Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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PLENTY OF

Volume: 105 No.81





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

Assurances on
GLICO under fire

®@ Former Minister criticises financial stability claims

@ Bahamian public given ‘incorrect’ level of comfort

ee L

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamian public was
given a level of comfort about
the financial stability of CLI-
CO (Bahamas) that "appeared
not to be absolutely correct",
former Minister of State James
Smith told The Tribune yester-
day.

Although earlier this month,
current State Finance Minister
Zhirvargo Laing told Tribune
Business he
planned to
meet CLICO
(Bahamas)
executives to
discuss “major
regulatory
concerns” sur-
rounding the
company’s
financial posi-
tion, made urgent by the bail-
out of its parent firm which had
guaranteed a $57 million loan
that accounts for 59 per cent of
the Bahamian insurer’s assets.

But up to a week ago the
country was given assurances
of the future of the company by
executives, frustrating policy
holders and creditors who were
blind-sided by a Supreme Court
Order issued this week to place

SEE page nine

7

AU steS TINT UN



Cynthia Pratt’s

husband has leg
amputated



m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

JOSEPH Pratt, husband of
PLP deputy leader Cynthia
“Mother” Pratt, had his left
leg amputat-
ed in hospital
yesterday, the
result of a
long battle
with diabetes.

According
to his wife,

= Mr Pratt is
"resting well"
in the
Princess Margaret Hospital,
despite the ordeal.

"They did the surgery and
they did amputate the left
leg," the PLP MP for St
Cecilia said last night.

SEE page six



COURT APPEARANCE: (from left) Shayne Knowles, Bryan Knowles and lawyer Fedner Dorestal
outside of court where they were sentenced for fraud-related charges. The three has been
accused of conspiring to commit forgery and of forging the signature of John William Lefler in rela-
tion to five condominium units at the Palms of Love Beach, West Bay Street.
FOR FULL STORY, SEE PAGE 3



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Hopes high of Bahamas hosting
2009 Miss Universe pageant

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas is very close to pulling off a
massive tourism coup — playing host to the 2009

Miss Universe pageant.

The event, scheduled for August, draws an
audience of many millions of people worldwide
and could bring in a similar amount in revenue for
the country at a time when the economy is flag-
ging, according to Ministry of Tourism sources.

The Tribune understands that an “extraordi-
narily good” bid has been made by the ministry to
the Miss Universe Organisation, which runs the
event, leaving local officials optimistic about their

chances.

“We are 90 per cent likely to get it,” said a

tourism source. “While it’s not signed, we think

off on it.”

we are way down the road in terms of signing

One high-level source said that if The Bahamas

SEE page nine

Talks on stepping up anti-drug fight

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PLANS to step up
counter-narcotics efforts,
which lost steam in 2008, were
discussed by Bahamian and
United States officials in a bi-
annual meeting of the Joint
Drug Task Force yesterday.

An understaffed and
underfunded Bahamian Drug
Secretariat hampered momen-
tum in the fight against drug
trafficking, and destruction
caused by Hurricane Ike in
Great Inagua last September
exacerbated by the slow-
down, according to the US
government’s International
Narcotics Control Strategy

Report 2009.

Plans to step up the war on
drug smuggling include inte-
grating Creole speakers in the
Bahamian Drug Enforcement
Unit (DEV) and working with
Haitian National Police offi-
cers to be stationed in Great
Inagua to develop informa-

SEE page six

Fridays & Saturdays



PRIGE=75¢

*
AOCT & CHAMDOK

*

Moves under way
to resolve NIB
payments dispute
— media boss

Jones Communications acting ‘in good faith’

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

JONES Communications CEO Wendall Jones said that his
company and the National Insurance Board are co-operating
in good faith to resolve over $430,000 that his company
owes in back payments to NIB.

Brushing aside the offer made by Arawak Homes CEO
Franklyn Wilson to assist him if necessary in covering the cost
of these back payments, Mr Jones said he does not need
anyone to “fight my battles” or pay his bills.

Jones Communication Network Ltd is responsible for the
publication of The Bahama Journal (in affiliation with the
Communicators and Associates), JCN TV channel 14, and

LOVE 97FM radio station.

Contacted for comment yesterday, Mr Jones remained
tight-lipped on details, explaining that his company and the
National Insurance Board (NIB) were both negotiating in

“good faith.”

SEE page six

Bahamian
NICSE
NiO Rm Ie
vital
Wendall Jones

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A LEADING Bahamian busi-
nessman yesterday offered to
“help out” media boss Wendall
Jones as he faced court action
over unpaid National Insurance
Board contributions.

As the future of the Jones
Communications’ empire could
hang in the balance, chairman of
Arawak Homes Franklyn Wilson
said he is willing to invest funds in
the media house if Mr Jones is
unable to meet court ordered
back payments to NIB.

On Thursday, Mr Jones plead-

Franklyn Wilson



ed guilty before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester to owing NIB over
$430,000.

Having agreed to pay 40 per
cent of the sum — $180,000 —
and the remainder over a two-
year period, concerns have been
raised among some of Mr Jones’
colleagues over whether this latest
fiasco could spell the end for the
media company.

As highlighted by Mr Wilson,
Jones Communications Ltd, with
its radio station, newspaper and
television station, plays a “very
important role” in media in the
country today.

SEE page six

Minister open to independent probe
into Detention Centre abuse claims

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

IMMIGRATION State Minister Branville McCartney said he is
open to an independent investigation into claims of abuse and inhu-
mane conditions at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre.

However, he firmly stated that internal investigations into recent alle-
gations of abuse and a hunger protest of three Cuban detainees proved

that the claims were false.

"From our investigations I can say there is not one person on a
hunger strike in the Detention Centre as of 5 o'clock (yesterday),” the

state minister said.

While he had not personally visited the Detention Centre to dispel
these claims, he said he received assurances from the head of the
holding facility that the allegations published earlier this week are

untrue.

"I haven't gone personally but I have spoken personally to the per-
son in charge of the Detention Centre on more than one occasion
today, on more than one occasion yesterday — but I have not gone
down (there) personally. But I intend to go down, I intend to go

SEE page six



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Reports of child

abuse on the rise



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A 24 per cent rise in reports of child abuse
and recent disclosures of an incest problem in
the Family Islands are further evidence that the
government must immediately enact the Child
Protection Act and implement a sex offenders
registry, it has been claimed.

Clever Duncombe, spokesman for the
father’s rights advocacy group Bahamian
Fathers for Children Everywhere, said there
can be no more “excuses.”

Earlier this week, the National Council for
the Protection of Children revealed that there
were 719 cases of child abuse in New Provi-
dence alone in 2008. In 2005, there were 581,
in 2006, 618 and in 2007, 545.

The council warned that incidences of abuse,
which can be emotional, verbal, physical or
sexual, or manifest as neglect or abandon-
ment, are likely to rise again over the next
year due to the economic hardship being suf-
fered by a growing number of Bahamian fam-
ilies.

Yesterday Mr Duncombe pointed out that
each “case” of child abuse may in fact
involve more than one child, therefore mak-


















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ing the statistics more disturbing than some
may recognise.

He said that new strategies are needed if
the government and society are going to start
reducing the number of children suffering
abuse.

Among these, he said, is implementing the
Child Protection Act, passed in 2007 towards
the end of the PLP’s term in office.

That Act provides for, among other things,
stricter penalties for abusers and a legal oblig-
ation on the part of all people who are aware
of abuse to report such crimes against chil-
dren. According to the Office of the Attor-
ney General, the Act would bring the Bahamas
into line with principles outlined in the UN
convention on the rights of children.

Since taking office, Minister of State for
Social Development Loretta Butler Turner
has said that the government is reviewing the
legislation.

Meanwhile, in June 2008 Ms Butler Turner
suggested that significant funding would be
needed to enact the law, which the govern-
ment now hopes to “phase in.”

Mr Duncombe yesterday called this a “flim-
sy excuse.”

“Exactly how much would it take to imple-
ment this Act in its entirety? Do we have a

cost? We just borrowed $150 million from the
Chinese the other day to build roads and we
continue to borrow recklessly ... why can’t we
borrow the money if that’s a problem?”

He said that “outdated social policies and
bad laws” are contributing to the likelihood of
Bahamian children suffering abuse.

Were the Bahamas to follow the example set
in developed countries like the US and place
sex offenders on a register which would allow
members of the public to find out where such
individuals live, the level of abuse could be
reduced, he suggested.

“We need pictures and posters to be posted
on these individuals who’ve already been
charged with these heinous crimes,” he said.

Mr Duncombe claimed that people who are
concerned about child abuse are “losing con-
fidence in the system” because in its present
form it is not designed to truly protect the
interests of children and properly punish those
who offend.

He said he hopes that recent media coverage
of the child abuse crisis facing the country will
“prick the heart of at least one politician.”

“You need at least one to be mindful and
raise this issue. Just one. But we can’t find
one. There’s something fundamentally wrong
with that,” he said.

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oe Inter-American Investment Corporation

Member of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) Group

The IIC and The College of The



THE EDWARDS TWINS
HOST FREE CONCERT

BAHAMIANS are being invited to a free concert
next week featuring The Edwards Twins, rated among
the best celebrity impersonators in the world.

The concert, to be held at the Rainforest Theatre on
Cable Beach on Sunday, March 8, is the Twins’ way of
saying thanks to the Bahamas for hosting their show for
the past three years.

Eddie Edwards, famous for his Cher and Barbra
Streisand impersonations, told The Tribune: “This is a
special appreciation concert for the Bahamas, where we
are now into our third year.

“All Bahamians showing ID at the door will be
allowed in free for a new show we have arranged fea-
turing my brother Anthony as Tom Jones and other
interesting changes.”

Eddie’s show-stopping impersonation of Cher will
also be developed, including costume changes and new
numbers.

“We are back in Nassau until August,” Eddie added.
“However, we will be taking a few weeks off in April to
appear in the America’s Got Talent show.

“We have enjoyed our time in Nassau so much that
we thought we’d like to have a Bahamian Appreciation
Day, so we hope lots of local people turn up for the
show.”

The Edwards Twins are based in Las Vegas, but their
seasons at the Rainforest Theatre have proved a big
draw for tourists and locals.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays

The College of the
Bahamas

Bahamas

Announce the Launching of FINPYME®

FINPYME offers free-of-charge diagnostic reviews to small and medium-size enterprises
(SMEs). If you would like assistance in making your SME* more competitive and
improving its access to potential sources of financing, don’t miss this opportunity to

register for FINPYME in The Bahamas.

The Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC) is a member of the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) Group. For more information on its FINPYME program please

visit www.FINPYME.org.

The launching event will take place on March 4, 2009, at 8:30 A.M. at the
British Colonial Hilton, Nassau
Speakers include:

ZHIVARGO 8S. LAING
Minister Of State And Governor of the IDB Ministry of Finance and Planning

RICHARD BERNAL
IIC Alternate Executive Director for The Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica, and
Trinidad and Tobago

To RSVP, please copy the invitation form available at www.finpyme.org
cob.edu.bs. You may also call The

and email your response to fin

College of The Bahamas at 302-4421 or 302-4417.

«: SMEs with annual sales in excess of approximately US$100,000.





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 3



SINGLE MOTHER SAYS SHE FEARED FOR LIFE AFTER GROUP CONFRONTED HER

Minister vows to probe claims of armed
immigration officers bursting into home

Police seize
illegal firearm
from apartment

¢ POLICE seized an ille-
gal firearm and a large
assortment of ammunition
from an apartment on Fire
Trail Road on Friday.

Officers of the Central
Detective Unit searched the
apartment at 2am and found
a laptop case which con-
tained a .40 handgun and
ammunition a for .38 hand-
gun, an AK-47 assault rifle
and a .40 handgun. Two
men, aged 26 and 28, were
taken into police custody.

Trio in custody
after shotgun
discovered

¢ THREE men are in
police custody following the
discovery of a black sawn-off
shotgun inside a home on
Palm Tree Avenue shortly
after 11am on Thursday.

Mobile Division officers
were acting on a tip and
went to the home where they
found the shotgun.

The three men are 18, 20
and 30 years old.

Teacher hadly
injured when
airbag activates

A YOUNG teacher suf-
fered serious facial and eye
injuries when the airbag in his
car activated without warning,
causing him to swerve into a
roadside Kerb.

Adrian Gibson, 24, who
writes a weekly column for
The Tribune, was driving in
Fox Hill with a friend when
the airbag exploded, striking
him hard in the face.

He was taken to Princess
Margaret Hospital, where he
was kept overnight with facial
bruising and a damaged right
eye.

“T look like I’ve been in a
boxing match,” Mr Gibson
told The Tribune, “My eye is
closed and filled with blood
and the doctors are planning
to do another scan on it
today.”

Mr Gibson was having a
lively discussion with his
friend when the incident
occurred. He believes he may
have struck the centre of the
streering wheel while gesticu-
lating, causing the airbag to
activate. As it burst into his
face, he swerved into the kerb,
threw open the door and
escaped into the street. His
friend was not injured.

Mr Gibson said it was only
after the incident that he dis-
covered that his car, a 1996
Toyota Corolla, was apparent-
ly prone to airbag difficulties.

“Tf anyone else in Nassau
has a car of this type and year
then I would suggest they get
the airbag checked out,” he
said.

Big load of pea-
rock spills after
truck overturns

m BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 30-ton load
of pea-rock spilled at the airport
roundabout on Friday when a
dump truck turned over near the
domestic terminal at the Grand
Bahama International Airport.

Traffic at the roundabout at
East Mall Drive came to a stand-
still as firefighters worked to free
the driver and his passenger from
the dump truck, which toppled
on its side shortly after 9am.

Driver Maxwell Campbell, 22,
and passenger Ramon Campbell,
of Campbell’s Trucking and
Loading Services, were rushed by
ambulance to Rand Memorial
Hospital for treatment.

The driver was said to have
been seriously injured. His con-
dition was not known up to press
time. In addition to the pea rock,
diesel had also spilled from the
gas tank onto the road, presenting
hazardous conditions for
motorists.

Although investigations are
continuing into the accident,
police believe that excessive
speed may have been a factor.

Three persons have died so far
on the streets of Grand Bahama
this year. Police are advising
motorists to obey the speed limits
and drive with care and caution.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

MINISTER of State for
Immigration Branville McCart-
ney has vowed to investigate
claims made by a single mother
who feared for her life when
unidentified armed immigration
officers burst into her home.

Violet Hanna, 41, was with
her seven-year-old daughter
Amber when officers demanded
entry into their home on Price
Street, Nassau Village, while
they were asleep just after 4am
on Tuesday.

Ms Hanna, a Bahamian citi-
zen, said the officers never iden-
tified themselves as being from
the Immigration Department
and declined her offer to see
her passport.

They broke down the gate to
her backyard to gain access to
the back door, while other offi-
cers banged violently on the
front door and more stood out-
side the house.

Their aggressive manner put
Ms Hanna and her child in fear
of their lives.

The single mother told The
Tribune : “I understand what
they are trying to do, but the
way they did it made me afraid



Branville McCartney

for my life. I’m still terrified.”

Vomiting

Amber, who was crying and
vomiting in fear as officers
shouted at her mother, was so
shaken by the incident she
stayed home from school that
day and insists on holding her
mother’s hand while in the
house. She has been staying
with her grandparents since the
incident. Minister of Immigra-
tion Branville McCartney called



“We must go about
things the right way
without causing any
harm to persons,
and if it is not the
right way I would
like to find out who
the persons
responsible are and
deal with them
accordingly.”

The Tribune yesterday in an
effort to contact Ms Hanna so
that he can personally oversee
an investigation into the inci-
dent. He said: “This is some-
thing we take very seriously and
especially as she is a young sin-
gle woman who has a child, who
she said was upset and vomiting
and very frightened, that is not
the way we do things in the
Immigration Department. That
is not the order of the day.
“We must go about things the
right way without causing any

Attorney one of two
men fined in connection
with fraud allegations

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN attorney was one of
two men fined $7,500 by a
judge yesterday in connection
with fraud charges surround-
ing alleged impropricties con-
nected to several condomini-
ums.

A third man was sentenced
to five years imprisonment on
24 fraud charges dating back
to 2003.

Lawyer Fedner Dorestal
and brothers Bryan Knowles
and Shayne Knowles were
accused of conspiring to com-
mit forgery and of forging the
signature of John William
Lefler in relation to five con-
dominium units at the Palms
of Love Beach, West Bay
Street.

The men were also accused
of forging and submitting con-
veyances for the units and
having a forged Nassau Indus-
trial Limited Seal on July 25,
2003.

It was further alleged that
the men obtained a $40,000
loan from First Caribbean
Bank on John F Kennedy Dri-
ve.

In early January, Bryan
Knowles was convicted on 24
counts of fraud, including con-
spiracy to commit fraud,
forgery, uttering a forged doc-
ument and fraud by false pre-
tenses in relation to the case.

Shayne Knowles was only
convicted on two counts of
fraud while lawyer Dorestal
was convicted on one count
of fraud.

Acting Justice Elliot Lock-
hart yesterday sentenced
Bryan Knowles to five years
imprisonment on each of the
24 counts for which he had
been convicted. The sentences
are to run concurrently.

In sentencing Shayne
Knowles, Acting Justice Lock-

hart noted that according to
the evidence, Knowles had
minimal involvement in the
matter. Shayne Knowles was
fined $7,500. Failure to pay
the fine will result in a two
year prison term for each of
the counts.

He was also ordered to per-
form 500 hours of community
service. Knowles was given 30
days to pay the fine.

Dorestal was also fined
$7,500. Failure to pay the fine
will result in a two year prison
term.

Bail

Attorney Michael Kemp,
who represented the three
men, also requested that
Shayne Knowles and Dorestal
be released on bail until their
fines are paid. The judge
granted the two men bail in
the sum of $10,000 with two
sureties.

A female relative of the
Knowles brothers was also
brought before the court yes-
terday after assistant director
of legal affairs and lead pros-
ecutor in the case Franklyn
Williams claimed that she had
assaulted him while he was on
his way to court.

The woman was taken to
the Central Police Station
where she was detained until
after the sentencing.

She denied physically
assaulting the prosecutor,
claiming that she told him:
"This is a big deal."

Acting Justice Lockhart said
that the matter was being con-
sidered as a contempt of court
issue.

After talking briefly with
Mr Kemp, the woman
apoligised. Acting Justice
Lockhart accepted the apolo-
gy, noting that Mr Williams
could still pursue the matter
further if he wants to.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

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CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

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harm to persons, and if it is not
the right way I would like to
find out who the persons
responsible are and deal with
them accordingly.”

Mr McCartney has now

| Galleria |

arranged to meet with Ms Han-
na and has vowed to oversee an
investigation into the matter in
an effort to root out illicit
behaviour by immigration offi-
cers.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Obama’s Olympian feat on the economy

IF PRESIDENT Obama were an Olympic
diver, the degree of difficulty in what he’s
trying to do would be off the charts.

He’s attempting to jump-start the economy,
fix the banking system, address the mortgage
crisis, reform healthcare, save the automobile
industry, catalyze a new green energy sec-
tor, invest more in education, and establish a
cap-and-trade system to fight climate change.

Oh yes, and start to tackle the nation’s
yawning fiscal deficit.

Casual observers of politics can be forgiv-
en if they are confused, for the new adminis-
tration’s economic message seems to translate
to this: Hard times are upon us, so we need to
loosen our belt. But when the recovery
comes, it will be time to suck in our gut and
cinch things up again.

That no doubt seems counterintuitive to
many. And yet, there’s an economic method
to the two-step approach.

Start with the belt-loosening. With the tra-
ditional generators of economic activity ane-
mic, the government is really all that’s left to
inject some demand into the economy.

The president and his team, who believe
government can spark lasting private-sector
activity, are betting heavily its stimulus plan
will work. Most congressional Republicans,
who doubt the economic efficacy of govern-
ment, have wagered with their votes that it
won't.

Thus, if Obama gets what he wants, we’ll
witness a real-time economic experiment. If
the president proves right, Democrats should
do well in the next few elections. If Republi-
cans are correct, voters may well punish the
party in power and reward the minority.

To move forward the way it hopes, the
administration clearly needs more revenue,
much of which the president plans to corral
by letting tax cuts expire for upper-earners
while raising their capital gains rate and lim-
iting the tax benefit they can secure by item-
izing.

Those proposals will raise cries of socialism
from those confused about what socialism
actually is.

Still, it’s certainly true that those moves
would put more of the tax burden on those
who own more of the country’s wealth.

Conservatives, of course, will predict that if
tax rates rise, the sky will fall. Given that

higher rates didn’t doom the economy during
the Clinton years, there’s every reason to be
sceptical that capitalism is really that frag-
ile.

But that too will be tested in this adminis-
tration’s liberal experiment.

In his presentation this week at the White
House’s fiscal responsibility summit, Robert
Greenstein, executive director of the Cen-
tre on Budget and Policy Priorities, offered
some valuable perspective on the nation’s
budgetary problems. Over the last 30 years,
federal revenues have averaged about 18.4
percent of GDP. But the only years we’ve
balanced the budget during that period - 1998
to 2001 - were when revenues totaled
between 20 and 21 per cent of GDP.

Even if Obama gets the new monies he
hopes for, revenues for the next decade will
only gradually grow to 19.5 per cent of GDP,
while expenditures won’t dip below 22 per
cent.

That will make the pivot toward deficit
reduction difficult. The president has pledged
to cut the deficit, which will be some $1.75
trillion this year, to $533 billion by the end of
his first term. Nevertheless, the administration
still projects it rising to $712 billion in 2019.

That would be 3.1 per cent of GDP, which
outstrips the average annual economic growth
of recent decades. Thus, even after a decade,
federal debt will probably still be increasing
relative to GDP.

“Tt shows what a huge problem we’ve got,”
says Robert Bixby, executive director of the
Concord Coalition, who thinks the potential
is there for the deficit to remain consider-
ably higher.

Given fiscal reality, Obama’s plan for per-
manent new tax cuts for businesses and for
families making up to about $190,000 a year
seems overly generous.

Justified as an offset to higher energy costs
that will result from the cap-and-trade system,
the middle-class tax break will obviously be
popular. Yet at a combined price tag of about
$100 billion a year, those tax benefits add
yet another tricky twist.

And the Olympian feat the president hopes
to pull off is difficult enough already.



(This article was written by Scot Lehigh
Boston Globe staff writer - c. 2009).



Vexed by poor
service of health
care professionals

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Kindly allow me space in
your column to address a vexing
problem. I am a civil servant
who is at her wit’s end with the
service of other public serving
members, particularly, members
within the Department of
Health.

Like many other people, I am
diagnosed with a disease, name-
ly diabetes, and have to be
treated for my condition, which
when paid out of my pocket and
small salary, is a costly condi-
tion.

Additionally, like other civil
servants, I partake in the use of
the government’s facilities such
as the health-care at the public
clinics and PMH.

Iam one of many civil ser-
vants who will boldly say that
the service rendered by persons
employed in these areas is
upsetting.

Most health care profession-
als employed by the govern-
ment display nonchalant, hos-
tile and in some cases verbally
rude attitudes towards their fel-
low civil servants and members
of the general public. This is
unacceptable.

Civil servants are privileged

letters@tripbunemedia net



to benefit from the governmen-
t’s facilities, which prove use-
less many times due to the
mediocre service of its employ-
ees.

When criticised by members
of the public and fellow civil
servant, these health care pro-
fessionals decide to hold the
public hostage by not render-
ing a service that they were
employed to do; yet they eager-
ly await “pay day”, which one
can consider an official govern-
ment holiday, because so many
government offices seem to shut
down!

Needless to say, complain-
ing to a supervisor when seek-
ing medical attention is done
with dismay.

Phone calls are never
returned, verbal complaints fall
on deaf ears and a cry for help
goes unheard.

The lack of compassion and
privacy is unbelievable. Seek-
ing further higher assistance
from the Minister of Health
proves fruitless! While await-

ing service, many civil servants
complain of the poor treatment
and the bad attitudes being dis-
played by members of the Pub-
lic Health Department. How
long must this go on, minister?

Respect from one colleague
to another is expected and
should be displayed at all times.
Lack of staff and medicines are
understandable, but should not
be tolerated when performing
public service.

It is actions like these that
cause members of the general
public to complain and insult
the workers in this profession,
who in turn retaliate by most
times offering poor service.

My health, your health, our
health is important. Assistance
and service from health care
professionals is appreciated
once rendered. Service is a
must, and with that in mind, all
civil servants must thrive to give
the public their utmost. Thank
you.

PATIENT
Fleming Street
Clinic

Nassau,

February 25, 2009.

Can anyone help me?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Hello Bahamas, my name is Clay Martin Sr. I
am a Bahamian citizen who is currently employed
in Nassau. I am married with four children and my
ultimate goal is to be a productive individual in
society displaying positive fatherhood and to be

an asset to my country.

Tam currently seeking financial aid during this
economic crisis we are now facing. My home can
be repossessed any day now because my salary is
not sufficient to take on the needs of a family of
six. Two of my kids are in school, my wife has
been unemployed for nearly three years and I
have a daughter who is severely ill; her vision is

not stable.

my kids to school without lunch or even lunch
money, that is embarrassing as a father and it

saddens my heart.

These issues that I am facing financially are
my responsibility but I am seeking assistance
because my circumstances are strenuous. If assis-
tance can be given through a grant or loan, med-

ical funding for my daughter or even a job for my

vices.

She has visited doctors locally and abroad and

they all were unsuccessful in determining her
continuous loss of sight. My monthly income is
mediocre, but my bills are special. To be honest
my water is off, it is ruff. Sometimes I have to send

Nassau,

CLAYTON
MARTIN Sr

wife I will appreciate it.

Any help given I will be thankful, even if it’s a
one dollar grant.

Tam willing to do community work on week-
ends or assist with any issues that require a handy
skilled man’s abilities. I can be contacted at 361-
3079 at home and at 466-4463 through cellular ser-

February, 2009.

Rolled-up newspapers sorely needed in family islands!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Your recent announcement
“increased air transport cost
end delivery to family islands”,
sad day, regrettable indeed! Liv-
ing on a family island; the excit-
ing days were mailboat and
“plane day!”

The arrival of the mailbag,
promptly collected, taken to the
post office, sorted, persons hur-
ried to their homes, laden down
with rolled-up copies of The

Tribune, Guardian, Herald,
which was also complemented
with magazines, newspapers col-
lected from the US Coast
Guard, Navy, Sea Bees and Pan
Am bases.

The availability of these
materials assisted many students
in this quest for knowledge!

IT hope that management will
continue sending “rolled-up
newspapers” via the post office
to our family island libraries,
they are sorely needed!

HAMILTON JONES
Nassau,
February, 2009.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue

Phone:d22-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

> we EATR, EXTRA,

NOTICE is hereby given that HARALD STEFFEN
SAUER of #9 TREASURE STREET, LITTLE
BLAIR, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person

e Bat d th For the stories behind the news,
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the

read Insight on Mondays
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20" day of February, _ = Large Sh pment
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, a of

P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.
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New Shipments Arrived

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On Premises





THE TRIBUNE



































































m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

tq I vex at how biggity
people on the streets

of the Bahamas is. I

tired of people carryin' on
bad like they have the right
of way, especially when they

don't even know how to dri- | with the signing of several Bahama, but will also

ve. eet Sei aia public — See contribute to further

people don't know how to including one for the con- ‘

use aroundabout? struction of a new ferry ter- ean eevee
"Just today, this stink] minal in East End. through the creation

woman shoot out in front Minister of Works Neko Of additional

of me while I was driving
around the roundabout
instead of yielding. She
lucky the devil ain’ run up
in me, because I had a mind
to chase her down and give
her a piece of my mind. I
think the government needs
to do mandatory re-testing
when people renew the
licenses every five years
because our streets are a
mess."

— Wendy L

"IT vex and vexer because
I keep complaining about
how bad people park on the
side of the road, making
blind spots so people can't
see when they want to pull
out of a corner.

"It is especially bad on
Village Road right by that
roadside vendor and on
Deveaux Street right down
the road from The Tribune.
Iam tired of people parking
all up on the road just
because they droppin’ their
baby off or going to see a
lawyer or God knows what
else.

"When their nice, new car
get scratch up, I wonder
who they ga’ blame?"

— Mad Motorist

"T vex because with all
this madness going on in the
world and now hitting home
to our insurance industry
and messing with people
pension and hard-earned
pennies, I ain' know what
to do.

"LT just about five minutes
away from pulling my mon-
ey out of the bank and tak-
ing my investments and
keeping them in my mat-
tress or burying it in my
backyard. These people
with all their fancy degrees

NEW FERRY TERMINAL TO BE BUILT AT THE MCCLEANS TOWN DOCK

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 5

$600,000-plus boost for Grand Bahama

economy with major contract signings

m@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - More than
$600,000 will be injected into
the Grand Bahama economy

Grant signed contracts
totalling $673,000 on Thurs-
day at the Prime Minister’s
Office in Freeport.

He said a new 1,900-square
foot ferry terminal will be built
at a cost of $212,000 at the
McCleans Town dock.

Contractor Amos Russell of
Quail Fast Construction was
awarded the contract.

The building will be
designed as a multi-purpose
complex and will house a fer-
ry booth, a ferry passenger
waiting area, a post office with
post office boxes for residents
of the immediate settlements,
and a police station.

Comfort

Minister Russell said the
new terminal will facilitate a
more structured ferry service,
providing a greater level of
comfort and convenience to
its passengers.

He said the McCleans Town
dock provides a vital trans-
portation and communication
link to nearby the Grand
Bahama cays and to the set-
tlements of South Abaco.

The other public works pro-
jects involve repairs and road
works in Freeport, Eight Mile
Rock and West End.

Mr Grant said a contract
worth $256,809.81 was award-
ed to Carters Air- Condition-
ing and Refrigeration to con-
duct remedial air-condition-
ing works at the Freeport Post
Office Department.

He noted that the public has
been significantly inconve-
nienced and postal workers
have endured adverse work-
ing conditions for several
years due to a malfunctioning
air-conditioning system.

“We in the Ministry of Pub-
lic Works and Transport apol-
ogise to the public for any



“It is anticipated that
these projects will not
only contribute to the
enhancement of basic
infrastructure within
communities of Grand

employment in the
construction industry
and other related
sectors.”

Neko Grant



lapses in service delivery that



Vandyke Hepburn/BIS Photo

they may have experienced as —_ PICTURED from left are Frank Miller, Miller and Sons; Dion Munroe, Ministry of Public Works; Frank Miller
a result of conditions at the Jr; Colin Higgs, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Public Works; Norman Tynes, Ministry of Public Works;

Freeport Post Office, and Verna Grant, MP for Eight Mile Rock, Andrew Rolle, Tripple A Construction, Public Works Minister Neko

expect that work to repair the Grant; Gordon Major, Acting Director of the Ministry of Public Works; Godfrey Waugh, Waugh Construction;
air-conditioning system will Roland Bevan, Ministry of Public Works; Ron Carter, Carter's Air-Conditioning; Debbie Pennerman, Assistant
commence immediately,” said Postmaster General and Godfrey Clarke, Postmaster General.

Mr Grant.

The Holmes Rock Ceme-
tery, which was damaged in
Hurricane Wilma, is also
expected to undergo repairs
and improvements.

Many tombs and graves
were compromised by storm
surge.

Triple A Construction Com-
pany was awarded a $25,000-
contract for graveyard repairs.

Paving

Road works contracts for
road paving between Freeport
and Eight Mile Rock will be
carried out by Waugh Con-
struction Company in the
amount of $136,950.

The installation of line
markings and reflectors along
the highway between Sea
Grape and West End will be
carried out by Frank Miller
and Sons for some $42,500.

“It is anticipated that these
projects will not only con-
tribute to the enhancement of
basic infrastructure within
communities of Grand
Bahama, but will also con-
tribute to further economic
development through the cre-
ation of additional employ-
ment in the construction
industry and other related sec-
tors,” Minister Grant said.

