Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Degrees: time

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SEE INSIGHT SECTION

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009



Mall accused Of rape
uring House invasion

Suspect
expected to be
charged today

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

POLICE arrested a man
accused of raping a woman after
he allegedly forced his way inside
her home in Prince Charles Dri-
ve.

The suspect is expected to be
formally arraigned on related
charges as early as today, police
said.

Head of the Central Detective
Unit (CDU) Supt Elsworth Moss
said around 2am Friday the lone
assailant was able to gain entry
through the front door of a home
in the eastern area.

He managed to sexually assault
the victim and rob her of person-
al effects. During the ordeal,
another female inside the home
escaped and alerted neighbours
who called the police.

"A lone assailant forced his
way into the home of a female
and robbed her of personal prop-
erties and also sexually molested
her," said Supt Moss.

He declined to provide more
details for fear of compromising
the case.

"Another female who was able
to get away, with the assistance of
neighbours, contacted the police
(who) were able to apprehend a
male who's presently in police
custody and expected to be
charged and appear before the
courts (Monday)."

SEE page eight

diy

THIS LITTLE girl surveys the scene amidst the huge crowd attending the Greek Festival at the

]

The Greek Orthodox Church grounds on West Street on Saturday

Investigation ordered into claim of

‘illegal activities’ at Detention Centre

CONCERN for an inmate in
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre has sparked a call
for Acting Commissioner of
Police Reginald Ferguson to
order an investigation into sev-

6 Che ERY:

ee Peete et



eral “illegal activities” that an
unknown caller to The Tribune
claims is rampant there.

Two weeks ago The Tribune
received a call from a “con-
cerned citizen” who requested
that The Tribune’s Chief
Reporter Rupert Missick visit
an inmate in the detention cen-
tre who claimed to have infor-
mation on some “serious
things” occurring at the facili-
ty.

Mr Missick was told that the
inmate had a 30-page document
that he wanted to turn over to
this newspaper. Mr Missick was
invited to scrutinize and vali-
date the accusations the inmate
would be making.

Mr Missick with Tribune Edi-
tor Paco Nunez, who speaks
Spanish, went to see the inmate
during visiting hours on Febru-
ary 10. During this visit, the pair
realised that in order to speak

SEE page eight

Quiznos



Call for ‘zero
tolerance’
MU TCAMU OIC
molestation

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

RELIGIOUS
leader Bishop
Simeon Hall is
calling for a
national "zero-
tolerance" policy
on child molesta- |
tion and sexual
assaults on
minors.

His comments Simeon Hall
came in the wake
of a story first published in The
Tribune which revealed allega-
tions of a sexual attack on a
young girl allegedly assaulted
on school grounds by a group of

SEE page eight

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Ross University
payroll is set
to exceed $4m

Estimated economic
impact on Grand Bahama
is $10m in first year

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr

Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

WITH its 2009 payroll expected to
exceed $4 million, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said that Ross University is
making good progress in fulfilling its com-
mitment to the government to create
employment opportunities for Bahamians

at all levels of its operation.

The prime minister made the state-

ment at the launch of the Freeport cam-
pus of Ross University in Grand Bahama.

Hubert Ingraham

He said that Ross estimates that its over-
all direct economic impact on the local economy - spending
on housing, food, transportation and other direct living
expenses - will be in excess of $10 million in the initial year

of operation.

It is estimated that rents from persons assocated with or
attending the university will pump some $2.6 million into the
Grand Bahamian economy this year.

Ross University has advised government that they typi-
cally construct on-campus student housing for about 30 per
cent of their enrolment. However, such student housing
construction is still several years out.

“So while typically 70 per cent of the student body is
required to find living accommodation off-campus, in the
immediate future that requirement will be 100 per cent,” the

prime minister pointed out.

SEE page nine



Glass manufacturing facility
‘will provide much needed jobs’

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham said the
opening of $20 million Fenes-
tration Glass Services is a “wel-
comed” investment in Freeport
and will provide much-needed
jobs on Grand Bahama.

“This is indeed good for
Grand Bahama,” Mr Ingraham
said on Friday evening at the
official opening of the new glass
manufacturing facility on
Queen’s Highway.

The prime minister noted
that the Grand Bahama econo-
my has suffered significant job
losses since 2004.

“As we know Grand Bahama
has sustained repeated blows
beginning with the difficult hur-
ricane season of 2004 and job
losses as a result of the closure
of Royal Oasis Resort proper-
ties, which are yet to be
replaced.

“And that disappointment



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

has been fuelled by additional
job losses in the economy and
also the fallout from the global
economic crisis, which contin-
ues to impact a number of sec-
tors in our economy,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said the tourism
sector in Freeport had been
severely impacted with low
hotel occupancy levels.

He noted that occupancy at
the Our Lucaya Resort
remained low and bookings
remained quite soft.

The prime minister com-
mended principals of Fenestra-
tion for expressing interest and
acquiring property in 2007 for
their venture in Freeport.

“The opening of this facility is
especially welcome as it pro-
vides much-need job growth for
the island. This is indeed good
for Grand Bahama on other
fronts as well.”

In addition to jobs, Mr Ingra-
ham said Fenestration intro-
duced new green energy effi-
cient products to the Bahamas.

SEE page nine





PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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BAHAMIANS got a taste of Greece at the weekend’s Greek Festival. The event was held at the Greek Orthodox

Church grounds on West Street.

Bahamas must ‘rethink
the way it does business’

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas must bring
“new vision” to tourism and
rethink the way it does busi-
ness, a top hotel official said
yesterday.

Chairman of the Bahamas
Hotel Corporation Michael
Scott said on the talk show
Jones and Company that he
doesn’t see the Bahamas mov-
ing from its reliance on “the
pillars of tourism” anytime
soon.

“We think that the world
revolves around the Bahamas.

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We are still a small part of the
globe. I think there is room
for our tourism product to
improve.

“We are not going to be
competitive in the industry
unless we really allow our-
selves to embrace thinking
internationally,” he said.

Mr Scott said another prob-
lem Bahamians face is their
attitude.

“T get really irritated some-
times when I go to some of
these government depart-
ments, whether it be the reg-
istry or at the passport office.
People need to understand

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that we live in the 21st centu-
ry not the 19th.

“There are complaints
about tardiness and delay and
persons not getting approvals
and explanations in a reason-
able period of time,” Mr Scott
said.

Mr Scott said he had come
into contact with a lot of peo-
ple who were deterred from
visiting the Bahamas because
of negative things they had
heard about our business sec-
tor.

“We somehow have this
penchant for looking success
in the face and trying to
destroy it.

“T have talked to a number
of boutique groups that would
love to come into the
Bahamas but they heard
about too much red tape, the
performance of Bahamians in
the workplace is terrible, the
cost of labour is too high, and
lack of discipline. Too many of
us in this country have
nowhere to go and take all
day to get there,” he said.

Mr Scott clatmed Bahami-
ans should adopt the attitude
that they are open for busi-
ness and are willing to make it
work.

“We sell something in this
country that no-one can make
- the most beautiful water in
the world, the sun and sand.
Therefore that is a commodi-
ty that will always be attrac-
tive. The Bahamas has its
place and as we are at the
doorsteps of the United States
we are a country that is best
poised for resort develop-
ment,” he added.

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 3

_ Family ‘outraged’ over outcome of murder trial

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK I t th i
Tribune Freeport Reporter Man ple ads guilty to manslaughter eer te He uiores 7
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net daughter and other women and

; . . . their daughters?
FREEPORT — Families for because the Attorney General’s which was introduced in the Grand Bahama for the trial. She “T believe that sentence is too

Justice said the family of Tiffany Office never notified the family | Bahamas justice system. said they were never told byany- — Jenient and I think he should
LaRoda was denied justice last that the accused was making a Shavonne Munnings, the one in the Attorney General pave gotten at least 35 years in
week when the man accused of guilty plea to manslaughter. deceased’s sister, was very dis- Office’s about the plea bargain. prison as a deterrent to other
her brutal murder was sentenced “This was unfair and unjust to appointed with the outcome of “T do not agree with this plea offenders,” she said.
to 15 years under the lesser the deceased’s family and the _ the trial. bargaining thing and I also Rev Bethel and the family are
charge of manslaughter. wider community,” said Rev “T sat through the trialand the believe that the 15-year sentence calling for an appeal in the case.
Rev Glenroy Bethel, founder Bethel. accused admitted and described was not sufficient because he “We are making a plea to the
of FEJ, said the victim’s family is “We believe this wasaslapin in detail what he did as part of | took a mother away from her Attorney General Michael Bar-
outraged over the outcome of the face for this family...tohave the plea bargain to the lesser four children. nett to appeal this case for the
the murder trial of Labion LaR- _—- the charge of murder reduced charge of manslaughter.” “It is not about my sister any — interest of justice,” he said.
oda, who allegedly stabbed his manslaughter when there was Tiffany LaRoda, a mother of
wife to death during a domestic Strong evidence to prove mur- four, sustained some 20 stab
dispute four years ago. der. . wounds to the body. |
“The family is outraged Rev Bethel said FFJ opposed Ms Munnings said several
the plea bargain legislation family members travelled to

SkyBahamas makes inaugural Abaco flight





Oa Ae UNAS

Former BIC
president
appointed to
CiG board

Warning over burning of
rubbish, debris outside

IN AN effort to stem the number of brush and forest fires, offi-
cials are warning that anyone found burning rubbish or debris out-

m@ By TANEKA m@ By LLOYD ALLEN He said along with infrastructural growth there side will be arrested and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.
THOMPSON Tribune Features Reporter had been an equal demand by residents for more air- Fire Services administrator Inspector Bradley Knowles admon-
Tribune Staff Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net lift services to bring better pricing and increased ished the public against burning items outside, a dangerous practice
tthompson@ reliability. that contributes to many of the country’s forest fires.

SKY BAHAMAS is the newest carrier to provide “Today Sky Bahamas has answered the call, and
daily flights to Abaco. by their presence here today, demonstrate their
The company’s SAAB 33-seater aircraft made faith and confidence in the economy, and the future
the inaugural flight with passengers and media growth and development in Abaco.
groups on board. “This additional airlift is good for the industry, and
At Marsh Harbour, they were welcomed by resi- ultimately good for the people of Abaco, who now
dents excited about the new service. have more choices and options.”
cote: Passengers received red carpet treatment, with Mr Cooper said he now looks forward to lower
munications conglomerate, treats and beverages in the air and an elaborate dis- _ airfares for regular commuters, as well as improved
Cobian International Group ? play of Abaconian hospitality on arrival. service and reduced delays. Captain Randy Butler,
(CIG). ea . ; Sky Bahamas executives were invited to an official CEO of Sky Bahamas, said the company hopes to
Mr Williams was appoint- : welcoming ceremony organised by island officials. service additional destinations in future.
ed as president and CEO of Senior island administrator Cephas Cooper said “We are very pleased to announce that we are
BTC in December, 2005, over the past several years there had been significant | exploring additional market developments to some
before being asked to resign growth in development within the islandcommuni- _ international destinations such as Providenciales in
from the company in April, ty. Turks and Caicos, Florida and Haiti.”

"As the hot period sets in, right now it's dry, so we're going to
soon be targeted with a lot of forest fires but what we've seen is per-
sons indiscriminately setting fires, burning rubbish in the yard or
people clearing down properties and they light refuse, rather than
carrying it to the city dump. All of these contribute to the spread of
forest fires and fires in the neighbourhood.

"It's a nuisance and we want the public to understand that this is
a breach of the law - the only (egal) avenue you have for lighting
fires in the neighbourhood is for cooking purposes. We've been
doing a lot of warning but the time has come where we're going to
have to prosecute people before the courts," he told The Tribune.

Under current "antiquated" laws the penalty for the offence is a
small fine, something Inspector Knowles feels should be reformed
with a harsher penalty.

Section 59 (2) of the Environmental Health Services Act (Chap-
ter 232) says: "No person shall burn waste at any place or in any
manner that is likely to create a health hazard or a nuisance; or (b)

tribunemedia.net

FORMER president and
CEO of BTC Leon
Williams has been appoint-
ed to the board of directors
of Orlando-based telecom-

2008. oo — -

eee

According to a press
release issued by Cobian,
Mr Williams -along with
two new additions Laurence
Sheehan and Dr Lawrence
Chimerine - was chosen for

7
Java G

burn any material that is likely to cause excessive smoke or produce
a noxious odour or to discharge any toxic substances which on
combustion are likely to affect the occupants of any premises,
except under conditions approved by the Director."

For more than 16 years the New Providence city dump has been
a constant problem, posing a danger not only to nearby homes, but

his strong industry back- to the health of those who live in the area.

ground and management
experience.

"The addition of Mr
Williams, Mr Sheehan and
Dr Chimerine to CIG's
board of directors ensures
the company will continue
to benefit from a diversity
of knowledge and opinions.

"These men are perfect
directors because of their
strong leadership skills,
extensive management
experience and proven
track records - especially in
creating results in their
respective industries,” said
CEO of CIG Joanne

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Employed at BTC for 40
years, Mr Williams spent 13
years as an executive and
two years as president and
CEO and represented the
company at many interna-
tional conferences.

In the wake of his uncere-
monious departure, Mr
Williams threatened to sue
the government entity
unless details of his sever-
ance package were revised.
He also took credit for a
number of achievements
BTC experienced with him
at the reins, including the
company’s profits and
increase in revenue.

Apart from his tenure at
BTC, Mr Williams was also
elected as chairman of the
board for the Caribbean
Association of National
Telecommunications
Organisations (CANTO) in
2005 after years of service
to the organisation. He is
now an honorary member
of the group. CIG is the
parent company for the
Cobian family of corpora-

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We’re Cleaning House!

BTC's advisory privatisa-
tion process but is still look-
ing for a buyer to privatise
the telecommunications
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Half truths are nothing but lies

“WHAT IS truth? said jesting Pilate, and
would not stay for an answer.”

This is the opening sentence of Sir Francis
Bacon’s essay “On Truth”.

Recently we had a discussion with a person
on how to evaluate a lie against a half truth. Was
a half truth really a lie, and as it is really true as
far as it goes, should it be considered as serious
as a full blown lie?

We maintain that any statement made know-
ing that despite what is said might be true, a
wrong impression is conveyed to the listener
because the whole truth is being withheld. It is
being deliberately withheld to give the desired
false impression. Although the speaker cannot
be faulted for telling a lie, the listener is blamed
for coming to the wrong conclusion because he
was not sensitive enough to what was not being
said.

In our opinion a person who plays with truth
in this way is more dangerous than the person
who is indeed honest enough to tell an outright
lie. It takes a certain underhand craftiness to try
to stay on the side of truth, while stealthily lead-
ing people into error.

Sir Etienne Dupuch, who considered for-
mer prime minister Sir Lynden Pindling, a mas-
ter of the half-truth, read Sir Lynden’s intent in
his unspoken words. When Sir Lynden made a
pronouncement, Sir Etienne did not take seri-
ously what he said, but rather what he did not
say. Bahamians understood one thing, Sir Eti-
enne saw another outcome down the long road
of time. Sir Etienne was seldom wrong. He
could read Sir Lynden like a book, often much
to our chagrin. He predicted decisions that we
did not think possible in a democracy, but even-
tually they were made.

During the discussion on truth versus a lie,
we were asked if we thought a half truth could
have as serious consequences as a lie.

To answer this question, we recalled read-
ing some time ago David Fromkin’s book, “A
Peace to End all Peace”, in which the Germans
were led into signing a secret alliance with the
Turks based on a half truth told by three young
Turks of the Committee of Union and Progress
(CUP) at the beginning of World War I. No
one could understand why the alliance, which
the German high command did not want and
had instructed should not be signed unless the
Turks had “something unexpectedly significant
to contribute to the war,” had been signed. No
one knew what that contribution could possibly
be as the Turks did not want to be drawn into
the war and were even secretly flirting with the
prospect of joining the Allied cause.

Yet the secret agreement was hurriedly

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signed with Germany obligating itself, “by force
of arms if need be, to defend Ottoman territo-
ry in case it should be threatened.” The treaty
expired on December 31, 1918. No one could
figure out what the Turks had that was so
important to the German cause that would
make them undertake this alliance.

Some time later a student of the German
diplomatic archives disclosed that they showed
that on August 1, 1914, Pasha Enver (a founder
of CUP) and Mehmed Talat (Turkish Minis-
ter of the Interior) in a meeting with Ambas-
sador von Wangenheim, suddenly offered to
turn over to Germany one of the most powerful
warships in the world: The Sultan Osman. Von
Wangenheim accepted the offer; and British
Intelligence reports from behind German lines
two weeks later shows that officers of the Ger-
man fleet had eagerly expected to receive the
vitally important new warship — and appar-
ently were bitterly disappointed when Churchill
seized the vessel instead.”

History will show that the Turks duped the
Germans on a half truth. This warship was very
important to the Germans because it would tip
the balance of naval strength in favour of Ger-
many. It is true that the Turks owned the war-
ship — after all it had been paid for by contri-
butions from the Turkish people. However Sul-
tan Osman I anda smaller warship were built in
British shipyards for the Ottoman government.
They had not yet left the shipyards for Turkey.
The Turks strongly suspected on July 29, 1914
that Churchill had planned to commandeer
both warships. By the next day — July 31 — the
Turks knew that Churchill had taken them. The
Germans had no knowledge of this. The Turks
had represented that they owned the warships,
which they would sign over to the German High
Command — full truth. However, they with-
held the fact that they could not deliver the
battleships. This turned their full truth into a
devilish half truth to achieve their own ends
and get an alliance of German protection for
Turkey for the duration of the war.

On August 1, 1914 Germany signed the
alliance with Turkey. On August 3, Churchill
sent an official cable to the Ottoman govern-
ment informing it that their two battleships had
been seized by the British government.

The Germans thought that the Turks had
been duped.

In fact the archives show that the Turks with
full knowledge of all of the facts before signing
that treaty had told a half truth in their negoti-
ations and got away with it.

A lie or a half truth? They are both despica-
ble and can cause equal damage.



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At The Bahamas Renewable
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ticipation is absolutely critical and
of key importance to derive the
maximum amount of benefit for
the Bahamas. We believe that we
have come up with a business
plan that will allow the maximum
benefit to be derived by Bahami-
ans and as such Winso Company
Ltd has a 49 per cent stake in
BREC, making it truly Bahamian
driven.

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that the types of renewable ener-
gy projects contemplated by BEC
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lars, but rather hundreds of mil-
lions in order for them to come to
fruition.

Given the state of the financial
markets, lenders who were there
yesterday and waiting for
approvals, have disappeared over
night.

We can therefore no longer
afford wishful thinking, because
we (the Bahamian people) will
miss our window of opportunity.

The current economic climate
warrants the need for out-of-the-
box thinking, in particular as it
relates to financing these projects.

We believe that BREC has
found strong partners in Schnei-
der Power and Emera that can
ensure our projects economic and
financial viability.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



The Bahamas can learn from
other leading renewable energy
jurisdictions such as Canada and
Germany.

Our partnership with Schnei-
der Power and Emera allows for a
significant knowledge transfer to
BREC and therefore to the
Bahamas.

The results of this are that we
have already significantly reduced
our learning curve, and will also
guarantee that these projects can
get built.

By committing ourselves to
employing local trades and con-
tractors this knowledge will be
dispersed amongst our own econ-
omy, allowing companies and
entrepreneurs an entry into a sec-
tor that generally has very high
barriers of entry, but is slated for
significant growth in the future.

A $60 million infrastructure
project in the Bahamas will act
as a mini stimulus package for
the economy in the region.

We anticipate that expendi-
tures will give a much needed
economic boost to local busi-
nesses, in particular local suppli-
ers and trades people, but also
hotels, restaurants, stores and
many peripheral services. BREC

is a showcase here in the
Bahamas how business can be
done with maximum local con-
tent and participation.

From an environmental stand-
point, BREC, with the help of
Schneider Power, is now one of
the leading Companies in the
world that employs “conservation
engineering” meaning that our
facilities will meet and/or exceed
all requirements under the
Bahamian Environmental Pro-
tection laws.

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the impact on nature with the
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landscape, wildlife and commu-
nities.

And once BEC has come to a
decision, we will be inviting the
Bahamian public and communi-
ties to comment and provide
feedback.

It is our intent to make
BREC’s renewable energy pro-
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Nassau,

February 23, 2009.

Stop this abuse of Government vehicles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me space in your column to

express the following:

As I drive around Nassau, it is common to see
government vehicles riding around after normal
working hours and on weekends.

I realise that some government officers are
entitled to a government vehicle and gas (Deputy
Permanent Secretary and above). But there are
other officers who are not entitled to a govern-
ment car who are just wasting the tax payers’
money by abusing the system and it is unfair,
particularly in these hard economic times.

When I did not have a car, I caught the bus. I
couldn’t go to my boss and ask for the use of the
office car to get to and from work because that is

this slackness but I guess he’s not aware of how

many officers are now being allowed to “put their

hands in the cookie jar” by getting away with

this madness. They can even be seen pulling up to
Ministry of Works to get free gas. They carry the

government car home illegally but would not

not the responsibility of the government. I now

have a car and when it is malfunctioning, I simply
jump on the bus or hike a ride with my neighbour.

During Prime Minister Ingraham’s first stint
in office, he did an excellent job in correcting

Watching
Nassau,

CE STUBBS

even pay for the gas. In addition to that, when
something goes wrong with the car, the govern-
ment fixes it. Something is definitely wrong with
this. It should not matter whether or not you are
friendly with the boss — this is wrong!

This vexing problem needs to be addressed,
as I notice that even persons who fall under the
Prime Minister’s ministry (which I’m sure he’s
not aware of) are taking the government car
home — persons who are not entitled to do so.

February, 2009.

Mr Minister, there appears to be a serious problem

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Recently we experienced a
home invasion but to our
knowledge no one has been
apprehended. A week later a
drunk driver knocked down a
large section of my wall. I was
advised by the officer on the
call that there is no law against



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drinking and driving or in fact
being intoxicated while driving.
Hence he was not charged with
any offence! A week later my
wife was charged with going
seven miles an hour over the
speed limit. The fine was $250.
Apart from the amount of the
fine in relation to the alleged
offence arguably a fast idling
vehicle can exceed seven miles
an hour. Today on the way to
pay the fine no less than four
vehicles turned in front of me
without signaling, two went

through a red light and a police
officer on a motor cycle went
straight through an intersection
with his turn signal on. Is there
anything wrong with this pic-
ture? Mr Minister there appears
to be a serious problem, is any-
thing being done to correct it
or is the silence that we hear an
admission that you are out of
your depth?

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Political activist plans ‘The Real Men March’

m By TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

POLITICAL activist Omar
Archer is planning a massive march
to rally Bahamian men together in
the face of rampant violence, poor
education, unemployment and other
social ills gripping the nation.

He hopes the peaceful demon-
stration dubbed "The Real Men
March" - scheduled for March 31 -
will send a clear message that not
every Bahamian man must fall victim
to urban temptations. He is antici-
pating some 5,000 to 10,000 partici-
pants.

Mr Archer released a statement
on the demonstration which said, in
part: "There are times in our lives
when we must stand up and defend
what is righteous and just. Our deci-
sions may not be popular among



peers, many of whom will turn their
backs on you when the pressure is
on.

"(But) Iam convinced that there
are still many of us who share the
dream of a better Bahamas. A
Bahamas of peace, where neighbours
once left their doors and windows
open for days without fear. A
Bahamas of love, where our sons
and daughters enjoyed their child-
hood - free from the watchful eyes of
paedophiles.

"We are now a Bahamas of petty
thieves and heavily secured homes
and churches encased with rein-
forced security bars. We are now a
Bahamas with abused and sexually
molested children, whose cries for
help for many years have fallen upon
deaf ears. We are now a Bahamas of
politically divided individuals, whose

MP: financial sector not doing enough
for Bahamians in these tough times






@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

FOX HILL MP Fred Mitchell said yesterday that not enough is
being done in the financial sector to assist Bahamian men and
their families in these hard economic times.

“T do not think that the banks are being creative enough as peo-
ple stand to lose their homes and businesses. There is a need for
public policy to intervene to ensure that homes are saved and
commercial lending is restored. The mortgage and credit crunch is
adversely affecting men and thereby families in our community,” Mr











Mitchell said.

Mr Mitchell spoke to a number of men at various Baptist church-
es in that community in celebration of Men’s Day urging them to
continue to do all they can in these trying times to maintain the fam-






ily structure.

“Today, we are celebrating male leadership in our community.
Today, we are also undergoing the greatest period of economic
stress in the recent history of our country. I want therefore to
speak up for the men in our country today.

“They build the buildings, fix the machines, build the roads and
parks, run the Junkanoo groups, maintain their families and assist
their wives. For all of those things and more, we salute them








today,” Mr Mitchell said.

Mr Mitchell said as MP for the Fox Hill area, he knew the eco-
nomic stress burdening the men of Bahamian society.

“T know that it has hit men hard, with construction down and the
hotel sector in retreat. Knowing how important the contribution of
aman’s income is to the family, it is imperative that we seek some
policies to assist in these hard times. Not enough is being done,” he






said.

Mr Mitchell encouraged all men to help to support their children
and said men had not been carrying the burden of hard times
alone as the women also helped to see the men through.

“They have help from the women of the country. And in mark-
ing the contribution of men to The Bahamas, no-one should min-
imise or negate the women of the country. We also remember

how far they have come.

“T hope to call an education summit for Fox Hill, to solicit the sup-
port of the entire community to get more resources for education
in this area, in particular at the Sandilands Primary School, L W
Young and Dame Doris Johnson. The situation particularly as it
affects young men and boys is critical and needs to be addressed,”

Mr Mitchell said.

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patriotism is now judged by two
colours - red or yellow."

The march is also intended to
challenge Bahamian men to restore
themselves to their “rightful place"
as the head of society.

"We are indeed tired of hearing
individuals, especially young men in
the over-the-hill communities, being
given seven-year criminal records as
a result of being caught at one point
in their lives with a marijuana joint.

"We must now agitate to address
the problem of statelessness and eth-
nic profiling. We are now agitating to
address the problems of unemploy-
ment, crime and inadequate educa-
tional facilities in the over-the-hill
communities.

"We are now agitating to stop
the imposing of homosexuality and
lesbianism on our children and less

Traffic accident
on Grand Bahama

A DRIVER on Grand Bahama
lost control of his vehicle and
crashed into a home off East Sun-
rise Highway.

According to a statement
released by Grand Bahamas press
liaison officer Clarence Reckley,
around 3am on February 20, 22-
year-old Ashley Moxey was speed-
ing along East Sunrise Highway
near the Kentucky Fried Chicken
restaurant when he lost control of
his silver 1995 Jeep Cherokee, reg-
istration 33680.

Moments before the accident,
the vehicle hurtled across the medi-
an into the westbound lane before
crashing into a single-storey house
owned by Rowland Stuart.

The vehicle was demolished and
left a "large hole” in the wall on
the northern side of Mr Stuart's
home.

While no-one in the home was
hurt during the crash, Mr Moxey,
of Orange Street, Pioneers Loop,
was taken to Rand Memorial Hos-
pital for treatment of his various
injuries.

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fortunate adults in this country.
These and many other reasons are
why Bahamian men, young and old
alike, will indeed gather in peace
with God as our refuge and indeed
block the streets in absolute protest,”
he said.

Mr Archer claimed the country
had failed to show the world that it
can govern itself free of corruption
and "shameful" internationally tele-
vised scandals.

He was referring to the recent
debacle surrounding the alleged
extortion attempt of celebrity John
Travolta after his son's death at his
second home in Grand Bahama.

The march has several planned
routes which will converge in Raw-
son Square, Bay Street. The group
will present government with a list of
recommendations for the social
development of Bahamian men after

the march. Omar Archer



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PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Online database aims to
ease book buying rat race

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS ONE semester ends and a
new one begins, students are scram-
bling to find new or used books that
will probably “break” their pock-
ets.

This yearly problem sparked the
idea in one College of the Bahamas
student to set up an online database
to ease the rat race for buying books.

Business analyst and computer
programmer Garnel Leo used his
computer systems degree from COB
to design a website called the
Bahamascollegezone.com back in
December, 2005.

Mr Leo said the site has over
1,850 members and over 1,000 books
for sale. For the past year the site has
had over 5,981 visitors and in the
last month over 66,480 page views.

“T know some students from the
time I was attending the college had
a hard time finding the books they

The PTA of Sum mit Academy Sa ys needed. I knew books were expen-

sive and I myself wanted to find
“THAN K YO yy" cheaper books. I never did a site

that would benefit others so it was
something that I wanted to give a

to all who supported its try,” he sai.

Mr Leo said there are many ben-

2009 STEAK OUT, MINI FAIR AND RAFFLE. oe
“Many times the bookstore does

It Was d wonderful day! not have the book students need so

students can find books from other

: students who may have it and want
Event Sponsors:- to get rid of it at a cheaper rate.
There is also a scholarship section
AID where high school and college stu-
dents can find scholarship listings

Checkers Cafe tE> that they may not have known

about. They can also come on and

= te discuss anything regarding college

JS. Johnson ae: life in the forums, get assistance
f | oar regarding schedules and man

- Sharon Wilson & Co. = A y

i Mr Leo said the forums have

Executive Printers 4 : been instrumental in most of the
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involving the college and what I did
was submit a list of those issues and
recomendations to the different
heads at COB and told them the list
was from different college students,”

Lisa Roberts, Bahamasair, Bahamas Fast Ferries, Sunshine Insurance (Agents & Brokers) Linuted, Ma-

jestic Tours, Atlantis, Maddison Deveaux & family, Elegant Steps Boutique, Mary El-Fitun, La Castta, ee Seen seeeteveiiinl
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Mr & Mrs. Michael Wilson, Avon by Avonel, Mr & Mrs. Sean McWeeney, John Bull, Beauty Haven | a hub for students. :

Salon, Hayley & Zara Wilson, Timeless Tattoo, Denny Bumside, Sunburst Paint, BeJewled by Dagny, eae i rh Ee

Le Petit Gourmet, Tinkerbell, Bahamas Inflight Lid, Geafirey Jones & Co., Mulu-Discount Furmture & come and look for books. I also
a 1 Wy Py oe . . Veen wanted to add a job section where
Appliances, Designer Haus, kim Riedel, Chapter One Bookstore, The Potting Shed, Virgo Car Rental, | students can come to look for jobs
Alpha Phi Alpha Fratemity Inc, Deborah McKellar and, of course, our amazing Summit Academy aera it’s ae aera

ay ; a, a or those who recently graduated,”
principal, teachers, administrators, students and families! Mel &o «aid, ve

He advised youngsters wanting
to develop Bahamian websites to
stick to a need and not duplicate
what is already out there.

“They should develop something

SEE YOU THERE NEXT YEAR! where they meet a need and where

there is a low supply of it. Don’t try
to duplicate Facebook because it is
sure to fail,” Mr Leo said.

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Love in Two Acts opens
Track Road Theatre season

TRACK Road Theatre has __ ity of a situation play out right
announced the opening of its in front of you.”
2009 theatrical season with Love in Two Acts stars local
Love in Two Acts, bringing actors Selina Archer, Leslie
the return of intimate theatre — Ellis-Tynes, Dion Johnson and
to The Hub on Bay Street and = Juanita Kelly.
Colebrook Lane. Director Matthew Kelly is
This pairing of one-act plays —_ both pleased with his cast and
directed by Matthew Kelly, excited about the response
chairman and long-time mem- from the upcoming produc-
ber of TRT, explores the tion.
tragedy and triumph of love. “T'm very happy and very
The production takes proud of the cast and their
advantage of the intimate set- performances. I'm not a hard
ting with staging in the round, or soft director, I'm demand-
and offers an intentionally dif- ing but I give a lot in return. I
ferent and immersive experi- learn from the experience as
ence with Anton Chekhov's much as the cast does. If
The Bear and Alfred Sutro's you're not learning, finding
The Open Door. new insights, changing the way
Chekhov's The Bear is a _youstage, direct, act, perceive
classic farce depicting the and perform, then it's about
unpredictability of romantic as interesting as the parlia-
love and the thin line between ment channel.
the passions of fury and lust. “Our audience expects to
Though written in 1888, the be engaged, entertained, chal-
rapid-fire exchanges and fiery lenged and ultimately satis-
arguments have been updat- _ fied, and it is our job to deliv-
ed to the post-colonial er, so that everyone walks
Bahamas. away Satisfied but still
The Open Door, a play by engaged, taking the experi-
Alfred Sutro, examines the — ence with them into their dai-
relief of confessed love, shock __ly lives.”
of reciprocated emotions, and Already well-known for
sadness that can accompany hosting the popular Express
unattainable desire. The com- Yourself events, The Hub sup-
plicated dynamics of friend- ports and encourages small
ship, loyalty, lust, and love are —_ performance and theatre as an
explored in Love in Two Acts. alternative venue for smaller,
In November last year The less costly and more experi-
Hub played host to a work- mental works.
shopped performance of Jonathan Murray, The
Oleana to please audience Hub’s exhibitions director,
members, among them Kelly _ said: “As a community orient-
himself. ed arts space, we at The Hub
He said: "I was enthralled are very excited to be hosting
by not just the play, but what TRT’s newest production.
was happening. In this inti- “Throughout our first year,
mate setting Iwas almost part ©The Hub has helped facilitate
of the play and I knew that many artistic events from var-
this intimacy was something I _ ious disciplines, including the-
wanted to explore as a direc- atre, and we would like to
tor.” encourage more use of our
Kelly said of his motivation space by theatrical produc-
to direct Love in Two Acts: “I tions. Unlike other conven-
want to show the layeredcom- _ tional spaces, The Hub offers
plexity of love. It's never so a unique, raw, intimate expe-
simple as we're told, even in rience. I believe it is this type
the blindness of passion. I'm — of experience that continues
also interested in experiment- to keep the community
ing more with the medium of | engaged and thus returning
theatre, and The Hub presents _ for other events.”
itself as a unique opportunity Love in Two Acts is TRT’s
to take advantage of the real first production from this
intimacy of live performance. year’s busy season. Also com-
Even when film gives you __ ing up this year is the new play
close up moments, it's noth- Light by Deon Simms, a
ing like the immediacy and planned return of the hilari-
presence of real people afew ous comedy Da Rally, TRT's
feet from you, voices filling yearly Spring Soiree and its
the room with passion and summer drama camp Drama-
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 7





Commonwealth Summit:

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

Ts INIDAD and
Tobago’s Prime Min-
ister, Patrick Manning, will
become the Chairman-in-
Office of the 53-nation Com-
monwealth in November this
year when his country hosts
the organization’s biennial
summit.

For two years thereafter, Mr
Manning should, theoretical-
ly be “Mr Commonwealth” —
the face of the leadership of
the group of countries whose
multi-ethnic, multi-cultural
member states are drawn from
every Continent of the world
and whose nearly two billion
people come from one of the
two largest nations in
the world and some of the tini-
est.

The Commonwealth is a
“voluntary” association of
States held together by their
shared history and common
values which are enshrined in
various declarations. The
“Crown of the United King-
dom” —- in this case Queen
Elizabeth II — is the symbolic
“Head of the Common-
wealth”.

It has no governance struc-
ture apart from the Summit
and its Secretariat headed by a
Secretary-General elected by
all Commonwealth Heads of
Government to serve a 4-year
term with a limit now of two-
terms only.

Nonetheless, the old cliché
about the Commonwealth is
perfectly true: if it did not
exist, nations would try to cre-
ate it because it does bring
together in a common forum,
speaking the same language,
53-leaders who represent
every known faith, race of
people and size of economy.

There could not be a better
microcosm of the world and,
therefore, no better forum for
seeking solutions to the
world’s problems.

As Chairman of the Com-
monwealth Summit in Novem-
ber in Trinidad, Mr Manning
has a real opportunity to shape
the direction of the Common-
wealth over the next two
years.

The Commonwealth coun-
tries of the Caribbean Com-
munity and Common Market
(CARICOM) also have a
chance, through Mr Manning’s
on-going Chairmanship, to
ensure that issues of impor-
tance to them are not only dis-
cussed at the Summit but are
advanced internationally right
through to the end of 2011.

One of the issues should be
the financing of the Common-
wealth Secretariat itself and
the raising of its profile.

For small countries, such as
those in the Caribbean and
Pacific, the Commonwealth is
vitally important as a tool of
their foreign policy.

As examples of this, it is in
the Commonwealth that both
Belize and Guyana first gar-
nered international support
against the territorial claims
by Guatemala and Venezuela
respectively, and it is the Com-
monwealth that has not only
been an ardent champion of
small states since 1977, but has
helped to fight specific issues
such as the assault on small
jurisdictions by the Organisa-
tion for Economic Coopera-
tion and Development
(OECD) over so-called “tax
competition”.

But, in recent time the old-
er and more powerful mem-
bers of the Commonwealth
have been paying lip service
to the organisation.

They have done enough to
keep it alive but stopped short
of contributing more to return
it to the vibrancy it enjoyed
when it fought racism in
Southern Africa and worked
to change the international
economic order.

Just recently, the British
Conservative Party opposition
spokesman on Commonwealth
affairs, William Hague,
accused the British govern-
ment of “turning its back” on
the Commonwealth.

He makes the point that the
Commonwealth is under-used
and that more money would
help.

Britain pays £54 per person
per year to the EU, £10 to the
North Atlantic Treaty Organ-
isation, £2 to the United

ie
US)

Ute ta
PHONE: 322-2157



7 =
‘
a
'
- — — ——" =

WORLD VIEW.

Nations and only 20p to the
Commonwealth.

The same parsimonious
approach to the Common-
wealth is reflected in the lack
of real zeal by Canada, Aus-
tralia and New Zealand all of
whom are participants in oth-
er powerful decision-making
bodies such as the OECD, the
G7, the G20 and the boards
of the IMF and World Bank.

Smaller states - the
Caribbean among them — have
also not helped to improve the
financial status of the Com-
monwealth.

Many of them have been
tardy in making their annual
contributions and some of
them are in arrears. When
they don’t demonstrate their
appreciation of the immense
value that the organisation is
to them, they play in to the
hands of those larger countries
that would like to keep it as a
tame pet rather than a vigilant
bulldog.

| he new Common-
wealth will be 60

years old in April. The occa-
sion of the Summit in Trinidad
in November is therefore an
historic event that should not
be allowed to pass without the
Caribbean and other small
countries seeking to take
advantage of Mr Manning’s
chairmanship for the next two
years.

CARICOM countries and
the CARICOM Secretariat
should have, by now, estab-
lished a permanent team to
help Mr Manning as Chairman
to carve out an agenda for the
Summit and to work with him
over the next two years to
make his Chairmanship-in-
Office a success.

While it is true that Mr
Manning would have the
resources of the Common-
wealth Secretariat and the
very astute and experienced
Secretary-General Kamalesh
Sharma upon whom to call,
the reality is that they will be
4,000 miles away and a busy
Head of Government should
be able to summon his team
on request. What is more, Mr
Sharma himself will call upon
Mr Manning as Chairman-in-
Office for guidance from time
to time.

The four other Heads of
Government, who have been
Chairmen-in-Office, have not
made much of the opportunity
unlike the Heads of Govern-
ment who serve 6-month
terms as President of the
European Union (EU).

But, the brevity of the Pres-
idency of the EU might be the
contributing factor to its suc-
cess.

Two years is simply too long
to expect a Head of Govern-
ment to split his or her atten-
tion between pressing nation-
al affairs and the Common-
wealth’s business unless they
are backed-up by a full time
and dedicated team.

Reform of the global finan-
cial architecture, changes in
IMF and World Bank criteria
to match loans and grants to
real needs, fundamental
change in their conditionali-
ties, the expansion of the G20
to include a permanent repre-
sentative voice of small states,
the consequences of climate



nt

change including sea-level rise
and a well-funded programme
to help developing nations
mitigate the effects of global
warming while preserving
their environment should all
form part of the agenda for
the Summit with well-

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researched and well-argued
papers from the Caribbean.
Manning has identified the
Commonwealth Caribbean
with the hosting of the Sum-
mit. The Caribbean, in turn,
should provide him with a
strong team, drawn from the
region, to help make his two-
year period as the Common-
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

In other crime news, two resi-
dents of Yamacraw were target-
ed by armed robbers while out-
side their homes. Police said the
victims were business people who
were more than likely the targets
of assailants who watched their
daily routines and followed them
home under the cover of dark-
ness.

Supt Moss said around
10.19pm on Friday, a female res-
ident of Twynam Heights was
returning home with her son
when they were approached by
two gunmen who robbed them





Man accused

of an undetermined amount of
cash and personal property.

The suspects were able to
escape and are still at large, Supt
Moss said.

Around 1.24am on Friday a
man was approached by two
males - both armed with guns -
while outside his home in Cool
Acres Sub-divison.

The men robbed him of an
undetermined amount of cash
before entering his home and
stealing his licensed 12-gauge
shotgun.

"Upon leaving the home, they

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KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

PT ary ae)

Mrs. Noelle Kelly Roberts, 38







































of Nassau, The
Bahamas will be held
at Trinity Methodist
Church, Frederick
Street and Trinity
Place, Nassau on
Tuesday, 24th
February, 2009 at 4:00

Bill Higgs,

President of The Bahamas Conference of The
Methodist Church and Brother Gregory Roberts
will officiate and interment will follow in The
Eastern Cemetery, Shirley Street, Nassau.









She is predeceased by her father, Noel Sawyer
Roberts; and is survived by her husband, R.
Montague Roberts; her sons, Blake Montague
and Oliver John; her mother, Susan K.Roberts;
her sisters, Clare L. Sands, Lucy K. Ward and
Shevaun F. Davies; her uncle, Richard C.
Roberts; her mother-in-law, Elizabeth Roberts;
her sister-in-law, Celeste Sweeting; her brothers-
in-law, James Sands, Mitchell Davies and Roy
Sweeting; ; nieces and nephews, Kelly, Gary,
Marcus, Liam, Ashton, Mallory, Piers, James,
Annabelle, Lily and Chloe ; and many dear
cousins and wonderful friends.







IN CELEBRATION OF NOELLE'S LOVE
OF LIFE, PLEASE DRESS IN BRIGHT

COLOURS.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the
Cancer Society of The Bahamas, P.O.Box S.S.
6539, in Memory of Mrs. Noel Kelly Roberts.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, The
Bahamas.

shot him in the left leg," said Supt
Moss. The victim is said to bein }

stable condition in hospital.
The gunmen fled the scene.

Police investigations continue }

into both incidents.

Supt Moss advised residents i
to ensure their properties were }
well-lit when returning home at }
night and to take extra care in }
alerting others when coming ;

home in the dark.

"It's almost a helpless situa- }
tion when people are already in
your house but you have to make }
sure that while you are in your }
home, it is properly secured, all }
the doors and windows are :
locked. Make sure sufficient
lighting is on the outside of the

house, that's important.

"If you have someone else at :
the home, alert them that you
are coming home and, on your
arrival, make some noise, toot }
the horn so they can be on the ;

lookout," he said.

Over the weekend police also :
arrested two men for possession }

of an illegal firearm.
Supt Moss

cious" manner.

"They were able to pull the :
car over. On searching the vehi- }
cle they removed a 9mm pistol }
along with ten rounds of ammu- }

nition," he said.

Both men are in custody and }
are expected in court on related

charges today.

Supt Moss said at this stage

there was "no connection"

between those arrests and the :
two armed robberies in eastern }

New Providence.

said around }
11.40pm Saturday, officers on }
patrol in the Goodman's Bay }
area stopped two men in avehi- }
cle who were acting in a "suspi- }

FROM page one

male secondary school students.

On January 23 the young girl
was reportedly lured behind the
public school sometime after three
o'clock by as many as four boys
from a separate government sec-
ondary school.

Although the matter is being
investigated by the CDU, the inci-
dent was not made public, prompt-
ing calls for more school trans-
parency from a citizen who heard
of the attack through students at
the school.

Stressing that he was not famil-
iar with particulars of the case,
Bishop Hall said we are living in a
culture where too many times cas-
es of sexual abuse against minors
go unreported.

"When we molest a child we
are disturbing not only the child's
innocence, but our future. So the
best I can think of is a national
policy of zero-tolerance towards
sexual predators.

“T just have a problem with
adults who are so off-balance and
deranged that they feel comfort-
able molesting children and at the
same time, people who tolerate it.

"The mother who allows it
because the boyfriend gives her
money - the grandmother, or the
neighbours - somebody knows
these things. And so I would like
to support the minister (of educa-
tion) in calling for the police to
do their job - and then we go for-
ward.”

When asked if he felt the matter
should have been brought to light
by officials sooner, Bishop Hall
said whenever allegations of sexual
impropriety against children are
made there must not be any sem-
blance of sweeping the claims
under the rug.

Call for ‘zero tolerance’

"I don't know the case, to be }
honest, but wherever children are
involved I think it is always best }
for independent studies or assess-
ment to be made. We donot want }
to even seem to appear to be har- }
bouring predators in our midst }

where children are involved.

“T do not know the case with }
this school, but we have to be }
overprotective where children are
concerned. We all should have
zero-tolerance - I think if las a
grandfather, as an uncle, asa }
neighbour, if I knew that a child }
was being molested - I think I }
should address it. I think we don't }
need to be standoffish where chil-

dren are concerned.

"We need a national policy of
zero-tolerance where children are
concerned in terms of molestation

of any kind."

According to statistics, there i
were 545 reported cases of child }
abuse in 2007 and 581 cases of }
child abuse - including 145 cases of
physical abuse - documented in }
the Bahamas for January to }

August, 2008.

When contacted about the alle- }
gations last week, Minister of Edu-
cation Carl Bethel said the matter
was turned over to police by edu- }
cation officials the same day the
alleged attack happened. He also }
said an internal review to deter- }
mine if any school official was in }
dereliction of their dutiesin terms ;

of school patrols was underway.

If any official is found to have }
been derelict in their duties during }
the alleged attack, appropriate :
action would be taken, he said. i
He did not specify what this action

would entail.
Police investigations continue.

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Investigation
ordered into
claim of ‘illegal
activities’ at
Detention Centre
FROM page one

with the inmate they would
have to shout across two fences
which were approximately 10
feet apart. They wondered
whether the inmate would be
willing to reveal sensitive infor-
mation in such a public setting.

They left the facility hoping
that the source close to the
inmate would contact The Tri-
bune again, which he did the
following day.

The source told Mr Missick
that the inmate was fully aware
of how public the visitor area
was and was still willing to dis-
close his allegations because “he
wouldn’t be doing anything
wrong. He is just passing some-
thing in his own words over to
you.”

Mr Missick returned to the
centre on the next visiting day,
February 13th, with another Tri-
bune reporter.

Once inside the facility, they
were told that in order to speak
with the inmate they — like oth-
ers who come to visit detainees
— would have to stand at the
double fence and shout his
name.

When they did this, they
caught the attention of an immi-
gration officer.

The officer came over to the
outer fence alongside the pair
and said, “If you two are coming
to see him, I need to see what
y'all are into. That man is a
trouble maker. He’s a pimp, he
talks too much. He got a lot of
good officers in trouble.”

“He’s been here too long.
Another day would be too long.
I don’t know why the govern-
ment don’t get rid of him,” the
immigration officer said of the
inmate who has been housed at
the detention centre for 18
months.

After the reporters got the
inmate’s attention, the inmate
went from the yard into the
housing unit and emerged car-
rying an armful of papers. The
reporters then joined the line
with other visitors at the search
point waiting to interact with
inmates.

However, the immigration
officer who expressed interest
in why the pair were visiting the
inmate, shouted at the man and
asked where he was going “with
all that garbage.”

The detainee replied that the
papers weren’t “garbage,” but
instead documents related to
his case.

“These men are not lawyers,”
the officer replied, “you not giv-
ing them anything.”

The inmate turned and shout-
ed to the reporters before
returning to the housing facility,
“They won't let me see you. Get
a lawyer to come see me.”

The reporters left the com-
pound and heard nothing about
the inmate until the following
Thursday.

It was then that The Tribune
received another call from the
source who said the detainee
had been taken to the
Carmichael Road police station
“for protection.”

When asked whether the
inmate was being protected
from officers at the detention
centre or other inmates the
caller replied, “I don’t know
what the situation is. I only
know he was taken there for his
protection,” he said.

The Tribune has since dis-
covered that after being in “pro-
tective custody for 48 hours”
the inmate has been returned
to the detention centre.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 9



Ross University payroll is set to exceed $4m

FROM page one

The prime minister said that
Bahamians engaged in, or inter-
ested in entering, the rental
home market have an excellent
opportunity to assist in provid-
ing this housing.

“T emphasise that now would
be the time to begin to explore
options with the university and
with local construction and
development companies so as
to maximise the benefit to the
Grand Bahamian economy.
And, of course, Grand
Bahama’s tourism sector can
also expect to benefit from trav-
el to and from Freeport by staff,
students and their families,” he
said.

Mr Ingraham said that gov-
ernment has spent seven months
fine-tuning terms and condi-
tions under which Ross Univer-
sity will operate in The
Bahamas.

“Tt has not always been easy
but, as they say, some things are
worth fighting for,” the prime
minister said.

Mr Ingraham said the deci-
sion by Ross University to
locate a clinical education site
in Grand Bahama bodes well
for this island and for The
Bahamas.

“The establishment of this
educational institution repre-
sents another important step
forward in the diversification of
the Bahamian economy which
has been on-going for many
years. Indeed, the creation of
Freeport a half century ago was
centred on the idea of econom-
ic diversification,” he said.

The operation of Ross Uni-

versity will open many oppor-
tunities for Bahamians, whether
facilitating access to medical
training, providing new employ-
ment opportunities in faculty,
staff and support roles, or in
spin-off business opportunities
flowing from the need to
provide supplies and services
to the school, its staff and stu-
dents.

So far, the university has 21
faculty and deans, including
Bahamian Rhodes Scholar Dr
Desiree Cox. Over 20 adminis-
trative staff positions have been
filled by Bahamians.

Ross is also honouring its
commitment to provide schol-
arships to Bahamian students.

The prime minister called on
all residents of Grand Bahama
to reciprocate the confidence
Ross University has demon-
strated in the Bahamas by
putting their best foot forward in
hosting this international acad-
emic institution.

“Those of you who are
employed by the university must
be diligent in your work and
maintain the highest level of
professionalism not only during
these difficult economic times
but at all times. Those who ben-
efit by providing goods and ser-
vices must let excellence be your
standard — at all times. And I
urge the entire Grand Bahama
community to be especially wel-
coming and hospitable as our
Bahamian culture and tradition
demands — at all times,” the
prime minister said.

The medical programme
begins as a clinical education

site of the Ross University’s
medical programme in Domini-
ca. It is meant to accommodate
the increased enrolment at the
medical school that can no
longer be accommodated at the
original campus.

Already some 200 students
have been registered to begin
study at Freeport this year; that
number is expected to climb
substantially over the next three
years.

Students enrolled at the
Freeport site are in the third and
fourth semesters of a 10-semes-
ter programme.

Each will have previously
completed a full four-year
undergraduate degree and the
first two semesters of their med-
ical programme in Dominica.

These students are expected
to spend the next eight months
of their programme in Freeport
where emphasis is to be placed
on preparing them for entering
the clinical component of their
training in the United States.

Ross reports that it has cre-
ated a state-of-the-art clinical-
ly-oriented education centre that
makes extensive use of sophisti-
cated learning technology,
including a human simulation
learning suite.

The university is working with
the Rand Hospital and Public
Hospitals Authority (PHA) to
ensure that the students have
valuable educational experi-
ences at the Rand.

Also, Ross has undertaken to
make available to the PHA and
the Rand some of its medical
education resources.

Glass manufacturing facility
‘will provide much needed jobs’

cooling requirements hence electricity usage and
demand for increased oil imports, especially dur-
ing hot summer months.

FROM page one

He noted that Fenestration had more than 60
years of experience in this industry, having oper-
ated in the United States and China.

“T want you to be assured that the government
will continue to do all it can to promote and sup-

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“Tam indeed happy to be here to mark the
official launch of Fenestration Glass Services
here in Freeport, Grand Bahama.

“They have satisfied the requirement of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority and the
government to operate here, and those
requirements include the best environmental
standards and evidence of funding,” Mr Ingraham
said.

Mr Ingraham said the products manufactured
by Fenestration will be employed in the con-
struction sector here on the island and will reduce

port increased investment here on this island in
diversifying industries.

“Tam grateful for your investment in Grand
Bahama. We look forward to a wonderful rela-
tionship over the years,” said Mr Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham was accompanied to Freeport by
his wife, who performed the official ribbon cutting
at the glass facility.

The prime minister and his wife also attended
the official opening of Ross University on Friday.
He told those attending the opening that the
medical facility is expected to pump some $3 mil-
lion annually into the Freeport economy.

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THE TRIBUNE

S
MO

PORT
NBRIE

BSC names
basketball
classic in
honour of
Joyce Minus

THE Baptist Sports Council
showed its appreciation to its
assistant director by naming the
2009 basketball classic in hon-
our of Joyce Minus for her
unselfish and dedication to the
sporting body over the past
decade.

On Saturday as the league got
started, her teams from Golden
Gates celebrated with back-to-
back victories at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex.

In the 19-and-under division,
Golden Gates pulled off a
heartbreaking 29-28 victory
over Mercy Seat as they missed
making their debut in the league
a triumphant one. And Golden
Gates men knocked off Calvary
Bible 43-29.

Two upsets were recorded on
the first day in the 19-and-under
division as defending champions
First Baptist lost 30-26 to the
Latter-Day Ministries and Mira-
cle Working Church of God
made their debut by stunning
last year's runners-up Macedo-
nia Baptist 37-17.

Frustration

Also on Saturday, First Bap-
tist took their frustration out by
clobbering BIBA men 68-23;
Temple Fellowship men held off
Latter-Day Ministries 49-41 and
Bahamas Harvest got by
Church of the Nazarene 33-24.
First Baptist 15-and-under open
defense of their title with a 24-
20 win over

Latter-Day Ministries and
Temple Fellowship won 25-15
over MiracleWorking Church of
God.

¢ Here's a summary of the
games played:

Golden Gates 29, Mercy Seat
28: Stephen Culmer scored six,
including the winning basketball
in their 19-and-under nail
baiter. Rocco Fernander and
Bradley Cash both led the
attack with eight. Fred Grant
had a game high 12 and Nardo
Higgs 11 in the loss.

Golden Gates 43, Calvary
Bible 29: Akeem Armbrister's
game high 18 and Bradley
Cash's eight was enough to pace
the men to victory. Garvin Tay-
lor had 11 and Christian St. Vil
10 in the loss.

First Baptist 24, Latter-Day
20: Leon Saunders scored 12
points and Leonardo Collie had
nine for the 15-and-under
defending champions.

Marvin Rolle had a game
high 14 in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 25, Mira-
cle Working Church of God 15:
DeShawn White had a game
high 11 and Jonathan Gordon
added six in Temple Fellow-
ship's 15-and-under victory.
Shaquille Davis had seven in th
loss.

Latter-Day Ministries 30,
First Baptist 26: Lerinel Christ-
ian scored seven and Lloyd Bai-
ley six in the upset 19-and-under
win for Latter-Day Saints. Noel
Richardson had a game high 12
and Tinto Thurston 10 in the
loss.

Miracle Working Church of
God 37, Macedonia 17: Jamaal
Deveaux scored a game high 15
and Tori Symonette had nine in
their 19-and-under debut win.
Brandon Brownwell had seven
in a losing effort.

Bahamas Harvest 33, Church
of the Nazarene 24: Travis
Sands had a game high 16 to
almost single-handedly beat
their men's opponents. Durrall
Rolle had 12 in the loss.

First Baptist 68, BIBA 23:
Kirby Thergelus and Jamaal
Johnson scored 17 and 15
respectively to pace the men in
their blowout. Burlington Moss
had 11 in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 49, Lat-
ter-Day 41: Isban Lynes had 14,
Breston Rolle nine and Jan Pin-
der eight in their men's victor.
Perez Thompson had eight in
the loss.

¢ Here's a look at Saturday's
schedule:

SEE page 12





2009

NDAY, FEBRUARY 23,





WES
unl






m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

IT was only their second time playing
together, but Mark Knowles and Mardy
Fish looked like a veteran duo all week
long in Memphis, Tennessee.

Yesterday, the number four seeded team,
capped off the Regions Morgan Keegan
Championships with a 7-6 (7), 6-1 win over
the unseeded team of Travis Parrott and
Flip Polasek.

“Tt’s always good to win a tournament,”
i] said Knowles, who won the title at the
tournament last year with his Indian part-
ner Mahesh Bhupathi.

This year, however, Bhupathi decided
to skip the tournament as he returned
home to relax after he and Knowles fin-
ished as runners-up at the Australian
Open.

Knowles, who immediately boarded a
20-hour flight to be reunited with Bhu-
pathi this week, decided to team up with
Fish. It turned out to be a great partner-
ship as Knowles and Fish didn’t lose a
set in the tournament.

Fourth title

“We played great all week,” pointed out Knowles, who went on
to win his fourth title with three different partners - his first two in
1996 and 2003 with former partner Daniel Nestor.

But Knowles noted that he and Fish were even better in the final.

“We got off to a great start and we never eased up,” said
Knowles, who hoisted his oldest son, Graham, on his shoulders at
the victory celebrations. “Mardy is such a great singles player. But
he can also play good doubles.”

SEE page 12



Mardy Fish





















Tribune
staff

Wi] WESTMINSTER COLLEGE DIPLOMATS’ Stephen Miller [
drives to the basket. SEE MORE PHOTOS on Page 14.

MARK KNOWLES holds his
winner's trophy as his son,
Graham, 3, sits on his shoul-
ders and waits for the cere-
mony to finish at the Regions
Morgan Keegan Champi-
onships tennis tournament in
Memphis, Tenn., Sunday, Feb. |
22, 2009. Mark Knowles and
Mardy Fish won the men's
doubles championship.
















Mark Humphrey/AP Photo

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



‘PAIN’ BOUNCES BACK FROM KNOCK DOWN TO KO AMERICAN IN FIFTH ROUND






















@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER absorbing an unex-
pected knock down in the sec-
ond round, Meacher ‘Pain’
Major bounced back to punish

_ American Kevin Carmody
~“ into a fifth round technical

Maula a LM neon ee ene orton PACE OUN:

OUTSTANDING CHILDREN IN THE ARTS NOTICE

The public is invited to nominate outstanding children in Music, Drama and
Dance for the First Annual “Outstanding Children In The Arts” Awards.

Awards Ceremony will take place at the First Annual Children’s Ball scheduled
for Saturday 18" April, 2009 at Sandal Royal Bahamian Resort, Cable Beach
Nassau, Bahamas.

The Awards Programme is sponsored by the ADISA Foundation for children.
The Awards will acknowledge, celebrate and reward the contributions of
children to the Artistic Culture of The Bahamas. The Competition is open to
children from Pre School to High School. The prizes will include Scholarship
Grants for the winners in each category.

Closing date for the entries is Friday 27' February, 2009. Nomination forms
are available upon request from the Adisa Foundation P.O. Box N-555 Nassau,
Bahamas, telephone 242-326-0159 (day time) or 394-3018 (night time), e-mail:
adisa.bahamas@ gmail.com.

The Adisa Foundation

ip
a Hay ery +

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

The public is invited to attend a
NEW PROVIDENCE ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

TOWN MEETING

on Tuesday, February 24th, at 7:00p.m.
at Super Club Breezes,
hosted by The Ministry of Works & Transport.

ese ve ele Reel
Corridor 4
(Bethell Avenue to John F. Kennedy Drive)
Corridor 5

(John F. Kennedy Drive to West Bay Street)

Speakers will include
Mr. Francis Clarke, Project Engineer in the Ministry of Works
[who will soeak on Land Acquisitions)
Mr. Damien Francis,
(who will s>eak on the History of fhe CNPRIP)

Also in attendance will be
The Hon. Neko Grant, Minister of Works & Transport
The Hon. Tommy Tumaquest, Minister of National Security
The Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health
MIP for Killarney f

Referee Dick Pakozdi
stepped in and called off the
fight on Friday night at the
Convention Center in Buffalo,
New York two minutes and
54 minutes of the scheduled
six round bout.

It was a successful debut for
Major under his new promo-
tional team headed by Nick
Garone of the X-Cel World-
wide LLC.

Thanking God for giving
him the strength and his
Garone for the opportunity to
display his skills, Major said
he put on a great show.

Prepared

“It was a great opponent,
but I want to thank my train-
ers for getting me prepared
for the fight,” said Major, who
singled out Anthony ‘Chills’
Wilson from Hollywood,
Florida and Nat Knowles, who
joined them in Florida.

Major said Garone was so
impressed with him that he’s
already looking forward to
putting him on X-Cel’s next
show to fight in the co-main
event on ESPN in April of
May.



Meacher ‘Pain’ Major

Against Carmody, who
came in with a 10-9-2 win-loss-
draw record, Major got a little
careless in the second when
he was floored with a wild
overhand right.

But Major said he got up,
shook it off and in the fifth,
he threw a left-right combina-
tion and continued the flurry
to pull off the fight and
improve his record to 16-3-1

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Major inflicts ‘Pain-ful’
defeat on Carmody

with 14 knockouts.

“Even though it was cold
and I came down with the flu
from the bad weather, it was
great,” said Major, who noted
that he got his first taste of
snow.

“Despite the weather, a lot
of people came out and every-
body was cheering me on, so I
was even more confident to
get back on my feet and do
what I knew best - box.”

While Major said both Wil-
son and Knowles pushed him
beyond his limits to get him
ready, he credit a lot of his
success as well to the strength
condition workout that he got
from Delvin ‘Blue’ Scott.

“Having done the strength
work with him, I was able to
get through it easier than a lot
of the boxers in the training
camp in Hollywood,” Major
noted. “So I want to encour-
age the boxers home to take
advantage of the training that
they get from blue because it’s
a great help.”

Major, 27, said he will be
back in the ring today in Hol-
lywood training for whenev-
er his next opportunity come
for him to fight again.

Knowles and
Fish win it
Memphis

FROM page 11

Fish was a runner-up in
Memphis in 2006 as he captured
his fifth ATP World Tour title.
Knowles clinched hisd 51st to
tie the Bryan brothers and Llie
Nastase for 19th place in Open
Era doubles titles list.

Knowles said he’s now look-
ing forward to playing in Dubai
with Bhupathi. He’s hoping that
they can maintain the same
intensity that he and Fish
enjoyed.

“We played well in January,
getting to the final of the first
Grand slam at the Australian
Open,” Knowles stressed. “It
would be good if we can go to
Dubai and perform just as well
as we did. Whatever happens,
we hope to be ready. Mahesh
needed to take the break and
I’ve had a good week, so I feel
we can turn that around into
another successful week.”

Off the court, Knowles has
been featured in the publica-
tion Teamwork that is produced
by the Fellowship of Christian
Athletes.

Written by author Chad Bon-
ham, Knowles is listed as one
of twelve prominent sports fig-
ures featured and it includes
exclusive commentary on his
athletic heritage and his rise to
multiple Grand Slam doubles
titles. Knowles, whose wife
Dawn Davidson gave birth to
their second son, Brody five
months ago, noted that he’s just
enjoying the best of both
worlds.

BSC names
haskethall
classic in
honour of

Joyce Minus
FROM page 11

Court One — 10 am Latter-
Day vs Temple Fellowship (15);

11 am Macedonia vs Miracle
Working Church of God (15);

Noon Golden Gates No.2 vs
Macedonia (19);

1 pm Miracle Working
Church of God vs Latter-Day
Saints (19);

2 pm Evangelistic Center vs
Bahamas Harvest

(M);

3 pm Calvary Bible vs New
Bethlehem (M).

Court Two - 10 am Faith
United vs First Baptist (15);

11 am Golden Gates vs Zion
South Beach (15);

Noon First Baptist vs Temple
Fellowship (19);

1 pm New Bethlehem vs Faith
United (19);

2 pm City of Praise vs Temple
Fellowship (M); 3 pm First Bap-
tist vs Faith United (M).



TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 13



SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Vanderpool-Wallace, Alanna Dillette
help Auburn University to second place

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

ARIANNA Vanderpool-Wal-
lace and Alanna Dillette helped
the Auburn University to a sec-
ond place finish in the women’s
division of the Southeastern Con-
ference Swimming Champi-
onships over the weekend.

And while the University of
Kentucky had to settle for sev-
enth place, Elvis Variance Bur-
rows posted a couple of record
breaking performances.

The three Bahamian
Olympians competed at the
championships at Auburn Uni-
versity.

Burrows, a junior at Kentucky,
was eighth in the men’s 100 but-
terfly in a time of 46.72 seconds to
break his school record. Earlier
on the final day of competition,
Burrows had lowered the mark
to 46.81. Both were below the B
qualifying time for the NCAA
Championships.

Burrows also got a school year
in his spilt in the 50 fly.

“This was something that I
thought I couldn’t do, but I sur-
prised myself,” Burrows stressed.
“T think I limited myself.”

Better

Looking at his performance
overall, Burrows said he per-
formed better than he had antic-
ipated.

“T surpassed all of my goal
times and I placed higher than I
thought I would place,” he said.
“T got some NCAA B cuts, which
was another goal of mine.”

Those cuts came in the 100 fly,
50 free, 400 medley relay and the
200 medley relay.

Looking back at his perfor-
mance, Burrows said he attrib-
uted to his hard training leading
up to the meet.

He said he was mentally ready
to compete and he was glad to
see the other two Bahamians
from Auburn University there as
well.

“We were not on the same
team, but they got to cheer me
on and I got to cheer for them,”
he said. “It was good to see them
do well and I know they were



ARIANNA VANDERPOOL-WALLACE (far left) and Alana Dillette (far right) flank their Auburn University teammates
on the SEC Swimming Championships podium as they receive their 200 IM Relay Silver Medal on Wednesday
evening at the SEC Swimming Championships.

Pe eg



100 FLY PRELIMINARIES: Bahamians Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace at

bottom, Alana Dillette (centre) and a Florida Gator swimmer at the top as
they swim in the 100 butterfly prelims. Both Bahamians have advanced to

the finals.

glad to see me do well.”

Also on the final day, Vander-
pool- Wallace, the freshman, was
second in the 100 freestyle in
48.04 seconds. The race was won

by Morgan Scroggy of Georgia
in 47.88.

She also swum on the second
leg of the Tigers’ winning 400
freestyle relay team that clocked

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for provision of General Insurance
Services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:

on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 690/09

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Accident Insurance - Money & Burglary

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The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163

3:12.00 for both a SEC and pool
record.

On the third day, Dillette, a
sophomore, came in fourth in the
final of the 100 butterfly in 52.51.
Her team-mate Caitlin Geary
won in 51.65.

And Dillette was fifth in the
100 backstroke in 52.77. The race
was won by Gemma Spofforth of
Florida in 50.56.

Vanderpool-Wallace, on the
other hand, was second in the 100
fly consolation final in 53.58.
Georgia’s Anne-Marie Botek
won in 52.99.

And Vanderpool-Wallace
anchored the tigers’ 400 medley
relay in 3:31.28 for another SEC
and pool record.

Day two saw Vanderpool-Wal-
lace touch the wall in 22.23 for
fourth place in the final of the 50
free.

Dillette was 12th in 22.65.
There was a tie for first place
between Michelle King of Ten-
nessee and Botek in 21.90.

WITTEN
HNIC
Thom Time 4

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THREE of the Bahamian elite athletes closed out their indoor
season by finishing in the top five in Birmingham, England on Sat-
urday.

Spr aier Chandra Sturrup posted the best result when she clocked
7.20 seconds for a third place in the women’s 60 metre final.

The veteran Golden girl, known for her quick start, was beaten
out by American Carmelita Jeter, who ran 7.11. Tahesia Harrigan
of the British Virgin Islands was second in 7.18.

Jeter joined Sturrup and American Angela Williams in a three-
way tie for the fastest times in the world this year.

Williams won the first heat in 7.25 with Sturrup coming in third
in 7.30. Jeter also won heat two in 7.25.

While they didn’t have a heat to compete in, the men’s 60 hurdles
was a straight final with Shamar Sands taking fifth place in 7.61
behind a host of Americans.

Dexter Faulk won in 7.54, followed by David Payn in 7.55, joel
Brown in 7.56 and David Oliver in 7.57.

“Tt was good, but I just had a horrible start,” said Sands on his per-
formance.

“You really can’t come back indoors from a poor start.”

Pleased

Despite the loss, Sands said he was quite pleased with his first full
indoor season in Europe. He ended up winning four out of the
seven races he competed in and he lowered his national record
twice.

“T think it was good,” he said about his season. “I went out there
and I did what I wanted to do from the break.

