Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.75



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BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2009

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Resort workers
‘being exploited

WH Claims that Bahamas company
is holding Mexicans illegally

Ml Bosses are accused of denying
access to travel documents

BOSSES at a Bahamas
resort have been accused of
exploiting Mexican workers
and denying them access to
their travel documents.

Lawmakers in Mexico are
seeking repatriation of work-
ers who, they claim, are being
held illegally.

Claiming
that 65 of
their citi-
zens are
affected,
the Mexi-
can Senate
has asked
for the fed-
eral execu-
tive to initi-
ate repatri-
ation of the



men.
PeMMeeeaey pe Sen-

ate claims
the workers are being

“exploited” and underpaid by
the company.

According to El Universal,
Mexico’s most read newspa-
per, Mexico’s Senate has
asked the Secretariat of
Labour and Social Welfare,
and the Attorney General’s
Office, to investigate the com-
pany’s activities.

According to the report,
Senator Jose Luis Garcia
Zalvidea said that in 2007 the

company contracted Mexicans
to work on construction of the
resort, with a promised salary
of $500 a week with produc-
tivity bonuses.

Senator Zalvidea said that
the workers were taken to the
Bahamas on a private flight
on May 13, 2007, where they
signed a contract in English
and had their passports “ille-
gally detained”.

When informed of this
report by The Tribune late last
night, Minister of Immigration
Branville McCartney
promised that he would have
the matter investigated.

El Universal suggested that
the workers were threatened
with being turned over to
Bahamian immigration offi-
cials for three months and
eventually incarcerated at Her
Majesty’s Prison.

The report also suggested
that the workers were
informed that if they needed
to return to their home coun-
try, they would have to pay
$3,000, or work for three
months without pay.

Furthermore, when the
workers’ salaries were due,
instead of their promised $500
a week they were allegedly

SEE page 6

Travolta sets up foundation
in memory of son Jett



JOHN TRAVOLTA has set up a foundation in memory of his
late son, Jett, to help children with special needs.

The Jett Travolta Foundation will work to “assist and provide
relief to children with vision, hearing, mobility, communication,

behavioural learning impairments or other spe-
cial medical, environmental, health or educa-
tion needs,” according to the actor’s website.

Jett, 16, died of a seizure at the actor’s holiday
home in Grand Bahama on January 2.

John Travolta and his wife, Kelly Preston,
claimed that he suffered from an illness known
as Kawasaki syndrome. Preston suggested the ill- |
ness was brought on by exposure to chemicals
used to clean carpets and had developed a detox-
ification progamme based on the teachings of
Scientology founder L Ron Hubbard.

ALolala sire} es



In the wake of Jett’s death, former senator Pleasant Bridgewater
was charged with abetment to extort and a paramedic, Tarino
Lightbourne, was charged with attempting to extort and conspira-
cy to extort in connection with an alleged attempt to extract $25 mil-
lion from the Travolta family. They next appear in court on April
10.

Ms Bridgewater subsequently resigned from her Senate seat.



court yesterday.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE man accused of shoot-
ing a police officer in Nassau
Village earlier this week was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Police have charged Lavardo
Miller, 27, of Nassau Village,
with the attempted murder of
Detective Corporal 518 Earl
Johnson as well as a list of oth-
er serious offences.

Yesterday, police escorted
Miller to Court Eight, Bank
Lane, to be arraigned before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel.

It is alleged that Miller, alias
‘Siggy’, attempted to cause the
death of Corporal 518 Earl
Johnson on Tuesday of this
week.

Officer Johnson was shot in
the thigh shortly after 4pm on
Tuesday while he was report-
edly attempting to arrest a man
in connection with a shooting
that had occurred in the area

Ua ees

LAVARDO MILLER, 27, alias ‘Siggy’, being escorted to

Man accused
of shooting
police officer

earlier that day.

Miller was informed by Mag-
istrate Bethel that he could not
be tried in the Magistrate’s
Court on the attempted mur-
der charge and that the case
would be sent to the Supreme
Court. He was not required to
plead to the charge.

Miller was also arraigned on
two counts of posession of a
firearm with intent to endanger
the life of another.

It is alleged that on Tuesday,
Miller was in posession of a
handgun with the intent to
endanger the lives of Detective

SEE page 6



The Tribune Ra

McDonald's downtown
leh Side Meh aot=1 9]

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays





David Kelly
seriously ill in
New York

Kelly’s Home Centre proprietor
undergoes procedure after chest pains

*.

DAVID KELLY and his wife, Nancy, ina file photo.

David Kelly, proprietor of Kelly’s Home Centre, is seri-
ously ill in New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York.

Mr Kelly, with his wife, Nancy, and several members of
Kelly’s Home Centre, flew to New York on Saturday for
their annual purchasing trip. However, at the beginning of
the week Mr Kelly developed chest pains and went to New
York Presbyterian Hospital for a check-up. Mr Kelly, who
has a heart condition, underwent a procedure on Wednes-
day. His condition is being closely monitored after compli-
cations developed.

His three sons, Andrew, Gregory and Scot, and his two
daughters-in-law, Candy and Shelly, flew to New York to be
with him.

Roberts links fuel
duty to BEC woes

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



FORMER Minister of Works Bradley
Roberts yesterday blamed the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation’s poor financial state on
the decision not to pass on the cost of duty
paid on oil to its customers.

He said that it is this, and not the rate cut on
electricity instituted when he was in office in |

SEE page 6

Three men in custody over
12th homicide of the year

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net



Bradley Roberts

POLICE have three men in custody for questioning in connec-
tion with the country's 12th homicide of the year.

Head of Central Detective Unit Supt Elsworth Moss said the men
were picked up late Thursday night and taken to Wulff Road
police station.

Their arrests came a day after Haitian Edvard Ficien was found
stabbed to death, clutching a fistful of cash, outside Happy Hour
Bar on Wulff Road.

"Three persons were arrested by officers from the North-eastern
Division, that they wanted to speak to in respect to this murder,"
Supt Moss said.

Supt Moss said he did not know if the men would face charges as
police had yet to bring them to CDU for questioning.

A caller alerted police to the whereabouts of the body around
9.30pm Wednesday, February 18. Ficien, 33, of St Charles Vincent
Road, was found between a fence and the building with about

SEE page 6



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Ministry offers support to suffering families

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FAMILIES suffering from
financial insecurity, broken rela-
tionships and abuse are being
offered support by the Ministry
of Labour and Social develop-
ment through a new campaign.

To ignite a movement of fami-
ly and social well-being across the
Bahamas, leading psychologists,
therapists and social services
providers yesterday welcomed the
“gatekeepers” of the community

Loretta Butler-Turner to a symposium on “Strengthen-



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ing the Family: A Holistic
Approach to Family Wellness” at
the Holy Cross Anglican Church
hall on Soldier Road.

Social workers, health profes-
sionals, non-governmental organ-
isations, police, prison and
defence force officers attending
the discussion heard how to pre-
vent individuals and families from
suffering the isolation and abuse
that leads to violence and social
unrest.

Challenges

Minister of State for Social
Development Loretta Butler-
Turner opened the discussion by
calling for the community “gate-
keepers” to help families face
today’s challenges in a period of
economic crisis to ensure a
healthy society.

“In these times the cost of
maintaining our physical and men-
tal health has increased. We must
incorporate measures to prevent
deterioration of our health. Well-
ness should therefore be a critical
goal for the Bahamian communi-
ty,” she said.

“A consistent, holistic, multi-
systematic approach to family

wellness is paramount if we hope
to develop healthy, well-
balanced families and by exten-
sion, a healthy, well-balanced
nation.”

Health and Social Services
director Dr Sandra Dean-Patter-
son said she hopes the symposium
will spark an outreach campaign
which addresses critical emotion-
al, spiritual, physical and social
issues before they lead to violence
and destruction.

As the leading psychologist at
the Crisis Centre in the Princess
Margaret Hospital, Dr Dean-Pat-
terson said she hopes a series of
programmes will be put in place in
cooperation with Urban Renewal
Liveable Neighbourhoods,
churches and community groups
in New Providence and the Fam-
ily Islands to reach the vulnerable
before they become victims by
spreading a message of well-being.

She said: “We see it in abuse,
child abuse, intimate partner vio-
lence and attempted suicide —
symptoms or behaviours that
come up when people are so over-
whelmed or hurt or powerless
they turn on each other or on
themselves.

“What we have to do now is

give people those techniques so
they do not hurt each other or
themselves.

“There are ways they can live
well, peacefully and without hurt-
ing each other, but when it
becomes violent it is too late, so
we want to help persons in rela-
tionships to treat each other with
care and concern and love,” Dr
Dean-Patterson said.

Symposium

Psychologist and director of the
Renascene Institute International
Dr David Allen, Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre chief of
staff Nelson Clarke, and marital
and family therapist Pastor Bar-
rington Hall made contributions
to the symposium about the
nature of family relationships and
how to ensure the emotional
health of the family.

President of the Bahamas
Christian Council Rev Patrick
Paul and Rev Angela Palacious
from St Margaret’s Anglican
Church spoke about the impor-
tance of spiritual wellness, while
medical doctors and social work-
ers spoke about how to cultivate
physical and social wellness.

COB aims to spark culture of research

AS PART of its drive toward university status, the
College of the Bahamas has adopted a key role in
the effort to reinstitute a culture of research among
educators in the Bahamas.

Towards this end, the college’s School of Educa-
tion is hosting the nation’s teachers and education
stakeholders at its 2009 Conference, which opened
on Wednesday at the National Centre for the Per-
forming Arts on Shirley Street.

The conference aims to reinforce the crucial role
of the nation’s educators in producing valuable data
that can positively impact the environment of learn-
ing for students and ultimately national develop-
ment.

It also aims to empower teachers with research
skills and reinforce the notion that they are best
positioned to conduct and benefit from the data
provided by such research.

“As an educator, I don’t believe that we can do
any teaching without having done some research
ourselves, and a part of what our responsibility and
role is as teachers is to inform our practice with
information and research that is based on some
sound theoretical underpinnings so that we know
what we are doing is going to make a difference,”
said assistant professor of education Margo Black-
well.

“For me, focusing on teachers as researchers is
more a reaffirmation of the work that we do and
demonstrates that there is a thoughtful process for
the way forward.”

The Bahamas has a literacy rate of more than 95
per cent, according to official figures, and education
has traditionally been allocated the largest amount

of the government’s recurrent budget.

In 2008, the national average for the BJC rose
from “D+” to “C-“ and the national average for
the BGCSE results inched from a “D” to a “D+”,
sparking vigorous debate about the merits and
demerits of the country’s system of learning.

In recent times, there has also been debate about
all-boys and all-girls classes, the potential impact
of extending the school day and teaching method-
ologies.

The government has acknowledged that there
are challenges in the education system in the
Bahamas, launching strategies to focus on core sub-
ject areas like English language, mathematics, social
and religious studies; expansion and improvement of
after-school study clubs and homework centres, and
the expansion and enhancement of the Magnet
School Programmes to every High School in
New Providence and two high schools in Grand
Bahama.

COB believes expanding the scope of teacher
involved research could prove fundamentally impor-
tant in improving Key areas of instruction and learn-
ing in the country.

“IT don’t think of one area in which we can’t use
more research, but literacy is a key area and it is
imperative that we start documenting the way teach-
ers teach and the way students learn and sharing
some practices that are going to move us forward,”
Professor Blackwell said.

“This conference is just a seed for all of us to get
together to remember and reaffirm and restore our
confidence in our practice and in our craft and we
inform ourselves as we go forward.”

UNO PRON 3

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©2009 JOHN HARDY LIMITED

O In brief

Caribbean awards
programme is
launched in Bahamas

THE Pioneers of Prosperity
? Caribbean Awards Pro-
? gramme has been officially
? launched in the Bahamas.
i Pioneers of Prosperity is a
? global awards programme that
: seeks to inspire a new genera-
? tion of entrepreneurs in
? emerging economies by iden-
i tifying, rewarding, and pro-
? moting outstanding businesses
? that can serve as role models.
i The Bahamas Chamber of
? Commerce, the Bahamas
? Development Bank (BDB)
? and the Inter-American
? Development Bank (IDB)
? came out to show support for
: Pioneers of Prosperity during
? a launch event yesterday at
? the Bahamas Development
? Bank.
: The event was opened by
? Anthony Woodside, acting
? managing director of the
? BDB, Dionisio D’ Aguilar,
i? president of the Chamber of
? Commerce and Sharon Miller,
? operations manager at the
i IDB.
: “The programme strives to
? create greater prosperity in
? the most challenging of mar-
: kets. This is especially impor-
? tant, as we all know, given the
? global economic situation.
? Pioneers of Prosperity is
? founded on the fact that inno-
? vative ideas and dynamic busi-
? ness models exist in even the
? most challenging of markets,
: and that greater prosperity
? will ensue if these local mod-
? els of success are better under-
i? stood and replicated effective-
: ly,” said Ms Miller.
? The event was attended by
? financial experts from leading
? local banks as well as a num-
: ber of entrepreneurs.
? In addition to being eligible
i for grants of up to $100,000 to
? invest in technical infrastruc-
: ture and training for their
? companies, winners of the
? award will be connected to
? networks of technical experts,
? potential investors, and other
? cutting-edge entrepreneurs on
? the local, regional, and global
i level.
: Applications for the Pio-
i neers of Prosperity Award
? must be submitted online. The
? application period will close
? on March 9.

» JOHN HARDY

iD):

DIAMONDS*®

INTERNATIONAL

Beaumont House, Bay Street
Tel: 242-322-1821 or 242-325-3837
www.Diamondsinternational.com





THE TRIBUNE



© In brief Acquittal of man who confessed [ERRAIHESS Seer
testify in murder re-trial

Large quantity of
marijuana found

A 28-YEAR-OLD man
is assisting the police in
their investigation into the
discovery of a large quanti-
ty of marijuana yesterday.

According to police, the
drugs were found in a bushy
area off Matthew Street,
Nassau Village, at around
11am.

POLICE confiscated
three handguns and an
assortment of ammunition
while in Redland Acres yes-
terday.

Officers were on patrol
in the area around noon
when they discovered an
old microwave oven which
contained two 9mm hand-
guns and a .380 handgun.

In addition, police dis-
covered an assortment of
bullets.

No arrests have been
made in relation to this dis-
covery.

Educators
tour coppice
forest of
EARTH Village
Bahamas

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

MORE than 25 educators
from primary, secondary and
tertiary level schools in New
Providence toured the coppice
forest at EARTH Village
Bahamas on Valentine’s Day.

Principals and teachers
joined the EARTH Village
Bahamas’ conservation team
on a nature walk through 180
acres of habitat area located on
Columbus Avenue and St
Albans Drive in Chippingham.

The area was formerly
known as the Perpall Tract
wellfield.

During the guided tour, the
teachers were given a special
preview of educational pro-
grammes being offered to intro-
duce students to nature as a
teaching tool.

Managing director of
EARTH Village Bahamas Ter-
ry Miller said they are commit-
ted to protecting the area.

“This is a very important
habitat of various species. We
want to promote this green
space as a resource lab for stu-
dents of all ages to learn about
any subject from math and sci-
ence through arts and humani-
ties tied with preservation,” he
said.

Mr Miller said children
should experience EARTH
Village Bahamas to better
understand the many benefits
of green spaces to the environ-
ment.

“They filter pollutants and
dust from the air, they provide
shade and lower temperatures
in built-up open spaces and
they even reduce soil erosion
of soil into our waterways,” Mr
Miller said.

The area was described by
scientist Dr Ethan Fried, of the
University of Tampa, as “one of
the last intact and natural land-
scapes existing in New Provi-

to killing ‘highlights reality
of Bahamians’ homophobia’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE acquittal of a man who
confessed to killing another man
who was alleged to be gay high-
lights the disturbing reality of
Bahamians’ homophobia and
“poor social and sexual develop-
ment”, according to a gay and
human rights activist.

Frederick Green-Neely was
acquitted in the Supreme Court of
murdering Dale Williams. Jurors
found that he used justifiable force
when he stabbed Mr Williams
three times after the man, who he
said was known to be gay and HIV-
positive, grabbed his crotch and
told him he had a crush on him.

Green-Neely’s lawyer, Dorsey
McPhee, told the court that he was
“defending his manhood.”

News of the acquittal has been
reproduced as a topic of interest
on several gay news sites interna-
tionally. One of _ these,
Pinknews.co.uk, highlighted the
case as another example of the suc-
cessful and worrying use of the
“gay panic defence.”

“Its use often sparks outrage
from the gay community around
the world because it places the bur-
den of blame on the victim (in this
case, Williams),” said the article.
This was followed by comments
from readers calling for a boycott
of the Bahamas, and for letters of
complaint to be written to the
Bahamian government.

Bahamian Gay and human
rights activist Erin Greene, yester-
day said she was disturbed by the
decision by the jury to acquit

Green-Neely as she believes it sets
a dangerous precedent where
“homosexuality is used as a justifi-
cation for murder.”

And she claimed it shows some
Bahamians have “more sympathy”
for a person who claims to have
been subject to an unsolicited sex-
ual approach by a gay person than
for a gay person who is killed for
attempting an unwanted advance
on someone.

Ms Greene called for a “review”
of a number of cases where those
committing alleged crimes against
gay people said that they were act-
ing in self defence but where this
was questionable.

Jurors

“T think there are possibly a
number of cases of men being mur-
dered that may have been adjudi-
cated incorrectly because the man
will claim that he was on the verge
of being raped and they will receive
sufficient sympathy from the
jurors.”

“Fear of rape is real, but the false
construction of fear of rape by
someone of the same sex as a jus-
tification for murder is dangerous
and it needs to be addressed by the
legislation and the judiciary,” she
said.

“More importantly we need to
investigate it as a gay community,
as a Bahamian community,” she
said. “We need to find out how we
allowed this to happen and how
we can stop it.”

However, Bernard Turner,
Director of Public Prosecutions in
the Attorney General’s Office, said

he does not see the case in the
same light as he has observed oth-
er cases where allegedly gay indi-
viduals were killed in similar cir-
cumstances where juries found
their killers guilty.

“You do have instances of deci-
sions being made on both sides of
the divide by juries on these
issues,” he said. “I would certainly
not say it’s any evidence of a homo-
phobic trend in these verdicts.”

In the case of a Grand Bahama
taxi driver who also killed a man
who he claimed had made an
unwanted sexual advance on him,
Mr Turner pointed out that he was
convicted by the jury, however hav-
ing his conviction later overturned
and a retrial ordered on appeal.

And he pointed out that it is up
to the prosecution to “prove
beyond a reasonable doubt” that
the killer — who would have been
the sole witness apart from the vic-
tim in most cases — did not need to
defend him or her self to this
degree.

If they do not, then juries are
justified in acquitting the individual
of the murder charge, he suggested.
He said that the Attorney Gener-
al’s office cannot appeal decisions
by juries, but only question if the
judge may have misdirected them
based on a point of law.

Ms Greene linked the case and
its outcome to what she said is
Bahamian’s “poor social and sexu-
al development” on the whole, with
some people being unable to relate
to others in an appropriate way.

This fact manifests itself in the
high rate of rape, incest and abuse
generally in The Bahamas, she sug-
gested.

PLP nomination hopeful says
the Police Act is a non-issue

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PLP nomination hopeful Paul Moss
criticised the government and his own
party for focusing too much on the Police

Act.

He said the Act is a non-issue, and
there are more important matters that
should be commanding the attention of
the government and the official opposi-
tion — for example the suffering economy.

Noting that people have been calling
him from around the country seeking
help, looking for jobs, or just hoping
someone will raise the issue, Mr Moss
said politicians should be discussing how
they can aid those who are unemployed, homeless,
or simply struggling to make ends meet.

“T have spoken to respected persons internation-
ally who have said to me that the Bahamas has not
yet even begun to experience difficulties because
of this economic downturn. So the government
ought to take this matter really seriously and call for
a bipartisan forum of persons who understand the

economy or have ideas,” he said.

A good starting point, Mr Moss said, would be to
lower the country’s prime lending rate so that
adjustable mortgage rates can be decreased, there-
by easing the burden on homeowners.

“At the same time, this would stimulate persons

Paul Moss



now.

it is a starting point.

“They also have to put some kind of
package together so that landlords can be
in a position to give some kind of break
to these persons who may be having a
difficulty paying their rent. Because the
alternative would be that these persons
would be out on the street, and that does-
n’t help anybody,” he said.

Mr Moss said he finds it difficult to
understand why the Bahamas put on such
a “show” during the official visit of the
Vice Premier of State Council of the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China.

Nor is he enthusiastic about the
Bahamas’ decision to borrow more than
$160 million from China, only to use it on
road works. This, he said, is not the kind
of stimulus packages that the country needs right

“They ought to be trying to borrow sufficient
funds to start the construction of a new hospital. I
was at the Princess Margaret Hospital, and I can
tell you, if it does not cut your heart to see people sit-
ting in wheelchairs, loitering around the Accident
and Emergency Room, dying and crying out for

help — no one around to help them, no beds avail-

able.

getting mortgages inside the market. And the ques- _ place.

tion has to be, what are we doing? It is clear that the
government does not have the answers. And every-
one is calling for these forums to be had, and I think

he said.

“That is a priority. It cannot be a priority for the
government to talk about broadening the road to
JFK — that is not priority, and it just tells me that our
leaders just have their priorities all in the wrong

“The idea has to be that you have to care for
your people and this is what is lacking here clearly,”

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

FIVE prosecution witnesses
were called to testify yesterday
at the re-trial into the February
2006 murder of local business-
man Keith Carey.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown
and Dwight Knowles are
charged with Mr Carey’s mur-
der and are also facing charges
of armed robbery and conspir-
acy to commit armed robbery.

Carey, 43, a married father
of three and former high school
coach was shot and killed on
the steps of the Bank of the
Bahamas on Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway before he was
able to deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Service
Station that he operated.

Detective Sergeant Earl
Thompson, a firearms examin-
er, testified that on October 23,
2006 he collected several items
connected to the case. He said
that after an examination, he
was able to identify them as two
fired 9mm Luger cartridges, two
unfired cartridge cases and two
fired 9mm Luger bullets.

Sergeant Thompson said he
determined that all of the car-
tridge cases came from the same
firearm but could not make a
distinction regarding the bul-
lets.

He said that a Glock 9mm
semi-automatic pistol could
have fired the bullets and that
based on the physical evidence,
the gun must have been fired
twice.

Officer

During cross-examination by
lawyer Craig Butler, the officer
admitted that he had never
been given a weapon to exam-
ine.

A 21-year-old woman, who
said she had known murder
accused Jamal Glinton for near-
ly 20 years, also testified.

The woman said she had
known Glinton for 18 years and
was his neighbour. She said that
in 2006, she and a female friend
worked at the Englerston
Urban Renewal Project at the
Police Headquarters on East
Street. The prosecution asked
that both women’s names be
withheld.

The woman testified that on
the morning of February 27,
2006, her colleague came to her
home and after the witness had
dressed, they both headed for

a) ig pe et |

re \i



She said they saw Glinton,
who offered them a ride to
work in a Nissan Maxima, with
two other men.

The witness said she did not
take note of the other men, and
that she and her friend arrived
at work around 9.45am.

Mickey Trevor Wright, a
cousin of defendant Dwight
Knowles, testified that some
time between late February and
early March 2006, he had a con-
versation with Knowles about
a “situation” concerning a white
Maxima which the prosecution
alleges was the getaway car in
Carey’s murder.

He said Knowles had
instructed him to go to Regi-
nald Rigby’s garage and make
some mechanical repairs to a
car.

Wright said he had seen his
cousin in a Maxima before but
could not say if that was the
same one.

Wright also told the court
that he had been detained by
police for four days and pres-
sured to tell officers “what they
wanted to hear” regarding the
car.

Medical practitioner Dr
Darin Donaldson also took the
stand, telling the court that he
had examined Sean Brown on
March 24, 2006, and that the
accused appeared to be well and
did not complain of any injuries.

He said that Brown did tell
him that he was in an accident
in 2005 and that he had four fin-
gers amputated from his left
hand.

Dr Donaldson said Brown
still had stitches in his hand at
the time of the examination.

During cross- examination by
Brown’s attorney Dorsey
McPhee, Dr Donaldson said
that the accused had never told
him that police had tried to
apply pressure to his injured
hand and that they had put a
plastic bag over his head to suf-
focate him.

He said that if the accused
had told him this, he would
have made a note of it.

The witness also said he
examined Dwight Knowles, but
noted nothing significant.

Assistant Commissioner of
Police Quinn McCartney, a
forensic chemist, testified that
on March 8, 2006, he received
two glass tubes containing
Carey’s blood, a glass tube con-
taining his urine and another
glass tube containing his stom-
ach contents.

The case will resume on
Monday at llam.

The Mlall« anihen
BOA OFFICE OPENS AT Dict AM DAILY

EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 20th, 2009

TS WUEACoESTOUL ew | 5 [40 [ WA [5 [uo [5

dence.”

EARTH Village Bahamas is
a project for social health con-
servation and preservation that
contains rich vegetation, insects,

Vehicle Purchasing
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SUZUKI DODGE

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380-FLIX

building, promote leadership
skills, enhance individual devel-
opment, enhance physical
development, improve problem
solving skills and expand cre-
ativity and imagination.

Beryl Gray, principal of
Oakes Field Primary, said she
enjoyed her experience in the
forest.

“We had a wonderful time
in the forest and our school will
take advantage of the outdoor
learning programmes and activ-
ities being offered,” she said.

Mts Gray said she got 32 per
cent of her staff to participate in
the nature walk on their day
off and as a result won a free
membership for all students
and teachers through the end
of the year.

le

w ~

No, HagglepPr Pricing” y a

—A



=
u

|

ZNS BIH



Hn

= Constant Everyday Low Prices!

<=

= wWW.preownedbahamas.com
= Thompson Blvd. Ph325-0881/2 Fax: 325-0883
HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN KIA SUZU

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Mount Tabor
to launch its

third housing

subdivision

JUST one
year after
Mount Tabor
Full Gospel
Baptist
Church
opened its
second subdi-
vision, the
church
has now
announced
the launch of

a third hous- Bishop Neil Ellis
ing area —



Mount Tabor Gardens in south-

west New Providence.

The new subdivision, located :
off Carmichael Road, offers }
“middle-class” housing to

Bahamians.

“This latest project is the third
in a series of initiatives designed
to not only fuel the local econo- }
my, but to help Mount Taborites
in particular, and Bahamians in
general become home owners }
and put scores of unemployed i
residents back to work,” the

church said in a statement.

Construction in Mount Tabor
Gardens has already begun and
senior pastor of Mount Tabor
Bishop Neil Ellis said: “Housing }
our people has become a part of
who we are. It has always been
an integral part of the social }
agenda of our church. I believe
the lack of housing is stillone of
the greatest social ills facing our }

country.”
Over the past two decades,

Mount Tabor said, it has assisted
several families in not only the }
acquisition of their homes, but
im some instances moving into
completely furnished homes debt

free.
In 2007, Mount Tabor Estates,

located off John F Kennedy Dri- i

ve, was officially opened.

The following year, the intro- }
duction of Mount Tabor Estates }
East “provided yet another
opportunity for economic }
empowerment and home own- }
ership for our people,” the }

church said.

ia
UUs)
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157


























































Police officer
found guilty of

accepting bribe
MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK attached to the West End Police
Tribune Freeport Reporter = Station.
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net Lewis testified that Martin r< . .
— told him to give him $3,000 not The public is invited to attend a

FREEPORT - Police officer | show up in court for Lewis’ case.
Pierre Martin, who was found He said he gave the officer
guilty in the Supreme Court of $1,500 on one occasion and

NEW PROVIDENCE ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
accepting a bribe, will be sen- $1,000 another time

tenced in April. The jury delivered an unani- I OWN ME ET | NG

Martin, 25, was also charged mous guilty verdict on one count
with soliciting a bribe, but was of accepting a bribe, but deliv- On Tuesday, February 24th, at 7;00p.m.
found not guilty of the charge. ered a not guilty verdict of eight at Super Club Breezes

Justice Vera Watkins, who to one on the count of solicit- aa = a
presided over the trial, hasseta ing a bribe, and a not guilty ver- hosted by The Minist ry of Works & Tra Asport,

sentence hearing for April 21. dict of seven to two on the sec-
In the meantime, Martin was ond count of accepting a bribe.

granted $10,000 bail with two Lawyer Carlson Shurland rep- ike reat trae Ta Tie |

sureties on Wednesday by the resented Martin. Corridor 4
Supreme Court. Prosecutors Jillian Williams, "

The condition of the bail Simon Rolle and Erica Kemp Ete Avenue to John F. Coes hd Drive)
requires that he surrender his of the Attorney General’s Office Corridor 5

travel documents and report to appeared on behalf of the
Central Police Station before Crown.

7pm on Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays.

(John F. Kennedy Drive to West Bay Street)

Martin was arrested for r ATG Speakers will include
pee ae + Mr, Francis Clarke, Project Engineer in the Ministry of Works
He was charged with one count . (who will speak on Land Acquisitions)
of soliciting a bribe and two A “4 7 !
counts of accepting a bribe. 7 “ Mr. Damien Francis,
It is alleged that Martin —— [whe will speak on the History of the CNPRIP)

bribed Garrick Lewis on Feb-
ruary 14, 2007.

Lewis was arrested on Febru- The Bashers Also in attendance will be
ary 5 at West End for obscene Sees ie The Hon. Neko Grant, Minister of Works & Transport
language, resisting arrest and i edness Espo as Pe’ =
making threats of death against The Hon. Tommy Tumquest, Minister of National Security
Martin, who was at time February 26the-2Â¥ah, 2008 The Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health

MP for Killamey

Caves Village Professional
Turn Key Office Suites For Rent

“The premier choice for serious business” ten pe TR UC Tl O N

1,661 sq. ft. $5,813.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees a _

1,083 sq. ft. $3,790.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees i WT
839 sq. ft. $2,936.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees

850 sq. ft. $2,975.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees :

Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on
327-1575 or 477-7610
Email: simon @cavesheights.com

With Heartfelt Thanks

And Fond and Loving Memories
ymasL states

Kisskadee Drive

Airis] ae | eae ra ao

: ; ite ol



Sunrise February 21st 1946
Sunset February 20th 2008

The Broken Chain LD me COMPLETED INFRASTRUCTURE INCLUDES:



Paved Roads ¢ Water & Sewerage

We little knew that morning that God was going to call your name. Ss > A pene Sabie @ Beccles Stier gis
in life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. - RECREATIONAL PARK INCLUDES:






Tennis Courts * Ornamental Pond Jogging Trails

lt broke our hearts to lose you Paul you did nat go alone. : Playground ¢ Basketball Court Gazebos ¢ Grills



For part of us with you, the day God called your home.

Rapidly developing commyntty

You left us peaceful memories; your love is still our guide

And though we cannot see you, you are always Dy our side. | , _ iy = : ol | i O 0 LY 23 LOTS LE FT
Our farnily chain is broken, and nothing seems the same, t : ! .
But as God call us one by one, the chain will link again. ; f= OUSE

We the family of the late Paul D. Jenoure would like to thank you for your prayers, words ut te RY 21, 2009
of encouragement, floral arrangements and visits. May God continue to bless you. a Ve r 1 0 AM TO 5p M




Special thanks go to Mr. & Mrs. Raleigh Bulter and the staff of Butlers Funeral Homes a. fees | o wl On the spot
and Crematorium, Rev. Alonzo Hinsey and the Golden Gates Native Baptist Church fam- ~~ y mee Tt Bank financing available
ily, Benjamin Butterfield, Renee Moss, Val Maura, Willard Hepburn, vy Knowles & family, :

Keith McSweeny, Criag Russell, Richard Fawkes, Nurse Marsha McQueen and June t 7 2 FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL:



Grant of Coastline Community Home family, The Prison Association Staff, Tactical Unit of

H.M.P., First Caribean Bank Receivables Managements Family, The Freeport Families.
The Family hoi CYL RYLEY OVAL)

Sanctuary Investments Ltd.
Church Street Plaza, Shirley & Church Sts.



PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



mi FROM PAGE ONE

Man accused of shooting police
officer is arraigned in court

FROM page one

2290 Bruce Chisholm and Tia
Thurston. It is also alleged that
Miller on Tuesday was found
in possession of a handgun with
the intent to prevent the lawful
arrest by Detective Corporal
518 Johnson and Detective
Constable 2290 Chisholm.
Miller was not required to plead
to the charges.

Miller pleaded not guilty to
assaulting Tia Thurston with a
deadly weapon and opted to
have the matter tried in the
Magistrate’s Court. He also
pleaded not guilty to causing
grievous harm to Emmanuel
Alfred Rolle. Miller is expected
to appear in Court Five, Bank
Lane, on Monday for a bail and
fixture hearing.

Miller’s attorney Roger
Gomez Jr told the court that he

had been instructed by his client
that he was beaten while in
police custody. Miller raised his
shirt and the leg of his trousers
to show the court his injuries.

Mr Gomez said his client had
informed him that a plastic bag
had been placed over his head
by Corporal Ferguson of the
Homicide Unit and that Detec-
tive Corporal 1675 Cash had
beat him in his head.

that Miller had blood on his
jeans and that areas of his black
shirt, which was under the
orange one he wore yesterday,
had been cut out so as to con-
ceal the bloodstains.

Miller admitted that he had
been taken to hospital for treat-
ment. Magistrate Bethel also
made a note on his remand war-
rant that he receive further
treatment at Her Majesty’s

The attorney told the court Prison.

Baliamas resort bosses accused of exploiting Mexican workers

FROM page one

paid $79.50 - or the equivalent of 862.66

Mexican pesos.

Senator Zalvidea stated that, after
receiving these complaints, he informed

the Council of the National Human
Rights Commission about the exploita-
tion of these workers, who were being
“forbidden to leave the work area during
hours of sleep or food.”

The proposal was supported by Sena-
tors from all parties, and the Senate

=o
















ls It time for
a fresh start?

Coe Sena eee
See aia a








wi second chances! §

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY





aa SERVIC ES

Adutt Education .........

Worship Senice

SON SAMiCe oo...

Eyaning Worsh

no Senta

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Sater ive

Mingionetes [rg

ec hiray

15] 4-14 Wg

Quy 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.

South Miné

+} MAHI q

RADIO MINISTRY

Sundays at 8:30) qum

~ ihe | - TERAPLE TIAA

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

ee Ce RPE ||
[MRR Ra ae Ce eM Og be
Ele mE TE tia ER

Securit y

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Dectors Hospital

1.88
2.27
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.01
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

ROYAL = FIDEL

Money at Work

approved the request by the executive to
redouble its efforts for repatriation of
the workers.

Attempts to reach Director of Immi-
gration Jack Thompson and company
executives were unsuccessful up to press
time last night.

Three men in custody over
12th homicide of the year

FROM page one

four stab wounds, police said.

The victim was dressed in blue jeans, a red shirt, blue jacket, with
black and white tennis shoes.

A police source revealed the victim had no legal status in the
country.

Supt Moss said initial evidence suggested the victim was killed
about an hour before police arrived. The fact that he died while
clutching money suggests an attempted robbery, but a clear motive
had not been established, police said.

Supt Moss said a murder weapon was not recovered at the scene,
but the nature of the wounds indicated the victim was stabbed
with a sharp instrument.

The country recorded its 11th homicide when a man, who was
shot in the chest last month, died while in hospital on February 15.

Oscarsin Williams, the victim, and another man got into an alter-
cation sometime after Spm on January 16 on Cox Way.

During the dispute, according to police, Williams was shot in the
chest. He was taken to hospital where he died on February 15.

Heico Duran Fowler, 23, of Palm Breeze Road, was on bail
charged with Williams’ attempted murder when the victim died. The
charge was later upgraded to murder.

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

2.

Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira

Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
cy hone number 325-5712
AIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ITY

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,678.29 | CHG -0.22 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -34.07 | YTD % -1.99
FINDEX: CLOSE 821.52 | YTD -1.60% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW. BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.16
2.40
7.80
11.00
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS $
0.070
0.992
0.319
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.255
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Change Daily Vol. Div $
1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.15
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50

10.00 0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

S2wk-Low

RND Holdings

ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets

RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CPFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3856
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.
Previous Close
Today's Close
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Securit
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

T%
Prime + 1.75%
T%
Prime + 1.75%

100.00
100.00
100.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
6.00
0.35

Ask $

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Last Price P/E
14.60
6.00

0.35

Weekly Vol.
8.42
6.25
0.40

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

31.72
11.23
0.45

33.26

29.00
14.00
0.55

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

12.04
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NA Vv
1.4387
2.9230
1.4376
3.3856

12.6180
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0401
1.0330
1.0410

YTD%

-10.83

-13.38

Last 12 Months
4.40
-2.54
4.38

-10.83
5.74
0.56
-3.59
0.00
-13.38
4.01

Div $ Yield %
30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-08
31-Jan-09

0.35
-0.58
0.28

5.74

0.56
-3.59

0.00

4.01
3.30
4.10

31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

3.30
4.10

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid &
Ask $

Last Price
Weekly Vol.

- Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
- Selling price of Colina and fidelity

- Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Roberts links fuel
duty to BEC woes

FROM page one

2003, that is primarily responsible for the company’s fiscal tribu-
lations.

His comments come as BEC announced that it is restructuring its
executive management team in a move to “strengthen the organ-
isation.”

A two-line statement released on Thursday said the exercise
“would result in a number of changes at the executive management
level.”

It said further details would be included in a forthcoming press
release. Yesterday, Mr Roberts said he understands that three
people have already been told their services are no longer needed
- all of whom are in the company’s financial department.

The company’s Chief Financial Officer will be replaced, he said,
along with two other senior people in that section. Calls to BEC for
confirmation and further comment were not returned up to press
time yesterday.

This comes after Minister of the
Environment with responsibility
for BEC, Earl Deveaux, said last
week that the organisation is
“financially compromised” and
seeking around $200 million in
funding. He blamed last year’s
high oil prices and the previous
government’s decision to cut the
electricity rate.

While stating that he was await-
ing a full explanation of the justi-
fication for the move, Mr Roberts
said he felt the restructuring is a
“rather haphazard approach to dealing with a serious matter” and
he hit out at those involved for not being clearer about what
changes were taking place.

He also claimed that the move was unfair on those who have “giv-
en long years of dedicated service” to BEC.

The former minister charged that the corporation is broke
because “the FNM government failed to act.”

“They claim that it had something to do with, one, the high
price of oil, which is true, and two, with the rate decrease. Logically,
if it had something to do with the rate decrease, how come with sev-
eral audits completed since the rate decrease they all showed BEC
making money? Something had to happen since then,” he said.

“The problem with BEC is that in its surcharge did not take into
account in its calculation the duty that it pays on fuel and BEC was
absorbing that. Well you know what the price of fuel went up to
over the past year so that’s been a lot of money BEC’s been
absorbing.”

He said that duty was not passed on to customers in the rate dur-
ing his 2002-2006 tenure as minister with responsibility for the
corporation because at that time “it was small.”

However, some may question how feasible passing on the duty
cost to the customer could have been, given that thousands of
Bahamians had already been disconnected last year due to an
inability to afford their electricity bills, and many businesses were
being put under serious strain for the same reason at a time when
oil hit record highs.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



“The problem with
BEC is that in its
surcharge it did not
take into account in
its calculation the
duty that it pays on
fuel and BEC was
absorbing that.”


























BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH

SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching iiam4& 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - 2NS 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

PasiorcH. Mills

"Preaching the Bible as is, bo men as they are”
| Pastor: A. Mills * Prone: 393-0563 * Box N-a22 |

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22ND, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Andre Bethel
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Marilyn Tinker
7:00 a.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Sis. Rosemary Williams

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

Grace and ert Wesleyan erties
4A Soclety of The Free Methodist Church of
Horth &merica

WHERE GODS ADORED AND EFERVONE [8 4APFIRWED

Worship Tune: Efacm, & 6pon.
Prayer Time: (6-1 3a.
Charch School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Bex $8-5631

Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324.2587



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 7A



s our company has grown, so too
EN... our family.
We continue to build upon our late
patriarch Tyrone d’Arville’s dream of
keeping family ties strong as we honor
wife and mother Lynne. In this our 20th
year of doing business in the Bahamas,
the d’Arville family would like to take
the opportunity to thank our wonderful
employees who continue to support our
goals and exceed our expectations. We are
only part of the larger family that has made

Furniture Plus a 20 year success story.

NASSAU

Tel: (242) 397-PLUS (7587)

Town Centre Mall » Fax: (242) 325-6368
Monday - Saturday 9am - 9pm

GRAND BAHAMA

Tel: (242) 352-PLUS (7587)

Madeira Croft » Fax: (242) 352-9823

Mon - Fri 9am - 6pm » Saturday 9am - 4pm
FP920

Included in this family are our loyal
customers who form the centerpiece for

our 20th anniversary celebration.

We sincerely thank all of you for your
continued patronage of Furniture Plus.
Your choice to shop at home and support
a Bahamian company has contributed to
the local economy by keeping a growing
number of your friends and neighbors
gainfully employed. Thanks to you, we
have soared from our humble beginnings
as a furniture store into a national retail

chain with locations in Nassau, Grand



Bahama and the worldwide Web offering
beautiful furniture, appliances, electronics,
home furnishings, plus so, so much more

at www.furnitureplus.com

Thank you Bahamas,

from our family to yours!





Nassau @ Grand Bahama « World Wide Web
www.furnitureplus.com





PAGE 8A, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





We ’re





into our BRAND
NEW Showroom!



LORLSWALNS

(/ One Week Only
(j February 23-28

Because we’d much rather
SELL IT than

MOVE IT!

FYP - 188 Wulff Road
Open Mon-Fri 7:00am-4:00pm, Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm

BUlainGOknercanhamas|

Tel: 323-3973 or 325-3976 Fax: 322-3937

Web: www.buildersmallbahamas.com Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com





©
a
no}
wi
oO
4
=
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9



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS
VICE PREMIER OF THE STATE COUNCIL VISITS A ee







VICE Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China Hui Liangyu flew to Grand
Bahama on Wednesday as part of his official two-day visit to the Bahamas.

In Grand Bahama, the Vice Premier and the Chinese delegation were taken on a tour of Freeport’s
tourist attractions and its industrial sector, including the Lucayan Harbour and the Freeport Container
Port, which is owned and operated by the Chinese-based Hutchison Whampoa group.

HIS Excellency Hui
Liangyu, Vice Pre-
mier of the State
Council of The Peo-
ple's Republic of
China, is greeted and
presented flowers by
a Chinese-Bahamian
student of Discovery
Primary School at
the Grand Bahama
International Airport
on Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 18. The Vice
Premier and his del-
egation arrived in
Freeport as part of
their two-day official
visit to the Bahamas.

A TOUR guide with
Freeport's Garden of =.
the Groves points out’ =
one of the island's ,
native palms to His
Excellency Hui Liangyu,
Vice Premier of the
State Council of The
People's Republic of
China, during a tour of
the nature and wildlife
facility on Wednesday,

February 18.





a

AN official of the Chinese-based Hutchison Whampoa group, owner and operator of the
Freeport Container Port, explains details of the development to His Excellency Hui
Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of The People's Republic of China, during a
boat tour of Freeport's Industrial Park on Wednesday, February 18.

a _ a

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& 160z Pepsi

HIS Excellency Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the

State Council of The People's Republic of China, is

greeted by Minister of Housing Kenneth Russell at

the Grand Bahama International Airport on Wednes-
e day, February 18.

The Vice Premier and his delegation arrived in

eer Recipe® Only oe part of their two-day official visit to the



A MEMBER of
the Chinese del-
egation enjoys a
dolphin hand-
shake at Dolphin
Encounters,
Freeport on
Wednesday,
February 18.



ee

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Bounty’s super absorbent quilts soak up just about anything PLUS its superior
strength when wet allows each sheet to be reused. Try Bounty paper towels to take
the stress out of disastrous household mess.

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Bar on hotel
industrial deal

registration is
removed

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE Supreme Court on
Wednesday night lifted an
injunction that, for several days,
had prevented the new hotel
sector industrial agreement
from being registered with the
Industrial Tribunal.

The injunction had been
obtained by opponents of the
current Bahamas Hotel, Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) leadership, who
were represented by attorney
Koed Smith, after their efforts
to prevent the signing of the
agreement with the Bahamas
Hotel Employers Association
(BHEA) failed.