ALL MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
ACCEPTED!
SORRY
ee ==)
CARDS!

TENT <\:

3 DAYS
ONLY!

Thursday,

Friday &

Saturday
FEBRUARY
26, 27, 28

3 00ff |

The Back Door
MADEIRA SHOPPING PLAZA

=

TENT SALE:
NO REFUNDS
NO EXCHANGES
CASH ONLY!



need to stop messing with
people money."

— Scared to invest,
Nassau.

"I vex that just about
every time I go into a
clothes shop with my good
money to spend and the
lazy sales girl too busy to
help me "’cause she yappin’'
on the phone.

"My thing is sweetie, I
don't need you to cater to
me, but at least move the
phone away from your face
long enough to tell me hel-
lo when I walk in the door.
These employees need to at
least take the phone from
their mout' when they bring
the shoes to try on. I mean
why don't they act like they
getting a pay-check instead
of like they doing you a
favour when you spend
your money?"





Du

CONTRACT SIGNING: A new
ferry terminal is to be built at
McCleans Town dock.



ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work




y <3 EG CAPITAL MARKETS
Ec BROKERAGE & ADVISOBY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.46 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -42.90 | YTD % -2.51

ae BR Bie
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.96 | YTD -2.03% | 2008 -12.31%

“ys ee
Fertilizer, ILE aL WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

AN Control : -Hi - aEESS —=eet y Previous oes Teday's cess Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
- a Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992
Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.319
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157

Benchmark 0.63 0.63 -0.877
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.105
Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.055
Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95 1.255
Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83
Commonwealth Bank (S1) Tr 6.77
Consolidated Water BDRs 1.78 1.71
Dector's Hospital 2.40 2.40
Famguard T.78 7.76
Finco 11.00 11.00

0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682

— Tonisha M, Nassau.

go9999909999090000
2200090000090000009
66666566155555660540

FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 10.45
0.337
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180

7 Focol (S) 5.00 5.00
ze @ Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.000
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.035
ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 “ 0.407
Securit S Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
: E 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 0.00 1%
4 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
f 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + 0.00 T%

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.952
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Ai S2wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
x Bahamas Supermarkets: . 8.42 14.60 -0.041 0.300

Caribbean Crossings (Pref) fe 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480
RND Holdings 0.40 0.35 0.001 0.000

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
a ABDAB 31.72 33.26 29.00 4.540 0.000
2 Bahamas Supermarkets 11.23 12.04 14.00 -0.041 0.300

RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.3781 Colina Bond Fund 0.35 4.40 30-Jan-09

(Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday)

We will re-open for business as usual on Monday, March 2. : 1.3773 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4376 0.28 4.38 23-Jan-09

3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund 3.3201 -1.94 -11.33 31-Jan-09
| ¥ 11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.6816 0.50 5.79 31-Jan-09

We apologise to our valued customers and regret any 4106,0000 “GEAL GicburBend rund 100.8606 0.86 0.56
. . . . ee 96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
inconvenience this may cause. All other sections of the 1.0000 GFAL High Grade Bond Fund 10000 9.00 0.00
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.1005 0.06 -13.33 31-Jan-09

AUTO MALL will be open for business as usual. 0 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0401 4.01 4.01 31-Jan-09

1.0000 FSG Financial Growth Fund 1.0330 3.30 3.30 31-Jan-09

31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07

1.0000 FSG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0410 4.10 4.10 31-Jan-09

MARKET TERMS
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks. Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
S2wk-Low - Lowe i rice in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close - eighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Ci ighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change - Change rice from day to day EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
LIMITED ily Vol. traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
- Divi

EAST SHIRLEY STREET ¢ 397-1700 rine he rae

dd by the last 12 month earmin: gs
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Moves under way to resolve NIB

payments dispute — media boss
FROM page one

However, Mr Jones said his company is challenging a “whole list
of charges” for which he claims his company is not responsible.

“Like everyone else we are paying National Insurance. There
were some names on the list that we are not responsible for,” he
said.

These individuals, Mr Jones said, were contract workers who the
company would not be obligated to pay NIB for under current
Labour laws.

While some observers suggested yesterday that the “singling
out” of the media house could be a political move designed to
embarrass the company, Mr Jones himself denied that politics had
anything to do with what was taking place.

“There is nothing political about this. If you owe National Insur-
ance you pay. I don’t think there is anything political about it and
I’m not going there.

“Whatever delinquency there is we will pay. Both sides are
negotiating in good faith and the matter is being resolved,” he
said.

On Thursday, Mr Jones pleaded guilty before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester to owing NIB over $430,000.

According to sources at the Magistrate’s Court, an agreement has
been reached where Mr Jones has agreed to pay 40 per cent of the
sum outright — $180,000 — and the remanding $250,000 over the
next two years.

The case was adjourned to June.

Cynthia Pratt’s husband
has left leg amputated

FROM page one

She said that the last few months have been challenging
due to her husband's illness, compounded with her own
health issues.

"It's been eight months of constant challenge because he's
been so ill. And physically I'm not up to my full strength and
the doctor told me I'm just burnt out,” she said.

Despite her commitment to her constituents, she will be
absent from the House of Assembly during the mid-year bud-
get debate on Monday under doctor's orders to “take it
easy.”

"Thank God I'm better than I was, but I won't be in Parlia-
ment on Monday for sure because my doctor wants me to
take a couple of days (off).

"Right now my health is more important and as muchas I
do have a responsibility, my health is more important."

Doctor's aren't certain if Mr Pratt's other leg will have to
be amputated, but the family is in deep prayer that his health
rebounds.








































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Businessman offers to ‘help out’ media boss

FROM page one

“What I am saying is that I
believe that Mr Jones has a viable
business,” Mr Wilson said, “or a
business which is potentially
viable.

“T am saying that if Mr Jones
should decide that he would wish
to seek additional investors to
join him in his enterprise, it is
something that I would certainly
listen to,” he said.

Despite reports to the contrary,

Mr Wilson said he does not cur-
rently have any shares in Jones
Communications.

“But in making that statement,
I am not attempting to distance
myself from Mr Jones in anyway.
I regard him as a friend, I respect
him as a colleague, and I am
hopeful and confident that what-
ever issues are involved will be
settled in a way that augurs well
for the country and him person-
ally.”

However, this mindset, Mr Wil-
son said, where persons suggest or

believe that an individual cannot
be successful in the Bahamas
unless they are “fronting” for
someone else, or doing something
illegal, is another form of mental
enslavement from which we must
free ourselves.

“These rumours have been so
unkind to Mr Jones, and so
unfair. In this country there is a
lack of faith on behalf of so many
for someone to pull themselves
up by their own boot-straps and
do something unless they are
‘fronting’ for somebody. That is a

Talks on stepping up anti-drug fight

FROM page one

tion on Haitian drug traffickers transiting the
Bahamas.

Such strategies were discussed by Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette, the US embassy’s Charge
d’Affaires Timothy Zuniga-Brown and gov-
ernment officials in a meeting chaired by
National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest
at the Royal Bahamas Police Force Head-
quarters in East Street.

Both governments stated redevelopment of
the Defence Force Base in Great Inagua as a
top priority, and the US government showed its
continued commitment to assisting Bahamian
officials with a $499,800 cheque presented to
the Bahamas Drug Enforcement Unit by the
US Drug Enforcement Agency.

Migrant

Mr Zuniga-Brown commended the “remark-
able progress” made in the fight against nar-
cotics and migrant smuggling as a result of
joint efforts in 2008.

He praised the Bahamas government’s deci-
sion to ban wooden-hulled Haitian sloops and
noted how the US government had expanded
its commitment to drug and migrant interdic-
tion in Bahamian territorial waters by provid-
ing four Nor-Tech fast boats to the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force last year.

Bahamian authorities seized 1,878 kilograms
of cocaine and approximately 12 metric tons of
marijuana, and the DEU arrested 1,030 people
on drug-related offences and seized $3.9 million

Box:

WANTED

in cash throughout 2008.

Included in the figures are seizures made by
Operation Bahamas, Turks and Caicos
(OPBAT) in cooperation with the US govern-
ment of 1,800 kilograms of cocaine and 12 met-
ric tons of marijuana.

Mr Zuniga-Brown said: “These seizures
directly impact narcotics smugglers’ bottom
line and are critical to our efforts to safeguard
our countries from the dangers of illicit nar-
cotics trafficking.”

Both Mr Zuniga-Brown and Mr Symonette
agreed that developing the base at Great
Inagua is paramount in 2009 after the destruc-
tion caused by Hurricane Ike forced the US to
relocate helicopters based there to Turks and
Caicos.

The US representative said his government
is eager to return to Great Inagua and rebuild
and improve the island’s infrastructure as it is
optimally located for interdicting smugglers
transiting through Bahamian waters, which
was demonstrated by a recent seizure of over
800 kilograms of cocaine on the island.

Mr Symonette said: “The major drug seizure
in Great Inagua through collaborative efforts of
the DEA, DEU and the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force will hopefully be a continued
trend throughout 2009.

“T encourage the continued relationship
between my government, our friends and part-
ners the Turks and Caicos Islands, who were
unfortunately unable to attend today, and the
US government.

“It is through this bilateral rapport that we
can improve our capabilities and maintain this
cooperative model which is heralded regional-
ly and locally.”

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.
Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to
DA 69806
c/o The Tribune

P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.



























BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH

SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching iiam& 7:30pm EWANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZN5 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

PasiorcH. Mills

"Preaching the Bible as is, bo men as hey are”
| Pastor A. Milis * Prone: 393-0563 * Box N-Sh22 |

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

=

trait that isn’t limited to just Mr
Jones today.

“T can tell you very honestly I
for years and years have had to
live with that myself. The Sun-
shine Boys lived with it. Who
were we fronting for? It’s as if
you can’t start something on your
own and pull yourself up by your
own boot-straps.

“T hate to inject the race ques-
tion again, but it is hard to avoid.
I hate to see it injected again, but
all too often it has proven rele-
vant,” he said.

Detention

Centre
FROM page one

down, but they are saying things
that are totally untrue in terms
of that strike — they are eating
and they are eating well."

Earlier in the week The Tri-
bune published claims from sev-
eral detainees at the Detention
Centre, whose complaints ranged
from beatings from officers, to
insufficient meals, and inadequate
healthcare, bath and toilet facili-
ties.

A day after the initial story
broke the Department of Immi-
gration denounced all the claims
as false, citing an internal investi-
gation.

But international human rights
agency Amnesty International
called for an impartial review into
the matter. Amnesty's Interna-
tional Secretariat is said to be
"monitoring the situation" before
making any further statements.

Yesterday Mr McCartney wel-
comed such an investigation.

"We don't have anything to
hide at the Detention Centre, we
have nothing to hide and certain-
ly that can always be welcomed
but when you talk about inde-
pendent investigations these per-
sons come over and are not as
independent as they claim they
are.”

Mr McCartney also dispelled
claims that the holding facility is
“inhumane” and without ade-
quate bathing and toilet facilities.

"These claims have been made
before, (but) we are not there to
mistreat anyone. They are there
to be held and in as comfortable
circumstances as possible. It's not
a jail, notwithstanding that these
people have come here illegally.
They say these things and they
try to get the international media
and organisations to put pressure,
but at the end of the day as long
as we are doing what is right, we
are not going to fall for that.

"There's no reason why we
should mistreat these people, and
if that is happening it's a no-no,
but I've found no evidence of mis-
treatment. I'm satisfied that it's
a complete fabrication.

While not denying that there
might be "bad apples" within the
Department of Immigration, Mr
McCartney said,

"If it were true I would have
done something about it. I would
not sit back and allow persons to
be abused in any form or fash-
ion.”

This week the US State
Department released its 2008
Human Rights Report for the
Bahamas, which expressed con-
cern that the department was
internally investigating claims of
abuse without independent over-
sight. Mr McCartney declined to
the report until he had a chance
to review the complete document.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427

(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MARCH IST, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Mathilda Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Jamicko Forde/Min. of Health (HC)
7:00 a.m. Bro. Jamicko Forde/Sis. Nathalie Thompson

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

Grace and ert Wesleyan Lees

Grounded In The Past &

-.. Geared To The Future

Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
ee number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

Re eM ee dt Sete ed
ULM Wel]

WHERE GODS ADORED AND EFERVONE [8 4APFIRVED

Worship Tune: Efacm, & 6pcn.
4 Prayer Times ffs! 3am,
Charch Scheel during Worship Service

Place: Twyvnam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Box $5-5631

Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324.2587

‘@ KO



THE TRIBUNE

m@ BY MATT MAURA
Bahamas Information
Services

COLLABORATION
between members of the clergy
and mental health profession-
als in the Bahamas is an
“important step” towards
addressing the mental health
needs of Bahamians, Minister
of Health Dr Hubert Minnis
said Wednesday.

Addressing a psychiatric sym-
posium for clergy hosted by offi-
cials of the Sandilands Rehabil-
itation Centre, the Ministry of
Health and the Public Hospi-
tals Authority, Dr Minnis said
such collaboration becomes
even more necessary with a
review of statistics that show
that 40 per cent of persons
experiencing mental health ill-
ness first contact their clergy.

“In times of crises, people
turn to their religious leaders
for guidance, support and help,”

AW /Os TESORO Cor
while snorkelling

Beatrice Chapman, a 71-
year-old resident of Ontario,
Canada, was snorkeling near
Half Moon Cay sometime
after noon on Thursday
when it is believed she
drowned. She was pro-
nounced dead sometime lat-
er. Foul play is not suspect-
ed.

Ms Chapman was a pas-
senger on the ss Massdam
cruise ship, which visited
Eleuthera on Thursday.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Health Ministry and clergy
partner to fight mental illness

MINISTER of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis addresses religious lead-
ers during a one-day psychiatric
symposium for clergy held on
Wednesday, February 25, 2009.

Dr Minnis said.

“Tt is duly noted that initially,
religious leaders are often the
only persons that individuals
needing assistance feel com-
fortable enough with to share
their problems and concerns.

“Recognising this fact, and
particularly as it relates to men-
tal illness, it is imperative that
our religious leaders are well
acquainted with those vital
aspects of mental illness for
which people need additional
medical help to recover, so that
their suffering can be addressed
and dealt with appropriately,”
he said.

Dr Minnis told religious lead-
ers that their input will “greatly
assist” mental health profes-
sionals in combatting mental ill-
ness in the Bahamas. They will
also assist in combatting the
stigma attached to mental ill-

ness - a stigma, he said, which is
“still very prevalent and which
has prevented persons from

ccessing the mental health
assistance they need to recover
from their illness.”

Dr Minnis said the collabo-
ration between the church and
the mental health profession
can also serve as a proactive
measure to combat some of the
“fall-out” from the current eco-
nomic downturn that is impact-
ing the Bahamas and, indeed,
the world.

“Today we are experiencing a
serious financial problem not
only here in the Bahamas, but
throughout the rest of the
world, and many individuals will
be experiencing mental illness
and particularly pressure,” Dr
Minnis said.

“The possibility exists that we
can see an increase in suicidal
rates and you must be able to —
as you guide your flock - detect
illnesses and/or depression, by
recognising mood changes in
the individuals whom you know
very well.”

The one-day workshop
focused on a number of areas
including tips for the clergy on
recognising and dealing with
mental illness, recognising and
addressing the early warning
signs of mental illness, tips for
communicating with mentally
ill persons and when to refer
them to professionals.

The religious leaders were
also provided with a blueprint
for developing the necessary
programmes to assist church
members who may be recover-
ing from mental illness.

Assurances on GLICO under fire

FROM page one

the company into provisional liquidation.

Said Mr Smith: "What we do know is that right
up until last week, everybody was saying every-
thing was okay, that (it) was something that
wouldn't affect here. So somebody was giving a
level of comfort to the Bahamian public that
appeared not to be absolutely correct."

When asked if he felt government should shoul-
der some culpability for company executives not
being forthcoming to its creditors and policy-
holders, Mr Smith said, "I really don't know how
much they knew and when they knew and what
options were available to them, but I don't think
any government would knowingly keep the pub-
lic at risk if there’s something that could be done
to avoid it.

"Sometime you would move too slowly, which
would result in you not responding to the public's
interest as quickly as you can."

His statements came as PLP MP for Fox Hill
Fred Mitchell criticised government for being
"complicit" in the failure of CLICO (Bahamas).

"By the public record, the Registrar of Insur-
ance, therefore the Government knew six to sev-
en months ago that this company was having
problems with capital. The Government allowed
the CLICO company in Nassau to issue a state-
ment assuring the public and their clients that
there was no connection between the problems in
Trinidad & Tobago and those in Nassau, when the
government by its own admission knew that the
company had a problem with capital.

"The government did nothing to contradict

CLICO public statements,” Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell argued yesterday. "There seems to have
been shocking negligence on the part of the
Bahamas government which has put at risk 30,000
clients of CLICO in Nassau."

When contacted for a response, Mr Laing chose
not to comment.

"If I speak now then you will preempt what
may be done, but I'm not going to comment at the
moment. But I expect you all will hear soon
enough,” he said yesterday.

Before CLICO (Bahamas) was put into liqui-
dation, Registrar of Insurance Lennox McCartney
told Tribune Business that his department had
been in "major" discussions with CLICO
(Bahamas) "since late 2008" regarding their finan-
cial position.

Mr Smith explained that the company’s prob-
lems arose from its investments in the US real
estate market, which collapsed last year due to the
global economic crisis. He disagreed with the
assertion that the problems of CLICO (Bahamas)
could have stemmed from a lack of oversight
during the PLP administration.

"This company was affected by the fall-out in
the credit markets and the real estate markets
in the States and no one, none of the regulators
here or abroad actually saw the strain coming so
I don't think that would be a very fair comment.

"Because up to that point if you look at their
statements they probably looked pretty good.
Your liabilities are well covered by assets that
have been invested here, it's just that we didn't
know that the investment part of it was going to
fall out,” said Mr Smith.

Hopes high of hosting Miss Universe pageant

FROM page one

is successful in its effort to lure
organisers, they anticipate “the
largest number of (Miss Uni-
verse attendees) ever” to enter
the country to see or participate
in the competition.

The prime minister is report-
edly set to make an announce-
ment on the matter once par-
liament approves the bills
tabled Wednesday asking for
the money needed.

The Miss Universe pageant,
now in its 58th year, tradition-
ally sees beauties from around
80 countries worldwide, fol-
lowed closely by international
media and fans, descend on an
exotic venue for about two
weeks.

If The Bahamas is chosen to
host the event Atlantis, Paradise
Island, would be the setting for
the show itself.

However, in what would
essentially be free advertising
for the country, the prospective
pageant queens also will be
filmed and broadcast interna-
tionally as they travel through-
out the archipelago in advance
of the final show.

According to MissUni-
verse.com, in recent years the
event has been televised in over
170 countries.

“This is going to be seen by
near to if not more than one
billion people around the world.
There’s no way you can spend
that kind of money and reach

one billion people...so it’s that
opportunity, that’s what it’s
really all about,” said a tourism
source.

“The most beautiful people
in the world coming to the most
beautiful islands in the world -
it’s a commercial. That’s really
the way we are looking at it,”
they added.

The high probability that the
Bahamas will win the bidding
for the event is reflected in the
fact that government is already
seeking to re-allocate an addi-
tional $2.9 million to the Min-
istry of Tourism towards fund-
ing their efforts in relation to
the whole affair.

The Tribune understands that
The Bahamas’ major competi-
tor in the bidding is Las Vegas,
California.

Despite the popularity of this
location, The Bahamas is said to
have the edge as it is recognised
that Miss Universe has “a great
deal more appeal when it’s
international.”

“Most Americans see it when
it’s in the United States as an
American event and they don’t
tune in as much as when it’s
international. Miss Universe
connotes international and glob-
al so we know we have an
advantage in that regard,”
explained a ministry official.

An added advantage, The
Tribune understands, is the fact
that The Bahamas is in the east
coast time zone, allowing offi-
cial broadcaster NBC to show
the event in that market as it

happens, and the country’s
proximity to the US, which pro-
vides for more convenient
opportunities for travel to
prospective visitors from the
United States, Central and
South America.

“Last year Miss Universe was
in Vietnam. It’s an enormous
cost for people to go to Viet-
nam, it’s not an enormous
expense for them to come to
The Bahamas,” said a source.

The event is known to be
highly popular among Latin
Americans, and with the
Bahamas government having
recently relaxed its visa require-
ments for all South American
countries the ministry is under-
stood to be seeing the event as a
potential opportunity to kick-
start a more lucrative tourism
relationship between The
Bahamas and these countries.

This comes days after Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham gave
a sobering assessment of the
outlook for the Bahamian econ-
omy, which is dependent on
tourism for more than 60 per
cent of GDP, for 2009.

Called for comment on the
possibility that The Bahamas
may be set to host the pageant
yesterday, Minister of Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool Wallace
told The Tribune to “await the
announcement by the prime
minister.”

“We're really trying to
finalise some details on that,”
he added.







JUDGE PARKER

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YOUR JOB !

SOUNDS

INTERESTING! I WANTEP A THANK YOU,

WHAT MADE PLACE TO GROW 3B AND FROM KATHERINE... -
YOU MOVE ROOTS..- ANI I = WHAT I HEAR, THE THAT'S VERY
BACK HERE LIKE THE PEOPLE! © PEOPLE LIKE YOU! REASSURING!

YES! OBVIOUSLY THAT
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NOW LET'S SEE IF
MOM JUMPS QUT OF
HER SKIN!



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‘©1989 Universal Press Syndicate



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several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
Qin the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
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50 WHERE'S I'M NOT ABOUT
YOUR DIAPER? To RISK GETTING
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or more can you make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used

The
Target

uses once only. Each must contain
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words m be at least one nine-letter word.
the main No plurals.
TODAY’S TARGET
body of Good 24; very good 36; excellent
Chambers 47 (or more). Solution tomorrow.
21st YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION
acid acted activate
Century ACTIVATED active advice
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(1999 date dative davit dictate diva
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Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











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Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer



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32009. Nori A

“MR.WILSON'S MOTTO IS, ‘IF ITAINT BROKE,
FIX [T ANYWAY.”

















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Difficulty Level * & %%&



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down
1° Pull leg about being in bed 1 Bea socially-acceptable
that’s untidy (10) lover (4)

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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
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The Right Way Is the Sure Way

6 Utterly rude and cross (4) 2 Put out fire (9) South dealer. East has the king, the contract is
10 Set sail on Eastern 3 Put oil on some crane Neither side vulnerable. made, but if West has it, the contract
passage (5) levers (5) | | | | | | || || NORTH goes down.
11 Pays liars to make a 4 They have no settled 15 17 4A9652 In this case, however, it would be
complaint (9) occupation (7) Eee lieaesoed i a ¥A73 wrong for declarer to stake every-
: Su as (8) 5 sales 5 or could be | | | | || | | | #742 thing on the diamond finesse, which
erman city shows angere #85 would give him only about a 50-50
unusual sense (5) 7 Deserted place of et} | | | P| ett | | ft S »
: : WEST EAST chance of succeeding. Instead, he
1 ee oe may be all Z Sale (5) fe [ea | | | z || #83 a7 should adopt a line of play that
alee See ne 25 ¥Q1062 ¥VI84 allows him to avoid the finesse alto-
17 Anumber agreed to be succeed? (10) eel ge ca o Q T5 #10986 gether — one that will make the con-
cea 2 a Si eae | a a Zi a | a fl #KQ104 #97632 tract regardless of who has the king
27 1
19 Went into liquidation when ill-grace (8) ee We ea ye | SOUTH of diamonds. a
: : ee #KQI104 Accordingly, declarer takes West’s
working hard? (7) 14 Sign for a missing || | | || | | h sil | ra : :
21 Small things that cause a letter (10) ¥K95 king-of-clubs lead with the ace and
caemeee es” | a5 de aqumirg EC CCE oe $h03 days tvo rounds of tanps, having
22 Flier appears to steal in (5) fish (8) eee made a mental note that West is
24 Useful people showing 18 Ashare in the plot (9) Across Down The bidding: marked by the opening lead with the
Lu

diplomacy in studies (8) 20 Possibly cleared to Mi 4) Close égeitiar 4: Brafeundniaiee South West North East queen of clubs. South then cashes the
27 Questions are asked when authorise dividend N (4,2,4) person (4) 1¢ Pass 2¢ Pass king and ace of hearts and leads a

such a group activity is payment (7) N | sh , 2 Worthy (9) 4% third heart. East wins with the jack

broadcast (5,4) 21. They prohibit flags (7) > neentve 1) y Opening lead — king of clubs. and returns the ten of diamonds.
28 Not here again after the 23 It’s good in France and Oo. 10 Great enjoyment (5) @ Flower (5) South refuses to try the diamond
start (5) America to get extra 11 Shame (9) 4 Sorrow (7) Some people greatly enjoy taking finesse, as there is now no point in
29 Formerly in older style (4) money (5) es 12. First night of film (8) 5 Ancestry (7) _ finesses — especially when the risking it. Instead, he wins with the
30 Our respect will be 25 Athenian garret (5) misplaced for such an 26 Decapitated their son may Lu 15 Abominable (7) 8 Urgently enthusiastic finesses should be avoided like the saddling West with the lead.
oppressor (10) be (4) 17 Metal wind (6,2,2) plague, and should be taken only West is helpless. If he cashes the
; ; ; instrument (7) 9 Hair style (8) when no better option is available. king of diamonds, it is all over, while
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 19 Deep purplish red (7) | 14 Gesture of Pane us eo ees declarer : : leads a sat a : Sues giving
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Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 22 Violent weather (5) ‘

: . : : 18 Invaluable (9) and a club. Since the heart and club Observe that when declarer leads
Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 24 Appeased (8) 1 cig aad hy ff Hie -thitd Heart. Hod t tt
Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 27 Insulting (9) 20 Inform (7) fend hails cl . ot ae te hi hae i . ial OL ae i
Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. 28 Clumsy (5) 21 To hide (7) re a S cowiL (lostae one aug i ie actualy her .
Down: 1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Down: 1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 29 An accepted 23 Express Jamone, not two. ; trick. Sout BS certain to succeed, as
Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 —_—‘ Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 standard (4) willingness (5) Experience Tells us Wat One Way: Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 25 Confidence (5) to tackle this problem is to lead adia- wriggle out of the trap he has laid for
14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20. Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 30 Bavarian leather 26 Knock mond from dummy to the queen. If — them.

Oral, 23 Arc.



19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie.

shorts (10)

unconscious (4)

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.



THE TRIBUNE

Sp

ATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28,








PAGE



Bahamas
Davis Cup
team off

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas men’s four-
man team left Miami for
Paraguay today to compete
in the first round of the
American Zone I Davis Cup
tie.

Although the tie is not
scheduled to begin until next
weekend, captain John Far-
rington decided to go a week
earlier to ensure that players
Devin Mullings, Timothy
Neilly, Bjorn Munroe and
Marvin Rolle get acclimatized
to the conditions in Paraguay.

The team will take on the
Paraguay’s team of Ramon
Delgado, Juan-Carlos
Ramirez, Nicolas Salama and
Diego Galeano. The team is
Victor Pecci at the Yachty
Golf Club in Paraguayo,
Lambare.

Last year at the National
Tennis Center, the team of
Delgado, Ricardo Mena,
Ramirez and Juan-Enrique
Crosa defeated the Bahamas’
team of Mark Knowles,
Munnings, Neilly and Rolle
4-1 in the semifinal over the
weekend of April 11-13.

Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association’s president Wes-
ley Rolle said despite losing
last year, he anticipated that
the Bahamas should prevail
this year.

“If they are playing their
same players, we are going to
have our work cut out for us,
but I believe that with the
players we are sending, we
can certainly expect a pretty
good performance,” Rolle
said.

“With a little luck, I think
we can get past these guys.

Four man team
left early to
prepare for tie

But it won’t be easy because
we are playing on the red clay
courts on their home turf. We
will definitely have to play
our best tennis in order to
win.”

Last year, Knowles and
Rolle teamed up to win the
pivotal doubles, but Mullings
and Neilly lost their respec-
tive singles against Delgado
and Mena and Ramirez won
their singles over Neilly and
Rolle.

Knowles has opted not to
travel with the team. Instead,
he has decided to continue
on the ATP men’s tour where
he’s teaming up with Mahesh
Bhupathi from India.

In preparation for the tour-
nament, Rolle said the play-
ers have been playing in satel-
lite tournaments in Florida
and they are eager to play in
the tie.

Munroe, on the other hand,
is coming off the death and
burial of one of his younger
brothers, LaVaughn. But
Rolle said Munroe insisted
that he was prepared to play
and he indicated that his
brother, who also played on
the Davis Cup team three
times, would have preferred
that he did.

“We’re going to go down
there and do our best,” Rolle
said. “As you know, this is
the same team that got us our
of Zone II and into Zone II.
So we're pretty confident that
these guys can get the job

SEE page 12

Wilson enjoys
freshman year

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

“GREAT improvement”
were the first two words
that coach Brent MacDon-
ald used to describe the way
that Bahamian Chadeau
Wilson made his debut on
the Xavier Muskateers
men’s swimming team.

“He’s a great kid, great to
have around our team. He
brings a lot more to the
team than a lot of others,”
said MacDonald, of Wilson,
made the Musketeers swim-
ming team as a walk on.

“He’s always smiling and
always positive. He fits all
the intangibles. He makes
up for a lot of things that
we were lacking. So it’s
good to have him around.”

Wilson helped the Mus-
keteers complete the 2009
Atlantic 10 Swimming and
Diving Championships over
the weekend at the Erie
Community College’s
Flickinger Athletic Center
with a fifth place finish.

For Wilson, he was just
delighted to have made the
necessary adjustments to
swimming in the Bahamas
Swimming Federation meets
at the Betty Kelly Kenning
Aquatic Center to compet-
ing on the collegiate scene.

“It’s really, really com-
petitive and the training has
been very hard,” he pointed
out. “But I’ve been able to
adopt and everything went
very well for me.”

Throughout his freshman
season, Wilson said he was

Chadeau Wilson

able to consistently drop his
times. He produced season’s
best of one minute and 36
seconds in the 100 back-
stroke; 2:21.11 in the 200
back; 1:01.63 in the 100
breaststroke; 2:20.46 in the
200 breaststroke; 57.48 in
the 100 butterfly; 2:03.10 in
the 200 individual medley
and 4:50.12 in the 400 IM.

Wilson, 18, said he was
pleased to have been able
to contribute to their overall
performance at A-10 Con-
ference meet. Based on
what he’s achieved, Wilson
said he’s looking forward to
his sophomore season.

“At first, I was over-
whelmed when I got here,”
said Wilson, who experi-
enced snow for the first
time. “I’ve made the adjust-
ments and I’ve been able to
stay focus in the pool.

SEE page 12

11 é . > ”
zy
_ F LF a } \





2009 ca -_





¢ WITH the Bahamas Football Association getting ready to host the FIFA Congress this
summer at the Atlantis Resort on Paradise Island, The Tribune’s Blast from the Past
takes its readers back in time to when the New Providence Football League was instruct-
ed by international soccer referee Diego De Leo. Remember any of the local players and
officials who participated in the clinic? Also, here’s one of the shots of a local game played
between Tropigas and the Dynamos. Do you remember any of these players in action?



Dave Mackey/Photo

SYLVAIN CLEMENTS, Clarins Branch Manager along with Mrs Clement offer the Clarins gift bags to an AWC
fundraising chairperson, Bev Hall. 130 bags were given to participants of the AWA Home Centre Golf Classic on
February 21st, 2009.



GRAND BAHAMA
ISLAND - In keep with
their desire to become
good corporate citizens
of Grand Bahama, Clar-
ins recently participated
as sponsors of the Ameri-
can Women's Club Golf
Classic which was held
on February 21st at the
Reef Golf Course in
Lucaya.