“T wanted to put my name out there for the hurdles and I think
IT accomplished that. Everybody now know about Shamar Sands.”

Back in the United States, Sands said he will take some time off
to recuperate from the hectic travel before he turn his focus to the
outdoor season.

But based on what he was able to achieve and remaining healthy,
Sands said he’s confident that he will be able to continue his per-
formance as he gear up for the [AAF World Championships in
Berlin, Germany in August.

No doubt Sturrup will be looking forward to the same thing.

And after winning the bronze medal at the Olympic Games in
Beijing, China last year, Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands is hoping to
bounce back on the medal diaz in Berlin too.

Sands also competed in Birmingham, but he too had to settle for
fifth place with his leap of 54-feet, 4-inches (16.56) on his sixth
and final attempt.

He had a series of jumps that included 53-11 1/4 (16.44), 53-11 1/4
(16.44), 54-0 (16.46), scratch and 53-4 1/4 (16.26).

Cuban David Giralt won the event with a leap of 56-2 1/2 (17.13)
on his second attempt. He passed until the sixth jump when he
scratched.

Brazilian Jadel Gregorio was second with 55-5 3/4 (16.91) and
American Brandon Roulhac was third with 55-5 (16.89).



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PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

HUGH CAMPBELL TOURNAMENT © UK: The Premiership
Liverpool drop more points

Westminster College |=".“nnser enw

Liverpool dropped more points in the race for the Premier

Oo
League title when it drew 1-1 with visiting Manchester City on Sun-
day, reports the Associated Press.
Liverpool was trailing after a deflected shot by Craig Bellamy

until Dirk Kuyt tied it with 12 minutes left.
The result left Liverpool seven points behind defending champion

Oo
Manchester United, which beat Blackburn 2-1 Saturday for its
10th straight league win.
If Liverpool fails to win its first league title since 1990, it will like-

ly regret the games it has tied — which already stands at a league
high of 10 in 26 matches.

“T have confidence that we can still win it, but we must win our
next two league games against Middlesbrough and Sunderland
and then win against Manchester United at Old Trafford,” Liver-
pool manager Rafa Benitez said. “Then we may have a different sit-
uation. But I just accept that this has been a bad result and it
clearly makes it more difficult for us to win the title.”

Manchester City dropped to 10th place with 32 points, pushed
down a spot by Fulham’s 2-0 win over last-place West Bromwich
Albion.

Fulham hit the frame of the goal three times and Bobby Zamo-
ra shot over the bar from close range before he finally put the
home team ahead in the 61st. Andrew Johnson ducked to flick on
John Pantsil’s right-wing cross and Zamora squeezed between
West Brom’s two central defenders to tap in from inside the box.

Johnson made it 2-0 from a rebound after goalkeeper Scott Car-
son had saved a shot by Zamora, while Fulham goalkeeper Mark
Schwarzer saved a late penalty to preserve the two-goal lead.

Sixth-place Everton drew 0-0 at Newcastle in Sunday’s other
game, dropping points despite the home side having to play the sec-
ond half with 10 men after Kevin Nolan was sent off for a danger-
ous tackle on Victor Anichebe.







GLASGOW, Scotland — Celtic missed the opportunity to go
above Rangers at the top of the Scottish Premier League when it
tied 1-1 at Motherwell on Sunday.

The defending champions, who are going for a fourth straight
title, led through Scott McDonald’s 13th goal of the season but Paul
Quinn tied it with nine minutes left.

McDonald scored in the 60th with a shot from the edge of the
area that hit a bump and went over the goalkeeper’s leg before
Quinn scored from 12 yards, leaving Celtic on 57 points, behind its
city rival on goal difference.

WESTMINISTER
COLLEGE DIPLO-
MATS’ Thomas
Mackey tries to
avoid the defence
of Doris Johnson
Mystic Marlins in
the Pool Finals of
the Hugh Camp-
bell Tournament.
The Westminster
College Diplo-
mats went on to
win 64-63.

MADRID — Malaga’s bid to finish the season in the Champions
League places got a boost Sunday when the promoted Spanish
league club beat Valladolid 3-1.

Albert Luque used the outside of his left foot to swirl a shot
between two defenders and out of the reach of goalkeeper Justo
Villar in the seventh minute. Antonio Galdeano then scored anoth-
er in the 29th from the penalty spot.

Substitute Ignacio Perez sealed the win in the closing moments
as Malaga improved to 39 points — two behind fourth-place Vil-
larreal and the final Champions League place. Malaga has lost
only two of its last 14 games.

Pedro Oldoni scored with a header in the 84th for Valladolid.

Valencia and Deportivo La Coruna played later Sunday in
another match with Champions League implications, while Getafe
and Athletic Bilbao also were to play.

Barcelona leads the league with 60 points, followed by Real
Madrid with 53, Sevilla with 44 and Valencia with 38.

Also Sunday, Osasuna beat Numancia 2-0, 10-man Almeria ral-
lied for a 1-1 tie at Recreativo Huelva and Jose Jurado scored in the
88th as Mallorca beat 10-man Racing Santander 1-0.

PHOTOS:
Felipé
Major

/Tribune

Staff



WESTMINSTER Larry Smith drives to the basket
for the win.

CP TOYOTA moving forward

O THE WORLD

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THE TRIBUNE

The new world order

Is THE past two weeks
a very powerful and
large delegation from the
Republic of China has visited
The Bahamas and Jamaica.

The delegation to Jamaica
was led by Vice President Xi
Jinping, the second most pow-
erful man in China and the
most likely next president. In
both countries, projects worth
hundreds of millions were
announced.

In Jamaica this week a util-
ity company from Abu Dhabi
purchased 40 per cent of the
electricity utility and also
invested in the electricity com-
pany on Grand Bahama.

The Russian armed forces
have carried out exercise in
the region in recent times.
Bolivia is getting Russian heli-
copters to use in their efforts
to control the drug trade.
Venezuela is planning to buy
Russian jets and helicopters.

All the above underlines
the importance which politi-
cally and financially powerful
nations place on our region.
It matters not that we may be
benefitting from the natural
competition between others.
Let us just make the most of

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



the benefits that result from
this reality.

History and geography
placed our islands squarely
within the sphere of influence
of the United States, Great
Britain and Canada. These
historical relationships have
had benefits, although who
benefitted most has been and
continues to be a matter of
argument and discussion. I
think there is little doubt that
if the accounting is done in
centuries rather than decades
that the answer is that the

North won. Then there is also
the natural tendency to take
what you "have" for granted.

Therefore, without taking
anything away from our tra-
ditional relationships or dis-
respecting our old friends, we
should cultivate all new suitors
who come to call. Let’s make
the talk of global integration
and the global economy a ben-
eficial reality for our islands
and not just a concept.

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 15


































THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF

BAHAMAS FIRST

GENERAL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED
WISHES TO CONGRATULATE

2ssful completion

of the AllIC and
‘ecent promotion
or Claims Officer.

thell joined Bahamas First
eas a Claims Officer and
of six years experience in
ce industry. He completed
if the Chartered Insurance
dgramme of the Insurance
ada and will be elected an
Associate of that Institute.

Genenal SIniuvance Company

Bahamas First General Insurance Company Limited
# 32 Collins Ave. P.O. Box SS 6238 Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 302-3900 + Fax: (242) 302-3901

For A Wendy's
UL MAGN

A Tender, Hand-Cut Cod Fillet
Creamy, Savory Tartar Sauce
Crisp Lettuce
Warm Premium Bun



THE TRIBUNE 6
usine
o yo he ee

MONDAY,

FEBRUARY 23,



im

y S

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life





rer

a
ed

~

PM Hubert Ingraham



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Arawak Cay Port
Development Com-
pany will this week
go back to its 19

shareholders to discover
whether they still want to invest
in the $60 million project, after
some key “rules of the game”
were changed during a meeting

with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham last week.

Jimmy Mosko, the company’s
chairman, was tight-lipped on

the details discussed with the
Prime Minister, declining to
reveal specifics when contacted
by Tribune Business, although

he attempted to downplay the
impact of any changes by saying
he was confident all 19 investors
would remain involved.

“It’s not changed much at
all,” he told Tribune Business
of the proposed Arawak Cay
project, which would create a



PM changes ‘rules of
the game’ on new port

* Arawak Cay Port Development Company to go back to 19 investors this week to see if they want to remain involved with $60m project
* Chairman expresses confidence that changes are ‘no deal breaker’, and that all will remain on board
* Survey of proposed port site carried out over weekend to determine boundaries for lease

* Memorandum of Understanding already submitted to government

purpose-built port at that site
to handle all New Providence’s

SEE page 8B

BEC targets ‘within $1-2m
of break even’ goal for ‘09

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

* Corporation losses rise
Tribune Business Editor

in four-year period to

THE Bahamas Electricity Cor- $18m peak in 2008
poration (BEC) is aiming to come

“within $1 million-$2 million of

breaking even” come its September 2009 financial year-end, its
chairman told Tribune Business, as it bids to reverse steadily
increasing net losses that peaked at $18 million last year.

Fred Gottlieb said the Board’s main objective was to restore the
monopoly power provider to profitability as rapidly as possible, a
goal that last week’s management restructuring is tied into, given
that BEC had sustained net losses ever since 2004.

Confirming that the short-term bottom line goal was to be “with-
in $1 million-$2 million of break even come September”, Mr Got-
theb told Tribune Business: “We would like to return the Corpo-
ration to net profitability, and significantly reduce its losses.

“Hopefully, with the exemption
from Customs duty [on BEC’s SEE page 10B

Star General Insurance

Judge refuses to order South
Ocean partner’s removal

Nine hundred Bahamas entities set up
to facilitate UBS scheme, IRS alleges

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A SUPREME Court judge
has refused to grant an order
recognizing that a Connecticut-
based hedge fund has become
the ‘general partner’ for the
$867 million New South Ocean
resort/casino project on New
Providence, finding it had not
established “reasonable cause”
to remove its developer part-
ner.

Senior Justice John Lyons, in
a February 18, 2009, ruling,
declined to grant a summons
brought before him by Seaside
Heights, the investment vehicle

for billion-dollar hedge fund
Plainfield Asset Management,
which had effectively sought
Supreme Court confirmation
that it had removed Roger Stein
and RHS Ventures as the devel-
opment’s ‘general partner’ via a
notice issued on October 20,
2008.

Justice Lyons’ ruling effec-
tively preserves the status quo
between the two parties pend-
ing the outcome of New York-
based arbitration between Mr
Stein/RHS Ventures and Plain-
field/Seaside Heights. He had
previously refused to grant Mr

SEE page 4B

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SWISS financial giant UBS
allegedly planned to create 900
Bahamian companies to enable
its US resident clients to dis-
guise their ownership of bank
accounts, and thus evade their
tax reporting and tax paying
requirements, the US tax
authorities have claimed.

Court documents filed to sup-
port evidence provided by
Internal Revenue Service (IRS)
agent Daniel Reeves, in the
effort launched by the US fed-
eral authorities to force UBS to
hand over the names of some
52,000 alleged US clients who

evaded taxes on assets worth
$14.8 billion, allege that the
Bahamas played a key role in
some of the schemes.

There is nothing to suggest,
though, that UBS (Bahamas),
its past and current managers,
directors and staff, have done
anything wrong in relation to
the IRS investigation.

One document filed with the
US district court in south Flori-
da, an alleged presentation to
UBS’s executive board for its
wealth management and busi-
ness banking unit, dated July 6,
2004, seeks approval for ‘alter-
native solutions’ for simple and

SEE page 6B

Agency — A correction



IN two recent articles carried
by Tribune Business concern-
ing the relationship between
Bahamas First and General
Brokers & Agents, it was

reported that Bahamas First
owned 100 per cent of Star
General Insurance Agency
(GB) Ltd. This was carried in
one article headlined Bahamas
First takes managerial control
at GBA, and another piece that
concerned Bahamas First’s hir-
ing of an accountant to work at
GBA.

Envy nightclub owner hits back at her critics

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE proprietor of Envy Nightclub and
Lounge on West Bay Street has hit back at
claims that her business is disrupting the
area’s tourist-based environment through
loud music and attracting an undesirable
clientele.

Delores Leeder, who once managed and
controlled the majority stake in Club Fluid
on Bay Street, said it was her dream to be
the sole owner of a nightclub. Now, com-

plaints from the nearby El Greco Hotel
about the volume of Envy's music has
forced Ms Leeder to answer to media and
government agencies alike.

Part-owner of El Greco, Mike Pikra-
menos, told Tribune Business that the Envy
nightclub, situated in the former Mayfair
hotel, was attracting the wrong elements
to the area surrounding his hotel.

"It's affecting the Strip adversely. They
are trying to improve it, but it’s difficult
when you get elements which should be
controlled by police,” he said.

Harry Pikramenos, who is also part-own-
er of El Greco, said the opening of Envy
compounded the area’s problems. "We
don't object to doing business, but that's
not doing business,” he said. "It's attracting
riff-raff outside our front door."

Only last year police raided the former
Mayfair hotel, netting eight suspected pros-
titutes.

But Ms Leeder said she has not seen any
kind of illegal activity inside the building

SEE page 6B

Star General Insurance
Agency has since confirmed to
Tribune Business that Bahamas
First does not own 100 per cent
of Star General Insurance
Agency (GB) Ltd.

Grand Bahama-based Star
General Insurance Agency
(GB) Ltd is 80 per cent owned
by Star General itself, through
its investment company, Star
General Investments (GB), and
20 per cent by Bahamas First.
The current shareholdings
resulted from the 2001 merger
of Nassau Underwriters
Freeport agency with Star Gen-
eral (Freeport).

Tribune Business apologises
for the error, and any problems
it may have caused, and is hap-
py to set the record straight.



Islan

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of Island House are a marvel of fine living with exquisite craftsman-
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lantic Ocean. Lush landscaping, pristine beachfront, golf, tennis,
swimming pools and private restaurants are a few amenities Island
House offers. Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at
$17,500,000.00 Web Listing # 8294.

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE








@ ROYALFIDELITY MARKET WRA

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 823.22 (-1.39%) YTD

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

By RoyalFidelity Capital the 25 listed securities, of which increase of 3,110 shares or 23. extended the deadline of its pri- SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
Markets two advanced, one declined and __ per cent, versus last week's trad- vate placement offering. AML $1.41 $- 0 -17.54%
one remained unchanged. ing volume of 13,551 shares. The preferred shares will be BBL $0.63 $- 0 4.55%

TRADING momentum Focol Holdings (FCL) was _ paying a dividend rate of prime BOB $7.64 $- 0 0.00%
increased slightly last week in EQUITY MARKET the volume leader this week + 1.75 per cent, payable semi- BPF $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
the Bahamian market with A total of 16,661 shares with 8,400 shares trading, its annually. BSL $9.58 $- 0 -5.99%
investors trading in four out of | changed hands, representing an stock rising by $0.01 to end the BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
week at $5.18. Dividends/AGM Notes: CAB $13.95 $- 0 -0.57%

Finance Corporation of the Famguard Corporation CBL $6.77 $- 0 -3.29%

Bahamas (FIN) was the big (FAM) has declared a dividend CHL $2.83 $- 0 0.00%

advancer last week, its stock ris- of $0.06 per share, payable on CIB $10.45 $- 0 0.00%

ing by $0.28 to $11.28 on a vol- February 23, 2009, to all share- CWCB $2.04 $-0.32 561 -9.33%

ume of 5,000 shares. holders of record date Febru- DHS $2.40 $- 0 -5.88%

FamGuard Corporation ary 16,2009. FAM $7.76 $-0.04 2,700 -0.51%

(FAM) saw 2,700 shares trade, FBB $2.37 $- 0 0.00%

its stock price falling by $0.04 Commonwealth Bank (CBL) | FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%

to close at $7.76. Consolidated has declared a dividend of $0.05 FCL $5.18 $0.01 8,400 0.19%

ee Cow Water Company (CWCB) trad- per share, payable on February FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%

Applications are invited for the UWI ed 561 shares at $2.27. 27, aN to eee = FIN $11.28 $0.28 5,000 -4.97%

‘ record date February 13, : ICD $5.50 $- 0 -10.28%

Regional Endowment Fund (UWIREF) BOND MARKET ISI $10.50 $- 0 5.41%

Scholarships and Bursaries. No notes traded in the Bank of the Bahamas (BOB) PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%




ELIGIBILITY

¢ Applicants must be citizens of one of UWI's Contributing Countries
¢ Must be a first time applicant to read for an undergraduate degree
¢ Applications for the scholarships and bursaries must accompany a UWI application




CONDITIONS OF AWARDS

Scholarship winners will receive benefits for the official duration of their degree

programmes as follows:

¢ Barbadian and Trinidadian nationals - BURSARIES (toward Maintenance costs)
¢ Nationals from other Contributing Countries - FULL SCHOLARSHIP (Tuition and

Maintenance costs) OR TUITION only
HOW TO APPLY

1. Complete the general application for admission to the UWI online at the campus

website of your choice.

. Submit all supporting documents as soon as you have completed the application

online.

. Complete also the UWIREF application online, download and submit

For further information, you may contact Admissions:
Cave Hill: www.cavehill.uwi.edu 246-417-4140-43
Mona: www.mona.uwiedu 876-977-2779/876-935-8651 Ext. 2651
The Open Campus: www.open.uwi.edu 868-662-2002 Exts 2607/2271
St Augustine: www.sta.uwiedu 868-662-2002/868-663-1443 Exts.2157/2154

The deadline for scholarship applications is FEBRUARY 27, 2009.

Applications for the UWIREF Scholarships/Bursaries will not be considered until all

supporting documents are received.

= aa
ya er] ey

Qocca@r nines

Bahamian market last week.
COMPANY NEWS
Earnings Releases.

There were no financial
results reported by any of the
24-listed companies during the
week.

Private Placement Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL) has

| ant ae ewe
Sa a"

4

Jus

Inviting/Applications|for)Admission}2009
ONLINE >'hitp://www.open:uwi-edu/admissions

The Open Campus of the University of the West Indies is now accepting applications
for entry into its undergraduate programmes for the 2009/2010 academic year

Undergraduate Degrees » Associate Degrees » Diplomas « Certificates

The Open Campus accepts online applications only at our website www.open.uwi.edu

Entry requirements ¢ can nbe viewed online by visiting the Open Campus website.

HOW TO APPLY

has declared a dividend of $0.10
per share, payable on March 3,
2009, to all shareholders of
record date February 24, 2009.

Focol Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on
Thursday March 19, 2009, at
10.30am in the Boardroom at
its Corporate Office in
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

consult







International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR






Weekly % Change
1.2506 +131
1.4441 +0.52
1.2829 -0.26








Commodities

Crude Oil $39.80
Gold $994.10
International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly
7,365.67
770.05
1,441.23
7,416.38

% Change
-5.28
+5.44

Weekly

% Change
-6.17
-6.87
-6.07
-4.67

DITA

S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

Share your news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ants limited

THE MANAGEMENT AND STAFF JOIN IN OFFERING
CONGRATULATIONS TO

MARK B. WILLIAMS

B. Eng., P.E.

SENIOR PROJECT ENGINEER

Applications should be submitted online by visiting the website. Instructions for completing
the application process are online. Persons without Internet access may visit the Open
Campus site in your country between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. to obtain
assistance submitting their online applications.

Applicants who do not possess Grade 1 in CXC or CSEC English (A), a Grade A in GCE ‘0’ Level
English, a Grade 1 in CAPE Communication Studies or a Grade A or B in the GCE General Paper,
are required to take the English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT).

Applicants are required to pay the equivalent of US$25.00 to cover the cost of the test.

Further details will be available from your Open Campus country site shortly.

— ON HIS RECENT SUCCESS IN OBTAINING HIS
Fliaible avol PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING QUALIFICATION

Eligible applicants are encouraged to apply for the UWI Regional Endowment Fund (UWIREF)
AND

Scholarship. Further information is available on the Open Campus website at Financial
TO WELCOME HIM INTO MANAGEMENT AS AN

ASSOCIATE

(February 2009)

CON if \CT US
For further information contact the Open Campus site nearest you or
admissions@open.uwi.edu.

A meeting will be held for perspective students on February 25th
at 6:00p.m. In The UWI Restaurant, Thompson Blvd.





THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 3B



Renewable energy
‘showcase’ pledge

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FIRM involved in a joint
venture bid with two Canadian
companies to supply the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) with renewable
energy has pledged to make its
project a “showcase”, and urged
Bahamians to avoid “wishful
thinking” that could lead to the
nation missing “our window of
opportunity”.

In a likely response to calls
for more Bahamian participa-
tion in the BEC renewable
energy tender, and demands
from environmentalist Sam
Duncombe that there be more
transparency, Vincent McDon-
ald, chief executive of Bahamas
Renewable Energy Corporation
(BREC), said the company
agreed that “local participation
is absolutely critical and of key
importance to derive the maxi-
mum amount of benefit for the
Bahamas”.

BREC, he added, was 49 per
cent owned by Winso Compa-
ny, a Bahamian firm, but to
access the “hundreds of mil-
lions” of dollars needed to bring
a renewable energy project to
fruition, it had partnered with
Emera Inc, a 25 per cent stake-
holder in Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company, and fellow Cana-
dian firm Schneider Power.

“Given the state of the finan-
cial markets, lenders who were
there yesterday and waiting for
approvals, have disappeared d
overnight. We can therefore no
longer afford wishful thinking,
because we (the Bahamian peo-
ple) will miss our window of
opportunity,” Mr McDonald
said.

“The current economic cli-
mate warrants the need for out-
of-the-box thinking, in particu-
lar as it relates to financing
these projects. We believe that

Environmentalist Sam Duncombe

BREC has found strong part-
ners in Schneider Power and
Emera that can ensure our pro-
ject’s economic and financial
viability.”

He added: “The Bahamas can



learn from other leading renew-
able energy jurisdictions such
as Canada and Germany. Our
partnership with Schneider
Power and Emera allows for a
significant knowledge transfer



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to BREC, and therefore to the
Bahamas.

“The results of this are that
we have already significantly
reduced our learning curve, and
will also guarantee that these
projects can get built. By com-
mitting ourselves to employing
local tradesmen and contrac-
tors, this knowledge will be dis-
persed amongst our own econ-
omy, allowing companies and
entrepreneurs an entry into a
sector that generally has very
high barriers of entry, but is slat-
ed for significant growth in the
future.”

Referring to BREC’s pro-
posed wind/solar solutions for
Harbour Island, Abaco and
Eleuthera, Mr McDonald said:
“A $60 million dollar infra-
structure project in the
Bahamas will act as a mini-stim-
ulus package for the economy in
the region. We anticipate that
expenditures will give a much-
needed economic boost to local
businesses, in particular local
suppliers and trades people, but
also hotels, restaurants, stores
and many peripheral services.
BREC is a showcase here in the
Bahamas as to how business can
be done with maximum local
content and participation.

“From an environmental
standpoint, BREC, with the
help of Schneider Power, is now
one of the leading companies
in the world that employs ‘con-
servation engineering’, mean-
ing that our facilities will meet
and/or exceed all requirements
under the Bahamian environ-
mental laws.

“We will also strive to reduce
the impact on nature with the
least possible intrusion on the
landscape, wildlife and commu-
nities. And once BEC has come
to a decision, we will be inviting
the Bahamian public and com-
munities to comment and pro-
vide feedback.”

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE















































































BS:

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international private
bank in The Bahamas, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently
accepting applications for:-

HEAD OF OPERATI RDINATI
STRUCTURED PRODUCTS

Applicants for the position of Head of Operations Coordination / Structured Products
must have relevant financial accreditation or professional qualifications, in-depth
managerial experience in all phases of securities & other assets in the offshore banking
industry, overall processes including front office & operations activities, and be fully
abreast of today’s sophisticated private banking products. Must be knowledgeable of
international markets, financial instruments and of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international banking practices. Fluency in Italian is
definitely required.

Personal qualities:-

Proven ability to supervise staff & control the daily flow of transactions & direct
and guide staff through knowledge and example

Must have demonstrated practical organization of self and others

Ability to assess, evaluate and make recommendations

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills

Possess analytical qualities

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook

Commitment to quality, service excellence and customer satisfaction

Responsibilities:-

Necessary liaison with units Private Banking & Service Provider (Outsourcer)
Verify that processed transactions are correctly settled

Perform control of administrative tasks to be executed locally

Ensure reconciliations of outstanding items and that pending items are resolved
Monitor & manage booking of structured products

Troubleshooting

Guide and train personnel in the unit

This position will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum vitae
to :-

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited

Goodman Bay Corporate Centre

P. O. Box N - 7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr @bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)

THE BAHAMAS RED

Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

EAI ANS

“OUR WORLD. YOUR MOVE. BECOME
INVOLVED.”

a

—" CONCH FRITTERS _

SATURDAY,
MARCH 7'", 2009
12 NOON - UNTIL

a
Judge refuses to order South

Ocean partner’s removal

FROM page 1B

Stein an injunction to prevent
Seaside Heights from taking
over as ‘general partner’.

However, in his latest ruling
on the dispute over the still-
closed South Ocean hotel’s
redevelopment (the golf course
is open), Justice Lyons also
granted Plainfield/Seaside
Heights some of its other
‘prayers for relief’, in particu-
lar by ordering RHS Ventures
to hand over to it financial doc-
uments and materials on the
project.

Recalling how the dispute
had arisen, Justice Lyons said
in his ruling that it all stemmed
from the August 6, 2007, part-
nership agreement between
RHS Ventures and Seaside
Heights for South Ocean’s rede-
velopment. RHS Ventures and
Mr Stein were the developers,
Plainfield/Seaside Heights the
financiers.

Mr Stein and RHS Ventures
were “given the day-to-day con-
trol” of South Ocean’s devel-
opment, but Seaside Heights —
via the partnership agreement —
obtained the right to remove or
replace him,

After a bitter dispute arose
between the two parties, Sea-
side Heights attempted to do
just that with its October 20,
2008, notice served on RHS
Ventures, but this was resisted
by Mr Stein. Justice Lyons
observed that “the relationship
between the parties here has
broken down”.

As a result, on January 9,
2009, Seaside Heights “brought
a summons before the court
seeking an order that it be
declared general partner of the
partnership pending resolution
of the arbitration presently
under way in New York. In
effect, it seeks the court’s ruling
(declaration) that the notice has
been effective”, Justice Lyons
said.

Referring to the agreement’s
stipulation that the general part-
ner could be removed ‘for cause
only’, Justice Lyons said:
“Counsel for [Seaside Heights]
submits that business efficacy
dictates that the parties meant it
to have a subjective reading — ie.

That so long as [Seaside
Heights] is satisfied that there is
cause, then it appears (at least
that is her argument flows logi-
cally) that the courts should be
satisfied with that. That is plain-
ly wrong.”

Justice Lyons said the agree-
ment showed that evidence
needed to be provided to sup-
port the general partner’s
removal, and that it must “stand
up to objective scrutiny”. “It
can hardly be conducive to the
efficient running of a business if
the second defendant [Seaside
Heights] were able to simply
replace the general partner as
and when it wished,” the judge
ruled.

“Were that to be the case,
then the general partner could
be replaced on a capricious
whim of [Seaside Heights].”
While it was not reasonable to
wait for arbitration outcomes if
the general partner was com-
mitting egregious breaches of
the agreement, Justice Lyons
nevertheless found that Seaside
Heights had to establish a prima
facie case to back up any move
to remove RHS Ventures.

Therefore, Seaside Heights
had to provide evidence to sup-
port the grounds it had cited for
removing RHS Ventures/Mr
Stein in the October 20, 2008,
notice. The hedge fund invest-
ment vehicle had cited as its
grounds for doing so clauses I,
II and VI of section 4.3 c in the
agreement, the first two refer-
ring to “fraud and willful mis-
conduct” and “intentional mis-
appropriation”.

Justice Lyons said the evi-
dence to support Seaside
Heights’ case revolved around
an affidavit provided by Susan
O’Donovan, which he described
as “very fair and very objec-
tive”.

Yet he ruled: “The frustra-
tion that Ms O’Donovan feels in
not being given the information
that she required to do a prop-
er audit of the books is evident.
I must say, however, that her
affidavit is, in my view, insuffi-
cient to establish reasonable
cause as pleaded in the notice
on an interim basis.

“T do not think, at this stage,
and to the required degree, that

it establishes fraud, willful mis-
conduct or intentional misap-
propriation. Ms O’Donovan,
very fairly, characterizes her dif-
ficulties as relating to some
reluctance of the first plaintiff
[RHS Ventures] and as relat-
ing, perhaps, to some poor
bookkeeping practices. I do not
consider, at this stage, that that
is sufficient to show reasonable
cause.”

Ms O’Donovan’s affidavit
only provided a “suspicion”,
Justice Lyons said, and failed
to carry the weight of evidence
needed at a trial. As a result,
he ruled that Seaside Heights
had not “established such suffi-
cient reasonable cause to give
effect to the notice and dis-
lodge” RHS Ventures.

In regards to financial infor-
mation on the New South
Ocean project, the-then attor-
ney for RHS Ventures, Higgs
& Johnson partner Michael
Allen, had in earlier evidence
said both he and his client were
not going to facilitate a ‘fishing
expedition’ by Seaside Heights
in a search for incriminating
material.

“Perhaps that was an under-
standable position to take, giv-
en the build-up of animosity
between the parties,” Justice
Lyons wrote. “The evidential
suggestion, therefore, is that any
reluctance or intransigence on
the part of the first plaintiff
[RHS Ventures] may well be as
a result of advice received from
its lawyers, rather than any mis-
conduct or fraudulent behav-
iour.”

However, Justice Lyons said
this position was not support-
ed by law, something that was
important given Seaside
Heights’ prayer that the court
order that it be provided with
financial information on New
South Ocean.

Noting that it was a “partner-
ship’, Justice Lyons said it went
without mention that both sides
should have unimpeded access
to the financial records. As a
result, he granted Seaside
Heights’ demand over the
records, but also refused to
make an order restricting press
coverage of the South Ocean
dispute.

We all want the same thing.

SR MRM MUR UE TEL a UU Gar IT air
Ralary's educalional programs and scholarships are dedicated solely to promoting peace.

Ue ee ERC eEE ani rth

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise

Commemorates the

104" Anniversary of Rotary International

“World Understanding and Peace Day”

Rotary. Humanity in motion.
www. rotary ore



THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 5B



Port unveils its new structure

Sir Albert Miller

THE Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA), and its Port
Group Ltd affiliate, have con-
firmed their Board and man-
agement restructuring, which
sees Hannes Babak restored as
the latter’s chairman and Ian
Rolle promoted to president of
both entities.

Mr Babak replaces Erik
Christiansen as Port Group Ltd
chairman, but it does not
resolve the ongoing feud
between the Hayward family
trust and the late Edward St
George’s estate over the com-
panies’ ownership.

The temperature in this battle
appears to have cooled of late,
though, with sources suggesting
Hutchison Whampoa remains
eager to conduct due diligence
on the Port as it attempts to
acquire the estate's stake, while
the Hayward family trust is said
to still be eyeing a sale to British
banker Roddie Fleming. Little
progress appears to have been
made on the latter deal of late,
though..

The restructuring also
involves the retirement of
GBPA president and Albert
Gray, a development anticipat-
ed by most observers. Mr Gray
joins the previously-departed
Carey Leonard, the GBPA’s
former in-house legal counsel,
among the major management
changes.



i

Hannes Babak

No mention was made of
Felix Stubbs, the GBPA’s chair-
man, with most believing this
indicates he is set to continue
in the role, with the Port
Authority having a separate
chairman from its Port Group
Ltd affiliate. Having dual chair-
manships is likely to somewhat
placate a portion of the Port’s
critics, who have long argued
that its regulatory/licensing
functions (the GBPA side)
should have been split-off, or
at least ‘Chinese walled’, from
the investments side at Port
Group Ltd.

Mr Babak’s return to the Port
Group Ltd chairmanship has
come as no surprise either, with
many analysts having expected
him to eventually reassume the
post. The way was cleared after
the Supreme Court overturned
the more than two-year bar on
Mr Babak playing any active
role in the GBPA/Port Group
Ltd’s management and Board
affairs, an injunction having
been obtained in November
2006 by the St George estate.
His return to the chairman’s
seat would have been sealed by
a directors’ vote at a Board
meeting last week.

In a statement, Mr Babak
said he would target the areas of
education, training, healthcare
and medical facilities as poten-
tial sources of investment for

Registration Fee: $5

The Healthy Hearts Walk starts at 6:30 a.m,
The Kids’ Walk starts at 8:00 a.m.

lan Rolle

Grand Bahama in the short-
term. Having met with contacts
in these industries during a
December 2008 investment
road show, he added that these
held the greatest opportunities
given the current global eco-
nomic climate.

“My primary focus is in the
area of business development,
and I will be back on the road
within the next few weeks to
secure more investments for our
great island,” he said.

“T will not rest until Grand
Bahama island reaches its full
potential. We have so much to
offer investors, and I will ensure
that we bring new projects, for
the benefit of the entire island
of Grand Bahama.”

Sir Albert Miller, a GBPA
and Port Group Ltd director,
attributed the arrival of projects
such as Ross University and
Fenestration Glass & Services
Company to Mr Babak’s previ-
ous tenure at the Port.

Meanwhile, Mr Rolle has
been promoted from his previ-
ous post as the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd chief financial offi-
cer to a post as president of the
group. He joined the compa-
nies as a group financial ana-
lyst in 2000, and has also served
as their group financial con-
troller.

He is also a former Ernst &
Young accountant, and held the




Healthy Hearts Walk
& Kids’ Walk

Tine Subhas Healthy Hears Walk i appeiomately Tour miles, staring a the Westen Eapkiniade, Qin 4481
no diman’s Bary pouni-abnat and back, The Sebevayl? Keds” Walk will stand peemplty af Ba) aim, af the
Western Eeplaiade Qoounids. Last enue pepetialioe i both walks begat al 6:50 6:00 am

Agpbcolions cane picked op ot particigaling Subway Restrnt of ot Ge Balas Heart Foundabor 5 office. Earty applicaione.
can be diopged oll at Sober Eretaucent in the Heatour Aes Shop ping Cepia the Heart Foun dafion's office on Cable Bact.



For More Information, Call 32/-0806-/ or 394-6715

Farticinant Infonmation
Merri:
Liate nf Her th
ay Tucan
Add rasa:
E-mail:

Organzalion inécneration
Hane of School iGrou
Loonthact Manne:
Lonathact E-mail

Flee] Auge:

Age hem

Telephone;

Prior to any physical activity, we strongly suggest you consult your physician

lacathe all eoks paacciated Wilh The Sobre Healtiy Heal Walk ame) Kids! Walk ick dite), bal ant limited to, lala, coetact
vail (her parted paels, ie eect ol Tie eater, inchidiag creme Neat, coor em ook, Ae ioe Fegrridily, tralle aad the coed in ns
Of he road all such iets beng koe ad appreceied bye. Hang read thee aaree and keoeng Wiese facts and mn

ons onan Of aespeptiog Mey Application,

hot (oe anid areata enti to acl on ite) bebe, Walvis ond raleerse Seghevey am

an all spo nsnes, Meir repeesen laces and aectesses feo all claims and Hahdllies of amy kind ares Ooh of ry pew eqial ion
m9 fhe Sabra) Hevdtiry Heart Walk aed Kade! Yalkewen Hough thet fab hy ay anes ool ol neqhper os of carelessness on the
perl of Bie: RSs ened [Pais evairer, Lam avaire (her the regeshealion lee is aon-eldatle. | am also aware thal fie cn rae
val open bo trate aid thal Gea phone, jogging strofiens, bekew; in lint skabors and amie dems aad animals ae Donpreng
ANSE are TEM eee on) Ce cen ee

Signature:

PARENTS SIGNATURE (if urcder 14):



a
abs * Health = ge

_ Ualinalmpenal

Date

[atte

eye:

PE sc Soune DASAN! ie (2 }

womans

“e+

W Albert Gray



post of finance manager at
Hutchison Lucaya, where he
was responsible for the man-
agement of a $450 million bud-
get for the redevelopment of
Our Lucaya.

Mr Gray, meanwhile, will still
be retained as a consultant to
the Port. “This day marks a cul-
mination of over 35 years of
outstanding and dedicated ser-
vice to the Group,” said Messrs
Babak and Stubbs of Mr Gray
in a short statement.

“The employees will certain-
ly miss Albert, and on behalf of
the directors, management and
staff of the Group, we thank
him for his years of devoted ser-
vice, and wish him the very best
for the future.”

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on

Mondays



The Bahamas Olympic Association

Invites suitably qualified applicants to apply for the
following position

Office Administrator

Requirements:

* PC Literacy and experienced in Microsoft Office
Applications (Word, Excel, Powerpoint)

¢ Excellent keyboarding skills

¢ Excellent Organizational Skills and ability to multi-
task successfully

¢ Excellent Communication Skills and ability to
work with minimum direction and supervision in
drafting correspondence for Executive Review

* Experienced in Office Administration and ability
to work with tight deadlines and flexibility to adjust
working hours to ensure that objectives are met.

* Coordinate Meetings/Business Travel as required

* To also serve as Office Receptionist and answer
telephones

The ideal candidate would have served in a similar
capacity and would have completed formal education
beyond the high school level. A Background in Sports
Administration is preferred and consideration will be
given to candidates that demonstrate skills that are
easily transferable to this position and demonstrate a
high level of professionalism.

Applications can be sent via email or fax to:
nocbah@coralwave.com ° Fax: 322-1195

or mailed to
The Bahamas Olympic Association
P.O. Box SS-6250,

Nassau, The Bahmas.

The Bahamas Olympic Association thanks all applicants and will only
interview short-listed candidates.



The Bahamas
Agricultural, Marine Resources (F

Agribusiness Expo

Security”

F Date: 26th-28th February, 2009
Location; Gladstone Road Agricultura
Research Centre (GRAC)

Nassau N,P, The Bahamas

For more information contact:
(242) 356-3100
(242) 322-3740
Email: bahamasagribusinessexpo(@ yahoo.com





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a > =; ;
Nine hundred Bahamas entities set up

to facilitate UBS scheme, IRS alleges

FROM page 1B

grantor trusts in relation to US
tax law compliance.

The paper notes that simple
and grantor trusts would have
to provide new documents,
including a US Tax Identifica-
tion Number (TIN), to the US
authorities, with the identities
of beneficial owners having to
be disclosed. A number of solu-
tions to this dilemma were pro-
posed, including clients — before
July 31, 2004, - selling their US
securities, or the creation of
underlying companies.

In his affidavit, Reeves

alleged in relation to the July
6, 2004, memo: “UBS acknowl-
edged that it would be illegal
to recommend that its US cus-
tomers use offshore entities to
avoid their US reporting oblig-
ations.

“Nonetheless, in 2004, on its
own initiative, UBS planned to
create approximately 900 off-
shore corporations for its largest
US customers — those holding
UBS accounts with asset bal-
ances exceeding 500,000 Swiss
francs.

“It intended to create 650
such dummy corporations for
customers it could not contact
by October 31, 2004, and anoth-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WATEREDGE OCEAN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,













Bahamas.

er 250 dummy corporations for
customers it could not contact,
and who UBS expected would
employ these dummy corpora-
tions to hide their Swiss
accounts from the IRS.”

The July 6, 2004, document
states that for clients who could
not be contacted by July 31,
2004, “UBS will establish an
underlying company in the
Bahamas for UBS internal
structures holding US securities
above a threshold of Swiss
francs 500,000. This will result in
550 underlying companies to be
set up.”

And it added: “UBS will
establish an underlying compa-

Envy nightclub owner hits back at

FROM page 1B

since she opened her club
almost three months ago.

“T don’t sell drugs or prosti-
tutes,” she said. “And I have
not seen any of that going on
in this building either.”

She told Tribune Business
that she took exception to Mr
Pikramenos labelling her
patrons, who come specifically
to visit her business, as "riff-
raft".

"Who is riff-raff? What's the
definition of riff-raff? Is he riff-

ny in the Bahamas for the
remaining UBS internal struc-
tures where the total invested
assets are above a threshold of
10 million Swiss francs, and the
total value of US securities
Swiss francs 10,000. This will
result in an additional 100
underlying companies to be set
Uu

Another 250 were to be cre-
ated for the estimated 20 per
cent of clients who could not be
contacted, but would wish to
have the same structure, the
document alleged. To help cre-
ate the structures, UBS alleged-
ly needed another seven foun-
dation and trust experts to be

raff? Am I riff-raff? Are you
riff-raff?" she exploded.

"Everybody is important,
everybody is a VIP. Why does
he have the right to say they are
riff-raff? They are people who
come to have a good time, and
have never caused a problem
in my club. I have to defend my
customers because they are
good people; they are not riff
raff.”

According to Ms Leeder, she
has never had a fight occur in
her club, partly because she
employs 15 security guards dur-
ing the busiest nights. She said

26° BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE

sent to the Bahamas for three
months, with an extra two based
in this nation full-time to help
administer the companies.

Meanwhile, an alleged 2004
UBS internal review of US res-
ident ‘non-W9 clients, mean-
ing those who had not supplied
the IRS with information on US
account holders, was tabled
with the US courts. It claimed
to show that in 2003, some 358
of Bahamas-based UBS clients,
with combined assets under
management of $894 million,
were non-compliant with the
W-9 requirements. Only four
were alleged to be in compli-
ance.

there are also constant police
patrols from the station one
block away.

Many property owners along
the strip between the West Bay
Hotel and Royal Palm Hotel
are confident that the area is
preparing for a boom in busi-
ness. With the peak of Spring
Break only weeks away, Envy is
preparing to attract its share of
that seasonal business, which
means music and drinks during
the daytime and parties at night.

“Everybody is going to go
after their share of that busi-
ness,” said Ms Leeder. “I will

Other court documents
include 2002 internal UBS e-
mails, saying that the bank’s
position on ‘corporate’ clients
with a US beneficial owner was
“applicable to accounts either
in Nassau or in Switzerland — a
consistent approach is applied”.

The same e-mail exchange
also says: “Can you please issue
an info in Nassau to that effect,
so that everyone is on the same
page”. It also expresses no opin-
ion on whether the Bahamas’
then-newly-signed Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agreement
(TIEA) with the US “calls for a
different treatment of such
structures in Nassau”.

her critics

just try to keep my music at an
acceptable level.”

According to her, the revital-
isation of the area and the com-
pletion of renovations to the
Mayfair will spell more business
for everyone in the area. She
hopes she and her neighbours
can find the solidarity to exploit
it in all of their best interests.

"You can eat here, you can
drink, have a good time and
then go home. There's police
right next doo. There are
restaurants, there is a club. You
can't ask for more along this
strip,” Ms Leeder said.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BONFIRE SPARKS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of January 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MONTRES INTERNATIONAL
HOLDING LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 15th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VAZE INVESTMENTS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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Legal Notice

NOTICE
BON VIVANT COMPANY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHANEL RIVER INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

The Compliance Commission
3rd Floor, Charlotte House
Charlotte Street South

Relocation and Temporary
Telephone Lines

The Public is advised that, effectively
immediately, The Compliance
Commission has relocated to the 3rd
Floor of Charlotte House, Charlotte Street
South, and may be contacted at the
following telephone number:

356-5717

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEMPER VERDE CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 19th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MULBERRY SLOPES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of November 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE



SHOWN (I-r) are Marietta Russell; Steve Davis, Wendy Warren, Sanchi-
na Kemp and Candia Dames. Missing from the photo is Patricia Glinton-

Meicholas.

Short Term Apartment
Cheaper than a Hotel

ea? week -weeks
Tee FLA HLA

HORE Av NG FROM HOME

month

BORD AW aAT
PROM MOrl



ACCOUNTANT NEEDED

For an Established Accounting Firm
Must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting
Strong work ethics and a professional disposition

All interested persons
Please apply via email to: S.Laquel@ gmail.com
or Call 242-393-0858. Ask for Ms. Hall or Ms. Farrington
Deadline: February 25, 2009

aS eRTTT
judging panel

THE Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) has
announced the judging panel
for this year’s Essay and Speech
Competitions, now underway
in secondary schools through-
out New Providence.

They are Candia Dames,
news editor, Nassau Guardian;
Marietta Russell, BFSB’s
achiever of the year (Bank of
the Bahamas); Patricia Glinton-
Meicholas, Bahamian author;
Sanchina Kemp, BFSB’s FSI
student of the year (Deloitte);
and Steve Davis, UBS
Bahamas.

Wendy Warren, BFSB’s chief
executive and executive direc-
tor, said the organisation intro-
duced its school outreach pro-
gramme in 2001 to profile the
important role human resource



development plays in financial
services sector growth.

“With the support of the
guidance counsellors — and the
Business and English Teachers
—in the secondary schools, the
Essay/Speech Competition por-
tion of this outreach is intended
to help promote a more com-
prehensive knowledge of the
sector, while at the same time
encouraging good research and
writing skills,” she added.

The competitions are co-
sponsored by the Ministry of
Education, Ministry of Finance,
Rotary Club of East Nassau,
and Rotary Sunrise — in collab-
oration with the Professional
Industry Associations.

Corporate sponsors are
Bahamas Business Solutions
and KPMG.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 7B

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~
*B) PICTET
PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

INFORMATION SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

-Excellent organizer, communicator and coordinator.

-Responsible, thorough and resourceful.

-Flexible, committed and willing to invest long hours as needed.
-Innovative and willing to learn new technology.

-Ability to function independently but able to work as part of a team.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Microsoft Office

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Lotus Notes.

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with basic hardware

(PC, server, printers...).

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Windows XP &
tools.

-Knowledge of and experience with Windows 2003 servers
administration.

-Knowledge of and experience with Active Directory.

-Knowledge of and experience with PDA’s & Mobility.
-Knowledge of and experience with AS/400 operation and system
administration.

-Knowledge of and experience with telecommunications and network.

-Basic knowledge of Unix Administration.

-At least five (5) years experience in System Administration and User
Support, at least two (2) years of which should be in a Bank/Trust
environment.

-Written and spoken French would be an asset.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND to:-
The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay Street & Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

APPLICATION DEADLINE: FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009
Offices in

Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London, Luxembourg,
Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome, Singapore, Tokyo, Turin, Zurich

NOTICE

The Bahamas Public Services Union
Contributory Medical Plan will conduct a
Membership Meeting for The Medical Plan
Members Only, at 7:00p.m. on Friday, March
6, 2009 at the Bahamas Public Services Union
Meeting Hall, East Street South, off Soldier
Road.

All Members are urged to attend

Refreshments will be served following the
meeting.

Stephen J. Miller
General Secretary





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





PM changes ‘rules of
the game’ on new port

FROM page 1B shipping needs.

“Tt won’t be an issue. We’ll

‘91 DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

DR. MEYER RASSIN
FOUNDATION
SCHOLARSHIPS



The Doctors Hospital Dr. Meyer
Rassin Foundation is pleased to
announce that applications are now
being accepted for scholarships &
financial assistance for students
pursuing healthcare careers.



4 Applicants must be Bahamian
. at citizens & return to the Bahamas
aaa upon completion of their studies.

Applications are available on our
website at www.doctorshosp.com.
Only completed applications with
required documentation submitted
would be considered.

Deadline for submission — of
completed application forms & all
supporting documentation is

March 31, 2009.

The Doctors Hospital
Dr. Meyer Rassin Foundation
P.O.Box N3018 ¢ Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

www.doctorshosp.com/foundation

1B
HOSPITAL

DR. MEYER RASSIN
paeLU pe eNleay



have it resolved by Monday
[today] or Tuesday. It won’t be
a deal breaker.”

The Arawak Cay port will
house the container and freight
terminals currently situated on
Bay Street, which will be re-
located to the new site as part of
the overall downtown Nassau
improvement project.

Mr Mosko acknowledged to
Tribune Business that the Prime
Minister had “changed a few lit-
tle things” when he and other
representatives of the Arawak
Cay Port Development Com-
pany met Mr Ingraham last
week, but “in no way” was it a
“game changer”.

“Tt’s still full steam ahead,”
said an upbeat Mr Mosko. “This
delays us by a week or two.
We've got to go back to the 19
investors and say: “These are
the rules of the game. If you still
want in, fine, if not, goodbye.’
But I’m confident everyone is
going to stay in.”

While Mr Mosko was
emphatically upbeat, down-
playing any notion of a potential
problem, several observers sug-
gested that the fact he had to
go back to all shareholders to
deliver the news, and see
whether they wanted to remain
as financial stakeholders in the
project, indicated something sig-
nificant had changed.

Sources familiar with the sit-
uation said the Arawak Cay
Port Development Company
had presented a detailed Mem-
orandum of Understanding
(MoU), detailing the whole pro-

ject proposal and its structure,
to the Government.

“They have presented a
detailed Memorandum of
Understanding to the Govern-
ment, which has been agreed in
principle, and are waiting for
final approval,” one source, who
did not know of last week’s
meeting, told Tribune Business.

Independent

“Halcrow [the independent
engineering consultants] have
done most of their work, and
are waiting for final approval to
put everything in final form for
bidding.”

The MoU was said to set out
the whole concept and overall
plan for the Arawak Cay port,
in addition to the proposal’s
structure and how it would be
financed.

Mr Mosko indicated that Mr
Ingraham had sought to alter
part of the MoU’s terms. “The
Prime Minister was clear on
what he wanted, and it’s what
we expected,” he told Tribune
Business. “They’ve given us the
feedback we needed.”

Mr Mosko added that con-
sultants for the Arawak Cay
Port Development Company
would be surveying the pro-
posed port site over the week-
end gone, with a view to deter-
mining its boundaries so that a
lease for the land and seabed
could be signed with the Gov-
ernment.

“We are doing the survey this
weekend and will give it to the

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT T

HANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CHOVOSKY
ALEXANDER BOWE Il of Atwar Court, Foxdale Subdivision,
PO. Box FH-14234, Nassau, The Bahamas, intend to change
my name to CHOVOSKY ALEXANDER JACKSON. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

CIA MIS ‘CF RICEEIS

Security & General Insurance Company (S&G), a subsidiary of Colonial Group International Limited (CGI), is
seeking to appoint an individual to the position of Claims Officer.

CGI, with offices in Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands as well as The Bahamas, offers a
complete range of premier financial and insurance services and continues to demonstrate significant growth
in these areas of business. This is an opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing and innovative company

focused on providing our clients with first class service linked to competitive products.

Reporting to the Claims Manager, the Claims Officer will be responsible for the processing of claims
enquiries using the Company’s procedural guidelines and coordinating with the Claims Supervisor on the
daily operational tasks within the Claims Department. The successful candidate should possess:

A CERT Cll or equivalent qualification

A minimum of three years experience handling and negotiating settlements of Personal Lines claims
Strong administration skills and claims negotiation experience

Competency in the use and application of standard Microsoft software applications
Good communication, presentation, and writing skills

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked to performance. S&G offers an
attractive benefits package that includes comprehensive medical & life insurance, a contributory pension plan

and long term disability coverage.

If you have a keen commitment to quality, are results oriented with a desire to contribute your talents to a
dynamic company, contact us about this opportunity. Applications will be treated in the strictest confidence

and should be made in writing to:
Security & General Insurance Co. Ltd.
Attn: Human Resources

P.O. Box N-3540, Nassau, Bahamas

Or by email to: bs_hr@atlantichouse.com.bs

PM, with a view to getting the
lease,” Mr Mosko added.

It is unclear what specific
terms Mr Ingraham wanted to
alter, although one source told
this newspaper it related to the
Arawak Cay port’s financing
and how this would be struc-
tured. The source also suggested
the Prime Minister had wanted
foreign capital to play a role in
the financing.

But this is no surprise, given
that the Arawak Cay Port
Development Company had
said from the outset that it
would be 60 per cent Bahamian-
owned at a minimum, thus leav-
ing the door open for foreign
investors and companies. The
Port-owning company was also
being structured to ensure no
one entity owned more than 15
per cent.

Mr Mosko confirmed this had
always been the intention, given
that Mediterranean Shipping
Company (MSC), Crowley and
Tropical Shipping — all with for-
eign ownership — were among
the Arawak Cay port’s pro-
posed 19 shareholders.

There was also speculation
that the proposed port was run-
ning into increasing opposition
from the Arawak Cay fish fry
vendors’ association, plus the
Bahamian cultural community,
who view industrial usage as
incompatible with developing
Arawak Cay into a centerpiece
venue for national culture/her-
itage.

Among those who have
objected to Arawak Cay’s selec-
tion as the site for the new port

is William Wong, the Bahamas
Real Estate Association’s
(BREA) president. Last year,
he told Rotarians that the loca-
tion “defies every sense of log-
ic”, running against sound plan-
ning principles by taking up the
last bit of prime real estate on
New Providence and present-
ing an unattractive first view of
Nassau to visiting cruise ship
passengers.

Still, the Arawak Cay port’s
proponents have argued that the
facility will serve Nassau and
New Providence’s shipping
needs for 50 years, with all
freight and cargo offloaded tak-
en to an inland terminal on
Gladstone Road. From there, it
would be distributed to its
respective owners.

Container

Currently, the container ship-
ping facilities in downtown Nas-
sau handle some 70,000 twen-
ty-foot equipment units (TEUs)
every year, a figure expected to
increase to 150,000 TEUs some
30 years from now.

Some have projected that if
a 50 per cent savings could be
made on current handling
charges for the 70,000 TEUs
imported into Nassau per
annum, some $7 million in sav-
ings could be passed on to
Bahamian consumers.

The Arawak Cay Port Devel-
opment Company is being
advised on its business plan by
KPMG Corporate Finance, with
Higgs & Johnson acting as its
attorneys.

TTT
TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
ShirleyStreet

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following positions for the

2009-2010 School Year

-Journalism/Literature (Gr, 10-12}
-Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr, 7-12)

-Math (Gr. 7-17)

-Physics (Gr. 10-12)

-Agriculture (Gr.7-9)

-Technical Drawing (Gr, 7-12)
-Accounts/‘Commerce/Economiecs (Gr, 10-12)
-Physical Education (Gr, 7-12)

-Spanish (Gr.7-12)

-Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)

-Chemistry

-Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
-Health Science (Gr, 7-9)
-General Science (Gr.7 -9)
-Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)

-Music (Gr. 7-12)

-Biology (Gr. 10-12)

Language Arts/Literature (Gr, 7-12)
-ArtCraft (Gr, 7-12)
-Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)
-Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
-Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)

-Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

Applicants must:
A c

a practicing bom-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Christian School.

B Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or Univerity
in the area of specialization.

Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or

Diploma,

Have at least two years teaching
experience in the relevant subject area
with excellent communications skills.
Applicants must have the ability to prepare

students for all examinations to the

BGCSE levels.

IC}

Be willing to participate in the high
school’s extra curricular programmes

Application must be picked up at the High
School Office on Shirley Street and be returned
with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph and three references to:

The closing date for applications is February 27th, 2009.

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas

SECURITY
& GENERAL

SECURITY & GENERAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Personal & Business Insurance
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue PO. Box N-3540, Nassau, Bahamas
tel. 326 7100 www.cgigroup.bm

Colonial Group International is
rated A- (Excellent) by AM Best

A member of Colonial Group International
Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life

be COLONIAL GROUP
lai INTERNATIONAL

Deadline for application is
March 6th, 2009





THE TRIBUNE



CAROLINE GARNHAM



foundations
law to be
unveiled

LEGISLATION designed to
give the Bahamas a significant
advantage over competing juris-
dictions in the private wealth
management niche is set to be
unveiled this week.

Caroline Garnham, a partner
in Lawrence Graham (LG), the
winner of the STEP Private
Client Team award in 2008, will
share draft legislation that she
and her colleagues have pro-
posed on Executive Founda-
tions during a workshop on
International Tax Planning,
which will take place this
Thursday following the two-day
Private Banking World 2009
Conference.

She will be joined for the
day-long workshop by top US
private client lawyer Basil Ziri-
nis, from Sullivan and
Cromwell in New York.

In the morning, Ms Garnham

and Mr Zinnis will talk about
the current market for private
client issues, US tax changes
and the recent move taken by
the Canton of Zurich in
Switzerland to repeal the forfait
system of taxation for foreign-
ers. This will dramatically
increase the taxation payable
for all Swiss foreign residents
of Zurich, such as Tina Turner.

Ms. Garnham is founder of
www.familybhive.com, winner
of Wealth Management Inno-
vation of the Year Award
2008. She writes a regular col-
umn for WMS Spears, for
which she has been nominated
columnist of the year 2009.

The Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board and the Associa-
tion of International Banks and
Trust Companies (AIBT) are
title sponsors of the Confer-
ence.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF MOHAMMED
BIN RASHID BIN ABDULLAH AL
FANNAH AL ARAIMI late of House
2651 Way No. 1949 Plot No. 80
Eastern Madinat, Qaboos, Sultanate
of Oman, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned
on or before the 25th day of March, 2009,
after which date the Administrators will

proceed to distribute the assets having regard
only to the claims of which they shall then
have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 9B

PuBnLtLic NOTICE
PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD LICENSE ARCHITECTS

Lr |S

Rodney W. Braynen, F.IB.A.
B. Arch.

John W. Darville, R.LB.A.
Dip. Arch., LB.A

Amos J. Ferguson, F.I.B.A.,
APA. B. Arch., M. Arch.

Anthony J. Jervis, FIL.B.A.
B.E.D., B. Arch., M. Arch.

Alvan K. Rolle, L.B.A.
B. Arch, Tech.

Douglas R.A. Smith R.IB.A.
FLB.A., Dip. Arch. BSc. MSc.

Gordon C. Major
B. Arch. Tech.

Arthur Colebrook, I.B.A.

Jonathan A. Adderley
LB.A., B.E.D., Dip. Arch.
M.A., P.U.G.

Michael C. Alexiou, B.A.
B. Arch,

Reginald W. Armbrister
B.Arch.

Neil Behagg, LB.A.
R.LB.A. Dip. Arch.

Gaetano A. Bonamy
B. Arch.

Trevor Bridgewater
B. Arch., M. Arch.

Victor R. Cartwright
B. Arch,

Ashward G. Ferguson
B. Arch., M. Arch.

Winston G. Jones
R.LB.A., Dip. Arch.
Dip. Urban Design
Kenneth V. Lam
R.LB.A., M.B.A.

Tram D. Lewis
B. Arch.

John L. McKenzie
B. Arch.
Clinton W. Pearce

B. Arch.

Andrew O. Stirling,
R.LB.A., B. Arch.

W. Kevin Sweeting, I.B.A.
B, Arts Arch, B, Arch.

Benjamin M. Albury
B. Arch.

Frederick D. Albury
B. Arch.

Andre W. Braynen, 1.B.A.
B. Arts Arch, Sc., B. Arch.

Sean A. Farrington
B. Sc. Arch. B. Arch.

Michael Foster
B. Sc., B. Arch.

Henry A. Hepburn, R.LB.A
LB.A.ALA.B. Arch.,
M. Arch., M.R.C.P.

Sean R. Mathews
Dip. Arch.

Charles J. Moss
B. Sc. Arch.

Alicia C-A. Oxley
B. Arch. M. Arch.

David 8. White
R.IB.A., R.ALC.

Douglas A. Minns, I.B.A.

R. John Paine, RA.LA., A.A.LA,
. Arch,

B. Are!

Jackson L, Burnside III, I.B.A.
R.LB.A., M. Arch,

Larry Forbes
B. Arch.

Jason P, Lorandos, B.A.
B. Arch., M. Arch.

David K. Griffiths
Dip. Arch.

Donald A. Dean

Bruce LaFleur
APA, ALA,
B. Sc. Envin. Des., M. Arch.

Michael J. Moss, I.B.A.
Garth W. Sawyer

Neville Bosfield
B. Arch.

Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Established by Act of Parliament 1994
P. O. Box CB-13040, 143 Nassau Street — Nassau, Bahamas

The Professional Architects Act 1994, empowers the “Professional Architects Board” to issue licenses to persons qualified to practice as Professional Architects
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The Act stipulates, “no person shall hold himself out as a Professional Architect or engage in public practice unless
he is the holder of a valid licence.” Any person who contravenes this provision is guilty of an offense and is liable on summary conviction to a fine, imprisonment
or both. Public Notice is hereby given that only the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board” to practice as “Professional
Architects” in the Bahamas until January 31, 2010.

pe at)

Phone No (242) 393-1874

P. O. Box N-1423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-2600
P.O. Box N-4556
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-0079
P.O. Box SS 6261
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-2628
P. O. Box N 7273
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-8141
P.O. Box N 7401
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-2600
P. O. Box N 4556
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242)
P. O. Box 3326
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-4061
P.O. Box N 3745
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-8893
P. O. Box N 9585
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-7383
P.O, Box N 672
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 395-1148
P. O. Box EE 16704
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-8109
P. O. Box CB 11187
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 367-2496
P. O. Box AB-20676
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Phone (242) 394-0014
P. O. Box N 8244
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1896
P.O. Box N 4383
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-7334
P.O. Box N 8156
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-1520
P. O. Box SS 5377
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2114
P. O. Box SS 5730
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 361-4972
P. O. Box CR 56998
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-8415
P.O. B ox N 3356
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 424-1463
P. O. Box EE 17989
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-7982
P. O. Box SS 5399
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-8150
P, O. Box N 3211
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-3552
P.O. Box N 1731
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-5916
P. O. Box N-1677
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-1874
P.O. Box N1423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 465-3738
P. O. Box N 7627
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-3385
P.O. Box N 1190
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-9389
P.O. Box 7248
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-4538
P. O. Box SS 19909
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 352-5204
P. O. Box F 41247
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 394-3251
P. O. Box CB11836
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1547
P.O. Box N 1013
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-4736
P. O. Box N 7936
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-2945
P. O. Box CB 11499
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-1886
P. O. Box N 1207
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-2021
P. O. Box SS 6351
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-4372
P. O. Box SS-6077
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 559-7200
P.O. Box F 40257
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 352-4835
P. O. Box F 41609
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 328-7240
P. O. Box FH 14435
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-5913
P.O. Box N 7091
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 464-1798
P. O. Box Ex 29276
Exuma, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-1900
P.O. Box SS 6351
Nassau, Bahamas

Bet ie

001

002

003

00S

007

008

010

O11

012

013

014

ols

016

018

019

020

021

022

023

024

025

027

028

029

031

032

033

035

036

038

039

042

049

050

055

056

057

060

061

063

065

Wr |S

Leo D. Ferguson

Patrick A. Rahming
B. Sc., B. Arch.

Timothy H. Neill, R.LB.A.
LB.A., Dip. Arch.

John W. McCardy
B. Arch.

Alberto G. Suighi, LB.A.
Phd. Arch.

Hyacinth Allen
B. Arch.

Tyrone Burrows
B. Arch.

Dwight M. Thompson
LB.A., B, Arch.

Jennifer A. Saunders
B. Arch.

Livingston Forbes
B. Arch.

Hiram H. Lockhart
Pier Baldacci
Lawrence Chisholm

Bruce M. Stewart
LB.A., A.LA., B. Arch.

Michael A. Diggiss
LB.A., B. Arch.

Thomas M. Dean
B. Arch., M. Arch,

Robert M. Isaacs
Dip. Arch.

Dirk K. Saunders

B. Arch.

Godwin Cargill
Robert Whittingham
Stephen J. Bain

B. Arch.

Jeremiah Moxey

B. Arch.

C, Bermardo Deleveaux

Lawrence C. Smith

Mark W. Henderson, I.B.A.

RIB.A., B. Sc., B. Arch.

Kevin R. Bryce
B. Sc. Arch, Arch. Eng.

Mark A. Smith
B. Arch., MLA

Copeland Moxey
B. Arch.

Carlos J. Hepburn
B. Arch., B.A.

Tan A. Bullard
B. Arch.

Timothy F, Johnson
B. Arch.

Tariq J. O’Brien, R.LB.A.
B. A. Dip., Arch. Dip.
Uban Design

Mark M. Braithwaite
B. Arts, B. Arch.

Stefan P. Russell
B. Arch., B.A.

Terry-Jeanne P. Thompson
IB.A., B.E.D.S.

Kesna M. Hunt
B. Arch.

Jan Brent Creary
B. Arch.

Samuel R. Williams
B. Arch.

Carlan A. Johnson
B. Arts, Arch Sc.
B. Arch.

Dezon A. Curry
B. Arch., M. Arch.

Jechelle T. Rolle
Bs. Arch. Studies

Wilfred B. Dorsett, B.A.
B. Sc. Tech.

Vanru 5S. Hepburn
B. Sc., B Arch.

February 2009

Pd) tt)

Phone (242) 324-5566
P. O. Box SS 6261
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-9080
P. O. Box N 9926
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 367-5415
P.O. Box AB 20006
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Phone (242) 332-2987
P. O. Box EL-25078
Governor’s Harbour
Eleuthera

Phone (242) 327-2335
P. O. Box CB 13177
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-4991
P. O. Box N-966
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 382-0611
P. O. Box N 9876
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-3220
P. O., Box CB 13826
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-1411
P.O. Box CB 12364
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-9738
P. O. Box N 4230
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-7789
P.O. Box CB 13452
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-4764
P.O. Box N 4674
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-6261
P. O. Box N 9025
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-8800
P.O. Box N 366
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-8916
P.O. Box CB 11388
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1170
P. O. Box N540
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1680
P.O. Box 1207
Nassau, Bahamas

Pone (242) 557-2308
P. O. Box CR-54122
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-0218
P. O. Box EE-16270
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-6591
P. O. Box CB-13846
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-6029
P. O. Box N-10083
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-4846
P. O. Box CR-54501
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-5103
P. O. Box GT-2277
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 427-1565
P.O. Box N1412
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-3274
P.O. Box CB 12436
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-4538
P.O. Box SS-19909
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-0486
P. O. Box SS 6888
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 457-2107
P. O. Box CB-12689
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-5166
P. O. Box CR-54090
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 362-2719
P. O. Box CR-54746
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 364-7813
P. O. Box SS-6906
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2114
P.O. Box 9116
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-7259
P. O. Box CB-11454
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-4982
P.O. Box CR-54423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 362-6306
P.O. Box N 402
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 352-4835
P. O. Box F-43578
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 394-1886
P. O. Box N-3857
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242)
P. O. Box CR-54385
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-9080
P. O. Box N 9926
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 424-1541
P.O. Box 29151
Exuma, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-2767
P. O. Box SB-50045
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-5529
P.O. Box N 842
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2829
P. O. Box GT-2368
Nassau, Bahamas

Ale te ey

067

070

071

072

073

074

075

076

077

078

079

080

082

083

084

085

086

087

088

089

091

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099

101

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113

114

115

PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD

LICENSED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNICIANS PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS ACT, 1994

Public Notice is hereby given that the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board”
to practice as “Professional Architectural Technicians” until 31 January 2010.

Pld) tat)

LICENCE #

persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators
Chambers
P.O. Box N-3247
Ocean Centre
Montagu Foreshore
East Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas



Henry A. Delancy

Michael A. Jones

Laurin L. Knowles

Ryan A. Archer

B. Se. Arch. Tech.

C. Jenkin Williams

Lockhart W. Turnquest

Phone (242) 326-8141
P. O. Box 6583
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 334-0458
Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera

Phone (242) 327-7486
P.O. Box N 3049
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 337-0025
Mangrove Bush
Long Island, Bahamas

Phone (242) 367-2001
P.O. Box 579
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Phone (242) 352-2500
P. O. Box F 44107
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 337-1086
P. O. Box DC 30607
Grey’s, Long Island

|S

Solomon J. Smith
Coralyn T. Adderley
B. Arch

Jermaine Evans
Trevor Butterfield

Brent Key

Pld) tat

Phone (242) 361-6517
P. O. Box N 10888
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-1247
P. O. Box GT-2315
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 646-3801
P. O. Box F 60283
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 352-7154
P. O. Box F 44042
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 367-4143
P. O. Box AB-20702
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

LICENCE #







PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

BEC targets ‘within $1-2m

THE TRIBUNE

of break even’ goal for ‘09

FROM page 1B

fuel imports, at the end of the
first year in September, we hope
to be close to a break even
point, through in-house effi-
ciencies and other measures we
have taken.”

Confirming that BEC has
“been in a loss position since
2004” year-end on September
30 of that year, Mr Gottlieb said
the loss “wasn’t very much”
then, “but has risen very quick-
Ly?

“Our losses for the last finan-
cial year were around $18 mil-
lion,” he confirmed. Such a

rapidly worsening financial posi-
tion has impacted BEC’s cash
flow, liquidity and balance sheet
to such an extent that it is no
longer in the once-enviable
position, as far as government-
owned corporations go, of being
able to obtain credit for long-
term infrastructure develop-
ment without government guar-
antees.

Mr Gottlieb said he “would
not negate” recent comments
from Dr Earl Deveaux, minister
of the environment, who has
ministerial responsibility for
BEC, that the Corporation
required $200 million in short-

term financing.