Kirk Wilson, the union’s first
vice-president, and Raymond
Wright had attempted to block
the agreement’s actual signing
on February 2, 2009, by pound-
ing on the door to the Depart-
ment of Labour’s conference
room and demanding entry.
They had alleged that the new
industrial agreement was illegal,
because it was not approved by
the union’s membership or
members of the executive coun-
cil.

However, the union’s general
secretary, Leo Douglas, told
Tribune Business yesterday that
as per the terms of the union’s
constitution, the decision to
approve the new contract was
his and president Roy Cole-
brooke’s alone.

“Under the constitution, we
find that the president and gen-
eral secretary are the chief
negotiators, and that gives us
the power to negotiate. It was
revealed in the court that there
is nothing in the constitution or
rules of our union that says we
have to go to the membership
or executive council - we sign on
behalf of the union,” he said.

According to Mr Douglas, he
and executive members of the
union spent some nine hours in
Justice Claire Hepburn’s court
on Wednesday, awaiting her
decision on whether to remove
the injunction.

In the end, she ruled that the
matter was for the jurisdiction
of the Industrial Tribunal. “She
said the power lies with the
Industrial Tribunal,” Mr Dou-
glas said, resulting in the injunc-
tion’s removal.

“Wilson and other officers
chose not to come into any
meeting to sit and hear the pro-
posed contract that Colebrooke
and Douglas negotiated,” Mr
Douglas said.

Mr Wilson last night declined
to comment on the injunction’s
lifting when contacted by Tri-
bune Business, saying he want-
ed to see the judge’s decision
first.

SEE page 5B





THE TRIBUNE &

u

FRIDAY,

ine

FEBRUARY 20,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Financial industry must
‘reposition’ in 10-15 years

Wi Ex-BFSB chair argues sector needs totally new business
model, based on double tax treaties and domestic corporate
tax, to survive long-term

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas must “transi-
tion” its financial services
industry to a completely new
business model within the next
10-15 years if it is to survive
long-term, a senior attorney
said yesterday, with the future
likely to involve double tax
treaties and a ‘corporate tax
environment’ for local com-
panies.

Michael Paton, a former
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) chairman and
head of the Lennox Paton law
firm’s financial services prac-
tice, told Tribune Business
yesterday that this nation
needed to re-position its finan-
cial sector and develop a time-
line for doing so, given the
external pressures that are
only likely to intensify.

Government policymakers,
the BFSB and other industry
organisations and individual
institutions were well aware



Michael Paton

of this, Mr Paton added, the
issue having figured promi-
nently at the recent Financial;
Services Retreat in Grand
Bahama.

However, he said the
Bahamas would “not do any-
thing” to jeopardise its exist-
ing book of financial services
business, and would look to
retain this during any transi-

$30k outlay produces
a model’ investment

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

MODELS?242, a fledgling
Bahamian model management
agency, is carving out a niche
for itself in the global fashion
industry through just an initial
$30,000 investment by its
founder, having signed its top
talent to a deal with New
York’s VNY Model Manage-
ment.

For 17-year-old Models242
model, Gabrielle Moss, endors-
ing a contract with the well-
recognised New York agency
represented an exciting oppor-
tunity not only for her, but also
acted a catalyst for Bahamian
management firms that have
not recognised the possibility
of moving talent outside the
Bahamas borders.

Models242’s founder and
operations director, Mark
Humes, said his dream to start a
model management company
grew out of his confidence in
the ability of Bahamian talent to
make money in the $300 billion
global fashion industry.

Government urged: More
public sector restructuring

* Senior accountant applauds moves so far, but calls
for coherent strategy, not ‘piecemeal approach’

* Says reforming government agencies, to make them
more ‘efficient and perform at higher level’, critical
for Bahamas competitiveness when economy turns

around

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government must develop a coher-
ent strategy for reforming public sector
agencies, a senior accountant said yester-
day, backing such moves as crucial to
enhancing efficiency and competitiveness
for “when the economy comes around”.

Raymond Winder, managing partner at
Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas), applauded
the Government for its shake-up of senior
management in the Police Force, Customs
and the Immigration Department, but
warned that the Government may have to
invest an even greater level of resources in
reforming all public sector agencies.

“That’s going to be more and more of an

PEMA NG

issue,” Mr Winder said. “In more of these
government agencies, the only way to get them performing at a better
level is through restructuring, because the people are not going to

change.”

SEE page 7B



"Done correctly, this business
could be a very lucrative busi-
ness, and I think people are see-
ing now how it could really
operate and how it could really
function," he said.

Mr Humes moved to New
York at the age of 18, as an
aspiring fashion photographer,
and immediately began work-
ing with several established
firms, under numerous estab-
lished photographers.

When he left New York, he
pursued his tertiary education

SEE page 5B

for a better life

Oroup pensions

tion to a new business model.
The international financial ser-
vices sector and its clients
would also be exempt from
any tax imposed on the
‘domestic’ Bahamian econo-
my.
“T think it’s quite apparent
that the OECD is re-ener-
gised,” Mr Paton told Tribune
Business. “They’re coming out
with a new blacklist, which
we'll be on, because we do not
have enough Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs) with other countries.

“T don’t think it'll have that
dramatic an impact, but the
pressure is coming through, it
will be much more intense
than it has been in the last five
years, and we'll have to seri-
ously reconsider how we repo-
sition the Bahamas going for-
ward.

“Everyone recognises that
the status quo is no longer

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission.
from the daily report.



PENSION

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Baha Mar ‘moves
forward’ on $2.6b
Chinese agreement

Monday meeting with China Ex-Im
Bank over Cable Beach project ‘went
very well’ but no deal done yet

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Baha Mar “moves a little bit further forward” on con-
cluding an agreement with two Chinese state-owned entities
for its $2.6 billion Cable Beach redevelopment “every time”
the parties meet, Tribune Business was told yesterday, a
meeting on Monday having gone “very well”.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president of gov-
ernmental and external affairs, said that while no deal had
been sealed yet, the resort developer had met with senior
officials from the China Export-Import Bank this week, just
prior to the two-day state visit of China’s Vice Premier of State

Council, Hui Liangyu.

“The meeting went very well. We con-
tinue to make progress,” Mr Sands told
Tribune Business. “We are very encour-
aged with these talks, and we continue to
work towards a finish line in this mat-
ter.”

Mr Sands said he was unable to give a
timeframe for when talks between Baha
Mar, the China Ex-Im Bank and China
State Construction would conclude. How-
ever, Sarkis Izmirlian, Baha Mar’s chief
executive, told this newspaper at Janu-

Ya nmsrlitels ary’s Business Outlook Conference that

it hoped to conclude an agreement with

two Chinese state-owned entities “over
the next six months”, implying that negotiations - if suc-
cessful - could be concluded by summer 2009.

“The fact that we have had multiple meetings, and a num-
ber of visits at the highest level, both from China State Con-
struction and the China Ex-Im Bank, gives us an indication
of their committed approach to this project,” Mr Sands said.

“They like what they see, but we have to work out the
details and come to an agreement between the parties. The
deal is not done yet, but every time we move a little further
forward.”

Mr Sands said Monday’s visiting delegation was headed by
Li Jun, the China Ex-Im Bank’s vice-president. He added
that Baha Mar had previously met with China State Con-
struction’s president, and in Monday’s delegation was also
that company’s president for its America operations.

“The highest level persons in these companies have made
multiple trips to the Bahamas, in terms of due diligence,
further deliberations with our principals in terms of trying to

SEE page 7B



FG FINANCIAL

PENSIONS & INVESTMENTS

C= attract the cream of the crop
[7 keep present employees happy
[- guarantee staff retirement savings

x all of the above





PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE is hereby given that ARIST ROGER of EAST

STREET SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20" day
of February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





















































CELEHARVEST TRADING LIMITED
(Company number 71,368 B)

An International Business Company

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of CELEHARVEST TRADING
LIMITED hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of
CELEHARVEST TRADING LIMITED has been completed in ac-
cordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that CELEHARVEST
TRADING LIMITED has been dissolved as of 12th day of February,
2009.

Dated this 18th day of February, 2009

Pine Limited
Liquidator

CASH REWARD

Male Rottweiller missing!

West Bay Street, in the Goodmans
Bay Beach area, go slow bend
Dog needs medication A.S.A-P.,
black with tan, slim build.

Any info to assist contact

535-7741

80 PICTET

1605

Bank staff ‘not qualified’
to assess business plans

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

MANY commercial bank loan
officers are not equipped with the
knowledge to properly evaluate
business plans, the administrator
of the Government-sponsored
Venture Capital Fund said yes-
terday, adding that this hindered
many aspiring entrepreneurs’ bid

A
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

to access capital. Jerome Gomez,
an accountant with Baker Tilly
Gomez, said accessing capital was
the most frustrating aspect of
starting a business in the
Bahamas.

He said that often, inexperi-
enced loan officers, due to their
lack of knowledge of certain mar-
kets and business environments,
became a formidable obstacle to

REQUEST FOR

QUOTATION

M-100, Test Well Drilling

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks the services
of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling
Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope

of services includes:

Drilling and pump testing of a 6” pilot hole;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Return Well;

Flow testing of the 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Discharge testing of the 10° Feed Water Return Well;
Geophysical logging and flow testing of Pilot Hole and wells;
Water temperature logging and analysis of water quality and

chemistry;

Professional supervision, (i.e. Hydrologist).

Request for Quotation Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009.

Request for Quotation closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at

3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:
Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

INFORMATION SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

-Excellent organizer, communicator and coordinator.

-Responsible, thorough and resourceful.

-Flexible, committed and willing to invest long hours as needed.
-Innovative and willing to learn new technology.
-Ability to function independently but able to work as part of a team.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Microsoft Office
-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Lotus Notes.
-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with basic hardware

(PC, server, printers...).

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Windows XP &

tools.

-Knowledge of and experience with Windows 2003 servers

administration.

-Knowledge of and experience with Active Directory.
-Knowledge of and experience with PDA’s & Mobility.
-Knowledge of and experience with AS/400 operation and system

administration.

-Knowledge of and experience with telecommunications and network.

-Basic knowledge of Unix Administration.

-At least five (5) years experience in System Administration and User
Support, at least two (2) years of which should be in a Bank/Trust

environment.

-Written and spoken French would be an asset.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND to:-
The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park

West Bay Street & Blake Road

Nassau, Bahamas

APPLICATION DEADLINE: FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

Offices in

Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London, Luxembourg,
Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome, Singapore, Tokyo, Turin, Zurich

email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

BSi

entrepreneurs obtaining credit.

Many financial institutions, par-
ticularly banks and insurance
companies, lacked any expertise
on staff to evaluate business plans
and the needs of small businesses,
properly, Mr Gomez said,
because it was indeed a different
sort of lending.

“Any person in a bank, let’s
say a teller, can be promoted

tomorrow to a loan officer, and
by simply filling out a form pro-
vided by the bank can lend to you
a $60,000 car, a house, a refriger-
ator, appliances and furniture - it
takes no special skill,” Mr Gomez
told the Bahamas Society of Engi-
neers.

SEE page 3B

Vopak expansion
details unveiled.

A senior Vopak Termi-
nal (Bahamas) official will
address the Grand Bahama
Business Outlook Confer-
ence on the implications of
the company’s planned
$300 million expansion pro-
gramme.

The former Bahamas
Oil Refining Company
(BORCO) was acquired
last year by a consortium
featuring US private equity
firm, First Reserve Corpo-
ration and Dutch-based oil
storage leader, Royal
Vopak.

Shortly thereafter, the
new owners announced
plans to invest more than
$300 million in upgrading



Max Sweeting

and expanding the facility into the largest and leading trans-ship-
ment hub for oil and petroleum products in the region.

Maxwell Sweeting, Vopak Terminal (Bahamas) executive vice-
president, said of Monday’s presentation to the Business Outlook
conference: “I would like to focus on what we would have done
from our inception, that is, April 29, 2008, leading up to today,
specifically as it relates to employment opportunities both with
international contractors and with Vopak Terminals Bahamas

itself.

“T also wish to talk about the next stages of development and
what this is going to mean for the local Grand Bahama communi-

ty.”

Mr Sweeting is a certified general accountant who began his
professional career in 1971 with Touche Ross (now Deloitte &
Touche) as an auditor. In 1978, he joined Bahamas Oil Refining
Company (now Vopak Terminal Bahamas) as financial accountant,
and now serves as the executive vice-president, having served 15
presidents, including the existing managing director of Vopak Ter-

minal Bahamas, T.J. Huizer.

Grand Bahama Business Outlook is organised by The Counsel-
lors Ltd. and will be held at Our Lucaya.

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently accepting

applications for:-

PRIVATE BANKING
RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Manager must have a banking or
financial degree and 7-10 years experience in the offshore banking sector, have
knowledge of international investment instruments & money market, ability to
partner with team members, must be confident regarding customer relations,
investments & portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local
legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices.
Fluency in Italian & French is required.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence
Able to work with minimal supervision
Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers

Maintain & follow up account relationships
Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors
Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking

professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis
Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre

P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted





THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 3B

British American principals meet PM NOTICE

a. INVESTMENT SOLUTIONS
: IN CELEBRATION of
ts end a MANAGEMENT LID.

entity, British Ameri- VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

can Financial paid a
courtesy call on the
Prime Minister.
Established in the
Bahamas in 1920
(almost 90 years
ago), the company
offers a wide array of
products and ser-
vices including insur-
ance, investments,
financial planning and
retirement planning
through offices in
Nassau, Freeport,
Abaco and Exuma.
Pictured (from L-R):
John F. Wilson, direc-
tor and principal:
Basil L. Sands, chair-
man; and |. Chester
Cooper, president
and chief executive.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000 the Disso-
lution of INVESTMENT SOLUTIONS MANAGEMENT
LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Reg-
ister of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 21st January

26’ BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

Bank '
all sta ‘hot qualifie : me
© Price: 595 000.00
© Hull: Fiborgins
© Engiee: Twin farcry OL OP TIMAX, 235 HP, 280 Hoos
0 aSSeSS business plaNS |: ss

OFFICE FROM page 2B

“But who can read those financial statements? Who can interpret the

business environment? Who can do the market research? Who can look
at competition?

Is that available at any of the banking institutions in the Bahamas?
I say it does not exist.”

ALL MUS T G oO Mr Gomez said another reason for the banks’ reluctance to lend to
small businesses was simply because they were too small and unap- tt Outrage in grest condition! Fully with Jipt, Vinh fncher, Chart platten/P4,
pealing to banks. “Small business funding requirements are usually Stereo/CD, Head, Freshanter, Bow cushions. Powered with twin Mercury 225 Optimax and
small, and that is the reason why they don’t tend to appeal to financial aL ,

pueeerea . Be : smart craft pauges,
Sat Feb 2 1 2 00 Qo institutions. Then financial institutions require much more collateral “
than the funds you wish to borrow,” he said.



PHOTO: Peter Rams

The Venture Capital Fund, which Mr Gomez administers, was intro- —_ Optional Equigment
duced to assist small businesses in acquiring capital. In its three year brregral bow pul wfpectunr roller and crate plate — ee
= existence, it has only been able to fund 46 out of 300 applicants. = Boer arciear sorape eyhatrh Totty avg pan oud
Mr Gomez said many individuals come to the fund hoping to start a = Peri Bivtorbowed lormurd deck slang Leaning pout wycocier
business which is in widespread existence already, such as a bar or beau- . “rank Aircbe
ty salon, and therefore are turned down. Other people come to the fund . or Aictsaid Gish bimet shieabes —

Poa apy ar athens aL, ae pale

deep in debt and are in need of a bailout - more than half the 46 com- = Fed haiders sedge, Beh Teds, VA, arte
CAS Hi dhe CARRY panies sponsored by the fund fall into this category. = Gat prepares /
He said that out of the 300 people, only 2 per cent approached the ' iceman natbiesd coor

venture capital fund with any kind of personal savings or collateral. & ‘Vertleal ed balers an tora deck ont

Nit P] t A Though the fund does not require applicants to hold any collateral 2 Sail bidtegg bsrplnia coche
easanh ve or make a down payment, Mr Gomez said he was astounded by the * Sficineiag wheel
number of individuals wanting to be entrepreneurs who have not ‘ anne webrad
«beet org

saved for the occasion. a
Between Jero Ein € Ave “Personal savings have never been a priority for many Bahamuians, ; ieee a oH en
molt becgecomhe Giger

Urveeye Det raunre ay enhcines
- especially those I find who want to start their own business, and I * Parward coming bole
Ge Cc arib Ro ad find it particularly peculiar that you intend to be an entrepreneur but Hycraetk pearing aati
make no plans towards saving money to do so,” Mr Gomez said.

Cz St. Cecilia’s Catholic
The Christian Book Shop
Sprang he Light ofthe Gogeet ireugheus the Bahama

Rosetta Street at Mt. Royal Avenue ¢ T: 322-1306





Church

Bazaar

Venue

Cultural & Heritage Site, Arawak Cay

Saturday 21st, February, a
12NOON - UNTIL




2* PASTRY
*<", «ICE CREAN

*HOT DOGS
* HOOP;LA
,* PONY RIDE
* PUNCH BOARD

* BINGO

* BOUNCING CASTLE
* MUSIC

*FOOD & DRINKS

* BOOKS ETC.

DISCOVER THE LEADER YOU WERE MEANT TO BE!

LEA



International known author and minister, Dr. Myles Munroe
We will be at The Christian Book Shop this Saturday February 21st at
3pm to sign his latest book, Becoming A Leader. You are invited to
come in and purchase your own autographed copy. That's this Saturday
at 3pm, at The Christian Book Shop, Roseta Street,
Dr. Myles Munroe in person.

Come and enjoy

International Food, Music and Festivities





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS ae
Financial industry must ‘reposition’ in 10-15 years

FROM page 1B

valid in the medium to long-
term. But we won’t do any-
thing in the short-term that
jeopardises the business we
already have. The last thing
we want to do is send a mes-
sage that we’re going to capit-
ulate in the short-term. That’s
not the case.”

The transition, he said,
would have to take place over
a 10-15 year period. “We’re
going to have to transition the
sector,” Mr Paton said. ‘It’s
not an overnight evolution, it’s
not a two-year evolution, it’s a
long-term transition, evolu-
tion, and the trick will be to
get everyone to agree to
where it is we want to go, and
the timeline for getting there.



“If we stay where we are
today, we’re going to fill out
the industry in 10-15 years’
time. There'll be nothing to
replace it.”

The Bahamas’ existing
financial services business
model had “served us well for
50-70 years, but it’s not going
to last for another 50-70
years”.

Crisis
Mr Paton said the Bahamas
had to “adapt” to the situa-
tion facing its financial ser-
vices industry, with developed
nations such as the US and
UK now looking to use the

global economic crisis as an
‘excuse’ to launch a fresh

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RUSSIAN CAMEROON INC.



— f—



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138



crackdown on so-called off-
shore centres, even though
their reasons for doing so do
not stand up to scrutiny.

British prime minister Gor-
don Brown said yesterday that
a planned crackdown on off-
shore shelters, used by large
companies to avoid tax, was
likely to be discussed at a sum-
mit of world leaders on April
2.

Calling for uniform global
regulatory structures, and an
end to major companies set-
ting up entities in so-called
offshore centres, Mr Brown
said: “We want the whole of
the world to take action. That
will mean action against regu-
latory and tax havens in parts
of the world which have
escaped the regulatory atten-
tion they need.”

And further shockwaves
were sent through the global
banking system after the US
federal authorities filed a law-
suit against UBS in Miami
yesterday, seeking to force the
Swiss bank to turn over
records on as many as 52,000
American customers they
allege evaded taxes by stash-
ing $14.8 billion worth assets

in Swiss accounts.

This threatens to knock a
further hole in so-called Swiss
‘bank confidentiality’ laws,
after UBS on Wednesday
handed over details on some
clients and paid $780 million
in fines over a previous case
launched against it by the US
government.

Tactics

Now, other international
financial centres, including the
Bahamas, are likely to fear the
US may use the same tactics
against themselves.

Mr Paton indicated that the
Bahamas’ future in financial
services lay in moving away
from a business platform pre-
viously based on client confi-
dentiality to one that was
based on transparency and
compliance.

“T think we’re going to have
to seriously consider tax trans-
parency points, and how we
re-position ourselves, and how
we develop a strategic plan
going forward,” he added.

“I think we’re going to be
transitioning, if not toa TIEA

environment, which is proba-
bly an easier solution, to a
more sophisticated solution
that would be a double tax
treaty network. That would
require us to have in place cer-
tain standards of taxation.

“T can see a move, in the
residential business environ-
ment, to having a corporate
tax environment - for busi-
nesses doing business here,
resident businesses.

“It would probably make
sense to transition to a corpo-
rate tax environment, which
would have aspects of taxa-
tion that would be recognised
by international standards. On
the back of that, we would be
able to negotiate double tax
treaties.

“The trick is going to be to



protect non-resident, private
banking businesses from that
tax.”

Double tax treaties with
other countries would enable
companies/clients in the
Bahamas to be taxed at lower
Bahamian tax rates, and avoid
tax when capital and assets
were repatriated to their home
countries.

Mr Paton said Barbados
had attracted companies and
business to its jurisdiction by
selectively targeting countries
to sign double tax deals with.
He added that the Bahamas
needed to work on re-posi-
tioning now, and not wait until
it was boxed into a corner with
nowhere to go.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OVER THE WATERFALLS LTD.










— «+ —





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138




(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RUSSIAN CAMEROON INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LE MALO CORPORATION

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LE MALO CORPORATION has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POSH SALOON INC.

—_— *—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of POSH SALOON INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UGRINITE LTD.

— *—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of UGRINITE LID. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAKILAINE JOSEPH
JEROME, P.O.BOX N3331, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13" day of February, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BADGE BRIGADE LTD.

a ,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BADGE BRIGADE LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
APPARATIO MOUNTAIN INC.

a ,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of APPARATIO MOUNTAIN INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RIPTIDE CURRENT LTD.

=_ ,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RIPTIDE CURRENT LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OVER THE WATERFALLS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ASHFORD VENTURES INC.

—_— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ASHFORD VENTURES INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIKANER CORPORATION

—_— *—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIKANER CORPORATION has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PLASSIC VIEW LTD.

—_— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PLASSIC VIEW LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 5B



Bar on hotel

registration is
removed

FROM page 1B

However, he added that a complaint had been filed against the
industrial agreement with the Industrial Tribunal

The new industrial agreement, which is retroactive to January 7,
2008, included a $300 lump sum that Mr Douglas said Mr Wilson
and others had tried to prevent union members from receiving.

“They tried to stop the people from getting their $300 lump sum
last week, but the people grabbed their money and left,” said Mr
Douglas. “The people don’t listen to them.”

He said that though the industrial agreement has not yet been
registered, hotels have begun to honour its terms. It introduces gra-
tuity increases, gratuities for departments that previously did not
receive it before, a retroactive $300 lump sum and a 4.8 per cent
salary increase in 2012.

“Understand that employers have already paid benefits per the
contract, so that shows good faith, because this contract is retroac-
tive,” said Mr Douglas.

“T think the employees should look at the leadership (of the
union) and see that Wilson and them ain’t the right guys for them.”

IN THE ESTATE OF Jeannine Marie
Therese Dusseault a.k.a. Jeannine
Marie Therese Buraglia a.k.a Jeannine
Buraglia late of 300 Joliette #208
Longueuil, Quebec in Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
above Estate are required to send the
same duly certified in writing to the
undersigned on or before the 5th day of
March A.D., 2009, after which date the
Executors will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims
of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE ts hereby given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate of
Jeannine Marie Therese Dusseault
a.k.a. Jeannine Marie Therese Buraglia
a.k.a Jeannine Buraglia are requested
to make full settlement on or before the
date hereinbefore mentioned.

NADIA A. WRIGHT
Attorney for the Executors
Chancellors Chambers
P.O, Box N-4589

Nassau, Bahamas

Watsau Aiport Deaiopment Company (MAD) seeks a
Qualfied Eraroamental Wontor tor Stage 1 of fhe LPIA
Eqpuansion Project. Tie scope ol services incucies:

' Pl iew BRS ADA CL eerie clare
Direlap idageion chert las and reed he ork ol
s for compliance [p erwironmanial pias
Fed lini and comimunicels ah requisiory suthoridss on
betall of the Project on environmental @suss: aed
Pears eee aed rarity repels

Tawa Boers
fequiztory Laws and agencies and fanilar wit intomataral
Beal Practices (Equator Princiies, IPG Standards)

THiS] DO Gil, TA eT 1c

Reed] For Propceal Pu ekaoes. ial Be Sle Io Gott i

afer 1:00 pn, on Thuraday, February tk, 2000

Aiquant for Proposal ciosing is Thursday, March 8h, 248 ai
1:00pm Batores Thre

Centar:

Traci Brishy

Contact & Procurement Manager

LPtA Expansion Projoot

Ph; (28a) FO2~1 Oe = Pe (242) 577.21 17
PO. Boor AP 55029. Massam, Bahamas
email: tracibrisbyenaibs



30K outlay produces a ‘model’ investment
industrial deal FROM page 1B

in Atlanta and Puerto Rico,
before returning home to the
Bahamas. In 2007, Mr Humes
put everything on the line to
see his dream of owning a mod-
el management agency come to
fruition, and with a full-time
job, limited equipment and vir-
tually no capital, he began to
shape his business.

"Nobody wants to invest in
something like this,” he said.
"So, last year was costly and
stressful."

Mr Humes said he relied on
his skill as a trained photogra-
pher and former knowledge of
the industry to recruit talent and
piece together the management
side of the business.

Desperately in need of liquid
assets, Mark was forced to turn
to Bahamian commercial banks
for a loan, as he had invested
much of his personal savings
into the early stages of business
development.

When Commonwealth Bank
approved his loan request, Mr
Humes began to accelerate
efforts to recruit talent and
complete preliminary photo
shoots, in hopes of having his
first model competition in Octo-
ber 2008.

In need of an edge and inter-
national accreditation, Mod-
els242 collaborated with Mod-
els.com’s top 10-ranked agency,
Ford Models, to hold the first
Bahamas Ford Supermodel of
the World competition. Mr
Humes was immediately over-
whelmed with the strain of stag-
ing his pilot model competition,
under the auspices and scrutiny
of a top model firm.

Taxing his rapidly depleting
coffers further, Mr Humes took
on the responsibility of bring-
ing Ford's judges and several
leaders in fashion cosmetology
to New Providence to partici-
pate in his competition.

Mr Humes said that by this
time he was deep in debt, and
owed banks, friends and family
alike.

"I still owe creditors, but I
will ensure that the debts are
paid at the end of the day,” he
said. “This is still about the busi-
ness: how much money I can
make out of this? That is why
the people that I am selecting to
be a part of this business are
saleable.”

When competition day rolled
around, Mark saw the fruits of
his labour, as his models, vying
for a chance to win $500,000 in
modelling contracts at the Ford
Supermodel of the World com-
petition in Montenegro, parad-
ed across a stage inside Fort
Charlotte for a team of inter-
national judges.

In the end, Gabrielle Moss
emerged as Ford's top model
of the Bahamas, and recently
travelled - via Canada and Ger-
many - to Montenegro for
Ford's competition.

Mr Humes, who accompa-
nied Gabrielle on the trip, said
he had never seen so much

excitement from a young per-
son. He said she glowed with
elation when she was among the
other models from countries
such as Brazil, who won the
overall competition, Egypt and
Africa.

Although Gabrielle was not
picked up by Ford in Montene-
gro, she sparked the interest of
VNY, who invited her to New
York and offered her a contract.

"Obviously when I didn't win
a contract with Ford, I was dis-
appointed,” Gabrielle said. But,
she added that she is just as
excited to have the same oppor-
tunity through VNY.

Mr Humes said the almost
$30,000 investment in his
agency has paid off, as several
agencies have expressed interest
in several of his other models.

Since his success, he said oth-
er have begun to try to follow
his lead. "Competition is nat-
ural in business and I like that,"
he said.

Mr Humes said he was work-
ing with his models to make
them into ambassadors for the
Bahamas, so that, should they
make it to the international
market, they will represent their
country duly.

"I don't want them to
become the status quo,” he said.
"I want them to represent the
country to their fullest ability. I
want to be able to make a dif-
ference in the lives of our young
people in the country."

Mr Humes, upset by the lack
of vision displayed by Bahami-
ans and Bahamian businesses,
said organisations should stop
sponsoring "foolishness" and
invest in the youth. He also dis-
missed some he approached for
help with his business plan, who
inevitably took his money and
produced nothing for him.





“Obviously when I didn’t win a

contract with Ford I was disappointed.”

Gabrielle Moss

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PIERRE HENRY 3
ABACO, BAHAMAS. is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, tor registration’
naturalization as a citizen of Ihe Bahamas, and that
eaty person who knows any reason why registration’
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twernty-eignit
days trom the 13° day of February, 2009 to the Minister
pesporist é jor nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
-/14/, Nassau, Bahamas.

MOTICE is hereby given that HARALD STEFFEN
SAUDER of #9 TREASURE STREET, LITTLE
BLAIR, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citzenship, for registration’
naturalization #5 a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
wih Knows any reason why registrationnaburaization should nat
be granted, should send a written and signed stalament of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20" day of February,
2009 to the Minéster responsible for nationality and Cittzenship
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE is hereby given that OLEMCIA JOSEPH
of GUMBELE HIGHTS, SOUTH, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nalonalty and Citzenstap, for regesirahion/naturalization a5 a
calizen of The Bahamas, and ihat any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should mat be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20° day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizensiwp, RO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas,



MUST SELL

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY

Andros A

ve. — Englerston Subdivision

: ; 2 bedrooms,
I bath

* Coniypprives;

Property 1,000 sq. ft!
Busting 734 sa. ft

For conditions af
ale ond aer
Woman,
Meare contact:

Phone:
AS6- 1685,
512-1929

or 326-1608

Interested persons should subarit offers in writing to:
The Manager
Credit Risk Management
P.O. Hox S-7S18, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than March 13, 2009



a ol |

Intelligent. Creative. Efficient.

The fine line of General Electric appliances
found at Geottrey Jones cater to boelay’s
busy households amd tit every litesthyle. Our
wide vanety of GE appliances are designed
fo Suit your need porery ding the ultimate
In canvenience, performance and style,
With the best that technalagy has te offer
competitive pricing and a full service
department, Geolirey bones is your ultimate

appliance centre.

JONES & CO

Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets

322-2188/9

WM eam eee ama







JUDGE PARKER APT 3-G

i ypu
Hii
ZI PONT KNOW

MUCH ABOUT WHAT
AN AGENT POES..-

SO, YOU'RE
ESSENTIALLY
GOING TO ACT AS
ALAN'S AGENTL

few OSL
Tah ete
Abecee, UV/A

fa taka
SS > MESS | |
1 ah

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc, World righls reserved.

---BUT DLC JUST
-| KEEP SAYING “NO”
CA UNTIL THE MONEY'S
RIPICULOUS!

THAT
SOUNDS LIKE
AN AGENT TO ME!



BLONDIE

IF BY DISCUSS YOU MEAN YOU OUT

WANT THEM TO CONTINUE,

REE CONSIDER IT DONE

YOU DON'T WORK FOR
J.C. DITHERS ALL THESE YEARS
WITHOUT PICKING UP A
TRICK OR TWO!

AEN

46 MARGO OPENS THE PARCEL +s.

OH, MY/ SUCH BEAUTIFUL} THERES
|RED AND GOLD SILK __

WHY SHOULD
I MOVE

YOUR WAY ?/



BUT YOU, MY_ Weep
LOVE, ARE WOTZ



I'M
WAY BIGGER
THAN YOU !

4

en

OF



www.kingfeatures.com





www.Blondie.com

HAGAR THE HORRI

V1 vou AND LUTE PLAN
TO MARRY, (TS TIME I



NEIL ARMSTZONG
WAS THE FIRST MAN
To WALK ON
THE MOON

WOULDNT His
CAR START?

he 2-10

‘2009 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved,








REALN? YOU THINK SO? Gosh,
THATD BE GREAT’ REAL FIRE-
MEN WITH REAL AXES! T
HOPE THEN DRIVE THEIR BIGGEST
FIRE TRUCK !

WEN WOULD SHE?’

DO You WEVE STILL GOT
THINK SHE HER SCIENCE
WENT 3

LISTENING ?
WE HAVE







T HOPE YOUR
PARENTS ARE
HATING A REST-
PUL EVENING.



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



TAUGHT YOU HOW TO COOK,



BLE
coop/ 1

| BUT FIRST
LET ME

PLAN

Inc. World rights reserved

©2008 by King Features



















MARGO READS ALOUD.

M.-~ ONLY THE FINEST

SILK WILL 00 FOR YOUR

WEDDING DRESS, IT KNOW
IMOST WOMEN PREFER WHITE,

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inié. Ward rights reserved.

I LOVE YOU AND M\é6



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.







BECAUSE
MY TEETH
ARE WAY
SHARPER

THAN YOURS!









Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer

IEMY > HE'S THE ONE WHO WILL

BE DOING THE COOKING!





HOW maar weds of fom leiners
OC TOTS Cah FL Tad: Bree thee
Ritar slow bere? In naling o
we, comes Lethe dea Lat tical
eae: ory, eget) mud caba Lh:
eenbre belo weed Linerw miuel be
aL eas cme
fies plurale
TODAYS TARGET

Cena 13: err mood LE excelent
21 (or mere). Zobstion tomccrcr

ne-leller word

TESTERDAL 8: SOLU

tos eed biedod udge
ouue lu keed kexle layed
toni pa
TeHH fuukcdiee Eeeiperd hoe
hated bubs holed aehie
Te. FRAG
mom pots lobe kote Lobe
ote i

Ingfge inkl bik ieanlh

fone aouhied



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

@ oO; f/- OM



‘MARGARET HAS BOOK-SMARTS, BUT SHES

2/19























Difficulty Level *%& *&

LACKIN’ IN PLAYGROUND-SMARTS.”

en an

Down




Across








1 Perceive increase in 2 Daring type of blazer (7)
value (10) 3 Reduced to the lowest

8 Castles in the air? (5) level (5)

9 Witty saying of an 4 Found note in packing




unusually prim age (7) case (6)




10 What one may do with a 5 Ina giddy goat it may be




stipend perhaps (5,2) musically excited (7)
Flier at the heart of 15
Down (5)

Stresses a ship seems to




A desire to write a
letter (5)
There’s a copy in the 7





12




southeast for a writer (6) produce (10)













14 Gets on the stage (6) 8 There’s opposition since
17 Anegative in some rates were changed (10)
trouble (5) 13 It may be fixed by one at
19 Issues Oriental variance (7) Lu Across Down
blends (7) 15 Those who have them will ol 1 In great demand 2 Amuster (4-3)
21 Comparative vacuum? (7) be sorry (7) N (2,1,7) 3 Partofa
: die 8 Sudden intense
22. Such work is 16 Fear to make the initial = effort (5) flower (5)
speculative (5) mistake (6) a b Bringichase 4 ened
23 | represent change and the J 18 Anice change to be with 0”) against (7) situation (6)
readiness to accept it (10) an Eastern relative (5) na 10 Small-time 5 Confiscate (7)
20 Agree to be keen (5) uu gangster (7) 6 Intended (5)
11 Up to the time of (5) 7 Very easy
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 12 People of a state (6) task (6,4)
Across: 1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Across: 1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 ae (8) 8 In jail (6,4)
Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 17 Push one's way 13 Supervised (7)
Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 rudely (5) 45 Enthusiast
Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 19 Asa whole (7) Opel
entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. 21. Quick retort (7) reception (7)
Down: 1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, Down: 1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 : 16 To rule (6)
5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 22 Quick to take
Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, offence (5) 18 To mature (5)
Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 23 Northeast part of 20 Support for
Overt, 21 Put on. By ear, 21 Weave. US (3,7) blackboard (5)

















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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2/19





















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Never Relax

North dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

NORTH

a@Kk4

VAT762

#K83

#&K 1053
WEST EAST
o— @J)1097
Â¥QOI985 VK 1043
@J952 #Q106
&O976 &y4

SOUTH

#AQ86532

y

@A74

RAB?
The bidding:
North East South West
1* Pass 26 Pass
2NT Pass 34 Pass
4% Pass 6%

Opening lead — queen of hearts.

There are many hands where, at
the outset, the contract seems very
easy to make. But one of the marks
of a top-notch declarer is that he asks
himself, even in apparently “cut-and-
dried” cases, whether anything can
possibly go wrong.

Consider this deal where declarer
won the opening heart lead with the
ace, discarding a club. He then
cashed the king of spades, discover-
ing that he had to lose a trump trick.

South still had a chance to avoid
a diamond loser if the opposing clubs
were divided 3-3, in which case he








could eventually discard a diamond
on dummy’s fourth club. So after
drawing two more rounds of trumps,
he cashed the A-K of clubs and
ruffed a club. But when the suit
failed to divide evenly, he could not
avoid losing a diamond and a spade
for down one.

However, declarer should have
made the slam. The fault lay in his
play to the very first trick, when he
failed to make provision for a 4-0
trump split.

As a safety measure, he should
have ruffed the opening heart lead in
his hand, since there was no need to
take the ace before testing the trump
situation. When a spade to the king
then reveals the bad trump break,
South can embark on a plan to try to
score all of the trumps in his hand.

He begins by cashing the ace of
hearts, discarding a club, then ruffs a
heart. Next the A-K of clubs are
taken and dummy’s last heart is
tuffed. Finally, the A-K of diamonds
are played and a club is led from
dummy.

At this point, East has the J-10-9
of trumps and qucen of diamonds,
while South has the A-Q-8 of spades
and seven of diamonds. If East dis-
cards his diamond, South ruffs low
and loses only a diamond. If East
trumps the club instead, declarer
sheds his losing diamond. Lither
way, the slam is made as one of
East’s two “sure” tricks simply van-
ishes.

Tomorrow: Bidding quiz.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 7B



OO ——neBUS INES eC
Baha Mar ‘moves forward’ on $2.6b Chinese agreement

FROM page1B

move the whole effort forward,” Mr Sands said.

Among the agreements signed between the Bahamas and China
during Mr Liangyu’s visit was an $150 million loan from the China
Ex-Im Bank to finance upgrades to the “airport highway”, mean-
ing the existing JFK Drive. Such a project would benefit, among
others, Baha Mar, as it would be the main access corridor for
guests going to and from the airport. The China Ex-Im Bank the
prospective financing partner for Baha Mar.

Meanwhile, Mr Sands said yesterday: “Mr Izmirlian was one of
the special guests at the state dinner, along with myself. He was one
of the few non-governmental people there, and I think that’s a very
clear indication of the relationship Mr Izmirlian has established with
Chinese officials, in terms of China Ex-Im Bank and China State
Construction.”

Mr Izmirlian had earlier this year told Tribune Business that Baha
Mar had soon hoped to sign a construction contract for the Cable
Beach development with China State Construction.

“Tm very optimistic,” Mr Izmirlian said. “I think the Chinese are
the right partners for us. They look at the world over a long peri-
od of time.

“They are very senior people who would not fly half-way around
the world if they were not serious. The negotiations are complex
and will take time, but over the next six months we hope to come
to a conclusion.

“We’ll hopefully be in a position to sign a construction contract
over the next few weeks,” Mr Izmirlian told Tribune Business,
adding that “after that” the main issue was likely to involve reach-
ing an agreement with the China Ex-Im Bank to provide debt
financing to fund the construction work.

While the bank would act as the financing partner, Mr Izmirlian
said that besides acting as general contractor, China State Con-
struction would also invest in the project and become Baha Mar’s
equity partner. Baha Mar would manage and operate the finished
resort complex, whose design has not changed since Harrah’s
Entertainment withdrew as the equity and casino partner.

The Baha Mar chief executive said it was “the right time” for the
Baha Mar project to be built, given the huge drop in input costs for
the project.

Mr Izmirlian explained that international shipping costs/rates had
dropped 90 per cent as a result of the global economic downturn,
thereby lowering Baha Mar’s costs when it came to imported con-
struction materials, equipment and other supplies, while raw mate-
rials costs had fallen by between 50-75 per cent.

Mr Izmirlian said the $2.6 billion Cable Beach redevelopment
would be fully completed and open in three-and-a-half years if
construction work began now, something that again represented
perfect timing, because it would hopefully coincide with a period
when the world economy was growing again.

Government urged: More
public sector restructuring

FROM page 1B

December last year, targeted the
Department of Public Service, the
Registrar General’s Department,

With the Police Force, Customs
and Immigration, the Govern-
ment offered early retirement
packages to a number of senior
officers in each department, and
Mr Winder suggested that the
Government had to “create
avenues” through which younger
officers “who are computer
savvy” could advance.

Older, entrenched officials who
had held their positions for years
were a potential impediment to
this process, he added.

“They are going to have to do
it, more so,” Mr Winder said of
the Government’s departmental
shake-ups.

“Granted that the economy is
slow, and we all agree that the
Government wants to be com-
passionate in its approach, but I
think the Government is going to
have to go through a detailed
analysis of all public sector agen-
cies.

“We want to be ready for when
the economy comes around, so
our agencies can be more effi-
cient than they are. It’s a benefi-
cial thing to do. I personally don’t
have a problem in congratulating
the Government in making this
happen.

“My concern is it’s still a piece-
meal approach, and if they’re
going to be in a position to pro-
vide better service once this thing
turns around, the Government
may have to spend money to
make it happen.”

Public service reform is one of
the Government’s key long-term
objectives, although Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for
finance, told Tribune Business
earlier this year that the effort
would focus on making existing
systems operate more efficiently
and productively, rather than civ-
il service downsizing.

“There’s a level of civil servants
who have the capabilities to take
the country to the next level, but
they will not be able to if the lev-
el above them does not have the
skill sets, the enthusiasm, to make
it happen,” Mr Winder told Tri-
bune Business. “The sooner we
deal with that, the better off we
will be.

“Tt’s a difficult choice they [the
Government] have to make.
While on an individual basis it
may seem a bit harsh, but when
one thinks about the level of com-
petition our country has to con-
tend with from around the world,
for the good of all Bahamians this
has to happen.

“Tf the Government has to
spend extra money to make a dif-
ference, I think it’s money well-
spent.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham indicated the Government
was prepared to do exactly that in
his New Year’s address to the
nation, with civil service reform
intended to help “reduce the
cumbersome application process-
es for permits, licences and regis-
tration”.

The administration’s pilot Pub-
lic Service Improvement Pro-
gramme, launched in six agencies
in May 2008 and completed in

the Building Control Division,
the Road Traffic Department, the
Department of Physical Planning,
and the Passport Office.

All were found to have defi-
ciencies in urgent need of correc-
tion when it came to properly
serving the Bahamian public.

Indicating he was prepared to
‘grab the bull by the horns’, Mr
Ingraham told the nation: “We
fully intend to work towards a
new culture of excellence in the
service of the Bahamian people, a
culture of ethical conduct on the
part of those who serve a culture
that is hostile to slackness and
corrupt practices.

“We expect that some ele-
ments of this process will be
painful and we fully expect to be
criticized. We may even have to
pay a political price.

“But we believe that we have a
duty to position our country more
securely on its constitutional
foundations of democratic gov-
ernment, equal access to the
rights, privileges and protections
which citizenship bestows, and
the rule of law.

“The Bahamian people
deserve no less than a country
with a modern, responsive public
service, a country that is equipped
to function in an increasingly
competitive world, a country that
is stable, and a country that can
hold its head high as a respected
member of the international com-
munity.”

Special Model-Year Close-o!



The 2008 Accord dramatic styling combined with the
greatest range of advanced technology In the model's

a
NAD

Nassau Airport
Oevelopmant Company

Machinery & Energy Limited Caterpillar dealer in the
Bahamas are seeking a candidate to work as a

Parts Supervisor, at our Freeport Office - Branch.

The Candidate should have the following requirements:
* Have 5-7 years experience with the Caterpillar or
similar Product Line, have worked in a Caterpillar

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

dealership or a similar Organization;

Have training in Ordering and Receiving Parts

Importation;

Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape Supply

Be able to Audit Parts Inventory; Cyclic Count

Procedure;

Degree from an accredited University would be an

asset;

Must be able to manager and motivate staff in the

Parts Department;

Must have experience in process statistical control in

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks
a qualified landscape supplier(s) to grow trees, palms,
shrubs and groundcover (items) in accordance with the
required schedule and speculations for completion of
Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. This is a supply
only contract.

planning, programming and control of Caterpillar

industrial parts and Warehouse production process; .
Able to manage major components interchange
process; Hoses assembling process.

