Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

The Tribune

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Volume: 105 No.80



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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009






Three detainee
on hunger strike

Cubans launch protest;
Tribune interviews 10 men
at the Detention Centre

Po ee CR RI ATS

m@ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor
pnunez@tribunemedia.net

THREE Cuban men at the
Immigration Detention Centre
say they have been on hunger
strike for two days in protest
against the deplorable conditions
they and hundreds of others are
forced to endure at the facility.

The men say they have not eat-
en since 8am on Wednesday and
do not plan to until their concerns
are addressed. The health of one
of them, an epileptic, has deterio-
rated severely — “but he is ready
to die,” one of his compatriots
said.

The Tribune spoke to two of
the hunger strikers and eight oth-
er detainees from various coun-
tries and backgrounds, who all
supported the men’s claims of
abuse and subhuman conditions at
the centre. They said others want
to join the hunger strike, but are
afraid of reprisals from guards.

In the face of calls from inter-
national human rights activists for
an independent investigation, gov-
ernment officials have denied that
there have been any beatings at
the centre, and say they know





















nothing about the hunger strike.
All the detainees who spoke to
The Tribune yesterday reacted
with anger upon hearing this,
claiming the authorities know
everything that is going on.

One of the hunger strikers
called on Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson to pay a sur-
prise visit to the centre and inter-
view them, “not in the air-condi-
tioned front office, but back here,
where we live.”

The allegations have been
mounting since Monday, when
The Tribune received information
about an alleged severe beating
at the centre in which the victim
lost several fingernails.

Yesterday, the man who says
he was the victim of that attack
explained that it took place a year
ago.

After having been at the centre
for several months, he said, he
began to ask the guards for infor-
mation about the status of his
case, persisting until they became
fed up with him.

He claims that one day, a group
of guards took him into a room

SEE page 10

‘an

=

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham along with Edison Key, Executive
Chairman of the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation, looks
at Bahamian grown produce on display yesterday at the opening of the
Agricultural, Marine Resources and Agribusiness Expo.

e SEE PAGE SEVEN

Concern over Department of
TMM rece

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

yesterday.

At the time of the report the
Carmichael Road Immigrant
Detention Centre held up to
500 detainees last year (with
tent space for an additional
500), and women and men
were held separately.

Haitians and Jamaicans were
the most commonly interdicted
migrants and the highest occu-
pancy during the year was

SEE page eight

HUMAN nights groups have
expressed concern that inves-
tigations conducted by the
Department of Immigration
were handled internally with-
out independent review and
oversight, the 2008 Human
Right’s Report for the
Bahamas conducted by the US
State Department = said

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Mother and
boyfriend
charged with
the murder

of her baby

m@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A YOUNG mother
charged in the death of her
10-month-old child was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday along with
her boyfriend.

Police have charged 21- |@ \

year-old Farah Augustine, of

Red Land Acres, and 21- J

year-old Teddy Thaddeus
Charlton of Talbot Street in
the murder of Fiara Augus-
tine Santil.

According to reports, the
10-month-old girl was found
dead on Sunday with unusu-
al marks about the body in
an apartment the child’s
mother shared with her
boyfriend.

Augustine and Charlton
were escorted to Court One,
Bank Lane yesterday after-
noon where they were for-
mally arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez.
The infant’s grandmother
and mother of Augustine
wept loudly on Bank Lane
yesterday as the accused
were escorted to court by

SEE page eight



Teddy Thaddeus Charlton
Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Employers illegally hiring foreign
workers ‘should pay $10,000 fine’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

EMPLOYERS who illegally hire foreign
workers should be forced to pay an increased
fine of $10,000 for contravening the Immi-
gration Act, Minister Branville McCartney

said yesterday.

Speaking at a senior manager’s conference
at the Breezes hotel in Cable Beach, the Min-
ister of Immigration said Bahamians who
employ illegal immigrants who have no right
to work or live in the country should be hit
with fines serious enough to affect businesses

that break the law.

£.

ts
Ng

Branville McCartney



“IT would like to see the fine increase to $10,000, and if they are
caught they would feel it in their pockets,” he said.

“We have an illegal problem and if we are serious about address-
ing the illegal problem let’s stop facilitating people from coming

over.
“Tt is not only about appre-
hension, it is about getting the
word out there.”
As he welcomed Immigration
chiefs to a day dedicated to the
review of legislative amend-

SEE page 11

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE
TO SPACE RESTRICTIONS,
THE COMICS PAGE IS AGAIN

NOT IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE.
THE PAGE WILL, HOWEVER,
RETURN TOMORROW.



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LOCAL NEWS



PM: $5m needed to cover
expected budget shorttall

GOVERNMENT has had to
find an additional $5 million to
make up for an anticipated short-
fall in the public service budget
caused by the decision to ask
police, immigration and customs
officers to take early retirement,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
said.

Yesterday, opposition
spokesman for the Public Service,
MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell
said that while it is normal for
this sector to experience a funding
shortfall, he feels that in these
cases the retirement of govern-
ment employees was not sought
in the name of “reform”, but
rather in order to remove politi-
cally contrary individuals.

“In the normal course of things
with the public service there’s
always a shortfall and this is
something the PLP would have
dealt with when it comes to the
actual budget time.

“What concerns us, of course,
is the fact that this was done, what
it’s costing to the overall public,
and whether this is the right thing
to do in the circumstances,” he
said.

“It doesn’t seem to be much
reform at all; all it is is a ques-
tion of dismissing some people
that he finds to be inconvenient to
the service and then turning
around and calling it streamlin-
ing or reform,” added the MP.

During his mid-year budget
statement in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday, Mr Ingraham
said extra money is required by
several government agencies as
they head into the second half of
the 2008/2009 budget period.

He said the funds that will be

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham speaking to the House.





“In the normal course of things with the
public service there’s always a shortfall and
this is something the PLP would have dealt
with when it comes to the actual budget

time.”



procured from other ministries
or departments, leaving the over-
all total cost of the budget
unchanged.

In addition to the $5,062,450
needed to “facilitate benefit pay-
ments to persons retiring from
the public service” and “make up
for a shortfall that will occur due
to early retirement packages” for
individuals from the three agen-

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Fred Mitchell

cies, $4,459,585 will be transferred
to the public service to meet oth-
er “expenditure needs” up to
June 2009.

Mr Mitchell said the PLP is
“disappointed” to see that no
money appears to have been
included in the budget for the
payment of pension entitlements
for prison officers agreed under
the former administration or
towards settling a dispute
between former Road Traffic offi-
cers and the government which
the PLP agreed to resolve in the
months before they left office in
2007.

“T’ve been trying since we lost
office to get that resolved,” said
Mr Mitchell.

“The government refuses to
do anything about it and these
people are really suffering from
this loss of pension entitlements.
These people don’t have the
resources to take the matter to
court.”

HOME | LIFE | TRAVEL



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Complaints against police ‘up 17%’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

COMPLAINTS against police
officers jumped by 17 per cent in
2008 compared to the previous

US State Department’s Human Rights
Report on the Bahamas is released

Despite these suggestions,
police have in the past argued
that they are impartial and adju-
dicate matters relating to police
misconduct.

The force has pointed to the
fact that officers were disciplined



year, according to the US State
Department’s Human Rights
Report on the Bahamas.

“There were 300 complaints
against police through Decem-
ber 19 (2008), compared with
249 in 2007. Of these 300 cases,
authorities resolved 139, 60
awaited judicial determination
of a complainant’s pending case,
and 101 were under investiga-
tion,” said the report, which was
released Wednesday.

“Of the 139 completed mat-
ters, 17 were referred to a police
tribunal, 11 were resolved infor-
mally, warnings were requested
in four cases, officers were dis-

charged in three cases, and the
rest were withdrawn (20), unsub-
stantiated (33), unfounded (8),
had insufficient evidence (39),
or did not require further action
(4),” the report said.

The State Department’s
report further notes that com-
pilers found information on the
nature of the complaints
“unavailable”, but added that
“in the past (offences) included
assault, unethical conduct,
unlawful arrest, and stealing.”

“The number of criminal
charges filed, if any, was not
reported,” it said.

The US State Department

creates annual reports on the
human rights situations in all
countries which receive assis-
tance from the US and which
are members of the United
Nations.

Each report covers a number
of areas, including compliance
with internationally recognised
individual, civil, political and
workers’ rights.

On the subject of the
Bahamas’ police force, the 2008
report notes that all officers
involved in “shooting or killing a
suspect are automatically placed
under investigation.”

The report said that the Police

Complaints and Corruption
Branch, which is responsible for
investigating allegations of police
brutality, reports directly to the
Deputy Commissioner, but has
no independent oversight.

The document also highlights
concerns expressed by local
attorneys and human rights
observers that the unit may lack
the independence necessary
to impartially investigate
abuses.

Commentators have also
pointed to this concern as one
that may discourage people from
reporting incidents that should
properly be investigated.

as evidence that they are able to
police their own.

Meanwhile, in the Police Act
passed in the House of Assem-
bly earlier this month, a provi-
sion is made for an independent
body to review investigations
into police officers.

According to the Act, no one
who has served as a police offi-
cer or in any elected government
office in the last five years can sit
on the body, which will report
to the Minister of National Secu-
rity.

The Police Service Act was
being debated in the Senate yes-
terday.
























Kenneth Russell

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Ministry of Housing “ran out of
money” for its home repairs in December
2008, leaving it unable to pay funds owed to
contractors who did work last year for two
months, Housing Minister Kenneth Russell
told The Tribune yesterday.

In the mid-year budget report tabled in
the House of Assembly on Wednesday,
provisions are made for the Ministry of
Housing to be given an additional $655,633
for repairs to some faulty houses built
under the former administration.

Minister Russell said: “It’s taking a long
time (to finish the repair of homes). Espe-
cially how we ran out of money in early
December. But we have the money now to
pay off the contractors we owe and to con-
tinue with repairs until June.”

now been repaired at a cost of over one
million dollars, hundreds more still need
fixing, Mr Russell said.

According to Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, the allocation of additional
funds to certain ministries and departments
in the mid-year budget will be done by
shifting money within ministries — per-
mitting the government to not spend any-
more in total than was approved last year
in parliament.

Of the $655,633 being reallocated to the
Ministry of Housing, $350,000 will go
towards the “cost of outstanding and unex-
pected emergency repairs” — to paying
off owed contractors, Mr Russell said.

Meanwhile, the remaining $305,633 will
be spent on other repairs that will be car-
ried out up until June 2009.

The issue of low-cost government hous-
ing was much discussed in parliament in the
first year after the FNM became the gov-

Ministry ‘ran out of money’ for home repairs

While the former PLP administration
pointed to the thousands of homes con-
structed during their tenure as an achieve-
ment which they are proud of, the incom-
ing government, like numerous home-
owners who made their disappointment
known to the press, pointed to the sub-par
condition of some homes as a blight on
their record.

Some contractors and other sources
alleged that shoddy workmanship prevailed
in many instances because of corruption
within the Ministry of Housing and among
contractors. A police investigation into
these allegations has been inconclusive so
far.

Despite attention required by “hun-
dreds” of homes built prior to the general
election of May 2007, Mr Russell said that
his ministry is keeping up with the con-
struction of new homes at the rate desired.
He said over two hundred homes are cur-



While “a couple hundred” homes have

ernment.

rently under construction.

Key witness reveals role in plot to rob businessman

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

STARTLING _ testimony
emerged in the Keith Carey mur-
der trial yesterday as a key pros-
ecution witness revealed his role
in the plot to rob the business-
man.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown
and Dwight Knowles are accused
of the murder and also face
charges of armed robbery and
conspiracy to commit armed rob-
bery.

Vaughn Carey, 34, a cousin of
the victim, testified that the rob-
bery plot did not initially involve
killing the businessman.

The victim was gunned down
on the steps of the Bank of the
Bahamas on Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway on February
27, 2006. He was killed before he
was able to deposit money that
belonged to the gas station that
he operated.

Vaughn Carey testified that
in January 2006, Dwight Knowles
approached him about “setting
up” the victim.

“I told him that I would have
to think about it,” the witness
said.

He said he had known
Knowles for a year prior to that
occasion, as Knowles frequent-
ed the Esso Service Station on
Carmichael Road and Faith
Avenue where he worked.

Carey testified that he agreed
to aid in the plot when Knowles
returned two days later. He tes-
tified that at that time, Knowles
introduced him to Sean Brown,
who had no fingers on his right
hand. He only had a thumb.

Carey said the men asked
which day would be best to carry
out the robbery, when the busi-
nessman made his deposits and to
which bank. He said the conver-
sation took place in Knowles’
white Nissan Maxima.

Carey testified that he asked
the men how the robbery would
be carried out, noting the fact
that Brown had only one “good”
hand.

“Dwight said that his friend
‘Bumper’ would do the robbery.
He said that ‘Bumper’ would
jump out of the car, throw Keith
to the ground and snatch the
bag,” the witness told the court.

He then identified Jamal Glin-
ton as ‘Bumper’.

Carey testified that while
working at the gas station
between 9am and 10am on Feb-
ruary 27, 2006, he was
approached by Sean Brown, who
pointed across the street to where
Knowles had parked his car and
was standing next to Keith’s
Breakfast Hut.

At this point in the testimony,
some of the victim’s relatives
began cry in court.

“Sean asked if he had left to go
to the bank and I told him no

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and that they would have to
wait,” the witness continued,
adding that he told the men that
the victim was going to deposit
about $70,000.

Carey testified that although
he did not see anyone else at the
time, when the two men got back
into the car he saw a third man in
the back passenger seat and
remembered that Knowles had
mentioned ‘Bumper.’

Carey said that as the victim
left the station and got into his
blue Toyota hatchback, he took
off his hat as a signal to the men
that the victim was heading to
the bank.

He said the men followed the
victim north onto Faith Avenue
and out of his sight.

Five to 10 minutes later, he
said, the victim’s wife Michelle,
who also worked at the station,
gave him certain information and
instructions. He said that as a
result, he stayed at the station
and later went to a bar.

Testified

Carey testified that he never
saw the men again and had no
contact information for them.

He said he went looking for
the three men because he was
afraid, adding that each had
agreed to give him $3,000 for his
role.

Carey said that while on
remand at Her Majesty’s Prison,
he and the three accused men

mane

met in the prison yard and
Knowles admitted that the rob-
bery had not gone as planned.

Carey said Knowles told him
that that the victim had seen
“Bumper” out of the corner of
his eye and had fallen on the
steps of the bank. The witness
said Knowles told him the victim
threw the bag with the money in
it, and all ‘Bumper’ had to do
was pick up it up.

“Keith put up no resistance,
but he still shot Keith,” Carey
said.

He said Knowles told him that
there was $48,000 in the bag, that
the three men got $16,000 each,
and that they had looked for him
but had no contact information
for him and that the gas station
had closed after the incident.

During cross-examination by
Brown’s attorney Dorsey
McPhee, Carey admitted that in
his first police statement he had
referred to Sean Brown as “the
man with no fingers.”

Carey said that he knew
Brown only had a thumb on his
right hand because when he first
saw Brown, he had no bandage
on his right hand.

During cross-examination by
Knowles’ attorney Perry Albury,
Carey admitted that he had given
police two statements — the first
in March 2006, the second in Jan-
uary 2009.

Mr Albury suggested that
Carey never met Knowles. Carey
denied the suggestion.

Mervin Benson, 42, testified

*

EKS Feb23-m

ISSA

yesterday that around 1lam on
the last Monday in February
2006, he was at his home on
Homestead Avenue when Jamal
Glinton, whom he knew as
‘Bumper’, arrived with two men.

He said that Glinton told him
that he wanted to “work a wibe”.

Benson said he had known
Glinton for three to five years
prior to that, but did not really
know the other men.

He said that Glinton often
came to the neighbourhood to
“work his hustle’” and often
came to the house to “cut up his
herb.”

He said that that morning,
Glinton was carrying a black and
brown bag.

He said that the three men
went into a back room where
they stayed for about an hour.

Police

Benson testified that in 2007,
he saw Glinton at the Needles
Inn on Homestead Avenue and
Lincoln Boulevard, where Glin-
ton approached him about a
statement he gave police regard-
ing the case.

He said Glinton told him that
his girlfriend had become preg-
nant while he was incarcerated
and that he had given someone
$80,000 to keep, but that person
had spent it.

Benson said that he saw Glin-
ton about four times after that,
but tried to avoid him.

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During cross-examination,
attorney Craig Butler asked Ben-
son why he had not mentioned
the information regarding the
money in his first statement to
police and suggested that he was
lying.

Benson denied lying, but
admitted that never wanted to
be a witness and did not want to
have anything to do with the law.

He said the statements he gave
to police were true.

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Electronic
work permits
could be
introduced
within the year

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net











ELECTRONIC work per-
mits the size of credit cards
could be introduced within
the year to enable the Immi-
gration Department to track
foreign workers more effi-
ciently.

Amendments to the
Immigration Act allowing
for the issuance of electronic
permits and the new type of
cards were reviewed by
senior immigration man-
agers at a conference held at
Breezes yesterday.

Minister of State for
Immigration Branville
McCartney said he hopes
the necessary legislation will
be passed by parliament
before it breaks for summer
recess so that the new cards
can be introduced this year.

The plastic wallet-sized
cards should be more conve-
nient for foreign workers to
carry with them at all times,
and will replace the paper
permits that are frequently
forged.

Cards will be logged on a
sophisticated computer sys-
tem which is already in place
and ready for operation
once the legislation has been
passed, Mr McCartney said.

“By the touch of a button
we will be able to see who
has a work permit, the type
of permit, and it will give us
an idea of who will be in the
country.

“Right now it is a labori-
ous task and there are
instances when you do have
to apprehend persons and
bring them in because there
are fraudulent documents
out there,” he said.

“But nothing is 100 per
cent, so when this system is
in place there will be times
when persons have to come
and verify their status.”

Plans to introduce the
new electronic permits have
been in place for sometime
now and were developed
alongside the introduction
of the new electronic pass-
ports for Bahamian citizens.
























































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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Obama plan brings cries of class warfare

WASHINGTON (AP) — He's not being
timid, that's for sure.

President Barack Obama's first federal bud-
get lays out the most far-reaching agenda for
American life since Lyndon Johnson's Great
Society. But paying for it by having upper-
income earners shoulder much of the cost quick-
ly provoked cries of class warfare in Congress.

The Obama priorities reflected in the $3.6
trillion budget guarantee a fierce political battle
ahead over taxes and spending. And despite
the administration's agonizing over the depth
and global nature of the worst recession in
decades, the new president's budget forecasts a
rapid U.S. recovery.

The budget outline includes activist initiatives
on energy, health care, education and climate
change. It would boost taxes on the wealthy, oil
companies and other businesses while cutting
Medicare and Medicaid payments to insurance
companies and hospitals to make way for a
$634 billion down payment on universal health
care. It would also limit charitable and other tax
deductions for the affluent and trim spending on
government subsidies to big farms.

Predictably, Republicans complained, much
as they had done during last year's presidential
campaign, that Obama was pitting the haves
against the have-nots.

"The era of big government is back, and
Democrats are asking you to pay for it," said
House Republican leader John Boehner of
Ohio. He suggested Obama's proposed tax
increases would reach deep into the middle
class, despite repeated administration state-
ments that tax hikes would be limited to families
making more than $250,000 a year.

Proposed new excise taxes on offshore
drilling and plans to cap greenhouse gas emis-
sions and require polluters to buy permits could
affect "all Americans who drive a car, who have
a job, who turn on a light switch," Boehner
said.

Boehner and other Republicans also said it
was folly to raise taxes during a recession.

But the administration's own economic fore-
casts suggest that the brunt of the tax increases,
including allowing existing tax cuts from the
Bush administration to expire, will fall only
after the nation is in recovery.

The Obama budget forecasts that, despite the
depth of the current recession, the economy
will recover and grow by 3.2 per cent in 2010
and then climb to an even more robust 4 per
cent in the three following years.

Most of the proposed Obama tax hikes,
including the permit levy on greenhouse gas
emissions, would not take effect until a pre-
sumably post-recession 2012.

Christina Romer, chairman of the presiden-
t's Council of Economic Advisers, defended
the administration's upbeat forecast for recov-

Fully furnished Phatal equipped SIRI e eee

ery, saying it "reflects the administration's
assessment that the comprehensive recovery
programme outlined by the president on Tues-
day night will be effective."

But some deficit hawks suggested that Oba-
ma was being too optimistic given the severity of
the recession.

"He is relying on a strong economic come-
back very quickly. And he's assuming that a
lot of the new issues will be paid for," said
Robert Bixby, the executive director of the
Concord Coalition, a bipartisan fiscal watch-
dog group.

Bixby said the budget has "a lot of downside
risk" that spending increases will not be fully off-
set by higher tax revenues. Obama's budget
plan projects a record $1.75 trillion deficit for
2009, largely swollen by stimulus and bank
bailout spending. Obama has said he hopes to
sharply reduce the annual shortfall by the end of
his term. In remarks, Obama said his budget
was an attempt to fairly "come to grips with
the hard choices that lie ahead."

But in written comments accompanying the
budget, he struck a far more defiant and populist
tone, blaming much of the government's budget
woes on his predecessor, President George W.
Bush.

"Prudent investments in education, clean
energy, health care, and infrastructure were
sacrificed for huge tax cuts for the wealthy and
well-connected," Obama wrote. "There's noth-
ing wrong with making money, but there is
something wrong when we allow the playing
field to be tilted so far in the favour of so few."

Asked whether the class-warfare argument
could complicate White House efforts to win
support for some of its big priorities, White
House spokesman Robert Gibbs said, "No. And
I think it's important to understand that what
the president has enumerated in his budget
today is precisely the blueprint and series of
promises that he made over the course of two
years in a campaign ... that the American people
voted for."

Still, Stanley Collender, a longtime budget
expert, predicted a huge battle in Congress over
the proposed tax cuts and Medicare changes.
But he noted that, with Democrats in control of
the House and Senate, there's probably not
much Republicans can do to keep the expiring
Bush tax cuts from ending on their own.

Furthermore, said Collender, in the current
economic and political climate, "the wealthy
are not as well thought of as they have been in
the past.”

He also noted that exit polls from last year's
presidential election showed those making more
than $200,000 a year tended to vote for Obama
rather than Republican Senator John McCain.

(This article was written by Tom Raum of the
Associated Press).



Petty theft
seems to
have become
acceptable

Bawa

EDITOR, The Tribune.

May I second the Letter to
the Editor entitled “Petty
Theft” (The Bahama Journal,
January 30, 2009) by R McKen-
zie.

Regarding the “tasting” of
grapes prior to purchasing
them, I, too, have decided that I
would no longer give silent con-
sent to this behaviour by doing
nothing about it.

I have asked a number of
people why they do it. They
usually reply that they are just
tasting. I tell them that they can
call it whatever they like, but
that it is nevertheless what they
very well know it is.

I say to them that we teach
our children not to eat any
items before we have paid for

letters@tribunemedia net



them.

Then the children see adults
doing just the opposite. What
are the children supposed to
think?

By the way, it is not just
grapes.

One day a “lady” picked up
an apple, took a bite, then gave
it to her child (who wasn’t even
asking for it).

On another occasion I chal-
lenged a “gentleman” in a nice
business suit who was munching
away at the dates (at $10.00 a
pound).

I asked him if he didn’t see

the relationship between his
behaviour and the crime prob-
lem in the country.

His answer: “Don’t you com-
pare me with those people, you
crazy woman.”

Petty theft has become so
common that people no longer
care who sees it.

After all, they are just “tast-
ing”.

It has become accepted
behaviour.

Most people just blindly copy
what others are doing. Are we
no longer able to think for our-
selves?

Or have we lost the ability to
tell right from wrong?

U McKINNEY
Nassau,
February 3, 2009.

What the Constitution says

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We all know that the beating that the FNM
and Rt Hon Hubert Ingraham received at the
hand of the Bahamian public in the national ref-
erendum back prior to the 1997 election will and
has forever caused the Prime Minister to change
his mind on ever holding a Constitutional Refer-
endum on even the most simplest item such as the
extending of tenure of judges of the Supreme

Court.

The Police Act debated and passed with the
opposition abstaining is a clear indication that
for some reason MPs can’t read The Constitution
and rationally deduce that if there is no restriction
today in the 1973 Constitution by placing restric-
tions to tenure of office of the Commissioner
and Deputy Commissioner you are naturally and

I also read into this that per the Constitution
where sometimes we have not had a substantive

Commissioner and/or Deputy Commissioner we
were in violation, I suggest, of the Constitution.

Do we now wait for an Attorney to bring a
challenge to this proposed legislation which is
heading quickly to the Senate?

The Commissioner is also the Provost Mar-
shall of The Bahamas which position is strictly
Constitutional and is without any doubt excep-

tionally important.

very obviously not in compliance with the Con-

stitution.

Your readers are directed to the Constitution

Article:119 (1).

He reads the writ to dissolve parliament and to
call a general election and has the awesome task
having to read the death warrant and witness for
the crown any hanging — how could any supreme
civil law give credence of not having someone in
a substantive appointed position? Totally illogical.
Acting is unacceptable.

SHEPARD SMITH

Nassau,

February 14, 2009.

Correct spelling should accompany technology

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Coming out of the stone-age
can only be the description of the
late arrival of the most modern
method of transmitting the news
— finally we can say congratula-
tions to The Tribune but add a
warning....with this technology
comes a lot of responsibility as
before only us locals and foreign
subscribers read The Tribune
now the world can, so please
make us proud.

Spelling — I cannot understand
why on the weather map on ZNS
TV-13 so very often the simple
word — harbour is harbor? Okay

there is a word spell check on a
computer, but we are English
speaking. Queen’s English and
not that abbreviated English
Americans use.

JEROME SMITH
Nassau,
February, 2009.

(Now that we are on the sub-
ject of ZNS and spelling, it would
be helpful if when identifying
members of the House of Assem-
bly and their constituencies, they
would get the spelling of the
name of the constituency correct.
For example, Mr Frank Smith is
MP for St Thomas More, not St

Thomas Moore. The constituency
was named after St Thomas More
Church, and the church was
named after St Thomas More,
Lord Chancellor of England, who
was beheaded in 1535 for refusing
to sign the Act of Supremacy that
declared King Henry VIII
Supreme Head of the Church of
England.

(The Bahamas has its own
Moore family, the best known
being the late Sir Walter Moore,
president of the Legislative Coun-
cil (now Senate), whose home
opposite St Francis Xavier Cathe-
dral, is now the National Art
Gallery. — Ed)

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THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief :

for firearm
possession

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A Freeport }
man was sentenced to eight }
months in prison after plead- ;
ing guilty to possession of a ;
firearm in a Freeport Magis- :

trates Court.

Kendrick Williams, 23, was }
charged with possession of an }
unlicensed firearm in Court }
One before Magistrate Deb- }

bye Ferguson.

Williams was found in pos- :
session of a .357 Smith and :
Wesson revolver on February :
Grand }

25, at Freeport,
Bahama.
According to police reports,

Williams and three other men :
were walking on Bonefish }
Street in Caravel Beach when }
police observed Williams act-

ing suspiciously.

Officers searched Williams }
and discovered a firearm ina i

knapsack on his back.
In a separate court matter,

Maxwell Jones, 22, of South
Bahamia, was also charged }

with firearm possession.

He pleaded not guilty to the i
charge and was granted $7,000 :
bail with one surety. The mat- }
ter was adjourned to March

13.

Consulate General
Office in Atlanta
to open in April

@ By LINDSAY
THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Services

THE new Consulate
General Office in Atlanta,
Georgia will be opened by
April 1, the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs confirmed.

“That office will offer a
wide-range of consular ser-
vices such as Bahamian
passports, visas and other
legalised documents, and
promotion of businesses,
investments and culture in
the Bahamas,” said Joshua
Sears, Director General at
the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs.

The process of staffing is
underway and the office
will be located in the same
building that houses the
Ministry of Tourism office.

The Atlanta Consulate,
Mr Sears said, will accom-
modate the large volume of
business interests floating
through that hub known as
the gateway to the United
States.

He said the office would
relieve the heavy volume
experienced by the Miami
Consulate Office in Florida.

Mr Sears urged Bahami-
ans studying and living in
Atlanta to register with the
consulate office once it is
opened to utilise the ser-
vices there.

The consular jurisdictions
for Atlanta are Alabama,
Arkansas, Georgia, Kansas,
Kentucky, Missouri, North
Carolina, Oklahoma, South
Carolina, and Tennessee.

The Consulate General
Office in Miami, which has
oversight for Florida,
Louisiana and Mississippi,
now has oversight for Ari-
zona, New Mexico, Col-
orado, Texas and Utah.

The Consulate General
Office in New York has
oversight for New Hemi-
sphere, New Jersey, Con-
necticut, Delaware, Massa-
chusetts, Vermont, Pennsyl-
vania, Rhode Island and
Maine.

The Bahamas Embassy in
Washington, DC, is respon-
sible for Ohio, the District
of Columbia, Oregon, Vir-
ginia, West Virginia, Michi-
gan, Wisconsin, Minnesota,
North Dakota, Indiana,
Nevada, Idaho, Wyoming,
Montana, Illinois,

Iowa, Alaska, Hawaii,
Nebraska, Maryland, and
California.

ae
US)

Ute ta
PHONE: 322-2157





Prison Dept gets
an extra $852,000 |
funding from govt |

IN ORDER to compensate for
the increase in food prices, the
Prison Department was allocated
$852,000 in additional funding
from the government.

This sum was outlined in the
mid-year budget report for the
2008/2009 fiscal year which covers
the period of July 1, 2008 to
December 31, 2008. The document
was tabled in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday.

Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest refrained from
providing a breakdown of these
resources until he gives his contri-
bution to the mid-year budget
debate next week.

However, he said the additional
funds requested were in keeping
with the government's responsi-
bility to adequately provide for all
incarcerated persons.

"Government's responsibility is
to ensure that those persons in its
protective custody are treated
humanely, are fed. But the opera-
tional costs of the prison in some
areas - we've had budget increases
and we put them in the mid-year
budget to deal with,” he said.

The Prison Department was also

















THIS accident
occurred shortly after
10am on Market Street
when the driver of a sil-



turn over.

The driver of the SUV
escaped uninjured, while
the driver of the bus sus-
tained visible injuries to
his right hand and had
to be taken away in an
ambulance.

Proud Paws







ANIMAL lovers are invited to
attend the Proud Paws Potcake Par-
ty which will be held on Saturday,
February 28, (not Friday - as was
previously reported) from 6pm to
midnight at the Bahamas National
Trust’s Retreat on Village Road.
The event will be an evening of
entertainment, music and dancing.
There will also be raffle prizes, a
silent auction and a light buffet.

Tickets for Saturday’s event are
available at Palmdale Veterinary
Clinic, Caves Village Clinic or at the
door. Please note that no dogs will be
allowed.

ee eS a GUE ENS

ver SUV (left) collided
with a bus, causing it to |T%

given an additional $36,000 to cov-
er increased gasoline costs; $27,000
to cover escalating diesel costs;
$23,000 to off-set rising prices in
propane, and $114, 000 for the pur-
chase of cleaning supplies.

Budget

Also outlined in the mid-year
budget, the Royal Bahamas Police
Force was given $382,500 for the
engagement of 85 new recruits for
the period of April to June, 2009;
$249,000 for the increase of travel
and settling of outstanding arrears
due to airlines; $250,000 for sub-
sistence for travellers in the
Bahamas; $10,000 for the local
transportation of goods due to the
increase in freight charges; $90,000
for the transportation of bodies for
the increasing need of mortician
services; $200,000 to cover gaso-
line costs for the next six months
and depleted gas funding in the
Family Islands, and $70,000 for
diesel to be used in fire trucks, bus-
es and generators.

An additional $80,000 was also
allocated for photocopying, pho-

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tography and blueprinting costs
which have increased due to ris-
ing levels of crime; $85,000 to cov-
er the maintenance of photocopy-
ing machines; $125,000 for forensic
science costs — $50,000 to pay
DNA Labs International for analy-
ses based on the current forensic
science case load and $75,000 to
contract Fairfax Identity Labs to
assist with the establishment of a
DNA Unit.

An extra $40,000 was given to
the police for the purchase of com-
puter software, supplies and acces-
sories; $150,000 for food for per-
sons in custody, recruit gradua-
tions, and other functions in New
Providence and the Family Islands;
$300,000 to buy uniform materi-
als for new recruits, to pay tailors
in Grand Bahama and New Prov-
idence; $75,000 for the mainte-
nance of computer and business
equipment; $100,000 for genera-
tor, air-conditioning and other
machinery maintenance; $125,000
to complete renovations and ongo-
ing repairs at police headquarters;
and $50,000 to fund the
maintenance of various police sta-
tions.



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

eve

Is cutting the store in half

/ Muistry Of Tourism endorses new
cruise port for Grand Bahama

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
remains among the weakest players in
the cruise tourism sector despite its envi- 9
able proximity to the US market,
Deputy-Director of Tourism Vernice
Walkine said.

The Ministry of Tourism, she said yes-
terday at the Grand Bahama Business
Outlook, fully endorses the develop-
ment of a new cruise passenger port as a
major attraction.

A new port could cost anywhere from
$15 to $60 million, depending on the
location, according to a Carnival Cruise
Line executive.

Freeport Harbour is considered too industrial and too far
removed from tourist attractions.

These two issues are among some of the main deterrents for
cruise ships.

Ms Walkine reported that Grand Bahama receives only
300,000 cruise passengers a year when that number could easi-
ly to be tripled.

She noted that almost 100 per cent of the cruise ships entering
the Caribbean from virtually every port north of West Palm
Beach pass almost in sight of Grand Bahama.

Ms Walkine said she believes that a new port is vital to the
renewal of the island.

“We know that this is in the best interest of the general pub-
lic that this development be accelerated.

Value

“T know that there are many sectors of the Grand Bahama
community that fully understand and appreciate the tremendous
value to the economy to be derived by the tripling of the num-
ber of cruise passengers coming to the island,” she said.

Giora Israel, vice-president of strategic planning at Carnival
Cruise Lines, said his company is interested in becoming partners
with the government, the Grand Bahama Port Authority and
Freeport Harbour in the development of a new cruise port on
Grand Bahama.

However, he also expressed concern over the lack of attrac-
tions and activities available to cruise passengers and encouraged
the development of new activities other than snorkelling or
glass bottom boat tours.

Mtr Israel said Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is trying to put
a group together to be willing partners in the development of the
new port.

The government is now in the process of identifying a suitable
location — a location that works from the land side and maritime
side, he said.

Ms Walkine said that duty-free shopping is another area of
major potential for Grand Bahama.

“We simply need the decision-makers to make a declaration
for Grand Bahama Island to be an international shopping cen-
tre similar to Dubai.

She stressed that Grand Bahama is already a global hub for
ocean freight movements.

“The Freeport Container Port can gain great distribution
advantage, being the hub for these inexpensive movements and
can very easily be promoted with the country as the ideal source
of goods coming into the country, making it an international
duty-free shopping Mecca,” she said.

Ms Walkine said thousands of people could fly to Grand
Bahama every day from the eastern US to shop.

Vernice Walkine



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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

6

&

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

RIGHT: The videographer
captures the couple’s moments.

FAR RIGHT: Daniel and
Linzi Belton and their
underwater marriage officer
Matthew Sweeting.

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Underwater weddings
offered at Atlantis

TO ATTRACT visitors
who are looking for an
unique experience, Atlantis
is now offering couples
underwater wedding services.

Atlantis is opening up one
its feature venues, “The
Ruins Lagoon”, that just may
become the next top spot to
get married.

With a stunning array of
sea life as the guests of hon-
our, couples can now
exchange or renew their vows
underwater.

Local marriage officer
Matthew Sweeting intro-
duced the project to the
Atlantis team.

“The increased requests for
underwater weddings would
make a lot of sense when you
have Atlantis’ world
renowned underwater habi-
tat as the backdrop,” he said.

Mr Sweeting said the idea
took hold with Atlantis’
senior director of marine and

water park operations Glen
Kelly and Michelle Lui-
Williamson, vice-president of
marine aquarium operations,
who then began developing
the idea that guarantees even
the most discerning bride and
groom all the frills that any
“dry” wedding may provide.

Photography

The underwater wedding
package includes the nuptials
with full underwater and out-
of-water photography and
videography followed by
ultra-luxurious pampering at
Mandara Spa that precedes
an intimate reception for the
bride and groom and their
wedding guests.

An underwater wedding
test run was held on Valen-
tine’s Day with photograph-
er Tim Aylen, videographer
Troy Aitken and the “My
Atlantis Photos” team cap-

tured the memories of Daniel
and Linzi Belton who
renewed their vows in the
unique setting.

Braving the chilly waters,
Linzi donned her original
wedding dress and Daniel a
traditional black and white
tuxedo as they literally
took the plunge for a second
time.

The event was not without
its amusing moments as Linz-
i’s veil came off in her descent
into the Ruins tank and then
she had to learn how to ele-
gantly walk underwater.

The ceremony was flawless
as both Ruins “residents”
the sea life — and those watch-
ing from the Royal Towers
Great Hall of Waters were
enamored by the event.

Future weddings will offer
all the bells and whistles of
underwater communications
and custom-made his and
hers wedding wetsuits.

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&

THE TRIBUNE





PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham walks around t

PM opens major

Sees i
——

he expo on its official opening.

6

LOCAL NEWS

Et
rs

agricultural expo

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham officially opened the
Second Annual Agricultural,
Marine Resources and
Agribusiness Exposition at the
Gladstone Road Agricultural
Centre yesterday.

Mr Ingraham described the
level of representation and the
quality of products displayed
at the expo as “impressive”
and congratulated the Min-
istry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources for the
great job done in spear-head-
ing the event.

“The renewed and enthusi-
astic expressions of interest in
local production by a wide
cross-section of our commu-
nity is commendable. Exhibi-
tions such as this one serve as
important showcases for

Bahamian products, assisting
in the creation and expansion
of markets for Bahamian
products.

“By raising the awareness
of consumers to the wide vari-
ety, quality and price compet-
itiveness of domestic produc-
tion, exhibitions of this nature
help to increase consumption
of domestic output.

“This is important because
it will not only create employ-
ment and raise the incomes of
producers, but also effect sav-
ings in foreign exchange that
would otherwise be expend-
ed for imports,” he said.

The theme for this year’s
exhibition, “Promoting locally
sustainable agricultural and
marine production and con-
sumption toward improving

food security”, brings focus to
the critical issue of food secu-
rity at a time of rising food
prices, the prime minister said.

¢ FOR FULL STORY
SEE BUSINESS

&

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 7




Beauty Festivdl

VL gE

It's a celebration of beauty and you're invited!

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

SO:

Fobn |

the cosmetic
Boutique

February 27th & 28th

10am to 4om

John Bull, 284 Bay Street

The Cosmetic Boutique, Bay & Charlotte Streets

David Yurman, Bay Street

Friday, February 27th, 10am - 4om

LITTLE DUCKS crowd together at the expo.



- Complimentary Makeovers*

+ International Make-up Artists & Skin Care Consultants
+ In-store Animation

- Free Gifts with Purchase

- Starbucks Coffee featured

Saturday, February 28th, 10am - 4om

- Complimentary Makeovers”

+ International Make-up Artists & Skin Care Consultants
- Beauty Workshops

- Product Demonstration/Face Mapping

* Free Gifts with Purchase

* Mini Manicures

- Mini Massage

+ In-store Animation

* Health & Wellness Corner

- Complimentary Jewellery Cleaning (limited to 2 pieces)
* John Hardy Jewellery stylist

- Starbucks Coffee featured

*Call 802-2800 to book your makeover appointment.
(Minimum $25.00 purchase required)

John Bull, 302-2800 - The Cosmetic Boutique, 323-2731





(Wy
LY

PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



























2008 FORD
EXPLORER XLT

5 passenger, leather
interior, loaded with all
options extra special
CASH price with
discounts & factory
incentives

2008 FORD
SPORT TRAC

4.0L V6 Automatic

with leather
interior, loaded
with all options
extr special
CASH price with
Discounts 7
factory incentives

°37,300”

Hurry in! Right Now is the best time to get
your best deal on a new Ford vehicle.

Price includes 3 year warranty
a3 year roadside assistant and 5 FREE services.

Available at

«zz» FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 » FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

SmartChoice

LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

approximately 600.

“Observers complained of continuing abuse by
guards, although immigration officials claimed
that no such complaints were filed during the year.
Human rights groups expressed concern that com-
plaint investigations were handled internally with-
out independent review and oversight. Children
under the age of 14 were held in the women's dor-
mitory. Many children arriving with both parents
were not allowed contact with the father except
during weekly visitation. Despite the possibility
of being held for months, children did not have
access to education,” the report said.

The average length of detention varied signifi-
cantly by nationality, willingness of governments to
accept their nationals back in a timely manner,
and availability of funds to pay for repatriation.

Haitians usually were repatriated within one
week, while Cubans were held for much longer
periods.

The US report said that although the country is
a signatory to both the 1951 UN Convention relat-
ing to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 protocol,
the government has not established a consistent
system for the protocol.

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

is having a

20%-50% OFF SALE

Beginning Thursday
February 26th, 2009



Mackey Street « Telephone: 393-0744
Monday . al bt 3:30pm

Concern over Department of
Immigration investigations

The authorities detained illegal immigrants, pri-
marily Haitians, until arrangements could be made
for them to leave the country or they obtained
legal status.

“Tn practice the government provided some pro-
tection against the expulsion or return of refugees
to countries where their lives or freedom would be
threatened. Applications for political asylum were
adjudicated on a case-by-case basis at the cabinet
level. The authorities did not grant asylum during
the year,” it said.

The report pointed out that both local and inter-
national human rights observers criticised gov-
ernment for failing to screen potential asylum
applicants adequately.

“Those requesting asylum screening often lacked
access to legal counsel. Human rights observers
claimed that the government detained Cuban
migrants for excessive periods. The government
asserted that all migrants who claimed asylum
were interviewed and screened adequately by
trained immigration officials,” the report said.

Mother and
boyfriend
charged with
the murder
of her baby

FROM page one

police. Augustine could only
look back tearfully as her moth-
er fell to the ground in anguish,



NOTICE

Saveco Trading will be close for
stocktaking on Monday March 2nd
and Tuesday March 3rd 2009. We
will re-open on March 4th 2009 at
10:00 am for business as usual.
Sorry for any inconvenience this

may have caused.

Thanks for your support.

Management

, pe

’ Latter}
2009

We recognize and thank the following for their
support of Bahamian children with cancer:

Derek & Darmell Osborne = Dairy Queen
Minister Loretta Butler-Tumer
Michelle Pindling Sands
Players & coaches of Insurance Management's Bears Soccer Club
sue Roberts - Cancer Society
Joanne Smith —- Media Enterprises
Krissy Love - Island FM
Karen — The Tribune

the many Schools and Businesses for their gracious support!

screaming so loudly that order-
lies from nearby courts had to
urge her to be quiet.
According to court dockets,
Augustine and Charlton
between Monday, February 16
and Sunday, February 22, 2009,
intentionally caused the death
of Fiara Augustine Santil. The
accused, who were represented
by attorneys Tai Pinder, Mario
McCartney and Jomo Camp-
bell, were not required to enter
a plea to the charge. A prelimi-
nary inquiry will be held to
determine whether there is suf-
ficient evidence against the
accused for them to stand trial
in the Supreme Court.
Attorney Pinder told the
court that Charlton claimed that
he had been beaten severely
while in police custody and
asked that he receive medical
attention. Chief Magistrate
Gomez ordered that Charlton
receive medical attention. The
accused were remanded to Her
Majesty’s prison. The case was
adjourned to March 18.





(|W

PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

6

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Reston Memorial Morlaary Three Detention Centre detainees

and Crematoiiam

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 373. 373- A116 J (242) ore ard
Pager: (242) 340: ‘auc (242) 373-

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

LOUISE JOSEY
BAIN, 50



Robinson and Soldier erie
P.O. Box CB-' 12072
Telephone: (242) 304 8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: (242} 340-8034

lassau, N.P., Bahamas

of Bethel Avenue will

be held on Sunday,

March Ist, 2009,

1:00p.m. at Hillview

Seventh Day Adventist

Church. Officiating

will be Pastor Peter

Joseph, assisted by other ministers of the
gospel and interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Roads.

Awaiting her resurrection are her children:
Antenella Bain, Adell Mcphee and Adam
Bastian; Adopted Daughter: Rochelle Green;
Grand daughter: Aniah Bain; Sisters: Effie
McIntosh, Darlene, Kimberley, Kermika,
Hiltina, Syd, Annette, and Raquel; Brothers:
Valentino, Clifford, Dewitte, Excel and Brent;
Aunts: Marietta McKinney, Julia Bain
Deveaux, Dorothy Bain-Curtis, Lee,
Sharmaine, Joyanne, Maryanne, and Larayette
Josey, Pat McKenzie, Ruthmae Adderley, Elsie
Winder, Barbara Bain, Lynette Bain, Judy
Bain, Nellie Pratt, Lilla Smith, Louise Smith,
Ruby Thurston; Uncles: Hayward McKinney,
Gilbert, Godfrey, and Clifford Bain, Anthony
Curtis Sr, Latandra, Arnold, Rufus, Pedro,
Desmond, and Dino Josey; Grand Aunt:
Willamae McKenzie; Sisters-in-law: Denise
and Sabrina Bain; Nieces and Nephews too
numerous to list. Other Relatives and Friends
including: Leading Mechanic Nevada Bain,
RBDF, Leading Seaman Dwayne Deveaux,
RBDF, Constable 1112 Owen Hanna, RBPF,
Lisa Young, Dr. Ada Thompson, Dr. Aneska
Armbrister, Nurse Phillipa Farquharson.

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at
Restview Memorial Mortuary and
Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads
on Saturday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and
at the church on Sunday from 11:30 am to
service time.

Bemeritte's Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
« MARKET STREET
* P.O. BOX GT-2087 » TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Patrick Leonard

Bethel Sr., 40,
a resident of Daveaun Street, wil be held at
Our Lady of the Holy Souls Cathole Church,
Deveaux Steel, on Saturday al 12200 noon.
Officiating wil be Fr. Michael Kaly, ss.cc.,
assisled by Rev. Deacon Peter Ratring &
Fev, Deacon Maxwell Jotinson, Intermeri
folows in Cathole Cemetery, Tyler Street.
Left ip cherish his mamories are his mother: Fredrica Bethel: son: Patrick Bethel Jr;
2 aunts: Cametia Willams& Martha Mophee; 9 brothers: Benjamin, Daniel, Dele,
Daren, Adrian St,, Kenwood, Terence, Ralph & Rodney Bethel 6 sisters: Coralee
Smith, Gayiean Gibson, Cyprianna Thompson, Deneloe & Rosemary Curtis &
Wendy Belhel: 3 adooted sisters: Margarete Willams, Michelle Knowles &
Samantha Green; nieoes & nephews: Benjalina, Jamal, Sheena, Teco, Dayan,
Benzel, Lakisha, Laquinta, Meagan, Shayna, Sabbath, Samane, Laquoya & Daniel
Bethel Jr., Palrina, Shaquile, Angelo & Able Seaman Bravado Thompson, Michael,
Lanoramas & Leonard Gibson Jt, Terran, Terrence, Kahja, Ketsha, Dia, DeWvan,
Jade, Deontarique, Tomand, Davaado, Denaisha, Terah, Justin, Shaquile, Rashad,
Crystal, Bizabeth, Deonia, Nicola Farrington, Janel Ramsey & Shanlel Cooper, 2
brothars-in-law: Leonard Gibson Sr. & Patrick Thompson: 4 sisters-in-law: Michelle,
June, Ancrea A Jucy Bethel: 10 grand laces & nephews: Kevon, David, Briana,
Raven, Benelique, Zachary, Shiah, Laxethra, Benge! J & Tristan; cousins:
Pauletie & James Macey, Gracie McPhee, Merve Higgins, Peler Walkes, Anthony,
Andre & Berard Lynden, Brian Goodridge, Maurice Ferguson, lan Green, Maryane,
Gertrude, Cardinal, Uriah Je, Gladstone, Sidney, Amold, Linda, Susanne, Ethel,
Gingex, Ruby, Cora, Peter & Everet McPhee, Cardinal Major, John Walter, Shervin
A Robert McPhee, Nurse Gloria Gardiner, Nurse Valencia Karna, Brenda, Katy,
Lavali, LaAleur, Jimmy, Simone, Tino, Clint, Tiny, Joe, Andy, Jerome, Stacia &
Barty; other relatives & friends including: Charlene Moss, Lakata, Margaretie
Ramsey & family, Kenelce Hamiton & family, Keno, Kelo, Kathrine Gustave &
farily, Ganieve Fowler, Arn Miler & family, Teresa Role & tamiy, Abigal Fotle &
family, Joanna Role & ‘arnily, Percy Role, Antony Fowler, Anthony Buller, Eames!
Lockari, Anaslia Siyvestar & family, Wiliam & Al Moss, Slanhane Glass & tamly,
Yvonne Thompson & fanny, Alexander Smif, Crystal Love, the Tucker Brothers &
famly, John Seymour, Philp Sturup & famly, Hiram Smith, Phiio Doroaus, McTavis
Johnson, Deane Gardiner & family, Prissla Dawkins & family, the former Nassau
Beach Hotel Housekeeping Staff, the G.G. Back Yard Crew & family, Deveaux &
fier Street family. Friends may pay thar last respects at Demertte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, trom 10-6:00 p.m: on Friday’ & on Saturday at fhe church from
11:00 a.m, untl service time,

Quality Auto Sales Ltd

PARTS DEPARTMENT
Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING
FEB 25 thru FEB 28

(Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday)

We will re-open for business as usual on Monday, March 2.