The BEC chairman said of
the Corporation’s infrastructure
needs: “They are quite consid-
erable, and so it is challenging at
this point in time. We are look-
ing for financing, and the Gov-
ernment is assisting us in that
regard.”

When asked whether this
meant that government would
have to guarantee — effectively
underwrite any syndicated loan
or bond issue, Mr Gottlieb
replied: “That’s what we’re try-
ing to work through right now.”

BEC’s financial position had
“improved to some degree,

Apphicatons are invited from suitably qualified persons for the position of Senior Manager
- Investments with the National Insurance Board:

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES
Manage portfolio of the National Insurance Board’s Investments, ensuring that
lnvestment decisions that are made conform to Comphance, Strategic, Risk and Yveld

objectives of the Board.

Mamntain Statutory imuts of all investments holdings with respective financial institutions,

prepantiy man apemvent reports to show compliance.

Represent the National Insurance Board as requested and required im stakeholder
meetings, investment discussions, and/or Public Relations events relative to invest-

ment portfolio,

Design and prepare as needed/requested, management reports of all investments,
indusive of Investment Holdings, Risk Statos, Outstanding issues, and/or other key

metrics.

Develop and/or maintain relationships with the National Insurance Board approved
Brokers, with specific focus on compliance, increasing investment opportunities and/

Or maximizing returns.

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE, SAILL & EAPERIENCE

At least a Bachelors Degree in a Business related discipline, preferably Finance or

A ccounting.

Professional designation i ml Finance (c “FA ur its equiv: alent) and jt ur have ao menpbeted a
professional designation in Accounting (CPA or its equivalent). (Consideration will be
given to applicants nearmg CFA qualificabon)

Poor expenence in managing a diversified mvestment portfolio.

APPLICATION

Interested persons may apply by submitting a completed application form, along with the
necessary proaf af qu: alification on or before Friday, February 27, 2009, to:

Assistant Director

Human Resources Department

National Insurance Board
Clifford Darling Complex
Nassau, Bahamas



thanks to the Government
exemption from having to pay
customs duty” on its oil imports.
As global oil prices soared to a
$147 per barrel peak last July,
the Government in its 2008-
2009 Budget introduced a two-
year window exempting BEC
from paying 10 per cent cus-
toms duty, and 7 per cent stamp
tax, on its fuel imports.

Mr Gottlieb said these tax
exemptions had saved BEC “in
excess of $10 million” last year,
adding: “That was a big strain
on us, particularly when you
had the oil price surge last
year.”

The subsequent dramatic
decline in global oil prices had
helped BEC’s financial position
“a tremendous amount”, Mr
Gottlieb added, telling Tribune
Business: “The situation has
improved through the customs
duty exemption, and oil prices
have fallen dramatically, which
is helping us a lot as well.”

BEC is understood to have
spent $350 million on fuel
imports alone in 2008, but this
was not the only reason cited
for the decline in the Corpora-
tion’s financial position.

“The former government
administration directed BEC to
reduce the tariffs,” Mr Gottlieb
said. “It had the effect of suck-
ing $18 million of revenue away
per year, and that’s unfortunate.
Because up until then, BEC was
in position to have the neces-
sary economic ratings to get
financing for its capital projects.
That was significantly under-
mined.”

This had forced the Ingraham
administration to ride to BEC’s
rescue and give it a two-year
amnesty on customs and stamp
duty payments.

“In that two-year period,
we’re trying to do everything
we can to make BEC as effi-
cient as possible, so that when
we come to the end of that two-
year period, we will see the Cor-
poration move forward on a
sound financial footing.”

Mr Gottlieb confirmed to Tri-
bune Business that Kevin Bas-
den, BEC’s general manager,
will not be affected by the man-
agement restructuring and
remains at his post. However,
he declined to confirm or deny
that among those set to leave
BEC are chief financial officer
Everette Sweeting; assistant
general manager with respon-
sibility for finance, Brian
Albury; and in-house legal
counsel, Shelley Cooke-Sey-
mour.

“This restructuring is really
something initiated by the pre-
sent Board, and is focused on
the functions of executive man-
agement, in terms of the struc-
ture and various offices held,
and the people holding those
offices,” Mr Gottlieb told Tri-
bune Business.

“BEC’s financial standing has
deteriorated significantly over
the last five years or so, and the
Board is working to make the
company as efficient as possi-
ble. One of the areas we’ve
focused on is the executive lev-
el, and to flatten it out and not

make it so top-heavy.”

Implying that there were
would be personnel moves,
including promotions, taking
place within BEC, Mr Gottlieb
declined to confirm the posts
or persons affected. “It would
be premature and irresponsible
for us to confirm any of that, or
make any comment on that,”
Mr Gottlieb said.

“We are in the process of
doing certain things, and until
that is finished, it would be
wrong to confirm if any of those
individuals are leaving the Cor-
poration or not. That will be
made public in due course —
who is staying or not.” It is
thought that the Board wants
to reduce BEC’s executive man-
agement to 11-12, rather than
the present 15.

Mr Gottlieb said the restruc-
turing had been intended to
send a message to Bahamian
taxpayers and BEC customers
that the Corporation was doing
everything possible to lower
costs and generate a better
return, rather than put the focus
on personalities and suggest
BEC was “getting rid of peo-
ple”.

Mr Gottlieb agreed with Tri-
bune Business, though, that the
natural reaction in these situa-
tions was to focus on those who
were leaving. He added: “It’s
not about individuals, but the

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT



measures being taken to
restructure the company and
achieve greater efficiency inter-
nally.

“There’s only so far we can
go with that; to a large extent,
we’re at the mercy of external
forces, but the Bahamian tax-
payer will know everything that
can be done is being done to
make BEC more efficient.”

Mr Gottlieb said the five-year
industrial agreement reached
with the Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union (BEWU) had
been critical, explaining: “That
allows us to focus on other
areas, and we feel optimistic we
will see significant improve-
ments. Some are happening as
we speak.

“We’re making progress, and
seeing improvements all the
time.”

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



2007
CrE/euU1/330

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of EVERETTE
STANFORD MILLER and HELEN DIANNE MILLER

AND

IN THE MATTER of the QUIETING
OF TITLES ACT OF 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE two (2)
pieces, parcels or tracts of land totaling 133.64
acres situate Eastwardly of the Settlement of
Deep Creek in the Island of Eleuthera, Bahamas
being immediately West of “The Delancy Estate”
on the Northern side of Queen’s Highway, called
and known as “The Wallace Estate” and more
particularly described as follows:

1. ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of
land totaling 129.98 acres bounded on
the South by land owned by various
owners from Deep Creek Settlement
on the West partly by land owned
by various owners from Deep Creek
Settlement and partly by a twelve (12)
foot wide Road Reservation called
“Free Town Road” on the North by
land owned by various owners from
Deep Creek Settlement and on the East
by a tract of land called and known as

“Delancy Estates”

sand

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract
of land totaling 3.66 acres bounded
Southwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
Westwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
Northwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
and Eastwardly by a twelve (12) foot
wide Road Reservation called and
known as “Free Town Road”.

NOTICE

EVERETTE STanrorD MILLER and HELEN Dianne MILLER claim to
be the owners in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and have made application to the Supreme Court in
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting
Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provision of
the said Act.

EG CAPITAL MARKETS
ROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,682.04 | CHG 3.75 | %CHG 0.22 | YTD -30.32 | YTD % -1.77
FINDEX: CLOSE 821.34 | YTD -1.62% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00
Bis LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade ona Ease Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
0.00 T%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
6.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
11.23 12.04 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387
2.9230
1.4376
3.3856
12.6180
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0401
1.0330
1.0410
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

rae A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal office hours
iv e .
1.39 in the following places:
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.88
2.27
6.02
11.00
10.45
6.01
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.15
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50

1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.04
2.40
7.76
11.28
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50

0.070
0.992
0.319
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.255
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said
City of Nassau;
The Administrators Office at Rock Sound,
Eleuthera;

oo99990000000000000
20000N9032000000000

The Chambers of Bethel, Moss &
Co., Cumberland House, Cumberland
& Duke Streets, New Providence,
Bahamas, Attorneys for the Petitioners

eoooomoo2000COoooO

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest
FBB17
FBB22

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
i: ity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
ity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

100.00

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
a right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the 21st day of April, 2009 from the
publication of the Notice inclusive of the day of such publication file
Notice in the Supreme Court in the city of Nassau 1n the Island of New
providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned
a statement of his/her claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. The failure of any such person to file
and serve a statement of his/her claim within the time fixed by the
Notice aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

52wk-Low Symbol EPS $ Div $ P/E

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Div $
1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3856
11.8789

100.0000

96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-O7
31-Dec-08
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bend Fund

Dated this 13th day of February, A. D., 2009

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund 4.10

BETHEL, MOSS & CO.
Chambers Cumberland House
Cumberland & Duke Streets
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioners

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 11B





Attorney authors green
practice guide for lawyers

A BAHAMIAN attorney has
co-authored an international
law firm network’s guide on the
best ‘green’ practices for
lawyers, with the focus on
reducing paper use to lower
energy consumption and the
carbon footprint.

Merrit Storr, a partner at
Chancellors Chambers, helped
to write The Green Guide for
Lawyers, produced by the inter-
national Meritas network of law
firms, in a bid to reduce the vol-
ume of paper used by attorneys
every year.

Mr Storr said the idea for the
guide came from the fact its
producers “did not think that
law firms in the Meritas net-
work were aggressively seeking



CRE C eee Ld

The Tribune

Real Estate |

TL tt

either to go green themselves,
or were appreciating the oppor-
tunities that exist with clients
whose businesses were trying
to go green.

“Firms need to start thinking
about reducing paper use
through recycling or other
means, and also reducing ener-
gy consumption, investing in
sustainability education for their
employees, and investing in or
contributing to organisations
that are spreading the message
of sustainability.”

Mr Storr encouraged
Bahamian law firms to conduct
an environmental audit of their
offices, and explore ways of cur-
tailing paper use and improv-
ing office energy efficiency.

te
a
.
.
5
.

ACCOUNTS ASSISTANT

He said: “While ‘going green’
is, to a large extent, about
reducing carbon dioxide fuel
emissions into the atmosphere,
and thus reversing or mitigat-
ing global warming trends, the
Bahamian marketplace has yet
to commit, or give a high pri-
ority, to incorporating green
practices in day-to-day business
activities.

Businesses

“This is probably because
they are not convinced it is good
for the bottom line of their busi-
nesses. Alternatively, in North
America, introducing environ-
mentally friendly green prac-
tices is very topical with Meritas

Apartment Communities t Rentals

lft,

Pe alleal

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is responsible for administering
The Bahamas Ship Register, which is the third largest in the world.
The Authority prides itself on the high standards and good safety

record of its fleet.

Applications are invited for the position of Accounts Assistant, to
be based in London. The successful candidate will be responsible
to the Senior Accountant.

Duties would include:

¢ Assist in the preparation of management and financial reports

law firms. Furthermore, clients
of those firms are adjusting their
business models to accommo-
date green practices.”

Among the process changes
advocated by The Green Guide
is the digitisation of paper files.
Bentata Abogados, a Venezue-
lan member firm, has adopted
the recommended processes,
and Karel Bentata, its manag-
ing partner, said: “The impact of
this project was 100 per cent
positive. We are not aware of
any negative impact.”

Major organisational changes
are not without some chal-
lenges, the two major ones
being process and people. Mr
Bentata added: “Perhaps the
difficult part is designing the

workflow to be followed. This
means that each file has to be
checked and then scanned in
order to finally eliminate the
excess paper.

Factor

“Also, there is an important
human factor which is reluctant
to change. However, by identi-
fying a technology-friendly
manager or director to begin
your project, you maximise the
possibilities of a success story,
which fortunately was our
case.”

To achieve total digitisation,
Bentata Abogados had to spend
$50,000 on consulting, licensing,
and installing a powerful new

computer server. Yet reducing
the need for paper storage
allowed it to sell premium office
space, which offset the cost—a
win-win situation.

One of the biggest gains has
been the ability to reduce the
wait time in responding to
clients’ requests for files or in
forwarding material to other
attorneys.

Other recommended conser-
vation practices in the Guide
include lowering energy con-
sumption by reducing the num-
ber of light bulbs, and eliminat-
ing bottled water and personal
printers. Bentata Abogados also
plans to introduce a flexible
working-from-home scheme for
employees.

MUST SELL

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY
— Englerston Subdivision

Andros Ave.

Interested persons should submit offers in writing to:

The Manager
Credit Risk Management
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than March 13, 2009

Nassau Airport

Development Company

The Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) is seeking candidates

for the position of Construction Project
Manager/Coordinator. Reporting directly to
the Construction Manager, the duties and
responsibilities of the successful applicant

will include:

Reviewing design drawings and



2 bedrooms,
I bath

© Comprises:
Property 3,600 sq. ft/
Building 733 sq. ft.

For conditions of
sale and other
information,
please contact:

Phone:
356-1685,
502-1929

or 356-1608

CAREER

OPPORTUNITY

Construction Project Manager/
Coordinator

Potential candidates will possess an
Engineering Degree, EIT or other technical
qualifications required and 5-10 years of
construction related experience on one or
more large scale projects with emphasis
on heavy civil, utilities, earthworks and

paving. Applicants must have the ability to
read and interpret construction drawings.

They should have excellent computer skills

¢ Data Input into the accounting package
¢ Performance of bank reconciliations
e Accounts Payables and Receivables

technical specifications

Providing feedback to the design

team as it relates to scope, schedule,
constructability, phasing and budget
Working with the Project Team on tasks
related to tendering, procurement and
evaluation of contractors and vendors
Coordination of quality assurance and
quality contro! testing and Ministry of
Works inspections

Liaising with local utility companies and
stakeholders to facilitate the sequencing
and phasing of the project and to
maintain the overall schedule
Communicating and interfacing with a
multi-disciplined design and construction
team including architectural, structural,
mechanical, electrical, civil and
environmental

Assisting with contract administration,
reporting, site inspection and
commissioning of project contracts

including MS Office, AutoCAD, scheduling
software or other related software.

Excellent analytical and problem solving
skills, oral and written communications
skills required. Candidates should

also have superior interpersonal and
organizational skills.

Prior experience working in an airport
environment a plus but not required.

Applicants for the post should hold an Accounting, Economics,
Finance or Business Degree. They must be self-motivated with the
ability to work without direct supervision in a hectic work
environment.

Remuneration will be commensurate with qualifications and
experience.

Applicants are invited to write in confidence, enclosing a copy of
their CV with photo attached and details of current salary to:-

If you are qualified and interested,
please submit your resume by

March 6, 2009 to:

Deputy Director Finance & Admin
The Bahamas Maritime Authority
Manx Corporate Centre

West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-4679
Nassau, The Bahamas

Fax: 242-356-5889

Deputy Director Finance & Admin
The Bahamas Maritime Authority
120 Old Broad Street

London EC2N 1AR

United Kingdom

Fax: 011 44 207 614 0670

Manager, People
Nassau Airport Development Co.
P.O. Box AP59229
Nassau, Bahamas

Only those applicants short listed will be
contacted.

Direct Email: finance@bahamasmaritime.com

Closing date for receipt of applications is 6th March, 2009











MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009
The stories behind the news

DEGREES: TIME FOR A RETHINK

Recession could force a review of the university system



ONE of the many by-products m By JOHN MARQUIS
Q M ing Edit
of the recession could be a Ss
9 9 OVER the last 30 , high-
thorough reappraisal of higher Pcie cee Ee

en” among middle-class fami-

education and whether it really fee aR ee nee

but also North America, Europe

serves a purpose in producing and Australasia.

A college degree is now seen

the ered aus kind of [eaey ee for the A. as not merely “proof” of an ele-
, d intelli d i
workplace. INSIGHT repotts... ~~ sa node ance

of social validation.

To have non-graduate chil-
dren in the family has become a
virtual no-no among the think-
ing classes, an admission of
defeat in an increasingly status-
conscious world.

Fortunes have been poured -
often at considerable sacrifice -
into the acquisition of gilded
certificates marking a young
person’s elevation into the intel-
lectual elite. So far it’s been
regarded as money well-spent.
But for how much longer as
economies shrink and unem-
ployment rises?

American writer Tom Wolfe,
whose 1987 novel The Bonfire
of the Vanities catalogued an age
of rampant materialism and
soaring social aspirations, has
said more than once that US
society is basically divided into
two major social groups - those
who have four-year degrees and
those who don’t.

The “haves”, he said, can
expect to secure good white-col-
lar jobs, earn respectable
salaries, and live comfortable
middle-class lifestyles, while the
“have nots” are left to struggle
in the lower reaches of a sup-
posedly egalitarian society.

Universities have cashed in
on this widely accepted belief
over the last quarter century,
promoting the notion that only
graduates have the intellectual
wherewithal to pursue demand-
ing careers, and driving a mon-
ey-based agenda which is now,
in these straitened times, bound
to come in for much closer
scrutiny.

In fact, higher education has
been one of the most impres-
sive growth industries of the
modern era. College bosses
have grown fat off the influx of
cash, especially from interna-
tional students who pay three
times the going rate for tertiary-
level schooling as parents strug-
gle to ensure their futures.

The “bums on seats” recruit-
ing dynamic of many colleges -
including some of the most pres-
tigious - has created an entire
generation of young people who
have emerged from campuses
in their early twenties with an
abundance of qualifications but
not a single clue about what
they want to do in life.

Armed with an array of diplo-
mas, trophies and other acade-
mic baubles, they find them-
selves well-qualified on paper,
but hopelessly ill-equipped for
the job at hand. Very often they
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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Will hard recession force
higher education review?

FROM page 1C

into long-term indebtedness
with little or nothing to show
for their pains at the end of it
all.

Instead of being directed into
worthwhile careers by college
courses and faculty advisers,
they are often left in limbo with
a multitude of supposed career
options which rarely materialise.
In many cases, they are woeful-
ly unsuited for the workplace,
and tottering dizzily under a
welter of unrealistic expecta-
tions.

Recessions do have their ben-
efits. Besides rooting out the
fraudsters, embarrassing the
profligate and exposing bankers
for what they really are, they
impose a reality check on soci-
ety and make everyone see
sense.

That process is already under-
way, as employers begin to
wonder whether college degrees
actually mean anything in terms
of identifying a student’s suit-
ability for a particular job.

JONES & CO

Doubts began to arise in my
own mind in the mid-1980s
while I was editing newspapers
in Britain. English language
graduates entering journalism
proved deficient in many key
areas.

Not only was their spelling
erratic, they were often
mediocre at sentence and story
construction, and seriously lack-
ing the kind of wide-ranging
general knowledge essential for
a newspaper career.

In fact, graduates frequently
had to “unlearn” many of the
bad habits they had picked up
on campus to become function-
al as junior reporters. Ham-
strung by academic jargon, they
had to free themselves from the
kind of convoluted terminology
expected of them in writing col-
lege essays to re-learn English
as an effective means of com-
munication.

Academics have in the past
frequently eschewed “voca-
tional” courses as essentially
second-rate, the preserve of the
technical colleges and night
schools. But more discerning

CiWA= IN

TO TEMPTATION



employers are now identifying
and singling out those univer-
sities which offer degree cours-
es relevant to the working envi-
ronment.

Autodidacts - the largely self-
taught - have long wondered
whether university education is
all it’s cracked up to be, espe-
cially as it so frequently fails to
address the basics. I’ve met his-
tory graduates who were com-
pletely unacquainted with most
of the major dates in European
and American history, includ-
ing 1485, 1588, 1605, 1649, 1745,
1805, 1807, 1815, 1832, 1833,
1865 and 1901. In one case, I
even drew a blank on 1066,
which IJ didn’t think possible.

Of course, education in its
broadest sense is always a good
thing. Colleges pride themselves
on sharpening up students’ crit-
ical skills. They insist that a
combination of discipline and
brainpower is essential for grad-
uation. There is no doubt that
we could all benefit from know-
ing more than we do.

But as economies tighten and
budgets come under review, it is
inevitable that employers and
parents will be looking closely
at higher education and won-
dering whether anyone gets a
fair return for their investment
when it comes to horrendously
expensive university courses
and the quality of students they
produce.

When I entered journalism in
the olden days (1961) nearly all
editorial recruits, along with
accountants, architects, solici-
tors and bankers, launched into
their professions via a three or
four-year period of articles or
indentureship.

In return for a virtually
unbreakable contractual com-
mitment to an employer for a
set period of time, a trainee was
guaranteed on-the-job training
bolstered in some cases by part-
time full-day or half-day release
courses.

In newspapers, the whole
process was overseen by a body
called the National Council for
the Training of Journalists,
which set standards for qualifi-
cation and ensured its diploma
only went to those of proven
competence.

By the age of 21 or 22, pro-
fessionals were fully functional
in their fields, able to earn a
good living for themselves, and
ready to meet the challenges of
their demanding careers.

University courses were seen,
in the main, as vehicles for pro-
pelling students into academia,
or enabling rich kids to keep
their minds occupied before
taking up executive roles in
family businesses.

Oxford and Cambridge were
then largely the preserves of
privileged students on their way
into the Foreign Office or the
Colonial Service. The brainiest
of them read Classics for some
odd reason, and the vaguest of
them headed into the Anglican
church via a theology degree.
No-one there gave a thought to
horny-handed occupations or
blue collar work. That was left
to the polytechnics, where City

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WILL a hard recession force a review of higher education and its place in modern society?

and Guild exams were open to
plumbers, electricians, joiners,
bricklayers and other trades.

It’s only since the late 1960s
and early 1970s that bachelor
degrees have been seen as
essential ‘passports’ to skilled
non-manual occupations. In
many ways, degrees now do the
job GCE O levels and A levels
did in times gone by.

Now the National Council for
the Training of Journalists, via
its student council, has come to
the conclusion that vocational
training is what really counts,
and that university degrees are
poor indicators of a student’s
worth in the workplace.

The news will not please the
hundreds, probably thousands,
of young people - a 24 per cent
increase over last year - now
applying for university courses
in Britain as preparation for
media careers, even at a time
when newspapers are contract-
ing and closing at a frightening
rate.

Yet it does point to what is
likely to be a growing trend as
college education becomes too
expensive for ordinary families
to pursue, and employers
become increasingly disillu-
sioned with “well qualified”
young people who can’t do the
job.

Paul Durrant, deputy editor
of the Eastern Daily Press in
England, told the British jour-
nalists’ trade paper Press
Gazette: “I’m not bothered
about a degree. I’m bothered
about NCTJ (professional)
qualifications. I’m bothered
about vocational training.”

He added: “I’m looking for
maturity, passion and confi-
dence. In terms of currency
within the industry, I need to
know someone’s got 100 wpm
shorthand, that they know
media law.”

There is no doubt that many

©2008 CreativeRelations.net

Sales & Full Service Department Rosetta & Montgomery Streets 322-2188/9

LLL LLG CLS LL



universities in recent years have
cashed in on media and creative
writing courses, selling them as
“easy options” for those who
don’t know where they’re head-
ing in life. The truth is, howev-
er, that few of these courses
actually produce functioning
professionals.

The British government has
encouraged the annual rush to
the campuses, mainly because
it has enabled civil servants to
manipulate unemployment fig-
ures downwards to make the
politicians look more efficient
than they are.

Mass communications and
media studies degree courses
are among the most popular for
students who labour under the
grossly mistaken belief that the
press is a permanently glam-
orous profession which is rela-
tively easy to enter.

In fact, the supply-and-
demand ratio has always made
entry into the profession diffi-
cult, and recession-hit media
houses are now employing few-
er people than ever.

Even in the good times, news-
paper editors were looking for a
rare combination of qualities
which is getting scarcer by the
day. Curiosity, honesty, maturi-
ty, judgment and talent are right
at the top of the list, along with
an inbuilt ability to use the lan-
guage effectively. Universities
don’t necessarily provide any
of them.

As the recession bites deeper,
and families are forced to con-
sider their own resources as
never before, it’s doubtful that
higher education, with all its
attendant expense, will continue
to rank high among personal
priorities.

In fact, old-styled appren-
ticeships are now being viewed
increasingly as a possible way
forward, offering young people
ways of becoming financially
independent quicker, avoiding
student debt along the way.

For this to happen, however,
primary and secondary school-
ing has to improve dramatically.
High school graduation at 16 or
18 must translate into accept-
able standards of literacy,
numeracy and general knowl-
edge. Basic education must pro-
mote self-discipline, work ethic
and ambition, however limited
that ambition may turn out to
be.

Even more importantly, stu-
dents have to be encouraged
from a relatively early age - say
14 or 15 - to identify the kinds
of careers they would like to
follow, and to be given oppor-
tunities in their final two or
three years at school to pursue
studies relevant to their goals.

Employers are much more
likely to invest in the commit-
ted, proven ability of a deter-
mined apprentice than in some-
one full of airy-fairy notions
about career development nur-
tured on a university campus.

For my part, I would be much
more inclined to take on some-
one with a genuine commitment
to journalism than a student
who finds himself at a newspa-
per interview only because mass
communications happened to
be part of his college curricu-
lum.

And I am old-fashioned
enough to believe that true pro-
ficiency in any craft or profes-
sion is best learned at the knee
of a master in the workplace
than in a classroom presided



over by an academic who prob-
ably has little or no direct
knowledge of the discipline they
are seeking to teach.

At the moment, the expecta-
tion of a university education
among all those with an IQ of
100 or more creates an awk-
ward hiatus of indecision
between the mid-teens and mid-
twenties which can be cata-
strophic for young lives.

One student told Insight: “In
many ways, we appear have too
many options, or did before the
recession kicked in. I know so
many of my college colleagues
who spend their time wondering
what they’re going to do with
their lives. So few of them have
focus. That’s what’s missing -
focus.”

Others tell of graduates end-
ing up as truck drivers or
engaged in other fairly routine
occupations they could have
profitably followed at the age
of 16, having discovered too late
that their particular degrees had
little value when it came to get-
ting a worthwhile career.

Go back 50 years and you
would find that high school stu-
dents also had options, but they
had to act upon them quickly if
they wanted to be first in. Every
summer, thousands of young-
sters were discharged into the
job market and focus was
essential if you were to avoid
the factory bench or a seat at a
supermarket till.

Generally, it was the more
determined among them who
grabbed the sweetest opportu-
nities. The lazy and indecisive
were left to pick up what was
left.

If the recession leads to a
return to more indentureships,
articles and apprenticeships, it
will be no bad thing. As an
autodidact myself, I have never
felt unduly deprived, and have
drawn much comfort from the
fact that practically every 20th
century icon I admired most
was in the same boat as myself.

D H Lawrence, Thomas
Hardy, John Steinbeck, Ernest
Hemingway, William Faulkner,
Pablo Picasso, Winston
Churchill, L S Lowry, Edward
Elgar and David Lloyd George
were all non-graduates. So
were, or are, Elvis Presley, The
Beatles, Charlie Chaplin, Bing
Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Henry
Ford, Richard Branson and, of
course, the Queen of England.

Go back a bit, and you dis-
cover that William Shakespeare
had no college qualifications.
Nor did Charles Dickens.

The complete list is, of
course, much longer, but the
point is made. A college degree
is fine and dandy for some, but
can become a very expensive
luxury if it fails to translate into
a rewarding and successful life.

It will be interesting to see
whether higher education sur-
vives in its present form if the
recession proves to be long and
hard. At the very least it will be
forced to become relevant to
the age we live in, with greater
emphasis on vocational train-
ing and the needs of the market.

Hard times are not all bad. If
we’re made to have a re-think,
rearrange our priorities, and
square up to reality, they can
be a godsend.

e What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT



insight

FEEDBACK

Re: Power game now

favours Christie (PLP
leadership)

I THINK the run-up to the
2012 general elections will be
all about leadership, not only
in the PLP but the FNM as
well. Pve heard there is a divi-
sion in the FNM, and that
Branville McCartney is being
supported as a challenger for
leadership as the election gets
closer.

After 2002, it’s accepted
that Tommy Turnquest can’t
cut it, and that Dion Foulkes
doesn’t have the brain noodles
to be right up there at the top
of the party.

Hubert Ingraham will not
be leader after 2012, mark my
word, but Christie will still be
up there for the PLP leader-
ship if he bides his time.

— ‘Doe’ McKenzie (Don’t

use my first name)



Mr John Marquis appears to
be a very remarkable fellow.
He strikes me as having quali-
fications in psychology, psy-
chiatry, political science, jour-
nalism and clairvoyance.

Tread his expose on the
PLP, its frontline soldiers and
its political future and won-
dered how in the world did
this lowly journalist come to
be such an all-round expert in
all matters of life, and able to
predict the future as well? His
insight into our party’s affairs
appeared in Monday’s edition
of The Tribune under the cap-
tion, “Insight” where he pre-
sumed to psychoanalyse the
Hon Alfred Sears, Obie
Wilchcombe, Dr Bernard Not-
tage, Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald and the Hon Perry
Christie. His conclusions?
Christie, as fate would have it,
would remain leader, as none
of the others have the political
charisma to be leader except
for Wilchcombe who he con-
cluded is now “damaged
goods” (my words, not his)
because of his questioning by
the police in the Travolta mat-
ter.

Mr Marquis very confident-
ly predicted that, in any event,

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2009

INSI

the PLP had as much of a
chance winning the next gen-
eral elections as the chances of
a snowball surviving in hell. I
did like his opening story
about the Editor of an Ameri-
can newspaper, though, and
how he outwitted his rum-
drinking rivals to get to the
top of his game; they all fell
down drunk around him, leav-
ing the lone Editor the only
game left standing in town.
John Marquis, you are not
of our culture, not of our ilk,
know nothing about what
makes us tick, don’t hang out
with us, don’t frequent the
places we do, don’t date the
same kind of women or men
(whatever your choice) we do;
your diet is totally different
from ours and our style of
worship, of God, is different
(that is if you worship any at
all) so tell me, how is it that
you can presume to be able to
predict what political deci-
sions we will make in 2012 or
before, when the next general
elections are called? That’s
stretching your imagination a
bit, isn’t it, John? You don’t
know us, John; you think you
do, but you don’t. That is basi-
cally your problem, John; you
came to the Bahamas from
wherever you came and in
three weeks you knew us,
already, and can predict our
every move and decision. I
don’t know “us” John, and
I’ve lived with “us” for sixty-
five (65) years. It isn’t that
easy to know us John, for if
one wishes to know us, John,
one will have to live with us,
John, and I know you, for one,
are not prepared for that
adventure. If you would be
kind enough, John, to allow
the FNM equal time and give
them the same makeover you
gave the PLP, it should be
very interesting reading to see,
exactly, what you would say
about them, in contrast.
Come to think about it,
though, you probably won’t
do it, seeing they are the ones
who are allowing you to rest,
undisturbed, for awhile, in our
country, and it’s your payback
time. Remember, John, the

GHT

The stories behind the news

ANNA'S LEGACY TWO YEARS ON

This story
isn’t over yet
-notbya
long way...

By JOHN MARQUES

cion and bitter recrimination,
much of it airedlin courtrooms
across America

In Florida, her erstwhile
attorney-companion Howard
K Stern has reportedly settled
his libel action against the
Provocative attorney Joh

*Quinn, whose television

commentstelating to Stern ancl
his relationship with Anna's
son. Daniel wefe inflammatc-
1, t0 say the least apparently nearing a concln-

‘As altorney for Anna's sion is Stern's libel action
mother, Virgie Arthur, Mr against former television jour.
OrQuinsi was v0 outragedusly — nalist Rita Cosby, whose book
candid about his suspicions ‘Blonde Ambition’ about Anna
felating to Daniel'sdeath that Nicole made several lure alle-
Stor fa ile chaie tat to gan agane Stem andstow-
hae hin ougteccurts, Bz photographer Larry Birk

With a summary judgment Yather of Anna's caugh-
romntteaeeatE eee TeeDannch
ingatan alaming tate, the par With acourt motion due this
es were prompted inte an month, both patties ate now

“accommodation which seems itvolwed in a tactical tussle as and the aforementioned Bitk-
tohavequieteneddown atleat Cosby mounts her robust ead, who objected to her
one of the many actions ari cefence against Stem, who is $200.600-plustegal bill for er-
ing from the Anna Nicole demanding S0million indam- vices rendered in his Nasvau
atfaic. ages from the authot and her court actions against Stern.

dust what the details of set. New York publishers, “You will remember that Opri
tement are is unknown. but Howevei, the smatt money isfamousy alleged to have run

Mamgngeaer LT has been two
uring the fina: YEAS since Anna
sx month of

Dz
elite, Ataf ‘
HEN ina Moridahotel,

Iuediningaiontha ste Weim of what a

enjoyed hardly a single

mony fi a 1»

hon tte wan't Ya of “accidental

fveriteedyit'wedaos, _ arg overdose,

hangerson and wildeyed fiti-

aerate, mo metnecone of the Late cover
‘her Rome, Horizons, on itl’ riotous life

spent mote time in bed than

st of hand, on ris, suffered

Uhle tettonag betweon ike UL the Bahamas and

dnigrcabinet andthe poole United States, where

In rare moments of relative

Incicity, she hammered out syr-
her tormentors rage and many
Deathcosid te expected, people are still
bring some mearure of calm
Jeast to there who knew her, 1
toe daepeacd sp, the circumstances
surrounding the
20-year-old
son, Daniel.

Nicole Smith died
‘was 30 fugh on drugs, and sa
moment of true peace andtta- COLONEL tuled was
cruginchced incomprehensicn,
gants who drove her deeper Yet the aftershock
Nassau's Bavtern Road, Ana 3
continues to be felt
roller-coaster mood swings
iounger. l
court battles still
tactically mangled e-mails ta
you might have thought, to
unhappy about
tbat Anna’zlegacy continues ta
death of her
INSIGHT reports...

Tai tee one ea

AE Tel: 502 2356 =~

ANNA NICOLE SIHITH is shown posing for photographers after arriving for the premiere of ‘Be Cool” at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in the Holly-
‘wood section of Las Angeks inthis February 14, 2005 file photo.

(AP Photo: Danny Btotashok)

pickup the tabfor eight or nine between Thompson and.aNas In action to all this, vari-
greedy altomeys feasting athis sau law firm. ous suits remain oulstandingin
expense. Exerything Anna touched, the name of Virgie Arthur, the
en, of coute, there isthe and practically everyone she anxious grandma who ted to
legal wrangle ower Horjzone, met, seemed to end up keep Dannielynn out ofthe
the Sl milion home Anna enenared by htigation of one is of both Stem and Birk:
claimed had been given toler kind or another head. She js suing Stern, CES

POCO s tu A) cies

erry

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Power game now
favours Christie

By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

any years ago I asked
the editor of a leading
American newspaper
how he had risen to the

top of his profession.

“Very early on,” he said, “I noticed
that all my main rivals were heavy
drinkers. I decided that if I stuck
around long enough, they would all
fall down drunk around me, and I
would be the only game left in town.”

At first I thought he was joking. In
fact, he was being deadly serious.
Heavy drinking was & riguew in jour-
nalism in those days. If you didn’t
drink with the right people in the right
places, you could wave farewell to any
promotion prospects. Sipping ginger
ale while pretending it was laced with
bourbon was a shrewd way to outwit
the serious imbibers.

His tactics paid off handsomely
because at the time - circa 1980 - he
had become one of the top five or six
newspaper editors in the United
States.

His apartment enjoyed a striking
view of one of America’s most famous
seascapes. Three huge limousines
graced his garage. His wife was a mod-
el of elegant self-assurance. Here was
aman not only on top of his game but
also very much at ease with himself.

Perry Christie, who only 18 months
ago was seen as a lost cause after lead-
ing his party to defeat in the 2007 gen-
eral election, can today feel much as
my editor friend felt all those years
ago.

By standing still, saying nothing,
and waiting for all the PLP’s leader-
ship pretenders to metaphorically “fall
down drunk” around him, Christie is
now emerging as the party’s best and
possibly only bet to lead the 2012 elec-
tion campaign.

One media pundit, a man known to
like a flutter, said: “As things stand
now, if I were putting my money on
the PLP’s leadership set-up in 2012, I
would go for the Christie-Bernard
Nottage ticket. All the others appear
to be rank outsiders - and that includes
Obie Wilehcombe, who could once
have been considered the leading con-
tender.”

There is no doubt that the Travolta
outrage has dealt a near-mortal blow
to Wilchcombe’s leadership prospects.
No-one knows this better than the
man himself, whose “Relaunch” rally
in his West End constituency last week
has been described by one spectator as
an orgy of self-pity which backfired
badly.

Wilchcombe, once regarded as one
of the slickest political operators in
the PLP, and a plausible threat to
Christie’s leadership, had his credibil-
ity torn apart by shrapnel from the
Travolta explosion.

Though released by police after
questioning, and having mounted a
credible defence of his innocence,
Wilchcombe knows full well that this
kind of international publicity is lethal
to anyone with national leadership
aspirations.

A Tribune reader felt compelled to
write the following after witnessing
Wilchcombe’s attempt to woo back
deserting voters:

“Obie, do us all a big favour and
get out of politics. No-one wants to

THE FRONT PAGE of the February 9, 2009 edition of /NS/GHT...

PLASTIC CASING UNITS



FORMER PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie, who only 18 months ago was seen as a lost cause after leading his party to defeat in the

2007 general election, can today feel much as my editor friend felt all those years ago...

hear anymore of your shallow vision-
less thoughts or rhyme time words
that will only place you in a more vul-
nerable position. Get out, sir, while
you still have what’s left of your dig-
nity.”

The rest of his withering assault can
be read in this week’s Feedback col-
umn. Its main thrust is to convey to
Wilchcombe (and, by implication, all
politicians who think they can manip-
ulate the electorate) that soft soap
can’t do it anymore, that Bahamians
are more savvy than they used to be.

Wilchcombe’s virtual demise as a
leadership prospect now leaves
Christie, no doubt with a broad Bud-
dha-style smile on his face, sitting
more or less immoveably on top of
the chaotic heap which voters know as

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the PLP.

Tf he can sway Dr Bernard Nottage,
aman more inscrutable than Mao Tse-
Tung, into becoming his deputy before
the next election scramble, he will
have made his own position pretty
much impregnable.

For Nottage, who appears to have
taken a vow of silence and acquired an
inexplicable fear of the press since his
return to the PLP three years ago, is
the only one left who could credibly be
described as a serious contender for
the party leadership.

But his maturity and apparent grav-
itas are off-set to a large degree by
his inability to lift an audience. Mea-
sured, pedantic, circumspect and reti-
cent, Nottage is short in areas where
Christie looms large.





It could be that, as times goes on, he
will be seen as more a Robin to
Christie’s Batman than the party’s
main man. In politics, shy guys rarely
win. It's left to the extroverts - the big
talkers - to claim the spoils.

There is no doubt that a Christie-
Nottage ticket will have some appeal
fora sizeable chunk of the PLP, which
in its current demoralised state has
about as much chance of winning the
2012 election as the Bahamas Nation-
al Party. And that has none.

Undoubtedly, the Christie-Nottage
combo is seen as markedly more entic-
ing than the alternatives, for the most
part a collection of no-hopers with lit-
tle or no grassroots support

Consider this assemblage of lead-
ership aspirants and you begin to

THE Travolta ‘extortion’
scandal has not only
plunged the Progressive
Liberal Party into a
major crisis, it has also
led to a marked shift

in power in its higher
ranks, leaving current
leader Perry Christie in
an increasingly strong
position. INSIGHT
reports...

realise just how deep the PLP’s trou-
bles are.

* Alfred Seare: a
pleasant, intelligent
man who, accord-
ing to parliamen-
tary journalists, has
as much appeal at
the hustings as a
BEC light-pole.
Though he has
been trying of late
to inject a trace of
dynamism into his
pronouncements,
he is seen as too professorial and retir-
ing for the cut-and-thrust of Bahami-
an politics, which is a nasty business at
the best of times.

“When Sears gets up to speak in
the House, everyone else settles down
for an afternoon snooze,” said one
reporter who believes that the ex-min-
ister’s lawyerly disdain will always be
his undoing.

Having risen from humble origins,
and been totally frank about his trou-
bled boyhood, Sears has much to com-
mend him, but his critics say he is
unsuited for frontline combat, espe-
cially in a leadership role.

PCat StU

© Jerme Fitegerald, a Nassau busi-
nessman, is rated a nil-to-nowhere
prospect whose David Yurman jew-
ellery, Gucci shoes and flash
demeanour do nothing to outweigh
what most regard as his fundamental
lack of experience. With no political
track record behind him, his emer-
gence as a prospect — albeit a very
peripheral one — is viewed as prema-
ture. “He seems to have acquired per-
sonal wealth by his own efforts, but he
lacks charisma,” said one reporter.

¢ Frenk Guith, who led the PLP
assault in the Mona Vie affair, does
not register on the Richter Scale when
it comes to making the FNM quake
and shake. The consensus is that he
lacks practically everything required to
lead the PLP out of the wilderness.

SEE page 5C



game of politics is a circular
one; it goes around, but it also
comes back around. Thank
you, — Forrester J Carroll J.P
Freeport, Grand Bahama

JOHN MARQUIS replies:
This ‘lowly’ journalist was
writing stories about the PLP
pre-1967 while most of the cur-
rent leaders were still in school
and many more were not yet
out of kindergarten. I know the
party all too well, even to the
extent of giving a public speech
about its evil habits 40 years
ago. You don’t have to lie
down and sleep with a hog to
know how bad it smells. Mr
Carroll is, however, right about
one thing: he and I have
absolutely nothing in common,
which is one of the many
things in life for which I am
eternally grateful.

YOU'RE right - Christie is
now once again the front-run-
ner for leadership. He is slick-
er and smoother than anybody

gives him credit for.
— Luke, Blue Hill

WHETHER Wilchcombe
survives as a potential leader
will depend on what comes
out of the Pleasant Bridgewa-
ter trial.

— Observer, Grand
Bahama

WE don’t want Obie Wilch-
combe as leader of the PLP.
He smiles a lot, but we don’t
take no heed of that. He ain’t
no good for us or the party.

— Voicemail caller

(West End)

Re: Anna’s legacy
two years on

I WAS alarmed to read in
Insight that an opera is to be
performed about Anna Nicole
Smith at the Royal Opera
House in London. This means
the entire story will be raked
over again, with some empha-
sis inevitably placed on the
final months of her life in Nas-
sau. Once again, the Bahamas
will come out of it badly, you
can be sure of that.

— GB Hanna

We don’t even know half
the Anna Nicole story, even
the part that took place here
in the Bahamas. But thanks
for updating us.

— A Nicholas

=8

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several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
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letters or more can you make

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TODAY'S TARGET

Good 20; very good 30;
excellent 39 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
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level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











Saturday’s Saturday’s

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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

“DENNIS DOESN'T KNOW THE MEANING OF
FEAR...OR STOP!”

Difficulty Level *&




















CRYPTIC PUZZLE ||












21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26









































9/3 7[4/6|5 NESS
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2 8 oR 1/3 0 PS
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8/4 3/5/9/2 914/6/5 R@9/1/4 8
11/6 9/7/4/8 m5 | 1 8/9/73 7
Difficulty Level 323 5/7 2/6/1/3| Misi7 MMs i7)1 B26































BEeEREHEH#
Sinits ai Famous Hand
1 Such a person doesn’t 2 Asomewhat well-endowed ee stead) dotted
look so well ata || | | || || Lal .
distance (11) lady) : Cl fi South dealer, When the deal was first played,
3 Paddy or Eric may Pes ey Pe ye North-South vulnerable. the Norwegian pair of Boye Broge-
9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets produce it (4) NORTH land and Erik Saelensminde reached
entangled (7) A Peiecnienacesert Fal Fes | | || ie] il @AK97654 a slam in spades as shown. Saelens-
10 Unusual Maori girl's P ¥52 minde’s decision to open two
of sport (6) Pea se ye | Pee ey ea #543 notrump with a 1-3-6-3 distribution
hamer(?) 5 The kindness of 17 46 convinced Brogeland to try for slam
11 A misshapen nose || || || fe || [ij WEST EAST on the assumption that his side had at
ages (4) people (8) ae cel al #182 #103 least nine spades.
fica: 6 Arab territory that makes ¥A1094 98763 Four diamonds was a slam try in
12 Legislation ine went aio ral fo Lt Lal [eal #05 #106 spades, and the rest of the auction
against the grain (4,4) $9832 #KQ754 consisted primarily of cuebids lead-
14 Dislike having to change a 7 Got lineages from him? PB} | ff Fee cecil sail SOUTH ing to the slam. With the spades
hotel (6) Yes! (11) #0 dividing 3-2, the defenders got only
16 Mass of people moving 8 The price of freedom, Ey fe | a fe Ea od 7 re : 872 Sone 1430 2 ee
about in the road in the perhaps (6,5) Pe a ile Te hi #&AT10 At the other table, with George
morning (6) 13 Choke — or another a pee cate 2 ee of the U.S.
18 Vessels that shoot over the out est Nort ast orth-South, the bidding went:
3 carburettor conical (3) tu |). Peres bom . 2NT Pass 4 Pass South West North East
waves (8) . 15 Something to keep aunty =] 1 Go to great expense 2 Blacksmith’s 4h Pass 5¢& Dble 1¢ Pass la Pass
19 The capital in old in change! (7) N (3,3,5) block (5) Redble Pass 54 Pass 3.NT All Pass
Czechoslovakia (4) so Hain wari een Shee > 9 Void (7) 3 Rumour (4) 64 : Pass 64% Jacobs, North, considered bidding
22 Rapid writer (5) y Opening lead — ace of hearts. over three notrump, but this was not
oe TH oe together (6) a 10 Scatter (5) 4 Cause to be loved (6) The 2007 world team champi- as clear-cut as it may seem. As
2 The very best time for 20 Most airlines provide this > 11 Showy flowering 5 Professional onship for the Bermuda Bowl was played by most of today’s expert
feathers (7) ~ plant (4) valuer (8) won by Norway, which easily partnerships, a rebid of three
24 Printers may be kind to Might (%) crossword compilers (11) 21 An act of duplicity? (4) Lu ae ecument (2) eau ( ) deal final by nearly 100 International minor tends to imply a strong, possi-
14 Uniformly (6) 7 Long jump, discus Match Points, 334-245.5. bly unbalanced hand containing a
: . . ; E 16 Breed of e.g. (5,6) After trailing early, the Norwe- long, solid or near-solid suit.
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution gians went ahead to stay about a third Jacobs therefore had to allow for
sheepdog (6) 8 Central elas
; ; ‘ ee of the way through the match and the possibility that South had only
Aerosse') Stall. 1 Aspenty, # Onicall, Aerose: 1 Sicily. 4 Amethyst 9 18 Large retail shop (8) European continued to build their lead by mak- one spade, and chose the conserva-
i ee 2 ie bith ea ee i. pare, ’ ei 19 Much revered country (11) ing one winning decision after tive course. After a spade lead by
sed Rant pagan ts oa eect sear : another. Today’s deal, from the ses- West, declarer had no trouble taking
scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack person (4) 13 Italian art centre (8) aa . :
ey : : ? ea , Y ; sion in which Norway assumed the all the tricks for a score of 720, but
28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 22 Sequence (5) 15 Clarify (7) lead, is a typical example. wound up losing 12 IMPs.
31 Trades. : Endanger, 31 Spirit. . 23 An advantageous 17 Deception (6)
Down: 1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, | Down: 1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Tomorrow: For whom the bells toll.
5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 purchase (7) 20 Empty ©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.
Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 24 Resistance completely (5)
16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 movement (11) 21. Liveliness (4)





THE TRIBUNE

THE WE

5-Day FORECAST

hm ORLANDO

High:69°F/20°C









HER REPORT

eA“

Sunny most of the






T

Wy all
Wit

Clouds and sun,

J

Partly cloudy; a

















Breezy with plenty of Partly sunny. Sunny, breezy and














o|1|2

LOW



3|4|5

MODERATE

yy
6|7

HIGH



8|9|1oji1

\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the





- a _ : : ine. : : greater the need for eye and skin protection.
' Low: 44° F/6°C a spotty showers shower around Sunn ; ; cayand ee pleasant ;
: @ High: 75 High: 76 High: 78 High: 80
TAMPA ee High: 77° Low: 66° Low: 65° Low: 67° Low: 69° Low: 70° see EOE
4 rae 7 ; PETE MEP
High: 66° F/18°C ne, 71°-63° F 70°-64° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low Ht (ft
Low: 46° F/7°C an r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:43am. 26 12:17am. 0.0
i. @ F 7 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 654p.m. 24 12:49p.m. 0.0
i : Tuesd 7:20am. 26 12:59am. -0.1
J a Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Wednesday?>5 am. 06 130am. 04
; —_. ae ABACO Temperature 8:07 p. 26 1:59p.m. -0.1
, : = Se 6 ° HG Mii, cgsscesencees toca vacteesessecncesteiseeher 79° F/26° C : : zi
— High: 72° F/22° C Thursday 880am. 26 2:18am. -0.1
- “a L “61°F 16°C LOW sessshasscccagetes 66° F/19° C y 8:44pm. 2.7 2:33pm. -0.2
f A Sem i ow: 61° F/ Normal high... 78° F/25°G
a Normal low 64° F/18° C
, ah @WESTPALMBEACH . Last year's High... ssnsestenesentnee 85° F/29° SUN rTM Ct
High: 75° F/24°C fics Last year's lOW oe eee 74° F/23° C a aa are a
Low: 57°FA4°C own Precipitation unrise...... 38 am. Moonrise..... ‘41 a.m.
a @ ae As of 1 p.m. yesterday ....cccccscssssssscessssseeen 0.00" Sunset....... 6:09 p.m. Moonset..... 5:07 p.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT i Year to date New First Full Last
High: 74° F/23°C @ High: 70° F/21°C Normal year to date oo... 3.07" . —- 7
Low: 59° F/15°C Low: 59° F/15°C nh ve
at AccuWeather.com i ag
AL @ i. Forecasts and graphics provided by : ay
be MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feb. 24 Mar.4 Mar.10 Mar. 18
—~ OMers°r23°c ELEUTHERA
Low: 58° FA ac NASSAU High: 75" F/2a C
i High: 17° F/25° cC Low: 69 F/21 C
Low: 66° F/19°C
KEY WEST , tT * +
5 ahs 70 ° —— i AY CATISLAND
High: 73° F/23°C K\ High: 75° F/24°C
Low: 64° F/18°C ~ Low: 65° F/18°C
@ a
= * GREAT EXUMA Nt SAN SALVADOR
A High: 78° F/26° C High: 79° F/26°C
; ANDROS a XN NN Low: 70° F/21°C Low: 67° FA9°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's 5 Oe oe.
highs and tonights's lows. High: 79° F/26° C _—
Low: 69° F/21°C 25 Se
X
lle \\
LONGISLAND
Low: 67° F/19°C
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W NN High: 83° F/28° C
F/C FIC F/C FIC FC FIC F/C FIC FC FC Fic FC e Low: 66° F/19° C
Albuquerque 70/21 44/6 ¢ 70/21 42/5 pe Indianapolis 28/-2 16/-8 pc 39/3 27/-2 pc Philadelphia 37/2 20/-6 s 40/4 26/-3 s
Anchorage 28/-2 18/-7 pc 30/-1 19/-7 c Jacksonville 60/15 29/-1 $s 61/16 42/5 s Phoenix 84/28 57/13 ¢ 82/27 57/13 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta BOO 27/-2 s 5241 36/2 s Kansas City 50/10 34 s 57/13 37/2 pc _ Pittsburgh 26/-3 16/-8 sf 32/0 20/-6 pe RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:83°F/28°c
Atlantic City 37/2 19/-7 s 40/4 16/-8 s Las Vegas 69/20 47/8 pe 73/22 48/8 pc Portland,OR 53/11 42/5 sh 51/10 40/4 sh High: 81° F/27°C Low: 69° F/21°C
Baltimore 39/3 20/6 s 40/4 21/-6 s§ Little Rock 53/11 36/2 s 510 45/7 pc Raleigh-Durham 42/5 22/-5 s 48/8 25/-3 § Low:65°F/18°C in ‘
Boston 37/2 22/-5 pc 35/1 21/-6 pc Los Angeles 71/21 52/1 c 66/18 52/11 pe St. Louis 38/3 26/-3 pc 48/8 35/1 pc .
Buffalo 21/-6 15/-9 sf 27/-2 21/6 pe Louisville 36/2 21/6 s 42/5 31/0 pc Salt Lake City 49/9 36/2 sh 53/11 33/0 sh GREATINAGUA Xai
Charleston, SC 53/11 28/-2 5s 565/12 31/0 s Memphis 52/11 32/0 s 55/12 42/5 pe San Antonio 70/21 54/12 s 83/28 59/15 pc High:87° F/31°C
Chicago 22/-5 14/-10 pc 37/2 27/-2 pc Miami 75/23 58/14 pe 75/23 62/16 pc San Diego 67/19 57/13 ¢ 66/18 55/12 pc Low 69° FDIC
Cleveland 21/-6 16/-8 pc 32/0 23/-5 pc Minneapolis 28/-2 16/-8 pc 37/2 23/-5 ¢ San Francisco 62/16 51/10 r 59/15 48/8 ¢ :
Dallas 6417 48/8 s 73/22 510 pe Nashville 43/6 21/6 §s 46/7 32/0 pc Seattle 5010 41/5 sh 49/9 41/5 sh
Denver 6116 34/1 ¢ 6417 32/0 pe New Orleans 60/15 44/6 s 66/18 53/11 pc Tallahassee 61/16 28/-2 s 6417 35/1 pe
Detroit 25/-3 15/-9 pc 30/-1 23/-5 pc New York 37/2 25/-3 s 36/2 25/-3 s Tampa 66/18 46/7 s 71/21 51/40 pe
Honolulu 78/25 65/18 pc 80/26 66/18 c Oklahoma City 62/16 43/6 s 64/17 43/6 pc Tucson 85/29 53/11 c 85/29 56/13 s
Houston 66/18 49/9 s 73/22 58/14 pe Orlando 69/20 44/6 pe 70/21 49/9 pc Washington,DC 40/4 24/-4 s 44/6 28/-2 s














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Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

Tsai hlase

High
F/C
88/31
45/7
37/2
47/8
72/22
97/36
84/28
57/13
37/2
59/15
35/1
35/1
66/18
68/20
46/7
34/1
79/26
66/18
95/35
22/-5
83/28
83/28
71/21
42/5
48/8
45/7
40/4
34/1
77/25
25/-3
82/27
63/17
44/6
52/11
74/23
84/28
80/26
50/10
63/17
90/32
74/23
78/25
25/-3
12/-11
32/0
89/31
88/31
34/1
46/7
36/2
89/31
81/27
54/12
83/28
90/32
90/32
88/31
85/29
87/30
48/8
34/1
82/27
87/30
52/11
23/-5
87/30
51/10
39/3
36/2
19/-7

iil







sn

High
F/C
87/30
47/8
40/4
47/8
68/20
97/36
84/28
54/12
43/6
62/16
36/2
38/3
62/16
67/19
43/6
34/1
85/29
68/20
97/36
9/-12
82/27
84/28
70/21
40/4
48/8
46/7
39/3
29/-1
78/25
30/-1
82/27
74/23
47/8
57/13
71/21
85/29
85/29
54/12
59/15
88/31
77/25
89/31
25/-3
17/-8
31/0
88/31
86/30
30/-1
46/7
35/1
87/30
85/29
54/12
84/28
95/35
91/32
86/30
83/28
81/27
50/10
32/0
86/30
89/31
50/10
29/-1
80/26
49/9
38/3
33/0
27/-2

Tuesday
Low
F/C
73/22
43/6
23/-5
45/7
ile
79/26
74/23
42/5
21/-6
53/11
25/-3
34/1
55/12
46/7
38/3
26/-3
59/15
49/9
70/21
-7/-21
62/16
68/20
47/8
39/3
41/5
38/3
29/-1
18/-7
56/13
27/-2
72/22
46/7
40/4
41/5
54/12
74/23
67/19
41/5
32/0
75/23
41/5
65/18
12/-11
17/-8
25/-3
56/13
54/12
29/-1
37/2
29/-1
76/24
56/13
34/1
74/23
65/18
72/22
55/12
69/20
66/18
36/2
25/-3
70/21
73/22
46/7
20/-6
71/21
40/4
31/0
30/-1
8/-13

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

MARINE FORECAST



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23rp, 2009, PAGE 7C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS




WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NE at 12-25 Knots 4-7 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 4-7 Feet 5-10 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NE at 12-25 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: NE at 12-25 Knots 6-9 Feet 5-8 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NE at 15-30 Knots 6-9 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

a
Washington
40/24

I
rat

Fronts

Cold
War allele

Stationary Memguaii

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eneame without us!

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eve roll Abaco | Eleathera Exum
READ Sia Re (81) S505 Tt (A S40 Tek: (240) 32-2002 | Te (242] SGH-D04





Full Text



PAGE 1

CONCERN for an inmate in the Carmichael Road Deten tion Centre has sparked a call for Acting Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson to order an investigation into several “illegal activities” that an unknown caller to The Tribune claims is rampant there. Two weeks ago The Tribune received a call from a “con cerned citizen” who requested that The Tribune’s Chief Reporter Rupert Missick visit an inmate in the detention centre who claimed to have information on some “serious things” occurring at the facility. Mr Missick was told that the inmate had a 30-page document that he wanted to turn over to this newspaper. Mr Missick was invited to scrutinize and validate the accusations the inmate would be making. Mr Missick with Tribune Edi tor Paco Nunez, who speaks Spanish, went to see the inmate during visiting hours on Febru ary 10. During this visit, the pair realised that in order to speak Man accused of rape during house invasion N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.76MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER CLOUDS, SUN, SHOWERS HIGH 77F LOW 76F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S SEEPAGE FOURTEEN Hugh Campbell Tournament The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY Degrees:time for a rethink I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate Ross University payroll is set to exceed $4m n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net WITH its 2009 payroll expected to exceed $4 million, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said that Ross University is making good progress in fulfilling its commitment to the government to create employment opportunities for Bahamians at all levels of its operation. The prime minister made the statement at the launch of the Freeport campus of Ross University in Grand Bahama. He said that Ross estimates that its over all direct economic impact on the local economy spending on housing, food, transportation and other direct living expenses will be in excess of $10 million in the initial year of operation. It is estimated that rents from persons assocated with or attending the university will pump some $2.6 million into the Grand Bahamian economy this year. Ross University has advised government that they typi cally construct on-campus student housing for about 30 per cent of their enrolment. However, such student housing construction is still several years out. “So while typically 70 per cent of the student body is required to find living accommodation off-campus, in the immediate future that requirement will be 100 per cent,” the prime minister pointed out. THIS LITTLE girl surveys the scene amidst the huge crowd attending the Greek Festival at the The Greek Orthodox Church grounds on West Street on Saturday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f HEADANDSHOULDERSABOVETHECROWD Estimated economic impact on Grand Bahama is $10m in first year Hubert Ingraham SEE page nine n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE arrested a man a ccused of raping a woman after he allegedly forced his way inside h er home in Prince Charles Dri ve. The suspect is expected to be formally arraigned on related charges as early as today, police s aid. Head of the Central Detective U nit (CDU said around 2am Friday the lone a ssailant was able to gain entry through the front door of a home in the eastern area. H e managed to sexually assault the victim and rob her of persona l effects. During the ordeal, another female inside the home e scaped and alerted neighbours who called the police. "A lone assailant forced his way into the home of a female and robbed her of personal properties and also sexually molested her," said Supt Moss. He declined to provide more details for fear of compromising the case. "Another female who was able to get away, with the assistance of neighbours, contacted the police (who male who's presently in police custody and expected to be charged and appear before the courts (Monday Suspect expected to be charged today SEE page eight Investigation ordered into claim of ‘illegal activities’ at Detention Centre SEE page eight n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said the opening of $20 million Fenes tration Glass Services is a “welcomed” investment in Freeport and will provide much-needed jobs on Grand Bahama. “This is indeed good for Grand Bahama,” Mr Ingraham said on Friday evening at the official opening of the new glass manufacturing facility on Queen’s Highway. The prime minister noted that the Grand Bahama econo my has suffered significant job losses since 2004. “As we know Grand Bahama has sustained repeated blows beginning with the difficult hurricane season of 2004 and job losses as a result of the closure of Royal Oasis Resort proper ties, which are yet to be replaced. “And that disappointment has been fuelled by additional job losses in the economy and also the fallout from the global economic crisis, which continues to impact a number of sectors in our economy,” he said. Mr Ingraham said the tourism sector in Freeport had been severely impacted with low hotel occupancy levels. He noted that occupancy at the Our Lucaya Resort remained low and bookings remained quite soft. The prime minister com mended principals of Fenestration for expressing interest and acquiring property in 2007 for their venture in Freeport. “The opening of this facility is especially welcome as it provides much-need job growth for the island. This is indeed good for Grand Bahama on other fronts as well.” In addition to jobs, Mr Ingraham said Fenestration introduced new green energy effi cient products to the Bahamas. SEE page nine Glass manufacturing facility ‘will provide much needed jobs’ n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net RELIGIOUS leader Bishop Simeon Hall is calling for a national "zerotolerance" policy on child molestation and sexual assaultson minors. His comments came in the wake of a story first published in The Tribune which revealed allega tions of a sexual attack on a young girl allegedly assaulted on school grounds by a group of Call for ‘zero tolerance’ policy on child molestation Bishop Simeon Hall SEE page eight

PAGE 2

n By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Staff Reporter THE Bahamas must bring new vision” to tourism and rethink the way it does busin ess, a top hotel official said yesterday. Chairman of the Bahamas H otel Corporation Michael Scott said on the talk show Jones and Company that he doesn’t see the Bahamas moving from its reliance on “the pillars of tourism” anytime s oon. “We think that the world r evolves around the Bahamas. We are still a small part of the g lobe. I think there is room for our tourism product to improve. We are not going to be competitive in the industry u nless we really allow our selves to embrace thinking internationally,” he said. M r Scott said another prob lem Bahamians face is their a ttitude. “I get really irritated some times when I go to some of t hese government depart ments, whether it be the reg istry or at the passport office. People need to understand that we live in the 21st centu r y not the 19th. “There are complaints about tardiness and delay andp ersons not getting approvals and explanations in a reason a ble period of time,” Mr Scott said. Mr Scott said he had come i nto contact with a lot of peo ple who were deterred from v isiting the Bahamas because of negative things they had heard about our business sec-t or. “We somehow have this penchant for looking success in the face and trying to destroy it. I have talked to a number of boutique groups that would love to come into theB ahamas but they heard about too much red tape, the p erformance of Bahamians in the workplace is terrible, the cost of labour is too high, andl ack of discipline. Too many of us in this country have n owhere to go and take all day to get there,” he said. Mr Scott claimed Bahamia ns should adopt the attitude that they are open for business and are willing to make it work. “We sell something in this c ountry that no-one can make the most beautiful water in the world, the sun and sand. Therefore that is a commodity that will always be attrac t ive. The Bahamas has its place and as we are at the doorsteps of the United States we are a country that is best poised for resort development,” he added. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 326,7,21$9$,/$%/()XOO7LPH(PHUJHQF\,&8XUVH 0XVWKDYHDWOHDVWWKUHH\HDUVH[SHULHQFHSRVW JUDGXDWLRQ +ROGHURIDFXUUHQW%/6t$&/6&HUWLFDWH 0XVWEHLQGHSHQGHQWUHVSRQVLEOHZLWKJRRG FRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV $WWUDFWLYH&RPSHQVDWLRQDFNDJH 6HQG&9WRJLJLDLUDPEXODQFH#FRUDOZDYHFRPE\ )HEUXDU\WK Bahamas must ‘rethink the way it does business’ COOKINGUPASTORMATGREEKFESTIVAL BAHAMIANS got a taste of Greece at the weekend’s Greek Festival. The event was held at the Greek Orthodox Church grounds on West Street.