This candidate is required to be a professional who

Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after
4:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th,
2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time.

thrives on the challenge of Managing Parts Inventory
and all other operational procedures within the Parts

Warehouse.

Send complete resume with education and work

experience to:

M & E Limited,

P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas,

Attention: Office Administrator, or email

me@me-ltd.com.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this

position will be contacted.

52wk-Low
1.39
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.88
2.27
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.01 Focol (S)
1.00

Abaco Markets

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco

0.30

5.50

8.60
10.00

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

ROYAL = FIDELITY

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Money at Work

Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,678.29 | CHG -0.22 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -34.07 | YTD % -1.99
FINDEX: CLOSE 821.52 | YTD -1.60% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW. BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Previous Close
1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.16
2.40
7.80
11.00
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Today's Close
1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.15
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Change

0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

EPS $ Div $

0.070 20.1
0.992 11.1
0.319

-0.877

0.105 30.0
0.055 43.1
1.255 11.1
0.118 24.0
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682 15.3
0.337 15.4
0.000 N/M

15.5
19.4
10.0
13.0
20.3

0.035 8.6
0.407 13.5
0.952 11.0
0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S52wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

S2wk-Low

RND Holdings

ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets

RND Holdings

Fund Name

Colina Bond Fund
2.9230
1.3773
3.3856
11.8789

96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets:
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

100.00
100.00
100.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
6.00
0.35

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

31.72
11.23
0.45

33.26
12.04
0.55

29.00
14.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

1.4387
2.9230
1.4376
3.3856
12.6180
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0401
1.0330
1.0410

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months.
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

4.10

Last 12 Months

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Daily Vol.

Weekly Vol.

Div $

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’‘s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

Interest Maturity

7% 19 October 2017
19 October 2022

Prime + 1.75%
T% 30 May 2013
Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

EPS $
-0.041

Div $ P/E
0.300

0.000

0.001

0.480
0.000

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

Yield %
30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-08
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

33-year history. It all adds up to lower emissions,
better fuel economy, larger cabin, top-rated safety,
low maintenance costs and high resale value.

s HinsTCARIBREAN

PATER Me Ce a be



On-the-apet financing and insurance,
24 mont'24,000-mile factory warranty.

Website: weaw.hondabahanas.com

F)

a =

a ta ere

« 268-hp, V-6 engine. ® immobilizer theft-deterrent system

* Comfortably seats five ® Remote entry system

® Air conditioning & filtration system = © 6-disc CD player

* Power windows, door mirrors * Steering wheel-mounted audio
and locks controls

* Cloth or leather interior

* Front, side & side curtain airbags

ddd
Tel: (242) 328-2285 © Fax: (242) 323-T272















THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST
























































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2 ; i — —— a tow | monerare | Hich | vHicH |
“ORLANDO
High: 60° FA6°C , , X Partly sunny, windy Patchy clouds. Breezy with plenty of Partly sunny and Clouds and sun, a Chance for a couple The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
vw th AFI5°C a 2 and less humid. sun. humid. t-storm possible. of showers. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
he me High: 79° High: 83° High: 80° High: 76°
TAMPA ae F High: 76° Low: 64° Low: 70° Low: 72° Low: 66° Low: 65° see Ey
4 ra i r PETE es
High: 60° F/16° C ‘we, 95°-64° F High Ht.(ft.) Low _HtL(ft
Low: 43° F/6°C oe r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 4:33am. 23 10:44am. 04
a @ F 7 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 441pm. 2.0 10:43pm. 0.2
: Saturd 5:22am. 24 11:31am. 03
a Awan ae
5 ie Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Sunday 605am. 25 I212pm. 01
>» ABACO Temperature 64pm. 22 0 sn
r * 3 HQ oo cecccccccscccsseeseenenesesesreseeeeeenee 81° F/27° C :
; High: 78° F/26° C aan Monday O43 am. 26 12:17am. 0.0
A . 1 ae LOW veces 61° FA16°C Vo.
re - Low: 56° F/13°C Normal high... i ee
r Normal low 64° F/18° C
pith @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's High ...ccccsscssssseessie se r3ic | NTI TCI
: High: 68° F/20° C ; Last year's VOW eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeteeeeeeeeeees 74° F/23° C " "
Low: 53° F/12°C Freciptation ——__________ a antes ae ee ine oe an
S of 1 p.m. yesterday 0... cece 00 Vi p.m. MOONnSEL..... “6 P.M.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date New First Full Last
High: 71°F/22° C @ High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date .......cccsccsccccccsecsecseeseeses 2.90" . oe os
Low: 56° F/13°C Low: 55° F/13°C ae - ee i P
> AccuWeather.com co Bion ae
A. @ Forecasts and graphics provided by : a: ‘a
* MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feb. 24 Mar.4 Mar.10 Mar. 18
High: 72° F/22°C EL ELT HERA
Se Low: 56°F/13°C NASSAU See Ege
High: 76° F/24° C oe:
Low: 64° F/18°C
a a
KEY WEST li i CATISLAND
High: 70° F/21°C —_— High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 60° F/16°C Low: 64° F/18°C
. i
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
~~ High: 80 F/27 C High: 81° F/27° C
; ANDROS Me Low: 68° F/20° C Low: 65° FA °C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ’ Oe
highs and tonights's lows. High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 68° F/20° C ©
LONGISLAND
Low: 66° F/19°C
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 85° F/29° C
FC FIC FC FIC F/C FIC F/C FIC FC FC Fic FC me Low: 66° F/19° C
Albuquerque 59/15 31/0 s 57/13 33/0 s Indianapolis 38/3 25/-3 $s 32/0 18/-7 sn Philadelphia 34/1 22/-5 pe 41/5 32/0 pe
Anchorage 30/-1 14/-10 s 22/-5 8/-13 s Jacksonville 56/13 27/-2 6417 425 s Phoenix 75/23 48/8 s 75/23 50/10 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta S010 29/-1 s 58/14 36/2 c Kansas City 54/12 24/-4 c 39/8: 19/-7 po _Pittsburgh 26/-3 18/-7 sf 34/1 24/-4 sn RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:86°F/s0°c
Atlantic City 37/2 18/-7 s 42/5 30/-1 pc _Las Vegas 6719 41/5 s 67/19 45/7 pc Portland,OR 56/13 37/2 pe 5412 416 c High: 83° F/28° C Low: 68° F/20°C
Baltimore 37/2 22/-5 s 42/5 32/0 pc Little Rock 62/16 38/3 s 49/9 30/-1 Fr Raleigh-Durham 45/7 25/-3 s 54/12 35/1 pe Low:64°F/18°C
Boston 36/2 27/-2 sf 39/3 29/-1 pc Los Angeles 68/20 50/10 s 72/22 50/10 pe St. Louis 50/10 32/0 pc 37/2 19/-7 sn .
Buffalo 26/-3 19/-7 sf 30/-1 21/6 sn Louisville 42/5 32/0 s 42/5 24/-4 c Salt Lake City 40/4 23/-5 pc 43/6 25/-3 pc GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 54/12 28/-2 s 61/16 39/3 s Memphis 58/14 39/3 s 49/9 30/-1 c San Antonio 70/21 56/13 pe 6216 37/2 © High:87°F/31°C
Chicago 27/-2 15/-9 pce 27/-2 14/-10 sn Miami 72/22 53/11 s 75/23 65/18 s San Diego 66/18 5110 s 67/9 51/10 pe Low 67°FA9°C
Cleveland 28/-2 17/-8 sf 31/0 23/-5 sn Minneapolis 20/-6 9/-12 sn 19/-7 6/-14 c¢ San Francisco 61/16 48/8 pce 62/16 51/10 pc .
Dallas 68/20 46/7 s 5713 32/0 pe Nashville 48/8 32/0 s 49/9 26/-3 + Seattle 5412 36/2 pe 52/11 393 c
Denver 46/7 16/-8 c 42/5 20/-6 pc New Orleans 60/15 44/6 s 66/18 45/7 c Tallahassee 58/14 23/-5 s 63/17 39/3 pc
Detroit 27/-2 18/-7 sf 28/-2 20/-6 sn New York 35/1 28/-2 pc 40/4 34/4 pc Tampa 60/15 39/3 s 66/18 52/11 5
Honolulu 76/24 63/17 pe 78/25 65/18 c Oklahoma City 66/18 34/1 s 48/8 23/-5 pc Tucson 76/24 43/6 s 73/22 44/6 §s
Houston 67/19 54/12 s 60/15 39/3 1 Orlando 60/15 37/2 s 70/21 48/8 s Washington, DC 40/4 25/-3 s 48/8 34/1 pc

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
46/7
37/2
48/8
79/26
93/33
84/28
54/12
41/5
61/16
28/-2
34/1
64/17
67/19
43/6
36/2
91/32
68/20
93/33
30/-1
81/27
84/28
68/20
38/3
46/7
39/3
39/3
34/1
75/23
28/-2
72/22
75/23
40/4
53/11
77/25
84/28
83/28
50/10
59/15
89/31
72/22
70/21
27/-2
27/-2
23/-5
90/32
17/25
27/-2
46/7
31/0
85/29
77/25
48/8
82/27
88/31
91/32
84/28
84/28
85/29
27/-2
30/-1
82/27
65/18
54/12
26/-3
84/28
47/8
35/1
29/-1
14/-10

Hl

Today

Low
F/C
72/22
39/3
30/-1
37/2
69/20
78/25
75/23
40/4
23/-5
55/12
20/-6
28/-2
56/13
43/6
36/2
23/-5
64/17
50/10
69/20
15/-9
64/17
68/20
54/12
33/0
41/5

57/13
19/-7
21/-6
22/-5
55/12
57/13
18/-7
37/2
28/-2
73/22
55/12
34/1
74/23
63/17
66/18
54/12
69/20
66/18
14/-11
23/-5
66/18
62/16
415
20/-6
72/22
35/1
30/-1
20/-6
-1/-18

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 20TH 2009 PAGE 8B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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High
F/C
87/30
45/7
36/2
45/7
73/22
94/34
84/28
54/12
46/7
56/13
32/0
32/0
64/17
67/19
46/7
36/2
70/21
65/18
93/33
32/0
83/28
83/28
70/21
37/2
48/8
39/3
38/3
33/0
80/26
30/-1
70/21
72/22
42/5
48/8
77/25
86/30
84/28
52/11
61/16
91/32
75/23
79/26
27/-2
25/-3
29/-1
90/32
79/26
30/-1
48/8
32/0
88/31
84/28
50/10
83/28
85/29
91/32
81/27
83/28
85/29
37/2
32/0
79/26
78/25
50/10
29/-1
86/30
48/8
37/2
26/-3
14/-10

Saturday
Low
F/C
74/23
40/4
25/-3
38/3
62/16
78/25
75/23
42/5
24/-4
52/11
29/-1
25/-3
59/15
42/5
37/2
26/-3
63/17
54/12
73/22
14/-10
62/16
68/20
49/9
35/1
41/5



=

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a eS ee ao ao a sees a’ ae

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace





MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: NE at 12-25 Knots 4-7 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: NE at 12-25 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: __NE at 15-30 Knots 6-9 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

SS
COLD Lo
Billings as
esate

1 20/9)

Ne

0:
Denver, d b
46/16 Kansas City)

V7

Miami
72/53

Showers
[XX] T-storms
Rain

* % Flurries
9%, 3€| Snow Warr iii,
[y_Â¥] Ice Stationary iaganfit

-10s is {/08)) 10s 20s /308)) 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s [90s [ilusl/ii0s)

Fronts
Cold
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.









NORIO R NSE) aN NIG

Never st our
eEneame without us!
Vhen it “Or es to Auto Insurance,

us smart choice 1s
ice Management.
eople you can trust.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

Crusaders first to get eliminated

n By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THEY fell in the first game of
this year’s tournament and after
squandering a late fourth quar-
ter lead last night, the Nassau
Christian Academy Crusaders
became the first team eliminat-
ed from the 27th Annual Hugh
Campbell Tournament.

The Queen’s College Comets
held off elimination and sent

36-34 overtime win in the first
of four elimination games in
yesterday’s second session.

Nathaniel Carter sank a pair
of free throws at the line with
5.3 seconds remaining in regu-
lation to send the game into
overtime.

Tied at 34 in overtime with
21 seconds remaining, Carter
also put the Comets ahead with
one of two free throws at the
line.

The Comets dominated the
offensive board down in the

waning moments of overtime,
none more important than
when Jordan Isaacs rebounded
Carter’s missed free throw and
was then sent to the line him-
self.

Isaacs made one of two at the
line to give the Comets a two
point lead.

Both teams began the game
woefully on the offensive end
with just two field goals
between them in the opening
quarter.

The Crusaders led 5-4 after

the first quarter.

NCA built their largest lead
of the game in the second quar-
ter on an Ashton Wells free
throw, giving them a 17-7 lead
with 1:37 left to play in the half.

The Comets ended the quar-
ter on a brief 6-2 run, to trim
the deficit, 19-13 at the half.

QC outscored NCA 10-4 in
a pivotal third quarter, opening
on an 8-2 run, capped by a
Carter lay-up to tie the game at
21

The Comets took their first

lead of the second half on a
jumper by Isaacs, however the
Crusaders Leonardo Hepburn
tied the game at 23 just before
the buzzer sounded to end the
third.

The Crusaders built a five
point lead in the fourth when
Kenneth Clarke’s three pointer
made the score 30-25 with 2:54
remaining.

The Comets rallied with a
basket by Isaacs and a tip in by
Carter with 32 seconds left in
regulation brought his team

within one, 30-29.

Ferguson made one of two
free throws to give the Cru-
saders a 31-29 lead before
Carter’s clutch free throws at
the line sent the game to over-
time.

Carter led the Comets with
19 points and 10 rebounds while
Isaacs finished with nine.

Clarke led the Crusaders with
nine points, Ferguson finished
with eight and Shaquille
Symonette posted five points
and 10 rebounds.

the Crusaders packing with a

Jaguars dominate the Stingers [Ghigaranoe

FROM page 11

TABERNACLE BAPTIST FALCONS — 44
JORDAN PRINCE WILLIAM FALCONS — 28

e WITH an already comfortable nine
point lead heading into the fourth quar-
ter, Tabernacle doubled Prince Williams
fourth quarter output to pull away for
their second impressive win of the tour-
nament.Tabernacle led 30-21 heading
into the fourth, and reached a double
figure lead in the quarter on a jumper
from Robin Lafrance.

Another lay-up by Lafrance, who fin-
ished with a game high 14 points, gave
Tabernacle a 19 point advantage, their
largest lead of the game, 41-22 with 2:42
remaining.

Jesper Thompson led Prince Wiliam
with nine points.



The Falcons have won both
games thus far by an average margin of
victory of 21 points per game...Defensive-
ly they have held their opponents to just
27 points per game...

WESTMINSTER DIPLOMATS — 52
BIMINI BIG GAME — 28

¢ BIMINI scored the game's first bas-
ket, but scored just one field goal the
remainder of the quarter and two the
remainder of the half as the Diplomats
cruised to an easy win.

Christorr Stuart nearly outscored the
Big Game on his own, finishing with a
game high 23 points.

Stuart also added five rebounds two
steals and two assists.

He gave the Diplomats their first dou-
ble figure lead of the game with a three
pointer to open the second quarter, 14-4.

Marako Lundy came off the bench
and quickly made a pair of threes point-
ers On consecutive possessions to give
the Diplomats a 20-4 advantage.

Westminster led 25-10 at the half and
opened the third in the same way they
opened the previous quarter.

Stuart and Lundy began the third with
a pair of threes and the usual acrobatic
finish from Larry Smith gave the Diplo-
mats a 31-10 lead midway through the
quarter.

Smith showed his versatility, stuffing
the stat sheet with a great all-around per-
formance, nine points, and team highs
of 10 rebounds, five steals and five assists.

Lundy finished with 10 points while
Rashard Morley finished with six points,
three rebounds and two blocks.

Tristan Kelly led the Big Game with
nine points while Larento Sands and
Cleo Sears finished with seven and six
points respectively.

The Diplomats led 40-21 at the end of
the third and Stuart gave them their first
20-point lead on the opening play of the
fourth.

The lead reached as much as 25, 50-25,
on a pair of free throws by Stuart with
2:00 remaining.

After a hard fought win over the
Jack Hayward Wildcats Wednesday night,
the Diplomats cruised to their biggest win of
the tournament thus far...It was Stephen
Miller, center for the Diplomats junior team
who came off the bench to finish with six
points and seven rebounds in Wednesday's
win over Jack Hayward and not Shaquille
Fernander as previously reported.

EIGHT MILE ROCK BLUEJAYS — 42
CATHOLIC HIGH CRUSADERS — 40





e LAST year's runners-up improved
to 2-0 in the tournament surviving a
desperation three at the buzzer from a
fellow rand Bahama rival.

Delario Rolle's fade away three point-
er from the left baseline drew only iron
as time expired to give the Bluejays the
win.

In a closely contested game between
evenly matched teams, the score was
tied after the first quarter, 10-10 , the
Crusaders held a slim 19-17 lead at the
half, and the Bluejays took an even slim-
mer 24-23 lead into the fourth quarter.

Both offences opened up consider-
ably in the fourth, with the Bluejays
holding a 33-29 lead midway through
the quarter.

A three pointer by Kalim Munnings
brought the Crusaders within one, and a
basket by Carlton Forbes gave them a
34-33 lead on the next possession.

The Crusaders went on a 7-0 capped
by a Kadeem Martin basket to give
them a 40-34 lead with two minutes
remaining.

Ervin Lewis led the Bluejays with 11
points and 10 rebounds while Martin,
Ramon James and Jamall Hall finished
with eight points apiece.

Forbes led the Crusaders with 13
while Munnings and Rolle finished with
11 and 10 points respectively.

Neither team led by more
than six points, the Crusaders biggest lead
was 16-10 early in the second quarter and
the Bluejays, 40-34 with two minutes left
to play... This year's Bluejays team sports
amore balanced attack, last year, swing-
man Hubert Williams willed the Bluejays
to the championship game with a series of
great individual performances...

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for provision of General Insurance
Services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 690/09
All Risks General Insurance

(a) Commercial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents); and



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TRIBUNE SPORTS



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SPORTS

SORT eee
Major ready for Carmody

n By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MEACHER ‘Pain’ Major is
eager to step into the ring
tonight to take on Kevin Car-
mody.

Major will be making his
debut under the X-Cel World-
wide LLC banner in a super
lightweight eight-rounder at the
Buffalo Niagara Convention
Center.

The weigh-in was last night
and Major said he was prepared
for the much anticipated show-
down with the ultra-durable
Philadelphia warrior Carmody,
who has a 10-10-2 win-loss-draw
record with one knockout.

Promoter Nick Garone said
he was delighted to welcome
Major on board with his 15-3-1,
13 KOs record.

“T’m excited about him fight-
ing on the card,” Garone said
prior to the official weigh-in.
“He’s fighting a tough kid, but
he have to go out there and do
what he have to do to win.
That’s the only way that the guys

Rolle finishes 18th at the

n By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SHE had a remarkable turn-
around from her opening round,
but Georgette Rolle fell short at
the end of the Sun Coast Ladies
Series that concluded yesterday.

Playing at the Errol Estates
Country Club in Apopko, Florida
just outside of Orlando, Rolle
shot rounds of 84-76-74 to finish
18-over-par with a total of 234

A

PEUS

get to the next level.”

When he signed Major last
year, Garone said it was on the
premise that Major possessed
the potential to become a legiti-
mate world champion and he
wanted to ensure that he was
put in a position to achieve that
goal.

“T don’t sign that many guys,
but I think he’s one of the guys
that I felt have been mis-han-
dled,” Garone pointed out. “But
I think I can move him in the
right direction. He just have to
go out there and prove that he’s
ready to go.”

Major said that shouldn’t be a
problem.

“T’m just grateful to God for
this opportunity,” said Major,
who has spent the past few
weeks in Hollywood, Florida
training with Anthony ‘Chills’
Wilson and Nathaniel Knowles.

“We had a great team work.
They got me in shape to this
point and so I’m just ready to
go out there and do what I’ve
always done, which is to remain
aggressive and hopefully come
out victorious in the end.”

While he knows little of Car-

for 18th place overall out of a
field of 26 competitors that
endured the three days of com-
petition.

American Noriko Narazaki of
Illinois captured her fifth title
with rounds of 72-71-74=217 for
one-over-par to earn $2,000.00
in the process.

Canadians Erin Thorne and
Carmen Bandea, tied for 8th with
totals of 226, were the last money
earners as they pocketed $615.00
each.

Rolle, the only Caribbean

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mody, who has lost three of his
last four fights, Major said he
intended to go into the ring and
take out the 22-year-old ortho-
dox fighter.

“Like I told my promoter, he’s
going to be watching his next big
time headline fighter,” Major
said. “It’s going to be an exciting
fight because I’m hungry.

“Tm back out here under a
new promotional group and
everything has been going so
great. I’ve gotten a lot of mes-
sages from home. Everybody has
been sending me their best wish-
es, so I want them to know that
I’m real confident that I will get
the job done, having put in the
work.”

Major, 27, thanked Michelle
Brady, his workout partner in
Nassau who has been calling him
early day he was in Florida
reminding him to get in his
workouts.

He also thanked his parents
for their encouragement, as well
as his family and friends and
everybody who has been in con-
tact with him since he left to
train.

Wilson, who has been reunit-



Meacher Major

ed with Major, said the Bahami-
an lightweight champion has
been well prepared for the fight
and will definitely put on a show.

“He had good sparring and
everything and he’s in good
shape,” Wilson said.

As long as Major can go out
and “ultilize his speed, establish
his jab and come off the jab with
the body shots,” he should be
able to secure the win.

“He’s still learning. So he’s
not really lacking anything,”
Wilson stressed. “The sky is the
limit for him. He just has to go
out there and do the things that

Sun Coast Ladies Series

golfer to participate in the tour-
nament, said she was quite
pleased with the way she man-
aged to come back after her dis-
mal first round.

“T’m happy that I was able to
focus and turn my scores around
from the first day,” Rolle said.
“T planned to use this tournament
to get ready for the upcoming
Futures Tour.

“So Pm quite happy that I
played in it. [learnt a lot by play-
ing in the tournament. I’m happy.
Thit the ball very good, but I did-
n’t make much putts. I hit the
ball fine.”

Although she didn’t crack the
top ten, Rolle noted that she was
hitting the ball just as everyone of
them, but she just needed to get a
little more experience under her
belt.

“T just have to make some
more putts,” she said. “But if I
didn’t shoot the way I did on the
first day, I think I would have
performed a lot better.”

As she heads back to school
to continue her undergraduate
studies at Texas Southern Uni-

KERZNER

FOUNDATION

versity, Rolle said if there’s any-
thing she has to work on, it will
be her “short game, short game,
short game.

“[’m just going to continue
practising. So I will go to school
in the mornings and in the after-
noons around 3-3:30, I will be
back on the course practising and
getting prepared for the next
tournament.”

While the Futures Tour won’t
get underway until March 22,
Rolle said she intended to take a
break from the Sun Coast Ladies
Series and will instead play in the
Florida Women’s Open, sched-
uled for the Rio Pinar Country
Club in Orlando, Florida.

“T probably won’t play in the
Sun Coast again until I get a
break from the Futures Tour,”
Rolle said. “So I just want to con-
centrate on that right now.”

The 23-year-old 2002 gradu-
ate of St. Augustine’s College
said her ultimate goal was to
graduate from the Futures Tour
with her professional card to
play in the Ladies Professional
Golf Association.



THE RESIDENCES
ATLANTIS

THE COVE
ATLANTIS

= ty bd
‘SKY CLIMBERS Se
nos
TO TENNIS
CENTER

Open to public starting on a

Saturdays Feb 21





















TURN LEFT OFF OF THE ON-BRIDGE AND CONTINUE WEST THROUGH THE TUNNEL
UNTIL YOU ARRIVE AT THE TENNIS CENTER FOR PARKING.

Phone number 363-0626
Ages 7-18 years.
Parents must accompany
under 14 years



Hours of operation
Tuesday-Saturday 9-5pm

Parents must sign waiver for
all climbers





THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11

MAJOR
READY TO
TAKE ON
CARMODY

=

|







FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 es
ani
iS md oe
=
Ss _
5 = “SHH Se = eee Pee
FUNERAL FOR MUNROE =

¢ FUNERAL service for the late and former Davis Cup player }
Lavaughn Munroe will take place on Saturday at 10 am at the Church }
of the Good Shepherd in Pibnder’s Point, Grand Bahama. :
Munroe, 27, was the brother of Patrick Bjorn Munroe, who is a }
member of this year’s Davis Cup team that will be heading to Parguay }
for the first round of the American Zone II playt from March 6-8. i

BASKETBALL
FUNERAL FOR McFALL

¢ FUNERAL service for the late Samuel McFall will be held on Sat- :
urday at 2:30 pm at the Bethel Baptist Church on Meeting Street. :
McFall, 48, was a former coach in the New Providence Basketball
Association and the father of twin brothers Raymond and Ramone
McFall, who starred in the Government Secondary Schools Sports
Association and they played in the Baptist Sports Council’s league.

n By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



ST. GEORGE'S JAGUARS — 47
SUNIAND BAPTIST STINGERS — 31

IN a first half where they led by two
after the opening quarter and were
tied at the half, the Jaguars dominated
the third quarter to win their second
game of the tournament.

Kentwan Smith scored eight of his
CL TOU eM OUl A OM EO CLOT NOMOCeR COIR Le
third and the Jaguars outscored the
Stingers 20-6 in the period to take
command of the contest.

At 18 all headed into the third, the
Jaguars opened
with a half court
trap that exposed
Watem yo lotcxesecwmervl
handling, or lack
thereof.

The trap ignit-
ed a 13-0 run,
capped by a pair
oJ NCeMNOTCON TS
sue suOMM Ee BOOr-DE
Walker to give

KNOWLES/FISH ADVANCE



¢ MARK Knowles and his new partner Mardy Fish have advanced :
to the semifinal of the Regions Morgan Keegan Championships in
Memphis, Tennessee. i

The Bahamian-American duo playing only in this tournament, }
pulled off their quarter-final with a 6-4, 6-3 win over the American team }
of James Blake and Bobby Reynolds. i

Knowles and Fish won their opener 6-3, 6-1 over the team of }
Christophe Rochus and Florent Serra. Their opponents in the semi’s is }
not known yet.

The final is set for Sunday.

BASEBALL
JBLN SCHEDULE

¢ THE Junior Baseball League of Nassau will be back in action
this weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams with the
following games on tap:

Saturday’s schedule the Jaguars a 31-
Tee Ball 18 lead.

Following a
Stingers’ basket,

11 am Grasshoppers vs Blue Claws; 1 pm Raptors
vs Knights and 3 pm Sidewinders vs Sand Gnats.

Coach Pitch Walker, who fin-

10 am Bluejays vs Diamondbacks and 12:30 pm i HU OLexOMY LOO Mes Ego

Angels vs Athletics. i points made a three pointer from the
Minor League i baseline to give his team a 34-20 lead.
10 am Mets vs Red Sox and 12:30 pm Smith ended the quarter with one of
Rays vs Rockies. several tip-ins to give the Jaguars a 38-
Major League : : 24 lead at the end of the third.

12:30 pm Reds vs Indians and 3 pm Mariners Henold Pinder came thera thei

vs Marlins. i

largest lead of the game with a late
fourth quarter lay-up for a 47-29
POM eOLecl en

Pinder finished with seven points.

Junior League

10 am Dodgers vs Yankees and 12:30 pm Twins
vs Cardinals.

Senior League

Saturday Verdell Grant led the Stingers with
3 pm Pirates vs Tigers. eight, Kingsley Cajuste added five,
Sunday while Troy Bullard and Ivaughn Gib-
2 pm Rangers vs Phillies. son each finished with four.

neem Nits ies) 11116 [31 6sim esi (ste (0 Oca
ona breakaway dunk by Bullard with 2:43
left in the second quarter to give them an

18-15 advantage... The Jaguars outscored



FREEDOM FARM SCHEDULE

¢ THE Freedom Farm Baseball League will be back in action

this weekend with the following games on tap:
TONIGHT

TEE BALL

6 pm Guineps vs Jujus.

SATURDAY

9 am Dillies vs Seagrapes and 10:15 am
Dillies vs Jujus.

COACH PITCH

TONIGHT

7:30 pm Sand Flies vs Mosquitoes.
SATURDAY

11:30 am Boas vs Green Turtles; 1 pm Wasps
vs Mosquitoes and 3 pm Sand Flies vs Bees.
SUNDAY

3 pm Green Turtles vs Wasps.

9-10

TONIGHT

6 pm Barracudas vs Red Snappers.
SATURDAY

10 am Octopus vs Dolphins (on Cable 12).
SUNDAY

4:30 pm Barracudas vs Turbots.

11-12

TONIGHT

7:30 pm Conchs vs Dogs.

SATURDAY

Noon Marlins vs Parrots; 1:30 pm Hurricanes
vs Iguanas and 3:30 pm Crowns vs Conchs.
SUNDAY

3 pm Marlins vs Groupers and 4:30 pm
Hurricanes vs Parrots.

13-15

SATURDAY

9 am Silverjacks vs Sharks; 11 am Owlz

vs Stingrays; 1 pm Silverjacks vs Raccoons
and 3 pm Potcakes vs Owlz.

16-18

SUNDAY

2:30 pm Caribs vs Tainos and 4 pm Arawaks vs Lucayans.



! n By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Cricket Asso-

? ciation has suffered a major blow
? by the suspension of the Stan-
? ford 20/20 Tournament, but
i president Greg Taylor said it
? intends to move on with the fur-
: ther development of the sport.

On Tuesday in a joint state-

? ment, the England and Wales
? Cricket Board and the West
? Indies Cricket Board announced
? that they have immediately sus-
? pended all their ongoing negoti-
? ations with Sir Allen Stanford
: and his corporate group.

The announcement came after

? the US Securities and Exchange
? Commission charged Sir Allen
? Stanford and three of his com-
? panies with fraudulent conduct.

The Bahamas, according to

? Taylor, was one of 19 countries
? that benefited greatly from Sir
? Stanford with funding to assist
? with funding for their players to
: participate in the Stanford 20/20

Tournament and the develop-
ment of their facilities.

“With news like this, it really
hurts, but the International
Cricket Council has stepped in
and so we can continue to do
some of the things that we want-
ed to do with the development
of cricket,” Taylor said.

“So although we lost the Stan-
ford sponsor, we have gained
another in the International
Cricket Council. It won’t be
nearly as half as what Stanford
did, but it will still be a continu-
ous contribution to the develop-
ment of cricket.”

In January 2006, the BCA
cricket received a cheque for
$100,000 from the Texas billion-
aire Stanford on his arrival in
the Bahamas. The funds were
earmarked for the development
of the cricket facilities at Haynes
Oval and preparing the national
team for the initial $1.5 million
20/20 Tournament that was held
in Antigua that year.

“We were able to put down
our grass turf, which cost us

the Stingers 29-13 in the second half.
SEE page nine

BCA disappointed, but moving on

some $60,000, so that helped us
tremendously,” Taylor said. “We
were also able to get in some
new equipment, so it was a big
help.”

The BSC, through the fund,
was also able to travel to a pre-
warm up tournament in the Cay-
man Islands and participated in
the 20/20 tournaments in
Antigua in 2006, 2007 and 2008.

“We didn’t do too well in
those,” said Taylor, of the 20/20
Tournaments that offered hefty
cash incentives of $1,000,000 for
first place, $50,000 for second
and $25,000 for the man of the
match.

“But this year, we were
preparing a team for this year’s
tournament, which we felt would
have done very well. Unfortu-
nately, we won’t have a chance
to really show that.”

Undoubtedly, Taylor said the
players were disappointed
because they were geared up
and upbeat for their participa-
tion this year.

With the tournament now in



jeopardy, Taylor said they would
only have the under-19 team
which will compete in the ICC
Americas Associate Countries
Tournament being held in July
in Canada.

“Because of our performance
in 2007 when we sent a team to
Canada, we performed to the
best of our ability and we were
the first affiliated country in the
Caribbean and the Americas to
do that, they have invited us to
come back.”

While the ICC has come forth
and provided some assistance,
Taylor said they intend to use
that to get the national team
ready to compete in 2010 in the
Division IT of the ICC of Amer-
icas and the World Cricket
League.

In the meantime, Taylor said
the BCA will continue play at
both Haynes Oval and at the
Windsor Park. At Haynes Oval,
the BCA will attempt to stage
two-day matches, while Wind-
sor Park will be the site for the
50-and-over matches.

CWSI

TO TEMPTATION



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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.75SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY AND NICE HIGH 75F LOW 65F Bosses are accused of denying access to travel documents Claims that Bahamas company is holding Mexicans illegally The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY www.tribune242.com David Kelly seriously ill in New York Resort workers ‘being exploited’ A A T T T T E E M M P P T T E E D D M M U U R R D D E E R R C C H H A A R R G G E E David Kelly, proprietor of Kelly’s Home Centre, is seriously ill in New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York. Mr Kelly, with his wife, Nancy, and several members of Kelly’s Home Centre, flew to New York on Saturday for their annual purchasing trip. However, at the beginning of the week Mr Kelly developed chest pains and went to New York Presbyterian Hospital for a check-up. Mr Kelly, who has a heart condition, underwent a procedure on Wednes day. His condition is being closely monitored after complications developed. His three sons, Andrew, Gregory and Scot, and his two daughters-in-law, Candy and Shelly, flew to New York to be with him. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE have three men in custody for questioning in connection with the country's 12th homicide of the year. Head of Central Detective Unit Supt Elsworth Moss said the men were picked up late Thursday night and taken to Wulff Road police station. Their arrests came a day after Haitian Edvard Ficien was found stabbed to death, clutching a fistful of cash, outside Happy Hour Bar on Wulff Road. "Three persons were arrested by officers from the North-eastern Division, that they wanted to speak to in respect to this murder," Supt Moss said. Supt Moss said he did not know if the men would face charges as police had yet to bring them to CDU for questioning. A caller alerted police to the whereabouts of the body around 9.30pm Wednesday, February 18. Ficien, 33, of St Charles Vincent Road, was found between a fence and the building with about Three men in custody over 12th homicide of the year SEE page 6 JOHN TRAVOLTA has set up a foundation in memory of his late son, Jett, to help children with special needs. The Jett Travolta Foundation will work to “assist and provide relief to children with vision, hearing, mobility, communication, behavioural learning impairments or other special medical, environmental, health or education needs,” according to the actor’s website. Jett, 16, died of a seizure at the actor’s holiday home in Grand Bahama on January 2. John Travolta and his wife, Kelly Preston, claimed that he suffered from an illness known as Kawasaki syndrome. Preston suggested the illness was brought on by exposure to chemicals used to clean carpets and had developed a detoxification progamme based on the teachings of Scientology founder L Ron Hubbard. In the wake of Jett’s death, former senator Pleasant Bridgewater was charged with abetment to extort and a paramedic, Tarino Lightbourne, was charged with attempting to extort and conspira cy to extort in connection with an alleged attempt to extract $25 million from the Travolta family. They next appear in court on April 10. Ms Bridgewater subsequently resigned from her Senate seat. Travolta sets up foundation in memory of son Jett John Travolta n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FORMERMinister of Works Bradley Roberts yesterday blamed the Bahamas Elec tricity Corporation’s poor financial state on the decision not to pass on the cost of duty paid on oil to its customers. He said that it is this, and not the rate cut on electricity instituted when he was in office in Roberts links fuel duty to BEC woes SEE page 6 n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE man accused of shoot ing a police officer in Nassau Village earlier this week was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Police have charged Lavardo Miller, 27, of Nassau Village, with the attempted murder of Detective Corporal 518 Earl Johnson as well as a list of oth er serious offences. Yesterday, police escorted Miller to Court Eight, Bank Lane, to be arraigned before Magistrate Carolita Bethel. It is alleged that Miller, alias ‘Siggy’, attempted to cause the death of Corporal 518 Earl Johnson on Tuesday of this week. Officer Johnson was shot in the thigh shortly after 4pm on Tuesday while he was reportedly attempting to arrest a man in connection with a shooting that had occurred in the area earlier that day. Miller was informed by Magistrate Bethel that he could not be tried in the Magistrate’s Court on the attempted murder charge and that the case would be sent to the Supreme Court. He was not required to plead to the charge. Miller was also arraigned on two counts of posession of a firearm with intent to endanger the life of another. It is alleged that on Tuesday, Miller was in posession of a handgun with the intent to endanger the lives of Detective Kelly’ s Home Centre proprietor undergoes procedure after chest pains DAVID KELLY and his wife, Nancy, in a file photo. LAVARDO MILLER , 27, alias ‘Siggy’, being escorted to court yesterday. Man accused of shooting police officer SEE page 6 B OSSES at a Bahamas resort have been accused of exploiting Mexican workers and denying them access to their travel documents. L awmakers in Mexico are seeking repatriation of workers who, they claim, are being held illegally. Claiming t hat 65 of their citi zens are a ffected, the Mexi can Senate has asked for the fed eral executive to initiate repatri ation of the men. The Sen ate claims the workers are being “exploited” and underpaid by the company. According to El Universal , Mexico’s most read newspa per, Mexico’s Senate has asked the Secretariat of Labour and Social Welfare, and the Attorney General’s Office, to investigate the company’s activities. According to the report, Senator Jose Luis Garcia Zalvidea said that in 2007 the c ompany contracted Mexicans to work on construction of the resort, with a promised salary of $500 a week with productivity bonuses. S enator Zalvidea said that the workers were taken to the Bahamas on a private flight on May 13, 2007, where they signed a contract in Englisha nd had their passports “illegally detained”. When informed of this r eport by T he Tribune l ate last night, Minister of Immigration Branville McCartney promised that he would have the matter investigated. El Universal suggested that the workers were threatened with being turned over to Bahamian immigration officials for three months and eventually incarcerated at Her Majesty’s Prison. The report also suggested that the workers were informed that if they needed to return to their home country, they would have to pay $3,000, or work for three months without pay. Furthermore, when the workers’ salaries were due, instead of their promised $500 a week they were allegedly SEE page 6 Tim Clarke / Tribune staff Bradley Roberts Branville McCartney

PAGE 2

n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net FAMILIES suffering from financial insecurity, broken relationships and abuse are being offered support by the Ministry of Labour and Social development through a new campaign. To ignite a movement of family and social well-being across the Bahamas, leading psychologists, therapists and social services providers yesterday welcomed the “gatekeepers” of the community t o a symposium on “Strengthening the Family: A Holistic Approach to Family Wellness” at the Holy Cross Anglican Church hall on Soldier Road. Social workers, health professionals, non-governmental organi sations, police, prison and defence force officers attending the discussion heard how to prevent individuals and families from suffering the isolation and abuse that leads to violence and social unrest. Challenges Minister of State for Social Development Loretta ButlerTurner opened the discussion by calling for the community “gatekeepers” to help families face today’s challenges in a period of economic crisis to ensure ah ealthy society. “In these times the cost of maintaining our physical and mental health has increased. We must incorporate measures to prevent deterioration of our health. Wellness should therefore be a critical goal for the Bahamian community,” she said. “A consistent, holistic, multisystematic approach to family wellness is paramount if we hope to develop healthy, wellbalanced families and by extension, a healthy, well-balanced nation.” Health and Social Services director Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson said she hopes the symposium will spark an outreach campaign which addresses critical emotional, spiritual, physical and sociali ssues before they lead to violence and destruction. As the leading psychologist at the Crisis Centre in the Princess Margaret Hospital, Dr Dean-Patterson said she hopes a series of programmes will be put in place in cooperation with Urban Renewal Liveable Neighbourhoods, churches and community groups in New Providence and the Family Islands to reach the vulnerable before they become victims by spreading a message of well-being. She said: “We see it in abuse, child abuse, intimate partner violence and attempted suicide – symptoms or behaviours that come up when people are so overwhelmed or hurt or powerless they turn on each other or on themselves. “What we have to do now is give people those techniques so they do not hurt each other or themselves. “There are ways they can live well, peacefully and without hurting each other, but when it b ecomes violent it is too late, so we want to help persons in relationships to treat each other with care and concern and love,” Dr Dean-Patterson said. Symposium Psychologist and director of the Renascene Institute International Dr David Allen, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre chief of staff Nelson Clarke, and marital and family therapist Pastor Barrington Hall made contributions to the symposium about the nature of family relationships andh ow to ensure the emotional health of the family. President of the Bahamas Christian Council Rev Patrick Paul and Rev Angela Palacious from St Margaret’s Anglican Church spoke about the importance of spiritual wellness, while medical doctors and social workers spoke about how to cultivate physical and social wellness. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE AS PART of its drive toward university status, the College of the Bahamas has adopted a key role in the effort to reinstitute a culture of research among educators in the Bahamas. Towards this end, the college’s School of Education is hosting the nation’s teachers and education stakeholders at its 2009 Conference, which opened on Wednesday at the National Centre for the Performing Arts on Shirley Street. The conference aims to reinforce the crucial role of the nation’s educators in producing valuable data that can positively impact the environment of learning for students and ultimately national development. It also aims to empower teachers with research skills and reinforce the notion that they are best positioned to conduct and benefit from the data provided by such research. “As an educator, I don’t believe that we can do any teaching without having done some research ourselves, and a part of what our responsibility and role is as teachers is to inform our practice with information and research that is based on some sound theoretical underpinnings so that we know what we are doing is going to make a difference,” said assistant professor of education Margo Blackwell. “For me, focusing on teachers as researchers is more a reaffirmation of the work that we do and demonstrates that there is a thoughtful process for the way forward.” The Bahamas has a literacy rate of more than 95 per cent, according to official figures, and education has traditionally been allocated the largest amount of the government’s recurrent budget. In 2008, the national average for the BJC rose from “D+” to “C-“ and the national average for the BGCSE results inched from a “D” to a “D+”, sparking vigorous debate about the merits and demerits of the country’s system of learning. In recent times, there has also been debate about all-boys and all-girls classes, the potential impact of extending the school day and teaching methodologies. The government has acknowledged that there are challenges in the education system in the Bahamas, launching strategies to focus on core subject areas like English language, mathematics, social and religious studies; expansion and improvement of after-school study clubs and homework centres, and the expansion and enhancement of the Magnet School Programmes to every High School in New Providence and two high schools in Grand Bahama. COB believes expanding the scope of teacher involved research could prove fundamentally impor tant in improving key areas of instruction and learn ing in the country. “I don’t think of one area in which we can’t use more research, but literacy is a key area and it is imperative that we start documenting the way teachers teach and the way students learn and sharing some practices that are going to move us forward,” Professor Blackwell said. “This conference is just a seed for all of us to get together to remember and reaffirm and restore our confidence in our practice and in our craft and we inform ourselves as we go forward.” COB aims to spark culture of research Ministry offers support to suffering families Loretta Butler-Turner In brief THE Pioneers of Prosperity Caribbean Awards Programme has been officially launched in the Bahamas. Pioneers of Prosperity is a global awards programme that seeks to inspire a new generation of entrepreneurs ine merging economies by identifying, rewarding, and promoting outstanding businesses that can serve as role models. The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, the Bahamas Development Bank (BDB and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDBc ame out to show support for Pioneers of Prosperity during a launch event yesterday at the Bahamas Development Bank. The event was opened by Anthony Woodside, acting managing director of the BDB, Dionisio D’Aguilar,p resident of the Chamber of Commerce and Sharon Miller, operations manager at the IDB. “The programme strives to create greater prosperity in the most challenging of markets. This is especially important, as we all know, given the global economic situation. P ioneers of Prosperity is founded on the fact that innovative ideas and dynamic business models exist in even the most challenging of markets, and that greater prosperity will ensue if these local models of success are better understood and replicated effectivel y,” said Ms Miller. The event was attended by financial experts from leading local banks as well as a number of entrepreneurs. In addition to being eligible for grants of up to $100,000 to invest in technical infrastructure and training for theirc ompanies, winners of the award will be connected to networks of technical experts, potential investors, and other cutting-edge entrepreneurs on the local, regional, and global level. Applications for the Pio neers of Prosperity Award must be submitted online. The application period will close on March 9. Caribbean awards programme is launched in Bahamas

