Authority was already starting to show through, with revenues fromt erminal leases and retail concessions, refueling royalt ies, car parking and advertising all above 2007 levels. Yet apart from the passenger facility fee, all aeronautical revenues – landing fees,b aggage claim fees, loading bridges and aircraft parking fees – were behind prior year comparatives. F rom a balance sheet pers pective, the main activity in 2008 was the refinancing of a $65 million bridging loan provided by a lending syndicate of banks. That refinancing, completed inN ovember 2007, rescheduled the Airport Authority’s debt f rom short to long-term, as a s yndicate stepped forward with an $80 million term l oan that is payable within seven years. R R e e p p l l a a c c e e d d That term loan is itself b eing replaced by the $80 million participating debt facility that forms the thirdt ranche of the $310 million financing round for LPIA’s first phase redevelopment. Some $50 million of the $80 million required is being putu p by the Government. But, as a requirement of the initial $80 million terml oan, the financial statements said the Airport Authority h ad “established a restricted debt service reserve account with Citibank, New York”. That account’s balance stood at $5.3 million as at June 30,2 008. And, to manage interest costs, NAD has set a policy that it will keep per cento f its borrowings at fixed r ates of interest”, a target it was in compliance with at June 30, 2008. As at year-end 2008, the sums owed by the Airport Authority to the NationalI nsurance Board (NIB more than tripled to $61,341, c ompared to $17,486 the y ear before. A $1.543 million payable w as also owed to the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC A lso on the balance sheet i s a more than-$20 million advance from the Ministry of Finance which, during 2006, gave $2.5 million to help set up NAD. A further $17.994 million was advanced by theM inistry to help purchase security equipment and e nhance security measures. N o interest was attached to these advances, and no m aturity date specified. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 9B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.411.410.000.0700.00020.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.3190.26021.93.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.2550.24011.11.72%3 .142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.001890.1180.04024.01.41% 7 .904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.776.770.000.4380.05015.50.74% 5.001.78Consolidated Water BDRs1.711.730.020.1110.05215.63.01% 3.002.27Doctor's Hospital2.402.400.000.2400.04010.01.67% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.007000.5420.52020.34.73% 1 4.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6820.40015.33.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.005.000.001,0000.3370.15014.83.00% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref6.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 14.0014.00Bahamas Supermarkets11.2312.0414.00-0.0410.300N/M2.67% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.9230-0.58-2.54 1.43761.3773Colina Money Market Fund1.43760.284.38 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 817.88 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSFRIDAY, 27 FEBRUARY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.48 | CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -42.88 | YTD % -2.50BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 31-Jan-09 23-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 127,&( 127,&( 127,&( Airport Authority's loss slashed 76.4% F ROM page 1B

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In a separate development, it has been confirmed to Tri-b une Business by sources familiar with the situation that the net income presented by Family Guardian’s parent, BISX-listed FamGuard Cor-p oration, was “overstated” during the first three quarters of 2008 due to an accounting error since picked up. But there is nothing to suggest that Ms Greene’s departure is linked to this, or thats he was directly responsible in any way. The financial statements impacted, this newspaper understands, are the threei nterim reports presented to shareholders for the nine months to September 30, 2008. It is unclear what the accounting error was, or itsm agnitude, but the reports presented to shareholders last year were unaudited, meaning they had not been scrutinized or approved by FamGuard’s external auditors. The error was picked up i nternally and rectified during the 2008 fourth quarter, Trib une Business understands, and FamGuard’s year-end results will not be impactedb y it. The insurer’s 2008 performance is said to have still b een profitable. Shareholders are only likely to see the changes when thec ompany starts publishing its quarterly results for fiscal 2009, as the 2008 comparativesw ould have to be restated. “It all happened in 12 months,” one source told Tribune Business. “There was nof raud. There was nothing dishonest that went on. It was just an unfortunate mistake. “Publicly traded companies of this size, in this country, arer elatively small, and if you make an accounting error it tends to be material.” Reiterating that the accounts impacted were unau-d ited management accounts, the source said the three quarterly statements issued by FamGuard last year were not subject to the same level of scrutiny as year-end accounts examined by external audi-t ors. U U n n a a u u d d i i t t e e d d For the nine months to September 30, 2008, Fam-G uard’s unaudited accounts showed the company had generated a net profit of $5.22m illion, compared to $6.527 million in net income for the y ear before. A major factor behind the more than-$1 million swing was a $2.14 million reversal on FamGuard’s paperg ains/losses from its various i nvestments in equities, a $1.368 million gain for the first n ine months of 2007 comp ared to a $736,724 loss last year due to the stock market s lide. When contacted by Tribune Business, Ms Hermannsd eclined to comment on whether FamGuard’s interim f inancial statements issued in 2008 had overstated net income. She said the compa-n y was currently undergoing its year-end 2008 audit, and b ecause it was in a closed period, she did not want to make any comments on its financialp erformance. “We are currently finishing o ur audit for 2008. That is being finalised as we speak, so until that is done I don’tw ant to make any comment,” Ms Hermanns said. When pressed on the overstatement/accounting error issue, she replied: “I can’t speak specifically to that at t his point. With financial state ments, we have to be careful h ow we present that, and I do not want to make sweeping statements without a fullr eview from the auditors. I c annot speak without having the benefit of the audit being c ompleted We’re not aware o f any substantial variations in our financials. We will review our financials once the audit is completed, and that should be thism onth. We anticipate that being at the end of March, and t hen we will provide full access. Everything will be clear, with full transparency.” M s Hermanns did, though, say the major difference b etween FamGuard’s 2008 and 2007 financial performances was the paperg ain/loss on its equity investments, which are described as changes in unrealized appreciation of equity investments’. “The most significant c hange to our financial statements that we anticipate over the prior year is the swing in equities,” she added. “Obviously, our equities were way down compared to the prior y ear. That will be the biggest change in our financial statem ents.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE +(/3:$17(' 127,&( 3OHDVHEHDGYLVHGWKDHIIHFWLY0DUF % HWW\$JHQFLHVZLOOUHVXPHLWVUHJXODUWZLFH ZHHNOVHUYLFHIURP0LDPL)ORULGDWR1DVVDX6 FKHGXOH 'HSDUWVLDPLRQRQGD\ $ UULYHVLQDVVDXRQXHVGD\ ' HSDUWVLDPLRQ:HGQHVGD\ $UULYHVLQDVVDXRQKXUVGD\1DVVDX (DVWWRUWK.HOO\V'RFN 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV RXWKLYHU'ULYH /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-DQXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-DQXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG GD\RI7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-DQXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI2FWREHU7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-DQXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV FamGuard's finance head in resignation FROM page 1B “It all happened in 12 months. There was no fraud. There was nothing dishonest that went on. It was just an unfortunate mistake. Publicly traded companies of this size, in this country, are relatively small, and if you make an accounting error it tends to be material.”

PAGE 26

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 11B 7KH$QJOLFDQ&HQWUDO(GXFDWLRQ$XWKRULW\LQYLWHVDSSOLFDWLRQVIURP T XDOLHGLQGLYLGXDOVIRUWKHSRVLWLRQRI35,1&,3-RKQ&ROOHJH E HJLQQLQJHSWHPEHU 7 KHDSSOLFDQWPXVWKDYH0DVWHUV'HJUHHLQ(GXFDWLRQIURPUHFRJQL]HG 8 QLYHUVLW\ZLWKDWOHDVW\HDUVDFFXPXODWLYHDGPLQLVWUDWLYHH[SHULHQFH7KH DSSOLFDQWPXVWDOVREHFRPSXWHUOLWHUDWH . 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Numerous other projects, includingt he Ritz-Carlton Rose Island, Royal Island, Ginn sur mer and Rum Cay Resort Marina,h ave all been impacted to some degree by the immense d ifficulty – if not impossibility – of obtaining debt financing at reasonable cost and terms. A s for Chub Cay, the receiver’s appointment comes a s little surprise. T ribune Business had been told that the project’s Homeowners Asso-c iation had been locked in last-ditch talks with Scotiab ank (Bahamas bank’s foreclosure plan when it reported last month thats ome 20 per cent of the 50 fulltime operational staff were laid-off. Those talks seemingly failed to produce a solution. Scotiabank (Bahamas l aunched a legal action against its three main principals – Kaye Pearson, Walt McCrory and Bob Moss – in the US District Court for the southernd istrict of Florida just before Christmas 2008, alleging that t hey had defaulted on the repayment of a $45 million loan. T he bank alleged that the trio had guaranteed the financing for the development of vacation residences, a marina, a clubhouse andr elated improvements for more than 800 acres on Chub Cay in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas”. As a result, it has been seeking to call in the $4 million loan guarantee proffered by Messrs McCrory, Pearson and Moss. In its lawsuit, Scotiabank (Bahamas trio owed $44.010 million in unpaid principal on the July 28, 2006, loan, plus interest, cost and expenses, including attorneys’ fees. D D e e a a d d l l i i n n e e The bank also alleged that t he three developer principals had guaranteed that construction work on Chub Cay would b e completed by December 31, 2007, a deadline that had b een missed. Some $38.6 million worth of work, Scotiabank (Bahamas needed to be done to bring the project to completion. “They’re [the developers] still looking for an investor partner, and right now the Homeowners Association are funding the operational expenses” of the resort and m arina, one source had told Tribune Business of the situation at Rum Cay. “Negotiations are still ongoing.” That new equity partner at one stage looked like being Dutch-based real estate and resort developer, La Perla International Living, which has developed resort and residential communities in nations i ncluding Antigua, Panama, S pain, France and Vietnam. H owever, talks between the two sides were said to have broken down more than a month ago. In their response to Scotiabank (Bahamas suit, Mr McCrory and Mr M oss, while admitting the loan default, denied they were responsible for paying the $4 million guarantee as the bank had already been able to call this in via a previously pledged s tand-by credit facility. T he duo also alleged that Bahamian law firm, Graham,T hompson & Co, had failed to protect their interests in talks with Scotiabank (Bahamas Freeport office had repre-s ented themselves, the Nass au office acted for the bank. T here is nothing to suggest that Graham, Thompson & Co, and its partners, attorneys, associates and staff, have done a nything wrong in relation to the affair, and they are not named as defendants in rela-t ion to the Chub Cay dispute. A part from Scotiabank (Bahamas financiers, Chub Cay’s woesh ave also impacted Bahamian contractors engaged on the p roject’s construction. Tribune Business previously reported that Osprey Developers and Gunite Pools had obtained separate default judgments worth a total $468,000 against the development over alleged ly unpaid bills. The whole episode again i llustrates the potential dam age that could be done to the Bahamas’ tourism and eco nomic reputation by unfin i shed resort developments, especially in instances where developers allegedly leave unpaid bills and debts. Scotiabank appoints receiver for resort F ROM page 1B

PAGE 27

A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN T IGER C lose together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 1 2 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 1 9 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 2 9 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 D own 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 1 0 Set sail on Eastern p assage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 1 2 Encouraging applause? (8 1 3 German city shows u nusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being h umble (7 1 9 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing d iplomacy in studies (8 2 7 Questions are asked when s uch a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 2 9 Formerly in older style (4 3 0 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be a ngered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react r ashly with unusual i ll-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 2 0 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra m oney (5 2 5 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 A cross:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionA cross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 2345678 9 1 011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 1 2345678 9 1 011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1 011 1213 14 15161718 192021 2 2232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1 011 1213 14 15161718 192021 2 2232425 26 2728 2930 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u T a R gT E Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1 011 1213 14 15161718 1 92021 22232425 26 2728 2 930 12345678 9 1 011 1213 14 15161718 1 92021 22232425 26 2728 2 930Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a BY STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1 2345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 2 2232425 26 2728 2930 1 2345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 2 2232425 26 2728 2930 T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 39F/4C Low: 41F/5C Low: 44F/7C Low: 46 F/8C Low: 49F/9C Low: 57F/14C Low: 60 F/16C Low: 55F/13C High: 61F/16C High: 59F/15C High: 68 F/20C High: 68F/20C High: 69F/21C High: 65 F/18 High: 73F/23C Low: 60F/16C High: 67 F/19C Low: 60 F/16 High: 80 F/27CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 60F/16C High: 81F/27C Low: 62 F/17C High: 80F/27C Low: 58 F/14C High: 79F/26C Low: 61 F/16C High: 81F/27C Low: 65F/18C High: 83 F/28C Low: 61F/16C High: 80 F/27C Low: 68 F/20C High: 82F/28C Low: 71F/22C High: 82F/28C Low: 60 F/16C High: 79F/26C High: 66F/19CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2ND, 2009, PAGE 15BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Partly sunny. Breezy early; otherwise, clear. Beautiful with sunshine. Partly sunny. Partly sunny. High: 73 Low: 60 High: 72 High: 75 High: 77 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Clouds and sun; breezy, pleasant. High: 81 Low: 63 Low: 65 Low: 69 AccuWeather RealFeel 65F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 60F 70-63F 73-62F 75-65F 82-67F Low: 69 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 79F/26C Low .................................................... 70F/21C Normal high ...................................... 78F/26C Normal low ........................................ 65F/18C Last year's high .................................. 81F/27C Last year's low .................................. 70F/21C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.69"Normal year to date ......................................3.49" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU First Full Last New Mar . 4 Mar . 10 Mar . 18 Mar . 26 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:32 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:13 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 9:48 a.m. Moonset . . . . 11:54 p.m. Today T uesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 11:14 a.m.2.35:16 a.m.0.1 11:45 p.m.2.85:16 p.m.-0.1 12:10 p.m.2.26:14 a.m.0.2 -----6:13 p.m.0.0 12:49 a.m.2.77:21 a.m.0.3 1:15 p.m. 2.17:19 p.m.0.0 2:00 a.m. 2.78:32 a.m.0.3 2:28 p.m. 2.2 8:32 p.m.0.0 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 88/3171/21s88/3172/22s Amsterdam49/939/3c47/838/3pc Ankara, Turkey39/330/-1sn46/729/-1sn Athens58/1454/12pc64/1754/12pc Auckland72/2262/16s72/2257/13s Bangkok91/3279/26pc93/3379/26pc Barbados84/2875/23pc85/2974/23s Barcelona58/1447/8pc54/1245/7c Beijing39/328/-2pc45/730/-1pc Beirut57/1348/8pc62/1657/13sh Belgrade54/1244/6c56/1345/7c Berlin47/836/2sh44/633/0c Bermuda 72/2260/15sh64/1755/12c Bogota65/1846/7t65/1847/8r Brussels48/833/0c47/837/2s Budapest46/740/4sh45/741/5cBuenos Aires 90/3273/22pc86/3068/20t Cairo66/1846/7pc72/2255/12s Calcutta 90/3266/18s93/3375/23s Calgar y47/825/-3pc44/626/-3pc Cancun80/2652/11c80/2658/14pc Caracas83/2869/20pc84/2870/21pcCasablanca 64/17 50/10 c 61/1648/8sh Copenhagen 43/638/3sn41/539/3r Dublin48/837/2sh45/736/2rFrankfurt 47/8 40/4sh52/1137/2pc Geneva48/843/6sh44/633/0c Halifax45/741/5sn42/515/-9snHavana 73/22 47/8 pc72/2252/11s Helsinki30/-121/-6pc30/-127/-2sn Hong Kong 73/2266/18sh77/2568/20pc Islamabad75/2356/13pc83/2853/11c Istanbul51/1044/6r50/1047/8shJerusalem 51/1045/7r54/1244/6sh Johannesburg 71/21 56/13t76/2455/12t Kingston 83/28 73/22sh82/2772/22sh Lima85/2966/18c85/2968/20c London 50/10 39/3 pc48/845/7sh Madrid57/1339/3sh50/1036/2pc Manila86/3073/22pc86/3075/23sh Mexico City76/2439/3s81/2741/5s Monterrey75/2359/15s89/3163/17sMontreal 13/-102/-16sn13/-104/-15c Moscow 29/-119/-7sf27/-219/-7sf Munich45/740/4sh41/533/0c Nairobi87/3056/13pc89/3156/13s New Delhi90/3254/12s95/3559/15s Oslo 32/028/-2c38/328/-2sf Paris 49/935/1pc48/841/5s Prague43/639/3sh42/536/2c Rio de Janeiro92/3378/25s90/3277/25pc Riyadh72/2245/7s70/2152/11pc Rome59/1547/8sh57/1352/11r St. Thomas 82/27 73/22sh83/2874/23pc San Juan100/3770/21s89/3164/17t San Salvador93/3371/21s94/3471/21s Santiago82/2750/10s78/2550/10pc Santo Domingo83/2868/20s82/2769/20c Sao Paulo93/3368/20pc90/3268/20pc Seoul 48/832/0s48/832/0c Stockholm34/130/-1sn36/232/0c Sydney77/2563/17pc81/2768/20pc T aipei 75/23 65/18c72/2265/18sh Tokyo48/839/3pc50/1041/5r Toronto16/-86/-14pc23/-514/-10s Trinidad88/3176/24r89/3175/23r Vancouver49/942/5sh48/840/4cVienna 48/8 45/7sh50/1045/7r Warsaw38/330/-1pc38/337/2r Winnipeg19/-76/-14sn27/-215/-9sn HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayTuesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SSE at 10-20 Knots3-5 Feet7-10 Miles74F Tuesday:NW at 15-30 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:SSW at 12-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles74F Tuesday:NW at 15-30 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:SSW at 15-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-8 Miles74F Tuesday:NW at 15-30 Knots6-10 Feet7-10 Miles75F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 73/2243/6s71/2144/6pc Anchorage18/-710/-12s27/-217/-8sf Atlanta 38/3 23/-5s50/1030/-1s Atlantic City28/-213/-10sn29/-116/-8pc Baltimore27/-213/-10sn32/016/-8sBoston 34/1 16/-8sn27/-215/-9sn Buffalo15/-98/-13sf22/-517/-8s Charleston, SC45/723/-5pc53/1126/-3s Chicago28/-211/-11pc36/226/-3pcCleveland 21/-6 11/-11s27/-216/-8s Dallas60/1540/4s72/2255/12pc Denver70/2138/3pc71/2136/2pc Detroit24/-413/-10pc32/018/-7s Honolulu79/2668/20s80/2667/19pcHouston 64/17 42/5 s72/2256/13pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayTuesday T odayTuesday T odayTuesday Indianapolis 34/111/-11s43/623/-5s Jacksonville53/1130/-1s56/1333/0s Kansas City 40/4 22/-5pc45/736/2pc Las Vegas74/2350/10pc73/2250/10pc Little Rock48/827/-2s53/1139/3pcLos Angeles 70/21 56/13c67/1954/12pc Louisville37/220/-6s44/626/-3s Memphis44/626/-3s53/1139/3pc Miami69/2046/7s70/2154/12s Minneapolis 24/-4 11/-11pc31/019/-7c Nashville37/217/-8s46/730/-1s New Orleans54/1239/3s60/1548/8s New York26/-314/-10sn25/-318/-7pc Oklahoma City58/1436/2pc65/1845/7pc Orlando 61/16 36/2 s65/1842/5s Philadelphia27/-213/-10sn26/-315/-9pc Phoenix89/3159/15s83/2859/15pc Pittsburgh24/-412/-11s30/-114/-10s Portland, OR55/1240/4sh50/1037/2c Raleigh-Durham 33/015/-9sn38/317/-8s St. Louis35/120/-6pc46/733/0pcSalt Lake City 55/1238/3c58/1438/3pc San Antonio 70/21 47/8 s76/2457/13s San Diego68/2058/14pc66/1854/12pc San Francisco61/1651/10sh58/1446/7rSeattle 53/1140/4sh52/1139/3c T allahassee 56/1327/-2s60/1526/-3s Tampa59/1537/2s62/1644/6s Tucson88/3153/11s85/2954/12pc Washington, DC29/-119/-7sn36/222/-5s UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuWeather.com

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Y OUR argument regarding university degrees has some m erit, as I can testify as one w ho has experienced it from b oth ends of the spectrum. Having entered the work m arket in the 1960s, when less t han five per cent of the UK’s population went to college, I was never given the opportu nity to see a university degreeas a realistic option. I didn’t even consider it at the time. Like most of my generation, I entered my profession (accountancy old, after taking the then stand ard three advanced level GCE (General Certificate of E ducation) subjects, which was regarded as the “gold standard” for having had a s ound basic education. I signed articles with a small p rovincial accountancy firm and learned my profession “at t he knee of a master” as y ou put it while being paid a pittance during training. W hatever the limitations of this system, it taught me e verything I needed to know about becoming a practising accountant. Much of the work w as routine, boring even, but it showed me all I needed tok now about providing accoun t ancy services to an accept able standard while observing all the ethical considerationsof such a position. When my e xaminations came around, I was able to pass, if not with flying colours, at least witha dequate marks, so I was able to “qualify” while earning a living, albeit a very humble one. S ome of my fellow trainees, w orking with other bigger and more prestigious firms, actually paid their employers (ora t least their parents did) for the privilege of being taught the business. The sums paid w ere considerably less than t he fees and living expenses o ne now has to find to put a student through university. By the time I was in my ear ly twenties, I had qualified as a chartered accountant and was in a position, had I chosen so to do, to marry, buy a home and have a family. My path was set and, for the most part,I have been pleased with the living accountancy has given me, though I would be the first to acknowledge that it is not one of the world’s most exciting occupations. By contrast, my own chil dren have completed very long and expensive university courses (I believe I have invested at least a quarter of a million dollars in educating two of my children at tertiary level) and they are still uncertain about which path to take. All of this begs the ques tion: if university education isn’t supposed to guide students towards career goals, then what is it for? I have seen no evidence in my own life that graduates are noticeably better informed than anyone else, except in their own limited area of speciality, and it could be argued that prolonged college careers leave them unsuited for the worldof “real work” rather than the theory-based assignments they have been used to. Your term “scammed into indebtedness” is about right. I think the old system of arti cles and indentureships is much to be preferred over what we have now, where universities have made a flour ishing business out of people’s sometimes ill thought out desire to obtain a degree. The cost is too high, and the results are often unsatisfactory. JPL (Expat accountant DO the math. My son went to a North American univer sity. The fees were more than $20,000 a year. He was there for four years. The cost of accommodation was substantial. I estimate the total price tag (to me t o bachelor degree level was, taking everything into a ccount, $150,000. When he c ame out of college, he didn’t k now what to do. He now works in a bar. The moneyw ould have been better spent b eing put towards his first home. You’re right the recession will make us all see sense. Nassau Dad I MUSTsay that I was very p leased with your article today entitled "Degrees: Time To Rethink". Your piece really h it home for me as I share some of your views on posts econdary education. Two things in particular that stood out to me were how coll ege/university graduates are ill-prepared for the careers t hey are about to enter; and how vocational training is not u p to standard compared to a c ollege/university degree for some. I f I had one wish it would be for vocational and technical t raining to be taken very seriously in The Bahamas. I can be a personal testament to w hat I am saying because I am enrolled in The Electronicsa nd Avionics Technology pro g ramme at George T Baker Aviation School in Miami, Florida. This school does not award degrees, but diplomas a nd certifications to students after the completion of a programme. M y school is highly recognised in Miami and throughout parts of the state of Florida for best preparing studentsf or entry into the workforce. I n the surrounding area are sponsors and businesses owned and operated by grad-u ates of Baker Aviation and they also employ graduates from the school well before t hey complete their prog ramme. Besides first-hand w itnessing what I am writing about I have proof to what you wrote about in your arti cle on students having these degrees and can't perform the duties of a job. For example: The USPS had openings for electronics technicians at a new facility they are opening in Opa Loc ka. The recruiter for The USPS said that the programme being offered at Baker Aviation is exactly what is needed for the job openings. He stressed the importance of the hands-on skills that we were acquiring in our training. When our Electronics Technology students were compared to students of ITTTech for the job, Baker stu dents were far more suited for what they need their people to know. ITT-Tech students were not even able to pass the examination, while students from my school were able to pass the exam. The point I am trying to make is that ITTTech offers a Bachelor's degree and Baker Aviation offers certificates. ITT-Tech has a huge tuition and Baker's is more affordable. One can pass the exam and the oth er can't. I feel that I have been pushed aside when applying for scholarships here at home because I will not be getting a degree when I graduate. It is hard to stand out next to someone with a Bachelor's in Engineering when all I am getting is a diploma and various certifications. So will it be Mr Big Bad Bachelor's Degree or me? It isn't fair, but such is life. I have an uncle that I stay with in Miami who has an MBA. And he has a business where he generates most of his money from road maintenace contracts and landscaping jobs. He stresses that if he knew then what he knows now, he would have gone into a different field. HVAC being one of the main ones because he knows that the "blue collar" jobs generate a lot of business, which means more money at the end of the d ay. O ne final thought for you, s ir. Look at this in terms of someone who is trained for ap articular job. Who would you p refer to perform maintenance on your aircraft. A mechanic with a bachelor's degree, that consists of a bunch of literature, art appreciation, economics and half of the time of study in contact h ours? OR a vocational student trained in every aspect of aviation maintenance from s afety to quality assuarance, with hands-on training every d ay dealing with an aircraft, whose classroom is a hangar and the various aircraft? Not t o de-value the other mechanic but, my money is on the seco nd one, sir.Good day and GOD bless! D erek Dames I AMvery delighted at the f act that there is a force out there that is still making its w ay into the minds of our people. Commendations are in order for a well thought t hrough and written article. I have always been an advocatef or vocational/skills training. A s a young man growing up I was trained in entrepreneurship and business development which I was able toa pply in the workplace. I started my own business at twentyone years of age and operatedi t for five years. Had it not been for the hands-on training I received during those times, I wouldn’t have beent he person I am today. A dmittedly, I am complet ing a degree in business management and it’s nothing likeb eing trained or prepared for the working world. Everyone these days seems to just study t o pass the exams that will l and them a degree. That’s not r ight, that cannot be good for the future of our economies in this region. Some graduates have no practical knowledge, neither can they perform with any semblance of efficiency and effectiveness. I laud you for the steps you have taken in bringing to the forefront this viewpoint about rethinking this concept of degrees. Nothing is wrong with attaining a degree. However, something is definitely wrong when you do not pos sess the ability to effectively meet the demands of the workforce. Thank you for this article. It is a reminder for me that I must still stand up for contin uous reviewing of the needs of the workforce both nationally and globally and ensure that my voice is heard among those who are doing the same. All the best Riccii Ricardo YOU are so right. Students now have four or five years after leaving high school to consider all the things they might do in life; then, when they graduate from college, they still don’t know, so they enter a period of professional training, if they’re lucky, eventually finding themselves ready for the workplace when they’re about 26 or 27; that’s ten whole years later than people of my generation. We need to wake up. College degrees, like much else in modern life, are a con trick played on gullible people. They are pretty much mean ingless when it comes to gaug ing brainpower or suitability for employment. George Hammond (Expat engineer) I TOOK articles to become an attorney and, like you, have never felt “unduly deprived” by not having had a university education. In fact, non-graduates tend to mature much more quickly and become use ful in the office/workshop at a n age when they are still young enough to enjoy their money. I think you’re absolutely r ight; old-style apprenticeships a re the way forward, so long as secondary schools can turno ut students at the required l evel. Nassau attorney WE should all follow the e xample of the medical pro f ession, whose degrees have always been vocationally based. I f you go to a teaching hos pital and graduate with a bachelor of medicine degree, that means you can functiona s a doctor, though you still require a lot of on-the-job training before you can gain seniority in the profession. A s far as I am aware, trainee doctors have always undergone hands-on training t o gain their degrees because t heory alone is obviously usel ess in a hospital or clinic environment. J B Barrett YOUR article made me feel much better about not having sent my own children to uni-v ersity. They have done very w ell for themselves without college degrees and I’m not sure that an expensive highere ducation would have put them in a better position. It is something that has troubled me a lot over the years, but Iw as reassured by what you said. ALS, Grand Bahama Re: Power game ( PLP leadership) Y OU would have thought t hat Forrester Carroll JP, whoe ver he is, would have learned s ome hard lessons from the f ate suffered by fellow memb ers of the PLP when they choose to tackle The Tribune. He tried to be facetious in a letter to Mr Marquis and was promptly “mashed up” in only two sentences. Surely all intelligent men know that you neve r take on a professional in his own ballpark. Please, Mr Carroll, and all l ike you, show some sense in these matters. V ivienne, Nassau Re: Enough of this foolishn ess (Fred Mitchell I HAVE only just caught up with your article on Mr FredM itchell, the former Minister o f Foreign Affairs. My father said it was “brutally brilliant”, which I agree with. Can youp lease reproduce this article and others from the Insight section in pamphlets so they can be studied in our schools? A B Adderley C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 13B 7(1'(5)257+(/< 3529,6,216t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f INSIGHT FEEDBACK Re: Degrees Time for a rethink S S o o m m e e o o f f m m y y f f e e l l l l o o w w t t r r a a i i n n e e e e s s , , w w o o r r k k i i n n g g w w i i t t h h o o t t h h e e r r b b i i g g g g e e r r a a n n d d m m o o r r e e p p r r e e s s t t i i g g i i o o u u s s f f i i r r m m s s , , a a c c t t u u a a l l l l y y p p a a i i d d t t h h e e i i r r e e m m p p l l o o y y e e r r s s ( ( o o r r a a t t l l e e a a s s t t t t h h e e i i r r p p a a r r e e n n t t s s d d i i d d ) ) f f o o r r t t h h e e p p r r i i v v i i l l e e g g e e o o f f b b e e i i n n g g t t a a u u g g h h t t t t h h e e b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s . .