PAGE 3

n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – Families for J ustice said the family of Tiffany LaRoda was denied justice last week when the man accused of her brutal murder was sentenced to 15 years under the lesser charge of manslaughter. R ev Glenroy Bethel, founder o f FFJ, said the victim’s family is outraged over the outcome of the murder trial of Labion LaRoda, who allegedly stabbed his wife to death during a domesticd ispute four years ago. The family is outraged because the Attorney General’s Office never notified the familyt hat the accused was making a g uilty plea to manslaughter. “This was unfair and unjust to the deceased’s family and the wider community,” said Rev Bethel. We believe this was a slap in t he face for this familyto have t he charge of murder reduced to manslaughter when there was strong evidence to prove murder.” Rev Bethel said FFJ opposed t he plea bargain legislation which was introduced in the Bahamas justice system. S havonne Munnings, the d eceased’s sister, was very disappointed with the outcome of the trial. “I sat through the trial and the accused admitted and described i n detail what he did as part of t he plea bargain to the lesser c harge of manslaughter.” Tiffany LaRoda, a mother of four, sustained some 20 stab wounds to the body. Ms Munnings said several f amily members travelled to Grand Bahama for the trial. She said they were never told by any-o ne in the Attorney General O ffice’s about the plea bargain. “I do not agree with this plea bargaining thing and I also believe that the 15-year sentence was not sufficient because he t ook a mother away from her f our children. It is not about my sister any m ore. I am angry at the system because who is to protect my daughter and other women and their daughters? “I believe that sentence is too l enient and I think he should h ave gotten at least 35 years in p rison as a deterrent to other offenders,” she said. Rev Bethel and the family are calling for an appeal in the case. “We are making a plea to the Attorney General Michael Bar-n ett to appeal this case for the interest of justice,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Q ueen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $ 3,730 $3,730 K ing 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $ 3,940 $3,940Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a IN ANeffort to stem the number of brush and forest fires, officials are warning that anyone found burning rubbish or debris outside will be arrested and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Fire Services administrator Inspector Bradley Knowles admonished the public against burning items outside, a dangerous practice that contributes to many of the country's forest fires. "As the hot period sets in, right now it's dry, so we're going to soon be targeted with a lot of forest fires but what we've seen is persons indiscriminately setting fires, burning rubbish in the yard or people clearing down properties and they light refuse, rather than carrying it to the city dump. All of these contribute to the spread of forest fires and fires in the neighbourhood. "It's a nuisance and we want the public to understand that this is a breach of the law the only (legal fires in the neighbourhood is for cooking purposes. We've been doing a lot of warning but the time has come where we're going to have to prosecute people before the courts," he told The Tribune . Under current "antiquated" laws the penalty for the offence is a small fine, something Inspector Knowles feels should be reformed with a harsher penalty. Section 59 (2) of the Environmental Health Services Act (Chapter 232) says: "No person shall burn waste at any place or in any manner that is likely to create a health hazard or a nuisance; or (b burn any material that is likely to cause excessive smoke or produce a noxious odour or to discharge any toxic substances which on combustion are likely to affect the occupants of any premises, except under conditions approved by the Director." For more than 16 years the New Providence city dump has been a constant problem, posing a danger not only to nearby homes, but to the health of those who live in the area. n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net SKYBAHAMASis the newest carrier to provide daily flights to Abaco. The company’s SAAB 33-seater aircraft made the inaugural flight with passengers and media groups on board. At Marsh Harbour, they were welcomed by residents excited about the new service. Passengers received red carpet treatment, with treats and beverages in the air and an elaborate display of Abaconian hospitality on arrival. Sky Bahamas executives were invited to an official welcoming ceremony organised by island officials. Senior island administrator Cephas Cooper said over the past several years there had been significant growth in development within the island community. He said along with infrastructural growth there had been an equal demand by residents for more airlift services to bring better pricing and increased reliability. “Today Sky Bahamas has answered the call, and by their presence here today, demonstrate their faith and confidence in the economy, and the future growth and development in Abaco. “This additional airlift is good for the industry, and ultimately good for the people of Abaco, who now have more choices and options.” Mr Cooper said he now looks forward to lower airfares for regular commuters, as well as improved service and reduced delays. Captain Randy Butler, CEO of Sky Bahamas, said the company hopes to service additional destinations in future. “We are very pleased to announce that we are exploring additional market developments to some international destinations such as Providenciales in Turks and Caicos, Florida and Haiti.” n B y TANEKA T HOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ t ribunemedia.net F ORMER president and CEO of BTC Leon Williams has been appoint-e d to the board of directors of Orlando-based telecom-m unications conglomerate, C obian International Group ( CIG). Mr Williams was appointed as president and CEO of B TC in December, 2005, before being asked to resign from the company in April,2 008. A ccording to a press release issued by Cobian, Mr Williams -along with two new additions Laurence Sheehan and Dr Lawrence Chimerine was chosen forh is strong industry background and management experience. "The addition of Mr Williams, Mr Sheehan and D r Chimerine to CIG's board of directors ensurest he company will continue to benefit from a diversity of knowledge and opinions. " These men are perfect directors because of their strong leadership skills, extensive managemente xperience and proven track records especially in creating results in their r espective industries," said CEO of CIG Joanne Negron. Executive Employed at BTC for 40 y ears, Mr Williams spent 13 years as an executive and two years as president andC EO and represented the company at many international conferences. In the wake of his uncerem onious departure, Mr Williams threatened to sue the government entityu nless details of his sever ance package were revised. He also took credit for an umber of achievements BTC experienced with him at the reins, including the company’s profits and increase in revenue. Apart from his tenure at BTC, Mr Williams was also elected as chairman of the board for the Caribbean Association of National Telecommunications Organisations (CANTO 2005 after years of service to the organisation. He is now an honorary member of the group. CIG is the parent company for the Cobian family of corpora-tions. Meanwhile, government has completed phase one of BTC's advisory privatisation process but is still look ing for a buyer to privatise the telecommunications company. SkyBahamas makes inaugural Abaco flight Family ‘outraged’ over outcome of murder trial Warning over burning of rubbish, debris outside Leon Williams Former BTC president appointed to CIGboard Man pleads guilty to manslaughter

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. Recently we experienced a home invasion but to our knowledge no one has been apprehended. A week later a drunk driver knocked down a large section of my wall. I was advised by the officer on the call that there is no law against drinking and driving or in fact being intoxicated while driving. Hence he was not charged with any offence! A week later my wife was charged with going seven miles an hour over the speed limit. The fine was $250. Apart from the amount of the fine in relation to the alleged offence arguably a fast idling vehicle can exceed seven miles an hour. Today on the way to pay the fine no less than four vehicles turned in front of me without signaling, two went through a red light and a police officer on a motor cycle went straight through an intersection with his turn signal on. Is there anything wrong with this picture? Mr Minister there appears to be a serious problem, is anything being done to correct it or is the silence that we hear an admission that you are out of your depth? FRUSTRATED Nassau, February 18, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. A t The Bahamas Renewable Energy Corporation (BREC are in agreement that local participation is absolutely critical and o f key importance to derive the m aximum amount of benefit for the Bahamas. We believe that we have come up with a business plan that will allow the maximumb enefit to be derived by Bahamians and as such Winso Company Ltd has a 49 per cent stake in BREC, making it truly Bahamian d riven. However, we have to realise that the types of renewable energy projects contemplated by BEC will not require just a million dollars, but rather hundreds of mil-l ions in order for them to come to fruition. Given the state of the financial markets, lenders who were there yesterday and waiting fora pprovals, have disappeared over night. W e can therefore no longer afford wishful thinking, because w e (the Bahamian people miss our window of opportunity. The current economic climate warrants the need for out-of-thebox thinking, in particular as itr elates to financing these projects. We believe that BREC has f ound strong partners in Schnei der Power and Emera that can e nsure our projects economic and financial viability. The Bahamas can learn from o ther leading renewable energy jurisdictions such as Canada and Germany. Our partnership with Schneid er Power and Emera allows for a significant knowledge transfer to BREC and therefore to the Bahamas. The results of this are that we h ave already significantly reduced our learning curve, and will also guarantee that these projects cang et built. By committing ourselves to employing local trades and contractors this knowledge will be d ispersed amongst our own economy, allowing companies and entrepreneurs an entry into a sector that generally has very highb arriers of entry, but is slated for s ignificant growth in the future. A $60 million infrastructure project in the Bahamas will act as a mini stimulus package for t he economy in the region. We anticipate that expenditures will give a much needed economic boost to local businesses, in particular local suppli e rs and trades people, but also hotels, restaurants, stores and m any peripheral services. BREC is a showcase here in the Bahamas how business can be d one with maximum local content and participation. From an environmental standpoint, BREC, with the help of S chneider Power, is now one of t he leading Companies in the world that employs “conservation engineering” meaning that our facilities will meet and/or exceeda ll requirements under the Bahamian Environmental Protection laws. We will also strive to reduce t he impact on nature with the least possible intrusion on the landscape, wildlife and communities. And once BEC has come to a decision, we will be inviting theB ahamian public and communities to comment and provide feedback. It is our intent to make BREC’s renewable energy pro j ects a showcase for the people of the Bahamas and to securef uture deployment of renewable energy technology that will put u s one step closer to energy independence and securing muchneeded electricity to power our economy. V INCENT McDONALD Chief Executive Officer, B ahamas Renewable Energy Corporation. N assau, February 23, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm Half truths are nothing but lies “WHAT IS truth? said jesting Pilate, and w ould not stay for an answer.” This is the opening sentence of Sir Francis B acon’s essay “On Truth”. Recently we had a discussion with a person on how to evaluate a lie against a half truth. Was a half truth really a lie, and as it is really true as far as it goes, should it be considered as seriousa s a full blown lie? We maintain that any statement made knowi ng that despite what is said might be true, a wrong impression is conveyed to the listener b ecause the whole truth is being withheld. It is being deliberately withheld to give the desired false impression. Although the speaker cannot b e faulted for telling a lie, the listener is blamed for coming to the wrong conclusion because he w as not sensitive enough to what was not being said. I n our opinion a person who plays with truth in this way is more dangerous than the person who is indeed honest enough to tell an outright lie. It takes a certain underhand craftiness to try to stay on the side of truth, while stealthily leadi ng people into error. Sir Etienne Dupuch, who considered form er prime minister Sir Lynden Pindling, a mas ter of the half-truth, read Sir Lynden’s intent in h is unspoken words. When Sir Lynden made a pronouncement, Sir Etienne did not take seriously what he said, but rather what he did not say. Bahamians understood one thing, Sir Etienne saw another outcome down the long road o f time. Sir Etienne was seldom wrong. He could read Sir Lynden like a book, often much t o our chagrin. He predicted decisions that we did not think possible in a democracy, but even t ually they were made. During the discussion on truth versus a lie, w e were asked if we thought a half truth could have as serious consequences as a lie. To answer this question, we recalled read ing some time ago David Fromkin’s book, “ A Peace to End all Peace ”, in which the Germans w ere led into signing a secret alliance with the Turks based on a half truth told by three youngT urks of the Committee of Union and Progress (CUP o ne could understand why the alliance, which the German high command did not want and had instructed should not be signed unless the Turks had “something unexpectedly significant to contribute to the war,” had been signed. Noo ne knew what that contribution could possibly be as the Turks did not want to be drawn into t he war and were even secretly flirting with the prospect of joining the Allied cause. Yet the secret agreement was hurriedly signed with Germany obligating itself, “by force o f arms if need be, to defend Ottoman territo ry in case it should be threatened.” The treaty e xpired on December 31, 1918. No one could figure out what the Turks had that was so important to the German cause that would make them undertake this alliance. Some time later a student of the German d iplomatic archives disclosed that they showed that on August 1, 1914, Pasha Enver (a foundero f CUP) and Mehmed Talat (Turkish Minis ter of the Interior) in a meeting with Ambass ador von Wangenheim, suddenly offered to turn over to Germany one of the most powerful warships in the world: The Sultan Osman . Von W angenheim accepted the offer; and British Intelligence reports from behind German lines t wo weeks later shows that officers of the Ger man fleet had eagerly expected to receive the v itally important new warship and appar ently were bitterly disappointed when Churchill seized the vessel instead.” History will show that the Turks duped the Germans on a half truth. This warship was very i mportant to the Germans because it would tip the balance of naval strength in favour of Germ any. It is true that the Turks owned the war ship after all it had been paid for by contrib utions from the Turkish people. However S ul tan Osman I and a smaller warship were built in British shipyards for the Ottoman government. They had not yet left the shipyards for Turkey. The Turks strongly suspected on July 29, 1914 t hat Churchill had planned to commandeer both warships. By the next day July 31 the T urks knew that Churchill had taken them. The Germans had no knowledge of this. The Turksh ad represented that they owned the warships, which they would sign over to the German High C ommand full truth. However, they with held the fact that they could not deliver the battleships. This turned their full truth into a devilish half truth to achieve their own ends and get an alliance of German protection for T urkey for the duration of the war. On August 1, 1914 Germany signed the a lliance with Turkey. On August 3, Churchill sent an official cable to the Ottoman governm ent informing it that their two battleships had been seized by the British government. The Germans thought that the Turks had been duped. In fact the archives show that the Turks with f ull knowledge of all of the facts before signing that treaty had told a half truth in their negotia tions and got away with it. A lie or a half truth? They are both despicable and can cause equal damage. We believe we can ensure renewable energy projects are financially viable LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net -2%,7<),1$1&,$/&21752//(5 '($'/,1( )(%58$5< EDITOR, The Tribune. Please allow me space in your column to express the following: As I drive around Nassau, it is common to see government vehicles riding around after normal working hours and on weekends. I realise that some government officers are entitled to a government vehicle and gas (Deputy Permanent Secretary and above). But there are other officers who are not entitled to a govern ment car who are just wasting the tax payers’ money by abusing the system and it is unfair, particularly in these hard economic times. When I did not have a car, I caught the bus. I couldn’t go to my boss and ask for the use of the office car to get to and from work because that is not the responsibility of the government. I now have a car and when it is malfunctioning, I simply jump on the bus or hike a ride with my neighbour. During Prime Minister Ingraham’s first stint in office, he did an excellent job in correcting this slackness but I guess he’s not aware of how many officers are now being allowed to “put their hands in the cookie jar” by getting away with this madness. They can even be seen pulling up to Ministry of Works to get free gas. They carry the government car home illegally but would not even pay for the gas. In addition to that, when something goes wrong with the car, the government fixes it. Something is definitely wrong with this. It should not matter whether or not you are friendly with the boss – this is wrong! This vexing problem needs to be addressed, as I notice that even persons who fall under the Prime Minister’s ministry (which I’m sure he’s not aware of) are taking the government car home – persons who are not entitled to do so. C E STUBBS Watching Nassau, February, 2009. Stop this a buse of Go v ernment vehicles Mr Minister, there appears to be a serious problem

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n By TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER POLITICAL activist Omar Archer is planning a massive marchto rally Bahamian men together in the face of rampant violence, poor education, unemployment and other social ills gripping the nation. He hopes the peaceful demonstration dubbed "The Real Men March" scheduled for March 31 will send a clear message that not every Bahamian man must fall victim to urban temptations. He is anticipating some 5,000 to 10,000 participants. Mr Archer released a statement on the demonstration which said, in part: "There are times in our lives when we must stand up and defend what is righteous and just. Our decisions may not be popular among peers, many of whom will turn their backs on you when the pressure is on. "(But are still many of us who share the dream of a better Bahamas. A Bahamas of peace, where neighbours once left their doors and windows open for days without fear. A Bahamas of love, where our sons and daughters enjoyed their childhood free from the watchful eyes of paedophiles. "We are now a Bahamas of petty thieves and heavily secured homes and churches encased with reinforced security bars. We are now a Bahamas with abused and sexually molested children, whose cries for help for many years have fallen upon deaf ears. We are now a Bahamas of politically divided individuals, whose patriotism is now judged by two colours red or yellow." The march is also intended to challenge Bahamian men to restore themselves to their "rightful place" as the head of society. "We are indeed tired of hearing individuals, especially young men in the over-the-hill communities, being given seven-year criminal records asa result of being caught at one point in their lives with a marijuana joint. "We must now agitate to address the problem of statelessness and ethnic profiling. We are now agitating to address the problems of unemployment, crime and inadequate educational facilities in the over-the-hill communities. "We are now agitating to stop the imposing of homosexuality and lesbianism on our children and less fortunate adults in this country. These and many other reasons are why Bahamian men, young and old alike, will indeed gather in peace with God as our refuge and indeed block the streets in absolute protest," he said. Mr Archer claimed the country had failed to show the world that it can govern itself free of corruption and "shameful" internationally televised scandals. He was referring to the recent debacle surrounding the alleged extortion attempt of celebrity John Travolta after his son's death at his second home in Grand Bahama. The march has several planned routes which will converge in Rawson Square, Bay Street. The group will present government with a list of recommendations for the social development of Bahamian men after the march. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS P HONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 A DRIVER on Grand Bahama lost control of his vehicle and crashed into a home off East Sunrise Highway. According to a statement released by Grand Bahamas press liaison officer Clarence Reckley, around 3am on February 20, 22year-old Ashley Moxey was speeding along East Sunrise Highway near the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant when he lost control of his silver 1995 Jeep Cherokee, registration 33680. Moments before the accident, the vehicle hurtled across the median into the westbound lane before crashing into a single-storey house owned by Rowland Stuart. The vehicle was demolished and left a "large hole" in the wall on the northern side of Mr Stuart's home. While no-one in the home was hurt during the crash, Mr Moxey, of Orange Street, Pioneers Loop, was taken to Rand Memorial Hospital for treatment of his various injuries. n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter FOX HILLMP Fred Mitchell said yesterday that not enough is being done in the financial sector to assist Bahamian men and their families in these hard economic times. “I do not think that the banks are being creative enough as people stand to lose their homes and businesses. There is a need for p ublic policy to intervene to ensure that homes are saved and commercial lending is restored. The mortgage and credit crunch is adversely affecting men and thereby families in our community,” Mr Mitchell said. Mr Mitchell spoke to a number of men at various Baptist churches in that community in celebration of Men’s Day urging them to continue to do all they can in these trying times to maintain the family structure. “Today, we are celebrating male leadership in our community. Today, we are also undergoing the greatest period of economic stress in the recent history of our country. I want therefore to speak up for the men in our country today. “They build the buildings, fix the machines, build the roads and parks, run the Junkanoo groups, maintain their families and assist their wives. For all of those things and more, we salute them today,” Mr Mitchell said. Mr Mitchell said as MP for the Fox Hill area, he knew the economic stress burdening the men of Bahamian society. “I know that it has hit men hard, with construction down and the hotel sector in retreat. Knowing how important the contribution ofa man’s income is to the family, it is imperative that we seek some policies to assist in these hard times. Not enough is being done,” he said. Mr Mitchell encouraged all men to help to support their children and said men had not been carrying the burden of hard times alone as the women also helped to see the men through. “They have help from the women of the country. And in marking the contribution of men to The Bahamas, no-one should min imise or negate the women of the country. We also rememberhow far they have come. “I hope to call an education summit for Fox Hill, to solicit the sup port of the entire community to get more resources for education in this area, in particular at the Sandilands Primary School, L W Young and Dame Doris Johnson. The situation particularly as it affects young men and boys is critical and needs to be addressed,” Mr Mitchell said. Omar Archer Political activist plans ‘The Real Men March’ Traffic accident on Grand Bahama MP:financial sector not doing enough for Bahamians in these tough times

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n By ALEX MISSICK T ribune Staff Reporter AS ONEsemester ends and a new one begins, students are scrambling to find new or used books that will probably “break” their pockets. This yearly problem sparked the idea in one College of the Bahamas s tudent to set up an online database to ease the rat race for buying books. Business analyst and computer programmer Garnel Leo used his computer systems degree from COB to design a website called the Bahamascollegezone.com back in December, 2005. Mr Leo said the site has over 1 ,850 members and over 1,000 books for sale. For the past year the site has had over 5,981 visitors and in the last month over 66,480 page views. “I know some students from the time I was attending the college had a hard time finding the books they needed. I knew books were expensive and I myself wanted to find c heaper books. I never did a site that would benefit others so it was something that I wanted to give a try,” he said. Mr Leo said there are many benefits that the website can offer both students and parents. “Many times the bookstore does n ot have the book students need so students can find books from other students who may have it and want to get rid of it at a cheaper rate. There is also a scholarship section where high school and college students can find scholarship listings that they may not have known about. They can also come on and d iscuss anything regarding college life in the forums, get assistance regarding schedules and many more,” he said. Mr Leo said the forums have been instrumental in most of the changes taking place at COB. “Many times we discuss issues involving the college and what I did w as submit a list of those issues and recomendations to the different heads at COB and told them the list was from different college students,” Mr Leo said. He wants the site to develop into a hub for students. “I was trying to add things for high school students where they canc ome and look for books. I also wanted to add a job section where students can come to look for jobs even if it’s summer employment or for those who recently graduated,” Mr Leo said. He advised youngsters wanting to develop Bahamian websites to stick to a need and not duplicatew hat is already out there. “They should develop something where they meet a need and where there is a low supply of it. Don’t try to duplicate Facebook because it is sure to fail,” Mr Leo said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Visit our Showroom today #12 Airport Industrial Park Nassau, The Bahamas Tel: (242 Fax: (242 eMail: craftmanskitchen@gmail.comDesign Supply Installationkitchen & bathroom cabinetry outdoor cabinetry built-in closets custom furniture Authorized Distributors of: CK12 Established in The Bahamas since 1996Cabinet Specialistswww.craftmanskitchen.com TRACKRoad Theatre has announced the opening of its 2009 theatrical season with Love in Two Acts , bringing the return of intimate theatre to The Hub on Bay Street and Colebrook Lane. This pairing of one-act plays directed by Matthew Kelly, chairman and long-time member of TRT, explores the tragedy and triumph of love. The production takes advantage of the intimate setting with staging in the round, and offers an intentionally different and immersive experience with Anton Chekhov's The Bear and Alfred Sutro's The Open Door . Chekhov's The Bear is a classic farce depicting the unpredictability of romantic love and the thin line between the passions of fury and lust. Though written in 1888, the rapid-fire exchanges and fiery arguments have been updated to the post-colonial Bahamas. The Open Door , a play by Alfred Sutro, examines the relief of confessed love, shock of reciprocated emotions, and sadness that can accompany unattainable desire. The complicated dynamics of friendship, loyalty, lust, and love are explored in Love in Two Acts . In November last year The Hub played host to a workshopped performance of O leana t o please audience members, among them Kelly himself. He said: "I was enthralled by not just the play, but what was happening. In this intimate setting I was almost part of the play and I knew that this intimacy was something Iw anted to explore as a direc tor.” Kelly said of his motivation to direct Love in Two Acts : want to show the layered complexity of love. It's never so simple as we're told, even in the blindness of passion. I'm also interested in experiment ing more with the medium of theatre, and The Hub presents itself as a unique opportunity to take advantage of the real intimacy of live performance. Even when film gives you close up moments, it's nothing like the immediacy and presence of real people a few feet from you, voices filling the room with passion and anguish, and having the total ity of a situation play out right in front of you.” Love in Two Acts stars local actors Selina Archer, Leslie Ellis-Tynes, Dion Johnson and Juanita Kelly. Director Matthew Kelly is both pleased with his cast and excited about the response from the upcoming production. “I'm very happy and very proud of the cast and their performances. I'm not a hard or soft director, I'm demand ing but I give a lot in return. I learn from the experience as much as the cast does. If you're not learning, finding new insights, changing the way you stage, direct, act, perceive and perform, then it's about as interesting as the parliament channel. “Our audience expects to be engaged, entertained, challenged and ultimately satisfied, and it is our job to deliver, so that everyone walks away satisfied but still engaged, taking the experience with them into their daily lives.” Already well-known for hosting the popular Express Yourself events, The Hub supports and encourages small performance and theatre as an alternative venue for smaller, less costly and more experimental works. Jonathan Murray, The H ub’s exhibitions director, said: “As a community orient ed arts space, we at The Hub are very excited to be hosting TRT’s newest production. “Throughout our first year, The Hub has helped facilitate many artistic events from var ious disciplines, including the a tre, and we would like to encourage more use of our space by theatrical produc tions. Unlike other conventional spaces, The Hub offers a unique, raw, intimate expe rience. I believe it is this type of experience that continues to keep the community engaged and thus returning for other events.” Love in Two Acts is TRT’s first production from this year’s busy season. Also coming up this year is the new play Light by Deon Simms, a planned return of the hilarious comedy Da Rally , TRT's yearly Spring Soiree and its summer drama camp Drama Rama. DION JOHNSON and Leslie Ellie-Tynes are in the grave yard. Love in Two Acts opens Track Road Theatre season Online database aims to ease book buying rat race

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n By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a consultant and former Caribbean d iplomat) T RINIDADand Tobago’s Prime Minister, Patrick Manning, willb ecome the Chairman-inO ffice of the 53-nation Commonwealth in November this year when his country hosts the organization’s biennial summit. For two years thereafter, Mr M anning should, theoretically be “Mr Commonwealth” – the face of the leadership of the group of countries whose multi-ethnic, multi-cultural member states are drawn from every Continent of the worlda nd whose nearly two billion people come from one of the t wo largest nations in the world and some of the tinie st. The Commonwealth is a “voluntary” association of States held together by their shared history and commonv alues which are enshrined in various declarations. The “Crown of the United Kingdom” – in this case Queen Elizabeth II – is the symbolic “Head of the Commonw ealth”. I t has no governance structure apart from the Summit and its Secretariat headed by aS ecretary-General elected by all Commonwealth Heads of Government to serve a 4-year t erm with a limit now of twot erms only. Nonetheless, the old clich about the Commonwealth is p erfectly true: if it did not exist, nations would try to create it because it does bringt ogether in a common forum, s peaking the same language, 53-leaders who represent e very known faith, race of people and size of economy. There could not be a better microcosm of the world and,t herefore, no better forum for seeking solutions to the world’s problems. As Chairman of the Com monwealth Summit in November in Trinidad, Mr Manning h as a real opportunity to shape t he direction of the Commonwealth over the next two years. T he Commonwealth count ries of the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM chance, through Mr Manning’s on-going Chairmanship, to ensure that issues of impor-t ance to them are not only dis cussed at the Summit but are advanced internationally rightt hrough to the end of 2011. One of the issues should be the financing of the Common wealth Secretariat itself and t he raising of its profile. For small countries, such as those in the Caribbean and Pacific, the Commonwealth is vitally important as a tool of their foreign policy. As examples of this, it is in the Commonwealth that both Belize and Guyana first garnered international support against the territorial claims by Guatemala and Venezuela respectively, and it is the Commonwealth that has not only been an ardent champion of small states since 1977, but has helped to fight specific issues such as the assault on small jurisdictions by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD competition”. But, in recent time the older and more powerful mem-bers of the Commonwealth have been paying lip serviceto the organisation. They have done enough to keep it alive but stopped short of contributing more to return it to the vibrancy it enjoyed when it fought racism in Southern Africa and worked to change the international economic order. Just recently, the British Conservative Party opposition spokesman on Commonwealth affairs, William Hague, accused the British govern ment of “turning its back” on the Commonwealth. He makes the point that the Commonwealth is under-used and that more money would help. Britain pays per person per year to the EU, to the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, to the United Nations and only 20p to the C ommonwealth. The same parsimonious approach to the Commonwealth is reflected in the lack of real zeal by Canada, Aus-t ralia and New Zealand all of whom are participants in oth-e r powerful decision-making bodies such as the OECD, the G7, the G20 and the boards of the IMF and World Bank. Smaller states – the C aribbean among them – have also not helped to improve the financial status of the Commonwealth. Many of them have been t ardy in making their annual c ontributions and some of them are in arrears. When they don’t demonstrate theira ppreciation of the immense value that the organisation is to them, they play in to theh ands of those larger countries that would like to keep it as a t ame pet rather than a vigilant bulldog. T h e new Commonw ealth will be 60 years old in April. The occa sion of the Summit in Trinidad i n November is therefore an historic event that should not be allowed to pass without the C aribbean and other small c ountries seeking to take advantage of Mr Manning’s chairmanship for the next twoy ears. CARICOM countries and the CARICOM Secretariats hould have, by now, establ ished a permanent team to help Mr Manning as Chairman t o carve out an agenda for the S ummit and to work with him over the next two years to make his Chairmanship-in-O ffice a success. While it is true that Mr Manning would have the r esources of the Common wealth Secretariat and the very astute and experienced Secretary-General Kamalesh S harma upon whom to call, the reality is that they will be 4,000 miles away and a busyH ead of Government should be able to summon his team on request. What is more, MrS harma himself will call upon Mr Manning as Chairman-inOffice for guidance from time to time. T he four other Heads of Government, who have been Chairmen-in-Office, have notm ade much of the opportunity unlike the Heads of Government who serve 6-month terms as President of theE uropean Union (EU But, the brevity of the Pres idency of the EU might be the contributing factor to its success. Two years is simply too long to expect a Head of Govern ment to split his or her attention between pressing nation al affairs and the Commonwealth’s business unless they are backed-up by a full time and dedicated team. Reform of the global financial architecture, changes in IMF and World Bank criteria to match loans and grants to real needs, fundamental change in their conditionalities, the expansion of the G20 to include a permanent representative voice of small states, the consequences of climate change including sea-level rise a nd a well-funded programme to help developing nations mitigate the effects of global warming while preserving their environment should allf orm part of the agenda for the Summit with wellr esearched and well-argued p apers from the Caribbean. Manning has identified the Commonwealth Caribbean with the hosting of the Summit. The Caribbean, in turn,s hould provide him with a s trong team, drawn from the region, to help make his twoyear period as the Commonwealth’s Chairman-in-Office a benefit to the Caribbean’s people and to the globaln eighbourhood. Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 7 Commonwealth Summit: A Caribbean opportunity WORLDVIEW n SIRRonald Sanders

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In other crime news, two residents of Yamacraw were targeted by armed robbers while outside their homes. Police said the victims were business people who w ere more than likely the targets of assailants who watched their daily routines and followed them home under the cover of darkness. Supt Moss said around 10.19pm on Friday, a female resident of Twynam Heights was returning home with her son w hen they were approached by two gunmen who robbed them o f an undetermined amount of c ash and personal property. The suspects were able to escape and are still at large, Supt Moss said. A round 1.24am on Friday a man was approached by two males both armed with guns while outside his home in Cool A cres Sub-divison. The men robbed him of an undetermined amount of cash before entering his home and stealing his licensed 12-gauge shotgun. "Upon leaving the home, they shot him in the left leg," said Supt M oss. The victim is said to be in stable condition in hospital. The gunmen fled the scene. Police investigations continue into both incidents. S upt Moss advised residents to ensure their properties were well-lit when returning home at night and to take extra care in a lerting others when coming home in the dark. "It's almost a helpless situation when people are already in your house but you have to makes ure that while you are in your home, it is properly secured, all the doors and windows are locked. Make sure sufficient l ighting is on the outside of the house, that's important. "If you have someone else at the home, alert them that you are coming home and, on youra rrival, make some noise, toot the horn so they can be on the lookout," he said. Over the weekend police also a rrested two men for possession of an illegal firearm. Supt Moss said around 11.40pm Saturday, officers on patrol in the Goodman's Baya rea stopped two men in a vehicle who were acting in a "suspicious" manner. "They were able to pull the c ar over. On searching the vehicle they removed a 9mm pistol along with ten rounds of ammunition," he said. B oth men are in custody and are expected in court on related c harges today. Supt Moss said at this stage t here was "no connection" between those arrests and thet wo armed robberies in eastern New Providence. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE with the inmate they would have to shout across two fences which were approximately 10 feet apart. They wonderedw hether the inmate would be w illing to reveal sensitive information in such a public setting. They left the facility hoping that the source close to the inmate would contact The Tri-b une again, which he did the f ollowing day. The source told Mr Missick t hat the inmate was fully aware o f how public the visitor area was and was still willing to disc lose his allegations because “he wouldn’t be doing anything wrong. He is just passing some-t hing in his own words over to you.” M r Missick returned to the centre on the next visiting day, February 13th, with another Tri-b une reporter. Once inside the facility, they w ere told that in order to speak with the inmate they like others who come to visit detainees would have to stand at the double fence and shout his name. When they did this, they caught the attention of an immi-g ration officer. The officer came over to the outer fence alongside the paira nd said, “If you two are coming to see him, I need to see what y’all are into. That man is a trouble maker. He’s a pimp, het alks too much. He got a lot of good officers in trouble.” “He’s been here too long. A nother day would be too long. I don’t know why the governm ent don’t get rid of him,” the immigration officer said of the inmate who has been housed att he detention centre for 18 months. After the reporters got the inmate’s attention, the inmate went from the yard into theh ousing unit and emerged carrying an armful of papers. The reporters then joined the line with other visitors at the search point waiting to interact withi nmates. However, the immigration officer who expressed interest in why the pair were visiting the inmate, shouted at the man anda sked where he was going “with all that garbage.” The detainee replied that the p apers weren’t “garbage,” but instead documents related to his case. These men are not lawyers,” the officer replied, “you not giving them anything.” The inmate turned and shout ed to the reporters before returning to the housing facility, “They won’t let me see you. Geta lawyer to come see me.” The reporters left the compound and heard nothing about the inmate until the following Thursday. It was then that The Tribune received another call from the source who said the detainee had been taken to the Carmichael Road police station “for protection.” When asked whether the inmate was being protected from officers at the detention centre or other inmates the caller replied, “I don’t know what the situation is. I only know he was taken there for his protection,” he said. The Tribune has since discovered that after being in “pro tective custody for 48 hours” the inmate has been returned to the detention centre. m ale secondary school students. O n January 23 the young girl was reportedly lured behind the public school sometime after three o'clock by as many as four boysf rom a separate government secondary school. Although the matter is being investigated by the CDU, the incid ent was not made public, prompti ng calls for more school transparency from a citizen who heard of the attack through students at the school. S tressing that he was not familiar with particulars of the case, Bishop Hall said we are living in a culture where too many times case s of sexual abuse against minors go unreported. "When we molest a child we are disturbing not only the child's innocence, but our future. So theb est I can think of is a national policy of zero-tolerance towards sexual predators. “I just have a problem with a dults who are so off-balance and deranged that they feel comfortable molesting children and at the same time, people who tolerate it. "The mother who allows it b ecause the boyfriend gives her money the grandmother, or the neighbours somebody knows these things. And so I would like t o support the minister (of education) in calling for the police to d o their job and then we go forward." W hen asked if he felt the matter should have been brought to light b y officials sooner, Bishop Hall said whenever allegations of sexual i mpropriety against children are made there must not be any semblance of sweeping the claimsu nder the rug. " I don't know the case, to be honest, but wherever children are involved I think it is always best for independent studies or assessm ent to be made. We do not want to even seem to appear to be harbouring predators in our midst where children are involved. “I do not know the case with t his school, but we have to be overprotective where children are concerned. We all should have zero-tolerance I think if I as a g randfather, as an uncle, as a neighbour, if I knew that a child was being molested I think I should address it. I think we don't need to be standoffish where chil-d ren are concerned. "We need a national policy of zero-tolerance where children are concerned in terms of molestation o f any kind." According to statistics, there were 545 reported cases of child abuse in 2007 and 581 cases of child abuse including 145 cases ofp hysical abuse documented in the Bahamas for January to August, 2008. When contacted about the alleg ations last week, Minister of Education Carl Bethel said the matter was turned over to police by education officials the same day the alleged attack happened. He also said an internal review to determine if any school official was in dereliction of their duties in termso f school patrols was underway. If any official is found to have b een derelict in their duties during the alleged attack, appropriatea ction would be taken, he said. H e did not specify what this action w ould entail. P olice investigations continue. F ROM page one Man accused Call for ‘zero tolerance’ F ROM page one I nvestigation o rdered into claim of ‘illegal a ctivities’ at D etention Centre FROM page one Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 9 Think.About innovation and safety. About uniting everything you want from a car with everything you need in an SUV. The Subaru Forester combines these ideas to create a vehicle of intelligent design, high performance and remarkable versatility.TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Subaru Forester at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667The Subaru ForesterThe cool crossover that redefines what an SUV can do. Finally!Drive.In the Subaru Forester, you will find high levels of comfort, utility and style. Each control is thoughtfully positioned tobest connect the driver to the vehicle. Complete with precise steering and potent acceleration, the Subaru Forester delivers the performance to bring pleasure to any drive. The prime minister said that Bahamians engaged in, or interested in entering, the rental home market have an excellent opportunity to assist in providing this housing. “I emphasise that now would be the time to begin to explore options with the university and with local construction and development companies so as to maximise the benefit to the Grand Bahamian economy. And, of course, Grand Bahama’s tourism sector can also expect to benefit from travel to and from Freeport by staff, students and their families,” he said. Mr Ingraham said that government has spent seven months fine-tuning terms and conditions under which Ross University will operate in The Bahamas. “It has not always been easy but, as they say, some things are worth fighting for,” the prime minister said. Mr Ingraham said the decision by Ross University to locate a clinical education site in Grand Bahama bodes well for this island and for The Bahamas. “The establishment of this educational institution repre sents another important step forward in the diversification of the Bahamian economy which has been on-going for many years. Indeed, the creation of Freeport a half century ago was centred on the idea of economic diversification,” he said. The operation of Ross Uni versity will open many opportunities for Bahamians, whether facilitating access to medical training, providing new employment opportunities in faculty, staff and support roles, or in spin-off business opportunities flowing from the need to provide supplies and services to the school, its staff and stud ents. S o far, the university has 21 f aculty and deans, including Bahamian Rhodes Scholar Dr Desiree Cox. Over 20 administrative staff positions have been filled by Bahamians. Ross is also honouring its commitment to provide scholarships to Bahamian students. The prime minister called on all residents of Grand Bahama to reciprocate the confidence Ross University has demonstrated in the Bahamas by putting their best foot forward in hosting this international academic institution. “Those of you who are e mployed by the university must b e diligent in your work and maintain the highest level of professionalism not only during these difficult economic times but at all times. Those who benefit by providing goods and services must let excellence be your standard – at all times. And I urge the entire Grand Bahama community to be especially welcoming and hospitable as our Bahamian culture and tradition demands – at all times,” the p rime minister said. T he medical programme begins as a clinical education site of the Ross University’s medical programme in Dominica. It is meant to accommodate the increased enrolment at the medical school that can no longer be accommodated at the original campus. Already some 200 students have been registered to begin study at Freeport this year; that n umber is expected to climb s ubstantially over the next three y ears. Students enrolled at the Freeport site are in the third and fourth semesters of a 10-semester programme. Each will have previously completed a full four-year undergraduate degree and the first two semesters of their medical programme in Dominica. These students are expected to spend the next eight months of their programme in Freeport where emphasis is to be placed on preparing them for entering the clinical component of their training in the United States. R oss reports that it has crea ted a state-of-the-art clinically-oriented education centre that makes extensive use of sophisticated learning technology, including a human simulation learning suite. The university is working with the Rand Hospital and Public Hospitals Authority (PHA ensure that the students have valuable educational experiences at the Rand. Also, Ross has undertaken to m ake available to the PHA and t he Rand some of its medical education resources. He noted that Fenestration had more than 60 years of experience in this industry, having operated in the United States and China. “I am indeed happy to be here to mark the official launch of Fenestration Glass Services here in Freeport, Grand Bahama. “They have satisfied the requirement of the Grand Bahama Port Authority and the government to operate here, and those requirements include the best environmental standards and evidence of funding,” Mr Ingraham said. Mr Ingraham said the products manufactured by Fenestration will be employed in the con struction sector here on the island and will reduce c ooling requirements hence electricity usage and d emand for increased oil imports, especially dur ing hot summer months. “I want you to be assured that the government will continue to do all it can to promote and sup port increased investment here on this island in diversifying industries. “I am grateful for your investment in Grand Bahama. We look forward to a wonderful relationship over the years,” said Mr Ingraham. Mr Ingraham was accompanied to Freeport by his wife, who performed the official ribbon cutting at the glass facility. The prime minister and his wife also attended the official opening of Ross University on Friday. He told those attending the opening that the medical facility is expected to pump some $3 million annually into the Freeport economy. FROM page one Glass manufacturing facility ‘will provide much needed jobs’ F ROM page one Ross University payroll is set to exceed $4m

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C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE English Premiership Smart ChoiceDRIVESales SPORTS IN BRIEF n B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net IT was only their second time playing together, but Mark Knowles and Mardy Fish looked like a veteran duo all week long in Memphis, Tennessee. Y esterday, the number four seeded team, capped off the Regions Morgan Keegan Championships with a 7-6 (7 the unseeded team of Travis Parrott and Flip Polasek. “It’s always good to win a tournament,” said Knowles, who won the title at the tournament last year with his Indian partner Mahesh Bhupathi. This year, however, Bhupathi decided to skip the tournament as he returned home to relax after he and Knowles fin ished as runners-up at the Australian Open. Knowles, who immediately boarded a 20-hour flight to be reunited with Bhu pathi this week, decided to team up with Fish. It turned out to be a great partner ship as Knowles and Fish didn’t lose a set in the tournament. F F o o u u r r t t h h t t i i t t l l e e “We played great all week,” pointed out Knowles, who went on to win his fourth title with three different partners his first two in 1996 and 2003 with former partner Daniel Nestor. But Knowles noted that he and Fish were even better in the final. “We got off to a great start and we never eased up,” said Knowles, who hoisted his oldest son, Graham, on his shoulders at the victory celebrations. “Mardy is such a great singles player. But he can also play good doubles.” Knowles, Fish win in Memphis THE REGIONS MORGAN KEEGAN CHAMPIONSHIPS M a r k H u m p h r e y / A P P h o t o M ARK KNOWLES h olds his winner's trophy as his son, Graham, 3, sits on his shoulders and waits for the ceremony to finish at the Regions Morgan Keegan Champi onships tennis tournament in Memphis, Tenn., Sunday, Feb. 22, 2009. Mark Knowles and Mardy Fish won the men's doubles championship. Mardy Fish THE Baptist Sports Council s howed its appreciation to its a ssistant director by naming the 2009 basketball classic in hono ur of Joyce Minus for her unselfish and dedication to the s porting body over the past decade. O n Saturday as the league got s tarted, her teams from Golden G ates celebrated with back-tob ack victories at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. I n the 19-and-under division, Golden Gates pulled off a h eartbreaking 29-28 victory over Mercy Seat as they missedm aking their debut in the league a triumphant one. And Golden G ates men knocked off Calvary Bible 43-29. Two upsets were recorded on the first day in the 19-and-under division as defending champions F irst Baptist lost 30-26 to the Latter-Day Ministries and Mirac le Working Church of God made their debut by stunning l ast year's runners-up Macedo nia Baptist 37-17. F F r r u u s s t t r r a a t t i i o o n n Also on Saturday, First Bap t ist took their frustration out by clobbering BIBA men 68-23; T emple Fellowship men held off Latter-Day Ministries 49-41 and B ahamas Harvest got by Church of the Nazarene 33-24. First Baptist 15-and-under open defense of their title with a 2420 win over L atter-Day Ministries and Temple Fellowship won 25-15 o ver MiracleWorking Church of God. Here's a summary of the games played: Golden Gates 29, Mercy Seat 28: Stephen Culmer scored six, including the winning basketball in their 19-and-under nail baiter. Rocco Fernander andB radley Cash both led the attack with eight. Fred Grant h ad a game high 12 and Nardo Higgs 11 in the loss. Golden Gates 43, Calvary Bible 29: Akeem Armbrister's game high 18 and Bradley Cash's eight was enough to pace the men to victory. Garvin Tay lor had 11 and Christian St. Vil 10 in the loss. First Baptist 24, Latter-Day 20: Leon Saunders scored 12 points and Leonardo Collie had nine for the 15-and-under defending champions. Marvin Rolle had a game high 14 in the loss. Temple Fellowship 25, Miracle Working Church of God 15: DeShawn White had a game high 11 and Jonathan Gordon added six in Temple Fellowship's 15-and-under victory. Shaquille Davis had seven in th loss. Latter-Day Ministries 30, First Baptist 26: Lerinel Christian scored seven and Lloyd Bailey six in the upset 19-and-under win for Latter-Day Saints. Noel Richardson had a game high 12 and Tinto Thurston 10 in the loss. Miracle Working Church of God 37, Macedonia 17: Jamaal Deveaux scored a game high 15 and Tori Symonette had nine in their 19-and-under debut win. Brandon Brownwell had seven in a losing effort. Bahamas Harvest 33, Church of the Nazarene 24: Travis Sands had a game high 16 to almost single-handedly beat their men's opponents. Durrall Rolle had 12 in the loss. First Baptist 68, BIBA 23: Kirby Thergelus and Jamaal Johnson scored 17 and 15 respectively to pace the men in their blowout. Burlington Moss had 11 in the loss. Temple Fellowship 49, Lat ter-Day 41: Isban Lynes had 14, Breston Rolle nine and Ian Pinder eight in their men's victor. Perez Thompson had eight in the loss. Here's a look at Saturday's schedule: 27TH ANNUAL HUGH C AMPBELL CL ASSIC BSC names basketball classic in honour of Joyce Minus SEE page 12 Felip Major / Tribune staff WESTMINSTER COLLEGEDIPLOMATS’ Stephen Miller drives to the basket. SEEMORE PHOTOS on Page 14. SEE page 12

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER absorbing an unexpected knock down in the second round, Meacher ‘Pain’M ajor bounced back to punish American Kevin Carmody i nto a fifth round technical knockout. Referee Dick Pakozdi s tepped in and called off the fight on Friday night at the Convention Center in Buffalo, New York two minutes and 54 minutes of the scheduleds ix round bout. It was a successful debut for Major under his new promotional team headed by NickG arone of the X-Cel Worldwide LLC. T hanking God for giving h im the strength and his Garone for the opportunity to d isplay his skills, Major said he put on a great show. P P r r e e p p a a r r e e d d It was a great opponent, but I want to thank my trainers for getting me preparedf or the fight,” said Major, who singled out Anthony ‘Chills’ W ilson from Hollywood, Florida and Nat Knowles, who joined them in Florida. M ajor said Garone was so impressed with him that he’s already looking forward to putting him on X-Cel’s next show to fight in the co-maine vent on ESPN in April of May. A gainst Carmody, who came in with a 10-9-2 win-lossd raw record, Major got a little careless in the second when he was floored with a wildo verhand right. But Major said he got up, shook it off and in the fifth, he threw a left-right combination and continued the flurryt o pull off the fight and improve his record to 16-3-1 with 14 knockouts. Even though it was cold and I came down with the flu from the bad weather, it was great,” said Major, who noted that he got his first taste ofs now. “Despite the weather, a lot of people came out and everybody was cheering me on, so Iw as even more confident to get back on my feet and do w hat I knew best box.” W hile Major said both Wilson and Knowles pushed him b eyond his limits to get him ready, he credit a lot of his success as well to the strengthc ondition workout that he got from Delvin ‘Blue’ Scott. Having done the strength work with him, I was able to get through it easier than a loto f the boxers in the training camp in Hollywood,” Major n oted. “So I want to encourage the boxers home to take advantage of the training thatt hey get from blue because it’s a great help.” Major, 27, said he will be back in the ring today in Hollywood training for whenev-e r his next opportunity come for him to fight again. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Major inflicts ‘Pain-ful’ defeat on Carmody AIN BOUNCESBACKFROMKNOCKDOWNTO KO A MERICANINFIFTHROUND Fish was a runner-up in M emphis in 2006 as he captured h is fifth ATP World Tour title. Knowles clinched hisd 51st to tie the Bryan brothers and Llie Nastase for 19th place in Open Era doubles titles list. Knowles said he’s now looking forward to playing in Dubai with Bhupathi. He’s hoping that they can maintain the same intensity that he and Fish enjoyed. “We played well in January, getting to the final of the first Grand slam at the Australian Open,” Knowles stressed. “It would be good if we can go to Dubai and perform just as well as we did. Whatever happens, we hope to be ready. Mahesh needed to take the break and I’ve had a good week, so I feel we can turn that around into another successful week.” Off the court, Knowles has been featured in the publica tion Teamwork that is produced by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Written by author Chad Bonham, Knowles is listed as one of twelve prominent sports figures featured and it includes exclusive commentary on his athletic heritage and his rise to multiple Grand Slam doubles titles. Knowles, whose wife Dawn Davidson gave birth to their second son, Brody five months ago, noted that he’s just enjoying the best of both worlds. Court One – 10 am LatterDay vs Temple Fellowship (15 11 am Macedonia vs Miracle Working Church of God (15 Noon Golden Gates No.2 vs Macedonia (19 1 pm Miracle Working Church of God vs Latter-Day Saints (19 2 pm Evangelistic Center vs Bahamas Harvest (M 3 pm Calvary Bible vs New Bethlehem (M Court Two – 10 am Faith United vs First Baptist (15 11 am Golden Gates vs Zion South Beach (15 Noon First Baptist vs Temple Fellowship (19 1 pm New Bethlehem vs Faith United (19 2 pm City of Praise vs Temple Fellowship (M tist vs Faith United (M Meacher ‘Pain’ Major Knowles and Fish win in Memphis FROM page 11 FROM page 11 BSC names basketball classic in honour of Joyce Minus MEACHER ‘PAIN’ MAJOR’ in action in a file photo.

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n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net A RIANNA Vanderpool-Wallace and Alanna Dillette helped the Auburn University to a second place finish in the women’s division of the Southeastern Con-f erence Swimming Championships over the weekend. And while the University of Kentucky had to settle for seve nth place, Elvis Variance Burrows posted a couple of record breaking performances. The three Bahamian Olympians competed at thec hampionships at Auburn University. Burrows, a junior at Kentucky, was eighth in the men’s 100 butt erfly in a time of 46.72 seconds to break his school record. Earlier on the final day of competition, Burrows had lowered the mark to 46.81. Both were below the B q ualifying time for the NCAA Championships. Burrows also got a school year i n his spilt in the 50 fly. “This was something that I t hought I couldn’t do, but I surprised myself,” Burrows stressed. I think I limited myself.” B B e e t t t t e e r r Looking at his performance overall, Burrows said he per-f ormed better than he had anticipated. I surpassed all of my goal times and I placed higher than I t hought I would place,” he said. “I got some NCAA B cuts, which was another goal of mine.” Those cuts came in the 100 fly, 50 free, 400 medley relay and the 2 00 medley relay. Looking back at his perform ance, Burrows said he attributed to his hard training leading u p to the meet. He said he was mentally ready to compete and he was glad to see the other two Bahamians from Auburn University there as w ell. “We were not on the same t eam, but they got to cheer me on and I got to cheer for them,” h e said. “It was good to see them do well and I know they were g lad to see me do well.” Also on the final day, Vanderp ool-Wallace, the freshman, was second in the 100 freestyle in 4 8.04 seconds. The race was won b y Morgan Scroggy of Georgia in 47.88. S he also swum on the second leg of the Tigers’ winning 400 f reestyle relay team that clocked 3:12.00 for both a SEC and pool r ecord. On the third day, Dillette, a s ophomore, came in fourth in the final of the 100 butterfly in 52.51. H er team-mate Caitlin Geary won in 51.65. And Dillette was fifth in the 100 backstroke in 52.77. The race was won by Gemma Spofforth of Florida in 50.56. Vanderpool-Wallace, on the o ther hand, was second in the 100 fly consolation final in 53.58. G eorgia’s Anne-Marie Botek won in 52.99. A nd Vanderpool-Wallace anchored the tigers’ 400 medley relay in 3:31.28 for another SEC and pool record. Day two saw Vanderpool-Wallace touch the wall in 22.23 for fourth place in the final of the 50 f ree. Dillette was 12th in 22.65. T here was a tie for first place between Michelle King of Ten n essee and Botek in 21.90. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 13 TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor provision of General Insurance Services described below.Biddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQIFH%OXH+LOOt7XFNHURDGV Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 7HQGHUVDUHWREHDGGUHVVHGWR Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. 6XEPLVVLRQVVKRXOGEHPDUNHGDVIROORZV Tender No. 690/09 $OOLVNV*HQHUDO,QVXUDQFH (acial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents (bs, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment Tender No. 691/09 0RWRU,QVXUDQFH&RPPHUFLDOtULYDWHHKLFOHV Tender No. 692/09 $FFLGHQW,QVXUDQFHRQH\t%XUJODU\ Tender No. 693/09 /LDELOLW\,QVXUHUVRQDOtXEOLF Tender No. 694/09 Professional Indemnity >2IFHU'LUHFWRU3URIHVVLRQDO6WDII(QJLQHHU Accountants, Attorneys] t Tender No. 695/09 Marine Insurance 7KH&RUSRUDWLRQUHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRDFFHSWRUUHMHFWDQ\RUDOOSURSRVDOV )RUDOOLQTXLULHVUHJDUGLQJWKHWHQGHUVtVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163 n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THREE of the Bahamian elite athletes closed out their indoor season by finishing in the top five in Birmingham, England on Saturday. Sprinter Chandra Sturrup posted the best result when she clocked 7.20 seconds for a third place in the women’s 60 metre final. T he veteran Golden girl, known for her quick start, was beaten out by American Carmelita Jeter, who ran 7.11. Tahesia Harrigan of the British Virgin Islands was second in 7.18. Jeter joined Sturrup and American Angela Williams in a threeway tie for the fastest times in the world this year. Williams won the first heat in 7.25 with Sturrup coming in third in 7.30. Jeter also won heat two in 7.25. While they didn’t have a heat to compete in, the men’s 60 hurdles was a straight final with Shamar Sands taking fifth place in 7.61 b ehind a host of Americans. Dexter Faulk won in 7.54, followed by David Payn in 7.55, joel Brown in 7.56 and David Oliver in 7.57. It was good, but I just had a horrible start,” said Sands on his perf ormance. You really can’t come back indoors from a poor start.” P P l l e e a a s s e e d d D espite the loss, Sands said he was quite pleased with his first full indoor season in Europe. He ended up winning four out of the s even races he competed in and he lowered his national record twice. I think it was good,” he said about his season. “I went out there and I did what I wanted to do from the break. I wanted to put my name out there for the hurdles and I think I accomplished that. Everybody now know about Shamar Sands.” Back in the United States, Sands said he will take some time off to recuperate from the hectic travel before he turn his focus to the outdoor season. B ut based on what he was able to achieve and remaining healthy, Sands said he’s confident that he will be able to continue his perf ormance as he gear up for the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany in August. No doubt Sturrup will be looking forward to the same thing. And after winning the bronze medal at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China last year, Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands is hoping to b ounce back on the medal diaz in Berlin too. Sands also competed in Birmingham, but he too had to settle for f ifth place with his leap of 54-feet, 4-inches (16.56 and final attempt. H e had a series of jumps that included 53-11 1/4 (16.44 (16.4416.4616.26 C uban David Giralt won the event with a leap of 56-2 1/2 (17.13 on his second attempt. He passed until the sixth jump when he scratched. Brazilian Jadel Gregorio was second with 55-5 3/4 (16.91 American Brandon Roulhac was third with 55-5 (16.89 S OUTHEASTERNCONFERENCESWIMMINGCHAMPIONSHIPS Vanderpool-Wallace, Alanna Dillette help Auburn University to second place ARIANNA VANDERPOOL-WALLACE (far leftfar right on the SEC Swimming Championships podium as they receive their 200 IM Relay Silver Medal on Wednesday evening at the SEC Swimming Championships. Bahamian trio finish in top five in UK 100 FLY PRELIMINARIES: Bahamians Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace at bottom, Alana Dillette (centre they swim in the 100 butterfly prelims. Both Bahamians have advanced to the finals.

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS AUTHORISED TOYOTADEALER Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Queens Hwy, 352-6122 Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916Parts and service guaranteed Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew’s Church) Open Mon to Fri 8am 5:30pm Sat 8am 12noon Tel:397-1700E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs HUGHCAMPBELL TOURNAMENT n L ONDON L iverpool dropped more points in the race for the Premier League title when it drew 1-1 with visiting Manchester City on Sunday, reports the Associated Press . Liverpool was trailing after a deflected shot by Craig Bellamy until Dirk Kuyt tied it with 12 minutes left. The result left Liverpool seven points behind defending champion Manchester United, which beat Blackburn 2-1 Saturday for its 10th straight league win. If Liverpool fails to win its first league title since 1990, it will likely regret the games it has tied which already stands at a league high of 10 in 26 matches. “I have confidence that we can still win it, but we must win our next two league games against Middlesbrough and Sunderland a nd then win against Manchester United at Old Trafford,” Liverp ool manager Rafa Benitez said. “Then we may have a different situation. But I just accept that this has been a bad result and it clearly makes it more difficult for us to win the title.” Manchester City dropped to 10th place with 32 points, pushed down a spot by Fulham’s 2-0 win over last-place West Bromwich Albion. Fulham hit the frame of the goal three times and Bobby Zamora shot over the bar from close range before he finally put the home team ahead in the 61st. Andrew Johnson ducked to flick on John Pantsil’s right-wing cross and Zamora squeezed between West Brom’s two central defenders to tap in from inside the box. Johnson made it 2-0 from a rebound after goalkeeper Scott Carson had saved a shot by Zamora, while Fulham goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer saved a late penalty to preserve the two-goal lead. Sixth-place Everton drew 0-0 at Newcastle in Sunday’s other game, dropping points despite the home side having to play the second half with 10 men after Kevin Nolan was sent off for a danger-o us tackle on Victor Anichebe. G LASGOW, Scotland Celtic missed the opportunity to go above Rangers at the top of the Scottish Premier League when it t ied 1-1 at Motherwell on Sunday. The defending champions, who are going for a fourth straight title, led through Scott McDonald’s 13th goal of the season but Paul Quinn tied it with nine minutes left. McDonald scored in the 60th with a shot from the edge of the area that hit a bump and went over the goalkeeper’s leg before Quinn scored from 12 yards, leaving Celtic on 57 points, behind its city rival on goal difference. MADRID Malaga’s bid to finish the season in the Champions League places got a boost Sunday when the promoted Spanish league club beat Valladolid 3-1. Albert Luque used the outside of his left foot to swirl a shot between two defenders and out of the reach of goalkeeper Justo Villar in the seventh minute. Antonio Galdeano then scored another in the 29th from the penalty spot. Substitute Ignacio Perez sealed the win in the closing moments as Malaga improved to 39 points two behind fourth-place Villarreal and the final Champions League place. Malaga has lost only two of its last 14 games. Pedro Oldoni scored with a header in the 84th for Valladolid. Valencia and Deportivo La Coruna played later Sunday in another match with Champions League implications, while Getafe and Athletic Bilbao also were to play. Barcelona leads the league with 60 points, followed by Real Madrid with 53, Sevilla with 44 and Valencia with 38. Also Sunday, Osasuna beat Numancia 2-0, 10-man Almeria rallied for a 1-1 tie at Recreativo Huelva and Jose Jurado scored in the 88th as Mallorca beat 10-man Racing Santander 1-0. U K: The Premiership Liverpool drop more points after Manchester United win WESTMINSTER’S Christopher Stuart drives to the basket. P HOTOS: Felip M ajor / Tribune staff WESTMINSTER Larry Smith drives to the basket for the win. WESTMINISTER COLLEGEDIPLOMATS’ Thomas Mackey tries to avoid the defenceo f Doris Johnson M ystic Marlins in the Pool Finals of the Hugh Campbell Tournament. The Westminster College Diplomats went on tow in 64-63. n Full coverage in tomorrow’ s paper Westminster College Diplomats edge past Doris Johnson

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I N THEpast two weeks a very powerful and large delegation from the Republic of China has visited The Bahamas and Jamaica. The delegation to Jamaica w as led by Vice President Xi J inping, the second most powe rful man in China and the most likely next president. In both countries, projects worth hundreds of millions were announced. In Jamaica this week a utility company from Abu Dhabi purchased 40 per cent of the electricity utility and also invested in the electricity company on Grand Bahama. The Russian armed forces have carried out exercise in the region in recent times. Bolivia is getting Russian helicopters to use in their efforts t o control the drug trade. V enezuela is planning to buy Russian jets and helicopters. A ll the above underlines t he importance which politi c ally and financially powerful nations place on our region. It matters not that we may beb enefitting from the natural competition between others. Let us just make the most of the benefits that result from this reality. History and geography placed our islands squarely within the sphere of influence o f the United States, Great Britain and Canada. These historical relationships have h ad benefits, although who b enefitted most has been and continues to be a matter of a rgument and discussion. I t hink there is little doubt that i f the accounting is done in centuries rather than decades that the answer is that the North won. Then there is also the natural tendency to take what you "have" for granted. T herefore, without taking a nything away from our trad itional relationships or disr especting our old friends, we s hould cultivate all new suitors w ho come to call. Let’s make the talk of global integration and the global economy a beneficial reality for our islands a nd not just a concept. C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 15 B a h a m a s F i r s t Z x x t \ t v x V t w G odfrey Bethell joined Bahamas First General Insurance as a Claims Officer and has a total of six years experience in t he General Insurance industry. He completed t he requirements of the Chartered Insurance P rofessional (CIP Institute of Canada and will be elected an A ssociate of that Institute.Bahamas First General Insurance Company Limited # 32 Collins Ave. P.O. Box SS 6238 Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas 7 Godfrey Bethellonthesuccessfulcompletion oftheAIICand hisrecentpromotion W R 6HQLRU&ODLPVIFHU THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFBAHAMAS FIRSTGENERALINSURANCECOMPANYLIMITED WISHES TO CONGRATULATE B ahamasFirstGeneralInsuranceCompanyisawholly-ownedsubsidiaryof %DKDPDV)LUVW+ROGLQJV/LPLWHG$VWKHUVWORFDOO\FDSLWDOL]HGSURSHUW\DQGFDVXDOW\LQVXUHULQ TheBahamas,theCompanyhaspioneeredthewayinprovidinginnovativeRiskManagementsolutionstotheBahamian PDUNHW7KH&RPSDQ\KDVDQ([FHOOHQWf5DWLQJIURP%HVWUHHFWLQJWKH&RPSDQ\VQDQFLDOVWDELOLW\DQGVRXQG ULVNPDQDJHPHQWSUDFWLFHV The new world order VIEW FROM AFAR B Y J OHN I SSA Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story.

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Envy nightclub owner hits back at her critics n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE proprietor of Envy Nightclub and Lounge on West Bay Street has hit back at claims that her business is disrupting the area’s tourist-based environment through loud music and attracting an undesirable clientele. Delores Leeder, who once managed and controlled the majority stake in Club Fluid on Bay Street, said it was her dream to be the sole owner of a nightclub. Now, complaints from the nearby El Greco Hotel about the volume of Envy's music has forced Ms Leeder to answer to media and government agencies alike. Part-owner of El Greco, Mike Pikramenos, told Tribune Business that the Envyn ightclub, situated in the former Mayfair hotel, was attracting the wrong elements to the area surrounding his hotel. "It's affecting the Strip adversely. They are trying to improve it, but it's difficult when you get elements which should be controlled by police," he said. Harry Pikramenos, who is also part-own er of El Greco, said the opening of Envy compounded the area’s problems. "We don't object to doing business, but that's not doing business," he said. "It's attracting riff-raff outside our front door." O nly last year police raided the former Mayfair hotel, netting eight suspected pros titutes. But Ms Leeder said she has not seen any kind of illegal activity inside the building IN two recent articles carried by Tribune Business concern ing the relationship between Bahamas First and General Brokers & Agents, it was reported that Bahamas First owned 100 per cent of Star General Insurance Agency (GB one article headlined Bahamas First takes managerial control at GBA , and another piece that concerned Bahamas First’s hiring of an accountant to work at GBA. Star General Insurance Agency has since confirmed to Tribune Business that Bahamas First does not own 100 per cent of Star General Insurance Agency (GB Grand Bahama-based Star General Insurance Agency (GB by Star General itself, through its investment company, Star General Investments (GB 20 per cent by Bahamas First. The current shareholdings resulted from the 2001 merger of Nassau Underwriters Freeport agency with Star General (Freeport Tribune Business apologises for the error, and any problems it may have caused, and is happy to set the record straight. n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Arawak Cay Port Development Company will this week go back to its 19 shareholders to discover whether they still want to invest in the $60 million project, after some key “rules of the game”w ere changed during a meeting with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham last week. Jimmy Mosko, the company’s chairman, was tight-lipped on the details discussed with the Prime Minister, declining to reveal specifics when contacted by Tribune Business, although he attempted to downplay the impact of any changes by saying he was confident all 19 investors would remain involved. “It’s not changed much at all,” he told Tribune Business of the proposed Arawak Cay project, which would create a purpose-built port at that site to handle all New Providence’s C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information contained is from a third party and The T ribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from thed aily report. $3.34 $3.39 $3.36 2*./*-4*0.!-%.!.%).!.% !.+'!) *-*)*"*" $"-*)/%)/!.*)%/$f -**(.)-!.% !)!.!'"*)/%)! #0!./$*0.!f"**/ '*)#.2%((%)#+**'"0''.0((!-&%/$!)2%/$#!#!)!-*0.1! $%#$%'%)#.*1!-.%5! bt'%#$/ **-./$!*)!. *".') *0.!-!(-1!'*""%)!'%1%)#2%/$!3,0%.%/! .$%+$%.)*-./4'!-!.% !)!*""!-.-!/$/&%)#1%!2.*"/$!/ ')/%.$+-%./%)!$"-*)/#*'"/!))%. .2%((%)#+**'.) +-%1/!-!./)/.-!"!2)%/%!. *0.!*""!-.“'0.%1!'4*""!-! '/4 %./%)# f f n n r r f f n n r r f f f f t t b b t t b bn n t t PM changes ‘rules of the game’ on new port Star General Insurance Agency – A correction * Arawak Cay Port Development Company to go back to 19 investors this week to see if they want to remain involved with $60m project * Chairman expresses confidence that changes are ‘no deal breaker’, and that all will remain on board * Survey of proposed port site carried out over weekend to determine boundaries for lease * Memorandum of Understanding already submitted to government PM Hubert Ingraham S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Electricity Cor poration (BEC “within $1 million-$2 million of breaking even” come its September 2009 financial year-end, its chairman told Tribune Business, as it bids to reverse steadily increasing net losses that peaked at $18 million last year. Fred Gottlieb said the Board’s main objective was to restore the monopoly power provider to profitability as rapidly as possible, a goal that last week’s management restructuring is tied into, given that BEC had sustained net losses ever since 2004. Confirming that the short-term bottom line goal was to be “with in $1 million-$2 million of break even come September”, Mr Gottlieb told Tribune Business: “We would like to return the Corpo ration to net profitability, and significantly reduce its losses. “Hopefully, with the exemption from Customs duty [on BEC’s BEC targets ‘within $1-2m of break even’ goal for * Corporation losses rise in four-year period to $18m peak in 2008 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A SUPREME Court judge has refused to grant an order recognizing that a Connecticut-b ased hedge fund has become the ‘general partner’ for the $867 million New South Ocean resort/casino project on New Providence, finding it had not established “reasonable cause” to remove its developer partner. Senior Justice John Lyons, in a February 18, 2009, ruling, declined to grant a summons brought before him by Seaside Heights, the investment vehicle for billion-dollar hedge fund Plainfield Asset Management, which had effectively sought Supreme Court confirmationt hat it had removed Roger Stein and RHS Ventures as the development’s ‘general partner’ via a notice issued on October 20, 2008. Justice Lyons’ ruling effec tively preserves the status quo b etween the two parties pending the outcome of New Yorkbased arbitration between Mr Stein/RHS Ventures and Plainfield/Seaside Heights. He had previously refused to grant Mr Judge refuses to order South Ocean partner’s removal S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B Nine hundred Bahamas entities set up to facilitate UBS scheme, IRS alleges n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor SWISS financial giant UBS allegedly planned to create 900 Bahamian companies to enable its US resident clients to disguise their ownership of bank accounts, and thus evade their tax reporting and tax paying requirements, the US tax authorities have claimed. Court documents filed to support evidence provided by Internal Revenue Service (IRS agent Daniel Reeves, in the effort launched by the US fed eral authorities to force UBS to hand over the names of some 52,000 alleged US clients who evaded taxes on assets worth $ 14.8 billion, allege that the B ahamas played a key role in s ome of the schemes. There is nothing to suggest, though, that UBS (Bahamas its past and current managers, directors and staff, have done anything wrong in relation to the IRS investigation. One document filed with the US district court in south Florida, an alleged presentation to UBS’s executive board for its wealth management and business banking unit, dated July 6, 2004, seeks approval for ‘alternative solutions’ for simple and S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B

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Stein an injunction to prevent Seaside Heights from taking over as ‘general partner’. However, in his latest ruling on the dispute over the stillclosed South Ocean hotel’s redevelopment (the golf course is open), Justice Lyons also granted Plainfield/Seaside Heights some of its other ‘prayers for relief’, in particular by ordering RHS Ventures to hand over to it financial documents and materials on the project. Recalling how the dispute had arisen, Justice Lyons said in his ruling that it all stemmed from the August 6, 2007, partnership agreement between RHS Ventures and Seaside Heights for South Ocean’s redevelopment. RHS Ventures and Mr Stein were the developers, Plainfield/Seaside Heights the financiers. Mr Stein and RHS Ventures were “given the day-to-day control” of South Ocean’s development, but Seaside Heights – via the partnership agreement – obtained the right to remove or replace him, After a bitter dispute arose between the two parties, Seaside Heights attempted to do just that with its October 20, 2008, notice served on RHS Ventures, but this was resisted by Mr Stein. Justice Lyons observed that “the relationship between the parties here has broken down”. As a result, on January 9, 2009, Seaside Heights “brought a summons before the court seeking an order that it be declared general partner of the partnership pending resolution of the arbitration presently under way in New York. In effect, it seeks the court’s ruling (declaration been effective”, Justice Lyons said. Referring to the agreement’s stipulation that the general partner could be removed ‘for cause only’, Justice Lyons said: “Counsel for [Seaside Heights] submits that business efficacy dictates that the parties meant it to have a subjective reading – ie. That so long as [Seaside Heights] is satisfied that there is cause, then it appears (at least that is her argument flows logically) that the courts should be satisfied with that. That is plainly wrong.” Justice Lyons said the agreement showed that evidence needed to be provided to support the general partner’s removal, and that it must “stand up to objective scrutiny”. “It can hardly be conducive to the efficient running of a business if the second defendant [Seaside Heights] were able to simply replace the general partner as and when it wished,” the judge ruled. “Were that to be the case, then the general partner could be replaced on a capricious whim of [Seaside Heights].” While it was not reasonable to wait for arbitration outcomes if t he general partner was committing egregious breaches of the agreement, Justice Lyons nevertheless found that Seaside Heights had to establish a prima facie case to back up any move to remove RHS Ventures. Therefore, Seaside Heights had to provide evidence to support the grounds it had cited for removing RHS Ventures/Mr Stein in the October 20, 2008, notice. The hedge fund investment vehicle had cited as its grounds for doing so clauses I, II and VI of section 4.3 c in the agreement, the first two referring to “fraud and willful misconduct” and “intentional misappropriation”. Justice Lyons said the evidence to support Seaside Heights’ case revolved around an affidavit provided by Susan O’Donovan, which he described as “very fair and very objective”. Yet he ruled: “The frustra tion that Ms O’Donovan feels in not being given the information that she required to do a proper audit of the books is evident.I must say, however, that her affidavit is, in my view, insufficient to establish reasonable cause as pleaded in the notice on an interim basis. “I do not think, at this stage, and to the required degree, that it establishes fraud, willful misconduct or intentional misappropriation. Ms O’Donovan, very fairly, characterizes her difficulties as relating to some reluctance of the first plaintiff [RHS Ventures] and as relating, perhaps, to some poor bookkeeping practices. I do not consider, at this stage, that that is sufficient to show reasonable cause.” Ms O’Donovan’s affidavit only provided a “suspicion”, Justice Lyons said, and failed to carry the weight of evidence needed at a trial. As a result, he ruled that Seaside Heights had not “established such sufficient reasonable cause to give effect to the notice and dislodge” RHS Ventures. In regards to financial information on the New South Ocean project, the-then attorney for RHS Ventures, Higgs & Johnson partner Michael Allen, had in earlier evidence said both he and his client were not going to facilitate a ‘fishing expedition’ by Seaside Heights in a search for incriminating material. “Perhaps that was an understandable position to take, given the build-up of animosity between the parties,” Justice Lyons wrote. “The evidential suggestion, therefore, is that any reluctance or intransigence on the part of the first plaintiff [RHS Ventures] may well be as a result of advice received from its lawyers, rather than any misconduct or fraudulent behaviour.” However, Justice Lyons said this position was not supported by law, something that was important given Seaside Heights’ prayer that the court order that it be provided with financial information on New South Ocean. Noting that it was a ‘partner ship’, Justice Lyons said it went without mention that both sides should have unimpeded access to the financial records. As a result, he granted Seaside Heights’ demand over the records, but also refused to make an order restricting press coverage of the South Ocean dispute. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Judge refuses to order South Ocean partner’s removal F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 5B THE Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA Group Ltd affiliate, have confirmed their Board and management restructuring, which sees Hannes Babak restored as the latter’s chairman and Ian Rolle promoted to president of both entities. Mr Babak replaces Erik Christiansen as Port Group Ltd chairman, but it does not resolvethe ongoing feud b etweenthe Hayward family t rust and the late Edward St G eorge’s estate over the companies’ ownership. The temperature in this battle appears to have cooled of late, though, with sources suggesting Hutchison Whampoa remains eager to conduct due diligence on the Port as it attempts to acquire the estate's stake, while the Hayward family trust is saidto still be eyeing a sale to British banker Roddie Fleming. Little progress appears to have been made on the latter deal of late, though.. The restructuring also involves the retirement of GBPA president and Albert Gray, a development anticipat ed by most observers. Mr Gray joins the previously-departed Carey Leonard, the GBPA’s former in-house legal counsel, among the major management changes. No mention was made of Felix Stubbs, the GBPA’s chairman, with most believing this indicates he is set to continue in the role, with the Port Authority having a separate chairman from its Port Group Ltd affiliate. Having dual chairmanships is likely to somewhat placate a portion of the Port’s critics, who have long argued that its regulatory/licensing functions (the GBPA side s hould have been split-off, or a t least ‘Chinese walled’, from t he investments side at Port Group Ltd. Mr Babak’s return to the Port Group Ltd chairmanship has come as no surprise either, with many analysts having expected him to eventually reassume the post. The way was cleared after the Supreme Court overturned the more than two-year bar on Mr Babak playing any active role in the GBPA/Port Group Ltd’s management and Board affairs, an injunction having been obtained in November 2006 by the St George estate. His return to the chairman’s seat would have been sealed bya directors’ vote at a Board meeting last week. In a statement, Mr Babak said he would target the areas of education, training, healthcare and medical facilities as potential sources of investment for Grand Bahama in the shortterm. Having met with contacts in these industries during a December 2008 investment road show, he added that these held the greatest opportunities given the current global economic climate. “My primary focus is in the area of business development, and I will be back on the road within the next few weeks to secure more investments for our g reat island,” he said. I will not rest until Grand B ahama island reaches its full potential. We have so much to offer investors, and I will ensure that we bring new projects, for the benefit of the entire island of Grand Bahama.” Sir Albert Miller, a GBPA and Port Group Ltd director, attributed the arrival of projects such as Ross University and Fenestration Glass & Services Company to Mr Babak’s previous tenure at the Port. Meanwhile, Mr Rolle has been promoted from his previous post as the GBPA and Port Group Ltd chief financial officer to a post as president of the group. He joined the compa nies as a group financial ana lyst in 2000, and has also served as their group financial controller. He is also a former Ernst & Young accountant, and held the post of finance manager at Hutchison Lucaya, where he was responsible for the management of a $450 million budget for the redevelopment of Our Lucaya. Mr Gray, meanwhile, will still be retained as a consultant to the Port. “This day marks a culmination of over 35 years of outstanding and dedicated service to the Group,” said Messrs Babak and Stubbs of Mr Gray i n a short statement. The employees will certainl y miss Albert, and on behalf of the directors, management and staff of the Group, we thank him for his years of devoted service, and wish him the very best for the future.” Port unveils its new structure Hannes Babak Ian Rolle W Albert Gray Sir Albert Miller I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI'HFHPEHU7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-DQXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $ UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-DQXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-DQXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI1RYHPEHU7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI'HFHPEHU7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI-DQXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV Nine hundred Bahamas entities set up to facilitate UBS scheme, IRS alleges g rantor trusts in relation to US t ax law compliance. The paper notes that simple and grantor trusts would have to provide new documents, including a US Tax Identification Number (TIN authorities, with the identities of beneficial owners having to be disclosed. A number of solutions to this dilemma were proposed, including clients – before July 31, 2004, selling their US securities, or the creation of u nderlying companies. I n his affidavit, Reeves alleged in relation to the July 6, 2004, memo: “UBS acknowledged that it would be illegal to recommend that its US customers use offshore entities to avoid their US reporting obligations. “Nonetheless, in 2004, on its own initiative, UBS planned to create approximately 900 offshore corporations for its largest US customers – those holding UBS accounts with asset balances exceeding 500,000 Swiss francs. “It intended to create 650 such dummy corporations for customers it could not contact by October 31, 2004, and another 250 dummy corporations for customers it could not contact, and who UBS expected would employ these dummy corporations to hide their Swiss accounts from the IRS.” The July 6, 2004, document states that for clients who could not be contacted by July 31, 2004, “UBS will establish an underlying company in the Bahamas for UBS internal structures holding US securities above a threshold of Swiss francs 500,000. This will result in 550 underlying companies to be set up.” And it added: “UBS will establish an underlying company in the Bahamas for the remaining UBS internal structures where the total invested assets are above a threshold of 10 million Swiss francs, and the total value of US securities Swiss francs 10,000. This will result in an additional 100 underlying companies to be set up.” Another 250 were to be created for the estimated 20 per cent of clients who could not be contacted, but would wish to have the same structure, the document alleged. To help create the structures, UBS allegedly needed another seven foundation and trust experts to be sent to the Bahamas for three months, with an extra two based in this nation full-time to help administer the companies. Meanwhile, an alleged 2004 UBS internal review of US resident ‘non-W9’ clients, meaning those who had not supplied the IRS with information on US account holders, was tabled with the US courts. It claimed to show that in 2003, some 358 of Bahamas-based UBS clients, with combined assets under management of $894 million, were non-compliant with the W-9 requirements. Only four were alleged to be in compliance. Other court documents include 2002 internal UBS emails, saying that the bank’s position on ‘corporate’ clients with a US beneficial owner was “applicable to accounts either in Nassau or in Switzerland – a consistent approach is applied”. The same e-mail exchange also says: “Can you please issue an info in Nassau to that effect, so that everyone is on the same page”. It also expresses no opinion on whether the Bahamas’ then-newly-signed Tax Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA different treatment of such structures in Nassau”. Envy nightclub owner hits back at her critics since she opened her club almost three months ago. “I don’t sell drugs or prostitutes,” she said. “And I have not seen any of that going on in this building either.” She told Tribune Business that she took exception to Mr Pikramenos labelling her patrons, who come specifically to visit her business, as "riffraff". "Who is riff-raff? What's the definition of riff-raff? Is he riffraff? Am I riff-raff? Are you riff-raff?" she exploded. "Everybody is important, everybody is a VIP. Why does he have the right to say they are riff-raff? They are people who come to have a good time, and have never caused a problem in my club. I have to defend my customers because they are good people; they are not riff raff.” According to Ms Leeder, she has never had a fight occur in her club, partly because she employs 15 security guards during the busiest nights. She said there are also constant police patrols from the station one block away. Many property owners along the strip between the West Bay Hotel and Royal Palm Hotel are confident that the area is preparing for a boom in business. With the peak of Spring Break only weeks away, Envy is preparing to attract its share of that seasonal business, which means music and drinks during the daytime and parties at night. “Everybody is going to go after their share of that business,” said Ms Leeder. “I will just try to keep my music at an acceptable level.” According to her, the revitalisation of the area and the completion of renovations to the Mayfair will spell more business for everyone in the area. She hopes she and her neighbours can find the solidarity to exploit it in all of their best interests. "You can eat here, you can drink, have a good time and then go home. There's police right next doo. There are restaurants, there is a club. You can't ask for more along this strip,” Ms Leeder said. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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f RXQGNQRZOHGJHRIDQGSUDFWLFDOH[SHULHQFHZLWK:LQGRZV;3 WRROV .QRZOHGJHRIDQGH[SHULHQFHZLWK: DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ .QRZOHGJHRIDQGH[SHULHQFHZLWK$FWLYH'LUHFWRU\ .QRZOHGJHRIDQGH[SHULHQFHZLWK'$VtRELOLW\ .QRZOHGJHRIDQGH[SHULHQFHZLWK$6RSHUDWLRQDQGV\VWHP DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ .QRZOHGJHRIDQGH[SHULHQFHZLWKWHOHFRPPXQLFDWLRQVDQGQHWZRUN %DVLFNQRZOHGJHRIQL[$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ $WOHDVWYHf\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQ\VWHP$GPLQLVWUDWLRQDQGVHU XSSRUWDWOHDVWWZRf\HDUVRIZKLFKVKRXOGEHLQD%DQN—UXVW ULWWHQDQGVSRNHQ)UHQFKZRXOGEHDQDVVHW $%62/87(/<7(/(3+21(&$//6:,//$&&(37(' 3OHDVHGHOLYHUHVXPHDQGWZRfUHIHUHQFHV %<+$1' 7KH+XPDQHVRXUFHVDQDJHU %D\VLGH([HFXWLYHDUN :HVW%D\WUHHWt%ODNHRDG 1DVVDX%DKDPDV$33/,&$7,21'( $'/,1( )5,'$< 2IFHVLQ)ORUHQFH)UDQNIXUW*HQHYD+RQJ.RQJ/DXVDQQH/RQGRQ/X[HPERXUJ 0DGULGLODQRQWUHDODVVDXDULVRPHLQJDSRUHRN\RXULQ=XULFK THE Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB announced the judging panel for this year’s Essay and Speech Competitions, now underway in secondary schools throughout New Providence. They are Candia Dames, news editor, Nassau Guardian; Marietta Russell, BFSB’s achiever of the year (Bank of the Bahamas); Patricia GlintonMeicholas, Bahamian author; Sanchina Kemp, BFSB’s FSI student of the year (Deloitte and Steve Davis, UBS Bahamas. Wendy Warren, BFSB’s chief executive and executive director, said the organisation intro duced its school outreach pro gramme in 2001 to profile the important role human resource development plays in financial services sector growth. “With the support of the guidance counsellors – and the Business and English Teachers in the secondary schools, the Essay/Speech Competition portion of this outreach is intended to help promote a more comprehensive knowledge of the sector, while at the same time encouraging good research and writing skills,” she added. The competitions are cosponsored by the Ministry of Education, Ministry of Finance, Rotary Club of East Nassau, and Rotary Sunrise – in collaboration with the Professional Industry Associations. Corporate sponsors are Bahamas Business Solutions and KPMG. BFSB unveils judging panel SHOWN (l-r na Kemp and Candia Dames. Missing from the photo is Patricia GlintonMeicholas.