PAGE 3

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 3 n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter MORE than 25 educators from primary, secondary and tertiary level schools in New Providence toured the coppice forest at EARTH Village Bahamas on Valentine’s Day. Principals and teachers joined the EARTH Village Bahamas’ conservation team on a nature walk through 180 acres of habitat area located on Columbus Avenue and St Albans Drive in Chippingham. The area was formerly known as the Perpall Tract wellfield. During the guided tour, the teachers were given a special preview of educational pro grammes being offered to introduce students to nature as a t eaching tool. Managing director of EARTH Village Bahamas Terry Miller said they are committed to protecting the area. “This is a very important habitat of various species. Wewant to promote this green space as a resource lab for students of all ages to learn about any subject from math and science through arts and humani ties tied with preservation,” he said. Mr Miller said children should experience EARTH Village Bahamas to better understand the many benefits of green spaces to the environment. “They filter pollutants and dust from the air, they provide shade and lower temperatures in built-up open spaces and they even reduce soil erosion of soil into our waterways,” Mr Miller said. The area was described by scientist Dr Ethan Fried, of the University of Tampa, as “one of the last intact and natural landscapes existing in New Provi dence.” EARTH Village Bahamas is a project for social health con servation and preservation that contains rich vegetation, insects, birds, water wells, trenches, and waterfield artifacts. The EARTH Village association offers experimental learning and aims to teach team building, promote leadership skills, enhance individual devel opment, enhance physical development, improve problem solving skills and expand creativity and imagination. Beryl Gray, principal of Oakes Field Primary, said she enjoyed her experience in the forest. “We had a wonderful time in the forest and our school will take advantage of the outdoor learning programmes and activities being offered,” she said. Mrs Gray said she got 32 per cent of her staff to participate in the nature walk on their day off and as a result won a free membership for all students and teachers through the end of the year. L arge quantity of marijuana found A 28-YEAR-OLDman i s assisting the police in t heir investigation into the d iscovery of a large quantity of marijuana yesterday. According to police, the drugs were found in a bushy area off Matthew Street, Nassau Village, at around1 1am. P OLICEconfiscated t hree handguns and an assortment of ammunition while in Redland Acres yes-t erday. Officers were on patrol in the area around noon w hen they discovered an old microwave oven which contained two 9mm hand-g uns and a .380 handgun. In addition, police disc overed an assortment of bullets. N o arrests have been m ade in relation to this discovery. Handguns and ammunition confiscated Educators tour coppice forest of EARTHVillage Bahamas In brief n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE acquittal of a man who confessed to killing another man who was alleged to be gay highlights the disturbing reality of Bahamians’ homophobia and “poor social and sexual development”, according to a gay and human rights activist. Frederick Green-Neely was acquitted in the Supreme Court of murdering Dale Williams. Jurors found that he used justifiable force when he stabbed Mr Williams three times after the man, who he said was known to be gay and HIVpositive, grabbed his crotch and told him he had a crush on him. Green-Neely’s lawyer, Dorsey McPhee, told the court that he was “defending his manhood.” News of the acquittal has been reproduced as a topic of interest on several gay news sites interna-t ionally. One of these, Pinknews.co.uk, highlighted the case as another example of the successful and worrying use of the “gay panic defence.” “Its use often sparks outrage from the gay community around the world because it places the burden of blame on the victim (in this case, Williams),” said the article. This was followed by comments from readers calling for a boycott of the Bahamas, and for letters of complaint to be written to the Bahamian government. Bahamian Gay and human rights activist Erin Greene, yesterday said she was disturbed by the decision by the jury to acquit Green-Neely as she believes it sets a dangerous precedent where “homosexuality is used as a justification for murder.” And she claimed it shows some Bahamians have “more sympathy” for a person who claims to have been subject to an unsolicited sexual approach by a gay person than for a gay person who is killed for attempting an unwanted advance on someone. Ms Greene called for a “review” of a number of cases where those committing alleged crimes against gay people said that they were acting in self defence but where this was questionable. Jurors “I think there are possibly a number of cases of men being murdered that may have been adjudicated incorrectly because the man will claim that he was on the verge of being raped and they will receive sufficient sympathy from the jurors.” “Fear of rape is real, but the false construction of fear of rape by someone of the same sex as a justification for murder is dangerous and it needs to be addressed by the legislation and the judiciary,” she said. “More importantly we need to investigate it as a gay community, as a Bahamian community,” she said. “We need to find out how we allowed this to happen and how we can stop it.” However, Bernard Turner, Director of Public Prosecutions in the Attorney General’s Office, said he does not see the case in the same light as he has observed other cases where allegedly gay individuals were killed in similar circumstances where juries found their killers guilty. “You do have instances of decisions being made on both sides of the divide by juries on these issues,” he said. “I would certainly not say it’s any evidence of a homophobic trend in these verdicts.” In the case of a Grand Bahama taxi driver who also killed a man who he claimed had made an unwanted sexual advance on him, Mr Turner pointed out that he was convicted by the jury, however having his conviction later overturned and a retrial ordered on appeal. And he pointed out that it is up to the prosecution to “prove beyond a reasonable doubt” that the killer who would have been the sole witness apart from the victim in most cases did not need to defend him or her self to this degree. If they do not, then juries are justified in acquitting the individual of the murder charge, he suggested. He said that the Attorney General’s office cannot appeal decisions by juries, but only question if the judge may have misdirected them based on a point of law. M s Greene linked the case and its outcome to what she said is Bahamian’s “poor social and sexual development” on the whole, with some people being unable to relate to others in an appropriate way. This fact manifests itself in the high rate of rape, incest and abuse generally in The Bahamas, she suggested. n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net PLP nomination hopeful Paul Moss criticised the government and his own party for focusing too much on the Police Act. He said the Act is a non-issue, and there are more important matters that should be commanding the attention of the government and the official opposition – for example the suffering economy. Noting that people have been calling him from around the country seeking help, looking for jobs, or just hoping someone will raise the issue, Mr Moss said politicians should be discussing how they can aid those who are unemployed, homeless, or simply struggling to make ends meet. “I have spoken to respected persons internationally who have said to me that the Bahamas has not yet even begun to experience difficulties because of this economic downturn. So the government ought to take this matter really seriously and call for a bipartisan forum of persons who understand the economy or have ideas,” he said. A good starting point, Mr Moss said, would be to lower the country’s prime lending rate so that adjustable mortgage rates can be decreased, there by easing the burden on homeowners. “At the same time, this would stimulate persons getting mortgages inside the market. And the question has to be, what are we doing? It is clear that the government does not have the answers. And everyone is calling for these forums to be had, and I think it is a starting point. “They also have to put some kind of package together so that landlords can be in a position to give some kind of break to these persons who may be having a difficulty paying their rent. Because the alternative would be that these persons would be out on the street, and that doesn’t help anybody,” he said. Mr Moss said he finds it difficult to understand why the Bahamas put on such a “show” during the official visit of the Vice Premier of State Council of the Peo ple’s Republic of China. Nor is he enthusiastic about the Bahamas’ decision to borrow more than $160 million from China, only to use it on road works. This, he said, is not the kind of stimulus packages that the country needs right now. “They ought to be trying to borrow sufficient funds to start the construction of a new hospital. I was at the Princess Margaret Hospital, and I can tell you, if it does not cut your heart to see people sitting in wheelchairs, loitering around the Accident and Emergency Room, dying and crying out for help – no one around to help them, no beds available. “That is a priority. It cannot be a priority for the government to talk about broadening the road to JFK – that is not priority, and it just tells me that our leaders just have their priorities all in the wrong place. “The idea has to be that you have to care for your people and this is what is lacking here clearly,” he said. n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter FIVE prosecution witnesses were called to testify yesterday at the re-trial into the February 2006 murder of local businessman Keith Carey. Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles are charged with Mr Carey’s murd er and are also facing charges of armed robbery and conspiracy to commit armed robbery. Carey, 43, a married father of three and former high school coach was shot and killed on the steps of the Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique WilliamsDarling Highway before he was a ble to deposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station that he operated. Detective Sergeant Earl Thompson, a firearms examiner, testified that on October 23, 2006 he collected several items connected to the case. He said that after an examination, he w as able to identify them as two fired 9mm Luger cartridges, two unfired cartridge cases and two fired 9mm Luger bullets. Sergeant Thompson said he determined that all of the cartridge cases came from the same firearm but could not make ad istinction regarding the bullets. He said that a Glock 9mm semi-automatic pistol could have fired the bullets and that based on the physical evidence, the gun must have been fired twice. Of ficer During cross-examination by lawyer Craig Butler, the officer admitted that he had never been given a weapon to exam ine. A 21-year-old woman, who said she had known murder accused Jamal Glinton for near-l y 20 years, also testified. The woman said she had known Glinton for 18 years and was his neighbour. She said that in 2006, she and a female friend worked at the Englerston Urban Renewal Project at the Police Headquarters on East Street. The prosecution askedt hat both women’s names be withheld. The woman testified that on the morning of February 27, 2006, her colleague came to her home and after the witness had dressed, they both headed for work. She said they saw Glinton, who offered them a ride to work in a Nissan Maxima, with t wo other men. The witness said she did not take note of the other men, and that she and her friend arrived at work around 9.45am. Mickey Trevor Wright, a cousin of defendant Dwight Knowles, testified that some time between late February and e arly March 2006, he had a conversation with Knowles abouta “situation” concerning a white Maxima which the prosecution alleges was the getaway car in Carey’s murder. He said Knowles had instructed him to go to Reginald Rigby’s garage and make s ome mechanical repairs to a car. Wright said he had seen his cousin in a Maxima before but could not say if that was the same one. Wright also told the court that he had been detained by police for four days and pressured to tell officers “what they wanted to hear” regarding the car. Medical practitioner Dr Darin Donaldson also took the stand, telling the court that he had examined Sean Brown on March 24, 2006, and that the accused appeared to be well and did not complain of any injuries. He said that Brown did tell him that he was in an accident in 2005 and that he had four fingers amputated from his left hand. Dr Donaldson said Brown still had stitches in his hand at the time of the examination. During crossexamination by Brown’s attorney Dorsey McPhee, Dr Donaldson said that the accused had never told him that police had tried to apply pressure to his injured hand and that they had put a plastic bag over his head to suffocate him. He said that if the accused had told him this, he would have made a note of it. The witness also said he e xamined Dwight Knowles, but noted nothing significant. Assistant Commissioner of Police Quinn McCartney, a forensic chemist, testified that on March 8, 2006, he received two glass tubes containing Carey’s blood, a glass tube con taining his urine and anotherg lass tube containing his stomach contents. The case will resume on Monday at 11am. Five witnesses called to testify in murder re-trial Acquittal of man who confessed to killing ‘highlights reality of Bahamians’ homophobia’ PLP nomination hopeful says the Police Act is a non-issue Paul Moss

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Police officer Pierre Martin, who was found guilty in the Supreme Court ofa ccepting a bribe, will be sentenced in April. M artin, 25, was also charged with soliciting a bribe, but was found not guilty of the charge. Justice Vera Watkins, who presided over the trial, has set as entence hearing for April 21. In the meantime, Martin was granted $10,000 bail with two sureties on Wednesday by the Supreme Court. The condition of the bail r equires that he surrender his travel documents and report to Central Police Station before7 pm on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Martin was arrested for b ribery on September 12, 2007. H e was charged with one count o f soliciting a bribe and two counts of accepting a bribe. I t is alleged that Martin bribed Garrick Lewis on February 14, 2007. L ewis was arrested on Februa ry 5 at West End for obscene language, resisting arrest and making threats of death against Martin, who was at time attached to the West End Police Station. L ewis testified that Martin t old him to give him $3,000 not show up in court for Lewis’ case. He said he gave the officer $1,500 on one occasion and $1,000 another time. The jury delivered an unanim ous guilty verdict on one count o f accepting a bribe, but delivered a not guilty verdict of eight to one on the count of soliciting a bribe, and a not guilty verdict of seven to two on the second count of accepting a bribe. L awyer Carlson Shurland repr esented Martin. Prosecutors Jillian Williams, Simon Rolle and Erica Kemp of the Attorney General’s Officea ppeared on behalf of the Crown. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 5 RECREATIONAL PARK INCLUDES:7HQQLV&RXUWVUQDPHQWDORQG-RJJLQJUDLOV 3OD\JURXQG%DVNHWEDOO&RXUW*D]HERV*ULOOVCOMPLETED INFRASTRUCTURE INCLUDES:3DYHGRDGV:DWHUtHZHUDJH KRQH&DEOH(OHFWULFLW\WUHHW/LJKWVOpen HouseFEBRUARY 21, 2009 10AM TO 5PMOn the spot %DQNQDQFLQJDYDLODEOHFORMORE INFORMATION CALL:6DQFWXDU\,QYHVWPHQWV/WG&KXUFKWUHHWOD]DKLUOH\t&KXUFKWV325-6456 325-6447/9Rapidly developing communityONLY 23 LOTS LEFT JUST one year after Mount Tabor Full Gospel Baptist Church opened its second subdiv ision, the church hasnow announced the launch of a third housing area – Mount Tabor Gardens in southwest New Providence. T he new subdivision, located off Carmichael Road, offers “middle-class” housing to Bahamians. “This latest project is the third in a series of initiatives designed to not only fuel the local economy, but to help Mount Taborites in particular, and Bahamians in g eneral become home owners and put scores of unemployed residents back to work,” the church said in a statement. Construction in Mount Tabor Gardens has already begun and senior pastor of Mount Tabor Bishop Neil Ellis said: “Housing our people has become a part of who we are. It has always been an integral part of the social agenda of our church. I believe the lack of housing is still one of the greatest social ills facing our country.” Over the past two decades, Mount Tabor said, it has assisted several families in not only the acquisition of their homes, but in some instances moving into completely furnished homes debt free. In 2007, Mount Tabor Estates, located off John F Kennedy Drive, was officially opened. The following year, the introduction of Mount Tabor Estates East “provided yet another opportunity for economic empowerment and home own ership for our people,” the church said. Police officer found guilty of accepting bribe M ount Tabor to launch its third housing subdivision Bishop Neil Ellis

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.411.410.000.0700.00020.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.64Bank of Bahamas7.647.640.000.3190.26023.93.40% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.2550.24011.11.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.776.770.000.4380.05015.50.74% 5 .001.88Consolidated Water BDRs2.162.15-0.015610.1110.05219.42.42% 3 .002.27Doctor's Hospital2.402.400.000.2400.04010.01.67% 8.106.02Famguard7.807.76-0.042,7000.5980.24013.03.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6820.40015.33.83% 6.045.01Focol (S5.185.180.004000.3370.15015.42.90% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref6.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 14.0014.00Bahamas Supermarkets11.2312.0414.00-0.0410.300N/M2.67% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.9230-0.58-2.54 1.43761.3773Colina Money Market Fund1.43760.284.38 3.79693.3856Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3856-10.83-10.83 12.618011.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.61805.745.74 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.0950-13.38-13.38 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 821.52 | YTD -1.60% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,678.29 | CHG -0.22 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -34.07 | YTD % -1.99BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 31-Jan-09 23-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 2003, that is primarily responsible for the company’s fiscal tribulations. His comments come as BEC announced that it is restructuring its executive management team in a move to “strengthen the organisation.” A two-line statement released on Thursday said the exercise “would result in a number of changes at the executive management level.” It said further details would be included in a forthcoming press release. Yesterday, Mr Roberts said he understands that three people have already been told their services are no longer neededall of whom are in the company’s financial department. The company’s Chief Financial Officer will be replaced, he said, along with two other senior people in that section. Calls to BEC for confirmation and further comment were not returned up to press time yesterday. This comes after Minister of the Environment with responsibility for BEC, Earl Deveaux, said last week that the organisation is “financially compromised” and seeking around $200 million in funding. He blamed last year’s high oil prices and the previous government’s decision to cut the electricity rate. While stating that he was awaiting a full explanation of the justification for the move, Mr Roberts said he felt the restructuring is a “rather haphazard approach to dealing with a serious matter” and he hit out at those involved for not being clearer about what changes were taking place. He also claimed that the move was unfair on those who have “given long years of dedicated service” to BEC. The former minister charged that the corporation is broke because “the FNM government failed to act.” “They claim that it had something to do with, one, the high price of oil, which is true, and two, with the rate decrease. Logically, if it had something to do with the rate decrease, how come with several audits completed since the rate decrease they all showed BEC making money? Something had to happen since then,” he said. “The problem with BEC is that in its surcharge did not take into account in its calculation the duty that it pays on fuel and BEC was absorbing that. Well you know what the price of fuel went up to over the past year so that’s been a lot of money BEC’s been absorbing.” He said that duty was not passed on to customers in the rate during his 2002-2006 tenure as minister with responsibility for the corporation because at that time “it was small.” However, some may question how feasible passing on the duty cost to the customer could have been, given that thousands of Bahamians had already been disconnected last year due to an inability to afford their electricity bills, and many businesses were being put under serious strain for the same reason at a time when oil hit record highs. Roberts links fuel duty to BEC woes n FROM PAGEONE F ROM page one 2290 Bruce Chisholm and Tia Thurston. It is also alleged that Miller on Tuesday was found in possession of a handgun with the intent to prevent the lawful arrest by Detective Corporal 518 Johnson and Detective Constable 2290 Chisholm. Miller was not required to plead to the charges. Miller pleaded not guilty to assaulting Tia Thurston with a deadly weapon and opted to have the matter tried in the Magistrate’s Court. He also pleaded not guilty to causing grievous harm to Emmanuel Alfred Rolle. Miller is expected to appear in Court Five, Bank Lane, on Monday for a bail and fixture hearing. Miller’s attorney Roger Gomez Jr told the court that he had been instructed by his client that he was beaten while in police custody. Miller raised his shirt and the leg of his trousers to show the court his injuries. Mr Gomez said his client had informed him that a plastic bag had been placed over his head by Corporal Ferguson of the Homicide Unit and that Detective Corporal 1675 Cash had beat him in his head. The attorney told the court that Miller had blood on his jeans and that areas of his black shirt, which was under the orange one he wore yesterday, had been cut out so as to conceal the bloodstains. Miller admitted that he had been taken to hospital for treatment. Magistrate Bethel also made a note on his remand warrant that he receive further treatment at Her Majesty’s Prison. Man accused of shooting police officer is arraigned in court F ROM page one four stab wounds, police said. The victim was dressed in blue jeans, a red shirt, blue jacket, with black and white tennis shoes. A police source revealed the victim had no legal status in the country. Supt Moss said initial evidence suggested the victim was killed about an hour before police arrived. The fact that he died while clutching money suggests an attempted robbery, but a clear motive had not been established, police said. Supt Moss said a murder weapon was not recovered at the scene, but the nature of the wounds indicated the victim was stabbed with a sharp instrument. The country recorded its 11th homicide when a man, who was shot in the chest last month, died while in hospital on February 15. Oscarsin Williams, the victim, and another man got into an altercation sometime after 8pm on January 16 on Cox Way. During the dispute, according to police, Williams was shot in the chest. He was taken to hospital where he died on February 15. Heico Duran Fowler, 23, of Palm Breeze Road, was on bail charged with Williams' attempted murder when the victim died. The charge was later upgraded to murder. Three men in custody over 12th homicide of the year FROM page one p aid $79.50 or the equivalent of 862.66 Mexican pesos. Senator Zalvidea stated that, after r eceiving these complaints, he informed t he Council of the National Human Rights Commission about the exploitation of these workers, who were being forbidden to leave the work area during hours of sleep or food.” T he proposal was supported by Senators from all parties, and the Senate a pproved the request by the executive to redouble its efforts for repatriation of the workers. A ttempts to reach Director of Immigration Jack Thompson and company e xecutives were unsuccessful up to press time last night. Bahamas resort bosses accused of exploiting Mexican workers FROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are m aking news in their neighbour hoods. Per h aps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning f or impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. The problem with B EC is that in its s urcharge it did not take into account in i ts calculation the d uty that it pays on f uel and BEC was a bsorbing that

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C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 7A

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8A, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE VICE Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China Hui Liangyu flew to Grand B ahama on Wednesday as part of his official two-day visit to the Bahamas. In Grand Bahama, the Vice Premier and the Chinese delegation were taken on a tour of Freeport’s tourist attractions and its industrial sector, including the Lucayan Harbour and the Freeport ContainerP ort, which is owned and operated by the Chinese-based Hutchison Whampoa group. Sharon Turner/ BIS Photo VICE PREMIER OF THE STATE COUNCIL VISITS GRAND BAHAMA HIS Excellency Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of The People's Republic of China, is greeted and presented flowers by a Chinese-Bahamian student of Discovery Primary School at the Grand Bahama International Airport on Wednesday, February 18. The Vice Premier and his delegation arrived in F reeport as part of their two-day official visit to the Bahamas. HIS Excellency Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of The People's Republic of China, is greeted by Minister of Housing Kenneth Russell at the Grand Bahama International Airport on Wednes day, February 18. The Vice Premier and his delegation arrived in Freeport as part of their two-day official visit to the Bahamas. A TOUR guide with Freeport's Garden of the Groves points out one of the island's native palms to His Excellency Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of The People's Republic of China, during a tour of the nature and wildlife facility on Wednesday, February 18. AN official of the Chinese-based Hutchison Whampoa group, owner and operator of the Freeport Container Port, explains details of the development to His Excellency Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of The People's Republic of China, during a boat tour of Freeport's Industrial Park on Wednesday, February 18. A MEMBER of the Chinese delegation enjoys a dolphin hand shake at Dolphin Encounters, Freeport on Wednesday, February 18.

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E x-BFSB chair argues sector needs totally new business model, based on double tax treaties and domestic corporate tax, to survive long-term n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter MODELS242, a fledgling Bahamian model management agency, is carving out a niche for itself in the global fashion industry through just an initial $30,000 investment by its founder, having signed its top talent to a deal with New York’s VNY Model Management. For 17-year-old Models242 model, Gabrielle Moss, endorsing a contract with the wellrecognised New York agency represented an exciting opportunity not only for her, but also acted a catalyst for Bahamian management firms that have not recognised the possibility of moving talent outside the Bahamas borders. Models242’s founder and operations director, Mark Humes, said his dream to start a model management company grew out of his confidence in the ability of Bahamian talent to make money in the $300 billion global fashion industry. "Done correctly, this business could be a very lucrative busi ness, and I think people are see ing now how it could really operate and how it could really function," he said. Mr Humes moved to New York at the age of 18, as an aspiring fashion photographer, and immediately began work ing with several established firms, under numerous estab lished photographers. When he left New York, he pursued his tertiary education C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.34 $3.39 $3.36 for a better lifePENSION group pensions attract the cream of the crop keep present employees happy guarantee staff retirement savingsall of the aboveFAMILY GUARDIAN CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.comcall us today at 396-4000 A SUBSIDIARY OF Baha Mar ‘moves forward’ on $2.6b Chinese agreement Bar on hotel industrial deal registration is removed n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Government must develop a coherent strategy for reforming public sector agencies, a senior accountant said yester day, backing such moves as crucial to enhancing efficiency and competitiveness for “when the economy comes around”. Raymond Winder, managing partner at Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas the Government for its shake-up of senior management in the Police Force, Customs and the Immigration Department, but warned that the Government may have to invest an even greater level of resources in reforming all public sector agencies. “That’s going to be more and more of an issue,” Mr Winder said. “In more of these government agencies, the only way to get them performing at a better level is through restructuring, because the people are not going to change.” Government urged: More public sector restructuring * Senior accountant applauds moves so far , but calls for coherent strategy , not ‘piecemeal approach’ * Says reforming government agencies, to make them more ‘efficient and perform at higher level’, critical for Bahamas competitiveness when economy turns around Raymond Winder SEE page 7B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Baha Mar “moves a little bit further forward” on concluding an agreement with two Chinese state-owned entities for its $2.6 billion Cable Beach redevelopment “every time” the parties meet, Tribune Business was told yesterday, a meeting on Monday having gone “very well”. Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president of governmental and external affairs, said that while no deal had been sealed yet, the resort developer had met with senior officials from the China Export-Import Bank this week, just prior to the two-day state visit of China’s Vice Premier of State Council, Hui Liangyu. “The meeting went very well. We continue to make progress,” Mr Sands told Tribune Business. “We are very encouraged with these talks, and we continue to work towards a finish line in this matter.” Mr Sands said he was unable to give a timeframe for when talks between Baha Mar, the China Ex-Im Bank and China State Construction would conclude. However, Sarkis Izmirlian, Baha Mar’s chief executive, told this newspaper at Janu ary’s Business Outlook Conference that it hoped to conclude an agreement with two Chinese state-owned entities “over the next six months”, implying that negotiations if suc cessful could be concluded by summer 2009. “The fact that we have had multiple meetings, and a num ber of visits at the highest level, both from China State Construction and the China Ex-Im Bank, gives us an indication of their committed approach to this project,” Mr Sands said. “They like what they see, but we have to work out the details and come to an agreement between the parties. The deal is not done yet, but every time we move a little further forward.” Mr Sands said Monday’s visiting delegation was headed by Li Jun, the China Ex-Im Bank’s vice-president. He added that Baha Mar had previously met with China State Con struction’s president, and in Monday’s delegation was also that company’s president for its America operations. “The highest level persons in these companies have made multiple trips to the Bahamas, in terms of due diligence,f urther deliberations with our principals in terms of trying to Monday meeting with China Ex-Im Bank over Cable Beach project ‘went very well’ but no deal done yet SEE page 7B Robert Sands n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter THE Supreme Court on Wednesday night lifted an i njunction that, for several days, h ad prevented the new hotel sector industrial agreement from being registered with the Industrial Tribunal. The injunction had been o btained by opponents of the current Bahamas Hotel, Cateri ng and Allied Workers Union (BHCAWU were represented by attorney Koed Smith, after their efforts to prevent the signing of thea greement with the Bahamas Hotel Employers Association( BHEA) failed. Kirk Wilson, the union’s first v ice-president, and Raymond Wright had attempted to block the agreement’s actual signing on February 2, 2009, by pounding on the door to the Depart-m ent of Labour’s conference room and demanding entry.T hey had alleged that the new industrial agreement was illegal, b ecause it was not approved by the union’s membership or m embers of the executive council. However, the union’s general secretary, Leo Douglas, told Tribune Business yesterday that as per the terms of the union’s constitution, the decision to a pprove the new contract was his and president Roy Cole-b rooke’s alone. “Under the constitution, we f ind that the president and gen eral secretary are the chief negotiators, and that gives us the power to negotiate. It was revealed in the court that there i s nothing in the constitution or rules of our union that says weh ave to go to the membership or executive council we sign on b ehalf of the union,” he said. According to Mr Douglas, he and executive members of the union spent some nine hours in Justice Claire Hepburn’s court o n Wednesday, awaiting her decision on whether to removet he injunction. In the end, she ruled that the matter was for the jurisdiction of the Industrial Tribunal. “She said the power lies with theI ndustrial Tribunal,” Mr Douglas said, resulting in the injunct ion’s removal. “Wilson and other officers c hose not to come into any meeting to sit and hear the proposed contract that Colebrooke and Douglas negotiated,” Mr Douglas said. Mr Wilson last night declined to comment on the injunction’s lifting when contacted by Tri bune Business, saying he wanted to see the judge’s decision first. SEE page 5B $30k outlay produces a ‘model’ investment SEE page 5B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas must “transition” its financial servicesi ndustry to a completely new business model within the next 1 0-15 years if it is to survive long-term, a senior attorney said yesterday, with the futurel ikely to involve double tax treaties and a ‘corporate tax e nvironment’ for local companies. Michael Paton, a former B ahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB head of the Lennox Paton law firm’s financial services practice, told Tribune Businessy esterday that this nation needed to re-position its finan cial sector and develop a time l ine for doing so, given the external pressures that are o nly likely to intensify. Government policymakers, the BFSB and other industryo rganisations and individual institutions were well aware o f this, Mr Paton added, the issue having figured prominently at the recent Financial; Services Retreat in Grand Bahama. H owever, he said the Bahamas would “not do anything” to jeopardise its exist-i ng book of financial services business, and would look to r etain this during any transition to a new business model. T he international financial services sector and its clients w ould also be exempt from any tax imposed on the ‘domestic’ Bahamian econo-m y. “I think it’s quite apparent that the OECD is re-ener-g ised,” Mr Paton told Tribune Business. “They’re coming out w ith a new blacklist, which we’ll be on, because we do not have enough Tax InformationE xchange Agreements (TIEAs I don’t think it’ll have that dramatic an impact, but the pressure is coming through, itw ill be much more intense than it has been in the last five y ears, and we’ll have to seriously reconsider how we reposition the Bahamas going for w ard. “Everyone recognises that the status quo is no longer Financial industry must ‘reposition’ in 10-15 years SEE page 4B Michael Paton

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f RXQGNQRZOHGJHRIDQGSUDFWLFDOH[SHULHQFHZLWK:LQGRZV;3 WRROV .QRZOHGJHRIDQGH[SHULHQFHZLWK: DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ .QRZOHGJHRIDQGH[SHULHQFHZLWK$FWLYH'LUHFWRU\ .QRZOHGJHRIDQGH[SHULHQFHZLWK'$VtRELOLW\ .QRZOHGJHRIDQGH[SHULHQFHZLWK$6RSHUDWLRQDQGV\VWHP DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ .QRZOHGJHRIDQGH[SHULHQFHZLWKWHOHFRPPXQLFDWLRQVDQGQHWZRUN %DVLFNQRZOHGJHRIQL[$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ $WOHDVWYHf\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQ\VWHP$GPLQLVWUDWLRQDQGVHU XSSRUWDWOHDVWWZRf\HDUVRIZKLFKVKRXOGEHLQD%DQN—UXVW ULWWHQDQGVSRNHQ)UHQFKZRXOGEHDQDVVHW $%62/87(/<7(/(3+21(&$//6:,//$&&(37(' 3OHDVHGHOLYHUHVXPHDQGWZRfUHIHUHQFHV %<+$1' 7KH+XPDQHVRXUFHVDQDJHU %D\VLGH([HFXWLYHDUN :HVW%D\WUHHWt%ODNHRDG 1DVVDX%DKDPDV$33/,&$7,21'( $'/,1( )5,'$< 2IFHVLQ)ORUHQFH)UDQNIXUW*HQHYD+RQJ.RQJ/DXVDQQH/RQGRQ/X[HPERXUJ 0DGULGLODQRQWUHDODVVDXDULVRPHLQJDSRUHRN\RXULQ=XULFK Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIAExpansion Project. The scope of services includes: 'ULOOLQJDQGSXPSWHVWLQJRIDSLORWKROH 'ULOOLQJDQGFDVLQJRID)HHG:DWHU6XSSO\:HOO 'ULOOLQJDQGFDVLQJRID)HHG:DWHU5HWXUQ:HOO )ORZWHVWLQJRIWKH)HHG:DWHU6XSSO\:HOO 'LVFKDUJHWHVWLQJRIWKH)HHG:DWHU5HWXUQ:HOO *HRSK\VLFDOORJJLQJDQGIORZWHVWLQJRI3LORW+ROHDQGZHOOV :DWHUWHPSHUDWXUHORJJLQJDQGDQDO\VLVRIZDWHUTXDOLW\DQG FKHPLVWU\ 3URIHVVLRQDOVXSHUYLVLRQ+\GURORJLVWf 5HTXHVWIRU4XRWDWLRQ3DFNDJHVZLOOEHDYDLODEOHIRUSLFNXSDIWHU 1 :00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009. 5HTXHVWIRU4XRWDWLRQFORVLQJLV Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at 3 :00pm Bahamas Time. M-100, Test Well DrillingContact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project 5(48(67)25QUOTATION A senior Vopak Terminal (Bahamas address the Grand Bahama Business Outlook Conference on the implications of the company’s planned $300 million expansion programme. The former Bahamas Oil Refining Company (BORCO last year by a consortium featuring US private equity firm, First Reserve Corpo ration and Dutch-based oil storage leader, Royal Vopak. Shortly thereafter, the new owners announced plans to invest more than $300 million in upgrading a nd expanding the facility into the largest and leading trans-shipm ent hub for oil and petroleum products in the region. M axwell Sweeting, Vopak Terminal (Bahamas president, said of Monday’s presentation to the Business Outlook conference: “I would like to focus on what we would have done from our inception, that is, April 29, 2008, leading up to today, specifically as it relates to employment opportunities both with international contractors and with Vopak Terminals Bahamasi tself. “I also wish to talk about the next stages of development and what this is going to mean for the local Grand Bahama communi ty.” Mr Sweeting is a certified general accountant who began his professional career in 1971 with Touche Ross (now Deloitte & Touche) as an auditor. In 1978, he joined Bahamas Oil Refining Company (now Vopak Terminal Bahamas and now serves as the executive vice-president, having served 15 presidents, including the existing managing director of Vopak Terminal Bahamas, T.J. Huizer. Grand Bahama Business Outlook is organised by The Counsellors Ltd. and will be held at Our Lucaya. Vopak expansion details unveiled Max Sweeting n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter MANY commercial bank loan officers are not equipped with the knowledge to properly evaluate b usiness plans, the administrator o f the Government-sponsored Venture Capital Fund said yesterday, adding that this hindered many aspiring entrepreneurs’ bid to access capital. Jerome Gomez, an accountant with Baker Tilly Gomez, said accessing capital was the most frustrating aspect of s tarting a business in the Bahamas. He said that often, inexperienced loan officers, due to their lack of knowledge of certain markets and business environments, became a formidable obstacle to entrepreneurs obtaining credit. Many financial institutions, particularly banks and insurance companies, lacked any expertise o n staff to evaluate business plans and the needs of small businesses, properly, Mr Gomez said, because it was indeed a different sort of lending. “Any person in a bank, let’s say a teller, can be promoted tomorrow to a loan officer, and by simply filling out a form provided by the bank can lend to you a $60,000 car, a house, a refrigera tor, appliances and furniture it takes no special skill,” Mr Gomez told the Bahamas Society of Engineers. Bank staff ‘not qualified’ to assess business plans S EE page 3B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 3B British American principals meet PM IN CELEBRATION of its second year as a Bahamian-owned entity, British American Financial paid a courtesy call on the Prime Minister. Established in the Bahamas in 1920 (almost 90 years ago), the company offers a wide array of products and services including insurance, investments, financial planning and retirement planning through offices in Nassau, Freeport, Abaco and Exuma. Pictured (from L-R John F. Wilson, director and principal; Basil L. Sands, chairman; and I. Chester Cooper, president and chief executive. But who can read those financial statements? Who can interpret the business environment? Who can do the market research? Who can look at competition? “Is that available at any of the banking institutions in the Bahamas? I say it does not exist.” M r Gomez said another reason for the banks’ reluctance to lend to small businesses was simply because they were too small and unap-p ealing to banks. “Small business funding requirements are usually small, and that is the reason why they don’t tend to appeal to financial i nstitutions. Then financial institutions require much more collateral than the funds you wish to borrow,” he said. The Venture Capital Fund, which Mr Gomez administers, was intro duced to assist small businesses in acquiring capital. In its three year existence, it has only been able to fund 46 out of 300 applicants. M r Gomez said many individuals come to the fund hoping to start a business which is in widespread existence already, such as a bar or beau-t y salon, and therefore are turned down. Other people come to the fund deep in debt and are in need of a bailout more than half the 46 comp anies sponsored by the fund fall into this category. He said that out of the 300 people, only 2 per cent approached the venture capital fund with any kind of personal savings or collateral. Though the fund does not require applicants to hold any collateral or make a down payment, Mr Gomez said he was astounded by the n umber of individuals wanting to be entrepreneurs who have not saved for the occasion. Personal savings have never been a priority for many Bahamians, especially those I find who want to start their own business, and I f ind it particularly peculiar that you intend to be an entrepreneur but make no plans towards saving money to do so,” Mr Gomez said. Bank staff ‘not qualified’ to assess business plans FROM page 2B P H O T O : P e t e r R a m s

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valid in the medium to longterm. But we won’t do any-t hing in the short-term that jeopardises the business we already have. The last thing we want to do is send a message that we’re going to capitulate in the short-term. That’s not the case.” T he transition, he said, would have to take place over a 10-15 year period. “We’re going to have to transition the sector,” Mr Paton said. ‘It’sn ot an overnight evolution, it’s not a two-year evolution, it’s a long-term transition, evolution, and the trick will be tog et everyone to agree to where it is we want to go, and t he timeline for getting there. If we stay where we are t oday, we’re going to fill out the industry in 10-15 years’ time. There’ll be nothing to replace it.” The Bahamas’ existing f inancial services business model had “served us well for 50-70 years, but it’s not goingto last for another 50-70 years”. C C r r i i s s i i s s Mr Paton said the Bahamas had to “adapt” to the situa-t ion facing its financial services industry, with developed nations such as the US and UK now looking to use theg lobal economic crisis as an ‘excuse’ to launch a fresh c rackdown on so-called offs hore centres, even though their reasons for doing so do not stand up to scrutiny. British prime minister Gordon Brown said yesterday thata planned crackdown on offshore shelters, used by large companies to avoid tax, was likely to be discussed at a summit of world leaders on April2 . Calling for uniform global regulatory structures, and an end to major companies setting up entities in so-calledo ffshore centres, Mr Brown said: “We want the whole of the world to take action. That will mean action against regu-l atory and tax havens in parts of the world which have e scaped the regulatory attention they need.” And further shockwaves w ere sent through the global banking system after the US f ederal authorities filed a lawsuit against UBS in Miami yesterday, seeking to force theS wiss bank to turn over records on as many as 52,000 American customers theya llege evaded taxes by stash ing $14.8 billion worth assets i n Swiss accounts. T his threatens to knock a further hole in so-called Swiss ‘bank confidentiality’ laws, after UBS on Wednesday handed over details on somec lients and paid $780 million in fines over a previous case launched against it by the US government. T T a a c c t t i i c c s s Now, other international financial centres, including the Bahamas, are likely to fear theU S may use the same tactics against themselves. Mr Paton indicated that the Bahamas’ future in financials ervices lay in moving away from a business platform prev iously based on client confidentiality to one that was based on transparency andc ompliance. “I think we’re going to have t o seriously consider tax transparency points, and how we r e-position ourselves, and how we develop a strategic plan g oing forward,” he added. “I think we’re going to be transitioning, if not to a TIEA e nvironment, which is probab ly an easier solution, to a more sophisticated solution that would be a double tax treaty network. That would require us to have in place cer-t ain standards of taxation. “I can see a move, in the residential business environment, to having a corporate tax environment for busi-n esses doing business here, resident businesses. “It would probably make sense to transition to a corporate tax environment, whichw ould have aspects of taxation that would be recognised by international standards. On the back of that, we would bea ble to negotiate double tax treaties. The trick is going to be to p rotect non-resident, private b anking businesses from that tax.” Double tax treaties with other countries would enable companies/clients in theB ahamas to be taxed at lower Bahamian tax rates, and avoid tax when capital and assets were repatriated to their home countries. M r Paton said Barbados had attracted companies and business to its jurisdiction by selectively targeting countries to sign double tax deals with.H e added that the Bahamas needed to work on re-positioning now, and not wait until it was boxed into a corner withn owhere to go. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 0$.,/$,1(-26(3+ -(520(31$66$8%$+$0$6 LV DSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG &LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH %DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\ U HJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOG V HQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKHWKGD\RI)HEUXDU\WRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 127,&( Financial industry must ‘reposition’ in 10-15 years FROM page 1B

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in Atlanta and Puerto Rico, before returning home to the Bahamas. In 2007, Mr Humes put everything on the line to see his dream of owning a model management agency come to fruition, and with a full-time job, limited equipment and virtually no capital, he began to shape his business. "Nobody wants to invest in something like this,” he said. "So, last year was costly and stressful." Mr Humes said he relied on his skill as a trained photographer and former knowledge of the industry to recruit talent and piece together the management side of the business. Desperately in need of liquid assets, Mark was forced to turn to Bahamian commercial banks for a loan, as he had invested much of his personal savings into the early stages of business development. When Commonwealth Bank approved his loan request, Mr Humes began to accelerate efforts to recruit talent and complete preliminary photo shoots, in hopes of having his first model competition in October 2008. In need of an edge and inter national accreditation, Models242 collaborated with Models.com’s top 10-ranked agency, Ford Models, to hold the first Bahamas Ford Supermodel of the World competition. Mr Humes was immediately overwhelmed with the strain of staging his pilot model competition, under the auspices and scrutiny of a top model firm. Taxing his rapidly depleting coffers further, Mr Humes took on the responsibility of bring ing Ford's judges and several leaders in fashion cosmetology to New Providence to partici pate in his competition. Mr Humes said that by this time he was deep in debt, and owed banks, friends and family alike. "I still owe creditors, but I will ensure that the debts are paid at the end of the day," he said. “This is still about the busi ness: how much money I can make out of this? That is why the people that I am selecting to be a part of this business are saleable." When competition day rolled around, Mark saw the fruits of his labour, as his models, vying for a chance to win $500,000 in modelling contracts at the Ford Supermodel of the World com-p etition in Montenegro, parad ed across a stage inside Fort Charlotte for a team of inter national judges. In the end, Gabrielle Moss emerged as Ford's top model o f the Bahamas, and recently t ravelled via Canada and Germ any to Montenegro for F ord's competition. Mr Humes, who accompa nied Gabrielle on the trip, said he had never seen so much excitement from a young person. He said she glowed with elation when she was among the other models from countries such as Brazil, who won the overall competition, Egypt and Africa. Although Gabrielle was not picked up by Ford in Montenegro, she sparked the interest of VNY, who invited her to New York and offered her a contract. "Obviously when I didn't win a contract with Ford, I was disappointed," Gabrielle said. But, she added that she is just as excited to have the same opportunity through VNY. Mr Humes said the almost $30,000 investment in his agency has paid off, as several agencies have expressed interest in several of his other models. Since his success, he said other have begun to try to follow his lead. "Competition is natural in business and I like that," he said. Mr Humes said he was working with his models to make them into ambassadors for the Bahamas, so that, should they make it to the international market, they will represent their country duly. "I don't want them to become the status quo," he said. "I want them to represent the country to their fullest ability. I want to be able to make a difference in the lives of our young people in the country." Mr Humes, upset by the lack of vision displayed by Bahamians and Bahamian businesses, said organisations should stop sponsoring "foolishness" and invest in the youth. He also dis missed some he approached for help with his business plan, who inevitably took his money and produced nothing for him. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 5B However, he added that a complaint had been filed against the industrial agreement with the Industrial Tribunal T he new industrial agreement, which is retroactive to January 7, 2008, included a $300 lump sum that Mr Douglas said Mr Wilson and others had tried to prevent union members from receiving. “They tried to stop the people from getting their $300 lump sum last week, but the people grabbed their money and left,” said MrD ouglas. “The people don’t listen to them.” He said that though the industrial agreement has not yet been registered, hotels have begun to honour its terms. It introduces gratuity increases, gratuities for departments that previously did not r eceive it before, a retroactive $300 lump sum and a 4.8 per cent salary increase in 2012. “Understand that employers have already paid benefits per the contract, so that shows good faith, because this contract is retroactive,” said Mr Douglas. I think the employees should look at the leadership (of the union) and see that Wilson and them ain’t the right guys for them.” Bar on hotel industrial deal registration is removed F ROM page 1B $30k outlay produces a ‘model’ investment F ROM page 1B Obviously when I didn’t win a c ontract with Ford I was disappointed.” Gabrielle Moss