Not only did the lead-
ing beauty line company
assist as Sapphire Spon-
sors of the event, they
also donated 130 Clarins
gift bags, 71 of which
were men’s bags which
consisted of one Clarins
men product along with a
sun care product anda
lip balm, and 59 women's
bags which consisted of a
Clarins product along
with a sun care and lip
balm.

Sylvain Clement,
Grand Bahama branch
manager was on hand at
the awards ceremony .

“We are pleased to be
helping in some small
way to help make this
worthy charitable event a
success. We are here to
assist in the community
as best we can,” said Mr
Clement.



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Bahamas Davis
Cup team off

FROM page 11

done.”

In the final of Zone III
in June, 2007, Farrington :
captained the team of

Mullings, Rolle, Munroe

and H’Cone Thompson to
a 2-1 victory over Puerto }

Rico to advance to Zone IIT.

In the first round of Zone
II last February at the }
National Tennis Center, the :

team of Knowles, Mullings,

Neilly and Rolle pulled off
decision over }
Venezuela before losing to }
Paraguay in the second }

a 4-1

round.
Depending on the out-
come of the tie next week-

end, the Bahamas will
either play the loser }

Guatemala versus the

Dominican Republic in a }

relegation playoff July 10-

12 or against the winner }
over the same weekend for :
the right to either stay in }
Zone II or a chance to go }
on to play in the final fora }
shot at promotion back to :

Zone One.

The last time the

Bahamas played in Zone

One was in 2003 when we
lost 4-0 to Venezuela to be

demoted to Zone II in

2004.

Wilson enjoys
freshman year

FROM page 11

“This has been a good
year for me. I’m looking }
forward to coming back :

home. I really want to see

what progress I’ve made
here when I compete in }

the Nationals.”

Wilson, a graduate of

Queen’s College and for-
mer Carifta team mem-

ber, is hoping to making

the CCCAN Champi-
onship team that will be
heading to Colombia.
MacDonald, the inter-
im head coach at Xavier,
said when Wilson came

out to try out for the
team, he earned it after ;

adjusting to the training.
“When he first came in,

we didn’t really know
where he was going to fit ;
in on our team as far as }

what his best event was,”
MacDonald pointed out.

“We didn’t find that out

until around mid-season.
He really excelled in the

breaststroke. He could

swim most of the strokes,

so we saw a large drop in }

his times in the IM and he

closed out the season by
swimming very well in }
both the 100 and 200 ;

breastroke and the 200 IM
in our conference meet.”

Although he didn’t |

score the big points, Mac-

Donald said Wilson per- }
formed exceptionally well :
and it only bodes well for }
his final three seasons at }

Xavier.
Wilson, a Natural Sci-

ence major, is the son of }

Larry and Fran Wilson.
He and his father are
talking with coach Mac-

Donald to hopefully get }
the Xavier team to come }
to the Bahamas to train at
the Betty Kelly Kenning :

Aquatic Center.

MacDonald said if it is
feasible, look forward to }
the Musketeers making :
the trip to the Bahamas }

very soon.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

PHOENIX Suns center Robin Lopez, left, puts up a shot as Los Angeles Lakers center Didier Ilunga-Mbenga,

ball game Thursday, Feb. 26, 2009, in Los Angeles.

Bryant’s Lakers beat Shaq’ s Suns

@ BASKETBALL
LOS ANGELES
Associated Press

WITHOUT Steve Nash,
nobody got the ball inside to
Shaquille O’Neal, and that
made the Phoenix Suns a
pushover.

The Los Angeles Lakers
scored 70 points in the first half
and rolled past the Nash-less
Suns 132-106 Thursday night
for their sixth consecutive vic-
tory.
Kobe Bryant had 22 points
and eight rebounds for the Lak-
ers, while O’Neal had 12 points
while taking just seven shots,
and grabbed seven rebounds
for the Suns in the former
teammates’ first meeting since
sharing MVP honors at the All-
Star game.

“Tonight’s game felt like
kind of a trap game because
we are at home and Steve’s not
playing,” Bryant said. “It is
kind of one of those things
where we kind of take the night

Chuck Burton/AP Photo

off. Iwanted to make sure from
the jump that we didn’t.”

Lamar Odom had a team-
high 23 points and Pau Gasol
added 16 points and nine
rebounds for the Lakers, who
own the NBA’s best record at
48-10 and lead the Pacific Divi-
sion by 15 games over the Suns.

Los Angeles’ points tied a
season high and the team made
a season-best 54 of 94 field
goals, bettering the 48 the Lak-
ers hit against Minnesota on
Jan. 30.

“Pretty good team, huh?”
said Suns interim coach Alvin
Gentry, who fell to 4-2. “It’s
tough against this team because
they play a great zone defense
and don’t allow Shaq to get
touches a lot of the time. It’s
tough getting guys touches
when we don’t have Steve out
there. He creates a lot of easy
stuff for everyone, easy shots
for guys on the perimeter.”

Leandro Barbosa scored 18
points and Alando Tucker
added 16 starting in place of

Nash. Jason Richardson added
3

The good feelings shared by
Bryant and O’Neal during All-
Star weekend in Phoenix con-
tinued in their seventh career
head-to-head meeting. Bryant
put his left arm around O’Neal
and thumped him on the chest
with his right fist before tip-off
after teammate Luke Walton
hugged O’Neal.

O’Neal was warmly received
by the crowd at Staples Cen-
ter, where the Lakers improved
to 27-4 and have won four ina
row.

“I was surprised,” he said
about his reception. “I haven’t
really played here in a while. I
respect them and they will
always be a part of my NBA
life.”

The Suns had won four of
their previous five games since
the All-Star break, but they
played without All-Stars Nash
and Amare Stoudemire, putting
them at a decided disadvantage
before the game even started.



Mark J. Terrill/AP Photos

f Congo, defends during the second half of their NBA basket-



LOS ANGELES Lakers forward Josh Powell, right, fouls Phoenix
Suns forward Boris Diaw (3), of France, during the second half of

their NBA basketball game.







NORTH Carolina
State's Dennis
Horner (31) tries
to shoot over
Wake Forest's
Chas McFarland
(13) during the
second half of
Wake Forest's 85-
78 win in an NCAA
college basketball
game in Winston-
Salem, N.C.,
Thursday, Feb. 26,
2009.

No. 13 Wake Forest beats NC State



@ BASKTEBALL
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.
Associated Press

WAKE FOREST blew most of a big lead
before James Johnson saved the game —
and maybe the rest of the season, too.

Johnson had career highs with 28 points
and 18 rebounds to help the 13th-ranked
Demon Deacons dodge another upset bid
from North Carolina State, holding off the
Wolfpack 85-78 on Thursday night.

Ishmael Smith added a season-high 18
points and Chas McFarland had 15 for the
Demon Deacons (21-5, 8-5 Atlantic Coast
Conference), who shot 52.5 percent, held a
42-27 rebounding advantage and led nearly
all the way.

But with memories of last season’s 1-5
collapse still fresh, they allowed most of an
early 15-point lead to slip away to a North
Carolina State team that beat them 82-76
and was looking to pull another stunner.

Johnson wasn’t about to let it happen
again.

“We’ve been working hard since the sum-
mertime,” Johnson said. ““There’s no need to
come out and just lose it now or not play
hard now, when it counts, and then go back
to the drawing board in the summertime, or
keep working while we’re watching every-

body else play in the NCAA tournament.”

He helped them recover in time to
improve to 13-1 at home and win for the
third time in four games. The victory moved
Wake Forest into a three-way tie for third in
the conference standings with No. 12 Clem-
son and No. 23 Florida State.

Tracy Smith scored 18 points to lead five
double-figure scorers for the Wolfpack (15-
11, 5-8), who were denied their second
sweep of Wake Forest in coach Sidney
Lowe’s three seasons.

Johnson had a double-double by halftime
and was 12-of-16 from the field to surpass his
previous top performance of 26 points —
which he matched in the up-and-down
Demon Deacons’ most recent outing, a 101-
91 loss four nights earlier at No. 7 Duke.

“He was a man out there,” high-scoring
guard Jeff Teague said.

Added coach Dino Gaudio: “He would-
n't let us lose.”

The production they received from John-
son and Smith — who finished one point
shy of a career high — made off nights from
two key teammates that much easier to
take.

Teague finished with 12 points — nine
fewer than his average — on 3-of-12 shoot-
ing in his second tough game against N.C.
State, which used a box-and-one defense

to limit him to three shots and 11 points in
the previous meeting.

The Wolfpack “knew they were playing
against an explosive player, a guy that could
put up big numbers,” Lowe said. “Our guys
were really just trying to concentrate on
making it as tough as possible.”

Additionally, freshman Al-Faroug
Aminu missed all six of his shots and had
just three points in his least productive night
of the season.

“It’s good when (Teague) doesn’t play
his very best, and Farouq doesn’t play his
very best, and we can win a basketball
game. That’s huge,” Gaudio said. “If we
can get all of them clicking on the same
cylinders, we know we can be a really good
basketball team.”

Farnold Degand and Ben McCauley both
had 12 points, and Dennis Horner and
Brandon Costner added 10 apiece for N.C.
State, which has lost two of three and
slipped into 10th in the ACC.

The Wolfpack made things interesting
late by getting within two points four times
midway through the second half — the last
coming on McCauley’s layup with 12:15
remaining — and then keeping it within
three points late. Courtney Fells’ 3-pointer
from the left corner made it 74-71 with 2:25
to play.

Fresno State
heats Nevada
65-66

| BASKETBALL

FRESNO, Calif.
Associated Press

SYLVESTER SEAY

scored 28 points, including
? two free throws that capped a
i rare five-point play, as Fresno

State held off Nevada 68-66

Thursday night.

Last-place Fresno State
(12-17, 3-10 WAC) needed a

missed 3-pointer at the buzzer
i by Like Babbitt to seal the
? victory.

Nevada (16-11, 8-5) had its

} three-game winning streak
? snapped and lost for the first
i time in eight tries against
? Fresno State.

The play that put the Bull-
dogs ahead came with 1:01

? remaining. Nedeljko Gol-
i ubovic hit a 3-pointer in Bab-
i? bitt’s face just as Seay drew a
? foul on Malik Cooke under
i the basket. Seay hit both free
? throws as Fresno State turned

a one-point deficit into a 66-

i 62lead.

Seay scored 20 of his points

in the second half, including
? one stretch when he hit three
? straight 3-pointers. Golubovic

added 18 points and shot 4-

for-7 behind the arc.

Fresno State coach Steve
Cleveland picked up his 200th

: career victory with the Bull-

dogs’ first win over Nevada

i since Jan. 18, 2006.

Babbitt led Nevada with 18

i points and teammate Malik

Cooke added 16.
Fresno State guard Dwight
O’Neil played for the first

? time since Jan. 28. He missed
? the past seven games and had
? been suspended since Jan. 31,
? the day after he was jailed on

a warrant for driving on a sus-

pended or revoked license.

O’Neil served six days in

Fresno County Jail and was
; released Feb. 5.

A starter through the first
19 games, O’Neil came off the

i bench for the first time and
i finished with nine points.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



PORT

INBRIEF

Pacman'’s next
football team will
he on reality TV

mg FOOTBALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WRITER



ADAM “Pacman” Jones
landed a new team Friday.
Sort of.

On the opening day of
the NFL’s free agent sign-
ing period, Jones instead
was on vacation in Puerto
Rico and talking about his
role on the upcoming reali-
ty TV show “Pros vs. Joes
4: All Stars.” His market-
ing representative refused
to allow Jones to comment
about what’s next in his real
playing career, but earlier
in the interview Jones
declared, “I’m definitely
not at the end of my career.
I’m basically just getting it
going.”

The 25-year-old Jones is
by far the youngest among
the six NFL and six NBA
stars who will compete
against regular guys in the
latest installment of the
Spike TV show. All others
are either retired or close
to it.

“Tt’s a good show,” Jones
said. “Hopefully I can bring
a little excitement to it.”

Jones’ NFL future is in
doubt because of his off-
field issues and mediocre
performance on the field
last season.

He was a star cornerback
and kick returner for the
Tennessee Titans in 2005
and ’06, but the NFL sus-
pended him for the entire
2007 season because of an
accumulation of legal prob-
lems. He was traded to the
Dallas Cowboys in 2008,
then was suspended for six
more games following a
fight with his team-provid-
ed bodyguard. The Cow-
boys announced they were
dumping him soon after the
season ended, weeks before
the move actually could be
made. His on-field play was
a factor, too, as he had no
interceptions and a pedes-
trian 4.5 yards per punt
return.

In the TV show, Jones
will be reunited with for-
mer Tennessee teammate
Steve McNair. Tim Brown,
Simeon Rice, Priest Holmes
and Rich Gannon are the
other NFL players who will
take on the Joes in three
skills competitions and a
three-on-three scrimmage
in each episode. There will
be four episodes per sport,
a change from previous sea-
sons when multiple sports
were played in each
episode.

“Tm going to make sure I
do my job,” Jones said. “I
don’t want no balls caught
on me.”

A-Rod still waiting
for MLB meeting

@ BASEBALL
TAMPA, Fla.
Associated Press

YANKEES third baseman
Alex Rodriguez is still waiting
to meet with Major League
Baseball officials, who want
to discuss his use of perfor-
mance-enhancing drugs from
2001-03 while with Texas.

MLB wants to speak with
Rodriguez about security
issues involving a trainer from
the Dominican Republic and
the cousin the three-time
MVP said injected him with a
banned substance called
“boli.”

Rodriguez didn’t make the
trip to Fort Myers for the
Yankees spring training game
Friday against Minnesota.
Instead, he worked out with a
group of players at Stein-
brenner Field that included
Derek Jeter, Johnny Damon,
Hidkei Matsui and Mark
Teixeira.

After the workout,
Rodriguez said no meeting
was scheduled for Friday.

Yankees manager Joe
Girardi said Rodriguez will
play in spring training games
Saturday and Sunday.
Rodriguez then is scheduled
to join the Dominican
Republic national team to
prepare for the World Base-
ball Classic.



Rockets rout Cavaliers 93-74

Cav’s Wallace out
with broken foot



HOUSTON Rockets’ Luis Scola (4), of Argentina, loses the ball out of bounds under pressure from

Cleveland Cavaliers’ Daniel Gibson during the second half.

Pat Sullivan/AP Photos

CLEVELAND Cavaliers’ Anderson Varejao (17), of Brazil, shoots between Houston Rockets’ Shane
Battier, left, and Yao Ming (11), of China, during the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday,

Feb. 26, 2009, in Houston.

IN THIS Nov. 2,
2008 file photo,
New York Knicks’
Stephon Marbury
watches the Knicks’
NBA basketball
game against Mil-
waukee Bucks from
the bench at Madi-
son Square Garden
in New York. Mar-
bury was waived
Tuesday by the
New York Knicks,
ending a turbulent
five-year stint in
which the former
All-Star couldn't
lead his hometown
- team to a single
Stephen Chernin/AP Photo playoff victory.

Marbury signs
with Celtics

@ BASKETBALL
WALTHAM, Mass.
Associated Press

THE BOSTON CELTICS signed Stephon Marbury on Friday,
bringing the former New York Knicks headache aboard in their
attempt to repeat as NBA champions.

Marbury cleared waivers on Friday morning, reported to the
Celtics for a physical and was expected to be in uniform on Friday
night for Boston’s game against the Indiana Pacers.

“We are very excited to have a player of Stephon’s caliber join-
ing our team,” Celtics general manager Danny Ainge said. “Our
entire organization is confident in the belief that Stephon can play
an important role in helping us to win another championship.”

Marbury, a former All-Star guard who alienated Knicks man-
agement, teammates and fans, was waived on Tuesday after he
agreed to a buyout of his $20.8 million contract. The Celtics were
expected to offer him a pro-rated share of the veteran’s $1.3 million
minimum.

Marbury, who turned 32 last week, hasn’t played a regular-sea-
son game in more than a year.

He arrived at the team’s practice facility in Waltham just before
noon, about 90 minutes after clearing waivers. He could be seen
from the public area of the workout facility wearing a white, long-
sleeved T-shirt and sweat pants, jumping up and down as he took
the practice court, smiling and chest-bumping with several people
wearing Celtics gear.

After few minutes, the automatic shades were lowered.

Marbury will back up Rajon Rondo at point guard, a role Sam
Cassell served when the Celtics won their 17th NBA title last sea-
son. Eddie House, who is more of a shooter, has been forced into
the role this year; Cassell did not play in a game for Boston this year
before he was traded to the Sacramento Kings and released last
week.

Marbury took a long leave of absence from the Knicks when his
father died in December 2007, then had season-ending ankle
surgery and has not played since Jan. 11, 2008.

He returned to the Knicks in training camp, but when the sides
tried to negotiate a buyout early in the season, Marbury at first
refused to surrender any more than $1 million of his $20.8 million
salary and the team told him to stay home until it could be com-
pleted.

Marbury was the center of controversy during his five years in
New York, feuding with coaches and skipping games.



Freezers
Refrigerators
Washers & Dryers
Television & Stereo

BEST REY

@ BASKETBALL
HOUSTON
Associated Press

LEBRON JAMES drove to
the basket in the fourth quar-
ter, trying to spark a last-ditch
comeback for the Cavaliers
against the Houston Rockets.

Yao Ming was there to block
his dunk attempt and James
twisted his ankle, a fitting end to
a terrible night for Cleveland.

James went an entire game
without an assist for the first
time in his career and the Cava-
liers lost Ben Wallace for four to
six weeks in a 93-74 loss to
Houston.

The Rockets, meanwhile,
showed they just might be con-
tenders in the Western Confer-
ence.

Yao scored 28 points and
Ron Artest added 15 while
harassing James on defense
most of the night, leading the
Rockets to their six consecutive
win and ninth straight at home.

“Tt is a big win,” said Yao,
who hit 13 of 15 shots despite
Cleveland’s constant double-
teams. “We played against one
of the best quality teams in this
league. That is a really good test
for us to see how far we can go.”

James scored 21 points, but
went 7-for-21 from the field
with three turnovers. He left for
good with 4:03 left, the only
time in 493 NBA games (count-
ing playoffs) he failed to record
an assist.

The Cavaliers had season-low
point totals in the first (11) and
third (10) quarters, and their 34
percent shooting (27-for-80) was
also a season worst.

“T can’t remember the last
time I didn’t have an assist,”
James said, “but as a team, we
didn’t move the ball at all.”

To make matters worse, the
Cavaliers lost their best interior
defender when Wallace broke
his leg in the second quarter
after Yao accidentally kicked
him.

“Tl definitely be back for the

Bedroom Pieces

Living Room Sets
Computer Desks & Chairs
SY eles

playoffs, ’m hoping to come
back before then,” Wallace said
after breaking his right fibula.

Von Wafer scored 19 points
and Luis Scola added 14 points
and nine rebounds for the
Rockets. Houston had 25
assists, its sixth straight game
with 20 or more, and went 8-
for-19 from 3-point range.

But the Rockets are more sat-
isfied with their defense lately;
they’ve held their last six oppo-
nents to an average of 83.6
points.

“You may get into the sec-
ond round (of the playoffs), but
if you want to make a serious
run and be a serious con-
tender,” said Wafer, “you’ve
got to be able to continue to
play defense. We are trying to
come together as a unit.”

Mo Williams also scored 21
for the Cavs, who had a five-
game winning streak snapped.

Cleveland looked as bad as
it did in a 92-77 loss in Houston
last season — James had 32 in
that one, but the Cavs shot 39.7
percent.

“We just can’t seem to get
into a good flow against the
Houston team,” James said. “A
lot of credit has to go to them,
they are a very good team.
Offensively, we couldn’t make a
shot and we could never get in
any rhythm.”

The Rockets led 45-40 at half-
time, and had assists on their
first five baskets of the second
half. James, meanwhile, tried a
no-look, over-his-head pass to
Anderson Varejao later in the
third period, but the ball sailed
out of bounds.

The Cavs shot 5-for-17 from
the field and coughed up five
turnovers in the third quarter
to trail 68-50.

James took a rest and
returned with 7:21 left in the
game, but the Rockets never
lost control. Yao blocked James
on a dunk try and Wafer fin-
ished off Cleveland with a 3-
pointer at the other end for an
85-68 lead.

RU MOU

T PRICES OF THE YEAR!

aye

Saturday Feb. 26th, 8:30 — 5:30, Village Rd.

Master

Technicfans

APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS





PAGE 16, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



thescene



by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP



NASSAU EVENTS



AT CHAPTER ONE book store in Oakes Field: Deandre Smith, a biochemistry student at the College of the Bahamas; attorney and author Anthony
Thompson, former deputy manager of the Bahamas Monetary Authority, a forerunner to the Central Bank of the Bahamas; Judy VC Munroe, for-
mer president of the Caribbean Bottling Company, and first woman president of the Chamber of Commerce; Celeste Gray, a biochemistry student

at COB.

et a i
Pat
“he aos:

ACKLINS ISLANDER, Dr Hervis L Bain Jr, who designed the national coat of arms of the Bahamas and made a significant contribution to the
design of the national flag in 1971; Anthony Thompson; attorney Gregory IH Cottis, Olivia Knowles Cottis Law.

ATTORNEY
Anthony
Thompson;
Adrianna Allen,
a Spanish
teacher at St
John’s College;
attorney David
Allen Jr.





CAPTURED



BERNARD K
Bonaby, secre-
tary of the Gam-
ing Board and
former commis-
sioner of police;
Basil L Sands,
chairman of
British American
Financial and
managing part-
ner of PKF Con-
sulting; attorney
Cecil Hilton,
Cecil Hilton and
Company.

CAMERA

THOMPSON LAUNCHES

ON January 29, Anthony
Thompson launched his new
book, An Economic History of
the Bahamas at a reception at
the Chapter One Bookstore at
the College of the Bahamas.

During his address, Mr
Thompson said that when con-
sidering the economic history
of the Bahamas, three impor-
tant things should be noted.

He said these are:

e That history repeats itself

e That the country’s 18th cen-
tury motto — Expulsis Piratis
(pirates expelled) Restitutia
Commercia (commerce
restored) — has become “Pirates
Restored, Commerce Expelled”

e That the country has no
philosophy of nation building

In terms of the first point,
that history repeats itself, Mr
Thompson noted that the reces-
sion the country now finds itself
in is a repeat of the situation in
the early 1930s.

“Thank God following all
recessions or depressions, con-
sumer demand builds up for
more goods and services, and
recovery takes place. The
Bahamas has been able to
bounce back from adversity into
prosperity over the years,” he
said.

On the second point, Mr
Thompson noted that for cen-
turies, the Bahamas was con-
trolled by pirates. Although
they were driven out by British
governors, the quest for survival
has made “pirates out of our
people” over the years.

“We took advantage of the
misfortunes of others and some-
times, by committing acts which
may have been legal in our
country but illegal elsewhere. I
refer to rum running, wrecking,
the transshipment of drugs, the
attracting of tax dodgers, and
illegal gambling, including the
numbers racket.

“Most notably, there have
been various Commissions of
Inquiry. In 1967 the Commis-
sion into gambling showed that
members of the former govern-
ment received direct pecuniary
benefits from the operation of
casinos.

“The Commissions of Inquiry
into Bahamasair, Batelco and
the Hotel Corporation demon-
strated that some of the offi-
cials involved therewith bene-
fited from slack practices, the
awarding of contracts and influ-
ence peddling.

“Today we are exposed to
much commentary regarding
alleged corruption in various
departments of government and
in the trade union movement.

“The pirates may not have
been expelled,” he said.



On his point about nation
building, Mr Thompson noted
that as a British colony, in the
17th century economic thought
in the Bahamas was dominat-
ed by mercantilism and over-
seen by Crown agents. There
was therefore no plan to devel-
op the economy for the resident
population.

He said that although foreign
investors were attracted under
the UBP, very little was done
in terms of national develop-
ment; “they owned and con-
trolled the retail and services
sectors of the economy and
until 1967 had the political pow-
er to sustain their economic
dominance.”

In 1972 the PLP stated its
intent to develop tourism, main-
tain the tax haven status, grow
the banking sector, push for-
ward with industrial diversifi-
cation, promote agriculture and
fisheries development to a self-
sufficiency level and Bahami-
anise the country, Mr Thomp-
son said, adding that the FNM
followed many of these policies.

“Fifty-four years later tourism
is severely challenged, and the
pressure of the international
community at the turn of the
21st century has devastated the
second industry. The industrial
diversification scheme which at
one time boasted of oil refin-
ing, cement manufacturing, rum
production, aragonite mining,
two salt producing plants at
Inagua and Long Island, a phar-
maceutical plant, and a pipe and
steel company have been left
only with a transshipment ter-
minal, one salt plant, and small
rum and beer plants.”

Despite the Bahamianisation
policy, Mr Thompson said, the
economy is not significantly
impacted by local entrepre-
neurship. He added that in the
tourist industry, there are few
Bahamian owned businesses
and the industrial sector has
attracted very little local own-
ership interest.

“Our crime problem, the
unacceptable educational
results, the large number of
young people in our country,
the growing number of illegal
immigrants, the rationalisation
of land ownership and property
development schemes includ-
ing anchor projects, the strug-
gling small business sector, the
density of the population in
New Providence with its
restricted land mass, the anti-
quated inequitable tax system,
and the traffic congestion in the
capital, all of these cry out for a
bi-partisan national develop-
ment plan,” Mr Thompson said.

JUSTICE JOSEPH
Alfred (retired); Dr
Elwood Donaldson,
a family practitioner
and former PLP
member of parlia-
ment for Kilarney
who along with 18
others, ushered in
Majority Rule in
1967. In 1970 he
was part of the Dis-
sident Eight who
formed the FNM; Dr
Rudolph B Dorsett —
internal medicine
and cardiology spe-
cialist. Dr Dorsett
recently returned
from the US and
practices at Skoorb
Medical Clinic, East
Street South.



Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

Assurances on
GLICO under fire

®@ Former Minister criticises financial stability claims

@ Bahamian public given ‘incorrect’ level of comfort

ee L

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamian public was
given a level of comfort about
the financial stability of CLI-
CO (Bahamas) that "appeared
not to be absolutely correct",
former Minister of State James
Smith told The Tribune yester-
day.

Although earlier this month,
current State Finance Minister
Zhirvargo Laing told Tribune
Business he
planned to
meet CLICO
(Bahamas)
executives to
discuss “major
regulatory
concerns” sur-
rounding the
company’s
financial posi-
tion, made urgent by the bail-
out of its parent firm which had
guaranteed a $57 million loan
that accounts for 59 per cent of
the Bahamian insurer’s assets.

But up to a week ago the
country was given assurances
of the future of the company by
executives, frustrating policy
holders and creditors who were
blind-sided by a Supreme Court
Order issued this week to place

SEE page nine

7

AU steS TINT UN



Cynthia Pratt’s

husband has leg
amputated



m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

JOSEPH Pratt, husband of
PLP deputy leader Cynthia
“Mother” Pratt, had his left
leg amputat-
ed in hospital
yesterday, the
result of a
long battle
with diabetes.

According
to his wife,

= Mr Pratt is
"resting well"
in the
Princess Margaret Hospital,
despite the ordeal.

"They did the surgery and
they did amputate the left
leg," the PLP MP for St
Cecilia said last night.

SEE page six



COURT APPEARANCE: (from left) Shayne Knowles, Bryan Knowles and lawyer Fedner Dorestal
outside of court where they were sentenced for fraud-related charges. The three has been
accused of conspiring to commit forgery and of forging the signature of John William Lefler in rela-
tion to five condominium units at the Palms of Love Beach, West Bay Street.
FOR FULL STORY, SEE PAGE 3



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Hopes high of Bahamas hosting
2009 Miss Universe pageant

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas is very close to pulling off a
massive tourism coup — playing host to the 2009

Miss Universe pageant.

The event, scheduled for August, draws an
audience of many millions of people worldwide
and could bring in a similar amount in revenue for
the country at a time when the economy is flag-
ging, according to Ministry of Tourism sources.

The Tribune understands that an “extraordi-
narily good” bid has been made by the ministry to
the Miss Universe Organisation, which runs the
event, leaving local officials optimistic about their

chances.

“We are 90 per cent likely to get it,” said a

tourism source. “While it’s not signed, we think

off on it.”

we are way down the road in terms of signing

One high-level source said that if The Bahamas

SEE page nine

Talks on stepping up anti-drug fight

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PLANS to step up
counter-narcotics efforts,
which lost steam in 2008, were
discussed by Bahamian and
United States officials in a bi-
annual meeting of the Joint
Drug Task Force yesterday.

An understaffed and
underfunded Bahamian Drug
Secretariat hampered momen-
tum in the fight against drug
trafficking, and destruction
caused by Hurricane Ike in
Great Inagua last September
exacerbated by the slow-
down, according to the US
government’s International
Narcotics Control Strategy

Report 2009.

Plans to step up the war on
drug smuggling include inte-
grating Creole speakers in the
Bahamian Drug Enforcement
Unit (DEV) and working with
Haitian National Police offi-
cers to be stationed in Great
Inagua to develop informa-

SEE page six

Fridays & Saturdays



PRIGE=75¢

*
AOCT & CHAMDOK

*

Moves under way
to resolve NIB
payments dispute
— media boss

Jones Communications acting ‘in good faith’

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

JONES Communications CEO Wendall Jones said that his
company and the National Insurance Board are co-operating
in good faith to resolve over $430,000 that his company
owes in back payments to NIB.

Brushing aside the offer made by Arawak Homes CEO
Franklyn Wilson to assist him if necessary in covering the cost
of these back payments, Mr Jones said he does not need
anyone to “fight my battles” or pay his bills.

Jones Communication Network Ltd is responsible for the
publication of The Bahama Journal (in affiliation with the
Communicators and Associates), JCN TV channel 14, and

LOVE 97FM radio station.

Contacted for comment yesterday, Mr Jones remained
tight-lipped on details, explaining that his company and the
National Insurance Board (NIB) were both negotiating in

“good faith.”

SEE page six

Bahamian
NICSE
NiO Rm Ie
vital
Wendall Jones

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A LEADING Bahamian busi-
nessman yesterday offered to
“help out” media boss Wendall
Jones as he faced court action
over unpaid National Insurance
Board contributions.

As the future of the Jones
Communications’ empire could
hang in the balance, chairman of
Arawak Homes Franklyn Wilson
said he is willing to invest funds in
the media house if Mr Jones is
unable to meet court ordered
back payments to NIB.

On Thursday, Mr Jones plead-

Franklyn Wilson



ed guilty before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester to owing NIB over
$430,000.

Having agreed to pay 40 per
cent of the sum — $180,000 —
and the remainder over a two-
year period, concerns have been
raised among some of Mr Jones’
colleagues over whether this latest
fiasco could spell the end for the
media company.

As highlighted by Mr Wilson,
Jones Communications Ltd, with
its radio station, newspaper and
television station, plays a “very
important role” in media in the
country today.

SEE page six

Minister open to independent probe
into Detention Centre abuse claims

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

IMMIGRATION State Minister Branville McCartney said he is
open to an independent investigation into claims of abuse and inhu-
mane conditions at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre.

However, he firmly stated that internal investigations into recent alle-
gations of abuse and a hunger protest of three Cuban detainees proved

that the claims were false.

"From our investigations I can say there is not one person on a
hunger strike in the Detention Centre as of 5 o'clock (yesterday),” the

state minister said.

While he had not personally visited the Detention Centre to dispel
these claims, he said he received assurances from the head of the
holding facility that the allegations published earlier this week are

untrue.

"I haven't gone personally but I have spoken personally to the per-
son in charge of the Detention Centre on more than one occasion
today, on more than one occasion yesterday — but I have not gone
down (there) personally. But I intend to go down, I intend to go

SEE page six



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Reports of child

abuse on the rise



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A 24 per cent rise in reports of child abuse
and recent disclosures of an incest problem in
the Family Islands are further evidence that the
government must immediately enact the Child
Protection Act and implement a sex offenders
registry, it has been claimed.

