Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Pim blowin’ it

75F
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= CLOUDS

Volume: 105 No.77

FEATURES

Te TATE LL

SEE ‘WOMAN’ SECTION

Detentic |
Tunger strike

Detainee who was
allegedly beaten to
stage protest with

other Cubans

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

A DETAINEE housed at
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre, who was allegedly
beaten so badly by officers
that he lost fingernails, is start-
ing a hunger strike tomorrow
with other Cubans at the facil-
ity.

Members of a Cuban Amer-
ican human rights organisa-
tion are expected to be in Nas-
sau today to check on the
health of the men detained at
the facility.

The “peaceful” protesters
are also appealing for “Chris-
tian-minded” Bahamians to
donate diapers and baby for-
mula along with food to assist
with the maintenance of those
housed at the centre.

“The food we get isn’t
enough. People try bartering
and sometimes they end up
giving sexual favours for food.

During visitation is the only
relief people have because the
ones who have family come
see them have food brought
in. If you complain about the
amount of food you get they
will say: ‘We don’t have
enough supplies for everyone
here. If you don’t like it then
you should go back home’,”
one detainee told The Tri-
bune.

He said that detainees get
a bowl of oatmeal or grits with
tuna for breakfast. Lunch, he
said, is not served every day
and may only consist of a
cheese sandwich. Women with
children, he said, tend to com-
plain the most frequently
about getting more food for
their children.

“Without hesitation I can
say this is a concentration
camp. Any human being upon
walking through the door
would be shocked because

SEE page nine

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Valid only on Tuesdays!

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009
)

eS
a

AND REAL Lh
BAHAMAS BIGGEST



I oar

TMEV (EMMA LOT Cemesy CCU



FIREFIGHTERS SURVEY the damage after a blaze at Nassau Village
last night. The fire destroyed an efficiency apartment above Andrea’s
Hardware store on Taylor Street before being extinguished. There were
no reports of any casualties.

Claim that a willing officer ‘could earn up to
$6,000’ for aiding a Detention Centre escape

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr ‘Force officer could possibly

be behind it and when docu-





PRICE = 75¢



Teen charged

with murder

17-year-old in court
over stabbing death

A 17-YEAR-OLD boy
accused of the brutal stab-
bing death of a 33-year-old
Haitian man was arraigned
in the Juvenile Court yes-
terday.

Police have charged the
juvenile in the February 18 |
stabbing death of Edvard |
Ficien of Charles Vincent
Street. Ficien was stabbed
four times outside the Hap-
py Hour Bar on Wulff
Road and died clutching a
fistful of cash, according to
police.

Around 9.30pm Wednes-
day, police were alerted by a
caller that a man was lying
on the ground near the bar.
When officers arrived, they
found the victim's body
between a fence and the
building.

He was dressed in blue
jeans, a red shirt, blue jacket,
with black and white tennis
shoes. It is believed that
Ficien was killed while he
was being robbed. His mur-
der marked the twelfth for
the year.

The 17-year-old boy of : : :

Claridge Road was escort- Me al Mei haetd is escorted
ed by police to Juvenile y Ue
Court 2 around noon yes-
terday with a light green comforter over his head to conceal his
identity. The 17-year-old, who was arraigned before the Juve-
nile Panel, was not required to plead to the murder charge.

He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case was
adjourned to April 21.

Christie: All PLP posts will
be challenged at convention

ff

Tim Clarke/Tribun

m@ By PAUL G spread yesterday
TURNQUEST that Mr Christie
Tribune Staff could be trying to
Reporter block individuals
pturnquest@ from making a push

tribunemedia.net at the convention,
ne the former PM said
that these allega-
tions are a complete
“fabrication.”

“As a matter of
course, all offices
are vacated and
must be filled by the Con-

FORMER Prime
Minister Perry
Christie stressed to
his party supporters
yesterday that all
posts within the
PLP will and can be chal-



Perry Christie

Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

AIDING in escapes from
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre could earn a will-
ing Defence Force or Immi-
gration officer between $4,000
to $6,000, a detainee told The
Tribune yesterday.

He claimed that whenever
there is a case of “someone
jumping the fence” a Defence

mentation is “miraculously”
provided for inmates, an
immigration officer could pos-
sibly be complicit in a fraud.

He claimed that there was
an instance of a Haitian man
who paid $5,000 to an immi-
gration officer and “became a
Bahamian national over
night.”

SEE page nine

lenged at the National Con-
vention in October or
November of this year.
With full faith that he will
be returned as leader of the
PLP, Mr Christie said he
hopes and expects that other
persons who feel that they
have a contribution to make
will come forward and make
themselves known.
However, as rumours

Then you need the Fidelity DebtSAVER



NASSAU AND BAHAME:

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

SEE page nine












DUE TO PRESS TIME con-
straints, we are unable to bring
readers the final score from
the Hugh Campbell Champi-
onship game. Tomorrow’s Tfi-
bune, however, will feature
substantial coverage of the
highlights from the basketball
tournament.



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

CHURCH LAUNCHES THIRD HOUSING AREA IN SOUTHWEST NEW PROVIDENCE

MOUNT TABOR

UST one year after

Mount Tabor Full

Gospel Baptist

Church opened its

second subdivision, the church

yesterday officially launched

a third housing area — Mount

Tabor Gardens in southwest
New Providence.

The new subdivision, locat-

ed off Carmichael Road,

local economy, but to help
Mount Taborites in particu-
lar, and Bahamians in general
become home owners and put
scores of unemployed resi-
dents back to work,” the
church said in a statement.
Construction in Mount
Tabor Gardens has already
begun and senior pastor Bish-
op Neil Ellis said: “Housing
our people has become a part

GARDENS



of who we are.

“Tt has always been an inte-
gral part of the social agenda
of our church.

“T believe the lack of hous-
ing is still one of the greatest

offers “middle-class” housing
to Bahamians.

' ; Se, ) ee ree aa “This latest project is the

Bs a ee = | Cithird in a series of initiatives

NEW subdivision offers “middle class” housing. designed to not only fuel the

social ills facing our country.” Mount Tabor Gardens. Gov-
A brief ceremony was held — ernor-General Arthur Hanna
yesterday at the opening was the keynote speaker.



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BISHOP Neil C Ellis officially
opens the new Mount Tabor
Gardens yesterday.

GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur Hanna and Bishop Neil C Ellis take a tour of

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farind



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 3



© In brief

Man, 44,
accused of
having Sex
with girl, 12

A 44-year-old man
accused of having inter-
course with a 12-year-old girl
was arraigned in a Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Delbert Roberts of Amos
Ferguson Street is accused of
having unlawful intercourse
with the 12-year-old girl in
December 2008.

Roberts, who appeared
before Magistrate Renee
McKay in Court 6, Parlia-
ment Street, was not
required to enter a plea to
the charge.

He was granted bail in the
sum of $10,000.

The case has been
adjourned to April 28.

Fox Hill man,
22, facing
rape charge
Is arraigned
in court

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 22-year-old Fox Hill
man accused of raping a
woman after he allegedly
forced his way inside her
home in eastern New Provi-
dence last Friday was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Sheehan Comarcho, 22, of
Revees Street was arraigned
before Magistrate Guillime-
na Archer in Court 10, Nas-
sau Street yesterday, charged
with two counts of armed
robbery, two counts of
receiving, burglary, rape and
assault.

It is alleged that between
12.05am and 1.30am on Fri-
day, February 20, the
accused broke into the home
of a 35-year-old woman and
raped her.

Phone

It is further alleged that
while armed with a knife, the
accused robbed the victim of
$1,000 cash, a green 1997
Nissan Sentra valued at
$5,000 and a black Sony
Ericsson cellular phone val-
ued at $60.

Comarcho was also
charged with receiving the
cash, car and cellular phone.

It is also alleged that on
the same day, while armed
with a knife, the accused
robbed another woman of a
$300 gold chain.

He is also accused of
receiving the chain and
assaulting the woman.

Comarcho was not
required to plead to the
charges.



REPLACEMENT judges will
soon be filling the vacancies on
the Court of Appeal bench,
Attorney General Michael Bar-
nett said yesterday.

He declined to say exactly
when the judges will be taking
up their posts, but asserted that
contrary to recent reports, two
judges will not be assuming
posts in the Supreme Court in
March.

Neither confirming nor deny-
ing reports that judges will be
arriving from various parts of
the West Indies next month, Mr
Barnett would only say that gov-
ernment has made no secret of
its intention to have a full com-
plement of judges, regardless of
nationality.

"Obviously we have to fill
those posts — we've said before
we're not limiting our choices.



LOCAL NEWS

Replacement judges will soon be filling
vacancies on Court of Appeal bench - AG

Michael Barnett

There are positions in the Court
of Appeal to be filled and we
are looking for judges to fill
those posts," Mr Barnett said

during a brief interview yester-
day. He added that contrary to
reports, “There are no vacan-
cies in the Supreme Court.”
Last October Justice Milton
Ganpatsingh retired from the
Court of Appeal. Justice
Emmanuel Osadebay is also get-
ting ready to retire this year.

Sitting

While speaking at a special
sitting of the Court of Appeal
to mark the opening of the legal
year last month, Mr Barnett said
the choice for these essential
positions must not be limited by
geography.

"It is imperative that we
secure the services of the per-
sons with the necessary schol-

arship and judicial temperament
to serve in this high office.

BUSINESSMAN IN NeW YORK PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL

David

Cal yall
RECS ABET!
hospital

treatment

in US

BUSINESSMAN David
Kelly is still undergoing treat-
ment at the New York Pres-
byterian Hospital in New
York.

According to a source close
to the family, Mr Kelly's con-
dition has not changed since
last Friday.

His family is still in New
York with him.

Mr Kelly, proprietor of Kel-
ly’s Home Centre, was taken
seriously ill while in New
York.

With his wife Nancy and
several members of Kelly’s
Home Centre, he had flown
to New York on the staff's
annual purchasing trip.

However, at the beginning

»
US au .

Tike Rahamers
Agrivalteral, Marine Reseurces
dod Agrihodines Fape

Pobruary 26th Tah, 200

DAVID KELLY and his wife, Nancy, pictured in a file photo.

of last week, Mr Kelly devel-
oped chest pains and went to
the New York Presbyterian
Hospital for a check-up.

Mr Kelly, who has a heart
condition, underwent a proce-
dure at the hospital last
Wednesday.



His condition was being
closely monitored after com-
plications developed.

His three sons, Andrew,
Gregory and Scot, and his two
daughters-in-law, Candy and
Shelly, flew to New York to
be with him.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Plbe oto Ones OalO Nal
Barter eect ere nee sncee P4

P12,13,14,15

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION

Business

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



"The panel from which this
selection must be made cannot
be limited by nationality or
geography. These efforts also
force us to address the terms
and conditions under which jus-
tices serve. In this regard, a new
commission under the Judges
Remuneration and Pension Act
may have to be appointed this
year, earlier than the three years
since the last commission, to
make further recommendations
to the terms and conditions
under which justices of both the
Court of Appeal and the lower
courts serve.

"We are all committed to
doing all we can to strengthen-
ing the administration of justice
in our country,” he said.

Court of Appeal president
Dame Joan Sawyer, Justice
Osadebay, Justice Hartman

Longley and Justice Christopher
Blackman are the only judges
currently on the bench of the
Appellate court.

According to Article 102 of
the Constitution, a justice of
appeal is permitted to hold
office until the age of 68. The
Constitution also allows for the
governor general, after consult-
ing with the prime minister, to
allow a justice to sit until the
age of 70.

The Constitution also says a
judge may continue to serve
beyond the age of 68, as may be
necessary to enable him to deliv-
er judgment or fulfil any other
duty in relation to proceedings
that were commenced in his
court before he attained that
age.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Obama faces split opinion on Iraq future

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack
Obama faces split opinions within the military
on whether to make the speedy withdrawal from
Iraq he championed as a candidate.

Obama's top generals in Baghdad are pressing
for an elongated timetable. Some influential senior
advisers inside the Pentagon are more amenable
to a quicker pullout. Obama has yet to decide the
matter. But his recent announcement that he is
sending thousands more combat troops to
Afghanistan implies a drawdown of at least two
brigades from Iraq by summer.

That does not answer the question whether
Obama will stick to his stated goal of a 16-month
pullout or opt for a slower, less risky approach.

Gen. Ray Odierno, the top American com-
mander in Baghdad, favours a longer timetable for
leaving Iraq. He sees 2009 as a pivotal year, with
parliamentary elections set to be held in Decem-
ber; he doesn't want to lose more than two of the
14 combat brigades that are now in Iraq before the
end of the year. And he believes the U.S. military
will need to remain engaged in Iraq, to some
degree, for years to come.

Odierno's boss at U.S. Central Command,
Gen. David Petraeus, leans toward Odierno's
view. Gen. David McKiernan, the top U.S. com-
mander in Afghanistan, has steered clear of the
debate over withdrawing from Iraq. But he sees
his battlefield as an increasingly urgent priority,
not just for additional combat troops but also for
Iraq-focused surveillance aircraft and more civil-
ian support. There are now about 146,000 USS.
troops in Iraq, compared with 38,000 in
Afghanistan. Obama has directed 17,000 more to
head to Afghanistan, including Marines and sol-
diers who had been in line for Iraq duty.

At the Pentagon, a more mixed view prevails.

The uniformed service chiefs see Iraq as a strain
on their troops and, more broadly, a drain on
their resources. The Marines, in particular, are
in the tough position of having a foothold in Iraq
and Afghanistan. As a relatively small service,
they would prefer to concentrate more fully on
Afghanistan, if only they could get out of Iraq.

Neither Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, nor Defence Secretary
Robert Gates has said publicly whether he sup-
ports a 16-month withdrawal timeline. But they
have an obligation to consider the full spectrum of
threats and potential threats to U.S. national secu-
rity. "There's a very clear understanding of what
is at stake here," Mullen said Feb. 10. "And it's
very natural for Gen. Odierno to want to go slow-
er and to hang onto capability as long as possible,”
he added. "That's not unusual. It's very natural for
Gen. McKiernan to say, 'I need more.’ And so
that's the tension. We don't have an infinite pot
(of resources and deployable forces). We have
to make hard decisions about where to accept
risk."

In internal discussions, the emphasis appears to
be on getting out responsibly rather than quickly,
several officials said, speaking on condition of
anonymity because no decisions have been made.

Obama must weigh an array of hard-to-figure
trade-offs in security and politics. And he must
















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reconcile his conviction that the combat phase of
US. involvement in Iraq must end with his com-
manders' concern in Baghdad that hard-fought
gains could be squandered.

It boils down to this: How much more effort is
the Iraq war worth? What is the risk of leaving too
soon? Is the 16-month timetable too short, given
the uncertain state of stability and political rec-
onciliation in Iraq and the potential cost of seeing
the country slide back into widespread sectarian
war? And is anything substantially beyond 16
months too long, given the call for still more
troops in Afghanistan, where Obama himself has
said the battle against extremists is going in the
wrong direction?

Obama is still considering his options, which
officials say includes a less hurried, 23-month
withdrawal. The deadline he inherited from the
Bush administration is Dec. 31, 2011, the date set
in a security agreement with Baghdad that says all
US. troops, not just combat forces, must be gone
by then. One clue to some of the thinking inside
the White House might lie with the views of Oba-
ma's national security adviser, retired Marine
Gen. James Jones. Jones co-chaired a study pub-
lished in January 2008 on the way ahead in
Afghanistan. The group endorsed the idea of pro-
viding more military support for Afghanistan,
including resources that become available as com-
bat forces are withdrawn from Iraq.

The president has an additional factor to weigh:
the political cost of backing off the 16-month pull-
out timetable that was a prominent feature of his
campaign. Although he has said he thinks 16
months is a reasonable timetable, he also has
assured military leaders that he will consider their
advice. Notably absent, at least so far, is even a
whiff of public pressure from fellow Democrats to
stick to a 16-month timeline. That suggests Oba-
ma's party might be satisfied so long as he makes
early and clear steps in the direction of ending
U.S. combat involvement in Iraq, even if on a
somewhat longer timeline. Obama campaigned
for the White House on a promise that he would
end the war and get U.S. commanders moving
immediately on a transition to Iraqi control of
their own security. He said military experts believe
combat troops can be pulled out safely at a rate of
one to two brigades a month, meaning all 14 com-
bat brigades there now could be gone within 16
months, which equates to mid-2010.

Peter Mansoor, a retired Army colonel who
was the executive officer for Petraeus when the
general was in Baghdad overseeing the "surge" of
US. forces in 2007-08, said he thinks it likely that
Obama will pull at least four combat brigades
out of Iraq by the end of this year. But he hopes
the president does not insist on getting all 14
brigades out within 16 months.

"If the president orders it, the military can do
it, but whether it's advisable or not is a different
story," he said in a telephone interview. "Quite
frankly, I don't think it is, given the risk you
would incur to potentially upsetting the political
situation" inside Iraq.

(This article was written by Robert Burns of the
Associated Press).



Barack
Obama and
skin colour

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It is terribly exciting to be
alive in these history making
days! Who woulda ever tink
we woulda see a conchyjoe
man in da White House? Well
muddos! Chile, try let ma say
sump-um. Thank you for a bit
of very valuable space.

First of all, congratulations
to Barak Obama for accom-
plishing that which is only pos-
sible in a great nation like
America — being the first non-
white man elected to the high-
est office in a land of a major-
ity of whites. Now that is
something!

As for Michelle Obama
finally being proud to be an
American, I don’t think we
should hold that against her.

Any of us are prone to get-
ting caught up in the excite-
ment of a given event, and this
event pretty much tops the list
at the moment.

I did not support Barak
Obama’s bid for the White
House because I am a conser-
vative, and having only his
record to go on, I felt he was
too liberal.

It seems though that since
his election he has moved
somewhat to the centre, in
speech anyway. Time, of
course, will tell whether or not
he was too liberal.

I heard it said somewhere,
or I read somewhere, that the
tremendous support by a
majority of Bahamians for
Barak Obama was because of
his stand on the issues, and
not because of his skin colour.

The only response I have
for that is to say that some
people will make up all sorts
of excuses for their behaviour
rather than simply being hon-
est.

Do you think Bahamians,
or Americans for that matter,
would have supported a white
man as vigorously, whose
stand on the issues was the
very same as Barak Obama’s?
Be honest now, keep it real! I
might just be a racist, though.

There has been much ado
about Martin Luther King Jr’s
dream having been realized
as a result of Barak Obama’s
election. There is one small
problem with that theory.

Dr King’s dream was that
he saw a time when a man
would be judged by the con-
tent of his character rather
than by the colour of his skin.

Barak Obama is President
of the United States today
because of one overwhelming

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fact, and that is the colour of
his skin. There are other cred-
ible reasons too that he is
President, of course, but if he
had not been a man of mixed
race, (he is not black) I con-
tend that he would not be
President today. Again, I
might just be a disgruntled
racist.

I tell you, if when I get to
Heaven and it turns out that
God is a black man, I’m still
going to fall on my face and
kiss his feet. If, on the other
hand Barak Obama would
have been a white man, there
would not be the worshipping
of him that we see. For
instance:

There are Hollywood actors
who have promised to be
kinder, love more, smile more,
etc., because of Barak Oba-
ma! Wow! Could somebody
please explain why so many
white Americans suffer froma
condition known as “White
Guilt”? Is this condition in the
medical journals?

There are gangsta rap
singers who have promised to
tone down the violent lyrics
in their music because of
Barak Obama! Not to sound
repetitive, but Wow! Glorify-
ing and/or trying to justify vio-
lence is just wrong no matter if
you come from the hood or
from the Ivy League. Dig?

Tyler Perry, a great (black)
comic and movie actor said
that he never voted before in
any election. What an insult
to the memory of black people
who suffered great humilia-
tion, discomfort and pain to
bring about the change nec-
essary for Barak Obama to
become President, and to give
Tyler Perry the right to vote.

The list goes on and on.

I find it extremely interest-
ing that there are so many
people that would try and con-
vince us that race relations in
the US have gone nowhere in
the last 50 years, but suddenly,
because a non-white man has
become President, all of the
problems of yesterday are
fixed.

That is where I differ from
most other folks. I am not tak-
en in by image or promises. I
need to see results, and when
I do I am more than man
enough to give due where it
is deserved.

Again, let me congratulate
Barak Obama on his victory,
and let me inform the Ameri-
can people that I am praying
for the success of their new
President, in the hopes that
he will bring America — and
by extension, the world — out
of this terrible economic time.
I prayed for their last Presi-
dent too because it was the
right thing to do.

It is necessary for America
to remain the world leader.

At least for us Bahamians it is.
One can only imagine what
could have been accomplished
had these Hollywood types
and their music industry coun-
terparts gotten behind the war
effort on terror. I believe vic-
tory would have long since
been announced. But, like I
always tell my wife, there is
absolutely nothing we can do
about the past. Some people
will never get it.

Let me assure the Ameri-
can people that while the
economy is the greatest prob-
lem facing them at the
moment, terrorism has by no
means become a non-issue.
The terror captains of the East
have boldly informed us that
they are intent upon world
domination, and they have
demonstrated time and again
that they are willing to do any-
thing they deem necessary to
accomplish their goals. And
they are very, very patient.
“Death to the infidels.” And
this is not because W. had the
balls to take the fight to them.

Those same captains of ter-
ror have stated repeatedly that
Israel has no right to exist and
they want to see her wiped off
the face of the earth.

If Barak Obama caves to
the pressures of the rest of the
world and sides with Israel’s
enemies, we won’t have to
worry about America being
the world leader any more. If,
on the other hand, Barak
Obama stands with Israel,
there is hope yet.

Simply being black — or at
least not white — will not be
enough. Actually doing the
very difficult things to effect
positive change will make the
man’s legacy and bring Amer-
ica back from the edge.

Finally, I would like to
thank George W Bush for his
service to his country and to
the world. But for his serious
stance on terrorism, it is very
probable that American blood
would have been spilt on
American soil again by now,
and for no other reason than
being deemed infidels by an
extremely violent and misin-
formed enemy. Also, it is
important to me that Mr Bush
know that I know, that the
war on terror did not alone
bring about this economic cri-
sis, aS a few very clever yet
intellectually dishonest liberals
would have us believe. As for
the rude reception Mr Bush
was given during Obama’s
inauguration, it is apparent to
me that some people have no
respect for protocol at all,
unless it serves their own pur-
poses. It is called a lack of
class.

In order for the truth to set
one free, one must first know
what the truth is.

Unafraid and narrow-mind-
ed as ever.

WILLIAM

(BILLY) ROBERTS
Abaco, Bahamas
February, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



.__- | MAGISTRATE’S COURT
© In brief

Three men arraigned in connection
with a spree of armed robberies

Promotional
push to lure
couples to
Bahamas

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CASH-strapped couples
across the globe who are wor-
ried they might have to put off
their dream wedding are being
invited to get creative and win
a Ministry of Tourism compe-
tition to get married in the
Bahamas for free.

To enter the aptly-titled
“Bahamas Bridal Bail-Out”
competition, couples must tell
the world their love story via a
video or written essay accom-
panied by a photograph which
will be posted on the website
www.bahamasbridalbailout.co
m. The only price to pay:
Once couples post the tale of
their love online, they will
have to open themselves up to
public scrutiny in the form of
an online poll.

The would-be spouses who
place in the top 20 will then be
reviewed by a panel of judges,
who will whittle the group
down to five couples who will
win the grand prize.

As part of their bail-out
package, couples will enjoy a
round-trip airfare for them-
selves and eight others to the
Bahamas; deluxe hotel accom-
modations for four days and
three nights for all 10 people;
the use of a wedding planner,
photographer; flowers, and a
wedding cake, according to
the Ministry of Tourism.

Advertised

The promotional push is
being advertised this week in
such high-profile publications
as The New York Times.

“Tt’s tough times for couples
wanting to get married or
renew their vows. However,
the islands of the Bahamas
doesn’t think a little thing like
money should stand in the
way of your dream wedding
coming true. So we’re here to
help you out with the
Bahamas Bridal Bail-Out con-
test where you can win a
dream destination wedding,
courtesy of the Bahamas Min-
istry of Tourism,” reads the
government-owned
Bahamas.com site.

Possible destinations for the
getaway will include the Peli-
can Bay at Lucaya, Grand
Bahama; the Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort; SuperClub
Breezes or the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort.

Submissions are being
accepted from March 20
through April 24. Public vot-
ing will take place from April
25 to May 17.

Antigua's PM
pledges action
in Stanford case

@ ST. JOHN’S, Antigua

Antigua’s prime minister says
parliament will reconvene to
deal with fallout from allega-
tions of fraud against R. Allen
Stanford, the country’s largest
private employer, according to
the Associated Press.

Prime Minister Baldwin
Spencer told reporters Sunday
night he is concerned about the
potential loss of hundreds of
jobs and that the government
“has decided on a course of
action.” He did not disclose any
details on the plan, however.

A parliamentary session is
scheduled for Thursday.

The twin-island nation of
Antigua and Barbuda dissolved
its parliament ahead of general
elections scheduled for March
12. But the law allows for it to
reconvene in special session to
address matters of urgent
national interest.

Stanford’s businesses employ
hundreds of people in Antigua
and include two restaurants, a
newspaper, cricket grounds and
a development company, and a
three-branch local bank as well
as the headquarters of his off-
shore bank in the island of
about 80,000 people.

The U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission filed a
civil lawsuit last week accusing
Stanford of a “massive” fraud
through Antigua-based Stan-
ford International Bank Ltd.

Stanford, who was served
legal papers by FBI agents last
week and ordered to surrender
his passport, has not been
charged with any crime.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THREE men accused of
committing a spree of armed
robberies this month were
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday afternoon.

John Augustine, 27, and Col-
bert Augustine, 25, both Haitian
nationals of Cambridge Drive,
and Sean Johnson, 26, of East
Street, were arraigned on a long
list of armed robbery charges
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane.

It is alleged that the three
men on February 10, 2009
robbed Donell Cox of $910
cash, the property of Adastra
Gardens.

It is further alleged that the
three men also robbed Ms Cox
of a pair of gold hoop earrings
valued at $173, a pair of gold

slave bands valued at $600 and
$100 cash.

It is alleged that on February
16, 2009 the accused, while
armed with a handgun, robbed
Marcia Newball of her Gucci
neck chain valued at $1,600 and
a silver Wittnauer watch valued
at $550.

It is further alleged that the
three men being concerned
together on Monday, February
16, 2009, robbed Marcella Rus-
sell of $40 cash, three Bahamian
passports valued at $90, a
Motorola cellular telephone val-
ued at $300, a black handbag
valued at $100 and an assort-
ment of bank cards and per-
sonal items belonging to Ms
Russell.

Court dockets also allege that
on the same day the three men
allegedly robbed Ketress
Knowles of a Motorola cellular
telephone valued at $300, an

orange handbag valued at $70, a
black wallet valued at $30, a
brown leather watch valued at
$120 along with two gold wed-
ding bands, together valued at
$2,500.

It is further alleged in the
court dockets that the three
men on February 16, 2009
robbed Kimberly Robins of a
black handbag valued at $150,
along with six cents.

Pre-school

All three men pleaded not
guilty to causing damage in the
amount of $250 to a wooden
door, the property of Little
Voices pre-school.

John Augustine and Colbert
Augustine were also arraigned
together on four separate
counts of armed robbery. It is
alleged that the men on January

19, 2009 robbed Yvania Alfred
of $85,000 in cash, the property
of L&S Convenience Store. It is
also alleged that on the same
day the two men robbed Ms
Alfred of $100 cash and a gray
Motorola cellular telephone val-
ued at $150 as well as a black
pistol grip 12-gauge shotgun val-
ued at $850.

Court dockets also state that
on the same day the men
allegedly robbed David Servin-
cent of $50 cash and a Motoro-
la cellular telephone valued at
$269.

It is also alleged that Shaun
Johnson along with John
Augustine on February 16, 2009
robbed Nicole Johnson of
$2,100, the property of Alpha
Learning Centre. The men were
not required to enter a plea to
the armed robbery charges.

Attorney Mark Rolle, who
represented the three men, told

the court that the accused had
been arrested last week and
claimed that they were subject-
ed to extreme brutality while in
police custody. According to Mr
Rolle, the men had been denied
access to medical treatment. He
told the court that Shaun John-
son had appeared at the Grove
Police Station, but had been
turned away as they had refused
to accept him. According to Mr
Rolle, Johnson said that he felt
as though a bone in his hand
had been broken and that one
of his ribs had been broken as
well. Mr Rolle yesterday
requested that the men be given
medical attention at Her
Majesty’s Prison. Chief Magis-
trate Gomez ordered that the
three men receive medical
attention. The case has been
adjourned to March 10 and
transferred to Court 5, Bank
Lane.



Child rights activist hits out

Public officials accused
of failing to protect
children from predators

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

CHILD rights activist Cleaver Duncombe accused public
officials of failing to properly protect the nation's children from
predators.

His comments came in response to allegations that a female
primary school student, said to be 6-years-old, was sexually
assaulted while on school grounds by a group of older boys
from a separate secondary school. The alleged assailants are
reportedly 7th graders.

Meanwhile Education Minister
Carl Bethel told The Tribune that
education officials are awaiting the
results of a police investigation
before determining whether any
security guard or teacher was in
neglect of their duties during the
alleged attack.

"The system is obviously con-
tributing to much of what is hap-
pening to these children because it
would be incumbent through law
for those who are entrusted with
those mammoth tasks to do what
they are supposed to do to protect
them — beef up security, moving
around, being more vigilant -
because if you know chances are
you are going to jail, then you would
be more vigilant," Mr Duncombe
said.

He argued that school officials
responsible for securing a campus should be held accountable
if it is found that their negligence contributed to an assault.

"What happens is, nobody is accountable, nobody can trace
to see exactly who would have been responsible at that partic-
ular time for the overseeing of the child. Developed countries
have these systems where people are held accountable. What
makes it so difficult for the Bahamas to be accountable?” he
asked.

According to a source close
to the investigation, one of the
alleged assailants was able to
gain access to the campus
because he was related to a stu-
dent there.

O-lamsisiials)



“Parents in this
country should
be horrified
It is claimed that after some-

>
one found out about the attack, because youre
the group of boys — between two Saying tO me now

to four of them — jumped the ’
school's back wall and escaped. you can't even
send your

Update children to

Yesterday Minister Bethe! School anymore.”
said he was awaiting an update
from the school's security team.
He also denied claims that the
fence around the school is insuf-
ficient.

When asked about the status of an internal review into the
matter aimed at discovering if any employee was derelict in their
duties, he replied: "That depends on the police report. Right
now we're waiting on that."

When pressed about whether he intends to punish any school
employee found to have been negligent in the matter, Mr
Bethel said it is unclear at this stage whether or not there was
any negligence.

The alleged incident took place on January 23 at a public pri-
mary school.

The alleged victim was reportedly lured behind a building
shortly after 3pm.

She is said to have been treated in hospital for her injuries,
however her present condition is unknown.

School officials have come under fire for not bringing the mat-
ter to light sooner.

"Parents in this country should be horrified because you're
saying to me now you can't even send your children to school
anymore? I know one thing, if something would have hap-
pened to my 11-year-old who I sent to school, it ain't ga' just be
no accident and we hush it and sweep it under the rug. And look
at the length of time that they took for this to come to the
public forum. It's so irresponsible," Mr Duncombe said.

He also repeated his call for government to implement the
proposed Family and Child Protection Act to allow for harsh-
er penalties for child negligence and other crimes against chil-
dren.

a ee |
Cleaver Duncombe

TOTTI Teta STAT

=

RANDY DEVEAUX, better known as the Downtown Drummer, pictured in his brand
new junkanoo costume with happy tourists.

SOMEWHERE between the blaring of cruise
ship horns the frenetic bustle of Bay Street, some
tourists are lucky enough to encounter the
melody of drums courtesy of Nassau’s very own
Randy Deveaux, better known as The Down-
town Drummer.

Clad in newly-made junkanoo attire, Mr
Deveaux plays his very own mix of junkanoo
beats to the delight of tourists.

He says his aim is to enhance each visitor’s
experience by sharing a little piece of his culture
with them.

“They love the music. Keep them dancing. Let
them know what junkanoo is,” Mr Deveaux said.

He often demonstrates the finer points of var-
ious junknoo dances like the “conch style” and
“mash the roach” and tells whoever is interested



a bit about the history of junkanoo.

Mr Deveaux is passionate about his role as
the unofficial junkanoo ambassador for the
Bahamas. “Its something within me — I love to do
it and am proud to do it. Downtown is the main
attraction and I boost (tourism) up.”

Reminiscing about memorable moments with
visitors quickly puts a smile on his face. He said
he likes “when they smile, taking pictures with
them, letting them try on my hat. When I give
away pieces of costume or show them beats like
‘Goombay’ and ‘Roll beat.’

He believes he has given visitors “‘a lot of joy.”

Mr Deveaux has played the role of the Down-
town Drummer for several years, and plans to
continue as long as tourists continue dancing to
the beat.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A united GB
Port Authority
“is crucial’

@ By SIMON LEWIS

FREEPORT - State Min-
ister for Finance Zhivargo
Laing said yesterday that giv-
en the economic situation fac-
ing Grand Bahama, a united
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty is crucial.

Mr Laing, a featured speak-
er at the 11th annual Grand
Bahama Business Outlook
held at the Our Lucaya
Resort, addressed participants
on the topic: Grand Bahama’s
Economy —- Possibilities
Beyond the Crisis.

“No one can blame the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty for the current economic
woes we are facing,” Mr Laing
said, “however in the best of
times a united, focused, proac-
tive, productive and consider-
ate Port Authority is impor-
tant to the success of this
island. In a crisis such as we
face, such a Port is crucial.

“If we are to promote the
necessary international and
domestic investment needed
to make this island proper
again, the Grand Bahama Port
Authority must come to the
table as a whole entity with
dedicated resolve. In that vein,
its leadership must be more

Minister speaks
out at Business
Outlook event

about the island’s progress
that its own,” he stated.

Mr Laing pointed out that
while the downturn in the
national economy began in
2006 or 2007, Grand Bahama’s
economic misfortunes began
much earlier, and that the
island is “now into its seventh
year of economic recession
and in its fifth year of eco-
nomic crisis.”

He emphasised that the hur-
ricanes of 2004 had a devas-
tating effect on Grand
Bahama’s economy, having
forced the closure of the Roy-
al Oasis and other business,
resulting in hundreds of resi-
dents losing their jobs.

Mr Laing pointed out that
the Bahamian economy can-
not be revived without the
global economy — in particular

the US economy — also return-
ing to good health.

“The reality is that the glob-
al economy is in a tailspin and
no one is certain when this
tailspin will end. Indeed, no
one knows just how severe
this tailspin will be.”

He noted that the industrial
sector of Grand Bahama,
which largely caters to an
international clientele, has not
been badly affected by the
downturn.

Focusing on the economic
possibilities beyond the crisis,
Mr Laing pointed to the
Ross University Freeport
Academic Facility and the
Fenestration Glass Services
Company.

“The fact is that this island
is ideally suited for an offshore
education industry and further

The Bahamas National Trust to
host Proud Paws Potcake Party

ANIMAL lovers are invit-
ed to attend this year’s Proud
Paws Potcake Party which
will be held on Friday, Feb-
ruary 28, from 6pm to mid-
night at the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust’s Retreat on Village
Road.

The annual Potcake Party
brings together supporters

and friends for an evening of |

entertainment, music and
dancing.
There will also be raffle

prizes, a silent auction and a |.

light buffet.
Proud Paws is a registered
non-profit charity which has

as its mission the reduction of |

unwanted dogs and cats by

means of a subsidised spay ©

and neuter project.

To date, the charity has spayed or neutered
5,700 animals, thereby drastically reducing

the stray and roaming dog
and cat populations of New
Providence.

Proud Paws’ education
programme takes the mes-
sage of responsible pet own-
ership and kindness towards
animals to schools through-
out the capital.

Volunteers and their pets
have made presentations to
more than 8,000 school chil-
dren.

Tickets for Friday’s event
are available at Palmdale
Veterinary Clinic, Caves Vil-
lage Clinic or at the door.

The executive of Proud
Paws has assured that the
charity will make every effort
to minimise disturbance to
the surrounding area, and

invites all nearby residents to join the party in
support the cause.



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medium to high technology
manufacturing. It is also high-
ly suited for offshore medical
services and offshore finance,”
he said.

Highlighting other develop-
ments, Mr Laing said: “Even
as we speak, the Grand
Bahama Shipyard has ordered
and secured another dry dock,
making a total of three.

“This means that it now has

Chamber of Commerce
director represents
non-profit organisation
in St Kitts and Nevis

Hank Ferguson, director of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s recently established
Small and Medium Enterprises Support Unit,
represented the non-profit organisation in St
Kitts and Nevis earlier this month.

He was attending the 93rd board of directors
meeting and joint regional chambers and man-
ufacturers meeting of the Caribbean Associa-
tion of Industry and Commerce (CAIC).

Representatives from chambers of commerce
from throughout the English speaking
Caribbean, the Dominican Republic, Guade-
loupe and St Maarten were in attendance.

The meeting focused on issues related to the
global financial crisis and its impact on the

region.

Additional discussions centered on the imple-



the capacity to service even
more ships therefore creating
more business and economic
opportunities.

“As we speak, the $900 mil-
lion acquisition of BORCO
by Vopak has been completed
and the company is undertak-
ing almost a quarter of a bil-
lion dollar upgrade to its new-
ly acquired oil storage facili-
ties. Vopak is a huge company

MINISTER OF STATE
for Finance Zhivargo
Laing addresses the

11th annual Grand
Bahama Business
Qutlook.

and it is only to be seen what
business opportunities will
ultimately emerge from its
investment here in Freeport,”
he said.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing
emphasised that the govern-
ment will continue to shore
up its social safety net in order
to soften, to the extent possi-
ble, the impact of the crisis on
citizens.



HANK FERGUSON, director of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s Small and Medium

Enterprises Support Unit, at right, with the Prime

mentation of the Economic Partnership Agree-

ment (EPA) with Europe, proposed activities
for the CAIC in 2009 and arrangements for
the Summit of the Americas scheduled for next
month in Trinidad and Tobago.

Minister of St Kitts and Nevis Denzil Douglas.

During the course of the meeting, Mr Fer-
guson had the opportunity to meet with Prime
Minister and Minister of Finance of St Kitts and

Nevis, Denzil Douglas.

Guadeloupe marchers
converge on strike talks

@ POINTE-A-PITRE,
Guadeloupe

SHOPS in this French
island’s biggest city opened
Monday for the first time in
more than a month, but then
slammed their doors shut as
thousands of chanting protest-
ers marched to a meeting
aimed at ending a 35-day-old
general strike, according to
Associated Press.

Even as protesters blocked
highways with new barriers,
hopes were high among
islanders that unions, busi-
nesses and French officials will
reach agreement and prevent a
repeat of last week’s riots. The
workers have been striking
since Jan. 20, demanding lower
prices and a euro200 ($250)
monthly raise for those making
euro900 ($1,130) a month.

Also fueling the unrest is
resentment over the control
that descendants of slave hold-
ers hold over much of the
island’s economy. Strikes also
have taken place on the nearby
French island of Martinique.

For a few hours Monday,
Pointe-a-Pitre’s commercial
center returned to normal as
shopowners took advantage of
a lull in the street protests.
Women lined up at a pharma-
cy and the smell of cinnamon



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SEVERAL VEHICLES sit in a blocked highway during riots in Gosier, on
the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe, Friday, Feb. 20, 2009.

and licorice filled an open-air
spice market that normally
caters to cruise ship passen-
gers.

But the city’s stores hastily
closed down as the marchers
approached waving red flags
and pumping their fists. They
chanted “We came to negoti-
ate!” and sang the anthem
“Guadeloupe is ours!” as they
marched to the seaside port
authority building, where talks
are taking place.

“We are afraid for ourselves,
we are afraid for our business-
es and we are afraid for our

customers,” said a visibly ner-
vous shopowner, who asked
not to be named for fear of
reprisal.

Among the marchers was
French leftist leader Olivier
Besancenot, who walked
behind strikers carrying red
flags bearing the image of rev-
olutionary icon Ernesto “Che”
Guevara.

Leaders of the strike-lead-
ing LKP, or Collective Against
Exploitation, told supporters
that no deal had been reached
by mid-afternoon and that
talks were continuing.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 7



Firearms expert: ‘toy’ gun found

next to man shot by the police

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A GUN found next to the
body of a man shot by police
was a “toy”, a firearms expert
told the Coroner’s Court yes-
terday.

However, former sergeant
Charles Bain said that having
been designed as a “replica”, it
would be reasonable for a per-
son to presume the gun was
real if it had been pointed at
them — a statement with which
Magistrate William Campbell
agreed.

Mr Bain was one of several
witnesses employed at the
police forensics laboratory
who testified yesterday at the
inquest into the shooting
death of 22-year-old Lincoln
Forbes.

Magistrate Campbell told
jurors that the aim of having
the various officers testify was
to establish the chain of cus-
tody for evidence collected at

Former sergeant testifies
in Coroner’s Court

the scene.

Last week, 25-year-old con-
vict Trevon Stevens was
accused by counsel for the
police officer involved of
telling the court of a “pack of
lies” when he alleged police
shot his friend Lincoln without
cause and afterwards dragged
his body and placed a gun
next to it.

Stevens said the pair were
followed into Garden Hills by
police in an unmarked vehi-
cle on the night of June 3,
2004. Officers shot at their
Toyota Corolla, shattering the
back windscreen, despite the
fact they had not threatened
the police with any weapon,
he alleged.

Yesterday Detective Cor-
poral Marvin Cargill, attached
to the Crime Scene Investiga-

tion Unit of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, told
the court that he attended the
scene of the shooting at
11.40pm on the night in ques-
tion.

He said he processed the
area, collecting a loaded black
and silver Makaroff pistol and
four unfired 9mm cartridges
from the northern side of a
black Toyota Corolla — the
vehicle which convict Mr
Stevens testified on Thursday
that he and the deceased had
been travelling in on the night
in question.

He also said he found a sil-
ver and black imitation
firearm next to Lincoln
Forbes’ body. DC Cargill said
he submitted the firearms and
ammunition to the police
forensic lab.

Guantanamo detainee freed after four years in prison

m@ LONDON

THE FIRST Guantanamo detainee released
since President Barack Obama took office
returned to Britain on Monday, saying his seven
years of captivity and torture at an alleged CIA
covert site in Morocco went beyond his “darkest
nightmares”, according to Associated Press.

Binyam Mohamed’s allegations — including
repeated beatings and having his genitals sliced by
a scalpel — have sparked lawsuits that could
ensnare the American and British governments in
protracted court battles.

Looking frail from a hunger strike, Mohamed,
who once was accused by U.S. authorities of
being part of a conspiracy to detonate a bomb on
American soil, stepped off a charter plane and
was whisked away by police, border control
agents and immigration officials.

The 30-year-old Ethiopian refugee, who moved
to Britain as a teenager, was freed after four
hours of questioning.

Attorney General Eric Holder, who traveled
Monday to Guantanamo Bay as the Obama
administration weighs what is needed to shut the
facility, thanked Britain for its cooperation in
the case.

“The friendship and assistance of the interna-
tional community is vitally important as we work
to close Guantanamo, and we greatly appreciate
the efforts of the British government to work
with us on the transfer of Binyam Mohamed,” he
said.

Lawyers for Mohamed are seeking secret US.
intelligence and legal documents they say will
prove the Bush administration sent Mohamed to
Morocco, where it knew he would be tortured.
They claim the documents also prove Britain was
complicit in the abuse.

Unlike in the U.S., Britain’s leaders don’t have
a past government to blame — Prime Minister
Gordon Brown’s Labour Party has been in pow-
er for more than a decade.

But the case is also a test for Obama. While he
has promised Guantanamo’s closure and an end
to torture, he has not yet publicly explained how
his government will change the process of extra-
ordinary renditions, which involve sending terror
suspects to foreign countries to be interrogated.

CIA Director Leon Panetta has told Congress
renditions could continue, but that prisoners
won't be handed over to countries where they
are likely to be tortured — which has always
been the stated U.S. policy.

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Washer Super Capacity $663.00
Electric Dryer $600.00
Gas Dryer $747.00
30” Gas Stove $558.00
Microwave Oven
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The officer stated that a
“large” quantity of cash and
a bank book was also found
near the deceased’s body. He
did not mention whether the
money was collected as evi-
dence, like the guns, ammu-
nition, and other items. The
money was not brought to
court as evidence yesterday.

According to the officer, no
one drew his attention to the
fact that the windscreen of the
vehicle driven by Mr Stevens,
and from which Mr Forbes
had run shortly before being
shot dead, had been shattered.

Asked by Magistrate
Cambpell whether he was told
who caused the windscreen to
shatter, he said he was not.

Firearms anaylst Mr Bain
told the court that he tested
all of the weapons from the
scene as well as three police
service revolvers submitted to
him and found them all to be
“functioning satisfactorily”.

He said the “toy” gun found
by investigators near Mr
Forbes’ body was designed
only to detonate “firecrack-
ers”, but he felt anyone could
mistake it for the genuine arti-
cle.

The former officer testified
that, based on his analysis, he
found that five of the bullet
casings found at the scene had
been fired by one police ser-
vice revolver.

It was not revealed which
police officer had been carry-
ing that particular Smith and
Wesson pistol on the night in
question.

Both woman DC Phyllis
Smith and Mr Bain mentioned
during their testimony that
certain other tests — for gunfire
residue on the victim’s cloth-
ing and to determine which
gun had fired the two bullets
collected from his body — had
not been completed yet as
analysts, having begun the
tests only shortly before the
inquest got underway last
Monday, had not had enough
time to do so.



Students visit the
prime minister

BUILDING



— —

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STUDENTS of the Lower Deadman's Cay Primary School called on
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham on Thursday, February 19, 2009 at
the Cabinet Office, Churchill Building.

Quality Auto Sales Ltd

PARTS DEPARTMENT
Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING
FEB 25 thru FEB 28

(Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday)
We will re-open for business as usual on Monday, March 2.
We apologise io our valued customers and regret any
inconvenience this may cause, All other sections of the
AUTO MALL will be open for business as usual

QUALITY :2°

LIMITED

EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 397-1700

O THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

Mail-Out of Cellular Bills Delayed

The Bahamas

Telecommunications

Company Ltd. (BTC} wishes to advise its
valued customers that due fo the
recent fire incident at the JFK head-
quarters, the mall-out of cellular bills for
the month January has been delayed.
BIC apologizes for any inconvenience

caused,

www. bicbahamas.com

BEAT « u 5 s :
5 HK Arta ered ge mes eT] |
Phone:

Per RPC ee ERP





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamas backdrop
for best selling
swimsuit calendar

THE Bahamas has been cho-
sen by the Dallas Cowboys
Cheerleaders Organisation as the
backdrop for the world’s num-
ber one selling swimsuit calen-
dar.

The cheerleaders, who arrived
at Atlantis on Sunday and will
be staying until March 1, will be
photographed for the 2010 cal-
endar at some of the resort prop-
erty’s signature spots, including
Cain at the Cove, Cove Beach,
One & Only Ocean Club, and
Aquaventure.

“This is a big deal for the des-
tination to have the world’s num-
ber one selling calendar being
shot here,” said Kerzner Inter-
national-Bahamas president and
managing director George
Markantonis.

The major marketing cam-
paign is reinforced by the rein-
troduction of American Airlines’
direct flights from Dallas to Nas-
sau two times per week.

The partnership between the
two major brands - Kerzner
International and the Dallas
Cowboys Franchise - provides
the property with access to
approximately 300,000 season

Hey, there SEXY lady,

your celebrating a

Bigaday

Happy Birthday
Kendra



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DALLAS COWBOYS CHEERLEADERS pose for a shot with Cove staff and Kerzner International-Bahamas staff.
Included in the shot are Butlers Wesley Marcel and Derrick Taylor, assistant manager at Atlas Kareem Bethel; Kapil
Sharma, vice-president of operations at the Cove; Anna Wilson, vice-president of Casino Special Projects, and

Ernie Cambridge, vice-president of VIP services.

ticket holders and others that
they can market to and bring
increased business to the
Bahamas and Atlantis, Paradise
Island.

Stadium

Moreover, the Cowboys fran-
chise plans to open its new sta-
dium next season and the capac-
ity crowd will be able to see
video of the cheerleaders on
location in the Bahamas on the
Jumbotrons during the game.

“We'll have a captive audience
to showcase the girls swimming
with the dolphins, dining in our
finest restaurants, partying in our

ultra-chic Aura Nightclub, and
enjoying three of our world-class
beaches,” Mr Markantonis said.

This is the 16th time that the
popular football cheerleaders
have shot their popular swimsuit
calendar on location. The calen-
dar has been a hot commodity
since the late 1970s when it was
first released.

As for the 2010 edition- with
scenes shot mostly at Atlantis,
Paradise Island - it will be
released in August with four dif-
ferent sized calendars for fans to
choose from.

“We’ve travelled everywhere,
but when I saw the waters of the
Bahamas, I just knew we had to
shoot here. The hospitality and



the accessibility of the property
are just as outstanding as the
scenery itself,” said director
of the Dallas Cowboys Cheer-
leaders Organisation Kelli Fin-
glass.

The 26 cheerleaders belong to
a 60-member team that arrived in
the Bahamas on Sunday. They
were given a Bahamian welcome
by Cove staff and later treated to
a welcome reception at Seaglass
hosted by Mr Markantonis.

During the week, the cheer-
leaders will be hosting several
guest activities including a cheer
camp for girls, Aquaventure
Olympics, and a cheer session
for guests on Atlantis’ Royal
Deck.

Debutantes pay
courtesy call
On Ministry

DEBUTANTES FROM public
and private schools in New
Providence paid a courtesy
call on the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture last week.
Permanent Secretary

Archie Nairn is pictured with
the group.

Letisha Henderson/BIS

The public is invited to attend a
NEW PROVIDENCE ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

TOWN MEETING

on Tuesday, February 24th, at 7:00.m.

at Super Club Breezes,

hosted by The Ministry of Works & Transport.

Peer ee ere Rees

Corridor 4

(Bethell Avenue to John F. Kennedy Drive)

Corridor 5

Ome Pe oR (hte) eg

Mr. Francis Clarke, Project E

Speakers will include

ineer in the Ministry of Works

[who will speck on Land Acquisitions)

Mr. Damien Francis,

(who will speak on the History of fhe CNPRIP)

Also in attendance will be

The Hon. Neko Grant, Minister of Works & Transport
The Hon. Tommy Tumaquest, Minister of National Security
The Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health

wv,

MIP for Killarney



WIDER CONSTRUCTION

WW.

La



THE TRIBUNE





FROM page one

what they are confronted
with is stripped barracks with
a bunch of rusty bunk-beds.
People sleep on the floor
under the bunk beds, in the
bathroom. The blankets they
provide have been here for
years and they are filled with
holes. There is no telephone
system, there is no laundry
system or mail system,” he
said.

The women are kept in the
same conditions with their
children.

“The sad thing about it is
they have a little play set out
there for them but that’s all
for show. They never bring
the children out there to play.
What they do is unload bus-
loads of Haitians in there,
sort them out and bring them
into the barracks from
there,” he said.

Overcrowding, a frequent
problem at the centre, was
exacerbated when American
Matthew Todd Davenport
set fire to one of the male
dormitories last December.

However, the detainee said
that the full story of what sur-
rounded the arson has not
been told and the incident
highlighted another serious
problem at the centre, fre-
quent beatings by some offi-
cers.

“He was obviously irra-
tional from the time he was
brought here. At one point
he got up on the roof of the
barracks and started scream-
ing about the conditions at
the centre and told us that
we didn’t have to put up with
this and tried to encourage
us to complain to our
embassies.

“The officers climbed on
top of the roof and beat him
senseless. He fell off the roof
and then they beat him some
more. The next day they put
him in the dorm and that’s
when he set it on fire. They
never said anything about the
vicious beating they gave that
man. I even heard that the
officers at the Carmichael
Road station were talking
about it,” he said.

There was another instance

LOCAL NEWS

Detainee who was
allegedly beaten
to stage protest

with other Cubans

with an inmate known as
Fritz who was told by offi-
cers to close the barracks
door.

“He told them that there
were too many people to
close the door and it was
even hard to breathe. They
came through the gate and
gun-butted him in the face
with a rifle. He had a gash in
his forehead above his eye.
There is another gentleman
by the name of Reginald.
They broke both of his knee
caps and knocked out his
teeth, these are the kinds of
beating that take place here,”
he claimed.

According to the detainee
Reginald was taken to the
police department after the
beating and the following day
he was taken to surgery but
other injuries tend to be
treated at the facility.

He stressed that no-one at
the centre believes that what
happens at the facility is rep-
resentative of all Bahamians,
but said that officials need to
pay more attention to the
way the centre is operated.

Claim that a willing
officer ‘could earn up
to $6,000’ for aiding a

Detention Centre escape

FROM page one

“The guy is not Bahamian. He was in New
York when he was deported from there to
Haiti and from Haiti he came here and was
awaiting deportation. He came up with $5,000
and he became a naturalised citizen.

“They falsified school records to say he
attended school in the Bahamas,” the detainee
alleged. “I don't know what else happened
from that point but that’s where it began,” he

told The Tribune.

In another instance he claimed that five
Chinese nationals were detained at the cen-
tre. He alleged persons paid some officials at
the centre $30,000 for them to be released.

“They put them on an airplane to Cuba so
that they could try and re-enter the Bahamas
from there and then go onto the US. They
stayed in Cuba for a few days and then they
got caught again here in the Bahamas, so essen-
tially they lost their money,” he claimed.

"People pay for those escapes. There are

people who are making a lot of money. Each
escape nets up between $4,000 to $6,000. Peo-

ple are snuck out of the centre in the middle of
the night and taken out of here,” he said.

Another case, he said, involved an alleged
former member of one of the armed gangs
who supported deposed Haitian President Jean
Bertand Aristide.

“When Aristide fell he ran to the US and
pleaded for political asylum. They didn’t want
him there so he came here. He has been locked
in the centre for about three years. He was
ordered (to be) deported by (officials at) Immi-
gration, but he paid $3,000 to an officer here.

"He was one of these old fellows who was
around here for years doing favours for money,
but he was offered a package deal to retire or
else and he retired.

“When he was about to be deported that
immigration officer was the one to take him off
the bus and off the deportation list and refilled
his papers saying he was applying for asylum,”
the detainee alleged.

Perry Christie: All
PLP posts will be

challenged at convention

FROM page one

vention. There has never been
a question about that.

“There is no question, I am
not at the next convention,
vacating, or moving on. And
therefore I will go into the
next convention as leader of
the PLP and most certainly I
will come out as leader. There
is no question about it in my
mind,” he said.

With the current deputy
leader, Cynthia Pratt having
already announced her deci-
sion not to run for the post
again, Mr Christie said it was
incumbent upon him to inform
would-be candidates that they
had best prepare themselves
for this fight, which he expects
would be highly contested.

“But what has to happen
now, is that as the deputy
leader has indicated that she is
going to move on, this is the
right time to do so. It gives the
party all the options. Because
if a person wins and becomes
deputy leader, that person has
the potential to become leader
of the PLP and then the PLP
is in a very good position for
transition.

“That is why it must happen
now. And so if there is a rela-
tively unknown person with
tremendous potential then
that person has to get out and
let people know they exist —
for the party to have maxi-
mum advantage in any such
challenge,” Mr Christie said.

Recently, the PLP has
undergone tremendous pub-

lic scrutiny as scandals contin-
ue to follow the party in
Opposition.

Following their loss at the
polls in 2007, the party has
seen the public resignation of
one of its members, the arrest
and charging before the courts
of a former sitting Senator,
and widespread speculation
that other members could
cross the floor if a change to
the leadership is not secured
before 2012.

Amongst those would-be
contenders for deputy leader
are PLP MP for West End and
Bimini Obie Wilchcombe, MP
for St Thomas More Frank
Smith, MP for Fort Charlotte
Alfred Sears, and the PLP’s
MP for Cat Island and San
Salvador Philip Davis.

Claim forms
reformed

Claims forms for all short
term benefits now have a wn-
formed look and feel, but the
ct 1 ae are far TIKITE thar LAR
metic

Claim forms for Injury,
Funeral, Maternity and Sick-
ness Benefits have heen modified
80 a8 Lo better elicit and capture
the information required to
not only process claims quickly
and accurately, but to be able
10 ContKt clain ails.

The Board's abi ity to con
tact claimants has always been
severely hampered by the ab-
$erice On MOS. persons’ files of
current contacts

Going forward, claimants
will be required to provide up-
to-chate trailing anid teleph one
ireorttiation.

The amended claim forms

will be p aced on the Board's

welwite Lot Gas) BO0eSs,

Visit www:

combined

The Med 2 form (on which a
woman claimed Maternity Benefit
When she stopped work in advance
of her date of confinement} and the
Med 3 form fon which she claimed
the Benefit or the balance of the
Benefit and the Grant after the
birth of the baby), are now com-
bined into one form. Theamended
Med 2 will be available on the
Board's website,

Register baby now

Increasingly, the National In-
suninice number, assigned to a per-
son Uipertl registration with the
National Insurance Board (NIB), is
being used as a national [D num-
ber, Many institutions » from
schools to banks to wility conipa

nies to the Passport Office - are re-

number t ACCESS SEPVIOgs,

Tn response, NIB ts encourag:
ing parents Lo register their babies
ag soon as possible after birth,

The registration process in-
volves the assignment of an NLL.
number that alay's with a Person
i, ir life

To register babies, parents
MSL present LO the Local Office a
birth certificate or Baptismal cer-
tificate and a completed Registra-

tion Form (R.4)

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 9

Short-term claiming now needs
employers’ sign-off

Beginning March 2, 200%, all
claims submitted for short-term
benefits by employed persons
(ie, persons who have hess
TrVLsl be accompanied by an) fe
juoyent Certiitaantion form (Mat 4),
The new Med ¢ form is a single-
sheet addition to the Med 1,
Med 1A and Med 2 forms. It re
quires the employer to certify
that all employee is/was will be
olf from work for the period
stated,

In the past, only attending
pliysicians and claimants were
required to provide information
ont claims for Sickness, Mater-
nity and Injury Benefits. Unfor
tunately, this permitted persons
To receive income-replacement
when they were, in fact, not off
from work ariel Were pel losing
any Income,

To address this and to im-

prove the clams (iniihigement

process, employers are now re
quired to conlirm the period that
an employee is off from work by
means of the new Med 4 form,
Claims for Sickness, Maternits
and Injury Benefits will not be
processed without it.

The processing time for
shortterm benefits is currently
pegged at three working days; the
added requirement of the Med 4
18 Hal itended to slow the prt
oes and is inher ded Te) eTSure that
claimsare only approved for per
sons that qualily.

The new fom will be among
those that each f mplayer Will he
required to have in his work
place, Currently, all places of
business are required to keep an-
hand C10 (monthly contribution
staterient) forms; BOO (nteritn
Report of Accident) forms; and
B44 (Employer's Report on Ac-
cident at Work) forms.

The new Med 4 form will be
placed on the Board's website for

CY ACCESS,

What you should know when claiming
Maternity or Sickness Benefit

You will not be paid for the
first three (wailing) days of your
Sickness Benefit Pernod,

Both Maternity Benefit and
Sickness Benefit are paid as in-
come-replacement when you
have to stay home from work be-
cause you're having or have hac
a baby, or because you are sick,
reapectively. Because the pay-
ments are intended to replace
lost income, you will only be
paid a benefit when you stay
home from work for the penod
stated by your doctor. Please in-
form NIB if you return to work
RO0NEF.

You may now qualify to re-
ceive the Maternity Grant even
if you do not qualify for the Ben-
efit. 50 weeks of contributions,
paidatany time in your work life,
will qualify you tor the Grant. As
of the 2106 amendments to the
National Insurance Act, the con-
tributions paid by your spouse
will also qualify you to receive
the Grant. Your spouse's contri-
butions must be such that they
would ordinanly qualify you to
receive the Benefit

Clams for Sickness Benefit
must be made within six months
of the date you saw the doctor;

Claims for Maternity Benetit
must be made within six months

of the date the Benefit became
payable - (.2., the date of confine.
ment of the date you stopped
work to have the baby, whichever
1s applicable.

Claims for Sickness Benefit
must be made on the Med | form;
Claims for Maternity Benefit
should be made on the Med 2
form. A Med 4 form should be
submitted along with both the
Med | and Med 2 forms,

When collecting a Maternity
or Sickness Benefit cheque, you
should bring along a photo 1.1).
and your National [nsurance card.

When sending a representa-
live To pick up Your cheque, make
sure that he or she brings along
an authorization letter or form,
signed by you; your National In-
stirance card, which must be
signed; anda photo ID of himself!
herself,

If you are not satisfied with
any decision made on your claim,
you have the nght to appeal. Sub-
mit letter or form of appeal within
2] days of the date you were iio
tified of the decision.

We recommend that you sub-
mit all your clams - particularly
subsequent claims for the same
illness - to one local office. This
helps speed up processing time.





PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

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your
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award. If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your story.



Fire in
Nassau
Village

FIREFIGHTERS
examine the dam-
age of last night’s
blaze at Nassau
Village. The fire
destroyed an
efficiency apartment
on Taylor Street.

¢ SEE PAGE ONE

Government Notice

Ministry of The Environment
Department of Environmental Health Services

Schedule of Residential Garbage Collection

The public is hereby notified of the Department of Environmental Health Solid Waste
Collection routes

Nightime collection:

Management Division Household (Residential) Garbage



MONDAY
SOUTH BEACH

TUESDAY
SEVEN HILLS
COWPEN RD,ZION BLVD(JIB)

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY FRIDAY



DANNOTTAGE ESTATES HILLSIDE ESTATES, BERNARD | SOUTH BEACH EAST (AREA BEHIND

RD(INCLUSIVE OF GARDEN POLICE STATION),AREA BOUNDED BY

VIEW ESTATES,) R.E.COOPER PINEWOOD DRIVE ON THE

ESTATES, JANE ST
THATCH PALM ON THE WEST,

BAYGERANIUM AVE ON THE EAST

NORTH,PINECREST DR ON THE SOUTH,

SIR LYNDEN PINDLING
ESTATES

AVOCADO, WALNUT AND PINEWOOD
DRIVE, AREA BOUNDED BY PIGEON
PLUM ON THE WEST, ACACIA ST ON
THE EAST, PINEWOOD DR ON THE
NORTH. BRAZILIA ST SOUTH

KEMP ROAD KEMP ROAD PYFROMS ADDITION MONTAGU HEIGHTS, VILLAGE KEMP ROAD
(EASTERN SIDE) (WESTERN SIDE) RD(EASTERN SIDE)

CULMERSVILLE
ROLLE AVENUE

PALMDALE,
MURPHYVILLE,
MT. ROYAL AVENUE

MT. ROSE AVE, MT ROYAL AVE

COLLINS AVE, HAWKINS HILL, SEARS
ROAD

DOWDESWELL ST,
SHIRLEA



MONASTERY PARK EASTWOOD FOXDALE
VILLAGE ROAD

LITTLE BLAIR

BLAIR EASTES EASTERN RD INCLUDING ALL

SUBDIVISIONS TO FOXHILL RD

GLENISTON GARDENS, SEA BREEZE EAST BAY ST, THE
POND, OKRA HILL
EASTERN ROAD INCLUDING ALL WINTON HEIGHTS

SUBDIVISIONS TO EASTERN PT



COLLEGE GARDEN JOE FARRINGTON RD,

SEABREEZE

LUMUMBA, KOOL ACRES

HORSE SHOE DRIVE
TO THE SEA, HANNA

MARIGOLD FARM RD, ALL SIDE
CORNERS AND SUBDIVISIONS

ROAD
CLARIDGE ROAD MARATHON MARATHON PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE COLONY VILLAGE

SAN SOUCI

AREA BOUNDED BY THATCH
PALM AVENUE ON THE WEST,
WILLOW TREE ON THE EAST ,
JACARANDA ON THE NORTH,
GUINEP ON THE SOUTH

BY EAST ST/JOANS HEIGHT,
WILD GUAVA AVE ON THE
WEST, SAPODILLA BLVD ON
THE NORTH, GUINEP TREE ON
THE SOUTH

ON THE WEST, SAPODILLA BLVD ON
THE NORTH, SAPOTE ST ON THE
SOUTH, BUTTONWOOD ON THE EAST

YAMACRAW SHORE, ST YAMACRAW BEACH
ANDREWS BEACH
TWYNAM HEIGHTS WINTON MEADOWS NASSAU EAST

AREA BOUNDED ON THE EAST | AREA BOUNDED BY WILLOW TREE AVE.

TWYNAM

NASSAU EAST NORTH, EASTERN STAR ESTATES
ESTATES

AREA BOUNDED ON THE WEST BY WISE MEN

BUTTONWOOD,TALBOT AVE, BEDFORD | AVE,JUMBEY ST,

AVE &SIDE CORNERS,SAPODILLA BLVD | LAUREL ST.