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A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN A preference just the same (5 23 Notice to keep out nothing i n the accounts (2,5 24 The illumination comes down (6 25 Acquired a list (6 Down 1 Profoundly improve a harbour? (6 2 Grounds for d evelopment? (5 3 Royal House set out in w ords (7 5 Does nothing, and some did less (5 6 Fight to save a battered used car (7 7 Agreement to attempt to get some food in (6 8 Awelcome sign of advancing senility (11) 14 He has a fish for curing (7 1 5 Just come in out of the running (7 1 6 Lie, in an open sort of way (6 17 Extremely ragged (6 19 Misguided voter, that’s obvious (5 2 1 Not up, not down, not true (3,2 Across:1 Profits, 5 Loser, 8 Statisticians, 9 Rumba, 10 Outside, 11 Allied, 12 Sonnet, 15 Last out, 17 Plate, 19 Weather-beaten, 20 Drear, 21 Deserts. Down:1 Poser, 2 On a small scale, 3 Imitate, 4 Sets on, 5 Licit, 6 Stationmaster, 7 Respect, 11 Allowed, 13 Oppress, 14 Stored, 16 Other, 18 Ernes. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Scrooge, 5 Athos, 8 Apple of the eye, 9 Plead, 10 Redwood, 11 Diesel, 12 Fillip, 15 Mistake, 17 Toper, 19 Rabble-rousing, 20 Teeny, 21 Pleased. Down:1 Sharp, 2 Reprehensible, 3 Overdue, 4 Effort, 5 Aphid, 6 Hieroglyphics, 7 Speed up, 11 Demerit, 13 Intrude, 14 Bear up, 16 Alloy, 18 Rigid. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425 1 234567 8 910 1112 131415 16 17 18192021 2223 2425Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 In great demand ( 2,1,7) 8 Sudden intense effort (5 9 Bring charge a gainst (7 10 Small-time gangster (7 11 Up to the time of (5 12 People of a state (6 14 Hateful (6 17 Push one’s way rudely (5 19 As a whole (7 21 Quick retort (7 22 Quick to take offence (5 23 Northeast part of US (3,7 Down 2 Amuster (4-3 3 Part of a flower (5 4 Mysterious situation (6 5 Confiscate (7 6 Intended (5 7 Very easy task (6,4 8 In jail (6,4 13 Supervised (7 15 Enthusiastic reception (7 16 To rule (6 18 To mature (5 20 Support for blackboard (5 fbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Perceive increase in value (10 8 Castles in the air? (5 9 Witty saying of an unusually prim age (7 1 0 What one may do with a s tipend perhaps (5,2 11 Adesire to write a letter (5 12 There’s a copy in the southeast for a writer (6 1 4 Gets on the stage (6 17 Anegative in some trouble (5 19 Issues Oriental b lends (7 21 Comparative vacuum? (7 22 Such work is speculative (5 2 3 I represent change and the r eadiness to accept it (10 Down 2 Daring type of blazer (7 3 Reduced to the lowest l evel (5 4 Found note in packing case (6 5 In a giddy goat it may be m usically excited (7 6 Flier at the heart of 15 Down (5 7 Stresses a ship seems to produce (10 8 There’s opposition since rates were changed (10 13 It may be fixed by one at variance (7 1 5 Those who have them will be sorry (7 16 Fear to make the initial mistake (6 18 Anice change to be with an Eastern relative (5 20 Agree to be keen (5 Across:1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Down:1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, 5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 Overt, 21 Put on. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. Down:1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 By ear, 21 Weave. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. A cross 1 In great demand (2,1,7 8 Sudden intense effort (5 9 Bring charge against (7 10 Small-time gangster (7 11 Up to the time of (5 1 2 People of a state (6 14 Hateful (6 17 Push one’s way rudely (5 19 As a whole (7 21 Quick retort (7 22 Quick to take offence (5 23 Northeast part of US (3,7 Down 2 Amuster (4-3 3 Part of a flower (5 4 Mysterious situation (6 5 Confiscate (7 6 Intended (5 7 Very easy task (6,4 8 In jail (6,4 13 Supervised (7 15 Enthusiastic reception (7 16 To rule (6 18 To mature (5 20 Support for blackboard (5 fbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 Perceive increase in v alue (10 8 Castles in the air? (5 9 Witty saying of an u nusually prim age (7 10 What one may do with a stipend perhaps (5,2 11 Adesire to write a letter (5 1 2 There’s a copy in the s outheast for a writer (6 14 Gets on the stage (6 17 Anegative in some trouble (5 1 9 Issues Oriental b lends (7 21 Comparative vacuum? (7 22 Such work is s peculative (5 23 I represent change and the readiness to accept it (10 Down 2 Daring type of blazer (7 3 Reduced to the lowest level (5 4 Found note in packing c ase (6 5 In a giddy goat it may be musically excited (7 6 Flier at the heart of 15 Down (5 7 Stresses a ship seems to p roduce (10 8 There’s opposition since rates were changed (10 13 It may be fixed by one at variance (7 1 5 Those who have them will b e sorry (7 16 Fear to make the initial mistake (6 18 Anice change to be with a n Eastern relative (5 20 Agree to be keen (5 Across:1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Down:1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, 5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 Overt, 21 Put on. Y esterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. Down:1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 By ear, 21 Weave. Y esterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1 011 12131415 1 6 1 7181920 2122 2 3 1 23456 7 89 1 011 12131415 1 6 1 7181920 2122 2 3Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker C hess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 In great demand (2,1,7 8 Sudden intense effort (5 9 Bring charge against (7 10 Small-time gangster (7 11 Up to the time of (5 12 People of a state (6 14 Hateful (6 17 Push one’s way rudely (5 19 As a whole (7 21 Quick retort (7 22 Quick to take offence (5 23 Northeast part of US (3,7 Down 2 Amuster (4-3 3 Part of a flower (5 4 Mysterious situation (6 5 Confiscate (7 6 Intended (5 7 Very easy task (6,4 8 In jail (6,4 13 Supervised (7 15 Enthusiastic reception (7 16 To rule (6 18 To mature (5 20 Support for blackboard (5 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Perceive increase in value (10 8 Castles in the air? (5 9 Witty saying of an unusually prim age (7 10 What one may do with a stipend perhaps (5,2 11 Adesire to write a letter (5 12 There’s a copy in the southeast for a writer (6 14 Gets on the stage (6 17 Anegative in some trouble (5 19 Issues Oriental blends (7 21 Comparative vacuum? (7 22 Such work is speculative (5 23 I represent change and the readiness to accept it (10 Down 2 Daring type of blazer (7 3 Reduced to the lowest level (5 4 Found note in packing case (6 5 In a giddy goat it may be musically excited (7 6 Flier at the heart of 15 Down (5 7 Stresses a ship seems to produce (10 8 There’s opposition since rates were changed (10 13 It may be fixed by one at variance (7 15 Those who have them will be sorry (7 16 Fear to make the initial mistake (6 18 Anice change to be with an Eastern relative (5 20 Agree to be keen (5 Across:1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Down:1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, 5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 Overt, 21 Put on. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. Down:1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 By ear, 21 Weave. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 In great demand (2,1,7 8 Sudden intense effort (5 9 Bring charge against (7 10 Small-time gangster (7 11 Up to the time of (5 12 People of a state (6 14 Hateful (6 17 Push one’s way rudely (5 19 As a whole (7 21 Quick retort (7 22 Quick to take offence (5 23 Northeast part of US (3,7 Down 2 Amuster (4-3 3 Part of a flower (5 4 Mysterious situation (6 5 Confiscate (7 6 Intended (5 7 Very easy task (6,4 8 In jail (6,4 13 Supervised (7 15 Enthusiastic reception (7 16 To rule (6 18 To mature (5 20 Support for blackboard (5 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Perceive increase in value (10 8 Castles in the air? (5 9 Witty saying of an unusually prim age (7 10 What one may do with a stipend perhaps (5,2 11 Adesire to write a letter (5 12 There’s a copy in the southeast for a writer (6 14 Gets on the stage (6 17 Anegative in some trouble (5 19 Issues Oriental blends (7 21 Comparative vacuum? (7 22 Such work is speculative (5 23 I represent change and the readiness to accept it (10 Down 2 Daring type of blazer (7 3 Reduced to the lowest level (5 4 Found note in packing case (6 5 In a giddy goat it may be musically excited (7 6 Flier at the heart of 15 Down (5 7 Stresses a ship seems to produce (10 8 There’s opposition since rates were changed (10 13 It may be fixed by one at variance (7 15 Those who have them will be sorry (7 16 Fear to make the initial mistake (6 18 Anice change to be with an Eastern relative (5 20 Agree to be keen (5 Across:1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Down:1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, 5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 Overt, 21 Put on. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. Down:1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 By ear, 21 Weave. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 In great demand (2,1,7 8 Sudden intense effort (5 9 Bring charge against (7 10 Small-time gangster (7 11 Up to the time of (5 12 People of a state (6 14 Hateful (6 17 Push one’s way rudely (5 19 As a whole (7 21 Quick retort (7 22 Quick to take offence (5 23 Northeast part of US (3,7 Down 2 Amuster (4-3 3 Part of a flower (5 4 Mysterious situation (6 5 Confiscate (7 6 Intended (5 7 Very easy task (6,4 8 In jail (6,4 13 Supervised (7 15 Enthusiastic reception (7 16 To rule (6 18 To mature (5 20 Support for blackboard (5 frbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Perceive increase in value (10 8 Castles in the air? (5 9 Witty saying of an unusually prim age (7 10 What one may do with a stipend perhaps (5,2 11 Adesire to write a letter (5 12 There’s a copy in the southeast for a writer (6 14 Gets on the stage (6 17 Anegative in some trouble (5 19 Issues Oriental blends (7 21 Comparative vacuum? (7 22 Such work is speculative (5 23 I represent change and the readiness to accept it (10 Down 2 Daring type of blazer (7 3 Reduced to the lowest level (5 4 Found note in packing case (6 5 In a giddy goat it may be musically excited (7 6 Flier at the heart of 15 Down (5 7 Stresses a ship seems to produce (10 8 There’s opposition since rates were changed (10 13 It may be fixed by one at variance (7 15 Those who have them will be sorry (7 16 Fear to make the initial mistake (6 18 Anice change to be with an Eastern relative (5 20 Agree to be keen (5 Across:1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Down:1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, 5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 Overt, 21 Put on. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. Down:1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 By ear, 21 Weave. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 In great demand (2,1,7 8 Sudden intense effort (5 9 Bring charge against (7 10 Small-time gangster (7 11 Up to the time of (5 12 People of a state (6 14 Hateful (6 17 Push one’s way rudely (5 19 As a whole (7 21 Quick retort (7 22 Quick to take offence (5 23 Northeast part of US (3,7 Down 2 Amuster (4-3 3 Part of a flower (5 4 Mysterious situation (6 5 Confiscate (7 6 Intended (5 7 Very easy task (6,4 8 In jail (6,4 13 Supervised (7 15 Enthusiastic reception (7 16 To rule (6 18 To mature (5 20 Support for blackboard (5 frbfrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Perceive increase in value (10 8 Castles in the air? (5 9 Witty saying of an unusually prim age (7 10 What one may do with a stipend perhaps (5,2 11 Adesire to write a letter (5 12 There’s a copy in the southeast for a writer (6 14 Gets on the stage (6 17 Anegative in some trouble (5 19 Issues Oriental blends (7 21 Comparative vacuum? (7 22 Such work is speculative (5 23 I represent change and the readiness to accept it (10 Down 2 Daring type of blazer (7 3 Reduced to the lowest level (5 4 Found note in packing case (6 5 In a giddy goat it may be musically excited (7 6 Flier at the heart of 15 Down (5 7 Stresses a ship seems to produce (10 8 There’s opposition since rates were changed (10 13 It may be fixed by one at variance (7 15 Those who have them will be sorry (7 16 Fear to make the initial mistake (6 18 Anice change to be with an Eastern relative (5 20 Agree to be keen (5 Across:1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Down:1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, 5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 Overt, 21 Put on. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. Down:1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 By ear, 21 Weave. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 In great demand (2,1,7 8 Sudden intense effort (5 9 Bring charge against (7 10 Small-time gangster (7 11 Up to the time of (5 12 People of a state (6 14 Hateful (6 17 Push one’s way rudely (5 19 As a whole (7 21 Quick retort (7 22 Quick to take offence (5 23 Northeast part of US (3,7 Down 2 Amuster (4-3 3 Part of a flower (5 4 Mysterious situation (6 5 Confiscate (7 6 Intended (5 7 Very easy task (6,4 8 In jail (6,4 13 Supervised (7 15 Enthusiastic reception (7 16 To rule (6 18 To mature (5 20 Support for blackboard (5 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Perceive increase in value (10 8 Castles in the air? (5 9 Witty saying of an unusually prim age (7 10 What one may do with a stipend perhaps (5,2 11 Adesire to write a letter (5 12 There’s a copy in the southeast for a writer (6 14 Gets on the stage (6 17 Anegative in some trouble (5 19 Issues Oriental blends (7 21 Comparative vacuum? (7 22 Such work is speculative (5 23 I represent change and the readiness to accept it (10 Down 2 Daring type of blazer (7 3 Reduced to the lowest level (5 4 Found note in packing case (6 5 In a giddy goat it may be musically excited (7 6 Flier at the heart of 15 Down (5 7 Stresses a ship seems to produce (10 8 There’s opposition since rates were changed (10 13 It may be fixed by one at variance (7 15 Those who have them will be sorry (7 16 Fear to make the initial mistake (6 18 Anice change to be with an Eastern relative (5 20 Agree to be keen (5 Across:1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Down:1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, 5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 Overt, 21 Put on. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. Down:1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 By ear, 21 Weave. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u t a r g e t Across 1 In great demand (2,1,7 8 Sudden intense effort (5 9 Bring charge against (7 10 Small-time gangster (7 11 Up to the time of (5 12 People of a state (6 14 Hateful (6 17 Push one’s way rudely (5 19 As a whole (7 21 Quick retort (7 22 Quick to take offence (5 23 Northeast part of US (3,7 Down 2 Amuster (4-3 3 Part of a flower (5 4 Mysterious situation (6 5 Confiscate (7 6 Intended (5 7 Very easy task (6,4 8 In jail (6,4 13 Supervised (7 15 Enthusiastic reception (7 16 To rule (6 18 To mature (5 20 Support for blackboard (5 frbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Perceive increase in value (10 8 Castles in the air? (5 9 Witty saying of an unusually prim age (7 10 What one may do with a stipend perhaps (5,2 11 Adesire to write a letter (5 12 There’s a copy in the southeast for a writer (6 14 Gets on the stage (6 17 Anegative in some trouble (5 19 Issues Oriental blends (7 21 Comparative vacuum? (7 22 Such work is speculative (5 23 I represent change and the readiness to accept it (10 Down 2 Daring type of blazer (7 3 Reduced to the lowest level (5 4 Found note in packing case (6 5 In a giddy goat it may be musically excited (7 6 Flier at the heart of 15 Down (5 7 Stresses a ship seems to produce (10 8 There’s opposition since rates were changed (10 13 It may be fixed by one at variance (7 15 Those who have them will be sorry (7 16 Fear to make the initial mistake (6 18 Anice change to be with an Eastern relative (5 20 Agree to be keen (5 Across:1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Down:1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, 5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 Overt, 21 Put on. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. Down:1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 By ear, 21 Weave. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 In great demand (2,1,7 8 Sudden intense effort (5 9 Bring charge against (7 10 Small-time gangster (7 11 Up to the time of (5 12 People of a state (6 14 Hateful (6 17 Push one’s way rudely (5 19 As a whole (7 21 Quick retort (7 22 Quick to take offence (5 23 Northeast part of US (3,7 Down 2 Amuster (4-3 3 Part of a flower (5 4 Mysterious situation (6 5 Confiscate (7 6 Intended (5 7 Very easy task (6,4 8 In jail (6,4 13 Supervised (7 15 Enthusiastic reception (7 16 To rule (6 18 To mature (5 20 Support for blackboard (5 fbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Perceive increase in value (10 8 Castles in the air? (5 9 Witty saying of an unusually prim age (7 10 What one may do with a stipend perhaps (5,2 11 Adesire to write a letter (5 12 There’s a copy in the southeast for a writer (6 14 Gets on the stage (6 17 Anegative in some trouble (5 19 Issues Oriental blends (7 21 Comparative vacuum? (7 22 Such work is speculative (5 23 I represent change and the readiness to accept it (10 Down 2 Daring type of blazer (7 3 Reduced to the lowest level (5 4 Found note in packing case (6 5 In a giddy goat it may be musically excited (7 6 Flier at the heart of 15 Down (5 7 Stresses a ship seems to produce (10 8 There’s opposition since rates were changed (10 13 It may be fixed by one at variance (7 15 Those who have them will be sorry (7 16 Fear to make the initial mistake (6 18 Anice change to be with an Eastern relative (5 20 Agree to be keen (5 Across:1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Down:1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, 5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 Overt, 21 Put on. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. Down:1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 By ear, 21 Weave. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 1 23456 7 89 1011 12131415 16 17181920 2122 23 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. P AGE 6B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 15

With the Police Force, Customs and Immigration, the Government offered early retirement packages to a number of senior o fficers in each department, and Mr Winder suggested that the G overnment had to “create avenues” through which younger o fficers “who are computer savvy” could advance. Older, entrenched officials who had held their positions for years were a potential impediment to t his process, he added. “They are going to have to do i t, more so,” Mr Winder said of the Government’s departmental s hake-ups. “Granted that the economy is slow, and we all agree that the Government wants to be compassionate in its approach, but I think the Government is going to have to go through a detailed a nalysis of all public sector agencies. We want to be ready for when the economy comes around, so our agencies can be more efficient than they are. It’s a benefi cial thing to do. I personally don’t have a problem in congratulating the Government in making this happen. “My concern is it’s still a piecemeal approach, and if they’re going to be in a position to pro vide better service once this thing turns around, the Government may have to spend money to make it happen.” Public service reform is one of the Government’s key long-term objectives, although Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told Tribune Businessearlier this year that the effort would focus on making existing systems operate more efficiently and productively, rather than civil service downsizing. “There’s a level of civil servants who have the capabilities to take the country to the next level, but they will not be able to if the lev el above them does not have the skill sets, the enthusiasm, to make it happen,” Mr Winder told Tribune Business. “The sooner we deal with that, the better off we will be. “It’s a difficult choice they [the Government] have to make. While on an individual basis it may seem a bit harsh, but when one thinks about the level of competition our country has to con-tend with from around the world, for the good of all Bahamians this has to happen. “If the Government has to spend extra money to make a dif ference, I think it’s money wellspent.” Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham indicated the Government was prepared to do exactly that in his New Year’s address to the nation, with civil service reform intended to help “reduce the cumbersome application process es for permits, licences and registration”. The administration’s pilot Public Service Improvement Pro gramme, launched in six agencies in May 2008 and completed in December last year, targeted the Department of Public Service, the R egistrar General’s Department, the Building Control Division, t he Road Traffic Department, the Department of Physical Planning, a nd the Passport Office. All were found to have defi ciencies in urgent need of correction when it came to properly serving the Bahamian public. I ndicating he was prepared to ‘grab the bull by the horns’, Mr I ngraham told the nation: “We fully intend to work towards a n ew culture of excellence in the service of the Bahamian people, a culture of ethical conduct on the part of those who serve a culture that is hostile to slackness and c orrupt practices. “We expect that some elem ents of this process will be painful and we fully expect to bec riticized. We may even have to pay a political price. “But we believe that we have a duty to position our country more securely on its constitutionalf oundations of democratic government, equal access to the r ights, privileges and protections which citizenship bestows, and the rule of law. “The Bahamian people deserve no less than a country with a modern, responsive public service, a country that is equipped to function in an increasingly competitive world, a country that is stable, and a country that can hold its head high as a respected member of the international com munity.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 7B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.411.410.000.0700.00020.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.64Bank of Bahamas7.647.640.000.3190.26023.93.40% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.2550.24011.11.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7 .904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.776.770.000.4380.05015.50.74% 5.001.88Consolidated Water BDRs2.162.15-0.015610.1110.05219.42.42% 3.002.27Doctor's Hospital2.402.400.000.2400.04010.01.67% 8.106.02Famguard7.807.76-0.042,7000.5980.24013.03.09% 1 3.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.5420.52020.34.73% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6820.40015.33.83% 6.045.01Focol (S5.185.180.004000.3370.15015.42.90% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1 .000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1 000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref6.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 14.0014.00Bahamas Supermarkets11.2312.0414.00-0.0410.300N/M2.67% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.9230-0.58-2.54 1.43761.3773Colina Money Market Fund1.43760.284.383 .79693.3856Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3856-10.83-10.83 12.618011.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.61805.745.74 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.0950-13.38-13.38 1.04011.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04014.014.01 1.03301.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03303.303.30 1.04101.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04104.104.10 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525FINDEX: CLOSE 821.52 | YTD -1.60% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,678.29 | CHG -0.22 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -34.07 | YTD % -1.99BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesP rime + 1.75% M aturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% P rime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Dec-08 31-Jan-09 31-Jan-09WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 31-Jan-09 23-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-08 3 1-Jan-09 0 DFKLQHU\t(QHUJ\/LPLWHG&DWHUSLOODUGHDOHULQWKH % DKDPDVDUHVHHNLQJDFDQGLGDWHWRZRUNDVD3DUWVXSHUYLVRU DWRXU)UHHSRUWI 7 KH&DQGLGDWHVKRXOGKDYHWKHIROORZLQJUHTXLUHPHQWV +DYH\HDUVH[SHULHQFHZLWKWKH&DWHUSLOODURU VLPLODUURGXFW/LQHKDYHZRUNHGLQD&DWHUSLOODU GHDOHUVKLSRUDVLPLODUUJDQL]DWLRQ +DYHWUDLQLQJLQUGHULQJDQGHFHLYLQJDUWV ,PSRUWDWLRQ %HDEOHWR$XGLWDUWV,QYHQWRU\&\FOLF&RXQW 3URFHGXUH 'HJUHHIURPDQDFFUHGLWHGQLYHUVLW\ZRXOGEHDQ DVVHW 0XVWEHDEOHWRPDQDJHUDQGPRWLYDWHVWDIILQWKH 3DUWV'HSDUWPHQW 0XVWKDYHH[SHULHQFHLQSURFHVVVWDWLVWLFDOFRQWUROLQ SODQQLQJSURJUDPPLQJDQGFRQWURORI&DWHUSLOODU LQGXVWULDOSDUWVDQG:DUHKRXVHSURGXFWLRQSURFHVV $EOHWRPDQDJHPDMRUFRPSRQHQWVLQWHUFKDQJH SURFHVV+RVHVDVVHPEOLQJSURFHVV 7 KLVFDQGLGDWHLVUHTXLUHGWREHDSURIHVVLRQDOZKR W KULYHVRQWKHFKDOOHQJHRIDQDJLQJDUWV,QYHQWRU\ D QGDOORWKHURSHUDWLRQDOSURFHGXUHVZLWKLQWKHDUWV :DUHKRXVH 6HQGFRPSOHWHUHVXPHZLWKHGXFDWLRQDQGZRUN H[SHULHQFHWR0 t ( /LPLWHG 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV $WWHQWLRQIFH$GPLQLVWUDWRU PH#PHOWGFRP 127(QO\SHUVRQVEHLQJLQWHUYLHZHGIRUWKLV SRVLWLRQZLOOEHFRQWDFWHG Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD a qualified landscapesupplier(sto grow trees, palms, s hrubs and groundcover (itemswith the required schedule and speculations for completion of Stage 1 of the LPIAExpansion Project. This is a supply o nly contract. Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after 1:00 pm , on T hursday, February 12th, 2009. Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time. Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape SupplyContact: Traci Brisby Contract & Procurement Manager LPIA Expansion Project REQUEST FORPROPOSAL FROM page 1B Government urged: More public sector restructuring move the whole effort forward,” Mr Sands said. Among the agreements signed between the Bahamas and China during Mr Liangyu ’s visit was an $150 million loan from the China Ex-Im Bank to finance upgrades to the “airport highway”, meaning the existing JFK Drive. Such a project would benefit, among others, Baha Mar, as it would be the main access corridor for guests going to and from the airport. The China Ex-Im Bank the prospective financing partner for Baha Mar. Meanwhile, Mr Sands said yesterday: “Mr Izmirlian was one of the special guests at the state dinner, along with myself. He was one of the few non-governmental people there, and I think that’s a very clear indication of the relationship Mr Izmirlian has established with Chinese officials, in terms of China Ex-Im Bank and China State Construction.” Mr Izmirlian had earlier this year told Tribune Business that Baha Mar had soon hoped to sign a construction contract for the Cable Beach development with China State Construction. “I’m very optimistic,” Mr Izmirlian said. “I think the Chinese are the right partners for us. They look at the world over a long period of time. “They are very senior people who would not fly half-way around the world if they were not serious. The negotiations are complex and will take time, but over the next six months we hope to come to a conclusion. “We’ll hopefully be in a position to sign a construction contract over the next few weeks,” Mr Izmirlian told Tribune Business, adding that “after that” the main issue was likely to involve reaching an agreement with the China Ex-Im Bank to provide debt financing to fund the construction work. W hile the bank would act as the financing partner, Mr Izmirlian s aid that besides acting as general contractor, China State Cons truction would also invest in the project and become Baha Mar’s equity partner. Baha Mar would manage and operate the finished r esort complex, whose design has not changed since Harrah’s Entertainment withdrew as the equity and casino partner. The Baha Mar chief executive said it was “the right time” for the Baha Mar project to be built, given the huge drop in input costs for the project. Mr Izmirlian explained that international shipping costs/rates had dropped 90 per cent as a result of the global economic downturn, thereby lowering Baha Mar’s costs when it came to imported construction materials, equipment and other supplies, while raw materials costs had fallen by between 50-75 per cent. Mr Izmirlian said the $2.6 billion Cable Beach redevelopment w ould be fully completed and open in three-and-a-half years if construction work began now, something that again represented perfect timing, because it would hopefully coincide with a period when the world economy was growing again. Baha Mar ‘moves forward’ on $2.6b Chinese agreement F ROM page1B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 41F/5C Low: 43F/6C Low: 53F/12C Low: 56F/13C Low: 56 F/13 C Low: 60F/16C Low: 64 F/18 C Low: 55 F/13 C High: 60F/16C High: 60F/16C High: 68 F/20 C High: 71 F/22 C High: 72F/22C High: 70 F/21C High: 76F/24C Low: 56F/13C High: 78F/26C Low: 66 F/19 C High: 78F/26C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 64F/18C High: 83 F/28 C Low: 68F/20C High: 80 F/27 Low: 64F/18C High: 78F/26C Low: 65 F/18C High: 81F/27C Low: 68 F/20 C High: 86F/30C Low: 66 F/19 C High: 82F/28C Low: 66 F/19 C High: 85F/29C Low: 67F/19C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 68F/20C High: 81F/27C High: 75 F/24 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY FEBRUARY 20 TH 2009 PAGE 8B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny, windy and less humid. Patchy clouds.Breezy with plenty of sun. Partly sunny and humid. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. High: 76 Low: 64 High: 79 High: 83 High: 80 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Chance for a couple of showers. High: 76 Low: 70 Low: 72 Low: 66 AccuWeather RealFeel 74F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 62F 71-70F 98-77F 95-64F 76-62F Low: 65 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................81F/27C Low ....................................................61F/16C Normal high ......................................77F/25C Normal low ........................................64F/18C Last year's high .................................. 88 F/31C Last year's low .................................. 74 F/23C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.68" Normal year to date ......................................2.90" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Feb. 24 Mar . 4 Mar . 10 Mar . 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:40 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:07 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 3:43 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 2:22 p.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 4:33 a.m.2.310:44 a.m.0.4 4:41 p.m.2.010:43 p.m.0.2 5:22 a.m.2.411:31 a.m.0.3 5:31 p.m.2.111:33 p.m.0.1 6:05 a.m.2.512:12 p.m.0.1 6:14 p.m.2.2----6:43 a.m.2.612:17 a.m.0.0 6:54 p.m.2.412:49 p.m.0.0 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3272/22s87/3074/23s Amsterdam46/739/3c45/740/4c Ankara, Turkey37/230/-1c36/225/-3c Athens48/837/2pc45/738/3s Auckland79/2669/20r73/2262/16pc Bangkok93/3378/25pc94/3478/25pc Barbados84/2875/23pc84/2875/23c Barcelona54/1240/4pc54/1242/5pc Beijing41/523/-5pc46/724/-4s Beirut61/1655/12r56/1352/11r Belgrade28/-220/-6c32/029/-1sn Berlin34/128/-2sn32/025/-3c Bermuda64/1756/13r64/1759/15s Bogota67/1943/6t67/1942/5c Brussels43/636/2c46/737/2c Budapest36/223/-5pc36/226/-3c Buenos Aires91/3264/17t70/2163/17r Cairo68/2050/10s65/1854/12pc Calcutta93/3369/20s93/3373/22s Calgary30/-115/-9pc32/014/-10s Cancun81/2764/17pc83/2862/16s Caracas84/2868/20pc83/2868/20sh Casablanca68/2054/12c70/2149/9s Copenhagen38/333/0sn37/235/1sn Dublin46/741/5pc48/841/5pc Frankfurt39/332/0sn39/334/1sh Geneva 39/3 32/0 pc 38/333/0c Halifax 34/1 21/-6 sf 33/0 21/-6 c Havana 75/23 55/12 pc 80/26 61/16 s Helsinki 28/-2 23/-5sf30/-125/-3sf Hong Kong 72/22 63/17 pc 70/21 66/18c Islamabad 75/23 50/10 pc 72/22 46/7 pc Istanbul40/431/0c42/539/3sn Jerusalem 53/11 44/6sh48/846/7r Johannesburg 77/2556/13t77/2558/14t Kingston 84/2875/23pc86/3075/23sh Lima83/2867/19sh84/2866/18c London50/1036/2pc52/1137/2pc Madrid59/1536/2s61/1632/0s Manila89/3175/23s91/3274/23pc Mexico City72/2246/7t75/2343/6pc Monterrey70/2157/13c79/2656/13c Montreal27/-219/-7sn27/-214/-10c Moscow27/-221/-6sf25/-316/-8sf Munich23/-522/-5sn29/-128/-2sn Nairobi90/3255/12s90/3256/13s New Delhi 77/2557/13s79/2657/13pc Oslo27/-218/-7sf30/-121/-6sn Paris46/737/2pc48/836/2c Prague 31/0 28/-2 sn 32/0 29/-1 sn Rio de Janeiro85/2973/22s88/3175/23c Riyadh77/2555/12pc84/2859/15pc Rome 48/8 34/1 s 50/10 38/3 r St. Thomas82/2774/23s83/2874/23s San Juan88/3163/17pc85/2963/17pc San Salvador 91/32 66/18 s 91/32 73/22 pc Santiago 84/2854/12s81/2754/12pc Santo Domingo84/2869/20pc83/2868/20pc Sao Paulo 85/29 66/18 c 85/29 65/18t Seoul27/-211/-11sn37/227/-2s Stockholm 30/-1 23/-5 pc 32/0 27/-2 pc Sydney 82/27 66/18 pc79/2666/18t Taipei65/1862/16sh78/2569/20pc T okyo 54/12 41/5 r 50/10 38/3 s T oronto 26/-320/-6sn29/-116/-8sn Trinidad84/2872/22t86/3074/23sh V ancouver 47/8 35/1 pc 48/838/3c Vienna 35/130/-1sn37/230/-1sf W arsaw 29/-1 20/-6 pc 26/-3 21/-6 pc Winnipeg 14/-10 -1/-18 sn 14/-10-2/-18sf H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:NW at 15-30 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Saturday:NE at 12-25 Knots4-7 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:NW at 15-30 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Saturday:NE at 12-25 Knots5-8 Feet7-10 Miles74F Today:NW at 15-30 Knots3-6 Feet7-10 Miles74F Saturday:NE at 15-30 Knots6-9 Feet7-10 Miles74F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque59/1531/0s57/1333/0s Anchorage30/-114/-10s22/-58/-13s Atlanta50/1029/-1s58/1436/2c Atlantic City37/218/-7s42/530/-1pc Baltimore37/222/-5s42/532/0pc Boston36/227/-2sf39/329/-1pc Buffalo26/-319/-7sf30/-121/-6sn Charleston, SC54/1228/-2s61/1639/3s Chicago27/-215/-9pc27/-214/-10sn Cleveland28/-217/-8sf31/023/-5sn Dallas68/2046/7s57/1332/0pc Denver46/716/-8c42/520/-6pc Detroit27/-218/-7sf28/-220/-6sn Honolulu76/2463/17pc78/2565/18c Houston67/1954/12s60/1539/3r HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday TodaySaturdayTodaySaturday Indianapolis38/325/-3s32/018/-7sn Jacksonville56/1327/-2s64/1742/5s Kansas City54/1224/-4c39/319/-7pc Las Vegas67/1941/5s67/1945/7pc Little Rock62/1638/3s49/930/-1r Los Angeles68/2050/10s72/2250/10pc Louisville42/532/0s42/524/-4c Memphis58/1439/3s49/930/-1c Miami72/2253/11s75/2365/18s Minneapolis20/-69/-12sn19/-76/-14c Nashville48/832/0s49/926/-3r New Orleans60/1544/6s66/1845/7c New York35/128/-2pc40/434/1pc Oklahoma City66/1834/1s48/823/-5pc Orlando60/1537/2s70/2148/8s Philadelphia34/122/-5pc41/532/0pc Phoenix 75/23 48/8 s 75/2350/10s Pittsburgh26/-318/-7sf34/124/-4sn Portland, OR 56/1337/2pc54/1241/5c Raleigh-Durham 45/7 25/-3 s 54/12 35/1 pc St. Louis50/1032/0pc37/219/-7sn Salt Lake City 40/4 23/-5 pc 43/625/-3pc San Antonio 70/21 56/13 pc 62/16 37/2 r San Diego66/1851/10s67/1951/10pc San Francisco 61/16 48/8 pc 62/1651/10pc Seattle54/1236/2pc52/1139/3c T allahassee 58/1423/-5s63/1739/3pc T ampa 60/15 39/3 s 66/18 52/11s Tucson76/2443/6s73/2244/6s W ashington, DC 40/4 25/-3s48/834/1pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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T ABERNACLE BAPTIST FALCONS – 44 JORDAN PRINCE WILLIAM FALCONS – 28 WITHan already comfortable nine point lead heading into the fourth quarter, Tabernacle doubled Prince Williams fourth quarter output to pull away for their second impressive win of the tournament.Tabernacle led 30-21 heading into the fourth, and reached a double figure lead in the quarter on a jumper from Robin Lafrance. Another lay-up by Lafrance, who finished with a game high 14 points, gave Tabernacle a 19 point advantage, their largest lead of the game, 41-22 with 2:42 remaining. Jesper Thompson led Prince William with nine points. GAME NOTES: The Falcons have won both games thus far by an average margin of victory of 21 points per gameDefensively they have held their opponents to just 27 points per game WESTMINSTER DIPLOMATS – 52 BIMINI BIG GAME – 28 BIMINI scored the game's first basket, but scored just one field goal the remainder of the quarter and two the remainder of the half as the Diplomats cruised to an easy win. Christorr Stuart nearly outscored the Big Game on his own, finishing with a game high 23 points. Stuart also added five rebounds two steals and two assists. He gave the Diplomats their first double figure lead of the game with a three pointer to open the second quarter, 14-4. Marako Lundy came off the bench and quickly made a pair of threes pointers on consecutive possessions to give the Diplomats a 20-4 advantage. Westminster led 25-10 at the half and opened the third in the same way they opened the previous quarter. Stuart and Lundy began the third with a pair of threes and the usual acrobatic finish from Larry Smith gave the Diplo mats a 31-10 lead midway through the quarter. Smith showed his versatility, stuffing the stat sheet with a great all-around performance, nine points, and team highs of 10 rebounds, five steals and five assists. Lundy finished with 10 points while Rashard Morley finished with six points, three rebounds and two blocks. Tristan Kelly led the Big Game with nine points while Larento Sands and Cleo Sears finished with seven and six points respectively. The Diplomats led 40-21 at the end of the third and Stuart gave them their first 20-point lead on the opening play of the fourth. The lead reached as much as 25, 50-25, on a pair of free throws by Stuart with 2:00 remaining. GAME NOTES: A fter a hard fought win over the Jack Hayward Wildcats Wednesday night, the Diplomats cruised to their biggest win of the tournament thus farIt was Stephen Miller, center for the Diplomats junior team who came off the bench to finish with six points and seven rebounds in Wednesday's win over Jack Hayward and not Shaquille Fernander as previously reported. E IGHT MILE ROCK BLUEJAYS – 42 CATHOLIC HIGH CRUSADERS – 40 LASTyear's runners-up improved to 2-0 in the tournament surviving a desperation three at the buzzer from a fellow rand Bahama rival. Delario Rolle's fade away three pointer from the left baseline drew only iron as time expired to give the Bluejays the win. In a closely contested game between evenly matched teams, the score was tied after the first quarter, 10-10 , the Crusaders held a slim 19-17 lead at the half, and the Bluejays took an even slimmer 24-23 lead into the fourth quarter. Both offences opened up considerably in the fourth, with the Bluejays holding a 33-29 lead midway through the quarter. A three pointer by Kalim Munnings brought the Crusaders within one, and a basket by Carlton Forbes gave them a 34-33 lead on the next possession. The Crusaders went on a 7-0 capped by a Kadeem Martin basket to give them a 40-34 lead with two minutes remaining. Ervin Lewis led the Bluejays with 11 points and 10 rebounds while Martin, Ramon James and Jamall Hall finished with eight points apiece. Forbes led the Crusaders with 13 while Munnings and Rolle finished with 11 and 10 points respectively. GAME NOTES: Neither team led by more than six points, the Crusaders biggest lead was 16-10 early in the second quarter and the Bluejays, 40-34 with two minutes left to playThis year's Bluejays team sportsa more balanced attack, last year, swingman Hubert Williams willed the Bluejays to the championship game with a series of great individual performances C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 9 Smart ChoiceDRIVESales TheBahamasElectricityCorporation Invites Tendersfor provision of General Insurance Services described below.Biddersarerequiredtocollectpackagesfromthe &RUSRUDWLRQ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQIFH%OXH+LOOt7XFNHURDGV Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 7HQGHUVDUHWREHDGGUHVVHGWR Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. 6XEPLVVLRQVVKRXOGEHPDUNHGDVIROORZV Tender No. 690/09 $OOLVNV*HQHUDO,QVXUDQFH (acial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents (bs, IT Infrastructure and Electronic Equipment Tender No. 691/09 0RWRU,QVXUDQFH&RPPHUFLDOtULYDWHHKLFOHV Tender No. 692/09 $FFLGHQW,QVXUDQFHRQH\t%XUJODU\ Tender No. 693/09 /LDELOLW\,QVXUHUVRQDOtXEOLF Tender No. 694/09 Professional Indemnity >2IFHU'LUHFWRU3URIHVVLRQDO6WDII(QJLQHHU Accountants, Attorneys] t Tender No. 695/09 Marine Insurance 7KH&RUSRUDWLRQUHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRDFFHSWRUUHMHFWDQ\RUDOOSURSRVDOV )RUDOOLQTXLULHVUHJDUGLQJWKHWHQGHUVtVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW Mr. Everette Sweeting at telephone 302-1163 n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THEYfell in the first game of this year’s tournament and after squandering a late fourth quarter lead last night, the Nassau Christian Academy Crusaders became the first team eliminated from the 27th Annual Hugh Campbell Tournament. The Queen’s College Comets held off elimination and sent the Crusaders packing with a 36-34 overtime win in the first of four elimination games in yesterday’s second session. Nathaniel Carter sank a pair of free throws at the line with 5.3 seconds remaining in regulation to send the game into overtime. Tied at 34 in overtime with 21 seconds remaining, Carter also put the Comets ahead with one of two free throws at the line. The Comets dominated the offensive board down in the waning moments of overtime, none more important than when Jordan Isaacs rebounded Carter’s missed free throw and was then sent to the line himself. Isaacs made one of two at the line to give the Comets a two point lead. Both teams began the game woefully on the offensive end with just two field goals between them in the opening quarter. The Crusaders led 5-4 after the first quarter. NCA built their largest lead of the game in the second quarter on an Ashton Wells free throw, giving them a 17-7 lead with 1:37 left to play in the half. The Comets ended the quarter on a brief 6-2 run, to trim the deficit, 19-13 at the half. QC outscored NCA 10-4 in a pivotal third quarter, opening on an 8-2 run, capped by a Carter lay-up to tie the game at 21. The Comets took their first lead of the second half on a jumper by Isaacs, however the Crusaders Leonardo Hepburn tied the game at 23 just before the buzzer sounded to end the third. The Crusaders built a five point lead in the fourth when Kenneth Clarke’s three pointer made the score 30-25 with 2:54 remaining. The Comets rallied with a basket by Isaacs and a tip in by Carter with 32 seconds left in regulation brought his team within one, 30-29. Ferguson made one of two free throws to give the Crusaders a 31-29 lead before Carter’s clutch free throws at the line sent the game to overtime. Carter led the Comets with 19 points and 10 rebounds while Isaacs finished with nine. Clarke led the Crusaders with nine points, Ferguson finished with eight and Shaquille Symonette posted five points and 10 rebounds. Crusaders first to get eliminated 27TH ANNUAL HUGH CAMPBELL CLASSIC DAY 5 SCHEDULE: F RIDAY, FEBRUARY 20TH SESSION ONE: ELIMINATION GAMES 8:30am Alpha/Omega Owls vs. J ack Hayward Wildcats 9:30am South Andros Cheetahs vs. St. Paul’s1 0:30am Temple Christian Suns vs. Bishop Michael Eldon Warr iors 11:30am Mt. Carmel Cavaliers vs. North Eleuthera B REAK SESSION TWO: ELIMINATION GAMES 1 pm GHS Magic vs. Winner of TC/BME 2 pm Teleos Cherubims vs. Winner of S. Andros/St. P’s 3pm Church of God Flames vs.W inner of Alph.Ome/JH 4pm CV Bethel Stingrays vs. W inner of Mt.C/N. Ele B REAK SESSION THREE 6pm CC Sweeting Cobras vs. Tabernacle Baptist Falcons 7pm DDJ Mystic Marlins vs.W estminster Diplomats 8pm CR Walker Knights vs. St. George’s Jaguars9 pm CI Gibson Rattlers vs. Eight Mile Rock Bluejays FROM page 11 Jaguars dominate the Stingers A SUNLAND Baptist Stingers’ player makes a move to the basket...