We apologise to our valued customers and regret ary
inconvenience this may cause, All other sections of the
AUTO MALL wall be open for business as usual

QUALITY:

EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 397-1700

FROM page one

and put a plastic bag over his
head, into which they sprayed
Mace, severely irritating his eyes
and making him feel as if his
throat was on fire.

The officers then beat him with
sticks so severely that he was
swollen and black and blue for
weeks, he said.

As a result of the beating, the
detainee claims, he lost three toe
nails from his left foot, two from
his right foot and two fingernails
from his left hand.

“Most of us are here for immi-
gration irregularities — we are not
murderers, we are human beings
and this is the 21st century,” he
said.

Another of the Cuban hunger
strikers questioned how the beat-
ing of his friend could be denied
by government officials.

“There were hundreds of wit-
nesses. He was swollen like a
watermelon, all black and blue.
He was in bed for a week. We had

Oweeting’s Colonial Mortuary & Crematorium

#84 Blue Hill Road, P.O. Box N 8161

Nassau, Bahamas, Tele 32

§-TEG7

MEMORIAL SERVICE

Memorial Service for the late Mr. Philip Sands will be held at the Chapel of the
Saints Sweeting’s Colonial Mortuary and Crematorium #84 Blue Hill Rd, on
Saturday 28th February, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. Leroy Burrows.

Left to cherish his memories are his Mother: Violet Sands-Gordon, Father: James
Gordon, Four Brothers: James Jr., Clayton, John and Godfrey Gordon, Two Sisters:
Maryann Newton and Elizabeth Strachan, Four Aunts: Marjorie, Janet and Madilyn
Sands and Brenda Williams, Two Uncles: Rudolph Sands and Frederick Gordon,
Three Nieces: Elliyah and Kimberly Strachan and Kenderia Newton, Two Nephews:
Kendal Jr. and Johnthan Newton, Two Brothers-in-Law: Elliott Strachan and Kendall
Newton and A host of other Relatives and Friends Including: The Gordon Family,
Doudoux, Vandergracht, Joseph Adderley, Franklyn, Basil, Shawn, Shawna, Mr.
and Mrs. Bethel, Romeo, Antonio, Keisha, Crystal, Samantha George, Philip, David,
Monique, Shikeray, Shanekia, Antonio, Romeo, Charlene, Marjorie Adderley,

Friands from Potters Cay Dock and Miss Hazel.

Services is being handled by Saints Sweeting'’s Colonial Mortuary and

Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd.

\CKYARD P

Lots of cell phone and phone card

give-a-ways|

a Stiletto

a Ancient man
a T'rez Hepburn
a te D

wu

1 Elon Moxey

i

; Ita Storr and the Spank Band
a Sky Juice Band & many many

more!!!

Date; Friday 27 February, 2008

Time: 3 p.m, unti|

Venue: QE Sports Center (Carmival Site}
Price: $15 with 1 FREE drink included

Tickets available at BUCK'S RECORD GALLERY &

BACKYARD RESTAURANT & BAR

Hosted by: Bird Nest Entertainment along side No Strings Attach Production

SECURITY WILL BE STRICTLY ENFORCED

RSVP: 376-0893

to tend to him because no one
else would,” the detainee said.

He went on to describe the con-
ditions at the centre as unbear-
able, saying the facility is so over-
crowded that at night, sleeping
bodies completely cover the floors
and hallways.

He also described a practice
that has come to be known to
detainees as “count-time.” Three
times a day — at 8am, 4pm and
midnight — all the occupants of
the Detention Centre are
marched out of the barracks, lined
up and counted. Several of the
detainees said this procedure is
overseen by heavily armed guards
who shove and shout at them,
often swearing at women and chil-
dren and pushing them with the
butts of their guns. One detainee
was “slapped around” just yester-
day morning for failing to move
fast enough, he said.

The detainee said there is also
no time for recreation at the cen-
tre, not even for the children, and
that while there is an area near
the front of the centre that fea-
tures a swing set, this is all for
show — as the area is only actually
used as a holding pen for large
groups of new arrivals.

According to the detainees, all
but two of the toilets at the chron-
ically overcrowded centre are bro-
ken. “Do you know what happens
when 200 to 300 people try to
share two toilets?” one asked.
“People have to fight to get to
them. Eventually people can’t
wait any more and they start to
use the bathroom on the side of
the building. Now the whole thing
stinks. We have to walk through
puddles of urine.”

A Jamaican detainee, who has
been at the centre for three
months said all the allegations lev-
elled by the Cuban detainees are
absolutely true.

He told of a young Dominican
man who was brought in on Tues-
day. “They have been beating
him, all sorts of abuse. He is spit-
ting blood. I tell you, it is pure
torture.

“The conditions at this place
are totally inhumane. They treat
people like dirt. It is total humili-
ation,” he said.

The Jamaican man called for
the government to grant the press
and international human rights
agencies full access to the facility.
“If I have nothing to hide, and
the authorities want to visit my
house to investigate some allega-
tions, I would let them in,” he
said.

Several of the detainees called
for the allegations to be brought
to the attention of the United
Nations Human Rights Council.
“If the UN ever saw what these
people are doing, there would be
some criminal charges,” one of
them suggested.

An African man, who has been
at the centre for three months,
told of how all his possessions
“disappeared” while he was in
custody. He explained that while
detainees can keep some clothes
with them in the barracks, any
other belongings brought in with
them are turned over to the
guards for storage.

He explained that when he lost
all his clothing during the fire that
destroyed one of the barracks a
few months ago, he asked the
guards to allow him access to his
suitcase, only to find that all his
belongings were gone. “My suits,
my laptop, my camera, all gone.
Now I have nothing. When I take
a shower, I don’t even have a tow-
el to dry off with.”

Worse he said, his travel docu-
ments have also disappeared.

“They keep me here, they don’t
feed me well, and they lost my
passport. This place is hard. Life is
not good here. They don’t have
human rights in this country,” he
said.

One man, who said he has a
legal right to work in the
Bahamas, claimed he was picked
up at a job site and given no
opportunity to produce docu-
ments proving his status.

He said: “In this place, we have
no blankets, we don’t have much
to eat.

“We should have someone to
talk to go and get our documents.
We live in here like dogs. I can’t
take it anymore.”

The detainees said there is
rarely enough food to go around,
despite assurances to the contrary
from the government. They called
on the Bahamian people to
donate blankets, baby food and
other supplies for the very young
and old, who they said suffer the
most.

They also asked human rights
agencies to seek permission to see
the conditions they live in as soon
as possible — as they fear the
guards may take steps to disguise
what has been going on in an
effort to avoid exposure.

When asked about conditions
at the centre yesterday morning,
before the detainees spoke to The
Tribune, Minister of State
Branville McCartney said:

“What we are trying to do at
the Detention Centre is operate it
like a holding facility, it’s not a
prison and that is our mandate
although we are housing people
who are here illegally. So what
we are in fact doing is holding
people as though they have not
committed a crime when in fact

SEE page 11



(e\"\
Na,

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

on hunger strike

FROM page 10

they have.”

When it was suggested that the
food was insufficient and of poor
quality, Mr McCartney said that
he has had lunch there, and it was
“good” :

On Tuesday, the day after the
first allegations were made, the
Department of Immigration said it
had already completed an inves-
tigation and determined that no
abuse had occurred at the facility.

However yesterday, Mr



Employers illegally
hiring foreign workers
‘should pay $10,000"

FROM page one

ments to the 1975 Immigra-
tion Act, Mr McCartney
highlighted the difficulties
presented by the current
economic climate and the
need to renew focus on cus-
tomer service.

Laws need to be simpli-
fied, and not over compli-
cated, in an effort to stem
the flow of foreign workers
seeking employment and
residency in the Bahamas
and improve the quality of
life for Bahamians, the Min-
ister said.





McCartney suggested that the
inquiry may be ongoing: “The fact
of the matter is, we have not been
informed about or haven’t been
able to verify any of these allega-
tions, and if there is corruption,
that is something that is a no-no
for me and we will try and deter-
mine the facts.”

He said he had not been
informed about a hunger strike,
but added that if detainees were
tempted to hold one, “my advice
to them is that they should eat
and eat well, because it doesn’t
do their body any good not to
eat.”

Speaking about Amnesty Inter-
national’s call for in independent
investigation, Mr McCartney said:
“We have nothing to hide in con-
nection with the Detention Cen-
tre. If there is a review being done
we would also want other persons
there to ensure that its well bal-
anced because these international
reports tend to be absolutely
wrong on occasion.”

He also noted that if a Cuban
national is outside Cuban territo-
ry for more than 11 months, it is
very rare that they will be accept-
ed back.

“We usually have to look for a
third country to send them and if
that fails, we would find a person
in the community who would
sponsor them or release them and
advise them to apply for some
type of status.

“The difficulty comes in when
these persons may have some
criminal past,” he said.

VTE
Claims he was
TEAMS

A DOMINICAN man
held at the Detention Cen-
tre since Tuesday claims he
was beaten repeatedly by
guards in an attempt to
extract “some information”
from him.

His claim was corrobo-
rated by several of his fel-
low detainees who spoke to
The Tribune yesterday.

The man said the beatings
were usually initiated by
two immigration officers
and continued by two
Defence Force marines who
wore masks and handed out
more severe abuse.

He said that on one occa-
sion the officers beat him
so severely that he began
coughing up blood, and that
they choked him and
repeatedly struck his geni-
tals.

“They keep saying that I
am lying. They want some
information. I was trying to
get to the US and they want
to know where I got my
documents from and how
much did I pay. I told them
everything I know.

“Tf I am lying then take
me to court and let the
judge decide,” he said.





CREDIT SUISSE
Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

Private Banking














an
Na LY,

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 11

is presently accepting applications for a

SOUTH

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER — CENTRAL &

AMERICAN DESK

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Business
Development Officer covering Central and South American Markets:






Requirements:




* Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) in Banking &
Finance
At least seven (10) years banking experience including relationship
management, trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities
markets
Marketing experience throughout Central and South America
Must have established international client base with assets under
management in excess of US$100 Mio and a well developed network within
the market regions
Strong communication skills in Spanish is a requirement to facilitate
marketing and relationship management with clients and prospects
Good computer skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook & Bloomberg)
Willing to travel extensively throughout Central and South America and
utilize a network of existing contacts and associates
Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Duties will include:























* Acquisition and development of new offshore Central and South American
based clients
Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management





“This is the 36th year since
the Bahamas obtained inde-
pendence and there remains
unclear guidelines and poli-
cies regarding immigration,
citizenship, permanent resi-
dency, annual residency,
etcetera,” he said.

“This is totally unaccept-
able so I would like to bring
clarity to the area of har-
bouring illegal persons and
employing illegal persons.

“JT encourage senior man-
agers to think outside the
box — embrace a paradigm
shift in this department.”

In an effort to improve
customer service a new web-
site with online application
forms and comprehensive
information about work per-
mits, citizenship and resi-
dency applications is being
developed and should be up
and running within the year,
Mr McCartney said.

“We are trying to be as
efficient as possible and cus-
tomer friendly,” he added.

“We have a special area
now in the department that
deals specifically with public
relations and they are
responsible for the website
and I anticipate that hope-
fully it will be launched
before the summer.”

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Caves Village Professional
Turn Key Office Suites For Rent

“The premier choice for serious business”

$5,813.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$3,790.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$2,936.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$2,975.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees

1,661 sq. ft.
1,083 sq. ft.
839 sq. ft.
850 sq. ft.

Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on
327-1575 or 477-7610
Email: simon @cavesheights.com

ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE

is accepting applications for the
2009-2010 Academic Year

Spanish
One person - to teach Spanish to grades seven through ten

Social Studies/History

One person - to teach Social Studies and History to grade eight to twelve. Experience in
preparing for external examinations is a requirement.

English Language/Literature
One person- to teach English Language/Literature to all grade levels. Experience in
preparing candidates for B.J.C and B.G.C.S.E examinations is required.

Two person - to teach English Language/Literature at the Grade seven and Eight levels.

Chemistry

Two persons - to teach Chemistry to grades nine through twelve. The applicant must
have experience in preparing students for external examinations.

One person - to teach General Science and Chemistry to all grade levels. The applicant
must have experience in preparing students for external examinations

Physical Education

One person - to teach Physical Education to all grade levels. The applicant must be
available to coach varsity teams in the core sports.

Mathematics
Three persons - to teach mathematics to all grade levels. Experience in preparing
students for external examinations (BJC, BGCSE & SAT) is a requirement

Biology
science and Biology to all
experience in preparing students

to teach General
must have

One person -
The applicant
examinations

grade levels.
for external

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited university and a Teacher’s
Certificate. Two letters of reference, copies of all degrees and certificate, and
two passport size photos should be submitted. A commitment to the values of
Catholic, Benedictine education is expected of our teachers. Only those persons who
have no difficulty with the Roman Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply. Please sub-
mit application and required documents to:

The Principal
St. Augustine’s College
P.O. Box N-3940
Nassau, Bahamas

services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as, the
set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures
Advising clients of clients origin on products, services and investment
opportunities

Management of accounts/relationships with clients originating from Central
and South America

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.
Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.

Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:
MARCH 3, 2009

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

ani
WY

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Djokovic to semifinals, Murray pulls out

SERBIA'S
Novak Djokovic
returns the ball
to Croatia's
Marin Cilic dur-
ing their quarter
final match of
the Emirates
Dubai ATP Ten-
nis Champi-
onships in
Dubai, United
Arab Emirates,
Thursday, Feb.
26, 2009.

Nousha Salimi/AP Photo

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Chairman’s Review
Of the Results
For the year ended October 31, 2008

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited earned a consolidated net income of $83.9 million
for the 2008 fiscal year. Earnings per share was 69.8 cents. This is a commendable performance given the
challenges imposed by the weakening global business environment. In producing this result, the Bank
has benefited greatly from sustained strength and resilience in its core businesses, as evidenced by the 5%
increase in loans and a year-over-year improvement in the net interest margin.

Total revenues for the year amounted to $171.6 million, a $7.7 million (4%) decrease over last year. Net
interest income rose $9 million, or 6%, over last year. Interest income was $263.6 million compared to
$288.6 million last year. Similarly, interest expenses decreased by $33 million or 24%.

Operating expenses for the year were $64.3 million, an increase of $7.2 million (13%) from last year. In
Fiscal 2007, a pension plan curtailment gain had the impact of lowering total operating expenses by $8.2
million. Excluding the impact of this prior year gain, Fiscal 2008 operating expenses would be $1.0
million (1.5%) lower.

The return on assets for the fiscal year was 1.9%, and the return on tangible equity was 18.2%. Both
performance measures continue to reflect the Bank’s strength and leadership in its markets. Importantly,
they reveal the benefits of sustained proactive measures to position the bank for challenging times.

At its meeting on December 19, 2008, the Board of Directors approved the payment of a final dividend of
20 cents per share which was paid to shareholders on January 9, 2009. Previously, an interim dividend of
20 cents per share was paid, bringing the total dividend to 40 cents per share for 2008.

The commendable financial results achieved in Fiscal 2008 are a testament to the outstanding efforts of
the staff and management team to find opportunities in the midst of uncertainty, and to remain focused
on increasing value for customers and shareholders. On behalf of the Board, I extend heartfelt thanks to
each of them for their continued support.

Michael K. Mansoor
Chairman

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet



BS'000
Audited. Audited.
October 31, 2008 October 31, 2007
Assets
Cash and due from banks 259,951 269,434
Securities 1,081,872 1,722,181
Loans and advances to customers 2,539,072 2,415,975
Goodwill 187,747 187,747
Property and equipment 25,913 26,954
Other assets 43,435 46,164
Total assets 4,137,990 4,668,455
Liabilities
Customer deposits 3,445,010 3,661,406
Other liabilities 47,168 64,926
Other borrowed funds - 278,171
Debt securities in issue 20,620
Total liabilities 3,492,178 4,025,123
Equity
Share capital & reserves 477,230 436,297
Retained earnings 168,582 207,035
645,812 643,332
Total liabilities and equity 4,137,990 4,668,455
, Who”
= TS les
Director Director

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity

BS'000

Share Capital. & Retained Earnings Total

Reserves

Balance at October 31, 2006 as restated 436,030 160,708

Net income for the year 109,860



596,738

109,860



Dividends - (56,499) (56,499)
Revaluation reserve- available for sale securities (6,767) - (6,767)
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands 5,200 (5,200) -
Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve 1,834 (1,834)

Balance at October 31, 2007 436,297 207,035 643 332
Net income for the year 83,904 83,904
Dividends - (54,097) (54,097)
Revaluation reserve- available for sale securities (27,327) - (27,327)
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands 6,085 (6,085) -
Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve-Bahamas (1,208) 1,208

Balance at October 31, 2008 (22,450) 24,930 2,480

@ DUBAI, United Arab
Emirates
Associated Press

TOP-SEEDED Novak
Djokovic advanced to the
semifinals of the $2.23 million
Dubai Tennis Championship
on Thursday with a straight
sets win over Marin Cilic, but
No. 2 seed Andy Murray with-
drew with a viral infection
hours before his match.

Third-seeded Gilles Simon
of France defeated compatri-
ot Fabrice Santoro 7-6 (3), 6-
1, and will next face Djokovic,
who defeated Cilic 6-3, 6-4 in
1 hour, 37 minutes.

Murray, ranked No. 4, was
scheduled to play the final
match of the day on Center
Court against France’s
Richard Gasquet, who will
now play fourth-seeded David
Ferrer of Spain in the semis.

Ferrer, who beat Igor

Andreev of Russia 7-5, 6-1,
denied that Murray’s with-
drawal meant he would now
have an easier semifinal.

“No, no. Murray going out
doesn’t make it any easier for
me because Gasquet is a very
good player,” Ferrer said.
“The last time I played against
him, it was very tough.”

Murray, also bothered by
an ankle injury, said he’s been
feeling poorly since the Aus-
tralian Open last month.

“T got it first down in Aus-
tralia, and I haven’t been the
same really since,” Murray
said. “I woke up in the middle
of the night sweating. I got
some anti-viral (medication)
from the doctor ... but it didn’t
help so much.”

The Djokovic-Cilic match
was perhaps the best match of
the tournament so far, with
the Serb producing some
superb returns to break Cilic
of Croatia three times. Cilic,

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Income
BS'000

Unaudited Audited

who lost for just the second
time this year, failed to con-
vert any of his six break
points.

“T was trying in the last
three matches to find this
exact rhythm, and that’s what
I finally did today,” Djokovic
said. “I think the key was
movement and focus. I was
really trying to move well in
the point, be patient, and just
wait for the chances, because I
was returning very well.”

Murray’s withdrawal was
another blow for an event
already hit by controversy and
a spate of injury-related
absences. Murray is doubtful
for Britain’s Davis Cup match
against Ukraine next week
after his doctor advised him
to rest for a week to 10 days.

“T don’t know. I obviously
want to try and play,” Mur-
ray said. “Il see how I feel
and give it my best shot to get
ready.”

Audited



Quarter Ended ‘Year Ended Year Ended
October 31, 2008 October 31, 2007 October 31, 2008 October 31, 2007
Total interest income 65,949 77,108 263,605 288,601
Total interest expense 20,214 36261 108,028 141,441
Net interest income 45,735 40,847 155,577 147,160
Operating income 4,517 5,844 16,017 32,143
50,252 46,691 171,594 179,303

OE

Operating expenses
Loan loss impairment

ee

15,287 15,657
8,324 4,292

64,340
23,350
23,611

19,949 87,690

57,104
12,339

————————

69,443





Net income

Weighted average number of common
shares outstanding for the period

Earnings per share (in cents)

120,216,204

26,641 26,742 83,904

120,216,204 120,216,204

222 22.2 69.8

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

BS'000

Net cash from operating activities

Net cash used in financing activities

Net cash from (used in) investing activities

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year

Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

Audited

Year Ended
October 31, 2008

93,782

109,860

a A sk

120,216,204

914

Audited
Year Ended
October 31, 2007

256,435

(347,641) (43,647)
115,918 (156,168)
(137,941) 56,620

236,704

98,763

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Year Ended
October 31, 2008

1. Accounting Policies

180,084

236,704

The accounting policies used in the preparation of these consolidated financial statements are
consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended October 31,

2007.

The consolidated interim financial statements include the accounts of the following wholly

owned subsidiaries:

FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International (Bahamas) Nominees Company Limited
FirstCaribbean International Land Holdings (TCD) Limited

2. Change in Accounting Policy

Effective March 1, 2007, the Bank changed the date on which all purchases and sales of
financial assets at fair value through the profit and loss are to be recognised from trade date
to settlement date. The audited October 31, 2006 balances have been restated to reflect this
change. The impact on the audited October 31, 2006 balances was to reduce trading securi-
ties by $157 million, other assets by $82 million and other liabilities by $239 million. There
was no impact on the year to date October 31, 2006 balances.

3. Dividends

At the Board of Directors meeting held on December 19, 2008, a final dividend of $0.20 per
share amounting to $24,043 in respect of the 2008 net income was proposed and declared.
The consolidated financial statements for the year ended October 31, 2008 do not reflect this
resolution, which will be accounted for in equity as a distribution of retained earnings in the

year ending October 31, 2009.

4. Debt Securities in Issue

During the year ended October 31, 2007, the Bank issued $20 million in redeemable floating
rate notes, with interest payable at a rate of Bahamas Prime plus 0.75% per annum.The unse-
cured notes were scheduled to mature on November 3, 2011, but were subject to early
redemption at the option of the Bank. The Bank exercised the early redemption clause and
called the notes in September 2008.

5. Other Borrowed Funds

The Bank previously sold under repurchase agreements, investment securities with maturities
between November 2007 and February 2008. All such investment securities were liquidated
during the year. Subsequent to the balance sheet date, the Bank sold under repurchase agree-
ments, investment securities having an aggregate fair value of $203,648 and maturities
between November 2008 and February 2009.





TEs
INBRIEF

Gibril ree

Safety Gibeil Wilson

signs with Dolphins

@ MIAMI

Associated Press

SAFETY Gibril Wilson
landed a big contract for
the second year in a row,
this time with the Miami
Dolphins.

Wilson signed a $27.5
million, five-year deal
Thursday with the Miami
Dolphins, who face the
prospect of losing both
starting safeties to free
agency.

A five-year veteran
released last week by the
Oakland Raiders, Wilson
will receive $8 million
guaranteed and $16.5 mil-

lion in the first three years

of the contract.

A year ago he signed a
$39 million, six-year deal
with the Raiders that

included about $16 million

in guaranteed money, but
he was cut after failing to
upgrade their run defense,
which ranked next-to-
worst in the league.

The Dolphins agreed to
the deal with safeties

Yeremiah Bell and Renal-

do Hill on the verge of
becoming unrestricted
free agents Friday, along
with cornerback Andre
Goodman. The trio start-
ed the final 14 games
together last season for
the Dolphins’ much-

improved defense, helping

them make the playoffs
for the first time since
2001.

Wilson led all NFL
safeties in solo tackles
over his first four seasons
playing for the New York
Giants. He has 66 career
starts, including 15 last
season, when he played
strong safety and made

129 tackles with two inter-

ceptions, three fumble
recoveries and a forced
fumble.

He started at free safety
for the Giants’ 2007 Super :

Bowl championship team.



SPORTS



A RAPTORS player is surrounded by the defense of the S.C. McPherson

Sharks.

Knights top
Stingrays 43-25

FROM page 15

“It is all or nothing this season, we really expect to win the
championship this year and if we do not win it it will be a dis-
appointment,” he said. “We have been injury free, but injuries
will probably be the only thing that can stop us from winning a
championship this year.”

JUNIOR GIRLS
S.C. MCPHERSON SHARKS — 37
C.H. REEVES RAPTORS — 10















The Sharks improved to 6-3 on the season, an important win
as they continue to set the stage for playoff seeding.

The Sharks opened the game on a 19-0 run and never left the
outcome of the game in doubt.

Rannice Bethel’s pair of free throws placed the Raptors on the
scoreboard with 3:47 remaining in the opening half.

S.C. McPherson led 24-2 at the half.

The Sharks continued to dominate in the second half and a
late three pointer by Shavona Adderley brought about the
game’s final margin, the largest lead of the game.

Johnethra Kelly outscored the Raptors on her own, dou-
bling their output with a game high 20 points.

Adderley finished with 10 and Angel Miller added five.

Sharks Head Coach Paula Clarke said her team did not play
as well as they could but the effort was enough to come out with
the win.

“We played a little sloppy today, we just played down to
their level,” she said. “Maybe if we played tougher competition
like H.O. Nash we would have played much harder but I am still
satisfied with the way we played.”

Clarke said she knows for her team to have a chance at a
championship title they must find a way to slow down the pen-
nant winning Lions.

“We just need to play more defence and we will be able to do
the job,” she said.

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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

ani
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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Knowles, Bhupathi ousted in quarters

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK _ Knowles and
Mahesh Bhupathi’s bid to suc-
cessfully defend their title at
the Barclays Dubai Tennis
Championships came to a halt
in the quarter-finals.

As the only seeded team left
at number two, Knowles and
Bhupathi felt they had a clear
path to the final, but it was
blocked yesterday as they fell
victim to Rik De Voest from
the Republic of South Africa
and Dmitry Tursuvon from

Russia.
The final score was 7-6 (4), 6-

“We had a lot of chances in
the first set. We were up 4-3 a
break, but lost two close
games,” said Knowles in an
interview with The Tribune
from his hotel room.

“We didn’t convert. We were
about 1-of-7 on break points
in the first set and we let it slip
away. Then they got ahead of
us in the second and things just
didn’t go our way after that.”

Unable to defend their title
in what turned out to be a wide
open draw, Knowles said they

were quite disappointed in
their performances.

“T don’t think we played our
best tennis,” he said. “So it’s
always disappointing when you
lose a match, especially when
you know you have the poten-
tial to easily win it.”

While Bhupathi was coming
off a break in India, Knowles
went directly to the tourna-
ment after he teamed up with
American Mardy Fish to win
the Regions Morgan Keegan
Championships in Memphis,
Tennessee on Sunday.

“For me, I had to play in a
different environment from last

Hield falls short
of gold medal

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

CARL Hield’s run through the Inde-
pendence Cup fell short of the gold
medal in the junior welterweight divi-
sion of the 28th Dominican Republic yes-
terday.

Against hometown favorite, Jonathan
Baptista, Hield suffered a heartbreaking
11-7 decision to end up with the silver
medal, the best showing by a Bahamian
at the yearly tournament.

“He gave it his best,” said coach Andre
Seymour from the Dominican Republic
in an interview with The Tribune. “The
guy was just more technical than him.

“The guy fought a much better techni-
cal fight than Carl Hield, but I was happy
that we came out with a silver medal.
I’m happy that he made it to the final.”

It was a historic performance for the
Bahamas as prior to this year’s tourna-
ment, Taureano ‘Reno’ Johnson and
Valentino Knowles secured consecutive
bronze medals in 2007 and 2008 respec-
tively.

At this year’s tournament, both John-
son and Knowles got eliminated in the
first round, leaving it up to Hield to pull
the Bahamas through on the medal dais.

“His performance was good, but the
guy just fought a much better technical
fight than him,” Seymour said. “He beat
Carl. He was more experienced than Carl
was.

“That was one of the advantages that

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he had with Carl. Both Reno and
Valentino lost to the fighters from the
Dominican Republic. But the guy Carl
fought is a seasoned boxer who is on the
Dominican Republic’s national team.”

Now that he’s established himself in
the tournament, Seymour said he’s con-
fident that the two boxers will meet each
other again in the future and the out-
come will definitely be different.

Seymour said after Johnson earned a
fifth place ranking in the welterweight
division at the Olympic Games in Beijing,
China last August and Hield coming
through with the silver, it was a good
indication of where the Bahamas project
was in the region.

“To make it this far, competing against
countries like Brazil, Ecuador, Cuba and
the Dominican Republic, it shows that
we can do it,” Seymour said.

“Tt shows that it isn’t long before we
return home with a gold medal.”

Seymour and his three-man team will
be returning home today, but he said the
work will continue as there is another
tournament coming in Puerto Rico in
May before the Commonwealth and
World Championships, which are slated
for this summer.

Additionally, there’s the Caribbean
Games in Trinidad and there is a tour-
nament in Cuba in May.

“We are going to be very busy this
year,” Seymour said. “So this is a great
start for us. Although we only won one
medal, we surpassed what we did in the
past at this tournament.”

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SPORT SNOTES

week, but that’s no excuse, I
still have to adjust,” Knowles
stressed. “TI had a little trouble
plying outdoors and with a dif-
ferent type of ball.

“But [have to get over that.
In this case, we just were not
able to execute under pres-
sure.”

The duo will take another
week off to recuperate from
the loss before they head back
on the circuit to play in their
next tournament.

They will head to the BNP
Paribas Open in Indian Wells,
California, the first ATP World
Tour Masters Tournament that



Here’s a look at the schedule of games in the

runs from March 12-23.

The tournament has been a
pretty good one for Knowles
and his former partner Daniel
Nestor from Canada, who won
the title a record four times
together.

They first did it in 1997, 2002
and back-to-back in 2005 and
2006.

The tournament offers
$225,000 for the winners and
1,000 ATP computer points,
$117,000 for the runners-up
and 600 points, $54,000 for
making the semifinal and 360
points, $23,000 for the quarter-
final with 180 points and





6 pm Jujus vs Coco plums

Saturday

9 am Guineps vs Sea Grapes
10:15 am Dillies vs Jujus

Junior Baseball League of Nassau this week-
end at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams:

SATURDAY
Tee Ball

11 am Sand Gnats vs Grasshoppers
1 pm Knights vs Sidewinders

3 pm Blue Claws vs Raptors
Coach Pitch

10 am Astros vs Blue Jays
12:30 pm Athletics vs Cubs

3 pm Diamondbacks vs Angels
Minor League

10 am Rockies vs Mets

12:30 pm Royals vs Rays
Major League

12:30 pm Marlins vs Indians

3 pm Mariners vs Reds

Junior League

10 am Cardinals vs Yankees
12:30 pm Twins vs Dodgers
Senior League

3 pm Phillies vs Tigers

Sunday

Senior League

2 pm Rangers vs Pirates



Here’s a look at the schedule of games on tap
this weekend at the Freedom Farm Baseball

League in Yamacraw Estates:

T-BALL:
Today



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February 28th

COACH PITCH:
Saturday

11:30 am Sandflies vs Boas
1 pm Bees vs Wasps
3 pm Mosquitoes vs Greenturtles

Sunday

3 pm Bees vs Mosquitoes

9-10:
Today

7:30 pm Red Snappers vs Eels

Saturday

9 am Dolphins vs Turbots
10:30 am Barracudas vs Octopus

Sunday

4:30 pm Octopus vs Red Snappers

11-12:
Today

6 pm Hurricanes vs Crowns
7:30 pm Groupers vs Divers

Saturday

Noon Crowns vs Divers
1:30 pm Conchs vs Iguanas
3:30 Marlins vs Divers

Sunday

3 pm Parrots vs Dogs
4:30 pm Hurricanes vs Marlins

13-15:
Saturday

9 am Silverjacks vs Sharks
11 am Owlz vs Raccoons

1 pm Potcakes vs Silverjacks
3 pm Sharks vs Stingrays

16-18:
Sunday

2:30 pm Caribs vs Lucayans
4 pm Tainos vs Arawak

Healthy Hearts Walk
& Kids’ Walk

Registration Fee: $5

$12,650 for reaching the round
of 16.

From Indian Wells, Knowles
and Bhupathi will come closer
to home as they compete in the
Sony Ericsson Open in Key
Biscayne, Florida, another
ATP World Tour Masters
1000.

Knowles and Nestor won this
title back in 2002.

The same prize money and
ATP points will be given as in
Indian Wells.

“We have two big tourna-
ments coming up,” Knowles
said. “Hopefully we can go out
there and ride the ship.”

























The Healthy Hearts Walk starts at 6:30 a.m.

The Kids’ Walk starts at 8:00 a.m.

The Subway® Healthy Hearts Walk is approximately four miles, starting at the Western Esplanade, going east to
Goodman's Bay round-about and back. The Subway® Kids’ Walk will start promptly at 8:00 a.m. at the
Western Esplanade grounds. Last minute registration for both walks begins at 6:30 6:00 a.m.

Applications can be picked up at participating Subway® Restaurants or at the Bahamas Heart Foundation’s office. Early applications



can be dropped off at Subway® Restaurant in the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre or the Heart Foundation’s office on Cable Beach.

For More Information, Call 327-0806-7 or 394-6715

Participant Information

Name:



Date of Birth: /

(day) (month)





Address:

Age: Sex:

(year)



E-mail:

Telephone:



Organzation Information
Name of School/Group:

Contact Name:





Contact E-mail:



Student Age:

Prior to any physical activity, we strongly suggest you consult your physician

| assume all risks associated with The Subway® Healthy Heart Walk and Kids’ Walk including, but not limited to, falls, contact
with other participants, the effect of the weather, including extreme heat, extreme cold, and/or humidity, traffic and the conditions
of the road, all such risks being known and appreciated by me. Having read this waiver and knowing these facts and in
consideration of accepting my application, |, for myself and anyone entitled to act on my behalf, waive and release Subway®

and all sponsors, their representatives and successors from all claims and liabilities of any kind arising out of my participation

in the Subway® Healthy Heart Walk and Kids’ Walk even though that liability may arise out of negligence or carelessness on the
part of the persons named in this waiver. | am aware that the registration fee is non-refundable. | am also aware that the course
will open to traffic and that headphone, jogging strollers, bikes; in line skaters and similar items and animals accompanying
entrants are not permitted on the course.

Signature:



PARENTS SIGNATURE (if under 18}:

event sponsors

The Nassa

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Date:
Date:



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&

THE TRIBUNE



PAGE 15

rts

S
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

C.R. WALKER’S Malesha Peterson drives to the basket for two of her game high 27 points in the Knights 43-

cd
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Knights top
Stingrays 43-25

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER a week-long break for the Hugh
Campbell basketball classic, the Government
Secondary Schools Sports Association contin-
ued their regular season play with one team
completing a perfect season while another took
a crucial step towards playoff seeding.

SENIOR GIRLS
C.R. Walker Knights — 43
C.V. Bethel Stingrays — 25

The Knights continued to solidify their sta-
tus as pennant winners and top seeds for the
playoffs yesterday with an effortless 18 point
win in the regular season finale.

The win gave C.R. Walker a perfect 12-0
record heading into the GSSSA playoffs with
a tentative date set for March 9th.

The Stingrays led 3-0 early in the first half,
however the Knights went on a 13-0 run to
take a commanding 10-0 lead.

C.R. Walkers stifling halfcourt trap netted a
series of easy transition baskets for backcourt
mates Malesha Peterson and Rickea Richard-
son.

The Knights ended the remainder of the
half on a 13-6 run to take a 26-9 lead at the



Sharks continue bid
for playoff spot

half.

Peterson scored 15 of her game high 27
points in the opening half.

The Stingrays opened the second half as
they did the first, scoring the opening baskets
with an early 4-0 run.

Peterson scored the next six points to halt
the Stingrays momentum and give her teama
32-13 lead.

Richardson finished with six points while
Pamela Bethel added three.

Knight’s Head Coach Ken Lightbourne said
the perfect season was the first of his career but
was expected with a high number of experi-
enced seniors on this year’s squad.

“This is the first time since I have been
coaching that we have had a perfect unde-
feated season and we thank God for that,” he
said. “This year we have a lot of seniors and
next year we will be rebuilding so we expected
this year to be pretty good.”

Lightbourne said his team finished the sea-
son largely untested.

SEE page 13

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* Inclusion of
gratuities/tips in wage
definition; raising pension
vesting period from three
years to 10; and linking
pensions to inflation
among proposals to
ensure NIB’s sustainability
* Director warns if nothing
done, NIB to face ‘serious
challenges’ come 2032

* ‘Hich profile’ businesses
prosecuted for
non-payment

* Businesses required by
law to keep all NIB
records ‘indefinitely’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The National Insurance
Board (NIB) has recommended
increasing the insurable wage
ceiling by 50 per cent - from
$400 to $600 - as a way to
ensure its long-term sustain-
ability, its director warning yes-
terday that the scheme faced
severe depletion by 2032 “if
nothing happens”.

Algernon Cargill, addressing
the Rotary Club of West Nas-
sau, said the proposed $200
increase in the ceiling for the
insurable wage - the portion of
employee income on which NIB
contributions is calculated - was
only an initial step, the recom-
mendation being that it contin-
ue to be raised in line with
increases in the average nation-
al wage.

Review

The recommendation was
one of a slew made in the wake
of the eighth actuarial review
of NIB, which was completed
last year.

While the review has not
been made public yet, Mr
Cargill indicated that NIB was
looking to bring contributions
in line with benefits, and link
both with ‘cost of living’ and
‘living standards’ indicators -
such as wage increases and
inflation.

The NIB director said that
the Government “will in due
time enact amendments to the
legislation that will enable [the
Fun d] not just to survive, but
thrive”.

SEE page 7B

Cruise line

rise 60%

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -—- Discovery
Cruises increased its passenger
arrivals to Freeport by 60 per cent
over last year during the first two
months of 2009, its president,
Hans Hahn, has revealed.

The ship, which provides daily
service between Florida and
Grand Bahama, brought a total of
32,000 passengers to the island
between January and February,
compared to 20,000 last year.

Of the 32,000 cruise passen-
gers, more than 50 per cent stayed
overnight for one or more nights
on Grand Bahama.

“Everybody needs a bit of good
news,” said Mr Hahn, who spoke
with Tribune Business at the
Grand Bahama Business Out-
look, held at the Our Lucaya
Resort.

He said Discovery slashed its
cruise fares by 60 per cent dur-
ing the traditionally slow period
that marks the beginning of every

THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY,

Wile

BLE. BeR, WeAs ReY- 2207-5



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Motor dealer in
700k expansion

Nassau Motor eyes four-phase service growth

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Nassau Motor Compa-
ny (NMC) yesterday said it
could ultimately invest up to
$600,-$700,000 in a four-phase
expansion designed to
enhance efficiency in its ser-
vice department, with the first
stage - the construction of five
new bays with hydraulic lifts -
set to be completed and oper-
ational within the next two
weeks.

Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor
Company’s operations man-
ager, told Tribune Business
that the construction of the
five new service bays at its
headquarters, sandwiched
between Shirley & Deveaux
Streets, was “a plan we’d been
trying to implement for a cou-
ple of years”.

“It’s actually the first phase
of a four-phase plan,” Mr
Lowe explained. “We’re ren-
ovating our service depart-

ment to make it more effi-
cient. We’re putting new lifts
in five of our bays. Hopefully,
our technicians will be more
efficient, and it will make
things just a little easier for
our service customers. It will
also be a better environment
for our technicians.”

Hydraulic

Mr Lowe said the five new
service bays, each with their
own hydraulic lifts to raise up
vehicles, would enable Nas-
sau Motor Company to
replace five old bays. The
company now had 20 bays in
which to service clients’ vehi-
cles.

He added that the second
phase of the project, whenev-
er Nassau Motor Company
initiated it, would involve
knocking down the existing
client reception building and
replacing it with a new prop-
erty.

$1.3m pig farm eyed
for Grand Bahama

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

A $1.3 million GRAND
Bahama pig farm project is wait-
ing on final approvals from gov-
ernment before it opens as the
largest sow farm in the Bahamas,
with 600 pigs being raised for
Bahamian consumption and
export.

Michael Douglas, director of
business development for Rose
Farmland Ltd, told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that the farm will
initially operate at a loss for about
three years before becoming sig-
nificantly profitable.

“The first three years is always
hard in any business, and we are
going to be operating at an
extreme loss for the first three
years, but thereafter our profit
margins are pretty good,” he said.

Capacity

Mr Douglas said that when the
farm is up to maximum capacity it
will be able to supply the entire
Bahamian market, with a long-
term goal of exporting to the
Turks and Caicos, Dominican
Republic and Haiti.

“We will control our own mar-
keting, so we will stem out to
any available markets,” said Mr
Douglas. “Over the past year we
did some marketing in Turks and
Caicos.”

Rose Farmland, in a bid to

’s arrivals
on 2008

But Discovery says price
deal did not benefit
bottom line, and
packages to Bahamian
travellers ‘not profitable’

year, following the Christmas and
New Year holidays.

“January and February are tra-
ditionally losing months, so what
we decided was... to come up
with a ‘fed up fare,’ and what we
managed to do is put customers
on board the vessel and on the
island,” Mr Hahn said.

“We didn’t increase the bot-
tom-line, but I think it was worth
the effort,” he said.

Mr Hahn added that the month
of March will be critical for Dis-
covery.

SEE page 8B

keep profit margins high, inte-
grated its own slaughter and
packing houses into the business
model, and intends to grow dedi-
cated food crops for feed, which
represents a large overhead cost.

“In this venture we own the
farm, we own the slaughter and
packaging house - they’re verti-
cally integrated - so we’re going to
be supplying ourselves with pigs
at a rate that is necessary so that
we can market them,” said Mr
Douglas.

He said about 60 per cent of
farm costs come from feed pur-

SEE page 8B

The reception office’s move
would create two additional
service bays, giving Nassau
Motor Company two more
service bays than it currently
has.

“If it all comes together, it
will probably be in excess of
$500,000, maybe as high as
$600,000-$700,000,” Mr Lowe
said of the company’s invest-
ment.

Nassau Motor Company’s
willingness to invest, even ina
troubled economy where new
car sales have plummeted,
dropping by around 30 per
cent industry-wide last year,
provides hope that the
Bahamas will eventually pull
out of recession through the
efforts of Bahamian-owned
businesses.

“This is what’s got to help
start turning the economy
around,” Mr Lowe told Tri-

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Many CLICO
clients ‘unlikely’
to recover 100%

of investments

* All Nassau offices close, and sales
agency force told to stay at home until
further notice

* Several potential buyers circle
insurance book of business

@ By NEIL
HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

Many CLICO
(Bahamas) creditors are
unlikely to recover 100 per
cent of their investments
if the company goes into
full liquidation, a former
government minister said
yesterday, as its Nassau-
based branch offices were
closed indefinitely, and the
sales agency force told to |
stay at home until further [its
notice.

James Smith, minister
of state for finance in the
former Christie adminis-
tration, described “the
move to liquidation as a
very serious, swift move,
so the Government must fF
have come under some |
serious technical advise-
ment”.

He suggested, though,
that before the Govern-
ment move to fully wind-
up CLICO (Bahamas) and
place it into full liquida-
tion, that the company be given one last chance to come up
with a plan to “satisfy its creditors” - in this case, its annuity
depositors, and the life and health insurance policyholders.

“Tf they come up with a plan, the chances of the creditors, the
policyholders, getting 100 per cent on the dollar is better, but if
they go into full liquidation, they will get a percentage on the dol-
lar and will have to pay the fees of the liquidator,” Mr Smith
explained.

SEE page 3B

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

A

A SECURITY OFFICER at CLICO shows
customers where to go.



FG FINANCIAL

for a better life

Qroup pensions

may it

call us today at 396-4000

| \N CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BE gt com



PENSIONS & INVESTMENTS

[attract the cream of the crop
[= keep present employees happy
[- guarantee staff retirement savings

pall of the above





(\W

PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

6

THE TRIBUNE





Port moves to ‘Build Now

Move aims to enable home buyers
to start building properties while
still paying for land purchases




















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No Phone Calls

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) has moved to
make real estate development more
affordable, its newly-appointed president
has said, with a ‘Build Now’ programme
designed to allow persons still paying for
land purchases to build their dream
homes right away.

“Many have projected doom and gloom
for 2009, and while things are tough, we
need to think of ingenious ways to invig-
orate the consumer market, and help
those who would like to acquire land,”
Ian Rolle told the Grand Bahama Busi-
ness Outlook.

While there was still no comparison
between the cost of property in Freeport
and Nassau, Mr Rolle said the Port was
committed to addressing the needs of the
market and ensure that land is afford-
able.

“We have heard many in the commu-
nity say that they would like to be able to
build as soon as they purchase the prop-
erty, irrespective of the sometimes seven-
year payment plan,” the GBPA presi-



“Property owners
will be allowed to
use the equity in the
property for
mortgages, and the
property will be
paid for during
construction
drawdowns.”



lan Rolle

dent said. Mr Rolle added that this would
stimulate development and the economy
in Freeport.

He said the ‘Build Now’ programme
will also benefit potential homeowners
in that it will allow qualified persons to
build right away and occupy their homes
before seven years are up.

“Property owners will be allowed to

use the equity in the property for mort-
gages, and the property will be paid for
during construction drawdowns,” he
explained. Mr Rolle stressed that the Port
Authority was committed to bettering
the lives of residents in Grand Bahama.

“In any community, if the basic human
needs of its people are met and jobs and
opportunities are available, they will be
able to provide for themselves and their
families. This should be our measure of
success,” he said.

In this vein, the Port has reduced its
retail business license fees by 50 per cent,
effective March 1 until March 2010, for
those who paid within three months of
billing dates.

A scholarship programme has been
implemented to offer full scholarships in
niche careers, particularly land survey-
ing, and other fields that will have an
impact on the island’s continuous devel-
opment.

Mr Rolle said award scholarships will
also be offered to the top graduating stu-
dent in each high school on Grand
Bahama who meets the Port’s scholar-
ship criteria. He said students will be
encouraged to spend the first two years at
the College of the Bahamas.










































































Please send bids for golf carts no later than March 14",
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J&J CHISHOLM
CONSTRUCTION LTD.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION
CLE/GEN/00239

2006

BETWEEN

KENDRICK CLARKE
Plaintiff
AND

FELIX DELANCY
Defendant

ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE ee

OF WRIT OF SUMMONS =a a :
‘We have many unique fome and apartment designs
ready to build. Free washer & dryer with any

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been contract signed before July 31, 2009.
commenced against you in the Supreme
Court, Common Law and Equity Division,
Action No. CLE/GEN/00239 of 2006 in which
the Plaintiff claims that you are negligent and
thereby is wholly responsible for the traffic
accident which occurred on the 6'"" December,
2003 in the vicinity of East Street and Wilson
Track and the Plaintiff claims damages,
interests and costs against you.

AND THAT it has been ordered by
the Supreme Court that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action on you be effected
by this advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that
you must within fourteen (14) days from the
publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
day of such publication, acknowledge service
of the said Writ of Summons by completing
a prescribed form of Acknowledgement of
Service which may be obtained on aie
from the Attorneys whose name and adaress
appear below, otherwise Judgment may be
entered against you.

Dated this 25" day of February, A.D., 2008

NOTICE

Please be advised that effective March 2, 2009
Betty K. Agencies will resume its regular twice
weekly service from Miami, Florida to Nassau.

Schedule:

Departs Miami on Monday
Arrives in Nassau on Tuesday

Departs Miami on Wednesday
Arrives in Nassau on Thursday

Nassau
East St. North, Kelly’s Dock
P.O. Box N-351
Nassau, Bahamas
242-322-2142

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.
CHAMBERS
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff
3701 N.W. South River Drive

Miami, Florida 33142

gx NUT

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE BAHAMAS could
soon again be ‘blacklisted’ by
the Organisation for Economic
Co-Operation and Develop-
ment (OECD) for a so-called
‘lack of effective exchange of
information on tax matters, a
former government minister
warned this week.

James Smith, minister of state
for finance in the former
Christie government, said
OECD member countries were
gearing up for a further offen-
sive to dismantle so-called ‘off-
shore financial centres’ with-
out regard to the impact on the
economy of these countries.

Mr Smith, who is now
CFAL’s chairman, said this
pressure was forcing banks in
international financial centres
to consider executing strict
transparency regulations that
were being pushed by OECD
states.

Agenda

These countries, which
include the US, UK, France and
Canada, have adopted an agen-
da aimed at “standardising and
bringing offshore activities
under control over the next few
years, and ultimately plugging
the loopholes which they per-
ceive are being used to avoid
and/or evade taxation in OECD
countries”.

Mr Smith said these states
and their regulators had used
the current financial crisis to try
and exert more control over the
financial services sector, and
exploit the situation with a
renewed attack on so-called off-
shore centres, who they are
blaming for the current woes..

“They seem convinced that
offshore centres exist for no
other reason than to facilitate
tax avoidance on behalf of their
citizens, and neither compelling
arguments nor irrefutable evi-
dence to the contrary could
change their collective mind-
set,” the former finance minister
said.

OECD countries were bear-
ing down on offshore centres
such as the Bahamas, threaten-
ing the reintroduction of
avblacklist’ that ostracises entire
nations.

“The OECD countries have
contemplated the reintroduc-
tion of the blacklisting initiative
at a meeting in October of last
year. The new list, if adopted,

Bahamas may face
OECD ‘blacklisting’



would list non-cooperative
countries as those which have
no effective tax information
exchanges on matters with the
OECD,” said Mr Smith.

“Effective information
exchange is now defined as hav-
ing a minimum of 12 tax infor-
mation exchange treaties
(TIEAs) between the country
(offshore centre) and other
OECD countries.

“Here in the Bahamas, we
have only one TIEA and that is
between this country and the
US.”

Mr Smith said that by the
OECD’s definition, the
Bahamas was qualified to be
blacklisted yet again, should the
latter go forward with the ini-
tiative.

“Offshore centers should be
mindful that they are likely to
remain on the radar screens of
the tax hungry OECD coun-
tries,” said Mr Smith.

Any new rules would ne
designed to make doing busi-
ness in developing countries
more costly and more cumber-
some, and if offshore centers
were to survive and prosper, Mr
Smith said they must continue
to become more efficient while,
at the same time, seeking to be
more compliant with the new
rules. Those objectives were not
always compatible.”