Clever Duncombe, spokesman for the
father’s rights advocacy group Bahamian
Fathers for Children Everywhere, said there
can be no more “excuses.”

Earlier this week, the National Council for
the Protection of Children revealed that there
were 719 cases of child abuse in New Provi-
dence alone in 2008. In 2005, there were 581,
in 2006, 618 and in 2007, 545.

The council warned that incidences of abuse,
which can be emotional, verbal, physical or
sexual, or manifest as neglect or abandon-
ment, are likely to rise again over the next
year due to the economic hardship being suf-
fered by a growing number of Bahamian fam-
ilies.

Yesterday Mr Duncombe pointed out that
each “case” of child abuse may in fact
involve more than one child, therefore mak-


















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ing the statistics more disturbing than some
may recognise.

He said that new strategies are needed if
the government and society are going to start
reducing the number of children suffering
abuse.

Among these, he said, is implementing the
Child Protection Act, passed in 2007 towards
the end of the PLP’s term in office.

That Act provides for, among other things,
stricter penalties for abusers and a legal oblig-
ation on the part of all people who are aware
of abuse to report such crimes against chil-
dren. According to the Office of the Attor-
ney General, the Act would bring the Bahamas
into line with principles outlined in the UN
convention on the rights of children.

Since taking office, Minister of State for
Social Development Loretta Butler Turner
has said that the government is reviewing the
legislation.

Meanwhile, in June 2008 Ms Butler Turner
suggested that significant funding would be
needed to enact the law, which the govern-
ment now hopes to “phase in.”

Mr Duncombe yesterday called this a “flim-
sy excuse.”

“Exactly how much would it take to imple-
ment this Act in its entirety? Do we have a

cost? We just borrowed $150 million from the
Chinese the other day to build roads and we
continue to borrow recklessly ... why can’t we
borrow the money if that’s a problem?”

He said that “outdated social policies and
bad laws” are contributing to the likelihood of
Bahamian children suffering abuse.

Were the Bahamas to follow the example set
in developed countries like the US and place
sex offenders on a register which would allow
members of the public to find out where such
individuals live, the level of abuse could be
reduced, he suggested.

“We need pictures and posters to be posted
on these individuals who’ve already been
charged with these heinous crimes,” he said.

Mr Duncombe claimed that people who are
concerned about child abuse are “losing con-
fidence in the system” because in its present
form it is not designed to truly protect the
interests of children and properly punish those
who offend.

He said he hopes that recent media coverage
of the child abuse crisis facing the country will
“prick the heart of at least one politician.”

“You need at least one to be mindful and
raise this issue. Just one. But we can’t find
one. There’s something fundamentally wrong
with that,” he said.

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oe Inter-American Investment Corporation

Member of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) Group

The IIC and The College of The



THE EDWARDS TWINS
HOST FREE CONCERT

BAHAMIANS are being invited to a free concert
next week featuring The Edwards Twins, rated among
the best celebrity impersonators in the world.

The concert, to be held at the Rainforest Theatre on
Cable Beach on Sunday, March 8, is the Twins’ way of
saying thanks to the Bahamas for hosting their show for
the past three years.

Eddie Edwards, famous for his Cher and Barbra
Streisand impersonations, told The Tribune: “This is a
special appreciation concert for the Bahamas, where we
are now into our third year.

“All Bahamians showing ID at the door will be
allowed in free for a new show we have arranged fea-
turing my brother Anthony as Tom Jones and other
interesting changes.”

Eddie’s show-stopping impersonation of Cher will
also be developed, including costume changes and new
numbers.

“We are back in Nassau until August,” Eddie added.
“However, we will be taking a few weeks off in April to
appear in the America’s Got Talent show.

“We have enjoyed our time in Nassau so much that
we thought we’d like to have a Bahamian Appreciation
Day, so we hope lots of local people turn up for the
show.”

The Edwards Twins are based in Las Vegas, but their
seasons at the Rainforest Theatre have proved a big
draw for tourists and locals.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays

The College of the
Bahamas

Bahamas

Announce the Launching of FINPYME®

FINPYME offers free-of-charge diagnostic reviews to small and medium-size enterprises
(SMEs). If you would like assistance in making your SME* more competitive and
improving its access to potential sources of financing, don’t miss this opportunity to

register for FINPYME in The Bahamas.

The Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC) is a member of the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) Group. For more information on its FINPYME program please

visit www.FINPYME.org.

The launching event will take place on March 4, 2009, at 8:30 A.M. at the
British Colonial Hilton, Nassau
Speakers include:

ZHIVARGO 8S. LAING
Minister Of State And Governor of the IDB Ministry of Finance and Planning

RICHARD BERNAL
IIC Alternate Executive Director for The Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica, and
Trinidad and Tobago

To RSVP, please copy the invitation form available at www.finpyme.org
cob.edu.bs. You may also call The

and email your response to fin

College of The Bahamas at 302-4421 or 302-4417.

«: SMEs with annual sales in excess of approximately US$100,000.


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 3



SINGLE MOTHER SAYS SHE FEARED FOR LIFE AFTER GROUP CONFRONTED HER

Minister vows to probe claims of armed
immigration officers bursting into home

Police seize
illegal firearm
from apartment

¢ POLICE seized an ille-
gal firearm and a large
assortment of ammunition
from an apartment on Fire
Trail Road on Friday.

Officers of the Central
Detective Unit searched the
apartment at 2am and found
a laptop case which con-
tained a .40 handgun and
ammunition a for .38 hand-
gun, an AK-47 assault rifle
and a .40 handgun. Two
men, aged 26 and 28, were
taken into police custody.

Trio in custody
after shotgun
discovered

¢ THREE men are in
police custody following the
discovery of a black sawn-off
shotgun inside a home on
Palm Tree Avenue shortly
after 11am on Thursday.

Mobile Division officers
were acting on a tip and
went to the home where they
found the shotgun.

The three men are 18, 20
and 30 years old.

Teacher hadly
injured when
airbag activates

A YOUNG teacher suf-
fered serious facial and eye
injuries when the airbag in his
car activated without warning,
causing him to swerve into a
roadside Kerb.

Adrian Gibson, 24, who
writes a weekly column for
The Tribune, was driving in
Fox Hill with a friend when
the airbag exploded, striking
him hard in the face.

He was taken to Princess
Margaret Hospital, where he
was kept overnight with facial
bruising and a damaged right
eye.

“T look like I’ve been in a
boxing match,” Mr Gibson
told The Tribune, “My eye is
closed and filled with blood
and the doctors are planning
to do another scan on it
today.”

Mr Gibson was having a
lively discussion with his
friend when the incident
occurred. He believes he may
have struck the centre of the
streering wheel while gesticu-
lating, causing the airbag to
activate. As it burst into his
face, he swerved into the kerb,
threw open the door and
escaped into the street. His
friend was not injured.

Mr Gibson said it was only
after the incident that he dis-
covered that his car, a 1996
Toyota Corolla, was apparent-
ly prone to airbag difficulties.

“Tf anyone else in Nassau
has a car of this type and year
then I would suggest they get
the airbag checked out,” he
said.

Big load of pea-
rock spills after
truck overturns

m BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 30-ton load
of pea-rock spilled at the airport
roundabout on Friday when a
dump truck turned over near the
domestic terminal at the Grand
Bahama International Airport.

Traffic at the roundabout at
East Mall Drive came to a stand-
still as firefighters worked to free
the driver and his passenger from
the dump truck, which toppled
on its side shortly after 9am.

Driver Maxwell Campbell, 22,
and passenger Ramon Campbell,
of Campbell’s Trucking and
Loading Services, were rushed by
ambulance to Rand Memorial
Hospital for treatment.

The driver was said to have
been seriously injured. His con-
dition was not known up to press
time. In addition to the pea rock,
diesel had also spilled from the
gas tank onto the road, presenting
hazardous conditions for
motorists.

Although investigations are
continuing into the accident,
police believe that excessive
speed may have been a factor.

Three persons have died so far
on the streets of Grand Bahama
this year. Police are advising
motorists to obey the speed limits
and drive with care and caution.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

MINISTER of State for
Immigration Branville McCart-
ney has vowed to investigate
claims made by a single mother
who feared for her life when
unidentified armed immigration
officers burst into her home.

Violet Hanna, 41, was with
her seven-year-old daughter
Amber when officers demanded
entry into their home on Price
Street, Nassau Village, while
they were asleep just after 4am
on Tuesday.

Ms Hanna, a Bahamian citi-
zen, said the officers never iden-
tified themselves as being from
the Immigration Department
and declined her offer to see
her passport.

They broke down the gate to
her backyard to gain access to
the back door, while other offi-
cers banged violently on the
front door and more stood out-
side the house.

Their aggressive manner put
Ms Hanna and her child in fear
of their lives.

The single mother told The
Tribune : “I understand what
they are trying to do, but the
way they did it made me afraid



Branville McCartney

for my life. I’m still terrified.”

Vomiting

Amber, who was crying and
vomiting in fear as officers
shouted at her mother, was so
shaken by the incident she
stayed home from school that
day and insists on holding her
mother’s hand while in the
house. She has been staying
with her grandparents since the
incident. Minister of Immigra-
tion Branville McCartney called



“We must go about
things the right way
without causing any
harm to persons,
and if it is not the
right way I would
like to find out who
the persons
responsible are and
deal with them
accordingly.”

The Tribune yesterday in an
effort to contact Ms Hanna so
that he can personally oversee
an investigation into the inci-
dent. He said: “This is some-
thing we take very seriously and
especially as she is a young sin-
gle woman who has a child, who
she said was upset and vomiting
and very frightened, that is not
the way we do things in the
Immigration Department. That
is not the order of the day.
“We must go about things the
right way without causing any

Attorney one of two
men fined in connection
with fraud allegations

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN attorney was one of
two men fined $7,500 by a
judge yesterday in connection
with fraud charges surround-
ing alleged impropricties con-
nected to several condomini-
ums.

A third man was sentenced
to five years imprisonment on
24 fraud charges dating back
to 2003.

Lawyer Fedner Dorestal
and brothers Bryan Knowles
and Shayne Knowles were
accused of conspiring to com-
mit forgery and of forging the
signature of John William
Lefler in relation to five con-
dominium units at the Palms
of Love Beach, West Bay
Street.

The men were also accused
of forging and submitting con-
veyances for the units and
having a forged Nassau Indus-
trial Limited Seal on July 25,
2003.

It was further alleged that
the men obtained a $40,000
loan from First Caribbean
Bank on John F Kennedy Dri-
ve.

In early January, Bryan
Knowles was convicted on 24
counts of fraud, including con-
spiracy to commit fraud,
forgery, uttering a forged doc-
ument and fraud by false pre-
tenses in relation to the case.

Shayne Knowles was only
convicted on two counts of
fraud while lawyer Dorestal
was convicted on one count
of fraud.

Acting Justice Elliot Lock-
hart yesterday sentenced
Bryan Knowles to five years
imprisonment on each of the
24 counts for which he had
been convicted. The sentences
are to run concurrently.

In sentencing Shayne
Knowles, Acting Justice Lock-

hart noted that according to
the evidence, Knowles had
minimal involvement in the
matter. Shayne Knowles was
fined $7,500. Failure to pay
the fine will result in a two
year prison term for each of
the counts.

He was also ordered to per-
form 500 hours of community
service. Knowles was given 30
days to pay the fine.

Dorestal was also fined
$7,500. Failure to pay the fine
will result in a two year prison
term.

Bail

Attorney Michael Kemp,
who represented the three
men, also requested that
Shayne Knowles and Dorestal
be released on bail until their
fines are paid. The judge
granted the two men bail in
the sum of $10,000 with two
sureties.

A female relative of the
Knowles brothers was also
brought before the court yes-
terday after assistant director
of legal affairs and lead pros-
ecutor in the case Franklyn
Williams claimed that she had
assaulted him while he was on
his way to court.

The woman was taken to
the Central Police Station
where she was detained until
after the sentencing.

She denied physically
assaulting the prosecutor,
claiming that she told him:
"This is a big deal."

Acting Justice Lockhart said
that the matter was being con-
sidered as a contempt of court
issue.

After talking briefly with
Mr Kemp, the woman
apoligised. Acting Justice
Lockhart accepted the apolo-
gy, noting that Mr Williams
could still pursue the matter
further if he wants to.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Comics
Weather

Palb2eo 5.6. lle

Reeeeterne ere ee ceee tere tennee P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES



TROPICAL
rs el

PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157



harm to persons, and if it is not
the right way I would like to
find out who the persons
responsible are and deal with
them accordingly.”

Mr McCartney has now

| Galleria |

arranged to meet with Ms Han-
na and has vowed to oversee an
investigation into the matter in
an effort to root out illicit
behaviour by immigration offi-
cers.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Obama’s Olympian feat on the economy

IF PRESIDENT Obama were an Olympic
diver, the degree of difficulty in what he’s
trying to do would be off the charts.

He’s attempting to jump-start the economy,
fix the banking system, address the mortgage
crisis, reform healthcare, save the automobile
industry, catalyze a new green energy sec-
tor, invest more in education, and establish a
cap-and-trade system to fight climate change.

Oh yes, and start to tackle the nation’s
yawning fiscal deficit.

Casual observers of politics can be forgiv-
en if they are confused, for the new adminis-
tration’s economic message seems to translate
to this: Hard times are upon us, so we need to
loosen our belt. But when the recovery
comes, it will be time to suck in our gut and
cinch things up again.

That no doubt seems counterintuitive to
many. And yet, there’s an economic method
to the two-step approach.

Start with the belt-loosening. With the tra-
ditional generators of economic activity ane-
mic, the government is really all that’s left to
inject some demand into the economy.

The president and his team, who believe
government can spark lasting private-sector
activity, are betting heavily its stimulus plan
will work. Most congressional Republicans,
who doubt the economic efficacy of govern-
ment, have wagered with their votes that it
won't.

Thus, if Obama gets what he wants, we’ll
witness a real-time economic experiment. If
the president proves right, Democrats should
do well in the next few elections. If Republi-
cans are correct, voters may well punish the
party in power and reward the minority.

To move forward the way it hopes, the
administration clearly needs more revenue,
much of which the president plans to corral
by letting tax cuts expire for upper-earners
while raising their capital gains rate and lim-
iting the tax benefit they can secure by item-
izing.

Those proposals will raise cries of socialism
from those confused about what socialism
actually is.

Still, it’s certainly true that those moves
would put more of the tax burden on those
who own more of the country’s wealth.

Conservatives, of course, will predict that if
tax rates rise, the sky will fall. Given that

higher rates didn’t doom the economy during
the Clinton years, there’s every reason to be
sceptical that capitalism is really that frag-
ile.

But that too will be tested in this adminis-
tration’s liberal experiment.

In his presentation this week at the White
House’s fiscal responsibility summit, Robert
Greenstein, executive director of the Cen-
tre on Budget and Policy Priorities, offered
some valuable perspective on the nation’s
budgetary problems. Over the last 30 years,
federal revenues have averaged about 18.4
percent of GDP. But the only years we’ve
balanced the budget during that period - 1998
to 2001 - were when revenues totaled
between 20 and 21 per cent of GDP.

Even if Obama gets the new monies he
hopes for, revenues for the next decade will
only gradually grow to 19.5 per cent of GDP,
while expenditures won’t dip below 22 per
cent.

That will make the pivot toward deficit
reduction difficult. The president has pledged
to cut the deficit, which will be some $1.75
trillion this year, to $533 billion by the end of
his first term. Nevertheless, the administration
still projects it rising to $712 billion in 2019.

That would be 3.1 per cent of GDP, which
outstrips the average annual economic growth
of recent decades. Thus, even after a decade,
federal debt will probably still be increasing
relative to GDP.

“Tt shows what a huge problem we’ve got,”
says Robert Bixby, executive director of the
Concord Coalition, who thinks the potential
is there for the deficit to remain consider-
ably higher.

Given fiscal reality, Obama’s plan for per-
manent new tax cuts for businesses and for
families making up to about $190,000 a year
seems overly generous.

Justified as an offset to higher energy costs
that will result from the cap-and-trade system,
the middle-class tax break will obviously be
popular. Yet at a combined price tag of about
$100 billion a year, those tax benefits add
yet another tricky twist.

And the Olympian feat the president hopes
to pull off is difficult enough already.



(This article was written by Scot Lehigh
Boston Globe staff writer - c. 2009).



Vexed by poor
service of health
care professionals

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Kindly allow me space in
your column to address a vexing
problem. I am a civil servant
who is at her wit’s end with the
service of other public serving
members, particularly, members
within the Department of
Health.

Like many other people, I am
diagnosed with a disease, name-
ly diabetes, and have to be
treated for my condition, which
when paid out of my pocket and
small salary, is a costly condi-
tion.

Additionally, like other civil
servants, I partake in the use of
the government’s facilities such
as the health-care at the public
clinics and PMH.

Iam one of many civil ser-
vants who will boldly say that
the service rendered by persons
employed in these areas is
upsetting.

Most health care profession-
als employed by the govern-
ment display nonchalant, hos-
tile and in some cases verbally
rude attitudes towards their fel-
low civil servants and members
of the general public. This is
unacceptable.

Civil servants are privileged

letters@tripbunemedia net



to benefit from the governmen-
t’s facilities, which prove use-
less many times due to the
mediocre service of its employ-
ees.

When criticised by members
of the public and fellow civil
servant, these health care pro-
fessionals decide to hold the
public hostage by not render-
ing a service that they were
employed to do; yet they eager-
ly await “pay day”, which one
can consider an official govern-
ment holiday, because so many
government offices seem to shut
down!

Needless to say, complain-
ing to a supervisor when seek-
ing medical attention is done
with dismay.

Phone calls are never
returned, verbal complaints fall
on deaf ears and a cry for help
goes unheard.

The lack of compassion and
privacy is unbelievable. Seek-
ing further higher assistance
from the Minister of Health
proves fruitless! While await-

ing service, many civil servants
complain of the poor treatment
and the bad attitudes being dis-
played by members of the Pub-
lic Health Department. How
long must this go on, minister?

Respect from one colleague
to another is expected and
should be displayed at all times.
Lack of staff and medicines are
understandable, but should not
be tolerated when performing
public service.

It is actions like these that
cause members of the general
public to complain and insult
the workers in this profession,
who in turn retaliate by most
times offering poor service.

My health, your health, our
health is important. Assistance
and service from health care
professionals is appreciated
once rendered. Service is a
must, and with that in mind, all
civil servants must thrive to give
the public their utmost. Thank
you.

PATIENT
Fleming Street
Clinic

Nassau,

February 25, 2009.

Can anyone help me?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Hello Bahamas, my name is Clay Martin Sr. I
am a Bahamian citizen who is currently employed
in Nassau. I am married with four children and my
ultimate goal is to be a productive individual in
society displaying positive fatherhood and to be

an asset to my country.

Tam currently seeking financial aid during this
economic crisis we are now facing. My home can
be repossessed any day now because my salary is
not sufficient to take on the needs of a family of
six. Two of my kids are in school, my wife has
been unemployed for nearly three years and I
have a daughter who is severely ill; her vision is

not stable.

my kids to school without lunch or even lunch
money, that is embarrassing as a father and it

saddens my heart.

These issues that I am facing financially are
my responsibility but I am seeking assistance
because my circumstances are strenuous. If assis-
tance can be given through a grant or loan, med-

ical funding for my daughter or even a job for my

vices.

She has visited doctors locally and abroad and

they all were unsuccessful in determining her
continuous loss of sight. My monthly income is
mediocre, but my bills are special. To be honest
my water is off, it is ruff. Sometimes I have to send

Nassau,

CLAYTON
MARTIN Sr

wife I will appreciate it.

Any help given I will be thankful, even if it’s a
one dollar grant.

Tam willing to do community work on week-
ends or assist with any issues that require a handy
skilled man’s abilities. I can be contacted at 361-
3079 at home and at 466-4463 through cellular ser-

February, 2009.

Rolled-up newspapers sorely needed in family islands!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Your recent announcement
“increased air transport cost
end delivery to family islands”,
sad day, regrettable indeed! Liv-
ing on a family island; the excit-
ing days were mailboat and
“plane day!”

The arrival of the mailbag,
promptly collected, taken to the
post office, sorted, persons hur-
ried to their homes, laden down
with rolled-up copies of The

Tribune, Guardian, Herald,
which was also complemented
with magazines, newspapers col-
lected from the US Coast
Guard, Navy, Sea Bees and Pan
Am bases.

The availability of these
materials assisted many students
in this quest for knowledge!

IT hope that management will
continue sending “rolled-up
newspapers” via the post office
to our family island libraries,
they are sorely needed!

HAMILTON JONES
Nassau,
February, 2009.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue

Phone:d22-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

> we EATR, EXTRA,

NOTICE is hereby given that HARALD STEFFEN
SAUER of #9 TREASURE STREET, LITTLE
BLAIR, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person

e Bat d th For the stories behind the news,
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the

read Insight on Mondays
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20" day of February, _ = Large Sh pment
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, a of

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On Premises


THE TRIBUNE



































































m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

tq I vex at how biggity
people on the streets

of the Bahamas is. I

tired of people carryin' on
bad like they have the right
of way, especially when they

don't even know how to dri- | with the signing of several Bahama, but will also

ve. eet Sei aia public — See contribute to further

people don't know how to including one for the con- ‘

use aroundabout? struction of a new ferry ter- ean eevee
"Just today, this stink] minal in East End. through the creation

woman shoot out in front Minister of Works Neko Of additional

of me while I was driving
around the roundabout
instead of yielding. She
lucky the devil ain’ run up
in me, because I had a mind
to chase her down and give
her a piece of my mind. I
think the government needs
to do mandatory re-testing
when people renew the
licenses every five years
because our streets are a
mess."

— Wendy L

"IT vex and vexer because
I keep complaining about
how bad people park on the
side of the road, making
blind spots so people can't
see when they want to pull
out of a corner.

"It is especially bad on
Village Road right by that
roadside vendor and on
Deveaux Street right down
the road from The Tribune.
Iam tired of people parking
all up on the road just
because they droppin’ their
baby off or going to see a
lawyer or God knows what
else.

"When their nice, new car
get scratch up, I wonder
who they ga’ blame?"

— Mad Motorist

"T vex because with all
this madness going on in the
world and now hitting home
to our insurance industry
and messing with people
pension and hard-earned
pennies, I ain' know what
to do.

"LT just about five minutes
away from pulling my mon-
ey out of the bank and tak-
ing my investments and
keeping them in my mat-
tress or burying it in my
backyard. These people
with all their fancy degrees

NEW FERRY TERMINAL TO BE BUILT AT THE MCCLEANS TOWN DOCK

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 5

$600,000-plus boost for Grand Bahama

economy with major contract signings

m@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - More than
$600,000 will be injected into
the Grand Bahama economy

Grant signed contracts
totalling $673,000 on Thurs-
day at the Prime Minister’s
Office in Freeport.

He said a new 1,900-square
foot ferry terminal will be built
at a cost of $212,000 at the
McCleans Town dock.

Contractor Amos Russell of
Quail Fast Construction was
awarded the contract.

The building will be
designed as a multi-purpose
complex and will house a fer-
ry booth, a ferry passenger
waiting area, a post office with
post office boxes for residents
of the immediate settlements,
and a police station.

Comfort

Minister Russell said the
new terminal will facilitate a
more structured ferry service,
providing a greater level of
comfort and convenience to
its passengers.

He said the McCleans Town
dock provides a vital trans-
portation and communication
link to nearby the Grand
Bahama cays and to the set-
tlements of South Abaco.

The other public works pro-
jects involve repairs and road
works in Freeport, Eight Mile
Rock and West End.

Mr Grant said a contract
worth $256,809.81 was award-
ed to Carters Air- Condition-
ing and Refrigeration to con-
duct remedial air-condition-
ing works at the Freeport Post
Office Department.

He noted that the public has
been significantly inconve-
nienced and postal workers
have endured adverse work-
ing conditions for several
years due to a malfunctioning
air-conditioning system.

“We in the Ministry of Pub-
lic Works and Transport apol-
ogise to the public for any



“It is anticipated that
these projects will not
only contribute to the
enhancement of basic
infrastructure within
communities of Grand

employment in the
construction industry
and other related
sectors.”

Neko Grant



lapses in service delivery that



Vandyke Hepburn/BIS Photo

they may have experienced as —_ PICTURED from left are Frank Miller, Miller and Sons; Dion Munroe, Ministry of Public Works; Frank Miller
a result of conditions at the Jr; Colin Higgs, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Public Works; Norman Tynes, Ministry of Public Works;

Freeport Post Office, and Verna Grant, MP for Eight Mile Rock, Andrew Rolle, Tripple A Construction, Public Works Minister Neko

expect that work to repair the Grant; Gordon Major, Acting Director of the Ministry of Public Works; Godfrey Waugh, Waugh Construction;
air-conditioning system will Roland Bevan, Ministry of Public Works; Ron Carter, Carter's Air-Conditioning; Debbie Pennerman, Assistant
commence immediately,” said Postmaster General and Godfrey Clarke, Postmaster General.

Mr Grant.

The Holmes Rock Ceme-
tery, which was damaged in
Hurricane Wilma, is also
expected to undergo repairs
and improvements.

Many tombs and graves
were compromised by storm
surge.

Triple A Construction Com-
pany was awarded a $25,000-
contract for graveyard repairs.

Paving

Road works contracts for
road paving between Freeport
and Eight Mile Rock will be
carried out by Waugh Con-
struction Company in the
amount of $136,950.

The installation of line
markings and reflectors along
the highway between Sea
Grape and West End will be
carried out by Frank Miller
and Sons for some $42,500.

“It is anticipated that these
projects will not only con-
tribute to the enhancement of
basic infrastructure within
communities of Grand
Bahama, but will also con-
tribute to further economic
development through the cre-
ation of additional employ-
ment in the construction
industry and other related sec-
tors,” Minister Grant said.

ALL MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
ACCEPTED!
SORRY
ee ==)
CARDS!

TENT <\:

3 DAYS
ONLY!

Thursday,

Friday &

Saturday
FEBRUARY
26, 27, 28

3 00ff |

The Back Door
MADEIRA SHOPPING PLAZA

=

TENT SALE:
NO REFUNDS
NO EXCHANGES
CASH ONLY!



need to stop messing with
people money."

— Scared to invest,
Nassau.

"I vex that just about
every time I go into a
clothes shop with my good
money to spend and the
lazy sales girl too busy to
help me "’cause she yappin’'
on the phone.

"My thing is sweetie, I
don't need you to cater to
me, but at least move the
phone away from your face
long enough to tell me hel-
lo when I walk in the door.
These employees need to at
least take the phone from
their mout' when they bring
the shoes to try on. I mean
why don't they act like they
getting a pay-check instead
of like they doing you a
favour when you spend
your money?"





Du

CONTRACT SIGNING: A new
ferry terminal is to be built at
McCleans Town dock.



ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work




y <3 EG CAPITAL MARKETS
Ec BROKERAGE & ADVISOBY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.46 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -42.90 | YTD % -2.51

ae BR Bie
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.96 | YTD -2.03% | 2008 -12.31%

“ys ee
Fertilizer, ILE aL WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

AN Control : -Hi - aEESS —=eet y Previous oes Teday's cess Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
- a Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992
Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.319
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157

Benchmark 0.63 0.63 -0.877
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.105
Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.055
Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95 1.255
Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83
Commonwealth Bank (S1) Tr 6.77
Consolidated Water BDRs 1.78 1.71
Dector's Hospital 2.40 2.40
Famguard T.78 7.76
Finco 11.00 11.00

0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682

— Tonisha M, Nassau.

go9999909999090000
2200090000090000009
66666566155555660540

FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 10.45
0.337
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180

7 Focol (S) 5.00 5.00
ze @ Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.000
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.035
ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 “ 0.407
Securit S Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
: E 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 0.00 1%
4 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
f 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + 0.00 T%

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.952
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Ai S2wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
x Bahamas Supermarkets: . 8.42 14.60 -0.041 0.300

Caribbean Crossings (Pref) fe 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480
RND Holdings 0.40 0.35 0.001 0.000

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
a ABDAB 31.72 33.26 29.00 4.540 0.000
2 Bahamas Supermarkets 11.23 12.04 14.00 -0.041 0.300

RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.3781 Colina Bond Fund 0.35 4.40 30-Jan-09

(Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday)

We will re-open for business as usual on Monday, March 2. : 1.3773 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4376 0.28 4.38 23-Jan-09

3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund 3.3201 -1.94 -11.33 31-Jan-09
| ¥ 11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.6816 0.50 5.79 31-Jan-09

We apologise to our valued customers and regret any 4106,0000 “GEAL GicburBend rund 100.8606 0.86 0.56
. . . . ee 96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
inconvenience this may cause. All other sections of the 1.0000 GFAL High Grade Bond Fund 10000 9.00 0.00
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.1005 0.06 -13.33 31-Jan-09

AUTO MALL will be open for business as usual. 0 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0401 4.01 4.01 31-Jan-09

1.0000 FSG Financial Growth Fund 1.0330 3.30 3.30 31-Jan-09

31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07

1.0000 FSG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0410 4.10 4.10 31-Jan-09

MARKET TERMS
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks. Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
S2wk-Low - Lowe i rice in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close - eighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Ci ighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change - Change rice from day to day EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
LIMITED ily Vol. traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
- Divi

EAST SHIRLEY STREET ¢ 397-1700 rine he rae

dd by the last 12 month earmin: gs
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Moves under way to resolve NIB

payments dispute — media boss
FROM page one

However, Mr Jones said his company is challenging a “whole list
of charges” for which he claims his company is not responsible.

“Like everyone else we are paying National Insurance. There
were some names on the list that we are not responsible for,” he
said.

These individuals, Mr Jones said, were contract workers who the
company would not be obligated to pay NIB for under current
Labour laws.

While some observers suggested yesterday that the “singling
out” of the media house could be a political move designed to
embarrass the company, Mr Jones himself denied that politics had
anything to do with what was taking place.

“There is nothing political about this. If you owe National Insur-
ance you pay. I don’t think there is anything political about it and
I’m not going there.

“Whatever delinquency there is we will pay. Both sides are
negotiating in good faith and the matter is being resolved,” he
said.

On Thursday, Mr Jones pleaded guilty before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester to owing NIB over $430,000.

According to sources at the Magistrate’s Court, an agreement has
been reached where Mr Jones has agreed to pay 40 per cent of the
sum outright — $180,000 — and the remanding $250,000 over the
next two years.

The case was adjourned to June.

Cynthia Pratt’s husband
has left leg amputated

FROM page one

She said that the last few months have been challenging
due to her husband's illness, compounded with her own
health issues.

"It's been eight months of constant challenge because he's
been so ill. And physically I'm not up to my full strength and
the doctor told me I'm just burnt out,” she said.

Despite her commitment to her constituents, she will be
absent from the House of Assembly during the mid-year bud-
get debate on Monday under doctor's orders to “take it
easy.”

"Thank God I'm better than I was, but I won't be in Parlia-
ment on Monday for sure because my doctor wants me to
take a couple of days (off).

"Right now my health is more important and as muchas I
do have a responsibility, my health is more important."

Doctor's aren't certain if Mr Pratt's other leg will have to
be amputated, but the family is in deep prayer that his health
rebounds.








































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Businessman offers to ‘help out’ media boss

FROM page one

“What I am saying is that I
believe that Mr Jones has a viable
business,” Mr Wilson said, “or a
business which is potentially
viable.

“T am saying that if Mr Jones
should decide that he would wish
to seek additional investors to
join him in his enterprise, it is
something that I would certainly
listen to,” he said.