AND MAIN ROAD, PINEWOOD MOUNT TABOR DR,
KAPER RD,ASH
LANE,MAHOGHANY ST

AREA BOUNDED BY CLARIDGE | AREA BOUNDED BY PODOLEO | AREA BOUNDED BY , PALM BEACH ST, | ROBINSON RD, EAST ST, WULFF RD ,
ROAD,MINNIE STREET, WULFF | STREETC CHARLES VINCENT EAST ST, WULFF RD AND ROBINSON RD | CORDEAUX AVENUE, BALFOUR
RD, ROBINSON RD ST ROBINSON RD AND WULFF AVENUE



RIDGELAND PARK
EAST, MONTELL
HEGHTS



FOXHILL(BEHIND JUNGLE FOXHILL RD JOHNSON TERRACE JOHNSON ESTATES JOHNSON ESTATES

CLUB) STEP STREET STEP STREET

IMPERIAL PARK PINE YARD ROAD- ALL SIDE SEA BREEZE LANE, FOXHILL ROAD SANDILANDS VILLAGE RD, FOXHILL SANDILANDS

SEABREEZE (WEST OF CANAL) | CORNERS FROM PRINCE CHARLES TO SEA ROAD, MIDWAY VILLAGE-TO
SEABREEZE
BOUNDARY



DAYTIME COLLECTION:

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

MT PLEASANT, GAMBIER
VILLAGE

CHIPPINGHAM BOYD SUBDIVISION GREATER CHIPPINGHAM, OAKES FIELD
FARRINGTON ROAD

LOVE BEACH, SUN FUN,
DELAPORTE

WESTRIDGE WEST VILLA

ROCKCRUSHER

HIGHLAND PARK, THE GROVE

HIGHBURY PARK NASSAU VILLAGE NASSAU VILLAGE NASSAU VILLAGE PERPALL TRACT, SAUNDERS
BEACH

GARDEN HILLS #1& 3 GARDEN HILLS #1 & 3 MALCOLM ROAD WEST SUNSHINE PARK STAPLEDON GARDENS

YELLOW ELDER #1 & 2

GOLDEN GATES # 2 (BEHIND THE
SCHOOL

CARMICHAEL RD FROM FAITH
AVE TO MILLERS HEIGHT, HIGH
TREE

GRANTS TOWN BETWEEN EAST
STREET, MARKET ST, GOAL
ALLEY, TAYLOR ST

STRACHAN SUBDIVISION,
REDLAND ACRES

BAIN TOWN, HOSPITAL LANE,
RUPERT DEAN LANE

COCONUT GROVE-AREA
BOUNDED BY MARKET ST, BLUE
HILL ROAD, BAHAMA AVE AND
WULFF RD GROVE AVENUE
COCONUT GROVE -ROBINSON
RD, BLUE HILL RD, BAHAMA
AVE, EAST STREET,

SOUTH OCEAN

YELLOW ELDER # 2 & 3

GARDENS AVENUE GARDENS
SILVER GATES, EMERALD Ee BLVD
SEER een

GARDENS

FLAMINGO GARDENS FAITH AVENUE, SOUTH BELAIR BELAIR ESTATES
ESTATES
GRANTS TOWN MARKET ST AND | SANDS LANE, STRACHAN’S EAST ST, COLLINS WALL, FRITZ
BLUE HILL ROAD CORNER LANE, WULFF ROAD
SUMMER ROAD, KENNEDY ES ROAD GARDEN (ieee ieee #2
SUBDIVISION
BAIN TOWN- AUGUSTA TO BIG POND, BLACK VILLAGE eee — AGNES, NASSAU ST, eye e-HOSE AGNES, WEST ST , HOSPITAL
NASSAU ST MEETING STREET LANE

COCONUT GROVE-AREA COCONUT GROVE - ANDROS
BOUNDED BY MARKET ST, EAST | AVENUE TO WULFF ROAD
COCONUT GROVE RIDGELAND PARK BLUE HILL ESTATES
HOPE GARDENS

ANDROS AVENUE, BAHAMA AVE
CORAL HARBOUR CORAL LAKES, EAST BACARDI ROAD TO ALL SAINTS
CARMICHAEL, ROLLING HILLS,
BACARDI ROAD

ST VINCENT ROAD, SOUTHERN
HEIGHTS

MILLLERS HEIGHTS, FLAMINGO
GARDENS

GRANTS TOWN-LILLY OF THE
VALLEY TO BROUGHAM ST

REDLAND ACRES, WINDSOR
PLACE

COCONUT GROVE
'T04â„¢" ST

CORAL LAKES



MARSHALL ROAD





FAITH GARDENS, PASTEL FIRETRAIL ROAD

GARDENS

COWPEN ROAD NORTH SIDE OF CARMICHAEL

ROAD

DIGINITY GARDENS, ROCKY PINES MCKINNEY DRIVE, BELLOT BELLOT ROAD, FIRETRAIL TALL PINES, JUBILEE GARDENS
GLADSTONE ROAD ROAD

GOLDEN GATES TO GODET AVE

SUNSET PARK BOIL FISH, FAITH AVENUE HAMSTER AND AVOCADO



NOTE THAT INCLEMENT WEATHER IS LIKELY TO EFFECT COLLECTION SCHEDULE



THE TRIBUNE

m@ By GLADSTONE
THURSTON
Bahamas Information
Services

EXUMA - The govern-
ment’s packing house system

for farmers in Exuma will be
reconstructed, Agriculture
and Marine Resources Min-
ister Larry Cartwright has
announced.

“We are trying all we can
to get that paid for and here



in Exuma out of the current
budget,” he told farmers dur-
ing a workshop on Saturday.
The workshop was held in
conjunction with the Exuma
Garden Club’s first Horticul-
tural Fair at Hooper’s Bay.

CLARABELL MAJOR shares a tes-






2 timony with fellow senior citizens in
< attendance at the Kemp Road Urban
g Renewal-Centre’s post Valentine’s
A,
‘S
=
aay
D
—_

Post-Valentine’s Day
Lerael sleoyemCeymnrostleyn



@ By KATHRYN
CAMPBELL
Bahamas Information
Services

SENIOR citizens in the
Kemp Road community
were treated to a post-
Valentine’s Day luncheon
last week at St James Road
Native Baptist Church.

The seniors were also
entertained with songs,
dances, skits and poetry by
children residing in the
neighborhood. The event
was organized by the Kemp
Road Urban Renewal Cen-
tre.

Kenyatto Johnson, assis-
tant manager of the Centre,
said the organisation aims to
make a positive change in
the community.

“We have been busy
cleaning the neighbourhood,
clearing overgrown proper-
ties and moving derelict
vehicles in. Kemp Road is
on the move and we’re real-
ly trying to brighten the
area.

“We've also been catering
to the seniors and they have
been assisting us with the
young people. They teach
them crafts and help with
the afternoon classes we
offer to the children. One
particular lady is also teach-
ing the children to plait
straw,” he said.

Mr Johnson said since the
Centre opened six years ago
there have been some signif-
icant changes.

“This is the largest
amount of seniors I’ve seen
today since we have been
hosting them to various
activities including outings,
functions. We’ve also seen
the young children interact-
ing with the elderly more.
They have formed relation-
ships since we’ve started this
programme,” he said.

Paulamae Miller, presi-
dent of the Kemp Road
Senior’s Association, has
been active in the communi-
ty visiting the seniors who
reside in the neighbourhood
on a daily basis.

“I go to their homes to see
what their needs or wants
are and then I report my
findings to the Urban
Renewal Centre.

“Instead of them sitting at
home after they retire, we
try to keep them busy.
We’re presently planning
arts and crafts and other
activities for them. We
realise that when they get a
certain age they don’t like to
come out of their homes. It’s
important to keep them
moving and they live a lot
longer. They are inspired to
do things when someone
shows interest in them,” Ms
Miller said.



tT

KENDRA Neen entertains the

guests in attendance at the Kemp Road
Urban Renewal Centre’s Post Valentine’s
Day luncheon for senior citizens in the com-
munity on Friday, February 20 at St James
Native Baptist Church, St James Road.

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

PT ar NYT gt)

Mrs. Noelle Kelly Roberts, 38

of Nassau, The
Bahamas will be held
at Trinity Methodist
Church, Frederick
Street and Trinity Place,
Nassau on Tuesday,
24th February, 2009 at
4:00 p.m.

Rev. Bill Higgs,
President of The
Bahamas Conference of

The Methodist Church and Brother Gregory
Roberts will officiate and interment will follow
in The Eastern Cemetery, Shirley Street, Nassau.

She is predeceased by her father, Noel Sawyer
Roberts; and is survived by her husband, R.
Montague Roberts; her sons, Blake Montague
and Oliver John; her mother, Susan K.Roberts;
her sisters, Clare L. Sands, Lucy K. Ward and
Shevaun F. Davies; her uncle, Richard C.
Roberts; her mother-in-law, Elizabeth Roberts;
her sister-in-law, Celeste Sweeting; her brothers-
in-law, James Sands, Mitchell Davies and Roy
Sweeting; ; nieces and nephews, Kelly, Gary,
Marcus, Liam, Ashton, Mallory, Piers, James,
Annabelle, Lily and Chloe ; and many dear
cousins and wonderful friends.

IN CELEBRATION OF NOELLE'S LOVE OF
LIFE, PLEASE DRESS IN BRIGHT

COLOURS.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the
Cancer Society of The Bahamas, P.O.Box S.S.
6539,Nassau or The Bahamas National Trust,
P.O.Box N.4105, Nassau, in Memory of Mrs.

Noelle Kelly Roberts.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, The Bahamas.



The former packing house
and cornmill were severely
damaged about 18 months
ago when they were flooded
during Tropical Storn Noel.
Farmers complained they
had to send their dried corn
to mills in Long Island to
make grits and other prod-
ucts.

“I was of the opinion and
so was the Director (of Agri-
culture) that the cornmill did
not experience any damage
as a result of the flood,” said
Mr Cartwright. “We found
that impression was incor-
rect. The cornmill did expe-
rience some damage.”

When Bahamas Agricul-
tural and Industrial Corpo-
ration executive chairman
Edison Key and a delegation
visited Exuma two weeks
ago, farmers complained to
them about the state of the
mill.

Cornmill

“They came right back to
Nassau and reported to us
and I was able to get the
Director of Agriculture to
have an investigation put in
place to find out what is
wrong with the cornmill, if it
can be fixed to get it fixed,
and if it can’t be fixed, to
have it replaced.

“There is no reason why 18
months later Exuma doesn’t
have a corn mill. While I
apologise and take responsi-
bility for it, I want to say it
was a terrible breakdown in
communication, and now that
we know what’s going on we
will do our best to try and get
it corrected,” said Mr
Cartwright.

Accompanied by perma-
nent secretary Cresswell
Sturrup, Minister Cartwright
was met in Exuma by admin-
istrator Ivan Ferguson, chief
councilor Teddy Clarke and
superintendent of police
Willard Cunningham, officer

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 11

Exuma farmer’s packing house

system ‘to be reconstructed’

“A
co
a
<=
So
—
n
—
=
=
e
o
<=
So
—
“”
cs
we
S



MAGNOLA ADDERLEY shows off her cakes to Exuma Garden Club

president Douglas Shuttleworth during Saturday’s Horticultural Fair.

in charge for Exuma and
Ragged Island.

The farm exhibits of Leon
Williams and his grandson
Ricardo took top honours at
the fair. Minister Cartwright
told farmers that hotels on
the island provide a con-
sumer base for them.

“There is no reason why
Four Seasons would have to
bring the produce into Exu-
ma that can be produced
right here,” said Mr
Cartwright.

He told farmers that the
government “will never be
able to afford to pay for all of
what you produce” and urged
them to form an association
and link directly with whole-
salers and retailers.

“With the amount of visi-
tors you have here on a daily
basis and with the amount of
hotels you have here,” said
Mr Cartwright, “there is no
reason why any farmer in
Exuma should have to go
looking for a (government)
packing house.

“The packing house is only
going to be there on the side
for items that you really can-
not get a market for in Exu-
ma.”

Farmers meanwhile
pressed Mr Cartwright for
assistance with non-Bahami-

an farm labourers. Following
a meeting with the new min-
ister with responsibility for
immigration (Mr McCart-
ney), he said, an arrangement
had been worked out to
expedite applications for
farm labourers.

When an application is
made to bring in farm labour-
ers, said Mr Cartwright,
Immigration is to notify Agri-
culture of the credentials of
the applicant determined.

Labour

“When you send your
application in let us know so
we can follow up on it for
you because we want farm-
ing to go on in this country,”
he said.

“In order for farming to go
on, we know you need farm
labourers. You cannot culti-
vate a lot of land without
labour.

“There are many farmers
who have been using help
from outside the country and
they need work permits. I
want to encourage you not
to hire persons who do not
have work permits, and per-
sons who have work permits
that are being paid for by
someone else.”

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Sea Bees Winter Invitational:

Swimmers qualify for Carifta



FOUR Carifta qualifying perfor-
mances were turned in at the Sea Bees
Winter Invitational held over the week-
end at the Betty Kelly Kenning Aquat-
ic Center.

Barracuda’s Dustin Tynes won the
boys’ 11-12 400 freestyle in five minutes
and 1.84 seconds with Zach Moses of
Swift coming in second in 5:12.44. They
both went under the qualifying time
of 5:13.49.

Dionisio Carey of the Barracudas
did the Carifta qualifying time in two
events in the boys’ 11-12 division. The
first came in the 100 backstroke in a
winning time of 1:22.27. The qualifying
mark is 1:19.69. The other was in the
100 freestyle in 1:06.54, surpassing the
mark of 1:08.49.

And Bria Deveaux, another Bar-
racuda, clocked 2:43.03 in the girls’ 13-
14 200 individual medley to go under
the qualifying mark of 2:44.29.

e Here’s a look at the first three fin-
ishers in each event at the meet:

Girls 8 & Under

50 breaststroke - Zoe McCarroll,
DSC, 54.58; Taja Scriven, SBSC, 538.92;
Celia Campbell, Un-SB, 59.47.

50 butterfly - Celia Campbell, Un-
SC, 44.92; Zoe McCarroll, DSC, 56.77;
Charlotte Reed, Swift, 59.92.

200 freestyle - Kacey Kemp, SBSC,
3:45.80; Charlotte Reed, Swift, 3:53.10;
Virginia Stamp, Swift, 4:22.60.

50 backstroke - Celia Campbell, Un-
SB, 47.15; Zoe McCarroll, DSC, 56.35;
Taja Scriven, SBSC, 57.68.

50 freestyle - Celia Campbell, UN-
SB, 37.12; Zoe McCarroll, DSC, 43.54;
Taja Scriven, SBSC, 45.15.

200 IM - Alaunte Major, BSC,
4:43.34; Cecily Bowe, BSC, 4:46.29;
Kacey Kemp, Swift, 4:59.11.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 4:09.16.

Girls 9-10

400 freestlye - Tremaine Allen,
SBSC, 5:28.59; Keitra Lloyd, SBSC,
6:11.48; Lauren Knowles, Swift, 7:27.64.

50 breaststroke - Simone Sturrup,
Swift, 44.94; Tremaine Allen, SBSC,
45.21; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 47.36.

50 butterfly - Simone Sturrup, Swift,
37.88; Tremaine Allen, SBSC, 38.32;
Keitra Lloyd, SBSC, 42.82.

200 freestyle - Simone Sturrup, Swift,
2:46.86; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 2:59.55;
Lauren Knowles, Swift, 3:41.89.

50 backstroke - Simone Sturrup,
Swift, 43.26; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 45.88;

Keitra Lloyd, SBSC, 46.77.

50 freestyle - Simone Sturrup, Swift,
32.02; Lauren Knowles, Swift, 45.29;
Danielle Hutchinson, DSC, 46.11.

200 IM - Tremaine Allen, SBSC,
3:02.86; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 3:27.56;
Keitra Lloyd, SBSC, 3:29.62.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:25.23.

Girls 11-12

400 freestyle - Leslie Campbell, SB,
5:22.54; Jacinda Williams, DSC, 5:22.85;
Abigail Lowe, Swift, 5:26.88.

100 breaststroke - Alaena Carey,
SBSC, 1:30.46; Christina-Marie Chea,
BSC, 1:40.15; Janae Davis, SBSC,
1:41.72.

100 butterfly - Janae Davis, SBSC,
1:24.16; Jourdan Bevans, BSC, 1:30.06;
Crystal Rahming, Swift, 1:35.11.

200 freestyle - Crystal Rahming,
Swift, 2:32.27; Abigail Lowe, Swift,
2:33.40; Alaena Carey, SBSC, 2:52.55.

100 backstroke - Sheean Hanlan,
SBSC, 1:22.79; Leslie Campbell, SB,
1:27.88; Alaena Carey, SBSC, 1:L32,39.

100 freestyle - Jacinda Williams,
BSC, 32.78; Sherelle Fernander, BSC,
1:11.16; Sheean Hanlan, SBSC, 1:11.22.

200 IM - Leslie Campbell, Un-SB,
3:03.22; Janae Davis, SBSC, 3:03.84;

TRE TAYLOR gives his
all in the 100m breast-
stroke. He finished first
in that event in the 11-
12 age group...



Alaena Carey, SBSC, 3:08.93.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:12.77;

DSC, 2:25.43.
Girls 13-14
400 freestyle -

Xenia Cox, SBSC, 6:15.24.

100 breastroke - Riquel Rolle, DSC,
1:28.43; Deja Johnson, SBSC, 1:33.77;

Ana-Philece Greene, BSC, 1:34.37.

100 butterfly - Bria Deveaux, BSC,
1:14.12; Ja’Nae Saunders, BSC, 1:16.13;

Lauren Glinton, DSC, 1:17.09.

200 freestyle - Fane Austin, BSC,
2:47.38; Brittney Watson, SBSC,

2:48.54; Zoe Galanis, SBSC, 2:51.13.

100 freestyle - Lauren Glinton, DSC,
1:08.60; Berchadette Moss, DSC,
1:09.86; Ana-Philece Greene, BSC,

1:11.10.

200 IM - Bria Deveaux, BSC,
2:43.03; Riquel Rolle, DSC, 2:50.07;

Zoe Galanis, SBSC, 3:12.17.
200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:21.02.
Girls 15 & Over

100 breaststroke - Shaunte Moss,

Swift, 1:24.63.

100 butterfly - Shaunte Moss, Swift,
1:14.93; Shayla Campbell, BSC, 1:19.05.
100 freestyle - Shaunte Moss, Swift,

Zoe Galanis, SBSC,
5:48.57; Sydnee Kerr, BSC, 6:03.50;

1:07.19; Shayla Campbell, BSC, 1:09.11.

200 IM - Leah Coleby, BSC, 3:17.92;
Shaunte Moss, Swift, 3:23.45.

Boys 8 & Under

50 breaststroke - BJ Murray, SBSC,
1:04.64; Alex King, DSC, 1:17.89.

50 butterfly - Jaivin Burrows, BSC,
1:19.51; Trent Strachan, BSC, 1:20.24.

200 freestyle - Izaak Bastian, BSC,
3:46.19; Alex King, DSC, 5:48.50.

50 backstroke - Jaivan Burrows,
BSC, 1:05.95; Trent Strachan, BSC,
1:11.75; Aaron Turnquest, SBSC,
1:18.22.

50 freestyle - Alex king, DSC, 58.13;
Christopher Neil, BSC, 58.87; Aaron
Turnquest, SBSC, 1:00.21.

200 IM - Paul Bevans, BSC, 4:23.76;
Samuel Gibson, BSC, 4:48.24; Davante
Carey, BSC, 5:00.24.

Boys 9-10

50 breaststroke - Tyrique Cox,
SBSC, 44.94; Malik Hepburn, Un-SC,
45.21; TJ Rolle, SBSC, 47.36.

50 butterfly - Malik Hepburn, Un-
SB, 40.13; Gershwin Greene, BSC,
40.49; TJ Rolle, SBSC, 42.76.

200 freestyle - Clement Bowe, BSC,
2:41.93; Nicholas Rahming, Swift,
3:02.01; Austin Aikman, BSC, 3:08.76.

50 backstroke - Gershwin Greene,
BSC, 42.02; Malik Hepburn, Un-SB,
42.58; Kadyn Coakley, SBSC, 51.38.

50 freestyle - Clement Bowe, BSC,
32.78; TJ Hepburn, SBSC, 35.98; Malik
Hepburn, Un-SB, 38.59.

200 IM - D’Angelo Gibson, DSC,
3:55.95; Ninnya Fernander, BSC,
4:29.95; Llando Chea, SBSC, DQ.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:36.97.

Boys 11-12

400 freestyle - Dustin Tynes, BSC,
5:01.84; Zach Moses, Swift, 5:12.44;
Kohen Kerr, BSC, 5:30.66.

100 breaststroke - Tre Taylor, SBSC,
1:29.77; Brandon Deveaux, BSC,
1:36.70; Ahmad Watson, SBSC,
1:36.71.

100 butterfly - Keith Lloyd, SBSC,
1:22.12; Cedric Bowe, BSC, 1:25.25;
Dylan Cash, SBSC, 42.76.

200 freestyle - Zach Moses, Swift,
2:33.13; Jaevon Munnings, SBSC,
2:38.76; Meshach Roberts, BSC,
2:41.65.

100 backstroke - Dionisio Carey,
BSC, 1:12.27; Dylan Cash, SBSC,
1:22.35; Meshach Roberts, BSC,
1:26.21.

100 freestyle - Dionisio Carey, BSC,

1:06.54; Kohen Kerr, BSC, 1:10.64;
Jaevon Munnings, SBSC, 1:10.72.

200 IM - Zach Moses, Swift, 3:02.16;
Keith Lloyd, SBSC, 3:02.25; Dylan
Cash, SBSC, 3:02.29.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:11.21;
SBSC, 2:31.02.

Boys 13-14

400 freestyle - Camron Bruney, BSC,
4:59.76; Jamarco Armbrister, SBSC,
5:45.13; Martin Dean, BSC, 6:11.32.

100 breaststroke - Anibal Hernandez
Valdes, Un, 1:36.84; Andre Ferguson,
SBSC, 1:37.84; Anthony Walkine, FSC,
1:38.37.

100 butterfly - Peter Farquharson,
YMCA, 1:11.43; Zarian Cleare, DSC,
1:13.43; T’Auren Moss, SBSC, 1:18.54.

200 freestyle - Toby McCarroll,
DSC, 2:23.49; Aaron Chea, BSC,
2:30.86; Anibal Hernandez Valdes,
Un., 2:37.04.

100 backstroke - Laron Morley,
SBSC, 1:13.32; Anibal Hernandez
Valdes, Un., 1:27.90; Peter Farquhar-
son, YMCA, 1:28.52.

100 freestyle - Zarian Cleare, DSC,
1:03.81; Peter Farquharson, YMCA,
1:04.17; Aaron Chea, BSC, 1:07.47.

200 IM - Laron Morley, SBSC,
2:42.61; Jamarco Armbrister, SBSC,
3:14.99; Aravind Govindaraju, BSC,
3:45.32.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:03.27;
DSC, 2:09.31.

Boys 15 & Over

400 freestyle - McGuire Pinder,
SBSC, 5:22.73; Donovan Dean, DSC,
5:28.72; Xavier Williams, BSC, 5:35.94.

100 breaststroke - Michael McIn-
tosh, BSC, 1:11.56; Mark Barrett,
SBSC, 1:30.89; Gabriel Hudson, BSC,
1:33.77.

100 butterfly - Armando Moss,
SBSC, 1:02.50; Denez Moss, SBSC,
1:08.17; Joshua Thompson, DSC,
1:16.52.

200 freestyle - McGuire Pinder,
SBSC, 2:35.38; Mark Barrett, SBSC,
2:46.93; Marlon Johnson, SBSC,
2:55.25.

100 backstroke - Denez Moss, SBSC,
1:18.46.

100 freestyle - Armando Moss,
SBSC, 57.77; Devonn Knowles, BSC,
1:02.09; Pemrae Walker, BSC, 1:02.11.

200 IM - Michael McIntosh, BSC,
2:34.71.

200 freestyle relay
SBSC, D

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TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 13
SPORTS

Twelve judo officials a are E corte

THE Bahamas Judo Federa- i] i z 7 x
tion (BJF) has certified 12 offi- } if

























































cials based on the results of the
Bahamas Junior Open Tourna-
ment and rigorous testing.

Class A referees can call
national tournaments and are
allowed to try for international
certification.

Class B referees can referee
at national tournaments and
class C officials can perform
various functions such as time
keeping and scoring.

"I am pleased with the
results", says D’Arcy Rahming,
president of the BJF.

"In order to grow the sport
we need individuals who are
trained, competent and tested
in actual situations. I am also
pleased to say that we have
another 12 officials and refer-
ees that are in development and
we hope by our next major
event to have them fully certi-
fied."

The classification of the A
and B referees were based on
the recommendations of Julio
Clemente, chief referee for the
Pan American Region who
gave a seminar for referees.

Clemente congratulated the
Bahamas on the efforts for
developing judo and pledged to
assist in any way possible to
bring up the level of referees
and officials in the country.

Class C officials are students
of The College of the Bahamas
who are taking judo credit level
courses

Clemente’s trip was spon-
sored by a $1,500 grant from
the Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion (BOA).

Wellington Miller, president
of the BOA, speaking at the
tournament, highlighted the
importance of sport for nation-
al development and tourism.

Anyone interested in assisting
the Bahamas Judo Federation
can call 364-6773.

Certified Officials Aleman ikese (TOP RIGHT) ~ Wellington Miller,
Bie Pace nen president of the BOA, speaks at the
David Rahming Bahamas Junior Open tourney..
Neville Mickey Munnings Class C

Marcian Tucker (TOP LEFT) - Tournament winners..
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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Rand: Younger coaches not
teaching basketball basics

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE prestigious Hugh Campbell
senior boys basketball title has
switched from New Providence to
Grand Bahama to New Providence
over the past 26 years.

Initially, the tournament was only
contested between the New Provi-
dence schools with the LW Young
Golden Eagles winning the first title.

Back then, LW Young was a high
school, but has since been reduced to
just a junior high, thus eliminating
them from participating in the tour-
nament.

Walter Rand, who holds the dis-
tinction of being the first coach to win
the title, said over the years, the
younger coaches have gotten away
from teaching their players the basics.

“T would like to see more funda-
mentals displayed like it was when the
tournament got started,” Rand reflect-
ed. “Not taking anything away from it
because it’s still a very good tourna-
ment. But I think if the coaches put
more emphasis on developing the fun-
damentals in their players, it could get
even better.”

Looking back at his championship
run, which was sparked by the most
valuable performance from guard
Bernard Storr, Rand said they had
some very good teams from New
Providence to compete against before
the Grand Bahama teams started to
come in the following year.

“Now the Nassau teams have the
exposure that we didn’t get back
then,” Rand said. “What we lacked in
exposure, we made up with the talent
that the players possessed.

“So it helped to make the tourna-

Walter Rand



ment that much better when we won
because the teams that participated
at first from New Providence were all
very talented.”

At the time, Rand said he had a
very disciplined team and that was
one of the things that has propelled
them to become productive citizens
today.

“Tt wasn’t all about winning then,”
he said. “It was about bringing out the
best in the players as individuals. Once
they did that, winning came easy.”

While Storr emerged as the MVP,
Rand had a cast that included Lester
Mortimer, Tony Taylor, Rev Pedro
Basden and James “Brother”
Knowles.

Although he’s still teaching physical
education at AF Adderley, the host
of the tournament, Rand is no longer
roaming the sidelines coaching after
school activities where the govern-

ment school coaches are awarded at
about $1,500 per sport.

But while he’s quite contended with
just being in the class setting, Rand
said he likes what he sees in Nigel
Ingraham, who has turned around the
Magics basketball programme at Gov-
ernment High School.

“When I see him coach, I see
myself,” Rand reflected. “That’s exact-
ly the way I was when I was coach-
ing. I was eager to go out there and get
the best out of my players.”

Rand said he would like to see the
day when more emphasis is placed on
getting the Family Island teams up to
par with New Providence and Grand
Bahama.

“They have a lot of talent, but it
just has to be nurtured,” he insisted. “I
think if we can get them to improve
their level of play, the tournament
would be even better.”

Road Runners’ Carifta qualifying performances

AT least two Carifta qualify-
ing performances were turned
in on Saturday as the Road
Runners Track Club hosted its
annual Dianna Lynn Thomp-
son Track Classic at the Thomas
A Robinson Track and Field
Stadium.

Versatile Byron Ferguson, a
member of the T-Bird Flyers,
threw the under-17 boys javelin
179-feet, 9 -inches or 54.78
metres to surpass the qualify-
ing mark of 49.00 metres.

And Ramond Farrington
from the RC Athletics Track
Club threw the open men’s
javelin 205-10 or 62.73 metres to
go well beyond the qualifying
mark of 59.45.

e Here’s a look at the top
three finishers in the field
events contested at the meet:

Girls Long Jump UNDER 11

Catalyn, Blayre, Sunblazers,
3.43m; Newry, Tanae, Striders
3.18m; Shaw, Danielle, Club
Monica, 2.96m

Girls Long Jump UNDER 13

Dorsett, Taj, Star Trackers,
3.72m; Henderson, Janiece,
Spirit OF Excell 3.64m;
Ferguson, Andira, Striders,
3.60m.

Girls High Jump UNDER 15

Gibson, Danielle, Ambas-
sadors, 1.40m; Thompson, Talia,
Striders J1.40m; Stra-
chan, Andriel, Star Trackers,
1.34m.

Girls High Jump UNDER 17

Butler, Antonique, Road
Runners, 1.34m, 4-04.75.

Girls Long Jump UNDER 17

Deveaux, Deandra, Jumpers
Inc, 4.70m; Hamilton, Cymone,
Star Trackers 4.15m;
Adderley, Alexandr, R. C. Ath-
letics, 3.92m.

Girls Shot Put UNDER 17

Hamilton, Cymone, Star
Trackers, 7.88m, 25-10.25; Tay-
lor, Jewel, C.R.Walker, 7.61m,
24-11.75; Johnson, Stekeia, Nas-
sau Christian, 6.55m 21-06.00.

Girls Discus Throw UNDER
17

Taylor, Jewel, C_.R.Walker,
21.43m, 70-04; Smith, Amanda,
Speed Dynamics, 19.56m, 64-
02; Johnson, Stekeia, Nassau
Christian.

Women High Jump OPEN

Crooks, Tanya, C. I. Gibson,
1.45m, 4-09.00.

Women Triple Jump OPEN

Deveaux, Deandra, Jumpers
Inc, 10.38m; Davis, Rashanda,
College OF The B, 9.78m;
Rolle, Brittny, Road Runners,
9.41m.

Women Shot Put OPEN

Duncanson, Juliann, College
OF The B, 10.80m, 35-05.25;
Dennard, Danielle, College OF
The B, 9.68m, 31-09.25; Fergu-
son, Dekethra Nassau Chris-
tian, 8.12m, 26-07.75.

Women Discus Throw OPEN

Duncanson, Juliann, College
OF The B, 36.46m, 119-07; Sey-
mour, Aboni, TT. Bird Flyers,
26.11m, 85-08; Ferguson,
Dekethra, Nassau Christian,
18.51m, 60-09.

Women Javelin Throw
OPEN

Rose, Venrika, R. C. Athlet-
ics, 29.54m, 96-11.

Boys Long Jump UNDER 11

Rolle, Branson, Road Run-
ners, 3.50m, 11-05.75; Bethel,
Miguel, Road Runners, 3.49m,
11-05.50; Bennett, Cordero,
Striders, 3.37m, 11-00.75.

Boys Long Jump UNDER 13

Fox, Lucius, Club Monica,
436m, 14-03.75; Nottage, Julius,

Striders, 4.22m, 13-10.25; Nixon,
Recarno, Road Runners, 4.19m,
13-09.00.

Boys High Jump UNDER 15

Coakley, Xavier, Road Run-
ners, 1.65m, 5-05.00; Light-
bourn, D'Aund — Star Track-
ers, 1.45m, 4-09.00; Butler,
Anthony, Road Runners,
1.34m, 4-04.75.

Boys High Jump UNDER 17

Wilmott, Jabari, T. Bird Fly-
ers, 1.88m, 6-02.00; Adderley,
Patrizio, C. I. Gibson, 1.73m, 5-
08.00; McDonald, Jerome,
Jumpers Inc, 1.73m, 5-08.00.

Boys Long Jump UNDER 17

Minns, Lathone, Jumpers Inc,
6.00m, 19-08.25; Minns, Lath-
ario Jumpers Inc, 5.71m, 18-
09.00; Wilson, Philip, Striders,
5.60m, 18-04.50.

Boys Shot Put UNDER 17

Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau
Christian, 10.10m, 33-01.75; Wil-
son, Albert Nassau Christ-
ian, 9.09m, 29-10.00; MACK-
EY, Samuel, C.R.Walker,
8.68m, 28-05.75.

Boys Discus Throw UNDER
17

Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau
Christian, 29.74m, 97-07; John-
son, Giovanni, T. Bird Flyers,
24.74m, 81-02; Whymms,
Michael, Nassau Christian,
24.03m 78-10.

Boys Javelin Throw UNDER
17

Ferguson, Bryon, T. Bird Fly-
ers, 54.78m*, 179-09; MACK-
EY, Samuel C.R. Walker,
42.26m, 138-08; Wilmott, Dono-
van, Silver Lightning, 33.29m
109-03.

Men High Jump OPEN

Bullard, Troy, Golden Eagles,
1.98m, 6-06.00; Hall, Peron, T.
Bird Flyers, 1.88m, 6-02.00.

Bahamas Football Association:
AT EY ee

As at February 23, 2009:

Team Name P
Bears FC 10 8
Caledonia FC
Cavalier FC

Sharks FC

Baha Juniors FC
Dynamos FC

FC Nassau

Recent Results

+oewWwwWwonNrts

Sunday, February 22, 2009

1:00 pm - Baha Juniors FC vs FC Nassau 2:2 Referee: J, Edwards

ae

NORPRO wWRoOAD
NOOR NM NOE

Goalscorers: Anson Coakley (FC Nassau) 29th; Andrew Pratt (Baha Juniors FC)31st; Raymorn Sturrup

(Baha Juniors) 70th; Craig Grahma (FC Nassau) 82nd
3:00 pm - Cavalier FC vs Caledonia FC 1:2

Goalscorers: Wagner Macahdo (Caledonia FC) 52nd; Frank Negri (Caledonia FC) 69th; Lance Liston
(Cavalier FC) 75th:

Upcoming Matches

Sunday, March 01, 2009

1:00 pm FC Nassau vs Caledonia FC
3:00 pm Dynamos FC vs Baha Juniors FC

Leading Goalscorers

1. Lesley St. Fleur

2. Marcus Trail

3. Odaine McCallum
4. Duckerno Exlias
5. Andre Carey

6. Ehren Hanna

7. Chedlet Pierre

8. Frank Negri

9. Alex Thompson
10. Dean Farry

Bears FC
Caledonia FC
Cavalier FC
Sharks FC
Bears FC
Dynamos FC
Sharks FC
Caledonia FC
Bears FC
Caledonia FC

a

LRRAoOONN NNO

Referee: D. Ferreira James



Men Triple Jump OPEN

Deveaux, J'Vente, Star
Trackers, 14.60m, 47-11.00;
Minns, Lathone, Jumpers Inc,
14.15m, 46-05.25; Minns, Lath-
ario, Jumpers Inc, 13.98m, 45-
10.50.

Men Shot Put OPEN

Rox, Devon, College OF The
B, 11.50m, 37-08.75, Rolle,
Elvis, C. I. Gibson, 11.12m, 36-
05.75; Scavella, Kennedy, Col-
lege OF The B, 10.02m.

Men Discus Throw OPEN

Saunder, Jevaughn, College
OF The B, 32.00m, 105-00;
McCoy, Rashad College
OF The B, 30.55m, 100-03:
Lightbourne, Benja, College OF
The B 30.18m, 99-00.

Men Javelin Throw OPEN

Farrington, Ramond, R. C.
Athletics, 62.73m*, 205-10; Rox,
Devon, College OF The B,
48.92m, 160-06; Dawkins,
Phillip, College OF The B,
47.25m, 155-00.

Women - UNDER 9 - Team
Rankings - 3 Events Scored

1) STRIDERS 66

2) SUNBLAZERS
22

3) CLUB MONICA

14 4) ROAD RUNNERS
6

5) T. BIRD FLYERS
4 6) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 2

Women - UNDER 11 -
Team Rankings - 4 Events
Scored

1) STRIDERS
80.50 2) SUNBLAZERS
48

3) CLUB MONICA

21 4) ROAD RUNNERS
17.50

5) SILVER LIGHTNING
5 6) ALLIANCE ATH-
LETIC 2

7) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 1

Women - UNDER 13 - Team
Rankings - 5 Events Scored

1) STRIDERS
102.50 2) SPIRIT OF
EXCELLENCE — 21

3) SUNBLAZERS
20.50 4) T. BIRD FLYERS

5) CLUB MONICA
12 6) STAR TRACKERS

7) ROAD RUNNERS
6

Women - UNDER 15 - Team
Rankings - 6 Events Scored

1) STRIDERS 55
2) T. BIRD FLYERS 34

3) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 30 4) CLUB

MONICA 29

5) SUNBLAZERS
28 6) AMBASSADORS
23

7) ROAD RUNNERS
22 8) SPEED DYNAMICS
18

9) STAR TRACKERS
13 10) SILVER LIGHT-
NING 7

11) CENTRAL
ELEUTHERA 6

Women - UNDER 17 - Team
Rankings - 12 Events Scored

1) ROAD RUNNERS

55 2) C. I. GIBSON
37

3) SPEED DYNAMICS
31 4) CLUB MONICA
29

5) C.R.WALKER

27 6) STAR TRACKERS

7) AMBASSADORS
20 7) STRIDERS

7) SILVER LIGHTNING
20 10) KENYAN
KNIGHTS 16

10) T. BIRD FLYERS
16 12) NASSAU CHRIST-
IAN ACADEMY 12

13) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 11 14)
JUMPERS INC 10

15) GOLDEN EAGLES
9 16) R. C. ATHLETICS
6

16) CAVALIERS
6 18) GOVERNMENT
HIGH SCHOOL 3

Women - OPEN - Team
Rankings - 13 Events Scored

1) SPEED DYNAMICS
76 2) CLUB MONICA
75

3) COLLEGE OF THE
BAHAMAS 39.50 4)
STRIDERS 34

5) AMBASSADORS
30 6) C. I. GIBSON
26

7) T. BIRD FLYERS
24 8) ROAD RUNNERS
23

9) NASSAU CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY 12 10)R.C.
ATHLETICS 10

10) JUMPERS INC
10 12) CAVALIERS
9

13) GOLDEN EAGLES
6 14) GOVERNMENT
HIGH SCHOOL = 5

15) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 0.50

Men - UNDER 9 - Team
Rankings - 3 Events Scored

1) SUNBLAZERS
55 2) KENYAN
KNIGHTS 18

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aCe tet ME aed at

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3) STRIDERS 16
4) SPEED DYNAMICS
7

Men - UNDER 11 - Team
Rankings - 4 Events Scored

1) ROAD RUNNERS

64 2) STRIDERS
48

3) SUNBLAZERS
27 4) KENYAN
KNIGHTS 14

5) AMBASSADORS
10 6) JUMPERS INC
2

Men - UNDER 13 - Team
Rankings - 5 Events Scored
1) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-

LENCE 64 2) ROAD
RUNNERS 60
3) STRIDERS 33
4) SUNBLAZERS 23
5) CLUB MONICA

18 6) AMBASSADORS
14

7) KENYAN KNIGHTS
4 7) SPEED DYNAMICS
4

9) JUMPERS INC
2

Men - UNDER 15 - Team
Rankings - 6 Events Scored

1) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 69 2) STAR
TRACKERS 52

3) SILVER LIGHTNING
48 4) ROAD RUNNERS
47

5) STRIDERS 32
6) CLUB MONICA 11

7) AMBASSADORS
10 8) T. BIRD FLYERS
5

9) SUNBLAZERS
1 9) NASSAU CHRIST-
IAN ACADEMY 1

Men - UNDER 17 - Team
Rankings - 13 Events Scored

1) STAR TRACKERS
82 2) T. BIRD FLYERS
53

3) NASSAU CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY 42 4) SIL-
VER LIGHTNING 41

5) C. I. GIBSON 31
6) CLUB MONICA 30

6) ROAD RUNNERS
30 8) GOLDEN EAGLES
29

9) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 26 10)
ALLIANCE ATHLETIC
24

10) JUMPERS INC
24 12) C.R.WALKER
20

13) KENYAN KNIGHTS

18 14) CENTRAL
ELEUTHERA 14
15) STRIDERS 6
16) SUNBLAZERS 5
17) H. O. NASH 4

17) GOVERNMENT HIGH
SCHOOL 4

19) CAVALIERS
1

Men - OPEN - Team Rank-
ings - 14 Events Scored

1) COLLEGE OF THE
BAHAMAS 83 2) T.
BIRD FLYERS 48

3) AMBASSADORS
39 4) GOLDEN EAGLES
31

5) STAR TRACKERS
26 6) ROAD RUNNERS
24

7) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-

LENCE 23 8)
BAHAMAS TIGERS
22

9) KENYAN KNIGHTS
21 10) SPEED DYNAM-
ICS 19

10) JUMPERS INC
19 12) C. I. GIBSON
18

13) C.R.WALKER

17 14) CLUB MONICA

5) R. C. ATHLETICS
10 16) NASSAU CHRIST-
IAN ACADEMY 9

17) SILVER LIGHTNING
3 18) ALLIANCE ATH-
LETIC 2



THE TRIBUNE

Sp

Hield last
man standing
as Johnson,
Knowles are
eliminated
from Cup

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

COACH
Andre Sey-
mour had
anticipated
that the
Bahamas’
three-man
boxing team
would sur-
pass the two
bronze IQR
medals won
at the past
two Independence Cups by
Taureano “Reno” Johnson
and Valentino Knowles.

But so far in the Dominican
Republic, the Bahamas is
now down to just one boxer
after Johnson and Knowles
were eliminated.

Carl Hield is the lone com-
petitor left and he hada
chance to box for the gold
medal last night. Results of
his bout were not available
up to press time last night.
Already assured of a bronze,
Hield was scheduled to fight
in the semifinal of the light
welterweight division against
Jose Abru with a chance to
become the first Bahamian to
advance to the gold medal
round.

Speaking from the Domini-
can Republic as he waited for
Hield to fight yesterday, Sey-
mour said the Bahamian
team performed exceptional-
ly well, but the judges’ deci-
sions obviously didn’t reflect
that.

“The performance wasn’t
bad at all. It’s just that the
judging here is terrible and
all of the countries are com-
plaining,” said Seymour, who
noted that with the exception
of Alvin Sargent, all of the
judges are from the Domini-
can Republic.

“We have the coaches and
delegates from Cuba, the US
Virgin Islands and even
Brazil complaining about the
judging to the director of the
tournament. He’s having a
meeting tonight before the
semifinal to discuss what is
going on.”

On Saturday, Knowles lost
11-7 to Ricardo Garfield from
the Dominican Republic in
the lightweight division and
on Sunday night, Johnson lost
12-7 to Willy Medina from
the Dominican Republic in
the middleweight division.

Hield, however, pulled off a
resounding 12-3 decision over
Henry Lawrence from the US
Virgin Islands to advance to
the semifinal. A win and he
will fight for the gold medal.
If he loses, he will be guar-
anteed the bronze.

The Bahamas already has
two bronze medals from the
past two tournaments. John-
son won the initial one two
years ago and Knowles got
his own last year.

Still peeved with the
results, Seymour reiterated
that “our boys performed
very well.”

“Although Reno lost, he
was the technician in the ring.
The fans from the Domini-
can Republic booed their
own boxer after he was
awarded the decision,” Sey-
mour pointed out. “That’s
just how bad the officiating
is over here.”

It was Johnson’s first bout
since he fell short of winning
a medal at the Beijing
Olympic Games in China in
August.

Brazil, US Virgin Islands,
Ecuador, Cuba and the
Dominican Republic, who
have three teams, are the
countries competing in this



PAGE 15



r

UESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

ts



Sea Bees
Invitational:
Swimmers
qualify for
Carifta...

See page 12

Atkins: ‘I think I'm going
to he better than ‘07’

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

fter going through

what he called a

“learning experi-

ence” last year,
reigning IAAF World Champi-
onships’ silver medallist Der-
rick Atkins said he’s gearing up
for a return to the impressive
form that he had in 2007.

Since October, Atkins has
taken his residence and train-
ing camp from Tallahassee,
Florida, to Kennesaw, Georgia,
just outside of Atlanta, where
he’s now being trained by
Lawrence Seagrave.

“My training has been going
good, slowly but surely as I pre-
pare for the outdoor season,”
said Atkins, who opted not to
compete during the indoor sea-
son.

In preparation for the season
that will culminate at the IAAF
World Championships in
Berlin, Germany, in August,
Atkins is looking at running on
a couple of relay teams in April
before he officially kicks off his
outdoor campaign at the end of
April.

“Tjust want to be back to the
form of ‘07 or better,” he insist-
ed. “T think I’m going to be bet-
ter than ‘07.”

In ‘07, Atkins ran consistent-
ly in the 9.9 seconds barrier,
lowering his Bahamian national
record to a then blistering 9.91
that earned him the silver at the
World Championships in Osa-
ka, Japan behind American
Tyson Gay (9.85) and ahead of
former world record holder
Asafa Powell (9.96).

On the heel of the World
Champs, Atkins went to the
Olympic Games last year in

No Hugh
Campbell
in today

THE TRIBUNE SPORTS sec-
tion’s coverage last night of the
Hugh Campbell Basketball Invi-
tational could not be published
today as the games, which
began around 9pm, were not
finished up to press time Mon-
day night.

See Wednesday’s Sports
special for highlights of the
annual basketball classic...



Py

Beijing, China where he had
a sub-par performance, due to
an injury.

He got to the semifinal of the
100m, clocking 10.13 for sixth
place and he was denied a shot
at making the historic final that
saw Jamaican Usain Bolt blast
his way to 9.69 for the fastest
legal time ever to secure the
first of three gold medals.

Bolt, who went on to record
the rare sprint double with
another world record perfor-
mance in the 200m and was a
member of the Jamaican 4 x
100m relay team, is without a
doubt the man to beat in Berlin.

But Atkins, a cousin of Pow-
ell, said he’s not concerned
about all of the advanced hype
surrounding the Jamaican and
the rest of their sprinting core.

“At the end of the day, it’s
the man who crosses the line
first,” said Atkins, who has a
history of being first having
dominated at Dickinson State
University as a three-time
National Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletics (NAIA)
champion in the century.

Atkins, who celebrated his
25th birthday on January 5, said
his only concern is to get back
on the podium in Berlin.

“Tt was a bad year to choose
to learn,” he pointed out. “But
I wouldn’t change anything
about it. I needed that to get to
where I am right now. I’m just
going to combine it to make it a
great year this year.”

The change in environment
is what Atkins feels he certain-
ly needs.

“Tt’s okay. The weather coop-
erates every now and again, but
as it gets warmer, it should be
better for us to train in,” he
pointed out. “Right now it’s
cold. But we have our days
when it’s cold and its hot.”

Atkins, a former star at CR
Walker, is training with long
jump specialist Dwight Phillips
and Travis Padgett, who com-
peted in the sprints for Clem-
son.

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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS





GLOBAL MANAGING PARTNER John K F Delaney receives a ture from Managing Partner —
Cayman Chris Narborough.














































BAHAMAS and Cayman partners.

Bahamian law firm n celebrates
Cayman Islands expansion

LEADING Bahamian law firm hosted by its Cayman office at one During 2009, Higgs and John-
Higgs and Johnson celebrated its of Grand Cayman’s premier — son’s Cayman office will practice
expansion into the Cayman Islands restaurants on the famous Seven —_ under the name “Higgs and John-
with a client cocktail reception Mile Beach. son - Truman Bodden and Co”
and thereafter will be known as
“Higgs and Johnson”.

Higgs and Johnson in the
Bahamas and the Cayman Islands
— already well-known for providing
legal services to the financial ser-
vices community in particular - will
provide enhanced convenience and
quality of service to clients in both
jurisdictions as well as international
clientele, the law firm said in a
press release.

The client cocktail reception was
well-attended by local clients who
celebrated the merger.

All of the Bahamas-based part-
ners joined their Cayman-based
colleagues in attendance for the
evening festivities.

Introductory remarks were
made by Chris Narborough, Coun-
try Managing Partner - Cayman.
Global Managing Partner,
Bahamas - based John Delaney,

| = spoke on behalf of Higgs and John-
‘a Pao eth — | son and introduced the full part-
r Ce am | nership to guests.

Guest speaker was Charles Clif-
ford, Cayman’s Minister of
Tourism.

He extended congratulatory
remarks on the merger and gave a
warm welcome to the Bahamian
partners. Mr Clifford offered full
support of the Cayman Islands
Government to this pioneering
Caribbean partnership and his
words were well received by all
those present.

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Landscapers
‘cut hack’



m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BAHAMIAN landscapers
yesterday told Tribune Business
they had been adversely affect-
ed by the economic downturn,
with some forced to scramble
to attract new clients and des-
perately hold on to existing ones
who may now be considering
cheaper migrant labour.

Owner of Chelly and Son
Landscaping, Michelle Roberts,
said her company had not

SEE page 6B

THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY,

ine

FEBRUARY 24,





2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Retail owner reduces work
survive week for ‘50-60%’ of staff

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamian retail entre-
preneur yesterday told
Tribune Business that
“about 50-60 per cent”
of staff across his multi-
ple retail formats were working a



ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

* John S George, QBC and Radioshack owner describes current trading

reduced work week in a bid to counter

the economic downturn, as he described
business conditions as “the most chal-
lenging” he had ever experienced.
Andrew Wilson, who owns John S$
George, Quality Business Centre (QBC),
the Radioshack franchise and a host of

Talks ongoing to overcome
Freeport airport obstacle

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Negotiations
are underway between the Min-
istry of Tourism and the Grand
Bahama Airport Company in a
bid to reduce airfare/airline
costs at the facility, with three
carriers willing to add new ser-
vices to Freeport if this hap-
pens.

“We are hoping to have some
resolution to that in the next
few weeks,” Vernice Walkine,
the director-general of tourism,
told Tribune Business at the
Grand Bahama Business Out-
look conference yesterday.

She said the Ministry of
Tourism was talking with three
new carriers who were serious-
ly considering flying into
Freeport if airport taxes and
fees can be reduced.

The Grand Bahama Interna-
tional Airport (GBIA) has the
highest airline turnaround costs
in the region, and one of the
highest seat costs (airfare) for

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



ISLANDS AT OLD PORT BAY

American travellers, despite its
close proximity to the US.

Ms Walkine believes the air-
port must function as a proper
gateway and work in “sync”
with the Ministry of Tourism to
enhance the overall tourism
product and be a catalyst for its
growth on Grand Bahama.

“Through partnership and
collaboration with the airport
operator and the Tourism
Board, we will effect a sched-
ule of incentives by the reduc-
tion or elimination of some of
these taxes and fees, which will
enable us to attract new airlift to
the destination, reduce the turn-
around cost to existing carriers,
and then we will be better posi-
tioned to promote affordable
travel packages to GBIA,” she
said.

“There are three new services
we are looking at which will
benefit from those incentives,
because otherwise the cost
would have been prohibitive for
them to even consider Grand
Bahama.

“But they are very seriously
considering it because were
making it more affordable for
them to come into Grand
Bahama Airport.”

Ms Walkine said the planned
incentives involved a mix of
some items, such as cuts in cus-
toms and immigration overtime
fees, and/or landing fees.

“It varies according to the
carrier, so it is not a one size
fits all necessarily. So those
negotiations are underway right
now, and we want the same
kind of consideration to be giv-
en to existing carriers,” she said.

Ms Walkine said the Ministry
of Tourism’s airfare reduction
strategy will focus on getting
low-cost airfares to Grand
Bahama, making it more com-
petitive with other destinations.

She said that in spite of hav-
ing an even greater proximity
advantage than Nassau, in
almost every US market, Grand

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wherever they could.

fashion retail formats, said his business-
es were “riding out the storm” and look-
ing to cut consumer prices and costs

“The environment remains challeng-
ing,” Mr Wilson told Tribune Business.

board.”

“We’re holding on.

“We’ve seen some substantial [sales]
declines, somewhere in the region of 25-
30 per cent, pretty much across the

Those figures are year-over-year com-

Carnival pushing new port for cruise

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Giora Israel,
vice president of strategic plan-
ning at Carnival Cruise Line,
told the Grand Bahama Busi-
ness Outlook that Nassau is the
number one cruise port in the
world and will be surpassing
Cozumel this year.

He said that of the 1.9 million
passengers Carnival brought to
the Bahamas, 1.1 million called
at Nassau, making it the leading
port in the Bahamas.

Mr Israel said that of the four
ports that Carnival visits in the
Bahamas, only 11 per cent or
270,000 passengers call at
Freeport.

He said Nassau’s port was
ideally located near downtown,
as opposed to the harbour in
Freeport, which is too industri-
al and far from the tourist
attractions.

“A new cruise ship port
needs to be a priority and it is
now the priority of the current
government and current Minis-
ter of Tourism to make that
happen,” Mr Israel said.

“Tt has been difficult to put
Freeport on the map and have
it as appealing. The port is too
industrial and we have a lot of
issues that are here.

Make ita
“3

yh.

i

“There is difficulty to get
good beach options. It is impor-
tant to have a beach, and we
need more attractions. We
hope that private entities will
develop more attractions other
than selling another snorkelling
or glass bottom tour. We need
the development of more things
for those cruise visitors who
come a second and third time.”

Mr Israel reported that 47
per cent of the cruise business
in the Bahamas, in general,
comes from the Carnival Cor-
poration.

Carnival has only two ships
calling at Freeport, and Mr
Israel believes that Grand
Bahama can do much better
with a new cruise ship port.

The Government is in the
process of identifying a suitable
location for a new port — a loca-
tion that works from the land
side and maritime side, he said.

“Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham is in the process of
putting together a group of will-
ing partners...to find and iden-
tify a location.,” Mr Israel said.

Mr Israel said Carnival was
willing to make the necessary
investment, together with three
key entities in Freeport.

“We want to build a new
port, but we need the Freeport
Harbour Company, the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, and

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Government of the Bahamas,”
he said.

“There are a lot of ideas of
different locations for such a
port, but no decision has been
made as far as I know as to
where the port will be.”

Mr Israel said Carnival takes
some 600,000 passengers to
Half Moon Cay, which is sig-
nificantly smaller than
Freeport. He noted that a new
cruise port will allow similar
passenger arrivals for Freeport.

“It is really difficult to add
Freeport to itineraries, but you
are very close and we can bring
so many more people here. We
can bring within a year of open-
ing half a million in Freeport
just by Carnival alone,” he said.

Mr Israel noted that a new
port could cost anywhere from
$15 to $60 million to construct,
depending on the location.

“T have been working on try-
ing to get a new port since 1997
and I have great trust and faith
in the current government,” he
said.

“The unfortunate passing of
Edward St George created a
slow down in what will happen
here in Freeport, but these
issues seems to have been
either resolved or in the process
of being resolved, and that will
be a tremendous help to get this
done.”



A

rere Pension Plan

e Efficient administration

e Competitive fees

conditions as ‘most challenging’ he has ever experienced in retail history
* John S George outlets in Lyford Cay, Independence Drive closes, with
staffing levels now at 45 from 68 as company rationalises locations

paratives for 2009 to date, and provide a
further indication of the impact the eco-
nomic downturn is having on many
Bahamian retailers.

SEE page 4B

Port in 50 per
cent fee slash

GRAND Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) president
Ian Rolle yesterday announced
a50 per cent reduction in retail
business licence fees for Port
licensees, starting on March 1,
2009, for a one-year period.

Mr Rolle told the Grand
Bahama Business Outlook con-
ference that the reduction
would be made available for
one year, until March 2010, for
those GBPA licensees who
paid their fees within three
months of billing.

Mr Rolle also unveiled a
Downtown Turnaround pro-
gramme intended to breathe
new life into Freeport’s down-
town area, which will start on
April 1, 2009, and involve three
phases, including a full scale
clean-up, lighting, landscaping
and benching initiatives.-

The GBPA is also looking
to launch a scholarship pro-
gramme focused on niche
careers, and in conjunction
with the Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce, BAIC and-
Bahamas Development Bank,
launch a Grand Bahama Busi-
ness Support Organisation.
Focused on small businesses,
it will be called The Enterpris-
ing Centre.

We can get you there!

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamians failing to exploit 40%
of Grand Bahama opportunities

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIANS have yet to
exploit 40 per cent of the eco-
nomic potential offered by
Grand Bahama, a government
minister said yesterday, while
acknowledging that the island
was “now in its seventh year of
recession and fifth year of eco-
nomic crisis”.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, acknowledged
that he was unable to predict
when an economic turnaround
would come, although he ruled
out any Bahamian or global
recovery within the next 12-18
months.

Addressing the Grand
Bahama Business Outlook con-
ference, Mr Laing said “Grand
Bahama’s economic misfor-
tunes began much earlier” than
the present downturn, which
started to emerge in the US in
2006-2007.

“Indeed, in my view, Grand
Bahama is now in its seventh
year of economic recession and
in its fifth year of economic cri-
sis,” he added.

“T wish I could say to Grand



















consultants

PROFESSIONAL

Bahama that there is an end in
sight for this enduring econom-
ic nightmare that it has faced
for the better part of seven
years now. I cannot. The reality
is that the global economy is in
a tailspin, and no one is certain
when this tailspin will end.”

Mr Laing based his view that
Grand Bahama was in its sev-
enth year of recession on the
fact that, while in 2002 the
island’s unemployment rate of
6.4 per cent was well below the
9.1 per cent national average,
it had begun to rise steadily
after that.

The ‘five years’ of economic
crisis were precipitated by the
2004 hurricane season and Roy-
al Oasis closure, Mr Laing
acknowledging that while
Grand Bahama’s unemploy-
ment rate decreased to 8.4 per

cent in 2006, this was largely
due to a rise in discouraged
workers - those not seeking
employment - and an exodus of
persons looking for work else-
where.

Mr Laing described the eco-
nomic hardship that many on
Grand Bahama have had to
endure as “profound”, with
unemployment impacting many
and families “stressed and
strained”.

“There are residents of this
island today who would not
have dreamed that they would
seek help from social services
who have had to do so,” the
minister said.

“Indeed, the multi-million
dollar social services budget that
we provided since coming to
office over the last two years is
being fully called upon here in

PCSb

limited

CONSULTING ENGINEERS

THE MANAGEMENT AND STAFF JOIN IN OFFERING
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ON HIS RECENT SUCCESS IN OBTAINING HIS
PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING QUALIFICATION

AND

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(February 2009)

Grand Bahama.

“While no one can understate
the increased difficulty that the
current crisis has brought to res-
idents of this island, in a way, it
is also true that the residents of
this island have endured eco-
nomic hardship for so long now
that theirs might be a less trau-
matic adjustment than other
parts of the country that are
now only seeing things get
decidedly worse.”

Looking beyond the present
economic situation, Mr Laing
said Grand Bahama was ideally
suited to attract an offshore
education industry, along with
high-technology manufacturing.
Offshore medical services and
captive/external insurance were
also potential targets.

Yet if Grand Bahama was to
attract such industries, it would
have to make a number of
adjustments, given that they
were dependent on expatriate
worker expertise.

“We will have to resist the
rising xenophobia that seems to
be plaguing us when it comes
to international workers in our
territory, as well as increasing
our own productivity and work
ethic to globally competitive
standards as a norm of our
workforce. We can and must do
both,” Mr Laing said.

While international investor
capital was important in turn-
ing round Grand Bahama’s
economy, Mr Laing said
Bahamians “have not yet
tapped into 40 per cent of the
economic opportunities of this
island”.

“This goes beyond blaming
others for keeping us down,”
he added. “This has to do with

ae
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

our own creativity, ingenuity,

REQUEST FOR

QUOTATION

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Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks the services
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Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

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Professional supervision, (i.e. Hydrologist}.

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Contact:

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Contract & Procurement Manager
LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117

P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

ZHIVARGO LAING



organisation, savings, drive and
execution.

“There are new businesses
we can mount here, and there
are existing businesses that we
can make better. In both
regards, there are multi-million
opportunities for us. The cur-
rent climate makes these pos-
sibilities less prominent, but my
fear is that even when the crisis
subsides, the attitude that too
many of us have had for far too
long may cause us to miss them
once again.”

Mr Laing said a united,
focused Grand Bahama Port
Authority was critical for the
island’s future, and its ability to
attract and retain internation-
al/domestic investment.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

GIVE IN

TO TEMPTATION





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 3B





Confidence on Spring
Break visitor totals

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE UPCOMING Spring
Break season could produce
visitor numbers close to last
year’s, according to the sales
director of a popular travel
website, with Freeport book-
ings said to be higher than ever.

Kristin Brenna, of StudentC-
ity, a company well known for
providing vacation packages for
college students and high
school graduates at budget
prices, said March bookings for
Freeport have been higher than
they have ever been in previ-
ous years, and that April will
be a good month for Nassau.

Student City rolled out a
Freeport Party Cruise package
starting at $399, which includes
a round-trip cruise to Freeport
from Fort Lauderdale and four
nights in one of three Freeport
hotels.

Ms Brenna told Tribune
Business that the Freeport trip
has appealed to the budget-
minded college student who
may not have as much dispos-
able income as previous years,
as they focus more than ever
on value-added packages for
the popular student travel sea-
son.

“Freeport is very popular.
We have a party cruise that
goes there which is actually
more popular than most years,”
she said.

“Nassau is still very popular
for Spring Break as well, but
most of the college demand for
trips to the Bahamas has gone
to Freeport because of its sig-
nificantly lower cost.

“They are shifting more to
those lower cost packages
because students have a lot less

CRUISE ships in Nassau harbour...

dollars to spend on travel this
year than they typically had in
years past, so we did meet that
demand with more lower cost
alternatives.”

Ms Brenna said the slump in
college students visiting Nas-
sau for the break was due in
part to significantly higher
package prices that could hit
$1,000 range or higher -
depending on accommodations.

However, she said bookings
for Nassau have been coming in
through StudentCity’s sister
company, GradCity, which pro-
duces vacation packages for
recent high school graduates.

“In April there will be a good

population of students down
there [Nassau],” said Ms Bren-
na.

Arecent USA Today Gallup
poll showed that 58 per cent of
vacationing Americans will
shrink their vacation spending
this year, or just not go at all.

Two firms which research
travel behaviour monthly, D.K.
Shifflet & Associates and THS
Global Insight, predict that
Americans will spend 9.7 per
cent less on leisure travel in
April, May and June, and 9 per
cent less in July, August and
September.

The USA today article con-
taming the Gallup poll figures



contends that Americans could
end up spending $30 billion less
on leisure travel this Spring and
Summer.

These figures could justify
the panic the hospitality sector
has been under during the past
several months.

Ministry of Tourism officials,
who seem to be cautiously opti-
mistic about this year’s tourism
numbers, however, told Tri-
bune Business that only time
will tell if travel will pick up.

Tourism Minister Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace, said the
Bahamas is getting ready to
reestablish its proximity advan-
tage in order to get the most

business every day. However,
he said the current problem
with the industry is a complex
issue to solve, as business mod-
els for predictions fall apart if
individuals book their vacations

closer to their expected depar-
ture dates.

Ms Brenna is confident the
Bahamas will do fairly well this
spring break saying: “Spring
Break is coming... Get Ready!”

ACCOUNTANT NEEDED

For an Established Accounting Firm
Must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting
Strong work ethics and a professional disposition

All interested persons
Please apply via email to: S.Laquel@ gmail.com
or Call 242-393-0858, Ask for Ms. Hall or Ms. Farrington
Deadline: February 25, 2009

26° BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

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Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ARTIC OVERSEAS LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of The
International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 23, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the April 6, 2009 to send their names and addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or, in de-

fault thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such debts are proved.

February 24, 2009
SHAKIRA BURROWS

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Legal Notice
NOTICE

MANDAL LIMITED
N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MANDAL LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 27 January, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 24th day of February, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

Legal Notice
NOTICE

CANIMO LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CANIMO LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 23 February, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 24th day of February, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

PARADISE SHOPPING
VILLAGE












































Short Term Apartment

Cheaper than a Hotel

week weeks month

BLA BA AS
HOME Aya FROM HOME

ROMP AA ar
PROM POM

Dare Te Ge Great
TV Show

i}
i Ct

Master Motivator Spence Finlayson is pictured during the taping
of his hit TV show ‘Dire % Be Green” at the Hilton Hotel. ‘Gere ZH
Bo Great” ars tonight at 8:30pm on ZNS TV 13.

Pictured along with the shows creator and host Spence Finlayson
are his guests The Hon. Fredrick Mitchell, MP for Fox Hill, Rory
Higgs, President of Apex Management Services Ltd. and Alpheus
“Hawk” Finlayson, former IAAF Council Member.

If you would like to be a guest on this show or advertise
please call 393-3404.

=e
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Ganpary

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

D-111 Qualified Environmental Monitor

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks a
Qualified Environmental Monitor for Stage 1 of the LPIA
Expansion Project. The scope of services includes:

Review and approve contractors’ environmental plans;
Develop inspection check lists and inspect the work of
contractors for compliance to environmental plans;
Facilitate and communicate with regulatory authorities on
behalf of the Project on environmental issues; and
Prepare weekly and monthly reports.

Interested proponents must be qualified, familiar with local
regulatory laws and agencies and familiar with International
Best Practices (Equator Principles, IFC Standards).

Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up
after 1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 5th, 2009 at
3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

F
| aa , 5

a
es

a

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=i ! al ae l
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KAVIGATING A KEW WORLD





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Retail owner reduces work
week for ‘50-60%’ of staff

FROM page 1B

With more than 1,500 job
losses in the economy towards
the end of 2008, and unemploy-
ment continuing to rise,
Bahamians are increasingly
fearful for their jobs and
incomes. As a result, consumer
spending - the lifeblood of
retailers and the wider Bahami-
an economy - has been reined
in, with confidence showing no
signs of making a return.

“We’re just trying to hold on
and ride out the storm,” Mr
Wilson explained, “trying to
control our expenses. We’re try-
ing to get our margins razor
thin, and trying to become more
competitive in pricing, customer

“We have quite a few staff

working less than a 40-hour
week in most of them [his retail
formats]. I would say about 50-
60 per cent of staff are on
reduced work weeks.” Across
his retail brands, Mr Wilson
employs around 100 staff.

Out of all his retail formats,
Mr Wilson said John S George
“remains the greatest chal-
lenge”. He has invested around
$1 million in upgrading the
retail chain since acquiring it in
summer 2007 from the ill-fated
ownership of the buyout group
put together by Ken Hutton.

That much-needed invest-
ment was injected just before
the world and Bahamian
economies lurched into full-
blown downturn, making it
extremely difficult for Mr Wil-
son to obtain a return on the

funds invested.

He yesterday confirmed to
Tribune Business that John S
George had rationalised its
store portfolio to the best-per-
forming outlets, having closed
both the Lyford Cay and Inde-
pendence Drive locations
before the Christmas holidays.