Mr Smith said offshore cen-
tres such as the Bahamas would
inevitably have to adhere to
three guidelines in order to
avoid OECD scrutiny and sanc-
tions:

* Increase their number of
tax information exchange
treaties

* Commit to desist from
assisting OECD citizens from
evading legitimate home coun-
try taxe

* Have their clients them-
selves become more tax com-
pliant in their own countries.

GIVE IN

TO TEMPTATION



ann
Na EY,

THE TRIBUNE



an
Na LY,

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 3B



Many CLICO clients ‘unlikely’
to recover 100% of investments

FROM page 1B

“Tf it [CLICO Bahamas] stays
in liquidation, they will get some
part of it [their investment], but
they will get less than 100 per
cent.”

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, the
Baker Tilly Gomez accountant
and partner appointed as CLICO
(Bahamas) provisional liquida-
tor, yesterday told Tribune Busi-
ness it was “likely that we’ll do a
creditor’s meeting next week” to
update the policyholders and
annuity depositors.

He confirmed that he and his
team had met with CLICO
(Bahamas) staff, and told a num-
ber of them - chiefly the sales
agent force - to remain at home
and await further instructions.
Lay-offs, though, possibly involv-
ing all CLICO (Bahamas) staff,
are only likely to be a matter of
time.

CLICO (Bahamas) has 170
employees, most of them based
here, but Mr Gomez emphasised
that none had been laid-off yet.
He explained that the company’s
sales agents had been advised to
go home because all the Nassau
branch offices, bar the CLICO
(Bahamas) head office, had been
closed indefinitely and there was
nowhere for them to base them-
selves.

Given that the provisional liq-
uidation has effectively frozen the
company’s business, meaning it
can sell no new policies or annu-
ities, there is nothing for CLICO
(Bahamas) agency force to do
anyway. Rather than leave them
hanging around the head office,
they have been asked to go home.

Mr Gomez said CLICO
(Bahamas) branch offices in
Freeport would also close indefi-
nitely come today, and the focus
would now shift to the work he
and his team will be doing at the
company’s Mount Royal Avenue
headquarters. They will likely be
assisted by CLICO (Bahamas)
administration and underwriting
staff.

Mr Gomez advised life and
health insurance policyholders
neither to panic, nor take out
alternative policies with other
insurance carriers.

He indicated it was likely that
the liquidation, with the Supreme
Court and regulator’s approval,
would seek to transfer/find a buy-

er for CLICO (Bahamas) insur-
ance book of business in the
shape of another carrier.

"We are moving quickly
because we've been approached
by several other companies to
assume those policies,” Mr
Gomez said, adding that cus-
tomers should continue to pay
their premiums.

The liquidator declined to com-
ment further, but Tribune Busi-
ness understands that apart from
British American Financial, sev-
eral other potential suitors have
come forward to inquire about
‘cherry picking’ CLICO
(Bahamas) assets via a potential
purchase.

Seamless

Tribune Business understands
that CLICO (Bahamas) life and
health insurance liabilities total
around $11 million, and there
may well be sufficient assets in
the Bahamas to cover these that
can be transferred to another
insurer, thus providing policy-
holders with seamless coverage.

As at year-end 2007, CLICO
(Bahamas) balance sheet showed
it had just over $6 million on fixed
deposit with the banks; over $5
million in policyholder loans; and
almost $3 million in bond invest-
ments held in the Bahamas.

It is the annuity depositors who
are likely to be most vulnerable in
a full CLICO (Bahamas) liquida-
tion.

As Tribune Business revealed
yesterday, CLICO (Bahamas)
was, in many respects, a deposit-
taking institution rather than a
pure life and health insurance
company. Of the $79.37 million
in future policyholder reserves on
its balance sheet at December 31,
2007, some $69.714 million - 87.8

per cent of the total - related to
annuities.

Several sources suggested that,
given the annuities weighting,
CLICO (Bahamas) was acting
more as a bank unregulated by
that sector’s supervisor, the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas. It then,
under the guidance of its CL
Financial parent, behaved as a
private equity/hedge fund, invest-
ing funds in a series of highly
speculative, risky foreign real
estate ventures that are now illig-
uid.

The main difficulties facing Mr
Gomez and his team are how
many of CLICO (Bahamas)
assets are still in this nation, and
whether the foreign-based ones
can be recovered and made to
realise their full value.

As previously revealed by Tri-
bune Business, at the December
31, 2007, balance sheet date, a full
impairment of the $57 million
loan tied up in Florida real estate
(it has since risen to $72 million)
would leave CLICO (Bahamas)
with just over $40 million in total
assets.

That would be insufficient to
meet liabilities worth almost $85.5
million, especially some $79.37
million in reserves set aside to
pay future policyholder benefits.

Given the state of the US and
Florida real estate market, any
sale of CLICO (Bahamas) invest-
ment there would almost certain-
ly fail to recover the full amount
of the loan, leaving a hole on the
balance sheet, with liabilities
exceeding assets.

A further headache regarding
the annuities is that they fall into
two classes, Tribune Business has
learnt. One class of annuity
depositors was investing in a
retirement-style plan, paying a
small sum per week or per month,
in return for receiving a lump sum

NOTICE is hereby given that AUNTENY DELVA of TAKE-
ME CORNER, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of
FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

and Citizenship,

P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



NOTICE

The

Bahamas
Contributory Medical

Public

Services
Plan will

Union
conduct a

Membership Meeting for The Medical Plan
Members Only, at 7:00p.m. on Friday, March
6, 2009 at the Bahamas Public Services Union
Meeting Hall, East Street South, off Soldier

Road.

All Members are urged to attend

Refreshments will be served following the
meeting.

Stephen J. Miller
General Secretary



- in instalments - on retirement.

Another set of annuity deposi-
tors was effectively placing large
sums of money on fixed deposit
with CLICO (Bahamas), in
return for above average market
rates of return. The question now
is whether the ‘retirement’ clients
should rank ahead of any ‘invest-
ment’ clients.

Assets

Meanwhile, Mr Smith was
another who raised questions as
to how CLICO (Bahamas) was
able to take so many Bahamian
dollar-denominated assets out of
the Bahamas, and parlay them
into US investments.

“What is concerning about this
is that you want to match assets
and liabilities,” Mr Smith said,
“and assets held here in the
Bahamas are in Bahamian dol-
lars, so you’d have thought they’d
match them in Bahamian assets.

“But most of the portfolio is
tied up in real estate in Florida. I
wonder how they were allowed
to do that, because a Bahamas
resident company who wants to
invest Bahamian dollars abroad is
usually told no.”

It is likely that CLICO
(Bahamas) took money out of
this nation through its branch net-
work in the Caribbean.

Meanwhile, Mr Gomez said he
had little in terms of detailed
information he could provide to

SEE page 8B

i

NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape Supply

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks
a qualified landscape supplier(s) to grow trees, palms,
shrubs and groundcover (items) in accordance with the
required schedule and speculations for completion of
Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. This is a supply
only contract.

Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th,
2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs



NOTICE

Notice is hereby given of the loss of Bahamas Government Registered Stock

Certificate as follows:

Interest
Rate
Stock
1. Bahamas
Registered
Stock

0.53125 % A.P.R.

Certificate Maturity

No. Date
64-027 2020

Amount
$412,000

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement certificate. If this certificate
is found, please write to RO.Box CB 12-407, Nassau, Bahamas

ACCOUNTS ASSISTANT

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is responsible for administering
The Bahamas Ship Register, which is the third largest in the world.
The Authority prides itself on the high standards and good safety

record of its fleet.

Applications are invited for the position of Accounts Assistant, to
be based in London. The successful candidate will be responsible
to the Senior Accountant.

Duties would include:

¢ Assist in the preparation of management and financial reports
e Data Input into the accounting package

¢ Performance of bank reconciliations

¢ Accounts Payables and Receivables

Applicants for the post should hold an Accounting, Economics,
Finance or Business Degree. They must be self-motivated with the
ability to work without direct supervision in a hectic work

environment.

Remuneration will be commensurate with qualifications and
experience.

Applicants are invited to write in confidence, enclosing a copy of
their CV with photo attached and details of current salary to:-

Deputy Director Finance & Admin
The Bahamas Maritime Authority

120 Old Broad Street
London EC2N 1AR
United Kingdom

Fax: 011 44 207 614 0670

Deputy Director Finance & Admin
The Bahamas Maritime Authority
Manx Corporate Centre

West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-4679
Nassau, The Bahamas

Fax: 242-356-5889

Direct Email: finance@bahamasmaritime.com

Closing date for receipt of applications is 6th March, 2009





(Wy (ew
LY IY
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS.
IM THE SUPREME COURT

2007
CLENQUI/Ne. 00739

Motor dealer in
$700k expansion

new bays have been opened
for a month.

“We started in December,”
Mr Lowe said of the new bays.
“They will be finished in two
weeks or so, hopefully. We’ve
got to tile the floor, install two
lifts and install the electricals,
so hopefully in two to three
weeks it will be ready to go.

“We're going to take a little
bit of a wait and see attitude
for a month.

“Once the bays have been
up and running for a month,
and we’ve seen whether it’s
made a difference from the
customer’s viewpoint, we’ll
make a determination as to

COMMON LAW and EQUITY DIVISION


























IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT tract of land
containing 14.3 Acres being a portion of a
Crown Grant originally made to Thomas
William Hall situate on the Morthern Side of
the Main Quean’s Highway in the Settlament of
Cripple Hill on the Island of Crooked Island,
one of the Islands of the Cammanvwealth of The
Bahamas.

Lowe said Nassau Motor
Company had no plans to lay-
off any of its 60-65 staff. Some
14 of those are technicians.

whether we see it all coming
together.”

While the expansion would
not create any extra jobs, Mr

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FROM page 1B

bune Business. “If everyone
does their bit, at the end of
the day, hopefully we’ll see
things start to turn.”

After constructing the new
reception office and customer
drive-in area in phase two, Mr
Lowe said the third and fourth
phases would involve con-
verting the old reception back
into work bays, and creating a
new transmission and lunch
area, respectively.

Nassau Motor Company
will assess whether to proceed
with the extra phases once the

AND




IN THE MATTER of The Guieting Titles Act, 1959,
Chapter 393

AMD

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
MHUELINGTON OSCAR SCAVELLA
Under The Cuieting Tithes Act, 71959

NOTICE

HUELINGTON OSCAR SCAVELLA, the
Petitioner claims te be the owner in fee simple in
possession of ALL THAT tract of land containing
14.3 acres being 4 portion of a Crown Grant

granted to the late Thomas William Hall situate on NOTICE is hereby given that TIMOTHE PAUL of EAST

NOTICE is hereby given that OLEMCIA JOSEPH

the Morthern Side of the Main Queen's Highway in
the Settlement of Cripple Hill on the Island of
Crooked Island one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas AND has made
application to the Supreme Court of the said
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
The Quieting Titles Act. 1959 to have his title to the
said parcel of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereaf determined and declared in a
Certificate of Tithe to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Petition and Plan showing tne
position boundaries shape marks and dimensions
tract or parcel of land filed in this
matter may be inspected during nermal working
office hours at the following places: —

of the said

1) The Fegistry of the Supreme Court,
Anshacher House, East Street, in the City of
Nassau on the Island of New Providence,

STREET, P-O.BOX N-T060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister respansible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registrationnaturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration'naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
hwenty-eight days from the 27" day of February, 2009 tothe
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizanship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HENRIDINE COOPER
of MACKEY STREET, P.O. BOX N-44, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27" day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

of GUMBELE HIGHTS, SOUTH, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Natonalty and Citzenship, for regisiration/naturalization as a
tilizen of The Bahamas, and ihat any person who knows any
reason why registrabon/naturalization should mot be granted,
should sand a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20" day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Gilizenshp, P.O. Box
N-F14d?, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CECELIA
CATHERINE ROXBURY of Western District, intends to
change my name to LAKISHA ROXBURY, If there are

any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

ore of the Islands ef the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas.

26° BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE

The Chambers of Clarita V. Lockhart,

Number $0 Shirley Street, Corner of Shirley WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER
Street and Elizabeth Awenue in the City of Yee: od

Nassau, The Bahamas, Attorney for the Price: 93,000.00

Petitioner. Hul: Fiserglain

Engine: Tein Mercury CML OP TWAS, 225 HP, 250 Howes
WW: S21 e

ES

Entry level book keeper urgently
needed must be proficient in
Notice is hareby given that any person having WY ETern esse) ve seca ce
Dower or a right to Dower or an Adwerse Claim or
a claim not recognized in the Petition shall within
Thirty (30) days after the appearance of Notice
filed in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the
City of Nassau and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his,
her or its claim in the prescribed form verified by

the Affidavit to be filed therewith,

Failure of any such parson to file and serve a
Statement of his, her or its clair on or before the
said Thirty (30) days herein will operate as a bar
te such claim.

Please fax resume to 394-3885.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ARIST ROGER of EAST
STREET SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20° day
of February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

aforesaid

36 Getrage inet condition! Fully lowded wath Autopilot, Fish finder, Chit potter ASPs,
Sereon/Ch, Mead, Preihwater, Bom cuthiogs, Powered with twin Meecury 275 Optimas ad
srt cratt gaps.

Standard Equipment Opticnal Equiprent
Oe Vas al era poached, yak a! rafal pe! bea Pde
Bre Satan (hge ohdih

Pot & war serd fone ai diet aeonage

a Bldg

wicgal wie pliler

Porta pet ofp & OM hege
Tih hak a de GBT

Leaning pot! wicca

eh ert

aapeme

Hoa phe Papen ss omy ball ag eaa, a ate ,
nutt-ae:, fab finder, WHE eran:

Pot Bi dar eared Pec ems, age et
Mad Foch.

Geb prep ase

Uechebte cos ote wees dar
Ledre posed rod reriny

CLARITA V. LOCKHART
Chanibers.
Neo. 90 Shirley Street
Shirley Street & Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner
CF. 9, 18, 28)

‘wiped a eed Rape = Mierevie dd deh ped
Sald oatieg les phir of wl ge

hh eg nhs

33 woecty pra ra

Tein trite.

Nig en here dee

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LOM TAT

Ringikey Ldgecore be, Ir.
Ph ala
Boral bed grate begyres lien

—
NAD

Nassau Airport
Devolopment Company

Trace reve oa bodes
Pedue c heing e

FG CAP

[TAL MARKEKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work

REQUEST FOR

QUOTATION

M-100, Test Well Drilling

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks the services
of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling
Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope
of services includes:

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.46 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -42.90 | YTD % -2.51
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.96 | YTD -2.03% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $
Abaco Markets 1.41 1.41
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00
Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00
Benchmark 0.63 0.63
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15
Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37
Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95
Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83
Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.77 6.77
Consolidated Water BDRs 1.78 1.71
Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40
Famguard 7.76 7.76
Finco 11.00 11.00
FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 10.45
Focol (S) 5.00 5.00
Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00
Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30
ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets faa 8.42 14.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35

Div $

0.992
0.319
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.255
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Drilling and pump testing of a 6” pilot hole;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Return Well;

Flow testing of the 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Discharge testing of the 10” Feed Water Return Well;
Geophysical logging and flow testing of Pilot Hole and wells;
Water temperature logging and analysis of water quality and
chemistry;

Professional supervision, (i.e. Hydrologist).

Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

S2wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB 31.72 33.26 29.00

Bahamas Supermarkets 11.23 12.04 14.00

RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _V YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387 0.35
2.9230 -0.58
1.4376 0.28
3.3201 -1.94
12.6816 0.50
100.5606 0.56
96.4070 -3.59
1.0000 0.00
9.1005 0.06
1.0401 4.01
1.0330 3.30
1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300

0.000 Request for Quotation Packages will be available for pick up after

und Name 1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009.
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3773 Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3781

2.9230

30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

Request for Quotation closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at
3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 7B



50% increase to NIB wage
ceiling is recommended

FROM page 1B

Pointing out that the chal-
lenges facing NIB were no dif-
ferent to those being experi-
enced by other public social
security schemes worldwide,
such as those in the UK and US,
Mr Cargill said reforms to the
National Insurance Act and
accompanying regulations
would ensure the almost-$1.6
billion reserve fund would
remain solvent well into the
future.

But he warned that, based on
actuarial projections: “By the
year 2032, if nothing happens
to the programme, the Nation-
al Insurance Fund will face sig-
nificant challenges. Already, the
fund is nearing equilibrium, that
is, contributions and benefits
[paid out per year] are near
equal.”

Effectively, actuarial studies
have shown that if the status
quo is maintained, and reform
eschewed, the NIB reserve fund
will by 2032 have become so
depleted - largely as a result of
an increasingly aged population
- that it would effectively be
bankrupt.

“The NIB programme of the
Bahamas continues to be
among the most generous in the
world,” Mr Cargill said, in terms
of benefit pay-outs and cover-
age.

Contribution rates were cur-
rently 8.8 per cent for salaried
employees - normally split 5.4
per cent/3.4 per cent between
employer and employee - and
either 6.8 per cent or 8.8 per
cent for the self-employed.

The NIB director pointed
that with the scheme entering
its 35th year in existence, it had
experienced only two increas-
es ever in the insurable wage
ceiling - to $250 in 1985, and
then to the current $400 in the

aN
~~ ¥
NAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company

late 1990s. Meanwhile, there
had never been an increase in
the contribution rates.

“While there is no immedi-
ate recommendation to increase
the rate of contribution, there is
a strong recommendation to
increase the insurable wage ceil-
ing to $600, and to increase it in
line with increases in the aver-
age national wage,” Mr Cargill
said. This, he explained, would
have the effect of “shoring up
the Fund, ensuring it remains
solvent” well into the future
past 2032. It would have the
effect of extending the life of
NIB’s reserves.

Another recommendation,
although not new, is to index
NIB’s pension benefits to infla-
tion. Mr Cargill said it had been
proposed that pensions be
linked to changed in the retail
price index, a move that would
help NIB to be “fair and rele-
vant”, and enable beneficiaries’
retirement incomes to keep
pace with the cost of living.

While NIB was working to
increase some benefits, Mr
Cargill said it also needed to
strengthen other benefits pro-
visions. This had led to the rec-
ommendation that to be fully
vested for an NIB pension, a
beneficiary needed to have
been making contributions for
10 years, not the current three.

Explaining the rationale
behind the seven-year increase
in the vesting period, Mr Cargill
said: “One only needs to have
been in 150 weeks to be fully
vested with a full pension. That
does not happen anywhere else
in the world.”

A much, longer and continu-
ous contribution history would
be required, Mr Cargill
explained, indicating that this
would exclude expatriate work-
ers who came to the Bahamas
on a temporary work permit

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

D-111 Qualified Environmental Monitor

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks a
Qualified Environmental Monitor for Stage 1 of the LPIA
Expansion Project. The scope of services includes:

+ Review and approve contractors’ environmental plans;

* Develop inspection check lists and inspect the work of
contractors for compliance to environmental plans;
Facilitate and communicate with regulatory authorities on
behalf of the Project on environmental issues; and
Prepare weekly and monthly reports.

Interested proponents must be qualified, familiar with local
regulatory laws and agencies and familiar with International
Best Practices (Equator Principles, IFC Standards).

Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up
after 1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 5th, 2009 at

3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:
Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

from receiving an NIB pension.

Currently, provided they have
made more than three years’
worth of contributions, NIB has
to pay expatriate workers a full
pension wherever they are in
the world, regardless of how
long they spent in the Bahamas.

“Tf anyone comes and works
in the Bahamas, regardless of
who they are, for three years,
they’re entitled to be paid a
pension,” Mr Cargill said. “Any
national who has paid into NIB
for 150 weeks or more is enti-
tled to a pension.”

Hence the recommendation
to increase the vesting period
from three to 10 years, a move
that would bring NIB into line
with other Caribbean and
worldwide social security
schemes. Mr Cargill added that
another recommendation was
for NIB to “expand the base” of
insurable wages to include
income received from sec-
ondary jobs, plus tips and gra-
tuities.

With tips and gratuities cur-
rently excluded from the NIB
‘wage’ definition, Mr Cargill
added: “For hotel workers, in
particular, this translates into
smaller benefits.” Such a move,
though, is unlikely to please the
hotel industry, which will see it
as an extra tax and additional
cost burden.

NIB would also, Mr Cargill,
warned, strengthen the penal-
ties for businesses and self-
employed persons who either
did not pay contributions, or
paid them late.

While the courts were used
“as a last resort”, the NIB direc-
tor said many of the Bahamas’
estimated 16,000 businesses
were either not paying NIB con-
tributions or paying them late.

“We are seeing a significant
increase in legal cases and incar-
cerations,” Mr Cargill said,
adding that the NIB Act treated
non-compliance as a criminal
matter.

“There has been a significant
increase in criminal matters, a
significant increases in cases, as
well as high profile ones, over
the last several months.”

Non-contribution “places
employees in a precarious posi-
tion” and jeopardised the sus-
tainability of the NIB Fund
itself, Mr Cargill said, given that
it was obligated to pay employ-
ees benefits even if their
employers had not been meet-
ing their obligations.

With monthly contributions
around $16 million, and benefits
close to $14 million, he added
that it was important NIB col-
lect every cent.

Mr Cargill said NIB paid out
around $150 million in total
benefits in 2008, and this month
some 28,000 persons would
receive its pensions or benefits.
Short-term benefits, such as
maternity and sickness pay,
accounted for $30 million.

The NIB director also
addressed business complaints
on record keeping, one Rotari-
an saying his business had been
contacted by the Board, claim-
ing it had not paid contributions
for a period of time many years
ago. The Board had also said
the business had missed a
month of contribution payments
more recently, but when chal-
lenged to produce evidence,
told the Rotarian businessman
he needed to produce his
records instead.

Mr Cargill said the NIB Act
required businesses and the self-
employed to keep their records
indefinitely, but the Board was
using common sense in applying
this.

MUST SELL

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY
Andros Ave. — Englerston Subdivision

Interested persons should submit offers in writing to:

The Manager
Credit Risk Management
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than March 13, 2009

2 bedrooms,
I bath

© Comprises:
Property 3,600 sq. ft/
Building 733 sq. ft.

For conditions of
sale and other
information,
please contact:

Phone:
356-1685,
502-1929

or 356-1608





(Wy
LY

PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Cruise line’s arrivals
rise 60% on 2008

FROM page 1B

“March will be the proof in the pudding,” he added. “With March
being Spring Break, we have to find how low or how high we can go
with cruise fares, and that will be the difficult part.”

Discovery’s operation is important to the Freeport community. Its
cruise ship is the largest tour operator on the island, and provides
daily cargo service for merchants and Grand Bahama residents.

In the last two years, Discovery has been challenged to remain
competitive and profitable, receiving millions in assistance from the
Government.

When asked about the financial outlook for Discovery, Mr Hahn
said: “It is hard to tell The news is not good and our booking window
is even shorter now.”

He added that domestic passenger loads account for no more than
12 per cent of Discovery’s business. This January and February, it
was less than 4,000, he said.

Mr Hahn said package offers to Bahamian passengers are unprof-
itable. “Regretfully, we tried, but since most Bahamians have relatives
and property in Florida, our efforts failed and we did not make any
money; we lost money,” he said.

Mr Hahn has tried to get to some support from the local Florida com-
munity. “I tried to get the local community in Florida to realise what
buying power the Bahamian population has over there. I think I am get-
ting through,” he said.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOYLENWORTH HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Many CLICO clients ‘unlikely’
to recover 100% of investments

FROM page 3B

CLICO (Bahamas) creditors yet,
given that he and his team had
just gone into the company.

They now have to go through a
huge volume of paperwork,
including the company’s financial
statements, to build up an accu-
rate picture of its financial posi-
tion.

“We are in a discovery and
exploration stage.

“We anticipate having a meet-
ing with the creditors next week,”
Mr Gomez said.

“The creditors meeting will
likely be in a public setting for
account holders only, to address
the pertinent issues.”

Information

Adding that “it’s simply too
early” to give CLICO (Bahamas)
policyholders and depositors
detailed information, Mr Gomez
added: “We understand the anx-
iety associated with this process,
and understand the human fac-
tor. We are looking to address all
these issues.

“This is a process, and it will
take time for the liquidator and
his team to go into the property,
unwravel the pieces and negotiate
with creditors, employees and all
interested parties.”

He added that a Supreme
Court hearing scheduled for

March 5, 2009, before Justice
Albury was unlikely to take place
because it was too soon for all
parties to be ready. It is likely
that at this juncture the Govern-
ment will petition for a full liqui-
dation.

“The liquidator’s role, over a
period of time, is to essentially
protect the policyholders, realise
the assets of the company and
settle with the creditors and
employees as best as possible,”
Mr Gomez said.

“This is a challenging process
for the liquidator, but a process
that must be achieved. CLICO
was a substantial company, with a
significant client base, with many,
many transactions in any one
month, any one year.

“The role of the liquidator is
not adversarial. It is to help those
who have invested with the com-
pany, and to do as best we can to
ensure they do not suffer loss.”

CLICO (Bahamas) employees
are unlikely to receive severance
pay, and will have to join the
creditor queue with policyhold-
ers and depositors.

Near the front of the queue will
be FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas), which has first
demand mortgages over most of
the company’s properties.

A call centre and website will
be set up to aid CLICO
(Bahamas) clients.

$1.3m pig farm eyed
for Grand Bahama

FROM page 1B

chase. However, Rose Farmlands, which will be situated in the eastern
end of Grand Bahama, five miles from the US missile base, will use a
portion of its 1,500 acres to produce corn for a portion of the sow feed
,along with pigeon peas and the natural bio-fuel Getropha, which
could be used for the company’s generators.

“You have to have sustainable inputs, so we’re talking about an ani-
mal that, to some degree, can actually be fed from crops grown on that
land,” Mr Douglas said. “In any piece of property you also have to
incorporate some diversity. Also, in our case, because of the particu-
lar site we chose, that land will also be set back from existing commu-
nities, so we’re not going to be a nuisance to people that are around us.”

Mr Douglas said the farm’s largest competition will be from imports
of foreign meats. He said, though, that the company will engage the
Bahamian public to educate them about their product, which will he
said will boast quality.

“No matter what effort a local person puts forth in getting a product,
if he doesn’t educate the consumer on that product you’re going to end
up in the same old stalemate, so the idea here is that a lot of people will
eat a piece of pork and have no idea where it came from - no farm to
table history,” Mr Douglas said.




Legal Notice

NOTICE
PARK AVENUE HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)













Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 30th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,






Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MALMESBURY VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRAPEVINE TRADING INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IPSKEW MOOR
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHELET JEAN JACQUES
of CARMICHEL ROAD, FAITH AVENUE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27" day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAELCHAN TWO GROUP INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HEEMA INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GAMBAS HEIGHTS
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FULLUCK COMPANY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW ENGISTERN

INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAGIC CHARM HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)








a Nt a aa ee)

THE WEATHER REPO

5-Day FORECAST

THE TRIBUNE

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MAarINE FORECAST



Ti INDEX NY















































; 7 Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
ry, | en on = v ai High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: ENE at 12-25 Knots 4-7 Feet 5-10 Miles 74°F
2 . Mn in : ae 6 oO F/C F/C F/C FIC Saturday: NE at 8-15 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
in ¢ é WE 0| 2 3|4|s 6|7 il Acapulco 90/32 71/21 s 88/31 71/21 S FREEPORT Today: : NE at 12-25 Knots 5-8 Feet 5-10 Miles 74°F
W y.
KK a — WS Low | MODERATE | HicH } V.HIGH J EX. Amsterdam 45/7 43/6 c 47/8 45/7 po Saturday: ENE at 8-15 Knots 3-5 Feet _7-10 Miles 74° F
MG ORLANDO : 7 Ankara, Turkey 39/3 30/-1 c 37/2 23/5 sn BAGO Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 6-9 Feet 5-8 Miles 74°F
High: 79° F/26°C ll Sunlit, breezy and Clear. Plenty of sun. Partly sunny, chance Partly sunny, breezy Mostly sunny. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 54/12 46/7 pe 50/10 41/5 sh Saturday: NE at 8-15 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F
v Low: 56° F/13°C om a pleasant. for p.m. showers. and cooler. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 68/20 67/19 r 76/24 66/18 +
756° stb gas eer ——— re Bangkok 98/36 81/27 pc 98/36 79/26 pc
i @ TN . 5 , High: 82° High: 79° High: 70° High: 74° Barbados 34/28 74/23 po 34/28 75/23. po
; lp ; High: 80 Low: 68 Low: 68 Low: 59 Low: 60 Low: 63 TIDES FOR NASSAU Barcelona 62/16 46/7 s 60/15 47/8 s DDA Wits
TAMPA ef Ee ECE EA Belin 46? 25/3 § 467 2/41 §
High: 78° F/25° C rz 80°-67° F 63°-61° F 19°-63° F High __Ht.(ff.)_Low _Ht.(ft. oan 573 52/11 4 505 53/11 +
Low: 60° F/15°C i - The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:06am. 26 2:57am. -0.1 Belgrade 43/6 29/-1 sh 40/4 36/2 sh
ai @ , 7 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:22pm. 28 3:08pm. -0.2 Berlin 41/5 30/-1 sh 42/5 35/1 sh
lf = Saturday 9:45am. 25 3:39am. -0.1 Bermuda 68/20 64/17 pc 71/21 67/19 pc
a om aa | CT . 10:04pm. 28 3:46pm. -0.2 Bogota 66/18 46/7 r 67/19 44/6 sh
WK tatistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Brussels 46/7 41/5 c 5010 43/6 pc
IW Vik Statistics are for Nassau through 1 d Sunday 10:27am. 24 4:25am. 00 p
1 r in ABACO Temperature 10:51pm. 28 4:28pm. -0.1 Budapest 40/4 28/-2 pc 39/3 36/2
- die High: 76° F/24° HIG: cuscaasiados.scgsinsnnasedncnaresatastenet 75° F/24° C Wada 0a Sam OA Buenos Aires 86/30 68/20 pc 86/30 72/22 pc
7 = igh: 76 F/24°C ° ° Monday : oe : ‘ ee : Cai 8/14 0/10 sh 64/1 12
7 \\, hee, LOW sacesiarasesaeted 66° F/19° C 1145pm. 28 S16om. -04 airo 58/14 50/10 s 17 55/12 pe
r YX” Low: 59° F/15°C Normal high... 7g paseo CO 97/36 72/22 s 95/35 67/19 s
' Normal low . 64° F/18° C Calgary 27/-2 4-15 s 26/-3 10/-12 pc
= @ WEST PALM BEACH iy Last year's GN secs esteetctennss as 85° F/29° C SUN ay Ty itn Cancun 84/28 63/17 s 86/30 65/18 s
’ el High: 77° F/25° C . Last year $ low saberbanieedeecaeea Gebeoners 68° F/20° C " " Caracas 81/27 65/18 pc 84/28 69/20 pc les
a, Low: 60° F/16°C Precipitation —_ ae aa a.m. Lay vie cy am. Casablanca 71/21 54/12 sh 69/20 53/11 pc 68/52
a As of 1 p.m. yesterday oo... cceccccceeeneseene 0.00" unsel....... “11 p.m. Moonset..... “40 p.m. Copenhagen 41/5 31/0 s 38/3 37/2 sn
\ FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date First Full iad New Dublin 52/11 43/6 c 5211 39/3. sh
WW \"\ High: 77° F/25° C @ High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date 0... 3.31" - = 7 Frankfurt 48/8 43/6 c 57/13 44/6 c
Low: 63° F/17°C _ Low: 56° F/13°C a ie oe Geneva 46/77 34/1 c 57/13 37/2 s
_ aX AccuWeather.com “a a ee Halifax 42/5 35/1 pe 42/5 30/-1 +
vy @ WS XK Forecasts and graphics provided by . : i Havana 82/27 57/13 s 83/28 57/13 s ENNY Showers Miami
ys MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.4 Mar.10 WMar.18 Mar.26 Helsinki 33/0 19/-7 sn 25/-3. 14/-10 sf T-storms aes
os High: 78° F/25° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 77/25 66/18 c 73/22 67/19 c Rain eae.
A Low:63°F/17°C NASSAU High: 78° F/26° C Islamabad 77/25 44/6 s 78/25 50/10 pc Flurries - Cold-ee—e=er
W \ : Fe é Low:62° FA7°C Istanbul 44/6 37/2 ¢ 43/6 39/3 + Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
High: 80 F/27°C J | 49/8 47/3 43/8 45/7 precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm iienfi@antie
~ Low: 68° F/20° C SGHATeSEN 75/93 58/14 76/24 55/12 / Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary M@eng=nfl
ag a
KEY WEST X @ Kingston 82/27 73/22 sh 84/28 76/24 sh ane
High:77° F/25°C W UNG CATISLAND Lima 85/29 67/19 pc 87/30 67/19 pc 1080s [H0S1) 10s 20s [BUSH 40s
Low: 65°F/18°C High:77° F/25° C London 55/12 43/6 pc 5211 43/6 s
: , Low: 58° F/14°C Madrid 68/20 37/2 s 573 41/5 pc
a
@ Manila 93/33 75/23 pc 93/33 73/22 pc
\.
WMG * . Mexico City 82/27 46/7 s 81/27 42/5 s
_— ~ Monterrey 99/37 66/18 s 76/24 51/10 pc a o 4
in GREAT EXUMA — al SAN SALVADOR Montreal 44/6 10/-12 ¢ 19/-7 9/-12 pc
AW High: 81° F/27° C High: 80° F/27° C Moscow 30/-1 25/-3 sn 30/-1 23/-5 sn
WW, Low: 68° F/20° C Lowe FTC Munich 36/2 32/0 sn 42/5 32/0 c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : Nairobi 88/31 56/13 sh 89/31 56/13 s
highs and tonights's lows. High: 82° F/28°C ie New Delhi 81/27 55/12 s 79/26 55/12 s ;
Low: 63° F/17°C ie . Oslo 28/-2 21/-6 s 25/-3 24/-4 sn Never St our
~ EK _— Paris 48/8 41/5 pe 5412 43/6 s Grin’ > {
Prague 40/4 34/1 sh 42/5 37/2 ¢ = t a x
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 90/32 76/24 pc 87/30 76/24 pc cil = LIME Wi O US .
a crc fame sod 208 pe STN3 AB 8 ; im
Low: 63° FA7°C Rome 55/12 39/3 pe s7/13 41/5 s yy - = .
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 83/28 73/22 sh 82/27 73/22 sh i A to Auto Insur ance,
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 81° F/27°C San Juan 95/35 66/18 s 99/37 70/21 pc - the smart choice 18
Fc FIC FC FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC ru Low: 65° F/18° C San Salvador 91/32 64/17 s 92/33 71/21 pc +. M
Albuquerque 66/18 37/2 s 6246 36/2 s Indianapolis 42/5 22/5 c 38/8 ‘17/8 pc Philadelphia 57/13 38/3 43/6 341 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santiago 90/32 55/12 s 82/27 55/12 pc = anagement.
Anchorage 25/-3 15/-9 s 26/3 17/-8 sf Jacksonville 75/23 52/11 pc 81/27 52/11 pc —_ Phoenix 79/26 55/12 po 84/28 57/13 s ye j Santo Domingo 83/28 67/19 sh 83/28 68/20 sh eople you can trust
Atlanta 68/20 49/9 sh 63/17 34/1 1 — Kansas City 38/3 20/6 c 33/0 17/8 c Pittsburgh = 52/11 28-2 + 42/5 26/3 po RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:84°F/29°c oT oreo ae be .
Atlantic City 50/10 38/3 + 45/77 31/0 pc Las Vegas 71/21 46/7 po 73/22 49/9 pc Portland, OR 49/9 35/1 po 49/9 40/4 + High: 81° F/27°C Low: 66° F/19°C Sokal aa i pe ae me pe ~ aa
Baltimore 5814 42/5 + 44/6 34/1 Little Rock 5613 36/2 Fr 47/8 28/-2 Raleigh-Durham 68/20 48/8 sh 54/12 36/2 1 Low:61°F/16°C at % a oa eae ie sa ETT z Sa
Boston 5110 37/2 + 44/6 29/-1 pe Los Angeles 68/20 52/11 pc 72/22 54/12 pe __ St. Louis 42/5 27/-2 c 34/1 22/-5 sn ° Wy a ae "Em ee =a eRe
Buffalo 44/6 17/-8 + 29/-1 18/-7 pce _ Louisville B1M0 32/0 + 42/5 24/-4 po SaltLake City 42 26/-3 pce 48/8 30/-1_ pe GREAT INAGUA wr Te 467 98/3 1 BOAL 97/9 1 INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Charleston, SC 70/21 5442 pe 71/21 52/41 sh Memphis 58/14 39/3 4+ 42/5 29/-1 5 San Antonio 86/30 5412 pe 64/17 38/3 pc High: 83° F/28° C anaes 44/6 19/-7 1 98/-2 16/-8 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMETED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 32/0 16/-8 pc 33/0 16/-8 ¢ Miami 78/25 638/17 $s 81/27 65/18 s San Diego 67/19 52/11 pe 67/19 55/12 pc anne 3 va: :
: . Low: 69° F/21°C Trinidad 81/27 72/22 t 80/26 72/22 sh =
Cleveland 48/8 20/-6 1 33/0 19/-7 pc Minneapolis 14/-10 3/16 ¢ 20/-6 7/-13 pe San Francisco 61/16 47/8 pe 63/17 53/11 r Taran 46/7 30/-1 pc 43/6 36/2 + j wvidene d leuth
Dallas 63/17 35/1 r 58/14 31/0 s Nashville 58/14 36/2 r 41/5 25/-3 + Seattle 47/8 3541 pe 48/8 40/4 + oy Visnaa 43/6 36/2 c 467 44/5 ' Hew Pr Gron Paton Shawn Eleuthera Frome
Denver 41/5 16/-8 1 50/10 25/-3 s New Orleans 78/25 61/16 pe 69/20 39/ t Tallahassee 73/22 54/12 pe 76/24 49/9 c lie Warsaw 37/2 27/-2 sn 34/1 30/-1 ‘ltd , a ' i.
Detroit 38/3 18/-7 pc 35/1 17/-8 pe New York 50/10 39/3 r 42/5 31/0 pc Tampa 78/25 60/15 s 78/25 62/16 $s » Winnipeg IAB -8/-22 po 14-10 -A/-20 po Tea 0 Wee 280 350-500 Tek (0) 347 ‘4 Tek (242) 380-284) Be: (240) 33 Hn
Honolulu 79/26 66/18 pc 78/25 6719 sh OklahomaCity 52/11 30/-1 po 46/7 24/-4 s Tucson 79/26 47/8 s 81/27 52A1 s Vw — : . ; : . a
Houston 82/27 5613 po 67/19 43/6 c¢ Orlando 79/26 5613 s 82/27 58/14 s Washington,DC 61/16 39/3 r 43/6 31/0 + Te een ae Me i ee ee