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n By TRIBUNE S TAFF WRITER MY MATERNALgrandm other refused to marry the f irst man she loved because h is surname was Skinner. “There is no possibility that I will spend the rest of my life being known as Mrs Skinner,” she told her friends and fami-l y defiantly. I also recall a shamefaced m an in an English bankruptcy c ourt who admitted changing his name to ‘Smith’ by deed p oll because his real name was Crapper. I couldn’t live with it anymore,” he informed the offi cial receiver, admitting that h is surname had imposed impossible burdens upon him w hich he could no longer e ndure. A family I knew called Uren w ere none too pleased with their surname, either, and 76y ear-old Stan Still remains stoically outraged by his, admit t ing to a British newspaper: “It’s been a blooming mill-s tone round my neck for my entire life.” N ow a survey has been concluded to record the silliest names in Britain, with bear ers being asked how they’vef ared over the years with labels they could do without. M r Still, a former RAF man, recalls with something less than amusement how senior officers used to shout: “Still, get a move on!” And Doug Hole, from Penrith, Cumbria, was unders tandably reluctant to discuss his name with researchers, having already taken enough flak over the years for an a ffliction imposed upon him by his parents. H owever, Rose Bush was more forthcoming. “Many have remarked on my name, b ut what they say is usually p ositive,” she told the Daily M ail. Enraged M ary Christmas, Sonny Day a nd Chris Cross were not too a nnoyed, either, but Terry Bull and Anna Sassin were enraged. Y ou can imagine how one woman felt when she was constantly asked: “Are you Jo K ing?” Believe it or not, my father had a mortician friend called Phil Graves while a village confectioner of my acquaint ance was named Ava Sweet. A well-known pasty maker i n Cornwall bears the unfort unate name Choak, while a N ottingham woman called Pepper claimed to have a brother called Zoltan. J ustin Case has taken a fair b it of playful mockery over the years, but not so much as Barry Cade, Tim Burr and R ay Gunn, all of whom figu red in the list. A spokesman for the website responsible for the survey said parents probably hadn’t recognised the implications of their offspring’s unfortunaten ames at the time. “There must be tremendous e mbarrassment every time t hey have to introduce thems elves,” he added. “Even their teachers must h ave had to hold back their s miles sometimes.” Talking about teachers, I must record an admirable but poker-faced teacher at my firsts chool called Miss Daft. It says m uch for her disciplinary skills t hat no-one ever dared to mock or even mention her name in her presence. However, her colleague Mr E Raser was known as ‘Rubb er’ behind his back while a butcher called McIntosh Carver was referred to cheekily by locals as ‘Mac the Knife’. So what’s in a name? Ask Helen Back, who has apparently been to Hell and Backs ince she was so christened 40 years ago. Not to mention Mancunian B en Twilley, who rejects all i nquiries about his name with a firm: “No comment.” Hardly surprising when you thinka bout it. D o you know any silly names? F ax 328-2398 or e-mail j marquis@tribunemedia.net t he entire United States.” But what to do when the sun goes down? O ne solution is pumped storage using the daytime power to pump water to a reservoir high in the mountains then releasing it in t he evening to drive generators as it rushes back downhill. B ruce Osborn, CEO of Stirling Energy Systems, has been working to develop the engine for 25 years. This exciting world record shows that using these dishes will be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way of producingp ower,” he says. “We are now actively engaged in preparing it for mass production.” Mass dish production also will be under t aken by the Infinia company, of Washington state, which after an investment of $50 million, plans to start making 30,000 dishes this year for sale worldwide. C ompany chief J D Sitton told me: “The Stirling engine’s moment has finally come.” Remarkably, Infinia first planned to use the Stirling engine in a fully implantable heartp ump 20 years ago. “This was to be an engine driven by a piece of fully-shielded plutonium the size of your pinkie fingertip,” said Mr Sitton. We had to drop the idea when it became clear that plutonium might have been attractive to people (terrorists s arily have the best interests of the patient at h eart.” Design However, the design lived on and grew a thousand-fold into the much larger Stirling engine at the centre of the company’s new solar dishes, which will be rolling off the production line at Infinia’s new factory any day now. “Our first target market is Spain. It has the right climate and landscape for our dishes,” said Mr Sitton. The company has also partnered with Massachusetts-based Emergence Bio Energy to build a device for poor countries such as Bangladesh which would “co-generate” elec tricity and heat. That Stirling-powered device runs on methane gas “produced by a digester that converts livestock manure and agricultural wastes into combustible biogas.” In other words, it runs on manure. In its first experi ment two villages were successfully powered for eight hours a day. Nowhere has the Stirling engine got its a dmirers more starry-eyed than in outer space. Dick Shaltens is chief of the Power and InSpace Propulsion Division of NASA, the American space organisation. He says: “I see the Stirling engine playing a major role. I see it in deep space probes, on the planet Mars, on the lunar surface, even on asteroids, anywhere there is insufficient solar energ y to sustain a NASA mission.” H e forecast. “I can see the Stirling working on a spacecraft on a 15-year mission. It is that reliable.” A good example of the Stirling’s reliabilit y is the Rhessi spacecraft, launched in 2002 to photograph the sun. It was originally a two-year mission and the Stirling’s job was tok eep the instruments cool. Today, seven years l ater, the Rhessi is still flying and still working! Dishwasher Back down here on earth, Britain’s National Grid is about to start selling a “home power plant” powered by a Stirling engine tor eplace the traditional boiler. Manufactured by Disenco of Sheffield, the heat source is gas, it looks just like an ordinary dishwasher in the kitchen, and it will cost around $5,000. B ut it will provide heat, light and power at savings of up to 35 per cent with a much smaller carbon footprint. And the homeo wner will even be able to sell surplus power b ack to the electricity company. Also planning a Stirling home power plant is the British Baxi company. The company Microgen, working with Baxi, expects a market of 150,000 of these devices over the next four years. James Rizzo, who once ran the Maltese Ministry of Tourism, took up the Stirling engine 30 years ago as a hobby. Now chairman of the British Stirling Engine Society, he says: "Most technical universities in Japan are working on the Stirling engine as the engine of the future. The Japanese navy is now putting Stirling engines in their submarines following Sweden. "Robert Stirling's invention may prove to be as important to the 21st century as James Watt's steam engine was to the 19th and 20th centuries." The stranglehold that Middle Eastern oil producers now have on the rest of the world may well be loosened by the ghostly fingers of the Rev Robert Stirling, who only wanted to save his parishioners from the long ago danger of exploding steam engines. Now he can help save the world. JUST CALL me the non-stop Stirling engine. This Rhessi satellite, launched seven years ago on a t wo-year mission to record solar flares, is still going strong and still taking pictures with an everr eliable Stirling engine at its heart: one reason why NASA engineers believe they can bank on Stirlings for deep-space missions of 15 years and more. How a 200-year -old gas engine could save the world F ROM page one It’s no joke for Jo King YOUR name can often define you. Those with ridiculous monikers rarely thank their parents for the burdens silly names impose upon them. INSIGHT investigates... n HAVANA Associated Press A MID TWO WARS and an eco nomic crisis, Cuba policy hardly ranks at the top of President Barack Obama’s long agenda. B ut circumstances are pressuring Obama to make a move on Cuba soon or miss an opportunity to advanceh is pledge to restore America’s leadership in the world and in its own hemisphere. Conversations with Cuban officials here suggest that unless the Obama administration signals its intentions quickly and clearly, it will disappoint not only Cuba, but also many Latin American leaders watching for signs that the U.S. is ready to chart a dramatic new course in the region. The unofficial target for action seems to be late April, when Obama travels to the Summit of the Americas, being held on the Caribbean island of Trinidad. Cuba is not invited, but will nonetheless be on many participants’ minds. More frequently than in the past, Latin Ameri can leaders have been flocking to Cuba in recent months, and late last year 33 Latin American and Caribbean nations called for an end to the U.S. embargo. Guatemalan President Alvaro Colon, leading a country long viewed as a loyal U.S. ally, even apologized during a recent visit for his country’s supporting role in the 1961 failed Bay of Pigs invasion. Relationship Fundamental change in the long-calcified CubanAmerican relationship appears possible now because of the dual change in leadership in Havana and Washington. In Cuba, an ailing Fidel Castro relinquished the presidency to his younger brother Raul, who has spent the past year maintaining the country’s socialist system while delivering modest adjustments and coping with the destruction wrought by three hurricanes. Any hopes that the post-Fidel era would lead to a rapid unraveling of Communist rule have faded. In Washington, Obama won the presidency in a campaign in which he pledged a willingness to speak to America’s rivals and enemies. Also, the voting indicated that the hard-core anti-Castro groups in the United States are less key to electoral success, reducing their ability to block closer rela tions. During a visit to Cuba last week by news exec utives of The Associated Press, Cuban government officials refused to speak publicly on the topic. That in itself could be a sign of how critical ly important they consider this period: The government does not wish any isolated comments to impede potential progress. An air of expectancy is palpable, especially after a U.S. Senate staff report Feb. 23 issued by Richard Lugar, the influential Indiana Republican who is the ranking member of the foreign relations com mittee. It stated what would seem obvious to many: that the 50-year U.S. policy of shun n ing communist Cuba by imposing a strict trade embargo has failed to pro duce significant change in the island’s g overnment. L ugar says it is time to re-evaluate the policy of trying to isolate Cuba economically, and deal with it “in aw ay that enhances U.S. interests.” While Cuban officials do not agree with everything in the Lugar report, itw as widely viewed here as positive. However, Cubans also have a long memory. Havana and Washington have periodically been on the verge of breakthroughs, only to watch those efforts be derailed by events. And Cubans note that Obama has specifically said he favors keeping the embargo, although he wants to ease restrictions on Cuban-Americans traveling to their homeland and sending money and gifts to relatives. Overtures With Obama’s foreign policy team still coming together, Cuba sees itself as sitting in the stands, waiting for the match to begin. From a Cuban perspective, the first serve goes to the U.S. side. Cubans take the position that they have always been open to overtures from the U.S. for better relations, but not at any cost. Economic relations with the U.S. could certainly make life easier for the country’s 11 million people, making food and other imports cheaper and opening possibilities for greater tourism and investments. Concerns about human rights and political free dom in Cuba and Cuba’s support for leftist guerrilla movements have been the main reasons cited by American presidents since John F. Kennedy for attempting to isolate the Caribbean nation. As President Jimmy Carter moved towards easing relations, a public furor erupted in late 1978 over the presence of MiG 23 jets inside Cuba, and the window of opportunity slammed shut. Again during the Clinton years, Cuba’s downing of two civilian planes sent towards Cuba by an anti-Castro group in Florida arrested possibilities for progress in 1996. The eight years of George W. Bush, which saw U.S.-Cuban contacts at a recent low, have come to a close. At the very least, it’s easy to envision a return to some of the contacts and negotiations that existed in earlier decades, even with the embargo in place. If Obama reaches out to Cuba, the thinking goes, Cuba will be waiting to take his hand. Meanwhile, some of the rhetoric from Washington that used to fall on Cuba seems to be shifting to Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez, the U.S. critic who after 10 years in power just won a referendum removing limits on the number of times he can run for re-election. Cubans warn the Obama administration against repeating the same mistakes with Venezuela that the U.S. made with Cuba. The risk, they say, is that Washington could find itself in the same position decades down the line, trying to extricate itself from a diplomatic impasse. Analysis: Cuba waiting and w atching Obama Barack Obama

PAGE 31

sold by the American Stirling company for around $500, (available on e-Bay by the heat from the palm of your hand. Whatever the size of the engine, there are absolutely NO emissions. The big comeback started on a winter’s day in 2008 in the New Mexico desert. The sun was beating down and the temperature was zero. Mirrors At the US top secret Sandia National Laboratory, giant dishes had been built, each composed of 82 mirrors. They would catch the glare of the sun as it moved across the sky and focus the heat on a Stirling engine. The beam of intense heat, hot enough to melt metal, started the engine pumping away, generating electricity. By the end of that day, January 31, one of the mirror dishes had set a world record; an all-time high of 31 per cent of the energy pouring down from the sun was converted into power going into the electricity grid. The engine used at Sandia in the SES dishes is a sealed system filled with hydro gen. As the gas heats and cools, its pressure rises and falls. The change in pressure drives pistons inside the engine, pro ducing mechanical power, which in turn drives a generator and makes electricity. Chuck Andraka, lead Sandia project engineer, said the use in the Mojave desert pro ject was “the largest proposed overall use of Stirling engines” so far. “Soon we will see these large fields of systems begin operation in the desert south-west of the US.” Now Stirling Energy Systems, the company behind the experiment, has signed agree ments with two big California electricity companies which will between them require up to 70,000 solar dish engine units. Work started on preproduction models of the mirror dishes in the Detroit area in February. There are now two Califor nia fields already under contract; one in Imperial Valley and one in the Mojave desert. Combined eventual output will be about 1600 megawatts about the same as a major nuclear power station. Work is scheduled to start in 2010. An Irish company, NTR, invested $100 million, becom ing the biggest shareholder – and the race to really make the Stirling engine commercial has really begun. “Just 30,000 of the dish es, in the Mojave desert, will provide enough power needed in daylight hours by the city of San Diego, with a population of 1.2 million,” said a spokeswoman for the Sandia National Laboratory. “A solar farm 100 miles square could generate enough power for INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 The stories behind the news n B y NOEL YOUNG C opyright 2009 Edit International AN ALMOST f orgotten i nvention from 200 years ago may answer the world’s energy problems and end our reliance on oil by using theg reatest source of power known to man – the sun. It’s known as the Stirling E ngine and it’s already worki ng in satellites whizzing round the globe...in a collection of giant gleaming dishes trapping the desert sun in New Mexi c o...powering a tiny car noiselessly along the roads of New Hampshire. And expertse xpect it to bring clean water t o millions across the planet. In Britain two big companies plan to start marketing “home power plants” this spring using Stirlings which will light and heat the house, cut the homeowner’s power costs by one-third – and allow him to sell surplus power back to the electricity company. Everyone on earth will soon know of the odd invention in 1816 by Scottish minister Robert Stirling who designed it in his church workshop by oil lamp because Edison’s electric light bulb was still 60 years in the future. Successful His engine came out at the same time as the highly suc cessful steam engine which powered the industrial revolution. As the steam engine became safer and more sophisticated, interest in the Stirling engine fell away and it was largely forgotten – until now. And that ‘now’ is breath taking. The giant dishes in New Mexico, which focus the sun’s rays on an engine have the astonishing potential of providing the electricity for the entire United States during daylight hours. The car, developed by America’s leading inventor D ean Kamen, is an all-elec tric hybrid, part-powered by a much smaller Stirling engine. He believes it can be in pro d uction in two years and show the world a dramatic way to slash the use of oil and curbc arbon emissions. Producing clean water in developing countries is anoth er field in which the Stirling t echnology has already shown i ts worth. Yet the Stirling is a puzzle among engines. It was largely ignored as the industrial revolution of the 19th century turned into the space race of the 20th century. But peoplew ho came in contact with it l oved it. The Stirling became a cult. Fans formed societies, who built models and attend ed meetings. For much of that time, the engine was known simply as the “hot air engine.” In 1960, the Philips organisation of Holland, which spent millions trying to develop it, finally dubbed it “the Stirling Engine”. In America, Ford also spent a fortune trying to adapt it to drive a car before giving up in the 1970s. But Stirling fans carried on. Hundreds of enthusiasts gathered last year at the Kew Gardens Steam Museum in London for a display of working models. One household fan driven by a Stirling engine could be seen whirring away very effectively. A similar one is now available commercially from an American company, for sitting on top of a hot stove. A Glasgow museum even has a gramophone powered by a tiny Stirling engine. The basic Stirling is deceptively simple. Gas or air inside a completely enclosed cylin der expands as it’s heated at one end and contracts as it is cooled at the other. This movement of the gas drives a piston, which turns a wheel outside the engine. The heat source can be anything you like. One demonstration model, How a 200-year-old gas engine could save the world WHILE Bahamians reel under the weight of high electricity bills, they ar e failing to make use of the one resource they possess in abundance. INSIGHT reports... SEE page two RIGHT: The Disenco home power plant, with a Stirling engine a t its heart. It's about the same size and no more obtrusive than the average dishwasher but it will slash your energy bills and vastly reduce the size of your carbon footprint. LEFT: A Swedish submarine surfaces ... not something they have to do very often because their power comes from no-emission Stirling engines. Now the Japanese Navy is following suit and installing Stirlings on their submarines. BELOW: Giant dishes at the Sandia National Laboratory i n New Mexico, capture the sun's rays and turn them into e lectricity into electricity via Stirling engines, mounted in t he center. ABOVE: A tricycle built for two with one added plus: less ped a ling than usual ! It's powered by a Stirling engine and was on show at the exhibition in Kew, London last year




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MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009
















‘$1 million missing’ “° masks
int
from embassy funds. :-.

Driver is believed to have
suffered seizure behind wheel

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

Auditor General’s dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Report unable to FREEPORT - A man and woman were killed Sunday
when the truck they were in crashed into the Cumming

account for money Temple AME Church on Settler’s Way, bringing the

: traffic fatality count to five on Grand Bahama.
spent on Bahamian The identities or ages of the victims were still not
. ; known to police up to press time on Sunday.
office in Cuba Asst Supt Clarence Reckley said the accident occurred

around 2.55pm on Settler’s Way, near Columbus Drive,
involving a 1992 Chevy Truck, licensed T-6916.

He reported that the male driver and female passenger
were both fatally injured at the scene. It was believed that
the driver may have suffered a seizure while driving.

Police investigations revealed that the driver lost con-
trol of the vehicle, which ran off the road, crashing into the
eastern wall of Cummings Temple AME Church.

“Investigations suggest that the truck was travelling
west along Settlers Way in the left west bound lane when,
according to eye witnesses, it veered to the right and ran
off the road and crashed into the church wall,” ASP

SEE page eight

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AUDITORS claim to have
been unable to properly
account for almost a million dol-
lars worth of funds said to have
been spent on the establishment
of a Bahamian embassy in
Cuba.

The 2006/2007 Auditor Gen-
eral’s Report, in its section on
foreign audits, recommends that
to “promote transparency and
accountability complete
accounting and documentation
for the ...funds be provided for
audit scrutiny.”

Those funds include a sum of



Hundreds of thousands
missing from Ministry



DETAILS were sketchy
up to press time last
night, but according to






sani thesis ane gene m BL eee
; . three police officers int H ighlights discrepancies
Se er ee i were seriously injured in Minister Says Armed robberies Tribune Staff in the Ministry’s
eral, Miami, Florida) “for the : :

é : ; this car crash at the ral tl lel k Reporter accounts including
purchase of necessary furnish- i VITOR ULL Cc mreynolds@ large payments without
ings for the official residence Shirley Street/Mackey report supports y ge pay

tribunemedia.net any documentation and
over half a million dol-
lars of missing rent.

It is noted the Min-
istry made two pay-
ments of $385,195.40
for repairs of a 10-unit

Street junction on
Saturday night at
around 9.30pm.

This police vehicle
collided with a white
pick-up truck. Calls to

PTR ase ita tt

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@

(of the Bahamian Ambassador
to Cuba) and the embassy”.

In this instance, auditors
reviewing the accounts said they
were “unable to verify the accu-
racy” of a listing of items pur-

‘visa scam’
allegations

m By ALISON LOWE

HUNDREDS of
thousands of dollars
spent by the Ministry
of Housing in 2006 and
2007 and unaccounted

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Kenneth Russell





chased with the money as they
were “not provided with ade-

SEE page eight



police yesterday for
more information were
not returned.



Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FINDINGS in the latest Audi-
tor General’s Report appear to
“vindicate” former FNM chair-
man Carl Bethel in his allegations

tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
armed robberies at two Nas-
sau businesses this weekend
and the robbery of two peo-
ple who were attacked with

for is still missing and the sub-
ject of a police investigation,
Minister of Housing Kenneth
Russell said.

The Auditor General’s
Report on revenue and expen-
diture in the Ministry of Hous-

complex in Freeport, but there
is no documentation to prove
the work was carried out.

And large payments were
made to a company for materi-

SEE page eight

394-1378

Meee o al Pett tea

that there was a “visa scam” going
on in the Consular Division of
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

“T think that certainly the find-
ings of the auditor general cer-
tainly seem to support the essence
of the criticisms that I was making
about a lack of due diligence in
the visa section at that time,” said
Mr Bethel, now minister of edu-
cation.

“The Auditor General’s report
is all time dated, in that it would
relate to years prior to the date of
the report. So certainly they were
referring directly to the same doc-
umentation that I would’ve been
referring to and drew the same

a cutlass on Saturday.

An armed robber held up
an employee of the Super-
wash laundromat in Robin-
son Road shortly before 3am
on Sunday after he entered
the premises pretending to
be a customer.

He held the Superwash
attendant at gunpoint and
demanded cash before get-
ting away with an undeter-
mined amount of cash and
disappearing into the Mon-
tell Heights area.

The hold-up followed an
armed robbery at Sill’s

SEE page eight

Colon and stomach cancer
on the rise in the Bahamas

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

LOCAL doctors are concerned about a marked increase in
colon and stomach cancer in Bahamians and fear that the numbers
could go up drastically in the near future.

Consultant for medical oncology at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital Dr Theodore Turnquest told The Tribune he predicts that the
stomach and colon cancer levels in the Bahamas will develop “into
something more.”

SEE page eight

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS













































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Police operation results in 30
arrests in connection with drugs

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Assistant Commis- |
sioner of Police Marvin Dames
revealed that a police operation |
launched over the weekend in
Freeport resulted in the arrest of 30
persons in connection with illegal
drugs.

Of those persons arrested, 27 are
expected to be arraigned before the |
courts today, he said.

Mr Dames reported that a total of
seven persons were arrested for sup-
plying dangerous drugs, which result-
ed in the seizure of some $2,000 in
cash. The other arrests were for drug possession.

Mr Dames said “Operation Harvest Time”
was conducted at Coral Gardens, an area
known for illegal drug activity. The first phase
of the operation was launched on Friday and the
second phase on Saturday.

ACP Dames was extremely pleased with the
success of the operation in Freeport, which was
carried out by the DEU, CDU, Mobile Patrol,
and the newly implemented Anti-violence Inter-
vention Response Team (AVIT) on Grand
Bahama.

He said the first phase of the operation con-
sisted of those persons purchasing illegal drugs
and involved the stopping and searching of 30
vehicles, which resulted in the arrest of 30 per-
sons by police for possession of dangerous
drugs.

The second phase conducted on Saturday, he
said, concentrated those persons who sell illegal
drugs in the community.

“Operation Harvest Time” will be a model of
our approach as we move forward to policing

Marvin Dames



this island of Grand Bahama,” he
| said at a press briefing on Sunday at
Police 4Headquarters.

“We at the RBPF Grand Bahama
District are committed in our resolve
to cleaning up the communities of
Grand Bahama of all forms of crim-
inality and vices,” he said.

Mr Dames was also pleased with
| the seizure of the firearms in the past
several weeks on Grand Bahama.

“We seized more firearms over
the last few wecks than any other
| time in the history on this island. You

| could expect as we intensify our
= efforts throughout the island that
there would be more seizures,” he
said.

Mr Dames said police will be relentless in its
pursuit of criminals who seek to intimidate cit-
izens of Grand Bahama.

“There will be no room for you to hide; we
will find you wherever you go. I am sending
this warning out, change your life now because
we will be relentless.

“We will not rest until the Grand Bahama
community is free of those persons destroying
these beautiful neighbourhoods,” he said.

“We intend to pursue those persons out there
possessing firearms, selling drugs, and breaking
into people’s homes. We have over the last few
weeks stepped up our efforts and as a result
arrested persons in the act of breaking into
businesses and homes.

And that is a positive sign that our patrols are
becoming a little more effective and we have
increased visibility and so we are extremely
pleased. We understand that a lot of work
remains. We are committed in our resolve to
restoring law and order in the streets,” said Mr
Dames.

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LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

‘Grand Bahama
Shipyard is
the number
one in world’

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Shipyard is the number
one shipyard in the world, ser-
vicing four times more ships
than its main rival.

The shipyard’s investment
here has now reached close to
$200 million, making it “the
biggest investment in the
Caribbean.”

These declarations were
made at the 11th annual Grand
Bahama Business Outlook in
Freeport.

According to Giora Israel,
senior vice president of port
development at Carnival Corpo-
ration, the shipyard is one of
Carnival Corporation’s major
investments in the Bahamas.

Carnival Corporation owns 80
per cent of the shipyard, while
the other 20 per cent is owned
by the Grand Bahama Port
Authority.

Commended

Mr Israel commended Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and
his government for supporting
such an investment. He also
thanked Sir Albert Miller, for-
mer Grand Bahama Port
Authority CEO and chairman
for his role.

“Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham is the right leader at
this right time to lead the coun-
try today,” he said followed by
applause.

“It was Mr
Ingraham who
negotiated the
shipyard and for
>) that we respect
. = him and his gov-
Hubert — ernment.”
Ingraham Mr Israel said
that the shipyard’s
acquisition of a new $60 million
dry dock last September has
brought its investment close to
$200 million on Grand Bahama.

“This is the biggest invest-
ment in the Caribbean here and
will continue grow.

“Today, this (the GB Ship-
yard) is the number one ship-
yard in the world servicing four
times more ships than the num-
ber two shipyard in the world; it
is just extraordinary,” he said.

According to Mr Israel, 80
per cent of the ships serviced
are tankers and cargo vessels
and general ships.

He explained that although
Carnival owns a lot of cruise
ships, the only way to have con-
tinuous employment year round
and have viable long term busi-
ness for Freeport was to make
the facility available to every-
body.

Mr Israel indicated that the
shipyard is also making signifi-
cant contributions to the
Freeport economy.

He noted that the employ-
ment of Bahamians has
increased continuously at the
facility.

“We have a lot of expatriates
working here. Because of the
specialty and professionalism
that we require in this industry
(we must employ) people that
have 10 and 20 years experi-
ence,” he explained.

“We have more Bahamians
who do not work in tourism that
work in the shipyard than in any
other industry in this country.”

“Tt is one of the largest users
of electricity from the local
power company. We are sus-
taining the economy of Freeport
where shipyard crews are using
rental apartments and housing,”

We have a great shipyard
here. It is a business we are
doing together and I think all in
Freeport will continue to sup-
port it,” Mr Israel said.

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New calls for redundancy
fund amid CLICO crisis

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CALLS for a redundancy
fund to help those who lose
employment when companies
close have been renewed now
170 CLICO (Bahamas)
employees could lose their
jobs.

The Trade Union Congress
(TUC) is calling on the Min-
istry of Labour to immediate-
ly act on recommendations
put forward by union presi-
dent Obie Ferguson to estab-
lish a redundancy fund to
which all employers would
contribute to assist workers
who lose employment as a
result of a company closing.

TUC secretary general
Tyrone Morris said the need
to establish a fund became
critical when CLICO
(Bahamas) staff learned last
week that their jobs are in
jeopardy.

The government appointed
accountant Craig Gomez as
liquidator of the company
under a Supreme Court order
on Tuesday in a move to
wind-up CLICO (Bahamas)
and over 100 agents and
employees were sent home on
Thursday while liquidators
assessed the situation.

Fate

The future employment of
CLICO (Bahamas) employ-
ees is still not known and Mr
Morris bemoaned the fate of
the Bahamian workers, some
of whom have worked at CLI-
CO (Bahamas) for more than
20 years, and the fact they
could be left to fend for them-
selves. He said: “Once again
the TUC is minded that this
recent closure of CLICO
(Bahamas) adds to the Glad-
stone Farm, Driftwood and
Pioneer Shipping where
affected employees were ter-

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tecting the interest of these
workers.

“In the meantime the TUC
invites the affected workers
at CLICO to contact us on
328-8973 for guidance.”

New Covenant Baptist
Church Bishop Simeon Hall
called a public meeting at the
church in East West Highway,
Nassau, to ascertain the
details of the closure as he is
one of about 29,000 policy-
holders affected by the wind-
up of CLICO (Bahamas).

He said: “I hope our gath-
ering will send a strong mes-
sage that we want to recover

Simeon Hall

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Visa racket still unanswered

LATE IN the summer of 2006 a boat owner
complained to The Tribune that he had been
barred from Nassau’s visa department because
he had “blown the whistle” on a visa racket at
Norfolk House.

He had alleged that visas were being sup-
plied illegally to Haitian “mules” for $1,000 a
time. Human traffickers, he claimed, were col-
lecting up to 40 visas at a time from Norfolk
House while he — a legitimate Bahamian boat
owner — could not get a visa through regular
channels.

He said he had been virtually put out of
business because he was told he could no longer
get visas for the three Haitians he needed to
operate his freight boats between Nassau and
Haiti. These crewmen were essential, he said.

However, he had been told by the police that
he could no longer go to the visa department.
“They have barred me,” he said. “I am being
victimised for telling the truth.”

He said he had a tape recording of a visa
employee asking him to pay him $1,000 for a
visa for a crewman. He was willing to play the
recording on any radio station that would open
their airwaves to him.

In an attempt to verify this information, a
Tribune reporter sought out other sources in the
ministry. Not only was the boatman’s story ver-
ified, but it was verified many times over. Our
reporter was told that despite our initial story
about the scam, the “mules” were still there
collecting their visas. It was also alleged that
the 90-day visas were handled by traffickers to
include Haitians who were willing to pay the
price. These Haitians with their stamped visas
were then absorbed into the local Haitian com-
munities — virtually disappearing under the
radar of the law.

A spokesman for then foreign affairs minister
Fred Mitchell denied the story. “It was not cred-
ible,” said the minister’s spokesman, adding
that all “allegations made in connection with all
such stories have been turned over to the police
and their investigation is ongoing.” The
spokesman said that the police had asked them
not to comment further on the investigations,
but that in due course a statement on behalf of
Minister Mitchell would be made to parliament.

Time passed. There was no comment from
the Ministry. There was no report from the
police and Mr Mitchell made no report to par-
liament.

But the report did not die a natural death as
many had hoped. The public continued to ask
questions. And persons within the ministry con-
tinued their concern and agitation.

“The traffickers are still coming in with bun-
dles of passports, and they are still leaving with
the visas stamped in them,” said one source.
And said another: “On Mondays, Tuesdays and
Fridays, a whole boatload of visas are being
handed out.” This was an obvious exaggera-

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tion, but even one illegal visa is one too many.

The allegations centred on Haitian and Chi-
nese immigrants who, it was claimed, were pay-
ing large amounts of money to “traffickers”
who secured visas with the cooperation from
some corrupt public officials. Again there was
official denial. However, this time the ministry’s
wrath was turned on The Tribune for using
unnamed sources to open a Pandora’s box that
officials wanted sealed as quickly as possible.

Education Minister Carl Bethel, then in
Opposition, was levelling similar charges against
the foreign ministry in connection with illegal
Chinese immigrants. His allegations were dis-
missed as political mischief.

Now we have the Auditor General’s report
for 2006/7 — the relevant period — dealing
with the consular (visa) division of the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs.

The auditor, among other discrepancies with
the cash book, noted that in some instances
visa applications were not complete, for exam-
ple “signatures of applicants were missing; the
declaration to be signed by the applicant pur-
porting that the information was true and cor-
rect, was missing; the occupation of the appli-
cant was not indicated on the forms; the appli-
cant’s photograph was not attached.”

Also, the report continued: “Our review
showed that one person was able to sponsor
up to 16 persons in a given period.”

During the audit it was discovered that an
applicant sponsored several individuals to attend
a funeral service that had been held two days
before the application was made.

The “visa ledger showed that for the period
July 2004 to June 2007, over 9,000 visa were
granted.” However, there was no evidence of
“exit forms to substantiate the number of visa
holders who left the country.”

After reading the report, Mr Bethel believes
his 2006 claims against the Foreign Ministry
have been vindicated. However, Mr Mitchell,
the foreign minister during that period, consid-
ers Mr Bethel’s comments on the report “utter
nonsense.” He believes the findings were the
result of “just bureaucracy and errors of that
time.”

The Tribune has many questions among
them:

Was this matter ever sent to the police, if so
what were their findings and why was no report
made to parliament as promised at the time?

This episode shows the urgent need of a
Freedom of Information Act so that such prob-
lems can get instant attention rather than hav-
ing to wait almost three years for discussion
after the initial complaint.

In the meantime, whether it was a deliber-
ate “scam” or bureaucratic “errors of that
time,” it has done a lot of damage to this
country, and complicated its already compli-
cated immigration problems.



Appalled by
claims about
Detention
Centre

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The recent press stories have
been highlighting the conditions
at the Detention Centre on
Carmichael Road.