“We are still operating in
Cable Beach, Palmdale and
Harbour Bay,” Mr Wilson said.
As a result of the downsized
chain, John S George’s staffing
levels have been reduced to
about 45 from 68.

Mr Wilson explained, though,
that the staff reduction had
been produced by both the
store closures and the compa-
ny’s decision not to replace
workers when they either left
or retired.

“It’s really the most chal-
lenging conditions I’ve experi-
enced since getting into retail,”
Mr Wilson said. “It’s a combi-
nation of the general economic
climate, the rising numbers of
people who are not working,
and people who are being real-
ly cautious.

“People don’t have the mon-
ey to spend. The customers
don’t have money to spend, and
the people who do have some
currency are rather hesitant to
spend. We’re just controlling
expenses and holding on.”

Mr Wilson added that John
S George had reduced its
import levels significantly.

Meanwhile, Chris Lowe,
operations manager at Kelly’s
(Freeport), told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that retail trading



Legal Notice

Legal Notice



NOTICE

NOTICE




QAMAR LIMITED

GOLDEN DRAGON




(In Voluntary Liquidation)

GROUP LIMITED





Notice is hereby given that the above-named

(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Company is in dissolution, which commenced on




the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on



is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,








Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
INTEGRATED SYNERGY
TECHNOLOGIES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MATRICARIA CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an

the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHIMANGO GROUP
CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHASING THE MOON
CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

For further information on this and

conditions experienced by his
firm were “firmer than we
thought it would be” given the
overall economic environment.

“January was a good month
for us,” Mr Lowe explained.
“Overall, we’re down a couple
of percentage points, but then
we have some months where
we’re up a few per cent. We’re
3-4 per cent up, then 3-4 per
cent down, but on average it’s
flat. There are no lay-offs on
our horizon.”

He added that a major con-
cern, both for himself and other
Bahamian retailers, was that
US-based suppliers had either
closed or significantly reduced
production/distribution, thus
depriving them of much-needed
supplies and inventory lines.

“There’s a number of ven-
dors who have gone out of busi-
ness, and certain things will not
get replaced,” Mr Lowe
explained. “Certain categories
of goods that have been carried
for a long time are not avail-
able.

“US companies have either
gone under or are not bothered
by foreign sales.” Mr Lowe said
surviving US companies were
also being increasingly forced
by even softer trading condi-
tions at home to explore new
markets in the Bahamas and the
Caribbean.

The Kelly’s (Freeport) exec-
utive said the company’s work
on internal systems over the
past eight years, and “very seri-

ous trending” on inventory and
turns, had made it better able to
manage its way through the cur-
rent downturn.

Expansion plans remained on
the drawing board, Mr Lowe
said, although Kelly’s
(Freeport) would not put any-
thing into action in the current
climate.

“There’s nothing directly on
the books with any start date,
but we have two different sets
of plans we can leap on,
although not right now,” Mr
Lowe said.

“As soon as we see a positive
turnaround in the economy, and
a positive direction espoused by
our leadership, we will look to
expand in building materials
and expand in retail.

“We're training, building and
doing back office renovations.
We’ve put in two new offices in
an internal expansion.”

Mr Lowe added: “We’re
holding the ship and paying
attention to the details. We’re
operating in a contracting mar-
ket. It makes mistakes in oper-
ations more expensive. You
have to be leaner, be more
tighter and be more efficient,
and leverage opportunities
when you see them. But you
must not get in over your head,
because you could end up cut-
ting your throat in the circum-
stances.

“T think competently run
business are holding their own
and doing OK.”

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POINTAM VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GLASSHOUSE
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

can
i

‘8 fo
MR > /

exciting career opportunity?

i
=

DIRECTOR TALENT MANAGEMENT

This role will be accountable for making a significant contribution to the
management and development of the careers of FirstCaribbean’s talent
with a special focus on high performing and high potential banking
professionals.

other available positions, please visit

slic webaies FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

www firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers GET THERE. TOGETHER.





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Landscapers ‘cut back’

picked up any new clients since
the economic contraction
became prevalent last year, with
existing customers scaling back
their monthly maintenance.

“Some of the old ones [cus-
tomers] have been telling me:
‘Don’t come this month because
things aren’t good. Come next
month or [Il call you when to
come’,” she said.

Ms Roberts said she was in
the process of revamping her
product in order to remain com-
petitive, but has staggered in
producing a feasible business
plan.

She said, though, that it was
imperative for her to come up
with something within the next
three months. “I have to come
up with something else to do,
but I haven’t thought of any-
thing yet,” she said.

Ms Roberts’ concern is that
her biggest competition will
come from the “guy off the
street”, who her clients and
potential clients will be able to
pay little or nothing for the ser-
vice.

She said she was working
harder than ever to keep her 25
to 26 clients satisfied, ensuring
she and her four employees
maintain a steady income.

Steve Bellot, proprietor of
Roots Landscape and Mainte-
nance, said his business has had

been a lot more demanding for
him since the economy soft-
ened, as he has been force to
spend more time pricing jobs
and setting up crews.

He said he has seen a
decrease in large contracts that
were once prevalent, and is now
taking on more small jobs. “I
imagine that’s because there is
not much development going
on,” he said.

Mr Bellot, like Ms Roberts,
said holding on to existing busi-
ness was paramount this year, as
well as innovation.

“Right now, you want to be
in a position where if someone
comes along to take one of your
contracts, your client is going
to say: ‘No, ’'m happy with who
I have’,” he said.

Mr Bellot said he has taken
on more jobs he would have
typically turned down in order
to stay competitive. As far as
cost cutting goes, he said he has
placed Roots on a hiring freeze
and is not purchasing any new
equipment for the business, but
is focusing on repairing what he
has.

Mr Bellot said he was using
the current economic downturn
to measure his business’s effi-
ciency, so that it can do much
better when things turn around.

“Times like these are always
a test when you’re in business,

Bank donation to support
aspiring businesswomen

BANK of the Bahamas International
has given a recent donation to the
O.P.A.L.S, the teen division of Kingdom
Women In Business, which stands for
Opening and Preparing Avenues for
young Ladies to Succeed.

The bank’s donation will make it pos-
sible for nearly 50 teenage girls to attend
next week’s K WIB seminar, where they
will officially be named members of the
organisation and matched up with men-
tors in careers they plan to pursue.

Along with a presentation by Dee-
genera Jones-Dixon, a peer-to-peer talk
by 18 year-old COB student, Cashena
Thompson, and a session with pageant
organiser, Michelle Malcolm, the young-
sters will be able to attend presentations
with women in the main conference.

Melisa Hall, K WIB’s founder, said:
“We are truly appreciative of the bank’s
immediate and overwhelming response
in this exciting venture.

“They didn’t hesitate to invest in the
lives of so many young women. Words
really can’t express how appreciative we
are of this generous gift. We know that
this will be an encouragement for more
students to attend, who felt they may
not have been able to attend. Who
knows, some of these girls who make it
through our O.P.A.L.S may one day

KWIB’s annual conference runs from

{Js Lari
rp UoeATLmE

DANIA Ferguson (centre), marketing coordinator for Bank of The Bahamas International, pre-
sents Kingdom Women In Business with a donation for the development of their organisation’s
teen arm, the 0.P.A.L.S. Also pictured are Charlene Paul, founder Melisa Hall, Deegenera Jones-
Dixon and Cashena Thompson.

(Photo by Arthia Nixon/ALC)

For more information call 328-6050 or

come back to Bank of the Bahamas as next Thursday to Friday at the British visit www.kingdomwomeninbusi-

to innovate in order to stay because it determines whether

ahead in the market.
Mr Bellot said business has

you are able to operate effi-
ciently,” said Mr Bellot.

trained professionals.”

Colonial Hilton.

ness.org



Talks ongoing to overcome Freeport airport obstacle















—_
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

REQUEST FOR

FROM page 1B

Bahama’s seat costs to con-
sumers remains higher than that
of Nassau and other destina-
tions. Based on distance from
Miami, these include Cancun
(197 miles), Montego Bay (526
miles), Puerto Rico (1037 miles)
and Las Vegas (2,177 miles).
“Las Vegas, which is more

than 20 times as far away from
Miami as is Grand Bahama, is
always less expensive to fly to
than GBIA,” Ms Walkine said.

“Now, we know that part of
the reason for this problem is
the cost of operating at Grand
Bahama International Airport.

“It is critically important for
us to make Grand Bahama,
which is the closest offshore
destination to America, not the
most expensive destination for
Americans.”

She indicated that hotels on
Grand Bahama will continue to
struggle if the high airfare and
airport turnaround costs are not
addressed.

“Until we fix some of these
core infrastructural things, Our
Lucaya Resort, Pelican Bay and
all the others are not going to be
able to benefit to the degree
that they can,” Ms Walkine
said.

“You can promote these
properties all day long, but if

that person who is sitting in
Miami looks at the option avail-
able to them, and if they can go
to Vegas, which is 20 times fur-
ther away and stay longer for
less than the cost of getting to
Grand Bahama, they may
decide to go to Vegas or to the
Dominican Republic.

“So unless we fix these issues,
it is not going to be well
received by the customer who
has to make a decision about
what he or she can afford.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that THOMAS ANTOINIER
EMMANUEL, of GREGORY TOWN, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 17 day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PROPOSAL

Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape Supply The Compliance Commission

3rd Floor, Charlotte House
Charlotte Street South

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks
a qualified landscape supplier(s) to grow trees, palms,
shrubs and groundcover (items) in accordance with the
required schedule and speculations for completion of
Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. This is a supply
only contract.

Relocation and Temporary
Telephone Lines

Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

The Public is advised that, effectively
immediately, The Compliance
Commission has relocated to the 3rd
Floor of Charlotte House, Charlotte Street
South, and may be contacted at the
following telephone number:

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th,
2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

The Bahamas Olympic Association

Invites suitably qualified applicants to apply for the
following position

Office Administrator

Requirements:

356-5717

PC Literacy and experienced in Microsoft Office
Applications (Word, Excel, Powerpoint)
Excellent keyboarding skills

Excellent Organizational Skills and ability to multi-
task successfully

Excellent Communication Skills and ability to
work with minimum direction and supervision in
drafting correspondence for Executive Review
Experienced in Office Administration and ability
to work with tight deadlines and flexibility to adjust
working hours to ensure that objectives are met.
Coordinate Meetings/Business Travel as required
To also serve as Office Receptionist and answer
telephones

Real P-face e

The Bahamas Source For Homes, Apartment Communities & Rentals ‘“—

Everywhere The Buyers Are!



The ideal candidate would have served in a similar
capacity and would have completed formal education
beyond the high school level. A Background in Sports
Administration is preferred and consideration will be
given to candidates that demonstrate skills that are
easily transferable to this position and demonstrate a
high level of professionalism.

Applications can be sent via email or fax to:
nocbah@coralwave.com ¢ Fax: 322-1195

or mailed to
The Bahamas Olympic Association
P.O. Box SS-6250,

Nassau, The Bahmas.

The Bahamas Olympic Association thanks all applicants and will only
interview short-listed candidates.

Tel: 502 2356 am

for ad rates





APRIL BOWER
WORKED BRIEFLY AS
A TEMP SECKETARY
IN OUR OFFICE!

BLONDIE

[WANT YOU TO CATER A SMALL
PARTY FOR ME, BLT I WANT TO
CUT AS MANY CORNERS AS [ CAN







GLORIA, WHO'S
THAT WOMAN WITH
RANDY? IVE NEVER
SEEN HER BEFORE!

2009 by King Features Syndicate, Ine. World Rights reserved



TIGER

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me





HEAK MOM
CALLING
Mou 7





CALVIN & HOBBES

DAD SAYS THE ANTICIPATION
GF HAVING SOMETHING \S
OFTEN MORE FUN THAN

ACTUALY HAVING IT. IMMEDIATELY .

©1989 Universal Press Syndicate























“TVE LOST AT LEAST TUREE
INCHES ONTHIS DIET.”

CRYPTIC PUZZLE





FOR EXAMPLE, CAN
YOU SERVE TUNA
FISH SANDWICHES
WITHOUT BREAD?

Ly v Vie j

VENT You Wi one

T THINK HE'S CRAZY. T HATE
WAITING FOR THINGS. I
LIKE TO HAVE EVERYTHING



‘SO, HOW TALL DOES THAT
MAKE You Now2”






SHE WAS RECRUITED
BY THE CIA..-GPEAKS
5] FIVE LANGUAGES!




WELL, ~]
SURE... BUT

THEN IT'S 4
JUST TUNA

af No. TELL

Sunday



Now
YOU'RE
TALKING!

TRY AGAIN, ONLY
MAKE IT LOLUVER!

T CANT THINK OF ANYTHING
TD RATHER ANTICIPATE THAN
HANE RIGHT AWAY. CAN You?



THE CIA JOB
DIDNT WORK OLIT,
SO SHE CAME
BACK HERE!

LET ME ASK YOU
THIS...ARE PLATES






HEL TO



, Ges
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To HAVE A LITTLE
DISCUSSION WITH



REALLY NECESSARY?



inveart Bury Aa 60026)

‘PEASE, SIUBY POM “OUI “elEOIUAS SEN



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

APT 3-G












MARTIN MAGEE N
LOVES NO ONE
BUT HIMSELF YOU

OF ALL PEOPLE
SHOULP KNOW THAT.’
OE





WE TALK SOMETIMES,
MOSTLY OF YOU. HE
LOVES YOU VERY
MUCH; MARGO.





YOUR FATHER DOES MUCH
BUSINESS IN CHINA.
IMPORTANT PEOPLE

RESPECT HIM THERE.

HOW DO YOU KNOW
THIG, GABRIELLA?
ARE YOU TWO IN TOUCH 2/

Ona













‘©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

FRANK BOLL E——



T WOKE UP TODAY
WITH A REALLY BAD
DIAPER RASH /

MY BOTTOM IS A GROSS,
RED MASS OF OOZING,
PUTRID SORES//

© 2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

www.kingteaturas.com



E

I AGREE THAT TALKING oN
THINGS OVER IS ALWAYS

PREFERABLE TO FHYSICAL
VIOLENCE...



BUT IT MAY BE
TOO LATE To
SCHEDULE A

PEACE
CONFERENCE







World rights reserved.




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TOYS. TLEacT
Cam Dower pred Sl: ercelient
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VESTEROATS SOLUTKIH

cgi. altos alti aomiing pon
alt camin. clamt ecicit enat crain
Tam PTA Pe. Pein Pe

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TD Ey
Curae bhai ci ci
tating ralng chmene cing

taming tang timine fer chor
ftp fremine





Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer




























Difficulty Level * *&
















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate. Inc.





































©2009 Conceplis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.




































5/8/3]/2 4 1]9/6|7 NINES

4/2/913 7 6/5/8]1 8 OREN? 3 2

1[7le[5 8 9/4l2/3 He ae Bk
7/1/5/9 2 8/3/4/6| Bee og mes 21113
2\9/8/4 6 317/115 MES 7M: 1 aS
3/6/4[1 5 7/8/9/2| fy7zlo sle Mee 3/311
914/116 3 5/2|7/8 9/8 RUN? 1 BW7\9
6/5/7(8 9 2/1/3/4 q7 4/918 Mt |6 3
8/3/2/7 1 4|6/5/9 Bi 2 (7/9 B49





For Whom the Bells Toll













Across Down
1 It can be boring if a 1 Call for a doctor,
commercial interrupts a perhaps (5)
fight (7) 2 Not easy to grasp by
4 In the operating theatre, sailors on land (8)
the routine anaesthetic (5) 3 Incline towards a simple
7 It’s not difficult to name a building (4-2)
novel midshipman (4) 4 Finished full of wrath and
8 Put out of one’s mind? (8) in jeopardy (10)
10 Prettiness in a constantly 5 Animal quarters,
recurring form (10) perhaps (4)
12 Get out the cane, for 6 Rusty looking
example, or put into locks (3,4)
confinement (6) 9 Brilliant winner of the
13 Remote sort of space- angling contest? (10)
traveller (6) 11 Mean the opposite
15 One without real authority (8)
led the way at sea (10) 12 Unmasks once one asks Ww
18 Perhaps | am disposed to questions (7) _I
produce an object of 14 Enough to prevent parting N
worth (8) without meeting (6) 5
19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting 16 Acommon flower I’d say ou
points (4) perhaps (5) >
20 Simple but revealing (5) 17 Perhaps every ~”
21 May accept a joke with church includes one iz

dignity (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10
Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14
Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19
Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24
Typesetters.

Down: 2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5
Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8
Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15
Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet.

(4)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid,
10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14
Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19
Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24
Underground.

Down: 2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5
Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events,
8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15
Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21
Brio.

Across
1 Sports arena (7)
4 Morass (5)
7 Once more (4)

8 Avaricious (8)

10 Significant (10)

12 Avoiding

extremes (6)

13 Reduced to
powder (6)
15 Complex details
(3,3,4)

Solid traffic jam (8)
Woodwind

instrument (4)

18
19

20 Motor sport event (5)
21 Generous (7)




















South dealer. declarer got home with an unmak-
Both sides vulnerable. able contract.
NORTH West led a heart against three
@)72 notrump, and declarer won East’s ten
974 with the jack. South had no choice
A 10973 but to try to establish dummy’s dia-
8 5 monds, without which he could not
WEST EAST possibly score nine tricks.
$9863 40 104 So at trick two, he cashed the dia-
VAQ652 ¥ 103 mond king, both defenders following
#Q5 #3382 low, and then played a second dia-
#17 #010942 mond. When West produced the
SOUTH queen, South allowed him to win the
@AK5 trick. This was not from a sense of
Â¥KI8 generosity, mind you, but because
#K64 West was the right person to have on
#AK 63 lead at this stage. It did not matter
Down The bidding: what West played next because
i Buddah conducts South West North East declarer now had nine sure tricks. _
2NT Pass 3NT_ AII Pass Of course, if West had dropped his

action (5) Opening lead — five of hearts. queen of diamonds under the king at

trick two, declarer would have had












2 Australian city (8
4 Optical ill 2 ” Bridge would be a much simpler _ no chance to make the contract. The
peal ilueion (6) game to play well if, whenever acrit- diamond queen was an albatross
4 Disguise oneself (10) ical point in the play was reached, around West’s neck that he should
5 Destroy (4) some kind soul would ring a bell to have gotten rid of at the earliest
warn you to watch your step. The opportunity.
6 Hollow-eyed and trouble is that, aside from the minor He should have reasoned that the
gaunt (7) expense of the bell, the cost of hiring queen was a worthless card if South
9 Like it or not (5-5) ya, Someone to ring it at precisely the — had the jack of diamonds as well as
gseq tight moment would be prohibitive. the king, while if his partner held the
11 Salad vegetable (8) ; For example, take this case where jack, the queen was certainly not a
12 Company < West missed his cue when the crucial good card to hang on to.
ayesutve tz) : point arose. The moment of truth Somebody should have rung a
$3 quietly passed him by, and asaresult bell!
.
- i vl : Tomorrow: The battle for trump control.
16 Artillery > ©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
projectile (5)
17 Determination (4)









PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a eV





B O =

The Tribune





Ca

coer N D



ith



nobody's

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IMAGINE living in a place, all too familiar to you,
the smells, the taste, the streets, the people, all con-
sidered a part of your home, and to suddenly
oe that despite your familiarity, you were an
alien.

This is the realty of many second generation Haitians in the local
community, who despite being born in the Bahamas, have no citzen-
ship and in essence, belong to no country.

Psychiatrist Dr Nelson Clarke explained that for the hundreds of
people in the country that fall in this category, the feeling of not
belonging and of being marginalised by main stream society could have
an extremely destructive effect.

“Tf you watch your people get rounded up and sent on buses to the
Detention Centre, it could evoke some very strong feelings of anger.”

Dr Clarke said many Haitian-Bahamian are left to carry this possi-
bly overwhelming burden because they feel that they cannot talk
about it.

Tribune Health spoke to one young man in this position who dis-
cussed how his situation has impacted his mind and soul.

He explained many Haitian- Bahamians wonder whether they
should cling to a culture and heritage attained only through birth, or
embrace a society and community which frequently discounts them,
and seldom embraces them as its kin.

Twenty seven year old Jeffrey Herard says life in the Bahamas as
a second generation Haitian, has proven to be one of the greatest
challenges he has even encountered, causing him often to question
his own identity.

He painted a picture of denial, social segregation, and said he has
undergone a constant struggle to validate his “ Bahamianism,” all in
an effort to secure the best possible future for himself and his fami-
ly.

Born in Nassau during the early 80s, Jeffrey said he spent the
first five years of his life in Nassau, before moving back to Haiti
with his mother.

Reflecting on his childhood on Ile de Ja Tortue in Haiti-, Jeffrey
said his life then was much different from what it is today.

Contrary to the media’s portrayal of Haiti as a lawless and vio-
lent country, Jeffrey says he has memories of a simple, safe, and
loving community.

Although his family was poor, he was able to attend a private
school sponsored by Canadian missionaries where his awareness on
the importance of education was first fostered.

While there, Jeffrey said he was able to study French as a second
language, and spent his senior years learning about computers and
information technology.

With his father already living in Nassau, Jeffrey said at the age of
17, he returned here in the hopes of having a better life.

Jeff said his return to Nassau was by plane, considered a luxury
and privilege by many Haitians, an opportunity made available by
his father who he said does not support illegal sloop migration.

Jeff explained, one of the first things he did after arriving back to
New Providence was to begin the process of naturalisation.

“T applied when I was 18, and it took me close to two years to get
all the documents that the government was asking for.”

He said this involved getting copies of his birth certificate, a copy
of his parents birth certificates, and other documents, some of which
have to be faxed or mailed from government offices in Haiti.

After getting the requested documents, Jeff said his educational
and civic growth were stunted because while he was waiting for
approval from the department of immigration, his birth certificate
was never seen as enough evidence of his Bahamian status.

Hoping to pursue his passion in computer design and information
technology, Jeff said he soon enrolled at the College of The

Aeon Tr



Bahamas pursuing a degree in Computer Science.

However he realised that because he could not present a Bahami-
an passport, he was not considered Bahamian by the college and
would have to pay twice as much for an education. This was the first
indication of his unequal status, he said.

He was employed at the Atlantis Resort where overtime, he was
able to advance to a senior position not because of his background,
but because of his work ethics and skill.

For him, this was an important experience, because for the first
time his Haitian heritage did not matter, and he was placed on an
equal playing field as everyone else.

Being Haitian-Bahamian comes with its share of challenges,
which Jeff said forces many young men in his position to join gangs
or rebel against the Bahamian culture because they feel like
strangers in both worlds.

He said Haitians don’t automatically accept them especially if
they don’t speak Creole, and Bahamians tend to turn their noises up
at people of Haitian lineage.

Jeff said even the way Haitian immigrants are portrayed on tele-
vision when apprehended by immigration officers, and the disre-
spect and inhumanity that so often outshines the legality of the offi-
cers’ action often proves reason enough for many Haitian-Bahami-
an to disown their Haitian background.

Jeff said although having to face discriminatory remarks from
Bahamians, he has been forced to rely on his inner strength and
sense of identity to success in the face of his trials.

Fast forwarding his life to 2009, Jeff is now a father of two. He
pointed out that

Haitians like Bahamians, Americans, and others have desires to
become successful, and that the Haitian-Bahamian too has worth
and deserves the same opportunity to prove themselves as con-
tributing members of society.

Jeff said although he has had to work extremely hard in achieve
all that he has, the struggle does not stop with him.

He encouraged others who find themselves in the same position
to look within and allow that inner strength to propel them to suc-
cess.

Jeff said: “Ifa Black man can succeed in becoming the president
of the greatest nation in the world, anyone can overcome challenges
with sufficient drive. If I can do it, so can you.”

READY
FOR TV

| MBY ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

TO help the growing number of persons

? especially kids who are either obese or over-
? weight, Jennifer Basden along with her busi-
i ness partner, Natasha Brown, have teamed up
: to start a health care initiative through a new
? television show- KIDFIT TV to make kids and
: their parents aware of the importance of good
i health and a positive lifestyle.

Mrs Basden said her eight year old daughter

was the main inspiration behind KIDFIT TV.

“TI found that my youngest daughter wasn’t

i working out and I wasn’t feeding her the
: healthiest meals and she started gaining weight.
? I recognised that I needed to do something. I
: didn’t feel like pushing her off onto someone
i else for help. I thought that if I could get her
: and some of her friends, because once you get
: one friends interested then the others will
? come, then it becomes a workout party. My
i kids got excited and other kids got excited as
: well when we wanted to do a casting call for
; this show,” Mrs Basden said.

Mrs Basden said although her target audi-

i ence is children between the ages of eight and
: 13 years old, the show is still kid inspiring but
: adult friendly. They are currently in negotia-
i tions with local stations to air the show.

“We want to encourage adults to be apart of

i it and watch along and work along with their
? kids. We want to educate them and build up
: their self esteem. Once you build up self esteem
i it empowers them and it encourages them to
: strive to do better and to want to do better in
? the community. As they grow older into ado-
: lescent and into adults, they will be able to
: contribute something positive to society,” Mrs
: Basden said.

Ms Brown, a Fitness trainer at NatBros, said
she is happy to be working with the pro-

: gramme.

“If you look at our surroundings as a nation,

? one will see that we are not as clean as we
? need to be. That can also bring about sickness
i and disease. We have now become to busy to
: teach our own kids the importance of fitness
; and good health,” Ms Brown said.

Mrs Basden said the entire show will be host-

ed by children to allow those watching at home
; to better relate to the activities on screen.

“The kids will have adult counterparts for

: each individual segment. So for our KIDFIT
i TV Cuisine segment, we will have a chef that is
$ going to be working along with the kid host
? chef to help them to stay safe in the kitchen and
? to teach them how to eat healthy with tasty
i alternatives to fast food,” Mrs Basden said.

Mrs Basden said there is also a “Go Green”

segment to get the kids involved with fun activ-
i ities to start instilling green values as they con-
: tinue a healthier lifestyle as they grow older.

“We want the children to learn how to be

! environmentally responsible. We want to
? encourage them to not only uplift themselves
: and those around them, but also to be con-
: scious of what happens when they do not take
? care of their environment. We want them to
? learn how to be respectful of themselves and
i their community so that everyone can enjoy it
: in the long term,” Mrs Basden said.

Mrs Basden said she hopes in the future to

not only have the kids watching the show and
: interact, but also have a place where they can
? come out and socialise with other children.

“We want to start a kids programme also at

: Natasha’s gym and have some of our cast mem-
i bers from the show and team from KIDFIT TV
: to be there and show the other kids that fitness
: and health is a great thing,” Mrs Basden said.

Can a “vitamin” keep wrinkles away?

What do mouth-watering strawber-
ries, pineapples, sweet cantaloupes,
tomatoes and red bell peppers, all have
in common- vitamin C.

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is an
extremely effective antioxidant. We’ve
already learned that antioxidants are
vitamins, amino acids and other natural
substances that can reverse the effect of
damage done by free radicals, which
are unstable oxygen molecules that age
the skin. We already know that vitamin
C, when taken orally, enhances the
immune system, a natural defense
against colds and flu. But is there more
to this vitamin? Let's take a look at its
skin care benefits.

VITAMIN € SKIN CARE BENEFITS:

IT softens

IT moisturises

IT helps reduce fine wrinkles

IT exfoliates

IT can help to prevent the production
of melanin in the skin, which are the
dark spots that usually increase
with aging.

IT reduces inflammation

IT neutralises free radical reactions
IT stimulates collagen production



Collagen is a protein that gives your
skin elasticity and firmness. This col-
lagen is decreased dramatically the old-
er we get and shows itself up as wrin-
kles on the skin. So, when collagen is
stimulated the aging skin is improved.

ARE THERE FORMS OF VITAMIN €
THAT DO NOT WORK?

As great as vitamin C is to the skin,
if not manufactured properly it is
impossible for your skin to absorb it.
Therefore, the vitamin C found in
many skin care products may vary in its
effectiveness. Why? Well, water and
vitamin C are incompatible. When it
comes into contact with water and air,
it oxidises very quickly and loses its
benefits. When this process occurs, it is
not only ineffective but also potential-
ly harmful (oxidised vitamin C may

increase the formation of free radi-
cals).

To receive the skin care benefits
from vitamin C, scientists have been
looking for a form of vitamin C that
can do the following:

— be more stable than vitamin C

— penetrate the skin easily

— are less irritating

— release ascorbic acid in a quantity
sufficient to boost collagen
production.

WHAT HAVE SCIENTISTS DISCOVERED?

Today, there are two derivatives that
have made their way into the skin care
market. What are they? Ascorbyl
palmitate also known as vitamin C,
ester and magnesium ascorbyl phos-
phate.

MAGNESIUM ASCORBYL PHOSPHATE

Magnesium ascorbyl phosphate is a
water-soluble derivative of vitamin C,
which means it only enters the inside of
the cell, which is mainly water. Not
being able to enter the exterior of the
cell means that it cannot prevent free
radical damage on the outside of the

cell. But it is popular because it is non-
irritating and more stable than vita-
min C. It also seems to increase skin
collagen production in significantly
lower concentrations. But if you have
sensitive skin it is better choice,
because vitamin C can be very acidic,
causing exfoliation.

ASCORBYL PALMITATE
(VITAMIN C ESTER)

Vitamin C ester it is the most com-
mon fat-soluble derivative of vitamin
C. It is composed of basic vitamin C
(ascorbic acid) along with palmitic acid,
which is derived from palm oil.

This derivative is non- irritating, and
unlike ascorbic acid, it is stable and
able to remain stable in creams for
years. Also, as a fat-soluble substance,
it quickly penetrates the skin and pro-
tects against free-radical damage, on
the exterior of the cells where there is
the most damage. Dermatologist and
anti-aging expert Dr Nicholas Perri-
cone (author of The wrinkle Cure)
believes it is the perfect "skin vitamin"
and "youth in a jar" and said " I was
fortunate to have help from the
research of the brilliant cell biologist
Olga Marko, PH.D., who found that

vitamin C ester helps stimulate the
growth of fibroblast, the cells that help
produce collagen and elastin in human
skin. This finding gave me a clue that
vitamin C-ester could boost collagen
production and provide a more youth-
ful appearance."

Dr Perricone was convinced he was
on his way to develop one of the first
antioxidant-based anti-aging skin treat-
ment.

Here are some of the skin condi-
tions topical vitamin C treatment are
recommended for:

¢ Fine lines and wrinkles on severely
sun-damaged skin

¢ Sagging skin that is losing its firmness
because of lost or damaged collagen

¢ Sunburned, inflamed, or irritated skin

¢ Kenya Mortimer-McKenzie
Anti-Aging Skin Care Specialist
Baha-Retreat Anti-Aging Spa
East Bay Street, East of Lucianos
323-6711 or 323-615
www.baharetreat.com

Email: info@baharetreat.com



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 9B



a Ne



HEART

at: vw

HEALTHY TIP

February is Heart Health
Awareness Month and the
Lighten Up & Live Healthy
team is urging you to use the
remainder of this month to
reflect on your own ‘heart
health’.

Heart diseases are the main
contributor to mortality in the
Bahamas. Chronic heart dis-
ease not only affects individu-
als, but also families and the
greater community. In addi-
tion, it places a colossal strain
on the national healthcare sys-
tem. However, we are here to
let you know that most cases of
heart disease can be prevented
by making simple lifestyle
choices that begin with you.
For a healthy country starts
with healthy citizens.

This week we will share with
you some lifestyle tips from
Dietitians of Canada on ways
to control your fat intake,
increase your fibre consump-
tion and increase your activity
level that can reduce the inci-
dences of most heart disease.
However, if you have heart
disease already, you will be
better able to manage it.

TIPS TO CONTROL
YOUR FAT INTAKE
eHave 5-11 servings of grain
products daily - such as whole
grain breads, cereals and other
grain products.

eReach for 5-9 servings of
vegetables & fruit each day.

eChoose soy milk, or lower
fat milk products such as skim
or 1 per cent milk, and yogurt
or cottage cheese made with
less than 2 per cent milk fat
more often.

eChoose fish, poultry and
leaner meats, with fat and skin
removed. An appropriate serv-
ing size is about the size and
thickness of a deck of cards or
the palm of your hand exclud-
ing your fingers.

eHave foods that are baked,
broiled or grilled more often
than deep-fried foods.

eHave more meals made
with beans and peas.

Cut down on extras such as
butter, margarine, oil, gravy
and rich sauces.

eChoose lower fat snack
foods such as light microwave
or air popped popcorn (without
added butter or topping) and
pretzels.

eRead package labels and
choose lower fat versions of
salad dressings, peanut butter,
cream soups, etc. To be called

"low fat", a food must contain i
less than 3 grams of fat per }
serving. i

¢Flavour foods without fat, }
use lime, salsa, mustard, herbs }
and spices instead. i

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

AND EXERCISE TIPS
To increase exercise and }
physical activity: i

Buy a frisbee & make a
family game out if it. i
Go swimming. If you can't }
swim, just be active in the }
water. i
ePlay beach volleyball. :
eWalk or jog along the }
beach, park, and neighbour- }
hood. :
Get involved in team sports }
(e.g. basketball, soccer) i
¢Buy askipping (jump rope) }
and use it. :
ePut on music while clean- : |
ing the house and clean to the }
beat! i
eUse the stairs more often.
Instead of lounging in front }
of the television go for a walk i
after dinner. :
eFind an exercise buddy.
eJoin a gym and attend fre-
quently. Purchase exercise
equipment

HEALTHY WEIGHT TIPS

eEat breakfast every morn-
ing

eFat a variety of healthy
foods i

e¢Have balanced meals :

¢Watch your portion sizes - }
practice moderation

eMake physical activity and
exercise a part of your lifestyle }

eExercise for 45 minutes tol }
hour at least four times per }
week i

eHat more whole grain }
foods, fruits and vegetables

eDrink at least eight 8 oz
cups of water daily

eUse cooking methods that :
require little or no fat - bak-
ing, boiling, grilling, roasting,
etc.

eUse products that have }
reduced calories, fat, sugar and
salt e.g. mayo :

°Get sufficient rest

eReduce your stress levels}

*Be patient, determined & }
discipline & enjoy your food }
because your health is in your }
hand! i

Remember, following these }
simple tips will not only lead }
toa healthier heart but a much
healthier you. ;

¢ Provided by Adelma Penn, Camelta Barnes, Shandera Smith and
Lathera Lotmore, Nutritionists from the Ministry Of Health/Department

of Public Health

MY WIFE and |

Strawberry

: do a lot of sharing

i berry season, that
: is. And strawberry
: season is now. The
: first one into the

: garden is the ear-
: ly bird that gets

: the fruits.

plants are obtain-
able from local

: and rarely try to nurseries and will
: outdo each other probably be.

: : bought bearing
; In-any seus fruit. Later on the
: way. Until straw- plants will propa-

gate themselves
with runners that
develop several
new plants. Half a
dozen plants this
year will be about
three or four-
dozen next year,
etc.

The plants usu-
ally have three
productive years
before they have to be replaced.

Strawberry plants like rich soil and
regular, but not heavy, watering. The
variety you buy will determine the size
of the fruit and the number of fruits pro-
duced per plant. Most strawberry flow-
ers are white but I have recently seen
some that are pink.

During winter the US market for
strawberries is served by Florida, mostly
from around Plant City in Central Flori-
da. The strawberry varieties used there
are short day cultivars like Florida
Belle,

Expressing yourself



At one time or another we have all
noticed our partners being distant, hav-
ing something on their mind but just not
saying anything. We may make excuses
that this is their normal behaviour and
perhaps the pattern of the relationship.
We may even wonder if it is something
we have done or not done. Alternative-
ly we may have something pressing, but
seeing our partner emotionally drained
and upset about their day may lead us to
think that there is never a right time to
talk. So we just do not talk about it and
we keep it to ourselves. Without a doubt
timing is very important, but being aware
of the tendency to avoid and withhold
the sharing of feelings can be detrimen-
tal to the individual and the couple bond.
Knowingly or unknowingly, silence can
be used as a weapon. Problems such as
suspicions, distrust and assumptions
creep in and are often unjustified. If left
unattended these small insidious prob-
lems can become huge milestones to
overcome. Is this learnt from our child-
hood or does it result from relationship
itself?

DIFFERNCES

There is no doubt that boys and girls
are brought up differently. Few would

disagree that society looks at boys who
show too much emotion as weak, and
‘girly’. Boys who show little emotion are
considered more 'masculine’. Of course
boys have feelings and emotions but
some are considered disadvantageous to
show. Showing enthusiasm, excitement,
anger, or being upset and gloomy is
acceptable. However, their showing love
and caring exposes vulnerability, partic-
ularly to the women in their lives. This
reveals a need and dependency on
women which in turn can be perceived as
a weakness. Generally girls are encour-
aged to express themselves and be gen-
tle and dependant. Feeling, hearing and
saying the words of love are essential
for the sense of well being for women. It
is often this disconnect between the gen-
ders that we see in relationship thera-
py. By showing couples why this has
come about and how, it can be easily
resolved if practised frequently. On the
whole, women continue being able to
put their thoughts together and express
their emotions throughout their lives.
That is not to say that our life experi-
ences and relationships don’t dent us
and at times we all have difficulty getting
the words out. Learning early on in life
how to open up and express ourselves
helps us then to form friendships and
then later on love relationships.

HISTATUSSIN

AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING DRUG STORES.



Florida 90, Tioga, Sweet Charlie and
Festival. Florida strawberries are avail-
able from Thanksgiving to May.

Most of the strawberry plants sold in
Bahamian nurseries are of the Ever-
bearing type. These tend to be day-
length neutral and respond to the ideal
time of year which is January to June in
The Bahamas. Everbearing strawberries
are, however, capable of giving you nice
surprises at any time of the year.

Strawberries attract critters — and
birds. The ‘straw’ in the name refers to
the European habit of covering the
plants with straw once they have been
set out in order to counteract an unex-
pected frost. Once the danger of frost
was over the straw was placed around
the plants in order to keep the fruits off
the ground. In The Bahamas as well as
Europe a fruit that touches the ground
will be predated.

Florida strawberries are grown using
black polyethylene sheeting. The plants
are put into the ground through slits and
the sheeting acts as a mulch.

Raising the fruit from the ground can
be done using plastic shreds (as found in
Easter baskets), paper towels, patches
of polyethylene, or a host of other mate-
rials. I use flat rocks from shale beaches.
A rubber snake (or reasonable facsimile
thereof) moved discreetly every day will
help with the bird problem.

TIMING

As relationship therapists we are often
asked how to bring up and talk about
negative topics when the anticipated
response is hostile body language, criti-
sism and a brick wall. Certainly the tim-
ing of such matters is paramount if you
are looking for a favorable outcome but
if this has become habitual then finding
ways to soften the relationship is essen-
tial. Appreciation is the best way to stave
off negative feelings. This may be some-
thing the person has done, or a part of
their personality you love. A few small
words of encouragement and apprecia-
tion can make all the difference. There is
no substitute or anything that has more
impact than the words 'I love you’. If
words of appreciation and love are intro-
duced on a daily basis then it will
undoubtedly help to reduce tension, criti-
sism and encourage more positive feed-
back. Hopefully then when it is time to
discuss difficult topics, there will be a
cushioning to the relationship and make
the ironing out of problems a little easi-
er.

SEX
A lot of people have difficulty talk-

Beyond snail, slug and bird predation
Ihave not had strawberry plants that
were attacked by diseases or mites,
though these problems exist. In a small
garden I would prefer to uproot the
plants and replace them in another area
rather than try to control the infestation.

If you have a strawberry jar you do
not have to worry about your fruits
touching the ground. Give the jar a
quarter turn every day so equal sun-
shine reaches every part of the contain-
er. Strawberry jars usually hold about
ten plants but there are strawberry
wheels that can hold 25 or more.

Strawberry plants like loose, friable
soil that has had compost added and is
slightly acid. They should be planted in
full sun and watered only moderately as
too much water damaged the roots.
Raised beds provide good drainage.
Strawberries should be fertilized lightly
twice a season but never when the
plants are holding fruit.

When to pick? Conventional wisdom
suggests picking the berries when they
are three-quarters red. Strawberries do
not ripen any further after being picked,
they only start to rot. A fully red straw-
berry is probably past its best.

Why bother to grow strawberries
when they are in stores all year round?
Taste. Real strawberry taste. Exquisite.
Worth fighting your wife over.

ing about sex with their partners. It
seems that sometimes it becomes
even more difficult if you have known
them for many years. You would
think it would be the opposite, but
the vulnerability and sense that there
is more to loose holds people back.
Couples often do not want to disturb
the sense of safety so things are left
unsaid. In relationship therapy cou-
ples often complain about their part-
ner's not expressing sexual pleasure
and passion. This often comes as a
complete surprise to the partner. If
you want to become more expressive
in your intimate life then pay atten-
tion to what you are feeling on the
inside and what you are showing on
the outside. Practise daily the ideas
talked about and see the dramatic
difference to and quality to the rela-
tionship.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical
Sex Therapist located at The Centre for
Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's
Close West. She can be contacted by call-
ing 356-7983 or by email at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com

Histatussin DM
COUGH SUPPRESSANT & RESPIRATORY DECONGESTANT





PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



OMAN
The balancing act between

and



I had a boss some time ago who
always reinforced the idea that “What
gets measured, gets done.” It is a very
simple statement but it means that if
you measure only processes, your peo-
ple will focus on the process to the
exclusion of all else. If this is how you
measure your team, they will master
the process and your leadership needs
may not be met. Additionally, mea-
suring only processes can lead to devel-
oping employees who feel:

eEntitled
eDisengaged
eUnderutilised
eUnder valued

You might say to yourself, “So what,
once I am getting the results I need
then there is no need to worry about
balance.” My assertion in response to
this claim is that yes, you may be
attaining your desired results, but with
strong leadership and an inspired team,
you can achieve quantum results.
Especially in challenging times.

If you are part of the “so what”
crowd you probably focus on building
processes and expect employees to
stick to the script at the risk of impact-



ing innovation and creativity or even
productivity. Creativity and innova-
tion are important cultural character-
istics because they show up when
employees are engaged. Engaged,
adaptable employees are not only able
to improve your results, they can inno-
vate solutions in any type of economic
climate and turbo-charge the perfor-
mance of your business.
Conventional wisdom used by man-
agers deciding on promotions is that
your best performers are the ones who
understand the process and produce
strong results. While they may be your
best employees, based on their techni-
cal skills, knowledge of the job or
results, sometimes these strong per-
formers are unable to motivate or
engage their respective teams.

Processes are usually established to
ensure standard levels of service are
offered to clients or standardised levels
of quality are applied throughout a
process. These reasons are certainly
important and should always be a part
of your focus but what about the peo-
ple considerations?

Process standards create safety, rou-
tine and opportunities for control.
Often process standards are treated as
rules or inflexible structures designed
to maintain uniformity. While stan-
dards are quite useful and necessary
for success, Tanmay Vorga once stat-
ed: “Processes have to be flexible since
each project is unique, each client is
unique and hence process require-
ments are unique too. Processes should
act as a tool and help people perform
better.”

His assertion supports the idea that
processes are tools and should be used
as part of a holistic solution. In higher
performing teams processes, not peo-
ple, are used as tools.

From a problem resolution perspec-
tive, managers can fall into the trap of
perceiving challenges primarily from
a process perspective and not see the
contributing people issues clearly

A lesson

in

green living

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunmedia.net

BLAZING the way in research and real world
application of various methods of green living,
South Eleuthera’s Island school is educating a
new generation of young people eager to examine
and discover ways of preserving nature’s won-
der, while celebrating the beauty of the Bahami-
an outdoors.

Nestled in the heart of Cape Eleuthera, the
Island School is a secondary level BI-semester
facility, which introduces a group of 48 high school
students to advanced academic training in fields
of Ecology, Environmental Art, Applied Science
and Research, and Bahamian culture and her-
itage.

With many of its students hailing from high
schools across the United States, one question
asked by many is how will this programme bene-
fit Bahamians, and what contribution is being
made to apply the same research locally.

Just ask 17-year-old Alannah Vellacott, past
recipient of the Bahamas Environmental Steward
Scholars (BESS) programme, and a 2008 gradu-
ate of the island school.

Alannah who is now interested in pursuing her
studies to the doctorate level, hopes to one day
lecture and write on the importance on marine
preservation in the Bahamas, mainly because of
her experience at the school.

Alannah said while growing up in Queen’s
Cove, Freeport, she always had a fascination with
the water. She recalls going out on dozens of
fishing trips with her neighbors where they caught
fish, dove for conch, and on a few occasions
caught sharks.

Although that was a fun experience, Alannah
said she never realised until recently how much of
a part of her future those trips meant.

“T didn’t know that it would ultimately affect
what I’m planning on doing later on in life, I was
just having fun.”

She said her path to finding the school was
completely by chance, but said that it was the
perfect place to foster her interest in marine biol-
ogy.
“Tnitially, I thought yeah it would be good, but
at the time I was looking at colleges, and I just
wanted to go off like everyone else, and was not
really concentrating or re-evaluating anything
that had to do with the Bahamas and how I could
possibly affect that.”

Learning that the school had a close relation-
ship with the University of Miami, she became
even more certain that she was making the right

‘Island School’ introduces students
to advanced training in Ecology,

Environmental Art, Applied Science
and Bahamian culture and heritage

choice in taking on the three month study at the
Island School.

Alannah said her experience at the school was
absolutely amazing, and being isolated from tech-
nology while learning the newest methods of
marine and environment research, has helped
her greatly in understanding the importance of
conservation, and the role she plays as a Bahami-
an in preserving the islands and waters of her
country.

17-year-old Bradley Watson, another BESS
recipient and graduate of the Island School, said
after his experience at the school he noticed a 180-
degree change in his confidence and ability to
socialise with others.

The school which exposed him for the first
time to non-invasive methods of shark and fish
research, helped illustrate how huge of an impact
humans have had on underwater species.

Taking a sabbatical from the College of The
Bahamas where he majored in Bio-Chemistry,
Bradley said he simply yearned for a new expe-
rience.

“Before then I had never been on a boat
before, no diving experience, and I’ve always
wanted to live on a family island, and I just want-
ed to have that experience.”

Bradley said even his parents, his father espe-
cially, had commented on his change in confi-
dence.

“T’m more independent, I use to ask a lot to do
things, I use to need advice on just about every-
thing, but now I’m not as dependent on my par-
ents and I feel like making the right choice is
now easy to identify.”

Bradley feels because of the practise at the
Island School where students are forced to think
about every decision they make, the ability of
thinking intelligently on his feet is now reflected
in his personal life.

He said also being a spokesperson for the
Island School, he is able to share on the fantastic
projects he has worked on, and how easy it can be
to introduce cleaner ways of living and co-habit-
ing with other creatures in the ecosystem.

Recently celebrating its tenth anniversary, the
Island School is continuing in its effort of research
in marine studied, intended to benefit not just
this country, but environments throughout the
globe.

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enough. Many managers learn how to
break down a systemic problem but
when people are involved, so are emo-
tions and emotions can impede the res-
olution process.

HOW DO | BRING MY
COMPANY INTO BALANCE?

In his book, Spiritual Capitalism,
Michael Hendren outlines his approach
to radical transformation of corporate
performance into quantum perfor-
mance. He states: “The outmoded
business practices of the past - top
heavy management, greed at the helm,
an employees-be-damned attitude, a
self interest focus in management - just
don't cut it anymore. I've had amazing
financial results with Spiritual Capi-
talism. I've also had a lot of fun in the
process while making a fortune for my
team.”

As a leader, you can achieve bal-
ance and quantum results through
some simple enhancements to your
behaviour. Michael Hendren suggests
that you should:

eCome from a place of empowerment
versus control.

| ee

Bradley Watson

AEE ere

On the catwalk

FROM page 12

eTalk to your people instead of at them
eLook out for your people instead of
for yourself

eShow how much you care about and
appreciate your people

Additionally, you can:

eDevelop your people through train-
ing, coaching and mentoring

eInspire creativity and open a safe
place for creativity

eDevelop an effective reward and
recognition program

eConduct an employee satisfaction sur-
vey to understand how well you are
maintaining the balance.

As a leader, while seeking to bal-
ance process and people, try to avoid
falling into the trap of achieving one to
the exclusion of the other. The process
of balancing is never-ending and over
time, the mastery comes from con-
scious attempts to recalibrate.

Adam Khan said: “You continually
find your balance, you don't achieve
balance. Even if you were able to find
your perfect balance and hold it, life
itself will throw you off balance con-
tinually. It is constant adjustment.”





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“We want to change the image of modeling
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help Gabriel in her profession.

“ Several persons took me aside and said
that she has what it takes, but she needs to
overcome her shyness, because as a Super-
model, a client wants their model to be
assertive and out there".

Mr Humes said that Gabriel’s success has
validated the efforts of Models 242 and proven
to the naysayers that there are opportunities
for young Bahamians to market themselves

This will also add tremendous publicity for
the Bahamas,” he added.

“When we got to Montenegro, a lot of peo-
ple did not know where we were from and
then as interest spread in Gabriel, everywhere
I went, people were talking about the
Bahamas. So hopefully, this will mean that
scouts come to the Bahamas, because they
know that they can find beautiful people here.”





THE TRIBUNE

2 man TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

SECTION B © HEALTH: Body and mind



































































@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

With onewstrut down the catwalk,
Supermodel of the Bahamas
Gabriel Moss propelled herself f
and the Bakiamas into the inter-
national spotlight, when she
dazzled persons attending the
Ford Supermodel of the World
contest in BUdva, Montenegro
last month,

The 5 foot nine and a half 17-year-old
beauty captured the crowd’s attention,
Standing sout.among the other 39 con-
testants from around the world to win
ihe “Best on Catwalk’ title.

“It Was amazing, when she came out
On the Catwalk, I just heard this gasp
from the crowd and this clapping and
when 1 looked up I realised it was her,”
said Mark Humes, the operations man-
ager Of Models 242 the agency which
awarded Gabriel the local Supermodel

title last October.
“In faet through-
out, the’competi- 4
tion, the officials ]
Were telling the oth- You WIN SOME
er girls, “This is how
cut are supposed to C nd YOU lose
Walk and they were
ommag to ner tor some, but that
lessons. d i
"She was incredible oesn tf mean
and it) Was so inspiring :
to see her develop from YO U Qg Ivewll) D .
the shy, quiet high
School graduate shewas |f ON ly means
(from St George’s High

School on Grand YOu must

. and really L d

Watch her develop as

she participated in the Iry Orel. )
COmpetition,” Mr MARK HUMES
Humes said.

“She had moments on the trip when I
could tell that she was in awe of what was
happening to her and she was absorbing it
all.”

Although Gabriel did not win the $500,000
contract with Ford, she did walk away with a
contract with New York model management
company VNY for an undisclosed amount.

Despite not wining the top award, Gabriel
said that the entire experience was wonderful
and exceeded her expectations and has not dis-
couraged her from modeling.

“Obviously when I didn’t win the contract with
Ford, I was disappointed , but it is very exciting to
have a company like VNY interested in me.”

“You win some and you lose some, but that

doesn’t mean you give up. It only means you must
try harder," she said.
Mr Humes added that the exposure will only

SEE page 10

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Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Detention Centre ‘hunger strike’ C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.77TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER BREEZYWITH CLOUDS HIGH 75F LOW 65F F E A T U R E S SEE‘WOMAN’ SECTION S P O R T S SEEPAGEFIFTEEN Atkins prepares for return n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net A DETAINEE housed at Carmichael Road Detention C entre, who was allegedly beaten so badly by officers that he lost fingernails, is starting a hunger strike tomorrow with other Cubans at the facility. Members of a Cuban American human rights organisa tion are expected to be in Nassau today to check on the health of the men detained at the facility. The “peaceful” protesters are also appealing for “Chris tian-minded” Bahamians to donate diapers and baby for mula along with food to assist with the maintenance of those housed at the centre. “The food we get isn’t enough. People try bartering and sometimes they end up giving sexual favours for food. During visitation is the only relief people have because the ones who have family come see them have food brought in. If you complain about the amount of food you get they will say: ‘We don’t have enough supplies for everyone here. If you don’t like it then y ou should go back home’,” one detainee told The Tribune. He said that detainees get a bowl of oatmeal or grits with tuna for breakfast. Lunch, he said, is not served every day and may only consist of a cheese sandwich. Women with children, he said, tend to complain the most frequently about getting more food for their children. “Without hesitation I can say this is a concentration camp. Any human being upon walking through the door would be shocked because Detainee who w as allegedly beaten to sta g e protest with other Cubans The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY On the catwalk BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Teen charged with murder A 17-YEAR-OLDboy accused of the brutal stab-b ing death of a 33-year-old H aitian man was arraigned in the Juvenile Court yesterday. Police have charged the juvenile in the February 18 stabbing death of Edvard F icien of Charles Vincent Street. Ficien was stabbed four times outside the Hap p y Hour Bar on Wulff Road and died clutching a fistful of cash, according top olice . A round 9.30pm Wednes day, police were alerted by a caller that a man was lyingo n the ground near the bar. When officers arrived, they found the victim's body between a fence and the building. He was dressed in blue jeans, a red shirt, blue jacket, w ith black and white tennis shoes. It is believed that Ficien was killed while hew as being robbed. His murder marked the twelfth for the year. The 17-year-old boy of C laridge Road was escorted by police to Juvenile Court 2 around noon yes-t erday with a light green comforter over his head to conceal his identity. The 17-year-old, who was arraigned before the Juvenile Panel, was not required to plead to the murder charge. He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case was adjourned to April 21. 17-year-old in court over stabbing death THE17-YEAR-OLD is escorted t o court yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page nine n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net AIDING in escapes from the Carmichael Road Detention Centre could earn a will ing Defence Force or Immi gration officer between $4,000 to $6,000, a detainee told The Tribune yesterday. He claimed that whenever there is a case of “someone jumping the fence” a Defence Force officer could possibly be behind it and when docu mentation is “miraculously” provided for inmates, an immigration officer could possibly be complicit in a fraud. He claimed that there was an instance of a Haitian man who paid $5,000 to an immi gration officer and “became a Bahamian national over night.” Claim that a willing officer ‘could earn up to $6,000’ for aiding a Detention Centr e escape SEE page nine n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net FORMER Prime MinisterPerry Christie stressed to his party supporters yesterday that all posts within the PLP will and can be challenged at the National Con vention in October or November of this year. With full faith that he will be returned as leader of the PLP, Mr Christie said he hopes and expects that other persons who feel that they have a contribution to make will come forward and make themselves known. However, as rumours spread yesterday that Mr Christie could be trying to block individuals from making a push at the convention, the former PM said that these allega tions are a complete “fabrication.” “As a matter of course, all offices are vacated and must be filled by the Con Christie: All PLP posts will be challenged at convention SEE page nine Perry Christie FIREINNASSAUVILLAGE FIREFIGHTERS SURVEY the damage after a blaze at Nassau Village last night. The fire destroyed an efficiency apartment above Andrea’s Hardware store on Taylor Street before being extinguished. There were no reports of any casualties. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f DUE TO PRESS TIME con straints, we are unable to bring readers the final score from the Hugh Campbell Champi onship game. Tomorrow’s Tribune , however, will feature substantial coverage of the highlights from the basketball tournament. w ww.tribune242.com

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE J U ST one year after M ount Tabor Full Gospel Baptist C hurch opened its s econd subdivision, the church yesterday officially launched a third housing area – Mount Tabor Gardens in southwest New Providence. The new subdivision, located off Carmichael Road, offers “middle-class” housing to Bahamians. “This latest project is the t hird in a series of initiatives d esigned to not only fuel the local economy, but to help Mount Taborites in particul ar, and Bahamians in general b ecome home owners and put scores of unemployed residents back to work,” the church said in a statement. Construction in Mount T abor Gardens has already b egun and senior pastor Bisho p Neil Ellis said: “Housing our people has become a part of who we are. “It has always been an integral part of the social agenda of our church. “I believe the lack of housi ng is still one of the greatest social ills facing our country.” A brief ceremony was held yesterday at the opening Mount Tabor Gardens. Governor-General Arthur Hanna was the keynote speaker. BISHOP Neil C Ellis officially opens the new Mount Tabor Gardens yesterday. GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur Hanna and Bishop Neil C Ellis take a tour of some of the homes after the ceremony. MOUNT TABOR GARDENS C HURCHLAUNCHESTHIRDHOUSINGAREAINSOUTHWEST N EW P ROVIDENCE No IPTC Header found P H O T O S : T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f N EW s ubdivision offers “middle class” housing. I I b b e e l l i i e e v v e e t t h h e e l l a a c c k k o o f f h h o o u u s s i i n n g g i i s s s s t t i i l l l l o o n n e e o o f f t t h h e e g g r r e e a a t t e e s s t t s s o o c c i i a a l l i i l l l l s s f f a a c c i i n n g g o o u u r r c c o o u u n n t t r r y y . .