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shipping needs. “It won’t be an issue. We’ll have it resolved by Monday [today] or Tuesday. It won’t be a deal breaker.” The Arawak Cay port will house the container and freight terminals currently situated on Bay Street, which will be relocated to the new site as part of the overall downtown Nassau improvement project. Mr Mosko acknowledged to Tribune Business that the Prime Minister had “changed a few little things” when he and other representatives of the Arawak Cay Port Development Company met Mr Ingraham last week, but “in no way” was it a “game changer”. “It’s still full steam ahead,” said an upbeat Mr Mosko. “This delays us by a week or two. We’ve got to go back to the 19 investors and say: ‘These are the rules of the game. If you still want in, fine, if not, goodbye.’ But I’m confident everyone is going to stay in.” While Mr Mosko was emphatically upbeat, downplaying any notion of a potential problem, several observers suggested that the fact he had to go back to all shareholders to deliver the news, and see whether they wanted to remain as financial stakeholders in the p roject, indicated something sign ificant had changed. S ources familiar with the situation said the Arawak Cay Port Development Company had presented a detailed Mem orandum of Understanding (MoU ject proposal and its structure, to the Government. “They have presented a detailed Memorandum of Understanding to the Government, which has been agreed in principle, and are waiting for final approval,” one source, who did not know of last week’s meeting, told Tribune Business. Independent “Halcrow [the independent engineering consultants] have done most of their work, and are waiting for final approval to put everything in final form for bidding.” The MoU was said to set out the whole concept and overall plan for the Arawak Cay port, in addition to the proposal’s structure and how it would be financed. Mr Mosko indicated that Mr Ingraham had sought to alter part of the MoU’s terms. “The Prime Minister was clear on what he wanted, and it’s what we expected,” he told Tribune Business. “They’ve given us the feedback we needed.” Mr Mosko added that consultants for the Arawak Cay Port Development Company would be surveying the prop osed port site over the weeke nd gone, with a view to determ ining its boundaries so that a lease for the land and seabed could be signed with the Government. “We are doing the survey this weekend and will give it to the PM, with a view to getting the lease,” Mr Mosko added. It is unclear what specific terms Mr Ingraham wanted to alter, although one source told this newspaper it related to the Arawak Cay port’s financing and how this would be structured. The source also suggested the Prime Minister had wanted foreign capital to play a role in the financing. But this is no surprise, given that the Arawak Cay Port Development Company had said from the outset that it would be 60 per cent Bahamianowned at a minimum, thus leaving the door open for foreign investors and companies. The Port-owning company was also being structured to ensure no one entity owned more than 15 per cent. Mr Mosko confirmed this had always been the intention, given that Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC Tropical Shipping – all with foreign ownership – were among the Arawak Cay port’s proposed 19 shareholders. There was also speculation that the proposed port was running into increasing opposition from the Arawak Cay fish fry vendors’ association, plus the B ahamian cultural community, w ho view industrial usage as i ncompatible with developing Arawak Cay into a centerpiece venue for national culture/heritage. Among those who have objected to Arawak Cay’s selection as the site for the new port is William Wong, the Bahamas Real Estate Association’s (BREA he told Rotarians that the location “defies every sense of logic”, running against sound planning principles by taking up the last bit of prime real estate on New Providence and presenting an unattractive first view of Nassau to visiting cruise ship passengers. Still, the Arawak Cay port’s proponents have argued that the facility will serve Nassau and New Providence’s shipping needs for 50 years, with all freight and cargo offloaded taken to an inland terminal on Gladstone Road. From there, it would be distributed to its respective owners. Container Currently, the container shipping facilities in downtown Nassau handle some 70,000 twenty-foot equipment units (TEUs every year, a figure expected to increase to 150,000 TEUs some 30 years from now. Some have projected that if a 50 per cent savings could be made on current handling charges for the 70,000 TEUs imported into Nassau per a nnum, some $7 million in savi ngs could be passed on to B ahamian consumers. The Arawak Cay Port Development Company is being advised on its business plan by KPMG Corporate Finance, with Higgs & Johnson acting as its attorneys. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TheDoctorsHospital Dr.MeyerRassinFoundation P.O.Box N3018 • Nassau, N.P., The BahamasDR.MEYERRASSINFOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS w ww.doctorshosp.com/foundationThe Doctors Hospital Dr. Meyer R assin Foundation is pleased to a nnounce that applications are now being accepted for scholarships & financial assistance for students p ursuing healthcare careers. Applicants must be Bahamian c itizens & return to the Bahamas u pon completion of their studies. Applicationsareavailableonour w ebsiteat www.doctorshosp.com. O nlycompletedapplicationswith requireddocumentationsubmitted wouldbeconsidered. Deadline for submission of completedapplicationforms&all supportingdocumentationisM arch31,2009. Security & General Insurance Company (S&G a subsidiary of Colonial Group International Limited (CGI is seeking to appoint an individual to the position of Claims Of cer. CGI, with of ces in Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands as well as The Bahamas, offers a complete range of premier nancial and insurance services and continues to demonstrate signi cant growth in these areas of business.This is an opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing and innovative company focused on providing our clients with rst class service linked to competitive products. Reporting to the Claims Manager, the Claims Of cer will be responsible for the processing of claims enquiries using the Compans procedural guidelines and coordinating with the Claims Supervisor on the daily operational tasks within the Claims Department.The successful candidate should possess: A CERT CII or equivalent quali cation A minimum of three years experience handling and negotiating settlements of Personal Lines claims Strong administration skills and claims negotiation experience Competency in the use and application of standard Microsoft software applications Good communication, presentation, and writing skills Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked to performance. S&G offers an attractive bene ts package that includes comprehensive medical & life insurance, a contributory pension plan and long term disability coverage. If you have a keen commitment to quality, are results oriented with a desire to contribute your talents to a dynamic company, contact us about this opportunity.Applications will be treated in the strictest con dence and should be made in writing to: Security & General Insurance Co. Ltd. Attn: Human Resources P.O. Box N-3540, Nassau, Bahamas Or by email to: bs_hr@atlantichouse.com.bs The closing date for applications is February 27th, 2009.SECURITY & GENERAL INSURANCE CO. LTD. Personal & Business Insurance Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue P.O. Box N-3540, Nassau, Bahamas tel. 326 7100 www.cgigroup.bmA member of Colonial Group International Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life CLAIMS OFFICER Colonial Group International is rated A(ExcellentyAM Best PM changes ‘rules of the game’ on new port F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 9B LEGISLATION designed to give the Bahamas a significant advantage over competing juris dictions in the private wealth management niche is set to be unveiled this week. Caroline Garnham, a partner i n Lawrence Graham (LG winner of the STEP Private Client Team award in 2008, will s hare draft legislation that she and her colleagues have proposed on Executive Foundations during a workshop on International Tax Planning, which will take place this Thursday following the two-day Private Banking World 2009 Conference. She will be joined for the day-long workshop by top US private client lawyer Basil Zirinis, from Sullivan and Cromwell in New York. In the morning, Ms Garnham and Mr Zinnis will talk about the current market for private client issues, US tax changes and the recent move taken by the Canton of Zurich in Switzerland to repeal the forfait system of taxation for foreigne rs. This will dramatically increase the taxation payable for all Swiss foreign residents o f Zurich, such as Tina Turner. Ms. Garnham is founder of www.familybhive.com, winner of Wealth Management Innovation of the Year Award 2008. She writes a regular col umn for WMS Spears, for which she has been nominated columnist of the year 2009. The Bahamas Financial Services Board and the Association of International Banks and Trust Companies (AIBT title sponsors of the Conference. Key foundations law to be unveiled CAROLINE GARNHAM

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fuel imports, at the end of the first year in September, we hope to be close to a break even point, through in-house efficiencies and other measures we have taken.” Confirming that BEC has “been in a loss position since 2004” year-end on September30 of that year, Mr Gottlieb said the loss “wasn’t very much” then, “but has risen very quickly”. “Our losses for the last financial year were around $18 mil-l ion,” he confirmed. Such a rapidly worsening financial position has impacted BEC’s cash flow, liquidity and balance sheet to such an extent that it is no longer in the once-enviable position, as far as governmentowned corporations go, of being able to obtain credit for longterm infrastructure development without government guarantees. Mr Gottlieb said he “would not negate” recent comments from Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of the environment, who has ministerial responsibility for BEC, that the Corporation required $200 million in shortterm financing. The BEC chairman said of the Corporation’s infrastructure needs: “They are quite considerable, and so it is challenging at this point in time. We are looking for financing, and the Government is assisting us in that regard.” When asked whether this meant that government would have to guarantee – effectively underwrite any syndicated loan or bond issue, Mr Gottlieb replied: “That’s what we’re trying to work through right now.” BEC’s financial position had “improved to some degree, thanks to the Government exemption from having to pay customs duty” on its oil imports. As global oil prices soared to a $147 per barrel peak last July, the Government in its 20082009 Budget introduced a twoyear window exempting BEC from paying 10 per cent customs duty, and 7 per cent stamp tax, on its fuel imports. Mr Gottlieb said these tax exemptions had saved BEC “in excess of $10 million” last year, adding: “That was a big strain on us, particularly when you had the oil price surge last year.” The subsequent dramatic decline in global oil prices had helped BEC’s financial position “a tremendous amount”, Mr Gottlieb added, telling Tribune Business: “The situation has improved through the customs duty exemption, and oil prices have fallen dramatically, which is helping us a lot as well.” BEC is understood to have spent $350 million on fuel imports alone in 2008, but this was not the only reason cited for the decline in the Corporation’s financial position. “The former government administration directed BEC to reduce the tariffs,” Mr Gottlieb said. “It had the effect of sucking $18 million of revenue away per year, and that’s unfortunate. Because up until then, BEC was in position to have the neces sary economic ratings to get financing for its capital projects. That was significantly under mined.” This had forced the Ingraham administration to ride to BEC’s rescue and give it a two-year amnesty on customs and stamp duty payments. “In that two-year period, we’re trying to do everything we can to make BEC as effi cient as possible, so that when we come to the end of that twoyear period, we will see the Corporation move forward on a sound financial footing.” Mr Gottlieb confirmed to Tri bune Business that Kevin Basden, BEC’s general manager,w ill not be affected by the man agement restructuring and remains at his post. However, he declined to confirm or deny that among those set to leave BEC are chief financial officer Everette Sweeting; assistantg eneral manager with respon sibility for finance, Brian Albury; and in-house legal counsel, Shelley Cooke-Seymour. “This restructuring is really something initiated by the pre s ent Board, and is focused on the functions of executive man agement, in terms of the struc ture and various offices held, and the people holding those offices,” Mr Gottlieb told Tribune Business. “BEC’s financial standing has deteriorated significantly over the last five years or so, and the Board is working to make the company as efficient as possi ble. One of the areas we’ve focused on is the executive level, and to flatten it out and not make it so top-heavy.” Implying that there were would be personnel moves, including promotions, taking place within BEC, Mr Gottlieb declined to confirm the posts or persons affected. “It would be premature and irresponsible for us to confirm any of that, or make any comment on that,” Mr Gottlieb said. “We are in the process of doing certain things, and until that is finished, it would be wrong to confirm if any of those individuals are leaving the Corporation or not. That will be made public in due course – who is staying or not.” It is thought that the Board wants to reduce BEC’s executive management to 11-12, rather than the present 15. Mr Gottlieb said the restructuring had been intended to send a message to Bahamian taxpayers and BEC customers that the Corporation was doing everything possible to lower costs and generate a better return, rather than put the focus on personalities and suggest BEC was “getting rid of people”. Mr Gottlieb agreed with Tribune Business, though, that the natural reaction in these situations was to focus on those who were leaving. He added: “It’s not about individuals, but the measures being taken to restructure the company and achieve greater efficiency internally. “There’s only so far we can go with that; to a large extent, we’re at the mercy of external forces, but the Bahamian taxpayer will know everything that can be done is being done to make BEC more efficient.” Mr Gottlieb said the five-year industrial agreement reached with the Bahamas Electrical Workers Union (BEWU been critical, explaining: “That allows us to focus on other areas, and we feel optimistic we will see significant improvements. Some are happening as we speak. “We’re making progress, and seeing improvements all the time.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.411.410.000.0700.00020.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.64Bank of Bahamas7.647.640.000.3190.26023.93.40% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.2550.24011.11.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.776.770.000.4380.05015.50.74% 5 .001.88Consolidated Water BDRs2.152.04-0.110.1110.05218.42.55% 3 .002.27Doctor's Hospital2.402.400.000.2400.04010.01.67% 8 .106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.280.285,0000.5420.52020.84.61% 1 4.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6820.40015.33.83% 6.045.01Focol (S5.185.180.000.3370.15015.42.90% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1 .000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref6.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 14.0014.00Bahamas Supermarkets11.2312.0414.00-0.0410.300N/M2.67% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.9230-0.58-2.54 1.43761.3773Colina Money Market Fund1.43760.284.38 3.79693.3856Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3856-10.83-10.83 12.618011.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.61805.745.74 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.0950-13.38-13.38 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S131-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 31-Jan-09 23-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Dec-08 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525F INDEX: CLOSE 821.34 | YTD -1.62% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,682.04 | CHG 3.75 | %CHG 0.22 | YTD -30.32 | YTD % -1.77BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases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t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t&2 &KDPEHUV&XPEHUODQG+RXVH &XPEHUODQGt'XNHWUHHWV 1DVVDX%DKDPDV $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHUV BEC targets ‘within $1-2m of break even’ goal for F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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A BAHAMIAN attorney has co-authored an international law firm network’s guide on the best ‘green’ practices for lawyers, with the focus on reducing paper use to lower energy consumption and the carbon footprint. Merrit Storr, a partner at Chancellors Chambers, helped to write The Green Guide for Lawyers, produced by the international Meritas network of law firms, in a bid to reduce the volume of paper used by attorneys every year. Mr Storr said the idea for the guide came from the fact its producers “did not think that law firms in the Meritas network were aggressively seeking either to go green themselves, or were appreciating the opportunities that exist with clients whose businesses were trying to go green. “Firms need to start thinking about reducing paper use through recycling or other means, and also reducing energy consumption, investing in sustainability education for their employees, and investing in or contributing to organisations that are spreading the message of sustainability.” Mr Storr encouraged Bahamian law firms to conduct an environmental audit of their offices, and explore ways of curtailing paper use and improving office energy efficiency. He said: “While ‘going green’ is, to a large extent, about reducing carbon dioxide fuel emissions into the atmosphere, and thus reversing or mitigating global warming trends, the Bahamian marketplace has yet to commit, or give a high priority, to incorporating green practices in day-to-day business activities. B usinesses “This is probably because they are not convinced it is good for the bottom line of their businesses. Alternatively, in North America, introducing environmentally friendly green practices is very topical with Meritas law firms. Furthermore, clients of those firms are adjusting their business models to accommodate green practices.” Among the process changes advocated by The Green Guide is the digitisation of paper files. Bentata Abogados, a Venezuelan member firm, has adopted the recommended processes, and KarelBentata, its managing partner, said: “The impact of this project was 100 per cent positive. We are not aware of any negative impact.” Major organisational changes are not without some challenges, the two major ones being process and people.Mr Bentata added: “Perhaps the difficult part is designing the workflow to be followed. This means that each file has to be checked and then scanned in order to finally eliminate the excess paper. Factor “Also, there is an important human factor which is reluctant to change. However, by identifying a technology-friendly manager or director to begin your project, you maximise the possibilities of a success story, which fortunately was our case.” To achieve total digitisation, Bentata Abogados had to spend $50,000 on consulting, licensing, and installing a powerful new computer server. Yet reducing the need for paper storage allowed it to sell premium office space, which offset the costa win-win situation. One of the biggest gains has been the ability to reduce the wait time in responding to clients’ requests for files or in forwarding material to other attorneys. Other recommended conservation practices in the Guide include lowering energy consumption by reducing the number of light bulbs, and eliminating bottled water and personal printers. Bentata Abogados also plans to introduce a flexible working-from-home scheme for employees. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 11B The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD for the position of Construction Project Manager/Coordinator. Reporting directly to the Construction Manager, the duties and responsibilities of the successful applicant will include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otential candidates will possess an Engineering Degree, EIT or other technical qualifications required and 5-10 years of construction related experience on one or more large scale projects with emphasis on heavy civil, utilities, earthworks and paving. Applicants must have the ability to read and interpret construction drawings. They should have excellent computer skills including MS Office, AutoCAD, scheduling software or other related software. Excellent analytical and problem solving skills, oral and written communications skills required. Candidates should also have superior interpersonal and organizational skills. Prior experience working in an airport environment a plus but not required. Construction Project Manager/ CoordinatorIfyouarequaliedandinterested, pleasesubmityourresumeby March 6, 2009to: Manager, People Nassau Airport Development Co. P.O. Box AP59229 Nassau, Bahamas Onlythoseapplicantsshortlistedwillbe contacted .CAREEROPPORTUNITY Attorney authors green practice guide for lawyers

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n By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets TRADING momentum increased slightly last week in the Bahamian market with investors trading in four out of t he 25 listed securities, of which t wo advanced, one declined and o ne remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 16,661 shares changed hands, representing an i ncrease of 3,110 shares or 23 p er cent, versus last week's tradi ng volume of 13,551 shares. Focol Holdings (FCL was the volume leader this week with 8,400 shares trading, its stock rising by $0.01 to end the week at $5.18. Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FIN was the big advancer last week, its stock rising by $0.28 to $11.28 on a volume of 5,000 shares. FamGuard Corporation (FAM saw 2,700 shares trade, its stock price falling by $0.04 to close at $7.76. Consolidated Water Company (CWCB ed 561 shares at $2.27. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T No notes traded in the Bahamian market last week. C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : There were no financial results reported by any of the 24-listed companies during the week. P P r r i i v v a a t t e e P P l l a a c c e e m m e e n n t t O O f f f f e e r r i i n n g g s s : : F OCOL Holdings (FCL h as e xtended the deadline of its priv ate placement offering. T he preferred shares will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable semiannually. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d s s / / A A G G M M N N o o t t e e s s : : Famguard Corporation (FAM has declared a dividend of $0.06 per share, payable on February 23, 2009, to all shareholders of record date February 16, 2009. Commonwealth Bank (CBL has declared a dividend of $0.05 per share, payable on February 27, 2009, to all shareholders of record date February 13, 2009. Bank of the Bahamas (BOB has declared a dividend of $0.10 per share, payable on March 3, 2009, to all shareholders of record date February 24, 2009. Focol Holdings (FCL announced it will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Thursday March 19, 2009, at 10.30am in the Boardroom at its Corporate Office in F reeport, Grand Bahama. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ROYALFIDELITY MARKET WRAP The Bahamian Stock Market F F I I N N D D E E X X 8 8 2 2 3 3 . . 2 2 2 2 ( ( 1 1 . . 3 3 9 9 % % ) ) Y Y T T D D B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E AML$1.41 $-0-17.54% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB$7.64 $-00.00% BPF$11.00 $-0-6.78% BSL$9.58 $-0-5.99% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$13.95$-0-0.57% CBL$6.77 $-0-3.29% CHL$2.83 $-00.00% CIB$10.45 $-00.00% CWCB$2.04 $-0.32561-9.33% DHS$2.40 $-0-5.88% FAM$7.76 $-0.042,700-0.51% FBB$2.37 $-00.00% FCC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$5.18 $0.018,4000.19% FCLB$1.00 $-00.00% FIN$11.28$0.285,000-4.97% ICD$5.50 $-0-10.28% JSJ$10.50 $-0-5.41% PRE$10.00 $-00.00% International Markets F F O O R R E E X X R R a a t t e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C A A D D $ $ 1 .2506+1.31 G G B B P P 1.4441+0.52 E E U U R R 1.2829-0.26 C C o o m m m m o o d d i i t t i i e e s s W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e C C r r u u d d e e O O i i l l $39.80-5.28 G G o o l l d d $ 994.10+5.44 I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l S S t t o o c c k k M M a a r r k k e e t t I I n n d d e e x x e e s s : : W W e e e e k k l l y y % % C C h h a a n n g g e e D D J J I I A A 7 ,365.67-6.17 S S & & P P 5 5 0 0 0 0 770.05-6.87 N N A A S S D D A A Q Q 1 ,441.23-6.07 N N i i k k k k e e i i 7,416.38-4.67 Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who a re making news in their n eighbourhoods. P erhaps you are raising funds for a good cause,c ampaigning for i mpr ovements in the ar e a or have won an a war d. If so, call us on 322-1986 a nd share your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 3B n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A FIRM involved in a joint v enture bid with two Canadian c ompanies to supply the B ahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC energy has pledged to make its project a “showcase”, and urged Bahamians to avoid “wishful thinking” that could lead to the nation missing “our window of opportunity”. In a likely response to calls for more Bahamian participation in the BEC renewable energy tender, and demands from environmentalist Sam Duncombe that there be more transparency, Vincent McDonald, chief executive of Bahamas Renewable Energy Corporation (BREC agreed that “local participation is absolutely critical and of key importance to derive the maximum amount of benefit for the Bahamas”. BREC, he added, was 49 per cent owned by Winso Company, a Bahamian firm, but to access the “hundreds of mil lions” of dollars needed to bringa renewable energy project to fruition, it had partnered with Emera Inc, a 25 per cent stakeh older in Grand Bahama Powe r Company, and fellow Cana dian firm Schneider Power. “Given the state of the financial markets, lenders who were there yesterday and waiting for approvals, have disappeared d overnight. We can therefore nol onger afford wishful thinking, because we (the Bahamian people) will miss our window of opportunity,” Mr McDonald said. “The current economic cli mate warrants the need for outof-the-box thinking, in particular as it relates to financing these projects. We believe that BREC has found strong partners in Schneider Power and Emera that can ensure our project’s economic and financial viability.” He added: “The Bahamas can learn from other leading renewable energy jurisdictions such as Canada and Germany. Our partnership with Schneider Power and Emera allows for a significant knowledge transfer to BREC, and therefore to the Bahamas. “The results of this are that we have already significantly reduced our learning curve, and will also guarantee that these projects can get built. By committing ourselves to employing local tradesmen and contractors, this knowledge will be dispersed amongst our own economy, allowing companies and entrepreneurs an entry into a sector that generally has very high barriers of entry, but is slated for significant growth in the future.” Referring to BREC’s proposed wind/solar solutions for Harbour Island, Abaco and Eleuthera, Mr McDonald said: $60 million dollar infrastructure project in the Bahamas will act as a mini-stimulus package for the economy in the region. We anticipate that expenditures will give a muchneeded economic boost to local businesses, in particular local suppliers and trades people, but also hotels, restaurants, stores and many peripheral services. BREC is a showcase here in the Bahamas as to how business can be done with maximum local content and participation. “From an environmental standpoint, BREC, with the help of Schneider Power, is now one of the leading companies in the world that employs ‘conservation engineering’, mean-i ng that our facilities will meet a nd/or exceed all requirements under the Bahamian environmental laws. “We will also strive to reduce the impact on nature with the least possible intrusion on the landscape, wildlife and commu-n ities. And once BEC has come to a decision, we will be inviting the Bahamian public and com munities to comment and provide feedback.” Renewable energy ‘showcase’ pledge Environmentalist Sam Duncombe

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 The stories behind the news DEGREES: TIME FOR A RETHINK WILL a hard recession force a review of higher education and its place in modern society? O NE of the many by-products o f the recession could be a thorough reappraisal of higher education and whether it really serves a purpose in producing the right kind of people for the workplace. INSIGHT reports... n By JOHN MARQUIS Managing Editor O VER the last 30 years, highe r education has become a “given” among middle-class families, not only in the Bahamas, but also North America, Europe and Australasia. A college degree is now seen as not merely “proof” of an elevated intelligence and superior schooling, but also a certificate of social validation. To have non-graduate child ren in the family has become a virtual no-no among the thinking classes, an admission of defeat in an increasingly statusconscious world. Fortunes have been poured often at considerable sacrifice into the acquisition of gilded certificates marking a young person’s elevation into the intel lectual elite. So far it’s been regarded as money well-spent. But for how much longer as economies shrink and unem ployment rises? American writer Tom Wolfe, whose 1987 novel TheBonfire of the Vanities catalogued an age of rampant materialism and soaring social aspirations, has said more than once that US society is basically divided into two major social groups those who have four-year degrees and those who don’t. The “haves”, he said, can expect to secure good white-collar jobs, earn respectable salaries, and live comfortable middle-class lifestyles, while the “have nots” are left to struggle in the lower reaches of a sup posedly egalitarian society. Universities have cashed in on this widely accepted belief over the last quarter century, promoting the notion that only graduates have the intellectual wherewithal to pursue demanding careers, and driving a money-based agenda which is now, in these straitened times, bound to come in for much closer scrutiny. In fact, higher education has been one of the most impressive growth industries of the modern era. College bosses have grown fat off the influx of cash, especially from interna tional students who pay three times the going rate for tertiarylevel schooling as parents struggle to ensure their futures. The “bums on seats” recruiting dynamic of many colleges including some of the most prestigious has created an entire generation of young people who have emerged from campuses in their early twenties with an abundance of qualifications but not a single clue about what they want to do in life. Armed with an array of diplo mas, trophies and other academic baubles, they find them selves well-qualified on paper, but hopelessly ill-equipped for the job at hand. Very often they feel they have been scammed S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 C C Recession could force a review of the university system

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into long-term indebtedness with little or nothing to show for their pains at the end of it all. Instead of being directed into worthwhile careers by college courses and faculty advisers, they are often left in limbo with a multitude of supposed career options which rarely materialise. In many cases, they are woefully unsuited for the workplace, and tottering dizzily under a welter of unrealistic expectations. Recessions do have their benefits. Besides rooting out the fraudsters, embarrassing the profligate and exposing bankers for what they really are, they impose a reality check on society and make everyone see sense. That process is already underway, as employers begin to wonder whether college degrees actually mean anything in terms of identifying a student’s suitability for a particular job. Doubts began to arise in my own mind in the mid-1980s while I was editing newspapers in Britain. English language graduates entering journalism proved deficient in many key areas. Not only was their spelling erratic, they were often mediocre at sentence and story construction, and seriously lacking the kind of wide-ranging general knowledge essential fora newspaper career. In fact, graduates frequently had to “unlearn” many of the bad habits they had picked up on campus to become functional as junior reporters. Hamstrung by academic jargon, they had to free themselves from the kind of convoluted terminology expected of them in writing college essays to re-learn English as an effective means of communication. Academics have in the past frequently eschewed “vocational” courses as essentially second-rate, the preserve of the technical colleges and night schools. But more discerning employers are now identifying and singling out those universities which offer degree courses relevant to the working environment. Autodidacts the largely selftaught have long wondered whether university education is all it’s cracked up to be, especially as it so frequently fails to address the basics. I’ve met history graduates who were completely unacquainted with most of the major dates in European and American history, including 1485, 1588, 1605, 1649, 1745, 1805, 1807, 1815, 1832, 1833, 1865 and 1901. In one case, I even drew a blank on 1066, which I didn’t think possible. Of course, education in its broadest sense is always a good thing. Colleges pride themselves on sharpening up students’ critical skills. They insist that a combination of discipline and brainpower is essential for graduation. There is no doubt that we could all benefit from knowing more than we do. But as economies tighten and budgets come under review, it is inevitable that employers and parents will be looking closely at higher education and wondering whether anyone gets a fair return for their investment when it comes to horrendously expensive university courses and the quality of students they produce. When I entered journalism in the olden days (1961 editorial recruits, along with accountants, architects, solicitors and bankers, launched into their professions via a three or four-year period of articles or indentureship. I n return for a virtually unbreakable contractual commitment to an employer for a set period of time, a trainee was guaranteed on-the-job training bolstered in some cases by parttime full-day or half-day releasec ourses. In newspapers, the whole process was overseen by a body called the National Council for the Training of Journalists, which set standards for qualification and ensured its diplomao nly went to those of proven competence. By the age of 21 or 22, pro fessionals were fully functional in their fields, able to earn a good living for themselves, and ready to meet the challenges of their demanding careers. University courses were seen, in the main, as vehicles for pro pelling students into academia, or enabling rich kids to keep their minds occupied before taking up executive roles in family businesses. Oxford and Cambridge were then largely the preserves of privileged students on their way into the Foreign Office or the Colonial Service. The brainiest of them read Classics for some odd reason, and the vaguest of them headed into the Anglican church via a theology degree. No-one there gave a thought to horny-handed occupations or blue collar work. That was left to the polytechnics, where City and Guild exams were open to plumbers, electricians, joiners, bricklayers and other trades. It’s only since the late 1960s and early 1970s that bachelor degrees have been seen as essential ‘passports’ to skilled non-manual occupations. In many ways, degrees now do the job GCE O levels and A levels did in times gone by. Now the National Council for the Training of Journalists, via its student council, has come to the conclusion that vocational training is what really counts, and that university degrees are poor indicators of a student’s worth in the workplace. The news will not please the hundreds, probably thousands, of young people a 24 per cent increase over last year now applying for university courses in Britain as preparation for media careers, even at a time when newspapers are contract ing and closing at a frightening rate. Yet it does point to what is likely to be a growing trend as college education becomes too expensive for ordinary families to pursue, and employers become increasingly disillu sioned with “well qualified” young people who can’t do the job. Paul Durrant, deputy editor of the Eastern Daily Press in England, told the British journalists’ trade paper Press Gazette : “I’m not bothered about a degree. I’m bothered about NCTJ (professional qualifications. I’m bothered about vocational training.” He added: “I’m looking for maturity, passion and confi dence. In terms of currency within the industry, I need to know someone’s got 100 wpm shorthand, that they know media law.” There is no doubt that many universities in recent years have cashed in on media and creative writing courses, selling them as “easy options” for those who don’t know where they’re heading in life. The truth is, however, that few of these courses actually produce functioning professionals. The British government has encouraged the annual rush to the campuses, mainly because it has enabled civil servants to manipulate unemployment figures downwards to make the politicians look more efficient than they are. Mass communications and media studies degree courses are among the most popular for students who labour under the grossly mistaken belief that the press is a permanently glamorous profession which is relatively easy to enter. In fact, the supply-anddemand ratio has always made entry into the profession difficult, and recession-hit media houses are now employing few er people than ever. Even in the good times, newspaper editors were looking for a rare combination of qualities which is getting scarcer by the day. Curiosity, honesty, maturi ty, judgment and talent are right at the top of the list, along with an inbuilt ability to use the language effectively. Universities don’t necessarily provide any of them. As the recession bites deeper, and families are forced to consider their own resources as never before, it’s doubtful that higher education, with all its attendant expense, will continue to rank high among personal priorities. In fact, old-styled appren ticeships are now being viewed increasingly as a possible way forward, offering young people ways of becoming financially independent quicker, avoiding student debt along the way. For this to happen, however, primary and secondary schooling has to improve dramatically. High school graduation at 16 or 18 must translate into acceptable standards of literacy, numeracy and general knowl edge. Basic education must promote self-discipline, work ethic and ambition, however limited that ambition may turn out to be. Even more importantly, students have to be encouraged from a relatively early age say 14 or 15 to identify the kinds of careers they would like to follow, and to be given opportunities in their final two or three years at school to pursue studies relevant to their goals. Employers are much more likely to invest in the committed, proven ability of a determined apprentice than in some one full of airy-fairy notions about career development nurtured on a university campus. For my part, I would be much more inclined to take on someone with a genuine commitment to journalism than a student who finds himself at a newspaper interview only because mass communications happened to be part of his college curricu lum. And I am old-fashioned enough to believe that true proficiency in any craft or profession is best learned at the knee of a master in the workplace than in a classroom presided over by an academic who probably has little or no direct knowledge of the discipline they are seeking to teach. At the moment, the expectation of a university education among all those with an IQ of 100 or more creates an awkward hiatus of indecision between the mid-teens and midtwenties which can be catastrophic for young lives. One student told Insight: “In many ways, we appear have too many options, or did before the recession kicked in. I know so many of my college colleagues who spend their time wondering what they’re going to do with their lives. So few of them have focus. That’s what’s missing focus.” Others tell of graduates ending up as truck drivers or engaged in other fairly routine occupations they could have profitably followed at the age of 16, having discovered too late that their particular degrees had little value when it came to get ting a worthwhile career. Go back 50 years and you would find that high school students also had options, but they had to act upon them quickly if they wanted to be first in. Every summer, thousands of youngsters were discharged into the job market and focus was essential if you were to avoid the factory bench or a seat at a supermarket till. Generally, it was the more determined among them who grabbed the sweetest opportunities. The lazy and indecisive were left to pick up what was left. If the recession leads to a return to more indentureships, articles and apprenticeships, it will be no bad thing. As an autodidact myself, I have never felt unduly deprived, and have drawn much comfort from the fact that practically every 20th century icon I admired most was in the same boat as myself. D H Lawrence, Thomas Hardy, John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Pablo Picasso, Winston Churchill, L S Lowry, Edward Elgar and David Lloyd George were all non-graduates. So were, or are, Elvis Presley, The Beatles, Charlie Chaplin, Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Henry Ford, Richard Branson and, of course, the Queen of England. Go back a bit, and you discover that William Shakespeare had no college qualifications. Nor did Charles Dickens. The complete list is, of course, much longer, but the point is made. A college degree is fine and dandy for some, but can become a very expensive luxury if it fails to translate into a rewarding and successful life. It will be interesting to see whether higher education survives in its present form if the recession proves to be long and hard. At the very least it will be forced to become relevant to the age we live in, with greater emphasis on vocational training and the needs of the market. Hard times are not all bad. If we’re made to have a re-think, rearrange our priorities, and square up to reality, they can be a godsend. W W h h a a t t d d o o y y o o u u t t h h i i n n k k ? ? F F a a x x 3 3 2 2 8 8 2 2 3 3 9 9 8 8 o o r r e e m m a a i i l l j j m m a a r r q q u u i i s s @ @ t t r r i i b b u u n n e e m m e e d d i i a a . . n n e e t t C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 322-2188/9You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. V ersatile+ Will hard recession force higher education review? F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 C C WILL a hard recession force a review of higher education and its place in modern society?

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R R e e : : P P o o w w e e r r g g a a m m e e n n o o w w f f a a v v o o u u r r s s C C h h r r i i s s t t i i e e ( ( P P L L P P l l e e a a d d e e r r s s h h i i p p ) ) I THINK the run-up to the 2012 general elections will be all about leadership, not only in the PLP but the FNM as well. I’ve heard there is a division in the FNM, and that Branville McCartney is being supported as a challenger for leadership as the election gets closer. After 2002, it’s accepted that Tommy Turnquest can’t cut it, and that Dion Foulkes doesn’t have the brain noodles to be right up there at the top of the party. Hubert Ingraham will not be leader after 2012, mark my word, but Christie will still be up there for the PLP leadership if he bides his time. D D o o c c M M c c K K e e n n z z i i e e ( ( D D o o n n t t u u s s e e m m y y f f i i r r s s t t n n a a m m e e ) ) Mr John Marquis appears to be a very remarkable fellow. He strikes me as having qualifications in psychology, psychiatry, political science, jour nalism and clairvoyance. I read his expose on the PLP, its frontline soldiers and its political future and wondered how in the world did this lowly journalist come to be such an all-round expert in a ll matters of life, and able to p redict the future as well? His i nsight into our party’s affairs appeared in Monday’s edition of The Tribune under the caption, “Insight” where he presumed to psychoanalyse the Hon Alfred Sears, ObieW ilchcombe, Dr Bernard Nottage, Senator Jerome Fitzgerald and the Hon Perry Christie. His conclusions? Christie, as fate would have it, would remain leader, as none of the others have the political charisma to be leader except for Wilchcombe who he con cluded is now “damaged goods” (my words, not his because of his questioning by the police in the Travolta mat ter. Mr Marquis very confidently predicted that, in any event, the PLP had as much of a chance winning the next general elections as the chances of a snowball surviving in hell. I did like his opening story about the Editor of an American newspaper, though, and how he outwitted his rumdrinking rivals to get to the top of his game; they all fell down drunk around him, leaving the lone Editor the only game left standing in town. John Marquis, you are not of our culture, not of our ilk, know nothing about what makes us tick, don’t hang out with us, don’t frequent the places we do, don’t date the same kind of women or men (whatever your choice your diet is totally different from ours and our style of worship, of God, is different (that is if you worship any at all) so tell me, how is it that you can presume to be able top redict what political decisions we will make in 2012 or before, when the next general elections are called? That’s stretching your imagination a bit, isn’t it, John? You don’t know us, John; you think you do, but you don’t. That is basically your problem, John; you came to the Bahamas from wherever you came and in three weeks you knew us, already, and can predict our e very move and decision. I d on’t know “us” John, and I ’ve lived with “us” for sixtyfive (65 easy to know us John, for if one wishes to know us, John, one will have to live with us, John, and I know you, for one,a re not prepared for that adventure. If you would be kind enough, John, to allow the FNM equal time and give them the same makeover you gave the PLP, it should be very interesting reading to see, exactly, what you would say about them, in contrast. Come to think about it, though, you probably won’t do it, seeing they are the ones who are allowing you to rest, undisturbed, for awhile, in our country, and it’s your payback time. Remember, John, the game of politics is a circular one; it goes around, but it also comes back around. Thank you, F F o o r r r r e e s s t t e e r r J J C C a a r r r r o o l l l l J J . . P P Freeport, Grand Bahama J J O O H H N N M M A A R R Q Q U U I I S S r r e e p p l l i i e e s s : : This ‘lowly’ journalist was writing stories about the PLP pre-1967 while most of the current leaders were still in school and many more were not yet out of kindergarten. I know the party all too well, even to the extent of giving a public speech about its evil habits 40 years ago. You don’t have to lie down and sleep with a hog to know how bad it smells. Mr Carroll is, however, right about one thing: he and I have absolutely nothing in common, which is one of the many things in life for which I am eternally grateful. YOU’RE right Christie is now once again the front-runner for leadership. He is slicker and smoother than anybody gives him credit for. L L u u k k e e , , B B l l u u e e H H i i l l l l WHETHER Wilchcombe survives as a potential leader will depend on what comes out of the Pleasant Bridgewater trial. O O b b s s e e r r v v e e r r , , G G r r a a n n d d B B a a h h a a m m a a WE don’t want Obie Wilchcombe as leader of the PLP. He smiles a lot, but we don’t take no heed of that. He ain’t no good for us or the party. V V o o i i c c e e m m a a i i l l c c a a l l l l e e r r ( ( W W e e s s t t E E n n d d ) ) R R e e : : A A n n n n a a s s l l e e g g a a c c y y t t w w o o y y e e a a r r s s o o n n I WAS alarmed to read in Insight that an opera is to be performed about Anna Nicole Smith at the Royal Opera House in London. This means the entire story will be raked over again, with some empha-s is inevitably placed on the f inal months of her life in Nas sau. Once again, the Bahamas will come out of it badly, you can be sure of that. G G B B H H a a n n n n a a We don’t even know half t he Anna Nicole story, even the part that took place here in the Bahamas. But thanks for updating us. A A N N i i c c h h o o l l a a s s C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 3C THE FRONT PAGE of the February 9, 2009 edition of INSIGHT ... FEEDBACK THE FRONT PAGE of the February 16, 2009 edition of INSIGHT ...

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APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN Across 1 Such a person doesn’t look so well at a distance (11) 9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets entangled (7 1 0 Unusual Maori girl’s name (5 1 1 Amisshapen nose ages (4 12 Legislation that went a gainst the grain (4,4 14 Dislike having to change a hotel (6 16 Mass of people moving a bout in the road in the morning (6 18 Vessels that shoot over the w aves (8 19 The capital in old C zechoslovakia (4 22 Rapid writer (5 2 3 The very best time for feathers (7 24 Printers may be kind to crossword compilers (11) Down 2 Asomewhat well-endowed l ady (5 3 Paddy or Eric may p roduce it (4 4 People enter for this sort of sport (6 5 The kindness of people (8 6 Arab territory that makes m e turn cross (7 7 Got lineages from him? Yes! (11) 8 The price of freedom, perhaps (6,5 1 3 Choke or another carburettor control (8 1 5 Something to keep aunty in change! (7 17 Main way to fasten sheets together (6 20 Most airlines provide this flight (5 21 An act of duplicity? (4 Across:1 Strait, 4 Asperity, 9 On call, 10 Tomorrow, 12 Thug, 13 Grate, 14 Hare, 17 Visibly moved, 20 Colour scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe, 28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 31 Trades. Down:1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, 5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, 16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 Char. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sicily, 4 Amethyst, 9 Ornate, 10 Stone age, 12 Lard, 13 Quiet, 14 Blue, 17 Eat one’s words, 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 Endanger, 31 Spirit. Down:1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26 Iran, 27 Bump. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Go to great expense (3,3,5 9 Void (7 1 0 Scatter (5 11 Showy flowering plant (4 12 Travel document (8 14 Uniformly (6 16 Breed of sheepdog (6 18 Large retail shop (8 19 Much revered person (4 22 Sequence (5 23 An advantageous purchase (7 24 Resistance movement (11) Down 2 Blacksmith’s block (5 3 Rumour (4 4 Cause to be loved (6 5 Professional valuer (8 6 Confusion (7 7 Long jump, discus e.g. (5,6 8 Central European country (11) 13 Italian art centre (8 15 Clarify (7 17 Deception (6 20 Empty completely (5 21 Liveliness (4 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER H AGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Such a person doesn’t look so well at a distance (11) 9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets entangled (7 1 0 Unusual Maori girl’s name (5 11 Amisshapen nose ages (4 12 Legislation that went a gainst the grain (4,4 14 Dislike having to change a hotel (6 16 Mass of people moving a bout in the road in the morning (6 18 Vessels that shoot over the w aves (8 19 The capital in old C zechoslovakia (4 22 Rapid writer (5 2 3 The very best time for feathers (7 24 Printers may be kind to crossword compilers (11) Down 2 Asomewhat well-endowed l ady (5 3 Paddy or Eric may p roduce it (4 4 People enter for this sort of sport (6 5 The kindness of people (8 6 Arab territory that makes m e turn cross (7 7 Got lineages from him? Yes! (11) 8 The price of freedom, perhaps (6,5 1 3 Choke or another carburettor control (8 15 Something to keep aunty i n change! (7 17 Main way to fasten sheets together (6 20 Most airlines provide this flight (5 21 An act of duplicity? (4 Across:1 Strait, 4 Asperity, 9 On call, 10 Tomorrow, 12 Thug, 13 Grate, 14 Hare, 17 Visibly moved, 20 Colour scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe, 28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 31 Trades. Down:1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, 5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, 16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 Char. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sicily, 4 Amethyst, 9 Ornate, 10 Stone age, 12 Lard, 13 Quiet, 14 Blue, 17 Eat one’s words, 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 Endanger, 31 Spirit. Down:1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26 Iran, 27 Bump. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 1 81920 21 2223 24 1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 1 81920 21 2223 24Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleSaturday s S udoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. S aturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Go to great expense (3,3,5 9 Void (7 10 Scatter (5 11 Showy flowering p lant (4 12 Travel document (8 14 Uniformly (6 16 Breed of sheepdog (6 1 8 Large retail shop (8 19 Much revered person (4 22 Sequence (5 23 An advantageous purchase (7 24 Resistance m ovement (11) Down 2 Blacksmith’s block (5 3 Rumour (4 4 Cause to be loved (6 5 Professional v aluer (8 6 Confusion (7 7 Long jump, discus e.g. (5,6 8 Central European country (11) 13 Italian art centre (8 15 Clarify (7 17 Deception (6 2 0 Empty completely (5 21 Liveliness (4 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 Such a person doesn’t look so well at a d istance (11) 9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets entangled (7 10 Unusual Maori girl’s name (5 1 1 Amisshapen nose ages (4 1 2 Legislation that went against the grain (4,4 14 Dislike having to change a h otel (6 16 Mass of people moving about in the road in the morning (6 1 8 Vessels that shoot over the waves (8 1 9 The capital in old Czechoslovakia (4 22 Rapid writer (5 23 The very best time for feathers (7 2 4 Printers may be kind to crossword compilers (11) D own 2 Asomewhat well-endowed lady (5 3 Paddy or Eric may p roduce it (4 4 People enter for this sort of sport (6 5 The kindness of people (8 6 Arab territory that makes me turn cross (7 7 Got lineages from him? Y es! (11) 8 The price of freedom, perhaps (6,5 13 Choke or another carburettor control (8 1 5 Something to keep aunty in change! (7 1 7 Main way to fasten sheets t ogether (6 20 Most airlines provide this flight (5 21 An act of duplicity? (4 Across:1 Strait, 4 Asperity, 9 On call, 10 Tomorrow, 12 Thug, 13 Grate, 14 Hare, 17 Visibly moved, 20 Colour scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe, 28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 31 Trades. Down:1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, 5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, 16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 Char. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sicily, 4 Amethyst, 9 Ornate, 10 Stone age, 12 Lard, 13 Quiet, 14 Blue, 17 Eat one’s words, 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 Endanger, 31 Spirit. Down:1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26 Iran, 27 Bump. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 910 1 112 1 3 141516 1 7 1 81920 21 2223 2 4 1 23456 7 8 910 1 112 1 3 141516 1 7 1 81920 21 2223 2 4T ribune Comics S udoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Go to great expense (3,3,5 9 Void (7 10 Scatter (5 11 Showy flowering plant (4 12 Travel document (8 14 Uniformly (6 16 Breed of sheepdog (6 18 Large retail shop (8 19 Much revered person (4 22 Sequence (5 23 An advantageous purchase (7 24 Resistance movement (11) Down 2 Blacksmith’s block (5 3 Rumour (4 4 Cause to be loved (6 5 Professional valuer (8 6 Confusion (7 7 Long jump, discus e.g. (5,6 8 Central European country (11) 13 Italian art centre (8 15 Clarify (7 17 Deception (6 20 Empty completely (5 21 Liveliness (4 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Such a person doesn’t look so well at a distance (11) 9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets entangled (7 10 Unusual Maori girl’s name (5 11 Amisshapen nose ages (4 12 Legislation that went against the grain (4,4 14 Dislike having to change a hotel (6 16 Mass of people moving about in the road in the morning (6 18 Vessels that shoot over the waves (8 19 The capital in old Czechoslovakia (4 22 Rapid writer (5 23 The very best time for feathers (7 24 Printers may be kind to crossword compilers (11) Down 2 Asomewhat well-endowed lady (5 3 Paddy or Eric may produce it (4 4 People enter for this sort of sport (6 5 The kindness of people (8 6 Arab territory that makes me turn cross (7 7 Got lineages from him? Yes! (11) 8 The price of freedom, perhaps (6,5 13 Choke or another carburettor control (8 15 Something to keep aunty in change! (7 17 Main way to fasten sheets together (6 20 Most airlines provide this flight (5 21 An act of duplicity? (4 Across:1 Strait, 4 Asperity, 9 On call, 10 Tomorrow, 12 Thug, 13 Grate, 14 Hare, 17 Visibly moved, 20 Colour scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe, 28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 31 Trades. Down:1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, 5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, 16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 Char. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sicily, 4 Amethyst, 9 Ornate, 10 Stone age, 12 Lard, 13 Quiet, 14 Blue, 17 Eat one’s words, 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 Endanger, 31 Spirit. Down:1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26 Iran, 27 Bump. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s K akuro AnswerAcross 1 Go to great expense (3,3,5 9 Void (7 10 Scatter (5 11 Showy flowering plant (4 12 Travel document (8 14 Uniformly (6 16 Breed of sheepdog (6 18 Large retail shop (8 19 Much revered person (4 22 Sequence (5 23 An advantageous purchase (7 24 Resistance movement (11) Down 2 Blacksmith’s block (5 3 Rumour (4 4 Cause to be loved (6 5 Professional valuer (8 6 Confusion (7 7 Long jump, discus e.g. (5,6 8 Central European country (11) 13 Italian art centre (8 15 Clarify (7 17 Deception (6 20 Empty completely (5 21 Liveliness (4 frbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Such a person doesn’t look so well at a distance (11) 9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets entangled (7 10 Unusual Maori girl’s name (5 11 Amisshapen nose ages (4 12 Legislation that went against the grain (4,4 14 Dislike having to change a hotel (6 16 Mass of people moving about in the road in the morning (6 18 Vessels that shoot over the waves (8 19 The capital in old Czechoslovakia (4 22 Rapid writer (5 23 The very best time for feathers (7 24 Printers may be kind to crossword compilers (11) Down 2 Asomewhat well-endowed lady (5 3 Paddy or Eric may produce it (4 4 People enter for this sort of sport (6 5 The kindness of people (8 6 Arab territory that makes me turn cross (7 7 Got lineages from him? Yes! (11) 8 The price of freedom, perhaps (6,5 13 Choke or another carburettor control (8 15 Something to keep aunty in change! (7 17 Main way to fasten sheets together (6 20 Most airlines provide this flight (5 21 An act of duplicity? (4 Across:1 Strait, 4 Asperity, 9 On call, 10 Tomorrow, 12 Thug, 13 Grate, 14 Hare, 17 Visibly moved, 20 Colour scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe, 28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 31 Trades. Down:1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, 5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, 16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 Char. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sicily, 4 Amethyst, 9 Ornate, 10 Stone age, 12 Lard, 13 Quiet, 14 Blue, 17 Eat one’s words, 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 Endanger, 31 Spirit. Down:1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26 Iran, 27 Bump. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 9 10 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 1 23456 7 8 9 10 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Go to great expense (3,3,5 9 Void (7 10 Scatter (5 11 Showy flowering plant (4 12 Travel document (8 14 Uniformly (6 16 Breed of sheepdog (6 18 Large retail shop (8 19 Much revered person (4 22 Sequence (5 23 An advantageous purchase (7 24 Resistance movement (11) Down 2 Blacksmith’s block (5 3 Rumour (4 4 Cause to be loved (6 5 Professional valuer (8 6 Confusion (7 7 Long jump, discus e.g. (5,6 8 Central European country (11) 13 Italian art centre (8 15 Clarify (7 17 Deception (6 20 Empty completely (5 21 Liveliness (4 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Such a person doesn’t look so well at a distance (11) 9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets entangled (7 10 Unusual Maori girl’s name (5 11 Amisshapen nose ages (4 12 Legislation that went against the grain (4,4 14 Dislike having to change a hotel (6 16 Mass of people moving about in the road in the morning (6 18 Vessels that shoot over the waves (8 19 The capital in old Czechoslovakia (4 22 Rapid writer (5 23 The very best time for feathers (7 24 Printers may be kind to crossword compilers (11) Down 2 Asomewhat well-endowed lady (5 3 Paddy or Eric may produce it (4 4 People enter for this sort of sport (6 5 The kindness of people (8 6 Arab territory that makes me turn cross (7 7 Got lineages from him? Yes! (11) 8 The price of freedom, perhaps (6,5 13 Choke or another carburettor control (8 15 Something to keep aunty in change! (7 17 Main way to fasten sheets together (6 20 Most airlines provide this flight (5 21 An act of duplicity? (4 Across:1 Strait, 4 Asperity, 9 On call, 10 Tomorrow, 12 Thug, 13 Grate, 14 Hare, 17 Visibly moved, 20 Colour scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe, 28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 31 Trades. Down:1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, 5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, 16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 Char. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sicily, 4 Amethyst, 9 Ornate, 10 Stone age, 12 Lard, 13 Quiet, 14 Blue, 17 Eat one’s words, 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 Endanger, 31 Spirit. Down:1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26 Iran, 27 Bump. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Go to great expense (3,3,5 9 Void (7 10 Scatter (5 11 Showy flowering plant (4 12 Travel document (8 14 Uniformly (6 16 Breed of sheepdog (6 18 Large retail shop (8 19 Much revered person (4 22 Sequence (5 23 An advantageous purchase (7 24 Resistance movement (11) Down 2 Blacksmith’s block (5 3 Rumour (4 4 Cause to be loved (6 5 Professional valuer (8 6 Confusion (7 7 Long jump, discus e.g. (5,6 8 Central European country (11) 13 Italian art centre (8 15 Clarify (7 17 Deception (6 20 Empty completely (5 21 Liveliness (4 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Such a person doesn’t look so well at a distance (11) 9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets entangled (7 10 Unusual Maori girl’s name (5 11 Amisshapen nose ages (4 12 Legislation that went against the grain (4,4 14 Dislike having to change a hotel (6 16 Mass of people moving about in the road in the morning (6 18 Vessels that shoot over the waves (8 19 The capital in old Czechoslovakia (4 22 Rapid writer (5 23 The very best time for feathers (7 24 Printers may be kind to crossword compilers (11) Down 2 Asomewhat well-endowed lady (5 3 Paddy or Eric may produce it (4 4 People enter for this sort of sport (6 5 The kindness of people (8 6 Arab territory that makes me turn cross (7 7 Got lineages from him? Yes! (11) 8 The price of freedom, perhaps (6,5 13 Choke or another carburettor control (8 15 Something to keep aunty in change! (7 17 Main way to fasten sheets together (6 20 Most airlines provide this flight (5 21 An act of duplicity? (4 Across:1 Strait, 4 Asperity, 9 On call, 10 Tomorrow, 12 Thug, 13 Grate, 14 Hare, 17 Visibly moved, 20 Colour scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe, 28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 31 Trades. Down:1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, 5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, 16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 Char. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sicily, 4 Amethyst, 9 Ornate, 10 Stone age, 12 Lard, 13 Quiet, 14 Blue, 17 Eat one’s words, 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 Endanger, 31 Spirit. Down:1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26 Iran, 27 Bump. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Go to great expense (3,3,5 9 Void (7 10 Scatter (5 11 Showy flowering plant (4 12 Travel document (8 14 Uniformly (6 16 Breed of sheepdog (6 18 Large retail shop (8 19 Much revered person (4 22 Sequence (5 23 An advantageous purchase (7 24 Resistance movement (11) Down 2 Blacksmith’s block (5 3 Rumour (4 4 Cause to be loved (6 5 Professional valuer (8 6 Confusion (7 7 Long jump, discus e.g. (5,6 8 Central European country (11) 13 Italian art centre (8 15 Clarify (7 17 Deception (6 20 Empty completely (5 21 Liveliness (4 frbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Such a person doesn’t look so well at a distance (11) 9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets entangled (7 10 Unusual Maori girl’s name (5 11 Amisshapen nose ages (4 12 Legislation that went against the grain (4,4 14 Dislike having to change a hotel (6 16 Mass of people moving about in the road in the morning (6 18 Vessels that shoot over the waves (8 19 The capital in old Czechoslovakia (4 22 Rapid writer (5 23 The very best time for feathers (7 24 Printers may be kind to crossword compilers (11) Down 2 Asomewhat well-endowed lady (5 3 Paddy or Eric may produce it (4 4 People enter for this sort of sport (6 5 The kindness of people (8 6 Arab territory that makes me turn cross (7 7 Got lineages from him? Yes! (11) 8 The price of freedom, perhaps (6,5 13 Choke or another carburettor control (8 15 Something to keep aunty in change! (7 17 Main way to fasten sheets together (6 20 Most airlines provide this flight (5 21 An act of duplicity? (4 Across:1 Strait, 4 Asperity, 9 On call, 10 Tomorrow, 12 Thug, 13 Grate, 14 Hare, 17 Visibly moved, 20 Colour scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe, 28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 31 Trades. Down:1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, 5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, 16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 Char. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sicily, 4 Amethyst, 9 Ornate, 10 Stone age, 12 Lard, 13 Quiet, 14 Blue, 17 Eat one’s words, 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 Endanger, 31 Spirit. Down:1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26 Iran, 27 Bump. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Saturday s S udoku Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u T a R gT E S aturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Go to great expense (3,3,5 9 Void (7 10 Scatter (5 11 Showy flowering plant (4 12 Travel document (8 14 Uniformly (6 16 Breed of sheepdog (6 18 Large retail shop (8 19 Much revered person (4 22 Sequence (5 23 An advantageous purchase (7 24 Resistance movement (11) Down 2 Blacksmith’s block (5 3 Rumour (4 4 Cause to be loved (6 5 Professional valuer (8 6 Confusion (7 7 Long jump, discus e.g. (5,6 8 Central European country (11) 13 Italian art centre (8 15 Clarify (7 17 Deception (6 20 Empty completely (5 21 Liveliness (4 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Such a person doesn’t look so well at a distance (11) 9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets entangled (7 10 Unusual Maori girl’s name (5 11 Amisshapen nose ages (4 12 Legislation that went against the grain (4,4 14 Dislike having to change a hotel (6 16 Mass of people moving about in the road in the morning (6 18 Vessels that shoot over the waves (8 19 The capital in old Czechoslovakia (4 22 Rapid writer (5 23 The very best time for feathers (7 24 Printers may be kind to crossword compilers (11) Down 2 Asomewhat well-endowed l ady (5 3 Paddy or Eric may produce it (4 4 People enter for this sort of sport (6 5 The kindness of people (8 6 Arab territory that makes me turn cross (7 7 Got lineages from him? Yes! (11) 8 The price of freedom, perhaps (6,5 13 Choke or another carburettor control (8 15 Something to keep aunty in change! (7 17 Main way to fasten sheets together (6 20 Most airlines provide this flight (5 21 An act of duplicity? (4 Across:1 Strait, 4 Asperity, 9 On call, 10 Tomorrow, 12 Thug, 13 Grate, 14 Hare, 17 Visibly moved, 20 Colour scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe, 28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 31 Trades. Down:1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, 5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, 16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 Char. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Sicily, 4 Amethyst, 9 Ornate, 10 Stone age, 12 Lard, 13 Quiet, 14 Blue, 17 Eat one’s words, 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 Endanger, 31 Spirit. Down:1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26 Iran, 27 Bump. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 8 910 1 112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 1 23456 7 8 910 1 112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Saturday’s K akuro Answer Across 1 Go to great expense (3,3,5 9 Void (7 10 Scatter (5 11 Showy flowering plant (4 12 Travel document (8 14 Uniformly (6 16 Breed of sheepdog (6 18 Large retail shop (8 19 Much revered person (4 22 Sequence (5 23 An advantageous purchase (7 24 Resistance movement (11) Down 2 Blacksmith’s block (5 3 Rumour (4 4 Cause to be loved (6 5 Professional valuer (8 6 Confusion (7 7 Long jump, discus e.g. (5,6 8 Central European country (11) 13 Italian art centre (8 15 Clarify (7 17 Deception (6 20 Empty completely (5 21 Liveliness (4 frbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Such a person doesn’t look so well at a distance (11) 9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets entangled (7 10 Unusual Maori girl’s name (5 11 Amisshapen nose ages (4 12 Legislation that went against the grain (4,4 14 Dislike having to change a hotel (6 16 Mass of people moving about in the road in the morning (6 18 Vessels that shoot over the waves (8 19 The capital in old Czechoslovakia (4 22 Rapid writer (5 23 The very best time for feathers (7 24 Printers may be kind to crossword compilers (11) Down 2 Asomewhat well-endowed lady (5 3 Paddy or Eric may produce it (4 4 People enter for this sort of sport (6 5 The kindness of people (8 6 Arab territory that makes me turn cross (7 7 Got lineages from him? Yes! (11) 8 The price of freedom, perhaps (6,5 13 Choke or another carburettor control (8 15 Something to keep aunty in change! (7 17 Main way to fasten sheets together (6 20 Most airlines provide this flight (5 21 An act of duplicity? (4 Across:1 Strait, 4 Asperity, 9 On call, 10 Tomorrow, 12 Thug, 13 Grate, 14 Hare, 17 Visibly moved, 20 Colour scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe, 28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 31 Trades. Down:1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, 5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, 16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 Char. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Sicily, 4 Amethyst, 9 Ornate, 10 Stone age, 12 Lard, 13 Quiet, 14 Blue, 17 Eat one’s words, 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 Endanger, 31 Spirit. Down:1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26 Iran, 27 Bump. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 1 23456 7 8 910 1112 13 141516 17 181920 21 2223 24 Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. P AGE 6C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY23, 2009 T HE TRIBUNE

PAGE 30

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 44F/6C Low: 46F/7C Low: 57F/14C Low: 59 F/15C Low: 58F/14C Low: 64F/18C Low: 66 F/19C Low: 59F/15C High: 69F/20C High: 66F/18C High: 75 F/24C High: 74F/23C High: 75F/23C High: 73 F/23 High: 77F/25C Low: 61F/16C High: 72 F/22C Low: 69 F/21 High: 75 F/24CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 65F/18C High: 81F/27C Low: 70 F/21C High: 78F/26C Low: 65 F/18C High: 75F/24C Low: 67 F/19C High: 79F/26C Low: 69F/21C High: 83 F/28C Low: 67F/19C High: 80 F/27C Low: 66 F/19C High: 83F/28C Low: 69F/21C High: 87F/31C Low: 69 F/21C High: 79F/26C High: 70F/21CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23RD, 2009, PAGE 7CTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Clouds and sun, spotty showers. Partly cloudy; a shower around. Breezy with plenty of sunshine. Partly sunny. Sunny most of the day and breezy. High: 77 Low: 66 High: 75 High: 76 High: 78 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Sunny, breezy and pleasant. High: 80 Low: 65 Low: 67 Low: 69 AccuWeather RealFeel 77F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 60F 71-63F 70-64F 73-67F 75-71F Low: 70 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 79F/26C Low .................................................... 66F/19C Normal high ...................................... 78F/25C Normal low ........................................ 64F/18C Last year's high .................................. 85F/29C Last year's low .................................. 74F/23C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.68"Normal year to date ......................................3.07" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU New First Full Last Feb. 24 Mar . 4 Mar . 10 Mar . 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:38 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:09 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 5:41 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 5:07 p.m. Today T uesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 6:43 a.m.2.612:17 a.m.0.0 6:54 p.m.2.412:49 p.m.0.0 7:20 a.m.2.612:59 a.m.-0.1 7:31 p.m.2.51:24 p.m.-0.1 7:55 a.m.2.61:39 a.m.-0.1 8:07 p.m. 2.61:59 p.m.-0.1 8:30 a.m. 2.62:18 a.m.-0.1 8:44 p.m. 2.7 2:33 p.m.-0.2 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 88/3171/21s87/3073/22s Amsterdam45/736/2c47/843/6c Ankara, Turkey37/229/-1sf40/423/-5sf Athens47/838/3sh47/845/7sh Auckland72/2261/16s68/2057/13sh Bangkok97/3679/26s97/3679/26s Barbados84/2875/23pc84/2874/23pc Barcelona57/1341/5s54/1242/5s Beijing37/228/-2pc43/621/-6pc Beirut59/1552/11sh62/1653/11sh Belgrade35/126/-3c36/225/-3c Berlin35/128/-2sn38/334/1sf Bermuda 66/1855/12r62/1655/12sh Bogota68/2045/7t67/1946/7sh Brussels46/735/1sh43/638/3c Budapest34/130/-1sn34/126/-3cBuenos Aires 79/2661/16s85/2959/15s Cairo66/1851/10pc68/2049/9s Calcutta 95/3568/20s97/3670/21s Calgar y22/-56/-14sn9/-12-7/-21sn Cancun83/2862/16s82/2762/16pc Caracas83/2867/19pc84/2868/20sCasablanca 71/21 50/10 s 70/2147/8s Copenhagen 42/535/1c40/439/3c Dublin48/843/6c48/841/5pcFrankfurt 45/7 33/0sn46/738/3c Geneva40/433/0c39/329/-1pc Halifax34/120/-6sf29/-118/-7cHavana 77/25 58/14 pc78/2556/13pc Helsinki25/-319/-7sf30/-127/-2sf Hong Kong 82/2772/22s82/2772/22s Islamabad63/1750/10sh74/2346/7sh Istanbul44/638/3sh47/840/4rJerusalem 52/1142/5sh57/1341/5s Johannesburg 74/23 54/12pc71/2154/12pc Kingston 84/28 76/24sh85/2974/23s Lima80/2668/20sh85/2967/19c London 50/10 41/5 pc54/1241/5c Madrid63/1732/0s59/1532/0s Manila90/3277/25pc88/3175/23s Mexico City74/2338/3s77/2541/5s Monterrey78/2562/16s89/3165/18sMontreal 25/-310/-12sf25/-312/-11pc Moscow 12/-117/-13c17/-817/-8c Munich32/030/-1sn31/025/-3sn Nairobi89/3161/16pc88/3156/13c New Delhi88/3152/11s86/3054/12s Oslo 34/125/-3pc30/-129/-1c Paris 46/734/1c46/737/2c Prague36/229/-1sn35/129/-1sf Rio de Janeiro89/3176/24s87/3076/24sh Riyadh81/2759/15s85/2956/13s Rome54/1237/2pc54/1234/1sh St. Thomas 83/28 73/22s84/2874/23s San Juan90/3265/18s95/3565/18s San Salvador90/3272/22s91/3272/22pc Santiago88/3154/12s86/3055/12s Santo Domingo85/2968/20s83/2869/20s Sao Paulo87/3067/19t81/2766/18t Seoul 48/834/1c50/1036/2c Stockholm34/123/-5c32/025/-3c Sydney82/2768/20pc86/3070/21pc T aipei 87/30 71/21s89/3173/22s Tokyo52/1143/6r50/1046/7c Toronto23/-511/-11pc29/-120/-6c Trinidad87/3076/24sh80/2671/21t Vancouver51/1045/7sh49/940/4shVienna 39/3 36/2sf38/331/0sn Warsaw36/228/-2sf33/030/-1c Winnipeg19/-712/-11sn27/-28/-13sn HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayTuesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:NE at 10-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles74F Tuesday:NE at 12-25 Knots4-7 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:NE at 10-20 Knots4-7 Feet5-10 Miles74F Tuesday:NE at 12-25 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:NE at 12-25 Knots6-9 Feet5-8 Miles74F Tuesday:NE at 15-30 Knots6-9 Feet7-10 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 70/2144/6c70/2142/5pc Anchorage28/-218/-7pc30/-119/-7c Atlanta 50/10 27/-2s52/1136/2s Atlantic City37/219/-7s40/416/-8s Baltimore39/320/-6s40/421/-6sBoston 37/2 22/-5pc35/121/-6pc Buffalo21/-615/-9sf27/-221/-6pc Charleston, SC53/1128/-2s55/1231/0s Chicago22/-514/-10pc37/227/-2pcCleveland 21/-6 16/-8pc32/023/-5pc Dallas64/1748/8s73/2251/10pc Denver61/1634/1c64/1732/0pc Detroit25/-315/-9pc30/-123/-5pc Honolulu78/2565/18pc80/2666/18cHouston 66/18 49/9 s73/2258/14pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayTuesday T odayTuesday T odayTuesday Indianapolis 28/-216/-8pc39/327/-2pc Jacksonville60/1529/-1s61/1642/5s Kansas City 50/10 34/1s57/1337/2pc Las Vegas69/2047/8pc73/2248/8pc Little Rock53/1136/2s51/1045/7pcLos Angeles 71/21 52/11c66/1852/11pc Louisville36/221/-6s42/531/0pc Memphis52/1132/0s55/1242/5pc Miami75/2358/14pc75/2362/16pc Minneapolis 28/-2 16/-8pc37/223/-5c Nashville43/621/-6s46/732/0pc New Orleans60/1544/6s66/1853/11pc New York37/225/-3s36/225/-3s Oklahoma City62/1643/6s64/1743/6pc Orlando 69/20 44/6 pc70/2149/9pc Philadelphia37/220/-6s40/426/-3s Phoenix84/2857/13c82/2757/13pc Pittsburgh26/-316/-8sf32/020/-6pc Portland, OR53/1142/5sh51/1040/4sh Raleigh-Durham 42/522/-5s48/825/-3s St. Louis38/326/-3pc48/835/1pcSalt Lake City 49/936/2sh53/1133/0sh San Antonio 70/21 54/12 s83/2859/15pc San Diego67/1957/13c66/1855/12pc San Francisco62/1651/10r59/1548/8cSeattle 50/1041/5sh49/941/5sh T allahassee 61/1628/-2s64/1735/1pc Tampa66/1846/7s71/2151/10pc Tucson85/2953/11c85/2956/13s Washington, DC40/424/-4s44/628/-2s UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuWeather.com


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Pim blowin’ it

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HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.76

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Degrees: time

for a rethink

SEE INSIGHT SECTION

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009



Mall accused Of rape
uring House invasion

Suspect
expected to be
charged today

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

POLICE arrested a man
accused of raping a woman after
he allegedly forced his way inside
her home in Prince Charles Dri-
ve.