Despite reports to the contrary,

Mr Wilson said he does not cur-
rently have any shares in Jones
Communications.

“But in making that statement,
I am not attempting to distance
myself from Mr Jones in anyway.
I regard him as a friend, I respect
him as a colleague, and I am
hopeful and confident that what-
ever issues are involved will be
settled in a way that augurs well
for the country and him person-
ally.”

However, this mindset, Mr Wil-
son said, where persons suggest or

believe that an individual cannot
be successful in the Bahamas
unless they are “fronting” for
someone else, or doing something
illegal, is another form of mental
enslavement from which we must
free ourselves.

“These rumours have been so
unkind to Mr Jones, and so
unfair. In this country there is a
lack of faith on behalf of so many
for someone to pull themselves
up by their own boot-straps and
do something unless they are
‘fronting’ for somebody. That is a

Talks on stepping up anti-drug fight

FROM page one

tion on Haitian drug traffickers transiting the
Bahamas.

Such strategies were discussed by Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette, the US embassy’s Charge
d’Affaires Timothy Zuniga-Brown and gov-
ernment officials in a meeting chaired by
National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest
at the Royal Bahamas Police Force Head-
quarters in East Street.

Both governments stated redevelopment of
the Defence Force Base in Great Inagua as a
top priority, and the US government showed its
continued commitment to assisting Bahamian
officials with a $499,800 cheque presented to
the Bahamas Drug Enforcement Unit by the
US Drug Enforcement Agency.

Migrant

Mr Zuniga-Brown commended the “remark-
able progress” made in the fight against nar-
cotics and migrant smuggling as a result of
joint efforts in 2008.

He praised the Bahamas government’s deci-
sion to ban wooden-hulled Haitian sloops and
noted how the US government had expanded
its commitment to drug and migrant interdic-
tion in Bahamian territorial waters by provid-
ing four Nor-Tech fast boats to the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force last year.

Bahamian authorities seized 1,878 kilograms
of cocaine and approximately 12 metric tons of
marijuana, and the DEU arrested 1,030 people
on drug-related offences and seized $3.9 million

Box:

WANTED

in cash throughout 2008.

Included in the figures are seizures made by
Operation Bahamas, Turks and Caicos
(OPBAT) in cooperation with the US govern-
ment of 1,800 kilograms of cocaine and 12 met-
ric tons of marijuana.

Mr Zuniga-Brown said: “These seizures
directly impact narcotics smugglers’ bottom
line and are critical to our efforts to safeguard
our countries from the dangers of illicit nar-
cotics trafficking.”

Both Mr Zuniga-Brown and Mr Symonette
agreed that developing the base at Great
Inagua is paramount in 2009 after the destruc-
tion caused by Hurricane Ike forced the US to
relocate helicopters based there to Turks and
Caicos.

The US representative said his government
is eager to return to Great Inagua and rebuild
and improve the island’s infrastructure as it is
optimally located for interdicting smugglers
transiting through Bahamian waters, which
was demonstrated by a recent seizure of over
800 kilograms of cocaine on the island.

Mr Symonette said: “The major drug seizure
in Great Inagua through collaborative efforts of
the DEA, DEU and the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force will hopefully be a continued
trend throughout 2009.

“T encourage the continued relationship
between my government, our friends and part-
ners the Turks and Caicos Islands, who were
unfortunately unable to attend today, and the
US government.

“It is through this bilateral rapport that we
can improve our capabilities and maintain this
cooperative model which is heralded regional-
ly and locally.”

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that
is currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person would
have a minimum of three years in commission sales; have their
own private vehicle and a track record as a top performer. We are
looking for excellent communicators that are driven. Candidates
must have computer skills and be able prepare public presentations
on behalf of companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.
Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to
DA 69806
c/o The Tribune

P.O.Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas

by March 14, 2009.



























BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH

SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching iiam& 7:30pm EWANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZN5 2

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"Preaching the Bible as is, bo men as hey are”
| Pastor A. Milis * Prone: 393-0563 * Box N-Sh22 |

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

=

trait that isn’t limited to just Mr
Jones today.

“T can tell you very honestly I
for years and years have had to
live with that myself. The Sun-
shine Boys lived with it. Who
were we fronting for? It’s as if
you can’t start something on your
own and pull yourself up by your
own boot-straps.

“T hate to inject the race ques-
tion again, but it is hard to avoid.
I hate to see it injected again, but
all too often it has proven rele-
vant,” he said.

Detention

Centre
FROM page one

down, but they are saying things
that are totally untrue in terms
of that strike — they are eating
and they are eating well."

Earlier in the week The Tri-
bune published claims from sev-
eral detainees at the Detention
Centre, whose complaints ranged
from beatings from officers, to
insufficient meals, and inadequate
healthcare, bath and toilet facili-
ties.

A day after the initial story
broke the Department of Immi-
gration denounced all the claims
as false, citing an internal investi-
gation.

But international human rights
agency Amnesty International
called for an impartial review into
the matter. Amnesty's Interna-
tional Secretariat is said to be
"monitoring the situation" before
making any further statements.

Yesterday Mr McCartney wel-
comed such an investigation.

"We don't have anything to
hide at the Detention Centre, we
have nothing to hide and certain-
ly that can always be welcomed
but when you talk about inde-
pendent investigations these per-
sons come over and are not as
independent as they claim they
are.”

Mr McCartney also dispelled
claims that the holding facility is
“inhumane” and without ade-
quate bathing and toilet facilities.

"These claims have been made
before, (but) we are not there to
mistreat anyone. They are there
to be held and in as comfortable
circumstances as possible. It's not
a jail, notwithstanding that these
people have come here illegally.
They say these things and they
try to get the international media
and organisations to put pressure,
but at the end of the day as long
as we are doing what is right, we
are not going to fall for that.

"There's no reason why we
should mistreat these people, and
if that is happening it's a no-no,
but I've found no evidence of mis-
treatment. I'm satisfied that it's
a complete fabrication.

While not denying that there
might be "bad apples" within the
Department of Immigration, Mr
McCartney said,

"If it were true I would have
done something about it. I would
not sit back and allow persons to
be abused in any form or fash-
ion.”

This week the US State
Department released its 2008
Human Rights Report for the
Bahamas, which expressed con-
cern that the department was
internally investigating claims of
abuse without independent over-
sight. Mr McCartney declined to
the report until he had a chance
to review the complete document.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427

(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MARCH IST, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Mathilda Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Jamicko Forde/Min. of Health (HC)
7:00 a.m. Bro. Jamicko Forde/Sis. Nathalie Thompson

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

Grace and ert Wesleyan Lees

Grounded In The Past &

-.. Geared To The Future

Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
ee number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

Re eM ee dt Sete ed
ULM Wel]

WHERE GODS ADORED AND EFERVONE [8 4APFIRVED

Worship Tune: Efacm, & 6pcn.
4 Prayer Times ffs! 3am,
Charch Scheel during Worship Service

Place: Twyvnam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Box $5-5631

Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324.2587

‘@ KO
THE TRIBUNE

m@ BY MATT MAURA
Bahamas Information
Services

COLLABORATION
between members of the clergy
and mental health profession-
als in the Bahamas is an
“important step” towards
addressing the mental health
needs of Bahamians, Minister
of Health Dr Hubert Minnis
said Wednesday.

Addressing a psychiatric sym-
posium for clergy hosted by offi-
cials of the Sandilands Rehabil-
itation Centre, the Ministry of
Health and the Public Hospi-
tals Authority, Dr Minnis said
such collaboration becomes
even more necessary with a
review of statistics that show
that 40 per cent of persons
experiencing mental health ill-
ness first contact their clergy.

“In times of crises, people
turn to their religious leaders
for guidance, support and help,”

AW /Os TESORO Cor
while snorkelling

Beatrice Chapman, a 71-
year-old resident of Ontario,
Canada, was snorkeling near
Half Moon Cay sometime
after noon on Thursday
when it is believed she
drowned. She was pro-
nounced dead sometime lat-
er. Foul play is not suspect-
ed.

Ms Chapman was a pas-
senger on the ss Massdam
cruise ship, which visited
Eleuthera on Thursday.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Health Ministry and clergy
partner to fight mental illness

MINISTER of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis addresses religious lead-
ers during a one-day psychiatric
symposium for clergy held on
Wednesday, February 25, 2009.

Dr Minnis said.

“Tt is duly noted that initially,
religious leaders are often the
only persons that individuals
needing assistance feel com-
fortable enough with to share
their problems and concerns.

“Recognising this fact, and
particularly as it relates to men-
tal illness, it is imperative that
our religious leaders are well
acquainted with those vital
aspects of mental illness for
which people need additional
medical help to recover, so that
their suffering can be addressed
and dealt with appropriately,”
he said.

Dr Minnis told religious lead-
ers that their input will “greatly
assist” mental health profes-
sionals in combatting mental ill-
ness in the Bahamas. They will
also assist in combatting the
stigma attached to mental ill-

ness - a stigma, he said, which is
“still very prevalent and which
has prevented persons from

ccessing the mental health
assistance they need to recover
from their illness.”

Dr Minnis said the collabo-
ration between the church and
the mental health profession
can also serve as a proactive
measure to combat some of the
“fall-out” from the current eco-
nomic downturn that is impact-
ing the Bahamas and, indeed,
the world.

“Today we are experiencing a
serious financial problem not
only here in the Bahamas, but
throughout the rest of the
world, and many individuals will
be experiencing mental illness
and particularly pressure,” Dr
Minnis said.

“The possibility exists that we
can see an increase in suicidal
rates and you must be able to —
as you guide your flock - detect
illnesses and/or depression, by
recognising mood changes in
the individuals whom you know
very well.”

The one-day workshop
focused on a number of areas
including tips for the clergy on
recognising and dealing with
mental illness, recognising and
addressing the early warning
signs of mental illness, tips for
communicating with mentally
ill persons and when to refer
them to professionals.

The religious leaders were
also provided with a blueprint
for developing the necessary
programmes to assist church
members who may be recover-
ing from mental illness.

Assurances on GLICO under fire

FROM page one

the company into provisional liquidation.

Said Mr Smith: "What we do know is that right
up until last week, everybody was saying every-
thing was okay, that (it) was something that
wouldn't affect here. So somebody was giving a
level of comfort to the Bahamian public that
appeared not to be absolutely correct."

When asked if he felt government should shoul-
der some culpability for company executives not
being forthcoming to its creditors and policy-
holders, Mr Smith said, "I really don't know how
much they knew and when they knew and what
options were available to them, but I don't think
any government would knowingly keep the pub-
lic at risk if there’s something that could be done
to avoid it.

"Sometime you would move too slowly, which
would result in you not responding to the public's
interest as quickly as you can."

His statements came as PLP MP for Fox Hill
Fred Mitchell criticised government for being
"complicit" in the failure of CLICO (Bahamas).

"By the public record, the Registrar of Insur-
ance, therefore the Government knew six to sev-
en months ago that this company was having
problems with capital. The Government allowed
the CLICO company in Nassau to issue a state-
ment assuring the public and their clients that
there was no connection between the problems in
Trinidad & Tobago and those in Nassau, when the
government by its own admission knew that the
company had a problem with capital.

"The government did nothing to contradict

CLICO public statements,” Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell argued yesterday. "There seems to have
been shocking negligence on the part of the
Bahamas government which has put at risk 30,000
clients of CLICO in Nassau."

When contacted for a response, Mr Laing chose
not to comment.

"If I speak now then you will preempt what
may be done, but I'm not going to comment at the
moment. But I expect you all will hear soon
enough,” he said yesterday.

Before CLICO (Bahamas) was put into liqui-
dation, Registrar of Insurance Lennox McCartney
told Tribune Business that his department had
been in "major" discussions with CLICO
(Bahamas) "since late 2008" regarding their finan-
cial position.

Mr Smith explained that the company’s prob-
lems arose from its investments in the US real
estate market, which collapsed last year due to the
global economic crisis. He disagreed with the
assertion that the problems of CLICO (Bahamas)
could have stemmed from a lack of oversight
during the PLP administration.

"This company was affected by the fall-out in
the credit markets and the real estate markets
in the States and no one, none of the regulators
here or abroad actually saw the strain coming so
I don't think that would be a very fair comment.

"Because up to that point if you look at their
statements they probably looked pretty good.
Your liabilities are well covered by assets that
have been invested here, it's just that we didn't
know that the investment part of it was going to
fall out,” said Mr Smith.

Hopes high of hosting Miss Universe pageant

FROM page one

is successful in its effort to lure
organisers, they anticipate “the
largest number of (Miss Uni-
verse attendees) ever” to enter
the country to see or participate
in the competition.

The prime minister is report-
edly set to make an announce-
ment on the matter once par-
liament approves the bills
tabled Wednesday asking for
the money needed.

The Miss Universe pageant,
now in its 58th year, tradition-
ally sees beauties from around
80 countries worldwide, fol-
lowed closely by international
media and fans, descend on an
exotic venue for about two
weeks.

If The Bahamas is chosen to
host the event Atlantis, Paradise
Island, would be the setting for
the show itself.

However, in what would
essentially be free advertising
for the country, the prospective
pageant queens also will be
filmed and broadcast interna-
tionally as they travel through-
out the archipelago in advance
of the final show.

According to MissUni-
verse.com, in recent years the
event has been televised in over
170 countries.

“This is going to be seen by
near to if not more than one
billion people around the world.
There’s no way you can spend
that kind of money and reach

one billion people...so it’s that
opportunity, that’s what it’s
really all about,” said a tourism
source.

“The most beautiful people
in the world coming to the most
beautiful islands in the world -
it’s a commercial. That’s really
the way we are looking at it,”
they added.

The high probability that the
Bahamas will win the bidding
for the event is reflected in the
fact that government is already
seeking to re-allocate an addi-
tional $2.9 million to the Min-
istry of Tourism towards fund-
ing their efforts in relation to
the whole affair.

The Tribune understands that
The Bahamas’ major competi-
tor in the bidding is Las Vegas,
California.

Despite the popularity of this
location, The Bahamas is said to
have the edge as it is recognised
that Miss Universe has “a great
deal more appeal when it’s
international.”

“Most Americans see it when
it’s in the United States as an
American event and they don’t
tune in as much as when it’s
international. Miss Universe
connotes international and glob-
al so we know we have an
advantage in that regard,”
explained a ministry official.

An added advantage, The
Tribune understands, is the fact
that The Bahamas is in the east
coast time zone, allowing offi-
cial broadcaster NBC to show
the event in that market as it

happens, and the country’s
proximity to the US, which pro-
vides for more convenient
opportunities for travel to
prospective visitors from the
United States, Central and
South America.

“Last year Miss Universe was
in Vietnam. It’s an enormous
cost for people to go to Viet-
nam, it’s not an enormous
expense for them to come to
The Bahamas,” said a source.

The event is known to be
highly popular among Latin
Americans, and with the
Bahamas government having
recently relaxed its visa require-
ments for all South American
countries the ministry is under-
stood to be seeing the event as a
potential opportunity to kick-
start a more lucrative tourism
relationship between The
Bahamas and these countries.

This comes days after Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham gave
a sobering assessment of the
outlook for the Bahamian econ-
omy, which is dependent on
tourism for more than 60 per
cent of GDP, for 2009.

Called for comment on the
possibility that The Bahamas
may be set to host the pageant
yesterday, Minister of Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool Wallace
told The Tribune to “await the
announcement by the prime
minister.”

“We're really trying to
finalise some details on that,”
he added.




JUDGE PARKER

ie

























YOUR JOB !

SOUNDS

INTERESTING! I WANTEP A THANK YOU,

WHAT MADE PLACE TO GROW 3B AND FROM KATHERINE... -
YOU MOVE ROOTS..- ANI I = WHAT I HEAR, THE THAT'S VERY
BACK HERE LIKE THE PEOPLE! © PEOPLE LIKE YOU! REASSURING!

YES! OBVIOUSLY THAT
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NOW LET'S SEE IF
MOM JUMPS QUT OF
HER SKIN!



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‘©1989 Universal Press Syndicate



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The
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uses once only. Each must contain
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words m be at least one nine-letter word.
the main No plurals.
TODAY’S TARGET
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21st YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION
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(1999 date dative davit dictate diva
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Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer



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Hea Sond,

32009. Nori A

“MR.WILSON'S MOTTO IS, ‘IF ITAINT BROKE,
FIX [T ANYWAY.”

















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Difficulty Level * & %%&



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down
1° Pull leg about being in bed 1 Bea socially-acceptable
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The Right Way Is the Sure Way

6 Utterly rude and cross (4) 2 Put out fire (9) South dealer. East has the king, the contract is
10 Set sail on Eastern 3 Put oil on some crane Neither side vulnerable. made, but if West has it, the contract
passage (5) levers (5) | | | | | | || || NORTH goes down.
11 Pays liars to make a 4 They have no settled 15 17 4A9652 In this case, however, it would be
complaint (9) occupation (7) Eee lieaesoed i a ¥A73 wrong for declarer to stake every-
: Su as (8) 5 sales 5 or could be | | | | || | | | #742 thing on the diamond finesse, which
erman city shows angere #85 would give him only about a 50-50
unusual sense (5) 7 Deserted place of et} | | | P| ett | | ft S »
: : WEST EAST chance of succeeding. Instead, he
1 ee oe may be all Z Sale (5) fe [ea | | | z || #83 a7 should adopt a line of play that
alee See ne 25 ¥Q1062 ¥VI84 allows him to avoid the finesse alto-
17 Anumber agreed to be succeed? (10) eel ge ca o Q T5 #10986 gether — one that will make the con-
cea 2 a Si eae | a a Zi a | a fl #KQ104 #97632 tract regardless of who has the king
27 1
19 Went into liquidation when ill-grace (8) ee We ea ye | SOUTH of diamonds. a
: : ee #KQI104 Accordingly, declarer takes West’s
working hard? (7) 14 Sign for a missing || | | || | | h sil | ra : :
21 Small things that cause a letter (10) ¥K95 king-of-clubs lead with the ace and
caemeee es” | a5 de aqumirg EC CCE oe $h03 days tvo rounds of tanps, having
22 Flier appears to steal in (5) fish (8) eee made a mental note that West is
24 Useful people showing 18 Ashare in the plot (9) Across Down The bidding: marked by the opening lead with the
Lu

diplomacy in studies (8) 20 Possibly cleared to Mi 4) Close égeitiar 4: Brafeundniaiee South West North East queen of clubs. South then cashes the
27 Questions are asked when authorise dividend N (4,2,4) person (4) 1¢ Pass 2¢ Pass king and ace of hearts and leads a

such a group activity is payment (7) N | sh , 2 Worthy (9) 4% third heart. East wins with the jack

broadcast (5,4) 21. They prohibit flags (7) > neentve 1) y Opening lead — king of clubs. and returns the ten of diamonds.
28 Not here again after the 23 It’s good in France and Oo. 10 Great enjoyment (5) @ Flower (5) South refuses to try the diamond
start (5) America to get extra 11 Shame (9) 4 Sorrow (7) Some people greatly enjoy taking finesse, as there is now no point in
29 Formerly in older style (4) money (5) es 12. First night of film (8) 5 Ancestry (7) _ finesses — especially when the risking it. Instead, he wins with the
30 Our respect will be 25 Athenian garret (5) misplaced for such an 26 Decapitated their son may Lu 15 Abominable (7) 8 Urgently enthusiastic finesses should be avoided like the saddling West with the lead.
oppressor (10) be (4) 17 Metal wind (6,2,2) plague, and should be taken only West is helpless. If he cashes the
; ; ; instrument (7) 9 Hair style (8) when no better option is available. king of diamonds, it is all over, while
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 19 Deep purplish red (7) | 14 Gesture of Pane us eo ees declarer : : leads a sat a : Sues giving
. . ; 21 Apparent (7 disapproval (6,4) is in four spades. He has four possi- eclarer a tuff-and-discard — his
Across: 1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Across: 1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 a ( A 16 Decorative object (8) ble losers — a heart, two diamonds _ play is equally ineffective.
Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 22 Violent weather (5) ‘

: . : : 18 Invaluable (9) and a club. Since the heart and club Observe that when declarer leads
Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 24 Appeased (8) 1 cig aad hy ff Hie -thitd Heart. Hod t tt
Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 27 Insulting (9) 20 Inform (7) fend hails cl . ot ae te hi hae i . ial OL ae i
Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. 28 Clumsy (5) 21 To hide (7) re a S cowiL (lostae one aug i ie actualy her .
Down: 1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Down: 1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 29 An accepted 23 Express Jamone, not two. ; trick. Sout BS certain to succeed, as
Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 —_—‘ Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 standard (4) willingness (5) Experience Tells us Wat One Way: Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 25 Confidence (5) to tackle this problem is to lead adia- wriggle out of the trap he has laid for
14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20. Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 30 Bavarian leather 26 Knock mond from dummy to the queen. If — them.

Oral, 23 Arc.



19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie.

shorts (10)

unconscious (4)

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
THE TRIBUNE

Sp

ATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28,








PAGE



Bahamas
Davis Cup
team off

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas men’s four-
man team left Miami for
Paraguay today to compete
in the first round of the
American Zone I Davis Cup
tie.

Although the tie is not
scheduled to begin until next
weekend, captain John Far-
rington decided to go a week
earlier to ensure that players
Devin Mullings, Timothy
Neilly, Bjorn Munroe and
Marvin Rolle get acclimatized
to the conditions in Paraguay.

The team will take on the
Paraguay’s team of Ramon
Delgado, Juan-Carlos
Ramirez, Nicolas Salama and
Diego Galeano. The team is
Victor Pecci at the Yachty
Golf Club in Paraguayo,
Lambare.

Last year at the National
Tennis Center, the team of
Delgado, Ricardo Mena,
Ramirez and Juan-Enrique
Crosa defeated the Bahamas’
team of Mark Knowles,
Munnings, Neilly and Rolle
4-1 in the semifinal over the
weekend of April 11-13.

Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association’s president Wes-
ley Rolle said despite losing
last year, he anticipated that
the Bahamas should prevail
this year.

“If they are playing their
same players, we are going to
have our work cut out for us,
but I believe that with the
players we are sending, we
can certainly expect a pretty
good performance,” Rolle
said.

“With a little luck, I think
we can get past these guys.

Four man team
left early to
prepare for tie

But it won’t be easy because
we are playing on the red clay
courts on their home turf. We
will definitely have to play
our best tennis in order to
win.”

Last year, Knowles and
Rolle teamed up to win the
pivotal doubles, but Mullings
and Neilly lost their respec-
tive singles against Delgado
and Mena and Ramirez won
their singles over Neilly and
Rolle.

Knowles has opted not to
travel with the team. Instead,
he has decided to continue
on the ATP men’s tour where
he’s teaming up with Mahesh
Bhupathi from India.

In preparation for the tour-
nament, Rolle said the play-
ers have been playing in satel-
lite tournaments in Florida
and they are eager to play in
the tie.

Munroe, on the other hand,
is coming off the death and
burial of one of his younger
brothers, LaVaughn. But
Rolle said Munroe insisted
that he was prepared to play
and he indicated that his
brother, who also played on
the Davis Cup team three
times, would have preferred
that he did.

“We’re going to go down
there and do our best,” Rolle
said. “As you know, this is
the same team that got us our
of Zone II and into Zone II.
So we're pretty confident that
these guys can get the job

SEE page 12

Wilson enjoys
freshman year

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

“GREAT improvement”
were the first two words
that coach Brent MacDon-
ald used to describe the way
that Bahamian Chadeau
Wilson made his debut on
the Xavier Muskateers
men’s swimming team.

“He’s a great kid, great to
have around our team. He
brings a lot more to the
team than a lot of others,”
said MacDonald, of Wilson,
made the Musketeers swim-
ming team as a walk on.

“He’s always smiling and
always positive. He fits all
the intangibles. He makes
up for a lot of things that
we were lacking. So it’s
good to have him around.”

Wilson helped the Mus-
keteers complete the 2009
Atlantic 10 Swimming and
Diving Championships over
the weekend at the Erie
Community College’s
Flickinger Athletic Center
with a fifth place finish.

For Wilson, he was just
delighted to have made the
necessary adjustments to
swimming in the Bahamas
Swimming Federation meets
at the Betty Kelly Kenning
Aquatic Center to compet-
ing on the collegiate scene.

“It’s really, really com-
petitive and the training has
been very hard,” he pointed
out. “But I’ve been able to
adopt and everything went
very well for me.”

Throughout his freshman
season, Wilson said he was

Chadeau Wilson

able to consistently drop his
times. He produced season’s
best of one minute and 36
seconds in the 100 back-
stroke; 2:21.11 in the 200
back; 1:01.63 in the 100
breaststroke; 2:20.46 in the
200 breaststroke; 57.48 in
the 100 butterfly; 2:03.10 in
the 200 individual medley
and 4:50.12 in the 400 IM.

Wilson, 18, said he was
pleased to have been able
to contribute to their overall
performance at A-10 Con-
ference meet. Based on
what he’s achieved, Wilson
said he’s looking forward to
his sophomore season.

“At first, I was over-
whelmed when I got here,”
said Wilson, who experi-
enced snow for the first
time. “I’ve made the adjust-
ments and I’ve been able to
stay focus in the pool.

SEE page 12

11 é . > ”
zy
_ F LF a } \





2009 ca -_





¢ WITH the Bahamas Football Association getting ready to host the FIFA Congress this
summer at the Atlantis Resort on Paradise Island, The Tribune’s Blast from the Past
takes its readers back in time to when the New Providence Football League was instruct-
ed by international soccer referee Diego De Leo. Remember any of the local players and
officials who participated in the clinic? Also, here’s one of the shots of a local game played
between Tropigas and the Dynamos. Do you remember any of these players in action?



Dave Mackey/Photo

SYLVAIN CLEMENTS, Clarins Branch Manager along with Mrs Clement offer the Clarins gift bags to an AWC
fundraising chairperson, Bev Hall. 130 bags were given to participants of the AWA Home Centre Golf Classic on
February 21st, 2009.



GRAND BAHAMA
ISLAND - In keep with
their desire to become
good corporate citizens
of Grand Bahama, Clar-
ins recently participated
as sponsors of the Ameri-
can Women's Club Golf
Classic which was held
on February 21st at the
Reef Golf Course in
Lucaya.

Not only did the lead-
ing beauty line company
assist as Sapphire Spon-
sors of the event, they
also donated 130 Clarins
gift bags, 71 of which
were men’s bags which
consisted of one Clarins
men product along with a
sun care product anda
lip balm, and 59 women's
bags which consisted of a
Clarins product along
with a sun care and lip
balm.

Sylvain Clement,
Grand Bahama branch
manager was on hand at
the awards ceremony .

“We are pleased to be
helping in some small
way to help make this
worthy charitable event a
success. We are here to
assist in the community
as best we can,” said Mr
Clement.
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Bahamas Davis
Cup team off

FROM page 11

done.”

In the final of Zone III
in June, 2007, Farrington :
captained the team of

Mullings, Rolle, Munroe

and H’Cone Thompson to
a 2-1 victory over Puerto }

Rico to advance to Zone IIT.

In the first round of Zone
II last February at the }
National Tennis Center, the :

team of Knowles, Mullings,

Neilly and Rolle pulled off
decision over }
Venezuela before losing to }
Paraguay in the second }

a 4-1

round.
Depending on the out-
come of the tie next week-

end, the Bahamas will
either play the loser }

Guatemala versus the

Dominican Republic in a }

relegation playoff July 10-

12 or against the winner }
over the same weekend for :
the right to either stay in }
Zone II or a chance to go }
on to play in the final fora }
shot at promotion back to :

Zone One.

The last time the

Bahamas played in Zone

One was in 2003 when we
lost 4-0 to Venezuela to be

demoted to Zone II in

2004.

Wilson enjoys
freshman year

FROM page 11

“This has been a good
year for me. I’m looking }
forward to coming back :

home. I really want to see

what progress I’ve made
here when I compete in }

the Nationals.”

Wilson, a graduate of

Queen’s College and for-
mer Carifta team mem-

ber, is hoping to making

the CCCAN Champi-
onship team that will be
heading to Colombia.
MacDonald, the inter-
im head coach at Xavier,
said when Wilson came

out to try out for the
team, he earned it after ;

adjusting to the training.
“When he first came in,

we didn’t really know
where he was going to fit ;
in on our team as far as }

what his best event was,”
MacDonald pointed out.

“We didn’t find that out

until around mid-season.
He really excelled in the

breaststroke. He could

swim most of the strokes,

so we saw a large drop in }

his times in the IM and he

closed out the season by
swimming very well in }
both the 100 and 200 ;

breastroke and the 200 IM
in our conference meet.”

Although he didn’t |

score the big points, Mac-

Donald said Wilson per- }
formed exceptionally well :
and it only bodes well for }
his final three seasons at }

Xavier.
Wilson, a Natural Sci-

ence major, is the son of }

Larry and Fran Wilson.
He and his father are
talking with coach Mac-

Donald to hopefully get }
the Xavier team to come }
to the Bahamas to train at
the Betty Kelly Kenning :

Aquatic Center.

MacDonald said if it is
feasible, look forward to }
the Musketeers making :
the trip to the Bahamas }

very soon.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

PHOENIX Suns center Robin Lopez, left, puts up a shot as Los Angeles Lakers center Didier Ilunga-Mbenga,

ball game Thursday, Feb. 26, 2009, in Los Angeles.

Bryant’s Lakers beat Shaq’ s Suns

@ BASKETBALL
LOS ANGELES
Associated Press

WITHOUT Steve Nash,
nobody got the ball inside to
Shaquille O’Neal, and that
made the Phoenix Suns a
pushover.

The Los Angeles Lakers
scored 70 points in the first half
and rolled past the Nash-less
Suns 132-106 Thursday night
for their sixth consecutive vic-
tory.
Kobe Bryant had 22 points
and eight rebounds for the Lak-
ers, while O’Neal had 12 points
while taking just seven shots,
and grabbed seven rebounds
for the Suns in the former
teammates’ first meeting since
sharing MVP honors at the All-
Star game.

“Tonight’s game felt like
kind of a trap game because
we are at home and Steve’s not
playing,” Bryant said. “It is
kind of one of those things
where we kind of take the night

Chuck Burton/AP Photo

off. Iwanted to make sure from
the jump that we didn’t.”

Lamar Odom had a team-
high 23 points and Pau Gasol
added 16 points and nine
rebounds for the Lakers, who
own the NBA’s best record at
48-10 and lead the Pacific Divi-
sion by 15 games over the Suns.

Los Angeles’ points tied a
season high and the team made
a season-best 54 of 94 field
goals, bettering the 48 the Lak-
ers hit against Minnesota on
Jan. 30.

“Pretty good team, huh?”
said Suns interim coach Alvin
Gentry, who fell to 4-2. “It’s
tough against this team because
they play a great zone defense
and don’t allow Shaq to get
touches a lot of the time. It’s
tough getting guys touches
when we don’t have Steve out
there. He creates a lot of easy
stuff for everyone, easy shots
for guys on the perimeter.”

Leandro Barbosa scored 18
points and Alando Tucker
added 16 starting in place of

Nash. Jason Richardson added
3

The good feelings shared by
Bryant and O’Neal during All-
Star weekend in Phoenix con-
tinued in their seventh career
head-to-head meeting. Bryant
put his left arm around O’Neal
and thumped him on the chest
with his right fist before tip-off
after teammate Luke Walton
hugged O’Neal.

O’Neal was warmly received
by the crowd at Staples Cen-
ter, where the Lakers improved
to 27-4 and have won four ina
row.

“I was surprised,” he said
about his reception. “I haven’t
really played here in a while. I
respect them and they will
always be a part of my NBA
life.”

The Suns had won four of
their previous five games since
the All-Star break, but they
played without All-Stars Nash
and Amare Stoudemire, putting
them at a decided disadvantage
before the game even started.