PAGE 3

BUSINESSMAN David K elly is still undergoing treatment at the New York Pres byterian Hospital in New York. According to a source close t o the family, Mr Kelly's condition has not changed since last Friday. His family is still in New York with him. M r Kelly, proprietor of Kelly’s Home Centre, was taken seriously ill while in New York. With his wife Nancy and s everal members of Kelly’s Home Centre, he had flown to New York on the staff’sa nnual purchasing trip. However, at the beginning of last week, Mr Kelly develo ped chest pains and went to the New York Presbyterian Hospital for a check-up. Mr Kelly, who has a heart condition, underwent a proce d ure at the hospital last Wednesday. His condition was being c losely monitored after complications developed. His three sons, Andrew, Gregory and Scot, and his two daughters-in-law, Candy andS helly, flew to New York to be with him. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 3 INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News.............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,16 Editorial/Letters. .........................................P4 Sports ........................................ P12,13,14,15 BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION Business ......................................... P1,2,3,4,6 Advt ............................................................ P5 Comics........................................................P7 W oman ........................................... P8,9,10,12 W eather ..................................................... P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES Man, 44, accused of having sex with girl, 12 Fox Hill man, 22, facing rape charge is arraigned in court In brief A 44-year-old man a ccused of having intercourse with a 12-year-old girl was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Delbert Roberts of Amos F erguson Street is accused of having unlawful intercourse with the 12-year-old girl in December 2008. R oberts, who appeared before Magistrate Renee M cKay in Court 6, Parliament Street, was not required to enter a plea tot he charge. He was granted bail in the s um of $10,000. The case has been adjourned to April 28. REPLACEMENT judges will soon be filling the vacancies on the Court of Appeal bench, Attorney General Michael Barnett said yesterday. He declined to say exactly when the judges will be taking up their posts, but asserted that contrary to recent reports, two judges will not be assuming posts in the Supreme Court in March. Neither confirming nor denying reports that judges will be arriving from various parts of the West Indies next month, Mr Barnett would only say that gove rnment has made no secret of its intention to have a full complement of judges, regardless of nationality. "Obviously we have to fill those posts – we've said before we're not limiting our choices. There are positions in the Court of Appeal to be filled and we are looking for judges to fillt hose posts," Mr Barnett said during a brief interview yesterday. He added that contrary to reports, “There are no vacancies in the Supreme Court.” Last October Justice Milton Ganpatsingh retired from the Court of Appeal. Justice Emmanuel Osadebay is also getting ready to retire this year. S S i i t t t t i i n n g g While speaking at a special sitting of the Court of Appeal to mark the opening of the legaly ear last month, Mr Barnett said the choice for these essential positions must not be limited by g eography. "It is imperative that we secure the services of the persons with the necessary scholarship and judicial temperament to serve in this high office. "The panel from which this selection must be made cannot be limited by nationality or geography. These efforts also force us to address the terms and conditions under which justices serve. In this regard, a new commission under the Judges Remuneration and Pension Act may have to be appointed this year, earlier than the three years since the last commission, to make further recommendations to the terms and conditions under which justices of both the Court of Appeal and the lower courts serve. " We are all committed to doing all we can to strengthening the administration of justice in our country," he said. Court of Appeal president Dame Joan Sawyer, Justice Osadebay, Justice Hartman Longley and Justice Christopher Blackman are the only judges currently on the bench of the Appellate court. According to Article 102 of the Constitution, a justice of appeal is permitted to hold office until the age of 68. The Constitution also allows for the governor general, after consulting with the prime minister, to allow a justice to sit until the age of 70. The Constitution also says a judge may continue to serve beyond the age of 68, as may be necessary to enable him to deliver judgment or fulfil any other duty in relation to proceedings t hat were commenced in his c ourt before he attained that age. Replacement judges will soon be filling vacancies on Court of Appeal bench – AG n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A 22-year-old Fox Hill man accused of raping a woman after he allegedly forced his way inside herh ome in eastern New Providence last Friday was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Sheehan Comarcho, 22, of R evees Street was arraigned before Magistrate Guillimena Archer in Court 10, Nas-s au Street yesterday, charged with two counts of armed r obbery, two counts of receiving, burglary, rape and assault. I t is alleged that between 12.05am and 1.30am on Fri day, February 20, the accused broke into the home of a 35-year-old woman andr aped her. P P h h o o n n e e It is further alleged that while armed with a knife, the accused robbed the victim of $1,000 cash, a green 1997N issan Sentra valued at $5,000 and a black Sony Ericsson cellular phone val ued at $60. Comarcho was also charged with receiving the cash, car and cellular phone. It is also alleged that on the same day, while armed with a knife, the accused robbed another woman of a $300 gold chain. He is also accused of receiving the chain and assaulting the woman. Comarcho was not required to plead to the charges. He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been adjourned to June 1. David Kelly still receiving hospital treatment in US DAVID KELLY and his wife, Nancy, pictured in a file photo. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y. B USINESSMANIN N EW Y ORK P RESBYTERIAN H OSPITAL Michael Barnett

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EDITOR, The Tribune. It is terribly exciting to be a live in these history making days! Who woulda ever tink we woulda see a conchyjoe man in da White House? Wellm uddos! Chile, try let ma say sump-um. Thank you for a bit o f very valuable space. First of all, congratulations to Barak Obama for accom-p lishing that which is only possible in a great nation like America – being the first non-w hite man elected to the highest office in a land of a majori ty of whites. Now that is something! As for Michelle Obama f inally being proud to be an American, I don’t think we s hould hold that against her. Any of us are prone to getting caught up in the excite-m ent of a given event, and this event pretty much tops the list a t the moment. I did not support Barak Obama’s bid for the WhiteH ouse because I am a conservative, and having only his record to go on, I felt he was too liberal. It seems though that since h is election he has moved somewhat to the centre, in speech anyway. Time, ofc ourse, will tell whether or not he was too liberal. I heard it said somewhere, or I read somewhere, that the tremendous support by am ajority of Bahamians for Barak Obama was because of his stand on the issues, and not because of his skin colour. The only response I have f or that is to say that some people will make up all sorts of excuses for their behaviour rather than simply being honest. D o you think Bahamians, or Americans for that matter, would have supported a white m an as vigorously, whose stand on the issues was the very same as Barak Obama’s?B e honest now, keep it real! I might just be a racist, though. There has been much ado about Martin Luther King Jr’s dream having been realized as a result of Barak Obama’s election. There is one small problem with that theory. Dr King’s dream was that he saw a time when a man would be judged by the content of his character rather than by the colour of his skin. Barak Obama is President of the United States today because of one overwhelming f act, and that is the colour of his skin. There are other credi ble reasons too that he is President, of course, but if he had not been a man of mixedr ace, (he is not black tend that he would not be P resident today. Again, I might just be a disgruntled racist. I tell you, if when I get to Heaven and it turns out that God is a black man, I’m stillg oing to fall on my face and kiss his feet. If, on the other h and Barak Obama would have been a white man, there would not be the worshippingo f him that we see. For instance: T here are Hollywood actors who have promised to be kinder, love more, smile more,e tc., because of Barak Obama! Wow! Could somebody p lease explain why so many white Americans suffer from a condition known as “White Guilt”? Is this condition in the medical journals? There are gangsta rap s ingers who have promised to tone down the violent lyrics in their music because ofB arak Obama! Not to sound repetitive, but Wow! Glorifyi ng and/or trying to justify violence is just wrong no matter if you come from the hood orf rom the Ivy League. Dig? Tyler Perry, a great (black comic and movie actor said that he never voted before in any election. What an insultt o the memory of black people who suffered great humiliation, discomfort and pain to bring about the change necessary for Barak Obama tob ecome President, and to give Tyler Perry the right to vote. The list goes on and on.I find it extremely interesting that there are so manyp eople that would try and con vince us that race relations in the US have gone nowhere in the last 50 years, but suddenly, because a non-white man has become President, all of the problems of yesterday are fixed. That is where I differ from most other folks. I am not taken in by image or promises. I need to see results, and whenI do I am more than man enough to give due where it is deserved. Again, let me congratulate Barak Obama on his victory, and let me inform the American people that I am praying for the success of their new President, in the hopes that he will bring America – and by extension, the world – out of this terrible economic time.I prayed for their last President too because it was the right thing to do. It is necessary for America to remain the world leader. At least for us Bahamians it is. One can only imagine what could have been accomplishedh ad these Hollywood types and their music industry counterparts gotten behind the war effort on terror. I believe vic-t ory would have long since been announced. But, like I a lways tell my wife, there is absolutely nothing we can do about the past. Some peoplew ill never get it. Let me assure the American people that while thee conomy is the greatest problem facing them at the m oment, terrorism has by no means become a non-issue. The terror captains of the Easth ave boldly informed us that they are intent upon world d omination, and they have demonstrated time and again that they are willing to do any-t hing they deem necessary to accomplish their goals. And t hey are very, very patient. “Death to the infidels.” And this is not because W. had theb alls to take the fight to them. Those same captains of terror have stated repeatedly that Israel has no right to exist and they want to see her wiped offt he face of the earth. If Barak Obama caves to the pressures of the rest of thew orld and sides with Israel’s enemies, we won’t have to w orry about America being the world leader any more. If, on the other hand, BarakO bama stands with Israel, there is hope yet. Simply being black – or at least not white – will not be enough. Actually doing thev ery difficult things to effect positive change will make the man’s legacy and bring America back from the edge. Finally, I would like to t hank George W Bush for his service to his country and to the world. But for his serious s tance on terrorism, it is very probable that American blood would have been spilt onA merican soil again by now, and for no other reason than being deemed infidels by an extremely violent and misinformed enemy. Also, it is important to me that Mr Bush know that I know, that the war on terror did not alone bring about this economic crisis, as a few very clever yet intellectually dishonest liberals would have us believe. As for the rude reception Mr Bush was given during Obama’s inauguration, it is apparent to me that some people have no respect for protocol at all, unless it serves their own purposes. It is called a lack of class. In order for the truth to set one free, one must first know what the truth is. Unafraid and narrow-minded as ever. WILLIAM (BILLY Abaco, Bahamas February, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm Obama faces split opinion on Iraq future W ASHINGTON (AP O bama faces split opinions within the military on whether to make the speedy withdrawal from Iraq he championed as a candidate. Obama's top generals in Baghdad are pressing for an elongated timetable. Some influential senior a dvisers inside the Pentagon are more amenable to a quicker pullout. Obama has yet to decide the matter. But his recent announcement that he is sending thousands more combat troops toA fghanistan implies a drawdown of at least two b rigades from Iraq by summer. That does not answer the question whether Obama will stick to his stated goal of a 16-month pullout or opt for a slower, less risky approach. G en. Ray Odierno, the top American commander in Baghdad, favours a longer timetable for leaving Iraq. He sees 2009 as a pivotal year, with parliamentary elections set to be held in Decem-b er; he doesn't want to lose more than two of the 1 4 combat brigades that are now in Iraq before the end of the year. And he believes the U.S. military w ill need to remain engaged in Iraq, to some degree, for years to come. O dierno's boss at U.S. Central Command, Gen. David Petraeus, leans toward Odierno's v iew. Gen. David McKiernan, the top U.S. com mander in Afghanistan, has steered clear of the d ebate over withdrawing from Iraq. But he sees his battlefield as an increasingly urgent priority, not just for additional combat troops but also for Iraq-focused surveillance aircraft and more civilian support. There are now about 146,000 U.S. t roops in Iraq, compared with 38,000 in Afghanistan. Obama has directed 17,000 more to h ead to Afghanistan, including Marines and sol diers who had been in line for Iraq duty. A t the Pentagon, a more mixed view prevails. The uniformed service chiefs see Iraq as a strain on their troops and, more broadly, a drain on their resources. The Marines, in particular, are in the tough position of having a foothold in Iraq a nd Afghanistan. As a relatively small service, they would prefer to concentrate more fully on A fghanistan, if only they could get out of Iraq. Neither Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the J oint Chiefs of Staff, nor Defence Secretary Robert Gates has said publicly whether he supports a 16-month withdrawal timeline. But they have an obligation to consider the full spectrum of threats and potential threats to U.S. national secu r ity. "There's a very clear understanding of what is at stake here," Mullen said Feb. 10. "And it's v ery natural for Gen. Odierno to want to go slow er and to hang onto capability as long as possible," h e added. "That's not unusual. It's very natural for Gen. McKiernan to say, 'I need more.' And so that's the tension. We don't have an infinite pot (of resources and deployable forces to make hard decisions about where to accept risk." In internal discussions, the emphasis appears to b e on getting out responsibly rather than quickly, several officials said, speaking on condition of a nonymity because no decisions have been made. Obama must weigh an array of hard-to-figure trade-offs in security and politics. And he must r econcile his conviction that the combat phase of U .S. involvement in Iraq must end with his commanders' concern in Baghdad that hard-fought gains could be squandered. It boils down to this: How much more effort is the Iraq war worth? What is the risk of leaving too s oon? Is the 16-month timetable too short, given the uncertain state of stability and political reconciliation in Iraq and the potential cost of seeing the country slide back into widespread sectarianw ar? And is anything substantially beyond 16 m onths too long, given the call for still more troops in Afghanistan, where Obama himself has said the battle against extremists is going in the wrong direction? O bama is still considering his options, which officials say includes a less hurried, 23-month withdrawal. The deadline he inherited from the Bush administration is Dec. 31, 2011, the date seti n a security agreement with Baghdad that says all U .S. troops, not just combat forces, must be gone by then. One clue to some of the thinking inside t he White House might lie with the views of Obama's national security adviser, retired Marine G en. James Jones. Jones co-chaired a study published in January 2008 on the way ahead in A fghanistan. The group endorsed the idea of pro viding more military support for Afghanistan, i ncluding resources that become available as com bat forces are withdrawn from Iraq. The president has an additional factor to weigh: the political cost of backing off the 16-month pullout timetable that was a prominent feature of his c ampaign. Although he has said he thinks 16 months is a reasonable timetable, he also has a ssured military leaders that he will consider their advice. Notably absent, at least so far, is even a w hiff of public pressure from fellow Democrats to stick to a 16-month timeline. That suggests Obama's party might be satisfied so long as he makes early and clear steps in the direction of ending U.S. combat involvement in Iraq, even if on a s omewhat longer timeline. Obama campaigned for the White House on a promise that he would e nd the war and get U.S. commanders moving immediately on a transition to Iraqi control of t heir own security. He said military experts believe combat troops can be pulled out safely at a rate of one to two brigades a month, meaning all 14 combat brigades there now could be gone within 16 months, which equates to mid-2010. P eter Mansoor, a retired Army colonel who was the executive officer for Petraeus when the g eneral was in Baghdad overseeing the "surge" of U.S. forces in 2007-08, said he thinks it likely that O bama will pull at least four combat brigades out of Iraq by the end of this year. But he hopes the president does not insist on getting all 14 brigades out within 16 months. "If the president orders it, the military can do it, but whether it's advisable or not is a different story," he said in a telephone interview. "Quitef rankly, I don't think it is, given the risk you would incur to potentially upsetting the political s ituation" inside Iraq. (This article was written by Robert Burns of the Associated Press). Barack Obama and skin colour LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* $67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 5 n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THREE men accused of committing a spree of armed robberies this month were arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday afternoon. John Augustine, 27, and Colbert Augustine, 25, both Haitian nationals of Cambridge Drive, and Sean Johnson, 26, of East Street, were arraigned on a long list of armed robbery charges before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane. I t is alleged that the three m en on February 10, 2009 r obbed Donell Cox of $910 cash, the property of Adastra Gardens. It is further alleged that the three men also robbed Ms Cox of a pair of gold hoop earrings valued at $173, a pair of gold slave bands valued at $600 and $100 cash. It is alleged that on February 16, 2009 the accused, while armed with a handgun, robbed Marcia Newball of her Gucci neck chain valued at $1,600 and a silver Wittnauer watch valued at $550. It is further alleged that the three men being concerned together on Monday, February 16, 2009, robbed Marcella Russell of $40 cash, three Bahamian passports valued at $90, a Motorola cellular telephone valued at $300, a black handbag valued at $100 and an assortment of bank cards and personal items belonging to Ms Russell. Court dockets also allege that on the same day the three men allegedly robbed Ketress Knowles of a Motorola cellular telephone valued at $300, an orange handbag valued at $70, a black wallet valued at $30, a brown leather watch valued at $120 along with two gold wedding bands, together valued at $2,500. It is further alleged in the court dockets that the three men on February 16, 2009 robbed Kimberly Robins of a black handbag valued at $150, along with six cents. P P r r e e s s c c h h o o o o l l All three men pleaded not guilty to causing damage in the amount of $250 to a wooden door, the property of Little Voices pre-school. John Augustine and Colbert Augustine were also arraigned together on four separate counts of armed robbery. It is alleged that the men on January 19, 2009 robbed Yvania Alfred of $85,000 in cash, the property of L&S Convenience Store. It is also alleged that on the same day the two men robbed Ms Alfred of $100 cash and a gray Motorola cellular telephone valued at $150 as well as a black pistol grip 12-gauge shotgun valued at $850. Court dockets also state that on the same day the men allegedly robbed David Servincent of $50 cash and a Motorola cellular telephone valued at $269. It is also alleged that Shaun Johnson along with John Augustine on February 16, 2009 robbed Nicole Johnson of $2,100, the property of Alpha Learning Centre. The men were not required to enter a plea to the armed robbery charges. Attorney Mark Rolle, who represented the three men, told the court that the accused had been arrested last week and claimed that they were subjected to extreme brutality while in police custody. According to Mr Rolle, the men had been denied access to medical treatment. He told the court that Shaun Johnson had appeared at the Grove Police Station, but had been turned away as they had refused to accept him. According to Mr Rolle, Johnson said that he felt as though a bone in his hand had been broken and that one of his ribs had been broken as well. Mr Rolle yesterday requested that the men be given medical attention at Her Majesty’s Prison. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that the three men receive medical attention. The case has been adjourned to March 10 and transferred to Court 5, Bank Lane. Three men arraigned in connection with a spree of armed robberies n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net CASH-strapped couples across the globe who are worried they might have to put off their dream wedding are being invited to get creative and win a Ministry of Tourism competition to get married in the Bahamas for free. To enter the aptly-titled “Bahamas Bridal Bail-Out” competition, couples must tell the world their love story via a video or written essay accompanied by a photograph which will be posted on the website www.bahamasbridalbailout.co m. The only price to pay: Once couples post the tale of their love online, they will have to open themselves up to public scrutiny in the form of an online poll. The would-be spouses who place in the top 20 will then be reviewed by a panel of judges, who will whittle the group down to five couples who will win the grand prize. As part of their bail-out package, couples will enjoy a round-trip airfare for themselves and eight others to the Bahamas; deluxe hotel accommodations for four days and three nights for all 10 people; the use of a wedding planner, photographer; flowers, and a wedding cake, according to the Ministry of Tourism. A A d d v v e e r r t t i i s s e e d d The promotional push is being advertised this week in such high-profile publicationsas The New York Times . “It’s tough times for couples wanting to get married or renew their vows. However, the islands of the Bahamas doesn’t think a little thing like money should stand in the way of your dream wedding coming true. So we’re here to help you out with the Bahamas Bridal Bail-Out con test where you can win a dream destination wedding, courtesy of the Bahamas Min istry of Tourism,” reads the government-owned Bahamas.com site. Possible destinations for the getaway will include the Peli can Bay at Lucaya, Grand Bahama; the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort; SuperClub B reezes or the Wyndham Nass au Resort. Submissions are being accepted from March 20 through April 24. Public vot ing will take place from April 25 to May 17. SOMEWHERE between the blaring of cruise s hip horns the frenetic bustle of Bay Street, some tourists are lucky enough to encounter the melody of drums courtesy of Nassau’s very own Randy Deveaux, better known as The Downtown Drummer. C lad in newly-made junkanoo attire, Mr Deveaux plays his very own mix of junkanoo b eats to the delight of tourists. He says his aim is to enhance each visitor’s e xperience by sharing a little piece of his culture with them. “They love the music. Keep them dancing. Let them know what junkanoo is,” Mr Deveaux said. He often demonstrates the finer points of various junknoo dances like the “conch style” and “mash the roach” and tells whoever is interested a bit about the history of junkanoo. M r Deveaux is passionate about his role as the unofficial junkanoo ambassador for the Bahamas. “Its something within me – I love to do it and am proud to do it. Downtown is the main attraction and I boost (tourism R eminiscing about memorable moments with visitors quickly puts a smile on his face. He said h e likes “when they smile, taking pictures with them, letting them try on my hat. When I give a way pieces of costume or show them beats like ‘Goombay’ and ‘Roll beat.’ He believes he has given visitors “a lot of joy.” Mr Deveaux has played the role of the Downtown Drummer for several years, and plans to continue as long as tourists continue dancing to the beat. Promotional push to lure couples to Bahamas Antigua’ s PM pledges action in Stanford case In brief n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net CHILD rights activist Cleaver Duncombe accused public o fficials of failing to properly protect the nation's children from predators. H is comments came in response to allegations that a female primary school student, said to be 6-years-old, was sexually assaulted while on school grounds by a group of older boysf rom a separate secondary school. The alleged assailants are reportedly 7th graders. Meanwhile Education Minister Carl Bethel told The Tribune that education officials are awaiting ther esults of a police investigation before determining whether any security guard or teacher was in neglect of their duties during the alleged attack. " The system is obviously cont ributing to much of what is hap pening to these children because it w ould be incumbent through law for those who are entrusted with those mammoth tasks to do whatt hey are supposed to do to protect them – beef up security, moving around, being more vigilant – because if you know chances are you are going to jail, then you would b e more vigilant," Mr Duncombe said. He argued that school officials responsible for securing a campus should be held accountable if it is found that their negligence contributed to an assault. "What happens is, nobody is accountable, nobody can trace to see exactly who would have been responsible at that partic ular time for the overseeing of the child. Developed countries have these systems where people are held accountable. What makes it so difficult for the Bahamas to be accountable?" he asked. According to a source close to the investigation, one of the alleged assailants was able to gain access to the campus because he was related to a stu dent there. It is claimed that after someone found out about the attack, the group of boys – between two to four of them – jumped the school's back wall and escaped. U U p p d d a a t t e e Yesterday Minister Bethel said he was awaiting an update from the school's security team. He also denied claims that the fence around the school is insufficient. When asked about the status of an internal review into the matter aimed at discovering if any employee was derelict in their duties, he replied: "That depends on the police report. Right now we're waiting on that." When pressed about whether he intends to punish any school employee found to have been negligent in the matter, Mr Bethel said it is unclear at this stage whether or not there was any negligence. The alleged incident took place on January 23 at a public primary school. The alleged victim was reportedly lured behind a building shortly after 3pm. She is said to have been treated in hospital for her injuries, however her present condition is unknown. School officials have come under fire for not bringing the matter to light sooner. "Parents in this country should be horrified because you're saying to me now you can't even send your children to school anymore? I know one thing, if something would have happened to my 11-year-old who I sent to school, it ain't ga' just be no accident and we hush it and sweep it under the rug. And look at the length of time that they took for this to come to the public forum. It's so irresponsible," Mr Duncombe said. He also repeated his call for government to implement the proposed Family and Child Protection Act to allow for harsher penalties for child negligence and other crimes against children. Downtown drummer gets new look R ANDY DEVEAUX, b etter known as the Downtown Drummer, pictured in his brand new junkanoo costume with happy tourists. Public officials accused of failing to protect children from predators Child rights activist hits out MAGISTRATE’SCOURT Carl Bethel “Parents in this country should be horrified because you’re saying to me now you can’t even send your childr en to school anymore.” Clea v er Duncombe n ST. JOHN’S, Antigua Antigua’s prime minister says parliament will reconvene to deal with fallout from allega tions of fraud against R. Allen Stanford, the country’s largest private employer, according to the Associated Press . Prime Minister Baldwin Spencer told reporters Sunday night he is concerned about the potential loss of hundreds of jobs and that the government “has decided on a course of action.” He did not disclose any details on the plan, however. A parliamentary session is scheduled for Thursday. The twin-island nation of Antigua and Barbuda dissolved its parliament ahead of general elections scheduled for March 12. But the law allows for it to reconvene in special session to address matters of urgent national interest. Stanford’s businesses employ hundreds of people in Antigua and include two restaurants, a newspaper, cricket grounds and a development company, and a three-branch local bank as well as the headquarters of his offshore bank in the island of about 80,000 people. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed a civil lawsuit last week accusing Stanford of a “massive” fraud through Antigua-based Stan ford International Bank Ltd. Stanford, who was served legal papers by FBI agents last week and ordered to surrender his passport, has not been charged with any crime.

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H ank Ferguson, director of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s recently established Small and Medium Enterprises Support Unit,r epresented the non-profit organisation in St K itts and Nevis earlier this month. He was attending the 93rd board of directors meeting and joint regional chambers and man u facturers meeting of the Caribbean Associat ion of Industry and Commerce (CAIC Representatives from chambers of commerce from throughout the English speaking Caribbean, the Dominican Republic, Guade-l oupe and St Maarten were in attendance. The meeting focused on issues related to the global financial crisis and its impact on the region. Additional discussions centered on the implementation of the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA for the CAIC in 2009 and arrangements for the Summit of the Americas scheduled for next month in Trinidad and Tobago. During the course of the meeting, Mr Ferguson had the opportunity to meet with Prime Minister and Minister of Finance of St Kitts and Nevis, Denzil Douglas. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By SIMON LEWIS F REEPORT – State Mini ster for Finance Zhivargo L aing said yesterday that give n the economic situation faci ng Grand Bahama, a united G rand Bahama Port Authority is crucial. Mr Laing, a featured speaker at the 11th annual Grand Bahama Business Outlook h eld at the Our Lucaya Resort, addressed participants o n the topic: Grand Bahama’s Economy – Possibilities Beyond the Crisis. “No one can blame the Grand Bahama Port Authorit y for the current economic w oes we are facing,” Mr Laing s aid, “however in the best of t imes a united, focused, proact ive, productive and consider a te Port Authority is important to the success of this island. In a crisis such as we face, such a Port is crucial. “If we are to promote the necessary international and domestic investment needed t o make this island proper again, the Grand Bahama Port Authority must come to the t able as a whole entity with d edicated resolve. In that vein, its leadership must be more about the island’s progress t hat its own,” he stated. Mr Laing pointed out that w hile the downturn in the national economy began in 2006 or 2007, Grand Bahama’se conomic misfortunes began much earlier, and that the i sland is “now into its seventh year of economic recession a nd in its fifth year of econ omic crisis.” He emphasised that the hurr icanes of 2004 had a devastating effect on Grand Bahama’s economy, having forced the closure of the Royal Oasis and other business,r esulting in hundreds of residents losing their jobs. M r Laing pointed out that the Bahamian economy cannot be revived without the g lobal economy – in particular the US economy – also returni ng to good health. “The reality is that the globa l economy is in a tailspin and no one is certain when this tailspin will end. Indeed, noo ne knows just how severe this tailspin will be.” H e noted that the industrial sector of Grand Bahama, w hich largely caters to an i nternational clientele, has not been badly affected by the d ownturn. Focusing on the economic possibilities beyond the crisis, Mr Laing pointed to the Ross University FreeportA cademic Facility and the Fenestration Glass Services C ompany. “The fact is that this island is ideally suited for an offshore e ducation industry and further m edium to high technology manufacturing. It is also highl y suited for offshore medical services and offshore finance,” h e said. Highlighting other developments, Mr Laing said: “Even a s we speak, the Grand Bahama Shipyard has ordereda nd secured another dry dock, m aking a total of three. “This means that it now has t he capacity to service even more ships therefore creating m ore business and economic opportunities. As we speak, the $900 million acquisition of BORCO by Vopak has been completed a nd the company is undertaking almost a quarter of a bil-l ion dollar upgrade to its newl y acquired oil storage facili ties. Vopak is a huge company a nd it is only to be seen what business opportunities will u ltimately emerge from its investment here in Freeport,” h e said. Meanwhile, Mr Laing emphasised that the governm ent will continue to shore up its social safety net in ordert o soften, to the extent possib le, the impact of the crisis on citizens. A NIMAL lovers are invite d to attend this year’s Proud Paws Potcake Party which will be held on Friday, Feb ruary 28, from 6pm to mid night at the Bahamas Nation al Trust’s Retreat on Village Road. T he annual Potcake Party b rings together supporters and friends for an evening of entertainment, music and dancing. There will also be raffle prizes, a silent auction and a light buffet. Proud Paws is a registered non-profit charity which has as its mission the reduction of unwanted dogs and cats by means of a subsidised spay and neuter project. To date, the charity has spayed or neutered 5,700 animals, thereby drastically reducing t he stray and roaming dog a nd cat populations of New Providence. Proud Paws’ education programme takes the mes sage of responsible pet own ership and kindness towards animals to schools through-o ut the capital. V olunteers and their pets have made presentations to more than 8,000 school children. Tickets for Friday’s event are available at Palmdale Veterinary Clinic, Caves Village Clinic or at the door. The executive of Proud Paws has assured that the charity will make every effort to minimise disturbance to the surrounding area, and invites all nearby residents to join the party in support the cause. A united GB Port Authority ‘is crucial’ MINISTER OF STATE for Finance Zhivargo Laing addresses the 11th annual Grand B ahama Business O utlook. Minister speaks out at Business Outlook event The Bahamas National Trust to host Proud Paws Potcake Party HANK FERGUSON , director of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s Small and Medium Enterprises Support Unit, at right, with the Prime Minister of St Kitts and Nevis Denzil Douglas. Chamber of Commerce director represents non-profit organisation in St Kitts and Nevis n POINTE-A-PITRE, Guadeloupe SHOPSin this French island’s biggest city opened Monday for the first time in more than a month, but then slammed their doors shut as thousands of chanting protesters marched to a meeting aimed at ending a 35-day-old general strike, according to Associated Press. Even as protesters blocked highways with new barriers, hopes were high among islanders that unions, busi nesses and French officials will reach agreement and prevent a repeat of last week’s riots. The workers have been striking since Jan. 20, demanding lower prices and a euro200 ($250 monthly raise for those making euro900 ($1,130 Also fueling the unrest is resentment over the control that descendants of slave hold ers hold over much of the island’s economy. Strikes also have taken place on the nearby French island of Martinique. For a few hours Monday, Pointe-a-Pitre’s commercial center returned to normal as shopowners took advantage of a lull in the street protests. Women lined up at a pharmacy and the smell of cinnamon and licorice filled an open-air spice market that normally caters to cruise ship passengers. But the city’s stores hastily closed down as the marchers approached waving red flags and pumping their fists. They chanted “We came to negotiate!” and sang the anthem “Guadeloupe is ours!” as they marched to the seaside port authority building, where talks are taking place. “We are afraid for ourselves, we are afraid for our business es and we are afraid for our customers,” said a visibly ner vous shopowner, who asked not to be named for fear of reprisal. Among the marchers was French leftist leader Olivier Besancenot, who walked behind strikers carrying red flags bearing the image of revolutionary icon Ernesto “Che” Guevara. Leaders of the strike-leading LKP, or Collective Against Exploitation, told supporters that no deal had been reached by mid-afternoon and that talks were continuing. Guadeloupe mar chers converge on strike talks SEVERAL VEHICLES sit in a blocked highway during riots in Gosier, on the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe, Friday, Feb. 20, 2009. R a m o n E s p i n o s a / A P

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 7 n B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net AGUNfound next to the body of a man shot by policewas a “toy”, a firearms expert told the Coroner’s Court yesterday. However, former sergeant Charles Bain said that having been designed as a “replica”, it would be reasonable for a person to presume the gun was real if it had been pointed at them – a statement with which Magistrate William Campbell a greed. Mr Bain was one of several witnesses employed at the p olice forensics laboratory w ho testified yesterday at the i nquest into the shooting death of 22-year-old Lincoln Forbes. M agistrate Campbell told jurors that the aim of having the various officers testify wasto establish the chain of custody for evidence collected at t he scene. L ast week, 25-year-old convict Trevon Stevens was accused by counsel for the police officer involved of telling the court of a “pack of lies” when he alleged polices hot his friend Lincoln without c ause and afterwards dragged h is body and placed a gun n ext to it. Stevens said the pair were f ollowed into Garden Hills by p olice in an unmarked vehicle on the night of June 3, 2004. Officers shot at their Toyota Corolla, shattering the back windscreen, despite the fact they had not threatened the police with any weapon, h e alleged. Y esterday Detective Cor p oral Marvin Cargill, attached t o the Crime Scene Investigat ion Unit of the Royal B ahamas Police Force, told the court that he attended the scene of the shooting at 11.40pm on the night in question. He said he processed the a rea, collecting a loaded black a nd silver Makaroff pistol and f our unfired 9mm cartridges f rom the northern side of a black Toyota Corolla – thev ehicle which convict Mr S tevens testified on Thursday that he and the deceased had been travelling in on the night in question. He also said he found a silver and black imitation firearm next to Lincoln F orbes’ body. DC Cargill said h e submitted the firearms and a mmunition to the police f orensic lab. T he officer stated that a large” quantity of cash and a bank book was also found near the deceased’s body. He did not mention whether the money was collected as evidence, like the guns, ammunition, and other items. The money was not brought to c ourt as evidence yesterday. A ccording to the officer, no o ne drew his attention to the fact that the windscreen of the vehicle driven by Mr Stevens, and from which Mr Forbes h ad run shortly before being s hot dead, had been shattered. Asked by Magistrate C ambpell whether he was told w ho caused the windscreen to s hatter, he said he was not. Firearms anaylst Mr Bain t old the court that he tested a ll of the weapons from the scene as well as three police service revolvers submitted to him and found them all to be “functioning satisfactorily”. He said the “toy” gun found by investigators near Mr F orbes’ body was designed o nly to detonate “firecracke rs”, but he felt anyone could m istake it for the genuine artic le. T he former officer testified that, based on his analysis, he found that five of the bullet casings found at the scene had been fired by one police service revolver. It was not revealed which p olice officer had been carrying that particular Smith and Wesson pistol on the night in q uestion. Both woman DC Phyllis S mith and Mr Bain mentioned during their testimony that certain other tests – for gunfirer esidue on the victim’s clothing and to determine which gun had fired the two bullets collected from his body – hadn ot been completed yet as a nalysts, having begun the tests only shortly before the inquest got underway lastM onday, had not had enough time to do so. STUDENTS of the Lower Deadman's Cay Primary School called on Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham on Thursday, February 19, 2009 at the Cabinet Office, Churchill Building. Students visit the prime minister P e t e r R a m s a y / B I S Firearms expert:‘toy’ gun found next to man shot by the police Former sergeant testifies in Coroner’s Court n L ONDON T HE FIRSTGuantanamo detainee released s ince President Barack Obama took office r eturned to Britain on Monday, saying his seven years of captivity and torture at an alleged CIA covert site in Morocco went beyond his “darkest n ightmares”, a ccording to Associated Press. Binyam Mohamed’s allegations including repeated beatings and having his genitals sliced bya scalpel have sparked lawsuits that could ensnare the American and British governments in protracted court battles. Looking frail from a hunger strike, Mohamed, w ho once was accused by U.S. authorities of being part of a conspiracy to detonate a bomb on American soil, stepped off a charter plane andw as whisked away by police, border control agents and immigration officials. The 30-year-old Ethiopian refugee, who moved to Britain as a teenager, was freed after fourh ours of questioning. Attorney General Eric Holder, who traveled Monday to Guantanamo Bay as the Obama a dministration weighs what is needed to shut the facility, thanked Britain for its cooperation in the case. “The friendship and assistance of the international community is vitally important as we work to close Guantanamo, and we greatly appreciate t he efforts of the British government to work with us on the transfer of Binyam Mohamed,” he said. L awyers for Mohamed are seeking secret U.S. intelligence and legal documents they say will prove the Bush administration sent Mohamed to M orocco, where it knew he would be tortured. T hey claim the documents also prove Britain was c omplicit in the abuse. Unlike in the U.S., Britain’s leaders don’t have a past government to blame Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s Labour Party has been in power for more than a decade. B ut the case is also a test for Obama. While he has promised Guantanamo’s closure and an end to torture, he has not yet publicly explained howh is government will change the process of extraordinary renditions, which involve sending terror suspects to foreign countries to be interrogated. CIA Director Leon Panetta has told Congress r enditions could continue, but that prisoners won’t be handed over to countries where they are likely to be tortured which has always b een the stated U.S. policy. Guantanamo detainee freed after four years in prison

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THE Bahamas has been chosen by the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders Organisation as theb ackdrop for the world’s numb er one selling swimsuit calendar. The cheerleaders, who arrived at Atlantis on Sunday and will be staying until March 1, will be photographed for the 2010 cal-e ndar at some of the resort prope rty’s signature spots, including Cain at the Cove, Cove Beach, One & Only Ocean Club, and Aquaventure. “This is a big deal for the dest ination to have the world’s number one selling calendar being shot here,” said Kerzner Inter-n ational-Bahamas president and m anaging director George Markantonis. The major marketing campaign is reinforced by the reintroduction of American Airlines’ direct flights from Dallas to Nas-s au two times per week. T he partnership between the two major brands Kerzner International and the Dallas Cowboys Franchise provides the property with access to approximately 300,000 season ticket holders and others that t hey can market to and bring increased business to the Bahamas and Atlantis, Paradise Island. Stadium M oreover, the Cowboys franchise plans to open its new stadium next season and the capac-i ty crowd will be able to see v ideo of the cheerleaders on l ocation in the Bahamas on the Jumbotrons during the game. “We’ll have a captive audience to showcase the girls swimming with the dolphins, dining in ourf inest restaurants, partying in our ultra-chic Aura Nightclub, and e njoying three of our world-class beaches,” Mr Markantonis said. This is the 16th time that the popular football cheerleaders have shot their popular swimsuit calendar on location. The calen-d ar has been a hot commodity since the late 1970s when it was f irst released. As for the 2010 editionwith scenes shot mostly at Atlantis, P aradise Island it will be r eleased in August with four diff erent sized calendars for fans to c hoose from. “We’ve travelled everywhere, b ut when I saw the waters of the Bahamas, I just knew we had to shoot here. The hospitality and the accessibility of the property a re just as outstanding as the scenery itself,” said director of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders Organisation Kelli Finglass. The 26 cheerleaders belong to a 60-member team that arrived in the Bahamas on Sunday. They w ere given a Bahamian welcome by Cove staff and later treated to a welcome reception at Seaglass h osted by Mr Markantonis. D uring the week, the cheerl eaders will be hosting several g uest activities including a cheer camp for girls, Aquaventure O lympics, and a cheer session for guests on Atlantis’ Royal Deck. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Debutantes pay cour tesy call on Ministry D EBUTANTES FROM p ublic a nd private schools in New Providence paid a courtesy call on the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture last week.P ermanent Secretary Archie N airn is pictured with the group. Letisha Henderson /BIS Bahamas backdrop for best selling swimsuit calendar DALLAS COWBOYS CHEERLEADERS pose for a shot with Cove staff and Kerzner International-Bahamas staff. Included in the shot are Butlers Wesley Marcel and Derrick Taylor, assistant manager at Atlas Kareem Bethel; Kapil Sharma, vice-president of operations at the Cove; Anna Wilson, vice-president of Casino Special Projects, and Ernie Cambridge, vice-president of VIP services.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 9 w hat they are confronted with is stripped barracks witha bunch of rusty bunk-beds. People sleep on the floor u nder the bunk beds, in the bathroom. The blankets they provide have been here for y ears and they are filled with h oles. There is no telephone s ystem, there is no laundry system or mail system,” hes aid. T he women are kept in the same conditions with their children. “The sad thing about it is they have a little play set out there for them but that’s all for show. They never bring t he children out there to play. W hat they do is unload busloads of Haitians in there, s ort them out and bring them i nto the barracks from t here,” he said. Overcrowding, a frequent problem at the centre, was exacerbated when American Matthew Todd Davenport set fire to one of the male dormitories last December. However, the detainee said that the full story of what surr ounded the arson has not b een told and the incident highlighted another serious problem at the centre, frequent beatings by some officers. “He was obviously irrational from the time he was b rought here. At one point h e got up on the roof of the barracks and started screami ng about the conditions at t he centre and told us that w e didn’t have to put up with this and tried to encourage us to complain to oure mbassies. “The officers climbed on top of the roof and beat him senseless. He fell off the roof and then they beat him some more. The next day they put him in the dorm and that’s w hen he set it on fire. They n ever said anything about the v icious beating they gave that man. I even heard that theo fficers at the Carmichael R oad station were talking about it,” he said. There was another instance with an inmate known as Fritz who was told by offic ers to close the barracks d oor. “He told them that there were too many people to close the door and it was even hard to breathe. They came through the gate and gun-butted him in the face w ith a rifle. He had a gash in h is forehead above his eye. There is another gentleman b y the name of Reginald. T hey broke both of his knee c aps and knocked out his teeth, these are the kinds of beating that take place here,”h e claimed. According to the detainee Reginald was taken to the police department after the beating and the following day he was taken to surgery but other injuries tend to be t reated at the facility. H e stressed that no-one at t he centre believes that what happens at the facility is rep-r esentative of all Bahamians, b ut said that officials need to pay more attention to the way the centre is operated. “The guy is not Bahamian. He was in New York when he was deported from there to Haiti and from Haiti he came here and was awaiting deportation. He came up with $5,000 and he became a naturalised citizen. “They falsified school records to say he attended school in the Bahamas,” the detainee alleged. “I don't know what else happened from that point but that’s where it began,” he told The Tribune. In another instance he claimed that five Chinese nationals were detained at the cen tre. He alleged persons paid some officials at the centre $30,000 for them to be released. “They put them on an airplane to Cuba so that they could try and re-enter the Bahamas from there and then go onto the US. They stayed in Cuba for a few days and then they got caught again here in the Bahamas, so essentially they lost their money,” he claimed. "People pay for those escapes. There are p eople who are making a lot of money. Each escape nets up between $4,000 to $6,000. People are snuck out of the centre in the middle of the night and taken out of here,” he said. Another case, he said, involved an alleged former member of one of the armed gangs who supported deposed Haitian President Jean Bertand Aristide. “When Aristide fell he ran to the US and pleaded for political asylum. They didn’t want him there so he came here. He has been locked in the centre for about three years. He was ordered (to beofficials at gration, but he paid $3,000 to an officer here. "He was one of these old fellows who was around here for years doing favours for money, but he was offered a package deal to retire or else and he retired. “When he was about to be deported that immigration officer was the one to take him off the bus and off the deportation list and refilled his papers saying he was applying for asylum,” the detainee alleged. vention. There has never been a question about that. “There is no question, I am not at the next convention, vacating, or moving on. And therefore I will go into the next convention as leader of the PLP and most certainly I will come out as leader. There is no question about it in my mind,” he said. With the current deputy leader, Cynthia Pratt having already announced her decision not to run for the post again, Mr Christie said it was incumbent upon him to inform would-be candidates that they had best prepare themselves for this fight, which he expects would be highly contested. “But what has to happen now, is that as the deputy leader has indicated that she is going to move on, this is the right time to do so. It gives the party all the options. Because if a person wins and becomes deputy leader, that person has the potential to become leader of the PLP and then the PLP is in a very good position for transition. “That is why it must happen now. And so if there is a relatively unknown person with tremendous potential then that person has to get out and let people know they exist for the party to have maxi mum advantage in any such challenge,” Mr Christie said. Recently, the PLP has undergone tremendous pub lic scrutiny as scandals continue to follow the party in Opposition. Following their loss at the polls in 2007, the party has seen the public resignation of one of its members, the arrest and charging before the courts of a former sitting Senator, and widespread speculation that other members could cross the floor if a change to the leadership is not secured before 2012. Amongst those would-be contenders for deputy leader are PLP MP for West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe, MP for St Thomas More Frank Smith, MP for Fort Charlotte Alfred Sears, and the PLP’s MP for Cat Island and San Salvador Philip Davis. Detainee who was allegedly beaten to stage protest with other Cubans FROM page one Claim that a willing officer ‘could earn up to $6,000’ for aiding a Detention Centre escape FROM page one Perry Christie: All PLP posts will be challenged at convention FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 0LQLVWU\RIKH(QYLURQPHQW ' HSDUWPHQWRI(QYLURQPHQWDO+HDOWKHUYLFHV 6FKHGXOHRIHVLGHQWLDO*DUEDJH&ROOHFWLRQ 7KHSXEOLFLVKHUHE\QRWLHGRIWKH'HSDUWPHQWRI(QYLURQPHQWDO+HDOWKROLG:DVWHDQDJHPHQW'LYLVLRQ+RXVHKROGHVLGHQWLDOf*DUEDJH & ROOHFWLRQURXWHV 1 LJKWLPHFROOHFWLRQ n f n bn n nbn frn n tnnb nn n r nnn n bnnbr nn b nnr n n n fnn rr n n nn n n rrnb b rn b r bf n bn t n fn b b rnfn n n tf frtf rrr r tr rnr ttnr t r t f ttrt ttrrr t r tt rfn trr rrrrt ttr rr ttrfrrt n rtbtr tttrr tftnf r r r ttrf n rr t rrtfnf tr nfr ttrfrrn nttrnrf trfrtf ftrf tn r tn rt rt ttrfn tfr tf rrr nf rtrfn f r r nt ttrfn nrt rt ff f frt rtrrnt t r rtft rtr nrf n f rr rr r t t t tnrr!rt rftf fr r rtnr!rttf rtrrt ftr tfft ff r tnrr!r ft r# " # # rr ! !r r " "! ! ! r # r ! r ! r ! r bn bn r" rr #"bt #"tn #"n r r! t !r !rr r ! "r# # rr r! r r! r rr ""r rr r## " # !#r "r r "r$ "r r! rr" r # ! r t "r " r ! rrr r"r ! r #r rr! "!r! ! r r!rr! ! r r!" r ! % r rr ! b ! rr r rr rr r r rr rr "r r tt r b ft r n n nnrbb FIREFIGHTERS examine the damage of last night’s blaze at Nassau Village. The fire destroyed an efficiency apartment on Taylor Street. SEEPAGEONE Fire in Nassau Village Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award.If so, call us on 3221986 and share your story.

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n By GLADSTONE THURSTON Bahamas Information Services EXUMA– The governm ent’s packing house system f or farmers in Exuma will be r econstructed, Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright has announced. “We are trying all we can to get that paid for and here i n Exuma out of the current b udget,” he told farmers during a workshop on Saturday. The workshop was held in conjunction with the Exuma Garden Club’s first Horticultural Fair at Hooper’s Bay. T he former packing house a nd cornmill were severely damaged about 18 months ago when they were flooded during Tropical Storn Noel. Farmers complained they had to send their dried cornt o mills in Long Island to make grits and other products. “I was of the opinion and so was the Director (of Agriculture) that the cornmill did not experience any damage a s a result of the flood,” said Mr Cartwright. “We found that impression was incorrect. The cornmill did experience some damage.” When Bahamas Agricult ural and Industrial Corpor ation executive chairman E dison Key and a delegation v isited Exuma two weeks ago, farmers complained to t hem about the state of the mill. Cornmill “They came right back to Nassau and reported to us and I was able to get the Director of Agriculture to have an investigation put in p lace to find out what is w rong with the cornmill, if it can be fixed to get it fixed, a nd if it can’t be fixed, to h ave it replaced. There is no reason why 18 months later Exuma doesn’t have a corn mill. While Ia pologise and take responsibility for it, I want to say it was a terrible breakdown in communication, and now that we know what’s going on we will do our best to try and get it corrected,” said Mr Cartwright. A ccompanied by permanent secretary Cresswell Sturrup, Minister Cartwrightw as met in Exuma by administrator Ivan Ferguson, chief councilor Teddy Clarke and superintendent of policeW illard Cunningham, officer in charge for Exuma and Ragged Island. The farm exhibits of Leon Williams and his grandson R icardo took top honours at t he fair. Minister Cartwright told farmers that hotels on t he island provide a cons umer base for them. There is no reason why Four Seasons would have to bring the produce into Exu-m a that can be produced right here,” said Mr Cartwright. He told farmers that the government “will never be able to afford to pay for all of what you produce” and urged t hem to form an association a nd link directly with whole s alers and retailers. “With the amount of visit ors you have here on a daily b asis and with the amount of hotels you have here,” said Mr Cartwright, “there is nor eason why any farmer in E xuma should have to go looking for a (government packing house. The packing house is only going to be there on the side for items that you really can not get a market for in Exu m a.” Farmers m eanwhile pressed Mr Cartwright for assistance with non-Bahami an farm labourers. Following a meeting with the new minister with responsibility for immigration (Mr McCartn ey), he said, an arrangement h ad been worked out to expedite applications for f arm labourers. W hen an application is m ade to bring in farm labourers, said Mr Cartwright, Immigration is to notify Agri-c ulture of the credentials of the applicant determined. Labour When you send your application in let us know so we can follow up on it for you because we want farming to go on in this country,” he said. “In order for farming to go o n, we know you need farm labourers. You cannot culti vate a lot of land without labour. There are many farmers who have been using help from outside the country andt hey need work permits. I want to encourage you not to hire persons who do not have work permits, and per sons who have work permitst hat are being paid for by someone else.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 11 MAGNOLA ADDERLEY shows off her cakes to Exuma Garden Club president Douglas Shuttleworth during Saturday’s Horticultural Fair. G l a d s t o n e T h u r s t o n / B I S Exuma farmer’s packing house system ‘to be reconstructed’ n B y K ATHRYN CAMPBELL Bahamas Information S ervices SENIOR citizens in the Kemp Road communityw ere treated to a postV alentine’s Day luncheon last week at St James Road Native Baptist Church. T he seniors were also entertained with songs, dances, skits and poetry by children residing in then eighborhood. The event was organized by the Kemp Road Urban Renewal Cen tre. K enyatto Johnson, assistant manager of the Centre, said the organisation aims to make a positive change in the community. “We have been busy cleaning the neighbourhood, c learing overgrown properties and moving derelict vehicles in. Kemp Road is on the move and we’re real-ly trying to brighten the area. “We’ve also been catering to the seniors and they have been assisting us with the young people. They teach them crafts and help with the afternoon classes we offer to the children. One particular lady is also teach ing the children to plait straw,” he said. Mr Johnson said since the Centre opened six years ago there have been some signif icant changes. “This is the largest amount of seniors I’ve seen today since we have been hosting them to various activities including outings, functions. We’ve also seen the young children interacting with the elderly more. They have formed relation ships since we’ve started this programme,” he said. Paulamae Miller, presi dent of the Kemp Road Senior’s Association, has been active in the communi ty visiting the seniors who reside in the neighbourhoodon a daily basis. “I go to their homes to see what their needs or wants are and then I report my findings to the Urban Renewal Centre. “Instead of them sitting at home after they retire, we try to keep them busy. We’re presently planning arts and crafts and other activities for them. We realise that when they get a certain age they don’t like to come out of their homes. It’s important to keep them moving and they live a lot longer. They are inspired todo things when someone shows interest in them,” Ms Miller said. CLARABELL MAJOR shares a test imony with fellow senior citizens in attendance at the Kemp Road Urban Renewal Centre’s post Valentine’s Day luncheon given in their honour on Friday, February 20 at St James N ative Baptist Church. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S Post-Valentine’s Day luncheon for seniors KENDRA DUNCOMBE entertains the guests in attendance at the Kemp Road Urban Renewal Centre’s Post Valentine’s Day luncheon for senior citizens in the community on Friday, February 20 at St James N ative Baptist Church, St James Road.

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Sea Bees Winter Invitational: Swimmers qualify for Carifta C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS FOUR Carifta qualifying performances were turned in at the Sea Bees Winter Invitational held over the weekend at the Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Center. Barracuda’s Dustin Tynes won the boys’ 11-12 400 freestyle in five minutes and 1.84 seconds with Zach Moses of Swift coming in second in 5:12.44. They both went under the qualifying time of 5:13.49. Dionisio Carey of the Barracudas did the Carifta qualifying time in two events in the boys’ 11-12 division. The first came in the 100 backstroke in a winning time of 1:22.27. The qualifying mark is 1:19.69. The other was in the 100 freestyle in 1:06.54, surpassing the mark of 1:08.49. And Bria Deveaux, another Barracuda, clocked 2:43.03 in the girls’ 1314 200 individual medley to go under t he qualifying mark of 2:44.29. Here’s a look at the first three fini shers in each event at the meet: G G i i r r l l s s 8 8 & & U U n n d d e e r r 50 breaststroke Zoe McCarroll, DSC, 54.58; Taja Scriven, SBSC, 58.92; Celia Campbell, Un-SB, 59.47. 50 butterfly Celia Campbell, UnSC, 44.92; Zoe McCarroll, DSC, 56.77; Charlotte Reed, Swift, 59.92. 200 freestyle Kacey Kemp, SBSC, 3:45.80; Charlotte Reed, Swift, 3:53.10; Virginia Stamp, Swift, 4:22.60. 50 backstroke Celia Campbell, UnSB, 47.15; Zoe McCarroll, DSC, 56.35; T aja Scriven, SBSC, 57.68. 5 0 freestyle Celia Campbell, UNSB, 37.12; Zoe McCarroll, DSC, 43.54; Taja Scriven, SBSC, 45.15. 200 IM Alaunte Major, BSC, 4:43.34; Cecily Bowe, BSC, 4:46.29; Kacey Kemp, Swift, 4:59.11. 200 freestyle relay SBSC, 4:09.16. G G i i r r l l s s 9 9 1 1 0 0 400 freestlye Tremaine Allen, SBSC, 5:28.59; Keitra Lloyd, SBSC, 6:11.48; Lauren Knowles, Swift, 7:27.64. 50 breaststroke Simone Sturrup, Swift, 44.94; Tremaine Allen, SBSC, 45.21; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 47.36. 50 butterfly Simone Sturrup, Swift, 37.88; Tremaine Allen, SBSC, 38.32; Keitra Lloyd, SBSC, 42.82. 200 freestyle Simone Sturrup, Swift, 2:46.86; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 2:59.55; Lauren Knowles, Swift, 3:41.89. 50 backstroke Simone Sturrup, Swift, 43.26; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 45.88; Keitra Lloyd, SBSC, 46.77. 50 freestyle Simone Sturrup, Swift, 32.02; Lauren Knowles, Swift, 45.29; Danielle Hutchinson, DSC, 46.11. 200 IM Tremaine Allen, SBSC, 3:02.86; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 3:27.56; Keitra Lloyd, SBSC, 3:29.62. 200 freestyle relay SBSC, 2:25.23. G G i i r r l l s s 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 400 freestyle Leslie Campbell, SB, 5:22.54; Jacinda Williams, DSC, 5:22.85; Abigail Lowe, Swift, 5:26.88. 100 breaststroke Alaena Carey, SBSC, 1:30.46; Christina-Marie Chea, BSC, 1:40.15; Janae Davis, SBSC, 1:41.72. 100 butterfly Janae Davis, SBSC, 1:24.16; Jourdan Bevans, BSC, 1:30.06;C rystal Rahming, Swift, 1:35.11. 2 00 freestyle Crystal Rahming, Swift, 2:32.27; Abigail Lowe, Swift, 2:33.40; Alaena Carey, SBSC, 2:52.55. 100 backstroke Sheean Hanlan, SBSC, 1:22.79; Leslie Campbell, SB, 1:27.88; Alaena Carey, SBSC, 1:L32,39. 100 freestyle Jacinda Williams, B SC, 32.78; Sherelle Fernander, BSC, 1:11.16; Sheean Hanlan, SBSC, 1:11.22. 200 IM Leslie Campbell, Un-SB, 3:03.22; Janae Davis, SBSC, 3:03.84; Alaena Carey, SBSC, 3:08.93. 200 freestyle relay SBSC, 2:12.77; DSC, 2:25.43. G G i i r r l l s s 1 1 3 3 1 1 4 4 400 freestyle Zoe Galanis, SBSC, 5:48.57; Sydnee Kerr, BSC, 6:03.50; Xenia Cox, SBSC, 6:15.24. 100 breastroke Riquel Rolle, DSC, 1:28.43; Deja Johnson, SBSC, 1:33.77; Ana-Philece Greene, BSC, 1:34.37. 100 butterfly Bria Deveaux, BSC, 1:14.12; Ja’Nae Saunders, BSC, 1:16.13; Lauren Glinton, DSC, 1:17.09. 200 freestyle Fane Austin, BSC, 2:47.38; Brittney Watson, SBSC, 2:48.54; Zoe Galanis, SBSC, 2:51.13. 100 freestyle Lauren Glinton, DSC, 1:08.60; Berchadette Moss, DSC,1 :09.86; Ana-Philece Greene, BSC, 1 :11.10. 200 IM Bria Deveaux, BSC, 2:43.03; Riquel Rolle, DSC, 2:50.07; Zoe Galanis, SBSC, 3:12.17. 200 freestyle relay SBSC, 2:21.02. G G i i r r l l s s 1 1 5 5 & & O O v v e e r r 100 breaststroke Shaunte Moss, S wift, 1:24.63. 100 butterfly Shaunte Moss, Swift, 1:14.93; Shayla Campbell, BSC, 1:19.05. 100 freestyle Shaunte Moss, Swift, 1:07.19; Shayla Campbell, BSC, 1:09.11. 200 IM Leah Coleby, BSC, 3:17.92; Shaunte Moss, Swift, 3:23.45. B B o o y y s s 8 8 & & U U n n d d e e r r 50 breaststroke BJ Murray, SBSC, 1:04.64; Alex King, DSC, 1:17.89. 50 butterfly Jaivin Burrows, BSC, 1:19.51; Trent Strachan, BSC, 1:20.24. 200 freestyle Izaak Bastian, BSC, 3:46.19; Alex King, DSC, 5:48.50. 50 backstroke Jaivan Burrows, BSC, 1:05.95; Trent Strachan, BSC, 1:11.75; Aaron Turnquest, SBSC, 1:18.22. 50 freestyle Alex king, DSC, 58.13; Christopher Neil, BSC, 58.87; Aaron Turnquest, SBSC, 1:00.21. 200 IM Paul Bevans, BSC, 4:23.76; Samuel Gibson, BSC, 4:48.24; Davante Carey, BSC, 5:00.24. B B o o y y s s 9 9 1 1 0 0 50 breaststroke Tyrique Cox, S BSC, 44.94; Malik Hepburn, Un-SC, 4 5.21; TJ Rolle, SBSC, 47.36. 5 0 butterfly Malik Hepburn, UnSB, 40.13; Gershwin Greene, BSC, 40.49; TJ Rolle, SBSC, 42.76. 200 freestyle Clement Bowe, BSC, 2:41.93; Nicholas Rahming, Swift, 3:02.01; Austin Aikman, BSC, 3:08.76. 50 backstroke Gershwin Greene, BSC, 42.02; Malik Hepburn, Un-SB, 42.58; Kadyn Coakley, SBSC, 51.38. 50 freestyle Clement Bowe, BSC, 32.78; TJ Hepburn, SBSC, 35.98; Malik Hepburn, Un-SB, 38.59. 200 IM D’Angelo Gibson, DSC, 3 :55.95; Ninnya Fernander, BSC, 4 :29.95; Llando Chea, SBSC, DQ. 200 freestyle relay SBSC, 2:36.97. B B o o y y s s 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 400 freestyle Dustin Tynes, BSC, 5:01.84; Zach Moses, Swift, 5:12.44; Kohen Kerr, BSC, 5:30.66. 100 breaststroke Tre Taylor, SBSC, 1:29.77; Brandon Deveaux, BSC, 1:36.70; Ahmad Watson, SBSC, 1:36.71. 100 butterfly Keith Lloyd, SBSC, 1:22.12; Cedric Bowe, BSC, 1:25.25; Dylan Cash, SBSC, 42.76. 200 freestyle Zach Moses, Swift, 2:33.13; Jaevon Munnings, SBSC, 2:38.76; Meshach Roberts, BSC, 2:41.65. 100 backstroke Dionisio Carey, BSC, 1:12.27; Dylan Cash, SBSC, 1:22.35; Meshach Roberts, BSC, 1:26.21. 100 freestyle Dionisio Carey, BSC, 1:06.54; Kohen Kerr, BSC, 1:10.64; Jaevon Munnings, SBSC, 1:10.72. 200 IM Zach Moses, Swift, 3:02.16; Keith Lloyd, SBSC, 3:02.25; Dylan Cash, SBSC, 3:02.29. 200 freestyle relay SBSC, 2:11.21; SBSC, 2:31.02. B B o o y y s s 1 1 3 3 1 1 4 4 400 freestyle Camron Bruney, BSC, 4:59.76; Jamarco Armbrister, SBSC, 5:45.13; Martin Dean, BSC, 6:11.32. 100 breaststroke Anibal Hernandez Valdes, Un, 1:36.84; Andre Ferguson, SBSC, 1:37.84; Anthony Walkine, FSC, 1:38.37. 100 butterfly Peter Farquharson, YMCA, 1:11.43; Zarian Cleare, DSC, 1:13.43; T’Auren Moss, SBSC, 1:18.54. 200 freestyle Toby McCarroll, DSC, 2:23.49; Aaron Chea, BSC, 2:30.86; Anibal Hernandez Valdes, Un., 2:37.04. 1 00 backstroke Laron Morley, S BSC, 1:13.32; Anibal Hernandez V aldes, Un., 1:27.90; Peter Farquharson, YMCA, 1:28.52. 100 freestyle Zarian Cleare, DSC, 1:03.81; Peter Farquharson, YMCA, 1:04.17; Aaron Chea, BSC, 1:07.47. 200 IM Laron Morley, SBSC, 2:42.61; Jamarco Armbrister, SBSC, 3:14.99; Aravind Govindaraju, BSC, 3:45.32. 200 freestyle relay SBSC, 2:03.27; DSC, 2:09.31. B B o o y y s s 1 1 5 5 & & O O v v e e r r 400 freestyle McGuire Pinder, S BSC, 5:22.73; Donovan Dean, DSC, 5 :28.72; Xavier Williams, BSC, 5:35.94. 100 breaststroke Michael McIntosh, BSC, 1:11.56; Mark Barrett, SBSC, 1:30.89; Gabriel Hudson, BSC, 1:33.77. 100 butterfly Armando Moss, SBSC, 1:02.50; Denez Moss, SBSC, 1:08.17; Joshua Thompson, DSC, 1:16.52. 200 freestyle McGuire Pinder, SBSC, 2:35.38; Mark Barrett, SBSC, 2:46.93; Marlon Johnson, SBSC, 2:55.25. 100 backstroke Denez Moss, SBSC, 1:18.46. 100 freestyle Armando Moss, SBSC, 57.77; Devonn Knowles, BSC, 1:02.09; Pemrae Walker, BSC, 1:02.11. 200 IM Michael McIntosh, BSC, 2:34.71. 200 freestyle relay DSC, 1:51.01; SBSC, DQ TRE TAYLOR gives his all in the 100m breaststroke. He finished first in that event in the 1112 age group...

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 13 THE Bahamas Judo Federation (BJF cials based on the results of the Bahamas Junior Open Tournament and rigorous testing. Class A referees can call national tournaments and are allowed to try for international certification. Class B referees can referee at national tournaments and class C officials can perform various functions such as time keeping and scoring. "I am pleased with the results", says D’Arcy Rahming, president of the BJF. "In order to grow the sport we need individuals who are trained, competent and tested in actual situations. I am also pleased to say that we have another 12 officials and referees that are in development and we hope by our next major event to have them fully certif ied." T he classification of the A a nd B referees were based on the recommendations of Julio Clemente, chief referee for the Pan American Region who gave a seminar for referees. Clemente congratulated the Bahamas on the efforts for developing judo and pledged to assist in any way possible to bring up the level of referees and officials in the country. Class C officials are students of The College of the Bahamas w ho are taking judo credit level courses Clemente’s trip was sponsored by a$1,500 grant from the Bahamas Olympic Association (BOA Wellington Miller, president of the BOA, speaking at the tournament, highlighted the importance of sport for nation-al development and tourism. Anyone interested in assisting the Bahamas Judo Federation can call 364-6773. Twelve judo officials are certified Certified Officials Class A David Rahming Neville Mickey Munnings Class B S Melanie Lobosky Reno Culmer Michael Delahey Jorg Schluter Mario Pavan Class C Marcian Tucker Alexio Brown Rashad Ferguson Cleinard Munroe Ashley Smith (TOP RIGHT Wellington Miller, president of the BOA, speaks at the Bahamas Junior Open tourney.. (TOP LEFT Tournament winners.. ( ABOVE) Action shots from the judo tournament.. T-BALL DIVISION WINSLOSSESTIESSTREAK 1. SEA GRAPES80_W8 2. COCO PLUMS62_W2 3. JUJUS23_W1 4. GUINEPS25_L2 5. DILLIES08_L8 COACH PITCH WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK 1. BEES70_W7 2. BOAS 6 2_W1 3. SANDFLIES44_L1 4. MOSQUITOES35_W1 5. GREEN TURTLES25_W1 6. WASPS17_L7 9-10 DIVISION WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK 1. DOLPHINS81_W8 2. BARRACUDAS 6 2_W2 3. OCTOPUS53_L2 4. TURBOTS35_L1 5. RED SNAPPERS26_L4 6. EELS07_L7 11-12 DIVISION WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK 1. WILD DOGS100_W10 2. CONCHS 93_W1 3. DIVERS65_L4 3. HURRICANES65_W2 5. NASSAU GROUPERS66_L1 5. BLUE MARLINS55_W1 7. IGUANAS 4 51L1 8. GREEN PAROTTS 2 10 _ L1 9. WHITE CROWNS091L5 13-15 DIVISION WINSLOSSESTIESSTREAK 1. SILVER JACKS72_W2 2. OWLZ631W2 3. STINGRAYS342L1 4. RACCOONS 352L3 4. POTCAKES 3 5 1 L1 6. SHARKS142L1 16-18 DIVISION WINSLOSSESTIESSTREAK 1. ARAWAKS31_L1 2. LUCAYANS11_W1 3. TAINOS12_L1 4. CARIBS 12_W1 FREEDOM FARM BASEBALL STANDINGS: WEEK 7

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AT least two Carifta qualifying performances were turned in on Saturday as the Road Runners Track Club hosted its annual Dianna Lynn Thompson Track Classic at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Versatile Byron Ferguson, a member of the T-Bird Flyers, threw the under-17 boys javelin 179-feet, 9 -inches or 54.78 metres to surpass the qualifying mark of 49.00 metres. And Ramond Farrington f rom the RC Athletics Track C lub threw the open men’s javelin 205-10 or 62.73 metres togo well beyond the qualifying mark of 59.45. Here’s a look at the top three finishers in the field events contested at the meet: G irls Long Jump UNDER 11 Catalyn, Blayre, Sunblazers, 3.43m; Newry, Tanae, Striders 3.18m; Shaw, Danielle, Club Monica, 2.96m Girls Long Jump UNDER 13 Dorsett, Taj, Star Trackers, 3.72m; Henderson, Janiece, Spirit OF Excell 3.64m; Ferguson, Andira, Striders, 3.60m. Girls High Jump UNDER 15 Gibson, Danielle, Ambassadors, 1.40m; Thompson, Talia, Striders J1.40m; Stra chan, Andriel, Star Trackers, 1.34m. Girls High Jump UNDER 17 Butler, Antonique, Road Runners, 1.34m, 4-04.75. Girls Long Jump UNDER 17 Deveaux, Deandra, Jumpers Inc, 4.70m; Hamilton, Cymone, Star Trackers 4.15m; Adderley, Alexandr, R. C. Athletics, 3.92m. Girls Shot Put UNDER 17 Hamilton, Cymone, Star Trackers, 7.88m, 25-10.25; Taylor, Jewel, C.R.Walker, 7.61m, 24-11.75; Johnson, Stekeia, Nassau Christian, 6.55m 21-06.00. Girls Discus Throw UNDER 17 Taylor, Jewel, C.R.Walker, 21.43m, 70-04; Smith, Amanda, Speed Dynamics, 19.56m, 6402; Johnson, Stekeia, Nassau Christian. Women High Jump OPEN Crooks, Tanya, C. I. Gibson, 1 .45m, 4-09.00. W omen Triple Jump OPEN Deveaux, Deandra, Jumpers Inc, 10.38m; Davis, Rashanda, College OF The B, 9.78m; Rolle, Brittny, Road Runners, 9.41m. Women Shot Put OPEND uncanson, Juliann, College OF The B, 10.80m, 35-05.25; Dennard, Danielle, College OF The B, 9.68m, 31-09.25; Ferguson, Dekethra Nassau Christian, 8.12m, 26-07.75. Women Discus Throw OPEN Duncanson, Juliann, College OF The B, 36.46m, 119-07; Sey mour, Aboni, T. Bird Flyers, 26.11m, 85-08; Ferguson, Dekethra, Nassau Christian, 18.51m, 60-09. Women Javelin Throw OPEN Rose, Venrika, R. C. Athlet ics, 29.54m, 96-11. Boys Long Jump UNDER 11 Rolle, Branson, Road Runners, 3.50m, 11-05.75; Bethel, Miguel, Road Runners, 3.49m, 11-05.50; Bennett, Cordero, Striders, 3.37m, 11-00.75. Boys Long Jump UNDER 13 Fox, Lucius, Club Monica, 4.36m, 14-03.75; Nottage, Julius, Striders, 4.22m, 13-10.25; Nixon, Recarno, Road Runners, 4.19m, 13-09.00. Boys High Jump UNDER 15 Coakley, Xavier, Road Runners, 1.65m, 5-05.00; Lightbourn, D'Aund Star Trackers, 1.45m, 4-09.00; Butler, Anthony, Road Runners, 1.34m, 4-04.75. Boys High Jump UNDER 17 Wilmott, Jabari, T. Bird Fly ers, 1.88m, 6-02.00; Adderley, Patrizio, C. I. Gibson, 1.73m, 508.00; McDonald, Jerome,J umpers Inc, 1.73m, 5-08.00. B oys Long Jump UNDER 17 Minns, Lathone, Jumpers Inc, 6.00m, 19-08.25; Minns, Lathario Jumpers Inc, 5.71m, 1809.00; Wilson, Philip, Striders, 5.60m, 18-04.50. Boys Shot Put UNDER 17S turrup, Carlos, Nassau Christian, 10.10m, 33-01.75; Wilson, Albert Nassau Christ ian, 9.09m, 29-10.00; MACKEY, Samuel, C.R.Walker, 8.68m, 28-05.75. Boys Discus Throw UNDER 17 Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau Christian, 29.74m, 97-07; Johnson, Giovanni, T. Bird Flyers, 24.74m, 81-02; Whymms, Michael, Nassau Christian, 24.03m 78-10. Boys Javelin Throw UNDER 17 Ferguson, Bryon, T. Bird Flyers, 54.78m*, 179-09; MACKEY, Samuel C.R.Walker, 42.26m, 138-08; Wilmott, Donovan, Silver Lightning, 33.29m 109-03. Men High Jump OPEN Bullard, Troy, Golden Eagles, 1.98m, 6-06.00; Hall, Peron, T. Bird Flyers, 1.88m, 6-02.00. Men Triple Jump OPEN Deveaux, J'Vente, Star Trackers, 14.60m, 47-11.00; Minns, Lathone, Jumpers Inc, 14.15m, 46-05.25; Minns, Lathario, Jumpers Inc, 13.98m, 4510.50. Men Shot Put OPEN Rox, Devon, College OF The B, 11.50m, 37-08.75, Rolle, Elvis, C. I. Gibson, 11.12m, 3605.75; Scavella, Kennedy, Col lege OF The B, 10.02m. Men Discus Throw OPEN Saunder, Jevaughn, College O F The B, 32.00m, 105-00; M cCoy, Rashad College OF The B, 30.55m, 100-03; Lightbourne, Benja, College OF The B 30.18m, 99-00. Men Javelin Throw OPEN Farrington, Ramond, R. C. Athletics, 62.73m*, 205-10; Rox,D evon, College OF The B, 48.92m, 160-06; Dawkins, Phillip, College OF The B, 47.25m, 155-00. Women UNDER 9 Team Rankings 3 Events Scored 1) STRIDERS 66 2) SUNBLAZERS 22 3) CLUB MONICA 14 4) ROAD RUNNERS6 5) T. BIRD FLYERS 4 6) SPIRIT OF EXCELLENCE 2 Women UNDER 11 Team Rankings 4 Events Scored 1) STRIDERS 80.50 2) SUNBLAZERS48 3) CLUB MONICA 21 4) ROAD RUNNERS 17.50 5) SILVER LIGHTNING 5 6) ALLIANCE ATHLETIC 2 7) SPIRIT OF EXCEL LENCE 1 Women UNDER 13 Team Rankings 5 Events Scored 1) STRIDERS 102.50 2) SPIRIT OF EXCELLENCE 21 3) SUNBLAZERS 20.50 4) T. BIRD FLYERS14 5) CLUB MONICA 12 6) STAR TRACKERS10 7) ROAD RUNNERS 6 Women UNDER 15 Team Rankings 6 Events Scored 1) STRIDERS 55 2) T. BIRD FLYERS 34 3) SPIRIT OF EXCELLENCE 30 4) CLUB MONICA 29 5) SUNBLAZERS 28 6) AMBASSADORS 23 7) ROAD RUNNERS 22 8) SPEED DYNAMICS 18 9) STAR TRACKERS 13 10) SILVER LIGHTNING 7 11) CENTRAL ELEUTHERA 6 Women UNDER 17 Team Rankings 12 Events Scored 1) ROAD RUNNERS 5 5 2) C. I. GIBSON 3 7 3) SPEED DYNAMICS 31 4) CLUB MONICA29 5) C.R.WALKER 27 6) STAR TRACKERS24 7 ) AMBASSADORS 20 7) STRIDERS20 7) SILVER LIGHTNING 20 10) KENYAN KNIGHTS 16 10) T. BIRD FLYERS 16 12) NASSAU CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 12 13) SPIRIT OF EXCELLENCE 11 14) JUMPERS INC 10 15) GOLDEN EAGLES 9 16) R. C. ATHLETICS 6 16) CAVALIERS 6 18) GOVERNMENT HIGH SCHOOL 3 Women OPEN Team Rankings 13 Events Scored 1) SPEED DYNAMICS 76 2) CLUB MONICA 75 3) COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS 39.50 4) STRIDERS 34 5) AMBASSADORS 30 6) C. I. GIBSON 26 7) T. BIRD FLYERS 24 8) ROAD RUNNERS 23 9) NASSAU CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 12 10) R. C. ATHLETICS 10 10) JUMPERS INC 10 12) CAVALIERS 9 13) GOLDEN EAGLES 6 14) GOVERNMENT HIGH SCHOOL 5 15) SPIRIT OF EXCELLENCE 0.50 Men UNDER 9 Team Rankings 3 Events Scored 1) SUNBLAZERS 55 2) KENYAN KNIGHTS 18 3) STRIDERS 16 4) SPEED DYNAMICS 7 Men UNDER 11 Team Rankings 4 Events Scored 1) ROAD RUNNERS 64 2) STRIDERS 48 3) SUNBLAZERS 27 4) KENYAN KNIGHTS 14 5) AMBASSADORS 10 6) JUMPERS INC2 Men UNDER 13 Team R ankings 5 Events Scored 1 ) SPIRIT OF EXCEL LENCE 64 2) ROAD RUNNERS 60 3) STRIDERS 33 4) SUNBLAZERS 23 5) CLUB MONICA 18 6) AMBASSADORS1 4 7) KENYAN KNIGHTS 4 7) SPEED DYNAMICS 4 9) JUMPERS INC 2 Men UNDER 15 Team Rankings 6 Events Scored 1) SPIRIT OF EXCEL LENCE 69 2) STAR TRACKERS 52 3) SILVER LIGHTNING 48 4) ROAD RUNNERS 47 5) STRIDERS 32 6) CLUB MONICA 11 7) AMBASSADORS 10 8) T. BIRD FLYERS5 9) SUNBLAZERS 1 9) NASSAU CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 1 Men UNDER 17 Team Rankings 13 Events Scored 1) STAR TRACKERS 82 2) T. BIRD FLYERS 53 3) NASSAU CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 42 4) SILVER LIGHTNING 41 5) C. I. GIBSON 31 6) CLUB MONICA 30 6) ROAD RUNNERS 30 8) GOLDEN EAGLES 29 9) SPIRIT OF EXCELLENCE 26 10) ALLIANCE ATHLETIC 24 10) JUMPERS INC 24 12) C.R.WALKER 20 13) KENYAN KNIGHTS 18 14) CENTRAL ELEUTHERA 14 15) STRIDERS 6 16) SUNBLAZERS 5 17) H. O. NASH 4 17) GOVERNMENT HIGH SCHOOL 4 19) CAVALIERS 1 Men OPEN Team Rankings 14 Events Scored 1) COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS 83 2) T. BIRD FLYERS 48 3) AMBASSADORS 39 4) GOLDEN EAGLES 31 5) STAR TRACKERS 26 6) ROAD RUNNERS 24 7) SPIRIT OF EXCEL LENCE 23 8) BAHAMAS TIGERS 22 9) KENYAN KNIGHTS 21 10) SPEED DYNAMICS 19 10) JUMPERS INC 19 12) C. I. GIBSON 18 13) C.R.WALKER 17 14) CLUB MONICA 12 5) R. C. ATHLETICS 10 16) NASSAU CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 9 17) SILVER LIGHTNING 3 18) ALLIANCE ATH LETIC 2 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net THE prestigious Hugh Campbell s enior boys basketball title has switched from New Providence to Grand Bahama to New Providence over the past 26 years. Initially, the tournament was only contested between the New Providence schools with the LW Young Golden Eagles winning the first title. B ack then, LW Young was a high school, but has since been reduced to just a junior high, thus eliminating them from participating in the tournament. Walter Rand, who holds the dist inction of being the first coach to win t he title, said over the years, the younger coaches have gotten away from teaching their players the basics. I would like to see more fundamentals displayed like it was when the tournament got started,” Rand reflecte d. “Not taking anything away from it because it’s still a very good tournament. But I think if the coaches put more emphasis on developing the fundamentals in their players, it could get e ven better.” Looking back at his championship run, which was sparked by the most valuable performance from guard Bernard Storr, Rand said they had some very good teams from New Providence to compete against before the Grand Bahama teams started to come in the following year. “Now the Nassau teams have the e xposure that we didn’t get back then,” Rand said. “What we lacked in exposure, we made up with the talent t hat the players possessed. So it helped to make the tournam ent that much better when we won because the teams that participated at first from New Providence were all v ery talented.” At the time, Rand said he had a very disciplined team and that was one of the things that has propelled them to become productive citizens t oday. “It wasn’t all about winning then,” he said. “It was about bringing out the best in the players as individuals. Once they did that, winning came easy.” While Storr emerged as the MVP, Rand had a cast that included Lester Mortimer, Tony Taylor, Rev Pedro Basden and James “Brother” Knowles. A lthough he’s still teaching physical education at AF Adderley, the host of the tournament, Rand is no longer r oaming the sidelines coaching after s chool activities where the governm ent school coaches are awarded at about $1,500 per sport. But while he’s quite contended with j ust being in the class setting, Rand said he likes what he sees in Nigel Ingraham, who has turned around the Magics basketball programme at Government High School. When I see him coach, I see myself,” Rand reflected. “That’s exactly the way I was when I was coaching. I was eager to go out there and get the best out of my players.” Rand said he would like to see the day when more emphasis is placed on getting the Family Island teams up to par with New Providence and Grand Bahama. They have a lot of talent, but it just has to be nurtured,” he insisted. “I think if we can get them to improve t heir level of play, the tournament w ould be even better.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS As at February 23, 2009: Team NamePWDLGFGAPts Bears FC 1081134825 Caledonia FC 10712281322 Cavalier FC 9 342201713 Sharks FC 10 3 34222212 Baha Juniors FC 9 3 1 5 182610 Dynamos FC 1014519327 FC Nassau 1012712355 Recent Results Sunday, February 22, 2009 1:00 pm Baha Juniors FC vs FC Nassau 2:2Referee: J, Edwards Goalscorers: Anson Coakley (FC NassauBaha Juniors FC (Baha JuniorsFC Nassau 3:00 pm Cavalier FC vs Caledonia FC 1:2 Referee: D. Ferreira James Goalscorers: Wagner Macahdo (Caledonia FCCaledonia FC (Cavalier FC Upcoming Matches Sunday, March 01, 2009 1:00 pm FC Nassau vs Caledonia FC 3:00 pm Dynamos FC vs Baha Juniors FC Leading Goalscorers 1. Lesley St. Fleur Bears FC 14 2. Marcus Trail Caledonia FC7 3. Odaine McCallumCavalier FC74. Duckerno Exlias Sharks FC 7 5. Andre CareyBears FC7 6. Ehren Hanna Dynamos FC 5 7. Chedlet Pierre Sharks FC 5 8. Frank NegriCaledonia FC5 9. Alex ThompsonBears FC4 10. Dean Farry Caledonia FC4 Bahamas Football Association: Senior League Standings Rand: Younger coaches not teaching basketball basics Walter Rand Road Runner s’ Carifta qualifying performances