Full Text



PAGE 1

n B y PACO NUNEZ Tribune News Editor p nunez@tribunemedia.net THREE Cuban men at the Immigration Detention Centre say they have been on hunger s trike for two days in protest against the deplorable conditions t hey and hundreds of others are forced to endure at the facility. T he men say they have not eaten since 8am on Wednesday and do not plan to until their concerns are addressed. The health of one of them, an epileptic, has deterio-r ated severely – “but he is ready to die,” one of his compatriots s aid. The Tribune spoke to two of the hunger strikers and eight other detainees from various coun tries and backgrounds, who all supported the men’s claims of abuse and subhuman conditions at the centre. They said others want to join the hunger strike, but are afraid of reprisals from guards. In the face of calls from international human rights activists for an independent investigation, gov ernment officials have denied that there have been any beatings at the centre, and say they know nothing about the hunger strike. All the detainees who spoke to T he Tribune y esterday reacted with anger upon hearing this, claiming the authorities know everything that is going on. One of the hunger strikers called on Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson to pay a surprise visit to the centre and inter view them, “not in the air-condi-t ioned front office, but back here, where we live.” T he allegations have been mounting since Monday, when The Tribune received information about an alleged severe beating at the centre in which the victiml ost several fingernails. Yesterday, the man who says he was the victim of that attack explained that it took place a year ago. After having been at the centre for several months, he said, he began to ask the guards for information about the status of his case, persisting until they became fed up with him. He claims that one day, a group of guards took him into a room Cubans launch protest; Tribune interviews 10 men at the Detention Centre N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Thr ee detainees on hunger strike C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.80FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER SUNSHINE HIGH 80F LOW 68F B U S I N E S S SEEBUSINESSFRONTPAGE S P O R T S Motor dealer in $700k expansion SEEPAGE FIFTEEN Knights top Stingrays The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY nB y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r A $ 1 . 3 m i l l i o n G R A N D B a h a m a p i g f a r m p r o j e c t i s w a i t i n g o n f i n a l a p p r o v a l s f r o m g o v e r n m e n t b e f o r e i t o p e n s a s t h e l a r g e s t s o w f a r m i n t h e B a h a m a s , w i t h 6 0 0 p i g s b e i n g r a i s e d f o r B a h a m i a n c o n s u m p t i o n a n d e x p o r t . M i c h a e l D o u g l a s , d i r e c t o r o f b u s i n e s s d e v e l o p m e n t f o r R o s e F a r m l a n d L t d , t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y t h a t t h e f a r m w i l l i n i t i a l l y o p e r a t e a t a l o s s f o r a b o u t t h r e e y e a r s b e f o r e b e c o m i n g s i g n i f i c a n t l y p r o f i t a b l e . T h e f i r s t t h r e e y e a r s i s a l w a y s h a r d i n a n y b u s i n e s s , a n d w e a r e g o i n g t o b e o p e r a t i n g a t a n e x t r e m e l o s s f o r t h e f i r s t t h r e e y e a r s , b u t t h e r e a f t e r o u r p r o f i t m a r g i n s a r e p r e t t y g o o d , h e s a i d .C a p a c i t yM r D o u g l a s s a i d t h a t w h e n t h e f a r m i s u p t o m a x i m u m c a p a c i t y i t w i l l b e a b l e t o s u p p l y t h e e n t i r e B a h a m i a n m a r k e t , w i t h a l o n g t e r m g o a l o f e x p o r t i n g t o t h e T u r k s a n d C a i c o s , D o m i n i c a n R e p u b l i c a n d H a i t i . W e w i l l c o n t r o l o u r o w n m a r k e t i n g , s o w e w i l l s t e m o u t t o a n y a v a i l a b l e m a r k e t s , s a i d M r D o u g l a s . O v e r t h e p a s t y e a r w e d i d s o m e m a r k e t i n g i n T u r k s a n d C a i c o s . R o s e F a r m l a n d , i n a b i d t o k e e p p r o f i t m a r g i n s h i g h , i n t e g r a t e d i t s o w n s l a u g h t e r a n d p a c k i n g h o u s e s i n t o t h e b u s i n e s s m o d e l , a n d i n t e n d s t o g r o w d e d i c a t e d f o o d c r o p s f o r f e e d , w h i c h r e p r e s e n t s a l a r g e o v e r h e a d c o s t . I n t h i s v e n t u r e w e o w n t h e f a r m , w e o w n t h e s l a u g h t e r a n d p a c k a g i n g h o u s e t h e y r e v e r t i c a l l y i n t e g r a t e d s o w e r e g o i n g t o b e s u p p l y i n g o u r s e l v e s w i t h p i g s a t a r a t e t h a t i s n e c e s s a r y s o t h a t w e c a n m a r k e t t h e m , s a i d M r D o u g l a s . H e s a i d a b o u t 6 0 p e r c e n t o f f a r m c o s t s c o m e f r o m f e e d p u r C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 2 7 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 4 .6 8$ 4 .5 1$ 4 .6 9T h e i n f o r m a t i o n c o n t a i n e d i s f r o m a t h i r d p a r t y a n d T h e T r i b u n e c a n n o t b e h e l d r e s p o n s i b l e f o r e r r o r s a n d / o r o m i s s i o n f r o m t h e d a i l y r e p o r t . $ 3 . 3 4 $ 3 . 5 6 $ 3 . 3 6 f o r a b e t t e r l i f eP E N S I O N g r o u p p e n s i o n s a t t r a c t t h e c r e a m o f t h e c r o p k e e p p r e s e n t e m p l o y e e s h a p p y g u a r a n t e e s t a f f r e t i r e m e n t s a v i n g sa l l o f t h e a b o v eF A M I L Y G U A R D I A N C O R P O R A T E C E N T R E : A T T H E J U N C T I O N O F V I L L A G E R O A D , S H I R L E Y S T R E E T & E A S T B A Y S T R E E T I w w w . f a m g u a r d b a h a m a s . c o mc a l l u s t o d a y a t 3 9 6 4 0 0 0 A S U B S I D I A R Y O F nB y D E N I S E M A Y C O C K T r i b u n e F r e e p o r t R e p o r t e r d m a y c o c k @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R E E P O R T D i s c o v e r y C r u i s e s i n c r e a s e d i t s p a s s e n g e r a r r i v a l s t o F r e e p o r t b y 6 0 p e r c e n t o v e r l a s t y e a r d u r i n g t h e f i r s t t w o m o n t h s o f 2 0 0 9 , i t s p r e s i d e n t , H a n s H a h n , h a s r e v e a l e d . T h e s h i p , w h i c h p r o v i d e s d a i l y s e r v i c e b e t w e e n F l o r i d a a n d G r a n d B a h a m a , b r o u g h t a t o t a l o f 3 2 , 0 0 0 p a s s e n g e r s t o t h e i s l a n d b e t w e e n J a n u a r y a n d F e b r u a r y , c o m p a r e d t o 2 0 , 0 0 0 l a s t y e a r . O f t h e 3 2 , 0 0 0 c r u i s e p a s s e n g e r s , m o r e t h a n 5 0 p e r c e n t s t a y e d o v e r n i g h t f o r o n e o r m o r e n i g h t s o n G r a n d B a h a m a . E v e r y b o d y n e e d s a b i t o f g o o d n e w s , s a i d M r H a h n , w h o s p o k e w i t h T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s a t t h e G r a n d B a h a m a B u s i n e s s O u t l o o k , h e l d a t t h e O u r L u c a y a R e s o r t . H e s a i d D i s c o v e r y s l a s h e d i t s c r u i s e f a r e s b y 6 0 p e r c e n t d u r i n g t h e t r a d i t i o n a l l y s l o w p e r i o d t h a t m a r k s t h e b e g i n n i n g o f e v e r y y e a r , f o l l o w i n g t h e C h r i s t m a s a n d N e w Y e a r h o l i d a y s . J a n u a r y a n d F e b r u a r y a r e t r a d i t i o n a l l y l o s i n g m o n t h s , s o w h a t w e d e c i d e d w a s t o c o m e u p w i t h a f e d u p f a r e , a n d w h a t w e m a n a g e d t o d o i s p u t c u s t o m e r s o n b o a r d t h e v e s s e l a n d o n t h e i s l a n d , M r H a h n s a i d . W e d i d n t i n c r e a s e t h e b o t t o m l i n e , b u t I t h i n k i t w a s w o r t h t h e e f f o r t , h e s a i d . M r H a h n a d d e d t h a t t h e m o n t h o f M a r c h w i l l b e c r i t i c a l f o r D i s c o v e r y . C r u i s e l i n e s a r r i v a l s r i s e 6 0 % o n 2 0 0 8B u t D i s c o v e r y s a y s p r i c e d e a l d i d n o t b e n e f i t b o t t o m l i n e , a n d p a c k a g e s t o B a h a m i a n t r a v e l l e r s n o t p r o f i t a b l e S E E p a g e 6 B M a n y C L I C O c l i e n t s u n l i k e l y t o r e c o v e r 1 0 0 % o f i n v e s t m e n t s nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e N a t i o n a l I n s u r a n c e B o a r d ( N I B ) h a s r e c o m m e n d e d i n c r e a s i n g t h e i n s u r a b l e w a g e c e i l i n g b y 5 0 p e r c e n t f r o m $ 4 0 0 t o $ 6 0 0 a s a w a y t o e n s u r e i t s l o n g t e r m s u s t a i n a b i l i t y , i t s d i r e c t o r w a r n i n g y e s t e r d a y t h a t t h e s c h e m e f a c e d s e v e r e d e p l e t i o n b y 2 0 3 2 i f n o t h i n g h a p p e n s . A l g e r n o n C a r g i l l , a d d r e s s i n g t h e R o t a r y C l u b o f W e s t N a s s a u , s a i d t h e p r o p o s e d $ 2 0 0 i n c r e a s e i n t h e c e i l i n g f o r t h e i n s u r a b l e w a g e t h e p o r t i o n o f e m p l o y e e i n c o m e o n w h i c h N I B c o n t r i b u t i o n s i s c a l c u l a t e d w a s o n l y a n i n i t i a l s t e p , t h e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n b e i n g t h a t i t c o n t i n u e t o b e r a i s e d i n l i n e w i t h i n c r e a s e s i n t h e a v e r a g e n a t i o n a l w a g e .R R e e v v i i e e w wT h e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n w a s o n e o f a s l e w m a d e i n t h e w a k e o f t h e e i g h t h a c t u a r i a l r e v i e w o f N I B , w h i c h w a s c o m p l e t e d l a s t y e a r . W h i l e t h e r e v i e w h a s n o t b e e n m a d e p u b l i c y e t , M r C a r g i l l i n d i c a t e d t h a t N I B w a s l o o k i n g t o b r i n g c o n t r i b u t i o n s i n l i n e w i t h b e n e f i t s , a n d l i n k b o t h w i t h c o s t o f l i v i n g a n d l i v i n g s t a n d a r d s i n d i c a t o r s s u c h a s w a g e i n c r e a s e s a n d i n f l a t i o n . T h e N I B d i r e c t o r s a i d t h a t t h e G o v e r n m e n t w i l l i n d u e t i m e e n a c t a m e n d m e n t s t o t h e l e g i s l a t i o n t h a t w i l l e n a b l e [ t h e F u n d ] n o t j u s t t o s u r v i v e , b u t t h r i v e . 5 0 % i n c r e a s e t o N I B w a g e c e i l i n g i s r e c o m m e n d e d * I n c l u s i o n o f g r a t u i t i e s / t i p s i n w a g e d e f i n i t i o n ; r a i s i n g p e n s i o n v e s t i n g p e r i o d f r o m t h r e e y e a r s t o 1 0 ; a n d l i n k i n g p e n s i o n s t o i n f l a t i o n a m o n g p r o p o s a l s t o e n s u r e N I B s s u s t a i n a b i l i t y * D i r e c t o r w a r n s i f n o t h i n g d o n e , N I B t o f a c e s e r i o u s c h a l l e n g e s c o m e 2 0 3 2 * H i g h p r o f i l e b u s i n e s s e s p r o s e c u t e d f o r n o n p a y m e n t * B u s i n e s s e s r e q u i r e d b y l a w t o k e e p a l l N I B r e c o r d s i n d e f i n i t e l y S E E p a g e 5 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r M a n y C L I C O ( B a h a m a s ) c r e d i t o r s a r e u n l i k e l y t o r e c o v e r 1 0 0 p e r c e n t o f t h e i r i n v e s t m e n t s i f t h e c o m p a n y g o e s i n t o f u l l l i q u i d a t i o n , a f o r m e r g o v e r n m e n t m i n i s t e r s a i d y e s t e r d a y , a s i t s N a s s a u b a s e d b r a n c h o f f i c e s w e r e c l o s e d i n d e f i n i t e l y , a n d t h e s a l e s a g e n c y f o r c e t o l d t o s t a y a t h o m e u n t i l f u r t h e r n o t i c e . J a m e s S m i t h , m i n i s t e r o f s t a t e f o r f i n a n c e i n t h e f o r m e r C h r i s t i e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , d e s c r i b e d t h e m o v e t o l i q u i d a t i o n a s a v e r y s e r i o u s , s w i f t m o v e , s o t h e G o v e r n m e n t m u s t h a v e c o m e u n d e r s o m e s e r i o u s t e c h n i c a l a d v i s e m e n t . H e s u g g e s t e d , t h o u g h , t h a t b e f o r e t h e G o v e r n m e n t m o v e t o f u l l y w i n d u p C L I C O ( B a h a m a s ) a n d p l a c e i t i n t o f u l l l i q u i d a t i o n , t h a t t h e c o m p a n y b e g i v e n o n e l a s t c h a n c e t o c o m e u p w i t h a p l a n t o s a t i s f y i t s c r e d i t o r s i n t h i s c a s e , i t s a n n u i t y d e p o s i t o r s , a n d t h e l i f e a n d h e a l t h i n s u r a n c e p o l i c y h o l d e r s . I f t h e y c o m e u p w i t h a p l a n , t h e c h a n c e s o f t h e c r e d i t o r s , t h e p o l i c y h o l d e r s , g e t t i n g 1 0 0 p e r c e n t o n t h e d o l l a r i s b e t t e r , b u t i f t h e y g o i n t o f u l l l i q u i d a t i o n , t h e y w i l l g e t a p e r c e n t a g e o n t h e d o l l a r a n d w i l l h a v e t o p a y t h e f e e s o f t h e l i q u i d a t o r , M r S m i t h e x p l a i n e d . * A l l N a s s a u o f f i c e s c l o s e , a n d s a l e s a g e n c y f o r c e t o l d t o s t a y a t h o m e u n t i l f u r t h e r n o t i c e * S e v e r a l p o t e n t i a l b u y e r s c i r c l e i n s u r a n c e b o o k o f b u s i n e s s A S E C U R I T Y O F F I C E R a t C L I C O s h o w s c u s t o m e r s w h e r e t o g o . F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f S E E p a g e 3 B $ 1 . 3 m p i g f a r m e y e d f o r G r a n d B a h a m a S E E p a g e 6 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y ( N M C ) y e s t e r d a y s a i d i t c o u l d u l t i m a t e l y i n v e s t u p t o $ 6 0 0 , $ 7 0 0 , 0 0 0 i n a f o u r p h a s e e x p a n s i o n d e s i g n e d t o e n h a n c e e f f i c i e n c y i n i t s s e r v i c e d e p a r t m e n t , w i t h t h e f i r s t s t a g e t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f f i v e n e w b a y s w i t h h y d r a u l i c l i f t s s e t t o b e c o m p l e t e d a n d o p e r a t i o n a l w i t h i n t h e n e x t t w o w e e k s . R i c k L o w e , N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y s o p e r a t i o n s m a n a g e r , t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f t h e f i v e n e w s e r v i c e b a y s a t i t s h e a d q u a r t e r s , s a n d w i c h e d b e t w e e n S h i r l e y & D e v e a u x S t r e e t s , w a s a p l a n w e d b e e n t r y i n g t o i m p l e m e n t f o r a c o u p l e o f y e a r s . I t s a c t u a l l y t h e f i r s t p h a s e o f a f o u r p h a s e p l a n , M r L o w e e x p l a i n e d . W e r e r e n o v a t i n g o u r s e r v i c e d e p a r t m e n t t o m a k e i t m o r e e f f i c i e n t . W e r e p u t t i n g n e w l i f t s i n f i v e o f o u r b a y s . H o p e f u l l y , o u r t e c h n i c i a n s w i l l b e m o r e e f f i c i e n t , a n d i t w i l l m a k e t h i n g s j u s t a l i t t l e e a s i e r f o r o u r s e r v i c e c u s t o m e r s . I t w i l l a l s o b e a b e t t e r e n v i r o n m e n t f o r o u r t e c h n i c i a n s . H H y y d d r r a a u u l l i i c cM r L o w e s a i d t h e f i v e n e w s e r v i c e b a y s , e a c h w i t h t h e i r o w n h y d r a u l i c l i f t s t o r a i s e u p v e h i c l e s , w o u l d e n a b l e N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y t o r e p l a c e f i v e o l d b a y s . T h e c o m p a n y n o w h a d 2 0 b a y s i n w h i c h t o s e r v i c e c l i e n t s v e h i c l e s . H e a d d e d t h a t t h e s e c o n d p h a s e o f t h e p r o j e c t , w h e n e v e r N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y i n i t i a t e d i t , w o u l d i n v o l v e k n o c k i n g d o w n t h e e x i s t i n g c l i e n t r e c e p t i o n b u i l d i n g a n d r e p l a c i n g i t w i t h a n e w p r o p e r t y . T h e r e c e p t i o n o f f i c e s m o v e w o u l d c r e a t e t w o a d d i t i o n a l s e r v i c e b a y s , g i v i n g N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y t w o m o r e s e r v i c e b a y s t h a n i t c u r r e n t l y h a s . I f i t a l l c o m e s t o g e t h e r , i t w i l l p r o b a b l y b e i n e x c e s s o f $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 , m a y b e a s h i g h a s $ 6 0 0 , 0 0 0 $ 7 0 0 , 0 0 0 , M r L o w e s a i d o f t h e c o m p a n y s i n v e s t m e n t . N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y s w i l l i n g n e s s t o i n v e s t , e v e n i n a t r o u b l e d e c o n o m y w h e r e n e w c a r s a l e s h a v e p l u m m e t e d , d r o p p i n g b y a r o u n d 3 0 p e r c e n t i n d u s t r y w i d e l a s t y e a r , p r o v i d e s h o p e t h a t t h e B a h a m a s w i l l e v e n t u a l l y p u l l o u t o f r e c e s s i o n t h r o u g h t h e e f f o r t s o f B a h a m i a n o w n e d b u s i n e s s e s . T h i s i s w h a t s g o t t o h e l p s t a r t t u r n i n g t h e e c o n o m y a r o u n d , M r L o w e t o l d T r i M o t o r d e a l e r i n $ 7 0 0 k e x p a n s i o n N a s s a u M o t o r e y e s f o u r p h a s e s e r v i c e g r o w t h S E E p a g e 4 B BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Mother and boyfriend charged with the murder of her baby n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A YOUNG mother charged in the death of her 10-month-old child was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday along with her boyfriend. Police have charged 21year-old Farah Augustine, of Red Land Acres, and 21year-old Teddy Thaddeus Charlton of Talbot Street in the murder of Fiara Augus tine Santil. According to reports, the 10-month-old girl was found dead on Sunday with unusu al marks about the body in an apartment the child’s mother shared with her boyfriend. Augustine and Charlton were escorted to Court One, Bank Lane yesterday afternoon where they were formally arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez. The infant’s grandmother and mother of Augustine wept loudly on Bank Lane yesterday as the accused were escorted to court by TRIBUNEEXCLUSIVE SEE page 10 PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham along with Edison Key, Executive Chairman of the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation, looks at Bahamian grown produce on display yesterday at the opening of the Agricultural, Marine Resources and Agribusiness Expo. SEE PAGE SEVEN B AHAMIAN GROWNPRODUCEONDISPLAYFORPM F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Farah Augustine Teddy Thaddeus Charlton SEE page eight Felip Major /Tribune staff n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net EMPLOYERS who illegally hire foreign workers should be forced to pay an increased fine of $10,000 for contravening the Immigration Act, Minister Branville McCartney said yesterday. Speaking at a senior manager’s conference at the Breezes hotel in Cable Beach, the Minister of Immigration said Bahamians who employ illegal immigrants who have no right to work or live in the country should be hit with fines serious enough to affect businesses that break the law. “I would like to see the fine increase to $10,000, and if they are caught they would feel it in their pockets,” he said. “We have an illegal problem and if we are serious about address ing the illegal problem let’s stop facilitating people from coming over. “It is not only about appre hension, it is about getting the word out there.” As he welcomed Immigration chiefs to a day dedicated to the review of legislative amendEmployers illegally hiring foreign workers ‘should pay $10,000 fine’ Branville McCartney SEE page 11 n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net HUMAN rights groups have expressed concern that investigations conducted by the Department of Immigration were handled internally without independent review and oversight, the 2008 Human Right’s Report for the Bahamas conducted by the US State Department said yesterday. At the time of the report the Carmichael Road Immigrant Detention Centre held up to 500 detainees last year (with tent space for an additional 500), and women and men were held separately. Haitians and Jamaicans were the most commonly interdicted migrants and the highest occupancy during the year was Concern over Department of Immigration investigations SEE page eight PLEASENOTE THAT, DUE TO SP ACE RESTRICTIONS, THE COMICSPAGEIS AGAIN NOTINTODAY’STRIBUNE. THE P AGE WILL, HOWEVER, RETURN TOMORROW. w ww.tribune242.com

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GOVERNMENT has had to find an additional $5 million to m ake up for an anticipated shortfall in the public service budget caused by the decision to ask police, immigration and customs o fficers to take early retirement, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said. Yesterday, opposition s pokesman for the Public Service, MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell said that while it is normal for this sector to experience a funding shortfall, he feels that in thesec ases the retirement of government employees was not sought in the name of “reform”, but rather in order to remove politic ally contrary individuals. “In the normal course of things with the public service there’s always a shortfall and this is something the PLP would haved ealt with when it comes to the actual budget time. “What concerns us, of course, is the fact that this was done, what i t’s costing to the overall public, and whether this is the right thing t o do in the circumstances,” he said. It doesn’t seem to be much reform at all; all it is is a ques-t ion of dismissing some people t hat he finds to be inconvenient to t he service and then turning a round and calling it streamlining or reform,” added the MP. D uring his mid-year budget statement in the House of Assem b ly on Wednesday, Mr Ingraham said extra money is required bys everal government agencies as they head into the second half of t he 2008/2009 budget period. He said the funds that will be procured from other ministries or departments, leaving the overall total cost of the budget unchanged. I n addition to the $5,062,450 needed to “facilitate benefit pay-m ents to persons retiring from the public service” and “make up f or a shortfall that will occur due to early retirement packages” for individuals from the three agencies, $4,459,585 will be transferred to the public service to meet other “expenditure needs” up to June 2009. M r Mitchell said the PLP is “disappointed” to see that nom oney appears to have been included in the budget for the p ayment of pension entitlements for prison officers agreed under the former administration or towards settling a dispute between former Road Traffic offic ers and the government which the PLP agreed to resolve in them onths before they left office in 2007. I’ve been trying since we lost office to get that resolved,” said Mr Mitchell. “The government refuses to do anything about it and these p eople are really suffering from this loss of pension entitlements.T hese people don’t have the resources to take the matter to c ourt.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE PM: $5m needed to cover expected budget shortfall P RIME MINISTER H ubert Ingraham speaking to the House. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f I I n n t t h h e e n n o o r r m m a a l l c c o o u u r r s s e e o o f f t t h h i i n n g g s s w w i i t t h h t t h h e e p p u u b b l l i i c c s s e e r r v v i i c c e e t t h h e e r r e e s s a a l l w w a a y y s s a a s s h h o o r r t t f f a a l l l l a a n n d d t t h h i i s s i i s s s s o o m m e e t t h h i i n n g g t t h h e e P P L L P P w w o o u u l l d d h h a a v v e e d d e e a a l l t t w w i i t t h h w w h h e e n n i i t t c c o o m m e e s s t t o o t t h h e e a a c c t t u u a a l l b b u u d d g g e e t t t t i i m m e e . . Fred Mitchell

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n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter STARTLING testimony emerged in the Keith Carey mur d er trial yesterday as a key prosecution witness revealed his rolein the plot to rob the businessman. Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles are accused of the murder and also face charges of armed robbery and conspiracy to commit armed rob b ery. Vaughn Carey, 34, a cousin of the victim, testified that the rob bery plot did not initially involve killing the businessman. The victim was gunned down on the steps of the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique WilliamsDarling Highway on February 27, 2006. He was killed before he was able to deposit money that belonged to the gas station that he operated. Vaughn Carey testified that in January 2006, Dwight Knowles approached him about “setting up” the victim. “I told him that I would have to think about it,” the witness said. He said he had known Knowles for a year prior to that occasion, as Knowles frequent ed the Esso Service Station on Carmichael Road and Faith Avenue where he worked. Carey testified that he agreed to aid in the plot when Knowles returned two days later. He testified that at that time, Knowles introduced him to Sean Brown, who had no fingers on his right hand. He only had a thumb. Carey said the men asked which day would be best to carry out the robbery, when the businessman made his deposits and to which bank. He said the conversation took place in Knowles’ white Nissan Maxima. Carey testified that he asked the men how the robbery would be carried out, noting the fact that Brown had only one “good” hand. “Dwight said that his friend ‘Bumper’ would do the robbery. He said that ‘Bumper’ would jump out of the car, throw Keith to the ground and snatch the bag,” the witness told the court. He then identified Jamal Glinton as ‘Bumper’. Carey testified that while working at the gas station between 9am and 10am on February 27, 2006, he was approached by Sean Brown, who pointed across the street to where Knowles had parked his car and was standing next to Keith’s Breakfast Hut. At this point in the testimony, some of the victim’s relatives began cry in court. “Sean asked if he had left to go to the bank and I told him no and that they would have to wait,” the witness continued, adding that he told the men that the victim was going to deposit about $70,000. Carey testified that although he did not see anyone else at the time, when the two men got back into the car he saw a third man in the back passenger seat and remembered that Knowles had mentioned ‘Bumper.’ Carey said that as the victim left the station and got into his blue Toyota hatchback, he took off his hat as a signal to the men that the victim was heading to the bank. He said the men followed the victim north onto Faith Avenue and out of his sight. Five to 10 minutes later, he said, the victim’s wife Michelle, who also worked at the station, gave him certain information and instructions. He said that as a result, he stayed at the station and later went to a bar. Testified Carey testified that he never saw the men again and had no contact information for them. He said he went looking for the three men because he was afraid, adding that each had agreed to give him $3,000 for his role. Carey said that while on remand at Her Majesty’s Prison, he and the three accused men met in the prison yard and Knowles admitted that the robbery had not gone as planned. Carey said Knowles told him that that the victim had seen “Bumper” out of the corner of his eye and had fallen on the steps of the bank. The witness said Knowles told him the victim threw the bag with the money in it, and all ‘Bumper’ had to do was pick up it up. “Keith put up no resistance, but he still shot Keith,” Carey said. He said Knowles told him that there was $48,000 in the bag, that the three men got $16,000 each, and that they had looked for him but had no contact information for him and that the gas station had closed after the incident. During cross-examination by Brown’s attorney Dorsey McPhee, Carey admitted that in his first police statement he had referred to Sean Brown as “the man with no fingers.” Carey said that he knew Brown only had a thumb on his right hand because when he first saw Brown, he had no bandage on his right hand. During cross-examination by Knowles’ attorney Perry Albury, Carey admitted that he had given police two statements – the first in March 2006, the second in Jan uary 2009. Mr Albury suggested that Carey never met Knowles. Carey denied the suggestion. Mervin Benson, 42, testified yesterday that around 11am on the last Monday in February 2006, he was at his home on Homestead Avenue when Jamal Glinton, whom he knew as ‘Bumper’, arrived with two men. He said that Glinton told him that he wanted to “work a wibe”. Benson said he had known Glinton for three to five years prior to that, but did not really know the other men. He said that Glinton often came to the neighbourhood to “work his hustle’” and often came to the house to “cut up his herb.” He said that that morning, Glinton was carrying a black and brown bag. He said that the three men went into a back room where they stayed for about an hour. Police Benson testified that in 2007, he saw Glinton at the Needles Inn on Homestead Avenue and Lincoln Boulevard, where Glinton approached him about a statement he gave police regard ing the case. He said Glinton told him that his girlfriend had become preg nant while he was incarcerated and that he had given someone $80,000 to keep, but that person had spent it. Benson said that he saw Glinton about four times after that, but tried to avoid him. During cross-examination, attorney Craig Butler asked Benson why he had not mentioned the information regarding the money in his first statement to police and suggested that he was lying. Benson denied lying, but admitted that never wanted to be a witness and did not want to have anything to do with the law. He said the statements he gave to police were true. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 3 n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net ELECTRONIC work permits the size of credit cards could be introduced within the year to enable the Immigration Department to track foreign workers more efficiently. Amendments to the Immigration Act allowing for the issuance of electronic permits and the new type of cards were reviewed by senior immigration managers at a conference held at Breezes yesterday. Minister of State for Immigration Branville McCartney said he hopes the necessary legislation will be passed by parliament before it breaks for summer recess so that the new cards can be introduced this year. The plastic wallet-sized cards should be more convenient for foreign workers to carry with them at all times, and will replace the paper permits that are frequently forged. Cards will be logged on a sophisticated computer system which is already in place and ready for operation once the legislation has been passed, Mr McCartney said. “By the touch of a button we will be able to see who has a work permit, the type of permit, and it will give us an idea of who will be in the country. “Right now it is a labori ous task and there are instances when you do have t o apprehend persons and bring them in because there are fraudulent documents out there,” he said. “But nothing is 100 per cent, so when this system is in place there will be times when persons have to come and verify their status.” P lans to introduce the new electronic permits have been in place for sometime now and were developed alongside the introduction of the new electronic passports for Bahamian citizens. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Ministry of Housing “ran out of money” for its home repairs in December 2008, leaving it unable to pay funds owed to contractors who did work last year for two months, Housing Minister Kenneth Russell told The Tribune yesterday. In the mid-year budget report tabled in the House of Assembly on Wednesday, provisions are made for the Ministry of Housing to be given an additional $655,633 for repairs to some faulty houses built under the former administration. Minister Russell said: “It’s taking a long time (to finish the repair of homes cially how we ran out of money in early December. But we have the money now to pay off the contractors we owe and to continue with repairs until June.” While “a couple hundred” homes have now been repaired at a cost of over one million dollars, hundreds more still need fixing, Mr Russell said. According to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, the allocation of additional funds to certain ministries and departments in the mid-year budget will be done by shifting money within ministries permitting the government to not spend anymore in total than was approved last year in parliament. Of the $655,633 being reallocated to the Ministry of Housing, $350,000 will go towards the “cost of outstanding and unexpected emergency repairs” to paying off owed contractors, Mr Russell said. Meanwhile, the remaining $305,633 will be spent on other repairs that will be carried out up until June 2009. The issue of low-cost government housing was much discussed in parliament in the first year after the FNM became the government. While the former PLP administration pointed to the thousands of homes constructed during their tenure as an achievement which they are proud of, the incoming government, like numerous homeowners who made their disappointment known to the press, pointed to the sub-par condition of some homes as a blight on their record. Some contractors and other sources alleged that shoddy workmanship prevailed in many instances because of corruption within the Ministry of Housing and among contractors. A police investigation into these allegations has been inconclusive so far. Despite attention required by “hundreds” of homes built prior to the general election of May 2007, Mr Russell said that his ministry is keeping up with the construction of new homes at the rate desired. He said over two hundred homes are currently under construction. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net COMPLAINTS against police officers jumped by 17 per cent in 2008 compared to the previousy ear, according to the US State Department’s Human Rights Report on the Bahamas. “There were 300 complaints against police through December 19 (2008 249 in 2007. Of these 300 cases, authorities resolved 139, 60a waited judicial determination of a complainant’s pending case, and 101 were under investigation,” said the report, which was released Wednesday. “Of the 139 completed matters, 17 were referred to a policet ribunal, 11 were resolved informally, warnings were requested in four cases, officers were discharged in three cases, and the rest were withdrawn (20 stantiated (338h ad insufficient evidence (39 o r did not require further action (4 The State Department’s report further notes that compilers found information on the nature of the complaints unavailable”, but added that in the past (offences assault, unethical conduct, unlawful arrest, and stealing.” “The number of criminal charges filed, if any, was not reported,” it said. T he US State Department creates annual reports on the human rights situations in all countries which receive assis-t ance from the US and which a re members of the United Nations. Each report covers a number of areas, including compliance with internationally recognised individual, civil, political andw orkers’ rights. O n the subject of the Bahamas’ police force, the 2008 report notes that all officers involved in “shooting or killing a suspect are automatically placed under investigation.” T he report said that the Police Complaints and Corruption Branch, which is responsible for investigating allegations of policeb rutality, reports directly to the D eputy Commissioner, but has no independent oversight. The document also highlights concerns expressed by local attorneys and human rights observers that the unit may lackt he independence necessary t o impartially investigate abuses. Commentators have also pointed to this concern as one that may discourage people from reporting incidents that shouldp roperly be investigated. Despite these suggestions, police have in the past argued that they are impartial and adju-d icate matters relating to police misconduct. T he force has pointed to the fact that officers were disciplined as evidence that they are able to police their own. Meanwhile, in the Police Act p assed in the House of Assembly earlier this month, a provision is made for an independent body to review investigations into police officers. According to the Act, no one who has served as a police offic er or in any elected government o ffice in the last five years can sit on the body, which will report to the Minister of National Security. The Police Service Act was being debated in the Senate yesterday. Complaints against police ‘up 17%’ USState Department’s Human Rights Report on the Bahamas is released Key witness reveals role in plot to rob businessman Ministry ‘ran out of money’ for home repairs K enneth Russell Electronic work permits could be introduced within the year

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EDITOR, The Tribune. May I second the Letter to the Editor entitled “Petty Theft” (The Bahama Journal, January 30, 2009) by R McKenzie. Regarding the “tasting” of grapes prior to purchasing them, I, too, have decided that I would no longer give silent consent to this behaviour by doing nothing about it. I have asked a number of people why they do it. They usually reply that they are just tasting. I tell them that they can call it whatever they like, but that it is nevertheless what they very well know it is. I say to them that we teach our children not to eat any items before we have paid for them. Then the children see adults doing just the opposite. What are the children supposed to think? By the way, it is not just grapes. One day a “lady” picked up an apple, took a bite, then gave it to her child (who wasn’t even asking for it). On another occasion I chal lenged a “gentleman” in a nice business suit who was munching away at the dates (at $10.00 a pound). I asked him if he didn’t see the relationship between his behaviour and the crime problem in the country. His answer: “Don’t you compare me with those people, you crazy woman.” Petty theft has become so common that people no longer care who sees it. After all, they are just “tasting”. It has become accepted behaviour. M ost people just blindly copy what others are doing. Are we no longer able to think for ourselves? Or have we lost the ability to tell right from wrong? U McKINNEY Nassau, February 3, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. We all know that the beating that the FNM and Rt Hon Hubert Ingraham received at the hand of the Bahamian public in the national referendum back prior to the 1997 election will and has forever caused the Prime Minister to change his mind on ever holding a Constitutional Referendum on even the most simplest item such as the extending of tenure of judges of the Supreme Court. The Police Act debated and passed with the opposition abstaining is a clear indication that for some reason MPs can’t read The Constitution and rationally deduce that if there is no restriction today in the 1973 Constitution by placing restrictions to tenure of office of the Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner you are naturally and very obviously not in compliance with the Con stitution. Your readers are directed to the Constitution Article:119 (1 I also read into this that per the Constitution where sometimes we have not had a substantive Commissioner and/or Deputy Commissioner we were in violation, I suggest, of the Constitution. Do we now wait for an Attorney to bring a challenge to this proposed legislation which is heading quickly to the Senate? The Commissioner is also the Provost Marshall of The Bahamas which position is strictly Constitutional and is without any doubt excep tionally important. He reads the writ to dissolve parliament and to call a general election and has the awesome task having to read the death warrant and witness for the crown any hanging how could any supreme civil law give credence of not having someone ina substantive appointed position? Totally illogical. Acting is unacceptable. SHEPARD SMITH Nassau, February 14, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm Obama plan brings cries of class war fare WASHINGTON (AP timid, that's for sure. President Barack Obama's first federal budg et lays out the most far-reaching agenda for American life since Lyndon Johnson's GreatS ociety. But paying for it by having upperincome earners shoulder much of the cost quickl y provoked cries of class warfare in Congress. The Obama priorities reflected in the $3.6 trillion budget guarantee a fierce political battle ahead over taxes and spending. And despite the administration's agonizing over the deptha nd global nature of the worst recession in decades, the new president's budget forecasts ar apid U.S. recovery. The budget outline includes activist initiatives o n energy, health care, education and climate change. It would boost taxes on the wealthy, oil c ompanies and other businesses while cutting Medicare and Medicaid payments to insurance companies and hospitals to make way for a $634 billion down payment on universal health care. It would also limit charitable and other tax d eductions for the affluent and trim spending on government subsidies to big farms. P redictably, Republicans complained, much as they had done during last year's presidential c ampaign, that Obama was pitting the haves against the have-nots. "The era of big government is back, and Democrats are asking you to pay for it," said House Republican leader John Boehner of Ohio. He suggested Obama's proposed tax increases would reach deep into the middle c lass, despite repeated administration statements that tax hikes would be limited to families m aking more than $250,000 a year. Proposed new excise taxes on offshore drilling and plans to cap greenhouse gas emis sions and require polluters to buy permits could affect "all Americans who drive a car, who have a job, who turn on a light switch," Boehner said. B oehner and other Republicans also said it was folly to raise taxes during a recession. B ut the administration's own economic fore casts suggest that the brunt of the tax increases, including allowing existing tax cuts from the Bush administration to expire, will fall only after the nation is in recovery. The Obama budget forecasts that, despite the depth of the current recession, the economy will recover and grow by 3.2 per cent in 2010 and then climb to an even more robust 4 per cent in the three following years. Most of the proposed Obama tax hikes, including the permit levy on greenhouse gas emissions, would not take effect until a pre sumably post-recession 2012. Christina Romer, chairman of the presiden t's Council of Economic Advisers, defended the administration's upbeat forecast for recovery, saying it "reflects the administration's assessment that the comprehensive recovery programme outlined by the president on Tues-d ay night will be effective." But some deficit hawks suggested that Obam a was being too optimistic given the severity of the recession. " He is relying on a strong economic comeback very quickly. And he's assuming that a lot of the new issues will be paid for," said Robert Bixby, the executive director of the Concord Coalition, a bipartisan fiscal watch-d og group. Bixby said the budget has "a lot of downside r isk" that spending increases will not be fully off set by higher tax revenues. Obama's budget p lan projects a record $1.75 trillion deficit for 2009, largely swollen by stimulus and bank b ailout spending. Obama has said he hopes to sharply reduce the annual shortfall by the end of his term. In remarks, Obama said his budget was an attempt to fairly "come to grips with the hard choices that lie ahead." B ut in written comments accompanying the budget, he struck a far more defiant and populistt one, blaming much of the government's budget woes on his predecessor, President George W. B ush. "Prudent investments in education, clean energy, health care, and infrastructure were sacrificed for huge tax cuts for the wealthy and well-connected," Obama wrote. "There's nothing wrong with making money, but there is something wrong when we allow the playing f ield to be tilted so far in the favour of so few." Asked whether the class-warfare argument c ould complicate White House efforts to win support for some of its big priorities, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said, "No. AndI think it's important to understand that what the president has enumerated in his budget today is precisely the blueprint and series of promises that he made over the course of two y ears in a campaign ... that the American people voted for." S till, Stanley Collender, a longtime budget expert, predicted a huge battle in Congress over the proposed tax cuts and Medicare changes. But he noted that, with Democrats in control of the House and Senate, there's probably not much Republicans can do to keep the expiring Bush tax cuts from ending on their own. Furthermore, said Collender, in the current economic and political climate, "the wealthy are not as well thought of as they have been in the past." He also noted that exit polls from last year's presidential election showed those making more than $200,000 a year tended to vote for Obama rather than Republican Senator John McCain. (This article was written by Tom Raum of the Associated Press). Petty theft seems to have become acceptable LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net What the Constitution says E DITOR, The Tribune. C oming out of the stone-age can only be the description of the l ate arrival of the most modern method of transmitting the news – finally we can say congratula t ions to The Tribune but add a warning....with this technology c omes a lot of responsibility as before only us locals and foreign s ubscribers read The Tribune now the world can, so please make us proud. Spelling – I cannot understand why on the weather map on ZNS TV-13 so very often the simple word – harbour is harbor? Okay t here is a word spell check on a computer, but we are Englishs peaking. Queen’s English and not that abbreviated English A mericans use. JEROME SMITH N assau, February, 2009. ( Now that we are on the subject of ZNS and spelling, it would b e helpful if when identifying members of the House of Assembly and their constituencies, they would get the spelling of the name of the constituency correct. For example, Mr Frank Smith is MP for St Thomas More , not St T homas Moore. The constituency was named after St Thomas More C hurch, and the church was named after St Thomas More , L ord Chancellor of England, who was beheaded in 1535 for refusing to sign the Act of Supremacy that d eclared King Henry VIII Supreme Head of the Church of E ngland. (The Bahamas has its own M oore family, the best known being the late Sir Walter Moore, president of the Legislative Council (now Senate opposite St Francis Xavier Cathedral, is now the National Art Gallery. Ed) Correct spelling should accompany technology

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 5 n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A Freeport man was sentenced to eight months in prison after pleading guilty to possession of af irearm in a Freeport Magist rates Court. K endrick Williams, 23, was charged with possession of an unlicensed firearm in Court One before Magistrate Deb-bye Ferguson. W illiams was found in poss ession of a .357 Smith and W esson revolver on February 25, at Freeport, GrandB ahama. A ccording to police reports, W illiams and three other men were walking on Bonefish Street in Caravel Beach whenp olice observed Williams acting suspiciously. O fficers searched Williams a nd discovered a firearm in a k napsack on his back. In a separate court matter, Maxwell Jones, 22, of South B ahamia, was also charged with firearm possession. He pleaded not guilty to the c harge and was granted $7,000 b ail with one surety. The matter was adjourned to March 13. n B y LINDSAY THOMPSON Bahamas InformationS ervices THE new Consulate General Office in Atlanta,G eorgia will be opened by A pril 1, the Ministry of For eign Affairs confirmed. “That office will offer a wide-range of consular services such as Bahamian passports, visas and other legalised documents, andp romotion of businesses, i nvestments and culture in the Bahamas,” said Joshua Sears, Director General at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The process of staffing is underway and the office will be located in the same building that houses the Ministry of Tourism office. The Atlanta Consulate, Mr Sears said, will accommodate the large volume of business interests floating through that hub known as the gateway to the United States. He said the office would relieve the heavy volume experienced by the Miami Consulate Office in Florida. Mr Sears urged Bahami ans studying and living in Atlanta to register with the consulate office once it is opened to utilise the services there. The consular jurisdictions for Atlanta are Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The Consulate General Office in Miami, which has oversight for Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi, now has oversight for Ari zona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas and Utah. The Consulate General Office in New York has oversight for New Hemi sphere, New Jersey, Con necticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Vermont, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Maine. The Bahamas Embassy in Washington, DC, is respon sible for Ohio, the District of Columbia, Oregon, Virginia, West Virginia, Michi gan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, Indiana, Nevada, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Illinois, Iowa, Alaska, Hawaii, Nebraska, Maryland, and California. n B y DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Grand Bahama remains among the weakest players in the cruise tourism sector despite its envi-a ble proximity to the US market, D eputy-Director of Tourism Vernice Walkine said. The Ministry of Tourism, she said yesterday at the Grand Bahama Business Outlook, fully endorses the development of a new cruise passenger port as am ajor attraction. A new port could cost anywhere from $15 to $60 million, depending on the location, according to a Carnival Cruise Line executive. Freeport Harbour is considered too industrial and too far r emoved from tourist attractions. T hese two issues are among some of the main deterrents for c ruise ships. Ms Walkine reported that Grand Bahama receives only 300,000 cruise passengers a year when that number could easily to be tripled. S he noted that almost 100 per cent of the cruise ships entering the Caribbean from virtually every port north of West Palm Beach pass almost in sight of Grand Bahama. M s Walkine said she believes that a new port is vital to the r enewal of the island. “We know that this is in the best interest of the general pub lic that this development be accelerated. Value “I know that there are many sectors of the Grand Bahama community that fully understand and appreciate the tremendous value to the economy to be derived by the tripling of the number of cruise passengers coming to the island,” she said. Giora Israel, vice-president of strategic planning at Carnival C ruise Lines, said his company is interested in becoming partners with the government, the Grand Bahama Port Authority and Freeport Harbour in the development of a new cruise port on Grand Bahama. However, he also expressed concern over the lack of attract ions and activities available to cruise passengers and encouraged t he development of new activities other than snorkelling or g lass bottom boat tours. Mr Israel said Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is trying to put a group together to be willing partners in the development of the n ew port. The government is now in the process of identifying a suitable l ocation – a location that works from the land side and maritime side, he said. M s Walkine said that duty-free shopping is another area of major potential for Grand Bahama. “We simply need the decision-makers to make a declaration f or Grand Bahama Island to be an international shopping centre similar to Dubai. She stressed that Grand Bahama is already a global hub for o cean freight movements. The Freeport Container Port can gain great distribution advantage, being the hub for these inexpensive movements and can very easily be promoted with the country as the ideal sourceo f goods coming into the country, making it an international duty-free shopping Mecca,” she said. Ms Walkine said thousands of people could fly to Grand B ahama every day from the eastern US to shop. IN ORDERto compensate for the increase in food prices, the Prison Department was allocated $852,000 in additional funding from the government. This sum was outlined in the mid-year budget report for the 2008/2009 fiscal year which covers the period of July 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008. The document was tabled in the House of Assembly on Wednesday. Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest refrained from providing a breakdown of these resources until he gives his contribution to the mid-year budget debate next week. However, he said the additional funds requested were in keeping with the government's responsibility to adequately provide for all incarcerated persons. "Government's responsibility is to ensure that those persons in its protective custody are treated humanely, are fed. But the operational costs of the prison in some areas we've had budget increases and we put them in the mid-year budget to deal with," he said. The Prison Department was also given an additional $36,000 to cover increased gasoline costs; $27,000 to cover escalating diesel costs; $23,000 to off-set rising prices in propane, and $114, 000 for the purchase of cleaning supplies. Budget Also outlined in the mid-year budget, the Royal Bahamas Police Force was given $382,500 for the engagement of 85 new recruits for the period of April to June, 2009; $249,000 for the increase of travel and settling of outstanding arrears due to airlines; $250,000 for subsistence for travellers in the Bahamas; $10,000 for the local transportation of goods due to the increase in freight charges; $90,000 for the transportation of bodies for the increasing need of mortician services; $200,000 to cover gasoline costs for the next six months and depleted gas funding in the Family Islands, and $70,000 for diesel to be used in fire trucks, buses and generators. An additional $80,000 was also allocated for photocopying, photography and blueprinting costs which have increased due to rising levels of crime; $85,000 to cover the maintenance of photocopying machines; $125,000 for forensic science costs – $50,000 to pay DNA Labs International for analyses based on the current forensic science case load and $75,000 to contract Fairfax Identity Labs to assist with the establishment of a DNA Unit. An extra $40,000 was given to the police for the purchase of computer software, supplies and accessories; $150,000 for food for persons in custody, recruit graduations, and other functions in New Providence and the Family Islands; $300,000 to buy uniform materials for new recruits, to pay tailors in Grand Bahama and New Providence; $75,000 for the maintenance of computer and business equipment; $100,000 for generator, air-conditioning and other machinery maintenance; $125,000 to complete renovations and ongo ing repairs at police headquarters; and $50,000 to fund the maintenance of various police stations. Consulate General Office in Atlanta to open in April Ministry of Tourism endorses new cruise port for Grand Bahama Vernice Walkine Man gets eight months for firearm possession In brief Prison Dept gets an extra $852,000 funding from govt ANIMAL lovers are invited to attend the Proud Paws Potcake Party which will be held on Saturday, February 28, (not Friday as was previously reported) from 6pm to midnight at the Bahamas National Trust’s Retreat on Village Road. The event will be an evening of entertainment, music and dancing. There will also be raffle prizes, a silent auction and a light buffet. Tickets for Saturday’s event are available at Palmdale Veterinary Clinic, Caves Village Clinic or at the door. Please note that no dogs will be allowed. Proud Paws Potcake Party T HIS accident occurred shortly after 10am on Market Streetw hen the driver of a silv er SUV (left with a bus, causing it to turn over. The driver of the SUV e scaped uninjured, while t he driver of the bus sus tained visible injuries to his right hand and hadt o be taken away in an a mbulance. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff SUVFLIPSOVERINCOLLISIONWITHBUS

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO ATTRACTvisitors w ho are looking for an u nique experience, Atlantis i s now offering couples underwater wedding services. A tlantis is opening up one its feature venues, “The R uins Lagoon”, that just may b ecome the next top spot to get married. With a stunning array of sea life as the guests of honour, couples can now exchange or renew their vows underwater. Local marriage officer Matthew Sweeting introduced the project to the Atlantis team. The increased requests for underwater weddings would make a lot of sense when you have Atlantis’ world renowned underwater habi-t at as the backdrop,” he said. Mr Sweeting said the idea took hold with Atlantis’s enior director of marine and water park operations Glen K elly and Michelle LuiW illiamson, vice-president of marine aquarium operations, who then began developing the idea that guarantees even the most discerning bride and groom all the frills that any dry” wedding may provide. Photography T he underwater wedding package includes the nuptials w ith full underwater and outo f-water photography and videography followed byu ltra-luxurious pampering at Mandara Spa that precedes an intimate reception for the bride and groom and their wedding guests. A n underwater wedding t est run was held on Valent ine’s Day with photograph er Tim Aylen, videographer T roy Aitken and the “My Atlantis Photos” team cap tured the memories of Daniel a nd Linzi Belton who r enewed their vows in the u nique setting. Braving the chilly waters, L inzi donned her original wedding dress and Daniel a t raditional black and white t uxedo as they literally took the plunge for a second time. The event was not without its amusing moments as Linzi’s veil came off in her descent into the Ruins tank and then she had to learn how to elegantly walk underwater. The ceremony was flawless as both Ruins “residents” – t he sea life – and those watch ing from the Royal Towers Great Hall of Waters were enamored by the event. Future weddings will offer a ll the bells and whistles of underwater communications and custom-made his andh ers wedding wetsuits. RIGHT: The videographer captures the couple’s moments. FARRIGHT: Daniel and Linzi Belton and their underwater marriage officer Matthew Sweeting. Underwater weddings offered at Atlantis

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PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham officially opened the Second Annual Agricultural, M arine Resources and Agribusiness Exposition at the Gladstone Road Agricultural C entre yesterday. M r Ingraham described the l evel of representation and the quality of products displayeda t the expo as “impressive” a nd congratulated the Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources for the great job done in spear-heading the event. “The renewed and enthusiastic expressions of interest in l ocal production by a wide c ross-section of our community is commendable. Exhibi tions such as this one serve as i mportant showcases for Bahamian products, assisting in the creation and expansion of markets for Bahamian p roducts. “By raising the awareness of consumers to the wide varie ty, quality and price competi tiveness of domestic product ion, exhibitions of this nature help to increase consumptiono f domestic output. This is important because it will not only create employment and raise the incomes of producers, but also effect savings in foreign exchange that would otherwise be expended for imports,” he said. T he theme for this year’s e xhibition, “Promoting locally sustainable agricultural and marine production and con s umption toward improving food security”, brings focus to the critical issue of food security at a time of rising food p rices, the prime minister said. FOR FULL STORY S EE BUSINESS C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 7 PMopens major agricultural expo F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f LITTLE DUCKS crowd together at the expo. THE PRIME MINISTER takes a look at some of the wares on display. PRIMEMINISTER Hubert Ingraham walks around the expo on its official opening.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE S mart ChoiceDRIVESales approximately 600. “Observers complained of continuing abuse by guards, although immigration officials claimed that no such complaints were filed during the year. Human rights groups expressed concern that complaint investigations were handled internally without independent review and oversight. Children under the age of 14 were held in the women's dormitory. Many children arriving with both parents were not allowed contact with the father except during weekly visitation. Despite the possibility of being held for months, children did not have access to education,” the report said. The average length of detention varied significantly by nationality, willingness of governments to accept their nationals back in a timely manner, and availability of funds to pay for repatriation. Haitians usually were repatriated within one week, while Cubans were held for much longer periods. The US report said that although the country is a signatory to both the 1951 UN Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 protocol, the government has not established a consistent system for the protocol. The authorities detained illegal immigrants, primarily Haitians, until arrangements could be made for them to leave the country or they obtained legal status. “In practice the government provided some protection against the expulsion or return of refugees to countries where their lives or freedom would be threatened. Applications for political asylum were adjudicated on a case-by-case basis at the cabinet level. The authorities did not grant asylum during the year,” it said. The report pointed out that both local and international human rights observers criticised government for failing to screen potential asylum applicants adequately. “Those requesting asylum screening often lacked access to legal counsel. Human rights observers claimed that the government detained Cuban migrants for excessive periods. The government asserted that all migrants who claimed asylum were interviewed and screened adequately by trained immigration officials,” the report said. police. Augustine could only look back tearfully as her mother fell to the ground in anguish, screaming so loudly that orderlies from nearby courts had to urge her to be quiet. According to court dockets, Augustine and Charlton between Monday, February 16 and Sunday, February 22, 2009, intentionally caused the death of Fiara Augustine Santil. The accused, who were represented by attorneys Tai Pinder, Mario McCartney and Jomo Campbell, were not required to enter a plea to the charge. A prelimi nary inquiry will be held to determine whether there is sufficient evidence against the accused for them to stand trial in the Supreme Court. Attorney Pinder told the court that Charlton claimed thath e had been beaten severely w hile in police custody and asked that he receive medical attention. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that Charlton receive medical attention. The accused were remanded to Her Majesty’s prison. The case wasa djourned to March 18. F ROM page one Concern over Department of Immigration investigations Mother and boyfriend charged with the murder of her baby F ROM page one

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and put a plastic bag over his head, into which they sprayed M ace, severely irritating his eyes and making him feel as if his throat was on fire. The officers then beat him with s ticks so severely that he was swollen and black and blue for weeks, he said. As a result of the beating, the detainee claims, he lost three toen ails from his left foot, two from his right foot and two fingernails from his left hand. “Most of us are here for immig ration irregularities – we are not murderers, we are human beings and this is the 21st century,” he said. Another of the Cuban hunger s trikers questioned how the beating of his friend could be denied by government officials. “There were hundreds of witn esses. He was swollen like a watermelon, all black and blue. He was in bed for a week. We had to tend to him because no one else would,” the detainee said. He went on to describe the conditions at the centre as unbear-a ble, saying the facility is so overcrowded that at night, sleeping bodies completely cover the floors and hallways. H e also described a practice that has come to be known to detainees as “count-time.” Three times a day – at 8am, 4pm and midnight – all the occupants of the Detention Centre are marched out of the barracks, lined up and counted. Several of the detainees said this procedure is o verseen by heavily armed guards who shove and shout at them, often swearing at women and children and pushing them with the butts of their guns. One detainee was “slapped around” just yesterday morning for failing to move fast enough, he said. The detainee said there is also n o time for recreation at the centre, not even for the children, and that while there is an area near the front of the centre that features a swing set, this is all for show – as the area is only actually used as a holding pen for large groups of new arrivals. According to the detainees, all b ut two of the toilets at the chroni cally overcrowded centre are broken. “Do you know what happens when 200 to 300 people try to share two toilets?” one asked. People have to fight to get to t hem. Eventually people can’t wait any more and they start to u se the bathroom on the side of the building. Now the whole thing s tinks. We have to walk through puddles of urine.” A Jamaican detainee, who has been at the centre for threem onths said all the allegations leve lled by the Cuban detainees are absolutely true. He told of a young Dominican man who was brought in on Tuesd ay. “They have been beating him, all sorts of abuse. He is spit ting blood. I tell you, it is pure torture. “The conditions at this place a re totally inhumane. They treat people like dirt. It is total humilia tion,” he said. The Jamaican man called for t he government to grant the press and international human rights agencies full access to the facility. “If I have nothing to hide, and the authorities want to visit my h ouse to investigate some allegations, I would let them in,” he s aid. Several of the detainees called f or the allegations to be brought to the attention of the United Nations Human Rights Council. “If the UN ever saw what these people are doing, there would be some criminal charges,” one of them suggested. A n African man, who has been at the centre for three months,t old of how all his possessions “disappeared” while he was in c ustody. He explained that while detainees can keep some clothes with them in the barracks, any other belongings brought in with them are turned over to theg uards for storage. He explained that when he lost a ll his clothing during the fire that destroyed one of the barracks a f ew months ago, he asked the guards to allow him access to his suitcase, only to find that all his belongings were gone. “My suits, my laptop, my camera, all gone. Now I have nothing. When I take a shower, I don’t even have a towel to dry off with.” Worse he said, his travel documents have also disappeared. “They keep me here, they don’t feed me well, and they lost my passport. This place is hard. Life is not good here. They don’t have human rights in this country,” he said. One man, who said he has a legal right to work in the Bahamas, claimed he was picked up at a job site and given no opportunity to produce documents proving his status. He said: “In this place, we have no blankets, we don’t have much to eat. “We should have someone to talk to go and get our documents. We live in here like dogs. I can’t take it anymore.” The detainees said there is rarely enough food to go around, despite assurances to the contrary from the government. They called on the Bahamian people to donate blankets, baby food and other supplies for the very young and old, who they said suffer the most. They also asked human rights agencies to seek permission to see the conditions they live in as soon as possible – as they fear the guards may take steps to disguise what has been going on in an effort to avoid exposure. When asked about conditions at the centre yesterday morning, before the detainees spoke to The Tribune , Minister of State Branville McCartney said: “What we are trying to do at the Detention Centre is operate it like a holding facility, it’s not a prison and that is our mandate although we are housing people who are here illegally. So what we are in fact doing is holding people as though they have not committed a crime when in fact C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Three Detention Centre detainees on hunger strike FROM page one SEE page 11