Mark J. Terrill/AP Photos

f Congo, defends during the second half of their NBA basket-



LOS ANGELES Lakers forward Josh Powell, right, fouls Phoenix
Suns forward Boris Diaw (3), of France, during the second half of

their NBA basketball game.







NORTH Carolina
State's Dennis
Horner (31) tries
to shoot over
Wake Forest's
Chas McFarland
(13) during the
second half of
Wake Forest's 85-
78 win in an NCAA
college basketball
game in Winston-
Salem, N.C.,
Thursday, Feb. 26,
2009.

No. 13 Wake Forest beats NC State



@ BASKTEBALL
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.
Associated Press

WAKE FOREST blew most of a big lead
before James Johnson saved the game —
and maybe the rest of the season, too.

Johnson had career highs with 28 points
and 18 rebounds to help the 13th-ranked
Demon Deacons dodge another upset bid
from North Carolina State, holding off the
Wolfpack 85-78 on Thursday night.

Ishmael Smith added a season-high 18
points and Chas McFarland had 15 for the
Demon Deacons (21-5, 8-5 Atlantic Coast
Conference), who shot 52.5 percent, held a
42-27 rebounding advantage and led nearly
all the way.

But with memories of last season’s 1-5
collapse still fresh, they allowed most of an
early 15-point lead to slip away to a North
Carolina State team that beat them 82-76
and was looking to pull another stunner.

Johnson wasn’t about to let it happen
again.

“We’ve been working hard since the sum-
mertime,” Johnson said. ““There’s no need to
come out and just lose it now or not play
hard now, when it counts, and then go back
to the drawing board in the summertime, or
keep working while we’re watching every-

body else play in the NCAA tournament.”

He helped them recover in time to
improve to 13-1 at home and win for the
third time in four games. The victory moved
Wake Forest into a three-way tie for third in
the conference standings with No. 12 Clem-
son and No. 23 Florida State.

Tracy Smith scored 18 points to lead five
double-figure scorers for the Wolfpack (15-
11, 5-8), who were denied their second
sweep of Wake Forest in coach Sidney
Lowe’s three seasons.

Johnson had a double-double by halftime
and was 12-of-16 from the field to surpass his
previous top performance of 26 points —
which he matched in the up-and-down
Demon Deacons’ most recent outing, a 101-
91 loss four nights earlier at No. 7 Duke.

“He was a man out there,” high-scoring
guard Jeff Teague said.

Added coach Dino Gaudio: “He would-
n't let us lose.”

The production they received from John-
son and Smith — who finished one point
shy of a career high — made off nights from
two key teammates that much easier to
take.

Teague finished with 12 points — nine
fewer than his average — on 3-of-12 shoot-
ing in his second tough game against N.C.
State, which used a box-and-one defense

to limit him to three shots and 11 points in
the previous meeting.

The Wolfpack “knew they were playing
against an explosive player, a guy that could
put up big numbers,” Lowe said. “Our guys
were really just trying to concentrate on
making it as tough as possible.”

Additionally, freshman Al-Faroug
Aminu missed all six of his shots and had
just three points in his least productive night
of the season.

“It’s good when (Teague) doesn’t play
his very best, and Farouq doesn’t play his
very best, and we can win a basketball
game. That’s huge,” Gaudio said. “If we
can get all of them clicking on the same
cylinders, we know we can be a really good
basketball team.”

Farnold Degand and Ben McCauley both
had 12 points, and Dennis Horner and
Brandon Costner added 10 apiece for N.C.
State, which has lost two of three and
slipped into 10th in the ACC.

The Wolfpack made things interesting
late by getting within two points four times
midway through the second half — the last
coming on McCauley’s layup with 12:15
remaining — and then keeping it within
three points late. Courtney Fells’ 3-pointer
from the left corner made it 74-71 with 2:25
to play.

Fresno State
heats Nevada
65-66

| BASKETBALL

FRESNO, Calif.
Associated Press

SYLVESTER SEAY

scored 28 points, including
? two free throws that capped a
i rare five-point play, as Fresno

State held off Nevada 68-66

Thursday night.

Last-place Fresno State
(12-17, 3-10 WAC) needed a

missed 3-pointer at the buzzer
i by Like Babbitt to seal the
? victory.

Nevada (16-11, 8-5) had its

} three-game winning streak
? snapped and lost for the first
i time in eight tries against
? Fresno State.

The play that put the Bull-
dogs ahead came with 1:01

? remaining. Nedeljko Gol-
i ubovic hit a 3-pointer in Bab-
i? bitt’s face just as Seay drew a
? foul on Malik Cooke under
i the basket. Seay hit both free
? throws as Fresno State turned

a one-point deficit into a 66-

i 62lead.

Seay scored 20 of his points

in the second half, including
? one stretch when he hit three
? straight 3-pointers. Golubovic

added 18 points and shot 4-

for-7 behind the arc.

Fresno State coach Steve
Cleveland picked up his 200th

: career victory with the Bull-

dogs’ first win over Nevada

i since Jan. 18, 2006.

Babbitt led Nevada with 18

i points and teammate Malik

Cooke added 16.
Fresno State guard Dwight
O’Neil played for the first

? time since Jan. 28. He missed
? the past seven games and had
? been suspended since Jan. 31,
? the day after he was jailed on

a warrant for driving on a sus-

pended or revoked license.

O’Neil served six days in

Fresno County Jail and was
; released Feb. 5.

A starter through the first
19 games, O’Neil came off the

i bench for the first time and
i finished with nine points.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



PORT

INBRIEF

Pacman'’s next
football team will
he on reality TV

mg FOOTBALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WRITER



ADAM “Pacman” Jones
landed a new team Friday.
Sort of.

On the opening day of
the NFL’s free agent sign-
ing period, Jones instead
was on vacation in Puerto
Rico and talking about his
role on the upcoming reali-
ty TV show “Pros vs. Joes
4: All Stars.” His market-
ing representative refused
to allow Jones to comment
about what’s next in his real
playing career, but earlier
in the interview Jones
declared, “I’m definitely
not at the end of my career.
I’m basically just getting it
going.”

The 25-year-old Jones is
by far the youngest among
the six NFL and six NBA
stars who will compete
against regular guys in the
latest installment of the
Spike TV show. All others
are either retired or close
to it.

“Tt’s a good show,” Jones
said. “Hopefully I can bring
a little excitement to it.”

Jones’ NFL future is in
doubt because of his off-
field issues and mediocre
performance on the field
last season.

He was a star cornerback
and kick returner for the
Tennessee Titans in 2005
and ’06, but the NFL sus-
pended him for the entire
2007 season because of an
accumulation of legal prob-
lems. He was traded to the
Dallas Cowboys in 2008,
then was suspended for six
more games following a
fight with his team-provid-
ed bodyguard. The Cow-
boys announced they were
dumping him soon after the
season ended, weeks before
the move actually could be
made. His on-field play was
a factor, too, as he had no
interceptions and a pedes-
trian 4.5 yards per punt
return.

In the TV show, Jones
will be reunited with for-
mer Tennessee teammate
Steve McNair. Tim Brown,
Simeon Rice, Priest Holmes
and Rich Gannon are the
other NFL players who will
take on the Joes in three
skills competitions and a
three-on-three scrimmage
in each episode. There will
be four episodes per sport,
a change from previous sea-
sons when multiple sports
were played in each
episode.

“Tm going to make sure I
do my job,” Jones said. “I
don’t want no balls caught
on me.”

A-Rod still waiting
for MLB meeting

@ BASEBALL
TAMPA, Fla.
Associated Press

YANKEES third baseman
Alex Rodriguez is still waiting
to meet with Major League
Baseball officials, who want
to discuss his use of perfor-
mance-enhancing drugs from
2001-03 while with Texas.

MLB wants to speak with
Rodriguez about security
issues involving a trainer from
the Dominican Republic and
the cousin the three-time
MVP said injected him with a
banned substance called
“boli.”

Rodriguez didn’t make the
trip to Fort Myers for the
Yankees spring training game
Friday against Minnesota.
Instead, he worked out with a
group of players at Stein-
brenner Field that included
Derek Jeter, Johnny Damon,
Hidkei Matsui and Mark
Teixeira.

After the workout,
Rodriguez said no meeting
was scheduled for Friday.

Yankees manager Joe
Girardi said Rodriguez will
play in spring training games
Saturday and Sunday.
Rodriguez then is scheduled
to join the Dominican
Republic national team to
prepare for the World Base-
ball Classic.



Rockets rout Cavaliers 93-74

Cav’s Wallace out
with broken foot



HOUSTON Rockets’ Luis Scola (4), of Argentina, loses the ball out of bounds under pressure from

Cleveland Cavaliers’ Daniel Gibson during the second half.

Pat Sullivan/AP Photos

CLEVELAND Cavaliers’ Anderson Varejao (17), of Brazil, shoots between Houston Rockets’ Shane
Battier, left, and Yao Ming (11), of China, during the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday,

Feb. 26, 2009, in Houston.

IN THIS Nov. 2,
2008 file photo,
New York Knicks’
Stephon Marbury
watches the Knicks’
NBA basketball
game against Mil-
waukee Bucks from
the bench at Madi-
son Square Garden
in New York. Mar-
bury was waived
Tuesday by the
New York Knicks,
ending a turbulent
five-year stint in
which the former
All-Star couldn't
lead his hometown
- team to a single
Stephen Chernin/AP Photo playoff victory.

Marbury signs
with Celtics

@ BASKETBALL
WALTHAM, Mass.
Associated Press

THE BOSTON CELTICS signed Stephon Marbury on Friday,
bringing the former New York Knicks headache aboard in their
attempt to repeat as NBA champions.

Marbury cleared waivers on Friday morning, reported to the
Celtics for a physical and was expected to be in uniform on Friday
night for Boston’s game against the Indiana Pacers.

“We are very excited to have a player of Stephon’s caliber join-
ing our team,” Celtics general manager Danny Ainge said. “Our
entire organization is confident in the belief that Stephon can play
an important role in helping us to win another championship.”

Marbury, a former All-Star guard who alienated Knicks man-
agement, teammates and fans, was waived on Tuesday after he
agreed to a buyout of his $20.8 million contract. The Celtics were
expected to offer him a pro-rated share of the veteran’s $1.3 million
minimum.

Marbury, who turned 32 last week, hasn’t played a regular-sea-
son game in more than a year.

He arrived at the team’s practice facility in Waltham just before
noon, about 90 minutes after clearing waivers. He could be seen
from the public area of the workout facility wearing a white, long-
sleeved T-shirt and sweat pants, jumping up and down as he took
the practice court, smiling and chest-bumping with several people
wearing Celtics gear.

After few minutes, the automatic shades were lowered.

Marbury will back up Rajon Rondo at point guard, a role Sam
Cassell served when the Celtics won their 17th NBA title last sea-
son. Eddie House, who is more of a shooter, has been forced into
the role this year; Cassell did not play in a game for Boston this year
before he was traded to the Sacramento Kings and released last
week.

Marbury took a long leave of absence from the Knicks when his
father died in December 2007, then had season-ending ankle
surgery and has not played since Jan. 11, 2008.

He returned to the Knicks in training camp, but when the sides
tried to negotiate a buyout early in the season, Marbury at first
refused to surrender any more than $1 million of his $20.8 million
salary and the team told him to stay home until it could be com-
pleted.

Marbury was the center of controversy during his five years in
New York, feuding with coaches and skipping games.



Freezers
Refrigerators
Washers & Dryers
Television & Stereo

BEST REY

@ BASKETBALL
HOUSTON
Associated Press

LEBRON JAMES drove to
the basket in the fourth quar-
ter, trying to spark a last-ditch
comeback for the Cavaliers
against the Houston Rockets.

Yao Ming was there to block
his dunk attempt and James
twisted his ankle, a fitting end to
a terrible night for Cleveland.

James went an entire game
without an assist for the first
time in his career and the Cava-
liers lost Ben Wallace for four to
six weeks in a 93-74 loss to
Houston.

The Rockets, meanwhile,
showed they just might be con-
tenders in the Western Confer-
ence.

Yao scored 28 points and
Ron Artest added 15 while
harassing James on defense
most of the night, leading the
Rockets to their six consecutive
win and ninth straight at home.

“Tt is a big win,” said Yao,
who hit 13 of 15 shots despite
Cleveland’s constant double-
teams. “We played against one
of the best quality teams in this
league. That is a really good test
for us to see how far we can go.”

James scored 21 points, but
went 7-for-21 from the field
with three turnovers. He left for
good with 4:03 left, the only
time in 493 NBA games (count-
ing playoffs) he failed to record
an assist.

The Cavaliers had season-low
point totals in the first (11) and
third (10) quarters, and their 34
percent shooting (27-for-80) was
also a season worst.

“T can’t remember the last
time I didn’t have an assist,”
James said, “but as a team, we
didn’t move the ball at all.”

To make matters worse, the
Cavaliers lost their best interior
defender when Wallace broke
his leg in the second quarter
after Yao accidentally kicked
him.

“Tl definitely be back for the

Bedroom Pieces

Living Room Sets
Computer Desks & Chairs
SY eles

playoffs, ’m hoping to come
back before then,” Wallace said
after breaking his right fibula.

Von Wafer scored 19 points
and Luis Scola added 14 points
and nine rebounds for the
Rockets. Houston had 25
assists, its sixth straight game
with 20 or more, and went 8-
for-19 from 3-point range.

But the Rockets are more sat-
isfied with their defense lately;
they’ve held their last six oppo-
nents to an average of 83.6
points.

“You may get into the sec-
ond round (of the playoffs), but
if you want to make a serious
run and be a serious con-
tender,” said Wafer, “you’ve
got to be able to continue to
play defense. We are trying to
come together as a unit.”

Mo Williams also scored 21
for the Cavs, who had a five-
game winning streak snapped.

Cleveland looked as bad as
it did in a 92-77 loss in Houston
last season — James had 32 in
that one, but the Cavs shot 39.7
percent.

“We just can’t seem to get
into a good flow against the
Houston team,” James said. “A
lot of credit has to go to them,
they are a very good team.
Offensively, we couldn’t make a
shot and we could never get in
any rhythm.”

The Rockets led 45-40 at half-
time, and had assists on their
first five baskets of the second
half. James, meanwhile, tried a
no-look, over-his-head pass to
Anderson Varejao later in the
third period, but the ball sailed
out of bounds.

The Cavs shot 5-for-17 from
the field and coughed up five
turnovers in the third quarter
to trail 68-50.

James took a rest and
returned with 7:21 left in the
game, but the Rockets never
lost control. Yao blocked James
on a dunk try and Wafer fin-
ished off Cleveland with a 3-
pointer at the other end for an
85-68 lead.

RU MOU

T PRICES OF THE YEAR!

aye

Saturday Feb. 26th, 8:30 — 5:30, Village Rd.

Master

Technicfans

APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS


PAGE 16, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



thescene



by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP



NASSAU EVENTS



AT CHAPTER ONE book store in Oakes Field: Deandre Smith, a biochemistry student at the College of the Bahamas; attorney and author Anthony
Thompson, former deputy manager of the Bahamas Monetary Authority, a forerunner to the Central Bank of the Bahamas; Judy VC Munroe, for-
mer president of the Caribbean Bottling Company, and first woman president of the Chamber of Commerce; Celeste Gray, a biochemistry student

at COB.

et a i
Pat
“he aos:

ACKLINS ISLANDER, Dr Hervis L Bain Jr, who designed the national coat of arms of the Bahamas and made a significant contribution to the
design of the national flag in 1971; Anthony Thompson; attorney Gregory IH Cottis, Olivia Knowles Cottis Law.

ATTORNEY
Anthony
Thompson;
Adrianna Allen,
a Spanish
teacher at St
John’s College;
attorney David
Allen Jr.





CAPTURED



BERNARD K
Bonaby, secre-
tary of the Gam-
ing Board and
former commis-
sioner of police;
Basil L Sands,
chairman of
British American
Financial and
managing part-
ner of PKF Con-
sulting; attorney
Cecil Hilton,
Cecil Hilton and
Company.

CAMERA

THOMPSON LAUNCHES

ON January 29, Anthony
Thompson launched his new
book, An Economic History of
the Bahamas at a reception at
the Chapter One Bookstore at
the College of the Bahamas.

During his address, Mr
Thompson said that when con-
sidering the economic history
of the Bahamas, three impor-
tant things should be noted.

He said these are:

e That history repeats itself

e That the country’s 18th cen-
tury motto — Expulsis Piratis
(pirates expelled) Restitutia
Commercia (commerce
restored) — has become “Pirates
Restored, Commerce Expelled”

e That the country has no
philosophy of nation building

In terms of the first point,
that history repeats itself, Mr
Thompson noted that the reces-
sion the country now finds itself
in is a repeat of the situation in
the early 1930s.

“Thank God following all
recessions or depressions, con-
sumer demand builds up for
more goods and services, and
recovery takes place. The
Bahamas has been able to
bounce back from adversity into
prosperity over the years,” he
said.

On the second point, Mr
Thompson noted that for cen-
turies, the Bahamas was con-
trolled by pirates. Although
they were driven out by British
governors, the quest for survival
has made “pirates out of our
people” over the years.

“We took advantage of the
misfortunes of others and some-
times, by committing acts which
may have been legal in our
country but illegal elsewhere. I
refer to rum running, wrecking,
the transshipment of drugs, the
attracting of tax dodgers, and
illegal gambling, including the
numbers racket.

“Most notably, there have
been various Commissions of
Inquiry. In 1967 the Commis-
sion into gambling showed that
members of the former govern-
ment received direct pecuniary
benefits from the operation of
casinos.

“The Commissions of Inquiry
into Bahamasair, Batelco and
the Hotel Corporation demon-
strated that some of the offi-
cials involved therewith bene-
fited from slack practices, the
awarding of contracts and influ-
ence peddling.

“Today we are exposed to
much commentary regarding
alleged corruption in various
departments of government and
in the trade union movement.

“The pirates may not have
been expelled,” he said.



On his point about nation
building, Mr Thompson noted
that as a British colony, in the
17th century economic thought
in the Bahamas was dominat-
ed by mercantilism and over-
seen by Crown agents. There
was therefore no plan to devel-
op the economy for the resident
population.

He said that although foreign
investors were attracted under
the UBP, very little was done
in terms of national develop-
ment; “they owned and con-
trolled the retail and services
sectors of the economy and
until 1967 had the political pow-
er to sustain their economic
dominance.”

In 1972 the PLP stated its
intent to develop tourism, main-
tain the tax haven status, grow
the banking sector, push for-
ward with industrial diversifi-
cation, promote agriculture and
fisheries development to a self-
sufficiency level and Bahami-
anise the country, Mr Thomp-
son said, adding that the FNM
followed many of these policies.

“Fifty-four years later tourism
is severely challenged, and the
pressure of the international
community at the turn of the
21st century has devastated the
second industry. The industrial
diversification scheme which at
one time boasted of oil refin-
ing, cement manufacturing, rum
production, aragonite mining,
two salt producing plants at
Inagua and Long Island, a phar-
maceutical plant, and a pipe and
steel company have been left
only with a transshipment ter-
minal, one salt plant, and small
rum and beer plants.”

Despite the Bahamianisation
policy, Mr Thompson said, the
economy is not significantly
impacted by local entrepre-
neurship. He added that in the
tourist industry, there are few
Bahamian owned businesses
and the industrial sector has
attracted very little local own-
ership interest.

“Our crime problem, the
unacceptable educational
results, the large number of
young people in our country,
the growing number of illegal
immigrants, the rationalisation
of land ownership and property
development schemes includ-
ing anchor projects, the strug-
gling small business sector, the
density of the population in
New Providence with its
restricted land mass, the anti-
quated inequitable tax system,
and the traffic congestion in the
capital, all of these cry out for a
bi-partisan national develop-
ment plan,” Mr Thompson said.

JUSTICE JOSEPH
Alfred (retired); Dr
Elwood Donaldson,
a family practitioner
and former PLP
member of parlia-
ment for Kilarney
who along with 18
others, ushered in
Majority Rule in
1967. In 1970 he
was part of the Dis-
sident Eight who
formed the FNM; Dr
Rudolph B Dorsett —
internal medicine
and cardiology spe-
cialist. Dr Dorsett
recently returned
from the US and
practices at Skoorb
Medical Clinic, East
Street South.





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PAGE 1

Bahamian businessman offers to ‘help out’ W endall Jones N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.81SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER PLENTYOF SUN HIGH 82F LOW 68F The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY www.tribune242.com Assurances on CLICO under fire Moves under way to resolve NIB payments dispute – media boss SENTENCEDFORFRAUD Hopes high of Bahamas hosting 2009 Miss Universe pageant COURT APPEARANCE: (from left outside of court where they were sentenced for fraud-related charges. The three has been accused of conspiring to commit forgery and of forging the signature of John William Lefler in relation to five condominium units at the Palms of Love Beach, West Bay Street. FORFULLSTORY, SEE PAGE 3 T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net JONES Communications CEO Wendall Jones said that his company and the National Insurance Board are co-operating in good faith to resolve over $430,000 that his company owes in back payments to NIB. Brushing aside the offer made by Arawak Homes CEO Franklyn Wilson to assist him if necessary in covering the cost of these back payments, Mr Jones said he does not need anyone to “fight my battles” or pay his bills. Jones Communication Network Ltd is responsible for the publication of The Bahama Journal (in affiliation with the Communicators and Associates), JCN TV channel 14, and LOVE 97FM radio station. Contacted for comment yesterday, Mr Jones remained tight-lipped on details, explaining that his company and the National Insurance Board (NIB “good faith.” Jones Communications acting ‘in good faith’ n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net A LEADING Bahamian businessman yesterday offered to “help out” media boss Wendall Jones as he faced court action over unpaid National Insurance Board contributions. As the future of the Jones Communications’ empire could hang in the balance, chairman of Arawak Homes Franklyn Wilson said he is willing to invest funds in the media house if Mr Jones is unable to meet court ordered back payments to NIB. On Thursday, Mr Jones pleaded guilty before Magistrate Susan Sylvester to owing NIB over $430,000. Having agreed to pay 40 per cent of the sum $180,000 and the remainder over a twoyear period, concerns have been raised among some of Mr Jones’ colleagues over whether this latest fiasco could spell the end for the media company. As highlighted by Mr Wilson, Jones Communications Ltd, with its radio station, newspaper and television station, plays a “very important role” in media in the country today. SEE page six Franklyn Wilson SEE page six n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THEBahamas is very close to pulling off a massive tourism coup playing host to the 2009 Miss Universe pageant. The event, scheduled for August, draws an audience of many millions of people worldwide and could bring in a similar amount in revenue for the country at a time when the economy is flag ging, according to Ministry of Tourism sources. The Tribune understands that an “extraordinarily good” bid has been made by the ministry to the Miss Universe Organisation, which runs the event, leaving local officials optimistic about their chances. “We are 90 per cent likely to get it,” said a tourism source. “While it’s not signed, we think we are way down the road in terms of signing off on it.” One high-level source said that if The Bahamas n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net PLANS to step up counter-narcotics efforts, which lost steam in 2008, were discussed by Bahamian and United States officials in a biannual meeting of the Joint Drug Task Force yesterday. An understaffed and underfunded Bahamian Drug Secretariat hampered momentum in the fight against drug trafficking, and destruction caused by Hurricane Ike in Great Inagua last September exacerbated by the slowdown, according to the US government’s International Narcotics Control Strategy Report 2009. Plans to step up the war on drug smuggling include integrating Creole speakers in the Bahamian Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU Haitian National Police officers to be stationed in Great Inagua to develop informaTalks on stepping up anti-drug fight n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net JOSEPH Pratt, husband of PLP deputy leader Cynthia “Mother” Pratt, had his left leg amputated in hospital yesterday, the result of a long battle with diabetes. According to his wife, Mr Pratt is "resting well" in the Princess Margaret Hospital, despite the ordeal. "They did the surgery and they did amputate the left leg," the PLP MP for St Cecilia said last night. Cynthia Pratt’s husband has leg amputated SEE page six SEE page nine SEE page six Cynthia Pratt n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net IMMIGRATION State Minister Branville McCartney said he is open to an independent investigation into claims of abuse and inhumane conditions at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre. However, he firmly stated that internal investigations into recent allegations of abuse and a hunger protest of three Cuban detainees proved that the claims were false. "From our investigations I can say there is not one person on a hunger strike in the Detention Centre as of 5 o'clock (yesterday state minister said. While he had not personally visited the Detention Centre to dispel these claims, he said he received assurances from the head of the holding facility that the allegations published earlier this week are untrue. "I haven't gone personally but I have spoken personally to the person in charge of the Detention Centre on more than one occasion today, on more than one occasion yesterday but I have not gone down (there Minister open to independent probe into Detention Centre abuse claims SEE page six n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamian public was given a level of comfort about the financial stability of CLICO (Bahamas not to be absolutely correct", former Minister of State James Smith told The Tribune yester day. Although earlier this month, current State Finance Minister Zhirvargo Laing told Tribune Business he planned to meet CLICO (Bahamas executives to discuss “major regulatory concerns” surrounding the company’s financial posi tion, made urgent by the bailout of its parent firm which had guaranteed a $57 million loan that accounts for 59 per cent of the Bahamian insurer’s assets. But up to a week ago the country was given assurances of the future of the company by executives, frustrating policy holders and creditors who were blind-sided by a Supreme Court Order issued this week to place SEE page nine Former Minister criticises financial stability claims Bahamian public given ‘incorrect’ level of comfort James Smith

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A 24 per cent rise in reports of child abuse a nd recent disclosures of an incest problem in the Family Islands are further evidence that the g overnment must immediately enact the Child Protection Act and implement a sex offenders registry, it has been claimed. Clever Duncombe, spokesman for the father’s rights advocacy group Bahamian F athers for Children Everywhere, said there can be no more “excuses.” E arlier this week, the National Council for the Protection of Children revealed that there were 719 cases of child abuse in New Provid ence alone in 2008. In 2005, there were 581, in 2006, 618 and in 2007, 545. T he council warned that incidences of abuse, which can be emotional, verbal, physical or sexual, or manifest as neglect or abandonment, are likely to rise again over the next year due to the economic hardship being suffered by a growing number of Bahamian fami lies. Y esterday Mr Duncombe pointed out that e ach “case” of child abuse may in fact involve more than one child, therefore making the statistics more disturbing than some m ay recognise. He said that new strategies are needed if the government and society are going to startr educing the number of children suffering abuse. A mong these, he said, is implementing the Child Protection Act, passed in 2007 towards the end of the PLP’s term in office. T hat Act provides for, among other things, stricter penalties for abusers and a legal obligation on the part of all people who are aware of abuse to report such crimes against children. According to the Office of the Attorn ey General, the Act would bring the Bahamas into line with principles outlined in the UN c onvention on the rights of children. Since taking office, Minister of State for Social Development Loretta Butler Turner has said that the government is reviewing the legislation. M eanwhile, in June 2008 Ms Butler Turner suggested that significant funding would ben eeded to enact the law, which the governm ent now hopes to “phase in.” M r Duncombe yesterday called this a “flims y excuse.” “Exactly how much would it take to implement this Act in its entirety? Do we have a cost? We just borrowed $150 million from the C hinese the other day to build roads and we continue to borrow recklessly . . . why can’t we borrow the money if that’s a problem?” H e said that “outdated social policies and bad laws” are contributing to the likelihood of B ahamian children suffering abuse. Were the Bahamas to follow the example set in developed countries like the US and place s ex offenders on a register which would allow members of the public to find out where such individuals live, the level of abuse could be reduced, he suggested. “We need pictures and posters to be posted o n these individuals who’ve already been charged with these heinous crimes,” he said. M r Duncombe claimed that people who are concerned about child abuse are “losing confidence in the system” because in its present form it is not designed to truly protect the interests of children and properly punish those w ho offend. He said he hopes that recent media coverage o f the child abuse crisis facing the country will prick the heart of at least one politician.” You need at least one to be mindful and r aise this issue. Just one. But we can’t find one. There’s something fundamentally wrong with that,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE B AHAMIANSare being invited to a free concert next week featuring The Edwards Twins, rated among t he best celebrity impersonators in the world. The concert, to be held at the Rainforest Theatre on Cable Beach on Sunday, March 8, is the Twins’ way ofs aying thanks to the Bahamas for hosting their show for the past three years. E ddie Edwards, famous for his Cher and Barbra Streisand impersonations, told The Tribune: “This is a special appreciation concert for the Bahamas, where wea re now into our third year. “All Bahamians showing ID at the door will be a llowed in free for a new show we have arranged featuring my brother Anthony as Tom Jones and other interesting changes.” E ddie’s show-stopping impersonation of Cher will also be developed, including costume changes and new numbers. “We are back in Nassau until August,” Eddie added. “However, we will be taking a few weeks off in April toa ppear in the America’s Got Talent show. “We have enjoyed our time in Nassau so much that we thought we’d like to have a Bahamian Appreciation Day, so we hope lots of local people turn up for the show.” T he Edwards Twins are based in Las Vegas, but their seasons at the Rainforest Theatre have proved a big d raw for tourists and locals. Reports of child abuse on the rise INSIGHT For the stories behind the ne ws, read Insight on Monda ys THE EDWARDS TWINS HOST FREE CONCERT