PAGE 18

n By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net SHE had a remarkable turnaround from her opening round, but Georgette Rolle fell short at the end of the Sun Coast Ladies Series that concluded yesterday. P laying at the Errol Estates Country Club in Apopko, Florida just outside of Orlando, Rolle shot rounds of 84-76-74 to finish 18-over-par with a total of 234 for 18th place overall out of a field of 26 competitors that e ndured the three days of competition. American Noriko Narazaki of Illinois captured her fifth title w ith rounds of 72-71-74=217 for one-over-par to earn $2,000.00 in the process. C anadians Erin Thorne and C armen Bandea, tied for 8th with totals of 226, were the last money earners as they pocketed $615.00 each. Rolle, the only Caribbean golfer to participate in the tournament, said she was quite p leased with the way she managed to come back after her dismal first round. “I’m happy that I was able to f ocus and turn my scores around from the first day,” Rolle said. “I planned to use this tournamentt o get ready for the upcoming F utures Tour. “So I’m quite happy that I played in it. I learnt a lot by playing in the tournament. I’m happy.I hit the ball very good, but I didn’t make much putts. I hit the ball fine.” Although she didn’t crack the t op ten, Rolle noted that she was hitting the ball just as everyone of them, but she just needed to get a little more experience under her belt. “I just have to make some more putts,” she said. “But if I didn’t shoot the way I did on the first day, I think I would have performed a lot better.” As she heads back to school to continue her undergraduate studies at Texas Southern Uni versity, Rolle said if there’s anything she has to work on, it will b e her “short game, short game, short game. “I’m just going to continue practising. So I will go to school i n the mornings and in the afternoons around 3-3:30, I will be back on the course practising andg etting prepared for the next t ournament.” While the Futures Tour won’t get underway until March 22, Rolle said she intended to take a break from the Sun Coast Ladies Series and will instead play in the Florida Women’s Open, sched uled for the Rio Pinar Country C lub in Orlando, Florida. “I probably won’t play in the Sun Coast again until I get a break from the Futures Tour,” Rolle said. “So I just want to con centrate on that right now.” The 23-year-old 2002 gradu ate of St. Augustine’s College said her ultimate goal was to graduate from the Futures Tour with her professional card to play in the Ladies Professional Golf Association. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MEACHER ‘Pain’ Major is eager to step into the ring tonight to take on Kevin Carmody. Major will be making his d ebut under the X-Cel Worldwide LLC banner in a super lightweight eight-rounder at the Buffalo Niagara Convention C enter. The weigh-in was last night and Major said he was prepared for the much anticipated showd own with the ultra-durable Philadelphia warrior Carmody, who has a 10-10-2 win-loss-draw record with one knockout. Promoter Nick Garone said he was delighted to welcome Major on board with his 15-3-1, 13 KOs record. “I’m excited about him fighting on the card,” Garone said prior to the official weigh-in. “He’s fighting a tough kid, but he have to go out there and do what he have to do to win. That’s the only way that the guys get to the next level.” When he signed Major last year, Garone said it was on the premise that Major possessed the potential to become a legitimate world champion and he wanted to ensure that he was put in a position to achieve that goal. I don’t sign that many guys, but I think he’s one of the guys that I felt have been mis-handled,” Garone pointed out. “But I think I can move him in the right direction. He just have to go out there and prove that he’s ready to go.” M ajor said that shouldn’t be a problem. “I’m just grateful to God for this opportunity,” said Major, w ho has spent the past few weeks in Hollywood, Florida training with Anthony ‘Chills’ Wilson and Nathaniel Knowles. “We had a great team work. They got me in shape to this point and so I’m just ready to go out there and do what I’ve always done, which is to remain aggressive and hopefully come out victorious in the end.” While he knows little of Carmody, who has lost three of his last four fights, Major said he intended to go into the ring and take out the 22-year-old orthodox fighter. “Like I told my promoter, he’s going to be watching his next big time headline fighter,” Major said. “It’s going to be an exciting f ight because I’m hungry. “I’m back out here under a new promotional group and everything has been going so g reat. I’ve gotten a lot of messages from home. Everybody has been sending me their best wishes, so I want them to know that I ’m real confident that I will get the job done, having put in the work.” Major, 27, thanked Michelle B rady, his workout partner in Nassau who has been calling him early day he was in Florida reminding him to get in his workouts. He also thanked his parents for their encouragement, as well as his family and friends and everybody who has been in contact with him since he left to train. Wilson, who has been reunited with Major, said the Bahamian lightweight champion has been well prepared for the fight and will definitely put on a show. “He had good sparring and everything and he’s in good shape,” Wilson said. As long as Major can go out and “ultilize his speed, establish his jab and come off the jab with the body shots,” he should be able to secure the win. “He’s still learning. So he’s not really lacking anything,” Wilson stressed. “The sky is the limit for him. He just has to go out there and do the things that Rolle finishes 18th at the Sun Coast Ladies Series Major ready for Carmody Meacher Major

PAGE 19

T ENNIS FUNERAL FOR MUNROE FUNERAL service for the late and former Davis Cup player Lavaughn Munroe will take place on Saturday at 10 am at the Churchof the Good Shepherd in Pibnder’s Point, Grand Bahama. M unroe, 27, was the brother of Patrick Bjorn Munroe, who is a m ember of this year’s Davis Cup team that will be heading to Parguay for the first round of the American Zone II playt from March 6-8. B ASKETBALL FUNERAL FOR McFALL FUNERAL service for the late Samuel McFall will be held on Saturday at 2:30 pm at the Bethel Baptist Church on Meeting Street. McFall, 48, was a former coach in the New Providence Basketball A ssociation and the father of twin brothers Raymond and Ramone McFall, who starred in the Government Secondary Schools SportsA ssociation and they played in the Baptist Sports Council’s league. T ENNIS K NOWLES/FISH ADVANCE MARK Knowles and his new partner Mardy Fish have advanced t o the semifinal of the Regions Morgan Keegan Championships in Memphis, Tennessee. T he Bahamian-American duo playing only in this tournament, pulled off their quarter-final with a 6-4, 6-3 win over the American team of James Blake and Bobby Reynolds. Knowles and Fish won their opener 6-3, 6-1 over the team of Christophe Rochus and Florent Serra. Their opponents in the semi’s isn ot known yet. The final is set for Sunday. BASEBALL J BLN SCHEDULE THE Junior Baseball League of Nassau will be back in action this weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams with the f ollowing games on tap: Saturday’s schedule T ee Ball 11 am Grasshoppers vs Blue Claws; 1 pm Raptors vs Knights and 3 pm Sidewinders vs Sand Gnats. Coach Pitch 10 am Bluejays vs Diamondbacks and 12:30 pm A ngels vs Athletics. Minor League 1 0 am Mets vs Red Sox and 12:30 pm Rays vs Rockies. M ajor League 12:30 pm Reds vs Indians and 3 pm Mariners vs Marlins. Junior League 10 am Dodgers vs Yankees and 12:30 pm Twins v s Cardinals. Senior League S aturday 3 pm Pirates vs Tigers. S unday 2 pm Rangers vs Phillies. B ASEBALL FREEDOM FARM SCHEDULE THE Freedom Farm Baseball League will be back in action t his weekend with the following games on tap: TONIGHT T EE BALL 6 pm Guineps vs Jujus. SATURDAY 9 am Dillies vs Seagrapes and 10:15 am Dillies vs Jujus. COACH PITCH TONIGHT 7:30 pm Sand Flies vs Mosquitoes. SATURDAY 11:30 am Boas vs Green Turtles; 1 pm Wasps vs Mosquitoes and 3 pm Sand Flies vs Bees. SUNDAY 3 pm Green Turtles vs Wasps. 9-10 TONIGHT 6 pm Barracudas vs Red Snappers. SATURDAY 10 am Octopus vs Dolphins (on Cable 12 SUNDAY 4:30 pm Barracudas vs Turbots. 11-12 TONIGHT 7:30 pm Conchs vs Dogs. SATURDAY Noon Marlins vs Parrots; 1:30 pm Hurricanes vs Iguanas and 3:30 pm Crowns vs Conchs. SUNDAY 3 pm Marlins vs Groupers and 4:30 pm Hurricanes vs Parrots. 13-15 SATURDAY 9 am Silverjacks vs Sharks; 11 am Owlz vs Stingrays; 1 pm Silverjacks vs Raccoons and 3 pm Potcakes vs Owlz. 16-18 SUNDAY 2:30 pm Caribs vs Tainos and 4 pm Arawaks vs Lucayans. C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Local sports news MAJOR READY TOT AKE ON CARMODY sports NOTES n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Cricket Association has suffered a major blow by the suspension of the Stan ford 20/20 Tournament, but president Greg Taylor said it intends to move on with the fur ther development of the sport. On Tuesday in a joint state ment, the England and Wales Cricket Board and the West Indies Cricket Board announced that they have immediately sus pended all their ongoing negotiations with Sir Allen Stanford and his corporate group. The announcement came after the US Securities and Exchange Commission charged Sir Allen Stanford and three of his companies with fraudulent conduct. The Bahamas, according to Taylor, was one of 19 countries that benefited greatly from Sir Stanford with funding to assist with funding for their players to participate in the Stanford 20/20 Tournament and the develop ment of their facilities. “With news like this, it really hurts, but the International Cricket Council has stepped in and so we can continue to do some of the things that we wanted to do with the development of cricket,” Taylor said. “So although we lost the Stan ford sponsor, we have gained another in the International Cricket Council. It won’t be nearly as half as what Stanford did, but it will still be a continuous contribution to the development of cricket.” In January 2006, the BCA cricket received a cheque for $100,000 from the Texas billionaire Stanford on his arrival in the Bahamas. The funds were earmarked for the development of the cricket facilities at Haynes Oval and preparing the national team for the initial $1.5 million 20/20 Tournament that was held in Antigua that year. “We were able to put down our grass turf, which cost us some $60,000, so that helped us tremendously,” Taylor said. “We were also able to get in some new equipment, so it was a big help.” The BSC, through the fund, was also able to travel to a prewarm up tournament in the Cay man Islands and participated in the 20/20 tournaments in Antigua in 2006, 2007 and 2008. “We didn’t do too well in those,” said Taylor, of the 20/20 Tournaments that offered hefty cash incentives of $1,000,000 for first place, $50,000 for second and $25,000 for the man of the match. “But this year, we were preparing a team for this year’s tournament, which we felt would have done very well. Unfortunately, we won’t have a chance to really show that.” Undoubtedly, Taylor said the players were disappointed because they were geared up and upbeat for their participa tion this year. With the tournament now in jeopardy, Taylor said they would only have the under-19 team which will compete in the ICC Americas Associate Countries Tournament being held in July in Canada. “Because of our performance in 2007 when we sent a team to Canada, we performed to the best of our ability and we were the first affiliated country in the Caribbean and the Americas to do that, they have invited us to come back.” While the ICC has come forth and provided some assistance, Taylor said they intend to use that to get the national team ready to compete in 2010 in the Division II of the ICC of Americas and the World Cricket League. In the meantime, Taylor said the BCA will continue play at both Haynes Oval and at the Windsor Park. At Haynes Oval, the BCA will attempt to stage two-day matches, while Wind sor Park will be the site for the 50-and-over matches. BCA disappointed, but moving on S T. GEORGE’S Kentwan Smith and Jamal Walker (inset in action yesterday. Ja guars Sti ngers d ominate the SEE page nine F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By RENALDO DORSETT S ports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net S T. GEORGE'S JAGUARS – 47 SUNLAND BAPTIST STINGERS – 31 INa first half where they led by two after the opening quarter and were tied at the half, the Jaguars dominated the third quarter to win their second game of the tournament. Kentwan Smith scored eight of his game high 15 points in the decisive third and the Jaguars outscored the Stingers 20-6 in the period to take command of the contest. At 18 all headed into the third, the Jaguars opened with a half court trap that exposed the Stingers' ball handling, or lack thereof. The trap ignited a 13-0 run, capped by a pair of free throws from Jamal Walker to give the Jaguars a 3118 lead. Following a Stingers' basket, Walker, who fin ished with eight points made a three pointer from the baseline to give his team a 34-20 lead. Smith ended the quarter with one of several tip-ins to give the Jaguars a 3824 lead at the end of the third. Harold Pinder gave them their largest lead of the game with a late fourth quarter lay-up for a 47-29 advantage. Pinder finished with seven points. Verdell Grant led the Stingers with e ight, Kingsley Cajuste added five, w hile Troy Bullard and Ivaughn Gib son each finished with four. GAME NOTES: The Stingers' last lead came on a breakaway dunk by Bullard with 2:43 left in the second quarter to give them an 18-15 advantageThe Jaguars outscored the Stingers 29-13 in the second half.


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BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2009

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Resort workers
‘being exploited

WH Claims that Bahamas company
is holding Mexicans illegally

Ml Bosses are accused of denying
access to travel documents

BOSSES at a Bahamas
resort have been accused of
exploiting Mexican workers
and denying them access to
their travel documents.

Lawmakers in Mexico are
seeking repatriation of work-
ers who, they claim, are being
held illegally.

Claiming
that 65 of
their citi-
zens are
affected,
the Mexi-
can Senate
has asked
for the fed-
eral execu-
tive to initi-
ate repatri-
ation of the



men.
PeMMeeeaey pe Sen-

ate claims
the workers are being

“exploited” and underpaid by
the company.

According to El Universal,
Mexico’s most read newspa-
per, Mexico’s Senate has
asked the Secretariat of
Labour and Social Welfare,
and the Attorney General’s
Office, to investigate the com-
pany’s activities.

According to the report,
Senator Jose Luis Garcia
Zalvidea said that in 2007 the

company contracted Mexicans
to work on construction of the
resort, with a promised salary
of $500 a week with produc-
tivity bonuses.

Senator Zalvidea said that
the workers were taken to the
Bahamas on a private flight
on May 13, 2007, where they
signed a contract in English
and had their passports “ille-
gally detained”.

When informed of this
report by The Tribune late last
night, Minister of Immigration
Branville McCartney
promised that he would have
the matter investigated.

El Universal suggested that
the workers were threatened
with being turned over to
Bahamian immigration offi-
cials for three months and
eventually incarcerated at Her
Majesty’s Prison.

The report also suggested
that the workers were
informed that if they needed
to return to their home coun-
try, they would have to pay
$3,000, or work for three
months without pay.

Furthermore, when the
workers’ salaries were due,
instead of their promised $500
a week they were allegedly

SEE page 6

Travolta sets up foundation
in memory of son Jett



JOHN TRAVOLTA has set up a foundation in memory of his
late son, Jett, to help children with special needs.

The Jett Travolta Foundation will work to “assist and provide
relief to children with vision, hearing, mobility, communication,

behavioural learning impairments or other spe-
cial medical, environmental, health or educa-
tion needs,” according to the actor’s website.

Jett, 16, died of a seizure at the actor’s holiday
home in Grand Bahama on January 2.

John Travolta and his wife, Kelly Preston,
claimed that he suffered from an illness known
as Kawasaki syndrome. Preston suggested the ill- |
ness was brought on by exposure to chemicals
used to clean carpets and had developed a detox-
ification progamme based on the teachings of
Scientology founder L Ron Hubbard.

ALolala sire} es



In the wake of Jett’s death, former senator Pleasant Bridgewater
was charged with abetment to extort and a paramedic, Tarino
Lightbourne, was charged with attempting to extort and conspira-
cy to extort in connection with an alleged attempt to extract $25 mil-
lion from the Travolta family. They next appear in court on April
10.

Ms Bridgewater subsequently resigned from her Senate seat.



court yesterday.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE man accused of shoot-
ing a police officer in Nassau
Village earlier this week was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Police have charged Lavardo
Miller, 27, of Nassau Village,
with the attempted murder of
Detective Corporal 518 Earl
Johnson as well as a list of oth-
er serious offences.

Yesterday, police escorted
Miller to Court Eight, Bank
Lane, to be arraigned before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel.

It is alleged that Miller, alias
‘Siggy’, attempted to cause the
death of Corporal 518 Earl
Johnson on Tuesday of this
week.

Officer Johnson was shot in
the thigh shortly after 4pm on
Tuesday while he was report-
edly attempting to arrest a man
in connection with a shooting
that had occurred in the area

Ua ees

LAVARDO MILLER, 27, alias ‘Siggy’, being escorted to

Man accused
of shooting
police officer

earlier that day.

Miller was informed by Mag-
istrate Bethel that he could not
be tried in the Magistrate’s
Court on the attempted mur-
der charge and that the case
would be sent to the Supreme
Court. He was not required to
plead to the charge.

Miller was also arraigned on
two counts of posession of a
firearm with intent to endanger
the life of another.

It is alleged that on Tuesday,
Miller was in posession of a
handgun with the intent to
endanger the lives of Detective

SEE page 6



The Tribune Ra

McDonald's downtown
leh Side Meh aot=1 9]

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays





David Kelly
seriously ill in
New York

Kelly’s Home Centre proprietor
undergoes procedure after chest pains

*.

DAVID KELLY and his wife, Nancy, ina file photo.

David Kelly, proprietor of Kelly’s Home Centre, is seri-
ously ill in New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York.

Mr Kelly, with his wife, Nancy, and several members of
Kelly’s Home Centre, flew to New York on Saturday for
their annual purchasing trip. However, at the beginning of
the week Mr Kelly developed chest pains and went to New
York Presbyterian Hospital for a check-up. Mr Kelly, who
has a heart condition, underwent a procedure on Wednes-
day. His condition is being closely monitored after compli-
cations developed.

His three sons, Andrew, Gregory and Scot, and his two
daughters-in-law, Candy and Shelly, flew to New York to be
with him.

Roberts links fuel
duty to BEC woes

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



FORMER Minister of Works Bradley
Roberts yesterday blamed the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation’s poor financial state on
the decision not to pass on the cost of duty
paid on oil to its customers.

He said that it is this, and not the rate cut on
electricity instituted when he was in office in |

SEE page 6

Three men in custody over
12th homicide of the year

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net



Bradley Roberts

POLICE have three men in custody for questioning in connec-
tion with the country's 12th homicide of the year.

Head of Central Detective Unit Supt Elsworth Moss said the men
were picked up late Thursday night and taken to Wulff Road
police station.

Their arrests came a day after Haitian Edvard Ficien was found
stabbed to death, clutching a fistful of cash, outside Happy Hour
Bar on Wulff Road.

"Three persons were arrested by officers from the North-eastern
Division, that they wanted to speak to in respect to this murder,"
Supt Moss said.

Supt Moss said he did not know if the men would face charges as
police had yet to bring them to CDU for questioning.

A caller alerted police to the whereabouts of the body around
9.30pm Wednesday, February 18. Ficien, 33, of St Charles Vincent
Road, was found between a fence and the building with about

SEE page 6



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Ministry offers support to suffering families

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FAMILIES suffering from
financial insecurity, broken rela-
tionships and abuse are being
offered support by the Ministry
of Labour and Social develop-
ment through a new campaign.

To ignite a movement of fami-
ly and social well-being across the
Bahamas, leading psychologists,
therapists and social services
providers yesterday welcomed the
“gatekeepers” of the community

Loretta Butler-Turner to a symposium on “Strengthen-



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ing the Family: A Holistic
Approach to Family Wellness” at
the Holy Cross Anglican Church
hall on Soldier Road.

Social workers, health profes-
sionals, non-governmental organ-
isations, police, prison and
defence force officers attending
the discussion heard how to pre-
vent individuals and families from
suffering the isolation and abuse
that leads to violence and social
unrest.

Challenges

Minister of State for Social
Development Loretta Butler-
Turner opened the discussion by
calling for the community “gate-
keepers” to help families face
today’s challenges in a period of
economic crisis to ensure a
healthy society.

“In these times the cost of
maintaining our physical and men-
tal health has increased. We must
incorporate measures to prevent
deterioration of our health. Well-
ness should therefore be a critical
goal for the Bahamian communi-
ty,” she said.

“A consistent, holistic, multi-
systematic approach to family

wellness is paramount if we hope
to develop healthy, well-
balanced families and by exten-
sion, a healthy, well-balanced
nation.”

Health and Social Services
director Dr Sandra Dean-Patter-
son said she hopes the symposium
will spark an outreach campaign
which addresses critical emotion-
al, spiritual, physical and social
issues before they lead to violence
and destruction.

As the leading psychologist at
the Crisis Centre in the Princess
Margaret Hospital, Dr Dean-Pat-
terson said she hopes a series of
programmes will be put in place in
cooperation with Urban Renewal
Liveable Neighbourhoods,
churches and community groups
in New Providence and the Fam-
ily Islands to reach the vulnerable
before they become victims by
spreading a message of well-being.

She said: “We see it in abuse,
child abuse, intimate partner vio-
lence and attempted suicide —
symptoms or behaviours that
come up when people are so over-
whelmed or hurt or powerless
they turn on each other or on
themselves.

“What we have to do now is

give people those techniques so
they do not hurt each other or
themselves.

“There are ways they can live
well, peacefully and without hurt-
ing each other, but when it
becomes violent it is too late, so
we want to help persons in rela-
tionships to treat each other with
care and concern and love,” Dr
Dean-Patterson said.

Symposium

Psychologist and director of the
Renascene Institute International
Dr David Allen, Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre chief of
staff Nelson Clarke, and marital
and family therapist Pastor Bar-
rington Hall made contributions
to the symposium about the
nature of family relationships and
how to ensure the emotional
health of the family.

President of the Bahamas
Christian Council Rev Patrick
Paul and Rev Angela Palacious
from St Margaret’s Anglican
Church spoke about the impor-
tance of spiritual wellness, while
medical doctors and social work-
ers spoke about how to cultivate
physical and social wellness.

COB aims to spark culture of research

AS PART of its drive toward university status, the
College of the Bahamas has adopted a key role in
the effort to reinstitute a culture of research among
educators in the Bahamas.

Towards this end, the college’s School of Educa-
tion is hosting the nation’s teachers and education
stakeholders at its 2009 Conference, which opened
on Wednesday at the National Centre for the Per-
forming Arts on Shirley Street.

The conference aims to reinforce the crucial role
of the nation’s educators in producing valuable data
that can positively impact the environment of learn-
ing for students and ultimately national develop-
ment.

It also aims to empower teachers with research
skills and reinforce the notion that they are best
positioned to conduct and benefit from the data
provided by such research.

“As an educator, I don’t believe that we can do
any teaching without having done some research
ourselves, and a part of what our responsibility and
role is as teachers is to inform our practice with
information and research that is based on some
sound theoretical underpinnings so that we know
what we are doing is going to make a difference,”
said assistant professor of education Margo Black-
well.

“For me, focusing on teachers as researchers is
more a reaffirmation of the work that we do and
demonstrates that there is a thoughtful process for
the way forward.”

The Bahamas has a literacy rate of more than 95
per cent, according to official figures, and education
has traditionally been allocated the largest amount

of the government’s recurrent budget.

In 2008, the national average for the BJC rose
from “D+” to “C-“ and the national average for
the BGCSE results inched from a “D” to a “D+”,
sparking vigorous debate about the merits and
demerits of the country’s system of learning.

In recent times, there has also been debate about
all-boys and all-girls classes, the potential impact
of extending the school day and teaching method-
ologies.

The government has acknowledged that there
are challenges in the education system in the
Bahamas, launching strategies to focus on core sub-
ject areas like English language, mathematics, social
and religious studies; expansion and improvement of
after-school study clubs and homework centres, and
the expansion and enhancement of the Magnet
School Programmes to every High School in
New Providence and two high schools in Grand
Bahama.

COB believes expanding the scope of teacher
involved research could prove fundamentally impor-
tant in improving Key areas of instruction and learn-
ing in the country.

“IT don’t think of one area in which we can’t use
more research, but literacy is a key area and it is
imperative that we start documenting the way teach-
ers teach and the way students learn and sharing
some practices that are going to move us forward,”
Professor Blackwell said.

“This conference is just a seed for all of us to get
together to remember and reaffirm and restore our
confidence in our practice and in our craft and we
inform ourselves as we go forward.”

UNO PRON 3

Jaa
TO GO>r

On Everything in the Store
(10% Discount On Appliances)

ede

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EVERYSODY
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©2009 JOHN HARDY LIMITED

O In brief

Caribbean awards
programme is
launched in Bahamas

THE Pioneers of Prosperity
? Caribbean Awards Pro-
? gramme has been officially
? launched in the Bahamas.
i Pioneers of Prosperity is a
? global awards programme that
: seeks to inspire a new genera-
? tion of entrepreneurs in
? emerging economies by iden-
i tifying, rewarding, and pro-
? moting outstanding businesses
? that can serve as role models.
i The Bahamas Chamber of
? Commerce, the Bahamas
? Development Bank (BDB)
? and the Inter-American
? Development Bank (IDB)
? came out to show support for
: Pioneers of Prosperity during
? a launch event yesterday at
? the Bahamas Development
? Bank.
: The event was opened by
? Anthony Woodside, acting
? managing director of the
? BDB, Dionisio D’ Aguilar,
i? president of the Chamber of
? Commerce and Sharon Miller,
? operations manager at the
i IDB.
: “The programme strives to
? create greater prosperity in
? the most challenging of mar-
: kets. This is especially impor-
? tant, as we all know, given the
? global economic situation.
? Pioneers of Prosperity is
? founded on the fact that inno-
? vative ideas and dynamic busi-
? ness models exist in even the
? most challenging of markets,
: and that greater prosperity
? will ensue if these local mod-
? els of success are better under-
i? stood and replicated effective-
: ly,” said Ms Miller.
? The event was attended by
? financial experts from leading
? local banks as well as a num-
: ber of entrepreneurs.
? In addition to being eligible
i for grants of up to $100,000 to
? invest in technical infrastruc-
: ture and training for their
? companies, winners of the
? award will be connected to
? networks of technical experts,
? potential investors, and other
? cutting-edge entrepreneurs on
? the local, regional, and global
i level.
: Applications for the Pio-
i neers of Prosperity Award
? must be submitted online. The
? application period will close
? on March 9.

» JOHN HARDY

iD):

DIAMONDS*®

INTERNATIONAL

Beaumont House, Bay Street
Tel: 242-322-1821 or 242-325-3837
www.Diamondsinternational.com


THE TRIBUNE



© In brief Acquittal of man who confessed [ERRAIHESS Seer
testify in murder re-trial

Large quantity of
marijuana found

A 28-YEAR-OLD man
is assisting the police in
their investigation into the
discovery of a large quanti-
ty of marijuana yesterday.

According to police, the
drugs were found in a bushy
area off Matthew Street,
Nassau Village, at around
11am.

POLICE confiscated
three handguns and an
assortment of ammunition
while in Redland Acres yes-
terday.

Officers were on patrol
in the area around noon
when they discovered an
old microwave oven which
contained two 9mm hand-
guns and a .380 handgun.

In addition, police dis-
covered an assortment of
bullets.

No arrests have been
made in relation to this dis-
covery.

Educators
tour coppice
forest of
EARTH Village
Bahamas

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

MORE than 25 educators
from primary, secondary and
tertiary level schools in New
Providence toured the coppice
forest at EARTH Village
Bahamas on Valentine’s Day.

Principals and teachers
joined the EARTH Village
Bahamas’ conservation team
on a nature walk through 180
acres of habitat area located on
Columbus Avenue and St
Albans Drive in Chippingham.

The area was formerly
known as the Perpall Tract
wellfield.

During the guided tour, the
teachers were given a special
preview of educational pro-
grammes being offered to intro-
duce students to nature as a
teaching tool.

Managing director of
EARTH Village Bahamas Ter-
ry Miller said they are commit-
ted to protecting the area.

“This is a very important
habitat of various species. We
want to promote this green
space as a resource lab for stu-
dents of all ages to learn about
any subject from math and sci-
ence through arts and humani-
ties tied with preservation,” he
said.

Mr Miller said children
should experience EARTH
Village Bahamas to better
understand the many benefits
of green spaces to the environ-
ment.

“They filter pollutants and
dust from the air, they provide
shade and lower temperatures
in built-up open spaces and
they even reduce soil erosion
of soil into our waterways,” Mr
Miller said.

The area was described by
scientist Dr Ethan Fried, of the
University of Tampa, as “one of
the last intact and natural land-
scapes existing in New Provi-

to killing ‘highlights reality
of Bahamians’ homophobia’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE acquittal of a man who
confessed to killing another man
who was alleged to be gay high-
lights the disturbing reality of
Bahamians’ homophobia and
“poor social and sexual develop-
ment”, according to a gay and
human rights activist.

Frederick Green-Neely was
acquitted in the Supreme Court of
murdering Dale Williams. Jurors
found that he used justifiable force
when he stabbed Mr Williams
three times after the man, who he
said was known to be gay and HIV-
positive, grabbed his crotch and
told him he had a crush on him.

Green-Neely’s lawyer, Dorsey
McPhee, told the court that he was
“defending his manhood.”

News of the acquittal has been
reproduced as a topic of interest
on several gay news sites interna-
tionally. One of _ these,
Pinknews.co.uk, highlighted the
case as another example of the suc-
cessful and worrying use of the
“gay panic defence.”

“Its use often sparks outrage
from the gay community around
the world because it places the bur-
den of blame on the victim (in this
case, Williams),” said the article.
This was followed by comments
from readers calling for a boycott
of the Bahamas, and for letters of
complaint to be written to the
Bahamian government.

Bahamian Gay and human
rights activist Erin Greene, yester-
day said she was disturbed by the
decision by the jury to acquit

Green-Neely as she believes it sets
a dangerous precedent where
“homosexuality is used as a justifi-
cation for murder.”

And she claimed it shows some
Bahamians have “more sympathy”
for a person who claims to have
been subject to an unsolicited sex-
ual approach by a gay person than
for a gay person who is killed for
attempting an unwanted advance
on someone.

Ms Greene called for a “review”
of a number of cases where those
committing alleged crimes against
gay people said that they were act-
ing in self defence but where this
was questionable.

Jurors

“T think there are possibly a
number of cases of men being mur-
dered that may have been adjudi-
cated incorrectly because the man
will claim that he was on the verge
of being raped and they will receive
sufficient sympathy from the
jurors.”

“Fear of rape is real, but the false
construction of fear of rape by
someone of the same sex as a jus-
tification for murder is dangerous
and it needs to be addressed by the
legislation and the judiciary,” she
said.

“More importantly we need to
investigate it as a gay community,
as a Bahamian community,” she
said. “We need to find out how we
allowed this to happen and how
we can stop it.”

However, Bernard Turner,
Director of Public Prosecutions in
the Attorney General’s Office, said

he does not see the case in the
same light as he has observed oth-
er cases where allegedly gay indi-
viduals were killed in similar cir-
cumstances where juries found
their killers guilty.

“You do have instances of deci-
sions being made on both sides of
the divide by juries on these
issues,” he said. “I would certainly
not say it’s any evidence of a homo-
phobic trend in these verdicts.”

In the case of a Grand Bahama
taxi driver who also killed a man
who he claimed had made an
unwanted sexual advance on him,
Mr Turner pointed out that he was
convicted by the jury, however hav-
ing his conviction later overturned
and a retrial ordered on appeal.

And he pointed out that it is up
to the prosecution to “prove
beyond a reasonable doubt” that
the killer — who would have been
the sole witness apart from the vic-
tim in most cases — did not need to
defend him or her self to this
degree.

If they do not, then juries are
justified in acquitting the individual
of the murder charge, he suggested.
He said that the Attorney Gener-
al’s office cannot appeal decisions
by juries, but only question if the
judge may have misdirected them
based on a point of law.

Ms Greene linked the case and
its outcome to what she said is
Bahamian’s “poor social and sexu-
al development” on the whole, with
some people being unable to relate
to others in an appropriate way.

This fact manifests itself in the
high rate of rape, incest and abuse
generally in The Bahamas, she sug-
gested.

PLP nomination hopeful says
the Police Act is a non-issue

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PLP nomination hopeful Paul Moss
criticised the government and his own
party for focusing too much on the Police

Act.

He said the Act is a non-issue, and
there are more important matters that
should be commanding the attention of
the government and the official opposi-
tion — for example the suffering economy.

Noting that people have been calling
him from around the country seeking
help, looking for jobs, or just hoping
someone will raise the issue, Mr Moss
said politicians should be discussing how
they can aid those who are unemployed, homeless,
or simply struggling to make ends meet.

“T have spoken to respected persons internation-
ally who have said to me that the Bahamas has not
yet even begun to experience difficulties because
of this economic downturn. So the government
ought to take this matter really seriously and call for
a bipartisan forum of persons who understand the

economy or have ideas,” he said.

A good starting point, Mr Moss said, would be to
lower the country’s prime lending rate so that
adjustable mortgage rates can be decreased, there-
by easing the burden on homeowners.

“At the same time, this would stimulate persons

Paul Moss



now.

it is a starting point.

“They also have to put some kind of
package together so that landlords can be
in a position to give some kind of break
to these persons who may be having a
difficulty paying their rent. Because the
alternative would be that these persons
would be out on the street, and that does-
n’t help anybody,” he said.

Mr Moss said he finds it difficult to
understand why the Bahamas put on such
a “show” during the official visit of the
Vice Premier of State Council of the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China.

Nor is he enthusiastic about the
Bahamas’ decision to borrow more than
$160 million from China, only to use it on
road works. This, he said, is not the kind
of stimulus packages that the country needs right

“They ought to be trying to borrow sufficient
funds to start the construction of a new hospital. I
was at the Princess Margaret Hospital, and I can
tell you, if it does not cut your heart to see people sit-
ting in wheelchairs, loitering around the Accident
and Emergency Room, dying and crying out for

help — no one around to help them, no beds avail-

able.

getting mortgages inside the market. And the ques- _ place.

tion has to be, what are we doing? It is clear that the
government does not have the answers. And every-
one is calling for these forums to be had, and I think

he said.

“That is a priority. It cannot be a priority for the
government to talk about broadening the road to
JFK — that is not priority, and it just tells me that our
leaders just have their priorities all in the wrong

“The idea has to be that you have to care for
your people and this is what is lacking here clearly,”

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Your Fast Lane to

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

FIVE prosecution witnesses
were called to testify yesterday
at the re-trial into the February
2006 murder of local business-
man Keith Carey.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown
and Dwight Knowles are
charged with Mr Carey’s mur-
der and are also facing charges
of armed robbery and conspir-
acy to commit armed robbery.

Carey, 43, a married father
of three and former high school
coach was shot and killed on
the steps of the Bank of the
Bahamas on Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway before he was
able to deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Service
Station that he operated.

Detective Sergeant Earl
Thompson, a firearms examin-
er, testified that on October 23,
2006 he collected several items
connected to the case. He said
that after an examination, he
was able to identify them as two
fired 9mm Luger cartridges, two
unfired cartridge cases and two
fired 9mm Luger bullets.

Sergeant Thompson said he
determined that all of the car-
tridge cases came from the same
firearm but could not make a
distinction regarding the bul-
lets.

He said that a Glock 9mm
semi-automatic pistol could
have fired the bullets and that
based on the physical evidence,
the gun must have been fired
twice.

Officer

During cross-examination by
lawyer Craig Butler, the officer
admitted that he had never
been given a weapon to exam-
ine.

A 21-year-old woman, who
said she had known murder
accused Jamal Glinton for near-
ly 20 years, also testified.

The woman said she had
known Glinton for 18 years and
was his neighbour. She said that
in 2006, she and a female friend
worked at the Englerston
Urban Renewal Project at the
Police Headquarters on East
Street. The prosecution asked
that both women’s names be
withheld.

The woman testified that on
the morning of February 27,
2006, her colleague came to her
home and after the witness had
dressed, they both headed for

a) ig pe et |

re \i



She said they saw Glinton,
who offered them a ride to
work in a Nissan Maxima, with
two other men.

The witness said she did not
take note of the other men, and
that she and her friend arrived
at work around 9.45am.

Mickey Trevor Wright, a
cousin of defendant Dwight
Knowles, testified that some
time between late February and
early March 2006, he had a con-
versation with Knowles about
a “situation” concerning a white
Maxima which the prosecution
alleges was the getaway car in
Carey’s murder.

He said Knowles had
instructed him to go to Regi-
nald Rigby’s garage and make
some mechanical repairs to a
car.

Wright said he had seen his
cousin in a Maxima before but
could not say if that was the
same one.

Wright also told the court
that he had been detained by
police for four days and pres-
sured to tell officers “what they
wanted to hear” regarding the
car.

Medical practitioner Dr
Darin Donaldson also took the
stand, telling the court that he
had examined Sean Brown on
March 24, 2006, and that the
accused appeared to be well and
did not complain of any injuries.

He said that Brown did tell
him that he was in an accident
in 2005 and that he had four fin-
gers amputated from his left
hand.

Dr Donaldson said Brown
still had stitches in his hand at
the time of the examination.

During cross- examination by
Brown’s attorney Dorsey
McPhee, Dr Donaldson said
that the accused had never told
him that police had tried to
apply pressure to his injured
hand and that they had put a
plastic bag over his head to suf-
focate him.

He said that if the accused
had told him this, he would
have made a note of it.

The witness also said he
examined Dwight Knowles, but
noted nothing significant.

Assistant Commissioner of
Police Quinn McCartney, a
forensic chemist, testified that
on March 8, 2006, he received
two glass tubes containing
Carey’s blood, a glass tube con-
taining his urine and another
glass tube containing his stom-
ach contents.

The case will resume on
Monday at llam.

The Mlall« anihen
BOA OFFICE OPENS AT Dict AM DAILY

EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 20th, 2009

TS WUEACoESTOUL ew | 5 [40 [ WA [5 [uo [5

dence.”

EARTH Village Bahamas is
a project for social health con-
servation and preservation that
contains rich vegetation, insects,

Vehicle Purchasing
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380-FLIX

building, promote leadership
skills, enhance individual devel-
opment, enhance physical
development, improve problem
solving skills and expand cre-
ativity and imagination.

Beryl Gray, principal of
Oakes Field Primary, said she
enjoyed her experience in the
forest.

“We had a wonderful time
in the forest and our school will
take advantage of the outdoor
learning programmes and activ-
ities being offered,” she said.

Mts Gray said she got 32 per
cent of her staff to participate in
the nature walk on their day
off and as a result won a free
membership for all students
and teachers through the end
of the year.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS

Mount Tabor
to launch its

third housing

subdivision

JUST one
year after
Mount Tabor
Full Gospel
Baptist
Church
opened its
second subdi-
vision, the
church
has now
announced
the launch of

a third hous- Bishop Neil Ellis
ing area —



Mount Tabor Gardens in south-

west New Providence.

The new subdivision, located :
off Carmichael Road, offers }
“middle-class” housing to

Bahamians.

“This latest project is the third
in a series of initiatives designed
to not only fuel the local econo- }
my, but to help Mount Taborites
in particular, and Bahamians in
general become home owners }
and put scores of unemployed i
residents back to work,” the

church said in a statement.

Construction in Mount Tabor
Gardens has already begun and
senior pastor of Mount Tabor
Bishop Neil Ellis said: “Housing }
our people has become a part of
who we are. It has always been
an integral part of the social }
agenda of our church. I believe
the lack of housing is stillone of
the greatest social ills facing our }

country.”
Over the past two decades,

Mount Tabor said, it has assisted
several families in not only the }
acquisition of their homes, but
im some instances moving into
completely furnished homes debt

free.
In 2007, Mount Tabor Estates,

located off John F Kennedy Dri- i

ve, was officially opened.

The following year, the intro- }
duction of Mount Tabor Estates }
East “provided yet another
opportunity for economic }
empowerment and home own- }
ership for our people,” the }

church said.

ia
UUs)
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157


























































Police officer
found guilty of

accepting bribe
MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK attached to the West End Police
Tribune Freeport Reporter = Station.
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net Lewis testified that Martin r< . .
— told him to give him $3,000 not The public is invited to attend a

FREEPORT - Police officer | show up in court for Lewis’ case.
Pierre Martin, who was found He said he gave the officer
guilty in the Supreme Court of $1,500 on one occasion and

NEW PROVIDENCE ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
accepting a bribe, will be sen- $1,000 another time

tenced in April. The jury delivered an unani- I OWN ME ET | NG

Martin, 25, was also charged mous guilty verdict on one count
with soliciting a bribe, but was of accepting a bribe, but deliv- On Tuesday, February 24th, at 7;00p.m.
found not guilty of the charge. ered a not guilty verdict of eight at Super Club Breezes

Justice Vera Watkins, who to one on the count of solicit- aa = a
presided over the trial, hasseta ing a bribe, and a not guilty ver- hosted by The Minist ry of Works & Tra Asport,

sentence hearing for April 21. dict of seven to two on the sec-
In the meantime, Martin was ond count of accepting a bribe.

granted $10,000 bail with two Lawyer Carlson Shurland rep- ike reat trae Ta Tie |

sureties on Wednesday by the resented Martin. Corridor 4
Supreme Court. Prosecutors Jillian Williams, "

The condition of the bail Simon Rolle and Erica Kemp Ete Avenue to John F. Coes hd Drive)
requires that he surrender his of the Attorney General’s Office Corridor 5

travel documents and report to appeared on behalf of the
Central Police Station before Crown.

7pm on Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays.

(John F. Kennedy Drive to West Bay Street)

Martin was arrested for r ATG Speakers will include
pee ae + Mr, Francis Clarke, Project Engineer in the Ministry of Works
He was charged with one count . (who will speak on Land Acquisitions)
of soliciting a bribe and two A “4 7 !
counts of accepting a bribe. 7 “ Mr. Damien Francis,
It is alleged that Martin —— [whe will speak on the History of the CNPRIP)

bribed Garrick Lewis on Feb-
ruary 14, 2007.

Lewis was arrested on Febru- The Bashers Also in attendance will be
ary 5 at West End for obscene Sees ie The Hon. Neko Grant, Minister of Works & Transport
language, resisting arrest and i edness Espo as Pe’ =
making threats of death against The Hon. Tommy Tumquest, Minister of National Security
Martin, who was at time February 26the-2Â¥ah, 2008 The Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health

MP for Killamey

Caves Village Professional
Turn Key Office Suites For Rent

“The premier choice for serious business” ten pe TR UC Tl O N

1,661 sq. ft. $5,813.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees a _

1,083 sq. ft. $3,790.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees i WT
839 sq. ft. $2,936.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees

850 sq. ft. $2,975.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees :

Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on
327-1575 or 477-7610
Email: simon @cavesheights.com

With Heartfelt Thanks

And Fond and Loving Memories
ymasL states

Kisskadee Drive

Airis] ae | eae ra ao

: ; ite ol



Sunrise February 21st 1946
Sunset February 20th 2008

The Broken Chain LD me COMPLETED INFRASTRUCTURE INCLUDES:



Paved Roads ¢ Water & Sewerage

We little knew that morning that God was going to call your name. Ss > A pene Sabie @ Beccles Stier gis
in life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. - RECREATIONAL PARK INCLUDES:






Tennis Courts * Ornamental Pond Jogging Trails

lt broke our hearts to lose you Paul you did nat go alone. : Playground ¢ Basketball Court Gazebos ¢ Grills



For part of us with you, the day God called your home.

Rapidly developing commyntty

You left us peaceful memories; your love is still our guide

And though we cannot see you, you are always Dy our side. | , _ iy = : ol | i O 0 LY 23 LOTS LE FT
Our farnily chain is broken, and nothing seems the same, t : ! .
But as God call us one by one, the chain will link again. ; f= OUSE

We the family of the late Paul D. Jenoure would like to thank you for your prayers, words ut te RY 21, 2009
of encouragement, floral arrangements and visits. May God continue to bless you. a Ve r 1 0 AM TO 5p M




Special thanks go to Mr. & Mrs. Raleigh Bulter and the staff of Butlers Funeral Homes a. fees | o wl On the spot
and Crematorium, Rev. Alonzo Hinsey and the Golden Gates Native Baptist Church fam- ~~ y mee Tt Bank financing available
ily, Benjamin Butterfield, Renee Moss, Val Maura, Willard Hepburn, vy Knowles & family, :

Keith McSweeny, Criag Russell, Richard Fawkes, Nurse Marsha McQueen and June t 7 2 FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL:



Grant of Coastline Community Home family, The Prison Association Staff, Tactical Unit of

H.M.P., First Caribean Bank Receivables Managements Family, The Freeport Families.
The Family hoi CYL RYLEY OVAL)

Sanctuary Investments Ltd.
Church Street Plaza, Shirley & Church Sts.
PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



mi FROM PAGE ONE

Man accused of shooting police
officer is arraigned in court

FROM page one

2290 Bruce Chisholm and Tia
Thurston. It is also alleged that
Miller on Tuesday was found
in possession of a handgun with
the intent to prevent the lawful
arrest by Detective Corporal
518 Johnson and Detective
Constable 2290 Chisholm.
Miller was not required to plead
to the charges.

Miller pleaded not guilty to
assaulting Tia Thurston with a
deadly weapon and opted to
have the matter tried in the
Magistrate’s Court. He also
pleaded not guilty to causing
grievous harm to Emmanuel
Alfred Rolle. Miller is expected
to appear in Court Five, Bank
Lane, on Monday for a bail and
fixture hearing.

Miller’s attorney Roger
Gomez Jr told the court that he

had been instructed by his client
that he was beaten while in
police custody. Miller raised his
shirt and the leg of his trousers
to show the court his injuries.

Mr Gomez said his client had
informed him that a plastic bag
had been placed over his head
by Corporal Ferguson of the
Homicide Unit and that Detec-
tive Corporal 1675 Cash had
beat him in his head.

that Miller had blood on his
jeans and that areas of his black
shirt, which was under the
orange one he wore yesterday,
had been cut out so as to con-
ceal the bloodstains.

Miller admitted that he had
been taken to hospital for treat-
ment. Magistrate Bethel also
made a note on his remand war-
rant that he receive further
treatment at Her Majesty’s

The attorney told the court Prison.

Baliamas resort bosses accused of exploiting Mexican workers

FROM page one

paid $79.50 - or the equivalent of 862.66

Mexican pesos.

Senator Zalvidea stated that, after
receiving these complaints, he informed

the Council of the National Human
Rights Commission about the exploita-
tion of these workers, who were being
“forbidden to leave the work area during
hours of sleep or food.”

The proposal was supported by Sena-
tors from all parties, and the Senate

=o
















ls It time for
a fresh start?

Coe Sena eee
See aia a








wi second chances! §

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY





aa SERVIC ES

Adutt Education .........

Worship Senice

SON SAMiCe oo...

Eyaning Worsh

no Senta

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Sater ive

Mingionetes [rg

ec hiray

15] 4-14 Wg

Quy 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.

South Miné

+} MAHI q

RADIO MINISTRY

Sundays at 8:30) qum

~ ihe | - TERAPLE TIAA

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

ee Ce RPE ||
[MRR Ra ae Ce eM Og be
Ele mE TE tia ER

Securit y

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Dectors Hospital

1.88
2.27
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.01
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

ROYAL = FIDEL

Money at Work

approved the request by the executive to
redouble its efforts for repatriation of
the workers.

Attempts to reach Director of Immi-
gration Jack Thompson and company
executives were unsuccessful up to press
time last night.

Three men in custody over
12th homicide of the year

FROM page one

four stab wounds, police said.

The victim was dressed in blue jeans, a red shirt, blue jacket, with
black and white tennis shoes.

A police source revealed the victim had no legal status in the
country.