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t hey have.” When it was suggested that the food was insufficient and of poor quality, Mr McCartney said that h e has had lunch there, and it was “good”. On Tuesday, the day after the first allegations were made, the D epartment of Immigration said it h ad already completed an investigation and determined that no abuse had occurred at the facility. However yesterday, Mr McCartney suggested that the inquiry may be ongoing: “The fact of the matter is, we have not been informed about or haven’t been able to verify any of these allegat ions, and if there is corruption, that is something that is a no-no for me and we will try and determine the facts.” He said he had not been informed about a hunger strike, but added that if detainees were tempted to hold one, “my advice to them is that they should eat a nd eat well, because it doesn’t do their body any good not to eat.” Speaking about Amnesty International’s call for in independent investigation, Mr McCartney said: “We have nothing to hide in connection with the Detention Centre. If there is a review being done w e would also want other persons there to ensure that its well balanced because these international reports tend to be absolutely w rong on occasion.” He also noted that if a Cuban national is outside Cuban territory for more than 11 months, it is very rare that they will be accept-e d back. “We usually have to look for a third country to send them and if that fails, we would find a person in the community who would s ponsor them or release them and advise them to apply for some type of status. “The difficulty comes in when these persons may have somec riminal past,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 11 A DOMINICAN man held at the Detention Cen-t re since Tuesday claims he was beaten repeatedly by guards in an attempt to extract “some information” f rom him. His claim was corroborated by several of his fellow detainees who spoke to The Tribune yesterday. T he man said the beatings were usually initiated by two immigration officers and continued by two D efence Force marines who wore masks and handed out more severe abuse. He said that on one occasion the officers beat hims o severely that he began coughing up blood, and that they choked him and repeatedly struck his genit als. “They keep saying that I am lying. They want some information. I was trying to get to the US and they wantt o know where I got my documents from and how much did I pay. I told theme verything I know. If I am lying then take me to court and let the judge decide,” he said. on hunger strike F ROM page 10 Dominican man claims he was beaten by guards ments to the 1975 Immigration Act, Mr McCartney highlighted the difficulties presented by the current economic climate and the need to renew focus on customer service. Laws need to be simplif ied, and not over complicated, in an effort to stem t he flow of foreign workers seeking employment and r esidency in the Bahamas and improve the quality of life for Bahamians, the Minister said. “This is the 36th year since the Bahamas obtained independence and there remains unclear guidelines and policies regarding immigration, citizenship, permanent residency, annual residency, etcetera,” he said. “This is totally unacceptable so I would like to bring clarity to the area of harbouring illegal persons and employing illegal persons. “I encourage senior man agers to think outside the box embrace a paradigm shift in this department.” In an effort to improve customer service a new website with online application forms and comprehensive information about work permits, citizenship and resi dency applications is being developed and should be up and running within the year, Mr McCartney said. “We are trying to be as efficient as possible and cus tomer friendly,” he added. “We have a special area now in the department that deals specifically with public relations and they are responsible for the website and I anticipate that hope fully it will be launched before the summer.” Employers illegally hiring foreign workers ‘should pay $10,000’ F ROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the a rea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter A $1.3 million GRAND Bahama pig farm project is wait ing on final approvals from gov ernment before it opens as the l argest sow farm in the Bahamas, with 600 pigs being raised forB ahamian consumption and export. M ichael Douglas, director of business development for Rose Farmland Ltd, told Tribune Business yesterday that the farm will initially operate at a loss for about three years before becoming significantly profitable. The first three years is always hard in any business, and we are going to be operating at an extreme loss for the first three years, but thereafter our profit margins are pretty good,” he said. C C a a p p a a c c i i t t y y Mr Douglas said that when the farm is up to maximum capacity it will be able to supply the entire Bahamian market, with a longterm goal of exporting to the Turks and Caicos, Dominican Republic and Haiti. “We will control our own mar keting, so we will stem out to any available markets,” said Mr Douglas. “Over the past year we did some marketing in Turks and Caicos.” Rose Farmland, in a bid to keep profit margins high, integrated its own slaughter and packing houses into the business m odel, and intends to grow dedi cated food crops for feed, whichr epresents a large overhead cost. “In this venture we own the f arm, we own the slaughter and packaging house they’re vertically integrated so we’re going to be supplying ourselves with pigs at a rate that is necessary so that we can market them,” said Mr Douglas. H e said about 60 per cent of farm costs come from feed pur C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information c ontained is from a t hird party and The Tribune can not be held responsible fore rrors and/or o mission from the daily report. $3.34 $3.56 $3.36 for a better lifePENSION group pensions attract the cream of the crop keep present employees happy guarantee staff retirement savingsall of the aboveFAMILY GUARDIAN CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.comcall us today at 396-4000 A SUBSIDIARY OF n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Discovery Cruises increased its passenger arrivals to Freeport by 60 per cent over last year during the first two months of 2009, its president, Hans Hahn, has revealed. The ship, which provides daily service between Florida and Grand Bahama, brought a total of 32,000 passengers to the island between January and February, compared to 20,000 last year. Of the 32,000 cruise passengers, more than 50 per cent stayed overnight for one or more nights on Grand Bahama. “Everybody needs a bit of good news,” said Mr Hahn, who spoke with Tribune Business at the Grand Bahama Business Out look, held at the Our Lucaya Resort. He said Discovery slashed its cruise fares by 60 per cent dur ing the traditionally slow period that marks the beginning of every year, following the Christmas and New Year holidays. “January and February are traditionally losing months, so what we decided was to come up with a ‘fed up fare,’ and what we managed to do is put customers on board the vessel and on the island,” Mr Hahn said. “We didn’t increase the bottom-line, but I think it was worth the effort,” he said. Mr Hahn added that the month of March will be critical for Discovery. Cruise line’ s arrivals rise 60% on 2008 But Discovery says price deal did not benefit bottom line, and packages to Bahamian travellers ‘not profitable’ SEE page 8B Many CLICO clients ‘unlikely’ to recover 100% of investments n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The National Insurance Board (NIB increasing the insurable wage ceiling by 50 per cent from $400 to $600 as a way to ensure its long-term sustain-a bility, its director warning yes terday that the scheme faced severe depletion by 2032 “if nothing happens”. Algernon Cargill, addressing the Rotary Club of West Nassau, said the proposed $200i ncrease in the ceiling for the insurable wage the portion of employee income on which NIB contributions is calculated was only an initial step, the recom mendation being that it contin ue to be raised in line with increases in the average nation al wage. R R e e v v i i e e w w The recommendation was one of a slew made in the wake of the eighth actuarial review of NIB, which was completed last year. While the review has not been made public yet, Mr Cargill indicated that NIB was looking to bring contributions in line with benefits, and link both with ‘cost of living’ and ‘living standards’ indicators such as wage increases and inflation. The NIB director said that the Government “will in due time enact amendments to the legislation that will enable [the Fun d] not just to survive, but thrive”. 50% increase to NIB wage ceiling is recommended * Inclusion of gratuities/tips in wage definition; raising pension vesting period from three years to 10; and linking pensions to inflation among proposals to ensure NIB’s sustainability * Director warns if nothing done, NIB to face ‘serious challenges’ come 2032 * ‘High profile’ businesses prosecuted for non-payment * Businesses required by law to keep all NIB records ‘indefinitely’ SEE page 7B n By NEIL H ARTNELL T ribune Business Editor Many CLICO ( Bahamas) creditors are unlikely to recover 100 per cent of their investments if the company goes into full liquidation, a former g overnment minister said yesterday, as its Nassaub ased branch offices were closed indefinitely, and the s ales agency force told to stay at home until further notice. James Smith, minister of state for finance in the f ormer Christie administration, described “the m ove to liquidation as a very serious, swift move, s o the Government must have come under some serious technical advisement”. He suggested, though, that before the Government move to fully windup CLICO (Bahamas place it into full liquidat ion, that the company be given one last chance to come up with a plan to “satisfy its creditors” in this case, its annuity depositors, and the life and health insurance policyholders. “If they come up with a plan, the chances of the creditors, the policyholders, getting 100 per cent on the dollar is better, but if they go into full liquidation, they will get a percentage on the dol lar and will have to pay the fees of the liquidator,” Mr Smith e xplained. * All Nassau offices close, and sales agency force told to stay at home until further notice * Several potential buyers circle insurance book of business A SECURITY OFFICER a t CLICO shows c ustomers where to go. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 3B $1.3m pig farm eyed for Grand Bahama SEE page 8B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Nassau Motor Company (NMCc ould ultimately invest up to $600,-$700,000 in a four-phase expansion designed toe nhance efficiency in its service department, with the first s tage the construction of five new bays with hydraulic lifts set to be completed and oper-a tional within the next two weeks. R ick Lowe, Nassau Motor Company’s operations manager, told Tribune Businesst hat the construction of the five new service bays at its h eadquarters, sandwiched between Shirley & Deveaux S treets, was “a plan we’d been trying to implement for a couple of years”. “It’s actually the first phase of a four-phase plan,” Mr Lowe explained. “We’re ren o vating our service depart ment to make it more effic ient. We’re putting new lifts in five of our bays. Hopefully, our technicians will be moree fficient, and it will make things just a little easier for o ur service customers. It will also be a better environment for our technicians.” H H y y d d r r a a u u l l i i c c Mr Lowe said the five new service bays, each with theiro wn hydraulic lifts to raise up vehicles, would enable Nass au Motor Company to replace five old bays. The company now had 20 bays inw hich to service clients’ vehicles. He added that the second p hase of the project, whenever Nassau Motor Company initiated it, would involvek nocking down the existing client reception building and r eplacing it with a new property. The reception office’s move w ould create two additional service bays, giving Nassau Motor Company two mores ervice bays than it currently has. If it all comes together, it will probably be in excess of $500,000, maybe as high as$ 600,000-$700,000,” Mr Lowe said of the company’s investm ent. Nassau Motor Company’s willingness to invest, even in at roubled economy where new car sales have plummeted, dropping by around 30 per cent industry-wide last year, provides hope that theB ahamas will eventually pull out of recession through the efforts of Bahamian-ownedb usinesses. “This is what’s got to help s tart turning the economy around,” Mr Lowe told TriMotor dealer in $700k expansion Nassau Motor eyes four-phase service growth SEE page 4B

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n B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – The Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA make real estate development more affordable, its newly-appointed president has said, with a ‘Build Now’ programme designed to allow persons still paying for land purchases to build their dream homes right away. “Many have projected doom and gloom f or 2009, and while things are tough, we need to think of ingenious ways to invigo rate the consumer market, and help those who would like to acquire land,” Ian Rolle told the Grand Bahama Busi-n ess Outlook. While there was still no comparison b etween the cost of property in Freeport a nd Nassau, Mr Rolle said the Port was committed to addressing the needs of the market and ensure that land is afforda ble. We have heard many in the commun ity say that they would like to be able to build as soon as they purchase the property, irrespective of the sometimes sevenyear payment plan,” the GBPA presid ent said. Mr Rolle added that this would stimulate development and the economy in Freeport. H e said the ‘Build Now’ programme will also benefit potential homeowners i n that it will allow qualified persons to build right away and occupy their homes before seven years are up. Property owners will be allowed to use the equity in the property for mortgages, and the property will be paid ford uring construction drawdowns,” he e xplained. Mr Rolle stressed that the Port A uthority was committed to bettering the lives of residents in Grand Bahama. “In any community, if the basic human n eeds of its people are met and jobs and o pportunities are available, they will be able to provide for themselves and their families. This should be our measure of success,” he said. In this vein, the Port has reduced its retail business license fees by 50 per cent,e ffective March 1 until March 2010, for those who paid within three months of billing dates. A scholarship programme has been implemented to offer full scholarships in niche careers, particularly land surveyi ng, and other fields that will have an impact on the island’s continuous develo pment. Mr Rolle said award scholarships will also be offered to the top graduating student in each high school on GrandB ahama who meets the Port’s scholars hip criteria. He said students will be e ncouraged to spend the first two years at t he College of the Bahamas. Port moves to ‘Build Now’ Move aims to enable home buyers to start building properties while still paying for land purchases “Property owners will be allowed to use the equity in the p roperty for mortgages, and thep roperty will be paid for during c onstruction drawdowns.” I an Rolle n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE BAHAMAS could soon again be ‘blacklisted’ by the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Develop ment (OECD ‘lack of effective exchange of information on tax matters, af ormer government minister warned this week. James Smith, minister of state for finance in the former Christie government, said OECD member countries were gearing up for a further offen sive to dismantle so-called ‘off shore financial centres’ with out regard to the impact on the economy of these countries. Mr Smith, who is now CFAL’s chairman, said this pressure was forcing banks in international financial centres to consider executing strict transparency regulations that were being pushed by OECD states. A A g g e e n n d d a a These countries, which include the US, UK, France and Canada, have adopted an agenda aimed at “standardising and bringing offshore activities under control over the next few years, and ultimately plugging the loopholes which they perceive are being used to avoid and/or evade taxation in OECD countries”. Mr Smith said these states and their regulators had used the current financial crisis to try and exert more control over the financial services sector, and exploit the situation with a renewed attack on so-called offshore centres, who they are blaming for the current woes.. “They seem convinced that offshore centres exist for no other reason than to facilitate tax avoidance on behalf of their citizens, and neither compelling arguments nor irrefutable evidence to the contrary could change their collective mindset,” the former finance minister said. OECD countries were bearing down on offshore centres such as the Bahamas, threatening the reintroduction of a’blacklist’ that ostracises entire nations. “The OECD countries have contemplated the reintroduc tion of the blacklisting initiative at a meeting in October of last year. The new list, if adopted, w ould list non-cooperative countries as those which have no effective tax information e xchanges on matters with the OECD,” said Mr Smith. “Effective information exchange is now defined as hav ing a minimum of 12 tax information exchange treaties (TIEAs (offshore centre OECD countries. “Here in the Bahamas, we have only one TIEA and that is between this country and the US.” Mr Smith said that by the OECD’s definition, the Bahamas was qualified to be blacklisted yet again, should the latter go forward with the initiative. “Offshore centers should be mindful that they are likely to remain on the radar screens of the tax hungry OECD coun tries,” said Mr Smith. Any new rules would ne designed to make doing business in developing countries more costly and more cumbersome, and if offshore centers were to survive and prosper, Mr Smith said they must continue to become more efficient while, at the same time, seeking to be more compliant with the new rules. Those objectives were not always compatible.” Mr Smith said offshore centres such as the Bahamas would inevitably have to adhere to three guidelines in order to avoid OECD scrutiny and sanctions: * Increase their number of tax information exchange treaties * Commit to desist from assisting OECD citizens from evading legitimate home country taxe * Have their clients them selves become more tax com pliant in their own countries. Bahamas may face OECD ‘blacklisting’ James Smith

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“If it [CLICO Bahamas] stays in liquidation, they will get some part of it [their investment], but t hey will get less than 100 per c ent.” Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez accountant and partner appointed as CLICO( Bahamas) provisional liquidator, yesterday told Tribune Business it was “likely that we’ll do a creditor’s meeting next week” to u pdate the policyholders and a nnuity depositors. He confirmed that he and his team had met with CLICO (Bahamasb er of them chiefly the sales agent force to remain at home and await further instructions. Lay-offs, though, possibly involvi ng all CLICO (Bahamas are only likely to be a matter of time. CLICO (Bahamas employees, most of them basedh ere, but Mr Gomez emphasised that none had been laid-off yet. He explained that the company’s sales agents had been advised to go home because all the Nassau b ranch offices, bar the CLICO ( Bahamas) head office, had been closed indefinitely and there was nowhere for them to base themselves. G iven that the provisional liquidation has effectively frozen the company’s business, meaning it can sell no new policies or annu-i ties, there is nothing for CLICO ( Bahamas) agency force to do anyway. Rather than leave them hanging around the head office, they have been asked to go home. M r Gomez said CLICO (Bahamas F reeport would also close indefinitely come today, and the focus w ould now shift to the work he and his team will be doing at the company’s Mount Royal Avenue headquarters. They will likely be assisted by CLICO (Bahamas a dministration and underwriting staff. M r Gomez advised life and health insurance policyholders n either to panic, nor take out alternative policies with other insurance carriers. He indicated it was likely that the liquidation, with the Supreme C ourt and regulator’s approval, would seek to transfer/find a buy er for CLICO (Bahamas a nce book of business in the shape of another carrier. "We are moving quickly because we've been approached b y several other companies to assume those policies," Mr Gomez said, adding that customers should continue to pay their premiums. T he liquidator declined to comment further, but Tribune Business understands that apart from British American Financial, seve ral other potential suitors have come forward to inquire about ‘cherry picking’ CLICO (Bahamas purchase. S S e e a a m m l l e e s s s s Tribune Business understands that CLICO (Bahamas h ealth insurance liabilities total around $11 million, and there may well be sufficient assets in the Bahamas to cover these that can be transferred to anotheri nsurer, thus providing policyholders with seamless coverage. As at year-end 2007, CLICO ( Bahamas) balance sheet showed it had just over $6 million on fixedd eposit with the banks; over $5 m illion in policyholder loans; and a lmost $3 million in bond investm ents held in the Bahamas. It is the annuity depositors who a re likely to be most vulnerable in a full CLICO (Bahamas t ion. As Tribune Business revealed y esterday, CLICO (Bahamas was, in many respects, a depositt aking institution rather than a p ure life and health insurance company. Of the $79.37 million i n future policyholder reserves on its balance sheet at December 31, 2 007, some $69.714 million 87.8 per cent of the total related to a nnuities. Several sources suggested that, given the annuities weighting, CLICO (Bahamas m ore as a bank unregulated by that sector’s supervisor, the Central Bank of the Bahamas. It then, under the guidance of its CL Financial parent, behaved as ap rivate equity/hedge fund, investing funds in a series of highly speculative, risky foreign real estate ventures that are now illiqu id. The main difficulties facing Mr Gomez and his team are how many of CLICO (Bahamas assets are still in this nation, andw hether the foreign-based ones can be recovered and made to realise their full value. As previously revealed by Trib une Business, at the December 31, 2007, balance sheet date, a full impairment of the $57 million loan tied up in Florida real estate (it has since risen to $72 millionw ould leave CLICO (Bahamas with just over $40 million in total assets. T hat would be insufficient to meet liabilities worth almost $85.5m illion, especially some $79.37 m illion in reserves set aside to p ay future policyholder benefits. G iven the state of the US and Florida real estate market, any s ale of CLICO (Bahamas ment there would almost certainl y fail to recover the full amount of the loan, leaving a hole on theb alance sheet, with liabilities exceeding assets. A further headache regarding t he annuities is that they fall into two classes, Tribune Business has l earnt. One class of annuity depositors was investing in a r etirement-style plan, paying a small sum per week or per month,i n return for receiving a lump sum in instalments on retirement. A nother set of annuity depositors was effectively placing large sums of money on fixed deposit with CLICO (Bahamas r eturn for above average market rates of return. The question now is whether the ‘retirement’ clients should rank ahead of any ‘investment’ clients. A A s s s s e e t t s s Meanwhile, Mr Smith was another who raised questions as t o how CLICO (Bahamas able to take so many Bahamian dollar-denominated assets out of the Bahamas, and parlay them into US investments. What is concerning about this is that you want to match assets and liabilities,” Mr Smith said, “and assets held here in the B ahamas are in Bahamian dollars, so you’d have thought they’d match them in Bahamian assets. “But most of the portfolio is tied up in real estate in Florida. Iw onder how they were allowed to do that, because a Bahamas resident company who wants toi nvest Bahamian dollars abroad is usually told no.” I t is likely that CLICO ( Bahamas) took money out of t his nation through its branch netw ork in the Caribbean. Meanwhile, Mr Gomez said he h ad little in terms of detailed information he could provide to C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 3B Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD a qualified landscapesupplier(sto grow trees, palms, shrubs and groundcover (itemswith the required schedule and speculations for completion of Stage 1 of the LPIAExpansion Project. This is a supply only contract. Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after 1:00 pm , on Thursday, February 12th, 2009. Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape SupplyContact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project REQUEST FORPROPOSAL Many CLICO clients ‘unlikely’ to recover 100% of investments F ROM page 1B SEE page 8B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.411.410.000.0700.00020.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .687.00Bank of Bahamas7.007.000.000.3190.26021.93.71% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2 .601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.2550.24011.11.72% 3 .142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7 .904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.776.770.000.4380.05015.50.74% 5.001.78Consolidated Water BDRs1.781.71-0.070.1110.05215.43.04% 3 .002.27Doctor's Hospital2.402.400.000.2400.04010.01.67% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 1 4.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6820.40015.33.83% 6.045.00Focol (S5.005.000.000.3370.15014.83.00% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1 .000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 1 2.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref6.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 14.0014.00Bahamas Supermarkets11.2312.0414.00-0.0410.300N/M2.67% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.9230-0.58-2.54 1.43761.3773Colina Money Market Fund1.43760.284.38 3.79693.3201Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3201-1.94-11.33 12.681611.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.68160.505.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.10050.06-13.33 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S131-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 31-Jan-09 23-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Jan-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 817.96 | YTD -2.03% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMST HURSDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.46 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -42.90 | YTD % -2.51BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIAExpansion Project. The scope of services includes: 'ULOOLQJDQGSXPSWHVWLQJRIDSLORWKROH 'ULOOLQJDQGFDVLQJRID)HHG:DWHU6XSSO\:HOO 'ULOOLQJDQGFDVLQJRID)HHG:DWHU5HWXUQ:HOO )ORZWHVWLQJRIWKH)HHG:DWHU6XSSO\:HOO 'LVFKDUJHWHVWLQJRIWKH)HHG:DWHU5HWXUQ:HOO *HRSK\VLFDOORJJLQJDQGIORZWHVWLQJRI3LORW+ROHDQGZHOOV :DWHUWHPSHUDWXUHORJJLQJDQGDQDO\VLVRIZDWHUTXDOLW\DQG FKHPLVWU\ 3URIHVVLRQDOVXSHUYLVLRQ+\GURORJLVWf 5HTXHVWIRU4XRWDWLRQ3DFNDJHVZLOOEHDYDLODEOHIRUSLFNXSDIWHU 1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009. 5HTXHVWIRU4XRWDWLRQFORVLQJLV Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. M-100, Test Well DrillingContact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project 5(48(67)25QUOTATION PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE bune Business. “If everyone does their bit, at the end of the day, hopefully we’ll see things start to turn.” A fter constructing the new reception office and customer drive-in area in phase two, Mr Lowe said the third and fourthp hases would involve converting the old reception back into work bays, and creating an ew transmission and lunch area, respectively. N assau Motor Company will assess whether to proceed with the extra phases once the new bays have been opened for a month. “We started in December,” M r Lowe said of the new bays. “They will be finished in two weeks or so, hopefully. We’ve got to tile the floor, install two lifts and install the electricals,s o hopefully in two to three weeks it will be ready to go. “We’re going to take a little bit of a wait and see attitudef or a month. “Once the bays have been u p and running for a month, and we’ve seen whether it’s made a difference from thec ustomer’s viewpoint, we’ll make a determination as to whether we see it all coming together.” While the expansion would n ot create any extra jobs, Mr Lowe said Nassau Motor Company had no plans to layoff any of its 60-65 staff. Some1 4 of those are technicians. Motor dealer in $700k expansion F ROM page 1B Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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Pointing out that the challenges facing NIB were no different to those being experienced by other public social security schemes worldwide, such as those in the UK and US, Mr Cargill said reforms to the N ational Insurance Act and a ccompanying regulations w ould ensure the almost-$1.6 billion reserve fund would remain solvent well into the future. But he warned that, based on actuarial projections: “By the year 2032, if nothing happens to the programme, the National Insurance Fund will face significant challenges. Already, the fund is nearing equilibrium, that is, contributions and benefits [paid out per year] are near equal.” Effectively, actuarial studies have shown that if the status quo is maintained, and reform eschewed, the NIB reserve fund will by 2032 have become so depleted largely as a result of an increasingly aged populationthat it would effectively be bankrupt. “The NIB programme of the Bahamas continues to be among the most generous in the world,” Mr Cargill said, in terms of benefit pay-outs and coverage. Contribution rates were currently 8.8 per cent for salaried e mployees normally split 5.4 p er cent/3.4 per cent between e mployer and employee and either 6.8 per cent or 8.8 per cent for the self-employed. The NIB director pointed that with the scheme entering its 35th year in existence, it hade xperienced only two increase s ever in the insurable wage ceiling to $250 in 1985, and then to the current $400 in the l ate 1990s. Meanwhile, there h ad never been an increase in the contribution rates. “While there is no immediate recommendation to increase the rate of contribution, there is a strong recommendation to increase the insurable wage ceiling to $600, and to increase it in line with increases in the average national wage,” Mr Cargill said. This, he explained, would have the effect of “shoring up the Fund, ensuring it remains s olvent” well into the future p ast 2032. It would have the e ffect of extending the life of NIB’s reserves. Another recommendation, although not new, is to index NIB’s pension benefits to inflation. Mr Cargill said it had been proposed that pensions be linked to changed in the retail price index, a move that would help NIB to be “fair and relevant”, and enable beneficiaries’ retirement incomes to keep pace with the cost of living. While NIB was working to increase some benefits, Mr Cargill said it also needed to strengthen other benefits prov isions. This had led to the reco mmendation that to be fully vested for an NIB pension, a beneficiary needed to have been making contributions for 10 years, not the current three. Explaining the rationale behind the seven-year increase in the vesting period, Mr Cargill said: “One only needs to have been in 150 weeks to be fully vested with a full pension. That does not happen anywhere else in the world.” A much, longer and continu o us contribution history would b e required, Mr Cargill explained, indicating that this would exclude expatriate workers who came to the Bahamas on a temporary work permit f rom receiving an NIB pension. C urrently, provided they have made more than three years’ worth of contributions, NIB has to pay expatriate workers a full pension wherever they are in the world, regardless of how long they spent in the Bahamas. “If anyone comes and works in the Bahamas, regardless of who they are, for three years, they’re entitled to be paid a pension,” Mr Cargill said. “Any national who has paid into NIB f or 150 weeks or more is entit led to a pension.” H ence the recommendation to increase the vesting period from three to 10 years, a move that would bring NIB into line with other Caribbean and worldwide social security schemes. Mr Cargill added that another recommendation was for NIB to “expand the base” of insurable wages to include income received from secondary jobs, plus tips and gratuities. With tips and gratuities currently excluded from the NIB ‘wage’ definition, Mr Cargill added: “For hotel workers, in p articular, this translates into s maller benefits.” Such a move, though, is unlikely to please the hotel industry, which will see it as an extra tax and additional cost burden. NIB would also, Mr Cargill, warned, strengthen the penalties for businesses and selfemployed persons who either did not pay contributions, or paid them late. While the courts were used “as a last resort”, the NIB director said many of the Bahamas’e stimated 16,000 businesses w ere either not paying NIB contributions or paying them late. “We are seeing a significant increase in legal cases and incar cerations,” Mr Cargill said, adding that the NIB Act treated non-compliance as a criminal matter. “There has been a significant increase in criminal matters, a significant increases in cases, as well as high profile ones, over the last several months.” Non-contribution “places employees in a precarious position” and jeopardised the sus tainability of the NIB Fund itself, Mr Cargill said, given that it was obligated to pay employ ees benefits even if their employers had not been meeting their obligations. With monthly contributions around $16 million, and benefits close to $14 million, he added that it was important NIB col lect every cent. Mr Cargill said NIB paid out around $150 million in total benefits in 2008, and this month some 28,000 persons would receive its pensions or benefits. Short-term benefits, such as maternity and sickness pay, accounted for $30 million. The NIB director also addressed business complaints on record keeping, one Rotari an saying his business had been contacted by the Board, claim ing it had not paid contributions for a period of time many years ago. The Board had also said the business had missed a month of contribution payments more recently, but when challenged to produce evidence, told the Rotarian businessman he needed to produce his records instead. Mr Cargill said the NIB Act required businesses and the selfemployed to keep their records indefinitely, but the Board was using common sense in applying this. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 7B Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD Qualified Environmental Monitor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope of services includes: 5HYLHZDQGDSSURYHFRQWUDFWRUVHQYLURQPHQWDOSODQV 'HYHORSLQVSHFWLRQFKHFNOLVWVDQGLQVSHFWWKHZRUNRI FRQWUDFWRUVIRUFRPSOLDQFHWRHQYLURQPHQWDOSODQV )DFLOLWDWHDQGFRPPXQLFDWHZLWKUHJXODWRU\DXWKRULWLHVRQ EHKDOIRIWKH3URMHFWRQHQYLURQPHQWDOLVVXHVDQG 3UHSDUHZHHNO\DQGPRQWKO\UHSRUWV ,QWHUHVWHGSURSRQHQWVPXVWEHTXDOLILHGIDPLOLDUZLWKORFDO UHJXODWRU\ODZVDQGDJHQFLHVDQGIDPLOLDUZLWK,QWHUQDWLRQDO %HVW3UDFWLFHV(TXDWRU3ULQFLSOHV,)&6WDQGDUGVf 5HTXHVW)RU3URSRVDO3DFNDJHVZLOOEHDYDLODEOHIRUSLFNXS after 1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009. 5HTXHVWIRU3URSRVDOFORVLQJLV Thursday, March 5th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. D-111 Qualified Environmental MonitorContact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project 5(48(67)25PROPOSAL FROM page 1B 50% increase to NIB wage ceiling is recommended

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ W GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG GD\RI7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-DQXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV “March will be the proof in the pudding,” he added. “With March b eing Spring Break, we have to find how low or how high we can go with cruise fares, and that will be the difficult part.” Discovery’s operation is important to the Freeport community. Its cruise ship is the largest tour operator on the island, and provides daily cargo service for merchants and Grand Bahama residents. I n the last two years, Discovery has been challenged to remain competitive and profitable, receiving millions in assistance from the Government. When asked about the financial outlook for Discovery, Mr Hahn s aid: “It is hard to tell The news is not good and our booking window is even shorter now.” He added that domestic passenger loads account for no more than 12 per cent of Discovery’s business. This January and February, it was less than 4,000, he said. M r Hahn said package offers to Bahamian passengers are unprofitable. “Regretfully, we tried, but since most Bahamians have relativesand property in Florida, our efforts failed and we did not make any money; we lost money,” he said. M r Hahn has tried to get to some support from the local Florida community. “I tried to get the local community in Florida to realise what buying power the Bahamian population has over there. I think I am getting through,” he said. Cruise line’s arrivals rise 60% on 2008 F ROM page 1B CLICO (Bahamas g iven that he and his team had just gone into the company. They now have to go through a huge volume of paperwork, i ncluding the company’s financial statements, to build up an accurate picture of its financial position. “We are in a discovery and e xploration stage. “We anticipate having a meeting with the creditors next week,” Mr Gomez said. The creditors meeting will likely be in a public setting for account holders only, to address the pertinent issues.” I I n n f f o o r r m m a a t t i i o o n n Adding that “it’s simply too early” to give CLICO (Bahamas policyholders and depositors d etailed information, Mr Gomez added: “We understand the anxiety associated with this process, and understand the human factor. We are looking to address allt hese issues. “This is a process, and it will take time for the liquidator andh is team to go into the property, unwravel the pieces and negotiatew ith creditors, employees and all i nterested parties.” H e added that a Supreme C ourt hearing scheduled for March 5, 2009, before Justice A lbury was unlikely to take place because it was too soon for all parties to be ready. It is likely t hat at this juncture the Government will petition for a full liquidation. The liquidator’s role, over a period of time, is to essentially protect the policyholders, realise the assets of the company and settle with the creditors ande mployees as best as possible,” Mr Gomez said. “This is a challenging process f or the liquidator, but a process that must be achieved. CLICO was a substantial company, with a significant client base, with many, many transactions in any one m onth, any one year. “The role of the liquidator is not adversarial. It is to help those w ho have invested with the company, and to do as best we can to ensure they do not suffer loss.” CLICO (Bahamas are unlikely to receive severancep ay, and will have to join the creditor queue with policyholders and depositors. Near the front of the queue will be FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas d emand mortgages over most of t he company’s properties. A call centre and website will be set up to aid CLICO ( Bahamas) clients. chase. However, Rose Farmlands, which will be situated in the eastern e nd of Grand Bahama, five miles from the US missile base, will use a portion of its 1,500 acres to produce corn for a portion of the sow feed ,along with pigeon peas and the natural bio-fuel Getropha, which could be used for the company’s generators. You have to have sustainable inputs, so we’re talking about an animal that, to some degree, can actually be fed from crops grown on that land,” Mr Douglas said. “In any piece of property you also have to incorporate some diversity. Also, in our case, because of the particular site we chose, that land will also be set back from existing commu-n ities, so we’re not going to be a nuisance to people that are around us.” Mr Douglas said the farm’s largest competition will be from imports of foreign meats. He said, though, that the company will engage the Bahamian public to educate them about their product, which will he s aid will boast quality. “No matter what effort a local person puts forth in getting a product, if he doesn’t educate the consumer on that product you’re going to end up in the same old stalemate, so the idea here is that a lot of people will eat a piece of pork and have no idea where it came from no farm tot able history,” Mr Douglas said. $1.3m pig farm eyed for Grand Bahama F ROM page 1B M any CLICO clients ‘unlikely’ t o recover 100% of investments F ROM page 3B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 56F/13C Low: 60F/15C Low: 60 F/16C Low: 63 F/17 Low: 63 F/17C Low: 65 F/18C Low: 68F/20C Low: 56 F/13 High: 79F/26C High: 78F/25C High: 77F/25C High: 77F/25C High: 78F/25C High: 77F/25C High: 80F/27C Low: 59F/15C High: 76F/24C Low: 62 F/17C High: 78F/26CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 61 F/16C High: 81F/27C Low: 68F/20C High: 81 F/27C Low: 58F/14C High: 77F/25C Low: 62 F/17 High: 80F/27C Low: 66 F/19C High: 84F/29C Low: 63 F/17C High: 80 F/27C Low: 65F/18C High: 81F/27C Low: 69 F/21 High: 83F/28C Low: 63F/17C High: 82 F/28C High: 75 F/24 CFREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI PAGE 16B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH, 2009 THE TRIBUNETHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Sunlit, breezy and pleasant. Clear .Plenty of sun.Partly sunny, chance for p.m. showers. Partly sunny, breezy and cooler. High: 80 Low: 68 High: 82 High: 79 High: 70 AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel Mostly sunny. High: 74 Low: 68 Low: 59 Low: 60 AccuWeather RealFeel 82 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 67F 80-67F 85-53F 63-61F 79 F Low: 63 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY ALMANAC High ..................................................75F/24C Low ....................................................66F/19C Normal high ......................................78F/25C Normal low ........................................64F/18C Last year's high ..................................85F/29C Last year's low ..................................68F/20C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.69" Normal year to date ......................................3.31" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU First Full Last New Mar . 4 Mar. 10Mar. 18Mar. 26 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:34 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:11 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 7:51 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 8:48 p.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:06 a.m.2.62:57 a.m.-0.1 9:22 p.m.2.83:08 p.m.-0.2 9:45 a.m. 2.53:39 a.m.-0.1 10:04 p.m. 2.83:46 p.m.-0.2 10:27 a.m.2.44:25 a.m.0.0 10:51 p.m.2.84:28 p.m.-0.1 11:14 a.m.2.35:16 a.m.0.1 11:45 p.m.2.85:16 p.m.-0.1 WORLDCITIES Acapulco90/3271/21s88/3171/21s Amsterdam45/743/6c47/845/7pcAnkara, T urkey39/330/-1c37/223/-5sn Athens54/1246/7pc50/1041/5sh Auckland68/2067/19r76/2466/18r Bangkok98/3681/27pc98/3679/26pcBarbados 84/2874/23pc84/2875/23pc Barcelona62/1646/7s60/1547/8s Beijing46/725/-3s46/729/-1s Beirut57/1352/11r59/1553/11rBelgrade 43/6 29/-1sh40/436/2sh Berlin 41/5 30/-1sh42/535/1sh Bermuda68/2064/17pc71/2167/19pc Bogota66/1846/7r67/1944/6sh Brussels46/741/5c50/1043/6pcBudapest 40/428/-2pc39/336/2c Buenos Aires86/3068/20pc86/3072/22pc Cairo58/1450/10sh64/1755/12pc Calcutta97/3672/22s95/3567/19s Calgary27/-24/-15s26/-310/-12pc Cancun84/2863/17s86/3065/18s Caracas81/2765/18pc84/2869/20pc Casablanca71/2154/12sh69/2053/11pc Copenhagen 41/531/0s38/337/2sn Dublin52/1143/6c52/1139/3sh Frankfurt 48/8 43/6 c57/1344/6c Geneva 46/7 34/1 c57/1337/2s Halifax42/535/1pc42/530/-1r Havana82/2757/13s83/2857/13s Helsinki33/019/-7sn25/-314/-10sfHong Kong 77/2566/18c73/2267/19c Islamabad77/2544/6s78/2550/10pc Istanbul44/637/2r43/639/3rJerusalem 48/8 47/8t48/845/7r Johannesburg75/2358/14t76/2455/12t Kingston82/2773/22sh84/2876/24sh Lima85/2967/19pc87/3067/19pc London55/1243/6pc52/1143/6s Madrid68/2037/2s57/1341/5pc Manila 93/33 75/23 pc93/3373/22pc Mexico City 82/27 46/7s81/2742/5s Monterrey 99/3766/18s76/2451/10pc Montreal44/610/-12r19/-79/-12pc Moscow30/-125/-3sn30/-123/-5sn Munich 36/2 32/0 sn42/532/0c Nairobi 88/31 56/13sh89/3156/13s New Delhi81/2755/12s79/2655/12s Oslo28/-221/-6s25/-324/-4sn Paris 48/841/5pc54/1243/6s Prague40/434/1sh42/537/2r Rio de Janeiro 90/3276/24pc87/3076/24pc Riyadh91/3266/18pc79/2655/12s Rome 55/12 39/3 pc57/1341/5s St. Thomas83/2873/22sh82/2773/22sh San Juan95/3566/18s99/3770/21pc San Salvador91/3264/17s92/3371/21pc Santiago90/3255/12s82/2755/12pc Santo Domingo 83/28 67/19 sh83/2868/20sh Sao Paulo 82/2766/18t83/2868/20t Seoul47/827/-2pc50/1030/-1pc Stockholm32/016/-8sn28/-223/-5s Sydney79/2663/17r86/3065/18sT aipei 76/24 68/20c73/2266/18r T okyo46/738/3r52/1137/2r Toronto44/619/-7r28/-216/-8pc T rinidad 81/2772/22t80/2672/22sh Vancouver46/730/-1pc43/636/2r Vienna43/636/2c46/741/5r Warsaw37/227/-2sn34/130/-1cWinnipeg 2/-16 -8/-22 pc14/-10-4/-20pc HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C T odaySaturdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow , i -ice, Pr cp-precipitation, T r -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO T oday:ENE at 12-25 Knots4-7 Feet5-10 Miles74F Saturday: NE at 8-15 Knots3-5 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:NE at 12-25 Knots5-8 Feet5-10 Miles74F Saturday:ENE at 8-15 Knots3-5 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:NE at 10-20 Knots6-9 Feet5-8 Miles74F Saturday:NE at 8-15 Knots3-5 Feet7-10 Miles75F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 66/18 37/2s62/1636/2s Anchorage25/-315/-9s26/-317/-8sf Atlanta 68/2049/9sh63/1734/1r Atlantic City50/1038/3r45/731/0pc Baltimore 58/14 42/5 r 44/634/1r Boston 51/1037/2r44/629/-1pc Buffalo44/617/-8r29/-118/-7pc Charleston, SC70/2154/12pc71/2152/11sh Chicago32/016/-8pc33/016/-8c Cleveland48/820/-6r33/019/-7pcDallas 63/17 35/1 r58/1431/0s Denver41/516/-8r50/1025/-3sDetroit 38/318/-7pc35/117/-8pc Honolulu79/2666/18pc78/2567/19sh Houston82/2756/13pc67/1943/6c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/C F/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySaturday T odaySaturday T odaySaturday Indianapolis 42/5 22/-5c38/317/-8pc Jacksonville75/2352/11pc81/2752/11pc Kansas City 38/320/-6c33/017/-8c Las Vegas71/2146/7pc73/2249/9pc Little Rock 56/13 36/2 r 47/828/-2c Los Angeles 68/2052/11pc72/2254/12pc Louisville51/1032/0r42/524/-4pc Memphis58/1439/3r42/529/-1r Miami78/2563/17s81/2765/18s Minneapolis14/-103/-16c20/-67/-13pcNashville 58/14 36/2 r41/525/-3r New Orleans78/2561/16pc69/2039/3t New Y ork50/1039/3r42/531/0pc Oklahoma City52/1130/-1pc46/724/-4s Orlando79/2656/13s82/2758/14s Philadelphia57/1338/3r43/634/1pc Phoenix79/2655/12pc84/2857/13s Pittsburgh52/1128/-2r42/526/-3pc Portland, OR 49/935/1pc49/940/4r Raleigh-Durham 68/20 48/8sh54/1236/2r St. Louis42/527/-2c34/122/-5sn Salt Lake City 42/5 26/-3 pc 48/8 30/-1 pc San Antonio86/3054/12pc64/1738/3pc San Diego 67/19 52/11pc67/1955/12pc San Francisco 61/16 47/8 pc 63/1753/11r Seattle 47/835/1pc48/840/4r Tallahassee73/2254/12pc76/2449/9c Tampa78/2560/15s78/2562/16sT ucson79/2647/8s81/2752/11s W ashington, DC 61/16 39/3r43/631/0r UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuW eather.com

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n DUBAI, United Arab E mirates Associated Press TOP-SEEDEDNovak Djokovic advanced to the semifinals of the $2.23 million Dubai Tennis Championship on Thursday with a straight sets win over Marin Cilic, but No. 2 seed Andy Murray withdrew with a viral infection hours before his match. Third-seeded Gilles Simon of France defeated compatriot Fabrice Santoro 7-6 (3 1, and will next face Djokovic, who defeated Cilic 6-3, 6-4 in 1 hour, 37 minutes. Murray, ranked No. 4, was scheduled to play the final match of the day on Center Court against France’s Richard Gasquet, who will now play fourth-seeded DavidF errer of Spain in the semis. Ferrer, who beat Igor Andreev of Russia 7-5, 6-1, denied that Murray’s with-d rawal meant he would now have an easier semifinal. “No, no. Murray going out d oesn’t make it any easier for me because Gasquet is a very good player,” Ferrer said. “The last time I played against him, it was very tough.” Murray, also bothered by an ankle injury, said he’s been feeling poorly since the Australian Open last month. “I got it first down in Australia, and I haven’t been the same really since,” Murray said. “I woke up in the middle of the night sweating. I got some anti-viral (medication from the doctor ... but it didn’t help so much.” The Djokovic-Cilic match was perhaps the best match of the tournament so far, with the Serb producing some superb returns to break Cilic of Croatia three times. Cilic, who lost for just the second time this year, failed to con-v ert any of his six break points. “I was trying in the last t hree matches to find this exact rhythm, and that’s what I finally did today,” Djokovic said. “I think the key was movement and focus. I was really trying to move well in the point, be patient, and just wait for the chances, because I was returning very well.” Murray’s withdrawal was another blow for an event already hit by controversy and a spate of injury-related absences. Murray is doubtful for Britain’s Davis Cup match against Ukraine next week after his doctor advised him to rest for a week to 10 days. “I don’t know. I obviously want to try and play,” Murray said. “Ill see how I feel and give it my best shot to get ready.” Djokovic to semifinals, Murray pulls out SERBIA'S Novak Djokovic returns the ballt o Croatia's Marin Cilic during their quarter final match of the EmiratesD ubai ATP Tennis Championships in Dubai, United Arab Emirates,T hursday, Feb. 26, 2009. N o u s h a S a l i m i / A P P h o t o FirstCaribbean International Bank (BahamasConsolidated Balance SheetB $'000 A uditedAudited October 31, 2008 October 31, 2007 A ssets Cash and due from banks259,951269,434 Securities1,081,8721,722,181 Loans and advances to customers2,539,0722,415,975 Goodwill187,747187,747 Property and equipment25,91326,954 Other assets43,43546,164 T otal assets 4,137,9904,668,455 Liabilities C ustomer deposits3,445,0103,661,406 O ther liabilities47,16864,926 O ther borrowed funds-278,171 D ebt securities in issue-20,620 T otal liabilities 3,492,1784,025,123 E quity Share capital & reserves477,230436,297 R etained earnings168,582207,035 645,812643,332 T otal liabilities and equity 4,137,9904,668,455 DirectorDirector FirstCaribbean International Bank (BahamasConsolidated Statement of Chan g es in E q uit y B$'000 Share Capital & Reserves Retained Earnings Total Balance at October 31, 2006 as restated 436,030160,708596,738 Net income for the year -109,860109,860 Dividends -(56,499(56,499 Revaluation reserveavailable for sale securities(6,767-(6,767 Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund Turks & Caicos Islands5,200(5,200Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve1,834(1,834Balance at October 31, 2007 436,297207,035643,332 --Net income for the year -83,90483,904 Dividends -(54,097(54,097 Revaluation reserveavailable for sale securities(27,327-(27,327 Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund Turks & Caicos Islands6,085(6,085Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve-Bahamas(1,2081,208Balance at October 31, 2008 (22,45024,9302,480 499,680143,652643,332 FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas Consolidated Statement of Income B $'000 AuditedAudited Y ear EndedYear Ended October 31, 2008 October 31, 2007 October 31, 2008 October 31, 2007 Total interest income65,94977,108263,605288,601 Total interest expense(20,214(36,261(108,028(141,441 N et interest income45,73540,847155,577147,160 Operating income4,5175,844 16,01732,143 50,25246,691171,594179,303 O perating expenses15,28715,65764,34057,104 Loan loss impairment8,3244,29223,35012,339 23,61119,94987,69069,443 N et income26,64126,74283,904109,860 120,216,204120,216,204120,216,204120,216,204 Earnings per share (in cents22.222.269.891.4 W eighted average number of common shares outstandin g for the p eriod Unaudited Quarter Ended FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows B$'000 AuditedAudited Y ear EndedYear Ended October 31, 2008 October 31, 2007 Net cash from operating activities 93,782256,435 Net cash used in financing activities (347,641(43,647 Net cash from (used in 115,918(156,168 Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents (137,94156,620 Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year 236,704180,084 Cash and cash equivalents, end of year 98,763236,704 FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Year Ended October 31, 2008 1. Accounting Policies The accounting policies used in the preparation of these consolidated financial statements are consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended October 31, 2007. The consolidated interim financial statements include the accounts of the following wholly owned subsidiaries: FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas FirstCaribbean International (Bahamas FirstCaribbean International Land Holdings (TCI 2. Change in Accounting Policy Effective March 1, 2007, the Bank changed the date on which all purchases and sales of financial assets at fair value through the profit and loss are to be recognised from trade date to settlement date. The audited October 31, 2006 balances have been restated to reflect this change. The impact on the audited October 31, 2006 balances was to reduce trading securities by $157 million, other assets by $82 million and other liabilities by $239 million. There was no impact on the year to date October 31, 2006 balances. 3. Dividends At the Board of Directors meeting held on December 19, 2008, a final dividend of $0.20 per share amounting to $24,043 in respect of the 2008 net income was proposed and declared. The consolidated financial statements for the year ended October 31, 2008 do not reflect this resolution, which will be accounted for in equity as a distribution of retained earnings in the year ending October 31, 2009. 4. Debt Securities in Issue During the year ended October 31, 2007, the Bank issued $20 million in redeemable floating rate notes, with interest payable at a rate of Bahamas Prime plus 0.75% per annum.The unsecured notes were scheduled to mature on November 3, 2011, but were subject to early redemption at the option of the Bank. The Bank exercised the early redemption clause and called the notes in September 2008. 5. OtherBorrowed Funds The Bank previously sold under repurchase agreements, investment securities with maturities between November 2007 and February 2008. All such investment securities were liquidated during the year. Subsequent to the balance sheet date, the Bank sold under repurchase agreements, investment securities having an aggregate fair value of $203,648 and maturities between November 2008 and February 2009. FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited Chairman Review O f the Results For the year endedOctober 31, 2008 FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limitedearned a consolidated net income of $83.9 million f orthe 2008 fiscal year.Earnings pershare was 69.8 cents.This is a commendable performance giventhe challenges imposed bythe weakening global business environment. In producingthis result, the Bank h as benefited greatly from sustained strength and resilience in its core businesses, as evidenced by the 5% increase in loans and a year-over-year improvementinthe netinterestmargin. Total revenues forthe year amountedto $171.6 million, a $7.7million (4%) decreaseover last year. Net i nterest incomerose $9million,or 6%, overlast year. Interest incomewas$263.6 million compared to $ 288.6 million last year. Similarly, interest expensesdecreased by$33 million or24%. O perating expenses for the year were $64.3 million, an increase of $7.2 million (13%) from last year. In Fiscal 2007, a pension plan curtailment gain hadthe impact of lowering totaloperating expenses by $8.2 m illion. Excluding the impact of this prior year gain, Fiscal2008 operating expenseswould be $1.0 m illion (1.5%) lower. T he returnon assets for the fiscal year was 1.9%, and the returnon tangible equity was 18.2%.Both performancemeasures continue toreflect the Banksstrength and leadership in itsmarkets. Importantly, theyreveal the benefits of sustained proactivemeasuresto positionthe bank for challengingtimes. At its meetingon December 19, 2008, the Board of Directors approved the paymentof a final dividend of 2 0 cents pershare whichwaspaidtoshareholderson January 9, 2009. Previously, aninterim dividendof 2 0 cents persharewas paid, bringing the totaldividend to 40 cents pershare for 2008. T he commendable financial results achieved in Fiscal 2008 are a testamenttothe outstanding efforts of t he staff and management team to findopportunities in themidst of uncertainty, and to remain focused o n increasing value for customers andshareholders. On behalf of the Board, I extendheartfelt thanksto e ach of themfor their continuedsupport. _ _________________________ M ichael K. Mansoor C hairman