The alleged treatment the
detainees are being given is
absolutely appalling and the gov-
ernment's lack of care or concern
is even more of an embarrass-
ment to this country.

T understand that we do have a
serious immigration problem, and
I have seen the increased num-
ber of raids on various construc-
tion sites and places of work,
rounding up those who are work-
ing illegally.

This is a great effort on the
government's part, and there is
no excuse for these people to
have the right to work here with-
out the proper authorization to
do so.

However to treat them so
poorly and brutally as such, for
coming to the Bahamas, some
even en route to other countries,
to find a better life for themselves

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia net



and maybe eventually obtain the
right to work, should not be tol-
erated.

Amnesty International has
already condemned the treatment
of these people at the Centre.
Our country is struggling with a
severe economic downturn at the
moment, why continue to make
the country look bad to the inter-
national community by allowing
this barbaric treatment to take
place.

There has not been one word
from any government official con-
demning or questioning the
alleged actions of some of the
officers at the Detention Centre.

As a Bahamian in this day and
age, I am very sad to say and see
that we are still living as a nation
of hypocrites, filled with corrup-
tion and bribery.

This was something that has

plagued this wonderful island
nation since the 1980's and nei-
ther government has been able
to rid themselves of it since then.
This has become a nation of
racism and ignorance when it
comes to people's human rights,
and I am sadly appalled by all of
this.

We take so much for granted
here, beautiful beaches and
waters, which fuels our tourism
economy and gives our people
jobs.

But a time will come when this
will come to a grinding halt and it
will be too late to do anything
about it.

If our nation keeps up with this
attitude of ignorance and "turning
your eye" we will slowly see all
that is good slip away from us.

T hope this will open a few eyes
as to what is really going on and
make people realize that things
need to change NOW.

CONCERNED
Nassau,
February 27, 2009.

Development of a University
of the Bahamas is imperative

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As an academic visitor to the
Bahamas, I read with interest
your February 25th editorial
regarding the establishment of
Ross University, including the
welcoming comments of Prime
Minister Ingraham.

It is indeed a positive devel-
opment for The Bahamas to be
known as an education destina-
tion, offering highly-priced clin-
ical programmes mainly to non-
Bahamians.

The spin-off employment
opportunities and related
spending are laudable, espe-
cially with the uncertain state
of the mainstream tourism sec-
tor.

However, the establishment
of an offshore site for select
clinical offerings should not be
seen as a substitute for the full
development of the University
of the Bahamas.

The global economic down-
turn makes it more imperative
than ever that there be an
indigenous Bahamian universi-
ty to serve as a platform for
national success.





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ported universities will succeed.
We need look no further than
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of education, science and
knowledge to battle the eco-
nomic crisis.

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Vice-Chancellor,
University of Prince
Edward Island,
February, 2009.

Plan for restoring civility is spot on

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Letter writer Marcus Smith today in his letter titled: Sugges-
tions for restoring law and order - showed us that there are some
clear thinking people and his plan for bringing back civility is

spot on.

Prime Minister Ingraham simply adopt Mr Marcus Smith’s
plan and we will finally be on the way to secing a Bahamas we

can be rightly proud of.

Don’t do it quickly with the ever contraction of the economy,
violent crime, robberies, rapes, murders will increase to an

unmanageable level.

Time is now - if you can shake up BEC leadership, then

shake up everywhere else.

Oh by the way...if we don’t do anything do you really think
anyone anywhere will believe It is Better in The Bahamas?

H HUMES
Nassau,
February 21, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 5

TIO URAAUUT UMNO MIPIM ILICM om Royal



m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

A FREEDOM OF INFORMA-
TION ACT must be passed so that
the public can gain access in a time-
ly manner to knowledge that will
enable them to push for necessary
improvements in the way Govern-
ment does business, according to a
Government Minister.

Reacting to the findings of the
Auditor General’s 2006/2007 report,
which reviews Government min-
istries and departments to check for
irregularities in how public funds are
accounted for, Education Minister
Carl Bethel said its findings high-
lights the need for the Act to be
passed.

The document highlights numer-
ous accounting discrepancies across
the spectrum of Government and
consequently makes recommenda-
tions about how procedures can be
enhanced to ensure greater trans-
parency and accountability in the
management of public money.

Despite being a review of
accounts during the 2006/2007 bud-
getary period, the report was only
tabled in the House of Assembly last
Wednesday.

On the front page of the report, a
memorandum from Financial Sec-



retary Ruth Millar, dated June 3,
2008, states that Government is
“working towards a position where-
by any audit issues arising are
resolved within an appropriate time-
frame, and procedures are consoli-
dated to prevent such issues recur-
ring.”

In relation to the School Boards
and Schools Accounts, which fall
under Mr Bethel’s ministry, the
report expresses its “grave concern”
about the fact that “cheques requir-
ing two signatories were being
processed with only one signature
affixed.”

Controls

“Management should implement
proper controls to ensure that the
required signatures are affixed
before cheques are issued,” advised
the auditors, who point out that not
doing so leaves the system open to
abuse.

The criticism was one that arose
with respect to numerous other Goy-
ernment accounts in the report.

Meanwhile, auditors, finding that
books were not balanced, certain
individuals were carrying out “too
many (accounting) related functions”
that should be segregated, and cer-
tain payments were not adequately

MP opens music

lab at new school

mg By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Lucaya MP Neko Grant, Min-
ister of Public Works, continues his commit-
ment to the development of well-rounded stu-
dents through his music ministry, having opened
a new Music Lab at the new Freeport Junior

High School on Friday.

Mr Grant, who started his music ministry in
1996, has contributed musical instruments to

*

Neko Sein

more than 20 organisations, including schools, junkanoo groups and

churches.

The MP recently donated some 34 musical instruments, valued at
$10,000, to the Freeport Bible Church.
“Giving the gift of music to the youth of our nation has provided me

with much satisfaction,” he said.

“This gift of musical instruments to Freeport Junior High School is
a further demonstration of my commitment to enriching the lives of cur-
rent and future students of this school.”

Minister Grant said many studies have shown that music educa-
tion has a positive affect on children and can enhance their performance

in other subjects.

He told students that music training can also lead to careers that can

provide economic benefit.

“You can also become actively involved in your church as organists

or pianist,” he added.

(fea h oS ita a
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accounted for, recommended that
internal controls are strengthened
and “officers assigned the accounting
functions be trained in basic book-
keeping.”

They further noted that a school
administrator was found still to be
conducting business on behalf of a
school after being transferred.

Mr Bethel said that he has made



you the information they’re going
to say ‘Well we’ll give you it when
we know what the facts are’, where-
as with a legislative intervention that
information can come forward faster
and then people will be able to make
their minds up at a much earlier
time,” he said.

“Like it or not, public knowledge
shapes public opinion and can shape

a public response and form a public
response that would not otherwise
be in a position where it can be
forced. If the public don’t know they
don’t know what to demand, where-
as if they know, the sooner they
know, the quicker they can make
demands of public officials to satisfy
their demands based on their knowl-
edge.”







Ph: 325-3336



addressing “lapses and errors” in the
accounting of School Boards a “mat-
ter of priority” since taking up the
post in 2007.

He said that while School Boards,
established in 1996, allow for crucial
decentralisation of decision making,
they must “be accountable for how
the funds are spent.”

“We’ve been working very hard
with all the school boards and not
only have been seeking to audit all of
them and have them addressed on a
school board by school board basis
and we’ve also started a training pro-
gramme for school board members,
as to what to demand and to expect
in terms of proper accounting and
transparency in terms of school
board accounts,” he said.

The Minister added, however, that
so far he has not been given any evi-
dence to suggest that despite weak
controls in some instances, money
was misappropriated.

Nonetheless, Mr Bethel said it is
of concern that discrepancies such
as those highlighted in the 2006/2007
report only become known to the
public years after the observations
are made.

The passing of a Freedom of
Information Act (FOIA), which
would give members of the public
the right to demand timely access to
certain Government information, is
a manifesto commitment of the Free
National Movement.

Mr Bethel said “there’s no ques-
tion” that the passing of a FOIA is a
critical issue if findings and discrep-
ancies such as those made by the
Auditor General are to be reacted to
and addressed in an effective way.

“Tf you leave officialdom to give

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THE TRIBUNE



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IT’S ATIME OF JOY AND spe ea
11'S AGRAND TIME OF Py OR
PRAISE AND CELEBRATION! — oy

cranes 2009 - East Street Tabernacle

be ME:
‘AWAKE? LET’S CELEBRATE!!””

GUEST SPEAKERS:
BISHOP RANDALL HOWARD Monday, March 9th, 2000

General erseer Bishop Dr. Elgarnet &. Rakming, Notional Overseer

BISHOP DR. BRICE THOMPSON
General Preshytet

BISHOP DAVID BRYAN

Global Outreach Director

BISHOP ADRIAN VARLACK

CBL [nstrector

MINISTER CATHERINE PAYNE
Internationa! Director of Women’s Ministries
BISHOP CLAYTON MARTIN
Reeoponal Gverseer of Jamaica, Cayman
Islands Guyana and French Guiana

and MINISTER SONDTA MARTIN
BISHOP CLARENCE WILLIAMS
Overseer of the Turks & Caicos Islunds

BISHOP DR. JOHN HUMES
National Overseer of the Church of Gad
Bahumies, Turks é& Catoos Islincds

LIVE VIA RADIO BAHAMAS [3-441 AM ond
S10 AM

The Convention climaxes on Sanday, March 15th
with the afternoon Annuul Parade and Water
Baptismal Service, followed by the evening
Service hbraadcast live on 28S Radio and TV 13
log on to: WwW.cogophahamas.org
For live webcasting

Ministering in song and performance
gre: the Centennial Mass Choir, the Tab-
ernack: Concert Choir, the Chorch of
God National Choir, the Bahamas Public
Officers Choir, and other Choirs, Praise
Teams and singing Groups, along with
the Bahama B aad, the Youth ard

ety «duced th Church ol =f F
Gael and sadera Brass als.

Bring, the fainily andih

* bles ed!

ay od

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AMERICAN tourists
accused of terrorising a flock
of wild ducks and slaughter-
ing a pet duck on a private cay
off Long Island are wanted by
police.

The Adamo sailboat crew
from Daytona Beach, Florida,
posted details of their
escapades at Hog Cay, in Joe
Sound, on an Internet blog
along with pictures of a
plucked duck in a roasting
pan ready for the oven.

They are suspected of hav-
ing trespassed on the 200-acre
private island owned by
lawyer Peter Graham and his
family, and are thought to
have walked through the pri-
vate cottages and across land-
scaped lawns where they
chased dozens of West Indi-
an tree ducks with their dog
for over two hours before they
caught and killed a flightless
rowan belonging to the Gra-
hams.

The innards, guts and
wingtips of the duck’s carcass
were found surrounded by
empty Budweiser beer cans
on the beach by caretaker and
Bahamas National Trust war-
den Earl Wilson on Monday,
Peter Graham’s son Gregory
Graham told The Tribune.

Mr Graham said: “When
we saw the pictures on their
website we lost our minds. It’s
sickening.”

He was raised at the island
where his father increased the
once endangered population
of tree ducks, or whistling
ducks, across Long Island and
as far away as Cat Island, by
feeding them at a cost of
around $35,000 a year.

He has seen their numbers
flourish from just three in the
late 1960’s to around 1,500
today.

Mr Graham said: “It was
my father’s passion and he
passed it to all of us, and Earl
has dedicated his life to the
animals.”

But the place famed for
being teeming with wildlife
was shrouded by a deathly
quiet following the sailboaters
visit, Mr Graham said.

“The effect has been terri-

LUT 4S) iT rocks at the mice island.

ble,” he explained.

“When Earl went there on
Monday morning there was a
deaf silence, there wasn’t a
bird around. It was like a child
had died.

“The ducks are incredibly
sensitive and these people just
harassed them.”

Chasing protected West
Indian tree ducks with the
intention of killing them is
also a federal offence under
international CITES (Conven-
tion on International Trade in
Endangered Species) laws,
Bahamian and United States
law, and Mr Graham has
reported the offence to all rel-
evant authorities.

The boat was last seen in
Exuma and police in George
Town maintain they will
apprehend the suspected
offenders. The Defence Force
and Bahamas National Trust
wardens in the Exuma Land
and Sea Park are also on the
look-out for the boat, and Mr
Graham will travel to Exuma
today to assist.

As news of the offence has
spread, the sailboaters web-
site has attracted more than
30 comments from the offend-
ed community.

Mr Graham said: “I think
we all realise it is a real prob-
lem just because this is hap-
pening in all the islands and
no-one’s really spoken out
because it has never been as
obvious, but with the Internet
we are all seeing it immedi-



ately and we can see the neg-
ligence on the part of sail-
boaters.”

The offence comes just
weeks after two American
tourists were fined $1,000 by
an Exuma magistrate after
posting pictures on social net-
working site Facebook of
themselves grilling and eating
an iguana and harvesting juve-
nile conch.

Two of the men pictured
with the offenders have still
not been apprehended by
police despite Bahamas
National Trust Chief Execu-
tive Eric Carey reporting the
whereabouts of one of the
men believed to be living in
Nassau.

Mr Carey said: “Crimes
against the environment
should not be given less
importance than other crimes.

“Yes, serious crimes like
murder and armed robbery
need to be given priority, but
environmental crimes don’t
need to be treated as if they
are not of any level of impor-
tance.

“It’s really sad because Mr
Graham has for so many years
built this incredible private
wildlife reserve.

“Visitors to this country
should not carry out such bar-
baric behaviour.”

The sailboaters blog also
features pictures of a dinghy
filled with juvenile conch on a
visit to the Bahamas in 2007,
an prisonable offence.

ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE

is accepting applications for the
2009-2010 Academic Year

anish

One person - to teach Spanish to grades seven through ten

4& Mewertoe will dehvcr his ANNTAL ADDRESS. 5

Social Studies/History

One person - to teach Social Studies and History to grade eight to twelve. Experience in
preparing for external examinations is a requirement.

English Language/Literature
One person- to teach English Language/Literature to all grade levels. Experience in
preparing candidates for B.J.C and B.G.C.S.E examinations is required.

Two person - to teach English Language/Literature at the Grade seven and Eight levels.

Chemistry

Two persons - to teach Chemistry to grades nine through twelve. The applicant must
have experience in preparing students for external examinations.

One person - to teach General Science and Chemistry to all grade levels. The applicant
must have experience in preparing students for external examinations

Physical Education

One person - to teach Physical Education to all grade levels. The applicant must be
available to coach varsity teams in the core sports.

Mathematics
Three persons - to teach mathematics to all grade levels. Experience in preparing
students for external examinations (BJC, BGCSE & SAT) is a requirement

Biology
One person - to teach General science and Biology to all grade levels.
The applicant must have experience in preparing students for external
examinations

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited university and a Teacher’s
Certificate. Two letters of reference, copies of all degrees and certificate, and
two passport size photos should be submitted. A commitment to the values of
Catholic, Benedictine education is expected of our teachers. Only those persons who
have no difficulty with the Roman Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply. Please sub-
mit application and required documents to:

The Principal
St. Augustine’s College

P.O. Box N-3940
Nassau, Bahamas
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 7





Caribbean
region and
Canadian aid

Insight |

WORLD VIEW

m By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a consultant and
former Caribbean diplomat)

Is the midst of a troubling
global financial crisis, there
is a little good news for the coun-
tries of the Caribbean. The region
is to be one of the 20 “countries”
of the world on which the Gov-
ernment of Canada will now focus
its aid.

The full list of countries,
released by the Canadian Inter-
national Development Agency
(CIDA) on February 23rd, is sev-
en African nations, five Asian
countries, five Latin American
nations, Ukraine, the West Bank
and Gaza and “Caribbean.”

Eighty per cent of CIDA’s $1.5-
billion bilateral programming bud-
get, which represents about 53 per
cent of Canada's overall develop-
ment assistance funding, will be
targeted towards those countries.

Contrary to a story carried in a
Guyana newspaper on 26th Febru-
ary, Guyana is included in the
“Caribbean” countries that will
benefit from Canada’s refocused
aid which will promote regional
integration and regional approach-
es to common development issues
and challenges. Canada has dou-
bled its development assistance to
the Caribbean, and is the largest
bilateral donor to the region.

The point is that the govern-
ment of Canada has begun to act
on a commitment made in 2007
by its Prime Minister, Stephen
Harper, to “re-engage” with the
Americas, and this refocusing of its
aid to include five Latin Ameri-
can countries and the Caribbean is
being regarded as part of that
commitment.

Two days after CIDA
announced the refocusing of
Canadian aid, a private consulta-
tion was held in Ottawa between
Canadian officials and a few out-
siders of whom I was privileged
to be one. At that consultation,
Canada’s Minister of State respon-
sible for the Latin American and
Caribbean area, Peter Kent, per-
suasively reiterated his govern-
ment’s genuine desire to make a
real and lasting contribution to
Latin America and the Caribbean.

On the day that Kent empha-
sised Canada’s commitment to the
welfare of its hemispheric neigh-
bourhood, a former Canadian
Prime Minister, Joe Clark, writ-
ing in the Toronto newspaper, The
Globe and Mail, declared that “a
critical test of the response to the
(current) global financial crisis is
whether rich countries, including
Canada, will look beyond their
narrow national and economic
interests.” Clark made the point
that “virtually none of the “stimu-
lus packages” in rich countries
address this disproportionate
impact on the poor world,” and
he asked the question: “Why
shouldn't Canada focus on the
growing crisis in the Caribbean,
our own backyard?”

The “growing crisis in the
Caribbean” to which Clark
referred includes the fact that the
economies of all Caribbean coun-
ties are hard-hit by “sharp declines
in investment, remittances and aid
but also calamitous declines in
income from tourism.” Added to
this is escalating crime promoted
by drug trafficking and arms smug-
gling. As Clark points out, "mur-
der rates in the Caribbean are
higher than in any other region of
the world, and assault rates ...
above the world average.”

Part of the reason for the Cana-
dian government’s renewed inter-
est in the Caribbean is the rapid
increase in violent crime through-
out the region, and the growing
influence of drug lords. It is now
widely recognised that the crime
situation is frightening away
investment, contributing to the
migration of skilled people, cre-
ating refugees, corroding political
stability and eroding democracy.

Quite rightly, Canada has been
very concerned about promoting

ie
US)

Ute ta
PHONE: 322-2157



and safeguarding democracy
throughout Latin America and the
Caribbean, for while economic
growth is vitally important to the
enhancement of people’s lives, so
too is the quality of governance
under which they live.

Drug trafficking and crime
thrive on conditions of poverty,
unemployment and declining
investment. In this connection,
crime is intricately tied-up with
development, and the former will
not be dealt with effectively unless
the latter receives attention.

The refocusing of Canada’s aid
programme for the benefit of
Latin America and the Caribbean
comes not a moment too soon.
And while it will be good for the
Caribbean, it will also be good for
Canada.

Canada is not a super power
in the league of the United States,
and while it is linked to the US
geographically and economically,
it does not have to try to match
the areas to which the US pro-
vides aid, nor does it have to sup-
port all the causes that the US pur-
sues. It should be conducting a
foreign policy — including an aid
and trade policy — that serves the
interests of Canada and does the
most good. Scatter-shooting its aid
to far-flung countries, which are
not desperate, limits the amount of
money Canada can spend in areas
where it can be most effective —
the Caribbean and some Latin
American countries are clearly
such areas.

Stephen Harper and Caribbean
Heads of Government attending
the Summit of the Americas in
April are scheduled to have a
working breakfast. At that session,
Harper will raise the matter of
Canada and the Caribbean enter-
ing a formal trade and economic
arrangement to replace CARIB-
CAN, the arrangement under
which Caribbean countries enjoy
duty-free access to the Canadian
market for 83.2 per cent of their
exports.



@ SIR Ronald Sanders

A World Trade Organisation
waiver, allowing CARIBCAN,
expires in December 2011, and
while trade between Canada and
Caribbean Community and Com-
mon Market (CARICOM) coun-
tries is relatively small for both
sides, CARICOM nonetheless
enjoys a trade surplus with Cana-
da averaging about $1 billion over
the five years ending in 2006.

For Canada, trade in goods
with CARICOM countries con-
stitute a mere 0.02 per cent of its
total trade. Therefore, whether or
not Canada concludes an FTA
with CARICOM countries is nei-
ther here nor there for Canada
economically. But, it would be a
good opportunity for Canada to
show understanding and commit-
ment to its smaller neighbours by
negotiating an agreement that
places their development as a pri-
ority.

It will call for both sides — but
especially Canada — to throw the
rule book out the window and
focus instead on an economic part-
nership agreement rather than
simply a Free Trade Agreement.
CARICOM countries would have
little interest in the latter, and
Canada could take pride in the
former. It would begin to address
what Joe Clark describes in the
context of the current global finan-
cial crisis — but which is true of the
entire present economic order —
as the “disproportionate impact
on the poor.”

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

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NOTICE TO BRITISH CITIZENS

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica) will visit Freeport and
Nassau from 9 to 11 March 2009 and will be available to discuss any individual problems
concerning passports and nationality issues.

Passport applications and renewals should continue to be sent by courier direct to the
High Commission in Kingston.

FREEPORT: MONDAY, 9 MARCH
10:00am to 4:00pm (Venue to be determined)

NASSAU: TUESDAY, 10 MARCH and WEDNESDAY, 11 MARCH

10:00am to 4:00pm at British Honorary Consul’s residence in Winton

Appointments for all 3 days can be booked by calling the
Honorary Consul in Nassau on 324-4089.

Bahamas
Issues Gone
Wild

www.bahamasissuesgonewild.com

It’s time the small man and young
people’s ideas are listened to!

Let’s Unite the Bahamian people &
stop dividing them with party politics!

35 years of independence & we still
are not happy with party politics!

41 years Independence looking out
for the people

Real change in 2012 “Yes we can”

The people are listening
The site they will all be watching

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘$1m missing’ from Hundreds of thousands missing from Ministry

embassy funds

FROM page one

quate documentation to determine items purchased and how }

much was spent.”

Meanwhile, another sum of $335,000 was noted by Auditors
to have been “trasnferred to a bank account in Cuba with
regard to the establishment of the office in Cuba.”

Auditors again stated that “due to inadequate record keep-
ing (they) could not verify how this money was spent.”

Under a section of the report relating to the Bahamas Con-
sulate General in Miami, Florida, auditors report that records
reflect that the sum of $274,000 was also “spent on behalf of
the Embassy’s office in Cuba” and adds, “this amount should
be reconciled.”

Auditors additionally reported that “six blank/open cheques

drawn on the Ministry’s account (Consulate General, Miami,
Florida) were with respect to expenditure relating to the
establishment of the Cuba Embassy.”

“We were unable to verify what the cheques were used for.
The normal purchasing procedures were not followed,” said
the report.

The establishment of the Bahamian embassy in Cuba has
been a point of contention politically.

Whilst in Cuba for a CARICOM conference in December
2008, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who had previously
declared his intention to close down the embassy should he
return to power, said Government had subsequently decided

to keep it open in part because of the amount expended by the

previous government in opening it and setting up an official
residence for the Ambassador.

Yesterday Minister of Foreign Affairs and Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette said the report “speaks for itself.”

“Tt is a report of the Auditor General of The Bahamas,
which is independent of the ministry of foreign affairs...any-
one who reads it can draw whatever conclusions from it,” he
said.

As to whether he was now aware of how the money, spent
by the ministry under his predecessor, Fred Mitchell, was
used, he said it was “spent on various items.”

“There have been significant changes in the budgetary allo-
cations to various missions overseas and also strengthening
accounting procedures as a result” of the report, he added.

Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell and Minister of Foreign Affairs
at the time of the establishment of the embassy told The Tri-
bune that Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Patricia
Rodgers, would have “all the explanations” for the points
raised by the Auditors with respect to the expenditure.

“There’s certainly no irregularity whatsoever and it would

all be properly accounted for. Audits have to do with what the

picture is on that particular day. The actual comments they
make seem to be directed more at record keeping than any
kind of misapproriation,” he said.




























The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 682/09
STORAGE TANK #11
CLEANING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Ms. Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236

Harbour Bay
HALF IS

50.% OFF

The other half
Is 15.% OFF

Ask about Our
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Purchase

FROM page one

als supplied and renovations done, but audi-
tors were not provided with contracts or
any bids.

Auditors also struggled to settle the Min-
istry’s Corporation Sole Current Account,
which was $89,465.31 overdrawn in April,
2007, as they were not presented with bank
reconciliation statements for the period
under review and the amount could not be
compared with the cash book as it was not
being balanced.

The whereabouts of the unaccounted
money is still unknown and is part of an
intensive police investigation into corrup-
tion in the Ministry of Housing during that
period, Mr Russell said.

“T don’t know the details of it but we are
still trying to find out what happened to
the money connected to the ten apartments
in Freeport,” he said.

“The money has disappeared and I think
the police are doing a full investigation into
that.”

The Auditor General also discovered an
outstanding $645,120.34 in rent which
should have been accumulated from ten-
ants of public rental units from as far back
as 1993.

And the report recommends all outstand-
ing rent is collected and a system is put in
place to ensure rental income remains cur-
rent as a matter of urgency.

Mr Russell said: “People in the rental
units claim they have paid, but there is no
record in our system to show that they paid.

“We will update the system to ensure
that we can account for these funds coming
through the Ministry for the public rental
unit accounts, and even the money that is
used through the Bahamas Mortgage corpo-
ration.

“We haven’t changed the whole system
yet but we have persons who are directly
responsible for monthly rents.”

In addition the auditor general found
official receipts were not issued for money
received from Abaco and Freeport for the
sale of property, and recommends official
receipts are issued and recorded in the cash

book to provide an audit trail and enhance
transparency and accountability.

A large number of general receipt books
were not provided for audit inspection and
were not seen in the cash book, and perti-
nent information was omitted from the cash
book which was not being balanced.

Receipt books should be provided for
audit inspection immediately, and the cash
book should be properly maintained, the
report states.

Mr Russell said: “We are trying to keep
everything accounted for now.

“We have already put in place for the
accounts on a regular basis and the account
is run directly by the Permanent Secretary.

“We scrutinise everything.”

Adding: “There was no record of any-
thing being kept, so we don’t know what
happened to the missing money. The police
will continue their investigation and hope-
fully they will announce something soon.”

PLP MP for Golden Gates Shane Gibson,
former Housing Minister, was not available
for comment before The Tribune went to
press.

Reve

Is cutting the store in half

Colon and stomach cancer
on the rise in the Bahamas

FROM page one

“With colon cancer, we are
seeing an increase with newly
diagnosed colon cancer cases a
year, and we are also seeing an
increase in the amount of stom-
ach cancer cases we have a year
within the public sector,” Dr
Turnquest said.

He explained that while
there was no actual study done,
doctors have been monitoring
cases of stomach and colon can-
cer through the tumour registry
at Princess Margaret Hospital.

“We are able to see trends
(more) quickly by using that
registry than anyone else would
be able to. We see population
trends and we try to see what is
going on in 2008 as opposed to
2002 and so forth,” he said.

Dr Turnquest said he thinks
colon and stomach cancer levels
are up in the country due to
poor diets and the lack of exer-
cise.

“We have a high fat, low
fibre diet. All the bad things
that people can do to get colon
cancer, we do it. Lack of exer-
cise, obesity, high body mass
index, and every particularly
bad thing to do we do, hence
the increase in these diseases,”
Dr Turnquest said.

However, he said there are
many changes that Bahamians
can make to their diets and
lifestyles to decrease their risk
of developing these types of
cancer.

“Tf you look at the body mass

of most Bahamians it is very
high. Most of our population is
technically at overweight or
obese levels. A precious few of
us fall into the normal body
mass index. Bahamians can start
increasing the amount of fibre
in their diet, actually get out
there and exercise and drop a
few pounds,” Dr Turnquest
said.

According to the oncology
channel’s website, stomach can-
cer occurs twice as often in men
and it is more common in peo-
ple over the age of 55.

In the United States, inci-
dence is higher in African
Americans than in Caucasians.

Changes in diet and food
preparation have led to a recent
decrease in the number of cases
of cancer of the lower stomach
(distal gastric cancer).

However, cases of cancer of
the upper stomach (proximal
gastric cancer) have increased,
primarily as a result of the
prevalence of obesity and gas-
troesophageal reflux disease
(GERD).

According to the US’
National Cancer Institute
(NCI), approximately 760,000
cases of stomach cancer are
diagnosed worldwide and more
than 24,000 cases are diagnosed
in the United States each year.
Incidence is highest in Japan,
South America, Eastern
Europe, and parts of the Middle
East.

Worldwide, stomach cancer
is the second leading cause of
cancer-related deaths.

Royal Bahamian Resort & Offshore Island

Invites application for the position of:

OPERATIONS MANAGER

University degree in Hotel Management
Must have at least 10 years as a Senior Manager

or similar position

Experience at a 4 or 5 diamond Hotel
Proficiency in several foreign languages would

be an asset

Strong communication skills oral and written
Willing to work long hours

Strong organizational and leadership skills
Competitive compensation package commensurate
with relevant experience and qualifications.

Applications should be email to:
cmajor@egrp.sandals.com

Extra 10°. off for

Privilege Cards &

Corporate Partners

00

Armed robberies
and cutlass attack
are investigated

FROM page one

Drugs and Notions store in
Kennedy Subdivision on Fri-
day afternoon.

Two men entered the store
at around lpm and one,
dressed in a yellow T-shirt and
black trousers, threatened
staff with a silver handgun to
steal cash, cell phone cards
and other items.

The pair then robbed a cus-
tomer of her beige coloured
1999 Mazda Millennium and
escaped in the car heading
west.

Assistant Superintendent
of Police Walter Evans said:
“Intensive investigations have
been launched into these mat-
ters.”

Also under investigation is
the brutal attack of a man who
was slashed with a cutlass, and
a woman who was beaten, by

aman they know.

The attacker approached
the pair as they were talking
in front of the man’s home in
Palm Beach Street sometime
after 8pm on Saturday and
demanded cash as he threat-
ened them with the blade.

The attacker threw the cut-
lass at the man’s head, and the
woman, of the Balfour
Avenue area, was beaten and
her left hand was injured.

Both were treated at
Princess Margaret Hospital in
Shirley Street and the woman
has since been discharged.

The man suffered from
head lacerations and is in sta-
ble condition in hospital.

Anyone with any informa-
tion which may assist police
investigations should call
police on 919 or call
Crimestoppers anonymously
on 328-8477.

Two killed as car
crashes into church

FROM page one

Reckley said.

“Additional information obtained from relatives of the
driver is that he suffers from seizures.”

A portion of Settler’s Way, from the crosswalk at Taber-
nacle Baptist Academy extending just past the Jehovah Wit-
ness Church, was cordoned off about an hour with police tape
to prevent traffic entering the area.

The vehicle was extensive damaged.

The bodies of the victims were removed from the wreck-
age and taken by Ambulance to Rand Memorial hospital,
where doctors pronounced them officially dead.