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net MINISTER of State for Immigration Branville McCartney has vowed to investigate claims made by a single mother who feared for her life when u nidentified armed immigration o fficers burst into her home. V iolet Hanna, 41, was with her seven-year-old daughter Amber when officers demanded entry into their home on Price Street, Nassau Village, while they were asleep just after 4am on Tuesday. Ms Hanna, a Bahamian citizen, said the officers never identified themselves as being from the Immigration Department and declined her offer to see her passport. They broke down the gate to her backyard to gain access to the back door, while other officers banged violently on the front door and more stood outside the house. T heir aggressive manner put Ms Hanna and her child in fear of their lives. The single mother told The Tribune : “I understand what they are trying to do, but the way they did it made me afraid for my life. I’m still terrified.” V V o o m m i i t t i i n n g g Amber, who was crying and vomiting in fear as officers shouted at her mother, was so shaken by the incident she stayed home from school that day and insists on holding her mother’s hand while in the house. She has been staying with her grandparents since the incident. Minister of Immigration Branville McCartney called The Tribune yesterday in an effort to contact Ms Hanna so that he can personally oversee an investigation into the incident. He said: “This is something we take very seriously and especially as she is a young single woman who has a child, who she said was upset and vomiting and very frightened, that is not the way we do things in the Immigration Department. That is not the order of the day. “We must go about things the right way without causing any harm to persons, and if it is not the right way I would like to find out who the persons responsible are and deal with them accordingly.” Mr McCartney has now arranged to meet with Ms Hanna and has vowed to oversee an investigation into the matter in an effort to root out illicit behaviour by immigration officers. n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter AN attorney was one of two men fined $7,500 by a j udge yesterday in connection with fraud charges surround ing alleged improprieties con n ected to several condominiums. A third man was sentenced to five years imprisonment on 24 fraud charges dating backt o 2003. Lawyer Fedner Dorestal and brothers Bryan Knowles and Shayne Knowles were accused of conspiring to com m it forgery and of forging the signature of John William L efler in relation to five condominium units at the Palms of Love Beach, West Bay Street. The men were also accused of forging and submitting con veyances for the units and having a forged Nassau Industrial Limited Seal on July 25, 2003. It was further alleged that the men obtained a $40,000 loan from First Caribbean Bank on John F Kennedy Drive. In early January, Bryan Knowles was convicted on 24 counts of fraud, including con spiracy to commit fraud, forgery, uttering a forged document and fraud by false pre tenses in relation to the case. Shayne Knowles was only convicted on two counts of fraud while lawyer Dorestal was convicted on one count of fraud. Acting Justice Elliot Lockhart yesterday sentenced Bryan Knowles to five years imprisonment on each of the 24 counts for which he had been convicted. The sentences are to run concurrently. In sentencing Shayne Knowles, Acting Justice Lock h art noted that according to the evidence, Knowles had minimal involvement in the matter. Shayne Knowles was fined $7,500. Failure to payt he fine will result in a two year prison term for each of the counts. H e was also ordered to per form 500 hours of community service. Knowles was given 30 days to pay the fine. Dorestal was also fined $ 7,500. Failure to pay the fine will result in a two year prison term. B B a a i i l l Attorney Michael Kemp, who represented the threem en, also requested that Shayne Knowles and Dorestal be released on bail until their fines are paid. The judge granted the two men bail in the sum of $10,000 with two sureties. A female relative of the Knowles brothers was also brought before the court yes terday after assistant director of legal affairs and lead prosecutor in the case Franklyn Williams claimed that she had assaulted him while he was on his way to court. The woman was taken to the Central Police Station where she was detained until after the sentencing. She denied physically assaulting the prosecutor, claiming that she told him: "This is a big deal." Acting Justice Lockhart said that the matter was being considered as a contempt of court issue. After talking briefly with Mr Kemp, the woman apoligised. Acting Justice Lockhart accepted the apology, noting that Mr Williams could still pursue the matter further if he wants to. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 3 INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News.............................P1,2,3,5,6,9,16 Editorial/Letters. ......................................... P4 Advts .................................................. P7,8,10 Sports.............................................P11,12,13 Comics ...................................................... P14 W eather ..................................................... P15 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES Police seize i llegal firearm from apartment T eacher badly injured when airbag activates Big load of pear ock spills after truck overturns In brief POLICE seized an illegal firearm and a large assortment of ammunitionf rom an apartment on Fire Trail Road on Friday. Officers of the Central Detective Unit searched the apartment at 2am and founda laptop case which contained a .40 handgun and ammunition a for .38 handgun, an AK-47 assault rifle and a .40 handgun. Two men, aged 26 and 28, were taken into police custody. Trio in custody after shotgun discovered THREE men are in police custody following the d iscovery of a black sawn-off shotgun inside a home on Palm Tree Avenue shortlya fter 11am on Thursday. Mobile Division officers were acting on a tip and went to the home where they found the shotgun. T he three men are 18, 20 and 30 years old. Minister vows to probe claims of armed immigration officers bursting into home S I NGLEMOTHERSAYSSHEFEAREDFORLIFEAFTERGROUPCONFRONTEDHER A YOUNG teacher suffered serious facial and eye injuries when the airbag in his car activated without warning, causing him to swerve into a roadside kerb. Adrian Gibson, 24, who writes a weekly column for The Tribune, was driving in Fox Hill with a friend when the airbag exploded, striking him hard in the face. He was taken to Princess Margaret Hospital, where he was kept overnight with facial bruising and a damaged right eye. “I look like I’ve been in a boxing match,” Mr Gibson told The Tribune, “My eye is closed and filled with blood and the doctors are planning to do another scan on it today.” Mr Gibson was having a lively discussion with his friend when the incident occurred. He believes he may have struck the centre of the streering wheel while gesticulating, causing the airbag to activate. As it burst into his face, he swerved into the kerb, threw open the door and escaped into the street. His friend was not injured. Mr Gibson said it was only after the incident that he discovered that his car, a 1996 Toyota Corolla, was apparently prone to airbag difficulties. “If anyone else in Nassau has a car of this type and year then I would suggest they get the airbag checked out,” he said. Attorney one of two men fined in connection with fraud allegations Branville McCartney We must go about t hings the right way without causing any harm to persons, and if it is not the r ight way I would l ike to find out who the persons responsible are and d eal with them a ccordingly.” n BY DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A 30-ton load of pea-rock spilled at the airport roundabout on Friday when a dump truck turned over near the domestic terminal at the Grand Bahama International Airport. Traffic at the roundabout at East Mall Drive came to a standstill as firefighters worked to free the driver and his passenger from the dump truck, which toppled on its side shortly after 9am. Driver Maxwell Campbell, 22, and passenger Ramon Campbell, of Campbell’s Trucking and Loading Services, were rushed by ambulance to Rand Memorial Hospital for treatment. The driver was said to have been seriously injured. His con dition was not known up to press time. In addition to the pea rock, diesel had also spilled from the gas tank onto the road, presenting hazardous conditions for motorists. Although investigations are continuing into the accident, police believe that excessive speed may have been a factor. Three persons have died so far on the streets of Grand Bahama this year. Police are advising motorists to obey the speed limits and drive with care and caution.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Your recent announcement “increased air transport cost end delivery to family islands”, sad day, regrettable indeed! Liv ing on a family island; the exciting days were mailboat and “plane day!” The arrival of the mailbag, promptly collected, taken to the post office, sorted, persons hurried to their homes, laden down with rolled-up copies of The Tribune, Guardian, Herald, which was also complemented with magazines, newspapers collected from the US Coast G uard, Navy, Sea Bees and Pan Am bases. The availability of these materials assisted many students in this quest for knowledge! I hope that management will continue sending “rolled-up newspapers” via the post office to our family island libraries, t hey are sorely needed! HAMILTON JONES Nassau, February, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. K indly allow me space in your column to address a vexing problem. I am a civil servant who is at her wit’s end with the service of other public serving members, particularly, members within the Department of Health. Like many other people, I am diagnosed with a disease, namely diabetes, and have to be treated for my condition, which when paid out of my pocket and small salary, is a costly condition. Additionally, like other civil servants, I partake in the use of the government’s facilities such as the health-care at the public clinics and PMH. I am one of many civil ser vants who will boldly say that the service rendered by persons employed in these areas is upsetting. Most health care professionals employed by the government display nonchalant, hostile and in some cases verbally rude attitudes towards their fellow civil servants and members of the general public. This is unacceptable. Civil servants are privileged to benefit from the government’s facilities, which prove useless many times due to the mediocre service of its employees. When criticised by members of the public and fellow civil servant, these health care professionals decide to hold the public hostage by not rendering a service that they were employed to do; yet they eagerly await “pay day”, which one can consider an official government holiday, because so many government offices seem to shut down! Needless to say, complaining to a supervisor when seeking medical attention is done with dismay. Phone calls are never returned, verbal complaints fall on deaf ears and a cry for help goes unheard. The lack of compassion and privacy is unbelievable. Seeking further higher assistance from the Minister of Health proves fruitless! While awaiting service, many civil servants complain of the poor treatment and the bad attitudes being displayed by members of the Public Health Department. How long must this go on, minister? Respect from one colleague to another is expected and should be displayed at all times. Lack of staff and medicines are understandable, but should not be tolerated when performing public service. It is actions like these that cause members of the general public to complain and insult the workers in this profession,w ho in turn retaliate by most t imes offering poor service. M y health, your health, our health is important. Assistance and service from health care professionals is appreciated once rendered. Service is a must, and with that in mind, all civil servants must thrive to give the public their utmost. Thank you. PATIENT Fleming Street Clinic Nassau, February 25, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm Obama’s Olympian feat on the economy IF PRESIDENT Obama were an Olympic diver, the degree of difficulty in what he’s trying to do would be off the charts. He’s attempting to jump-start the economy, fix the banking system, address the mortgage crisis, reform healthcare, save the automobile industry, catalyze a new green energy sector, invest more in education, and establish a cap-and-trade system to fight climate change. Oh yes, and start to tackle the nation’s yawning fiscal deficit. Casual observers of politics can be forgive n if they are confused, for the new administ ration’s economic message seems to translate to this: Hard times are upon us, so we need to loosen our belt. But when the recovery comes, it will be time to suck in our gut and cinch things up again. That no doubt seems counterintuitive to many. And yet, there’s an economic methodt o the two-step approach. Start with the belt-loosening. With the traditional generators of economic activity anemic, the government is really all that’s left to inject some demand into the economy. The president and his team, who believe government can spark lasting private-sectora ctivity, are betting heavily its stimulus plan will work. Most congressional Republicans, who doubt the economic efficacy of govern ment, have wagered with their votes that it won’t. Thus, if Obama gets what he wants, we’ll witness a real-time economic experiment. If the president proves right, Democrats should do well in the next few elections. If Republicans are correct, voters may well punish the party in power and reward the minority. To move forward the way it hopes, the administration clearly needs more revenue, much of which the president plans to corral by letting tax cuts expire for upper-earners while raising their capital gains rate and lim iting the tax benefit they can secure by itemizing. Those proposals will raise cries of socialism from those confused about what socialism actually is. Still, it’s certainly true that those moves would put more of the tax burden on those who own more of the country’s wealth. Conservatives, of course, will predict that if tax rates rise, the sky will fall. Given that higher rates didn’t doom the economy during the Clinton years, there’s every reason to be sceptical that capitalism is really that fragile. But that too will be tested in this administration’s liberal experiment. In his presentation this week at the White House’s fiscal responsibility summit, Robert Greenstein, executive director of the Centre on Budget and Policy Priorities, offered some valuable perspective on the nation’s budgetary problems. Over the last 30 years,f ederal revenues have averaged about 18.4 p ercent of GDP. But the only years we’ve balanced the budget during that period 1998 to 2001 were when revenues totaled between 20 and 21 per cent of GDP. Even if Obama gets the new monies he hopes for, revenues for the next decade will only gradually grow to 19.5 per cent of GDP,w hile expenditures won’t dip below 22 per cent. That will make the pivot toward deficit reduction difficult. The president has pledged to cut the deficit, which will be some $1.75 trillion this year, to $533 billion by the end of his first term. Nevertheless, the administrations till projects it rising to $712 billion in 2019. That would be 3.1 per cent of GDP, which outstrips the average annual economic growth of recent decades. Thus, even after a decade, federal debt will probably still be increasing relative to GDP. “It shows what a huge problem we’ve got,” says Robert Bixby, executive director of the Concord Coalition, who thinks the potential is there for the deficit to remain considerably higher. Given fiscal reality, Obama’s plan for permanent new tax cuts for businesses and for families making up to about $190,000 a year seems overly generous. Justified as an offset to higher energy costs that will result from the cap-and-trade system, the middle-class tax break will obviously be popular. Yet at a combined price tag of about $100 billion a year, those tax benefits add yet another tricky twist. And the Olympian feat the president hopes to pull off is difficult enough already. (This article was written by Scot Lehigh Boston Globe staff writer c. 2009). Vexed by poor service of health care profession als LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net EDITOR, The Tribune. Hello Bahamas, my name is Clay Martin Sr. I am a Bahamian citizen who is currently employed in Nassau. I am married with four children and my ultimate goal is to be a productive individual in society displaying positive fatherhood and to be an asset to my country. I am currently seeking financial aid during this economic crisis we are now facing. My home can be repossessed any day now because my salary is not sufficient to take on the needs of a family of six. Two of my kids are in school, my wife has been unemployed for nearly three years and I have a daughter who is severely ill; her vision is not stable. She has visited doctors locally and abroad and they all were unsuccessful in determining her continuous loss of sight. My monthly income is mediocre, but my bills are special. To be honest my water is off, it is ruff. Sometimes I have to send my kids to school without lunch or even lunch money, that is embarrassing as a father and it saddens my heart. These issues that I am facing financially are my responsibility but I am seeking assistance because my circumstances are strenuous. If assistance can be given through a grant or loan, medical funding for my daughter or even a job for my wife I will appreciate it. Any help given I will be thankful, even if it’s a one dollar grant. I am willing to do community work on week ends or assist with any issues that require a handy skilled man’s abilities. I can be contacted at 3613079 at home and at 466-4463 through cellular services. CLAYTON MARTIN Sr Nassau, February, 2009. Can anyone help me? Rolled-up newspapers sorely needed in family islands! I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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n B Y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – More than $600,000 will be injected into the Grand Bahama economy with the signing of several major public works contracts, including one for the construction of a new ferry terminal in East End. M inister of Works Neko G rant signed contracts totalling $673,000 on Thursday at the Prime Minister’s O ffice in Freeport. H e said a new 1,900-square foot ferry terminal will be built at a cost of $212,000 at the McCleans Town dock. Contractor Amos Russell of Quail Fast Construction was a warded the contract. The building will be d esigned as a multi-purpose complex and will house a ferr y booth, a ferry passenger w aiting area, a post office with post office boxes for residents of the immediate settlements, and a police station. C C o o m m f f o o r r t t M inister Russell said the n ew terminal will facilitate a more structured ferry service, providing a greater level of comfort and convenience to i ts passengers. H e said the McCleans Town dock provides a vital transportation and communication l ink to nearby the Grand Bahama cays and to the settlements of South Abaco. T he other public works projects involve repairs and road works in Freeport, Eight Mile Rock and West End. M r Grant said a contract worth $256,809.81 was awarded to Carters AirConditioning and Refrigeration to cond uct remedial air-conditioning works at the Freeport Post Office Department. He noted that the public has b een significantly inconve nienced and postal workers have endured adverse work ing conditions for several years due to a malfunctioning air-conditioning system. “We in the Ministry of Pub lic Works and Transport apol ogise to the public for any lapses in service delivery that t hey may have experienced as a result of conditions at theF reeport Post Office, and expect that work to repair the air-conditioning system will c ommence immediately,” said Mr Grant. The Holmes Rock Ceme t ery, which was damaged in Hurricane Wilma, is also expected to undergo repairsa nd improvements. Many tombs and graves w ere compromised by storm surge. Triple A Construction Company was awarded a $25,000contract for graveyard repairs. P P a a v v i i n n g g Road works contracts for r oad paving between Freeport and Eight Mile Rock will be carried out by Waugh Construction Company in the a mount of $136,950. T he installation of line markings and reflectors along the highway between Sea Grape and West End will be c arried out by Frank Miller a nd Sons for some $42,500. “It is anticipated that these projects will not only contribute to the enhancement of basic infrastructure within communities of GrandB ahama, but will also cont ribute to further economic development through the cre ation of additional employ m ent in the construction industry and other related sect ors,” Minister Grant said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 5 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.411.410.000.0700.00020.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.3190.26021.93.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.2550.24011.11.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.776.770.000.4380.05015.50.74% 5.001.78Consolidated Water BDRs1.781.71-0.070.1110.05215.43.04% 3.002.27Doctor's Hospital2.402.400.000.2400.04010.01.67%8 .106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 1 4.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6820.40015.33.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.005.000.000.3370.15014.83.00% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref6.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 14.0014.00Bahamas Supermarkets11.2312.0414.00-0.0410.300N/M2.67% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.9230-0.58-2.54 1.43761.3773Colina Money Market Fund1.43760.284.38 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S131-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 31-Jan-09 23-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 817.96 | YTD -2.03% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.46 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -42.90 | YTD % -2.51BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases Why V V e e x x ? ? you $600,000-plus boost for Grand Bahama economy with major contract signings PICTURED from left are Frank Miller, Miller and Sons; Dion Munroe, Ministry of Public Works; Frank Miller Jr; Colin Higgs, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Public Works; Norman Tynes, Ministry of Public Works; Verna Grant, MP for Eight Mile Rock; Andrew Rolle, Tripple A Construction; Public Works Minister Neko Grant; Gordon Major, Acting Director of the Ministry of Public Works; Godfrey Waugh, Waugh Construction; Roland Bevan, Ministry of Public Works; Ron Carter, Carter's Air-Conditioning; Debbie Pennerman, Assistant Postmaster General and Godfrey Clarke, Postmaster General. Vandyke Hepburn /BIS Photo n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter w hyyouvex@tribunemedia.net " I vex at how biggity p eople on the streets of the Bahamas is. I tired of people carryin' on bad like they have the right of way, especially when they don't even know how to drive. Tell me why so many people don't know how to use a roundabout? " Just today, this stink w oman shoot out in front o f me while I was driving a round the roundabout instead of yielding. She lucky the devil ain' run up i n me, because I had a mind t o chase her down and give h er a piece of my mind. I t hink the government needs t o do mandatory re-testing when people renew the l icenses every five years because our streets are a mess." W endy L "I vex and vexer because I keep complaining about how bad people park on the s ide of the road, making b lind spots so people can't s ee when they want to pull out of a corner. "It is especially bad on V illage Road right by that roadside vendor and on Deveaux Street right down the road from The Tribune . I am tired of people parking all up on the road justb ecause they droppin' their baby off or going to see a lawyer or God knows what else. "When their nice, new car get scratch up, I wonderw ho they ga' blame?" M ad Motorist " I vex because with all this madness going on in the world and now hitting home to our insurance industrya nd messing with people p ension and hard-earned p ennies, I ain' know what to do. "I just about five minutes away from pulling my mon ey out of the bank and tak ing my investments and keeping them in my mattress or burying it in my backyard. These people with all their fancy degrees need to stop messing with people money." Scared to invest, Nassau. "I vex that just about every time I go into a clothes shop with my good money to spend and the lazy sales girl too busy to help me '’cause she yappin' on the phone. "My thing is sweetie, I don't need you to cater to me, but at least move the phone away from your face long enough to tell me hello when I walk in the door. These employees need to at least take the phone from their mout' when they bring the shoes to try on. I mean why don't they act like they getting a pay-check instead of like they doing you a favour when you spend your money?" Tonisha M, Nassau. N E WFERRYTERMINALTOBEBUILTATTHE M C C L EANS T O WNDOCK “It is anticipated that these projects will not only contribute to the enhancement of basic infrastructure within communities of Grand B ahama, but will also contribute to further economic development t hrough the creation of additional employment in the construction industry and other related sectors.” Neko Grant CONTRACT SIGNING: A new ferry terminal is to be built at McCleans Town dock.

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owever, Mr Jones said his company is challenging a “whole list of charges” for which he claims his company is not responsible. “Like everyone else we are paying National Insurance. There were some names on the list that we are not responsible for,” he said. These individuals, Mr Jones said, were contract workers who the company would not be obligated to pay NIB for under current Labour laws. While some observers suggested yesterday that the “singling out” of the media house could be a political move designed to embarrass the company, Mr Jones himself denied that politics had anything to do with what was taking place. “There is nothing political about this. If you owe National Insurance you pay. I don’t think there is anything political about it and I’m not going there. “Whatever delinquency there is we will pay. Both sides are negotiating in good faith and the matter is being resolved,” he said. On Thursday, Mr Jones pleaded guilty before Magistrate Susan Sylvester to owing NIB over $430,000. According to sources at the Magistrate’s Court, an agreement has been reached where Mr Jones has agreed to pay 40 per cent of the sum outright $180,000 and the remanding $250,000 over the next two years. The case was adjourned to June. Moves under way to resolve NIB payments dispute – media boss FROM page one “What I am saying is that I believe that Mr Jones has a viable business,” Mr Wilson said, “or a business which is potentially viable. “I am saying that if Mr Jones should decide that he would wisht o seek additional investors to j oin him in his enterprise, it is something that I would certainly listen to,” he said. Despite reports to the contrary, Mr Wilson said he does not currently have any shares in Jones Communications. “But in making that statement, I am not attempting to distance myself from Mr Jones in anyway. I regard him as a friend, I respect him as a colleague, and I am hopeful and confident that whatever issues are involved will be settled in a way that augurs well for the country and him personally.” However, this mindset, Mr Wilson said, where persons suggest or believe that an individual cannot be successful in the Bahamas unless they are “fronting” for someone else, or doing something illegal, is another form of mental enslavement from which we must free ourselves. “These rumours have been so unkind to Mr Jones, and so unfair. In this country there is a lack of faith on behalf of so many for someone to pull themselves up by their own boot-straps and do something unless they are ‘fronting’ for somebody. That is a trait that isn’t limited to just Mr Jones today. “I can tell you very honestly I for years and years have had to live with that myself. The Sunshine Boys lived with it. Who were we fronting for? It’s as if you can’t start something on your own and pull yourself up by your own boot-straps. “I hate to inject the race question again, but it is hard to avoid. I hate to see it injected again, but all too often it has proven relevant,” he said. Businessman offers to ‘help out’ media boss F ROM page one down, but they are saying things that are totally untrue in terms of that strike they are eating and they are eating well." E arlier in the week The Tribune published claims from several detainees at the Detention Centre, whose complaints ranged from beatings from officers, to i nsufficient meals, and inadequate h ealthcare, bath and toilet facilit ies. A day after the initial story broke the Department of Immig ration denounced all the claims as false, citing an internal investi g ation. But international human rights a gency Amnesty International called for an impartial review into t he matter. Amnesty's International Secretariat is said to be "monitoring the situation" before making any further statements. Yesterday Mr McCartney welc omed such an investigation. "We don't have anything to h ide at the Detention Centre, we have nothing to hide and certainly that can always be welcomed but when you talk about inde pendent investigations these pers ons come over and are not as independent as they claim theya re." Mr McCartney also dispelled c laims that the holding facility is "inhumane" and without adequate bathing and toilet facilities. "These claims have been made before, (but m istreat anyone. They are there to be held and in as comfortable c ircumstances as possible. It's not a jail, notwithstanding that these p eople have come here illegally. They say these things and they try to get the international media and organisations to put pressure, but at the end of the day as long a s we are doing what is right, we are not going to fall for that. " There's no reason why we should mistreat these people, and i f that is happening it's a no-no, but I've found no evidence of mis treatment. I'm satisfied that it's a complete fabrication. While not denying that there might be "bad apples" within the Department of Immigration, MrM cCartney said, "If it were true I would have done something about it. I would not sit back and allow persons to be abused in any form or fash-i on." This week the US State Department released its 2008 Human Rights Report for the Bahamas, which expressed con cern that the department was internally investigating claims of abuse without independent over sight. Mr McCartney declined to the report until he had a chance to review the complete document. Detention Centre FROM page one t ion on Haitian drug traffickers transiting the Bahamas. Such strategies were discussed by Deputy P rime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette, the US embassy’s Charge d ’Affaires Timothy Zuniga-Brown and government officials in a meeting chaired by National Security Minister Tommy Turnquesta t the Royal Bahamas Police Force Headquarters in East Street. Both governments stated redevelopment of the Defence Force Base in Great Inagua as a top priority, and the US government showed itsc ontinued commitment to assisting Bahamian officials with a $499,800 cheque presented to the Bahamas Drug Enforcement Unit by theU S Drug Enforcement Agency. M M i i g g r r a a n n t t Mr Zuniga-Brown commended the “remarka ble progress” made in the fight against narcotics and migrant smuggling as a result of j oint efforts in 2008. H e praised the Bahamas government’s decision to ban wooden-hulled Haitian sloops and noted how the US government had expanded its commitment to drug and migrant interdiction in Bahamian territorial waters by provid i ng four Nor-Tech fast boats to the Royal Bahamas Defence Force last year. Bahamian authorities seized 1,878 kilograms of cocaine and approximately 12 metric tons of marijuana, and the DEU arrested 1,030 peopleo n drug-related offences and seized $3.9 million i n cash throughout 2008. Included in the figures are seizures made by Operation Bahamas, Turks and Caicos( OPBAT) in cooperation with the US government of 1,800 kilograms of cocaine and 12 metric tons of marijuana. M r Zuniga-Brown said: “These seizures directly impact narcotics smugglers’ bottom l ine and are critical to our efforts to safeguard our countries from the dangers of illicit narcotics trafficking.” B oth Mr Zuniga-Brown and Mr Symonette agreed that developing the base at Great I nagua is paramount in 2009 after the destruction caused by Hurricane Ike forced the US to relocate helicopters based there to Turks andC aicos. The US representative said his government i s eager to return to Great Inagua and rebuild and improve the island’s infrastructure as it is optimally located for interdicting smugglerst ransiting through Bahamian waters, which was demonstrated by a recent seizure of over 800 kilograms of cocaine on the island. Mr Symonette said: “The major drug seizure in Great Inagua through collaborative efforts oft he DEA, DEU and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force will hopefully be a continued trend throughout 2009. I encourage the continued relationship between my government, our friends and partn ers the Turks and Caicos Islands, who were unfortunately unable to attend today, and the US government. It is through this bilateral rapport that we can improve our capabilities and maintain this c ooperative model which is heralded regionally and locally.” Talks on stepping up anti-drug fight FROM page one S he said that the last few months have been challenging due to her husband's illness, compounded with her own health issues. "It's been eight months of constant challenge because he's been so ill. And physically I'm not up to my full strength andt he doctor told me I'm just burnt out," she said. Despite her commitment to her constituents, she will be absent from the House of Assembly during the mid-year bud-g et debate on Monday under doctor's orders to “take it easy.” " Thank God I'm better than I was, but I won't be in Parliament on Monday for sure because my doctor wants me to take a couple of days (off " Right now my health is more important and as much as I do have a responsibility, my health is more important." Doctor's aren't certain if Mr Pratt's other leg will have to be amputated, but the family is in deep prayer that his health rebounds. Cynthia Pratt’s husband has left leg amputated FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 9 n BY MATT MAURA B ahamas Information Services COLLABORATION between members of the clergy and mental health professionals in the Bahamas is an “important step” towards addressing the mental health needs of Bahamians, Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis said Wednesday. Addressing a psychiatric symposium for clergy hosted by officials of the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, the Ministry of Health and the Public Hospitals Authority, Dr Minnis said such collaboration becomes even more necessary with a review of statistics that show that 40 per cent of persons experiencing mental health illness first contact their clergy. “In times of crises, people turn to their religious leaders for guidance, support and help,” Dr Minnis said. “It is duly noted that initially, religious leaders are often the only persons that individuals needing assistance feel comfortable enough with to share t heir problems and concerns. “Recognising this fact, and particularly as it relates to mental illness, it is imperative that our religious leaders are well acquainted with those vital aspects of mental illness for which people need additional medical help to recover, so that their suffering can be addressed and dealt with appropriately,”h e said. Dr Minnis told religious leade rs that their input will “greatly assist” mental health professionals in combatting mental ill ness in the Bahamas. They will also assist in combatting the stigma attached to mental illness a stigma, he said, which is “still very prevalent and which has prevented persons from accessing the mental health assistance they need to recover from their illness.” Dr Minnis said the collaboration between the church and the mental health profession can also serve as a proactive measure to combat some of the “fall-out” from the current economic downturn that is impacting the Bahamas and, indeed, the world. “Today we are experiencing a serious financial problem not only here in the Bahamas, but throughout the rest of the world, and many individuals will be experiencing mental illness and particularly pressure,” Dr Minnis said. “The possibility exists that we can see an increase in suicidal rates and you must be able to – as you guide your flock detect illnesses and/or depression, by recognising mood changes in the individuals whom you know very well.” The one-day workshop focused on a number of areas including tips for the clergy on recognising and dealing with mental illness, recognising and addressing the early warning signs of mental illness, tips for communicating with mentally ill persons and when to refer them to professionals. The religious leaders were also provided with a blueprint for developing the necessary programmes to assist church members who may be recover ing from mental illness. Health Ministry and clergy partner to fight mental illness MINISTER of Health Dr Hubert Minnis addresses religious leaders during a one-day psychiatric symposium for clergy held on Wednesday, February 25, 2009. is successful in its effort to lure organisers, they anticipate “the largest number of (Miss Uni verse attendees) ever” to enter the country to see or participate in the competition. The prime minister is reportedly set to make an announcement on the matter once par liament approves the bills tabled Wednesday asking for the money needed. The Miss Universe pageant, now in its 58th year, traditionally sees beauties from around 80 countries worldwide, followed closely by international media and fans, descend on an exotic venue for about two weeks. If The Bahamas is chosen to host the event Atlantis, Paradise Island, would be the setting for the show itself. However, in what would essentially be free advertising for the country, the prospective pageant queens also will be filmed and broadcast interna tionally as they travel through out the archipelago in advance of the final show. According to MissUniverse.com, in recent years the event has been televised in over 170 countries. “This is going to be seen by near to if not more than one billion people around the world. There’s no way you can spend that kind of money and reach one billion people...so it’s that opportunity, that’s what it’s really all about,” said a tourism source. “The most beautiful people in the world coming to the most beautiful islands in the world it’s a commercial. That’s really the way we are looking at it,” they added. The high probability that the Bahamas will win the bidding for the event is reflected in the fact that government is already seeking to re-allocate an additional $2.9 million to the Ministry of Tourism towards funding their efforts in relation to the whole affair. The Tribune understands that The Bahamas’ major competitor in the bidding is Las Vegas, California. Despite the popularity of this location, The Bahamas is said to have the edge as it is recognised that Miss Universe has “a great deal more appeal when it’s international.” “Most Americans see it when it’s in the United States as an American event and they don’t tune in as much as when it’s international. Miss Universe connotes international and glob al so we know we have an advantage in that regard,” explained a ministry official. An added advantage, The Tribune understands, is the fact that The Bahamas is in the east coast time zone, allowing offi cial broadcaster NBC to show the event in that market as it happens, and the country’s proximity to the US, which provides for more convenient opportunities for travel to prospective visitors from the United States, Central and South America. “Last year Miss Universe was in Vietnam. It’s an enormous cost for people to go to Viet nam, it’s not an enormous expense for them to come to The Bahamas,” said a source. The event is known to be highly popular among Latin Americans, and with the Bahamas government having recently relaxed its visa requirements for all South American countries the ministry is understood to be seeing the event as a potential opportunity to kickstart a more lucrative tourism relationship between The Bahamas and these countries. This comes days after Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham gave a sobering assessment of the outlook for the Bahamian economy, which is dependent on tourism for more than 60 per cent of GDP, for 2009. Called for comment on the possibility that The Bahamas may be set to host the pageant yesterday, Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace told The Tribune to “await the announcement by the prime minister.” “We’re really trying to finalise some details on that,” he added. Hopes high of hosting Miss Universe pageant FROM page one the company into provisional liquidation. Said Mr Smith: "What we do know is that right up until last week, everybody was saying everything was okay, that (it wouldn't affect here. So somebody was giving a level of comfort to the Bahamian public that appeared not to be absolutely correct." When asked if he felt government should shoul der some culpability for company executives not being forthcoming to its creditors and policyholders, Mr Smith said, "I really don't know how much they knew and when they knew and what options were available to them, but I don't think any government would knowingly keep the public at risk if there's something that could be done to avoid it. "Sometime you would move too slowly, which would result in you not responding to the public's interest as quickly as you can." His statements came as PLP MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell criticised government for being "complicit" in the failure of CLICO (Bahamas "By the public record, the Registrar of Insurance, therefore the Government knew six to seven months ago that this company was having problems with capital. The Government allowed the CLICO company in Nassau to issue a statement assuring the public and their clients that there was no connection between the problems in Trinidad & Tobago and those in Nassau, when the government by its own admission knew that the company had a problem with capital. "The government did nothing to contradict CLICO public statements," Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell argued yesterday. "There seems to have been shocking negligence on the part of the Bahamas government which has put at risk 30,000 clients of CLICO in Nassau." When contacted for a response, Mr Laing chose not to comment. "If I speak now then you will preempt what may be done, but I'm not going to comment at the moment. But I expect you all will hear soon enough," he said yesterday. Before CLICO (Bahamas dation, Registrar of Insurance Lennox McCartney told Tribune Business that his department had been in "major" discussions with CLICO (Bahamas cial position. Mr Smith explained that the company's problems arose from its investments in the US real estate market, which collapsed last year due to the global economic crisis. He disagreed with the assertion that the problems of CLICO (Bahamas could have stemmed from a lack of oversight during the PLP administration. "This company was affected by the fall-out in the credit markets and the real estate markets in the States and no one, none of the regulators here or abroad actually saw the strain coming so I don't think that would be a very fair comment. "Because up to that point if you look at their statements they probably looked pretty good. Your liabilities are well covered by assets that have been invested here, it's just that we didn't know that the investment part of it was going to fall out," said Mr Smith. Assurances on CLICO under fire FROM page one Beatrice Chapman, a 71year-old resident of Ontario, Canada, was snorkeling near Half Moon Cay sometime after noon on Thursday when it is believed she drowned. She was pronounced dead sometime later. Foul play is not suspected. Ms Chapman was a passenger on the ss Massdam cruise ship, which visited Eleuthera on Thursday. Woman dies while snorkelling