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Hield last man standing as Johnson, Knowles are eliminated from Cup n B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net A fter going through what he called a “learning experience” last year, reigning IAAF World Championships’ silver medallist Derrick Atkins said he’s gearing up for a return to the impressive form that he had in 2007. S ince October, Atkins has taken his residence and training camp from Tallahassee, Florida, to Kennesaw, Georgia, just outside of Atlanta, where he’s now being trained by Lawrence Seagrave. My training has been going good, slowly but surely as I prepare for the outdoor season,” said Atkins, who opted not to compete during the indoor season. In preparation for the season t hat will culminate at the IAAF W orld Championships in Berlin, Germany, in August, Atkins is looking at running on a couple of relay teams in April before he officially kicks off his outdoor campaign at the end of April. “I just want to be back to the form of or better,” he insisted. “I think I’m going to be bet ter than .” In , Atkins ran consistently in the 9.9 seconds barrier, lowering his Bahamian national record to a then blistering 9.91 that earned him the silver at the World Championships in Osaka, Japan behind American Tyson Gay (9.85 former world record holder Asafa Powell (9.96 On the heel of the World Champs, Atkins went to the Olympic Games last year in Beijing, China where he had a sub-par performance, due to an injury. He got to the semifinal of the 100m, clocking 10.13 for sixth place and he was denied a shota t making the historic final that s aw Jamaican Usain Bolt blast his way to 9.69 for the fastest legal time ever to secure the first of three gold medals. Bolt, who went on to record the rare sprint double with another world record perfor mance in the 200m and was a member of the Jamaican 4 x 100m relay team, is without a doubt the man to beat in Berlin. But Atkins, a cousin of Pow ell, said he’s not concerned about all of the advanced hype surrounding the Jamaican and the rest of their sprinting core. “At the end of the day, it’s the man who crosses the line first,” said Atkins, who has a history of being first having dominated at Dickinson State University as a three-time National Association of Inter collegiate Athletics (NAIA champion in the century. Atkins, who celebrated his 25th birthday on January 5, said his only concern is to get back on the podium in Berlin. “It was a bad year to choose to learn,” he pointed out. “But I wouldn’t change anything about it. I needed that to get to where I am right now. I’m just going to combine it to make it a great year this year.” The change in environment is what Atkins feels he certain ly needs. “It’s okay. The weather coop erates every now and again, but as it gets warmer, it should be better for us to train in,” he pointed out. “Right now it’s cold. But we have our days when it’s cold and its hot.” Atkins, a former star at C R Walker, is training with long jump specialist Dwight Phillips and Travis Padgett, who competed in the sprints for Clemson. n B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net COACH Andre Sey mour had anticipated that the Bahamas’ t hree-man b oxing team would sur pass the two bronze m edals won at the past two Independence Cups by Taureano “Reno” Johnson and Valentino Knowles. But so far in the Dominican Republic, the Bahamas is now down to just one boxer after Johnson and Knowlesw ere eliminated. Carl Hield is the lone competitor left and he had ac hance to box for the gold m edal last night. Results of h is bout were not available up to press time last night. Already assured of a bronze, Hield was scheduled to fight in the semifinal of the light welterweight division against Jose Abru with a chance to become the first Bahamian to advance to the gold medal round. Speaking from the Dominican Republic as he waited for H ield to fight yesterday, Seymour said the Bahamian team performed exceptional ly well, but the judges’ decisions obviously didn’t reflect that. The performance wasn’t b ad at all. It’s just that the j udging here is terrible and a ll of the countries are com p laining,” said Seymour, who n oted that with the exception of Alvin Sargent, all of the judges are from the Dominican Republic. “We have the coaches and delegates from Cuba, the US Virgin Islands and even Brazil complaining about the judging to the director of the tournament. He’s having a meeting tonight before the semifinal to discuss what is going on.” On Saturday, Knowles lost 11-7 to Ricardo Garfield from the Dominican Republic in the lightweight division and on Sunday night, Johnson lost 12-7 to Willy Medina from the Dominican Republic in the middleweight division. Hield, however, pulled off a resounding 12-3 decision over Henry Lawrence from the US Virgin Islands to advance to the semifinal. A win and he will fight for the gold medal. If he loses, he will be guaranteed the bronze. The Bahamas already has two bronze medals from the past two tournaments. John son won the initial one two years ago and Knowles got his own last year. Still peeved with the results, Seymour reiterated that “our boys performed very well.” “Although Reno lost, he was the technician in the ring. The fans from the Dominican Republic booed their own boxer after he was awarded the decision,” Seymour pointed out. “That’s just how bad the officiating is over here.” It was Johnson’s first bout since he fell short of winning a medal at the Beijing Olympic Games in China in August. Brazil, US Virgin Islands, Ecuador, Cuba and the Dominican Republic, who have three teams, are the countries competing in this year’s tournament. The tour nament, which got started on Saturday night, will conclude on February 26. The Bahami an team will return home on Friday. C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE 13 Judo officials are certified... S ea Bees I nvitational: S wimmers qualify for Carifta... See page 12 J ohnson THE TRIBUNE SPORTS section’s coverage last night of the Hugh Campbell Basketball Invi tational could not be published today as the games, which began around 9pm, were not finished up to press time Monday night. See Wednesday’s Sports special for highlights of the annual basketball classic... No Hugh Campbell in today Atkins: ‘I think I’m going to be better than ’ IAAF WORLD Championships’ silver medallist Derrick Atkins said he’s gearing up for a return to the impressive form that he had in 2007...

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LEADING Bahamian law firm Higgs and Johnson celebrated its expansion into the Cayman Islands with a client cocktail reception hosted by its Cayman office at one of Grand Cayman’s premier restaurants on the famous Seven Mile Beach. During 2009, Higgs and Johnson’s Cayman office will practice under the name “Higgs and Johnson Truman Bodden and Co” and thereafter will be known as “Higgs and Johnson”. H iggs and Johnson in the Bahamas and the Cayman Islands already well-known for providing legal services to the financial services community in particular will provide enhanced convenience and quality of service to clients in both jurisdictions as well as international clientele, the law firm said in ap ress release. The client cocktail reception was well-attended by local clients who celebrated the merger. All of the Bahamas-based partners joined their Cayman-based colleagues in attendance for the evening festivities. Introductory remarks were m ade by Chris Narborough, Country Managing Partner Cayman. Global Managing Partner, Bahamas based John Delaney, spoke on behalf of Higgs and Johnson and introduced the full partnership to guests. Guest speaker was Charles Clif ford, Cayman’s Minister of Tourism. He extended congratulatory remarks on the merger and gave a warm welcome to the Bahamian partners. Mr Clifford offered full support of the Cayman Islands Government to this pioneering Caribbean partnership and his words were well received by all those present. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS P AGE 16, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE G LOBAL MANAGING PARTNER J ohn K F Delaney receives a turtle from Managing Partner – Cayman Chris Narborough. BAHAMAS and Cayman partners. Bahamian law firm celebrates Cayman Islands expansion

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Carnival pushing new port for cruise n By DENISE MAYCOCK Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Negotiations are underway between the Min i stry of Tourism and the Grand Bahama Airport Company in a bid to reduce airfare/airline costs at the facility, with three carriers willing to add new services to Freeport if this hap pens. We are hoping to have some r esolution to that in the next few weeks,” Vernice Walkine, the director-general of tourism, told Tribune Business at the Grand Bahama Business Out look conference yesterday. She said the Ministry of Tourism was talking with three new carriers who were serious-ly considering flying into Freeport if airport taxes and fees can be reduced. The Grand Bahama Interna tional Airport (GBIA highest airline turnaround costsin the region, and one of the highest seat costs (airfare American travellers, despite its close proximity to the US. Ms Walkine believes the airport must function as a proper gateway and work in “sync” with the Ministry of Tourism to enhance the overall tourism product and be a catalyst for its growth on Grand Bahama. “Through partnership and collaboration with the airport operator and the Tourism Board, we will effect a sched ule of incentives by the reduction or elimination of some of these taxes and fees, which will enable us to attract new airlift to the destination, reduce the turnaround cost to existing carriers, and then we will be better positioned to promote affordable travel packages to GBIA,” she said. “There are three new services we are looking at which will benefit from those incentives, because otherwise the cost would have been prohibitive for them to even consider Grand Bahama. “But they are very seriously considering it because were making it more affordable fort hem to come into Grand B ahama Airport.” Ms Walkine said the planned incentives involved a mix of some items, such as cuts in cus toms and immigration overtime fees, and/or landing fees. “It varies according to the carrier, so it is not a one size fits all necessarily. So those negotiations are underway right now, and we want the same kind of consideration to be given to existing carriers,” she said. Ms Walkine said the Ministry of Tourism’s airfare reduction strategy will focus on getting low-cost airfares to Grand Bahama, making it more competitive with other destinations. She said that in spite of having an even greater proximity advantage than Nassau, in almost every US market, Grand C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.34 $3.39 $3.36 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Bahamian retail entrepreneur yesterday told Tribune Business that “about 50-60 per cent” of staff across his multiple retail formats were working a reduced work week in a bid to counter the economic downturn, as he described business conditions as “the most challenging” he had ever experienced. A ndrew Wilson, who owns John S G eorge, Quality Business Centre (QBC t he Radioshack franchise and a host of fashion retail formats, said his businesses were “riding out the storm” and looking to cut consumer prices and costs wherever they could. “The environment remains challenging,” Mr Wilson told Tribune Business. “We’re holding on. “We’ve seen some substantial [sales] declines, somewhere in the region of 2530 per cent, pretty much across the board.” Those figures are year-over-year comparatives for 2009 to date, and provide a further indication of the impact the economic downturn is having on many Bahamian retailers. Retail owner reduces work week for -60%’ of staff Talks ongoing to overcome Freeport airport obstacle n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter BAHAMIAN landscapers yesterday told Tribune Business they had been adversely affected by the economic downturn, with some forced to scramble to attract new clients and desperately hold on to existing ones who may now be considering cheaper migrant labour. Owner of Chelly and Son Landscaping, Michelle Roberts, said her company had not Landscapers ‘cut back’ to survive S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B * John S George, QBC and Radioshack owner describes current trading conditions as ‘most challenging’ he has ever experienced in retail history * John S George outlets in Lyford Cay, Independence Drive closes, with staffing levels now at 45 from 68 as company rationalises locations GRAND Bahama Port Authority (GBPA Ian Rolle yesterday announced a 50 per cent reduction in retail business licence fees for Port licensees, starting on March 1, 2009, for a one-year period. M r Rolle told the Grand Bahama Business Outlook conference that the reduction would be made available for one year, until March 2010, for those GBPA licensees who paid their fees within three months of billing. Mr Rolle also unveiled a Downtown Turnaround pro-g ramme intended to breathe new life into Freeport’s downtown area, which will start on April 1, 2009, and involve three phases, including a full scale clean-up, lighting, landscaping and benching initiatives.The GBPA is also looking to launch a scholarship pro gramme focused on niche c areers, and in conjunction with the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce, BAIC andBahamas Development Bank, launch a Grand Bahama Busi ness Support Organisation. Focused on small businesses, it will be called The Enterprising Centre. Port in 50 per cent fee slash n B y DENISE MAYCOCK Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Giora Israel, vice president of strategic plan ning at Carnival Cruise Line, told the Grand Bahama Busi ness Outlook that Nassau is the number one cruise port in the world and will be surpassing Cozumel this year. H e said that of the 1.9 million passengers Carnival brought to the Bahamas, 1.1 million called at Nassau, making it the leading p ort in the Bahamas. Mr Israel said that of the four ports that Carnival visits in the B ahamas, only 11 per cent or 270,000 passengers call at Freeport. He said Nassau’s port was ideally located near downtown, as opposed to the harbour in Freeport, which is too industrial and far from the tourist attractions. A new cruise ship port needs to be a priority and it is now the priority of the current government and current Minis ter of Tourism to make that happen,” Mr Israel said. “It has been difficult to put Freeport on the map and have it as appealing. The port is too industrial and we have a lot of issues that are here. “There is difficulty to get good beach options. It is important to have a beach, and we need more attractions. Weh ope that private entities will develop more attractions other than selling another snorkelling or glass bottom tour. We needt he development of more things for those cruise visitors who come a second and third time.” Mr Israel reported that 47 per cent of the cruise business in the Bahamas, in general, comes from the Carnival Corporation. Carnival has only two ships calling at Freeport, and Mr Israel believes that Grand Bahama can do much better with a new cruise ship port. The Government is in the process of identifying a suitable location for a new port – a loca t ion that works from the land s ide and maritime side, he said. “Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is in the process of putting together a group of willing partnersto find and iden tify a location.,” Mr Israel said. Mr Israel said Carnival was willing to make the necessary investment, together with three key entities in Freeport. “We want to build a new port, but we need the Freeport Harbour Company, the Grand Bahama Port Authority, and Government of the Bahamas,” he said. “There are a lot of ideas of different locations for such ap ort, but no decision has been made as far as I know as to where the port will be.” Mr Israel said Carnival takes s ome 600,000 passengers to Half Moon Cay, which is significantly smaller than Freeport. He noted that a new cruise port will allow similar passenger arrivals for Freeport. “It is really difficult to add Freeport to itineraries, but you are very close and we can bring so many more people here. We can bring within a year of open ing half a million in Freeport just by Carnival alone,” he said. Mr Israel noted that a new port could cost anywhere from $15 to $60 million to construct, d epending on the location. I have been working on trying to get a new port since 1997 and I have great trust and faith in the current government,” he said. “The unfortunate passing of Edward St George created a slow down in what will happen here in Freeport, but these issues seems to have been either resolved or in the process of being resolved, and that will be a tremendous help to get this done.”

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIANS have yet to exploit 40 per cent of the economic potential offered by Grand Bahama, a government minister said yesterday, while acknowledging that the island was “now in its seventh year of recession and fifth year of economic crisis”. Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, acknowledged that he was unable to predict when an economic turnaroundwould come, although he ruled out any Bahamian or global recovery within the next 12-18 months. Addressing the Grand Bahama Business Outlook conference, Mr Laing said “Grand Bahama’s economic misfortunes began much earlier” than the present downturn, which started to emerge in the US in 2006-2007. “Indeed, in my view, Grand Bahama is now in its seventh year of economic recession and in its fifth year of economic crisis,” he added. “I wish I could say to Grand Bahama that there is an end in sight for this enduring economic nightmare that it has faced for the better part of seven years now. I cannot. The reality i s that the global economy is in a tailspin, and no one is certain w hen this tailspin will end.” Mr Laing based his view that Grand Bahama was in its seventh year of recession on the fact that, while in 2002 the island’s unemployment rate of 6.4 per cent was well below the 9.1 per cent national average, it had begun to rise steadily after that. The ‘five years’ of economic crisis were precipitated by the 2004 hurricane season and Royal Oasis closure, Mr Laing acknowledging that while Grand Bahama’s unemployment rate decreased to 8.4 per cent in 2006, this was largely due to a rise in discouraged workers those not seeking employment and an exodus of persons looking for work elsew here. M r Laing described the econ omic hardship that many on Grand Bahama have had to endure as “profound”, with unemployment impacting many and families “stressed and strained”. “There are residents of this island today who would not have dreamed that they would seek help from social services who have had to do so,” the minister said. “Indeed, the multi-million dollar social services budget that we provided since coming to office over the last two years is being fully called upon here in Grand Bahama. “While no one can understate the increased difficulty that the current crisis has brought to residents of this island, in a way, it i s also true that the residents of t his island have endured econ omic hardship for so long now that theirs might be a less traumatic adjustment than other parts of the country that are now only seeing things get decidedly worse.” Looking beyond the present economic situation, Mr Laing said Grand Bahama was ideally suited to attract an offshore education industry, along with high-technology manufacturing. Offshore medical services and captive/external insurance were also potential targets. Yet if Grand Bahama was to attract such industries, it would have to make a number of adjustments, given that they were dependent on expatriate worker expertise. “We will have to resist the rising xenophobia that seems to be plaguing us when it comes to international workers in our territory, as well as increasing our own productivity and work ethic to globally competitive standards as a norm of our workforce. We can and must do both,” Mr Laing said. While international investor capital was important in turn ing round Grand Bahama’s economy, Mr Laing said Bahamians “have not yet tapped into 40 per cent of the economic opportunities of this island”. “This goes beyond blaming others for keeping us down,” he added. “This has to do with our own creativity, ingenuity,organisation, savings, drive and execution. “There are new businesses we can mount here, and there are existing businesses that we can make better. In both regards, there are multi-million opportunities for us. The current climate makes these pos sibilities less prominent, but my fear is that even when the crisis subsides, the attitude that too many of us have had for far too long may cause us to miss them once again.” Mr Laing said a united, focused Grand Bahama Port Authority was critical for the island’s future, and its ability to attract and retain international/domestic investment. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIAExpansion Project. The scope of services includes: 'ULOOLQJDQGSXPSWHVWLQJRIDSLORWKROH 'ULOOLQJDQGFDVLQJRID)HHG:DWHU6XSSO\:HOO 'ULOOLQJDQGFDVLQJRID)HHG:DWHU5HWXUQ:HOO )ORZWHVWLQJRIWKH)HHG:DWHU6XSSO\:HOO 'LVFKDUJHWHVWLQJRIWKH)HHG:DWHU5HWXUQ:HOO *HRSK\VLFDOORJJLQJDQGIORZWHVWLQJRI3LORW+ROHDQGZHOOV :DWHUWHPSHUDWXUHORJJLQJDQGDQDO\VLVRIZDWHUTXDOLW\DQG FKHPLVWU\ 3URIHVVLRQDOVXSHUYLVLRQ+\GURORJLVWf 5HTXHVWIRU4XRWDWLRQ3DFNDJHVZLOOEHDYDLODEOHIRUSLFNXSDIWHU 1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009. 5HTXHVWIRU4XRWDWLRQFORVLQJLV Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. M-100, Test Well DrillingContact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project 5(48(67)25QUOTATION PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Bahamians failing to exploit 40% of Grand Bahama opportunities Island ‘in seventh year of recession, and fifth year of economic crisis’ ZHIVARGO LAING Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE UPCOMING Spring Break season could produce visitor numbers close to last year’s, according to the sales director of a popular travel website, with Freeport bookings said to be higher than ever. Kristin Brenna, of StudentCity, a company well known for providing vacation packages for college students and high school graduates at budget prices, said March bookings for Freeport have been higher thant hey have ever been in previous years, and that April will be a good month for Nassau. S tudent City rolled out a Freeport Party Cruise package starting at $399, which includes a round-trip cruise to Freeport from Fort Lauderdale and four nights in one of three Freeport hotels. Ms Brenna told Tribune Business that the Freeport trip has appealed to the budgetminded college student who m ay not have as much disposable income as previous years, as they focus more than ever o n value-added packages for the popular student travel season. Freeport is very popular. We have a party cruise that goes there which is actually more popular than most years,” she said. “Nassau is still very popular for Spring Break as well, but most of the college demand for trips to the Bahamas has gone to Freeport because of its sig nificantly lower cost. “They are shifting more to those lower cost packages because students have a lot less d ollars to spend on travel this year than they typically had in years past, so we did meet thatd emand with more lower cost alternatives.” Ms Brenna said the slump in college students visiting Nassau for the break was due in part to significantly higher package prices that could hit $1,000 range or higher depending on accommodations. However, she said bookings for Nassau have been coming in through StudentCity’s sister c ompany, GradCity, which pro duces vacation packages for recent high school graduates. In April there will be a good p opulation of students down there [Nassau],” said Ms Brenna. A recent USA Today Gallup poll showed that 58 per cent of vacationing Americans will shrink their vacation spending this year, or just not go at all. Two firms which research travel behaviour monthly, D.K. Shifflet & Associates and IHS Global Insight, predict that Americans will spend 9.7 per cent less on leisure travel in April, May and June, and 9 per c ent less in July, August and September. The USA today article con t aining the Gallup poll figures c ontends that Americans could end up spending $30 billion less on leisure travel this Spring andS ummer. These figures could justify the panic the hospitality sector has been under during the past several months. Ministry of Tourism officials, who seem to be cautiously optimistic about this year’s tourism numbers, however, told Tribune Business that only time will tell if travel will pick up. Tourism Minister Vincent V anderpool-Wallace, said the Bahamas is getting ready to reestablish its proximity advan t age in order to get the most business every day. However, he said the current problem with the industry is a complex issue to solve, as business models for predictions fall apart if individuals book their vacations closer to their expected departure dates. Ms Brenna is confident the Bahamas will do fairly well this spring break saying: “Spring Break is coming... Get Ready!” Confidence on Spring Break visitor totals C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 3B Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD Qualified Environmental Monitor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope of services includes: 5HYLHZDQGDSSURYHFRQWUDFWRUVHQYLURQPHQWDOSODQV 'HYHORSLQVSHFWLRQFKHFNOLVWVDQGLQVSHFWWKHZRUNRI FRQWUDFWRUVIRUFRPSOLDQFHWRHQYLURQPHQWDOSODQV )DFLOLWDWHDQGFRPPXQLFDWHZLWKUHJXODWRU\DXWKRULWLHVRQ EHKDOIRIWKH3URMHFWRQHQYLURQPHQWDOLVVXHVDQG 3UHSDUHZHHNO\DQGPRQWKO\UHSRUWV ,QWHUHVWHGSURSRQHQWVPXVWEHTXDOLILHGIDPLOLDUZLWKORFDO UHJXODWRU\ODZVDQGDJHQFLHVDQGIDPLOLDUZLWK,QWHUQDWLRQDO %HVW3UDFWLFHV(TXDWRU3ULQFLSOHV,)&6WDQGDUGVf 5HTXHVW)RU3URSRVDO3DFNDJHVZLOOEHDYDLODEOHIRUSLFNXS after 1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009. 5HTXHVWIRU3URSRVDOFORVLQJLV Thursday, March 5th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. D-111 Qualified Environmental MonitorContact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project 5(48(67)25PROPOSAL CRUISE ships in Nassau harbour...

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With more than 1,500 job losses in the economy towards the end of 2008, and unemployment continuing to rise, Bahamians are increasingly fearful for their jobs and incomes. As a result, consumer spending the lifeblood of retailers and the wider Bahamian economy has been reined in, with confidence showing no signs of making a return. “We’re just trying to hold on and ride out the storm,” Mr Wilson explained, “trying to control our expenses. We’re trying to get our margins razor thin, and trying to become more competitive in pricing, customer service...... “We have quite a few staff working less than a 40-hour week in most of them [his retail formats]. I would say about 5060 per cent of staff are on reduced work weeks.” Across his retail brands, Mr Wilson employs around 100 staff. Out of all his retail formats, Mr Wilson said John S George “remains the greatest challenge”. He has invested around $1 million in upgrading the retail chain since acquiring it in summer 2007 from the ill-fated ownership of the buyout group put together by Ken Hutton. That much-needed investment was injected just before the world and Bahamian economies lurched into fullblown downturn, making it extremely difficult for Mr Wilson to obtain a return on the funds invested. He yesterday confirmed to Tribune Business that John S George had rationalised its store portfolio to the best-performing outlets, having closed both the Lyford Cay and Independence Drive locations before the Christmas holidays. “We are still operating in Cable Beach, Palmdale and Harbour Bay,” Mr Wilson said. As a result of the downsized chain, John S George’s staffing levels have been reduced to about 45 from 68. Mr Wilson explained, though, that the staff reduction had been produced by both the store closures and the company’s decision not to replace workers when they either left or retired. “It’s really the most challenging conditions I’ve experienced since getting into retail,” Mr Wilson said. “It’s a combination of the general economic climate, the rising numbers of people who are not working, and people who are being really cautious. “People don’t have the money to spend. The customers don’t have money to spend, and the people who do have some currency are rather hesitant to spend. We’re just controlling expenses and holding on.” Mr Wilson added that John S George had reduced its import levels significantly. Meanwhile, Chris Lowe, operations manager at Kelly’s (Freeport ness yesterday that retail trading conditions experienced by his firm were “firmer than we thought it would be” given the overall economic environment. “January was a good month for us,” Mr Lowe explained. “Overall, we’re down a couple of percentage points, but then we have some months where we’re up a few per cent. We’re 3-4 per cent up, then 3-4 per cent down, but on average it’s flat. There are no lay-offs on our horizon.” He added that a major concern, both for himself and other Bahamian retailers, was that US-based suppliers had either closed or significantly reduced production/distribution, thus depriving them of much-needed supplies and inventory lines. “There’s a number of vendors who have gone out of business, and certain things will not get replaced,” Mr Lowe explained. “Certain categories of goods that have been carried for a long time are not available. “US companies have either gone under or are not bothered by foreign sales.” Mr Lowe said surviving US companies were also being increasingly forced by even softer trading conditions at home to explore new markets in the Bahamas and the Caribbean. The Kelly’s (Freeport utive said the company’s work on internal systems over the past eight years, and “very serious trending” on inventory and turns, had made it better able to manage its way through the current downturn. Expansion plans remained on the drawing board, Mr Lowe said, although Kelly’s (Freeport thing into action in the current climate. “There’s nothing directly on the books with any start date, but we have two different sets of plans we can leap on, although not right now,” Mr Lowe said. “As soon as we see a positive turnaround in the economy, and a positive direction espoused by our leadership, we will look to expand in building materials and expand in retail. “We’re training, building and doing back office renovations. We’ve put in two new offices in an internal expansion.” Mr Lowe added: “We’re holding the ship and paying attention to the details. We’re operating in a contracting market. It makes mistakes in operations more expensive. You have to be leaner, be more tighter and be more efficient, and leverage opportunities when you see them. But you must not get in over your head, because you could end up cutting your throat in the circumstances. “I think competently run business are holding their own and doing OK.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Retail owner reduces work week for -60%’ of staff I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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Bank donation to support aspiring businesswomen Bahama’s seat costs to consumers remains higher than that of Nassau and other destinations. Based on distance from Miami, these include Cancun (197 miles), Montego Bay (526 miles), Puerto Rico (1037 miles) and Las Vegas (2,177 miles “Las Vegas, which is more than 20 times as far away from Miami as is Grand Bahama, is always less expensive to fly to than GBIA,” Ms Walkine said. “Now, we know that part of the reason for this problem is the cost of operating at Grand Bahama International Airport. “It is critically important for us to make Grand Bahama, which is the closest offshore destination to America, not the most expensive destination for Americans.” She indicated that hotels on Grand Bahama will continue to struggle if the high airfare and airport turnaround costs are not addressed. “Until we fix some of these core infrastructural things, Our Lucaya Resort, Pelican Bay and all the others are not going to be able to benefit to the degree that they can,” Ms Walkine said. “You can promote these properties all day long, but if that person who is sitting in Miami looks at the option available to them, and if they can go to Vegas, which is 20 times fur ther away and stay longer for less than the cost of getting to Grand Bahama, they may decide to go to Vegas or to the Dominican Republic. “So unless we fix these issues, it is not going to be well received by the customer who has to make a decision about what he or she can afford. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD a qualified landscapesupplier(sto grow trees, palms, shrubs and groundcover (itemswith the required schedule and speculations for completion of Stage 1 of the LPIAExpansion Project. This is a supply only contract. Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after 1:00 pm , on Thursday, February 12th, 2009. Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape SupplyContact: T raci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project REQUEST FORPROPOSAL 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 7+20$6$172,1,(5 ( 00$18(/RI*5(*25<7(/(87+(5$ %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ D FLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQ ZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ VKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQG V LJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\V IURPWKH W GD\RI)HEUXDU\ WRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 1 127,&( picked up any new clients since the economic contraction became prevalent last year, with existing customers scaling back their monthly maintenance. “Some of the old ones [customers] have been telling me: ‘Don’t come this month because things aren’t good. Come next month or I’ll call you when to come’,” she said. Ms Roberts said she was in the process of revamping her product in order to remain competitive, but has staggered in producing a feasible business plan. She said, though, that it was imperative for her to come up with something within the next three months. “I have to come up with something else to do, but I haven’t thought of anything yet,” she said. Ms Roberts’ concern is that her biggest competition will come from the “guy off the street”, who her clients and potential clients will be able to pay little or nothing for the service. She said she was working harder than ever to keep her 25 to 26 clients satisfied, ensuring she and her four employees maintain a steady income. Steve Bellot, proprietor of Roots Landscape and Maintenance, said his business has had to innovate in order to stay ahead in the market. Mr Bellot said business has been a lot more demanding for him since the economy softened, as he has been force to spend more time pricing jobs and setting up crews. He said he has seen a decrease in large contracts that were once prevalent, and is now taking on more small jobs. “I imagine that’s because there is not much development going on,” he said. Mr Bellot, like Ms Roberts, said holding on to existing business was paramount this year, as well as innovation. “Right now, you want to be in a position where if someone comes along to take one of your contracts, your client is going to say: ‘No, I’m happy with who I have’,” he said. Mr Bellot said he has taken on more jobs he would have typically turned down in order to stay competitive. As far as cost cutting goes, he said he has placed Roots on a hiring freeze and is not purchasing any new equipment for the business, but is focusing on repairing what he has. Mr Bellot said he was using the current economic downturn to measure his business’s efficiency, so that it can do much better when things turn around. “Times like these are always a test when you’re in business, because it determines whether you are able to operate efficiently,” said Mr Bellot. Landscapers ‘cut back’ Talks ongoing to overcome Freeport airport obstacle F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B BANK of the Bahamas International has given a recent donation to the O.P.A.L.S, the teen division of Kingdom Women In Business, which stands for Opening and Preparing Avenues for young Ladies to Succeed. The bank’s donation will make it possible for nearly 50 teenage girls to attend next week’s KWIB seminar, where they will officially be named members of the organisation and matched up with mentors in careers they plan to pursue. Along with a presentation by Deegenera Jones-Dixon, a peer-to-peer talk by 18 year-old COB student, Cashena Thompson, and a session with pageant organiser, Michelle Malcolm, the youngsters will be able to attend presentations with women in the main conference. Melisa Hall, KWIB’s founder, said: “We are truly appreciative of the bank’s immediate and overwhelming response in this exciting venture. “They didn’t hesitate to invest in the lives of so many young women. Words really can’t express how appreciative we are of this generous gift. We know that this will be an encouragement for more students to attend, who felt they mayn ot have been able to attend. Who knows, some of these girls who make it through our O.P.A.L.S may one day come back to Bank of the Bahamas as trained professionals.” KWIB’s annual conference runs from next Thursday to Friday at the British Colonial Hilton. For more information call 328-6050 or visit www.kingdomwomeninbusiness.org DANIA Ferguson (centre sents Kingdom Women In Business with a donation for the development of their organisation’s t een arm, the O.P.A.L.S. Also pictured are Charlene Paul, founder Melisa Hall, Deegenera JonesDixon and Cashena Thompson. (Photo by Arthia Nixon/ALC

PAGE 22

APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN 19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting points (4 20 Simple but revealing (5 21 May accept a joke with dignity (7 D own 1 Call for a doctor, perhaps (5 2 Not easy to grasp by sailors on land (8 3 Incline towards a simple building (4-2 4 Finished full of wrath and in jeopardy (10 5 Animal quarters, p erhaps (4 6 Rusty looking l ocks (3,4 9 Brilliant winner of the a ngling contest? (10 11 Mean the opposite (8 12 Unmasks once one asks questions (7 14 Enough to prevent parting without meeting (6 1 6 Acommon flower I’d say perhaps (5 1 7 Perhaps every church includes one (4 Across:1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10 Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14 Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19 Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24 Typesetters. Down:2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5 Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8 Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15 Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid, 10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14 Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19 Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24 Underground. Down:2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5 Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events, 8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15 Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21 Brio. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1 213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1 213 14 1516 17 1819 2021T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sports arena (7 4 Morass (5 7 Once more (4 8 Avaricious (8 10 Significant (10 12 Avoiding extremes (6 13 Reduced to powder (6 15 Complex details (3,3,4 18 Solid traffic jam (8 19 Woodwind instrument (4 20 Motor sport event (5 21 Generous (7 Down 1 Sudden convulsive action (5 2 Australian city (8 3 Optical illusion (6 4 Disguise oneself (10 5 Destroy (4 6 Hollow-eyed and gaunt (7 9 Like it or not (5-5 11 Salad vegetable (8 12 Company executive (7 14 Revoke (6 16 Artillery projectile (5 17 Determination (4 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It can be boring if a commercial interrupts a fight (7 4 In the operating theatre, the routine anaesthetic (5 7 It’s not difficult to name a novel midshipman (4 8 Put out of one’s mind? (8 10 Prettiness in a constantly recurring form (10 12 Get out the cane, for example, or put intoc onfinement (6 13 Remote sort of spacet raveller (6 15 One without real authority led the way at sea (10 18 Perhaps I am disposed to produce an object of w orth (8 19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting points (4 20 Simple but revealing (5 2 1 May accept a joke with dignity (7 Down 1 Call for a doctor, perhaps (5 2 Not easy to grasp by s ailors on land (8 3 Incline towards a simple b uilding (4-2 4 Finished full of wrath and in jeopardy (10 5 Animal quarters, perhaps (4 6 Rusty looking locks (3,4 9 Brilliant winner of the angling contest? (10 11 Mean the opposite (8 1 2 Unmasks once one asks questions (7 14 Enough to prevent parting without meeting (6 16 Acommon flower I’d say p erhaps (5 17 Perhaps every c hurch includes one (4 Across:1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10 Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14 Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19 Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24 Typesetters. Down:2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5 Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8 Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15 Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid, 10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14 Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19 Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24 Underground. Down:2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5 Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events, 8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15 Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21 Brio. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sports arena (7 4 Morass (5 7 Once more (4 8 Avaricious (8 10 Significant (10 1 2 Avoiding extremes (6 13 Reduced to powder (6 15 Complex details ( 3,3,4) 18 Solid traffic jam (8 19 Woodwind instrument (4 2 0 Motor sport event (5 21 Generous (7 Down 1 Sudden convulsive action (5 2 Australian city (8 3 Optical illusion (6 4 Disguise oneself (10 5 Destroy (4 6 Hollow-eyed and g aunt (7 9 Like it or not (5-5 1 1 Salad vegetable (8 12 Company executive (7 14 Revoke (6 16 Artillery p rojectile (5 17 Determination (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 It can be boring if a commercial interrupts a f ight (7 4 In the operating theatre, t he routine anaesthetic (5 7 It’s not difficult to name a n ovel midshipman (4 8 Put out of one’s mind? (8 1 0 Prettiness in a constantly r ecurring form (10 1 2 Get out the cane, for example, or put into confinement (6 1 3 Remote sort of spacetraveller (6 1 5 One without real authority led the way at sea (10 18 Perhaps I am disposed to produce an object of worth (8 1 9 Withdrawal of 101 meeting points (4 20 Simple but revealing (5 21 May accept a joke with dignity (7 D own 1 Call for a doctor, perhaps (5 2 Not easy to grasp by sailors on land (8 3 Incline towards a simple building (4-2 4 Finished full of wrath and in jeopardy (10 5 Animal quarters, p erhaps (4 6 Rusty looking l ocks (3,4 9 Brilliant winner of the a ngling contest? (10 11 Mean the opposite ( 8) 12 Unmasks once one asks questions (7 14 Enough to prevent parting without meeting (6 16 Acommon flower I’d say perhaps (5 1 7 Perhaps every church includes one (4 A cross:1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10 Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14 L oathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19 Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24 Typesetters. D own:2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5 Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8 Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15 Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionA cross:1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid, 10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14 E venly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19 Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24 Underground. D own:2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5 Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events, 8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15 Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21 Brio. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 1 23456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sports arena (7 4 Morass (5 7 Once more (4 8 Avaricious (8 10 Significant (10 12 Avoiding extremes (6 13 Reduced to powder (6 15 Complex details (3,3,4 18 Solid traffic jam (8 19 Woodwind instrument (4 20 Motor sport event (5 21 Generous (7 Down 1 Sudden convulsive action (5 2 Australian city (8 3 Optical illusion (6 4 Disguise oneself (10 5 Destroy (4 6 Hollow-eyed and gaunt (7 9 Like it or not (5-5 11 Salad vegetable (8 12 Company executive (7 14 Revoke (6 16 Artillery projectile (5 17 Determination (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It can be boring if a commercial interrupts a fight (7 4 In the operating theatre, the routine anaesthetic (5 7 It’s not difficult to name a novel midshipman (4 8 Put out of one’s mind? (8) 10 Prettiness in a constantly recurring form (10 12 Get out the cane, for example, or put into confinement (6 13 Remote sort of spacetraveller (6 15 One without real authority led the way at sea (10 18 Perhaps I am disposed to produce an object of worth (8 19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting points (4 20 Simple but revealing (5 21 May accept a joke with dignity (7 Down 1 Call for a doctor, perhaps (5 2 Not easy to grasp by sailors on land (8 3 Incline towards a simple building (4-2 4 Finished full of wrath and in jeopardy (10 5 Animal quarters, perhaps (4 6 Rusty looking locks (3,4 9 Brilliant winner of the angling contest? (10 11 Mean the opposite (8 12 Unmasks once one asks questions (7 14 Enough to prevent parting without meeting (6 16 Acommon flower I’d say perhaps (5 17 Perhaps every church includes one (4 Across:1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10 Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14 Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19 Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24 Typesetters. Down:2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5 Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8 Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15 Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid, 10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14 Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19 Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24 Underground. Down:2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5 Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events, 8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15 Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21 Brio. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sports arena (7 4 Morass (5 7 Once more (4 8 Avaricious (8 10 Significant (10 12 Avoiding extremes (6 13 Reduced to powder (6 15 Complex details (3,3,4 18 Solid traffic jam (8 19 Woodwind instrument (4 20 Motor sport event (5 21 Generous (7 Down 1 Sudden convulsive action (5 2 Australian city (8 3 Optical illusion (6 4 Disguise oneself (10 5 Destroy (4 6 Hollow-eyed and gaunt (7 9 Like it or not (5-5 11 Salad vegetable (8 12 Company executive (7 14 Revoke (6 16 Artillery projectile (5 17 Determination (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It can be boring if a commercial interrupts a fight (7 4 In the operating theatre, the routine anaesthetic (5 7 It’s not difficult to name a novel midshipman (4 8 Put out of one’s mind? (8 10 Prettiness in a constantly recurring form (10 12 Get out the cane, for example, or put into confinement (6 13 Remote sort of spacetraveller (6 15 One without real authority led the way at sea (10 18 Perhaps I am disposed to produce an object of worth (8 19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting points (4 20 Simple but revealing (5 21 May accept a joke with dignity (7 Down 1 Call for a doctor, perhaps (5 2 Not easy to grasp by sailors on land (8 3 Incline towards a simple building (4-2 4 Finished full of wrath and in jeopardy (10 5 Animal quarters, perhaps (4 6 Rusty looking locks (3,4 9 Brilliant winner of the angling contest? (10 11 Mean the opposite (8 12 Unmasks once one asks questions (7 14 Enough to prevent parting without meeting (6 16 Acommon flower I’d say perhaps (5 17 Perhaps every church includes one (4 Across:1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10 Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14 Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19 Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24 Typesetters. Down:2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5 Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8 Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15 Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid, 10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14 Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19 Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24 Underground. Down:2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5 Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events, 8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15 Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21 Brio. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 1 23456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sports arena (7 4 Morass (5 7 Once more (4 8 Avaricious (8 10 Significant (10 12 Avoiding extremes (6 13 Reduced to powder (6 15 Complex details (3,3,4 18 Solid traffic jam (8 19 Woodwind instrument (4 20 Motor sport event (5 21 Generous (7 Down 1 Sudden convulsive action (5 2 Australian city (8 3 Optical illusion (6 4 Disguise oneself (10 5 Destroy (4 6 Hollow-eyed and gaunt (7 9 Like it or not (5-5 11 Salad vegetable (8 12 Company executive (7 14 Revoke (6 16 Artillery projectile (5 17 Determination (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It can be boring if a commercial interrupts a fight (7 4 In the operating theatre, the routine anaesthetic (5 7 It’s not difficult to name a novel midshipman (4 8 Put out of one’s mind? (8) 10 Prettiness in a constantly recurring form (10 12 Get out the cane, for example, or put into confinement (6 13 Remote sort of spacetraveller (6 15 One without real authority led the way at sea (10 18 Perhaps I am disposed to produce an object of worth (8 19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting points (4 20 Simple but revealing (5 21 May accept a joke with dignity (7 Down 1 Call for a doctor, perhaps (5 2 Not easy to grasp by sailors on land (8 3 Incline towards a simple building (4-2 4 Finished full of wrath and in jeopardy (10 5 Animal quarters, perhaps (4 6 Rusty looking locks (3,4 9 Brilliant winner of the angling contest? (10 11 Mean the opposite (8 12 Unmasks once one asks questions (7 14 Enough to prevent parting without meeting (6 16 Acommon flower I’d say perhaps (5 17 Perhaps every church includes one (4 Across:1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10 Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14 Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19 Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24 Typesetters. Down:2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5 Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8 Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15 Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid, 10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14 Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19 Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24 Underground. Down:2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5 Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events, 8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15 Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21 Brio. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sports arena (7 4 Morass (5 7 Once more (4 8 Avaricious (8 10 Significant (10 12 Avoiding extremes (6 13 Reduced to powder (6 15 Complex details (3,3,4 18 Solid traffic jam (8 19 Woodwind instrument (4 20 Motor sport event (5 21 Generous (7 Down 1 Sudden convulsive action (5 2 Australian city (8 3 Optical illusion (6 4 Disguise oneself (10 5 Destroy (4 6 Hollow-eyed and gaunt (7 9 Like it or not (5-5 11 Salad vegetable (8 12 Company executive (7 14 Revoke (6 16 Artillery projectile (5 17 Determination (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It can be boring if a commercial interrupts a fight (7 4 In the operating theatre, the routine anaesthetic (5 7 It’s not difficult to name a novel midshipman (4 8 Put out of one’s mind? (8 10 Prettiness in a constantly recurring form (10 12 Get out the cane, for example, or put into confinement (6 13 Remote sort of spacetraveller (6 15 One without real authority led the way at sea (10 18 Perhaps I am disposed to produce an object of worth (8 19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting points (4 20 Simple but revealing (5 21 May accept a joke with dignity (7 Down 1 Call for a doctor, perhaps (5 2 Not easy to grasp by sailors on land (8 3 Incline towards a simple building (4-2 4 Finished full of wrath and in jeopardy (10 5 Animal quarters, perhaps (4 6 Rusty looking locks (3,4 9 Brilliant winner of the angling contest? (10 11 Mean the opposite (8 12 Unmasks once one asks questions (7 14 Enough to prevent parting without meeting (6 16 Acommon flower I’d say perhaps (5 17 Perhaps every church includes one (4 Across:1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10 Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14 Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19 Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24 Typesetters. Down:2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5 Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8 Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15 Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid, 10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14 Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19 Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24 Underground. Down:2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5 Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events, 8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15 Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21 Brio. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Sports arena (7 4 Morass (5 7 Once more (4 8 Avaricious (8 10 Significant (10 12 Avoiding extremes (6 13 Reduced to powder (6 15 Complex details (3,3,4 18 Solid traffic jam (8 19 Woodwind instrument (4 20 Motor sport event (5 21 Generous (7 Down 1 Sudden convulsive action (5 2 Australian city (8 3 Optical illusion (6 4 Disguise oneself (10 5 Destroy (4 6 Hollow-eyed and gaunt (7 9 Like it or not (5-5 11 Salad vegetable (8 12 Company executive (7 14 Revoke (6 16 Artillery projectile (5 17 Determination (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It can be boring if a commercial interrupts a fight (7 4 In the operating theatre, the routine anaesthetic (5 7 It’s not difficult to name a novel midshipman (4 8 Put out of one’s mind? (8 10 Prettiness in a constantly recurring form (10 12 Get out the cane, for example, or put into confinement (6 13 Remote sort of spacetraveller (6 15 One without real authority led the way at sea (10 18 Perhaps I am disposed to produce an object of worth (8 19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting points (4 20 Simple but revealing (5 21 May accept a joke with dignity (7 Down 1 Call for a doctor, perhaps (5 2 Not easy to grasp by sailors on land (8 3 Incline towards a simple building (4-2 4 Finished full of wrath and in jeopardy (10 5 Animal quarters, perhaps (4 6 Rusty looking locks (3,4 9 Brilliant winner of the angling contest? (10 11 Mean the opposite (8 12 Unmasks once one asks questions (7 14 Enough to prevent parting without meeting (6 16 Acommon flower I’d say perhaps (5 17 Perhaps every church includes one (4 Across:1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10 Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14 Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19 Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24 Typesetters. Down:2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5 Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8 Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15 Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid, 10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14 Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19 Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24 Underground. Down:2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5 Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events, 8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15 Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21 Brio. Yesterday’s Easy Solution123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u T a R gT E Across 1 Sports arena (7 4 Morass (5 7 Once more (4 8 Avaricious (8 10 Significant (10 12 Avoiding extremes (6 13 Reduced to powder (6 15 Complex details (3,3,4 18 Solid traffic jam (8 19 Woodwind instrument (4 20 Motor sport event (5 21 Generous (7 Down 1 Sudden convulsive action (5 2 Australian city (8 3 Optical illusion (6 4 Disguise oneself (10 5 Destroy (4 6 Hollow-eyed and gaunt (7 9 Like it or not (5-5 11 Salad vegetable (8 12 Company executive (7 14 Revoke (6 16 Artillery projectile (5 17 Determination (4 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It can be boring if a c ommercial interrupts a fight (7 4 In the operating theatre, the routine anaesthetic (5 7 It’s not difficult to name a novel midshipman (4 8 Put out of one’s mind? (8 10 Prettiness in a constantly recurring form (10 12 Get out the cane, for example, or put into confinement (6 13 Remote sort of spacetraveller (6 15 One without real authority led the way at sea (10 18 Perhaps I am disposed to produce an object of worth (8 19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting points (4 20 Simple but revealing (5 21 May accept a joke with dignity (7 Down 1 Call for a doctor, p erhaps (5 2 Not easy to grasp by sailors on land (8 3 Incline towards a simple building (4-2 4 Finished full of wrath and in jeopardy (10 5 Animal quarters, perhaps (4 6 Rusty looking locks (3,4 9 Brilliant winner of the angling contest? (10 11 Mean the opposite (8 12 Unmasks once one asks questions (7 14 Enough to prevent parting without meeting (6 16 Acommon flower I’d say perhaps (5 17 Perhaps every church includes one (4 Across:1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10 Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14 Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19 Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24 Typesetters. Down:2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5 Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8 Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15 Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid, 10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14 Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19 Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24 Underground. Down:2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5 Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events, 8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15 Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21 Brio. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 9 10 1 1 1 213 1 4 1516 1 7 1819 2021 1 23456 7 8 9 10 1 1 1 213 1 4 1516 1 7 1819 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Sports arena (7 4 Morass (5 7 Once more (4 8 Avaricious (8 10 Significant (10 12 Avoiding extremes (6 13 Reduced to powder (6 15 Complex details (3,3,4 18 Solid traffic jam (8 19 Woodwind instrument (4 20 Motor sport event (5 21 Generous (7 Down 1 Sudden convulsive action (5 2 Australian city (8 3 Optical illusion (6 4 Disguise oneself (10 5 Destroy (4 6 Hollow-eyed and gaunt (7 9 Like it or not (5-5 11 Salad vegetable (8 12 Company executive (7 14 Revoke (6 16 Artillery projectile (5 17 Determination (4 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 It can be boring if a commercial interrupts a fight (7 4 In the operating theatre, the routine anaesthetic (5 7 It’s not difficult to name a novel midshipman (4 8 Put out of one’s mind? (8 10 Prettiness in a constantly recurring form (10 12 Get out the cane, for example, or put into confinement (6 13 Remote sort of spacetraveller (6 15 One without real authority led the way at sea (10 18 Perhaps I am disposed to produce an object of worth (8 19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting points (4 20 Simple but revealing (5 21 May accept a joke with dignity (7 Down 1 Call for a doctor, perhaps (5 2 Not easy to grasp by sailors on land (8 3 Incline towards a simple building (4-2 4 Finished full of wrath and in jeopardy (10 5 Animal quarters, perhaps (4 6 Rusty looking locks (3,4 9 Brilliant winner of the angling contest? (10 11 Mean the opposite (8 12 Unmasks once one asks questions (7 14 Enough to prevent parting without meeting (6 16 Acommon flower I’d say perhaps (5 17 Perhaps every church includes one (4 Across:1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10 Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14 Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19 Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24 Typesetters. Down:2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5 Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8 Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15 Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid, 10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14 Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19 Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24 Underground. Down:2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5 Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events, 8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15 Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21 Brio. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 123456 78 9 10 11 1213 14 1516 17 1819 2021 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY24, 2009, PAGE 7B

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This is the realty of many second generation Haitians in the local community, who despite being born in the Bahamas, have no citzenship and in essence, belong to no country. Psychiatrist Dr Nelson Clarke explained that for the hundreds of people in the country that fall in this category, the feeling of not belonging and of being marginalised by main stream society could have an extremely destructive effect. “If you watch your people get rounded up and sent on buses to the Detention Centre, it could evoke some very strong feelings of anger.” Dr Clarke said many Haitian-Bahamian are left to carry this possibly overwhelming burden because they feel that they cannot talk about it. Tribune Health spoke to one young man in this position who dis cussed how his situation has impacted his mind and soul. He explained many HaitianBahamians wonder whether they should cling to a culture and heritage attained only through birth, or embrace a society and community which frequently discounts them,and seldom embraces them as its kin. Twenty seven year old Jeffrey Herard says life in the Bahamas as a second generation Haitian, has proven to be one of the greatest challenges he has even encountered, causing him often to question his own identity. H e painted a picture of denial, social segregation, and said he has u ndergone a constant struggle to validate his “ Bahamianism,” all in an effort to secure the best possible future for himself and his fami ly. Born in Nassau during the early 80s, Jeffrey said he spent the first five years of his life in Nassau, before moving back to Haiti with his mother. Reflecting on his childhood on lle de la Tortue in Haiti-, Jeffrey s aid his life then was much different from what it is today. Contrary to the media’s portrayal of Haiti as a lawless and violent country, Jeffrey says he has memories of a simple, safe, and loving community. Although his family was poor, he was able to attend a private school sponsored by Canadian missionaries where his awareness on the importance of education was first fostered. While there, Jeffrey said he was able to study French as a second language, and spent his senior years learning about computers and information technology. With his father already living in Nassau, Jeffrey said at the age of 17, he returned here in the hopes of having a better life. Jeff said his return to Nassau was by plane, considered a luxury and privilege by many Haitians, an opportunity made available by his father who he said does not support illegal sloop migration. Jeff explained, one of the first things he did after arriving back to New Providence was to begin the process of naturalisation. “I applied when I was 18, and it took me close to two years to get all the documents that the government was asking for.” He said this involved getting copies of his birth certificate, a copy of his parents birth certificates, and other documents, some of which have to be faxed or mailed from government offices in Haiti. After getting the requested documents, Jeff said his educational and civic growth were stunted because while he was waiting for approval from the department of immigration, his birth certificate was never seen as enough evidence of his Bahamian status. Hoping to pursue his passion in computer design and information technology, Jeff said he soon enrolled at the College of The Bahamas pursuing a degree in Computer Science. However he realised that because he could not present a Bahamian passport, he was not considered Bahamian by the college and would have to pay twice as much for an education. This was the first indication of his unequal status, he said. He was employed at the Atlantis Resort where overtime, he was able to advance to a senior position not because of his background, but because of his work ethics and skill. For him, this was an important experience, because for the first time his Haitian heritage did not matter, and he was placed on an equal playing field as everyone else. Being Haitian-Bahamian comes with its share of challenges, which Jeff said forces many young men in his position to join gangs or rebel against the Bahamian culture because they feel like strangers in both worlds. He said Haitians don’t automatically accept them especially if they don’t speak Creole, and Bahamians tend to turn their noises up at people of Haitian lineage. Jeff said even the way Haitian immigrants are portrayed on television when apprehended by immigration officers, and the disrespect and inhumanity that so often outshines the legality of the officers’ action often proves reason enough for many Haitian-Bahamian to disown their Haitian background. Jeff said although having to face discriminatory remarks from Bahamians, he has been forced to rely on his inner strength and sense of identity to success in the face of his trials. Fast forwarding his life to 2009, Jeff is now a father of two. He pointed out that Haitians like Bahamians, Americans, and others have desires to become successful, and that the Haitian-Bahamian too has worth and deserves the same opportunity to prove themselves as contributing members of society. Jeff said although he has had to work extremely hard in achieve all that he has, the struggle does not stop with him. He encouraged others who find themselves in the same position to look within and allow that inner strength to propel them to suc cess. Jeff said: “If a Black man can succeed in becoming the president of the greatest nation in the world, anyone can overcome challenges with sufficient drive. If I can do it, so can you.” What do mouth-watering strawberries, pineapples, sweet cantaloupes, tomatoes and red bell peppers, all have in commonvitamin C. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid extremely effective antioxidant. We’ve already learned that antioxidants are vitamins, amino acids and other natural substances that can reverse the effect of damage done by free radicals, which are unstable oxygen molecules that age the skin. We already know that vitaminC, when taken orally, enhances the immune system, a natural defense against colds and flu. But is there more to this vitamin? Let's take a look at its skin care benefits. VITAMIN C SKIN CARE BENEFITS : : IT softens IT moisturises IT helps reduce fine wrinkles IT exfoliates IT can help to prevent the production of melanin in the skin, which are the dark spots that usually increase with aging. IT reduces inflammation IT neutralises free radical reactions IT stimulates collagen production Collagen is a protein that gives your skin elasticity and firmness. This col lagen is decreased dramatically the older we get and shows itself up as wrinkles on the skin. So, when collagen is stimulated the aging skin is improved. ARE THERE FORMS OF VITAMIN C THAT DO NOT WORK? As great as vitamin C is to the skin, if not manufactured properly it is impossible for your skin to absorb it. Therefore, the vitamin C found in many skin care products may vary in its effectiveness. Why? Well, water and vitamin C are incompatible. When it comes into contact with water and air, it oxidises very quickly and loses its benefits. When this process occurs, it is not only ineffective but also potential ly harmful (oxidised vitamin C may increase the formation of free radicals). To receive the skin care benefits from vitamin C, scientists have been looking for a form of vitamin C that can do the following: – be more stable than vitamin C – penetrate the skin easily – are less irritating – release ascorbic acid in a quantity sufficient to boost collagen production. WHAT HAVE SCIENTISTS DISCOVERED? Today, there are two derivatives that have made their way into the skin care market. What are they? Ascorbyl palmitate also known as vitamin C, ester and magnesium ascorbyl phosphate. MAGNESIUM ASCORBYL PHOSPHATE Magnesium ascorbyl phosphate is a water-soluble derivative of vitamin C, which means it only enters the inside of the cell, which is mainly water. Not being able to enter the exterior of the cell means that it cannot prevent free radical damage on the outside of the cell. But it is popular because it is nonirritating and more stable than vitamin C. It also seems to increase skin collagen production in significantly lower concentrations. But if you have sensitive skin it is better choice, because vitamin C can be very acidic, causing exfoliation. ASCORBYL PALMITATE (VITAMIN C ESTER Vitamin C ester it is the most com mon fat-soluble derivative of vitamin C. It is composed of basic vitamin C (ascorbic acid which is derived from palm oil. This derivative is nonirritating, and unlike ascorbic acid, it is stable and able to remain stable in creams for years. Also, as a fat-soluble substance, it quickly penetrates the skin and pro tects against free-radical damage, on the exterior of the cells where there is the most damage. Dermatologist and anti-aging expert Dr Nicholas Perricone (author of The wrinkle Cure believes it is the perfect "skin vitamin" and "youth in a jar" and said " I was fortunate to have help from the research of the brilliant cell biologist Olga Marko, PH.D., who found that vitamin C ester helps stimulate the growth of fibroblast, the cells that help produce collagen and elastin in human skin. This finding gave me a clue that vitamin C-ester could boost collagen production and provide a more youthful appearance." Dr Perricone was convinced he was on his way to develop one of the first antioxidant-based anti-aging skin treatment. Here are some of the skin condi tions topical vitamin C treatment are recommended for: Fine lines and wrinkles on severely sun-damaged skin Sagging skin that is losing its firmness because of lost or damaged collagen Sunburned, inflamed, or irritated skin Kenya Mortimer-McKenzie Anti-Aging Skin Care Specialist Baha-Retreat Anti-Aging Spa East Bay Street, East of Lucianos 323-6711 or 323-615 www.baharetreat.com Email: info@baharetreat.com C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Can a “vitamin” keep wrinkles away? BY KENYA MOR TIMERMCKENZIE n B y LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net IMA GINE living in a place, all too familiar to you, the smells, the taste, the streets, the people, all cons idered a part of your home, and to suddenly r e alise that despite your familiarity, you were an a lien. n B Y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter T O help the growing number of persons especially kids who are either obese or overweight, Jennifer Basden along with her busi-n ess partner, Natasha Brown, have teamed up to start a health care initiative through a new t elevision showKIDFIT TV to make kids and their parents aware of the importance of good health and a positive lifestyle. M rs Basden said her eight year old daughter was the main inspiration behind KIDFIT TV. “I found that my youngest daughter wasn’t w orking out and I wasn’t feeding her the healthiest meals and she started gaining weight. I recognised that I needed to do something. I didn’t feel like pushing her off onto someone else for help. I thought that if I could get hera nd some of her friends, because once you get one friends interested then the others will c ome, then it becomes a workout party. My kids got excited and other kids got excited as well when we wanted to do a casting call fort his show,” Mrs Basden said. Mrs Basden said although her target audie nce is children between the ages of eight and 13 years old, the show is still kid inspiring but adult friendly. They are currently in negotia-t ions with local stations to air the show. “We want to encourage adults to be apart of i t and watch along and work along with their kids. We want to educate them and build up their self esteem. Once you build up self esteem it empowers them and it encourages them to strive to do better and to want to do better int he community. As they grow older into adolescent and into adults, they will be able to contribute something positive to society,” MrsB asden said. Ms Brown, a Fitness trainer at NatBros, said s he is happy to be working with the programme. “If you look at our surroundings as a nation, o ne will see that we are not as clean as we need to be. That can also bring about sickness a nd disease. We have now become to busy to teach our own kids the importance of fitness and good health,” Ms Brown said. M rs Basden said the entire show will be hosted by children to allow those watching at home to better relate to the activities on screen. “The kids will have adult counterparts for each individual segment. So for our KIDFITT V Cuisine segment, we will have a chef that is going to be working along with the kid host chef to help them to stay safe in the kitchen and to teach them how to eat healthy with tasty alternatives to fast food,” Mrs Basden said. Mrs Basden said there is also a “Go Green” s egment to get the kids involved with fun activities to start instilling green values as they con tinue a healthier lifestyle as they grow older. “We want the children to learn how to be environmentally responsible. We want to encourage them to not only uplift themselves and those around them, but also to be conscious of what happens when they do not take care of their environment. We want them to learn how to be respectful of themselves and their community so that everyone can enjoy it in the long term,” Mrs Basden said. Mrs Basden said she hopes in the future to not only have the kids watching the show and interact, but also have a place where they can come out and socialise with other children. “We want to start a kids programme also at Natasha’s gym and have some of our cast members from the show and team from KIDFIT TV to be there and show the other kids that fitness and health is a great thing,” Mrs Basden said. GET READY FOR KIDFIT TV nobody’s child health BODYANDMIND T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e Jeffrey Herard