Mr Reckley said the two deaths are recorded as the fourth
and fifth traffic fatalities for the year.

He said the accident is still under investigation by police.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 9



Armed robberies investigated

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
Police are investigating two sepa-
rate incidents in the West Grand
Bahama area, where persons
were assaulted and robbed by
gunmen.

Supt Wendell Deveaux, officer
in charge of the West End Dis-
trict, reported that police have
arrested one man who is assist-
ing them with their investigation
into one of the matters.

Mr Deveaux reported that the
first incident occurred around
9.30pm on Friday at Eight Mile
Rock.

A 31-year-old male resident
of Jones Town, Eight Mile Rock,
told police that he was walking

through Batelco Corner when a
man armed with a black handgun
held him up, putting him in fear
for his life.

Investigations are continuing
into the matter.

Supt Deveaux said police
received a report of a second inci-
dent on Saturday around 10.42pm
at West End.

He reported that a 37-year-old
man and a 23-year-old woman
were accosted by two armed men
who put him in fear for his life.

The man told police that the
suspects were wearing tan Dickies
and had cloths over their faces.

Supt Deveaux said a 24-year-
old male resident of West End
was taken into custody and is
assisting police with their investi-
gation into the incident.

He said police are searching

for a second suspect in connec-
tion with the matter.

Police are also investigating
an armed robbery that occurred
at Lewis Yard early Saturday
morning.

Supt Deveaux said sometime
around 5.58 am on Saturday, a
56-year-old male resident of
Hawksbill, with other persons,
was in Lewis Yard when two dark
men armed with a handgun
robbed him of cash.

There was no arrest in the
matter. Police are continuing their
investigations.

Supt Deveaux reported that
21 arrests were made over the
weekend in the West End Dis-
trict.

He said nine persons were
charged for various criminal
offences.

FROM page one

conclusions.

“So it does give me a sense of vindication if you
will that these findings are finally coming to light,”
he said.

His comments appeared to be supported by those
of current minister of foreign affairs and deputy
prime minister Brent Symonette, who said he
believes the report “speaks for itself”, adding that
“changes have been made to make sure that kind of
issue does not recur.”

In the 2006/2007 report, tabled in the House of
Assembly last week, a section on the Consular Divi-
sion of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs notes in some
instances visa application forms were processed
despite not containing all required information.

They were often found to be missing applicants’
signatures, declarations by the applicant that the
information was true and correct as well as details of
their occupation and their photograph.

In relation to seamen applying for visas, auditors
said that documents such as their “identity”, their
financial information, immigration status, what type
of visa was granted, and general receipts to support
payment having been made, were missing.

In these instances, auditors recommended that
in future such information must be included and
submitted before visas are granted.

Auditors also raised concern that their review
found that one person was “able to sponsor up to six-
teen people in a given period” for visas.

They said they were “unable to determine” from
the ministry whether there were any established
guidelines determining the number of people a per-
son is able to sponsor, but they recommend that
guidelines be established to provide a “greater lev-
el of assurance that only genuine requests are con-
sidered.”

Meanwhile, auditors added that a “large num-
ber” of general receipt books relating to visa appli-
cations were not provided for audit inspection and
were not “seen in the cash book.”

They also noted that they “found that pertinent
information was omitted from the cash book, which
was not being balanced.”

Yesterday, former Minister of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell described Mr Bethel’s comments on

Minister says report supports
‘visa scam’ allegations

the report as “utter nonsense.”

He said that he believes the Auditor General
made the same observations directly to the Perma-
nent Secretary “at the time” and “corrective mea-
sures were taken to deal with it.”

“T don’t think there’s anything there really. I think
it’s just bureaucracy and errors of that time, I don’t
think there’s any fire behind it,” he added.

In 2005 and 2006, Mr Bethel, then FNM party
Chairman and a senator, claimed to have evidence
that there was a visa scandal going on in the consular
division of the Ministry.

He alleged that there was political interference in
the issuance of visas and that the number of visas
issued shot up under Mr Mitchell’s tenure.

Mr Mitchell denied the claims, and challenged
the FNM to present any such evidence to the police.

Yesterday Mr Symonette said that “there have
been changes at the consular division and there
have been changes in the way that visas can be
issued.”

“Various controls have been put in place to make
sure this type of thing does not recur in the future,”
he added.

The 2006/2007 report also states that 9,000 visas
were granted between July 2004 and June 2007. It
adds that auditors were unable to determine how
many of these people left the country as they were
“not presented with exit forms” to substantiate such
a determination.

Mr Symonette said that this is “of serious concern”
but highlighted certain impediments to the Gov-
ernment keeping track of the movements of such
individuals.

“When you leave The Bahamas, I leave The
Bahamas, many other people leave The Bahamas
there are no exit forms and that is a concern. We
don’t know if the people do leave and it is a con-
cern,” he said, adding, however, that many countries
do not have such a system.

Mr Symonette said he expects that with the intro-
duction of electronic visas, a programme being insti-
tuted in conjunction with the issuance of e-pass-
ports, the Government will be better able to moni-
tor people granted visas for a specific time period.

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THE TRIBUNE



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YOUR FUTURE

IS ABOUT TO GET BRIGHTER

m@ By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

PUBLIC Works and Transport
Minister Neko Grant assured res-
idents of the communities affected
by the New Providence Road
Improvement Project (NPRIP)
that their opinions are vital to the
success of the project.

“As tax payers who wish to be
assured that public monies are
being wisely spent, and as residents
or business owners of these com-
munities in which road works will
commence, I assure you that your
presence and input are essential
to the success of this undertaking,”
he said.

Residents and business owners
attended a town meeting organ-
ised by the Project Execution Unit
of the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport. The town meeting,
held at SuperClubs Breezes
Resort, Cable Beach, was organ-
ised to disseminate information,
receive feedback and address
queries regarding the road works.

Two months ago, government
signed a $120-million contract with
Jose Cartellone Construccciones
Civiles of Argentina, South Amer-
ica, for the re-launch of the com-
pletion of the road works.

The project is expected to be
completed in 33 months and is
funded by the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB). It
includes approximately 15.7 miles
of roads, 19 corridors and five
major intersections.

Mr Grant said his ministry is
“committed to the execution of
this project in strict adherence to
the specifications.”

“We also committed to execu-
tion of this project in a manner
that would create minimal discom-
fort and inconvenience to residen-
tial and commercial property own-
ers and the general public who may
utilise these routes on a regular
basis. Furthermore, we promised
to make every effort to keep the
public informed at every stage of
the project’s progress,” he said.

The town meeting specifically
addressed issues relevant to the
first three corridors to be construct-
ed. They are:

- Corridor four (Bethel Avenue
extension) at a cost of $8.6 million
- Corridor five — the road to be
constructed from John F Kennedy
Drive/Farrington Road junction
through Rock Crusher Road onto

NEKO GRANT, Minister of Public Works
and Transport, addresses a town meet-
ing organised by the Project Execution
Unit of the Ministry on the New Provi-
dence Road Improvement Project. Colin
Higgs, Permanent Secretary in the Min-
istry of Public Works and Transport, is
pictured seated.

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West Bay Street at a cost of $5.1
million

- Corridor 18 which commences
at this point on West Bay Street
and continues along to Saunders
Beach at a cost of $2.3 million

- Section 24 at the Bethel
Avenue/John F Kennedy Drive
junction at a cost of $6.8 million

tives of the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport were opened
for residents and business owners
to raise questions and express their
concerns.

“In addition to the lodging of
verbal complaints or queries at
these information booths, partici-
pants are encouraged to put their
concerns in writing,” said Minis-

addressed to the Permanent Secre-
tary, Ministry of Public Works and
Transport to which a response will
be provided at the earliest oppor-
tunity for your records.”

Also in attendance at the meet-
ing were Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis, Minister of Nation-
al Security Tommy Turnquest and
Attorney General and Minister of

Following the meeting, informa-
tion booths manned by representa- ten

ter Grant. “In this regard, the writ-
submission

Legal Affairs Senator Michael Bar-

should be nett.

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THE TRIBUNE

S
ke
MONDAY, MARCH 2,

wa
ale

Russian stops
‘the Hammer’
Pitt in the
first round

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

RICHARD ‘the Hammer’
Pitt didn’t get a chance to get
started against Russian welter-
weight Khabib Alakhuerdiev.

Friday night at the Seminole
Hard Rock Cafe, Alakhuerdiev
wasted little time in stopping
Pitt two minutes and 19 seconds
in the first round after dropping
the Bahamian three times.

“The fight turned out to be a
tougher fighter than we
though,” said Pitt’s
manager/trainer Ray Minus Jr.
“Anthony ‘Psycho’ Woods
fought this same guy a couple
months ago and so we though
that Richard Pitt who is around
the same level, had a chance.”

The 26-year-old
Alakhuerdiev, who remained
undefeated at 9-0 with his
fourth technical knockout,
caught Pitt with a left hook to
the body for the first eight
count.

After he got up, minus said
Pittt moved around and man-
aged to score some points, but
he caught another left-right
body shot for the second eight
count.

Caught

Again after he got up, Minus
said Pitt went after his oppo-
nent, but he was caught for the
third time, this time forcing the
referee to step in and call off
the fight on the flurry of punch-
es.
Pitt, dropped his record to 3-

“He was doing fairly okay as
he was boxing, but he didn’t
pull out the kind of response
that we planned,” said Minus, of
Pitt, who received a mandatory
30-day suspension. “He wants
to get back in the gym and get
another fight in Florida.

“Everybody recognize that
he’s a good fighter, but he just
have to execute. So right now,
he’s excited about getting back
in the gym and improve his per-
formance before he get back
into the gym.”

Pitt, who was working in Exu-
ma, had not fought since June
30, 2007 when he won an unan-
imous six round decision over
Dencil ‘Death’ Miller at the CI
Gibson Gymnasium.

Although they only put in
three weeks of training prior to
going to Hollywood, Minus said
he felt Pitt was ready because
he was doing a lot of running
and staying in shape in Exuma.

Next month, Minus said he
intend to take both light heavy-
weight Ryan ‘Big Youth’
McKenzie and heavyweight Jer-
ry ‘Big Daddy’ Butler to Cana-
da to fight on March 20 at Casi-
no Rama.

“Those two guys have been
in training and they are look-
ing forward to it,” Minus said.
“So we are expecting some
good performances from both
of them.”

The fights for the local boxers
are being arranged through
First Class Promotions, headed
by Michelle Minus.

First Class Promotions, whose
12-month suspension by the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
has been lifted, is preparing to
host Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey’s British Common-
wealth against Charles ‘the Cru-
sader’ Adamu from Ghana.

The fight is scheduled for
May 23 at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

But Minus said they are just
waiting on Adamu to sign his
contract.

Once he does that, Minus
said they will submit it to the
British Boxing Board for their
approval and then to the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
for sanctioning.

PAGE 11



ts

2009



BAHAMIAN SENIOR’S SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY LEGACY WILL BE HARD TO MATCH

Bianca Stuart jumps

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

HEN Bianca
Stuart gradu-
ates from
Southern IIli-
nois University this year, she will
leave behind a legacy that will
probably be hard to duplicate.

Meanwhile, sprinters Cache
Armbrister and Nivea Smith are
just getting started with their
Auburn University careers in the
Southeastern Conference.

Stuart, the Bahamian senior,
ended her campaign at the State
Farm Missouri Valley Conference
Indoor Championships with her
fourth straight title in the wom-
en’s long jump.

On Saturday at the University
of Iowa in Cedar Falls, Stuart
cleared 21-feet, 6 1/4-inches to
lead the Salukis to victory in her
speciality.

The mark, which surpassed the
All-Time Conference record of
20-11 1/2, MVC meet of 20-9 and
the UNI Dome of 20-8 1/2, now
have Stuart ranked at number
three in the nation as she also
went over the NCAA automatic
qualifying mark of 20-10.

Stuart, who turns 22 on May
17, ended up third in the final of
the 60 metre final in a season’s
best of 7.62 seconds. Jeanne Mid-
dleton of Indiana State won in a
season’s best of 7.51, followed by
‘Yomeaqua Brents of Illinois State
in her season’s best of 7.58 as
well.

Alexandria Oembler, of Mis-
souri State, had to settle for
eighth place in 7.87.

Stuart, a graduate of Queen’s
College, clocked 7.61 for the sec-
ond fastest qualifying time in win-
ning the first of three heats.

Middleton turned in the fastest
time of 7.56 in winning the third
heat. Oembler had the sixth
fastest time of 7.74. Oembler was
second in the second heat.

0 fourth straight



SUCCESSFUL LEGACY: Bianca Stuart pictured in a file me during a university meet.

Just before running in the 60,
Oembler participated in the final
of the 60, placing fourth in 8.79.
Meredith Haynes of Southern Illi-
nois went under the NCAA pro-
visional time of 8.43 in winning
the race in 8.42.

At the Southeastern Confer-
ence Championship at the Nut-
ter Fieldhouse at the University
of Kentucky over the weekend,
nivea Smith and Cache Armbris-
ter were both third in their sec-
tions of the women’s 200 final.

Competing in the first final,
Smith, the Grand Bahamian
native in her freshman year, was
timed in 23.92 behind Tennessee’s
juniot Lynne Layne in 23.53 and

Lousiana State’s sophomore
Kenyanna Wilson in 23.85.

Cache Armbrister, the sopho-
more at Auburn University, ran
23.93 for her third place in section
two. Samantha Henry, a junior
from Louisiana State, won in
23.45 and Alishea Usery, a fresh-
man from Fllrida, was seconsd in
23:19.

Surpassed

Combined together, Smith fin-
ished fifth overall just ahead of
Armbrister. All four competitors
ahead of them - Henry, Layne,
Usery and Wilson in that order -
surpassed the NCAA provisional











Bahamas team’s

trip to Paraguay

AEM tM OY
ARYL bloc

Late arrival should be no problem, says captain

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

THE Bahamas’ Davis Cup
team had to spend the weekend
in Miami, Florida, but captain
John Farrington said he doesn’t
expect their late arrival in
Paraguay to have any effect on
the way they play in the first
round of the American Zone II
Davis Cup tie.

The young team, comprising of
Devin Mullings, Timothy Neilly,
Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle,
were scheduled to leave for
Paraguay on Friday to spend at
least a week getting acclimatized.

But because of a visa problem,
the team had to stay in Miami.
They are now due to leave today
and should arrive in Paraguay on
Tuesday. “We were able to prac-
tice, which was the most impor-
tant thing,” said Farrington, who
had the team together for the first
time since the players all played in
the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Asso-
ciation’s December Invitational

at the National Tennis Center.

“Everybody look good. Every-
body is working hard. The team is
ready.”

The team will be out to avenge
last year’s 4-1 loss to Paraguay at
the National Tennis Center when
they play at the Yacht Golf Club
in Paraguayo, Lambare from Fri-
day to Sunday.

The official draw is scheduled
for Wednesday when the team
will get to find out who will be
matched against the team from
Paraguay, comprising of Ramon
Delgado, Juan Carlos Ramirez,
Nicolas Salama and Diego
Galeano. “T think out chances are
good playing them at home,” Far-
rington projected. “Devin has
been playing in a few tourna-
ments and Marvin has also played
in acouple of tournaments.,

“Timmy was practicing hard
with Layton Hewith and BJ has
been playing in tournaments too.
So everybody look good. We
should have no excuses. We just
need to go out there and play and
we are confident that we can

Devin Mullings

ia
fe

;

Timothy Neilly

come home with the win.”

Although they are on the road,
Farrington said the Bahamas has
been successful playing away
against some big teams and they
have had their share of success
at home as well.

“In Davis Cup, anything is pos-
sible,” Farrington summed up.

Having experienced some of
the hostile environment that the
Bahamas has faced in the past,
Farrington said he doesn’t expect
the players to encounter that type
of problem because the Davis
Cup rules are strict and the chair

qualifying time of 23.90.

In the preliminaries on Satur-
day, Smith won the fourth of sev-
en heats in 23.98 and Armbrister
was second in the third heat in
23.94 behind Henry’s winning
time of 23.30.

Armbrister, however, had the
fifth fastest qualifying time just
ahead of Smith’s sixth place.

The two former Carifta team-
mates also contested the 60, but
neither advanced to the final.

Armbrister, a graduate from
St. Augustine’s College, had the
best showing when she ran 7.57
for 14th overall, coming in fifth in
heat one. Smith was 17th in 7.64.

Another SAC graduate, Ger-

Marvin Rolle

umpire have been enforcing the
rules.

“So for the large part of it, we
are protected by the ITF’s rules,
so we should be fin,” he said. “I
just hope that we don’t create a
problem for ourselves in our atti-
tude and what we demonstrate.

“Tf we can go up there and
keep our head together, some-
thing that I intend to continue to
upon them, and play, we should
be okay. There’s nothing we can
do with the crowd unless the
umpire takes control.”

Before leaving Miami today,

ard Brown, in his sophomore year
at Auburn, competed in the
men’s long jump where he was
13th with his best leap of 21-2 1/2.

Brown, coming off an injury
season last year, was fifth in flight
one. Christian Taylor, a freshman
from Florida, won the event with
a leap of 25-3 1/2.

Next weekend, a host of ath-
letes, including Olympic sprinter
Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson, hurdler
Krystal Bodie and high jumper
Jamal Wilson, will compete at the
National Junior College Athletic
Association (NJCAA) Indoor
Championships.

The championships will be
staged at Texas Tech University.



Farrington said they intend to
have one last practice this morn-
ing just so that the players can
stay sharp.

Once they get into Paraguay,
he said they should be able to
make the adjustment to the red
clay courts at the playing facilities.
The only concern, if he has one,
would be the weather.

But Farrington said they play-
ers have all traveled before and
they have been able to stay right
in and make the adjustment, so he
doesn’t see it being a major chal-
lenge.
PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



| ate



‘Resurrection Day is coming’

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

PUBLIC relations officer
Bob Brown is calling it “Res-
urrection Day” as the Bahamas

Powerlifting Federation
relaunches its National Power-
lifting Championships.
Scheduled for March 21 at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
starting at 9am, Brown said the
championships will be back

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Mi Relaunch of National Powerlifting Championships

after a hiatus bigger and better.

“This time, we are showcas-
ing 70 percent of new, vibrant
strong lifters,” according to
Brown, who was a former
national champion. “They will
be coming from all over the
place.”

The College of the Bahamas,
under the leadership of Keith
Cox, have been grooming some
new competitors and John Mills
has taken talented Leslie White
under his wings.

“Why we’re calling it Resur-
rection Day, it’s because a lot of
the past lifters like Falcon
Major, Keith Capron, myself,
Kevin Woodside, Arlington
Clarke and Delvin ‘Blue Boy’
Scott, who benched over 600
pounds, have all been working
with a new breed of power-
lifters,” Brown pointed out.

“So we are looking forward
to one of the best champi-
onships ever as Resurrection
Day on March 21 take place.
We are looking forward to a
great time that day.”

Not to be left out is Grand
Bahama, who are expected to
coming to town with a contin-
gent of competitors led by sen-
sational Bernard ‘Spikes’ Rolle.

“Spikes, who has been a pio-
neer of powerlifting, is going to
give it his best because he does-
n’t know how long he will con-
tinue to be in the sport,” Brown
stressed.

The Federation, under the
leadership of veteran president
Rex Burnside, is looking for-
ward to returning to the inter-
national scene, if not at the
World Championships, at some



ao . |
i

TITRA ne EnCheneiccasenchetin

other big meet to “let the world
know that we are still around,”
Brown stated.

“That’s why we are calling
this championship Resurrection
Day because we want to get
back out there competing again
and to get our national team
back in place.”

Calling themselves the “old
Pilgrims or Gladiators,” Brown
said the big names in the sport
are eager to see what their new
protégés are capable of doing
when the championships take
place.

“We are anticipating a con-

ite

tingent from COB, a contingent
from all of the major gyms. We
are anticipating at least 70 com-
petitors participating,” Brown
said. All of the competitors will
compete in the benchpress,
squats and the deadlift. But he
noted that in the event a com-
petitor is only good in one
event, there will be a prize for
the competitor who excel the
best in either event.

“We're trying to motivate the
young new competitors and that
is one way that we feel we can
do it,” Brown proclaimed.

Another, he said, is for some






AFTER losing their seaon
openers, last year's 19-and-
under champions and runners-
up First Baptist and Macedo-
nia got revenge on Saturday
as the Baptist Sports Council
continued its 2009 Joyce

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for provision of General Insurance
Services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:

on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 690/09

All Risks General Insurance

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Motor Insurance - Commercial & Private Vehicles

Tender No. 692/09

Accident Insurance - Money & Burglary

Tender No. 693/09

Liability Insurance - Personal & Public

Tender No. 694/09
Professional Indemnity

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The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163





of the top powerlifters, who
have been in training, to sit on
the side and let the newcomers
take the stage, rather than dis-
couraging those ones who might
be on the par with the renown
competitors. Brown, one of
those competitors who was
intending to compete in the
championships, said between
August and September, the fans
can look for more of the old
guards to step out and compete.

But he said the focus is on
trying to showcase the young
new lifters on “Resurrection
Day.”

First Baptist and Macedonia gain
revenge after losing season openers

Minus Basketball Classic on
Saturday at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.

First Baptist blasted Tem-
ple Fellowship 37-14, while
Macedonia had to go an extra
three minutes for a 35-31 over-
time win over Golden Gates
No.2 in one of the most excit-
ing games played.

The other thriller came in
the 19-and-under division as
Miracle Working Church of
God stayed undefeated with
a 48-47 nipping of the Latter-
Day Saints in double over-
time.

¢ In other results posted,
Latter-Day Saints (15) won
27-24 over Temple

Fellowship; Macedonia (15)
blasted Miracle Working
Church of God

25-15; Zion South Beach
(15) held off Golden Gates
19-18; Faith United

(15) won 39-32 over First
Baptist; Evangelistic Center
(Men) nipped

Bahamas Harvest 33-32;
Temple Fellowship (Men)
knocked off City of

Praise 32-20; Faith United
(Men) def. Mercy Seat 29-22.

¢ Here's a summary of the
games played:
First Baptist 37, Temple Fel-

lowship 14: Edrico McGregor
had a game high 15 for First
Baptist as they climbed to 1-1
on the year. Najee Bethel and
Tavaughn Gibson both had
four in Temple Fellowship's
season's debut.

Macedonia 35, Golden
Gates No.2 31: Marvin
Roberts pumped in a game
high 16 points to lift Macedo-
nia to a 1-1 record. The game
was tied at 31-31 at the end of
regulation. Rio Johnson had
eight for Golden Gates, who
didn't score in the extra three
minutes.

Miracle Working Church of
God 48, Latter-Day 47: Allen
Curry had 13 in Latter-Day's
first loss after winning their
opener.

Faith United 39, First Bap-
tist 32; Delano Forbes' game
high 19 points led Faith Unit-
ed to their season opening 15-
and-under win. Leon Saun-
ders had 18 in the loss for First
Baptist.

Zion South Beach 19, Gold-
en Gates 18: Asenio Wood-
side scored eight as Zion
South Beach made a success-
ful debut in the 15-and-under
division.

Perez Hall had eight in
Golden Gates’ debut on the
losing end.

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Macedonia 25, Miracle
Working Church of God 15:
Geno Bullard lid up

the nets for a game high 10
for Macedonia's 15-and-under
debut.

Shaquille Davis had nine in
a losing effort for Miracle
Working Church of God.

Latter-Day 27, Temple Fel-
lowship 24: Jermaine Rolle
had eight points for Latter-
Day Saints’ 15-and-under win.
Antonious Collie had eight for
Temple Fellowship, who fell
to 1-1.

Temple Fellowship 32, City
of Praise 20: Edwin Burrows
had a game high 10 to lead a
balanced scoring attack in this
marquee men's game. Jeff
Rolle had six in the loss.

Faith United 29, Mercy Seat
22: Denero Moss canned a
game high 13 to lead Faith
United to their 19-and-under
season opening victory.

Cordero McDonald had six
in the loss.

New Bethlehem 32, Calvary
Bible 24: Theo Cleare scored a
game high 14 points to pace
the winners in this men's
encounter.

Evangelistic Center 33,
Bahamas Harvest 32: Tyrone
Sands had 15 points for Even-
gelistic Center men's season
debut win. Imara Thompson
had a game high 16 as
Bahamas Harvest fell to 1-1.

° Here's a look at the sched-
ule fo Saturday, March 7:

Court One

10 am Macedonia vs Golden
Gates (15)

11 am First Baptist vs Zion
South Beach (15)

Noon Golden Gates No.2
vs Miracle Working Church
of God (19)

1 pm Mercy Seat vs First
Baptist (19)

2 pm BIBA vs City of Praise
(M) .

3 pm Macedonia vs Temple
Fellowship (M).

Court Two

10 am Miracle Working
Church of God vs Latter-Day
Saints

(15)

11 am Faith Unied vs Tem-
ple Fellowship (15)

Noon Macedonia vs
Ebenezer (19)

1 pm Golden Gates vs Tem-
ple Fellowship (19)

2 pm Christian Tabernacle
vs Church of Nazarene (M)

3 pm New Bethlehem vs
Evangelistic Center (M).
TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 13



Gy aE

BFA: preparations well underway
for hosting 64th FIFA Congress

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

As the local governing body
for football prepares to host
the international Congress for
member federations of the
world’s most popular sport,
the association remains opti-
mistic in their ability to host a
successful event.

The Bahamas Football
Association will to host the
64th FIFA Congress, May 31st
— June 3rd at the Atlantis
Resort, Paradise Island and
BFA President Anton Sealy
reports that preparations for
the international event have
been ahead of schedule.

“Preparations are well
underway, we have been
meeting with the various gov-
ernment agencies that are
gong to be intimately involved
in this for t\he past several
weeks,” he said, “We have
also solidified our arrange-
ments with the Atlantis hotel.
Things are going very well, we
are actually ahead of our
schedule and we are very
pleased with the way things
are going at the moment.”

Each of the 208 member
federations from the global



“The members are very excited to
come here and I hope that our
people will be as welcoming and
as warm as I know they can be and
just show off this beautiful country
to these people, may of whom
have never been here before.”



football community will be
represented by a minimum of
three delegates and with a pre-
ponderance of international
media and guests, the FIFA
Congress promises to be one
of the most populated events
hosted in the country.

“It is going to be perhaps
the largest, certainly the most
countries represented in the
Bahamas, at one event,” Sealy
said,

“The members are very
excited to come here and I
hope that our people will be as
welcoming and as warm as I
know they can be and just

Anton Sealy

show off this beautiful country
to these people, may of whom
have never been here before.”

According to the organiza-
tion’s website, The FIFA Con-
gress is considered “the most
critical organ of football’s
international governing body.”

What originally began as a
bi-annual meeting has been
increased to once per year
since 1998 and at the congress
member federations discuss a
myriad of topics and decision
making including governing
statutes, methods by which
they are implemented, an
annual report, acceptance of

NPBA plays four exciting
games over weekend

WITH its regular season starting to wind
down, the New Providence Basketball Asso-
ciation played four exciting games over the
weekend, two at the CI Gibson Gymnasi-
um and two at the CI Gibson Gymnasium.

On Saturday at their home base at CI Gib-
son, the Foxies Pros pulled off a big 77-72
victory over the Coca-Cola Explorers just
after the Police Crimestoppers held off the

Falcons 85-83.

In the Pros win, Dereck Ferguson scored a
side high 18 points. Lamar Watkins paced
the losing Explorers with a game high 23.

Vernon Stubbs came up with 18 to aid in
the Crimestoppers’ win in the opening game.
Renaldo Baillou also had 18 in a losing effort

for the Falcons.

On Friday at Kendal Isaacs, the defending

OVERSEAS NEWS

champions Commonwealth Bank Giants suf-
fered a heartbreaking 71-70 loss to the John-
son’s Trucking Jumpers, while runners-up
Electro Telecom Cybots knocked off the Y-
Care Wreckers 98-95.

Brian Bain exploded for 31 points in the
win for the Cybots, Breston Rolle had 31 in
the loss for the Wreckers.

And Floyd Armbrister exploded for 30

points to help the Truckers in the win.

Giants.

Garvin Lightbourne had 27 in the loss for the

Another double header will be played
tonight at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. In the
opener at 7 pm, the Entertainers will enter-
tain the Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders and in

the 8 pm feature contest, the Giants will

play the Jumpers.



Mark Wilson wins PGA's Mayakoba Classic

@ PLAYA DEL
CARMEN, Mexico

Mark Wilson came south of the
border to work. Although his job
took him to a Mexican resort, and
he stayed at a hotel near the
beach, never once during the
Mayakoba Golf Classic did he
hear any mariachis play.

Not until the eight guys in som-
breros and matching cream-col-
ored suits were playing in his hon-
or. The co-leader after the sec-
ond and third rounds, Wilson
went ahead for good on the sec-
ond hole Sunday, then held on
through dark clouds and wild
winds over the back nine to
secure his second career PGA
Tour victory.

“Holes that we saw earlier in
the week hitting 3-wood and 8-
iron into, we were hitting driver
and 3-wood into,” said Wilson,
who shot a final-round 68 and fin-
ished at 267, two stokes ahead of
J.J. Henry. “It was definitely a
different challenge.”

Wilson opened this tournament
with a birdie and remained steady
all week. He got to the 13th tee
box leading Henry by three
strokes, but was up only one by
the time he tapped in for bogey
on 14. Then he bogeyed 16, too.

Henry, however, was having
just as tough of a time. He
bogeyed 16 and 17, then turned
up his palms in frustration when
the wind grabbed his approach
on 18. Although he parred the
hole, it wasn’t enough. When
Wilson’s approach on 18 landed
on the back of the green, it was
time to cue the mariachis.

“Once I hit the 3 wood, it was
just pure joy,” Wilson said. “You
know, you're so nervous and you
somehow pull off one of the best
shots (of the) week. It’s just pure
joy and satisfaction that the hard
work went in and that you didn’t
get overwhelmed by the situation
and hit a good shot.”

Henry also shot 68 to finish
alone in second at 269.

“(It was) extremely difficult,
but it was the same for every-
body,” said Henry, who still had
his best finish since 2006.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for the services described below

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 26th March, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 688/09
BUSSING SERVICES
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders
and site visits, contact
Mr. Anthony S. Forbes
at telephone 302-1165



new national associations and
elections.

Vote

Each national association is
represented by one vote
regardless of international
football prowess.

This will be the sixth Con-
gress held in the CONCA-
CAF region.

Sealy said with the cross-
section of people which will
be in town for the event,
sports tourism has the oppor-
tunity to pay even further div-
idends for the Bahamas
beyond the four day Congress.

“T have made a point to the
various ministries that I have
spoken to that we are going
to have some very influential
people and from a personal
standpoint who I would like
to see return not only as a
FIFA delegate but to do some
further investments in this
country as well,” he said, “I
as president was very hum-
bled by FIFA’s acceptance of
our bid and so we are looking
to a great time here in the next
few weeks.”

The BFA President noted
that support from various gov-
ernment agencies would be
vital in ensuring the success
of the prestigious event.