Supt Moss said initial evidence suggested the victim was killed
about an hour before police arrived. The fact that he died while
clutching money suggests an attempted robbery, but a clear motive
had not been established, police said.

Supt Moss said a murder weapon was not recovered at the scene,
but the nature of the wounds indicated the victim was stabbed
with a sharp instrument.

The country recorded its 11th homicide when a man, who was
shot in the chest last month, died while in hospital on February 15.

Oscarsin Williams, the victim, and another man got into an alter-
cation sometime after Spm on January 16 on Cox Way.

During the dispute, according to police, Williams was shot in the
chest. He was taken to hospital where he died on February 15.

Heico Duran Fowler, 23, of Palm Breeze Road, was on bail
charged with Williams’ attempted murder when the victim died. The
charge was later upgraded to murder.

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

2.

Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira

Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
cy hone number 325-5712
AIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ITY

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,678.29 | CHG -0.22 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -34.07 | YTD % -1.99
FINDEX: CLOSE 821.52 | YTD -1.60% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW. BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.16
2.40
7.80
11.00
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS $
0.070
0.992
0.319
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.255
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Change Daily Vol. Div $
1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.15
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50

10.00 0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

S2wk-Low

RND Holdings

ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets

RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CPFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3856
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.
Previous Close
Today's Close
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Securit
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

T%
Prime + 1.75%
T%
Prime + 1.75%

100.00
100.00
100.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
6.00
0.35

Ask $

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Last Price P/E
14.60
6.00

0.35

Weekly Vol.
8.42
6.25
0.40

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

31.72
11.23
0.45

33.26

29.00
14.00
0.55

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

12.04
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NA Vv
1.4387
2.9230
1.4376
3.3856

12.6180
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0401
1.0330
1.0410

YTD%

-10.83

-13.38

Last 12 Months
4.40
-2.54
4.38

-10.83
5.74
0.56
-3.59
0.00
-13.38
4.01

Div $ Yield %
30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-08
31-Jan-09

0.35
-0.58
0.28

5.74

0.56
-3.59

0.00

4.01
3.30
4.10

31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

3.30
4.10

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid &
Ask $

Last Price
Weekly Vol.

- Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
- Selling price of Colina and fidelity

- Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Roberts links fuel
duty to BEC woes

FROM page one

2003, that is primarily responsible for the company’s fiscal tribu-
lations.

His comments come as BEC announced that it is restructuring its
executive management team in a move to “strengthen the organ-
isation.”

A two-line statement released on Thursday said the exercise
“would result in a number of changes at the executive management
level.”

It said further details would be included in a forthcoming press
release. Yesterday, Mr Roberts said he understands that three
people have already been told their services are no longer needed
- all of whom are in the company’s financial department.

The company’s Chief Financial Officer will be replaced, he said,
along with two other senior people in that section. Calls to BEC for
confirmation and further comment were not returned up to press
time yesterday.

This comes after Minister of the
Environment with responsibility
for BEC, Earl Deveaux, said last
week that the organisation is
“financially compromised” and
seeking around $200 million in
funding. He blamed last year’s
high oil prices and the previous
government’s decision to cut the
electricity rate.

While stating that he was await-
ing a full explanation of the justi-
fication for the move, Mr Roberts
said he felt the restructuring is a
“rather haphazard approach to dealing with a serious matter” and
he hit out at those involved for not being clearer about what
changes were taking place.

He also claimed that the move was unfair on those who have “giv-
en long years of dedicated service” to BEC.

The former minister charged that the corporation is broke
because “the FNM government failed to act.”

“They claim that it had something to do with, one, the high
price of oil, which is true, and two, with the rate decrease. Logically,
if it had something to do with the rate decrease, how come with sev-
eral audits completed since the rate decrease they all showed BEC
making money? Something had to happen since then,” he said.

“The problem with BEC is that in its surcharge did not take into
account in its calculation the duty that it pays on fuel and BEC was
absorbing that. Well you know what the price of fuel went up to
over the past year so that’s been a lot of money BEC’s been
absorbing.”

He said that duty was not passed on to customers in the rate dur-
ing his 2002-2006 tenure as minister with responsibility for the
corporation because at that time “it was small.”

However, some may question how feasible passing on the duty
cost to the customer could have been, given that thousands of
Bahamians had already been disconnected last year due to an
inability to afford their electricity bills, and many businesses were
being put under serious strain for the same reason at a time when
oil hit record highs.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



“The problem with
BEC is that in its
surcharge it did not
take into account in
its calculation the
duty that it pays on
fuel and BEC was
absorbing that.”


























BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH

SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching iiam4& 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - 2NS 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

PasiorcH. Mills

"Preaching the Bible as is, bo men as they are”
| Pastor: A. Mills * Prone: 393-0563 * Box N-a22 |

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22ND, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Andre Bethel
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Marilyn Tinker
7:00 a.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Sis. Rosemary Williams

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

Grace and ert Wesleyan erties
4A Soclety of The Free Methodist Church of
Horth &merica

WHERE GODS ADORED AND EFERVONE [8 4APFIRWED

Worship Tune: Efacm, & 6pon.
Prayer Time: (6-1 3a.
Charch School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Bex $8-5631

Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324.2587
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 7A



s our company has grown, so too
EN... our family.
We continue to build upon our late
patriarch Tyrone d’Arville’s dream of
keeping family ties strong as we honor
wife and mother Lynne. In this our 20th
year of doing business in the Bahamas,
the d’Arville family would like to take
the opportunity to thank our wonderful
employees who continue to support our
goals and exceed our expectations. We are
only part of the larger family that has made

Furniture Plus a 20 year success story.

NASSAU

Tel: (242) 397-PLUS (7587)

Town Centre Mall » Fax: (242) 325-6368
Monday - Saturday 9am - 9pm

GRAND BAHAMA

Tel: (242) 352-PLUS (7587)

Madeira Croft » Fax: (242) 352-9823

Mon - Fri 9am - 6pm » Saturday 9am - 4pm
FP920

Included in this family are our loyal
customers who form the centerpiece for

our 20th anniversary celebration.

We sincerely thank all of you for your
continued patronage of Furniture Plus.
Your choice to shop at home and support
a Bahamian company has contributed to
the local economy by keeping a growing
number of your friends and neighbors
gainfully employed. Thanks to you, we
have soared from our humble beginnings
as a furniture store into a national retail

chain with locations in Nassau, Grand



Bahama and the worldwide Web offering
beautiful furniture, appliances, electronics,
home furnishings, plus so, so much more

at www.furnitureplus.com

Thank you Bahamas,

from our family to yours!





Nassau @ Grand Bahama « World Wide Web
www.furnitureplus.com


PAGE 8A, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





We ’re





into our BRAND
NEW Showroom!



LORLSWALNS

(/ One Week Only
(j February 23-28

Because we’d much rather
SELL IT than

MOVE IT!

FYP - 188 Wulff Road
Open Mon-Fri 7:00am-4:00pm, Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm

BUlainGOknercanhamas|

Tel: 323-3973 or 325-3976 Fax: 322-3937

Web: www.buildersmallbahamas.com Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com





©
a
no}
wi
oO
4
=
st
@
1S)
ro)
So
fo}
ra
9
PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS
VICE PREMIER OF THE STATE COUNCIL VISITS A ee







VICE Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China Hui Liangyu flew to Grand
Bahama on Wednesday as part of his official two-day visit to the Bahamas.

In Grand Bahama, the Vice Premier and the Chinese delegation were taken on a tour of Freeport’s
tourist attractions and its industrial sector, including the Lucayan Harbour and the Freeport Container
Port, which is owned and operated by the Chinese-based Hutchison Whampoa group.

HIS Excellency Hui
Liangyu, Vice Pre-
mier of the State
Council of The Peo-
ple's Republic of
China, is greeted and
presented flowers by
a Chinese-Bahamian
student of Discovery
Primary School at
the Grand Bahama
International Airport
on Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 18. The Vice
Premier and his del-
egation arrived in
Freeport as part of
their two-day official
visit to the Bahamas.

A TOUR guide with
Freeport's Garden of =.
the Groves points out’ =
one of the island's ,
native palms to His
Excellency Hui Liangyu,
Vice Premier of the
State Council of The
People's Republic of
China, during a tour of
the nature and wildlife
facility on Wednesday,

February 18.





a

AN official of the Chinese-based Hutchison Whampoa group, owner and operator of the
Freeport Container Port, explains details of the development to His Excellency Hui
Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of The People's Republic of China, during a
boat tour of Freeport's Industrial Park on Wednesday, February 18.

a _ a

1 pc. Thigh or Leg
1 Dinner Roll
& 160z Pepsi

HIS Excellency Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the

State Council of The People's Republic of China, is

greeted by Minister of Housing Kenneth Russell at

the Grand Bahama International Airport on Wednes-
e day, February 18.

The Vice Premier and his delegation arrived in

eer Recipe® Only oe part of their two-day official visit to the



A MEMBER of
the Chinese del-
egation enjoys a
dolphin hand-
shake at Dolphin
Encounters,
Freeport on
Wednesday,
February 18.



ee

‘ Get lt Done '
‘\ With One! /’

Have no fear. Bounty is here. :

Bounty’s super absorbent quilts soak up just about anything PLUS its superior
strength when wet allows each sheet to be reused. Try Bounty paper towels to take
the stress out of disastrous household mess.

Available in The Bahamas








Bar on hotel
industrial deal

registration is
removed

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE Supreme Court on
Wednesday night lifted an
injunction that, for several days,
had prevented the new hotel
sector industrial agreement
from being registered with the
Industrial Tribunal.

The injunction had been
obtained by opponents of the
current Bahamas Hotel, Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) leadership, who
were represented by attorney
Koed Smith, after their efforts
to prevent the signing of the
agreement with the Bahamas
Hotel Employers Association
(BHEA) failed.

Kirk Wilson, the union’s first
vice-president, and Raymond
Wright had attempted to block
the agreement’s actual signing
on February 2, 2009, by pound-
ing on the door to the Depart-
ment of Labour’s conference
room and demanding entry.
They had alleged that the new
industrial agreement was illegal,
because it was not approved by
the union’s membership or
members of the executive coun-
cil.

However, the union’s general
secretary, Leo Douglas, told
Tribune Business yesterday that
as per the terms of the union’s
constitution, the decision to
approve the new contract was
his and president Roy Cole-
brooke’s alone.

“Under the constitution, we
find that the president and gen-
eral secretary are the chief
negotiators, and that gives us
the power to negotiate. It was
revealed in the court that there
is nothing in the constitution or
rules of our union that says we
have to go to the membership
or executive council - we sign on
behalf of the union,” he said.

According to Mr Douglas, he
and executive members of the
union spent some nine hours in
Justice Claire Hepburn’s court
on Wednesday, awaiting her
decision on whether to remove
the injunction.

In the end, she ruled that the
matter was for the jurisdiction
of the Industrial Tribunal. “She
said the power lies with the
Industrial Tribunal,” Mr Dou-
glas said, resulting in the injunc-
tion’s removal.

“Wilson and other officers
chose not to come into any
meeting to sit and hear the pro-
posed contract that Colebrooke
and Douglas negotiated,” Mr
Douglas said.

Mr Wilson last night declined
to comment on the injunction’s
lifting when contacted by Tri-
bune Business, saying he want-
ed to see the judge’s decision
first.

SEE page 5B





THE TRIBUNE &

u

FRIDAY,

ine

FEBRUARY 20,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Financial industry must
‘reposition’ in 10-15 years

Wi Ex-BFSB chair argues sector needs totally new business
model, based on double tax treaties and domestic corporate
tax, to survive long-term

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas must “transi-
tion” its financial services
industry to a completely new
business model within the next
10-15 years if it is to survive
long-term, a senior attorney
said yesterday, with the future
likely to involve double tax
treaties and a ‘corporate tax
environment’ for local com-
panies.

Michael Paton, a former
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) chairman and
head of the Lennox Paton law
firm’s financial services prac-
tice, told Tribune Business
yesterday that this nation
needed to re-position its finan-
cial sector and develop a time-
line for doing so, given the
external pressures that are
only likely to intensify.

Government policymakers,
the BFSB and other industry
organisations and individual
institutions were well aware



Michael Paton

of this, Mr Paton added, the
issue having figured promi-
nently at the recent Financial;
Services Retreat in Grand
Bahama.

However, he said the
Bahamas would “not do any-
thing” to jeopardise its exist-
ing book of financial services
business, and would look to
retain this during any transi-

$30k outlay produces
a model’ investment

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

MODELS?242, a fledgling
Bahamian model management
agency, is carving out a niche
for itself in the global fashion
industry through just an initial
$30,000 investment by its
founder, having signed its top
talent to a deal with New
York’s VNY Model Manage-
ment.

For 17-year-old Models242
model, Gabrielle Moss, endors-
ing a contract with the well-
recognised New York agency
represented an exciting oppor-
tunity not only for her, but also
acted a catalyst for Bahamian
management firms that have
not recognised the possibility
of moving talent outside the
Bahamas borders.

Models242’s founder and
operations director, Mark
Humes, said his dream to start a
model management company
grew out of his confidence in
the ability of Bahamian talent to
make money in the $300 billion
global fashion industry.

Government urged: More
public sector restructuring

* Senior accountant applauds moves so far, but calls
for coherent strategy, not ‘piecemeal approach’

* Says reforming government agencies, to make them
more ‘efficient and perform at higher level’, critical
for Bahamas competitiveness when economy turns

around

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government must develop a coher-
ent strategy for reforming public sector
agencies, a senior accountant said yester-
day, backing such moves as crucial to
enhancing efficiency and competitiveness
for “when the economy comes around”.

Raymond Winder, managing partner at
Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas), applauded
the Government for its shake-up of senior
management in the Police Force, Customs
and the Immigration Department, but
warned that the Government may have to
invest an even greater level of resources in
reforming all public sector agencies.

“That’s going to be more and more of an

PEMA NG

issue,” Mr Winder said. “In more of these
government agencies, the only way to get them performing at a better
level is through restructuring, because the people are not going to

change.”

SEE page 7B



"Done correctly, this business
could be a very lucrative busi-
ness, and I think people are see-
ing now how it could really
operate and how it could really
function," he said.

Mr Humes moved to New
York at the age of 18, as an
aspiring fashion photographer,
and immediately began work-
ing with several established
firms, under numerous estab-
lished photographers.

When he left New York, he
pursued his tertiary education

SEE page 5B

for a better life

Oroup pensions

tion to a new business model.
The international financial ser-
vices sector and its clients
would also be exempt from
any tax imposed on the
‘domestic’ Bahamian econo-
my.
“T think it’s quite apparent
that the OECD is re-ener-
gised,” Mr Paton told Tribune
Business. “They’re coming out
with a new blacklist, which
we'll be on, because we do not
have enough Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs) with other countries.

“T don’t think it'll have that
dramatic an impact, but the
pressure is coming through, it
will be much more intense
than it has been in the last five
years, and we'll have to seri-
ously reconsider how we repo-
sition the Bahamas going for-
ward.

“Everyone recognises that
the status quo is no longer

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission.
from the daily report.



PENSION

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Baha Mar ‘moves
forward’ on $2.6b
Chinese agreement

Monday meeting with China Ex-Im
Bank over Cable Beach project ‘went
very well’ but no deal done yet

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Baha Mar “moves a little bit further forward” on con-
cluding an agreement with two Chinese state-owned entities
for its $2.6 billion Cable Beach redevelopment “every time”
the parties meet, Tribune Business was told yesterday, a
meeting on Monday having gone “very well”.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president of gov-
ernmental and external affairs, said that while no deal had
been sealed yet, the resort developer had met with senior
officials from the China Export-Import Bank this week, just
prior to the two-day state visit of China’s Vice Premier of State

Council, Hui Liangyu.

“The meeting went very well. We con-
tinue to make progress,” Mr Sands told
Tribune Business. “We are very encour-
aged with these talks, and we continue to
work towards a finish line in this mat-
ter.”

Mr Sands said he was unable to give a
timeframe for when talks between Baha
Mar, the China Ex-Im Bank and China
State Construction would conclude. How-
ever, Sarkis Izmirlian, Baha Mar’s chief
executive, told this newspaper at Janu-

Ya nmsrlitels ary’s Business Outlook Conference that

it hoped to conclude an agreement with

two Chinese state-owned entities “over
the next six months”, implying that negotiations - if suc-
cessful - could be concluded by summer 2009.

“The fact that we have had multiple meetings, and a num-
ber of visits at the highest level, both from China State Con-
struction and the China Ex-Im Bank, gives us an indication
of their committed approach to this project,” Mr Sands said.

“They like what they see, but we have to work out the
details and come to an agreement between the parties. The
deal is not done yet, but every time we move a little further
forward.”

Mr Sands said Monday’s visiting delegation was headed by
Li Jun, the China Ex-Im Bank’s vice-president. He added
that Baha Mar had previously met with China State Con-
struction’s president, and in Monday’s delegation was also
that company’s president for its America operations.

“The highest level persons in these companies have made
multiple trips to the Bahamas, in terms of due diligence,
further deliberations with our principals in terms of trying to

SEE page 7B



FG FINANCIAL

PENSIONS & INVESTMENTS

C= attract the cream of the crop
[7 keep present employees happy
[- guarantee staff retirement savings

x all of the above


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE is hereby given that ARIST ROGER of EAST

STREET SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20" day
of February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





















































CELEHARVEST TRADING LIMITED
(Company number 71,368 B)

An International Business Company

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of CELEHARVEST TRADING
LIMITED hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of
CELEHARVEST TRADING LIMITED has been completed in ac-
cordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that CELEHARVEST
TRADING LIMITED has been dissolved as of 12th day of February,
2009.

Dated this 18th day of February, 2009

Pine Limited
Liquidator

CASH REWARD

Male Rottweiller missing!

West Bay Street, in the Goodmans
Bay Beach area, go slow bend
Dog needs medication A.S.A-P.,
black with tan, slim build.

Any info to assist contact

535-7741

80 PICTET

1605

Bank staff ‘not qualified’
to assess business plans

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

MANY commercial bank loan
officers are not equipped with the
knowledge to properly evaluate
business plans, the administrator
of the Government-sponsored
Venture Capital Fund said yes-
terday, adding that this hindered
many aspiring entrepreneurs’ bid

A
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

to access capital. Jerome Gomez,
an accountant with Baker Tilly
Gomez, said accessing capital was
the most frustrating aspect of
starting a business in the
Bahamas.

He said that often, inexperi-
enced loan officers, due to their
lack of knowledge of certain mar-
kets and business environments,
became a formidable obstacle to

REQUEST FOR

QUOTATION

M-100, Test Well Drilling

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks the services
of a Bahamas Water and Sewerage Company approved Drilling
Contractor for Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope

of services includes:

Drilling and pump testing of a 6” pilot hole;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Drilling and casing of a 10” Feed Water Return Well;

Flow testing of the 10” Feed Water Supply Well;

Discharge testing of the 10° Feed Water Return Well;
Geophysical logging and flow testing of Pilot Hole and wells;
Water temperature logging and analysis of water quality and

chemistry;

Professional supervision, (i.e. Hydrologist).

Request for Quotation Packages will be available for pick up after
1:00 pm, on Friday, February 20th, 2009.

Request for Quotation closing is Thursday, March 12th, 2009 at

3:00pm Bahamas Time.

Contact:
Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

INFORMATION SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

-Excellent organizer, communicator and coordinator.

-Responsible, thorough and resourceful.

-Flexible, committed and willing to invest long hours as needed.
-Innovative and willing to learn new technology.
-Ability to function independently but able to work as part of a team.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Microsoft Office
-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Lotus Notes.
-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with basic hardware

(PC, server, printers...).

-Sound knowledge of and practical experience with Windows XP &

tools.

-Knowledge of and experience with Windows 2003 servers

administration.

-Knowledge of and experience with Active Directory.
-Knowledge of and experience with PDA’s & Mobility.
-Knowledge of and experience with AS/400 operation and system

administration.

-Knowledge of and experience with telecommunications and network.

-Basic knowledge of Unix Administration.

-At least five (5) years experience in System Administration and User
Support, at least two (2) years of which should be in a Bank/Trust

environment.

-Written and spoken French would be an asset.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND to:-
The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park

West Bay Street & Blake Road

Nassau, Bahamas

APPLICATION DEADLINE: FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2009

Offices in

Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London, Luxembourg,
Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome, Singapore, Tokyo, Turin, Zurich

email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

BSi

entrepreneurs obtaining credit.

Many financial institutions, par-
ticularly banks and insurance
companies, lacked any expertise
on staff to evaluate business plans
and the needs of small businesses,
properly, Mr Gomez said,
because it was indeed a different
sort of lending.

“Any person in a bank, let’s
say a teller, can be promoted

tomorrow to a loan officer, and
by simply filling out a form pro-
vided by the bank can lend to you
a $60,000 car, a house, a refriger-
ator, appliances and furniture - it
takes no special skill,” Mr Gomez
told the Bahamas Society of Engi-
neers.

SEE page 3B

Vopak expansion
details unveiled.

A senior Vopak Termi-
nal (Bahamas) official will
address the Grand Bahama
Business Outlook Confer-
ence on the implications of
the company’s planned
$300 million expansion pro-
gramme.

The former Bahamas
Oil Refining Company
(BORCO) was acquired
last year by a consortium
featuring US private equity
firm, First Reserve Corpo-
ration and Dutch-based oil
storage leader, Royal
Vopak.

Shortly thereafter, the
new owners announced
plans to invest more than
$300 million in upgrading



Max Sweeting

and expanding the facility into the largest and leading trans-ship-
ment hub for oil and petroleum products in the region.

Maxwell Sweeting, Vopak Terminal (Bahamas) executive vice-
president, said of Monday’s presentation to the Business Outlook
conference: “I would like to focus on what we would have done
from our inception, that is, April 29, 2008, leading up to today,
specifically as it relates to employment opportunities both with
international contractors and with Vopak Terminals Bahamas

itself.

“T also wish to talk about the next stages of development and
what this is going to mean for the local Grand Bahama communi-

ty.”

Mr Sweeting is a certified general accountant who began his
professional career in 1971 with Touche Ross (now Deloitte &
Touche) as an auditor. In 1978, he joined Bahamas Oil Refining
Company (now Vopak Terminal Bahamas) as financial accountant,
and now serves as the executive vice-president, having served 15
presidents, including the existing managing director of Vopak Ter-

minal Bahamas, T.J. Huizer.

Grand Bahama Business Outlook is organised by The Counsel-
lors Ltd. and will be held at Our Lucaya.

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently accepting

applications for:-

PRIVATE BANKING
RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Manager must have a banking or
financial degree and 7-10 years experience in the offshore banking sector, have
knowledge of international investment instruments & money market, ability to
partner with team members, must be confident regarding customer relations,
investments & portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local
legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices.
Fluency in Italian & French is required.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence
Able to work with minimal supervision
Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers

Maintain & follow up account relationships
Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors
Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking

professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis
Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre

P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted


THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 3B

British American principals meet PM NOTICE

a. INVESTMENT SOLUTIONS
: IN CELEBRATION of
ts end a MANAGEMENT LID.

entity, British Ameri- VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

can Financial paid a
courtesy call on the
Prime Minister.
Established in the
Bahamas in 1920
(almost 90 years
ago), the company
offers a wide array of
products and ser-
vices including insur-
ance, investments,
financial planning and
retirement planning
through offices in
Nassau, Freeport,
Abaco and Exuma.
Pictured (from L-R):
John F. Wilson, direc-
tor and principal:
Basil L. Sands, chair-
man; and |. Chester
Cooper, president
and chief executive.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000 the Disso-
lution of INVESTMENT SOLUTIONS MANAGEMENT
LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Reg-
ister of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 21st January

26’ BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

Bank '
all sta ‘hot qualifie : me
© Price: 595 000.00
© Hull: Fiborgins
© Engiee: Twin farcry OL OP TIMAX, 235 HP, 280 Hoos
0 aSSeSS business plaNS |: ss

OFFICE FROM page 2B

“But who can read those financial statements? Who can interpret the

business environment? Who can do the market research? Who can look
at competition?

Is that available at any of the banking institutions in the Bahamas?
I say it does not exist.”

ALL MUS T G oO Mr Gomez said another reason for the banks’ reluctance to lend to
small businesses was simply because they were too small and unap- tt Outrage in grest condition! Fully with Jipt, Vinh fncher, Chart platten/P4,
pealing to banks. “Small business funding requirements are usually Stereo/CD, Head, Freshanter, Bow cushions. Powered with twin Mercury 225 Optimax and
small, and that is the reason why they don’t tend to appeal to financial aL ,

pueeerea . Be : smart craft pauges,
Sat Feb 2 1 2 00 Qo institutions. Then financial institutions require much more collateral “
than the funds you wish to borrow,” he said.



PHOTO: Peter Rams

The Venture Capital Fund, which Mr Gomez administers, was intro- —_ Optional Equigment
duced to assist small businesses in acquiring capital. In its three year brregral bow pul wfpectunr roller and crate plate — ee
= existence, it has only been able to fund 46 out of 300 applicants. = Boer arciear sorape eyhatrh Totty avg pan oud
Mr Gomez said many individuals come to the fund hoping to start a = Peri Bivtorbowed lormurd deck slang Leaning pout wycocier
business which is in widespread existence already, such as a bar or beau- . “rank Aircbe
ty salon, and therefore are turned down. Other people come to the fund . or Aictsaid Gish bimet shieabes —

Poa apy ar athens aL, ae pale

deep in debt and are in need of a bailout - more than half the 46 com- = Fed haiders sedge, Beh Teds, VA, arte
CAS Hi dhe CARRY panies sponsored by the fund fall into this category. = Gat prepares /
He said that out of the 300 people, only 2 per cent approached the ' iceman natbiesd coor

venture capital fund with any kind of personal savings or collateral. & ‘Vertleal ed balers an tora deck ont

Nit P] t A Though the fund does not require applicants to hold any collateral 2 Sail bidtegg bsrplnia coche
easanh ve or make a down payment, Mr Gomez said he was astounded by the * Sficineiag wheel
number of individuals wanting to be entrepreneurs who have not ‘ anne webrad
«beet org

saved for the occasion. a
Between Jero Ein € Ave “Personal savings have never been a priority for many Bahamuians, ; ieee a oH en
molt becgecomhe Giger

Urveeye Det raunre ay enhcines
- especially those I find who want to start their own business, and I * Parward coming bole
Ge Cc arib Ro ad find it particularly peculiar that you intend to be an entrepreneur but Hycraetk pearing aati
make no plans towards saving money to do so,” Mr Gomez said.

Cz St. Cecilia’s Catholic
The Christian Book Shop
Sprang he Light ofthe Gogeet ireugheus the Bahama

Rosetta Street at Mt. Royal Avenue ¢ T: 322-1306





Church

Bazaar

Venue

Cultural & Heritage Site, Arawak Cay

Saturday 21st, February, a
12NOON - UNTIL




2* PASTRY
*<", «ICE CREAN

*HOT DOGS
* HOOP;LA
,* PONY RIDE
* PUNCH BOARD

* BINGO

* BOUNCING CASTLE
* MUSIC

*FOOD & DRINKS

* BOOKS ETC.

DISCOVER THE LEADER YOU WERE MEANT TO BE!

LEA



International known author and minister, Dr. Myles Munroe
We will be at The Christian Book Shop this Saturday February 21st at
3pm to sign his latest book, Becoming A Leader. You are invited to
come in and purchase your own autographed copy. That's this Saturday
at 3pm, at The Christian Book Shop, Roseta Street,
Dr. Myles Munroe in person.

Come and enjoy

International Food, Music and Festivities


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS ae
Financial industry must ‘reposition’ in 10-15 years

FROM page 1B

valid in the medium to long-
term. But we won’t do any-
thing in the short-term that
jeopardises the business we
already have. The last thing
we want to do is send a mes-
sage that we’re going to capit-
ulate in the short-term. That’s
not the case.”

The transition, he said,
would have to take place over
a 10-15 year period. “We’re
going to have to transition the
sector,” Mr Paton said. ‘It’s
not an overnight evolution, it’s
not a two-year evolution, it’s a
long-term transition, evolu-
tion, and the trick will be to
get everyone to agree to
where it is we want to go, and
the timeline for getting there.



“If we stay where we are
today, we’re going to fill out
the industry in 10-15 years’
time. There'll be nothing to
replace it.”

The Bahamas’ existing
financial services business
model had “served us well for
50-70 years, but it’s not going
to last for another 50-70
years”.

Crisis
Mr Paton said the Bahamas
had to “adapt” to the situa-
tion facing its financial ser-
vices industry, with developed
nations such as the US and
UK now looking to use the

global economic crisis as an
‘excuse’ to launch a fresh

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RUSSIAN CAMEROON INC.



— f—



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138



crackdown on so-called off-
shore centres, even though
their reasons for doing so do
not stand up to scrutiny.

British prime minister Gor-
don Brown said yesterday that
a planned crackdown on off-
shore shelters, used by large
companies to avoid tax, was
likely to be discussed at a sum-
mit of world leaders on April
2.

Calling for uniform global
regulatory structures, and an
end to major companies set-
ting up entities in so-called
offshore centres, Mr Brown
said: “We want the whole of
the world to take action. That
will mean action against regu-
latory and tax havens in parts
of the world which have
escaped the regulatory atten-
tion they need.”

And further shockwaves
were sent through the global
banking system after the US
federal authorities filed a law-
suit against UBS in Miami
yesterday, seeking to force the
Swiss bank to turn over
records on as many as 52,000
American customers they
allege evaded taxes by stash-
ing $14.8 billion worth assets

in Swiss accounts.

This threatens to knock a
further hole in so-called Swiss
‘bank confidentiality’ laws,
after UBS on Wednesday
handed over details on some
clients and paid $780 million
in fines over a previous case
launched against it by the US
government.

Tactics

Now, other international
financial centres, including the
Bahamas, are likely to fear the
US may use the same tactics
against themselves.

Mr Paton indicated that the
Bahamas’ future in financial
services lay in moving away
from a business platform pre-
viously based on client confi-
dentiality to one that was
based on transparency and
compliance.

“T think we’re going to have
to seriously consider tax trans-
parency points, and how we
re-position ourselves, and how
we develop a strategic plan
going forward,” he added.

“I think we’re going to be
transitioning, if not toa TIEA

environment, which is proba-
bly an easier solution, to a
more sophisticated solution
that would be a double tax
treaty network. That would
require us to have in place cer-
tain standards of taxation.

“T can see a move, in the
residential business environ-
ment, to having a corporate
tax environment - for busi-
nesses doing business here,
resident businesses.

“It would probably make
sense to transition to a corpo-
rate tax environment, which
would have aspects of taxa-
tion that would be recognised
by international standards. On
the back of that, we would be
able to negotiate double tax
treaties.

“The trick is going to be to



protect non-resident, private
banking businesses from that
tax.”

Double tax treaties with
other countries would enable
companies/clients in the
Bahamas to be taxed at lower
Bahamian tax rates, and avoid
tax when capital and assets
were repatriated to their home
countries.

Mr Paton said Barbados
had attracted companies and
business to its jurisdiction by
selectively targeting countries
to sign double tax deals with.
He added that the Bahamas
needed to work on re-posi-
tioning now, and not wait until
it was boxed into a corner with
nowhere to go.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OVER THE WATERFALLS LTD.










— «+ —





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138




(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RUSSIAN CAMEROON INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LE MALO CORPORATION

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LE MALO CORPORATION has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POSH SALOON INC.

—_— *—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of POSH SALOON INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UGRINITE LTD.

— *—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of UGRINITE LID. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAKILAINE JOSEPH
JEROME, P.O.BOX N3331, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13" day of February, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BADGE BRIGADE LTD.

a ,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BADGE BRIGADE LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
APPARATIO MOUNTAIN INC.

a ,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of APPARATIO MOUNTAIN INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RIPTIDE CURRENT LTD.

=_ ,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RIPTIDE CURRENT LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OVER THE WATERFALLS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ASHFORD VENTURES INC.

—_— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ASHFORD VENTURES INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIKANER CORPORATION

—_— *—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIKANER CORPORATION has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PLASSIC VIEW LTD.

—_— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PLASSIC VIEW LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 5B



Bar on hotel

registration is
removed

FROM page 1B

However, he added that a complaint had been filed against the
industrial agreement with the Industrial Tribunal

The new industrial agreement, which is retroactive to January 7,
2008, included a $300 lump sum that Mr Douglas said Mr Wilson
and others had tried to prevent union members from receiving.

“They tried to stop the people from getting their $300 lump sum
last week, but the people grabbed their money and left,” said Mr
Douglas. “The people don’t listen to them.”

He said that though the industrial agreement has not yet been
registered, hotels have begun to honour its terms. It introduces gra-
tuity increases, gratuities for departments that previously did not
receive it before, a retroactive $300 lump sum and a 4.8 per cent
salary increase in 2012.

“Understand that employers have already paid benefits per the
contract, so that shows good faith, because this contract is retroac-
tive,” said Mr Douglas.

“T think the employees should look at the leadership (of the
union) and see that Wilson and them ain’t the right guys for them.”

IN THE ESTATE OF Jeannine Marie
Therese Dusseault a.k.a. Jeannine
Marie Therese Buraglia a.k.a Jeannine
Buraglia late of 300 Joliette #208
Longueuil, Quebec in Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
above Estate are required to send the
same duly certified in writing to the
undersigned on or before the 5th day of
March A.D., 2009, after which date the
Executors will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims
of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE ts hereby given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate of
Jeannine Marie Therese Dusseault
a.k.a. Jeannine Marie Therese Buraglia
a.k.a Jeannine Buraglia are requested
to make full settlement on or before the
date hereinbefore mentioned.

NADIA A. WRIGHT
Attorney for the Executors
Chancellors Chambers
P.O, Box N-4589

Nassau, Bahamas

Watsau Aiport Deaiopment Company (MAD) seeks a
Qualfied Eraroamental Wontor tor Stage 1 of fhe LPIA
Eqpuansion Project. Tie scope ol services incucies:

' Pl iew BRS ADA CL eerie clare
Direlap idageion chert las and reed he ork ol
s for compliance [p erwironmanial pias
Fed lini and comimunicels ah requisiory suthoridss on
betall of the Project on environmental @suss: aed
Pears eee aed rarity repels

Tawa Boers
fequiztory Laws and agencies and fanilar wit intomataral
Beal Practices (Equator Princiies, IPG Standards)

THiS] DO Gil, TA eT 1c

Reed] For Propceal Pu ekaoes. ial Be Sle Io Gott i

afer 1:00 pn, on Thuraday, February tk, 2000

Aiquant for Proposal ciosing is Thursday, March 8h, 248 ai
1:00pm Batores Thre

Centar:

Traci Brishy

Contact & Procurement Manager

LPtA Expansion Projoot

Ph; (28a) FO2~1 Oe = Pe (242) 577.21 17
PO. Boor AP 55029. Massam, Bahamas
email: tracibrisbyenaibs



30K outlay produces a ‘model’ investment
industrial deal FROM page 1B

in Atlanta and Puerto Rico,
before returning home to the
Bahamas. In 2007, Mr Humes
put everything on the line to
see his dream of owning a mod-
el management agency come to
fruition, and with a full-time
job, limited equipment and vir-
tually no capital, he began to
shape his business.

"Nobody wants to invest in
something like this,” he said.
"So, last year was costly and
stressful."

Mr Humes said he relied on
his skill as a trained photogra-
pher and former knowledge of
the industry to recruit talent and
piece together the management
side of the business.

Desperately in need of liquid
assets, Mark was forced to turn
to Bahamian commercial banks
for a loan, as he had invested
much of his personal savings
into the early stages of business
development.

When Commonwealth Bank
approved his loan request, Mr
Humes began to accelerate
efforts to recruit talent and
complete preliminary photo
shoots, in hopes of having his
first model competition in Octo-
ber 2008.

In need of an edge and inter-
national accreditation, Mod-
els242 collaborated with Mod-
els.com’s top 10-ranked agency,
Ford Models, to hold the first
Bahamas Ford Supermodel of
the World competition. Mr
Humes was immediately over-
whelmed with the strain of stag-
ing his pilot model competition,
under the auspices and scrutiny
of a top model firm.

Taxing his rapidly depleting
coffers further, Mr Humes took
on the responsibility of bring-
ing Ford's judges and several
leaders in fashion cosmetology
to New Providence to partici-
pate in his competition.

Mr Humes said that by this
time he was deep in debt, and
owed banks, friends and family
alike.

"I still owe creditors, but I
will ensure that the debts are
paid at the end of the day,” he
said. “This is still about the busi-
ness: how much money I can
make out of this? That is why
the people that I am selecting to
be a part of this business are
saleable.”

When competition day rolled
around, Mark saw the fruits of
his labour, as his models, vying
for a chance to win $500,000 in
modelling contracts at the Ford
Supermodel of the World com-
petition in Montenegro, parad-
ed across a stage inside Fort
Charlotte for a team of inter-
national judges.

In the end, Gabrielle Moss
emerged as Ford's top model
of the Bahamas, and recently
travelled - via Canada and Ger-
many - to Montenegro for
Ford's competition.

Mr Humes, who accompa-
nied Gabrielle on the trip, said
he had never seen so much

excitement from a young per-
son. He said she glowed with
elation when she was among the
other models from countries
such as Brazil, who won the
overall competition, Egypt and
Africa.

Although Gabrielle was not
picked up by Ford in Montene-
gro, she sparked the interest of
VNY, who invited her to New
York and offered her a contract.

"Obviously when I didn't win
a contract with Ford, I was dis-
appointed,” Gabrielle said. But,
she added that she is just as
excited to have the same oppor-
tunity through VNY.

Mr Humes said the almost
$30,000 investment in his
agency has paid off, as several
agencies have expressed interest
in several of his other models.

Since his success, he said oth-
er have begun to try to follow
his lead. "Competition is nat-
ural in business and I like that,"
he said.

Mr Humes said he was work-
ing with his models to make
them into ambassadors for the
Bahamas, so that, should they
make it to the international
market, they will represent their
country duly.

"I don't want them to
become the status quo,” he said.
"I want them to represent the
country to their fullest ability. I
want to be able to make a dif-
ference in the lives of our young
people in the country."

Mr Humes, upset by the lack
of vision displayed by Bahami-
ans and Bahamian businesses,
said organisations should stop
sponsoring "foolishness" and
invest in the youth. He also dis-
missed some he approached for
help with his business plan, who
inevitably took his money and
produced nothing for him.





“Obviously when I didn’t win a

contract with Ford I was disappointed.”

Gabrielle Moss

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PIERRE HENRY 3
ABACO, BAHAMAS. is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, tor registration’
naturalization as a citizen of Ihe Bahamas, and that
eaty person who knows any reason why registration’
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twernty-eignit
days trom the 13° day of February, 2009 to the Minister
pesporist é jor nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
-/14/, Nassau, Bahamas.

MOTICE is hereby given that HARALD STEFFEN
SAUDER of #9 TREASURE STREET, LITTLE
BLAIR, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citzenship, for registration’
naturalization #5 a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
wih Knows any reason why registrationnaburaization should nat
be granted, should send a written and signed stalament of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20" day of February,
2009 to the Minéster responsible for nationality and Cittzenship
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE is hereby given that OLEMCIA JOSEPH
of GUMBELE HIGHTS, SOUTH, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nalonalty and Citzenstap, for regesirahion/naturalization a5 a
calizen of The Bahamas, and ihat any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should mat be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20° day of February, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizensiwp, RO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas,



MUST SELL

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY

Andros A

ve. — Englerston Subdivision

: ; 2 bedrooms,
I bath

* Coniypprives;

Property 1,000 sq. ft!
Busting 734 sa. ft

For conditions af
ale ond aer
Woman,
Meare contact:

Phone:
AS6- 1685,
512-1929

or 326-1608

Interested persons should subarit offers in writing to:
The Manager
Credit Risk Management
P.O. Hox S-7S18, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than March 13, 2009



a ol |

Intelligent. Creative. Efficient.

The fine line of General Electric appliances
found at Geottrey Jones cater to boelay’s
busy households amd tit every litesthyle. Our
wide vanety of GE appliances are designed
fo Suit your need porery ding the ultimate
In canvenience, performance and style,
With the best that technalagy has te offer
competitive pricing and a full service
department, Geolirey bones is your ultimate

appliance centre.

JONES & CO

Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets

322-2188/9

WM eam eee ama




JUDGE PARKER APT 3-G

i ypu
Hii
ZI PONT KNOW

MUCH ABOUT WHAT
AN AGENT POES..-

SO, YOU'RE
ESSENTIALLY
GOING TO ACT AS
ALAN'S AGENTL

few OSL
Tah ete
Abecee, UV/A

fa taka
SS > MESS | |
1 ah

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc, World righls reserved.

---BUT DLC JUST
-| KEEP SAYING “NO”
CA UNTIL THE MONEY'S
RIPICULOUS!

THAT
SOUNDS LIKE
AN AGENT TO ME!



BLONDIE

IF BY DISCUSS YOU MEAN YOU OUT

WANT THEM TO CONTINUE,

REE CONSIDER IT DONE

YOU DON'T WORK FOR
J.C. DITHERS ALL THESE YEARS
WITHOUT PICKING UP A
TRICK OR TWO!

AEN

46 MARGO OPENS THE PARCEL +s.

OH, MY/ SUCH BEAUTIFUL} THERES
|RED AND GOLD SILK __

WHY SHOULD
I MOVE

YOUR WAY ?/



BUT YOU, MY_ Weep
LOVE, ARE WOTZ



I'M
WAY BIGGER
THAN YOU !

4

en

OF



www.kingfeatures.com





www.Blondie.com

HAGAR THE HORRI

V1 vou AND LUTE PLAN
TO MARRY, (TS TIME I



NEIL ARMSTZONG
WAS THE FIRST MAN
To WALK ON
THE MOON

WOULDNT His
CAR START?

he 2-10

‘2009 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved,








REALN? YOU THINK SO? Gosh,
THATD BE GREAT’ REAL FIRE-
MEN WITH REAL AXES! T
HOPE THEN DRIVE THEIR BIGGEST
FIRE TRUCK !

WEN WOULD SHE?’

DO You WEVE STILL GOT
THINK SHE HER SCIENCE
WENT 3

LISTENING ?
WE HAVE







T HOPE YOUR
PARENTS ARE
HATING A REST-
PUL EVENING.



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



TAUGHT YOU HOW TO COOK,



BLE
coop/ 1

| BUT FIRST
LET ME

PLAN

Inc. World rights reserved

©2008 by King Features



















MARGO READS ALOUD.

M.-~ ONLY THE FINEST

SILK WILL 00 FOR YOUR

WEDDING DRESS, IT KNOW
IMOST WOMEN PREFER WHITE,

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inié. Ward rights reserved.

I LOVE YOU AND M\é6



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.







BECAUSE
MY TEETH
ARE WAY
SHARPER

THAN YOURS!









Yesterday’s
Sudoku Answer

IEMY > HE'S THE ONE WHO WILL

BE DOING THE COOKING!