The suspect is expected to be
formally arraigned on related
charges as early as today, police
said.

Head of the Central Detective
Unit (CDU) Supt Elsworth Moss
said around 2am Friday the lone
assailant was able to gain entry
through the front door of a home
in the eastern area.

He managed to sexually assault
the victim and rob her of person-
al effects. During the ordeal,
another female inside the home
escaped and alerted neighbours
who called the police.

"A lone assailant forced his
way into the home of a female
and robbed her of personal prop-
erties and also sexually molested
her," said Supt Moss.

He declined to provide more
details for fear of compromising
the case.

"Another female who was able
to get away, with the assistance of
neighbours, contacted the police
(who) were able to apprehend a
male who's presently in police
custody and expected to be
charged and appear before the
courts (Monday)."

SEE page eight

diy

THIS LITTLE girl surveys the scene amidst the huge crowd attending the Greek Festival at the

]

The Greek Orthodox Church grounds on West Street on Saturday

Investigation ordered into claim of

‘illegal activities’ at Detention Centre

CONCERN for an inmate in
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre has sparked a call
for Acting Commissioner of
Police Reginald Ferguson to
order an investigation into sev-

6 Che ERY:

ee Peete et



eral “illegal activities” that an
unknown caller to The Tribune
claims is rampant there.

Two weeks ago The Tribune
received a call from a “con-
cerned citizen” who requested
that The Tribune’s Chief
Reporter Rupert Missick visit
an inmate in the detention cen-
tre who claimed to have infor-
mation on some “serious
things” occurring at the facili-
ty.

Mr Missick was told that the
inmate had a 30-page document
that he wanted to turn over to
this newspaper. Mr Missick was
invited to scrutinize and vali-
date the accusations the inmate
would be making.

Mr Missick with Tribune Edi-
tor Paco Nunez, who speaks
Spanish, went to see the inmate
during visiting hours on Febru-
ary 10. During this visit, the pair
realised that in order to speak

SEE page eight

Quiznos



Call for ‘zero
tolerance’
MU TCAMU OIC
molestation

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

RELIGIOUS
leader Bishop
Simeon Hall is
calling for a
national "zero-
tolerance" policy
on child molesta- |
tion and sexual
assaults on
minors.

His comments Simeon Hall
came in the wake
of a story first published in The
Tribune which revealed allega-
tions of a sexual attack on a
young girl allegedly assaulted
on school grounds by a group of

SEE page eight

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Ross University
payroll is set
to exceed $4m

Estimated economic
impact on Grand Bahama
is $10m in first year

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr

Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

WITH its 2009 payroll expected to
exceed $4 million, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said that Ross University is
making good progress in fulfilling its com-
mitment to the government to create
employment opportunities for Bahamians

at all levels of its operation.

The prime minister made the state-

ment at the launch of the Freeport cam-
pus of Ross University in Grand Bahama.

Hubert Ingraham

He said that Ross estimates that its over-
all direct economic impact on the local economy - spending
on housing, food, transportation and other direct living
expenses - will be in excess of $10 million in the initial year

of operation.

It is estimated that rents from persons assocated with or
attending the university will pump some $2.6 million into the
Grand Bahamian economy this year.

Ross University has advised government that they typi-
cally construct on-campus student housing for about 30 per
cent of their enrolment. However, such student housing
construction is still several years out.

“So while typically 70 per cent of the student body is
required to find living accommodation off-campus, in the
immediate future that requirement will be 100 per cent,” the

prime minister pointed out.

SEE page nine



Glass manufacturing facility
‘will provide much needed jobs’

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham said the
opening of $20 million Fenes-
tration Glass Services is a “wel-
comed” investment in Freeport
and will provide much-needed
jobs on Grand Bahama.

“This is indeed good for
Grand Bahama,” Mr Ingraham
said on Friday evening at the
official opening of the new glass
manufacturing facility on
Queen’s Highway.

The prime minister noted
that the Grand Bahama econo-
my has suffered significant job
losses since 2004.

“As we know Grand Bahama
has sustained repeated blows
beginning with the difficult hur-
ricane season of 2004 and job
losses as a result of the closure
of Royal Oasis Resort proper-
ties, which are yet to be
replaced.

“And that disappointment



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

has been fuelled by additional
job losses in the economy and
also the fallout from the global
economic crisis, which contin-
ues to impact a number of sec-
tors in our economy,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said the tourism
sector in Freeport had been
severely impacted with low
hotel occupancy levels.

He noted that occupancy at
the Our Lucaya Resort
remained low and bookings
remained quite soft.

The prime minister com-
mended principals of Fenestra-
tion for expressing interest and
acquiring property in 2007 for
their venture in Freeport.

“The opening of this facility is
especially welcome as it pro-
vides much-need job growth for
the island. This is indeed good
for Grand Bahama on other
fronts as well.”

In addition to jobs, Mr Ingra-
ham said Fenestration intro-
duced new green energy effi-
cient products to the Bahamas.

SEE page nine


PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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ODA 2009

BAHAMIANS got a taste of Greece at the weekend’s Greek Festival. The event was held at the Greek Orthodox

Church grounds on West Street.

Bahamas must ‘rethink
the way it does business’

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas must bring
“new vision” to tourism and
rethink the way it does busi-
ness, a top hotel official said
yesterday.

Chairman of the Bahamas
Hotel Corporation Michael
Scott said on the talk show
Jones and Company that he
doesn’t see the Bahamas mov-
ing from its reliance on “the
pillars of tourism” anytime
soon.

“We think that the world
revolves around the Bahamas.

A‘
Need Help Collecting Ngqyy \
Past Due Accounts?

We are still a small part of the
globe. I think there is room
for our tourism product to
improve.

“We are not going to be
competitive in the industry
unless we really allow our-
selves to embrace thinking
internationally,” he said.

Mr Scott said another prob-
lem Bahamians face is their
attitude.

“T get really irritated some-
times when I go to some of
these government depart-
ments, whether it be the reg-
istry or at the passport office.
People need to understand

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FOOTLONGS ”°

that we live in the 21st centu-
ry not the 19th.

“There are complaints
about tardiness and delay and
persons not getting approvals
and explanations in a reason-
able period of time,” Mr Scott
said.

Mr Scott said he had come
into contact with a lot of peo-
ple who were deterred from
visiting the Bahamas because
of negative things they had
heard about our business sec-
tor.

“We somehow have this
penchant for looking success
in the face and trying to
destroy it.

“T have talked to a number
of boutique groups that would
love to come into the
Bahamas but they heard
about too much red tape, the
performance of Bahamians in
the workplace is terrible, the
cost of labour is too high, and
lack of discipline. Too many of
us in this country have
nowhere to go and take all
day to get there,” he said.

Mr Scott clatmed Bahami-
ans should adopt the attitude
that they are open for busi-
ness and are willing to make it
work.

“We sell something in this
country that no-one can make
- the most beautiful water in
the world, the sun and sand.
Therefore that is a commodi-
ty that will always be attrac-
tive. The Bahamas has its
place and as we are at the
doorsteps of the United States
we are a country that is best
poised for resort develop-
ment,” he added.

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 3

_ Family ‘outraged’ over outcome of murder trial

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK I t th i
Tribune Freeport Reporter Man ple ads guilty to manslaughter eer te He uiores 7
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net daughter and other women and

; . . . their daughters?
FREEPORT — Families for because the Attorney General’s which was introduced in the Grand Bahama for the trial. She “T believe that sentence is too

Justice said the family of Tiffany Office never notified the family | Bahamas justice system. said they were never told byany- — Jenient and I think he should
LaRoda was denied justice last that the accused was making a Shavonne Munnings, the one in the Attorney General pave gotten at least 35 years in
week when the man accused of guilty plea to manslaughter. deceased’s sister, was very dis- Office’s about the plea bargain. prison as a deterrent to other
her brutal murder was sentenced “This was unfair and unjust to appointed with the outcome of “T do not agree with this plea offenders,” she said.
to 15 years under the lesser the deceased’s family and the _ the trial. bargaining thing and I also Rev Bethel and the family are
charge of manslaughter. wider community,” said Rev “T sat through the trialand the believe that the 15-year sentence calling for an appeal in the case.
Rev Glenroy Bethel, founder Bethel. accused admitted and described was not sufficient because he “We are making a plea to the
of FEJ, said the victim’s family is “We believe this wasaslapin in detail what he did as part of | took a mother away from her Attorney General Michael Bar-
outraged over the outcome of the face for this family...tohave the plea bargain to the lesser four children. nett to appeal this case for the
the murder trial of Labion LaR- _—- the charge of murder reduced charge of manslaughter.” “It is not about my sister any — interest of justice,” he said.
oda, who allegedly stabbed his manslaughter when there was Tiffany LaRoda, a mother of
wife to death during a domestic Strong evidence to prove mur- four, sustained some 20 stab
dispute four years ago. der. . wounds to the body. |
“The family is outraged Rev Bethel said FFJ opposed Ms Munnings said several
the plea bargain legislation family members travelled to

SkyBahamas makes inaugural Abaco flight





Oa Ae UNAS

Former BIC
president
appointed to
CiG board

Warning over burning of
rubbish, debris outside

IN AN effort to stem the number of brush and forest fires, offi-
cials are warning that anyone found burning rubbish or debris out-

m@ By TANEKA m@ By LLOYD ALLEN He said along with infrastructural growth there side will be arrested and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.
THOMPSON Tribune Features Reporter had been an equal demand by residents for more air- Fire Services administrator Inspector Bradley Knowles admon-
Tribune Staff Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net lift services to bring better pricing and increased ished the public against burning items outside, a dangerous practice
tthompson@ reliability. that contributes to many of the country’s forest fires.

SKY BAHAMAS is the newest carrier to provide “Today Sky Bahamas has answered the call, and
daily flights to Abaco. by their presence here today, demonstrate their
The company’s SAAB 33-seater aircraft made faith and confidence in the economy, and the future
the inaugural flight with passengers and media growth and development in Abaco.
groups on board. “This additional airlift is good for the industry, and
At Marsh Harbour, they were welcomed by resi- ultimately good for the people of Abaco, who now
dents excited about the new service. have more choices and options.”
cote: Passengers received red carpet treatment, with Mr Cooper said he now looks forward to lower
munications conglomerate, treats and beverages in the air and an elaborate dis- _ airfares for regular commuters, as well as improved
Cobian International Group ? play of Abaconian hospitality on arrival. service and reduced delays. Captain Randy Butler,
(CIG). ea . ; Sky Bahamas executives were invited to an official CEO of Sky Bahamas, said the company hopes to
Mr Williams was appoint- : welcoming ceremony organised by island officials. service additional destinations in future.
ed as president and CEO of Senior island administrator Cephas Cooper said “We are very pleased to announce that we are
BTC in December, 2005, over the past several years there had been significant | exploring additional market developments to some
before being asked to resign growth in development within the islandcommuni- _ international destinations such as Providenciales in
from the company in April, ty. Turks and Caicos, Florida and Haiti.”

"As the hot period sets in, right now it's dry, so we're going to
soon be targeted with a lot of forest fires but what we've seen is per-
sons indiscriminately setting fires, burning rubbish in the yard or
people clearing down properties and they light refuse, rather than
carrying it to the city dump. All of these contribute to the spread of
forest fires and fires in the neighbourhood.

"It's a nuisance and we want the public to understand that this is
a breach of the law - the only (egal) avenue you have for lighting
fires in the neighbourhood is for cooking purposes. We've been
doing a lot of warning but the time has come where we're going to
have to prosecute people before the courts," he told The Tribune.

Under current "antiquated" laws the penalty for the offence is a
small fine, something Inspector Knowles feels should be reformed
with a harsher penalty.

Section 59 (2) of the Environmental Health Services Act (Chap-
ter 232) says: "No person shall burn waste at any place or in any
manner that is likely to create a health hazard or a nuisance; or (b)

tribunemedia.net

FORMER president and
CEO of BTC Leon
Williams has been appoint-
ed to the board of directors
of Orlando-based telecom-

2008. oo — -

eee

According to a press
release issued by Cobian,
Mr Williams -along with
two new additions Laurence
Sheehan and Dr Lawrence
Chimerine - was chosen for

7
Java G

burn any material that is likely to cause excessive smoke or produce
a noxious odour or to discharge any toxic substances which on
combustion are likely to affect the occupants of any premises,
except under conditions approved by the Director."

For more than 16 years the New Providence city dump has been
a constant problem, posing a danger not only to nearby homes, but

his strong industry back- to the health of those who live in the area.

ground and management
experience.

"The addition of Mr
Williams, Mr Sheehan and
Dr Chimerine to CIG's
board of directors ensures
the company will continue
to benefit from a diversity
of knowledge and opinions.

"These men are perfect
directors because of their
strong leadership skills,
extensive management
experience and proven
track records - especially in
creating results in their
respective industries,” said
CEO of CIG Joanne

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Employed at BTC for 40
years, Mr Williams spent 13
years as an executive and
two years as president and
CEO and represented the
company at many interna-
tional conferences.

In the wake of his uncere-
monious departure, Mr
Williams threatened to sue
the government entity
unless details of his sever-
ance package were revised.
He also took credit for a
number of achievements
BTC experienced with him
at the reins, including the
company’s profits and
increase in revenue.

Apart from his tenure at
BTC, Mr Williams was also
elected as chairman of the
board for the Caribbean
Association of National
Telecommunications
Organisations (CANTO) in
2005 after years of service
to the organisation. He is
now an honorary member
of the group. CIG is the
parent company for the
Cobian family of corpora-

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm

Half truths are nothing but lies

“WHAT IS truth? said jesting Pilate, and
would not stay for an answer.”

This is the opening sentence of Sir Francis
Bacon’s essay “On Truth”.

Recently we had a discussion with a person
on how to evaluate a lie against a half truth. Was
a half truth really a lie, and as it is really true as
far as it goes, should it be considered as serious
as a full blown lie?

We maintain that any statement made know-
ing that despite what is said might be true, a
wrong impression is conveyed to the listener
because the whole truth is being withheld. It is
being deliberately withheld to give the desired
false impression. Although the speaker cannot
be faulted for telling a lie, the listener is blamed
for coming to the wrong conclusion because he
was not sensitive enough to what was not being
said.

In our opinion a person who plays with truth
in this way is more dangerous than the person
who is indeed honest enough to tell an outright
lie. It takes a certain underhand craftiness to try
to stay on the side of truth, while stealthily lead-
ing people into error.

Sir Etienne Dupuch, who considered for-
mer prime minister Sir Lynden Pindling, a mas-
ter of the half-truth, read Sir Lynden’s intent in
his unspoken words. When Sir Lynden made a
pronouncement, Sir Etienne did not take seri-
ously what he said, but rather what he did not
say. Bahamians understood one thing, Sir Eti-
enne saw another outcome down the long road
of time. Sir Etienne was seldom wrong. He
could read Sir Lynden like a book, often much
to our chagrin. He predicted decisions that we
did not think possible in a democracy, but even-
tually they were made.

During the discussion on truth versus a lie,
we were asked if we thought a half truth could
have as serious consequences as a lie.

To answer this question, we recalled read-
ing some time ago David Fromkin’s book, “A
Peace to End all Peace”, in which the Germans
were led into signing a secret alliance with the
Turks based on a half truth told by three young
Turks of the Committee of Union and Progress
(CUP) at the beginning of World War I. No
one could understand why the alliance, which
the German high command did not want and
had instructed should not be signed unless the
Turks had “something unexpectedly significant
to contribute to the war,” had been signed. No
one knew what that contribution could possibly
be as the Turks did not want to be drawn into
the war and were even secretly flirting with the
prospect of joining the Allied cause.

Yet the secret agreement was hurriedly

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signed with Germany obligating itself, “by force
of arms if need be, to defend Ottoman territo-
ry in case it should be threatened.” The treaty
expired on December 31, 1918. No one could
figure out what the Turks had that was so
important to the German cause that would
make them undertake this alliance.

Some time later a student of the German
diplomatic archives disclosed that they showed
that on August 1, 1914, Pasha Enver (a founder
of CUP) and Mehmed Talat (Turkish Minis-
ter of the Interior) in a meeting with Ambas-
sador von Wangenheim, suddenly offered to
turn over to Germany one of the most powerful
warships in the world: The Sultan Osman. Von
Wangenheim accepted the offer; and British
Intelligence reports from behind German lines
two weeks later shows that officers of the Ger-
man fleet had eagerly expected to receive the
vitally important new warship — and appar-
ently were bitterly disappointed when Churchill
seized the vessel instead.”

History will show that the Turks duped the
Germans on a half truth. This warship was very
important to the Germans because it would tip
the balance of naval strength in favour of Ger-
many. It is true that the Turks owned the war-
ship — after all it had been paid for by contri-
butions from the Turkish people. However Sul-
tan Osman I anda smaller warship were built in
British shipyards for the Ottoman government.
They had not yet left the shipyards for Turkey.
The Turks strongly suspected on July 29, 1914
that Churchill had planned to commandeer
both warships. By the next day — July 31 — the
Turks knew that Churchill had taken them. The
Germans had no knowledge of this. The Turks
had represented that they owned the warships,
which they would sign over to the German High
Command — full truth. However, they with-
held the fact that they could not deliver the
battleships. This turned their full truth into a
devilish half truth to achieve their own ends
and get an alliance of German protection for
Turkey for the duration of the war.

On August 1, 1914 Germany signed the
alliance with Turkey. On August 3, Churchill
sent an official cable to the Ottoman govern-
ment informing it that their two battleships had
been seized by the British government.

The Germans thought that the Turks had
been duped.

In fact the archives show that the Turks with
full knowledge of all of the facts before signing
that treaty had told a half truth in their negoti-
ations and got away with it.

A lie or a half truth? They are both despica-
ble and can cause equal damage.



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We believe we can
ensure renewable
energy projects are
financially viable

EDITOR, The Tribune.

At The Bahamas Renewable
Energy Corporation (BREC) we
are in agreement that local par-
ticipation is absolutely critical and
of key importance to derive the
maximum amount of benefit for
the Bahamas. We believe that we
have come up with a business
plan that will allow the maximum
benefit to be derived by Bahami-
ans and as such Winso Company
Ltd has a 49 per cent stake in
BREC, making it truly Bahamian
driven.

However, we have to realise
that the types of renewable ener-
gy projects contemplated by BEC
will not require just a million dol-
lars, but rather hundreds of mil-
lions in order for them to come to
fruition.

Given the state of the financial
markets, lenders who were there
yesterday and waiting for
approvals, have disappeared over
night.

We can therefore no longer
afford wishful thinking, because
we (the Bahamian people) will
miss our window of opportunity.

The current economic climate
warrants the need for out-of-the-
box thinking, in particular as it
relates to financing these projects.

We believe that BREC has
found strong partners in Schnei-
der Power and Emera that can
ensure our projects economic and
financial viability.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



The Bahamas can learn from
other leading renewable energy
jurisdictions such as Canada and
Germany.

Our partnership with Schnei-
der Power and Emera allows for a
significant knowledge transfer to
BREC and therefore to the
Bahamas.

The results of this are that we
have already significantly reduced
our learning curve, and will also
guarantee that these projects can
get built.

By committing ourselves to
employing local trades and con-
tractors this knowledge will be
dispersed amongst our own econ-
omy, allowing companies and
entrepreneurs an entry into a sec-
tor that generally has very high
barriers of entry, but is slated for
significant growth in the future.

A $60 million infrastructure
project in the Bahamas will act
as a mini stimulus package for
the economy in the region.

We anticipate that expendi-
tures will give a much needed
economic boost to local busi-
nesses, in particular local suppli-
ers and trades people, but also
hotels, restaurants, stores and
many peripheral services. BREC

is a showcase here in the
Bahamas how business can be
done with maximum local con-
tent and participation.

From an environmental stand-
point, BREC, with the help of
Schneider Power, is now one of
the leading Companies in the
world that employs “conservation
engineering” meaning that our
facilities will meet and/or exceed
all requirements under the
Bahamian Environmental Pro-
tection laws.

We will also strive to reduce
the impact on nature with the
least possible intrusion on the
landscape, wildlife and commu-
nities.

And once BEC has come to a
decision, we will be inviting the
Bahamian public and communi-
ties to comment and provide
feedback.

It is our intent to make
BREC’s renewable energy pro-
jects a showcase for the people
of the Bahamas and to secure
future deployment of renewable
energy technology that will put
us one step closer to energy inde-
pendence and securing much-
needed electricity to power our
economy.

VINCENT McDONALD

Chief Executive Officer,

Bahamas Renewable Energy
Corporation.

Nassau,

February 23, 2009.

Stop this abuse of Government vehicles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me space in your column to

express the following:

As I drive around Nassau, it is common to see
government vehicles riding around after normal
working hours and on weekends.

I realise that some government officers are
entitled to a government vehicle and gas (Deputy
Permanent Secretary and above). But there are
other officers who are not entitled to a govern-
ment car who are just wasting the tax payers’
money by abusing the system and it is unfair,
particularly in these hard economic times.

When I did not have a car, I caught the bus. I
couldn’t go to my boss and ask for the use of the
office car to get to and from work because that is

this slackness but I guess he’s not aware of how

many officers are now being allowed to “put their

hands in the cookie jar” by getting away with

this madness. They can even be seen pulling up to
Ministry of Works to get free gas. They carry the

government car home illegally but would not

not the responsibility of the government. I now

have a car and when it is malfunctioning, I simply
jump on the bus or hike a ride with my neighbour.

During Prime Minister Ingraham’s first stint
in office, he did an excellent job in correcting

Watching
Nassau,

CE STUBBS

even pay for the gas. In addition to that, when
something goes wrong with the car, the govern-
ment fixes it. Something is definitely wrong with
this. It should not matter whether or not you are
friendly with the boss — this is wrong!

This vexing problem needs to be addressed,
as I notice that even persons who fall under the
Prime Minister’s ministry (which I’m sure he’s
not aware of) are taking the government car
home — persons who are not entitled to do so.

February, 2009.

Mr Minister, there appears to be a serious problem

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Recently we experienced a
home invasion but to our
knowledge no one has been
apprehended. A week later a
drunk driver knocked down a
large section of my wall. I was
advised by the officer on the
call that there is no law against



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drinking and driving or in fact
being intoxicated while driving.
Hence he was not charged with
any offence! A week later my
wife was charged with going
seven miles an hour over the
speed limit. The fine was $250.
Apart from the amount of the
fine in relation to the alleged
offence arguably a fast idling
vehicle can exceed seven miles
an hour. Today on the way to
pay the fine no less than four
vehicles turned in front of me
without signaling, two went

through a red light and a police
officer on a motor cycle went
straight through an intersection
with his turn signal on. Is there
anything wrong with this pic-
ture? Mr Minister there appears
to be a serious problem, is any-
thing being done to correct it
or is the silence that we hear an
admission that you are out of
your depth?

FRUSTRATED
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February 18, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Political activist plans ‘The Real Men March’

m By TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

POLITICAL activist Omar
Archer is planning a massive march
to rally Bahamian men together in
the face of rampant violence, poor
education, unemployment and other
social ills gripping the nation.

He hopes the peaceful demon-
stration dubbed "The Real Men
March" - scheduled for March 31 -
will send a clear message that not
every Bahamian man must fall victim
to urban temptations. He is antici-
pating some 5,000 to 10,000 partici-
pants.

Mr Archer released a statement
on the demonstration which said, in
part: "There are times in our lives
when we must stand up and defend
what is righteous and just. Our deci-
sions may not be popular among



peers, many of whom will turn their
backs on you when the pressure is
on.

"(But) Iam convinced that there
are still many of us who share the
dream of a better Bahamas. A
Bahamas of peace, where neighbours
once left their doors and windows
open for days without fear. A
Bahamas of love, where our sons
and daughters enjoyed their child-
hood - free from the watchful eyes of
paedophiles.

"We are now a Bahamas of petty
thieves and heavily secured homes
and churches encased with rein-
forced security bars. We are now a
Bahamas with abused and sexually
molested children, whose cries for
help for many years have fallen upon
deaf ears. We are now a Bahamas of
politically divided individuals, whose

MP: financial sector not doing enough
for Bahamians in these tough times






@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

FOX HILL MP Fred Mitchell said yesterday that not enough is
being done in the financial sector to assist Bahamian men and
their families in these hard economic times.

“T do not think that the banks are being creative enough as peo-
ple stand to lose their homes and businesses. There is a need for
public policy to intervene to ensure that homes are saved and
commercial lending is restored. The mortgage and credit crunch is
adversely affecting men and thereby families in our community,” Mr











Mitchell said.

Mr Mitchell spoke to a number of men at various Baptist church-
es in that community in celebration of Men’s Day urging them to
continue to do all they can in these trying times to maintain the fam-






ily structure.

“Today, we are celebrating male leadership in our community.
Today, we are also undergoing the greatest period of economic
stress in the recent history of our country. I want therefore to
speak up for the men in our country today.

“They build the buildings, fix the machines, build the roads and
parks, run the Junkanoo groups, maintain their families and assist
their wives. For all of those things and more, we salute them








today,” Mr Mitchell said.

Mr Mitchell said as MP for the Fox Hill area, he knew the eco-
nomic stress burdening the men of Bahamian society.

“T know that it has hit men hard, with construction down and the
hotel sector in retreat. Knowing how important the contribution of
aman’s income is to the family, it is imperative that we seek some
policies to assist in these hard times. Not enough is being done,” he






said.

Mr Mitchell encouraged all men to help to support their children
and said men had not been carrying the burden of hard times
alone as the women also helped to see the men through.

“They have help from the women of the country. And in mark-
ing the contribution of men to The Bahamas, no-one should min-
imise or negate the women of the country. We also remember

how far they have come.

“T hope to call an education summit for Fox Hill, to solicit the sup-
port of the entire community to get more resources for education
in this area, in particular at the Sandilands Primary School, L W
Young and Dame Doris Johnson. The situation particularly as it
affects young men and boys is critical and needs to be addressed,”

Mr Mitchell said.

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patriotism is now judged by two
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The march is also intended to
challenge Bahamian men to restore
themselves to their “rightful place"
as the head of society.

"We are indeed tired of hearing
individuals, especially young men in
the over-the-hill communities, being
given seven-year criminal records as
a result of being caught at one point
in their lives with a marijuana joint.

"We must now agitate to address
the problem of statelessness and eth-
nic profiling. We are now agitating to
address the problems of unemploy-
ment, crime and inadequate educa-
tional facilities in the over-the-hill
communities.

"We are now agitating to stop
the imposing of homosexuality and
lesbianism on our children and less

Traffic accident
on Grand Bahama

A DRIVER on Grand Bahama
lost control of his vehicle and
crashed into a home off East Sun-
rise Highway.

According to a statement
released by Grand Bahamas press
liaison officer Clarence Reckley,
around 3am on February 20, 22-
year-old Ashley Moxey was speed-
ing along East Sunrise Highway
near the Kentucky Fried Chicken
restaurant when he lost control of
his silver 1995 Jeep Cherokee, reg-
istration 33680.

Moments before the accident,
the vehicle hurtled across the medi-
an into the westbound lane before
crashing into a single-storey house
owned by Rowland Stuart.

The vehicle was demolished and
left a "large hole” in the wall on
the northern side of Mr Stuart's
home.

While no-one in the home was
hurt during the crash, Mr Moxey,
of Orange Street, Pioneers Loop,
was taken to Rand Memorial Hos-
pital for treatment of his various
injuries.

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fortunate adults in this country.
These and many other reasons are
why Bahamian men, young and old
alike, will indeed gather in peace
with God as our refuge and indeed
block the streets in absolute protest,”
he said.

Mr Archer claimed the country
had failed to show the world that it
can govern itself free of corruption
and "shameful" internationally tele-
vised scandals.

He was referring to the recent
debacle surrounding the alleged
extortion attempt of celebrity John
Travolta after his son's death at his
second home in Grand Bahama.

The march has several planned
routes which will converge in Raw-
son Square, Bay Street. The group
will present government with a list of
recommendations for the social
development of Bahamian men after

the march. Omar Archer



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PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Online database aims to
ease book buying rat race

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS ONE semester ends and a
new one begins, students are scram-
bling to find new or used books that
will probably “break” their pock-
ets.

This yearly problem sparked the
idea in one College of the Bahamas
student to set up an online database
to ease the rat race for buying books.

Business analyst and computer
programmer Garnel Leo used his
computer systems degree from COB
to design a website called the
Bahamascollegezone.com back in
December, 2005.

Mr Leo said the site has over
1,850 members and over 1,000 books
for sale. For the past year the site has
had over 5,981 visitors and in the
last month over 66,480 page views.

“T know some students from the
time I was attending the college had
a hard time finding the books they

The PTA of Sum mit Academy Sa ys needed. I knew books were expen-

sive and I myself wanted to find
“THAN K YO yy" cheaper books. I never did a site

that would benefit others so it was
something that I wanted to give a

to all who supported its try,” he sai.

Mr Leo said there are many ben-

2009 STEAK OUT, MINI FAIR AND RAFFLE. oe
“Many times the bookstore does

It Was d wonderful day! not have the book students need so

students can find books from other

: students who may have it and want
Event Sponsors:- to get rid of it at a cheaper rate.
There is also a scholarship section
AID where high school and college stu-
dents can find scholarship listings

Checkers Cafe tE> that they may not have known

about. They can also come on and

= te discuss anything regarding college

JS. Johnson ae: life in the forums, get assistance
f | oar regarding schedules and man

- Sharon Wilson & Co. = A y

i Mr Leo said the forums have

Executive Printers 4 : been instrumental in most of the
h taki 1 t COB.
GEMS 105,9FM ; ae oe das issues

involving the college and what I did
was submit a list of those issues and
recomendations to the different
heads at COB and told them the list
was from different college students,”

Lisa Roberts, Bahamasair, Bahamas Fast Ferries, Sunshine Insurance (Agents & Brokers) Linuted, Ma-

jestic Tours, Atlantis, Maddison Deveaux & family, Elegant Steps Boutique, Mary El-Fitun, La Castta, ee Seen seeeteveiiinl
re iar 4 \ eet ‘: " ' © wants the site to develop into
Mr & Mrs. Michael Wilson, Avon by Avonel, Mr & Mrs. Sean McWeeney, John Bull, Beauty Haven | a hub for students. :

Salon, Hayley & Zara Wilson, Timeless Tattoo, Denny Bumside, Sunburst Paint, BeJewled by Dagny, eae i rh Ee

Le Petit Gourmet, Tinkerbell, Bahamas Inflight Lid, Geafirey Jones & Co., Mulu-Discount Furmture & come and look for books. I also
a 1 Wy Py oe . . Veen wanted to add a job section where
Appliances, Designer Haus, kim Riedel, Chapter One Bookstore, The Potting Shed, Virgo Car Rental, | students can come to look for jobs
Alpha Phi Alpha Fratemity Inc, Deborah McKellar and, of course, our amazing Summit Academy aera it’s ae aera

ay ; a, a or those who recently graduated,”
principal, teachers, administrators, students and families! Mel &o «aid, ve

He advised youngsters wanting
to develop Bahamian websites to
stick to a need and not duplicate
what is already out there.

“They should develop something

SEE YOU THERE NEXT YEAR! where they meet a need and where

there is a low supply of it. Don’t try
to duplicate Facebook because it is
sure to fail,” Mr Leo said.

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Love in Two Acts opens
Track Road Theatre season

TRACK Road Theatre has __ ity of a situation play out right
announced the opening of its in front of you.”
2009 theatrical season with Love in Two Acts stars local
Love in Two Acts, bringing actors Selina Archer, Leslie
the return of intimate theatre — Ellis-Tynes, Dion Johnson and
to The Hub on Bay Street and = Juanita Kelly.
Colebrook Lane. Director Matthew Kelly is
This pairing of one-act plays —_ both pleased with his cast and
directed by Matthew Kelly, excited about the response
chairman and long-time mem- from the upcoming produc-
ber of TRT, explores the tion.
tragedy and triumph of love. “T'm very happy and very
The production takes proud of the cast and their
advantage of the intimate set- performances. I'm not a hard
ting with staging in the round, or soft director, I'm demand-
and offers an intentionally dif- ing but I give a lot in return. I
ferent and immersive experi- learn from the experience as
ence with Anton Chekhov's much as the cast does. If
The Bear and Alfred Sutro's you're not learning, finding
The Open Door. new insights, changing the way
Chekhov's The Bear is a _youstage, direct, act, perceive
classic farce depicting the and perform, then it's about
unpredictability of romantic as interesting as the parlia-
love and the thin line between ment channel.
the passions of fury and lust. “Our audience expects to
Though written in 1888, the be engaged, entertained, chal-
rapid-fire exchanges and fiery lenged and ultimately satis-
arguments have been updat- _ fied, and it is our job to deliv-
ed to the post-colonial er, so that everyone walks
Bahamas. away Satisfied but still
The Open Door, a play by engaged, taking the experi-
Alfred Sutro, examines the — ence with them into their dai-
relief of confessed love, shock __ly lives.”
of reciprocated emotions, and Already well-known for
sadness that can accompany hosting the popular Express
unattainable desire. The com- Yourself events, The Hub sup-
plicated dynamics of friend- ports and encourages small
ship, loyalty, lust, and love are —_ performance and theatre as an
explored in Love in Two Acts. alternative venue for smaller,
In November last year The less costly and more experi-
Hub played host to a work- mental works.
shopped performance of Jonathan Murray, The
Oleana to please audience Hub’s exhibitions director,
members, among them Kelly _ said: “As a community orient-
himself. ed arts space, we at The Hub
He said: "I was enthralled are very excited to be hosting
by not just the play, but what TRT’s newest production.
was happening. In this inti- “Throughout our first year,
mate setting Iwas almost part ©The Hub has helped facilitate
of the play and I knew that many artistic events from var-
this intimacy was something I _ ious disciplines, including the-
wanted to explore as a direc- atre, and we would like to
tor.” encourage more use of our
Kelly said of his motivation space by theatrical produc-
to direct Love in Two Acts: “I tions. Unlike other conven-
want to show the layeredcom- _ tional spaces, The Hub offers
plexity of love. It's never so a unique, raw, intimate expe-
simple as we're told, even in rience. I believe it is this type
the blindness of passion. I'm — of experience that continues
also interested in experiment- to keep the community
ing more with the medium of | engaged and thus returning
theatre, and The Hub presents _ for other events.”
itself as a unique opportunity Love in Two Acts is TRT’s
to take advantage of the real first production from this
intimacy of live performance. year’s busy season. Also com-
Even when film gives you __ ing up this year is the new play
close up moments, it's noth- Light by Deon Simms, a
ing like the immediacy and planned return of the hilari-
presence of real people afew ous comedy Da Rally, TRT's
feet from you, voices filling yearly Spring Soiree and its
the room with passion and summer drama camp Drama-
anguish, and having the total- Rama.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 7





Commonwealth Summit:

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

Ts INIDAD and
Tobago’s Prime Min-
ister, Patrick Manning, will
become the Chairman-in-
Office of the 53-nation Com-
monwealth in November this
year when his country hosts
the organization’s biennial
summit.

For two years thereafter, Mr
Manning should, theoretical-
ly be “Mr Commonwealth” —
the face of the leadership of
the group of countries whose
multi-ethnic, multi-cultural
member states are drawn from
every Continent of the world
and whose nearly two billion
people come from one of the
two largest nations in
the world and some of the tini-
est.

The Commonwealth is a
“voluntary” association of
States held together by their
shared history and common
values which are enshrined in
various declarations. The
“Crown of the United King-
dom” —- in this case Queen
Elizabeth II — is the symbolic
“Head of the Common-
wealth”.

It has no governance struc-
ture apart from the Summit
and its Secretariat headed by a
Secretary-General elected by
all Commonwealth Heads of
Government to serve a 4-year
term with a limit now of two-
terms only.

Nonetheless, the old cliché
about the Commonwealth is
perfectly true: if it did not
exist, nations would try to cre-
ate it because it does bring
together in a common forum,
speaking the same language,
53-leaders who represent
every known faith, race of
people and size of economy.

There could not be a better
microcosm of the world and,
therefore, no better forum for
seeking solutions to the
world’s problems.

As Chairman of the Com-
monwealth Summit in Novem-
ber in Trinidad, Mr Manning
has a real opportunity to shape
the direction of the Common-
wealth over the next two
years.

The Commonwealth coun-
tries of the Caribbean Com-
munity and Common Market
(CARICOM) also have a
chance, through Mr Manning’s
on-going Chairmanship, to
ensure that issues of impor-
tance to them are not only dis-
cussed at the Summit but are
advanced internationally right
through to the end of 2011.

One of the issues should be
the financing of the Common-
wealth Secretariat itself and
the raising of its profile.

For small countries, such as
those in the Caribbean and
Pacific, the Commonwealth is
vitally important as a tool of
their foreign policy.

As examples of this, it is in
the Commonwealth that both
Belize and Guyana first gar-
nered international support
against the territorial claims
by Guatemala and Venezuela
respectively, and it is the Com-
monwealth that has not only
been an ardent champion of
small states since 1977, but has
helped to fight specific issues
such as the assault on small
jurisdictions by the Organisa-
tion for Economic Coopera-
tion and Development
(OECD) over so-called “tax
competition”.

But, in recent time the old-
er and more powerful mem-
bers of the Commonwealth
have been paying lip service
to the organisation.

They have done enough to
keep it alive but stopped short
of contributing more to return
it to the vibrancy it enjoyed
when it fought racism in
Southern Africa and worked
to change the international
economic order.

Just recently, the British
Conservative Party opposition
spokesman on Commonwealth
affairs, William Hague,
accused the British govern-
ment of “turning its back” on
the Commonwealth.

He makes the point that the
Commonwealth is under-used
and that more money would
help.

Britain pays £54 per person
per year to the EU, £10 to the
North Atlantic Treaty Organ-
isation, £2 to the United

ie
US)

Ute ta
PHONE: 322-2157



7 =
‘
a
'
- — — ——" =

WORLD VIEW.

Nations and only 20p to the
Commonwealth.

The same parsimonious
approach to the Common-
wealth is reflected in the lack
of real zeal by Canada, Aus-
tralia and New Zealand all of
whom are participants in oth-
er powerful decision-making
bodies such as the OECD, the
G7, the G20 and the boards
of the IMF and World Bank.

Smaller states - the
Caribbean among them — have
also not helped to improve the
financial status of the Com-
monwealth.

Many of them have been
tardy in making their annual
contributions and some of
them are in arrears. When
they don’t demonstrate their
appreciation of the immense
value that the organisation is
to them, they play in to the
hands of those larger countries
that would like to keep it as a
tame pet rather than a vigilant
bulldog.

| he new Common-
wealth will be 60

years old in April. The occa-
sion of the Summit in Trinidad
in November is therefore an
historic event that should not
be allowed to pass without the
Caribbean and other small
countries seeking to take
advantage of Mr Manning’s
chairmanship for the next two
years.

CARICOM countries and
the CARICOM Secretariat
should have, by now, estab-
lished a permanent team to
help Mr Manning as Chairman
to carve out an agenda for the
Summit and to work with him
over the next two years to
make his Chairmanship-in-
Office a success.

While it is true that Mr
Manning would have the
resources of the Common-
wealth Secretariat and the
very astute and experienced
Secretary-General Kamalesh
Sharma upon whom to call,
the reality is that they will be
4,000 miles away and a busy
Head of Government should
be able to summon his team
on request. What is more, Mr
Sharma himself will call upon
Mr Manning as Chairman-in-
Office for guidance from time
to time.

The four other Heads of
Government, who have been
Chairmen-in-Office, have not
made much of the opportunity
unlike the Heads of Govern-
ment who serve 6-month
terms as President of the
European Union (EU).

But, the brevity of the Pres-
idency of the EU might be the
contributing factor to its suc-
cess.

Two years is simply too long
to expect a Head of Govern-
ment to split his or her atten-
tion between pressing nation-
al affairs and the Common-
wealth’s business unless they
are backed-up by a full time
and dedicated team.

Reform of the global finan-
cial architecture, changes in
IMF and World Bank criteria
to match loans and grants to
real needs, fundamental
change in their conditionali-
ties, the expansion of the G20
to include a permanent repre-
sentative voice of small states,
the consequences of climate



nt

change including sea-level rise
and a well-funded programme
to help developing nations
mitigate the effects of global
warming while preserving
their environment should all
form part of the agenda for
the Summit with well-

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researched and well-argued
papers from the Caribbean.
Manning has identified the
Commonwealth Caribbean
with the hosting of the Sum-
mit. The Caribbean, in turn,
should provide him with a
strong team, drawn from the
region, to help make his two-
year period as the Common-
wealth’s Chairman-in-Office a
benefit to the Caribbean’s
people and to the global
neighbourhood.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com




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PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

In other crime news, two resi-
dents of Yamacraw were target-
ed by armed robbers while out-
side their homes. Police said the
victims were business people who
were more than likely the targets
of assailants who watched their
daily routines and followed them
home under the cover of dark-
ness.

Supt Moss said around
10.19pm on Friday, a female res-
ident of Twynam Heights was
returning home with her son
when they were approached by
two gunmen who robbed them





Man accused

of an undetermined amount of
cash and personal property.

The suspects were able to
escape and are still at large, Supt
Moss said.

Around 1.24am on Friday a
man was approached by two
males - both armed with guns -
while outside his home in Cool
Acres Sub-divison.

The men robbed him of an
undetermined amount of cash
before entering his home and
stealing his licensed 12-gauge
shotgun.

"Upon leaving the home, they

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22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

PT ary ae)

Mrs. Noelle Kelly Roberts, 38







































of Nassau, The
Bahamas will be held
at Trinity Methodist
Church, Frederick
Street and Trinity
Place, Nassau on
Tuesday, 24th
February, 2009 at 4:00

Bill Higgs,

President of The Bahamas Conference of The
Methodist Church and Brother Gregory Roberts
will officiate and interment will follow in The
Eastern Cemetery, Shirley Street, Nassau.









She is predeceased by her father, Noel Sawyer
Roberts; and is survived by her husband, R.
Montague Roberts; her sons, Blake Montague
and Oliver John; her mother, Susan K.Roberts;
her sisters, Clare L. Sands, Lucy K. Ward and
Shevaun F. Davies; her uncle, Richard C.
Roberts; her mother-in-law, Elizabeth Roberts;
her sister-in-law, Celeste Sweeting; her brothers-
in-law, James Sands, Mitchell Davies and Roy
Sweeting; ; nieces and nephews, Kelly, Gary,
Marcus, Liam, Ashton, Mallory, Piers, James,
Annabelle, Lily and Chloe ; and many dear
cousins and wonderful friends.







IN CELEBRATION OF NOELLE'S LOVE
OF LIFE, PLEASE DRESS IN BRIGHT

COLOURS.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the
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Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, The
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shot him in the left leg," said Supt
Moss. The victim is said to bein }

stable condition in hospital.
The gunmen fled the scene.

Police investigations continue }

into both incidents.

Supt Moss advised residents i
to ensure their properties were }
well-lit when returning home at }
night and to take extra care in }
alerting others when coming ;

home in the dark.

"It's almost a helpless situa- }
tion when people are already in
your house but you have to make }
sure that while you are in your }
home, it is properly secured, all }
the doors and windows are :
locked. Make sure sufficient
lighting is on the outside of the

house, that's important.

"If you have someone else at :
the home, alert them that you
are coming home and, on your
arrival, make some noise, toot }
the horn so they can be on the ;

lookout," he said.

Over the weekend police also :
arrested two men for possession }

of an illegal firearm.
Supt Moss

cious" manner.

"They were able to pull the :
car over. On searching the vehi- }
cle they removed a 9mm pistol }
along with ten rounds of ammu- }

nition," he said.

Both men are in custody and }
are expected in court on related

charges today.

Supt Moss said at this stage

there was "no connection"

between those arrests and the :
two armed robberies in eastern }

New Providence.

said around }
11.40pm Saturday, officers on }
patrol in the Goodman's Bay }
area stopped two men in avehi- }
cle who were acting in a "suspi- }

FROM page one

male secondary school students.

On January 23 the young girl
was reportedly lured behind the
public school sometime after three
o'clock by as many as four boys
from a separate government sec-
ondary school.

Although the matter is being
investigated by the CDU, the inci-
dent was not made public, prompt-
ing calls for more school trans-
parency from a citizen who heard
of the attack through students at
the school.

Stressing that he was not famil-
iar with particulars of the case,
Bishop Hall said we are living in a
culture where too many times cas-
es of sexual abuse against minors
go unreported.

"When we molest a child we
are disturbing not only the child's
innocence, but our future. So the
best I can think of is a national
policy of zero-tolerance towards
sexual predators.

“T just have a problem with
adults who are so off-balance and
deranged that they feel comfort-
able molesting children and at the
same time, people who tolerate it.

"The mother who allows it
because the boyfriend gives her
money - the grandmother, or the
neighbours - somebody knows
these things. And so I would like
to support the minister (of educa-
tion) in calling for the police to
do their job - and then we go for-
ward.”

When asked if he felt the matter
should have been brought to light
by officials sooner, Bishop Hall
said whenever allegations of sexual
impropriety against children are
made there must not be any sem-
blance of sweeping the claims
under the rug.

Call for ‘zero tolerance’

"I don't know the case, to be }
honest, but wherever children are
involved I think it is always best }
for independent studies or assess-
ment to be made. We donot want }
to even seem to appear to be har- }
bouring predators in our midst }

where children are involved.

“T do not know the case with }
this school, but we have to be }
overprotective where children are
concerned. We all should have
zero-tolerance - I think if las a
grandfather, as an uncle, asa }
neighbour, if I knew that a child }
was being molested - I think I }
should address it. I think we don't }
need to be standoffish where chil-

dren are concerned.

"We need a national policy of
zero-tolerance where children are
concerned in terms of molestation

of any kind."

According to statistics, there i
were 545 reported cases of child }
abuse in 2007 and 581 cases of }
child abuse - including 145 cases of
physical abuse - documented in }
the Bahamas for January to }

August, 2008.

When contacted about the alle- }
gations last week, Minister of Edu-
cation Carl Bethel said the matter
was turned over to police by edu- }
cation officials the same day the
alleged attack happened. He also }
said an internal review to deter- }
mine if any school official was in }
dereliction of their dutiesin terms ;

of school patrols was underway.

If any official is found to have }
been derelict in their duties during }
the alleged attack, appropriate :
action would be taken, he said. i
He did not specify what this action

would entail.
Police investigations continue.

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Investigation
ordered into
claim of ‘illegal
activities’ at
Detention Centre
FROM page one

with the inmate they would
have to shout across two fences
which were approximately 10
feet apart. They wondered
whether the inmate would be
willing to reveal sensitive infor-
mation in such a public setting.

They left the facility hoping
that the source close to the
inmate would contact The Tri-
bune again, which he did the
following day.

The source told Mr Missick
that the inmate was fully aware
of how public the visitor area
was and was still willing to dis-
close his allegations because “he
wouldn’t be doing anything
wrong. He is just passing some-
thing in his own words over to
you.”

Mr Missick returned to the
centre on the next visiting day,
February 13th, with another Tri-
bune reporter.

Once inside the facility, they
were told that in order to speak
with the inmate they — like oth-
ers who come to visit detainees
— would have to stand at the
double fence and shout his
name.

When they did this, they
caught the attention of an immi-
gration officer.

The officer came over to the
outer fence alongside the pair
and said, “If you two are coming
to see him, I need to see what
y'all are into. That man is a
trouble maker. He’s a pimp, he
talks too much. He got a lot of
good officers in trouble.”

“He’s been here too long.
Another day would be too long.
I don’t know why the govern-
ment don’t get rid of him,” the
immigration officer said of the
inmate who has been housed at
the detention centre for 18
months.

After the reporters got the
inmate’s attention, the inmate
went from the yard into the
housing unit and emerged car-
rying an armful of papers. The
reporters then joined the line
with other visitors at the search
point waiting to interact with
inmates.

However, the immigration
officer who expressed interest
in why the pair were visiting the
inmate, shouted at the man and
asked where he was going “with
all that garbage.”

The detainee replied that the
papers weren’t “garbage,” but
instead documents related to
his case.

“These men are not lawyers,”
the officer replied, “you not giv-
ing them anything.”

The inmate turned and shout-
ed to the reporters before
returning to the housing facility,
“They won't let me see you. Get
a lawyer to come see me.”

The reporters left the com-
pound and heard nothing about
the inmate until the following
Thursday.

It was then that The Tribune
received another call from the
source who said the detainee
had been taken to the
Carmichael Road police station
“for protection.”

When asked whether the
inmate was being protected
from officers at the detention
centre or other inmates the
caller replied, “I don’t know
what the situation is. I only
know he was taken there for his
protection,” he said.

The Tribune has since dis-
covered that after being in “pro-
tective custody for 48 hours”
the inmate has been returned
to the detention centre.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 9



Ross University payroll is set to exceed $4m

FROM page one

The prime minister said that
Bahamians engaged in, or inter-
ested in entering, the rental
home market have an excellent
opportunity to assist in provid-
ing this housing.

“T emphasise that now would
be the time to begin to explore
options with the university and
with local construction and
development companies so as
to maximise the benefit to the
Grand Bahamian economy.
And, of course, Grand
Bahama’s tourism sector can
also expect to benefit from trav-
el to and from Freeport by staff,
students and their families,” he
said.

Mr Ingraham said that gov-
ernment has spent seven months
fine-tuning terms and condi-
tions under which Ross Univer-
sity will operate in The
Bahamas.

“Tt has not always been easy
but, as they say, some things are
worth fighting for,” the prime
minister said.

Mr Ingraham said the deci-
sion by Ross University to
locate a clinical education site
in Grand Bahama bodes well
for this island and for The
Bahamas.

“The establishment of this
educational institution repre-
sents another important step
forward in the diversification of
the Bahamian economy which
has been on-going for many
years. Indeed, the creation of
Freeport a half century ago was
centred on the idea of econom-
ic diversification,” he said.

The operation of Ross Uni-

versity will open many oppor-
tunities for Bahamians, whether
facilitating access to medical
training, providing new employ-
ment opportunities in faculty,
staff and support roles, or in
spin-off business opportunities
flowing from the need to
provide supplies and services
to the school, its staff and stu-
dents.

So far, the university has 21
faculty and deans, including
Bahamian Rhodes Scholar Dr
Desiree Cox. Over 20 adminis-
trative staff positions have been
filled by Bahamians.

Ross is also honouring its
commitment to provide schol-
arships to Bahamian students.

The prime minister called on
all residents of Grand Bahama
to reciprocate the confidence
Ross University has demon-
strated in the Bahamas by
putting their best foot forward in
hosting this international acad-
emic institution.

“Those of you who are
employed by the university must
be diligent in your work and
maintain the highest level of
professionalism not only during
these difficult economic times
but at all times. Those who ben-
efit by providing goods and ser-
vices must let excellence be your
standard — at all times. And I
urge the entire Grand Bahama
community to be especially wel-
coming and hospitable as our
Bahamian culture and tradition
demands — at all times,” the
prime minister said.

The medical programme
begins as a clinical education

site of the Ross University’s
medical programme in Domini-
ca. It is meant to accommodate
the increased enrolment at the
medical school that can no
longer be accommodated at the
original campus.

Already some 200 students
have been registered to begin
study at Freeport this year; that
number is expected to climb
substantially over the next three
years.

Students enrolled at the
Freeport site are in the third and
fourth semesters of a 10-semes-
ter programme.

Each will have previously
completed a full four-year
undergraduate degree and the
first two semesters of their med-
ical programme in Dominica.

These students are expected
to spend the next eight months
of their programme in Freeport
where emphasis is to be placed
on preparing them for entering
the clinical component of their
training in the United States.

Ross reports that it has cre-
ated a state-of-the-art clinical-
ly-oriented education centre that
makes extensive use of sophisti-
cated learning technology,
including a human simulation
learning suite.

The university is working with
the Rand Hospital and Public
Hospitals Authority (PHA) to
ensure that the students have
valuable educational experi-
ences at the Rand.

Also, Ross has undertaken to
make available to the PHA and
the Rand some of its medical
education resources.

Glass manufacturing facility
‘will provide much needed jobs’

cooling requirements hence electricity usage and
demand for increased oil imports, especially dur-
ing hot summer months.

FROM page one

He noted that Fenestration had more than 60
years of experience in this industry, having oper-
ated in the United States and China.

“T want you to be assured that the government
will continue to do all it can to promote and sup-

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“Tam indeed happy to be here to mark the
official launch of Fenestration Glass Services
here in Freeport, Grand Bahama.

“They have satisfied the requirement of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority and the
government to operate here, and those
requirements include the best environmental
standards and evidence of funding,” Mr Ingraham
said.

Mr Ingraham said the products manufactured
by Fenestration will be employed in the con-
struction sector here on the island and will reduce

port increased investment here on this island in
diversifying industries.

“Tam grateful for your investment in Grand
Bahama. We look forward to a wonderful rela-
tionship over the years,” said Mr Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham was accompanied to Freeport by
his wife, who performed the official ribbon cutting
at the glass facility.

The prime minister and his wife also attended
the official opening of Ross University on Friday.
He told those attending the opening that the
medical facility is expected to pump some $3 mil-
lion annually into the Freeport economy.

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THE TRIBUNE

S
MO

PORT
NBRIE

BSC names
basketball
classic in
honour of
Joyce Minus

THE Baptist Sports Council
showed its appreciation to its
assistant director by naming the
2009 basketball classic in hon-
our of Joyce Minus for her
unselfish and dedication to the
sporting body over the past
decade.

On Saturday as the league got
started, her teams from Golden
Gates celebrated with back-to-
back victories at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex.

In the 19-and-under division,
Golden Gates pulled off a
heartbreaking 29-28 victory
over Mercy Seat as they missed
making their debut in the league
a triumphant one. And Golden
Gates men knocked off Calvary
Bible 43-29.

Two upsets were recorded on
the first day in the 19-and-under
division as defending champions
First Baptist lost 30-26 to the
Latter-Day Ministries and Mira-
cle Working Church of God
made their debut by stunning
last year's runners-up Macedo-
nia Baptist 37-17.

Frustration

Also on Saturday, First Bap-
tist took their frustration out by
clobbering BIBA men 68-23;
Temple Fellowship men held off
Latter-Day Ministries 49-41 and
Bahamas Harvest got by
Church of the Nazarene 33-24.
First Baptist 15-and-under open
defense of their title with a 24-
20 win over

Latter-Day Ministries and
Temple Fellowship won 25-15
over MiracleWorking Church of
God.

¢ Here's a summary of the
games played:

Golden Gates 29, Mercy Seat
28: Stephen Culmer scored six,
including the winning basketball
in their 19-and-under nail
baiter. Rocco Fernander and
Bradley Cash both led the
attack with eight. Fred Grant
had a game high 12 and Nardo
Higgs 11 in the loss.

Golden Gates 43, Calvary
Bible 29: Akeem Armbrister's
game high 18 and Bradley
Cash's eight was enough to pace
the men to victory. Garvin Tay-
lor had 11 and Christian St. Vil
10 in the loss.

First Baptist 24, Latter-Day
20: Leon Saunders scored 12
points and Leonardo Collie had
nine for the 15-and-under
defending champions.

Marvin Rolle had a game
high 14 in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 25, Mira-
cle Working Church of God 15:
DeShawn White had a game
high 11 and Jonathan Gordon
added six in Temple Fellow-
ship's 15-and-under victory.
Shaquille Davis had seven in th
loss.

Latter-Day Ministries 30,
First Baptist 26: Lerinel Christ-
ian scored seven and Lloyd Bai-
ley six in the upset 19-and-under
win for Latter-Day Saints. Noel
Richardson had a game high 12
and Tinto Thurston 10 in the
loss.

Miracle Working Church of
God 37, Macedonia 17: Jamaal
Deveaux scored a game high 15
and Tori Symonette had nine in
their 19-and-under debut win.
Brandon Brownwell had seven
in a losing effort.

Bahamas Harvest 33, Church
of the Nazarene 24: Travis
Sands had a game high 16 to
almost single-handedly beat
their men's opponents. Durrall
Rolle had 12 in the loss.

First Baptist 68, BIBA 23:
Kirby Thergelus and Jamaal
Johnson scored 17 and 15
respectively to pace the men in
their blowout. Burlington Moss
had 11 in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 49, Lat-
ter-Day 41: Isban Lynes had 14,
Breston Rolle nine and Jan Pin-
der eight in their men's victor.
Perez Thompson had eight in
the loss.

¢ Here's a look at Saturday's
schedule:

SEE page 12





2009

NDAY, FEBRUARY 23,





WES
unl






m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

IT was only their second time playing
together, but Mark Knowles and Mardy
Fish looked like a veteran duo all week
long in Memphis, Tennessee.

Yesterday, the number four seeded team,
capped off the Regions Morgan Keegan
Championships with a 7-6 (7), 6-1 win over
the unseeded team of Travis Parrott and
Flip Polasek.

“Tt’s always good to win a tournament,”
i] said Knowles, who won the title at the
tournament last year with his Indian part-
ner Mahesh Bhupathi.

This year, however, Bhupathi decided
to skip the tournament as he returned
home to relax after he and Knowles fin-
ished as runners-up at the Australian
Open.

Knowles, who immediately boarded a
20-hour flight to be reunited with Bhu-
pathi this week, decided to team up with
Fish. It turned out to be a great partner-
ship as Knowles and Fish didn’t lose a
set in the tournament.

Fourth title

“We played great all week,” pointed out Knowles, who went on
to win his fourth title with three different partners - his first two in
1996 and 2003 with former partner Daniel Nestor.

But Knowles noted that he and Fish were even better in the final.

“We got off to a great start and we never eased up,” said
Knowles, who hoisted his oldest son, Graham, on his shoulders at
the victory celebrations. “Mardy is such a great singles player. But
he can also play good doubles.”

SEE page 12



Mardy Fish





















Tribune
staff

Wi] WESTMINSTER COLLEGE DIPLOMATS’ Stephen Miller [
drives to the basket. SEE MORE PHOTOS on Page 14.

MARK KNOWLES holds his
winner's trophy as his son,
Graham, 3, sits on his shoul-
ders and waits for the cere-
mony to finish at the Regions
Morgan Keegan Champi-
onships tennis tournament in
Memphis, Tenn., Sunday, Feb. |
22, 2009. Mark Knowles and
Mardy Fish won the men's
doubles championship.
















Mark Humphrey/AP Photo

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



‘PAIN’ BOUNCES BACK FROM KNOCK DOWN TO KO AMERICAN IN FIFTH ROUND






















@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER absorbing an unex-
pected knock down in the sec-
ond round, Meacher ‘Pain’
Major bounced back to punish

_ American Kevin Carmody
~“ into a fifth round technical

Maula a LM neon ee ene orton PACE OUN:

OUTSTANDING CHILDREN IN THE ARTS NOTICE

The public is invited to nominate outstanding children in Music, Drama and
Dance for the First Annual “Outstanding Children In The Arts” Awards.

Awards Ceremony will take place at the First Annual Children’s Ball scheduled
for Saturday 18" April, 2009 at Sandal Royal Bahamian Resort, Cable Beach
Nassau, Bahamas.

The Awards Programme is sponsored by the ADISA Foundation for children.
The Awards will acknowledge, celebrate and reward the contributions of
children to the Artistic Culture of The Bahamas. The Competition is open to
children from Pre School to High School. The prizes will include Scholarship
Grants for the winners in each category.