“T would like to encourage
our people to put their best
foot forward. I know the gov-
ernment has taken some
proactive steps and a lot of
work in participation of this
Congress,” he said, “From the
Prime Minister’s offense right
down they have been inti-
mately involved in making
sure that we the local orga-
nizing community have every-
thing that we need to enable
FIFA to be confident in know-
ing that they are coming to a
secure country and a country
where they have all the facili-
ties that are necessary to host
a conference of this magni-
tude.”

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS







SPORTS



|



TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR'S David Bentley, right, misses from the
penalty spot during a shootout at the end of the English League
Cup final soccer match at Wembley Stadium in London.



MANCHESTER UNITED manager Alex Ferguson lifts the trophy fol-
lowing the English League Cup final between Manchester United and
Tottenham Hotspur at Wembley Stadium, London Sunday March 1,

2009.

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Stephen Pond, POOL/AP Photo



Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP Photo

BEN FOSTER OF MANCHESTER UNITED makes a save from Tottenham Hotspur's Jamie O'Hara during the penalty shootout in the ae League
Cup final soccer match at Wembley Stadium in London, Sunday, March 1, 2009.

m WEMBLEY, England

Manchester United won the
League Cup with a 4-1 penalty
shootout victory over Tottenham
on Sunday that kept the English
Premier League leaders on course
for an unprecedented five tro-
phies this season, according to the
Associated Press.

After a 0-0 draw through extra
time, United goalkeeper Ben Fos-
ter saved Tottenham’s first
shootout kick from Jamie O’Hara
and David Bentley missed the
third before Anderson hit the
winning penalty.

The victory gave United its sec-
ond trophy of the season follow-
ing December’s Club World Cup
title. The Red Devils also lead
the Premier League by seven
points and are in contention for
the Champions League and FA
Cup.

In Sunday’s Premier League
action, Aston Villa’s chances of
qualifying for the Champions
League were dented when the
home side squandered a two-goal
lead in the final minutes against
Stoke to draw 2-2 at Villa Park.

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The result means Villa remains
fourth, in the final Champions
League slot, three points behind
Liverpool in third and sixth points
clear of Arsenal, which is fifth.

Stoke stays 19th, below Mid-
dlesbrough on goal difference.

West Ham moved up to sev-
enth after a 1-0 win over Man-
chester City at Upton Park on
Sunday. Blackburn moved out of
the relegation zone on goal dif-
ference with a 2-1 win at Hull, a
fiery game that saw both sides
reduced to 10 men.



MILAN (AP) — AC Milan
slipped further behind Inter
Milan and Juventus in the Serie A
title race after losing to Sampdo-
ria 2-1.

Antonio Cassano gave the
Genoa side the lead in the first
half, and Gianpaolo Pazzini dou-
bled it early in the second.
Alexandre Pato scored in the 80th
minute to give Milan some hope,
and Emerson had a goal disal-
lowed.

Inter, which hosted AS Roma
later Sunday, is in first place with
59 points, followed by Juventus



with 53, AC Milan with 48 and
Fiorentina with 46.

Cassano gave Sampdoria the
lead in the 33rd minute. He
tapped in the ball at the far post
after Marius Stankevicius headed
Angelo Palombo’s corner.

Fiorentina and Genoa, the two
teams chasing the fourth Cham-
pions League qualification place,
both failed to win.

Fiorentina drew 1-1 at last-
place Reggina, with Emiliano
Bonnazzoli’s goal equalizing
Alessio Sestu’s opener for Reg-
gina. Genoa was unable to break-
down stubborn defending by
Siena in their 0-0 draw.

Also Sunday, it was: Atalanta
0, Chievo Verona 2; Cagliari 0,
Torino 0; Palermo 0, Catania 4;
and Udinese 2, Lecce 0.



MADRID (AP) — Malaga’s
pursuit of a Champions League
spot lost momentum after a 2-0
loss to Recreativo Huelva, while
Deportivo La Coruna bolstered
its European ambitions with a 1-
0 win at last-place Numancia.

Albert Camunas gave Recre-
ativo the lead in the 54th minute,

© CRICKET: WEST INDIES vs ENGLAND
Sarwan strikes 291 to end England hopes of comeback win



MANCHESTER UNIT-
ED captain Rio Ferdi-
nand lifts the trophy
lifts the trophy follow-
ing the English League
Cup final between
Manchester United
and Tottenham Hot-
spur at Wembley Sta-
dium, London Sunday
March 1, 2009.

Stephen Pond,
POOL/AP Photo

and 10 minutes later Adrian Col-
unga added a goal to hand Mala-
ga only its third loss in 15 games.

Juan Rodriguez scored from a
sharp angle with 15 minutes to
play as Deportivo rallied from
Thursday’s UEFA Cup exit to
join Malaga and Valencia —
which played Valladolid later
Sunday — on 39 pomts. The three
clubs are only two points behind
fourth-placed Villarreal, which
occupies the final Champions
League spot and will attempt to
consolidate its position against
lowly Real Betis later Sunday.

Barcelona also played later,
and needed to snap a three-game
winless streak at Atletico Madrid
to get its title campaign back on
track. The Catalan giant led Real
Madrid by 12 points going into
2009, but has since let Madrid
narrow that gap to just four

Barcelona has 60 points,
Madrid has 56, Sevilla is third
with 47 and Villarreal has 41.

In Sunday’s other 25th round
results, it was: Almeria 2, Getafe
1; Racing Santander 1, Osasuna 1;
and Sporting Gijon 0, Mallorca
1.

Thalia Codrington/AP Photo

WEST INDIES' Denesh Ramdin, right, is clean bowled by England's Graeme Swann, unseen, for 166 runs as wick-
etkeeper Tim Ambrose reacts during the fourth day of the fourth cricket Test match at Kensington Oval in
Bridgetown, Barbados, Sunday, March 1, 2009.



WEST INDIES" Denesh
Ramdin, centre, plays a shot Pe
as England’ S wicketkeeper
Tim Ambrose, right, and
captain Andrew Strauss
looks on, during the fourth
day of the fourth cricket Test
match at Kensington Oval in
Bridgetown, Barbados, Sun-
day, March 1, 2009.

Thalia Codrington/AP Photo

Rammnaresh Sarwan struck 291 to end
England's hopes of completing a come-
back Test series victory in the
Caribbean and open up the chance of
them losing it on the final day here.

Sarwan's vigil at Kensington Oval,
which lasted 11 hours and 40 minutes,
was the cornerstone of West Indies’
749 for nine, the second largest total
England have conceded in Test history.

It meant they began their second
innings 149 runs in arrears and were
required to save a match they had tar-
geted as a must-win - they will resume
on six without loss in the morning.
THE TRIBUNE



Honour roll
Students pay
courtesy call
on Governor
General

HONOUR roll students of
the H O Nash Junior High
School paid a courtesy call
on Governor General
Arthur Hanna on Wednes-
day, February 25, at Govern-
ment House.

Seated from left are Sherry
Strachan, Governor-General
Hanna, Evon Wisdom and
Dora Boston.

Raymond A Bethel/BIS

SL Ee)



thecal
yar

Aerie

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 15










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THE TRIBUNE
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ine

MONDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



MARC Heo.

/. S

ColinaImperial.

Confidence For Life





Airport
PUNO eA a

loss slashed
wh

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Airport Authority’s
net loss for fiscal 2008 was
slashed by 76.4 per cent to
$1.527 million, its audited
financial statements have
revealed, its performance
benefiting from the passen-
ger user facility fee’s intro-
duction and the airport’s
transfer to private sector
management.

The Authority’s financials
for the year to June 30, 2008,
showed that the entity that
owns Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA)
managed to reduce its net
loss almost four-fold - down
from $6.534 million — due
largely to the extra $32.666
million in revenues earned
from the passenger facility
fee and security charges.

These fees were intro-
duced for the first time that
financial year, so prior year
comparatives are slightly
misleading, but for perhaps
the first time LPIA’s rev-
enue streams are starting to
match expenses, a feat
helped by the airport’s lease
to the Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD)
and the management skills of
Vancouver Airport Services
(YVRAS).

Reverse

For the 12 months to June
30, 2008, the Airport
Authority was able to
reverse a $9.359 million
operating loss and parlay
that into $12.23 million of
operating profits, helped in
no small measure by the new
fees/charges.

However, a tripling of
interest and bank charges
from $1.552 million the pre-
vious year to $4.773 million
in 2008, plus a quadrupling
in finance costs to $1.857
million, saw the Airport
Authority’s total non-operat-
ing expenses increase to
$14.757 million. That repre-
sented a 44.5 per cent year-
over-year increase.

As aresult, the Airport
Authority’s loss before
receiving a government sub-
sidy was $2.527 million, yet
this paled into relative
insignificance against the
2007 comparative of $19.569
million.

Especially noteworthy, as
far as Bahamian taxpayers
are concerned, was that the
Government only subsidized
the Airport Authority to the

SEE page 9B



Scotiabank appoints
receiver for resort

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Scotiabank (Bahamas) has
appointed a receiver for the
troubled $250 million Chub
Cay resort project, Tribune
Business can reveal, the latest
move in a battle over the
developers’ failure to repay a
$45 million loan.

Sources familiar with the sit-
uation told this newspaper
that the Bahamian bank had
within the last two weeks
secured the appointment of
Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez as
receiver for the Berry Islands-
based project and its proper-
ties, via the mortgages it holds
on them and associated land
parcels.

It is understood that Mr
Gomez, whose role will be to
protect and secure the resort’s
assets, and take over running
the existing operating facili-
ties, will be the receiver for
properties held in the name
of both Chub Cay Resorts Ltd
and Chub Club Associates
Ltd. He will likely remain in
place until a buyer is found to
take over Chub Cay.

@ Bahamian bank names Craig A.
'Tony' Gomez to protect assets at
$250m Chub Cay project

Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez



His appointment likely
means that Mr Gomez, an

Ex-BEC chair accuses
Government of trying to

‘demonise'

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A former Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation (BEC)
executive chairman has hit
back at claims the basic tariff
rate reductions initiated on his
watch are responsible for the
Corporation’s current finan-
cial woes, and accused the cur-
rent administration and Board
of seeking to “demonise” him
despite “piggybacking” on the
ideas/plans he left in place.

Al Jarrett, who chaired
BEC from June 2002 until the
2005 first quarter, questioned
how the tariff rate reduction
could be responsible for the
Corporation’s current finan-
cial predicament given that its
2004 financial year — the first
full year after the new rates
were in force — saw BEC have
one of its most successful
years ever by generating $14.1
million in net profits.

Mr Jarrett was responding
to BEC’s current chairman,
Fred Gottlieb, who had
blamed the Corporation’s sub-
sequent annual losses — now
running at $18 million per year

SEE page 8B

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his efforts

Denies tariff cuts
responsible for BEC
financial woes, and
says current
government trying
to ‘piggyback’ off
ideas

medical emergencies
don't study economics

accountant and partner at
Baker Tilly Gomez, will be in
for a busy and eventful time in
the forthcoming months, hav-
ing also just been appointed
as CLICO (Bahamas) provi-
sional liquidator by the
Bahamian Supreme Court.

Chub Cay, which was
unveiled with much fanfare as
the so-called ‘anchor project’
for the Berry Islands and
North Andros just five years
ago, is the first such major
mixed-use resort project to
suffer being placed into
receivership.

Its fate is a prime example
of just how bad a toll the glob-
al economic downturn, and
especially the freezing of cred-
it/debt markets, has exacted

SEE page 11B





FamGuard’s
finance head in
resignation

In separate development, accounting
error causes company to ‘overstate’ net
income in 2008 unaudited interims

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Family Guardian’s chief financial officer, Cecile
Greene, has resigned from the BISX-listed life and health
insurer, Tribune Business can confirm.

Patricia Hermanns, Family Guardian’s president,
acknowledged that Ms Greene had left the company
when contacted by Tribune Business, saying: “Cecile
has resigned.” She declined to comment on the reasons

why she had left.

Rising star

Ms Greene’s unexpected departure from Family
Guardian has been widely talked about within the
Bahamian insurance industry. She was considered to be
a rapidly-rising star in that sector, and the wider financial
services arena, and is highly regarded by colleagues and

peers alike.

SEE page 10B



Government stimulus
focus ‘a bit misguided"

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government’s focus on stim-
ulating the economy through capital
budget construction-related projects
is “a bit misguided”, a former minis-
ter has told Tribune Business,
because it fails to address the need to
maintain foreign currency inflows
that stabilise the exchange rate and
import reserves.

James Smith, former minister of
state for finance, said that while
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s
mid-year Budget communication had
“sounded the correct notes” on the
potentially severe recession, and rein-

SEE page 7B

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* Former minister says
more important to focus
on tourism, and
stabilising foreign
currency inflows, than
boosting local demand
through construction
spend

* Says Bahamas already
well above 40% debt-to-
GDP ratio

—_
ColinalImperial.


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







There was an increase in trading activity last week in the Bahamian market, as
investors traded in six out of the 25 listed securitie,s of which three declined and
three remained unchanged. There were no advancers in the market this week.

BISX CLOSING CHANGE
SYMBOL PRICE

AML 1.41
FOREX Rates Weekly % BBL One:

BOB 7.00
CAD$ ea BPF $17.00
GBP 1.4298 BSL $9.58

EUR 1.2659 BWL $3.15

CAB 13.95
Commodities Weekly % CBL " 77

Crude Oil 44.40 CIB Mods
Gold 941.70 CWCB $1.73
G AVA IN International Stock Market Indexes: at oe

TO TEMPTATION Goce FBB $2.37
FCC $0.30
DJIA 7,062.93 FCL $5.00

S & P.500 735.09
NASDAQ 1,377.84 a : . i
Nikkei 7,968.42 ICD $5.50

JSJ $10.50
PRE

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aa eae a T: 242 322-1041. www.HGChristie.com

1
=

oo
4

I
Oo 9S

FINDEX 817.84 = (-2.04%) YTD

VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE

-17.54%
-4.55%
8.38%
-6.78%
-5.99%
0.00%
-0.57%
-8.29%
0.00%
0.00%
-23.11%
-5.88%
-0.51%
0.00%
0.00%
-8.29%
0.00%
-1.33%
-10.28%
5.41%
0.00%

@
ae
No
[Stee

saO0900==0000
eS
oO

INS
co ©

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 42,931 shares
changed hands, representing
a significant increase of
26,270 shares versus last
week's trading volume of
16,661 shares.

Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB) was the volume
leader and big decliner last
week, with 20,000 shares
trading, its stock falling by
$0.64 to end the week at a
new 52-week low of $7.

Finance Corporation of
the Bahamas (FIN) also saw
its share price decline by
$0.28 to $11 on a volume of
6,492 shares. Focol Holdings
(FCL) traded 15,000 shares,
its stock falling by $0.18 to
end the week at a new 52-
week low of $5.

BOND MARKET

No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.

COMPANY NEWS:

Earnings Releases:

There were no financial
results reported by any of
the 24-listed companies dur-
ing the week.

Private Placement
Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extend-
ing the deadline of its private
placement offering. The pre-
ferred shares will be paying a
dividend rate of prime + 1.75
per cent, payable semi-annu-
ally.

Dividends/AGM Notes

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.05 per share,
payable on February 27,
2009, to all shareholders of
record date February 13,
2009.

Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.10 per share,
payable on March 3, 2009, to
all shareholders of record
date February 24, 2009.

Focol Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be holding
its Annual General Meeting
on Thursday March 19, 2009,
at 10.30am in the Board-
room at there Corporate
Office in Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

Finance Corporation of
the Bahamas (FIN)
announced it will be holding
its Annual General Meeting
on Thursday, March 19,
2009, at 6.30pm in the Gov-
ernor's Ballroom at The
British Colonial Hilton
Hotel.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
etto Melle] ars
on Mondays


THE TRIBUNE

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FINCO) is “in the
final stages” of introducing a
property title insurance
scheme for its clients, a move
that might reduce home buy-
ing costs and shorten the
transaction closing window by
eliminating the need for an
attorney’s opinion.

Tanya McCartney, FIN-
CO’s managing director, writ-
ing in the company’s 2008
annual report, said: “We are in
the final stages of preparation
for the introduction of prop-
erty title insurance.

“In this way, clients will be
able to have funds advanced
quickly without lengthy delays
for legal opinions of title.

“RBC Royal Bank of Cana-

da has been instrumental in
providing guidance in devel-
oping policies and procedures
associated with this product.”

Whether FINCO’s property
title insurance coverage results
in cost savings for mortgage
borrowers is likely to depend
on whether the premiums
charged are lower than the
fees demanded by attorneys
for their work on real estate
transactions.

These fees are normally 2.5
per cent of the property’s pur-
chase price.

Title insurance, which is in
widespread use in many juris-
dictions, such as the US, pro-
vides homeowners and real
estate purchasers with cover-
age should the title to their
properties at a later stage be
shown to be defective.

It is starting to catch on in

the Bahamas, Higgs & John-
son having formed an affiliate
title brokerage agency. Jason
Kinsale, developer of The Bal-
moral real estate project, used
the recent Bahamas Business
Outlook conference to push
for title insurance, arguing that
it was even more critical in a
depressed economy to reduce
the transaction closing time
by eliminating the need for
lengthy attorney searches to
determine whether there was
clean title.

Growth

In her message to FINCO
shareholders, Ms McCartney
said the bank saw 10 per cent
growth in its mortgage port-
folio in the year to October
31, 2008.

5m back pay dispute

headed for the Tribunal

@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

A dispute over $5 million
in back pay allegedly owed
to workers on a private
island resort development
will have to go to the Indus-
trial Tribunal, the Minister
of Labour has told Tribune
Business.

Dion Foulkes said a recent
meeting between himself,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and the principal
investor in the Exuma-based
Bock Cay project, John Fry,
owner of multi-million Cali-
fornia retailer Fry’s Elec-
tronics, produced no solu-
tion.

Mr Foulkes, though, said
some progress was being
made in amending the devel-
oper’s rule requiring workers
to leave Bock Cay during the
weekends, which has proven
financially imprudent for
those living outside of Exu-
ma.

Workers on site said the
taxing travel expenses had
seen the development lose
around 60 per cent of its
workforce, which was down
to 47 from 120, according to
a worker who wished to
remain anonymous because
of a pending lawsuit with the
company.

“Guys are falling off one
by one,” he said.

Bock Cay workers, accord-
ing to former timekeeper
Ken Clarke, were made to
leave Bock Cay on Fridays
and return on Sundays at
their own expense.

Commute

Workers who lived Nassau
were spending up to $2,100
per year on the commute, a
figure some said made
employment with the com-
pany nonsensical.

The worker said he and
others were preparing a writ
in readiness to launch a legal
action against the developer
for the allegedly overdue
back pay.

The worker also told Tri-
bune Business that Mr Fry
visited Bock Cay shortly
after his meeting with gov-
ernment ministers, and
announced to the workforce
that his company was not
obligated to pay the alleged-
ly year-old overdue over-
time.

Last year, Bahamian attor-
ney Errol Mckinney accused
Bock Cay of owing its work-
ers up to $5 million for four
years of back pay. This was
denied by the developers,
who said everything they had
done was in accordance with
the law.

Work on Bock Cay initial-
ly lasted for 10 hours per
day, seven days per week,
for 28 continuous days. Fol-
lowing almost a month of
work, employees were given
a week off without pay.

According to Mr Mckin-
ney, the company then
allegedly compensated
employees incorrectly for
overtime and vacation pay.

However, workers alleged
that Bock Cay had recently
changed employee work
hours and implemented new
overtime pay rates.

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Much of that growth
appeared to come from the
institution’s Blockbuster
Mortgage Campaign, FINCO
seeing a 14 per cent increase
in the value of mortgages writ-
ten — from $71 million in 2007
to $81 million — during the
promotion’s four months.

Ms McCartney said client
surveys showed FINCO had
“exceeded benchmarks” for
customer service, with 88 per
cent of customers indicating
they felt treated as if they






MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 3B

FINCO ‘in final stages' on property title insurance

were long-term, valued bor-
rowers.

Some 93 per cent of line
customers were served with-
in 10 minutes, and trailer calls
showed 95 per cent of cus-
tomers felt FINCO had
adhered to quality customer
service standards.

Looking ahead, Ms McCart-
ney said that, not surprisingly,
2009 would be a “challenging
year”, but FINCO was opti-
mistic of continued growth
and profitability.

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She added: “In the year
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“A comprehensive sales
strategy to maximise oppor-
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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
No.45 of 2000

TIBOR LTD.

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE GOVERNMENT is aim-
ing to decrease the Bahamas’
$500 million food import bill by
implementing initiatives to jump-
start commercial and subsistence
farming, while using new tech-
nology to bring livestock rearing
to levels that could be sustain-
able.

The recent global food short-
age, coupled with a spate of nat-
ural disasters and a rise in fuel
costs, have increased the price of
consumer goods across-the-board,
and forced grocery stores to raise
prices.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said the Food and Agricul-
ture Organisation (FAO) had
warned last year of an impend-
ing global food crisis that could be
of “undetermined proportion and
incalculable effect”.

“The increased frequency of
storms and the occurrence of pro-
tracted droughts, perhaps the out-
come of global warming, have
also affected crop yields and con-
tributed to a doomsday scenario
affecting rich and poor nations
alike,” the Prime Minister said.

This, Mr Ingraham added,
underscores the importance of
investing in the agri-business sec-
tor in an effort to “promote local-
ly sustainable agricultural and
marine production.

“This is important, because it
will not only create employment
and raise the incomes of produc-
ers, but also affect savings in for-
eign exchange that would other-
wise be expended for imports,”
said Mr Ingraham. “There is no
better time than now for us as a
people to re-define agriculture.”

Opening the second annual
Bahamas Agricultural, Marine

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
No.45 of 2000, the Dissolution of TIBOR LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of the
dissolution was the 16" February, 2009.

David J. Rounce
Liquidator

PRIME OFFICE
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Approximately 2,200 square feet of second floor
space will be available April, 2009 in newly
constructed building at the corner of Marlborough
and Cumberland Streets. Two (2) on-site car
spaces included.

Ideal location for offshore bank, trust company,
law firm, or other professions.

Contact Owner at:

362-6006



DIESEL MECHANIC WANTED

A well established local company is seeking to employ a certified Diesel Mechanic on a
full time basis. Successful candidate must possess diesel mechanic certification from a
recognized training institution and have a minimum of 5 years experience in the field.

* Candidate must have extensive knowledge and experience on diesel engine
trucks and trailers.

* Must be able to use computer diagnostic equipment to troubleshoot and correct
engine problems.

* Must be able to implement and maintain a preventative maintenance program
for the company’s fleet of vehicles throughout the Bahamas.

* Must have experience with auto-marine hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical
systems.

* Experience with emergency generators and electric motors would be a plus.
* Must be willing to work flexible hours and travel to the family islands.

Salary based on certification and experience and compensation and benefit package is
very competitive.

Deadline for applying: March 18, 2009
DA 67911 c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassu, Bahamas



OUTSTANDING CHILDREN IN THE ARTS NOTICE

The public is invited to nominate outstanding children in Music, Drama and
Dance for the First Annual “Outstanding Children In The Arts” Awards.

Awards Ceremony will take place at the First Annual Children’s Ball scheduled
for Saturday 18" April, 2009 at Sandal Royal Bahamian Resort, Cable Beach
Nassau, Bahamas.

The Awards Programme is sponsored by the ADISA Foundation for children.
The Awards will acknowledge, celebrate and reward the contributions of
children to the Artistic Culture of The Bahamas. The Competition is open to
children from Pre School to High School. The prizes will include Scholarship
Grants for the winners in each category.

Closing date for the entries is Friday 27" February, 2009. Nomination forms
are available upon request from the Adisa Foundation P.O. Box N-555 Nassau,
Bahamas, telephone 242-326-0159 (day time) or 394-3018 (night time), e-mail:
adisa.bahamas@ gmail.com.

The Adisa Foundation







FOOD FOR THOUGHT: The second annual Bahamaas Agricultural, Marine Resources and Agribusiness

Exp was opened by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham.

Resources and Agribusiness
Expo, Mr Ingraham said urbani-
sation and the movement of
labour into tourism, banking, con-

struction, the public sector and
retail, had led to a decline in
interest in food production.
“Farms and backyard gardens

‘Mission’ set to lower
$500m food imports





—. “ al ‘3 i. é,

declined as a result,” he said. Lar-
ry Cartwright, minister of agri-
culture and marine resources, said
the Bahamas has embarked on a

“mission to grow as much of its
food as possible”.

“Recently, the backyard gar-
dening programme was launched
with a view to encouraging per-
sons to plant agricultural crops
to supplement their household
needs,” he said.

Plots

Mr Cartwright said his Ministry
has also leased plots of land to
encourage individuals to start
small and medium-sized farms.
However, it was discovered that
much of the land was still not
being used, or was being misused.

“We have discovered that in a
number of cases, land leased for
the purpose of food production
has been diverted from that pur-
pose to speculative purposes. We
do not propose to regularise such
unauthorised diversions, or per-
mit the same to continue,” said
Mr Ingraham

He said government will con-
tinue to upgrade agricultural ser-
vices and “establish a farmer’s
credit programme, and a hurri-

; cane and disaster insurance fund”.
For Uchat sales and travel information contact Mr Cartwright said the crop

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(2 positions)
(2 positions)
{1 position)
Bishop Michael Elden School, Freeport Grand Bahama

Grades 7-12

Qualifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from an accredited
University together with a Teacher's Certificate from an accredited
Teacher's College.

Applications may be collected from the Education Department located on Sands Road off of East
Street,

Completed application forms with the requested supporting documents must be received by
the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 13"° March 2009, and must be addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
FP. 0. Box N656
Nassau, The Bahamas

Providing quality education in a Christian enviranment by developing the whale child: spiritually

acadencally, physically and socially thus preparing the ofa for fe.


THE TRIBUNE



a =>
Bahamas not alone

on low savings rate

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE BAHAMAS is not alone
in the world in having a danger-
ously low 2.5 per cent savings
rate, coupled with a rapidly
depleting social security fund in
the shape of the National Insur-
ance Board, a Chamber of Com-
merce seminar has revealed.

According to the Chamber’s
pension plan administrator, Cle-
ora Farquharson, countries such
as the US, which had a savings
rate in the 2008 second quarter
of 2.7 per cent, and the UK,
which had a 2009 first quarter sav-
ings rate projected at 1.1 per cent,
also have massive shortfalls in
their state-owned pension funds.

Hailing the Chamber fund as
the most affordable, benefit laden
and progressive plan on the mar-
ket, Ms Farquharson, a Fidelity
executive, told prospective clients
they should not wait for the Gov-
ernment to make it mandatory to
have a pension plan, but should
begin saving now.

“According to their own study
(NIB), which they conducted in
2001, the fund is projected to be
depleted by 2029, and this phe-
nomenon is not limited to the
Bahamas,” Ms Farquharson said.
“Pension reform is the buzz word
in the international community.

“In the United Kingdom, for
example, it is estimated that
about 12 million Britons are not
saving enough for their retire-
ment. In the United States, their
guaranteed corporation is pro-
jecting roughly a $23 million
shortfall over the next 10 years. In
China, their retiree numbers are
expected to jump to about 100
million in 2020, and their current
pension shortfall is estimated at
$300 billion.”

The Chgamber’s executive
director, Philip Simon, said there
had been overwhelming interest
in its pension plan since its incep-
tion last month, both from New
Providence-based and Family
Island companies.

Representatives from several
small and medium-sized busi-
nesses quizzed members of Roy-
alFidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust, which manages and admin-
isters the investment contribu-
tions, on the benefits of their plan
versus others.Ms Farquharson
said the Chamber pension plan
was open to both individuals and

companies. There were trustee
services, she added, and it was
portable, providing flexible
investment options, administra-
tive solutions and additional plan
benefits. The client assets will be
held in a private trust, separate
from RoyalFidelity’s assets.
“We take protection of our
clients’ assets seriously,” Ms Far-
quharson said. “In the unfortu-
nate event that RoyalFidelity
becomes bankrupt, our creditors
cannot touch your money to sat-
isfy our debt obligations. This was
just one of the many provisions
we put in place to increase the

level of competence that our
clients have come to expect.”

RoyalFidelity and Chamber
executives reiterated that
Bahamians were charged with
taking responsibility for their own
retirement security by saving for
the future now. “Less than one-
third of all Bahamians have more
than $1,000 in their bank
accounts, and this was really pri-
or to the economic downturn,”
said Ms Farquharson. The infor-
mation workshop was held to
introduce the Chamber’s month-
old pension plan to its members
and to the general public.

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





FOR SALE

Two and Four Passenger Golf Carts

2003 Club Fairway Village Golf Cart S/N PQOs27296094
2003 Club Fairway Village Golf Cart S/N FQOS27296096
2003 Club Fairway Village Golf Cort $/N FQ0S27296097
2003 Club Farway Village Goll Cart i/N RQdg2? 294096
2003 Club Fairway Village Golf Cort $/N FQ0327296102
2003 Club Farway Village Goll Cart S/N PQdg27294103
2003 Club Fairway Village Golf Cart $/N FQ0327296104
2004 Club Camyall || Fectic 3.75 HP. $/N 60611406767

No Phone Calls

Please send bids for golf carts no later than March Fd
2009 to the attention of:-

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

Golf Cart Sales dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Facilities Manager
Fax 363-6873
Email- Pizolfcarts/omail.com

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) has created a new
website to focus on investing
in Grand Bahama, its newly-
appointed president has
announced.

Tan Rolle said the launch of

Please inclade amount of golf carts requested, bid price with contact infcemetion,






































NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT ALL SECTIONS
AND DEPARTMENTS OF THE PUBLIC
TREASURY OF THE BAHAMAS HAVE BEEN
RELOCATED TO THE FIRST AND SECOND
FLOORS OF THE BRITISH AMERICAN
FIANCIAL CENTRE, MARLBOROUGH ST. &
NAVY LION RD.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL
322-4561-4

New Providence Classical School
Invites K4 through Grade 5 Parents

To an Evening of Educational Consultation
Come hear a Presentation on an Education Model
that truly works and is producing astounding
results!

Come and Hear how your child can have:

A Foundation for life-long learning
Mastery in Learning
Better Test Results

Increased Proficiency in reading, basic
mathematical operations, classification,
written and verbal expression,
and much more.

Come and Learn how the differences in
cognitive and social development & gender-based
learning tendencies are recognized as significant

factors in learning.

Place: British Colonial Hilton Bay Street, Nassau

Date: Wednesday, 4th March 2009
Time: 5:30 -7:30 pm

R.S.V.P. 394-7393/4

the new website, www.invest-
grandbahama.com, was
required because many busi-
ness people do not initially
equate the name, Grand
Bahama Port Authority, with
investment.

“The name Grand Bahama
Port Authority is a misnomer.
Business people do not ini-
tially think investment when
they hear Port Authority. In
this regard, we have created
the website, which specifically
caters to investing on Grand
Bahama,” he said.