HOW maar weds of fom leiners
OC TOTS Cah FL Tad: Bree thee
Ritar slow bere? In naling o
we, comes Lethe dea Lat tical
eae: ory, eget) mud caba Lh:
eenbre belo weed Linerw miuel be
aL eas cme
fies plurale
TODAYS TARGET

Cena 13: err mood LE excelent
21 (or mere). Zobstion tomccrcr

ne-leller word

TESTERDAL 8: SOLU

tos eed biedod udge
ouue lu keed kexle layed
toni pa
TeHH fuukcdiee Eeeiperd hoe
hated bubs holed aehie
Te. FRAG
mom pots lobe kote Lobe
ote i

Ingfge inkl bik ieanlh

fone aouhied



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer































©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

@ oO; f/- OM



‘MARGARET HAS BOOK-SMARTS, BUT SHES

2/19























Difficulty Level *%& *&

LACKIN’ IN PLAYGROUND-SMARTS.”

en an

Down




Across








1 Perceive increase in 2 Daring type of blazer (7)
value (10) 3 Reduced to the lowest

8 Castles in the air? (5) level (5)

9 Witty saying of an 4 Found note in packing




unusually prim age (7) case (6)




10 What one may do with a 5 Ina giddy goat it may be




stipend perhaps (5,2) musically excited (7)
Flier at the heart of 15
Down (5)

Stresses a ship seems to




A desire to write a
letter (5)
There’s a copy in the 7





12




southeast for a writer (6) produce (10)













14 Gets on the stage (6) 8 There’s opposition since
17 Anegative in some rates were changed (10)
trouble (5) 13 It may be fixed by one at
19 Issues Oriental variance (7) Lu Across Down
blends (7) 15 Those who have them will ol 1 In great demand 2 Amuster (4-3)
21 Comparative vacuum? (7) be sorry (7) N (2,1,7) 3 Partofa
: die 8 Sudden intense
22. Such work is 16 Fear to make the initial = effort (5) flower (5)
speculative (5) mistake (6) a b Bringichase 4 ened
23 | represent change and the J 18 Anice change to be with 0”) against (7) situation (6)
readiness to accept it (10) an Eastern relative (5) na 10 Small-time 5 Confiscate (7)
20 Agree to be keen (5) uu gangster (7) 6 Intended (5)
11 Up to the time of (5) 7 Very easy
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 12 People of a state (6) task (6,4)
Across: 1 Disown, 4 Tipcat, 9 Across: 1 Refuse, 4 Strong, 9 ae (8) 8 In jail (6,4)
Estonia, 10 Louse, 11 Gasps, 12 Fervour, 10 Utter, 11 Thong, 12 17 Push one's way 13 Supervised (7)
Descant, 13 Shorthanded, 18 Achieve, 13 Bring to book, 18 rudely (5) 45 Enthusiast
Peacock, 20 Wiper, 22 Alike, 23 No Macabre, 20 Lower, 22 Abuse, 23 19 Asa whole (7) Opel
entry, 24 Lights, 25 Leaned. Cutlass, 24 Artery, 25 Breezy. 21. Quick retort (7) reception (7)
Down: 1 Dredge, 2 Sites, 3 Windsor, Down: 1 Refute, 2 Forgo, 3 : 16 To rule (6)
5 Idles, 6 Crusade, 7 Treaty, 8 Shotgun, 5 Tough, 6 On the go, 7 22 Quick to take
Handshaking, 14 Healing, 15 Garnet, 8 Break the ice, 14 Recruit, offence (5) 18 To mature (5)
Nowhere, 16 Sprawl, 17 Frayed, 19 15 Bolster, 16 Impala, 17 Trusty, 19 23 Northeast part of 20 Support for
Overt, 21 Put on. By ear, 21 Weave. US (3,7) blackboard (5)

















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

O1/C0/ Mo |W w]/o









= /D/M]c O1/COIN {oo

NCO} 09
i

2/19





















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MN? 1 Ak? o
Ma ii2.9 3/8 MMe 1 2
(9/7 (82/9/87 9
8 19/1 7 M6 (3 9 8
817 9MNol1 8



Never Relax

North dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

NORTH

a@Kk4

VAT762

#K83

#&K 1053
WEST EAST
o— @J)1097
Â¥QOI985 VK 1043
@J952 #Q106
&O976 &y4

SOUTH

#AQ86532

y

@A74

RAB?
The bidding:
North East South West
1* Pass 26 Pass
2NT Pass 34 Pass
4% Pass 6%

Opening lead — queen of hearts.

There are many hands where, at
the outset, the contract seems very
easy to make. But one of the marks
of a top-notch declarer is that he asks
himself, even in apparently “cut-and-
dried” cases, whether anything can
possibly go wrong.

Consider this deal where declarer
won the opening heart lead with the
ace, discarding a club. He then
cashed the king of spades, discover-
ing that he had to lose a trump trick.

South still had a chance to avoid
a diamond loser if the opposing clubs
were divided 3-3, in which case he








could eventually discard a diamond
on dummy’s fourth club. So after
drawing two more rounds of trumps,
he cashed the A-K of clubs and
ruffed a club. But when the suit
failed to divide evenly, he could not
avoid losing a diamond and a spade
for down one.

However, declarer should have
made the slam. The fault lay in his
play to the very first trick, when he
failed to make provision for a 4-0
trump split.

As a safety measure, he should
have ruffed the opening heart lead in
his hand, since there was no need to
take the ace before testing the trump
situation. When a spade to the king
then reveals the bad trump break,
South can embark on a plan to try to
score all of the trumps in his hand.

He begins by cashing the ace of
hearts, discarding a club, then ruffs a
heart. Next the A-K of clubs are
taken and dummy’s last heart is
tuffed. Finally, the A-K of diamonds
are played and a club is led from
dummy.

At this point, East has the J-10-9
of trumps and qucen of diamonds,
while South has the A-Q-8 of spades
and seven of diamonds. If East dis-
cards his diamond, South ruffs low
and loses only a diamond. If East
trumps the club instead, declarer
sheds his losing diamond. Lither
way, the slam is made as one of
East’s two “sure” tricks simply van-
ishes.

Tomorrow: Bidding quiz.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 7B



OO ——neBUS INES eC
Baha Mar ‘moves forward’ on $2.6b Chinese agreement

FROM page1B

move the whole effort forward,” Mr Sands said.

Among the agreements signed between the Bahamas and China
during Mr Liangyu’s visit was an $150 million loan from the China
Ex-Im Bank to finance upgrades to the “airport highway”, mean-
ing the existing JFK Drive. Such a project would benefit, among
others, Baha Mar, as it would be the main access corridor for
guests going to and from the airport. The China Ex-Im Bank the
prospective financing partner for Baha Mar.

Meanwhile, Mr Sands said yesterday: “Mr Izmirlian was one of
the special guests at the state dinner, along with myself. He was one
of the few non-governmental people there, and I think that’s a very
clear indication of the relationship Mr Izmirlian has established with
Chinese officials, in terms of China Ex-Im Bank and China State
Construction.”

Mr Izmirlian had earlier this year told Tribune Business that Baha
Mar had soon hoped to sign a construction contract for the Cable
Beach development with China State Construction.

“Tm very optimistic,” Mr Izmirlian said. “I think the Chinese are
the right partners for us. They look at the world over a long peri-
od of time.

“They are very senior people who would not fly half-way around
the world if they were not serious. The negotiations are complex
and will take time, but over the next six months we hope to come
to a conclusion.

“We’ll hopefully be in a position to sign a construction contract
over the next few weeks,” Mr Izmirlian told Tribune Business,
adding that “after that” the main issue was likely to involve reach-
ing an agreement with the China Ex-Im Bank to provide debt
financing to fund the construction work.

While the bank would act as the financing partner, Mr Izmirlian
said that besides acting as general contractor, China State Con-
struction would also invest in the project and become Baha Mar’s
equity partner. Baha Mar would manage and operate the finished
resort complex, whose design has not changed since Harrah’s
Entertainment withdrew as the equity and casino partner.

The Baha Mar chief executive said it was “the right time” for the
Baha Mar project to be built, given the huge drop in input costs for
the project.

Mr Izmirlian explained that international shipping costs/rates had
dropped 90 per cent as a result of the global economic downturn,
thereby lowering Baha Mar’s costs when it came to imported con-
struction materials, equipment and other supplies, while raw mate-
rials costs had fallen by between 50-75 per cent.

Mr Izmirlian said the $2.6 billion Cable Beach redevelopment
would be fully completed and open in three-and-a-half years if
construction work began now, something that again represented
perfect timing, because it would hopefully coincide with a period
when the world economy was growing again.

Government urged: More
public sector restructuring

FROM page 1B

December last year, targeted the
Department of Public Service, the
Registrar General’s Department,

With the Police Force, Customs
and Immigration, the Govern-
ment offered early retirement
packages to a number of senior
officers in each department, and
Mr Winder suggested that the
Government had to “create
avenues” through which younger
officers “who are computer
savvy” could advance.

Older, entrenched officials who
had held their positions for years
were a potential impediment to
this process, he added.

“They are going to have to do
it, more so,” Mr Winder said of
the Government’s departmental
shake-ups.

“Granted that the economy is
slow, and we all agree that the
Government wants to be com-
passionate in its approach, but I
think the Government is going to
have to go through a detailed
analysis of all public sector agen-
cies.

“We want to be ready for when
the economy comes around, so
our agencies can be more effi-
cient than they are. It’s a benefi-
cial thing to do. I personally don’t
have a problem in congratulating
the Government in making this
happen.

“My concern is it’s still a piece-
meal approach, and if they’re
going to be in a position to pro-
vide better service once this thing
turns around, the Government
may have to spend money to
make it happen.”

Public service reform is one of
the Government’s key long-term
objectives, although Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for
finance, told Tribune Business
earlier this year that the effort
would focus on making existing
systems operate more efficiently
and productively, rather than civ-
il service downsizing.

“There’s a level of civil servants
who have the capabilities to take
the country to the next level, but
they will not be able to if the lev-
el above them does not have the
skill sets, the enthusiasm, to make
it happen,” Mr Winder told Tri-
bune Business. “The sooner we
deal with that, the better off we
will be.

“Tt’s a difficult choice they [the
Government] have to make.
While on an individual basis it
may seem a bit harsh, but when
one thinks about the level of com-
petition our country has to con-
tend with from around the world,
for the good of all Bahamians this
has to happen.

“Tf the Government has to
spend extra money to make a dif-
ference, I think it’s money well-
spent.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham indicated the Government
was prepared to do exactly that in
his New Year’s address to the
nation, with civil service reform
intended to help “reduce the
cumbersome application process-
es for permits, licences and regis-
tration”.

The administration’s pilot Pub-
lic Service Improvement Pro-
gramme, launched in six agencies
in May 2008 and completed in

the Building Control Division,
the Road Traffic Department, the
Department of Physical Planning,
and the Passport Office.

All were found to have defi-
ciencies in urgent need of correc-
tion when it came to properly
serving the Bahamian public.

Indicating he was prepared to
‘grab the bull by the horns’, Mr
Ingraham told the nation: “We
fully intend to work towards a
new culture of excellence in the
service of the Bahamian people, a
culture of ethical conduct on the
part of those who serve a culture
that is hostile to slackness and
corrupt practices.

“We expect that some ele-
ments of this process will be
painful and we fully expect to be
criticized. We may even have to
pay a political price.

“But we believe that we have a
duty to position our country more
securely on its constitutional
foundations of democratic gov-
ernment, equal access to the
rights, privileges and protections
which citizenship bestows, and
the rule of law.

“The Bahamian people
deserve no less than a country
with a modern, responsive public
service, a country that is equipped
to function in an increasingly
competitive world, a country that
is stable, and a country that can
hold its head high as a respected
member of the international com-
munity.”

Special Model-Year Close-o!



The 2008 Accord dramatic styling combined with the
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Price Inquiry P-120 Landscape Supply

Be able to Audit Parts Inventory; Cyclic Count

Procedure;

Degree from an accredited University would be an

asset;

Must be able to manager and motivate staff in the

Parts Department;

Must have experience in process statistical control in

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) seeks
a qualified landscape supplier(s) to grow trees, palms,
shrubs and groundcover (items) in accordance with the
required schedule and speculations for completion of
Stage 1 of the LPIA Expansion Project. This is a supply
only contract.

planning, programming and control of Caterpillar

industrial parts and Warehouse production process; .
Able to manage major components interchange
process; Hoses assembling process.

This candidate is required to be a professional who

Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after
4:00 pm, on Thursday, February 12th, 2009.

Request for Proposal closing is Thursday, March 12th,
2009 at 3:00pm Bahamas Time.

thrives on the challenge of Managing Parts Inventory
and all other operational procedures within the Parts

Warehouse.

Send complete resume with education and work

experience to:

M & E Limited,

P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas,

Attention: Office Administrator, or email

me@me-ltd.com.

Contact:

Traci Brisby

Contract & Procurement Manager

LPIA Expansion Project

Ph: (242) 702-1086 « Fax: (242) 377.2117
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this

position will be contacted.

52wk-Low
1.39
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
1.95
12.61
2.83
4.80
1.88
2.27
6.02
11.00
10.45
5.01 Focol (S)
1.00

Abaco Markets

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco

0.30

5.50

8.60
10.00

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

ROYAL = FIDELITY

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Money at Work

Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,678.29 | CHG -0.22 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -34.07 | YTD % -1.99
FINDEX: CLOSE 821.52 | YTD -1.60% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW. BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Previous Close
1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.16
2.40
7.80
11.00
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Today's Close
1.41
11.00
7.64
0.63
3.15
2.37
13.95
2.83
6.77
2.15
2.40
7.76
11.00
10.45
5.18
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

Change

0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

EPS $ Div $

0.070 20.1
0.992 11.1
0.319

-0.877

0.105 30.0
0.055 43.1
1.255 11.1
0.118 24.0
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682 15.3
0.337 15.4
0.000 N/M

15.5
19.4
10.0
13.0
20.3

0.035 8.6
0.407 13.5
0.952 11.0
0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S52wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

S2wk-Low

RND Holdings

ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets

RND Holdings

Fund Name

Colina Bond Fund
2.9230
1.3773
3.3856
11.8789

96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks.

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets:
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

100.00
100.00
100.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
6.00
0.35

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

31.72
11.23
0.45

33.26
12.04
0.55

29.00
14.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

1.4387
2.9230
1.4376
3.3856
12.6180
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0401
1.0330
1.0410

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months.
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

4.10

Last 12 Months

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Daily Vol.

Weekly Vol.

Div $

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’‘s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

Interest Maturity

7% 19 October 2017
19 October 2022

Prime + 1.75%
T% 30 May 2013
Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

EPS $
-0.041

Div $ P/E
0.300

0.000

0.001

0.480
0.000

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

Yield %
30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-08
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
31-Jan-09

FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

33-year history. It all adds up to lower emissions,
better fuel economy, larger cabin, top-rated safety,
low maintenance costs and high resale value.

s HinsTCARIBREAN

PATER Me Ce a be



On-the-apet financing and insurance,
24 mont'24,000-mile factory warranty.

Website: weaw.hondabahanas.com

F)

a =

a ta ere

« 268-hp, V-6 engine. ® immobilizer theft-deterrent system

* Comfortably seats five ® Remote entry system

® Air conditioning & filtration system = © 6-disc CD player

* Power windows, door mirrors * Steering wheel-mounted audio
and locks controls

* Cloth or leather interior

* Front, side & side curtain airbags

ddd
Tel: (242) 328-2285 © Fax: (242) 323-T272












THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST
























































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“ORLANDO
High: 60° FA6°C , , X Partly sunny, windy Patchy clouds. Breezy with plenty of Partly sunny and Clouds and sun, a Chance for a couple The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
vw th AFI5°C a 2 and less humid. sun. humid. t-storm possible. of showers. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
he me High: 79° High: 83° High: 80° High: 76°
TAMPA ae F High: 76° Low: 64° Low: 70° Low: 72° Low: 66° Low: 65° see Ey
4 ra i r PETE es
High: 60° F/16° C ‘we, 95°-64° F High Ht.(ft.) Low _HtL(ft
Low: 43° F/6°C oe r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 4:33am. 23 10:44am. 04
a @ F 7 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 441pm. 2.0 10:43pm. 0.2
: Saturd 5:22am. 24 11:31am. 03
a Awan ae
5 ie Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Sunday 605am. 25 I212pm. 01
>» ABACO Temperature 64pm. 22 0 sn
r * 3 HQ oo cecccccccscccsseeseenenesesesreseeeeeenee 81° F/27° C :
; High: 78° F/26° C aan Monday O43 am. 26 12:17am. 0.0
A . 1 ae LOW veces 61° FA16°C Vo.
re - Low: 56° F/13°C Normal high... i ee
r Normal low 64° F/18° C
pith @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's High ...ccccsscssssseessie se r3ic | NTI TCI
: High: 68° F/20° C ; Last year's VOW eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeteeeeeeeeeees 74° F/23° C " "
Low: 53° F/12°C Freciptation ——__________ a antes ae ee ine oe an
S of 1 p.m. yesterday 0... cece 00 Vi p.m. MOONnSEL..... “6 P.M.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date New First Full Last
High: 71°F/22° C @ High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date .......cccsccsccccccsecsecseeseeses 2.90" . oe os
Low: 56° F/13°C Low: 55° F/13°C ae - ee i P
> AccuWeather.com co Bion ae
A. @ Forecasts and graphics provided by : a: ‘a
* MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feb. 24 Mar.4 Mar.10 Mar. 18
High: 72° F/22°C EL ELT HERA
Se Low: 56°F/13°C NASSAU See Ege
High: 76° F/24° C oe:
Low: 64° F/18°C
a a
KEY WEST li i CATISLAND
High: 70° F/21°C —_— High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 60° F/16°C Low: 64° F/18°C
. i
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
~~ High: 80 F/27 C High: 81° F/27° C
; ANDROS Me Low: 68° F/20° C Low: 65° FA °C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ’ Oe
highs and tonights's lows. High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 68° F/20° C ©
LONGISLAND
Low: 66° F/19°C
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 85° F/29° C
FC FIC FC FIC F/C FIC F/C FIC FC FC Fic FC me Low: 66° F/19° C
Albuquerque 59/15 31/0 s 57/13 33/0 s Indianapolis 38/3 25/-3 $s 32/0 18/-7 sn Philadelphia 34/1 22/-5 pe 41/5 32/0 pe
Anchorage 30/-1 14/-10 s 22/-5 8/-13 s Jacksonville 56/13 27/-2 6417 425 s Phoenix 75/23 48/8 s 75/23 50/10 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta S010 29/-1 s 58/14 36/2 c Kansas City 54/12 24/-4 c 39/8: 19/-7 po _Pittsburgh 26/-3 18/-7 sf 34/1 24/-4 sn RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:86°F/s0°c
Atlantic City 37/2 18/-7 s 42/5 30/-1 pc _Las Vegas 6719 41/5 s 67/19 45/7 pc Portland,OR 56/13 37/2 pe 5412 416 c High: 83° F/28° C Low: 68° F/20°C
Baltimore 37/2 22/-5 s 42/5 32/0 pc Little Rock 62/16 38/3 s 49/9 30/-1 Fr Raleigh-Durham 45/7 25/-3 s 54/12 35/1 pe Low:64°F/18°C
Boston 36/2 27/-2 sf 39/3 29/-1 pc Los Angeles 68/20 50/10 s 72/22 50/10 pe St. Louis 50/10 32/0 pc 37/2 19/-7 sn .
Buffalo 26/-3 19/-7 sf 30/-1 21/6 sn Louisville 42/5 32/0 s 42/5 24/-4 c Salt Lake City 40/4 23/-5 pc 43/6 25/-3 pc GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 54/12 28/-2 s 61/16 39/3 s Memphis 58/14 39/3 s 49/9 30/-1 c San Antonio 70/21 56/13 pe 6216 37/2 © High:87°F/31°C
Chicago 27/-2 15/-9 pce 27/-2 14/-10 sn Miami 72/22 53/11 s 75/23 65/18 s San Diego 66/18 5110 s 67/9 51/10 pe Low 67°FA9°C
Cleveland 28/-2 17/-8 sf 31/0 23/-5 sn Minneapolis 20/-6 9/-12 sn 19/-7 6/-14 c¢ San Francisco 61/16 48/8 pce 62/16 51/10 pc .
Dallas 68/20 46/7 s 5713 32/0 pe Nashville 48/8 32/0 s 49/9 26/-3 + Seattle 5412 36/2 pe 52/11 393 c
Denver 46/7 16/-8 c 42/5 20/-6 pc New Orleans 60/15 44/6 s 66/18 45/7 c Tallahassee 58/14 23/-5 s 63/17 39/3 pc
Detroit 27/-2 18/-7 sf 28/-2 20/-6 sn New York 35/1 28/-2 pc 40/4 34/4 pc Tampa 60/15 39/3 s 66/18 52/11 5
Honolulu 76/24 63/17 pe 78/25 65/18 c Oklahoma City 66/18 34/1 s 48/8 23/-5 pc Tucson 76/24 43/6 s 73/22 44/6 §s
Houston 67/19 54/12 s 60/15 39/3 1 Orlando 60/15 37/2 s 70/21 48/8 s Washington, DC 40/4 25/-3 s 48/8 34/1 pc

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
46/7
37/2
48/8
79/26
93/33
84/28
54/12
41/5
61/16
28/-2
34/1
64/17
67/19
43/6
36/2
91/32
68/20
93/33
30/-1
81/27
84/28
68/20
38/3
46/7
39/3
39/3
34/1
75/23
28/-2
72/22
75/23
40/4
53/11
77/25
84/28
83/28
50/10
59/15
89/31
72/22
70/21
27/-2
27/-2
23/-5
90/32
17/25
27/-2
46/7
31/0
85/29
77/25
48/8
82/27
88/31
91/32
84/28
84/28
85/29
27/-2
30/-1
82/27
65/18
54/12
26/-3
84/28
47/8
35/1
29/-1
14/-10

Hl

Today

Low
F/C
72/22
39/3
30/-1
37/2
69/20
78/25
75/23
40/4
23/-5
55/12
20/-6
28/-2
56/13
43/6
36/2
23/-5
64/17
50/10
69/20
15/-9
64/17
68/20
54/12
33/0
41/5

57/13
19/-7
21/-6
22/-5
55/12
57/13
18/-7
37/2
28/-2
73/22
55/12
34/1
74/23
63/17
66/18
54/12
69/20
66/18
14/-11
23/-5
66/18
62/16
415
20/-6
72/22
35/1
30/-1
20/-6
-1/-18

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 20TH 2009 PAGE 8B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Ww

Ss

pc

pc
sn
s
pc
$
s
pc
$
$
pc
c
sn
pc
pc
sh
r
sn
t
pc
sn
pc
sn

High
F/C
87/30
45/7
36/2
45/7
73/22
94/34
84/28
54/12
46/7
56/13
32/0
32/0
64/17
67/19
46/7
36/2
70/21
65/18
93/33
32/0
83/28
83/28
70/21
37/2
48/8
39/3
38/3
33/0
80/26
30/-1
70/21
72/22
42/5
48/8
77/25
86/30
84/28
52/11
61/16
91/32
75/23
79/26
27/-2
25/-3
29/-1
90/32
79/26
30/-1
48/8
32/0
88/31
84/28
50/10
83/28
85/29
91/32
81/27
83/28
85/29
37/2
32/0
79/26
78/25
50/10
29/-1
86/30
48/8
37/2
26/-3
14/-10

Saturday
Low
F/C
74/23
40/4
25/-3
38/3
62/16
78/25
75/23
42/5
24/-4
52/11
29/-1
25/-3
59/15
42/5
37/2
26/-3
63/17
54/12
73/22
14/-10
62/16
68/20
49/9
35/1
41/5



=

oO

oO

a eS ee ao ao a sees a’ ae

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace





MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: NE at 12-25 Knots 4-7 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
FREEPORT Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: NE at 12-25 Knots 5-8 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
ABACO Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-6 Feet 7-10 Miles 74° F
Saturday: __NE at 15-30 Knots 6-9 Feet 7-10 Miles 74°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

SS
COLD Lo
Billings as
esate

1 20/9)

Ne

0:
Denver, d b
46/16 Kansas City)

V7

Miami
72/53

Showers
[XX] T-storms
Rain

* % Flurries
9%, 3€| Snow Warr iii,
[y_Â¥] Ice Stationary iaganfit

-10s is {/08)) 10s 20s /308)) 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s [90s [ilusl/ii0s)

Fronts
Cold
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.









NORIO R NSE) aN NIG

Never st our
eEneame without us!
Vhen it “Or es to Auto Insurance,

us smart choice 1s
ice Management.
eople you can trust.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“New Povidece {Grad Bobomo Aco | eather Brun
TM SH TD 50) BO | 080 4-4

a
TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

Crusaders first to get eliminated

n By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THEY fell in the first game of
this year’s tournament and after
squandering a late fourth quar-
ter lead last night, the Nassau
Christian Academy Crusaders
became the first team eliminat-
ed from the 27th Annual Hugh
Campbell Tournament.

The Queen’s College Comets
held off elimination and sent

36-34 overtime win in the first
of four elimination games in
yesterday’s second session.

Nathaniel Carter sank a pair
of free throws at the line with
5.3 seconds remaining in regu-
lation to send the game into
overtime.

Tied at 34 in overtime with
21 seconds remaining, Carter
also put the Comets ahead with
one of two free throws at the
line.

The Comets dominated the
offensive board down in the

waning moments of overtime,
none more important than
when Jordan Isaacs rebounded
Carter’s missed free throw and
was then sent to the line him-
self.

Isaacs made one of two at the
line to give the Comets a two
point lead.

Both teams began the game
woefully on the offensive end
with just two field goals
between them in the opening
quarter.

The Crusaders led 5-4 after

the first quarter.

NCA built their largest lead
of the game in the second quar-
ter on an Ashton Wells free
throw, giving them a 17-7 lead
with 1:37 left to play in the half.

The Comets ended the quar-
ter on a brief 6-2 run, to trim
the deficit, 19-13 at the half.

QC outscored NCA 10-4 in
a pivotal third quarter, opening
on an 8-2 run, capped by a
Carter lay-up to tie the game at
21

The Comets took their first

lead of the second half on a
jumper by Isaacs, however the
Crusaders Leonardo Hepburn
tied the game at 23 just before
the buzzer sounded to end the
third.

The Crusaders built a five
point lead in the fourth when
Kenneth Clarke’s three pointer
made the score 30-25 with 2:54
remaining.

The Comets rallied with a
basket by Isaacs and a tip in by
Carter with 32 seconds left in
regulation brought his team

within one, 30-29.

Ferguson made one of two
free throws to give the Cru-
saders a 31-29 lead before
Carter’s clutch free throws at
the line sent the game to over-
time.

Carter led the Comets with
19 points and 10 rebounds while
Isaacs finished with nine.

Clarke led the Crusaders with
nine points, Ferguson finished
with eight and Shaquille
Symonette posted five points
and 10 rebounds.

the Crusaders packing with a

Jaguars dominate the Stingers [Ghigaranoe

FROM page 11

TABERNACLE BAPTIST FALCONS — 44
JORDAN PRINCE WILLIAM FALCONS — 28

e WITH an already comfortable nine
point lead heading into the fourth quar-
ter, Tabernacle doubled Prince Williams
fourth quarter output to pull away for
their second impressive win of the tour-
nament.Tabernacle led 30-21 heading
into the fourth, and reached a double
figure lead in the quarter on a jumper
from Robin Lafrance.

Another lay-up by Lafrance, who fin-
ished with a game high 14 points, gave
Tabernacle a 19 point advantage, their
largest lead of the game, 41-22 with 2:42
remaining.

Jesper Thompson led Prince Wiliam
with nine points.



The Falcons have won both
games thus far by an average margin of
victory of 21 points per game...Defensive-
ly they have held their opponents to just
27 points per game...

WESTMINSTER DIPLOMATS — 52
BIMINI BIG GAME — 28

¢ BIMINI scored the game's first bas-
ket, but scored just one field goal the
remainder of the quarter and two the
remainder of the half as the Diplomats
cruised to an easy win.

Christorr Stuart nearly outscored the
Big Game on his own, finishing with a
game high 23 points.

Stuart also added five rebounds two
steals and two assists.

He gave the Diplomats their first dou-
ble figure lead of the game with a three
pointer to open the second quarter, 14-4.

Marako Lundy came off the bench
and quickly made a pair of threes point-
ers On consecutive possessions to give
the Diplomats a 20-4 advantage.

Westminster led 25-10 at the half and
opened the third in the same way they
opened the previous quarter.

Stuart and Lundy began the third with
a pair of threes and the usual acrobatic
finish from Larry Smith gave the Diplo-
mats a 31-10 lead midway through the
quarter.

Smith showed his versatility, stuffing
the stat sheet with a great all-around per-
formance, nine points, and team highs
of 10 rebounds, five steals and five assists.

Lundy finished with 10 points while
Rashard Morley finished with six points,
three rebounds and two blocks.

Tristan Kelly led the Big Game with
nine points while Larento Sands and
Cleo Sears finished with seven and six
points respectively.

The Diplomats led 40-21 at the end of
the third and Stuart gave them their first
20-point lead on the opening play of the
fourth.

The lead reached as much as 25, 50-25,
on a pair of free throws by Stuart with
2:00 remaining.

After a hard fought win over the
Jack Hayward Wildcats Wednesday night,
the Diplomats cruised to their biggest win of
the tournament thus far...It was Stephen
Miller, center for the Diplomats junior team
who came off the bench to finish with six
points and seven rebounds in Wednesday's
win over Jack Hayward and not Shaquille
Fernander as previously reported.

EIGHT MILE ROCK BLUEJAYS — 42
CATHOLIC HIGH CRUSADERS — 40





e LAST year's runners-up improved
to 2-0 in the tournament surviving a
desperation three at the buzzer from a
fellow rand Bahama rival.

Delario Rolle's fade away three point-
er from the left baseline drew only iron
as time expired to give the Bluejays the
win.

In a closely contested game between
evenly matched teams, the score was
tied after the first quarter, 10-10 , the
Crusaders held a slim 19-17 lead at the
half, and the Bluejays took an even slim-
mer 24-23 lead into the fourth quarter.

Both offences opened up consider-
ably in the fourth, with the Bluejays
holding a 33-29 lead midway through
the quarter.

A three pointer by Kalim Munnings
brought the Crusaders within one, and a
basket by Carlton Forbes gave them a
34-33 lead on the next possession.

The Crusaders went on a 7-0 capped
by a Kadeem Martin basket to give
them a 40-34 lead with two minutes
remaining.

Ervin Lewis led the Bluejays with 11
points and 10 rebounds while Martin,
Ramon James and Jamall Hall finished
with eight points apiece.

Forbes led the Crusaders with 13
while Munnings and Rolle finished with
11 and 10 points respectively.

Neither team led by more
than six points, the Crusaders biggest lead
was 16-10 early in the second quarter and
the Bluejays, 40-34 with two minutes left
to play... This year's Bluejays team sports
amore balanced attack, last year, swing-
man Hubert Williams willed the Bluejays
to the championship game with a series of
great individual performances...

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Invites Tenders

for provision of General Insurance
Services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
on or before 18th March, 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 690/09
All Risks General Insurance

(a) Commercial Property (Buildings, Plant, Contents); and



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Everything Must Gott

05
“OUOt

BUTCH

Se a

SPORTS

SORT eee
Major ready for Carmody

n By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MEACHER ‘Pain’ Major is
eager to step into the ring
tonight to take on Kevin Car-
mody.

Major will be making his
debut under the X-Cel World-
wide LLC banner in a super
lightweight eight-rounder at the
Buffalo Niagara Convention
Center.

The weigh-in was last night
and Major said he was prepared
for the much anticipated show-
down with the ultra-durable
Philadelphia warrior Carmody,
who has a 10-10-2 win-loss-draw
record with one knockout.

Promoter Nick Garone said
he was delighted to welcome
Major on board with his 15-3-1,
13 KOs record.

“T’m excited about him fight-
ing on the card,” Garone said
prior to the official weigh-in.
“He’s fighting a tough kid, but
he have to go out there and do
what he have to do to win.
That’s the only way that the guys

Rolle finishes 18th at the

n By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SHE had a remarkable turn-
around from her opening round,
but Georgette Rolle fell short at
the end of the Sun Coast Ladies
Series that concluded yesterday.

Playing at the Errol Estates
Country Club in Apopko, Florida
just outside of Orlando, Rolle
shot rounds of 84-76-74 to finish
18-over-par with a total of 234

A

PEUS

get to the next level.”

When he signed Major last
year, Garone said it was on the
premise that Major possessed
the potential to become a legiti-
mate world champion and he
wanted to ensure that he was
put in a position to achieve that
goal.

“T don’t sign that many guys,
but I think he’s one of the guys
that I felt have been mis-han-
dled,” Garone pointed out. “But
I think I can move him in the
right direction. He just have to
go out there and prove that he’s
ready to go.”

Major said that shouldn’t be a
problem.

“T’m just grateful to God for
this opportunity,” said Major,
who has spent the past few
weeks in Hollywood, Florida
training with Anthony ‘Chills’
Wilson and Nathaniel Knowles.

“We had a great team work.
They got me in shape to this
point and so I’m just ready to
go out there and do what I’ve
always done, which is to remain
aggressive and hopefully come
out victorious in the end.”

While he knows little of Car-

for 18th place overall out of a
field of 26 competitors that
endured the three days of com-
petition.

American Noriko Narazaki of
Illinois captured her fifth title
with rounds of 72-71-74=217 for
one-over-par to earn $2,000.00
in the process.

Canadians Erin Thorne and
Carmen Bandea, tied for 8th with
totals of 226, were the last money
earners as they pocketed $615.00
each.

Rolle, the only Caribbean

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mody, who has lost three of his
last four fights, Major said he
intended to go into the ring and
take out the 22-year-old ortho-
dox fighter.

“Like I told my promoter, he’s
going to be watching his next big
time headline fighter,” Major
said. “It’s going to be an exciting
fight because I’m hungry.

“Tm back out here under a
new promotional group and
everything has been going so
great. I’ve gotten a lot of mes-
sages from home. Everybody has
been sending me their best wish-
es, so I want them to know that
I’m real confident that I will get
the job done, having put in the
work.”

Major, 27, thanked Michelle
Brady, his workout partner in
Nassau who has been calling him
early day he was in Florida
reminding him to get in his
workouts.

He also thanked his parents
for their encouragement, as well
as his family and friends and
everybody who has been in con-
tact with him since he left to
train.

Wilson, who has been reunit-



Meacher Major

ed with Major, said the Bahami-
an lightweight champion has
been well prepared for the fight
and will definitely put on a show.

“He had good sparring and
everything and he’s in good
shape,” Wilson said.

As long as Major can go out
and “ultilize his speed, establish
his jab and come off the jab with
the body shots,” he should be
able to secure the win.

“He’s still learning. So he’s
not really lacking anything,”
Wilson stressed. “The sky is the
limit for him. He just has to go
out there and do the things that

Sun Coast Ladies Series

golfer to participate in the tour-
nament, said she was quite
pleased with the way she man-
aged to come back after her dis-
mal first round.

“T’m happy that I was able to
focus and turn my scores around
from the first day,” Rolle said.
“T planned to use this tournament
to get ready for the upcoming
Futures Tour.

“So Pm quite happy that I
played in it. [learnt a lot by play-
ing in the tournament. I’m happy.
Thit the ball very good, but I did-
n’t make much putts. I hit the
ball fine.”

Although she didn’t crack the
top ten, Rolle noted that she was
hitting the ball just as everyone of
them, but she just needed to get a
little more experience under her
belt.

“T just have to make some
more putts,” she said. “But if I
didn’t shoot the way I did on the
first day, I think I would have
performed a lot better.”

As she heads back to school
to continue her undergraduate
studies at Texas Southern Uni-

KERZNER

FOUNDATION

versity, Rolle said if there’s any-
thing she has to work on, it will
be her “short game, short game,
short game.

“[’m just going to continue
practising. So I will go to school
in the mornings and in the after-
noons around 3-3:30, I will be
back on the course practising and
getting prepared for the next
tournament.”

While the Futures Tour won’t
get underway until March 22,
Rolle said she intended to take a
break from the Sun Coast Ladies
Series and will instead play in the
Florida Women’s Open, sched-
uled for the Rio Pinar Country
Club in Orlando, Florida.

“T probably won’t play in the
Sun Coast again until I get a
break from the Futures Tour,”
Rolle said. “So I just want to con-
centrate on that right now.”

The 23-year-old 2002 gradu-
ate of St. Augustine’s College
said her ultimate goal was to
graduate from the Futures Tour
with her professional card to
play in the Ladies Professional
Golf Association.



THE RESIDENCES
ATLANTIS

THE COVE
ATLANTIS

= ty bd
‘SKY CLIMBERS Se
nos
TO TENNIS
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Open to public starting on a

Saturdays Feb 21





















TURN LEFT OFF OF THE ON-BRIDGE AND CONTINUE WEST THROUGH THE TUNNEL
UNTIL YOU ARRIVE AT THE TENNIS CENTER FOR PARKING.

Phone number 363-0626
Ages 7-18 years.
Parents must accompany
under 14 years



Hours of operation
Tuesday-Saturday 9-5pm

Parents must sign waiver for
all climbers


THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11

MAJOR
READY TO
TAKE ON
CARMODY

=

|







FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009 es
ani
iS md oe
=
Ss _
5 = “SHH Se = eee Pee
FUNERAL FOR MUNROE =

¢ FUNERAL service for the late and former Davis Cup player }
Lavaughn Munroe will take place on Saturday at 10 am at the Church }
of the Good Shepherd in Pibnder’s Point, Grand Bahama. :
Munroe, 27, was the brother of Patrick Bjorn Munroe, who is a }
member of this year’s Davis Cup team that will be heading to Parguay }
for the first round of the American Zone II playt from March 6-8. i

BASKETBALL
FUNERAL FOR McFALL

¢ FUNERAL service for the late Samuel McFall will be held on Sat- :
urday at 2:30 pm at the Bethel Baptist Church on Meeting Street. :
McFall, 48, was a former coach in the New Providence Basketball
Association and the father of twin brothers Raymond and Ramone
McFall, who starred in the Government Secondary Schools Sports
Association and they played in the Baptist Sports Council’s league.

n By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



ST. GEORGE'S JAGUARS — 47
SUNIAND BAPTIST STINGERS — 31

IN a first half where they led by two
after the opening quarter and were
tied at the half, the Jaguars dominated
the third quarter to win their second
game of the tournament.

Kentwan Smith scored eight of his
CL TOU eM OUl A OM EO CLOT NOMOCeR COIR Le
third and the Jaguars outscored the
Stingers 20-6 in the period to take
command of the contest.

At 18 all headed into the third, the
Jaguars opened
with a half court
trap that exposed
Watem yo lotcxesecwmervl
handling, or lack
thereof.

The trap ignit-
ed a 13-0 run,
capped by a pair
oJ NCeMNOTCON TS
sue suOMM Ee BOOr-DE
Walker to give

KNOWLES/FISH ADVANCE



¢ MARK Knowles and his new partner Mardy Fish have advanced :
to the semifinal of the Regions Morgan Keegan Championships in
Memphis, Tennessee. i

The Bahamian-American duo playing only in this tournament, }
pulled off their quarter-final with a 6-4, 6-3 win over the American team }
of James Blake and Bobby Reynolds. i

Knowles and Fish won their opener 6-3, 6-1 over the team of }
Christophe Rochus and Florent Serra. Their opponents in the semi’s is }
not known yet.

The final is set for Sunday.

BASEBALL
JBLN SCHEDULE

¢ THE Junior Baseball League of Nassau will be back in action
this weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams with the
following games on tap:

Saturday’s schedule the Jaguars a 31-
Tee Ball 18 lead.

Following a
Stingers’ basket,

11 am Grasshoppers vs Blue Claws; 1 pm Raptors
vs Knights and 3 pm Sidewinders vs Sand Gnats.

Coach Pitch Walker, who fin-

10 am Bluejays vs Diamondbacks and 12:30 pm i HU OLexOMY LOO Mes Ego

Angels vs Athletics. i points made a three pointer from the
Minor League i baseline to give his team a 34-20 lead.
10 am Mets vs Red Sox and 12:30 pm Smith ended the quarter with one of
Rays vs Rockies. several tip-ins to give the Jaguars a 38-
Major League : : 24 lead at the end of the third.

12:30 pm Reds vs Indians and 3 pm Mariners Henold Pinder came thera thei

vs Marlins. i

largest lead of the game with a late
fourth quarter lay-up for a 47-29
POM eOLecl en

Pinder finished with seven points.

Junior League

10 am Dodgers vs Yankees and 12:30 pm Twins
vs Cardinals.

Senior League

Saturday Verdell Grant led the Stingers with
3 pm Pirates vs Tigers. eight, Kingsley Cajuste added five,
Sunday while Troy Bullard and Ivaughn Gib-
2 pm Rangers vs Phillies. son each finished with four.

neem Nits ies) 11116 [31 6sim esi (ste (0 Oca
ona breakaway dunk by Bullard with 2:43
left in the second quarter to give them an

18-15 advantage... The Jaguars outscored



FREEDOM FARM SCHEDULE

¢ THE Freedom Farm Baseball League will be back in action

this weekend with the following games on tap:
TONIGHT

TEE BALL

6 pm Guineps vs Jujus.

SATURDAY

9 am Dillies vs Seagrapes and 10:15 am
Dillies vs Jujus.

COACH PITCH

TONIGHT

7:30 pm Sand Flies vs Mosquitoes.
SATURDAY

11:30 am Boas vs Green Turtles; 1 pm Wasps
vs Mosquitoes and 3 pm Sand Flies vs Bees.
SUNDAY

3 pm Green Turtles vs Wasps.

9-10

TONIGHT

6 pm Barracudas vs Red Snappers.
SATURDAY

10 am Octopus vs Dolphins (on Cable 12).
SUNDAY

4:30 pm Barracudas vs Turbots.

11-12

TONIGHT

7:30 pm Conchs vs Dogs.

SATURDAY

Noon Marlins vs Parrots; 1:30 pm Hurricanes
vs Iguanas and 3:30 pm Crowns vs Conchs.
SUNDAY

3 pm Marlins vs Groupers and 4:30 pm
Hurricanes vs Parrots.

13-15

SATURDAY

9 am Silverjacks vs Sharks; 11 am Owlz

vs Stingrays; 1 pm Silverjacks vs Raccoons
and 3 pm Potcakes vs Owlz.

16-18

SUNDAY

2:30 pm Caribs vs Tainos and 4 pm Arawaks vs Lucayans.



! n By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Cricket Asso-

? ciation has suffered a major blow
? by the suspension of the Stan-
? ford 20/20 Tournament, but
i president Greg Taylor said it
? intends to move on with the fur-
: ther development of the sport.

On Tuesday in a joint state-

? ment, the England and Wales
? Cricket Board and the West
? Indies Cricket Board announced
? that they have immediately sus-
? pended all their ongoing negoti-
? ations with Sir Allen Stanford
: and his corporate group.

The announcement came after

? the US Securities and Exchange
? Commission charged Sir Allen
? Stanford and three of his com-
? panies with fraudulent conduct.

The Bahamas, according to

? Taylor, was one of 19 countries
? that benefited greatly from Sir
? Stanford with funding to assist
? with funding for their players to
: participate in the Stanford 20/20

Tournament and the develop-
ment of their facilities.

“With news like this, it really
hurts, but the International
Cricket Council has stepped in
and so we can continue to do
some of the things that we want-
ed to do with the development
of cricket,” Taylor said.

“So although we lost the Stan-
ford sponsor, we have gained
another in the International
Cricket Council. It won’t be
nearly as half as what Stanford
did, but it will still be a continu-
ous contribution to the develop-
ment of cricket.”

In January 2006, the BCA
cricket received a cheque for
$100,000 from the Texas billion-
aire Stanford on his arrival in
the Bahamas. The funds were
earmarked for the development
of the cricket facilities at Haynes
Oval and preparing the national
team for the initial $1.5 million
20/20 Tournament that was held
in Antigua that year.

“We were able to put down
our grass turf, which cost us

the Stingers 29-13 in the second half.
SEE page nine

BCA disappointed, but moving on

some $60,000, so that helped us
tremendously,” Taylor said. “We
were also able to get in some
new equipment, so it was a big
help.”

The BSC, through the fund,
was also able to travel to a pre-
warm up tournament in the Cay-
man Islands and participated in
the 20/20 tournaments in
Antigua in 2006, 2007 and 2008.

“We didn’t do too well in
those,” said Taylor, of the 20/20
Tournaments that offered hefty
cash incentives of $1,000,000 for
first place, $50,000 for second
and $25,000 for the man of the
match.

“But this year, we were
preparing a team for this year’s
tournament, which we felt would
have done very well. Unfortu-
nately, we won’t have a chance
to really show that.”

Undoubtedly, Taylor said the
players were disappointed
because they were geared up
and upbeat for their participa-
tion this year.

With the tournament now in



jeopardy, Taylor said they would
only have the under-19 team
which will compete in the ICC
Americas Associate Countries
Tournament being held in July
in Canada.

“Because of our performance
in 2007 when we sent a team to
Canada, we performed to the
best of our ability and we were
the first affiliated country in the
Caribbean and the Americas to
do that, they have invited us to
come back.”

While the ICC has come forth
and provided some assistance,
Taylor said they intend to use
that to get the national team
ready to compete in 2010 in the
Division IT of the ICC of Amer-
icas and the World Cricket
League.

In the meantime, Taylor said
the BCA will continue play at
both Haynes Oval and at the
Windsor Park. At Haynes Oval,
the BCA will attempt to stage
two-day matches, while Wind-
sor Park will be the site for the
50-and-over matches.

CWSI

TO TEMPTATION