Closing date for the entries is Friday 27' February, 2009. Nomination forms
are available upon request from the Adisa Foundation P.O. Box N-555 Nassau,
Bahamas, telephone 242-326-0159 (day time) or 394-3018 (night time), e-mail:
adisa.bahamas@ gmail.com.

The Adisa Foundation

ip
a Hay ery +

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

The public is invited to attend a
NEW PROVIDENCE ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

TOWN MEETING

on Tuesday, February 24th, at 7:00p.m.
at Super Club Breezes,
hosted by The Ministry of Works & Transport.

ese ve ele Reel
Corridor 4
(Bethell Avenue to John F. Kennedy Drive)
Corridor 5

(John F. Kennedy Drive to West Bay Street)

Speakers will include
Mr. Francis Clarke, Project Engineer in the Ministry of Works
[who will soeak on Land Acquisitions)
Mr. Damien Francis,
(who will s>eak on the History of fhe CNPRIP)

Also in attendance will be
The Hon. Neko Grant, Minister of Works & Transport
The Hon. Tommy Tumaquest, Minister of National Security
The Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health
MIP for Killarney f

Referee Dick Pakozdi
stepped in and called off the
fight on Friday night at the
Convention Center in Buffalo,
New York two minutes and
54 minutes of the scheduled
six round bout.

It was a successful debut for
Major under his new promo-
tional team headed by Nick
Garone of the X-Cel World-
wide LLC.

Thanking God for giving
him the strength and his
Garone for the opportunity to
display his skills, Major said
he put on a great show.

Prepared

“It was a great opponent,
but I want to thank my train-
ers for getting me prepared
for the fight,” said Major, who
singled out Anthony ‘Chills’
Wilson from Hollywood,
Florida and Nat Knowles, who
joined them in Florida.

Major said Garone was so
impressed with him that he’s
already looking forward to
putting him on X-Cel’s next
show to fight in the co-main
event on ESPN in April of
May.



Meacher ‘Pain’ Major

Against Carmody, who
came in with a 10-9-2 win-loss-
draw record, Major got a little
careless in the second when
he was floored with a wild
overhand right.

But Major said he got up,
shook it off and in the fifth,
he threw a left-right combina-
tion and continued the flurry
to pull off the fight and
improve his record to 16-3-1

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Major inflicts ‘Pain-ful’
defeat on Carmody

with 14 knockouts.

“Even though it was cold
and I came down with the flu
from the bad weather, it was
great,” said Major, who noted
that he got his first taste of
snow.

“Despite the weather, a lot
of people came out and every-
body was cheering me on, so I
was even more confident to
get back on my feet and do
what I knew best - box.”

While Major said both Wil-
son and Knowles pushed him
beyond his limits to get him
ready, he credit a lot of his
success as well to the strength
condition workout that he got
from Delvin ‘Blue’ Scott.

“Having done the strength
work with him, I was able to
get through it easier than a lot
of the boxers in the training
camp in Hollywood,” Major
noted. “So I want to encour-
age the boxers home to take
advantage of the training that
they get from blue because it’s
a great help.”

Major, 27, said he will be
back in the ring today in Hol-
lywood training for whenev-
er his next opportunity come
for him to fight again.

Knowles and
Fish win it
Memphis

FROM page 11

Fish was a runner-up in
Memphis in 2006 as he captured
his fifth ATP World Tour title.
Knowles clinched hisd 51st to
tie the Bryan brothers and Llie
Nastase for 19th place in Open
Era doubles titles list.

Knowles said he’s now look-
ing forward to playing in Dubai
with Bhupathi. He’s hoping that
they can maintain the same
intensity that he and Fish
enjoyed.

“We played well in January,
getting to the final of the first
Grand slam at the Australian
Open,” Knowles stressed. “It
would be good if we can go to
Dubai and perform just as well
as we did. Whatever happens,
we hope to be ready. Mahesh
needed to take the break and
I’ve had a good week, so I feel
we can turn that around into
another successful week.”

Off the court, Knowles has
been featured in the publica-
tion Teamwork that is produced
by the Fellowship of Christian
Athletes.

Written by author Chad Bon-
ham, Knowles is listed as one
of twelve prominent sports fig-
ures featured and it includes
exclusive commentary on his
athletic heritage and his rise to
multiple Grand Slam doubles
titles. Knowles, whose wife
Dawn Davidson gave birth to
their second son, Brody five
months ago, noted that he’s just
enjoying the best of both
worlds.

BSC names
haskethall
classic in
honour of

Joyce Minus
FROM page 11

Court One — 10 am Latter-
Day vs Temple Fellowship (15);

11 am Macedonia vs Miracle
Working Church of God (15);

Noon Golden Gates No.2 vs
Macedonia (19);

1 pm Miracle Working
Church of God vs Latter-Day
Saints (19);

2 pm Evangelistic Center vs
Bahamas Harvest

(M);

3 pm Calvary Bible vs New
Bethlehem (M).

Court Two - 10 am Faith
United vs First Baptist (15);

11 am Golden Gates vs Zion
South Beach (15);

Noon First Baptist vs Temple
Fellowship (19);

1 pm New Bethlehem vs Faith
United (19);

2 pm City of Praise vs Temple
Fellowship (M); 3 pm First Bap-
tist vs Faith United (M).
TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 13



SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Vanderpool-Wallace, Alanna Dillette
help Auburn University to second place

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

ARIANNA Vanderpool-Wal-
lace and Alanna Dillette helped
the Auburn University to a sec-
ond place finish in the women’s
division of the Southeastern Con-
ference Swimming Champi-
onships over the weekend.

And while the University of
Kentucky had to settle for sev-
enth place, Elvis Variance Bur-
rows posted a couple of record
breaking performances.

The three Bahamian
Olympians competed at the
championships at Auburn Uni-
versity.

Burrows, a junior at Kentucky,
was eighth in the men’s 100 but-
terfly in a time of 46.72 seconds to
break his school record. Earlier
on the final day of competition,
Burrows had lowered the mark
to 46.81. Both were below the B
qualifying time for the NCAA
Championships.

Burrows also got a school year
in his spilt in the 50 fly.

“This was something that I
thought I couldn’t do, but I sur-
prised myself,” Burrows stressed.
“T think I limited myself.”

Better

Looking at his performance
overall, Burrows said he per-
formed better than he had antic-
ipated.

“T surpassed all of my goal
times and I placed higher than I
thought I would place,” he said.
“T got some NCAA B cuts, which
was another goal of mine.”

Those cuts came in the 100 fly,
50 free, 400 medley relay and the
200 medley relay.

Looking back at his perfor-
mance, Burrows said he attrib-
uted to his hard training leading
up to the meet.

He said he was mentally ready
to compete and he was glad to
see the other two Bahamians
from Auburn University there as
well.

“We were not on the same
team, but they got to cheer me
on and I got to cheer for them,”
he said. “It was good to see them
do well and I know they were



ARIANNA VANDERPOOL-WALLACE (far left) and Alana Dillette (far right) flank their Auburn University teammates
on the SEC Swimming Championships podium as they receive their 200 IM Relay Silver Medal on Wednesday
evening at the SEC Swimming Championships.

Pe eg



100 FLY PRELIMINARIES: Bahamians Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace at

bottom, Alana Dillette (centre) and a Florida Gator swimmer at the top as
they swim in the 100 butterfly prelims. Both Bahamians have advanced to

the finals.

glad to see me do well.”

Also on the final day, Vander-
pool- Wallace, the freshman, was
second in the 100 freestyle in
48.04 seconds. The race was won

by Morgan Scroggy of Georgia
in 47.88.

She also swum on the second
leg of the Tigers’ winning 400
freestyle relay team that clocked

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for provision of General Insurance
Services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:

on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 690/09

All Risks General Insurance

(a) Commercial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents); and
(b) Computers, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment

Tender No. 691/09

Motor Insurance - Commercial & Private Vehicles

Tender No. 692/09

Accident Insurance - Money & Burglary

Tender No. 693/09

Liability Insurance - Personal & Public

Tender No. 694/09
Professional Indemnity

[Officers, Directors, Professional Staff, Engineers,

Accountants, Attorneys]
&

Tender No. 695/09
Marine Insurance

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals.
For all inquiries regarding the tenders & site visits, contact
Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163

3:12.00 for both a SEC and pool
record.

On the third day, Dillette, a
sophomore, came in fourth in the
final of the 100 butterfly in 52.51.
Her team-mate Caitlin Geary
won in 51.65.

And Dillette was fifth in the
100 backstroke in 52.77. The race
was won by Gemma Spofforth of
Florida in 50.56.

Vanderpool-Wallace, on the
other hand, was second in the 100
fly consolation final in 53.58.
Georgia’s Anne-Marie Botek
won in 52.99.

And Vanderpool-Wallace
anchored the tigers’ 400 medley
relay in 3:31.28 for another SEC
and pool record.

Day two saw Vanderpool-Wal-
lace touch the wall in 22.23 for
fourth place in the final of the 50
free.

Dillette was 12th in 22.65.
There was a tie for first place
between Michelle King of Ten-
nessee and Botek in 21.90.

WITTEN
HNIC
Thom Time 4

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THREE of the Bahamian elite athletes closed out their indoor
season by finishing in the top five in Birmingham, England on Sat-
urday.

Spr aier Chandra Sturrup posted the best result when she clocked
7.20 seconds for a third place in the women’s 60 metre final.

The veteran Golden girl, known for her quick start, was beaten
out by American Carmelita Jeter, who ran 7.11. Tahesia Harrigan
of the British Virgin Islands was second in 7.18.

Jeter joined Sturrup and American Angela Williams in a three-
way tie for the fastest times in the world this year.

Williams won the first heat in 7.25 with Sturrup coming in third
in 7.30. Jeter also won heat two in 7.25.

While they didn’t have a heat to compete in, the men’s 60 hurdles
was a straight final with Shamar Sands taking fifth place in 7.61
behind a host of Americans.

Dexter Faulk won in 7.54, followed by David Payn in 7.55, joel
Brown in 7.56 and David Oliver in 7.57.

“Tt was good, but I just had a horrible start,” said Sands on his per-
formance.

“You really can’t come back indoors from a poor start.”

Pleased

Despite the loss, Sands said he was quite pleased with his first full
indoor season in Europe. He ended up winning four out of the
seven races he competed in and he lowered his national record
twice.

“T think it was good,” he said about his season. “I went out there
and I did what I wanted to do from the break.

“T wanted to put my name out there for the hurdles and I think
IT accomplished that. Everybody now know about Shamar Sands.”

Back in the United States, Sands said he will take some time off
to recuperate from the hectic travel before he turn his focus to the
outdoor season.

But based on what he was able to achieve and remaining healthy,
Sands said he’s confident that he will be able to continue his per-
formance as he gear up for the [AAF World Championships in
Berlin, Germany in August.

No doubt Sturrup will be looking forward to the same thing.

And after winning the bronze medal at the Olympic Games in
Beijing, China last year, Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands is hoping to
bounce back on the medal diaz in Berlin too.

Sands also competed in Birmingham, but he too had to settle for
fifth place with his leap of 54-feet, 4-inches (16.56) on his sixth
and final attempt.

He had a series of jumps that included 53-11 1/4 (16.44), 53-11 1/4
(16.44), 54-0 (16.46), scratch and 53-4 1/4 (16.26).

Cuban David Giralt won the event with a leap of 56-2 1/2 (17.13)
on his second attempt. He passed until the sixth jump when he
scratched.

Brazilian Jadel Gregorio was second with 55-5 3/4 (16.91) and
American Brandon Roulhac was third with 55-5 (16.89).



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PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

HUGH CAMPBELL TOURNAMENT © UK: The Premiership
Liverpool drop more points

Westminster College |=".“nnser enw

Liverpool dropped more points in the race for the Premier

Oo
League title when it drew 1-1 with visiting Manchester City on Sun-
day, reports the Associated Press.
Liverpool was trailing after a deflected shot by Craig Bellamy

until Dirk Kuyt tied it with 12 minutes left.
The result left Liverpool seven points behind defending champion

Oo
Manchester United, which beat Blackburn 2-1 Saturday for its
10th straight league win.
If Liverpool fails to win its first league title since 1990, it will like-

ly regret the games it has tied — which already stands at a league
high of 10 in 26 matches.

“T have confidence that we can still win it, but we must win our
next two league games against Middlesbrough and Sunderland
and then win against Manchester United at Old Trafford,” Liver-
pool manager Rafa Benitez said. “Then we may have a different sit-
uation. But I just accept that this has been a bad result and it
clearly makes it more difficult for us to win the title.”

Manchester City dropped to 10th place with 32 points, pushed
down a spot by Fulham’s 2-0 win over last-place West Bromwich
Albion.

Fulham hit the frame of the goal three times and Bobby Zamo-
ra shot over the bar from close range before he finally put the
home team ahead in the 61st. Andrew Johnson ducked to flick on
John Pantsil’s right-wing cross and Zamora squeezed between
West Brom’s two central defenders to tap in from inside the box.

Johnson made it 2-0 from a rebound after goalkeeper Scott Car-
son had saved a shot by Zamora, while Fulham goalkeeper Mark
Schwarzer saved a late penalty to preserve the two-goal lead.

Sixth-place Everton drew 0-0 at Newcastle in Sunday’s other
game, dropping points despite the home side having to play the sec-
ond half with 10 men after Kevin Nolan was sent off for a danger-
ous tackle on Victor Anichebe.







GLASGOW, Scotland — Celtic missed the opportunity to go
above Rangers at the top of the Scottish Premier League when it
tied 1-1 at Motherwell on Sunday.

The defending champions, who are going for a fourth straight
title, led through Scott McDonald’s 13th goal of the season but Paul
Quinn tied it with nine minutes left.

McDonald scored in the 60th with a shot from the edge of the
area that hit a bump and went over the goalkeeper’s leg before
Quinn scored from 12 yards, leaving Celtic on 57 points, behind its
city rival on goal difference.

WESTMINISTER
COLLEGE DIPLO-
MATS’ Thomas
Mackey tries to
avoid the defence
of Doris Johnson
Mystic Marlins in
the Pool Finals of
the Hugh Camp-
bell Tournament.
The Westminster
College Diplo-
mats went on to
win 64-63.

MADRID — Malaga’s bid to finish the season in the Champions
League places got a boost Sunday when the promoted Spanish
league club beat Valladolid 3-1.

Albert Luque used the outside of his left foot to swirl a shot
between two defenders and out of the reach of goalkeeper Justo
Villar in the seventh minute. Antonio Galdeano then scored anoth-
er in the 29th from the penalty spot.

Substitute Ignacio Perez sealed the win in the closing moments
as Malaga improved to 39 points — two behind fourth-place Vil-
larreal and the final Champions League place. Malaga has lost
only two of its last 14 games.

Pedro Oldoni scored with a header in the 84th for Valladolid.

Valencia and Deportivo La Coruna played later Sunday in
another match with Champions League implications, while Getafe
and Athletic Bilbao also were to play.

Barcelona leads the league with 60 points, followed by Real
Madrid with 53, Sevilla with 44 and Valencia with 38.

Also Sunday, Osasuna beat Numancia 2-0, 10-man Almeria ral-
lied for a 1-1 tie at Recreativo Huelva and Jose Jurado scored in the
88th as Mallorca beat 10-man Racing Santander 1-0.

PHOTOS:
Felipé
Major

/Tribune

Staff



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for the win.

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THE TRIBUNE

The new world order

Is THE past two weeks
a very powerful and
large delegation from the
Republic of China has visited
The Bahamas and Jamaica.

The delegation to Jamaica
was led by Vice President Xi
Jinping, the second most pow-
erful man in China and the
most likely next president. In
both countries, projects worth
hundreds of millions were
announced.

In Jamaica this week a util-
ity company from Abu Dhabi
purchased 40 per cent of the
electricity utility and also
invested in the electricity com-
pany on Grand Bahama.

The Russian armed forces
have carried out exercise in
the region in recent times.
Bolivia is getting Russian heli-
copters to use in their efforts
to control the drug trade.
Venezuela is planning to buy
Russian jets and helicopters.

All the above underlines
the importance which politi-
cally and financially powerful
nations place on our region.
It matters not that we may be
benefitting from the natural
competition between others.
Let us just make the most of

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



the benefits that result from
this reality.

History and geography
placed our islands squarely
within the sphere of influence
of the United States, Great
Britain and Canada. These
historical relationships have
had benefits, although who
benefitted most has been and
continues to be a matter of
argument and discussion. I
think there is little doubt that
if the accounting is done in
centuries rather than decades
that the answer is that the

North won. Then there is also
the natural tendency to take
what you "have" for granted.

Therefore, without taking
anything away from our tra-
ditional relationships or dis-
respecting our old friends, we
should cultivate all new suitors
who come to call. Let’s make
the talk of global integration
and the global economy a ben-
eficial reality for our islands
and not just a concept.

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 15


































THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF

BAHAMAS FIRST

GENERAL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED
WISHES TO CONGRATULATE

2ssful completion

of the AllIC and
‘ecent promotion
or Claims Officer.

thell joined Bahamas First
eas a Claims Officer and
of six years experience in
ce industry. He completed
if the Chartered Insurance
dgramme of the Insurance
ada and will be elected an
Associate of that Institute.

Genenal SIniuvance Company

Bahamas First General Insurance Company Limited
# 32 Collins Ave. P.O. Box SS 6238 Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 302-3900 + Fax: (242) 302-3901

For A Wendy's
UL MAGN

A Tender, Hand-Cut Cod Fillet
Creamy, Savory Tartar Sauce
Crisp Lettuce
Warm Premium Bun
THE TRIBUNE 6
usine
o yo he ee

MONDAY,

FEBRUARY 23,



im

y S

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life





rer

a
ed

~

PM Hubert Ingraham



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Arawak Cay Port
Development Com-
pany will this week
go back to its 19

shareholders to discover
whether they still want to invest
in the $60 million project, after
some key “rules of the game”
were changed during a meeting

with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham last week.

Jimmy Mosko, the company’s
chairman, was tight-lipped on

the details discussed with the
Prime Minister, declining to
reveal specifics when contacted
by Tribune Business, although

he attempted to downplay the
impact of any changes by saying
he was confident all 19 investors
would remain involved.

“It’s not changed much at
all,” he told Tribune Business
of the proposed Arawak Cay
project, which would create a



PM changes ‘rules of
the game’ on new port

* Arawak Cay Port Development Company to go back to 19 investors this week to see if they want to remain involved with $60m project
* Chairman expresses confidence that changes are ‘no deal breaker’, and that all will remain on board
* Survey of proposed port site carried out over weekend to determine boundaries for lease

* Memorandum of Understanding already submitted to government

purpose-built port at that site
to handle all New Providence’s

SEE page 8B

BEC targets ‘within $1-2m
of break even’ goal for ‘09

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

* Corporation losses rise
Tribune Business Editor

in four-year period to

THE Bahamas Electricity Cor- $18m peak in 2008
poration (BEC) is aiming to come

“within $1 million-$2 million of

breaking even” come its September 2009 financial year-end, its
chairman told Tribune Business, as it bids to reverse steadily
increasing net losses that peaked at $18 million last year.

Fred Gottlieb said the Board’s main objective was to restore the
monopoly power provider to profitability as rapidly as possible, a
goal that last week’s management restructuring is tied into, given
that BEC had sustained net losses ever since 2004.

Confirming that the short-term bottom line goal was to be “with-
in $1 million-$2 million of break even come September”, Mr Got-
theb told Tribune Business: “We would like to return the Corpo-
ration to net profitability, and significantly reduce its losses.

“Hopefully, with the exemption
from Customs duty [on BEC’s SEE page 10B

Star General Insurance

Judge refuses to order South
Ocean partner’s removal

Nine hundred Bahamas entities set up
to facilitate UBS scheme, IRS alleges

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A SUPREME Court judge
has refused to grant an order
recognizing that a Connecticut-
based hedge fund has become
the ‘general partner’ for the
$867 million New South Ocean
resort/casino project on New
Providence, finding it had not
established “reasonable cause”
to remove its developer part-
ner.

Senior Justice John Lyons, in
a February 18, 2009, ruling,
declined to grant a summons
brought before him by Seaside
Heights, the investment vehicle

for billion-dollar hedge fund
Plainfield Asset Management,
which had effectively sought
Supreme Court confirmation
that it had removed Roger Stein
and RHS Ventures as the devel-
opment’s ‘general partner’ via a
notice issued on October 20,
2008.

Justice Lyons’ ruling effec-
tively preserves the status quo
between the two parties pend-
ing the outcome of New York-
based arbitration between Mr
Stein/RHS Ventures and Plain-
field/Seaside Heights. He had
previously refused to grant Mr

SEE page 4B

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SWISS financial giant UBS
allegedly planned to create 900
Bahamian companies to enable
its US resident clients to dis-
guise their ownership of bank
accounts, and thus evade their
tax reporting and tax paying
requirements, the US tax
authorities have claimed.

Court documents filed to sup-
port evidence provided by
Internal Revenue Service (IRS)
agent Daniel Reeves, in the
effort launched by the US fed-
eral authorities to force UBS to
hand over the names of some
52,000 alleged US clients who

evaded taxes on assets worth
$14.8 billion, allege that the
Bahamas played a key role in
some of the schemes.

There is nothing to suggest,
though, that UBS (Bahamas),
its past and current managers,
directors and staff, have done
anything wrong in relation to
the IRS investigation.

One document filed with the
US district court in south Flori-
da, an alleged presentation to
UBS’s executive board for its
wealth management and busi-
ness banking unit, dated July 6,
2004, seeks approval for ‘alter-
native solutions’ for simple and

SEE page 6B

Agency — A correction



IN two recent articles carried
by Tribune Business concern-
ing the relationship between
Bahamas First and General
Brokers & Agents, it was

reported that Bahamas First
owned 100 per cent of Star
General Insurance Agency
(GB) Ltd. This was carried in
one article headlined Bahamas
First takes managerial control
at GBA, and another piece that
concerned Bahamas First’s hir-
ing of an accountant to work at
GBA.

Envy nightclub owner hits back at her critics

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE proprietor of Envy Nightclub and
Lounge on West Bay Street has hit back at
claims that her business is disrupting the
area’s tourist-based environment through
loud music and attracting an undesirable
clientele.

Delores Leeder, who once managed and
controlled the majority stake in Club Fluid
on Bay Street, said it was her dream to be
the sole owner of a nightclub. Now, com-

plaints from the nearby El Greco Hotel
about the volume of Envy's music has
forced Ms Leeder to answer to media and
government agencies alike.

Part-owner of El Greco, Mike Pikra-
menos, told Tribune Business that the Envy
nightclub, situated in the former Mayfair
hotel, was attracting the wrong elements
to the area surrounding his hotel.

"It's affecting the Strip adversely. They
are trying to improve it, but it’s difficult
when you get elements which should be
controlled by police,” he said.

Harry Pikramenos, who is also part-own-
er of El Greco, said the opening of Envy
compounded the area’s problems. "We
don't object to doing business, but that's
not doing business,” he said. "It's attracting
riff-raff outside our front door."

Only last year police raided the former
Mayfair hotel, netting eight suspected pros-
titutes.

But Ms Leeder said she has not seen any
kind of illegal activity inside the building

SEE page 6B

Star General Insurance
Agency has since confirmed to
Tribune Business that Bahamas
First does not own 100 per cent
of Star General Insurance
Agency (GB) Ltd.

Grand Bahama-based Star
General Insurance Agency
(GB) Ltd is 80 per cent owned
by Star General itself, through
its investment company, Star
General Investments (GB), and
20 per cent by Bahamas First.
The current shareholdings
resulted from the 2001 merger
of Nassau Underwriters
Freeport agency with Star Gen-
eral (Freeport).

Tribune Business apologises
for the error, and any problems
it may have caused, and is hap-
py to set the record straight.



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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE








@ ROYALFIDELITY MARKET WRA

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 823.22 (-1.39%) YTD

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

By RoyalFidelity Capital the 25 listed securities, of which increase of 3,110 shares or 23. extended the deadline of its pri- SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
Markets two advanced, one declined and __ per cent, versus last week's trad- vate placement offering. AML $1.41 $- 0 -17.54%
one remained unchanged. ing volume of 13,551 shares. The preferred shares will be BBL $0.63 $- 0 4.55%

TRADING momentum Focol Holdings (FCL) was _ paying a dividend rate of prime BOB $7.64 $- 0 0.00%
increased slightly last week in EQUITY MARKET the volume leader this week + 1.75 per cent, payable semi- BPF $11.00 $- 0 -6.78%
the Bahamian market with A total of 16,661 shares with 8,400 shares trading, its annually. BSL $9.58 $- 0 -5.99%
investors trading in four out of | changed hands, representing an stock rising by $0.01 to end the BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
week at $5.18. Dividends/AGM Notes: CAB $13.95 $- 0 -0.57%

Finance Corporation of the Famguard Corporation CBL $6.77 $- 0 -3.29%

Bahamas (FIN) was the big (FAM) has declared a dividend CHL $2.83 $- 0 0.00%

advancer last week, its stock ris- of $0.06 per share, payable on CIB $10.45 $- 0 0.00%

ing by $0.28 to $11.28 on a vol- February 23, 2009, to all share- CWCB $2.04 $-0.32 561 -9.33%

ume of 5,000 shares. holders of record date Febru- DHS $2.40 $- 0 -5.88%

FamGuard Corporation ary 16,2009. FAM $7.76 $-0.04 2,700 -0.51%

(FAM) saw 2,700 shares trade, FBB $2.37 $- 0 0.00%

its stock price falling by $0.04 Commonwealth Bank (CBL) | FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%

to close at $7.76. Consolidated has declared a dividend of $0.05 FCL $5.18 $0.01 8,400 0.19%

ee Cow Water Company (CWCB) trad- per share, payable on February FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%

Applications are invited for the UWI ed 561 shares at $2.27. 27, aN to eee = FIN $11.28 $0.28 5,000 -4.97%

‘ record date February 13, : ICD $5.50 $- 0 -10.28%

Regional Endowment Fund (UWIREF) BOND MARKET ISI $10.50 $- 0 5.41%

Scholarships and Bursaries. No notes traded in the Bank of the Bahamas (BOB) PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%




ELIGIBILITY

¢ Applicants must be citizens of one of UWI's Contributing Countries
¢ Must be a first time applicant to read for an undergraduate degree
¢ Applications for the scholarships and bursaries must accompany a UWI application




CONDITIONS OF AWARDS

Scholarship winners will receive benefits for the official duration of their degree

programmes as follows:

¢ Barbadian and Trinidadian nationals - BURSARIES (toward Maintenance costs)
¢ Nationals from other Contributing Countries - FULL SCHOLARSHIP (Tuition and

Maintenance costs) OR TUITION only
HOW TO APPLY

1. Complete the general application for admission to the UWI online at the campus

website of your choice.

. Submit all supporting documents as soon as you have completed the application

online.

. Complete also the UWIREF application online, download and submit

For further information, you may contact Admissions:
Cave Hill: www.cavehill.uwi.edu 246-417-4140-43
Mona: www.mona.uwiedu 876-977-2779/876-935-8651 Ext. 2651
The Open Campus: www.open.uwi.edu 868-662-2002 Exts 2607/2271
St Augustine: www.sta.uwiedu 868-662-2002/868-663-1443 Exts.2157/2154

The deadline for scholarship applications is FEBRUARY 27, 2009.

Applications for the UWIREF Scholarships/Bursaries will not be considered until all

supporting documents are received.

= aa
ya er] ey

Qocca@r nines

Bahamian market last week.
COMPANY NEWS
Earnings Releases.

There were no financial
results reported by any of the
24-listed companies during the
week.

Private Placement Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL) has

| ant ae ewe
Sa a"

4

Jus

Inviting/Applications|for)Admission}2009
ONLINE >'hitp://www.open:uwi-edu/admissions

The Open Campus of the University of the West Indies is now accepting applications
for entry into its undergraduate programmes for the 2009/2010 academic year

Undergraduate Degrees » Associate Degrees » Diplomas « Certificates

The Open Campus accepts online applications only at our website www.open.uwi.edu

Entry requirements ¢ can nbe viewed online by visiting the Open Campus website.

HOW TO APPLY

has declared a dividend of $0.10
per share, payable on March 3,
2009, to all shareholders of
record date February 24, 2009.

Focol Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on
Thursday March 19, 2009, at
10.30am in the Boardroom at
its Corporate Office in
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

consult







International Markets

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR






Weekly % Change
1.2506 +131
1.4441 +0.52
1.2829 -0.26








Commodities

Crude Oil $39.80
Gold $994.10
International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly
7,365.67
770.05
1,441.23
7,416.38

% Change
-5.28
+5.44

Weekly

% Change
-6.17
-6.87
-6.07
-4.67

DITA

S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei

Share your news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ants limited

THE MANAGEMENT AND STAFF JOIN IN OFFERING
CONGRATULATIONS TO

MARK B. WILLIAMS

B. Eng., P.E.

SENIOR PROJECT ENGINEER

Applications should be submitted online by visiting the website. Instructions for completing
the application process are online. Persons without Internet access may visit the Open
Campus site in your country between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. to obtain
assistance submitting their online applications.

Applicants who do not possess Grade 1 in CXC or CSEC English (A), a Grade A in GCE ‘0’ Level
English, a Grade 1 in CAPE Communication Studies or a Grade A or B in the GCE General Paper,
are required to take the English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT).

Applicants are required to pay the equivalent of US$25.00 to cover the cost of the test.

Further details will be available from your Open Campus country site shortly.

— ON HIS RECENT SUCCESS IN OBTAINING HIS
Fliaible avol PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING QUALIFICATION

Eligible applicants are encouraged to apply for the UWI Regional Endowment Fund (UWIREF)
AND

Scholarship. Further information is available on the Open Campus website at Financial
TO WELCOME HIM INTO MANAGEMENT AS AN

ASSOCIATE

(February 2009)

CON if \CT US
For further information contact the Open Campus site nearest you or
admissions@open.uwi.edu.

A meeting will be held for perspective students on February 25th
at 6:00p.m. In The UWI Restaurant, Thompson Blvd.


THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 3B



Renewable energy
‘showcase’ pledge

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FIRM involved in a joint
venture bid with two Canadian
companies to supply the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) with renewable
energy has pledged to make its
project a “showcase”, and urged
Bahamians to avoid “wishful
thinking” that could lead to the
nation missing “our window of
opportunity”.

In a likely response to calls
for more Bahamian participa-
tion in the BEC renewable
energy tender, and demands
from environmentalist Sam
Duncombe that there be more
transparency, Vincent McDon-
ald, chief executive of Bahamas
Renewable Energy Corporation
(BREC), said the company
agreed that “local participation
is absolutely critical and of key
importance to derive the maxi-
mum amount of benefit for the
Bahamas”.

BREC, he added, was 49 per
cent owned by Winso Compa-
ny, a Bahamian firm, but to
access the “hundreds of mil-
lions” of dollars needed to bring
a renewable energy project to
fruition, it had partnered with
Emera Inc, a 25 per cent stake-
holder in Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company, and fellow Cana-
dian firm Schneider Power.

“Given the state of the finan-
cial markets, lenders who were
there yesterday and waiting for
approvals, have disappeared d
overnight. We can therefore no
longer afford wishful thinking,
because we (the Bahamian peo-
ple) will miss our window of
opportunity,” Mr McDonald
said.

“The current economic cli-
mate warrants the need for out-
of-the-box thinking, in particu-
lar as it relates to financing
these projects. We believe that

Environmentalist Sam Duncombe

BREC has found strong part-
ners in Schneider Power and
Emera that can ensure our pro-
ject’s economic and financial
viability.”

He added: “The Bahamas can



learn from other leading renew-
able energy jurisdictions such
as Canada and Germany. Our
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Bahamas.

“The results of this are that
we have already significantly
reduced our learning curve, and
will also guarantee that these
projects can get built. By com-
mitting ourselves to employing
local tradesmen and contrac-
tors, this knowledge will be dis-
persed amongst our own econ-
omy, allowing companies and
entrepreneurs an entry into a
sector that generally has very
high barriers of entry, but is slat-
ed for significant growth in the
future.”

Referring to BREC’s pro-
posed wind/solar solutions for
Harbour Island, Abaco and
Eleuthera, Mr McDonald said:
“A $60 million dollar infra-
structure project in the
Bahamas will act as a mini-stim-
ulus package for the economy in
the region. We anticipate that
expenditures will give a much-
needed economic boost to local
businesses, in particular local
suppliers and trades people, but
also hotels, restaurants, stores
and many peripheral services.
BREC is a showcase here in the
Bahamas as to how business can
be done with maximum local
content and participation.

“From an environmental
standpoint, BREC, with the
help of Schneider Power, is now
one of the leading companies
in the world that employs ‘con-
servation engineering’, mean-
ing that our facilities will meet
and/or exceed all requirements
under the Bahamian environ-
mental laws.

“We will also strive to reduce
the impact on nature with the
least possible intrusion on the
landscape, wildlife and commu-
nities. And once BEC has come
to a decision, we will be inviting
the Bahamian public and com-
munities to comment and pro-
vide feedback.”

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE















































































BS:

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international private
bank in The Bahamas, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently
accepting applications for:-

HEAD OF OPERATI RDINATI
STRUCTURED PRODUCTS

Applicants for the position of Head of Operations Coordination / Structured Products
must have relevant financial accreditation or professional qualifications, in-depth
managerial experience in all phases of securities & other assets in the offshore banking
industry, overall processes including front office & operations activities, and be fully
abreast of today’s sophisticated private banking products. Must be knowledgeable of
international markets, financial instruments and of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international banking practices. Fluency in Italian is
definitely required.

Personal qualities:-

Proven ability to supervise staff & control the daily flow of transactions & direct
and guide staff through knowledge and example

Must have demonstrated practical organization of self and others

Ability to assess, evaluate and make recommendations

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills

Possess analytical qualities

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook

Commitment to quality, service excellence and customer satisfaction

Responsibilities:-

Necessary liaison with units Private Banking & Service Provider (Outsourcer)
Verify that processed transactions are correctly settled

Perform control of administrative tasks to be executed locally

Ensure reconciliations of outstanding items and that pending items are resolved
Monitor & manage booking of structured products

Troubleshooting

Guide and train personnel in the unit

This position will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum vitae
to :-

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited

Goodman Bay Corporate Centre

P. O. Box N - 7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr @bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)

THE BAHAMAS RED

Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

EAI ANS

“OUR WORLD. YOUR MOVE. BECOME
INVOLVED.”

a

—" CONCH FRITTERS _

SATURDAY,
MARCH 7'", 2009
12 NOON - UNTIL

a
Judge refuses to order South

Ocean partner’s removal

FROM page 1B

Stein an injunction to prevent
Seaside Heights from taking
over as ‘general partner’.

However, in his latest ruling
on the dispute over the still-
closed South Ocean hotel’s
redevelopment (the golf course
is open), Justice Lyons also
granted Plainfield/Seaside
Heights some of its other
‘prayers for relief’, in particu-
lar by ordering RHS Ventures
to hand over to it financial doc-
uments and materials on the
project.

Recalling how the dispute
had arisen, Justice Lyons said
in his ruling that it all stemmed
from the August 6, 2007, part-
nership agreement between
RHS Ventures and Seaside
Heights for South Ocean’s rede-
velopment. RHS Ventures and
Mr Stein were the developers,
Plainfield/Seaside Heights the
financiers.

Mr Stein and RHS Ventures
were “given the day-to-day con-
trol” of South Ocean’s devel-
opment, but Seaside Heights —
via the partnership agreement —
obtained the right to remove or
replace him,

After a bitter dispute arose
between the two parties, Sea-
side Heights attempted to do
just that with its October 20,
2008, notice served on RHS
Ventures, but this was resisted
by Mr Stein. Justice Lyons
observed that “the relationship
between the parties here has
broken down”.

As a result, on January 9,
2009, Seaside Heights “brought
a summons before the court
seeking an order that it be
declared general partner of the
partnership pending resolution
of the arbitration presently
under way in New York. In
effect, it seeks the court’s ruling
(declaration) that the notice has
been effective”, Justice Lyons
said.

Referring to the agreement’s
stipulation that the general part-
ner could be removed ‘for cause
only’, Justice Lyons said:
“Counsel for [Seaside Heights]
submits that business efficacy
dictates that the parties meant it
to have a subjective reading — ie.

That so long as [Seaside
Heights] is satisfied that there is
cause, then it appears (at least
that is her argument flows logi-
cally) that the courts should be
satisfied with that. That is plain-
ly wrong.”

Justice Lyons said the agree-
ment showed that evidence
needed to be provided to sup-
port the general partner’s
removal, and that it must “stand
up to objective scrutiny”. “It
can hardly be conducive to the
efficient running of a business if
the second defendant [Seaside
Heights] were able to simply
replace the general partner as
and when it wished,” the judge
ruled.

“Were that to be the case,
then the general partner could
be replaced on a capricious
whim of [Seaside Heights].”
While it was not reasonable to
wait for arbitration outcomes if
the general partner was com-
mitting egregious breaches of
the agreement, Justice Lyons
nevertheless found that Seaside
Heights had to establish a prima
facie case to back up any move
to remove RHS Ventures.

Therefore, Seaside Heights
had to provide evidence to sup-
port the grounds it had cited for
removing RHS Ventures/Mr
Stein in the October 20, 2008,
notice. The hedge fund invest-
ment vehicle had cited as its
grounds for doing so clauses I,
II and VI of section 4.3 c in the
agreement, the first two refer-
ring to “fraud and willful mis-
conduct” and “intentional mis-
appropriation”.

Justice Lyons said the evi-
dence to support Seaside
Heights’ case revolved around
an affidavit provided by Susan
O’Donovan, which he described
as “very fair and very objec-
tive”.

Yet he ruled: “The frustra-
tion that Ms O’Donovan feels in
not being given the information
that she required to do a prop-
er audit of the books is evident.
I must say, however, that her
affidavit is, in my view, insuffi-
cient to establish reasonable
cause as pleaded in the notice
on an interim basis.

“T do not think, at this stage,
and to the required degree, that

it establishes fraud, willful mis-
conduct or intentional misap-
propriation. Ms O’Donovan,
very fairly, characterizes her dif-
ficulties as relating to some
reluctance of the first plaintiff
[RHS Ventures] and as relat-
ing, perhaps, to some poor
bookkeeping practices. I do not
consider, at this stage, that that
is sufficient to show reasonable
cause.”

Ms O’Donovan’s affidavit
only provided a “suspicion”,
Justice Lyons said, and failed
to carry the weight of evidence
needed at a trial. As a result,
he ruled that Seaside Heights
had not “established such suffi-
cient reasonable cause to give
effect to the notice and dis-
lodge” RHS Ventures.

In regards to financial infor-
mation on the New South
Ocean project, the-then attor-
ney for RHS Ventures, Higgs
& Johnson partner Michael
Allen, had in earlier evidence
said both he and his client were
not going to facilitate a ‘fishing
expedition’ by Seaside Heights
in a search for incriminating
material.

“Perhaps that was an under-
standable position to take, giv-
en the build-up of animosity
between the parties,” Justice
Lyons wrote. “The evidential
suggestion, therefore, is that any
reluctance or intransigence on
the part of the first plaintiff
[RHS Ventures] may well be as
a result of advice received from
its lawyers, rather than any mis-
conduct or fraudulent behav-
iour.”

However, Justice Lyons said
this position was not support-
ed by law, something that was
important given Seaside
Heights’ prayer that the court
order that it be provided with
financial information on New
South Ocean.

Noting that it was a “partner-
ship’, Justice Lyons said it went
without mention that both sides
should have unimpeded access
to the financial records. As a
result, he granted Seaside
Heights’ demand over the
records, but also refused to
make an order restricting press
coverage of the South Ocean
dispute.

We all want the same thing.

SR MRM MUR UE TEL a UU Gar IT air
Ralary's educalional programs and scholarships are dedicated solely to promoting peace.

Ue ee ERC eEE ani rth

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 5B



Port unveils its new structure

Sir Albert Miller

THE Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA), and its Port
Group Ltd affiliate, have con-
firmed their Board and man-
agement restructuring, which
sees Hannes Babak restored as
the latter’s chairman and Ian
Rolle promoted to president of
both entities.

Mr Babak replaces Erik
Christiansen as Port Group Ltd
chairman, but it does not
resolve the ongoing feud
between the Hayward family
trust and the late Edward St
George’s estate over the com-
panies’ ownership.

The temperature in this battle
appears to have cooled of late,
though, with sources suggesting
Hutchison Whampoa remains
eager to conduct due diligence
on the Port as it attempts to
acquire the estate's stake, while
the Hayward family trust is said
to still be eyeing a sale to British
banker Roddie Fleming. Little
progress appears to have been
made on the latter deal of late,
though..

The restructuring also
involves the retirement of
GBPA president and Albert
Gray, a development anticipat-
ed by most observers. Mr Gray
joins the previously-departed
Carey Leonard, the GBPA’s
former in-house legal counsel,
among the major management
changes.



i

Hannes Babak

No mention was made of
Felix Stubbs, the GBPA’s chair-
man, with most believing this
indicates he is set to continue
in the role, with the Port
Authority having a separate
chairman from its Port Group
Ltd affiliate. Having dual chair-
manships is likely to somewhat
placate a portion of the Port’s
critics, who have long argued
that its regulatory/licensing
functions (the GBPA side)
should have been split-off, or
at least ‘Chinese walled’, from
the investments side at Port
Group Ltd.

Mr Babak’s return to the Port
Group Ltd chairmanship has
come as no surprise either, with
many analysts having expected
him to eventually reassume the
post. The way was cleared after
the Supreme Court overturned
the more than two-year bar on
Mr Babak playing any active
role in the GBPA/Port Group
Ltd’s management and Board
affairs, an injunction having
been obtained in November
2006 by the St George estate.
His return to the chairman’s
seat would have been sealed by
a directors’ vote at a Board
meeting last week.

In a statement, Mr Babak
said he would target the areas of
education, training, healthcare
and medical facilities as poten-
tial sources of investment for

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lan Rolle

Grand Bahama in the short-
term. Having met with contacts
in these industries during a
December 2008 investment
road show, he added that these
held the greatest opportunities
given the current global eco-
nomic climate.

“My primary focus is in the
area of business development,
and I will be back on the road
within the next few weeks to
secure more investments for our
great island,” he said.

“T will not rest until Grand
Bahama island reaches its full
potential. We have so much to
offer investors, and I will ensure
that we bring new projects, for
the benefit of the entire island
of Grand Bahama.”

Sir Albert Miller, a GBPA
and Port Group Ltd director,
attributed the arrival of projects
such as Ross University and
Fenestration Glass & Services
Company to Mr Babak’s previ-
ous tenure at the Port.

Meanwhile, Mr Rolle has
been promoted from his previ-
ous post as the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd chief financial offi-
cer to a post as president of the
group. He joined the compa-
nies as a group financial ana-
lyst in 2000, and has also served
as their group financial con-
troller.

He is also a former Ernst &
Young accountant, and held the




Healthy Hearts Walk
& Kids’ Walk

Tine Subhas Healthy Hears Walk i appeiomately Tour miles, staring a the Westen Eapkiniade, Qin 4481
no diman’s Bary pouni-abnat and back, The Sebevayl? Keds” Walk will stand peemplty af Ba) aim, af the
Western Eeplaiade Qoounids. Last enue pepetialioe i both walks begat al 6:50 6:00 am

Agpbcolions cane picked op ot particigaling Subway Restrnt of ot Ge Balas Heart Foundabor 5 office. Earty applicaione.
can be diopged oll at Sober Eretaucent in the Heatour Aes Shop ping Cepia the Heart Foun dafion's office on Cable Bact.



For More Information, Call 32/-0806-/ or 394-6715

Farticinant Infonmation
Merri:
Liate nf Her th
ay Tucan
Add rasa:
E-mail:

Organzalion inécneration
Hane of School iGrou
Loonthact Manne:
Lonathact E-mail

Flee] Auge:

Age hem

Telephone;

Prior to any physical activity, we strongly suggest you consult your physician

lacathe all eoks paacciated Wilh The Sobre Healtiy Heal Walk ame) Kids! Walk ick dite), bal ant limited to, lala, coetact
vail (her parted paels, ie eect ol Tie eater, inchidiag creme Neat, coor em ook, Ae ioe Fegrridily, tralle aad the coed in ns
Of he road all such iets beng koe ad appreceied bye. Hang read thee aaree and keoeng Wiese facts and mn

ons onan Of aespeptiog Mey Application,

hot (oe anid areata enti to acl on ite) bebe, Walvis ond raleerse Seghevey am

an all spo nsnes, Meir repeesen laces and aectesses feo all claims and Hahdllies of amy kind ares Ooh of ry pew eqial ion
m9 fhe Sabra) Hevdtiry Heart Walk aed Kade! Yalkewen Hough thet fab hy ay anes ool ol neqhper os of carelessness on the
perl of Bie: RSs ened [Pais evairer, Lam avaire (her the regeshealion lee is aon-eldatle. | am also aware thal fie cn rae
val open bo trate aid thal Gea phone, jogging strofiens, bekew; in lint skabors and amie dems aad animals ae Donpreng
ANSE are TEM eee on) Ce cen ee

Signature:

PARENTS SIGNATURE (if urcder 14):



a
abs * Health = ge

_ Ualinalmpenal

Date

[atte

eye:

PE sc Soune DASAN! ie (2 }

womans

“e+

W Albert Gray



post of finance manager at
Hutchison Lucaya, where he
was responsible for the man-
agement of a $450 million bud-
get for the redevelopment of
Our Lucaya.

Mr Gray, meanwhile, will still
be retained as a consultant to
the Port. “This day marks a cul-
mination of over 35 years of
outstanding and dedicated ser-
vice to the Group,” said Messrs
Babak and Stubbs of Mr Gray
in a short statement.

“The employees will certain-
ly miss Albert, and on behalf of
the directors, management and
staff of the Group, we thank
him for his years of devoted ser-
vice, and wish him the very best
for the future.”

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on

Mondays



The Bahamas Olympic Association

Invites suitably qualified applicants to apply for the
following position

Office Administrator

Requirements:

* PC Literacy and experienced in Microsoft Office
Applications (Word, Excel, Powerpoint)

¢ Excellent keyboarding skills

¢ Excellent Organizational Skills and ability to multi-
task successfully

¢ Excellent Communication Skills and ability to
work with minimum direction and supervision in
drafting correspondence for Executive Review

* Experienced in Office Administration and ability
to work with tight deadlines and flexibility to adjust
working hours to ensure that objectives are met.

* Coordinate Meetings/Business Travel as required

* To also serve as Office Receptionist and answer
telephones

The ideal candidate would have served in a similar
capacity and would have completed formal education
beyond the high school level. A Background in Sports
Administration is preferred and consideration will be
given to candidates that demonstrate skills that are
easily transferable to this position and demonstrate a
high level of professionalism.

Applications can be sent via email or fax to:
nocbah@coralwave.com ° Fax: 322-1195

or mailed to
The Bahamas Olympic Association
P.O. Box SS-6250,

Nassau, The Bahmas.

The Bahamas Olympic Association thanks all applicants and will only
interview short-listed candidates.



The Bahamas
Agricultural, Marine Resources (F

Agribusiness Expo

Security”

F Date: 26th-28th February, 2009
Location; Gladstone Road Agricultura
Research Centre (GRAC)

Nassau N,P, The Bahamas

For more information contact:
(242) 356-3100
(242) 322-3740
Email: bahamasagribusinessexpo(@ yahoo.com


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a > =; ;
Nine hundred Bahamas entities set up

to facilitate UBS scheme, IRS alleges

FROM page 1B

grantor trusts in relation to US
tax law compliance.

The paper notes that simple
and grantor trusts would have
to provide new documents,
including a US Tax Identifica-
tion Number (TIN), to the US
authorities, with the identities
of beneficial owners having to
be disclosed. A number of solu-
tions to this dilemma were pro-
posed, including clients — before
July 31, 2004, - selling their US
securities, or the creation of
underlying companies.

In his affidavit, Reeves

alleged in relation to the July
6, 2004, memo: “UBS acknowl-
edged that it would be illegal
to recommend that its US cus-
tomers use offshore entities to
avoid their US reporting oblig-
ations.

“Nonetheless, in 2004, on its
own initiative, UBS planned to
create approximately 900 off-
shore corporations for its largest
US customers — those holding
UBS accounts with asset bal-
ances exceeding 500,000 Swiss
francs.

“It intended to create 650
such dummy corporations for
customers it could not contact
by October 31, 2004, and anoth-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WATEREDGE OCEAN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,













Bahamas.

er 250 dummy corporations for
customers it could not contact,
and who UBS expected would
employ these dummy corpora-
tions to hide their Swiss
accounts from the IRS.”

The July 6, 2004, document
states that for clients who could
not be contacted by July 31,
2004, “UBS will establish an
underlying company in the
Bahamas for UBS internal
structures holding US securities
above a threshold of Swiss
francs 500,000. This will result in
550 underlying companies to be
set up.”

And it added: “UBS will
establish an underlying compa-

Envy nightclub owner hits back at

FROM page 1B

since she opened her club
almost three months ago.

“T don’t sell drugs or prosti-
tutes,” she said. “And I have
not seen any of that going on
in this building either.”

She told Tribune Business
that she took exception to Mr
Pikramenos labelling her
patrons, who come specifically
to visit her business, as "riff-
raft".

"Who is riff-raff? What's the
definition of riff-raff? Is he riff-

ny in the Bahamas for the
remaining UBS internal struc-
tures where the total invested
assets are above a threshold of
10 million Swiss francs, and the
total value of US securities
Swiss francs 10,000. This will
result in an additional 100
underlying companies to be set
Uu

Another 250 were to be cre-
ated for the estimated 20 per
cent of clients who could not be
contacted, but would wish to
have the same structure, the
document alleged. To help cre-
ate the structures, UBS alleged-
ly needed another seven foun-
dation and trust experts to be

raff? Am I riff-raff? Are you
riff-raff?" she exploded.

"Everybody is important,
everybody is a VIP. Why does
he have the right to say they are
riff-raff? They are people who
come to have a good time, and
have never caused a problem
in my club. I have to defend my
customers because they are
good people; they are not riff
raff.”

According to Ms Leeder, she
has never had a fight occur in
her club, partly because she
employs 15 security guards dur-
ing the busiest nights. She said

26° BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE

sent to the Bahamas for three
months, with an extra two based
in this nation full-time to help
administer the companies.

Meanwhile, an alleged 2004
UBS internal review of US res-
ident ‘non-W9 clients, mean-
ing those who had not supplied
the IRS with information on US
account holders, was tabled
with the US courts. It claimed
to show that in 2003, some 358
of Bahamas-based UBS clients,
with combined assets under
management of $894 million,
were non-compliant with the
W-9 requirements. Only four
were alleged to be in compli-
ance.

there are also constant police
patrols from the station one
block away.

Many property owners along
the strip between the West Bay
Hotel and Royal Palm Hotel
are confident that the area is
preparing for a boom in busi-
ness. With the peak of Spring
Break only weeks away, Envy is
preparing to attract its share of
that seasonal business, which
means music and drinks during
the daytime and parties at night.

“Everybody is going to go
after their share of that busi-
ness,” said Ms Leeder. “I will

Other court documents
include 2002 internal UBS e-
mails, saying that the bank’s
position on ‘corporate’ clients
with a US beneficial owner was
“applicable to accounts either
in Nassau or in Switzerland — a
consistent approach is applied”.

The same e-mail exchange
also says: “Can you please issue
an info in Nassau to that effect,
so that everyone is on the same
page”. It also expresses no opin-
ion on whether the Bahamas’
then-newly-signed Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agreement
(TIEA) with the US “calls for a
different treatment of such
structures in Nassau”.

her critics

just try to keep my music at an
acceptable level.”

According to her, the revital-
isation of the area and the com-
pletion of renovations to the
Mayfair will spell more business
for everyone in the area. She
hopes she and her neighbours
can find the solidarity to exploit
it in all of their best interests.

"You can eat here, you can
drink, have a good time and
then go home. There's police
right next doo. There are
restaurants, there is a club. You
can't ask for more along this
strip,” Ms Leeder said.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BONFIRE SPARKS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of January 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MONTRES INTERNATIONAL
HOLDING LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 15th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VAZE INVESTMENTS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

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Price: S35 /00000)
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Legal Notice

NOTICE
BON VIVANT COMPANY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CHANEL RIVER INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

The Compliance Commission
3rd Floor, Charlotte House
Charlotte Street South

Relocation and Temporary
Telephone Lines

The Public is advised that, effectively
immediately, The Compliance
Commission has relocated to the 3rd
Floor of Charlotte House, Charlotte Street
South, and may be contacted at the
following telephone number:

356-5717

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEMPER VERDE CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 19th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MULBERRY SLOPES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of November 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE



SHOWN (I-r) are Marietta Russell; Steve Davis, Wendy Warren, Sanchi-
na Kemp and Candia Dames. Missing from the photo is Patricia Glinton-

Meicholas.

Short Term Apartment
Cheaper than a Hotel

ea? week -weeks
Tee FLA HLA

HORE Av NG FROM HOME

month

BORD AW aAT
PROM MOrl



ACCOUNTANT NEEDED

For an Established Accounting Firm
Must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting
Strong work ethics and a professional disposition

All interested persons
Please apply via email to: S.Laquel@ gmail.com
or Call 242-393-0858. Ask for Ms. Hall or Ms. Farrington
Deadline: February 25, 2009

aS eRTTT
judging panel

THE Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) has
announced the judging panel
for this year’s Essay and Speech
Competitions, now underway
in secondary schools through-
out New Providence.

They are Candia Dames,
news editor, Nassau Guardian;
Marietta Russell, BFSB’s
achiever of the year (Bank of
the Bahamas); Patricia Glinton-
Meicholas, Bahamian author;
Sanchina Kemp, BFSB’s FSI
student of the year (Deloitte);
and Steve Davis, UBS
Bahamas.

Wendy Warren, BFSB’s chief
executive and executive direc-
tor, said the organisation intro-
duced its school outreach pro-
gramme in 2001 to profile the
important role human resource



development plays in financial
services sector growth.

“With the support of the
guidance counsellors — and the
Business and English Teachers
—in the secondary schools, the
Essay/Speech Competition por-
tion of this outreach is intended
to help promote a more com-
prehensive knowledge of the
sector, while at the same time
encouraging good research and
writing skills,” she added.

The competitions are co-
sponsored by the Ministry of
Education, Ministry of Finance,
Rotary Club of East Nassau,
and Rotary Sunrise — in collab-
oration with the Professional
Industry Associations.

Corporate sponsors are
Bahamas Business Solutions
and KPMG.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 7B

=
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For The Best Rates flow

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~
*B) PICTET
PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

INFORMATION SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

-Excellent organizer, communicator and coordinator.

-Responsible, thorough and resourceful.

-Flexible, committed and willing to invest long hours as needed.
-Innovative and willing to learn new technology.

-Ability to function independently but able to work as part of a team.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Microsoft Office

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Lotus Notes.

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with basic hardware

(PC, server, printers...).

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Windows XP &
tools.

-Knowledge of and experience with Windows 2003 servers
administration.

-Knowledge of and experience with Active Directory.

-Knowledge of and experience with PDA’s & Mobility.
-Knowledge of and experience with AS/400 operation and system
administration.

-Knowledge of and experience with telecommunications and network.

-Basic knowledge of Unix Administration.

-At least five (5) years experience in System Administration and User
Support, at least two (2) years of which should be in a Bank/Trust
environment.

-Written and spoken French would be an asset.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND to:-
The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay Street & Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

APPLICATION DEADLINE: FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009
Offices in

Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London, Luxembourg,
Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome, Singapore, Tokyo, Turin, Zurich

NOTICE

The Bahamas Public Services Union
Contributory Medical Plan will conduct a
Membership Meeting for The Medical Plan
Members Only, at 7:00p.m. on Friday, March
6, 2009 at the Bahamas Public Services Union
Meeting Hall, East Street South, off Soldier
Road.

All Members are urged to attend

Refreshments will be served following the
meeting.

Stephen J. Miller
General Secretary


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





PM changes ‘rules of
the game’ on new port

FROM page 1B shipping needs.

“Tt won’t be an issue. We’ll

‘91 DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

DR. MEYER RASSIN
FOUNDATION
SCHOLARSHIPS



The Doctors Hospital Dr. Meyer
Rassin Foundation is pleased to
announce that applications are now
being accepted for scholarships &
financial assistance for students
pursuing healthcare careers.



4 Applicants must be Bahamian
. at citizens & return to the Bahamas
aaa upon completion of their studies.

Applications are available on our
website at www.doctorshosp.com.
Only completed applications with
required documentation submitted
would be considered.

Deadline for submission — of
completed application forms & all
supporting documentation is

March 31, 2009.

The Doctors Hospital
Dr. Meyer Rassin Foundation
P.O.Box N3018 ¢ Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

www.doctorshosp.com/foundation

1B
HOSPITAL

DR. MEYER RASSIN
paeLU pe eNleay



have it resolved by Monday
[today] or Tuesday. It won’t be
a deal breaker.”

The Arawak Cay port will
house the container and freight
terminals currently situated on
Bay Street, which will be re-
located to the new site as part of
the overall downtown Nassau
improvement project.

Mr Mosko acknowledged to
Tribune Business that the Prime
Minister had “changed a few lit-
tle things” when he and other
representatives of the Arawak
Cay Port Development Com-
pany met Mr Ingraham last
week, but “in no way” was it a
“game changer”.

“Tt’s still full steam ahead,”
said an upbeat Mr Mosko. “This
delays us by a week or two.
We've got to go back to the 19
investors and say: “These are
the rules of the game. If you still
want in, fine, if not, goodbye.’
But I’m confident everyone is
going to stay in.”

While Mr Mosko was
emphatically upbeat, down-
playing any notion of a potential
problem, several observers sug-
gested that the fact he had to
go back to all shareholders to
deliver the news, and see
whether they wanted to remain
as financial stakeholders in the
project, indicated something sig-
nificant had changed.

Sources familiar with the sit-
uation said the Arawak Cay
Port Development Company
had presented a detailed Mem-
orandum of Understanding
(MoU), detailing the whole pro-

ject proposal and its structure,
to the Government.

“They have presented a
detailed Memorandum of
Understanding to the Govern-
ment, which has been agreed in
principle, and are waiting for
final approval,” one source, who
did not know of last week’s
meeting, told Tribune Business.

Independent

“Halcrow [the independent
engineering consultants] have
done most of their work, and
are waiting for final approval to
put everything in final form for
bidding.”

The MoU was said to set out
the whole concept and overall
plan for the Arawak Cay port,
in addition to the proposal’s
structure and how it would be
financed.

Mr Mosko indicated that Mr
Ingraham had sought to alter
part of the MoU’s terms. “The
Prime Minister was clear on
what he wanted, and it’s what
we expected,” he told Tribune
Business. “They’ve given us the
feedback we needed.”

Mr Mosko added that con-
sultants for the Arawak Cay
Port Development Company
would be surveying the pro-
posed port site over the week-
end gone, with a view to deter-
mining its boundaries so that a
lease for the land and seabed
could be signed with the Gov-
ernment.

“We are doing the survey this
weekend and will give it to the

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT T

HANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CHOVOSKY
ALEXANDER BOWE Il of Atwar Court, Foxdale Subdivision,
PO. Box FH-14234, Nassau, The Bahamas, intend to change
my name to CHOVOSKY ALEXANDER JACKSON. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

CIA MIS ‘CF RICEEIS

Security & General Insurance Company (S&G), a subsidiary of Colonial Group International Limited (CGI), is
seeking to appoint an individual to the position of Claims Officer.

CGI, with offices in Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands as well as The Bahamas, offers a
complete range of premier financial and insurance services and continues to demonstrate significant growth
in these areas of business. This is an opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing and innovative company

focused on providing our clients with first class service linked to competitive products.

Reporting to the Claims Manager, the Claims Officer will be responsible for the processing of claims
enquiries using the Company’s procedural guidelines and coordinating with the Claims Supervisor on the
daily operational tasks within the Claims Department. The successful candidate should possess:

A CERT Cll or equivalent qualification

A minimum of three years experience handling and negotiating settlements of Personal Lines claims
Strong administration skills and claims negotiation experience

Competency in the use and application of standard Microsoft software applications
Good communication, presentation, and writing skills

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked to performance. S&G offers an
attractive benefits package that includes comprehensive medical & life insurance, a contributory pension plan

and long term disability coverage.

If you have a keen commitment to quality, are results oriented with a desire to contribute your talents to a
dynamic company, contact us about this opportunity. Applications will be treated in the strictest confidence

and should be made in writing to:
Security & General Insurance Co. Ltd.
Attn: Human Resources

P.O. Box N-3540, Nassau, Bahamas

Or by email to: bs_hr@atlantichouse.com.bs

PM, with a view to getting the
lease,” Mr Mosko added.

It is unclear what specific
terms Mr Ingraham wanted to
alter, although one source told
this newspaper it related to the
Arawak Cay port’s financing
and how this would be struc-
tured. The source also suggested
the Prime Minister had wanted
foreign capital to play a role in
the financing.

But this is no surprise, given
that the Arawak Cay Port
Development Company had
said from the outset that it
would be 60 per cent Bahamian-
owned at a minimum, thus leav-
ing the door open for foreign
investors and companies. The
Port-owning company was also
being structured to ensure no
one entity owned more than 15
per cent.

Mr Mosko confirmed this had
always been the intention, given
that Mediterranean Shipping
Company (MSC), Crowley and
Tropical Shipping — all with for-
eign ownership — were among
the Arawak Cay port’s pro-
posed 19 shareholders.

There was also speculation
that the proposed port was run-
ning into increasing opposition
from the Arawak Cay fish fry
vendors’ association, plus the
Bahamian cultural community,
who view industrial usage as
incompatible with developing
Arawak Cay into a centerpiece
venue for national culture/her-
itage.

Among those who have
objected to Arawak Cay’s selec-
tion as the site for the new port

is William Wong, the Bahamas
Real Estate Association’s
(BREA) president. Last year,
he told Rotarians that the loca-
tion “defies every sense of log-
ic”, running against sound plan-
ning principles by taking up the
last bit of prime real estate on
New Providence and present-
ing an unattractive first view of
Nassau to visiting cruise ship
passengers.

Still, the Arawak Cay port’s
proponents have argued that the
facility will serve Nassau and
New Providence’s shipping
needs for 50 years, with all
freight and cargo offloaded tak-
en to an inland terminal on
Gladstone Road. From there, it
would be distributed to its
respective owners.

Container

Currently, the container ship-
ping facilities in downtown Nas-
sau handle some 70,000 twen-
ty-foot equipment units (TEUs)
every year, a figure expected to
increase to 150,000 TEUs some
30 years from now.

Some have projected that if
a 50 per cent savings could be
made on current handling
charges for the 70,000 TEUs
imported into Nassau per
annum, some $7 million in sav-
ings could be passed on to
Bahamian consumers.

The Arawak Cay Port Devel-
opment Company is being
advised on its business plan by
KPMG Corporate Finance, with
Higgs & Johnson acting as its
attorneys.

TTT
TEACHING VACANCY

Temple Christian High School
ShirleyStreet

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following positions for the

2009-2010 School Year

-Journalism/Literature (Gr, 10-12}
-Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr, 7-12)

-Math (Gr. 7-17)

-Physics (Gr. 10-12)

-Agriculture (Gr.7-9)

-Technical Drawing (Gr, 7-12)
-Accounts/‘Commerce/Economiecs (Gr, 10-12)
-Physical Education (Gr, 7-12)

-Spanish (Gr.7-12)

-Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)

-Chemistry

-Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
-Health Science (Gr, 7-9)
-General Science (Gr.7 -9)
-Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)

-Music (Gr. 7-12)

-Biology (Gr. 10-12)

Language Arts/Literature (Gr, 7-12)
-ArtCraft (Gr, 7-12)
-Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)
-Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
-Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)

-Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

Applicants must:
A c

a practicing bom-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Christian School.

B Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or Univerity
in the area of specialization.

Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or

Diploma,

Have at least two years teaching
experience in the relevant subject area
with excellent communications skills.
Applicants must have the ability to prepare

students for all examinations to the

BGCSE levels.

IC}

Be willing to participate in the high
school’s extra curricular programmes

Application must be picked up at the High
School Office on Shirley Street and be returned
with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph and three references to:

The closing date for applications is February 27th, 2009.

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas

SECURITY
& GENERAL

SECURITY & GENERAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Personal & Business Insurance
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue PO. Box N-3540, Nassau, Bahamas
tel. 326 7100 www.cgigroup.bm

Colonial Group International is
rated A- (Excellent) by AM Best

A member of Colonial Group International
Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life

be COLONIAL GROUP
lai INTERNATIONAL

Deadline for application is
March 6th, 2009


THE TRIBUNE



CAROLINE GARNHAM



foundations
law to be
unveiled

LEGISLATION designed to
give the Bahamas a significant
advantage over competing juris-
dictions in the private wealth
management niche is set to be
unveiled this week.

Caroline Garnham, a partner
in Lawrence Graham (LG), the
winner of the STEP Private
Client Team award in 2008, will
share draft legislation that she
and her colleagues have pro-
posed on Executive Founda-
tions during a workshop on
International Tax Planning,
which will take place this
Thursday following the two-day
Private Banking World 2009
Conference.

She will be joined for the
day-long workshop by top US
private client lawyer Basil Ziri-
nis, from Sullivan and
Cromwell in New York.

In the morning, Ms Garnham

and Mr Zinnis will talk about
the current market for private
client issues, US tax changes
and the recent move taken by
the Canton of Zurich in
Switzerland to repeal the forfait
system of taxation for foreign-
ers. This will dramatically
increase the taxation payable
for all Swiss foreign residents
of Zurich, such as Tina Turner.

Ms. Garnham is founder of
www.familybhive.com, winner
of Wealth Management Inno-
vation of the Year Award
2008. She writes a regular col-
umn for WMS Spears, for
which she has been nominated
columnist of the year 2009.

The Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board and the Associa-
tion of International Banks and
Trust Companies (AIBT) are
title sponsors of the Confer-
ence.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF MOHAMMED
BIN RASHID BIN ABDULLAH AL
FANNAH AL ARAIMI late of House
2651 Way No. 1949 Plot No. 80
Eastern Madinat, Qaboos, Sultanate
of Oman, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned
on or before the 25th day of March, 2009,
after which date the Administrators will

proceed to distribute the assets having regard
only to the claims of which they shall then
have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 9B

PuBnLtLic NOTICE
PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD LICENSE ARCHITECTS

Lr |S

Rodney W. Braynen, F.IB.A.
B. Arch.

John W. Darville, R.LB.A.
Dip. Arch., LB.A

Amos J. Ferguson, F.I.B.A.,
APA. B. Arch., M. Arch.

Anthony J. Jervis, FIL.B.A.
B.E.D., B. Arch., M. Arch.

Alvan K. Rolle, L.B.A.
B. Arch, Tech.

Douglas R.A. Smith R.IB.A.
FLB.A., Dip. Arch. BSc. MSc.

Gordon C. Major
B. Arch. Tech.

Arthur Colebrook, I.B.A.

Jonathan A. Adderley
LB.A., B.E.D., Dip. Arch.
M.A., P.U.G.

Michael C. Alexiou, B.A.
B. Arch,

Reginald W. Armbrister
B.Arch.

Neil Behagg, LB.A.
R.LB.A. Dip. Arch.

Gaetano A. Bonamy
B. Arch.

Trevor Bridgewater
B. Arch., M. Arch.

Victor R. Cartwright
B. Arch,

Ashward G. Ferguson
B. Arch., M. Arch.

Winston G. Jones
R.LB.A., Dip. Arch.
Dip. Urban Design
Kenneth V. Lam
R.LB.A., M.B.A.

Tram D. Lewis
B. Arch.

John L. McKenzie
B. Arch.
Clinton W. Pearce

B. Arch.

Andrew O. Stirling,
R.LB.A., B. Arch.

W. Kevin Sweeting, I.B.A.
B, Arts Arch, B, Arch.

Benjamin M. Albury
B. Arch.

Frederick D. Albury
B. Arch.

Andre W. Braynen, 1.B.A.
B. Arts Arch, Sc., B. Arch.

Sean A. Farrington
B. Sc. Arch. B. Arch.

Michael Foster
B. Sc., B. Arch.

Henry A. Hepburn, R.LB.A
LB.A.ALA.B. Arch.,
M. Arch., M.R.C.P.

Sean R. Mathews
Dip. Arch.

Charles J. Moss
B. Sc. Arch.

Alicia C-A. Oxley
B. Arch. M. Arch.

David 8. White
R.IB.A., R.ALC.

Douglas A. Minns, I.B.A.