The website, which features
several major investments on
Grand Bahama, details the
many competitive advantages,
including the tax-free status,
that have transformed
Freeport into a major invest-
ment centre with a relatively
high standard of living.

Inward investment into
Freeport was somewhat
stalled two years ago, when
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority’s two principal
shareholders - the Hayward
family trust and late Edward
St George’s estate - became
embroiled in a legal dispute
over its ownership. That bitter
legal fight has continued to
this day.

At that time, there were
concerns that the behind-the-
scenes distractions at the Port
Authority had created a cli-
mate of uncertainty in
Freeport, discouraging poten-
tial investment and investors.

Yet Freeport has since seen
several major investments
come to fruition, including the
opening of Ross University,

av K,
Saf

“We must also be
transparent in our
operations. There
are things that we
can and will do to
improve
transparency and
accountability.”



lan Rolle

the Fenestration Glass Ser-
vices company, and the $900
million acquisition of BOR-
CO, and its transformation

into Vopak Terminal
Bahamas.
Planning

Mr Rolle said a critical
component in the continued
internal development of any
organisation lies in succession
planning, which is an essen-
tial element for how the Port
moves forward.

“We must also be transpar-
ent in our operations. There
are things that we can and will
do to improve transparency
and accountability,” said Mr
Rolle.

He added that the Port will
relaunch the GBPA.com web-
site on April 1, to provide per-
sons with a better under-
standing of “who we are, what
we do, and what we offer”.

By the end of the year, he
said GBPA.com will allow
online payment, but for its
launch the eServices compo-

Port creates new
website targeting
Freeport investors

nent of the site will allow users
to get immediate responses to
queries.

“You will be able to down-
load restrictive covenants spe-
cific to your area. The licence
fee schedule will also be avail-
able online,” Mr Rolle added.

Mr Rolle said business
licensees in good standing, and
who have a website, will be
allowed to have a link from
gbpa.com.

He said the site will feature
the Port’s latest news and
developments.

The Port Authority is also
taking a proactive approach
to addressing the fundamental
problems that affect progress
in Freeport.

A major revitalization of
downtown Freeport will get
underway on April 1. Mr
Rolle explained that the pro-
ject will occur in three phases,
having a major impact on the
town centre and breathing
new life into the once-popular
native and tourist area.

He said a full-scale clean-
up of the area will be con-
ducted, with new landscaping,
signage, benches, lighting and
other aesthetically pleasing
features.

Mr Rolle stressed that
vagrancy must be addressed
in order for the revitalisation
project to be successful.

Mr Rolle said one or two
buildings for a Halfway
House, to be operated by the
Grand Bahama Christian
Council, have been identified.
The Port will provide the
building and water.

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Phone: 242-367-0593
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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 7B



Stimulus focus

FROM page 1B

forced that it had to be “more
than business as usual”, it had
failed to focus on the areas where
a stimulus was most needed.

Adding that the Bahamas’
national debt-to-GDP ratio was
already likely to have passed the
40 per cent threshold, above
which its sovereign credit rating
may come under pressure, Mr
Smith expressed concern over
whether the largest spending item
in the 2009-2010 Budget might be
debt redemption/principal repay-
ment costs.

With the Government and its
fiscal position facing some “strong
headwinds”, Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business: “What we want
to avoid is debt servicing items
becoming the largest item in the
Budget, because if that happens,
we will really be headed down
the road of the third world.”

To ensure the Bahamas had
access to an emergency line of
foreign currency if 1t needed, Mr
Smith suggested that had he been
in office he would have opened
talks with the International Mon-
etary Fund (IMF) about access
to a stand-by line of credit.

This, he added, would be espe-
cially important if all other
sources of foreign currency
financing dried up, particularly
since other countries might be
competing for the same facilities.
And if the Bahamas’ credit rating
was impacted by the current glob-
al economic downturn, it might
not be able to borrow from the
capital and credit markets at the
favourable interest rates it had
previously enjoyed.

“T would have had some chats
with the IMF for a stand-by facil-
ity, in case all the other countries
in the region are lining up,” Mr
Smith said. “They’re going to
need some stand-by foreign cur-
rency to fall back on if this thing
goes on for a long time, and we
do not get enough foreign cur-
rency to support imports.

“You’ve got to explore all of
the options open to you and jug-
gle interest rates. The important
thing, in a Bahamian context and
in a foreign exchange rate regime,
is to get foreign currency inflows
and stabilize the currency,
because the last thing you want is
a run on the dollar.”

While there had been “insuffi-
cient details” in the mid-year
Budget statement to allow for a
thorough analysis of the Govern-
ment’s proposed stimulus pack-
age, Mr Smith said it appeared
to be primarily focused on boost-
ing the construction sector
through the construction of roads,
public buildings, schools, docks
and such like.

“That’s almost the capital bud-
get,” the former minister said,
and while not wanting to diminish
the impact spending in the con-
struction industry would have,
added that the sector was esti-
mated to account for only 10 per
cent of per annum gross domestic
product (GDP).

Mr Smith added that efforts to
boost the construction industry
would assist domestic demand,
but the demand that the Bahamas
really wanted to stimulate was
outside the Bahamas, primarily
in the shape of tourists.

While not wanting to “second
guess” the Ministry of Tourism’s
promotional plans, Mr Smith said:
“We have to take a page out of
the books of retailers. The one
item they don’t cut back on is
advertising because they want
people to keep spending. Tourism
is similar to a retail outlet, and
while there is a recession in the
US, people are still travelling to
Jamaica, Belize and Florida.”

The former minister said it was
vital to stimulate tourism demand
for Bahamas vacations, and visi-
tor spending, given that this
would be the prime source of for-
eign currency inflows with for-
eign direct investment depressed.
To this end, he suggested expand-
ing the tourism marketing bud-
get, and focusing on areas less hit
by the recession, such as Cana-
da, whose cities were a similar
flight time from the Bahamas’
core US east coast market.

RBC

Royal Bank
asi), of Canada

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown Allot-
ments, Love Hill Settlement, An-
dros. Containing a two-storey res.
Appraised value: $100,000

(806) Lot #13, Block 4 of Coral Wa-
terways, Section One, Coral Harbour,
New Providence with two houses
and a swimming pool, #312 N.P.
bounded Northwardly by a canal
or waterway of the said Subdivision
known as Flamingo waterway and
running 102.004 ft. Eastwardly by
lot #14 and 146.145ft Southwardly
by areservation for a private road.
Appraised value: $530,000

(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with
a parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom
condominium — Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised value:
$750,000

(433) Lot#27 of Village Allotment#14
in the Eastern District, containing
residence situated on Denver Street
off Parkgate Road in the Ann’s Town
Constituency, New Providence. Prop-
erty size 2,500 sqft Building size 990
sqft. Appraised value: $50,000

(400) Property situated in Calabash
Bay on the Island of Andros. 75’ x
150’ and containing thereon a small
grocery store 480 sqft. and an in-
complete 3 bed 2 bath house 900
sqft. Appraised value: $65,000

(301) Lot #2 in block #8, Steward
Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-
sion situated in Western District of
New Providence, approx. size 8,800
sq. ft. with a split level containing
two bed, two bath, living, dining &
family rooms, kitchen and utility
room — approx. size of building 2,658
sqft Appraised value: $322,752

(702) Lot #20 with residential prop-
erty located Skyline Heights.
Appraised value $280,000

(902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150 x
150 on Queens Highway just south
of Palmetto Point with a two sto-
rey stone building containing two
apartments. Each unit has 3 bed/2
1/2 bath, kitchen, living room and
3 linen closets. Appraised value:
$287,209

(400) Lot #14 situated in the settle-
ment of Love Hill on the Island of
Andros totalling 20,000 sqft Property
contains a two storey 5 bedroom,
3 bathroom residence.

Appraised value: $185,000

(105) Lot containing 2 storey bldg.
with three bed, two and a half bath

(902) 0.281 acre of vacant land off
Queen's Highway, Governor’s Har-
bour, Eleuthera.

Appraised value: $31,320

(702) Undeveloped lots # 4A, 16,
17, 18 and 19 located Chapman
Estates, West Bay. Appraised value:
$348,000

(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-
fan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivi-
sion. Grand Bahama, 18750 sqft.
Appraised value: TBA

(565) Vacantlot#5 located Eleuthera
Island Shores, Seaside Drive Section B,
Block#15, Eleuthera, Bahamas. 9,691
sqft, Appraised value: $27,620

(402) Lot89, Block7 Aberdeen Drive,
Bahamia West Replat Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, consist-
ing of 12,100 sqft.

Appraised value: $51,000

(800) Vacant property located Baha-
mia South. Block 16 lot 9A, Freeport,
Grand Bahama consisting of 24,829.20
sqft. Appraised value: $52,000

(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sqft)
situated in Mango Lane Section “B”
Block#15, Eleuthera Island Shores,

residence, and 30’ x 86’ situated Bai-
ley Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value: $235,000

(902) Lot containing commercial
building housing a sports bar, res-
taurant and a2 storey commercial
building on Queens Highway Tar-
pum Bay Eleuthera.

Appraised value: $180,000

(902) Lot#31 situated at the inter-
section of Albert & Victoria Streets
in Hatchet Bay containing a2 sto-
rey concrete building with an in-
complete 2bed 1 bath apt and store
downstairs. Property approx 2250

sq ft.
Appraised value: $65,000

(810) Description: Lot #60 Skyline
Lakes Subdivision approximately
13,000 square feet containing a split
level residence about 10 years old.
Living space is approx 2,633 sq ft,
with covered patios approx 480 sq
ft, walkways & driveways approx
102 sq ft. Located on the ground
floor is the garage, foyer, powder
room, 2 bedrooms with closets, 1
complete bathroom, sunken living
room, dining room, kitchen, play
room & utility room. Located on the
upper flooris the master bedroom
& bathroom, walk-in closets & tiled
balcony.

Appraised value: $453,000

(908) Lot# 23 located in the Subdi-
vision of Spring City, Abaco. Con-
taining a one storey house with 2
bed/1 bath. Wooden structure.
Appraised value: $60,000

(801) Lot #18 in Sandilands Allot-
ment on the western side of Cross-
wind Road between Seabreeze Lane
and Pineyard Road in the Eastern
Distract of The Island of New Prov-
idence-The Bahamas.,containing
single storey private residence com-
prising the following: covered entry
porch, living room, dining room,
kitchen, laundry room, family room,
sitting area, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom
and patio. The total area ofland is
approximately 7,641 square feet.
Appraised value: $289,426

(801) Two parcels of land containing
21,120 sq.ft. situated on the southern
side of East Shirley Street and 100
feet west ofits junction with “Shirlea”
in the Eastern District, New Provi-
dence. Situated thereon is a Gas
Station and Auto Repair Shop.
Appraised value: $799,497

(601) Lot #17 located Village Allot-
ment with fourplex,

Appraised value: $500,000

Eleuthera.
Appraised value: $50,189

(902) Vacant lot of land situated
in South Palmetto Point, Eleuthera
measuring 97x127x82x121.
Appraised value $38,000

(909) Vacantresidential Lot# 63 (7800
sqft) Crown Allotments located Mur-
phy Town, Abaco.

Appraised value: $18,000

(908) Vacantresidential Lot#30com-
prising of 1.02 acre located Dundas
Town, Abaco.

Appraised value $20,000

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block #5 Unit #1 Devonshire
Appraised value $30,000

(108) Vacant canal lot #71 Silver
Cove Court, Silver Cove Subdivi-
sion Zoned Tourist Commercial.
Approximately 0.4 acre.
Appraised value: $175,000

(802) Vacant Commercial Lot No:
3A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision
VI containing 3 acres located Free-
port, Grand Bahama.

Appraised value: $750,000

(902) Property contains 9,660 sq,
ft lot #17 Block Section ‘A’ of the
subdivision called Eleuthera Island
Shores, three miles Northwest of
Hatchet Bay. On this site is a house
that is six years old containing three
bedrooms, 2 baths (one incomplete),
living room, dining room, kitchen,
utility room with a gross floor area
of 1,217 sq.ft. Eleuthera Shores is a
residential development. Appraised
value $99,000.00

(701) Lot ofland having the number
16 in Block number 16 in Section
Three of the Subdivision called
and known as Sea Breeze Estates
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
a three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $277,000

(701) Lot ofland being lot number
11 in Block number 10 ona plan of
allotments laid out by Village Estates
Limited and filed in the dept of Land
& Surveys as number 142 N.P. and
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $165,000

(565) Lot # 1018 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Subdivision situate in the
South Western District of the island
of New Providence Containing a sin-
gle storey private residence 3 bed-
room 2 bath. Property approx. size
6,000 sqft Building approx size 2,400
sqft Appraised value: $173,176

(205) Lot B - 50 ft x 115.73 ft situ-
ated on the north side of Shell Fish
Road, being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster Road
with a one half duplex residential
premises. Appraised value: TBA

(808) Lot #3 Block 24 in the Cen-
treville Subdivision . Building #109/
Eastern side of Collins Avenue .
Comprising commercial 2,800 sq
ft commercial building.
Appraised value: $582,000

(901) Lot #32 containing 4 bed-
room 2bath concrete structure
located Triana Shores Harbour Is-
land, Eleuthera. Property size 80’ x
120’ x 80’ 120 feet Appraised value:
$332,735

(909) Lot# 22 with (5000 sqft) Crown
Allotments located Dundas Town,
Abaco Containing a one storey house
with 3 bed/1 bath -Wooden Struc-
ture. Appraised value: $50,000

(908) Lot#52 Crown Allotments lo-
cated Murphy Town, Abaco. Contain-
ing a one storey house with 3 bed/2

VACANT PROPERTIES

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block F Bahamia South Subdivision.
Appraised value $35,700

(569) Vacant property located in Sub-
division called “Culmerville” being
a portion of Lot #47 anda portion of
Lot #57. Appraised value: $24,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land situate in the settlement of James
Cistern on the Island of Eleuthera
one of the Islands of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas measuring
approx 10,000 sq.ft.

Appraised value TBA

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot No. 102 in the Sub-
division known as “EXUMA HAR-
BOUR’ in the Island of Great Exuma
measuring 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised
value $20,000.00.

(202) Vacant lot ofland containing
41,164 sqft, Lot #8, Love Estate, Phase
1, 2,300 ft. south of West Bay Street,
Western District, New Providence.
Appraised value $165,000

(202) Vacant lot ofland containing
1.786 acre, situated east of Knowles
Drive, approximately 1,420 ft. south-
ward of Harold Road in the western

OFFICERS

bath —- Concrete Block Structure —
Appraised value: $200,000

(108) Lot #1 Block #6 Winton Heights
Subdivision Easter District, N P The
propertyis approximately 14,834
sq ft in total. Property contains a
house of 2963 sq ft.

Appraised value: $433,000

(902) Parcel of land located on the
south side of Dry Hill Road in Pal-
metto Point containing 1.087 acres
with partially started structure.
Appraised value: $38,000

(902) Property contains 23,125 sq ft
lot #30 Lover's Hill Subdivision with
two storey structure approximately
15 years old. House contains Three
bedrooms, Two baths, living room,
dining room, t.v. room, kitchen, attic
space and Double car garage with a
gross floor area of 3,378 sq. ft. Lover’s
Hill is a residential development.
Appraised value $254,154.00

(902) Property contains approx.
5,800 sq. ft. situated in North Pal-
metto Point with a single storey con-
crete structure approx. 18 years old.
House contains three bedrooms,
two baths, living room, dining room
and kitchen with a gross floor area
of 1,444.26 sq. ft. Palmetto Point is
a residential developed area. Ap-
praised value $128,766.00

(101-N) Singel Family Resi-
dence-810 sqft, 2 bed,1 bath Lot#
3 Block #1 Eastville Subdivision East-
ern District, New Providence.
Appraised value: $65,000

(910) Lot #12 Maderia Park, a small
subdivision on the outskirts of Treas-
ure Cay, Abaco having an area of
9,444 square feet residence contain-
ing a concrete block structure with
asphalt shingle roof comprises of
three bedrooms, two bathrooms,
family room, living room, dining
room, and kitchen. Appraised value:
$147,000

(501) Property situated on Wil-
liams Lane off Kemp Road, New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a two-storey house and an apart-
ment building consisting of 1800
sqft. Appraised value $100,000

(501) All that piece of land being Par-
cel #3 and Parcel #4 situated on the
South side of Prince Charles Drive,
New Providence, Bahamas contain-
ing a commercial building housing
two shop space on the ground floor
and three shop space on the second
floor with a large storage area in the
rear. Total area 8400 sqft.

district of New Providence, Baha-
mas. Appraised value: $ 170,000

(501) Vacant property consisting
of Lot #894 situated in the Freep-
ort Ridge Subdivision, Section #1,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
Appraised value: TBA

(501) Ten (10) acres of land situ-
ated on Woods Cay, knownas Little
Abaco, between Cooper's Town and
Cedar Harbour in Abaco, Bahamas.
The property is undeveloped witha
view ofthe sea from both the North
and South side. Appraised value:
$1,078,750

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land Lot #977, Pinewood Gardens
Subdivision, Southern District, New
Providence. Appraised value: TBA.

(201) Lot No. 11703 Bahama Sound
Subd. Number 11 West, Great Exuma.
Size: approx. 10,000 sqft.
Appraised value: TBA.

(201) Lot No. 11698 Bahama Sound
Subd. #11 West, Great Exuma. Size:
approx. 10,000saqft.

Appraised value: TBA.

(201) Lot No. 10 Southeast Cor-

Appraised value: $366,650

(501) All that piece, parcel or land
having an approximate area of 2100
sqft situated on the Western side of
Blue Hill Road about 70 ft North of
Peter Street and about 115 ft south
of Laird Street in the Southern Dis-
trict of New Providence, Bahamas
containing a commercial building
housing a two bed/one bath unit on
the top floor and a store on the first
floor. Appraised value: $154,000

(501) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #39 in the Highbury
Park Subdivision in the Eastern Dis-
trict of New Providence, Bahamas
containing a3-bedroom/2-bathroom
house. Appraised value: $131,000

(501) All that piece, parcel or lot
of land situated on Cowpen Road
(1000 ft east of the Faith Avenue Junc-
tion) in the Southern District of New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a duplex apartment comprising of
two - 2-bedroom/1-bathroom apart-
ments. Appraised value: $150,000

(201) Lot of land situated on Fire
Trail Road being a partition of Glad-
ston Allot#41 New Providence, Ba-
hamas containing townhouse apart-
ment unit and two proposed units
(completed as is).

Appraised value: $237,714

(800) All that parcel or lot of land
being Lots #10 and 11 in Block 29
of Coconut Grove Subdivision, con-
taining a shopping plaza. The lotis
trapezium in shape, 8,383 square
feet. Appraised value $500,000

(560) Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-
division, Russell Island, Spanish
Wells. Property size 11,323 sqft,
building size 2236 sqft containing
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, an
eat-in kitchen, dining room, laun-
dry room, covered porch, a one car
garage, and a covered water tank.
Appraised value: $299,000

(901) Lot #57 block # Trianna Shores
containing 3 bed 2 bath front room,
dining room, & kitchen. Concrete
structure, 1926.40 sq. ft wooden deck
321.60 sq.ft. property 9600 sqft.
Appraised value: $448,645

(901) Lot “k” Barrack Street, Harbour
Island containing a2 storey concrete
building with 4 bed 4 bath, dining
room & kitchen -Building 2934.56
sqft property 6563 sqft.
Appraised value: $479,228

ner of Mandarin Drive, Sugar Apple
Road, Sans Souci Subdivision. Size:
14,368sqft. Appraised value: TBA.

(008) All that piece parcel oflot and
land on the Island of Great Exumasit-
uated about 10 1/2 miles Northwest-
wardly of George Town which said
piece parcel or lot ofland is #10750
Bahama Sound O.A.E. 10,900 sqft.
Appraised value: $65,000

(008) All that piece parcel or lot
of land designated as Lot Number
563 on aplan of a Subdivision called
or known as Bahama Highlands #4.
11,223.41 sqft. Appraised value:
$87,000

(008) All that piece parcel orlotland
being Lot # 12032 in the Bahama
Sound of Exuma Subdivision #
11 West, Great Exuma, Bahamas.
Appraised value: $224,000

(008) A parcel ofland situate about
the eastern portion of The Forest
Estate in the vicinity of the settle-
ments of Southside and The Forest
being Lot# 4803 in Bahama Sound
of Exuma 6, Exuma The Bahamas.
Appraised value $25,000

“From a more general per-
spective, we do not want to stim-
ulate local demand so much,
which is why this is a bit misguid-
ed. Not to ignore the issue, but
while we’re doing that, I think
resources are more appropriately
used to stimulate demand from
outside,” Mr Smith said of the
Government’s plans. “The
demand we want to stimulate is
demand from the outside, for
travel. While it’s important to
have local demand, Bahamian
dollars are less important than
US dollars.” This would repre-
sent the best way of mitigating
the global economic downturn’s
impact on the Bahamas, Mr
Smith said, backing the Ministry
of Tourism’s plans to reduce air-
lift and airfare costs coming into
the Bahamas. Tourism, after all,
was the Bahamas’ largest indus-
try, accounting for most employ-
ment and economic activity. He
added: “We need a continuous
inflow of foreign currency to sta-
bilize the Bahamian dollar and
finance import needs, even in the
case of the stimulus package. We
import all we consume, so we ulti-
mately want to have the objec-
tive of increasing foreign curren-
cy inflows on the recurrent side
through tourism expenditure.

COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE
Tel: 242-356-8568

800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
801) Mr. Jerome Pinder

802) Mr. Brian Knowles

805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O’brien
806) Mrs. Lois Hollis

807) Mr. Lester Cox

808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
810) Miss LaPaige Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or
242-302-3800

(201) Ms. Nicola Walker

(202) Mr. Robert Pantry

(205) Mrs. Anya Major

NASSAU MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-8700

(701) Mr. James Strachan

702) Mr. Antonio Eyma 724) Mrs. Faye Higgs

301) Ms. Thyra Johnson 725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson 565) Mrs. Catherine Davis

MACKEY STREET BRANCH 569) Mrs. Vanessa Scott

Tel: 242-393-3097 NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT

601) Ms. Cherelle Martinborough Tel: 242-377-7179

JOHN E KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH 433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss

Tel: 242-325-4711 LYFORD CAY BRANCH

401) Mrs. Renea Walkine Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037

402) Mrs. Chandra Gilbert 101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson

PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA

Tel: 242-393-7505/8 Tel: 242-332-2856/8

501) Mr. Keith Lloyd

902) Ms. Nicole Evans
505) Ms. Patricia Russell HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
CABLE BEACH BRANCH

Tel:242-333-2230
Tel: 242-327-6077 901) Ms. Velderine Laroda
466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts ANDROS TOWN BRANCH
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE Tel: 242-368-2071
Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180 400) Mrs. Rose Bethel
716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

Tel: 242-367-2420
723) Ms. Deidre King 908) Mrs. Joyce Riviere

909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier

910) Miss Cyprianna Williams
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel:242-347-3031

105) Miss. Ganiatu Tinubu
GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND

Tel: 242-337-0101

100) Mrs. Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH

Tel: 242-336-3251

008) Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-6631/2

101-F) Ms. Garnell Frith
102) Ms. Elaine Collie

103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-Cartwright
108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
SPANISH WELLS

Tel: 242-333-4131 or
242-333-4145

(560) Mr. Walter Carey

(
(
(
(
(
(
(
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PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





x-BEC chair accuses Government
of trying to 'demonise' his efforts

FROM page 1B

— and inability to obtain debt
financing without it being gov-
ernment guaranteed, on the
tariff rate cuts he had intro-
duced.

“The former government
administration directed BEC
to reduce the tariffs,” Mr Got-
tlieb said in an interview with
Tribune Business, which was
published last week.

“It had the effect of suck-
ing $18 million of revenue
away per year, and that’s
unfortunate. Because up until
then, BEC was in position to

have the necessary economic
ratings to get financing for its
capital projects. That was sig-
nificantly undermined.”

But BEC’s annual report
for its financial year that end-
ed on September 30, 2004,
showed that despite the
$16.246 million less that the
Corporation earned from elec-
tricity sales as a result of the
tariff cut, it still generated a
27.08 per cent increase in net
profitability — from $11.143
million in 2003 to $14.16 mil-
lion the following year.

“In the 2004 annual report,
we reduced costs by as much
as $28 million and gave away

NOTICE OF SALE

Expocredit Corporation (‘the Company”) invites
offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Lot Number
199, Section 1, Phase 3, “Stella Maris Subdivision’,
comprising approximately 22,560 sq.ft. situate to the
South of Burnt Ground in the [sland of Long Island
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas having constructed thereon a 3 bedroom/ 2
bathroom main house of approximately 2,000 sq. ft.
and a guest house of approximately 468 sq. ft.

The Company makes no representations or warranties
with respect to the state of the Property which is
offered for sale “as is where 1s”.

The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(1) of the Conveyancing

& Law of Property Act.

TERMS:

Ten percent (10%) of the purchase

price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company
reserves the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may

submit written offers

addressed to Expocredit Corporation, c/o Managing
Partner, P, O Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 30"

day of March, 2009.

$16 million,” Mr Jarrett told
Tribune Business.

Referring to Mr Gottlieb’s
comments about the impact
of the base tariff cuts, he
replied: “If one wants to make
that case, how do you explain
that there was a major
increase in net profitability the
year I gave the reduction?
2004 was BEC’s best year in
terms of cost effectiveness and
efficiency. If we’d taken back
the tariff cut we'd given, prof-
its would have been $31 mil-
lion.

“TI make no apologies for
the rate reduction. It was the
right thing to do then, and it’s
still the right thing to do.

“T was pleased to do it. I did
it for the Bahamian people,
who deserve it.

“They’ve sacrificed so much
with the rates and Customs
duty.”

Mr Jarrett said Mr Got-
tleb’s comments “don’t pan
out on the evidence”, adding
that BEC’s ongoing problems
stemmed from its own internal
efficiencies, low workforce
productivity, maintenance
issues and the need for better
management, not to mention
the rapid increase in global oil
prices that last July peaked at
$147 million per barrel.

The former BEC chairman
said BEC’s financial position
was also partly attributable to
the 10 per cent Customs duty
rate that the Ministry of
Finance, in 1994 under the
first Ingraham administration,
imposed on the Corporation’s
oil imports. That duty rate has

“I make no apologies for the
rate reduction. It was the right
thing to do then, and it’s still the
right thing to do. I was pleased
to do it. I did it for the Bahamian
people, who deserve it. They’ve
sacrificed so much with the rates
and Customs duty.”



currently been removed as a
result of the two-year payment
moratorium announced in the
2008-2009 Budget.

Paper

A December 6, 2004, Cabi-
net paper presented to the for-
mer Christie administration,
said the decision to impose the
10 per cent Customs duty rate
had been taken without con-
sultation with BEC manage-
ment.

Its effect had been to cre-
ate “an unbearable 17 per cent
rate” for BEC to pay on its
oil imports, when added to the
7 per cent Stamp Duty it was
already paying.

The paper said: “Although
the 7 per cent Stamp Tax is
eventually recoverable, the 10
per cent is not passed on to
the public and has a negative
effect on the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation’s financial

ee
TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
ShirleyStreet

Invites applications from qualified Christian

performance and working cap-
ital position.

“The carrying cost of the 10
per cent duty, which has not
been passed on to the cus-
tomers in the surcharge, as
well as the additional cost of
$16.2 million associated with
the ‘true up’ formula used dur-
ing the fiscal year have also
created a burden of at least
25 per cent of customers’
usage of electricity borne by
BEC during the year......

“We are therefore recom-
mending the elimination of
this customs duty of 10 per
cent pro-rated over a three-
year period by 3.3 per cent to
put the Corporation in a posi-
tion to raise all funds inde-
pendently on the strength of
its balance sheet perfor-
mance.”

Mr Jarrett added: “BEC
was able to generate enough
revenue to live with that up
until 2004, 2005, when rising
global oil prices exposed the
folly of the FNM govern-
ment.”

The current Ingraham
administration appears to
share similar views, given the
two-year moratorium it has
imposed to enable BEC to
restructure and sort out its bal-
ance sheet without having to
pay taxes worth 17 per cent
of its fuel imports’ value.

The Government has also
continued with another policy
proposed in that 2004 Cabi-
net paper, namely writing off
taxes and import duties owed
by BEC against the unpaid
electricity receivables owed to
the Corporation by other gov-
ernment ministries, agencies
and departments.

Scapegoat

Given this, Mr Jarrett said
he feared the current govern-
ment was seeking to
“demonise” and scapegoat
himself, and all that had been
done at BEC under the
Christie administration, to jus-
tify what it was doing now
despite the fact they had
adopted many of the same
policies and plans.

“They’re piggybacking on
what I did, and the value of
that,” Mr Jarrett added.
“They’ve brought no new
ideas to BEC. All they’re
doing is piggybacking on what
I did and putting a new face
on it.”

On the customs duty situa-
tion, the 2004 Cabinet paper
noted: “Further exacerbating
this problem is the high cost of
government receivables ($45.5
million at fiscal year 2004)
which is not being systemati-
cally reduced by government
from the fixed monthly pay-
ments of $700,000, compared
to average monthly billings of
$900,000 for usage by the
Government and its depen-
dent agencies.”

Mr Jarrett told Tribune
Business that accounts receiv-
ables stood at $104 million
when he entered BEC back
in June 2002.

To deal with that, the
December 2004 Cabinet paper
had suggested offsetting the
$45.5 million in government
receivables owed to BEC with
the $28.5 million in customs
duties owed by BEC.

teachers for the following positions for the
20109-2010 School Year

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, SOPHONIE BASTIAN of
Tyler Street, P.O. Box CB-12401, Nassau, Bahamas intends
to change my name to SOPHONIE BASTIEN. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

-Journalism/Literature (Gr, 10-12)
-Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr, 7-12)
-Math (Gr. 7-127)
-Physics (Gr. 10-12)
-Agriculture (Gr.7-9)
-Technical Drawing (Gr, 7-12)
-Accounts‘Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
-Physical Education (Gr, 7-12)
-Spanish (Gr.7-12)
-Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)
(Chemistry
-Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
-Health Science (Gr, 7-9)
-General Science (Gr.7 -9)
-Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)
-Music (Gr. 7-12)
-Biology (Gr. 10-12)

Language Arts/Literature (Gr, 7-12)
-Art/Craft (Gr, 7-12)
-Food Nutrition (Gr, 10-12)
-Clothing Construction (Gr. 1(-12)
-Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)

-Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION
CLE/GEN/00239

2006

BETWEEN

KENDRICK CLARKE
Plaintiff
AND

FELIX DELANCY
Defendant

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Action No. CLE/GEN/00239 of 2006 in which
the Plaintiff claims that you are negligent and
thereby is wholly responsible for the traffic
accident which occurred on the 6" December,
2003 in the vicinity of East Street and Wilson
Track and the Plaintiff claims damages,
interests and costs against you.