PAGE 24

L IGHTEN UP AND LIVE Strawberry plants are obtainable from local nurseries and willp robably be b ought bearing fruit. Later on the plants will propagate themselves with runners that develop several new plants. Half ad ozen plants this year will be about three or fourdozen next year, etc. The plants usu ally have three productive years before they have to be replaced. Strawberry plants like rich soil and regular, but not heavy, watering. The variety you buy will determine the size of the fruit and the number of fruits produced per plant. Most strawberry flowers are white but I have recently seen some that are pink. During winter the US market for strawberries is served by Florida, mostly from around Plant City in Central Florida. The strawberry varieties used there are short day cultivars like Florida Belle, Florida 90, Tioga, Sweet Charlie and Festival. Florida strawberries are available from Thanksgiving to May. Most of the strawberry plants sold in B ahamian nurseries are of the Everb earing type. These tend to be daylength neutral and respond to the ideal time of year which is January to June in The Bahamas. Everbearing strawberries are, however, capable of giving you nice surprises at any time of the year. Strawberries attract critters – and b irds. The ‘straw’ in the name refers to the European habit of covering the plants with straw once they have been set out in order to counteract an unexpected frost. Once the danger of frost was over the straw was placed around the plants in order to keep the fruits off the ground. In The Bahamas as well as Europe a fruit that touches the ground will be predated. Florida strawberries are grown using black polyethylene sheeting. The plants are put into the ground through slits and the sheeting acts as a mulch. Raising the fruit from the ground can be done using plastic shreds (as found in Easter baskets), paper towels, patches of polyethylene, or a host of other materials. I use flat rocks from shale beaches.A rubber snake (or reasonable facsimile thereof) moved discreetly every day will help with the bird problem. Beyond snail, slug and bird predation I have not had strawberry plants that were attacked by diseases or mites, though these problems exist. In a smallg arden I would prefer to uproot the p lants and replace them in another area rather than try to control the infestation. If you have a strawberry jar you do not have to worry about your fruits touching the ground. Give the jar a quarter turn every day so equal sunshine reaches every part of the contain-e r. Strawberry jars usually hold about ten plants but there are strawberry wheels that can hold 25 or more. Strawberry plants like loose, friable soil that has had compost added and is slightly acid. They should be planted in full sun and watered only moderately as too much water damaged the roots. Raised beds provide good drainage. Strawberries should be fertilized lightly twice a season but never when the plants are holding fruit. When to pick? Conventional wisdom suggests picking the berries when they are three-quarters red. Strawberries do not ripen any further after being picked, they only start to rot. A fully red strawberry is probably past its best. Why bother to grow strawberries when they are in stores all year round? Taste. Real strawberry taste. Exquisite. Worth fighting your wife over. G REEN SCENE BY GARDENER JACK C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 9B M Y WIFE and I do a lo t of shar ing a nd rarely try to o utdo each other in an y serious way. Until strawberry season, that is. And strawberry season is no w . The f irst one into the gar den is t he ear l y bir d t hat gets t he fruits. Straw berries February is Heart Health Awareness Month and the Lighten Up & Live Healthy team is urging you to use the remainder of this month to reflect on your own 'heart health'. Heart diseases are the main contributor to mortality in the Bahamas. Chronic heart disease not only affects individuals, but also families and the greater community. In addition, it places a colossal strain on the national healthcare system. However, we are here to let you know that most cases of heart disease can be prevented by making simple lifestyle choices that begin with you. For a healthy country starts w ith healthy citizens. This week we will share with you some lifestyle tips from Dietitians of Canada on ways to control your fat intake, increase your fibre consumption and increase your activity level that can reduce the incidences of most heart disease. However, if you have heart disease already, you will be better able to manage it. TIPS TO CONTROL Y OUR FAT INTAKE Have 5-11 servings of grain products daily such as whole grain breads, cereals and other grain products. Reach for 5-9 servings of vegetables & fruit each day. Choose soy milk, or lower fat milk products such as skim or 1 per cent milk, and yogurt or cottage cheese made with less than 2 per cent milk fat more often. Choose fish, poultry and leaner meats, with fat and skin removed. An appropriate serving size is about the size and thickness of a deck of cards or the palm of your hand excluding your fingers. Have foods that are baked, broiled or grilled more often than deep-fried foods. Have more meals made with beans and peas. Cut down on extras such as butter, margarine, oil, gravy and rich sauces. Choose lower fat snack foods such as light microwave or air popped popcorn (without added butter or topping) and pretzels. Read package labels and choose lower fat versions of salad dressings, peanut butter, cream soups, etc. To be called "low fat", a food must contain less than 3 grams of fat per serving. Flavour foods without fat, use lime, salsa, mustard, herbs and spices instead. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND EXERCISE TIPS To increase exercise and physical activity: Buy a frisbee & make a family game out if it. Go swimming. If you can't swim, just be active in the water. Play beach volleyball. Walk or jog along the beach, park, and neighbourhood. Get involved in team sports (e.g. basketball, soccer Buy a skipping (jump rope and use it. Put on music while cleaning the house and clean to the beat! Use the stairs more often. Instead of lounging in front of the television go for a walk a fter dinner. Find an exercise buddy. Join a gym and attend frequently. Purchase exercise equipment HEALTHY WEIGHT TIPS Eat breakfast every morni ng Eat a variety of healthy foods Have balanced meals Watch your portion sizes practice moderation Make physical activity and exercise a part of your lifestyle Exercise for 45 minutes to 1 hour at least four times per week Eat more whole grain foods, fruits and vegetables Drink at least eight 8 oz cups of water daily Use cooking methods that require little or no fat baking, boiling, grilling, roasting, etc. Use products that have reduced calories, fat, sugar and salt e.g. mayo Get sufficient rest Reduce your stress levels Be patient, determined & discipline & enjoy your food because your health is in your hand! Remember, following these simple tips will not only lead to a healthier heart but a much healthier you. HEART HEALTHY TIPS Provided by Adelma Penn, Camelta Barnes, Shandera Smith and Lathera Lotmore, Nutritionists from the Ministry Of Health/Department o f Public Health At one time or another we have all noticed our partners being distant, hav ing something on their mind but just not saying anything. We may make excuses that this is their normal behaviour and perhaps the pattern of the relationship. We may even wonder if it is something we have done or not done. Alternatively we may have something pressing, but seeing our partner emotionally drained and upset about their day may lead us to think that there is never a right time to talk. So we just do not talk about it and we keep it to ourselves. Without a doubt timing is very important, but being aware of the tendency to avoid and withhold the sharing of feelings can be detrimental to the individual and the couple bond. Knowingly or unknowingly, silence can be used as a weapon. Problems such as suspicions, distrust and assumptions creep in and are often unjustified. If left unattended these small insidious problems can become huge milestones to overcome. Is this learnt from our childhood or does it result from relationship itself? DIFFERNCES There is no doubt that boys and girls are brought up differently. Few would disagree that society looks at boys who show too much emotion as weak, and ‘girly’. Boys who show little emotion are considered more 'masculine'. Of course boys have feelings and emotions but some are considered disadvantageous to show. Showing enthusiasm, excitement, anger, or being upset and gloomy is acceptable. However, their showing love and caring exposes vulnerability, particularly to the women in their lives. This reveals a need and dependency on women which in turn can be perceived as a weakness. Generally girls are encouraged to express themselves and be gen tle and dependant. Feeling, hearing and saying the words of love are essential for the sense of well being for women. It is often this disconnect between the genders that we see in relationship thera py. By showing couples why this has come about and how, it can be easily resolved if practised frequently. On the whole, women continue being able to put their thoughts together and express their emotions throughout their lives. That is not to say that our life experi ences and relationships don’t dent us and at times we all have difficulty getting the words out. Learning early on in life how to open up and express ourselves helps us then to form friendships and then later on love relationships. TIMING As relationship therapists we are often asked how to bring up and talk about negative topics when the anticipated response is hostile body language, critisism and a brick wall. Certainly the timing of such matters is paramount if you are looking for a favorable outcome but if this has become habitual then finding ways to soften the relationship is essen tial. Appreciation is the best way to stave off negative feelings. This may be something the person has done, or a part of their personality you love. A few small words of encouragement and appreciation can make all the difference. There is no substitute or anything that has more impact than the words 'I love you'. If words of appreciation and love are intro duced on a daily basis then it will undoubtedly help to reduce tension, critisism and encourage more positive feedback. Hopefully then when it is time to discuss difficult topics, there will be a cushioning to the relationship and make the ironing out of problems a little easier. SEX A lot of people have difficulty talking about sex with their partners. It seems that sometimes it becomes even more difficult if you have known them for many years. You would think it would be the opposite, but the vulnerability and sense that there is more to loose holds people back. Couples often do not want to disturb the sense of safety so things are left unsaid. In relationship therapy couples often complain about their part ner's not expressing sexual pleasure and passion. This often comes as a complete surprise to the partner. If you want to become more expressive in your intimate life then pay attention to what you are feeling on the inside and what you are showing on the outside. Practise daily the ideas talked about and see the dramatic difference to and quality to the relationship. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist located at The Centre for Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's Close West. She can be contacted by calling 356-7983 or by email at relatebahamas@yahoo.com Expressing yourself By Maggie Bain

PAGE 25

n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunmedia.net BLAZING the way in research and real world application of various methods of green living, South Eleuthera’s Island school is educating anew generation of young people eager to examine and discover ways of preserving nature’s won der, while celebrating the beauty of the Bahamian outdoors. Nestled in the heart of Cape Eleuthera, the Island School is a secondary level BI-semester facility, which introduces a group of 48 high school students to advanced academic training in fieldsof Ecology, Environmental Art, Applied Science and Research, and Bahamian culture and her itage. With many of its students hailing from high schools across the United States, one question asked by many is how will this programme benefit Bahamians, and what contribution is being made to apply the same research locally. Just ask 17-year-old Alannah Vellacott, past recipient of the Bahamas Environmental Steward Scholars (BESS ate of the island school. Alannah who is now interested in pursuing her studies to the doctorate level, hopes to one day lecture and write on the importance on marine preservation in the Bahamas, mainly because of her experience at the school. Alannah said while growing up in Queen’s Cove, Freeport, she always had a fascination with the water. She recalls going out on dozens of fishing trips with her neighbors where they caught fish, dove for conch, and on a few occasions caught sharks. Although that was a fun experience, Alannah said she never realised until recently how much of a part of her future those trips meant. didn’t know that it would ultimately affect what I’m planning on doing later on in life, I was just having fun.” She said her path to finding the school was completely by chance, but said that it was the perfect place to foster her interest in marine biol ogy. “Initially, I thought yeah it would be good, but at the time I was looking at colleges, and I just wanted to go off like everyone else, and was not really concentrating or re-evaluating anything that had to do with the Bahamas and how I could possibly affect that.” Learning that the school had a close relationship with the University of Miami, she became even more certain that she was making the right choice in taking on the three month study at the Island School. A lannah said her experience at the school was absolutely amazing, and being isolated from technology while learning the newest methods of marine and environment research, has helped her greatly in understanding the importance of conservation, and the role she plays as a Bahamian in preserving the islands and waters of herc ountry. 17-year-old Bradley Watson, another BESS recipient and graduate of the Island School, said after his experience at the school he noticed a 180degree change in his confidence and ability to socialise with others. The school which exposed him for the first t ime to non-invasive methods of shark and fish r esearch, helped illustrate how huge of an impact humans have had on underwater species. Taking a sabbatical from the College of The Bahamas where he majored in Bio-Chemistry, Bradley said he simply yearned for a new experience. “Before then I had never been on a boat before, no diving experience, and I’ve always wanted to live on a family island, and I just wanted to have that experience.” Bradley said even his parents, his father espe cially, had commented on his change in confidence. “I’m more independent, I use to ask a lot to do things, I use to need advice on just about every thing, but now I’m not as dependent on my parents and I feel like making the right choice is now easy to identify.” Bradley feels because of the practise at the Island School where students are forced to think about every decision they make, the ability of thinking intelligently on his feet is now reflected in his personal life. He said also being a spokesperson for the Island School, he is able to share on the fantastic projects he has worked on, and how easy it can be to introduce cleaner ways of living and co-habiting with other creatures in the ecosystem. Recently celebrating its tenth anniversary, the Island School is continuing in its effort of research in marine studied, intended to benefit not just this country, but environments throughout the globe. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE I had a boss some time ago who always reinforced the idea that “What gets measured, gets done.” It is a very s imple statement but it means that if y ou measure only processes, your peop le will focus on the process to the exclusion of all else. If this is how you measure your team, they will master the process and your leadership needs may not be met. Additionally, measuring only processes can lead to developing employees who feel: Entitled Disengaged Underutilised Under valued You might say to yourself, “So what, once I am getting the results I need then there is no need to worry about balance.” My assertion in response to this claim is that yes, you may be attaining your desired results, but with strong leadership and an inspired team, you can achieve quantum results. Especially in challenging times. If you are part of the “so what” crowd you probably focus on building processes and expect employees to stick to the script at the risk of impacting innovation and creativity or even productivity. Creativity and innovation are important cultural character-i stics because they show up when employees are engaged. Engaged, adaptable employees are not only able to improve your results, they can innovate solutions in any type of economic climate and turbo-charge the performance of your business. Conventional wisdom used by managers deciding on promotions is that your best performers are the ones who understand the process and produce strong results. While they may be your best employees, based on their technical skills, knowledge of the job or results, sometimes these strong performers are unable to motivate or engage their respective teams. Processes are usually established to ensure standard levels of service are offered to clients or standardised levels o f quality are applied throughout a p rocess. These reasons are certainly i mportant and should always be a part of your focus but what about the people considerations? Process standards create safety, routine and opportunities for control. Often process standards are treated as rules or inflexible structures designed to maintain uniformity. While standards are quite useful and necessary for success, Tanmay Vorga once stated: “Processes have to be flexible since each project is unique, each client is unique and hence process requirements are unique too. Processes should act as a tool and help people perform better . His assertion supports the idea that processes are tools and should be used as part of a holistic solution. In higher performing teams processes, not people, are used as tools. From a problem resolution perspective, managers can fall into the trap of perceiving challenges primarily froma process perspective and not see the contributing people issues clearly enough. Many managers learn how to break down a systemic problem but when people are involved, so are emot ions and emotions can impede the reso lution process. H OW DO I BRING MY COMPANY INTO BALANCE? In his book, Spiritual Capitalism, Michael Hendren outlines his approach to radical transformation of corporate performance into quantum performance. He states: “The outmoded business practices of the past top heavy management, greed at the helm, an employees-be-damned attitude, a self interest focus in management just don't cut it anymore. I've had amazing financial results with Spiritual Capitalism. I've also had a lot of fun in the process while making a fortune for my team.” As a leader, you can achieve balance and quantum results through some simple enhancements to your behaviour. Michael Hendren suggests that you should: Come from a place of empowerment versus control. Talk t t o o your people instead of a a t t them Look out for your people instead of for yourself Show how much you care about and a ppreciate your people Additionally, you can: Develop your people through training, coaching and mentoring Inspire creativity and open a safe place for creativity Develop an effective reward and recognition program Conduct an employee satisfaction survey to understand how well you are maintaining the balance. As a leader, while seeking to balance process and people, try to avoid falling into the trap of achieving one to the exclusion of the other. The process of balancing is never-ending and over time, the mastery comes from conscious attempts to recalibrate. Adam Khan said: “You continually find your balance, you don't achieve balance. Even if you were able to find your perfect balance and hold it, life itself will throw you off balance continually. It is constant adjustment.” The balancing act between process people and By YVETTE BETHEL help Gabriel in her profession. “ Several persons took me aside and said that she has what it takes, but she needs to overcome her shyness, because as a Supermodel, a client wants their model to be assertive and out there". Mr Humes said that Gabriel’s success has validated the efforts of Models 242 and proven to the naysayers that there are opportunities for young Bahamians to market themselves and earn lucrative money in this industry. “We want to change the image of modeling in this country,” he said. This will also add tremendous publicity for the Bahamas,” he added. “When we got to Montenegro, a lot of people did not know where we were from and then as interest spread in Gabriel, everywhere I went, people were talking about the Bahamas. So hopefully, this will mean that scouts come to the Bahamas, because they know that they can find beautiful people here.” FROM page 12 On the catwalk A lesson in green living Island School’ introduces students to advanced training in Ecology, Environmental Art, Applied Science and Bahamian culture and heritage Bradley Watson Alannah Vellacot

PAGE 26

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 B A H A M I A N B E A U T Y W I N S B E S T O N C A T W A L K A T F O R D S U P E R M O D E L O F T H E W O R L D C O N T E S T catwalk With one strut down the catwalk, Super m odel of t he Bahamas Gabriel Moss propelled herself a nd t he Bahamas int o t h e int ern ational spo tlight, when she dazzled persons attending the Ford Supermodel of the World contest in Budva, Montenegro last month. T he 5 foot nine and a half 17-year-old beauty captured the crowd’s attention, standing out among the other 39 con t estants from around the world to win the 'Best on Catwalk' title. It was amazing, when she came out on the catwalk, I just heard this gasp from the crowd and this clapping and w hen I looked up I realised it was her,” said Mark Humes, the operations manager of Models 242 the agency which awarded Gabriel the local Supermodel title last October. In fact through out, the competi tion, the officials were telling the oth er girls, ‘This is how you are supposed to walk’ and they were coming to her for lessons. “She was incredible and it was so inspiring to see her develop from the shy, quiet high school graduate she was (from St George’s High School on Grand Bahama) and really watch her develop as she participated in the competition,” Mr Humes said. “She had moments on the trip when I could tell that she was in awe of what was happening to her and she was absorbing it all.” Although Gabriel did not win the $500,000 contract with Ford, she did walk away with a contract with New York model management company VNY for an undisclosed amount. Despite not wining the top award, Gabriel said that the entire experience was wonderful and exceeded her expectations and has not dis couraged her from modeling. “Obviously when I didn’t win the contract with Ford, I was disappointed , but it is very exciting to have a company like VNY interested in me.” “You win some and you lose some, but that doesn’t mean you give up. It only means you must try harder," she said. Mr Humes added that the exposure will only n B y CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL Tribune Features Editor Y ou win some and you lose some, but that doesn’t mean you give up. It only means you must try harder. SEE page 10 MARK HUMES on the


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FEATURES

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SEE ‘WOMAN’ SECTION

Detentic |
Tunger strike

Detainee who was
allegedly beaten to
stage protest with

other Cubans

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

A DETAINEE housed at
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre, who was allegedly
beaten so badly by officers
that he lost fingernails, is start-
ing a hunger strike tomorrow
with other Cubans at the facil-
ity.

Members of a Cuban Amer-
ican human rights organisa-
tion are expected to be in Nas-
sau today to check on the
health of the men detained at
the facility.

The “peaceful” protesters
are also appealing for “Chris-
tian-minded” Bahamians to
donate diapers and baby for-
mula along with food to assist
with the maintenance of those
housed at the centre.

“The food we get isn’t
enough. People try bartering
and sometimes they end up
giving sexual favours for food.

During visitation is the only
relief people have because the
ones who have family come
see them have food brought
in. If you complain about the
amount of food you get they
will say: ‘We don’t have
enough supplies for everyone
here. If you don’t like it then
you should go back home’,”
one detainee told The Tri-
bune.

He said that detainees get
a bowl of oatmeal or grits with
tuna for breakfast. Lunch, he
said, is not served every day
and may only consist of a
cheese sandwich. Women with
children, he said, tend to com-
plain the most frequently
about getting more food for
their children.

“Without hesitation I can
say this is a concentration
camp. Any human being upon
walking through the door
would be shocked because

SEE page nine

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009
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BAHAMAS BIGGEST



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TMEV (EMMA LOT Cemesy CCU



FIREFIGHTERS SURVEY the damage after a blaze at Nassau Village
last night. The fire destroyed an efficiency apartment above Andrea’s
Hardware store on Taylor Street before being extinguished. There were
no reports of any casualties.

Claim that a willing officer ‘could earn up to
$6,000’ for aiding a Detention Centre escape

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr ‘Force officer could possibly

be behind it and when docu-





PRICE = 75¢



Teen charged

with murder

17-year-old in court
over stabbing death

A 17-YEAR-OLD boy
accused of the brutal stab-
bing death of a 33-year-old
Haitian man was arraigned
in the Juvenile Court yes-
terday.

Police have charged the
juvenile in the February 18 |
stabbing death of Edvard |
Ficien of Charles Vincent
Street. Ficien was stabbed
four times outside the Hap-
py Hour Bar on Wulff
Road and died clutching a
fistful of cash, according to
police.

Around 9.30pm Wednes-
day, police were alerted by a
caller that a man was lying
on the ground near the bar.
When officers arrived, they
found the victim's body
between a fence and the
building.

He was dressed in blue
jeans, a red shirt, blue jacket,
with black and white tennis
shoes. It is believed that
Ficien was killed while he
was being robbed. His mur-
der marked the twelfth for
the year.

The 17-year-old boy of : : :

Claridge Road was escort- Me al Mei haetd is escorted
ed by police to Juvenile y Ue
Court 2 around noon yes-
terday with a light green comforter over his head to conceal his
identity. The 17-year-old, who was arraigned before the Juve-
nile Panel, was not required to plead to the murder charge.

He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case was
adjourned to April 21.

Christie: All PLP posts will
be challenged at convention

ff

Tim Clarke/Tribun

m@ By PAUL G spread yesterday
TURNQUEST that Mr Christie
Tribune Staff could be trying to
Reporter block individuals
pturnquest@ from making a push

tribunemedia.net at the convention,
ne the former PM said
that these allega-
tions are a complete
“fabrication.”

“As a matter of
course, all offices
are vacated and
must be filled by the Con-

FORMER Prime
Minister Perry
Christie stressed to
his party supporters
yesterday that all
posts within the
PLP will and can be chal-



Perry Christie

Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

AIDING in escapes from
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre could earn a will-
ing Defence Force or Immi-
gration officer between $4,000
to $6,000, a detainee told The
Tribune yesterday.

He claimed that whenever
there is a case of “someone
jumping the fence” a Defence

mentation is “miraculously”
provided for inmates, an
immigration officer could pos-
sibly be complicit in a fraud.

He claimed that there was
an instance of a Haitian man
who paid $5,000 to an immi-
gration officer and “became a
Bahamian national over
night.”

SEE page nine

lenged at the National Con-
vention in October or
November of this year.
With full faith that he will
be returned as leader of the
PLP, Mr Christie said he
hopes and expects that other
persons who feel that they
have a contribution to make
will come forward and make
themselves known.
However, as rumours

Then you need the Fidelity DebtSAVER



NASSAU AND BAHAME:

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

SEE page nine












DUE TO PRESS TIME con-
straints, we are unable to bring
readers the final score from
the Hugh Campbell Champi-
onship game. Tomorrow’s Tfi-
bune, however, will feature
substantial coverage of the
highlights from the basketball
tournament.
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

CHURCH LAUNCHES THIRD HOUSING AREA IN SOUTHWEST NEW PROVIDENCE

MOUNT TABOR

UST one year after

Mount Tabor Full

Gospel Baptist

Church opened its

second subdivision, the church

yesterday officially launched

a third housing area — Mount

Tabor Gardens in southwest
New Providence.

The new subdivision, locat-

ed off Carmichael Road,

local economy, but to help
Mount Taborites in particu-
lar, and Bahamians in general
become home owners and put
scores of unemployed resi-
dents back to work,” the
church said in a statement.
Construction in Mount
Tabor Gardens has already
begun and senior pastor Bish-
op Neil Ellis said: “Housing
our people has become a part

GARDENS



of who we are.

“Tt has always been an inte-
gral part of the social agenda
of our church.

“T believe the lack of hous-
ing is still one of the greatest

offers “middle-class” housing
to Bahamians.

' ; Se, ) ee ree aa “This latest project is the

Bs a ee = | Cithird in a series of initiatives

NEW subdivision offers “middle class” housing. designed to not only fuel the

social ills facing our country.” Mount Tabor Gardens. Gov-
A brief ceremony was held — ernor-General Arthur Hanna
yesterday at the opening was the keynote speaker.



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BISHOP Neil C Ellis officially
opens the new Mount Tabor
Gardens yesterday.

GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur Hanna and Bishop Neil C Ellis take a tour of

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 3



© In brief

Man, 44,
accused of
having Sex
with girl, 12

A 44-year-old man
accused of having inter-
course with a 12-year-old girl
was arraigned in a Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Delbert Roberts of Amos
Ferguson Street is accused of
having unlawful intercourse
with the 12-year-old girl in
December 2008.

Roberts, who appeared
before Magistrate Renee
McKay in Court 6, Parlia-
ment Street, was not
required to enter a plea to
the charge.

He was granted bail in the
sum of $10,000.

The case has been
adjourned to April 28.

Fox Hill man,
22, facing
rape charge
Is arraigned
in court

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 22-year-old Fox Hill
man accused of raping a
woman after he allegedly
forced his way inside her
home in eastern New Provi-
dence last Friday was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Sheehan Comarcho, 22, of
Revees Street was arraigned
before Magistrate Guillime-
na Archer in Court 10, Nas-
sau Street yesterday, charged
with two counts of armed
robbery, two counts of
receiving, burglary, rape and
assault.

It is alleged that between
12.05am and 1.30am on Fri-
day, February 20, the
accused broke into the home
of a 35-year-old woman and
raped her.

Phone

It is further alleged that
while armed with a knife, the
accused robbed the victim of
$1,000 cash, a green 1997
Nissan Sentra valued at
$5,000 and a black Sony
Ericsson cellular phone val-
ued at $60.

Comarcho was also
charged with receiving the
cash, car and cellular phone.

It is also alleged that on
the same day, while armed
with a knife, the accused
robbed another woman of a
$300 gold chain.

He is also accused of
receiving the chain and
assaulting the woman.

Comarcho was not
required to plead to the
charges.



REPLACEMENT judges will
soon be filling the vacancies on
the Court of Appeal bench,
Attorney General Michael Bar-
nett said yesterday.

He declined to say exactly
when the judges will be taking
up their posts, but asserted that
contrary to recent reports, two
judges will not be assuming
posts in the Supreme Court in
March.

Neither confirming nor deny-
ing reports that judges will be
arriving from various parts of
the West Indies next month, Mr
Barnett would only say that gov-
ernment has made no secret of
its intention to have a full com-
plement of judges, regardless of
nationality.

"Obviously we have to fill
those posts — we've said before
we're not limiting our choices.



LOCAL NEWS

Replacement judges will soon be filling
vacancies on Court of Appeal bench - AG

Michael Barnett

There are positions in the Court
of Appeal to be filled and we
are looking for judges to fill
those posts," Mr Barnett said

during a brief interview yester-
day. He added that contrary to
reports, “There are no vacan-
cies in the Supreme Court.”
Last October Justice Milton
Ganpatsingh retired from the
Court of Appeal. Justice
Emmanuel Osadebay is also get-
ting ready to retire this year.

Sitting

While speaking at a special
sitting of the Court of Appeal
to mark the opening of the legal
year last month, Mr Barnett said
the choice for these essential
positions must not be limited by
geography.

"It is imperative that we
secure the services of the per-
sons with the necessary schol-

arship and judicial temperament
to serve in this high office.

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BUSINESSMAN David
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According to a source close
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last Friday.

His family is still in New
York with him.

Mr Kelly, proprietor of Kel-
ly’s Home Centre, was taken
seriously ill while in New
York.

With his wife Nancy and
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DAVID KELLY and his wife, Nancy, pictured in a file photo.

of last week, Mr Kelly devel-
oped chest pains and went to
the New York Presbyterian
Hospital for a check-up.

Mr Kelly, who has a heart
condition, underwent a proce-
dure at the hospital last
Wednesday.



His condition was being
closely monitored after com-
plications developed.

His three sons, Andrew,
Gregory and Scot, and his two
daughters-in-law, Candy and
Shelly, flew to New York to
be with him.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Plbe oto Ones OalO Nal
Barter eect ere nee sncee P4

P12,13,14,15

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION

Business

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



"The panel from which this
selection must be made cannot
be limited by nationality or
geography. These efforts also
force us to address the terms
and conditions under which jus-
tices serve. In this regard, a new
commission under the Judges
Remuneration and Pension Act
may have to be appointed this
year, earlier than the three years
since the last commission, to
make further recommendations
to the terms and conditions
under which justices of both the
Court of Appeal and the lower
courts serve.

"We are all committed to
doing all we can to strengthen-
ing the administration of justice
in our country,” he said.

Court of Appeal president
Dame Joan Sawyer, Justice
Osadebay, Justice Hartman

Longley and Justice Christopher
Blackman are the only judges
currently on the bench of the
Appellate court.

According to Article 102 of
the Constitution, a justice of
appeal is permitted to hold
office until the age of 68. The
Constitution also allows for the
governor general, after consult-
ing with the prime minister, to
allow a justice to sit until the
age of 70.

The Constitution also says a
judge may continue to serve
beyond the age of 68, as may be
necessary to enable him to deliv-
er judgment or fulfil any other
duty in relation to proceedings
that were commenced in his
court before he attained that
age.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Obama faces split opinion on Iraq future

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack
Obama faces split opinions within the military
on whether to make the speedy withdrawal from
Iraq he championed as a candidate.

Obama's top generals in Baghdad are pressing
for an elongated timetable. Some influential senior
advisers inside the Pentagon are more amenable
to a quicker pullout. Obama has yet to decide the
matter. But his recent announcement that he is
sending thousands more combat troops to
Afghanistan implies a drawdown of at least two
brigades from Iraq by summer.

That does not answer the question whether
Obama will stick to his stated goal of a 16-month
pullout or opt for a slower, less risky approach.

Gen. Ray Odierno, the top American com-
mander in Baghdad, favours a longer timetable for
leaving Iraq. He sees 2009 as a pivotal year, with
parliamentary elections set to be held in Decem-
ber; he doesn't want to lose more than two of the
14 combat brigades that are now in Iraq before the
end of the year. And he believes the U.S. military
will need to remain engaged in Iraq, to some
degree, for years to come.

Odierno's boss at U.S. Central Command,
Gen. David Petraeus, leans toward Odierno's
view. Gen. David McKiernan, the top U.S. com-
mander in Afghanistan, has steered clear of the
debate over withdrawing from Iraq. But he sees
his battlefield as an increasingly urgent priority,
not just for additional combat troops but also for
Iraq-focused surveillance aircraft and more civil-
ian support. There are now about 146,000 USS.
troops in Iraq, compared with 38,000 in
Afghanistan. Obama has directed 17,000 more to
head to Afghanistan, including Marines and sol-
diers who had been in line for Iraq duty.

At the Pentagon, a more mixed view prevails.

The uniformed service chiefs see Iraq as a strain
on their troops and, more broadly, a drain on
their resources. The Marines, in particular, are
in the tough position of having a foothold in Iraq
and Afghanistan. As a relatively small service,
they would prefer to concentrate more fully on
Afghanistan, if only they could get out of Iraq.

Neither Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, nor Defence Secretary
Robert Gates has said publicly whether he sup-
ports a 16-month withdrawal timeline. But they
have an obligation to consider the full spectrum of
threats and potential threats to U.S. national secu-
rity. "There's a very clear understanding of what
is at stake here," Mullen said Feb. 10. "And it's
very natural for Gen. Odierno to want to go slow-
er and to hang onto capability as long as possible,”
he added. "That's not unusual. It's very natural for
Gen. McKiernan to say, 'I need more.’ And so
that's the tension. We don't have an infinite pot
(of resources and deployable forces). We have
to make hard decisions about where to accept
risk."

In internal discussions, the emphasis appears to
be on getting out responsibly rather than quickly,
several officials said, speaking on condition of
anonymity because no decisions have been made.

Obama must weigh an array of hard-to-figure
trade-offs in security and politics. And he must
















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reconcile his conviction that the combat phase of
US. involvement in Iraq must end with his com-
manders' concern in Baghdad that hard-fought
gains could be squandered.

It boils down to this: How much more effort is
the Iraq war worth? What is the risk of leaving too
soon? Is the 16-month timetable too short, given
the uncertain state of stability and political rec-
onciliation in Iraq and the potential cost of seeing
the country slide back into widespread sectarian
war? And is anything substantially beyond 16
months too long, given the call for still more
troops in Afghanistan, where Obama himself has
said the battle against extremists is going in the
wrong direction?

Obama is still considering his options, which
officials say includes a less hurried, 23-month
withdrawal. The deadline he inherited from the
Bush administration is Dec. 31, 2011, the date set
in a security agreement with Baghdad that says all
US. troops, not just combat forces, must be gone
by then. One clue to some of the thinking inside
the White House might lie with the views of Oba-
ma's national security adviser, retired Marine
Gen. James Jones. Jones co-chaired a study pub-
lished in January 2008 on the way ahead in
Afghanistan. The group endorsed the idea of pro-
viding more military support for Afghanistan,
including resources that become available as com-
bat forces are withdrawn from Iraq.

The president has an additional factor to weigh:
the political cost of backing off the 16-month pull-
out timetable that was a prominent feature of his
campaign. Although he has said he thinks 16
months is a reasonable timetable, he also has
assured military leaders that he will consider their
advice. Notably absent, at least so far, is even a
whiff of public pressure from fellow Democrats to
stick to a 16-month timeline. That suggests Oba-
ma's party might be satisfied so long as he makes
early and clear steps in the direction of ending
U.S. combat involvement in Iraq, even if on a
somewhat longer timeline. Obama campaigned
for the White House on a promise that he would
end the war and get U.S. commanders moving
immediately on a transition to Iraqi control of
their own security. He said military experts believe
combat troops can be pulled out safely at a rate of
one to two brigades a month, meaning all 14 com-
bat brigades there now could be gone within 16
months, which equates to mid-2010.

Peter Mansoor, a retired Army colonel who
was the executive officer for Petraeus when the
general was in Baghdad overseeing the "surge" of
US. forces in 2007-08, said he thinks it likely that
Obama will pull at least four combat brigades
out of Iraq by the end of this year. But he hopes
the president does not insist on getting all 14
brigades out within 16 months.

"If the president orders it, the military can do
it, but whether it's advisable or not is a different
story," he said in a telephone interview. "Quite
frankly, I don't think it is, given the risk you
would incur to potentially upsetting the political
situation" inside Iraq.

(This article was written by Robert Burns of the
Associated Press).



Barack
Obama and
skin colour

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It is terribly exciting to be
alive in these history making
days! Who woulda ever tink
we woulda see a conchyjoe
man in da White House? Well
muddos! Chile, try let ma say
sump-um. Thank you for a bit
of very valuable space.

First of all, congratulations
to Barak Obama for accom-
plishing that which is only pos-
sible in a great nation like
America — being the first non-
white man elected to the high-
est office in a land of a major-
ity of whites. Now that is
something!

As for Michelle Obama
finally being proud to be an
American, I don’t think we
should hold that against her.

Any of us are prone to get-
ting caught up in the excite-
ment of a given event, and this
event pretty much tops the list
at the moment.

I did not support Barak
Obama’s bid for the White
House because I am a conser-
vative, and having only his
record to go on, I felt he was
too liberal.

It seems though that since
his election he has moved
somewhat to the centre, in
speech anyway. Time, of
course, will tell whether or not
he was too liberal.

I heard it said somewhere,
or I read somewhere, that the
tremendous support by a
majority of Bahamians for
Barak Obama was because of
his stand on the issues, and
not because of his skin colour.

The only response I have
for that is to say that some
people will make up all sorts
of excuses for their behaviour
rather than simply being hon-
est.

Do you think Bahamians,
or Americans for that matter,
would have supported a white
man as vigorously, whose
stand on the issues was the
very same as Barak Obama’s?
Be honest now, keep it real! I
might just be a racist, though.

There has been much ado
about Martin Luther King Jr’s
dream having been realized
as a result of Barak Obama’s
election. There is one small
problem with that theory.

Dr King’s dream was that
he saw a time when a man
would be judged by the con-
tent of his character rather
than by the colour of his skin.

Barak Obama is President
of the United States today
because of one overwhelming

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



fact, and that is the colour of
his skin. There are other cred-
ible reasons too that he is
President, of course, but if he
had not been a man of mixed
race, (he is not black) I con-
tend that he would not be
President today. Again, I
might just be a disgruntled
racist.

I tell you, if when I get to
Heaven and it turns out that
God is a black man, I’m still
going to fall on my face and
kiss his feet. If, on the other
hand Barak Obama would
have been a white man, there
would not be the worshipping
of him that we see. For
instance:

There are Hollywood actors
who have promised to be
kinder, love more, smile more,
etc., because of Barak Oba-
ma! Wow! Could somebody
please explain why so many
white Americans suffer froma
condition known as “White
Guilt”? Is this condition in the
medical journals?

There are gangsta rap
singers who have promised to
tone down the violent lyrics
in their music because of
Barak Obama! Not to sound
repetitive, but Wow! Glorify-
ing and/or trying to justify vio-
lence is just wrong no matter if
you come from the hood or
from the Ivy League. Dig?

Tyler Perry, a great (black)
comic and movie actor said
that he never voted before in
any election. What an insult
to the memory of black people
who suffered great humilia-
tion, discomfort and pain to
bring about the change nec-
essary for Barak Obama to
become President, and to give
Tyler Perry the right to vote.

The list goes on and on.

I find it extremely interest-
ing that there are so many
people that would try and con-
vince us that race relations in
the US have gone nowhere in
the last 50 years, but suddenly,
because a non-white man has
become President, all of the
problems of yesterday are
fixed.

That is where I differ from
most other folks. I am not tak-
en in by image or promises. I
need to see results, and when
I do I am more than man
enough to give due where it
is deserved.

Again, let me congratulate
Barak Obama on his victory,
and let me inform the Ameri-
can people that I am praying
for the success of their new
President, in the hopes that
he will bring America — and
by extension, the world — out
of this terrible economic time.
I prayed for their last Presi-
dent too because it was the
right thing to do.

It is necessary for America
to remain the world leader.

At least for us Bahamians it is.
One can only imagine what
could have been accomplished
had these Hollywood types
and their music industry coun-
terparts gotten behind the war
effort on terror. I believe vic-
tory would have long since
been announced. But, like I
always tell my wife, there is
absolutely nothing we can do
about the past. Some people
will never get it.

Let me assure the Ameri-
can people that while the
economy is the greatest prob-
lem facing them at the
moment, terrorism has by no
means become a non-issue.
The terror captains of the East
have boldly informed us that
they are intent upon world
domination, and they have
demonstrated time and again
that they are willing to do any-
thing they deem necessary to
accomplish their goals. And
they are very, very patient.
“Death to the infidels.” And
this is not because W. had the
balls to take the fight to them.

Those same captains of ter-
ror have stated repeatedly that
Israel has no right to exist and
they want to see her wiped off
the face of the earth.

If Barak Obama caves to
the pressures of the rest of the
world and sides with Israel’s
enemies, we won’t have to
worry about America being
the world leader any more. If,
on the other hand, Barak
Obama stands with Israel,
there is hope yet.

Simply being black — or at
least not white — will not be
enough. Actually doing the
very difficult things to effect
positive change will make the
man’s legacy and bring Amer-
ica back from the edge.

Finally, I would like to
thank George W Bush for his
service to his country and to
the world. But for his serious
stance on terrorism, it is very
probable that American blood
would have been spilt on
American soil again by now,
and for no other reason than
being deemed infidels by an
extremely violent and misin-
formed enemy. Also, it is
important to me that Mr Bush
know that I know, that the
war on terror did not alone
bring about this economic cri-
sis, aS a few very clever yet
intellectually dishonest liberals
would have us believe. As for
the rude reception Mr Bush
was given during Obama’s
inauguration, it is apparent to
me that some people have no
respect for protocol at all,
unless it serves their own pur-
poses. It is called a lack of
class.

In order for the truth to set
one free, one must first know
what the truth is.

Unafraid and narrow-mind-
ed as ever.

WILLIAM

(BILLY) ROBERTS
Abaco, Bahamas
February, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



.__- | MAGISTRATE’S COURT
© In brief

Three men arraigned in connection
with a spree of armed robberies

Promotional
push to lure
couples to
Bahamas

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CASH-strapped couples
across the globe who are wor-
ried they might have to put off
their dream wedding are being
invited to get creative and win
a Ministry of Tourism compe-
tition to get married in the
Bahamas for free.

To enter the aptly-titled
“Bahamas Bridal Bail-Out”
competition, couples must tell
the world their love story via a
video or written essay accom-
panied by a photograph which
will be posted on the website
www.bahamasbridalbailout.co
m. The only price to pay:
Once couples post the tale of
their love online, they will
have to open themselves up to
public scrutiny in the form of
an online poll.

The would-be spouses who
place in the top 20 will then be
reviewed by a panel of judges,
who will whittle the group
down to five couples who will
win the grand prize.

As part of their bail-out
package, couples will enjoy a
round-trip airfare for them-
selves and eight others to the
Bahamas; deluxe hotel accom-
modations for four days and
three nights for all 10 people;
the use of a wedding planner,
photographer; flowers, and a
wedding cake, according to
the Ministry of Tourism.

Advertised

The promotional push is
being advertised this week in
such high-profile publications
as The New York Times.

“Tt’s tough times for couples
wanting to get married or
renew their vows. However,
the islands of the Bahamas
doesn’t think a little thing like
money should stand in the
way of your dream wedding
coming true. So we’re here to
help you out with the
Bahamas Bridal Bail-Out con-
test where you can win a
dream destination wedding,
courtesy of the Bahamas Min-
istry of Tourism,” reads the
government-owned
Bahamas.com site.

Possible destinations for the
getaway will include the Peli-
can Bay at Lucaya, Grand
Bahama; the Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort; SuperClub
Breezes or the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort.

Submissions are being
accepted from March 20
through April 24. Public vot-
ing will take place from April
25 to May 17.

Antigua's PM
pledges action
in Stanford case

@ ST. JOHN’S, Antigua

Antigua’s prime minister says
parliament will reconvene to
deal with fallout from allega-
tions of fraud against R. Allen
Stanford, the country’s largest
private employer, according to
the Associated Press.

Prime Minister Baldwin
Spencer told reporters Sunday
night he is concerned about the
potential loss of hundreds of
jobs and that the government
“has decided on a course of
action.” He did not disclose any
details on the plan, however.

A parliamentary session is
scheduled for Thursday.

The twin-island nation of
Antigua and Barbuda dissolved
its parliament ahead of general
elections scheduled for March
12. But the law allows for it to
reconvene in special session to
address matters of urgent
national interest.

Stanford’s businesses employ
hundreds of people in Antigua
and include two restaurants, a
newspaper, cricket grounds and
a development company, and a
three-branch local bank as well
as the headquarters of his off-
shore bank in the island of
about 80,000 people.

The U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission filed a
civil lawsuit last week accusing
Stanford of a “massive” fraud
through Antigua-based Stan-
ford International Bank Ltd.

Stanford, who was served
legal papers by FBI agents last
week and ordered to surrender
his passport, has not been
charged with any crime.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THREE men accused of
committing a spree of armed
robberies this month were
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday afternoon.

John Augustine, 27, and Col-
bert Augustine, 25, both Haitian
nationals of Cambridge Drive,
and Sean Johnson, 26, of East
Street, were arraigned on a long
list of armed robbery charges
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane.

It is alleged that the three
men on February 10, 2009
robbed Donell Cox of $910
cash, the property of Adastra
Gardens.

It is further alleged that the
three men also robbed Ms Cox
of a pair of gold hoop earrings
valued at $173, a pair of gold

slave bands valued at $600 and
$100 cash.

It is alleged that on February
16, 2009 the accused, while
armed with a handgun, robbed
Marcia Newball of her Gucci
neck chain valued at $1,600 and
a silver Wittnauer watch valued
at $550.

It is further alleged that the
three men being concerned
together on Monday, February
16, 2009, robbed Marcella Rus-
sell of $40 cash, three Bahamian
passports valued at $90, a
Motorola cellular telephone val-
ued at $300, a black handbag
valued at $100 and an assort-
ment of bank cards and per-
sonal items belonging to Ms
Russell.

Court dockets also allege that
on the same day the three men
allegedly robbed Ketress
Knowles of a Motorola cellular
telephone valued at $300, an

orange handbag valued at $70, a
black wallet valued at $30, a
brown leather watch valued at
$120 along with two gold wed-
ding bands, together valued at
$2,500.

It is further alleged in the
court dockets that the three
men on February 16, 2009
robbed Kimberly Robins of a
black handbag valued at $150,
along with six cents.

Pre-school

All three men pleaded not
guilty to causing damage in the
amount of $250 to a wooden
door, the property of Little
Voices pre-school.

John Augustine and Colbert
Augustine were also arraigned
together on four separate
counts of armed robbery. It is
alleged that the men on January

19, 2009 robbed Yvania Alfred
of $85,000 in cash, the property
of L&S Convenience Store. It is
also alleged that on the same
day the two men robbed Ms
Alfred of $100 cash and a gray
Motorola cellular telephone val-
ued at $150 as well as a black
pistol grip 12-gauge shotgun val-
ued at $850.

Court dockets also state that
on the same day the men
allegedly robbed David Servin-
cent of $50 cash and a Motoro-
la cellular telephone valued at
$269.

It is also alleged that Shaun
Johnson along with John
Augustine on February 16, 2009
robbed Nicole Johnson of
$2,100, the property of Alpha
Learning Centre. The men were
not required to enter a plea to
the armed robbery charges.

Attorney Mark Rolle, who
represented the three men, told

the court that the accused had
been arrested last week and
claimed that they were subject-
ed to extreme brutality while in
police custody. According to Mr
Rolle, the men had been denied
access to medical treatment. He
told the court that Shaun John-
son had appeared at the Grove
Police Station, but had been
turned away as they had refused
to accept him. According to Mr
Rolle, Johnson said that he felt
as though a bone in his hand
had been broken and that one
of his ribs had been broken as
well. Mr Rolle yesterday
requested that the men be given
medical attention at Her
Majesty’s Prison. Chief Magis-
trate Gomez ordered that the
three men receive medical
attention. The case has been
adjourned to March 10 and
transferred to Court 5, Bank
Lane.



Child rights activist hits out

Public officials accused
of failing to protect
children from predators

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

CHILD rights activist Cleaver Duncombe accused public
officials of failing to properly protect the nation's children from
predators.

His comments came in response to allegations that a female
primary school student, said to be 6-years-old, was sexually
assaulted while on school grounds by a group of older boys
from a separate secondary school. The alleged assailants are
reportedly 7th graders.

Meanwhile Education Minister
Carl Bethel told The Tribune that
education officials are awaiting the
results of a police investigation
before determining whether any
security guard or teacher was in
neglect of their duties during the
alleged attack.

"The system is obviously con-
tributing to much of what is hap-
pening to these children because it
would be incumbent through law
for those who are entrusted with
those mammoth tasks to do what
they are supposed to do to protect
them — beef up security, moving
around, being more vigilant -
because if you know chances are
you are going to jail, then you would
be more vigilant," Mr Duncombe
said.

He argued that school officials
responsible for securing a campus should be held accountable
if it is found that their negligence contributed to an assault.

"What happens is, nobody is accountable, nobody can trace
to see exactly who would have been responsible at that partic-
ular time for the overseeing of the child. Developed countries
have these systems where people are held accountable. What
makes it so difficult for the Bahamas to be accountable?” he
asked.

According to a source close
to the investigation, one of the
alleged assailants was able to
gain access to the campus
because he was related to a stu-
dent there.

O-lamsisiials)



“Parents in this
country should
be horrified
It is claimed that after some-

>
one found out about the attack, because youre
the group of boys — between two Saying tO me now

to four of them — jumped the ’
school's back wall and escaped. you can't even
send your

Update children to

Yesterday Minister Bethe! School anymore.”
said he was awaiting an update
from the school's security team.
He also denied claims that the
fence around the school is insuf-
ficient.

When asked about the status of an internal review into the
matter aimed at discovering if any employee was derelict in their
duties, he replied: "That depends on the police report. Right
now we're waiting on that."

When pressed about whether he intends to punish any school
employee found to have been negligent in the matter, Mr
Bethel said it is unclear at this stage whether or not there was
any negligence.

The alleged incident took place on January 23 at a public pri-
mary school.

The alleged victim was reportedly lured behind a building
shortly after 3pm.

She is said to have been treated in hospital for her injuries,
however her present condition is unknown.

School officials have come under fire for not bringing the mat-
ter to light sooner.

"Parents in this country should be horrified because you're
saying to me now you can't even send your children to school
anymore? I know one thing, if something would have hap-
pened to my 11-year-old who I sent to school, it ain't ga' just be
no accident and we hush it and sweep it under the rug. And look
at the length of time that they took for this to come to the
public forum. It's so irresponsible," Mr Duncombe said.

He also repeated his call for government to implement the
proposed Family and Child Protection Act to allow for harsh-
er penalties for child negligence and other crimes against chil-
dren.

a ee |
Cleaver Duncombe

TOTTI Teta STAT

=

RANDY DEVEAUX, better known as the Downtown Drummer, pictured in his brand
new junkanoo costume with happy tourists.

SOMEWHERE between the blaring of cruise
ship horns the frenetic bustle of Bay Street, some
tourists are lucky enough to encounter the
melody of drums courtesy of Nassau’s very own
Randy Deveaux, better known as The Down-
town Drummer.

Clad in newly-made junkanoo attire, Mr
Deveaux plays his very own mix of junkanoo
beats to the delight of tourists.

He says his aim is to enhance each visitor’s
experience by sharing a little piece of his culture
with them.

“They love the music. Keep them dancing. Let
them know what junkanoo is,” Mr Deveaux said.

He often demonstrates the finer points of var-
ious junknoo dances like the “conch style” and
“mash the roach” and tells whoever is interested



a bit about the history of junkanoo.

Mr Deveaux is passionate about his role as
the unofficial junkanoo ambassador for the
Bahamas. “Its something within me — I love to do
it and am proud to do it. Downtown is the main
attraction and I boost (tourism) up.”

Reminiscing about memorable moments with
visitors quickly puts a smile on his face. He said
he likes “when they smile, taking pictures with
them, letting them try on my hat. When I give
away pieces of costume or show them beats like
‘Goombay’ and ‘Roll beat.’

He believes he has given visitors “‘a lot of joy.”

Mr Deveaux has played the role of the Down-
town Drummer for several years, and plans to
continue as long as tourists continue dancing to
the beat.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A united GB
Port Authority
“is crucial’

@ By SIMON LEWIS

FREEPORT - State Min-
ister for Finance Zhivargo
Laing said yesterday that giv-
en the economic situation fac-
ing Grand Bahama, a united
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty is crucial.

Mr Laing, a featured speak-
er at the 11th annual Grand
Bahama Business Outlook
held at the Our Lucaya
Resort, addressed participants
on the topic: Grand Bahama’s
Economy —- Possibilities
Beyond the Crisis.

“No one can blame the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty for the current economic
woes we are facing,” Mr Laing
said, “however in the best of
times a united, focused, proac-
tive, productive and consider-
ate Port Authority is impor-
tant to the success of this
island. In a crisis such as we
face, such a Port is crucial.

“If we are to promote the
necessary international and
domestic investment needed
to make this island proper
again, the Grand Bahama Port
Authority must come to the
table as a whole entity with
dedicated resolve. In that vein,
its leadership must be more

Minister speaks
out at Business
Outlook event

about the island’s progress
that its own,” he stated.

Mr Laing pointed out that
while the downturn in the
national economy began in
2006 or 2007, Grand Bahama’s
economic misfortunes began
much earlier, and that the
island is “now into its seventh
year of economic recession
and in its fifth year of eco-
nomic crisis.”

He emphasised that the hur-
ricanes of 2004 had a devas-
tating effect on Grand
Bahama’s economy, having
forced the closure of the Roy-
al Oasis and other business,
resulting in hundreds of resi-
dents losing their jobs.

Mr Laing pointed out that
the Bahamian economy can-
not be revived without the
global economy — in particular

the US economy — also return-
ing to good health.

“The reality is that the glob-
al economy is in a tailspin and
no one is certain when this
tailspin will end. Indeed, no
one knows just how severe
this tailspin will be.”

He noted that the industrial
sector of Grand Bahama,
which largely caters to an
international clientele, has not
been badly affected by the
downturn.

Focusing on the economic
possibilities beyond the crisis,
Mr Laing pointed to the
Ross University Freeport
Academic Facility and the
Fenestration Glass Services
Company.

“The fact is that this island
is ideally suited for an offshore
education industry and further

The Bahamas National Trust to
host Proud Paws Potcake Party

ANIMAL lovers are invit-
ed to attend this year’s Proud
Paws Potcake Party which
will be held on Friday, Feb-
ruary 28, from 6pm to mid-
night at the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust’s Retreat on Village
Road.

The annual Potcake Party
brings together supporters

and friends for an evening of |

entertainment, music and
dancing.
There will also be raffle

prizes, a silent auction and a |.

light buffet.
Proud Paws is a registered
non-profit charity which has

as its mission the reduction of |

unwanted dogs and cats by

means of a subsidised spay ©

and neuter project.

To date, the charity has spayed or neutered
5,700 animals, thereby drastically reducing

the stray and roaming dog
and cat populations of New
Providence.

Proud Paws’ education
programme takes the mes-
sage of responsible pet own-
ership and kindness towards
animals to schools through-
out the capital.

Volunteers and their pets
have made presentations to
more than 8,000 school chil-
dren.

Tickets for Friday’s event
are available at Palmdale
Veterinary Clinic, Caves Vil-
lage Clinic or at the door.

The executive of Proud
Paws has assured that the
charity will make every effort
to minimise disturbance to
the surrounding area, and

invites all nearby residents to join the party in
support the cause.



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medium to high technology
manufacturing. It is also high-
ly suited for offshore medical
services and offshore finance,”
he said.

Highlighting other develop-
ments, Mr Laing said: “Even
as we speak, the Grand
Bahama Shipyard has ordered
and secured another dry dock,
making a total of three.

“This means that it now has

Chamber of Commerce
director represents
non-profit organisation
in St Kitts and Nevis

Hank Ferguson, director of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s recently established
Small and Medium Enterprises Support Unit,
represented the non-profit organisation in St
Kitts and Nevis earlier this month.

He was attending the 93rd board of directors
meeting and joint regional chambers and man-
ufacturers meeting of the Caribbean Associa-
tion of Industry and Commerce (CAIC).

Representatives from chambers of commerce
from throughout the English speaking
Caribbean, the Dominican Republic, Guade-
loupe and St Maarten were in attendance.

The meeting focused on issues related to the
global financial crisis and its impact on the

region.

Additional discussions centered on the imple-



the capacity to service even
more ships therefore creating
more business and economic
opportunities.

“As we speak, the $900 mil-
lion acquisition of BORCO
by Vopak has been completed
and the company is undertak-
ing almost a quarter of a bil-
lion dollar upgrade to its new-
ly acquired oil storage facili-
ties. Vopak is a huge company

MINISTER OF STATE
for Finance Zhivargo
Laing addresses the

11th annual Grand
Bahama Business
Qutlook.

and it is only to be seen what
business opportunities will
ultimately emerge from its
investment here in Freeport,”
he said.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing
emphasised that the govern-
ment will continue to shore
up its social safety net in order
to soften, to the extent possi-
ble, the impact of the crisis on
citizens.



HANK FERGUSON, director of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s Small and Medium

Enterprises Support Unit, at right, with the Prime

mentation of the Economic Partnership Agree-

ment (EPA) with Europe, proposed activities
for the CAIC in 2009 and arrangements for
the Summit of the Americas scheduled for next
month in Trinidad and Tobago.

Minister of St Kitts and Nevis Denzil Douglas.

During the course of the meeting, Mr Fer-
guson had the opportunity to meet with Prime
Minister and Minister of Finance of St Kitts and

Nevis, Denzil Douglas.

Guadeloupe marchers
converge on strike talks

@ POINTE-A-PITRE,
Guadeloupe

SHOPS in this French
island’s biggest city opened
Monday for the first time in
more than a month, but then
slammed their doors shut as
thousands of chanting protest-
ers marched to a meeting
aimed at ending a 35-day-old
general strike, according to
Associated Press.

Even as protesters blocked
highways with new barriers,
hopes were high among
islanders that unions, busi-
nesses and French officials will
reach agreement and prevent a
repeat of last week’s riots. The
workers have been striking
since Jan. 20, demanding lower
prices and a euro200 ($250)
monthly raise for those making
euro900 ($1,130) a month.

Also fueling the unrest is
resentment over the control
that descendants of slave hold-
ers hold over much of the
island’s economy. Strikes also
have taken place on the nearby
French island of Martinique.

For a few hours Monday,
Pointe-a-Pitre’s commercial
center returned to normal as
shopowners took advantage of
a lull in the street protests.
Women lined up at a pharma-
cy and the smell of cinnamon



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SEVERAL VEHICLES sit in a blocked highway during riots in Gosier, on
the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe, Friday, Feb. 20, 2009.

and licorice filled an open-air
spice market that normally
caters to cruise ship passen-
gers.

But the city’s stores hastily
closed down as the marchers
approached waving red flags
and pumping their fists. They
chanted “We came to negoti-
ate!” and sang the anthem
“Guadeloupe is ours!” as they
marched to the seaside port
authority building, where talks
are taking place.

“We are afraid for ourselves,
we are afraid for our business-
es and we are afraid for our

customers,” said a visibly ner-
vous shopowner, who asked
not to be named for fear of
reprisal.

Among the marchers was
French leftist leader Olivier
Besancenot, who walked
behind strikers carrying red
flags bearing the image of rev-
olutionary icon Ernesto “Che”
Guevara.

Leaders of the strike-lead-
ing LKP, or Collective Against
Exploitation, told supporters
that no deal had been reached
by mid-afternoon and that
talks were continuing.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 7



Firearms expert: ‘toy’ gun found

next to man shot by the police

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A GUN found next to the
body of a man shot by police
was a “toy”, a firearms expert
told the Coroner’s Court yes-
terday.

However, former sergeant
Charles Bain said that having
been designed as a “replica”, it
would be reasonable for a per-
son to presume the gun was
real if it had been pointed at
them — a statement with which
Magistrate William Campbell
agreed.

Mr Bain was one of several
witnesses employed at the
police forensics laboratory
who testified yesterday at the
inquest into the shooting
death of 22-year-old Lincoln
Forbes.

Magistrate Campbell told
jurors that the aim of having
the various officers testify was
to establish the chain of cus-
tody for evidence collected at

Former sergeant testifies
in Coroner’s Court

the scene.

Last week, 25-year-old con-
vict Trevon Stevens was
accused by counsel for the
police officer involved of
telling the court of a “pack of
lies” when he alleged police
shot his friend Lincoln without
cause and afterwards dragged
his body and placed a gun
next to it.

Stevens said the pair were
followed into Garden Hills by
police in an unmarked vehi-
cle on the night of June 3,
2004. Officers shot at their
Toyota Corolla, shattering the
back windscreen, despite the
fact they had not threatened
the police with any weapon,
he alleged.

Yesterday Detective Cor-
poral Marvin Cargill, attached
to the Crime Scene Investiga-

tion Unit of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, told
the court that he attended the
scene of the shooting at
11.40pm on the night in ques-
tion.

He said he processed the
area, collecting a loaded black
and silver Makaroff pistol and
four unfired 9mm cartridges
from the northern side of a
black Toyota Corolla — the
vehicle which convict Mr
Stevens testified on Thursday
that he and the deceased had
been travelling in on the night
in question.

He also said he found a sil-
ver and black imitation
firearm next to Lincoln
Forbes’ body. DC Cargill said
he submitted the firearms and
ammunition to the police
forensic lab.

Guantanamo detainee freed after four years in prison

m@ LONDON

THE FIRST Guantanamo detainee released
since President Barack Obama took office
returned to Britain on Monday, saying his seven
years of captivity and torture at an alleged CIA
covert site in Morocco went beyond his “darkest
nightmares”, according to Associated Press.

Binyam Mohamed’s allegations — including
repeated beatings and having his genitals sliced by
a scalpel — have sparked lawsuits that could
ensnare the American and British governments in
protracted court battles.

Looking frail from a hunger strike, Mohamed,
who once was accused by U.S. authorities of
being part of a conspiracy to detonate a bomb on
American soil, stepped off a charter plane and
was whisked away by police, border control
agents and immigration officials.

The 30-year-old Ethiopian refugee, who moved
to Britain as a teenager, was freed after four
hours of questioning.

Attorney General Eric Holder, who traveled
Monday to Guantanamo Bay as the Obama
administration weighs what is needed to shut the
facility, thanked Britain for its cooperation in
the case.

“The friendship and assistance of the interna-
tional community is vitally important as we work
to close Guantanamo, and we greatly appreciate
the efforts of the British government to work
with us on the transfer of Binyam Mohamed,” he
said.

Lawyers for Mohamed are seeking secret US.
intelligence and legal documents they say will
prove the Bush administration sent Mohamed to
Morocco, where it knew he would be tortured.
They claim the documents also prove Britain was
complicit in the abuse.

Unlike in the U.S., Britain’s leaders don’t have
a past government to blame — Prime Minister
Gordon Brown’s Labour Party has been in pow-
er for more than a decade.

But the case is also a test for Obama. While he
has promised Guantanamo’s closure and an end
to torture, he has not yet publicly explained how
his government will change the process of extra-
ordinary renditions, which involve sending terror
suspects to foreign countries to be interrogated.

CIA Director Leon Panetta has told Congress
renditions could continue, but that prisoners
won't be handed over to countries where they
are likely to be tortured — which has always
been the stated U.S. policy.

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The officer stated that a
“large” quantity of cash and
a bank book was also found
near the deceased’s body. He
did not mention whether the
money was collected as evi-
dence, like the guns, ammu-
nition, and other items. The
money was not brought to
court as evidence yesterday.

According to the officer, no
one drew his attention to the
fact that the windscreen of the
vehicle driven by Mr Stevens,
and from which Mr Forbes
had run shortly before being
shot dead, had been shattered.

Asked by Magistrate
Cambpell whether he was told
who caused the windscreen to
shatter, he said he was not.

Firearms anaylst Mr Bain
told the court that he tested
all of the weapons from the
scene as well as three police
service revolvers submitted to
him and found them all to be
“functioning satisfactorily”.

He said the “toy” gun found
by investigators near Mr
Forbes’ body was designed
only to detonate “firecrack-
ers”, but he felt anyone could
mistake it for the genuine arti-
cle.

The former officer testified
that, based on his analysis, he
found that five of the bullet
casings found at the scene had
been fired by one police ser-
vice revolver.

It was not revealed which
police officer had been carry-
ing that particular Smith and
Wesson pistol on the night in
question.

Both woman DC Phyllis
Smith and Mr Bain mentioned
during their testimony that
certain other tests — for gunfire
residue on the victim’s cloth-
ing and to determine which
gun had fired the two bullets
collected from his body — had
not been completed yet as
analysts, having begun the
tests only shortly before the
inquest got underway last
Monday, had not had enough
time to do so.



Students visit the
prime minister

BUILDING



— —

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STUDENTS of the Lower Deadman's Cay Primary School called on
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham on Thursday, February 19, 2009 at
the Cabinet Office, Churchill Building.

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamas backdrop
for best selling
swimsuit calendar

THE Bahamas has been cho-
sen by the Dallas Cowboys
Cheerleaders Organisation as the
backdrop for the world’s num-
ber one selling swimsuit calen-
dar.

The cheerleaders, who arrived
at Atlantis on Sunday and will
be staying until March 1, will be
photographed for the 2010 cal-
endar at some of the resort prop-
erty’s signature spots, including
Cain at the Cove, Cove Beach,
One & Only Ocean Club, and
Aquaventure.

“This is a big deal for the des-
tination to have the world’s num-
ber one selling calendar being
shot here,” said Kerzner Inter-
national-Bahamas president and
managing director George
Markantonis.

The major marketing cam-
paign is reinforced by the rein-
troduction of American Airlines’
direct flights from Dallas to Nas-
sau two times per week.

The partnership between the
two major brands - Kerzner
International and the Dallas
Cowboys Franchise - provides
the property with access to
approximately 300,000 season

Hey, there SEXY lady,

your celebrating a

Bigaday

Happy Birthday
Kendra



THE MORE YOU SAVE, THE MORE YOU EARN. SO START
SAVING WITH SCOTIABANK TODAY!



+ Condtions apply. * Tradererk of The Bank of Nove Scotia used und licence
Bso7I08



DALLAS COWBOYS CHEERLEADERS pose for a shot with Cove staff and Kerzner International-Bahamas staff.
Included in the shot are Butlers Wesley Marcel and Derrick Taylor, assistant manager at Atlas Kareem Bethel; Kapil
Sharma, vice-president of operations at the Cove; Anna Wilson, vice-president of Casino Special Projects, and

Ernie Cambridge, vice-president of VIP services.

ticket holders and others that
they can market to and bring
increased business to the
Bahamas and Atlantis, Paradise
Island.

Stadium

Moreover, the Cowboys fran-
chise plans to open its new sta-
dium next season and the capac-
ity crowd will be able to see
video of the cheerleaders on
location in the Bahamas on the
Jumbotrons during the game.

“We'll have a captive audience
to showcase the girls swimming
with the dolphins, dining in our
finest restaurants, partying in our

ultra-chic Aura Nightclub, and
enjoying three of our world-class
beaches,” Mr Markantonis said.

This is the 16th time that the
popular football cheerleaders
have shot their popular swimsuit
calendar on location. The calen-
dar has been a hot commodity
since the late 1970s when it was
first released.

As for the 2010 edition- with
scenes shot mostly at Atlantis,
Paradise Island - it will be
released in August with four dif-
ferent sized calendars for fans to
choose from.

“We’ve travelled everywhere,
but when I saw the waters of the
Bahamas, I just knew we had to
shoot here. The hospitality and



the accessibility of the property
are just as outstanding as the
scenery itself,” said director
of the Dallas Cowboys Cheer-
leaders Organisation Kelli Fin-
glass.

The 26 cheerleaders belong to
a 60-member team that arrived in
the Bahamas on Sunday. They
were given a Bahamian welcome
by Cove staff and later treated to
a welcome reception at Seaglass
hosted by Mr Markantonis.

During the week, the cheer-
leaders will be hosting several
guest activities including a cheer
camp for girls, Aquaventure
Olympics, and a cheer session
for guests on Atlantis’ Royal
Deck.

Debutantes pay
courtesy call
On Ministry

DEBUTANTES FROM public
and private schools in New
Providence paid a courtesy
call on the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture last week.
Permanent Secretary

Archie Nairn is pictured with
the group.

Letisha Henderson/BIS

The public is invited to attend a
NEW PROVIDENCE ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

TOWN MEETING

on Tuesday, February 24th, at 7:00.m.

at Super Club Breezes,

hosted by The Ministry of Works & Transport.

Peer ee ere Rees

Corridor 4

(Bethell Avenue to John F. Kennedy Drive)

Corridor 5

Ome Pe oR (hte) eg

Mr. Francis Clarke, Project E

Speakers will include

ineer in the Ministry of Works

[who will speck on Land Acquisitions)

Mr. Damien Francis,

(who will speak on the History of fhe CNPRIP)

Also in attendance will be

The Hon. Neko Grant, Minister of Works & Transport
The Hon. Tommy Tumaquest, Minister of National Security
The Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health

wv,

MIP for Killarney



WIDER CONSTRUCTION

WW.

La
THE TRIBUNE





FROM page one

what they are confronted
with is stripped barracks with
a bunch of rusty bunk-beds.
People sleep on the floor
under the bunk beds, in the
bathroom. The blankets they
provide have been here for
years and they are filled with
holes. There is no telephone
system, there is no laundry
system or mail system,” he
said.

The women are kept in the
same conditions with their
children.

“The sad thing about it is
they have a little play set out
there for them but that’s all
for show. They never bring
the children out there to play.
What they do is unload bus-
loads of Haitians in there,
sort them out and bring them
into the barracks from
there,” he said.