PAGE 19

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 13 )25(17(IILFLHQF\LQHDEUHD]H3DUWO\)XUQLVKHG (OHFWULFLW\ &DEOHDQG:DWHUSHUPRQWK&DOO 3KRQH &HOO SPORTS IN BRIEF n MIAMI Associated Press SAFETYGibril Wilson l anded a big contract for the second year in a row, this time with the Miami Dolphins. Wilson signed a $27.5 m illion, five-year deal Thursday with the Miami Dolphins, who face thep rospect of losing both starting safeties to free a gency. A five-year veteran released last week by theO akland Raiders, Wilson will receive $8 million g uaranteed and $16.5 mill ion in the first three years of the contract. A year ago he signed a $39 million, six-year deal with the Raiders thati ncluded about $16 million in guaranteed money, but he was cut after failing tou pgrade their run defense, which ranked next-tow orst in the league. The Dolphins agreed to the deal with safetiesY eremiah Bell and Renal do Hill on the verge of b ecoming unrestricted free agents Friday, along with cornerback AndreG oodman. The trio start ed the final 14 games together last season for the Dolphins’ muchimproved defense, helpingt hem make the playoffs for the first time since 2001. Wilson led all NFL safeties in solo tackleso ver his first four seasons playing for the New YorkG iants. He has 66 career starts, including 15 last season, when he played strong safety and made 129 tackles with two inter ceptions, three fumble recoveries and a forced fumble. He started at free safety for the Giants’ 2007 Super Bowl championship team. Safety Gibril Wilson signs with Dolphins Gibril Wilson It is all or nothing this season, we really expect to win the championship this year and if we do not win it it will be a disa ppointment,” he said. “We have been injury free, but injuries will probably be the only thing that can stop us from winning a championship this year.” JUNIOR GIRLS S.C. MCPHERSON SHARKS – 37 C.H. REEVES RAPTORS – 10 The Sharks improved to 6-3 on the season, an important win as they continue to set the stage for playoff seeding. T he Sharks opened the game on a 19-0 run and never left the outcome of the game in doubt. Rannice Bethel’s pair of free throws placed the Raptors on the scoreboard with 3:47 remaining in the opening half. S.C. McPherson led 24-2 at the half.T he Sharks continued to dominate in the second half and a late three pointer by Shavona Adderley brought about the game’s final margin, the largest lead of the game. Johnethra Kelly outscored the Raptors on her own, dou bling their output with a game high 20 points. A dderley finished with 10 and Angel Miller added five. Sharks Head Coach Paula Clarke said her team did not play a s well as they could but the effort was enough to come out with the win. “We played a little sloppy today, we just played down to their level,” she said. “Maybe if we played tougher competition like H.O. Nash we would have played much harder but I am still satisfied with the way we played.” Clarke said she knows for her team to have a chance at a championship title they must find a way to slow down the pennant winning Lions. “We just need to play more defence and we will be able to do the job,” she said. %HWW\.QRZVKLSVIURP-DFNVRQYLOOH)ORULGD 7R 1DVVDX$EDFR%DKDPDV6KLSSLQJ\RXU/&/RUIXOOFRQWDLQHUORDGVWRWKH %DKDPDVMXVWJRWHDVLHUZKHWKHUPXOWLSOHVKLSPHQWV RUMXVW)URP&DOLIRUQLDWR1HEUDVND1HZ
PAGE 20

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi’s bid to successfully defend their title at the Barclays Dubai Tennis Championships came to a halt in the quarter-finals. As the only seeded team left at number two, Knowles and Bhupathi felt they had a clear path to the final, but it was blocked yesterday as they fell victim to Rik De Voest from the Republic of South Africa and Dmitry Tursuvon from Russia. The final score was 7-6 (4 2. “We had a lot of chances in the first set. We were up 4-3 a break, but lost two close games,” said Knowles in an interview with The Tribune from his hotel room. “We didn’t convert. We were about 1-of-7 on break points in the first set and we let it slip away. Then they got ahead of us in the second and things just didn’t go our way after that.” Unable to defend their title in what turned out to be a wide open draw, Knowles said they were quite disappointed in their performances. “I don’t think we played our best tennis,” he said. “So it’s always disappointing when you lose a match, especially when you know you have the potential to easily win it.” While Bhupathi was coming off a break in India, Knowles went directly to the tournament after he teamed up with American Mardy Fish to win the Regions Morgan Keegan Championships in Memphis, Tennessee on Sunday. “For me, I had to play in a different environment from last week, but that’s no excuse, I still have to adjust,” Knowles stressed. “I had a little trouble plying outdoors and with a different type of ball. “But I have to get over that. In this case, we just were not able to execute under pressure.” The duo will take another week off to recuperate from the loss before they head back on the circuit to play in their next tournament. They will head to the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California, the first ATP World Tour Masters Tournament that runs from March 12-23. The tournament has been a pretty good one for Knowles and his former partner Daniel Nestor from Canada, who won the title a record four times together. They first did it in 1997, 2002 and back-to-back in 2005 and 2006. The tournament offers $225,000 for the winners and 1,000 ATP computer points, $117,000 for the runners-up and 600 points, $54,000 for making the semifinal and 360 points, $23,000 for the quarterfinal with 180 points and $12,650 for reaching the round of 16. From Indian Wells, Knowles and Bhupathi will come closer to home as they compete in the Sony Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, Florida, another ATP World Tour Masters 1000. Knowles and Nestor won this title back in 2002. The same prize money and ATP points will be given as in Indian Wells. “We have two big tournaments coming up,” Knowles said. “Hopefully we can go out there and ride the ship.” Knowles, Bhupathi ousted in quarters n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net CARL Hield’s run through the Independence Cup fell short of the gold medal in the junior welterweight division of the 28th Dominican Republic yesterday. A gainst hometown favorite, Jonathan B aptista, Hield suffered a heartbreaking 1 1-7 decision to end up with the silver medal, the best showing by a Bahamian at the yearly tournament. “He gave it his best,” said coach Andre Seymour from the Dominican Republic in an interview with The Tribune . “The guy was just more technical than him. “The guy fought a much better technical fight than Carl Hield, but I was happy that we came out with a silver medal. I’m happy that he made it to the final.” It was a historic performance for the Bahamas as prior to this year’s tournament, Taureano ‘Reno’ Johnson and Valentino Knowles secured consecutive bronze medals in 2007 and 2008 respectively. At this year’s tournament, both John son and Knowles got eliminated in the first round, leaving it up to Hield to pull the Bahamas through on the medal dais. “His performance was good, but the guy just fought a much better technical fight than him,” Seymour said. “He beat Carl. He was more experienced than Carl was. “That was one of the advantages that he had with Carl. Both Reno and Valentino lost to the fighters from the Dominican Republic. But the guy Carl fought is a seasoned boxer who is on the Dominican Republic’s national team.” Now that he’s established himself in the tournament, Seymour said he’s confident that the two boxers will meet each other again in the future and the outcome will definitely be different. Seymour said after Johnson earned a fifth place ranking in the welterweight division at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China last August and Hield coming through with the silver, it was a good indication of where the Bahamas project was in the region. “To make it this far, competing against countries like Brazil, Ecuador, Cuba and the Dominican Republic, it shows that we can do it,” Seymour said. “It shows that it isn’t long before we return home with a gold medal.” Seymour and his three-man team will be returning home today, but he said the work will continue as there is another tournament coming in Puerto Rico in May before the Commonwealth and World Championships, which are slated for this summer. Additionally, there’s the Caribbean Games in Trinidad and there is a tour nament in Cuba in May. “We are going to be very busy this year,” Seymour said. “So this is a great start for us. Although we only won one medal, we surpassed what we did in the past at this tournament.” Hield falls short of gold medal B ASEBALL JBLN SCHEDULE H ere’s a look at the schedule of games in the Junior Baseball League of Nassau this weeke nd at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams: SATURDAY T T e e e e B B a a l l l l 11 am Sand Gnats vs Grasshoppers 1 pm Knights vs Sidewinders 3 pm Blue Claws vs Raptors C C o o a a c c h h P P i i t t c c h h 10 am Astros vs Blue Jays 12:30 pm Athletics vs Cubs3 pm Diamondbacks vs Angels M M i i n n o o r r L L e e a a g g u u e e 1 0 am Rockies vs Mets 12:30 pm Royals vs Rays M M a a j j o o r r L L e e a a g g u u e e 1 2:30 pm Marlins vs Indians 3 pm Mariners vs Reds J J u u n n i i o o r r L L e e a a g g u u e e 10 am Cardinals vs Yankees 12:30 pm Twins vs Dodgers S S e e n n i i o o r r L L e e a a g g u u e e 3 pm Phillies vs Tigers S S u u n n d d a a y y S S e e n n i i o o r r L L e e a a g g u u e e 2 pm Rangers vs Pirates BASEBALL FREDOM FARM SCHEDULE Here’s a look at the schedule of games on tap t his weekend at the Freedom Farm Baseball League in Yamacraw Estates: T -BALL: T T o o d d a a y y 6 pm Jujus vs Coco plums S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 9 am Guineps vs Sea Grapes 10:15 am Dillies vs Jujus C OACH PITCH: S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 11:30 am Sandflies vs Boas 1 pm Bees vs Wasps 3 pm Mosquitoes vs Greenturtles S S u u n n d d a a y y 3 pm Bees vs Mosquitoes 9 9 1 1 0 0 : : T T o o d d a a y y 7 :30 pm Red Snappers vs Eels S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 9 am Dolphins vs Turbots 10:30 am Barracudas vs Octopus S S u u n n d d a a y y 4 :30 pm Octopus vs Red Snappers 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 : : T T o o d d a a y y 6 pm Hurricanes vs Crowns 7:30 pm Groupers vs Divers S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y Noon Crowns vs Divers 1:30 pm Conchs vs Iguanas3 :30 Marlins vs Divers S S u u n n d d a a y y 3 pm Parrots vs Dogs 4:30 pm Hurricanes vs Marlins 1 1 3 3 1 1 5 5 : : S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 9 am Silverjacks vs Sharks 1 1 am Owlz vs Raccoons 1 pm Potcakes vs Silverjacks 3 pm Sharks vs Stingrays 1 1 6 6 1 1 8 8 : : S S u u n n d d a a y y 2:30 pm Caribs vs Lucayans 4 pm Tainos vs Arawak SPORTS NOTES

PAGE 21

C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 I NSIDE International sports news C.R. WALKER’S Malesha Peterson drives to the basket for two of her game high 27 points in the Knights 4325 win over the C.V. Bethel Stingrays yesterday at the D.W. Davis Gymnasium. n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net AFTER a week-long break for the Hugh C ampbell basketball classic, the Government Secondary Schools Sports Association continued their regular season play with one teamc ompleting a perfect season while another took a crucial step towards playoff seeding. SENIOR GIRLS C .R. Walker Knights – 43 C.V. Bethel Stingrays – 25 The Knights continued to solidify their stat us as pennant winners and top seeds for the playoffs yesterday with an effortless 18 point w in in the regular season finale. The win gave C.R. Walker a perfect 12-0 record heading into the GSSSA playoffs witha tentative date set for March 9th. The Stingrays led 3-0 early in the first half, however the Knights went on a 13-0 run to take a commanding 10-0 lead. C.R. Walkers stifling halfcourt trap netted a s eries of easy transition baskets for backcourt mates Malesha Peterson and Rickea Richardson. T he Knights ended the remainder of the half on a 13-6 run to take a 26-9 lead at the half. Peterson scored 15 of her game high 27 p oints in the opening half. The Stingrays opened the second half as they did the first, scoring the opening basketsw ith an early 4-0 run. Peterson scored the next six points to halt t he Stingrays momentum and give her team a 32-13 lead. Richardson finished with six points while P amela Bethel added three. Knight’s Head Coach Ken Lightbourne said t he perfect season was the first of his career but was expected with a high number of experienced seniors on this year’s squad. This is the first time since I have been coaching that we have had a perfect undef eated season and we thank God for that,” he said. “This year we have a lot of seniors and next year we will be rebuilding so we expected this year to be pretty good.” Lightbourne said his team finished the sea son largely untested. Knights top Stingrays 43-25 SEE page 13 T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Sharks continue bid for playoff spot DJOKOVIC TO SEMIFINALS,M URRAY P ULLS OUT


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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009






Three detainee
on hunger strike

Cubans launch protest;
Tribune interviews 10 men
at the Detention Centre

Po ee CR RI ATS

m@ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor
pnunez@tribunemedia.net

THREE Cuban men at the
Immigration Detention Centre
say they have been on hunger
strike for two days in protest
against the deplorable conditions
they and hundreds of others are
forced to endure at the facility.

The men say they have not eat-
en since 8am on Wednesday and
do not plan to until their concerns
are addressed. The health of one
of them, an epileptic, has deterio-
rated severely — “but he is ready
to die,” one of his compatriots
said.

The Tribune spoke to two of
the hunger strikers and eight oth-
er detainees from various coun-
tries and backgrounds, who all
supported the men’s claims of
abuse and subhuman conditions at
the centre. They said others want
to join the hunger strike, but are
afraid of reprisals from guards.

In the face of calls from inter-
national human rights activists for
an independent investigation, gov-
ernment officials have denied that
there have been any beatings at
the centre, and say they know





















nothing about the hunger strike.
All the detainees who spoke to
The Tribune yesterday reacted
with anger upon hearing this,
claiming the authorities know
everything that is going on.

One of the hunger strikers
called on Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson to pay a sur-
prise visit to the centre and inter-
view them, “not in the air-condi-
tioned front office, but back here,
where we live.”

The allegations have been
mounting since Monday, when
The Tribune received information
about an alleged severe beating
at the centre in which the victim
lost several fingernails.

Yesterday, the man who says
he was the victim of that attack
explained that it took place a year
ago.

After having been at the centre
for several months, he said, he
began to ask the guards for infor-
mation about the status of his
case, persisting until they became
fed up with him.

He claims that one day, a group
of guards took him into a room

SEE page 10

‘an

=

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham along with Edison Key, Executive
Chairman of the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation, looks
at Bahamian grown produce on display yesterday at the opening of the
Agricultural, Marine Resources and Agribusiness Expo.

e SEE PAGE SEVEN

Concern over Department of
TMM rece

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

yesterday.

At the time of the report the
Carmichael Road Immigrant
Detention Centre held up to
500 detainees last year (with
tent space for an additional
500), and women and men
were held separately.

Haitians and Jamaicans were
the most commonly interdicted
migrants and the highest occu-
pancy during the year was

SEE page eight

HUMAN nights groups have
expressed concern that inves-
tigations conducted by the
Department of Immigration
were handled internally with-
out independent review and
oversight, the 2008 Human
Right’s Report for the
Bahamas conducted by the US
State Department = said

NISSAN
BLUEBIRD

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Mother and
boyfriend
charged with
the murder

of her baby

m@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A YOUNG mother
charged in the death of her
10-month-old child was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday along with
her boyfriend.

Police have charged 21- |@ \

year-old Farah Augustine, of

Red Land Acres, and 21- J

year-old Teddy Thaddeus
Charlton of Talbot Street in
the murder of Fiara Augus-
tine Santil.

According to reports, the
10-month-old girl was found
dead on Sunday with unusu-
al marks about the body in
an apartment the child’s
mother shared with her
boyfriend.

Augustine and Charlton
were escorted to Court One,
Bank Lane yesterday after-
noon where they were for-
mally arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez.
The infant’s grandmother
and mother of Augustine
wept loudly on Bank Lane
yesterday as the accused
were escorted to court by

SEE page eight



Teddy Thaddeus Charlton
Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Employers illegally hiring foreign
workers ‘should pay $10,000 fine’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

EMPLOYERS who illegally hire foreign
workers should be forced to pay an increased
fine of $10,000 for contravening the Immi-
gration Act, Minister Branville McCartney

said yesterday.

Speaking at a senior manager’s conference
at the Breezes hotel in Cable Beach, the Min-
ister of Immigration said Bahamians who
employ illegal immigrants who have no right
to work or live in the country should be hit
with fines serious enough to affect businesses

that break the law.

£.

ts
Ng

Branville McCartney



“IT would like to see the fine increase to $10,000, and if they are
caught they would feel it in their pockets,” he said.

“We have an illegal problem and if we are serious about address-
ing the illegal problem let’s stop facilitating people from coming

over.
“Tt is not only about appre-
hension, it is about getting the
word out there.”
As he welcomed Immigration
chiefs to a day dedicated to the
review of legislative amend-

SEE page 11

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE
TO SPACE RESTRICTIONS,
THE COMICS PAGE IS AGAIN

NOT IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE.
THE PAGE WILL, HOWEVER,
RETURN TOMORROW.



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LOCAL NEWS



PM: $5m needed to cover
expected budget shorttall

GOVERNMENT has had to
find an additional $5 million to
make up for an anticipated short-
fall in the public service budget
caused by the decision to ask
police, immigration and customs
officers to take early retirement,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
said.

Yesterday, opposition
spokesman for the Public Service,
MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell
said that while it is normal for
this sector to experience a funding
shortfall, he feels that in these
cases the retirement of govern-
ment employees was not sought
in the name of “reform”, but
rather in order to remove politi-
cally contrary individuals.

“In the normal course of things
with the public service there’s
always a shortfall and this is
something the PLP would have
dealt with when it comes to the
actual budget time.

“What concerns us, of course,
is the fact that this was done, what
it’s costing to the overall public,
and whether this is the right thing
to do in the circumstances,” he
said.

“It doesn’t seem to be much
reform at all; all it is is a ques-
tion of dismissing some people
that he finds to be inconvenient to
the service and then turning
around and calling it streamlin-
ing or reform,” added the MP.

During his mid-year budget
statement in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday, Mr Ingraham
said extra money is required by
several government agencies as
they head into the second half of
the 2008/2009 budget period.

He said the funds that will be

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham speaking to the House.





“In the normal course of things with the
public service there’s always a shortfall and
this is something the PLP would have dealt
with when it comes to the actual budget

time.”



procured from other ministries
or departments, leaving the over-
all total cost of the budget
unchanged.

In addition to the $5,062,450
needed to “facilitate benefit pay-
ments to persons retiring from
the public service” and “make up
for a shortfall that will occur due
to early retirement packages” for
individuals from the three agen-

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Fred Mitchell

cies, $4,459,585 will be transferred
to the public service to meet oth-
er “expenditure needs” up to
June 2009.

Mr Mitchell said the PLP is
“disappointed” to see that no
money appears to have been
included in the budget for the
payment of pension entitlements
for prison officers agreed under
the former administration or
towards settling a dispute
between former Road Traffic offi-
cers and the government which
the PLP agreed to resolve in the
months before they left office in
2007.

“T’ve been trying since we lost
office to get that resolved,” said
Mr Mitchell.

“The government refuses to
do anything about it and these
people are really suffering from
this loss of pension entitlements.
These people don’t have the
resources to take the matter to
court.”

HOME | LIFE | TRAVEL
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Complaints against police ‘up 17%’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

COMPLAINTS against police
officers jumped by 17 per cent in
2008 compared to the previous

US State Department’s Human Rights
Report on the Bahamas is released

Despite these suggestions,
police have in the past argued
that they are impartial and adju-
dicate matters relating to police
misconduct.

The force has pointed to the
fact that officers were disciplined



year, according to the US State
Department’s Human Rights
Report on the Bahamas.

“There were 300 complaints
against police through Decem-
ber 19 (2008), compared with
249 in 2007. Of these 300 cases,
authorities resolved 139, 60
awaited judicial determination
of a complainant’s pending case,
and 101 were under investiga-
tion,” said the report, which was
released Wednesday.

“Of the 139 completed mat-
ters, 17 were referred to a police
tribunal, 11 were resolved infor-
mally, warnings were requested
in four cases, officers were dis-

charged in three cases, and the
rest were withdrawn (20), unsub-
stantiated (33), unfounded (8),
had insufficient evidence (39),
or did not require further action
(4),” the report said.

The State Department’s
report further notes that com-
pilers found information on the
nature of the complaints
“unavailable”, but added that
“in the past (offences) included
assault, unethical conduct,
unlawful arrest, and stealing.”

“The number of criminal
charges filed, if any, was not
reported,” it said.

The US State Department

creates annual reports on the
human rights situations in all
countries which receive assis-
tance from the US and which
are members of the United
Nations.

Each report covers a number
of areas, including compliance
with internationally recognised
individual, civil, political and
workers’ rights.

On the subject of the
Bahamas’ police force, the 2008
report notes that all officers
involved in “shooting or killing a
suspect are automatically placed
under investigation.”

The report said that the Police

Complaints and Corruption
Branch, which is responsible for
investigating allegations of police
brutality, reports directly to the
Deputy Commissioner, but has
no independent oversight.

The document also highlights
concerns expressed by local
attorneys and human rights
observers that the unit may lack
the independence necessary
to impartially investigate
abuses.

Commentators have also
pointed to this concern as one
that may discourage people from
reporting incidents that should
properly be investigated.

as evidence that they are able to
police their own.

Meanwhile, in the Police Act
passed in the House of Assem-
bly earlier this month, a provi-
sion is made for an independent
body to review investigations
into police officers.

According to the Act, no one
who has served as a police offi-
cer or in any elected government
office in the last five years can sit
on the body, which will report
to the Minister of National Secu-
rity.

The Police Service Act was
being debated in the Senate yes-
terday.
























Kenneth Russell

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Ministry of Housing “ran out of
money” for its home repairs in December
2008, leaving it unable to pay funds owed to
contractors who did work last year for two
months, Housing Minister Kenneth Russell
told The Tribune yesterday.

In the mid-year budget report tabled in
the House of Assembly on Wednesday,
provisions are made for the Ministry of
Housing to be given an additional $655,633
for repairs to some faulty houses built
under the former administration.

Minister Russell said: “It’s taking a long
time (to finish the repair of homes). Espe-
cially how we ran out of money in early
December. But we have the money now to
pay off the contractors we owe and to con-
tinue with repairs until June.”

now been repaired at a cost of over one
million dollars, hundreds more still need
fixing, Mr Russell said.

According to Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, the allocation of additional
funds to certain ministries and departments
in the mid-year budget will be done by
shifting money within ministries — per-
mitting the government to not spend any-
more in total than was approved last year
in parliament.

Of the $655,633 being reallocated to the
Ministry of Housing, $350,000 will go
towards the “cost of outstanding and unex-
pected emergency repairs” — to paying
off owed contractors, Mr Russell said.

Meanwhile, the remaining $305,633 will
be spent on other repairs that will be car-
ried out up until June 2009.

The issue of low-cost government hous-
ing was much discussed in parliament in the
first year after the FNM became the gov-

Ministry ‘ran out of money’ for home repairs

While the former PLP administration
pointed to the thousands of homes con-
structed during their tenure as an achieve-
ment which they are proud of, the incom-
ing government, like numerous home-
owners who made their disappointment
known to the press, pointed to the sub-par
condition of some homes as a blight on
their record.

Some contractors and other sources
alleged that shoddy workmanship prevailed
in many instances because of corruption
within the Ministry of Housing and among
contractors. A police investigation into
these allegations has been inconclusive so
far.

Despite attention required by “hun-
dreds” of homes built prior to the general
election of May 2007, Mr Russell said that
his ministry is keeping up with the con-
struction of new homes at the rate desired.
He said over two hundred homes are cur-



While “a couple hundred” homes have

ernment.

rently under construction.

Key witness reveals role in plot to rob businessman

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

STARTLING _ testimony
emerged in the Keith Carey mur-
der trial yesterday as a key pros-
ecution witness revealed his role
in the plot to rob the business-
man.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown
and Dwight Knowles are accused
of the murder and also face
charges of armed robbery and
conspiracy to commit armed rob-
bery.

Vaughn Carey, 34, a cousin of
the victim, testified that the rob-
bery plot did not initially involve
killing the businessman.

The victim was gunned down
on the steps of the Bank of the
Bahamas on Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway on February
27, 2006. He was killed before he
was able to deposit money that
belonged to the gas station that
he operated.

Vaughn Carey testified that
in January 2006, Dwight Knowles
approached him about “setting
up” the victim.

“I told him that I would have
to think about it,” the witness
said.

He said he had known
Knowles for a year prior to that
occasion, as Knowles frequent-
ed the Esso Service Station on
Carmichael Road and Faith
Avenue where he worked.

Carey testified that he agreed
to aid in the plot when Knowles
returned two days later. He tes-
tified that at that time, Knowles
introduced him to Sean Brown,
who had no fingers on his right
hand. He only had a thumb.

Carey said the men asked
which day would be best to carry
out the robbery, when the busi-
nessman made his deposits and to
which bank. He said the conver-
sation took place in Knowles’
white Nissan Maxima.

Carey testified that he asked
the men how the robbery would
be carried out, noting the fact
that Brown had only one “good”
hand.

“Dwight said that his friend
‘Bumper’ would do the robbery.
He said that ‘Bumper’ would
jump out of the car, throw Keith
to the ground and snatch the
bag,” the witness told the court.

He then identified Jamal Glin-
ton as ‘Bumper’.

Carey testified that while
working at the gas station
between 9am and 10am on Feb-
ruary 27, 2006, he was
approached by Sean Brown, who
pointed across the street to where
Knowles had parked his car and
was standing next to Keith’s
Breakfast Hut.

At this point in the testimony,
some of the victim’s relatives
began cry in court.

“Sean asked if he had left to go
to the bank and I told him no

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and that they would have to
wait,” the witness continued,
adding that he told the men that
the victim was going to deposit
about $70,000.

Carey testified that although
he did not see anyone else at the
time, when the two men got back
into the car he saw a third man in
the back passenger seat and
remembered that Knowles had
mentioned ‘Bumper.’

Carey said that as the victim
left the station and got into his
blue Toyota hatchback, he took
off his hat as a signal to the men
that the victim was heading to
the bank.

He said the men followed the
victim north onto Faith Avenue
and out of his sight.

Five to 10 minutes later, he
said, the victim’s wife Michelle,
who also worked at the station,
gave him certain information and
instructions. He said that as a
result, he stayed at the station
and later went to a bar.

Testified

Carey testified that he never
saw the men again and had no
contact information for them.

He said he went looking for
the three men because he was
afraid, adding that each had
agreed to give him $3,000 for his
role.

Carey said that while on
remand at Her Majesty’s Prison,
he and the three accused men

mane

met in the prison yard and
Knowles admitted that the rob-
bery had not gone as planned.

Carey said Knowles told him
that that the victim had seen
“Bumper” out of the corner of
his eye and had fallen on the
steps of the bank. The witness
said Knowles told him the victim
threw the bag with the money in
it, and all ‘Bumper’ had to do
was pick up it up.

“Keith put up no resistance,
but he still shot Keith,” Carey
said.

He said Knowles told him that
there was $48,000 in the bag, that
the three men got $16,000 each,
and that they had looked for him
but had no contact information
for him and that the gas station
had closed after the incident.

During cross-examination by
Brown’s attorney Dorsey
McPhee, Carey admitted that in
his first police statement he had
referred to Sean Brown as “the
man with no fingers.”

Carey said that he knew
Brown only had a thumb on his
right hand because when he first
saw Brown, he had no bandage
on his right hand.

During cross-examination by
Knowles’ attorney Perry Albury,
Carey admitted that he had given
police two statements — the first
in March 2006, the second in Jan-
uary 2009.

Mr Albury suggested that
Carey never met Knowles. Carey
denied the suggestion.

Mervin Benson, 42, testified

*

EKS Feb23-m

ISSA

yesterday that around 1lam on
the last Monday in February
2006, he was at his home on
Homestead Avenue when Jamal
Glinton, whom he knew as
‘Bumper’, arrived with two men.

He said that Glinton told him
that he wanted to “work a wibe”.

Benson said he had known
Glinton for three to five years
prior to that, but did not really
know the other men.

He said that Glinton often
came to the neighbourhood to
“work his hustle’” and often
came to the house to “cut up his
herb.”

He said that that morning,
Glinton was carrying a black and
brown bag.

He said that the three men
went into a back room where
they stayed for about an hour.

Police

Benson testified that in 2007,
he saw Glinton at the Needles
Inn on Homestead Avenue and
Lincoln Boulevard, where Glin-
ton approached him about a
statement he gave police regard-
ing the case.

He said Glinton told him that
his girlfriend had become preg-
nant while he was incarcerated
and that he had given someone
$80,000 to keep, but that person
had spent it.

Benson said that he saw Glin-
ton about four times after that,
but tried to avoid him.

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During cross-examination,
attorney Craig Butler asked Ben-
son why he had not mentioned
the information regarding the
money in his first statement to
police and suggested that he was
lying.

Benson denied lying, but
admitted that never wanted to
be a witness and did not want to
have anything to do with the law.

He said the statements he gave
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Electronic
work permits
could be
introduced
within the year

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net











ELECTRONIC work per-
mits the size of credit cards
could be introduced within
the year to enable the Immi-
gration Department to track
foreign workers more effi-
ciently.

Amendments to the
Immigration Act allowing
for the issuance of electronic
permits and the new type of
cards were reviewed by
senior immigration man-
agers at a conference held at
Breezes yesterday.

Minister of State for
Immigration Branville
McCartney said he hopes
the necessary legislation will
be passed by parliament
before it breaks for summer
recess so that the new cards
can be introduced this year.

The plastic wallet-sized
cards should be more conve-
nient for foreign workers to
carry with them at all times,
and will replace the paper
permits that are frequently
forged.

Cards will be logged on a
sophisticated computer sys-
tem which is already in place
and ready for operation
once the legislation has been
passed, Mr McCartney said.

“By the touch of a button
we will be able to see who
has a work permit, the type
of permit, and it will give us
an idea of who will be in the
country.

“Right now it is a labori-
ous task and there are
instances when you do have
to apprehend persons and
bring them in because there
are fraudulent documents
out there,” he said.

“But nothing is 100 per
cent, so when this system is
in place there will be times
when persons have to come
and verify their status.”

Plans to introduce the
new electronic permits have
been in place for sometime
now and were developed
alongside the introduction
of the new electronic pass-
ports for Bahamian citizens.
























































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Na EY,

PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Obama plan brings cries of class warfare

WASHINGTON (AP) — He's not being
timid, that's for sure.

President Barack Obama's first federal bud-
get lays out the most far-reaching agenda for
American life since Lyndon Johnson's Great
Society. But paying for it by having upper-
income earners shoulder much of the cost quick-
ly provoked cries of class warfare in Congress.

The Obama priorities reflected in the $3.6
trillion budget guarantee a fierce political battle
ahead over taxes and spending. And despite
the administration's agonizing over the depth
and global nature of the worst recession in
decades, the new president's budget forecasts a
rapid U.S. recovery.

The budget outline includes activist initiatives
on energy, health care, education and climate
change. It would boost taxes on the wealthy, oil
companies and other businesses while cutting
Medicare and Medicaid payments to insurance
companies and hospitals to make way for a
$634 billion down payment on universal health
care. It would also limit charitable and other tax
deductions for the affluent and trim spending on
government subsidies to big farms.

Predictably, Republicans complained, much
as they had done during last year's presidential
campaign, that Obama was pitting the haves
against the have-nots.

"The era of big government is back, and
Democrats are asking you to pay for it," said
House Republican leader John Boehner of
Ohio. He suggested Obama's proposed tax
increases would reach deep into the middle
class, despite repeated administration state-
ments that tax hikes would be limited to families
making more than $250,000 a year.

Proposed new excise taxes on offshore
drilling and plans to cap greenhouse gas emis-
sions and require polluters to buy permits could
affect "all Americans who drive a car, who have
a job, who turn on a light switch," Boehner
said.

Boehner and other Republicans also said it
was folly to raise taxes during a recession.

But the administration's own economic fore-
casts suggest that the brunt of the tax increases,
including allowing existing tax cuts from the
Bush administration to expire, will fall only
after the nation is in recovery.

The Obama budget forecasts that, despite the
depth of the current recession, the economy
will recover and grow by 3.2 per cent in 2010
and then climb to an even more robust 4 per
cent in the three following years.

Most of the proposed Obama tax hikes,
including the permit levy on greenhouse gas
emissions, would not take effect until a pre-
sumably post-recession 2012.

Christina Romer, chairman of the presiden-
t's Council of Economic Advisers, defended
the administration's upbeat forecast for recov-

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ery, saying it "reflects the administration's
assessment that the comprehensive recovery
programme outlined by the president on Tues-
day night will be effective."

But some deficit hawks suggested that Oba-
ma was being too optimistic given the severity of
the recession.

"He is relying on a strong economic come-
back very quickly. And he's assuming that a
lot of the new issues will be paid for," said
Robert Bixby, the executive director of the
Concord Coalition, a bipartisan fiscal watch-
dog group.

Bixby said the budget has "a lot of downside
risk" that spending increases will not be fully off-
set by higher tax revenues. Obama's budget
plan projects a record $1.75 trillion deficit for
2009, largely swollen by stimulus and bank
bailout spending. Obama has said he hopes to
sharply reduce the annual shortfall by the end of
his term. In remarks, Obama said his budget
was an attempt to fairly "come to grips with
the hard choices that lie ahead."

But in written comments accompanying the
budget, he struck a far more defiant and populist
tone, blaming much of the government's budget
woes on his predecessor, President George W.
Bush.

"Prudent investments in education, clean
energy, health care, and infrastructure were
sacrificed for huge tax cuts for the wealthy and
well-connected," Obama wrote. "There's noth-
ing wrong with making money, but there is
something wrong when we allow the playing
field to be tilted so far in the favour of so few."

Asked whether the class-warfare argument
could complicate White House efforts to win
support for some of its big priorities, White
House spokesman Robert Gibbs said, "No. And
I think it's important to understand that what
the president has enumerated in his budget
today is precisely the blueprint and series of
promises that he made over the course of two
years in a campaign ... that the American people
voted for."

Still, Stanley Collender, a longtime budget
expert, predicted a huge battle in Congress over
the proposed tax cuts and Medicare changes.
But he noted that, with Democrats in control of
the House and Senate, there's probably not
much Republicans can do to keep the expiring
Bush tax cuts from ending on their own.

Furthermore, said Collender, in the current
economic and political climate, "the wealthy
are not as well thought of as they have been in
the past.”

He also noted that exit polls from last year's
presidential election showed those making more
than $200,000 a year tended to vote for Obama
rather than Republican Senator John McCain.

(This article was written by Tom Raum of the
Associated Press).



Petty theft
seems to
have become
acceptable

Bawa

EDITOR, The Tribune.

May I second the Letter to
the Editor entitled “Petty
Theft” (The Bahama Journal,
January 30, 2009) by R McKen-
zie.

Regarding the “tasting” of
grapes prior to purchasing
them, I, too, have decided that I
would no longer give silent con-
sent to this behaviour by doing
nothing about it.

I have asked a number of
people why they do it. They
usually reply that they are just
tasting. I tell them that they can
call it whatever they like, but
that it is nevertheless what they
very well know it is.

I say to them that we teach
our children not to eat any
items before we have paid for

letters@tribunemedia net



them.

Then the children see adults
doing just the opposite. What
are the children supposed to
think?

By the way, it is not just
grapes.

One day a “lady” picked up
an apple, took a bite, then gave
it to her child (who wasn’t even
asking for it).

On another occasion I chal-
lenged a “gentleman” in a nice
business suit who was munching
away at the dates (at $10.00 a
pound).

I asked him if he didn’t see

the relationship between his
behaviour and the crime prob-
lem in the country.

His answer: “Don’t you com-
pare me with those people, you
crazy woman.”

Petty theft has become so
common that people no longer
care who sees it.

After all, they are just “tast-
ing”.

It has become accepted
behaviour.

Most people just blindly copy
what others are doing. Are we
no longer able to think for our-
selves?

Or have we lost the ability to
tell right from wrong?

U McKINNEY
Nassau,
February 3, 2009.

What the Constitution says

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We all know that the beating that the FNM
and Rt Hon Hubert Ingraham received at the
hand of the Bahamian public in the national ref-
erendum back prior to the 1997 election will and
has forever caused the Prime Minister to change
his mind on ever holding a Constitutional Refer-
endum on even the most simplest item such as the
extending of tenure of judges of the Supreme

Court.

The Police Act debated and passed with the
opposition abstaining is a clear indication that
for some reason MPs can’t read The Constitution
and rationally deduce that if there is no restriction
today in the 1973 Constitution by placing restric-
tions to tenure of office of the Commissioner
and Deputy Commissioner you are naturally and

I also read into this that per the Constitution
where sometimes we have not had a substantive

Commissioner and/or Deputy Commissioner we
were in violation, I suggest, of the Constitution.

Do we now wait for an Attorney to bring a
challenge to this proposed legislation which is
heading quickly to the Senate?

The Commissioner is also the Provost Mar-
shall of The Bahamas which position is strictly
Constitutional and is without any doubt excep-

tionally important.

very obviously not in compliance with the Con-

stitution.

Your readers are directed to the Constitution

Article:119 (1).

He reads the writ to dissolve parliament and to
call a general election and has the awesome task
having to read the death warrant and witness for
the crown any hanging — how could any supreme
civil law give credence of not having someone in
a substantive appointed position? Totally illogical.
Acting is unacceptable.

SHEPARD SMITH

Nassau,

February 14, 2009.

Correct spelling should accompany technology

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Coming out of the stone-age
can only be the description of the
late arrival of the most modern
method of transmitting the news
— finally we can say congratula-
tions to The Tribune but add a
warning....with this technology
comes a lot of responsibility as
before only us locals and foreign
subscribers read The Tribune
now the world can, so please
make us proud.

Spelling — I cannot understand
why on the weather map on ZNS
TV-13 so very often the simple
word — harbour is harbor? Okay

there is a word spell check on a
computer, but we are English
speaking. Queen’s English and
not that abbreviated English
Americans use.

JEROME SMITH
Nassau,
February, 2009.

(Now that we are on the sub-
ject of ZNS and spelling, it would
be helpful if when identifying
members of the House of Assem-
bly and their constituencies, they
would get the spelling of the
name of the constituency correct.
For example, Mr Frank Smith is
MP for St Thomas More, not St

Thomas Moore. The constituency
was named after St Thomas More
Church, and the church was
named after St Thomas More,
Lord Chancellor of England, who
was beheaded in 1535 for refusing
to sign the Act of Supremacy that
declared King Henry VIII
Supreme Head of the Church of
England.

(The Bahamas has its own
Moore family, the best known
being the late Sir Walter Moore,
president of the Legislative Coun-
cil (now Senate), whose home
opposite St Francis Xavier Cathe-
dral, is now the National Art
Gallery. — Ed)

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THE TRIBUNE

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Na LY,

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief :

for firearm
possession

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A Freeport }
man was sentenced to eight }
months in prison after plead- ;
ing guilty to possession of a ;
firearm in a Freeport Magis- :

trates Court.

Kendrick Williams, 23, was }
charged with possession of an }
unlicensed firearm in Court }
One before Magistrate Deb- }

bye Ferguson.

Williams was found in pos- :
session of a .357 Smith and :
Wesson revolver on February :
Grand }

25, at Freeport,
Bahama.
According to police reports,

Williams and three other men :
were walking on Bonefish }
Street in Caravel Beach when }
police observed Williams act-

ing suspiciously.

Officers searched Williams }
and discovered a firearm ina i

knapsack on his back.
In a separate court matter,

Maxwell Jones, 22, of South
Bahamia, was also charged }

with firearm possession.

He pleaded not guilty to the i
charge and was granted $7,000 :
bail with one surety. The mat- }
ter was adjourned to March

13.

Consulate General
Office in Atlanta
to open in April

@ By LINDSAY
THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Services

THE new Consulate
General Office in Atlanta,
Georgia will be opened by
April 1, the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs confirmed.

“That office will offer a
wide-range of consular ser-
vices such as Bahamian
passports, visas and other
legalised documents, and
promotion of businesses,
investments and culture in
the Bahamas,” said Joshua
Sears, Director General at
the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs.

The process of staffing is
underway and the office
will be located in the same
building that houses the
Ministry of Tourism office.

The Atlanta Consulate,
Mr Sears said, will accom-
modate the large volume of
business interests floating
through that hub known as
the gateway to the United
States.

He said the office would
relieve the heavy volume
experienced by the Miami
Consulate Office in Florida.

Mr Sears urged Bahami-
ans studying and living in
Atlanta to register with the
consulate office once it is
opened to utilise the ser-
vices there.

The consular jurisdictions
for Atlanta are Alabama,
Arkansas, Georgia, Kansas,
Kentucky, Missouri, North
Carolina, Oklahoma, South
Carolina, and Tennessee.

The Consulate General
Office in Miami, which has
oversight for Florida,
Louisiana and Mississippi,
now has oversight for Ari-
zona, New Mexico, Col-
orado, Texas and Utah.

The Consulate General
Office in New York has
oversight for New Hemi-
sphere, New Jersey, Con-
necticut, Delaware, Massa-
chusetts, Vermont, Pennsyl-
vania, Rhode Island and
Maine.

The Bahamas Embassy in
Washington, DC, is respon-
sible for Ohio, the District
of Columbia, Oregon, Vir-
ginia, West Virginia, Michi-
gan, Wisconsin, Minnesota,
North Dakota, Indiana,
Nevada, Idaho, Wyoming,
Montana, Illinois,

Iowa, Alaska, Hawaii,
Nebraska, Maryland, and
California.

ae
US)

Ute ta
PHONE: 322-2157





Prison Dept gets
an extra $852,000 |
funding from govt |

IN ORDER to compensate for
the increase in food prices, the
Prison Department was allocated
$852,000 in additional funding
from the government.

This sum was outlined in the
mid-year budget report for the
2008/2009 fiscal year which covers
the period of July 1, 2008 to
December 31, 2008. The document
was tabled in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday.

Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest refrained from
providing a breakdown of these
resources until he gives his contri-
bution to the mid-year budget
debate next week.

However, he said the additional
funds requested were in keeping
with the government's responsi-
bility to adequately provide for all
incarcerated persons.

"Government's responsibility is
to ensure that those persons in its
protective custody are treated
humanely, are fed. But the opera-
tional costs of the prison in some
areas - we've had budget increases
and we put them in the mid-year
budget to deal with,” he said.

The Prison Department was also

















THIS accident
occurred shortly after
10am on Market Street
when the driver of a sil-



turn over.

The driver of the SUV
escaped uninjured, while
the driver of the bus sus-
tained visible injuries to
his right hand and had
to be taken away in an
ambulance.

Proud Paws







ANIMAL lovers are invited to
attend the Proud Paws Potcake Par-
ty which will be held on Saturday,
February 28, (not Friday - as was
previously reported) from 6pm to
midnight at the Bahamas National
Trust’s Retreat on Village Road.
The event will be an evening of
entertainment, music and dancing.
There will also be raffle prizes, a
silent auction and a light buffet.

Tickets for Saturday’s event are
available at Palmdale Veterinary
Clinic, Caves Village Clinic or at the
door. Please note that no dogs will be
allowed.

ee eS a GUE ENS

ver SUV (left) collided
with a bus, causing it to |T%

given an additional $36,000 to cov-
er increased gasoline costs; $27,000
to cover escalating diesel costs;
$23,000 to off-set rising prices in
propane, and $114, 000 for the pur-
chase of cleaning supplies.

Budget

Also outlined in the mid-year
budget, the Royal Bahamas Police
Force was given $382,500 for the
engagement of 85 new recruits for
the period of April to June, 2009;
$249,000 for the increase of travel
and settling of outstanding arrears
due to airlines; $250,000 for sub-
sistence for travellers in the
Bahamas; $10,000 for the local
transportation of goods due to the
increase in freight charges; $90,000
for the transportation of bodies for
the increasing need of mortician
services; $200,000 to cover gaso-
line costs for the next six months
and depleted gas funding in the
Family Islands, and $70,000 for
diesel to be used in fire trucks, bus-
es and generators.

An additional $80,000 was also
allocated for photocopying, pho-

Harbour Bay
HALF IS

The other half
Is 15.% OFF

Ask about Our
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tography and blueprinting costs
which have increased due to ris-
ing levels of crime; $85,000 to cov-
er the maintenance of photocopy-
ing machines; $125,000 for forensic
science costs — $50,000 to pay
DNA Labs International for analy-
ses based on the current forensic
science case load and $75,000 to
contract Fairfax Identity Labs to
assist with the establishment of a
DNA Unit.

An extra $40,000 was given to
the police for the purchase of com-
puter software, supplies and acces-
sories; $150,000 for food for per-
sons in custody, recruit gradua-
tions, and other functions in New
Providence and the Family Islands;
$300,000 to buy uniform materi-
als for new recruits, to pay tailors
in Grand Bahama and New Prov-
idence; $75,000 for the mainte-
nance of computer and business
equipment; $100,000 for genera-
tor, air-conditioning and other
machinery maintenance; $125,000
to complete renovations and ongo-
ing repairs at police headquarters;
and $50,000 to fund the
maintenance of various police sta-
tions.



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

eve

Is cutting the store in half

/ Muistry Of Tourism endorses new
cruise port for Grand Bahama

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
remains among the weakest players in
the cruise tourism sector despite its envi- 9
able proximity to the US market,
Deputy-Director of Tourism Vernice
Walkine said.

The Ministry of Tourism, she said yes-
terday at the Grand Bahama Business
Outlook, fully endorses the develop-
ment of a new cruise passenger port as a
major attraction.

A new port could cost anywhere from
$15 to $60 million, depending on the
location, according to a Carnival Cruise
Line executive.

Freeport Harbour is considered too industrial and too far
removed from tourist attractions.

These two issues are among some of the main deterrents for
cruise ships.

Ms Walkine reported that Grand Bahama receives only
300,000 cruise passengers a year when that number could easi-
ly to be tripled.

She noted that almost 100 per cent of the cruise ships entering
the Caribbean from virtually every port north of West Palm
Beach pass almost in sight of Grand Bahama.

Ms Walkine said she believes that a new port is vital to the
renewal of the island.

“We know that this is in the best interest of the general pub-
lic that this development be accelerated.

Value

“T know that there are many sectors of the Grand Bahama
community that fully understand and appreciate the tremendous
value to the economy to be derived by the tripling of the num-
ber of cruise passengers coming to the island,” she said.

Giora Israel, vice-president of strategic planning at Carnival
Cruise Lines, said his company is interested in becoming partners
with the government, the Grand Bahama Port Authority and
Freeport Harbour in the development of a new cruise port on
Grand Bahama.

However, he also expressed concern over the lack of attrac-
tions and activities available to cruise passengers and encouraged
the development of new activities other than snorkelling or
glass bottom boat tours.

Mtr Israel said Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is trying to put
a group together to be willing partners in the development of the
new port.

The government is now in the process of identifying a suitable
location — a location that works from the land side and maritime
side, he said.

Ms Walkine said that duty-free shopping is another area of
major potential for Grand Bahama.

“We simply need the decision-makers to make a declaration
for Grand Bahama Island to be an international shopping cen-
tre similar to Dubai.

She stressed that Grand Bahama is already a global hub for
ocean freight movements.

“The Freeport Container Port can gain great distribution
advantage, being the hub for these inexpensive movements and
can very easily be promoted with the country as the ideal source
of goods coming into the country, making it an international
duty-free shopping Mecca,” she said.

Ms Walkine said thousands of people could fly to Grand
Bahama every day from the eastern US to shop.

Vernice Walkine



Extra 10% off for
Privilege Cards &
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British Colonial Hilton's

Sumptuous Breakfast Buffet Offer!

Take a break this weekend and

have breakfast at The Portofino Restaurant

Saturday & Sunday ll

Sunday Brunch

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For reservations call: 322.3301 ext. 4045

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&

PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

6

&

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

RIGHT: The videographer
captures the couple’s moments.

FAR RIGHT: Daniel and
Linzi Belton and their
underwater marriage officer
Matthew Sweeting.

The Back Door
MADEIRA SHOPPING PLAZA

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Underwater weddings
offered at Atlantis

TO ATTRACT visitors
who are looking for an
unique experience, Atlantis
is now offering couples
underwater wedding services.

Atlantis is opening up one
its feature venues, “The
Ruins Lagoon”, that just may
become the next top spot to
get married.

With a stunning array of
sea life as the guests of hon-
our, couples can now
exchange or renew their vows
underwater.

Local marriage officer
Matthew Sweeting intro-
duced the project to the
Atlantis team.

“The increased requests for
underwater weddings would
make a lot of sense when you
have Atlantis’ world
renowned underwater habi-
tat as the backdrop,” he said.

Mr Sweeting said the idea
took hold with Atlantis’
senior director of marine and

water park operations Glen
Kelly and Michelle Lui-
Williamson, vice-president of
marine aquarium operations,
who then began developing
the idea that guarantees even
the most discerning bride and
groom all the frills that any
“dry” wedding may provide.

Photography

The underwater wedding
package includes the nuptials
with full underwater and out-
of-water photography and
videography followed by
ultra-luxurious pampering at
Mandara Spa that precedes
an intimate reception for the
bride and groom and their
wedding guests.

An underwater wedding
test run was held on Valen-
tine’s Day with photograph-
er Tim Aylen, videographer
Troy Aitken and the “My
Atlantis Photos” team cap-

tured the memories of Daniel
and Linzi Belton who
renewed their vows in the
unique setting.

Braving the chilly waters,
Linzi donned her original
wedding dress and Daniel a
traditional black and white
tuxedo as they literally
took the plunge for a second
time.

The event was not without
its amusing moments as Linz-
i’s veil came off in her descent
into the Ruins tank and then
she had to learn how to ele-
gantly walk underwater.

The ceremony was flawless
as both Ruins “residents”
the sea life — and those watch-
ing from the Royal Towers
Great Hall of Waters were
enamored by the event.

Future weddings will offer
all the bells and whistles of
underwater communications
and custom-made his and
hers wedding wetsuits.

SU aR

»
e

Freezers Bedroom Pieces
Refrigerators Living Room Sets
Washers & Dryers Computer Desks & Chairs
Television & Stereo Separate Chairs

LOWEST

Ti

Saturday Feb. 28th, 8:30 -— 5:30, Village Rd.

T PRICES OF THE YEAR!

ii
| a |
eg


&

THE TRIBUNE





PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham walks around t

PM opens major

Sees i
——

he expo on its official opening.

6

LOCAL NEWS

Et
rs

agricultural expo

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham officially opened the
Second Annual Agricultural,
Marine Resources and
Agribusiness Exposition at the
Gladstone Road Agricultural
Centre yesterday.

Mr Ingraham described the
level of representation and the
quality of products displayed
at the expo as “impressive”
and congratulated the Min-
istry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources for the
great job done in spear-head-
ing the event.

“The renewed and enthusi-
astic expressions of interest in
local production by a wide
cross-section of our commu-
nity is commendable. Exhibi-
tions such as this one serve as
important showcases for

Bahamian products, assisting
in the creation and expansion
of markets for Bahamian
products.

“By raising the awareness
of consumers to the wide vari-
ety, quality and price compet-
itiveness of domestic produc-
tion, exhibitions of this nature
help to increase consumption
of domestic output.

“This is important because
it will not only create employ-
ment and raise the incomes of
producers, but also effect sav-
ings in foreign exchange that
would otherwise be expend-
ed for imports,” he said.