AND THAT it has been ordered by
the Supreme Court that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action on you be effected
by this advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that
you must within fourteen (14) days from the
publication ofthis advertisement inclusive ofthe
day of such publication, acknowledge service
of the said Writ of Summons by completing
a prescribed form of Acknowledgement of
Service which may be obtained on request
from the Attorneys whose name and address
appear below, otherwise Judgment may be
entered against you.

Dated this 25" day of February, A.D., 2008

“Play like the Pros” |
Applicants must: . . On the job training!
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willing to subscribe to the Statement of

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Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or Univerity
in the area of specialization.

Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or
Diploma,

Have at least two years teaching

experience in the relevant subject area

With excellent communications skills.
Applicants must have the ability to prepare
students for all examinations to the BIC!
BOCSE levels

Be willing to participate in the high

school’s extra curricular programmes

Joe Farrington Rd. Ravagar Plaza »°

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of JAMES ALEXANDER WALLACE late
of West Bay Street in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Island of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of the
same certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the 21st day March A.D., 2009, and if required, prove
such debts or claims, or in default be excluded from
any distribution; after the above date the assets will
be distributed having regard only to the proved debts
or claims of which the Administrator shall have had Notice.

Application must be picked up at the High
School Office on Shirley Street and be returned
with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph and three references to:

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.
CHAMBERS
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the aforementioned date.

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.,
Attorneys for the Administrator
Alvernia Court, 94 Dowdeswell Street
P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff

Deadline for application is
March 6th, 2009


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 9B





Airport Authority's jam
loss slashed 76.4%

FROM page 1B

tune of $1 million in its 2008
financial year, compared toa
$13.035 million hand-out giv-
en the year before.

Reducing the Airport
Authority’s drain on the
Treasury is understood to
have been a key component
in the 10-year management
contract handed to YVRAS,
which has a deadline by
when it must make the air-
port profitable. YVRAS
earned $844,902 in manage-
ment fees during 2008.

Since its incorporation in
2000, the Airport Authority
has been another financial
burden for the taxpayer and
the Government, its accumu-
lated deficit — total losses -
after eight years in existence
standing at $45.164 million.

For 2008, the commercial
expertise YVRAS has
brought to bear on NAD
and the Airport Authority
was already starting to show
through, with revenues from
terminal leases and retail
concessions, refueling royal-
ties, car parking and adver-
tising all above 2007 levels.

Yet apart from the passen-
ger facility fee, all aeronauti-
cal revenues — landing fees,
baggage claim fees, loading
bridges and aircraft parking

fees — were behind prior year
comparatives.

From a balance sheet per-
spective, the main activity in
2008 was the refinancing of a
$65 million bridging loan
provided by a lending syndi-
cate of banks. That re-
financing, completed in
November 2007, rescheduled
the Airport Authority’s debt
from short to long-term, as a
syndicate stepped forward
with an $80 million term
loan that is payable within
seven years.

Replaced

That term loan is itself
being replaced by the $80
million participating debt
facility that forms the third
tranche of the $310 million
financing round for LPIA’s
first phase redevelopment.
Some $50 million of the $80
million required is being put
up by the Government.

But, as a requirement of
the initial $80 million term
loan, the financial statements
said the Airport Authority
had “established a restricted
debt service reserve account
with Citibank, New York”.
That account’s balance stood
at $5.3 million as at June 30,
2008.

And, to manage interest

NOTICE

MARATHON INVEST & TRADE S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies

Act. 2000

MARATHON INVEST & TRADE

S.A. is in dissolution as of February 26, 2009

Athinoula Vasiliou of Ioanni Kyrakide 12A,
Apostolos Andreas, 3067 Limassol, Cyprus is the

Liquidator.

NOTICE

GOLDHAWK MANAGEMENT BUSINESS

CORPORATION
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000 GOLDHAWK MANAGEMENT BUSINESS
CORPORATION. is in dissolution as of February

26, 2009

Diana Demetriou of Stavrou Stylianide 1A, Mesa
Yitonia, 4003 Limassol, Cyprus is the Liquidator.

NOTICE

FRESHWATER INCORPORATED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies

Act. 2000
is in dissolution as

FRESHWATER INCORPORATED.
of February 26, 2009

Amanda Cacoyanni of 284 Arch Makarios III
Ave., Fortuna Court, Block B, 3105 Limassol,
Cyprus is the Liquidator.

SHOLM
CONSTRUCTION LTD.

204


























costs, NAD has set a policy
that it will keep “50 per cent
of its borrowings at fixed
rates of interest”, a target it
was in compliance with at
June 30, 2008.

As at year-end 2008, the
sums owed by the Airport
Authority to the National
Insurance Board (NIB) had
more than tripled to $61,341,
compared to $17,486 the
year before.

A $1.543 million payable
was also owed to the

Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration (BEC).

Also on the balance sheet
is a more than-$20 million
advance from the Ministry of
Finance which, during 2006,
gave $2.5 million to help set
up NAD. A further $17.994
million was advanced by the
Ministry to help purchase
security equipment and
enhance security measures.

No interest was attached
to these advances, and no
maturity date specified.

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International
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Private study lounge
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Internships & career
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Special recognition at
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BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 27 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.48 | CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -42.88 | YTD % -2.50
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.88 | YTD -2.04% | 2008 -12.31%
WWVW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $

1.39 Abaco Markets 1.41 1.41 0.00 0.070
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992
7.00 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.319
0.63. Benchmark 0.63. 0.63 0.00 -0.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.105
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00
12.61 Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95 0.00
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83 0.00
4.80 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.77 6.77 0.00
1.78 Consolidated Water BDRs 1.71 1.73 0.02
2.27 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00
6.02 Famguard 7.76 7.76 0.00
11.00 Finco 11.00 11.00 0.00
10.45 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 10.45 0.00
5.00 Focol (S) 5.00 5.00 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

f2ahH 1

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Morery 20 Vitork
â„¢& T.

Div $

0.055
1.255
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00
8.60 J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
FBB17 0.00. 7%
100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low

1000.00

Securi Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22

S2wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $

-0.041

Div $ P/E
0.300

0.000

0.001

0.480
0.000

ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets 11.23 12.04 14.00

RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387 0.35 4.40
2.9230 -0.58 -2.54
1.4376 0.28 4.38
3.3201 -1.94 -11.33

12.6816 0.50 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59

1.0000 0.00 0.00.
9.1005 0.06 -13.33
1.0401 4.01 4.01
1.0330 3.30 3.30
1.0410 4.10 4.10

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
del

Fund Name Div $ Yield %

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3773 Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund

1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3781
2.9230

1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
jast 52 weeks
ighted price for daily volume
ted price for daily volume
Change - Cha m day to day
Daily Vol. -N raded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin: gs
(S) - 4for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Weekly Vol. - Tre

EPS $ - A company’

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meanin: gful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



FamGuard's finance head in resignation

FROM page 1B

In a separate development,
it has been confirmed to Tri-
bune Business by sources
familiar with the situation that











the net income presented by
Family Guardian’s parent,
BISX-listed FamGuard Cor-
poration, was “overstated”
during the first three quarters
of 2008 due to an accounting
error since picked up.

Please be advised that effective March 2, 2009
Betty K. Agencies will resume its regular twice
weekly service from Miami, Florida to Nassau.









Schedule:

Departs Miami on Monday





Arrives in Nassau on Tuesday







Departs Miami on Wednesday





Arrives in Nassau on Thursday





Nassau
East St. North, Kelly’s Dock
P.O. Box N-351
Nassau, Bahamas
242-322-2142













3701 N.W. South River Drive
Miami, Florida 33142








Legal Notice

NOTICE
CORONA ELLINGTON INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JIGGER Ill LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of January 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GARAMOND S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

But there is nothing to sug-
gest that Ms Greene’s depar-
ture is linked to this, or that
she was directly responsible
in any way.

The financial statements
impacted, this newspaper
understands, are the three
interim reports presented to
shareholders for the nine
months to September 30, 2008.

It is unclear what the
accounting error was, or its
magnitude, but the reports
presented to shareholders last
year were unaudited, mean-
ing they had not been scruti-
nized or approved by Fam-
Guard’s external auditors.

The error was picked up
internally and rectified during
the 2008 fourth quarter, Tri-
bune Business understands,
and FamGuard’s year-end
results will not be impacted
by it. The insurer’s 2008 per-
formance is said to have still
been profitable.

Shareholders are only like-
ly to see the changes when the
company starts publishing its
quarterly results for fiscal
2009, as the 2008 comparatives
would have to be restated.

“It all happened in 12
months,” one source told Tri-
bune Business. “There was no
fraud. There was nothing dis-
honest that went on. It was
just an unfortunate mistake.

“Publicly traded companies
of this size, in this country, are
relatively small, and if you
make an accounting error it
tends to be material.”

Reiterating that the
accounts impacted were unau-
dited management accounts,
the source said the three quar-
terly statements issued by
FamGuard last year were not
subject to the same level of
scrutiny as year-end accounts
examined by external audi-
tors.

Unaudited

For the nine months to
September 30, 2008, Fam-
Guard’s unaudited accounts
showed the company had gen-
erated a net profit of $5.22
million, compared to $6.527
million in net income for the
year before.

A major factor behind the
more than-$1 million swing

a)

Entry level book keeper urgently
needed must be proficient in
Microsoft Applications.

Please fax resume to 394-3885.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETOILE LUMINEUSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HORNBILL HALLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BREATH OF DAWN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 26th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



“It all happened in 12 months.
There was no fraud. There was
nothing dishonest that went on. It
was just an unfortunate mistake.
Publicly traded companies of this
size, in this country, are relatively
small, and if you make an accounting
error it tends to be material.”



was a $2.14 million reversal
on FamGuard’s paper
gains/losses from its various
investments in equities, a
$1.368 million gain for the first
nine months of 2007 com-
pared to a $736,724 loss last
year due to the stock market
slide.

When contacted by Tri-
bune Business, Ms Hermanns
declined to comment on
whether FamGuard’s interim
financial statements issued in
2008 had overstated net
income. She said the compa-
ny was currently undergoing
its year-end 2008 audit, and
because it was in a closed peri-
od, she did not want to make
any comments on its financial
performance.

“We are currently finishing
our audit for 2008. That is
being finalised as we speak,
so until that is done I don’t
want to make any comment,”
Ms Hermanns said.

When pressed on the over-
statement/accounting error
issue, she replied: “I can’t
speak specifically to that at
this point. With financial state-
ments, we have to be careful
how we present that, and I do

not want to make sweeping
statements without a full
review from the auditors. I
cannot speak without having
the benefit of the audit being
completed... We’re not aware
of any substantial variations
in our financials.

“We will review our finan-
cials once the audit is com-
pleted, and that should be this
month. We anticipate that
being at the end of March, and
then we will provide full
access. Everything will be
clear, with full transparency.”

Ms Hermanns did, though,
say the major difference
between FamGuard’s 2008
and 2007 financial perfor-
mances was the paper
gain/loss on its equity invest-
ments, which are described as
‘changes in unrealized appre-
ciation of equity investments’.

“The most significant
change to our financial state-
ments that we anticipate over
the prior year is the swing in
equities,” she added. “Obvi-
ously, our equities were way
down compared to the prior
year. That will be the biggest
change in our financial state-
ments.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HOT PASTY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUNBEACH ISLAND INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RHUBARBE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of January 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 11B



Scotiabank appoints
receiver for resort

FROM page 1B

on foreign direct investment
projects that the Bahamas was
counting on to generate jobs
and economic growth. Numer-
ous other projects, including
the Ritz-Carlton Rose Island,
Royal Island, Ginn sur mer
and Rum Cay Resort Marina,
have all been impacted to
some degree by the immense
difficulty — if not impossibility
— of obtaining debt financing
at reasonable cost and terms.

As for Chub Cay, the
receiver’s appointment comes
as little surprise. Tribune Busi-
ness had been told that the
project’s Homeowners Asso-
ciation had been locked in
last-ditch talks with Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) to avert the
bank’s foreclosure plan when
it reported last month that
some 20 per cent of the 50 full-
time operational staff were
laid-off. Those talks seeming-
ly failed to produce a solution.

Scotiabank (Bahamas) had
launched a legal action against
its three main principals -
Kaye Pearson, Walt McCro-
ry and Bob Moss — in the US
District Court for the southern
district of Florida just before
Christmas 2008, alleging that
they had defaulted on the
repayment of a $45 million
loan.

The bank alleged that the
trio had guaranteed the
“financing for the develop-
ment of vacation residences,
a marina, a clubhouse and
related improvements for
more than 800 acres on Chub
Cay in the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas”. As a result, it
has been seeking to call in the



$4 million loan guarantee
proffered by Messrs McCro-
ry, Pearson and Moss.

In its lawsuit, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) alleged that the
trio owed $44.010 million in
unpaid principal on the July
28, 2006, loan, plus interest,
cost and expenses, including
attorneys’ fees.

Deadline

The bank also alleged that
the three developer principals
had guaranteed that construc-
tion work on Chub Cay would
be completed by December
31, 2007, a deadline that had
been missed. Some $38.6 mil-
lion worth of work, Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) claimed,
needed to be done to bring
the project to completion.

“They’re [the developers]
still looking for an investor
partner, and right now the
Homeowners Association are
funding the operational
expenses” of the resort and
Marina, one source had told
Tribune Business of the situa-
tion at Rum Cay. “Negotia-
tions are still ongoing.”

That new equity partner at
one stage looked like being
Dutch-based real estate and
resort developer, La Perla
International Living, which
has developed resort and res-
idential

communities in nations
including Antigua, Panama,
Spain, France and Vietnam.
However, talks between the
two sides were said to have
broken down more than a
month ago.

In their response to Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) Florida law-



suit, Mr McCrory and Mr
Moss, while admitting the loan
default, denied they were
responsible for paying the $4
million guarantee as the bank
had already been able to call
this in via a previously pledged
stand-by credit facility.

The duo also alleged that
Bahamian law firm, Graham,
Thompson & Co, had failed
to protect their interests in
talks with Scotiabank
(Bahamas), because while its
Freeport office had repre-
sented themselves, the Nas-
sau office acted for the bank.

There is nothing to suggest
that Graham, Thompson &
Co, and its partners, attorneys,
associates and staff, have done
anything wrong in relation to
the affair, and they are not
named as defendants in rela-
tion to the Chub Cay dispute.

Apart from Scotiabank
(Bahamas) and _ other
financiers, Chub Cay’s woes
have also impacted Bahami-
an contractors engaged on the
project’s construction. Tribune
Business previously reported
that Osprey Developers and
Gunite Pools had obtained
separate default judgments
worth a total $468,000 against
the development over alleged-
ly unpaid bills.

The whole episode again
illustrates the potential dam-
age that could be done to the
Bahamas’ tourism and eco-
nomic reputation by unfin-
ished resort developments,
especially in instances where
developers allegedly leave
unpaid bills and debts.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
MATERIALS MANAGEMENT DIRECTORATE

A Ae
5 t,
w

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY
OF MEDICAL & SURGICAL ITEMS

PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from
qualified individuals for the position of PRINCIPAL, St. John’s College,
beginning September, 2009.

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in Education from a recognized
University, with at least (5) years accumulative administrative experience. The
applicant must also be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Providing leadership - set the climate and pace for success and high
achievement in the school.

- Organizing and supervising schedules, programmes, records and
procedures.

- Supervising and evaluating teachers and support staff.

- Managing records, school finances and end-of-year closing
procedures.

- Communicating with parents, community groups and organizations.

- Displaying consistent organizational and human relationship skills.

- Assisting the Education Department with and initiating Staff
Development Programmes.

school

Applicants should submit a cover letter, Curriculum Vitae, copies of
degree certificates, three references and passport photographs to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY
P. O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Friday March 27th, 2009.





THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

TENDER

MAKING AND/OR SUPPLYING UNIFORMS
FOR SECURITY OFFICERS, SCREENERS
PAV CO MES

Bids are invited for a one year contract to manufacture uniforms for the Security
Officers, Screeners and Firefighters of the Airport Authority. The details for security
and firefighters are as follows:

Trousers (Male and Female)
Trousers (Male)-Dickies

Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(M/F)
Female Caps

Rain Coats

Shoulders Patches

Trousers (Male and Female)-Dickies
Skirts

Short and Long Sleeve Shirts(Dickies)M/F
Male Peak Caps

Shoulders Bars

Tenders are invited from qualified Contractors for the supply pois Malo smale)

of Medical & Surgical Items for the Materials Management
Directorate, Public Hospitals Authority, for a period of one (1) year.

Ties Windbreakers

Sweaters Shoes (Male and Female)
Cap Badges Safety Boots

Dress Uniform Jackets Golf Shirts — K-9 Unit
Trousers K-9 Unit Pants*

Shirts* Boots*

Senior Officers Shirts* Dress Pants Senior Officers*
Shoes* Overalls*

Belts* Base Ball Caps*

Tender documents, which include instructions to Tenderers,
specifications and other relevant information, can be collected
9:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at the Materials
Management Directorate, Princess Margaret Hospital’s compound,
Shirley Street.

(*Items are for Fire Fighters)

Collection of the Bid Specifications and viewing of the samples of the uniforms may
be done at the Security Office (located in the former Police Station at Lynden Pindling
International Airport) between the hours of 9:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m., Monday thru Friday
up to March 10, 2009.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or
packaged identified as “ TENDER TO SUPPLY MEDICAL
& SURGICAL ITEMS FOR THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS

AUTHORITY?” and addressed to:

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes addressed to the undersigned and the
envelope must specify “BID FOR UNIFORMS”. The Airport Authority reserves the
right to reject any envelope not properly addressed and/or not specifying “BID FOR
UNIFORMS”. Faxed bids will NOT be considered.

The Chairman
Tenders Committee
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace West
Collins Avenue
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas

The Authority reserves the right to reject any and all bids without stating any
reason (s).

Bids should be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday March 31, 2009. Bids
received after the deadline will not be considered.

All Tenders must be received at the above address by 5:00 p.m. on
20% April 2009.

There will be a public opening of bids at 10:00 a.m. on Friday April 3, 2009. Interested
bidders may attend, and bring copies of the business licenses.

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate of up to date
National Insurance Contributions should accompany all proposal.

Acting General Manager
The Airport Authority
Lynden Pindling International Airport
P. O. Box AP59222
Nassau, Bahamas

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any or all Tender(s).




JUDGE PARKER

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MOM JUMPS QUT OF
KER SKIN!



©1989 Universal Press Syndicate



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www. kingfeatures.com





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12 Encouraging applause? (8) 5 Angered — or could be || | || | | Bi || #742 thing on the diamond finesse, which
18 ee city e : ene #85 would give him only about a 50-50
HNMSUAL Sense Gserled piace 0 WEST EAST chance of succeeding. Instead, he
15 Their accounts may be all i ene (5) 483 a7 should adopt a tne of play that
at sea (7) 8 Don't ae i ¥01062 vIs4 allows him to avoid the finesse alto-
17 Anumber agreed to be succeed? (10 #KI5 410986 gether — one that will make the con-
corrected, being 9 Being so one may react | || | | | | || | | || &KO104 #97632 tract regardless of who has the king
humble (7) rashly with unusual WF SOUTH of diamonds.
19 Went into liquidation when ill-grace (8) Pa oe Weleed. Weil ae thee al @#KQIJ 104 Accordingly, declarer takes West’s
king hard? (7) a; Sign tora iS et fe eee es ¥K95 lénp of clube lead with the ace- and
working hard’ ign for a missing ing-of-clubs lead with the ace an
21 Small things that cause a letter (10) @AQ3 draws two rounds of trumps, having
lot of ill-feeling (7) 16 aa squirming Fic = Ie | Pl tT | ft tp yd i ede AT eee oe note a bg -
22 Flier appears to steal in (5) ish (8 e bidding: marked by the opening lead with the
24 Useful people showing 18 Ashare in the plot (9) Across Down South West North East queen of clubs. South then cashes the
= ate in Se @) 20 oe ees : M4 1 Close together 1 Profoundly wise es Pass 2% Pass eae recess : hearts ee :
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oe N (4,2,4) person (4) : 4 % :
such a group activity is payment (7) N Bincanvetas 2 Worthy (9) Opening lead — king of clubs. ae eon hea a _ apn ‘
broadcast (5,4) 21 They prohibit flags (7) » deepest an fie a Flower (5) : outh refuses to try the diamon
28 Not here again after the 23 It’s good in France and Oo. reat enjoyment (5) _ Some people greatly enjoy taking _ finesse, as there is now no point in
start (5) America to get extra 11 Shame (9) 4 Sorrow (7) finesses — especially when the risking it. Instead, he wins with the
29 Formerly in older style (4) money (5) > 12 First night of film (8) 5 Ancestry (7) finesses win. But the fact is that ace and exits with the jack of clubs,
30 Our respect will be 25 Athenian garret (5) ” 13. A criminal (5) 7 Wander stealthily (5) finesses should be avoided like the — saddling West with the lead.
misplaced for such an 26 Decapitated their son may < 15 Abominable (7) 8 Urgently enthusiastic plague, and should be taken only West is helpless. If he cashes the
10 be (4 Lu : when no better option is available. king of diamonds, it is all over, while
oppressor (10) e (4) 17 Metal wind (6,2,2) ‘ : ae
: 9 Hair style (8) Consider this deal where declarer _ if he leads a heart or a club — giving
Yesterday's Cryptle Solution Yesterday's E Solution instrument (7) y is in four spades. He has four possi- declarer a ruff-and-discard — his
7 ay 3 VTP u 2 ay = Easy u 19 Deep purplish red (7) | 14 Gesture of ble losers — a heart, two diamonds __ play is equally ineffective.
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; ee 16 Decorative object (8) losers cannot be avoided, the enti the third heart, it does not matt
Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 22 Violent weather (5) : OO ee ee toe ee ne ee ae
Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 24 Appeased (8) 18 Invaluable (2) : ees ee down to losing only one ae ek atlually oceed ae
Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 27 Insulting (9) 20 Inform (7) 2 one , Hol oni h ce : Soul oe eres bo oe eae
Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. 28 Clumsy (5) 21 To hide (7) : Ae tee a us t . nk ae. Mere ic ne Pb ie a
Down: 1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Down: 1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 29 An accepted 23 Express . t 7 a. ce ie a Soar Tp ita SOUL Wie trap ie Ras tale te
Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 standard (4) willingness (5) 3 ee eae
Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 25 Confidence (5) ; se O0e suing Teatures Syndicate Ines
14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20. ~=Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 30 Bavarian leather 26 Knock




unconscious (4)






THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009, PAGE 13B



INSIGHT



G H T

FEEDBACK

Re: Degrees -
Time for a rethink



YOUR argument regarding
university degrees has some
merit, as I can testify as one
who has experienced it from
both ends of the spectrum.

Having entered the work
market in the 1960s, when less
than five per cent of the UK’s
population went to college, I
was never given the opportu-
nity to see a university degree
as a realistic option. I didn’t
even consider it at the time.

Like most of my generation,
I entered my profession
(accountancy) as an 18-year-
old, after taking the then stan-
dard three advanced level
GCE (General Certificate of
Education) subjects, which
was regarded as the “gold
standard” for having had a
sound basic education. I
signed articles with a small
provincial accountancy firm
and learned my profession “at
the knee of a master” — as
you put it — while being paid
a pittance during training.

Whatever the limitations of
this system, it taught me
everything I needed to know
about becoming a practising
accountant. Much of the work
was routine, boring even, but
it showed me all I needed to
know about providing accoun-
tancy services to an accept-
able standard while observing
all the ethical considerations
of such a position. When my
examinations came around, I
was able to pass, if not with
flying colours, at least with
adequate marks, so I was able
to “qualify” while earning a
living, albeit a very humble
one.

Some of my fellow trainees,
working with other bigger and
more prestigious firms, actu-
ally paid their employers (or
at least their parents did) for
the privilege of being taught
the business. The sums paid
were considerably less than
the fees and living expenses
one now has to find to put a
student through university.

By the time I was in my ear-
ly twenties, I had qualified as a
chartered accountant and was
in a position, had I chosen so
to do, to marry, buy a home
and have a family. My path
was set and, for the most part,
I have been pleased with the
living accountancy has given
me, though I would be the
first to acknowledge that it is
not one of the world’s most
exciting occupations.

By contrast, my own chil-
dren have completed very
long and expensive university
courses (I believe I have
invested at least a quarter of a
million dollars in educating
two of my children at tertiary
level) and they are still uncer-
tain about which path to take.

All of this begs the ques-
tion: if university education
isn’t supposed to guide stu-
dents towards career goals,
then what is it for? I have seen
no evidence in my own life
that graduates are noticeably
better informed than anyone
else, except in their own lim-
ited area of speciality, and it
could be argued that pro-
longed college careers leave
them unsuited for the world
of “real work” rather than the
theory-based assignments they
have been used to.

Your term “scammed into
indebtedness” is about right. I
think the old system of arti-
cles and indentureships is
much to be preferred over
what we have now, where uni-
versities have made a flour-
ishing business out of people’s
sometimes ill thought out
desire to obtain a degree. The
cost is too high, and the results
are often unsatisfactory.

JPL (Expat accountant)

DO the math. My son went
to a North American univer-
sity. The fees were more than
$20,000 a year. He was there
for four years. The cost of
accommodation was substan-
tial. I estimate the total price
tag (to me) of educating him

to bachelor degree level was,
taking everything into
account, $150,000. When he
came out of college, he didn’t
know what to do. He now
works in a bar. The money
would have been better spent
being put towards his first
home. You’re right — the
recession will make us all see
sense.
Nassau Dad

I MUST say that I was very
pleased with your article today
entitled “Degrees: Time To
Rethink". Your piece really
hit home for me as I share
some of your views on post-
secondary education.

Two things in particular that
stood out to me were how col-
lege/university graduates are
ill-prepared for the careers
they are about to enter; and
how vocational training is not
up to standard compared toa
college/university degree for
some.

If I had one wish it would
be for vocational and technical
training to be taken very seri-
ously in The Bahamas. I can
be a personal testament to
what I am saying because I am
enrolled in The Electronics
and Avionics Technology pro-
gramme at George T Baker
Aviation School in Miami,
Florida. This school does not
award degrees, but diplomas
and certifications to students
after the completion of a pro-
gramme.

My school is highly recog-
nised in Miami and through-
out parts of the state of Flori-
da for best preparing students
for entry into the workforce.
In the surrounding area are
sponsors and businesses
owned and operated by grad-
uates of Baker Aviation and
they also employ graduates
from the school well before
they complete their pro-
gramme. Besides first-hand
witnessing what I am writing
about I have proof to what
you wrote about in your arti-
cle on students having these
degrees and can't perform the
duties of a job.

For example: The USPS
had openings for electronics
technicians at a new facility
they are opening in Opa Loc-
ka. The recruiter for The
USPS said that the pro-
gramme being offered at Bak-
er Aviation is exactly what is
needed for the job openings.
He stressed the importance of
the hands-on skills that we
were acquiring in our train-
ing. When our Electronics
Technology students were
compared to students of ITT-
Tech for the job, Baker stu-
dents were far more suited for
what they need their people
to know. ITT-Tech students
were not even able to pass the
examination, while students
from my school were able to
pass the exam. The point Iam
trying to make is that ITT-
Tech offers a Bachelor's
degree and Baker Aviation
offers certificates. ITT-Tech
has a huge tuition and Bak-
er's is more affordable. One
can pass the exam and the oth-
er can't.

I feel that I have been
pushed aside when applying
for scholarships here at home
because I will not be getting a
degree when I graduate. It is
hard to stand out next to
someone with a Bachelor's in
Engineering when all I am
getting is a diploma and vari-
ous certifications. So will it be
Mr Big Bad Bachelor's
Degree or me? It isn't fair, but
such is life. I have an uncle
that I stay with in Miami who
has an MBA. And he has a
business where he generates
most of his money from road
maintenace contracts and
landscaping jobs. He stresses
that if he knew then what he
knows now, he would have
gone into a different field.
HVAC being one of the main
ones because he knows that
the "blue collar" jobs generate



a lot of business, which means
more money at the end of the
day.

One final thought for you,
sir. Look at this in terms of
someone who is trained for a
particular job. Who would you
prefer to perform mainte-
nance on your aircraft. A
mechanic with a bachelor's
degree, that consists of a
bunch of literature, art appre-
ciation, economics and half of
the time of study in contact
hours? OR a vocational stu-
dent trained in every aspect
of aviation maintenance from
safety to quality assuarance,
with hands-on training every
day dealing with an aircraft,
whose classroom is a hangar
and the various aircraft? Not
to de-value the other mechan-
ic but, my money is on the sec-
ond one, sir. Good day and
GOD bless!

Derek Dames

I AM very delighted at the
fact that there is a force out
there that is still making its
way into the minds of our peo-
ple. Commendations are in
order for a well thought
through and written article. I
have always been an advocate
for vocational/skills training.

As a young man growing
up I was trained in entrepre-
neurship and business devel-
opment which I was able to
apply in the workplace. I start-
ed my own business at twenty-
one years of age and operated
it for five years. Had it not
been for the hands-on train-
ing I received during those
times, I wouldn’t have been
the person I am today.

Admittedly, I am complet-
ing a degree in business man-
agement and it’s nothing like
being trained or prepared for
the working world. Everyone
these days seems to just study
to pass the exams that will
land them a degree. That’s not
right, that cannot be good for
the future of our economies
in this region.

Some graduates have no
practical knowledge, neither
can they perform with any
semblance of efficiency and
effectiveness.

Ilaud you for the steps you
have taken in bringing to the
forefront this viewpoint about
rethinking this concept of
degrees. Nothing is wrong
with attaining a degree. How-
ever, something is definitely
wrong when you do not pos-
sess the ability to effectively
meet the demands of the
workforce.

Thank you for this article. It
is a reminder for me that I
must still stand up for contin-
uous reviewing of the needs
of the workforce both nation-
ally and globally and ensure
that my voice is heard among
those who are doing the same.

All the best

Riccii Ricardo

YOU are so right. Students
now have four or five years
after leaving high school to
consider all the things they
might do in life; then, when
they graduate from college,
they still don’t know, so they
enter a period of professional
training, if they’re lucky, even-
tually finding themselves
ready for the workplace when
they’re about 26 or 27; that’s
ten whole years later than
people of my generation. We
need to wake up. College
degrees, like much else in
modern life, are a con trick
played on gullible people.
They are pretty much mean-
ingless when it comes to gaug-
ing brainpower or suitability
for employment.

George Hammond (Expat
engineer)

I TOOK articles to become
an attorney and, like you, have
never felt “unduly deprived”
by not having had a university
education. In fact, non-gradu-
ates tend to mature much
more quickly and become use-

a

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

DEGREES: TIME FOR A RETHINK

Recession could force a review of the university system



ful in the office/workshop at
an age when they are still
young enough to enjoy their
money.

I think you’re absolutely
right; old-style apprenticeships
are the way forward, so long
as secondary schools can turn
out students at the required
level.

Nassau attorney

WE should all follow the
example of the medical pro-
fession, whose degrees have
always been vocationally
based.

If you go to a teaching hos-
pital and graduate with a
bachelor of medicine degree,
that means you can function
as a doctor, though you still
require a lot of on-the-job
training before you can gain

seniority in the profession.