Overcrowding, a frequent
problem at the centre, was
exacerbated when American
Matthew Todd Davenport
set fire to one of the male
dormitories last December.

However, the detainee said
that the full story of what sur-
rounded the arson has not
been told and the incident
highlighted another serious
problem at the centre, fre-
quent beatings by some offi-
cers.

“He was obviously irra-
tional from the time he was
brought here. At one point
he got up on the roof of the
barracks and started scream-
ing about the conditions at
the centre and told us that
we didn’t have to put up with
this and tried to encourage
us to complain to our
embassies.

“The officers climbed on
top of the roof and beat him
senseless. He fell off the roof
and then they beat him some
more. The next day they put
him in the dorm and that’s
when he set it on fire. They
never said anything about the
vicious beating they gave that
man. I even heard that the
officers at the Carmichael
Road station were talking
about it,” he said.

There was another instance

LOCAL NEWS

Detainee who was
allegedly beaten
to stage protest

with other Cubans

with an inmate known as
Fritz who was told by offi-
cers to close the barracks
door.

“He told them that there
were too many people to
close the door and it was
even hard to breathe. They
came through the gate and
gun-butted him in the face
with a rifle. He had a gash in
his forehead above his eye.
There is another gentleman
by the name of Reginald.
They broke both of his knee
caps and knocked out his
teeth, these are the kinds of
beating that take place here,”
he claimed.

According to the detainee
Reginald was taken to the
police department after the
beating and the following day
he was taken to surgery but
other injuries tend to be
treated at the facility.

He stressed that no-one at
the centre believes that what
happens at the facility is rep-
resentative of all Bahamians,
but said that officials need to
pay more attention to the
way the centre is operated.

Claim that a willing
officer ‘could earn up
to $6,000’ for aiding a

Detention Centre escape

FROM page one

“The guy is not Bahamian. He was in New
York when he was deported from there to
Haiti and from Haiti he came here and was
awaiting deportation. He came up with $5,000
and he became a naturalised citizen.

“They falsified school records to say he
attended school in the Bahamas,” the detainee
alleged. “I don't know what else happened
from that point but that’s where it began,” he

told The Tribune.

In another instance he claimed that five
Chinese nationals were detained at the cen-
tre. He alleged persons paid some officials at
the centre $30,000 for them to be released.

“They put them on an airplane to Cuba so
that they could try and re-enter the Bahamas
from there and then go onto the US. They
stayed in Cuba for a few days and then they
got caught again here in the Bahamas, so essen-
tially they lost their money,” he claimed.

"People pay for those escapes. There are

people who are making a lot of money. Each
escape nets up between $4,000 to $6,000. Peo-

ple are snuck out of the centre in the middle of
the night and taken out of here,” he said.

Another case, he said, involved an alleged
former member of one of the armed gangs
who supported deposed Haitian President Jean
Bertand Aristide.

“When Aristide fell he ran to the US and
pleaded for political asylum. They didn’t want
him there so he came here. He has been locked
in the centre for about three years. He was
ordered (to be) deported by (officials at) Immi-
gration, but he paid $3,000 to an officer here.

"He was one of these old fellows who was
around here for years doing favours for money,
but he was offered a package deal to retire or
else and he retired.

“When he was about to be deported that
immigration officer was the one to take him off
the bus and off the deportation list and refilled
his papers saying he was applying for asylum,”
the detainee alleged.

Perry Christie: All
PLP posts will be

challenged at convention

FROM page one

vention. There has never been
a question about that.

“There is no question, I am
not at the next convention,
vacating, or moving on. And
therefore I will go into the
next convention as leader of
the PLP and most certainly I
will come out as leader. There
is no question about it in my
mind,” he said.

With the current deputy
leader, Cynthia Pratt having
already announced her deci-
sion not to run for the post
again, Mr Christie said it was
incumbent upon him to inform
would-be candidates that they
had best prepare themselves
for this fight, which he expects
would be highly contested.

“But what has to happen
now, is that as the deputy
leader has indicated that she is
going to move on, this is the
right time to do so. It gives the
party all the options. Because
if a person wins and becomes
deputy leader, that person has
the potential to become leader
of the PLP and then the PLP
is in a very good position for
transition.

“That is why it must happen
now. And so if there is a rela-
tively unknown person with
tremendous potential then
that person has to get out and
let people know they exist —
for the party to have maxi-
mum advantage in any such
challenge,” Mr Christie said.

Recently, the PLP has
undergone tremendous pub-

lic scrutiny as scandals contin-
ue to follow the party in
Opposition.

Following their loss at the
polls in 2007, the party has
seen the public resignation of
one of its members, the arrest
and charging before the courts
of a former sitting Senator,
and widespread speculation
that other members could
cross the floor if a change to
the leadership is not secured
before 2012.

Amongst those would-be
contenders for deputy leader
are PLP MP for West End and
Bimini Obie Wilchcombe, MP
for St Thomas More Frank
Smith, MP for Fort Charlotte
Alfred Sears, and the PLP’s
MP for Cat Island and San
Salvador Philip Davis.

Claim forms
reformed

Claims forms for all short
term benefits now have a wn-
formed look and feel, but the
ct 1 ae are far TIKITE thar LAR
metic

Claim forms for Injury,
Funeral, Maternity and Sick-
ness Benefits have heen modified
80 a8 Lo better elicit and capture
the information required to
not only process claims quickly
and accurately, but to be able
10 ContKt clain ails.

The Board's abi ity to con
tact claimants has always been
severely hampered by the ab-
$erice On MOS. persons’ files of
current contacts

Going forward, claimants
will be required to provide up-
to-chate trailing anid teleph one
ireorttiation.

The amended claim forms

will be p aced on the Board's

welwite Lot Gas) BO0eSs,

Visit www:

combined

The Med 2 form (on which a
woman claimed Maternity Benefit
When she stopped work in advance
of her date of confinement} and the
Med 3 form fon which she claimed
the Benefit or the balance of the
Benefit and the Grant after the
birth of the baby), are now com-
bined into one form. Theamended
Med 2 will be available on the
Board's website,

Register baby now

Increasingly, the National In-
suninice number, assigned to a per-
son Uipertl registration with the
National Insurance Board (NIB), is
being used as a national [D num-
ber, Many institutions » from
schools to banks to wility conipa

nies to the Passport Office - are re-

number t ACCESS SEPVIOgs,

Tn response, NIB ts encourag:
ing parents Lo register their babies
ag soon as possible after birth,

The registration process in-
volves the assignment of an NLL.
number that alay's with a Person
i, ir life

To register babies, parents
MSL present LO the Local Office a
birth certificate or Baptismal cer-
tificate and a completed Registra-

tion Form (R.4)

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 9

Short-term claiming now needs
employers’ sign-off

Beginning March 2, 200%, all
claims submitted for short-term
benefits by employed persons
(ie, persons who have hess
TrVLsl be accompanied by an) fe
juoyent Certiitaantion form (Mat 4),
The new Med ¢ form is a single-
sheet addition to the Med 1,
Med 1A and Med 2 forms. It re
quires the employer to certify
that all employee is/was will be
olf from work for the period
stated,

In the past, only attending
pliysicians and claimants were
required to provide information
ont claims for Sickness, Mater-
nity and Injury Benefits. Unfor
tunately, this permitted persons
To receive income-replacement
when they were, in fact, not off
from work ariel Were pel losing
any Income,

To address this and to im-

prove the clams (iniihigement

process, employers are now re
quired to conlirm the period that
an employee is off from work by
means of the new Med 4 form,
Claims for Sickness, Maternits
and Injury Benefits will not be
processed without it.

The processing time for
shortterm benefits is currently
pegged at three working days; the
added requirement of the Med 4
18 Hal itended to slow the prt
oes and is inher ded Te) eTSure that
claimsare only approved for per
sons that qualily.

The new fom will be among
those that each f mplayer Will he
required to have in his work
place, Currently, all places of
business are required to keep an-
hand C10 (monthly contribution
staterient) forms; BOO (nteritn
Report of Accident) forms; and
B44 (Employer's Report on Ac-
cident at Work) forms.

The new Med 4 form will be
placed on the Board's website for

CY ACCESS,

What you should know when claiming
Maternity or Sickness Benefit

You will not be paid for the
first three (wailing) days of your
Sickness Benefit Pernod,

Both Maternity Benefit and
Sickness Benefit are paid as in-
come-replacement when you
have to stay home from work be-
cause you're having or have hac
a baby, or because you are sick,
reapectively. Because the pay-
ments are intended to replace
lost income, you will only be
paid a benefit when you stay
home from work for the penod
stated by your doctor. Please in-
form NIB if you return to work
RO0NEF.

You may now qualify to re-
ceive the Maternity Grant even
if you do not qualify for the Ben-
efit. 50 weeks of contributions,
paidatany time in your work life,
will qualify you tor the Grant. As
of the 2106 amendments to the
National Insurance Act, the con-
tributions paid by your spouse
will also qualify you to receive
the Grant. Your spouse's contri-
butions must be such that they
would ordinanly qualify you to
receive the Benefit

Clams for Sickness Benefit
must be made within six months
of the date you saw the doctor;

Claims for Maternity Benetit
must be made within six months

of the date the Benefit became
payable - (.2., the date of confine.
ment of the date you stopped
work to have the baby, whichever
1s applicable.

Claims for Sickness Benefit
must be made on the Med | form;
Claims for Maternity Benefit
should be made on the Med 2
form. A Med 4 form should be
submitted along with both the
Med | and Med 2 forms,

When collecting a Maternity
or Sickness Benefit cheque, you
should bring along a photo 1.1).
and your National [nsurance card.

When sending a representa-
live To pick up Your cheque, make
sure that he or she brings along
an authorization letter or form,
signed by you; your National In-
stirance card, which must be
signed; anda photo ID of himself!
herself,

If you are not satisfied with
any decision made on your claim,
you have the nght to appeal. Sub-
mit letter or form of appeal within
2] days of the date you were iio
tified of the decision.

We recommend that you sub-
mit all your clams - particularly
subsequent claims for the same
illness - to one local office. This
helps speed up processing time.


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your story.



Fire in
Nassau
Village

FIREFIGHTERS
examine the dam-
age of last night’s
blaze at Nassau
Village. The fire
destroyed an
efficiency apartment
on Taylor Street.

¢ SEE PAGE ONE

Government Notice

Ministry of The Environment
Department of Environmental Health Services

Schedule of Residential Garbage Collection

The public is hereby notified of the Department of Environmental Health Solid Waste
Collection routes

Nightime collection:

Management Division Household (Residential) Garbage



MONDAY
SOUTH BEACH

TUESDAY
SEVEN HILLS
COWPEN RD,ZION BLVD(JIB)

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY FRIDAY



DANNOTTAGE ESTATES HILLSIDE ESTATES, BERNARD | SOUTH BEACH EAST (AREA BEHIND

RD(INCLUSIVE OF GARDEN POLICE STATION),AREA BOUNDED BY

VIEW ESTATES,) R.E.COOPER PINEWOOD DRIVE ON THE

ESTATES, JANE ST
THATCH PALM ON THE WEST,

BAYGERANIUM AVE ON THE EAST

NORTH,PINECREST DR ON THE SOUTH,

SIR LYNDEN PINDLING
ESTATES

AVOCADO, WALNUT AND PINEWOOD
DRIVE, AREA BOUNDED BY PIGEON
PLUM ON THE WEST, ACACIA ST ON
THE EAST, PINEWOOD DR ON THE
NORTH. BRAZILIA ST SOUTH

KEMP ROAD KEMP ROAD PYFROMS ADDITION MONTAGU HEIGHTS, VILLAGE KEMP ROAD
(EASTERN SIDE) (WESTERN SIDE) RD(EASTERN SIDE)

CULMERSVILLE
ROLLE AVENUE

PALMDALE,
MURPHYVILLE,
MT. ROYAL AVENUE

MT. ROSE AVE, MT ROYAL AVE

COLLINS AVE, HAWKINS HILL, SEARS
ROAD

DOWDESWELL ST,
SHIRLEA



MONASTERY PARK EASTWOOD FOXDALE
VILLAGE ROAD

LITTLE BLAIR

BLAIR EASTES EASTERN RD INCLUDING ALL

SUBDIVISIONS TO FOXHILL RD

GLENISTON GARDENS, SEA BREEZE EAST BAY ST, THE
POND, OKRA HILL
EASTERN ROAD INCLUDING ALL WINTON HEIGHTS

SUBDIVISIONS TO EASTERN PT



COLLEGE GARDEN JOE FARRINGTON RD,

SEABREEZE

LUMUMBA, KOOL ACRES

HORSE SHOE DRIVE
TO THE SEA, HANNA

MARIGOLD FARM RD, ALL SIDE
CORNERS AND SUBDIVISIONS

ROAD
CLARIDGE ROAD MARATHON MARATHON PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE COLONY VILLAGE

SAN SOUCI

AREA BOUNDED BY THATCH
PALM AVENUE ON THE WEST,
WILLOW TREE ON THE EAST ,
JACARANDA ON THE NORTH,
GUINEP ON THE SOUTH

BY EAST ST/JOANS HEIGHT,
WILD GUAVA AVE ON THE
WEST, SAPODILLA BLVD ON
THE NORTH, GUINEP TREE ON
THE SOUTH

ON THE WEST, SAPODILLA BLVD ON
THE NORTH, SAPOTE ST ON THE
SOUTH, BUTTONWOOD ON THE EAST

YAMACRAW SHORE, ST YAMACRAW BEACH
ANDREWS BEACH
TWYNAM HEIGHTS WINTON MEADOWS NASSAU EAST

AREA BOUNDED ON THE EAST | AREA BOUNDED BY WILLOW TREE AVE.

TWYNAM

NASSAU EAST NORTH, EASTERN STAR ESTATES
ESTATES

AREA BOUNDED ON THE WEST BY WISE MEN

BUTTONWOOD,TALBOT AVE, BEDFORD | AVE,JUMBEY ST,

AVE &SIDE CORNERS,SAPODILLA BLVD | LAUREL ST.

AND MAIN ROAD, PINEWOOD MOUNT TABOR DR,
KAPER RD,ASH
LANE,MAHOGHANY ST

AREA BOUNDED BY CLARIDGE | AREA BOUNDED BY PODOLEO | AREA BOUNDED BY , PALM BEACH ST, | ROBINSON RD, EAST ST, WULFF RD ,
ROAD,MINNIE STREET, WULFF | STREETC CHARLES VINCENT EAST ST, WULFF RD AND ROBINSON RD | CORDEAUX AVENUE, BALFOUR
RD, ROBINSON RD ST ROBINSON RD AND WULFF AVENUE



RIDGELAND PARK
EAST, MONTELL
HEGHTS



FOXHILL(BEHIND JUNGLE FOXHILL RD JOHNSON TERRACE JOHNSON ESTATES JOHNSON ESTATES

CLUB) STEP STREET STEP STREET

IMPERIAL PARK PINE YARD ROAD- ALL SIDE SEA BREEZE LANE, FOXHILL ROAD SANDILANDS VILLAGE RD, FOXHILL SANDILANDS

SEABREEZE (WEST OF CANAL) | CORNERS FROM PRINCE CHARLES TO SEA ROAD, MIDWAY VILLAGE-TO
SEABREEZE
BOUNDARY



DAYTIME COLLECTION:

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

MT PLEASANT, GAMBIER
VILLAGE

CHIPPINGHAM BOYD SUBDIVISION GREATER CHIPPINGHAM, OAKES FIELD
FARRINGTON ROAD

LOVE BEACH, SUN FUN,
DELAPORTE

WESTRIDGE WEST VILLA

ROCKCRUSHER

HIGHLAND PARK, THE GROVE

HIGHBURY PARK NASSAU VILLAGE NASSAU VILLAGE NASSAU VILLAGE PERPALL TRACT, SAUNDERS
BEACH

GARDEN HILLS #1& 3 GARDEN HILLS #1 & 3 MALCOLM ROAD WEST SUNSHINE PARK STAPLEDON GARDENS

YELLOW ELDER #1 & 2

GOLDEN GATES # 2 (BEHIND THE
SCHOOL

CARMICHAEL RD FROM FAITH
AVE TO MILLERS HEIGHT, HIGH
TREE

GRANTS TOWN BETWEEN EAST
STREET, MARKET ST, GOAL
ALLEY, TAYLOR ST

STRACHAN SUBDIVISION,
REDLAND ACRES

BAIN TOWN, HOSPITAL LANE,
RUPERT DEAN LANE

COCONUT GROVE-AREA
BOUNDED BY MARKET ST, BLUE
HILL ROAD, BAHAMA AVE AND
WULFF RD GROVE AVENUE
COCONUT GROVE -ROBINSON
RD, BLUE HILL RD, BAHAMA
AVE, EAST STREET,

SOUTH OCEAN

YELLOW ELDER # 2 & 3

GARDENS AVENUE GARDENS
SILVER GATES, EMERALD Ee BLVD
SEER een

GARDENS

FLAMINGO GARDENS FAITH AVENUE, SOUTH BELAIR BELAIR ESTATES
ESTATES
GRANTS TOWN MARKET ST AND | SANDS LANE, STRACHAN’S EAST ST, COLLINS WALL, FRITZ
BLUE HILL ROAD CORNER LANE, WULFF ROAD
SUMMER ROAD, KENNEDY ES ROAD GARDEN (ieee ieee #2
SUBDIVISION
BAIN TOWN- AUGUSTA TO BIG POND, BLACK VILLAGE eee — AGNES, NASSAU ST, eye e-HOSE AGNES, WEST ST , HOSPITAL
NASSAU ST MEETING STREET LANE

COCONUT GROVE-AREA COCONUT GROVE - ANDROS
BOUNDED BY MARKET ST, EAST | AVENUE TO WULFF ROAD
COCONUT GROVE RIDGELAND PARK BLUE HILL ESTATES
HOPE GARDENS

ANDROS AVENUE, BAHAMA AVE
CORAL HARBOUR CORAL LAKES, EAST BACARDI ROAD TO ALL SAINTS
CARMICHAEL, ROLLING HILLS,
BACARDI ROAD

ST VINCENT ROAD, SOUTHERN
HEIGHTS

MILLLERS HEIGHTS, FLAMINGO
GARDENS

GRANTS TOWN-LILLY OF THE
VALLEY TO BROUGHAM ST

REDLAND ACRES, WINDSOR
PLACE

COCONUT GROVE
'T04â„¢" ST

CORAL LAKES



MARSHALL ROAD





FAITH GARDENS, PASTEL FIRETRAIL ROAD

GARDENS

COWPEN ROAD NORTH SIDE OF CARMICHAEL

ROAD

DIGINITY GARDENS, ROCKY PINES MCKINNEY DRIVE, BELLOT BELLOT ROAD, FIRETRAIL TALL PINES, JUBILEE GARDENS
GLADSTONE ROAD ROAD

GOLDEN GATES TO GODET AVE

SUNSET PARK BOIL FISH, FAITH AVENUE HAMSTER AND AVOCADO



NOTE THAT INCLEMENT WEATHER IS LIKELY TO EFFECT COLLECTION SCHEDULE
THE TRIBUNE

m@ By GLADSTONE
THURSTON
Bahamas Information
Services

EXUMA - The govern-
ment’s packing house system

for farmers in Exuma will be
reconstructed, Agriculture
and Marine Resources Min-
ister Larry Cartwright has
announced.

“We are trying all we can
to get that paid for and here



in Exuma out of the current
budget,” he told farmers dur-
ing a workshop on Saturday.
The workshop was held in
conjunction with the Exuma
Garden Club’s first Horticul-
tural Fair at Hooper’s Bay.

CLARABELL MAJOR shares a tes-






2 timony with fellow senior citizens in
< attendance at the Kemp Road Urban
g Renewal-Centre’s post Valentine’s
A,
‘S
=
aay
D
—_

Post-Valentine’s Day
Lerael sleoyemCeymnrostleyn



@ By KATHRYN
CAMPBELL
Bahamas Information
Services

SENIOR citizens in the
Kemp Road community
were treated to a post-
Valentine’s Day luncheon
last week at St James Road
Native Baptist Church.

The seniors were also
entertained with songs,
dances, skits and poetry by
children residing in the
neighborhood. The event
was organized by the Kemp
Road Urban Renewal Cen-
tre.

Kenyatto Johnson, assis-
tant manager of the Centre,
said the organisation aims to
make a positive change in
the community.

“We have been busy
cleaning the neighbourhood,
clearing overgrown proper-
ties and moving derelict
vehicles in. Kemp Road is
on the move and we’re real-
ly trying to brighten the
area.

“We've also been catering
to the seniors and they have
been assisting us with the
young people. They teach
them crafts and help with
the afternoon classes we
offer to the children. One
particular lady is also teach-
ing the children to plait
straw,” he said.

Mr Johnson said since the
Centre opened six years ago
there have been some signif-
icant changes.

“This is the largest
amount of seniors I’ve seen
today since we have been
hosting them to various
activities including outings,
functions. We’ve also seen
the young children interact-
ing with the elderly more.
They have formed relation-
ships since we’ve started this
programme,” he said.

Paulamae Miller, presi-
dent of the Kemp Road
Senior’s Association, has
been active in the communi-
ty visiting the seniors who
reside in the neighbourhood
on a daily basis.

“I go to their homes to see
what their needs or wants
are and then I report my
findings to the Urban
Renewal Centre.

“Instead of them sitting at
home after they retire, we
try to keep them busy.
We’re presently planning
arts and crafts and other
activities for them. We
realise that when they get a
certain age they don’t like to
come out of their homes. It’s
important to keep them
moving and they live a lot
longer. They are inspired to
do things when someone
shows interest in them,” Ms
Miller said.



tT

KENDRA Neen entertains the

guests in attendance at the Kemp Road
Urban Renewal Centre’s Post Valentine’s
Day luncheon for senior citizens in the com-
munity on Friday, February 20 at St James
Native Baptist Church, St James Road.

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

PT ar NYT gt)

Mrs. Noelle Kelly Roberts, 38

of Nassau, The
Bahamas will be held
at Trinity Methodist
Church, Frederick
Street and Trinity Place,
Nassau on Tuesday,
24th February, 2009 at
4:00 p.m.

Rev. Bill Higgs,
President of The
Bahamas Conference of

The Methodist Church and Brother Gregory
Roberts will officiate and interment will follow
in The Eastern Cemetery, Shirley Street, Nassau.

She is predeceased by her father, Noel Sawyer
Roberts; and is survived by her husband, R.
Montague Roberts; her sons, Blake Montague
and Oliver John; her mother, Susan K.Roberts;
her sisters, Clare L. Sands, Lucy K. Ward and
Shevaun F. Davies; her uncle, Richard C.
Roberts; her mother-in-law, Elizabeth Roberts;
her sister-in-law, Celeste Sweeting; her brothers-
in-law, James Sands, Mitchell Davies and Roy
Sweeting; ; nieces and nephews, Kelly, Gary,
Marcus, Liam, Ashton, Mallory, Piers, James,
Annabelle, Lily and Chloe ; and many dear
cousins and wonderful friends.

IN CELEBRATION OF NOELLE'S LOVE OF
LIFE, PLEASE DRESS IN BRIGHT

COLOURS.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the
Cancer Society of The Bahamas, P.O.Box S.S.
6539,Nassau or The Bahamas National Trust,
P.O.Box N.4105, Nassau, in Memory of Mrs.

Noelle Kelly Roberts.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, The Bahamas.



The former packing house
and cornmill were severely
damaged about 18 months
ago when they were flooded
during Tropical Storn Noel.
Farmers complained they
had to send their dried corn
to mills in Long Island to
make grits and other prod-
ucts.

“I was of the opinion and
so was the Director (of Agri-
culture) that the cornmill did
not experience any damage
as a result of the flood,” said
Mr Cartwright. “We found
that impression was incor-
rect. The cornmill did expe-
rience some damage.”

When Bahamas Agricul-
tural and Industrial Corpo-
ration executive chairman
Edison Key and a delegation
visited Exuma two weeks
ago, farmers complained to
them about the state of the
mill.

Cornmill

“They came right back to
Nassau and reported to us
and I was able to get the
Director of Agriculture to
have an investigation put in
place to find out what is
wrong with the cornmill, if it
can be fixed to get it fixed,
and if it can’t be fixed, to
have it replaced.

“There is no reason why 18
months later Exuma doesn’t
have a corn mill. While I
apologise and take responsi-
bility for it, I want to say it
was a terrible breakdown in
communication, and now that
we know what’s going on we
will do our best to try and get
it corrected,” said Mr
Cartwright.

Accompanied by perma-
nent secretary Cresswell
Sturrup, Minister Cartwright
was met in Exuma by admin-
istrator Ivan Ferguson, chief
councilor Teddy Clarke and
superintendent of police
Willard Cunningham, officer

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 11

Exuma farmer’s packing house

system ‘to be reconstructed’

“A
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MAGNOLA ADDERLEY shows off her cakes to Exuma Garden Club

president Douglas Shuttleworth during Saturday’s Horticultural Fair.

in charge for Exuma and
Ragged Island.

The farm exhibits of Leon
Williams and his grandson
Ricardo took top honours at
the fair. Minister Cartwright
told farmers that hotels on
the island provide a con-
sumer base for them.

“There is no reason why
Four Seasons would have to
bring the produce into Exu-
ma that can be produced
right here,” said Mr
Cartwright.

He told farmers that the
government “will never be
able to afford to pay for all of
what you produce” and urged
them to form an association
and link directly with whole-
salers and retailers.

“With the amount of visi-
tors you have here on a daily
basis and with the amount of
hotels you have here,” said
Mr Cartwright, “there is no
reason why any farmer in
Exuma should have to go
looking for a (government)
packing house.

“The packing house is only
going to be there on the side
for items that you really can-
not get a market for in Exu-
ma.”

Farmers meanwhile
pressed Mr Cartwright for
assistance with non-Bahami-

an farm labourers. Following
a meeting with the new min-
ister with responsibility for
immigration (Mr McCart-
ney), he said, an arrangement
had been worked out to
expedite applications for
farm labourers.

When an application is
made to bring in farm labour-
ers, said Mr Cartwright,
Immigration is to notify Agri-
culture of the credentials of
the applicant determined.

Labour

“When you send your
application in let us know so
we can follow up on it for
you because we want farm-
ing to go on in this country,”
he said.

“In order for farming to go
on, we know you need farm
labourers. You cannot culti-
vate a lot of land without
labour.

“There are many farmers
who have been using help
from outside the country and
they need work permits. I
want to encourage you not
to hire persons who do not
have work permits, and per-
sons who have work permits
that are being paid for by
someone else.”

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Sea Bees Winter Invitational:

Swimmers qualify for Carifta



FOUR Carifta qualifying perfor-
mances were turned in at the Sea Bees
Winter Invitational held over the week-
end at the Betty Kelly Kenning Aquat-
ic Center.

Barracuda’s Dustin Tynes won the
boys’ 11-12 400 freestyle in five minutes
and 1.84 seconds with Zach Moses of
Swift coming in second in 5:12.44. They
both went under the qualifying time
of 5:13.49.

Dionisio Carey of the Barracudas
did the Carifta qualifying time in two
events in the boys’ 11-12 division. The
first came in the 100 backstroke in a
winning time of 1:22.27. The qualifying
mark is 1:19.69. The other was in the
100 freestyle in 1:06.54, surpassing the
mark of 1:08.49.

And Bria Deveaux, another Bar-
racuda, clocked 2:43.03 in the girls’ 13-
14 200 individual medley to go under
the qualifying mark of 2:44.29.

e Here’s a look at the first three fin-
ishers in each event at the meet:

Girls 8 & Under

50 breaststroke - Zoe McCarroll,
DSC, 54.58; Taja Scriven, SBSC, 538.92;
Celia Campbell, Un-SB, 59.47.

50 butterfly - Celia Campbell, Un-
SC, 44.92; Zoe McCarroll, DSC, 56.77;
Charlotte Reed, Swift, 59.92.

200 freestyle - Kacey Kemp, SBSC,
3:45.80; Charlotte Reed, Swift, 3:53.10;
Virginia Stamp, Swift, 4:22.60.

50 backstroke - Celia Campbell, Un-
SB, 47.15; Zoe McCarroll, DSC, 56.35;
Taja Scriven, SBSC, 57.68.

50 freestyle - Celia Campbell, UN-
SB, 37.12; Zoe McCarroll, DSC, 43.54;
Taja Scriven, SBSC, 45.15.

200 IM - Alaunte Major, BSC,
4:43.34; Cecily Bowe, BSC, 4:46.29;
Kacey Kemp, Swift, 4:59.11.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 4:09.16.

Girls 9-10

400 freestlye - Tremaine Allen,
SBSC, 5:28.59; Keitra Lloyd, SBSC,
6:11.48; Lauren Knowles, Swift, 7:27.64.

50 breaststroke - Simone Sturrup,
Swift, 44.94; Tremaine Allen, SBSC,
45.21; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 47.36.

50 butterfly - Simone Sturrup, Swift,
37.88; Tremaine Allen, SBSC, 38.32;
Keitra Lloyd, SBSC, 42.82.

200 freestyle - Simone Sturrup, Swift,
2:46.86; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 2:59.55;
Lauren Knowles, Swift, 3:41.89.

50 backstroke - Simone Sturrup,
Swift, 43.26; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 45.88;

Keitra Lloyd, SBSC, 46.77.

50 freestyle - Simone Sturrup, Swift,
32.02; Lauren Knowles, Swift, 45.29;
Danielle Hutchinson, DSC, 46.11.

200 IM - Tremaine Allen, SBSC,
3:02.86; Nia Scriven, SBSC, 3:27.56;
Keitra Lloyd, SBSC, 3:29.62.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:25.23.

Girls 11-12

400 freestyle - Leslie Campbell, SB,
5:22.54; Jacinda Williams, DSC, 5:22.85;
Abigail Lowe, Swift, 5:26.88.

100 breaststroke - Alaena Carey,
SBSC, 1:30.46; Christina-Marie Chea,
BSC, 1:40.15; Janae Davis, SBSC,
1:41.72.

100 butterfly - Janae Davis, SBSC,
1:24.16; Jourdan Bevans, BSC, 1:30.06;
Crystal Rahming, Swift, 1:35.11.

200 freestyle - Crystal Rahming,
Swift, 2:32.27; Abigail Lowe, Swift,
2:33.40; Alaena Carey, SBSC, 2:52.55.

100 backstroke - Sheean Hanlan,
SBSC, 1:22.79; Leslie Campbell, SB,
1:27.88; Alaena Carey, SBSC, 1:L32,39.

100 freestyle - Jacinda Williams,
BSC, 32.78; Sherelle Fernander, BSC,
1:11.16; Sheean Hanlan, SBSC, 1:11.22.

200 IM - Leslie Campbell, Un-SB,
3:03.22; Janae Davis, SBSC, 3:03.84;

TRE TAYLOR gives his
all in the 100m breast-
stroke. He finished first
in that event in the 11-
12 age group...



Alaena Carey, SBSC, 3:08.93.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:12.77;

DSC, 2:25.43.
Girls 13-14
400 freestyle -

Xenia Cox, SBSC, 6:15.24.

100 breastroke - Riquel Rolle, DSC,
1:28.43; Deja Johnson, SBSC, 1:33.77;

Ana-Philece Greene, BSC, 1:34.37.

100 butterfly - Bria Deveaux, BSC,
1:14.12; Ja’Nae Saunders, BSC, 1:16.13;

Lauren Glinton, DSC, 1:17.09.

200 freestyle - Fane Austin, BSC,
2:47.38; Brittney Watson, SBSC,

2:48.54; Zoe Galanis, SBSC, 2:51.13.

100 freestyle - Lauren Glinton, DSC,
1:08.60; Berchadette Moss, DSC,
1:09.86; Ana-Philece Greene, BSC,

1:11.10.

200 IM - Bria Deveaux, BSC,
2:43.03; Riquel Rolle, DSC, 2:50.07;

Zoe Galanis, SBSC, 3:12.17.
200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:21.02.
Girls 15 & Over

100 breaststroke - Shaunte Moss,

Swift, 1:24.63.

100 butterfly - Shaunte Moss, Swift,
1:14.93; Shayla Campbell, BSC, 1:19.05.
100 freestyle - Shaunte Moss, Swift,

Zoe Galanis, SBSC,
5:48.57; Sydnee Kerr, BSC, 6:03.50;

1:07.19; Shayla Campbell, BSC, 1:09.11.

200 IM - Leah Coleby, BSC, 3:17.92;
Shaunte Moss, Swift, 3:23.45.

Boys 8 & Under

50 breaststroke - BJ Murray, SBSC,
1:04.64; Alex King, DSC, 1:17.89.

50 butterfly - Jaivin Burrows, BSC,
1:19.51; Trent Strachan, BSC, 1:20.24.

200 freestyle - Izaak Bastian, BSC,
3:46.19; Alex King, DSC, 5:48.50.

50 backstroke - Jaivan Burrows,
BSC, 1:05.95; Trent Strachan, BSC,
1:11.75; Aaron Turnquest, SBSC,
1:18.22.

50 freestyle - Alex king, DSC, 58.13;
Christopher Neil, BSC, 58.87; Aaron
Turnquest, SBSC, 1:00.21.

200 IM - Paul Bevans, BSC, 4:23.76;
Samuel Gibson, BSC, 4:48.24; Davante
Carey, BSC, 5:00.24.

Boys 9-10

50 breaststroke - Tyrique Cox,
SBSC, 44.94; Malik Hepburn, Un-SC,
45.21; TJ Rolle, SBSC, 47.36.

50 butterfly - Malik Hepburn, Un-
SB, 40.13; Gershwin Greene, BSC,
40.49; TJ Rolle, SBSC, 42.76.

200 freestyle - Clement Bowe, BSC,
2:41.93; Nicholas Rahming, Swift,
3:02.01; Austin Aikman, BSC, 3:08.76.

50 backstroke - Gershwin Greene,
BSC, 42.02; Malik Hepburn, Un-SB,
42.58; Kadyn Coakley, SBSC, 51.38.

50 freestyle - Clement Bowe, BSC,
32.78; TJ Hepburn, SBSC, 35.98; Malik
Hepburn, Un-SB, 38.59.

200 IM - D’Angelo Gibson, DSC,
3:55.95; Ninnya Fernander, BSC,
4:29.95; Llando Chea, SBSC, DQ.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:36.97.

Boys 11-12

400 freestyle - Dustin Tynes, BSC,
5:01.84; Zach Moses, Swift, 5:12.44;
Kohen Kerr, BSC, 5:30.66.

100 breaststroke - Tre Taylor, SBSC,
1:29.77; Brandon Deveaux, BSC,
1:36.70; Ahmad Watson, SBSC,
1:36.71.

100 butterfly - Keith Lloyd, SBSC,
1:22.12; Cedric Bowe, BSC, 1:25.25;
Dylan Cash, SBSC, 42.76.

200 freestyle - Zach Moses, Swift,
2:33.13; Jaevon Munnings, SBSC,
2:38.76; Meshach Roberts, BSC,
2:41.65.

100 backstroke - Dionisio Carey,
BSC, 1:12.27; Dylan Cash, SBSC,
1:22.35; Meshach Roberts, BSC,
1:26.21.

100 freestyle - Dionisio Carey, BSC,

1:06.54; Kohen Kerr, BSC, 1:10.64;
Jaevon Munnings, SBSC, 1:10.72.

200 IM - Zach Moses, Swift, 3:02.16;
Keith Lloyd, SBSC, 3:02.25; Dylan
Cash, SBSC, 3:02.29.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:11.21;
SBSC, 2:31.02.

Boys 13-14

400 freestyle - Camron Bruney, BSC,
4:59.76; Jamarco Armbrister, SBSC,
5:45.13; Martin Dean, BSC, 6:11.32.

100 breaststroke - Anibal Hernandez
Valdes, Un, 1:36.84; Andre Ferguson,
SBSC, 1:37.84; Anthony Walkine, FSC,
1:38.37.

100 butterfly - Peter Farquharson,
YMCA, 1:11.43; Zarian Cleare, DSC,
1:13.43; T’Auren Moss, SBSC, 1:18.54.

200 freestyle - Toby McCarroll,
DSC, 2:23.49; Aaron Chea, BSC,
2:30.86; Anibal Hernandez Valdes,
Un., 2:37.04.

100 backstroke - Laron Morley,
SBSC, 1:13.32; Anibal Hernandez
Valdes, Un., 1:27.90; Peter Farquhar-
son, YMCA, 1:28.52.

100 freestyle - Zarian Cleare, DSC,
1:03.81; Peter Farquharson, YMCA,
1:04.17; Aaron Chea, BSC, 1:07.47.

200 IM - Laron Morley, SBSC,
2:42.61; Jamarco Armbrister, SBSC,
3:14.99; Aravind Govindaraju, BSC,
3:45.32.

200 freestyle relay - SBSC, 2:03.27;
DSC, 2:09.31.

Boys 15 & Over

400 freestyle - McGuire Pinder,
SBSC, 5:22.73; Donovan Dean, DSC,
5:28.72; Xavier Williams, BSC, 5:35.94.

100 breaststroke - Michael McIn-
tosh, BSC, 1:11.56; Mark Barrett,
SBSC, 1:30.89; Gabriel Hudson, BSC,
1:33.77.

100 butterfly - Armando Moss,
SBSC, 1:02.50; Denez Moss, SBSC,
1:08.17; Joshua Thompson, DSC,
1:16.52.

200 freestyle - McGuire Pinder,
SBSC, 2:35.38; Mark Barrett, SBSC,
2:46.93; Marlon Johnson, SBSC,
2:55.25.

100 backstroke - Denez Moss, SBSC,
1:18.46.

100 freestyle - Armando Moss,
SBSC, 57.77; Devonn Knowles, BSC,
1:02.09; Pemrae Walker, BSC, 1:02.11.

200 IM - Michael McIntosh, BSC,
2:34.71.

200 freestyle relay
SBSC, D

- DSC, 1:51.01;

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TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 13
SPORTS

Twelve judo officials a are E corte

THE Bahamas Judo Federa- i] i z 7 x
tion (BJF) has certified 12 offi- } if

























































cials based on the results of the
Bahamas Junior Open Tourna-
ment and rigorous testing.

Class A referees can call
national tournaments and are
allowed to try for international
certification.

Class B referees can referee
at national tournaments and
class C officials can perform
various functions such as time
keeping and scoring.

"I am pleased with the
results", says D’Arcy Rahming,
president of the BJF.

"In order to grow the sport
we need individuals who are
trained, competent and tested
in actual situations. I am also
pleased to say that we have
another 12 officials and refer-
ees that are in development and
we hope by our next major
event to have them fully certi-
fied."

The classification of the A
and B referees were based on
the recommendations of Julio
Clemente, chief referee for the
Pan American Region who
gave a seminar for referees.

Clemente congratulated the
Bahamas on the efforts for
developing judo and pledged to
assist in any way possible to
bring up the level of referees
and officials in the country.

Class C officials are students
of The College of the Bahamas
who are taking judo credit level
courses

Clemente’s trip was spon-
sored by a $1,500 grant from
the Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion (BOA).

Wellington Miller, president
of the BOA, speaking at the
tournament, highlighted the
importance of sport for nation-
al development and tourism.

Anyone interested in assisting
the Bahamas Judo Federation
can call 364-6773.

Certified Officials Aleman ikese (TOP RIGHT) ~ Wellington Miller,
Bie Pace nen president of the BOA, speaks at the
David Rahming Bahamas Junior Open tourney..
Neville Mickey Munnings Class C

Marcian Tucker (TOP LEFT) - Tournament winners..
Class B Alexio Brown
S Melanie Lobosky Rashad Ferguson (ABOVE) - Action shots from the
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TRIBUNE SPORTS





Rand: Younger coaches not
teaching basketball basics

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE prestigious Hugh Campbell
senior boys basketball title has
switched from New Providence to
Grand Bahama to New Providence
over the past 26 years.

Initially, the tournament was only
contested between the New Provi-
dence schools with the LW Young
Golden Eagles winning the first title.

Back then, LW Young was a high
school, but has since been reduced to
just a junior high, thus eliminating
them from participating in the tour-
nament.

Walter Rand, who holds the dis-
tinction of being the first coach to win
the title, said over the years, the
younger coaches have gotten away
from teaching their players the basics.

“T would like to see more funda-
mentals displayed like it was when the
tournament got started,” Rand reflect-
ed. “Not taking anything away from it
because it’s still a very good tourna-
ment. But I think if the coaches put
more emphasis on developing the fun-
damentals in their players, it could get
even better.”

Looking back at his championship
run, which was sparked by the most
valuable performance from guard
Bernard Storr, Rand said they had
some very good teams from New
Providence to compete against before
the Grand Bahama teams started to
come in the following year.

“Now the Nassau teams have the
exposure that we didn’t get back
then,” Rand said. “What we lacked in
exposure, we made up with the talent
that the players possessed.

“So it helped to make the tourna-

Walter Rand



ment that much better when we won
because the teams that participated
at first from New Providence were all
very talented.”

At the time, Rand said he had a
very disciplined team and that was
one of the things that has propelled
them to become productive citizens
today.

“Tt wasn’t all about winning then,”
he said. “It was about bringing out the
best in the players as individuals. Once
they did that, winning came easy.”

While Storr emerged as the MVP,
Rand had a cast that included Lester
Mortimer, Tony Taylor, Rev Pedro
Basden and James “Brother”
Knowles.

Although he’s still teaching physical
education at AF Adderley, the host
of the tournament, Rand is no longer
roaming the sidelines coaching after
school activities where the govern-

ment school coaches are awarded at
about $1,500 per sport.

But while he’s quite contended with
just being in the class setting, Rand
said he likes what he sees in Nigel
Ingraham, who has turned around the
Magics basketball programme at Gov-
ernment High School.

“When I see him coach, I see
myself,” Rand reflected. “That’s exact-
ly the way I was when I was coach-
ing. I was eager to go out there and get
the best out of my players.”

Rand said he would like to see the
day when more emphasis is placed on
getting the Family Island teams up to
par with New Providence and Grand
Bahama.

“They have a lot of talent, but it
just has to be nurtured,” he insisted. “I
think if we can get them to improve
their level of play, the tournament
would be even better.”

Road Runners’ Carifta qualifying performances

AT least two Carifta qualify-
ing performances were turned
in on Saturday as the Road
Runners Track Club hosted its
annual Dianna Lynn Thomp-
son Track Classic at the Thomas
A Robinson Track and Field
Stadium.

Versatile Byron Ferguson, a
member of the T-Bird Flyers,
threw the under-17 boys javelin
179-feet, 9 -inches or 54.78
metres to surpass the qualify-
ing mark of 49.00 metres.

And Ramond Farrington
from the RC Athletics Track
Club threw the open men’s
javelin 205-10 or 62.73 metres to
go well beyond the qualifying
mark of 59.45.

e Here’s a look at the top
three finishers in the field
events contested at the meet:

Girls Long Jump UNDER 11

Catalyn, Blayre, Sunblazers,
3.43m; Newry, Tanae, Striders
3.18m; Shaw, Danielle, Club
Monica, 2.96m

Girls Long Jump UNDER 13

Dorsett, Taj, Star Trackers,
3.72m; Henderson, Janiece,
Spirit OF Excell 3.64m;
Ferguson, Andira, Striders,
3.60m.

Girls High Jump UNDER 15

Gibson, Danielle, Ambas-
sadors, 1.40m; Thompson, Talia,
Striders J1.40m; Stra-
chan, Andriel, Star Trackers,
1.34m.

Girls High Jump UNDER 17

Butler, Antonique, Road
Runners, 1.34m, 4-04.75.

Girls Long Jump UNDER 17

Deveaux, Deandra, Jumpers
Inc, 4.70m; Hamilton, Cymone,
Star Trackers 4.15m;
Adderley, Alexandr, R. C. Ath-
letics, 3.92m.

Girls Shot Put UNDER 17

Hamilton, Cymone, Star
Trackers, 7.88m, 25-10.25; Tay-
lor, Jewel, C.R.Walker, 7.61m,
24-11.75; Johnson, Stekeia, Nas-
sau Christian, 6.55m 21-06.00.

Girls Discus Throw UNDER
17

Taylor, Jewel, C_.R.Walker,
21.43m, 70-04; Smith, Amanda,
Speed Dynamics, 19.56m, 64-
02; Johnson, Stekeia, Nassau
Christian.

Women High Jump OPEN

Crooks, Tanya, C. I. Gibson,
1.45m, 4-09.00.

Women Triple Jump OPEN

Deveaux, Deandra, Jumpers
Inc, 10.38m; Davis, Rashanda,
College OF The B, 9.78m;
Rolle, Brittny, Road Runners,
9.41m.

Women Shot Put OPEN

Duncanson, Juliann, College
OF The B, 10.80m, 35-05.25;
Dennard, Danielle, College OF
The B, 9.68m, 31-09.25; Fergu-
son, Dekethra Nassau Chris-
tian, 8.12m, 26-07.75.

Women Discus Throw OPEN

Duncanson, Juliann, College
OF The B, 36.46m, 119-07; Sey-
mour, Aboni, TT. Bird Flyers,
26.11m, 85-08; Ferguson,
Dekethra, Nassau Christian,
18.51m, 60-09.

Women Javelin Throw
OPEN

Rose, Venrika, R. C. Athlet-
ics, 29.54m, 96-11.

Boys Long Jump UNDER 11

Rolle, Branson, Road Run-
ners, 3.50m, 11-05.75; Bethel,
Miguel, Road Runners, 3.49m,
11-05.50; Bennett, Cordero,
Striders, 3.37m, 11-00.75.

Boys Long Jump UNDER 13

Fox, Lucius, Club Monica,
436m, 14-03.75; Nottage, Julius,

Striders, 4.22m, 13-10.25; Nixon,
Recarno, Road Runners, 4.19m,
13-09.00.

Boys High Jump UNDER 15

Coakley, Xavier, Road Run-
ners, 1.65m, 5-05.00; Light-
bourn, D'Aund — Star Track-
ers, 1.45m, 4-09.00; Butler,
Anthony, Road Runners,
1.34m, 4-04.75.

Boys High Jump UNDER 17

Wilmott, Jabari, T. Bird Fly-
ers, 1.88m, 6-02.00; Adderley,
Patrizio, C. I. Gibson, 1.73m, 5-
08.00; McDonald, Jerome,
Jumpers Inc, 1.73m, 5-08.00.

Boys Long Jump UNDER 17

Minns, Lathone, Jumpers Inc,
6.00m, 19-08.25; Minns, Lath-
ario Jumpers Inc, 5.71m, 18-
09.00; Wilson, Philip, Striders,
5.60m, 18-04.50.

Boys Shot Put UNDER 17

Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau
Christian, 10.10m, 33-01.75; Wil-
son, Albert Nassau Christ-
ian, 9.09m, 29-10.00; MACK-
EY, Samuel, C.R.Walker,
8.68m, 28-05.75.

Boys Discus Throw UNDER
17

Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau
Christian, 29.74m, 97-07; John-
son, Giovanni, T. Bird Flyers,
24.74m, 81-02; Whymms,
Michael, Nassau Christian,
24.03m 78-10.

Boys Javelin Throw UNDER
17

Ferguson, Bryon, T. Bird Fly-
ers, 54.78m*, 179-09; MACK-
EY, Samuel C.R. Walker,
42.26m, 138-08; Wilmott, Dono-
van, Silver Lightning, 33.29m
109-03.

Men High Jump OPEN

Bullard, Troy, Golden Eagles,
1.98m, 6-06.00; Hall, Peron, T.
Bird Flyers, 1.88m, 6-02.00.

Bahamas Football Association:
AT EY ee

As at February 23, 2009:

Team Name P
Bears FC 10 8
Caledonia FC
Cavalier FC

Sharks FC

Baha Juniors FC
Dynamos FC

FC Nassau

Recent Results

+oewWwwWwonNrts

Sunday, February 22, 2009

1:00 pm - Baha Juniors FC vs FC Nassau 2:2 Referee: J, Edwards

ae

NORPRO wWRoOAD
NOOR NM NOE

Goalscorers: Anson Coakley (FC Nassau) 29th; Andrew Pratt (Baha Juniors FC)31st; Raymorn Sturrup

(Baha Juniors) 70th; Craig Grahma (FC Nassau) 82nd
3:00 pm - Cavalier FC vs Caledonia FC 1:2

Goalscorers: Wagner Macahdo (Caledonia FC) 52nd; Frank Negri (Caledonia FC) 69th; Lance Liston
(Cavalier FC) 75th:

Upcoming Matches

Sunday, March 01, 2009

1:00 pm FC Nassau vs Caledonia FC
3:00 pm Dynamos FC vs Baha Juniors FC

Leading Goalscorers

1. Lesley St. Fleur

2. Marcus Trail

3. Odaine McCallum
4. Duckerno Exlias
5. Andre Carey

6. Ehren Hanna

7. Chedlet Pierre

8. Frank Negri

9. Alex Thompson
10. Dean Farry

Bears FC
Caledonia FC
Cavalier FC
Sharks FC
Bears FC
Dynamos FC
Sharks FC
Caledonia FC
Bears FC
Caledonia FC

a

LRRAoOONN NNO

Referee: D. Ferreira James



Men Triple Jump OPEN

Deveaux, J'Vente, Star
Trackers, 14.60m, 47-11.00;
Minns, Lathone, Jumpers Inc,
14.15m, 46-05.25; Minns, Lath-
ario, Jumpers Inc, 13.98m, 45-
10.50.

Men Shot Put OPEN

Rox, Devon, College OF The
B, 11.50m, 37-08.75, Rolle,
Elvis, C. I. Gibson, 11.12m, 36-
05.75; Scavella, Kennedy, Col-
lege OF The B, 10.02m.

Men Discus Throw OPEN

Saunder, Jevaughn, College
OF The B, 32.00m, 105-00;
McCoy, Rashad College
OF The B, 30.55m, 100-03:
Lightbourne, Benja, College OF
The B 30.18m, 99-00.

Men Javelin Throw OPEN

Farrington, Ramond, R. C.
Athletics, 62.73m*, 205-10; Rox,
Devon, College OF The B,
48.92m, 160-06; Dawkins,
Phillip, College OF The B,
47.25m, 155-00.

Women - UNDER 9 - Team
Rankings - 3 Events Scored

1) STRIDERS 66

2) SUNBLAZERS
22

3) CLUB MONICA

14 4) ROAD RUNNERS
6

5) T. BIRD FLYERS
4 6) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 2

Women - UNDER 11 -
Team Rankings - 4 Events
Scored

1) STRIDERS
80.50 2) SUNBLAZERS
48

3) CLUB MONICA

21 4) ROAD RUNNERS
17.50

5) SILVER LIGHTNING
5 6) ALLIANCE ATH-
LETIC 2

7) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 1

Women - UNDER 13 - Team
Rankings - 5 Events Scored

1) STRIDERS
102.50 2) SPIRIT OF
EXCELLENCE — 21

3) SUNBLAZERS
20.50 4) T. BIRD FLYERS

5) CLUB MONICA
12 6) STAR TRACKERS

7) ROAD RUNNERS
6

Women - UNDER 15 - Team
Rankings - 6 Events Scored

1) STRIDERS 55
2) T. BIRD FLYERS 34

3) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 30 4) CLUB

MONICA 29

5) SUNBLAZERS
28 6) AMBASSADORS
23

7) ROAD RUNNERS
22 8) SPEED DYNAMICS
18

9) STAR TRACKERS
13 10) SILVER LIGHT-
NING 7

11) CENTRAL
ELEUTHERA 6

Women - UNDER 17 - Team
Rankings - 12 Events Scored

1) ROAD RUNNERS

55 2) C. I. GIBSON
37

3) SPEED DYNAMICS
31 4) CLUB MONICA
29

5) C.R.WALKER

27 6) STAR TRACKERS

7) AMBASSADORS
20 7) STRIDERS

7) SILVER LIGHTNING
20 10) KENYAN
KNIGHTS 16

10) T. BIRD FLYERS
16 12) NASSAU CHRIST-
IAN ACADEMY 12

13) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 11 14)
JUMPERS INC 10

15) GOLDEN EAGLES
9 16) R. C. ATHLETICS
6

16) CAVALIERS
6 18) GOVERNMENT
HIGH SCHOOL 3

Women - OPEN - Team
Rankings - 13 Events Scored

1) SPEED DYNAMICS
76 2) CLUB MONICA
75

3) COLLEGE OF THE
BAHAMAS 39.50 4)
STRIDERS 34

5) AMBASSADORS
30 6) C. I. GIBSON
26

7) T. BIRD FLYERS
24 8) ROAD RUNNERS
23

9) NASSAU CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY 12 10)R.C.
ATHLETICS 10

10) JUMPERS INC
10 12) CAVALIERS
9

13) GOLDEN EAGLES
6 14) GOVERNMENT
HIGH SCHOOL = 5

15) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 0.50

Men - UNDER 9 - Team
Rankings - 3 Events Scored

1) SUNBLAZERS
55 2) KENYAN
KNIGHTS 18

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3) STRIDERS 16
4) SPEED DYNAMICS
7

Men - UNDER 11 - Team
Rankings - 4 Events Scored

1) ROAD RUNNERS

64 2) STRIDERS
48

3) SUNBLAZERS
27 4) KENYAN
KNIGHTS 14

5) AMBASSADORS
10 6) JUMPERS INC
2

Men - UNDER 13 - Team
Rankings - 5 Events Scored
1) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-

LENCE 64 2) ROAD
RUNNERS 60
3) STRIDERS 33
4) SUNBLAZERS 23
5) CLUB MONICA

18 6) AMBASSADORS
14

7) KENYAN KNIGHTS
4 7) SPEED DYNAMICS
4

9) JUMPERS INC
2

Men - UNDER 15 - Team
Rankings - 6 Events Scored

1) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 69 2) STAR
TRACKERS 52

3) SILVER LIGHTNING
48 4) ROAD RUNNERS
47

5) STRIDERS 32
6) CLUB MONICA 11

7) AMBASSADORS
10 8) T. BIRD FLYERS
5

9) SUNBLAZERS
1 9) NASSAU CHRIST-
IAN ACADEMY 1

Men - UNDER 17 - Team
Rankings - 13 Events Scored

1) STAR TRACKERS
82 2) T. BIRD FLYERS
53

3) NASSAU CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY 42 4) SIL-
VER LIGHTNING 41

5) C. I. GIBSON 31
6) CLUB MONICA 30

6) ROAD RUNNERS
30 8) GOLDEN EAGLES
29

9) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-
LENCE 26 10)
ALLIANCE ATHLETIC
24

10) JUMPERS INC
24 12) C.R.WALKER
20

13) KENYAN KNIGHTS

18 14) CENTRAL
ELEUTHERA 14
15) STRIDERS 6
16) SUNBLAZERS 5
17) H. O. NASH 4

17) GOVERNMENT HIGH
SCHOOL 4

19) CAVALIERS
1

Men - OPEN - Team Rank-
ings - 14 Events Scored

1) COLLEGE OF THE
BAHAMAS 83 2) T.
BIRD FLYERS 48

3) AMBASSADORS
39 4) GOLDEN EAGLES
31

5) STAR TRACKERS
26 6) ROAD RUNNERS
24

7) SPIRIT OF EXCEL-

LENCE 23 8)
BAHAMAS TIGERS
22

9) KENYAN KNIGHTS
21 10) SPEED DYNAM-
ICS 19

10) JUMPERS INC
19 12) C. I. GIBSON
18

13) C.R.WALKER

17 14) CLUB MONICA

5) R. C. ATHLETICS
10 16) NASSAU CHRIST-
IAN ACADEMY 9

17) SILVER LIGHTNING
3 18) ALLIANCE ATH-
LETIC 2
THE TRIBUNE

Sp

Hield last
man standing
as Johnson,
Knowles are
eliminated
from Cup

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

COACH
Andre Sey-
mour had
anticipated
that the
Bahamas’
three-man
boxing team
would sur-
pass the two
bronze IQR
medals won
at the past
two Independence Cups by
Taureano “Reno” Johnson
and Valentino Knowles.

But so far in the Dominican
Republic, the Bahamas is
now down to just one boxer
after Johnson and Knowles
were eliminated.

Carl Hield is the lone com-
petitor left and he hada
chance to box for the gold
medal last night. Results of
his bout were not available
up to press time last night.
Already assured of a bronze,
Hield was scheduled to fight
in the semifinal of the light
welterweight division against
Jose Abru with a chance to
become the first Bahamian to
advance to the gold medal
round.

Speaking from the Domini-
can Republic as he waited for
Hield to fight yesterday, Sey-
mour said the Bahamian
team performed exceptional-
ly well, but the judges’ deci-
sions obviously didn’t reflect
that.

“The performance wasn’t
bad at all. It’s just that the
judging here is terrible and
all of the countries are com-
plaining,” said Seymour, who
noted that with the exception
of Alvin Sargent, all of the
judges are from the Domini-
can Republic.

“We have the coaches and
delegates from Cuba, the US
Virgin Islands and even
Brazil complaining about the
judging to the director of the
tournament. He’s having a
meeting tonight before the
semifinal to discuss what is
going on.”

On Saturday, Knowles lost
11-7 to Ricardo Garfield from
the Dominican Republic in
the lightweight division and
on Sunday night, Johnson lost
12-7 to Willy Medina from
the Dominican Republic in
the middleweight division.

Hield, however, pulled off a
resounding 12-3 decision over
Henry Lawrence from the US
Virgin Islands to advance to
the semifinal. A win and he
will fight for the gold medal.
If he loses, he will be guar-
anteed the bronze.

The Bahamas already has
two bronze medals from the
past two tournaments. John-
son won the initial one two
years ago and Knowles got
his own last year.

Still peeved with the
results, Seymour reiterated
that “our boys performed
very well.”

“Although Reno lost, he
was the technician in the ring.
The fans from the Domini-
can Republic booed their
own boxer after he was
awarded the decision,” Sey-
mour pointed out. “That’s
just how bad the officiating
is over here.”

It was Johnson’s first bout
since he fell short of winning
a medal at the Beijing
Olympic Games in China in
August.

Brazil, US Virgin Islands,
Ecuador, Cuba and the
Dominican Republic, who
have three teams, are the
countries competing in this



PAGE 15



r

UESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

ts



Sea Bees
Invitational:
Swimmers
qualify for
Carifta...

See page 12

Atkins: ‘I think I'm going
to he better than ‘07’

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

fter going through

what he called a

“learning experi-

ence” last year,
reigning IAAF World Champi-
onships’ silver medallist Der-
rick Atkins said he’s gearing up
for a return to the impressive
form that he had in 2007.

Since October, Atkins has
taken his residence and train-
ing camp from Tallahassee,
Florida, to Kennesaw, Georgia,
just outside of Atlanta, where
he’s now being trained by
Lawrence Seagrave.

“My training has been going
good, slowly but surely as I pre-
pare for the outdoor season,”
said Atkins, who opted not to
compete during the indoor sea-
son.

In preparation for the season
that will culminate at the IAAF
World Championships in
Berlin, Germany, in August,
Atkins is looking at running on
a couple of relay teams in April
before he officially kicks off his
outdoor campaign at the end of
April.

“Tjust want to be back to the
form of ‘07 or better,” he insist-
ed. “T think I’m going to be bet-
ter than ‘07.”

In ‘07, Atkins ran consistent-
ly in the 9.9 seconds barrier,
lowering his Bahamian national
record to a then blistering 9.91
that earned him the silver at the
World Championships in Osa-
ka, Japan behind American
Tyson Gay (9.85) and ahead of
former world record holder
Asafa Powell (9.96).

On the heel of the World
Champs, Atkins went to the
Olympic Games last year in

No Hugh
Campbell
in today

THE TRIBUNE SPORTS sec-
tion’s coverage last night of the
Hugh Campbell Basketball Invi-
tational could not be published
today as the games, which
began around 9pm, were not
finished up to press time Mon-
day night.

See Wednesday’s Sports
special for highlights of the
annual basketball classic...



Py

Beijing, China where he had
a sub-par performance, due to
an injury.

He got to the semifinal of the
100m, clocking 10.13 for sixth
place and he was denied a shot
at making the historic final that
saw Jamaican Usain Bolt blast
his way to 9.69 for the fastest
legal time ever to secure the
first of three gold medals.

Bolt, who went on to record
the rare sprint double with
another world record perfor-
mance in the 200m and was a
member of the Jamaican 4 x
100m relay team, is without a
doubt the man to beat in Berlin.

But Atkins, a cousin of Pow-
ell, said he’s not concerned
about all of the advanced hype
surrounding the Jamaican and
the rest of their sprinting core.

“At the end of the day, it’s
the man who crosses the line
first,” said Atkins, who has a
history of being first having
dominated at Dickinson State
University as a three-time
National Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletics (NAIA)
champion in the century.

Atkins, who celebrated his
25th birthday on January 5, said
his only concern is to get back
on the podium in Berlin.

“Tt was a bad year to choose
to learn,” he pointed out. “But
I wouldn’t change anything
about it. I needed that to get to
where I am right now. I’m just
going to combine it to make it a
great year this year.”

The change in environment
is what Atkins feels he certain-
ly needs.

“Tt’s okay. The weather coop-
erates every now and again, but
as it gets warmer, it should be
better for us to train in,” he
pointed out. “Right now it’s
cold. But we have our days
when it’s cold and its hot.”

Atkins, a former star at CR
Walker, is training with long
jump specialist Dwight Phillips
and Travis Padgett, who com-
peted in the sprints for Clem-
son.

CANCH-22 IS THE ONLY
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IAAF WORLD Championships’ silver medallist Derrick Atkins said he’s gearing up for a return to the impressive
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OFFER ISCLUGES BOCE POET BEANS DLT.
PAGE 16, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS





GLOBAL MANAGING PARTNER John K F Delaney receives a ture from Managing Partner —
Cayman Chris Narborough.














































BAHAMAS and Cayman partners.

Bahamian law firm n celebrates
Cayman Islands expansion

LEADING Bahamian law firm hosted by its Cayman office at one During 2009, Higgs and John-
Higgs and Johnson celebrated its of Grand Cayman’s premier — son’s Cayman office will practice
expansion into the Cayman Islands restaurants on the famous Seven —_ under the name “Higgs and John-
with a client cocktail reception Mile Beach. son - Truman Bodden and Co”
and thereafter will be known as
“Higgs and Johnson”.

Higgs and Johnson in the
Bahamas and the Cayman Islands
— already well-known for providing
legal services to the financial ser-
vices community in particular - will
provide enhanced convenience and
quality of service to clients in both
jurisdictions as well as international
clientele, the law firm said in a
press release.

The client cocktail reception was
well-attended by local clients who
celebrated the merger.

All of the Bahamas-based part-
ners joined their Cayman-based
colleagues in attendance for the
evening festivities.

Introductory remarks were
made by Chris Narborough, Coun-
try Managing Partner - Cayman.
Global Managing Partner,
Bahamas - based John Delaney,

| = spoke on behalf of Higgs and John-
‘a Pao eth — | son and introduced the full part-
r Ce am | nership to guests.

Guest speaker was Charles Clif-
ford, Cayman’s Minister of
Tourism.

He extended congratulatory
remarks on the merger and gave a
warm welcome to the Bahamian
partners. Mr Clifford offered full
support of the Cayman Islands
Government to this pioneering
Caribbean partnership and his
words were well received by all
those present.

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Landscapers
‘cut hack’



m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BAHAMIAN landscapers
yesterday told Tribune Business
they had been adversely affect-
ed by the economic downturn,
with some forced to scramble
to attract new clients and des-
perately hold on to existing ones
who may now be considering
cheaper migrant labour.

Owner of Chelly and Son
Landscaping, Michelle Roberts,
said her company had not

SEE page 6B

THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY,

ine

FEBRUARY 24,





2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Retail owner reduces work
survive week for ‘50-60%’ of staff

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamian retail entre-
preneur yesterday told
Tribune Business that
“about 50-60 per cent”
of staff across his multi-
ple retail formats were working a



ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

* John S George, QBC and Radioshack owner describes current trading

reduced work week in a bid to counter

the economic downturn, as he described
business conditions as “the most chal-
lenging” he had ever experienced.
Andrew Wilson, who owns John S$
George, Quality Business Centre (QBC),
the Radioshack franchise and a host of

Talks ongoing to overcome
Freeport airport obstacle

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Negotiations
are underway between the Min-
istry of Tourism and the Grand
Bahama Airport Company in a
bid to reduce airfare/airline
costs at the facility, with three
carriers willing to add new ser-
vices to Freeport if this hap-
pens.

“We are hoping to have some
resolution to that in the next
few weeks,” Vernice Walkine,
the director-general of tourism,
told Tribune Business at the
Grand Bahama Business Out-
look conference yesterday.

She said the Ministry of
Tourism was talking with three
new carriers who were serious-
ly considering flying into
Freeport if airport taxes and
fees can be reduced.

The Grand Bahama Interna-
tional Airport (GBIA) has the
highest airline turnaround costs
in the region, and one of the
highest seat costs (airfare) for

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



ISLANDS AT OLD PORT BAY

American travellers, despite its
close proximity to the US.

Ms Walkine believes the air-
port must function as a proper
gateway and work in “sync”
with the Ministry of Tourism to
enhance the overall tourism
product and be a catalyst for its
growth on Grand Bahama.

“Through partnership and
collaboration with the airport
operator and the Tourism
Board, we will effect a sched-
ule of incentives by the reduc-
tion or elimination of some of
these taxes and fees, which will
enable us to attract new airlift to
the destination, reduce the turn-
around cost to existing carriers,
and then we will be better posi-
tioned to promote affordable
travel packages to GBIA,” she
said.

“There are three new services
we are looking at which will
benefit from those incentives,
because otherwise the cost
would have been prohibitive for
them to even consider Grand
Bahama.

“But they are very seriously
considering it because were
making it more affordable for
them to come into Grand
Bahama Airport.”

Ms Walkine said the planned
incentives involved a mix of
some items, such as cuts in cus-
toms and immigration overtime
fees, and/or landing fees.

“It varies according to the
carrier, so it is not a one size
fits all necessarily. So those
negotiations are underway right
now, and we want the same
kind of consideration to be giv-
en to existing carriers,” she said.

Ms Walkine said the Ministry
of Tourism’s airfare reduction
strategy will focus on getting
low-cost airfares to Grand
Bahama, making it more com-
petitive with other destinations.