R. John Paine, RA.LA., A.A.LA,
. Arch,

B. Are!

Jackson L, Burnside III, I.B.A.
R.LB.A., M. Arch,

Larry Forbes
B. Arch.

Jason P, Lorandos, B.A.
B. Arch., M. Arch.

David K. Griffiths
Dip. Arch.

Donald A. Dean

Bruce LaFleur
APA, ALA,
B. Sc. Envin. Des., M. Arch.

Michael J. Moss, I.B.A.
Garth W. Sawyer

Neville Bosfield
B. Arch.

Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Established by Act of Parliament 1994
P. O. Box CB-13040, 143 Nassau Street — Nassau, Bahamas

The Professional Architects Act 1994, empowers the “Professional Architects Board” to issue licenses to persons qualified to practice as Professional Architects
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The Act stipulates, “no person shall hold himself out as a Professional Architect or engage in public practice unless
he is the holder of a valid licence.” Any person who contravenes this provision is guilty of an offense and is liable on summary conviction to a fine, imprisonment
or both. Public Notice is hereby given that only the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board” to practice as “Professional
Architects” in the Bahamas until January 31, 2010.

pe at)

Phone No (242) 393-1874

P. O. Box N-1423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-2600
P.O. Box N-4556
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-0079
P.O. Box SS 6261
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-2628
P. O. Box N 7273
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-8141
P.O. Box N 7401
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-2600
P. O. Box N 4556
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242)
P. O. Box 3326
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-4061
P.O. Box N 3745
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-8893
P. O. Box N 9585
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-7383
P.O, Box N 672
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 395-1148
P. O. Box EE 16704
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-8109
P. O. Box CB 11187
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 367-2496
P. O. Box AB-20676
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Phone (242) 394-0014
P. O. Box N 8244
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1896
P.O. Box N 4383
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-7334
P.O. Box N 8156
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-1520
P. O. Box SS 5377
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2114
P. O. Box SS 5730
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 361-4972
P. O. Box CR 56998
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-8415
P.O. B ox N 3356
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 424-1463
P. O. Box EE 17989
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-7982
P. O. Box SS 5399
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-8150
P, O. Box N 3211
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-3552
P.O. Box N 1731
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-5916
P. O. Box N-1677
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-1874
P.O. Box N1423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 465-3738
P. O. Box N 7627
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-3385
P.O. Box N 1190
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-9389
P.O. Box 7248
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-4538
P. O. Box SS 19909
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 352-5204
P. O. Box F 41247
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 394-3251
P. O. Box CB11836
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1547
P.O. Box N 1013
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-4736
P. O. Box N 7936
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-2945
P. O. Box CB 11499
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-1886
P. O. Box N 1207
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-2021
P. O. Box SS 6351
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-4372
P. O. Box SS-6077
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 559-7200
P.O. Box F 40257
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 352-4835
P. O. Box F 41609
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 328-7240
P. O. Box FH 14435
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-5913
P.O. Box N 7091
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 464-1798
P. O. Box Ex 29276
Exuma, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-1900
P.O. Box SS 6351
Nassau, Bahamas

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Wr |S

Leo D. Ferguson

Patrick A. Rahming
B. Sc., B. Arch.

Timothy H. Neill, R.LB.A.
LB.A., Dip. Arch.

John W. McCardy
B. Arch.

Alberto G. Suighi, LB.A.
Phd. Arch.

Hyacinth Allen
B. Arch.

Tyrone Burrows
B. Arch.

Dwight M. Thompson
LB.A., B, Arch.

Jennifer A. Saunders
B. Arch.

Livingston Forbes
B. Arch.

Hiram H. Lockhart
Pier Baldacci
Lawrence Chisholm

Bruce M. Stewart
LB.A., A.LA., B. Arch.

Michael A. Diggiss
LB.A., B. Arch.

Thomas M. Dean
B. Arch., M. Arch,

Robert M. Isaacs
Dip. Arch.

Dirk K. Saunders

B. Arch.

Godwin Cargill
Robert Whittingham
Stephen J. Bain

B. Arch.

Jeremiah Moxey

B. Arch.

C, Bermardo Deleveaux

Lawrence C. Smith

Mark W. Henderson, I.B.A.

RIB.A., B. Sc., B. Arch.

Kevin R. Bryce
B. Sc. Arch, Arch. Eng.

Mark A. Smith
B. Arch., MLA

Copeland Moxey
B. Arch.

Carlos J. Hepburn
B. Arch., B.A.

Tan A. Bullard
B. Arch.

Timothy F, Johnson
B. Arch.

Tariq J. O’Brien, R.LB.A.
B. A. Dip., Arch. Dip.
Uban Design

Mark M. Braithwaite
B. Arts, B. Arch.

Stefan P. Russell
B. Arch., B.A.

Terry-Jeanne P. Thompson
IB.A., B.E.D.S.

Kesna M. Hunt
B. Arch.

Jan Brent Creary
B. Arch.

Samuel R. Williams
B. Arch.

Carlan A. Johnson
B. Arts, Arch Sc.
B. Arch.

Dezon A. Curry
B. Arch., M. Arch.

Jechelle T. Rolle
Bs. Arch. Studies

Wilfred B. Dorsett, B.A.
B. Sc. Tech.

Vanru 5S. Hepburn
B. Sc., B Arch.

February 2009

Pd) tt)

Phone (242) 324-5566
P. O. Box SS 6261
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-9080
P. O. Box N 9926
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 367-5415
P.O. Box AB 20006
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Phone (242) 332-2987
P. O. Box EL-25078
Governor’s Harbour
Eleuthera

Phone (242) 327-2335
P. O. Box CB 13177
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-4991
P. O. Box N-966
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 382-0611
P. O. Box N 9876
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-3220
P. O., Box CB 13826
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-1411
P.O. Box CB 12364
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-9738
P. O. Box N 4230
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-7789
P.O. Box CB 13452
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-4764
P.O. Box N 4674
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-6261
P. O. Box N 9025
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-8800
P.O. Box N 366
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-8916
P.O. Box CB 11388
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1170
P. O. Box N540
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1680
P.O. Box 1207
Nassau, Bahamas

Pone (242) 557-2308
P. O. Box CR-54122
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-0218
P. O. Box EE-16270
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-6591
P. O. Box CB-13846
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-6029
P. O. Box N-10083
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-4846
P. O. Box CR-54501
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-5103
P. O. Box GT-2277
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 427-1565
P.O. Box N1412
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-3274
P.O. Box CB 12436
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-4538
P.O. Box SS-19909
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-0486
P. O. Box SS 6888
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 457-2107
P. O. Box CB-12689
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-5166
P. O. Box CR-54090
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 362-2719
P. O. Box CR-54746
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 364-7813
P. O. Box SS-6906
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2114
P.O. Box 9116
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-7259
P. O. Box CB-11454
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-4982
P.O. Box CR-54423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 362-6306
P.O. Box N 402
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 352-4835
P. O. Box F-43578
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 394-1886
P. O. Box N-3857
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242)
P. O. Box CR-54385
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-9080
P. O. Box N 9926
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 424-1541
P.O. Box 29151
Exuma, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-2767
P. O. Box SB-50045
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-5529
P.O. Box N 842
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2829
P. O. Box GT-2368
Nassau, Bahamas

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PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD

LICENSED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNICIANS PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS ACT, 1994

Public Notice is hereby given that the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board”
to practice as “Professional Architectural Technicians” until 31 January 2010.

Pld) tat)

LICENCE #

persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators
Chambers
P.O. Box N-3247
Ocean Centre
Montagu Foreshore
East Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas



Henry A. Delancy

Michael A. Jones

Laurin L. Knowles

Ryan A. Archer

B. Se. Arch. Tech.

C. Jenkin Williams

Lockhart W. Turnquest

Phone (242) 326-8141
P. O. Box 6583
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 334-0458
Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera

Phone (242) 327-7486
P.O. Box N 3049
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 337-0025
Mangrove Bush
Long Island, Bahamas

Phone (242) 367-2001
P.O. Box 579
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Phone (242) 352-2500
P. O. Box F 44107
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 337-1086
P. O. Box DC 30607
Grey’s, Long Island

|S

Solomon J. Smith
Coralyn T. Adderley
B. Arch

Jermaine Evans
Trevor Butterfield

Brent Key

Pld) tat

Phone (242) 361-6517
P. O. Box N 10888
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-1247
P. O. Box GT-2315
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 646-3801
P. O. Box F 60283
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 352-7154
P. O. Box F 44042
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 367-4143
P. O. Box AB-20702
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

LICENCE #




PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

BEC targets ‘within $1-2m

THE TRIBUNE

of break even’ goal for ‘09

FROM page 1B

fuel imports, at the end of the
first year in September, we hope
to be close to a break even
point, through in-house effi-
ciencies and other measures we
have taken.”

Confirming that BEC has
“been in a loss position since
2004” year-end on September
30 of that year, Mr Gottlieb said
the loss “wasn’t very much”
then, “but has risen very quick-
Ly?

“Our losses for the last finan-
cial year were around $18 mil-
lion,” he confirmed. Such a

rapidly worsening financial posi-
tion has impacted BEC’s cash
flow, liquidity and balance sheet
to such an extent that it is no
longer in the once-enviable
position, as far as government-
owned corporations go, of being
able to obtain credit for long-
term infrastructure develop-
ment without government guar-
antees.

Mr Gottlieb said he “would
not negate” recent comments
from Dr Earl Deveaux, minister
of the environment, who has
ministerial responsibility for
BEC, that the Corporation
required $200 million in short-

term financing.

The BEC chairman said of
the Corporation’s infrastructure
needs: “They are quite consid-
erable, and so it is challenging at
this point in time. We are look-
ing for financing, and the Gov-
ernment is assisting us in that
regard.”

When asked whether this
meant that government would
have to guarantee — effectively
underwrite any syndicated loan
or bond issue, Mr Gottlieb
replied: “That’s what we’re try-
ing to work through right now.”

BEC’s financial position had
“improved to some degree,

Apphicatons are invited from suitably qualified persons for the position of Senior Manager
- Investments with the National Insurance Board:

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES
Manage portfolio of the National Insurance Board’s Investments, ensuring that
lnvestment decisions that are made conform to Comphance, Strategic, Risk and Yveld

objectives of the Board.

Mamntain Statutory imuts of all investments holdings with respective financial institutions,

prepantiy man apemvent reports to show compliance.

Represent the National Insurance Board as requested and required im stakeholder
meetings, investment discussions, and/or Public Relations events relative to invest-

ment portfolio,

Design and prepare as needed/requested, management reports of all investments,
indusive of Investment Holdings, Risk Statos, Outstanding issues, and/or other key

metrics.

Develop and/or maintain relationships with the National Insurance Board approved
Brokers, with specific focus on compliance, increasing investment opportunities and/

Or maximizing returns.

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE, SAILL & EAPERIENCE

At least a Bachelors Degree in a Business related discipline, preferably Finance or

A ccounting.

Professional designation i ml Finance (c “FA ur its equiv: alent) and jt ur have ao menpbeted a
professional designation in Accounting (CPA or its equivalent). (Consideration will be
given to applicants nearmg CFA qualificabon)

Poor expenence in managing a diversified mvestment portfolio.

APPLICATION

Interested persons may apply by submitting a completed application form, along with the
necessary proaf af qu: alification on or before Friday, February 27, 2009, to:

Assistant Director

Human Resources Department

National Insurance Board
Clifford Darling Complex
Nassau, Bahamas



thanks to the Government
exemption from having to pay
customs duty” on its oil imports.
As global oil prices soared to a
$147 per barrel peak last July,
the Government in its 2008-
2009 Budget introduced a two-
year window exempting BEC
from paying 10 per cent cus-
toms duty, and 7 per cent stamp
tax, on its fuel imports.

Mr Gottlieb said these tax
exemptions had saved BEC “in
excess of $10 million” last year,
adding: “That was a big strain
on us, particularly when you
had the oil price surge last
year.”

The subsequent dramatic
decline in global oil prices had
helped BEC’s financial position
“a tremendous amount”, Mr
Gottlieb added, telling Tribune
Business: “The situation has
improved through the customs
duty exemption, and oil prices
have fallen dramatically, which
is helping us a lot as well.”

BEC is understood to have
spent $350 million on fuel
imports alone in 2008, but this
was not the only reason cited
for the decline in the Corpora-
tion’s financial position.

“The former government
administration directed BEC to
reduce the tariffs,” Mr Gottlieb
said. “It had the effect of suck-
ing $18 million of revenue away
per year, and that’s unfortunate.
Because up until then, BEC was
in position to have the neces-
sary economic ratings to get
financing for its capital projects.
That was significantly under-
mined.”

This had forced the Ingraham
administration to ride to BEC’s
rescue and give it a two-year
amnesty on customs and stamp
duty payments.

“In that two-year period,
we’re trying to do everything
we can to make BEC as effi-
cient as possible, so that when
we come to the end of that two-
year period, we will see the Cor-
poration move forward on a
sound financial footing.”

Mr Gottlieb confirmed to Tri-
bune Business that Kevin Bas-
den, BEC’s general manager,
will not be affected by the man-
agement restructuring and
remains at his post. However,
he declined to confirm or deny
that among those set to leave
BEC are chief financial officer
Everette Sweeting; assistant
general manager with respon-
sibility for finance, Brian
Albury; and in-house legal
counsel, Shelley Cooke-Sey-
mour.

“This restructuring is really
something initiated by the pre-
sent Board, and is focused on
the functions of executive man-
agement, in terms of the struc-
ture and various offices held,
and the people holding those
offices,” Mr Gottlieb told Tri-
bune Business.

“BEC’s financial standing has
deteriorated significantly over
the last five years or so, and the
Board is working to make the
company as efficient as possi-
ble. One of the areas we’ve
focused on is the executive lev-
el, and to flatten it out and not

make it so top-heavy.”

Implying that there were
would be personnel moves,
including promotions, taking
place within BEC, Mr Gottlieb
declined to confirm the posts
or persons affected. “It would
be premature and irresponsible
for us to confirm any of that, or
make any comment on that,”
Mr Gottlieb said.

“We are in the process of
doing certain things, and until
that is finished, it would be
wrong to confirm if any of those
individuals are leaving the Cor-
poration or not. That will be
made public in due course —
who is staying or not.” It is
thought that the Board wants
to reduce BEC’s executive man-
agement to 11-12, rather than
the present 15.

Mr Gottlieb said the restruc-
turing had been intended to
send a message to Bahamian
taxpayers and BEC customers
that the Corporation was doing
everything possible to lower
costs and generate a better
return, rather than put the focus
on personalities and suggest
BEC was “getting rid of peo-
ple”.

Mr Gottlieb agreed with Tri-
bune Business, though, that the
natural reaction in these situa-
tions was to focus on those who
were leaving. He added: “It’s
not about individuals, but the

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT



measures being taken to
restructure the company and
achieve greater efficiency inter-
nally.

“There’s only so far we can
go with that; to a large extent,
we’re at the mercy of external
forces, but the Bahamian tax-
payer will know everything that
can be done is being done to
make BEC more efficient.”

Mr Gottlieb said the five-year
industrial agreement reached
with the Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union (BEWU) had
been critical, explaining: “That
allows us to focus on other
areas, and we feel optimistic we
will see significant improve-
ments. Some are happening as
we speak.

“We’re making progress, and
seeing improvements all the
time.”

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



2007
CrE/euU1/330

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of EVERETTE
STANFORD MILLER and HELEN DIANNE MILLER

AND

IN THE MATTER of the QUIETING
OF TITLES ACT OF 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE two (2)
pieces, parcels or tracts of land totaling 133.64
acres situate Eastwardly of the Settlement of
Deep Creek in the Island of Eleuthera, Bahamas
being immediately West of “The Delancy Estate”
on the Northern side of Queen’s Highway, called
and known as “The Wallace Estate” and more
particularly described as follows:

1. ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of
land totaling 129.98 acres bounded on
the South by land owned by various
owners from Deep Creek Settlement
on the West partly by land owned
by various owners from Deep Creek
Settlement and partly by a twelve (12)
foot wide Road Reservation called
“Free Town Road” on the North by
land owned by various owners from
Deep Creek Settlement and on the East
by a tract of land called and known as

“Delancy Estates”

sand

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract
of land totaling 3.66 acres bounded
Southwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
Westwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
Northwardly by “Sweeting Estates”
and Eastwardly by a twelve (12) foot
wide Road Reservation called and
known as “Free Town Road”.

NOTICE

EVERETTE STanrorD MILLER and HELEN Dianne MILLER claim to
be the owners in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and have made application to the Supreme Court in
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting
Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provision of
the said Act.

EG CAPITAL MARKETS
ROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,682.04 | CHG 3.75 | %CHG 0.22 | YTD -30.32 | YTD % -1.77
FINDEX: CLOSE 821.34 | YTD -1.62% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00
Bis LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade ona Ease Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
0.00 T%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
6.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
11.23 12.04 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387
2.9230
1.4376
3.3856
12.6180
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0401
1.0330
1.0410
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

rae A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal office hours
iv e .
1.39 in the following places:
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.88
2.27
6.02
11.00
10.45
6.01
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.15
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50

1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.04
2.40
7.76
11.28
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50

0.070
0.992
0.319
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.255
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said
City of Nassau;
The Administrators Office at Rock Sound,
Eleuthera;

oo99990000000000000
20000N9032000000000

The Chambers of Bethel, Moss &
Co., Cumberland House, Cumberland
& Duke Streets, New Providence,
Bahamas, Attorneys for the Petitioners

eoooomoo2000COoooO

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest
FBB17
FBB22

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
i: ity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
ity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

100.00

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
a right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the 21st day of April, 2009 from the
publication of the Notice inclusive of the day of such publication file
Notice in the Supreme Court in the city of Nassau 1n the Island of New
providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned
a statement of his/her claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. The failure of any such person to file
and serve a statement of his/her claim within the time fixed by the
Notice aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

52wk-Low Symbol EPS $ Div $ P/E

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Div $
1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3856
11.8789

100.0000

96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-O7
31-Dec-08
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bend Fund

Dated this 13th day of February, A. D., 2009

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund 4.10

BETHEL, MOSS & CO.
Chambers Cumberland House
Cumberland & Duke Streets
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioners

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 11B





Attorney authors green
practice guide for lawyers

A BAHAMIAN attorney has
co-authored an international
law firm network’s guide on the
best ‘green’ practices for
lawyers, with the focus on
reducing paper use to lower
energy consumption and the
carbon footprint.

Merrit Storr, a partner at
Chancellors Chambers, helped
to write The Green Guide for
Lawyers, produced by the inter-
national Meritas network of law
firms, in a bid to reduce the vol-
ume of paper used by attorneys
every year.

Mr Storr said the idea for the
guide came from the fact its
producers “did not think that
law firms in the Meritas net-
work were aggressively seeking



CRE C eee Ld

The Tribune

Real Estate |

TL tt

either to go green themselves,
or were appreciating the oppor-
tunities that exist with clients
whose businesses were trying
to go green.

“Firms need to start thinking
about reducing paper use
through recycling or other
means, and also reducing ener-
gy consumption, investing in
sustainability education for their
employees, and investing in or
contributing to organisations
that are spreading the message
of sustainability.”

Mr Storr encouraged
Bahamian law firms to conduct
an environmental audit of their
offices, and explore ways of cur-
tailing paper use and improv-
ing office energy efficiency.

te
a
.
.
5
.

ACCOUNTS ASSISTANT

He said: “While ‘going green’
is, to a large extent, about
reducing carbon dioxide fuel
emissions into the atmosphere,
and thus reversing or mitigat-
ing global warming trends, the
Bahamian marketplace has yet
to commit, or give a high pri-
ority, to incorporating green
practices in day-to-day business
activities.

Businesses

“This is probably because
they are not convinced it is good
for the bottom line of their busi-
nesses. Alternatively, in North
America, introducing environ-
mentally friendly green prac-
tices is very topical with Meritas

Apartment Communities t Rentals

lft,

Pe alleal

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is responsible for administering
The Bahamas Ship Register, which is the third largest in the world.
The Authority prides itself on the high standards and good safety

record of its fleet.

Applications are invited for the position of Accounts Assistant, to
be based in London. The successful candidate will be responsible
to the Senior Accountant.

Duties would include:

¢ Assist in the preparation of management and financial reports

law firms. Furthermore, clients
of those firms are adjusting their
business models to accommo-
date green practices.”

Among the process changes
advocated by The Green Guide
is the digitisation of paper files.
Bentata Abogados, a Venezue-
lan member firm, has adopted
the recommended processes,
and Karel Bentata, its manag-
ing partner, said: “The impact of
this project was 100 per cent
positive. We are not aware of
any negative impact.”

Major organisational changes
are not without some chal-
lenges, the two major ones
being process and people. Mr
Bentata added: “Perhaps the
difficult part is designing the

workflow to be followed. This
means that each file has to be
checked and then scanned in
order to finally eliminate the
excess paper.

Factor

“Also, there is an important
human factor which is reluctant
to change. However, by identi-
fying a technology-friendly
manager or director to begin
your project, you maximise the
possibilities of a success story,
which fortunately was our
case.”

To achieve total digitisation,
Bentata Abogados had to spend
$50,000 on consulting, licensing,
and installing a powerful new

computer server. Yet reducing
the need for paper storage
allowed it to sell premium office
space, which offset the cost—a
win-win situation.

One of the biggest gains has
been the ability to reduce the
wait time in responding to
clients’ requests for files or in
forwarding material to other
attorneys.

Other recommended conser-
vation practices in the Guide
include lowering energy con-
sumption by reducing the num-
ber of light bulbs, and eliminat-
ing bottled water and personal
printers. Bentata Abogados also
plans to introduce a flexible
working-from-home scheme for
employees.

MUST SELL

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY
— Englerston Subdivision

Andros Ave.

Interested persons should submit offers in writing to:

The Manager
Credit Risk Management
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than March 13, 2009

Nassau Airport

Development Company

The Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) is seeking candidates

for the position of Construction Project
Manager/Coordinator. Reporting directly to
the Construction Manager, the duties and
responsibilities of the successful applicant

will include:

Reviewing design drawings and



2 bedrooms,
I bath

© Comprises:
Property 3,600 sq. ft/
Building 733 sq. ft.

For conditions of
sale and other
information,
please contact:

Phone:
356-1685,
502-1929

or 356-1608

CAREER

OPPORTUNITY

Construction Project Manager/
Coordinator

Potential candidates will possess an
Engineering Degree, EIT or other technical
qualifications required and 5-10 years of
construction related experience on one or
more large scale projects with emphasis
on heavy civil, utilities, earthworks and

paving. Applicants must have the ability to
read and interpret construction drawings.

They should have excellent computer skills

¢ Data Input into the accounting package
¢ Performance of bank reconciliations
e Accounts Payables and Receivables

technical specifications

Providing feedback to the design

team as it relates to scope, schedule,
constructability, phasing and budget
Working with the Project Team on tasks
related to tendering, procurement and
evaluation of contractors and vendors
Coordination of quality assurance and
quality contro! testing and Ministry of
Works inspections

Liaising with local utility companies and
stakeholders to facilitate the sequencing
and phasing of the project and to
maintain the overall schedule
Communicating and interfacing with a
multi-disciplined design and construction
team including architectural, structural,
mechanical, electrical, civil and
environmental

Assisting with contract administration,
reporting, site inspection and
commissioning of project contracts

including MS Office, AutoCAD, scheduling
software or other related software.

Excellent analytical and problem solving
skills, oral and written communications
skills required. Candidates should

also have superior interpersonal and
organizational skills.

Prior experience working in an airport
environment a plus but not required.

Applicants for the post should hold an Accounting, Economics,
Finance or Business Degree. They must be self-motivated with the
ability to work without direct supervision in a hectic work
environment.

Remuneration will be commensurate with qualifications and
experience.

Applicants are invited to write in confidence, enclosing a copy of
their CV with photo attached and details of current salary to:-

If you are qualified and interested,
please submit your resume by

March 6, 2009 to:

Deputy Director Finance & Admin
The Bahamas Maritime Authority
Manx Corporate Centre

West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-4679
Nassau, The Bahamas

Fax: 242-356-5889

Deputy Director Finance & Admin
The Bahamas Maritime Authority
120 Old Broad Street

London EC2N 1AR

United Kingdom

Fax: 011 44 207 614 0670

Manager, People
Nassau Airport Development Co.
P.O. Box AP59229
Nassau, Bahamas

Only those applicants short listed will be
contacted.

Direct Email: finance@bahamasmaritime.com

Closing date for receipt of applications is 6th March, 2009








MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009
The stories behind the news

DEGREES: TIME FOR A RETHINK

Recession could force a review of the university system



ONE of the many by-products m By JOHN MARQUIS
Q M ing Edit
of the recession could be a Ss
9 9 OVER the last 30 , high-
thorough reappraisal of higher Pcie cee Ee

en” among middle-class fami-

education and whether it really fee aR ee nee

but also North America, Europe

serves a purpose in producing and Australasia.

A college degree is now seen

the ered aus kind of [eaey ee for the A. as not merely “proof” of an ele-
, d intelli d i
workplace. INSIGHT repotts... ~~ sa node ance

of social validation.

To have non-graduate chil-
dren in the family has become a
virtual no-no among the think-
ing classes, an admission of
defeat in an increasingly status-
conscious world.

Fortunes have been poured -
often at considerable sacrifice -
into the acquisition of gilded
certificates marking a young
person’s elevation into the intel-
lectual elite. So far it’s been
regarded as money well-spent.
But for how much longer as
economies shrink and unem-
ployment rises?

American writer Tom Wolfe,
whose 1987 novel The Bonfire
of the Vanities catalogued an age
of rampant materialism and
soaring social aspirations, has
said more than once that US
society is basically divided into
two major social groups - those
who have four-year degrees and
those who don’t.

The “haves”, he said, can
expect to secure good white-col-
lar jobs, earn respectable
salaries, and live comfortable
middle-class lifestyles, while the
“have nots” are left to struggle
in the lower reaches of a sup-
posedly egalitarian society.

Universities have cashed in
on this widely accepted belief
over the last quarter century,
promoting the notion that only
graduates have the intellectual
wherewithal to pursue demand-
ing careers, and driving a mon-
ey-based agenda which is now,
in these straitened times, bound
to come in for much closer
scrutiny.

In fact, higher education has
been one of the most impres-
sive growth industries of the
modern era. College bosses
have grown fat off the influx of
cash, especially from interna-
tional students who pay three
times the going rate for tertiary-
level schooling as parents strug-
gle to ensure their futures.

The “bums on seats” recruit-
ing dynamic of many colleges -
including some of the most pres-
tigious - has created an entire
generation of young people who
have emerged from campuses
in their early twenties with an
abundance of qualifications but
not a single clue about what
they want to do in life.

Armed with an array of diplo-
mas, trophies and other acade-
mic baubles, they find them-
selves well-qualified on paper,
but hopelessly ill-equipped for
the job at hand. Very often they
feel they have been scammed

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Will hard recession force
higher education review?

FROM page 1C

into long-term indebtedness
with little or nothing to show
for their pains at the end of it
all.

Instead of being directed into
worthwhile careers by college
courses and faculty advisers,
they are often left in limbo with
a multitude of supposed career
options which rarely materialise.
In many cases, they are woeful-
ly unsuited for the workplace,
and tottering dizzily under a
welter of unrealistic expecta-
tions.

Recessions do have their ben-
efits. Besides rooting out the
fraudsters, embarrassing the
profligate and exposing bankers
for what they really are, they
impose a reality check on soci-
ety and make everyone see
sense.

That process is already under-
way, as employers begin to
wonder whether college degrees
actually mean anything in terms
of identifying a student’s suit-
ability for a particular job.

JONES & CO

Doubts began to arise in my
own mind in the mid-1980s
while I was editing newspapers
in Britain. English language
graduates entering journalism
proved deficient in many key
areas.

Not only was their spelling
erratic, they were often
mediocre at sentence and story
construction, and seriously lack-
ing the kind of wide-ranging
general knowledge essential for
a newspaper career.

In fact, graduates frequently
had to “unlearn” many of the
bad habits they had picked up
on campus to become function-
al as junior reporters. Ham-
strung by academic jargon, they
had to free themselves from the
kind of convoluted terminology
expected of them in writing col-
lege essays to re-learn English
as an effective means of com-
munication.

Academics have in the past
frequently eschewed “voca-
tional” courses as essentially
second-rate, the preserve of the
technical colleges and night
schools. But more discerning

CiWA= IN

TO TEMPTATION



employers are now identifying
and singling out those univer-
sities which offer degree cours-
es relevant to the working envi-
ronment.

Autodidacts - the largely self-
taught - have long wondered
whether university education is
all it’s cracked up to be, espe-
cially as it so frequently fails to
address the basics. I’ve met his-
tory graduates who were com-
pletely unacquainted with most
of the major dates in European
and American history, includ-
ing 1485, 1588, 1605, 1649, 1745,
1805, 1807, 1815, 1832, 1833,
1865 and 1901. In one case, I
even drew a blank on 1066,
which IJ didn’t think possible.

Of course, education in its
broadest sense is always a good
thing. Colleges pride themselves
on sharpening up students’ crit-
ical skills. They insist that a
combination of discipline and
brainpower is essential for grad-
uation. There is no doubt that
we could all benefit from know-
ing more than we do.

But as economies tighten and
budgets come under review, it is
inevitable that employers and
parents will be looking closely
at higher education and won-
dering whether anyone gets a
fair return for their investment
when it comes to horrendously
expensive university courses
and the quality of students they
produce.

When I entered journalism in
the olden days (1961) nearly all
editorial recruits, along with
accountants, architects, solici-
tors and bankers, launched into
their professions via a three or
four-year period of articles or
indentureship.

In return for a virtually
unbreakable contractual com-
mitment to an employer for a
set period of time, a trainee was
guaranteed on-the-job training
bolstered in some cases by part-
time full-day or half-day release
courses.

In newspapers, the whole
process was overseen by a body
called the National Council for
the Training of Journalists,
which set standards for qualifi-
cation and ensured its diploma
only went to those of proven
competence.

By the age of 21 or 22, pro-
fessionals were fully functional
in their fields, able to earn a
good living for themselves, and
ready to meet the challenges of
their demanding careers.

University courses were seen,
in the main, as vehicles for pro-
pelling students into academia,
or enabling rich kids to keep
their minds occupied before
taking up executive roles in
family businesses.

Oxford and Cambridge were
then largely the preserves of
privileged students on their way
into the Foreign Office or the
Colonial Service. The brainiest
of them read Classics for some
odd reason, and the vaguest of
them headed into the Anglican
church via a theology degree.
No-one there gave a thought to
horny-handed occupations or
blue collar work. That was left
to the polytechnics, where City

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we are sure to find what works
for you.

WILL a hard recession force a review of higher education and its place in modern society?

and Guild exams were open to
plumbers, electricians, joiners,
bricklayers and other trades.

It’s only since the late 1960s
and early 1970s that bachelor
degrees have been seen as
essential ‘passports’ to skilled
non-manual occupations. In
many ways, degrees now do the
job GCE O levels and A levels
did in times gone by.

Now the National Council for
the Training of Journalists, via
its student council, has come to
the conclusion that vocational
training is what really counts,
and that university degrees are
poor indicators of a student’s
worth in the workplace.

The news will not please the
hundreds, probably thousands,
of young people - a 24 per cent
increase over last year - now
applying for university courses
in Britain as preparation for
media careers, even at a time
when newspapers are contract-
ing and closing at a frightening
rate.

Yet it does point to what is
likely to be a growing trend as
college education becomes too
expensive for ordinary families
to pursue, and employers
become increasingly disillu-
sioned with “well qualified”
young people who can’t do the
job.

Paul Durrant, deputy editor
of the Eastern Daily Press in
England, told the British jour-
nalists’ trade paper Press
Gazette: “I’m not bothered
about a degree. I’m bothered
about NCTJ (professional)
qualifications. I’m bothered
about vocational training.”

He added: “I’m looking for
maturity, passion and confi-
dence. In terms of currency
within the industry, I need to
know someone’s got 100 wpm
shorthand, that they know
media law.”

There is no doubt that many

©2008 CreativeRelations.net

Sales & Full Service Department Rosetta & Montgomery Streets 322-2188/9

LLL LLG CLS LL



universities in recent years have
cashed in on media and creative
writing courses, selling them as
“easy options” for those who
don’t know where they’re head-
ing in life. The truth is, howev-
er, that few of these courses
actually produce functioning
professionals.

The British government has
encouraged the annual rush to
the campuses, mainly because
it has enabled civil servants to
manipulate unemployment fig-
ures downwards to make the
politicians look more efficient
than they are.

Mass communications and
media studies degree courses
are among the most popular for
students who labour under the
grossly mistaken belief that the
press is a permanently glam-
orous profession which is rela-
tively easy to enter.

In fact, the supply-and-
demand ratio has always made
entry into the profession diffi-
cult, and recession-hit media
houses are now employing few-
er people than ever.

Even in the good times, news-
paper editors were looking for a
rare combination of qualities
which is getting scarcer by the
day. Curiosity, honesty, maturi-
ty, judgment and talent are right
at the top of the list, along with
an inbuilt ability to use the lan-
guage effectively. Universities
don’t necessarily provide any
of them.

As the recession bites deeper,
and families are forced to con-
sider their own resources as
never before, it’s doubtful that
higher education, with all its
attendant expense, will continue
to rank high among personal
priorities.

In fact, old-styled appren-
ticeships are now being viewed
increasingly as a possible way
forward, offering young people
ways of becoming financially
independent quicker, avoiding
student debt along the way.

For this to happen, however,
primary and secondary school-
ing has to improve dramatically.
High school graduation at 16 or
18 must translate into accept-
able standards of literacy,
numeracy and general knowl-
edge. Basic education must pro-
mote self-discipline, work ethic
and ambition, however limited
that ambition may turn out to
be.

Even more importantly, stu-
dents have to be encouraged
from a relatively early age - say
14 or 15 - to identify the kinds
of careers they would like to
follow, and to be given oppor-
tunities in their final two or
three years at school to pursue
studies relevant to their goals.

Employers are much more
likely to invest in the commit-
ted, proven ability of a deter-
mined apprentice than in some-
one full of airy-fairy notions
about career development nur-
tured on a university campus.

For my part, I would be much
more inclined to take on some-
one with a genuine commitment
to journalism than a student
who finds himself at a newspa-
per interview only because mass
communications happened to
be part of his college curricu-
lum.

And I am old-fashioned
enough to believe that true pro-
ficiency in any craft or profes-
sion is best learned at the knee
of a master in the workplace
than in a classroom presided



over by an academic who prob-
ably has little or no direct
knowledge of the discipline they
are seeking to teach.

At the moment, the expecta-
tion of a university education
among all those with an IQ of
100 or more creates an awk-
ward hiatus of indecision
between the mid-teens and mid-
twenties which can be cata-
strophic for young lives.

One student told Insight: “In
many ways, we appear have too
many options, or did before the
recession kicked in. I know so
many of my college colleagues
who spend their time wondering
what they’re going to do with
their lives. So few of them have
focus. That’s what’s missing -
focus.”

Others tell of graduates end-
ing up as truck drivers or
engaged in other fairly routine
occupations they could have
profitably followed at the age
of 16, having discovered too late
that their particular degrees had
little value when it came to get-
ting a worthwhile career.

Go back 50 years and you
would find that high school stu-
dents also had options, but they
had to act upon them quickly if
they wanted to be first in. Every
summer, thousands of young-
sters were discharged into the
job market and focus was
essential if you were to avoid
the factory bench or a seat at a
supermarket till.

Generally, it was the more
determined among them who
grabbed the sweetest opportu-
nities. The lazy and indecisive
were left to pick up what was
left.

If the recession leads to a
return to more indentureships,
articles and apprenticeships, it
will be no bad thing. As an
autodidact myself, I have never
felt unduly deprived, and have
drawn much comfort from the
fact that practically every 20th
century icon I admired most
was in the same boat as myself.

D H Lawrence, Thomas
Hardy, John Steinbeck, Ernest
Hemingway, William Faulkner,
Pablo Picasso, Winston
Churchill, L S Lowry, Edward
Elgar and David Lloyd George
were all non-graduates. So
were, or are, Elvis Presley, The
Beatles, Charlie Chaplin, Bing
Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Henry
Ford, Richard Branson and, of
course, the Queen of England.

Go back a bit, and you dis-
cover that William Shakespeare
had no college qualifications.
Nor did Charles Dickens.

The complete list is, of
course, much longer, but the
point is made. A college degree
is fine and dandy for some, but
can become a very expensive
luxury if it fails to translate into
a rewarding and successful life.

It will be interesting to see
whether higher education sur-
vives in its present form if the
recession proves to be long and
hard. At the very least it will be
forced to become relevant to
the age we live in, with greater
emphasis on vocational train-
ing and the needs of the market.

Hard times are not all bad. If
we’re made to have a re-think,
rearrange our priorities, and
square up to reality, they can
be a godsend.

e What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT



insight

FEEDBACK

Re: Power game now

favours Christie (PLP
leadership)

I THINK the run-up to the
2012 general elections will be
all about leadership, not only
in the PLP but the FNM as
well. Pve heard there is a divi-
sion in the FNM, and that
Branville McCartney is being
supported as a challenger for
leadership as the election gets
closer.

After 2002, it’s accepted
that Tommy Turnquest can’t
cut it, and that Dion Foulkes
doesn’t have the brain noodles
to be right up there at the top
of the party.

Hubert Ingraham will not
be leader after 2012, mark my
word, but Christie will still be
up there for the PLP leader-
ship if he bides his time.

— ‘Doe’ McKenzie (Don’t

use my first name)



Mr John Marquis appears to
be a very remarkable fellow.
He strikes me as having quali-
fications in psychology, psy-
chiatry, political science, jour-
nalism and clairvoyance.

Tread his expose on the
PLP, its frontline soldiers and
its political future and won-
dered how in the world did
this lowly journalist come to
be such an all-round expert in
all matters of life, and able to
predict the future as well? His
insight into our party’s affairs
appeared in Monday’s edition
of The Tribune under the cap-
tion, “Insight” where he pre-
sumed to psychoanalyse the
Hon Alfred Sears, Obie
Wilchcombe, Dr Bernard Not-
tage, Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald and the Hon Perry
Christie. His conclusions?
Christie, as fate would have it,
would remain leader, as none
of the others have the political
charisma to be leader except
for Wilchcombe who he con-
cluded is now “damaged
goods” (my words, not his)
because of his questioning by
the police in the Travolta mat-
ter.

Mr Marquis very confident-
ly predicted that, in any event,

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2009

INSI

the PLP had as much of a
chance winning the next gen-
eral elections as the chances of
a snowball surviving in hell. I
did like his opening story
about the Editor of an Ameri-
can newspaper, though, and
how he outwitted his rum-
drinking rivals to get to the
top of his game; they all fell
down drunk around him, leav-
ing the lone Editor the only
game left standing in town.
John Marquis, you are not
of our culture, not of our ilk,
know nothing about what
makes us tick, don’t hang out
with us, don’t frequent the
places we do, don’t date the
same kind of women or men
(whatever your choice) we do;
your diet is totally different
from ours and our style of
worship, of God, is different
(that is if you worship any at
all) so tell me, how is it that
you can presume to be able to
predict what political deci-
sions we will make in 2012 or
before, when the next general
elections are called? That’s
stretching your imagination a
bit, isn’t it, John? You don’t
know us, John; you think you
do, but you don’t. That is basi-
cally your problem, John; you
came to the Bahamas from
wherever you came and in
three weeks you knew us,
already, and can predict our
every move and decision. I
don’t know “us” John, and
I’ve lived with “us” for sixty-
five (65) years. It isn’t that
easy to know us John, for if
one wishes to know us, John,
one will have to live with us,
John, and I know you, for one,
are not prepared for that
adventure. If you would be
kind enough, John, to allow
the FNM equal time and give
them the same makeover you
gave the PLP, it should be
very interesting reading to see,
exactly, what you would say
about them, in contrast.
Come to think about it,
though, you probably won’t
do it, seeing they are the ones
who are allowing you to rest,
undisturbed, for awhile, in our
country, and it’s your payback
time. Remember, John, the

GHT

The stories behind the news

ANNA'S LEGACY TWO YEARS ON

This story
isn’t over yet
-notbya
long way...

By JOHN MARQUES

cion and bitter recrimination,
much of it airedlin courtrooms
across America

In Florida, her erstwhile
attorney-companion Howard
K Stern has reportedly settled
his libel action against the
Provocative attorney Joh

*Quinn, whose television

commentstelating to Stern ancl
his relationship with Anna's
son. Daniel wefe inflammatc-
1, t0 say the least apparently nearing a concln-

‘As altorney for Anna's sion is Stern's libel action
mother, Virgie Arthur, Mr against former television jour.
OrQuinsi was v0 outragedusly — nalist Rita Cosby, whose book
candid about his suspicions ‘Blonde Ambition’ about Anna
felating to Daniel'sdeath that Nicole made several lure alle-
Stor fa ile chaie tat to gan agane Stem andstow-
hae hin ougteccurts, Bz photographer Larry Birk

With a summary judgment Yather of Anna's caugh-
romntteaeeatE eee TeeDannch
ingatan alaming tate, the par With acourt motion due this
es were prompted inte an month, both patties ate now

“accommodation which seems itvolwed in a tactical tussle as and the aforementioned Bitk-
tohavequieteneddown atleat Cosby mounts her robust ead, who objected to her
one of the many actions ari cefence against Stem, who is $200.600-plustegal bill for er-
ing from the Anna Nicole demanding S0million indam- vices rendered in his Nasvau
atfaic. ages from the authot and her court actions against Stern.

dust what the details of set. New York publishers, “You will remember that Opri
tement are is unknown. but Howevei, the smatt money isfamousy alleged to have run

Mamgngeaer LT has been two
uring the fina: YEAS since Anna
sx month of

Dz
elite, Ataf ‘
HEN ina Moridahotel,

Iuediningaiontha ste Weim of what a

enjoyed hardly a single

mony fi a 1»

hon tte wan't Ya of “accidental

fveriteedyit'wedaos, _ arg overdose,

hangerson and wildeyed fiti-

aerate, mo metnecone of the Late cover
‘her Rome, Horizons, on itl’ riotous life

spent mote time in bed than

st of hand, on ris, suffered

Uhle tettonag betweon ike UL the Bahamas and

dnigrcabinet andthe poole United States, where

In rare moments of relative

Incicity, she hammered out syr-
her tormentors rage and many
Deathcosid te expected, people are still
bring some mearure of calm
Jeast to there who knew her, 1
toe daepeacd sp, the circumstances
surrounding the
20-year-old
son, Daniel.

Nicole Smith died
‘was 30 fugh on drugs, and sa
moment of true peace andtta- COLONEL tuled was
cruginchced incomprehensicn,
gants who drove her deeper Yet the aftershock
Nassau's Bavtern Road, Ana 3
continues to be felt
roller-coaster mood swings
iounger. l
court battles still
tactically mangled e-mails ta
you might have thought, to
unhappy about
tbat Anna’zlegacy continues ta
death of her
INSIGHT reports...

Tai tee one ea

AE Tel: 502 2356 =~

ANNA NICOLE SIHITH is shown posing for photographers after arriving for the premiere of ‘Be Cool” at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in the Holly-
‘wood section of Las Angeks inthis February 14, 2005 file photo.

(AP Photo: Danny Btotashok)

pickup the tabfor eight or nine between Thompson and.aNas In action to all this, vari-
greedy altomeys feasting athis sau law firm. ous suits remain oulstandingin
expense. Exerything Anna touched, the name of Virgie Arthur, the
en, of coute, there isthe and practically everyone she anxious grandma who ted to
legal wrangle ower Horjzone, met, seemed to end up keep Dannielynn out ofthe
the Sl milion home Anna enenared by htigation of one is of both Stem and Birk:
claimed had been given toler kind or another head. She js suing Stern, CES

POCO s tu A) cies

erry

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Power game now
favours Christie

By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

any years ago I asked
the editor of a leading
American newspaper
how he had risen to the

top of his profession.

“Very early on,” he said, “I noticed
that all my main rivals were heavy
drinkers. I decided that if I stuck
around long enough, they would all
fall down drunk around me, and I
would be the only game left in town.”

At first I thought he was joking. In
fact, he was being deadly serious.
Heavy drinking was & riguew in jour-
nalism in those days. If you didn’t
drink with the right people in the right
places, you could wave farewell to any
promotion prospects. Sipping ginger
ale while pretending it was laced with
bourbon was a shrewd way to outwit
the serious imbibers.

His tactics paid off handsomely
because at the time - circa 1980 - he
had become one of the top five or six
newspaper editors in the United
States.

His apartment enjoyed a striking
view of one of America’s most famous
seascapes. Three huge limousines
graced his garage. His wife was a mod-
el of elegant self-assurance. Here was
aman not only on top of his game but
also very much at ease with himself.

Perry Christie, who only 18 months
ago was seen as a lost cause after lead-
ing his party to defeat in the 2007 gen-
eral election, can today feel much as
my editor friend felt all those years
ago.

By standing still, saying nothing,
and waiting for all the PLP’s leader-
ship pretenders to metaphorically “fall
down drunk” around him, Christie is
now emerging as the party’s best and
possibly only bet to lead the 2012 elec-
tion campaign.

One media pundit, a man known to
like a flutter, said: “As things stand
now, if I were putting my money on
the PLP’s leadership set-up in 2012, I
would go for the Christie-Bernard
Nottage ticket. All the others appear
to be rank outsiders - and that includes
Obie Wilehcombe, who could once
have been considered the leading con-
tender.”

There is no doubt that the Travolta
outrage has dealt a near-mortal blow
to Wilchcombe’s leadership prospects.
No-one knows this better than the
man himself, whose “Relaunch” rally
in his West End constituency last week
has been described by one spectator as
an orgy of self-pity which backfired
badly.

Wilchcombe, once regarded as one
of the slickest political operators in
the PLP, and a plausible threat to
Christie’s leadership, had his credibil-
ity torn apart by shrapnel from the
Travolta explosion.

Though released by police after
questioning, and having mounted a
credible defence of his innocence,
Wilchcombe knows full well that this
kind of international publicity is lethal
to anyone with national leadership
aspirations.

A Tribune reader felt compelled to
write the following after witnessing
Wilchcombe’s attempt to woo back
deserting voters:

“Obie, do us all a big favour and
get out of politics. No-one wants to

THE FRONT PAGE of the February 9, 2009 edition of /NS/GHT...

PLASTIC CASING UNITS



FORMER PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie, who only 18 months ago was seen as a lost cause after leading his party to defeat in the

2007 general election, can today feel much as my editor friend felt all those years ago...

hear anymore of your shallow vision-
less thoughts or rhyme time words
that will only place you in a more vul-
nerable position. Get out, sir, while
you still have what’s left of your dig-
nity.”

The rest of his withering assault can
be read in this week’s Feedback col-
umn. Its main thrust is to convey to
Wilchcombe (and, by implication, all
politicians who think they can manip-
ulate the electorate) that soft soap
can’t do it anymore, that Bahamians
are more savvy than they used to be.

Wilchcombe’s virtual demise as a
leadership prospect now leaves
Christie, no doubt with a broad Bud-
dha-style smile on his face, sitting
more or less immoveably on top of
the chaotic heap which voters know as

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the PLP.

Tf he can sway Dr Bernard Nottage,
aman more inscrutable than Mao Tse-
Tung, into becoming his deputy before
the next election scramble, he will
have made his own position pretty
much impregnable.

For Nottage, who appears to have
taken a vow of silence and acquired an
inexplicable fear of the press since his
return to the PLP three years ago, is
the only one left who could credibly be
described as a serious contender for
the party leadership.

But his maturity and apparent grav-
itas are off-set to a large degree by
his inability to lift an audience. Mea-
sured, pedantic, circumspect and reti-
cent, Nottage is short in areas where
Christie looms large.





It could be that, as times goes on, he
will be seen as more a Robin to
Christie’s Batman than the party’s
main man. In politics, shy guys rarely
win. It's left to the extroverts - the big
talkers - to claim the spoils.

There is no doubt that a Christie-
Nottage ticket will have some appeal
fora sizeable chunk of the PLP, which
in its current demoralised state has
about as much chance of winning the
2012 election as the Bahamas Nation-
al Party. And that has none.

Undoubtedly, the Christie-Nottage
combo is seen as markedly more entic-
ing than the alternatives, for the most
part a collection of no-hopers with lit-
tle or no grassroots support

Consider this assemblage of lead-
ership aspirants and you begin to

THE Travolta ‘extortion’
scandal has not only
plunged the Progressive
Liberal Party into a
major crisis, it has also
led to a marked shift

in power in its higher
ranks, leaving current
leader Perry Christie in
an increasingly strong
position. INSIGHT
reports...

realise just how deep the PLP’s trou-
bles are.

* Alfred Seare: a
pleasant, intelligent
man who, accord-
ing to parliamen-
tary journalists, has
as much appeal at
the hustings as a
BEC light-pole.
Though he has
been trying of late
to inject a trace of
dynamism into his
pronouncements,
he is seen as too professorial and retir-
ing for the cut-and-thrust of Bahami-
an politics, which is a nasty business at
the best of times.

“When Sears gets up to speak in
the House, everyone else settles down
for an afternoon snooze,” said one
reporter who believes that the ex-min-
ister’s lawyerly disdain will always be
his undoing.

Having risen from humble origins,
and been totally frank about his trou-
bled boyhood, Sears has much to com-
mend him, but his critics say he is
unsuited for frontline combat, espe-
cially in a leadership role.

PCat StU

© Jerme Fitegerald, a Nassau busi-
nessman, is rated a nil-to-nowhere
prospect whose David Yurman jew-
ellery, Gucci shoes and flash
demeanour do nothing to outweigh
what most regard as his fundamental
lack of experience. With no political
track record behind him, his emer-
gence as a prospect — albeit a very
peripheral one — is viewed as prema-
ture. “He seems to have acquired per-
sonal wealth by his own efforts, but he
lacks charisma,” said one reporter.

¢ Frenk Guith, who led the PLP
assault in the Mona Vie affair, does
not register on the Richter Scale when
it comes to making the FNM quake
and shake. The consensus is that he
lacks practically everything required to
lead the PLP out of the wilderness.

SEE page 5C



game of politics is a circular
one; it goes around, but it also
comes back around. Thank
you, — Forrester J Carroll J.P
Freeport, Grand Bahama

JOHN MARQUIS replies:
This ‘lowly’ journalist was
writing stories about the PLP
pre-1967 while most of the cur-
rent leaders were still in school
and many more were not yet
out of kindergarten. I know the
party all too well, even to the
extent of giving a public speech
about its evil habits 40 years
ago. You don’t have to lie
down and sleep with a hog to
know how bad it smells. Mr
Carroll is, however, right about
one thing: he and I have
absolutely nothing in common,
which is one of the many
things in life for which I am
eternally grateful.

YOU'RE right - Christie is
now once again the front-run-
ner for leadership. He is slick-
er and smoother than anybody

gives him credit for.
— Luke, Blue Hill

WHETHER Wilchcombe
survives as a potential leader
will depend on what comes
out of the Pleasant Bridgewa-
ter trial.

— Observer, Grand
Bahama

WE don’t want Obie Wilch-
combe as leader of the PLP.
He smiles a lot, but we don’t
take no heed of that. He ain’t
no good for us or the party.

— Voicemail caller

(West End)

Re: Anna’s legacy
two years on

I WAS alarmed to read in
Insight that an opera is to be
performed about Anna Nicole
Smith at the Royal Opera
House in London. This means
the entire story will be raked
over again, with some empha-
sis inevitably placed on the
final months of her life in Nas-
sau. Once again, the Bahamas
will come out of it badly, you
can be sure of that.

— GB Hanna

We don’t even know half
the Anna Nicole story, even
the part that took place here
in the Bahamas. But thanks
for updating us.

— A Nicholas

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JUDGE PARKER

CU

I] 80, THE CLA THING
io DIDN'T WORK OUT?








REALLY? I THINK
YOU WOULDVE







RANDY If
PLEASANTLY
SURPRISED TO
HEAR APRIL
BOWER HAS
MOVEP BACK
TO TOWN!





YEAH... GUESS
I GUST DIDNT
HAVE THE
RIGHT STUPE!

NO, IT WAS

ALITILE (Oo w\



TOO GUNG -
HO FOR ME!

~
©2009 by North America Syrdicate, inc. World rights reserve

BLONDIE

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LIFE AND DEATH
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BALANCE / A

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LITTLE SLED RIDERS. WHAT FATE * ME | SECOND AND
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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



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4FTER MARGO EXPLAING +.
















ITS A LONG YOU CAN'T BE |
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BOTH IN DANGER,” LHAVE 10 PE LIER SIT L2] NEED TOTALK TO YOUR WHY WOULD

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DO SOMETHING, MAMA,’ FATHER,

©2009 by North America Syndicate, inc. Warld rights reserved



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©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

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©2099 hy King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.



HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make

uses from the letters shown here?
words in [In making a word, each letter
the main May be used once only. Each

must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals,

hody of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)

TODAY'S TARGET

Good 20; very good 30;
excellent 39 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











Saturday’s Saturday’s

Kakuro Answer

Sudoku Answer























92004, NokTH AMEN cA Sund.















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

“DENNIS DOESN'T KNOW THE MEANING OF
FEAR...OR STOP!”

Difficulty Level *&




















CRYPTIC PUZZLE ||












21 Massif, 22 Vienna, 26 Clap, 27 In effect, 21 Bridge, 22 Afraid, 26









































9/3 7[4/6|5 NESS
6/1 813/217 N12 1\|2/4 14
IN 3/407 [9/8 Be 38

2/5 4/1/8/9 s
a9 6lel7i4 IS 4/7/8/9 Ba1]7/3 9
2 8 oR 1/3 0 PS
3/8 1/9/5/6) Pie io pai l3i2 Bei 5
72 5/8/3/4) (BBM 2 | 4 B4/8 9
8/4 3/5/9/2 914/6/5 R@9/1/4 8
11/6 9/7/4/8 m5 | 1 8/9/73 7
Difficulty Level 323 5/7 2/6/1/3| Misi7 MMs i7)1 B26































BEeEREHEH#
Sinits ai Famous Hand
1 Such a person doesn’t 2 Asomewhat well-endowed ee stead) dotted
look so well ata || | | || || Lal .
distance (11) lady) : Cl fi South dealer, When the deal was first played,
3 Paddy or Eric may Pes ey Pe ye North-South vulnerable. the Norwegian pair of Boye Broge-
9 Incorrectly cleaned, gets produce it (4) NORTH land and Erik Saelensminde reached
entangled (7) A Peiecnienacesert Fal Fes | | || ie] il @AK97654 a slam in spades as shown. Saelens-
10 Unusual Maori girl's P ¥52 minde’s decision to open two
of sport (6) Pea se ye | Pee ey ea #543 notrump with a 1-3-6-3 distribution
hamer(?) 5 The kindness of 17 46 convinced Brogeland to try for slam
11 A misshapen nose || || || fe || [ij WEST EAST on the assumption that his side had at
ages (4) people (8) ae cel al #182 #103 least nine spades.
fica: 6 Arab territory that makes ¥A1094 98763 Four diamonds was a slam try in
12 Legislation ine went aio ral fo Lt Lal [eal #05 #106 spades, and the rest of the auction
against the grain (4,4) $9832 #KQ754 consisted primarily of cuebids lead-
14 Dislike having to change a 7 Got lineages from him? PB} | ff Fee cecil sail SOUTH ing to the slam. With the spades
hotel (6) Yes! (11) #0 dividing 3-2, the defenders got only
16 Mass of people moving 8 The price of freedom, Ey fe | a fe Ea od 7 re : 872 Sone 1430 2 ee
about in the road in the perhaps (6,5) Pe a ile Te hi #&AT10 At the other table, with George
morning (6) 13 Choke — or another a pee cate 2 ee of the U.S.
18 Vessels that shoot over the out est Nort ast orth-South, the bidding went:
3 carburettor conical (3) tu |). Peres bom . 2NT Pass 4 Pass South West North East
waves (8) . 15 Something to keep aunty =] 1 Go to great expense 2 Blacksmith’s 4h Pass 5¢& Dble 1¢ Pass la Pass
19 The capital in old in change! (7) N (3,3,5) block (5) Redble Pass 54 Pass 3.NT All Pass
Czechoslovakia (4) so Hain wari een Shee > 9 Void (7) 3 Rumour (4) 64 : Pass 64% Jacobs, North, considered bidding
22 Rapid writer (5) y Opening lead — ace of hearts. over three notrump, but this was not
oe TH oe together (6) a 10 Scatter (5) 4 Cause to be loved (6) The 2007 world team champi- as clear-cut as it may seem. As
2 The very best time for 20 Most airlines provide this > 11 Showy flowering 5 Professional onship for the Bermuda Bowl was played by most of today’s expert
feathers (7) ~ plant (4) valuer (8) won by Norway, which easily partnerships, a rebid of three
24 Printers may be kind to Might (%) crossword compilers (11) 21 An act of duplicity? (4) Lu ae ecument (2) eau ( ) deal final by nearly 100 International minor tends to imply a strong, possi-
14 Uniformly (6) 7 Long jump, discus Match Points, 334-245.5. bly unbalanced hand containing a
: . . ; E 16 Breed of e.g. (5,6) After trailing early, the Norwe- long, solid or near-solid suit.
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution gians went ahead to stay about a third Jacobs therefore had to allow for
sheepdog (6) 8 Central elas
; ; ‘ ee of the way through the match and the possibility that South had only
Aerosse') Stall. 1 Aspenty, # Onicall, Aerose: 1 Sicily. 4 Amethyst 9 18 Large retail shop (8) European continued to build their lead by mak- one spade, and chose the conserva-
i ee 2 ie bith ea ee i. pare, ’ ei 19 Much revered country (11) ing one winning decision after tive course. After a spade lead by
sed Rant pagan ts oa eect sear : another. Today’s deal, from the ses- West, declarer had no trouble taking
scheme, 23 Acid, 24 Spies, 25 Babe 20 Satisfaction, 23 Rife, 24 Snack person (4) 13 Italian art centre (8) aa . :
ey : : ? ea , Y ; sion in which Norway assumed the all the tricks for a score of 720, but
28 Singlets, 29 Ghetto, 30 Flagpole, 25 Wolf, 28 Diatribe, 29 Cuddle, 30 22 Sequence (5) 15 Clarify (7) lead, is a typical example. wound up losing 12 IMPs.
31 Trades. : Endanger, 31 Spirit. . 23 An advantageous 17 Deception (6)
Down: 1 Sportive, 2 Recourse, 3 Idle, | Down: 1 Shoulder, 2 Contrite, 3 Tomorrow: For whom the bells toll.
5 Short journey, 6 Eros, 7 Inroad, 8 Lots, 5 Matter-of-fact, 6 Tune, 7 purchase (7) 20 Empty ©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.
Yawned, 11 Army hospital, 15 Abbot, Yearly, 8 Teeter, 11 Questionable, 24 Resistance completely (5)
16 Teach, 18 Departed, 19 Generous, 15 On tap, 16 Edict, 18 Disorder, 19 movement (11) 21. Liveliness (4)


THE TRIBUNE

THE WE

5-Day FORECAST

hm ORLANDO

High:69°F/20°C









HER REPORT

eA“

Sunny most of the






T

Wy all
Wit

Clouds and sun,

J

Partly cloudy; a

















Breezy with plenty of Partly sunny. Sunny, breezy and














o|1|2

LOW



3|4|5

MODERATE

yy
6|7

HIGH



8|9|1oji1

\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the





- a _ : : ine. : : greater the need for eye and skin protection.
' Low: 44° F/6°C a spotty showers shower around Sunn ; ; cayand ee pleasant ;
: @ High: 75 High: 76 High: 78 High: 80
TAMPA ee High: 77° Low: 66° Low: 65° Low: 67° Low: 69° Low: 70° see EOE
4 rae 7 ; PETE MEP
High: 66° F/18°C ne, 71°-63° F 70°-64° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low Ht (ft
Low: 46° F/7°C an r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:43am. 26 12:17am. 0.0
i. @ F 7 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 654p.m. 24 12:49p.m. 0.0
i : Tuesd 7:20am. 26 12:59am. -0.1
J a Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Wednesday?>5 am. 06 130am. 04
; —_. ae ABACO Temperature 8:07 p. 26 1:59p.m. -0.1
, : = Se 6 ° HG Mii, cgsscesencees toca vacteesessecncesteiseeher 79° F/26° C : : zi
— High: 72° F/22° C Thursday 880am. 26 2:18am. -0.1
- “a L “61°F 16°C LOW sessshasscccagetes 66° F/19° C y 8:44pm. 2.7 2:33pm. -0.2
f A Sem i ow: 61° F/ Normal high... 78° F/25°G
a Normal low 64° F/18° C
, ah @WESTPALMBEACH . Last year's High... ssnsestenesentnee 85° F/29° SUN rTM Ct
High: 75° F/24°C fics Last year's lOW oe eee 74° F/23° C a aa are a
Low: 57°FA4°C own Precipitation unrise...... 38 am. Moonrise..... ‘41 a.m.
a @ ae As of 1 p.m. yesterday ....cccccscssssssscessssseeen 0.00" Sunset....... 6:09 p.m. Moonset..... 5:07 p.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT i Year to date New First Full Last
High: 74° F/23°C @ High: 70° F/21°C Normal year to date oo... 3.07" . —- 7
Low: 59° F/15°C Low: 59° F/15°C nh ve
at AccuWeather.com i ag
AL @ i. Forecasts and graphics provided by : ay
be MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feb. 24 Mar.4 Mar.10 Mar. 18
—~ OMers°r23°c ELEUTHERA
Low: 58° FA ac NASSAU High: 75" F/2a C
i High: 17° F/25° cC Low: 69 F/21 C
Low: 66° F/19°C
KEY WEST , tT * +
5 ahs 70 ° —— i AY CATISLAND
High: 73° F/23°C K\ High: 75° F/24°C
Low: 64° F/18°C ~ Low: 65° F/18°C
@ a
= * GREAT EXUMA Nt SAN SALVADOR
A High: 78° F/26° C High: 79° F/26°C
; ANDROS a XN NN Low: 70° F/21°C Low: 67° FA9°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's 5 Oe oe.
highs and tonights's lows. High: 79° F/26° C _—
Low: 69° F/21°C 25 Se
X
lle \\
LONGISLAND
Low: 67° F/19°C
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W NN High: 83° F/28° C
F/C FIC F/C FIC FC FIC F/C FIC FC FC Fic FC e Low: 66° F/19° C
Albuquerque 70/21 44/6 ¢ 70/21 42/5 pe Indianapolis 28/-2 16/-8 pc 39/3 27/-2 pc Philadelphia 37/2 20/-6 s 40/4 26/-3 s
Anchorage 28/-2 18/-7 pc 30/-1 19/-7 c Jacksonville 60/15 29/-1 $s 61/16 42/5 s Phoenix 84/28 57/13 ¢ 82/27 57/13 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta BOO 27/-2 s 5241 36/2 s Kansas City 50/10 34 s 57/13 37/2 pc _ Pittsburgh 26/-3 16/-8 sf 32/0 20/-6 pe RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:83°F/28°c
Atlantic City 37/2 19/-7 s 40/4 16/-8 s Las Vegas 69/20 47/8 pe 73/22 48/8 pc Portland,OR 53/11 42/5 sh 51/10 40/4 sh High: 81° F/27°C Low: 69° F/21°C
Baltimore 39/3 20/6 s 40/4 21/-6 s§ Little Rock 53/11 36/2 s 510 45/7 pc Raleigh-Durham 42/5 22/-5 s 48/8 25/-3 § Low:65°F/18°C in ‘
Boston 37/2 22/-5 pc 35/1 21/-6 pc Los Angeles 71/21 52/1 c 66/18 52/11 pe St. Louis 38/3 26/-3 pc 48/8 35/1 pc .
Buffalo 21/-6 15/-9 sf 27/-2 21/6 pe Louisville 36/2 21/6 s 42/5 31/0 pc Salt Lake City 49/9 36/2 sh 53/11 33/0 sh GREATINAGUA Xai
Charleston, SC 53/11 28/-2 5s 565/12 31/0 s Memphis 52/11 32/0 s 55/12 42/5 pe San Antonio 70/21 54/12 s 83/28 59/15 pc High:87° F/31°C
Chicago 22/-5 14/-10 pc 37/2 27/-2 pc Miami 75/23 58/14 pe 75/23 62/16 pc San Diego 67/19 57/13 ¢ 66/18 55/12 pc Low 69° FDIC
Cleveland 21/-6 16/-8 pc 32/0 23/-5 pc Minneapolis 28/-2 16/-8 pc 37/2 23/-5 ¢ San Francisco 62/16 51/10 r 59/15 48/8 ¢ :
Dallas 6417 48/8 s 73/22 510 pe Nashville 43/6 21/6 §s 46/7 32/0 pc Seattle 5010 41/5 sh 49/9 41/5 sh
Denver 6116 34/1 ¢ 6417 32/0 pe New Orleans 60/15 44/6 s 66/18 53/11 pc Tallahassee 61/16 28/-2 s 6417 35/1 pe
Detroit 25/-3 15/-9 pc 30/-1 23/-5 pc New York 37/2 25/-3 s 36/2 25/-3 s Tampa 66/18 46/7 s 71/21 51/40 pe
Honolulu 78/25 65/18 pc 80/26 66/18 c Oklahoma City 62/16 43/6 s 64/17 43/6 pc Tucson 85/29 53/11 c 85/29 56/13 s
Houston 66/18 49/9 s 73/22 58/14 pe Orlando 69/20 44/6 pe 70/21 49/9 pc Washington,DC 40/4 24/-4 s 44/6 28/-2 s














Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

Tsai hlase

High
F/C
88/31
45/7
37/2
47/8
72/22
97/36
84/28
57/13
37/2
59/15
35/1
35/1
66/18
68/20
46/7
34/1
79/26
66/18
95/35
22/-5
83/28
83/28
71/21
42/5
48/8
45/7
40/4
34/1
77/25
25/-3
82/27
63/17
44/6
52/11
74/23
84/28
80/26
50/10
63/17
90/32
74/23
78/25
25/-3
12/-11
32/0
89/31
88/31
34/1
46/7
36/2
89/31
81/27
54/12
83/28
90/32
90/32
88/31
85/29
87/30
48/8
34/1
82/27
87/30
52/11
23/-5
87/30
51/10
39/3
36/2
19/-7

iil







sn

High
F/C
87/30
47/8
40/4
47/8
68/20
97/36
84/28
54/12
43/6
62/16
36/2
38/3
62/16
67/19
43/6
34/1
85/29
68/20
97/36
9/-12
82/27
84/28
70/21
40/4
48/8
46/7
39/3
29/-1
78/25
30/-1
82/27
74/23
47/8
57/13
71/21
85/29
85/29
54/12
59/15
88/31
77/25
89/31
25/-3
17/-8
31/0
88/31
86/30
30/-1
46/7
35/1
87/30
85/29
54/12
84/28
95/35
91/32
86/30
83/28
81/27
50/10
32/0
86/30
89/31
50/10
29/-1
80/26
49/9
38/3
33/0
27/-2

Tuesday
Low
F/C
73/22
43/6
23/-5
45/7
ile
79/26
74/23
42/5
21/-6
53/11
25/-3
34/1
55/12
46/7
38/3
26/-3
59/15
49/9
70/21
-7/-21
62/16
68/20
47/8
39/3
41/5
38/3
29/-1
18/-7
56/13
27/-2
72/22
46/7
40/4
41/5
54/12
74/23
67/19
41/5
32/0
75/23
41/5
65/18
12/-11
17/-8
25/-3
56/13
54/12
29/-1
37/2
29/-1
76/24
56/13
34/1
74/23
65/18
72/22
55/12
69/20
66/18
36/2
25/-3
70/21
73/22
46/7
20/-6
71/21
40/4
31/0
30/-1
8/-13

oO B® hao men Gao mac ee
Oo =

a+ Bao beet feo) Bee Bee oe
ap |

nn
Ss =

oO

sn

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

MARINE FORECAST



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23rp, 2009, PAGE 7C

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS




WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NE at 12-25 Knots 4-7 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 4-7 Feet 5-10 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NE at 12-25 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: NE at 12-25 Knots 6-9 Feet 5-8 Miles 74° F
Tuesday: NE at 15-30 Knots 6-9 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

a
Washington
40/24

I
rat

Fronts

Cold
War allele

Stationary Memguaii

AUTO INSURANCE

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eneame without us!

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Our

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eve roll Abaco | Eleathera Exum
READ Sia Re (81) S505 Tt (A S40 Tek: (240) 32-2002 | Te (242] SGH-D04





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