The theme for this year’s
exhibition, “Promoting locally
sustainable agricultural and
marine production and con-
sumption toward improving

food security”, brings focus to
the critical issue of food secu-
rity at a time of rising food
prices, the prime minister said.

¢ FOR FULL STORY
SEE BUSINESS

&

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 7




Beauty Festivdl

VL gE

It's a celebration of beauty and you're invited!

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

SO:

Fobn |

the cosmetic
Boutique

February 27th & 28th

10am to 4om

John Bull, 284 Bay Street

The Cosmetic Boutique, Bay & Charlotte Streets

David Yurman, Bay Street

Friday, February 27th, 10am - 4om

LITTLE DUCKS crowd together at the expo.



- Complimentary Makeovers*

+ International Make-up Artists & Skin Care Consultants
+ In-store Animation

- Free Gifts with Purchase

- Starbucks Coffee featured

Saturday, February 28th, 10am - 4om

- Complimentary Makeovers”

+ International Make-up Artists & Skin Care Consultants
- Beauty Workshops

- Product Demonstration/Face Mapping

* Free Gifts with Purchase

* Mini Manicures

- Mini Massage

+ In-store Animation

* Health & Wellness Corner

- Complimentary Jewellery Cleaning (limited to 2 pieces)
* John Hardy Jewellery stylist

- Starbucks Coffee featured

*Call 802-2800 to book your makeover appointment.
(Minimum $25.00 purchase required)

John Bull, 302-2800 - The Cosmetic Boutique, 323-2731


(Wy
LY

PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



























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THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 » FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

SmartChoice

LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

approximately 600.

“Observers complained of continuing abuse by
guards, although immigration officials claimed
that no such complaints were filed during the year.
Human rights groups expressed concern that com-
plaint investigations were handled internally with-
out independent review and oversight. Children
under the age of 14 were held in the women's dor-
mitory. Many children arriving with both parents
were not allowed contact with the father except
during weekly visitation. Despite the possibility
of being held for months, children did not have
access to education,” the report said.

The average length of detention varied signifi-
cantly by nationality, willingness of governments to
accept their nationals back in a timely manner,
and availability of funds to pay for repatriation.

Haitians usually were repatriated within one
week, while Cubans were held for much longer
periods.

The US report said that although the country is
a signatory to both the 1951 UN Convention relat-
ing to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 protocol,
the government has not established a consistent
system for the protocol.

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

is having a

20%-50% OFF SALE

Beginning Thursday
February 26th, 2009



Mackey Street « Telephone: 393-0744
Monday . al bt 3:30pm

Concern over Department of
Immigration investigations

The authorities detained illegal immigrants, pri-
marily Haitians, until arrangements could be made
for them to leave the country or they obtained
legal status.

“Tn practice the government provided some pro-
tection against the expulsion or return of refugees
to countries where their lives or freedom would be
threatened. Applications for political asylum were
adjudicated on a case-by-case basis at the cabinet
level. The authorities did not grant asylum during
the year,” it said.

The report pointed out that both local and inter-
national human rights observers criticised gov-
ernment for failing to screen potential asylum
applicants adequately.

“Those requesting asylum screening often lacked
access to legal counsel. Human rights observers
claimed that the government detained Cuban
migrants for excessive periods. The government
asserted that all migrants who claimed asylum
were interviewed and screened adequately by
trained immigration officials,” the report said.

Mother and
boyfriend
charged with
the murder
of her baby

FROM page one

police. Augustine could only
look back tearfully as her moth-
er fell to the ground in anguish,



NOTICE

Saveco Trading will be close for
stocktaking on Monday March 2nd
and Tuesday March 3rd 2009. We
will re-open on March 4th 2009 at
10:00 am for business as usual.
Sorry for any inconvenience this

may have caused.

Thanks for your support.

Management

, pe

’ Latter}
2009

We recognize and thank the following for their
support of Bahamian children with cancer:

Derek & Darmell Osborne = Dairy Queen
Minister Loretta Butler-Tumer
Michelle Pindling Sands
Players & coaches of Insurance Management's Bears Soccer Club
sue Roberts - Cancer Society
Joanne Smith —- Media Enterprises
Krissy Love - Island FM
Karen — The Tribune

the many Schools and Businesses for their gracious support!

screaming so loudly that order-
lies from nearby courts had to
urge her to be quiet.
According to court dockets,
Augustine and Charlton
between Monday, February 16
and Sunday, February 22, 2009,
intentionally caused the death
of Fiara Augustine Santil. The
accused, who were represented
by attorneys Tai Pinder, Mario
McCartney and Jomo Camp-
bell, were not required to enter
a plea to the charge. A prelimi-
nary inquiry will be held to
determine whether there is suf-
ficient evidence against the
accused for them to stand trial
in the Supreme Court.
Attorney Pinder told the
court that Charlton claimed that
he had been beaten severely
while in police custody and
asked that he receive medical
attention. Chief Magistrate
Gomez ordered that Charlton
receive medical attention. The
accused were remanded to Her
Majesty’s prison. The case was
adjourned to March 18.


(|W

PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

6

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Reston Memorial Morlaary Three Detention Centre detainees

and Crematoiiam

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 373. 373- A116 J (242) ore ard
Pager: (242) 340: ‘auc (242) 373-

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

LOUISE JOSEY
BAIN, 50



Robinson and Soldier erie
P.O. Box CB-' 12072
Telephone: (242) 304 8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: (242} 340-8034

lassau, N.P., Bahamas

of Bethel Avenue will

be held on Sunday,

March Ist, 2009,

1:00p.m. at Hillview

Seventh Day Adventist

Church. Officiating

will be Pastor Peter

Joseph, assisted by other ministers of the
gospel and interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Roads.

Awaiting her resurrection are her children:
Antenella Bain, Adell Mcphee and Adam
Bastian; Adopted Daughter: Rochelle Green;
Grand daughter: Aniah Bain; Sisters: Effie
McIntosh, Darlene, Kimberley, Kermika,
Hiltina, Syd, Annette, and Raquel; Brothers:
Valentino, Clifford, Dewitte, Excel and Brent;
Aunts: Marietta McKinney, Julia Bain
Deveaux, Dorothy Bain-Curtis, Lee,
Sharmaine, Joyanne, Maryanne, and Larayette
Josey, Pat McKenzie, Ruthmae Adderley, Elsie
Winder, Barbara Bain, Lynette Bain, Judy
Bain, Nellie Pratt, Lilla Smith, Louise Smith,
Ruby Thurston; Uncles: Hayward McKinney,
Gilbert, Godfrey, and Clifford Bain, Anthony
Curtis Sr, Latandra, Arnold, Rufus, Pedro,
Desmond, and Dino Josey; Grand Aunt:
Willamae McKenzie; Sisters-in-law: Denise
and Sabrina Bain; Nieces and Nephews too
numerous to list. Other Relatives and Friends
including: Leading Mechanic Nevada Bain,
RBDF, Leading Seaman Dwayne Deveaux,
RBDF, Constable 1112 Owen Hanna, RBPF,
Lisa Young, Dr. Ada Thompson, Dr. Aneska
Armbrister, Nurse Phillipa Farquharson.

Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at
Restview Memorial Mortuary and
Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads
on Saturday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and
at the church on Sunday from 11:30 am to
service time.

Bemeritte's Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
« MARKET STREET
* P.O. BOX GT-2087 » TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Patrick Leonard

Bethel Sr., 40,
a resident of Daveaun Street, wil be held at
Our Lady of the Holy Souls Cathole Church,
Deveaux Steel, on Saturday al 12200 noon.
Officiating wil be Fr. Michael Kaly, ss.cc.,
assisled by Rev. Deacon Peter Ratring &
Fev, Deacon Maxwell Jotinson, Intermeri
folows in Cathole Cemetery, Tyler Street.
Left ip cherish his mamories are his mother: Fredrica Bethel: son: Patrick Bethel Jr;
2 aunts: Cametia Willams& Martha Mophee; 9 brothers: Benjamin, Daniel, Dele,
Daren, Adrian St,, Kenwood, Terence, Ralph & Rodney Bethel 6 sisters: Coralee
Smith, Gayiean Gibson, Cyprianna Thompson, Deneloe & Rosemary Curtis &
Wendy Belhel: 3 adooted sisters: Margarete Willams, Michelle Knowles &
Samantha Green; nieoes & nephews: Benjalina, Jamal, Sheena, Teco, Dayan,
Benzel, Lakisha, Laquinta, Meagan, Shayna, Sabbath, Samane, Laquoya & Daniel
Bethel Jr., Palrina, Shaquile, Angelo & Able Seaman Bravado Thompson, Michael,
Lanoramas & Leonard Gibson Jt, Terran, Terrence, Kahja, Ketsha, Dia, DeWvan,
Jade, Deontarique, Tomand, Davaado, Denaisha, Terah, Justin, Shaquile, Rashad,
Crystal, Bizabeth, Deonia, Nicola Farrington, Janel Ramsey & Shanlel Cooper, 2
brothars-in-law: Leonard Gibson Sr. & Patrick Thompson: 4 sisters-in-law: Michelle,
June, Ancrea A Jucy Bethel: 10 grand laces & nephews: Kevon, David, Briana,
Raven, Benelique, Zachary, Shiah, Laxethra, Benge! J & Tristan; cousins:
Pauletie & James Macey, Gracie McPhee, Merve Higgins, Peler Walkes, Anthony,
Andre & Berard Lynden, Brian Goodridge, Maurice Ferguson, lan Green, Maryane,
Gertrude, Cardinal, Uriah Je, Gladstone, Sidney, Amold, Linda, Susanne, Ethel,
Gingex, Ruby, Cora, Peter & Everet McPhee, Cardinal Major, John Walter, Shervin
A Robert McPhee, Nurse Gloria Gardiner, Nurse Valencia Karna, Brenda, Katy,
Lavali, LaAleur, Jimmy, Simone, Tino, Clint, Tiny, Joe, Andy, Jerome, Stacia &
Barty; other relatives & friends including: Charlene Moss, Lakata, Margaretie
Ramsey & family, Kenelce Hamiton & family, Keno, Kelo, Kathrine Gustave &
farily, Ganieve Fowler, Arn Miler & family, Teresa Role & tamiy, Abigal Fotle &
family, Joanna Role & ‘arnily, Percy Role, Antony Fowler, Anthony Buller, Eames!
Lockari, Anaslia Siyvestar & family, Wiliam & Al Moss, Slanhane Glass & tamly,
Yvonne Thompson & fanny, Alexander Smif, Crystal Love, the Tucker Brothers &
famly, John Seymour, Philp Sturup & famly, Hiram Smith, Phiio Doroaus, McTavis
Johnson, Deane Gardiner & family, Prissla Dawkins & family, the former Nassau
Beach Hotel Housekeeping Staff, the G.G. Back Yard Crew & family, Deveaux &
fier Street family. Friends may pay thar last respects at Demertte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, trom 10-6:00 p.m: on Friday’ & on Saturday at fhe church from
11:00 a.m, untl service time,

Quality Auto Sales Ltd

PARTS DEPARTMENT
Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING
FEB 25 thru FEB 28

(Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday)

We will re-open for business as usual on Monday, March 2.

We apologise to our valued customers and regret ary
inconvenience this may cause, All other sections of the
AUTO MALL wall be open for business as usual

QUALITY:

EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 397-1700

FROM page one

and put a plastic bag over his
head, into which they sprayed
Mace, severely irritating his eyes
and making him feel as if his
throat was on fire.

The officers then beat him with
sticks so severely that he was
swollen and black and blue for
weeks, he said.

As a result of the beating, the
detainee claims, he lost three toe
nails from his left foot, two from
his right foot and two fingernails
from his left hand.

“Most of us are here for immi-
gration irregularities — we are not
murderers, we are human beings
and this is the 21st century,” he
said.

Another of the Cuban hunger
strikers questioned how the beat-
ing of his friend could be denied
by government officials.

“There were hundreds of wit-
nesses. He was swollen like a
watermelon, all black and blue.
He was in bed for a week. We had

Oweeting’s Colonial Mortuary & Crematorium

#84 Blue Hill Road, P.O. Box N 8161

Nassau, Bahamas, Tele 32

§-TEG7

MEMORIAL SERVICE

Memorial Service for the late Mr. Philip Sands will be held at the Chapel of the
Saints Sweeting’s Colonial Mortuary and Crematorium #84 Blue Hill Rd, on
Saturday 28th February, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. Leroy Burrows.

Left to cherish his memories are his Mother: Violet Sands-Gordon, Father: James
Gordon, Four Brothers: James Jr., Clayton, John and Godfrey Gordon, Two Sisters:
Maryann Newton and Elizabeth Strachan, Four Aunts: Marjorie, Janet and Madilyn
Sands and Brenda Williams, Two Uncles: Rudolph Sands and Frederick Gordon,
Three Nieces: Elliyah and Kimberly Strachan and Kenderia Newton, Two Nephews:
Kendal Jr. and Johnthan Newton, Two Brothers-in-Law: Elliott Strachan and Kendall
Newton and A host of other Relatives and Friends Including: The Gordon Family,
Doudoux, Vandergracht, Joseph Adderley, Franklyn, Basil, Shawn, Shawna, Mr.
and Mrs. Bethel, Romeo, Antonio, Keisha, Crystal, Samantha George, Philip, David,
Monique, Shikeray, Shanekia, Antonio, Romeo, Charlene, Marjorie Adderley,

Friands from Potters Cay Dock and Miss Hazel.

Services is being handled by Saints Sweeting'’s Colonial Mortuary and

Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd.

\CKYARD P

Lots of cell phone and phone card

give-a-ways|

a Stiletto

a Ancient man
a T'rez Hepburn
a te D

wu

1 Elon Moxey

i

; Ita Storr and the Spank Band
a Sky Juice Band & many many

more!!!

Date; Friday 27 February, 2008

Time: 3 p.m, unti|

Venue: QE Sports Center (Carmival Site}
Price: $15 with 1 FREE drink included

Tickets available at BUCK'S RECORD GALLERY &

BACKYARD RESTAURANT & BAR

Hosted by: Bird Nest Entertainment along side No Strings Attach Production

SECURITY WILL BE STRICTLY ENFORCED

RSVP: 376-0893

to tend to him because no one
else would,” the detainee said.

He went on to describe the con-
ditions at the centre as unbear-
able, saying the facility is so over-
crowded that at night, sleeping
bodies completely cover the floors
and hallways.

He also described a practice
that has come to be known to
detainees as “count-time.” Three
times a day — at 8am, 4pm and
midnight — all the occupants of
the Detention Centre are
marched out of the barracks, lined
up and counted. Several of the
detainees said this procedure is
overseen by heavily armed guards
who shove and shout at them,
often swearing at women and chil-
dren and pushing them with the
butts of their guns. One detainee
was “slapped around” just yester-
day morning for failing to move
fast enough, he said.

The detainee said there is also
no time for recreation at the cen-
tre, not even for the children, and
that while there is an area near
the front of the centre that fea-
tures a swing set, this is all for
show — as the area is only actually
used as a holding pen for large
groups of new arrivals.

According to the detainees, all
but two of the toilets at the chron-
ically overcrowded centre are bro-
ken. “Do you know what happens
when 200 to 300 people try to
share two toilets?” one asked.
“People have to fight to get to
them. Eventually people can’t
wait any more and they start to
use the bathroom on the side of
the building. Now the whole thing
stinks. We have to walk through
puddles of urine.”

A Jamaican detainee, who has
been at the centre for three
months said all the allegations lev-
elled by the Cuban detainees are
absolutely true.

He told of a young Dominican
man who was brought in on Tues-
day. “They have been beating
him, all sorts of abuse. He is spit-
ting blood. I tell you, it is pure
torture.

“The conditions at this place
are totally inhumane. They treat
people like dirt. It is total humili-
ation,” he said.

The Jamaican man called for
the government to grant the press
and international human rights
agencies full access to the facility.
“If I have nothing to hide, and
the authorities want to visit my
house to investigate some allega-
tions, I would let them in,” he
said.

Several of the detainees called
for the allegations to be brought
to the attention of the United
Nations Human Rights Council.
“If the UN ever saw what these
people are doing, there would be
some criminal charges,” one of
them suggested.

An African man, who has been
at the centre for three months,
told of how all his possessions
“disappeared” while he was in
custody. He explained that while
detainees can keep some clothes
with them in the barracks, any
other belongings brought in with
them are turned over to the
guards for storage.

He explained that when he lost
all his clothing during the fire that
destroyed one of the barracks a
few months ago, he asked the
guards to allow him access to his
suitcase, only to find that all his
belongings were gone. “My suits,
my laptop, my camera, all gone.
Now I have nothing. When I take
a shower, I don’t even have a tow-
el to dry off with.”

Worse he said, his travel docu-
ments have also disappeared.

“They keep me here, they don’t
feed me well, and they lost my
passport. This place is hard. Life is
not good here. They don’t have
human rights in this country,” he
said.

One man, who said he has a
legal right to work in the
Bahamas, claimed he was picked
up at a job site and given no
opportunity to produce docu-
ments proving his status.

He said: “In this place, we have
no blankets, we don’t have much
to eat.

“We should have someone to
talk to go and get our documents.
We live in here like dogs. I can’t
take it anymore.”

The detainees said there is
rarely enough food to go around,
despite assurances to the contrary
from the government. They called
on the Bahamian people to
donate blankets, baby food and
other supplies for the very young
and old, who they said suffer the
most.

They also asked human rights
agencies to seek permission to see
the conditions they live in as soon
as possible — as they fear the
guards may take steps to disguise
what has been going on in an
effort to avoid exposure.

When asked about conditions
at the centre yesterday morning,
before the detainees spoke to The
Tribune, Minister of State
Branville McCartney said:

“What we are trying to do at
the Detention Centre is operate it
like a holding facility, it’s not a
prison and that is our mandate
although we are housing people
who are here illegally. So what
we are in fact doing is holding
people as though they have not
committed a crime when in fact

SEE page 11
(e\"\
Na,

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

on hunger strike

FROM page 10

they have.”

When it was suggested that the
food was insufficient and of poor
quality, Mr McCartney said that
he has had lunch there, and it was
“good” :

On Tuesday, the day after the
first allegations were made, the
Department of Immigration said it
had already completed an inves-
tigation and determined that no
abuse had occurred at the facility.

However yesterday, Mr



Employers illegally
hiring foreign workers
‘should pay $10,000"

FROM page one

ments to the 1975 Immigra-
tion Act, Mr McCartney
highlighted the difficulties
presented by the current
economic climate and the
need to renew focus on cus-
tomer service.

Laws need to be simpli-
fied, and not over compli-
cated, in an effort to stem
the flow of foreign workers
seeking employment and
residency in the Bahamas
and improve the quality of
life for Bahamians, the Min-
ister said.





McCartney suggested that the
inquiry may be ongoing: “The fact
of the matter is, we have not been
informed about or haven’t been
able to verify any of these allega-
tions, and if there is corruption,
that is something that is a no-no
for me and we will try and deter-
mine the facts.”

He said he had not been
informed about a hunger strike,
but added that if detainees were
tempted to hold one, “my advice
to them is that they should eat
and eat well, because it doesn’t
do their body any good not to
eat.”

Speaking about Amnesty Inter-
national’s call for in independent
investigation, Mr McCartney said:
“We have nothing to hide in con-
nection with the Detention Cen-
tre. If there is a review being done
we would also want other persons
there to ensure that its well bal-
anced because these international
reports tend to be absolutely
wrong on occasion.”

He also noted that if a Cuban
national is outside Cuban territo-
ry for more than 11 months, it is
very rare that they will be accept-
ed back.

“We usually have to look for a
third country to send them and if
that fails, we would find a person
in the community who would
sponsor them or release them and
advise them to apply for some
type of status.

“The difficulty comes in when
these persons may have some
criminal past,” he said.

VTE
Claims he was
TEAMS

A DOMINICAN man
held at the Detention Cen-
tre since Tuesday claims he
was beaten repeatedly by
guards in an attempt to
extract “some information”
from him.

His claim was corrobo-
rated by several of his fel-
low detainees who spoke to
The Tribune yesterday.

The man said the beatings
were usually initiated by
two immigration officers
and continued by two
Defence Force marines who
wore masks and handed out
more severe abuse.

He said that on one occa-
sion the officers beat him
so severely that he began
coughing up blood, and that
they choked him and
repeatedly struck his geni-
tals.

“They keep saying that I
am lying. They want some
information. I was trying to
get to the US and they want
to know where I got my
documents from and how
much did I pay. I told them
everything I know.

“Tf I am lying then take
me to court and let the
judge decide,” he said.





CREDIT SUISSE
Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

Private Banking














an
Na LY,

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 11

is presently accepting applications for a

SOUTH

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER — CENTRAL &

AMERICAN DESK

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Business
Development Officer covering Central and South American Markets:






Requirements:




* Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) in Banking &
Finance
At least seven (10) years banking experience including relationship
management, trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities
markets
Marketing experience throughout Central and South America
Must have established international client base with assets under
management in excess of US$100 Mio and a well developed network within
the market regions
Strong communication skills in Spanish is a requirement to facilitate
marketing and relationship management with clients and prospects
Good computer skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook & Bloomberg)
Willing to travel extensively throughout Central and South America and
utilize a network of existing contacts and associates
Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Duties will include:























* Acquisition and development of new offshore Central and South American
based clients
Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management





“This is the 36th year since
the Bahamas obtained inde-
pendence and there remains
unclear guidelines and poli-
cies regarding immigration,
citizenship, permanent resi-
dency, annual residency,
etcetera,” he said.

“This is totally unaccept-
able so I would like to bring
clarity to the area of har-
bouring illegal persons and
employing illegal persons.

“JT encourage senior man-
agers to think outside the
box — embrace a paradigm
shift in this department.”

In an effort to improve
customer service a new web-
site with online application
forms and comprehensive
information about work per-
mits, citizenship and resi-
dency applications is being
developed and should be up
and running within the year,
Mr McCartney said.

“We are trying to be as
efficient as possible and cus-
tomer friendly,” he added.

“We have a special area
now in the department that
deals specifically with public
relations and they are
responsible for the website
and I anticipate that hope-
fully it will be launched
before the summer.”

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE

is accepting applications for the
2009-2010 Academic Year

Spanish
One person - to teach Spanish to grades seven through ten

Social Studies/History

One person - to teach Social Studies and History to grade eight to twelve. Experience in
preparing for external examinations is a requirement.

English Language/Literature
One person- to teach English Language/Literature to all grade levels. Experience in
preparing candidates for B.J.C and B.G.C.S.E examinations is required.

Two person - to teach English Language/Literature at the Grade seven and Eight levels.

Chemistry

Two persons - to teach Chemistry to grades nine through twelve. The applicant must
have experience in preparing students for external examinations.

One person - to teach General Science and Chemistry to all grade levels. The applicant
must have experience in preparing students for external examinations

Physical Education

One person - to teach Physical Education to all grade levels. The applicant must be
available to coach varsity teams in the core sports.

Mathematics
Three persons - to teach mathematics to all grade levels. Experience in preparing
students for external examinations (BJC, BGCSE & SAT) is a requirement

Biology
science and Biology to all
experience in preparing students

to teach General
must have

One person -
The applicant
examinations

grade levels.
for external

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited university and a Teacher’s
Certificate. Two letters of reference, copies of all degrees and certificate, and
two passport size photos should be submitted. A commitment to the values of
Catholic, Benedictine education is expected of our teachers. Only those persons who
have no difficulty with the Roman Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply. Please sub-
mit application and required documents to:

The Principal
St. Augustine’s College
P.O. Box N-3940
Nassau, Bahamas

services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as, the
set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures
Advising clients of clients origin on products, services and investment
opportunities

Management of accounts/relationships with clients originating from Central
and South America

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.
Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.

Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:
MARCH 3, 2009

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

ani
WY

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Djokovic to semifinals, Murray pulls out

SERBIA'S
Novak Djokovic
returns the ball
to Croatia's
Marin Cilic dur-
ing their quarter
final match of
the Emirates
Dubai ATP Ten-
nis Champi-
onships in
Dubai, United
Arab Emirates,
Thursday, Feb.
26, 2009.

Nousha Salimi/AP Photo

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Chairman’s Review
Of the Results
For the year ended October 31, 2008

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited earned a consolidated net income of $83.9 million
for the 2008 fiscal year. Earnings per share was 69.8 cents. This is a commendable performance given the
challenges imposed by the weakening global business environment. In producing this result, the Bank
has benefited greatly from sustained strength and resilience in its core businesses, as evidenced by the 5%
increase in loans and a year-over-year improvement in the net interest margin.

Total revenues for the year amounted to $171.6 million, a $7.7 million (4%) decrease over last year. Net
interest income rose $9 million, or 6%, over last year. Interest income was $263.6 million compared to
$288.6 million last year. Similarly, interest expenses decreased by $33 million or 24%.

Operating expenses for the year were $64.3 million, an increase of $7.2 million (13%) from last year. In
Fiscal 2007, a pension plan curtailment gain had the impact of lowering total operating expenses by $8.2
million. Excluding the impact of this prior year gain, Fiscal 2008 operating expenses would be $1.0
million (1.5%) lower.

The return on assets for the fiscal year was 1.9%, and the return on tangible equity was 18.2%. Both
performance measures continue to reflect the Bank’s strength and leadership in its markets. Importantly,
they reveal the benefits of sustained proactive measures to position the bank for challenging times.

At its meeting on December 19, 2008, the Board of Directors approved the payment of a final dividend of
20 cents per share which was paid to shareholders on January 9, 2009. Previously, an interim dividend of
20 cents per share was paid, bringing the total dividend to 40 cents per share for 2008.

The commendable financial results achieved in Fiscal 2008 are a testament to the outstanding efforts of
the staff and management team to find opportunities in the midst of uncertainty, and to remain focused
on increasing value for customers and shareholders. On behalf of the Board, I extend heartfelt thanks to
each of them for their continued support.

Michael K. Mansoor
Chairman

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet



BS'000
Audited. Audited.
October 31, 2008 October 31, 2007
Assets
Cash and due from banks 259,951 269,434
Securities 1,081,872 1,722,181
Loans and advances to customers 2,539,072 2,415,975
Goodwill 187,747 187,747
Property and equipment 25,913 26,954
Other assets 43,435 46,164
Total assets 4,137,990 4,668,455
Liabilities
Customer deposits 3,445,010 3,661,406
Other liabilities 47,168 64,926
Other borrowed funds - 278,171
Debt securities in issue 20,620
Total liabilities 3,492,178 4,025,123
Equity
Share capital & reserves 477,230 436,297
Retained earnings 168,582 207,035
645,812 643,332
Total liabilities and equity 4,137,990 4,668,455
, Who”
= TS les
Director Director

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity

BS'000

Share Capital. & Retained Earnings Total

Reserves

Balance at October 31, 2006 as restated 436,030 160,708

Net income for the year 109,860



596,738

109,860



Dividends - (56,499) (56,499)
Revaluation reserve- available for sale securities (6,767) - (6,767)
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands 5,200 (5,200) -
Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve 1,834 (1,834)

Balance at October 31, 2007 436,297 207,035 643 332
Net income for the year 83,904 83,904
Dividends - (54,097) (54,097)
Revaluation reserve- available for sale securities (27,327) - (27,327)
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands 6,085 (6,085) -
Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve-Bahamas (1,208) 1,208

Balance at October 31, 2008 (22,450) 24,930 2,480

@ DUBAI, United Arab
Emirates
Associated Press

TOP-SEEDED Novak
Djokovic advanced to the
semifinals of the $2.23 million
Dubai Tennis Championship
on Thursday with a straight
sets win over Marin Cilic, but
No. 2 seed Andy Murray with-
drew with a viral infection
hours before his match.

Third-seeded Gilles Simon
of France defeated compatri-
ot Fabrice Santoro 7-6 (3), 6-
1, and will next face Djokovic,
who defeated Cilic 6-3, 6-4 in
1 hour, 37 minutes.

Murray, ranked No. 4, was
scheduled to play the final
match of the day on Center
Court against France’s
Richard Gasquet, who will
now play fourth-seeded David
Ferrer of Spain in the semis.

Ferrer, who beat Igor

Andreev of Russia 7-5, 6-1,
denied that Murray’s with-
drawal meant he would now
have an easier semifinal.

“No, no. Murray going out
doesn’t make it any easier for
me because Gasquet is a very
good player,” Ferrer said.
“The last time I played against
him, it was very tough.”

Murray, also bothered by
an ankle injury, said he’s been
feeling poorly since the Aus-
tralian Open last month.

“T got it first down in Aus-
tralia, and I haven’t been the
same really since,” Murray
said. “I woke up in the middle
of the night sweating. I got
some anti-viral (medication)
from the doctor ... but it didn’t
help so much.”

The Djokovic-Cilic match
was perhaps the best match of
the tournament so far, with
the Serb producing some
superb returns to break Cilic
of Croatia three times. Cilic,

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Income
BS'000

Unaudited Audited

who lost for just the second
time this year, failed to con-
vert any of his six break
points.

“T was trying in the last
three matches to find this
exact rhythm, and that’s what
I finally did today,” Djokovic
said. “I think the key was
movement and focus. I was
really trying to move well in
the point, be patient, and just
wait for the chances, because I
was returning very well.”

Murray’s withdrawal was
another blow for an event
already hit by controversy and
a spate of injury-related
absences. Murray is doubtful
for Britain’s Davis Cup match
against Ukraine next week
after his doctor advised him
to rest for a week to 10 days.

“T don’t know. I obviously
want to try and play,” Mur-
ray said. “Il see how I feel
and give it my best shot to get
ready.”

Audited



Quarter Ended ‘Year Ended Year Ended
October 31, 2008 October 31, 2007 October 31, 2008 October 31, 2007
Total interest income 65,949 77,108 263,605 288,601
Total interest expense 20,214 36261 108,028 141,441
Net interest income 45,735 40,847 155,577 147,160
Operating income 4,517 5,844 16,017 32,143
50,252 46,691 171,594 179,303

OE

Operating expenses
Loan loss impairment

ee

15,287 15,657
8,324 4,292

64,340
23,350
23,611

19,949 87,690

57,104
12,339

————————

69,443





Net income

Weighted average number of common
shares outstanding for the period

Earnings per share (in cents)

120,216,204

26,641 26,742 83,904

120,216,204 120,216,204

222 22.2 69.8

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

BS'000

Net cash from operating activities

Net cash used in financing activities

Net cash from (used in) investing activities

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year

Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

Audited

Year Ended
October 31, 2008

93,782

109,860

a A sk

120,216,204

914

Audited
Year Ended
October 31, 2007

256,435

(347,641) (43,647)
115,918 (156,168)
(137,941) 56,620

236,704

98,763

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Year Ended
October 31, 2008

1. Accounting Policies

180,084

236,704

The accounting policies used in the preparation of these consolidated financial statements are
consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended October 31,

2007.

The consolidated interim financial statements include the accounts of the following wholly

owned subsidiaries:

FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International (Bahamas) Nominees Company Limited
FirstCaribbean International Land Holdings (TCD) Limited

2. Change in Accounting Policy

Effective March 1, 2007, the Bank changed the date on which all purchases and sales of
financial assets at fair value through the profit and loss are to be recognised from trade date
to settlement date. The audited October 31, 2006 balances have been restated to reflect this
change. The impact on the audited October 31, 2006 balances was to reduce trading securi-
ties by $157 million, other assets by $82 million and other liabilities by $239 million. There
was no impact on the year to date October 31, 2006 balances.

3. Dividends

At the Board of Directors meeting held on December 19, 2008, a final dividend of $0.20 per
share amounting to $24,043 in respect of the 2008 net income was proposed and declared.
The consolidated financial statements for the year ended October 31, 2008 do not reflect this
resolution, which will be accounted for in equity as a distribution of retained earnings in the

year ending October 31, 2009.

4. Debt Securities in Issue

During the year ended October 31, 2007, the Bank issued $20 million in redeemable floating
rate notes, with interest payable at a rate of Bahamas Prime plus 0.75% per annum.The unse-
cured notes were scheduled to mature on November 3, 2011, but were subject to early
redemption at the option of the Bank. The Bank exercised the early redemption clause and
called the notes in September 2008.

5. Other Borrowed Funds

The Bank previously sold under repurchase agreements, investment securities with maturities
between November 2007 and February 2008. All such investment securities were liquidated
during the year. Subsequent to the balance sheet date, the Bank sold under repurchase agree-
ments, investment securities having an aggregate fair value of $203,648 and maturities
between November 2008 and February 2009.


TEs
INBRIEF

Gibril ree

Safety Gibeil Wilson

signs with Dolphins

@ MIAMI

Associated Press

SAFETY Gibril Wilson
landed a big contract for
the second year in a row,
this time with the Miami
Dolphins.

Wilson signed a $27.5
million, five-year deal
Thursday with the Miami
Dolphins, who face the
prospect of losing both
starting safeties to free
agency.

A five-year veteran
released last week by the
Oakland Raiders, Wilson
will receive $8 million
guaranteed and $16.5 mil-

lion in the first three years

of the contract.

A year ago he signed a
$39 million, six-year deal
with the Raiders that

included about $16 million

in guaranteed money, but
he was cut after failing to
upgrade their run defense,
which ranked next-to-
worst in the league.

The Dolphins agreed to
the deal with safeties

Yeremiah Bell and Renal-

do Hill on the verge of
becoming unrestricted
free agents Friday, along
with cornerback Andre
Goodman. The trio start-
ed the final 14 games
together last season for
the Dolphins’ much-

improved defense, helping

them make the playoffs
for the first time since
2001.

Wilson led all NFL
safeties in solo tackles
over his first four seasons
playing for the New York
Giants. He has 66 career
starts, including 15 last
season, when he played
strong safety and made

129 tackles with two inter-

ceptions, three fumble
recoveries and a forced
fumble.

He started at free safety
for the Giants’ 2007 Super :

Bowl championship team.



SPORTS



A RAPTORS player is surrounded by the defense of the S.C. McPherson

Sharks.

Knights top
Stingrays 43-25

FROM page 15

“It is all or nothing this season, we really expect to win the
championship this year and if we do not win it it will be a dis-
appointment,” he said. “We have been injury free, but injuries
will probably be the only thing that can stop us from winning a
championship this year.”

JUNIOR GIRLS
S.C. MCPHERSON SHARKS — 37
C.H. REEVES RAPTORS — 10















The Sharks improved to 6-3 on the season, an important win
as they continue to set the stage for playoff seeding.

The Sharks opened the game on a 19-0 run and never left the
outcome of the game in doubt.

Rannice Bethel’s pair of free throws placed the Raptors on the
scoreboard with 3:47 remaining in the opening half.

S.C. McPherson led 24-2 at the half.

The Sharks continued to dominate in the second half and a
late three pointer by Shavona Adderley brought about the
game’s final margin, the largest lead of the game.

Johnethra Kelly outscored the Raptors on her own, dou-
bling their output with a game high 20 points.

Adderley finished with 10 and Angel Miller added five.

Sharks Head Coach Paula Clarke said her team did not play
as well as they could but the effort was enough to come out with
the win.

“We played a little sloppy today, we just played down to
their level,” she said. “Maybe if we played tougher competition
like H.O. Nash we would have played much harder but I am still
satisfied with the way we played.”

Clarke said she knows for her team to have a chance at a
championship title they must find a way to slow down the pen-
nant winning Lions.

“We just need to play more defence and we will be able to do
the job,” she said.

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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

ani
WY

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Knowles, Bhupathi ousted in quarters

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK _ Knowles and
Mahesh Bhupathi’s bid to suc-
cessfully defend their title at
the Barclays Dubai Tennis
Championships came to a halt
in the quarter-finals.

As the only seeded team left
at number two, Knowles and
Bhupathi felt they had a clear
path to the final, but it was
blocked yesterday as they fell
victim to Rik De Voest from
the Republic of South Africa
and Dmitry Tursuvon from

Russia.
The final score was 7-6 (4), 6-

“We had a lot of chances in
the first set. We were up 4-3 a
break, but lost two close
games,” said Knowles in an
interview with The Tribune
from his hotel room.

“We didn’t convert. We were
about 1-of-7 on break points
in the first set and we let it slip
away. Then they got ahead of
us in the second and things just
didn’t go our way after that.”

Unable to defend their title
in what turned out to be a wide
open draw, Knowles said they

were quite disappointed in
their performances.

“T don’t think we played our
best tennis,” he said. “So it’s
always disappointing when you
lose a match, especially when
you know you have the poten-
tial to easily win it.”

While Bhupathi was coming
off a break in India, Knowles
went directly to the tourna-
ment after he teamed up with
American Mardy Fish to win
the Regions Morgan Keegan
Championships in Memphis,
Tennessee on Sunday.

“For me, I had to play in a
different environment from last

Hield falls short
of gold medal

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

CARL Hield’s run through the Inde-
pendence Cup fell short of the gold
medal in the junior welterweight divi-
sion of the 28th Dominican Republic yes-
terday.

Against hometown favorite, Jonathan
Baptista, Hield suffered a heartbreaking
11-7 decision to end up with the silver
medal, the best showing by a Bahamian
at the yearly tournament.

“He gave it his best,” said coach Andre
Seymour from the Dominican Republic
in an interview with The Tribune. “The
guy was just more technical than him.

“The guy fought a much better techni-
cal fight than Carl Hield, but I was happy
that we came out with a silver medal.
I’m happy that he made it to the final.”

It was a historic performance for the
Bahamas as prior to this year’s tourna-
ment, Taureano ‘Reno’ Johnson and
Valentino Knowles secured consecutive
bronze medals in 2007 and 2008 respec-
tively.

At this year’s tournament, both John-
son and Knowles got eliminated in the
first round, leaving it up to Hield to pull
the Bahamas through on the medal dais.

“His performance was good, but the
guy just fought a much better technical
fight than him,” Seymour said. “He beat
Carl. He was more experienced than Carl
was.

“That was one of the advantages that

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Valentino lost to the fighters from the
Dominican Republic. But the guy Carl
fought is a seasoned boxer who is on the
Dominican Republic’s national team.”

Now that he’s established himself in
the tournament, Seymour said he’s con-
fident that the two boxers will meet each
other again in the future and the out-
come will definitely be different.

Seymour said after Johnson earned a
fifth place ranking in the welterweight
division at the Olympic Games in Beijing,
China last August and Hield coming
through with the silver, it was a good
indication of where the Bahamas project
was in the region.

“To make it this far, competing against
countries like Brazil, Ecuador, Cuba and
the Dominican Republic, it shows that
we can do it,” Seymour said.

“Tt shows that it isn’t long before we
return home with a gold medal.”

Seymour and his three-man team will
be returning home today, but he said the
work will continue as there is another
tournament coming in Puerto Rico in
May before the Commonwealth and
World Championships, which are slated
for this summer.

Additionally, there’s the Caribbean
Games in Trinidad and there is a tour-
nament in Cuba in May.

“We are going to be very busy this
year,” Seymour said. “So this is a great
start for us. Although we only won one
medal, we surpassed what we did in the
past at this tournament.”

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SPORT SNOTES

week, but that’s no excuse, I
still have to adjust,” Knowles
stressed. “TI had a little trouble
plying outdoors and with a dif-
ferent type of ball.

“But [have to get over that.
In this case, we just were not
able to execute under pres-
sure.”

The duo will take another
week off to recuperate from
the loss before they head back
on the circuit to play in their
next tournament.

They will head to the BNP
Paribas Open in Indian Wells,
California, the first ATP World
Tour Masters Tournament that



Here’s a look at the schedule of games in the

runs from March 12-23.

The tournament has been a
pretty good one for Knowles
and his former partner Daniel
Nestor from Canada, who won
the title a record four times
together.

They first did it in 1997, 2002
and back-to-back in 2005 and
2006.

The tournament offers
$225,000 for the winners and
1,000 ATP computer points,
$117,000 for the runners-up
and 600 points, $54,000 for
making the semifinal and 360
points, $23,000 for the quarter-
final with 180 points and





6 pm Jujus vs Coco plums

Saturday

9 am Guineps vs Sea Grapes
10:15 am Dillies vs Jujus

Junior Baseball League of Nassau this week-
end at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams:

SATURDAY
Tee Ball

11 am Sand Gnats vs Grasshoppers
1 pm Knights vs Sidewinders

3 pm Blue Claws vs Raptors
Coach Pitch

10 am Astros vs Blue Jays
12:30 pm Athletics vs Cubs

3 pm Diamondbacks vs Angels
Minor League

10 am Rockies vs Mets

12:30 pm Royals vs Rays
Major League

12:30 pm Marlins vs Indians

3 pm Mariners vs Reds

Junior League

10 am Cardinals vs Yankees
12:30 pm Twins vs Dodgers
Senior League

3 pm Phillies vs Tigers

Sunday

Senior League

2 pm Rangers vs Pirates



Here’s a look at the schedule of games on tap
this weekend at the Freedom Farm Baseball

League in Yamacraw Estates:

T-BALL:
Today



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Saturday

11:30 am Sandflies vs Boas
1 pm Bees vs Wasps
3 pm Mosquitoes vs Greenturtles

Sunday

3 pm Bees vs Mosquitoes

9-10:
Today

7:30 pm Red Snappers vs Eels

Saturday

9 am Dolphins vs Turbots
10:30 am Barracudas vs Octopus

Sunday

4:30 pm Octopus vs Red Snappers

11-12:
Today

6 pm Hurricanes vs Crowns
7:30 pm Groupers vs Divers

Saturday

Noon Crowns vs Divers
1:30 pm Conchs vs Iguanas
3:30 Marlins vs Divers

Sunday

3 pm Parrots vs Dogs
4:30 pm Hurricanes vs Marlins

13-15:
Saturday

9 am Silverjacks vs Sharks
11 am Owlz vs Raccoons

1 pm Potcakes vs Silverjacks
3 pm Sharks vs Stingrays

16-18:
Sunday

2:30 pm Caribs vs Lucayans
4 pm Tainos vs Arawak

Healthy Hearts Walk
& Kids’ Walk

Registration Fee: $5

$12,650 for reaching the round
of 16.

From Indian Wells, Knowles
and Bhupathi will come closer
to home as they compete in the
Sony Ericsson Open in Key
Biscayne, Florida, another
ATP World Tour Masters
1000.

Knowles and Nestor won this
title back in 2002.

The same prize money and
ATP points will be given as in
Indian Wells.

“We have two big tourna-
ments coming up,” Knowles
said. “Hopefully we can go out
there and ride the ship.”

























The Healthy Hearts Walk starts at 6:30 a.m.

The Kids’ Walk starts at 8:00 a.m.

The Subway® Healthy Hearts Walk is approximately four miles, starting at the Western Esplanade, going east to
Goodman's Bay round-about and back. The Subway® Kids’ Walk will start promptly at 8:00 a.m. at the
Western Esplanade grounds. Last minute registration for both walks begins at 6:30 6:00 a.m.

Applications can be picked up at participating Subway® Restaurants or at the Bahamas Heart Foundation’s office. Early applications



can be dropped off at Subway® Restaurant in the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre or the Heart Foundation’s office on Cable Beach.

For More Information, Call 327-0806-7 or 394-6715

Participant Information

Name:



Date of Birth: /

(day) (month)





Address:

Age: Sex:

(year)



E-mail:

Telephone:



Organzation Information
Name of School/Group:

Contact Name:





Contact E-mail:



Student Age:

Prior to any physical activity, we strongly suggest you consult your physician

| assume all risks associated with The Subway® Healthy Heart Walk and Kids’ Walk including, but not limited to, falls, contact
with other participants, the effect of the weather, including extreme heat, extreme cold, and/or humidity, traffic and the conditions
of the road, all such risks being known and appreciated by me. Having read this waiver and knowing these facts and in
consideration of accepting my application, |, for myself and anyone entitled to act on my behalf, waive and release Subway®

and all sponsors, their representatives and successors from all claims and liabilities of any kind arising out of my participation

in the Subway® Healthy Heart Walk and Kids’ Walk even though that liability may arise out of negligence or carelessness on the
part of the persons named in this waiver. | am aware that the registration fee is non-refundable. | am also aware that the course
will open to traffic and that headphone, jogging strollers, bikes; in line skaters and similar items and animals accompanying
entrants are not permitted on the course.

Signature:



PARENTS SIGNATURE (if under 18}:

event sponsors

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Date:
Date:



2
&

THE TRIBUNE



PAGE 15

rts

S
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

C.R. WALKER’S Malesha Peterson drives to the basket for two of her game high 27 points in the Knights 43-

cd
see



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Knights top
Stingrays 43-25

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER a week-long break for the Hugh
Campbell basketball classic, the Government
Secondary Schools Sports Association contin-
ued their regular season play with one team
completing a perfect season while another took
a crucial step towards playoff seeding.

SENIOR GIRLS
C.R. Walker Knights — 43
C.V. Bethel Stingrays — 25

The Knights continued to solidify their sta-
tus as pennant winners and top seeds for the
playoffs yesterday with an effortless 18 point
win in the regular season finale.

The win gave C.R. Walker a perfect 12-0
record heading into the GSSSA playoffs with
a tentative date set for March 9th.

The Stingrays led 3-0 early in the first half,
however the Knights went on a 13-0 run to
take a commanding 10-0 lead.

C.R. Walkers stifling halfcourt trap netted a
series of easy transition baskets for backcourt
mates Malesha Peterson and Rickea Richard-
son.

The Knights ended the remainder of the
half on a 13-6 run to take a 26-9 lead at the



Sharks continue bid
for playoff spot

half.

Peterson scored 15 of her game high 27
points in the opening half.

The Stingrays opened the second half as
they did the first, scoring the opening baskets
with an early 4-0 run.

Peterson scored the next six points to halt
the Stingrays momentum and give her teama
32-13 lead.

Richardson finished with six points while
Pamela Bethel added three.

Knight’s Head Coach Ken Lightbourne said
the perfect season was the first of his career but
was expected with a high number of experi-
enced seniors on this year’s squad.

“This is the first time since I have been
coaching that we have had a perfect unde-
feated season and we thank God for that,” he
said. “This year we have a lot of seniors and
next year we will be rebuilding so we expected
this year to be pretty good.”

Lightbourne said his team finished the sea-
son largely untested.

SEE page 13

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* Inclusion of
gratuities/tips in wage
definition; raising pension
vesting period from three
years to 10; and linking
pensions to inflation
among proposals to
ensure NIB’s sustainability
* Director warns if nothing
done, NIB to face ‘serious
challenges’ come 2032

* ‘Hich profile’ businesses
prosecuted for
non-payment

* Businesses required by
law to keep all NIB
records ‘indefinitely’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The National Insurance
Board (NIB) has recommended
increasing the insurable wage
ceiling by 50 per cent - from
$400 to $600 - as a way to
ensure its long-term sustain-
ability, its director warning yes-
terday that the scheme faced
severe depletion by 2032 “if
nothing happens”.

Algernon Cargill, addressing
the Rotary Club of West Nas-
sau, said the proposed $200
increase in the ceiling for the
insurable wage - the portion of
employee income on which NIB
contributions is calculated - was
only an initial step, the recom-
mendation being that it contin-
ue to be raised in line with
increases in the average nation-
al wage.

Review

The recommendation was
one of a slew made in the wake
of the eighth actuarial review
of NIB, which was completed
last year.

While the review has not
been made public yet, Mr
Cargill indicated that NIB was
looking to bring contributions
in line with benefits, and link
both with ‘cost of living’ and
‘living standards’ indicators -
such as wage increases and
inflation.

The NIB director said that
the Government “will in due
time enact amendments to the
legislation that will enable [the
Fun d] not just to survive, but
thrive”.

SEE page 7B

Cruise line

rise 60%

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -—- Discovery
Cruises increased its passenger
arrivals to Freeport by 60 per cent
over last year during the first two
months of 2009, its president,
Hans Hahn, has revealed.

The ship, which provides daily
service between Florida and
Grand Bahama, brought a total of
32,000 passengers to the island
between January and February,
compared to 20,000 last year.

Of the 32,000 cruise passen-
gers, more than 50 per cent stayed
overnight for one or more nights
on Grand Bahama.

“Everybody needs a bit of good
news,” said Mr Hahn, who spoke
with Tribune Business at the
Grand Bahama Business Out-
look, held at the Our Lucaya
Resort.

He said Discovery slashed its
cruise fares by 60 per cent dur-
ing the traditionally slow period
that marks the beginning of every

THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY,

Wile

BLE. BeR, WeAs ReY- 2207-5



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Motor dealer in
700k expansion

Nassau Motor eyes four-phase service growth

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Nassau Motor Compa-
ny (NMC) yesterday said it
could ultimately invest up to
$600,-$700,000 in a four-phase
expansion designed to
enhance efficiency in its ser-
vice department, with the first
stage - the construction of five
new bays with hydraulic lifts -
set to be completed and oper-
ational within the next two
weeks.

Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor
Company’s operations man-
ager, told Tribune Business
that the construction of the
five new service bays at its
headquarters, sandwiched
between Shirley & Deveaux
Streets, was “a plan we’d been
trying to implement for a cou-
ple of years”.

“It’s actually the first phase
of a four-phase plan,” Mr
Lowe explained. “We’re ren-
ovating our service depart-

ment to make it more effi-
cient. We’re putting new lifts
in five of our bays. Hopefully,
our technicians will be more
efficient, and it will make
things just a little easier for
our service customers. It will
also be a better environment
for our technicians.”

Hydraulic

Mr Lowe said the five new
service bays, each with their
own hydraulic lifts to raise up
vehicles, would enable Nas-
sau Motor Company to
replace five old bays. The
company now had 20 bays in
which to service clients’ vehi-
cles.