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APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 1 0 Great enjoyment (5 1 1 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind i nstrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 2 7 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 1 8 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE C RYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 Pull leg about being in bed t hat’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 1 2 Encouraging applause? (8 1 3 German city shows u nusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 1 7 Anumber agreed to be c orrected, being h umble (7 1 9 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a l ot of ill-feeling (7 2 2 Flier appears to steal in (5 2 4 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is b roadcast (5,4 2 8 Not here again after the s tart (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 D own 1 Be a socially-acceptable l over (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be a ngered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react r ashly with unusual i ll-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 1 6 Snare 10 squirming f ish (8 1 8 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 2 1 They prohibit flags (7 2 3 It’s good in France and A merica to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 L earning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 I dolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 U nderhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 1 4 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 O ral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 P olished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 S ouvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 R etriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 R ehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 1 9 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 2345678 9 1011 1213 141 5161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 1 2345678 9 1011 1213 141 5161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1011 1213 14 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930T ribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u T a R gT E Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution12345678 9 1 011 1213 1 4 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 12345678 9 1 011 1213 1 4 15161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a BY STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Close together (4,2,4 6 Incentive (4 10 Great enjoyment (5 11 Shame (9 12 First night of film (8 13 Acriminal (5 15 Abominable (7 17 Metal wind instrument (7 19 Deep purplish red (7 21 Apparent (7 22 Violent weather (5 24 Appeased (8 27 Insulting (9 28 Clumsy (5 29 An accepted standard (4 30 Bavarian leather shorts (10 Down 1 Profoundly wise person (4 2 Worthy (9 3 Flower (5 4 Sorrow (7 5 Ancestry (7 7 Wander stealthily (5 8 Urgently enthusiastic (6,2,2 9 Hair style (8 14 Gesture of disapproval (6,4 16 Decorative object (8 18 Invaluable (9 20 Inform (7 21 To hide (7 23 Express willingness (5 25 Confidence (5 26 Knock unconscious (4 nbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Pull leg about being in bed that’s untidy (10 6 Utterly rude and cross (4 10 Set sail on Eastern passage (5 11 Pays liars to make a complaint (9 12 Encouraging applause? (8 13 German city shows unusual sense (5 15 Their accounts may be all at sea (7 17 Anumber agreed to be corrected, being humble (7 19 Went into liquidation when working hard? (7 21 Small things that cause a lot of ill-feeling (7 22 Flier appears to steal in (5 24 Useful people showing diplomacy in studies (8 27 Questions are asked when such a group activity is broadcast (5,4 28 Not here again after the start (5 29 Formerly in older style (4 30 Our respect will be misplaced for such an oppressor (10 Down 1 Be a socially-acceptable lover (4 2 Put out fire (9 3 Put oil on some crane levers (5 4 They have no settled occupation (7 5 Angered or could be angered (7 7 Deserted place of refreshment? (5 8 Don’t allow to succeed? (10 9 Being so one may react rashly with unusual ill-grace (8 14 Sign for a missing letter (10 16 Snare 10 squirming fish (8 18 Ashare in the plot (9 20 Possibly cleared to authorise dividend payment (7 21 They prohibit flags (7 23 It’s good in France and America to get extra money (5 25 Athenian garret (5 26 Decapitated their son may be (4 Across:1 Weather, 5 Scrum, 8 Samarkand, 9 Men, 10 Etch, 12 Learning, 14 Ronald, 15 Wander, 17 Idolater, 18 Kris, 21 Era, 22 Underhand, 24 Title, 25 Pelican. Down:1 Waste, 2 Aim, 3 Herb, 4 Reamer, 5 Side road, 6 Remainder, 7 Manager, 11 Consonant, 13 Pleasure, 14 Raiment, 16 Held up, 19 Sudan, 20 Oral, 23 Arc. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Contact, 5 Fight, 8 Dalmatian, 9 Emu, 10 Rock, 12 Polished, 14 Primer, 15 Jujube, 17 Souvenir, 18 Edge, 21 Ash, 22 Retriever, 24 Erase, 25 Mastery. Down:1 Cedar, 2 Nil, 3 Away, 4 Tripod, 5 Fanciful, 6 Greyhound, 7 Trundle, 11 Chihuahua, 13 Rehearse, 14 Passage, 16 Victim, 19 Early, 20 Bias, 23 Vie. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1 2345678 9 1011 1213 141 5161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 1 2345678 9 1011 1213 141 5161718 192021 22232425 26 2728 2930 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. R PAGE 14, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE the scene N ASSAU E VENTS C APTURED O N C AMERA by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP ON January 29, Anthony Thompson launched his new book, An Economic History of the Bahamas at a reception at the Chapter One Bookstore at the College of the Bahamas. During his address, Mr Thompson said that when considering the economic history of the Bahamas, three important things should be noted. He said these are: That history repeats itself That the country’s 18th century motto – Expulsis Piratis (pirates expelled Commercia (commerce restored) – has become “Pirates Restored, Commerce Expelled” That the country has no philosophy of nation building In terms of the first point, that history repeats itself, Mr Thompson noted that the recession the country now finds itself in is a repeat of the situation in the early 1930s. “Thank God following all recessions or depressions, consumer demand builds up for more goods and services, and recovery takes place. The Bahamas has been able to bounce back from adversity into prosperity over the years,” he said. On the second point, Mr Thompson noted that for cen turies, the Bahamas was con trolled by pirates. Although they were driven out by British governors, the quest for survival has made “pirates out of our people” over the years. “We took advantage of the misfortunes of others and sometimes, by committing acts which may have been legal in ourc ountry but illegal elsewhere. I r efer to rum running, wrecking, the transshipment of drugs, the attracting of tax dodgers, and illegal gambling, including the numbers racket. “Most notably, there have been various Commissions ofI nquiry. In 1967 the Commis sion into gambling showed that members of the former government received direct pecuniary benefits from the operation of casinos. “The Commissions of Inquiry into Bahamasair, Batelco and the Hotel Corporation demonstrated that some of the officials involved therewith benefited from slack practices, the awarding of contracts and influ ence peddling. “Today we are exposed to much commentary regarding alleged corruption in various departments of government and in the trade union movement. “The pirates may not have been expelled,” he said. On his point about nation building, Mr Thompson noted that as a British colony, in the 17th century economic thought in the Bahamas was dominated by mercantilism and overseen by Crown agents. There was therefore no plan to develop the economy for the resident population. He said that although foreign investors were attracted under the UBP, very little was done in terms of national development; “they owned and controlled the retail and services sectors of the economy and until 1967 had the political power to sustain their economic dominance.” In 1972 the PLP stated its intent to develop tourism, maintain the tax haven status, grow the banking sector, push forward with industrial diversification, promote agriculture and fisheries development to a selfsufficiency level and Bahamianise the country, Mr Thompson said, adding that the FNM followed many of these policies. “Fifty-four years later tourism is severely challenged, and the pressure of the international community at the turn of the 21st century has devastated the second industry. The industrial diversification scheme which at one time boasted of oil refin ing, cement manufacturing, rum production, aragonite mining, two salt producing plants at Inagua and Long Island, a pharmaceutical plant, and a pipe and steel company have been left only with a transshipment terminal, one salt plant, and small rum and beer plants.” D espite the Bahamianisation p olicy, Mr Thompson said, the economy is not significantly impacted by local entrepreneurship. He added that in the tourist industry, there are few Bahamian owned businesses and the industrial sector hasa ttracted very little local own ership interest. “Our crime problem, the unacceptable educational results, the large number of young people in our country, the growing number of illegal immigrants, the rationalisation of land ownership and property development schemes including anchor projects, the struggling small business sector, the density of the population in New Providence with its restricted land mass, the anti quated inequitable tax system, and the traffic congestion in the capital, all of these cry out for a bi-partisan national development plan,” Mr Thompson said. ATTORNEY Anthony Thompson; Adrianna Allen, a Spanish teacher at St John’s College; attorney David Allen Jr. THOMPSON LAUNCHES NEW BOOK JUSTICE JOSEPH Alfred (retired Elwood Donaldson, a family practitioner and former PLP member of parlia ment for Kilarney who along with 18 others, ushered in Majority Rule in 1967. In 1970 he was part of the Dissident Eight who formed the FNM; Dr Rudolph B Dorsett – internal medicine and cardiology spe cialist. Dr Dorsett recently returned from the US and practices at Skoorb Medical Clinic, East Street South. BERNARD K Bonaby, secretary of the Gaming Board and former commissioner of police; Basil L Sands, chairman of British American Financial and managing partner of PKF Consulting; attorney Cecil Hilton, Cecil Hilton and Company. AT CHAPTER ONE book store in Oakes Field: Deandre Smith, a biochemistry student at the College of the Bahamas; attorney and author Anthony Thompson, former deputy manager of the Bahamas Monetary Authority, a forerunner to the Central Bank of the Bahamas; Judy VC Munroe, former president of the Caribbean Bottling Company, and first woman president of the Chamber of Commerce; Celeste Gray, a biochemistry student at COB. ACKLINS ISLANDER, Dr Hervis L Bain Jr, who designed the national coat of arms of the Bahamas and made a significant contribution to the design of the national flag in 1971; Anthony Thompson; attorney Gregory IH Cottis, Olivia Knowles Cottis Law.

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C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE International sports news n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas men’s fourm an team left Miami for Paraguay today to compete in the first round of theA merican Zone II Davis Cup tie. Although the tie is not scheduled to begin until next weekend, captain John Far-r ington decided to go a week earlier to ensure that players Devin Mullings, TimothyN eilly, Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle get acclimatized t o the conditions in Paraguay. The team will take on the Paraguay’s team of RamonD elgado, Juan-Carlos Ramirez, Nicolas Salama andD iego Galeano. The team is Victor Pecci at the Yachty G olf Club in Paraguayo, Lambare. Last year at the National T ennis Center, the team of Delgado, Ricardo Mena, Ramirez and Juan-Enrique Crosa defeated the Bahamas’ team of Mark Knowles, Munnings, Neilly and Rolle 4-1 in the semifinal over the weekend of April 11-13. B ahamas Lawn Tennis Association’s president Wes ley Rolle said despite losing l ast year, he anticipated that the Bahamas should prevail t his year. “If they are playing their same players, we are going toh ave our work cut out for us, but I believe that with the players we are sending, we can certainly expect a pretty good performance,” Rolles aid. “With a little luck, I think we can get past these guys. B ut it won’t be easy because we are playing on the red clay courts on their home turf. Wew ill definitely have to play our best tennis in order to w in.” Last year, Knowles and Rolle teamed up to win thep ivotal doubles, but Mullings and Neilly lost their respective singles against Delgadoa nd Mena and Ramirez won their singles over Neilly and R olle. Knowles has opted not to travel with the team. Instead,h e has decided to continue on the ATP men’s tour where h e’s teaming up with Mahesh Bhupathi from India. In preparation for the tourn ament, Rolle said the players have been playing in satellite tournaments in Florida and they are eager to play in the tie. Munroe, on the other hand, is coming off the death and burial of one of his youngerb rothers, LaVaughn. But Rolle said Munroe insisted that he was prepared to playa nd he indicated that his brother, who also played on t he Davis Cup team three times, would have preferred that he did. We’re going to go down there and do our best,” Rolle said. “As you know, this is the same team that got us our of Zone III and into Zone II.S o we’re pretty confident that these guys can get the job GRAND BAHAMA ISLANDIn keep with their desire to become good corporate citizens of Grand Bahama, Clarins recently participated as sponsors of the Ameri can Women's Club Golf Classic which was held on February 21st at the Reef Golf Course in Lucaya. Not only did the lead ing beauty line company assist as Sapphire Sponsors of the event, they also donated 130 Clarins gift bags, 71 of which were men’s bags which consisted of one Clarins men product along with a sun care product and a lip balm, and 59 women's bags which consisted of a Clarins product along with a sun care and lip balm. Sylvain Clement, Grand Bahama branch manager was on hand at the awards ceremony . “We are pleased to be helping in some small way to help make this worthy charitable event a success. We are here to assist in the community as best we can,” said Mr Clement. Bahamas Davis Cup team off BLAST FROM THE PAST WITH the Bahamas Football Association getting ready to host the FIFA Congress this s ummer at the Atlantis Resort on Paradise Island, The Tribune’s Blast from the Past takes its readers back in time to when the New Providence Football League was instruct ed by international soccer referee Diego De Leo. Remember any of the local players and officials who participated in the clinic? Also, here’s one of the shots of a local game played between Tropigas and the Dynamos. Do you remember any of these players in action? n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net “GREAT improvement” were the first two words that coach Brent MacDonald used to describe the way that Bahamian Chadeau Wilson made his debut on the Xavier Muskateers men’s swimming team. “He’s a great kid, great to have around our team. He brings a lot more to the team than a lot of others,” said MacDonald, of Wilson, made the Musketeers swimming team as a walk on. “He’s always smiling and always positive. He fits all the intangibles. He makes up for a lot of things that we were lacking. So it’s good to have him around.” Wilson helped the Musketeers complete the 2009 Atlantic 10 Swimming and Diving Championships over the weekend at the Erie Community College’s Flickinger Athletic Center with a fifth place finish. For Wilson, he was just delighted to have made the necessary adjustments to swimming in the Bahamas Swimming Federation meets at the Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Center to competing on the collegiate scene. “It’s really, really competitive and the training has been very hard,” he pointed out. “But I’ve been able to adopt and everything went very well for me.” Throughout his freshman season, Wilson said he was able to consistently drop his times. He produced season’s best of one minute and 36 seconds in the 100 backstroke; 2:21.11 in the 200 back; 1:01.63 in the 100 breaststroke; 2:20.46 in the 200 breaststroke; 57.48 in the 100 butterfly; 2:03.10 in the 200 individual medley and 4:50.12 in the 400 IM. Wilson, 18, said he was pleased to have been able to contribute to their overall performance at A-10 Conference meet. Based on what he’s achieved, Wilson said he’s looking forward to his sophomore season. “At first, I was overwhelmed when I got here,” said Wilson, who experienced snow for the first time. “I’ve made the adjustments and I’ve been able to stay focus in the pool. Wilson enjoys freshman year SYLVAIN CLEMENTS, Clarins Branch Manager along with Mrs Clement offer the Clarins gift bags to an AWC fundraising chairperson, Bev Hall. 130 bags were given to participants of the AWA Home Centre Golf Classic on February 21st, 2009. Clarins sponsors of the American Women's Club Golf Classic Dave Macke y / Photo Chadeau Wilson SEE page 12 SEE page 12 Four man team l eft early to p repare for tie

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n BASKETBALL LOS ANGELES A ssociated Press W ITHOUTSteve Nash, nobody got the ball inside to Shaquille O’Neal, and thatm ade the Phoenix Suns a pushover. T he Los Angeles Lakers scored 70 points in the first half and rolled past the Nash-lessS uns 132-106 Thursday night for their sixth consecutive victory. Kobe Bryant had 22 points and eight rebounds for the Lak-e rs, while O’Neal had 12 points while taking just seven shots, and grabbed seven rebounds for the Suns in the former teammates’ first meeting sinces haring MVP honors at the AllStar game. “Tonight’s game felt like k ind of a trap game because we are at home and Steve’s not p laying,” Bryant said. “It is kind of one of those things where we kind of take the night o ff. I wanted to make sure from the jump that we didn’t.” Lamar Odom had a teamhigh 23 points and Pau Gasol added 16 points and niner ebounds for the Lakers, who own the NBA’s best record at 48-10 and lead the Pacific Division by 15 games over the Suns. Los Angeles’ points tied a s eason high and the team made a season-best 54 of 94 field g oals, bettering the 48 the Lakers hit against Minnesota on Jan. 30. Pretty good team, huh?” said Suns interim coach Alvin G entry, who fell to 4-2. “It’s tough against this team because they play a great zone defensea nd don’t allow Shaq to get touches a lot of the time. It’s tough getting guys touches when we don’t have Steve out there. He creates a lot of easys tuff for everyone, easy shots for guys on the perimeter.” Leandro Barbosa scored 18 points and Alando Tucker added 16 starting in place of N ash. Jason Richardson added 13. The good feelings shared by Bryant and O’Neal during AllStar weekend in Phoenix con-t inued in their seventh career head-to-head meeting. Bryant put his left arm around O’Neal and thumped him on the chest with his right fist before tip-offa fter teammate Luke Walton hugged O’Neal. O ’Neal was warmly received by the crowd at Staples Cen ter, where the Lakers improved t o 27-4 and have won four in a row. I was surprised,” he said about his reception. “I haven’t really played here in a while. Ir espect them and they will always be a part of my NBA life.” The Suns had won four of their previous five games sincet he All-Star break, but they played without All-Stars Nash and Amare Stoudemire, putting them at a decided disadvantage before the game even started. Bryant’s Lakers beat Shaq’s Suns n BASKETBALL FRESNO, Calif. Associated Press SYLVESTER SEAY scored 28 points, including two free throws that capped a rare five-point play, as Fresno State held off Nevada 68-66 Thursday night. Last-place Fresno State (12-17, 3-10 WAC missed 3-pointer at the buzzer by Like Babbitt to seal the victory. Nevada (16-11, 8-5 three-game winning streak snapped and lost for the first time in eight tries against Fresno State. The play that put the Bulldogs ahead came with 1:01 remaining. Nedeljko Gol ubovic hit a 3-pointer in Babbitt’s face just as Seay drew a foul on Malik Cooke under the basket. Seay hit both free throws as Fresno State turned a one-point deficit into a 6662 lead. Seay scored 20 of his points in the second half, including one stretch when he hit three straight 3-pointers. Golubovic added 18 points and shot 4for-7 behind the arc. Fresno State coach Steve Cleveland picked up his 200th career victory with the Bulldogs’ first win over Nevada since Jan. 18, 2006. Babbitt led Nevada with 18 points and teammate Malik Cooke added 16. Fresno State guard Dwight O’Neil played for the first time since Jan. 28. He missed the past seven games and had been suspended since Jan. 31, the day after he was jailed on a warrant for driving on a sus pended or revoked license. O’Neil served six days in Fresno County Jail and was released Feb. 5. A starter through the first 19 games, O’Neil came off the bench for the first time and finished with nine points. Fr esno State beats Nevada 68-66 n BASKTEBALL WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Associated Press WAKE FOREST blew most of a big lead before James Johnson saved the game and maybe the rest of the season, too. Johnson had career highs with 28 points and 18 rebounds to help the 13th-ranked Demon Deacons dodge another upset bid from North Carolina State, holding off the Wolfpack 85-78 on Thursday night. Ishmael Smith added a season-high 18 points and Chas McFarland had 15 for the Demon Deacons (21-5, 8-5 Atlantic Coast Conference), who shot 52.5 percent, held a 42-27 rebounding advantage and led nearly all the way. But with memories of last season’s 1-5 collapse still fresh, they allowed most of an early 15-point lead to slip away to a North Carolina State team that beat them 82-76 and was looking to pull another stunner. Johnson wasn’t about to let it happen again. “We’ve been working hard since the sum mertime,” Johnson said. “There’s no need to come out and just lose it now or not play hard now, when it counts, and then go back to the drawing board in the summertime, or keep working while we’re watching everybody else play in the NCAA tournament.” He helped them recover in time to improve to 13-1 at home and win for the third time in four games. The victory moved Wake Forest into a three-way tie for third in the conference standings with No. 12 Clem son and No. 23 Florida State. Tracy Smith scored 18 points to lead five double-figure scorers for the Wolfpack (1511, 5-8), who were denied their second sweep of Wake Forest in coach Sidney Lowe’s three seasons. Johnson had a double-double by halftime and was 12-of-16 from the field to surpass his previous top performance of 26 points which he matched in the up-and-down Demon Deacons’ most recent outing, a 10191 loss four nights earlier at No. 7 Duke. “He was a man out there,” high-scoring guard Jeff Teague said. Added coach Dino Gaudio: “He wouldn’t let us lose.” The production they received from Johnson and Smith who finished one point shy of a career high made off nights from two key teammates that much easier to take. Teague finished with 12 points nine fewer than his average on 3-of-12 shooting in his second tough game against N.C. State, which used a box-and-one defense to limit him to three shots and 11 points in the previous meeting. The Wolfpack “knew they were playing against an explosive player, a guy that could put up big numbers,” Lowe said. “Our guys were really just trying to concentrate on making it as tough as possible.” Additionally, freshman Al-Farouq Aminu missed all six of his shots and had just three points in his least productive night of the season. “It’s good when (Teague his very best, and Farouq doesn’t play his very best, and we can win a basketball game. That’s huge,” Gaudio said. “If we can get all of them clicking on the same cylinders, we know we can be a really good basketball team.” Farnold Degand and Ben McCauley both had 12 points, and Dennis Horner and Brandon Costner added 10 apiece for N.C. State, which has lost two of three and slipped into 10th in the ACC. The Wolfpack made things interesting late by getting within two points four times midway through the second half the last coming on McCauley’s layup with 12:15 remaining and then keeping it within three points late. Courtney Fells’ 3-pointer from the left corner made it 74-71 with 2:25 to play. No. 13 Wake Forest beats NC State NORTH Carolina State's Dennis Horner (31 to shoot over Wake Forest's Chas McFarland( 13) during the second half of Wake Forest's 8578 win in an NCAA college basketball game in WinstonSalem, N.C., Thursday, Feb. 26, 2009. C h u c k B u r t o n / A P P h o t o LOS ANGELES Lakers forward Josh Powell, right, fouls Phoenix Suns forward Boris Diaw (3 their NBA basketball game. M a r k J . T e r r i l l / A P P h o t o s P HOENIX S uns center Robin Lopez, left, puts up a shot as Los Angeles Lakers center Didier Ilunga-Mbenga, of Congo, defends during the second half of their NBA basketball game Thursday, Feb. 26, 2009, in Los Angeles. done.” In the final of Zone III in June, 2007, Farrington captained the team ofM ullings, Rolle, Munroe a nd H’Cone Thompson to a 2-1 victory over Puerto Rico to advance to Zone II. In the first round of Zone II last February at theN ational Tennis Center, the t eam of Knowles, Mullings, Neilly and Rolle pulled off a 4-1 decision over Venezuela before losing to Paraguay in the secondr ound. Depending on the outcome of the tie next week-e nd, the Bahamas will e ither play the loser Guatemala versus the D ominican Republic in a relegation playoff July 1012 or against the winnero ver the same weekend for the right to either stay in Z one II or a chance to go on to play in the final for a shot at promotion back toZ one One. The last time the B ahamas played in Zone One was in 2003 when we lost 4-0 to Venezuela to bed emoted to Zone II in 2004. F ROM page 11 FROM page 11 Bahamas Davis Cup team off Wilson enjoys freshman year This has been a good year for me. I’m looking f orward to coming back home. I really want to see what progress I’ve madeh ere when I compete in the Nationals.” W ilson, a graduate of Queen’s College and former Carifta team mem-b er, is hoping to making the CCCAN Championship team that will be heading to Colombia. MacDonald, the interi m head coach at Xavier, said when Wilson came out to try out for the team, he earned it after adjusting to the training. When he first came in, we didn’t really know where he was going to fit in on our team as far as what his best event was,”M acDonald pointed out. “We didn’t find that out until around mid-season.H e really excelled in the breaststroke. He could swim most of the strokes,s o we saw a large drop in his times in the IM and he closed out the season by swimming very well in both the 100 and 200 breastroke and the 200 IM in our conference meet.” Although he didn’t score the big points, Mac Donald said Wilson performed exceptionally well and it only bodes well for his final three seasons at Xavier. Wilson, a Natural Sci ence major, is the son of Larry and Fran Wilson. He and his father are talking with coach MacDonald to hopefully get the Xavier team to come to the Bahamas to train at the Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Center. MacDonald said if it is feasible, look forward to the Musketeers making the trip to the Bahamas very soon. Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2009, PAGE 13 n FOOTBALL ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER ADAM“Pacman” Jones landed a new team Friday. Sort of. On the opening day of the NFL’s free agent signing period, Jones instead was on vacation in Puerto Rico and talking about his role on the upcoming reality TV show “Pros vs. Joes 4: All Stars.” His marketing representative refusedto allow Jones to comment about what’s next in his real p laying career, but earlier i n the interview Jones declared, “I’m definitely not at the end of my career. I’m basically just getting it going.” The 25-year-old Jones is by far the youngest among the six NFL and six NBA stars who will compete against regular guys in the latest installment of the Spike TV show. All others are either retired or closet o it. “It’s a good show,” Jones s aid. “Hopefully I can bring a little excitement to it.” Jones’ NFL future is in doubt because of his offfield issues and mediocre performance on the field last season. He was a star cornerback and kick returner for the Tennessee Titans in 2005 and , but the NFL sus-pended him for the entire 2007 season because of an accumulation of legal problems. He was traded to the Dallas Cowboys in 2008, then was suspended for six more games following a fight with his team-provid ed bodyguard. The Cowboys announced they were dumping him soon after the season ended, weeks before the move actually could be made. His on-field play wasa factor, too, as he had no interceptions and a pedes trian 4.5 yards per punt return. In the TV show, Jones will be reunited with for mer Tennessee teammate Steve McNair. Tim Brown, Simeon Rice, Priest Holmesand Rich Gannon are the other NFL players who will take on the Joes in three skills competitions and a three-on-three scrimmage in each episode. There will be four episodes per sport, a change from previous seasons when multiple sports were played in each episode. “I’m going to make sure I do my job,” Jones said. “I don’t want no balls caught on me.” SPORTS IN BRIEF P acman’s next football team will be on reality TV A-Rod still waiting for MLB meeting n BASEBALL TAMPA, Fla. Associated Press YANKEESthird baseman Alex Rodriguez is still waiting to meet with Major League Baseball officials, who want to discuss his use of performance-enhancing drugs from 2001-03 while with Texas. MLB wants to speak with Rodriguez about security issues involving a trainer from the Dominican Republic and the cousin the three-time MVP said injected him with a banned substance called “boli.” Rodriguez didn’t make the trip to Fort Myers for the Yankees spring training game Friday against Minnesota. Instead, he worked out with a group of players at Steinbrenner Field that included Derek Jeter, Johnny Damon, Hidkei Matsui and Mark Teixeira. After the workout, Rodriguez said no meeting was scheduled for Friday. Yankees manager Joe Girardi said Rodriguez will play in spring training games Saturday and Sunday. Rodriguez then is scheduled to join the Dominican Republic national team to prepare for the World Baseball Classic. n BASKETBALL WALTHAM, Mass. Associated Press THE BOSTON CELTICSsigned Stephon Marbury on Friday, bringing the former New York Knicks headache aboard in their attempt to repeat as NBA champions. Marbury cleared waivers on Friday morning, reported to the Celtics for a physical and was expected to be in uniform on Friday night for Boston’s game against the Indiana Pacers. “We are very excited to have a player of Stephon’s caliber joining our team,” Celtics general manager Danny Ainge said. “Our entire organization is confident in the belief that Stephon can play an important role in helping us to win another championship.” Marbury, a former All-Star guard who alienated Knicks management, teammates and fans, was waived on Tuesday after he agreed to a buyout of his $20.8 million contract. The Celtics were expected to offer him a pro-rated share of the veteran’s $1.3 million minimum. Marbury, who turned 32 last week, hasn’t played a regular-season game in more than a year. He arrived at the team’s practice facility in Waltham just before noon, about 90 minutes after clearing waivers. He could be seen from the public area of the workout facility wearing a white, longsleeved T-shirt and sweat pants, jumping up and down as he took the practice court, smiling and chest-bumping with several people wearing Celtics gear. After few minutes, the automatic shades were lowered. Marbury will back up Rajon Rondo at point guard, a role Sam Cassell served when the Celtics won their 17th NBA title last season. Eddie House, who is more of a shooter, has been forced into the role this year; Cassell did not play in a game for Boston this year before he was traded to the Sacramento Kings and released last week. Marbury took a long leave of absence from the Knicks when his father died in December 2007, then had season-ending ankle surgery and has not played since Jan. 11, 2008. He returned to the Knicks in training camp, but when the sides tried to negotiate a buyout early in the season, Marbury at first refused to surrender any more than $1 million of his $20.8 million salary and the team told him to stay home until it could be completed. Marbury was the center of controversy during his five years in New York, feuding with coaches and skipping games. Marbury signs with Celtics IN THIS Nov. 2, 2008 file photo, New York Knicks' Stephon Marbury watches the Knicks' NBA basketball game against Mil waukee Bucks from the bench at Madi son Square Garden in New York. Mar bury was waived Tuesday by the New York Knicks, ending a turbulent five-year stint in which the former All-Star couldn't lead his hometown team to a single playoff victory. Stephen Chernin/ AP Photo n BASKETBALL HOUSTON Associated Press LEBRON JAMESdrove to the basket in the fourth quarter, trying to spark a last-ditch comeback for the Cavaliers against the Houston Rockets. Yao Ming was there to block his dunk attempt and James twisted his ankle, a fitting end to a terrible night for Cleveland. James went an entire game without an assist for the first time in his career and the Cavaliers lost Ben Wallace for four to six weeks in a 93-74 loss to Houston. The Rockets, meanwhile, showed they just might be contenders in the Western Conference. Yao scored 28 points and Ron Artest added 15 while harassing James on defense most of the night, leading the Rockets to their six consecutive win and ninth straight at home. “It is a big win,” said Yao, who hit 13 of 15 shots despite Cleveland’s constant doubleteams. “We played against one of the best quality teams in this league. That is a really good test for us to see how far we can go.” James scored 21 points, but went 7-for-21 from the field with three turnovers. He left for good with 4:03 left, the only time in 493 NBA games (counting playoffs) he failed to record an assist. The Cavaliers had season-low point totals in the first (11 third (10 percent shooting (27-for-80 also a season worst. “I can’t remember the last time I didn’t have an assist,” James said, “but as a team, we didn’t move the ball at all.” To make matters worse, the Cavaliers lost their best interior defender when Wallace broke his leg in the second quarter after Yao accidentally kicked him. “I’ll definitely be back for the playoffs, I’m hoping to come back before then,” Wallace said after breaking his right fibula. Von Wafer scored 19 points and Luis Scola added 14 points and nine rebounds for the Rockets. Houston had 25 assists, its sixth straight game with 20 or more, and went 8for-19 from 3-point range. But the Rockets are more satisfied with their defense lately; they’ve held their last six opponents to an average of 83.6 points. “You may get into the second round (of the playoffs if you want to make a serious run and be a serious contender,” said Wafer, “you’ve got to be able to continue to play defense. We are trying to come together as a unit.” Mo Williams also scored 21 for the Cavs, who had a fivegame winning streak snapped. Cleveland looked as bad as i t did in a 92-77 loss in Houston last season James had 32 in that one, but the Cavs shot 39.7 percent. “We just can’t seem to get into a good flow against the Houston team,” James said. “A lot of credit has to go to them, they are a very good team. Offensively, we couldn’t make a shot and we could never get in any rhythm.” The Rockets led 45-40 at halft ime, and had assists on their f irst five baskets of the second h alf. James, meanwhile, tried a no-look, over-his-head pass to Anderson Varejao later in the third period, but the ball sailed out of bounds. The Cavs shot 5-for-17 from the field and coughed up five turnovers in the third quarter to trail 68-50. James took a rest and returned with 7:21 left in the game, but the Rockets never lost control. Yao blocked James on a dunk try and Wafer finished off Cleveland with a 3pointer at the other end for an 85-68 lead. Rockets rout Cavaliers 93-74 CLEVELAND Cavaliers' Anderson Varejao (17 B attier, left, and Yao Ming (11 Feb. 26, 2009, in Houston. H OUSTON R ockets' Luis Scola (4 Cleveland Cavaliers' Daniel Gibson during the second half. P a t S u l l i v a n / A P P h o t o s Cas Wallace out with broken foot