She said that in spite of hav-
ing an even greater proximity
advantage than Nassau, in
almost every US market, Grand

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wherever they could.

fashion retail formats, said his business-
es were “riding out the storm” and look-
ing to cut consumer prices and costs

“The environment remains challeng-
ing,” Mr Wilson told Tribune Business.

board.”

“We’re holding on.

“We’ve seen some substantial [sales]
declines, somewhere in the region of 25-
30 per cent, pretty much across the

Those figures are year-over-year com-

Carnival pushing new port for cruise

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Giora Israel,
vice president of strategic plan-
ning at Carnival Cruise Line,
told the Grand Bahama Busi-
ness Outlook that Nassau is the
number one cruise port in the
world and will be surpassing
Cozumel this year.

He said that of the 1.9 million
passengers Carnival brought to
the Bahamas, 1.1 million called
at Nassau, making it the leading
port in the Bahamas.

Mr Israel said that of the four
ports that Carnival visits in the
Bahamas, only 11 per cent or
270,000 passengers call at
Freeport.

He said Nassau’s port was
ideally located near downtown,
as opposed to the harbour in
Freeport, which is too industri-
al and far from the tourist
attractions.

“A new cruise ship port
needs to be a priority and it is
now the priority of the current
government and current Minis-
ter of Tourism to make that
happen,” Mr Israel said.

“Tt has been difficult to put
Freeport on the map and have
it as appealing. The port is too
industrial and we have a lot of
issues that are here.

Make ita
“3

yh.

i

“There is difficulty to get
good beach options. It is impor-
tant to have a beach, and we
need more attractions. We
hope that private entities will
develop more attractions other
than selling another snorkelling
or glass bottom tour. We need
the development of more things
for those cruise visitors who
come a second and third time.”

Mr Israel reported that 47
per cent of the cruise business
in the Bahamas, in general,
comes from the Carnival Cor-
poration.

Carnival has only two ships
calling at Freeport, and Mr
Israel believes that Grand
Bahama can do much better
with a new cruise ship port.

The Government is in the
process of identifying a suitable
location for a new port — a loca-
tion that works from the land
side and maritime side, he said.

“Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham is in the process of
putting together a group of will-
ing partners...to find and iden-
tify a location.,” Mr Israel said.

Mr Israel said Carnival was
willing to make the necessary
investment, together with three
key entities in Freeport.

“We want to build a new
port, but we need the Freeport
Harbour Company, the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, and

reality.

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Government of the Bahamas,”
he said.

“There are a lot of ideas of
different locations for such a
port, but no decision has been
made as far as I know as to
where the port will be.”

Mr Israel said Carnival takes
some 600,000 passengers to
Half Moon Cay, which is sig-
nificantly smaller than
Freeport. He noted that a new
cruise port will allow similar
passenger arrivals for Freeport.

“It is really difficult to add
Freeport to itineraries, but you
are very close and we can bring
so many more people here. We
can bring within a year of open-
ing half a million in Freeport
just by Carnival alone,” he said.

Mr Israel noted that a new
port could cost anywhere from
$15 to $60 million to construct,
depending on the location.

“T have been working on try-
ing to get a new port since 1997
and I have great trust and faith
in the current government,” he
said.

“The unfortunate passing of
Edward St George created a
slow down in what will happen
here in Freeport, but these
issues seems to have been
either resolved or in the process
of being resolved, and that will
be a tremendous help to get this
done.”



A

rere Pension Plan

e Efficient administration

e Competitive fees

conditions as ‘most challenging’ he has ever experienced in retail history
* John S George outlets in Lyford Cay, Independence Drive closes, with
staffing levels now at 45 from 68 as company rationalises locations

paratives for 2009 to date, and provide a
further indication of the impact the eco-
nomic downturn is having on many
Bahamian retailers.

SEE page 4B

Port in 50 per
cent fee slash

GRAND Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) president
Ian Rolle yesterday announced
a50 per cent reduction in retail
business licence fees for Port
licensees, starting on March 1,
2009, for a one-year period.

Mr Rolle told the Grand
Bahama Business Outlook con-
ference that the reduction
would be made available for
one year, until March 2010, for
those GBPA licensees who
paid their fees within three
months of billing.

Mr Rolle also unveiled a
Downtown Turnaround pro-
gramme intended to breathe
new life into Freeport’s down-
town area, which will start on
April 1, 2009, and involve three
phases, including a full scale
clean-up, lighting, landscaping
and benching initiatives.-

The GBPA is also looking
to launch a scholarship pro-
gramme focused on niche
careers, and in conjunction
with the Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce, BAIC and-
Bahamas Development Bank,
launch a Grand Bahama Busi-
ness Support Organisation.
Focused on small businesses,
it will be called The Enterpris-
ing Centre.

We can get you there!

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamians failing to exploit 40%
of Grand Bahama opportunities

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIANS have yet to
exploit 40 per cent of the eco-
nomic potential offered by
Grand Bahama, a government
minister said yesterday, while
acknowledging that the island
was “now in its seventh year of
recession and fifth year of eco-
nomic crisis”.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, acknowledged
that he was unable to predict
when an economic turnaround
would come, although he ruled
out any Bahamian or global
recovery within the next 12-18
months.

Addressing the Grand
Bahama Business Outlook con-
ference, Mr Laing said “Grand
Bahama’s economic misfor-
tunes began much earlier” than
the present downturn, which
started to emerge in the US in
2006-2007.

“Indeed, in my view, Grand
Bahama is now in its seventh
year of economic recession and
in its fifth year of economic cri-
sis,” he added.

“T wish I could say to Grand



















consultants

PROFESSIONAL

Bahama that there is an end in
sight for this enduring econom-
ic nightmare that it has faced
for the better part of seven
years now. I cannot. The reality
is that the global economy is in
a tailspin, and no one is certain
when this tailspin will end.”

Mr Laing based his view that
Grand Bahama was in its sev-
enth year of recession on the
fact that, while in 2002 the
island’s unemployment rate of
6.4 per cent was well below the
9.1 per cent national average,
it had begun to rise steadily
after that.

The ‘five years’ of economic
crisis were precipitated by the
2004 hurricane season and Roy-
al Oasis closure, Mr Laing
acknowledging that while
Grand Bahama’s unemploy-
ment rate decreased to 8.4 per

cent in 2006, this was largely
due to a rise in discouraged
workers - those not seeking
employment - and an exodus of
persons looking for work else-
where.

Mr Laing described the eco-
nomic hardship that many on
Grand Bahama have had to
endure as “profound”, with
unemployment impacting many
and families “stressed and
strained”.

“There are residents of this
island today who would not
have dreamed that they would
seek help from social services
who have had to do so,” the
minister said.

“Indeed, the multi-million
dollar social services budget that
we provided since coming to
office over the last two years is
being fully called upon here in

PCSb

limited

CONSULTING ENGINEERS

THE MANAGEMENT AND STAFF JOIN IN OFFERING
CONGRATULATIONS TO









MARK B. WILLIAMS, B. En

PLE.

SENIOR PROJECT ENGINEER

























ON HIS RECENT SUCCESS IN OBTAINING HIS
PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING QUALIFICATION

AND

TO WELCOME HIM INTO MANAGEMENT AS AN

ASSOCIATE

(February 2009)

Grand Bahama.

“While no one can understate
the increased difficulty that the
current crisis has brought to res-
idents of this island, in a way, it
is also true that the residents of
this island have endured eco-
nomic hardship for so long now
that theirs might be a less trau-
matic adjustment than other
parts of the country that are
now only seeing things get
decidedly worse.”

Looking beyond the present
economic situation, Mr Laing
said Grand Bahama was ideally
suited to attract an offshore
education industry, along with
high-technology manufacturing.
Offshore medical services and
captive/external insurance were
also potential targets.

Yet if Grand Bahama was to
attract such industries, it would
have to make a number of
adjustments, given that they
were dependent on expatriate
worker expertise.

“We will have to resist the
rising xenophobia that seems to
be plaguing us when it comes
to international workers in our
territory, as well as increasing
our own productivity and work
ethic to globally competitive
standards as a norm of our
workforce. We can and must do
both,” Mr Laing said.

While international investor
capital was important in turn-
ing round Grand Bahama’s
economy, Mr Laing said
Bahamians “have not yet
tapped into 40 per cent of the
economic opportunities of this
island”.

“This goes beyond blaming
others for keeping us down,”
he added. “This has to do with

ae
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

our own creativity, ingenuity,

REQUEST FOR

QUOTATION

M-100, Test Well Drilling

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks the services
of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling
Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope

of services includes:

Drilling and pump testing of a 6” pilot hole;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Return Well;

Flow testing of the 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Discharge testing of the 10” Feed Water Return Well;
Geophysical logging and flow testing of Pilot Hole and wells;
Water temperature logging and analysis of water quality and

chemistry;

Professional supervision, (i.e. Hydrologist}.

Request for Quotation Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009.

Request for Quotation closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at

3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager
LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117

P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

ZHIVARGO LAING



organisation, savings, drive and
execution.

“There are new businesses
we can mount here, and there
are existing businesses that we
can make better. In both
regards, there are multi-million
opportunities for us. The cur-
rent climate makes these pos-
sibilities less prominent, but my
fear is that even when the crisis
subsides, the attitude that too
many of us have had for far too
long may cause us to miss them
once again.”

Mr Laing said a united,
focused Grand Bahama Port
Authority was critical for the
island’s future, and its ability to
attract and retain internation-
al/domestic investment.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

GIVE IN

TO TEMPTATION


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 3B





Confidence on Spring
Break visitor totals

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE UPCOMING Spring
Break season could produce
visitor numbers close to last
year’s, according to the sales
director of a popular travel
website, with Freeport book-
ings said to be higher than ever.

Kristin Brenna, of StudentC-
ity, a company well known for
providing vacation packages for
college students and high
school graduates at budget
prices, said March bookings for
Freeport have been higher than
they have ever been in previ-
ous years, and that April will
be a good month for Nassau.

Student City rolled out a
Freeport Party Cruise package
starting at $399, which includes
a round-trip cruise to Freeport
from Fort Lauderdale and four
nights in one of three Freeport
hotels.

Ms Brenna told Tribune
Business that the Freeport trip
has appealed to the budget-
minded college student who
may not have as much dispos-
able income as previous years,
as they focus more than ever
on value-added packages for
the popular student travel sea-
son.

“Freeport is very popular.
We have a party cruise that
goes there which is actually
more popular than most years,”
she said.

“Nassau is still very popular
for Spring Break as well, but
most of the college demand for
trips to the Bahamas has gone
to Freeport because of its sig-
nificantly lower cost.

“They are shifting more to
those lower cost packages
because students have a lot less

CRUISE ships in Nassau harbour...

dollars to spend on travel this
year than they typically had in
years past, so we did meet that
demand with more lower cost
alternatives.”

Ms Brenna said the slump in
college students visiting Nas-
sau for the break was due in
part to significantly higher
package prices that could hit
$1,000 range or higher -
depending on accommodations.

However, she said bookings
for Nassau have been coming in
through StudentCity’s sister
company, GradCity, which pro-
duces vacation packages for
recent high school graduates.

“In April there will be a good

population of students down
there [Nassau],” said Ms Bren-
na.

Arecent USA Today Gallup
poll showed that 58 per cent of
vacationing Americans will
shrink their vacation spending
this year, or just not go at all.

Two firms which research
travel behaviour monthly, D.K.
Shifflet & Associates and THS
Global Insight, predict that
Americans will spend 9.7 per
cent less on leisure travel in
April, May and June, and 9 per
cent less in July, August and
September.

The USA today article con-
taming the Gallup poll figures



contends that Americans could
end up spending $30 billion less
on leisure travel this Spring and
Summer.

These figures could justify
the panic the hospitality sector
has been under during the past
several months.

Ministry of Tourism officials,
who seem to be cautiously opti-
mistic about this year’s tourism
numbers, however, told Tri-
bune Business that only time
will tell if travel will pick up.

Tourism Minister Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace, said the
Bahamas is getting ready to
reestablish its proximity advan-
tage in order to get the most

business every day. However,
he said the current problem
with the industry is a complex
issue to solve, as business mod-
els for predictions fall apart if
individuals book their vacations

closer to their expected depar-
ture dates.

Ms Brenna is confident the
Bahamas will do fairly well this
spring break saying: “Spring
Break is coming... Get Ready!”

ACCOUNTANT NEEDED

For an Established Accounting Firm
Must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting
Strong work ethics and a professional disposition

All interested persons
Please apply via email to: S.Laquel@ gmail.com
or Call 242-393-0858, Ask for Ms. Hall or Ms. Farrington
Deadline: February 25, 2009

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Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ARTIC OVERSEAS LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of The
International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 23, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the April 6, 2009 to send their names and addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or, in de-

fault thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such debts are proved.

February 24, 2009
SHAKIRA BURROWS

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Legal Notice
NOTICE

MANDAL LIMITED
N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MANDAL LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 27 January, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 24th day of February, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

Legal Notice
NOTICE

CANIMO LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CANIMO LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 23 February, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 24th day of February, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

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of his hit TV show ‘Dire % Be Green” at the Hilton Hotel. ‘Gere ZH
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Pictured along with the shows creator and host Spence Finlayson
are his guests The Hon. Fredrick Mitchell, MP for Fox Hill, Rory
Higgs, President of Apex Management Services Ltd. and Alpheus
“Hawk” Finlayson, former IAAF Council Member.

If you would like to be a guest on this show or advertise
please call 393-3404.

=e
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Ganpary

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

D-111 Qualified Environmental Monitor

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks a
Qualified Environmental Monitor for Stage 1 of the LPIA
Expansion Project. The scope of services includes:

Review and approve contractors’ environmental plans;
Develop inspection check lists and inspect the work of
contractors for compliance to environmental plans;
Facilitate and communicate with regulatory authorities on
behalf of the Project on environmental issues; and
Prepare weekly and monthly reports.

Interested proponents must be qualified, familiar with local
regulatory laws and agencies and familiar with International
Best Practices (Equator Principles, IFC Standards).

Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up
after 1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 5th, 2009 at
3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

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KAVIGATING A KEW WORLD


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Retail owner reduces work
week for ‘50-60%’ of staff

FROM page 1B

With more than 1,500 job
losses in the economy towards
the end of 2008, and unemploy-
ment continuing to rise,
Bahamians are increasingly
fearful for their jobs and
incomes. As a result, consumer
spending - the lifeblood of
retailers and the wider Bahami-
an economy - has been reined
in, with confidence showing no
signs of making a return.

“We’re just trying to hold on
and ride out the storm,” Mr
Wilson explained, “trying to
control our expenses. We’re try-
ing to get our margins razor
thin, and trying to become more
competitive in pricing, customer

“We have quite a few staff

working less than a 40-hour
week in most of them [his retail
formats]. I would say about 50-
60 per cent of staff are on
reduced work weeks.” Across
his retail brands, Mr Wilson
employs around 100 staff.

Out of all his retail formats,
Mr Wilson said John S George
“remains the greatest chal-
lenge”. He has invested around
$1 million in upgrading the
retail chain since acquiring it in
summer 2007 from the ill-fated
ownership of the buyout group
put together by Ken Hutton.

That much-needed invest-
ment was injected just before
the world and Bahamian
economies lurched into full-
blown downturn, making it
extremely difficult for Mr Wil-
son to obtain a return on the

funds invested.

He yesterday confirmed to
Tribune Business that John S
George had rationalised its
store portfolio to the best-per-
forming outlets, having closed
both the Lyford Cay and Inde-
pendence Drive locations
before the Christmas holidays.

“We are still operating in
Cable Beach, Palmdale and
Harbour Bay,” Mr Wilson said.
As a result of the downsized
chain, John S George’s staffing
levels have been reduced to
about 45 from 68.

Mr Wilson explained, though,
that the staff reduction had
been produced by both the
store closures and the compa-
ny’s decision not to replace
workers when they either left
or retired.

“It’s really the most chal-
lenging conditions I’ve experi-
enced since getting into retail,”
Mr Wilson said. “It’s a combi-
nation of the general economic
climate, the rising numbers of
people who are not working,
and people who are being real-
ly cautious.

“People don’t have the mon-
ey to spend. The customers
don’t have money to spend, and
the people who do have some
currency are rather hesitant to
spend. We’re just controlling
expenses and holding on.”

Mr Wilson added that John
S George had reduced its
import levels significantly.

Meanwhile, Chris Lowe,
operations manager at Kelly’s
(Freeport), told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that retail trading



Legal Notice

Legal Notice



NOTICE

NOTICE




QAMAR LIMITED

GOLDEN DRAGON




(In Voluntary Liquidation)

GROUP LIMITED





Notice is hereby given that the above-named

(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Company is in dissolution, which commenced on




the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on



is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,








Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
INTEGRATED SYNERGY
TECHNOLOGIES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MATRICARIA CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an

the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHIMANGO GROUP
CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHASING THE MOON
CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

For further information on this and

conditions experienced by his
firm were “firmer than we
thought it would be” given the
overall economic environment.

“January was a good month
for us,” Mr Lowe explained.
“Overall, we’re down a couple
of percentage points, but then
we have some months where
we’re up a few per cent. We’re
3-4 per cent up, then 3-4 per
cent down, but on average it’s
flat. There are no lay-offs on
our horizon.”

He added that a major con-
cern, both for himself and other
Bahamian retailers, was that
US-based suppliers had either
closed or significantly reduced
production/distribution, thus
depriving them of much-needed
supplies and inventory lines.

“There’s a number of ven-
dors who have gone out of busi-
ness, and certain things will not
get replaced,” Mr Lowe
explained. “Certain categories
of goods that have been carried
for a long time are not avail-
able.

“US companies have either
gone under or are not bothered
by foreign sales.” Mr Lowe said
surviving US companies were
also being increasingly forced
by even softer trading condi-
tions at home to explore new
markets in the Bahamas and the
Caribbean.

The Kelly’s (Freeport) exec-
utive said the company’s work
on internal systems over the
past eight years, and “very seri-

ous trending” on inventory and
turns, had made it better able to
manage its way through the cur-
rent downturn.

Expansion plans remained on
the drawing board, Mr Lowe
said, although Kelly’s
(Freeport) would not put any-
thing into action in the current
climate.

“There’s nothing directly on
the books with any start date,
but we have two different sets
of plans we can leap on,
although not right now,” Mr
Lowe said.

“As soon as we see a positive
turnaround in the economy, and
a positive direction espoused by
our leadership, we will look to
expand in building materials
and expand in retail.

“We're training, building and
doing back office renovations.
We’ve put in two new offices in
an internal expansion.”

Mr Lowe added: “We’re
holding the ship and paying
attention to the details. We’re
operating in a contracting mar-
ket. It makes mistakes in oper-
ations more expensive. You
have to be leaner, be more
tighter and be more efficient,
and leverage opportunities
when you see them. But you
must not get in over your head,
because you could end up cut-
ting your throat in the circum-
stances.

“T think competently run
business are holding their own
and doing OK.”

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POINTAM VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GLASSHOUSE
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

can
i

‘8 fo
MR > /

exciting career opportunity?

i
=

DIRECTOR TALENT MANAGEMENT

This role will be accountable for making a significant contribution to the
management and development of the careers of FirstCaribbean’s talent
with a special focus on high performing and high potential banking
professionals.

other available positions, please visit

slic webaies FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

www firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers GET THERE. TOGETHER.


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Landscapers ‘cut back’

picked up any new clients since
the economic contraction
became prevalent last year, with
existing customers scaling back
their monthly maintenance.

“Some of the old ones [cus-
tomers] have been telling me:
‘Don’t come this month because
things aren’t good. Come next
month or [Il call you when to
come’,” she said.

Ms Roberts said she was in
the process of revamping her
product in order to remain com-
petitive, but has staggered in
producing a feasible business
plan.

She said, though, that it was
imperative for her to come up
with something within the next
three months. “I have to come
up with something else to do,
but I haven’t thought of any-
thing yet,” she said.

Ms Roberts’ concern is that
her biggest competition will
come from the “guy off the
street”, who her clients and
potential clients will be able to
pay little or nothing for the ser-
vice.

She said she was working
harder than ever to keep her 25
to 26 clients satisfied, ensuring
she and her four employees
maintain a steady income.

Steve Bellot, proprietor of
Roots Landscape and Mainte-
nance, said his business has had

been a lot more demanding for
him since the economy soft-
ened, as he has been force to
spend more time pricing jobs
and setting up crews.

He said he has seen a
decrease in large contracts that
were once prevalent, and is now
taking on more small jobs. “I
imagine that’s because there is
not much development going
on,” he said.

Mr Bellot, like Ms Roberts,
said holding on to existing busi-
ness was paramount this year, as
well as innovation.

“Right now, you want to be
in a position where if someone
comes along to take one of your
contracts, your client is going
to say: ‘No, ’'m happy with who
I have’,” he said.

Mr Bellot said he has taken
on more jobs he would have
typically turned down in order
to stay competitive. As far as
cost cutting goes, he said he has
placed Roots on a hiring freeze
and is not purchasing any new
equipment for the business, but
is focusing on repairing what he
has.

Mr Bellot said he was using
the current economic downturn
to measure his business’s effi-
ciency, so that it can do much
better when things turn around.

“Times like these are always
a test when you’re in business,

Bank donation to support
aspiring businesswomen

BANK of the Bahamas International
has given a recent donation to the
O.P.A.L.S, the teen division of Kingdom
Women In Business, which stands for
Opening and Preparing Avenues for
young Ladies to Succeed.

The bank’s donation will make it pos-
sible for nearly 50 teenage girls to attend
next week’s K WIB seminar, where they
will officially be named members of the
organisation and matched up with men-
tors in careers they plan to pursue.

Along with a presentation by Dee-
genera Jones-Dixon, a peer-to-peer talk
by 18 year-old COB student, Cashena
Thompson, and a session with pageant
organiser, Michelle Malcolm, the young-
sters will be able to attend presentations
with women in the main conference.

Melisa Hall, K WIB’s founder, said:
“We are truly appreciative of the bank’s
immediate and overwhelming response
in this exciting venture.

“They didn’t hesitate to invest in the
lives of so many young women. Words
really can’t express how appreciative we
are of this generous gift. We know that
this will be an encouragement for more
students to attend, who felt they may
not have been able to attend. Who
knows, some of these girls who make it
through our O.P.A.L.S may one day

KWIB’s annual conference runs from

{Js Lari
rp UoeATLmE

DANIA Ferguson (centre), marketing coordinator for Bank of The Bahamas International, pre-
sents Kingdom Women In Business with a donation for the development of their organisation’s
teen arm, the 0.P.A.L.S. Also pictured are Charlene Paul, founder Melisa Hall, Deegenera Jones-
Dixon and Cashena Thompson.

(Photo by Arthia Nixon/ALC)

For more information call 328-6050 or

come back to Bank of the Bahamas as next Thursday to Friday at the British visit www.kingdomwomeninbusi-

to innovate in order to stay because it determines whether

ahead in the market.
Mr Bellot said business has

you are able to operate effi-
ciently,” said Mr Bellot.

trained professionals.”

Colonial Hilton.

ness.org



Talks ongoing to overcome Freeport airport obstacle















—_
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

REQUEST FOR

FROM page 1B

Bahama’s seat costs to con-
sumers remains higher than that
of Nassau and other destina-
tions. Based on distance from
Miami, these include Cancun
(197 miles), Montego Bay (526
miles), Puerto Rico (1037 miles)
and Las Vegas (2,177 miles).
“Las Vegas, which is more

than 20 times as far away from
Miami as is Grand Bahama, is
always less expensive to fly to
than GBIA,” Ms Walkine said.

“Now, we know that part of
the reason for this problem is
the cost of operating at Grand
Bahama International Airport.

“It is critically important for
us to make Grand Bahama,
which is the closest offshore
destination to America, not the
most expensive destination for
Americans.”

She indicated that hotels on
Grand Bahama will continue to
struggle if the high airfare and
airport turnaround costs are not
addressed.

“Until we fix some of these
core infrastructural things, Our
Lucaya Resort, Pelican Bay and
all the others are not going to be
able to benefit to the degree
that they can,” Ms Walkine
said.

“You can promote these
properties all day long, but if

that person who is sitting in
Miami looks at the option avail-
able to them, and if they can go
to Vegas, which is 20 times fur-
ther away and stay longer for
less than the cost of getting to
Grand Bahama, they may
decide to go to Vegas or to the
Dominican Republic.

“So unless we fix these issues,
it is not going to be well
received by the customer who
has to make a decision about
what he or she can afford.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that THOMAS ANTOINIER
EMMANUEL, of GREGORY TOWN, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 17 day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PROPOSAL

Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape Supply The Compliance Commission

3rd Floor, Charlotte House
Charlotte Street South

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks
a qualified landscape supplier(s) to grow trees, palms,
shrubs and groundcover (items) in accordance with the
required schedule and speculations for completion of
Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. This is a supply
only contract.

Relocation and Temporary
Telephone Lines

Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

The Public is advised that, effectively
immediately, The Compliance
Commission has relocated to the 3rd
Floor of Charlotte House, Charlotte Street
South, and may be contacted at the
following telephone number:

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th,
2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

The Bahamas Olympic Association

Invites suitably qualified applicants to apply for the
following position

Office Administrator

Requirements:

356-5717

PC Literacy and experienced in Microsoft Office
Applications (Word, Excel, Powerpoint)
Excellent keyboarding skills

Excellent Organizational Skills and ability to multi-
task successfully

Excellent Communication Skills and ability to
work with minimum direction and supervision in
drafting correspondence for Executive Review
Experienced in Office Administration and ability
to work with tight deadlines and flexibility to adjust
working hours to ensure that objectives are met.
Coordinate Meetings/Business Travel as required
To also serve as Office Receptionist and answer
telephones

Real P-face e

The Bahamas Source For Homes, Apartment Communities & Rentals ‘“—

Everywhere The Buyers Are!



The ideal candidate would have served in a similar
capacity and would have completed formal education
beyond the high school level. A Background in Sports
Administration is preferred and consideration will be
given to candidates that demonstrate skills that are
easily transferable to this position and demonstrate a
high level of professionalism.

Applications can be sent via email or fax to:
nocbah@coralwave.com ¢ Fax: 322-1195

or mailed to
The Bahamas Olympic Association
P.O. Box SS-6250,

Nassau, The Bahmas.

The Bahamas Olympic Association thanks all applicants and will only
interview short-listed candidates.

Tel: 502 2356 am

for ad rates


APRIL BOWER
WORKED BRIEFLY AS
A TEMP SECKETARY
IN OUR OFFICE!

BLONDIE

[WANT YOU TO CATER A SMALL
PARTY FOR ME, BLT I WANT TO
CUT AS MANY CORNERS AS [ CAN







GLORIA, WHO'S
THAT WOMAN WITH
RANDY? IVE NEVER
SEEN HER BEFORE!

2009 by King Features Syndicate, Ine. World Rights reserved



TIGER

id] |
me





HEAK MOM
CALLING
Mou 7





CALVIN & HOBBES

DAD SAYS THE ANTICIPATION
GF HAVING SOMETHING \S
OFTEN MORE FUN THAN

ACTUALY HAVING IT. IMMEDIATELY .

©1989 Universal Press Syndicate























“TVE LOST AT LEAST TUREE
INCHES ONTHIS DIET.”

CRYPTIC PUZZLE





FOR EXAMPLE, CAN
YOU SERVE TUNA
FISH SANDWICHES
WITHOUT BREAD?

Ly v Vie j

VENT You Wi one

T THINK HE'S CRAZY. T HATE
WAITING FOR THINGS. I
LIKE TO HAVE EVERYTHING



‘SO, HOW TALL DOES THAT
MAKE You Now2”






SHE WAS RECRUITED
BY THE CIA..-GPEAKS
5] FIVE LANGUAGES!




WELL, ~]
SURE... BUT

THEN IT'S 4
JUST TUNA

af No. TELL

Sunday



Now
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TALKING!

TRY AGAIN, ONLY
MAKE IT LOLUVER!

T CANT THINK OF ANYTHING
TD RATHER ANTICIPATE THAN
HANE RIGHT AWAY. CAN You?



THE CIA JOB
DIDNT WORK OLIT,
SO SHE CAME
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LET ME ASK YOU
THIS...ARE PLATES






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‘PEASE, SIUBY POM “OUI “elEOIUAS SEN



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

APT 3-G












MARTIN MAGEE N
LOVES NO ONE
BUT HIMSELF YOU

OF ALL PEOPLE
SHOULP KNOW THAT.’
OE





WE TALK SOMETIMES,
MOSTLY OF YOU. HE
LOVES YOU VERY
MUCH; MARGO.





YOUR FATHER DOES MUCH
BUSINESS IN CHINA.
IMPORTANT PEOPLE

RESPECT HIM THERE.

HOW DO YOU KNOW
THIG, GABRIELLA?
ARE YOU TWO IN TOUCH 2/

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‘©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

FRANK BOLL E——



T WOKE UP TODAY
WITH A REALLY BAD
DIAPER RASH /

MY BOTTOM IS A GROSS,
RED MASS OF OOZING,
PUTRID SORES//

© 2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

www.kingteaturas.com



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I AGREE THAT TALKING oN
THINGS OVER IS ALWAYS

PREFERABLE TO FHYSICAL
VIOLENCE...



BUT IT MAY BE
TOO LATE To
SCHEDULE A

PEACE
CONFERENCE







World rights reserved.




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Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











Yesterday’s Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer Kakuro Answer




























Difficulty Level * *&
















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate. Inc.





































©2009 Conceplis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.




































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For Whom the Bells Toll













Across Down
1 It can be boring if a 1 Call for a doctor,
commercial interrupts a perhaps (5)
fight (7) 2 Not easy to grasp by
4 In the operating theatre, sailors on land (8)
the routine anaesthetic (5) 3 Incline towards a simple
7 It’s not difficult to name a building (4-2)
novel midshipman (4) 4 Finished full of wrath and
8 Put out of one’s mind? (8) in jeopardy (10)
10 Prettiness in a constantly 5 Animal quarters,
recurring form (10) perhaps (4)
12 Get out the cane, for 6 Rusty looking
example, or put into locks (3,4)
confinement (6) 9 Brilliant winner of the
13 Remote sort of space- angling contest? (10)
traveller (6) 11 Mean the opposite
15 One without real authority (8)
led the way at sea (10) 12 Unmasks once one asks Ww
18 Perhaps | am disposed to questions (7) _I
produce an object of 14 Enough to prevent parting N
worth (8) without meeting (6) 5
19 Withdrawal of 101 meeting 16 Acommon flower I’d say ou
points (4) perhaps (5) >
20 Simple but revealing (5) 17 Perhaps every ~”
21 May accept a joke with church includes one iz

dignity (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Nearsighted, 9 Enlaced, 10
Moira, 11 Eons, 12 Corn laws, 14
Loathe, 16 Stream, 18 Gunboats, 19
Oslo, 22 Swift, 23 Plumage, 24
Typesetters.

Down: 2 Ellen, 3 Rice, 4 Indoor, 5
Humanity, 6 Emirate, 7 Genealogist, 8
Ransom money, 13 Throttle, 15
Annuity, 17 Staple, 20 Stair, 21 Duet.

(4)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Pay the earth, 9 Invalid,
10 Strew, 11 Lily, 12 Passport, 14
Evenly, 16 Collie, 18 Emporium, 19
Idol, 22 Train, 23 Bargain, 24
Underground.

Down: 2 Anvil, 3 Talk, 4 Endear, 5
Assessor, 6 Turmoil, 7 Field events,
8 Switzerland, 13 Florence, 15
Explain, 17 Humbug, 20 Drain, 21
Brio.

Across
1 Sports arena (7)
4 Morass (5)
7 Once more (4)

8 Avaricious (8)

10 Significant (10)

12 Avoiding

extremes (6)

13 Reduced to
powder (6)
15 Complex details
(3,3,4)

Solid traffic jam (8)
Woodwind

instrument (4)

18
19

20 Motor sport event (5)
21 Generous (7)




















South dealer. declarer got home with an unmak-
Both sides vulnerable. able contract.
NORTH West led a heart against three
@)72 notrump, and declarer won East’s ten
974 with the jack. South had no choice
A 10973 but to try to establish dummy’s dia-
8 5 monds, without which he could not
WEST EAST possibly score nine tricks.
$9863 40 104 So at trick two, he cashed the dia-
VAQ652 ¥ 103 mond king, both defenders following
#Q5 #3382 low, and then played a second dia-
#17 #010942 mond. When West produced the
SOUTH queen, South allowed him to win the
@AK5 trick. This was not from a sense of
Â¥KI8 generosity, mind you, but because
#K64 West was the right person to have on
#AK 63 lead at this stage. It did not matter
Down The bidding: what West played next because
i Buddah conducts South West North East declarer now had nine sure tricks. _
2NT Pass 3NT_ AII Pass Of course, if West had dropped his

action (5) Opening lead — five of hearts. queen of diamonds under the king at

trick two, declarer would have had












2 Australian city (8
4 Optical ill 2 ” Bridge would be a much simpler _ no chance to make the contract. The
peal ilueion (6) game to play well if, whenever acrit- diamond queen was an albatross
4 Disguise oneself (10) ical point in the play was reached, around West’s neck that he should
5 Destroy (4) some kind soul would ring a bell to have gotten rid of at the earliest
warn you to watch your step. The opportunity.
6 Hollow-eyed and trouble is that, aside from the minor He should have reasoned that the
gaunt (7) expense of the bell, the cost of hiring queen was a worthless card if South
9 Like it or not (5-5) ya, Someone to ring it at precisely the — had the jack of diamonds as well as
gseq tight moment would be prohibitive. the king, while if his partner held the
11 Salad vegetable (8) ; For example, take this case where jack, the queen was certainly not a
12 Company < West missed his cue when the crucial good card to hang on to.
ayesutve tz) : point arose. The moment of truth Somebody should have rung a
$3 quietly passed him by, and asaresult bell!
.
- i vl : Tomorrow: The battle for trump control.
16 Artillery > ©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
projectile (5)
17 Determination (4)






PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a eV





B O =

The Tribune





Ca

coer N D



ith



nobody's

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IMAGINE living in a place, all too familiar to you,
the smells, the taste, the streets, the people, all con-
sidered a part of your home, and to suddenly
oe that despite your familiarity, you were an
alien.

This is the realty of many second generation Haitians in the local
community, who despite being born in the Bahamas, have no citzen-
ship and in essence, belong to no country.

Psychiatrist Dr Nelson Clarke explained that for the hundreds of
people in the country that fall in this category, the feeling of not
belonging and of being marginalised by main stream society could have
an extremely destructive effect.

“Tf you watch your people get rounded up and sent on buses to the
Detention Centre, it could evoke some very strong feelings of anger.”

Dr Clarke said many Haitian-Bahamian are left to carry this possi-
bly overwhelming burden because they feel that they cannot talk
about it.

Tribune Health spoke to one young man in this position who dis-
cussed how his situation has impacted his mind and soul.

He explained many Haitian- Bahamians wonder whether they
should cling to a culture and heritage attained only through birth, or
embrace a society and community which frequently discounts them,
and seldom embraces them as its kin.

Twenty seven year old Jeffrey Herard says life in the Bahamas as
a second generation Haitian, has proven to be one of the greatest
challenges he has even encountered, causing him often to question
his own identity.

He painted a picture of denial, social segregation, and said he has
undergone a constant struggle to validate his “ Bahamianism,” all in
an effort to secure the best possible future for himself and his fami-
ly.

Born in Nassau during the early 80s, Jeffrey said he spent the
first five years of his life in Nassau, before moving back to Haiti
with his mother.

Reflecting on his childhood on Ile de Ja Tortue in Haiti-, Jeffrey
said his life then was much different from what it is today.

Contrary to the media’s portrayal of Haiti as a lawless and vio-
lent country, Jeffrey says he has memories of a simple, safe, and
loving community.

Although his family was poor, he was able to attend a private
school sponsored by Canadian missionaries where his awareness on
the importance of education was first fostered.

While there, Jeffrey said he was able to study French as a second
language, and spent his senior years learning about computers and
information technology.

With his father already living in Nassau, Jeffrey said at the age of
17, he returned here in the hopes of having a better life.

Jeff said his return to Nassau was by plane, considered a luxury
and privilege by many Haitians, an opportunity made available by
his father who he said does not support illegal sloop migration.

Jeff explained, one of the first things he did after arriving back to
New Providence was to begin the process of naturalisation.

“T applied when I was 18, and it took me close to two years to get
all the documents that the government was asking for.”

He said this involved getting copies of his birth certificate, a copy
of his parents birth certificates, and other documents, some of which
have to be faxed or mailed from government offices in Haiti.

After getting the requested documents, Jeff said his educational
and civic growth were stunted because while he was waiting for
approval from the department of immigration, his birth certificate
was never seen as enough evidence of his Bahamian status.

Hoping to pursue his passion in computer design and information
technology, Jeff said he soon enrolled at the College of The

Aeon Tr



Bahamas pursuing a degree in Computer Science.

However he realised that because he could not present a Bahami-
an passport, he was not considered Bahamian by the college and
would have to pay twice as much for an education. This was the first
indication of his unequal status, he said.

He was employed at the Atlantis Resort where overtime, he was
able to advance to a senior position not because of his background,
but because of his work ethics and skill.

For him, this was an important experience, because for the first
time his Haitian heritage did not matter, and he was placed on an
equal playing field as everyone else.

Being Haitian-Bahamian comes with its share of challenges,
which Jeff said forces many young men in his position to join gangs
or rebel against the Bahamian culture because they feel like
strangers in both worlds.

He said Haitians don’t automatically accept them especially if
they don’t speak Creole, and Bahamians tend to turn their noises up
at people of Haitian lineage.

Jeff said even the way Haitian immigrants are portrayed on tele-
vision when apprehended by immigration officers, and the disre-
spect and inhumanity that so often outshines the legality of the offi-
cers’ action often proves reason enough for many Haitian-Bahami-
an to disown their Haitian background.

Jeff said although having to face discriminatory remarks from
Bahamians, he has been forced to rely on his inner strength and
sense of identity to success in the face of his trials.

Fast forwarding his life to 2009, Jeff is now a father of two. He
pointed out that

Haitians like Bahamians, Americans, and others have desires to
become successful, and that the Haitian-Bahamian too has worth
and deserves the same opportunity to prove themselves as con-
tributing members of society.

Jeff said although he has had to work extremely hard in achieve
all that he has, the struggle does not stop with him.

He encouraged others who find themselves in the same position
to look within and allow that inner strength to propel them to suc-
cess.

Jeff said: “Ifa Black man can succeed in becoming the president
of the greatest nation in the world, anyone can overcome challenges
with sufficient drive. If I can do it, so can you.”

READY
FOR TV

| MBY ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter

TO help the growing number of persons

? especially kids who are either obese or over-
? weight, Jennifer Basden along with her busi-
i ness partner, Natasha Brown, have teamed up
: to start a health care initiative through a new
? television show- KIDFIT TV to make kids and
: their parents aware of the importance of good
i health and a positive lifestyle.

Mrs Basden said her eight year old daughter

was the main inspiration behind KIDFIT TV.

“TI found that my youngest daughter wasn’t

i working out and I wasn’t feeding her the
: healthiest meals and she started gaining weight.
? I recognised that I needed to do something. I
: didn’t feel like pushing her off onto someone
i else for help. I thought that if I could get her
: and some of her friends, because once you get
: one friends interested then the others will
? come, then it becomes a workout party. My
i kids got excited and other kids got excited as
: well when we wanted to do a casting call for
; this show,” Mrs Basden said.

Mrs Basden said although her target audi-

i ence is children between the ages of eight and
: 13 years old, the show is still kid inspiring but
: adult friendly. They are currently in negotia-
i tions with local stations to air the show.

“We want to encourage adults to be apart of

i it and watch along and work along with their
? kids. We want to educate them and build up
: their self esteem. Once you build up self esteem
i it empowers them and it encourages them to
: strive to do better and to want to do better in
? the community. As they grow older into ado-
: lescent and into adults, they will be able to
: contribute something positive to society,” Mrs
: Basden said.

Ms Brown, a Fitness trainer at NatBros, said
she is happy to be working with the pro-

: gramme.

“If you look at our surroundings as a nation,

? one will see that we are not as clean as we
? need to be. That can also bring about sickness
i and disease. We have now become to busy to
: teach our own kids the importance of fitness
; and good health,” Ms Brown said.

Mrs Basden said the entire show will be host-

ed by children to allow those watching at home
; to better relate to the activities on screen.

“The kids will have adult counterparts for

: each individual segment. So for our KIDFIT
i TV Cuisine segment, we will have a chef that is
$ going to be working along with the kid host
? chef to help them to stay safe in the kitchen and
? to teach them how to eat healthy with tasty
i alternatives to fast food,” Mrs Basden said.

Mrs Basden said there is also a “Go Green”

segment to get the kids involved with fun activ-
i ities to start instilling green values as they con-
: tinue a healthier lifestyle as they grow older.

“We want the children to learn how to be

! environmentally responsible. We want to
? encourage them to not only uplift themselves
: and those around them, but also to be con-
: scious of what happens when they do not take
? care of their environment. We want them to
? learn how to be respectful of themselves and
i their community so that everyone can enjoy it
: in the long term,” Mrs Basden said.

Mrs Basden said she hopes in the future to

not only have the kids watching the show and
: interact, but also have a place where they can
? come out and socialise with other children.

“We want to start a kids programme also at

: Natasha’s gym and have some of our cast mem-
i bers from the show and team from KIDFIT TV
: to be there and show the other kids that fitness
: and health is a great thing,” Mrs Basden said.

Can a “vitamin” keep wrinkles away?

What do mouth-watering strawber-
ries, pineapples, sweet cantaloupes,
tomatoes and red bell peppers, all have
in common- vitamin C.

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is an
extremely effective antioxidant. We’ve
already learned that antioxidants are
vitamins, amino acids and other natural
substances that can reverse the effect of
damage done by free radicals, which
are unstable oxygen molecules that age
the skin. We already know that vitamin
C, when taken orally, enhances the
immune system, a natural defense
against colds and flu. But is there more
to this vitamin? Let's take a look at its
skin care benefits.

VITAMIN € SKIN CARE BENEFITS:

IT softens

IT moisturises

IT helps reduce fine wrinkles

IT exfoliates

IT can help to prevent the production
of melanin in the skin, which are the
dark spots that usually increase
with aging.

IT reduces inflammation

IT neutralises free radical reactions
IT stimulates collagen production



Collagen is a protein that gives your
skin elasticity and firmness. This col-
lagen is decreased dramatically the old-
er we get and shows itself up as wrin-
kles on the skin. So, when collagen is
stimulated the aging skin is improved.

ARE THERE FORMS OF VITAMIN €
THAT DO NOT WORK?

As great as vitamin C is to the skin,
if not manufactured properly it is
impossible for your skin to absorb it.
Therefore, the vitamin C found in
many skin care products may vary in its
effectiveness. Why? Well, water and
vitamin C are incompatible. When it
comes into contact with water and air,
it oxidises very quickly and loses its
benefits. When this process occurs, it is
not only ineffective but also potential-
ly harmful (oxidised vitamin C may

increase the formation of free radi-
cals).

To receive the skin care benefits
from vitamin C, scientists have been
looking for a form of vitamin C that
can do the following:

— be more stable than vitamin C

— penetrate the skin easily

— are less irritating

— release ascorbic acid in a quantity
sufficient to boost collagen
production.

WHAT HAVE SCIENTISTS DISCOVERED?

Today, there are two derivatives that
have made their way into the skin care
market. What are they? Ascorbyl
palmitate also known as vitamin C,
ester and magnesium ascorbyl phos-
phate.

MAGNESIUM ASCORBYL PHOSPHATE

Magnesium ascorbyl phosphate is a
water-soluble derivative of vitamin C,
which means it only enters the inside of
the cell, which is mainly water. Not
being able to enter the exterior of the
cell means that it cannot prevent free
radical damage on the outside of the

cell. But it is popular because it is non-
irritating and more stable than vita-
min C. It also seems to increase skin
collagen production in significantly
lower concentrations. But if you have
sensitive skin it is better choice,
because vitamin C can be very acidic,
causing exfoliation.

ASCORBYL PALMITATE
(VITAMIN C ESTER)

Vitamin C ester it is the most com-
mon fat-soluble derivative of vitamin
C. It is composed of basic vitamin C
(ascorbic acid) along with palmitic acid,
which is derived from palm oil.

This derivative is non- irritating, and
unlike ascorbic acid, it is stable and
able to remain stable in creams for
years. Also, as a fat-soluble substance,
it quickly penetrates the skin and pro-
tects against free-radical damage, on
the exterior of the cells where there is
the most damage. Dermatologist and
anti-aging expert Dr Nicholas Perri-
cone (author of The wrinkle Cure)
believes it is the perfect "skin vitamin"
and "youth in a jar" and said " I was
fortunate to have help from the
research of the brilliant cell biologist
Olga Marko, PH.D., who found that

vitamin C ester helps stimulate the
growth of fibroblast, the cells that help
produce collagen and elastin in human
skin. This finding gave me a clue that
vitamin C-ester could boost collagen
production and provide a more youth-
ful appearance."

Dr Perricone was convinced he was
on his way to develop one of the first
antioxidant-based anti-aging skin treat-
ment.

Here are some of the skin condi-
tions topical vitamin C treatment are
recommended for:

¢ Fine lines and wrinkles on severely
sun-damaged skin

¢ Sagging skin that is losing its firmness
because of lost or damaged collagen

¢ Sunburned, inflamed, or irritated skin

¢ Kenya Mortimer-McKenzie
Anti-Aging Skin Care Specialist
Baha-Retreat Anti-Aging Spa
East Bay Street, East of Lucianos
323-6711 or 323-615
www.baharetreat.com

Email: info@baharetreat.com
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009, PAGE 9B



a Ne



HEART

at: vw

HEALTHY TIP

February is Heart Health
Awareness Month and the
Lighten Up & Live Healthy
team is urging you to use the
remainder of this month to
reflect on your own ‘heart
health’.

Heart diseases are the main
contributor to mortality in the
Bahamas. Chronic heart dis-
ease not only affects individu-
als, but also families and the
greater community. In addi-
tion, it places a colossal strain
on the national healthcare sys-
tem. However, we are here to
let you know that most cases of
heart disease can be prevented
by making simple lifestyle
choices that begin with you.
For a healthy country starts
with healthy citizens.

This week we will share with
you some lifestyle tips from
Dietitians of Canada on ways
to control your fat intake,
increase your fibre consump-
tion and increase your activity
level that can reduce the inci-
dences of most heart disease.
However, if you have heart
disease already, you will be
better able to manage it.

TIPS TO CONTROL
YOUR FAT INTAKE
eHave 5-11 servings of grain
products daily - such as whole
grain breads, cereals and other
grain products.

eReach for 5-9 servings of
vegetables & fruit each day.

eChoose soy milk, or lower
fat milk products such as skim
or 1 per cent milk, and yogurt
or cottage cheese made with
less than 2 per cent milk fat
more often.

eChoose fish, poultry and
leaner meats, with fat and skin
removed. An appropriate serv-
ing size is about the size and
thickness of a deck of cards or
the palm of your hand exclud-
ing your fingers.

eHave foods that are baked,
broiled or grilled more often
than deep-fried foods.

eHave more meals made
with beans and peas.

Cut down on extras such as
butter, margarine, oil, gravy
and rich sauces.

eChoose lower fat snack
foods such as light microwave
or air popped popcorn (without
added butter or topping) and
pretzels.

eRead package labels and
choose lower fat versions of
salad dressings, peanut butter,
cream soups, etc. To be called

"low fat", a food must contain i
less than 3 grams of fat per }
serving. i

¢Flavour foods without fat, }
use lime, salsa, mustard, herbs }
and spices instead. i

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

AND EXERCISE TIPS
To increase exercise and }
physical activity: i

Buy a frisbee & make a
family game out if it. i
Go swimming. If you can't }
swim, just be active in the }
water. i
ePlay beach volleyball. :
eWalk or jog along the }
beach, park, and neighbour- }
hood. :
Get involved in team sports }
(e.g. basketball, soccer) i
¢Buy askipping (jump rope) }
and use it. :
ePut on music while clean- : |
ing the house and clean to the }
beat! i
eUse the stairs more often.
Instead of lounging in front }
of the television go for a walk i
after dinner. :
eFind an exercise buddy.
eJoin a gym and attend fre-
quently. Purchase exercise
equipment

HEALTHY WEIGHT TIPS

eEat breakfast every morn-
ing

eFat a variety of healthy
foods i

e¢Have balanced meals :

¢Watch your portion sizes - }
practice moderation

eMake physical activity and
exercise a part of your lifestyle }

eExercise for 45 minutes tol }
hour at least four times per }
week i

eHat more whole grain }
foods, fruits and vegetables

eDrink at least eight 8 oz
cups of water daily

eUse cooking methods that :
require little or no fat - bak-
ing, boiling, grilling, roasting,
etc.

eUse products that have }
reduced calories, fat, sugar and
salt e.g. mayo :

°Get sufficient rest

eReduce your stress levels}

*Be patient, determined & }
discipline & enjoy your food }
because your health is in your }
hand! i

Remember, following these }
simple tips will not only lead }
toa healthier heart but a much
healthier you. ;

¢ Provided by Adelma Penn, Camelta Barnes, Shandera Smith and
Lathera Lotmore, Nutritionists from the Ministry Of Health/Department

of Public Health

MY WIFE and |

Strawberry

: do a lot of sharing

i berry season, that
: is. And strawberry
: season is now. The
: first one into the

: garden is the ear-
: ly bird that gets

: the fruits.

plants are obtain-
able from local

: and rarely try to nurseries and will
: outdo each other probably be.

: : bought bearing
; In-any seus fruit. Later on the
: way. Until straw- plants will propa-

gate themselves
with runners that
develop several
new plants. Half a
dozen plants this
year will be about
three or four-
dozen next year,
etc.

The plants usu-
ally have three
productive years
before they have to be replaced.

Strawberry plants like rich soil and
regular, but not heavy, watering. The
variety you buy will determine the size
of the fruit and the number of fruits pro-
duced per plant. Most strawberry flow-
ers are white but I have recently seen
some that are pink.

During winter the US market for
strawberries is served by Florida, mostly
from around Plant City in Central Flori-
da. The strawberry varieties used there
are short day cultivars like Florida
Belle,

Expressing yourself



At one time or another we have all
noticed our partners being distant, hav-
ing something on their mind but just not
saying anything. We may make excuses
that this is their normal behaviour and
perhaps the pattern of the relationship.
We may even wonder if it is something
we have done or not done. Alternative-
ly we may have something pressing, but
seeing our partner emotionally drained
and upset about their day may lead us to
think that there is never a right time to
talk. So we just do not talk about it and
we keep it to ourselves. Without a doubt
timing is very important, but being aware
of the tendency to avoid and withhold
the sharing of feelings can be detrimen-
tal to the individual and the couple bond.
Knowingly or unknowingly, silence can
be used as a weapon. Problems such as
suspicions, distrust and assumptions
creep in and are often unjustified. If left
unattended these small insidious prob-
lems can become huge milestones to
overcome. Is this learnt from our child-
hood or does it result from relationship
itself?

DIFFERNCES

There is no doubt that boys and girls
are brought up differently. Few would

disagree that society looks at boys who
show too much emotion as weak, and
‘girly’. Boys who show little emotion are
considered more 'masculine’. Of course
boys have feelings and emotions but
some are considered disadvantageous to
show. Showing enthusiasm, excitement,
anger, or being upset and gloomy is
acceptable. However, their showing love
and caring exposes vulnerability, partic-
ularly to the women in their lives. This
reveals a need and dependency on
women which in turn can be perceived as
a weakness. Generally girls are encour-
aged to express themselves and be gen-
tle and dependant. Feeling, hearing and
saying the words of love are essential
for the sense of well being for women. It
is often this disconnect between the gen-
ders that we see in relationship thera-
py. By showing couples why this has
come about and how, it can be easily
resolved if practised frequently. On the
whole, women continue being able to
put their thoughts together and express
their emotions throughout their lives.
That is not to say that our life experi-
ences and relationships don’t dent us
and at times we all have difficulty getting
the words out. Learning early on in life
how to open up and express ourselves
helps us then to form friendships and
then later on love relationships.

HISTATUSSIN

AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING DRUG STORES.



Florida 90, Tioga, Sweet Charlie and
Festival. Florida strawberries are avail-
able from Thanksgiving to May.

Most of the strawberry plants sold in
Bahamian nurseries are of the Ever-
bearing type. These tend to be day-
length neutral and respond to the ideal
time of year which is January to June in
The Bahamas. Everbearing strawberries
are, however, capable of giving you nice
surprises at any time of the year.

Strawberries attract critters — and
birds. The ‘straw’ in the name refers to
the European habit of covering the
plants with straw once they have been
set out in order to counteract an unex-
pected frost. Once the danger of frost
was over the straw was placed around
the plants in order to keep the fruits off
the ground. In The Bahamas as well as
Europe a fruit that touches the ground
will be predated.

Florida strawberries are grown using
black polyethylene sheeting. The plants
are put into the ground through slits and
the sheeting acts as a mulch.

Raising the fruit from the ground can
be done using plastic shreds (as found in
Easter baskets), paper towels, patches
of polyethylene, or a host of other mate-
rials. I use flat rocks from shale beaches.
A rubber snake (or reasonable facsimile
thereof) moved discreetly every day will
help with the bird problem.

TIMING

As relationship therapists we are often
asked how to bring up and talk about
negative topics when the anticipated
response is hostile body language, criti-
sism and a brick wall. Certainly the tim-
ing of such matters is paramount if you
are looking for a favorable outcome but
if this has become habitual then finding
ways to soften the relationship is essen-
tial. Appreciation is the best way to stave
off negative feelings. This may be some-
thing the person has done, or a part of
their personality you love. A few small
words of encouragement and apprecia-
tion can make all the difference. There is
no substitute or anything that has more
impact than the words 'I love you’. If
words of appreciation and love are intro-
duced on a daily basis then it will
undoubtedly help to reduce tension, criti-
sism and encourage more positive feed-
back. Hopefully then when it is time to
discuss difficult topics, there will be a
cushioning to the relationship and make
the ironing out of problems a little easi-
er.

SEX
A lot of people have difficulty talk-

Beyond snail, slug and bird predation
Ihave not had strawberry plants that
were attacked by diseases or mites,
though these problems exist. In a small
garden I would prefer to uproot the
plants and replace them in another area
rather than try to control the infestation.

If you have a strawberry jar you do
not have to worry about your fruits
touching the ground. Give the jar a
quarter turn every day so equal sun-
shine reaches every part of the contain-
er. Strawberry jars usually hold about
ten plants but there are strawberry
wheels that can hold 25 or more.

Strawberry plants like loose, friable
soil that has had compost added and is
slightly acid. They should be planted in
full sun and watered only moderately as
too much water damaged the roots.
Raised beds provide good drainage.
Strawberries should be fertilized lightly
twice a season but never when the
plants are holding fruit.

When to pick? Conventional wisdom
suggests picking the berries when they
are three-quarters red. Strawberries do
not ripen any further after being picked,
they only start to rot. A fully red straw-
berry is probably past its best.

Why bother to grow strawberries
when they are in stores all year round?
Taste. Real strawberry taste. Exquisite.
Worth fighting your wife over.

ing about sex with their partners. It
seems that sometimes it becomes
even more difficult if you have known
them for many years. You would
think it would be the opposite, but
the vulnerability and sense that there
is more to loose holds people back.
Couples often do not want to disturb
the sense of safety so things are left
unsaid. In relationship therapy cou-
ples often complain about their part-
ner's not expressing sexual pleasure
and passion. This often comes as a
complete surprise to the partner. If
you want to become more expressive
in your intimate life then pay atten-
tion to what you are feeling on the
inside and what you are showing on
the outside. Practise daily the ideas
talked about and see the dramatic
difference to and quality to the rela-
tionship.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical
Sex Therapist located at The Centre for
Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's
Close West. She can be contacted by call-
ing 356-7983 or by email at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com

Histatussin DM
COUGH SUPPRESSANT & RESPIRATORY DECONGESTANT


PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



OMAN
The balancing act between

and



I had a boss some time ago who
always reinforced the idea that “What
gets measured, gets done.” It is a very
simple statement but it means that if
you measure only processes, your peo-
ple will focus on the process to the
exclusion of all else. If this is how you
measure your team, they will master
the process and your leadership needs
may not be met. Additionally, mea-
suring only processes can lead to devel-
oping employees who feel:

eEntitled
eDisengaged
eUnderutilised
eUnder valued

You might say to yourself, “So what,
once I am getting the results I need
then there is no need to worry about
balance.” My assertion in response to
this claim is that yes, you may be
attaining your desired results, but with
strong leadership and an inspired team,
you can achieve quantum results.
Especially in challenging times.

If you are part of the “so what”
crowd you probably focus on building
processes and expect employees to
stick to the script at the risk of impact-



ing innovation and creativity or even
productivity. Creativity and innova-
tion are important cultural character-
istics because they show up when
employees are engaged. Engaged,
adaptable employees are not only able
to improve your results, they can inno-
vate solutions in any type of economic
climate and turbo-charge the perfor-
mance of your business.
Conventional wisdom used by man-
agers deciding on promotions is that
your best performers are the ones who
understand the process and produce
strong results. While they may be your
best employees, based on their techni-
cal skills, knowledge of the job or
results, sometimes these strong per-
formers are unable to motivate or
engage their respective teams.

Processes are usually established to
ensure standard levels of service are
offered to clients or standardised levels
of quality are applied throughout a
process. These reasons are certainly
important and should always be a part
of your focus but what about the peo-
ple considerations?

Process standards create safety, rou-
tine and opportunities for control.
Often process standards are treated as
rules or inflexible structures designed
to maintain uniformity. While stan-
dards are quite useful and necessary
for success, Tanmay Vorga once stat-
ed: “Processes have to be flexible since
each project is unique, each client is
unique and hence process require-
ments are unique too. Processes should
act as a tool and help people perform
better.”

His assertion supports the idea that
processes are tools and should be used
as part of a holistic solution. In higher
performing teams processes, not peo-
ple, are used as tools.

From a problem resolution perspec-
tive, managers can fall into the trap of
perceiving challenges primarily from
a process perspective and not see the
contributing people issues clearly

A lesson

in

green living

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunmedia.net

BLAZING the way in research and real world
application of various methods of green living,
South Eleuthera’s Island school is educating a
new generation of young people eager to examine
and discover ways of preserving nature’s won-
der, while celebrating the beauty of the Bahami-
an outdoors.

Nestled in the heart of Cape Eleuthera, the
Island School is a secondary level BI-semester
facility, which introduces a group of 48 high school
students to advanced academic training in fields
of Ecology, Environmental Art, Applied Science
and Research, and Bahamian culture and her-
itage.

With many of its students hailing from high
schools across the United States, one question
asked by many is how will this programme bene-
fit Bahamians, and what contribution is being
made to apply the same research locally.

Just ask 17-year-old Alannah Vellacott, past
recipient of the Bahamas Environmental Steward
Scholars (BESS) programme, and a 2008 gradu-
ate of the island school.

Alannah who is now interested in pursuing her
studies to the doctorate level, hopes to one day
lecture and write on the importance on marine
preservation in the Bahamas, mainly because of
her experience at the school.

Alannah said while growing up in Queen’s
Cove, Freeport, she always had a fascination with
the water. She recalls going out on dozens of
fishing trips with her neighbors where they caught
fish, dove for conch, and on a few occasions
caught sharks.

Although that was a fun experience, Alannah
said she never realised until recently how much of
a part of her future those trips meant.

“T didn’t know that it would ultimately affect
what I’m planning on doing later on in life, I was
just having fun.”

She said her path to finding the school was
completely by chance, but said that it was the
perfect place to foster her interest in marine biol-
ogy.
“Tnitially, I thought yeah it would be good, but
at the time I was looking at colleges, and I just
wanted to go off like everyone else, and was not
really concentrating or re-evaluating anything
that had to do with the Bahamas and how I could
possibly affect that.”

Learning that the school had a close relation-
ship with the University of Miami, she became
even more certain that she was making the right

‘Island School’ introduces students
to advanced training in Ecology,

Environmental Art, Applied Science
and Bahamian culture and heritage

choice in taking on the three month study at the
Island School.

Alannah said her experience at the school was
absolutely amazing, and being isolated from tech-
nology while learning the newest methods of
marine and environment research, has helped
her greatly in understanding the importance of
conservation, and the role she plays as a Bahami-
an in preserving the islands and waters of her
country.

17-year-old Bradley Watson, another BESS
recipient and graduate of the Island School, said
after his experience at the school he noticed a 180-
degree change in his confidence and ability to
socialise with others.

The school which exposed him for the first
time to non-invasive methods of shark and fish
research, helped illustrate how huge of an impact
humans have had on underwater species.

Taking a sabbatical from the College of The
Bahamas where he majored in Bio-Chemistry,
Bradley said he simply yearned for a new expe-
rience.

“Before then I had never been on a boat
before, no diving experience, and I’ve always
wanted to live on a family island, and I just want-
ed to have that experience.”

Bradley said even his parents, his father espe-
cially, had commented on his change in confi-
dence.

“T’m more independent, I use to ask a lot to do
things, I use to need advice on just about every-
thing, but now I’m not as dependent on my par-
ents and I feel like making the right choice is
now easy to identify.”

Bradley feels because of the practise at the
Island School where students are forced to think
about every decision they make, the ability of
thinking intelligently on his feet is now reflected
in his personal life.

He said also being a spokesperson for the
Island School, he is able to share on the fantastic
projects he has worked on, and how easy it can be
to introduce cleaner ways of living and co-habit-
ing with other creatures in the ecosystem.

Recently celebrating its tenth anniversary, the
Island School is continuing in its effort of research
in marine studied, intended to benefit not just
this country, but environments throughout the
globe.

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enough. Many managers learn how to
break down a systemic problem but
when people are involved, so are emo-
tions and emotions can impede the res-
olution process.

HOW DO | BRING MY
COMPANY INTO BALANCE?

In his book, Spiritual Capitalism,
Michael Hendren outlines his approach
to radical transformation of corporate
performance into quantum perfor-
mance. He states: “The outmoded
business practices of the past - top
heavy management, greed at the helm,
an employees-be-damned attitude, a
self interest focus in management - just
don't cut it anymore. I've had amazing
financial results with Spiritual Capi-
talism. I've also had a lot of fun in the
process while making a fortune for my
team.”

As a leader, you can achieve bal-
ance and quantum results through
some simple enhancements to your
behaviour. Michael Hendren suggests
that you should:

eCome from a place of empowerment
versus control.

| ee

Bradley Watson

AEE ere

On the catwalk

FROM page 12

eTalk to your people instead of at them
eLook out for your people instead of
for yourself

eShow how much you care about and
appreciate your people

Additionally, you can:

eDevelop your people through train-
ing, coaching and mentoring

eInspire creativity and open a safe
place for creativity

eDevelop an effective reward and
recognition program

eConduct an employee satisfaction sur-
vey to understand how well you are
maintaining the balance.

As a leader, while seeking to bal-
ance process and people, try to avoid
falling into the trap of achieving one to
the exclusion of the other. The process
of balancing is never-ending and over
time, the mastery comes from con-
scious attempts to recalibrate.

Adam Khan said: “You continually
find your balance, you don't achieve
balance. Even if you were able to find
your perfect balance and hold it, life
itself will throw you off balance con-
tinually. It is constant adjustment.”





and earn lucrative money in this industry.
“We want to change the image of modeling
in this country,” he said.

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help Gabriel in her profession.

“ Several persons took me aside and said
that she has what it takes, but she needs to
overcome her shyness, because as a Super-
model, a client wants their model to be
assertive and out there".

Mr Humes said that Gabriel’s success has
validated the efforts of Models 242 and proven
to the naysayers that there are opportunities
for young Bahamians to market themselves

This will also add tremendous publicity for
the Bahamas,” he added.

“When we got to Montenegro, a lot of peo-
ple did not know where we were from and
then as interest spread in Gabriel, everywhere
I went, people were talking about the
Bahamas. So hopefully, this will mean that
scouts come to the Bahamas, because they
know that they can find beautiful people here.”


THE TRIBUNE

2 man TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2009

SECTION B © HEALTH: Body and mind



































































@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

With onewstrut down the catwalk,
Supermodel of the Bahamas
Gabriel Moss propelled herself f
and the Bakiamas into the inter-
national spotlight, when she
dazzled persons attending the
Ford Supermodel of the World
contest in BUdva, Montenegro
last month,

The 5 foot nine and a half 17-year-old
beauty captured the crowd’s attention,
Standing sout.among the other 39 con-
testants from around the world to win
ihe “Best on Catwalk’ title.

“It Was amazing, when she came out
On the Catwalk, I just heard this gasp
from the crowd and this clapping and
when 1 looked up I realised it was her,”
said Mark Humes, the operations man-
ager Of Models 242 the agency which
awarded Gabriel the local Supermodel

title last October.
“In faet through-
out, the’competi- 4
tion, the officials ]
Were telling the oth- You WIN SOME
er girls, “This is how
cut are supposed to C nd YOU lose
Walk and they were
ommag to ner tor some, but that
lessons. d i
"She was incredible oesn tf mean
and it) Was so inspiring :
to see her develop from YO U Qg Ivewll) D .
the shy, quiet high
School graduate shewas |f ON ly means
(from St George’s High

School on Grand YOu must

. and really L d

Watch her develop as

she participated in the Iry Orel. )
COmpetition,” Mr MARK HUMES
Humes said.

“She had moments on the trip when I
could tell that she was in awe of what was
happening to her and she was absorbing it
all.”

Although Gabriel did not win the $500,000
contract with Ford, she did walk away with a
contract with New York model management
company VNY for an undisclosed amount.

Despite not wining the top award, Gabriel
said that the entire experience was wonderful
and exceeded her expectations and has not dis-
couraged her from modeling.

“Obviously when I didn’t win the contract with
Ford, I was disappointed , but it is very exciting to
have a company like VNY interested in me.”

“You win some and you lose some, but that

doesn’t mean you give up. It only means you must
try harder," she said.
Mr Humes added that the exposure will only

SEE page 10

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