He added that the second
phase of the project, whenev-
er Nassau Motor Company
initiated it, would involve
knocking down the existing
client reception building and
replacing it with a new prop-
erty.

$1.3m pig farm eyed
for Grand Bahama

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

A $1.3 million GRAND
Bahama pig farm project is wait-
ing on final approvals from gov-
ernment before it opens as the
largest sow farm in the Bahamas,
with 600 pigs being raised for
Bahamian consumption and
export.

Michael Douglas, director of
business development for Rose
Farmland Ltd, told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that the farm will
initially operate at a loss for about
three years before becoming sig-
nificantly profitable.

“The first three years is always
hard in any business, and we are
going to be operating at an
extreme loss for the first three
years, but thereafter our profit
margins are pretty good,” he said.

Capacity

Mr Douglas said that when the
farm is up to maximum capacity it
will be able to supply the entire
Bahamian market, with a long-
term goal of exporting to the
Turks and Caicos, Dominican
Republic and Haiti.

“We will control our own mar-
keting, so we will stem out to
any available markets,” said Mr
Douglas. “Over the past year we
did some marketing in Turks and
Caicos.”

Rose Farmland, in a bid to

’s arrivals
on 2008

But Discovery says price
deal did not benefit
bottom line, and
packages to Bahamian
travellers ‘not profitable’

year, following the Christmas and
New Year holidays.

“January and February are tra-
ditionally losing months, so what
we decided was... to come up
with a ‘fed up fare,’ and what we
managed to do is put customers
on board the vessel and on the
island,” Mr Hahn said.

“We didn’t increase the bot-
tom-line, but I think it was worth
the effort,” he said.

Mr Hahn added that the month
of March will be critical for Dis-
covery.

SEE page 8B

keep profit margins high, inte-
grated its own slaughter and
packing houses into the business
model, and intends to grow dedi-
cated food crops for feed, which
represents a large overhead cost.

“In this venture we own the
farm, we own the slaughter and
packaging house - they’re verti-
cally integrated - so we’re going to
be supplying ourselves with pigs
at a rate that is necessary so that
we can market them,” said Mr
Douglas.

He said about 60 per cent of
farm costs come from feed pur-

SEE page 8B

The reception office’s move
would create two additional
service bays, giving Nassau
Motor Company two more
service bays than it currently
has.

“If it all comes together, it
will probably be in excess of
$500,000, maybe as high as
$600,000-$700,000,” Mr Lowe
said of the company’s invest-
ment.

Nassau Motor Company’s
willingness to invest, even ina
troubled economy where new
car sales have plummeted,
dropping by around 30 per
cent industry-wide last year,
provides hope that the
Bahamas will eventually pull
out of recession through the
efforts of Bahamian-owned
businesses.

“This is what’s got to help
start turning the economy
around,” Mr Lowe told Tri-

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Many CLICO
clients ‘unlikely’
to recover 100%

of investments

* All Nassau offices close, and sales
agency force told to stay at home until
further notice

* Several potential buyers circle
insurance book of business

@ By NEIL
HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

Many CLICO
(Bahamas) creditors are
unlikely to recover 100 per
cent of their investments
if the company goes into
full liquidation, a former
government minister said
yesterday, as its Nassau-
based branch offices were
closed indefinitely, and the
sales agency force told to |
stay at home until further [its
notice.

James Smith, minister
of state for finance in the
former Christie adminis-
tration, described “the
move to liquidation as a
very serious, swift move,
so the Government must fF
have come under some |
serious technical advise-
ment”.

He suggested, though,
that before the Govern-
ment move to fully wind-
up CLICO (Bahamas) and
place it into full liquida-
tion, that the company be given one last chance to come up
with a plan to “satisfy its creditors” - in this case, its annuity
depositors, and the life and health insurance policyholders.

“Tf they come up with a plan, the chances of the creditors, the
policyholders, getting 100 per cent on the dollar is better, but if
they go into full liquidation, they will get a percentage on the dol-
lar and will have to pay the fees of the liquidator,” Mr Smith
explained.

SEE page 3B

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

A

A SECURITY OFFICER at CLICO shows
customers where to go.



FG FINANCIAL

for a better life

Qroup pensions

may it

call us today at 396-4000

| \N CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BE gt com



PENSIONS & INVESTMENTS

[attract the cream of the crop
[= keep present employees happy
[- guarantee staff retirement savings

pall of the above


(\W

PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

6

THE TRIBUNE





Port moves to ‘Build Now

Move aims to enable home buyers
to start building properties while
still paying for land purchases




















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No Phone Calls

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) has moved to
make real estate development more
affordable, its newly-appointed president
has said, with a ‘Build Now’ programme
designed to allow persons still paying for
land purchases to build their dream
homes right away.

“Many have projected doom and gloom
for 2009, and while things are tough, we
need to think of ingenious ways to invig-
orate the consumer market, and help
those who would like to acquire land,”
Ian Rolle told the Grand Bahama Busi-
ness Outlook.

While there was still no comparison
between the cost of property in Freeport
and Nassau, Mr Rolle said the Port was
committed to addressing the needs of the
market and ensure that land is afford-
able.

“We have heard many in the commu-
nity say that they would like to be able to
build as soon as they purchase the prop-
erty, irrespective of the sometimes seven-
year payment plan,” the GBPA presi-



“Property owners
will be allowed to
use the equity in the
property for
mortgages, and the
property will be
paid for during
construction
drawdowns.”



lan Rolle

dent said. Mr Rolle added that this would
stimulate development and the economy
in Freeport.

He said the ‘Build Now’ programme
will also benefit potential homeowners
in that it will allow qualified persons to
build right away and occupy their homes
before seven years are up.

“Property owners will be allowed to

use the equity in the property for mort-
gages, and the property will be paid for
during construction drawdowns,” he
explained. Mr Rolle stressed that the Port
Authority was committed to bettering
the lives of residents in Grand Bahama.

“In any community, if the basic human
needs of its people are met and jobs and
opportunities are available, they will be
able to provide for themselves and their
families. This should be our measure of
success,” he said.

In this vein, the Port has reduced its
retail business license fees by 50 per cent,
effective March 1 until March 2010, for
those who paid within three months of
billing dates.

A scholarship programme has been
implemented to offer full scholarships in
niche careers, particularly land survey-
ing, and other fields that will have an
impact on the island’s continuous devel-
opment.

Mr Rolle said award scholarships will
also be offered to the top graduating stu-
dent in each high school on Grand
Bahama who meets the Port’s scholar-
ship criteria. He said students will be
encouraged to spend the first two years at
the College of the Bahamas.










































































Please send bids for golf carts no later than March 14",
2(009 to the attention of:-

Golf Cart Sales
Facilities Manager
Fax 363-6873
Email- Pigolfcarts(@email.com

Pleas: include amount of aclf carts requested, bid price with contact infeemation,

J&J CHISHOLM
CONSTRUCTION LTD.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION
CLE/GEN/00239

2006

BETWEEN

KENDRICK CLARKE
Plaintiff
AND

FELIX DELANCY
Defendant

ADVERTISEMENT OF SERVICE ee

OF WRIT OF SUMMONS =a a :
‘We have many unique fome and apartment designs
ready to build. Free washer & dryer with any

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been contract signed before July 31, 2009.
commenced against you in the Supreme
Court, Common Law and Equity Division,
Action No. CLE/GEN/00239 of 2006 in which
the Plaintiff claims that you are negligent and
thereby is wholly responsible for the traffic
accident which occurred on the 6'"" December,
2003 in the vicinity of East Street and Wilson
Track and the Plaintiff claims damages,
interests and costs against you.

AND THAT it has been ordered by
the Supreme Court that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action on you be effected
by this advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that
you must within fourteen (14) days from the
publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
day of such publication, acknowledge service
of the said Writ of Summons by completing
a prescribed form of Acknowledgement of
Service which may be obtained on aie
from the Attorneys whose name and adaress
appear below, otherwise Judgment may be
entered against you.

Dated this 25" day of February, A.D., 2008

NOTICE

Please be advised that effective March 2, 2009
Betty K. Agencies will resume its regular twice
weekly service from Miami, Florida to Nassau.

Schedule:

Departs Miami on Monday
Arrives in Nassau on Tuesday

Departs Miami on Wednesday
Arrives in Nassau on Thursday

Nassau
East St. North, Kelly’s Dock
P.O. Box N-351
Nassau, Bahamas
242-322-2142

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.
CHAMBERS
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff
3701 N.W. South River Drive

Miami, Florida 33142

gx NUT

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE BAHAMAS could
soon again be ‘blacklisted’ by
the Organisation for Economic
Co-Operation and Develop-
ment (OECD) for a so-called
‘lack of effective exchange of
information on tax matters, a
former government minister
warned this week.

James Smith, minister of state
for finance in the former
Christie government, said
OECD member countries were
gearing up for a further offen-
sive to dismantle so-called ‘off-
shore financial centres’ with-
out regard to the impact on the
economy of these countries.

Mr Smith, who is now
CFAL’s chairman, said this
pressure was forcing banks in
international financial centres
to consider executing strict
transparency regulations that
were being pushed by OECD
states.

Agenda

These countries, which
include the US, UK, France and
Canada, have adopted an agen-
da aimed at “standardising and
bringing offshore activities
under control over the next few
years, and ultimately plugging
the loopholes which they per-
ceive are being used to avoid
and/or evade taxation in OECD
countries”.

Mr Smith said these states
and their regulators had used
the current financial crisis to try
and exert more control over the
financial services sector, and
exploit the situation with a
renewed attack on so-called off-
shore centres, who they are
blaming for the current woes..

“They seem convinced that
offshore centres exist for no
other reason than to facilitate
tax avoidance on behalf of their
citizens, and neither compelling
arguments nor irrefutable evi-
dence to the contrary could
change their collective mind-
set,” the former finance minister
said.

OECD countries were bear-
ing down on offshore centres
such as the Bahamas, threaten-
ing the reintroduction of
avblacklist’ that ostracises entire
nations.

“The OECD countries have
contemplated the reintroduc-
tion of the blacklisting initiative
at a meeting in October of last
year. The new list, if adopted,

Bahamas may face
OECD ‘blacklisting’



would list non-cooperative
countries as those which have
no effective tax information
exchanges on matters with the
OECD,” said Mr Smith.

“Effective information
exchange is now defined as hav-
ing a minimum of 12 tax infor-
mation exchange treaties
(TIEAs) between the country
(offshore centre) and other
OECD countries.

“Here in the Bahamas, we
have only one TIEA and that is
between this country and the
US.”

Mr Smith said that by the
OECD’s definition, the
Bahamas was qualified to be
blacklisted yet again, should the
latter go forward with the ini-
tiative.

“Offshore centers should be
mindful that they are likely to
remain on the radar screens of
the tax hungry OECD coun-
tries,” said Mr Smith.

Any new rules would ne
designed to make doing busi-
ness in developing countries
more costly and more cumber-
some, and if offshore centers
were to survive and prosper, Mr
Smith said they must continue
to become more efficient while,
at the same time, seeking to be
more compliant with the new
rules. Those objectives were not
always compatible.”

Mr Smith said offshore cen-
tres such as the Bahamas would
inevitably have to adhere to
three guidelines in order to
avoid OECD scrutiny and sanc-
tions:

* Increase their number of
tax information exchange
treaties

* Commit to desist from
assisting OECD citizens from
evading legitimate home coun-
try taxe

* Have their clients them-
selves become more tax com-
pliant in their own countries.

GIVE IN

TO TEMPTATION
ann
Na EY,

THE TRIBUNE



an
Na LY,

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 3B



Many CLICO clients ‘unlikely’
to recover 100% of investments

FROM page 1B

“Tf it [CLICO Bahamas] stays
in liquidation, they will get some
part of it [their investment], but
they will get less than 100 per
cent.”

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, the
Baker Tilly Gomez accountant
and partner appointed as CLICO
(Bahamas) provisional liquida-
tor, yesterday told Tribune Busi-
ness it was “likely that we’ll do a
creditor’s meeting next week” to
update the policyholders and
annuity depositors.

He confirmed that he and his
team had met with CLICO
(Bahamas) staff, and told a num-
ber of them - chiefly the sales
agent force - to remain at home
and await further instructions.
Lay-offs, though, possibly involv-
ing all CLICO (Bahamas) staff,
are only likely to be a matter of
time.

CLICO (Bahamas) has 170
employees, most of them based
here, but Mr Gomez emphasised
that none had been laid-off yet.
He explained that the company’s
sales agents had been advised to
go home because all the Nassau
branch offices, bar the CLICO
(Bahamas) head office, had been
closed indefinitely and there was
nowhere for them to base them-
selves.

Given that the provisional liq-
uidation has effectively frozen the
company’s business, meaning it
can sell no new policies or annu-
ities, there is nothing for CLICO
(Bahamas) agency force to do
anyway. Rather than leave them
hanging around the head office,
they have been asked to go home.

Mr Gomez said CLICO
(Bahamas) branch offices in
Freeport would also close indefi-
nitely come today, and the focus
would now shift to the work he
and his team will be doing at the
company’s Mount Royal Avenue
headquarters. They will likely be
assisted by CLICO (Bahamas)
administration and underwriting
staff.

Mr Gomez advised life and
health insurance policyholders
neither to panic, nor take out
alternative policies with other
insurance carriers.

He indicated it was likely that
the liquidation, with the Supreme
Court and regulator’s approval,
would seek to transfer/find a buy-

er for CLICO (Bahamas) insur-
ance book of business in the
shape of another carrier.

"We are moving quickly
because we've been approached
by several other companies to
assume those policies,” Mr
Gomez said, adding that cus-
tomers should continue to pay
their premiums.

The liquidator declined to com-
ment further, but Tribune Busi-
ness understands that apart from
British American Financial, sev-
eral other potential suitors have
come forward to inquire about
‘cherry picking’ CLICO
(Bahamas) assets via a potential
purchase.

Seamless

Tribune Business understands
that CLICO (Bahamas) life and
health insurance liabilities total
around $11 million, and there
may well be sufficient assets in
the Bahamas to cover these that
can be transferred to another
insurer, thus providing policy-
holders with seamless coverage.

As at year-end 2007, CLICO
(Bahamas) balance sheet showed
it had just over $6 million on fixed
deposit with the banks; over $5
million in policyholder loans; and
almost $3 million in bond invest-
ments held in the Bahamas.

It is the annuity depositors who
are likely to be most vulnerable in
a full CLICO (Bahamas) liquida-
tion.

As Tribune Business revealed
yesterday, CLICO (Bahamas)
was, in many respects, a deposit-
taking institution rather than a
pure life and health insurance
company. Of the $79.37 million
in future policyholder reserves on
its balance sheet at December 31,
2007, some $69.714 million - 87.8

per cent of the total - related to
annuities.

Several sources suggested that,
given the annuities weighting,
CLICO (Bahamas) was acting
more as a bank unregulated by
that sector’s supervisor, the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas. It then,
under the guidance of its CL
Financial parent, behaved as a
private equity/hedge fund, invest-
ing funds in a series of highly
speculative, risky foreign real
estate ventures that are now illig-
uid.

The main difficulties facing Mr
Gomez and his team are how
many of CLICO (Bahamas)
assets are still in this nation, and
whether the foreign-based ones
can be recovered and made to
realise their full value.

As previously revealed by Tri-
bune Business, at the December
31, 2007, balance sheet date, a full
impairment of the $57 million
loan tied up in Florida real estate
(it has since risen to $72 million)
would leave CLICO (Bahamas)
with just over $40 million in total
assets.

That would be insufficient to
meet liabilities worth almost $85.5
million, especially some $79.37
million in reserves set aside to
pay future policyholder benefits.

Given the state of the US and
Florida real estate market, any
sale of CLICO (Bahamas) invest-
ment there would almost certain-
ly fail to recover the full amount
of the loan, leaving a hole on the
balance sheet, with liabilities
exceeding assets.

A further headache regarding
the annuities is that they fall into
two classes, Tribune Business has
learnt. One class of annuity
depositors was investing in a
retirement-style plan, paying a
small sum per week or per month,
in return for receiving a lump sum

NOTICE is hereby given that AUNTENY DELVA of TAKE-
ME CORNER, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of
FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

and Citizenship,

P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



NOTICE

The

Bahamas
Contributory Medical

Public

Services
Plan will

Union
conduct a

Membership Meeting for The Medical Plan
Members Only, at 7:00p.m. on Friday, March
6, 2009 at the Bahamas Public Services Union
Meeting Hall, East Street South, off Soldier

Road.

All Members are urged to attend

Refreshments will be served following the
meeting.

Stephen J. Miller
General Secretary



- in instalments - on retirement.

Another set of annuity deposi-
tors was effectively placing large
sums of money on fixed deposit
with CLICO (Bahamas), in
return for above average market
rates of return. The question now
is whether the ‘retirement’ clients
should rank ahead of any ‘invest-
ment’ clients.

Assets

Meanwhile, Mr Smith was
another who raised questions as
to how CLICO (Bahamas) was
able to take so many Bahamian
dollar-denominated assets out of
the Bahamas, and parlay them
into US investments.

“What is concerning about this
is that you want to match assets
and liabilities,” Mr Smith said,
“and assets held here in the
Bahamas are in Bahamian dol-
lars, so you’d have thought they’d
match them in Bahamian assets.

“But most of the portfolio is
tied up in real estate in Florida. I
wonder how they were allowed
to do that, because a Bahamas
resident company who wants to
invest Bahamian dollars abroad is
usually told no.”

It is likely that CLICO
(Bahamas) took money out of
this nation through its branch net-
work in the Caribbean.

Meanwhile, Mr Gomez said he
had little in terms of detailed
information he could provide to

SEE page 8B

i

NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape Supply

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks
a qualified landscape supplier(s) to grow trees, palms,
shrubs and groundcover (items) in accordance with the
required schedule and speculations for completion of
Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. This is a supply
only contract.

Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th,
2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs



NOTICE

Notice is hereby given of the loss of Bahamas Government Registered Stock

Certificate as follows:

Interest
Rate
Stock
1. Bahamas
Registered
Stock

0.53125 % A.P.R.

Certificate Maturity

No. Date
64-027 2020

Amount
$412,000

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement certificate. If this certificate
is found, please write to RO.Box CB 12-407, Nassau, Bahamas

ACCOUNTS ASSISTANT

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is responsible for administering
The Bahamas Ship Register, which is the third largest in the world.
The Authority prides itself on the high standards and good safety

record of its fleet.

Applications are invited for the position of Accounts Assistant, to
be based in London. The successful candidate will be responsible
to the Senior Accountant.

Duties would include:

¢ Assist in the preparation of management and financial reports
e Data Input into the accounting package

¢ Performance of bank reconciliations

¢ Accounts Payables and Receivables

Applicants for the post should hold an Accounting, Economics,
Finance or Business Degree. They must be self-motivated with the
ability to work without direct supervision in a hectic work

environment.

Remuneration will be commensurate with qualifications and
experience.

Applicants are invited to write in confidence, enclosing a copy of
their CV with photo attached and details of current salary to:-

Deputy Director Finance & Admin
The Bahamas Maritime Authority

120 Old Broad Street
London EC2N 1AR
United Kingdom

Fax: 011 44 207 614 0670

Deputy Director Finance & Admin
The Bahamas Maritime Authority
Manx Corporate Centre

West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-4679
Nassau, The Bahamas

Fax: 242-356-5889

Direct Email: finance@bahamasmaritime.com

Closing date for receipt of applications is 6th March, 2009


(Wy (ew
LY IY
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS.
IM THE SUPREME COURT

2007
CLENQUI/Ne. 00739

Motor dealer in
$700k expansion

new bays have been opened
for a month.

“We started in December,”
Mr Lowe said of the new bays.
“They will be finished in two
weeks or so, hopefully. We’ve
got to tile the floor, install two
lifts and install the electricals,
so hopefully in two to three
weeks it will be ready to go.

“We're going to take a little
bit of a wait and see attitude
for a month.

“Once the bays have been
up and running for a month,
and we’ve seen whether it’s
made a difference from the
customer’s viewpoint, we’ll
make a determination as to

COMMON LAW and EQUITY DIVISION


























IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT tract of land
containing 14.3 Acres being a portion of a
Crown Grant originally made to Thomas
William Hall situate on the Morthern Side of
the Main Quean’s Highway in the Settlament of
Cripple Hill on the Island of Crooked Island,
one of the Islands of the Cammanvwealth of The
Bahamas.

Lowe said Nassau Motor
Company had no plans to lay-
off any of its 60-65 staff. Some
14 of those are technicians.

whether we see it all coming
together.”

While the expansion would
not create any extra jobs, Mr

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FROM page 1B

bune Business. “If everyone
does their bit, at the end of
the day, hopefully we’ll see
things start to turn.”

After constructing the new
reception office and customer
drive-in area in phase two, Mr
Lowe said the third and fourth
phases would involve con-
verting the old reception back
into work bays, and creating a
new transmission and lunch
area, respectively.

Nassau Motor Company
will assess whether to proceed
with the extra phases once the

AND




IN THE MATTER of The Guieting Titles Act, 1959,
Chapter 393

AMD

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
MHUELINGTON OSCAR SCAVELLA
Under The Cuieting Tithes Act, 71959

NOTICE

HUELINGTON OSCAR SCAVELLA, the
Petitioner claims te be the owner in fee simple in
possession of ALL THAT tract of land containing
14.3 acres being 4 portion of a Crown Grant

granted to the late Thomas William Hall situate on NOTICE is hereby given that TIMOTHE PAUL of EAST

NOTICE is hereby given that OLEMCIA JOSEPH

the Morthern Side of the Main Queen's Highway in
the Settlement of Cripple Hill on the Island of
Crooked Island one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas AND has made
application to the Supreme Court of the said
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
The Quieting Titles Act. 1959 to have his title to the
said parcel of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereaf determined and declared in a
Certificate of Tithe to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Petition and Plan showing tne
position boundaries shape marks and dimensions
tract or parcel of land filed in this
matter may be inspected during nermal working
office hours at the following places: —

of the said

1) The Fegistry of the Supreme Court,
Anshacher House, East Street, in the City of
Nassau on the Island of New Providence,

STREET, P-O.BOX N-T060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister respansible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registrationnaturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration'naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
hwenty-eight days from the 27" day of February, 2009 tothe
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizanship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HENRIDINE COOPER
of MACKEY STREET, P.O. BOX N-44, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27" day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

of GUMBELE HIGHTS, SOUTH, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Natonalty and Citzenship, for regisiration/naturalization as a
tilizen of The Bahamas, and ihat any person who knows any
reason why registrabon/naturalization should mot be granted,
should sand a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20" day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Gilizenshp, P.O. Box
N-F14d?, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CECELIA
CATHERINE ROXBURY of Western District, intends to
change my name to LAKISHA ROXBURY, If there are

any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

ore of the Islands ef the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas.

26° BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE

The Chambers of Clarita V. Lockhart,

Number $0 Shirley Street, Corner of Shirley WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER
Street and Elizabeth Awenue in the City of Yee: od

Nassau, The Bahamas, Attorney for the Price: 93,000.00

Petitioner. Hul: Fiserglain

Engine: Tein Mercury CML OP TWAS, 225 HP, 250 Howes
WW: S21 e

ES

Entry level book keeper urgently
needed must be proficient in
Notice is hareby given that any person having WY ETern esse) ve seca ce
Dower or a right to Dower or an Adwerse Claim or
a claim not recognized in the Petition shall within
Thirty (30) days after the appearance of Notice
filed in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the
City of Nassau and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his,
her or its claim in the prescribed form verified by

the Affidavit to be filed therewith,

Failure of any such parson to file and serve a
Statement of his, her or its clair on or before the
said Thirty (30) days herein will operate as a bar
te such claim.

Please fax resume to 394-3885.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ARIST ROGER of EAST
STREET SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20° day
of February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

aforesaid

36 Getrage inet condition! Fully lowded wath Autopilot, Fish finder, Chit potter ASPs,
Sereon/Ch, Mead, Preihwater, Bom cuthiogs, Powered with twin Meecury 275 Optimas ad
srt cratt gaps.

Standard Equipment Opticnal Equiprent
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Bre Satan (hge ohdih

Pot & war serd fone ai diet aeonage

a Bldg

wicgal wie pliler

Porta pet ofp & OM hege
Tih hak a de GBT

Leaning pot! wicca

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Hoa phe Papen ss omy ball ag eaa, a ate ,
nutt-ae:, fab finder, WHE eran:

Pot Bi dar eared Pec ems, age et
Mad Foch.

Geb prep ase

Uechebte cos ote wees dar
Ledre posed rod reriny

CLARITA V. LOCKHART
Chanibers.
Neo. 90 Shirley Street
Shirley Street & Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner
CF. 9, 18, 28)

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Sald oatieg les phir of wl ge

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33 woecty pra ra

Tein trite.

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Ringikey Ldgecore be, Ir.
Ph ala
Boral bed grate begyres lien

—
NAD

Nassau Airport
Devolopment Company

Trace reve oa bodes
Pedue c heing e

FG CAP

[TAL MARKEKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work

REQUEST FOR

QUOTATION

M-100, Test Well Drilling

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks the services
of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling
Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope
of services includes:

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,669.46 | CHG -0.07 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -42.90 | YTD % -2.51
FINDEX: CLOSE 817.96 | YTD -2.03% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $
Abaco Markets 1.41 1.41
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00
Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00
Benchmark 0.63 0.63
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15
Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37
Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95
Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83
Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.77 6.77
Consolidated Water BDRs 1.78 1.71
Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40
Famguard 7.76 7.76
Finco 11.00 11.00
FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 10.45
Focol (S) 5.00 5.00
Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00
Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30
ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets faa 8.42 14.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35

Div $

0.992
0.319
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.255
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Drilling and pump testing of a 6” pilot hole;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Return Well;

Flow testing of the 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Discharge testing of the 10” Feed Water Return Well;
Geophysical logging and flow testing of Pilot Hole and wells;
Water temperature logging and analysis of water quality and
chemistry;

Professional supervision, (i.e. Hydrologist).

Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

S2wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

ABDAB 31.72 33.26 29.00

Bahamas Supermarkets 11.23 12.04 14.00

RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA _V YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387 0.35
2.9230 -0.58
1.4376 0.28
3.3201 -1.94
12.6816 0.50
100.5606 0.56
96.4070 -3.59
1.0000 0.00
9.1005 0.06
1.0401 4.01
1.0330 3.30
1.0410 4.10
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300

0.000 Request for Quotation Packages will be available for pick up after

und Name 1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009.
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3773 Colina Money Market Fund
3.3201 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield %
1.3781

2.9230

30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

Request for Quotation closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at
3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 7B



50% increase to NIB wage
ceiling is recommended

FROM page 1B

Pointing out that the chal-
lenges facing NIB were no dif-
ferent to those being experi-
enced by other public social
security schemes worldwide,
such as those in the UK and US,
Mr Cargill said reforms to the
National Insurance Act and
accompanying regulations
would ensure the almost-$1.6
billion reserve fund would
remain solvent well into the
future.

But he warned that, based on
actuarial projections: “By the
year 2032, if nothing happens
to the programme, the Nation-
al Insurance Fund will face sig-
nificant challenges. Already, the
fund is nearing equilibrium, that
is, contributions and benefits
[paid out per year] are near
equal.”

Effectively, actuarial studies
have shown that if the status
quo is maintained, and reform
eschewed, the NIB reserve fund
will by 2032 have become so
depleted - largely as a result of
an increasingly aged population
- that it would effectively be
bankrupt.

“The NIB programme of the
Bahamas continues to be
among the most generous in the
world,” Mr Cargill said, in terms
of benefit pay-outs and cover-
age.

Contribution rates were cur-
rently 8.8 per cent for salaried
employees - normally split 5.4
per cent/3.4 per cent between
employer and employee - and
either 6.8 per cent or 8.8 per
cent for the self-employed.

The NIB director pointed
that with the scheme entering
its 35th year in existence, it had
experienced only two increas-
es ever in the insurable wage
ceiling - to $250 in 1985, and
then to the current $400 in the

aN
~~ ¥
NAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company

late 1990s. Meanwhile, there
had never been an increase in
the contribution rates.

“While there is no immedi-
ate recommendation to increase
the rate of contribution, there is
a strong recommendation to
increase the insurable wage ceil-
ing to $600, and to increase it in
line with increases in the aver-
age national wage,” Mr Cargill
said. This, he explained, would
have the effect of “shoring up
the Fund, ensuring it remains
solvent” well into the future
past 2032. It would have the
effect of extending the life of
NIB’s reserves.

Another recommendation,
although not new, is to index
NIB’s pension benefits to infla-
tion. Mr Cargill said it had been
proposed that pensions be
linked to changed in the retail
price index, a move that would
help NIB to be “fair and rele-
vant”, and enable beneficiaries’
retirement incomes to keep
pace with the cost of living.

While NIB was working to
increase some benefits, Mr
Cargill said it also needed to
strengthen other benefits pro-
visions. This had led to the rec-
ommendation that to be fully
vested for an NIB pension, a
beneficiary needed to have
been making contributions for
10 years, not the current three.

Explaining the rationale
behind the seven-year increase
in the vesting period, Mr Cargill
said: “One only needs to have
been in 150 weeks to be fully
vested with a full pension. That
does not happen anywhere else
in the world.”

A much, longer and continu-
ous contribution history would
be required, Mr Cargill
explained, indicating that this
would exclude expatriate work-
ers who came to the Bahamas
on a temporary work permit

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

D-111 Qualified Environmental Monitor

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks a
Qualified Environmental Monitor for Stage 1 of the LPIA
Expansion Project. The scope of services includes:

+ Review and approve contractors’ environmental plans;

* Develop inspection check lists and inspect the work of
contractors for compliance to environmental plans;
Facilitate and communicate with regulatory authorities on
behalf of the Project on environmental issues; and
Prepare weekly and monthly reports.

Interested proponents must be qualified, familiar with local
regulatory laws and agencies and familiar with International
Best Practices (Equator Principles, IFC Standards).

Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up
after 1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 5th, 2009 at

3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:
Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

from receiving an NIB pension.

Currently, provided they have
made more than three years’
worth of contributions, NIB has
to pay expatriate workers a full
pension wherever they are in
the world, regardless of how
long they spent in the Bahamas.

“Tf anyone comes and works
in the Bahamas, regardless of
who they are, for three years,
they’re entitled to be paid a
pension,” Mr Cargill said. “Any
national who has paid into NIB
for 150 weeks or more is enti-
tled to a pension.”

Hence the recommendation
to increase the vesting period
from three to 10 years, a move
that would bring NIB into line
with other Caribbean and
worldwide social security
schemes. Mr Cargill added that
another recommendation was
for NIB to “expand the base” of
insurable wages to include
income received from sec-
ondary jobs, plus tips and gra-
tuities.

With tips and gratuities cur-
rently excluded from the NIB
‘wage’ definition, Mr Cargill
added: “For hotel workers, in
particular, this translates into
smaller benefits.” Such a move,
though, is unlikely to please the
hotel industry, which will see it
as an extra tax and additional
cost burden.

NIB would also, Mr Cargill,
warned, strengthen the penal-
ties for businesses and self-
employed persons who either
did not pay contributions, or
paid them late.

While the courts were used
“as a last resort”, the NIB direc-
tor said many of the Bahamas’
estimated 16,000 businesses
were either not paying NIB con-
tributions or paying them late.

“We are seeing a significant
increase in legal cases and incar-
cerations,” Mr Cargill said,
adding that the NIB Act treated
non-compliance as a criminal
matter.

“There has been a significant
increase in criminal matters, a
significant increases in cases, as
well as high profile ones, over
the last several months.”

Non-contribution “places
employees in a precarious posi-
tion” and jeopardised the sus-
tainability of the NIB Fund
itself, Mr Cargill said, given that
it was obligated to pay employ-
ees benefits even if their
employers had not been meet-
ing their obligations.

With monthly contributions
around $16 million, and benefits
close to $14 million, he added
that it was important NIB col-
lect every cent.

Mr Cargill said NIB paid out
around $150 million in total
benefits in 2008, and this month
some 28,000 persons would
receive its pensions or benefits.
Short-term benefits, such as
maternity and sickness pay,
accounted for $30 million.

The NIB director also
addressed business complaints
on record keeping, one Rotari-
an saying his business had been
contacted by the Board, claim-
ing it had not paid contributions
for a period of time many years
ago. The Board had also said
the business had missed a
month of contribution payments
more recently, but when chal-
lenged to produce evidence,
told the Rotarian businessman
he needed to produce his
records instead.

Mr Cargill said the NIB Act
required businesses and the self-
employed to keep their records
indefinitely, but the Board was
using common sense in applying
this.

MUST SELL

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY
Andros Ave. — Englerston Subdivision

Interested persons should submit offers in writing to:

The Manager
Credit Risk Management
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than March 13, 2009

2 bedrooms,
I bath

© Comprises:
Property 3,600 sq. ft/
Building 733 sq. ft.

For conditions of
sale and other
information,
please contact:

Phone:
356-1685,
502-1929

or 356-1608


(Wy
LY

PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Cruise line’s arrivals
rise 60% on 2008

FROM page 1B

“March will be the proof in the pudding,” he added. “With March
being Spring Break, we have to find how low or how high we can go
with cruise fares, and that will be the difficult part.”

Discovery’s operation is important to the Freeport community. Its
cruise ship is the largest tour operator on the island, and provides
daily cargo service for merchants and Grand Bahama residents.

In the last two years, Discovery has been challenged to remain
competitive and profitable, receiving millions in assistance from the
Government.

When asked about the financial outlook for Discovery, Mr Hahn
said: “It is hard to tell The news is not good and our booking window
is even shorter now.”

He added that domestic passenger loads account for no more than
12 per cent of Discovery’s business. This January and February, it
was less than 4,000, he said.

Mr Hahn said package offers to Bahamian passengers are unprof-
itable. “Regretfully, we tried, but since most Bahamians have relatives
and property in Florida, our efforts failed and we did not make any
money; we lost money,” he said.

Mr Hahn has tried to get to some support from the local Florida com-
munity. “I tried to get the local community in Florida to realise what
buying power the Bahamian population has over there. I think I am get-
ting through,” he said.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOYLENWORTH HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Many CLICO clients ‘unlikely’
to recover 100% of investments

FROM page 3B

CLICO (Bahamas) creditors yet,
given that he and his team had
just gone into the company.

They now have to go through a
huge volume of paperwork,
including the company’s financial
statements, to build up an accu-
rate picture of its financial posi-
tion.

“We are in a discovery and
exploration stage.

“We anticipate having a meet-
ing with the creditors next week,”
Mr Gomez said.

“The creditors meeting will
likely be in a public setting for
account holders only, to address
the pertinent issues.”

Information

Adding that “it’s simply too
early” to give CLICO (Bahamas)
policyholders and depositors
detailed information, Mr Gomez
added: “We understand the anx-
iety associated with this process,
and understand the human fac-
tor. We are looking to address all
these issues.

“This is a process, and it will
take time for the liquidator and
his team to go into the property,
unwravel the pieces and negotiate
with creditors, employees and all
interested parties.”

He added that a Supreme
Court hearing scheduled for

March 5, 2009, before Justice
Albury was unlikely to take place
because it was too soon for all
parties to be ready. It is likely
that at this juncture the Govern-
ment will petition for a full liqui-
dation.

“The liquidator’s role, over a
period of time, is to essentially
protect the policyholders, realise
the assets of the company and
settle with the creditors and
employees as best as possible,”
Mr Gomez said.

“This is a challenging process
for the liquidator, but a process
that must be achieved. CLICO
was a substantial company, with a
significant client base, with many,
many transactions in any one
month, any one year.

“The role of the liquidator is
not adversarial. It is to help those
who have invested with the com-
pany, and to do as best we can to
ensure they do not suffer loss.”

CLICO (Bahamas) employees
are unlikely to receive severance
pay, and will have to join the
creditor queue with policyhold-
ers and depositors.

Near the front of the queue will
be FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas), which has first
demand mortgages over most of
the company’s properties.

A call centre and website will
be set up to aid CLICO
(Bahamas) clients.

$1.3m pig farm eyed
for Grand Bahama

FROM page 1B

chase. However, Rose Farmlands, which will be situated in the eastern
end of Grand Bahama, five miles from the US missile base, will use a
portion of its 1,500 acres to produce corn for a portion of the sow feed
,along with pigeon peas and the natural bio-fuel Getropha, which
could be used for the company’s generators.

“You have to have sustainable inputs, so we’re talking about an ani-
mal that, to some degree, can actually be fed from crops grown on that
land,” Mr Douglas said. “In any piece of property you also have to
incorporate some diversity. Also, in our case, because of the particu-
lar site we chose, that land will also be set back from existing commu-
nities, so we’re not going to be a nuisance to people that are around us.”

Mr Douglas said the farm’s largest competition will be from imports
of foreign meats. He said, though, that the company will engage the
Bahamian public to educate them about their product, which will he
said will boast quality.

“No matter what effort a local person puts forth in getting a product,
if he doesn’t educate the consumer on that product you’re going to end
up in the same old stalemate, so the idea here is that a lot of people will
eat a piece of pork and have no idea where it came from - no farm to
table history,” Mr Douglas said.




Legal Notice

NOTICE
PARK AVENUE HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)













Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 30th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,






Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MALMESBURY VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRAPEVINE TRADING INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IPSKEW MOOR
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHELET JEAN JACQUES
of CARMICHEL ROAD, FAITH AVENUE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27" day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAELCHAN TWO GROUP INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HEEMA INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GAMBAS HEIGHTS
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FULLUCK COMPANY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW ENGISTERN

INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAGIC CHARM HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





a Nt a aa ee)

THE WEATHER REPO

5-Day FORECAST

THE TRIBUNE

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MAarINE FORECAST



Ti INDEX NY















































; 7 Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
ry, | en on = v ai High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: ENE at 12-25 Knots 4-7 Feet 5-10 Miles 74°F
2 . Mn in : ae 6 oO F/C F/C F/C FIC Saturday: NE at 8-15 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F
in ¢ é WE 0| 2 3|4|s 6|7 il Acapulco 90/32 71/21 s 88/31 71/21 S FREEPORT Today: : NE at 12-25 Knots 5-8 Feet 5-10 Miles 74°F
W y.
KK a — WS Low | MODERATE | HicH } V.HIGH J EX. Amsterdam 45/7 43/6 c 47/8 45/7 po Saturday: ENE at 8-15 Knots 3-5 Feet _7-10 Miles 74° F
MG ORLANDO : 7 Ankara, Turkey 39/3 30/-1 c 37/2 23/5 sn BAGO Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 6-9 Feet 5-8 Miles 74°F
High: 79° F/26°C ll Sunlit, breezy and Clear. Plenty of sun. Partly sunny, chance Partly sunny, breezy Mostly sunny. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 54/12 46/7 pe 50/10 41/5 sh Saturday: NE at 8-15 Knots 3-5 Feet 7-10 Miles 75° F
v Low: 56° F/13°C om a pleasant. for p.m. showers. and cooler. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 68/20 67/19 r 76/24 66/18 +
756° stb gas eer ——— re Bangkok 98/36 81/27 pc 98/36 79/26 pc
i @ TN . 5 , High: 82° High: 79° High: 70° High: 74° Barbados 34/28 74/23 po 34/28 75/23. po
; lp ; High: 80 Low: 68 Low: 68 Low: 59 Low: 60 Low: 63 TIDES FOR NASSAU Barcelona 62/16 46/7 s 60/15 47/8 s DDA Wits
TAMPA ef Ee ECE EA Belin 46? 25/3 § 467 2/41 §
High: 78° F/25° C rz 80°-67° F 63°-61° F 19°-63° F High __Ht.(ff.)_Low _Ht.(ft. oan 573 52/11 4 505 53/11 +
Low: 60° F/15°C i - The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:06am. 26 2:57am. -0.1 Belgrade 43/6 29/-1 sh 40/4 36/2 sh
ai @ , 7 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:22pm. 28 3:08pm. -0.2 Berlin 41/5 30/-1 sh 42/5 35/1 sh
lf = Saturday 9:45am. 25 3:39am. -0.1 Bermuda 68/20 64/17 pc 71/21 67/19 pc
a om aa | CT . 10:04pm. 28 3:46pm. -0.2 Bogota 66/18 46/7 r 67/19 44/6 sh
WK tatistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Brussels 46/7 41/5 c 5010 43/6 pc
IW Vik Statistics are for Nassau through 1 d Sunday 10:27am. 24 4:25am. 00 p
1 r in ABACO Temperature 10:51pm. 28 4:28pm. -0.1 Budapest 40/4 28/-2 pc 39/3 36/2
- die High: 76° F/24° HIG: cuscaasiados.scgsinsnnasedncnaresatastenet 75° F/24° C Wada 0a Sam OA Buenos Aires 86/30 68/20 pc 86/30 72/22 pc
7 = igh: 76 F/24°C ° ° Monday : oe : ‘ ee : Cai 8/14 0/10 sh 64/1 12
7 \\, hee, LOW sacesiarasesaeted 66° F/19° C 1145pm. 28 S16om. -04 airo 58/14 50/10 s 17 55/12 pe
r YX” Low: 59° F/15°C Normal high... 7g paseo CO 97/36 72/22 s 95/35 67/19 s
' Normal low . 64° F/18° C Calgary 27/-2 4-15 s 26/-3 10/-12 pc
= @ WEST PALM BEACH iy Last year's GN secs esteetctennss as 85° F/29° C SUN ay Ty itn Cancun 84/28 63/17 s 86/30 65/18 s
’ el High: 77° F/25° C . Last year $ low saberbanieedeecaeea Gebeoners 68° F/20° C " " Caracas 81/27 65/18 pc 84/28 69/20 pc les
a, Low: 60° F/16°C Precipitation —_ ae aa a.m. Lay vie cy am. Casablanca 71/21 54/12 sh 69/20 53/11 pc 68/52
a As of 1 p.m. yesterday oo... cceccccceeeneseene 0.00" unsel....... “11 p.m. Moonset..... “40 p.m. Copenhagen 41/5 31/0 s 38/3 37/2 sn
\ FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date First Full iad New Dublin 52/11 43/6 c 5211 39/3. sh
WW \"\ High: 77° F/25° C @ High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date 0... 3.31" - = 7 Frankfurt 48/8 43/6 c 57/13 44/6 c
Low: 63° F/17°C _ Low: 56° F/13°C a ie oe Geneva 46/77 34/1 c 57/13 37/2 s
_ aX AccuWeather.com “a a ee Halifax 42/5 35/1 pe 42/5 30/-1 +
vy @ WS XK Forecasts and graphics provided by . : i Havana 82/27 57/13 s 83/28 57/13 s ENNY Showers Miami
ys MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Mar.4 Mar.10 WMar.18 Mar.26 Helsinki 33/0 19/-7 sn 25/-3. 14/-10 sf T-storms aes
os High: 78° F/25° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 77/25 66/18 c 73/22 67/19 c Rain eae.
A Low:63°F/17°C NASSAU High: 78° F/26° C Islamabad 77/25 44/6 s 78/25 50/10 pc Flurries - Cold-ee—e=er
W \ : Fe é Low:62° FA7°C Istanbul 44/6 37/2 ¢ 43/6 39/3 + Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
High: 80 F/27°C J | 49/8 47/3 43/8 45/7 precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm iienfi@antie
~ Low: 68° F/20° C SGHATeSEN 75/93 58/14 76/24 55/12 / Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary M@eng=nfl
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KEY WEST X @ Kingston 82/27 73/22 sh 84/28 76/24 sh ane
High:77° F/25°C W UNG CATISLAND Lima 85/29 67/19 pc 87/30 67/19 pc 1080s [H0S1) 10s 20s [BUSH 40s
Low: 65°F/18°C High:77° F/25° C London 55/12 43/6 pc 5211 43/6 s
: , Low: 58° F/14°C Madrid 68/20 37/2 s 573 41/5 pc
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@ Manila 93/33 75/23 pc 93/33 73/22 pc
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WMG * . Mexico City 82/27 46/7 s 81/27 42/5 s
_— ~ Monterrey 99/37 66/18 s 76/24 51/10 pc a o 4
in GREAT EXUMA — al SAN SALVADOR Montreal 44/6 10/-12 ¢ 19/-7 9/-12 pc
AW High: 81° F/27° C High: 80° F/27° C Moscow 30/-1 25/-3 sn 30/-1 23/-5 sn
WW, Low: 68° F/20° C Lowe FTC Munich 36/2 32/0 sn 42/5 32/0 c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : Nairobi 88/31 56/13 sh 89/31 56/13 s
highs and tonights's lows. High: 82° F/28°C ie New Delhi 81/27 55/12 s 79/26 55/12 s ;
Low: 63° F/17°C ie . Oslo 28/-2 21/-6 s 25/-3 24/-4 sn Never St our
~ EK _— Paris 48/8 41/5 pe 5412 43/6 s Grin’ > {
Prague 40/4 34/1 sh 42/5 37/2 ¢ = t a x
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 90/32 76/24 pc 87/30 76/24 pc cil = LIME Wi O US .
a crc fame sod 208 pe STN3 AB 8 ; im
Low: 63° FA7°C Rome 55/12 39/3 pe s7/13 41/5 s yy - = .
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 83/28 73/22 sh 82/27 73/22 sh i A to Auto Insur ance,
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 81° F/27°C San Juan 95/35 66/18 s 99/37 70/21 pc - the smart choice 18
Fc FIC FC FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC ru Low: 65° F/18° C San Salvador 91/32 64/17 s 92/33 71/21 pc +. M
Albuquerque 66/18 37/2 s 6246 36/2 s Indianapolis 42/5 22/5 c 38/8 ‘17/8 pc Philadelphia 57/13 38/3 43/6 341 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santiago 90/32 55/12 s 82/27 55/12 pc = anagement.
Anchorage 25/-3 15/-9 s 26/3 17/-8 sf Jacksonville 75/23 52/11 pc 81/27 52/11 pc —_ Phoenix 79/26 55/12 po 84/28 57/13 s ye j Santo Domingo 83/28 67/19 sh 83/28 68/20 sh eople you can trust
Atlanta 68/20 49/9 sh 63/17 34/1 1 — Kansas City 38/3 20/6 c 33/0 17/8 c Pittsburgh = 52/11 28-2 + 42/5 26/3 po RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:84°F/29°c oT oreo ae be .
Atlantic City 50/10 38/3 + 45/77 31/0 pc Las Vegas 71/21 46/7 po 73/22 49/9 pc Portland, OR 49/9 35/1 po 49/9 40/4 + High: 81° F/27°C Low: 66° F/19°C Sokal aa i pe ae me pe ~ aa
Baltimore 5814 42/5 + 44/6 34/1 Little Rock 5613 36/2 Fr 47/8 28/-2 Raleigh-Durham 68/20 48/8 sh 54/12 36/2 1 Low:61°F/16°C at % a oa eae ie sa ETT z Sa
Boston 5110 37/2 + 44/6 29/-1 pe Los Angeles 68/20 52/11 pc 72/22 54/12 pe __ St. Louis 42/5 27/-2 c 34/1 22/-5 sn ° Wy a ae "Em ee =a eRe
Buffalo 44/6 17/-8 + 29/-1 18/-7 pce _ Louisville B1M0 32/0 + 42/5 24/-4 po SaltLake City 42 26/-3 pce 48/8 30/-1_ pe GREAT INAGUA wr Te 467 98/3 1 BOAL 97/9 1 INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Charleston, SC 70/21 5442 pe 71/21 52/41 sh Memphis 58/14 39/3 4+ 42/5 29/-1 5 San Antonio 86/30 5412 pe 64/17 38/3 pc High: 83° F/28° C anaes 44/6 19/-7 1 98/-2 16/-8 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMETED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 32/0 16/-8 pc 33/0 16/-8 ¢ Miami 78/25 638/17 $s 81/27 65/18 s San Diego 67/19 52/11 pe 67/19 55/12 pc anne 3 va: :
: . Low: 69° F/21°C Trinidad 81/27 72/22 t 80/26 72/22 sh =
Cleveland 48/8 20/-6 1 33/0 19/-7 pc Minneapolis 14/-10 3/16 ¢ 20/-6 7/-13 pe San Francisco 61/16 47/8 pe 63/17 53/11 r Taran 46/7 30/-1 pc 43/6 36/2 + j wvidene d leuth
Dallas 63/17 35/1 r 58/14 31/0 s Nashville 58/14 36/2 r 41/5 25/-3 + Seattle 47/8 3541 pe 48/8 40/4 + oy Visnaa 43/6 36/2 c 467 44/5 ' Hew Pr Gron Paton Shawn Eleuthera Frome
Denver 41/5 16/-8 1 50/10 25/-3 s New Orleans 78/25 61/16 pe 69/20 39/ t Tallahassee 73/22 54/12 pe 76/24 49/9 c lie Warsaw 37/2 27/-2 sn 34/1 30/-1 ‘ltd , a ' i.
Detroit 38/3 18/-7 pc 35/1 17/-8 pe New York 50/10 39/3 r 42/5 31/0 pc Tampa 78/25 60/15 s 78/25 62/16 $s » Winnipeg IAB -8/-22 po 14-10 -A/-20 po Tea 0 Wee 280 350-500 Tek (0) 347 ‘4 Tek (242) 380-284) Be: (240) 33 Hn
Honolulu 79/26 66/18 pc 78/25 6719 sh OklahomaCity 52/11 30/-1 po 46/7 24/-4 s Tucson 79/26 47/8 s 81/27 52A1 s Vw — : . ; : . a
Houston 82/27 5613 po 67/19 43/6 c¢ Orlando 79/26 5613 s 82/27 58/14 s Washington,DC 61/16 39/3 r 43/6 31/0 + Te een ae Me i ee ee



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