As far as I am aware,
trainee doctors have always
undergone hands-on training
to gain their degrees because
theory alone is obviously use-
less in a hospital or clinic envi-
ronment.

J B Barrett

YOUR article made me feel
much better about not having
sent my own children to uni-
versity. They have done very
well for themselves without
college degrees and I’m not
sure that an expensive higher
education would have put
them in a better position. It is
something that has troubled
me a lot over the years, but I
was reassured by what you
said.

ALS, Grand Bahama



“Some of
my fellow
trainees,
working with
other bigger
and more

paid their
employers
(or at least
their parents
did) for the
privilege of
being taught
the business.”



Re: Power game
(PLP leadership)

YOU would have thought
that Forrester Carroll JP, who-
ever he is, would have learned
some hard lessons from the
fate suffered by fellow mem-
bers of the PLP when they
choose to tackle The Tribune.

He tried to be facetious ina
letter to Mr Marquis and was
promptly “mashed up” in only
two sentences. Surely all intel-
ligent men know that you nev-
er take on a professional in
his own ballpark.

Please, Mr Carroll, and all
like you, show some sense in
these matters.

Vivienne, Nassau

Re: Enough of this foolish-
ness (Fred Mitchell)

I HAVE only just caught up
with your article on Mr Fred
Mitchell, the former Minister
of Foreign Affairs. My father
said it was “brutally brilliant”,
which I agree with. Can you
please reproduce this article
and others from the Insight
section in pamphlets so they
can be studied in our schools?

AB Adderley

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL &
SANDILANDS REHABILITAION CENTRE

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF
PROVISIONS & FOOD ITEMS

Tenders are invited from qualified Contractors for the supply of
Provisions and Foods Items for the Princess Margaret Hospital and
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals Authority, for a period

of one (1) year.

Tender documents, which include instructions to Tenderers, specifications
and other relevant information, can be collected 9:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday at the Materials Management Directorate,
Princess Margaret Hospital’s compound, Shirley Street.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or packaged
identified as “ TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF PROVISIONS AND
FOODS ITEMS FOR THE PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL

AND SANDILANDS REHABILITATION CENTRE” and addressed
to:

The Chairman
Tenders Committee

Public Hospitals Authority

Third Terrace West
Collins Avenue
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address by 5:00 p.m. on 20% April 2009.

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate of up to date

National Insurance Contributions

should accompany all proposal.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any or all Tender(s).


PAGE 14B, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



—

JUST CALL me the non-stop Stirling engine. This Rhessi satellite, launched seven years ago ona
two-year mission to record solar flares, is still going strong and still taking pictures with an ever-
reliable Stirling engine at its heart: one reason why NASA engineers believe they can bank on Stirlings

for deep-space missions of 15 years and more.

How a 200-year-old gas
CITI COLI CO YAY om I ITom NOBLE

FROM page one

the entire United States.”

But what to do when the sun goes down?
One solution is pumped storage — using the
daytime power to pump water to a reservoir
high in the mountains — then releasing it in
the evening to drive generators as it rushes
back downhill.

Bruce Osborn, CEO of Stirling Energy
Systems, has been working to develop the
engine for 25 years.

“This exciting world record shows that
using these dishes will be a cost-effective and
environmentally friendly way of producing
power,” he says.

“We are now actively engaged in preparing
it for mass production.”

Mass dish production also will be under-
taken by the Infinia company, of Washington
state, which after an investment of $50 mil-
lion, plans to start making 30,000 dishes this
year for sale worldwide.

Company chief J D Sitton told me: “The
Stirling engine’s moment has finally come.”
Remarkably, Infinia first planned to use the
Stirling engine in a fully implantable heart
pump 20 years ago. “This was to be an
engine driven by a piece of fully-shielded
plutonium the size of your pinkie fingertip,”
said Mr Sitton.

“We had to drop the idea when it became
clear that plutonium might have been attrac-
tive to people (terrorists) who didn’t neces-
sarily have the best interests of the patient at
heart.”

Design

However, the design lived on — and grew
a thousand-fold into the much larger Stirling
engine at the centre of the company’s new
solar dishes, which will be rolling off the pro-
duction line at Infinia’s new factory any day
now.

“Our first target market is Spain. It has the
right climate and landscape for our dishes,”
said Mr Sitton.

The company has also partnered with
Massachusetts-based Emergence Bio Energy
to build a device for poor countries such as
Bangladesh which would “co-generate” elec-
tricity and heat.

That Stirling-powered device runs on
methane gas “produced by a digester that
converts livestock manure and agricultural
wastes into combustible biogas.” In other
words, it runs on manure. In its first experi-
ment two villages were successfully powered
for eight hours a day.

Nowhere has the Stirling engine got its

Box:

‘a’
ca
=
x
=



admirers more starry-eyed than in outer
space.

Dick Shaltens is chief of the Power and In-
Space Propulsion Division of NASA, the
American space organisation.

He says: “I see the Stirling engine playing a
major role.

“T see it in deep space probes, on the plan-
et Mars, on the lunar surface, even on aster-
oids, anywhere there is insufficient solar ener-
gy to sustain a NASA mission.”

He forecast. “I can see the Stirling working
on a spacecraft on a 15-year mission. It is
that reliable.”

A good example of the Stirling’s reliabili-
ty is the Rhessi spacecraft, launched in 2002
to photograph the sun. It was originally a
two-year mission and the Stirling’s job was to
keep the instruments cool. Today, seven years
later, the Rhessi is still flying — and still
working!

Dishwasher

Back down here on earth, Britain’s Nation-
al Grid is about to start selling a “home pow-
er plant” powered by a Stirling engine to
replace the traditional boiler. Manufactured
by Disenco of Sheffield, the heat source is gas,
it looks just like an ordinary dishwasher in the
kitchen, and it will cost around $5,000.

But it will provide heat, light and power at
savings of up to 35 per cent with a much
smaller carbon footprint. And the home-
owner will even be able to sell surplus power
back to the electricity company.

Also planning a Stirling home power plant
is the British Baxi company. The company
Microgen, working with Baxi, expects a mar-
ket of 150,000 of these devices over the next
four years.

James Rizzo, who once ran the Maltese
Ministry of Tourism, took up the Stirling
engine 30 years ago as a hobby. Now chair-
man of the British Stirling Engine Society, he
says: "Most technical universities in Japan
are working on the Stirling engine as the
engine of the future. The Japanese navy is
now putting Stirling engines in their sub-
marines following Sweden.

"Robert Stirling's invention may prove to
be as important to the 21st century as James
Watt's steam engine was to the 19th and 20th
centuries."

The stranglehold that Middle Eastern oil
producers now have on the rest of the world
may well be loosened by the ghostly fingers of
the Rev Robert Stirling, who only wanted to
save his parishioners from the long ago dan-
ger of exploding steam engines. Now he can
help save the world.

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.
Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to
DA 69806
c/o The Tribune

P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.



It’s no joke
for Jo King

YOUR name can often define you. Those with ridiculous
monikers rarely thank their parents for the burdens silly
names impose upon them. INSIGHT investigates...

Bm By TRIBUNE
STAFF WRITER

MY MATERNAL grand-
mother refused to marry the
first man she loved because
his surname was Skinner.
“There is no possibility that I
will spend the rest of my life
being known as Mrs Skinner,”
she told her friends and fami-
ly defiantly.

I also recall a shamefaced
man in an English bankruptcy
court who admitted changing
his name to ‘Smith’ by deed
poll because his real name was
Crapper.

“T couldn’t live with it any-
more,” he informed the offi-
cial receiver, admitting that
his surname had imposed
impossible burdens upon him
which he could no longer
endure.

A family I knew called Uren
were none too pleased with
their surname, either, and 76-
year-old Stan Still remains sto-
ically outraged by his, admit-
ting to a British newspaper:
“It’s been a blooming mill-
stone round my neck for my
entire life.”

Now a survey has been con-
cluded to record the silliest
names in Britain, with bear-
ers being asked how they’ve
fared over the years with
labels they could do without.

Mr Still, a former RAF
man, recalls with something
less than amusement how
senior officers used to shout:

“Still, get a move on!”

And Doug Hole, from Pen-
rith, Cumbria, was under-
standably reluctant to discuss
his name with researchers,
having already taken enough
flak over the years for an
affliction imposed upon him
by his parents.

However, Rose Bush was
more forthcoming. “Many
have remarked on my name,
but what they say is usually
positive,” she told the Daily
Mail.

Enraged

Mary Christmas, Sonny Day
and Chris Cross were not too
annoyed, either, but Terry
Bull and Anna Sassin were
enraged.

You can imagine how one
woman felt when she was con-
stantly asked: “Are you Jo
King?”

Believe it or not, my father
had a mortician friend called
Phil Graves while a village
confectioner of my acquain-
tance was named Ava Sweet.

A well-known pasty maker
in Cornwall bears the unfor-
tunate name Choak, while a
Nottingham woman called
Pepper claimed to have a
brother called Zoltan.

Justin Case has taken a fair
bit of playful mockery over
the years, but not so much as
Barry Cade, Tim Burr and
Ray Gunn, all of whom fig-
ured in the list.

A spokesman for the web-
site responsible for the survey
said parents probably hadn’t
recognised the implications of
their offspring’s unfortunate
names at the time.

“There must be tremendous
embarrassment every time
they have to introduce them-
selves,” he added.

“Even their teachers must
have had to hold back their
smiles sometimes.”

Talking about teachers, I
must record an admirable but
poker-faced teacher at my first
school called Miss Daft. It says
much for her disciplinary skills
that no-one ever dared to
mock — or even mention —
her name in her presence.

However, her colleague Mr
E Raser was known as ‘Rub-
ber’ behind his back while a
butcher called McIntosh Carv-
er was referred to cheekily by
locals as ‘Mac the Knife’.

So what’s in a name? Ask
Helen Back, who has appar-
ently been to Hell and Back
since she was so christened 40
years ago.

Not to mention Mancunian
Ben Twilley, who rejects all
inquiries about his name with
a firm: “No comment.” Hard-
ly surprising when you think
about it.

¢ Do you know
any silly names?
Fax 328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net

Analysis: Cuba waiting
and watching Obama

m@ HAVANA
Associated Press

AMID TWO WARS and an eco-
nomic crisis, Cuba policy hardly ranks
at the top of President Barack Oba-
ma’s long agenda.

But circumstances are pressuring
Obama to make a move on Cuba soon
— or miss an opportunity to advance
his pledge to restore America’s lead-
ership in the world and in its own
hemisphere.

Conversations with Cuban officials
here suggest that unless the Obama
administration signals its intentions
quickly and clearly, it will disappoint
not only Cuba, but also many Latin
American leaders watching for signs
that the U.S. is ready to chart a dramatic new
course in the region.

The unofficial target for action seems to be late
April, when Obama travels to the Summit of the
Americas, being held on the Caribbean island of
Trinidad. Cuba is not invited, but will nonetheless
be on many participants’ minds.

More frequently than in the past, Latin Ameri-
can leaders have been flocking to Cuba in recent
months, and late last year 33 Latin American and
Caribbean nations called for an end to the U.S.
embargo. Guatemalan President Alvaro Colon,
leading a country long viewed as a loyal US. ally,
even apologized during a recent visit for his coun-
try’s supporting role in the 1961 failed Bay of Pigs
invasion.

Relationship

Fundamental change in the long-calcified Cuban-
American relationship appears possible now
because of the dual change in leadership in Havana
and Washington.

In Cuba, an ailing Fidel Castro relinquished the
presidency to his younger brother Raul, who has
spent the past year maintaining the country’s social-
ist system while delivering modest adjustments
and coping with the destruction wrought by three
hurricanes. Any hopes that the post-Fidel era
would lead to a rapid unraveling of Communist
rule have faded.

In Washington, Obama won the presidency in a
campaign in which he pledged a willingness to
speak to America’s rivals and enemies. Also, the
voting indicated that the hard-core anti-Castro
groups in the United States are less key to electoral
success, reducing their ability to block closer rela-
tions.

During a visit to Cuba last week by news exec-
utives of The Associated Press, Cuban govern-
ment officials refused to speak publicly on the
topic. That in itself could be a sign of how critical-
ly important they consider this period: The gov-
ernment does not wish any isolated comments to
impede potential progress.

An air of expectancy is palpable, especially after
a US. Senate staff report Feb. 23 issued by Richard
Lugar, the influential Indiana Republican who is
the ranking member of the foreign relations com-
mittee. It stated what would seem obvious to many:



Barack Obama

that the 50-year U.S. policy of shun-
ning communist Cuba by imposing a
strict trade embargo has failed to pro-
duce significant change in the island’s
government.

Lugar says it is time to re-evaluate
the policy of trying to isolate Cuba
economically, and deal with it “in a
way that enhances U.S. interests.”

While Cuban officials do not agree
with everything in the Lugar report, it
was widely viewed here as positive.
However, Cubans also have a long
memory. Havana and Washington
have periodically been on the verge of
breakthroughs, only to watch those
efforts be derailed by events.

And Cubans note that Obama has
specifically said he favors keeping the
embargo, although he wants to ease restrictions on
Cuban-Americans traveling to their homeland and
sending money and gifts to relatives.

Overtures

With Obama’s foreign policy team still coming
together, Cuba sees itself as sitting in the stands,
waiting for the match to begin. From a Cuban
perspective, the first serve goes to the U.S. side.
Cubans take the position that they have always
been open to overtures from the U.S. for better
relations, but not at any cost.

Economic relations with the U.S. could certain-
ly make life easier for the country’s 11 million
people, making food and other imports cheaper
and opening possibilities for greater tourism and
investments.

Concerns about human rights and political free-
dom in Cuba and Cuba’s support for leftist guerrilla
movements have been the main reasons cited by
American presidents since John F. Kennedy for
attempting to isolate the Caribbean nation.

As President Jimmy Carter moved towards eas-
ing relations, a public furor erupted in late 1978
over the presence of MiG 23 jets inside Cuba, and
the window of opportunity slammed shut. Again
during the Clinton years, Cuba’s downing of two
civilian planes sent towards Cuba by an anti-Cas-
tro group in Florida arrested possibilities for
progress in 1996.

The eight years of George W. Bush, which saw
U.S.-Cuban contacts at a recent low, have come to
a close. At the very least, it’s easy to envision a
return to some of the contacts and negotiations that
existed in earlier decades, even with the embargo
in place. If Obama reaches out to Cuba, the think-
ing goes, Cuba will be waiting to take his hand.

Meanwhile, some of the rhetoric from Wash-
ington that used to fall on Cuba seems to be shift-
ing to Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez, the US. critic
who after 10 years in power just won a referendum
removing limits on the number of times he can
run for re-election.

Cubans warn the Obama administration against
repeating the same mistakes with Venezuela that
the U.S. made with Cuba. The risk, they say, is that
Washington could find itself in the same position
decades down the line, trying to extricate itself
from a diplomatic impasse.
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

=

5-Day FORECAST

(

E-
y 337
« .,
ORLANDO > \
» High:61°FAG°C
[i Low: 39° F/4°C Ce i .

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TAMPA

Partly sunny.

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High: 65° F/18°C
Low: 57° F/14°C

@

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Today Tuesday

High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 73/22 43/6 s 71/21 44/6 pc Indianapolis
Anchorage 18/-7 10/-12 s 27/-2 17/-8 sf Jacksonville
Atlanta 38/3 23/-5 s 50/10 30/-1 s Kansas City
Atlantic City 28/-2 13/-10 sn 29/-1 16/-8 pc Las Vegas
Baltimore 27/-2 13/-10 sn 32/0 16/-8 s Little Rock
Boston 34/1 16/-8 sn 27/-2 15/-9 sn Los Angeles
Buffalo 15/-9 38/-13 sf 22/-5 17/-8 s Louisville
Charleston,SC = 45/7 23/-5 pe 53/11 26/3 s Memphis
Chicago 28/-2 11/-11_ pe 36/2 26/-3 pc Miami
Cleveland 21/-6 11/-11 $s 27/-2 16/-8 s Minneapolis
Dallas 60/15 40/4 s 72/22 55/12 pe Nashville
Denver 70/21 38/3 pe 71/21 36/2 pc New Orleans
Detroit 24/-4 13/-10 pc 32/0 18/-7 s New York
Honolulu 79/26 68/20 s 80/26 67/19 pc Oklahoma City
Houston 6417 42/5 s 72/22 56/13 pe Orlando

@ WEST PALM BEACH



Breezy early;

Beautiful with

otherwise, clear. sunshine.
High: 72°
Low: 60° Low: 63°
70°-63° F

High: 68° F/20° C
Low: 44° F/7°C

Q

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 68° F/20° C @
Low: 46° F/8° C

@
MIAMI
High: 69° F/21°C
Low: 49° F/9°C



Today
Low
F/C F/C
34/1 11/-11

High

53/11
40/4
74/23
48/8
70/21

30/-1
22/-5
50/10
27/-2
56/13
37/2 20/-6
44/6 26/-3
69/20 46/7
24/-4 11/-11
37/2 17/-8
54/12 39/3
26/-3 14/-10
58/14 36/2
61/16 36/2

Ww

Ss
$

High
F/C
43/6
56/13
45/7
73/22
53/11
67/19
44/6
53/11
70/21
31/0
46/7
60/15
25/-3
65/18
65/18

Tuesday

Low

F/C
23/-5
33/0
36/2
50/10
39/3
54/12
26/-3
39/3
54/12
19/-7
30/-1
48/8
18/-7
45/7
42/5

ABACO
High: 67° F/19° C

Ce



ANDROS

High: 79° F/26° C
Low: 60° F/16°C

Ww

s
s
pe
pe
pe
pe
s
pe
s
C
s
s
pe
pce
s

Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis

Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego

San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa

Tucson
Washington, DC

High: 73° F/23° C

Low: 60° F/16°C
ae
a?
a
FREEPORT
High: 66° F/19°C
Low: 55° F/13°C
NASSAU

=

Partly sunny.

High:
Low:

79°
65°

ICE c dt

73°-62° F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Low: 60° F/16°C
@

High
F/C
27/-2
89/31
24/-4
55/12
33/0
35/1
55/12
70/21
68/20
61/16
53/11
56/13
59/15
88/31
29/-1

Today

Low

F/C
13/-10
59/15
12/-11
40/4
15/-9
20/-6
33/3
47/8
58/14
51/10
40/4
27/-2
37/2
53/11
19/-7

WwW

sn
s
S$
sh
sn
pc
Cc
Ss
pc
sh
sh

GREAT EXUMA

ELEUTHERA







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LOW

3|4|5

MODERATE

=

Partly sunny.





Clouds and sun;
breezy, pleasant.







High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 60° F/16°C

a

High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 62°F/17°C

=

High
F/C

26/-3

83/28

Tuesday

Low

F/C
15/-9
59/15

30/-1 14/-10

50/10
38/3
46/7

58/14

76/24

66/18

58/14

52/11

60/15

62/16

85/29
36/2

37/2
17/-8
33/0
38/3
57/13
54/12
46/7
39/3
26/-3
44/6
54/12
22/-5

WwW

nD MN
oO

High: 77° High: 81°
Low: 69° Low: 69° a
ETCH cl
82°-67° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _HI.(ft.
Tod 14:14am. 23 5:16am. 0.1
mv 44:45pm. 28 5:16pm. -0.1
12:10pm. 22 6:14am. 0.2
PALMANAG cia. 03
Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Wednesday24oam. 27 72am. 03
Temperature Y445 p.m. : 7:19 p.m. 0.0
HIGH oeceeeecccececesesteseseetsteseeeeteseseeceseees 79° F/26° C 0am. 27 832am. 023
Low nagenranensaeen 70° F/21° C Thursday 9-98 a 29 8:39 oa. 0.0
Normal high .... 78° F/26° C ——————— eee
Normal low 65° F/18° C
Last year’s HIGH sssccccccscecescececene srr c | ONT U(IIN
Last year's lOW o.ccecseseseteeeeeeeees 70° F/21°C
Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:32 a.m. Moonrise..... 9:48 a.m.
As of 1 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccssseccscseeeeessseeee 0.00" Sunset....... 6:13 p.m. Moonset... . 11:54 p.m.
Year to date i
Normal year to date oo... cece ceeeceeeeee 3.49" ay am My New
218, phe
-
AccuWeather.com = as 4
Forecasts and graphics provided by Ss i Ped
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar. 4 Mar.10 Mar.18 Mar. 26
CATISLAND
High: 79° F/26° C
Low: 58° F/14°C
=
a SAN SALVADOR
High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 61°F/16°C
— 5
ii
LONGISLAND
High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 61° F/16°C MAYAGUANA

High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 68° F/20° C

Ge

oe

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGEDISLAND Nist:88-F/28°¢
High: 81° F/27°C :

Low: 60°F/16°C
GREAT INAGUA

High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 71° F/22°C

ay
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HIGH



\. HIGH







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EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

ry 2MNiyy
>

Wortp Cities

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

‘
oF NOES”

High
F/C
88/31
49/9
39/3
58/14
72/22
91/32
84/28
58/14
Eve
57/13
54/12
47/8
72/22
65/18
48/8
46/7
90/32
66/18
90/32
47/8
80/26
83/28
64/17
43/6
48/8
47/8
48/8
45/7
73/22
30/-1
73/22
75/23
51/10
51/10
71/21
83/28
85/29
50/10
57/13
86/30
76/24
75/23
13/-10
29/-1
45/7
87/30
90/32
32/0
49/9
43/6
92/33
72/22
59/15
82/27
100/37
93/33
82/27
83/28
93/33
48/8
34/1
77/25
75/23
48/8
16/-8
88/31
49/9
48/8
38/3
19/-7

iil

Today

Low
F/C
71/21
39/3
30/-1
54/12
62/16
79/26
75/23
47/8
28/-2
43/8
44/6
36/2
60/15
46/7
33/0
40/4
73/22
46/7
66/18
25/-3
52/11
69/20
50/10
33/3
37/2
40/4
43/6
41/5
47/8
21/-6
66/18
56/13
44/6
45/7
56/13
73/22
66/18
39/3
39/3
73/22
39/3
59/15
2/-16
19/-7
40/4
56/13
54/12
28/-2
35/1
39/3
78/25
45/7
47/8
73/22
70/21
71/21
50/10
68/20
68/20
32/0
30/-1
63/17
65/18
39/3
6/-14
76/24
42/5
45/7
30/-1
6/-14





pc
$

sn
pc
Cc

pc
pc
r

sh
sh
pc
sn

High
F/C
88/31
47/8
46/7
64/17
72/22
93/33
85/29
54/12
45/7
62/16
56/13
44/6
64/17
65/18
47/8
45/7
86/30
72/22
93/33
44/6
80/26
84/28
61/16
41/5
45/7
52/11
44/6
42/5
72/22
30/-1
77/25
83/28
50/10
54/12
76/24
82/27
85/29
48/8
50/10
86/30
81/27
89/31
13/-10
27/-2
41/5
89/31
95/35
38/3
48/8
42/5
90/32
70/21
57/13
83/28
89/31
94/34
78/25
82/27
90/32
48/8
36/2
81/27
72/22
50/10
23/-5
89/31
48/8
50/10
38/3
27/-2

Tuesday
Low
F/C
72/22
38/3
29/-1
54/12
ile
79/26
74/23
45/7
30/-1
57/13
45/7
33/0
55/12
47/8
37/2
41/5
68/20
55/12
75/23
26/-3
58/14
70/21
43/8
39/3
36/2
37/2
33/0
15/-9
52/11
27/-2
68/20
53/11
47/8
44/6
55/12
72/22
68/20
45/7
36/2
75/23
41/5
63/17
4/-15
19/-7
33/0
56/13
59/15
28/-2
41/5
36/2
77/25
52/11
52/11
74/23
64/17
71/21
50/10
69/20
68/20
32/0
32/0
68/20
65/18
41/5
14/-10
75/23
40/4
45/7
37/2
15/-9

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

MONDAY, MARCH 2np, 2009, PAGE 15B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: SSW at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-8 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 6-10 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

aS
Washington
29/19)

, Kansas City)
as

Le.
iy Yow)

yet
qwarmen) / | \“ausing
38/23,
El Paso,

40/22

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice

Miami
69/46

Fronts
Cold

War flitenflltenilte

Stationary Mangal

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

-0s Os 10s 20s /30s)) 40s



-10s







AUTO INSURANCE

Never start your |
Engine without us:
Vh n “comes to Auto Insurance,

Temember the smart choice is

_ Insurance Management.

art people you can trust.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
te.

~ New Providence Grond Bahama Abaco Eleuthera Exum
Te 502-0407 Te: (242) 350-3500 } Tel (242) 367-4204 | Te (242) 332-2862 | Tel: (247) 336-2304

ad


MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009

be







i Ca aa 1

@ By NOEL YOUNG
Copyright 2009
Edit International

AN ALMOST forgotten
invention from 200 years ago
may answer the world’s ener-
gy problems and end our
reliance on oil by using the
greatest source of power
known to man — the sun.

It’s known as the Stirling
Engine and it’s already work-
ing in satellites whizzing round
the globe...in a collection of
giant gleaming dishes trapping
the desert sun in New Mexi-
co...powering a tiny car noise-
lessly along the roads of New
Hampshire. And experts
expect it to bring clean water
to millions across the planet.

In Britain two big compa-
nies plan to start marketing
“home power plants” this
spring using Stirlings which
will light and heat the house,
cut the homeowner’s power
costs by one-third — and allow
him to sell surplus power back
to the electricity company.

Everyone on earth will soon
know of the odd invention in
1816 by Scottish minister
Robert Stirling who designed
it in his church workshop by
oil lamp because Edison’s
electric light bulb was still 60
years in the future.

Successful

His engine came out at the
same time as the highly suc-
cessful steam engine which
powered the industrial revo-
lution. As the steam engine
became safer and more
sophisticated, interest in the
Stirling engine fell away and it
was largely forgotten — until
now.

And that ‘now’ is breath
taking.

The giant dishes in New
Mexico, which focus the sun’s
rays on an engine have the
astonishing potential of pro-
viding the electricity for the
entire United States during
daylight hours.

The car, developed by
America’s leading inventor

The stories behind the news

How a 200-year-old gas
engine could save the world

WHILE Bahamians reel
under the weight of high
electricity bills, they are
failing to make use of
the one resource they

possess in abundance.
INSIGHT reports...

Dean Kamen, is an all-elec-
tric hybrid, part-powered by
a much smaller Stirling engine.
He believes it can be in pro-
duction in two years and show
the world a dramatic way to
slash the use of oil and curb
carbon emissions.

Producing clean water in
developing countries is anoth-
er field in which the Stirling
technology has already shown
its worth.

Yet the Stirling is a puzzle
among engines. It was largely
ignored as the industrial revo-
lution of the 19th century
turned into the space race of
the 20th century. But people
who came in contact with it
loved it. The Stirling became a
cult. Fans formed societies,
who built models and attend-
ed meetings. For much of that
time, the engine was known
simply as the “hot air engine.”

In 1960, the Philips organ-
isation of Holland, which
spent millions trying to devel-
op it, finally dubbed it “the
Stirling Engine”.

In America, Ford also spent
a fortune trying to adapt it to
drive a car before giving up in
the 1970s.

But Stirling fans carried on.
Hundreds of enthusiasts gath-
ered last year at the Kew Gar-
dens Steam Museum in Lon-
don for a display of working
models.

One household fan driven
by a Stirling engine could be
seen whirring away very effec-
tively. A similar one is now
available commercially from
an American company, for sit-
ting on top of a hot stove.

A Glasgow museum even
has a gramophone powered
by a tiny Stirling engine.

The basic Stirling is decep-
tively simple. Gas or air inside
a completely enclosed cylin-
der expands as it’s heated at
one end — and contracts as it
is cooled at the other. This
movement of the gas drives a
piston, which turns a wheel
outside the engine. The heat
source can be anything you
like.

One demonstration model,

ae 4 4
Way of Life!

Grand Vitara features:

CBee
emg
mE Rite rial ict

* Power steering, windows & locks

wee eer La]
Seer me!
eee ene
eH Beatie ls
me aL

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING





























RIGHT: The Disenco home power plant, with a Stirling engine
at its heart. It's about the same size and no more obtrusive than
the average dishwasher - but it will slash your energy bills and
vastly reduce the size of your carbon footprint.

sold by the American Stirling
company for around $500,
(available on e-Bay) is driven
by the heat from the palm of
your hand. Whatever the size
of the engine, there are
absolutely NO emissions.
The big comeback started
on a winter’s day in 2008 in
the New Mexico desert. The
sun was beating down and the
temperature was zero.

Mirrors

At the US top secret San-
dia National Laboratory, giant
dishes had been built, each
composed of 82 mirrors. They
would catch the glare of the
sun as it moved across the sky
and focus the heat on a Stir-
ling engine.

The beam of intense heat,
hot enough to melt metal,
started the engine pumping
away, generating electricity.

By the end of that day, Jan-
uary 31, one of the mirror
dishes had set a world record;
an all-time high of 31 per cent
of the energy pouring down
from the sun was converted
into power going into the elec-
tricity grid.

The engine used at Sandia

ABOVE: A tricycle built for two with one added plus: less ped-
aling than usual ! It's powered by a Stirling engine and was
on show at the exhibition in Kew, London last year

in the SES dishes
is a sealed system
filled with hydro-
gen. As the gas
heats and cools, its
pressure rises and
falls. The change in
pressure drives pistons
inside the engine, pro-
ducing mechanical
power, which in turn
drives a generator and
makes electricity.
Chuck

Andraka, lead
Sandia project
engineer, said
the use in the
Mojave desert pro-
ject was “the largest
proposed overall use of
Stirling engines” so far. “Soon
we will see these large fields of
systems begin operation in the
desert south-west of the US.”

Now Stirling Energy Sys-
tems, the company behind the
experiment, has signed agree-
ments with two big California
electricity companies which
will between them require up
to 70,000 solar dish engine
units. Work started on pre-
production models of the mir-
ror dishes in the Detroit area
in February.

There are now two Califor-

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nia fields

already under

contract; one in

Imperial Valley and

one in the Mojave desert.

Combined eventual output

will be about 1600 megawatts

— about the same as a major

nuclear power station. Work is

scheduled to start in 2010.
An Irish company, NTR,

invested $100 million, becom-

ing the biggest shareholder —

LEFT: A Swedish submarine surfaces ...
they have to do very often because their power comes
from no-emission Stirling engines. Now the Japanese
Navy is following suit - and installing Stirlings on their

not something

BELOW: Giant dishes at the Sandia National Laboratory
in New Mexico, capture the sun's rays and turn them into
electricity into electricity via Stirling engines, mounted in

the center.



- TF
r q _—
7 a 4

7 4
_

and
the
race to
really
make
the Stirling engine
commercial has
really begun.

“Just 30,000 of the dish-
es, in the Mojave desert, will
provide enough power needed
in daylight hours by the city
of San Diego, with a popula-
tion of 1.2 million,” said a
spokeswoman for the Sandia
National Laboratory. “A solar
farm 100 miles square could
generate enough power for

SEE page two